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Sample records for african burkitt lymphoma

  1. Denis Burkitt and the African lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Magrath, I

    2009-01-01

    Burkitt lymphoma has provided a model for the understanding of the epidemiology, the molecular abnormalities that induce tumours, and the treatment of other lymphomas. It is important to remember that the early phases of this work were conducted in Africa where today, unfortunately, the disease usually results in death because of limited resources, even though most children in more developed countries are cured. This must be changed. In addition, it is time to re-explore, with modern techniques, some of the questions that were raised some 50 years ago shortly after Burkitt’s first description, as well as new questions that can be asked only in the light of modern understanding of the immune system and the molecular basis of tumor development. The African lymphoma has taught us much, but there is a great deal still to be learned. PMID:22276020

  2. Burkitt lymphoma is molecularly distinct from other lymphomas

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists have uncovered a number of molecular signatures in Burkitt lymphoma, including unique genetic alterations that promote cell survival, that are not found in other lymphomas. These findings provide the first genetic evidence that Burkitt lymphoma

  3. Burkitt's lymphoma in a young Brazilian boy.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Cláudio M; Lopes, Ana Paula M; Meneghini, Alexandre J; Silva, Geisa B L; Monteiro, Mariana C; Botelho, Tessa de L

    2010-06-01

    Burkitt's lymphoma is not an uncommon malignancy in the paediatric population. It is a high-grade non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma which may present as endemic, sporadic and human immunodeficiency-associated subtypes. The African, or endemic, variant usually involves the maxilla and other facial bones while head and neck manifestations in sporadic Burkitt's lymphoma are rare. We described a case of oral Burkitt's lymphoma involving the right jaw in a 4-year-old boy. The patient presented with a rapidly-enlarging swelling of one month duration, toothache-like pain and radiographical appearance of 'floating teeth' in the right mandible. Incisional biopsy revealed small round tumour cells with scarce cytoplasm and multiple small nuclei interspersed by phagocytic macrophages. The tumour cells were immunopositivity for CD20 and CD10, expressed weak positivity for CD3, negative for CD5 and showed > 90% positivity for Ki-67. Tumour remission was achieved with six cycles of chemotherapy with the CHOP regime. PMID:20614728

  4. Burkitt lymphoma involving jejunum in children

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi; Feng, Jiexiong; Sun, Xiaoyi

    2014-01-01

    A 5-year-old boy presented with 3-month bloody stool from unknown origin and progressive anemia. In this case report, we review the incidence, diagnosis, pathology, treatment and prognosis of Burkitt Lymphoma. PMID:25568790

  5. Burkitt lymphoma research in East Africa: highlights from the 9th African organization for research and training in cancer conference held in Durban, South Africa in 2013

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A one-day workshop on Burkitt lymphoma (BL) was held at the 9th African Organization for Research and Training in Cancer (AORTIC) conference in 2013 in Durban, South Africa. The workshop featured 15 plenary talks by delegates representing 13 institutions that either fund or implement research on BL targeting AORTIC delegates primarily interested in pediatric oncology. The main outcomes of the meeting were improved sharing of knowledge and experience about ongoing epidemiologic BL research, BL treatment in different settings, the role of cancer registries in cancer research, and opportunities for African scientists to publish in scientific journals. The idea of forming a consortium of BL to improve coordination, information sharing, accelerate discovery, dissemination, and translation of knowledge and to build capacity, while reducing redundant efforts was discussed. Here, we summarize the presentations and discussions from the workshop. PMID:25686906

  6. Rare Case of Primary Gastric Burkitt Lymphoma in a Child.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soon Chul; Hwang, Jung Won; Lee, Min Kyung; Hwang, Pyoung Han

    2016-08-25

    Primary gastric tumors are very rare in children. Burkitt lymphoma is a common type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and gastric Burkitt lymphoma usually occurs in the aged. When involving the gastrointestinal tract, primary gastric Burkitt lymphoma is very rare in younger childhood. Many gastric lymphomas including mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma are associated with Helicobacter pylori infection or acute bleeding symptom. We report a seven-year-old boy who presented with only some vomiting and postprandial pain. His upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and biopsy revealed a large primary Burkitt lymphoma with no acute bleeding and no evidence of H. pylori infection. After chemotherapy, he remains in remission. PMID:27554215

  7. Burkitt lymphoma with unusual presentation: Acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Koca, Tugba; Aslan, Nagehan; Dereci, Selim; Akcam, Mustafa

    2015-08-01

    Pancreatitis due to malignant infiltration is an uncommon condition in childhood. Pancreatic lymphomas constitute <2% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Only six reported cases with various clinical presentation have been documented in the literature. Described herein is the case of a nine-year-old boy with abdominal pain, jaundice, emesis, weight loss, diarrhea, who developed hyperlipidemia and cholestasis. Pancreatitis was suspected due to high amylase and lipase. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography showed diffuse enlargement of the pancreas. This sausage pancreas imaging was suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis, but the patient was diagnosed with Burkitt lymphoma on bone marrow aspiration, and rapidly improved with chemotherapy. Burkitt lymphoma should be kept in mind when patients present with pancreatitis, especially with diffuse enlarged pancreas. PMID:26031558

  8. Uroradiographic manifestations of Burkitt's lymphoma in children

    SciTech Connect

    Fernbach, S.K.; Glass, R.B.

    1986-05-01

    The radiological studies of 18 children with biopsy proved Burkitt's lymphoma were analyzed retrospectively. Before therapy the genitourinary tract was evaluated in 15 children by excretory urography, sonography, computerized tomography and/or gallium citrate scintigraphy. Genitourinary abnormalities were detected in 9 children. Changes due to tumor included renal or ureteral displacement in 4 children, hydronephrosis in 3 and intraparenchymal masses in 4. Extrinsic compression of the bladder causing no compromise of function was seen in only 2 children. Gonadal involvement occurred in 2 boys and 1 girl. The modality of choice for evaluating the genitourinary tract in patients with Burkitt's lymphoma has been excretory urography. Since ultrasound and computerized tomography provide more direct information about tumor deposits within the kidney and retroperitoneum, either should be performed in this population before initiation of chemotherapy.

  9. Imaging features of Burkitt lymphoma in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Derinkuyu, Betül Emine; Boyunağa, Öznur; Öztunalı, Çiğdem; Tekkeşin, Funda; Damar, Çağrı; Alımlı, Ayşe Gül; Okur, Arzu

    2016-01-01

    Burkitt lymphoma is an aggressive and rapidly growing tumor that is curable and highly sensitive to chemotherapy. It can affect almost every tissue in the body, producing various clinical presentations and imaging appearances, according to the predilection of the different subtypes for certain sites. Awareness of its diagnostically specific imaging appearances plays an important role in rapid detection and treatment. In this pictorial review, we aimed to identify the most common imaging features of Burkitt lymphoma in pediatric patients. PMID:26611257

  10. Xanthogranulomatous Appendicitis Mimicking Residual Burkitt's Lymphoma After Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Soomin; Choi, Sung-Eun; Kim, Yu Ri; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Sohn, Seung-Kook

    2016-01-01

    The case of a 23-year-old female treated with aggressive high-dose therapy for Burkitt's lymphoma is reported. A positron emission tomography and computed tomography scan after completion of chemotherapy revealed a residual hypermetabolic lesion in the right pelvic cavity. A pelvic magnetic resonance imaging scan showed circumferential wall thickening at the tip of the appendix. A laparoscopic exploration and appendectomy were performed, and a pathologic examination of the resected appendix revealed xanthogranulomatous appendicitis. This is a rare case of a xanthogranulomatous appendicitis mimicking remnant Burkitt's lymphoma after completion of chemotherapy. PMID:27218100

  11. Adult abdominal Burkitt lymphoma with isolated peritoneal involvement.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Catarina; Matos, Hugo; Serra, Paula; Catarino, Rui; Estevão, Amélia

    2014-01-01

    Burkitt lymphoma is a fast-growing high grade B-cell neoplasm that rarely affects adults. Three clinical variants are described in the World Health Organization classification: endemic, sporadic, and immunodeficiency-associated. The non-endemic form typically presents as an abdominal mass in children. Symptoms usually occur due to mass effect or direct intestinal involvement. We describe a very unusual presentation of a sporadic Burkitt lymphoma case in a 61-year-old male with diffuse peritoneal and omental involvement, without lymphadenopathies, mimicking peritoneal carcinomatosis.

  12. An Atypical Presentation of Sporadic Jejunal Burkitt's Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Naik, Pratik; Wang, James; Brazeau, Michael J; Rosario, Domingo

    2016-01-01

    Burkitt's lymphoma is a very aggressive type of B-cell NHL with replication approaching 100%. Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma is rare. In our case, a 24-year-old male initially presented with symptomatic anemia. He was initially evaluated with colonoscopy and EGD, both of which were unremarkable. A capsule endoscopy was then performed to further evaluate his significant anemia which revealed friable inflamed ulcerated mass in the jejunum. A push enteroscopy was then performed to obtain tissue from the jejunal mass. Biopsy results and immunohistochemical stains were consistent with Burkitt's lymphoma. PET/CT scan revealed only jejunal involvement. Treatment consisted of bowel resection prior to chemotherapy due to concern for perforation with chemotherapy. Patient achieved complete remission after the treatment. PMID:27672459

  13. An Atypical Presentation of Sporadic Jejunal Burkitt's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Burkitt's lymphoma is a very aggressive type of B-cell NHL with replication approaching 100%. Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma is rare. In our case, a 24-year-old male initially presented with symptomatic anemia. He was initially evaluated with colonoscopy and EGD, both of which were unremarkable. A capsule endoscopy was then performed to further evaluate his significant anemia which revealed friable inflamed ulcerated mass in the jejunum. A push enteroscopy was then performed to obtain tissue from the jejunal mass. Biopsy results and immunohistochemical stains were consistent with Burkitt's lymphoma. PET/CT scan revealed only jejunal involvement. Treatment consisted of bowel resection prior to chemotherapy due to concern for perforation with chemotherapy. Patient achieved complete remission after the treatment.

  14. An Atypical Presentation of Sporadic Jejunal Burkitt's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Burkitt's lymphoma is a very aggressive type of B-cell NHL with replication approaching 100%. Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma is rare. In our case, a 24-year-old male initially presented with symptomatic anemia. He was initially evaluated with colonoscopy and EGD, both of which were unremarkable. A capsule endoscopy was then performed to further evaluate his significant anemia which revealed friable inflamed ulcerated mass in the jejunum. A push enteroscopy was then performed to obtain tissue from the jejunal mass. Biopsy results and immunohistochemical stains were consistent with Burkitt's lymphoma. PET/CT scan revealed only jejunal involvement. Treatment consisted of bowel resection prior to chemotherapy due to concern for perforation with chemotherapy. Patient achieved complete remission after the treatment. PMID:27672459

  15. Dimeric peroxiredoxins are druggable targets in human Burkitt lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Trzeciecka, Anna; Klossowski, Szymon; Bajor, Malgorzata; Zagozdzon, Radoslaw; Gaj, Pawel; Muchowicz, Angelika; Malinowska, Agata; Czerwoniec, Anna; Barankiewicz, Joanna; Domagala, Antoni; Chlebowska, Justyna; Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Winiarska, Magdalena; Ostaszewski, Ryszard; Gwizdalska, Iwonna; Golab, Jakub; Nowis, Dominika; Firczuk, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Burkitt lymphoma is a fast-growing tumor derived from germinal center B cells. It is mainly treated with aggressive chemotherapy, therefore novel therapeutic approaches are needed due to treatment toxicity and developing resistance. Disturbance of red-ox homeostasis has recently emerged as an efficient antitumor strategy. Peroxiredoxins (PRDXs) are thioredoxin-family antioxidant enzymes that scavenge cellular peroxides and contribute to red-ox homeostasis. PRDXs are robustly expressed in various malignancies and critically involved in cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. To elucidate potential role of PRDXs in lymphoma, we studied their expression level in B cell-derived primary lymphoma cells as well as in cell lines. We found that PRDX1 and PRDX2 are upregulated in tumor B cells as compared with normal counterparts. Concomitant knockdown of PRDX1 and PRDX2 significantly attenuated the growth rate of lymphoma cells. Furthermore, in human Burkitt lymphoma cell lines, we isolated dimeric 2-cysteine peroxiredoxins as targets for SK053, a novel thiol-specific small-molecule peptidomimetic with antitumor activity. We observed that treatment of lymphoma cells with SK053 triggers formation of covalent PRDX dimers, accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species, phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and AKT and leads to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Based on site-directed mutagenesis and modeling studies, we propose a mechanism of SK053-mediated PRDX crosslinking, involving double thioalkylation of active site cysteine residues. Altogether, our results suggest that peroxiredoxins are novel therapeutic targets in Burkitt lymphoma and provide the basis for new approaches to the treatment of this disease. PMID:26636537

  16. Severe acute kidney injury as presentation of Burkitt's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    ter Haar, Eva; Labarque, Veerle; Tousseyn, Thomas; Mekahli, Djalila

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a case of acute kidney injury (AKI) at a very young age caused by primary lymphomatous renal infiltration due to Burkitt's lymphoma and analyse the literature on this rare condition. At presentation, clinical examination showed impressive bilateral nephromegaly and hypertension. Blood analysis indicated severe AKI, mild anaemia and normal serum electrolytes. There were no signs of tumour lysis syndrome. Urine sediment was normal, with neither haematuria nor proteinuria. Abdominal ultrasound demonstrated bilateral renal enlargement (+12 SD), with increased corticomedullar differentiation. MRI demonstrated the presence of a homogenous renal enlargement with features of an infiltrative lesion. Ultimately, microscopic and immunohistochemical analysis of the renal biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of Burkitt's lymphoma. Early and aggressive therapy is the key to ensure a good outcome. PMID:27118748

  17. T-helper 1 versus T-helper 2 lymphocyte immunodysregulation is the central factor in genesis of Burkitt lymphoma: hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Lubega, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Background The HIV epidemic has challenged our previous understanding of endemic Burkitt's lymphoma. Despite the strong association of Burkitt's lymphoma and HIV infection in the Developed world, and against previous postulations that the cancer is due to immunosupression among African children, the HIV epidemic in the Malaria belt has not been associated with a corresponding increase in incidence of childhood Burkitt's lymphoma. Even outside the context of HIV infection, there is substantial evidence for a strong but skewed immune response towards a TH2 response in genesis of Burkitt lymphoma. Presentation of the hypothesis Rather than a global and/or profound immunosupression, the final common pathway in genesis of Burkitt's lymphoma is the dysregulation of the immune response towards a TH2 response dominated by B-lymphocytes, and the concomitant suppression of the TH1 cell-mediated immune surveillance, driven by various viral/parasitic/bacterial infections. Testing the hypothesis Case control studies comparing TH2 and TH1 immune responses in Burkitt lymphoma of different etiological types (sporadic, HIV-related, endemic and post-transplant) to demonstrate significant dominance of TH2 immune response in presence of poor CMI response as a common factor. Immunological profiling to evaluate differences between immune states that are associated (such as recurrent Malaria infection) and those that are not associated (such as severe protein-energy malnutrition) with Burkitt lymphoma. Prospective cohorts profiling chronology of immunological events leading to Burkitt lymphoma in children with EBV infection. Implications of the hypothesis The dysregulation of the immune response may be the missing link in our understanding of Burkitt lymphomagenesis. This will provide possibilities for determination of risk and for control of development of malignancy in individuals/populations exposed to the relevant infections. PMID:17509139

  18. [Bilateral ovarian Burkitt's lymphoma. A case presentation].

    PubMed

    Briseño-Hernández, Andrés Alejandro; Quezada-López, Deissy Roxana; Castañeda-Chávez, Agar; Dassaejv Macías-Amezcua, Michel; Pintor-Belmontes, Julio Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Antecedentes: el linfoma de Burkitt es una forma agresiva de los linfomas no Hodgkin de células B que ocurre con mayor frecuencia en niños y adultos jóvenes; el linfoma de ovario puede aparecer como lesión primaria o, más comúnmente, como una metástasis. Las lesiones primarias de ovario son manifestaciones raras que corresponden a 0.5% de los linfomas no Hodgkin y 1.5% de los tumores de ovario. Caso clínico: paciente femenina de 31 años de edad, con debilidad generalizada, incapacidad para la marcha, disnea, hiporexia, fiebre, diaforesis, pérdida de 20 kg de peso, abdomen plano, con dolor abdominal; Ca125 610 U/mL. La tomografía computada abdominal mostró un gran tumor de aspecto sólido que afectaba a la cavidad pélvica derecha. Se extirparon los tumores ováricos bilaterales. Desde el punto de vista microscópico ambas lesiones muestran una imagen en "cielo estrellado" compuesta por un patrón de infiltrado monótono de linfocitos mezclada con macrófagos de citoplasma amplio y claro, abundantes mitosis atípicas, zonas de necrosis y hemorragia. La inmunohistoquímica reveló positividad para CDI0 y CD20, negativo con CD3, índice de proliferación Ki67 alto. Se diagnosticó linfoma tipo Burkitt bilateral de ovario. Conclusiones: el linfoma de Burkitt de ovario bilateral es poco frecuente, con variabilidad de presentación; el dolor abdominal y los tumores abdominales son lo más frecuente. El pronóstico a corto plazo de las pacientes es malo, por lo que es necesario conocer esta afección para poder establecer el diagnóstico temprano.

  19. Sporadic Burkitt Lymphoma Presenting as Acute Pancreatitis, Concurrent Sinusitis, and Enlarged Adenoids

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Vasudha; Qian, You-Wen; Blake, Brooke; Rojas-Khalil, Yesenia; Radhakrishnan, Ravi S.; Muthukumar, Akila

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatitis and sinusitis as presentations of Burkitt lymphoma are uncommon and rarely described in children. We describe here the case of a child who presented with symptoms suggestive of sinusitis unresponsive to antibiotics, with subsequent development of abdominal symptoms due to pancreatitis. He was eventually diagnosed with Burkitt lymphoma. PMID:27213067

  20. Study finds low-intensity therapy for Burkitt lymphoma highly effective

    Cancer.gov

    Adult patients with a type of cancer known as Burkitt lymphoma had excellent long-term survival rates—upwards of 90 percent—following treatment with low-intensity chemotherapy regimens, according to a new clinical trial finding. Burkitt lymphoma is the mo

  1. Biological characterization of adult MYC-translocation-positive mature B-cell lymphomas other than molecular Burkitt lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Aukema, Sietse M; Kreuz, Markus; Kohler, Christian W; Rosolowski, Maciej; Hasenclever, Dirk; Hummel, Michael; Küppers, Ralf; Lenze, Dido; Ott, German; Pott, Christiane; Richter, Julia; Rosenwald, Andreas; Szczepanowski, Monika; Schwaenen, Carsten; Stein, Harald; Trautmann, Heiko; Wessendorf, Swen; Trümper, Lorenz; Loeffler, Markus; Spang, Rainer; Kluin, Philip M; Klapper, Wolfram; Siebert, Reiner

    2014-04-01

    Chromosomal translocations affecting the MYC oncogene are the biological hallmark of Burkitt lymphomas but also occur in a subset of other mature B-cell lymphomas. If accompanied by a chromosomal break targeting the BCL2 and/or BCL6 oncogene these MYC translocation-positive (MYC(+)) lymphomas are called double-hit lymphomas, otherwise the term single-hit lymphomas is applied. In order to characterize the biological features of these MYC(+) lymphomas other than Burkitt lymphoma we explored, after exclusion of molecular Burkitt lymphoma as defined by gene expression profiling, the molecular, pathological and clinical aspects of 80 MYC-translocation-positive lymphomas (31 single-hit, 46 double-hit and 3 MYC(+)-lymphomas with unknown BCL6 status). Comparison of single-hit and double-hit lymphomas revealed no difference in MYC partner (IG/non-IG), genomic complexity, MYC expression or gene expression profile. Double-hit lymphomas more frequently showed a germinal center B-cell-like gene expression profile and had higher IGH and MYC mutation frequencies. Gene expression profiling revealed 130 differentially expressed genes between BCL6(+)/MYC(+) and BCL2(+)/MYC(+) double-hit lymphomas. BCL2(+)/MYC(+) double-hit lymphomas more frequently showed a germinal center B-like gene expression profile. Analysis of all lymphomas according to MYC partner (IG/non-IG) revealed no substantial differences. In this series of lymphomas, in which immunochemotherapy was administered in only a minority of cases, single-hit and double-hit lymphomas had a similar poor outcome in contrast to the outcome of molecular Burkitt lymphoma and lymphomas without the MYC break. Our data suggest that, after excluding molecular Burkitt lymphoma and pediatric cases, MYC(+) lymphomas are biologically quite homogeneous with single-hit and double-hit lymphomas as well as IG-MYC and non-IG-MYC(+) lymphomas sharing various molecular characteristics.

  2. Burkitt lymphoma and MYC: what else is new?

    PubMed

    Said, Jonathan; Lones, Mark; Yea, Steven

    2014-05-01

    Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is the most common non-Hodgkin lymphoma in children and adolescents, but at least 30% of cases occur in patients older than 60 years, and the absolute number of BL cases in adults exceeds those in childhood. BL is described as a monomorphic proliferation of medium-sized transformed B cells with round nuclei, clumped chromatin, basophilic cytoplasm, and squared-off cell borders, cytoplasmic vacuoles, medium-sized paracentral nucleoli, and a starry sky pattern. Translocation involving MYC is characteristic but not specific for BL. No single parameter is the gold standard for diagnosis; morphology, cytogenetics, immunophenotype, and gene expression profiles all may contribute to the diagnosis. Although neither EBV nor MYC are sufficient to cause BL there is increasing information from techniques such as complete RNA sequencing that identify essential pathways that are activated in the pathogenesis of BL. These findings suggest novel opportunities for improved therapeutic intervention. PMID:24713985

  3. Distinct Viral and Mutational Spectrum of Endemic Burkitt Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mundo, Lucia; Laginestra, Maria Antonella; Fuligni, Fabio; Rossi, Maura; Zairis, Sakellarios; Gazaneo, Sara; De Falco, Giulia; Lazzi, Stefano; Bellan, Cristiana; Rocca, Bruno Jim; Amato, Teresa; Marasco, Elena; Etebari, Maryam; Ogwang, Martin; Calbi, Valeria; Ndede, Isaac; Patel, Kirtika; Chumba, David; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Pileri, Stefano; Leoncini, Lorenzo; Rabadan, Raul

    2015-01-01

    Endemic Burkitt lymphoma (eBL) is primarily found in children in equatorial regions and represents the first historical example of a virus-associated human malignancy. Although Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and MYC translocations are hallmarks of the disease, it is unclear whether other factors may contribute to its development. We performed RNA-Seq on 20 eBL cases from Uganda and showed that the mutational and viral landscape of eBL is more complex than previously reported. First, we found the presence of other herpesviridae family members in 8 cases (40%), in particular human herpesvirus 5 and human herpesvirus 8 and confirmed their presence by immunohistochemistry in the adjacent non-neoplastic tissue. Second, we identified a distinct latency program in EBV involving lytic genes in association with TCF3 activity. Third, by comparing the eBL mutational landscape with published data on sporadic Burkitt lymphoma (sBL), we detected lower frequencies of mutations in MYC, ID3, TCF3 and TP53, and a higher frequency of mutation in ARID1A in eBL samples. Recurrent mutations in two genes not previously associated with eBL were identified in 20% of tumors: RHOA and cyclin F (CCNF). We also observed that polyviral samples showed lower numbers of somatic mutations in common altered genes in comparison to sBL specimens, suggesting dual mechanisms of transformation, mutation versus virus driven in sBL and eBL respectively. PMID:26468873

  4. Burkitt's lymphoma: a child's case presenting in the maxilla. Clinical and radiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela-Salas, Borja; Dean-Ferrer, Alicia; Alamillos-Granados, Francisco-Jesús

    2010-05-01

    Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) is a neoplasm which, despite its very aggressive behaviour is potentially curable. It typically affects the paediatric population. BL belongs to the non-Hodgkin lymphomas group, and is the first human tumour undoubtedly related to a viral origin (Epstein-Barr virus). Two main clinical subtypes are recognized: endemic or African type, and sporadic type; HIV associated BL constitutes a third type. Although common in endemic BL, maxillary involvement is rare in sporadic cases. This, together with the clinical lack of specificity associated to this location, makes diagnosis difficult. New chemotherapeutic protocols achieve a high survival rate. Most important prognostic factors are location and tumour stage. We report a paediatric case of BL presenting in the maxilla, with a review and a description of the characteristics of the disease.

  5. Can Burkitt's Lymphoma and Hodgkin's Lymphoma occur in siblings simultaneously?

    PubMed

    Kaymak Cihan, Meriç; Kandemir, Olcay; Dalva, Klara; Sarı, Neriman; Kurucu, Nilgün; Ergürhan İlhan, İnci

    2015-01-01

    Familial clustering of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and increased risk of developing disease among the siblings has been reported earlier. Usually familial lymphoma in sibling pairs occurs in the pairs of either non-Hodgkin lymphoma or HL. In the familial HL, same type of human leukocyte antigens (HLA) is responsible in the affected family members. There are also some studies stating "Killer cell immunoglobulin like receptor (KIR)" genotypes can be important in the etiology of familial HL. Here we report two siblings; one with Non-Hodgkin and the other with Hodgkin lymphoma which showed Epstein-Barr virus encoded small RNAs positivity in the tumor tissues. We have also found that their HLA genotypes are same with each other. In addition, we have discussed familial lymphoma pathogenesis and HLA haplotypes. PMID:27411427

  6. Concurrent and Clonally Related Pediatric Follicular Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma in a 5-Year-Old Boy.

    PubMed

    Shaver, Aaron C; Zimmerman, David; Liu, Mingya; Vnencak-Jones, Cindy; Kim, Annette S

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric follicular lymphoma shares morphologic similarities with the adult form of the disease but lacks other classic features of adult lymphoma, including t(14;18) translocation, BCL2 overexpression, and transformation to aggressive higher-grade lymphoma. Herein, we report a novel case in which a 5-year-old boy (ethnicity unknown) had follicular lymphoma, along with concurrent high-grade and clonally related disease that fulfilled all of the morphologic, immunophenotypic, and genetic criteria for Burkitt lymphoma, including a t(8;14) translocation involving the MYC gene. To our knowledge, this case is the first reported instance of transformation of follicular lymphoma of any sort into true Burkitt lymphoma and the first reported instance of acquisition of MYC abnormalities in pediatric follicular lymphoma.

  7. Intensive chemotherapy for non-localised Burkitt's lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Attar, A; Pritchard, J; Al-Saleem, T; Al-Naimi, M; Alash, N; Attra, A

    1986-01-01

    Between 1982 and 1984, 24 consecutively diagnosed children from Iraq with non-localised Burkitt lymphoma (Murphy stages II, III, and IV) were eligible for treatment with a multi-drug rotating chemotherapy schedule. This schedule was intensive and included early treatment directed at the central nervous system but was of only six months' duration and fairly inexpensive compared with schedules recently advocated for use in the developed world. Some patients had 'debulking' abdominal surgery, but no radiation treatment was used. There were a number of complications related to early treatment, some of them fatal, but of 13 patients entering complete remission 12 are long term survivors who are free of disease and, hopefully, cured. These results represent a substantial improvement over our experience before 1982 (6.9% survival). A similar treatment approach might be adopted by other centres, especially those in developing countries where cancer accounts for a rising proportion of childhood death but whose resources are limited. Images Fig. 2 PMID:3777984

  8. [Acute kidney failure as the clinical presenting form of renal Burkitt's lymphoma in an HIV-positive patient].

    PubMed

    Saurina, A; Ramírez de Arellano, M; Chiné, M; Fulquet, M; Lladó, I; de las Cuevas, X

    2001-01-01

    Burkitt's lymphoma is a tumour often associated with low immunity as acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (l3) or infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The incidence of renal affection is variable (34-62%) and there are different aetiologies. We present a case of acute renal failure in a patient with a Burkitt's lymphoma and renal infiltration, and infected by the human immunodeficiency virus.

  9. Burkitt Lymphoma Presenting as an Intracardiac Mass: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Onyee; Igwe, Michael; Breburda, Christian S.; Amar, Surabhi

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 27 Final Diagnosis: Burkitt lymphoma with intracardiac mass Symptoms: Dizziness • fatigue • palpitations • weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Catheter-directed thrombolytic therapy with intracardiac infusion of alteplase Specialty: Hematology Objective: Rare disease Background: Non-neoplastic causes such as infections and thrombi account for most intracardiac masses. Primary tumors such as myxomas and metastasis from breast cancer, lung cancer, or melanomas account for many of the remaining cases. Burkitt lymphoma manifesting as an intracardiac mass is a rare entity, with 21 cases reported in the English literature. Case Report: We report the case of a man infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who presented with non-specific cardiac symptoms and was later found to have intracardiac mass caused by Burkitt lymphoma. His rapid decline with unexpected complications was reversed with prompt management. Subsequent to induction, the patient achieved a near complete response with considerable improvement in his condition. Conclusions: Lymphoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intracardiac masses. Associated cardiac symptoms are frequently non-specific and can often be overlooked or underappreciated. Burkitt lymphoma has a short doubling time and an intracardiac lesion can become life-threatening in a matter of days. Early recognition and prompt treatment are crucial to achieving optimal outcomes. PMID:27484990

  10. Complete remission of gastric Burkitt's lymphoma after eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Baumgaertner, Isabelle; Copie-Bergman, Christiane; Levy, Michael; Haioun, Corinne; Charachon, Antoine; Baia, Maryse; Sobhani, Iradj; Delchier, Jean-Charles

    2009-12-01

    Burkitt's lymphoma is a highly aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma, often presenting in extra-nodal sites. It generally has a poor spontaneous outcome and needs aggressive treatment with systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy. Occurrence at the gastric site is rare. We report the case of a 39-year old woman who presented with a prominent ulcerated lesion of the antrum corresponding histologically to a Burkitt's lymphoma associated with Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection. Interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) demonstrated c-MYC gene rearrangement in tumour cells without BCL2 or BCL6 gene translocations. Ulcer healing and tumour regression with a complete histological response were obtained 8 wk after H pylori eradication. In spite of this complete remission, taking into account the high risk of recurrence, the patient received systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy. Two years later, the patient remained in complete remission. This is the first report of a gastric Burkitt's lymphoma responding to H pylori eradication. These findings raise the question of the potential role of H pylori in the pathogenesis of some gastric Burkitt's lymphomas, and show the importance of searching for and eradicating the bacteria in combination with conventional chemotherapy regimens. PMID:19960575

  11. Dual inhibition of histone deacetylases and phosphoinositide 3-kinases: effects on Burkitt lymphoma cell growth and migration.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana Carolina dos Santos; de-Freitas-Junior, Julio Cesar Madureira; Morgado-Díaz, Jose Andres; Ridley, Anne J; Klumb, Claudete Esteves

    2016-04-01

    Burkitt lymphoma is a highly aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma that is characterized by MYC deregulation. Recently, the PI3K pathway has emerged as a cooperative prosurvival mechanism in Burkitt lymphoma. Despite the highly successful results of treatment that use high-dose chemotherapy regimens in pediatric Burkitt lymphoma patients, the survival rate of pediatric patients with progressive or recurrent disease is low. PI3Ks are also known to regulate cell migration, and abnormal cell migration may contribute to cancer progression and dissemination in Burkitt lymphoma. Little is known about Burkitt lymphoma cell migration, but the cooperation between MYC and PI3K in Burkitt lymphoma pathogenesis suggests that a drug combination could be used to target the different steps involved in Burkitt lymphoma cell dissemination and disease progression. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid combined with the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 on Burkitt lymphoma cell growth and migration. The combination enhanced the cell growth inhibition and cell-cycle arrest induced by the PI3K inhibitor or histone deacetylase inhibitor individually. Moreover, histone deacetylase inhibitor/PI3K inhibitor cotreatment suppressed Burkitt lymphoma cell migration and decreased cell polarization, Akt and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and leads to RhoB induction. In summary, the histone deacetylase inhibitor/PI3Ki combination inhibits cell proliferation and migration via alterations in PI3K signaling and histone deacetylase activity, which is involved in the acetylation of α-tubulin and the regulation of RhoB expression. PMID:26561567

  12. Frequent expression of multiple myeloma 1/interferon regulatory factor 4 in Burkitt lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gualco, Gabriela; Queiroga, Eduardo M; Weiss, Lawrence M; Klumb, Claudete E N; Harrington, William J; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2009-04-01

    Burkitt lymphoma is a highly aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma with endemic, sporadic, and immunodeficiency-associated clinical variants composed of monomorphic medium-sized B cells with a high proliferation rate and a translocation involving the C-MYC locus. Classically, the immunophenotype of Burkitt lymphoma has been considered to be the germinal center type. In most reports, all cases of Burkitt lymphoma are reported to be multiple myeloma 1-negative. multiple myeloma 1 expression is seen in plasma cells and in a small fraction of B cells located in the light zone of germinal centers corresponding to the final step of intra-germinal center B-cell differentiation, and in activated T cells. Therefore, multiple myeloma 1 expression may denote the final step of intra-germinal center B-cell differentiation at the centrocyte stage, as well as the subsequent steps of B-cell maturation toward plasma cells. Unlike most normal germinal center B cells, in which the expression of multiple myeloma 1 and bcl-6 are mutually exclusive, the tumor cells in approximately 50% of multiple myeloma 1-positive DLBCL show coexpression of bcl-6, suggesting that the expression of these proteins may be deregulated. Twenty-five Burkitt lymphoma cases, including 19 associated with HIV, were reported in one of the few studies in the literature; 2 of these cases showed occasional multiple myeloma 1-positive cells, less than the 20% cutoff for positivity. We studied 222 cases of well-characterized Burkitt lymphoma with the classic phenotype and C-MYC translocation and found 90 cases (40.5%) with multiple myeloma 1 nuclear expression, suggesting a late germinal center stage of differentiation.

  13. Pediatric B-Cell Lymphoma With Lymphoblastic Morphology, TdT Expression, MYC Rearrangement, and Features Overlapping With Burkitt Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Meznarich, Jessica; Miles, Rodney; Paxton, Christian N; Afify, Zeinab

    2016-05-01

    Burkitt lymphoma (BL) and B-lymphoblastic lymphoma are subtypes of pediatric non-Hodgkin lymphoma with different presenting features, treatment, and outcomes. This case report documents a 5-year-old female who presented with B-cell lymphoma with lymphoblastic morphology, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase expression, MYC rearrangement, and features overlapping with BL. Genomic microarray analysis identified a gain on the long arm of chromosome 1 without other definitive changes. She was treated according to a BL protocol and remains in remission 16-months after initial diagnosis. PMID:26785246

  14. The PCBP1 gene encoding poly(rC) binding protein I is recurrently mutated in Burkitt lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Wagener, Rabea; Aukema, Sietse M; Schlesner, Matthias; Haake, Andrea; Burkhardt, Birgit; Claviez, Alexander; Drexler, Hans G; Hummel, Michael; Kreuz, Markus; Loeffler, Markus; Rosolowski, Maciej; López, Cristina; Möller, Peter; Richter, Julia; Rohde, Marius; Betts, Matthew J; Russell, Robert B; Bernhart, Stephan H; Hoffmann, Steve; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schilhabel, Markus; Szczepanowski, Monika; Trümper, Lorenz; Klapper, Wolfram; Siebert, Reiner

    2015-09-01

    The genetic hallmark of Burkitt lymphoma is the translocation t(8;14)(q24;q32), or one of its light chain variants, resulting in IG-MYC juxtaposition. However, these translocations alone are insufficient to drive lymphomagenesis, which requires additional genetic changes for malignant transformation. Recent studies of Burkitt lymphoma using next generation sequencing approaches have identified various recurrently mutated genes including ID3, TCF3, CCND3, and TP53. Here, by using similar approaches, we show that PCBP1 is a recurrently mutated gene in Burkitt lymphoma. By whole-genome sequencing, we identified somatic mutations in PCBP1 in 3/17 (18%) Burkitt lymphomas. We confirmed the recurrence of PCBP1 mutations by Sanger sequencing in an independent validation cohort, finding mutations in 3/28 (11%) Burkitt lymphomas and in 6/16 (38%) Burkitt lymphoma cell lines. PCBP1 is an intron-less gene encoding the 356 amino acid poly(rC) binding protein 1, which contains three K-Homology (KH) domains and two nuclear localization signals. The mutations predominantly (10/12, 83%) affect the KH III domain, either by complete domain loss or amino acid changes. Thus, these changes are predicted to alter the various functions of PCBP1, including nuclear trafficking and pre-mRNA splicing. Remarkably, all six primary Burkitt lymphomas with a PCBP1 mutation expressed MUM1/IRF4, which is otherwise detected in around 20-40% of Burkitt lymphomas. We conclude that PCBP1 mutations are recurrent in Burkitt lymphomas and might contribute, in cooperation with other mutations, to its pathogenesis.

  15. Recurrent mutation of the ID3 gene in Burkitt lymphoma identified by integrated genome, exome and transcriptome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Richter, Julia; Schlesner, Matthias; Hoffmann, Steve; Kreuz, Markus; Leich, Ellen; Burkhardt, Birgit; Rosolowski, Maciej; Ammerpohl, Ole; Wagener, Rabea; Bernhart, Stephan H; Lenze, Dido; Szczepanowski, Monika; Paulsen, Maren; Lipinski, Simone; Russell, Robert B; Adam-Klages, Sabine; Apic, Gordana; Claviez, Alexander; Hasenclever, Dirk; Hovestadt, Volker; Hornig, Nadine; Korbel, Jan O; Kube, Dieter; Langenberger, David; Lawerenz, Chris; Lisfeld, Jasmin; Meyer, Katharina; Picelli, Simone; Pischimarov, Jordan; Radlwimmer, Bernhard; Rausch, Tobias; Rohde, Marius; Schilhabel, Markus; Scholtysik, René; Spang, Rainer; Trautmann, Heiko; Zenz, Thorsten; Borkhardt, Arndt; Drexler, Hans G; Möller, Peter; MacLeod, Roderick A F; Pott, Christiane; Schreiber, Stefan; Trümper, Lorenz; Loeffler, Markus; Stadler, Peter F; Lichter, Peter; Eils, Roland; Küppers, Ralf; Hummel, Michael; Klapper, Wolfram; Rosenstiel, Philip; Rosenwald, Andreas; Brors, Benedikt; Siebert, Reiner

    2012-12-01

    Burkitt lymphoma is a mature aggressive B-cell lymphoma derived from germinal center B cells. Its cytogenetic hallmark is the Burkitt translocation t(8;14)(q24;q32) and its variants, which juxtapose the MYC oncogene with one of the three immunoglobulin loci. Consequently, MYC is deregulated, resulting in massive perturbation of gene expression. Nevertheless, MYC deregulation alone seems not to be sufficient to drive Burkitt lymphomagenesis. By whole-genome, whole-exome and transcriptome sequencing of four prototypical Burkitt lymphomas with immunoglobulin gene (IG)-MYC translocation, we identified seven recurrently mutated genes. One of these genes, ID3, mapped to a region of focal homozygous loss in Burkitt lymphoma. In an extended cohort, 36 of 53 molecularly defined Burkitt lymphomas (68%) carried potentially damaging mutations of ID3. These were strongly enriched at somatic hypermutation motifs. Only 6 of 47 other B-cell lymphomas with the IG-MYC translocation (13%) carried ID3 mutations. These findings suggest that cooperation between ID3 inactivation and IG-MYC translocation is a hallmark of Burkitt lymphomagenesis.

  16. Clonality Analysis of Immunoglobulin Gene Rearrangement by Next-Generation Sequencing in Endemic Burkitt Lymphoma Suggests Antigen Drive Activation of BCR as Opposed to Sporadic Burkitt Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Teresa; Abate, Francesco; Piccaluga, Pierpaolo; Iacono, Michele; Fallerini, Chiara; Renieri, Alessandra; De Falco, Giulia; Ambrosio, Maria Raffaella; Mourmouras, Vaselious; Ogwang, Martin; Calbi, Valeria; Rabadan, Roul; Hummel, Michael; Pileri, Stefano; Bellan, Cristiana

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Recent studies using next-generation sequencing (NGS) analysis disclosed the importance of the intrinsic activation of the B-cell receptor (BCR) pathway in the pathogenesis of sporadic Burkitt lymphoma (sBL) due to mutations of TCF3/ID3 genes. Since no definitive data are available on the genetic landscape of endemic Burkitt (eBL), we first assessed the mutation frequency of TCF3/ID3 in eBL compared with sBL and subsequently the somatic hypermutation status of the BCR to answer whether an extrinsic activation of BCR signaling could also be demonstrated in Burkitt lymphoma. Methods: We assessed the mutations of TCF3/ID3 by RNAseq and the BCR status by NGS analysis of the immunoglobulin genes (IGs). Results: We detected mutations of TCF3/ID3 in about 30% of the eBL cases. This rate is significantly lower than that detected in sBL (64%). The NGS analysis of IGs revealed intraclonal diversity, suggesting an active targeted somatic hypermutation process in eBL compared with sBL. Conclusions: These findings support the view that the antigenic pressure plays a key role in the pathogenetic pathways of eBL, which may be partially distinct from those driving sBL development. PMID:26712879

  17. Complete Remission of Burkitt Lymphoma After Surgical Excision: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Bekoz, Huseyin Saffet; Kantarcioglu, Bulent; Tecimer, Tulay; Uskent, Necdet; Cetiner, Mustafa; Ferhanoglu, Burhan; Sargin, Deniz

    2016-06-01

    Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is a highly aggressive B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has a high proliferation rate. The prognosis for BL is generally favorable, with cure rate of 75-90 % with modern chemoimmunotherapy regimens. Prompt administration of multiagent immunochemotherapy regimens is critical, because BL is almost always fatal if left untreated. Nevertheless here we report a case of BL that is still in complete remission after more than 4 years without any further treatment after surgical excision of the involved lymph node. PMID:27408385

  18. Metachronous T-Lymphoblastic Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma in a Child With Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Thomas B; McGee, Rose B; Kaye, Erica C; McCarville, Mary Beth; Choi, John K; Cavender, Cary P; Nichols, Kim E; Sandlund, John T

    2016-08-01

    Constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMRD) is a cancer predisposition syndrome associated with a high risk of developing early-onset malignancies of the blood, brain, and intestinal tract. We present the case of a patient with T-lymphoblastic lymphoma at the age of 3 years, followed by Burkitt lymphoma 10 years later. This patient also exhibited numerous nonmalignant findings including café au lait spots, lipomas, bilateral renal nodules, a nonossifying fibroma, multiple colonic adenomas, and a rapidly enlarging pilomatrixoma. The spectrum of malignant and nonmalignant neoplasms in this patient highlights the remarkable diversity, and early onset, of lesions seen in children with CMMRD. PMID:27037742

  19. A 12-year-old girl presenting with bilateral gigantic Burkitt's lymphoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Lingohr, Philipp; Eidt, Sebastian; Rheinwalt, Karl Peter

    2009-05-01

    The female breast rarely constitutes the primary localization for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The incidence of primary breast lymphoma (PBL) lies between 0.04 and 1.1% for all breast tumors and 1.7-2.2% for all extranodal NHL. Mostly it occurs during the child-bearing period, during pregnancy or lactation. In general, children between the ages of 8 and 10 years are most frequently affected by Burkitt's lymphoma. Methods for classification, detection and especially treatment of this condition continue being a subject of discussions and research. We present and evaluate the rare case of a 12-year-old girl with bilateral gigantic breast tumors treated during a surgical mission with "Doctors without borders" (MSF, "médecins sans frontiers") in the zone of civil war in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The monstrous bilateral breast hypertrophy, symmetrical, rapidly growing, consequently ulcerating and severely bleeding had to be treated by bilateral mastectomy as a salvage procedure. Examinations through histopathology was not feasible and other facilities like ultrasound, CT, MRI and further laboratory examinations were not available.. The patient died 27 days after the surgical procedure. The histological result received by later examination in Germany showed a bilateral high malignant B cell lymphoma (Burkitt lymphoma) of the breast.

  20. Sporadic Burkitt Lymphoma Mimicking Osteomyelitis of the Mandible Revealing Clinically Unsuspected HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Sivolella, Stefano; Rizzo, Giovanni; Valente, Marialuisa; Lumachi, Franco

    2015-09-01

    Adult sporadic Burkitt lymphoma is a rare and highly aggressive malignancy, accounting for approximately 1-2% of adult lymphomas in Western countries, and exclusively intra-oral localization is very uncommon. We describe a rare case of a moderately painful sporadic Burkitt lymphoma localized in the posterior third of the left mandibular bone, initially misdiagnosed as osteomyelitis-like lesion, in a patient Epstein-Barr virus infection-negative with unknown human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positivity and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. A 52-year-old man was referred to our Department complaining of persistent moderate pain localized in the left mandibular arch. According to clinical and radiological features, a diagnosis of post-extraction osteomyelitis was made and a surgical revision, including soft and hard tissue biopsy, was performed. Histopathology revealed the presence of a diffuse proliferation of lymphoid cells, exhibiting the typical 'starry-sky' appearance that was consistent with the diagnosis of B-type non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Unexpectedly, HIV seropositivity was also found, but the patient was unaware of this, and the history did not reveal any particular risk factor for HIV infection. Positron-emission tomography showed a highly (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-avid mass in the left maxillofacial region and extensive disease in bone marrow and mediastinum. Thus, the patient was referred to our onco-hematological team for final assessment and care. In conclusion, sporadic Burkitt lymphoma is an aggressive malignancy, which rarely affects adults with initial intra-oral manifestations. In the presence of abnormal gingival or alveolar lesions, a non-odontogenic disease should be suspected and the appropriate diagnostic test should be performed.

  1. Expression of KLF4 is a predictive marker for survival in pediatric Burkitt lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Hipόlito, Alberto; Hernández-Atenógenes, Miriam; Vega, Gabriel G; Maldonado-Valenzuela, Altagracia; Ramon, Guillermo; Mayani, Héctor; Peña Alonso, Yolanda; Martinez-Maza, Otoniel; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Huerta-Yepez, Sara; Bonavida, Benjamin; Vega, Mario I

    2014-08-01

    Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is expressed in a variety of tissues with diverse physiological functions and activities. KLF4 can also function as a tumor suppressor or an oncogene, depending on the cellular context. Its role in hematological malignancies is controversial. This study examined the expression levels of KLF4 by immunohistochemistry in 73 pediatric non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) in a tissue microarray and also on several B-NHL cell lines. Elevated levels of KLF4 expression were detected in 66% of lymphoma cases and were more frequent in the Burkitt lymphoma (p = 0.05) subtype. There was a significant predictive power for outcome with low KLF4 expression, predicting a favorable overall survival compared to high levels. Multivariate analyses confirmed the association of KLF4 expression with unfavorable overall survival (p < 0.005). These findings were consistent with analyses in existing NHL microarray datasets. The present findings revealed that KLF4 is overexpressed in Burkitt pediatric lymphoma and is a potential biomarker for inferior overall survival. PMID:24067139

  2. Etiopathogenesis of Burkitt's lymphoma: a lesson from a BL-like in CD1 mouse immune to Plasmodium yoelii yoelii

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction There is a jaw cancer that develops in children five to eight years old in holoendemic malaria regions of Africa, associated to malaria and Epstein Barr virus infections (EBV). This malignancy is known as endemic Burkitt's lymphoma, and histopatologically is characterized by a starry sky appearance. To date, no histopathologic expression of Burkitt's lymphoma has been reported in non-genetically manipulated experimental animals. The purpose of the study is to describe the case of a mouse immune to Plasmodium yoelii yoelii (Pyy) that developed a Burkitt's lymphoma-like neoplasm after repeated malaria infections. Results Immune mouse 10 (IM-10) developed neoplasms at eight months of age, after receiving three Pyy inoculations. At autopsy eight subcutaneous tumors were found of which the right iliac fosse tumor perforated the abdominal wall and invaded the colon. The histopathologic study showed that all neoplasms were malignant lymphomas of large non-cleaved cells also compatible with variants or previous states of development of a Burkitt's lymphoma-like. The thymus, however, showed a typical starry sky Burkitt's lymphoma-like neoplasm. Conclusions Neoplasm development in CD1 mouse is associated to both, immunity against malaria and continuous antigenic stimulation with living parasites. It is the first observation of a histopathologically expressed Human Burkitt's lymphoma-like neoplasm in a non-genetically manipulated mouse. Chronic immune response associated to neoplasms development could probably be not an exclusive expression of malaria-host interaction but, it could be a pattern that can bee applied also to other agent-host interactions such as host-bacteria, fungus, virus and other parasites. PMID:21740585

  3. B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Burkitt's lymphoma: A case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Chettiankandy, Tabita Joy; Tupkari, Jagdish Vishnu; Kumar, Keshav; Ahire, Manisha Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and classical Burkitt's lymphoma (BL), is a diagnostic provisional category in the World Health Organization 2008 classification of lymphomas. This category was designed as a measure to accommodate borderline cases that cannot be reliably classified into a single distinct disease entity after all available morphological, immunophenotypical and molecular studies have been performed. Typically, these cases share features intermediate between DLBCL and classical BL or include characteristics of both lymphomas. The rarity of such cases poses a tremendous challenge to both pathologists and oncologists because its differential diagnosis has direct implications for management strategies. In this article, we present a “classical unclassifiable lymphoma with features intermediate between DLBCL and BL” in a young male patient and review of literature. PMID:27601842

  4. B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Burkitt's lymphoma: A case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Chettiankandy, Tabita Joy; Tupkari, Jagdish Vishnu; Kumar, Keshav; Ahire, Manisha Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and classical Burkitt's lymphoma (BL), is a diagnostic provisional category in the World Health Organization 2008 classification of lymphomas. This category was designed as a measure to accommodate borderline cases that cannot be reliably classified into a single distinct disease entity after all available morphological, immunophenotypical and molecular studies have been performed. Typically, these cases share features intermediate between DLBCL and classical BL or include characteristics of both lymphomas. The rarity of such cases poses a tremendous challenge to both pathologists and oncologists because its differential diagnosis has direct implications for management strategies. In this article, we present a “classical unclassifiable lymphoma with features intermediate between DLBCL and BL” in a young male patient and review of literature.

  5. B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Burkitt's lymphoma: A case report and review.

    PubMed

    Chettiankandy, Tabita Joy; Tupkari, Jagdish Vishnu; Kumar, Keshav; Ahire, Manisha Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and classical Burkitt's lymphoma (BL), is a diagnostic provisional category in the World Health Organization 2008 classification of lymphomas. This category was designed as a measure to accommodate borderline cases that cannot be reliably classified into a single distinct disease entity after all available morphological, immunophenotypical and molecular studies have been performed. Typically, these cases share features intermediate between DLBCL and classical BL or include characteristics of both lymphomas. The rarity of such cases poses a tremendous challenge to both pathologists and oncologists because its differential diagnosis has direct implications for management strategies. In this article, we present a "classical unclassifiable lymphoma with features intermediate between DLBCL and BL" in a young male patient and review of literature. PMID:27601842

  6. Burkitt Lymphoma with Initial Clinical Presentation due to Infiltration of the Central Nervous System and Eye Orbits

    PubMed Central

    Camilo, Gustavo Bittencourt; Machado, Dequitier Carvalho; de Oliveira, Celso Estevão; Lacerda, Letícia da Silva; de Oliveira, Romulo Varella; de França Silva, Monique; Lopes, Agnaldo José

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 17 Final Diagnosis: Burkitt lymphoma Symptoms: Anisocoria, ipsilateral ptosis, opthalmoparesis, paresis Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Oncology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Burkitt lymphoma rarely affects the central nervous system and ocular region. Under these conditions, computed tomography and (particularly) magnetic resonance imaging of the skull increase the diagnostic accuracy, as they objectively show the topography of lesions and the effect of neoplasia on structures. Case Report: We report here the case of a 17-year-old male whose initial clinical manifestations were related to neurological impairment and to the ocular musculature and ocular innervation. The diagnosis of Burkitt lymphoma with leukemization and infiltration of the central nervous system was confirmed. Conclusions: In this case, it is important to recognize that the neuroimaging findings were fundamentally important in indicating the initial form of the disease and in directing the appropriate clinical management. PMID:25243420

  7. Viral studies in burkitt lymphoma: association with Epstein-Barr virus but not HHV-8.

    PubMed

    Queiroga, Eduardo M; Gualco, Gabriela; Chioato, Lucimara; Harrington, William J; Araujo, Iguaracyra; Weiss, Lawrence M; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2008-08-01

    Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is a highly aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma, composed of a monomorphic population of medium-sized B cells with a high proliferation rate and a consistent MYC translocation. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with BL with different frequencies depending on the clinical variant. Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, or human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), infects a wide range of normal cells, having a well-established role in the pathogenesis of various neoplasms, including Kaposi sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) and MCD-associated plasmablastic lymphoma. In secondary immunodeficiencies, such as HIV-1 infection and organ transplantation, HHV-8 is considered an opportunistic pathogen linked to the development of lymphomas in patients with AIDS and HIV + patients. We studied the association of EBV and HHV-8 by immunohistochemical analysis, in situ hybridization, and polymerase chain reaction in a large number of well-characterized BLs. EBV was present in 45.0% of all BL cases with higher incidence in the pediatric group; most cases were EBV type A. We found no association of BL with HHV-8 in EBV + BL or in EBV-cases, including the HIV + BL group.

  8. First Report of AIDS-Related Burkitt's Lymphoma Presenting as Bilateral Orbital Masses

    PubMed Central

    Alves de Almeida, Monica; Nesi Cardoso Migliano Porto, Juliana; de Brito Lyra, Ana Carolina; Calheiros Leite, Luiz Arthur; Basilio-de-Oliveira, Rodrigo Panno; Neves-Motta, Rogério; Correa, Andréa Ramos; Raphael de Almeida Ferry, Fernando; Grechi Pacheco, Ronaldo

    2016-01-01

    Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) is an aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and one of the fastest growing tumors in humans. It is an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome- (AIDS-) defining disease and occurs with relatively preserved CD4 cell counts. It rarely affects the orbital region in the setting of AIDS. We report unusual presentation of a fatal case of AIDS-associated BL in a 42-year-old female patient with severe CD4 cell depletion who presented with dramatic fast growing (within days) bilateral orbital masses leading to striking facial deformities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of bilateral orbital involvement in AIDS-associated BL.

  9. Regulation of CD45-induced signaling by galectin-1 in Burkitt lymphoma B cells.

    PubMed

    Fouillit, M; Joubert-Caron, R; Poirier, F; Bourin, P; Monostori, E; Levi-Strauss, M; Raphael, M; Bladier, D; Caron, M

    2000-04-01

    It has been well established that Galectin-1 (GAL1), a beta-galactoside-binding protein, regulates the viability of lymphoid cells. However, the signaling pathway governed by the binding of GAL1 to the cell membrane is not understood. As a first step towards the elucidation of GAL1-initiated signaling events leading to a reduced viability of Burkitt lymphoma B cells, we tried to characterize the initial events induced by the binding of GAL1 to its receptor. This characterization was performed in BL36 cells, a Burkitt lymphoma cell line sensitive to GAL1. The results were as follows: (1) when solubilized cell membrane lysates were affinity bound to immobilized GAL1 and eluted by competition, the tyrosine phosphatase glyco-protein CD45 was found in the eluate, highlighting the role of CD45 as a receptor of GAL1; (2) the phosphatase activity of cell membranes diminished after incubation with GAL1; (3) immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that the phosphotyrosine kinase Lyn was dysregulated in cells that have been cultured in medium containing 700 nM GAL1, and (4) that the ratio between two isoforms of Lyn was modified during the treatment with GAL1. The regulation of Lyn therefore seems to be a key event in the action of GAL1.

  10. Burkitt Lymphoma Pathogenesis and Therapeutic Targets from Structural and Functional Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Roland; Young, Ryan M.; Ceribelli, Michele; Jhavar, Sameer; Xiao, Wenming; Zhang, Meili; Wright, George; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Hodson, Daniel J.; Buras, Eric; Liu, Xuelu; Powell, John; Yang, Yandan; Xu, Weihong; Zhao, Hong; Kohlhammer, Holger; Rosenwald, Andreas; Kluin, Philip; Müller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Ott, German; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Connors, Joseph M.; Rimsza, Lisa M.; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Delabie, Jan; Smeland, Erlend B.; Ogwang, Martin D.; Reynolds, Steven J.; Fisher, Richard I.; Braziel, Rita M.; Tubbs, Raymond R.; Cook, James R.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Chan, Wing C.; Pittaluga, Stefania; Wilson, Wyndham; Waldmann, Thomas A.; Rowe, Martin; Mbulaiteye, Sam M.; Rickinson, Alan B.; Staudt, Louis M.

    2013-01-01

    Burkitt lymphoma (BL) can often be cured by intensive chemotherapy, but the toxicity of such therapy precludes its use in the elderly and in patients with endemic BL in developing countries, necessitating new strategies. We used high throughput RNA sequencing and RNA interference screening to discover essential regulatory pathways that cooperate with MYC, the defining oncogene of this cancer. In 38% of sporadic BL (sBL) cases, oncogenic CCND3 mutations produced highly stable cyclin D3 isoforms that drive cell cycle progression. In 70% of sBL cases, mutations affecting the transcription factor TCF3 (E2A) or its negative regulator ID3 fostered TCF3 dependency. TCF3 activated the pro-survival PI(3) kinase pathway in BL, in part by augmenting constitutive B cell receptor signaling. These findings suggest opportunities to improve therapy for patients with BL. PMID:22885699

  11. Maxillary sporadic Burkitt's lymphoma associated with neuro-orbital involvement in an Indian male

    PubMed Central

    Manne, Rakesh Kumar; Madu, Chandra Sekhar; Talla, Harsh Vardhan

    2014-01-01

    Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) is the fastest growing malignancy of the lymphoreticular system to affect humans and has a potential ability to double in size every day. A case of maxillary sporadic BL (sBL) associated with neuro-orbital involvement in an Indian male is presented. sBL initially presented as maxillary swelling with no obvious dental and periodontal changes. Histological specimen from incisional biopsy revealed a round cell malignant tumor and immunohistochemistry reactions favored nonHodgkin's lymphoma consistent with BL. Four weeks later, patient presented with orbital involvement as diplopia, sixth cranial nerve palsy, and medial rectus palsy. Chemotherapy regimen according to LMB 89 protocol was started. During chemotherapy regimen patient showed bradycardia and Babinski response, suggestive of central nervous system involvement. sBL associated with orbital involvement is extremely rare and only seven cases have been reported. Our case showed unusual presentation; despite the aggressive tumor did not show any common clinical, radiological, and hematological findings. We also discussed the role of oral medicine specialist, importance of early diagnosis, and prompt referral in management of maxillary sBL. PMID:24963253

  12. Maxillary sporadic Burkitt's lymphoma associated with neuro-orbital involvement in an Indian male.

    PubMed

    Manne, Rakesh Kumar; Madu, Chandra Sekhar; Talla, Harsh Vardhan

    2014-04-01

    Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) is the fastest growing malignancy of the lymphoreticular system to affect humans and has a potential ability to double in size every day. A case of maxillary sporadic BL (sBL) associated with neuro-orbital involvement in an Indian male is presented. sBL initially presented as maxillary swelling with no obvious dental and periodontal changes. Histological specimen from incisional biopsy revealed a round cell malignant tumor and immunohistochemistry reactions favored nonHodgkin's lymphoma consistent with BL. Four weeks later, patient presented with orbital involvement as diplopia, sixth cranial nerve palsy, and medial rectus palsy. Chemotherapy regimen according to LMB 89 protocol was started. During chemotherapy regimen patient showed bradycardia and Babinski response, suggestive of central nervous system involvement. sBL associated with orbital involvement is extremely rare and only seven cases have been reported. Our case showed unusual presentation; despite the aggressive tumor did not show any common clinical, radiological, and hematological findings. We also discussed the role of oral medicine specialist, importance of early diagnosis, and prompt referral in management of maxillary sBL.

  13. Burkitt lymphoma in Brazil is characterized by geographically distinct clinicopathologic features.

    PubMed

    Queiroga, Eduardo M; Gualco, Gabriela; Weiss, Lawrence M; Dittmer, Dirk P; Araujo, Iguaracyra; Klumb, Claudette E N; Harrington, William J; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2008-12-01

    Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is a highly aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma with a consistent MYC translocation. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with BL at different frequencies, depending on the clinical variant and geographic regions. This is a large-scale study of BL in Brazil, including 234 patients from 5 geographic regions that are widely disparate socioeconomically, including pediatric (61.1%) and adult (37.6%) populations. EBV was present in 52.6% of all BL cases, varying from 29% (12/42) in the South to 76% (13/17) in the North. Most of the cases were EBV type A. The frequency was higher in the pediatric group, and EBV association within this age range predominated in all regions except the South. Expression of p53 protein was observed in 16.2%, and only rare cases showed p63 expression. BL in Brazil is regionally distinct and has a low incidence of p53 overexpression and a higher-than-expected association with EBV in sporadic cases.

  14. Virus-encoded microRNA contributes to the molecular profile of EBV-positive Burkitt lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Navari, Mohsen; De Falco, Giulia; Ambrosio, Maria Raffaella; Lazzi, Stefano; Fuligni, Fabio; Bellan, Cristiana; Rossi, Maura; Sapienza, Maria Rosaria; Laginestra, Maria Antonella; Etebari, Maryam; Rogena, Emily A.; Tumwine, Lynnette; Tripodo, Claudio; Gibellini, Davide; Consiglio, Jessica; Croce, Carlo M.; Pileri, Stefano A.; Leoncini, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is an aggressive neoplasm characterized by consistent morphology and phenotype, typical clinical behavior and distinctive molecular profile. The latter is mostly driven by the MYC over-expression associated with the characteristic translocation (8;14) (q24; q32) or with variant lesions. Additional genetic events can contribute to Burkitt Lymphoma pathobiology and retain clinical significance. A pathogenetic role for Epstein-Barr virus infection in Burkitt lymphomagenesis has been suggested; however, the exact function of the virus is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the molecular profiles (genes and microRNAs) of Epstein-Barr virus-positive and -negative BL, to identify specific patterns relying on the differential expression and role of Epstein-Barr virus-encoded microRNAs. First, we found significant differences in the expression of viral microRNAs and in selected target genes. Among others, we identified LIN28B, CGNL1, GCET2, MRAS, PLCD4, SEL1L, SXX1, and the tyrosine kinases encoding STK10/STK33, all provided with potential pathogenetic significance. GCET2, also validated by immunohistochemistry, appeared to be a useful marker for distinguishing EBV-positive and EBV-negative cases. Further, we provided solid evidences that the EBV-encoded microRNAs (e.g. BART6) significantly mold the transcriptional landscape of Burkitt Lymphoma clones. In conclusion, our data indicated significant differences in the transcriptional profiles of EBV-positive and EBV-negative BL and highlight the role of virus encoded miRNA. PMID:26325594

  15. Burkitt lymphoma presenting as a mass in the thyroid gland: a clinicopathologic study of 7 cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Quesada, Andrés E; Liu, Huifei; Miranda, Roberto N; Golardi, Natalia; Billah, Shahreen; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Jaso, Jesse Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Burkitt lymphoma presenting in the thyroid gland is rare, and only a few cases have been reported. We retrospectively reviewed 7 patients diagnosed with Burkitt lymphoma of the thyroid gland between 2000 and 2015. There were 4 men and 3 women with a median age of 41 years (range, 19-49 years). All patients presented with a rapidly growing neck mass associated with upper airway compression in 5 (71%) patients. Two patients presented with localized (stage I/II) and 5 patients with disseminated (stage III/IV) disease. All cases showed morphologic and immunophenotypic features of Burkitt lymphoma with MYC rearrangement in all 5 cases tested. One case showed evidence of concurrent Hashimoto thyroiditis. Six of 7 patients were treated primarily with rituximab, hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone. One patient was treated primarily with dose-adjusted rituximab, etoposide, prednisolone, vincristine, and cyclophosphamide. At the end of the study period, 5 patients were alive: 4 in complete remission and 1 with persistent disease. Two patients died with persistent disease (median follow-up, 25 months; range, 12-361 months). We conclude that Burkitt lymphoma of the thyroid gland shows clinicopathologic features similar to sporadic Burkitt lymphoma at other anatomic sites, but patients present at an older median age. The clinical course is aggressive with a high frequency of disseminated disease at diagnosis; however, a subset of patients responds well to aggressive chemotherapy.

  16. Effects of microwave exposure and Gemcitabine treatment on apoptotic activity in Burkitt's lymphoma (Raji) cells.

    PubMed

    Canseven, Ayşe G; Esmekaya, Meric Arda; Kayhan, Handan; Tuysuz, Mehmet Zahid; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of 1.8 MHz Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM)-modulated microwave (MW) radiation on apoptotic level and cell viability of Burkitt's lymphoma (Raji) cells with or without Gemcitabine, which exhibits cell phase specificity, primarily killing cells undergoing DNA synthesis (S-phase). Raji cells were exposed to 1.8 GHz GSM-modulated MW radiation at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 0.350 W/kg in a CO2 incubator. The duration of the exposure was 24 h. The amount of apoptotic cells was analyzed using Annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide (PI) staining with flow cytometer. The apoptotic activity of MW exposed Raji cells was increased significantly. In addition, cell viability of exposed samples was significantly decreased. Combined exposure of MW and Gemcitabine increased the amount of apoptotic cells than MW radiation alone. Moreover, viability of MW + Gemcitabine exposed cells was lower than that of cells exposed only to MW. These results demonstrated that MW radiation exposure and Gemcitabine treatment have a synergistic effect on apoptotic activity of Raji cells.

  17. Relationship between Plasmodium falciparum malaria prevalence, genetic diversity and endemic Burkitt lymphoma in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Johnston, W Thomas; Mutalima, Nora; Sun, David; Emmanuel, Benjamin; Bhatia, Kishor; Aka, Peter; Wu, Xiaolin; Borgstein, E; Liomba, G N; Kamiza, Steve; Mkandawire, Nyengo; Batumba, Mkume; Carpenter, Lucy M; Jaffe, Harold; Molyneux, Elizabeth M; Goedert, James J; Soppet, Daniel; Newton, Robert; Mbulaiteye, Sam M

    2014-01-01

    Endemic Burkitt lymphoma (eBL) has been linked to Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) malaria infection, but the contribution of infection with multiple Pf genotypes is uncertain. We studied 303 eBL (cases) and 274 non eBL-related cancers (controls) in Malawi using a sensitive and specific molecular-barcode array of 24 independently segregating Pf single nucleotide polymorphisms. Cases had a higher Pf malaria prevalence than controls (64.7% versus 45.3%; odds ratio [OR] 2.1, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.5 to 3.1). Cases and controls were similar in terms of Pf density (4.9 versus 4.5 log copies, p = 0.28) and having ≥3 non-clonal calls (OR 2.7, 95% CI: 0.7-9.9, P = 0.14). However, cases were more likely to have a higher Pf genetic diversity score (153.9 versus 133.1, p = 0.036), which measures a combination of clonal and non-clonal calls, than controls. Further work is needed to evaluate the possible role of Pf genetic diversity in the pathogenesis of endemic BL.

  18. Subcellular localization of PUMA regulates its pro-apoptotic activity in Burkitt's lymphoma B cells.

    PubMed

    Ambroise, Gorbatchev; Portier, Alain; Roders, Nathalie; Arnoult, Damien; Vazquez, Aimé

    2015-11-10

    The BH3-only protein PUMA (p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis) is a major regulator of apoptosis. It belongs to the Bcl-2 family of proteins responsible for maintaining mitochondrial outer membrane integrity by controlling the intrinsic (mitochondrial) apoptotic pathway. We describe here a new pathway regulating PUMA activation through the control of its subcellular distribution. Surprisingly, neither PUMA upregulation in normal activated human B lymphocytes nor high levels of PUMA in Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) were associated with cell death. We show that PUMA is localized to the cytosol in these cells. By contrast, various apoptosis-triggering signals were found to promote the translocation of PUMA to the mitochondria in these cells, leading to their death by apoptosis. This apoptosis was associated with the binding of mitochondrial PUMA to anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family, such as Bcl-2 and Mcl-1. This translocation was caspase-independent but was prevented by inhibiting or knocking down the expression of the MAPK kinase p38. Our data suggest that the accumulation of PUMA in the cytosol may be important for the participation of this protein in apoptosis without the need for prior transcription. This regulatory pathway may be an important feature of differentiation and tumorigenic processes.

  19. IGH switch breakpoints in Burkitt lymphoma: exclusive involvement of noncanonical class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Guikema, Jeroen E J; de Boer, Conny; Haralambieva, Eugenia; Smit, Laura A; van Noesel, Carel J M; Schuuring, Ed; Kluin, Philip M

    2006-09-01

    Most chromosomal t(8;14) translocations in sporadic Burkitt lymphomas (BL) are mediated by immunoglobulin class switch recombination (CSR), yet all tumors express IgM, suggesting an incomplete or exclusively monoallelic CSR event. We studied the exact configuration of both the nontranslocated IGH allele and the MYC/IGH breakpoint by applying a combination of low- and high-resolution methods (interphase FISH, DNA fiber FISH, long-distance PCR, and Southern blotting) on 16 BL. IGH class switch events involving the nontranslocated IGH allele were not observed. Thirteen cases had MYC/IGH breakpoints in or nearby IGH switch (S) sites, including five at Smu, three at Sgamma and five at Salpha. All eight translocations with a breakpoint at Sgamma or Salpha were perfectly reciprocal, without deletion of Cmu-Cdelta or other CH elements. Internal Smu deletions claimed to be a marker for CSR activity and implicated in stabilization of IgM expression were found in BL but did not correlate with downstream translocation events. This study shows that switch breakpoints in sporadic BL are exclusively resolved by a noncanonical recombination mechanism involving only one switch region.

  20. HIV-associated Burkitt lymphoma in a Japanese patient with early submandibular swelling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are at risk of developing malignancies and have an increased susceptibility to infection. HIV-associated Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is relatively rare in developed countries, but remains prevalent in developing counties and is sometimes compounded by the fact that patients may be unaware that they are HIV-positive. Case presentation A 37-year-old Japanese man was referred to our department for diagnosis and management of submandibular swelling. He was unaware that he was HIV-positive at the initial visit. Here, we describe our diagnostic approach, in which we used hematological and immunological investigations, biopsy, fluorescence-activated cell sorting and fluorescence in situ hybridization to confirm the diagnosis of HIV-associated BL. The patient has no risk factors for HIV infection, and the source of infection remains unclear. Conclusions In this case, submandibular swelling was the first clinical sign of pathology and the patient’s HIV-positive status only became evident later. It is highly likely that BL was triggered by HIV infection. PMID:24370065

  1. The human zinc-finger protein-7 gene is located 90 kb 3' of MYC and is not expressed in Burkitt lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Feduchi, E; Gallego, M I; Lazo, P A

    1994-09-15

    The zinc-finger gene-7 (ZNF7) was located 90 kb 3' of MYC on human chromosome 8 band q24 by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). This position lies between the MLV14 and BVR1 loci, 2 variant translocation breakpoints in Burkitt lymphomas. The structure of the ZNF7 gene was not altered by translocations in Burkitt-lymphoma cell lines as shown by its germline-restriction map configuration. The chromosomal region surrounding the ZNF7 gene was extensively methylated. The ZNF7 gene was not expressed in 19 BL cell lines. Expression was detected only in the BL41 and BL47 cell lines and in the SW756 cervical-carcinoma cell line. The RNA in each was of a different size. We postulate that the lack of ZNF7 expression in Burkitt lymphomas might contribute to the tumor phenotype.

  2. Antibodies reactive to Plasmodium falciparum serine repeat antigen in children with Burkitt lymphoma from Ghana.

    PubMed

    Guech-Ongey, Mercy; Yagi, Masanori; Palacpac, Nirianne Marie Q; Emmanuel, Benjamin; Talisuna, Ambrose O; Bhatia, Kishor; Stefan, D Cristina; Biggar, Robert J; Nkrumah, Francis; Neequaye, Janet; Tougan, Takahiro; Horii, Toshihiro; Mbulaiteye, Sam M

    2012-04-15

    The role of protective immunity to Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) malaria in Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is unknown. We investigated the association between BL and antibodies reactive to SE36 antigen, a recombinant protein based on P. falciparum serine repeat antigen 5 gene, targeted by protective malaria immune responses. Cases were children (0-14 years) enrolled at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana, during 1965-1994 with BL confirmed by histology or cytology (92% of cases). Controls were apparently healthy children enrolled contemporaneous to the cases from the nearest neighbor house to the case house and were age,- sex-frequency-matched to the cases. Anti-SE36 IgG antibodies were measured using enzyme-linked absorbent immunoassays (ELISAs). SE36 titers were estimated by extrapolating ELISA optical density readings to a standard fitting curve. Anti-SE36 titers were log-transformed for analysis. Odds ratios (ORs) and two-sided 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. The mean log endpoint dilution titers were 0.63 logs lower in cases than in controls (8.26 [SD 1.68] vs. 8.89 [SD 1.75], Student's t-test, p = 0.019). Lower titers were observed in cases than controls aged 0-4 years (p = 0.05) and in those aged 5-14 years (p = 0.06). Low and medium tertiles of anti-SE36 IgG antibodies were associated with increased OR for BL ([OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.21-2.31] and [OR 1.33, 95% CI 0.96-1.86], respectively, p(trend) = 0.002) in analyses adjusting for age, sex, calendar period and test plate. Our findings suggest that compared to similarly aged children enrolled from the same community, children with BL in Ghana have lower antibodies to SE36 antigen. PMID:21630256

  3. Antibodies reactive to Plasmodium falciparum serine repeat antigen in children with Burkitt lymphoma from Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Guech-Ongey, Mercy; Yagi, Masanori; Palacpac, Nirianne Marie Q.; Emmanuel, Benjamin; Talisuna, Ambrose O.; Bhatia, Kishor; Stefan, D. Cristina; Biggar, Robert J.; Nkrumah, Francis; Neequaye, Janet; Tougan, Takahiro; Horii, Toshihiro; Mbulaiteye, Sam M.

    2011-01-01

    The role of protective immunity to Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) malaria in Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is unknown. We investigated the association between BL and antibodies reactive to SE36 antigen, a recombinant protein based on Pf-SERA5 gene, targeted by protective malaria immune responses. Cases were children (0–14 years) enrolled at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana, during 1965–1994 with BL confirmed by histology or cytology (92% of cases). Controls were healthy appearing children enrolled contemporaneous to the cases from the nearest neighbor house to the case house age- and sex-frequency matched to the cases. Anti-SE36 IgG antibodies were measured using enzyme-linked absorbent immunoassays (ELISA). SE36 titers were estimated by extrapolating ELISA optical density (OD) readings to a standard fitting curve. Anti-SE36 titers were log-transformed for analysis. Odds ratios (OR) and 2-sided 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. The mean log endpoint dilution titers were 0.63 logs lower in cases than in controls (8.26 [SD 1.68] versus 8.89 [SD 1.75], Student’s t-test, P=0.019). Lower titers were observed in cases than controls aged 0–4 years (P=0.05) and in those aged 5–14 years (P=0.06). Low and medium tertiles of anti-SE36 IgG antibodies were associated with increased OR for BL ([OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.21–2.31] and [OR 1.33, 95% CI 0.96– 1.86], respectively, Ptrend =0.002) in analyses adjusting for age, sex, calendar period, and test plate. Our findings suggest that compared to similarly aged children enrolled from the same community, children with BL in Ghana have lower antibodies to SE36 antigen. PMID:21630256

  4. Identification of a subset of normal B cells with a Burkitt's lymphoma (BL)-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Gregory, C D; Tursz, T; Edwards, C F; Tetaud, C; Talbot, M; Caillou, B; Rickinson, A B; Lipinski, M

    1987-07-01

    Fresh biopsy cells from cases of Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) display a homogeneous cell surface phenotype. The cells were found to be reactive with the pan B cell marker B1, and consistently co-expressed the BL-associated glycolipid antigen, BLA, and the common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen, CALLA, but lacked the B cell "activation" antigens characteristically expressed on EB virus-transformed normal B cells. Microscopic and cell sorter analysis of cells isolated from a series of fresh normal tonsils have identified a subpopulation of normal B cells carrying the same cell surface markers. That BLA and CALLA could be co-expressed on individual B cells was demonstrated by two-color immunofluorescence (IF) of tonsils in suspension, and immunoperoxidase (IP) staining of serial tonsil sections. These BLA+, CALLA+, "activation" antigen- cells were further characterized as B1+, sIgM+, sIgD-, C3d/EB virus receptor+ and were susceptible to virus-induced transformation in vitro. IF studies on Percoll-fractionated tonsillar cell populations and direct examination of IP-stained tonsil semi-thin sections indicated that the BLA+, CALLA+ cells were localized in germinal centers. Their morphological characteristics matched those of BL cells, and their location within germinal centers was consistent both with the known phenotype of germinal center tonsillar B cells and with the description of BL as a proliferation of centroblasts. We suggest that this population of tonsillar germinal center B cells provides the normal counterpart of BL tumor cells. PMID:2953817

  5. Burkitt's lymphoma is a malignancy of mature B cells expressing somatically mutated V region genes.

    PubMed Central

    Klein, U.; Klein, G.; Ehlin-Henriksson, B.; Rajewsky, K.; Küppers, R.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The developmental stage from which stems the malignant B cell population in Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) is unclear. An approach to answering this question is provided by the sequence analysis of rear-ranged immunoglobulin (Ig) variable region (V) genes from BL for evidence of somatic mutations, together with a phenotypic characterization. As somatic hypermutation of Ig V region genes occurs in germinal center B cells, somatically mutated Ig genes are found in germinal center B cells and their descendents. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Rearranged V kappa region genes from 10 kappa-expressing sporadic and endemic BL-derived cell lines (9 IgM and 1 IgG positive) and three kappa-expressing endemic BL biopsy specimens were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. In addition, VH region gene sequences from these cell lines were determined. RESULTS: All BL cell lines and the three biopsy specimens carried somatically mutated V region genes. The average mutation frequency of rearranged V kappa genes from eight BL cell lines established from sporadic BL was 1.8%. A higher frequency (6%) was found in five endemic cases (three biopsy specimens and two BL cell lines). CONCLUSIONS: The detection of somatic mutations in the rearranged V region genes suggests that both sporadic and endemic BL represent a B-cell malignancy originating from germinal center B cells or their descendants. Interestingly, the mutation frequency detected in sporadic BL is in a range similar to that characteristic for IgM-expressing B cells in the human peripheral blood and for mu chain-expressing germinal center B cells, whereas the mutation frequency found in endemic BL is significantly higher. PMID:8529116

  6. The chick chorioallantoic membrane as an in vivo xenograft model for Burkitt lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is an aggressive malignancy that arises from B-cells and belongs to the group of Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Due to the lack of appropriate in vivo models NHL research is mainly performed in vitro. Here, we studied the use of the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) for the generation of human BL xenograft tumors, which we compared with known characteristics of the human disease. Methods In order to generate experimental BL tumors, we inoculated human BL2B95 and BL2-GFP cells on the CAM. BL2B95 xenograft-tumors were grown for seven days and subsequently analyzed with transmission electron and immunofluorescence microscopy, as well as histological staining approaches. BL2-GFP cells were studied at regular intervals up to seven days, and their metastatic behavior was visualized with intravital immunofluorescence techniques. Results Xenografted BL2B95 cells formed solid tumors in the CAM model with a Ki67-index greater than 90%, preservation of typical tumor markers (CD10, CD19, CD20), a ‘starry sky’ morphology, production of agyrophilic fibers in the stroma, formation of blood and lymphatic vessels and lymphogenic dissemination of BL2B95 to distant sites. We identified macrophages, lymphocytes and heterophilic granulocytes (chick homolog of neutrophils) as the most abundant immune cells in the experimental tumors. BL2-GFP cells could be traced in real-time during their distribution in the CAM, and the first signs for their dissemination were visible after 2-3 days. Conclusions We show that xenografted BL2B95 cells generate tumors in the CAM with a high degree of cellular, molecular and proliferative concord with the human disease, supporting the application of the CAM model for NHL research with a focus on tumor-stroma interactions. Additionally we report that BL2-GFP cells, grafted on the CAM of ex ovo cultured chick embryos, provide a powerful tool to study lymphogenic dissemination in real-time. PMID:24884418

  7. Pediatric Burkitt's lymphoma and diffuse B-cell lymphoma: are surveillance scans required?

    PubMed

    Eissa, H M; Allen, C E; Kamdar, K; Simko, S; Goradia, P; Dreyer, Z; Steuber, P; McClain, K L; Guillerman, R P; Bollard, Catherine M

    2014-04-01

    Outcomes in pediatric B-Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (B NHL) have improved with intensive chemotherapy protocols, with long-term survival now over 80%. However, long-term adverse effects of therapy and poor outcomes for patients who relapse remain challenges. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the potential risks and benefits of routine relapse surveillance imaging after the completion of therapy. We reviewed 44 B NHL patients diagnosed and treated at Texas Children's Cancer Center in the period between 2000 to 2011. All cross-sectional diagnostic imaging examinations performed for disease assessment after completion of chemotherapy were reviewed and cumulative radiation dosage from these examinations and the frequency of relapse detection by these examinations were recorded. Only 3 patients of the 44 relapsed (6.8%), though none of the relapses were initially diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) or fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scans. Median effective dose of ionizing radiation per patient was 40.3 mSv with an average of 49.1 mSv (range 0-276 mSv). This single-institution study highlights the low relapse rate in pediatric B-NHL with complete response at the end of therapy, the low sensitivity of early detection of relapse with surveillance CT or FDG-PET imaging, and the costs and potential increased risk of secondary malignancies from cumulative radiation exposure from surveillance imaging. We propose that routine surveillance CT or FDG-PET scans for these patients may not be necessary. PMID:24087880

  8. Concomitant Classic Hodgkin Lymphoma of Lymph Node and cMYC-Positive Burkitt Leukemia/Lymphoma of the Bone Marrow Presented Concurrently at the Time of Presentation: A Rare Combination of Discordant Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Dina S.; Fareed, Shehab; Alkuwari, Einas; El-Omri, Halima; Al-Sabbagh, Ahmad; Gameel, Amna; Yassin, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Discordant lymphoma is rare condition in which different types of malignant lymphomas occurring in different anatomic sites. The two diseases may present clinically as concurrent or sequential disease (10). Herein we are reporting a Pakistani female in her 60s, a carrier of hepatitis B virus with multiple comorbidities presented with cervical lymphadenopathy, diagnosed as Hodgkin’s lymphoma, mixed cellularity. During the staging workup, the patient was discovered to have extensive bone marrow (BM) involvement by Burkitt leukaemia/lymphoma (BL). Cytogenetic analysis revealed positivity for t(8;14)(q24;q32) confirmed by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) for IGH/MYC. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was demonstrated heavily in our case, with (EBV) DNA of 24,295,560 copies/ml by PCR at time of presentation, in addition, the neoplastic cells in both diagnostic tissues (cervical lymph node and BM) demonstrated positivity for EBV. A diagnosis of concomitant EBV related discordant lymphoma (classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) and Burkitt lymphoma (BL) in leukemic phase was made. Among all reported cases, this case is highly exceptional because it is the first case of discordant/composite lymphoma, with this combination and concomitant presentation. Since we are dealing with a case with an exceptionally rare combination, we found it significant to elaborate more on its clinical features, contributing factors including EBV role, response to treatment, complications, and prognosis. PMID:27512341

  9. Clinicopathological features of aggressive B-cell lymphomas including B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell and Burkitt lymphomas: a study of 44 patients from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Bürgesser, María Virginia; Gualco, Gabriela; Diller, Ana; Natkunam, Yasodha; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2013-06-01

    Aggressive B-cell lymphomas incorporate a wide spectrum of lymphomas that pose challenges in diagnosis as well as treatment. We evaluated the clinicopathological features of 44 patients with aggressive B-cell lymphomas which were classified into 3 groups based on the World Health Organization 2008 classification as follows: including 30 cases of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), 8 cases of Burkitt lymphoma (BL) and 6 cases of B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between Burkitt lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (BCLU). Male predominance was observed in BL and BCLU groups and the mean age varied from 29 years in BL, 61 years in DLBCL and 70 years in BCLU. Patients with BCLU presented at more advanced stages and had a higher international prognostic index. By immunohistochemistry, they shared characteristics of both BL (including more frequent expression of SOX11) and DLBCL. FISH analyses showed three cases with more than one rearrangement: one MYC/BCL2 and two BCL2/BCL6, in addition to which one case with BCL2/IGH translocation and another with MYC rearrangement were also detected. The mean follow-up survival time of BCLU was 6.6 months, which was significantly shorter in comparison to DLBCL (31 months) and BL (30 months), respectively. The importance of recognizing this BCLU group relies on its different clinical course, poor prognosis and shorter survival than DLBCL and BL. An accurate diagnosis is critical for risk stratification and to improve therapeutic approaches and outcomes.

  10. c-Myc over-expression in Ramos Burkitt's lymphoma cell line predisposes to iron homeostasis disruption in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Habel, Marie-Eve; Jung, Daniel . E-mail: djung@hema-quebec.qc.ca

    2006-03-24

    Burkitt's lymphoma is an aggressive B-cell neoplasm resulting from deregulated c-myc expression. We have previously shown that proliferation of Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines such as Ramos is markedly reduced by iron treatment. It has been shown that iron induces expression of c-myc which, owing to its transcriptional regulatory functions, regulates genes involved in iron metabolism. Transient enhancement of c-myc expression by iron could increase the expression of genes involved in iron incorporation, which could lead to an accumulation of intracellular free iron. Here, we have investigated whether cells with a high basal level of c-Myc were more likely to accumulate free iron. Our results suggest that the basal level of c-Myc in Ramos cells is twofold higher than what is seen in HL-60 cells. Moreover, in Ramos cells, where c-Myc is expressed at a high level, H-ferritin expression is down-regulated, transferrin receptor (CD71) expression is increased, and ferritin translation is inhibited. These modifications in iron metabolism, resulting from the strong basal expression of c-Myc, and amplified by iron addition, could lead to a disruption in homeostasis and consequently to growth arrest.

  11. Properties of immunotoxins against a glycolipid antigen associated with Burkitt's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Wiels, J; Junqua, S; Dujardin, P; Le Pecq, J B; Tursz, T

    1984-01-01

    A monoclonal immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibody (38-13) which recognizes Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) cells, by reacting with the neutral glycolipid Gal alpha 1 leads to 4-Gal beta 1 leads to 4-Glc beta 1 leads to 1-ceramide, was recently characterized. This monoclonal IgM was coupled to either ricin A chain or gelonin. The two different immunotoxins obtained retained the apparent immunological specificity of 38-13 IgM, as shown by flow cytofluorometry analysis and complement-dependent cytotoxicity test. The BL Ramos cells and the apparently irrelevant Epstein-Barr virus-containing lymphoblastoid Priess cells were used as targets in in vitro assays of the cytotoxic properties of the two immunotoxins by measuring the inhibition of protein synthesis. Isolated ricin A chain, gelonin, and 38-13 IgM exhibited very low intrinsic cytotoxicity on both target cells. 38-13 ricin A chain and 38-13 gelonin conjugates exerted toxic effects on both target cells which were about 6000-fold and 3000-fold higher than uncoupled ricin A chain and gelonin, respectively. The toxicity of these conjugates almost reached that of intact ricin. On Ramos BL cells, the kinetics of action of the 38-13 ricin A chain conjugate was almost as fast as that of intact ricin, because 50% protein synthesis inhibition was reached after 3 hr. In contrast, the kinetics of action in the non-BL Priess was much slower (50% protein synthesis inhibition after 10 hr). An obviously irrelevant immunotoxin (anti-trinitrophenol IgM-ricin A chain) had no significant cytotoxic effect on BL Ramos and non-BL Priess cells. An excess of D-galactose was shown previously to inhibit the 38-13 IgM from binding to the reactive glycolipid antigen bearing a terminal galactose. An excess of D-galactose (0.1 M) inhibited the cytotoxic effect of the two 38-13 immunotoxins, whereas it did not prevent the cytotoxic effect of the anti-trinitrophenol immunotoxin on the same trinitrophenol labeled target cells. These data suggest that the

  12. Effects of mTOR and calcineurin inhibitors combined therapy in Epstein-Barr virus positive and negative Burkitt lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wowro, Sylvia J; Schmitt, Katharina R L; Tong, Giang; Berger, Felix; Schubert, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder is a severe complication in solid organ transplant recipients, which is highly associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection in pediatric patients and occasionally presents as Burkitt- or Burkitt-like lymphoma. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has been described as a possible antitumor target whose inhibition may influence lymphoma development and proliferation after pediatric transplantation. We treated Epstein-Barr virus positive (Raji and Daudi) and negative (Ramos) human Burkitt lymphoma derived cells with mTOR inhibitor everolimus alone and in combination with clinically relevant immunosuppressive calcineurin inhibitors (tacrolimus or cyclosporin A). Cell proliferation, toxicity, and mitochondrial metabolic activity were analyzed. The effect on mTOR Complex 1 downstream targets p70 S6 kinase, eukaryotic initiation factor 4G, and S6 ribosomal protein activation was also investigated. We observed that treatment with everolimus alone significantly decreased Burkitt lymphoma cell proliferation and mitochondrial metabolic activity. Everolimus in combination with cyclosporin A had a stronger suppressive effect in Epstein-Barr virus negative but not in Epstein-Barr virus positive cells. In contrast, tacrolimus completely abolished the everolimus-mediated suppressive effects. Moreover, we showed a significant decrease in activation of mTOR Complex 1 downstream targets after treatment with everolimus that was attenuated when combined with tacrolimus, but not with cyclosporin A. For the first time we showed the competitive effect between everolimus and tacrolimus when used as combination therapy on Burkitt lymphoma derived cells. Thus, according to our in vitro data, the combination of calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporin A with everolimus is preferred to the combination of tacrolimus and everolimus. PMID:26613512

  13. A recurrent 11q aberration pattern characterizes a subset of MYC-negative high-grade B-cell lymphomas resembling Burkitt lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Salaverria, Itziar; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Wagener, Rabea; Kreuz, Markus; Kohler, Christian W; Richter, Julia; Pienkowska-Grela, Barbara; Adam, Patrick; Burkhardt, Birgit; Claviez, Alexander; Damm-Welk, Christine; Drexler, Hans G; Hummel, Michael; Jaffe, Elaine S; Küppers, Ralf; Lefebvre, Christine; Lisfeld, Jasmin; Löffler, Markus; Macleod, Roderick A F; Nagel, Inga; Oschlies, Ilske; Rosolowski, Maciej; Russell, Robert B; Rymkiewicz, Grzegorz; Schindler, Detlev; Schlesner, Matthias; Scholtysik, René; Schwaenen, Carsten; Spang, Rainer; Szczepanowski, Monika; Trümper, Lorenz; Vater, Inga; Wessendorf, Swen; Klapper, Wolfram; Siebert, Reiner

    2014-02-20

    The genetic hallmark of Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is the t(8;14)(q24;q32) and its variants leading to activation of the MYC oncogene. It is a matter of debate whether true BL without MYC translocation exists. Here, we identified 59 lymphomas concordantly called BL by 2 gene expression classifiers among 753 B-cell lymphomas. Only 2 (3%) of these 59 molecular BL lacked a MYC translocation, which both shared a peculiar pattern of chromosome 11q aberration characterized by interstitial gains including 11q23.2-q23.3 and telomeric losses of 11q24.1-qter. We extended our analysis to 17 MYC-negative high-grade B-cell lymphomas with a similar 11q aberration and showed this aberration to be recurrently associated with morphologic and clinical features of BL. The minimal region of gain was defined by high-level amplifications in 11q23.3 and associated with overexpression of genes including PAFAH1B2 on a transcriptional and protein level. The recurrent region of loss contained a focal homozygous deletion in 11q24.2-q24.3 including the ETS1 gene, which was shown to be mutated in 4 of 16 investigated cases. These findings indicate the existence of a molecularly distinct subset of B-cell lymphomas reminiscent of BL, which is characterized by deregulation of genes in 11q.

  14. A recurrent 11q aberration pattern characterizes a subset of MYC-negative high-grade B-cell lymphomas resembling Burkitt lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Salaverria, Itziar; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Wagener, Rabea; Kreuz, Markus; Kohler, Christian W; Richter, Julia; Pienkowska-Grela, Barbara; Adam, Patrick; Burkhardt, Birgit; Claviez, Alexander; Damm-Welk, Christine; Drexler, Hans G; Hummel, Michael; Jaffe, Elaine S; Küppers, Ralf; Lefebvre, Christine; Lisfeld, Jasmin; Löffler, Markus; Macleod, Roderick A F; Nagel, Inga; Oschlies, Ilske; Rosolowski, Maciej; Russell, Robert B; Rymkiewicz, Grzegorz; Schindler, Detlev; Schlesner, Matthias; Scholtysik, René; Schwaenen, Carsten; Spang, Rainer; Szczepanowski, Monika; Trümper, Lorenz; Vater, Inga; Wessendorf, Swen; Klapper, Wolfram; Siebert, Reiner

    2014-02-20

    The genetic hallmark of Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is the t(8;14)(q24;q32) and its variants leading to activation of the MYC oncogene. It is a matter of debate whether true BL without MYC translocation exists. Here, we identified 59 lymphomas concordantly called BL by 2 gene expression classifiers among 753 B-cell lymphomas. Only 2 (3%) of these 59 molecular BL lacked a MYC translocation, which both shared a peculiar pattern of chromosome 11q aberration characterized by interstitial gains including 11q23.2-q23.3 and telomeric losses of 11q24.1-qter. We extended our analysis to 17 MYC-negative high-grade B-cell lymphomas with a similar 11q aberration and showed this aberration to be recurrently associated with morphologic and clinical features of BL. The minimal region of gain was defined by high-level amplifications in 11q23.3 and associated with overexpression of genes including PAFAH1B2 on a transcriptional and protein level. The recurrent region of loss contained a focal homozygous deletion in 11q24.2-q24.3 including the ETS1 gene, which was shown to be mutated in 4 of 16 investigated cases. These findings indicate the existence of a molecularly distinct subset of B-cell lymphomas reminiscent of BL, which is characterized by deregulation of genes in 11q. PMID:24398325

  15. Epstein-Barr Virus-Induced Gene 3 (EBI3): A Novel Diagnosis Marker in Burkitt Lymphoma and Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bastard, Christian; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Couturier, Jérôme; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Dietrich, Céline; Brousse, Nicole; Vacher-Lavenu, Marie-Cécile; Devergne, Odile

    2011-01-01

    The distinction between Burkitt lymphoma (BL) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), two types of mature aggressive B-cell lymphomas that require distinct treatments, can be difficult because of forms showing features intermediate between DLBCL and BL (here called BL/DLBCL). They can be discriminated by the presence of c-myc translocations characteristic of BL. However, these are not exclusive of BL and when present in DLBCL are associated with lower survival. In this study, we show that Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3) is differentially expressed among BL and DLBCL. Analysis of gene expression data from 502 cases of aggressive mature B-cell lymphomas available on Gene Expression Omnibus and immunohistochemical analysis of 184 cases of BL, BL/DLBCL or DLBCL, showed that EBI3 was not expressed in EBV-positive or -negative BL cases, whereas it was expressed by over 30% of tumoral cells in nearly 80% of DLBCL cases, independently of their subtypes. In addition, we show that c-myc overexpression represses EBI3 expression, and that DLBCL or BL/DLBCL cases with c-myc translocations have lower expression of EBI3. Thus, EBI3 immunohistochemistry could be useful to discriminate BL from DLBCL, and to identify cases of BL/DLBCL or DLBCL with potential c-myc translocations. PMID:21931777

  16. Two-Dimensional Matrix Algorithm Using Detrended Fluctuation Analysis to Distinguish Burkitt and Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Rong-Guan; Lin, Chung-Wu; Abbod, Maysam F.; Shieh, Jiann-Shing

    2012-01-01

    A detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) method is applied to image analysis. The 2-dimensional (2D) DFA algorithms is proposed for recharacterizing images of lymph sections. Due to Burkitt lymphoma (BL) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), there is a significant different 5-year survival rates after multiagent chemotherapy. Therefore, distinguishing the difference between BL and DLBCL is very important. In this study, eighteen BL images were classified as group A, which have one to five cytogenetic changes. Ten BL images were classified as group B, which have more than five cytogenetic changes. Both groups A and B BLs are aggressive lymphomas, which grow very fast and require more intensive chemotherapy. Finally, ten DLBCL images were classified as group C. The short-term correlation exponent α1 values of DFA of groups A, B, and C were 0.370 ± 0.033, 0.382 ± 0.022, and 0.435 ± 0.053, respectively. It was found that α1 value of BL image was significantly lower (P < 0.05) than DLBCL. However, there is no difference between the groups A and B BLs. Hence, it can be concluded that α1 value based on DFA statistics concept can clearly distinguish BL and DLBCL image. PMID:23365623

  17. Bortezomib inhibits Burkitt's lymphoma cell proliferation by downregulating sumoylated hnRNP K and c-Myc expression.

    PubMed

    Suk, Fat-Moon; Lin, Shyr-Yi; Lin, Ren-Jye; Hsine, Yung-Hsin; Liao, Yen-Ju; Fang, Sheng-Uei; Liang, Yu-Chih

    2015-09-22

    Bortezomib (Velcal) was the first proteasome inhibitor to be approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to treat patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myelomas. Previous studies have demonstrated that bortezomib inhibits tumor cell proliferation and induces apoptosis by blocking the nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathway. However, the exact mechanism by which bortezomib induces cancer cell apoptosis is still not well understood. In this study, we found that bortezomib significantly inhibited cell proliferation in both human Burkitt's lymphoma CA46 and Daudi cells. Through proteomic analysis, we found that bortezomib treatment changed the expression of various proteins in distinct functional categories including unfolding protein response (UPS), RNA processing, protein targeting and biosynthesis, apoptosis, and signal transduction. Among the proteins with altered expression, hnRNP K, hnRNP H, Hsp90α, Grp78, and Hsp7C were common to both Daudi and CA46 cells. Interestingly, bortezomib treatment downregulated the expression of high-molecular-weight (HMw) hnRNP K and c-Myc but upregulated the expression of low-molecular-weight (LMw) hnRNP K. Moreover, cell proliferation was significantly correlated with high expression of HMw hnRNP K and c-Myc. HMw and LMw hnRNP K were identified as sumoylated and desumoylated hnRNP K, respectively. Using transient transfection, we found that sumoylated hnRNP K increased c-Myc expression at the translational level and contributed to cell proliferation, and that Lys422 of hnRNP K is the candidate sumoylated residue. Our results suggest that besides inhibiting the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, bortezomib may inhibit cell proliferation by downregulating sumoylated hnRNP K and c-Myc expression in Burkitt's lymphoma cells.

  18. Analysis of the autoantibody repertoire in Burkitt's lymphoma patients: frequent response against the transcription factor ATF-2.

    PubMed

    Kersten, Christian; Delabie, Jan; Gaudernack, Gustav; Smeland, Erlend B; Fosså, Alexander

    2004-12-01

    In the last few years, serological identification of tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) by recombinant cDNA expression cloning (SEREX) has enabled the mapping of humoral immune responses against TAAs in various types of cancer. The present paper describes the application of SEREX to Burkitt's lymphoma (BL), a malignancy not previously characterized by SEREX. By using a cDNA library from a BL cell line that does not express IgG, technical difficulties related to background immunoglobulin clones were overcome. Screening with sera from three BL patients revealed immunoreactivity against seven different gene products, six of which represent known human genes. Five proteins had previously been characterized by SEREX in other malignancies or identified as targets of autoantibodies in autoimmune disease. Seroreactivity against ATF-2, a member of the AP-1 transcription factor family, was validated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blot analysis using recombinant ATF-2 protein. Autoantibody responses against ATF-2 were detected by ELISA in 6 of 8 BL patients, compared with 6 of 13 patients with T-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (T-NHL), 5 of 23 patients with follicular lymphoma and 2 of 27 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients. In contrast, reactivity was found in only 1 of 50 healthy volunteers. Next, we showed by immunohistochemistry that the activated form of ATF2 (ATF-2pp) was highly expressed in six different BL samples. We conclude that the SEREX approach with a B-cell cDNA source is applicable in NHL. Furthermore, we identified genes with possible involvement in the pathogenesis of BL using this technique.

  19. Epstein-Barr virus patterns in US Burkitt lymphoma tumors from the SEER residual tissue repository during 1979-2009.

    PubMed

    Mbulaiteye, Sam M; Pullarkat, Sheeja T; Nathwani, Bharat N; Weiss, Lawrence M; Rao, Nagesh; Emmanuel, Benjamin; Lynch, Charles F; Hernandez, Brenda; Neppalli, Vishala; Hawes, Debra; Cockburn, Myles G; Kim, Andre; Williams, Makeda; Altekruse, Sean; Bhatia, Kishor; Goodman, Marc T; Cozen, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    Burkitt lymphoma (BL) occurs at all ages, but the patterns of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) positivity in relation to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), immunoprofiles and age have not been fully explored. BL tissues from residual tissue repositories, and two academic centers in the United States were examined by expert hematopathologists for morphology, immunohistochemistry, MYC rearrangement, EBV-encoded RNA (EBER), and diagnosed according to the 2008 WHO lymphoma classification. Analysis was done using frequency tables, Chi-squared statistics, and Student's t-test. Of 117 cases examined, 91 were confirmed as BL. The age distribution was 26%, 15%, 19%, and 29% for 0-19, 20-34, 35-59, 60+ years, and missing in 11%. MYC rearrangement was found in 89% and EBER positivity in 29% of 82 cases with results. EBER positivity varied with age (from 13% in age group 0-19 to 55% in age group 20-34, and fell to 25% in age group 60+ years, p = 0.08); with race (56% in Blacks/Hispanics vs 21% in Whites/Asians/Pacific Islanders, p = 0.006); and by HIV status (64% in HIV positive vs 22% in HIV negative cases, p = 0.03). EBER positivity was demonstrated in about one-third of tumors and it was strongly associated with race and HIV status, and marginally with age-group. PMID:23607450

  20. Hypermethylation of the tumor suppressor gene PRDM1/Blimp-1 supports a pathogenetic role in EBV-positive Burkitt lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, T; Ma, J; Nie, K; Yan, J; Liu, Y; Bacchi, C E; Queiroga, E M; Gualco, G; Sample, J T; Orazi, A; Knowles, D M; Tam, W

    2014-01-01

    PRDM1/Blimp-1 is a tumor suppressor gene in the activated B-cell subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. Its inactivation contributes to pathogenesis in this setting by impairing terminal B-cell differentiation induced by constitutive nuclear factor-κB activation. The role of PRDM1 in Burkitt lymphoma (BL) lymphomagenesis is not known. Here we identified hypermethylation of the promoter region and exon 1 of PRDM1 in all six Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-positive BL cell lines and 12 of 23 (52%) primary EBV-positive BL or BL-related cases examined, but in none of the EBV-negative BL cell lines or primary tumors that we assessed, implying a tumor suppressor role for PRDM1 specifically in EBV-associated BL. A direct induction of PRDM1 hypermethylation by EBV is unlikely, as PRDM1 hypermethylation was not observed in EBV-immortalized B lymphoblastoid cell lines. Treatment of EBV-positive BL cells with 5′ azacytidine resulted in PRDM1 induction associated with PRDM1 demethylation, consistent with transcriptional silencing of PRDM1 as a result of DNA methylation. Overexpression of PRDM1 in EBV-positive BL cell lines resulted in cell cycle arrest. Our results expand the spectrum of lymphoid malignancies in which PRDM1 may have a tumor suppressor role and identify an epigenetic event that likely contributes to the pathogenesis of BL. PMID:25382611

  1. Successful Control of Massive Bleeding in a Child with Burkitt's Lymphoma via a Biosimilar Recombinant Activated Factor VII (AryoSeven™)

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzi Pour, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of a 4-year-old girl with Burkitt's lymphoma, who suffered from a massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage 3 days after chemotherapy. In spite of applying the common practice in correction of coagulopathy, thrombocytopenia persisted and bleeding became life-threatening. In the present case report, we report a successful control of bleeding with a single-dose administration of a biosimilar recombinant activated human factor VII (AryoSeven). PMID:27478659

  2. MINCR is a MYC-induced lncRNA able to modulate MYC's transcriptional network in Burkitt lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Doose, Gero; Haake, Andrea; Bernhart, Stephan H; López, Cristina; Duggimpudi, Sujitha; Wojciech, Franziska; Bergmann, Anke K; Borkhardt, Arndt; Burkhardt, Birgit; Claviez, Alexander; Dimitrova, Lora; Haas, Siegfried; Hoell, Jessica I; Hummel, Michael; Karsch, Dennis; Klapper, Wolfram; Kleo, Karsten; Kretzmer, Helene; Kreuz, Markus; Küppers, Ralf; Lawerenz, Chris; Lenze, Dido; Loeffler, Markus; Mantovani-Löffler, Luisa; Möller, Peter; Ott, German; Richter, Julia; Rohde, Marius; Rosenstiel, Philip; Rosenwald, Andreas; Schilhabel, Markus; Schneider, Markus; Scholz, Ingrid; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Szczepanowski, Monika; Trümper, Lorenz; Weniger, Marc A; Hoffmann, Steve; Siebert, Reiner; Iaccarino, Ingram

    2015-09-22

    Despite the established role of the transcription factor MYC in cancer, little is known about the impact of a new class of transcriptional regulators, the long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), on MYC ability to influence the cellular transcriptome. Here, we have intersected RNA-sequencing data from two MYC-inducible cell lines and a cohort of 91 B-cell lymphomas with or without genetic variants resulting in MYC overexpression. We identified 13 lncRNAs differentially expressed in IG-MYC-positive Burkitt lymphoma and regulated in the same direction by MYC in the model cell lines. Among them, we focused on a lncRNA that we named MYC-induced long noncoding RNA (MINCR), showing a strong correlation with MYC expression in MYC-positive lymphomas. To understand its cellular role, we performed RNAi and found that MINCR knockdown is associated with an impairment in cell cycle progression. Differential gene expression analysis after RNAi showed a significant enrichment of cell cycle genes among the genes down-regulated after MINCR knockdown. Interestingly, these genes are enriched in MYC binding sites in their promoters, suggesting that MINCR acts as a modulator of the MYC transcriptional program. Accordingly, MINCR knockdown was associated with a reduction in MYC binding to the promoters of selected cell cycle genes. Finally, we show that down-regulation of Aurora kinases A and B and chromatin licensing and DNA replication factor 1 may explain the reduction in cellular proliferation observed on MINCR knockdown. We, therefore, suggest that MINCR is a newly identified player in the MYC transcriptional network able to control the expression of cell cycle genes.

  3. [Noma and Burkitt disease; a particular association about three observations seen in the Teaching Hospital Center Yalgado Ouedraogo (Burkina Faso)].

    PubMed

    Konsem, T; Millogo, M; Gare, J; Ouedraogo, D; Ouoba, K

    2014-08-01

    Cancrum oris is a gangrenous stomatitis arising from a periodontal infection and leading to severe soft tissue and bone destruction. The pathology involves numerous factors including local thrombosis, vascularitis, necrotizing gingivitis, immunodeficiency, Gram negative and anaerobic infection. It is usually a disease of infants and malnourished children in tropical areas often occurring after a debilitating disease like measles [3]. Burkitt lymphoma is a highly aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma first described by Burkitt in 1958 in African children from areas holoendemic for malaria. It is the first cancer of African child [6]. The association between Burkitt lymphoma and cancrum oris is non common. We report in the present study three cases of this association at the Academic Hospital Yalgado Ouedraogo of Ouagadougou. This association poses a problem of late diagnosis with difficulties in therapeutic management.

  4. Clinical and pathological features of Burkitt lymphoma showing expression of BCL2--an analysis including gene expression in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Masqué-Soler, Neus; Szczepanowski, Monika; Kohler, Christian W; Aukema, Sietse M; Nagel, Inga; Richter, Julia; Siebert, Reiner; Spang, Rainer; Burkhardt, Birgit; Klapper, Wolfram

    2015-11-01

    The differential diagnosis between Burkitt lymphoma (BL) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) can be challenging. BL has been reported to express less BCL2 than DLBCL, but this issue has not been analysed systematically. BL expressing BCL2 can be considered to be MYC/BCL2 co-expressors, a feature that is associated with poorer outcome in DLBCL but that has not been correlated with outcome in BL so far. We analysed the expression of BCL2 in 150 cases of conventionally diagnosed BL using two different BCL2 antibodies. BCL2 expression was detected in 23% of the cases, though the expression varied in intensity and number of positive cells. We did not detect any relevant differences in clinical presentation and outcome between BCL2-positive and BCL2-negative BL in a subgroup of 43 cases for which detailed clinical data were available. An independent cohort of 17 BL with expression of BCL2 were analysed molecularly, with 13 of 17 cases classified as molecularly defined BL (Burkitt Lymphoma) using gene expression profiling on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues. The four lymphomas diagnosed molecularly as intermediates did not differ in clinical presentation and outcome from molecularly defined BL. PMID:26218299

  5. Inhibition of autophagy in EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphoma cells enhances EBV lytic genes expression and replication

    PubMed Central

    De Leo, A; Colavita, F; Ciccosanti, F; Fimia, G M; Lieberman, P M; Mattia, E

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, an important degradation system involved in maintaining cellular homeostasis, serves also to eliminate pathogens and process their fragments for presentation to the immune system. Several viruses have been shown to interact with the host autophagic machinery to suppress or make use of this cellular catabolic pathway to enhance their survival and replication. Epstein Barr virus (EBV) is a γ-herpes virus associated with a number of malignancies of epithelial and lymphoid origin in which establishes a predominantly latent infection. Latent EBV can periodically reactivate to produce infectious particles that allow the virus to spread and can lead to the death of the infected cell. In this study, we analyzed the relationship between autophagy and EBV reactivation in Burkitt's lymphoma cells. By monitoring autophagy markers and EBV lytic genes expression, we demonstrate that autophagy is enhanced in the early phases of EBV lytic activation but decreases thereafter concomitantly with increased levels of EBV lytic proteins. In a cell line defective for late antigens expression, we found an inverse correlation between EBV early antigens expression and autophagosomes formation, suggesting that early after activation, the virus is able to suppress autophagy. We report here for the first time that inhibition of autophagy by Bafilomycin A1 or shRNA knockdown of Beclin1 gene, highly incremented EBV lytic genes expression as well as intracellular viral DNA and viral progeny yield. Taken together, these findings indicate that EBV activation induces the autophagic response, which is soon inhibited by the expression of EBV early lytic products. Moreover, our findings open the possibility that pharmacological inhibitors of autophagy may be used to enhance oncolytic viral therapy of EBV-related lymphomas. PMID:26335716

  6. Improved outcome of adult Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia with rituximab and chemotherapy: report of a large prospective multicenter trial

    PubMed Central

    Walewski, Jan; Döhner, Hartmut; Viardot, Andreas; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Spiekermann, Karsten; Serve, Hubert; Dührsen, Ulrich; Hüttmann, Andreas; Thiel, Eckhard; Dengler, Jolanta; Kneba, Michael; Schaich, Markus; Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo G. H.; Beck, Joachim; Hertenstein, Bernd; Reichle, Albrecht; Domanska-Czyz, Katarzyna; Fietkau, Rainer; Horst, Heinz-August; Rieder, Harald; Schwartz, Stefan; Burmeister, Thomas; Gökbuget, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    This largest prospective multicenter trial for adult patients with Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia aimed to prove the efficacy and feasibility of short-intensive chemotherapy combined with the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab. From 2002 to 2011, 363 patients 16 to 85 years old were recruited in 98 centers. Treatment consisted of 6 5-day chemotherapy cycles with high-dose methotrexate, high-dose cytosine arabinoside, cyclophosphamide, etoposide, ifosphamide, corticosteroids, and triple intrathecal therapy. Patients >55 years old received a reduced regimen. Rituximab was given before each cycle and twice as maintenance, for a total of 8 doses. The rate of complete remission was 88% (319/363); overall survival (OS) at 5 years, 80%; and progression-free survival, 71%; with significant difference between adolescents, adults, and elderly patients (OS rate of 90%, 84%, and 62%, respectively). Full treatment could be applied in 86% of the patients. The most important prognostic factors were International Prognostic Index (IPI) score (0-2 vs 3-5; P = .0005), age-adjusted IPI score (0-1 vs 2-3; P = .0001), and gender (male vs female; P = .004). The high cure rate in this prospective trial with a substantial number of participating hospitals demonstrates the efficacy and feasibility of chemoimmunotherapy, even in elderly patients. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00199082. PMID:25359988

  7. Detection of Epstein-Barr virus in children and adolescents with Burkitt's lymphoma by in situ hybridization using tissue microarrays.

    PubMed

    Pizza, Maria; Bruniera, Paula; Luporini, Silvia Maria; Marcelino da Silva, Helena Reis; Borsato, Maria Luisa; de Castro, Helaine Cristina; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Paes, Roberto Antoônio Pinto

    2008-04-01

    In this retrospective study, we evaluated 53 patients diagnosed with Burkitt's lymphoma (BL). Patients were admitted to the Pediatric Department of Santa Casa de São Paulo, Brazil from August 1988 to September 2006. The male gender was found more frequently in the proportion of three males to one female. At the time of the diagnosis, the mean age was 6 years. The most frequent clinical presentation was abdominal (extra nodal) in 42 (79.2%) cases. The patients were treated with chemotherapy using two different treatment methods, 30 cases until September 1994 with BGLTI -87 and the other 23 until September of 2006 with BGLTI -96. According to Murphy's classification, 90.2% of the patients were diagnosed as stages III and VI showing an advanced disease at time of diagnosis. Using Tissue Microarrays (TMA); we searched for the expression of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) RNA in 50 patients. The presence of EBV using in situ hybridization was found in 33/50 (66%) and there was no association between the presence of the virus in the tumor cells or patient age, as well as the survival rate. There was 74.5% global survival rate until September, 2005 of 12 years and 8 months. The disease free survival rate was 86.5%. The frequency of the EBV association with this neoplasia in Brazil is intermediate between the endemic and sporadic forms of disease.

  8. Hematogones With Lambda Light Chain Restriction in a 4-Year-Old Boy With Burkitt Lymphoma: A Potential Diagnostic Pitfall

    PubMed Central

    Guillory, Tesha; Li, Shiyong; Bergsagel, Daniel J.; Weinzierl, Elizabeth; Bunting, Silvia T.

    2016-01-01

    Hematogones are immature normal B cell precursors with a characteristic immunophenotype profile on flow cytometry that typically do not express surface immunoglobulin light chains. In this report, we describe a case in which the hematogones exhibit light chain restriction. Our patient was a 4-year-old boy with a complicated medical history involving treatment for a presumed bilateral Wilms tumor of the kidney that on later resection was diagnosed as Burkitt lymphoma. Flow cytometry analysis of his bone marrow revealed a small distinct population of cells expressing dim cluster of differentiation (CD)10, CD19, CD22, CD38, dim CD58, human leukocyte antigen–D related (HLA-DR), and dim CD45, which are characteristic of hematogones. These cells, however, demonstrated dim surface immunoglobulin lambda light-chain restriction. Molecular study results for immunoglobulin heavy and kappa light-chain gene rearrangements were negative. We present this case to raise awareness of the potential pitfalls of working up bone marrow for involvement by B cell lymphoproliferative disorder. PMID:27069035

  9. Combination Chemotherapy, Rituximab, and Ixazomib Citrate in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-19

    Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; MYC Gene Mutation; Plasmablastic Lymphoma

  10. Indole-3-carbinol induces cMYC and IAP-family downmodulation and promotes apoptosis of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive but not of EBV-negative Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Perez-Chacon, Gema; de Los Rios, Cristobal; Zapata, Juan M

    2014-11-01

    Indole-3-carbinol (I3C) is a natural product found in broadly consumed plants of the Brassica genus, such as broccoli, cabbage, and cauliflower, which exhibits anti-tumor effects through poorly defined mechanisms. I3C can be orally administered and clinical trials have demonstrated that I3C and derivatives are safe in humans. In this study we show that I3C efficiently induces apoptosis in cell lines derived from EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphomas (virus latency I/II), while it does not have any cytotoxic activity against EBV-negative Burkitt's lymphomas and immortalized EBV-infected lymphoblastoid cell lines (virus latency III). The effect of I3C in EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphoma is very specific, since only I3C and its C6-methylated derivative, but not other 3-substituted indoles, have an effect on cell viability. I3C treatment caused apoptosis characterized by loss of mitochondria membrane potential and caspase activation. I3C alters the expression of proteins involved in the control of apoptosis and transcription regulation in EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines. Among those, cMYC, cIAP1/2 and XIAP downmodulation at mRNA and protein level precede apoptosis induction, thus suggesting a role in I3C cytotoxicity. We also showed that I3C and, more particularly, its condensation dimer 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM) prolonged survival and reduced tumor burden of mice xenotransplanted with EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphoma Daudi cells. In summary these results, together with previous reports from clinical trials indicating the lack of toxicity in humans of I3C and derivatives, support the use of these compounds as a new therapeutic approach for treating patients with endemic (EBV-positive) Burkitt's lymphoma. PMID:25180456

  11. Endemic Burkitt lymphoma is associated with strength and diversity of Plasmodium falciparum malaria stage-specific antigen antibody response

    PubMed Central

    Aka, Peter; Vila, Maria Candida; Jariwala, Amar; Nkrumah, Francis; Emmanuel, Benjamin; Yagi, Masanori; Palacpac, Nirianne Marie Q.; Periago, Maria V.; Neequaye, Janet; Kiruthu, Christine; Tougan, Takahiro; Levine, Paul H.; Biggar, Robert J.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Bhatia, Kishor; Horii, Toshihiro; Bethony, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Endemic Burkitt lymphoma (eBL) is linked to Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) infection geographically, but evidence from individual-level studies is limited. We investigated this issue among 354 childhood eBL cases and 384 age-, sex-, and location-matched controls enrolled in Ghana from 1965 to 1994. Immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) and immunoglobulin G3 (IgG3) antibodies to antigens diagnostic of recent infection Pf histidine-rich protein-II (HRP-II) and 6NANP, Pf-vaccine candidates SE36 and 42-kDa region of the 3D7 Pf merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1), and tetanus toxoid were measured by indirect enzyme-linked immunoassay. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for association with eBL were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. After adjustments, eBL was positively associated with HRP-IIIgG3 seropositivity (adjusted OR: 1.60; 95% CI 1.08-2.36) and inversely associated with SE36IgG1 seropositivity (adjusted OR: 0.37; 95% CI 0.21-0.64) and with tetanus toxoidIgG3 levels equal or higher than the mean (adjusted OR: 0.46; 95% CI 0.32-0.66). Anti–MSP-1IgG3 and anti-6NANPIgG3 were indeterminate. eBL risk was potentially 21 times higher (95% CI 5.8-74) in HRP-IIIgG3–seropositive and SE36IgG1-seronegative responders compared with HRP-IIIgG3–seronegative and SE36IgG1-seropositive responders. Our results suggest that recent malaria may be associated with risk of eBL but long-term infection may be protective. PMID:23645841

  12. Endemic Burkitt lymphoma is associated with strength and diversity of Plasmodium falciparum malaria stage-specific antigen antibody response.

    PubMed

    Aka, Peter; Vila, Maria Candida; Jariwala, Amar; Nkrumah, Francis; Emmanuel, Benjamin; Yagi, Masanori; Palacpac, Nirianne Marie Q; Periago, Maria V; Neequaye, Janet; Kiruthu, Christine; Tougan, Takahiro; Levine, Paul H; Biggar, Robert J; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Bhatia, Kishor; Horii, Toshihiro; Bethony, Jeffrey M; Mbulaiteye, Sam M

    2013-08-01

    Endemic Burkitt lymphoma (eBL) is linked to Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) infection geographically, but evidence from individual-level studies is limited. We investigated this issue among 354 childhood eBL cases and 384 age-, sex-, and location-matched controls enrolled in Ghana from 1965 to 1994. Immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) and immunoglobulin G3 (IgG3) antibodies to antigens diagnostic of recent infection Pf histidine-rich protein-II (HRP-II) and 6NANP, Pf-vaccine candidates SE36 and 42-kDa region of the 3D7 Pf merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1), and tetanus toxoid were measured by indirect enzyme-linked immunoassay. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for association with eBL were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. After adjustments, eBL was positively associated with HRP-IIIgG3 seropositivity (adjusted OR: 1.60; 95% CI 1.08-2.36) and inversely associated with SE36IgG1 seropositivity (adjusted OR: 0.37; 95% CI 0.21-0.64) and with tetanus toxoidIgG3 levels equal or higher than the mean (adjusted OR: 0.46; 95% CI 0.32-0.66). Anti-MSP-1IgG3 and anti-6NANPIgG3 were indeterminate. eBL risk was potentially 21 times higher (95% CI 5.8-74) in HRP-IIIgG3-seropositive and SE36IgG1-seronegative responders compared with HRP-IIIgG3-seronegative and SE36IgG1-seropositive responders. Our results suggest that recent malaria may be associated with risk of eBL but long-term infection may be protective. PMID:23645841

  13. Factors influencing survival among Kenyan children diagnosed with endemic Burkitt lymphoma between 2003 and 2011: A historical cohort study.

    PubMed

    Buckle, Geoffrey; Maranda, Louise; Skiles, Jodi; Ong'echa, John Michael; Foley, Joslyn; Epstein, Mara; Vik, Terry A; Schroeder, Andrew; Lemberger, Jennifer; Rosmarin, Alan; Remick, Scot C; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Vulule, John; Otieno, Juliana A; Moormann, Ann M

    2016-09-15

    Discovering how to improve survival and establishing clinical reference points for children diagnosed with endemic Burkitt lymphoma (eBL) in resource-constrained settings has recaptured international attention. Using multivariate analyses, we evaluated 428 children with eBL in Kenya for age, gender, tumor stage, nutritional status, hemoglobin, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Plasmodium falciparum prior to induction of chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, methotrexate and doxorubicin) to identify predictive and prognostic biomarkers of survival. During this 10 year prospective study period, 22% died in-hospital and 78% completed six-courses of chemotherapy. Of those, 16% relapsed or died later; 31% achieved event-free-survival; and 31% were lost to follow-up; the overall one-year survival was 45%. After adjusting for covariates, low hemoglobin (<8 g/dL) and high LDH (>400 mU/ml) were associated with increased risk of death (adjusted Hazard Ratio (aHR) = 1.57 [0.97-2.41]) and aHR = 1.84, [0.91-3.69], respectively). Anemic children with malaria were 3.55 times more likely to die [1.10-11.44] compared to patients without anemia or malarial infection. EBV load did not differ by tumor stage nor was it associated with survival. System-level factors can also contribute to poor outcomes. Children were more likely to die when inadvertently overdosed by more than 115% of the correct dose of cyclophosphamide (a HR = 1.43 [0.84-2.43]) or doxorubicin (a HR = 1.25, [0.66-2.35]), compared with those receiving accurate doses of the respective agent in this setting. This study codifies risk factors associated with poor outcomes for eBL patients in Africa and provides a benchmark by which to assess improvements in survival for new chemotherapeutic approaches.

  14. AMC 048: modified CODOX-M/IVAC-rituximab is safe and effective for HIV-associated Burkitt lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Noy, Ariela; Lee, Jeannette Y; Cesarman, Ethel; Ambinder, Richard; Baiocchi, Robert; Reid, Erin; Ratner, Lee; Wagner-Johnston, Nina; Kaplan, Lawrence

    2015-07-01

    The toxicity of dose-intensive regimens used for Burkitt lymphoma prompted modification of cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, high-dose methotrexate/ifosfamide, etoposide, and high-dose cytarabine (CODOX-M/IVAC) for HIV-positive patients. We added rituximab, reduced and/or rescheduled cyclophosphamide and methotrexate, capped vincristine, and used combination intrathecal chemotherapy. Antibiotic prophylaxis and growth factor support were required; highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was discretionary. Thirteen AIDS Malignancy Consortium centers enrolled 34 patients from 2007 to 2010. Median age was 42 years (range, 19-55 years), 32 of 34 patients were high risk, 74% had stage III to IV BL and CD4 count of 195 cells per μL (range, 0-721 cells per μL), and 5 patients (15%) had CD4 <100 cells per μL. Twenty-six patients were receiving HAART; viral load was <100 copies per mL in 12 patients. Twenty-seven patients had at least one grade 3 to 5 toxicity, including 20 hematologic, 14 infectious, and 6 metabolic. None had grade 3 to 4 mucositis. Five patients did not complete treatments because of adverse events. Eleven patients died, including 1 treatment-related and 8 disease-related deaths. The 1-year progression-free survival was 69% (95% confidence interval [CI], 51%-82%) and overall survival was 72% (95% CI, 53%-84%); 2-year overall survival was 69% (95% CI, 50%-82%). Modifications of the CODOX-M/IVAC regimen resulted in a grade 3 to 4 toxicity rate of 79%, which was lower than that in the parent regimen (100%), without grade 3 to 4 mucositis. Despite a 68% protocol completion rate, the 1-year survival rate compares favorably with 2 studies that excluded HIV-positive patients. This trial was registered at http://clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00392834.

  15. Binding profiles and cytokine-inducing effects of fish rhamnose-binding lectins on Burkitt's lymphoma Raji cells.

    PubMed

    Hosono, Masahiro; Sugawara, Shigeki; Matsuda, Atsushi; Tatsuta, Takeo; Koide, Yasuhiro; Hasan, Imtiaj; Hasan, Imtiaji; Ozeki, Yasuhiro; Nitta, Kazuo

    2014-10-01

    Rhamnose-binding lectin (RBL) is one of the animal lectin categories which take part in the innate immune responses of fish. Osmerus lanceolatus lectin (OLL) from shishamo smelt eggs is an RBL composed of two tandem-repeated domains, both of which are considered to be a carbohydrate-recognition domain. SAL, catfish (Silurus asotus) egg RBL composed of three domains, binds to Burkitt's lymphoma Raji cells through globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) carbohydrate chain and to reduce cell size and growth by altering membrane composition without causing cell death. In this experiment, we tried to compare the binding effects of these two RBLs on Raji cells. Flow cytometric and fluorescence microscopic analyses revealed that OLL also directly bound to and shrunk Raji cells with ten times less reactivity than SAL but reduced cell growth with decreasing cell viability. Anti-Gb3 antibody completely blocked the binding of SAL to Raji cells but not that of OLL. In addition, the direct bindings of OLL and SAL to Raji cells were comparably inhibited by melibiose, but lactose was more effective inhibitor for the binding of OLL than that of SAL. These results suggest that OLL has slightly different cell-binding property compared with SAL and binds not only to Gb3 but also to the other carbohydrate receptor-bearing β-galactoside chains. The quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that SAL induced the expression of TNF-α but not of IFN-γ, IL-1β, and IL-10. Thus, SAL-induced cytostatic effect on Raji cells might be partially caused by TNF-α-mediated signaling pathway. PMID:24861899

  16. Medical Management of Pediatric Malignant Bowel Obstruction in a Patient with Burkitt's Lymphoma and Ataxia Telangiectasia Using Continuous Ambulatory Drug Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, Arunangshu; Salins, Naveen; Damani, Anuja; Deodhar, Jayita; Muckaden, M A

    2016-01-01

    Malignant bowel obstruction (MBO) is commonly seen in patients with advanced abdominal cancers. The incidence of pediatric MBO in a patient with Burkitt's lymphoma and ataxia telangiectasia is rare, with no published case reports till now. Conservative management of inoperable MBO results in relief of symptoms and improves quality of life. An 11-year-old boy with Burkitt's lymphoma and ataxia telangiectasia was referred to pediatric palliative care with MBO. The objective of this report is to demonstrate conservative management of pediatric MBO using continuous ambulatory drug delivery system. The patient was initiated on continuous ambulatory drug delivery (CADD) system for symptom relief. MBO was reversed with conservative management and the child was discharged on self-collapsible portable elastomeric continuous infusion pump under the supervision of a local family physician. The child remained comfortable at home for 4 weeks until his death. His parents were satisfied with the child's symptom control, quality of life, and were able to care for the child at home. In a resource-limited setting, managing patients at home using elastomeric continuous infusion pumps instead of expensive automated CADD is a practical pharmacoeconomic approach. PMID:26862790

  17. High-Dose Y-90-Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Added to Reduced-Intensity Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Regimen for Relapsed or Refractory Aggressive B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-08

    Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Burkitt Lymphoma; Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Burkitt Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

  18. Safety and Tolerability Study of PCI-32765 in B Cell Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-26

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Diffuse Well-differentiated Lymphocytic Lymphoma; B Cell Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma,; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Diffuse Lymphoma

  19. Deregulation of DNMT1, DNMT3B and miR-29s in Burkitt lymphoma suggests novel contribution for disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Robaina, Marcela C; Mazzoccoli, Luciano; Arruda, Viviane Oliveira; Reis, Flaviana Ruade de Souza; Apa, Alexandre Gustavo; de Rezende, Lidia Maria Magalhães; Klumb, Claudete Esteves

    2015-04-01

    Methylation of CpG islands in promoter gene regions is frequently observed in lymphomas. DNA methylation is established by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). DNMT1 maintains methylation patterns, while DNMT3A and DNMT3B are critical for de novo DNA methylation. Little is known about the expression of DNMTs in lymphomas. DNMT3A and 3B genes can be regulated post-transcriptionally by miR-29 family. Here, we demonstrated for the first time the overexpression of DNMT1 and DNMT3B in Burkitt lymphoma (BL) tumor samples (69% and 86%, respectively). Specifically, the treatment of two BL cell lines with the DNMT inhibitor 5-aza-dC decreased DNMT1 and DNMT3B protein levels and inhibited cell growth. Additionally, miR-29a, miR-29b and miR-29c levels were significantly decreased in the BL tumor samples. Besides, the ectopic expression of miR-29a, miR-29b and miR-29c reduced the DNMT3B expression and miR-29a and miR-29b lead to increase of p16(INK4a) mRNA expression. Altogether, our data suggest that deregulation of DNMT1, DNMT3B and miR29 may be involved in BL pathogenesis. PMID:25746661

  20. Efficacy and toxicity of a rituximab and methotrexate based regimen (GMALL B-ALL/NHL 2002 protocol) in Burkitt's and primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Pohlen, Michele; Gerth, Hans U; Liersch, Ruediger; Koschmieder, Steffen; Mesters, Rolf M; Kessler, Torsten; Appelmann, Iris; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Berdel, Wolfgang E

    2011-12-01

    There have been several attempts to improve treatment and outcome of patients with primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) and Burkitt's lymphoma (BL). In recent years, chemotherapy dose intensification and the addition of rituximab have led to a remarkable progress and have developed into integral parts of treatment for both entities of lymphoma [1–4]. Here, we report our monocenter results of a high-dose methotrexate based alternating regimen with rituximab (B-ALL/NHL 2002 protocol) in 15 patients with PMBL and 28 patients with sporadic BL. Since the early 1980s, protocols of GMALL have been continuously adapted and in the meantime they have become reference treatment for BL and B-ALL in Germany. The latest changes comprised the additional use of rituximab, standardized G-CSF support,implementation of high-dose cytarabine, intrathecal triple therapy,and age-adjusted stratification. Furthermore, we additionally amended supportive care with palifermin as it reduced severity and prevalence of mucositis [5]. PMID:21898532

  1. An Extremely Rare Intersection: Neurolymphomatosis in a Patient with Burkitt Lymphoma Detected by 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Oner, Ali Ozan; Okuyucu, Kursat; Alagoz, Engin; Battal, Bilal; Arslan, Nuri

    2016-01-01

    Neurolymphomatosis (NL) is a rarely seen neurologic involvement of the systematic lymphoma. Its diagnosis is challenging, and requires biopsy. In cases where biopsy is not appropriate, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) may aid in diagnosis. Here, we present a 54-year old male patient diagnosed with Burkitt lymphoma who underwent FDG-PET/CT in order to evaluate the treatment response after chemotherapy and radiotherapy. On viewing PET/CT images of the patient who complained of pain and weakness in his upper extremities after therapy, linear FDG uptake was observed in bilateral cervical 5 (C5), left cervical 6 (C6), bilateral cervical 7 (C7), and right lumbar 4 (L4) nerve roots. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed dilation and thickening of nerve roots consisted with FDG uptake observed on PET/CT images. Since biopsy was not performed, histopathological diagnosis could not be established. However, overlapping of clinical, PET/CT, and MRI findings strongly suggested the presence of NL. As is the case of this patient, in cases with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, a combined evaluation of FDG-PET/CT and MRI modalities aid in the establishment of the diagnosis of NL. PMID:27651745

  2. An Extremely Rare Intersection: Neurolymphomatosis in a Patient with Burkitt Lymphoma Detected by 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Oner, Ali Ozan; Okuyucu, Kursat; Alagoz, Engin; Battal, Bilal; Arslan, Nuri

    2016-09-01

    Neurolymphomatosis (NL) is a rarely seen neurologic involvement of the systematic lymphoma. Its diagnosis is challenging, and requires biopsy. In cases where biopsy is not appropriate, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) may aid in diagnosis. Here, we present a 54-year old male patient diagnosed with Burkitt lymphoma who underwent FDG-PET/CT in order to evaluate the treatment response after chemotherapy and radiotherapy. On viewing PET/CT images of the patient who complained of pain and weakness in his upper extremities after therapy, linear FDG uptake was observed in bilateral cervical 5 (C5), left cervical 6 (C6), bilateral cervical 7 (C7), and right lumbar 4 (L4) nerve roots. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed dilation and thickening of nerve roots consisted with FDG uptake observed on PET/CT images. Since biopsy was not performed, histopathological diagnosis could not be established. However, overlapping of clinical, PET/CT, and MRI findings strongly suggested the presence of NL. As is the case of this patient, in cases with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, a combined evaluation of FDG-PET/CT and MRI modalities aid in the establishment of the diagnosis of NL. PMID:27651745

  3. Protein kinase CK2 is widely expressed in follicular, Burkitt and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas and propels malignant B-cell growth.

    PubMed

    Pizzi, Marco; Piazza, Francesco; Agostinelli, Claudio; Fuligni, Fabio; Benvenuti, Pietro; Mandato, Elisa; Casellato, Alessandro; Rugge, Massimo; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Pileri, Stefano A

    2015-03-30

    Serine-threonine kinase CK2 is highly expressed and pivotal for survival and proliferation in multiple myeloma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and mantle cell lymphoma. Here, we investigated the expression of α catalytic and β regulatory CK2 subunits by immunohistochemistry in 57 follicular (FL), 18 Burkitt (BL), 52 diffuse large B-cell (DLBCL) non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) and in normal reactive follicles. In silico evaluation of available Gene Expression Profile (GEP) data sets from patients and Western blot (WB) analysis in NHL cell-lines were also performed. Moreover, the novel, clinical-grade, ATP-competitive CK2-inhibitor CX-4945 (Silmitasertib) was assayed on lymphoma cells. CK2 was detected in 98.4% of cases with a trend towards a stronger CK2α immunostain in BL compared to FL and DLBCL. No significant differences were observed between Germinal Center B (GCB) and non-GCB DLBCL types. GEP data and WB confirmed elevated CK2 mRNA and protein levels as well as active phosphorylation of specific targets in NHL cells. CX-4945 caused a dose-dependent growth-arresting effect on GCB, non-GCB DLBCL and BL cell-lines and it efficiently shut off phosphorylation of NF-κB RelA and CDC37 on CK2 target sites. Thus, CK2 is highly expressed and could represent a suitable therapeutic target in BL, FL and DLBCL NHL.

  4. An Extremely Rare Intersection: Neurolymphomatosis in a Patient with Burkitt Lymphoma Detected by 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Oner, Ali Ozan; Okuyucu, Kursat; Alagoz, Engin; Battal, Bilal; Arslan, Nuri

    2016-01-01

    Neurolymphomatosis (NL) is a rarely seen neurologic involvement of the systematic lymphoma. Its diagnosis is challenging, and requires biopsy. In cases where biopsy is not appropriate, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) may aid in diagnosis. Here, we present a 54-year old male patient diagnosed with Burkitt lymphoma who underwent FDG-PET/CT in order to evaluate the treatment response after chemotherapy and radiotherapy. On viewing PET/CT images of the patient who complained of pain and weakness in his upper extremities after therapy, linear FDG uptake was observed in bilateral cervical 5 (C5), left cervical 6 (C6), bilateral cervical 7 (C7), and right lumbar 4 (L4) nerve roots. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed dilation and thickening of nerve roots consisted with FDG uptake observed on PET/CT images. Since biopsy was not performed, histopathological diagnosis could not be established. However, overlapping of clinical, PET/CT, and MRI findings strongly suggested the presence of NL. As is the case of this patient, in cases with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, a combined evaluation of FDG-PET/CT and MRI modalities aid in the establishment of the diagnosis of NL.

  5. Improved efficacy using rituximab and brief duration, high intensity chemotherapy with filgrastim support for Burkitt or aggressive lymphomas: Cancer and Leukemia Group B study 10002

    PubMed Central

    Rizzieri, David A.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Byrd, John C.; Lozanski, Gerard; Blum, Kristie A.; Powell, Bayard L.; Shea, Thomas C.; Nattam, Sreenivasa; Hoke, Eva; Cheson, Bruce D.; Larson, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary To improve long-term outcomes for Burkitt leukaemia/lymphoma (BL) or aggressive lymphomas in adults, we assessed the benefit of adding rituximab and filgrastim support to a dose-dense modified chemotherapy regimen from the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 9251 trial. One hundred and five patients (aged 19–79 years) were enrolled; 27% were >60 years old; 47% had high or high-intermediate risk by International Prognostic Index (IPI) criteria. Common severe toxicities included stomatitis/upper gastrointestinal toxicity (69%), renal insufficiency (10%), neurological events (25%) and pulmonary events (18%). Seven died from treatment-related causes (1 central nervous system bleed, 4 infections, 2 respiratory failure); 5 were > 60 years old. Results in this adult population are encouraging as complete response (CR) was observed in 83% and 4-year event-free (EFS) and overall survivals (OS) were 74% and 78%, respectively. Results compare favourably to our prior chemotherapy alone study (CALGB 9251) but despite this, high-risk patients still had worse outcomes. In conclusion, short duration, intensive chemo-immunotherapy is feasible and should be considered in adults with BL as it results in high remission rates and durable remissions. PMID:24428673

  6. Study of Alisertib (MLN8237) in Adults With Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-15

    Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; Precursor B-lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; T-cell Lymphoma, Excluding Primary Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma; Transformed Follicular Lymphoma With ≥ 50% Diffuse Large Cell Component

  7. MINCR is a MYC-induced lncRNA able to modulate MYC’s transcriptional network in Burkitt lymphoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Doose, Gero; Haake, Andrea; Bernhart, Stephan H.; López, Cristina; Duggimpudi, Sujitha; Wojciech, Franziska; Bergmann, Anke K.; Borkhardt, Arndt; Burkhardt, Birgit; Claviez, Alexander; Dimitrova, Lora; Haas, Siegfried; Hoell, Jessica I.; Hummel, Michael; Karsch, Dennis; Klapper, Wolfram; Kleo, Karsten; Kretzmer, Helene; Kreuz, Markus; Küppers, Ralf; Lawerenz, Chris; Lenze, Dido; Loeffler, Markus; Mantovani-Löffler, Luisa; Möller, Peter; Ott, German; Richter, Julia; Rohde, Marius; Rosenstiel, Philip; Rosenwald, Andreas; Schilhabel, Markus; Schneider, Markus; Scholz, Ingrid; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; Szczepanowski, Monika; Trümper, Lorenz; Weniger, Marc A.; Hoffmann, Steve; Siebert, Reiner; Iaccarino, Ingram

    2015-01-01

    Despite the established role of the transcription factor MYC in cancer, little is known about the impact of a new class of transcriptional regulators, the long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), on MYC ability to influence the cellular transcriptome. Here, we have intersected RNA-sequencing data from two MYC-inducible cell lines and a cohort of 91 B-cell lymphomas with or without genetic variants resulting in MYC overexpression. We identified 13 lncRNAs differentially expressed in IG-MYC-positive Burkitt lymphoma and regulated in the same direction by MYC in the model cell lines. Among them, we focused on a lncRNA that we named MYC-induced long noncoding RNA (MINCR), showing a strong correlation with MYC expression in MYC-positive lymphomas. To understand its cellular role, we performed RNAi and found that MINCR knockdown is associated with an impairment in cell cycle progression. Differential gene expression analysis after RNAi showed a significant enrichment of cell cycle genes among the genes down-regulated after MINCR knockdown. Interestingly, these genes are enriched in MYC binding sites in their promoters, suggesting that MINCR acts as a modulator of the MYC transcriptional program. Accordingly, MINCR knockdown was associated with a reduction in MYC binding to the promoters of selected cell cycle genes. Finally, we show that down-regulation of Aurora kinases A and B and chromatin licensing and DNA replication factor 1 may explain the reduction in cellular proliferation observed on MINCR knockdown. We, therefore, suggest that MINCR is a newly identified player in the MYC transcriptional network able to control the expression of cell cycle genes. PMID:26351698

  8. Lenalidomide and Blinatumomab in Treating Patients With Relapsed Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-10

    B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; Mediastinal Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  9. Hybridization of a myeloid leukemia-derived human cell line (K562) with a human Burkitt's lymphoma line (P3HR-1).

    PubMed

    Klein, G; Zeuthen, J; Eriksson, I; Terasaki, P; Bernoco, M; Rosén, A; Masucci, G; Povey, S; Ber, R

    1980-04-01

    The myeloid leukemia-derived Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-negative human lymphoid cell line K562 was successfully hybridized with the EBV-carrying Burkitt's lymphoma line P3HR-1. Authenticity of the hybrid PUTKO-1 was established by chromosome and isoenzyme studies. A virtually complete hybrid PUTKO-1 carried the EBV genome derived from the lymphoma parent. It averaged 26 EBV DNA copies per cell and was 100% positive for Epstein-Barr virus-associated nuclear antigen (EBNA). In most respects, the hybrid resembled the K562 parent: It had a high Fc receptor concentration, high sensitivity to natural killer cells, absence of EBV C3 receptors, and deficiency of membrane-associated beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2M) and HLA, in parallel with intracellular synthesis and secretion of beta 2M to the medium. Unlike the P3HR-1 parent, the hybrid was completely nonpermissive for antigens of the EBV cycle, early antigen, and viral capsid antigen. None of the 3 inducing agents, 5-lodo-2'-deoxyuridine, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol 13-acetate, or sodium butyrate, caused any viral antigen synthesis in PUTKO-1 in contrast to the good inducibility of the parental P3HR-1 subline. Thus the myeloid parent restricted expression of EBV antigens except EBNA. This exception further supports the concept that EBNA is an autonomous function of the viral genome, independent of host cell control that regulates expression of antigens related to the viral cycle. On the contrary, extinction of viral antigens in this hybrid between 2 cell lineages supports our previous concept that the ability to produce viral antigens is similar to a differentiated B-cell property.

  10. Prognostic Value and Clinical Impact of 18FDG-PET in the Management of Children with Burkitt Lymphoma after Induction Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bailly, Clément; Eugène, Thomas; Couec, Marie-Laure; Strullu, Marion; Frampas, Eric; Campion, Loïc; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Bodet-Milin, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is a rare and aggressive form of B-cell lymphoma that is curable using intensive chemotherapy. Obtaining a complete response (CR) at the end of induction chemotherapy is a major prognostic factor. This study retrospectively evaluates the potential impact of 18FDG-PET in the management of children with BL after induction chemotherapy, and the prognostic performance of the Deauville criteria. Methods: Nineteen children with BL treated according to the French LMB2001 protocol between 2005 and 2012 were included. 18FDG-PET and conventional imaging (CI) were performed after induction chemotherapy to confirm CR. 18FDG-PET was interpreted according to Deauville criteria with follow-up and/or histology as the gold standard. Results: 18FDG-PET was negative in 15 cases, in agreement with CI in 9/15 cases. The six discordant cases confirmed to be negative by histology, were considered as true negative for 18FDG-PET. Negative predictive value (NPV) of CI and 18FDG-PET were 73 and 93%, respectively. The 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) was significantly higher in patients with negative 18FDG-PET than those with positive 18FDG-PET (p = 0.011). Conclusion: 18FDG-PET interpreted using Deauville criteria can help confirm CR at the end of induction chemotherapy, with a prognostic impact on 5-year PFS. Its high NPV could limit the use of residual mass biopsy. Given the small size of our population, these results need to be confirmed by future prospective studies on a larger population. PMID:25593926

  11. OSU-DY7, a novel D-tyrosinol derivative, mediates cytotoxicity in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and Burkitt lymphoma through p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Li-Yuan; Ma, Yihui; Kulp, Samuel K.; Wang, Shu-Huei; Chiu, Chang-Fang; Frissora, Frank; Mani, Rajeswaran; Mo, Xiaokui; Jarjoura, David; Byrd, John C.; Chen, Ching-Shih; Muthusamy, Natarajan

    2013-01-01

    Summary Drug resistance and associated immune deregulation limit use of current therapies in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), thus warranting alternative therapy development. Herein we demonstrate that OSU-DY7, a novel D-tyrosinol derivative targeting p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), mediates cytotoxicity in lymphocytic cell lines representing CLL (MEC-1), acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (697 cells), Burkitt lymphoma (Raji and Ramos) and primary B cells from CLL patients in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The OSU-DY7-induced cytotoxicity is dependent on caspase activation, as evidenced by induction of caspase-3 activation and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage and rescue of cytotoxicity by Z-VAD-FMK. Interestingly, OSU-DY7-induced cytotoxicity is mediated through activation of p38 MAPK, as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and downstream target protein MAPKAPK2. Pretreatment of B-CLL cells with SB202190, a specific p38 MAPK inhibitor, results in decreased MAPKAPK2 protein level with concomitant rescue of the cells from OSU-DY7-mediated cytotoxicity. Furthermore, OSU-DY7-induced cytotoxicity is associated with down regulation of p38 MAPK target BIRC5, that is rescued at protein and mRNA levels by SB202190. This study provides evidence for a role of OSU-DY7 in p38 MAPK activation and BIRC5 down regulation associated with apoptosis in B lymphocytic cells, thus warranting development of this alternative therapy for lymphoid malignancies. PMID:21470196

  12. Treatment of Burkitt lymphoma in equatorial Africa using a simple three-drug combination followed by a salvage regimen for patients with persistent or recurrent disease

    PubMed Central

    Ngoma, T; Adde, M; Durosinmi, M; Githang’a, J; Aken’Ova, Y; Kaijage, J; Adeodou, O; Rajab, J; Brown, BJ; Leoncini, L; Naresh, K; Raphael, M; Hurwitz, N; Scanlan, P; Rohatiner, A; Venzon, D; Magrath, I

    2012-01-01

    Prior to the introduction of the International Network for Cancer Treatment and Research (INCTR) protocol INCTR 03-06, survival of patients with Burkitt lymphoma at 4 tertiary care centres in equatorial Africa was probably no more than 10–20%. The results reported here for 356 patients have demonstrated marked improvement in survival through the use of a uniform treatment protocol consisting of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, vincristine, and intrathecal therapy, and the introduction of non-cross resistant second-line (salvage) therapy, consisting of ifosfamide, mesna, etoposide and cytarabine, when patients failed to achieve a complete response to first-line therapy or relapsed early. Overall survival rates of 67% and 62% were observed at 1 and 2 years (relapse is rare after one year). Of interest was the small impact of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and bone marrow involvement on outcome. However, the presence or absence of abdominal involvement clearly defined two prognostic groups. An additional finding was the association between CSF pleocytosis and orbital tumours, suggesting that spread of tumour cells to the central nervous system may occur via direct involvement of cranial nerves in the orbit. Survival rates may be increased in patients with abdominal involvement by combining first- and second-line therapy, but verification will require a further clinical study. PMID:22844968

  13. Dose-intensive chemotherapy including rituximab is highly effective but toxic in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia: parallel study of 81 patients.

    PubMed

    Xicoy, Blanca; Ribera, Josep-Maria; Müller, Markus; García, Olga; Hoffmann, Christian; Oriol, Albert; Hentrich, Marcus; Grande, Carlos; Wasmuth, Jan-Christian; Esteve, Jordi; van Lunzen, Jan; Del Potro, Eloy; Knechten, Heribert; Brunet, Salut; Mayr, Christoph; Escoda, Lourdes; Schommers, Philipp; Alonso, Natalia; Vall-Llovera, Ferran; Pérez, Montserrat; Morgades, Mireia; González, José; Fernández, Angeles; Thoden, Jan; Gökbuget, Nicola; Hoelzer, Dieter; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Wyen, Christoph

    2014-10-01

    The results of intensive immunochemotherapy were analyzed in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia (BLL) in two cohorts (Spain and Germany). Alternating cycles of chemotherapy were administered, with dose reductions for patients over 55 years. Eighty percent of patients achieved remission, 11% died during induction, 9% failed and 7% died in remission. Four-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) probabilities were 72% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 62-82%) and 71% (95% CI: 61-81%). CD4 T-cell count < 200/μL and bone marrow involvement were associated with poor OS (hazard ratio [HR] 3.2 [1.2-8.3] and HR 2.7 [1.1-6.6]) and PFS (HR 3.5 [1.3-9.1] and HR 2.4 [1-5.7]), bone marrow involvement with poor disease-free survival (DFS) (HR 14.4 [1.7-119.7] and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score > 2 (odds ratio [OR] 11.9 [1.4-99.9]) with induction death. In HIV-related BLL, intensive immunochemotherapy was feasible and effective, but toxic. Prognostic factors were performance status, CD4 T-cell count and bone marrow involvement.

  14. Epstein-Barr virus from Burkitt Lymphoma biopsies from Africa and South America share novel LMP-1 promoter and gene variations

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Haiyan; Li, Tianwei; Li, Bingjie; Tsai, Shien; Biggar, Robert J.; Nkrumah, Francis; Neequaye, Janet; Gutierrez, Marina; Epelman, Sidnei; Mbulaiteye, Sam M.; Bhatia, Kishor; Lo, Shyh-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV) sequence variation is thought to contribute to Burkitt lymphoma (BL), but lack of data from primary BL tumors hampers efforts to test this hypothesis. We directly sequenced EBV from 12 BL biopsies from Ghana, Brazil, and Argentina, aligned the obtained reads to the wild-type (WT) EBV reference sequence, and compared them with 100 published EBV genomes from normal and diseased people from around the world. The 12 BL EBVs were Type 1. Eleven clustered close to each other and to EBV from Raji BL cell line, but away from 12 EBVs reported from other BL-derived cell lines and away from EBV from NPC and healthy people from Asia. We discovered 23 shared novel nucleotide-base changes in the latent membrane protein (LMP)-1 promoter and gene (associated with 9 novel amino acid changes in the LMP-1 protein) of the 11 BL EBVs. Alignment of this region for the 112 EBV genomes revealed four distinct patterns, tentatively termed patterns A to D. The distribution of BL EBVs was 48%, 8%, 24% and 20% for patterns A to D, respectively; the NPC EBV’s were Pattern B, and EBV-WT was pattern D. Further work is needed to investigate the association between EBV LMP-1 patterns with BL. PMID:26593963

  15. Redefining the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded nuclear antigen EBNA-1 gene promoter and transcription initiation site in group I Burkitt lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, B C; Strominger, J L; Speck, S H

    1995-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus-encoded nuclear antigen EBNA-1 gene promoter for the restricted Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latency program operating in group I Burkitt lymphoma (BL) cell lines was previously identified incorrectly. Here we present evidence from RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) cloning, reverse transcription-PCR, and S1 nuclease analyses, which demonstrates that the EBNA-1 gene promoter in group I BL cell lines is located in the viral BamHI Q fragment, immediately upstream of two low-affinity EBNA-1 binding sites. Transcripts initiated from this promoter, referred to as Qp, have the previously reported Q/U/K exon splicing pattern. Qp is active in group I BL cell lines but not in group III BL cell lines or in EBV immortalized B-lymphoblastoid cell lines. In addition, transient transfection of Qp-driven reporter constructs into both an EBV-negative BL cell line and a group I BL cell line gave rise to correctly initiated transcripts. Inspection of Qp revealed that it is a TATA-less promoter whose architecture is similar to the promoters of housekeeping genes, suggesting that Qp may be a default promoter which ensures EBNA-1 expression in cells that cannot run the full viral latency program. Elucidation of the genetic mechanism responsible for the EBNA-1-restricted program of EBV latency is an essential step in understanding control of viral latency in EBV-associated tumors. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7479841

  16. Ascorbic acid kills Epstein-Barr virus positive Burkitt lymphoma cells and Epstein-Barr virus transformed B-cells in vitro, but not in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shatzer, Amber N; Espey, Michael Graham; Chavez, Mayra; Tu, Hongbin; Levine, Mark; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2013-05-01

    Ascorbic acid has been shown to kill various cancer cell lines at pharmacologic concentrations. We found that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive Burkitt lymphoma (BL) cells were more susceptible to ascorbic acid-induced cell killing than EBV-negative BL cells or EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cells (LCLs). Ascorbic acid did not induce apoptosis in any of the tested cells but did induce the production of reactive oxygen species and cell death. Previously, we showed that bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor, induces cell death in LCLs and EBV-positive BL cells. We found that ascorbic acid is strongly antagonistic for bortezomib-induced cell death in LCLs and EBV-positive BL cells. Finally, ascorbic acid did not prolong survival of severe combined immunodefiency mice inoculated with LCLs either intraperitoneally or subcutaneously. Thus, while ascorbic acid was highly effective at killing EBV-positive BL cells and LCLs in vitro, it antagonized cell killing by bortezomib and was ineffective in an animal model.

  17. Plasma homocysteine, methionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine levels following high-dose methotrexate treatment in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or Burkitt lymphoma: association with hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Masaru; Nakata, Rieko; Adachi, Souichi; Watanabe, Ken-Ichiro; Heike, Toshio; Takeshita, Yasufumi; Shima, Midori

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate: (i) changes of plasma homocysteine, methionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine levels following high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) treatment and (ii) the correlation of these sulfur-containing amino acids with MTX-induced hepatotoxicity. Fifteen pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and one patient with Burkitt lymphoma, with a total of 26 treatment courses of HD-MTX, were enrolled. Homocysteine levels increased at 24 h after HD-MTX treatment, and showed marginal decreases at 48 and 72 h. Methionine levels showed a biphasic pattern, i.e. an initial decrease at 24 h followed by increases at 48 and 72 h. S-adenosylhomocysteine exhibited a marginal decrease at 24 h. Changes of homocysteine exhibited significant correlation only with a maximum increase of alanine aminotransferase or total bilirubin from baseline. This study has demonstrated, for the first time, simultaneous changes of plasma homocysteine, methionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine following HD-MTX. The potential of homocysteine as a marker of hepatotoxicity is also presented.

  18. Dose-intensive chemotherapy including rituximab is highly effective but toxic in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia: parallel study of 81 patients.

    PubMed

    Xicoy, Blanca; Ribera, Josep-Maria; Müller, Markus; García, Olga; Hoffmann, Christian; Oriol, Albert; Hentrich, Marcus; Grande, Carlos; Wasmuth, Jan-Christian; Esteve, Jordi; van Lunzen, Jan; Del Potro, Eloy; Knechten, Heribert; Brunet, Salut; Mayr, Christoph; Escoda, Lourdes; Schommers, Philipp; Alonso, Natalia; Vall-Llovera, Ferran; Pérez, Montserrat; Morgades, Mireia; González, José; Fernández, Angeles; Thoden, Jan; Gökbuget, Nicola; Hoelzer, Dieter; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Wyen, Christoph

    2014-10-01

    The results of intensive immunochemotherapy were analyzed in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia (BLL) in two cohorts (Spain and Germany). Alternating cycles of chemotherapy were administered, with dose reductions for patients over 55 years. Eighty percent of patients achieved remission, 11% died during induction, 9% failed and 7% died in remission. Four-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) probabilities were 72% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 62-82%) and 71% (95% CI: 61-81%). CD4 T-cell count < 200/μL and bone marrow involvement were associated with poor OS (hazard ratio [HR] 3.2 [1.2-8.3] and HR 2.7 [1.1-6.6]) and PFS (HR 3.5 [1.3-9.1] and HR 2.4 [1-5.7]), bone marrow involvement with poor disease-free survival (DFS) (HR 14.4 [1.7-119.7] and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score > 2 (odds ratio [OR] 11.9 [1.4-99.9]) with induction death. In HIV-related BLL, intensive immunochemotherapy was feasible and effective, but toxic. Prognostic factors were performance status, CD4 T-cell count and bone marrow involvement. PMID:24397614

  19. Study of ADCT-402 in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Lineage Non Hodgkin Lymphoma (B-NHL)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-04

    Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse; Lymphoma, Follicular; Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell; Lymphoma, Marginal Zone; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  20. Alisertib and Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell or T-Cell Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-25

    Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mature T- and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Burkitt Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Follicular Lymphoma; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  1. Disruption of HLA class II antigen presentation in Burkitt lymphoma: implication of a 47,000 MW acid labile protein in CD4+ T-cell recognition.

    PubMed

    God, Jason M; Zhao, Dan; Cameron, Christine A; Amria, Shereen; Bethard, Jennifer R; Haque, Azizul

    2014-07-01

    While Burkitt lymphoma (BL) has a well-known defect in HLA class I-mediated antigen presentation, the exact role of BL-associated HLA class II in generating a poor CD4(+) T-cell response remains unresolved. Here, we found that BL cells are deficient in their ability to optimally stimulate CD4(+) T cells via the HLA class II pathway. This defect in CD4(+) T-cell recognition was not associated with low levels of co-stimulatory molecules on BL cells, as addition of external co-stimulation failed to elicit CD4(+) T-cell activation by BL. Further, the defect was not caused by faulty antigen/class II interaction, because antigenic peptides bound with measurable affinity to BL-associated class II molecules. Interestingly, functional class II-peptide complexes were formed at acidic pH 5·5, which restored immune recognition. Acidic buffer (pH 5·5) eluate from BL cells contained molecules that impaired class II-mediated antigen presentation and CD4(+) T-cell recognition. Biochemical analysis showed that these molecules were greater than 30,000 molecular weight in size, and proteinaceous in nature. In addition, BL was found to have decreased expression of a 47,000 molecular weight enolase-like molecule that enhances class II-mediated antigen presentation in B cells, macrophages and dendritic cells, but not in BL cells. These findings demonstrate that BL likely has multiple defects in HLA class II-mediated antigen presentation and immune recognition, which may be exploited for future immunotherapies.

  2. Reversion of apoptotic resistance of TP53-mutated Burkitt lymphoma B-cells to spindle poisons by exogenous activation of JNK and p38 MAP kinases

    PubMed Central

    Farhat, M; Poissonnier, A; Hamze, A; Ouk-Martin, C; Brion, J-D; Alami, M; Feuillard, J; Jayat-Vignoles, C

    2014-01-01

    Defects in apoptosis are frequently the cause of cancer emergence, as well as cellular resistance to chemotherapy. These phenotypes may be due to mutations of the tumor suppressor TP53 gene. In this study, we examined the effect of various mitotic spindle poisons, including the new isocombretastatin derivative isoNH2CA-4 (a tubulin-destabilizing molecule, considered to bind to the colchicine site by analogy with combretastatin A-4), on BL (Burkitt lymphoma) cells. We found that resistance to spindle poison-induced apoptosis could be reverted in tumor protein p53 (TP53)-mutated cells by EBV (Epstein Barr virus) infection. This reversion was due to restoration of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, as assessed by relocation of the pro-apoptotic molecule Bax to mitochondria, loss of mitochondrial integrity and activation of the caspase cascade with PARP (poly ADP ribose polymerase) cleavage. EBV sensitized TP53-mutated BL cells to all spindle poisons tested, including vincristine and taxol, an effect that was systematically downmodulated by pretreatment of cells with inhibitors of p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein kinases. Exogenous activation of p38 and JNK pathways by dihydrosphingosine reverted resistance of TP53-mutated BL cells to spindle poisons. Dihydrosphingosine treatment of TP53-deficient Jurkat and K562 cell lines was also able to induce cell death. We conclude that activation of p38 and JNK pathways may revert resistance of TP53-mutated cells to spindle poisons. This opens new perspectives for developing alternative therapeutic strategies when the TP53 gene is inactivated. PMID:24787013

  3. Factors influencing time to diagnosis and initiation of treatment of endemic Burkitt Lymphoma among children in Uganda and western Kenya: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Survival rates for children diagnosed with Burkitt lymphoma (BL) in Africa are far below those achieved in developed countries. Late stage of presentation contributes to poor prognosis, therefore this study investigated factors leading to delays in BL diagnosis and treatment of children in Uganda and western Kenya. Methods Guardians of children diagnosed with BL were interviewed at the Jaramogi Oginga Odinga Teaching and Referral Hospital (JTRH) and Uganda Cancer Institute (UCI) from Jan-Dec 2010. Information on sociodemographics, knowledge, attitudes, illness perceptions, health-seeking behaviors and prior health encounters was collected using a standardized, pre-tested questionnaire. Results Eighty-two guardians were interviewed (20 JTRH, 62 UCI). Median "total delay" (1st symptoms to BL diagnosis) was 12.1 weeks [interquartile range (IQR) 4.9-19.9] in Kenya and 12.9 weeks (IQR 4.3-25.7) in Uganda. In Kenya, median "guardian delay" (1st symptoms to 1st health encounter) and "health system delay" (1st health encounter to BL diagnosis) were 9.0 weeks (IQR 3.6-15.7) and 2.0 weeks (IQR 1.6-5.8), respectively. Data on guardian and health system delay in Uganda were only available for those with < 4 prior health encounters (n = 26). Of these, median guardian delay was 4.3 weeks (range 0.7-149.9), health system delay 2.6 weeks (range 0.1-16.0), and total delay 10.7 weeks (range 1.7-154.3). Guardians in Uganda reported more health encounters than those in Kenya (median 5, range 3–16 vs. median 3, range 2–6). Among Kenyan guardians, source of income was the only independent predictor of delay, whereas in Uganda, guardian delay was influenced by guardians’ beliefs on the curability of cancer, health system delay, by guardians’ perceptions of cancer as a contagious disease, and total delay, by the number of children in the household and guardians’ role as caretaker. Qualitative findings suggest financial costs, transportation, and other

  4. Gene Therapy and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With AIDS-Related Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-29

    AIDS-Related Burkitt Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Plasmablastic Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Primary Effusion Lymphoma; HIV Infection; AIDS Related Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  5. Study of ADCT-301 in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-11

    Hodgkin Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse; Lymphoma, Follicular; Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell; Lymphoma, Marginal Zone; Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinaemia; Lymphoma,T-cell Cutaneous; Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral

  6. Gene Therapy in Treating Patients With Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Related Lymphoma Receiving Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-08

    HIV Infection; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Plasmablastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  7. A prospective clinicopathologic study of dose-modified CODOX-M/IVAC in patients with sporadic Burkitt lymphoma defined using cytogenetic and immunophenotypic criteria (MRC/NCRI LY10 trial).

    PubMed

    Mead, Graham M; Barrans, Sharon L; Qian, Wendi; Walewski, Jan; Radford, John A; Wolf, Max; Clawson, Simon M; Stenning, Sally P; Yule, Claire L; Jack, Andrew S

    2008-09-15

    This prospective study aimed to develop reproducible diagnostic criteria for sporadic Burkitt lymphoma (BL), applicable to routine practice, and to evaluate the efficacy of dose-modified (dm) CODOX-M/IVAC in patients diagnosed using these criteria. The study was open to patients with an aggressive B-cell lymphoma with an MKI67 fraction approaching 100%. Immunophenotype and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were used to separate BL from other aggressive B-cell lymphomas. BL was characterized by the presence of a cMYC rearrangement as a sole cytogenetic abnormality occurring in patients with a germinal center phenotype with absence of BCL-2 expression and abnormal TP53 expression. A total of 128 patients were eligible for the study, of whom 58 were considered to have BL and 70 to have diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). There were 110 clinically fit patients who received dmCODOX-M (methotrexate, dose 3 g/m(2)) with or without IVAC according to risk group. The 2-year progression-free survival was 64% (95% confidence interval [CI] 51%-77%) for BL, 55% (95% CI 42%-66%) for DLBCL, 85% (95% CI 73%-97%) for low risk, and 49% (95% CI 38%-60%) for high-risk patients. The observed differences in outcome and other clinical features validate the proposed diagnostic criteria. Compared with the previous trial LY06 with full-dose methotrexate (6.7 g/m(2)), there was a reduction in toxicity with comparable outcomes. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00040690.

  8. Alisertib With and Without Rituximab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-15

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  9. Pomalidomide and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma or Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed or Refractory Intraocular Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; Central Nervous System Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Primary Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma of the Central Nervous System; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Retinal Lymphoma

  10. Histone deacetylase inhibitor prevents cell growth in Burkitt's lymphoma by regulating PI3K/Akt pathways and leads to upregulation of miR-143, miR-145, and miR-101.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana Carolina dos Santos; Robaina, Marcela Cristina; Rezende, Lídia Maria Magalhães de; Severino, Patricia; Klumb, Claudete Esteves

    2014-06-01

    Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is an aggressive B-cell lymphoma more common in children comprising one third of pediatric non-Hodgkin lymphoma cases. The recent discovery in BL pathogenesis highlighted the activation of PI3K pathway in cooperation with Myc in the development of BL. In this study, we demonstrated that PI3K/Akt pathway is a target to histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) in BL cells. The combination of HDACi (sodium butyrate, NaB) and chemotherapy (VP-16) inhibited 51 % of the proliferation and enhanced the blockage of the cell cycle progression at G2/M with a concurrent decrease in the S phase. Microarray profiling showed a synergistic action of NaB/VP-16 combination through the differential regulation of 1,413 genes. Comparing VP-16 treatment with the NaB/VP-16 combination, 318 genes were deregulated: 250 genes were downregulated, and 68 were upregulated when compared with untreated cells. Among these genes, six (CDKN1A, CCND1, FAS, CHEK2, MDM4, and SESN2) belong to the p53-signaling pathway. The activation of this signaling pathway is usually induced by stress signals and ultimately leads to cell cycle arrest. Besides, the inhibition of the cell growth was related to reduced Akt phosphorylation, and decrease of c-Myc protein expression by about 60 % (p ≤ 0.005). Moreover, HDACi enhanced miR-101, miR-143, and miR-145 levels in BL cell line, which were inversely associated with the levels of miR-101, miR-143, and miR-145 found to be extremely downregulated in the sample of BL patients. We highlight the fact that effective combinations of HDACis with other target drugs could improve BL therapy in the future. PMID:24577510

  11. Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    Lymphoma is a cancer of a part of the immune system called the lymph system. There are many types of lymphoma. One type is Hodgkin disease. The rest are called non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas begin when a type of ...

  12. Cellular Immunotherapy Following Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-29

    Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma

  13. Panobinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  14. Cilengitide (EMD 121974) in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2

  15. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Rituximab in Treating Younger Patients With Stage III-IV Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or B-Cell Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-24

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma

  16. Combination of SAHA and bortezomib up-regulates CDKN2A and CDKN1A and induces apoptosis of Epstein-Barr virus-positive Wp-restricted Burkitt lymphoma and lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hui, Kwai Fung; Leung, Yvonne Y; Yeung, Po L; Middeldorp, Jaap M; Chiang, Alan K S

    2014-12-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent proteins exert anti-apoptotic effects on EBV-transformed lymphoid cells by down-regulating BCL2L11 (BIM), CDKN2A (p16(INK4A) ) and CDKN1A (p21(WAF1) ). However, the potential therapeutic effects of targeting these anti-apoptotic mechanisms remain unexplored. Here, we tested both in vitro and in vivo effects of the combination of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and proteasome inhibitors on the apoptosis of six endemic Burkitt lymphoma (BL) lines of different latency patterns (types I and III and Wp-restricted) and three lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). We found that the combination of HDAC and proteasome inhibitors (e.g. SAHA/bortezomib) synergistically induced the killing of Wp-restricted and latency III BL and LCLs but not latency I BL cells. The synergistic killing was due to apoptosis, as evidenced by the high percentage of annexin V positivity and strong cleavage of PARP1 (PARP) and CASP3 (caspase-3). Concomitantly, SAHA/bortezomib up-regulated the expression of CDKN2A and CDKN1A but did not affect the level of BCL2L11 or BHRF1 (viral homologue of BCL2). The apoptotic effects were dependent on reactive oxygen species generation. Furthermore, SAHA/bortezomib suppressed the growth of Wp-restricted BL xenografts in nude mice. This study provides the rationale to test the novel application of SAHA/bortezomib on the treatment of EBV-associated Wp-restricted BL and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

  17. Combination of SAHA and bortezomib up-regulates CDKN2A and CDKN1A and induces apoptosis of Epstein-Barr virus-positive Wp-restricted Burkitt lymphoma and lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hui, Kwai Fung; Leung, Yvonne Y; Yeung, Po L; Middeldorp, Jaap M; Chiang, Alan K S

    2014-12-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent proteins exert anti-apoptotic effects on EBV-transformed lymphoid cells by down-regulating BCL2L11 (BIM), CDKN2A (p16(INK4A) ) and CDKN1A (p21(WAF1) ). However, the potential therapeutic effects of targeting these anti-apoptotic mechanisms remain unexplored. Here, we tested both in vitro and in vivo effects of the combination of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and proteasome inhibitors on the apoptosis of six endemic Burkitt lymphoma (BL) lines of different latency patterns (types I and III and Wp-restricted) and three lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). We found that the combination of HDAC and proteasome inhibitors (e.g. SAHA/bortezomib) synergistically induced the killing of Wp-restricted and latency III BL and LCLs but not latency I BL cells. The synergistic killing was due to apoptosis, as evidenced by the high percentage of annexin V positivity and strong cleavage of PARP1 (PARP) and CASP3 (caspase-3). Concomitantly, SAHA/bortezomib up-regulated the expression of CDKN2A and CDKN1A but did not affect the level of BCL2L11 or BHRF1 (viral homologue of BCL2). The apoptotic effects were dependent on reactive oxygen species generation. Furthermore, SAHA/bortezomib suppressed the growth of Wp-restricted BL xenografts in nude mice. This study provides the rationale to test the novel application of SAHA/bortezomib on the treatment of EBV-associated Wp-restricted BL and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder. PMID:25155625

  18. The cost effectiveness of treating paediatric cancer in low-income and middle-income countries: a case-study approach using acute lymphocytic leukaemia in Brazil and Burkitt lymphoma in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Bhakta, Nickhill; Martiniuk, Alexandra L C; Gupta, Sumit; Howard, Scott C

    2013-02-01

    Approximately 90% of children with cancer reside in low-income and middle-income countries (LMIC) where healthcare resources are scarce and allocation decisions difficult. The cost effectiveness of treating childhood cancers in these settings is unknown. The objective of the present work was to determine cost-effectiveness thresholds for common paediatric cancers using acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in Brazil and Burkitt lymphoma (BL) in Malawi as examples. Disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) prevented by treatment were compared to the gross domestic product (GDP) per capita of each country to define cost-effectiveness thresholds using WHO-CHOICE ('CHOosing Interventions that are Cost-Effective') guidelines. The case examples were selected due to the data available and because ALL and BL both have the potential to yield significant health gains at a low cost per patient treated. The key findings were as follows: the 3:1 cost/DALY prevented to GDP/capita ratio for ALL in Brazil was US $771,225; expenditures below this threshold were cost effective. Costs below US $257,075 (1:1 ratio) were considered very cost effective. Analogous thresholds for BL in Malawi were US $42,729 and US $14,243. Actual costs were far less. In Brazil, US $16,700 was spent to treat each patient while in Malawi total drug costs were less than US $50 per child. In summary, treatment of certain paediatric cancers in LMIC is very cost effective. Future research should evaluate actual treatment and infrastructure expenditures to help guide policymakers.

  19. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors, Multiple Myeloma, or Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma With or Without Impaired Liver or Kidney Function

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-04

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  20. Pediatric Extranodal Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ellen M; Pavio, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Lymphoma is the third most common pediatric neoplasm. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) accounts for nearly half of cases and commonly involves extranodal sites. Compared with adults, this histologic spectrum of pediatric NHL is very narrow and consists of aggressive tumors. Patients typically present with widespread disease. Generally, NHL occurring in children includes Burkitt lymphoma, lymphoblastic lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Staging and assessment of therapeutic response are usually based on FDG-PET/CT. Due to the increased susceptibility of young patients to the effects of ionizing radiation, alternative methods of imaging are being explored.

  1. Oxaliplatin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  2. Everolimus and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  3. Interleukin-2 or Observation Following Radiation Therapy, Combination Chemotherapy, and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Recurrent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-27

    Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

  4. Rituximab, Rasburicase, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed Advanced B-Cell Leukemia or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-10

    Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  5. MORAb-004 in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-07

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  6. 17-DMAG in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenstr

  7. AIDS lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Middleton, G W; Lau, R K

    1992-01-01

    Chronically immunosuppressed individuals are susceptible to lymphoreticular tumors. Up to 15% of patients with congenital deficiencies such as ataxia=telangiectasia may develop malignancies, mainly high-grade B cell non=Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs). AIDS lymphomas are comprised of NHLs including Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) and primary cerebral lymphomas (PCLs). Almost 3% of all AIDS patients (2824 of 97,258 cases) developed NHL. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) as a co-factor in AIDS lymphomagenesis has been studied: in 12 cases of 24 AIDS lymphomas EBV by DNA in situ hybridization was found. In an analysis of 6 primary cerebral lymphomas, .5 were positive for EBV DNA by Southern blotting. In Burkitt's lymphoma the characteristic genetic alteration affects the c-myc oncogene. In 1/3 of BL p53 mutations were found but none in the 43 NHLs suggesting that p53 mutations and c-myc activation act synergistically in the pathogenesis of these tumors. Cytotoxic agents dideoxyinosine, dideoxycytosine, and zidovudine may cause secondary neoplasia. 8 of 55 AIDS patients under zidovudine treatment developed high-grade lymphoma 23.8 months subsequently; recently doses were reduced. PCL was found in 21 of 90 patients. A 5.2 months survival was associated with combined treatment with cyclophosphamide, Oncovin (vincristine), methotrexate, etoposide, and cytosine arabinoside compared with 11.3 months with chemotherapy. Colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) alleviate drug-induced myelotoxicity and zidovudine-induced neutropenia, however, l8 of 11 patients receiving granulocyte-macrophage CSF developed hematological toxicity. Interleukine-2 produced by T-helper cells enhancing tumor cells cytotoxicity has been used in AIDS-associated cryptosporidial diarrhea and in 4 patients with AIDS lymphoma with modest response, but its stimulation of the HIV-infected substrate may increase viral proliferation.

  8. Panobinostat and Everolimus in Treating Patients With Recurrent Multiple Myeloma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  9. FAU in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-06

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell

  10. Lymphoma in acquired generalized lipodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rebecca J; Chan, Jean L; Jaffe, Elaine S; Cochran, Elaine; DePaoli, Alex M; Gautier, Jean-Francois; Goujard, Cecile; Vigouroux, Corinne; Gorden, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Acquired generalized lipodystrophy (AGL) is a rare disease thought to result from autoimmune destruction of adipose tissue. Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) has been reported in two AGL patients. We report five additional cases of lymphoma in AGL, and analyze the role of underlying autoimmunity and recombinant human leptin (metreleptin) replacement in lymphoma development. Three patients developed lymphoma during metreleptin treatment (two PTCL and one ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma), and two developed lymphomas (mycosis fungoides and Burkitt lymphoma) without metreleptin. AGL is associated with high risk for lymphoma, especially PTCL. Autoimmunity likely contributes to this risk. Lymphoma developed with or without metreleptin, suggesting metreleptin does not directly cause lymphoma development; a theoretical role of metreleptin in lymphoma progression remains possible. For most patients with AGL and severe metabolic complications, the proven benefits of metreleptin on metabolic disease will likely outweigh theoretical risks of metreleptin in lymphoma development or progression.

  11. The lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, P; Wood, L

    1996-09-01

    Hodgkin's disease and the malignant lymphomas are, by all available evidence, eminently curable neoplasms. The debates, therefore, on how best the largest numbers of individuals in any community can receive appropriate treatment and this implies their ready access to an experienced multi disciplinary combined clinic. It is important that proper perspective be retained in the African context so that preventive medicine can be employed where appropriate but, based on current understanding, those with lymphoreticular malignancy become immediate beneficiaries of whatever diagnostic and therapeutic resources need to be expended in ensuring optimal outcome. The last word is far from written on how we, as inhabitants of the African continent, will achieve this goal and so measure up to our obligation. However, as resources continue to contract, three observations justify reiteration. Firstly, diagnostic skills need to be honed by experienced pathologists together reviewing all biopsy material and, wherever possible, participating in national or international study groups. Secondly, the silly distinction propagated by some self serving individuals who fantasize that state hospitals and private clinics somehow differ, must be replaced by a more responsible attitude in which resources are pooled in the common quest for maintaining academic standards. Thirdly, given acceptance of the above common sense proposals, a mechanism will exist for the establishment and constant upgrading of national guidelines for management on agreed and achievable protocols. Whilst the theme remains that of tested conventional treatment, flexibility must exist, where appropriate, for palliative care on the one hand with scientific growth and exploration of innovative options on the other. One might conclude by observing that Africa is most certainly unique and this extends to the frequency with which some of these tumours occur; a classical example would be Burkitt's Lymphoma. This places an

  12. Oblimersen and Gemcitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumor or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  13. Combination Chemotherapy and Rituximab in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; L3 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma

  14. Ibrutinib Before and After Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-27

    Activated B-Cell-Like Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

  15. Iodine I 131 Tositumomab, Etoposide and Cyclophosphamide Followed by Autologous Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-04

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  16. CCI-779 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Malignant Neoplasm; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  17. Vorinostat, Rituximab, Ifosfamide, Carboplatin, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Previously Untreated T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-02

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  18. Lenalidomide And Rituximab as Maintenance Therapy in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-25

    Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent

  19. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Lymphoma and Liver Dysfunction

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-21

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage

  20. Genetic Testing Plus Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic

  1. AR-42 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Relapsed Multiple Myeloma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large

  2. Bendamustine Hydrochloride, Etoposide, Dexamethasone, and Filgrastim For Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Mobilization in Treating Patients With Refractory or Recurrent Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-08

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  3. 3-AP and Gemcitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T

  4. Genetically Modified Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With HIV-Associated Non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-06

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; HIV-associated Hodgkin Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage II AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage III AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage IV AIDS-related Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  5. PXD101 and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-01

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin

  6. Lenalidomide as Maintenance Therapy After Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Rituximab and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma That is Resistant to Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-02

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  7. Dose Monitoring of Busulfan and Combination Chemotherapy in Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-12

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult

  8. Yttrium Y 90 Ibritumomab Tiuxetan, Fludarabine, Radiation Therapy, and Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-21

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  9. Lymphomas in sub-Saharan Africa--what can we learn and how can we help in improving diagnosis, managing patients and fostering translational research?

    PubMed

    Naresh, Kikkeri N; Raphael, Martine; Ayers, Leona; Hurwitz, Nina; Calbi, Valeria; Rogena, Emily; Sayed, Shahin; Sherman, Omar; Ibrahim, Hazem A H; Lazzi, Stefano; Mourmouras, Vasileios; Rince, Patricia; Githanga, Jessie; Byakika, Bessie; Moshi, Emma; Durosinmi, Muheez; Olasode, Babatunde J; Oluwasola, Olayiwola A; Akang, Effiong E; Akenòva, Yetunde; Adde, Melissa; Magrath, Ian; Leoncini, Lorenzo

    2011-09-01

    Approximately 30 000 cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) occur in the equatorial belt of Africa each year. Apart from the fact that Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is very common among children and adolescents in Africa and that an epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is currently ongoing in this part of the world, very little is known about lymphomas in Africa. This review provides information regarding the current infrastructure for diagnostics in sub-Saharan Africa. The results on the diagnostic accuracy and on the distribution of different lymphoma subsets in sub-Saharan Africa were based on a review undertaken by a team of lymphoma experts on 159 fine needle aspirate samples and 467 histological samples during their visit to selected sub-Saharan African centres is presented. Among children (<18 years of age), BL accounted for 82% of all NHL, and among adults, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma accounted for 55% of all NHLs. Among adults, various lymphomas other than BL, including T-cell lymphomas, were encountered. The review also discusses the current strategies of the International Network of Cancer Treatment and Research on improving the diagnostic standards and management of lymphoma patients and in acquiring reliable clinical and pathology data in sub-Saharan Africa for fostering high-quality translational research.

  10. Bortezomib and Filgrastim in Promoting Stem Cell Mobilization in Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular

  11. Tanespimycin and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-21

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous

  12. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Hodgkin's or Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-11

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  13. MS-275 and Isotretinoin in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  14. Vorinostat and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  15. Alisertib in Combination With Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma, B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-25

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Lymphomatous Involvement of Non-Cutaneous Extranodal Site; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  16. Vorinostat and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-12-08

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  17. PXD101 and 17-N-Allylamino-17-Demethoxygeldanamycin in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-15

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV

  18. 17-N-Allylamino-17-Demethoxygeldanamycin in Treating Patients With Advanced Epithelial Cancer, Malignant Lymphoma, or Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-06

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Chondrosarcoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Osteosarcoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small

  19. Rituximab in Treating Patients Undergoing Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant for Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-23

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  20. Iodine I 131 Tositumomab and Fludarabine Phosphate in Treating Older Patients Who Are Undergoing an Autologous or Syngeneic Stem Cell Transplant for Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-04

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  1. CPI-613, Bendamustine Hydrochloride, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-12

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  2. Ibrutinib in Treating Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma in Patients With HIV Infection

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-18

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; HIV Infection; Intraocular Lymphoma; Multicentric Angiofollicular Lymphoid Hyperplasia; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  3. Bevacizumab and Cediranib Maleate in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumor, Lymphoma, Intracranial Glioblastoma, Gliosarcoma or Anaplastic Astrocytoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-14

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV

  4. Aggressive lymphoma in a 14 year old Indian boy, diagnosed on fine needle aspiration cytology.

    PubMed

    Pathade, Smita C; Kurpad, Ramkumar; Narayanan, Manoj; Sasikumar, V K; Jadhav, S S

    2014-10-01

    Burkitt's lymphoma(BL) is a highly aggressive B -cell Lymphoma of childhood with a doubling time of 24 to 48 h. Depending upon the clinical and epidemiological factors it is classified as Epidemic, Sporadic and Immunodeficiency associated Burkitt's lymphoma. Sporadic Burkitt's lymphoma has its own characteristics with few differences pertaining to specific geographical location. Here, we present a case of 14-year-old boy who presented with advanced stage disease. On examination he had cervical lymphadenopathy and CNS involvement in the form of nerve palsy.USG revealed multiple well defined solid lesions in liver, both kidneys and pancreas. However, PBS did not show the presence of lymphomatous cells. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of cervical lymph node and liver lesion showed features suggestive of Burkitt's lymphoma, which was further confirmed on Histopathological and immunohistochemical examination.

  5. [Lymphomas in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Brugières, Laurence; Minard, Véronique; Patte, Catherine

    2012-04-01

    Non Hodgkin lymphomas in the pediatric population are a heterogeneous group of tumors with distinct pathologic, immunologic and clinical characteristics. Over the past three decades, significant advancements have been made in the molecular characterization of these disorders. More than 90% of pediatric childhood non Hodgkin lymphomas are high grade lymphomas belonging to four major histologic subtypes, Burkitt lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, lymphoblastic lymphoma and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. With the use of intensive multiagent chemotherapy, most patients can now be cured and long-term event free survival is above 80% in most histologic subtypes. The identification of molecular events associated with carcinogenesis leads to the identification of novel targeted therapy which should allow a further improvement of treatment including a reduction of treatment burden in early stages and improvement of survival in advanced stages. PMID:22641877

  6. Rituximab, Romidepsin, and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-09

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  7. Oxaliplatin, Ifosfamide and Etoposide in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-21

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  8. Brentuximab Vedotin + Rituximab as Frontline Therapy for Pts w/ CD30+ and/or EBV+ Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-28

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Epstein-Barr Virus Infection; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis

  9. Novel Therapies for Aggressive B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Foon, Kenneth A.; Takeshita, Kenichi; Zinzani, Pier L.

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive B-cell lymphoma (BCL) comprises a heterogeneous group of malignancies, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), Burkitt lymphoma, and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). DLBCL, with its 3 subtypes, is the most common type of lymphoma. Advances in chemoimmunotherapy have substantially improved disease control. However, depending on the subtype, patients with DLBCL still exhibit substantially different survival rates. In MCL, a mature B-cell lymphoma, the addition of rituximab to conventional chemotherapy regimens has increased response rates, but not survival. Burkitt lymphoma, the most aggressive BCL, is characterized by a high proliferative index and requires more intensive chemotherapy regimens than DLBCL. Hence, there is a need for more effective therapies for all three diseases. Increased understanding of the molecular features of aggressive BCL has led to the development of a range of novel therapies, many of which target the tumor in a tailored manner and are summarized in this paper. PMID:22536253

  10. Blood Sample Markers of Reproductive Hormones in Assessing Ovarian Reserve in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-06

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone

  11. Genetically Modified T-cell Infusion Following Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Recurrent or High-Risk Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-29

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  12. Salvia Hispanica Seed in Reducing Risk of Disease Recurrence in Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-26

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; B Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Burkitt Leukemia; Central Nervous System Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Mycosis Fungoides; Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Cutaneous Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Primary Effusion Lymphoma; Sezary Syndrome; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Subcutaneous Panniculitis-Like T-Cell Lymphoma; Systemic Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; T Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Transformed Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  13. Immunohistochemistry and scoring of Ki-67 proliferative index and p53 expression in gastric B cell lymphoma from Northern African population: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Zeggai, Soumia; Tou, Abdelnacer; Sellam, Feriel; Mrabent, Meriem N.; Salah, Rachida

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to clarify the Ki-67 distribution, p53 expression and their relationship with clinico-pathologic features of gastric B cell lymphoma from Northern African population. Methods Twenty paraffin blocks of gastric lymphoma were retrieved from the archival materials of Department of Pathology, Central University Hospital of Sidi Bel Abbes (Western Algeria) from 2007 to 2013. Four µm section specimens were stained by immunohistochemical (IHC) technique with Ki-67 and p53 tumor markers. P values <0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results Expression of p53 proteins and the mean proliferative index (PI) were compared between high grade gastric B cell lymphomas (DLBCL) and low grade gastric B cell lymphomas (gastric MALTs). p53 overexpression (P=0.007) and a high proliferation index Ki-67 (P=0.001) were significantly associated with gastric DLBCL. We found also a statistically significant correlation between p53 and Ki-67 (P=0.007) but no obvious relationships were found between Ki-67 PI and p53 expression as well as clinico-pathological features (age, sex, location, macroscopic type). Conclusions The IHC studies of Ki-67 and p53 expression in gastric B cell lymphoma can help in monitoring of patients at risk, and to give suitable treatment and management of patients. PMID:27284480

  14. Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Solid Tumors With Liver Dysfunction

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-26

    Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Solid Neoplasm; AIDS Related Immunoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Burkitt Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Hodgkin Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma; Glioma; Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Neoplasm; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Mature T- and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  15. Obatoclax Mesylate, Vincristine Sulfate, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Dexrazoxane Hydrochloride in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphoma, or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-30

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  16. Lenalidomide With or Without Rituximab in Treating Patients With Progressive or Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Prolymphocytic Leukemia, or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-03

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  17. Veliparib, Bendamustine Hydrochloride, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma, Multiple Myeloma, or Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-14

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Adult Solid Neoplasm; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Lymphomatous Involvement of Non-Cutaneous Extranodal Site; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  18. Ipilimumab and Local Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Melanoma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Colon, or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-19

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  19. Etoposide, Filgrastim, and Plerixafor in Improving Stem Cell Mobilization in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  20. [Specifics of histopathological and genetical diagnosis and classification of lymphomas in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Klapper, W; Oschlies, I

    2012-04-01

    Malignant lymphoma along with leukemias account for nearly half of all malignancies arising in childhood and adolescence. The correct tissue-based histopathological diagnosis of lymphomas results from a close interdisciplinary exchange between pediatric oncologists and hematopathologists. We describe here relevant features of lymphoma subtypes arising in the young age group, Burkitt lymphoma, precursor/lymphoblastic lymphomas, anaplastic large cell lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma as well as primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma and the rare pediatric follicular lymphomas. Special focus is put on specific diagnostic difficulties as well as new insights into biological features of pediatric lymphomas in comparison with their adult counterpart. In addition the relevance of newly defined lymphoma entities of the WHO-classification 2008, e.g. greyzone lymphomas, will be discussed for the young age group. PMID:22513791

  1. Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors or Lymphomas That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-30

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Adult Solid Neoplasm; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Localized Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Lymphomatous Involvement of Non-Cutaneous Extranodal Site; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia Initial Treatment; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult

  2. Vorinostat With or Without Isotretinoin in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphoma, or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-16

    Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  3. Adolescent non-Hodgkin lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma: state of the science.

    PubMed

    Hochberg, Jessica; Waxman, Ian M; Kelly, Kara M; Morris, Erin; Cairo, Mitchell S

    2009-01-01

    Lymphoma is the most common malignancy among adolescents, accounting for >25% of newly diagnosed cancers in the 15-19 year age group. Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) accounts for the majority (two-thirds) of cases, while the remainder of patients have one of four subtypes of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL): diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) including primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL), Burkitt lymphoma (BL), lymphoblastic lymphoma (LL) or anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). Epidemiology, histology, treatment and outcome differ between HL and NHL, as well as among the various subtypes of NHL. Adolescent lymphoma is particularly interesting because it often shares features with both childhood and adult lymphoma. As medical oncologists and paediatric oncologists often follow divergent treatment plans, disagreements may arise between practitioners as to how best treat the adolescent group. Additional complicating factors associated with the adolescent years, such as lack of insurance, issues pertaining to body image, and concerns about fertility, can also hinder prompt, appropriate medical management. This review details the complexities associated with the diagnosis and treatment of adolescent lymphoma and updates the state of the science, with particular emphasis on epidemiology, diagnosis, and proper management of HL and the various subtypes of NHL. PMID:19087093

  4. Low-Dose Total Body Irradiation and Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Lymphocyte Infusion in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Multiple Myeloma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-24

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  5. Membrane-associated signaling in human B-lymphoma lines

    SciTech Connect

    Tauzin, Sebastien; Ding, Heidrun; Burdevet, Dimitri; Borisch, Bettina; Hoessli, Daniel C.

    2011-01-15

    In B-non-Hodgkin lymphomas, Lyn and Cbp/PAG constitute the core of an oncogenic signalosome that captures the Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, the Spleen tyrosine kinase and the Signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 to generate pro-survival and proliferative signals. Lymphoma lines corresponding to follicular, mantle-cell and Burkitt-derived lymphomas display type-specific signalosome organizations that differentially activate PI3K, Syk and STAT3. In the follicular lymphoma line, PI3K, Syk and STAT3 were optimally activated upon association with the Lyn-Cbp/PAG signalosome, while in the Burkitt lymphoma-derived line, the association with Cbp/PAG and activation of PI3K were interfered with by the latent membrane proteins encoded by the Epstein-Barr virus. In the Jeko-1 mantle-cell line, a weak association of Syk with the Lyn-Cbp/PAG signalosome resulted in poor activation of Syk, but in those cells, as in the follicular and Burkitt-derived lines, efficient apoptosis induction by the Syk inhibitor R406 indicated that Syk is nonetheless an important prosurvival element and therefore a valuable therapeutic target. In all configurations described herein is the Lyn-Cbp/PAG signalosome independent of external signals and provides efficient means of activation for its associated lipid and protein kinases. In follicular and Burkitt-derived lines, Syk appears to be activated following binding to Cbp/PAG and no longer requires B-cell receptor-associated activation motifs for activation. Assessment of the different modalities of Lyn-Cbp/PAG signalosome organization could help in selecting the appropriate combination of kinase inhibitors to eliminate a particular type of lymphoma cells.

  6. Rationale and Design of the International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph) Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes Project

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Lindsay M.; Sampson, Joshua N.; Cerhan, James R.; Turner, Jennifer J.; Vajdic, Claire M.; Wang, Sophia S.; Smedby, Karin E.; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Monnereau, Alain; Benavente, Yolanda; Bracci, Paige M.; Chiu, Brian C. H.; Skibola, Christine F.; Zhang, Yawei; Mbulaiteye, Sam M.; Spriggs, Michael; Robinson, Dennis; Norman, Aaron D.; Kane, Eleanor V.; Spinelli, John J.; Kelly, Jennifer L.; Vecchia, Carlo La; Dal Maso, Luigino; Maynadié, Marc; Kadin, Marshall E.; Cocco, Pierluigi; Costantini, Adele Seniori; Clarke, Christina A.; Roman, Eve; Miligi, Lucia; Colt, Joanne S.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Mannetje, Andrea; de Roos, Anneclaire J.; Kricker, Anne; Nieters, Alexandra; Franceschi, Silvia; Melbye, Mads; Boffetta, Paolo; Clavel, Jacqueline; Linet, Martha S.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Slager, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), the most common hematologic malignancy, consists of numerous subtypes. The etiology of NHL is incompletely understood, and increasing evidence suggests that risk factors may vary by NHL subtype. However, small numbers of cases have made investigation of subtype-specific risks challenging. The International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium therefore undertook the NHL Subtypes Project, an international collaborative effort to investigate the etiologies of NHL subtypes. This article describes in detail the project rationale and design. Methods We pooled individual-level data from 20 case-control studies (17471 NHL cases, 23096 controls) from North America, Europe, and Australia. Centralized data harmonization and analysis ensured standardized definitions and approaches, with rigorous quality control. Results The pooled study population included 11 specified NHL subtypes with more than 100 cases: diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (N = 4667), follicular lymphoma (N = 3530), chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (N = 2440), marginal zone lymphoma (N = 1052), peripheral T-cell lymphoma (N = 584), mantle cell lymphoma (N = 557), lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/Waldenström macroglobulinemia (N = 374), mycosis fungoides/Sézary syndrome (N = 324), Burkitt/Burkitt-like lymphoma/leukemia (N = 295), hairy cell leukemia (N = 154), and acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (N = 152). Associations with medical history, family history, lifestyle factors, and occupation for each of these 11 subtypes are presented in separate articles in this issue, with a final article quantitatively comparing risk factor patterns among subtypes. Conclusions The International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium NHL Subtypes Project provides the largest and most comprehensive investigation of potential risk factors for a broad range of common and rare NHL subtypes to date. The analyses contribute to our understanding of the multifactorial nature of NHL

  7. Epstein-Barr virus viral load and serology in childhood non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and chronic inflammatory conditions in Uganda: implications for disease risk and characteristics.

    PubMed

    Orem, Jackson; Sandin, Sven; Mbidde, Edward; Mangen, Fred Wabwire; Middeldorp, Jaap; Weiderpass, Elisabete

    2014-10-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been linked to malignancies and chronic inflammatory conditions. In this study, EBV detection was compared in children with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and children with chronic inflammatory conditions, using samples and data from a case-control study carried out at the Mulago National Referral Hospital between 2004 and 2008. EBV viral load was measured in saliva, whole blood and white blood cells by real-time PCR. Serological values for IgG-VCA, EBNA1, and EAd-IgG were compared in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and chronic inflammatory conditions; and in Burkitt's lymphoma and other subtypes of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Of the 127 children included (87 males and 40 females; median age 7 years, range 2-17), 96 had non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (46 Burkitt's lymphoma and 50 other non-Hodgkin's lymphoma), 31 had chronic inflammatory conditions, and only 10% were HIV-positive. The most common clinical presentations for all disease categories considered were fever, night sweats, and weight loss. EBV viral load in whole blood was elevated in Burkitt's lymphoma compared to other non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (OR 6.67, 95% CI 1.32, 33.69; P-value = 0.04), but EBV viral loads in saliva and white blood cells were not different in any of the disease categories considered. A significant difference in EAd-IgG was observed when non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was compared with chronic inflammatory conditions (OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.07, 0.51; P-value = 0.001). When compared to chronic inflammatory conditions, EBV viral load was elevated in Burkitt's lymphoma, and EA IgG was higher in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. This study supports an association between virological and serological markers of EBV and childhood non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, irrespective of subtype, in Uganda.

  8. Fine needle aspiration cytology in the diagnosis of uncommon types of lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mayall, F; Darlington, A; Harrison, B

    2003-01-01

    Aims: Fine needle aspiration (FNA) cytology is an accepted means of diagnosing and typing common forms of lymphoma, particularly small lymphocytic lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, and large B cell lymphoma. However, its usefulness for diagnosing less common forms of lymphoma is not clearly established and this study was designed to examine this. Methods: The study reviewed the FNAs of suspected lymphomas collected over a period of approximately five years. Results: FNA samples were available for 138 definite lymphomas; most were common forms of B cell lymphoma. However, there was also one Burkitt lymphoma (BL), two Burkitt-like large B cell lymphomas, 15 classic Hodgkin lymphomas (HLs), two nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphomas, four mantle cell lymphomas, two mediastinal (thymic) large B cell lymphomas (MLBCLs), 11 peripheral T cell lymphomas (PTCLs), and five T cell rich large B cell lymphomas (TCRLBCLs). Conclusions: FNA diagnosis of BL was possible with immunoflow cytometry (IFC), cell block immunohistochemistry (IHC), and cell block fluorescent in situ hybridisation for c-myc alteration. It was difficult to make a definite diagnosis of HL and MLBCL on FNA alone. Both tend to be sclerotic tumours and FNA tends to yield scanty neoplastic cells. The FNA diagnosis of PTCL depended on cell block IHC; IFC was not usually useful. TCRLBCL did not show light chain restriction on IFC of FNA samples, probably because of frequent reactive B cells in the tumour. Thus, HL, MLBCL, and TCRLBCL are often difficult to diagnose accurately on FNA cytology, even when using IFC and cell block IHC. PMID:14600125

  9. Ispinesib in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Choroid Plexus Tumor; Childhood Craniopharyngioma; Childhood Grade I Meningioma; Childhood Grade II Meningioma; Childhood Grade III Meningioma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Infratentorial Ependymoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Spinal Cord Neoplasm; Childhood Supratentorial Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  10. Dose-adjusted Chemotherapy for Untreated c-MYC-positive Lymphoma

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, adult patients with newly diagnosed Burkitt lymphoma or c-MYC-positive DLBCL will be separated into low-risk and high-risk groups; those in the low-risk group will be treated with at least three cycles of dose-adjusted EPOCH-R

  11. Primary malignant lymphomas of the breast.

    PubMed

    Mambo, N C; Burke, J S; Butler, J J

    1977-05-01

    Fourteen cases of primary malignant lymphomas of the breast were found in the pathology files of the M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute from 1944 to 1975. The lymphomas represented only 0.12% of 11,277 primary malignant breast tumors seen during the same period. There were no definite clinical features to distinguish the patients with lymphoma from those with breast carcinoma. All of the lymphomas had a diffuse pattern. Eight cases were classified as undifferentiated lymphoma, five as histiocytic, and one as poorly differentiated lymphocytic, convoluted cell type. Four patients had mastectomies and the remainder biopsies as their sole surgical procedure. Eight patients received post-surgical radiotherapy and all eventually had chemotherapy. The five-year survival rate for the 13 patients with follow-up was 49%. Patients with histiocytic lymphoma appeared to have a more favorable prognosis than those with the undifferentiated type. Six of the latter patients are dead with a median survival of seven months, comparable to the reported survival of patients with American Burkitt's lymphoma. The patient with the convoluted cell type has developed acute blastic leukemia and is currently under therapy.

  12. KLF4 is a tumor suppressor in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and in classic Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Guan, Hanfeng; Xie, Linka; Leithäuser, Frank; Flossbach, Lucia; Möller, Peter; Wirth, Thomas; Ushmorov, Alexey

    2010-09-01

    The transcription factor KLF4 may act both as an oncogene and a tumor suppressor in a tissue-depending manner. In T- and pre-B-cell lymphoma, KLF4 was found to act as tumor suppressor. We found the KLF4 promoter methylated in B-cell lymphoma cell lines and in primary cases of B-cell lymphomas, namely, follicular lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, Burkitt lymphoma, and in classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) cases. Promoter hypermethylation was associated with silencing of KLF4 expression. Conditional overexpression of KLF4 in Burkitt lymphoma cell lines moderately retarded proliferation, via cell-cycle arrest in G(0)/G(1). In the cHL cell lines, KLF4 induced massive cell death that could partially be inhibited with Z-VAD.fmk. A quantitative reverse-transcribed polymerase chain reaction array revealed KLF4 target genes, including the proapoptotic gene BAK1. Using an shRNA-mediated knock-down approach, we found that BAK1 is largely responsible for KLF4-induced apoptosis. In addition, we found that KLF4 negatively regulates CXCL10, CD86, and MSC/ABF-1 genes. These genes are specifically up-regulated in HRS cells of cHL and known to be involved in establishing the cHL phenotype. We conclude that epigenetic silencing of KLF4 in B-cell lymphomas and particularly in cHL may favor lymphoma survival by loosening cell-cycle control and protecting from apoptosis. PMID:20519630

  13. Oxaliplatin and Irinotecan in Treating Young Patients With Refractory Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-04

    Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Liver Cancer; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Malignant Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway Glioma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Cancer; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  14. Phase II Study of Alisertib, a Selective Aurora A Kinase Inhibitor, in Relapsed and Refractory Aggressive B- and T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Friedberg, Jonathan W.; Mahadevan, Daruka; Cebula, Erin; Persky, Daniel; Lossos, Izidore; Agarwal, Amit B.; Jung, JungAh; Burack, Richard; Zhou, Xiaofei; Leonard, E. Jane; Fingert, Howard; Danaee, Hadi; Bernstein, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Aurora A kinase (AAK) is overexpressed in aggressive lymphomas and can correlate with more histologically aggressive forms of disease. We therefore designed a phase II study of alisertib, a selective AAK inhibitor, in patients with relapsed and refractory aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Patients and Methods Patients age ≥ 18 years were eligible if they had relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), mantle-cell lymphoma (MCL), transformed follicular lymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma, or noncutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Alisertib was administered orally at 50 mg twice daily for 7 days in 21-day cycles. Results We enrolled 48 patients. Histologies included DLBCL (n = 21), MCL (n = 13), peripheral T-cell lymphoma (n = 8), transformed follicular lymphoma (n = 5), and Burkitt's (n = 1). Most common grade 3 to 4 adverse events were neutropenia (63%), leukopenia (54%), anemia (35%), thrombocytopenia (33%), stomatitis (15%), febrile neutropenia (13%), and fatigue (6%). Four deaths during the study were attributed to progressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 2), treatment-related sepsis (n = 1), and unknown cause (n = 1). The overall response rate was 27%, including responses in three of 21 patients with DLBCL, three of 13 with MCL, one of one with Burkitt's lymphoma, two of five with transformed follicular lymphoma, and four of eight with noncutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The alisertib steady-state trough concentration (n = 25) revealed the expected pharmacokinetic variability, with a trend for higher incidence of adverse event–related dose reductions at higher trough concentrations. Analysis for AAK gene amplification and total AAK protein revealed no differences between histologies or correlation with clinical response. Conclusion The novel AAK inhibitor alisertib seems clinically active in both B- and T-cell aggressive lymphomas. On the basis of these results, confirmatory single-agent and combination studies have been initiated. PMID:24043741

  15. Lymphoma in Adolescents and Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Brugières, Laurence; Brice, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    Lymphomas are one of the commonest malignancies in adolescents and young adults (AYA) accounting respectively for 22% of all cancers in patients aged 15-24 years (16% for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and 6% for non-HL (NHL)). The distribution of NHL subtypes in this age group differs strikingly from the distribution in children and in older adults with 4 main subtypes accounting for the majority of the cases: diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) including primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma, Burkitt lymphoma, lymphoblastic lymphoma or anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Age-related differences in tumor biology have been demonstrated mainly in DLBCL but there is still a need for biological studies to better understand age-related differences in this age group. AYA patients currently diagnosed with HL and NHL have 5-year survival expectations exceeding 90 and 75%, respectively. Different therapeutic strategies are often used in children and adult lymphoma and the dispersion of lymphoma care between adult and pediatric hematologist-oncologists results in heterogeneous strategies for each subgroup according to age. The impact of these different strategies on outcomes is not easy to evaluate given the paucity of population-based data focused on this age group, taking into account tumor biology and the lack of a uniform staging system. Given the excellent results obtained with current therapies, the challenge now is to develop strategies aimed at reducing acute and long-term toxicity in most patients while maintaining high cure rates and to identify patients at high risk of failure requiring new strategies including more selective targeted therapies. PMID:27595360

  16. Identification of Highly Methylated Genes across Various Types of B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bethge, Nicole; Honne, Hilde; Hilden, Vera; Trøen, Gunhild; Eknæs, Mette; Liestøl, Knut; Holte, Harald; Delabie, Jan; Smeland, Erlend B.; Lind, Guro E.

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic alterations of gene expression are important in the development of cancer. In this study, we identified genes which are epigenetically altered in major lymphoma types. We used DNA microarray technology to assess changes in gene expression after treatment of 11 lymphoma cell lines with epigenetic drugs. We identified 233 genes with upregulated expression in treated cell lines and with downregulated expression in B-cell lymphoma patient samples (n = 480) when compared to normal B cells (n = 5). The top 30 genes were further analyzed by methylation specific PCR (MSP) in 18 lymphoma cell lines. Seven of the genes were methylated in more than 70% of the cell lines and were further subjected to quantitative MSP in 37 B-cell lymphoma patient samples (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (activated B-cell like and germinal center B-cell like subtypes), follicular lymphoma and Burkitt`s lymphoma) and normal B lymphocytes from 10 healthy donors. The promoters of DSP, FZD8, KCNH2, and PPP1R14A were methylated in 28%, 67%, 22%, and 78% of the 36 tumor samples, respectively, but not in control samples. Validation using a second series of healthy donor controls (n = 42; normal B cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, bone marrow, tonsils and follicular hyperplasia) and fresh-frozen lymphoma biopsies (n = 25), confirmed the results. The DNA methylation biomarker panel consisting of DSP, FZD8, KCNH2, and PPP1R14A was positive in 89% (54/61) of all lymphomas. Receiver operating characteristic analysis to determine the discriminative power between lymphoma and healthy control samples showed a c-statistic of 0.96, indicating a possible role for the biomarker panel in monitoring of lymphoma patients. PMID:24260260

  17. From the radiologic pathology archives: gastrointestinal lymphoma: radiologic and pathologic findings.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Rachel B; Mehrotra, Anupamjit K; Rodríguez, Pablo; Manning, Maria A; Levine, Marc S

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) lymphoma encompasses a heterogeneous group of neoplasms that have a common lymphoid origin but variable pathologic and imaging features. Extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma (ENMZL) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) are the most common. ENMZL usually occurs in the stomach, where it is associated with chronic infection by Helicobacter pylori, and is typically a superficial spreading lesion that causes mucosal nodularity or ulceration and mild wall thickening. DLBCL may arise de novo or from transformation of ENMZL or other low-grade lymphomas. This form of lymphoma produces extensive wall thickening or a bulky mass, but obstruction is uncommon. Mantle cell lymphoma is the classic cause of lymphomatous polyposis, but multiple polyps or nodules can also be seen with ENMZL and follicular lymphoma. Burkitt lymphoma is usually characterized by an ileocecal mass or wall thickening in the terminal ileum in young children, often in the setting of widespread disease. Primary GI Hodgkin lymphoma, which is rare, may be manifested by a variety of findings, though stenosis is more common than with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma is frequently associated with celiac disease and is characterized by wall thickening, ulceration, and even perforation of the jejunum. Accurate radiologic diagnosis of GI lymphoma requires a multifactorial approach based on the clinical findings, site of involvement, imaging findings, and associated complications. PMID:25384294

  18. MicroRNA signatures in B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Di Lisio, L; Sánchez-Beato, M; Gómez-López, G; Rodríguez, M E; Montes-Moreno, S; Mollejo, M; Menárguez, J; Martínez, M A; Alves, F J; Pisano, D G; Piris, M A; Martínez, N

    2012-01-01

    Accurate lymphoma diagnosis, prognosis and therapy still require additional markers. We explore the potential relevance of microRNA (miRNA) expression in a large series that included all major B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) types. The data generated were also used to identify miRNAs differentially expressed in Burkitt lymphoma (BL) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) samples. A series of 147 NHL samples and 15 controls were hybridized on a human miRNA one-color platform containing probes for 470 human miRNAs. Each lymphoma type was compared against the entire set of NHLs. BL was also directly compared with DLBCL, and 43 preselected miRNAs were analyzed in a new series of routinely processed samples of 28 BLs and 43 DLBCLs using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. A signature of 128 miRNAs enabled the characterization of lymphoma neoplasms, reflecting the lymphoma type, cell of origin and/or discrete oncogene alterations. Comparative analysis of BL and DLBCL yielded 19 differentially expressed miRNAs, which were confirmed in a second confirmation series of 71 paraffin-embedded samples. The set of differentially expressed miRNAs found here expands the range of potential diagnostic markers for lymphoma diagnosis, especially when differential diagnosis of BL and DLBCL is required. PMID:22829247

  19. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma in Southern Africa: review of 487 cases from The International Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Classification Project.

    PubMed

    Perry, Anamarija M; Perner, Yvonne; Diebold, Jacques; Nathwani, Bharat N; MacLennan, Kenneth A; Müller-Hermelink, Hans K; Bast, Martin; Boilesen, Eugene; Armitage, James O; Weisenburger, Dennis D

    2016-03-01

    Comparative data on the distribution of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) subtypes in Southern Africa (SAF) is scarce. In this study, five expert haematopathologists classified 487 consecutive cases of NHL from SAF using the World Health Organization classification, and compared the results to North America (NA) and Western Europe (WEU). Southern Africa had a significantly lower proportion of low-grade (LG) B-NHL (34·3%) and a higher proportion of high-grade (HG) B-NHL (51·5%) compared to WEU (54·5% and 36·4%) and NA (56·1% and 34·3%). High-grade Burkitt-like lymphoma was significantly more common in SAF (8·2%) than in WEU (2·4%) and NA (2·5%), most likely due to human immunodeficiency virus infection. When SAF patients were divided by race, whites had a significantly higher frequency of LG B-NHL (60·4%) and a lower frequency of HG B-NHL (32·7%) compared to blacks (22·5% and 62·6%), whereas the other races were intermediate. Whites and other races had a significantly higher frequency of follicular lymphoma and a lower frequency of Burkitt-like lymphoma compared to blacks. The median ages of whites with LG B-NHL, HG B-NHL and T-NHL (64, 56 and 67 years) were significantly higher than those of blacks (55, 41 and 34 years). Epidemiological studies are needed to better understand these differences. PMID:26898194

  20. Primary Cutaneous Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma With a MYC-IGH Rearrangement and Gain of BCL2: Expanding the Spectrum of MYC/BCL2 Double-Hit Lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Testo, Natalia; Olson, Luke C; Subramaniyam, Shivakumar; Hanson, Ty; Magro, Cynthia M

    2016-10-01

    Aggressive extracutaneous B-cell lymphomas span the various stages of B-cell ontogeny and include B-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma, Burkitt lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Diffuse large B-cell lymphomas represent the most common histologic subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphomas, comprising 30% of adult non-Hodgkin lymphomas in the United States. A distinctive form of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the double-hit lymphoma, with most cases exhibiting a combined MYC and BCL2 rearrangement, leading some hematopathologists to propose the term MYC/BCL2 lymphoma. More recently, MYC rearrangement with multiple copies/gain of BCL2 or multiple copies/gain of MYC with a BCL2 rearrangement have been described and exhibit a very similar clinical course to conventional double-hit lymphomas. We report the seventh case of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma exhibiting this distinct cytogenetic abnormality and the first reported case in the skin. The patient's clinical course was aggressive, succumbing to disease 18 months after his initial presentation. PMID:27391453

  1. [Mediastinal lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Rauthe, S; Rosenwald, A

    2016-09-01

    Lymphomas infiltrating the mediastinum are a challenge for the treating physician as well as for the pathological diagnostics. The clinical scenario is often an emergency situation, while the pathologist is usually confronted only with small biopsy samples. Classical Hodgkin's lymphoma is by far the most frequently occurring lymphoma in the mediastinum and predominantly the nodular sclerosis subtype. In small and very sclerotic specimens it can be difficult to morphologically detect Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells and to identify the characteristic phenotype by immunohistochemistry. Primary mediastinal large B‑cell lymphomas should be distinguished from classical Hodgkin's lymphomas as the treatment is different. This is characterized by the detection of sheets of blast cells, which immunohistochemically show a strong B‑cell phenotype (positivity for CD20 and CD79a), while CD30 can also often be expressed. The intimate biological relationship between classical Hodgkin's lymphomas and mediastinal large B‑cell lymphomas is illustrated by the existence of B‑cell lymphomas with intermediate features (so-called mediastinal grey zone lymphomas). It is important to recognize and diagnose these lymphomas as they are associated with a slightly inferior prognosis. Extranodal thymic marginal zone lymphomas of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) type are a rare form of lymphoma encountered in the mediastinum, which can be associated with autoimmune diseases. T‑lymphoblastic lymphomas and leukemia, which occur predominantly in children and young adults, represent a rapidly growing precursor cell neoplasia and must be distinguished from thymomas in the differential diagnostics as well as from normal and hyperplastic thymus glands. PMID:27507160

  2. Subtype distribution of lymphomas in South of Iran, analysis of 1085 cases based on World Health Organization classification.

    PubMed

    Monabati, Ahmad; Safaei, Akbar; Noori, Sadat; Mokhtari, Maral; Vahedi, Amir

    2016-03-01

    Lymphoma is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. Subtype distribution is different throughout the world. Some reports from the Middle East are in record. This article is trying to report the subtype distribution of lymphoma in Iran and compare it to that of Western, Far East Asian and Middle Eastern countries. A retrospective study was done on all lymphomas diagnosed in a large referral center in the South of Iran during a time period between 2009 and 2014. All diagnoses have been made according to 2008 WHO classification. A total number of 1085 cases with diagnoses of lymphoma retrieved. Twenty-nine cases (2.6 % of all) were precursor lymphoid neoplasm, 608 cases (56 % of all) were mature B cell neoplasm, 115 cases (10.5 % of all) were mature T and NK cell neoplasm, and 333 cases (30.6 % of all) were Hodgkin lymphoma. The six most frequent subtypes of mature B cell neoplasm were diffuse large B cell lymphoma, NOS (57 %), Burkitt lymphoma (7 %), small lymphocytic lymphoma (6.9 %), mantle cell lymphoma (5.7 %), extranodal marginal zone B cell lymphoma (5.2 %) and follicular lymphoma (3.6 %). Among mature T and NK cell neoplasm, mycosis fungoides was the most common type (43.4 %) followed by peripheral T cell lymphoma, NOS (20 %) and angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma (9.9 %). Of Hodgkin lymphoma cases, 90.6 % were classical type and 9.3 % were nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma. Extranodal involvement was seen in 42.2 % and GI tract was the most common site. Lymphoma frequencies were similar to that of Middle Eastern countries except for lower rate of follicular lymphoma and higher incidence of diffuse large B cell lymphoma, NOS and small lymphocytic lymphoma. PMID:26754635

  3. Subtype distribution of lymphomas in South of Iran, analysis of 1085 cases based on World Health Organization classification.

    PubMed

    Monabati, Ahmad; Safaei, Akbar; Noori, Sadat; Mokhtari, Maral; Vahedi, Amir

    2016-03-01

    Lymphoma is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. Subtype distribution is different throughout the world. Some reports from the Middle East are in record. This article is trying to report the subtype distribution of lymphoma in Iran and compare it to that of Western, Far East Asian and Middle Eastern countries. A retrospective study was done on all lymphomas diagnosed in a large referral center in the South of Iran during a time period between 2009 and 2014. All diagnoses have been made according to 2008 WHO classification. A total number of 1085 cases with diagnoses of lymphoma retrieved. Twenty-nine cases (2.6 % of all) were precursor lymphoid neoplasm, 608 cases (56 % of all) were mature B cell neoplasm, 115 cases (10.5 % of all) were mature T and NK cell neoplasm, and 333 cases (30.6 % of all) were Hodgkin lymphoma. The six most frequent subtypes of mature B cell neoplasm were diffuse large B cell lymphoma, NOS (57 %), Burkitt lymphoma (7 %), small lymphocytic lymphoma (6.9 %), mantle cell lymphoma (5.7 %), extranodal marginal zone B cell lymphoma (5.2 %) and follicular lymphoma (3.6 %). Among mature T and NK cell neoplasm, mycosis fungoides was the most common type (43.4 %) followed by peripheral T cell lymphoma, NOS (20 %) and angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma (9.9 %). Of Hodgkin lymphoma cases, 90.6 % were classical type and 9.3 % were nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma. Extranodal involvement was seen in 42.2 % and GI tract was the most common site. Lymphoma frequencies were similar to that of Middle Eastern countries except for lower rate of follicular lymphoma and higher incidence of diffuse large B cell lymphoma, NOS and small lymphocytic lymphoma.

  4. High-Dose Busulfan and High-Dose Cyclophosphamide Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Multiple Myeloma, or Recurrent Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-08-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; De Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent

  5. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the developing world: review of 4539 cases from the International Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Classification Project

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Anamarija M.; Diebold, Jacques; Nathwani, Bharat N.; MacLennan, Kenneth A.; Müller-Hermelink, Hans K.; Bast, Martin; Boilesen, Eugene; Armitage, James O.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtypes varies around the world, but a large systematic comparative study has never been done. In this study, we evaluated the clinical features and relative frequencies of non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtypes in five developing regions of the world and compared the findings to the developed world. Five expert hematopathologists classified 4848 consecutive cases of lymphoma from 26 centers in 24 countries using the World Health Organization classification, and 4539 (93.6%) were confirmed to be non-Hodgkin lymphoma, with a significantly greater number of males than females in the developing regions compared to the developed world (P<0.05). The median age at diagnosis was significantly lower for both low- and high-grade B-cell lymphoma in the developing regions. The developing regions had a significantly lower frequency of B-cell lymphoma (86.6%) and a higher frequency of T- and natural killer-cell lymphoma (13.4%) compared to the developed world (90.7% and 9.3%, respectively). Also, the developing regions had significantly more cases of high-grade B-cell lymphoma (59.6%) and fewer cases of low-grade B-cell lymphoma (22.7%) compared to the developed world (39.2% and 32.7%, respectively). Among the B-cell lymphomas, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was the most common subtype (42.5%) in the developing regions. Burkitt lymphoma (2.2%), precursor B- and T-lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (1.1% and 2.9%, respectively) and extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (2.2%) were also significantly increased in the developing regions. These findings suggest that differences in etiologic and host risk factors are likely responsible, and more detailed epidemiological studies are needed to better understand these differences. PMID:27354024

  6. Association of Epstein-Barr virus with sinonasal angiocentric T cell lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    O'Leary, G; Kennedy, S M

    1995-01-01

    AIM--To investigate whether non-Hodgkin's lymphomas arising in the sinonasal region or Waldeyer's ring contain the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome in lesional tissue. METHOD--Sections from paraffin wax blocks of 22 lymphoid proliferations arising in the sinonasal region or Waldeyer's ring were studied with EBV encoded RNAs (EBER-1 and -2) using in situ hybridisation. RESULTS--EBV was detected in nuclei of tumour cells of five of seven T cell lymphomas and in nuclei of two of seven diffuse, large cell immunoblastic lymphomas of B phenotype in the sinonasal region. Of tumours arising in Waldeyer's ring, two of 10 non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (both large cell) were positive, as was a single case of Hodgkin's disease. Lymphoma of other types, including Western type Burkitt's lymphoma, and nodular and diffuse small cleaved cell lymphoma, were negative. CONCLUSION--EBV is highly associated with large cell lymphomas especially T cell lymphomas of sinonasal origin in the indigenous Irish population, underlining the importance of this virus in nasopharyngeal lymphomas in Northern European as well as Asian populations. Images PMID:8537496

  7. B-cell lymphomas with concurrent MYC and BCL2 abnormalities other than translocations behave similarly to MYC/BCL2 double-hit lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaoying; Seegmiller, Adam C; Lin, Pei; Wang, Xuan J; Miranda, Roberto N; Bhagavathi, Sharathkumar; Medeiros, L Jeffrey

    2015-02-01

    Large B-cell lymphomas with IGH@BCL2 and MYC rearrangement, known as double-hit lymphoma (DHL), are clinically aggressive neoplasms with a poor prognosis. Some large B-cell lymphomas have concurrent abnormalities of MYC and BCL2 other than coexistent translocations. Little is known about patients with these lymphomas designated here as atypical DHL. We studied 40 patients of atypical DHL including 21 men and 19 women, with a median age of 60 years. Nine (23%) patients had a history of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. There were 30 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), 7 B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between DLBCL and Burkitt lymphoma, and 3 DLBCL with coexistent follicular lymphoma. CD10, BCL2, and MYC were expressed in 28/39 (72%), 33/35 (94%), and 14/20 (70%) cases, respectively. Patients were treated with standard (n=14) or more aggressive chemotherapy regimens (n=17). We compared the atypical DHL group with 76 patients with DHLand 35 patients with DLBCL lacking MYC and BCL2 abnormalities. The clinicopathologic features and therapies were similar between patients with atypical and typical DHL. The overall survival of patients with atypical double-hit lymphoma was similar to that of patients with double-hit lymphoma (P=0.47) and significantly worse than that of patients with DLBCL with normal MYC and BCL2 (P=0.02). There were some minor differences. Cases of atypical double-hit lymphoma more often have DLBCL morphology (P<0.01), less frequently expressed CD10 (P<0.01), and patients less often had an elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase level (P=0.01). In aggregate, these results support expanding the category of MYC/BCL2 DHL to include large B-cell lymphomas with coexistent MYC and BCL2 abnormalities other than concurrent translocations. PMID:25103070

  8. MYC gene rearrangements detected by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Misharina, J A; Sitko, V V; Klymenko, S V; Minchenko, J A; Kurchenko, A I; Silaev, Y O; Lyashenko, L O; Polyanska, V M; Bebeshko, V G

    2014-09-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common type of lymphoma, including approximately 30-40% of all B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas (B-NHL). Chromosomal translocations are the hallmark of genetic aberrations in B-lymphoma and are often associated with a specific subtype of B-NHL. MYC gene dysregulation due to chromosomal translocations is characteristic for the most cases of Burkitt's lymphoma. Objective. The goal of this study was to improve the diagnostic accuracy of DLBCL. Identification of chromosome 8 and 14 abnormalities including the translocation of MYC gene t(8; 14)(q24; q32) in substrate cells of lymph nodes was applied using the method of tri-color interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (I-FISH). Materials and methods. Lymph node biopsy specimens of 17 patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and three patients with Burkitt's lymphoma (including one participant of liquidation of consequences of the catastrophe at the Chornobyl NPP) were studied. The age of patients ranged from 10 to 66 years old (41.3 ± 3.7 average). Biopsy specimens fixed in paraffin. I-FISH-analysis was performed using the commercial test Vysis IGH/MYC, CEP 8 tri-color, dual fusion translocation probe (Abbott Molecular, USA). Results and conclusions. MYC gene and immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) gene translocations were found in four out of twenty persons. Consequently the I-FISH method allows identification of of MYC and IGH gene rearrangements in tissue cells substrate of lymphoma fixed in paraffin. Using this method the molecular-cytogenetic abnormalities were found in eight of twenty patients with B-cell lymphoma providing verification of the lymphoma diagnosis, prediction of their clinical course and advance in management i.e increase the effectiveness of therapy, in refractory lymphoma cases among others.

  9. [Central nervous system relapse in diffuse large B cell lymphoma: Risk factors].

    PubMed

    Sancho, Juan-Manuel; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2016-01-15

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement by lymphoma is a complication associated, almost invariably, with a poor prognosis. The knowledge of the risk factors for CNS relapse is important to determine which patients could benefit from prophylaxis. Thus, patients with very aggressive lymphomas (such as lymphoblastic lymphoma or Burkitt's lymphoma) must systematically receive CNS prophylaxis due to a high CNS relapse rate (25-30%), while in patients with indolent lymphoma (such as follicular lymphoma or marginal lymphoma) prophylaxis is unnecessary. However, the question about CNS prophylaxis in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common type of lymphoma, remains controversial. The information available is extensive, mainly based on retrospective and heterogeneous studies. There seems that immunochemotherapy based on rituximab reduces the CNS relapse rate. On the other hand, patients with increased serum lactate dehydrogenase plus more than one extranodal involvement seem to have a higher risk of CNS relapse, but a prophylaxis strategy based only on the presence of these 2 factors does not prevent all CNS relapses. Patients with involvement of testes or breast have high risk of CNS relapse and prophylaxis is mandatory. Finally, CNS prophylaxis could be considered in patients with DLBCL and renal or epidural space involvement, as well as in those cases with MYC rearrangements, although additional studies are necessary.

  10. [Central nervous system relapse in diffuse large B cell lymphoma: Risk factors].

    PubMed

    Sancho, Juan-Manuel; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2016-01-15

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement by lymphoma is a complication associated, almost invariably, with a poor prognosis. The knowledge of the risk factors for CNS relapse is important to determine which patients could benefit from prophylaxis. Thus, patients with very aggressive lymphomas (such as lymphoblastic lymphoma or Burkitt's lymphoma) must systematically receive CNS prophylaxis due to a high CNS relapse rate (25-30%), while in patients with indolent lymphoma (such as follicular lymphoma or marginal lymphoma) prophylaxis is unnecessary. However, the question about CNS prophylaxis in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common type of lymphoma, remains controversial. The information available is extensive, mainly based on retrospective and heterogeneous studies. There seems that immunochemotherapy based on rituximab reduces the CNS relapse rate. On the other hand, patients with increased serum lactate dehydrogenase plus more than one extranodal involvement seem to have a higher risk of CNS relapse, but a prophylaxis strategy based only on the presence of these 2 factors does not prevent all CNS relapses. Patients with involvement of testes or breast have high risk of CNS relapse and prophylaxis is mandatory. Finally, CNS prophylaxis could be considered in patients with DLBCL and renal or epidural space involvement, as well as in those cases with MYC rearrangements, although additional studies are necessary. PMID:25817451

  11. Automatic lymphoma classification with sentence subgraph mining from pathology reports

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yuan; Sohani, Aliyah R; Hochberg, Ephraim P; Szolovits, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Objective Pathology reports are rich in narrative statements that encode a complex web of relations among medical concepts. These relations are routinely used by doctors to reason on diagnoses, but often require hand-crafted rules or supervised learning to extract into prespecified forms for computational disease modeling. We aim to automatically capture relations from narrative text without supervision. Methods We design a novel framework that translates sentences into graph representations, automatically mines sentence subgraphs, reduces redundancy in mined subgraphs, and automatically generates subgraph features for subsequent classification tasks. To ensure meaningful interpretations over the sentence graphs, we use the Unified Medical Language System Metathesaurus to map token subsequences to concepts, and in turn sentence graph nodes. We test our system with multiple lymphoma classification tasks that together mimic the differential diagnosis by a pathologist. To this end, we prevent our classifiers from looking at explicit mentions or synonyms of lymphomas in the text. Results and Conclusions We compare our system with three baseline classifiers using standard n-grams, full MetaMap concepts, and filtered MetaMap concepts. Our system achieves high F-measures on multiple binary classifications of lymphoma (Burkitt lymphoma, 0.8; diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, 0.909; follicular lymphoma, 0.84; Hodgkin lymphoma, 0.912). Significance tests show that our system outperforms all three baselines. Moreover, feature analysis identifies subgraph features that contribute to improved performance; these features agree with the state-of-the-art knowledge about lymphoma classification. We also highlight how these unsupervised relation features may provide meaningful insights into lymphoma classification. PMID:24431333

  12. Primary lymphoma of the brain

    MedlinePlus

    Brain lymphoma; Cerebral lymphoma; Primary lymphoma of the central nervous system; Lymphoma - brain ... The cause of primary brain lymphoma is not known. People with a weakened immune system are at high risk for primary lymphoma of the brain. ...

  13. Concanavalin A-induced agglutination of human leukemic and lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Maca, R D

    1976-04-01

    With a newly developed turbidometric method, concanavalin A was shown to agglutinate normal lymphocytes, lymphoma cells, and leukemic cells from chronic lymphocytic leukemia and from acute myelocytic and lymphocytic leukemia. However, there was a marked difference in the kinetics of this agglutination process. Leukemic blast cells and cells from a patient with convoluted lymphoma agglutinated poorly in this system. Conversely, the degree of agglutination for chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells was greater than that for the blast cells and also slightly greater than that for normal lymphocytes. Cultured cells from a Burkitt's lymphoma (Raji) and from a patient with poorly differentiated lymphoma agglutinated very rapidly with concanavalin A. Prior incubation of all cell types with neuraminidase markedly enhanced the agglutination process similar to that of trypsinization. Thus, these studies illustrate the usefulness of this method in quantitating the kinetics of agglutination of various human neoplastic cell types by concanavalin A. PMID:1063062

  14. Etiologic Heterogeneity Among Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes: The InterLymph Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes Project

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Lindsay M.; Slager, Susan L.; Cerhan, James R.; Wang, Sophia S.; Vajdic, Claire M.; Skibola, Christine F.; Bracci, Paige M.; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Smedby, Karin E.; Chiu, Brian C. H.; Zhang, Yawei; Mbulaiteye, Sam M.; Monnereau, Alain; Turner, Jennifer J.; Clavel, Jacqueline; Adami, Hans-Olov; Chang, Ellen T.; Glimelius, Bengt; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Melbye, Mads; Crosignani, Paolo; di Lollo, Simonetta; Miligi, Lucia; Nanni, Oriana; Ramazzotti, Valerio; Rodella, Stefania; Costantini, Adele Seniori; Stagnaro, Emanuele; Tumino, Rosario; Vindigni, Carla; Vineis, Paolo; Becker, Nikolaus; Benavente, Yolanda; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Cocco, Pierluigi; Foretova, Lenka; Maynadié, Marc; Nieters, Alexandra; Staines, Anthony; Colt, Joanne S.; Cozen, Wendy; Davis, Scott; de Roos, Anneclaire J.; Hartge, Patricia; Rothman, Nathaniel; Severson, Richard K.; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Call, Timothy G.; Feldman, Andrew L.; Habermann, Thomas M.; Liebow, Mark; Blair, Aaron; Cantor, Kenneth P.; Kane, Eleanor V.; Lightfoot, Tracy; Roman, Eve; Smith, Alex; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Connors, Joseph M.; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Spinelli, John J.; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Kricker, Anne; Holford, Theodore R.; Lan, Qing; Zheng, Tongzhang; Orsi, Laurent; Dal Maso, Luigino; Franceschi, Silvia; La Vecchia, Carlo; Negri, Eva; Serraino, Diego; Bernstein, Leslie; Levine, Alexandra; Friedberg, Jonathan W.; Kelly, Jennifer L.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Birmann, Brenda M.; Clarke, Christina A.; Flowers, Christopher R.; Foran, James M.; Kadin, Marshall E.; Paltiel, Ora; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Linet, Martha S.; Sampson, Joshua N.

    2014-01-01

    teacher generally were restricted to marginal zone lymphoma, Burkitt/Burkitt-like lymphoma/leukemia, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and/or lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/Waldenström macroglobulinemia. Conclusions Using a novel approach to investigate etiologic heterogeneity among NHL subtypes, we identified risk factors that were common among subtypes as well as risk factors that appeared to be distinct among individual or a few subtypes, suggesting both subtype-specific and shared underlying mechanisms. Further research is needed to test putative mechanisms, investigate other risk factors (eg, other infections, environmental exposures, and diet), and evaluate potential joint effects with genetic susceptibility. PMID:25174034

  15. The Histological and Biological Spectrum of Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma in the WHO Classification

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Madhu P.; Pittaluga, Stefania; Jaffe, Elaine S.

    2012-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCL) are aggressive B-cell lymphomas that are clinically, pathologically and genetically diverse, in part reflecting the functional diversity of the B-cell system. The focus in recent years has been towards incorporation of clinical features, morphology, immunohistochemistry and ever evolving genetic data into the classification scheme. The 2008 WHO classification reflects this complexity with the addition of several new entities and variants. The discovery of distinct subtypes by gene expression profiling (GEP) heralded a new era with a focus on pathways of transformation as well as a promise of more targeted therapies, directed at specific pathways. Some DLBCLs exhibit unique clinical characteristics with a predilection for specific anatomic sites; the anatomic site often reflects underlying biological distinctions. Recently, the spectrum of EBV-driven B-cell proliferations in patients without iatrogenic or congenital immunosuppression has been better characterized; most of these occur in patients of advanced age, and include EBV-positive large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly. HHV-8 is involved in the pathogenesis of primary effusion lymphoma, which can present as a “solid variant.” Two borderline categories were created; one deals with tumors at the interface between classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) and DLBCL. The second confronts the interface between Burkitt Lymphoma (BL) and DLBCL, so called “B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and Burkitt lymphoma” in the 2008 classification. Most cases harbor both MYC and BCL2 translocations, and are highly aggressive. Another interesting entity is ALK+ DLBCL, which renders itself potentially targetable by ALK inhibitors. Ongoing investigations at the genomic level, with both exome and whole genome sequencing, are sure to reveal new pathways of transformation in the future. PMID:23006945

  16. Canine lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    Canine lymphoma has served as the ''workhorse'' for the development of veterinary oncology and as an important animal model for human non-Hodgkins lymphomas. Significant advances have been achieved in understanding the biological behavior of the disease and in its treatment. Although it is unlikely that a cure for lymphoma will be achieved, owners should be encouraged to treat their pets, provided they understand that only prolonged remissions and survivals are likely to result. Cooperative studies, employing large numbers of dogs, are needed to optimize and refine the classification scheme to provide a system with diagnostic and prognostic correlates and derive maximum benefit from therapeutic regimens. Such studies need to be prospective in nature, with a solid statistical base incorporated into their design. Rather than being content with what we have accomplished to date in treatment of canine lymphoma, the opportunity exists for the veterinary profession to make further significant contributions to the understanding and treatment of lymphoma in the dog. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  17. Epigenetic Heterogeneity of B-Cell Lymphoma: Chromatin Modifiers.

    PubMed

    Hopp, Lydia; Nersisyan, Lilit; Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Arakelyan, Arsen; Binder, Hans

    2015-01-01

    We systematically studied the expression of more than fifty histone and DNA (de)methylating enzymes in lymphoma and healthy controls. As a main result, we found that the expression levels of nearly all enzymes become markedly disturbed in lymphoma, suggesting deregulation of large parts of the epigenetic machinery. We discuss the effect of DNA promoter methylation and of transcriptional activity in the context of mutated epigenetic modifiers such as EZH2 and MLL2. As another mechanism, we studied the coupling between the energy metabolism and epigenetics via metabolites that act as cofactors of JmjC-type demethylases. Our study results suggest that Burkitt's lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell Lymphoma differ by an imbalance of repressive and poised promoters, which is governed predominantly by the activity of methyltransferases and the underrepresentation of demethylases in this regulation. The data further suggest that coupling of epigenetics with the energy metabolism can also be an important factor in lymphomagenesis in the absence of direct mutations of genes in metabolic pathways. Understanding of epigenetic deregulation in lymphoma and possibly in cancers in general must go beyond simple schemes using only a few modes of regulation. PMID:26506391

  18. Guideline on the prevention of secondary central nervous system lymphoma: British Committee for Standards in Haematology.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Andrew; Ardeshna, Kirit M; Cwynarski, Kate; Lyttelton, Matthew; McKay, Pam; Montoto, Silvia

    2013-10-01

    The guideline group was selected to be representative of UK-based medical experts. Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE and NCBI Pubmed were searched systematically for publications in English from 1980 to 2012 using the MeSH subheading 'lymphoma, CNS', 'lymphoma, central nervous system', 'lymphoma, high grade', 'lymphoma, Burkitt's', 'lymphoma, lymphoblastic' and 'lymphoma, diffuse large B cell' as keywords, as well as all subheadings. The writing group produced the draft guideline, which was subsequently revised by consensus by members of the Haemato-oncology Task Force of the British Committee for Standards in Haematology (BCSH). The guideline was then reviewed by a sounding board of ~50 UK haematologists, the BCSH and the British Society for Haematology (BSH) Committee and comments incorporated where appropriate. The 'GRADE' system was used to quote levels and grades of evidence, details of which can be found in Appendix I. The objective of this guideline is to provide healthcare professionals with clear guidance on the optimal prevention of secondary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma. The guidance may not be appropriate to patients of all lymphoma sub-types and in all cases individual patient circumstances may dictate an alternative approach. Acronyms are defined at time of first use.

  19. My Treatment Approach to Patients With Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Armitage, James O.

    2012-01-01

    My favored treatment approach for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma continues to evolve. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma can now be cured in more than 50% of patients. This is a result of improved definitions of the disease, improved diagnostic capabilities, better staging and restaging techniques, a useful prognostic index to guide therapeutic decisions, and the development of increasingly effective therapies. Positron emission tomographic scans have improved the accuracy of both staging and restaging. Findings on a positron emission tomographic scan at the end of therapy are the best predictors of a good treatment outcome. Numerous subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma have been identified that require specific treatment approaches. For example, plasmablastic lymphoma typically lacks CD20 and does not benefit from treatment with rituximab. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma originating in specific extranodal sites such as the central nervous system, testes, and skin presents special problems and requires specific treatment approaches. A subgroup of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with a very high proliferative rate seems to have a poor outcome when treated with CHOP-R and does better with regimens used for patients with Burkitt lymphoma. New insights into the biology of these disorders are likely to further change treatment approaches. Recognition that diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is not one disease, but a variety of clinicopathologic syndromes provides the opportunity to further improve our ability to benefit patients. PMID:22305028

  20. My treatment approach to patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Armitage, James O

    2012-02-01

    My favored treatment approach for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma continues to evolve. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma can now be cured in more than 50% of patients. This is a result of improved definitions of the disease, improved diagnostic capabilities, better staging and restaging techniques, a useful prognostic index to guide therapeutic decisions, and the development of increasingly effective therapies. Positron emission tomographic scans have improved the accuracy of both staging and restaging. Findings on a positron emission tomographic scan at the end of therapy are the best predictors of a good treatment outcome. Numerous subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma have been identified that require specific treatment approaches. For example, plasmablastic lymphoma typically lacks CD20 and does not benefit from treatment with rituximab. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma originating in specific extranodal sites such as the central nervous system, testes, and skin presents special problems and requires specific treatment approaches. A subgroup of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with a very high proliferative rate seems to have a poor outcome when treated with CHOP-R and does better with regimens used for patients with Burkitt lymphoma. New insights into the biology of these disorders are likely to further change treatment approaches. Recognition that diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is not one disease, but a variety of clinicopathologic syndromes provides the opportunity to further improve our ability to benefit patients. PMID:22305028

  1. Residential Radon Exposure and Incidence of Childhood Lymphoma in Texas, 1995-2011.

    PubMed

    Peckham, Erin C; Scheurer, Michael E; Danysh, Heather E; Lubega, Joseph; Langlois, Peter H; Lupo, Philip J

    2015-10-01

    There is warranted interest in assessing the association between residential radon exposure and the risk of childhood cancer. We sought to evaluate the association between residential radon exposure and the incidence of childhood lymphoma in Texas. The Texas Cancer Registry (n = 2147) provided case information for the period 1995-2011. Denominator data were obtained from the United States Census. Regional arithmetic mean radon concentrations were obtained from the Texas Indoor Radon Survey and linked to residence at diagnosis. Exposure was assessed categorically: ≤25th percentile (reference), >25th to ≤50th percentile, >50th to ≤75th percentile, and >75th percentile. Negative binomial regression generated adjusted incidence rate ratios (aIRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). We evaluated lymphoma overall and by subtype: Hodgkin (HL; n = 1248), Non-Hodgkin excluding Burkitt (non-BL NHL; n = 658), Burkitt (BL; n = 241), and Diffuse Large B-cell (DLBCL; n = 315). There was no evidence that residential radon exposure was positively associated with lymphoma overall, HL, or BL. Areas with radon concentrations >75th percentile had a marginal increase in DLBCL incidence (aIRR = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.03-2.91). In one of the largest studies of residential radon exposure and the incidence of childhood lymphoma, we found little evidence to suggest a positive or negative association; an observation consistent with previous studies. PMID:26404336

  2. Residential Radon Exposure and Incidence of Childhood Lymphoma in Texas, 1995–2011

    PubMed Central

    Peckham, Erin C.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Danysh, Heather E.; Lubega, Joseph; Langlois, Peter H.; Lupo, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    There is warranted interest in assessing the association between residential radon exposure and the risk of childhood cancer. We sought to evaluate the association between residential radon exposure and the incidence of childhood lymphoma in Texas. The Texas Cancer Registry (n = 2147) provided case information for the period 1995–2011. Denominator data were obtained from the United States Census. Regional arithmetic mean radon concentrations were obtained from the Texas Indoor Radon Survey and linked to residence at diagnosis. Exposure was assessed categorically: ≤25th percentile (reference), >25th to ≤50th percentile, >50th to ≤75th percentile, and >75th percentile. Negative binomial regression generated adjusted incidence rate ratios (aIRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). We evaluated lymphoma overall and by subtype: Hodgkin (HL; n = 1248), Non-Hodgkin excluding Burkitt (non-BL NHL; n = 658), Burkitt (BL; n = 241), and Diffuse Large B-cell (DLBCL; n = 315). There was no evidence that residential radon exposure was positively associated with lymphoma overall, HL, or BL. Areas with radon concentrations >75th percentile had a marginal increase in DLBCL incidence (aIRR = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.03–2.91). In one of the largest studies of residential radon exposure and the incidence of childhood lymphoma, we found little evidence to suggest a positive or negative association; an observation consistent with previous studies. PMID:26404336

  3. Residential Radon Exposure and Incidence of Childhood Lymphoma in Texas, 1995-2011.

    PubMed

    Peckham, Erin C; Scheurer, Michael E; Danysh, Heather E; Lubega, Joseph; Langlois, Peter H; Lupo, Philip J

    2015-09-25

    There is warranted interest in assessing the association between residential radon exposure and the risk of childhood cancer. We sought to evaluate the association between residential radon exposure and the incidence of childhood lymphoma in Texas. The Texas Cancer Registry (n = 2147) provided case information for the period 1995-2011. Denominator data were obtained from the United States Census. Regional arithmetic mean radon concentrations were obtained from the Texas Indoor Radon Survey and linked to residence at diagnosis. Exposure was assessed categorically: ≤25th percentile (reference), >25th to ≤50th percentile, >50th to ≤75th percentile, and >75th percentile. Negative binomial regression generated adjusted incidence rate ratios (aIRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). We evaluated lymphoma overall and by subtype: Hodgkin (HL; n = 1248), Non-Hodgkin excluding Burkitt (non-BL NHL; n = 658), Burkitt (BL; n = 241), and Diffuse Large B-cell (DLBCL; n = 315). There was no evidence that residential radon exposure was positively associated with lymphoma overall, HL, or BL. Areas with radon concentrations >75th percentile had a marginal increase in DLBCL incidence (aIRR = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.03-2.91). In one of the largest studies of residential radon exposure and the incidence of childhood lymphoma, we found little evidence to suggest a positive or negative association; an observation consistent with previous studies.

  4. Identification of Epstein-Barr Virus Replication Proteins in Burkitt's Lymphoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Traylen, Chris; Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Zuo, Jianmin; Rowe, Martin; Almohammad, Rajaei; Heesom, Kate; Sweet, Steve M M; Matthews, David A; Sinclair, Alison J

    2015-01-01

    The working model to describe the mechanisms used to replicate the cancer-associated virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is partly derived from comparisons with other members of the Herpes virus family. Many genes within the EBV genome are homologous across the herpes virus family. Published transcriptome data for the EBV genome during its lytic replication cycle show extensive transcription, but the identification of the proteins is limited. We have taken a global proteomics approach to identify viral proteins that are expressed during the EBV lytic replication cycle. We combined an enrichment method to isolate cells undergoing EBV lytic replication with SILAC-labeling coupled to mass-spectrometry and identified viral and host proteins expressed during the OPEN ACCESS Pathogens 2015, 4 740 EBV lytic replication cycle. Amongst the most frequently identified viral proteins are two components of the DNA replication machinery, the single strand DNA binding protein BALF2, DNA polymerase accessory protein BMRF1 and both subunits of the viral ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase enzyme (BORF2 and BaRF1). An additional 42 EBV lytic cycle proteins were also detected. This provides proteomic identification for many EBV lytic replication cycle proteins and also identifies post-translational modifications. PMID:26529022

  5. Bortezomib induction of C/EBPβ mediates Epstein-Barr virus lytic activation in Burkitt lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Shirley, Courtney M; Chen, Jianmeng; Shamay, Meir; Li, Huili; Zahnow, Cynthia A; Hayward, S Diane; Ambinder, Richard F

    2011-06-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with a variety of lymphoid malignancies. Bortezomib activates EBV lytic gene expression. Bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor, leads to increased levels of CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteinβ (C/EBPβ) in a variety of tumor cell lines. C/EBPβ activates the promoter of the EBV lytic switch gene ZTA. Bortezomib treatment leads to increased binding of C/EBP to previously recognized binding sites in the ZTA promoter. Knockdown of C/EBPβ inhibits bortezomib activation of EBV lytic gene expression. Bortezomib also induces the unfolded protein response (UPR), as evidenced by increases in ATF4, CHOP10, and XBP1s and cleavage of ATF6. Thapsigargin, an inducer of the UPR that does not interfere with proteasome function, also induces EBV lytic gene expression. The effects of thapsigargin on EBV lytic gene expression are also inhibited by C/EBPβ knock-down. Therefore, C/EBPβ mediates the activation of EBV lytic gene expression associated with bortezomib and another UPR inducer. PMID:21447826

  6. Resveratrol inhibits Epstein Barr Virus lytic cycle in Burkitt's lymphoma cells by affecting multiple molecular targets.

    PubMed

    De Leo, Alessandra; Arena, Giuseppe; Lacanna, Egidio; Oliviero, Giorgio; Colavita, Francesca; Mattia, Elena

    2012-11-01

    Resveratrol (RV), a polyphenolic natural product present in many plants and fruits, exhibits anti-inflammatory, cardio-protective and anti-proliferative properties. Moreover, RV affects a wide variety of viruses including members of the Herpesviridae family, retroviruses, influenza A virus and polyomavirus by altering cellular pathways that affect viral replication itself. Epstein Barr Virus (EBV), the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis, is associated with different proliferative diseases in which it establishes a latent and/or a lytic infection. In this study, we examined the antiviral activity of RV against the EBV replicative cycle and investigated the molecular targets possibly involved. In a cellular context that allows in vitro EBV activation and lytic cycle progression through mechanisms closely resembling those that in vivo initiate and enable productive infection, we found that RV inhibited EBV lytic genes expression and the production of viral particles in a dose-dependent manner. We demonstrated that RV inhibited protein synthesis, decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and suppressed the EBV-induced activation of the redox-sensitive transcription factors NF-kB and AP-1. Further insights into the signaling pathways and molecular targets modulated by RV may provide the basis for exploiting the antiviral activity of this natural product on EBV replication.

  7. Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 8,500 % of All New Cancer Cases 0.5% Estimated Deaths in 2016 1,120 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 193,545 people living with Hodgkin lymphoma in ...

  8. Vorinostat and Bortezomib in Treating Young Patients With Refractory or Recurrent Solid Tumors, Including Central Nervous System Tumors and Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-01

    Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Choriocarcinoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Central Nervous System Germinoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Central Nervous System Teratoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Yolk Sac Tumor; Childhood Choroid Plexus Tumor; Childhood Craniopharyngioma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Medulloepithelioma; Childhood Meningioma; Childhood Mixed Glioma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Malignant Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Pineoblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway Glioma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  9. A Gene Panel, Including LRP12, Is Frequently Hypermethylated in Major Types of B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bethge, Nicole; Honne, Hilde; Andresen, Kim; Hilden, Vera; Trøen, Gunhild; Liestøl, Knut; Holte, Harald; Delabie, Jan; Lind, Guro E.; Smeland, Erlend B.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications and DNA methylation in particular, have been recognized as important mechanisms to alter gene expression in malignant cells. Here, we identified candidate genes which were upregulated after an epigenetic treatment of B-cell lymphoma cell lines (Burkitt's lymphoma, BL; Follicular lymphoma, FL; Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, DLBCL activated B-cell like, ABC; and germinal center like, GCB) and simultaneously expressed at low levels in samples from lymphoma patients. Qualitative methylation analysis of 24 candidate genes in cell lines revealed five methylated genes (BMP7, BMPER, CDH1, DUSP4 and LRP12), which were further subjected to quantitative methylation analysis in clinical samples from 59 lymphoma patients (BL, FL, DLBCL ABC and GCB; and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma, PMBL). The genes LRP12 and CDH1 showed the highest methylation frequencies (94% and 92%, respectively). BMPER (58%), DUSP4 (32%) and BMP7 (22%), were also frequently methylated in patient samples. Importantly, all gene promoters were unmethylated in various control samples (CD19+ peripheral blood B cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells and tonsils) as well as in follicular hyperplasia samples, underscoring a high specificity. The combination of LRP12 and CDH1 methylation could successfully discriminate between the vast majority of the lymphoma and control samples, emphasized by receiver operating characteristic analysis with a c-statistic of 0.999. These two genes represent promising epigenetic markers which may be suitable for monitoring of B-cell lymphoma. PMID:25226156

  10. A gene panel, including LRP12, is frequently hypermethylated in major types of B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bethge, Nicole; Honne, Hilde; Andresen, Kim; Hilden, Vera; Trøen, Gunhild; Liestøl, Knut; Holte, Harald; Delabie, Jan; Lind, Guro E; Smeland, Erlend B

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications and DNA methylation in particular, have been recognized as important mechanisms to alter gene expression in malignant cells. Here, we identified candidate genes which were upregulated after an epigenetic treatment of B-cell lymphoma cell lines (Burkitt's lymphoma, BL; Follicular lymphoma, FL; Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, DLBCL activated B-cell like, ABC; and germinal center like, GCB) and simultaneously expressed at low levels in samples from lymphoma patients. Qualitative methylation analysis of 24 candidate genes in cell lines revealed five methylated genes (BMP7, BMPER, CDH1, DUSP4 and LRP12), which were further subjected to quantitative methylation analysis in clinical samples from 59 lymphoma patients (BL, FL, DLBCL ABC and GCB; and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma, PMBL). The genes LRP12 and CDH1 showed the highest methylation frequencies (94% and 92%, respectively). BMPER (58%), DUSP4 (32%) and BMP7 (22%), were also frequently methylated in patient samples. Importantly, all gene promoters were unmethylated in various control samples (CD19+ peripheral blood B cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells and tonsils) as well as in follicular hyperplasia samples, underscoring a high specificity. The combination of LRP12 and CDH1 methylation could successfully discriminate between the vast majority of the lymphoma and control samples, emphasized by receiver operating characteristic analysis with a c-statistic of 0.999. These two genes represent promising epigenetic markers which may be suitable for monitoring of B-cell lymphoma. PMID:25226156

  11. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lymphoma? A lymphoma is a cancer of the lymphatic system . The lymphatic system is a part of the body's immune system. ... non-Hodgkin lymphoma, cancer cells form in the lymphatic system and start to grow. Most of the time, ...

  12. The Histological Classification of Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yi; Pittaluga, Stefania; Jaffe, Elaine S.

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) are aggressive B-cell neoplasms with considerable clinical, biologic and pathologic diversity, in part reflecting the functional diversity of the B-cell system and multiple pathways of transformation. In recent years, the advent of new high-throughput genomic technologies has provided new insights into the biology of DLBCL, leading to the identification of distinct molecular identities and novel pathogenetic pathways. This increasing complexity had led to an expanding number of entities in the WHO classification. Using a multi-modality approach, the updated 2008 classification delineated some new subgroups, including DLBCLs associated with particular age groups or specific anatomic sites, as well as two borderline categories: tumors at the interface between classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) and DLBCL as well as between Burkitt Lymphoma (BL) and DLBCL. This article reviews the histopathologic features of the various aggressive B-cell lymphoma subtypes included in the 2008 classification, with emphasis on some of the new entities as well as areas of diagnostic challenge. PMID:25805585

  13. [Malignant lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Asano, Naoko; Nakamura, Shigeo

    2014-06-01

    The WHO classification, considered as a bible for lymphoma diagnosis, is a list of disease units. It is expected that it will fully classify all diseases based on indicators with objectivity of constants, even in the present state, in which it cannot be said that the source, causes, and tumorigenesis mechanisms have been identified for all neoplasms. The indicators are the histology, phenotype, genotype, and clinical picture. In the current WHO classification, these indicators are described for each diseases unit, and considered as diagnostic items. While the importance of items which serve as indicators differ depending on each illness, the pathologic centering on a morphological finding does not change for lymphoma diagnosis in accordance with this WHO classification. An indispensable factor in order to evaluate this objective of pathologic diagnosis is phenotypic and genotype assessment. A phenotype is analyzed by immunohistochemistry techniques, and a genotype is clarified by various gene chromosome tests. Diagnostic applications using these test results are developed as follows: 1. Histological diagnosis based on the immunohistochemical features of lymphoma cells, 2. Identification of oncogene products, 3. Evaluation of biological prognostic factors, 4. Analysis of the inflammatory microenvironment of tumor cells. This paper describes all items. PMID:25151780

  14. Cytogenetics in the management of lymphomas and lymphoproliferative disorders in adults and children: an update by the Groupe francophone de cytogénétique hématologique (GFCH).

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Christine; Callet-Bauchu, Evelyne; Chapiro, Elise; Nadal, Nathalie; Penther, Dominique; Poirel, Hélène-Antoine

    2016-10-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and lymphoproliferative disorders include a high number of heterogeneous entities, described in the 2008 WHO classification. This classification reflects the crucial role of a multidisciplinary approach which integrates cytogenetic results both for the notion of clonality and for differential diagnosis between these entities. The prognostic impact of some cytogenetic abnormalities or genome complexity is also confirmed for many of these entities. Novel provisional entities have been described, such as BCLU (B-cell lymphoma unclassifiable with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma) for which karyotype is critical to distinguish BCLU from Burkitt's lymphoma. The karyotype can be established from any tumour or liquid infiltrated by lymphoma cells. Recent adaptations of technics for cellular cultures according to the subtype of known (or suspected) lymphoma have significantly improved the percentage of informative karyotypes. Conventional karyotypes remain the best technical approach recommended for most of these subtypes. Interphase and/or metaphase FISH also represents a solid and rapid approach, because of the significant number of recurrent (sometimes specific) rearrangements of these entities. Next generation sequencing technologies contribute to enrich genomic data and substantially improve the understanding of oncogenic mechanisms underlying these lymphoid malignancies. Some molecular biomarkers are already part of the diagnostic process (for example, somatic mutation of MYD88 in Waldenström disease) thus reinforcing the essential principle of a multidisciplinary approach for the diagnosis of all the mature lymphoid malignancies.

  15. The SMAC mimetic, LCL-161, reduces survival in aggressive MYC-driven lymphoma while promoting susceptibility to endotoxic shock

    PubMed Central

    West, A C; Martin, B P; Andrews, D A; Hogg, S J; Banerjee, A; Grigoriadis, G; Johnstone, R W; Shortt, J

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) antagonize caspase activation and regulate death receptor signaling cascades. LCL-161 is a small molecule second mitochondrial activator of caspase (SMAC) mimetic, which both disengages IAPs from caspases and induces proteasomal degradation of cIAP-1 and -2, resulting in altered signaling through the NFκB pathway, enhanced TNF production and sensitization to apoptosis mediated by the extrinsic pathway. SMAC mimetics are undergoing clinical evaluation in a range of hematological malignancies. Burkitt-like lymphomas are hallmarked by a low apoptotic threshold, conveying sensitivity to a range of apoptosis-inducing stimuli. While evaluating LCL-161 in the Eμ-Myc model of aggressive Burkitt-like lymphoma, we noted unexpected resistance to apoptosis induction despite ‘on-target' IAP degradation and NFκB activation. Moreover, LCL-161 treatment of lymphoma-bearing mice resulted in apparent disease acceleration concurrent to augmented inflammatory cytokine-release in the same animals. Indiscriminate exposure of lymphoma patients to SMAC mimetics may therefore be detrimental due to both unanticipated prolymphoma effects and increased susceptibility to endotoxic shock. PMID:27043662

  16. Inhibition of the miR-155 target NIAM phenocopies the growth promoting effect of miR-155 in B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Slezak-Prochazka, Izabella; Kluiver, Joost; de Jong, Debora; Smigielska-Czepiel, Katarzyna; Kortman, Gertrud; Winkle, Melanie; Rutgers, Bea; Koerts, Jasper; Visser, Lydia; Diepstra, Arjan; Kroesen, Bart-Jan; van den Berg, Anke

    2016-01-19

    Several studies have indicated an important role for miR-155 in the pathogenesis of B-cell lymphoma. Highly elevated levels of miR-155 were indeed observed in most B-cell lymphomas with the exception of Burkitt lymphoma (BL). However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie the oncogenic role of miR-155 in B-cell lymphoma are not well understood. To identify the miR-155 targets relevant for B-cell lymphoma, we performed RNA immunoprecipitation of Argonaute 2 in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) cells upon miR-155 inhibition and in BL cells upon ectopic expression of miR-155. We identified 54 miR-155-specific target genes in BL cells and confirmed miR-155 targeting of DET1, NIAM, TRIM32, HOMEZ, PSIP1 and JARID2. Five of these targets are also regulated by endogenous miR-155 in HL cells. Both overexpression of miR-155 and inhibition of expression of the novel miR-155 target gene NIAM increased proliferation of BL cells. In primary B-cell lymphoma NIAM-positive cases have significant lower levels of miR-155 as compared to NIAM-negative cases, suggesting that NIAM is also regulated by miR-155 in primary B-cell lymphoma. Thus, our data indicate an oncogenic role for miR-155 in B-cell lymphoma which involves targeting the tumor suppressor NIAM.

  17. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtype distribution, geodemographic patterns, and survival in the US: A longitudinal analysis of the National Cancer Data Base from 1998 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Al-Hamadani, Mohammed; Habermann, Thomas M; Cerhan, James R; Macon, William R; Maurer, Matthew J; Go, Ronald S

    2015-09-01

    The World Health Organization classification of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) was introduced in 2001. However, its incorporation into clinical practice is not well-described. We studied the distribution of NHL subtypes in adults diagnosed from 1998 to 2011, evaluated time trends, geo-demographic correlates, and changes in 5-year overall survival (OS). We obtained data prospectively collected by the National Cancer Data Base, which covers 70% of US cancer cases. There were 596,476 patients diagnosed with NHL. The major subtypes were diffuse large B-cell (32.5%), chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL; 18.6%), follicular (17.1%), marginal zone (8.3%), mantle cell (4.1%), peripheral T-cell not-otherwise-specified (1.7%), Burkitt (1.6%), hairy cell (1.1%), lymphoplasmacytic (1.1%), and NHL not-otherwise-specified (10.8%). Over the study period, the proportion of NHL not-otherwise-specified declined by half, while marginal zone lymphoma doubled. The distribution of major and rare NHL subtypes varied according to demographics but less so geographically or by type of treatment facility. We noted several novel findings among Hispanics (lower proportion of CLL/SLL, but higher Burkitt lymphoma and nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma), Asians (higher enteropathy-associated T-cell and angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphomas), Blacks (higher hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma), and Native Americans (similar proportions of CLL/SLL and nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma as Asians). With the exception of peripheral T-cell not-otherwise-specified and hairy cell leukemia, 5-year OS has improved for all the major NHL subtypes. PMID:26096944

  18. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The InterLymph Consortium, or formally the International Consortium of Investigators Working on Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Epidemiologic Studies, is an open scientific forum for epidemiologic research in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  19. T-Cell Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... are extremely rare. T-cell lymphomas can be aggressive (fast-growing) or indolent (slow-growing). Lymphomas are ... also be involved. This group of PTCLs is aggressive and requires combination chemotherapy upon diagnosis. For more ...

  20. Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... called primary cutaneous ALCL and follows a less aggressive course. In almost all cases of primary cutaneous ... kinase (ALK). While both lymphomas are treated as aggressive lymphomas, the prognosis for ALCL depends on whether ...

  1. The African Organisation for Research and Training in Cancer and its conferences: a historical perspective and highlights of the Ninth International Conference, Durban, South Africa, 21-24 November 2013.

    PubMed

    Williams, Christopher Ko; Cristina Stefan, D; Rawlinson, Fiona; Simbiri, Kenneth; Mbulaiteye, Sam M

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of the African Organisation for Research and Training in Cancer (AORTIC), both at its inception in the early 1980s, and at its reactivation in 2000 following a decade of inactivity, included bringing the products of decades of advances in cancer research to African populations through international collaboration. The historical perspective provided in this report illustrates progress in achieving these objectives through successive continent-wide activities over a period of 30 years, culminating in the organisation's most recent conference held in Durban, South Africa, 21-24 November 2013. The constant growth in the number of attendants and increasing diversity of the nations of their origin are consistent with advances, whereby the number of participants and the nations of their origin have grown from 24 in 1983 to almost 1000 in 2013, and from 14 to 70, respectively. While earlier AORTIC conferences used to assume the atmosphere of 'jamborees', more recent ones have morphed to problem-solving events, with the concerted collaboration of international organisations, including the World Health Organisation (WHO), International Union Against Cancer (UICC), the Africa Union (AU), the US National Cancer Institute (NCI), the International Psycho-Oncology Society (IPOS), and others. The topics of discussion at the Ninth AORTIC International Conference on Cancer in Africa in Durban were those of paramount importance for low- and middle-income countries: childhood cancers, cancers of the cervix, breast, and prostate, as well as cancer care challenges resulting from ignorance, neglect, and economic deprivation. The role of environmental factors that underlie Burkitt's lymphoma was the subject of the Epidemiology of Burkitt Lymphoma in East-African Children and Minors Workshop, highlighting the NCI research programme in East Africa, while the Workshop on Cost Effectiveness of Treatment of Cancer in Africa surmised that treating childhood cancers is affordable

  2. The African Organisation for Research and Training in Cancer and its conferences: a historical perspective and highlights of the Ninth International Conference, Durban, South Africa, 21-24 November 2013.

    PubMed

    Williams, Christopher Ko; Cristina Stefan, D; Rawlinson, Fiona; Simbiri, Kenneth; Mbulaiteye, Sam M

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of the African Organisation for Research and Training in Cancer (AORTIC), both at its inception in the early 1980s, and at its reactivation in 2000 following a decade of inactivity, included bringing the products of decades of advances in cancer research to African populations through international collaboration. The historical perspective provided in this report illustrates progress in achieving these objectives through successive continent-wide activities over a period of 30 years, culminating in the organisation's most recent conference held in Durban, South Africa, 21-24 November 2013. The constant growth in the number of attendants and increasing diversity of the nations of their origin are consistent with advances, whereby the number of participants and the nations of their origin have grown from 24 in 1983 to almost 1000 in 2013, and from 14 to 70, respectively. While earlier AORTIC conferences used to assume the atmosphere of 'jamborees', more recent ones have morphed to problem-solving events, with the concerted collaboration of international organisations, including the World Health Organisation (WHO), International Union Against Cancer (UICC), the Africa Union (AU), the US National Cancer Institute (NCI), the International Psycho-Oncology Society (IPOS), and others. The topics of discussion at the Ninth AORTIC International Conference on Cancer in Africa in Durban were those of paramount importance for low- and middle-income countries: childhood cancers, cancers of the cervix, breast, and prostate, as well as cancer care challenges resulting from ignorance, neglect, and economic deprivation. The role of environmental factors that underlie Burkitt's lymphoma was the subject of the Epidemiology of Burkitt Lymphoma in East-African Children and Minors Workshop, highlighting the NCI research programme in East Africa, while the Workshop on Cost Effectiveness of Treatment of Cancer in Africa surmised that treating childhood cancers is affordable

  3. Pegfilgrastim and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Untreated, Relapsed, or Refractory Follicular Lymphoma, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, or Marginal Zone Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-20

    Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  4. [Investigation of Epstein-Barr virus DNA and RNA in tissues of patients with lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Zeytinoğlu, Ayşin; Hekimgil, Mine; Erensoy, Selda; Aydemir, Söhret; Berber, Sahir; Cağirgan, Seçkin; Soydan, Saliha; Bilgiç, Altinay

    2005-10-01

    Relation between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and nasopharyngeal carsinoma, Burkitt's lymphoma, and lymphomas in immunosupressed patients have been shown previously in different studies. The same relationship was also shown in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) by some researchers. The aim of this study was to demonstrate EBV nucleic acids in tissue sections of adult patients with lymphoma. The presence of EBV encoded RNA (EBER) were investigated with in situ hybridization and EBV-DNA with PCR method in 29 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections (19 lymph nodes, the others being gastric, orbital, skin, salivary gland, testicle, small intestinal, tongue root, bone marrow and gingival tissues) of 8 patients with HL and 21 patients with NHL who were followed-up in Haematology Clinics of our university hospital. EBER and EBV-DNA positivity rates were found as follows respectively; 50% (n: 4) and 37.5% (n: 3) of 8 HL patients, and 23.8% (n: 5) and 47.6% (n: 10) of 21 NHL patients. In total evaluation EBER and/or EBV-DNA were positive in 5 of 8 (62.5%) HL, and 12 of 21 (57.1%) NHL tissue sections. There was no significant difference in EBER and EBV-DNA positivity between HL and NHL groups. As a result, our study emphasize a possible EBV related aetiology in HL and NHL. PMID:16544549

  5. Application value of magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosing central nervous system lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shanhua; Li, Hongjun; Zhu, Rongguang; Zhang, Mingming

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of central nervous system lymphoma. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed MRI images of 40 patients who had pathologically proven primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) and received treatment in Binzhou People’s Hospital, Shandong, China from January to December in 2014. Location, size and form of tumor was observed and relevant data were recorded for analysis. Results: Foci of 40 cases of PCNSL all located in brain, among which. 18 cases were single (45.0%) and 22 cases were multiple (55.5%). Of 96 Foci, 84 were supratentorial, 12 were subtentorial. Enhanced MRI scanning showed that, most Foci had significant homogenous enhancement, shaping as multiple nodular or lumpy, and few had ring-enhancement. MRI suggested that, T1 signal of most Foci concentrated on low signal segment and T2 signal gathered on high signal segment, suggesting a significant homogeneous enhancement; moreover, mild and medium edema surrounded the tumor. They were pathologically confirmed as B cell derived non-hodgkin lymphoma. Except one case of Burkitt lymphoma, the others were all diffuse large B cell lymphoma which was observed with diffuse distribution of cancer cells (little cytoplasm, large nucleus, rough perichromatin granule) in same size. Fifteen cases were observed with sleeve-like infiltration of cancer cells around blood vessels. No case was found with hemorrhage, necrosis or calcification. Conclusion: Pathological foundation of PCNSL determines its characteristic MRI performance. Typical case of PCNSL can be diagnosed accurately by MRI. PMID:27182246

  6. Immunohistochemical expression of procaspase-3 and its clinical significance in childhood non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Grazyna; Maldyk, Jadwiga; Kazanowska, Bernarda; Rapala, Malgorzata; Maciejka-Kapuscinska, Lucyna; Chaber, Radosław

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown differences in expression levels of apoptosis regulatory proteins in non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) and indicated the correlation of procaspase-3 (proC-3) and caspase-3 activation to the response of chemotherapy. We investigated whether proC-3 expression in tumor biopsies of childhood NHLs is related to clinical outcome. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues from 58 children with NHL were evaluated for proC-3 expression by immunochemistry analysis. The study included 20 cases of Burkitt lymphoma, 7 cases of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, 18 cases of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), and 13 cases of precursor lymphoblastic lymphoma. The highest expression level of proC-3 was observed in ALCL. In the multivariate analysis the higher clinical stage of disease and higher expression level of proC-3 were independent and appear to be significant prognostic factors of treatment failure. Our results suggest that the high expression level of proC-3 may be a powerful independent predictor of response to chemotherapy and progression-free survival in childhood NHLs. PMID:20722551

  7. Autotransplant conditioning regimens for aggressive lymphoma: are we on the right road?

    PubMed

    Fernandez, H F; Escalón, M P; Pereira, D; Lazarus, H M

    2007-09-01

    High-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) is the standard approach for chemosensitive, relapsed aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Various conditioning regimens have been used as treatment before ASCT and disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates range from 34 to 60% and 26 to 46%, respectively. To date, few comparative randomized trials have been performed and no regimen has demonstrated superiority to another. Reduction of disease relapse remains the major hurdle for improving patient outcome and in vitro and in vivo purging of lymphoma cells has not necessarily enhanced results. Rituximab pre-mobilization and post-transplant appear to provide better response rates with OS approaching 87-91% at 2-3 years. Newer approaches with radioimmunotherapy may raise DFS to 78% and OS to 93%, albeit with short follow-up. Advances in the conditioning regimens and supportive care have reduced transplant-related mortality to less than 10%. In this review we discuss commonly utilized conditioning regimens, describe their pros and cons and address purging and present conditioning strategies. Owing to the poor outcome with conventional chemotherapy in mantle cell, Burkitt's and T-cell lymphoma, we propose the standard approach of front-line ASCT for these high-risk lymphoma patients. Finally, we will present novel strategies, which can enhance the anti-lymphoma effect, at the same time reducing toxicity, to improve the outcome of ASCT in NHL patients.

  8. Intraocular Lymphoma Models

    PubMed Central

    Aronow, Mary E.; Shen, Defen; Hochman, Jacob; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2015-01-01

    Primary vitreoretinal lymphoma (PVRL) is a subtype of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL), a high-grade, extranodal, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, predominantly of B-cell origin. PVRL is an aggressive disease with a poor prognosis. Human studies are not ideally suited for the study of intraocular lymphoma pathogenesis or treatment strategies due to the rare nature of the disease, its variable presentation, limited volume of available ocular fluids, and fragility of sampled lymphoma cells. Animal models have been critical in making progress in understanding intraocular lymphoma pathogenesis and investigating potential therapeutic strategies. Early murine models for intraocular lymphoma used intraperitoneal injection of mouse T-cell lymphomas. This was followed by intravitreal T-cell murine models. More recent murine models have used B-cell lymphomas to more closely mimic human disease. The most current B-cell lymphoma models employ a combined approach of inoculating both the mouse vitreous cavity and brain. The challenge in murine models for intraocular lymphoma lies in recreating the clinical features, disease behavior, molecular profile, systemic immunity, and the microenvironment observed in human disease. In the future, animal models will continue to be central to furthering our understanding of the disease and in the investigation of potential treatment targets. PMID:27171354

  9. AT13387 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, Mantle Cell Lymphoma, or Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-06

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, ALK-Positive; Recurrent Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  10. Addiction to Runx1 is partially attenuated by loss of p53 in the Eμ-Myc lymphoma model

    PubMed Central

    Borland, Gillian; Kilbey, Anna; Hay, Jodie; Gilroy, Kathryn; Terry, Anne; Mackay, Nancy; Bell, Margaret; McDonald, Alma; Mills, Ken; Cameron, Ewan; Neil, James C.

    2016-01-01

    The Runx genes function as dominant oncogenes that collaborate potently with Myc or loss of p53 to induce lymphoma when over-expressed. Here we examined the requirement for basal Runx1 activity for tumor maintenance in the Eμ-Myc model of Burkitt's lymphoma. While normal Runx1fl/fl lymphoid cells permit mono-allelic deletion, primary Eμ-Myc lymphomas showed selection for retention of both alleles and attempts to enforce deletion in vivo led to compensatory expansion of p53null blasts retaining Runx1. Surprisingly, Runx1 could be excised completely from established Eμ-Myc lymphoma cell lines in vitro without obvious effects on cell phenotype. Established lines lacked functional p53, and were sensitive to death induced by introduction of a temperature-sensitive p53 (Val135) allele. Transcriptome analysis of Runx1-deleted cells revealed a gene signature associated with lymphoid proliferation, survival and differentiation, and included strong de-repression of recombination-activating (Rag) genes, an observation that was mirrored in a panel of human acute leukemias where RUNX1 and RAG1,2 mRNA expression were negatively correlated. Notably, despite their continued growth and tumorigenic potential, Runx1null lymphoma cells displayed impaired proliferation and markedly increased sensitivity to DNA damage and dexamethasone-induced apoptosis, validating Runx1 function as a potential therapeutic target in Myc-driven lymphomas regardless of their p53 status. PMID:27056890

  11. Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas in children. II. Treatment.

    PubMed

    White, L; Siegel, S E; Quah, T C

    1992-07-01

    The prognosis of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in childhood has improved steadily in the last 2 decades. This is primarily the result of increasingly effective chemotherapy regimens tailored to defined and relatively homogeneous prognostic categories and tested in prospective clinical trials. Surgical excision remains of prognostic benefit only when near-total resection can be performed without delay of chemotherapy. The role of radiation therapy is now limited to the treatment of overt central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma, disease unresponsive to chemotherapy, and certain emergencies. Effective 'prophylactic' treatment of the CNS has been achieved in most series by intrathecal and systemic chemotherapy alone. The most relevant modality of treatment is chemotherapy and a very large number of protocols have been published. The origins of current multi-agent regimens stem both from early experience with cyclophosphamide in endemic Burkitt's lymphoma and from therapeutic studies of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Sub-stratification of non-localized NHL has produced protocols designed for either lymphoblastic (mostly T cell) or non-lymphoblastic (mostly B cell) categories. While the cure rate for lymphoblastic lymphoma now exceed 70%, the non-localized non-lymphoblastic disease remains a major obstacle to cure. These patients frequently present with large abdominal primaries and are prone to regional as well as hematogenous dissemination. In particular, involvement of the CNS is now considered to be the most adverse prognostic variable in this group. Recently, highly intensive regimens are addressing these obstacles. On the other hand, NHL defined as localized has been shown to be curable in up to 95% of children with the use of simple chemotherapy regimens as short as 6 months in duration. Salvage of patients who relapse during or after chemotherapy remains bleak but cures are possible with regimens incorporating bone marrow transplantation from either an autologous or

  12. Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma This page lists cancer ... in Hodgkin lymphoma that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma Adcetris (Brentuximab Vedotin) Ambochlorin ( ...

  13. Lymphoma Microenvironment and Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mina L; Fedoriw, Yuri

    2016-03-01

    Understanding of the lymphoma tumor microenvironment is poised to expand in the era of next-generation sequencing studies of the tumor cells themselves. Successful therapies of the future will rely on deeper appreciation of the interactions between elements of the microenvironment. Although the phenotypic, cytogenetic, and molecular characterization of tumor cells in lymphomas has progressed faster than most other solid organ tumors, concrete advancements in understanding the lymphoma microenvironment have been fewer. This article explores the composition of the lymphoma tumor microenvironment; its role in immune surveillance, evasion, and drug resistance; and its potential role in the development of targeted therapies.

  14. Piperlongumine inhibits LMP1/MYC-dependent mouse B-lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seong-Su; Tompkins, Van S.; Son, Dong-Ju; Kamberos, Natalie L.; Stunz, Laura L.; Halwani, Ahmad; Bishop, Gail A.; Janz, Siegfried

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Mouse model of human Burkitt lymphoma revealed cancer inhibition by PL. •Treatment with PL led to apoptosis of malignant but not normal B cells. •PL inhibited LMP1–NF-κB–Myc-dependent target genes including p21-encoding Cdkn1a. •PL holds promise for new interventions approaches to hematologic malignancies. -- Abstract: Piperlongumine (PL), isolated from the fruit of Long pepper, Piper longum, is a cancer-inhibiting compound that selectively kills tumor cells while sparing their normal counterparts. Here we evaluated the efficacy with which PL suppresses malignant B cells derived from a newly developed, double-transgenic mouse model of human endemic Burkitt lymphoma (BL), designated mCD40-LMP1/iMyc{sup Eμ}. PL inhibited tumor cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner and induced apoptosis of neoplastic but not normal B cells. Treatment with PL resulted in downregulation of EBV-encoded LMP1, cellular Myc, constitutive NF-κB activity, and a host of LMP1-Myc-NF-κB-regulated target genes including Aurka, Bcat1, Bub1b, Ccnb1, Chek1, Fancd2, Tfrc and Xrcc6. Of note, p21{sup Cip1}-encoding Cdkn1a was suppressed independent of changes in Trp53 mRNA levels and p53 DNA-binding activity. Considering the central role of the LMP1–NF-κB–Myc axis in B-lineage neoplasia, these findings further our understanding of the mechanisms by which PL inhibits B-lymphoma and provide a preclinical rationale for the inclusion of PL in new interventions in blood cancers.

  15. [Radiotherapy of lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Barillot, I; Mahé, M A; Antoni, D; Hennequin, C

    2016-09-01

    Radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma has evolved over time but retains a dominant position in the treatment of early stage tumours. Its indications are more limited for non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, but the techniques follow the same principles whatever the histological type. This review presents the French recommendations in terms of preparation and choice of irradiation techniques. PMID:27521031

  16. Sarcoidosis Occurring After Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    London, Jonathan; Grados, Aurélie; Fermé, Christophe; Charmillon, Alexandre; Maurier, François; Deau, Bénédicte; Crickx, Etienne; Brice, Pauline; Chapelon-Abric, Catherine; Haioun, Corinne; Burroni, Barbara; Alifano, Marco; Le Jeunne, Claire; Guillevin, Loïc; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Schleinitz, Nicolas; Mouthon, Luc; Terrier, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disease that most frequently affects the lungs with pulmonary infiltrates and/or bilateral hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathy. An association of sarcoidosis and lymphoproliferative disease has previously been reported as the sarcoidosis-lymphoma syndrome. Although this syndrome is characterized by sarcoidosis preceding lymphoma, very few cases of sarcoidosis following lymphoma have been reported. We describe the clinical, biological, and radiological characteristics and outcome of 39 patients presenting with sarcoidosis following lymphoproliferative disease, including 14 previously unreported cases and 25 additional patients, after performing a literature review. Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma were equally represented. The median delay between lymphoma and sarcoidosis was 18 months. Only 16 patients (41%) required treatment. Sarcoidosis was of mild intensity or self-healing in most cases, and overall clinical response to sarcoidosis was excellent with complete clinical response in 91% of patients. Sarcoidosis was identified after a follow-up computerized tomography scan (CT-scan) or 18fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (18FDG-PET/CT) evaluation in 18/34 patients (53%). Sarcoidosis is therefore a differential diagnosis to consider when lymphoma relapse is suspected on a CT-scan or 18FDG-PET/CT, emphasizing the necessity to rely on histological confirmation of lymphoma relapse. PMID:25380084

  17. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma in Children and Adolescents: Progress Through Effective Collaboration, Current Knowledge, and Challenges Ahead

    PubMed Central

    Minard-Colin, Véronique; Brugières, Laurence; Reiter, Alfred; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Gross, Thomas G.; Woessmann, Wilhelm; Burkhardt, Birgit; Sandlund, John T.; Williams, Denise; Pillon, Marta; Horibe, Keizo; Auperin, Anne; Le Deley, Marie-Cécile; Zimmerman, Martin; Perkins, Sherrie L.; Raphael, Martine; Lamant, Laurence; Klapper, Wolfram; Mussolin, Lara; Poirel, Hélène A.; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Damm-Welk, Christine; Rosolen, Angelo; Patte, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is the fourth most common malignancy in children, has an even higher incidence in adolescents, and is primarily represented by only a few histologic subtypes. Dramatic progress has been achieved, with survival rates exceeding 80%, in large part because of a better understanding of the biology of the different subtypes and national and international collaborations. Most patients with Burkitt lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma are cured with short intensive pulse chemotherapy containing cyclophosphamide, cytarabine, and high-dose methotrexate. The benefit of the addition of rituximab has not been established except in the case of primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma. Lymphoblastic lymphoma is treated with intensive, semi-continuous, longer leukemia-derived protocols. Relapses in B-cell and lymphoblastic lymphomas are rare and infrequently curable, even with intensive approaches. Event-free survival rates of approximately 75% have been achieved in anaplastic large-cell lymphomas with various regimens that generally include a short intensive B-like regimen. Immunity seems to play an important role in prognosis and needs further exploration to determine its therapeutic application. ALK inhibitor therapeutic approaches are currently under investigation. For all pediatric lymphomas, the intensity of induction/consolidation therapy correlates with acute toxicities, but because of low cumulative doses of anthracyclines and alkylating agents, minimal or no long-term toxicity is expected. Challenges that remain include defining the value of prognostic factors, such as early response on positron emission tomography/computed tomography and minimal disseminated and residual disease, using new biologic technologies to improve risk stratification, and developing innovative therapies, both in the first-line setting and for relapse. PMID:26304908

  18. Inflammatory myopathies and lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Stübgen, Joerg-Patrick

    2016-10-15

    The inflammatory myopathies comprise a group of immune-mediated muscle diseases. Lymphoma is a term for a variety of lymphatic system malignancies. Autoimmune diseases and lymphoproliferative malignancies share a complex bidirectional relationship. A causal relationship between inflammatory mypathies and lymphoma has not been established. The diagnosis/treatment of inflammatory myopathy usually precedes the detection/diagnosis of lymphoma. Immune system dysregulation presumably underlies the evolution of lymphoma in patients with inflammatory myopathies. Inflammatory activity with chronic B-cell activation and/or antigen stimulation is deemed the major risk factor for lymphoma in patients with autoimmunity. A "paraneoplastic" phenomenon or the effects of immunosuppressive therapy may be alternative immune-based mechanisms. In chronic lymphocytic leukemia immune system disturbance rarely results in non-hematological autoimmune disease, including inflammatory myopathies. PMID:27653927

  19. Biomarkers for lymphoma

    DOEpatents

    Zangar, Richard C.; Varnum, Susan M.

    2014-09-02

    A biomarker, method, test kit, and diagnostic system for detecting the presence of lymphoma in a person are disclosed. The lymphoma may be Hodgkin's lymphoma or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The person may be a high-risk subject. In one embodiment, a plasma sample from a person is obtained. The level of at least one protein listed in Table S3 in the plasma sample is measured. The level of at least one protein in the plasma sample is compared with the level in a normal or healthy subject. The lymphoma is diagnosed based upon the level of the at least one protein in the plasma sample in comparison to the normal or healthy level.

  20. Ovarian Lymphoma and Hydronephrosis

    PubMed Central

    Bernardini, Luca; Angeloni, Moira; Gogna, Paolo; Intersimone, Donatella; Fedeli, Franco

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Ovarian lymphoma is a rare entity, and hydronephrosis from lymphoma is even rarer. Most reports describe a laparoscopic approach to the disease, but we report a case of hydroureteronephrosis associated with ovarian lymphoma managed completely by mini-invasive techniques. Case Report: A 51-year-old woman was referred to us for back pain and renal colic and computed tomography scan findings of right hydroureteronephrosis and a mass in the right mesorectum and uterosacral ligament. After magnetic resonance imaging was performed, the patient underwent laparoscopic adnexectomy and ureterolysis after ureteroscopy and stenting. Histology results showed diffuse B-cell lymphoma of the ovary occluding the ureter without infiltration. The patient has undergone 6 cycles of chemotherapy. Discussion: This is the first report to describe ovarian lymphoma and hydroureteronephrosis managed completely by laparoscopic surgery and endoscopy. Frequency in clinical practice, differential diagnosis, and endoscopic approach are discussed. The advantages of a multidisciplinary endoscopic team are underlined. PMID:24398216

  1. Oral Clofarabine for Relapsed/Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-16

    Follicular Lymphoma; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Low Grade B-cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large-cell Lymphoma

  2. Primary gastrointestinal lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D L; Doria, R; Salloum, E

    1996-03-01

    Recent evidence suggests that a significant proportion of primary gastrointestinal lymphomas are driven by exogenous agents/antigens. In the stomach, Helicobacter pylori appears to be responsible for most cases of low-grade lymphomas (MALToma), whereas an infectious etiology is suspected in immunoproliferative small intestine disease (IPSID). Similarly, enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphomas appear to result from a disordered response to gluten, although this profile remains controversial. Accordingly, although traditional antineoplastic treatments, such as surgery and radiation, are still important for the treatment of primary GI lymphomas, antibiotics may be the first line of therapy for low-grade gastric MALToma, and they are often used alone or in combination with chemotherapy for IPSID. In patients with celiac sprue, a gluten-free diet appears to markedly reduce the risk for lymphoma. An important caveat for the treatment of gastric lymphomas is that only low-grade gastric MALTomas have consistently responded to antibiotics. Treatment of high-grade gastric lymphoma is evolving. Although surgery was once considered central to diagnosis, staging, and treatment of gastric lymphoma, most patients can now have a diagnosis established by endoscopic biopsy and are candidates for chemotherapy and adjuvant radiation. The risks of fatal hemorrhage and perforation have probably been vastly overestimated and appear to be equal or less than the mortality associated with surgery. In addition, the long-term effects of gastric resection on quality of life have been almost completely ignored. Systemic lymphomas involve the GI tract far more often than is clinically apparent. In most cases, treatment should not be affected.

  3. Integrating understanding of epidemiology and genomics in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma as a pathway to novel management strategies.

    PubMed

    Glass, Samantha; Phan, Anh; Williams, Jessica N; Flowers, Christopher R; Koff, Jean L

    2016-03-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphomas include a biologically and clinically heterogeneous group of cancers distinguished by genetics, histology, and treatment outcomes. New discoveries regarding the genomic alterations and epidemiological exposures associated with these lymphomas have enhanced our understanding of factors that contribute to lymphomagenesis for specific subtypes. We explore the impact of normal B-cell biology engineered for recognizing a wide variety of antigens on the development of specific lymphoma subtypes, review lymphoma genetics, and examine the epidemiology of B-cell NHLs including recent investigations of risk factors for particular lymphoma subtypes based on large pooled analyses. Burkitt lymphoma, an aggressive form of B-cell NHL involving translocation of the MYC gene and an immunoglobulin gene has been associated with a history of eczema, hepatitis C, and occupation as a cleaner. Increased risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma has been associated with increased young adult body mass index, history of B-cell-activating autoimmune diseases, hepatitis C, and several single nucleotide variants involving the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region of chromosome 6 and non-HLA loci near EXOC2, PVT1, MYC, and NCOA1. Tumor sequencing studies suggest that multiple pathways are involved in the development of DLBCL. Additional studies of epidemiological exposures, genome wide associations, and tumor sequencing in follicular, lymphoplasmacytic, marginal zone, and mantle cell lymphoma demonstrate overlapping areas of increased risk factors and unique factors for specific subtypes. Integrating these findings is important for constructing comprehensive models of NHL pathogenesis, which could yield novel targets for therapy and strategies for lymphoma prevention in certain populations. PMID:27115168

  4. Hodgkin Lymphoma (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... following treatment. Occasionally, cancer may return, and follow-up appointments with your cancer specialist can help you catch it early if it does. Your doctor will also watch for any late side effects of your treatment. After Hodgkin lymphoma ...

  5. Primary Gastrointestinal Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yinting; Chen, Yanzhu; Chen, Shaojie; Wu, Lili; Xu, Lishu; Lian, Guoda; Yang, Kege; Li, Yaqing; Zeng, Linjuan; Huang, Kaihong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma (PGIL) is a rare malignant tumor without standard diagnosis and treatment methods. This study is aimed to systematically analyze its clinical characteristics and draw out an appropriate flow chart of diagnosis and treatment process for PGIL in China. This study retrospectively analyzed the clinicopathological characteristics, diagnostic approaches, prognostic factors, and therapeutic modalities in 415 cases of PGIL in Chinese province of Guangdong. A systematic review was conducted in 118 studies containing 5075 patients to further identify clinical manifestations and mortalities of therapeutic modalities. The most common clinical presentations were abdominal pain and bloody stools. Endoscopic biopsy was an important diagnostic means, and usually more than once to make a definite diagnosis. Retrospective multicenter clinical study showed that younger onset age (<60 years), female, one region involved, one lesion, early stage, International Prognostic Index (IPI ≤1), normal lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), normal albumin, and nonemergency operation were significant prognostic factors for B-cell lymphoma; non-B symptom, tumor restricted to gastric or ileocecal region, one lesion, performance status (PS ≤1), normal LDH, and nonsurgery alone were significant prognostic factors for T-cell lymphoma. Site of origin and IPI were independent prognostic factors for B-cell lymphoma; PS was the independent prognostic factor for T-cell lymphoma. And T-cell lymphoma had worse overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) than B-cell lymphoma. Among different therapeutic modalities, chemotherapy alone or combined with surgery showed better OS and PFS than surgery alone for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of stage I/II E and T-cell lymphoma. For DLBCL of stage III E/IV and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, OS and PFS did not differ among different therapeutic groups. In meta-analysis, surgery plus chemotherapy

  6. [Cytogenetic studies in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (nHL)].

    PubMed

    Haus, O; Kozłowska, J; Zubkiewicz, L; Jagielski, J; Kotlarek-Haus, S

    1991-09-01

    Cytogenetic examinations were carried out in 24 untreated patients with non-Hodgkin, non-Burkitt lymphoma. 10-20 G-banded metaphases, obtained from short-term cultures of unstimulated lymph++ node, bone marrow and blood cells were analyzed in each case. In 18 patients only, the obtained metaphases were suitable for cytogenetic analysis. In 11 patients (group A) karyotype was normal or only single, +non-clonal aberrations were observed. In 7 patients (group B) clonal aberrations were found, among them, in 3-structural changes of chromosome 1, but with different breakpoints: 1p31, 1p31, 1p36. The group of patients with chromosomal aberrations showed statistically significantly shorter survival time than the group without aberrations (p = 0.04). In the former group more patients had low grade malignancy lymphoma. Our observations confirm those data from the literature which indicate that the presence of chromosomal aberrations is a factor of poor prognosis, independent of other clinical and histopathological prognostic factors in non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

  7. p53 status dictates responses of B lymphomas to monotherapy with proteasome inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Duonan; Carroll, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The proapoptotic function of p53 is thought to underlie most anticancer modalities and is also activated in response to oncogenic insults, such as overexpression of the Myc oncoprotein. Here we generated tractable B lymphomas using retroviral transduction of the MYC oncogene into hematopoietic cells with 2 knock-in alleles encoding a fusion between p53 and 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4OHT) receptor (p53ERTAM). In these polyclonal tumors, Myc is the only oncogenic lesion, and p53ERTAM status can be rapidly toggled between “off” and “on” with 4OHT, provided that the Trp53 promoter has been independently activated. Although 4OHT can trigger widespread apoptosis and overt tumor regression even in the absence of DNA-damaging agents, in tumors with high levels of Mdm2 these responses are blunted. However, cotreatment with proteasome inhibitors fully restores therapeutic effects in vivo. Similarly, human Burkitt lymphomas with wild-type p53 and overexpression of Hdm2 are highly sensitive to proteasome inhibitors, unless p53 levels are reduced using the HPV-E6 ubiquitin ligase. Therefore, proteasome inhibitors could be highly effective as a monotherapy against Myc-induced lymphomas, with no need for adjuvant chemotherapy or radiation therapy. On the other hand, their efficacy is crucially dependent on the wild-type p53 status of the tumor, placing important restrictions on patient selection. PMID:17284530

  8. Jaw1/LRMP, a germinal centre-associated marker for the immunohistological study of B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Tedoldi, S; Paterson, J C; Cordell, J; Tan, S-Y; Jones, M; Manek, S; Dei Tos, A P; Roberton, H; Masir, N; Natkunam, Y; Pileri, S A; Facchetti, F; Hansmann, M-L; Mason, D Y; Marafioti, T

    2006-08-01

    Jaw1, also known as lymphoid-restricted membrane protein (LRMP), is an endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein. High levels of Jaw1/LRMP mRNA have been found in germinal centre B-cells and in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas of 'germinal centre' subtype. This paper documents Jaw1/LRMP expression at the protein level in human tissues by immunohistochemical and western blotting analysis using an antibody reactive with paraffin-embedded tissues. Jaw1/LRMP was highly expressed in germinal centre B-cells (in keeping with gene expression data), in 'monocytoid B-cells', and in splenic marginal zone B-cells. It was absent, or present at only low levels, in mature T-cells, although cortical thymocytes were weakly positive. Among lymphoid neoplasms, Jaw1/LRMP was found in germinal centre-derived lymphomas (follicle centre lymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma, lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin's disease) but not in T-cell neoplasms (with the exception of a single T lymphoblastic lymphoma). Classical Hodgkin's disease and myeloma lacked Jaw1/LRMP but many cases of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (but not mantle zone lymphoma) were Jaw1/LRMP-positive. Approximately half of the marginal zone lymphomas were Jaw1/LRMP-positive. In diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, Jaw1/LRMP was found in three-quarters (24/32) of the cases classified phenotypically as being of 'germinal centre' type, but it was also expressed in almost half (13/28) of the 'non-germinal centre' cases. A similar proportion of 'non-germinal centre' cases were positive for the protein products of two other genes expressed highly in germinal centre cells (HGAL/GCET2 and PAG). The fact that all three of these proteins are expressed in a significant proportion of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas assigned to the 'non-germinal centre' category indicates that the immunophenotypic categorization of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma according to cellular origin may be more complicated than currently understood. Finally, the expression of Jaw1/LRMP

  9. Human lymphoma-lymphoma hybrids and lymphoma-leukemia hybrids. I. Isolation, characterization, cell surface markers, and B-cell markers.

    PubMed

    Zeuthen, J; Klein, G; Ber, R; Masucci, G; Bisballe, S; Povey, S; Terasaki, P; Ralph, P

    1982-02-01

    Four new somatic cell hybrids were obtained by fusion of various Burkitt's lymphoma (BL)-derived cell lines that had different selective markers: Raji-P3HR-1, Daudi-Raji, and a P3HR-1-P3HR-1 "autohybrid" derived from two P3HR-1 sublines. In addition, a hybrid was obtained between the Daudi (BL) line and the human leukemia cell line K562. The hybrids were extensively characterized by means of chromosome, isozyme, and HLA surface markers. The phenotypic differences between the parent cell lines allowed some conclusions with respect to the expression of latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genomes, C3 and EBV receptors, and of immunoglobulin and beta 2-microglobulin-HLA expression as well as the influence of the leukemia cell (K562) genome on B-cell properties in the Daudi-K562 hybrid. B-cell and differentiated markers of these hybrids were characterized. High-level expression dominated for the marker C3 and EBV receptors, which showed a good correlation coefficient of 0.84, as was true for Fc receptors and surface immunoglobulin. The Daudi-K562 hybrid showed loss of all B-cell markers but retention of the leukemia cell markers (e.g., hemoglobin synthesis).

  10. Molecular distinctions between pediatric and adult mature B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas identified through genomic profiling

    PubMed Central

    Deffenbacher, Karen E.; Iqbal, Javeed; Sanger, Warren; Shen, Yulei; Lachel, Cynthia; Liu, Zhongfeng; Liu, Yanyan; Lim, Megan S.; Perkins, Sherrie L.; Fu, Kai; Smith, Lynette; Lynch, James; Staudt, Louis M.; Rimsza, Lisa M.; Jaffe, Elaine; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German K.; Delabie, Jan; Campo, Elias; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Greiner, Timothy C.; Gross, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    Burkitt lymphoma (BL) predominates in pediatric patients, whereas diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is uncommon. In contrast to adults, BL and DLBCL are treated similarly in children and both entities have superior outcomes in children compared with adults. Gene expression profiling (GEP) and miRNA expression profiling clearly differentiated pediatric DLBCL from BL, forming distinct clusters regardless of patient age. However, pathway analysis of GEP data identified minor differences between corresponding pediatric and adult tumors. Predominance (6:1) of the germinal center B-cell subtype to activated B-cell subtype was found among pediatric DLBCL. Two cases were molecularly classified as primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma. We observed frequent abnormalities in 8q24 in pediatric DLBCL, including MYC rearrangement in 31% (5 of 16) and gain or amplification in 50% (6 of 12) nonrearranged cases. MYC rearrangement was present in 96% (23 of 24) BL cases. Array-based CGH analysis identified abnormalities that are shared between adult and pediatric DLBCL (+12q15, +19q13, −6q), and abnormalities unique to the pediatric cases (−4p14, −19q13.32, +16p11.2), suggesting distinct pathogenetic mechanisms relative to age. Elucidation of the underlying target genes may provide insight into factors that modulate outcome and could provide potential novel therapeutic targets with less toxicity for pediatric patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:22374697

  11. GNA13 loss in germinal center B cells leads to impaired apoptosis and promotes lymphoma in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Jane A.; Nugent, Adrienne; Rempel, Rachel E.; Moffitt, Andrea B.; Davis, Nicholas S.; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Shingleton, Jennifer R.; Zhang, Jenny; Love, Cassandra; Datta, Jyotishka; McKinney, Matthew E.; Tzeng, Tiffany J.; Wettschureck, Nina; Offermanns, Stefan; Walzer, Katelyn A.; Chi, Jen-Tsan; Rasheed, Suhail A. K.; Casey, Patrick J.; Lossos, Izidore S.

    2016-01-01

    GNA13 is the most frequently mutated gene in germinal center (GC)-derived B-cell lymphomas, including nearly a quarter of Burkitt lymphoma and GC-derived diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. These mutations occur in a pattern consistent with loss of function. We have modeled the GNA13-deficient state exclusively in GC B cells by crossing the Gna13 conditional knockout mouse strain with the GC-specific AID-Cre transgenic strain. AID-Cre+ GNA13-deficient mice demonstrate disordered GC architecture and dark zone/light zone distribution in vivo, and demonstrate altered migration behavior, decreased levels of filamentous actin, and attenuated RhoA activity in vitro. We also found that GNA13-deficient mice have increased numbers of GC B cells that display impaired caspase-mediated cell death and increased frequency of somatic hypermutation in the immunoglobulin VH locus. Lastly, GNA13 deficiency, combined with conditional MYC transgene expression in mouse GC B cells, promotes lymphomagenesis. Thus, GNA13 loss is associated with GC B-cell persistence, in which impaired apoptosis and ongoing somatic hypermutation may lead to an increased risk of lymphoma development. PMID:26989201

  12. Obatoclax and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Aggressive Relapsed or Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  13. Relapse of lymphoma after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: management strategies and outcome.

    PubMed

    Wudhikarn, Kitsada; Brunstein, Claudio G; Bachanova, Veronika; Burns, Linda J; Cao, Qing; Weisdorf, Daniel J

    2011-10-01

    The outcome and management of relapsed lymphoma after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is difficult. Therapeutic options may include donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI), reduction of immunosuppression (RIS), chemotherapy, radiation, immunotherapy, second HCT, and experimental treatments, but reported data contrasting the response and efficacy of these salvage treatments are limited. We describe the treatments, response, prognosis, and long-term survival of 72 patients with relapse of lymphoma after allogeneic HCT. Between 1991 and 2007, 227 lymphoma patients underwent allogeneic HCT. Of these, 72 (32%) developed relapse/progression after their HCT at a median of 99 days (0-1898 days); 37 had early (<100 days) post-HCT relapse. Forty-four had non-Hodgkin lymphoma (7 mantle cell, 5 indolent, 15 diffuse large B cell, 4 Burkitt's, and 13 T/Natural Killer cell), and 28 patients had Hodgkin lymphoma. At the time of HCT, 62 patients were in remission (22 in complete [CR] and 40 in partial [PR]), 1 had stable whereas 9 had progressive disease. Seventeen cases received myeloablative and 55 received a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen. At relapse, most patients had generalized lymphadenopathy, extranodal organ involvement, and advanced disease. Five patients received no intervention for the post-HCT relapse. Immunosuppressive treatment was reduced or withdrawn as the first-line therapy in 58 patients (80.5%); 47 were treated using combinations of conventional chemotherapy (n = 22), rituximab (n = 27), interferon (IFN) (n = 1), DLI (n = 7), second HCT (n = 2), local radiation (n = 23), and other therapy (n = 6). Thirty-eight patients had an objective response (CR in 30, PR in 8), and 2 had stable disease (SD). At the post-HCT relapse, favorable prognostic factors for survival after HCT included good ECOG performance status (0-2), normal lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), early stage disease (stage I-III), isolated extranodal organ involvement, and later relapse

  14. Lymphomas of salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, M J; Bennett, M H; Cawson, R A

    1986-08-01

    Primary lymphomas arising in salivary glands are very uncommon. The histologic classification of 40 cases of lymphomas in salivary gland tissue submitted to the British Salivary Gland Tumour Panel is reported, and, for 30 of the patients for whom adequate information was available, the clinical presentation, management, and outcome have been analyzed. Lymphomas in salivary glands represented 1.7% of all reported salivary neoplasms. The majority developed in the parotid glands of patients aged between 50 and 70 years. Only four cases gave a premorbid history compatible with sicca syndrome. In this series, non-Hodgkin's lymphomas predominated; 23 were Grade I, and 13 were Grade II. Treatment regimens were not uniform, but are outlined. Survival ranged from 5 to 111 months. Median survival for the group was 49 months. Prognosis was not influenced by the clinical stage of disease at presentation. Four cases of lymphoma arising in benign lymphoepithelial lesions are included. None had clinical symptoms of sicca complex. Prognosis for this group was found to be as favorable as the others.

  15. Enhanced susceptibility of B lymphoma cells to measles virus by Epstein-Barr virus type III latency that upregulates CD150/signaling lymphocytic activation molecule.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Satoshi; Kanbayashi, Daiki; Kurata, Takako; Yoshiyama, Hironori; Komano, Jun

    2014-02-01

    Measles virus (MV) is one of the candidates for the application of oncolytic virotherapy (OVT). Although an advanced clinical study has been reported on a T-cell lymphoma, the potential of MV OVT against B-cell lymphomas remains to be clarified. We found that an EBV-transformed B lymphoblastoid cell line, a model for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphoma cells bearing type III latency were highly susceptible to the cytolysis induced by an MV vaccine strain CAM-70. As analyzed by EBV-positive and -negative counterparts of the same cytogenetic background, type III EBV latency, not type I, was shown to augment the susceptibility of B lymphoma cells to MV-induced cytolysis. Cell surface levels of CD150/signaling lymphocytic activation molecule, a receptor of MV, were upregulated in B lymphoma cell lines with type III EBV latency by 3.8-fold, on average. The cytolytic activity of CD150-tropic WT MV was akin to that of CD46- and CD150-tropic CAM-70, suggesting that CD150 is critical for the susceptibility to MV-induced cytolysis. Among EBV-encoded genes, latent membrane protein 1 was responsible for the CD150 upregulation. It was notable that the majority of B lymphoma cell lines of type III EBV latency showed higher susceptibility to the non-Edmonston-derived CAM-70 than to the Edmonston-derived Schwarz strain. This is the first report indicating the potential of non-Edmonston MV strain for the application of OVT. Furthermore, a cellular regulator of MV replication was implicated that functions in a vaccine strain-specific fashion. Altogether, the MV OVT should serve as an alternative therapy against EBV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with type III EBV latency.

  16. Speckled-like Pattern in the Germinal Center (SLIP-GC), a Nuclear GTPase Expressed in Activation-induced Deaminase-expressing Lymphomas and Germinal Center B Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Kathleen; Brar, Sukhdev; Ray, Madhumita; Pisitkun, Prapaporn; Bolland, Silvia; Verkoczy, Laurent; Diaz, Marilyn

    2009-01-01

    We identified a novel GTPase, SLIP-GC, with expression limited to a few tissues, in particular germinal center B cells. It lacks homology to any known proteins, indicating that it may belong to a novel family of GTPases. SLIP-GC is expressed in germinal center B cells and in lymphomas derived from germinal center B cells such as large diffuse B cell lymphomas. In cell lines, SLIP-GC is expressed in lymphomas that express activation-induced deaminase (AID) and that likely undergo somatic hypermutation. SLIP-GC is a nuclear protein, and it localizes to replication factories. Reduction of SLIP-GC levels in the Burkitt lymphoma cell line Raji and in non-Hodgkin lymphoma cell lines resulted in an increase in DNA breaks and apoptosis that was AID-dependent, as simultaneous reduction of AID abrogated the deleterious effects of SLIP-GC reduction. These results strongly suggest that SLIP-GC is a replication-related protein in germinal center B cells whose reduction is toxic to cells through an AID-dependent mechanism. PMID:19734146

  17. Anomalous expression of Thy1 (CD90) in B-cell lymphoma cells and proliferation inhibition by anti-Thy1 antibody treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiura, Yoshihito; Kotani, Norihiro; Yamashita, Ryusuke; Yamamoto, Harumi; Kozutsumi, Yasunori; Honke, Koichi

    2010-05-28

    The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (Ab) rituximab is accepted to be an effective therapeutic Ab for malignant B-cell lymphoma; however, discovery of other cell surface antigens is required for the option of antibody medicine. Considering that many tumor-associated antigens are glycans, we have searched glycoconjugates for the candidate antigens that therapeutic Abs target. To this end, we first focused on the difference in the glycogenes expression in terms of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of a Burkitt's lymphoma cell line, Akata. Using DNA array, flow cytometry and Western blotting, we found that Thy1 was highly expressed in EBV-positive Akata cells. Subsequently, Thy1 was found to be expressed in other B-cell lymphoma cell lines: BJAB, MutuI, and MutuIII, irrespective of EBV infection. Treatment of these cells with an anti-Thy1 monoclonal antibody inhibited proliferation more strongly than the therapeutic Ab rituximab. The B-cell lymphoma cell lines were classified based on the extent of the proliferation inhibition, which was not correlated with the expression level of Thy1. It is suggested that stable residence of receptor tyrosine kinases in lipid rafts sustains cell growth in B-cell lymphoma cells.

  18. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in adolescents: experiences in 378 adolescent NHL patients treated according to pediatric NHL-BFM protocols.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, B; Oschlies, I; Klapper, W; Zimmermann, M; Woessmann, W; Meinhardt, A; Landmann, E; Attarbaschi, A; Niggli, F; Schrappe, M; Reiter, A

    2011-01-01

    Age-related differences in the distribution, biology and treatment response of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in adolescents remain to be elucidated. The current analyses present clinical parameters and outcomes of adolescents treated in pediatric NHL-BFM trials. Patients were stratified by histological subtype: lymphoblastic lymphoma (LBL); mature B-NHL, including Burkitt's lymphoma/leukemia (BL/B-AL), diffuse B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL-CB) and mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMLBL); and anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). Between October 1986 and December 2007, 2915 patients were registered, including 378 (13%) adolescents (15-18 years) with BL/B-AL (n=101), ALCL (n=74), DLBCL-CB (n=55), T-LBL (n=45), PMLBL (n=24), pB-LBL (n=13) and rare or not-specified NHL subtypes (n=66). The 5-year event-free survival (EFS) was 79±2% for adolescents compared with 85±1% for patients aged <15 years (P=0.014). EFS was 83±7% for adolescents with T-LBL, 82±4% with BL/B-AL, 85±5% with DLBCL-CB, 57±10% with PMLBL and 70±6% with ALCL. According to sex, the 5-year EFS in females versus males, respectively, was 70±5 versus 83±2% overall (P=0.004), 57±17 versus 92±6% (P=0.0036) for T-LBL patients and 71±9 versus 97±3% (P=0.0067) for DLBCL-CB patients. Adolescents with NHL treated according to pediatric NHL-BFM protocols had an EFS of 79±2%, which is marginally inferior to that of children. In adolescents with T-LBL and DLBCL-CB, female sex was associated with a worse prognosis. PMID:21030984

  19. Ophthalmic lymphoma: epidemiology and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sjö, Lene Dissing

    2009-02-01

    With a lifetime risk of 1% and 700 new cases per year, Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is the seventh most frequent type of cancer in Denmark. The incidence of NHL has increased considerably in Western countries over the last decades; consequently, NHL is an increasing clinical problem. Ophthalmic lymphoma, (lymphoma localized in the ocular region, i.e. eyelid, conjunctiva, lacrimal sac, lacrimal gland, orbit, or intraocularly) is relatively uncommon, accounting for 5%-10% of all extranodal lymphomas. It is, however, the most common orbital malignancy. The purpose of this thesis was to review specimens from all Danish patients with a diagnosis of ophthalmic lymphoma during the period 1980-2005, in order to determine the distribution of lymphoma subtypes, and the incidence- and time trends in incidence for ophthalmic lymphoma. Furthermore, an extended analysis of the most frequent subtype, extranodal marginal zone lymphoma (MALT lymphoma), was done to analyse clinical factors and cytogenetic changes with influence on prognosis. A total of 228 Danish patients with a biopsy-reviewed verified diagnosis of ocular adnexal-, orbital-, or intraocular lymphoma were identified. We found that more than 50% of orbital- and ocular adnexal lymphomas were of the MALT lymphoma subtype, whereas diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) predominated intraocularly (Sjo et al. 2008a). Furthermore, lymphoma arising in the lacrimal sac was surprisingly predominantly DLBCL (Sjo et al. 2006). Incidence rates were highly dependent on patient age. There was an increase in incidence rates for the whole population from 1980 to 2005, corresponding to an annual average increase of 3.4% (Sjo et al. 2008a). MALT lymphoma arising in the ocular region was found in 116 patients (Sjo et al. 2008b). One third of patients had a relapse or progression of disease after initial therapy and relapses were frequently found at extra-ocular sites. Overall survival, however, was not significantly poorer for patients

  20. Update on gastric lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, C. R.

    1991-01-01

    Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma is an uncommon entity that can often present like classic adenocarcinoma. The most common organ site involved is the stomach. Important prognostic indicators include location of lymph node involvement, histologic subtype, lymphocyte lineage, gross size, and location of the tumor. Surgical resection is the mainstay of curative therapy. Combination chemotherapy and radiotherapy may have a role either separately or as part of a multimodality treatment program. Clinicians are encouraged to enter patients with primary gastric lymphoma into multi-institutional, cooperative group clinical trials to more clearly define the best treatment strategy. PMID:1956083

  1. Radiation therapy for orbital lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Ping . E-mail: pzhou@partners.org; Ng, Andrea K.; Silver, Barbara; Li Sigui; Hua Ling; Mauch, Peter M.

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To describe radiation techniques and evaluate outcomes for orbital lymphoma. Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients (and 62 eyes) with orbital lymphoma treated with radiotherapy between 1987 and 2003 were included. The majority had mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (48%) or follicular (30%) lymphoma. Seventeen patients had prior lymphoma at other sites, and 29 had primary orbital lymphoma. Median follow-up was 46 months. Results: The median dose was 30.6 Gy; one-third received <30 Gy. Electrons were used in 9 eyes with disease confined to the conjunctiva or eyelid, and photons in 53 eyes with involvement of intraorbital tissues to cover entire orbit. Local control rate was 98% for all patients and 100% for those with indolent lymphoma. Three of the 26 patients with localized primary lymphoma failed distantly, resulting in a 5-year freedom-from-distant-relapse rate of 89%. The 5-year disease-specific and overall survival rates were 95% and 88%, respectively. Late toxicity was mainly cataract formation in patients who received radiation without lens block. Conclusions A dose of 30 Gy is sufficient for indolent orbital lymphoma. Distant relapse rate in patients with localized orbital lymphoma was lower than that reported for low-grade lymphoma presenting in other sites. Orbital radiotherapy can be used for salvage of recurrent indolent lymphoma.

  2. 78 FR 47321 - Determination That CYTOXAN (Cyclophosphamide) for Injection Was Not Withdrawn From Sale for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ... lymphoma, mixed-cell type lymphoma, histiocytic lymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma, multiple myeloma, leukemias..., among other items, drug products that have been discontinued from marketing for reasons other...

  3. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 72,580 % of All New Cancer Cases 4.3% Estimated Deaths in 2016 20,150 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 569,536 people living with non-Hodgkin lymphoma ...

  4. Centrofacial angiocentric lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Peral-Cagigal, Beatriz; Galdeano-Arenas, María; Crespo-Pinilla, Juan Ignacio; García-Cantera, José Miguel; Sánchez-Cuéllar, Luis Antonio; Verrier-Hernández, Alberto

    2005-01-01

    The centrofacial angiocentric lymphoma is a rare lymphoid neoplasm, with an often-difficult diagnosis due to the non-specific clinical picture. On many occasions it is necessary to perform various biopsies to reach the correct diagnosis. This lymphoma is an aggressive Non-Hodgkin's (NHL) type, which is normally found in the upper respiratory tract (predominantly in the nasal cavity), and has an ominous prognosis, as the average survival rate is between 12 and 18 months (1). It is predominantly found in subjects of oriental and South American extraction, who are between the ages of 50 and 60 years and with a slight tendency towards males (2:1). This is the case study of a female Ecuadorian patient who was referred to our department with a hemifacial edema, chocolate- like rhinorrhea and nasal respiratory obstruction, which had been treated with antibiotics and anti-inflammatories for a month without success. After performing a number of diagnostic tests, it was found histologically that the patient had an extranodal T-cell lymphoma of the nasal type (also known as T-cell angiocentric lymphoma).

  5. Primary Pulmonary Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Tanveer, Shumaila; El Damati, Ahmed; El Baz, Ayman; Alsayyah, Ahmed; ElSharkawy, Tarek

    2015-01-01

    Primary pulmonary Hodgkin lymphoma (PPHL) is a rare disease. Herein, we report a case of PPHL with diagnostic concerns encountered during initial evaluation which is of paramount importance to keep the differential diagnosis in cases with high index of suspicion for this rare entity. PMID:26788271

  6. Relation between enzymatic activities and the degree of malignancy of human lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Vezzoni, P; Giardini, R; Raineri, M; Pozzi, M R; Lucchini, R; Vezzoni, M A; Clerici, L; Besana, C; Rugarli, C; Rilke, F

    1985-08-01

    The relationship between the intracellular levels of DNA polymerase alpha (DP-alpha), adenosine deaminase (ADA) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and the degree of malignancy of human lymphomas was investigated. Twelve non-neoplastic lymph nodes and 88 malignant lymphomas were examined. For non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) the low or high grade of malignancy was established according to three classifications: the Rappaport, the Kiel and the Working Formulation for Clinical Usage, with the latter also recognizing an intermediate grade group. Non-neoplastic lymph nodes had significantly lower levels of all the three enzymes than those found in high-grade malignant NHL (the P value ranged from less than 0.02 to less than 0.001). Hodgkin's disease, a slowly evolving neoplasia, showed lower levels of DP-alpha (P less than 0.001) and ADA (P less than 0.001), but not of LDH, than high-grade NHL. Among NHL, whatever classification was used, the low-grade malignant lymphomas had significantly lower levels than the high-grade ones for all the three enzymes (P less than 0.005 or P less than 0.001). The intermediate-grade group of the Working Formulation differed from the high-grade group for DP-alpha (P less than 0.01) and ADA (P less than 0.02) but not for LDH. It differed from the low-grade group only for ADA (P less than 0.005). Lymphoblastic and Burkitt's lymphomas were the groups with the highest levels of the three enzymes. Among low-grade lymphomas very low values were found in the histological entities defined as DLWD in the Rappaport classification, CLL and lymphoplasmacytoid immunocytoma in the Kiel classification and small lymphocytic (group A) in the WF. The levels of all enzymes in these histotypes were always significantly different from the other low-grade histotypes, and from the intermediate-grade ones of the WF. In the Kiel classification polymorphous lymphoplasmacytoid lymphoma, recently recognized as a group with a quite aggressive clinical course, was

  7. The African Organisation for Research and Training in Cancer and its conferences: a historical perspective and highlights of the Ninth International Conference, Durban, South Africa, 21–24 November 2013

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Christopher KO; Cristina Stefan, D; Rawlinson, Fiona; Simbiri, Kenneth; Mbulaiteye, Sam M

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of the African Organisation for Research and Training in Cancer (AORTIC), both at its inception in the early 1980s, and at its reactivation in 2000 following a decade of inactivity, included bringing the products of decades of advances in cancer research to African populations through international collaboration. The historical perspective provided in this report illustrates progress in achieving these objectives through successive continent-wide activities over a period of 30 years, culminating in the organisation’s most recent conference held in Durban, South Africa, 21–24 November 2013. The constant growth in the number of attendants and increasing diversity of the nations of their origin are consistent with advances, whereby the number of participants and the nations of their origin have grown from 24 in 1983 to almost 1000 in 2013, and from 14 to 70, respectively. While earlier AORTIC conferences used to assume the atmosphere of ‘jamborees’, more recent ones have morphed to problem-solving events, with the concerted collaboration of international organisations, including the World Health Organisation (WHO), International Union Against Cancer (UICC), the Africa Union (AU), the US National Cancer Institute (NCI), the International Psycho-Oncology Society (IPOS), and others. The topics of discussion at the Ninth AORTIC International Conference on Cancer in Africa in Durban were those of paramount importance for low- and middle-income countries: childhood cancers, cancers of the cervix, breast, and prostate, as well as cancer care challenges resulting from ignorance, neglect, and economic deprivation. The role of environmental factors that underlie Burkitt’s lymphoma was the subject of the Epidemiology of Burkitt Lymphoma in East-African Children and Minors Workshop, highlighting the NCI research programme in East Africa, while the Workshop on Cost Effectiveness of Treatment of Cancer in Africa surmised that treating childhood cancers is

  8. Primary intracranial lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Mufti, Shagufta T.; Baeesa, Saleh S.; Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL), a rare form of aggressive extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), has increased in incidence during the last three decades and occurs in both immune compromised and immune competent hosts. It has an overall poor prognosis. Objective: This study attempts to further delineate the clinico-pathological, immunohistochemical and radiological profile of PCNSL at Jeddah to King Faisal Hospital and Research Center. Methods: Computerized search through the archives of King Faisal Hospital and Research Centre between July 2000- December 2012 identified 15 patients with pathologically confirmed PCNSL. These were analyzed retrospectively. Their clinico-pathological, immunohistochemical and radiological data were analyzed. Results: Of the 15 PCNSL patients, 8 (53.3%) were females and 7 (46.6%) were males. There was female predilection especially in the age group of 40-59 years. Mean age at diagnosis for all patients was 50.4 years. There was no patient in the pediatric age group. The most common location in the brain was the frontal region in 7 patients (46.6%), 7 (46.6%) had multiple intracranial masses; all 15 (100%) were Non Hodgkin B-cell lymphomas, among which 13 (86.6%) were diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. All 15 (100%) cases showed diffuse and strong positivity for CD 45, and CD 20. Fourteen patients were immune competent while one was immune compromised. Conclusions: PCNSL often occurs in middle-aged and aged patients. There is female predilection especially in the middle age. Frontal region is the most common location with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma being the predominant subtype. PMID:27366250

  9. Drugs Approved for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma This page lists ... non-Hodgkin lymphoma that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Abitrexate (Methotrexate) Adcetris ( ...

  10. Ixazomib Citrate and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Indolent B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-01

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Follicular Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Refractory Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  11. The genomic landscape of mantle cell lymphoma is related to the epigenetically determined chromatin state of normal B cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jenny; Jima, Dereje; Moffitt, Andrea B; Liu, Qingquan; Czader, Magdalena; Hsi, Eric D; Fedoriw, Yuri; Dunphy, Cherie H; Richards, Kristy L; Gill, Javed I; Sun, Zhen; Love, Cassandra; Scotland, Paula; Lock, Eric; Levy, Shawn; Hsu, David S; Dunson, David; Dave, Sandeep S

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we define the genetic landscape of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) through exome sequencing of 56 cases of MCL. We identified recurrent mutations in ATM, CCND1, MLL2, and TP53. We further identified a number of novel genes recurrently mutated in patients with MCL including RB1, WHSC1, POT1, and SMARCA4. We noted that MCLs have a distinct mutational profile compared with lymphomas from other B-cell stages. The ENCODE project has defined the chromatin structure of many cell types. However, a similar characterization of primary human mature B cells has been lacking. We defined, for the first time, the chromatin structure of primary human naïve, germinal center, and memory B cells through chromatin immunoprecipitation and sequencing for H3K4me1, H3K4me3, H3Ac, H3K36me3, H3K27me3, and PolII. We found that somatic mutations that occur more frequently in either MCLs or Burkitt lymphomas were associated with open chromatin in their respective B cells of origin, naïve B cells, and germinal center B cells. Our work thus elucidates the landscape of gene-coding mutations in MCL and the critical interplay between epigenetic alterations associated with B-cell differentiation and the acquisition of somatic mutations in cancer. PMID:24682267

  12. Imaging of Extranodal Genitourinary Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Rohena-Quinquilla, Iván R; Lattin, Grant E; Wolfman, Darcy

    2016-07-01

    The genitourinary (GU) system is commonly affected by disseminated lymphoma. Rarely, lymphoma can originate from and remain localized to one of the GU organs and thus presents as primary extranodal disease. Up to 40% of lymphomas present as extranodal disease, with only 3% having the GU system as the primary site of involvement. This article describes and correlates the radiologic and pathologic features of extranodal lymphomatous disease affecting the GU system with specific focus on the kidneys, adrenal glands, testicles, and ovaries. Lymphoma of the uterine body and cervix, external female genitalia, urinary bladder, and prostate gland is briefly discussed.

  13. [Blood test for malignant lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Kuroda, Junya; Taniwaki, Masafumi

    2014-03-01

    Malignant lymphoma is a neoplastic disease that develops in the lymph system, which consists of various different subtypes. In addition, the differential diagnosis of malignant lymphoma includes infections, autoimmune diseases, allergic diseases, endocrine disorders, and so on. Therefore accurate diagnosis is very important to decide therapeutic strategy. Blood test is the most common examination in clinical practice and used extensively for evaluating etiology, pathology, disease state, efficacy of treatment and disease prognosis of lymphoma. We are required to understand the characteristics of blood examinations correctly and use them appropriately in daily medical practice. Here, we introduce some blood examinations used for treatment of lymphoma.

  14. Imaging of Extranodal Genitourinary Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Rohena-Quinquilla, Iván R; Lattin, Grant E; Wolfman, Darcy

    2016-07-01

    The genitourinary (GU) system is commonly affected by disseminated lymphoma. Rarely, lymphoma can originate from and remain localized to one of the GU organs and thus presents as primary extranodal disease. Up to 40% of lymphomas present as extranodal disease, with only 3% having the GU system as the primary site of involvement. This article describes and correlates the radiologic and pathologic features of extranodal lymphomatous disease affecting the GU system with specific focus on the kidneys, adrenal glands, testicles, and ovaries. Lymphoma of the uterine body and cervix, external female genitalia, urinary bladder, and prostate gland is briefly discussed. PMID:27265606

  15. Yttrium Y 90 Ibritumomab Tiuxetan and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  16. Multifocal extranodal lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Li, Lin; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Jin-Song; Gao, Ting; Xu, Yan; Li, Wen-Chan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: We report an unusual and interesting case of non-Hodgkin lymphoma involving 7 extranodal sites. In this case, a 43-year-old woman with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, including stomach, breasts, pancreas, adrenal glands, ovary and bones, was confirmed by biopsy and positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan. The patient achieved a complete response after 2 cycles of chemotherapy with combined rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone, but subsequently developed central nervous system involvement. Conclusion: This case illustrated the usefulness of positron emission tomography/computed tomography in diagnosis, disease staging, and assessment of response to therapy. Selection of the optimal treatment regimen is challenging and needs further research. PMID:27749564

  17. Pathobiology of Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Agostinelli, Claudio; Gazzola, Anna; Tripodo, Claudio; Bacci, Francesco; Sabattini, Elena; Sista, Maria Teresa; Mannu, Claudia; Sapienza, Maria Rosaria; Rossi, Maura; Laginestra, Maria Antonella; Sagramoso-Sacchetti, Carlo A.; Righi, Simona; Pileri, Stefano A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite its well-known histological and clinical features, Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) has recently been the object of intense research activity, leading to a better understanding of its phenotype, molecular characteristics, histogenesis, and possible mechanisms of lymphomagenesis. There is complete consensus on the B-cell derivation of the tumor in most cases, and on the relevance of Epstein-Barr virus infection and defective cytokinesis in at least a proportion of patients. The REAL/WHO classification recognizes a basic distinction between lymphocyte predominance HL (LP-HL) and classic HL (cHL), reflecting the differences in clinical presentation and behavior, morphology, phenotype, and molecular features. cHL has been classified into four subtypes: lymphocyte rich, nodular sclerosing, with mixed cellularity, and lymphocyte depleted. The borders between cHL and anaplastic large-cell lymphoma have become sharper, whereas those between LP-HL and T-cell-rich B-cell lymphoma remain ill defined. Treatments adjusted to the pathobiological characteristics of the tumor in at-risk patients have been proposed and are on the way to being applied. PMID:21253495

  18. Lymphoma Immunotherapy: Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Zappasodi, Roberta; de Braud, Filippo; Di Nicola, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The rationale to treat lymphomas with immunotherapy comes from long-standing evidence on their distinctive immune responsiveness. Indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, in particular, establish key interactions with the immune microenvironment to ensure prosurvival signals and prevent antitumor immune activation. However, reports of spontaneous regressions indicate that, under certain circumstances, patients develop therapeutic antitumor immunity. Several immunotherapeutic approaches have been thus developed to boost these effects in all patients. To date, targeting CD20 on malignant B cells with the antibody rituximab has been the most clinically effective strategy. However, relapse and resistance prevent to cure approximately half of B-NHL patients, underscoring the need of more effective therapies. The recognition of B-cell receptor variable regions as B-NHL unique antigens promoted the development of specific vaccines to immunize patients against their own tumor. Despite initial promising results, this strategy has not yet demonstrated a sufficient clinical benefit to reach the regulatory approval. Several novel agents are now available to stimulate immune effector functions or counteract immunosuppressive mechanisms, such as engineered antitumor T cells, co-stimulatory receptor agonist, and immune checkpoint-blocking antibodies. Thus, multiple elements can now be exploited in more effective combinations to break the barriers for the induction of anti-lymphoma immunity. PMID:26388871

  19. [Diagnostics and treatment of choroidal lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Doycheva, D; Zierhut, M; Süsskind, D; Bartz-Schmidt, K U; Deuter, C

    2015-03-01

    Choroidal lymphoma is a rare disease and can be classified into primary and secondary choroidal lymphomas. Primary choroidal lymphoma is a low-grade extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma and secondary choroidal lymphomas present ocular manifestations of disseminated systemic lymphomas. Typical clinical features of choroidal lymphoma are multifocal, yellow-whitish choroidal infiltrates. The vitreous body is usually clear and cell-free. Choroidal lymphoma has a tendency to extend through the sclera. In contrast to primary choroidal lymphoma, which is more often unilateral, does not show signs of anterior segment involvement and has a slow progression, secondary choroidal lymphoma is more often bilateral, has a rapidly progressive course with anterior segment and vitreous involvement and belongs to the high-grade lymphomas. The definitive diagnosis of choroidal lymphoma can only be confirmed by histopathological examination of biopsy tissue. The choroidal biopsy is the gold standard in the diagnostics of choroidal lymphoma. To date, no standardized treatment for choroidal lymphoma has been established. The treatment modalities include external beam radiotherapy, immunotherapy with rituximab and chemotherapy. The prognosis for survival of primary choroidal lymphoma is usually good. The prognosis of secondary choroidal lymphoma depends on the malignancy grade of systemic lymphoma.

  20. Advanced Stage, Increased Lactate Dehydrogenase, and Primary Site, but Not Adolescent Age (≥ 15 Years), Are Associated With an Increased Risk of Treatment Failure in Children and Adolescents With Mature B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: Results of the FAB LMB 96 Study

    PubMed Central

    Cairo, Mitchell S.; Sposto, Richard; Gerrard, Mary; Auperin, Anne; Goldman, Stanton C.; Harrison, Lauren; Pinkerton, Ross; Raphael, Martine; McCarthy, Keith; Perkins, Sherrie L.; Patte, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Adolescents (age 15 to 21 years) compared with younger children with mature B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) have been historically considered to have an inferior prognosis. We therefore analyzed the impact of age and other diagnostic factors on the risk of treatment failure in children and adolescents treated on the French-American-British Mature B-Cell Lymphoma 96 (FAB LMB 96) trial. Patients and Methods Patients were divided by risk: group A (limited), group B (intermediate), and group C (advanced), as previously described. Prognostic factors analyzed for event-free survival (EFS) included age (< 15 v ≥ 15 years), stage (I/II v III/IV), primary site, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), bone marrow/CNS (BM/CNS) involvement, and histology (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma v mediastinal B-cell lymphoma v Burkitt lymphoma or Burkitt-like lymphoma). Results The 3-year EFS for the whole cohort was 88% ± 1%. Age was not associated as a risk factor for increased treatment failure in either univariate analysis (P = .15) or multivariate analysis (P = .58). Increased LDH (≥ 2 × upper limit of normal [ULN] v < 2 × ULN), primary site, and BM-positive/CNS-positive disease were all independent risk factors associated with a significant increase in treatment failure rate (relative risk, 2.0; P < .001, P < .012, and P < .001, respectively). Conclusion LDH level at diagnosis, mediastinal disease, and combined BM-positive/CNS-positive involvement are independent risk factors in children with mature B-cell NHL. Future studies should be developed to identify specific therapeutic strategies (immunotherapy) to overcome these risk factors and to identify the biologic basis associated with these prognostic factors in children with mature B-cell NHL. PMID:22215753

  1. Lenalidomide and Ibrutinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Refractory Follicular Lymphoma; Refractory Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  2. Brentuximab Vedotin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-IV HIV-Associated Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-19

    AIDS-Related Hodgkin Lymphoma; Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; HIV Infection; Stage IIA Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIB Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIIA Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIIB Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IVA Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IVB Hodgkin Lymphoma

  3. The NF-κB subunit c-Rel regulates Bach2 tumour suppressor expression in B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, J E; Butterworth, J A; Zhao, B; Sellier, H; Campbell, K J; Thomas, H D; Bacon, C M; Cockell, S J; Gewurz, B E; Perkins, N D

    2016-01-01

    The REL gene, encoding the NF-κB subunit c-Rel, is frequently amplified in B-cell lymphoma and functions as a tumour-promoting transcription factor. Here we report the surprising result that c-rel–/– mice display significantly earlier lymphomagenesis in the c-Myc driven, Eμ-Myc model of B-cell lymphoma. c-Rel loss also led to earlier onset of disease in a separate TCL1-Tg-driven lymphoma model. Tumour reimplantation experiments indicated that this is an effect intrinsic to the Eμ-Myc lymphoma cells but, counterintuitively, c-rel–/– Eμ-Myc lymphoma cells were more sensitive to apoptotic stimuli. To learn more about why loss of c-Rel led to earlier onset of disease, microarray gene expression analysis was performed on B cells from 4-week-old, wild-type and c-rel–/– Eμ-Myc mice. Extensive changes in gene expression were not seen at this age, but among those transcripts significantly downregulated by the loss of c-Rel was the B-cell tumour suppressor BTB and CNC homology 2 (Bach2). Quantitative PCR and western blot analysis confirmed loss of Bach2 in c-Rel mutant Eμ-Myc tumours at both 4 weeks and the terminal stages of disease. Moreover, Bach2 expression was also downregulated in c-rel–/– TCL1-Tg mice and RelA Thr505Ala mutant Eμ-Myc mice. Analysis of wild-type Eμ-Myc mice demonstrated that the population expressing low levels of Bach2 exhibited the earlier onset of lymphoma seen in c-rel–/– mice. Confirming the relevance of these findings to human disease, analysis of chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing data revealed that Bach2 is a c-Rel and NF-κB target gene in transformed human B cells, whereas treatment of Burkitt's lymphoma cells with inhibitors of the NF-κB/IκB kinase pathway or deletion of c-Rel or RelA resulted in loss of Bach2 expression. These data reveal a surprising tumour suppressor role for c-Rel in lymphoma development explained by regulation of Bach2 expression, underlining the context-dependent complexity of NF

  4. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Before Autologous Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-10

    Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  5. Drinking Water Contamination and the Incidence of Leukemia and Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, P; Klotz, J; Bove, F; Berkowitz, M; Fagliano, J

    1994-01-01

    >A study of drinking water contamination and leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) incidence (1979-1987) was conducted in a 75-town study area. Comparing incidence in towns in the highest trichloroethylene (TCE) stratum (>5 microg/l) to towns without detectable TCE yielded an age-adjusted rate ratio (RR) for total leukemia among females of 1.43 (95% CI 1.07-1.90). For females under 20 years old, the RR for acute lymphocytic leukemia was 3.26 (95% CI 1.27-8.15). Elevated RRs were observed for chronic myelogenous leukemia among females and for chronic lymphocytic leukemia among males and females. NHL incidence among women was also associated with the highest TCE stratum (RR = 1.36; 95% CI 1.08-1.70). For diffuse large cell NHL and non-Burkitt's high-grade NHL among females, the RRs were 1.66 (95% CI 1.07-2.59) and 3.17 (95% CI 1.23-8.18), respectively, and 1.59 (95% CI 1.04-2.43) and 1.92 (95% CI 0.54-6.81), respectively, among males. Perchloroethylene (PCE) was associated with incidence of non-Burkitt's high-grade NHL among females, but collinearity with TCE made it difficult to assess relative influences. The results suggest a link between TCE/PCE and leukemia/ NHL incidence. However, the conclusions are limited by potential misclassification of exposure due to lack of individual information on long-term residence, water consumption, and inhalation of volatilized compounds. PMID:9679115

  6. Gray zone lymphoma: better treated like hodgkin lymphoma or mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma?

    PubMed

    Dunleavy, Kieron; Grant, Cliona; Eberle, Franziska C; Pittaluga, Stefania; Jaffe, Elaine S; Wilson, Wyndham H

    2012-09-01

    Although primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) and classic Hodgkin lymphoma of the nodular sclerosis type (CHL-NS) are distinct diseases, they share several clinical characteristics and biologic features. Given that, it is not surprising that there exist mediastinal lymphomas that do not fit well into either category but have clinical and morphologic features overlapping and transitional between PMBL and CHL-NS. The term mediastinal gray zone lymphoma (MGZL) has been used for these tumors, which are included in the World Health Organization classification as "B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classic Hodgkin lymphoma." Although several studies have evaluated different therapeutic strategies in PMBL and CHL-NS, there is a paucity of prospective experience treating MGZL, given its rarity and relatively recent recognition. Historically, diseases that today would be categorized as MGZL were probably called "anaplastic large-cell lymphoma Hodgkin-like," and their outcome with standard approaches was poor, with short overall survivals. In this review-following a discussion of the biology and clinical features of MGZL, and how they compare to PMBL and CHL-NS-we outline how the treatment of PMBL and CHL-NS has evolved in recent years, and how we believe MGZL should be approached therapeutically. PMID:22833351

  7. Specific cytogenetic abnormalities are associated with a significantly inferior outcome in children and adolescents with mature B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: results of the FAB/LMB 96 international study.

    PubMed

    Poirel, H A; Cairo, M S; Heerema, N A; Swansbury, J; Aupérin, A; Launay, E; Sanger, W G; Talley, P; Perkins, S L; Raphaël, M; McCarthy, K; Sposto, R; Gerrard, M; Bernheim, A; Patte, C

    2009-02-01

    Clinical studies showed that advanced stage, high LDH, poor response to reduction therapy and combined bone marrow and central nervous system disease are significantly associated with a decreased event-free survival (EFS) in pediatric mature B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B-NHL) treated on FAB/LMB96. Although rearranged MYC/8q24 (R8q24) is characteristic of Burkitt lymphoma (BL), little information is available on other cytogenetic abnormalities and their prognostic importance. We performed an international review of 238 abnormal karyotypes in childhood mature B-NHL treated on FAB/LMB96: 76% BL, 8% Burkitt-like lymphoma, 13% diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). The main BL R8q24-associated chromosomal aberrations were +1q (29%), +7q and del(13q) (14% each). The DLBCL appeared heterogeneous and more complex. Incidence of R8q24 (34%) was higher than reported in adult DLBCL. The prognostic value of cytogenetic abnormalities on EFS was studied by Cox model controlling for the known risk factors: R8q24, +7q and del(13q) were independently associated with a significant inferior EFS (hazard ratio: 6.1 (P=0.030), 2.5 (P=0.015) and 4.0 (P=0.0003), respectively). The adverse prognosis of R8q24 was observed only in DLBCL, whereas del(13q) and +7q had a similar effect in DLBCL and BL. These results emphasize the significant biological heterogeneity and the development of cytogenetic risk-adapted therapy in childhood mature B-NHL.

  8. Clinical and Pathologic Studies in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Patients Receiving Antibody Treatment

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-05-31

    Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Cutaneous Lymphoma; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Diffuse Large B-Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Follicular / Indolent B-Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Mantle Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Marginal Zone; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Peripheral T-Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Waldenstr Macroglobulinemia

  9. Primary non-Hodgkin's lymphomas of the female breast.

    PubMed

    Giardini, R; Piccolo, C; Rilke, F

    1992-02-01

    The charts of 35 women with primary malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) of the breast were retrieved from the files of the Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan, over a 30-year period (1957 to 1986). These cases represented 0.1% of the more than 25,000 primary malignant tumors of the breast treated during the same period. The median age of these patients was 57 years (range, 28 to 81 years). In most cases, the clinical diagnosis was carcinoma. The tumors were either Stage IE(48%) or IIE(52%) at presentation, and only two patients had B symptoms. The right breast was involved in 17 patients, the left breast in 14, and both breasts in two. According to the updated Kiel classification and the Working Formulation (WF) for Clinical Usage, three cases were lymphoplasmacytoid (immunocytoma) NHL (WF, A); three, centroblastic-centrocytic, follicular NHL (WF, B); four, centroblastic-centrocytic, diffuse NHL (WF, F); 17 centroblastic NHL (WF, G); three immunoblastic NHL (WF, H); two B-lymphoblastic NHL (WF, I); and one, a Burkitt-like NHL (WF, J). Treatment consisted either of a combination of surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy or radiation therapy and chemotherapy. The follow-up period for 32 patients ranged from 6 to 161 months (mean, 45 months); 17 patients died of their disease. The prognosis appeared to be related to the histologic type and stage of the disease. Median survival periods were 63, 52, 42, and 47 months for centroblastic-centrocytic follicular, centroblastic-centrocytic diffuse, centroblastic, and immunoblastic NHL, respectively. The overall 5-year survival rate was 43%; the 5-year survival rate and the probability of freedom from progression at 5 years were, respectively, 61% and 50% for Stage I and 27% and 26% for Stage II disease.

  10. Hodgkin Lymphoma: Diagnosis and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ansell, Stephen M

    2015-11-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma is a rare B-cell malignant neoplasm affecting approximately 9000 new patients annually. This disease represents approximately 11% of all lymphomas seen in the United States and comprises 2 discrete disease entities--classical Hodgkin lymphoma and nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma. Within the subcategorization of classical Hodgkin lymphoma are defined subgroups: nodular sclerosis, mixed cellularity, lymphocyte depletion, and lymphocyte-rich Hodgkin lymphoma. Staging of this disease is essential for the choice of optimal therapy. Prognostic models to identify patients at high or low risk for recurrence have been developed, and these models, along with positron emission tomography, are used to provide optimal therapy. The initial treatment for patients with Hodgkin lymphoma is based on the histologic characteristics of the disease, the stage at presentation, and the presence or absence of prognostic factors associated with poor outcome. Patients with early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma commonly receive combined-modality therapies that include abbreviated courses of chemotherapy followed by involved-field radiation treatment. In contrast, patients with advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma commonly receive a more prolonged course of combination chemotherapy, with radiation therapy used only in selected cases. For patients with relapse or refractory disease, salvage chemotherapy followed by high-dose treatment and an autologous stem cell transplant is the standard of care. For patients who are ineligible for this therapy or those in whom high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplant have failed, treatment with brentuximab vedotin is a standard approach. Additional options include palliative chemotherapy, immune checkpoint inhibitors, nonmyeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplant, or participation in a clinical trial testing novel agents. PMID:26541251

  11. Pathobiology of Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Agostinelli, Claudio; Pileri, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Hodgkin’s lymphoma is a lymphoid tumour that represents about 1% of all de novo neoplasms occurring every year worldwide. Its diagnosis is based on the identification of characteristic neoplastic cells within an inflammatory milieu. Molecular studies have shown that most, if not all cases, belong to the same clonal population, which is derived from peripheral B-cells. The relevance of Epstein-Barr virus infection at least in a proportion of patients was also demonstrated. The REAL/WHO classification recognizes a basic distinction between nodular lymphocyte predominance HL (NLPHL) and classic HL (CHL), reflecting the differences in clinical presentation, behavior, morphology, phenotype, molecular features as well as in the composition of their cellular background. CHL has been classified into four subtypes: lymphocyte rich, nodular sclerosing, mixed cellularity and lymphocyte depleted. Despite its well known histological and clinical features, Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL) has recently been the object of intense research activity, leading to a better understanding of its phenotype, molecular characteristics and possible mechanisms of lymphomagenesis. PMID:24959337

  12. Mantle Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Chan Yoon; Seymour, John F; Wang, Michael L

    2016-04-10

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an uncommon subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma previously considered to have a poor prognosis. Large gains were made in the first decade of the new century when clinical trials established the importance of high-dose therapy and autologous stem-cell rescue and high-dose cytarabine in younger patients and the benefits of maintenance rituximab and bendamustine in older patients. In particular, greater depth of understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of MCL has resulted in an explosion of specifically targeted new efficacious agents. In particular, agents recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration include the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, immunomodulator lenalidomide, and Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib. We review recent advances in the understanding of MCL biology and outline our recommended approach to therapy, including choice of chemoimmunotherapy, the role of stem-cell transplantation, and mechanism-based targeted therapies, on the basis of a synthesis of the data from published clinical trials. PMID:26755518

  13. African Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abiodun, Rowland

    2001-01-01

    No single traditional discipline can adequately supply answers to the many unresolved questions in African art history. Because of the aesthetic, cultural, historical, and, not infrequently, political biases, already built into the conception and development of Western art history, the discipline of art history as defined and practiced in the West…

  14. "African Connection."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Cathy; And Others

    This interdisciplinary unit provides students in grades kindergarten through seventh grade an opportunity to understand diversity through a study of Africa as a diverse continent. The project is designed to provide all elementary students with cultural enrichment by exposing them to African music, art, storytelling, and movement. This project can…

  15. Computed tomography of gastric lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Buy, J N; Moss, A A

    1982-05-01

    The CT features in 12 patients with gastric lymphoma, four primary and eight secondary, were analyzed, correlated with other diagnostic studies, surgery, and pathologic features, and compared with the CT findings in 22 patients with gastric adenocarcinoma. An abnormally thickened gastric wall (mean, 4.0 cm) was found in all patients with gastric lymphoma. Lymphomas of the stomach often involved more than one region of the stomach (83%). The contour of the outer gastric wall was smooth or lobulated in 42%, perigastric lymph adenopathy was common (58%), extension into adjacent organs was found in 42%, and 42% had lymphadenopathy at or below the renal pedicle.

  16. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cutaneous Lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Angela M; Hurley, M Yadira

    2015-01-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas are non-Hodgkin lymphomas, which are broadly divided into cutaneous T-cell lymphomas and cutaneous B-cell lymphomas. These classifications include numerous distinct entities, all with varying clinical presentations and disease courses. Herein, we will review the cutaneous T-cell lymphomas, including Mycosis Fungoides, Sézary syndrome, CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders, as well as other less common entities. Cutaneous B-cell lymphomas will also be discussed, including primary cutaneous marginal zoned lymphoma, cutaneous follicle-center lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type, as well as other less common entities. Accurate and early diagnosis is key, as the treatment and prognosis varies significantly between conditions. PMID:26455060

  17. Rare gastrointestinal lymphomas: The endoscopic investigation

    PubMed Central

    Vetro, Calogero; Bonanno, Giacomo; Giulietti, Giorgio; Romano, Alessandra; Conticello, Concetta; Chiarenza, Annalisa; Spina, Paolo; Coppolino, Francesco; Cunsolo, Rosario; Raimondo, Francesco Di

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal lymphomas represent up to 10% of gastrointestinal malignancies and about one third of non-Hodgkin lymphomas. The most prominent histologies are mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. However, the gastrointestinal tract can be the site of rarer lymphoma subtypes as a primary or secondary localization. Due to their rarity and the multifaceted histology, an endoscopic classification has not been validated yet. This review aims to analyze the endoscopic presentation of rare gastrointestinal lymphomas from disease diagnosis to follow-up, according to the involved site and lymphoma subtype. Existing, new and emerging endoscopic technologies have been examined. In particular, we investigated the diagnostic, prognostic and follow-up endoscopic features of T-cell and natural killer lymphomas, lymphomatous polyposis and mantle cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, plasma cell related disease, gastrointestinal lymphomas in immunodeficiency and Hodgkin’s lymphoma of the gastrointestinal tract. Contrarily to more frequent gastrointestinal lymphomas, data about rare lymphomas are mostly extracted from case series and case reports. Due to the data paucity, a synergism between gastroenterologists and hematologists is required in order to better manage the disease. Indeed, clinical and prognostic features are different from nodal and extranodal or the bone marrow (in case of plasma cell disease) counterpart. Therefore, the approach should be based on the knowledge of the peculiar behavior and natural history of disease. PMID:26265987

  18. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2

  19. Anti-CD22 CAR-T Therapy for CD19-refractory or Resistant Lymphoma Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-22

    Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III/IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III/IV Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III/IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  20. Combination Chemotherapy Followed by Radiation Therapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-21

    Childhood Favorable Prognosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

  1. Epitheliotropic lymphoma in a dog.

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, H

    2000-01-01

    Despite treatment with steroids, nodular areas of alopecia and erythematous skin lesions persisted in a 9-year-old Irish water spaniel with discoid lupus. Epitheliotropic lymphoma was diagnosed by skin biopsy. PMID:10945129

  2. Agatolimod Sodium, Rituximab, and Yttrium Y 90 Ibritumomab Tiuxetan in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-04

    Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  3. Brentuximab Vedotin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Stage II-IV Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-27

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

  4. Preclinical evaluation of a diabody-based (177)Lu-radioimmunoconjugate for CD22-directed radioimmunotherapy in a non-Hodgkin lymphoma mouse model.

    PubMed

    Weber, Tobias; Bötticher, Benedikt; Arndt, Michaela A E; Mier, Walter; Sauter, Max; Exner, Evelyn; Keller, Armin; Krämer, Susanne; Leotta, Karin; Wischnjow, Artjom; Grosse-Hovest, Ludger; Strumberg, Dirk; Jäger, Dirk; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Haberkorn, Uwe; Brem, Gottfried; Krauss, Jürgen

    2016-10-28

    Radioimmunotherapy is considered as treatment option in recurrent and/or refractory B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL). To overcome the dose limiting bone marrow toxicity of IgG-based radioimmunoconjugates (RICs), we modified a humanized diabody with 5-, 10-, or 20-kDa polyethylene glycol (PEG) for CD22-targeted radioimmunotherapy using the low-energy β-emitter lutetium-177 ((177)Lu). A favorable pharmacokinetic profile was observed for the 10-kDa-PEG-diabody in nude mice being xenografted with subcutaneous human Burkitt lymphoma. Even at high doses of 16 MBq this diabody RIC was well tolerated by NOD Rag1(null) IL2rγ(null) (NRG) mice and did not reveal signs of organ long-term toxicity 80 days post injection. Combination therapy of the diabody RIC with unconjugated anti-CD20 Rituximab demonstrated therapeutic efficacy in established disseminated mantle cell lymphoma xenograft models. When compared with the combination of the IgG formatted (177)Lu anti-CD22 antibody and Rituximab, dual targeted therapy with the diabody RIC achieved an improved reduction of disease burden in the first nine days following treatment. The data indicate that the PEGylated anti-CD22 diabody may have potential for extending the repertoire of radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of patients with B-NHL. PMID:27524505

  5. [Molecular pathogenesis of peripheral T-cell lymphoma (1): angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified and anaplastic large cell lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Couronné, Lucile; Bastard, Christian; Gaulard, Philippe; Hermine, Olivier; Bernard, Olivier

    2015-10-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL) belong to the group of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and particularly that of mature T/NK cells lymphoproliferative neoplasms. The 2008 WHO classification describes different PTCL entities with varying prevalence. With the exception of the histological subtype "ALK positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma", PTCL are characterized by a poor prognosis. The mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of these lymphomas are not yet fully understood, but development of genomic high-throughput analysis techniques now allows to extensively identify the molecular abnormalities present in tumor cells. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge and recent advances about the molecular events occurring at the origin or during the natural history of main entities of PTCL. It will be published in two parts : the first is focused on the three more frequent entities, angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified, and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. The second (which will appear in the november issue) will describe other subtypes less frequent and of poor prognosis : extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma. T or NK cell lymphoproliferative disorders with leukemic presentation, primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and very rare subtypes of PTCL whose prevalence is less than 5% (hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma and subcutaneous panniculitis-like T cell lymphoma) will not be discussed herein. PMID:26481023

  6. Memory-enriched CAR-T Cells Immunotherapy for B Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-25

    Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  7. Apolizumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-15

    Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  8. Rituxan/Bendamustine/PCI-32765 in Relapsed DLBCL, MCL, or Indolent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-05

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  9. Plasma Epstein–Barr virus and Hepatitis B virus in non-Hodgkin lymphomas: Two lymphotropic, potentially oncogenic, latently occurring DNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Mahua; Rao, Clementina Rama; Premalata, C. S.; Shafiulla, Mohammed; Lakshmaiah, K. C.; Jacob, Linu Abraham; Babu, Govind K.; Viveka, B. K.; Appaji, L.; Subramanyam, Jayshree R.

    2016-01-01

    Context: There is a need to study potential infective etiologies in lymphomas. Lymphocyte-transforming viruses can directly infect lymphocytes, disrupt normal cell functions, and promote cell division. Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is known to be associated with several lymphomas, especially Hodgkin lymphomas (HLs). And recently, the lymphocyte-transforming role of hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been emphasized. Aims: The aim of this study was to elucidate the association of two potentially oncogenic, widely prevalent latent DNA viruses, EBV and HBV, in non-HL (NHL). Settings and Design: In this prospective study, we estimated plasma EBV and HBV DNA in NHL patients. Materials and Methods: Peripheral blood was obtained from newly diagnosed, treatment na ïve, histologically confirmed NHL patients. Plasma EBV DNA was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting Epstein–Barr Nucleic acid 1 while the plasma HBV DNA was detected using nested PCR targeting HBX gene. In a small subset of patients, follow-up plasma samples post-anticancer chemotherapy were available and retested for viral DNA. Results: Of the 110 NHL patients, ~79% were B-cell NHL and ~21% were T-cell NHL. Plasma EBV-DNA was detected in 10% NHLs with a higher EBV association in Burkitt lymphoma (33.3%) than other subtypes. Pretherapy HBV DNA was detected in 21% NHLs; most of them being diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Moreover, 42% of DLBCL patients had HBV DNA in plasma. Since all patients were HBV surface antigen seronegative at diagnosis, baseline plasma HBV-DNAemia before chemotherapy was indicative of occult hepatitis B infection. Conclusions: Our findings indicate a significant association of HBV with newly diagnosed DLBCL.

  10. Rituximab pharmacokinetics in children and adolescents with de novo intermediate and advanced mature B-cell lymphoma/leukaemia: a Children's Oncology Group report.

    PubMed

    Barth, Matthew J; Goldman, Stanton; Smith, Lynette; Perkins, Sherrie; Shiramizu, Bruce; Gross, Thomas G; Harrison, Lauren; Sanger, Warren; Geyer, Mark B; Giulino-Roth, Lisa; Cairo, Mitchell S

    2013-09-01

    The ANHL01P1 trial was undertaken to determine pharmacokinetics and safety following the addition of rituximab to French-American-British/Lymphome Malins de Burkitt (FAB/LMB96) chemotherapy in 41 children and adolescents with Stage III/IV mature B-cell lymphoma/leukaemia. Patients received rituximab (375 mg/m(2) ) days -2 and 0 of two induction cycles and day 0 of two consolidation cycles. Highest peak levels were achieved following the second dose of each induction cycle [299 ± 19 and 384 ± 25 μg/ml (Group-B); 245 ± 31 and 321 ± 32 μg/ml (Group-C)] with sustained troughs and t½ of 26-29 d. Rituximab can be safely added to FAB chemotherapy with high early rituximab peak/trough levels and a long t½. PMID:23802659

  11. Perinucleolar relocalization and nucleolin as crucial events in the transcriptional activation of key genes in mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Allinne, Jeanne; Pichugin, Andrei; Iarovaia, Olga; Klibi, Manel; Barat, Ana; Zlotek-Zlotkiewicz, Ewa; Markozashvili, Diana; Petrova, Natalia; Camara-Clayette, Valérie; Ioudinkova, Elena; Wiels, Joëlle; Razin, Sergey V; Ribrag, Vincent; Lipinski, Marc; Vassetzky, Yegor S

    2014-03-27

    In mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), one allele of the cyclin D1 (Ccnd1) gene is translocated from its normal localization on chromosome 11 to chromosome 14. This is considered as the crucial event in the transformation process of a normal naive B-cell; however, the actual molecular mechanism leading to Ccnd1 activation remains to be deciphered. Using a combination of three-dimensional and immuno-fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments, the radial position of the 2 Ccnd1 alleles was investigated in MCL-derived cell lines and malignant cells from affected patients. The translocated Ccnd1 allele was observed significantly more distant from the nuclear membrane than its nontranslocated counterpart, with a very high proportion of IgH-Ccnd1 chromosomal segments localized next to a nucleolus. These perinucleolar areas were found to contain active RNA polymerase II (PolII) clusters. Nucleoli are rich in nucleolin, a potent transcription factor that we found to bind sites within the Ccnd1 gene specifically in MCL cells and to activate Ccnd1 transcription. We propose that the Ccnd1 transcriptional activation in MCL cells relates to the repositioning of the rearranged IgH-Ccnd1-carrying chromosomal segment in a nuclear territory with abundant nucleolin and active PolII molecules. Similar transforming events could occur in Burkitt and other B-cell lymphomas.

  12. Obesity and African Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Data > Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Obesity Obesity and African Americans African American women have the ... ss6304.pdf [PDF | 3.38MB] HEALTH IMPACT OF OBESITY More than 80 percent of people with type ...

  13. Genetically Engineered Lymphocytes, Cyclophosphamide, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma or Indolent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-04

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  14. General Information about AIDS-Related Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About AIDS-Related Lymphoma Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  15. General Information about Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  16. A Lectin from the Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis Has a Highly Novel Primary Structure and Induces Glycan-mediated Cytotoxicity of Globotriaosylceramide-expressing Lymphoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Yuki; Dohmae, Naoshi; Takio, Koji; Kawsar, Sarkar M. A.; Matsumoto, Ryo; Hasan, Imtiaj; Koide, Yasuhiro; Kanaly, Robert A.; Yasumitsu, Hidetaro; Ogawa, Yukiko; Sugawara, Shigeki; Hosono, Masahiro; Nitta, Kazuo; Hamako, Jiharu; Matsui, Taei; Ozeki, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    A novel lectin structure was found for a 17-kDa α-d-galactose-binding lectin (termed “MytiLec”) isolated from the Mediterranean mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis. The complete primary structure of the lectin was determined by Edman degradation and mass spectrometric analysis. MytiLec was found to consist of 149 amino acids with a total molecular mass of 16,812.59 Da by Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry, in good agreement with the calculated value of 16,823.22 Da. MytiLec had an N terminus of acetylthreonine and a primary structure that was highly novel in comparison with those of all known lectins in the structure database. The polypeptide structure consisted of three tandem-repeat domains of ∼50 amino acids each having 45–52% homology with each other. Frontal affinity chromatography technology indicated that MytiLec bound specifically to globotriose (Gb3; Galα1–4Galβ1–4Glc), the epitope of globotriaosylceramide. MytiLec showed a dose-dependent cytotoxic effect on human Burkitt lymphoma Raji cells (which have high surface expression of Gb3) but had no such effect on erythroleukemia K562 cells (which do not express Gb3). The cytotoxic effect of MytiLec was specifically blocked by the co-presence of an α-galactoside. MytiLec treatment of Raji cells caused increased binding of anti-annexin V antibody and incorporation of propidium iodide, which are indicators of cell membrane inversion and perforation. MytiLec is the first reported lectin having a primary structure with the highly novel triple tandem-repeat domain and showing transduction of apoptotic signaling against Burkitt lymphoma cells by interaction with a glycosphingolipid-enriched microdomain containing Gb3. PMID:23093409

  17. Specific cytogenetic abnormalities are associated with a significantly inferior outcome in children and adolescents with mature B-cell Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma: Results of the FAB/LMB 96 international study

    PubMed Central

    Poirel, HA; Cairo, MS; Heerema, NA; Swansbury, J; Aupérin, A; Launay, E; Sanger, WG; Talley, P; Perkins, SL; Raphaël, M; McCarthy, K; Sposto, R; Gerrard, M; Bernheim, A; Patte, C

    2010-01-01

    Clinical studies showed that advanced stage, high LDH, poor response to reduction therapy and combined bone marrow and central nervous system disease are significantly associated with a decreased event free survival (EFS) in pediatric mature B-NHL treated on FAB/LMB96. Although rearranged MYC/8q24 (R8q24) is characteristic of Burkitt Lymphoma (BL), little information is available on other cytogenetic abnormalities and their prognostic importance. We performed an international review of 238 abnormal karyotypes in childhood mature-B-NHL treated on FAB/LMB96: 76% BL, 8% Burkitt-like lymphoma, 13% diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). The main BL R8q24 associated chromosomal aberrations were +1q [29%], +7q and del(13q) [14% each]. The DLBCL appeared heterogeneous and more complex. Incidence of R8q24 [34%] was higher than reported in adult DLBCL. The prognostic value of cytogenetic abnormalities on EFS was studied by Cox model controlling for the known risk factors: R8q24, +7q and del(13q) were independently associated with a significant inferior EFS [HR: 6.1 (p=0.030), 2.5 (p=0.015), 4.0 (p=0.0003), respectively]. The adverse prognosis of R8q24 was observed only in DLBCL while del(13q) and +7q had a similar effect in DLBCL and BL. These results emphasize the significant biological heterogeneity and the development of cytogenetic risk adapted therapy in childhood mature-B-NHL. PMID:19020548

  18. Interleukin-12 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or Hodgkin's Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  19. Cure of incurable lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    De Nardo, Gerald L.

    2006-10-01

    The most potent method for augmenting the cytocidal power of monoclonal antibody (MAb) treatment is to conjugate radionuclides to the MAb to deliver systemic radiotherapy (radioimmunotherapy; RIT). The antigen, MAb, and its epitope can make a difference in the performance of the drug. Additionally, the radionuclide, radiochemistry, chelator for radiometals and the linker between the MAb and chelator can have a major influence on the performance of drugs (radiopharmaceuticals) for RIT. Smaller radionuclide carriers, such as antibody fragments and mimics, and those used for pretargeting strategies, have been described and evaluated. All of these changes in the drugs and strategies for RIT have documented potential for improved performance and patient outcomes. RIT is a promising new therapy that should be incorporated into the management of patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) soon after these patients have proven incurable. Predictable improvements using better drugs, strategies, and combinations with other drugs seem certain to make RIT integral to the management of patients with NHL, and likely lead to cure of currently incurable NHL.

  20. Radiological Features of Gastrointestinal Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lo Re, Giuseppe; Federica, Vernuccio; Midiri, Federico; Picone, Dario; La Tona, Giuseppe; Galia, Massimo; Lo Casto, Antonio; Lagalla, Roberto; Midiri, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal lymphomas represent 5–20% of extranodal lymphomas and mainly occur in the stomach and small intestine. Clinical findings are not specific, thus often determining a delay in the diagnosis. Imaging features at conventional and cross-sectional imaging must be known by the radiologist since he/she plays a pivotal role in the diagnosis and disease assessment, thus assisting in the choice of the optimal treatment to patients. This review focuses on the wide variety of imaging presentation of esophageal, gastric, and small and large bowel lymphoma presenting their main imaging appearances at conventional and cross-sectional imaging, mainly focusing on computed tomography and magnetic resonance, helping in the choice of the best imaging technique for the disease characterization and assessment and the recognition of potential complications. PMID:26819598

  1. Malignant lymphoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Zapater, E; Bagán, J V; Carbonell, F; Basterra, J

    2010-03-01

    Malignant lymphomas represent approximately 5% of all malignant neoplasms of the head and neck area. They are classically divided into two subgroups, Hodgkin's lymphomas (HLs) and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs). We describe the clinical characteristics of head and neck lymphomas and the methods to establish the diagnosis. The World Health Organization classification of lymphoid tissues describes more than 50 different histological types, and we analyse the most common staging system for lymphomas, the Ann Arbor staging system. Finally, the different therapeutic approaches are discussed. PMID:20374502

  2. Real Time Analysis of Binding between Rituximab (anti-CD20 antibody) and B Lymphoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Liang; Lin, Peiling; Chisti, Mohammad M.; Rehman, Abdul; Zeng, Xiangqun

    2013-01-01

    CD20, expressed on greater than 90% of B-lymphocytic lymphomas, is an attractive target for antibody therapy. Rituximab is a chimeric murine/human-engineered monoclonal antibody and can selectively deplete CD20-expressing cells in peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues. The immobilization of B-lymphoblast-like Burkitt's lymphoma Raji cells on the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) gold electrode surface using RGD tripeptide was electrochemically confirmed. The real-time processes of attachment of Raji cells on the gold electrode and the subsequent binding of Rituximab to the cells were studied using QCM biosensor. The interaction between Rituximab and Raji cells led to the increased resonant frequency shifts (Δf0) in the studied antibody concentration range from 5 to 250 µg mL−1 following the Langmuir adsorption model. From these observations, the apparent binding constant between a single-layer of Rituximab and Raji cells was calculated to be 1.6×106 M−1. Control experiments using other therapeutic antibodies (i.e., Trastuzumab and Bevacizumab) and different cells (i.e., T cells and endothelial cells) proved the specific interaction between Rituximab and B cells. The effects of Ca2+ and Mn2+ ions on the Rituximab-Raji cell interaction were also studied providing the enhanced QCM signals, in particular, further indicating that CD20 is a calcium ion channel that can transport these metal ions into the cells and accelerate the cell lysis induced by Rituximab. Thus the real time capability of QCM and its simplicity of operation are highly suitable for multipurpose studies on living cells including cell-immobilization, cytotoxicity of drugs, and the cell action mechanisms. PMID:23926879

  3. Alvocidib, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Lymphoproliferative Disorders or Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Untreated Hairy Cell Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  4. Africans in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Ayanna; Spangler, Earl

    This book introduces African-American history and culture to children. The first Africans in America came from many different regions and cultures, but became united in this country by being black, African, and slaves. Once in America, Africans began a long struggle for freedom which still continues. Slavery, the Civil War, emancipation, and the…

  5. Therapy with African Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nwadiora, Emeka

    1996-01-01

    Informs helping professionals about the unique history and challenges of African families to guide them toward providing ethnically sensitive psychological services to African immigrant families in need. African families undergo great stress when faced with the alienation of being Black and African in a Euro-American culture. (SLD)

  6. African Outreach Workshop 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Nancy J.

    This report discusses the 1974 African Outreach Workshop planned and coordinated by the African Studies Program at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Its major aim was to assist teachers in developing curriculum units on African using materials available in their local community. A second aim was for the African Studies Program to…

  7. Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-27

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Multiple Myeloma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  8. Gastric lymphoma: the histology report.

    PubMed

    Doglioni, Claudio; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Ferreri, Andrés J M; Savio, Antonella

    2011-03-01

    The diagnosis of gastric MALT lymphoma is frequently difficult for the general histopathologist. During recent years there have been relevant changes in the therapeutic approach to gastric MALT lymphoma and our knowledge about its pathogenesis has greatly improved. The management of this disease actually requires a close cooperation between the histopathologist and the clinicians. The histology report of biopsies of a newly diagnosed or of an already treated case implies information of clinical and therapeutical relevance. This paper aims at giving the histopathologist a general knowledge about the state of art of this disease and its management. The diagnostic process leading to a complete and competent report is then described step by step.

  9. [Cutaneous lymphomas: new entities and rare variants].

    PubMed

    Kempf, W; Mitteldorf, C

    2015-02-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas are the second most common group of extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Recently several new variants and entities have been described but have not yet become part of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification. These forms include the granulomatous form of mycosis fungoides, which is associated with a poorer prognosis, as well as indolent CD8+ lymphoproliferations on the head and at acral localizations. Within the group of cutaneous CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders, new histological types of lymphomatoid papulosis have been identified, such as type D (CD8+ epidermotropic) and type E (angioinvasive) which simulate aggressive lymphomas. Cutaneous peripheral T-cell lymphomas are a prognostically heterogeneous group of cutaneous lymphomas. The cutaneous CD8+ aggressive epidermotropic cytotoxic T-cell lymphoma and cutaneous gamma/delta T-cell lymphoma are very aggressive neoplasms, whereas cutaneous CD4+ small to medium-sized T-cell lymphoma in its solitary or localized form represents an indolent lymphoproliferation: the terminology, histogenesis and differentiation from nodular T-cell pseudolymphoma are still a matter of debate. Among B-cell lymphomas, disorders associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are discussed focusing on EBV diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly and EBV-associated mucocutaneous ulcer. This review describes the clinical, histological and immunophenotypic features of new and rare entities and variants of cutaneous lymphomas and highlights the impact of the clinicopathological correlation in the diagnostic process.

  10. Bispecific anti-CD20/22 antibodies inhibit B-cell lymphoma proliferation by a unique mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Zhengxing; Cardillo, Thomas M.; Shi, Victoria; Hansen, Hans J.; Chang, Chien-Hsing

    2008-01-01

    Combination immunotherapy with anti-CD20 and anti-CD22 mAbs shows promising activity in non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Therefore, bispecific mAbs (bsAbs) were recombinantly constructed from veltuzumab (humanized anti-CD20) and epratuzumab (humanized anti-CD22) and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. While none of the parental mAbs alone or mixed had notable antiproliferative activity against Burkitt lymphoma cells when not cross-linked, the bsAbs [eg, anti-CD20 IgG-anti–CD22 (scFv)2] were inhibitory without cross-linking and synergistic with B-cell antigen (BCR)-mediated inhibition. The bsAbs demonstrated higher antibody-dependent cellulary cytoxicity (ADCC) activity than the parental mAbs, but not complement-dependent cytoxicity (CDC) of the parental CD20 mAb. Cross-linking both CD20 and CD22 with the bsAbs resulted in the prominent redistribution of not only CD20 but also CD22 and BCR into lipid rafts. Surprisingly, appreciable translocation of CD22 into lipid rafts was also observed after treatment with epratuzumab. Finally, the bsAbs inhibited Daudi lymphoma transplant growth, but showed a significant advantage over the parental anti-CD20 mAb only at the highest dose tested. These results suggest that recombinantly fused, complementary, bispecific, anti-CD20/22 antibodies exhibit functional features distinct from their parental antibodies, perhaps representing new candidate therapeutic molecules. PMID:18025153

  11. Global microRNA expression profiling uncovers molecular markers for classification and prognosis in aggressive B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Javeed; Shen, Yulei; Huang, Xin; Liu, Yanyan; Wake, Laura; Liu, Cuiling; Deffenbacher, Karen; Lachel, Cynthia M; Wang, Chao; Rohr, Joseph; Guo, Shuangping; Smith, Lynette M; Wright, George; Bhagavathi, Sharathkumar; Dybkaer, Karen; Fu, Kai; Greiner, Timothy C; Vose, Julie M; Jaffe, Elaine; Rimsza, Lisa; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Delabie, Jan; Campo, Elias; Braziel, Rita M; Cook, James R; Tubbs, Raymond R; Armitage, James O; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Staudt, Louis M; Gascoyne, Randy D; McKeithan, Timothy W; Chan, Wing C

    2015-02-12

    We studied the global microRNA (miRNA) expression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL; n = 79), Burkitt lymphoma (BL; n = 36), primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL; n = 12), B-cell lines (n = 11), and normal subsets of naïve B cells, centroblasts (CBs), and peripheral blood B cells along with their corresponding gene expression profiles (GEPs). The normal B-cell subsets have well-defined miRNA signatures. The CB miRNA signature was significantly associated with germinal center B-cell (GCB)-DLBCL compared with activated B-cell (ABC)-DLBCL (P = .002). We identified a 27-miRNA signature that included v-myc avian myelomatosis viral oncogene homolog (MYC) targets and enabled the differentiation of BL from DLBCL, a distinction comparable with the "gold standard" GEP-defined diagnosis. Distinct miRNA signatures were identified for DLBCL subgroups, including GCB-DLBCL, activated B-cell (ABC)-DLBCL, and PMBL. Interestingly, most of the unclassifiable-DLBCL by GEP showed a strong similarity to the ABC-DLBCL by miRNA expression profiling. Consistent results for BL and DLBCL subgroup classification were observed in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue, making such tests practical for clinical use. We also identified predictive miRNA biomarker signatures in DLBCL, including high expression of miR-155, which is significantly associated with rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP) treatment failure. This finding was further supported by the observation that high expression of miR-155 sensitizes cells to v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog-1 inhibitors in vitro, suggesting a novel treatment option for resistant DLBCL. PMID:25498913

  12. Global microRNA expression profiling uncovers molecular markers for classification and prognosis in aggressive B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yulei; Huang, Xin; Liu, Yanyan; Wake, Laura; Liu, Cuiling; Deffenbacher, Karen; Lachel, Cynthia M.; Wang, Chao; Rohr, Joseph; Guo, Shuangping; Smith, Lynette M.; Wright, George; Bhagavathi, Sharathkumar; Dybkaer, Karen; Fu, Kai; Greiner, Timothy C.; Vose, Julie M.; Jaffe, Elaine; Rimsza, Lisa; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Delabie, Jan; Campo, Elias; Braziel, Rita M.; Cook, James R.; Tubbs, Raymond R.; Armitage, James O.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Staudt, Louis M.; Gascoyne, Randy D.; McKeithan, Timothy W.; Chan, Wing C.

    2015-01-01

    We studied the global microRNA (miRNA) expression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL; n = 79), Burkitt lymphoma (BL; n = 36), primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL; n = 12), B-cell lines (n = 11), and normal subsets of naïve B cells, centroblasts (CBs), and peripheral blood B cells along with their corresponding gene expression profiles (GEPs). The normal B-cell subsets have well-defined miRNA signatures. The CB miRNA signature was significantly associated with germinal center B-cell (GCB)–DLBCL compared with activated B-cell (ABC)–DLBCL (P = .002). We identified a 27-miRNA signature that included v-myc avian myelomatosis viral oncogene homolog (MYC) targets and enabled the differentiation of BL from DLBCL, a distinction comparable with the “gold standard” GEP-defined diagnosis. Distinct miRNA signatures were identified for DLBCL subgroups, including GCB-DLBCL, activated B-cell (ABC)-DLBCL, and PMBL. Interestingly, most of the unclassifiable-DLBCL by GEP showed a strong similarity to the ABC-DLBCL by miRNA expression profiling. Consistent results for BL and DLBCL subgroup classification were observed in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue, making such tests practical for clinical use. We also identified predictive miRNA biomarker signatures in DLBCL, including high expression of miR-155, which is significantly associated with rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP) treatment failure. This finding was further supported by the observation that high expression of miR-155 sensitizes cells to v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog-1 inhibitors in vitro, suggesting a novel treatment option for resistant DLBCL. PMID:25498913

  13. 506U78 in Treating Patients With Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome

  14. CPI-613 and Bendamustine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  15. Occupational Risk Factors for Selected Cancers Among African American and White Men in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Nathaniel C.; Levine, Robert S.; Hall, H. Irene; Cosby, Otis; Brann, Edward A.; Hennekens, Charles H.

    2003-01-01

    Objectives. This study examined occupational risks for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, Hodgkin’s disease, and soft-tissue sarcoma among African American and White men. Methods. Race-specific multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted using data from a large US population-based case–control study. Results. Significant occupational risks were limited to African Americans; chromium was associated with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (odds ratio [OR] = 3.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2, 12.9) and wood dust was associated with Hodgkin’s disease (OR = 4.6, 95% CI = 1.6, 13.3) and soft-tissue sarcoma (OR = 3.7, 95% CI = 1.6, 8.6). Conclusions. Race-specific occupational risk factors for cancer were evident only among African American men. This may reflect racial disparities in levels of exposure to occupational carcinogens. PMID:14534232

  16. Study of BKM120 & Rituximab in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Indolent B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  17. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-31

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  18. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Recurrent Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-05

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  19. Computational diagnosis of canine lymphoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkes, E. M.; Alexandrakis, I.; Slater, K.; Tuli, R.; Gorban, A. N.

    2014-03-01

    One out of four dogs will develop cancer in their lifetime and 20% of those will be lymphoma cases. PetScreen developed a lymphoma blood test using serum samples collected from several veterinary practices. The samples were fractionated and analysed by mass spectrometry. Two protein peaks, with the highest diagnostic power, were selected and further identified as acute phase proteins, C-Reactive Protein and Haptoglobin. Data mining methods were then applied to the collected data for the development of an online computer-assisted veterinary diagnostic tool. The generated software can be used as a diagnostic, monitoring and screening tool. Initially, the diagnosis of lymphoma was formulated as a classification problem and then later refined as a lymphoma risk estimation. Three methods, decision trees, kNN and probability density evaluation, were used for classification and risk estimation and several preprocessing approaches were implemented to create the diagnostic system. For the differential diagnosis the best solution gave a sensitivity and specificity of 83.5% and 77%, respectively (using three input features, CRP, Haptoglobin and standard clinical symptom). For the screening task, the decision tree method provided the best result, with sensitivity and specificity of 81.4% and >99%, respectively (using the same input features). Furthermore, the development and application of new techniques for the generation of risk maps allowed their user-friendly visualization.

  20. Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Hodgkin lymphoma. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  1. Expression of p63 in anaplastic large cell lymphoma but not in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gualco, Gabriela; Weiss, Lawrence M; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2008-10-01

    Immunohistochemical determination of p63 protein is frequently used in the pathologic diagnosis of nonhematological solid tumors. In malignant hematological disease, p63 expression has been reported in 22% of follicular lymphoma, about 35% of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, 23% of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and in some cases of blast crisis of chronic myelogenous leukemia. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a rare disease that accounts for less than 5% of all cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. There is little information concerning p63 expression in this specific type of lymphoma. In some cases, the morphological and phenotypic features between anaplastic large cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin's lymphoma are similar, making this differential diagnosis challenging. We studied p63 expression using a tissue microarray approach in 154 cases of anaplastic large cell lymphoma, including 38% anaplastic large cell kinase positive and 62% anaplastic large cell kinase negative, and 58 Hodgkin's lymphoma cases. Sixty-eight cases of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (44%) showed p63 nuclear positivity (41% of anaplastic large cell kinase positive and 47% of anaplastic large cell kinase negative). Of 130 cases of systemic-anaplastic large cell lymphoma, 42% showed p63 positivity. The neoplastic cells expressed p63 in 38% of the cases of CD45-negative/anaplastic large cell kinase-negative null cell-type anaplastic large cell lymphoma, a subgroup that offers the most difficulties in the differential diagnosis with classical Hodgkin's lymphoma. In contrast, none of the cases of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma demonstrated any p63 expression. These results demonstrate that p63 protein expression is frequently expressed in a subset of anaplastic large cell lymphoma cases and may be used as a potential tool in the differential diagnosis between anaplastic large cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  2. Carfilzomib and Hyper-CVAD in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-09

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  3. Carfilzomib, Rituximab, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-29

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma

  4. [Molecular pathogenesis of peripheral T cell lymphoma (2): extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type, adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma and enteropathy associated T cell lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Couronné, Lucile; Bastard, Christian; Gaulard, Philippe; Hermine, Olivier; Bernard, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL) belong to the group of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and particularly that of mature T /NK cells lymphoproliferative neoplasms. The 2008 WHO classification describes different PTCL entities with varying prevalence. With the exception of histologic subtype "ALK positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma", PTCL are characterized by a poor prognosis. The mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of these lymphomas are not yet fully understood, but development of genomic high-throughput analysis techniques now allows to extensively identify the molecular abnormalities present in tumor cells. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge and recent advances about the molecular events occurring at the origin or during the natural history of main entities of PTCL. The first part published in the October issue was focused on the three more frequent entities, i.e. angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified, and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. The second part presented herein will describe other subtypes less frequent and of poor prognosis : extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma. PMID:26576610

  5. [Malignant Lymphoma of the Brain, and Dementia].

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Saneyuki; Mizutani, Tomohiko

    2016-04-01

    A differential diagnosis of acute and subacute progressive dementias includes malignant lymphoma of the brain. We reviewed primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL), intravascular lymphomatosis (IVL), lymphomatosis cerebri, and the relapse and invasion of systemic lymphomas. PCNSL is confined to the central nervous system; the infiltration and compression by the lymphoma result in adverse neurological symptoms. IVL is a rare form of malignant lymphoma that is characterized by the proliferation of primarily B-cell type lymphoma cells within the blood vessels of various organs. This causes ischemia and results in the associated neurological symptoms. Medical history and neuroimaging studies provide crucial informations to distinguish the lymphomas from other diseases that cause dementia, such an Alzheimer's disease. MRI imaging of the brain using contrast agent, and the biopsy of diseased tissues are essential for the diagnosis of the lymphomas. A histopathological examination is the most effective way to diagnose malignant lymphomas of the brain. Presently, the treatment of choice for PCNSL is the intravenous administration of high dose methotrexate with and without radiation therapy. Futhermore, Rituximab-containing chemotherapy has proved to greatly improve the prognosis of IVL. A better outcome can be achieved with the earlier diagnosis and treatment of the malignant lymphoma of the brain.

  6. Rituximab With or Without Yttrium Y-90 Ibritumomab Tiuxetan in Treating Patients With Untreated Follicular Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-15

    Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma

  7. What's New in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Additional resources for non-Hodgkin lymphoma What’s new in non-Hodgkin lymphoma research and treatment? Research ... non-Hodgkin lymphoma is focused on looking at new and better ways to treat this disease. Chemotherapy ...

  8. Etoposide, Prednisone, Vincristine Sulfate, Cyclophosphamide, and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride With Asparaginase in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-24

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent T Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Refractory B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Refractory T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  9. Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibody With or Without Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Children With Recurrent or Refractory Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-16

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

  10. Bortezomib and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Mantle Cell Lymphoma Who Have Previously Undergone Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-09

    Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  11. Bortezomib, Ifosfamide, and Vinorelbine Tartrate in Treating Young Patients With Hodgkin's Lymphoma That is Recurrent or Did Not Respond to Previous Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

  12. Genetically Engineered Lymphocyte Therapy After Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk, Intermediate-Grade, B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-10

    Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  13. Fusion Protein Cytokine Therapy After Rituximab in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  14. Primary Gastric Burkitt’s Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Swarupa; Mehta, Anurag; Gupta, Sunil Kumar; Sharma, Anila; Louis, A. Robert; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Saxena, Upasna; Simson, David K.; Dewan, Abhinav

    2014-01-01

    The primary gastrointestinal non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, although rare, is among the most common extra-nodal lymphomas, considering that gastric lymphomas are more common than intestinal lymphomas. Burkitt’s lymphoma (BL) is an aggressive form of B-cell lymphoma that is typically endemic in Africa, while non-endemic cases are found in the rest of the world. Primary gastric BL is extremely rare and only around 50 cases have been reported worldwide. Here we present the case of a young HIV-negative male, who was referred to our department with a stage IV gastric BL. He was planned for palliative chemotherapy, but after the first cycle of chemotherapy he succumbed to the progression of the disease. PMID:25568743

  15. B Cell Lymphoma mimicking Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cosatti, M A; Pisoni, C N; Altuve, J L; Lorente, C

    2016-01-01

    Non Hodking´s lymphoma (NHL) may involve bones but synovial involvement is uncommon. We describe a patient who presented with polyarthritis, sicca symptoms and rash suggestive of rheumatoid arthritis. An atypical skin rash prompted skin and synovial biopsies. A diagnosis of synovial and skin malignant large B-cell lymphoma anaplastic subtype was performed. Chemotherapy with dexamethasone, vincristine and rituximab was started. Following treatment the patient had complete resolution of cutaneous and articular lymphoma manifestations. PMID:27419896

  16. Outcome of hyperfractionated radiotherapy in chemotherapy-resistant non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, Chandra; Hodgson, David C.; Wells, Woodrow A.; Sun, Alex; Bezjak, Andrea; Pintilie, Melania; Crump, Michael; Gospodarowicz, Mary K.; Tsang, Richard . E-mail: Richard.Tsang@rmp.uhn.on.ca

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: Patients with chemotherapy-resistant lymphoma have rapidly progressive disease and a poor prognosis. Local symptoms are treated with radiotherapy (RT) for local control. We have reviewed local control and toxicity in patients treated with hyperfractionated accelerated RT. Methods and Materials: A total of 34 patients received hyperfractionated RT between 1997 and 2003. The radiation dose was 39.9-40.5 Gy in 30 fractions. The median treatment time was 22 days with twice-daily involved-field RT. The median follow-up was 4.4 years. Response was assessed <3 months after RT and was classified as a complete response, a complete response-unconfirmed, a partial response, or no response. Local control was defined as maintenance of local complete response, complete response-unconfirmed, or lack of local progression with a partial response. Recurrence or progression outside the RT volume was regarded as distant disease. Results: The median age was 53 years; 20 patients were men and 14 were women. The initial diagnosis was Stage I-II in 56% and Stage III-IV in 44%. The disease bulk was {>=}10 cm in 35% (n 12). The histologic features at diagnosis were follicular in 11 (Grade 1 in 4, Grade 2 in 3, and Grade 3 in 4), diffuse large B-cell in 14, peripheral T-cell lymphoma in 2, Burkitt-like in 1, mantle cell in 2, natural killer cell in 2, plasmacytoma/lymphoma in 1, and T-cell lymphoblastic in 1. The initial treatment was chemotherapy in 32 patients (94%); 71% were refractory to initial chemotherapy and 29% developed a relapse after an initial response. The RT response was complete in 24% (n = 8), complete, unconfirmed in 26% (n = 9), partial in 47% (n = 16), and none in 3% (n = 1). The local control rate was 73% at 1, 2, and 3 years. Grade 1 dermatitis was the most common side effect. Conclusion: Hyperfractionated RT provided good local control and was well tolerated. This encouraging result requires additional study with comparison to conventional fractionation

  17. Autologous Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-23

    Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; T-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

  18. Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bogle, Melissa A; Riddle, Christy C; Triana, Emily M; Jones, Dan; Duvic, Madeleine

    2005-09-01

    Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas include extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, large B-cell lymphoma, and, rarely, mantle cell lymphoma. Our purpose in conducting this review was to determine the clinical and behavioral characteristics of primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas, their relationship to infectious triggers, and therapeutic response. We conducted a retrospective chart review of 23 adult patients presenting to the dermatology clinic at M. D. Anderson Cancer Center with primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma between January 1999 and May 2003. Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas generally present on the head and neck, with the trunk and extremities afflicted to a lesser extent. Patients were found to have serologic evidence of prior infection with Borrelia burgdorferi (n = 10), Helicobacter pylori (n = 5), and Epstein-Barr virus (n = 6). Overall, treatment of primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma should involve multiple modalities; however, specific treatment aimed at concurrent or suspected infection, particularly B burgdorferi, is a helpful adjunct and may achieve complete remission in a small subset of patients.

  19. Primary bony Hodgkin’s lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Binesh, Fariba; Mirjalili, Mohammad Reza; Akhavan, Ali; Navabii, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Hodgkin’s lymphoma most commonly presents with progressive painless enlargement of peripheral lymph nodes, especially around the cervical region. At the time of diagnosis osseous involvement is uncommon and even in the late stages only 9–35% of cases have any bony involvement. Rarely Hodgkin’s lymphoma presents as an osseous lesion without involvement of lymph nodes, therefore the histological diagnosis of osseous Hodgkin’s lymphoma can be problematic. Here, the authors present a rare case of primary osseous Hodgkin’s lymphoma and a review of the literature. PMID:22787180

  20. Primary splenic lymphoma with filiform ultrastructure.

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, U R; Eyden, B P; Banerjee, S S; Reeve, N L

    1993-01-01

    A case of primary large cell splenic lymphoma of B lineage exhibiting filiform cell appearance is reported. The patient presented with massive splenomegaly, and following spontaneous splenic rupture, died of adult respiratory distress syndrome. The clinical aspects of the case, notably a lymphoma arising as a primary tumour in the spleen, with spontaneous spleen rupture and rapid fatal outcome, in combination with the filiform appearance of the lymphoma on electron microscopic examination, constitute an unusual combination of features. As far as is known, this B cell neoplasm is only the second primary splenic lymphoma of filiform type to be recorded. Images PMID:8331186

  1. Primary Extranodal Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma of the Head and Neck in Patients with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: A Clinicopathologic Study of 24 Patients in a Single Hospital of Infectious Diseases in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Corti, Marcelo; Villafañe, María; Bistmans, Alicia; Narbaitz, Marina; Gilardi, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) are commonly described in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and are related with an atypical morphology and aggressive clinical course. AIDS-associated lymphomas are characterized by their rapid progression, frequent extranodal manifestations, and poor outcome. Objective The aim of this article is to remake the clinical features of head and neck (HN) NHL in patients with AIDS to facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. Methods We evaluated the epidemiologic, clinical, immunologic, virologic, and histopathologic characteristics of 24 patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS with primary HN NHL treated at a single institution between 2002 and 2012. Histopathologic diagnosis was made according to the criteria of the World Health Organization Classification of Tumors of Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues. Additional immunohistochemical stains were applied in all cases. Results Eighteen patients (75%) were men and the median of age was 39 years. The gingiva and the hard palate were the most common sites of the lesions (15 patients, 62.5%). Lactate dehydrogenase levels were elevated in 16 cases (84%). Bone marrow infiltration was detected only in 4 cases (16.6%). The median CD4 T-cell count was 100 cells/µL. According to the histopathologic evaluation, the most common subtype was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (12 cases, 50%), followed by plasmablastic lymphoma (9 cases, 37.5%) and Burkitt lymphoma (3 cases, 12.5%). Conclusion HN NHL is a severe complication of advanced HIV/AIDS disease. Early diagnosis followed by chemotherapy plus highly active antiretroviral treatment is necessary to improve the prognosis and the survival of these patients. PMID:25992103

  2. Primary extranodal non-hodgkin lymphoma of the head and neck in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a clinicopathologic study of 24 patients in a single hospital of infectious diseases in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Corti, Marcelo; Villafañe, María; Bistmans, Alicia; Narbaitz, Marina; Gilardi, Leonardo

    2014-07-01

    Introduction Extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) are commonly described in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and are related with an atypical morphology and aggressive clinical course. AIDS-associated lymphomas are characterized by their rapid progression, frequent extranodal manifestations, and poor outcome. Objective The aim of this article is to remake the clinical features of head and neck (HN) NHL in patients with AIDS to facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. Methods We evaluated the epidemiologic, clinical, immunologic, virologic, and histopathologic characteristics of 24 patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS with primary HN NHL treated at a single institution between 2002 and 2012. Histopathologic diagnosis was made according to the criteria of the World Health Organization Classification of Tumors of Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues. Additional immunohistochemical stains were applied in all cases. Results Eighteen patients (75%) were men and the median of age was 39 years. The gingiva and the hard palate were the most common sites of the lesions (15 patients, 62.5%). Lactate dehydrogenase levels were elevated in 16 cases (84%). Bone marrow infiltration was detected only in 4 cases (16.6%). The median CD4 T-cell count was 100 cells/µL. According to the histopathologic evaluation, the most common subtype was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (12 cases, 50%), followed by plasmablastic lymphoma (9 cases, 37.5%) and Burkitt lymphoma (3 cases, 12.5%). Conclusion HN NHL is a severe complication of advanced HIV/AIDS disease. Early diagnosis followed by chemotherapy plus highly active antiretroviral treatment is necessary to improve the prognosis and the survival of these patients. PMID:25992103

  3. Primary extranodal non-hodgkin lymphoma of the head and neck in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a clinicopathologic study of 24 patients in a single hospital of infectious diseases in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Corti, Marcelo; Villafañe, María; Bistmans, Alicia; Narbaitz, Marina; Gilardi, Leonardo

    2014-07-01

    Introduction Extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) are commonly described in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and are related with an atypical morphology and aggressive clinical course. AIDS-associated lymphomas are characterized by their rapid progression, frequent extranodal manifestations, and poor outcome. Objective The aim of this article is to remake the clinical features of head and neck (HN) NHL in patients with AIDS to facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. Methods We evaluated the epidemiologic, clinical, immunologic, virologic, and histopathologic characteristics of 24 patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS with primary HN NHL treated at a single institution between 2002 and 2012. Histopathologic diagnosis was made according to the criteria of the World Health Organization Classification of Tumors of Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues. Additional immunohistochemical stains were applied in all cases. Results Eighteen patients (75%) were men and the median of age was 39 years. The gingiva and the hard palate were the most common sites of the lesions (15 patients, 62.5%). Lactate dehydrogenase levels were elevated in 16 cases (84%). Bone marrow infiltration was detected only in 4 cases (16.6%). The median CD4 T-cell count was 100 cells/µL. According to the histopathologic evaluation, the most common subtype was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (12 cases, 50%), followed by plasmablastic lymphoma (9 cases, 37.5%) and Burkitt lymphoma (3 cases, 12.5%). Conclusion HN NHL is a severe complication of advanced HIV/AIDS disease. Early diagnosis followed by chemotherapy plus highly active antiretroviral treatment is necessary to improve the prognosis and the survival of these patients.

  4. Outcome and pathologic classification of children and adolescents with mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma treated with FAB/LMB96 mature B-NHL therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gerrard, Mary; Waxman, Ian M.; Sposto, Richard; Auperin, Anne; Perkins, Sherrie L.; Goldman, Stanton; Harrison, Lauren; Pinkerton, Ross; McCarthy, Keith; Raphael, Martine; Patte, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (MLBL) represents 2% of mature B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma in patients ≤ 18 years of age. We analyzed data from childhood and adolescent patients with stage III MLBL (n = 42) and non-MLBL DLBCL (n = 69) treated with Group B therapy in the French-American-British/Lymphome Malins de Burkitt (FAB/LMB) 96 study. MLBL patients had a male/female 26/16; median age, 15.7 years (range, 12.5-19.7); and LDH < 2 versus ≥ 2 × the upper limit of normal, 23:19. Six MLBL patients (14%) had < a 20% response to initial COP (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisone) therapy. Central pathology revealed approximately 50% with classical features of primary MLBL. Five-year event-free survival for the stage III MLBL and non-MLBL DLBCL groups was 66% (95% confidence interval [CI], 49%-78%) and 85% (95% CI, 71%-92%), respectively (P < .001; 14%). The 5-year overall survival in the 42 MLBL patients was 73% (95% CI, 56%-84%). We conclude that MLBL in adolescent patients is associated with significantly inferior event-free survival compared with stage III non-MLBL DLBCL and can be of multiple histologies. Alternate treatment strategies should be investigated in the future taking into account both adult MLBL approaches and more recent biologic findings in adult MLBL. PMID:23149845

  5. Outcome and pathologic classification of children and adolescents with mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma treated with FAB/LMB96 mature B-NHL therapy.

    PubMed

    Gerrard, Mary; Waxman, Ian M; Sposto, Richard; Auperin, Anne; Perkins, Sherrie L; Goldman, Stanton; Harrison, Lauren; Pinkerton, Ross; McCarthy, Keith; Raphael, Martine; Patte, Catherine; Cairo, Mitchell S

    2013-01-10

    Mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (MLBL) represents 2% of mature B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma in patients ≤ 18 years of age. We analyzed data from childhood and adolescent patients with stage III MLBL (n = 42) and non-MLBL DLBCL (n = 69) treated with Group B therapy in the French-American-British/Lymphome Malins de Burkitt (FAB/LMB) 96 study. MLBL patients had a male/female 26/16; median age, 15.7 years (range, 12.5-19.7); and LDH < 2 versus ≥ 2 × the upper limit of normal, 23:19. Six MLBL patients (14%) had < a 20% response to initial COP (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisone) therapy. Central pathology revealed approximately 50% with classical features of primary MLBL. Five-year event-free survival for the stage III MLBL and non-MLBL DLBCL groups was 66% (95% confidence interval [CI], 49%-78%) and 85% (95% CI, 71%-92%), respectively (P < .001; 14%). The 5-year overall survival in the 42 MLBL patients was 73% (95% CI, 56%-84%). We conclude that MLBL in adolescent patients is associated with significantly inferior event-free survival compared with stage III non-MLBL DLBCL and can be of multiple histologies. Alternate treatment strategies should be investigated in the future taking into account both adult MLBL approaches and more recent biologic findings in adult MLBL. PMID:23149845

  6. Relationship between ambient ultraviolet radiation and non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtypes: a U.S. population-based study of racial and ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Cahoon, Elizabeth K; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Wheeler, David C; Arhancet, Juan; Lin, Shih-Wen; Alexander, Bruce H; Linet, Martha S; Freedman, D Michal

    2015-03-01

    Associations between ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) have been inconsistent, but few studies have examined these associations for specific subtypes or across race/ethnicities. We evaluated the relationship between ambient UVR exposure and subtype-specific NHL incidence for whites, Hispanics and blacks in the United States for years 2001-2010 (n = 187,778 cases). Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for UVR quintiles using Poisson regression. Incidence was lower for the highest UVR quintile for chronic/small lymphocytic/leukemia (CLL/SLL) (IRR = 0.87, 95% CI: 0.77-0.97), mantle cell (IRR = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.69-0.97), lymphoplasmacytic (IRR = 0.58, 95% CI: 0.42-0.80), mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MZLMALT) (IRR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.60-0.90), follicular (FL) (IRR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.68-0.86), diffuse large B-cell (IRR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.76-0.94;), peripheral T-cell other (PTCL) (IRR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.61-0.95) and PTCL not otherwise specified (PNOS) (IRR = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.61-0.98). Trends were significant for MZLMALT, FL, DLBCL, BNOS and PTCL, with FL and DLBCL still significant after Bonferroni correction. We found interaction by race/ethnicity for CLL/SLL, FL, Burkitt, PNOS and MF/SS, with CLL/SLL and FL still significant after Bonferroni correction. Some B-cell lymphomas (CLL/SLL, FL and Burkitt) suggested significant inverse relationships in whites and Hispanics, but not in blacks. Some T-cell lymphomas suggested the most reduced risk for the highest quintile of UVR among blacks (PNOS and MF/SS), though trends were not significant. These findings strengthen the case for an inverse association of UVR exposure, support modest heterogeneity between NHL subtypes and suggest some differences by race/ethnicity.

  7. Molecular genetics of cutaneous lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, S

    2001-09-01

    The underlying molecular basis of primary cutaneous lymphomas has not yet been clarified. However, abnormalities of cell cycle control genes and well-defined tumor suppressor genes such as p53 are common and may contribute to disease progression and treatment resistance. Biallelic inactivation of tumor suppressor genes usually occurs by a combination of deletion, point mutation, and/or promotor hypermethylation. The detection of UVB-specific mutations of p53 requires confirmation but may have important implications for the management of patients with mycosis fungoides. Molecular cytogenetic studies have identified common regions of chromosomal deletion and amplification, which suggests the presence and location of genes that are of critical importance in the pathogenesis of cutaneous lymphoma.

  8. Molecular Profiling of Aggressive Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Maura; Laginestra, Maria Antonella; Gazzola, Anna; Sapienza, Maria Rosaria; Pileri, Stefano A.; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo

    2012-01-01

    In the last years, several studies of molecular profiling of aggressive lymphomas were performed. In particular, it was shown that DLBCL can be distinguished in two different entities according to GEP. Specifically, ABC and GCB subtypes were characterized by having different pathogenetic and clinical features. In addition, it was demonstrated that DLBCLs are distinct from BL. Indeed, the latter is a unique molecular entity. However, relevant pathological differences emerged among the clinical subtypes. More recently, microRNA profiling provided further information concerning BL-DLBCL distinction as well as for their subclassification. In this paper, the authors based on their own experience and the most updated literature review, the main concept on molecular profiling of aggressive lymphomas. PMID:22190944

  9. Vaccine Therapy With or Without Cryosurgery in Treating Patients With Residual, Relapsed, or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia With Nodal Disease

  10. The African Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oguntoyinbo, Lekan

    2012-01-01

    From student and faculty exchanges to joint research projects, U.S. universities maintain a broad spectrum of collaborative relationships with African universities. It's unclear how many U.S. colleges and universities have partnerships with African universities. The African Studies Association, an organization of scholars, doesn't keep that kind…

  11. Linguistic Imperialism: African Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillipson, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Responds to an article on aspects of African language policy and discusses the following issues: multilingualism and monolingualism, proposed changes in language policy from the Organization for African Unity and South African initiatives, the language of literature, bilingual education, and whose interests English-language teaching is serving.…

  12. [Acute intestinal obstruction revealing enteropathy associated t-cell lymphoma, about a case].

    PubMed

    Garba, Abdoul Aziz; Adamou, Harissou; Magagi, Ibrahim Amadou; Brah, Souleymane; Habou, Oumarou

    2016-01-01

    Enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL) is a rare complication of celiac disease (CD). We report a case of EATL associated with CD revealed by acute intestinal obstruction. A North African woman of 38 years old with a history of infertility and chronic abdominal pain was admitted in emergency with acute intestinal obstruction. During the surgery, we found a tumor on the small intestine with mesenteric lymphadenopathy. Histology and immunohistochemistry of the specimen objectified a digestive T lymphoma CD3+ and immunological assessment of celiac disease was positive. The diagnosis of EATL was thus retained. Chemotherapy (CHOEP protocol) was established as well as gluten-free diet with a complete response to treatment. The EATL is a rare complication of CD that can be revealed by intestinal obstruction. The prognosis can be improved by early treatment involving surgery and chemotherapy. Its prevention requires early diagnosis of celiac and gluten-free diets. PMID:27217874

  13. Peripheral T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Foss, Francine M; Zinzani, Pier Luigi; Vose, Julie M; Gascoyne, Randy D; Rosen, Steven T; Tobinai, Kensei

    2011-06-23

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are a heterogeneous group of clinically aggressive diseases associated with poor outcome. Studies that focus specifically on PTCL are emerging, with the ultimate goal of improved understanding of disease biology and the development of more effective therapies. However, one of the difficulties in classifying and studying treatment options in clinical trials is the rarity of these subtypes. Various groups have developed lymphoma classifications over the years, including the World Health Organization, which updated its classification in 2008. This article briefly reviews the major lymphoma classification schema, highlights contributions made by the collaborative International PTCL Project, discusses prognostic issues and gene expression profiling, and outlines therapeutic approaches to PTCL. These include the standard chemotherapeutic regimens and other modalities incorporating antifolates, conjugates, histone deacetylase inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies, nucleoside analogs, proteasome inhibitors, and signaling inhibitors. As this review emphasizes, the problem has now evolved into an abundance of drugs and too few patients available to test them. Collaborative groups will aid in future efforts to find the best treatment strategies to improve the outcome for patients with PTCL.

  14. [Pathological diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Tamaru, Jun-ichi

    2014-03-01

    This lymphoma was recognized by Thomas Hodgkin in 1832. In 1865, Samuel Wilks named it Hodgkin disease. Now, the term Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is acceptable over Hodgkin disease. Since the neoplastic cells of the disease is well-recognized to be a lymphoid cell, especially B lymphocyte. In WHO classification published in 2008, HLs are divided into two entities: Classical HL and nodular lymphocyte predominat HL. The former is composed of four different subtypes: nodular sclerosis (NS), mixed cellularity (MC), lymphocyte rich (LR), and lymphocyte depletion (LD). HL is characterized by the morphological feature comprising a minority of neoplastic cells, Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells and popcorn (LP) cells and a majority of non-neoplastic reactive cells. Antigen receptor gene analyses by prevailing molecular methods and flow cytometry are not appropriate method for the diagnosis of HL, because of small number of neoplastic cells. They are, however, very useful in the differential diagnosis to rule out other lymphomas. Even the present when science progressed, pathological (morphological and immunohistochemical) examination is very worth for diagnosis of HL. PMID:24724402

  15. Hepatosplenic alphabeta T cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yuya; Ikegame, Kazuhiro; Mori, Minako; Inoue, Daichi; Kimura, Takaharu; Shimoji, Sonoko; Togami, Katsuhiro; Tabata, Sumie; Kurata, Masayuki; Imai, Yukihiro; Matsushita, Akiko; Nagai, Kenichi; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Takayuki

    2010-04-01

    A 32-year-old male with chronic hepatitis B was admitted to a hospital with cellulitis in the right leg in September 2006. Pancytopenia, hepatosplenomegaly, and systemic superficial lymph node swelling were noted, and he was referred to our hospital. He developed fever and liver dysfunction in June 2007 and underwent a splenectomy. His pancytopenia subsequently improved. A pathologic diagnosis of hepatosplenic alphabeta T cell lymphoma was made by examining spleen tissue and biopsy specimens of the liver and mesenteric lymph node. He had stage IVB disease because neoplastic T cells were noted in the bone marrow. The response of the lymphoma to conventional chemotherapy including the CHOP (cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, vincristine, prednisolone) and DeVIC (dexamethasone, etoposide, ifoshamide, carboplatin) regimens was poor and transient. A partial remission was obtained with an ESHAP (etoposide, cisplatin, cytarabine, methylprednisolone) regimen. Therefore, we planned a bone marrow transplantation (BMT) from an HLA-haploidentical sibling donor. He was moved to the Department of Hematology, Hyogo Medical College, to receive this BMT as part of a clinical trial. During the conditioning procedure for the transplantation, however, he died of septicemia. Since hepatosplenic alphabeta T cell lymphoma is very rare with only 23 reported cases to date, herein we report this case and discuss the therapeutic strategy. PMID:20217452

  16. Lenalidomide and Combination Chemotherapy (DA-EPOCH-R) in Treating Patients With MYC-Associated B-Cell Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-24

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic

  17. Composite lymphoma: EBV-positive classic Hodgkin lymphoma and peripheral T-cell lymphoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gualco, Gabriela; Chioato, Lucimara; Van Den Berg, Anke; Weiss, Lawrence M; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2009-01-01

    Composite lymphomas are rare and defined as hematopoietic neoplasms with more than 1 malignant lymphomatous clone showing different phenotypic features. Of all possible combinations between non-Hodgkin lymphomas, B cell or T cell, and Hodgkin lymphoma, the least frequent are the ones combining T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and classic Hodgkin lymphoma. We report a case of a 55-year-old woman with cervical and mediastinal lymphadenopathy, fever, weight loss, and night sweats. A cervical lymph node biopsy revealed a composite lymphoma with classic Hodgkin lymphoma and peripheral T-cell lymphoma components. The bone marrow was not involved. The patient refused treatment and died of disease progression 2 months after diagnosis. The biopsied lymph node showed 2 distinct populations, one composed of large cells including typical Reed-Sternberg cells and their variants, with expression of CD30, CD15, PAX5, and LMP-1. The other component was more abundant and comprised polymorphic medium-sized cells with convoluted nuclei; CD3, CD5, CD2, and CD4 expression; and negativity for CD30, cytotoxic granules, and B-cell markers. Epstein-Barr virus DNA of subtype A was identified only in the Hodgkin cells. Clonal T-cell receptor gamma and beta gene rearrangements were detected in the T-cell component, whereas monoclonal immunoglobulin H gene rearrangement was found in the Hodgkin cells.

  18. Alisertib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

  19. Rituximab and Interleukin-12 in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-23

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  20. Overexpression of MicroRNAs from the miR-17-92 Paralog Clusters in AIDS-Related Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Thapa, Dharma R.; Li, Xinmin; Jamieson, Beth D.; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel

    2011-01-01

    Background Individuals infected by HIV are at an increased risk for developing non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (AIDS-NHL). In the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era, there has been a significant decline in the incidence of AIDS-associated primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). However, only a modest decrease in incidence has been reported for other AIDS-NHL subtypes. Thus, AIDS-NHLs remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV infected individuals. Recently, much attention has been directed toward the role of miRNAs in cancer, including NHL. Several miRNAs, including those encoded by the miR-17-92 polycistron, have been shown to play significant roles in B cell tumorigenesis. However, the role of miRNAs in NHL in the setting of HIV infection has not been defined. Methodology/Principal Findings We used quantitative realtime PCR to assess the expression of miRNAs from three different paralog clusters, miR-17-92, miR-106a-363, and miR-106b-25 in 24 cases of AIDS-NHLs representing four tumor types, Burkitt's lymphoma (BL, n = 6), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL, n = 8), primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL, n = 5), and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL, n = 5). We also used microarray analysis to identify a differentiation specific miRNA signature of naïve, germinal center, and memory B cell subsets from tonsils (n = 4). miRNAs from the miR-17-92 paralog clusters were upregulated by B cells, specifically during the GC differentiation stage. We also found overexpression of these miRNA clusters in all four AIDS-NHL subtypes. Finally, we also show that select miRNAs from these clusters (miR-17, miR-106a, and miR-106b) inhibited p21 in AIDS-BL and DLBCL cases, thus providing a mechanistic role for these miRNAs in AIDS-NHL pathogenesis. Conclusion Dysregulation of miR-17-92 paralog clusters is a common feature of AIDS-associated NHLs. PMID:21698185

  1. Combined applications of fine needle aspiration cytology and Flow cytometric immunphenotyping for diagnosis and classification of non Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Pranab; Amir, Thasneem; Al Jassar, Aisha; Al Shemmari, Salem; Jogai, Sanjay; Bhat M, Ganapathi; Al Quallaf, Aisha; Al Shammari, Zahia

    2006-01-01

    cases was diagnosed as Burkitt's lymphoma on histology. Cases of FL (4), SLL (3) and MCL (2) were well correlated with histopathology. Out of the five cases suggestive of NHL on cytology, histopathology was available in four cases. Histology diagnosis was given as DLBL (1), SLL (1), anaplastic large cell lymphoma (1) and FL transformed into large cell NHL (1). Considering histopathology as gold standard, diagnostic specificity of combined FNAC and FCI was 100% (31/31) and sensitivity in sub-classification was 83.8% (26/31). Conclusion FNAC combined with FCI may be helpful in accurately sub-classifying NHL according to WHO classification. Many of the subtypes of NHL such as FL and MCL which were previously recognized as a pure morphologic entity can be diagnosed by combined use of FNAC and FCI. Other ancillary investigations such as chromosomal changes, cell proliferation markers etc. may be helpful in this aspect. PMID:17069647

  2. T-Regulatory Cell and CD3 Depleted Double Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation in Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-04

    Hematologic Malignancy; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blast Crisis; Anemia, Refractory, With Excess of Blasts; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disease; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Mantle-Cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Lymphoma; Large Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; High Grade Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

  3. Autoimmune hemolytic anaemia in Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mihir B; Nanjapp, Veena; Devaraj, H S; Sindhu, K S

    2013-07-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anaemia is a rare presentation of Hodgkin's lymphoma though its association with Non- Hodgkin's lymphoma is well known. It is usually detected at the time of diagnosis when it accompanies Hodgkin's and rarely precedes it. It is a warm immune hemolytic anemia which is responsive to steroids and rituximab. We hereby report a case of advanced Hodgkin's disease who presented as AIHA.

  4. An update on ocular adnexal lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mulay, Kaustubh; Honavar, Santosh G

    2016-05-01

    Ocular adnexal lymphoma (OAL) is a relatively common lesion in the practice of ophthalmic oncology. Although OALs are usually primary tumors, secondary involvement of the ocular adnexae by systemic lymphoma is also possible. The clinical and radiological features of OAL are non-specific. Thorough morphological evaluation, aided by immunostaining, cytogenetic studies and molecular testing, are necessary for accurate diagnosis. PMID:26972223

  5. Cerebral lymphoma presenting as a leukoencephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ayuso-Peralta, L; Orti-Pareja, M; Zurdo-Hernandez, M; Jimenez-Jimenez, F; Tejeiro-Martinez, J; Ricoy, J; de la Lama, A; Bernardo, A

    2001-01-01

    Cerebral lymphoma is infrequent in immunocompetent patients. This tumour usually appears on CT and MRI as a single lesion or as multiple lesions with mass effect and homogeneous enhancement after contrast administration. A patient is described with a cerebral lymphoma, confirmed by histopathological examination, who presented as a progressive leukoencephalopathy.

 PMID:11459903

  6. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70)-stimulated deoxycytidine deaminases from a human lymphoma cell but not the activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) from Ramos 6.4 human Burkitt's lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bases, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Deoxycytidine deaminase enzyme activity was reduced in lysates of human leukemic THP1 cells 24 h after transfection with siRNA designed to inhibit cell synthesis of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70)1a and Hsp701b. The cytidine deaminase enzyme activity from the cell lysates was purified from an affinity column which contained bound single-stranded oligodeoxycytidylic acid. Deficient enzyme activity in certain elution fractions from the siRNA-transfected cells was restored by including recombinant HSP 70 in the assays. Enzyme activity in some other fractions was increased after siRNA transfection. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is a central factor in the immune response. A more specific assay for AID was used to study the influence of Hsp70 on AID activity. Unlike Hsp70's ability to stimulate certain enzymes of DNA base excision repair and other cytidine deaminases, it had little effect on AID activity in vitro, or was weakly inhibitory.

  7. Comparative efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    DOE PAGES

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; et al

    2015-03-18

    Purpose Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targetingmore » either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice. Methods Parallel experiments evaluating the biodistribution, imaging, dosimetry, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity were performed in female athymic nude mice bearing either Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) or Granta (mantle cell lymphoma) xenografts, utilizing an anti-CD20 antibodystreptavidin conjugate (1F5-SA) and an 90Y- or 177Lu-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-biotin second step reagent. Results The two radionuclides displayed comparable biodistributions in tumors and normal organs; however, the absorbed radiation dose delivered to tumor was more than twice as high for 90Y (1.3 Gy/MBq) as for 177Lu (0.6 Gy/MBq). More importantly, therapy with 90Y-DOTAbiotin was dramatically more effective than with 177Lu-DOTA-biotin, with 100% of Ramos xenograft-bearing mice cured with 37 MBq 90Y, whereas 0% were cured using identical amounts of 177Lu-DOTA-biotin. Similar results were observed in mice bearing Granta xenografts, with 80% of the mice cured with 90Y-PRIT and 0% cured with 177Lu-PRIT. Toxicities were comparable with both isotopes. Conclusion 90Y was therapeutically superior to 177Lu for streptavidin-biotin PRIT

  8. Comparative Efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; Bäck, Tom A.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Press, Oliver W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targeting either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice. Methods Parallel experiments evaluating the biodistribution, imaging, dosimetry, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity were performed in female athymic nude mice bearing either Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) or Granta (mantle cell lymphoma) xenografts, utilizing an anti-CD20 antibody-streptavidin conjugate (1F5-SA) and an 90Y- or 177Lu-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-biotin second step reagent. Results The two radionuclides displayed comparable biodistributions in tumors and normal organs; however, the absorbed radiation dose delivered to tumor was more than twice as high for 90Y (1.3 Gy/MBq) as for 177Lu (0.6 Gy/MBq). More importantly, therapy with 90Y-DOTA-biotin was dramatically more effective than with 177Lu-DOTA-biotin, with 100% of Ramos xenograft-bearing mice cured with 37 MBq 90Y, whereas 0% were cured using identical amounts of 177Lu-DOTA-biotin. Similar results were observed in mice bearing Granta xenografts, with 80% of the mice cured with 90Y-PRIT and 0% cured with 177Lu-PRIT. Toxicities were comparable with both isotopes. Conclusion 90Y was therapeutically superior to 177Lu for streptavidin-biotin PRIT approaches in

  9. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  10. Rituximab, Lenalidomide, and Ibrutinib in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage II-IV Follicular Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-26

    Stage II Grade 1 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

  11. Study of Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Patients With Relapsed Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-09

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  12. Initial cutaneous manifestation of lymphomas in children.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Maria Christina Lopes Araujo de; Pereira, Luciana Baptista; Rodrigues, Priscila Cezarino; Sampaio, Keyla Cunha; Oliveira, Benigna Maria de; Viana, Marcos Borato

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous lymphomas comprise a heterogeneous group of lymphoproliferative disorders with skin involvement and are classified as a subgroup of non-Hodgkin lymphomas. From 1981 to 2007, 100 children with non-Hodgkin lymphomas were admitted to the Hematology Unit of the Federal University of Minas Gerais Teaching Hospital. In nine of these children, the skin was involved at the onset of the disease. Three patients were classified as having primary cutaneous lymphoma, while in six the disease was systemic with cutaneous involvement. In seven patients, the immunophenotype was T-cell, in one it was B-cell, and in the remaining case the immunophenotype was indefinable. No deaths occurred in any of the children with primary cutaneous lymphoma. PMID:21987155

  13. Study of Bortezomib and Panobinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma or NK/T-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-26

    Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma (Not Otherwise Specified); Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma Nasal Type; Enteropathy- Type T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL) (ALK-1 Negative); Relapsed ALCL (ALK-1 Positive) Post Autologous Transplant

  14. Gastrointestinal lymphomas: Morphology, immunophenotype and molecular features

    PubMed Central

    Bautista-Quach, Marnelli A.; Ake, Christopher D.; Chen, Mingyi

    2012-01-01

    Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma comprises 10-15% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas and encompasses 30-40% of the total extranodal lymphomas. Approximately 60-75% of cases occur in the stomach, and then the small bowel, ileum, cecum, colon and rectum. Lymphoid neoplasms may consist of mature B, T and less commonly extranodal NK/T cells. Of these, the two most frequently encountered histologic subtypes are extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma), where Helicobacter pylori infection is implicated in a number of cases, and diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Several B cell lymphomas are associated with chromosomal aberrations. Enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma, type I in particular, usually arises in a background of celiac disease. T cell gene rearrangement confirms clonality. NK/T cell neoplasms are invariably associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection and are often aggressive; thus, differentiation from a benign NK-cell enteropathy is paramount. Although incidence of other hematopoietic malignancies in the gastrointestinal tract such as plasma cell myeloma associated with amyloidosis, plasmablastic lymphoma, Hodgkin disease, histiocytic sarcoma and mast cell sarcoma is extremely rare, these entities have been documented, with the latter two demonstrating aggressive clinical behavior. Endoscopic ultrasonography is an important adjunct in disease staging and follow-up. Conservative antibiotic treatment of stage I MALT lymphomas with associated Helicobacter pylori infection achieves good clinical outcome with high remission rate. Chemotherapy, radiation and rarely surgery are reserved for advanced diseases or cases resistant to conservative therapy and those not associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. PMID:22943012

  15. Individualized management of follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bai, Bing; Huang, Hui-Qiang

    2015-03-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) is the most common indolent non-hodgkin lymphoma. Most patients with FL are diagnosed with advanced disease and are considered incurable. The classical prognostic index in FL is the FL international prognostic index (FLIPI). The management of FL is mainly determined by histologic grading, clinical stage, and tumor burden. For patients with stage I and II disease, an involved-site radiation therapy (ISRT) is recommended and may be potentially curative approach with 60% to 80% of 10-year overall survival (OS) rates, while patients with stage III and IV should be treated with systemic therapy. The watchful waiting is still an option for patients without symptoms or/and low tumor burden. Induction of immuno-chemotherapy combined with consolidation of rituximab maintenance (MR) is standard care for patients with symptomatic disease or with high tumor burden when treatment indicated. The major indication for systemic therapy is including candidate for clinical trials, threatened end organ function, cytopenia secondary to lymphoma bulky disease and steady progress etc. at present time. Routine baseline and regular hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb) testing is strongly recommended for all patients before the initiation of immuno-chemotherapy in order to minimize the risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation which has been observed approximately 20% to 50% of patients with positive HBsAg and 3% to 45% of patients with positive HBcAb. Prophylactic antiviral treatment in patients who are HBsAg-positive or HBcAb-positive is indicated before immuno-chemotherapy. The management for elderly patients should be carefully selected to avoid overtreatment and severe toxicities. Individualized dose adjustment for chemotherapy and an adequate supportive treatment are essential for this special population. Novel agents such as lenalidomide, ibrutinib and idelalisib are promising. In conclusion, individualized management

  16. HIV-Resistant Gene Modified Stem Cells and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Lymphoma With HIV Infection

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-06

    HIV Infection; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  17. A study of the mutational landscape of pediatric-type follicular lymphoma and pediatric nodal marginal zone lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Michael G; Bhaduri, Aparna; Chisholm, Karen M; Baker, Steven A; Ma, Lisa; Zehnder, James L; Luna-Fineman, Sandra; Link, Michael P; Merker, Jason D; Arber, Daniel A; Ohgami, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric-type follicular lymphoma and pediatric marginal zone lymphoma are two of the rarest B-cell lymphomas. These lymphomas occur predominantly in the pediatric population and show features distinct from their more common counterparts in adults: adult-type follicular lymphoma and adult-type nodal marginal zone lymphoma. Here we report a detailed whole-exome deep sequencing analysis of a cohort of pediatric-type follicular lymphomas and pediatric marginal zone lymphomas. This analysis revealed a recurrent somatic variant encoding p.Lys66Arg in the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) in 3 of 6 cases (50%) of pediatric-type follicular lymphoma. This specific point mutation was not detected in pediatric marginal zone lymphoma or in adult-type follicular lymphoma. Additional somatic point mutations in pediatric-type follicular lymphoma were observed in genes involved in transcription, intracellular signaling, and cell proliferation. In pediatric marginal zone lymphoma, no recurrent mutation was identified; however, somatic point mutations were observed in genes involved in cellular adhesion, cytokine regulatory elements, and cellular proliferation. A somatic variant in AMOTL1, a recurrently mutated gene in splenic marginal zone lymphoma, was also identified in a case of pediatric marginal zone lymphoma. The overall non-synonymous mutational burden was low in both pediatric-type follicular lymphoma and pediatric marginal zone lymphoma (4.6 mutations per exome). Altogether, these findings support a distinctive genetic basis for pediatric-type follicular lymphoma and pediatric marginal zone lymphoma when compared with adult subtypes and to one another. Moreover, identification of a recurrent point mutation in IRF8 provides insight into a potential driver mutation in the pathogenesis of pediatric-type follicular lymphoma with implications for novel diagnostic or therapeutic strategies. PMID:27338637

  18. Double-hit and double-protein-expression lymphomas: aggressive and refractory lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Sarkozy, Clémentine; Traverse-Glehen, Alexandra; Coiffier, Bertrand

    2015-11-01

    Double-hit lymphoma (DHL) is a subgroup of aggressive lymphomas with both MYC and BCL2 gene rearrangements, characterised by a rapidly progressing clinical course that is refractory to aggressive treatment and short survival. Over time, the definition was modified and now includes diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) with MYC translocation combined with an additional translocation involving BCL2 or BCL6. Some cases that have a similar clinical course with concomitant overexpression of MYC or BCL2 proteins were recently characterised as immunohistochemical double-hit lymphomas (ie, double-protein-expression lymphomas [DPLs]). The clinical course of these DPLs is worse than so-called standard DLBCL but suggested by some studies to be slightly better than DHL, although there is overlap between the two categories. Present treatment does not allow cure or long-term survival in patients with genetic or immunohistochemical double-hit lymphomas, but several new drugs are being developed. PMID:26545844

  19. Gastric MALT lymphoma: old and new insights

    PubMed Central

    Zullo, Angelo; Hassan, Cesare; Ridola, Lorenzo; Repici, Alessandro; Manta, Raffaele; Andriani, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The stomach is the most frequent site of extranodal lymphoma. Gastric lymphoma originating from mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) is typically a low-grade, B-cell neoplasia strongly associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Only certain H. pylori strains in some predisposed patients determine lymphoma development in the stomach, according to a strain-host-organ specific process. The clinical presentation is poorly specific, symptoms ranging from vague dyspepsia to alarm symptoms. Similarly, different endoscopy patterns have been described for gastric lymphoma. H. pylori eradication is advised as first-line therapy in early stage disease, and complete lymphoma remission is achieved in 75% of cases. Neoplasia stage, depth of infiltration in the gastric wall, presence of the API2-MALT1 translocation, localization in the stomach, and patient ethnicity have been identified as predictors of remission. Recent data suggests that H. pylori eradication therapy may be successful for gastric lymphoma treatment also in a small subgroup (15%) of H. pylori-negative patients. The overall 5-year survival and disease-free survival rates are as high as 90% and 75%, respectively. Management of patients who failed to achieve lymphoma remission following H. pylori eradication include radiotherapy, chemotherapy and, in selected cases, surgery. PMID:24714739

  20. Hodgkin lymphoma: Pathology and biology.

    PubMed

    Mathas, Stephan; Hartmann, Sylvia; Küppers, Ralf

    2016-07-01

    The Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) tumor cells of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), as well as the lymphocyte predominant (LP) cells of nodular lymphocyte predominant HL (NLPHL), are derived from mature B cells. However, HRS cells have largely lost their B-cell phenotype and show a very unusual expression of many markers of other hematopoietic cell lineages, which aids in the differential diagnosis between classical HL (cHL) and NLPHL and distinguishes cHL from all other hematopoietic malignancies. The bi- or multinucleated Reed-Sternberg cells most likely derive from the mononuclear Hodgkin cells through a process of incomplete cytokinesis. HRS cells show a deregulated activation of numerous signaling pathways, which is partly mediated by cellular interactions in the lymphoma microenvironment and partly by genetic lesions. In a fraction of cases, Epstein-Barr virus contributes to the pathogenesis of cHL. Recurrent genetic lesions in HRS cells identified so far often involve members of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and JAK/STAT pathways and genes involved in major histocompatibility complex expression. However, further lead transforming events likely remain to be identified. We here discuss the current knowledge on HL pathology and biology. PMID:27496304

  1. The African superswell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyblade, Andrew A.; Robinson, Scott W.

    1994-01-01

    Maps of residual bathymetry in the ocean basins around the African continent reveal a broad bathymetric swell in the southeastern Atlantic Ocean with an amplitude of about 500 m. We propose that this region of anomalously shallow bathymetry, together with the contiguous eastern and southern African plateaus, form a superswell which we refer to as the African superswell. The origin of the African superswell is uncertain. However, rifting and volcanism in eastern Africa, as well as heat flow measurements in southern Africa and the southeastern Atlantic Ocean, suggest that the superswell may be attributed, at least in part, to heating of the lithosphere.

  2. Neuroimaging in Central Nervous System Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nabavizadeh, Seyed Ali; Vossough, Arastoo; Hajmomenian, Mehrdad; Assadsangabi, Reza; Mohan, Suyash

    2016-08-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare aggressive high-grade type of extranodal lymphoma. PCNSL can have a variable imaging appearance and can mimic other brain disorders such as encephalitis, demyelination, and stroke. In addition to PCNSL, the CNS can be secondarily involved by systemic lymphoma. Computed tomography and conventional MRI are the initial imaging modalities to evaluate these lesions. Recently, however, advanced MRI techniques are more often used in an effort to narrow the differential diagnosis and potentially inform diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. PMID:27443998

  3. Primary cardiac lymphoma mimicking infiltrative cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ga Yeon; Kim, Won Seog; Ko, Young-Hyeh; Choi, Jin-Oh; Jeon, Eun-Seok

    2013-05-01

    Primary cardiac lymphoma is a rare malignancy which has been described as thickened myocardium due to the infiltration of atypical lymphocytes and accompanying intracardiac masses. Here, we report a case of a primary cardiac lymphoma without demonstrable intracardiac masses, mimicking infiltrative cardiomyopathy. A 40-year-old male presented with exertional dyspnoea and was diagnosed as having restrictive cardiomyopathy with severely decreased LV systolic function. Endomyocardial biopsy was performed and the diagnosis of primary cardiac lymphoma was confirmed. After appropriate chemotherapy, he recovered his systolic function fully. PMID:23248217

  4. Romidepsin for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Prince, H Miles; Dickinson, Michael; Khot, Amit

    2013-12-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas are relatively rare lymphomas and the most common form is mycosis fungoides. Its rare leukemic variant is Sezary syndrome. Advanced-stage disease is typically treated with bexarotene (a retinoid), IFN-α or conventional chemotherapeutic agents, but relapses are inevitable. Histone deacetylase inhibitors that modify the epigenome are an attractive addition to the armamentarium. Based on two large Phase II studies, the US FDA approved intravenous romidepsin for patients with relapsed/refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. Romidepsin provides a subset of patients with an opportunity for prolonged clinical responses with a tolerable side-effect profile.

  5. An overview of cutaneous T cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Bagherani, Nooshin; Smoller, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous T cell lymphomas (CTCLs) are a heterogeneous group of extranodal non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas that are characterized by a cutaneous infiltration of malignant monoclonal T lymphocytes. They typically afflict adults with a median age of 55 to 60 years, and the annual incidence is about 0.5 per 100,000. Mycosis fungoides, Sézary syndrome, and primary cutaneous peripheral T cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are the most important subtypes of CTCL. CTCL is a complicated concept in terms of etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, therapy, and prognosis. Herein, we summarize advances which have been achieved in these fields. PMID:27540476

  6. Malignant lymphomas involving the salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Colby, T V; Dorfman, R F

    1979-01-01

    Malignant lymphomas involving the salivary glands are probably more common than has been previously recognized. They must be differentiated from the benign lymphoepithelial lesion, although there may be an association between the two. The entire histologic spectrum of malignant lymphomas found at other sites can be seen in the salivary gland. In this study of 59 patients with lymphoma affecting the salivary gland, a large percentage were found to have disseminated disease. We recommend the same rigorous clinical evaluation and staging procedures as used in patients who present with primary lymph node involvement.

  7. Sialylation and glycosylation modulate cell adhesion and invasion to extracellular matrix in human malignant lymphoma: Dependency on integrin and the Rho GTPase family.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Osamu; Abe, Masafumi; Hashimoto, Yuko

    2015-12-01

    To determine the biological roles of cell surface glycosylation, we modified the surface glycosylation of human malignant lymphoma cell lines using glycosylation inhibitors. The O-glycosylation inhibitor, benzyl-α-GalNAc (BZ) enhanced the fibronectin adhesion of HBL-8 cells, a human Burkitt's lymphoma cell line, and of H-ALCL cells, a human anaplastic large cell lymphoma cell line, both of which were established in our laboratory. The N-glycosylation inhibitor, tunicamycin (TM) inhibited the surface expression of Phaseolus vulgaris leukoagglutinating (L-PHA) lectin- and Canavalia ensiformis (ConA) lectin-reactive oligosaccharides in the HBL-8 cell line. Assay of the adhesion of HBL-8 cells to fibronectin showed that fibronectin adhesion is mediated by the integrin very late antigen (VLA)-4 and that not only BZ but also TM treatment enhanced HBL-8 cell adhesion to fibronectin. Furthermore, although BZ treatment also enhanced H-ALCL cell adhesion to fibronectin, this effect was not mediated by VLA-5 or the RGD sequence of fibronectin. We also showed that H-ALCL cell adhesion to galectin-3 was enhanced by pre-treatment with neuraminidase, which cleaves cell surface sialic acid. Additionally, H-ALCL cell adhesion to galectin-3 was inhibited by pre‑treatment with the RGD peptide suggesting that cell adhesion to galectin-3 is mediated by integrin (VLA-5). Furthermore, H-ALCL cell invasion of galectin-1 and galectin-3 was inhibited by pre-treatment with the RGD peptide. Therefore, cell adhesion to and invasion of galectin-1 and galectin-3 are integrin-dependent. In addition to these findings, cell adhesion to galectin-3 was markedly inhibited by treatment with β-lactose compared to treatment with sucrose. Therefore, interactions between integrins and galectin-3 may be mediated through β-galactose that is linked to glycans of integrins. AZA1, an inhibitor of Ras homolog oncoprotein (Rho) GTPase family proteins, RAS-related C3 botulinus toxin substrate 1 (Rac 1) and

  8. Bortezomib and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-02

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Small Intestine Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  9. Cutaneous Lymphoma in Korea: A Nationwide Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Soo; Suh, Kee Suck; Lee, Dong-Youn; Cho, Kwang Hyun; Oh, Sang Ho; Kim, Soo-Chan; Lee, Seok-Jong; Shin, Dong Hoon; Yoon, Tae Young; Won, Young Ho; Kim, You Chan

    2016-05-01

    The epidemiological and clinicopathological features of cutaneous lymphoma may vary by geographical area. However, only a few large-scale epidemiological studies of cutaneous lymphoma have been performed, mainly in the USA and Europe. This aim of this study was to determine the recent characteristics of cutaneous lymphoma in Korea according to the WHO/EORTC classification. A total of 422 patients with newly diagnosed cutaneous lymphoma from January 2009 to December 2013 comprising 293 cases of mature T-cell and natural killer (NK)-cell lymphoma and 39 cases of mature B-cell lymphoma were retrospectively reviewed. The incidence of mature B-cell lymphoma was lower in Korea than in Europe and the USA. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was more prevalent in Korea than in Western countries. The incidence of extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal-type was higher in Korea than in Western countries and Japan. PMID:26560051

  10. Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation Using a Myeloablative Preparative Regimen for Hematological Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-15

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL); Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Plasma Cell Leukemia; Myelofibrosis; Myelodysplasia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Marginal Zone B-Cell Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Mantle-Cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma; Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma

  11. UCB Transplant for Hematological Diseases Using a Non Myeloablative Prep

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-08

    Acute Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; Natural Killer Cell Malignancies; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Large-cell Lymphoma; Hodgkin Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Mantle-cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes; Myeloproliferative Syndromes

  12. A Phase II Study of Single Agent Brentuximab Vedotin in Relapsed/Refractory CD30 Low (<10%) Mature T Cell Lymphoma (TCL)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-24

    T-cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepato-splenic T-cell Lymphoma; Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Enteropathy Associated T-cell Lymphoma; NK T-cell Lymphoma; Transformed Mycosis Fungoides

  13. CTOP/ITE/MTX Compared With CHOP as the First-line Therapy for Newly Diagnosed Young Patients With T Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-24

    ALK-negative Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Peripherial T Cell Lymphoma,Not Otherwise Specified; Angioimmunoblastic T Cell Lymphoma; Enteropathy Associated T Cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T Cell Lymphoma; Subcutaneous Panniculitis Like T Cell Lymphoma

  14. CAR-pNK Cell Immunotherapy in CD7 Positive Leukemia and Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-11

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Precursor T-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma; T-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocytic Leukemia; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma, NOS; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma, Nasal Type; Enteropathy-type Intestinal T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma

  15. Nivolumab in Treating Patients With HTLV-Associated T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-17

    Acute Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Chronic Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; HTLV-1 Infection; Lymphomatous Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Smoldering Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

  16. Lenalidomide Therapy for Patients With Relapsed and/or Refractory, Peripheral T-Cell Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-04-18

    Peripheral T-cell Lymphomas; Adult T-cell Leukemia; Adult T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma Unspecified; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; T/Null Cell Systemic Type; Cutaneous t-Cell Lymphoma With Nodal/Visceral Disease

  17. Treatment of T cell lymphoma in dogs.

    PubMed

    Moore, Antony S

    2016-09-17

    Overall, canine lymphoma remains one of the most chemotherapy-responsive cancers in the dog. In addition to the stage and the substage of disease, T cell phenotype is the most consistently important prognostic factor. T cell lymphoma (TCL) in dogs is a heterogeneous disease; dogs with a separate entity of indolent TCL can have a considerably better prognosis than dogs with other forms of lymphoma, and indolent TCL may not always require immediate treatment. In contrast, high-grade TCL is an aggressive disease, and when treated with CHOP-based protocols, dogs with this high-grade TCL have a complete remission rate as low as 40 per cent, relapse earlier and have shorter survival time than dogs with a comparable stage, high-grade B cell lymphoma. This review describes the different disease entities that comprise canine TCL, discusses prognosis for each and treatment options that appear to give the best outcomes. PMID:27634860

  18. Large cell lymphoma stage IA/IAE.

    PubMed

    Nussbaum, H; Koo, C; Kagan, A R; Rao, A; Ryoo, M C

    1991-06-01

    Fifty-two patients with large cell lymphoma stage IA/IAE were retrospectively reviewed for the purpose of evaluation of treatment methods. All pathology slides were reviewed by one pathologist with a special interest in lymphoma. There were 24 patients at stage IA and 28 at stage IAE. Twenty-six patients were treated with radiation alone (10 IA, 16 IAE) and 26 patients were treated with radiation therapy and chemotherapy (13 IA, 13 IAE). Patients treated with radiation therapy alone and those with combined modality therapy (CMT) have similar survival curves with p values greater than 0.05. Recurrence patterns are similar for either method of treatment. While the majority of the literature recommends CMT for large cell lymphoma, our study of 52 patients reveals no difference in survival or recurrence patterns for these patients by either method of treatment. We recommend radiation therapy alone for stage IA/IAE large cell lymphoma, with chemotherapy held in reserve for failure.

  19. Primary lymphoma of the upper small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Nasr, Khosrow; Haghighi, Parviz; Bakhshandeh, Kiumars; Haghshenas, Mansour

    1970-01-01

    Seven patients with primary lymphoma involving the upper small intestine and presenting with diarrhoea, non-specific abdominal pain, and clubbing are reported. The disease appears to be more prevalent in young women, and clinical and radiological findings can provide an excellent preliminary diagnosis which is usually confirmed by peroral biopsy of the small intestine. This type of lymphoma is found to be clinically distinguishable both from the primary intestinal lymphomas reported from western countries and also from gastrointestinal involvement as part of a more systemic disease. It appears to be prevalent in the Middle East, and because of clear clinical, radiological, and histological features, it can be singled out from other primary intestinal lymphomas and considered as a distinct clinical entity. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:4919259

  20. Risk factors identified for certain lymphoma subtypes

    Cancer.gov

    In a large international collaborative analysis of risk factors for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), scientists were able to quantify risk associated with medical history, lifestyle factors, family history of blood or lymph-borne cancers, and occupation for 11

  1. [Malignant Lymphomas - Past, Present and Future].

    PubMed

    Trněný, M; Klener, P; Pytlík, R

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes the key steps on the way to understanding lymphoma biology and management. The history of lymphomas started in 1832 when Thomas Hodgkin first presented lymphomas. Classification of lymphoproliferative tumors has changed almost every 10 years as a reflection of deeper knowledge of this disease. Systemic therapy has developed in several steps starting by monotherapy with different chemotherapeutic agents, followed by the era of combination chemotherapy and by the rituximab era, which significantly changed the treatment paradigm. Several years ago, we entered into the fourth era characterized by many different targeted treatments. Radiotherapy remains an important part of lymphoma management. Lymphoproliferative tumors incidence is growing but mortality has started to decline starting in the year 2000 as the reflection of targeted therapy based on biology and pathogenesis.

  2. Treatment of T cell lymphoma in dogs.

    PubMed

    Moore, Antony S

    2016-09-17

    Overall, canine lymphoma remains one of the most chemotherapy-responsive cancers in the dog. In addition to the stage and the substage of disease, T cell phenotype is the most consistently important prognostic factor. T cell lymphoma (TCL) in dogs is a heterogeneous disease; dogs with a separate entity of indolent TCL can have a considerably better prognosis than dogs with other forms of lymphoma, and indolent TCL may not always require immediate treatment. In contrast, high-grade TCL is an aggressive disease, and when treated with CHOP-based protocols, dogs with this high-grade TCL have a complete remission rate as low as 40 per cent, relapse earlier and have shorter survival time than dogs with a comparable stage, high-grade B cell lymphoma. This review describes the different disease entities that comprise canine TCL, discusses prognosis for each and treatment options that appear to give the best outcomes.

  3. FDA Approves First Immunotherapy for Lymphoma

    Cancer.gov

    The FDA has approved nivolumab (Opdivo®) for the treatment of patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma whose disease has relapsed or worsened after receiving an autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation followed by brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris®)

  4. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph)

    Cancer.gov

    A consortium designed to enhance collaboration among epidemiologists studying lymphoma, to provide a forum for the exchange of research ideas, and to create a framework for collaborating on analyses that pool data from multiple studies

  5. Immune Therapy Makes Headway Against a Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... non-Hodgkin lymphoma. And those pretreated with more aggressive chemotherapy did even better, researchers report. "It's a ... trial, a group of 20 patients who received aggressive two-drug chemotherapy responded very well to the ...

  6. Targeted drug induces responses in aggressive lymphomas

    Cancer.gov

    Preliminary results from clinical trials in a subtype of lymphoma show that for a number of patients whose disease was not cured by other treatments, the drug ibrutinib can provide significant anti-cancer responses with modest side effects.

  7. [Intravascular lymphoma: Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Young, Pablo; Massa, María; Finn, Bárbara C; Fleire, Gonzalo; Stemmelin, Germán R; Ruades, Amanda; Sutovsky, Daniel; Casas, José G; Dezanzo, Pablo; Vigovich, Félix; Bruetman, Julio E

    2015-08-01

    Intravascular lymphoma is a rare subtype of extranodal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma characterized by clonal proliferation of lymphocytes inside of small and medium caliber vessels. Its incidence is estimated at one case per million. The clinical picture is very variable, but frequently has skin and central nervous system involvement. It is diagnosed by demonstrating pathological blood vessel infiltration by lymphoma cells. We report a 44 years old male presenting with fever, malaise and erythematous lesions in the abdominal wall. An abdominal wall biopsy showed dilated vascular vessels with atypical cells in their lumen, compatible with large B-cell intravascular lymphoma. He was treated with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, vincristine and prednisone and an autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, achieving a complete remission that has lasted two years. PMID:26436939

  8. Clinical Management Updates in Mantle Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Robert; Sanchez, James; Rosen, Steven T

    2016-04-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma is an aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma that is often considered incurable. Different clinical and biological biomarkers can be utilized to categorize this lymphoma into various risk levels. Several randomized trials reported in 2015 shed light on the optimal induction therapy. Recent advances include: (1) identification of new pathways to target, (2) novel therapeutics to treat patients with relapsed/refractory disease, and (3) monitoring of minimal residual disease and adoption of a maintenance therapy approach to prevent relapses post induction or post stem cell transplantation. Due to the efforts of translational/clinical research, the overall survival of patients with mantle cell lymphoma has increased and should continue to improve. PMID:27083466

  9. Study Identifies New Lymphoma Treatment Target

    Cancer.gov

    NCI researchers have identified new therapeutic targets for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Drugs that hit these targets are under clinical development and the researchers hope to begin testing them in clinical trials of patients with DLBCL.

  10. B-cell leukemia/lymphoma panel

    MedlinePlus

    ... Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 183. Bierman PJ, Armitage JO. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, ... cytometry in oncologic diagnosis. In: Niederhuber JE, Armitage JO, Doroshow JH, Kastan MB, Tepper JE, eds. Abeloff's ...

  11. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the chest a computerized tomography (CT or CAT) scan , which rotates around the patient and creates ... ray (Video) Getting an MRI (Video) Getting a CAT Scan (Video) Chemotherapy Hodgkin Lymphoma Stem Cell Transplants ...

  12. Nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Savage, Kerry J; Mottok, Anja; Fanale, Michelle

    2016-07-01

    Nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) is a rare subtype of Hodgkin lymphoma with distinct clinicopathologic features. It is typified by the presence of lymphocyte predominant (LP) cells, which are CD20(+) but CD15(-) and CD30(-) and are found scattered amongst small B lymphocytes arranged in a nodular pattern. Despite frequent and often late or multiple relapses, the prognosis of NLPHL is very favorable. There is an inherent risk of secondary aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and studies support that risk is highest in those with splenic involvement at presentation. Given disease rarity, the optimal management is unclear and opinions differ as to whether treatment paradigms should be similar to or differ from those for classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL). This review provides an overview of the existing literature describing pathological subtypes, outcome and treatment approaches for NLPHL. PMID:27496311

  13. Evaluation, Diagnosis, and Staging of Cutaneous Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Elise A

    2015-10-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas (PCLs) are an extremely heterogeneous group of non-Hodgkin lymphomas that manifest in the skin. Their diagnosis is complex and based on clinical lesion type and evaluation of findings on light microscopic examination, immunohistochemistry and molecular analysis of representative skin biopsies. The evaluation, classification, and staging system is unique for mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS), the most common subtypes of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) versus the other subtypes of Non-MF/Non-SS CTCL and the subtypes of cutaneous B-cell lymphoma (CBCL). Since current treatment is stage-based, it is particularly important that the correct diagnosis and stage be ascertained initially. The purpose of this article is to review the current evaluation, diagnosis, classification, staging, assessment techniques, and response criteria for the various types of both T-cell and B-cell PCLs. PMID:26433839

  14. 16 Extraordinary African Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobb, Nancy

    This collection for children tells the stories of 16 African Americans who helped make America what it is today. African Americans can take pride in the heritage of these contributors to society. Biographies are given for the following: (1) Sojourner Truth, preacher and abolitionist; (2) Frederick Douglass, abolitionist; (3) Harriet Tubman, leader…

  15. African Studies Computer Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntz, Patricia S.

    African studies computer resources that are readily available in the United States with linkages to Africa are described, highlighting those most directly corresponding to African content. Africanists can use the following four fundamental computer systems: (1) Internet/Bitnet; (2) Fidonet; (3) Usenet; and (4) dial-up bulletin board services. The…

  16. Understanding African American Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Edward Earl

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the socialization skills, self-esteem, and academic readiness of African American males in a school environment. Discussions with students and the School Perceptions Questionnaire provided data for this investigation. The intended targets for this investigation were African American students; however, there…

  17. Africans Away from Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, John Henrik

    Africans who were brought across the Atlantic as slaves never fully adjusted to slavery or accepted its inevitability. Resistance began on board the slave ships, where many jumped overboard or committed suicide. African slaves in South America led the first revolts against tyranny in the New World. The first slave revolt in the Caribbean occurred…

  18. Keeping African Masks Real

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddington, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Art is a good place to learn about our multicultural planet, and African masks are prized throughout the world as powerfully expressive artistic images. Unfortunately, multicultural education, especially for young children, can perpetuate stereotypes. Masks taken out of context lose their meaning and the term "African masks" suggests that there is…

  19. Educating African American Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Edward E.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Schools across America spend money, invest in programs, and sponsor workshops, offer teacher incentives, raise accountability standards, and even evoke the name of Obama in efforts to raise the academic achievement of African American males. Incarceration and college retention rates point to a dismal plight for many African American…

  20. African horse sickness and African carnivores.

    PubMed

    Alexander, K A; Kat, P W; House, J; House, C; O'Brien, S J; Laurenson, M K; McNutt, J W; Osburn, B I

    1995-11-01

    African horse sickness (AHS) is a disease that affects equids, and is principally transmitted by Culicoides spp. that are biological vectors of AHS viruses (AHSV). The repeated spread of AHSV from sub-Saharan Africa to the Middle East, northern Africa and the Iberian peninsula indicate that a better understanding of AHS epizootiology is needed. African horse sickness has long been known to infect and cause mortality among domestic dogs that ingest virus contaminated meat, but it is uncertain what role carnivores play in transmission of the virus. We present evidence of widespread natural AHS infection among a diversity of African carnivore species. We hypothesize that such infection resulted from ingestion of meat and organs from AHS-infected prey species. The effect of AHS on the carnivores is unknown, as is their role in the maintenance cycle of the disease.

  1. Transmission of Naturally Occurring Lymphoma in Macaque Monkeys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Ronald D.; Blake, Beverly J.; Chalifoux, Laura V.; Sehgal, Prabhat K.; King, Norval W.; Letvin, Norman L.

    1983-08-01

    Spontaneously occurring rhesus monkey lymphomas were transmitted into healthy rhesus monkeys by using tumor cell suspensions. The naturally arising tumors included an immunoblastic sarcoma and an undifferentiated lymphoma. Recipient animals developed undifferentiated lymphomas, poorly differentiated lymphomas, or parenchymal lymphoproliferative abnormalities suggestive of early lesions of lymphoma. Some of these animals developed such opportunistic infections as cytomegalovirus hepatitis and cryptosporidiosis. They also showed evidence of an abnormal circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cell. These findings, all characteristic of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) of macaques, suggest a link between these transmissible lymphomas and AIDS in macaque monkeys.

  2. Composite lymphoma arising in the parotid gland: a case report.

    PubMed

    Urano, Makoto; Mizoguchi, Yoshikazu; Nishio, Tomoko; Abe, Masato; Kuroda, Makoto; Saito, Shoji; Sakurai, Kazuo

    2004-03-01

    A case of composite lymphoma (CL) arisen in the parotid gland in a 58-year-old male is reported. Histologically, most of the tumor region was follicular lymphoma (FL), grade 2. However complicating classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) was noted inside the lesion. There have been a few reports of composite lymphoma, complicated by multiple histologic types in the same organ. Extra-nodal cases are particularly rare. This is a very significant case with regard to differences between B cell-derived non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and its histological origin. PMID:15041061

  3. Diabetes in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, M

    2005-01-01

    African Americans have a high risk for type 2 diabetes. Genetic traits, the prevalence of obesity, and insulin resistance all contribute to the risk of diabetes in the African American community. African Americans have a high rate of diabetic complications, because of poor glycaemic control and racial disparities in health care in the USA. African Americans with diabetes may have an atypical presentation that simulates type 1 diabetes, but then their subsequent clinical course is typical of type 2 diabetes. Culturally sensitive strategies, structured disease management protocols, and the assistance of nurses, diabetic educators, and other health care professionals are effective in improving the outcome of diabetes in the African American community. PMID:16344294

  4. Bryostatin 1 Plus Vincristine in Treating Patients With Progressive or Relapsed Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma After Bone Marrow or Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-09

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  5. WHO-EORTC classification for cutaneous lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Willemze, Rein; Jaffe, Elaine S; Burg, Günter; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Berti, Emilio; Swerdlow, Steven H; Ralfkiaer, Elisabeth; Chimenti, Sergio; Diaz-Perez, José L; Duncan, Lyn M; Grange, Florent; Harris, Nancy Lee; Kempf, Werner; Kerl, Helmut; Kurrer, Michael; Knobler, Robert; Pimpinelli, Nicola; Sander, Christian; Santucci, Marco; Sterry, Wolfram; Vermeer, Maarten H; Wechsler, Janine; Whittaker, Sean; Meijer, Chris J L M

    2005-05-15

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas are currently classified by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) classification or the World Health Organization (WHO) classification, but both systems have shortcomings. In particular, differences in the classification of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas other than mycosis fungoides, Sezary syndrome, and the group of primary cutaneous CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders and the classification and terminology of different types of cutaneous B-cell lymphomas have resulted in considerable debate and confusion. During recent consensus meetings representatives of both systems reached agreement on a new classification, which is now called the WHO-EORTC classification. In this paper we describe the characteristic features of the different primary cutaneous lymphomas and other hematologic neoplasms frequently presenting in the skin, and discuss differences with the previous classification schemes. In addition, the relative frequency and survival data of 1905 patients with primary cutaneous lymphomas derived from Dutch and Austrian registries for primary cutaneous lymphomas are presented to illustrate the clinical significance of this new classification.

  6. Biomimetic, synthetic HDL nanostructures for lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuo; Damiano, Marina G.; Zhang, Heng; Tripathy, Sushant; Luthi, Andrea J.; Rink, Jonathan S.; Ugolkov, Andrey V.; T. K. Singh, Amareshwar; Dave, Sandeep S.; Gordon, Leo I.; Thaxton, C. Shad

    2013-01-01

    New therapies that challenge existing paradigms are needed for the treatment of cancer. We report a nanoparticle-enabled therapeutic approach to B-cell lymphoma using synthetic high density lipoprotein nanoparticles (HDL-NPs). HDL-NPs are synthesized using a gold nanoparticle template to control conjugate size and ensure a spherical shape. Like natural HDLs, biomimetic HDL-NPs target scavenger receptor type B-1, a high-affinity HDL receptor expressed by lymphoma cells. Functionally, compared with natural HDL, the gold NP template enables differential manipulation of cellular cholesterol flux in lymphoma cells, promoting cellular cholesterol efflux and limiting cholesterol delivery. This combination of scavenger receptor type B-1 binding and relative cholesterol starvation selectively induces apoptosis. HDL-NP treatment of mice bearing B-cell lymphoma xenografts selectively inhibits B-cell lymphoma growth. As such, HDL-NPs are biofunctional therapeutic agents, whose mechanism of action is enabled by the presence of a synthetic nanotemplate. HDL-NPs are active in B-cell lymphomas and potentially, other malignancies or diseases of pathologic cholesterol accumulation. PMID:23345442

  7. Vaccines for lymphomas: idiotype vaccines and beyond.

    PubMed

    Houot, Roch; Levy, Ronald

    2009-05-01

    Therapeutic vaccines for lymphomas have been developed to induce active and long-lasting immune responses against lymphoma capable of eradicating the tumor. Most of these vaccines use the tumor B cell idiotype (the unique variable region of the surface immunoglobulin) as a tumor-specific antigen. The first human clinical trial for lymphoma vaccine was initiated 20 years ago. Along with several other phase I/II trials, it showed encouraging results which supported the initiation of three phase III trials. The results of these trials have recently been released (although not published yet) which failed to demonstrate a prolongation in progression-free survival following chemotherapy. Despite this disappointing result, a number of observations have accumulated over the years that suggest some clinical efficacy of lymphoma vaccines. Several strategies are being developed to improve these results that include optimization of antigen delivery and presentation as well as enhancement of anti-tumor T cell function. This review describes the clinical development of lymphoma vaccines and delineates advances, problems and prospects towards integration of this strategy in the therapeutic armamentarium for lymphoma. PMID:18951668

  8. Relapsed Hodgkin Lymphoma: Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Montanari, Francesca; Diefenbach, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Although Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is largely curable with first-line therapy, approximately one-third of patients will not have a complete response to frontline treatment or will subsequently relapse. Only 50 % of these patients will be effectively salvaged with conventional therapies. The prognosis is particularly poor for those patients with chemotherapy refractory disease, who are unable to obtain even transient disease control, and for patients who relapse following high dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant. In this review, we summarize the most recent updates on the management of patients with relapsed HL, the role of novel therapies such as brentuximab vedotin, and an overview of promising new agents currently under investigation. We also discuss the role of consolidation strategies such as high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant, and reduced-intensity allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant, and the need for new strategies in the elderly patient population. PMID:24942298

  9. New drugs for follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sorigue, Marc; Ribera, Josep-Maria; Motlló, Cristina; Sancho, Juan-Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Despite the improvement in prognosis since the advent of rituximab, follicular lymphoma is still incurable and remains the cause of death of most afflicted patients. With the expanding knowledge of the pathogenesis of B-cell malignancies, in the last few years a plethora of new therapies acting through a variety of mechanisms have shown promising results. This review attempts to analyze the evidence available on these new drugs, which include new monoclonal antibodies and immunoconjugates, the anti-angiogenic and immunomodulatory agent lenalidomide, the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, inhibitors of B-cell receptor pathway enzymes, such as ibrutinib, idelalisib, duvelisib and entospletinib, BCL2 inhibitors and checkpoint inhibitors. We conclude that despite the high expectations around the new therapeutic options for patients with refractory disease, these new drugs have side effects that require caution with their use, particularly in light of the still short follow up and the lack of both randomized trials and data on combination regimens.

  10. African bees to control African elephants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollrath, Fritz; Douglas-Hamilton, Iain

    2002-11-01

    Numbers of elephants have declined in Africa and Asia over the past 30 years while numbers of humans have increased, both substantially. Friction between these two keystone species is reaching levels which are worryingly high from an ecological as well as a political viewpoint. Ways and means must be found to keep the two apart, at least in areas sensitive to each species' survival. The aggressive African bee might be one such method. Here we demonstrate that African bees deter elephants from damaging the vegetation and trees which house their hives. We argue that bees can be employed profitably to protect not only selected trees, but also selected areas, from elephant damage.

  11. Genetically Engineered Lymphocyte Therapy in Treating Patients With Lymphoma That is Resistant or Refractory to Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-27

    Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  12. Clinicopathologic characteristics and treatment of marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma).

    PubMed

    Raderer, Markus; Kiesewetter, Barbara; Ferreri, Andrés J M

    2016-01-01

    Extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma) accounts for 7% to 8% of newly diagnosed lymphomas. Because of its association with infectious causes, such as Helicobacter pylori (HP) or Chlamydophila psittaci (CP), and autoimmune diseases, it has become the paradigm of an antigen-driven malignancy. MALT lymphoma usually displays an indolent course, and watch-and-wait strategies are justified initially in a certain percentage of patients. In patients with gastric MALT lymphoma or ocular adnexal MALT lymphoma, antibiotic therapy against HP or CP, respectively, is the first-line management of choice, resulting in lymphoma response rates from 75% to 80% after HP eradication and from 33% to 65% after antibiotic therapy for CP. In patients who have localized disease that is refractory to antibiotics, radiation is widely applied in various centers with excellent local control, whereas systemic therapies are increasingly being applied, at least in Europe, because of the potentially systemic nature of the disease. Therefore, the objective of this review is to briefly summarize the clinicopathologic characteristics of this distinct type of lymphoma along with current data on management strategies. PMID:26773441

  13. Plasmablastic lymphoma of the oral cavity: a rapidly progressive lymphoma associated with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Riedel, David J; Gonzalez-Cuyar, Luis F; Zhao, X Frank; Redfield, Robert R; Gilliam, Bruce L

    2008-04-01

    Plasmablastic lymphoma of the oral cavity is a form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and was first described in 1997. We describe a case of plasmablastic lymphoma in an HIV-infected patient who presented with an expanding oral lesion and symptoms of a toothache. We review all cases of plasmablastic lymphoma that have been reported in the literature. Plasmablastic lymphoma is strongly associated with immunodeficiency, and most particularly, with HIV infection. The pathophysiological origin of plasmablastic lymphoma has not been fully characterised, but the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has often been documented in biopsy specimens, supporting a role for EBV in the pathogenesis of this lymphoma. The differential diagnosis for an expanding oral lesion includes both infectious and malignant processes. Biopsy is essential for making a correct and prompt diagnosis. Treatment usually involves chemotherapy, but antiretroviral therapy may also have an important role. Infectious disease clinicians should be aware of this newly described and increasingly encountered lymphoma, since it is prominently associated with immunosuppression and may be mistaken for other entities. PMID:18353267

  14. Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas in Saskatchewan: a clinicopathologic study

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Thomas; Skinnider, Leo F.; Wright, Joanne L.; Komjathy, Gabriel

    1978-01-01

    In a retrospective clinical study of 208 previously untreated persons with non-Hodgkin's lymphomas the disorders were classified and staged according to the histopathologic criteria of Rappaport, Winter and Hicks and the Ann Arbor clinical staging classification. Nodular types constituted 22% and diffuse types 78% of the lymphomas. The nodular lymphomas were slightly more common in females and were clustered in the age range 30 to 90 years. The diffuse lymphomas were slightly more common in males; the age distribution was bimodal, with one peak in the age range 10 to 19 years and the other in the age range 60 to 69 years, but when the age distribution of the general population in which the lymphomas occurred was taken into account, the incidence of these lymphomas was found to be significantly higher (P < 0.001) in persons more than 69 years of age than in those 40 to 69 years of age. Survival correlated with histopathologic type: persons with nodular (follicular) lymphomas and diffuse lymphocytic well differentiated lymphomas had a significantly greater survival (P < 0.05) than those with other diffuse lymphomas. No significant difference in survival was noticed between persons with nodal and extranodal lymphomas. While Rappaport and colleagues' criteria are still very useful, it is important to recognize the nodular lymphoma as a specific entity requiring generally different management from diffuse lymphomas. Appreciation of the different biologic behaviour of the various lymphomas is important to clinicians planning therapy. PMID:356951

  15. Intravenous Chemotherapy or Oral Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage III-IV HIV-Associated Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-09

    AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage IV AIDS-related Lymphoma

  16. Malignant lymphomas of the skin: their differentiation from lymphoid and nonlymphoid cutaneous infiltrates that simulate lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Burke, J S

    1985-08-01

    Malignant lymphomas of the skin, excluding mycosis fungoides, are pathologically, immunologically, and clinically heterogeneous. Varying patterns and degrees of cutaneous infiltration are encountered in all histologic subtypes of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Immunologic studies have shown relatively equal numbers of cases with B and T cell phenotypes, but true histiocytic lymphomas of the skin also occur. Patients may be of any age, and they may have lymphoma in any clinical stage. A low clinical stage and a low-grade histologic subtype are significant factors for long survival. The differential diagnosis includes a variety of lymphoid infiltrates that are referred to as a group as cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia; it also includes lymphomatoid papulosis as well as nonlymphoid cutaneous infiltrates such as myeloid leukemias, histiocytosis X, malignant histiocytosis, regressing atypical histiocytosis, and neuroendocrine (Merkel) cell carcinoma. Distinction of cutaneous lymphomas from these entities requires comprehension of multiple variables, including immunologic as well as morphologic and clinical factors.

  17. Anti-ICOS Monoclonal Antibody MEDI-570 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma Follicular Variant or Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-08

    Follicular Variant Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mature T- and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  18. Mechanisms of Idelalisib-Associated Diarrhea in Patients With Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Indolent Non-hodgkin Lymphoma, or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-06

    Absence of Signs or Symptoms; B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Digestive System Signs and Symptoms; Indolent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Indolent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  19. The spectrum of B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma: a description of 10 cases.

    PubMed

    Gualco, Gabriela; Natkunam, Yasodha; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2012-05-01

    B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma, is a diagnostic provisional category in the World Health Organization (WHO) 2008 classification of lymphomas. This category was designed as a measure to accommodate borderline cases that cannot be reliably classified into a single distinct disease entity after all available morphological, immunophenotypical and molecular studies have been performed. Typically, these cases share features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma, or include characteristics of both lymphomas. The rarity of such cases poses a tremendous challenge to both pathologists and oncologists because its differential diagnosis has direct implications for management strategies. In this study, we present 10 cases of B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma and have organized the criteria described by the WHO into four patterns along with detailed clinical, morphological and immunophenotypic characterization and outcome data. Our findings show a male preponderance, median age of 37 years and a mediastinal presentation in 80% of cases. All cases expressed at least two markers associated with B-cell lineage and good response to combination chemotherapy currently employed for non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

  20. Vorinostat and Combination Chemotherapy With Rituximab in Treating Patients With HIV-Related Diffuse Large B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Other Aggressive B-Cell Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-25

    AIDS-Related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Plasmablastic Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Primary Effusion Lymphoma; Grade 3b Follicular Lymphoma; HIV Infection; Plasmablastic Lymphoma; Primary Effusion Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma