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Sample records for african craton wac

  1. A historical overview of Moroccan magmatic events along northwest edge of the West African Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikenne, Moha; Souhassou, Mustapha; Arai, Shoji; Soulaimani, Abderrahmane

    2017-03-01

    Located along the northwestern edge of the West African Craton, Morocco exhibits a wide variety of magmatic events from Archean to Quaternary. The oldest magmatic rocks belong to the Archean Reguibat Shield outcrops in the Moroccan Sahara. Paleoproterozoic magmatism, known as the Anti-Atlas granitoids, is related to the Eburnean orogeny and initial cratonization of the WAC. Mesoproterozoic magmatism is represented by a small number of mafic dykes known henceforth as the Taghdout mafic volcanism. Massive Neoproterozoic magmatic activity, related to the Pan-African cycle, consists of rift-related Tonian magmatism associated with the Rodinia breakup, an Early Cryogenian convergent margin event (760-700 Ma), syn-collisional Bou-Azzer magmatism (680-640 Ma), followed by widespread Ediacaran magmatism (620-555 Ma). Each magmatic episode corresponded to a different geodynamic environment and produced different types of magma. Phanerozoic magmatism began with Early Cambrian basaltic (rift?) volcanism, which persisted during the Middle Cambrian, and into the Early Ordovician. This was succeeded by massive Late Devonian and Carboniferous, pre-Variscan tholeiitic and calc-alkaline (Central Morocco) volcanic flows in basins of the Moroccan Meseta. North of the Atlas Paleozoic Transform Zone, the Late Carboniferous Variscan event was accompanied by the emplacement of 330-300 Ma calc-alkaline granitoids in upper crustal shear zones. Post-Variscan alkaline magmatism was associated with the opening of the Permian basins. Mesozoic magmatism began with the huge volumes of magma emplaced around 200 Ma in the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) which was associated with the fragmentation of Pangea and the subsequent rifting of Central Atlantic. CAMP volcanism occurs in all structural domains of Morocco, from the Anti-Atlas to the External Rif domain with a peak activity around 199 Ma. A second Mesozoic magmatic event is represented by mafic lava flows and gabbroic intrusions in

  2. Paleogeographic Evolution of the Late Neoproterozoic and Early Phanerozoic with New Paleomagnetic Constraints from West African Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, B.; Besse, J.; Blein, O.; Greff-Lefftz, M.; Baudin, T.; Fernando, L.; Meslouh, S.; Belbadaoui, M.

    2015-12-01

    The paleogeographic evolution of the late Neoproterozoic and early Phanerozoic is dominated by the dispersion of Rodinia and the assembly of Gondwana. The timing of these two episodes is still highly debated, partly due to the low number of good quality paleomagnetic data. In order to better constrain the paleogeography for this epoch, we bring new paleomagnetic data on volcanic series from the West African Craton (WAC), which is a key block to understand the evolution of these two supercontinents. We have sampled well dated pyroclastic and lava flows from the groups of Ouarzazate (upper Ediacaran) and Taroudant (lower Cambrian) in the Anti-Atlas (Morocco). 500 samples from 105 sites were thermally demagnetized in laboratory. Our results highlight two major groups of directions, mainly carried by minerals of the titano-hematite family. Magnetite may also contribute sometimes to the magnetization. The first group displays a single polarity direction, with a shallow inclination and a south-east declination. This direction close to the expected direction derived from the Permo-Carboniferous segment of the Gondwana apparent polar wander path (APWP) is due to a remagnetization acquired during the Kiaman reversed polarity superchron (320-262Ma). The second group, observed in the Ouarzazate and Taroudant groups, consists of a dual polarity high inclination direction and may represent the characteristic magnetization. On the basis of geologic and paleomagnetic data from literature, we constructed an APWP for both WAC and Amazonia between 615 and 530Ma, assuming these two blocks were already accreted. We found a paleomagnetic solution in which Laurentia and WAC-Amazonia remained attached from ~615Ma up to the late Ediacaran, Laurentia remaining at low latitude during this period. Around ~550Ma, WAC-Amazonia separated from Laurentia and finally collided with the other Gondwanan blocks during the lower Cambrian, marking the final accretion of Gondwana.

  3. Lower Cambrian-Ediacaran Paleogeography and True Polar Wander with New Paleomagnetic Constraints from West African Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, B.; Besse, J.; Blein, O.; Greff-Lefftz, M.; Baudin, T.; Fernando, L.; Meslouh, S.; Belbadaoui, M.

    2014-12-01

    Paleomagnetic data from Laurentia and Baltica continents suggest fast large oscillations of the virtual geomagnetic poles (VGP) from high to low latitudes during the Ediacaran (635-542 Ma). These data are interpreted in the literature either as oscillations of the Earth magnetic dipole between polar and equatorial positions, or as True Polar Wander (TPW), implying a very fast tumbling of continents and perhaps, of whole Earth. In this study, we try to test these hypotheses by bringing new paleomagnetic data on volcanic series from another continent, the West African Craton (WAC). We have sampled well dated pyroclastic and lava flows from the Ouarzazate and Taroudant groups in the Anti-Atlas, (Morocco). 480 samples from 105 sites were thermally demagnetized in our laboratory. Our preliminary results highlight two major groups of directions, mainly carried by hematite, magnetite also contributing sometimes to the magnetization. The first group consists of a dual polarity high inclination direction that may represent the original magnetization. The observed paleolatitude is compatible with that predicted by the lower Cambrian-Ediacaran apparent polar wander path (APWP) of Gondwana, assuming that the WAC was already accreted to Gondwana at this age. Nevertheless, a complete agreement between our pole and the APWP needs a local rotation of around 80° on a vertical axis. The second group displays a single polarity direction, with a shallow inclination and a south-east declination. This direction is close to the expected direction derived from the Permo-Carboniferous segment of the Gondwana APWP, and may represent a remagnetization acquired during the Kiaman reversed polarity superchron. Our preliminary paleomagnetic results thus display large changes in the VGP position, as also evidenced by others on Baltica and Laurentia. However, their interpretation does not favor TPW episodes or equatorial Earth magnetic dipole during the lower Cambrian-Ediacaran periods, but

  4. African hot spot volcanism: small-scale convection in the upper mantle beneath cratons.

    PubMed

    King, S D; Ritsema, J

    2000-11-10

    Numerical models demonstrate that small-scale convection develops in the upper mantle beneath the transition of thick cratonic lithosphere and thin oceanic lithosphere. These models explain the location and geochemical characteristics of intraplate volcanos on the African and South American plates. They also explain the presence of relatively high seismic shear wave velocities (cold downwellings) in the mantle transition zone beneath the western margin of African cratons and the eastern margin of South American cratons. Small-scale, edge-driven convection is an alternative to plumes for explaining intraplate African and South American hot spot volcanism, and small-scale convection is consistent with mantle downwellings beneath the African and South American lithosphere.

  5. Tectonic evolution of the Oudalan-Gorouol greenstone belt in NE Burkina Faso and Niger, West African craton.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tshibubudze, Asinne; Hein, Kim A. A.

    2010-05-01

    The Oudalan-Gorouol Greenstone Belt (OGGB) forms part of the Palaeoproterozoic as the Baoulé-Mossi domain of the West African Craton (WAC) and hosts gold deposits at Essakane, Gossey, Korizena, and Falagountou in NE Burkina Faso, and Kossa goldfield in Niger. The Birimian supracrustal sequences in the OGGB are dominated by meta-volcanoclastic greywacke intercalated meta-conglomerate, siltstone and shale, carbonate (dolomite) and volcanic units pillow basalts). The belt is surrounded by plutonic rocks including granite, TTG suite granitoids and granite gneiss. The sequences where subjected to two phases of deformation, and several phases of contact metamorphosed to hornblende-hornfels facies during emplacement of pyroxenite-gabbro-norite, granodiorite-tonalite and gabbro dykes and porphyritic sills. The OGGB is bounded and/or crosscut by several major NNE to NE-trending shear zones including the steeply east-dipping Markoye Shear Zone (western margin of the OGGB), Tin Takanet-Bellekcire Shear Zone, Dori Shear Zone, Kargouna Shear Zone, Takabougou Shear Zone, and Bom Kodjelé Shear Zone (transects the centre of the OGGB). The structures were readily identified using LANDSAT, Aster, aeromagnetic and RTP magnetic data, with follow-up strategic mapping, highlighting the value of interpreting geophysical and remotely sensed data in regional mapping in Burkina Faso and Niger. Structural studies completed in 2007 adjacent to the Essakane gold mine indicated that the NE-trending, first-order crustal-scale Markoye Shear Zone (MSZ) has undergone at least two phases of reactivation concomitant to two phases of regional deformation (Tshibubudze et al., 2009). The first phase of deformation, D1, resulted in the formation of NNW-NW trending folds and thrusts during dextral-reverse displacement on the MSZ. The deformation predates the Eburnean Orogeny is termed the Tangaean Event (meaning low hills in the Moré language of Burkina Faso) and is tentatively dated at ca. 2170

  6. Probing the edge of the West African Craton: A first seismic glimpse from Niger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Leo, Jeanette F.; Wookey, James; Kendall, J.-Michael; Selby, Neil D.

    2015-03-01

    Constraints on crustal and mantle structure of the Eastern part of the West African Craton have to date been scarce. Here we present results of P receiver function and SK(K)S wave splitting analyses of data recorded at International Monitoring System array TORD in SW Niger. Despite lacking in lateral coverage, our measurements sharply constrain crustal thickness (˜41 km), VP/VS ratio (1.69 ± 0.03), mantle transition zone (MTZ) thickness (˜247 km), and a midlithospheric discontinuity at ˜67 km depth. Splitting delay times are low with an average of 0.63 ± 0.01 s. Fast directions follow the regional surface geological trend with an average of 57 ± 1°. We suggest that splitting is due to fossil anisotropic fabrics in the crust and lithosphere, incurred during the Paleoproterozoic Eburnean Orogeny, with possible contributions from the later Pan-African Orogeny and present-day mantle flow. The MTZ appears to be unperturbed, despite the proximity of the sampled region to the deep cratonic root.

  7. Relative Motion of Africa Plate with Respect to South African Kalahari Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Njoroge, Mary; Malservisi, Rocco; Hugentobler, Urs; Voytenko, Denis

    2014-05-01

    The presence of the Rift Valley within the African continent and its eventual propagation southward in the Okavango rift zone (ORZ) strongly affects the regional seismic hazard evaluation. Here we use a comparison of the motion inferred from the South African GPS network TrigNet with the motion of instruments with the rest of the African continent to evaluate the propagation of the Rift Valley to Botswana. We use data from all the available GPS stations located in the Nubian plate to develop two reference frames north and south of the ORZ. The data was processed using two major codes (Bernese and Gipsy-oasis) to evaluate effects on the references due to processing assumptions. Given the importance of uncertainties in understanding the significance of small signals, a full analysis of the Allan Variance of the velocity has been performed. Preliminary results suggest that although still within the limits of the uncertainties, the data are compatible with relative motion between the TrigNet network and the rest of Nubia, and does not exclude a possible counter clockwise rotation of the South African Kalahari craton with respect to the Nubian plate, and thus a southward propagation of the Rift Valley.

  8. Upper mantle structure of the Congo Craton and the East African Rift from full wave ambient noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emry, E.; Shen, Y.; Nyblade, A.; Bao, X.; Flinders, A. F.

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between lithospheric structure, mantle flow, and continental rifting along the East African Rift is the subject of ongoing discussion. The upper mantle beneath the Main Ethiopian Rift and the East African Rift farther south has been seismically imaged following the deployment of several temporary regional arrays. However, due to uneven distribution of seismic arrays, key questions regarding a connection between these upper mantle anomalies at the Turkana Depression and the effect that the thick Congo Craton has on diverting upwelling material towards the East African Rift are poorly resolved. We use overlapping records from several temporary and permanent broadband seismic arrays (1980-2014) located throughout the African continent and surrounding regions in order to image the upper mantle beneath the East African Rift and the Congo Craton where regional seismic arrays have not been deployed. We do this by seismic ambient noise tomography using the recently developed frequency-time normalization (FTN) method to extract empirical Green's functions (EGFs) at periods of 7-250 seconds. We cross correlate the normalized continuous records and stack them to obtain EGFs for each temporally coincident station-station pair. We simulate wave propagation through a spherical Earth using a finite-difference method, measure phase delay times between synthetics and EGFs, and invert them for velocity perturbations with 3D Rayleigh wave sensitivity kernels. We will present results from full-wave ambient noise inversions that illuminate upper mantle structure throughout the continent, with particular focus on the Congo Craton and northern sections of the East African Rift System.

  9. Southern African perspectives on the long-term morpho-tectonic evolution of cratonic interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kounov, Alexandre; Viola, Giulio; Dunkl, István; Frimmel, Hartwig E.

    2013-08-01

    We propose a refined conceptual model for the Paleo- and Mesozoic morpho-tectonic evolution of the southern African cratonic interior. Constraints are derived from new zircon and apatite fission-track and (U-Th-[Sm])/He dates (ZFT, AFT, ZHe and AHe) of rocks from the Augrabies Falls and Fish River Canyon regions in South Africa and southern Namibia, respectively. The combined ZFT and ZHe thermochronological results suggest a smooth and simple tectonic evolution, wherein the study area cooled monotonically as one coherent block from the Early Silurian to the Mid Triassic in response to very low denudation rates of less than 5 m/myr. Some of the new zircon ages may indicate a discrete and short-lived period of enhanced cooling interrupting this monotonic cooling during the Mid Devonian-Early Carboniferous. We tentatively correlate this episode to the events that caused the regional hiatus that separates the Cape Supergroup from the overlying Karoo Supergroup. Apatite fission-track and (U-Th-[Sm])/He data joint modeling reveals a period of accelerated regional cooling through 120 to 40 °C between 100 and 65 Ma ago. We interpret the latter as most probably due to regional uplift in combination with high river gradients and enhanced erosion rates in the Orange and Fish River basins, which, during the Cretaceous, were probably part of the greater Kalahari River catchment area. Based on the apatite results, a denudation rate of ca. 25 m/myr was calculated for the Late Cretaceous. At that time the area was probably characterized by an elevated average altitude and low relief, as indicated by the AFT and AHe age patterns.

  10. Geochemistry of Archean Mafic Amphibolites from the Amsaga Area, West African Craton, Mauritania: Occurrence of Archean oceanic plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Atrassi, Fatima; Debaille, Vinciane; Mattielli, Nadine; Berger, Julien

    2015-04-01

    While Archean terrains are mainly composed of a TTG (Tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite) suite, more mafic lithologies such as amphibolites are also a typical component of those ancient terrains. Although mafic rocks represent only ~10% of the Archean cratons, they may provide key evidence of the role and nature of basaltic magmatism in the formation of the Archean crust as well as the evolution of the Archean mantle. This study focuses on the Archean crust from the West African craton in Mauritania (Amsaga area). The Amsaga Archean crust mainly consists of TTG and thrust-imbricated slices of mafic volcanic rocks, which have been affected by polymetamorphic events from the amphibolite to granulite facies. We report the results of a combined petrologic, Sm-Nd isotopic, major element and rare earth element (REE) study of the Archean amphibolites in the West African craton. This study was conducted in order to characterize these rocks, to constrain the time of their formation and to evaluate their tectonic setting and their possible mantle source. Our petrological observations show that these amphibolites have fine to medium granoblastic and nematoblastic textures. They are dominated by amphibolite-facies mineral assemblages (mainly amphibole and plagioclase), but garnet and clinopyroxene occur in a few samples. These amphibolites have tholeiitic basalt composition. On a primitive mantle-normalized diagram, they display fairly flat patterns without negative anomalies for either Eu or Nb-Ta. We have shown using Sm-Nd whole rock isotopic data that these amphibolites formed at 3.3 ±0.075 Ga. They have positive ɛNdi values (+5.2 ± 1.6). These samples show isotopically juvenile features, which rule out the possibility of significant contamination of the protolith magmas by ancient continental crust. Based on these geochemical data we propose that the tholeiitic basalts were formed in an oceanic plateau tectonic setting from a mantle plume source and that they have a

  11. Analogies Between the East African Rift Around the Tanzania Craton and the Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montesi, L. G.

    2013-12-01

    Continental rifts and oceanic spreading centers both accommodate plate divergence but their morphologies are often quite different. Yet, ultraslow spreading centers, especially the Southwest Indian ridge at the 9 to 16°E area (SWIR), present good analogies for the East African Rift (EAR), including localized volcanism, avolcanic segments, and a continuous but not straight rift axis. The archetypal oceanic spreading center features transform offsets. Volcanism is continuous along the ridge axis and is most vigorous at the center of spreading segments. By contrast, continental rifts do not feature transform offsets. The orientation of the rift can change along strike. Several rift segments are purely tectonic, with relatively isolated volcanic centers. The EAR around the Tanzania Craton clearly shows this kind of morphology. Ultraslow spreading centers share many of these features. The SWIR, in particular, displays dramatic changes in orientation, with volcanism localized at the junction between segments of different obliquity. Melt production and transport are controlled by the effective spreading rate, a combination of plate divergence velocity and rift obliquity. Ultraslow spreading center all have an effective spreading rate less than 13 mm/yr. At that speed the thickness of the thermal boundary layer is similar to the depth from which magma can be effectively extracted, opening the possibility for long-distance transport of magma along axis without extraction. Volcanic centers correspond to the location where the magma transport system first encounters a tectonically damaged zone that enables extraction to the surface. The effective velocity of the EAR in the Kenya dome is less than 4mm/yr firmly on par with ultraslow ridges. In fact, to generate magma by mantle upwelling at such a slow opening rate requires a higher mantle temperature or fertility than in the oceanic domain. Both opening rate and effective velocity increase northward along the Eastern branch

  12. Vintage WAC: Improving the Learning Impact of WAC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thew, Neill; Gustafsson, Magnus

    2007-01-01

    This article is a report on the 2006 WAC Conference at Clemson University, written from the perspective of two international "critical friends." We use our reflections on the conference as a springboard for exploring the current state of play of the WAC movement, and for suggesting future areas for development. We noted three common sets…

  13. North African petroleum geology: regional structure and stratigraphic overview of a hydrocarbon-rich cratonic area

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, T.E.; Kanes, W.H.

    1985-02-01

    North Africa, including Sinai, contains some of the most important hydrocarbon-producing basins in the world. The North African Symposium is devoted to examining the exploration potential of the North African margin in light of the most recent and promising exploration discoveries. The geologic variety of the region is extraordinary and can challenge any exploration philosophy. Of primary interest are the Sirte basin of Libya, which has produced several billion barrels of oil, and the Gulf of Suez, a narrow, evaporite-capped trough with five fields that will produce more than 5 billion bbl. Both are extensional basins with minimal lateral movement and with good source rocks in direct proximity to reservoirs. Structural models of these basins give firm leads for future exploration. More difficult to evaluate are the Tethyan realm basins of the northern Sinai, and the Western Desert of Egypt, the Cyrenaican Platform of Libya, and the Tunisia-Sicily shelf area, where there are only limited subsurface data. These basins are extensional in origin also, but have been influenced by lateral tectonics. Favorable reservoirs exist, but source rocks have been a problem locally. Structural models with strong stratigraphic response offer several favorable play concepts. The Paleozoic Ghadames basin in Libya, Tunisia, and Algeria has the least complex structural history, and production appears to be limited to small structures. A series of stratigraphic models indicates additional areas with exploration potential. The Paleozoic megabasin of Morocco, with its downfaulted Triassic grabens, remains an untested but attractive area.

  14. Nature and evolution of Neoproterozoic ocean-continent transition: Evidence from the passive margin of the West African craton in NE Mali

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaud, Caby

    2014-03-01

    The Timétrine massif exposed west of the Pan-African suture zone in northeastern Mali belongs to the passive margin of the West African craton facing to the east intra-oceanic arc assemblages and 730 Ma old pre-collisional calc-alkaline plutons. The Timétrine lithologic succession includes from the base to the top Mesoproterozoic cratonic to passive margin formations overlain by deep-sea Fe-Mg schists. Submarine metabasalts and two ultramafic massifs of serpentinized mantle peridotites are inserted as olistoliths towards the top whereas turbidites of continental origin represent the younger unit. Field and petrological data have revealed a distinct metasedimentary sequence attached to the serpentinized peridotites. It essentially consists of impure carbonates, Fe jaspers and polymictic breccias containing altered blocks of mantle peridotites, most rocks being enriched in detrital chromite. This association is interpreted as reworked chemical and detrital sediments derived from the alteration of mafic-ultramafic rocks. It is argued that mantle exhumation above sea floor took place during the Neoproterozoic rifting and crustal thinning period under possible tropical conditions, as suggested by the large volume of silicified serpentinites. In spite of greenschist facies metamorphic overprint characterized by widespread Fe-rich blue amphiboles that are not diagnostic of high-pressure conditions, it is possible to reconstruct a former ocean-continent transition similar to that evidenced for the Mesozoic period, followed by the deposition of syn-to post rift terrigeneous turbidites roughly coeval with ocean spreading some time before 800 Ma. It is concluded that the serpentinite massifs were tectonically emplaced first in an extensional setting, then incorporated within deep-sea sediments as olistoliths and finally transported westward during late Neoproterozoic collisional tectonics onto the West African craton.

  15. Deformation-driven differentiation during in-situ crystallization of the Iguilid mafic intrusion (West African craton)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Julien; Diot, Hervé; Lo, Khalidou

    2015-04-01

    The 2.7 Ga Iguilid mafic body is a small (9x2 km) magmatic intrusion with preserved igneous textures and not affected by metamorphism and deformation. It intrudes the metamorphic Archean basement of the Amsaga domain in the West African craton in Mauritania. The dominant lithology is a gabbronorite with subordinate gabbros and norites. We investigated 45 oriented samples for fabric analysis, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility and geochemical analyses to explore the link between chemical differentiation and emplacement of the plutonic body. According to the limited variations in modal proportions and in major element compositions within the intrusion, the Iguilid pluton crystallized via an in-situ mechanism where solidification fronts progressively thickens from the rim to the core of the cooling intrusion and where the trace-element composition is controlled by the amount of interstitial liquid (containing most incompatible trace-elements) preserved between cumulus minerals before total solidification. An in-situ crystallization process alone normally does not produce chemical differentiation but the mafic cumulates at Iguilid have been deformed during their crystallization (i.e. when melt was still present). The vertical foliations and the randomly oriented lineations argue for horizontal flattening as the main deformation mechanism. We estimated the amount of trapped interstitial liquid preserved between the network of cumulate minerals with geochemical modelling in 12 samples and found that it is negatively correlated to the anisotropy degree determined by fabric analysis. The rocks located close to the margins of the intrusion were not deformed, probably because the degree of crystallization and, hence, the viscosity of the mush was too high. The most deformed rocks with the lowest trapped interstitial liquid content are found in the center of the intrusion where the crystal mushes were rich enough in melt to record significant strain. Deformation leaded to

  16. The basement of the Punta del Este Terrane (Uruguay): an African Mesoproterozoic fragment at the eastern border of the South American Río de La Plata craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basei, Miguel A. S.; Peel, Elena; Sánchez Bettucci, Leda; Preciozzi, Fernando; Nutman, Allen P.

    2011-04-01

    The Punta del Este Terrane (eastern Uruguay) lies in a complex Neoproterozoic (Brasiliano/Pan-African) orogenic zone considered to contain a suture between South American terranes to the west of Major Gercino-Sierra Ballena Suture Zone and eastern African affinities terranes. Zircon cores from Punta del Este Terrane basement orthogneisses have U-Pb ages of ca. 1,000 Ma, which indicate an lineage with the Namaqua Belt in Southwestern Africa. U-Pb zircon ages also provide the following information on the Punta del Este terrane: the orthogneisses containing the ca. 1,000 Ma inheritance formed at ca. 750 Ma; in contrast to the related terranes now in Africa, reworking of the Punta del Este Terrane during Brasiliano/Pan-African orogenesis was very intense, reaching granulite facies at ca. 640 Ma. The termination of the Brasiliano/Pan-African orogeny is marked by formation of acid volcanic and volcanoclastic rocks at ca. 570 Ma (Sierra de Aguirre Formation), formation of late sedimentary basins (San Carlos Formation) and then intrusion at ca. 535 Ma of post-tectonic granitoids (Santa Teresa and José Ignacio batholiths). The Punta del Este Terrane and unrelated western terranes represented by the Dom Feliciano Belt and the Río de La Plata Craton were in their present positions by ca. 535 Ma.

  17. Petrochemical and petrophysical characterization of the lower crust and the Moho beneath the West African Craton, based on Xenoliths from Kimberlites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, Stephen E.; Toft, Paul B.

    1988-01-01

    Additional evidence to the composition of the lower crust and uppermost mantle was presented in the form of xenolith data. Xenoliths from the 2.7-Ga West African Craton indicate that the Moho beneath this shield is a chemically and physically gradational boundary, with intercalations of garnet granulite and garnet eclogite. Inclusions in diamonds indicate a depleted upper mantle source, and zenolith barometry and thermometry data suggest a high mantle geotherm with a kink near the Moho. Metallic iron in the xenoliths indicates that the uppermost mantle has a significant magnetization, and that the depth to the Curie isotherm, which is usually considered to be at or above the Moho, may be deeper than the Moho.

  18. Assessing WAC Elements in Business Syllabi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicolas, Maureen O’Day; Annous, Samer

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates syllabi for evidence of the principles of writing across the curriculum (WAC) in courses offered by the Faculty of Business (FOB) at a university operating in a non–English-speaking country. The research analyzed all syllabi of FOB courses offered in the spring 2010 semester for evidence of WAC looking for indications of…

  19. The Archean kalsilite-nepheline syenites of the Awsard intrusive massif (Reguibat Shield, West African Craton, Morocco) and its relationship to the alkaline magmatism of Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haissen, Faouziya; Cambeses, Aitor; Montero, Pilar; Bea, Fernando; Dilek, Yildirim; Mouttaqi, Abdellah

    2017-03-01

    More than 40% of the known alkaline complexes are reported from Africa. Most are ring complexes composed of syenites and associated or not, lithotypes as carbonatites, granites and mafic rocks. Radiometric dating indicates the presence of alkaline complexes with ages spanning from Precambrian to the present. In terms of outcrops, alkaline complexes are reported from cratonic zones and from belts embedded between cratonic areas. Because of the high economic potential for associated REE deposits, these alkaline complexes have received much attention from Earth scientists. These studies aim mainly to constrain the role of the mantle and the crust (and the interaction between them) in the genesis of this peculiar magmatism, and also to explain the variability observed in lithotypes and geotectonic settings. Among those alkaline complexes, Precambrian occurrences are rare. Up-to-date only a few Proterozoic examples were cited in Africa. The recently studied Awsard complex in Southern Morocco is a peculiar one with a crystallization age of 2.46 Ga and an unusual rock assemblages. This paper is a first approximation to a comparison of geochemical and isotopic fingerprints of the Awsard magmatism (as the oldest one) with other known different ages African complexes from different geotectonic settings, aiming to detect if there is any evolution in this alkaline magmatism through time. A first conclusion is that magma sources for this alkaline magmatism has been probably evaluating over geological time, from parental magmas compositions close to that of primitive mantle in these early geological time to compositions holding more and more depleted mantle and continental crust components. However, to go further in this debate more modern isotopic, geochemical and geochronological data from all these complexes are needed. Nevertheless, this comparison highlighted the peculiar character of the Awsard magmatism with an isotopic composition very close to that of Primitive mantle

  20. Washington Teacher Preparation and Certification Regulations (WAC 180-75, WAC 180-78, and WAC 180-79).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board of Education, Olympia.

    Three chapters set forth the regulations of the Washington State Board of Education that relate to teacher preparation and certification. General certification provisions incorporated in chapter WAC 180-75 include rules on: (1) equivalency of standards; (2) appeal procedures; (3) certificate revocation and notification of revocation; (4)…

  1. WAC: Closing Doors or Opening Doors for Second Language Writers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Written by a WAC program director and second language writing studies scholar, this article raises questions about how second language writers are faring in WAC programs and the extent to which the fields of second language writing and WAC are informed by each other's scholarship. In this article, Cox draws from her review of 26 journal articles…

  2. Support for a Uniformitarian Model of Continental Mantle Lithosphere Formation from the "Near-Cratonic" Composition of Proterozoic Southern African Mantle Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janney, P. E.

    2014-12-01

    The transition at the end of the Archean between the generation of cratonic and mobile belt continental lithosphere is regarded as a first-order change in the mode of generation of continental lithosphere. It is widely debated whether this transition represented a fundamental change in the process by which the lithospheric mantle was generated (i.e., as melting residues of deep-seated mantle upwellings to residues of relatively shallow mantle melting at subduction zones), or whether it primarily reflected a more gradual change in the conditions (i.e., temperatures, depths and degrees of melting) of lithosphere generation in a suprasubduction zone setting. The marked contrast, in many cases, between the major element compositions of peridotite xenoliths from Archean cratons and those from adjacent post-Archean mobile belts has accentuated the significance of this transition. Peridotite xenoliths from the post-Archean mobile belt terranes surrounding the Kaapvaal craton in southern Africa are clearly Proterozoic in age from Re-Os isotope constraints, but they are unusual in that they share several key similarities in composition and mineralogy with Archean Kaapvaal peridotites (e.g., low bulk-rock Al2O3, relatively low modal olivine and high modal orthopyroxene). Although they lack the low FeO and high olivine Mg# values of the most extreme Kaapvaal samples, they show a very large degree of overlap (extending to olivine Mg# values of greater than 93 for example). These similarities support a common mode of origin for cratonic and post-cratonic lithosphere in southern Africa (although varying somewhat in the degrees and depths of melt extraction) and a similar history of post-formation modification. A comparison of the conditions of melt extraction for cratonic and post-cratonic lithosphere inferred from compatible and mildly incompatible trace elements will be presented.

  3. Photometric normalization of LROC WAC images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, H.; Denevi, B.; Robinson, M. S.; Hapke, B. W.; McEwen, A. S.; LROC Science Team

    2010-12-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Wide Angle Camera (WAC) acquires near global coverage on a monthly basis. The WAC is a push frame sensor with a 90° field of view (FOV) in BW mode and 60° FOV in 7-color mode (320 nm to 689 nm). WAC images are acquired during each orbit in 10° latitude segments with cross track coverage of ~50 km. Before mosaicking, WAC images are radiometrically calibrated to remove instrumental artifacts and to convert at sensor radiance to I/F. Images are also photometrically normalized to common viewing and illumination angles (30° phase), a challenge due to the wide angle nature of the WAC where large differences in phase angle are observed in a single image line (±30°). During a single month the equatorial incidence angle drifts about 28° and over the course of ~1 year the lighting completes a 360° cycle. The light scattering properties of the lunar surface depend on incidence(i), emission(e), and phase(p) angles as well as soil properties such as single-scattering albedo and roughness that vary with terrain type and state of maturity [1]. We first tested a Lommel-Seeliger Correction (LSC) [cos(i)/(cos(i) + cos(e))] [2] with a phase function defined by an exponential decay plus 4th order polynomial term [3] which did not provide an adequate solution. Next we employed a LSC with an exponential 2nd order decay phase correction that was an improvement, but still exhibited unacceptable frame-to-frame residuals. In both cases we fitted the LSC I/F vs. phase angle to derive the phase corrections. To date, the best results are with a lunar-lambert function [4] with exponential 2nd order decay phase correction (LLEXP2) [(A1exp(B1p)+A2exp(B2p)+A3) * cos(i)/(cos(e) + cos(i)) + B3cos(i)]. We derived the parameters for the LLEXP2 from repeat imaging of a small region and then corrected that region with excellent results. When this correction was applied to the whole Moon the results were less than optimal - no surprise given the

  4. Kimberlites of the Man craton, West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, E. M. W.; Apter, D. B.; Morelli, C.; Smithson, N. K.

    2004-09-01

    The Man craton in West Africa is an Archaean craton formerly joined to the Guyana craton (South America) that was rifted apart in the Mesozoic. Kimberlites of the Man craton include three Jurassic-aged clusters in Guinea, two Jurassic-aged clusters in Sierra Leone, and in Liberia two clusters of unknown age and one Neoproterozoic cluster recently dated at ˜800 Ma. All of the kimberlites irrespective of age occur as small pipes and prolific dykes. Some of the Banankoro cluster pipes in Guinea, the Koidu pipes in Sierra Leone and small pipes in the Weasua cluster in Liberia contain hypabyssal-facies kimberlite and remnants of the so-called transitional-facies and diatreme-facies kimberlite. Most of the Man craton kimberlites are mineralogically classified as phlogopite kimberlites, although potassium contents are relatively low. They are chemically similar to mica-poor Group 1A Southern African examples. The Jurassic kimberlites are considered to represent one province of kimberlites that track from older bodies in Guinea (Droujba 153 Ma) to progressively younger kimberlites in Sierra Leone (Koidu, 146 Ma and Tongo, 140 Ma). The scarcity of diatreme-facies kimberlites relative to hypabyssal-facies kimberlites and the presence of the so-called transitional-facies indicate that the pipes have been eroded down to the interface between the root and diatreme zones. From this observation, it is concluded that extensive erosion (1-2 km) has occurred since the Jurassic. In addition to erosion, the presence of abundant early crystallizing phlogopite is considered to have had an effect on the relatively small sizes of the Man craton kimberlites.

  5. Cratons: Why Are The Little Ones So Tough?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, G. R.

    2013-12-01

    Cratons are ancient (>1 Ga) survivors of multiple tectonic events and diverse tectonic regimes. The question that arises is why are they so tough? If one looks around the world at relatively small cratons, the answer at least partly lies in their crustal structure. This is not to say that their lithospheric mantle is not also part of the answer, but mapping the LAB is still a challenge. Some examples of relatively small cratons in North America that are relatively well studied are the Wyoming and SASK cratons. A good example in Africa is the Tanzanian craton, and a good example in China is the North China craton. The Wyoming craton initially formed at ~2.5 Ga and formed has very thick (~50 km) crust that includes a high velocity layer (Vp ~7.5 km/s) at its base. Recent xenolith studies indicate that at least some of this high velocity layer was underplated at ~1.8 Ga. The recently discovered Sask craton in Canada was caught up in the Trans-Hudson orogen and is completely covered by younger rocks. It also has a thick crust. The Tanzanian craton has been strong enough to cause the East African rift system to split into two arms that wrap around it. It has relatively thick crust (and lithospheric keel?). The Colorado plateau in the western U. S. and the Ordos block in north China are very similar in many respects and have resisted deformation in the their interiors while they are bounded on three sides by rifts. A common theme among these examples is relatively thick crust, and in most cases, a unusually fast lower crust.

  6. WAC for the New Millennium: Strategies for Continuing Writing-Across-the-Curriculum Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Susan H., Ed.; Miraglia, Eric, Ed.; Soven, Margot, Ed.; Thaiss, Christopher, Ed.

    Celebrating the achievements of Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) by highlighting the promise of its future, this book presents 12 essays that describe how WAC programs have adapted and continue to adapt to meet new challenges. Essays in the book explain strategies for continuing WAC programs in an atmosphere of change; explore new avenues of…

  7. Separating Siamese Twins: Can We Extricate WAC from Writing Centers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumner, Jacob S.

    This paper addresses the culture of writing in higher education from a multicultural perspective of those within the "monolith." The paper first notes that writing programs, more specifically writing across the curriculum (WAC), and writing centers work in similar ways by benefiting each other and sharing the broad mission of improving…

  8. Using Bloom To Bridge the WAC/WID Divide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Geoffrey; Wills, Katherine

    A longitudinal study combined Stephen Tsuchdi's Workaday activities with Bloom's taxonomy of educational objectives to bridge the WAC/WID (writing across the curriculum/writing in the disciplines) divide. The researchers hoped that by combining concrete activities that can be applied across disciplines with a Bloomian conceptual framework of…

  9. Change Agent Research for Windsor Aquatic Club (CAR/WAC).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Dick; Olafson, Gord

    This study of the Windsor Aquatic Club (WAC) was undertaken to investigate the following problems and questions: (a) identification of goals; (b) conflict in the interface of age class and school class swimming, as well as the interface of municipal, regional, provincial, federal, and international organizations; (c) identification of task,…

  10. Origin of cratonic basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev. Klein, George; Hsui, Albert T.

    1987-12-01

    Tectonic subsidence curves show that the Illinois, Michigan, and Williston basins formed by initial fault-controlled mechanical subsidence during rifting and by subsequent thermal subsidence. Thermal subsidence began around 525 Ma in the Illinois Basin, 520 460 Ma in the Michigan Basin, and 530 500 Ma in the Williston Basin. In the Illinois Basin, a second subsidence episode (middle Mississippian through Early Permian) was caused by flexural foreland subsidence in response to the Alleghanian-Hercynian orogeny. Resurgent Permian rifting in the Illinois Basin is inferred because of intrusion of well-dated Permian alnoites; such intrusive rocks are normally associated with rifting processes. The process of formation of these cratonic basins remains controversial. Past workers have suggested mantle phase changes at the base of the crust, mechanical subsidence in response to isostatically uncompensated excess mass following igneous intrusions, intrusion of mantle plumes into the crust, or regional thermal metamorphic events as causes of basin initiation. Cratonic basins of North America, Europe, Africa, and South America share common ages of formation (around 550 to 500 Ma), histories of sediment accumulation, temporal volume changes of sediment fills, and common dates of interregional unconformities. Their common date of formation suggests initiation of cratonic basins in response to breakup of a late Precambrian super-continent. This supercontinent acted as a heat lens that caused partial melting of the lower crust and upper mantle followed by emplacement of anorogenic granites during extensional tectonics in response to supercontinent breakup. Intrusion of anorogenic granites and other partially melted intrusive rocks weakened continental lithosphere, thus providing a zone of localized regional stretching and permitting formation of cratonic basins almost simultaneously over sites of intrusion of these anorogenic granites and other partially melted intrusive rocks.

  11. Geological evolution of the Antongil Craton, NE Madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schofield, D.I.; Thomas, Ronald J.; Goodenough, K.M.; De Waele, B.; Pitfield, P.E.J.; Key, R.M.; Bauer, W.; Walsh, G.J.; Lidke, D.J.; Ralison, A.V.; Rabarimanana, M.; Rafahatelo, J.-M.; Randriamananjara, T.

    2010-01-01

    interpreted as being the only manifestation of the Pan-African orogeny seen in the craton, which led to the assembly of the tectonic blocks that comprise the island. ?? 2010 NERC.

  12. Geochemistry and Sm-Nd isotopic composition of the Imiter Pan-African granitoids (Saghro massif, eastern Anti-Atlas, Morocco): Geotectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baidada, Bouchra; Cousens, Brian; Alansari, Abdelkhalek; Soulaimani, Abderrahmane; Barbey, Pierre; Ilmen, Said; Ikenne, Moha

    2017-03-01

    The Imiter inlier (eastern part of the Moroccan Anti-Atlas) is located on the northwestern border of the West African Craton (WAC) and exhibits a range of Pan-African granitoids. Three massifs that crosscut the Imiter Saghro Group were targeted in this work: the Igoudrane granodiorite, Bou Teglimt granodiorite and Bou Fliou granite. We present here additional geochemical analyses (major and trace elements) and Sm-Nd isotopic data, which define two distinct groups: (i) the Igoudrane massif (677 Ma) and (ii) the Bou Teglimt granodiorite (576 Ma) and the Bou Fliou granite (550 Ma). Geochemical data confirm the calc-alkaline signature of the studied granitoids. Both groups of granitoids are slightly peraluminous and show strong negative anomalies in Nb, Ta and Ti in multi-element plots normalized to the primitive mantle. The granitoids have low 143Nd/144Nd initial ratios (0.5116-0.5117), with TDM model ages ranging from 1.73 to 1.52Ga. The εNd(t) values are negative, decreasing from the Igoudrane samples (-1.1 to -3.1) to the Bou Teglimt granodiorite (-3.0 to -3.3) and Bou Fliou (-4.2 to -4.8). All these data suggest a mixed magmatic origin involving a juvenile mantle source and an old, at least Paleoproterozoic crust. Given Mesoproterozoic rocks are lacking or very scarce in the Anti-Atlas, these results confirm the existence of an old cratonic basement beneath the eastern Anti-Atlas, and therefore suggest that the northern border of the West African Craton must be placed further to the north, as suggested by previous work in this region.

  13. Understanding cratonic flood basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Paul G.; Behn, Mark D.; Kelley, Katherine; Schmitz, Mark; Savage, Brian

    2006-05-01

    The origin of continental flood basalts has been debated for decades. These eruptions often produce millions of cubic kilometers of basalt on timescales of only a million years. Although flood basalts are found in a variety of settings, no locale is more puzzling than cratonic areas such as southern Africa or the Siberian craton, where strong, thick lithosphere is breached by these large basaltic outpourings. Conventionally, flood basalts have been interpreted as melting events produced by one of two processes: 1) elevated temperatures associated with mantle plumes and/or 2) adiabatic-decompression melting associated with lithospheric thinning. In southern Africa, however, there are severe problems with both of these mechanisms. First, the rifting circumstances of several well-known basaltic outpourings clearly reflect lithospheric control rather than the influence of a deep-seated plume. Specifically, rift timing and magmatism are correlated with stress perturbations to the lithosphere associated with the formation of collisional rifts. Second, the substantial lithospheric thinning required for adiabatic decompression melting is inconsistent with xenolith evidence for the continued survival of thick lithosphere beneath flood basalt domains. As an alternative to these models, we propose a new two-stage model that interprets cratonic flood basalts not as melting events, but as short-duration drainage events that tap previously created sublithospheric reservoirs of molten basalt formed over a longer time scale. Reservoir creation/existence (Stage I) requires long-term (e.g. ≫ 1 Ma) supersolidus conditions in the sublithospheric mantle that could be maintained by an elevated equilibrium geotherm (appropriate for the Archean), a slow thermal perturbation (e.g. thermal blanketing or large-scale mantle upwelling), or a subduction-related increase in volatile content. The drainage event (Stage II) occurs in response to an abrupt stress change in the lithosphere, which

  14. The electrical structure of the Slave craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Alan G.; Lezaeta, Pamela; Ferguson, Ian J.; Chave, Alan D.; Evans, Rob L.; Garcia, Xavier; Spratt, Jessica

    2003-12-01

    Proceeding, J.B. Dawson Volume, 1, 307-313] on the basis of garnet geochemistry (G10 vs. G9) populations. Deep-probing MT data from the lake bottom instruments infer that the conductor has a total depth-integrated conductivity (conductance) of the order of 2000 Siemens, which, given an internal resistivity of 10-15 Ω m, implies a thickness of 20-30 km. Below the CSMC the electrical resistivity of the lithosphere increases by a factor of 3-5 to values of around 50 Ω m. This change occurs at depths consistent with the graphite-diamond transition, which is taken as consistent with a carbon interpretation for the CSMC. Preliminary three-dimensional MT modelling supports the NE-SW striking geometry for the conductor, and also suggests a NW dip. This geometry is taken as implying that the tectonic processes that emplaced this geophysical-geochemical body are likely related to the subduction of a craton of unknown provenance from the SE (present-day coordinates) during 2630-2620 Ma. It suggests that the lithospheric stacking model of Helmstaedt and Schulze [Helmstaedt, H.H., Schulze, D.J., 1989. Southern African kimberlites and their mantle sample: implications for Archean tectonics and lithosphere evolution. In Ross, J. (Ed.), Kimberlites and Related Rocks, Vol. 1: Their Composition, Occurrence, Origin, and Emplacement. Geological Society of Australia Special Publication, vol. 14, 358-368] is likely correct for the formation of the Slave's current SCLM.

  15. Women Content in Units: Force Development Test (MAX WAC)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-10-03

    than the men. Some women complained of the difficulty of personal hygiene during the menstrual cycle. The problem of hygiene and menstrual discomforts...conditions, b. Enlisted personnel management policies, and c. Cost effectiveness comparisons. The HAX-WAC study was extremely useful and provides some...instruction to NCOs and officers on EW problems, so that appropriate leadership may be provided. - EW are dissatisfied with their uniforms, and field hygiene

  16. Women Content in the Army - REFORGER 77 (REF WAC 77)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-05-30

    physically located in communities in close proximity to their respective units. The exercise area in which REF WAC 77 observations generally were made was...participating in the field training exercise did not seem to have any significant impact on opinions tapped by this questionnaire item. C. Sex Role...76. Do you consider yourself an athletic person? -1) Yes 2) No 77. When you were 13 to 17 years old, how often did you take part in physical activities

  17. Opposition effect of the Moon from LROC WAC data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikodsky, Yu. I.; Korokhin, V. V.; Shkuratov, Yu. G.; Kaydash, V. G.; Videen, Gorden

    2016-09-01

    LROC WAC images acquired in 5 bands of the visible spectral range were used to study the opposition effect for two mare and two highland regions near the lunar equator. Opposition phase curves were extracted from the images containing the opposition by separating the phase-curve effect from the albedo pattern by comparing WAC images at different phase angles (from 0° to 30°). Akimov's photometric function and the NASA Digital Terrain Model GLD100 were used in the processing. It was found that phase-curve slopes at small phase angles directly correlate with albedo, while at larger phase angles, they are anti-correlated. We suggest a parameter to characterize the coherent-backscattering component of the lunar opposition surge, which is defined as the maximum phase angle for which the opposition-surge slope increases with growing albedo. The width of the coherent-backscattering opposition effect varies from approximately 1.2° for highlands in red light to 3.9° for maria in blue light. The parameter depends on albedo, which is in agreement with the coherent-backscattering theory. The maximum amplitude of the coherent opposition effect is estimated to be near 8%. Maps of albedo and phase-curve slope at phase angles larger than those, at which the coherent-backscattering occurs, were built for the areas under study. Absolute calibration of WAC images was compared with Earth-based observations: the WAC-determined albedo is very close to the mean lunar albedo calculated using available Earth-based observations.

  18. The State of WAC/WID in 2010: Methods and Results of the U.S. Survey of the International WAC/WID Mapping Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thaiss, Chris; Porter, Tara

    2010-01-01

    As writing across the curriculum (WAC) has matured and diversified as a concept and as an organizational structure in U.S. higher education, there has arisen a need for accurate, up-to-date information on the presence and characteristics of WAC and writing-in-the-disciplines (WID) programs. Following on the only previous nationwide survey of…

  19. Field, geochemistry and Sr-Nd isotopes of the Pan-African granitoids from the Tifnoute Valley (Sirwa, Anti-Atlas, Morocco): a post-collisional event in a metacratonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toummite, A.; Liegeois, J. P.; Gasquet, D.; Bruguier, O.; Beraaouz, E. H.; Ikenne, M.

    2013-10-01

    In the Tifnoute Valley, three plutonic units have been defined: the Askaoun intrusion, the Imourkhssen intrusion and the Ougougane group of small intrusions. They are made of quartz diorite, granodiorite and granite and all contain abundant mafic microgranular enclaves (MME). The Askaoun granodiorite and the Imourkhssen granite have been dated by LA-ICP-MS on zircon at 558 ± 2 Ma and 561 ± 3 Ma, respectively. These granitic intrusions are subcontemporaneous to the widespread volcanic and volcano-detrital rocks from the Ouarzazate Group (580-545 Ma), marking the post-collisional transtensional period in the Anti-Atlas and which evolved towards alkaline and tholeiitic lavas in minor volume at the beginning of the Cambrian anorogenic intraplate extensional period. Geochemically, the Tifnoute Valley granitoids belong to an alkali-calcic series (high-K calc-alkaline) with typical Nb-Ta negative anomalies and no alkaline affinities. Granitoids and enclaves display positive ɛNd-560Ma (+0.8 to +3.5) with young Nd-TDM between 800 and 1200 Ma and relatively low 87Sr/86Sr initial ratios (Sri: 0.7034 and 0.7065). These values indicate a mainly juvenile source corresponding to a Pan-African metasomatized lithospheric mantle partly mixed with an old crustal component from the underlying West African Craton (WAC). Preservation in the Anti-Atlas of pre-Pan-African lithologies (c. 2.03 Ga basement, c. 800 Ma passive margin greenschist-facies sediments, allochthonous 750-700 Ma ophiolitic sequences) indicates that the Anti-Atlas lithosphere has not been thickened and was never an active margin during the Neoproterozoic. After a transpressive period, the late Ediacaran period (580-545 Ma) is marked by movement on near vertical transtensional faults, synchronous with the emplacement of the huge Ouarzazate Group and the Tifnoute Valley granitoids. We propose here a geodynamical model where the Tifnoute Valley granitoids as well as the Ouarzazate Group were generated during the post

  20. Craton destruction and related resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Rixiang; Zhang, Hongfu; Zhu, Guang; Meng, Qingren; Fan, Hongrui; Yang, Jinhui; Wu, Fuyuan; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zheng, Tianyu

    2017-02-01

    Craton destruction is a dynamic event that plays an important role in Earth's evolution. Based on comprehensive observations of many studies on the North China Craton (NCC) and correlations with the evolution histories of other cratons around the world, craton destruction has be defined as a geological process that results in the total loss of craton stability due to changes in the physical and chemical properties of the involved craton. The mechanisms responsible for craton destruction would be as the follows: (1) oceanic plate subduction; (2) rollback and retreat of a subducting oceanic plate; (3) stagnation and dehydration of a subducting plate in the mantle transition zone; (4) melting of the mantle above the mantle transition zone caused by dehydration of a stagnant slab; (5) non-steady flow in the upper mantle induced by melting, and/or (6) changes in the nature of the lithospheric mantle and consequent craton destruction caused by non-steady flow. Oceanic plate subduction itself does not result in craton destruction. For the NCC, it is documented that westward subduction of the paleo-Pacific plate should have initiated at the transition from the Middle-to-Late Jurassic, and resulted in the change of tectonic regime of eastern China. We propose that subduction, rollback and retreat of oceanic plates and dehydration of stagnant slabs are the main dynamic factors responsible for both craton destruction and concentration of mineral deposits, such as gold, in the overriding continental plate. Based on global distribution of gold deposits, we suggest that convergent plate margins are the most important setting for large gold concentrations. Therefore, decratonic gold deposits appear to occur preferentially in regions with oceanic subduction and overlying continental lithospheric destruction/modification/growth.

  1. Craton stability and continental lithosphere dynamics during plume-plate interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Van Hunen, J.; Pearson, D.

    2013-12-01

    the craton itself. Given the considerable debate on the uplift history of southern African plateau (Nyblade and Sleep, 2003), our numerical models that encompass lithospheric heterogeneity within cratons could help to achieve a better understanding of this issue.

  2. Limiting depth of magnetization in cratonic lithosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toft, Paul B.; Haggerty, Stephen E.

    1988-01-01

    Values of magnetic susceptibility and natural remanent magnetization (NRM) of clino-pyroxene-garnet-plagioclase granulite facies lower crustal xenoliths from a kimberlite in west Africa are correlated to bulk geochemistry and specific gravity. Thermomagnetic and alternating-field demagnetization analyses identify magnetite (Mt) and native iron as the dominant magnetic phases (totaling not more than 0.1 vol pct of the rocks) along with subsidiary sulfides. Oxidation states of the granulites are not greater than MW, observed Mt occurs as rims on coarse (about 1 micron) Fe particles, and inferred single domain-pseudosingle domain Mt may be a result of oxidation of fine-grained Fe. The deepest limit of lithospheric ferromagnetism is 95 km, but a limit of 70 km is most reasonable for the West African Craton and for modeling Magsat anomalies over exposed Precambrian shields.

  3. Implementation of Writing across the Curriculum (WAC) Learning Approaches in Social Work and Sociology Gerontology Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the goals and methods of the international Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) movement in higher education, and WAC-enriched learning approaches that the author used in teaching a social work gerontology practice course and a sociological theories of aging course. The author's in-class, low-stakes, nongraded writing…

  4. Notes from the Margins: WAC, WID, and the Politics of Place(ment)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    This institutional autoethnography (IAE) explores the political and pedagogical dynamics of WPA and WAC/WID work within an exceedingly small, resolutely single-sex, and assuredly rural liberal arts campus ecology. Working within a theoretical framework informed by WAC/WID's historical commitment to increasing literacy in students from diverse…

  5. Electrical lithosphere beneath the Kaapvaal craton, southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Rob L.; Jones, Alan G.; Garcia, Xavier; Muller, Mark; Hamilton, Mark; Evans, Shane; Fourie, C. J. S.; Spratt, Jessica; Webb, Susan; Jelsma, Hielke; Hutchins, Dave

    2011-04-01

    A regional-scale magnetotelluric (MT) experiment across the southern African Kaapvaal craton and surrounding terranes, called the Southern African Magnetotelluric Experiment (SAMTEX), has revealed complex structure in the lithospheric mantle. Large variations in maximum resistivity at depths to 200-250 km relate directly to age and tectonic provenance of surface structures. Within the central portions of the Kaapvaal craton are regions of resistive lithosphere about 230 km thick, in agreement with estimates from xenolith thermobarometry and seismic surface wave tomography, but thinner than inferred from seismic body wave tomography. The MT data are unable to discriminate between a completely dry or slightly "damp" (a few hundred parts per million of water) structure within the transitional region at the base of the lithosphere. However, the structure of the uppermost ˜150 km of lithosphere is consistent with enhanced, but still low, conductivities reported for hydrous olivine and orthopyroxene at levels of water reported for Kaapvaal xenoliths. The electrical lithosphere around the Kimberley and Premier diamond mines is thinner than the maximum craton thickness found between Kimberley and Johannesburg/Pretoria. The mantle beneath the Bushveld Complex is highly conducting at depths around 60 km. Possible explanations for these high conductivities include graphite or sulphide and/or iron metals associated with the Bushveld magmatic event. We suggest that one of these conductive phases (most likely melt-related sulphides) could electrically connect iron-rich garnets in a garnet-rich eclogitic composition associated with a relict subduction slab.

  6. Widespread refertilization of cratonic and circum-cratonic lithospheric mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yan-Jie; Zhang, Hong-Fu; Ying, Ji-Feng; Su, Ben-Xun

    2013-03-01

    Studies of mantle xenoliths have confirmed that Archean subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) is highly depleted in basaltic components (such as Al, Ca and Na) due to high-degree extraction of mafic and ultramafic melts and thus is refractory and buoyant, which made it chronically stable as tectonically independent units. However, increasing studies show that ancient SCLM can be refertilized by episodic rejuvenation events like infiltration of upwelling fertile material. The North China Craton is one of the most typical cases for relatively complete destruction of its Archean keel since the eruption of Paleozoic kimberlites, as is evidenced by a dramatic change in the compositions of mantle xenoliths sampled by Paleozoic to Cenozoic magmas, reflecting significant lithospheric thinning and the change in the character of the SCLM. The compositional change has been interpreted as the result of refertilization of Archean SCLM via multiple-stage peridotite-melt reactions, suggested by linear correlations between MgO and indices of fertility, covariations of Al2O3 with CaO, La/Yb, 87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd, 187Os/188Os and Re-depletion ages (TRD), high Re abundances, scatter in Re-Os isotopic plot, variable in situ TRD ages of sulfides, and correlation between TRD ages and olivine Fo of peridotite xenoliths in Paleozoic kimberlites and Cenozoic basalts on the craton. By integrating major and trace element, Sr, Nd and Os isotopic compositions of peridotite xenoliths and orogenic massif peridotites from the continents of Europe, Asia, America, Africa and Australia, together with previous studies of petrology and geochemistry of global peridotites, we suggest that (1) refertilization of cratonic and circum-cratonic lithospheric mantle is widespread; (2) Archean SCLM worldwide has experienced a multi-stage history of melt depletion and refertilization since segregation from the convecting mantle; (3) cratonic SCLM may be more susceptible to compositional change caused by

  7. On the Origin of Cratonic Sag Basins: Did They Sag?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Jason P.

    2015-04-01

    Cratonic sag basins are regions of long-lived, extremely slow (~20-30 m/Myr) shallow water and terrestrial sediment accumulation that have no striking signs of tectonic activity (cf. Allen and Armitage, 2012). In their evolution, hundreds of Myr-long periods of slow sediment accumulation are separated by unconformities. The mechanisms for their formation resist geodynamic characterization by other common hypotheses for basin subsidence because of their extremely slow subsidence and lack of evident tectonic activity. I propose their dynamics are better understood within the geodynamic context of continental cratons that ride over a ~250km-deep sub-asthenospheric mantle with lateral temperature variations between a few wide and persistent 1000s-km broad ~1400C 'superplume' upwelling mantle structures (e.g. currently beneath S. African Atlantic and French Polynesia) and prevalent surrounding ~1150C average temperature sub-asthenospheric mantle. When continents pass over typical mantle plumes, buoyant plume material tends to drain beneath the continent along junctions between cratons where the lithosphere is relatively thin, keeping the lithosphere over regions where plume material drains hotter than the average temperature of ~250km-deep mantle. (e.g., the Cameroon Line.) Regions where melting of plume material occurs during decompression associated with either plume ascent or lateral drainage beneath continents are associated with the addition of a buoyant rind of more depleted mantle to the continent. In addition, regions where plume material can pond in a relatively thin sub-lithospheric 'anti-basin' beneath a continent, or that stay stationary for long times over super plumes will heat to a lithospheric basal temperature of ~1400C instead of ~1150C, with ~700m of associated uplift. (e.g., Southern Africa). In this scenario (cf. Yamamoto, Morgan, and Morgan in "Plumes, Plates, and Paradigms"), it is the relative plume-passage-induced uplift of arches between

  8. Origin and evolution of the Amazonian craton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, A. K.; Wirth, K. R.

    1986-01-01

    The Amazonian craton appears to be formed and modifed by processes much like those of the better-known Precambrian cratons, but the major events did not always follow conventional sequences nor did they occur synchronously with those of other cratons. Much of the craton's Archean style continental crust formation, recorded in granite-greenstone and high-grade terranes, occurred in the Early Proterozoic: a period of relative quiescence in many other Precambrian regions. The common Archean to Proterozoic transition in geological style did not occur here, but an analogous change from abundant marine volcanism to dominantly continental sedimentary and eruptive styles occurred later. Amazonian geology is summarized, explaining the evolution of the craton.

  9. Tectonics of the junction region between the East European craton and West Arctic platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, A. S.; Morozov, Y. A.; Terekhov, E. N.; Bayanova, T. B.; Tyupanov, S. N.

    2016-09-01

    The region of the junction and interaction between the East European Craton (EEC) and the West Arctic Craton (WAC) is regarded as a complexly built zone or assembly of both the volumetric and dividing linear tectonic elements: the Trollfjord-Rybachi-Kanin (TRK) Lineament, the pericratonic subsidence zone of the EEC, the Karpinskii Lineament, the Murmansk Block of the Fennoscandian (Baltic) Shield, and the Kolmozero-Voronya Zone, which are briefly characterized in this paper. Evidences of thrusting have been established not only in the TRK Suture Zone and on the Rybachi Peninsula, which represent a fragment of the Timanides fold-thrust belt, but also to the southwest, in the Upper Riphean and Vendian terrigenous sequences making up the Sredni Peninsula and related to the pericratonic trough of the VEC. Two phases of fold-thrust deformations with elements of left-lateral strike-slip offset pertaining to the activity and evolution of the lineament suture dividing the Sredni and Rybachi peninsulas have been recorded. The variously oriented fault-fold systems within this fault zone are evidence for multistage deformation and can be explained by an at least twostage change in the kinematics that control displacement along the fault. The disintegrated granitic massifs of the Archean crystalline basement tectonically squeezed out in the upper crust as protrusions are localized within TRK Fault Zone. Plagiogranitic bodies, which underwent superposed fault-fold deformations of both kinematic stages, are an evidence of the vigorous tectonic event that predated folding and two-stage strike-slip displacement along the TRK Fault—by thrusting of Riphean sequences from north to south toward the Archean craton. The nappe-thrust regional structure was formed at this stage; elements of it have been recognized in the Sredni, Rybachi, and Kanin peninsulas. The main stages of tectonic evolution in the junction zone between the EEC and the WAP have been revealed and substantiated.

  10. Implementation of Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) learning approaches in social work and sociology gerontology courses.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the goals and methods of the international Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) movement in higher education, and WAC-enriched learning approaches that the author used in teaching a social work gerontology practice course and a sociological theories of aging course. The author's in-class, low-stakes, nongraded writing assignments facilitated students' development of knowledge about gerontological practice and sociological theories, as well as analytical thinking. The assignments are influenced by WAC's perspective that when students write their reactions to information, their understanding and retention of information improves; that writing can facilitate the application of new content to students' own lives and interests; and that increased frequency of writing increases writing comfort and maintenance and can result in the improvement of writing skills. The students' reactions to the assignments have been very positive.

  11. RESULTS FOR THE FOURTH QUARTER 2010 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M

    2011-02-22

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2010 Fourth Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section. (2) The reported detection limits for {sup 94}Nb, {sup 247}Cm and {sup 249}Cf are above the requested limits from Reference 2. However, they are below the limits established in Reference 3. (3) There is an estimated concentration of trimethylbenzene (2.25 mg/L). This is not a WAC analyte, but it is the first time this organic compound has been detected in a quarterly WAC sample from Tank 50. (4) The reported detection limit for Norpar 13 is greater than the limit from Table 4 and Attachment 8.2 of the WAC. (5) The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from Table 3 of the WAC. (6) Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples. The values reported in this memo are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the GC/MS; however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50.

  12. RESULTS FOR THE SECOND QUARTER 2011 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Eibling, R.

    2011-08-25

    The Saltstone Facility is designed and permitted to immobilize and dispose of low-level radioactive and hazardous liquid waste (salt solution) remaining from the processing of radioactive material at the Savannah River Site. Low-level waste (LLW) streams from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), H-Canyon, the DDA (Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment) process, and the decontaminated salt solution product from the Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (ARP/MCU) process are stored in Tank 50 until the LLW can be transferred to the Saltstone Facility for treatment and disposal. The LLW must meet the specified waste acceptance criteria (WAC) before it is processed into saltstone. The specific chemical and radionuclide contaminants and their respective WAC limits are listed in the current Saltstone WAC. Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform quarterly analysis on saltstone samples. The concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants are measured to ensure the saltstone produced during each quarter is in compliance with the current WAC. This report documents the concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants for the 2011 Second Quarter samples collected from Tank 50 on April 4, 2011 and discusses those results in further detail than the previously issued results report. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section. (2) The reported detection limit for {sup 59}Ni is above the requested limit from Reference 2 but below the established limit in Reference 3. (3) The reported detection limit for {sup 94}Nb is above the requested limit from Reference 2; however, it is below the established limits in Reference 3. (4) The reported concentration of

  13. Speculations on the formation of cratons and cratonic basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Dan; Priestley, Keith

    2016-02-01

    Surface wave tomography using Rayleigh waves has shown that Tibet and the surrounding mountain ranges that are now being shortened are underlain by thick lithosphere, of similar thickness to that beneath cratons. Both their elevation and lithospheric thickness can result from pure shear shortening of normal thickness continental lithosphere by about a factor of two. The resulting thermal evolution of the crust and lithosphere is dominated by radioactive decay in the crust. It raises the temperature of the lower part of the crust and of the upper part of the lithosphere to above their solidus temperatures, generating granites and small volumes of mafic alkaline rocks from beneath the Moho, as well as generating high temperature metamorphic assemblages in the crust. Thermal models of this process show that it can match the P, T estimates determined from metamorphic xenoliths from Tibet and the Pamirs, and can also match the compositions of the alkaline rocks. The seismological properties of the upper part of the lithosphere beneath northern Tibet suggest that it has already been heated by the blanketing effect and radioactivity of the thick crust on top. If the crustal thickness is reduced by erosion alone to its normal value at low elevations, without any tectonic extension, over a time scale that is short compared to the thermal time constant of thick lithosphere, of ∼250 Ma, thermal subsidence will produce a basin underlain by thick lithosphere. Though this simple model accounts for the relevant observations, there is not yet sufficient information available to be able to model in detail the resulting thermal evolution of the sediments deposited in such cratonic basins.

  14. Lessons for WAC/WID from Language Learning Research: Multicompetence, Register Acquisition, and the College Writing Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Jonathan; Navarro, Nela

    2011-01-01

    This article is a collaboration between WAC/WID and second language acquisition (SLA) specialists. It examines alternate disciplinary notions of the place of writing among other skills and adapts concepts from SLA theory and pedagogy with the goal of providing new interdisciplinary options for WAC/WID research and classroom practice.

  15. WAC at Century's End: Haunted by the Ghost of Fred Newton Scott.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Susan H.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses two danger signs for writing across the curriculum (WAC) program survival, dealing with their cross-curricular structure, and their heavy dependence on just one person for their health and continuation. Outlines two cases from the history of writing instruction at the University of Michigan providing a precautionary tale for both kinds…

  16. Results For The First Quarter 2012 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical And Radionuclide Contaminant Results

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2012-07-16

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2012 First Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this memorandum: The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted; The reported detection limit for {sup 94}Nb is above the requested limit but below the estimated limit; {sup 247}Cm and {sup 249}Cf are above the requested limits. However, they are below the limits established; The reported detection limit for Norpar 13 is greater than the limit from the WAC; The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from WAC; Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples; The values reported in this report are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the instrument, however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50; The low insoluble solids content increases the measurement uncertainty for insoluble species.

  17. RESULTS FOR THE THIRD QUARTER 2011 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.

    2011-10-20

    The Saltstone Facility is designed and permitted to immobilize and dispose of low-level radioactive and hazardous liquid waste (salt solution) remaining from the processing of radioactive material at the Savannah River Site. Low-level waste (LLW) streams from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), H-Canyon, and the decontaminated salt solution product from the Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (ARP/MCU) process are stored in Tank 50 until the LLW can be transferred to the Saltstone Facility for treatment and disposal. The LLW must meet the specified waste acceptance criteria (WAC) before it is processed into saltstone. The specific chemical and radionuclide contaminants and their respective WAC limits are in the current Saltstone WAC. Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform quarterly analysis on saltstone samples. The concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants are measured to ensure the saltstone produced during each quarter is in compliance with the current WAC. This report documents the concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants for the 2011 Third Quarter samples collected from Tank 50 on July 7, 2011 and discusses those results in further detail than the previously issued results report.

  18. RESULTS FOR THE FOURTH QUARTER 2011 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.

    2012-01-31

    The Saltstone Facility is designed and permitted to immobilize and dispose of low-level radioactive and hazardous liquid waste (salt solution) remaining from the processing of radioactive material at the Savannah River Site. Low-level waste (LLW) streams from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), H-Canyon, and the decontaminated salt solution product from the Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (ARP/MCU) process are stored in Tank 50 until the LLW can be transferred to the Saltstone Facility for treatment and disposal. The LLW must meet the specified waste acceptance criteria (WAC) before it is processed into saltstone. The specific chemical and radionuclide contaminants and their respective WAC limits are in the current Saltstone WAC. Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform quarterly analysis on saltstone samples. The concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants are measured to ensure the saltstone produced during each quarter is in compliance with the current WAC. This report documents the concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants for the 2011 Fourth Quarter samples collected from Tank 50 on October 12, 2011 and discusses those results in further detail than the previously issued results report.

  19. Building on Common Ground: Overcoming Resistance to WAC in the Technical College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiser, Michael S.

    Writing-Across-the-Curriculum (WAC) program administrators who wish to work effectively and amicably with faculty in the two-year technical college would do well to remember two principles: (1) work first with the type of writing that already exists in the curriculum; and (2) try to speak a language to the faculty outside the field of composition…

  20. Pairing WAC and Quantitative Reasoning through Portfolio Assessment and Faculty Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutz, Carol; Grawe, Nathan D.

    2009-01-01

    Writing across the curriculum has been a pedagogy associated with faculty development since the earliest days of the movement. Carleton College, an early adopter of WAC pedagogy and faculty development, has, in the last decade, added portfolio assessment to the combination with positive results. Among the unexpected consequences has been a…

  1. RESULTS FOR THE FIRST QUARTER 2009 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.; Diprete, C.; Bibler, N.

    2009-10-06

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2009 First Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The concentrations of the chemical and radioactive contaminants were all less than their respective WAC Targets or Limits except for Am-242m. (2) The radionuclide Am-242m was not detected; however, its detection limit is above the WAC Target given in Attachment 8.4. The higher detection limit was expected based on current analytical capabilities as stated in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP). (3) The reported detection limit of isopropanol was lower than its WAC Limit for accident analysis but higher than its WAC concentration given in Table 4 for vault flammability. The higher detection limit was expected based on current analytical capabilities and is documented in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP). (4) The reported detection limit for Isopar L is lower than its WAC limit for accident analysis in Appendix 8.1 but higher than its WAC concentration given in Table 3 in reference to vault flammability. The higher detection limit was expected based on current analytical capabilities as stated in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP). (5) Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples. The values reported in this memo are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the GC/MS; however, the results may not accurately

  2. RESULTS FOR THE THIRD QUARTER 2010 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.; Bibler, N.

    2010-12-09

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2010 Third Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (i) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section. (ii) The reported detection limits for {sup 94}Nb, {sup 247}Cm and {sup 249}Cf are above the requested limits from Reference 4. However, they are below the limits established in Reference 3. (iii) The reported detection limit for {sup 242m}Am is greater than the requested limit from Attachment 8.4 of the WAC. (iv) The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from Table 3 of the WAC. (v) The reported concentration of Isopropanol is greater than the limit from Table 4 of the WAC. (vi) Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples. The values reported in this memo are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the GC/MS; however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50.

  3. RESULTS FOR THE SECOND QUARTER 2010 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.; Bibler, N.

    2010-08-04

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2010 Second Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC).1 Information from this characterization will be used by Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section. (2) The reported detection limits for {sup 94}Nb and {sup 144}Ce are above both the established and requested limits from References 4 and 6. (3) The reported detection limits for {sup 247}Cm and {sup 249}Cf are above the requested limits from Reference 4. However, they are below the limits established in Reference 6. (4) The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from Table 3 of the WAC. (5) A measurable concentration of Norpar 13 is present in the sample. The reported concentration is greater than the requested limit from Table 4 and Attachment 8.2 of the WAC. (6) Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples. The values reported in this memo are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the GC/MS; however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50. (7) The detection limit for isopropanol has been lowered from 0.5 mg/L to 0.25 mg/L{sup 7}. This revised limit now satisfies the limit in Table 4 of the WAC.

  4. Ambient Noise Imaging of Craton Modification: Examples from the Kaapvaal craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, R. C.; Shirey, S. B.; Fouch, M. J.; James, D. E.

    2013-12-01

    Mapping of crustal and upper-mantle seismic velocities can give important insight into the geologic evolution of cratonic regions. In order to better understand the formation and evolution of the Kaapvaal craton and surrounding regions, we use ambient noise tomography to produce a new crustal and upper-mantle 3D shear-velocity model for southeastern Africa using data collected during the (1995-1999) Kaapvaal Seismic Experiment. Ambient noise tomography enables imaging of shear-velocity variations at smaller scales (10s of km) and shallower depths (< 10 km) than previously determined using natural-source body- and surface-wave techniques within the region. The goal of this work is to image geological features of the Kaapvaal-Zimbabwe craton such as kimberlite pipe density, flood basalt feeder dike systems, granite-greenstone belts, layered mafic intrusions and craton assembly/collision patterns at mid- lower crustal levels where information is typically lacking. Our results provide important constraints on the evolution of the Kaapvaal craton, including the collision with the Zimbabwe craton and the formation of the Bushveld Complex and Witwatersrand basin, and the impact of these events on lithospheric structure. Preliminary images exhibit key first-order features of the craton. At depth ranges of 4-12 km, reduced shear velocities correlate with the Bushveld-Malopo Farms complexes. At a depth interval of 10-18 km, lower velocities are associated with the Witwatersrand sedimentary basin, and higher velocities may be attributed to unroofed mid-crustal rocks of high metamorphic grade formed during the Kaapvaal-Zimbabwe craton collision. At depths of 36-46 km, velocity patterns reflect Moho topography, with thinner crust associated with the undisturbed regions of the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe cratons and thicker crust associated with the Limpopo Belt and Namaqua-Natal Mobile Belt. At greater depths, higher upper-mantle velocities are observed in the southern Kaapvaal

  5. Madagascar: A continental fragment of the paleo-super Dharwar craton of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, P. K.; Pandey, O. P.; Negi, J. G.

    1992-06-01

    The morphological kinship of Madagascar to its immediate neighbors on the west (African continent) and east (Indian subcontinent) during the Early and middle Cretaceous has been debated for the past two decades on the basis of available geologic, tectonic, and paleomagnetic information. Most of the paleoreconstructions of Madagascar have shown its attachment to the east African continent. We present magnetic satelite and gravity data, and morphological, geophysical, and geotectonic similarities to hypothesize that in the period before the breakup of Gondwana, Madagascar was a continental fragment of the paleo-super Dharwar craton of India.

  6. Cratonic lithosphere: an electrifying view (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. G.

    2013-12-01

    Deep-probing electromagnetic studies reveal the vertical and lateral electrical conductivity structure of cratonic lithosphere. At lithospheric temperatures and for silicate mantle minerals, semi-conduction is from small polaron hopping and, in the presence of water, proton conduction, both of which is thermally-driven and can be described by an Arrhenius equation. There is little compositional sensitivity, save for the far higher water contents prevalent in pyroxenes (typically 200-400 wt ppm) compared to olivine (typically 10-100 wt ppm), with the latter exhibiting a depth dependence and the former none. Seismological methods are sensitive to temperature and composition, and virtually insensitive to low amounts of water. Taken together, the two are highly complementary. Seismological and magnetotelluric studies across Southern Africa can be employed together to constraint temperature and water content, where there is a significant difference at 100 km depth between the Kaapvaal Craton compared to the Angola (Congo) Craton compared to the Zimbabwe Craton. The Congo Craton is driest but hottest, the Kaapvaal Craton exhibits laterally-varying water content and is coldest, and the Zimbabwe Craton is the wettest and intermediate in temperature. Such thermal and water content variation results in lateral rheological variation, with the wettest and warmest being more deformable. For the Canadian Shield, there is again significant lateral variation at 100 km, with the Superior Province being mostly dry, and the Slave Craton and Rae/Hearne Provinces being far wetter. By 200 km however, all of the Canadian Shield is dry, consistent with the xenolith-based observations from the Kaapvaal Craton of far higher water contents in olivine at 100 km (50-100 wt ppm) decreasing with depth to around 10 wt ppm at 200 km. The lithosphere beneath the Kimberley area of the Kaapvaal Craton has been forward modeled in a manner that is self-consistent not only with the seismological and

  7. Water in the Cratonic Mantle Lithosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslier, A. H.

    2016-01-01

    The fact that Archean and Proterozoic cratons are underlain by the thickest (>200 km) lithosphere on Earth has always puzzled scientists because the dynamic convection of the surrounding asthenosphere would be expected to delaminate and erode these mantle lithospheric "keels" over time. Although density and temperature of the cratonic lithosphere certainly play a role in its strength and longevity, the role of water has only been recently addressed with data on actual mantle samples. Water in mantle lithologies (primarily peridotites and pyroxenites) is mainly stored in nominally anhydrous minerals (olivine, pyroxene, garnet) where it is incorporated as hydrogen bonded to structural oxygen in lattice defects. The property of hydrolytic weakening of olivine [4] has generated the hypothesis that olivine, the main mineral of the upper mantle, may be dehydrated in cratonic mantle lithospheres, contributing to its strength. This presentation will review the distribution of water concentrations in four cratonic lithospheres. The distribution of water contents in olivine from peridotite xenoliths found in kimberlites is different in each craton (Figure 1). The range of water contents of olivine, pyroxene and garnet at each xenolith location appears linked to local metasomatic events, some of which occurred later then the Archean and Proterozoic when these peridotites initially formed via melting. Although the low olivine water contents (<10 ppm wt H2O) at > 6 GPa at the base of the Kaapvaal cratonic lithosphere may contribute to its strength, and prevent its delamination, the wide range of those from Siberian xenoliths is not compatible with providing a high enough viscosity contrast with the asthenophere. The water content in olivine inclusions from Siberian diamonds, on the other hand, have systematically low water contents (<20 ppm wt H2O). The xenoliths may represent a biased sample of the cratonic lithosphere with an over-­abundance of metasomatized peridotites with

  8. RESULTS FOR THE THIRD QUARTER 2009 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.; Diprete, C.; Bibler, N.

    2009-11-13

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2009 Third Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. Recently, a review of the radionuclide inventory in Saltstone Vaults 1 and 4 identified several additional radionuclides, not currently in the WAC, which require quantification ({sup 40}K, {sup 108m}Ag, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 207}Bi, {sup 227}Ac, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 228}Th, {sup 231}Pa, {sup 247}Cm, {sup 249}Cf, {sup 251}Cf). In addition, several of the radionuclides previously reported with minimum detection limits below the requirements listed in the WAC required analysis with reduced detection limits to support future inventory reporting requirements ({sup 22}Na, {sup 26}Al, {sup 59}Ni, {sup 94}Nb, {sup 106}Ru, {sup 144}Ce, {sup 152}Eu, {sup 155}Eu, {sup 226}Ra). This added scope was formally requested in a revision to the standing Technical Task Request for CY2009 Saltstone support and is further discussed in several supporting documents. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants are less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section. (2) The reported detection limits for {sup 59}Ni, {sup 94}Nb, {sup 247}Cm, and {sup 249}Cf are above the limits requested by LWO; however, they are below the achievable limits established by Analytical Development (AD). (3) The reported detection limit of isopropanol is lower than its WAC Limit for accident analysis in Appendix 8.1, but higher than its WAC concentration given in

  9. RESULTS FOR THE FOURTH QUARTER TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.; Bibler, N.

    2010-01-27

    The Saltstone Facility is designed and permitted to immobilize and dispose of low-level radioactive and hazardous liquid waste (salt solution) remaining from the processing of radioactive material at the Savannah River Site. Low-level waste (LLW) streams from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), H-Canyon, the DDA (Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment) process, and the decontaminated salt solution product from the Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (ARP/MCU) process are stored in Tank 50 until the LLW can be transferred to the Saltstone Facility for treatment and disposal. The LLW must meet the specified waste acceptance criteria (WAC) before it is processed into saltstone. The specific chemical and radionuclide contaminants and their respective WAC limits are listed in the current Saltstone WAC. SRS Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform quarterly analysis on saltstone samples. The concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants are measured to ensure the saltstone produced during each quarter is in compliance with the current WAC. This report documents the concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants for the 2009 Fourth Quarter samples collected from Tank 50 on October 2, 2009 and discusses those results in further detail than the previously issued results report. This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2009 Fourth Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results

  10. RESULTS FOR THE FIRST QUARTER 2012 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.

    2012-06-06

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2012 First Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this memorandum: (1) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section; (2) The reported detection limit for {sup 94}Nb is above the requested limit from Reference 2 but below the estimated limit in Reference 3; (3) {sup 247}Cm and {sup 249}Cf are above the requested limits from Reference 2. however, they are below the limits established in Reference 3; (4) The reported detection limit for Norpar 13 is greater than the limit from Table 4 and Attachment 8.2 of the WAC; (5) The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from Table 3 of the WAC; (6) Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples, the values reported in this report are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the instrument; however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50; and (7) The low insoluble solids content increases the measurement uncertainty for insoluble species.

  11. RESULTS FOR THE FIRST QUARTER 2010 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.; Bibler, N.

    2010-05-05

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2010 First Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section. (2) The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from Table 3 of the WAC. (3) The reported detection limits for {sup 59}Ni and {sup 94}Nb are above the requested limits from Reference 4. However, they are each below the limits established in Reference 6. (4) The reported detection limit for isopropanol is greater than the requested limit from Table 4 of the WAC. (5) The reported detection limits for 247Cm and 249Cf are above the requested limits from Reference 4. However, they are below the limits established in Reference 6. (6) Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples. The values reported in this memo are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the GC/MS; however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50.

  12. The Tachakoucht-Iriri-Tourtit arc complex (Moroccan Anti-Atlas): Neoproterozoic records of polyphased subduction-accretion dynamics during the Pan-African orogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triantafyllou, Antoine; Berger, Julien; Baele, Jean-Marc; Diot, Hervé; Ennih, Nasser; Plissart, Gaëlle; Monnier, Christophe; Watlet, Arnaud; Bruguier, Olivier; Spagna, Paul; Vandycke, Sara

    2016-05-01

    We report new mapping, tectonic, metamorphic and U-Pb zircon dating data on the polyphased Tachakoucht-Iriri and Tourtit arc-related units within the Moroccan Pan-African belt (Sirwa window, Anti-Atlas). The studied area contains four different sub-units, from south to north: (1) the Tachakoucht gneisses intruded to its northern part by (2) Iriri intrusions. To the north, the Tachakoucht-Iriri massif is thrusted by (3) the south-verging 760 Ma Khzama ophiolitic sequence intruded by (4) the Tourtit meta-granitic complex. The Tachakoucht gneiss represents former andesitic to dacitic porphyritic rocks crystallized around 740-720 Ma in an intra-oceanic arc setting (IOAS). Subsequently, it has been buried and metamorphosed to 700 °C, 8 kbar in response to early accretion of the arc onto the West African Craton (WAC). This tectono-metamorphic event also led to the dismembering and stacking of back-arc ophiolite onto the arc unit. Subsequently, the Iriri intrusions, a suite of hydrous mafic dykes (hornblende gabbro and fine-grained basalt) and ultramafic (hornblendite) plutons showing subduction zone affinities, intruded the Tachakoucht gneiss under P-T conditions of 750-800 °C and 2-5 kbar. Emplacement of Iriri intrusions led locally to pronounced partial melting of the Tachakoucht gneiss and to the production of leucogranitic melts. These melts crop out into the Iriri-Tachakoucht gneiss contacts as leucogneissic bands (former leucosomes, dated at 651 ± 5 Ma) but also intruded the Khzama ophiolite to form the Tourtit granite (dated at 651 ± 3 Ma). These ages (651-641 Ma) also constrain the timing of Iriri intrusion emplacement. The entire complex has been overprinted by a second deformation event under greenschist to amphibolite facies conditions marked by transposition of primary structures and a development of mylonitic shear zones. These results and those published on the Bou Azzer window show that two phases of subduction-related magmatism occurred in the Anti

  13. Results For The First Quarter 2013 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical And Radionuclide Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2013-05-14

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2013 First Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: SRR WAC targets or limits were met for all analyzed chemical and radioactive contaminates unless noted in this section; {sup 59}Ni, {sup 94}Nb, {sup 247}Cm, {sup 249}Cf, and {sup 251}Cf are above the requested SRR target concentrations. However, they are below the detection limits established by SRNL; Norpar 13 and Isopar L have higher detection limits compared with the Saltstone WAC. The data provided in this report is based upon the concentrations in the sub-sample, and due to the limited solubility in aqueous solution, may not represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50; and, The low insoluble solids content increases the measurement uncertainty for insoluble species.

  14. Results for the Third Quarter 2013 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical and Radionuclide Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, Christopher J.

    2014-09-30

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2013 Third Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) in effect at that time.1 Information from this characterization will be used by DWPF & Saltstone Facility Engineering (DSFE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: SRR WAC targets or limits were met for all analyzed chemical and radioactive contaminates unless noted in this section. 59Ni, 94Nb, 247Cm, 249Cf, and 251Cf are above the requested SRR target concentrations.2 However, they are below the detection limits established by SRNL.3 Norpar 13 and Isopar L have higher detection limits4 compared with the Saltstone WAC.1 The data provided in this report is based upon the concentrations in the sub-sample, and due to the limited solubility in aqueous solution, may not represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50. Finally, the low insoluble solids content increases the measurement uncertainty for insoluble species.

  15. Results for the Fourth Quarter 2012 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical and Radionuclide Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, Christopher J.

    2014-09-30

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2012 Fourth Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC).1 Information from this characterization will be used by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: The concentration of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC Limits and Targets, unless noted in this section. Norpar 13 and Isopar L have higher detection limits5 compared with the Saltstone WAC1. The data provided in this report is based upon the concentrations in the sub-sample, and due to the limited solubility in aqueous solution, may not represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50. Diisooctyl adipate (or diisooctyl hexanedioate) was measured at 1.30E+00 mg/L in one of two replicate measurements conducted on an at-depth sample.a The organic analysis of the at-depth sample was conducted at the request of SRR.4 This analyte was below the detection limit in the surface sample. The low insoluble solids content increases the measurement uncertainty for insoluble species.

  16. RESULTS FOR THE FIRST QUARTER 2011 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.

    2011-06-15

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2011 First Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section; (2) The reported detection limit for {sup 59}Ni is above both the requested limits from Reference 2 and the established limits in Reference 3; (3) The reported detection limit for {sup 94}Nb is above the requested limit from Reference 2; however, it is below the established limits in Reference 3. This is a change from previously reported results; (4) The reported concentration of {sup 242m}Am is above the target in Listed in Attachment 8.4 of the Saltstone WAC. This is a change from the previously reported results; (5) {sup 247}Cm and {sup 249}Cf are above the requested limits from Reference 2. However, they are below the limits established in Reference 3; (6) The reported detection limit for Norpar 13 is greater than the limit from Table 4 and Attachment 8.2 of the WAC; (7) The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from Table 3 of the WAC; and (8) Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples. The values reported in this memo are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the instrument; however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank

  17. Stalled Orogen Linked to East Antarctic Craton Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martos, Y. M.; Ferraccioli, F.; Finn, C.; Bell, R. E.; Jordan, T. A.; Damaske, D.

    2015-12-01

    The interior of East Antarctica is often regarded as a coherent Archean craton surrounded by Paleo to Neoproterozoic orogenic belts. Here we use recent aerogeophysical, satellite magnetic, satellite gravity and passive seismic results in central East Antarctica to challenge this view. Firstly, anomalously thick crust (compared to most other cratons) has been imaged in East Antarctica by both passive seismic and gravity modelling with values up to 60 km (Ferraccioli et al., 2011, Nature; An et al., 2015, JGR). The thick crust underlies both the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains and an elevated region between Lake Vostok and Dronning Maud Land, referred to as the East Antarctic Mountain Ranges plateau (An et al., 2015). Second, satellite magnetic data reveal that the Gamburtev Province lies in between the Ruker/Princess Elizabeth Land, Vostok, Nimrod/South Pole and Recovery provinces. The Nimrod/ South Pole province is a Paleo to Meso Proterozoic igneous province formed along the edges of the Archean/Paleoproterozoic Mawson continent (e.g. Goodge and Fanning, 2010 JGR). Our aerogeophysical and sediment provenance data interpretations suggest that the Gamburtsev Province represents a distinct Grenvillian-age orogenic belt. A stalled orogen with thick crust (i.e. an orogen where widespread orogenic collapse and root delamination has not occurred)- is preserved in the interior of East Antarctica resembling e.g. the Paleoproterozoic Trans Hudson Orogen and segments of Grenvillian orogens in Laurentia. The stalled orogen may relate to widespread accretionary and collisional events within Rodinia. However, passive seismic interpretations (An et al., 2015) favour linking crustal thickening to the Pan-African age assembly of Greater India, East Antarctica and Australia within Gondwana (e.g. Aitken et al., 2014 GRL). Further aerogeophysical observations over Princess Elizabeth Land are timely to enable more robust correlations with geological observations and to help dating the

  18. Lithospheric growth at margins of cratons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, D. B.

    2002-09-01

    Deep seismic reflection profiles collected across Proterozoic-Archean margins are now sufficiently numerous to formulate a consistent hypothesis of how continental nuclei grow laterally to form cratonic shields. This picture is made possible both because the length of these regional profiles spans all the tectonic elements of an orogen on a particular cratonic margin and because of their great depth range. Key transects studied include the LITHOPROBE SNORCLE 1 transect and the BABEL survey, crossing the Slave and Baltic craton margins, respectively. In most cases, the older (Archean) block appears to form a wedge of uppermost mantle rock embedded into the more juvenile (Proterozoic) block by as much as 100-200 km at uppermost mantle depths and Archean lithosphere is therefore more laterally extensive at depth than at the surface. Particularly bright reflections along the Moho are cited as evidence of shear strain within a weak, low-viscosity lower crustal channel that lies along the irregular top of the indenting wedge. The bottom of the wedge is an underthrust/subduction zone, and associated late reversal in subduction polarity beneath the craton margin emerges as a common characteristic of these margins although related arc magmatism may be minor.

  19. Cyclic Cratonic Carbonates and Phanerozoic Calcite Seas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Bruce H.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses causes of cyclicity in cratonic carbonate sequences and evidence for and potential significance of postulated primary calcite sediment components in past Paleozoic seas, outlining problems, focusing on models explaining existing data, and identifying background. Future sedimentary geologists will need to address these and related areas…

  20. Phanerozoic surface history of the Slave craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, Alexis K.; Flowers, Rebecca M.; Bowring, Samuel A.

    2013-09-01

    apatite (U-Th)/He (AHe) thermochronometry data and key geologic constraints from Slave craton kimberlites are used to develop a model for the Phanerozoic burial, unroofing, and hypsometric history of the northwestern Canadian shield. AHe dates range from 210 ± 13 to 382 ± 79 Ma, are older in the eastern Slave craton and decrease westward, and resolve the spatial extent, thickness, and history of now-denuded sedimentary units. Results indicate Paleozoic heating to temperatures ≥85-90°C, suggesting regional burial beneath ≥2.8 km of strata while the region was at sea level, followed by the westward migration of unroofing across the craton. This Paleozoic-Mesozoic history does not correlate with sea level change, instead requiring Paleozoic subsidence of the craton followed by surface uplift. The AHe data restrict Cretaceous burial to ≤1.6 km, followed by unroofing, Eocene terrestrial sediment deposition, and removal of Phanerozoic sedimentary cover across the region by present day. The craton underwent ≥300 m of post-100 Ma elevation gain, based on ~100 Ma marine sedimentary xenoliths entrained in ~75-45 Ma kimberlites at modern elevations of 550-600 m. The transition from Paleozoic-Mesozoic subsidence to surface uplift may signal a change from predominantly northern (Franklinian-Innuitian) to western (Canadian Cordillera) plate boundary controls on continental interior processes, with the latter driving the east-to-west wave of unroofing. Canadian Cordillera evolution also affected the Cretaceous-early Tertiary history. Dynamic topography due to changing mantle flow regimes and proximity to sediment sources influenced the Phanerozoic surface evolution of the northwestern Canadian shield.

  1. The Río de la Plata craton and the assembly of SW Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapela, C. W.; Pankhurst, R. J.; Casquet, C.; Fanning, C. M.; Baldo, E. G.; González-Casado, J. M.; Galindo, C.; Dahlquist, J.

    2007-07-01

    origin within Gondwana-forming blocks, for which the closest identifiable sources are 'Brazilian' and 'African' (Namaqua-Natal). Consequently, the preferred model for the Pampean orogeny is that the Río de la Plata craton reached its present position by large-scale dextral strike-slip movement against fore-arc sedimentary sequences that had developed on the southern and western margins of the Kalahari craton during the Early Cambrian. In the final stage the displaced sedimentary sequences outboard of the RPC collided with the Mesoproterozoic Western Sierras Pampeanas terrane, which was at the time attached to the large Amazonia craton and other smaller continental blocks, such as Arequipa-Antofalla and Río Apa. Protracted relative displacement of the RPC after the Pampean Orogeny led to its final position.

  2. Results For The Fourth Quarter 2012 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical And Radionuclide Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2013-02-05

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2012 Fourth Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC).Information from this characterization will be used by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: The concentration of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC Limits and Targets, unless noted in this section; Norpar 13 and Isopar L have higher detection limits compared with the Saltstone WAC. The data provided in this report is based upon the concentrations in the sub-sample, and due to the limited solubility in aqueous solution, may not represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50; Diisooctyl adipate (or diisooctyl hexanedioate) and 5-methyl-3-hexanol, plasticizers, were measured at 1.30E+00 mg/L and 3.00E+00 mg/L, respectively, in one of two replicate measurements conducted on an at-depth sample. The organic analysis of the at-depth sample was conducted at the request of SRR. These analytes were below the detection limits for the surface sample; and, The low insoluble solids content increases the measurement uncertainty for insoluble species.

  3. RESULTS FOR THE FOURTH QUARTER 2013 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.

    2014-04-01

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2013 Fourth Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) in effect at that time. Information from this characterization will be used by DWPF & Saltstone Facility Engineering (DSFE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: SRR WAC targets or limits were met for all analyzed chemical and radioactive contaminants unless noted in this section. {sup 59}Ni, {sup 94}Nb, {sup 247}Cm, {sup 249}Cf, and {sup 251}Cf are above the requested SRR target concentrations. However, they are below the detection limits established by SRNL. Norpar 13 and Isopar L have higher detection limits compared with the Saltstone WAC. The data provided in this report is based upon the concentrations in the sub-sample, and due to the limited solubility of these materials in aqueous solution, may not represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50. The low insoluble solids content increases the measurement uncertainty for insoluble species. The semivolatile organic analysis (SVOA) method employed in the measurement of Norpar 13 and tributyl phosphate (TBP) has resulted in the erroneous reporting of a variety of small chain alcohols, including 4-methyl-3-hexanol and 5-methyl-3-hexanol, in previous quarterly sample reports. It has now been determined that these alcohols are an artifact of the sample preparation. Further work is being conducted in SRNL to delineate the conditions that produce these alcohols, and these findings will be reported separately.

  4. Results For The Second Quarter 2013 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical And Radionuclide Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, Christopher J.

    2013-07-31

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2013 Second Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) in effect at that time. Information from this characterization will be used by Saltstone Facility Engineering (SFE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System.

  5. Results For The Third Quarter 2013 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, Christopher J.

    2013-11-26

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2013 Third Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) in effect at that time. Information from this characterization will be used by DWPF & Saltstone Facility Engineering (DSFE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System.

  6. Results For The Fourth Quarter 2014 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical And Radionuclide Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.

    2015-09-30

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the Calendar Year (CY) 2014 Fourth Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) in effect at that time. Information from this characterization will be used by DWPF & Saltstone Facility Engineering (DSFE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System.

  7. Results for the Third Quarter 2012 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical and Radionuclide Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2012-10-26

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2012 Third Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System.

  8. Results for the second quarter 2014 tank 50 WAC slurry sample chemical and radionuclide contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.

    2014-09-04

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2014 Second Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) in effect at that time. Information from this characterization will be used by DWPF & Saltstone Facility Engineering (DSFE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System.

  9. Results for the Third Quarter 2014 Tank 50 WAC slurry sample: Chemical and radionuclide contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Charles L.

    2015-01-08

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2014 Third Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) in effect at that time.1 Information from this characterization will be used by DWPF & Saltstone Facility Engineering (DSFE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System.

  10. Lithospheric layering in the North American craton.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Huaiyu; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2010-08-26

    How cratons-extremely stable continental areas of the Earth's crust-formed and remained largely unchanged for more than 2,500 million years is much debated. Recent studies of seismic-wave receiver function data have detected a structural boundary under continental cratons at depths too shallow to be consistent with the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, as inferred from seismic tomography and other geophysical studies. Here we show that changes in the direction of azimuthal anisotropy with depth reveal the presence of two distinct lithospheric layers throughout the stable part of the North American continent. The top layer is thick ( approximately 150 km) under the Archaean core and tapers out on the surrounding Palaeozoic borders. Its thickness variations follow those of a highly depleted layer inferred from thermo-barometric analysis of xenoliths. The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary is relatively flat (ranging from 180 to 240 km in depth), in agreement with the presence of a thermal conductive root that subsequently formed around the depleted chemical layer. Our findings tie together seismological, geochemical and geodynamical studies of the cratonic lithosphere in North America. They also suggest that the horizon detected in receiver function studies probably corresponds to the sharp mid-lithospheric boundary rather than to the more gradual lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary.

  11. Cratonization: a thermal and petrological perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, H.N.

    1985-01-01

    The long term thermal and tectonic history of the continental lithosphere derives from the processes that lead to crationization. Cratons are characterized by mechanical stability, buoyancy and freeboard, a paucity of magmatism, and deep roots. The process is not slow and gradual, extending over aeons, but rather is relatively rapid, being accomplished in a period on the order of 300-500 Ma; cratonic nuclei existed by the end of the Archean. The essential process is devolatilization of the upper mantle, in associations with major orogenic events, to a depth of about 300 km. Devolatilization has the following effects: 1) it elevates the solidus of the affected lithosphere, making it less vulnerable to subsequent melting, 2) it augments the mechanical strength and stiffness of the region by increasing the activation energy, thereby 3) enhancing the structural stability of the lithosphere, thickening it, and extending to greater depths the region in which conduction is the principal mode of heat transfer, thereby 4) maintaining freeboard by the thermal expansion of the extended lithosphere because of the higher temperatures of the conductive thermal regime, and 5) enhancement of buoyancy by thermal expansion and petrological differentiation. The process of cratonization can be reversed by reintroduction of volatiles for the deeper mantle, or by raising the temperature sufficiently to reach the volatile-free refractory solidus. Mantle metasomatic processes probably promote destabilization by recharging the thick need lithosphere with both volatiles and heat producing isotopes.

  12. Cold cratonic roots and thermal blankets: How continents affect mantle convection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trubitsyn, V.P.; Mooney, W.D.; Abbott, D.H.

    2003-01-01

    Two-dimensional convection models with moving continents show that continents profoundly affect the pattern of mantle convection. If the continents are wider than the wavelength of the convection cells (???3000 km, the thickness of the mantle), they cause neighboring deep mantle thermal upwellings to coalesce into a single focused upwelling. This focused upwelling zone will have a potential temperature anomaly of about 200??C, much higher than the 100??C temperature anomaly of upwelling zones generated beneath typical oceanic lithosphere. Extensive high-temperature melts (including flood basalts and late potassic granites) will be produced, and the excess temperature anomaly will induce continental uplift (as revealed in sea level changes) and the eventual breakup of the supercontinent. The mantle thermal anomaly will persist for several hundred million years after such a breakup. In contrast, small continental blocks (<1000 km diameter) do not induce focused mantle upwelling zones. Instead, small continental blocks are dragged to mantle downwelling zones, where they spend most of their time, and will migrate laterally with the downwelling. As a result of sitting over relatively cold mantle (downwellings), small continental blocks are favored to keep their cratonic roots. This may explain the long-term survival of small cratonic blocks (e.g., the Yilgarn and Pilbara cratons of western Australia, and the West African craton). The optimum size for long-term stability of a continental block is <3000 km. These results show that continents profoundly affect the pattern of mantle convection. These effects are illustrated in terms of the timing and history of supercontinent breakup, the production of high-temperature melts, and sea level changes. Such two-dimensional calculations can be further refined and tested by three-dimensional numerical simulations of mantle convection with moving continental and oceanic plates.

  13. Lower Crustal Seismicity, Volatiles, and Evolving Strain Fields During the Initial Stages of Cratonic Rifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, C.; Muirhead, J.; Ebinger, C. J.; Tiberi, C.; Roecker, S. W.; Ferdinand-Wambura, R.; Kianji, G.; Mulibo, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    The volcanically active East African rift system in southern Kenya and northern Tanzania transects thick cratonic lithosphere, and comprises several basins characterized by deep crustal seismicity. The US-French-Tanzania-Kenya CRAFTI project aims to understand the role of magma and volatile movement during the initiation and evolution of rifting in cratonic lithosphere. Our 38-station broadband network spans all or parts of fault-bounded rift segments, enabling comparison of lithospheric structure, fault kinematics, and seismogenic layer thickness with age and proximity to the deeply rooted Archaen craton. Seismicity levels are high in all basins, but we find profound differences in seismogenic layer thickness along the length of the rift. Seismicity in the Manyara basin occurs almost exclusively within the lower crust, and in spatial clusters that have been active since 1990. In contrast, seismicity in the ~ 5 My older Magadi basin is localized in the upper crust, and the long border fault bounding the west side of the basin is seismically inactive. Between these two basins lies the Natron rift segment, which shows seismicity between ~ 20 and ~2 km depth, and high concentrations at Oldoinyo Lengai and Gelai volcanoes. Older volcanoes on the uplifted western flank (e.g., Ngorongoro) experience swarms of activity, suggesting that active magmatism and degassing are widespread. Focal mechanisms of the frequent earthquakes recorded across the array are spatially variable, and indicate a stress field strongly influenced by (1) Holocene volcanoes, (2) mechanical interactions between adjacent rift basins, and (3) a far-field ESE-WNW extensional stress regime. We explore the spatial correlation between zones of intense degassing along fault systems and seismicity, and examine the influence of high gas pressures on lower and upper crustal seismicity in this youthful cratonic rift zone.

  14. Structural framework across the Bastar craton - the Eastern Ghats Granulite Belt interface: Implications for making of eastern Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patole, Vishal; Nasipuri, Pritam

    2015-04-01

    existence of a single landmass since the time of Grenvillian orogeny (1000 Ma) and it is suggested that the same configuration was preserved up to the formation of East Gondwana. The EGGB orogenic belt is considered as intercontinental high grade domain with no evidence for the closing of Mesoproterozoic oceans and the younger Pan-African metamorphic events are the results of intercontinental reactivation of old crustal weakness during the Gondwana assembly in the late Neoproterozoic-Paleozoic. However, recent palaeomagnetic data from India and Australia indicate that India was at much higher palaeolatitude compared to the Australia-Antarctica block, and the accretion of Eastern Ghats Granulite Belt over Bastar craton should have occurred during the Pan-African orogeny. The presence of NNW-SSW trending melt bands and the increase in the intensity of melting and tightness of folding near the contact indicate that Eastern Ghats Granulite belt collided with the Bastar craton during the Paleozoic.

  15. Tracing origins of cratonic eclogites by magnesium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Teng, F. Z.; Rudnick, R. L.; Li, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Cratonic eclogites are samples of lithospheric mantle preserved beneath ancient continental cratons. Hence, the origin of cratonic eclogites is closely related to the formation and evolution of cratonic mantle. Here we report Mg isotopic compositions for 27 cratonic eclogites and 52 garnet and clinopyroxene mineral separates from Koidu, Bellsbank and Kaalvallei kimberlite pipes in South and West Africa. Whole-rock Mg isotopic compositions vary widely, with δ26Mg ranging from -1.60 to +0.17, significantly different from the value (δ26Mg = -0.25 ± 0.07) of peridotite xenoliths. Garnet and clinopyroxene in these cratonic eclogites record equilibrium inter-mineral Mg isotope partitioning at mantle temperatures, with Δ26MgCpx-Grt (= δ26MgCpx - δ26MgGrt) in the range of 0.43 - 0.85 ‰. The constructed bulk δ26Mg values based on mineral compositions are identical to the measured whole-rock values, indicating limited influence of kimberlite infiltration on Mg isotopic compositions of cratonic eclogites. As significant Mg isotope fractionation can only occur during low-temperature surface processes, the large Mg isotopic variations of cratonic eclogites suggest the incorporation of subducted materials in their protoliths. Therefore, our Mg isotopic data suggest the cratonic eclogites are the remnants of subducted oceanic crust within the lithospheric mantle. Collectively, Mg isotopes are potentially excellent tracers of the formation and evolution of sub-continental lithospheric mantle.

  16. WAC regulates mTOR activity by acting as an adaptor for the TTT and Pontin/Reptin complexes

    PubMed Central

    David-Morrison, Gabriela; Xu, Zhen; Rui, Yan-Ning; Charng, Wu-Lin; Jaiswal, Manish; Yamamoto, Shinya; Xiong, Bo; Zhang, Ke; Sandoval, Hector; Duraine, Lita; Zuo, Zhongyuan; Zhang, Sheng; Bellen, Hugo J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The ability to sense energy status is crucial in the regulation of metabolism via the mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1). The assembly of the TTT-Pontin/Reptin complex is responsive to changes in energy status. In energy sufficient conditions, the TTT-Pontin/Reptin complex promotes mTORC1 dimerization and mTORC1-Rag interaction, which are critical for mTORC1 activation. We show that WAC is a regulator of energy-mediated mTORC1 activity. In a Drosophila screen designed to isolate mutations that cause neuronal dysfunction, we identified wacky, the homolog of WAC. Loss of Wacky leads to neurodegeneration, defective mTOR activity and increased autophagy. Wacky and WAC have conserved physical interactions with mTOR and its regulators, including Pontin and Reptin which bind to the TTT complex to regulate energy-dependent activation of mTORC1. WAC promotes the interaction between TTT and Pontin/Reptin in an energy-dependent manner, thereby promoting mTORC1 activity by facilitating mTORC1 dimerization and mTORC1-Rag interaction. PMID:26812014

  17. "A Way to Talk about the Institution as Opposed to Just My Field": WAC Fellowships and Graduate Student Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cripps, Michael J.; Hall, Jonathan; Robinson, Heather M.

    2016-01-01

    The teaching assistantship is a venerable model for funding graduate studies, staffing undergraduate courses, and providing pedagogical support for emerging college and university instructors. In this article, we present a variation of this model of graduate student support: the WAC Fellowship at the City University of New York. Using survey data…

  18. RESULTS FOR THE THIRD QUARTER 2007 TANK 50H WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Zeigler, K; Ned Bibler, N

    2008-07-11

    The Saltstone Facility is designed and permitted to immobilize and dispose of low-level radioactive and hazardous liquid waste (salt solution) remaining from the processing of radioactive material at the Savannah River Site. Low activity wastewater streams from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), H-Canyon, and the high level waste (HLW) storage tanks, are stored as a mixture in Tank 50H until it can be pumped to the Saltstone Facility for treatment and disposal. Specific waste acceptance criteria (WAC) must be met for the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50H to the Saltstone Facility. Low level waste which meets the WAC can be transferred, stored and treated in the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) for subsequent disposal as saltstone in the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested through a Technical Task Request (TTR) that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measure the concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants listed in the currently approved Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). A Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan and Analytical Study Plan has been written for this request. WAC determinations are needed on a quarterly basis for chemical contaminants and every first and third quarter for radioactive contaminants. This memorandum presents the results for the chemical and radionuclide contaminants in the third quarter, from the samples taken from Tank 50 in September, 2007.

  19. Geology of interior cratonic sag basins

    SciTech Connect

    Leighton, M.W.; Eidel, J.J.; Kolata, D.R.; Oltz, D.F. )

    1990-05-01

    Interior cratonic sag basins are thick accumulations of sediment, generally more or less oval in shape, located entirely in the interiors of continental masses. Some are single-cycle basins and others are characterized by repeated sag cycles or are complex polyhistory basins. Many appear to have developed over ancient rift systems. Interior cratonic sag basins are typified by a dominance of flexural over fault-controlled subsidence, and a low ratio of sediment volume to surface area of the basin. The Baltic, Carpentaria, Illinois, Michigan, Parana, Paris, and Williston basins are examples of interior cratonic sag basins. Tectonics played a dominant role in controlling the shapes and the geometries of the juxtaposed packets of sedimentary sequences. While the mechanics of tectonic control are not clear, evidence suggests that the movements are apparently related to convergence of lithospheric plates and collision and breakup of continents. Whatever the cause, tectonic movements controlled the freeboard of continents, altering base level and initiating new tectono-sedimentologic regimes. Sag basins situated in low latitudes during their development commonly were sites of thick carbonates (e.g., Illinois, Michigan, Williston, and Paris basins). In contrast, siliciclastic sedimentation characterized basins that formed in higher latitudes (e.g., Parana and Carpentaria basins). Highly productive sag basins are characterized by widespread, mature, organic-rich source rocks, large structures, and good seals. Nonproductive basins have one or more of the following characteristics: immature source rocks, leaky plumbing, freshwater flushing, and/or complex geology due to numerous intrusions that inhibit mapping of plays.

  20. Photometric parameter maps of the Moon derived from LROC WAC images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, H.; Robinson, M. S.; Hapke, B. W.; Denevi, B. W.; Boyd, A. K.

    2013-12-01

    Spatially resolved photometric parameter maps were computed from 21 months of Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Wide Angle Camera (WAC) images. Due to a 60° field-of-view (FOV), the WAC achieves nearly global coverage of the Moon each month with more than 50% overlap from orbit-to-orbit. From the repeat observations at various viewing and illumination geometries, we calculated Hapke bidirectional reflectance model parameters [1] for 1°x1° "tiles" from 70°N to 70°S and 0°E to 360°E. About 66,000 WAC images acquired from February 2010 to October 2011 were converted from DN to radiance factor (I/F) though radiometric calibration, partitioned into gridded tiles, and stacked in a time series (tile-by-tile method [2]). Lighting geometries (phase, incidence, emission) were computed using the WAC digital terrain model (100 m/pixel) [3]. The Hapke parameters were obtained by model fitting against I/F within each tile. Among the 9 parameters of the Hapke model, we calculated 3 free parameters (w, b, and hs) by setting constant values for 4 parameters (Bco=0, hc=1, θ, φ=0) and interpolating 2 parameters (c, Bso). In this simplification, we ignored the Coherent Backscatter Opposition Effect (CBOE) to avoid competing CBOE and Shadow Hiding Opposition Effect (SHOE). We also assumed that surface regolith porosity is uniform across the Moon. The roughness parameter (θ) was set to an averaged value from the equator (× 3°N). The Henyey-Greenstein double lobe function (H-G2) parameter (c) was given by the 'hockey stick' relation [4] (negative correlation) between b and c based on laboratory measurements. The amplitude of SHOE (Bso) was given by the correlation between w and Bso at the equator (× 3°N). Single scattering albedo (w) is strongly correlated to the photometrically normalized I/F, as expected. The c shows an inverse trend relative to b due to the 'hockey stick' relation. The parameter c is typically low for the maria (0.08×0.06) relative to the

  1. Baffling system for the Wide Angle Camera (WAC) of ROSETTA mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunello, Pierfrancesco; Peron, Fabio; Barbieri, Cesare; Fornasier, Sonia

    2000-10-01

    After the experience of GIOTTO fly-by to comet Halley in 1986, the European Space Agency planned to improve the scientific knowledge of these astronomical objects by means of an even more ambitious rendezvous mission with another comet (P/Wirtanen). This mission, named ROSETTA, will go on from 2003 to 2013, ending after the comet perihelion phase and including also the fly-by with two asteroids of the main belt (140 Siwa and 4979 Otawara). Scientific priority of the mission is the in situ investigation of the cometary nucleus, with the aim of better understanding the formation and the composition of planetesimals and their evolution over the last 4.5 billions of years. In this context, the Authors were involved in the design of the baffling for the Wide Angle Camera (WAC) of the imaging system (OSIRIS) carried on board of the spacecraft. Scientific requirements for the WAC are : a large field of view (FOV) of 12 degree(s) x 12 degree(s) with a resolution of 100 (mu) rad per pixel, UV response, and a contrast ratio of 10-4 in order to detect gaseous and dusty features close to the nucleus of the comet. TO achieve these performances, a fairly novel class of optical solutions employing off-axis sections of concentric mirrors was explored. Regarding baffling, the peculiar demand was the rejection of stray-light generated by the optics for sources within the FOV, since the optical entrance aperture is located at the level of the secondary mirror (instead of the primary as usual). This paper describes the baffle design and analyzes its performances, calculated by numerical simulation with ray tracing methods, at different angles of incidence of the light, for sources both outside and inside the field of view.

  2. The Building of the Archean Superior Craton: Thermal Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaupart, C. P.; Mareschal, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    The building of a craton involves the extraction of continental crust from the Earth's mantle and the lateral accretion of juvenile volcanic terranes. Ascertaining which conditions allow a newborn continental assemblage to survive requires information on its mechanical strength, which depends on the amount and vertical distribution of radioactive elements in the crust. There is thus a connection between crust formation mechanisms and a successful amalgamation process. To address outstanding questions concerning Archean cratons, the Superior province in Canada is the perfect region because it contains a well preserved geological record of accretion that provides compelling evidence for plate tectonic processes at 2.7 Ga. At almost the same time, the rate of continental growth decreased significantly, which may result from either slower crust formation or enhanced destruction through erosion and subduction. These issues are linked to the strength of the newborn continent. The extensive heat flow data set now available in the Superior Province reveals a clear demarcation between a chemically depleted and differentiated craton core and weakly differentiated enriched juvenile accreted terranes. The Superior craton was thus made of a strong core surrounded by weak terranes. This dichotomy implies that the accretion process could not involve complex imbrication of the accreted belts into the craton core. Subsequently, the craton may have been protected from convective disruption or delamination by its weak margins. Differences between the craton core and accreted terranes may be due to different crustal extraction processes, such as melting in a mantle plume or magmatism in a subduction zone. If subduction started at about 3 Ga, as advocated by several authors, the assembly and survival of large cratons may well be a consequence of this key shift in mantle activity. Alternatively, the chemical depletion of the craton core may be due to a prolonged history of internal

  3. Redox preconditioning deep cratonic lithosphere for kimberlite genesis - evidence from the central Slave Craton.

    PubMed

    Yaxley, G M; Berry, A J; Rosenthal, A; Woodland, A B; Paterson, D

    2017-12-01

    We present the first oxygen fugacity (fO2) profile through the cratonic lithospheric mantle under the Panda kimberlite (Ekati Diamond Mine) in the Lac de Gras kimberlite field, central Slave Craton, northern Canada. Combining this data with new and existing data from garnet peridotite xenoliths from an almost coeval kimberlite (A154-N) at the nearby Diavik Diamond Mine demonstrates that the oxygen fugacity of the Slave cratonic mantle varies by several orders of magnitude as a function of depth and over short lateral distances. The lower part of the diamond-bearing Slave lithosphere (>120-130 km deep) has been oxidized by up to 4 log units in fO2, and this is clearly linked to metasomatic enrichment. Such coupled enrichment and oxidation was likely caused by infiltrating carbonate-bearing, hydrous, silicate melts in the presence of diamond, a process proposed to be critical for "pre-conditioning" deep lithospheric mantle and rendering it suitable for later generation of kimberlites and other SiO2-undersaturated magmas.

  4. Lunar textural analysis based on WAC-derived kilometer-scale roughness and entropy maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Wang, XueQiang; Zhang, Jiang; Chen, Jian; Ling, Zongcheng

    2016-06-01

    In general, textures are thought to be some complicated repeated patterns formed by elements, or primitives which are sorted in certain rules. Lunar surfaces record the interactions between its outside environment and itself, thus, based on high-resolution DEM model or image data, there are some topographic features which have different roughness and entropy values or signatures on lunar surfaces. Textures of lunar surfaces can help us to concentrate on typical topographic and photometric variations and reveal the relationships between obvious features (craters, impact basins, sinuous rilles (SRs) and ridges) with resurfacing processes on the Moon. In this paper, the term surface roughness is an expression of the variability of a topographic or photometric surface at kilometer scale, and the term entropy can characterize the variability inherent in a geological and topographic unit and evaluate the uncertainty of predictions made by a given geological process. We use the statistical moments of gray-level histograms in different-sized neighborhoods (e.g., 3, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 pixels) to compute the kilometer-scale roughness and entropy values, using the mosaic image from 70°N to 70°S obtained by Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Wide Angle Camera (WAC). Large roughness and entropy signatures were only found in the larger scale maps, while the smallest 3-pixel scale map had more disorderly and unsystematic textures. According to the entropy values in 10-pixel scale entropy map, we made a frequency curve and categorized lunar surfaces into three types, shadow effects, maria and highlands. A 2D scatter plot of entropy versus roughness values was produced and we found that there were two point clusters corresponding to the highlands and maria, respectively. In the last, we compared the topographic and photometric signatures derived from Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) data and WAC mosaic image. On the lunar surfaces, the ridges have obvious multilevel

  5. Origin of cratonic lithospheric mantle roots: A geochemical study of peridotites from the North Atlantic Craton, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittig, N.; Pearson, D. G.; Webb, M.; Ottley, C. J.; Irvine, G. J.; Kopylova, M.; Jensen, S. M.; Nowell, G. M.

    2008-09-01

    A critical examination of the extent to which geodynamic information on the initial mantle depletion and accretion event(s) is preserved in kimberlite-borne cratonic SCLM peridotite xenoliths is attempted by using new major and trace element data of whole-rock peridotites ( n = 55) sampled across the North Atlantic Craton (NAC; West Greenland). We also present additional whole-rock trace element data of mantle xenoliths from Somerset Island, the Slave and Kaapvaal cratons for comparison. Peridotites comprising the West Greenland SCLM are distinctly more olivine-rich and orthopyroxene-poor than most other cratonic peridotites, in particular those from the Kaapvaal craton. The West Greenland peridotites have higher Mg/Si but lower Al/Si, Al 2O 3 and CaO than cratonic mantle from the Kaapvaal Craton. We suggest that the more orthopyroxene depleted, harzburgite to dunite character of the NAC peridotites reflects more of the original melting history than peridotites from other cratons and in that sense may be more typical of cratonic lithosphere compositions prior to extensive modification. Despite this, some modal and cryptic metasomatism has clearly taken place in the West Greenland lithosphere. The insensitivity of major elements to pressure of melting at high degrees of melt extraction combined with the ease with which these elements may be changed by modal metasomatism mean that we cannot confidently constrain the depth of melting of peridotites using this approach. Mildly incompatible trace elements offer much more promise in terms of providing geodynamic information about the original Archean melting regime. The very low, systematically varying heavy REE abundances in NAC whole-rock peridotites and in peridotites from all other cratons where high-quality data are available provide ubiquitous evidence for a shallow melting regime in the absence of, or to the exhaustion of garnet. This finding explicitly excludes large extents of deep (iso- and polybaric) melting

  6. Late Precambrian aulacogens of the North China craton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qian, X.

    1985-01-01

    According to tectonic styles, the Precambrian evolution history of the North China craton may be subdivided into four stages: (1) Archean consolidation in 3.5 to 2.5 Ga, (2) Early Proterozoic rifting in 2.5 to 1.8 Ga, (3) Late Precambrian aulacogen in 1.8 to 0.8 Ga and (4) Platform regime after 0.8 Ga. In the Late Precambrian aulacogen stage of the North China craton there were two main aulacogens, Yanliao and Zhongtiao (Y and Z), developed in Middle Proterozoic time with an age 1.8 to 1.0 Ga. Their NE trend caused them to meet together in the central part of the craton and build up one great Y-Z aulacogen throughout the craton.

  7. Construction and destruction of some North American cratons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, D. B.; Humphreys, G.

    2015-12-01

    Construction histories of Archean cratons remain poorly understood; their destruction is even less clear because of, by definition, its rarity. By assembling geophysical and geochemical data in 3-D lithosphere models, a clearer understanding of the geometry of major structures within the Rae, Slave and Wyoming cratons of central North America is now possible. Little evidence exists of subducted slabs similar to modern oceanic lithosphere in these construction histories whereas underthrusting and wedging of proto-continental lithosphere is inferred from multiple dipping discontinuities. Archean continental building blocks may resemble the modern lithosphere of Ontong-Java-Hikurangi oceanic plateau. Radiometric dating of xenoliths provides estimates of rock types and ages at depth beneath sparse kimberlite occurrences. These ages can be correlated to surface rocks. The 3.6-2.6 Ga Rae, Slave and Wyoming cratons comprise smaller continental terranes that 'cratonized' during a granitic bloom at 2.61-2.55 ga. Cratonization probably represents the final differentiation of early crust into a relatively homogeneous, uniformly thin (35-42 km), tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite crust with pyroxenite layers near the Moho atop depleted lithospheric mantle. Peak thermo-tectonic events at 1.86-1.7 Ga broadly metasomatized, mineralized and recrystallized mantle and lower crustal rocks, apparently making mantle peridotite more 'fertile' and conductive by introducing or concentrating sulfides or graphite throughout the lithosphere at 80-120 km depths. This metasomatism may have also weakened the lithosphere or made it more susceptible to tectonic or chemical erosion. The arrival of the subducted Shatsky Rise conjugate at the Wyoming craton at 65-75 Ma appears to have eroded and displaced the thus weakened base of the craton below 140-160 km. This replaced old refertilized continental mantle with new depleted oceanic mantle. Is this the same craton?

  8. Water in the Cratonic Mantle: Insights from FTIR Data on Lac De Gras Xenoliths (Slave Craton, Canada)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslier, Anne H.; Brandon, Alan D.; Schaffer, Lillian Aurora; O'Reilly, Suzanne Yvette; Griffin, William L.; Morris, Richard V.; Graff, Trevor G.; Agresti, David G.

    2014-01-01

    The mantle lithosphere beneath the cratonic part of continents is the deepest (> 200 km) and oldest (>2-3 Ga) on Earth, remaining a conundrum as to how these cratonic roots could have resisted delamination by asthenospheric convection over time. Water, or trace H incorporated in mineral defects, could be a key player in the evolution of continental lithosphere because it influences melting and rheology of the mantle. Mantle xenoliths from the Lac de Gras kimberlite in the Slave craton were analyzed by FTIR. The cratonic mantle beneath Lac de Gras is stratified with shallow (<145 km) oxidized ultradepleted peridotites and pyroxenites with evidence for carbonatitic metasomatism, underlain by reduced and less depleted peridotites metasomatized by kimberlite melts. Peridotites analyzed so far have H O contents in ppm weight of 7-100 in their olivines, 58 to 255 in their orthopyroxenes (opx), 11 to 84 in their garnet, and 139 in one clinopyroxene. A pyroxenite contains 58 ppm H2O in opx and 5 ppm H2O in its olivine and garnet. Olivine and garnet from the deep peridotites have a range of water contents extending to higher values than those from the shallow ones. The FTIR spectra of olivines from the shallow samples have more prominent Group II OH bands compared to the olivines from the deep samples, consistent with a more oxidized mantle environment. The range of olivine water content is similar to that observed in Kaapvaal craton peridotites at the same depths (129-184 km) but does not extend to as high values as those from Udachnaya (Siberian craton). The Slave, Kaapvaal and Siberian cratons will be compared in terms of water content distribution, controls and role in cratonic root longevity.

  9. Majorite Garnet and Lithosphere Evolution: Kaapvaal Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, W. L.; Tessalina, S.; O'Reilly, S. Y.

    2013-12-01

    The uppermost 50-70 km of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) beneath the Kaapvaal Craton (S. Africa) consists largely of highly-depleted chromite harzburgites. These rocks are understudied, mainly because of their uniformity and their lack of indicator minerals such as garnet and clinopyroxene (cpx). Kimberlite-borne xenoliths of these rocks contain rare volumes of cpx-spinel (modal 76/24) symplectite, with smooth grain boundaries; many studies have suggested that these might represent low-pressure breakdown products of garnet (majorite + olivine → cpx + spinel). Our reconstruction of a suite of these grains, using element mapping and EMP analysis of constituent minerals, gives a majoritic garnet with mean composition 21.8% CaO, 15.8% Cr2O3, 9.22% Al2O3, Si=3.118, mg#=0.93. The majorite contents suggest formation at depths of 250-280 km. Ni contents imply temperatures ≥1500 °C, but have large uncertainties related to the subtraction of olivine (ca 20%) during the reconstruction calculation. LAM-ICPMS analyses show strongly sinuous REE patterns with CN Dy/Lu <0.1 and Ce/Dy >100. Most analyses have negative Eu anomalies, consistent with chromite compositions that indicate strongly reducing conditions (ΔfO2(FMQ) = -4 to -5). Melt modeling suggests that the harzburgites are products of 30-40% melting of asthenospheric mantle at 250 km depth, leaving residues of ol+opx+chromite. The presence of the majorites and their overall LREE enrichment are ascribed to the introduction of carbonatitic metasomatic fluids, similar to those recorded by diamond-inclusions (subcalcic garnets), shortly after the depletion. We suggest that the melting, the metasomatism and the ultimate breakdown of the majorite track a process of mantle upwelling, with melt-extraction at depth providing the buoyancy that allowed the residual harzburgites to rise to shallow levels and stabilize the SCLM. Os-isotope analyses of sulfides associated with the majorites give TRD = 2.5-3.4 Ga

  10. Pampia: A large cratonic block missing in the Rodinia supercontinent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Victor A.; Vujovich, Graciela; Martino, Roberto; Otamendi, Juan

    2010-09-01

    The large cratonic block of Pampia, at present in southern South America, is commonly missing in recent comprehensive reconstructions of Rodinia. This block was the conjugate margin of the Amazonia craton that corresponds to the W-NW-trending segment of the Sunsás orogen. This segment developed between Sucre in Bolivia and Corumbá in Brazil as a result of a Mesoproterozoic collision. The western margin of Pampia partially coincides with the southern part of the Arequipa-Antofalla terrane that was also amalgamated during the Mesoproterozoic. The Cuyania terrane, a Laurentian rifted continental block, was accreted to the southern sector of this margin of Pampia in middle Ordovician times. The northern sector of the eastern margin of Pampia is the lower plate of the Brasiliano belt developed along the Paranapanema craton during the early Cambrian collision associated with the closure of the Clymene Ocean. The southern sector of the eastern margin partially coincides with the southern extension of the Transbrasiliano lineament, which juxtaposed the Rio de La Plata Craton with the Pampia cratonic block. Along this eastern margin the Pampean-Paraguay orogen was formed during the late Brasiliano cycle in latest Proterozoic-Early Cambrian time. The southern margin was generated by the collision of Patagonia during late Paleozoic times. This cratonic block of Pampia, so defined, has western and northern sectors formed by Mesoproterozoic orogens, while the eastern sector is partially formed by juvenile Neoproterozoic crust, although older rocks cannot be ruled out. The Pampia cratonic block was the locus of several magmatic belts associated with important metamorphism during the Paleozoic and preserved in the central part at lower crustal levels.

  11. Cloud water measurements of glyoxal and methylglyoxal during the Whistler Aerosol and Cloud Study (WACS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herckes, P.; Ervens, B.; Wang, Y.; Eagar, J.; Leaitch, R.; Macdonald, A.; Sjostedt, S.; Abbatt, J.

    2011-12-01

    Glyoxal and methylglyoxal are produced in high yields from both anthropogenic (aromatics) and biogenic (isoprene) precursors. The role of glyoxal and methylglyoxal in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in the aqueous phase of cloud water and aerosols has received great attention over the past years. In addition, gas phase oxidation and photolysis of these compounds yield radicals and, thus, impact the oxidant budgets. While the reactivity of methylglyoxal and glyoxal in both the gas and aqueous phases is nearly identical, the much higher solubility of glyoxal leads to its more efficient removal in the presence of clouds. Thus, the amount of cloud water (liquid water content, LWC) and cloud processing time will affect the concentration ratios and thus the reaction rates of oxidation processes in the gas and aqueous phase, respectively. The Whistler Aerosol and Cloud Study (WACS) investigated the interactions between clouds and biogenic aerosol in summer 2010 in Whistler (Canada). During this study, cloud samples were collected at two locations, Whistler peak and a mid mountain station Raven's Nest. Cloud samples were extensively chemically characterized including the measurements of glyoxal and methylglyoxal using liquid chromatography coupled to UV and mass spectrometric detection after derivatization. Concentrations were variable on the order of micromoles, accounting for 1% of the dissolved organic matter in clouds. Glyoxal and methylglyoxal concentrations at both locations are predicted by means of model studies using VOC measurements and liquid water contents as input data. These concentrations and their ratios are compared to those in different regions. It will be discussed how cloud liquid water content, cloud processing time and amount and mixture of precursors (emissions) affect these concentration ratios. Finally, the role of different emission scenarios and the presence of clouds for SOA formation and radical budgets will be briefly assessed.

  12. A Precambrian cratonic block in the west-central Chihuahua - The Sierra del Nido cratonic block

    SciTech Connect

    Goodell, P.C. . Dept. of Geological)

    1993-02-01

    Precambrian rocks in west-central Chihuahua have been recognized by Denison (1969) and Mauger et al. (1983), on the basis of radiometric dating. The rocks are rhyolite clasts, and an allucthonous block, respectively, however their source direction and vergence can be measured. They point back to and are on the edge of a large, uniform, negative Bouguer gravity anomaly, having values greater than 200 milligals. The isotopic geochemical character of several Tertiary felsic fields within this anomalous are has been determined, and initial strontium isotopic ratios are all greater than 0.7055. Outside the anomalous area these ratios are lower, and Basin and Range extension tectonism is more evident. It is proposed that a Precambrian cratonic block, the Sierra del Nido, is present in the crust in west-central Chihuahua. It is reasonable to propose that it was decreted from North America during a Precambrian extensional (1.1. By ) event, from somewhere along the Arizona Transition Zone-Texas Linament region. The Sierra del Nido Block is separated form the ATZ-TL by a region of disrupted craton and extended crust, the Basin and Range Province. Implications of the pressure of the Sierra del Nido Block on other regional tectonic events will be discussed.

  13. Archaean Crustal Growth, Proterozoic Terrane Amalgamation and the Pan-African Orogeny, as Recorded in the NE African Sedimentary Record.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najman, Y.; Fielding, L.; Millar, I.; Butterworth, P.; Andò, S.; Padoan, M.; Barfod, D. N.; Kneller, B. C.

    2015-12-01

    The cratons of Central Africa are formed of various blocks of Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic crust, flanked or truncated by Palaeoproterozoic to Mesoproterozoic orogenic belts. The geology of east Africa has largely been shaped by the events of the Pan-African Orogeny when east and west Gondwana collided to form 'Greater Gondwana' at the end of the Neoproterozoic. The Pan-African orogeny in NE Africa involved the collision of Archaean cratons and the Saharan Metacraton with the Arabian Nubian Shield, a terrane comprising Neoproterozoic juvenile oceanic island arcs. Phanerozoic cover sedimentary rocks, eroded from the Pan-African orogenies, blanket much of NE Africa. Detrital data from these Phanerozoic cover sedimentary rocks, and modern rivers draining both the cover the basement, provide a wealth of information on basement evolution, of particular relevance for regions where the basement itself is poorly exposed due to ancient or modern sedimentary cover. From samples collected in Uganda, Ethiopia, Sudan and Egypt, we provide combined U-Pb and Hf-isotope zircon, U-Pb rutile and Ar-Ar mica datasets, heavy mineral analyses, and bulk trace element data, from Archaean basement, Phanerozoic cover and modern river sediment from the Nile and its tributaries to document the evolution of the North African crust. The data document early crust-forming events in the Congo Craton and Sahara Metacraton, phased development of the Arabian Nubian Shield culminating in the Neoproterozoic assembly of Gondwana during the Pan African Orogeny, and the orogen's subsequent erosion, with deposition of voluminous Phanerozoic cover.

  14. Precambrian Cratons and Fold-Belts in Brazil: Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuck, R.

    2008-05-01

    The main Precambrian terrains recognized in Brazil comprise the Amazonian, São Francisco and Rio de la Plata cratons, surrounded by Neoproterozoic Brasiliano fold belts, making up the Borborema, Mantiqueira and Tocantins provinces. The Amazonian craton comprises an Archean core, surrounded by Paleoproterozoic terrains (Maroni-Itacaiunas, Ventuari-Tapajós, Rio Negro-Juruena), which southwestwards give way to the Mesoproterozoic Rondoniano-San Ignacio and Sunsas belts, the latter thought to be related to the Grenville belt of North America. The São Francisco craton comprises several Archean blocks (Gavião, Serrinha, Jequié) amalgamated by the Paleoproterozoic high-grade Itabuna-Salvador-Curaçá orogen. The Rio de la Plata craton, largely covered by Phanerozoic strata, is made of Paleoproterozoic basement gneiss and several Paleoproterozoic greenstone belts. Other cratonic blocks are hidden below large Phanerozoic basins, like the Paranapanema and Parnaíba blocks below the Paraná and Parnaíba basins, respectively. Several smaller Archean/Paleoproterozoic blocks appear within the Brasiliano provinces: some were strongly reworked during the Neoproterozoic orogenic events (São José do Campestre, Pernambuco-Alagoas, Goiás, Guanhães, Juiz de Fora, Curitiba), others were only marginally affected (São Luiz, Rio Apa, Luís Alves). The Brasiliano provinces are the result of Neoproterozoic to early Paleozoic orogenic events within the framework of West Gondwana amalgamation. The Mantiqueira Province extends from eastern Brazil to southern Uruguay and includes the Araçuaí, Ribeira and Dom Feliciano fold belts, bordering the São Francisco, Paranapanema and Rio de la Plata cratons and surrounding the Luís Alves craton. The Tocantins province in central Brazil includes the Araguaia, Paraguay and Brasília fold belts, the former bordering the Amazonian craton, the second bordering both the southern Amazonian craton and the Rio Apa block, and the last established on

  15. The 3-dimensional construction of the Rae craton, central Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, David B.; Craven, James A.; Pilkington, Mark; Hillier, Michael J.

    2015-10-01

    Reconstruction of the 3-dimensional tectonic assembly of early continents, first as Archean cratons and then Proterozoic shields, remains poorly understood. In this paper, all readily available geophysical and geochemical data are assembled in a 3-D model with the most accurate bedrock geology in order to understand better the geometry of major structures within the Rae craton of central Canada. Analysis of geophysical observations of gravity and seismic wave speed variations revealed several lithospheric-scale discontinuities in physical properties. Where these discontinuities project upward to correlate with mapped upper crustal geological structures, the discontinuities can be interpreted as shear zones. Radiometric dating of xenoliths provides estimates of rock types and ages at depth beneath sparse kimberlite occurrences. These ages can also be correlated to surface rocks. The 3.6-2.6 Ga Rae craton comprises at least three smaller continental terranes, which "cratonized" during a granitic bloom. Cratonization probably represents final differentiation of early crust into a relatively homogeneous, uniformly thin (35-42 km), tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite crust with pyroxenite layers near the Moho. The peak thermotectonic event at 1.86-1.7 Ga was associated with the Hudsonian orogeny that assembled several cratons and lesser continental blocks into the Canadian Shield using a number of southeast-dipping megathrusts. This orogeny metasomatized, mineralized, and recrystallized mantle and lower crustal rocks, apparently making them more conductive by introducing or concentrating sulfides or graphite. Little evidence exists of thin slabs similar to modern oceanic lithosphere in this Precambrian construction history whereas underthrusting and wedging of continental lithosphere is inferred from multiple dipping discontinuities.

  16. Volatile organic compound production and consumption by microbial plankton communities on the NOAA WACS cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannoni, S. J.; Halsey, K.; Thrash, J. C.; De Gouw, J. A.; Graus, M.

    2013-12-01

    Information about biological sources and sinks of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the ocean surface could result in a better understanding of the underlying causes of variation in air/sea VOC fluxes, and potentially could alter predictions about the impact of climate change on ocean surface ecology and air/sea interactions. The goal of this work was to measure rates of biological production, oxidation and assimilation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by microbial plankton communities along the WACS cruise transect from Boston to Bermuda in August 2013. Tangential flow filtration was used to concentrate microbial plankton communities for incubation in environmentally controlled dynamic stripping chambers under simulated ocean surface layer conditions. Gas streams exiting the chambers were monitored in real time with proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). In separate experiments aliquots of plankton suspensions were incubated with 14C-methanol, 14C-TMAO, and 14C-pyruvate, and the assimilation of 14C into biomass and the production of 14C-CO2 were measured. Results showed that the highly productive George's Bank plankton community has a high capacity for methanol and trimethylamine oxide (TMAO) oxidation. Biomass was estimated by counting cells. The rate of incorporation of methanol-carbon into biomass was only 21% of the rate of methanol oxidation to CO2. Similar results were observed for TMAO. These experiments also allowed estimates of kinetic constants for both compounds. The half-saturation constants (Ks) for methanol oxidation were similar in natural populations collected at George's Bank and the Sargasso Sea (12.8 and 9.9 μM, respectively). Interestingly, the Ks values for TMAO oxidation were an order of magnitude lower than for methanol in plankton communities sampled from both sites (0.5 and 0.3 μM, respectively). These results provide additional evidence that microbial plankton have a high capacity for oxidation of these low

  17. Formation of cratonic lithosphere: An integrated thermal and petrological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzberg, Claude; Rudnick, Roberta

    2012-09-01

    The formation of cratonic mantle peridotite of Archean age is examined within the time frame of Earth's thermal history, and how it was expressed by temporal variations in magma and residue petrology. Peridotite residues that occupy the lithospheric mantle are rare owing to the effects of melt-rock reaction, metasomatism, and refertilization. Where they are identified, they are very similar to the predicted harzburgite residues of primary magmas of the dominant basalts in greenstone belts, which formed in a non-arc setting (referred to here as "non-arc basalts"). The compositions of these basalts indicate high temperatures of formation that are well-described by the thermal history model of Korenaga. In this model, peridotite residues of extensive ambient mantle melting had the highest Mg-numbers, lowest FeO contents, and lowest densities at ~ 2.5-3.5 Ga. These results are in good agreement with Re-Os ages of kimberlite-hosted cratonic mantle xenoliths and enclosed sulfides, and provide support for the hypothesis of Jordan that low densities of cratonic mantle are a measure of their high preservation potential. Cratonization of the Earth reached its zenith at ~ 2.5-3.5 Ga when ambient mantle was hot and extensive melting produced oceanic crust 30-45 km thick. However, there is a mass imbalance exhibited by the craton-wide distribution of harzburgite residues and the paucity of their complementary magmas that had compositions like the non-arc basalts. We suggest that the problem of the missing basaltic oceanic crust can be resolved by its hydration, cooling and partial transformation to eclogite, which caused foundering of the entire lithosphere. Some of the oceanic crust partially melted during foundering to produce continental crust composed of tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG). The remaining lithosphere gravitationally separated into 1) residual eclogite that continued its descent, and 2) buoyant harzburgite diapirs that rose to underplate cratonic nuclei

  18. The Role of Water in the Stability of Cratonic Keels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslier, Anne H.; Woodland, Alan B.; Bell, David R.; Lazarov, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Cratons are typically underlain by large, deep, and old lithospheric keels (to greater than 200 km depth, greater than 2.5 Ga old) projecting into the asthenosphere (e.g., Jordan, 1978; Richardson et al., 1984). This has mystified Earth scientists as the dynamic and relatively hot asthenosphere should have eroded away these keels over time (e.g., Sleep, 2003; O'Neill et al., 2008; Karato, 2010). Three key factors have been invoked to explain cratonic root survival: 1) Low density makes the cratonic mantle buoyant (e.g., Poudjom Djomani et al., 2001). 2) Low temperatures (e.g., Pollack, 1986; Boyd, 1987), and 3) low water contents (e.g., Pollack, 1986), would make cratonic roots mechanically strong. Here we address the mechanism of the longevity of continental mantle lithosphere by focusing on the water parameter. Although nominally anhydrous , olivine, pyroxene and garnet can accommodate trace amounts of water in the form of H bonded to structural O in mineral defects (e.g., Bell and Rossman, 1992). Olivine softens by orders of magnitude if water (1-1000 ppm H2O) is added to its structure (e.g., Mackwell et al., 1985). Our recent work has placed constraints on the distribution of water measured in peridotite minerals in the cratonic root beneath the Kaapvaal in southern Africa (Peslier et al., 2010). At P greater than 5 GPa, the water contents of pyroxene remain relatively constant while those of olivine systematically decrease from 50 to less than 10 ppm H2O at 6.4 GPa. We hypothesized that at P greater than 6.4 GPa, i.e. at the bottom of the cratonic lithosphere, olivines are essentially dry (greater than 10 ppm H2O). As olivine likely controls the rheology of the mantle, we calculated that the dry olivines could be responsible for a contrast in viscosity between cratonic lithosphere and surrounding asthenosphere large enough to explain the resistance of cratonic root to asthenospheric delamination.

  19. Archean crustal evolution of the northern North China Craton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qian, Xianglin; Chen, Yaping; Liu, Jinzhong

    1988-01-01

    The Archean granultie facies rocks of the North China (Sino-Korean) Craton mostly occur inside the northern boundary forming a unique and spectacular granulite belt trending roughly E-W from eastern Hebei, North China in the east to Mt. Daqinchan, western Inner Mongolia in the west, ranging about 1,000 km long. Over the years in the middle portion of this Archean high-grade metamorphic belt a stratigraphic unconformity between the khondalite rock assemblage and the medium in composition granulite assemblage in Datong-Xinghe area is determined. The geological structural properties of the North China Craton are discussed.

  20. Interaction between an incipient rift and a cratonic lithosphere : The North Tanzania Rift seen from some seismic tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, Stéphanie; Plasman, Matthieu; Tiberi, Christel; Lopez, Marie; Peyrat, Sophie; Perrot, Julie; Albaric, Julie; Déverchère, Jacques; Deschamps, Anne; Ebinger, Cindy; Roecker, Steven; Mulibo, Gabriel; Wambura, Richard Ferdinand; Muzuka, Alfred; Msabi, Michael; Gama, Remigius

    2016-04-01

    The North Tanzania part of the East African Rift is the place of an incipient break up of the lithosphere. This continental rifting happens on the edge of the Tanzanian craton, and their interaction leads to major changes in the surface deformation. The evolution of the rift and its morphology is strongly linked to the inherited structures, particularly the Proterozoic belts and the craton itself. It is thus of prime interest to image the structure of the craton edges to fully understand its impact on the localisation of the current deformation at the surface. Since 2007 different multidisciplinary projects have taken place in this area to address this question. We present here a work based on a collaborative work between French, American and Tanzanian institutes that started in 2013. About 35 seismological stations were installed for 2 years in the Natron lake region, and 10 short period instruments were added for 9 months in the Manyara area to record local and telesismic events. We have analysed more than a hundred teleseismic events to compute the receiver function, and we finally obtain a Moho map of the region as well as azimuthal distribution of converted phases. The stations located on the edge of the rift and near the craton present a continuous evolution of their crustal pattern in the RF signal. Especially, we identify a clear phase at about 7s for those stations that corresponds to an interface separating a normal upper mantle from a very slow mantle at about 70 km depth. We first model those receiver functions to perfectly fit the signal, and more precisely the transverse component, which shows a strong and coherent pattern. Second, the local seismic network we have installed for 9 months in Manyara region advantageously completed the 2007 SEISMOTANZ network. In this part of the rift the seismicity is deep (20-30 km) and clustered without any magmatism record at the surface, opposite to Natron area. We could then relocalize the deep seismicity observed

  1. The story of a craton from heart to margins: illuminating cratonic lithosphere with Rayleigh wave phase velocities in Eastern Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrescu, L.; Darbyshire, F. A.; Gilligan, A.; Bastow, I. D.; Totten, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    Cratons are Precambrian continental nuclei that are geologically distinct from modern continental regions and are typically underlain by seismically fast lithospheric roots (keels) to at least 200 km depth. Both plate and non-plate tectonic origin theories such as stacking of subducted slabs or multiple mantle plume underplating have been proposed to explain keel growth.Eastern Canada is an ideal continental region to investigate cratonization processes and the onset of plate tectonics. It comprises part of the largest Archean craton in the world, the Superior Province, flanked by a ~1.1 Ga Himalayan-scale orogenic belt, the Grenville Province, and the 500-300 Ma old Appalachian orogenic province, following the same general SW-NE axial trend. The region is also cross-cut by the Great Meteor Hotspot track, providing an excellent opportunity to study the interaction of hotspot tectonism with progressively younger lithospheric domains.We investigate the lithospheric structure of Precambrian Eastern Canada using teleseismic earthquake data recorded at permanent and temporary networks. We measure interstation dispersion curves of Rayleigh wave phase velocities between ~15 and 220 s, and compare the results to standard continental and cratonic reference models. We combine the dispersion curves via a tomographic inversion which solves for isotropic phase velocity heterogeneity and azimuthal anisotropy across the region at a range of periods. The phase velocity maps indicate variations in lithospheric properties from the heart of the Superior craton to the SE Canadian coast.The new regional-scale models will help to understand the processes that generated, stabilized and reworked the cratonic roots through their billion-year tectonic history. We investigate how surface tectonic boundaries relate to deeper lithospheric structural changes, and consider the effects of the multiple Wilson cycles that affected Laurentia.

  2. [Professor Wacław Kuśnierczyk (1908-1997)--Pro Memoria in the century of birthday].

    PubMed

    Brozek, Krzysztof; Kozakiewicz, Jacek; Kierzek, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    Wacław Kuśnierczyk was born in 1908 in Sniatyń. He received the degree in medicine at Jan Kazimierz University in Lwów in 1932. He did his PhD degree under Professor Zaleski supervision in 1938 at Jan Kazimierz University. At that time he concentrated his scientific activity on research on tuberculosis. In 1953 he obtained the title of second degree specialist in ear, nose and throat diseases. He became a chief of Otolaryngology at Urban Hospital No 4 in Katowice in 1960. Since then this eminent physician was working on tumours located in upper respiratory tract and the possibility of its endoscopic diagnosis at Silesian Academy of Medicine in Katowice. As one of the first he pointed out the negative influence of smoking cigarettes on cancer of larynx. It was Wacław Kuśnierczyk who implemented new priorities for integrated programs in patient care, research, education and cancer prevention. He has published widely in peer reviewed journals and has edited or contributed to many books. He has given many major lectures and is the recipient of numerous prestigious awards for his scientific accomplishments. The achievement of Professor Kuśnierczyk were the valuable source of information for the physicians. In 1997, on the 31st of January he died in Katowice.

  3. Physico-chemical constraints on cratonic lithosphere discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulbach, Sonja; Rondenay, Stéphane; Huismans, Ritske

    2014-05-01

    The origins of the mid-lithospheric discontinuity (MLD) and lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) have received much attention over the recent years. Peculiarities of cratonic lithosphere construction - compositional and rheological stratification due to thickening in collisional settings or by plume subcretion, multiple metasomatic overprints due to longevity - offer a variety of possibilities for the generation of discontinuities. Interconnected small degrees of conductive partial melt (carbonate-rich melts, such as carbonatites and kimberlites, or highly alkaline melts) at the cratonic LAB, which produce seismic discontinuities, may be generated in the presence of volatiles. These depress the peridotite solidus sufficiently to intersect the mantle adiabat at depths near the cratonic LAB at ~160-220 km, i.e. above the depth of metal saturation where carbonatite becomes unstable. The absence of agreement between the different seismic and magnetotelluric estimates for the depth of the LAB beneath Kaapvaal may be due to impingement of a plume, leading to a pervasively, but heterogeneously metasomatised ('asthenospherised') hot and deep root. Such a root and hot sublithosphere may yield conflicting seismic-thermal-geochemical depths for the LAB. The question arises whether the chemical boundary layer should be defined as above or below the asthenospherised part of the SCLM, which has preserved isotopic, compositional (non-primitive olivine forsterite content) and physical evidence (e.g. from teleseismic tomography and receiver functions) for a cratonic heritage and which therefore is still distinguishable from the asthenospheric mantle. If cratonic lithosphere overlies anomalously hot mantle for extended periods of time, the LAB may be significantly thinned, aided by penetration of relatively high-degree Fe-rich partial melts, as has occurred beneath the Tanzanian craton. Xenoliths from the deep Slave craton show little evidence for 'asthenospherisation'. Its root

  4. References for HNF-SD-WM-TRD-007, ``System specification for the double-shell tank system: HNF-PROs, CFRs, DOE Orders, WACs``

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, C.P.

    1998-07-30

    HNF-SD-WM-TRD-O07, System Specification for the Double-Shell Tank System, (hereafter referred to as DST Specification), defines the requirements of the double-shell tank system at the Hanford Site for Phase 1 privatization. Many of the sections in this document reference other documents for design guidance and requirements. Referenced documents include Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) procedures (HNF-PROS), Codes of Federal Regulation (CFRs), DOE Orders, and Washington Administrative Codes (WACs). This document provides rationale for the selection and inclusion of HNF-PROS, CFRs, DOE Orders and WACs.

  5. Water in the Cratonic Mantle: Insights from FTIR Data on Lac de Gras Xenoliths (Slave Craton, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peslier, A. H.; Brandon, A. D.; Schaffer, L. A.; O'Reilly, S. Y.; Griffin, W. L.; Morris, R. V.; Graff, T. G.; Agresti, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    The mantle lithosphere beneath the cratonic part of continents is the deepest (> 200 km) and oldest (>2-3 Ga) on Earth, remaining a conundrum as to how these cratonic roots could have resisted delamination by asthenospheric convection over time. Water, or trace H incorporated in mineral defects, could be a key player in the evolution of continental lithosphere because it influences melting and rheology of the mantle [e.g., 1]. Mantle xenoliths from the Lac de Gras kimberlite in the Slave craton [2] were analyzed by FTIR. The cratonic mantle beneath Lac de Gras is stratified with shallow (<145 km) oxidized ultradepleted peridotites and pyroxenites with evidence for carbonatitic metasomatism, underlain by reduced and less depleted peridotites metasomatized by kimberlite melts [3,4]. Peridotites analyzed so far have H2O contents in ppm weight of 7-100 in their olivines, 58 to 255 in their orthopyroxenes (opx), 11 to 84 in their garnet, and 139 in one clinopyroxene. A pyroxenite contains 58 ppm H2O in opx and 5 ppm H2O in its olivine and garnet. Olivine and garnet from the deep peridotites have a range of water contents extending to higher values than those from the shallow ones. The FTIR spectra of olivines from the shallow samples have more prominent Group II OH bands compared to the olivines from the deep samples, consistent with a more oxidized mantle environment [5]. The range of olivine water content is similar to that observed in Kaapvaal craton peridotites at the same depths (129-184 km [1]) but does not extend to as high values as those from Udachnaya (Siberian craton [6]). The Slave, Kaapvaal and Siberian cratons will be compared in terms of water content distribution, controls and role in cratonic root longevity. [1] Peslier et al. 2010 Nature 467, 78-81. [2] Aulbach et al. 2007 CMP 154, 409-427. [3] Creighton et al. 2009 CMP 157, 491-504. [4] Aulbach et al. 2013 CG 352, 153-169. [5] Bai & Kohlstedt 1993 PCM 19, 460-471. [6] Doucet et al. 2014 GCA 137, 159-187.

  6. Constraints on the depth and thermal history of cratonic lithosphere from peridotite xenoliths, xenocrysts and seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mather, Kathy A.; Pearson, D. Graham; McKenzie, Dan; Kjarsgaard, Bruce A.; Priestley, Keith

    2011-07-01

    the southern African lithosphere. We find very similar estimates for the heat flow and thickness of the lithosphere between SW Namibia (off-craton) and Bultfontein (on-craton). This supports suggestions of a cratonic thermal regime and equivalent lithospheric thickness across that region of southern Africa at the time of kimberlite sampling, with concurrent local thermal disturbance evident in Namibia. Complimentary, novel, seismically-obtained geotherm estimates show that the lithosphere in Namibia is now significantly thinner than the estimate at 70 Ma obtained from xenolith thermobarometry.

  7. Recycling lower continental crust in the North China craton.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shan; Rudnick, Roberta L; Yuan, Hong-Ling; Liu, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Yong-Sheng; Xu, Wen-Liang; Ling, Wen-Li; Ayers, John; Wang, Xuan-Che; Wang, Qing-Hai

    2004-12-16

    Foundering of mafic lower continental crust into underlying convecting mantle has been proposed as one means to explain the unusually evolved chemical composition of Earth's continental crust, yet direct evidence of this process has been scarce. Here we report that Late Jurassic high-magnesium andesites, dacites and adakites (siliceous lavas with high strontium and low heavy-rare-earth element and yttrium contents) from the North China craton have chemical and petrographic features consistent with their origin as partial melts of eclogite that subsequently interacted with mantle peridotite. Similar features observed in adakites and some Archaean sodium-rich granitoids of the tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite series have been interpreted to result from interaction of slab melts with the mantle wedge. Unlike their arc-related counterparts, however, the Chinese magmas carry inherited Archaean zircons and have neodymium and strontium isotopic compositions overlapping those of eclogite xenoliths derived from the lower crust of the North China craton. Such features cannot be produced by crustal assimilation of slab melts, given the high Mg#, nickel and chromium contents of the lavas. We infer that the Chinese lavas derive from ancient mafic lower crust that foundered into the convecting mantle and subsequently melted and interacted with peridotite. We suggest that lower crustal foundering occurred within the North China craton during the Late Jurassic, and thus provides constraints on the timing of lithosphere removal beneath the North China craton.

  8. Temperature-dependent transient creep and dynamics of cratonic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birger, Boris I.

    2013-11-01

    Large-scale mantle convection forms the upper boundary layer (lithosphere) where the vertical temperature drop is about 1300 K. Theoretical rheology and laboratory experiments with rock samples show that transient creep occurs while creep strains are sufficiently small. The transient creep is described by the temperature-dependent Andrade rheological model. Since plate tectonics allows only small deformations in lithospheric plates, creep of the lithosphere plates is transient whereas steady-state creep, described by non-Newtonian power-law rheological model, takes place in the underlying mantle. The solution of stability problem shows that the lithosphere is stable but small-scale convective oscillations are attenuated very weakly in regions of thickened lithosphere beneath continental cratons (subcratonic roots) where the thickness of the lithosphere is about 200 km. These oscillations create small-scale convective cells (the horizontal dimensions of the cells are of the order of the subcratonic lithosphere thickness). Direction of motion within the cells periodically changes (the period of convective oscillations is of the order of 3 × 108 yr). In this study, the oscillations of cratonic lithosphere caused by initial relief perturbation are considered. This relief perturbation is assumed to be created by overthrusting in orogenic belts surrounding cratons. The perturbation of the Earth's surface relief leads to a fast isothermal process of isostatic recovery. In the presence of vertical temperature gradient, vertical displacements, associated with the recovery process in the lithosphere interior, instantly produce the initial temperature perturbations exciting thermoconvective oscillations in the cratonic lithosphere. These small-amplitude convective oscillations cause oscillatory crustal movements which form sedimentary basins on cratons.

  9. Lithospheric thinning in the Eastern Indian Craton: Evidence for lithospheric delamination below the Archean Singhbhum Craton?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Prantik

    2017-02-01

    We herein present shear velocity structure extending down to 300 km depth below the Archean Singhbhum-Odisha Craton (SOC) and Proterozoic Chotanagpur granitic-gneissic terrain (CGGT), which has been obtained through the inversion modeling of P-receiver functions. We use three-component broadband recordings of 200 teleseismic earthquakes (30° ≤ ∆ ≤ 90°) from a 15 station seismic network that has been operational in the Eastern Indian shield since February 2013. We obtain the thinnest crust of 35 km overlying a thin lithosphere of 78 km, below the region near south Singhbhum shear zone, which could be attributed to the 1.6 Ga plume activity associated with Dalma volcanic. However, the thickest crust of 47 km overlying a thin lithosphere of 81 km is noticed below the region near the Singhbhum granite of 3.6 Ga. This thinning of lithosphere could be attributed to the delamination of lithospheric root due to the Himalayan orogeny with a shortening rate of 2 cm/year. This delamination model in SOC gets further support from the densification of the lower crust, which could result from repeated episodes of basaltic underplating associated with episodes related to Dalma ( 1.6 Ga) and Rajmahal ( 117 Ma) volcanisms. This led to relatively more mafic, heterogeneous and deformed crustal structure in SOC as well as EGMB (with an average crustal Vs of 4.0 km/s) in comparison to that in CGGT (with an average crustal Vs of 3.9 km/s), as seen through our modeling results. The thickest lithosphere of 100 km is observed in the southwestern SOC as well as northeastern CGGT. We also notice that a sharp and flat Moho in CGGT, which could be attributed to thermal reactivation and large volume melting of the mafic cratonic crust during the late Archean subduction process and associated volcanism episodes. This model gets further support from the estimated 169 km thick lower Vs zone in the upper mantle below CGGT. Our modeling results also support a northward subduction of Archean

  10. How to Create High-Impact Writing Assignments That Enhance Learning and Development and Reinvigorate WAC/WID Programs: What Almost 72,000 Undergraduates Taught Us

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Paul; Anson, Chris M.; Gonyea, Robert M.; Paine, Charles

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on a study that suggests ways that Writing Across the Curriculum/Writing in the Disciplines (WAC/WID) programs can increase the effectiveness of their efforts, including implementation of writingintensive courses, which are one of the Association of American Colleges and Universities' High-Impact Educational Practices. The…

  11. Les chaînes de la marge occidentale du Craton Ouest-Africain, modèles géodynamiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villeneuve, Michel; El Archi, Abdelkrim; Nzamba, Juste

    2010-01-01

    Until now, no satisfactory geodynamic model has been delivered concerning the three main West African orogens: Panafrican 1 (Bassaride belt), Panafrican 2 (Rokelide belt) and Hercynian (Mauritanide belt). However, since the last synthetic paper ( Villeneuve, 2008), new geological, geophysical and geochronological data, from the Moroccan Sahara to Sierra Leone, allow us to propose a new geodynamical model. It includes the two Panafrican events in a single model very similar to the present western Pacific margin. An old "West African Neoproterozoic ocean" (WANO) was limited by a set of island arcs separated from the West African craton by a series of "back arc basins". The closure of this first round of back arc basins around 650 Ma led to the Bassaride belt (Panafrican 1). Then the WANO was subducting underneath the island arcs (between 650 and 550 Ma) meanwhile a new generation of "back arc basins" opened to the east between the arcs and the craton margin. The closure of the WANO and associated island arcs and back arc basins (550 to 500 Ma) led to the Rokelide belt (Panafrican 2). The Hercynian structures involving a Palaeozoic cover (made with continental material) associated to a "greeenschist facies" metamorphism is ascribed to an intracontinental belt.

  12. Paleomagnetism of the Wyoming Craton: A Pre-Laurentian Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilian, T.; Chamberlain, K.; Mitchell, R. N.; Evans, D. A.; Bleeker, W.; Lecheminant, A. N.

    2010-12-01

    The Archean Wyoming craton is mostly buried beneath Phanerozoic sediments in the Rocky Mountains of the west central United States. Exposures of the craton are entirely in thrust-bounded Laramide uplifts and contain numerous swarms of Neoarchean-Proterozoic mafic dikes. U-Pb ages from these dikes include ~2685 Ma from a dike in the Owl Creek Mountains (Frost et al., 2006) as well as another in the Bald Mountain region of the Bighorn Mountains (this study), ~2170 Ma from the Wind River Mountain quartz diorite (Harlan et al., 2003), ~2110 Ma from a dike in the Granite Mountains (Bowers and Chamberlain, 2006), ~2010 Ma from a Kennedy dike in the Laramie Range (Cox et al., 2000), and ~780 Ma for dikes in the Beartooth and Teton Mountains (Harlan et al., 1997). These possible age ranges of magmatic events will allow a detailed comparison with other cratons, especially Superior and Slave. Prior to the assembly of Laurentia, Wyoming may have been connected with Slave in supercraton Sclavia (Bleeker, 2003; Frost et al., 2007), or alternatively, Wyoming may have been attached to the present southern margin of Superior in the supercraton Superia, as judged by similarities of the thrice-glaciated Huronian and Snowy Pass sedimentary successions (Roscoe and Card, 1993). Paleomagnetic results will be presented from over 150 dikes in the Wyoming craton. All dikes were from the basement uplifts of the Beartooth Mountains, Bighorn Mountains, Owl Creek Mountains, Granite Mountains, Ferris Mountains and Laramie Range. Dikes range in widths from 1 to >100 meters, and trends vary across all orientations. Stable remanence is observed in majority of sites with at least 8 different directions from the various uplifts. Structural corrections are applied when necessary to restore shallowly dipping Cambrian strata to horizontal. The paleomagnetic study is being integrated with precise U-Pb geochronology of dikes that bear stable remanence directions. Results will eventually allow a

  13. On craton thinning/destruction: Insight from 2D thermal-mechanical numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, J.

    2014-12-01

    Although most cratons maintain stable, some exceptions are present, such as the North China craton, North Atlantic craton, and Wyoming craton, which have experienced dramatic lithospheric deformation/thinning. Mechanisms triggering cratonic thinning remains enigmatic [Lee et al., 2011]. Using a 2D thermo-mechanical coupled numerical model [Gerya and Yuen, 2007], we investigate two possible mechanisms: (1) stratification of cratonic lithospheric mantle, and (2) rheological weakening due to hydration.Lithospheric mantle stratification is a common feature in cratonic areas which has been demonstrated by geophysical and geochemical studies [Thybo and Perchuc, 1997; Griffin et al., 2004; Romanowicz, 2009; Rychert and Shearer, 2009; Yuan and Romanowicz, 2010]. The influence of lithospheric mantle stratification during craton evolution remains poorly understood. A rheologically weak layer representing hydrated and/or metasomatized composition is implemented in the lithospheric mantle. Our results show that the weak mantle layer changes the dynamics of lithospheric extension by enhancing the deformation of the overlying mantle and crust and inhibiting deformation of the underlying mantle [Liao et al., 2013; Liao and Gerya, 2014]. Modeling results are compared with North China and North Atlantic cratons. Our work indicates that although the presence of a weak layer may not be sufficient to initiate craton deformation, it enhances deformation by lowering the required extensional plate boundary force. Rheological weakening due to hydration is a possible mechanism triggering/enhancing craton deformation, especially for cratons jaxtaposing with a subduction, since water can release from a subducting slab. We investigate the influence of wet mantle flow laws [Hirth and Kohlstedt, 2003], in which a water parameter (i.e. constant water content) is involved. Our results show that wet dislocation alone does not accelerate cratonic deformation significantly. However, if wet diffusion

  14. One View of the Genesis of Cratonic Mantle and Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Jull, M.; Kelly, R.

    2002-12-01

    Kelemen et al. [1] proposed that SiO2-rich, cratonic mantle peridotite xenoliths from Kaapvaal and Siberia had a two stage history. First, they underwent ca. 40% polybaric decompression melting, ending in spinel peridotite facies, to produce depleted, SiO2-poor residues [2]. Second, residues reacted with migrating, felsic melt to become SiO2-rich and light REE-enriched, in accord with previous work [3-5]. Modified melt rose to form continental crust. In this way, cratonic upper mantle and crust may be genetically linked. This differs from theories in which SiO2-rich cratonic mantle formed via high pressure melting and crystal fractionation involving komatiitic melts, with a coincidental relationship between SiO2-rich peridotites and SiO2-rich crust. With regard to Stage 1, average melt removed from primitive mantle [6] to form depleted, SiO2-poor, Archean mantle in Greenland is similar to experimental partial melts at 2.5 to 3 GPa [2]. Also, heavy REE in cratonic peridotite xenoliths are correlated with Ca, suggesting that residual garnet was exhausted early in melting, long before residual clinopyroxene [1]. This, combined with data on melting as a function of pressure [7], yields an average pressure for polybaric melting ca. 3 GPa. Thus, depleted cratonic peridotites recording equilibration pressures greater than 3 GPa have undergone subsolidus pressure increase and garnet growth. Pressure increase could be in response to thickening via tectonic imbrication, pure shear during continental collision, viscous flow in a "mantle wedge", or diapirism of buoyant, depleted residues through dense, subducting, basaltic crust. We will examine these hypotheses in the light of new calculations of the density of cratonic peridotites as a function of P and T. With regard to Stage 2, this provides an explanation for positive correlation between Ni in olivine and modal orthopyroxene, seen in xenolith suites from some kimberlites, and in a global comparison of cratonic xenoliths

  15. Middle Paleozoic kimberlite magmatism in the northeastern Siberian craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, E. O.; Afanas'ev, V. P.; Pokhilenko, N. P.

    2016-10-01

    The mineral chemistry and crystal morphology of kimberlite pyropes from the Billyakh River placer in the northeastern Siberian craton are characterised in terms of the placer history. The pyropes bear signatures of chemical weathering (dissolution), presumably in a Middle Paleozoic laterite profile, and therefore were originally hosted by Middle Paleozoic kimberlites. The broad occurrence of placer pyropes with lateritic dissolution signatures points to the presence of Middle Paleozoic diamond-bearing kimberlites in the study area.

  16. Construction and destruction of some North American cratons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, David B.; Humphreys, Eugene; Pearson, D. Graham

    2017-01-01

    Construction histories of Archean cratons remain poorly understood; their destruction is even less clear because of its rarity, but metasomatic weakening is an essential precursor. By assembling geophysical and geochemical data in 3-D lithosphere models, a clearer understanding of the geometry of major structures within the Rae, Slave and Wyoming cratons of central North America is now possible. Little evidence exists of subducted slab-like geometries similar to modern oceanic lithosphere in these construction histories. Underthrusting and wedging of proto-continental lithosphere is inferred from multiple dipping discontinuities, emphasizing the role of lateral accretion. Archean continental building blocks may resemble the modern lithosphere of oceanic plateau, but they better match the sort of refractory crust expected to have formed at Archean ocean spreading centres. Radiometric dating of mantle xenoliths provides estimates of rock types and ages at depth beneath sparse kimberlite occurrences, and these ages can be correlated to surface rocks. The 3.6-2.6 Ga Rae, Slave and Wyoming cratons stabilized during a granitic bloom at 2.61-2.55 Ga. This stabilization probably represents the final differentiation of early crust into a relatively homogeneous, uniformly thin (35-42 km), tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite crust with pyroxenite layers near the Moho atop depleted lithospheric mantle. Peak thermo-tectonic events at 1.86-1.7 Ga broadly metasomatized, mineralized and recrystallized mantle and lower crustal rocks, apparently making mantle peridotite more 'fertile' and more conductive by introducing or concentrating sulfides or graphite at 80-120 km depths. This metasomatism may have also weakened the lithosphere or made it more susceptible to tectonic or chemical erosion. Late Cretaceous flattening of Farallon lithosphere that included the Shatsky Rise conjugate appears to have weakened, eroded and displaced the base of the Wyoming craton below 140-160 km. This

  17. Asymmetry of Non-Volcanic Passive Margins Induced by the Proximity of a Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres-Martinez, M.; Perez-Gussinye, M.; Morgan, J. P.; Araujo, M. N.

    2015-12-01

    Symmetry of conjugated rifted margins is controlled by the rheology of the crust and the mantle, extension velocities and heterogeneities in the lithosphere. However, there is a lack of knowledge on how the feedbacks between these initial conditions influence the final architecture of passive margins and the polarity of the asymmetry. Here we focus on cratons as stiff heterogeneities which potentially induce asymmetry. For simplicity, we choose to address only non-volcanic rifted margins developed next to cratons, such as the Brazil-Congo and Australia-Antarctica margin pairs. In the South Atlantic case, where cratons are closer to the margins (north of Sao Francisco craton and north and south of Congo craton) the margins are narrow, while wide margins develop far away from cratons. Extreme asymmetry occurs where rifting takes place close to a craton in one margin (narrow) and a fold belt in the conjugate (wide). The same is observed for the Australia-Antarctic pair in the sector of Recherche basin, where the Australian margin is narrow next to the Yilgarn craton and widens towards the east as it lays further from the craton. We use numerical models in order to study how cratons induce asymmetry of conjugated rifted margins and affect the polarity of the asymmetry. We ran experiments with different lower crustal rheologies for a fold belt lithosphere in order to understand which rheologies 'naturally' result in asymmetric margins. We also ran experiments where a cratonic lithosphere is placed next to a fold belt lithosphere, and where rifting is initiated by a weak seed in the fold belt at different distances from the craton. We found that where some fold belt experiments result in symmetric margins, their equivalent experiments with craton result in asymmetric margins. Furthermore, strong- and intermediate-rheology experiments with cratons showcase narrow margins in the craton side and wide margins on the fold belt side. We also observe that the distance from the

  18. Magnesium isotopic variations in cratonic eclogites: Origins and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shui-Jiong; Teng, Fang-Zhen; Williams, Helen M.; Li, Shu-Guang

    2012-12-01

    Cratonic eclogites play an important role in the formation and dynamic evolution of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle. However, their origin, whether as fragments of subducted oceanic crust or high-pressure mantle cumulates, remains controversial. Here, we report Mg isotopic compositions (δ26Mg) for cratonic eclogites from Kaalvallei and Bellsbank kimberlite pipes, South Africa. We find that clinopyroxene is 0.375±0.069 to 0.676±0.075‰ heavier than coexisting garnet, which reflects equilibrium isotope fractionation between these phases, primarily driven by the difference in Mg coordination between clinopyroxene and garnet. Bulk eclogites have strikingly variable Mg isotopic compositions, which range from -0.797±0.075 to -0.139±0.061‰, values that are significantly lighter than the range displayed by global mantle peridotites to date (-0.25±0.07‰, 2SD). As significant Mg isotope fractionation is only known to occur during low-temperature water-rock interaction, our results provide further evidence for the derivation of cratonic eclogites from subducted altered oceanic crust. In addition, the lack of correlation between Δ26Mg and Δ57Fe provides evidence for redox control on equilibrium inter-mineral Fe isotope fractionation.

  19. Seismic structure and dynamics of cratons: Stability and modification, continental collision and subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Sergei; Meier, Thomas; Schaeffer, Andrew J.; Agius, Matthew R.; Adam, Joanne M.-C.

    2014-05-01

    The Archean crust of stable cratons within today's continents is typically underlain by cold, thick mantle lithosphere. These mechanically strong, compositionally buoyant mantle roots (overall, roughly neutrally buoyant due to the density increase caused by low temperatures) have ensured the survival of cratons since their formation. Global and regional seismic tomography detects cratons readily by the anomalously high seismic velocities within their mantle lithosphere. The increasing resolution of seismic imaging now enables detailed mapping of the locations, boundaries and properties of cratons and offers new insight into their dynamics and evolution. Here, we summarise inferences on cratonic structure and dynamics based on recent multimode-waveform tomography on the global and continental (Europe, N America) scales and from regional, surface-wave array imaging. Where crustal cratonic boundaries can be mapped at the surface, they are, normally, closely matched by the boundaries of the high-velocity (thick and cold) mantle lithosphere beneath. Where the ancient crust is covered by sediments, with crustal block boundaries thus unclear, cratons can be mapped accurately by the seismic imaging of their high-velocity lithosphere. (Important exceptions include cratons that lost their ancient mantle roots in the Phanerozoic, e.g., eastern Sino-Korean Craton). On average, the upper mantle beneath cratons shows shear-wave speeds higher than elsewhere down to depths smaller than 300 km; large shear-speed anomalies are seen down to around 200 km depth only. Layered azimuthal anisotropy within cratonic lithosphere indicates frozen fabric that is probably a record of complex, vertically stratified deformation during the formation and stabilisation of cratons. Lateral variations in seismic velocities within cratonic roots present evidence for their modification and evolution after their formation. Beneath cratons in northern Europe, the locations of kimberlites coincide with

  20. Electrical conductivity images across the Namibian passive margin: Implications for tectonic processes along the Kaoko Belt, the western Kongo Craton and the Walvis Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weckmann, Ute; Meqbel, Naser; Kapinos, Gerhard; Jegen-Kulcsar, Marion; Ritter, Oliver

    2014-05-01

    The Special Priority Programme SAMPLE of the German Science Foundation DFG is focussed on investigating processes related to the breakup of supercontinent Gondwana and the post breakup evolution of the passive continental margins of Africa and South America. Within this framework an amphibian magnetotelluric (MT) experiment was conducted at the Southern African passive continental margin, starting at the Walvis Ridge in the Atlantic Ocean and crossing onshore the entire Kaoko Belt and the western boundary of the Kongo Craton in Northern Namibia. High-quality MT data at 167 onshore and xx offshore sites show a strong variability within short distances and indicate complex subsurface structures in parts of the Kaoko Belt and along some of the major thrust and fault zones. To identify the main conductivity features and resolve their properties in more spatial detail we started our modelling procedure with 2D inversion for a sub-set of the data where the 3D effects are less dominant along the amphibian profile. However, to account for 3D effects in the MT data and to assess robustness of conductivity anomalies revealed in the 2D model we used the entire data set for the 3D inversion using ModEM. 2D and 3D inversion models show zones of high electrical conductivity that correlate with surface expressions of prominent faults such as the Purros Mylonite Zone and the Three Palm Mylonite Zone of the Kaoko Belt. Outcropping Etendeka flood basalts in the Western Kaoko Zones are imaged by 10-15km deep reaching zones of high resistivity. Additionally, the inversion models reveal a spatial correlation of resistive zones with the cratonic Northern Platform; however, the geologically defined onset of the Kongo Craton appears as an area of high conductivity. Compared with other craton boundaries in Southern Africa this is very untypical.

  1. Were aspects of Pan-African deformation linked to Iapetus opening?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunow, Anne; Hanson, Richard; Wilson, Terry

    1996-12-01

    The convergence recorded in some Pan-African deformational belts (sensu lato) in South America, Africa, Madagascar, southern India, Sri Lanka, and Antarctica is temporally correlated with opening of the Iapetus ocean. We propose a model in which continent-continent collision and closure of the Adamastor ocean between the Amazon West African Rio de La Plata cratons and the São Francisco Congo Kalahari cratons in the late Neoproterozoic are linked to rifting and orthogonal spreading between Laurentia and the South American cratons. By the Early Cambrian, the cratons in South America and Africa were assembled as West Gondwana. Closure of the Mozambique ocean, which appears to have extended across Antarctica between Lützow-Holm Bay and the Shackleton Range, resulted in continued convergence between the Congo Kalahari Queen Maud Land block and East Gondwana in the Cambrian. Coeval deformation in the Transantarctic Mountains may be related to the obliquity of the Antarctic margin relative to Iapetus spreading directions. Initiation of voluminous arc magmatism along the paleo-Pacific margin of Gondwana in the Early Cambrian is broadly synchronous with the cessation of intra-Gondwana Pan-African deformation, possibly reflecting a change in plate motions at the time of final Gondwana assembly. The new subduction regime along the Gondwana margin in the Early Cambrian may be linked to the closure of the Iapetus ocean basin.

  2. Dating brittle deformation in the Archean Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thebaud, N.; Zwingmann, H.

    2012-12-01

    Major deformation throughout the Archean Yilgarn Craton has mostly been interpreted to be Neoarchean (Blewett and Czarnota, 2007). The timing of the deformation events of the brittle/ductile deformation generally relies on dating of cross-cutting intrusions or unconformities. Proterozoic overprinting and reactivation of Archean structures in the north-western part of the Yilgarn Craton has previously been dated from direct dating of the structures and fabrics from the Narryer Terrane(Spaggiari et al., 2008). However, the brittle deformation that postdates Neoarchean brittle-ductile structures in the Yilgarn Craton have received little attention to date. In the centre of the Yilgarn Craton, the Eastern Goldfields present a well developed network of E-W trending of normal brittle faults and fractures. Typically these structures are interpreted to have developed in result of a late Neoarchean tectonic relaxation following the main Yilgarn wide E-W contraction (Blewett and Czarnota, 2007). Poorly preserved and weathered faulted rocks in the subsurface environment preclude direct dating of fault gouge. However, exposure from the underground Agnew mine, in the Agnew Wiluna greenstone belt, recently provided access to fresh fault gouge material suitable for analysis. The clay gouge was characterized by SEM, TEM and XRD methods prior to age dating indicating an authigenic origin (Zwingmann et al., 2010). K-Ar illite age data of a whole rock sample split yielded an age of 1148 ± 23 Ma, which is within error close to the <2 micron clay fraction yielding an age of 1094 ± 22 Ma (Mesoproterozoic-Stenian). Our result is the first documentation of the age of the brittle deformation that affects the Yilgarn Craton. This age is within error of the Gilles event which is an extension event that affected the whole Australian continent and is responsible for the emplacement of the Warakurna Large Igneous Province and related dolerite dykes in the Yilgarn Craton (Evins et al., 2010

  3. Results for the First, Second, and Third Quarter Calendar Year 2015 Tank 50H WAC slurry samples chemical and radionuclide contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.

    2016-02-18

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the Calendar Year (CY) 2015 First, Second, and Third Quarter sampling of Tank 50H for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) in effect at that time. Information from this characterization will be used by Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) & Saltstone Facility Engineering (D&S-FE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50H to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50H Waste Characterization System. Previous memoranda documenting the WAC analyses results have been issued for these three samples.

  4. Wacław Szybalski's contribution to immunotherapy: HGPRT mutation & HAT selection as first steps to gene therapy and hybrid techniques in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Bigda, Jacek J; Koszałka, Patrycja

    2013-08-10

    In this report we describe Wacław Szybalski's fundamental contribution to gene therapy and immunotherapy. His 1962 PNAS paper (Szybalska and Szybalski, 1962) documented the first successful gene repair in mammalian cells. Furthermore, this was also the first report on the HAT selection method used later in many applications. Most importantly, somatic cell fusion and HAT selection were subsequently used to develop monoclonal antibody technology, which contributed significantly to the progress of today's medicine.

  5. Latest Jurassic-early Cretaceous regressive facies, northeast Africa craton

    SciTech Connect

    van Houten, F.B.

    1980-06-01

    Nonmarine to paralic detrital deposits accumulated in six large basins between Algeria and the Arabo-Nubian shield during major regression in latest Jurassic and Early Cretaceous time. The Ghadames Sirte (north-central Libya), and Northern (Egypt) basins lay along the cratonic margin of northeastern Africa. The Murzuk, Kufra, and Southern (Egypt) basins lay in the south within the craton. Data for reconstructing distribution, facies, and thickness of relevant sequences are adequate for the three northern basins only. High detrital influx near the end of Jurassic time and in mid-Cretaceous time produced regressive nubian facies composed largely of low-sinuosity stream and fahdelta deposits. In the west and southwest the Ghadames, Murzuk, and Kufra basins were filled with a few hundred meters of detritus after long-continued earlier Mesozoic aggradation. In northern Egypt the regressive sequence succeeded earlier Mesozoic marine sedimentation; in the Sirte and Southern basins correlative deposits accumulated on Precambrian and Variscan terranes after earlier Mesozoic uplift and erosion. Waning of detrital influx into southern Tunisia and adjacent Libya in the west and into Israel in the east initiated an Albian to early Cenomanian transgression of Tethys. By late Cenomanian time it had flooded the entire cratonic margin, and spread southward into the Murzuk and Southern basins, as well as onto the Arabo-Nubian shield. Latest Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous, mid-Cretaceous, and Late Cretaceous transgressions across northeastern Africa recorded in these sequences may reflect worldwide eustatic sea-level rises. In contrast, renewed large supply of detritus during each regression and a comparable subsidence history of intracratonic and marginal basins imply regional tectonic control. 6 figures.

  6. Teleseismic receiver functions modeling of the eastern Indian craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Prantik; Biswas, Koushik

    2016-09-01

    We estimate receiver functions (RFs) through the time-domain deconvolution using three-component broadband data of 100 teleseismic events (30° ⩽ ∧ ⩽ 90°) from 15 seismographs in the eastern Indian craton. Estimated radial RFs show a positive phase at 4.6-5.8 s delay time corresponding to the crustal thicknesses of 37-46 km. Through the differential evolution (DE) waveform inversion modeling of radial receiver functions, we delineate the crustal structure at 15 broadband stations. On an average, the Archean Singhbhum Odisha Craton (SOC) is characterized by a thick crust of 43 ± 3 km in comparison to a relatively thin crust of 41 ± 1 km underlying the Proterozoic Chotanagpur Granite Gneissic terrain (CGGT). While, a thin crust of 38 ± 1 km characterizes the younger Eastern Ghats Mobile Belt (EGMB). The main results of our modeling reveal a 46 km thick Archean crust underlying the Singhbhum granite (SG) of 3.6 Ga, which is characterized by a 3 km crustal thickening probably resulted from the Archean subduction process. Our modeling also detects a 2-3 km crustal thinning with the thinnest crust of 37 km below the region near South Singhbhum Shear Zone, which could be attributed to the 1.6 Ga plume activity associated with Dalma volcanic. Our modeling also led to the delineation of a crustal thinning of 2-3 km underlying the region in EGMB, which was influenced by a much younger (∼117 Ma) Rajmahal magmatism associated with the Gondwana break-up episode. However, our study could not detect any age-dependent variation of crustal thicknesses in the eastern Indian craton. The main result of our modeling suggests a two-phase crustal evolution process for the SOC viz. older E-W crustal thickening due to E-W plate compression and later crustal thinning episodes associated with the Dalma volcanism in the north and the Rajmahal volcanism in the South.

  7. Genome-wide siRNA screen reveals amino acid starvation-induced autophagy requires SCOC and WAC

    PubMed Central

    McKnight, Nicole C; Jefferies, Harold B J; Alemu, Endalkachew A; Saunders, Rebecca E; Howell, Michael; Johansen, Terje; Tooze, Sharon A

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process by which cytoplasmic components are sequestered and transported by autophagosomes to lysosomes for degradation, enabling recycling of these components and providing cells with amino acids during starvation. It is a highly regulated process and its deregulation contributes to multiple diseases. Despite its importance in cell homeostasis, autophagy is not fully understood. To find new proteins that modulate starvation-induced autophagy, we performed a genome-wide siRNA screen in a stable human cell line expressing GFP–LC3, the marker-protein for autophagosomes. Using stringent validation criteria, our screen identified nine novel autophagy regulators. Among the hits required for autophagosome formation are SCOC (short coiled-coil protein), a Golgi protein, which interacts with fasciculation and elongation protein zeta 1 (FEZ1), an ULK1-binding protein. SCOC forms a starvation-sensitive trimeric complex with UVRAG (UV radiation resistance associated gene) and FEZ1 and may regulate ULK1 and Beclin 1 complex activities. A second candidate WAC is required for starvation-induced autophagy but also acts as a potential negative regulator of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The identification of these novel regulatory proteins with diverse functions in autophagy contributes towards a fuller understanding of autophagosome formation. PMID:22354037

  8. Remobilization in the cratonic lithosphere recorded in polycrystalline diamond

    PubMed

    Jacob; Viljoen; Grassineau; Jagoutz

    2000-08-18

    Polycrystalline diamonds (framesites) from the Venetia kimberlite in South Africa contain silicate minerals whose isotopic and trace element characteristics document remobilization of older carbon and silicate components to form the framesites shortly before kimberlite eruption. Chemical variations within the garnets correlate with carbon isotopes in the diamonds, indicating contemporaneous formation. Trace element, radiogenic, and stable isotope variations can be explained by the interaction of eclogites with a carbonatitic melt, derived by remobilization of material that had been stored for a considerable time in the lithosphere. These results indicate more recent formation of diamonds from older materials within the cratonic lithosphere.

  9. Numerical modeling of continental rifting: Implications for the East African Rift system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koptev, Alexander; Burov, Evgueni; Calais, Eric; Leroy, Sylvie; Gerya, Taras; Guillou-Frottier, Laurent; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2016-04-01

    The East African Rift system (EARS) provides a unique system with juxtaposition of two contrasting yet simultaneously formed rift branches, the eastern, magma-rich, and the western, magma-poor, on either side of the old thick Tanzanian craton embedded into younger lithosphere. Here we take advantage of the improvements in our understanding of deep structures, geological evolution and recent kinematics, together with new cutting edge numerical modeling techniques to design a three-dimensional ultra-high resolution viscous plastic thermo-mechanical numerical model that accounts for thermo-rheological structure of the lithosphere and hence captures the essential geophysical features of the central EARS. Based on our experiments, we show that in case of the mantle plume seeded slightly to the northeast of the craton center, the ascending plume material is deflected by the cratonic keel and preferentially channeled along the eastern side of the craton, leading to formation of a large rift zone characterized by important magmatic activity with substantial amounts of melts derived from mantle plume material. This model is in good agreement with the observations in the EARS, as it reproduces the magmatic eastern branch and at the same time, anticlockwise rotation of the craton. However, this experiment does not reproduce the observed strain localization along the western margin of the cratonic bloc. To explain the formation of contrasting magmatic and amagmatic rift branches initiating simultaneously on either side of a non-deforming block as observed in the central EARS, we experimentally explored several scenarios of which three can be retained as specifically pertaining to the EARS: (1) The most trivial first scenario assumes rheologically weak vertical interface simulating the suture zone observed in the geological structure along the western border of the craton; (2) The second scenario involves a second smaller plume initially shifted in SW direction; (3) Finally, a

  10. Upper mantle P velocities beneath the North America craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, R.; Helmberger, D. V.

    2010-12-01

    In this work, we determined the detailed mechanisms of three earthquakes occurring in Quebec, Texas and Idaho for use in modeling triplication data. The first event provided pure-path triplication recordings at over 400 USArray stations. Although amplitudes of the direct P waves are small, the depth phase sP is clear and displays shadow-zone characteristics indicative a low velocity layer (LVL) in the upper mantle, where the amplitude of the AB branch decreases rapidly at a distance of 16 degrees. Another feature of the LVL is that the AB branch can be seen at distances larger than 23 degrees. Similar to the Canadian Shield velocity model S25 (LeFevre and Helmberger, 1989), we found a LVL between 160 km and 215 km and obtained excellent fits assuming 1D model. The other two events are located near the craton margins and have been recorded by the MOMA array (Texas event) and CANOE array (Idaho event). These mixed paths are mostly craton with modified 1D models producing good fits. We, also, produced 2D modeling results that use tomographic images for correcting the source structures.

  11. Crustal evolution and the eclogite to granulite phase transition in xenoliths from the West African Craton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, S. E.; Hills, D. V.; Toft, P. B.

    1988-01-01

    A suite of eclogite and granulite facies xenoliths from kimberlite pipes in the Archean Man Shield of West Africa is described. The xenoliths include lithologies ranging in composition from komatiite to anorthosite and appear to be geochemically, petrologically, and geophysically related. The suite may represent fractionation of felsic material separated from ancient mantle and added to early Archean crust. The samples can be used to define a xenolith geotherm, which may represent an ancient episode of high heat flow. The samples also imply that the crust-mantle boundary is a gradational and possibly interlayered geochemical, mineralogical, and seismic transition. It is speculated that the depleted subcontinental mantle required by diamond bearing coalescence of smaller depletion cells formed by extraction of ancient crustal components. These depleted zones are surrounded by fertile asthenospheric mantle, which may have given rise to later flood basalts such as the Karroo and Parana Provinces.

  12. Geology of the world-class Kiaka polyphase gold deposit, West African Craton, Burkina Faso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, Arnaud; Eglinger, Aurélien; Ada, Koumangdiwè; André-Mayer, Anne-Sylvie; Reisberg, Laurie; Siebenaller, Luc; Le Mignot, Elodie; Ganne, Jérôme; Poujol, Marc

    2017-02-01

    The Kiaka gold deposit is a major resource in West Africa, with measured and indicated resources of 124 Mt at 1.09 g/t Au (3.9 Moz) and inferred resources of 27 Mt at 0.83 g/t Au (0.8 Moz). Located within the Manga-Fada N'Gourma greenstone and plutonic belt in south of the Burkina Faso, the deposit is hosted by a metamorphosed volcano-sedimentary sequence of lithic-, quartz-biotite metagreywackes, aluminosilicate-bearing metapelites and garnet-orthopyroxene-bearing schists and volcanic units. Structural observations indicate four local deformation events: DK1, DK2 and DK3 and DK4. Respectively, these events are linked to regional D1 E-W compression, D2 NW-SE compression and lastly, D3- and D4-related reactivations along D2 shear zones. The S2 foliation and D2 shear zones are developed during lower amphibolite facies metamorphism whereas retrogression occurs during D3-4 reactivations along these shear zones at upper greenschist facies conditions. The emplacement of a dioritic intrusion, dated at 2140 ± 7 Ma (Concordia U-Pb age on magmatic zircon), is interpreted to be contemporaneous with sinistral displacement along mineralized, NE-trending D2 shear zones. The intersection of these shears zones and the Markoye shear zone (dextral-reverse D1 and sinistral-reverse D2 reactivations) controlled the final geometry of the host rocks and the ore zones. Four subparallel elongated ore bodies are mainly hosted within D2-related shear zones and some are developed in an apparent axial plane of a F2 isoclinal fold. Detailed petrographic studies have identified two main types of hydrothermal alteration associated with two stages of gold mineralization. The stage (1) corresponds to replacement zones with biotite and clinozoisite during the D2 event associated with pyrrhotite ± pyrite, chalcopyrite (disseminated gold stage). The stage (2) occurs during reactivations of the D2-related auriferous shear zones (vein stage) and is characterized by diopside ± actinolite D3 veins and veinlets and D4 pervasive muscovite, ± chlorite, ± calcite in quartz-carbonate vein selvages and associated with pyrrhotite + arsenopyrite ± electrum, ± native gold and tellurobismuthite. The latter stage (2) could be divided into two sub-stages based on mineralogy and crosscutting relationship. A weighted average Re-Os pyrrhotite age at 2157 ± 24 Ma (Re-Os age based on 3 replicates) constraints the timing of the disseminated gold stage and represents the first absolute age for gold mineralization in the Manga Fada N'Gourma area. The timing of gold at Kiaka may be also coeval with one of the two lode gold event at ∼ ca. 2.16-2.15 Ga and occurred concomitant with tectono-thermal activity during Eo-Eburnean orogeny. The study of the Kiaka gold deposit emphasizes the importance of a multi-scale and multidisciplinary approach (field observations, petrography geothermobarometry and geochronology) to decipher the polyphase character of some Paleoproterozoic gold deposits.

  13. 3-D Structure of the Slave and Rae Cratons Provides Clues to Their Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    Deep geologic structures within cratons that make up continental cores were long neglected. Recently acquired geophysical data from large observational arrays and geochemical data resulting from exploration for diamond has now made possible co-registration of large-scale (400-km depth), truly 3-dimensional data sets. P-waves, surface waves and magnetotelluric observations provide 3-D wavespeed and conductivity models. Multi-azimuthal receiver functions map seismic discontinuity surfaces in 3-D. Xenolith suites erupted in kimberlites provide rock samples at key lithospheric depths, albeit at sparsely distributed locations. These multi-disciplinary models are becoming available for several key cratons worldwide; here the deep structure of the Slave and Rae cratons of the Canadian Shield is described. Lithospheric layers with tapered, wedge-shaped margins are common. Slave craton layers are sub-horizontal and indicate construction of the craton core at 2.7 Ga by underthrusting and flat stacking of lithosphere. The central Rae craton has predominantly dipping discontinuities that indicate construction at 1.9 Ga by thrusting similar to that observed in crustal ';thick-skinned' fold-and-thrust belts. 3-D mapping of conductivity and metasomatism, the latter via mineral recrystallization and resetting of isotopic ages, overprints primary structures in both cratons. Distribution of more conductivitve mantle suggests that assumed causative pervasive metasomatism occurs at 100-200 km depths with ';chimneys' reaching to shallower depths, typically in locations where kimberlites or mineralization has occurred.

  14. Origins of cratonic mantle discontinuities: A view from petrology, geochemistry and thermodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulbach, Sonja; Massuyeau, Malcolm; Gaillard, Fabrice

    2017-01-01

    Geophysically detectible mid-lithospheric discontinuities (MLD) and lithosphere-asthenosphere boundaries (LAB) beneath cratons have received much attention over recent years, but a consensus on their origin has not yet emerged. Cratonic lithosphere composition and origin is peculiar due to its ultra-depletion during plume or accretionary tectonics, cool present-day geothermal gradients, compositional and rheological stratification and multiple metasomatic overprints. Bearing this in mind, we integrate current knowledge on the physical properties, chemical composition, mineralogy and fabric of cratonic mantle with experimental and thermodynamic constraints on the formation and migration of melts, both below and within cratonic lithosphere, in order to find petrologically viable explanations for cratonic mantle discontinuities. LABs characterised by strong seismic velocity gradients and increased conductivity require the presence of melts, which can form beneath intact cratonic roots reaching to 200-250 km depth only in exceptionally warm and/or volatile-rich mantle, thus explaining the paucity of seismical LAB observations beneath cratons. When present, pervasive interaction of these - typically carbonated - melts with the deep lithosphere leads to densification and thermochemical erosion, which generates topography at the LAB and results in intermittent seismic LAB signals or conflicting seismic, petrologic and thermal LAB depths. In rare cases (e.g. Tanzanian craton), the tops of live melt percolation fronts may appear as MLDs and, after complete lithosphere rejuvenation, may be sites of future, shallower LABs (e.g. North China craton). Since intact cratons are presently tectonomagmatically quiescent, and since MLDs produce both positive and negative velocity gradients, in some cases with anisotropy, most MLDs may be best explained by accumulations (metasomes) of seismically slow minerals (pyroxenes, phlogopite, amphibole, carbonates) deposited during past

  15. A Sharp Edge of the Cratonic Lithosphere of North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, T. B.; Skryzalin, P. A.; Menke, W. H.; Levin, V. L.; Darbyshire, F. A.

    2015-12-01

    Using teleseismic travel time delays, we develop a tomographic model of the lithosphere beneath northeastern North America, from the shore of James Bay in Quebec to the Atlantic coast of New England and to a depth of 300 km. Three major terranes lie within this cratonic margin: the 2.7 Ga Superior province, the 1 Ga Grenville orogenic belt and the 0.3-0.4 Ga Appalachian terranes, which are bounded by the Grenville Front (GF) and Appalachian Front (AF), respectively. Additionally, the 0.8 Ga Avalon terrain was accreted to coastal New England by strike-skip faulting during the Appalachian orogeny. Our tomographic model uses earthquake seismograms recorded by permanent US and Canadian stations, the Transportable Array and the temporary QMIII deployment. All data were corrected for instrument response and record sections were examined visually to identify gross errors in response and timing. Differential arrival times of P and PKP waves were determined by cross-correlation and have a maximum amplitude of about ±1 second. In our model, lithospheric boundaries do not correlate well with geological boundaries, nor do they strike parallel to them. The seismically-fast (by 5% relative to AK135) cratonic lithosphere of North America is much thicker than that of the younger terranes, extending to 200 km or more depth but with a sharp east-dipping eastern edge located (at Moho depths) 100-250 km northwest of the GF. The lithosphere beneath the Grenville and Appalachian terranes, which were affected by subduction during the Grenville and Appalachian orogenies, is slower (by 4%). A sliver of seismically-fast lithosphere, extending to ~150 km depth, occurs along the Atlantic coast and is interpreted as the Avalonian lithosphere.

  16. SRNL PHASE 1 ASSESSMENT OF THE WAC/DQO AND UNIT OPERATIONS FOR THE WTP WASTE QUALIFICATION PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D.; Adamson, D.; Bannochie, C.; Cozzi, A.; Eibling, R.; Hay, M.; Hansen, E.; Herman, D.; Martino, C.; Nash, C.; Pennebaker, F.; Poirier, M.; Reboul, S.; Stone, M.; Taylor-Pashow, K.; White, T.; Wilmarth, B.

    2012-05-16

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is currently transitioning its emphasis from a design and construction phase toward start-up and commissioning. With this transition, the WTP Project has initiated more detailed assessments of the requirements related to actual processing of the Hanford Site tank waste. One particular area of interest is the waste qualification program to be implemented to support the WTP. Given the successful implementation of similar waste qualification efforts at the Savannah River Site (SRS), based on critical technical support and guidance from the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), WTP requested the utilization of subject matter experts from SRNL to support a technology exchange to perform a review of the WTP waste qualification program, discuss the general qualification approach at SRS, and to identify critical lessons learned through the support of DWPF's sludge batch qualification efforts. As part of Phase 1, SRNL subject matter experts in critical technical and/or process areas reviewed specific WTP waste qualification information. The Phase 1 review was a collaborative, interactive, and iterative process between the two organizations. WTP provided specific analytical procedures, descriptions of equipment, and general documentation as baseline review material. SRNL subject matter experts reviewed the information and, as appropriate, requested follow-up information or clarification to specific areas of interest. This process resulted in multiple teleconferences with key technical contacts from both organizations resolving technical issues that lead to the results presented in this report. This report provides the results of SRNL's Phase 1 review of the WAC-DQO waste acceptance criteria and processability parameters, and the specific unit operations which are required to support WTP waste qualification efforts. The review resulted in SRNL providing concurrence, alternative methods, or gap identification

  17. Plume-induced dynamic instabilities near cratonic blocks: Implications for P-T-t paths and metallogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillou-Frottier, L.; Burov, E.; Cloetingh, S.; Le Goff, E.; Deschamps, Y.; Huet, B.; Bouchot, V.

    2012-06-01

    Plume head-lithosphere interactions around cratonic blocks result in thermo-mechanical disturbances that lead to heating and burial phases of crustal rocks. We present results from numerical models of plume head-cratonic blocks interactions where a free upper surface condition and realistic rheologies are accounted for. These models include distinct cratonic blocks embedded within a continental lithosphere and separated by several hundreds of kilometers. Surface topography, thermal field and effective viscosity values are tracked for 20 Myr of interactions. The modeled dynamic interaction of a plume head around cratonic blocks results in two main types of instabilities, each of them resulting in a distinct P-T-t path. The "slab-like" instability, focused on cratonic edges when plume head is away from the craton center, shows a near-isothermal burial phase, while the "drip-like" instability occurring above plume head material results in a near-isobaric heating phase. Consequently, both clockwise and counterclockwise P-T-t paths can be expected around cratons, as actually observed around the Tanzanian craton and other cratonic areas. Metallogenic data from gemstone-bearing rocks in south-east Africa and data from ultrahigh temperature and ultrahigh pressure metamorphism are compatible with our model. It appears that vertical mantle dynamics around cratons may also explain thermobarometric signatures that are often attributed to horizontal tectonics.

  18. On the relations between cratonic lithosphere thickness, plate motions, and basal drag

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Artemieva, I.M.; Mooney, W.D.

    2002-01-01

    An overview of seismic, thermal, and petrological evidence on the structure of Precambrian lithosphere suggests that its local maximum thickness is highly variable (140-350 km), with a bimodal distribution for Archean cratons (200-220 km and 300-350 km). We discuss the origin of such large differences in lithospheric thickness, and propose that the lithospheric base can have large depth variations over short distances. The topography of Bryce Canyon (western USA) is proposed as an inverted analog of the base of the lithosphere. The horizontal and vertical dimensions of Archean cratons are strongly correlated: larger cratons have thicker lithosphere. Analysis of the bimodal distribution of lithospheric thickness in Archean cratons shows that the "critical" surface area for cratons to have thick (>300 km) keels is >6-8 ?? 106 km2 . Extrapolation of the linear trend between Archean lithospheric thickness and cratonic area to zero area yields a thickness of 180 km. This implies that the reworking of Archean crust should be accompanied by thinning and reworking of the entire lithospheric column to a thickness of 180 km in accord with thickness estimates for Proterozoic lithosphere. Likewise, extrapolation of the same trend to the size equal to the total area of all Archean cratons implies that the lithospheric thickness of a hypothesized early Archean supercontinent could have been 350-450 km decreasing to 280-400 km for Gondwanaland. We evaluate the basal drag model as a possible mechanism that may thin the cratonic lithosphere. Inverse correlations are found between lithospheric thickness and (a) fractional subduction length and (b) the effective ridge length. In agreement with theoretical predictions, lithospheric thickness of Archean keels is proportional to the square root of the ratio of the craton length (along the direction of plate motion) to the plate velocity. Large cratons with thick keels and low plate velocities are less eroded by basal drag than small

  19. Dating Kimberlite Eruption and Erosion Phases Using Perovskite, Zircon, and Apatite (U-Th)/He Geochronology to Link Cratonic Lithosphere Evolution and Surface Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, J. R.; Flowers, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    In many cases it is difficult to evaluate the synchronicity and thus potential connections between disparate geologic events, such as the links between processes in the mantle lithosphere and at the surface. Developing new geochronologic tools and strategies for integrating existing chronologic data with other information is essential for addressing these problems. Here we use (U-Th)/He dating of multiple kimberlitic minerals to date kimberlite eruption and cratonic erosion phases. This approach permits us to more directly assess the link between unroofing and thermomodification of the lithosphere by tying our results to information obtained from mantle-derived clasts in the same pipes. Kimberlites are rich sources of information about the composition of the cratonic lithosphere and its evolution over time. Their xenoliths and xenocrysts can preserve a snapshot of the entire lithosphere and its sedimentary cover at the time of eruption. Accurate geochronology of these eruptions is crucial for interpreting spatiotemporal trends, but kimberlites can be difficult to date using standard techniques. Here we show that the mid-temperature thermochonometers of the zircon and perovskite (U-Th)/He (ZHe, PHe) systems can be viable tools for dating kimberlite eruption. When combined with the low temperature sensitivity of (U-Th)/He in apatite (AHe), the (U-Th)/He system can be used to date both the emplacement and the erosional cooling history of kimberlites. The southern African shield is an ideal location to test the utility of this approach because the region was repeatedly intruded by kimberlites in the Cretaceous, with two major pulses at ~200-110 Ma and ~100-80 Ma. These kimberlites contain a well-studied suite of mantle xenoliths and xenocrysts that document lithospheric heating and metasomatism over this interval. Our ZHe and PHe dates overlap with published eruption ages and add new ages for undated pipes. Our AHe dates constrain the spatial patterns of Cretaceous

  20. Lithospheric Structure of the North American Craton Imaged Using Waveform Inversion of Global and Usarray Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, A. J.; Lebedev, S.

    2014-12-01

    The North American Craton, now forming the stable core of North America, has a long, eventful tectonic history. The assembly of the craton, collisions and accretion at its current boundaries, major rifting episodes within it, and the loss of ancient lithosphere beneath parts of it are type examples of these key components of cratonic dynamics and evolution. Seismic tomography offers rich evidence on the structure and evolution of the cratonic lithosphere. With the deployment of the USArray during the last decade, much of the North American continent has been densely sampled with broadband seismic data. The resolution of regional-scale imaging, however, remains uneven, with important questions regarding deep structure, lateral extent and evolution difficult to answer. Here we present a new high-resolution model of the upper mantle beneath North America constrained by waveform fits of over 700,000 vertical-component broadband seismograms. Automated multimode waveform inversion was used to extract structural information from surface and S waveforms, yielding resolving power from the crust down to the transition zone, and improved resolution for a variety of features in North America. The internal structure of the Craton is resolved in detail. The lithosphere surrounding the 1 Ga failed Mid-Continental Rift shows reduced wavespeeds compared to the surrounding craton, likely indicating thermo-chemical alteration of the sub-continental lithospheric mantle. The sharp northern boundaries of the cratonic lithosphere closely follow the coastlines, with North America's and Greenland's lithospheric roots clearly separated. Strong lateral velocity gradients at depth observed in western Canada indicate the transition from cratonic lithosphere to Cordillera closely follows the surface trace of the Deformation Front. On the eastern margin of the continent, where multiple episodes of continental rifting are superimposed, the craton boundary coincides with the western extent of the

  1. Lithopsheric anisotropy in the Archean Slave craton, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, D. B.; Bostock, M.; Lockhart, G. D.

    2003-12-01

    Shear wave anisotropy and discontinuity studies of teleseismic earthquakes recorded at single seismic stations help to define vertical mantle stratigraphic columns. Beneath the Archean outcrops of the central Slave craton seismic discontinuities at 38, 115, 140, and 190 km appear to bound two distinct anisotropic layers. The discontinuity at 38 km is the Moho; discontinuities at 110-120 and 140-150 km depths observed at multiple nearby stations indicate that a layer of low velocity or distinct anisotropy exists between these depths. The coherent pulses at about 13 seconds on the radial component indicates a strong decrease in velocity at 110 km depth north and west of the Ekati diamond mine, but not to the south. The response on the transverse component indicates a rotation of anisotropic fabric at 117 km depth, a reversal at 140 km, and another rotation at 190 km. A flip in polarity at a back azimuth of about 280° occurs in the 117 km discontinuity and apparently marks an axis of symmetry of anisotropy, here probably the dip direction of steep layering or planar fabric. SKS anisotropy studies at this station indicate that the upper of two anisotopic layers has a fast-axis direction of 010° . Geochemical studies of xenolith samples from nearby kimberlites suggest that the boundaries at 115 and 140 bound a layer of ultra-depleted harzburgite, almost pure olivine, that formed as oceanic crust.

  2. Architecture of the Sulu crustal suture between the North China Craton and Yangtze Craton: Constraints from Mesozoic granitoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Rui; Wang, Qingfei; Liu, Xuefei; Wang, Wei; Pan, Ruiguang

    2016-12-01

    The Yangtze Craton (YC) and the North China Craton (NCC) collided in the Triassic, producing the prominent NNE-trending Sulu high-ultrahigh pressure metamorphic belt and associated crustal thickening. Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous granitic plutons in the Sulu orogenic belt and the Jiaobei terrane to the west were used to investigate the crustal architecture across the suture. Our new data show that the granitoids from these two regions have similar chemical and isotope compositions. They are all characterized by very high Sr and low Y-Yb contents, high Sr/Y and (La/Yb)N ratios, similar ƐNd(t) values from - 18.2 to - 21.4, and similar initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios from 0.7076 to 0.7119. The calculated Nd two-stage model ages (TDM2) based on whole rock data vary from 2415 to 2662 Ma. Co-magmatic zircon crystals from the granitoids have variably negative ƐHf(t) values from - 26.8 to - 12.8, with the calculated Hf TDM2 from 2008 to 2892 Ma. The inherited zircon crystals from these rocks are dominated by Neoproterozoic (800-600 Ma) and Triassic-Early Jurassic ( 220 Ma and 180 Ma) ages. The ƐHf(t) values of the inherited zircon crystals with U-Pb ages between 180 Ma and 800 Ma from Sulu and Jiaobei range from - 21.6 to 4.2 and from - 23 to - 1.9, respectively. They all plot within the field of crustal evolution between 1385 and 2583 Ma. The similar whole rock geochemical signatures and similar inherited zircon data indicate a similar source for the granitoids in these two regions. We propose that the source regions across the suture all belong to the YC. The occurrence of the YC crust beneath the NCC at this location is thought to have resulted from the westward subduction of the YC beneath the NCC and subsequent continental collision in the Triassic. In this model, the abundant 800 to 230 Ma inherited zircon crystals in the granitoids are interpreted to have been derived from the source region whereas the rare older inherited zircon crystals are thought to have been

  3. Spatial distribution of eclogite in the Slave cratonic mantle: The role of subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylova, Maya G.; Beausoleil, Yvette; Goncharov, Alexey; Burgess, Jennifer; Strand, Pamela

    2016-03-01

    We reconstructed the spatial distribution of eclogites in the cratonic mantle based on thermobarometry for ~ 240 xenoliths in 4 kimberlite pipes from different parts of the Slave craton (Canada). The accuracy of depth estimates is ensured by the use of a recently calibrated thermometer, projection of temperatures onto well-constrained local peridotitic geotherms, petrological screening for unrealistic temperature estimates, and internal consistency of all data. The depth estimates are based on new data on mineral chemistry and petrography of 148 eclogite xenoliths from the Jericho and Muskox kimberlites of the northern Slave craton and previously reported analyses of 95 eclogites from Diavik and Ekati kimberlites (Central Slave). The majority of Northern Slave eclogites of the crustal, subduction origin occurs at 110-170 km, shallower than in the majority of the Central Slave crustal eclogites (120-210 km). The identical geochronological history of these eclogite populations and the absence of steep suture boundaries between the central and northern Slave craton suggest the lateral continuity of the mantle layer relatively rich in eclogites. We explain the distribution of eclogites by partial preservation of an imbricated and plastically dispersed oceanic slab formed by easterly dipping Proterozoic subduction. The depths of eclogite localization do not correlate with geophysically mapped discontinuities. The base of the depleted lithosphere of the Slave craton constrained by thermobarometry of peridotite xenoliths coincides with the base of the thickened lithospheric slab, which supports contribution of the recycled oceanic lithosphere to formation of the cratonic root. Its architecture may have been protected by circum-cratonic subduction and shielding of the shallow Archean lithosphere from the destructive asthenospheric metasomatism.

  4. Episodic, Multi-staged Lithospheric Delamination Responsible for Destruction of the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Wang, Y.; Zhong, S.

    2013-12-01

    Archean cratons represent the oldest tectonic units on the Earth and most of them are tectonically stable for >3 Ga. The North China Craton (NCC), however, had undergone extensive destruction during the Mesozoic to Cenozoic as seen from surface volcanism, magmatism, and tectonic deformation and geochemical and seismic observations suggesting removal and replacement of thick, old, and fertile cratonic lithosphere with thin, young, and depleted oceanic-type lithosphere [Griffin et al., 1998; Xu, 2001; Menzies et al., 2007; Zhu et al., 2012; Zhang et al., 2012]. Lithospheric delamination has been proposed to explain different episodes of volcanism in the Jurassic [Gao et al., 2004; 2008] and Cretaceous [Yang et al., 2003; Wu et al., 2003] on NCC and hence as a mechanism for destruction of NCC. However, the relatively long period (~100 Myr) of volcanism associated with the destruction of NCC was considered as a challenge to the delamination process [Menzies et al., 2007] which typically lasts for several Myr [Conrad and Molnar, 1999]. Here we show that delamination for cratonic lithosphere with chemically buoyant root and non-Newtonian rheology, different from that for normal lithosphere that was considered in most previous geodynamic studies, is episodic and multi-staged and may last for tens to 100 Myrs. For cratonic lithosphere with non-Newtonian rheology with relatively large chemical buoyancy, the cold, shallow part of the lithosphere goes unstable first, causing significant stirring and mixing of asthenospheric mantle and cratonic lithosphere. This delamination process may explain the main geochemical signatures in the Jurassic and Cretaceous volcanic rocks found in the NCC including their eclogite component [Gao et al., 2004, 2008] and sourcing both cratonic lithosphere and asthenosphere [Zheng et al., 2000]. Subduction process, by increasing tectonic stress and water content, helps reduce the lithospheric viscosity sufficiently to delaminate the entire

  5. Giant Mesozoic gold provinces related to the destruction of the North China craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Wei; Bi, Shi-Jian; Selby, David; Chen, Lei; Vasconcelos, Paulo; Thiede, David; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Zhao, Xin-Fu; Li, Zhan-Ke; Qiu, Hua-Ning

    2012-10-01

    Lode gold deposits in Precambrian cratons represent the world's major gold source and were mostly generated during formation and stabilization of the cratons. However, there is an extraordinary exception in the North China craton (NCC), where lode gold deposits formed after prolonged stabilization of the craton. Molybdenite Re-Os and hydrothermal sericite and biotite 40Ar/39Ar dating of major gold deposits from the Xiaoqinling district, southern NCC, bracket their emplacement in the range of 154.1±1.1 to 118.9±1.2 Ma (n=23), postdating formation of the craton by more than 1.7 billion years. Fluid inclusions extracted from gold-bearing pyrite have elevated 3He/4He ratios (1.52-0.22 Ra) and mantle-like Ne isotopes (20Ne/22Ne=10.02-9.22 and 21Ne/22Ne=0.033-0.027), indicating presence of mantle-derived fluids in the ore system. Measured δ34S of pyrite and δD and δ18O of hydrothermal micas and fluid inclusion waters in auriferous quartz further confirm a magmatic/mantle source for sulfur and ore fluids. Gold deposits of similar ages also widely occur in the eastern and northern margins of the NCC, which, together with those in the Xiaoqinling district, have a total reserve of ˜2500 t gold, forming the only known giant late Mesozoic gold province in the world's Precambrian cratons. These deposits formed coevally with extensive felsic to mafic magmatism, development of intracontinental rift basins, and exhumation of metamorphic core complexes across the eastern NCC, events interpreted as indicating thinning and destruction of the lithosphere beneath the craton. Rising of asthenosphere coupled with destruction of the lithosphere has generated voluminous mafic and felsic magmas that provided sufficient fluids, sulfur and, by inference, other ore components to form the giant gold provinces.

  6. African Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abiodun, Rowland

    2001-01-01

    No single traditional discipline can adequately supply answers to the many unresolved questions in African art history. Because of the aesthetic, cultural, historical, and, not infrequently, political biases, already built into the conception and development of Western art history, the discipline of art history as defined and practiced in the West…

  7. African Pentecostalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrard, David J.

    2009-01-01

    The diversity of African Pentecostalism, its early colonial and missionary history and its current characteristics are described and analysed. Reference is made to methods of training and forms of leadership, and suggestions are made about the reasons for its growth and persistence. (Contains 19 notes.)

  8. The Preservation of Meso- Archean Refractory Lithospheric Mantle Underneath the Eastern Margin of the Tanzania Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Q.; Liu, J.; Pearson, G. D.; Gibson, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    Numerous studies on the petrology and geochemistry of peridotite xenoliths from the Tanzanian Craton and its rifted margins have investigated the origin, chemical change and thermal state of the cratonic roots from its core area (Nzega and Mwadui), its Northern (Marsabit) and Eastern margin Labait and Lashaine area (e.g. Dawson, 1964; Henjes-Kunst and Altherr, 1991; Lee & Rudnick, 1999; Chesley et al., 1999; Gibson et al., 2013). These studies suggest that the Tanzanian cratonic mantle formed via high degrees of melt extraction in the Archean (oldest Re-depletion age TRD = 3.4 Ga, Burton et al., 2000) and sev­eral episodes of refertilization. In order to gain further temporal and chemical understanding on the effects of tectonic processes on cratonic roots, we carried out a Re-Os isotopic study on peridotites (n = 11) from Lashaine, which will be followed by Lu-Hf, Sm-Nd and Sr isotope investigations of the constituent minerals of the same samples. The preliminary whole-rock Os isotope data from Lashaine peridotites show a large range of 187Os/188Os (0.1061 - 0.1261), with TRD ages from Meso-Archean to very young (3.1 Ga to 0.3 Ga). There is a negative correlation between TRD and bulk alumina contents. One sample with the lowest Al2O3 yields the oldest age of 3.1 Ga. Five samples range from 2.5 to 2.8 Ga, three give ages close to 2 Ga, and one sample with a high Al2O3 has a TRD at 0.3 Ga. The positive Al2O3-187Os/188Os correlation trend passes above the PM composition may reflect ancient metasomatism by high Re/Os melts or recent metasomatism by very radiogenic Os plume-derived melts. These processes could be related to the evolution of the peripheral Proterozoic mobile belts, or Cenozoic rifting on the Eastern margin. Collectively, our new Os isotope data demonstrate that Meso-Archean (at least 3.1 Ga old) mantle portions are still retained underneath the rifted Eastern margin of the Craton. This is in line with previous results indicating that Archean cratonic

  9. High Water Contents in the Siberian Cratonic Mantle: An FTIR Study of Udachnaya Peridotite Xenoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doucet, Luc S.; Peslier, Anne H.; Ionov, Dimitri A.; Brandon, Alan D.; Golovin, Alexander V.; Ashchepkov, Igor V.

    2013-01-01

    Water is believed to be a key factor controlling the long-term stability of cratonic lithosphere, but mechanisms responsible for the water content distribution in the mantle remain poorly constrained. Water contents were obtained by FTIR in olivine, pyroxene and garnet for 20 well-characterized peridotite xenoliths from the Udachnaya kimberlite (central Siberian craton) and equilibrated at 2-7 GPa. Water contents in minerals do not appear to be related to interaction with the host kimberlite. Diffusion modeling indicates that the core of olivines preserved their original water contents. The Udachnaya peridotites show a broad range of water contents in olivine (6.5 +/- 1.1 to 323 +- 65 ppm H2O (2 sigma)), and garnet (0 - 23 +/- 6 ppm H2O). The water contents of olivine and garnet are positively correlated with modal clinopyroxene, garnet and FeO in olivine. Water-rich garnets are also rich in middle rare earth elements. This is interpreted as the result of interaction between residual peridotites and water rich-melts, consistent with modal and cryptic metasomatism evidenced in the Siberian cratonic mantle. The most water-rich Udachnaya minerals contain 2 to 3 times more water than those from the Kaapvaal craton, the only craton with an intact mantle root for which water data is available. The highest water contents in olivine and orthopyroxene in this study (>= 300 ppm) are found at the bottom of the lithosphere (> 6.5 GPa). This is in contrast with the Kaapvaal craton where the olivines of peridotites equilibrated at > 6.4 GPa have < 1 ppm H2O. The latter "dry" olivine may make the base of the Kaapvaal cratonic root strong and thus protects it from erosion by the convective mantle The calculated viscosity for water-rich Udachnaya peridotites at > 6 GPa is lower or similar (8.4× 10(exp 16) to 8.0× 10(exp 18) Pa./s) to that of the asthenosphere (<= 3.7x10(exp 18) Pa./s ). Such lithologies would not be able to resist delamination by the convecting asthenosphere

  10. Supercontinents, True Polar Wander, and Paleogeography of the Slave Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Ross Nelson

    evidence in support of a long-lived, Ediacaran-aged hotspot. The consistency of paleocurrent directions derived from the Great Slave Supergroup argues against significant regional vertical-axis rotations and for large and rapid TPW to explain discordant paleomagnetic directions observed within section. The last frontier for paleomagnetic constraints on supercontinents, TPW, and the antiquity of plate tectonics is earliest Proterozoic time. Laurentia, one of Earth's oldest continents that formed at the core supercontinent Nuna, contains several cratons that have adequate paleomagnetic and geochronologic data with which to test for evidence of early TPW and relative plate motion, the hallmark of tectonics. Although past comparisons have been made between the Slave and Superior cratons at each "bookend" of Laurentia, new paleomagnetic data supported by baked contact tests allow for conclusive early Proterozoic reconstructions. Similar to periods following Proterozoic supercontinents Nuna and Rodinia, early Proterozoic time is characterized by large TPW oscillations and large-scale plate reorganizations prior to amalgamation, possibly indicating the presence of `Kenorland', an Archean supercontinent.

  11. Surface Curvature in Island Groups and Discontinuous Cratonic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, M. S.

    2002-05-01

    The Canadian Archipelago includes eight major islands and a host of smaller ones. They are separated by water bodies, of varying widths attributable to glacial activity and ocean currents. Land form varies from relatively rugged mountains (~2000 m) in eastern, glacial, islands, to low lying western, similar to the continental topography adjacent. The Arctic region is thought to have been low average elevation before the Pleistocene. To a picture puzzler, it all looks like it fit together. Experimentally cutting apart the islands from large scale maps shows that the rough edges match fairly well. However, when those independent pieces are sutured together, without restraint, as in free air, the fit is far better. Far more importantly, they consistently form a noticeably concave surface. This tendency is not at all apparent in flat surface or computer screen manipulation; the pieces need to be "hand joined" or on a molded surface to allow the assembly to freely form as it will. Fitting together the coastlines above 60 \\deg north, from 120 \\deg west to 45 \\deg east, and comparing the resulting contracted area to the original, obtains an 8 percent area reduction. The curvature "humps" a trial planar section of 15 cms by 1.6 cm, a substantial difference in the radius of curvature. If you rashly suggest applying that formula globally, the resulting sphere would have a surface area of 4.7 x108,(down from 5 x108), and therefore radius of 6117 km, down from 6400, which is a rather preposterous conclusion. As nobody would believe it, I tested the idea elsewhere. The Huronian succession of six named cratons is adjacent on the south. I cut this map apart, too, and fit it together, once again getting a curvature, this time more pronounced. I am trying it with the Indonesian Archipelago, although this area has volcanic complications, and with Precambrian Basins in western Australia and Nimibia, Africa. Indications are - an essentially similar pattern of fit, but non uniform

  12. Crustal velocity structure of western Dharwar Craton, South India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, D.; Chandrakala, K.; Padmavathi Devi, P.; Sridhar, A. R.; Sain, K.; Reddy, P. R.

    2001-03-01

    A deep seismic sounding (DSS) experiment was carried out across the Indian shield in 1972-1975. Kaila et al. (Kaila, K.L., Roy Chowdhury, K., Reddy, P.R., Krishna, V.G., Hari Narain, Subbotin, S.I., Sollogub, V.B., Chekunov, A.V., Kharetchko, G.E., Lazarenko, M.A., Ilchenko T.V., 1979. Crustal structure along Kavali-Udipi profile in the Indian peninsular shield from deep seismic sounding. J. Geol. Soc. of Ind., 20, 307-333) presented a crustal depth section based on the interpretation of the analog seismic data. In this paper, we re-examine the crustal structure of the Western Dharwar Craton (WDC) by reprocessing the data of three major shot points. Kinematic 1-D inversion, followed by 2-D forward modeling of the first arrival refraction and a few persistent wide-angle reflection phases, was carried out to build, a first order two-dimensional velocity model of this segment of the profile. This model brings out a simple crustal velocity structure consisting of an upper and lower crust. The upper crust (velocity 6.0-6.2 km/s) is on average 23 km thick, which is underlain by a lower crust of velocity 6.8-7.0 km/s. The average Moho depth in this part is about 37-40 km, with higher-than-normal P n velocity of 8.4 km/s. A relatively deep Moho in this part of the Archean peninsular shield is associated with relatively low velocities in the lower crust, perhaps indicating absence of underplating in this region. Present results bring out the fact that the crust of WDC is not so typical as many other Archean crusts, in terms of both thickness and velocities.

  13. Synthesis, biological evaluation, WAC and NMR studies of S-galactosides and non-carbohydrate ligands of cholera toxin based on polyhydroxyalkylfuroate moieties.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Soriano, Javier; Niss, Ulf; Angulo, Jesús; Angulo, Manuel; Moreno-Vargas, Antonio J; Carmona, Ana T; Ohlson, Sten; Robina, Inmaculada

    2013-12-23

    The synthesis of several non-carbohydrate ligands of cholera toxin based on polyhydroxyalkylfuroate moieties is reported. Some of them have been linked to D-galactose through a stable and well-tolerated S-glycosidic bond. They represent a novel type of non-hydrolyzable bidentate ligand featuring galactose and polyhydroxyalkylfuroic esters as pharmacophoric residues, thus mimicking the GM1 ganglioside. The affinity of the new compounds towards cholera toxin was measured by weak affinity chromatography (WAC). The interaction of the best candidates with this toxin was also studied by saturation transfer difference NMR experiments, which allowed identification of the binding epitopes of the ligands interacting with the protein. Interestingly, the highest affinity was shown by non-carbohydrate mimics based on a polyhydroxyalkylfuroic ester structure.

  14. African-American Biography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Ron

    1995-01-01

    Suggests sources of information for African American History Month for library media specialists who work with students in grades four through eight. Gale Research's "African-American Reference Library," which includes "African-America Biography,""African-American Chronology," and "African-American Almanac,"…

  15. Secular changes recorded in mineralization of African crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabidi, T.; Thiart, C.; de Wit, M. J.

    2007-02-01

    Variations in enrichment of mineral deposits in continental crust over time may be one way to test for secular changes in crustal genesis. We present spatial and chemical information about African mineral deposits with which to 'fingerprint' the metal endowment of African crust of different age. We then compare three regions of juvenile African crust, all with similar geology, tectonic history, and mineral deposits, but each of a different age. Each region was formed during rapid accretion of similar tectonic units derived from the mantle over ˜500 million years, and is apparently devoid of older recycled continental crust. Together, the three areas span 2500 million years of Earth history, from 0.5 Ga to 3.0 Ga, (e.g. the Zimbabwe Craton (2.5-3.0 Ga), the Birimian Shield (1.8-2.3 Ga), and the Arabian-Nubian Shield (0.5-1.0 Ga)). The three areas have a studied total of 2671 mineral deposits that are divided into six groups according to their geochemical affinities. Using these known deposits, a measure of spatial association (spatial coefficient) is derived. We show that each region has a unique metal endowment and that, per unit area, there is a greater concentration of mineral deposits in the crust of the Archean Zimbabwe Craton relative to the younger crust of the Birimian Shield and in turn the Arabian-Nubian Shield. This study quantitatively corroborates past studies that suggest older crust is more mineral diverse and enriched in mineral deposits than younger crust. Thus, a secular change in mineralization is implicated, and the mantle derived metal endowment of the African crust has undergone major evolutionary changes from Archean to Neoproterozoic time.

  16. East asian gold: Deciphering the anomaly of phanerozoic gold in precambrian cratons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldfarb, R.J.; Hart, C.; Davis, G.; Groves, D.

    2007-01-01

    Early Cretaceous orogenic gold deposits in eastern Asia are globally unique in that large Phanerozoic lode gold deposits occur in Archean-Paleoproterozoic cratons. In the northern Pacific region, ca. 125 Ma orogenic gold deposits in the North China, Yangzte, and Siberian craton margins, as well as in young terranes in California, may ultimately relate to the giant Cretaceous mantle plume in the southern Pacific basin and the relatively rapid tectonic consequences along both continental margins from resulting Pacific plate reconfigurations. In eastern Asia, such consequences include reactivation of and fluid flow along major fault systems, with fluid focusing into simultaneously forming, isolated core complexes of uncertain genesis. Deposition of gold ores in previously devolatilized high-grade Precambrian metamorphic rocks requires an exotic source of ore fluid, most likely subducted Mesozoic oceanic crust and/or overlying sediment. An implication is that Phanerozoic metamorphic core complexes in other destabilized craton margins could host large gold resources. ?? 2007 by Economic Geology.

  17. African Trypanosomiasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    infection by protozoan hemo- flagellates of the Trypanosoma brucei complex, 2 subspe- cies of which cause disease in humans: Trypanosoma bru- cei gambiense...public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES See also ADA545141. Chapter 3 from e-book, Topics on the Pathology of Protozoan and...the brief ferry crossing. 2 3 • Topics on The paThology of proTozoan and invasive arThropod diseases Three severe epidemics of African trypanosomiasis

  18. Continental lithospheric evolution: Constraints from the geochemistry of felsic volcanic rocks in the Dharwar Craton, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikyamba, C.; Ganguly, Sohini; Saha, Abhishek; Santosh, M.; Rajanikanta Singh, M.; Subba Rao, D. V.

    2014-12-01

    Felsic magmatism associated with ocean-ocean and ocean-continent subduction processes provide important evidence for distinct episodes of crust-generation and continental lithospheric evolution. Rhyolites constitute an integral component of the tholeiitic to calc-alkaline basalt-andesite-dacite-rhyolite (BADR) association and contribute to crustal growth processes at convergent plate margins. The evolution of the Dharwar Craton of southern peninsular India during Meso- to Neoarchean times was marked by extensive development of greenstone belts. These granite-greenstone terranes have distinct volcano-sedimentary associations consistent with their geodynamic setting. The present study deals with geochemistry of rhyolites from the Chitradurga-Shimoga greenstone belts of western (WDC) and the Gadwal-Kadiri greenstone belts of eastern (EDC) sectors of Dharwar Craton to compare and evaluate their petrogenesis and geodynamic setting and their control on the continental lithospheric evolution of the Dharwar Craton. At a similar range of SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, the rhyolites of WDC are more potassic, whereas the EDC rhyolites are more sodic and less magnesian with slight increase in TiO2. Minor increase in MgO content of WDC rhyolites reflects their ferromagnesian trace elements which are comparatively lower in the rhyolites of EDC. The relative enrichment in LILE (K, Rb) and depletion in HFSE (Nb, Ta, Zr, Hf) marked by negative Nb-Ta, Zr-Hf and Ti anomalies endorse the convergent margin processes for the generation of rhyolites of both the sectors of Dharwar Craton. The high silica potassic rhyolites of Shimoga and Chitradurga greenstone belts of WDC showing prominent negative Eu and Ti anomalies, flat HREE patterns correspond to Type 3 rhyolites and clearly point towards their generation and emplacement in an active continental margin environment. The geochemical characteristics of Gadwal and Kadiri rhyolites from eastern Dharwar Craton marked by aluminous compositions with

  19. Seismic evidence for stratification in composition and anisotropic fabric within the thick lithosphere of Kalahari Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodoudi, F.; Yuan, X.; Kind, R.; Lebedev, S.; Tilmann, F. J.

    2013-12-01

    S receiver functions obtained from the data of 97 seismic stations present evidence for the existence of a layered and thick lithosphere beneath the Kalahari Craton. We identified three negative discontinuities within the lithosphere of the Archean cratons and Proterozoic mobile belts of southern Africa. We also employed a novel combination of SRFs and surface-wave analysis to constrain the anisotropic properties of the lithosphere and its internal layering. Our results show that frozen-in anisotropy and compositional changes can generate sharp Mid-Lithospheric Discontinuities (MLD) at depths of 85 and 150-200 km, respectively. We found that a 50 km thick anisotropic layer containing 3% S wave anisotropy and with a fast-velocity axis different from that in the layer beneath can account for the first MLD at about 85 km depth. This depth is largely consistent with that of 8° discontinuity suggested as a global characteristic of cratonic lithosphere. Significant correlation between the depths of an apparent boundary separating the depleted and metasomatic refertilized lithosphere, as inferred from chemical tomography, and those of our second MLD (at 150-200 km depth) led us to characterize this negative discontinuity as a compositional boundary, most likely due to the modification of the cratonic mantle lithosphere by magma infiltration. We detected this MLD at a depth of about 150 km beneath the Zimbabwe Craton and Limpopo belt with a steep deepening to about 200 km underneath the Kaapvaal Craton and its passive margin. The deepening of this boundary is spatially correlated with the surficial expression of the ancient Thabazimbi-Murchison Lineament (TML). This may imply that the translithospheric TML isolates the lithospheric block of the relatively younger Limpopo terrane from that of the ancient Kaapvaal terrane. Finally, the largest velocity contrast (3.6-4.7%) is observed at a boundary located at depths of 260-280 km beneath the Archean domains and the older

  20. Paleomagnetism of the early Paleoproterozoic, volcanic Hekpoort Formation (Transvaal Supergroup) of the Kaapvaal craton, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humbert, F.; Sonnette, L.; de Kock, M. O.; Robion, P.; Horng, C. S.; Cousture, A.; Wabo, H.

    2017-02-01

    The Kaapvaal craton (South Africa) was the host of several major magmatic events during the Paleoproterozoic, including the volcanic Hekpoort and Ongeluk formations. Their possible comagmatic origin is the subject of a long debate. We performed a paleomagnetic study of the Hekpoort Formation to get a primary pole can be compared with the available paleopole of the Ongeluk Formation, but also to contribute to the apparent pole wander path of the Kaapvaal craton. Characterization of magnetic mineralogy by 3-axis thermal demagnetization of IRM and magnetic susceptibility vs temperature points out magnetite as the main remanence carrier in most samples.

  1. Building early Archean cratons from recycled Hadean crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neil, J.; Carlson, R. W.; Boyet, M.

    2013-12-01

    The formation of Earth's early crust and the geological processes leading to creation and preservation of stable Archean cratons are still poorly understood. Archean terrains are dominated by felsic Tonalite-Trondhjemite-Granodiorite (TTG) rocks. These felsic rocks however, cannot be directly produced from melting of the mantle but must instead be derived from the melting of an older mafic precursor. Despite growing evidence for a basaltic >4.3 Ga primordial crust on Earth, there are only a few occurrences of zircons older than 4.0 Ga; in the Jack Hills conglomerates and in the Acasta gneisses. Only after ~3.8 Ga does the zircon record become more prominent. The zircon age distribution in itself suggests a long quiescence period of over half a billion years before the mafic primitive crust was extensively recycled to produce a significant amount of felsic magma. The Nuvvuagittuq greenstone belt (NGB) provides a glimpse at the nature of the mafic primitive crust. The mafic rocks from the Nuvvuagittuq greenstone belt (NGB), called the Ujaraaluk unit, have 146Sm-142Nd systematics consistent with them being formed in the Hadean, between 4.3 and 4.4 Ga. The NGB also comprises multiple generations of TTG ranging from 3.75 Ga to 3.35 Ga. Despite the fact that the mafic and felsic lithologies of the NGB show strong evidence of disturbance in the 147Sm-143Nd and 176Lu-177Hf long-lived isotopic systems, the NGB TTGs yield 142Nd and 182W anomalies that can be only generated in the Hadean. Moreover, zircons from the 3.35 to 3.65 TTGs have strongly subchondritic initial ɛHf values and display an ɛHf vs. age array consistent with their derivation from a Hadean mafic precursor. The NGB TTGs appear to have been formed primarily from melting of a source compositionally similar to the 4.4 Ga Ujaraaluk unit. The crustal history recorded in the NGB seems to be similar to the early crustal evolution recorded in the Jack Hills Hadean zircons where reworking of a >4.3 Ga enriched

  2. An Integrated Crustal Analysis of Craton-Terrane Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contenti, S. M.; Gu, Y. J.; Shen, L.

    2012-12-01

    velocities along the Thorsby/Rimbey domains. The proximity of these two domains to the STZ may shed new light on the spatial variability of subduction during the Proterozoic era. The combination of crustal depth, velocity, Vp/Vs ratios and anisotropy enables a careful re-examination of the existing tectonic model regarding the domain formation and reworking near the western edge of the North American Craton.

  3. The Hales discontinuity and upper mantle anisotropy beneath cratons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musacchio, G.; White, D. J.; Thomson, C. J.

    2003-04-01

    Seismic velocity discontinuities are commonly found within the upper 100 km of the mantle lithosphere, with great variability in their depth, lateral extent, and the polarity of velocity jump. Among the more commonly observed is the Hales discontinuity, identified in a variety of tectonic environments, and commonly associated with a high-velocity, highly reflective and sometimes anisotropic layer. In the Archean Western Superior Province of the Canadian Shield, long range R/WAR profiling gives a high-resolution estimate of the mantle V_P in the shallow upper mantle, providing a more certain determination of the nature of the Hales dicontinuity. Ray-based travel-time inversion of the data, have shown that Vp in the uppermost mantle is 8.0-8.3 km/s. A 15-20 km thick layer (layer-H) with >6% seismic anisotropy (N-S V_P of 8.3 km/s and E-W V_P of 8.8 km/s) dips northward at ˜10^o from a minimum depth of 48-50 km. The attitude of layer-H is consistent with the general tectonic strike; its depth range (50-75 km) falls within that of the Hales discontinuity. If a link between the Hales discontinuity and layer-H can be drawn, observations strengthen the objection that the estimated velocity contrast (0.2 to 0.4 km/s depending on the direction of wave propagation) is relatively high if layer-H represents a phase transition, and thus (re)opens the debate on the nature of shallow upper-mantle boundaries beneath continents. The high V_P and intermediate anisotropy of upper-mantle layer-H requires a harzburgite peridotitic composition with the a-axis of olivine aligned E-W. Layer-H might have emplaced during accretion (2.7 Ga Kenoran orogeny) of the North American proto-craton and be relic oceanic lithosphere. The Hales discontinuity might be an expression of continents accretion and map relic slabs in the shallow upper mantle.

  4. Petrology, 40Ar/39Ar age, Sr-Nd isotope systematics, and geodynamic significance of an ultrapotassic (lamproitic) dyke with affinities to kamafugite from the easternmost margin of the Bastar Craton, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, N. V. Chalapathi; Atiullah; Burgess, R.; Nanda, Purnendu; Choudhary, A. K.; Sahoo, Samarendra; Lehmann, B.; Chahong, Ngazipmi

    2016-04-01

    We report the mineralogy, bulk-rock geochemistry, 40Ar/39Ar (whole-rock) age and radiogenic (Sr and Nd) isotope composition of an ultrapotassic dyke from Sakri (Nuapada lamproite field) located at the tectonic contact between the easternmost margin of the Bastar craton and Eastern Ghats Mobile Belt, India. The Sakri dyke has a mineralogy which strongly resembles a lamproite sensu stricto (viz.,Ti-rich phlogopite, Na-poor diopside, Fe-rich sanidine, ulvospinel trend and Sr-rich apatite). However, its bulk-rock major element geochemical characteristics (viz., extreme silica-undersaturated nature) resemble sensu lato kamafugite from Toro Ankole, Uganda, East African Rift, and Alto Paranaiba Province, Brazil. The Sakri dyke also displays certain compositional peculiarities (viz., high degree of evolution of mica composition from phlogopite to biotite, elevated titanium and aluminum in clinopyroxene and significantly lower bulk Mg#) when compared to the ultrapotassic rocks from various Indian cratons. 40Ar/39Ar dating gave a plateau age of 1045 ± 9 Ma which is broadly similar to that of other Mesoproterozoic (i) lamproites from the Bastar and Bundelkhand cratons, and (ii) kimberlites from the Eastern Dharwar craton. Initial bulk-rock Sr (0.705865-0.709024) and Nd (0.511063-0.511154) isotopic ratios reveal involvement of an `enriched' source region with long-term incompatible element enrichment and a depleted mantle (TDM) Nd model age of 2.56 Ga straddling the Archaean-Proterozoic chronostratigraphic boundary. The bulk-rock incompatible trace element ratios (Ta/Yb, Th/Yb, Rb/Ba and Ce/Y) of the Sakri ultrapotassic dyke negate any significant influence of crustal contamination. Small-degree melting (1 to 1.5 %) of a mixed garnet-facies and spinel-facies phlogopite lherzolite can account for its observed REE concentrations. Whereas the emplacement of the Sakri ultrapotassic dyke is related to the amalgamation of the supercontinent of Rodinia, its overlapping geochemical

  5. Late-Archaean Potassic Granite from the Bundelkhand Craton, Central India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Saheli; Saha, Lopamudra; Nasipuri, Pritam; Pati, Jayanta Kumar; Patole, Vishal

    2014-05-01

    Late-Archaean granitoids, show wide range of compositional variation: (i) TTG like granitoids with strongly fractionated REE patterns, which can be both Na-rich and K-Mg-rich (Sanukitoids) (ii) K-rich, Mg-poor biotite granites with less fractionated REE patterns and showing negative Eu-anomalies (type area, the Closepet Granite, Eastern Dharwar Craton, India). Amongst them Late-Archaean Sanukitoid or K-rich Closepet-type granitoids are most widely reported from the Archaean Cratons world-wide: Superior Province, Canada, Pilbara Craton, Yilgarn Craton, Antarctica, Limpopo Belt, Dharwar Craton. Several models proposed so far for the origin of these granitoids mostly include partial melting of hydrated basalts, reaction of slab melts with mantle wedge peridotites, re-melting of an enriched mantle and then mixing of the resulting melt with the anatectic melt generated during the melting of continental crust in subduction zone settings. The Closepet-type potassic biotite-rich granites were mostly produced by re-melting of TTG-like continental basements most likely in a subduction zone setting. Most of the proposed models suggest such partial melting to have taken place in garnet-stability field and some in orthopyroxene-stability field. In this study we report late-Archaean (~2.61-2.5 Ga) potassic granite from the Bundelkhand Craton in central India. The Late-Archaean granitoids recorded from the craton are intrusive into the high-grade supracrustal rocks of the craton. They are classified as coarse grained grey, pink porphyritic granite, medium granied pink granite, granite porphyry and fine-grained pink granite. The supracrustal rocks of the craton have been metamorphosed at ~2.78 Ga under high-pressure conditions (~17-18 kbar)- medium temperature (600ºC) in a subduction zone setting. The intrusions of the granitoids at ~2.6-2.5 Ga mark the stability of the craton. The pink-porphyritic granite studied here preserves plagioclase-potash feldspar

  6. Gondwanan basement terranes of the Variscan-Appalachian orogen: Baltican, Saharan and West African hafnium isotopic fingerprints in Avalonia, Iberia and the Armorican Terranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Bonnie J.; Collins, William Joseph; Murphy, James Brendan; Gutierrez-Alonso, Gabriel; Hand, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Iberia, Avalonia and the "Armorican" terranes form key constituents of the Variscan-Appalachian orogen, but their Neoproterozoic origins along the northern Gondwanan margin continue to be strongly debated. Here, we present a new detrital zircon U-Pb-Hf dataset from Neoproterozoic-Silurian sedimentary sequences in NW Iberia and Avalonia, in conjunction with the comprehensive existing datasets from potential source cratons, to demonstrate that the provenance of each terrane is relatively simple and can be traced back to three major cratons. The enigmatic Tonian-Stenian detrital zircons in autochthonous Iberian rocks were derived from the Saharan metacraton in the latest Neoproterozoic-early Cambrian. Avalonia is commonly considered to have been derived from the Amazonian margin of Gondwana, but the hafnium isotopic characteristics of the detrital zircon grains in early Neoproterozoic rocks bear much stronger similarities to Baltica. The hafnium isotopic array also suggests the early Avalonian oceanic arc was built on a sliver of "Grenvillian-type crust" (~ 2.0-1.0 Ga) possibly of Baltican affinity at ~ 800 Ma, prior to accretion with a continental margin at ~ 640 Ma. The Upper Allochthon of Iberia is frequently linked to the West African Craton in the late Neoproterozoic-early Cambrian, however the hafnium isotopic array presented here does not support this connection; rather it is more similar to the hafnium array from Avalonia. The Armorican terranes have strong detrital zircon isotopic links to the West African Craton during the late Neoproterozoic-Cambrian.

  7. Petrology, geochemistry and genesis of newly discovered Mesoproterozoic highly magnesian, calcite-rich kimberlites from Siddanpalli, Eastern Dharwar Craton, Southern India: products of subduction-related magmatic sources?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalapathi Rao, N. V.; Dongre, A.; Kamde, G.; Srivastava, Rajesh K.; Sridhar, M.; Kaminsky, F. V.

    2010-03-01

    The Siddanpalli kimberlites constitute a newly discovered cluster (SKC) of Mesoproterozoic (1090 Ma) dykes occurring in the granite-greenstone terrain of the Gadwal area in the Eastern Dharwar Craton (EDC), Southern India. They belong to coherent facies and contain serpentinized olivines (two generations), phlogopite, spinel, perovskite, ilmenite, apatite, carbonate and garnet xenocrysts. A peculiar feature of these kimberlites is the abundance of carbonate and limestone xenoliths of the eroded platformal Proterozoic (Purana) sedimentary cover of Kurnool/Bhima age. Chemically, the Siddanpalli dykes are the most magnesium-rich (up to 35 wt.% MgO) and silica-undersaturated (SiO2 < 35 wt.%) of all kimberlites described so far from the Eastern Dharwar Craton. The La/Yb ratio in the Siddanpalli kimberlites (64-105) is considerably lower than that in the other EDC kimberlites (108-145), primarily owing to their much higher HREE abundances. Since there is no evidence of any crustal contamination by granitic rocks we infer this to be a specific character of the magmatic source. A comparison of the REE geochemistry of the Siddanpalli kimberlites with petrogenetic models for southern African kimberlites suggests that they display involvement of a wide range in the degree of melting in their genesis. The different geochemical signatures of the SKC compared to the other known kimberlites in the EDC can be explained by a combination of factors involving: (i) higher degrees of partial melting; (ii) relatively shallower depths of derivation; (iii) possible involvement of subducted component in their mantle source region; and (iv) previous extraction of boninitic magmas from their geological domain.

  8. Integrated Seismic Arrays for Imaging the North China Craton: the ¡°Destruction of the North China Craton¡± Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. J.; Chen, L.; Zheng, T.; Zhou, S.

    2007-12-01

    It has been known, mostly according to the petrological and geochemical studies particularly the xenolith's data, that the North China craton (NCC), which is part of the Archaean Sino-Korean craton, had been reactivated since Mesozoic, and experienced widespread extension and volcanism through much of the Cenozoic. Currently the NCC is characterized by a thin lithosphere (as thin as 80 km according to published studies) and strong internal deformation, where over half of the eastern China's earthquakes occurred while the two major plate boundaries about China are thousands kilometers away. Although it is seismically quite active this region encompasses the China's capital and several mega cities which together hosts a large population and are very important to China's growing economy. Supported by the Chinese earth science community, the Chinese NSF recently started a major research program, the ¡°Destruction of the North China craton¡± (DNCC). About 150 million RMB (~ 20 million US dollars) will be allocated for this 5-year multi-disciplinary research program which is open for competition for all the earth scientists in China. Here we report one major seismic observation project of ¡°Integrated Seismic Arrays of DNCC¡± just funded during the first phase funding of DNCC. This observation-driven project integrates two groups at the Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Peking University, and both institutions have their own broadband seismometers and have recently conducted pilot portable seismic array studies in North China. Up to seven linear broadband seismic arrays, each consists of 60-100 stations, are planned within the NCC. The principle objectives are to quantify the range and degree of the craton destruction in spatial domain with major focus on the east-west variation from the previously proposed intact craton in the west to the rejuvenated region in the east and the transition zone in the middle. With the expected

  9. Lithosphere structure underneath the North China Craton inferred from elevation, gravity and geoid anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.

    2015-12-01

    The North China Craton (NCC) is a classical example of ancient destroyed cratons. The NCC experienced widespread thermotectonic reactivations in the Phanerozoic. Recent work suggested that the old craton has been significantly modified or destroyed during this process. However, most of the studies were confined to the Eastern NCC, the nature and evolution of the lithosphere beneath the Central and Western NCC was less constrained due to the lack of data. While, recent geodetic data, with the advantages of high resolution and coverage, offers an opportunity to study the deep structure underneath the whole NCC. Here we construct a lithospheric-scale 3D model based on the integration of regional elevation, gravity, geoid and thermal data together with available seismic data. The combined interpretation of these data provides information on the density and temperature distribution at different depth ranges. In the Eastern NCC, a rapid thickness decrease of both crust and lithosphere is reflected, concordant with abrupt changes in surface topography and Bouguer gravity anomaly. Our results together with the widespread magmatic rocks suggest that the Eastern NCC has experienced significant destruction of the lithospheric mantle with substantial modifications and thinning of the crust. In the Central and Western NCC, the generally thick and 'cold' lithosphere suggests that the cratonic mantle root is preserved in the central and western NCC, in agreement with the relatively low heat flow, rare magmatic activity and long-term tectonic stability observed at the surface, with some areas mildly modified as indicated by thin lithosphere.

  10. Geology of the Terre Adélie Craton (135 – 146˚ E)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ménot, R.P.; Duclaux, G.; Peucat, J.J.; Rolland, Y.; Guillot, S.; Fanning, M.; Bascou, J.; Gapais, D.; Pêcher, A.

    2007-01-01

    More than 15 years of field and laboratory investigations on samples from Terre Adélie to the western part of George Vth Land (135 to 146°E) during the GEOLETA program allow a reassessment of the Terre Adélie Craton (TAC) geology. The TAC represents the largest exposed fragment of the East Antarctic Shield preserved from both Grenville and Ross tectono-metamorphic events. Therefore it corresponds to a well-preserved continental segment that developed from the Neoarchean to the Paleoproterozoic. Together with the Gawler Craton in South Australia, the TAC is considered as part of the Mawson continent, i.e. a striking piece of the Rodinia Supercontinent. However, this craton represents one of the less studied parts of the East Antarctic Shield. The three maps presented here clearly point out the extent of two distinct domains within the Terre Adélie Craton and suggest that the TAC was built up through a polyphased evolution during the Neoarchean-Siderian (c.a. 2.5Ga) and the Statherian (c.a. 1.7Ga) periods. These data support a complete re-assessment of the TAC geology and represent a valuable base for the understanding of global geodynamics changes during Paleoproterozoic times.

  11. Lithospheric architecture of the Slave craton, northwest Canada, as determined from an interdisciplinary 3-D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, D. B.; Hillier, M. J.; Kjarsgaard, B. A.; de Kemp, E. A.; Craven, J. A.

    2014-05-01

    geologic structures characteristic of mantle lithosphere within cratons found in continent interiors are interpreted using geo-registered diverse data sets from the Slave craton of northwest Canada. We developed and applied a new method for mapping seismic discontinuities in three dimensions using multiyear observations at sparse, individual broadband receivers. New, fully 3-D conductivity models used all available magnetotelluric data. Discontinuity surfaces and conductivity models were geo-registered with previously published P-wave and surface-wave velocity models to confirm first-order structures such as a midlithosphere discontinuity. Our 3-D model to 400 km depth was calibrated by "drill hole" observations derived from xenolith suites extracted from kimberlites. A number of new structural discontinuities emerge from direct comparison of coregistered data sets and models. Importantly, we distinguish primary mantle layers from secondary features related to younger metasomatism. Subhorizontal Slave craton layers with tapered, wedge-shaped margins indicate construction of the craton core at 2.7 Ga by underthrusting and flat stacking of lithosphere. Mapping of conductivity and metasomatism in 3-D, the latter inferred via mineral recrystallization and resetting of isotopic ages in xenoliths, indicates overprinting of the primary layered structures. The observed distribution of relatively conductive mantle at 100-200 km depths is consistent with pervasive metasomatism; vertical "chimneys" reaching to crustal depths in locations where kimberlites erupted or where Au mineralization is known.

  12. An isotopic perspective on growth and differentiation of Proterozoic orogenic crust: From subduction magmatism to cratonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Simon P.; Korhonen, Fawna J.; Kirkland, Christopher L.; Cliff, John B.; Belousova, Elena A.; Sheppard, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    The in situ chemical differentiation of continental crust ultimately leads to the long-term stability of the continents. This process, more commonly known as 'cratonization', is driven by deep crustal melting with the transfer of those melts to shallower regions resulting in a strongly chemically stratified crust, with a refractory, dehydrated lower portion overlain by a complementary enriched upper portion. Since the lower to mid portions of continental crust are rarely exposed, investigation of the cratonization process must be through indirect methods. In this study we use in situ Hf and O isotope compositions of both magmatic and inherited zircons from several felsic magmatic suites in the Capricorn Orogen of Western Australia to highlight the differentiation history (i.e. cratonization) of this portion of late Archean to Proterozoic orogenic crust. The Capricorn Orogen shows a distinct tectonomagmatic history that evolves from an active continental margin through to intracratonic reworking, ultimately leading to thermally stable crust that responds similarly to the bounding Archean Pilbara and Yilgarn Cratons. The majority of magmatic zircons from the main magmatic cycles have Hf isotopic compositions that are generally more evolved than CHUR, forming vertical arrays that extend to moderately radiogenic compositions. Complimentary O isotope data, also show a significant variation in composition. However, combined, these data define not only the source components from which the magmas were derived, but also a range of physio-chemical processes that operated during magma transport and emplacement. These data also identify a previously unknown crustal reservoir in the Capricorn Orogen.

  13. Distribution of mineral deposits in accreted terranes and cratonal rocks of western United States.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Albers, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    The western margin of the USA, covering approx 777 000 km2, is an agglomeration of tectonostratigraphic terrains accreted to the North American craton mainly during Mesozoic time. The terrains represent a number of fundamental crustal types: oceanic crust, island-arc crust, melange, various combinations of the preceding three, batholithic, miogeoclinal and platform. The distribution patterns of types of mineral deposits show that miogeoclinal terrains of the craton are characterized by replacement and vein-type Pb-Zn-Ag, skarn W deposits, Mo and Sn, whereas accreted terrains contain all the known volcanic massive sulphide deposits, all chromite and chert-associated Mn, and all the large Au quartz-vein deposits, except Goldfield, Nevada. Carlin-type disseminated fine-grained Au deposits occur mostly in windows of Palaeozoic miogeoclinal rocks in Nevada, but the only known fine-grained Au deposit in California is in very youthful volcanic rocks overlying oceanic-crust terrain. Large bedded-type baryte deposits, although in the same area and showing the same trend as disseminated Au in Nevada, are in allochthonous oceanic terrain. Hg and Sb are dominantly in accreted terrains, but Sb also forms important deposits in cratonal rocks. Most of the large Fe deposits are in the craton, but a few are in accreted island-arc terrains.-P.Br.

  14. Microxenoliths from the Slave craton: Archives of diamond formation along fluid conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulbach, Sonja; Stachel, Thomas; Heaman, Larry M.; Carlson, Jon A.

    2011-10-01

    A suite of 23 diamondiferous microxenoliths from the Ekati kimberlites in the central Slave craton was studied to elucidate the tectonothermal evolution of the lithosphere during craton formation and modification along craton margins, and associated diamond formation. Major- and trace-element abundances of eclogites (n = 16) reveal the presence of two compositionally distinct suites: a group of three eclogites with typical gabbroic trace-element patterns (flat REE N and low ΣREE, positive Sr N and Pb N, negative Zr N anomalies) and a group of 13 eclogites that are characterised by lower Mg#, Cr, Sc and Sr combined with higher Al 2O 3, TiO 2 and Na 2O, and a conspicuously stepped REE pattern with lower LREE/HREE. Inclusions in diamonds from the central Slave craton consistently plot with the latter group. The unusual trace-element characteristics of the second group are strikingly similar to those produced along fluid conduits in younger subduction zones, where infiltration of a metasomatic fluid induced eclogitisation. Eclogitic diamonds contain an average of 540 at.ppm nitrogen that is poorly aggregated (12% in the B centre), similar to eclogitic diamonds recovered from the A154 kimberlite (Diavik Mine, ~ 30 km southeast) that were dated to 1.85 Ga and linked to subduction at the western craton margin. This suggests that (1) by 1.85 Ga subduction-related reactive fluid transport and element mobilisation similar to younger examples were established, and (2) this fluid flow not only catalysed eclogitisation of subducting oceanic crust, but also was a prerequisite for the majority of eclogitic diamond formation beneath the central Slave craton. Harzburgitic and lherzolitic diamondiferous microxenoliths (n = 4) may document diamond formation in the Slave craton prior to emplacement of eclogites. Peridotitic garnets have sinusoidal REE-patterns with strong depletions in Ti, consistent with carbonate-melt or fluid metasomatism that may have also prompted diamond growth

  15. African Outreach Workshop 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Nancy J.

    This report discusses the 1974 African Outreach Workshop planned and coordinated by the African Studies Program at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Its major aim was to assist teachers in developing curriculum units on African using materials available in their local community. A second aim was for the African Studies Program to…

  16. Africans in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Ayanna; Spangler, Earl

    This book introduces African-American history and culture to children. The first Africans in America came from many different regions and cultures, but became united in this country by being black, African, and slaves. Once in America, Africans began a long struggle for freedom which still continues. Slavery, the Civil War, emancipation, and the…

  17. Ambient noise tomography of the Cameroon Volcanic Line and Northern Congo craton: new constraints on the structure of the lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidarelli, M.; Aoudia, A.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the lithospheric structure of Cameroon inverting Rayleigh waves obtained from the cross-correlation of ambient seismic noise. We correlate seismic records between 32 broad-band stations and we obtain good quality Rayleigh waves for 310 interstation paths. We measure group velocity dispersion curves from the reconstructed Rayleigh waves in the period range 10-35 s and we invert the group velocities for tomographic images. After the tomography the group velocities are then inverted, together with longer period group velocity measurements from existing literature, to compute a 3-D S-wave velocity model of the Cameroon lithosphere down to 100 km depth. Our results provide an unprecedented mapping of the physical properties of the different crustal units and their correlations with surface geology, as well as with mantle lithospheric variations. The Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL) appears as a segmented feature exhibiting different physical properties along strike. The active Mt Cameroon volcano is underlain by very low velocities, unlike the other segments of the CVL. The along-strike variations in crustal structure suggest that lateral heterogeneities in lithospheric thickness and physical properties have influenced the location and distribution of magmatism. The crust beneath the Central African Shear Zone exhibits a sizeable low velocity anomaly. The lithosphere beneath Cameroon is characterised by a heterogeneous crust with a relatively constant thickness and a low velocity uppermost mantle at the edge of the Congo Craton. Our results favour processes combining small-scale upwelling at the edge of a thick lithosphere and reactivation of Precambrian basement structures to explain the distribution of Holocene-Recent magmatism and plateau uplift. Our results also indicate that Mt Cameroon and surroundings areas are the most at risk zones for magmatic activity during this stage of CVL development.

  18. Multiscale finite-frequency Rayleigh wave tomography of the Kaapvaal craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevrot, S.; Zhao, L.

    2007-04-01

    We have measured phase delays of fundamental-mode Rayleigh waves for 12 events recorded by the Southern Africa Seismic Experiment at frequencies between 0.005 and 0.035 Hz. A novel multiscale finite-frequency tomographic method based on wavelet decomposition of 3-D sensitivity kernels for the phase of Rayleigh waves is used to map the shear velocities in the upper mantle beneath southern Africa. The kernels are computed by summing coupled normal modes over a very fine grid surrounding the seismic array. To estimate and minimize the biases in the model resulting from structures outside the tomographic grid, a jackknife inversion method is implemented. The contribution of heterogeneities outside the target volume is significant, but produces artefacts in the tomographic model that are easily identified and discarded before interpretation. With structures on length scales as short as 100 km retrieved beneath the array, the deep structure of the Kaapvaal craton is revealed with unprecedented detail. Outside the array, the corresponding resolution is 200 km. High velocity cratonic roots are confined to the Archean craton, and extend to depths of at least 250 km. Confirming earlier surface structural studies, we recognize two distinct units in the Kaapvaal craton. The eastern Witwatersrand block and the western Kimberley block are separated by a major near-vertical translithospheric boundary which coincides with the Colesberg Lineament. Lower than average velocities south and east of the Kaapvaal craton reveal extensive metasomatism and heating of the lithosphere, probably related to the Karoo magmatic event and to the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean.

  19. Neoproterozoic-Early Paleozoic rifting of the craton margin in eastern Kentucky: Evidence from subsidence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, P.T. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Walker, D. )

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of subsidence along the craton margin in eastern Kentucky indicates a Neoproterozoic to Early through Middle Cambrian rifting event developing on a subsiding passive margin of the Laurentian craton to the Iapetus Ocean. Subsidence associated with rifting is confined to the Rome Trough; an internally broken half-graben within the Laurentian craton; the trough trends sub-parallel to the Appalachian orogenic belt. In cross section the through as an abrupt faulted margin on the carton side and a tapering, gentle extension toward the orogenic belt. The stratigraphic sequence within the Rome Trough and toward the orogen consists of Neoproterozoic or early Cambrian basal sands overlying Grenville basement, and succeeded by silts, shales and discontinuous carbonates of the Rome Fm. that are overlain by shales and carbonates of the Conesauga Fm. Stratigraphic relationships suggest that an out-of-sequence, inboard rift developed along the Laurentian margin adjacent to a drift-phase continental shelf represented by strata of the Blue Ridge and Valley and Ridge. Analysis of the subsidence history of this region reveals trends which support the notion that the subsidence history of this area cannot be accounted for by typical passive-margin development. The subsidence history of the area within the Rome Trough presents a pattern of high thermal subsidence and produces beta values greater than in areas nearer the craton margin. These data indicate that an inboard locus of anomalous crustal extension occurred in the area of the Rome Trough while the remainder of the cratonal margin underwent drift-phase subsidence, and that the timing and magnitude of this event is related to the development of the Iapetan margin.

  20. Craton Development and Stabilization: Insights from SE Canada using P and S Wave Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, A.; Bastow, I. D.; Darbyshire, F. A.; Gilligan, A.; Ellwood, A.; Levin, V. L.; Menke, W. H.

    2015-12-01

    Cratons, the ancient cores of the continents, are the longest-lived parts of Earth's surface that have survived thermal and mechanical erosion during multiple Wilson cycles. They are visible in tomographic images due to their thick (>200km), seismically fast keels or roots. The Laurentian keel beneath North America is intriguing since its root is thought to extend beneath both the Archean Superior craton and the Proterozoic Grenville province thus implying that keel formation may not have been restricted to Archean times. In order to address this issue we present a P and S wave relative arrival-time tomographic study using data from seismograph networks in SE Canada and the NE US, stretching from the southern tip of Hudson Bay within the Superior craton to the coastal Phanerozoic Appalachian terranes. The tomographic images display three broad zones of increasing mantle wavespeed from globally "slow" in the Appalachian terranes, to a "fast" Grenville Province and "extremely fast" Superior craton. We observe a linear low-velocity feature resulting from modification of the Laurentian keel by the passage of the Great Meteor hotspot. This feature is progressively offset southwestward with depth, potentially due to viscous coupling with mantle flow. No major plate-scale underthrusting during the Grenville Orogeny is apparent, which contradicts the inferred results from crustal seismic reflection and refraction studies. Our results therefore may have fundamental implications for the nature of the Grenville orogenic collision and cratonic stabilization of North America. The results also support the developing consensus that keels form in two stages: a chemically depleted core of Archean age followed by a thermally developed, less-depleted lithosphere during Proterozoic times, highlighted by an abrupt wavespeed contrast in the tomographic images.

  1. The Vostok-Adventure tectonic corridor in the East Antarctic Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianfarra, Paola; Salvini, Francesco

    2010-05-01

    The East Antarctic craton (EAC) is a fragment of the Gondwanaland Precambrian shield as confirmed from the sea floor geophysical reconstruction. Despite the progress achieved in the last decades for the understanding of the tectonic evolution of the EAC, our knowledge of the subglacial geology mainly derives from geophysical data because the ice sheet (3500m average thickness) prevents from direct investigations. Since the onset of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) (34 Ma), the tectonic activity represents the major modelling agent of the subglacial landscape, due to the dry ice cap-bedrock contact preventing any erosional or sedimentary episodes. Radio echo-sounding (RES) data evidence the existence of an articulated bedrock physiography characterised by elongated valleys. From W to E there are: the Vostok Subglacial Depression, the Aurora Trench, the Concordia Trench and the Adventure Trench. All these valleys have asymmetric shape with the eastern steeper side and the western gentler slope characterised by rounded shape that resemble the morphology observed in the East African rift valleys with half graben geometry. To explore the tectonic origin of the Aurora, Concordia and Adventure depressions a forward modelling approach was followed (Hybrid Cellular Automata technique), in order to best fit the present day bedrock morphology with the topographic expression of normal faults with a given geometry and displacement. The modelling consisted in simulating the development of the present day morphology by the relative movement between the footwall and the hangingwall of faults with normal component. These faults produce the observed asymmetry in their topographic expression. Tuning of fault geometry and displacement allowed to minimise the misfit between the model and the morphology derived from RES data. The Adventure and Aurora Trenches were replicated by the activity of two W dipping, listric faults, both fading into a detachment surface at the depth of 34 km

  2. Diamonds and the african lithosphere.

    PubMed

    Boyd, F R; Gurney, J J

    1986-04-25

    Data and inferences drawn from studies of diamond inclusions, xenocrysts, and xenoliths in the kimberlites of southern Africa are combined to characterize the structure of that portion of the Kaapvaal craton that lies within the mantle. The craton has a root composed in large part of peridotites that are strongly depleted in basaltic components. The asthenosphere boundary shelves from depths of 170 to 190 kilometers beneath the craton to approximately 140 kilometers beneath the mobile belts bordering the craton on the south and west. The root formed earlier than 3 billion years ago, and at that time ambient temperatures in it were 900 degrees to 1200 degrees C; these temperatures are near those estimated from data for xenoliths erupted in the Late Cretaceous or from present-day heat-flow measurements. Many of the diamonds in southern Africa are believed to have crystallized in this root in Archean time and were xenocrysts in the kimberlites that brought them to the surface.

  3. Variations of the lithospheric strength across the edges of the North American craton and their relation to intraplate earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesauro, Magdala; Kaban, Mikhail; Mooney, Walter; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2016-04-01

    Seismic tomography models revealed a pronounced velocity contrast between the cratonic and off-cratonic regions of North America. However, the location of the transition between the fast/slow velocities characterizing the Archean-Proterozoic and Phanerozoic regions, respectively, is still under debate. In order to understand the structure of the edges of North American (NA) cratons, we analyze the results of two recent thermal and strength models of the NA continent, obtained using seismic and gravity data (Kaban et al., 2014; Tesauro et al., 2014; 2015). We could observe that in the peripheral parts of the cratons, as the Proterozoic Canadian Platform, the Grenville, and the western part of the Yavapai-Mazatzal province, the integrated strength for one model is 10 times larger than the other one, due to a temperature difference of >200°C in the uppermost mantle. The differences in the effective elastic thickness (Te) between the two models are less pronounced. In both models, Proterozoic regions reactivated by Meso-Cenozoic tectonics (e.g., Rocky Mountains and the Mississippi Embayment), are characterized by a weak lithosphere due to the absence of the mechanically strong part of the mantle lithospheric layer. Furthermore, intraplate earthquakes are distributed along the edges of the cratons, demonstrating that tectonic stress accumulates there, while the cores of the cratons remain undeformed. In both models, intraplate seismicity occurs in weak lithosphere or in the regions characterized by pronounced contrasts of strength and Te.

  4. Mantle density beneath the Siberian craton based on free board constrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepanova, Yulia; Artemieva, Irina

    2014-05-01

    We present the mantle density model of the Archean-Proterozoic Siberian Craton (SC). The density model is constrained by free-board (buoyancy) modeling (Lachenbruch and Morgan, 1990). The approach assumes isostatic compensation of the region, and is justified by the near-zero free-air gravity for most of the region, except for the flanking orogenic belts with high topography. Despite a relatively uniform topography of the SC (ca. 400 m for most of the region and reaching 700 m in the shields), the craton has a strongly heterogeneous crustal structure with large regional variations in Moho and average crustal Vp (Cherepanova et al., 2013) which reflects its complex tectonic evolution. Formed by amalgamation of several Archean terranes, the craton has been significantly affected by Proterozoic collisional and extensional events, the late- Proterozoic rifting at its margins, the Devonian rifting of the Vilyui rift, several pulses of kimberlite magmatism, and the Permo-Triassic trap basalt magmatism. The strong lateral and vertical heterogeneity of the lithospheric mantle has been documented so far in the studied of the mantle xenoliths from kimberlite pipes and in a limited number of geophysical studies. Here we extend geophysical analysis of mantle compositional heterogeneity by evaluating mantle density structure and interpreting its regional variations in terms of mantle mg#. We link regional large-amplitude variations in mantle depletion to the tectonic evolution of the craton and compare these results with geophysical models and petrologic data. We speculate on the origin of compositional heterogeneity of the lithospheric mantle, which is in overall agreement with results of a joint analysis of seismic and thermal data (Artemieva, 2009) and mantle xenolith studies which provide information on metasomatic enrichment of the depleted lithospheric mantle by the tectonic events. The results indicate the heterogeneous structure of mantle density, with the average

  5. Thermal erosion of cratonic lithosphere as a potential trigger for mass-extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilet, Sebastien; Guex, Jean; Muntener, Othmar; Bartolini, Annachiara; Spangenberg, Jorge; Schoene, Blair; Schaltegger, Urs

    2016-04-01

    The temporal coincidence between large igneous provinces (LIPs) and mass extinctions has led many to pose a causal relationship between the two. However, there is still no consensus on a mechanistic model that explains how magmatism leads to the turnover of terrestrial and marine plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. Here, we present a synthesis of stratigraphic constraints on the Triassic-Jurassic (T-J) and Pliensbachian-Toarcian (Pl-To) boundaries combined with geochronological data in order to establish the sequence of events that initiate two of the major mass extinctions recorded in Earth's history. This synthesis demonstrates that these biotic crises are both associated with rapid change from an initial cool period to greenhouse conditions. The initial regressive events recorded at T-J and Pl-To boundaries seem difficult to reconcile either with large initial CO2 degassing associated with plume activity or by volatile-release (CO2, CH4, Cl2) from deep sedimentary reservoirs during contact metamorphism associated to dykes and sills intrusion because massive CO2 degassing is expected to produce super greenhouse conditions. We evaluate, here, an alternative suggesting that the initial cooling could be due to gas release during the initial thermal erosion of the cratonic lithosphere due to emplacement of the CAMP and Karoo-Ferrar volcanic provinces. Petrological constraints on primary magmas indicate that the mantle is hotter and melts more extensively to produce LIP lavas than for current oceanic islands basalts. However, available data suggest that the Karoo and CAMP areas were underlain by thick lithosphere (>200 km) prior to continental break up. The presence of thick lithosphere excludes significant melting of the asthenospheric mantle without initial stage of thermal erosion of the cratonic lithosphere. This initial step of thermal erosion / thermal heating of the cratonic lithosphere is critical to understand the volatile budget associated with LIPs while

  6. Magnetotelluric investigations of the lithosphere beneath the central Rae craton, mainland Nunavut, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spratt, Jessica E.; Skulski, Thomas; Craven, James A.; Jones, Alan G.; Snyder, David B.; Kiyan, Duygu

    2014-03-01

    New magnetotelluric soundings at 64 locations throughout the central Rae craton on mainland Nunavut constrain 2-D resistivity models of the crust and lithospheric mantle beneath three regional transects. Responses determined from colocated broadband and long-period magnetotelluric recording instruments enabled resistivity imaging to depths of > 300 km. Strike analysis and distortion decomposition on all data reveal a regional trend of 45-53°, but locally the geoelectric strike angle varies laterally and with depth. The 2-D models reveal a resistive upper crust to depths of 15-35 km that is underlain by a conductive layer that appears to be discontinuous at or near major mapped geological boundaries. Surface projections of the conductive layer coincide with areas of high grade, Archean metasedimentary rocks. Tectonic burial of these rocks and thickening of the crust occurred during the Paleoproterozoic Arrowsmith (2.3 Ga) and Trans-Hudson orogenies (1.85 Ga). Overall, the uppermost mantle of the Rae craton shows resistivity values that range from ~3000 Ω m in the northeast (beneath Baffin Island and the Melville Peninsula) to ~10,000 Ω m beneath the central Rae craton, to >50,000 Ω m in the south near the Hearne Domain. Near-vertical zones of reduced resistivity are identified within the uppermost mantle lithosphere that may be related to areas affected by mantle melt or metasomatism associated with emplacement of Hudsonian granites. A regional decrease in resistivities to values of ~500 Ω m at depths of 180-220 km, increasing to 300 km near the southern margin of the Rae craton, is interpreted as the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary.

  7. Early proterozoic evolution of the saskatchewan craton and its allochthonous coyer, trans-hudson Orogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chiarenzelli, J.; Aspler, L.; Villeneuve, M.; Lewry, J.

    1998-01-01

    The composition, chronology, and structural relations of the Saskatchewan Craton and enveloping mylonitic rocks exposed in basement windows of the Glennie Domain, Trans-Hudson Orogen, have been determined by geochemical, geochronologic, and structural studies accompanying detailed field mapping. Basement windows lie along the hinge zone of a regional crustal culmination and consist mostly of 2.4-2.5 Ga felsic plutonic rocks enveloped by the Nistowiak Thrust. The Nistowiak Thrust is a folded, 1-2 km thick, upper amphibolite facie??s mylonite zone formed during emplacement of the Flin Flon-Glennie Complex across the Saskatchewan Craton. It is likely correlative to the Pelican Thrust, which envelops basement windows in the Hanson Lake Block -100 km to the east. An internal high strain zone within the overlying nappe pile, the Guncoat Thrust, is composed primarily of mylonitized porphyroclastic pelitic and psammitic migmatites. U-Pb geochronological results suggest calc-alkaline plutonism from 1889-1837 Ma, thrust stacking, peak metamorphism and associated anatexis between 1837 and 1809 Ma, isotopic closure of titanite at 1790-1772 Ma, and intrusion of late granitic rocks at 1770-1762 Ma. This is in agreement with ages from the Hanson Lake Block, and La Ronge, Kisseynew, and Flin-Flon domains in Saskatchewan and Manitoba, and from the Ungava-Baffin portion of Trans-Hudson Orogen, suggesting broadly synchronous thermotectonic processes along a strike length of 2000 km. We speculate that the Saskatchewan Craton, rather than representing an exotic continental fragment, rifted from the Superior and/or Hearne Provinces at ca. 2.1 Ga and that the Trans-Hudson Orogen is an internal orogen. In this scenario the Maniwekan Ocean, developed between the Rae-Hearne and Superior cratons, opened and closed about similar pole(s) of plate motion. ?? 1998 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  8. Olivine water contents in the continental lithosphere and the longevity of cratons.

    PubMed

    Peslier, Anne H; Woodland, Alan B; Bell, David R; Lazarov, Marina

    2010-09-02

    Cratons, the ancient cores of continents, contain the oldest crust and mantle on the Earth (>2 Gyr old). They extend laterally for hundreds of kilometres, and are underlain to depths of 180-250 km by mantle roots that are chemically and physically distinct from the surrounding mantle. Forming the thickest lithosphere on our planet, they act as rigid keels isolated from the flowing asthenosphere; however, it has remained an open question how these large portions of the mantle can stay isolated for so long from mantle convection. Key physical properties thought to contribute to this longevity include chemical buoyancy due to high degrees of melt-depletion and the stiffness imparted by the low temperatures of a conductive thermal gradient. Geodynamic calculations, however, suggest that these characteristics are not sufficient to prevent the lithospheric mantle from being entrained during mantle convection over billions of years. Differences in water content are a potential source of additional viscosity contrast between cratonic roots and ambient mantle owing to the well-established hydrolytic weakening effect in olivine, the most abundant mineral of the upper mantle. However, the water contents of cratonic mantle roots have to date been poorly constrained. Here we show that olivine in peridotite xenoliths from the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary region of the Kaapvaal craton mantle root are water-poor and provide sufficient viscosity contrast with underlying asthenosphere to satisfy the stability criteria required by geodynamic calculations. Our results provide a solution to a puzzling mystery of plate tectonics, namely why the oldest continents, in contrast to short-lived oceanic plates, have resisted recycling into the interior of our tectonically dynamic planet.

  9. Crustal and Lithospheric Structure across the Boundary of the East European Craton from Receiver Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapmeyer-Endrun, B.; Krueger, F.

    2014-12-01

    The Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ), which extends from the North Sea to the Black Sea, marks a fundamental lithospheric boundary in Europe. It separates the East European Craton to the north-east, which has been stable for at least 1.45 Ga, from the younger lithosphere of Phanerozoic Europe to the south-west. In this study we use a large dataset of more than 40,000 teleseismic P- and S-receiver functions from almost 500 seismological stations to image crustal and lithospheric structure across central and eastern Europe between the Benelux and the Baltic countries. An important data source is the PASSEQ project, which deployed close to 200 temporary stations between Germany and Lithuania for two years with the aim to obtain detailed, 3D information on the upper mantle structure across the TESZ. Combining P and S observations, we find a stepwise transition in crustal thickness, spread over 200 km laterally, from on average of 30 km in Phanerozoic Europe to more than 45 km beneath the East European Craton. Individual Paleoproterozoic terranes in Lithuania can also be distinguished based on crustal thickness. Crustal layering is not resolved with the receiver functions, but a high Poisson's ratio of 0.27 is obtained for the craton, compared to 0.25 for Phanerozoic Europe, which is consistent with a thick mafic lower crust. Moho depth results show an excellent correlation with the interpretation of a seismic line in the area, lending confidence to the interpretation of deeper structures. The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), as mapped by S-receiver functions, is located at an average depth of 90 km beneath Phanerozoic Europe. Towards the east, the LAB is dipping to about 125 km depth beneath the Elbe Line. Below the craton, a mid-lithospheric discontinuity is found at about 80 km depth, whereas weak indications of the LAB are found at an average depth of 260 km.

  10. Intraplate deformation on north-dipping basement structures in the Northern Gawler Craton, Australia: reactivation of original terrane boundaries or later intra-cratonic thrusts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baines, G.; Giles, D.; Betts, P. G.; Backé, G.

    2007-12-01

    Multiple intraplate orogenic events have deformed Neoproterozoic to Carboniferous sedimentary sequences that cover the Archean to Mesoproterozoic basement of the northern Gawler Craton, Australia. These intraplate orogenies reactivated north-dipping basement penetrating faults that are imaged on seismic reflection profiles. These north-dipping structures pre-date Neoproterozoic deposition but their relationships to significant linear magnetic and gravity anomalies that delineate unexposed Archean to Early Mesoproterozoic basement terranes are unclear. The north-dipping structures are either terrane boundaries that formed during continental amalgamation or later faults, which formed during a mid- to late-Mesoproterozoic transpressional orogeny and cross-cut the original lithological terrane boundaries. We model magnetic and gravity data to determine the 3D structure of the unexposed basement of the northern Gawler Craton. These models are constrained by drill hole and surface observations, seismic reflection profiles and petrophysical data, such that geologically reasonable models that can satisfy the data are limited. The basement structures revealed by this modelling approach constrain the origin and significance of the north-dipping structures that were active during the later intraplate Petermann, Delamerian and Alice Springs Orogenies. These results have bearing on which structures are likely to be active during present-day intraplate deformation in other areas, including, for example, current seismic activity along similar basement structures in the Adelaide "Geosyncline".

  11. Making and Breaking of a Continent: Following the Scent of Geodynamic Imprints on the African Continent Using Electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weckmann, Ute

    2012-01-01

    The African continent inherits a long history of continental accretion and breakup. The stage of "making" a continent goes back to the Archean, when the first continental masses formed cratons which mostly remained stable ever since. Subsequent collision of weaker continental masses was followed by several extension and compression episodes that resulted in the formation of super-continents. After the assemblage of Gondwana, a period of predominantly "breaking" , i.e., the breakup of super-continents, took over. The modern-day African continent exhibits different types of margins; continental rifting occurs side by side with recent collision. Since the late 1960s, magnetotelluric (MT) experiments have played an important role in studies of the electrical conductivity structure of Africa. The early results significantly shaped the MT community's understanding of continental-scale conductivity belts and basic characteristics of cratons and mobile belts on both crustal and lithospheric mantle scales for some decades. Modern MT studies in Africa have generally supported earlier results with high resistivities observed on cratons and low resistivities observed across mobile belts. Advances in instrumentation, data processing and interpretation resulted in higher-resolution images of the lithosphere, which in consequence induce an improved understanding of tectonic processes and geological prerequisites for the occurrence of natural resources. The high electrical conductivity of mobile belts and their relation to reactivated fault and detachment zones were often interpreted to characterize mobile belts as tectonic weak zones, which can accommodate stress and constitute zones along which continents can break. Recent breaking of the African continent can be studied on land across the East African rift; however, the lack of amphibian MT experiments across today's margins does not allow for good resolution of remnants of continental breakup processes. Naturally, the regions

  12. Thermal erosion of cratonic lithosphere as a potential trigger for mass-extinction

    PubMed Central

    Guex, Jean; Pilet, Sebastien; Müntener, Othmar; Bartolini, Annachiara; Spangenberg, Jorge; Schoene, Blair; Sell, Bryan; Schaltegger, Urs

    2016-01-01

    The temporal coincidence between large igneous provinces (LIPs) and mass extinctions has led many to pose a causal relationship between the two. However, there is still no consensus on a mechanistic model that explains how magmatism leads to the turnover of terrestrial and marine plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. Here we present a synthesis of ammonite biostratigraphy, isotopic data and high precision U-Pb zircon dates from the Triassic-Jurassic (T-J) and Pliensbachian-Toarcian (Pl-To) boundaries demonstrating that these biotic crises are both associated with rapid change from an initial cool period to greenhouse conditions. We explain these transitions as a result of changing gas species emitted during the progressive thermal erosion of cratonic lithosphere by plume activity or internal heating of the lithosphere. Our petrological model for LIP magmatism argues that initial gas emission was dominated by sulfur liberated from sulfide-bearing cratonic lithosphere before CO2 became the dominant gas. This model offers an explanation of why LIPs erupted through oceanic lithosphere are not associated with climatic and biotic crises comparable to LIPs emitted through cratonic lithosphere. PMID:27009463

  13. An isotopic perspective on growth and differentiation of Proterozoic orogenic crust: From subduction magmatism to cratonization

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Simon P.; Korhonen, Fawna J.; Kirkland, Christopher L.; Cliff, John B.; Belousova, Elena A.; Sheppard, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    The in situ chemical differentiation of continental crust ultimately leads to the long-term stability of the continents. This process, more commonly known as ‘cratonization’, is driven by deep crustal melting with the transfer of those melts to shallower regions resulting in a strongly chemically stratified crust, with a refractory, dehydrated lower portion overlain by a complementary enriched upper portion. Since the lower to mid portions of continental crust are rarely exposed, investigation of the cratonization process must be through indirect methods. In this study we use in situ Hf and O isotope compositions of both magmatic and inherited zircons from several felsic magmatic suites in the Capricorn Orogen of Western Australia to highlight the differentiation history (i.e. cratonization) of this portion of late Archean to Proterozoic orogenic crust. The Capricorn Orogen shows a distinct tectonomagmatic history that evolves from an active continental margin through to intracratonic reworking, ultimately leading to thermally stable crust that responds similarly to the bounding Archean Pilbara and Yilgarn Cratons.

  14. How Did the North China Craton Move from Nuna to Rodinia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.

    2015-12-01

    Several models that include the paleogeographic positions of the North China Craton (NCC) in Precambrian supercontinents Nuna and Rodinia were tested in this study using Proterozoic global paleomagnetic database. During ca. 1.8 - 1.4 Ga, the NCC can be placed far from Laurentia and Baltica. In Nuna, the present southern margin of the NCC faced an open ocean, whilst its present northern margin was likely connected to Indian and Australian cratons. In Rodinia, however, during ca. 1.1 - 0.85 Ga, the paleomagnetic data indicate a proximate connection between the NCC and the arctic side of Laurentia. These two models, if both are right, suggest that the NCC may have moved a long distance since the departure from Nuna to the joining of Rodinia. Moreover, paleomagnetic data and our reconstructions require many cratons to drift away from their connections in Nuna after ca. 1.35 Ga. These reconstructions strongly challenges the currently influential speculation of limited breakup of Nuna, which is mainly based on the observation of low abundance of passive margins that were formed during the boring billion years (ca. 1.75 - 0.75 Ga).

  15. Thermal erosion of cratonic lithosphere as a potential trigger for mass-extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guex, Jean; Pilet, Sebastien; Müntener, Othmar; Bartolini, Annachiara; Spangenberg, Jorge; Schoene, Blair; Sell, Bryan; Schaltegger, Urs

    2016-03-01

    The temporal coincidence between large igneous provinces (LIPs) and mass extinctions has led many to pose a causal relationship between the two. However, there is still no consensus on a mechanistic model that explains how magmatism leads to the turnover of terrestrial and marine plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. Here we present a synthesis of ammonite biostratigraphy, isotopic data and high precision U-Pb zircon dates from the Triassic-Jurassic (T-J) and Pliensbachian-Toarcian (Pl-To) boundaries demonstrating that these biotic crises are both associated with rapid change from an initial cool period to greenhouse conditions. We explain these transitions as a result of changing gas species emitted during the progressive thermal erosion of cratonic lithosphere by plume activity or internal heating of the lithosphere. Our petrological model for LIP magmatism argues that initial gas emission was dominated by sulfur liberated from sulfide-bearing cratonic lithosphere before CO2 became the dominant gas. This model offers an explanation of why LIPs erupted through oceanic lithosphere are not associated with climatic and biotic crises comparable to LIPs emitted through cratonic lithosphere.

  16. Reactivation and mantle dynamics of North China Craton: insight from P-wave anisotropy tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, You; Zhao, Dapeng

    2013-12-01

    We determined the first 3-D P-wave anisotropic tomography beneath the North China Craton (NCC) using a large number of high-quality arrival-time data from local earthquakes and teleseismic events, which reveals depth-dependent azimuthal anisotropy in the crust and upper mantle down to 600 km depth. In the NCC western block, the fast velocity direction (FVD) varies from east-west in the southern part to northeast-southwest in the northern part, which may reflect either the interaction between the Yangtze block and NCC or fossil lithospheric fabrics in the craton. Under the NCC eastern block, a uniform northwest-southeast FVD is revealed in the lower part of the upper mantle (300-410 km depths) and the mantle transition zone (410-660 km depths), which may reflect horizontal and upwelling flows in the big mantle wedge (BMW) above the stagnant Pacific slab in the mantle transition zone. The NCC central block exhibits a northeast-southwest FVD, consistent with the surface tectonic orientation there, suggesting that the cold and thick (>300 km) cratonic root of the NCC western block may obstruct the northwest-southeast trending mantle flow induced by the Pacific Plate subduction, resulting in a northeast-southwest trending mantle flow under the central block. Our present results indicate that the corner flow in the BMW associated with the deep subduction of the Pacific Plate is the main cause of NCC reactivation and mantle dynamics under East China.

  17. Moho offsets beneath the Western Ghat and the contact of Archean crusts of Dharwar Craton, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, Utpal; Rai, S. S.; Meena, Rishikesh; Prasad, B. N. V.; Borah, Kajaljyoti

    2016-03-01

    We present the Moho depth variation along a 600 km long profile from the west to the east coast of South India covering the passive continental margin, and the Western Ghat escarpment created during India-Madagascar separation at ~ 85 Ma; Archean western and eastern Dharwar Craton, and Proterozoic basin. The image is generated through three different approaches: H - vP/vS stacking, common conversion point (CCP) migration and inversion of teleseismic receiver functions at 38 locations. The Moho depth along the profile varies smoothly between 34 and 41 km, except beneath the Western Ghat and at the contact of east and west Dharwar Craton, where it is offset by up to ~ 8 km. The study suggests (i) the possible differential uplift of the Western Ghat, as a consequence of India-Madagascar separation and the prominent role of deep crustal structure in the location of the escarpment, compared to the surface process and (ii) presence of long-lived steeply dipping fault separating the two distinct Archean crustal blocks indicative of mechanically strong continental lithosphere beneath the Dharwar Craton.

  18. Plateau uplift in western Canada caused by lithospheric delamination along a craton edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xuewei; Eaton, David W.; Guest, Bernard

    2014-11-01

    Continental plateaux, such as the Tibetan Plateau in Asia and the Altiplano-Puna Plateau in South America, are thought to form partly because upwelling, hot asthenospheric mantle replaces some of the denser, lower lithosphere, making the region more buoyant. The spatial and temporal scales of this process are debated, with proposed mechanisms ranging from delamination of fragments to that of the entire lithosphere. The Canadian Cordillera is an exhumed ancient plateau that abuts the North American Craton. The region experienced rapid uplift during the mid-to-late Eocene, followed by voluminous magmatism, a transition from a compressional to extensional tectonic regime and removal of mafic lower crust. Here we use Rayleigh-wave tomographic and thermochronological data to show that these features can be explained by delamination of the entire lithosphere beneath the Canadian Cordillera. We show that the transition from the North American Craton to the plateau is marked by an abrupt reduction in lithospheric thickness by more than 150 km and that asthenosphere directly underlies the crust beneath the plateau region. We identify a 250-km-wide seismic anomaly about 150-250 km beneath the plateau that we interpret as a block of intact, delaminated lithosphere. We suggest that mantle material upwelling along the sharp craton edge triggered large-scale delamination of the lithosphere about 55 million years ago, and caused the plateau to uplift.

  19. Thermal erosion of cratonic lithosphere as a potential trigger for mass-extinction.

    PubMed

    Guex, Jean; Pilet, Sebastien; Müntener, Othmar; Bartolini, Annachiara; Spangenberg, Jorge; Schoene, Blair; Sell, Bryan; Schaltegger, Urs

    2016-03-24

    The temporal coincidence between large igneous provinces (LIPs) and mass extinctions has led many to pose a causal relationship between the two. However, there is still no consensus on a mechanistic model that explains how magmatism leads to the turnover of terrestrial and marine plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. Here we present a synthesis of ammonite biostratigraphy, isotopic data and high precision U-Pb zircon dates from the Triassic-Jurassic (T-J) and Pliensbachian-Toarcian (Pl-To) boundaries demonstrating that these biotic crises are both associated with rapid change from an initial cool period to greenhouse conditions. We explain these transitions as a result of changing gas species emitted during the progressive thermal erosion of cratonic lithosphere by plume activity or internal heating of the lithosphere. Our petrological model for LIP magmatism argues that initial gas emission was dominated by sulfur liberated from sulfide-bearing cratonic lithosphere before CO2 became the dominant gas. This model offers an explanation of why LIPs erupted through oceanic lithosphere are not associated with climatic and biotic crises comparable to LIPs emitted through cratonic lithosphere.

  20. Lithospheric Structure of the Northeastern North China Craton Imaged by S Receiver Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingchen; Ding, Zhifeng; Zhu, Lupei

    2016-08-01

    Lithosphere thickness variation is important for understanding the significant tectonic reactivation of the North China Craton (NCC) in the Mesozoic and Cenozoic time. Here, we determined the lithospheric structure in the northeastern NCC using S receiver functions from 305 teleseismic events recorded by 223 seismic stations. The Moho and lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) are imaged clearly beneath the region. The Moho depth decreases from ~45 km beneath the western NCC to ~25 km beneath the eastern NCC. We found that the lithospheric thickness varies from 60 to 80 km beneath the Trans-North China Orogen (TNCO) and eastern NCC with no significant change of the LAB depth. The lithosphere thickness beneath the northwestern Ordos plateau is 100-130 km. In addition, there is a mid-lithosphere discontinuity at a depth of 80 km beneath the plateau that is connected to the base of thinned lithosphere in TNCO and eastern NCC. We suggest that the mid-lithosphere discontinuity represents a mechanically weak zone in the original cratonic lithosphere of the NCC. The material in the lower lithosphere of the craton, when warmed and hydrated by water released from the subducting slab of Western Pacific, became weak due to decrease in viscosity and/or partial melting and was subsequently removed through small-scale mantle convections.

  1. African Americans and Glaucoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Involved News About Us Donate In This Section African Americans and Glaucoma email Send this article to a ... glaucoma is the leading cause of blindness in African Americans. Half of those with glaucoma don't know ...

  2. Black African Traditional Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaslavsky, Claudia

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the traditional number systems and the origin of the number names used by several African peoples living south of the Sahara. Also included are limitations in African mathematical development, and possible topics for research. (RP)

  3. Early African Diaspora in colonial Campeche, Mexico: strontium isotopic evidence.

    PubMed

    Price, T Douglas; Tiesler, Vera; Burton, James H

    2006-08-01

    Construction activities around Campeche's central park led to the discovery of an early colonial church and an associated burial ground, in use from the mid-16th century AD to the late 17th century. Remains of some individuals revealed dental mutilations characteristic of West Africa. Analyses of strontium isotopes of dental enamel from these individuals yielded unusually high (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios, inconsistent with an origin in Mesoamerica, but consistent with an origin in West Africa in terrain underlain by the West Africa Craton, perhaps near the port of Elmina, a principal source of slaves for the New World during the 16th century. These individuals likely represent some of the earliest representatives of the African Diaspora in the Americas.

  4. Phanerozoic deposition, erosion, and vertical motion history of the Slave craton from apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, A. K.; Flowers, R. M.; Bowring, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Resolving the history and causes of elevation change in cratonic settings is a challenging problem. We integrate apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronometry (AHe) data and geologic observations to constrain the Phanerozoic burial, unroofing, and hypsometric evolution of the Archean Slave craton and surrounding Proterozoic belts in the northwestern Canadian shield. Although the craton currently lacks Phanerozoic strata, Phanerozoic sedimentary xenoliths contained within kimberlites of different ages demonstrate that such rocks once covered the craton. The thermochronometry data allow us to constrain the spatial extent, thickness, and history of these now-denuded sedimentary units. New AHe results consist of 94 apatite analyses for 16 samples and, together with previously published data, yield one of the largest published cratonic AHe datasets. AHe dates range from 210 ± 12 Ma to 363 ± 37 Ma. Dates are older in the eastern Slave craton and decrease to the west. Thermal history simulations are consistent with Paleozoic heating to temperatures ≥88-90 °C, suggesting burial beneath ≥3.5 km of sedimentary rocks across the region, followed by cooling and unroofing that progressed from east to west. Model results also permit heating in Cretaceous time, consistent with burial to ≤1.3 km and subsequent unroofing. When combined with other AHe datasets, regional unconformities, and sedimentary xenolith data, the results show that an episode of Paleozoic-early Mesozoic burial and unroofing affected most of the western Canadian shield. This history is out of sequence with sea level chronologies and demands Paleozoic subsidence of the craton followed by surface uplift. The Slave craton subsequently underwent at least 300 m of post-100 Ma elevation gain, based on ca. 100 Ma marine sedimentary xenoliths entrained in ~75-45 Ma kimberlites of the central Slave craton at modern 500-600 m elevations. Comparison of this hypsometric history with far-field plate boundary activity suggests

  5. Structural and geochronological constraints on the Pan-African tectonic evolution of the northern Damara Belt, Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Jérémie; Saalmann, Kerstin; Naydenov, Kalin V.; Milani, Lorenzo; Belyanin, George A.; Zwingmann, Horst; Charlesworth, Guy; Kinnaird, Judith A.

    2016-01-01

    The Pan-African Orogen formed by convergence of numerous continental blocks during the Neoproterozoic to early Cambrian. This convergence eventually led to amalgamation of Gondwana, a supercontinent crosscut by a network of highly oblique linear orogenic belts that locally intersect each other, as in NW Namibia, where the NNW trending Kaoko Belt joins the NE trending Damara Belt. The northern Damara Belt has preserved well three regional Pan-African tectonic events due to the dominance of weak Neoproterozoic marine sediments (Damara Supergroup) that have been affected by low-grade metamorphism. A newly discovered early N-S horizontal contraction, dated by 40Ar/39Ar at ~590 Ma, is tentatively linked to convergence between the Congo and Kalahari cratons. This was superseded by collision between the Congo and Rio de la Plata cratons between 580 and 530 Ma that thickened and exhumed the orogenic crust of the Kaoko Belt and produce upper crustal N-S oriented folds of earlier fold trains and associated axial planar schistosities in the northern Damara Belt. A switch from E-W to NW-SE horizontal shortening occurred at ~530 Ma as a result of collision with the Kalahari Craton, triggering extensive syn-orogenic magmatism in the entire Damara Belt. During this last event, southward indentation and underthrusting of the Congo Craton promontory below the Neoproterozoic cover sequences produced a deformation front in the northern Damara Belt. Our results show that highly oblique convergent processes competed over a period of ~120 Ma to build Gondwana in Namibia during the late Neoproterozoic to early Cambrian.

  6. The African Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oguntoyinbo, Lekan

    2012-01-01

    From student and faculty exchanges to joint research projects, U.S. universities maintain a broad spectrum of collaborative relationships with African universities. It's unclear how many U.S. colleges and universities have partnerships with African universities. The African Studies Association, an organization of scholars, doesn't keep that kind…

  7. Extremely depleted lithospheric mantle and diamonds beneath the southern Zimbabwe Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Chris B.; Pearson, D. Graham; Bulanova, Galina P.; Beard, Andrew D.; Carlson, Richard W.; Wittig, Nadine; Sims, Keith; Chimuka, Lovemore; Muchemwa, Ellah

    2009-11-01

    Inclusion-bearing diamonds, mantle xenoliths, and kimberlite concentrates from the Cambrian-aged Murowa and Sese kimberlites have been studied to characterise the nature of the lithospheric mantle beneath the southern Zimbabwe Craton. The diamonds are mostly octahedral, moderately rich in nitrogen with moderate to high aggregation, and contain mainly dunite-harzburgite mineral inclusions. Similarly, dunite xenoliths predominate over harzburgite and lherzolite and carry olivines with Mg/Mg + Fe (Mg#) values of 0.92-0.95, spanning the average signatures for Kaapvaal Craton peridotites. Eclogitic xenoliths are extremely rare, in contrast to the Kaapvaal mantle lithosphere. The Zimbabwe mantle assemblage has been only slightly affected by later silicic metasomatism and re-fertilisation with re-introduction of pyroxenes in contrast to the Kaapvaal and many cratonic lithospheric blocks elsewhere where strong metasomatism and re-fertilisation is widespread. Pyroxene, garnet and spinel thermobarometry suggests an ambient 40 mW m - 2 geotherm, with the lithosphere extending down to 210 km at the time of kimberlite eruption. Whole rock peridotite Re-Os isotope analyses yield T RD model ages of 2.7 to 2.9 Ga, providing minimum estimates of the time of melt depletion, are slightly younger in age than the basement greenstone formation. These model ages coincide with the mean T RD age of > 200 analyses of Kaapvaal Craton peridotites, whereas the average Re-Os model age for the Zimbabwe peridotites is 3.2 Ga. The Os data and low Yb n/Lu n ratios suggest a model whereby thick lithospheric mantle was stabilised during the early stages of crustal development by shallow peridotite melting required for formation of residues with sufficiently high Cr/Al to stabilise chromite which then transforms to low Ca, high Cr garnet. Sulphide inclusions in diamond produce minimum T RD model ages of 3.4 Ga indicating that parts of the lithosphere were present at the earliest stages of crust

  8. Seismic Tomography of the Arctic: Continental Cratons, Ancient Orogens, Oceanic Lithosphere and Convecting Mantle Beneath (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, S.; Schaeffer, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Lateral variations in seismic velocities in the upper mantle, mapped by seismic tomography, reflect primarily the variations in the temperature of the rock at depth. Seismic tomography thus reveals lateral changes in the temperature and thickness of the lithosphere; it maps deep boundaries between tectonic blocks with different properties and with different age of the lithosphere. Our new global, shear-wave tomographic model of the upper mantle and the crust is constrained by an unprecedentedly large number of broadband waveform fits (nearly one million seismograms, with both surface and S waves included) and provides improved resolution of the lithosphere across the whole of the Arctic region, compared to other available models. The most prominent high-velocity anomalies, seen down to 150-200 km depths, indicate the cold, thick, stable mantle lithosphere beneath Precambrian cratons. The northern boundaries of the Canadian Shield's and Greenland's cratonic lithosphere closely follow the coastlines, with the Greenland and North American cratons clearly separated from each other. In Eurasia, in contrast, cratonic lithosphere extends hundreds of kilometres north of the coast of the continent, beneath the Barents and eastern Kara Seas. The boundaries of the Archean cratons mapped by tomography indicate the likely offshore extensions of major Phanerozoic sutures in northern Eurasia. The old oceanic lithosphere of the Canada Basin is much colder and thicker than the younger lithosphere beneath the adjacent Amundsen Basin, north of the Gakkel Ridge. Beneath the slow-spreading Gakkel Ridge, we detect the expected low-velocity anomaly associated with partial melting in the uppermost mantle; the anomaly is weaker, however, than beneath faster-spreading ridges globally. South of the ridge, the Nansen Basin shows higher seismic velocities in the upper mantle beneath it, compared to the Amundsen Basin. At 150-250 km depth, most of the oceanic portions of the central Arctic (the

  9. Aeromagnetic interpretation in the south-central Zimbabwe Craton: (reappraisal of) crustal structure and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranganai, Rubeni T.; Whaler, Kathryn A.; Ebinger, Cynthia J.

    2016-11-01

    Regional aeromagnetic data from the south-central Zimbabwe Craton have been digitally processed and enhanced for geological and structural mapping and tectonic interpretation integrated with gravity data, to constrain previous interpretations based on tentative geologic maps and provide new information to link these structural features to known tectonic events. The derived maps show excellent correlation between magnetic anomalies and the known geology, and extend lithological and structural mapping to the shallow/near subsurface. In particular, they reveal the presence of discrete crustal domains and several previously unrecognised dykes, faults, and ultramafic intrusions, as well as extensions to others. Five regional structural directions (ENE, NNE, NNW, NW, and WNW) are identified and associated with trends of geological units and cross-cutting structures. The magnetic lineament patterns cut across the >2.7 Ga greenstone belts, which are shown by gravity data to be restricted to the uppermost 10 km of the crust. Therefore, the greenstone belts were an integral part of the lithosphere before much of the upper crustal (brittle) deformation occurred. Significantly, the observed magnetic trends have representatives craton-wide, implying that our interpretation and inferences can be applied to the rest of the craton with confidence. Geological-tectonic correlation suggests that the interpreted regional trends are mainly 2.5 Ga (Great Dyke age) and younger, and relate to tectonic events including the reactivation of the Limpopo Belt at 2.0 Ga and the major regional igneous/dyking events at 1.8-2.0 Ga (Mashonaland), 1.1 Ga (Umkondo), and 180 Ma (Karoo). Thus, their origin is here inferred to be inter- and intra-cratonic collisions and block movements involving the Zimbabwe and Kaapvaal Cratons and the Limpopo Belt, and later lithospheric heating and extension associated with the break-up of Gondwana. The movements produced structures, or reactivated older fractures

  10. Spatial distribution of kimberlite in the Slave craton, Canada: a geometrical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubley, M. P.

    2004-09-01

    Exploration within the Slave craton has revealed clusters of kimberlite intrusions, commonly with internally consistent geochemical and temporal characteristics. Translation diagrams ("Fry analysis") allow an unbiased geometrical examination of the distance and direction between each kimberlite occurrence and all others in the database. Recurrent patterns are visually accentuated due to the square function in data density. Circular histograms quantify the azimuthal density of kimberlite at various distances. For this study, the database comprises the geographic position of 212 kimberlite occurrences of which 70% are from the Lac de Gras field (LDG). Analyses are presented separately for the LDG data and for all non-LDG data in order to test for regional variations and to avoid overwhelming the craton-scale studies by the high density of LDG data. Empirical grouping of kimberlite locations results in delineation of five elliptical clusters that encompass all but four kimberlite occurrences. Clusters within the western part of the craton are elongate to the north-northeast and align within a narrow zone ("Western Corridor"). Elsewhere, the clusters are elongate to the northwest or west-northwest and appear to be arranged en echelon within a poorly defined north-northwest trending zone ("Central Corridor"). Geometrical spatial analyses of kimberlite locations highlight the craton-scale pattern of emplacement within the two main corridors. At regional and local scales, individual intrusions are preferentially located towards the west-northwest (ca. 280°) and north-northeast (ca. 015°) of other intrusions, and these orientations are interpreted to reflect upper mantle trends in magma generation. At local scales (10-25 km), kimberlite of the central and southern craton tends to be located to the northeast (ca. 045°), and possibly weakly to the east-northeast (ca. 070°), of other intrusions, and these orientations correspond to major crustal fractures systems. It is

  11. The building and stabilization of an Archean Craton in the Superior Province, Canada, from a heat flow perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaupart, C.; Mareschal, J.-C.; Bouquerel, H.; Phaneuf, C.

    2014-12-01

    How continental lithosphere responds to tectonic stresses and mantle convective processes is determined in large part by its mechanical strength and temperature distribution, which depend on crustal heat production. In order to establish reliable crustal and thermal models for the Superior Craton, Canadian Shield, new measurements of heat flux and heat production in 28 deep boreholes at 16 sites are combined with a larger set of older data. The Superior Province was assembled by the docking of volcanic/plutonic and metasedimentary terranes and continental fragments to the southern margin of an older core around 2.7 Ga. The average heat flux is much lower in the craton core than in the accreted terranes, 31 versus 43 mW m-2. The major accreted volcanic/plutonic belts share the same heat production characteristics, testifying to the remarkable uniformity of crust-building mechanisms. The marked difference between the crusts of the core and the accreted belts supports the operation of two different crust-forming processes. The crust of the craton core has an enriched upper layer, in contrast to that of the younger belts which lack marked internal differentiation. At the end of amalgamation, the lithosphere of the craton core was colder and mechanically stronger than the lithosphere beneath newly accreted material. Surrounding the craton core with weaker belts may have ensured its stability against tectonic and mantle convection perturbations. This large strength contrast accounts for the lack of lithospheric imbrication at the edge of the craton core as well as for the different characteristics of seismic anisotropy in the lithospheres of the craton core and the younger terranes.

  12. The Pan-African continental margin in northeastern Africa - Evidence from a geochronological study of granulites at Sabaloka, Sudan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, A.; Stern, R. J.; Dawoud, A. S.; Compston, W.; Reischmann, T.

    1987-09-01

    The evolution of the Pan-African ancient continental margin in northeastern Africa was investigated, using an Nd model age, ion-microprobe data on zircon ages, and Rb-Sr whole-rock dates on the high-grade gneiss terrain at Sabaloka, Sudan, a region which is formally considered to be part of the Archaean/early Proterozoic Nile craton. The analysis of these data indicates that the Sabaloka granulites and gneisses are not Archaen in age. Instead, they reflect Pan-African metamorphic events. The gneisses studied may represent the infrastructure of the ancient African continental margin onto which the juvenile arc assemblage of the Arabian-Nubian shield was accreted during intense horizontal shortening and crustal interstacking of a major collision event.

  13. Geophysical data on the cratonic lithosphere structure and composition in the Northern Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlenkova, Ninel; Pavlenkova, Galina; Yegorova, Tamara

    2014-05-01

    The seismic profiles made in Russia with Peaceful Nuclear Explosions (PNE), were interpreted with the purpose of constructing the upper mantle velocity models of the Northern Eurasia. The profiles show that the horizontal inhomogeneity of the upper mantle correlates with tectonics and geophysical fields. Higher velocities (8.2-8.4 km/s) are characteristic of the uppermost mantle of the cold East European and Siberian cratons, the velocities of 8.0-8.1 km/s are observed in the young plates with higher heat flows. The PNE data show a clear velocity and rheology stratification of the craton lithospheres. The asthenosphere is not traced as a low velocity layer, on the contrary, the 10-20 km thick velocity inversion zone is revealed at a depth of around 100 km. Several seismic boundaries are traced along all the profiles at depths of 100, 150, 200 and 300 km. The boundaries are not simple discontinuities. The reflections from these boundaries are complicated many-phase groups which may be explained by the reflective zones with alternation of the high- and low-velocity layers. The most important boundaries are the N boundary (depth of 80-120 km) which underlies the lithosphere brittle part, and the L boundary (depth of 200-250 km) which is the lithosphere bottom. The 2D gravity modelling for the PNE profiles shows differences in the lithosphere composition of the East European and of the Siberian cratons. The Siberian Craton is characterized by the decreased densities which may be a result of the lithosphere material depletion. These data are in good agreement with the petrophysical modelling based on the xsenolite and thermal data. The higher densities are characteristic of the fertile matter of the primitive mantle, the lower densities - of the depleted mantle represented mainly by the garnet peridotites. The seismic boundary L may be a transition from the depleted to the fertile upper mantle. The obtained data show that an important role in the mantle dynamics belongs

  14. [The role of Wacława Moszyński in the development of the Polish School of Machine and Mechanism Theory].

    PubMed

    Kisiel, Janusz; Pylak, Konrad; Schabowska, Krystyna

    2005-01-01

    The end of the 19th and the first half of the 20th centuries saw the emergence and intensive development of many disciplines in the technical sciences, and the laying of a groundwork for those disciplines in their current form. In Poland, a country deprived of independent statehood until 1918, this was additionally a period when native research centres and scientific schools came into being, and when Polish-language specialist literatures emerged as well. Many of the eminent personages whose activities contributed to those trends have already been described in biographical notes and articles. There are still, however, not enough studies dealing with the substance of their scientific and professional achievements. One of the personages in question was Wacława Moszyński, professor of the Warsaw Technical University, a pioneer of machine construction and mechanism theory, author of the first academic textbook in the field to be published in Poland. The current article discusses Moszyński's contribution to the development of mechanism and machine theory. The first part of the article gives an outline of the history of the discipline until 1945, presents the context of the after-war activities of the author, and evaluates his influence on the development of machine and mechanism theory in Poland; it also carries a short biography of Moszyński. The rest of the article is devoted to Moszyński's scientific achievements, and describes his approach to matters of structure, kinematics and dynamics, with special focus on those of his formulations and solution to problems that appear particularly innovative and original. The article also points out those proposals by Moszyński which made him a precursor of other disciplines, such as vibroacoustics, biomechanics and ergonomics. The paper also presents the role of Moszyński's work as a foundation for the development of the Warsaw research-and-teching centre in the field. The achievements and methods of the Warsaw school

  15. "13 BB star" - broadband seismic array at the edge of East European Craton in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, Marcin; Grad, Marek; Wilde-Piórko, Monika; Suchcicki, Jerzy; Arant, Tadeusz

    2014-05-01

    "13 BB star" is a dense array of 13 Reftek 151-120 broadband seismometers located in unpopulated forests in northern Poland - just on the edge of East European Craton. The shape of array was designed as a "star" with one central station and 12 station located on two circles (radius of about 30 and 60 km) around it. This geometry allows us to study seismic waves (in particular surface waves) incoming from all azimuths. Our "13 BB star" array stations are self powered (solar panels and batteries), equipped with local storage system and on-line transmission of seismic and auxiliary data using 2G and 3G cellular network. We also developed on-line application for monitoring array status (transmission, connections, power, temperature, etc.) and on-line data visualization. Main advantages of our array are: 1) 120s broadband seismometers recording with 100Hz sampling, 2) density of array - distances between neighboring stations does not exceed 30 km, 3) station placement in underground wells, 4) stations located in forests far (usually 2-3 km) from industries, roads, villages and other human activity. "13 BB star" started operating in July 2013 and since that time recorded several local, regional, and teleseismic events proving good array functionality. The scientific aim of the "13 BB star" project is development of a quantitative model of the lithosphere-asthenosphere-structure in the marginal zone of the East European Craton in northern Poland. New acquired data will be analyzed using integrated seismic methods, which will yield images of lithosphere-asthenosphere system hitherto unknown for this area. The knowledge of detailed structure of the cratonic lithosphere-asthenosphere system is crucial for the better understanding of the regional, as well as global mantle dynamics and evolution of the Earth's interior. This work was supported by NCN-grant DEC 2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  16. Sediment budget of cratons: insights from West Africa over the Cenozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean-Louis, G.; Chardon, D.; Rouby, D.; Beauvais, A.

    2015-12-01

    The sediment load of rivers constitutes the material that builds the stratigraphic successions found from continental margins to the deep ocean. Measure of this flux is relevant to understanding continental controls on denudation, riverine transport and basin filling. An increasing number of sediment yield measures is available but whether these modern values can be extrapolated at geological timescales for large watersheds is still questioned. One reason is the lack of long-term data. Here, we present a sediment budget for Sub-Saharan West Africa over the Cenozoic to compare with the modern rates. The denudation of this cratonic area is constrained using three regional lateritic paleo-landsurfaces that formed during periods of enhanced weathering since the Paleocene-Eocene greenhouse peak. The 3D interpolation of these surfaces allowed building three successive denudation maps for the 45-24, 24-11 and 11-0 Ma intervals together with reconstructions of the paleo-drainage. The regional distribution of erosion suggests the influence of lithospheric deformation, concentrated around a southern marginal upwarp and eastern hotspot swells. The export of large-scale drainages was calculated by converting denudated volumes into sediment fluxes using the porosity and density of lateritic regolith. Exported volumes calculated for the Niger watershed fall within the same range as the Cenozoic clastic accumulations of the Niger delta. Comparisons also show that modern fluxes can be an order of magnitude above the long-term fluxes for moderately large watersheds but that modern and long-term yields are similar for the largest watersheds (e.g. Niger, Volta, Senegal). These results suggest that the export of very large cratonic watersheds is independent of the measurement timescale and that their modern yields can be extrapolated at long-timescale. Finally, it allows assessing the relative contribution of cratons, i.e. non-active orogenic areas, to the global sediment budgets at

  17. Craton vs. rift uppermost mantle contributions to magnetic anomalies in the United States interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, S. A.; Feinberg, J. M.; Ferré, E. C.; Demory, F.; Martín-Hernández, F.; Conder, J. A.; Rochette, P.

    2014-06-01

    The interpretation of satellite magnetic information (Magsat, Oersted, CHAMP, Swarm) requires the understanding of the mineralogy of crustal and mantle sources. Also, spectral analysis of magnetic data over forearcs and cratons calls for upper mantle contribution. The prospect of such a contribution contradicts the view that the mantle is too hot and its magnetism is too weak to influence magnetic anomalies. Here we examine the rock magnetic properties of fresh mantle xenoliths from four settings across the United States: phlogopite-spinel dunites from the Bearpaw Mountains, Montana, and lherzolites/harzburgites from San Carlos, Arizona; Kilbourne Hole, New Mexico; and Knippa, Texas. Paleomagnetic results show single-component natural remanent magnetizations (NRMs), which, combined with optical and secondary electron microscopy support the lack of post-eruption alteration and absence of host-rock contamination. The NRM carriers include magnetite at Bearpaw Mountain and San Carlos, and pyrrhotite at Kilbourne Hole and Knippa. These four areas show continental crust of distinct thicknesses and various geotherms. The potential mantle contribution to magnetic anomalies is forward modeled using crustal thickness, current geotherm and average magnetic properties of xenoliths. The San Carlos and Kilbourne Hole mantle, situated near the Rio Grande Rift is too hot and its magnetism is too weak to contribute to anomalies. The sulfide-dominated assemblage at Knippa does not support magnetization at mantle depths. In contrast, the Bearpaw Mountains combine a relatively cold geotherm (craton) and abundance of magnetite formed at mantle depth. This cratonic mantle, metasomatized by fluids from the Farallon plate, may contribute to long wavelength magnetic anomalies.

  18. Cambrian-Ordovician craton margin section, southern Great Basin: A sequence stratigraphic perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.D. ); Edwards, J.C. )

    1991-02-01

    The Upper Cambrian through Upper Ordovician cratonal to miogeoclinal transition section in southern Nevada and eastern California accumulated on a gentle homoclinal ramp and includes a variety of peritidal and subtidal carbonate facies. This section consists of a westward-thickening wedge assigned to the Nopah and Mountain Springs formations and can be related to one type 1 and least four type 2 sequences. The basal part of the section is the Dunderberg Shale Member of the Nopah Formation, which is composed of meter-scale cyclical shale-carbonate bundles. Carbonate interbeds signify a variety of peritidal to deep subtidal paleoenvironments that comprise shelf margin and transgressive systems tracts. The progradation of a thrombolitic bank complex in the overlying upper Nopah may reflect emergence on the craton, evidenced by the Sauk II-Sauk III cratonic disconformity. The overlying A' member of the Mountain Springs Formation rests in sharp and, in places, slightly discordant contact with the top of the Nopah. This contact is interpreted as a marine flooding surface and type 2 sequence boundary. Member A consists of Lower Ordovician transgressive and highstand systems tracts comprised of oolitic shoal and back-shoal to intertidal carbonates. The type 1 unconformity that separates member A from overlying B' member is the top of the first-order Sauk Sequence. The B' member is a thin stratal interval of late Middle to Late Ordovician age and consists of dark, burrow-mottled skeletal wackestone and mudstone that is part of a transgressive systems tract. It is bounded above by another type 1 unconformity and therefore represents the first-order Tippecanoe sequence of Sloss.

  19. Bouguer images of the North American craton and its structural evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, R. E.; Bowring, S.; Eddy, M.; Guinness, E.; Leff, C.; Bindschadler, D.

    1984-01-01

    Digital image processing techniques have been used to generate Bouguer images of the North American craton that diplay more of the granularity inherent in the data as compared with existing contour maps. A dominant NW-SE linear trend of highs and lows can be seen extending from South Dakota, through Nebraska, and into Missouri. The structural trend cuts across the major Precambrian boundary in Missouri, separating younger granites and rhyolites from older sheared granites and gneisses. This trend is probably related to features created during an early and perhaps initial episode of crustal assembly by collisional processes. The younger granitic materials are probably a thin cover over an older crust.

  20. Isotopic composition of Mg and Fe in garnet peridotites from the Kaapvaal and Siberian cratons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yajun; Huang, Jin-Xiang; Griffin, W. L.; Liu, Chuanzhou; Huang, Fang

    2017-03-01

    We present Mg and Fe isotopic data for whole rocks and separated minerals (olivine, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, garnet, and phlogopite) of garnet peridotites that equilibrated at depths of 134-186 km beneath the Kaapvaal and Siberian cratons. There is no clear difference in δ26Mg and δ56Fe of garnet peridotites from these two cratons. δ26Mg of whole rocks varies from -0.243‰ to -0.204‰ with an average of -0.225 ± 0.037‰ (2σ, n = 19), and δ56Fe from -0.038‰ to 0.060‰ with an average of -0.003 ± 0.068‰ (2σ, n = 19). Both values are indistinguishable from the fertile upper mantle, indicating that there is no significant Mg-Fe isotopic difference between the shallow and deep upper mantle. The garnet peridotites from ancient cratons show δ26Mg similar to komatiites and basalts, further suggesting that there is no obvious Mg isotopic fractionation during different degrees of partial melting of deep mantle peridotites and komatiite formation. The precision of the Mg and Fe isotope data (⩽±0.05‰ for δ26Mg and δ56Fe, 2σ) allows us to distinguish inter-mineral isotopic fractionations. Olivines are in equilibrium with opx in terms of Mg and Fe isotopes. Garnets have the lowest δ26Mg and δ56Fe among the coexisting mantle minerals, suggesting the dominant control of crystal structure on the Mg-Fe isotopic compositions of garnets. Elemental compositions and mineralogy suggest that clinopyroxene and garnet were produced by later metasomatic processes as they are not in chemical equilibrium with olivine or orthopyroxene. This is consistent with the isotopic disequilibrium of Mg and Fe isotopes between orthopyroxene/olivine and garnet/clinopyroxene. Combined with one sample showing slightly heavy δ26Mg and much lighter δ56Fe, these disequilibrium features in the garnet peridotites reveal kinetic isotopic fractionation due to Fe-Mg inter-diffusion during reaction between peridotites and percolating melts in the Kaapvaal craton.

  1. The ambient noise and earthquake surface wave tomography of the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, J.; Obrebski, M. J.; Wu, Q.; Li, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The North China Craton (NCC) is unique for its unusual Phanerozoic tectonic activity. The NCC was internally tectonically stable until Jurassic when its southern margin collided with the Yangzte Craton. Subsequently, the eastern and central part of the NCC underwent distinctive evolutions during the Late Mesozoic and Cenozoic. In contrast to the Erdos block located in the western part of NCC and that seems to have preserved the typical features of a stable craton, the eastern NCC has experienced significant lithospheric thinning as evidenced by widespread magmatism activity and normal faulting, among other manifestations. The eastern part of the NCC is also one of the most seismically active intracontinental regions in the world. Here we focus on the region that comprises the North China Basin and the Yanshan-Taihang Mountains, two major tectonic units located to the east and in the center of the NCC, respectively. We combine ambient noise data and ballistic surface wave data recorded by the dense temporary seismic array deployed in the North China to obtain phase velocity maps at periods ranging from 5s to 60s. 1587 and 3667 ray paths were obtained from earthquake surface waves and ambient noise correlations, respectively. The phase velocity distribution was reconstructed with grid size 0.25x0.25 degrees and 0.5x0.5 degrees from ambient noise tomography and earthquake surface wave tomography. For periods shorter than 15s, the phase velocity variations are well correlated with the principal geological units in the NCC, with low-speed anomalies corresponding to the major sedimentary basins and high-speed anomalies coinciding with the main mountain ranges. Within the period range from 20s to 30s, the phase velocity variations seem to be related to the local variations of the crustal thickness. For the periods above 30s, the strength of the phase velocity variations decreases with increasing periods, which may imply that the uppermost mantle is much more homogeneous

  2. Nature of the mantle roots beneath the North American craton: mantle xenolith evidence from Somerset Island kimberlites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidberger, S. S.; Francis, D.

    1999-09-01

    The recently discovered Nikos kimberlite on Somerset Island, in the Canadian Arctic, hosts an unusually well preserved suite of mantle xenoliths dominated by garnet-peridotite (lherzolite, harzburgite, dunite) showing coarse and porphyroclastic textures, with minor garnet-pyroxenite. The whole rock and mineral data for 54 Nikos xenoliths indicate a highly refractory underlying mantle with high olivine forsterite contents (ave. Fo=92.3) and moderate to high olivine abundances (ave. 80 wt.%). These characteristics are similar to those reported for peridotites from the Archean Kaapvaal and Siberian cratons (ave. olivine Fo=92.5), but are clearly distinct from the trend defined by oceanic peridotites and mantle xenoliths in alkaline basalts and kimberlites from post-Archean continental terranes (ave. olivine Fo=91.0). The Nikos xenoliths yield pressures and temperatures of last equilibration between 20 and 55 kb and 650 and 1300°C, and a number of the peridotite nodules appear to have equilibrated in the diamond stability field. The pressure and temperature data define a conductive paleogeotherm corresponding to a surface heat flow of 44 mW/m 2. Paleogeotherms based on xenolith data from the central Slave province of the Canadian craton require a lower surface heat flow (˜40 mW/m 2) indicating a cooler geothermal regime than that beneath the Canadian Arctic. A large number of kimberlite-hosted peridotites from the Kaapvaal craton in South Africa and parts of the Siberian craton are characterized by high orthopyroxene contents (ave. Kaapvaal 32 wt.%, Siberia 20 wt.%). The calculated modal mineral assemblages for the Nikos peridotites show moderate to low contents of orthopyroxene (ave. 12 wt.%), indicating that the orthopyroxene-rich mineralogy characteristic of the Kaapvaal and Siberian cratons is not a feature of the cratonic upper mantle beneath Somerset Island.

  3. The African superswell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyblade, Andrew A.; Robinson, Scott W.

    1994-01-01

    Maps of residual bathymetry in the ocean basins around the African continent reveal a broad bathymetric swell in the southeastern Atlantic Ocean with an amplitude of about 500 m. We propose that this region of anomalously shallow bathymetry, together with the contiguous eastern and southern African plateaus, form a superswell which we refer to as the African superswell. The origin of the African superswell is uncertain. However, rifting and volcanism in eastern Africa, as well as heat flow measurements in southern Africa and the southeastern Atlantic Ocean, suggest that the superswell may be attributed, at least in part, to heating of the lithosphere.

  4. Zircon from East Antarctica: evidence for Archean intracrustal recycling in the Kaapvaal-Grunehogna Craton from O and Hf isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschall, H. R.; Hawkesworth, C. J.; Storey, C.; Leat, P. T.; Dhuime, B.

    2010-12-01

    The Grunehogna Craton (GC, East Antarctica) is interpreted as part of the Archean Kaapvaal Craton of southern Africa prior to Gondwana breakup. The basement of the GC is only exposed within a small area comprising the dominantly leucocratic Annandagstoppane (ADT) granite. The granite (and hence the craton) has been dated previously only by Rb-Sr and Pb-Pb mica and whole-rock methods. Here, the crystallisation age of the granite was determined to 3,067 ± 8 Ma by U-Pb dating of zircon. This age is coeval with granitoids and volcanics in the Swaziland and Witwatersrand blocks of the Kaapvaal Craton. Inherited grains in the ADT granite were discovered with ages of up to 3,433 ±7 Ma, and are the first evidence of Palaeoarchean basement in Dronning-Maud Land. The age spectrum of the inherited grains reflects well-known tectono-magmatic events in the Kaapvaal Craton and form important pieces of evidence for the connection of the GC to the Kaapvaal Craton for at least three billion years and probably longer. Whole-rock chemistry and zircon O isotopes demonstrate a supracrustal sedimentary source for the granite, and Hf model ages show that at least two or three different crustal sources were contributing to the magma with model ages of ~3.50, ~3.75 and possibly ~3.90 Ga, respectively. 3.1 Ga granites covering ~60 % of the outcrop area of the Kaapvaal-Grunehogna Craton played a major role in the mechanical stabilisation of the continental crust during the establishment of the craton in the Mesoarchean. Combined zircon Hf-O isotope data and the lack of juvenile additions to the crust in the Mesoarchean strongly suggest that crustal melting and granite formation was caused by the deep burial of clastic sediments and subsequent incubational heating of the crust. Intracrustal recycling of this type may be an important process during cratonisation and the long-term stabilisation of continental crust.

  5. Abnormal lithium isotope composition from the ancient lithospheric mantle beneath the North China Craton

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yan-Jie; Zhang, Hong-Fu; Deloule, Etienne; Su, Ben-Xun; Ying, Ji-Feng; Santosh, M.; Xiao, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Lithium elemental and isotopic compositions of olivines in peridotite xenoliths from Hebi in the North China Craton provide direct evidence for the highly variable δ7Li in Archean lithospheric mantle. The δ7Li in the cores of olivines from the Hebi high-Mg# peridotites (Fo > 91) show extreme variation from −27 to +21, in marked deviation from the δ7Li range of fresh MORB (+1.6 to +5.6) although the Li abundances of the olivines are within the range of normal mantle (1–2 ppm). The Li abundances and δ7Li characteristics of the Hebi olivines could not have been produced by recent diffusive-driven isotopic fractionation of Li and therefore the δ7Li in the cores of these olivines record the isotopic signature of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle. Our data demonstrate that abnormal δ7Li may be preserved in the ancient lithospheric mantle as observed in our study from the central North China Craton, which suggest that the subcontinental lithospheric mantle has experienced modification of fluid/melt derived from recycled oceanic crust. PMID:24589693

  6. Neogene cratonic erosion fluxes and landform evolution processes from regional regolith mapping (Burkina Faso, West Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimaud, Jean-Louis; Chardon, Dominique; Metelka, Václav; Beauvais, Anicet; Bamba, Ousmane

    2015-07-01

    The regionally correlated and dated regolith-paleolandform sequence of Sub-Saharan West Africa offers a unique opportunity to constrain continental-scale regolith dynamics as the key part of the sediment routing system. In this study, a regolith mapping protocol is developed and applied at the scale of Southwestern Burkina Faso. Mapping combines field survey and remote sensing data to reconstruct the topography of the last pediplain that formed over West Africa in the Early and Mid-Miocene (24-11 Ma). The nature and preservation pattern of the pediplain are controlled by the spatial variation of bedrock lithology and are partitioned among large drainage basins. Quantification of pediplain dissection and drainage growth allows definition of a cratonic background denudation rate of 2 m/My and a minimum characteristic timescale of 20 Ma for shield resurfacing. These results may be used to simulate minimum export fluxes of drainage basins of constrained size over geological timescales. Background cratonic denudation results in a clastic export flux of ~ 4 t/km2/year, which is limited by low denudation efficiency of slope processes and correlatively high regolith storage capacity of tropical shields. These salient characteristics of shields' surface dynamics would tend to smooth the riverine export fluxes of shields through geological time.

  7. Abnormal lithium isotope composition from the ancient lithospheric mantle beneath the North China Craton.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan-Jie; Zhang, Hong-Fu; Deloule, Etienne; Su, Ben-Xun; Ying, Ji-Feng; Santosh, M; Xiao, Yan

    2014-03-04

    Lithium elemental and isotopic compositions of olivines in peridotite xenoliths from Hebi in the North China Craton provide direct evidence for the highly variable δ(7)Li in Archean lithospheric mantle. The δ(7)Li in the cores of olivines from the Hebi high-Mg# peridotites (Fo > 91) show extreme variation from -27 to +21, in marked deviation from the δ(7)Li range of fresh MORB (+1.6 to +5.6) although the Li abundances of the olivines are within the range of normal mantle (1-2 ppm). The Li abundances and δ(7)Li characteristics of the Hebi olivines could not have been produced by recent diffusive-driven isotopic fractionation of Li and therefore the δ(7)Li in the cores of these olivines record the isotopic signature of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle. Our data demonstrate that abnormal δ(7)Li may be preserved in the ancient lithospheric mantle as observed in our study from the central North China Craton, which suggest that the subcontinental lithospheric mantle has experienced modification of fluid/melt derived from recycled oceanic crust.

  8. Organic matter in the Neoproterozoic cap carbonate from the Amazonian Craton, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa Júnior, Gustavo R.; Nogueira, Afonso C. R.; Santos Neto, Eugênio V.; Moura, Candido A. V.; Araújo, Bruno Q.; Reis, Francisco de A. M.

    2016-12-01

    Bitumen found in Neoproterozoic carbonates from the southern Amazonian Craton, Brazil, represents a great challenge for its geochemical characterization (origin, thermal maturity and the degree of preservation) within a context of petroleum system. This organic material occurs in the basal Araras Group, considered as a Neoproterozoic cap carbonate, composed of dolostones (Mirassol d'Oeste Formation) overlaid by limestones and shales (Guia Formation). Geochemical analyses in samples of carbonate with bitumen from two open pits (Terconi and Tangará quarries) have shown low to very low total organic carbon content. Analyses of representative samples of Guia and Mirassol d'Oeste formations allowed us to obtain Gas chromatography (GC) traces and diagnostic biomarkers. n-C14 to n-C37 alkane distribution patterns in all samples suggests a major contribution of marine algae. Mid-chain monomethyl alkanes (C14sbnd C25) identified in both sets of samples were also reported in all mid to late Proterozoic oils and source rocks. However, there are significant differences among terpane distribution between the Mirassol d'Oeste and Tangará da Serra regions. The integration of organic geochemistry data and geological information suggests an indigenous origin for studied bitumen, primarily accumulated as hydrocarbon fluids migrated to carbonate rocks with higher porosity and permeability, and afterwards, altered to bitumen or migrabitumen. Although further investigations are required, this work provides a significant contribution to the knowledge about the remnant of this hypothetical Neoproterozoic petroleum system developed in the Southern Amazonian Craton.

  9. Mantle density structure of the Siberian craton and the West Siberian basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepanova, Y. V.; Artemieva, I. M.

    2013-12-01

    We present a mantle density model of the Proterozoic- Paleozoic West Siberian basin (WSB) and the Archean -Proterozoic Siberian craton (SC) based on free-board constraints. Given complex tectonic evolution of both WSB and SC, a strong compositional heterogeneity of mantle lithosphere is expected, but has never been documented so far in regional geophysical studies. In particular, the Siberian craton, formed by amalgamation of Archean terranes, has been significantly affected by Proterozoic collisional and extensional events, Devonian rifting of the Vilyui rift, and several pulses of kimberlite magmatism. The basement of the West Siberian basin, the largest in the world intracontinental basin, was formed by amalgamation of island arcs, terranes, micro-continents, and relict ocean basins during late Proterozoic-Paleozoic orogenic events, and was later affected by the Permian-early Triassic rifting, followed by emplacement of the Siberian traps, which cover much of the SC and the WSB. Their source region and geodynamic origin are still a subject of debate, although a strong reworking of the lithosphere is expected to be associated with the Siberian LIP. The present-day West Siberian basin and the Siberian craton lack significant surface topography variations, whereas the crustal structure is highly heterogeneous with large lateral variations in crustal thickness (ca. 20 km), thickness of sediments (ca. 15 km), and average crustal density (Cherepanova et al., 2013). Similarly, thermal regime of the lithosphere is also heterogeneous, ranging from typical cold cratonic geotherms in much of the SC with up-to 350 km thick lithosphere to hot geotherms in the rifted part of the WSB, where the lithosphere thickness is ca. 90-130 km (Artemieva and Mooney, 2001). Nonetheless, free air gravity is near-zero for much of Siberia suggesting that it is close to isostatic equilibrium. Topography, through the lithosphere buoyancy, is controlled by the structure of the mantle

  10. Orogen styles in the East African Orogen: A review of the Neoproterozoic to Cambrian tectonic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, H.; Abdelsalam, M.; Ali, K. A.; Bingen, B.; Collins, A. S.; Fowler, A. R.; Ghebreab, W.; Hauzenberger, C. A.; Johnson, P. R.; Kusky, T. M.; Macey, P.; Muhongo, S.; Stern, R. J.; Viola, G.

    2013-10-01

    The East African Orogen, extending from southern Israel, Sinai and Jordan in the north to Mozambique and Madagascar in the south, is the world´s largest Neoproterozoic to Cambrian orogenic complex. It comprises a collage of individual oceanic domains and continental fragments between the Archean Sahara-Congo-Kalahari Cratons in the west and Neoproterozoic India in the east. Orogen consolidation was achieved during distinct phases of orogeny between ∼850 and 550 Ma. The northern part of the orogen, the Arabian-Nubian Shield, is predominantly juvenile Neoproterozoic crust that formed in and adjacent to the Mozambique Ocean. The ocean closed during a protracted period of island-arc and microcontinent accretion between ∼850 and 620 Ma. To the south of the Arabian Nubian Shield, the Eastern Granulite-Cabo Delgado Nappe Complex of southern Kenya, Tanzania and Mozambique was an extended crust that formed adjacent to theMozambique Ocean and experienced a ∼650-620 Ma granulite-facies metamorphism. Completion of the nappe assembly around 620 Ma is defined as the East African Orogeny and was related to closure of the Mozambique Ocean. Oceans persisted after 620 Ma between East Antarctica, India, southern parts of the Congo-Tanzania-Bangweulu Cratons and the Zimbabwe-Kalahari Craton. They closed during the ∼600-500 Ma Kuungan or Malagasy Orogeny, a tectonothermal event that affected large portions of southern Tanzania, Zambia, Malawi, Mozambique, Madagascar and Antarctica. The East African and Kuungan Orogenies were followed by phases of post-orogenic extension. Early ∼600-550 Ma extension is recorded in the Arabian-Nubian Shield and the Eastern Granulite-Cabo Delgado Nappe Complex. Later ∼550-480 Ma extension affected Mozambique and southern Madagascar. Both extension phases, although diachronous,are interpreted as the result of lithospheric delamination. Along the strike of the East African Orogen, different geodynamic settings resulted in the evolution of

  11. Orogen styles in the East African Orogen: A review of the Neoproterozoic to Cambrian tectonic evolution☆

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, H.; Abdelsalam, M.; Ali, K.A.; Bingen, B.; Collins, A.S.; Fowler, A.R.; Ghebreab, W.; Hauzenberger, C.A.; Johnson, P.R.; Kusky, T.M.; Macey, P.; Muhongo, S.; Stern, R.J.; Viola, G.

    2013-01-01

    The East African Orogen, extending from southern Israel, Sinai and Jordan in the north to Mozambique and Madagascar in the south, is the world́s largest Neoproterozoic to Cambrian orogenic complex. It comprises a collage of individual oceanic domains and continental fragments between the Archean Sahara–Congo–Kalahari Cratons in the west and Neoproterozoic India in the east. Orogen consolidation was achieved during distinct phases of orogeny between ∼850 and 550 Ma. The northern part of the orogen, the Arabian–Nubian Shield, is predominantly juvenile Neoproterozoic crust that formed in and adjacent to the Mozambique Ocean. The ocean closed during a protracted period of island-arc and microcontinent accretion between ∼850 and 620 Ma. To the south of the Arabian Nubian Shield, the Eastern Granulite–Cabo Delgado Nappe Complex of southern Kenya, Tanzania and Mozambique was an extended crust that formed adjacent to theMozambique Ocean and experienced a ∼650–620 Ma granulite-facies metamorphism. Completion of the nappe assembly around 620 Ma is defined as the East African Orogeny and was related to closure of the Mozambique Ocean. Oceans persisted after 620 Ma between East Antarctica, India, southern parts of the Congo–Tanzania–Bangweulu Cratons and the Zimbabwe–Kalahari Craton. They closed during the ∼600–500 Ma Kuungan or Malagasy Orogeny, a tectonothermal event that affected large portions of southern Tanzania, Zambia, Malawi, Mozambique, Madagascar and Antarctica. The East African and Kuungan Orogenies were followed by phases of post-orogenic extension. Early ∼600–550 Ma extension is recorded in the Arabian–Nubian Shield and the Eastern Granulite–Cabo Delgado Nappe Complex. Later ∼550–480 Ma extension affected Mozambique and southern Madagascar. Both extension phases, although diachronous,are interpreted as the result of lithospheric delamination. Along the strike of the East African Orogen, different geodynamic settings

  12. Orogen styles in the East African Orogen: A review of the Neoproterozoic to Cambrian tectonic evolution.

    PubMed

    Fritz, H; Abdelsalam, M; Ali, K A; Bingen, B; Collins, A S; Fowler, A R; Ghebreab, W; Hauzenberger, C A; Johnson, P R; Kusky, T M; Macey, P; Muhongo, S; Stern, R J; Viola, G

    2013-10-01

    The East African Orogen, extending from southern Israel, Sinai and Jordan in the north to Mozambique and Madagascar in the south, is the world́s largest Neoproterozoic to Cambrian orogenic complex. It comprises a collage of individual oceanic domains and continental fragments between the Archean Sahara-Congo-Kalahari Cratons in the west and Neoproterozoic India in the east. Orogen consolidation was achieved during distinct phases of orogeny between ∼850 and 550 Ma. The northern part of the orogen, the Arabian-Nubian Shield, is predominantly juvenile Neoproterozoic crust that formed in and adjacent to the Mozambique Ocean. The ocean closed during a protracted period of island-arc and microcontinent accretion between ∼850 and 620 Ma. To the south of the Arabian Nubian Shield, the Eastern Granulite-Cabo Delgado Nappe Complex of southern Kenya, Tanzania and Mozambique was an extended crust that formed adjacent to theMozambique Ocean and experienced a ∼650-620 Ma granulite-facies metamorphism. Completion of the nappe assembly around 620 Ma is defined as the East African Orogeny and was related to closure of the Mozambique Ocean. Oceans persisted after 620 Ma between East Antarctica, India, southern parts of the Congo-Tanzania-Bangweulu Cratons and the Zimbabwe-Kalahari Craton. They closed during the ∼600-500 Ma Kuungan or Malagasy Orogeny, a tectonothermal event that affected large portions of southern Tanzania, Zambia, Malawi, Mozambique, Madagascar and Antarctica. The East African and Kuungan Orogenies were followed by phases of post-orogenic extension. Early ∼600-550 Ma extension is recorded in the Arabian-Nubian Shield and the Eastern Granulite-Cabo Delgado Nappe Complex. Later ∼550-480 Ma extension affected Mozambique and southern Madagascar. Both extension phases, although diachronous,are interpreted as the result of lithospheric delamination. Along the strike of the East African Orogen, different geodynamic settings resulted in the evolution

  13. Provenances of the Mesozoic sediments in the Ordos Basin and implications for collision between the North China Craton (NCC) and the South China Craton (SCC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Bao; Yuelong, Chen; Dapeng, Li; Shanhui, Wang

    2014-12-01

    To constrain the provenance of the Ordos Basin and the evolution history of the Qinling Orogen Belt from the Triassic to the Jurassic, 10 samples from the Dongsheng area and 28 samples from the Yan'an area were analyzed for U-Pb ages and Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd isotopic compositions. The results indicate that Middle Jurassic sediments in the Dongsheng area were derived from the Khondalite Belt, Langshan Mountain and the Yinshan Terrane. Mesozoic sediments in the Yan'an area consist of two parts. One part is derived from the North China Craton (NCC), which has U-Pb age groups of ∼1.8 Ga and ∼2.5 Ga, and Hf model ages of ∼2.8 Ga. The other part is derived from the Qilian-Qinling Orogenic Belt, which has U-Pb age groups of 600-1500 Ma and 100-500 Ma, and Nd and Hf isotopic model ages of less than 2.2 Ga. Combining the U-Pb ages with the Hf and Nd isotopic model ages, Mesozoic detrital zircons with U-Pb age groups of ∼1.8 Ga and ∼2.5 Ga in the Yan'an area are found to also be derived from the Khondalite Belt, Langshan Mountain and the Yinshan Terrane, not from the Trans-China Orogen Belt. From the late-Late Triassic sediments of the Yan'an area, the low average values of the Hf (2.03 Ga) and Nd (2.03 Ga) model ages and the characteristic age population of 600-1500 Ma reveal that the main collision or continental subduction between the NCC and the South China Craton (SCC) occurred in the late-Late Triassic. After the main collision or continental subduction, the proportion of sediments from the Qinling-Qilian Orogenic Belt began to decrease (recorded in the early Jurassic samples), which may be in response to the gradual slowing of the uplift speed of the Qinling Orogenic Belt. In the early-middle Jurassic, the sediments have a main U-Pb age population of 100-500 Ma, low detrital zircon Hf model ages (average value is 1.17 Ga) and low whole rock Nd model ages (average value is 1.13 Ga), which suggests that the Qilian-Qinling Orogenic Belt may have a fast uplift

  14. A Pan-African thermal event in southern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jonathan S.; Santosh, M.; Pressley, Rachel A.; Clements, Alina S.; Rogers, John J. W.

    UPb zircon data from five igneous suites confirm previous studies that demonstrated widespread Pan-African magmatism in the Granulite Terrain of southern India. Ages determined here are ˜560 Ma for the Peralimala Granite and ˜555 Ma for the Kalpatta Granite, both north of the Palghat-Cauvery lineament, and ˜585 Ma for a charnockite in the Cardamom massif south of the lineament. Zircon from a pegmatite in the Kerala khondalite belt at Melankode yields an age of 512 Ma. Resetting of zircons in the 2500-Ma Arsikere Granite of the western Dharwar craton probably occurred at ˜450 Ma. These ages and the concentration of Pan-African granitic magmatism around the Indian portion of a broad region of granulite-facies metamorphism in East Gondwana demostrates generation of a restricted area of high temperature either above a rising plume or a zone of rifting. Mantle-derived fluids continued to move upward through the crust of southern India for at least 100 m.y. after the peak of magmatism, and the entire region was still cooling at 400 Ma.

  15. Understanding African American Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Edward Earl

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the socialization skills, self-esteem, and academic readiness of African American males in a school environment. Discussions with students and the School Perceptions Questionnaire provided data for this investigation. The intended targets for this investigation were African American students; however, there…

  16. Africans Away from Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, John Henrik

    Africans who were brought across the Atlantic as slaves never fully adjusted to slavery or accepted its inevitability. Resistance began on board the slave ships, where many jumped overboard or committed suicide. African slaves in South America led the first revolts against tyranny in the New World. The first slave revolt in the Caribbean occurred…

  17. Educating African American Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Edward E.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Schools across America spend money, invest in programs, and sponsor workshops, offer teacher incentives, raise accountability standards, and even evoke the name of Obama in efforts to raise the academic achievement of African American males. Incarceration and college retention rates point to a dismal plight for many African American…

  18. 16 Extraordinary African Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobb, Nancy

    This collection for children tells the stories of 16 African Americans who helped make America what it is today. African Americans can take pride in the heritage of these contributors to society. Biographies are given for the following: (1) Sojourner Truth, preacher and abolitionist; (2) Frederick Douglass, abolitionist; (3) Harriet Tubman, leader…

  19. Keeping African Masks Real

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddington, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Art is a good place to learn about our multicultural planet, and African masks are prized throughout the world as powerfully expressive artistic images. Unfortunately, multicultural education, especially for young children, can perpetuate stereotypes. Masks taken out of context lose their meaning and the term "African masks" suggests that there is…

  20. A Sm-Nd and Pb isotope study of Archaean greenstone belts in the southern Kaapvaal Craton, South Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. H.; Carlson, R. W.

    1989-01-01

    An Sm-Nd and Pb study on a wide variety of lithologies in Archaean greenstone belt fragments in the southern Kaapvaal Craton reveals a complex petrogenetic history. The fragments are important because they represent a 350 km transect through the craton south of Barberton to its southern margin. The Commondale greenstone belt yields a precise Sm-Nd age of 3334 + or - 18 Ma on an exceptionally well preserved peridotite suite of komatiitic affinity. The wide range of Sm/Nd from 0.6 to 1.0 is attributed to the unusual occurrence of orthopyroxene in the spinifex-bearing rocks. A considerably younger age of about 3.2 Ga is suggested for the Nondweni greenstone belt close to the southern margin of the craton on the basis of separate Sm-Nd isochrons on individual lithologies ranging from komatiite, through komatiitic basalt and basalt to felsic volcanic rocks. On the basis of the present study the greenstone belts appear to have been emplaced at progressively younger ages toward the southern margin of the craton.

  1. Influence of cratonic lithosphere on the formation and evolution of flat slabs: Insights from 3-D time-dependent modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taramón, Jorge M.; Rodríguez-González, Juan; Negredo, Ana M.; Billen, Magali I.

    2015-09-01

    Several mechanisms have been suggested for the formation of flat slabs including buoyant features on the subducting plate, trenchward motion and thermal or cratonic structure of the overriding plate. Analysis of episodes of flat subduction indicate that not all flat slabs can be attributed to only one of these mechanisms and it is likely that multiple mechanisms work together to create the necessary conditions for flat slab subduction. In this study we examine the role of localized regions of cratonic lithosphere in the overriding plate in the formation and evolution of flat slabs. We explicitly build on previous models, by using time-dependent simulations with three-dimensional variation in overriding plate structure. We find that there are two modes of flat subduction: permanent underplating occurs when the slab is more buoyant (shorter or younger), while transient flattening occurs when there is more negative buoyancy (longer or older slabs). Our models show how regions of the slab adjacent to the subcratonic flat portion continue to pull the slab into the mantle leading to highly contorted slab shapes with apparent slab gaps beneath the craton. These results show how the interpretation of seismic images of subduction zones can be complicated by the occurrence of either permanent or transient flattening of the slab, and how the signature of a recent flat slab episode may persist as the slab resumes normal subduction. Our models suggest that permanent underplating of slabs may preferentially occur below thick and cold lithosphere providing a built-in mechanism for regeneration of cratons.

  2. Neotropical Africanized honey bees have African mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Smith, D R; Taylor, O R; Brown, W M

    1989-05-18

    Non-indigenous African honey bees have invaded most of South and Central America in just over 30 years. The genetic composition of this population and the means by which it rapidly colonizes new territory remain controversial. In particular, it has been unclear whether this 'Africanized' population has resulted from interbreeding between African and domestic European bees, or is an essentially pure African population. Also, it has not been known whether this population expanded primarily by female or by male migration. Restriction site mapping of 62 mitochondrial DNAs of African bees from Brazil, Venezuela and Mexico reveals that 97% were of African (Apis mellifera scutellata) type. Although neotropical European apiary populations are rapidly Africanized by mating with neotropical African males, there is little reciprocal gene flow to the neotropical African population through European females. These are the first genetic data to indicate that the neotropical African population could be expanding its range by female migration.

  3. Cretaceous mantle of the Congo craton: Evidence from mineral and fluid inclusions in Kasai alluvial diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosman, Charles W.; Kopylova, Maya G.; Stern, Richard A.; Hagadorn, James W.; Hurlbut, James F.

    2016-11-01

    Alluvial diamonds from the Kasai River, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) are sourced from Cretaceous kimberlites of the Lucapa graben in Angola. Analysis of 40 inclusion-bearing diamonds provides new insights into the characteristics and evolution of ancient lithospheric mantle of the Congo craton. Silicate inclusions permitted us to classify diamonds as peridotitic, containing Fo91-95 and En92-94, (23 diamonds, 70% of the suite), and eclogitic, containing Cr-poor pyrope and omphacite with 11-27% jadeite (6 diamonds, 18% of the suite). Fluid inclusion compositions of fibrous diamonds are moderately to highly silicic, matching compositions of diamond-forming fluids from other DRC diamonds. Regional homogeneity of Congo fibrous diamond fluid inclusion compositions suggests spatially extensive homogenization of Cretaceous diamond forming fluids within the Congo lithospheric mantle. In situ cathodoluminescence, secondary ion mass spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reveal large heterogeneities in N, N aggregation into B-centers (NB), and δ13C, indicating that diamonds grew episodically from fluids of distinct sources. Peridotitic diamonds contain up to 2962 ppm N, show 0-88% NB, and have δ13C isotopic compositions from - 12.5‰ to - 1.9‰ with a mode near mantle-like values. Eclogitic diamonds contain 14-1432 ppm N, NB spanning 29%-68%, and wider and lighter δ13C isotopic compositions of - 17.8‰ to - 3.4‰. Fibrous diamonds on average contain more N (up to 2976 ppm) and are restricted in δ13C from - 4.1‰ to - 9.4‰. Clinopyroxene-garnet thermobarometry suggests diamond formation at 1350-1375 °C at 5.8 to 6.3 GPa, whereas N aggregation thermometry yields diamond residence temperatures between 1000 and 1280 °C, if the assumed mantle residence time is 0.9-3.3 Ga. Integrated geothermobaromtery indicates heat fluxes of 41-44 mW/m2 during diamond formation and a lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) at 190-210 km. The hotter

  4. Cover sequences at the northern margin of the Antongil Craton, NE Madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bauer, W.; Walsh, G.J.; De Waele, B.; Thomas, Ronald J.; Horstwood, M.S.A.; Bracciali, L.; Schofield, D.I.; Wollenberg, U.; Lidke, D.J.; Rasaona, I.T.; Rabarimanana, M.H.

    2011-01-01

    The island of Madagascar is a collage of Precambrian, generally high-grade metamorphic basement domains, that are locally overlain by unmetamorphosed sedimentary rocks and poorly understood low-grade metasediments. In the Antalaha area of NE Madagascar, two distinct cover sequences rest on high-grade metamorphic and igneous basement rocks of the Archaean Antongil craton and the Neoproterozoic Bemarivo belt. The older of these two cover sequences, the Andrarona Group, consists of low-grade metasedimentary rocks. The younger sequence, the newly defined Ampohafana Formation, consists of unmetamorphosed sedimentary rocks. The Andrarona Group rests on Neoarchaean granites and monzogranites of the Antongil craton and consists of a basal metagreywacke, thick quartzites and an upper sequence of sericite-chlorite meta-mudstones, meta-sandstones and a volcaniclastic meta-sandstone. The depositional age of the volcaniclastic meta-sandstone is constrained in age by U–Pb laser-ablation ICP-MS analyses of euhedral zircons to 1875 ± 8 Ma (2σ). Detrital zircons of Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic age represent an input from the Antongil craton and a newly defined Palaeoproterozoic igneous unit, the Masindray tonalite, which underlies the Andrarona Group, and yielded a U–Pb zircon age of 2355 ± 11 Ma (2σ), thus constraining the maximum age of deposition of the basal part of the Andrarona Group. The Andrarona Group shows a low-grade metamorphic overprint in the area near Antalaha; illite crystallinity values scatter around 0.17°Δ2Θ CuKα, which is within the epizone. The Ampohafana Formation consists of undeformed, polymict conglomerate, cross-bedded sandstone, and red mudstone. An illite crystallinity value of >0.25°Δ2Θ CuKα obtained from the rocks is typical of the diagenetic zone. Occurrences of rhyodacite pebbles in the Ampohafana Formation and the intrusion of a basaltic dyke suggest a deposition in a WSW-ENE-trending graben system during the opening of the Indian

  5. Paleogene post-collisional lamprophyres in western Yunnan, western Yangtze Craton: Mantle source and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yong-Jun; Campbell McCuaig, T.; Li, Zheng-Xiang; Jourdan, Fred; Hart, Craig J. R.; Hou, Zeng-Qian; Tang, Suo-Han

    2015-09-01

    A suite of lamprophyres, spatially associated with mafic lavas and potassic felsic intrusive rocks, was emplaced between 36.5 ± 0.2 and 33.7 ± 0.5 Ma (based on phlogopite 40Ar/39Ar dating) on the eastern side of the Ailao Shan-Red River shear zone in the western Yangtze Craton. These shoshonitic and ultrapotassic intrusive rocks post-date the 60-55 Ma collisional event between the Indian and the Asian continents. They are characterized by: (1) enrichment in large-ion lithophile elements and light rare-earth elements with (La/Sm)n = 3.15-7.15; (2) strong positive Pb spikes; (3) depletion in high-field-strength elements (e.g. Nb/La = 0.08-0.98); (4) high initial 87Sr/86Sr (0.706-0.709) with negative εNd(t) values of - 10.5 to - 0.9; (5) old Nd model ages of 1542-945 Ma; and (6) radiogenic (207Pb/204Pb)i of 15.57-15.70 and (208Pb/204Pb)i (38.70-39.06). These features suggest that the mantle source was metasomatized by Proterozoic subduction beneath the Yangtze Craton. The lamprophyres have similar trace element patterns, and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope compositions, as coeval mafic lava, indicating a common source of metasomatized veined continental lithospheric mantle (CLM). Lower degree partial melting of metasomatic veins likely generated the lamprophyres, whereas the coeval mafic lava was likely derived from melting of phlogopite harzburgite. The lamprophyres and mafic lava have similar Sr-Nd isotope systematics as CLM-derived Neoproterozoic mafic rocks and Late Permian Emeishan low-Ti basalt in the region, indicating that they share the same Proterozoic source. We envisage that mantle plumes thermally eroded the Proterozoic metasomatized CLM beneath the western part of the Yangtze Craton during 825-750 Ma and 260-250 Ma, although residual metasomatized domains remained before being tapped by delamination after the India-Asia continental collision during the Paleogene period.

  6. The Precambrian of Transangaria, Yenisei Ridge (Siberia): Neoproterozoic microcontinent, Grenville-age orogen, or reworked margin of the Siberian craton?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmichev, Alexander B.; Sklyarov, Eugene V.

    2016-01-01

    The Yenisei Ridge was traditionally perceived as an uplifted segment of the western Siberian craton affected by Neoproterozoic collision events. However, the suggestions for Archaean or Palaeoproterozoic ('Siberian') basement in Transangaria have not been confirmed by reliable geochronological data. A new view regards most of the Ridge, namely, its Transangarian segment, to be an exotic Neoproterozoic terrane that collided with Siberia in the late Neoproterozoic. This paper presents new U-Pb SHRIMP zircon ages demonstrating that Archaean rocks (2611 ± 12 Ma) actually exist in this territory. We also provide a review of published U-Pb zircon ages for igneous and metamorphic rocks of Transangaria together with our new age data. This geochronological dataset clarifies the geology of the Yenisei Ridge and leads to new conclusions, as follows. (1) It is likely that Transangaria was originally underlain by an Archaean-Palaeoproterozoic basement, similar to that of the Siberian craton. (2) Geochronological data do not confirm the idea of widespread "Greenvillian age" granitoides in Transangaria. (3) The Neoproterozoic evolution of the Yenisei Ridge segment of the Siberian craton margin includes the following events. (i) Collision of an unidentified terrane with the western margin (in recent coordinates) of the Siberian craton during 900-855 Ma. The colliding terrane is no longer present in the current structure. (ii) Dextral shearing during 830-800 Ma may have been caused by counter-clockwise rotation of the Siberian craton. (iii) Extensional conditions prevailed during 800-700 Ma. The Isakovka oceanic basin formed at this time interval. (iv) Thrusting of the Isakovka island arc and accretionary prism onto the Siberian margin occurred during the late Neoproterozoic (650-630 Ma) and caused high-pressure metamorphism.

  7. Cenozoic Source-to-Sink of the African margin of the Equatorial Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouby, Delphine; Chardon, Dominique; Huyghe, Damien; Guillocheau, François; Robin, Cecile; Loparev, Artiom; Ye, Jing; Dall'Asta, Massimo; Grimaud, Jean-Louis

    2016-04-01

    The objective of the Transform Source to Sink Project (TS2P) is to link the dynamics of the erosion of the West African Craton to the offshore sedimentary basins of the African margin of the Equatorial Atlantic at geological time scales. This margin, alternating transform and oblique segments from Guinea to Nigeria, shows a strong structural variability in the margin width, continental geology and relief, drainage networks and subsidence/accumulation patterns. We analyzed this system combining onshore geology and geomorphology as well as offshore sub-surface data. Mapping and regional correlation of dated lateritic paleo-landscape remnants allows us to reconstruct two physiographic configurations of West Africa during the Cenozoic. We corrected those reconstitutions from flexural isostasy related to the subsequent erosion. These geometries show that the present-day drainage organization stabilized by at least 29 Myrs ago (probably by 34 Myr) revealing the antiquity of the Senegambia, Niger and Volta catchments toward the Atlantic as well as of the marginal upwarp currently forming a continental divide. The drainage rearrangement that lead to this drainage organization was primarily enhanced by the topographic growth of the Hoggar swell and caused a major stratigraphic turnover along the Equatorial margin of West Africa. Elevation differences between paleo-landscape remnants give access to the spatial and temporal distribution of denudation for 3 time-increments since 45 Myrs. From this, we estimate the volumes of sediments and associated lithologies exported by the West African Craton toward different segments of the margin, taking into account the type of eroded bedrock and the successive drainage reorganizations. We compare these data to Cenozoic accumulation histories in the basins and discuss their stratigraphic expression according to the type of margin segment they are preserved in.

  8. East-China Geochemistry Database (ECGD):A New Networking Database for North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Ma, W.

    2010-12-01

    North China Craton is one of the best natural laboratories that research some Earth Dynamic questions[1]. Scientists made much progress in research on this area, and got vast geochemistry data, which are essential for answering many fundamental questions about the age, composition, structure, and evolution of the East China area. But the geochemical data have long been accessible only through the scientific literature and theses where they have been widely dispersed, making it difficult for the broad Geosciences community to find, access and efficiently use the full range of available data[2]. How to effectively store, manage, share and reuse the existing geochemical data in the North China Craton area? East-China Geochemistry Database(ECGD) is a networking geochemical scientific database system that has been designed based on WebGIS and relational database for the structured storage and retrieval of geochemical data and geological map information. It is integrated the functions of data retrieval, spatial visualization and online analysis. ECGD focus on three areas: 1.Storage and retrieval of geochemical data and geological map information. Research on the characters of geochemical data, including its composing and connecting of each other, we designed a relational database, which based on geochemical relational data model, to store a variety of geological sample information such as sampling locality, age, sample characteristics, reference, major elements, rare earth elements, trace elements and isotope system et al. And a web-based user-friendly interface is provided for constructing queries. 2.Data view. ECGD is committed to online data visualization by different ways, especially to view data in digital map with dynamic way. Because ECGD was integrated WebGIS technology, the query results can be mapped on digital map, which can be zoomed, translation and dot selection. Besides of view and output query results data by html, txt or xls formats, researchers also can

  9. A major Archean, gold- and crust-forming event in the Kaapvaal craton, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Jason; Ruiz, Joaquin; Chesley, John; Walshe, John; England, Gavin

    2002-09-13

    The 2.89- to 2.76-gigayear-old conglomerates of the Central Rand Group of South Africa host an immense concentration of gold. The gold and rounded pyrites from the conglomerates yield a rhenium-osmium isochron age of 3.03 +/- 0.02 gigayears and an initial 187Os/188Os ratio of 0.1079 +/- 0.0001. This age is older than that of the conglomerates. Thus, the gold is detrital and was not deposited by later hydrothermal fluids. This Middle Archean gold mineralization event corresponds to a period of rapid crustal growth in which much of the Kaapvaal craton was formed and is evidence for a significant noble metal flux from the mantle.

  10. Refined Proterozoic evolution of the Gawler Craton, South Australia, through U-Pb zircon geochronology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fanning, C.M.; Flint, R.B.; Parker, A.J.; Ludwig, K. R.; Blissett, A.H.

    1988-01-01

    Through the application of both conventional U-Pb zircon analyses and small-sample U-Pb isotopic analyses, the nature and timing of tectonic events leading to the formation of the Gawler Craton have been defined more precisely. Constraints on deposition of Early Proterozoic iron formation-bearing sediments have been narrowed down to the period 1960-1847 Ma. Deformed acid volcanics, including the economically important Moonta Porphyry, have zircon ages of ??? 1790 and 1740 Ma. The voluminous acid Gawler Range Volcanics and correlatives to the east were erupted over a short interval at 1592 ?? 2 Ma, and were intruded by anorogenic granites at ??? 1575 Ma. Small-sample zircon analyses proved to be an extremely valuable adjunct to conventional analyses, generally yielding more-concordant data which forced a curved discordia through an upper intercept slightly younger than from a conventional straight-line discordia. ?? 1988.

  11. Mid-lithosphere discontinuities beneath the western and central North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weijia; Kennett, B. L. N.

    2017-02-01

    By analyzing P reflectivity extracted from stacked autocorrelograms for teleseismic events on a dense seismic profile, we obtain a detailed image of the mid-lithosphere discontinuity (MLD) beneath western and central North China Craton (NCC). This seismic daylight imaging exploits a broad high-frequency band (0.5-4 Hz) to reveal the fine-scale component of multi-scale lithospheric heterogeneity. The depth of the MLD beneath the western and central parts of the NCC ranges 80-120 km, with a good match to the transition to negative S velocity gradient with depth from Rayleigh wave tomography. The MLD inferred from seismic daylight imaging also has good correspondence with the transition from conductive to convective regimes estimated from heat flow data indicating likely thermal control within the seismological lithosphere.

  12. The Butana Region of Central Sudan: Sahara Craton or Arabian-Nubian Shield?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Alam, T.; Stüwe, K.

    2012-04-01

    The Butana region lies 250 km south east of Khartoum and is one of the few exposures of Proterozoic basement in Central Sudan. The area is characterized by a flat surface and isolated basement exposures. Various authors have allocated the region to part of the Arabian-Nubian Shield or to part of the reworked Sahara Craton. Although the area is indeed located in the rough region of this transition, little information exists on the details of the basement geology in Butana. Field work indicates that the geology of the study area is similar to the other parts of the Arabian-Nubian Shield. The area consists of low-grade metavolcanic rocks (arc assemblage), pre- and syn-tectonic granitic intrusions. In particular the presence of serpentinites, ophiolitic metagabbro and high-grade metamorphic rocks may identify it as part of the Arabian-Nubian Shield. The main metamorphic foliation trend in the low-grade rocks is northeast-southwest with steep foliation plains and sub-horizontal lineation. In the high-grade rocks, at least three deformation phases were observed in the field. D1 associates with northeast-southwest foliation planes and D2 associates with high temperature folding mechanism which gave the high-grade rocks domal pattern. While D3 is a faulting phase with brittle features. The peak metamorphism most probably occurred after the D2 as indicated by the migmatic features. Geochronological work is in progress in order to identify uniquely if the region should be allocated to the Arabian-Nubian Shield or the Sahara Craton.

  13. Seismic evidence for stratification in composition and anisotropic fabric within the thick lithosphere of Kalahari Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodoudi, Forough; Yuan, Xiaohui; Kind, Rainer; Lebedev, Sergei; Adam, Joanne M.-C.; Kästle, Emanuel; Tilmann, Frederik

    2013-12-01

    Based on joint consideration of S receiver functions and surface-wave anisotropy we present evidence for the existence of a thick and layered lithosphere beneath the Kalahari Craton. Our results show that frozen-in anisotropy and compositional changes can generate sharp Mid-Lithospheric Discontinuities (MLD) at depths of 85 and 150-200 km, respectively. We found that a 50 km thick anisotropic layer, containing 3% S wave anisotropy and with a fast-velocity axis different from that in the layer beneath, can account for the first MLD at about 85 km depth. Significant correlation between the depths of an apparent boundary separating the depleted and metasomatised lithosphere, as inferred from chemical tomography, and those of our second MLD led us to characterize it as a compositional boundary, most likely due to the modification of the cratonic mantle lithosphere by magma infiltration. The deepening of this boundary from 150 to 200 km is spatially correlated with the surficial expression of the Thabazimbi-Murchison Lineament (TML), implying that the TML isolates the lithosphere of the Limpopo terrane from that of the ancient Kaapvaal terrane. The largest velocity contrast (3.6-4.7%) is observed at a boundary located at depths of 260-280 km beneath the Archean domains and the older Proterozoic belt. This boundary most likely represents the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, which shallows to about 200 km beneath the younger Proterozoic belt. Thus, the Kalahari lithosphere may have survived multiple episodes of intense magmatism and collisional rifting during the billions of years of its history, which left their imprint in its internal layering.

  14. (142)Nd evidence for an enriched Hadean reservoir in cratonic roots.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Dewashish; Scherer, Erik E; Mezger, Klaus

    2009-06-25

    The isotope (146)Sm undergoes alpha-decay to (142)Nd, with a half-life of 103 million years. Measurable variations in the (142)Nd/(144)Nd values of rocks resulting from Sm-Nd fractionation could therefore only have been produced within about 400 million years of the Solar System's formation (that is, when (146)Sm was extant). The (142)Nd/(144)Nd compositions of terrestrial rocks are accordingly a sensitive monitor of the main silicate differentiation events that took place in the early Earth. High (142)Nd/(144)Nd values measured in some Archaean rocks from Greenland hint at the existence of an early incompatible-element-depleted mantle. Here we present measurements of low (142)Nd/(144)Nd values in 1.48-gigayear-(Gyr)-old lithospheric mantle-derived alkaline rocks from the Khariar nepheline syenite complex in southeastern India. These data suggest that a reservoir that was relatively enriched in incompatible elements formed at least 4.2 Gyr ago and traces of its isotopic signature persisted within the lithospheric root of the Bastar craton until at least 1.48 Gyr ago. These low (142)Nd/(144)Nd compositions may represent a diluted signature of a Hadean (4 to 4.57 Gyr ago) enriched reservoir that is characterized by even lower values. That no evidence of the early depleted mantle has been observed in rocks younger than 3.6 Gyr (refs 3, 4, 7) implies that such domains had effectively mixed back into the convecting mantle by then. In contrast, some early enriched components apparently escaped this fate. Thus, the mantle sampled by magmatism since 3.6 Gyr ago may be biased towards a depleted composition that would be balanced by relatively more enriched reservoirs that are 'hidden' in Hadean crust, the D'' layer of the lowermost mantle or, as we propose here, also within the roots of old cratons.

  15. Eastern Barents Sea: crustal structure of the craton-shelf transition.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulgin, Alexey; Mjelde, Rolf

    2015-04-01

    The former disputed area of the Barents Sea is a hot area for geophysical investigations, since little is known so far about its deep crustal structure, while the area is of a particular interest for hydrocarbon prospecting. Once the territorial disputes have been finally settled recently, a regional ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) survey was conducted in this area in summer 2012. The seismic line is a northeast-southwest trending profile located in the easternmost area of the Norwegian waters. The transect is approximately 600 km long and includes marine and onshore parts. The major part of the profile was recorded on the 38 OBS with an average spacing of 13 km. In addition, 80 land stations (with 1 km spacing) were deployed during the field campaign: 50 of them on the southern continuation of the marine profile, and 30 were deployed semi-parallel to the marine profile along the eastern coast of the Varanger Peninsula. We present the crustal model of the craton-shelf transition obtained from the seismic tomography and gravity modeling. The model shows the presence of six principally different crustal domains, which correlate with the near-surface observations. The interpretation of these changes along the profile links to the different tectonic settings along the profile. Presence of the large volumes of the underplated material is attributed to the rifting events on the shelf. The lateral variations in the seismic velocities in the onshore part of the transect is interpreted as a change from the typical cratonic crust to the continental type crust of the Varanger terrane. We also show the results of the ongoing work on the S-waves tomography modeling for the same profile. The combined interpretation of P and S data will provide additional details on the compositional differences between crustal domains and will give extra information on the origin of the underplating.

  16. Wisconsin gravity minimum: Solution of a geologic and geophysical puzzle and implications for cratonic evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.J.; Hinze, W.J. )

    1992-06-01

    An intense Bouguer gravity anomaly minimum extending across much of Wisconsin cannot be explained by the surface Phanerozoic sedimentary strata, the basement Precambrian geology, or the topography of the region. The most intense ({minus}100 mgal) part of the minimum coincides with the 1.47 Ga anorogenic granitic Wolf River batholith of northeastern Wisconsin. In southern Wisconsin, however, the densities of the Precambrian basement rocks, which are older than the batholith, provide no clue to the origin of the anomaly. The gradients of the minimum indicate that the source of the anomaly is in the upper crust. Furthermore, nearby deep seismic reflection data indicate that lower crustal structures do not significantly contribute to the gravity minimum. Thus, the minimum is appropriately interpreted as originating from the low-density Wolf River batholith that crops out only in northeastern Wisconsin but is buried beneath a veneer of older rocks in the southern and central parts of the state. Gravity modeling suggests that the batholith is at least 10 km thick and encompasses an area of {approximately}50,000 km{sup 2}. This interpretation provides an important clue to the origin of similar negative gravity anomalies of the Phanerozoic strata-covered craton. Also, the presence of this massive granitic body appears to have influenced the evolution of the craton - e.g., by controlling the location of the 1.1 Ga Midcontinent rift system and the Paleozoic Wisconsin arch. The fact that the Wolf River batholith is mostly buried suggests that central Wisconsin has been tectonically stable for the past 1.47 b.y. and that the Precambrian basement has been minimally eroded.

  17. Is the Paleoproterozoic Jiao-Liao-Ji Belt (North China Craton) a rift?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhuang; Chen, Bin; Wei, Chunjing

    2017-01-01

    As a typical example of the Paleoproterozoic crust in the Eastern Block of the North China Craton, the Paleoproterozoic Jiao-Liao-Ji Belt consists principally of the Liaohe Group (and its equivalents), Liaoji granites and mafic intrusions. Previous studies indicate that the evolution of the Jiao-Liao-Ji Belt has been mainly attributed to the opening and closing of an intracontinental rift along the eastern continental margin of the North China Craton. Here we synthesize the Paleoproterozoic magmatism, sedimentation, metamorphism and metallogeny against the rift model and propose a process of arc-continent collision between the northern Longgang and the southern Nangrim Blocks. This conclusion is consistent with the observations, including that (a) the 2.0- to 2.2-Ga magmatism shows a typical subalkaline series, rather than a bimodal distribution, since the mafic rocks mostly have arc affinities and the acidic-intermediate rocks belong to the calc-alkaline series; (b) the main source of the 1.9- to 2.0-Ga sedimentary rocks is the Paleoproterozoic arc materials, indicating a fore-arc or back-arc basin setting; (c) a couple of big borate deposits occur in the boron-rich volcanic rocks that were formed in convergent continental margins; (d) the North and South Liaohe Groups show different rock associations and metamorphic histories (P-T paths); and (e) the Nangrim and Longgang Blocks vary in lithological units, geochronology and metamorphic features. Thus, an arc-continent collision tectonic scenario for the Paleoproterozoic Jiao-Liao-Ji Belt is involved: (a) a southward subduction in the period 2.0-2.2 Ga; (b) sedimentation during the period 1.9-2.0 Ga; (c) arc-continent collision at ca. 1.9 Ga; and (d) post-collisional extension at 1.82-1.87 Ga, marking the end of the Paleoproterozoic tectonothermal event.

  18. Further constraints of the North American Craton structure provided by the recent Oklahoma earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, R.; Helmberger, D. V.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic velocities and attenuation are essential for understanding the structure of continental lithosphere and geodynamics of the earth. Chu et al. (2012abc) used USArray waveform data from small regional earthquakes in Quebec and Virginia to investigate the upper-mantle P velocity structure (CR) beneath the North American Craton. These results suggest a lithospheric thickness of ~200 km with an 8° discontinuity at a depth of ~120 km. Here we present results from the 2011 Oklahoma earthquake to investigate the S-velocity structure and seismic attenuation. We first obtain the source parameters of the earthquake using the Cut-and-Paste method. Next we use this source to model the regional waveform data. This strike-slip event produced excellent profiles of broadband tangential motions to the edge of the array (14°). The crossover of crustal S to Sn is well observed where SmS has a critical distance of ~2°. The strength of this critical-angle reflection allows the crustal multiples to setup and be strong out to 14° before crossing into the stronger crustal Love waves. These waveforms are modeled broadband (2~100 s) by assuming a three-layer crust and CR-type mantle. The best model is accessed through a grid-search approach as used above. Our results favor a weak low-velocity layer in the lower crust with a shear velocity of 3.6 km/s. This low-velocity zone appear to be responsible for the high frequency shaking at larger distances in eastern United States. Below the Moho, S-velocity slightly decreases with depth, which agrees with the CR model. Synthetic calculations using various undulating Moho depths and sediment thickness suggest that sediment structures have a strong impact on the crustal multiples, which may be why those multiples are not commonly observed. Preliminary work on the attenuation suggests that the Q in the craton is relatively high (Q~600).

  19. Low water contents in diamond mineral inclusions: Proto-genetic origin in a dry cratonic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Lawrence A.; Logvinova, Alla M.; Howarth, Geoffrey H.; Liu, Yang; Peslier, Anne H.; Rossman, George R.; Guan, Yunbin; Chen, Yang; Sobolev, Nikolay V.

    2016-01-01

    The mantle is the major reservoir of Earth's water, hosted within Nominally Anhydrous Minerals (NAMs) (e.g., Bell and Rossman, 1992; Peslier et al., 2010; Peslier, 2010; Nestola and Smyth, 2015), in the form of hydrogen bonded to the silicate's structural oxygen. From whence cometh this water? Is the water in these minerals representative of the Earth's primitive upper mantle or did it come from melting events linked to crustal formation or to more recent metasomatic/re-fertilization events? During diamond formation, NAMs are encapsulated at hundreds of kilometers depth within the mantle, thereby possibly shielding and preserving their pristine water contents from re-equilibrating with fluids and melts percolating through the lithospheric mantle. Here we show that the NAMs included in diamonds from six locales on the Siberian Craton contain measurable and variable H2O concentrations from 2 to 34 parts per million by weight (ppmw) in olivine, 7 to 276 ppmw in clinopyroxene, and 11-17 ppmw in garnets. Our results suggest that if the inclusions were in equilibrium with the diamond-forming fluid, the water fugacity would have been unrealistically low. Instead, we consider the H2O contents of the inclusions, shielded by diamonds, as pristine representatives of the residual mantle prior to encapsulation, and indicative of a protogenetic origin for the inclusions. Hydrogen diffusion in the diamond does not appear to have modified these values significantly. The H2O contents of NAMs in mantle xenoliths may represent some later metasomatic event(s), and are not always representative of most of the continental lithospheric mantle. Results from the present study also support the conclusions of Peslier et al. (2010) and Novella et al. (2015) that the dry nature of the SCLM of a craton may provide stabilization of its thickened continental roots.

  20. The African upper mantle: the view from surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishwick, Stewart

    2014-05-01

    Given the sparse distribution of seismic stations across significant regions of the African continent surface wave tomography is the ideal seismological technique to give a clear picture of the large scale structure for the upper mantle. An updated tomographic model is presented, and reviewed in comparison with other tomography for the region. Cratonic regions are clearly outlined with fast velocities extending to depths of >175km. Areas of slow shear velocity, at depths of 100-150km, show good correlation with long wavelength gravity highs and areas of uplifted topography. The numerous temporary deployments of seismometers along the East African rift system provide strong constraints on the structure in this region. Importantly, many of the seismological features are now converging in a range of tomographic models, adding to the confidence in interpretations. However, significant challenges remain, both for seismology and for the interpretations of the results. Pushing towards smaller features and higher resolution to understand geological problems is still difficult. For example, the mantle structure imaged beneath the Bushveld Complex remains very variable depending on the technique used. Lithospheric thickness can be estimated using a variety of proxies - comparisons of this are shown for southern Africa. But, are the seismic models actually compatible with a mineral physics view of the lithosphere? From a geodynamic perspective, how do localised regions of low velocity in the upper mantle relate to the larger patterns of whole mantle circulation? While seismic imaging is providing an increasingly clear picture of the present velocity structure more integration is still needed to answer many of the questions related to the African continent.

  1. African American Suicide

    MedlinePlus

    ... accounted for 83.8% of Caucasian elderly suicides. • Firearms were the predominant method of suicide among African ... per 100,000 annually. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Vital Statistics System. Mortality Data. ...

  2. Obesity and African Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Management System Report to Congress Knowledge Center Capacity Building Information Services Events Calendar Resource Guide Justice ... Workforce Diversity Grants Youth Program Grants Other Grants Planning and Evaluation Grantee Best Practices Black/African American ...

  3. AfricaArray seismological studies of the structure and evolution of the African continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrheim, Raymond; Nyblade, Andrew; Brandt, Martin; Tugume, Fred; Mulibo, Gabriel; Kgaswane, Eldridge; Mangongolo, Azangi; Manzi, Musa; El Tahir, Nada; Loots, Letticia

    2014-05-01

    The AfricaArray programme was launched in 2005 to conduct research that promotes development in Africa by building human and infrastructural capacity in support of the mineral exploration, mining, geohazard and environmental sectors. The AfricaArray "backbone" network now consists of 51 geophysical observatories in 20 sub-Saharan countries. Most stations are equipped with broadband seismometers, while 25 stations have continuous GPS sensors and 22 stations have meteorological packs. In addition, several temporary seismic arrays have been deployed to investigate the seismotectonics of the East African Rift System, the extent of the Congo craton, and the rifting of Mozambique and Madagascar. In this paper we will present results pertinent to large-scale crustal and mantle geodynamic processes that have been obtained by AfricaArray researchers. Brandt and Mulibo elucidated the relationship between the African Superplume, Superswell and the East African Rift System by studying the seismic velocity structure of the mantle. Kgaswane jointly inverted P-wave receiver functions (PRFs) and surface waves, and found that the Kalahari Craton lower crust is largely mafic, except for a few terrains such as the Kimberley. Kgaswane also produced evidence that supports a link between the eastern and western lobes of the Bushveld Complex. Mangongolo used surface wave tomography to define the south-western boundary of the Congo Craton. El Tahir used PRFs to investigate the crustal structure of the Khartoum Basin, while Tugume determined the Moho depths and Poisson's ratios of the Precambrian crust in East Africa. Manzi reprocessed 3D reflection seismic data covering part of the Witwatersrand goldfields using seismic attribute analysis methods, and has provided new constraints on the evolution of the Basin during the Neoarchean. Loots interpreted a 105 km 2D seismic reflection profile immediately to the north of the Cape Fold Belt, imaging the Karoo and Cape Supergroup rocks and the

  4. Heat flow, heat generation and crustal thermal structure of the northern block of the South Indian Craton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Mohan L.; Sharma, S. R.; Sundar, A.

    1988-01-01

    Heat flow values and heat generation data calculated from the concentration of heat producing radioactive elements, U, Th and K in surface rocks were analyzed. The South Indian Craton according to Drury et al., can be divided into various blocks, separated by late Proterozoic shear belts. The northern block comprises Eastern and Western Dharwar Cratons of Rogers (1986), Naqvi and Rogers (1987) and a part of the South Indian granulite terrain up to a shear system occupying the Palghat-Cauvery low lands. The geothermal data analysis clearly demonstrates that the present thermal characteristics of the above two Archaean terrains of the Indian and Australian Shields are quite similar. Their crustal thermal structures are likely to be similar also.

  5. 2.6-2.7 Ga continental crust growth in Yangtze craton, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K.; Gao, S.; Wu, Y.

    2013-12-01

    A combined study of zircon U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopes and whole rock major and trace elements and Sr-Nd isotopes has been conducted for 10 granitic and tonalitic-trondhjemitic-granodioritic (TTG) gneisses from the Kongling terrain, the only known Archean microcontinent in the Yangtze craton, South China. The results reveal a significant magmatic event at ~2.6-2.7 Ga (Fig. 1), in addition to the previously reported ~2.9 Ga and ~3.2-3.3 Ga magmatism (Zhang et al., 2006; Jiao et al., 2009; Gao et al., 2011). The ~2.6-2.7 Ga rocks show relatively high REE (530-1074 ppm), apparently negative Eu anomaly (Eu/Eu* = 0.22-0.35), low #Mg (19.51-22.63) and low LaN/YbN (10.3-24.2). Besides, they have high K-feldspar proportion and relatively evaluated (K2O+Na2O)/CaO, TFeO/MgO, Zr, Nb, Ce and Y contents. Their 10000 × Ga/Al ratios range between 3.00 and 3.54. All these features suggest that the protoliths of these gneisses are A-type granites. Most of the ~2.6-2.7 Ga zircon grains have ɛHf(t) values >0 (up to 7.93, close to the depleted mantle value). This clearly indicates a considerably higher proportion of new crustal components in the ~2.6-2.7 Ga granitoids compared to the ~3.2-3.3 Ga and ~2.9 Ga TTGs. Our results support the conclusion of worldwide studies of igneous and detrital zircons that age peaks at 2.65-2.76 Ga represent increases in the volume of juvenile continental crust. The present study also confirms the existence of the two older magmatic events in the Kongling terrain. Both whole rock ɛNd(t) values (-3.74 to 1.59) and the zircon ɛHf(t) values (-11.18 to 3.55) for the ~2.9 Ga TTG and the Hf isotopes of ~3.2-3.3 Ga igneous zircons (-7.37 to 3.12) are chondritic or subchondritic, suggesting that they were mainly generated by reworking of older rocks with a small amount of new crustal additions. References Gao, S., Yang, J., Zhou, L., Li, M., Hu, Z.C., Guo, J.L., Yuan, H.L., Gong, H.J., Xiao, G.Q., Wei, J.Q., 2011. Age and growth of the Archean Kongling terrain

  6. Deformation of the Continental Lithosphere at the Margins of the North American Craton: Constraints from Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, M. D.; Benoit, M. H.; Ford, H. A.; Wirth, E. A.; Aragon, J. C.; Abrahams, L.; McNamara, J.; Jackson, K.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's continents exhibit striking properties, including relatively thick and low-density crust and a strong, thick, long-lived mantle lithosphere. Major questions related to the formation, stability, evolution, and dynamics of cratonic lithosphere remain unanswered. One promising avenue for understanding the stability of cratonic lithosphere through geologic time is to understand how their margins are deformed via tectonic processes such as orogenesis and rifting. Here we present results of several recent and ongoing studies which aim to constrain past lithospheric deformation along the eastern margin of the North American craton. Each of these studies focuses on constraining seismic anisotropy, or the directional dependence of seismic wavespeeds, in the lithospheric upper mantle. Because there is a causative link between upper mantle deformation and the resulting seismic anisotropy, studies of anisotropic structure in the upper mantle beneath continental interiors can shed light on the deformation processes associated with past tectonic events. The recent explosion in the availability of seismic data in the eastern United States, largely due to the EarthScope initiative, has enabled detailed studies of lithospheric deformation using anisotropic receiver function (RF) analysis and SKS splitting analysis. A comparison of lithospheric structure inferred from RFs for stations located to the east of the Grenville deformation front with those located within the cratonic interior argues for extensive deformation of the lithosphere during the formation and/or breakup of Rodinia. The pattern of fast SKS splitting directions measured at USArray Transportable Array (TA) stations shows clear evidence for a specific lithospheric anisotropy signature at stations beneath the Appalachian Mountains, indicating strong, coherent lithospheric deformation associated with Appalachian orogenesis. The Mid-Atlantic Geophysical Integrative Collaboration (MAGIC) experiment, a linear array

  7. Precambrian Processes, the Trans-Hudson Orogen, and Cratonic Keels: Insights From Teleseismic Tomography in Northern Hudson Bay, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddell, M. V.; Bastow, I. D.; Gilligan, A.; Kendall, J. M.; Darbyshire, F. A.

    2015-12-01

    Earth conditions in the Precambrian, and their effect upon the formation of cratons and orogenies from that era, are not fully understood. For example, the precise onset of modern plate tectonics remains ambiguous; it has been hypothesised to have begun anywhere from ~4.1Ga (Hopkins, 2008) to ~1Ga (Stern, 2005). Also, the exceptional depth to which fast wave-speed and geoid anomalies extend beneath some cratons points to the existence of thick "cratonic keels", the origin of which remains unexplained. To improve our understanding of the early Earth processes, geological evidence preserved within ancient plates that have remained largely unchanged since the Precambrian can be used. The rocks of northern Hudson Bay include Archean domains, the Paleoproterozoic Trans-Hudson Orogen (THO), and lie atop one of the largest cratonic keels on Earth (Bastow et al., 2013), making this region an ideal laboratory for study of Precambrian processes. Here, we use seismological data recorded at Canadian POLARIS and Hudson Bay Lithospheric Experiment (HuBLE) stations to perform a relative arrival-time study of northern Hudson Bay region and the THO. Waveforms are aligned using the adaptive stacking routine of Rawlinson et al. (2004), and inversions are produced using the Fast Marching Tomography (FMTOMO) inversion code of Rawlinson et al. (2006). Our inversions provide an improved velocity model of the lithosphere and upper mantle of northern Canada, suggesting updated boundaries between lithospheric blocks at mantle depths and constituting new body-wave constraints on their structure. The results are used to address a number of outstanding questions regarding the processes that formed the THO and the Laurentian Keel of North America.

  8. Coccidioidomycosis in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Ruddy, Barbara E.; Mayer, Anita P.; Ko, Marcia G.; Labonte, Helene R.; Borovansky, Jill A.; Boroff, Erika S.; Blair, Janis E.

    2011-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is caused by Coccidioides species, a fungus endemic to the desert regions of the southwestern United States, and is of particular concern for African Americans. We performed a PubMed search of the English-language medical literature on coccidioidomycosis in African Americans and summarized the pertinent literature. Search terms were coccidioidomycosis, Coccidioides, race, ethnicity, African, black, and Negro. The proceedings of the national and international coccidioidomycosis symposia were searched. All relevant articles and their cited references were reviewed; those with epidemiological, immunologic, clinical, and therapeutic data pertaining to coccidioidomycosis in African Americans were included in the review. Numerous studies documented an increased predilection for severe coccidioidal infections, coccidioidomycosis-related hospitalizations, and extrapulmonary dissemination in persons of African descent; however, most of the published studies are variably problematic. The immunologic mechanism for this predilection is unclear. The clinical features and treatment recommendations are summarized. Medical practitioners need to be alert to the possibility of coccidioidomycosis in persons with recent travel to or residence in an area where the disease is endemic. PMID:21193657

  9. Synsedimentary deformation and the paleoseismic record in Marinoan cap carbonate of the southern Amazon Craton, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Joelson Lima; Nogueira, Afonso César Rodrigues; Domingos, Fábio; Riccomini, Claudio

    2013-12-01

    Event Layers in Neoproterozoic cap carbonates of Brazil's southwestern Amazon Craton record post-Marinoan synsedimentary seismicity. The 35 m-thick cap carbonates overlie glaciogenic sediments related to the Marinoan glaciation (635 Ma) and are comprised of two units: the lower cap consists of dolomite (˜15 m thick) and the upper cap is limestone (˜25 m thick). The cap dolomite includes pinkish crystalline dolostone with even parallel lamination, stratiform stromatolites, eventual tube structures and megaripple bedded peloidal dolostone interpreted as shallow (euphotic) platform deposits. The cap limestone onlaps the cap dolomite and consists of red marl, gray to black bituminous lime mudstone, bituminous shale with abundant calcite crystal fans (pseudomorphs after aragonite) and even parallel lamination interpreted as moderately deep to deep platform deposits. Five successive events of synsedimentary deformation were recognized in the cap carbonates exposed at Mirassol d'Oeste and Tangará da Serra, in Central Brazil: Event 1 - large to small-scale load cast structures in the contact between dolostones and glaciogenic sediments; Event 2 - stromatolitic lamination truncated by tube structures; Event 3 - vertical to subvertical fractures and faults, and large-scale synclines and anticlines with chevron folds; Event 4 - conglomerate and breccia filling neptunian dykes limited by undeformed beds; and Event 5 - slump and sliding deposits found only in the upper part of the cap limestone. Event 1 was produced by hydroplastic dynamics likely induced by isostatic rebound during ice cap melting in the final stages of the Marinoan glaciation. Events 2 and 5 are autocyclic in nature, and related to depositional processes. Event 2 is linked to fluid and methane escape from organic degradation of microbial mats and domes that formed tubestones; Event 5 is associated to collapse and sliding/slumping in the platform and slope. The reliable orientations of synsedimentary faults

  10. TESZ as a diffuse paleoplate boundary between the East European Craton and Phanerozoic Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecsey, Ludek; Plomerova, Jaroslava; Chyba, Jan; Babuska, Vladislav

    2016-04-01

    The Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ) manifests a broad transition between the Precambrian and Phanerozoic Europe. To contribute to better understanding the upper mantle structure, we analyse isotropic velocity variations by means of standard teleseismic tomography as well as we analyse anisotropic parameters of teleseismic body waves. The velocity perturbations in the tomographic model down to 600 km indicate the Phanerozoic part of Europe thrust over the Precambrian East European Craton (EEC). Depth of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) - modelled as a transition between fossil anisotropy in the mantle lithosphere and anisotropy due to present-day flow in the underlying asthenosphere - increases to ~250 km toward the EEC. For anisotropy study, we examine lateral variations of directional terms of relative P-wave travel-time deviations from about 100 teleseismic events, selected to provide good azimuthal coverage, and evaluate shear-wave splitting parameters from about 20 events recorded during passive seismic experiment PASSEQ (2006-2008). We model in 3D large-scale olivine fabrics of mantle lithosphere domains on a transect from the eastern limit of the Bohemian Massif (BM) through the Polish Paleozoic Platform towards the Teisseyre-Tornquist Zone (TTZ) - the NE limit of the TESZ - to the East European Craton (EEC). Variations of anisotropic signal around the central part of the TESZ are surprisingly moderate. There is no distinct change of the P-residual pattern and shear-wave splitting parameters across the surface trace of the TTZ. The most distinct change of the anisotropic signal occurs at the northern boundary of the BM. Week changes of the mantle lithosphere structure across the TESZ suggest, in accord with results from P-wave tomography, a south-westward continuation of the EEC beneath this broad and diffuse paleoplate boundary. Inferences from seismic tomography as well as seismic anisotropy indicate that this laterally heterogeneous pervasive

  11. Gravity data inversion for the lithospheric density structure beneath North China Craton from EGM 2008 model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Yang, Yushan

    2011-11-01

    The density structures of the crust and upper mantle beneath the North China Craton (NCC) are reconstructed in this paper by using the Bouguer gravity anomaly derived from EGM08 model. The Occam's inversion method and preconditioned conjugate gradient (PCG) are adopted in our paper for solving the 3D density inversion problems. Then the depth weighted function is incorporated into model parameters to avoid the skin effects in inversion. In our study, the Bouguer gravity anomaly derived from EGM08 model is used to study the crust and upper mantle structures beneath the NCC. For reducing the non-uniqueness of our inversion problem, we use the inverted density distribution from 0.5° × 0.5° P-wave tomographic results as our initial model. Finally, the high-resolution 3D density model is established down to 250 km depth for the first time in this region. The density images at eight representative layers (10, 25, 40, 60, 80, 120, 160, 200 km) and eight vertical cross-sections (linear profiles along latitude 35°, 36°, 37°, 38°, 39°, 40°, longitude 108°, 119°) are displayed and compared with the P-wave velocity tomographic images. The 3D-dimensional density model indicates that lateral heterogeneities are widely distributed in different units within the NCC, while their density patterns and depth extensions are significantly different for three main units of NCC, suggesting different tectonic mechanisms that have dominated the evolution of these regions in the Phanerozoic. In particular, our inverted density images demonstrate that the Phanerozoic lithospheric reactivation and thinning may not have influenced the central and western NCC to the same extent as the eastern NCC, most of which preserves relatively thick cratonic lithosphere today. However, localized lithospheric thinning may exist in the circular-Ordos rift systems, whose ancient tectonic belts around the Ordos plateau may have been affected by multi-phase tectonic events in its long evolution

  12. The thermal structure of cratonic lithosphere from global Rayleigh wave attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, Colleen A.; Bao, Xueyang; Ma, Zhitu

    2017-01-01

    The resolution of and level of agreement between different attenuation models have historically been limited by complexities associated with extracting attenuation from seismic-wave amplitudes, which are also affected by the source, the receiver, and propagation through velocity heterogeneities. For intermediate- and long-period Rayleigh waves, removing the amplitude signal due to focusing and defocusing effects is the greatest challenge. In this paper, three independent data sets of fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave amplitude are analyzed to investigate how three factors contribute to discrepancies between the attenuation models: uncertainties in the amplitude measurements themselves, variable path coverage, and the treatment of focusing effects. Regionalized pure-path and fully two-dimensional attenuation models are derived and compared. The approach for determining attenuation models from real data is guided by an analysis of amplitudes measured from synthetic spectral-element waveforms, for which the input Earth model is perfectly known. The results show that differences in the amplitude measurements introduce only very minor differences between the attenuation models; path coverage and the removal of focusing effects are more important. The pure-path attenuation values exhibit a clear dependence on tectonic region at shorter periods that disappears at long periods, in agreement with pure-path phase-velocity results obtained by inverting Rayleigh wave phase delays. The 2-D attenuation maps are highly correlated with each other to spherical-harmonic degree 16 and can resolve smaller features than the previous generation of global attenuation models. Anomalously low attenuation is nearly perfectly associated with continental cratons. Variations in lithospheric thickness are determined by forward modeling the global attenuation variations as a thermal boundary layer of variable thickness. Temperature profiles that satisfy the attenuation values systematically

  13. Paleoproterozoic volcanism in the southern Amazon Craton (Brazil): insight into its origin and deposit textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roverato, Matteo; Juliani, Caetano

    2014-05-01

    The Brazilian Amazon craton hosts a primitive volcanic activity that took place in a region completely stable since 1.87 Ga. The current geotectonic context is very different from what caused the huge volcanism that we are presenting in this work. Volcanic rocks in several portions of the Amazon craton were grouped in the proterozoic Uatumã supergroup, a well-preserved magmatic region that covers an area with more than 1,200,000 km2. In this work one specific region is considered, the southwestern Tapajos Gold province (TGP) that is part of the Tapajós-Parina tectonic province (Tassinari and Macambri, 1999). TGP consists of metamorphic, igneous and sedimentary sequences resulted from a ca. 2.10-1.87 Ga ocean-continent orogeny. High-K andesites to felsic volcanic sequences and plutonic bodies, andesitic/rhyolitic epiclastic volcanic rocks and A-type granitic intrusions form part of this volcanism/plutonism. In this work we focus particularly our attention on welded, reomorphic and lava-like rhyolitic ignimbrites and co-ignimbrite brecchas. Fiamme texture of different welding intensity, stretched obsidian fragments, "glassy folds", relict pumices, lithics, rotated crystals of feldspars, bipiramidal quarz, and devetrification spherulites are the common features represented by our samples. Microscopical images are provided to characterize the deposits analyzed during this preliminary research. The lack of continuum outcrops in the field made more difficult the stratigraphic reconstruction, but the superb preservation of the deposits, apparently without any metamorphic evidences (not even low-grade), permits a clearly description of the textures and a differentiation between deposits. A detailed exploration of this ancient andesitic and rhyolitic volcanic activity could contribute greatly to the knowledge of the Amazon territory and in particular for the recognition of the various units that form the supergroup Uatumã, especially in relation to different eruptive

  14. Metasomatic Control of Water in Garnet and Pyroxene from Kaapvaal Craton Mantle Xenoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslier, Anne H.; Woodland, Alan B.; Bell, David R.; Lazarov, Marina; Lapen, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) were used to determine water, rare earth (REE), lithophile (LILE), and high field strength (HFSE) element contents in garnet and pyroxene from mantle xenoliths, Kaapvaal craton, southern Africa. Water enters these nominally anhydrous minerals as protons bonded to structural oxygen in lattice defects. Pyroxene water contents (150-400 ppm in clinopyroxene; 40-250 ppm in orthopyroxene) correlate with their Al, Fe, Ca and Na and are homogeneous within a mineral grains and a xenolith. Garnets from Jagersfontein are chemically zoned for Cr, Ca, Ti and water contents. Garnets contain 0 to 20 ppm H2 Despite the fast diffusion rate of H in mantle m inerals, the observations above indicate that the water contents of mantle xenolith minerals were not disturbed during kimberlite entrainment and that the measured water data represent mantle values. Trace elements in all minerals show various degrees of light REE and LILE enrichments indicative of minimal to strong metasomatism. Water contents of peridotite minerals from the Kaapvaal lithosphere are not related to the degree of depletion of the peridotites. Instead, metasomatism exerts a clear control on the amount of water of mantle minerals. Xenoliths from each location record specific types of metasomatism with different outcomes for the water contents of mantle minerals. At pressures . 5.5 GPa, highly alkaline melts metasomatized Liqhobong and Kimberley peridotites, and increased the water contents of their olivine, pyroxenes and garnet. At higher pressures, the circulation of ultramafic melts reacting with peridotite resulted in co-variation of Ca, Ti and water at the edge of garnets at Jagersfontein, overall decreasing their water content, and lowered the water content of olivines at Finsch Mine. The calculated water content of these melts varies depending on whether the water content of the peridotite

  15. Mental Health and African Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Mental Health Mental Health and African Americans Poverty level affects mental health ... compared to 120% of non-Hispanic whites. 1 MENTAL HEALTH STATUS Serious psychological distress among adults 18 years ...

  16. The Struggles over African Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maseko, Pam; Vale, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In this interview, African Language expert Pam Maseko speaks of her own background and her first encounter with culture outside of her mother tongue, isiXhosa. A statistical breakdown of South African languages is provided as background. She discusses Western (originally missionary) codification of African languages and suggests that this approach…

  17. Results from SAMTEX: The Southern African lithospheric mantle - electrical structures and geometries and comparison with seismological information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    G.. Jones, A.; Muller, M. P.; Miensopust, M. P.; Khosa, D.; Share, P.-E.

    2009-04-01

    The Southern African Magnetotelluric Experiment (SAMTEX) is imaging the electrical structures and geometries of the continental lithosphere below Botswana, Namibia and South Africa to depths of 200+ km. Primary geometrical information can readily be obtained from lithospheric-scale MT experiments about the three-dimensional variation in conductivity, and this information can be related to formation and deformation processes. In particular, one important piece of geometrical information easily and relatively precisely (to within 10%) obtained from MT data is the depth to the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), due to the sensitivity of conductivity to small fractions (<1%) of partial melt and/or increased water content. Over four phases of acquisition SAMTEX measurements have been made at a total of more than 700 MT sites in an area of greater than a million square kilometers, making it by far the largest-ever MT project undertaken. In particular, during Phase IV very challenging MT measurements were made in the highly-remote Central Kalahari Game Reserve, completing the coverage of Botswana. One of the most significant results from SAMTEX is the mapping of the LAB beneath the Archean cratons and bounding mobile belts of Southern Africa, particularly beneath Namibia and Botswana for which no prior lithospheric information exists. As would be expected, the electrically-defined LAB is generally shallow (150 km) beneath the mobile belts, deep (250 km) in the centres of the cratons, and transitional at the edges of cratons. Kimberlites are useful in also inferring lithospheric thickness, and diamondiferous kimberlites are located primarily where the electrical lithosphere is transitional in thickness, or where there is a change in its electrical anisotropy properties, both of which are craton edge effects. The electrical properties of the continental mantle derived from SAMTEX data can be compared with seismic ones derived from data from the South African Seismic

  18. Narcolepsy in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Makoto; O'Hara, Ruth; Einen, Mali; Lin, Ling; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Although narcolepsy affects 0.02–0.05% of individuals in various ethnic groups, clinical presentation in different ethnicities has never been fully characterized. Our goal was to study phenotypic expression across ethnicities in the United States. Design/Setting: Cases of narcolepsy from 1992 to 2013 were identified from searches of the Stanford Center for Narcolepsy Research database. International Classification of Sleep Disorders, Third Edition diagnosis criteria for type 1 and type 2 narcolepsy were used for inclusion, but subjects were separated as with and without cataplexy for the purpose of data presentation. Information extracted included demographics, ethnicity and clinical data, HLA-DQB1*06:02, polysomnography (PSG), multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) data, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hypocretin-1 level. Patients: 182 African-Americans, 839 Caucasians, 35 Asians, and 41 Latinos with narcolepsy. Results: Sex ratio, PSG, and MSLT findings did not differ across ethnicities. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score was higher and age of onset of sleepiness earlier in African Americans compared with other ethnicities. HLA-DQB1*06:02 positivity was higher in African Americans (91.0%) versus others (76.6% in Caucasians, 80.0% in Asians, and 65.0% in Latinos). CSF hypocretin-1 level, obtained in 222 patients, was more frequently low (≤ 110 pg/ml) in African Americans (93.9%) versus Caucasians (61.5%), Asians (85.7%) and Latinos (75.0%). In subjects with low CSF hypocretin-1, African Americans (28.3%) were 4.5 fold more likely to be without cataplexy when compared with Caucasians (8.1%). Conclusions: Narcolepsy in African Americans is characterized by earlier symptom onset, higher Epworth Sleepiness Scale score, higher HLA-DQB1*06:02 positivity, and low cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1 level in the absence of cataplexy. In African Americans, more subjects without cataplexy have type 1 narcolepsy. Citation: Kawai M, O'Hara R, Einen M, Lin L

  19. Lithospheric origin of the DUPAL anomaly: A case study of a suite of Miocene basalts across the Siberian craton boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demonterova, E.; Ivanov, A.; Savatenkov, V.

    2009-04-01

    DUPAL is a lead isotope anomaly in basalts which has been long considered to be a unique feature of the Southern Hemisphere. Originally it was preferentially explained as a very ancient anomaly located deep in the lower mantle and sampled by plumes. However, recent studies have reinterpreted, at least the DUPAL signature in Indian Ocean basalts, as recycled lower crust. Basalts with DUPAL isotopic features are also known in the Northern Hemisphere at a few places. In the East Sayan range, Siberia, Miocene basalts with DUPAL-like signatures have been reported from the Riphean Tuva-Mongolian massif, whereas basalts outside this massif are non-DUPAL. In the present work we sampled Miocene (15-17 Ma) basalts along a 70-km long profile which runs from the Tuva-Mongolian massif to the Siberian craton. The structural boundary between these two lithospheric blocks is sharp and indisputable. It is accommodated by the kilometer-wide Major Sayan Fault. There are minor differences in major and trace elements between the Miocene basalts emplaced within the craton and within the Tuva-Mongolian massif, namely, the former have lower TiO2, lower LREE/HREE ratios and higher Al2O3. The most striking difference is seen in the Delta-8/4 lead isotope ratios. These ratios are typically DUPAL-like in the cratonic basalts, lying in the range 62-75. In basalt erupted within the Tuva-Mongolian massif the ratio is lower (55-62) but still elevated compared with basalts erupted outside the massif. The cratonic basalts are also characterized by lower 143Nd/144Nd ratios and a narrower 87Sr/86Sr ratio range compared to off-cratonic basalts. We find that the lead isotope signature in Miocene basalts of the East Sayan range is strongly dependent on lithospheric structure and we conclude that the DUPAL signature is lithospheric in origin. This work was supported by RFBR (grant 08-05-98100) and the President of the Russian Federation (grant MK-1228.2008.5).

  20. The Hlagothi Complex: The identification of fragments from a Mesoarchaean large igneous province on the Kaapvaal Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumsley, A. P.; de Kock, M. O.; Rajesh, H. M.; Knoper, M. W.; Söderlund, U.; Ernst, R. E.

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we present geochronological, geochemical and palaeomagnetic results from the Hlagothi Complex and a NW-trending dolerite dyke swarm on the southeastern region of the Kaapvaal Craton in northern KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The Hlagothi Complex consists of layered sills of meta-peridotite, pyroxenite and gabbro intruding into the Pongola Supergroup. U-Pb baddeleyite ages on the Hlagothi Complex and a NW-trending dyke of 2866 ± 2 Ma and 2874 ± 2 Ma, respectively, reveal a ca. 2.87 Ga magmatic event on the southeastern Kaapvaal Craton. The geochemical signature of the Hlagothi Complex recognises two discrete groupings, with a magmatic source that is chemically distinct from those of the older rift-related Nsuze and Dominion groups. Additional units on the Kaapvaal Craton can be linked with this new ‘Hlagothi' event based on spatial and temporal association, and geochemistry: 1) the Thole Complex, 2) parts of the Usushwana Complex, and 3) flood basalts within the Mozaan Group and Central Rand Group. The association between all these units suggests a previously unrecognised large igneous province in the southeastern Kaapvaal Craton. Our palaeomagnetic data identifies a possible primary magnetisation within the least-altered lithologies of the Hlagothi Complex (with a virtual geographic pole at 23.4°N, 53.4°E, dp = 8.2° and dm = 11.8°). The bulk of samples however, displayed two episodes of remagnetisation. These are likely to be associated with 2.85 to 2.75 Ga aged granitoids across the southeastern Kaapvaal Craton, and tectonic activity in the nearby Meso- to Neoproterozoic Namaqua-Natal mobile belt. A short-lived (≤ 8 Ma) mantle plume is proposed to have caused the ca. 2.87 Ga magmatism, and also may well have controlled sedimentation within the Pongola-Witwatersrand basin. Volcanism during uplift would have been fed through a series of feeder dykes and sills, of which the Hlagothi Complex and NW-trending dykes are part of.

  1. Curie Point Depths in North China Craton Based on Spectral Analysis of Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ya; Hao, Tianyao; Zeyen, Hermann; Nan, Fangzhou

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic anomaly analysis is an important method to study the structure of deep crust. With the assumption of random magnetization sources, the structure of a magnetic layer can be inverted via spectral analysis. Curie point depth (CPD), the depth at which rocks lose their ferromagnetic properties, is the bottom of a magnetic layer. In this study, we estimate from the magnetic anomaly data of EMAG2 dataset the CPD and the top of the magnetic layer in North China. With a moving window of 180 km × 180 km, we calculate the average top and centroid depth of the magnetic layer in each window and determine the regional CPD distribution across North China. The CPD of North China varies from 18 to 32 km. In addition, the CPD in the western part of the North China Craton is deeper than that in the eastern part. The shallowest CPD is located near the Bohai Sea. When compared to available heat flow data, the estimated CPD values are consistent with thermal conductivity of 1.8-3.2 Wm-1 K-1 and on heat production value of 0.4-1.3 µWm-3.

  2. Geology, geochemistry and genesis of BIF of Kushtagi schist belt, Archaean Dharwar Craton, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, R. M. K.; Naqvi, S. M.

    1996-01-01

    The Banded Iron-Formation (BIF) of the Kushtagi schist belt, Dharwar Craton is interbedded with metavolcanics. The oxide fades cherty (Al2O3 < 2%) and shaley (Al2O3 > 2%) BIFs show large-scale variations in their major and trace elements abundance. Cherty Banded Iron-Formation (CBIF) is depleted in Al2O3, TiO2, Zr, Hf and other trace elements like Cr, Ni, Co, Rb, Sr, V, Y and REE in comparison to Shaley Banded Iron-Formation (SBIF). Depleted ∑REE, positive Eu anomalies and the flat to HREE-enriched pattern of CBIF indicate that Fe and SiO2 for these BIFs were added to ambient ocean water by hydrothermal solutions at the AMOR vent sites. It is inferred that the higher amount of hydrothermal fluid flux with a higher exit temperature provided enormous quantities of iron and silica. Fine-grained sedimentation in the basin gave rise to the observed variability in the composition of BIF. During transgression a wave base was raised up, consequently deposition of CBIF became possible, whereas, during the regressive stage, these chemical sediments were buried by and/or mixed with the terrigenous sediments resulting in deposition of SBIF and interbedded shales. Volcaniclastic activity within the basin appears to have contributed significantly to the composition of some SBIF and shales. The hydrothermal exhalative hypothesis combined with the Archaean miniplate model explains most of the chemical features of the BIFs of greenstone belts.

  3. Lithospheric thermal structure of the North China Craton and its geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiongying; Zhang, Linyou; Zhang, Chao; He, Lijuan

    2016-12-01

    We conduct 2-D numerical modeling of the lithospheric thermal structure of the North China Craton (NCC) on basis of twenty-four crustal velocity structure profiles. About five hundred heat flow data constitute the principal constraints for our modeling. The modeling results demonstrate marked lateral variations in thermal regime of the crust-lithosphere system in the NCC. The average mantle heat flow decreases from 38 ± 5 mW m-2 under the Bohai Bay Basin in the eastern NCC to 27 ± 4 mW m-2 under the Ordos Basin in the western NCC, characterized by a 'cold crust but hot mantle' structure and a 'hot crust but cold mantle' structure, respectively. Thermal lithospheric thickness varies from ∼65 km beneath the Tan-Lu Fault zone to ∼160 km beneath the western and northern Ordos Basin, with similar trend to the seismic lithosphere. However, the disparities in thickness between the thermal and seismic lithosphere are within 20 km beneath the Bohai Bay Basin, but 30-90 km beneath the Shanxi-Weihe Graben and 50-120 km beneath the Ordos Basin. This may imply a westward thickening trend of the rheological boundary layer, which might be attributed to the reducing of asthenosphere viscosity due to hydrous fluid released by dehydration of the subducting Pacific Plate under the eastern NCC. Combined with other pieces of evidence, we suggest that vigorous mantle processes may occur beneath the eastern NCC, whereas the western NCC is relatively stable.

  4. Density heterogeneity of the cratonic mantle and dynamic topography in southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemieva, Irina; Vinnik, Lev

    2016-04-01

    An unusually high topography in southern Africa may be caused by the dynamic support of the mantle below the lithosphere base and/or by a low density (high depletion) of the cratonic lithospheric mantle. We use free-board constraints to examine the relative contributions of the both factors to surface topography and present the model of density structure of the lithospheric mantle in southern Africa. The results indicate that 0.5-1.0 km of topography requires contribution from the sublithospheric mantle because it cannot be explained by the lithosphere structure within the petrologically permitted range of mantle densities. We propose that this additional topography may be associated with the low-density region below the depth of isostatic compensation (LAB). A likely candidate is the low velocity layer between the lithospheric base and the mantle transition zone, where a temperature anomaly of 100-200 deg may produce the required extra contribution to regional topographic uplift. The calculated lithospheric mantle density values are in an overall agreement with xenolith-based data for lithospheric terranes of different ages and show an overall trend in mantle density increase from Archean to younger lithospheric terranes. A significant anomaly in mantle depletion beneath the Limpopo belt and the Bushveld Complex may result from regional melt-metasomatism. Density anomalies in the lithospheric mantle show an overall inverse correlation with seismic Vp, Vs velocities at 100-150 km depth; however, density-velocity relationship is strongly non-unique. Manuscripts in revision, Gondwana Research (2016)

  5. Oxidation state of the lithospheric mantle beneath Diavik diamond mine, central Slave craton, NWT, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creighton, Steven; Stachel, Thomas; Eichenberg, Dave; Luth, Robert W.

    2010-05-01

    Oxygen fugacity ( fO2) conditions were determined for 29 peridotite xenoliths from the A154-North and A154-South kimberlites of the Diavik diamond mine using the newly developed flank method modified specifically for measuring Fe3+ in mantle-derived pyropic garnets. The results indicate that the garnet-bearing lithospheric mantle beneath the central Slave craton is vertically layered with respect to oxidation state. The shallow (<140 km), “ultra-depleted” layer is the most oxidized section of garnet-bearing subcratonic mantle thus far measured, up to one log unit more oxidizing relative to the FMQ buffer [Δlog fO2 (FMQ) + 1]. The lower, more fertile layer has fO2 conditions that extend down to Δlog fO2 (FMQ) - 3.8, consistent with xenolith suites from other localities worldwide. Based on trace element concentrations in garnets, two distinct metasomatic events affected the mantle lithosphere at Diavik. An oxidized fluid imparted sinusoidal chondrite-normalized REE patterns on garnets throughout the entire depth range sampled. In contrast, a reducing melt metasomatic event affected only the lower portion of the lithospheric mantle. The fO2 state of the Diavik mantle sample suggests that diamond formation occurred by reduction of carbonate by fluids arising from beneath the lithosphere.

  6. Using Ocean Tidal Load Response to Explore the Elastic Structure of the Amazonian Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, H. R.; Simons, M.; Rivera, L. A.; Owen, S. E.; Ito, T.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate ocean tidal load response in South America using observations of GPS displacements from Brazil, Argentina, and Uruguay. Spatial variations in the tidal loading response allow us to constrain absolute ranges of density and the two elastic moduli through the regional crust and upper mantle. We process 30-second GPS data using the GIPSY-OASIS II software to obtain position estimates every 5-minutes, with special attention paid to removing tropospheric delay effects. We then extract tidal loading response signals from multiple years of processed GPS time series using generalized harmonic analysis techniques, whereby satellite modulation corrections and the astronomical argument are updated at each epoch. To compare with our observations, we construct a range of forward models by convolving modern ocean tidal loading models (e.g., FES2012, TPX08-Atlas) with Greens functions for Earth structure. The development of our own load Love number and Greens function computation code provides us with the facility to explore a wide range of 1D, layered elastic Earth models. Finally, we convert our forward modeling methods into a Bayesian inversion framework to explore the range of density and elastic structural models for the Amazonian Craton that are consistent with our observations.

  7. Paleoproterozoic felsic volcanism of the Tapajós Mineral Province, Southern Amazon Craton, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roverato, M.; Giordano, D.; Echeverri-Misas, C. M.; Juliani, C.

    2016-01-01

    Amazonian rocks record one amongst the most complete and best-preserved Paleoproterozoic magmatic episodes on Earth. The present contribution documents the extremely well preserved paleoproterozoic architecture of a series of felsic rocks found in the Tapajós Mineral Province (TMP), located in the western part of Pará State, southern Amazon Craton, north of Brazil. These rocks are the first to be investigated to comprehend, based on their textural evidences, their emplacement mechanisms. Textural characterization allowed to identify three main facies with, as following reported, 1) chaotic ("Breccia") group, 2) eutaxitic ("Eutax") group and 3) parataxitic ("Paratax") group vitrophyric textures. Given the superb preservation of our samples, the investigated rocks are grouped, according to their grade of welding, into a wide variety of lithofacies from very low-grade to high-grade and rheomorphic ignimbrites. In the "Paratax group" strong similarities with banding in lava flows are observed. Based on the presented data we discuss the effusive or explosive origin of the observed flow mechanisms.

  8. Upper Devonian-Tournaisian facies and oil resources of the Russian craton's eastern margin

    SciTech Connect

    Ulmishek, G.F.

    1987-01-01

    Upper Devonian-Tournaisian facies on the Russian craton's eastern margin indicate deposition in two distinct paleomorphic environments: bathimetrically expressed basins and shallow platforms. Shallow-water carbonate sedimentation persisted on the platforms, and black, thin-bedded, organic-rich shales and limestones of the Domanik facies were deposited in stagnant basins that stretched more than 2000 km from the Arctic Ocean to the Caspian Sea. Intermittently introduced clastic material and detrital carbonates formed progradational shelves. Barrier reefs along platform edges, atolls and reef mounds on basin margins, and smaller patch reefs on platforms were abundant. The basins were finally filled with Tournaisian (in the Timan-Pechora province) or basal Visean (in the Volga-Ural province) clastics. The North Caspian deep-water basin survived until the end of Early Permian time when it was filled with a thick salt formation. The organic-rich Domanik facies is the major source rock in the Volga-Ural, Timam-Pechora, and North Caspian petroleum provinces. About one-third of oil reserves occurs predominantly in structural traps in Middle Devonian-lower Frasnian clastics that directly underlie Domanik rocks. Most of the remaining two-thirds is found in reefs, especially in drape structures over the reefs in Tournaisian carbonates and basal Visean clastics. 61 refs., 16 figs.

  9. Deposition and diagenesis of a cratonic Silurian platform reef, Pipe Creek Jr. , Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    Simo, A.; Lehmann, P.

    1988-01-01

    Petrographic and geochemical characteristics of the Pipe Creek Jr. paragenesis record the stratigraphic and burial evolution of the cratonic Silurian platform of Indiana during Late Silurian to Pennsylvanian. A variety of several diagenetic fluids acting over geological time affected the reef. The paragenetic sequence is as follows: (1) precipitation of turbid, fibrous, blotchy cathodoluminescent (CL) cement; (2) dolomitization of mud-rich facies; (3) precipitation of clear, zoned CL equant calcite cements; (4) fracturing and karst formation, partially filled by geopetal silt and sandstone; (5) precipitation of clear, dull CL, ferroan to nonferroan equant calcite cement, ferroan dolomite overgrowth and equant dolomite cement in moldic porosity, caves and fractures; (6) microdissolution and hydrocarbon emplacement; and (7) stylolitization. Carbonate grew and fibrous cements precipitated in an open marine environment. During Late Silurian an increasingly restricted environment stopped reef growth and dolomite replaced mud-rich faces. The reefs were then subaerially exposed and two meteoric cement sequences, non-luminescent to bright luminescent, precipitated prior to Mid-Devonian fracture-controlled karsting. Caves and fractures crosscut former cement stages and were filled by sandstones. Later, the platform was buried by the late Mid-Devonian organic-rich New Albany Shale, and clear, dull CL calcite cement and ferroan dolomite precipitated. Hydrocarbon migration postdates all cements and created minor moldic porosity and predates stylolitization.

  10. Deposition and diagenesis of a cratonic Silurian platform reef, Pipe Creek Jr. , Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    Simo, A.; Lehmann, P.

    1988-02-01

    Petrographic and geochemical characteristics of the Pipe Creek Jr. paragenesis record the stratigraphic and burial evolution of the cratonic Silurian platform of Indiana during Late Silurian to Pennsylvanian. A variety of several diagenetic fluids acting over geological time affected the reef. The paragenetic sequence is as follows: (1) precipitation of turbid, fibrous, blotchy cathodoluminescent (CL) cement; (2) dolomitization of mud-rich facies; (3) precipitation of clear, zoned CL equant calcite cements; (4) fracturing and karst formation, partially filled by geopetal silt and sandstone; (5) precipitation of clear, dull CL, ferroan to nonferroan equant calcite cement, ferroan dolomite overgrowth and equant dolomite cement in moldic porosity, caves and fractures; (6) microdissolution and hydrocarbon emplacement; and (7) stylolitization. The New Albany Shale was both the hydrocarbon source and top seal to the fossil Pipe Creek Jr. oil field with original oil in place estimated at 11 million bbl. The level of organic metamorphism of the New Albany Shale, the oil residue, and the two-phase fluid inclusions in the burial cements suggest that sediments accumulated on the platform throughout Mississippian time.

  11. Seismic anisotropy of the Slave craton, NW Canada, from joint interpretation of SKS and Rayleigh waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, David; Bruneton, Marianne

    2007-04-01

    Teleseismic events recorded at a 25-element array in NW Canada between 2001 and 2006 provided sufficient distribution in back azimuth to demonstrate birefringence in SKS and SKKS waves as well as directional dependence of Rayleigh-wave phase velocities. Typical delays between orthogonally polarized SKS waves are 0.8-1.2 s, and modelling of azimuthal dependence indicates two nearly horizontal layers of anisotropy within the mantle. Anisotropy of Rayleigh waves is generally consistent with models of layered Vs anisotropies that increase with depth from 1 per cent at the Moho to 9 per cent at 200 km but vary between subarrays. Consistency between the SKS and Rayleigh wave anisotropies in one subarray suggests that the assumption of symmetry about a horizontal axis is valid there but is not fully valid in other parts of the craton. The upper layer of anisotropy occupies approximately the uppermost 120 km in which the fast polarization direction strikes generally north-south, coinciding with regional-scale fold axes mapped at the surface. The fast polarization direction of the deeper layer aligns with current North America plate motion, but its correlation with trends of coeval kimberlite eruptions within the Lac de Gras field suggests it can be at least partly attributed to structural preferred orientation of vertical dykes inferred to exist to depths of 200 km.

  12. Depth-dependent extension, two-stage breakup and cratonic underplating at rifted margins.

    PubMed

    Huismans, Ritske; Beaumont, Christopher

    2011-05-05

    Uniform lithospheric extension predicts basic properties of non-volcanic rifted margins but fails to explain other important characteristics. Significant discrepancies are observed at 'type I' margins (such as the Iberia-Newfoundland conjugates), where large tracts of continental mantle lithosphere are exposed at the sea floor, and 'type II' margins (such as some ultrawide central South Atlantic margins), where thin continental crust spans wide regions below which continental lower crust and mantle lithosphere have apparently been removed. Neither corresponds to uniform extension. Instead, either crust or mantle lithosphere has been preferentially removed. Using dynamical models, we demonstrate that these margins are opposite end members: in type I, depth-dependent extension results in crustal-necking breakup before mantle-lithosphere breakup and in type II, the converse is true. These two-layer, two-stage breakup behaviours explain the discrepancies and have implications for the styles of the associated sedimentary basins. Laterally flowing lower-mantle cratonic lithosphere may underplate some type II margins, thereby contributing to their anomalous characteristics.

  13. The genetic structure and history of Africans and African Americans.

    PubMed

    Tishkoff, Sarah A; Reed, Floyd A; Friedlaender, Françoise R; Ehret, Christopher; Ranciaro, Alessia; Froment, Alain; Hirbo, Jibril B; Awomoyi, Agnes A; Bodo, Jean-Marie; Doumbo, Ogobara; Ibrahim, Muntaser; Juma, Abdalla T; Kotze, Maritha J; Lema, Godfrey; Moore, Jason H; Mortensen, Holly; Nyambo, Thomas B; Omar, Sabah A; Powell, Kweli; Pretorius, Gideon S; Smith, Michael W; Thera, Mahamadou A; Wambebe, Charles; Weber, James L; Williams, Scott M

    2009-05-22

    Africa is the source of all modern humans, but characterization of genetic variation and of relationships among populations across the continent has been enigmatic. We studied 121 African populations, four African American populations, and 60 non-African populations for patterns of variation at 1327 nuclear microsatellite and insertion/deletion markers. We identified 14 ancestral population clusters in Africa that correlate with self-described ethnicity and shared cultural and/or linguistic properties. We observed high levels of mixed ancestry in most populations, reflecting historical migration events across the continent. Our data also provide evidence for shared ancestry among geographically diverse hunter-gatherer populations (Khoesan speakers and Pygmies). The ancestry of African Americans is predominantly from Niger-Kordofanian (approximately 71%), European (approximately 13%), and other African (approximately 8%) populations, although admixture levels varied considerably among individuals. This study helps tease apart the complex evolutionary history of Africans and African Americans, aiding both anthropological and genetic epidemiologic studies.

  14. Application of multi-dimensional discrimination diagrams and probability calculations to Paleoproterozoic acid rocks from Brazilian cratons and provinces to infer tectonic settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Sanjeet K.; Oliveira, Elson P.

    2013-08-01

    In present work, we applied two sets of new multi-dimensional geochemical diagrams (Verma et al., 2013) obtained from linear discriminant analysis (LDA) of natural logarithm-transformed ratios of major elements and immobile major and trace elements in acid magmas to decipher plate tectonic settings and corresponding probability estimates for Paleoproterozoic rocks from Amazonian craton, São Francisco craton, São Luís craton, and Borborema province of Brazil. The robustness of LDA minimizes the effects of petrogenetic processes and maximizes the separation among the different tectonic groups. The probability based boundaries further provide a better objective statistical method in comparison to the commonly used subjective method of determining the boundaries by eye judgment. The use of readjusted major element data to 100% on an anhydrous basis from SINCLAS computer program, also helps to minimize the effects of post-emplacement compositional changes and analytical errors on these tectonic discrimination diagrams. Fifteen case studies of acid suites highlighted the application of these diagrams and probability calculations. The first case study on Jamon and Musa granites, Carajás area (Central Amazonian Province, Amazonian craton) shows a collision setting (previously thought anorogenic). A collision setting was clearly inferred for Bom Jardim granite, Xingú area (Central Amazonian Province, Amazonian craton) The third case study on Older São Jorge, Younger São Jorge and Maloquinha granites Tapajós area (Ventuari-Tapajós Province, Amazonian craton) indicated a within-plate setting (previously transitional between volcanic arc and within-plate). We also recognized a within-plate setting for the next three case studies on Aripuanã and Teles Pires granites (SW Amazonian craton), and Pitinga area granites (Mapuera Suite, NW Amazonian craton), which were all previously suggested to have been emplaced in post-collision to within-plate settings. The seventh case

  15. A c. 1710 Ma mafic sill emplaced into a quartzite and calcareous series from Ighrem, Anti-Atlas - Morocco: Evidence that the Taghdout passive margin sedimentary group is nearly 1 Ga older than previously thought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikenne, Moha; Söderlund, Ulf; Ernst, Richard E.; Pin, Christian; Youbi, Nasrrddine; El Aouli, El Hassan; Hafid, Ahmid

    2017-03-01

    The Taghdout Group is a passive margin sequence deposited during rifting and break-up of the northern margin of the West African craton (WAC), culminating with the creation of an oceanic basin between the northern edge of the WAC and an unknown terrane. However, the age of this passive margin has been poorly constrained. It was previously thought to be c. 800-1000 Ma on the basis of age of the contact metamorphosed host rocks of the associated mafic dykes (Rb/Sr, 789 ± 10 Ma). However, with the U-Pb dating of numerous dyke swarms in the Anti-Atlas Inliers, at c. 870, 1416-1380, 1650, 1750, and 2040 Ma, it was suggested by Youbi et al. (2013) that the Taghdout Group could be Mesoproterozoic in age, with a preference for an age of 1750 Ma. In order to test this idea, a mafic sill within the Taghdout Group has been dated by the ID-TIMS U-Pb method on baddeleyite, yielding an approximate age of c. 1710 Ma. This preliminary age confirms that the Taghdout Group is much older than previously thought. Further geochronology work is required to determine whether this c. 1710 Ma age represents a new intraplate event in the WAC or whether more concordant data could yield an age closer to the known WAC LIP event of c. 1750 Ma. With this result we propose a new lithostratigraphic framework for the Proterorozoic in the Anti-Atlas.

  16. Mechanisms for strain localization within Archaean craton: A structural study from the Bundelkhand Tectonic Zone, north-central India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Saheli; Patole, Vishal; Saha, Lopamudra; Pati, Jayanta Kumar; Nasipuri, Pritam

    2015-04-01

    The transformation of palaeo-continents involve breakup, dispersal and reassembly of cratonic blocks by collisional suturing that develop a network of orogenic (mobile) belts around the periphery of the stable cratons. The nature of deformation in the orogenic belt depends on the complex interaction of fracturing, plastic deformation and diffusive mass transfer. Additionally, the degree and amount of melting during regional deformation is critical as the presence of melt facilitates the rate of diffusive mass transfer and weakens the rock by reducing the effective viscosity of the deformed zone. The nature of strain localization and formation of ductile shear zones surrounding the cratonic blocks have been correlated with Proterozoic-Palaeozoic supercontinent assembly (Columbia, Rodinia and Gondwana reconstruction). Although, a pre-Columbia supercontinent termed as Kenorland has been postulated, there is no evidence that supports the notion due to lack of the presence of shear zones within the Archaean cratonic blocks. In this contribution, we present the detailed structural analysis of ductile shear zones within the Bundelkhand craton. The ductlile shear zone is termed as Bundelkhand Tectonic Zone (BTZ) that extends east-west for nearly 300 km throughout the craton with a width of two-three kilometer . In the north-central India, the Bundelkhand craton is exposed over an area of 26,000 sq. The craton is bounded by Central Indian Tectonic zone in the south, the Great Boundary fault in the west and by the rocks of Lesser Himalaya in the north. A series of tonalite-trondjhemite-granodiorite gneiss are the oldest rocks of the Bundelkhand craton that also contains a succession of metamorphosed supracrustal rocks comprising of banded iron formation, quartzite, calc-silicate and ultramafic rocks. K-feldspar bearing granites intrude the tonalite-trondjhemite-granodiorite and the supracrustal rocks during the time span of 2.1 to 2.5 Ga. The TTGs near Babina, in central

  17. On the nature and origin of highly-refractory Archean lithosphere: Petrological and geophysical constraints from the Tanzanian craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, S. A.; McMahon, S. C.; Day, J. A.; Dawson, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    The nature and timescales of garnet formation are important to understanding how subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) has evolved since the Archean, and also to mantle dynamics, because the presence of garnet greatly influences the density of the lower lithosphere and hence the long-term stability of thick (150 to 220 km) subcratonic lithosphere. Nevertheless, the widespread occurrence of garnet in the SCLM remains one of the 'holy grails' of mantle petrology. Garnets found in mantle xenoliths from the eastern margin of the Tanzanian Craton (Lashaine) have diverse compositions and provide major constraints on how the underlying deep (120 to 160 km) mantle evolved during the last 3 billion years. Certain harzburgite members of the xenolith suite contain the first reported occurrence of pyrope garnets with rare-earth element patterns similar to hypothetical garnets proposed to have formed in the Earth's SCLM during the Archean, prior to metasomatism [Stachel et al., 2004]. These rare ultradepleted low-Cr garnets occur in low temperature (~1050 oC) xenoliths derived from depths of ~120 km and coexist in chemical and textural equilibrium with highly-refractory olivine (Fo95.4) and orthopyroxene (Mg#=96.4). These phases are all more magnesian than generally encountered in global mantle harzburgites and diamond inclusions. The ultradepleted garnets form interconnecting networks around grains of orthopyroxene which give the rocks a banded appearance: we propose that the increase in pressure associated with cratonization may have caused isochemical exsolution of ultradepleted garnet from orthopyroxene. These unique garnets have not previously been identified in global suites of mantle xenoliths or diamond inclusions. We believe they are rare because their low concentrations of trace elements make them readily susceptible to geochemical overprinting. This highly-refractory low-density peridotite may be common in the 'shallow' SCLM but not normally brought to the

  18. Elective: African Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Kenneth V.

    The make-up of a course in African literature for high school students is discussed. It is pointed out that the course can be constructed on already familiar lines. High school students will be able to describe clearly, for example, the relationship between environment and character or the dilemma of characters caught between traditional values…

  19. African Americans and Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Joan

    2000-01-01

    Reviews the opportunities available in the field of agriculture for African American students and notes efforts of the 136 colleges of agriculture to publicize their offerings and recruit students. Profiles six black leaders in agriculture, highlighting their achievements in research and aid to developing countries. A table provides data on annual…

  20. African Literature: Selected Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deschenes, Martin O.; Waters, Harold A.

    This bibliography of resources for the teaching of African literature includes over 100 citations of books, textbooks, anthologies, plays, novels, short stories, and periodicals in French and English. Publishing house addresses, audiovisual aids, professional organizations, and a course list are also cited. The books are listed under the following…

  1. High-resolution sequence stratigraphy of lower Paleozoic sheet sandstones in central North America: The role of special conditions of cratonic interiors in development of stratal architecture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, Anthony C.; Miller, J.F.; McKay, R.M.; Palmer, A.R.; Taylor, John F.

    2007-01-01

    Well-known difficulties in applying sequence stratigraphic concepts to deposits that accumulated across slowly subsiding cratonic interior regions have limited our ability to interpret the history of continental-scale tectonism, oceanographic dynamics of epeiric seas, and eustasy. We used a multi-disciplinary approach to construct a high-resolution stratigraphic framework for lower Paleozoic strata in the cratonic interior of North America. Within this framework, these strata proved readily amenable to modern sequence stratigraphic techniques that were formulated based on successions along passive margins and in foreland basins, settings markedly different from the cratonic interior. Parasequences, parasequence stacking patterns, systems tracts, maximum flooding intervals, and sequence-bounding unconformities can be confidently recognized in the cratonic interior using mostly standard criteria for identification. The similarity of cratonic interior and foreland basin successions in size, geometry, constituent facies, and local stacking patterns of nearshore parasequences is especially striking. This similarity indicates that the fundamental processes that establish shoreface morphology and determine the stratal expression of retreat and progradation were likewise generally the same, despite marked differences in tectonism, physiography, and bathymetry between the two settings. Our results do not support the widespread perception that Paleozoic cratonic interior successions are so anomalous in stratal geometries, and constitute such a poor record of time, that they are poorly suited for modern sequence stratigraphic analyses. The particular arrangement of stratal elements in the cratonic interior succession we studied is no more anomalous or enigmatic than the variability in architecture that sets all sedimentary successions apart from one another. Thus, Paleozoic strata of the cratonic interior are most appropriately considered as a package that belongs in a

  2. LA-SF-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb geochronology of granitic rocks from the central Bundelkhand greenstone complex, Bundelkhand craton, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Sanjeet K.; Verma, Surendra P.; Oliveira, Elson P.; Singh, Vinod K.; Moreno, Juan A.

    2016-03-01

    The central Bundelkhand greenstone complex in Bundelkhand craton, northern India is one of the well exposed Archaean supracrustal amphibolite, banded iron formation (BIF) and felsic volcanic rocks (FV) and associated with grey and pink porphyritic granite, tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG). Here we present high precision zircon U-Pb geochronological data for the pinkish porphyritic granites and TTG. The zircons from the grey-pinkish porphyritic granite show three different concordia ages of 2531 ± 21 Ma, 2516 ± 38 Ma, and 2514 ± 13 Ma, which are interpreted as the best estimate of the magmatic crystallization age for the studied granites. We also report the concordia age of 2669 ± 7.4 Ma for a trondhjemite gneiss sample, which is so far the youngest U-Pb geochronological data for a TTG rock suite in the Bundelkhand craton. This TTG formation at 2669 Ma is also more similar to Precambrian basement TTG gneisses of the Aravalli Craton of north western India and suggests that crust formation in the Bundelkhand Craton occurred in a similar time-frame to that recorded from the Aravalli craton of the North-western India.

  3. Palaeointensity and palaeodirection determinations of Paleoproterozoic dykes in the Kaapvaal Craton (South Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakova, V. V.; Lubnina, N. V.; Shcherbakov, V. P.; Zhidkov, G. V.

    2012-04-01

    A combined palaeodirectional and palaeointensity study of a representative collection from the Bushveld Igneous Complex from 27 dolerite dykes from the 2.9, 2.7, and 1.8 Ga age swarms radiating SE, E and NE, respectively [Olsson et al., 2010] was carried out. Conventional progressive thermal or AF demagnetization was applied to all specimens. The palaeomagnetic directions have been calculated after thermal demagnetization. The ChRMs were isolated over the temperature interval 440-590 C and their intensities amount to 95% of total NRMs. Paleopole calculate from the primary high-temperature component, separated in the 2.9 Ga SE-dykes, is close to the paleopoles, obtained by Wingate (1998) and Strik et al. (2007) for 2.78 Ga volcanics. The paleopole calculated for the 2.7 Ga age E-trending dykes of the eastern region does not correspond to any of the previously obtained Archean-Paleoproterozoic paleopoles for the Kaapvaal Craton. The paleopole calculated for some NE-trending dykes of the Black Ridge swarm in the NE region is close to the 1.87 Ga pole of the Kaapvaal Craton obtained by Hanson et al. (2004). Palaeointensity determinations were carried out on rocks from ten dykes of different ages using Thellier-Coe method with the "check-points" procedure on specimens of 1 cm in edge length cut from either drilled cores or hand samples. Rock magnetic measurements were made on sister specimens. Curie temperatures and the thermal stability of magnetic minerals were estimated from thermomagnetic heating-cooling cycles to incrementally higher temperatures Ti with a Curie balance in an external magnetic field H = 0.45 T. To assess the magnetic hardness and mineralogy of samples, measurements of magnetic susceptibility and hysteresis loop parameters were performed. The domain structure (DS) was estimated also from the thermomagnetic criterion by evaluating the tails of pTRMs. Wilson's method of palaeointensity determination based on comparison of thermodemagnetization curves

  4. Understanding basement tectonics of an interior cratonic basin: southern Illinois Basin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, John H.

    1998-07-01

    Although the Illinois Basin is one of the world's most studied interior cratonic basins, little is known of its deep structure or seismotectonic framework. In this study, seismic reflection profiles over the major structures of the basin reveal reverse faults that penetrate the upper Precambrian crust, disrupt the surface of Precambrian basement, and accommodate folding of Paleozoic sediments. Observations of deformation indicate concordant folding of the basement surface and overlying strata and/or possible `Laramide-style' basement-controlled folding. Most profiles show evidence of dual fold vergence and some profiles suggest transpression involving lower Paleozoic strata and the basement surface. The moderate seismicity in the southern Illinois Basin, just north of the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ), defines an active deformation regime of interpreted NNE-striking dextral strike-slip and reverse faulting. Upper crustal fault structure, such as shown in this study, could provide a fabric capable of reactivation by stress manifested as contemporary seismicity. A tectonic framework for the possible kinematic linkage of deformation in the NMSZ and the southern Illinois Basin is proposed on the basis of a hypothetical distribution of branched fault (and/or fold) patterns in southern Illinois that broaden northward beyond the NMSZ. Such a dispersive deformation pattern is thought to be associated with the gradual cessation in displacement north of the NMSZ (i.e., displacement is dissipated over many faults). The abrupt change in seismotectonic regime from a relatively discrete, highly seismic NMSZ with infrequent great earthquakes to a multi-stranded fault pattern with more frequent moderate earthquakes in southern Illinois is typical of active strike-slip systems involving a bend or shift in direction.

  5. Chemical transfers along slowly eroding catenas developed on granitic cratons in southern Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Khomo, Lesego; Bern, Carleton R.; Hartshorn, Anthony S.; Rogers, Kevin H.; Chadwick, Oliver A.

    2013-01-01

    A catena is a series of distinct but co-evolving soils arrayed along a slope. On low-slope, slowly eroding catenas the redistribution of mass occurs predominantly as plasma, the dissolved and suspended constituents in soil water. We applied mass balance methods to track how redistribution via plasma contributed to physical and geochemical differentiation of nine slowly eroding (~ 5 mm ky− 1) granitic catenas. The catenas were arrayed in a 3 × 3 climate by relief matrix and located in Kruger National Park, South Africa. Most of the catenas contained at least one illuviated soil profile that had undergone more volumetric expansion and less mass loss, and these soils were located in the lower halves of the slopes. By comparison, the majority of slope positions were eluviated. Soils from the wetter climates (550 and 730 mm precipitation yr− 1) generally had undergone greater collapse and lost more mass, while soils in the drier climate (470 mm yr− 1) had undergone expansion and lost less mass. Effects of differences in catena relief were less clear. Within each climate zone, soil horizon mass loss and strain were correlated, as were losses of most major elements, illustrating the predominant influence of primary mineral weathering. Nevertheless, mass loss and volumetric collapse did not become extreme because of the skeleton of resistant primary mineral grains inherited from the granite. Colloidal clay redistribution, as traced by the ratio of Ti to Zr in soil, suggested clay losses via suspension from catena eluvial zones. Thus illuviation of colloidal clays into downslope soils may be crucial to catena development by restricting subsurface flow there. Our analysis provides quantitative support for the conceptual understanding of catenas in cratonic landscapes and provides an endmember reference point in understanding the development of slowly eroding soil landscapes.

  6. The Fazenda Largo off-craton kimberlites of Piauí State, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminsky, Felix V.; Sablukov, Sergei M.; Sablukova, Ludmila I.; Zakharchenko, Olga D.

    2009-10-01

    In the late 1990s, the Fazenda Largo kimberlite cluster was discovered in the Piauí State of Brazil. As with earlier known kimberlites in this area - Redondão, Santa Filomena-Bom Jesus (Gilbues) and Picos - this cluster is located within the Palaeozoic Parnaiba Sedimentary Basin that separates the São Francisco and the Amazonian Precambrian cratons. Locations of kimberlites are controlled by the 'Transbrasiliano Lineament'. The Fazenda Largo kimberlites are intensely weathered, almost completely altered rocks with a fine-grained clastic structure, and contain variable amounts of terrigene admixture (quartz sand). These rocks represent near-surface volcano-sedimentary deposits of the crater parts of kimberlite pipes. By petrographic, mineralogical and chemical features, the Fazenda Largo kimberlites are similar to average kimberlite. The composition of the deep-seated material in the Fazenda Largo kimberlites is quite diverse: among mantle microxenoliths are amphibolitised pyrope peridotites, garnetised spinel peridotites, ilmenite peridotites, chromian spinel + chromian diopside + pyrope intergrowths, and large xenoliths of pyrope dunite. High-pressure minerals are predominantly of the ultramafic suite, Cr-association minerals (purplish-red and violet pyrope, chromian spinel, chromian diopside, Cr-pargasite and orthopyroxene). The Ti-association minerals of the ultramafic suite (picroilmenite and orange pyrope), as well as rare grains of orange pyrope-almandine of the eclogite association, are subordinate. Kimberlites from all four pipes contain rare grains of G10 pyrope of the diamond association, but chromian spinel of the diamond association was not encountered. By their tectonic position, by geochemical characteristics, and by the composition of kimberlite indicator minerals, the Fazenda Largo kimberlites, like the others of such type, are unlikely to be economic.

  7. Neoproterozoic extension in the greater dharwar craton: A reevaluation of the "betsimisaraka suture" in madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tucker, R.D.; Roig, J.-Y.; Delor, C.; Amlin, Y.; Goncalves, P.; Rabarimanana, M.H.; Ralison, A.V.; Belcher, R.W.

    2011-01-01

    The Precambrian shield of Madagascar is reevaluated with recently compiled geological data and new U-Pb sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) geochronology. Two Archean domains are recognized: the eastern Antongil-Masora domain and the central Antananarivo domain, the latter with distinctive belts of metamafic gneiss and schist (Tsaratanana Complex). In the eastern domain, the period of early crust formation is extended to the Paleo-Mesoarchean (3.32-3.15 Ga) and a supracrustal sequence (Fenerivo Group), deposited at 3.18 Ga and metamorphosed at 2.55 Ga, is identified. In the central domain, a Neoarchean period of high-grade metamorphism and anatexis that affected both felsic (Betsiboka Suite) and mafic gneisses (Tsaratanana Complex) is documented. We propose, therefore, that the Antananarivo domain was amalgamated within the Greater Dharwar Craton (India + Madagascar) by a Neoarchean accretion event (2.55-2.48 Ga), involving emplacement of juvenile igneous rocks, high-grade metamorphism, and the juxtaposition of disparate belts of mafic gneiss and schist (metagreenstones). The concept of the "Betsimisaraka suture" is dispelled and the zone is redefined as a domain of Neoproterozoic metasedimentary (Manampotsy Group) and metaigneous rocks (Itsindro-Imorona Suite) formed during a period of continental extension and intrusive igneous activity between 840 and 760 Ma. Younger orogenic convergence (560-520 Ma) resulted in east-directed overthrusting throughout south Madagascar and steepening with local inversion of the domain in central Madagascar. Along part of its length, the Manampotsy Group covers the boundary between the eastern and central Archean domains and is overprinted by the Angavo-Ifanadiana high-strain zone that served as a zone of crustal weakness throughout Cretaceous to Recent times.

  8. Highly elaborate putative microfossils from 3.02 Ga chert, Pilbara Craton: indications of cell division?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugitani, K.; Grey, K.; Nagaoka, T.; Mimura, K.; Walter, M. R.

    2009-04-01

    Diverse microstructures have recently been reported from the Archean sedimentary succession now assigned to the Farrel Quartzite (3.02 Ga) at the Mount Grant and Mount Goldsworthy area, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia [1]. A highly probable to possible biogenic origin of the four major morphological types (thread-like, film-like, spheroidal and lenticular to spindle-like) has been inferred from indigenousness, syngenicity, sedimentary origin of the host chert, size distribution, composition, evidence of flexible and/or breakable walls, apparent taphonomic features and the presence of colony-like aggregations. This result is supported by new geochemical and paleontological lines of evidence [2, 3] in addition to the continued accumulation of data about located specimens (more than 2000) and discoveries of similar structures from new and remote localities. The cumulative data provide reliable fossil evidence for Archean life. On the other hand, some fundamental problems remain unresolved: for example: (1) Does the morphological diversity actually correlate to the biotic diversity? (2) What is the significance of the size of many of the structures larger than 20µm and occasionally up to 80µm along the major axis? (3) Can we explain some structures and occurrences that appear to be unusual as Archean fossil records in the biological context? In this study, we refer to these problems and address ourselves particularly to the issue of elaborate structures morphologically similar to reproducing cells and resting spores, proposing a new systematic classification scheme that will aid in eventually establishing a taxonomy of the microstructures. [1] Sugitani et al. (2007) Precambrian Research 158, 228-262. [2] Oehler et al. (2008) 39th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, 1303pdf. [3] Grey and Sugitani (2008) Abstract for WSAMF2008.

  9. The seismotectonics of Southeastern Tanzania: Implications for the propagation of the eastern branch of the East African Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulibo, Gabriel D.; Nyblade, Andrew A.

    2016-04-01

    Seismicity patterns and focal mechanisms in southeastern Tanzania, determined from data recorded on temporary and permanent AfricaArray seismic stations, have been used to investigate the propagation direction of the Eastern branch of the East African Rift System southward from the Northern Tanzania Divergence Zone (NTDZ). Within the NTDZ, the rift zone is defined by three segments, the Eyasi segment to the west, the Manyara segment in the middle, and the Pangani segment to the east. Results show that most of the seismicity (~ 75%) extends to the south of the Manyara segment along the eastern margin of the Tanzania Craton, and at ~ 6-7° S latitude trends to the SE along the northern boundary of the Ruvuma microplate, connecting with a N-S zone of seismicity offshore southern Tanzania and Mozambique. A lesser amount of seismicity (~ 25%) is found extending from the SE corner of the Tanzania Craton at ~ 6-7° S latitude southwards towards Lake Nyasa. This finding supports a model of rift propagation via the Manyara segment to the southeast of the Tanzania Craton along the northern boundary of the Ruvuma microplate. However, given the limited duration of the seismic recordings used in this study, the possibility of another zone of extension developing to the south towards Lake Nyasa (Malawi) cannot be ruled out. Focal mechanisms along the boundary between the Victoria and the Ruvuma microplates and offshore southeastern Tanzania show a combination of normal and strike slip faulting indicating mainly extension with some sinistral motion, consistent with the mapped geologic faults and a clockwise rotation of the Ruvuma microplate.

  10. Petrological-Geochemical Constraints on Formation and Modification of Cratonic Lithospheric Mantle and Implications for its Thermophysical Properties (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulbach, S.; Huismans, R. S.; Rondenay, S.

    2013-12-01

    Petrological-Geochemical Constraints on Formation and Modification of Cratonic Lithospheric Mantle and Implications for its Thermophysical Properties Oceanic basalts sample compositionally heterogeneous convecting mantle sources that are not primitive, but contain some amount of recycled crustal material [1]. This also applies to the distant geological past, as picritic and komatiitic melts show evidence for the presence of such heterogeneities [2]. Since the loss of these melts leads to the generation of a complementary lithospheric mantle residue and since 50% of the present continental crust formed by the Late Archaean [3], half of today's continents may be underlain by highly depleted cratonic lithospheric mantle that potentially formed from non-primitive mantle sources. While intensive effort has focused on identifying and constraining the relative contributions of recycled components in melts, their effects on the melting relations and thermophysical properties of mantle residues remain obscure. The FeO-MgO relationships of refractory cratonic garnet peridotite xenoliths filtered for the effects of metasomatism and opx enrichment are consistent with the onset of partial melt extraction at >5 GPa, while their Al2O3-Cr2O3/Al2O3 systematics indicate an average melting pressure ≥3 GPa for most cratonic mantle sections [4]. Thus, they followed deep partial melting paths at excess mantle potential temperatures (plumes), which generates more buoyant residues with higher shear wave velocities [5]. Superposed on the effects of melt depletion may be the effects of entrainment of oceanic crust in these plumes. This can lead to variable, pervasive enrichment of peridotite by aluminous opx (corresponding to SiO2 addition) depending plume buoyancy (excess temperature) and ability to entrain dense eclogite material, and entails a secular trend toward less SiO2-enriched mantle residues [4]. Such opx addition will also lead to an increase in Al2O3 and dilution of FeO, which

  11. Crustal and uppermost mantle structure of the eastern margin of the Yilgarn Craton (Australia) from passive seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sippl, Christian; Tkalčić, Hrvoje; Kennett, Brian; Spaggiari, Catherine; Gessner, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    The Yilgarn Craton in Western Australia is one of the largest units of Archean lithosphere on earth. Along its southern and southeastern margin, it is bounded by the Albany-Fraser Orogen (AFO), a Paleo- to Mesoproterozoic extensioal-accretionary orogen. In this contribution, we investigate the crustal and upper mantle structure of the AFO and adjacent regions using passive seismic data collected during the recent ALFREX experiment. Since the entire region has not been significantly reactivated since the Mesoproterozoic, the old signature of craton edge modification should have been well preserved until today. From November 2013 until January 2016, we operated a temporary passive seismic network consisting of 70 stations in the eastern Albany-Fraser Orogen. The array had an average station spacing of about 40 km and was designed to fill the gap between recently acquired active seismic profiles. We present results from the analysis of P receiver functions and ambient noise tomography using the ALFREX data. Receiver functions were used to derive a Moho depth map via H-K stacking, for direct imaging (common conversion point stacking) as well as joint inversion with surface wave dispersion data to derive 1D S-velocity profiles beneath the stations. The obtained receiver functions show a marked change of character from west to east across the array. Whereas they feature clear and sharp Moho phases for stations on the Yilgarn Craton, significantly more crustal complexity and fainter Moho phases are seen throughout the AFO. Crustal thickness increases from 36-39 km for the Yilgarn Craton to values between 42 and 48 km across the AFO, decreasing to around 40 km in the east. Ambient noise cross-correlations were used to derive maps of phase and group velocities of Rayleigh waves at periods between 1 and 30 seconds. A three-dimensional model of S wavespeeds throughout the area was then computed by pixelwise inversion of dispersion curves. Obtained S wavespeeds are generally

  12. New Precambrian paleomagnetic and geochronological results from the North China Craton and their implications for supercontinent Nuna reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.

    2013-05-01

    A recent update of available global paleomagnetic data demonstrate that a coherent Nuna formed by ca. 1.75 Ga, and lasted till at least ca. 1.4 Ga (Zhang et al, 2012). This paleomagnetism-based reconstruction of Nuna is also in agreement with those proposed, geologically based models, including the SAMBA connection between Baltica, Amazonia and Western Africa (Johansson, 2009), the Nuna core connection between Laurentia, Baltica and Siberia (Evans and Mitchell, 2011), the proto-SWEAT connection between Laurentia, Mawson block and Australian blocks (Payne et al., 2009) and the NCB-India connection (Zhao et al., 2011). The North China Craton (NCC) is positioned by superimposing its four high quality poles between 1.78 Ga and ~1.44 Ga atop coeval poles from the combined cratonic assemblage, including Laurentia, Baltica, Siberia and Australian blocks. In this reconstruction, the present south margin of the NCB represented an active continental margin in Nuna and likely faced an open ocean, whilst its north margin was connected to a large landmass. Recently, Su et al (2012) reported a precise age of 1611±8 Ma (zircon U-Pb LA-MC- ICPMS) obtained from a tuff bed in the Luoyukou Formation in western Henan Province. This age suggested that two high quality paleomagnetic poles from the Baicaoping and Yunmengshan formations in this region, which were considered as of 1.2-1.3 Ga, should be of ~1.61 - 1.78 Ga. Although with poor age constraint, the two poles also support the NCC's position in the Nuna. In addition, new paleomagnetic results have been obtained from the well dated ~1.33 Ga mafic sills in the northern NCC (Zhang et al, 2011; Chen et al, 2013). However, because there is no coeval pole from other major cratons, whether the NCC had still connected with them is not conclusive.

  13. Phanerozoic orogeny triggers reactivation and exhumation in the northern part of the Archean-Paleoproterozoic North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong-Fu; Zou, Dong-Ya; Santosh, M.; Zhu, Bin

    2016-09-01

    Cratons and orogenic belts are integral components of ancient continents. In some cases, stable continents can be reactivated and even largely destroyed by younger events. The mechanisms of reactivation or destruction of ancient cratons remain equivocal. Here we compile zircon U-Pb data from the metamorphic rocks of the Hongqiyingzi Group in the northern part of the North China Craton (NCC) to evaluate this problem. The results reveal episodic tectonothermal events related to three major periods of Latest Neoarchean-Earliest Paleoproterozoic (2.6-2.4 Ga), Paleoproterozoic (1.85-1.95 Ma) and Phanerozoic (480-220 Ma, with peak at 360-320 Ma). The Neoarchean-Paleoproterozoic crust as represented by the Hongqiyingzi Group was subducted to eclogite facies at ca. 1.95 Ga, followed by the final collision between the Eastern and Western Blocks at ca. 1.85 Ga to produce the Trans-North China Orogen (TNCO). The ubiquitous presence of Phanerozoic concordant zircons in the Hongqiyingzi Group suggests the episodic exhumation of the TNCO in the northern segment during the Phanerozoic. The 460-420 Ma concordant zircons record the onset of exhumation, triggered by the Ordovician-Silurian southward subduction of the Paleoasian Ocean. Widespread occurrence of 360-320 Ma metamorphic and magmatic zircons in the Hongqiyingzi Group demonstrates that the Carboniferous-Permian was an important period of exhumation for the TNCO, possibly related to back-arc extension. A few Permian-Triassic concordant zircons record late Permian accretion and Triassic post-accretional uplifting. Our study demonstrates that the young orogeny during the formation of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt resulted in extensive reactivation of not only the Archean continental crust but also the Paleoproterozoic orogen in the northern NCC.

  14. 2480 Ma mafic magmatism in the northern Black Hills, South Dakota: A new link connecting the Wyoming and Superior cratons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dahl, P.S.; Hamilton, M.A.; Wooden, J.L.; Foland, K.A.; Frei, R.; McCombs, J.A.; Holm, D.K.

    2006-01-01

    The Laramide Black Hills uplift of southwest South Dakota exposes a Precambrian crystalline core of ???2560-2600 Ma basement granitoids nonconformably overlain by two Paleoproterozoic intracratonic rift successions. In the northern Black Hills, a 1 km thick, layered sill (the Blue Draw metagabbro) that intrudes the older rift succession provides a key constraint on the timing of mafic magmatism and of older rift-basin sedimentation. Ion microprobe spot analyses of megacrysts of magmatic titanite from a horizon of dioritic pegmatite in the uppermost sill portion yield a 207Pb/206Pb upper-intercept age of 2480 ?? 6 Ma (all age errors ??2??), comparable to two-point 207Pb/206Pb errorchron ages obtained by Pb stepwise leaching of the same titanites. Nearly concordant domains in coexisting magmatic zircon yield apparent spot ages ranging from 2458 ?? 16 to 2284 ?? 20 Ma (i.e., differentially reset along U-Pb concordia), and hornblende from an associated metadiorite yields a partially reset date with oldest apparent-age increments ranging between 2076 ?? 16 and 2010 ?? 8 Ma. We interpret these data as indicating that an episode of gabbroic magmatism occurred at 2480 Ma, in response to earlier rifting of the eastern edge of the Wyoming craton. Layered mafic intrusions of similar thickness and identical age occur along a rifted belt in the southern Superior craton (Sudbury region, Ontario). Moreover, these mafic intrusions are spatially aligned using previous supercontinent restorations of the Wyoming and Superior cratons (Kenorland-Superia configurations). This new "piercing point" augments one previously inferred by spatial-temporal correlation of the Paleoproterozoic Huronian (southern Ontario) and Snowy Pass (southeastern Wyoming) supergroups. We propose that layered mafic intrusions extending from Nemo, South Dakota, to Sudbury, Ontario, delineate an axial rift zone along which Wyoming began to separate from Superior during initial fragmentation of the Neoarchean

  15. Understanding traditional African healing

    PubMed Central

    MOKGOBI, M.G.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional African healing has been in existence for many centuries yet many people still seem not to understand how it relates to God and religion/spirituality. Some people seem to believe that traditional healers worship the ancestors and not God. It is therefore the aim of this paper to clarify this relationship by discussing a chain of communication between the worshipers and the Almighty God. Other aspects of traditional healing namely types of traditional healers, training of traditional healers as well as the role of traditional healers in their communities are discussed. In conclusion, the services of traditional healers go far beyond the uses of herbs for physical illnesses. Traditional healers serve many roles which include but not limited to custodians of the traditional African religion and customs, educators about culture, counselors, social workers and psychologists. PMID:26594664

  16. Ectoparasites of African Mammals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-11-30

    This study consisted of ectoparasites from approximately 100,000 African small mammals, representing probably more than 500 species of which many are...study of ectoparasites may provide information concerning interactions among animal reservoirs of disease, and (3) an understanding of ecological...parameters for ectoparasites and their hosts may enhance understanding of epidemiological patterns. Of the four major groups dealt with, considerably more

  17. Assessment of Undiscovered Petroleum Resources of the North and East Margins of the Siberian Craton, Russian Federation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klett, T.R.

    2008-01-01

    Four geologic provinces located along the north and east margins of the Siberian craton were assessed for undiscovered crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids/condensates resources as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Circum-Arctic Oil and Gas Resource Appraisal. Using a geology-based methodology, the USGS estimated the mean undiscovered, conventional petroleum resources in these provinces to be approximately 28 billion barrels of oil equivalent, including approximately 8 billion barrels of crude oil, 106 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 3 billion barrels of natural gas liquids.

  18. Petrogenesis and Tectonic Implications of Paleoproterozoic Metapelitic Rocks in the Archean Kongling Complex from the Northern Yangtze Craton, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Zheng, J.; Wang, W.; Xiong, Q.

    2015-12-01

    The Archean Kongling Complex in the northern Yangtze Craton is an ideal target to investigate the Precambrian accretion and evolution of continental crust in South China. This study aims to unravel the crustal evolution and tectonic setting of the Yangtze Craton during the Paleoproterozoic time, using integrated studies of petrography, zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopes and whole-rock geochemistry of Paleoproterozoic metapelitic rocks in the Kongling Complex. These rocks contain garnet, sillimanite, biotite, plagioclase, minor graphite and ilmenite. Zircons from the samples show nebulous sector-zoning and rim-core structure, suggesting both metamorphic origin and detrital origin with metamorphic overprints. The metamorphic zircons and metamorphic overprints have concordant 207Pb/206Pb age at ~2.0 Ga, while detrital grains yield three distinct concordant-age populations of >2.5 Ga, 2.4-2.2 Ga and 2.2-2.1 Ga. The age patterns indicate that the depositional age of the metasedimentary rocks was 2.1-2.0 Ga. Those 2.2-2.1 Ga detrital zircons with variable ɛHf(t) values (-7.28 to 2.97) suggest the addition of juvenile materials from depleted mantle to the crust during 2.2-2.1 Ga. The 2.4-2.2 Ga zircons have Hf model ages (TDM2) of ~2.6-3.5 Ga and >2.5 Ga zircons have TDM2 ages varying from 2.9 Ga to 3.3 Ga. The new data suggest that the Kongling Complex was originally a Paleoarchean (old up to 3.5 Ga) continental nucleus, which experienced multiple episodes of growth and reworking events at 3.3-3.2 Ga, 2.9 Ga, 2.7-2.6 Ga, 2.4-2.2 Ga and 2.2-2.1 Ga. In combination with available data, the new results in this study suggest a continent-arc-continent evolution model to explain the tectonic evolution of the Yangtze Craton during the Paleoproterozoic time: the western margin of Yangtze Craton was originally an individual continent, which underwent a reworking event during 2.4-2.2 Ga and a crust growth event caused by continent-arc collision during 2.2-2.1 Ga; it subsequently collided

  19. Geology, mineralization, and geochronology of the Qianhe gold deposit, Xiong'ershan area, southern North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ke-Fei; Li, Jian-Wei; Selby, David; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Bi, Shi-Jian; Deng, Xiao-Dong

    2013-08-01

    The Qianhe gold deposit in the Xiong'ershan area is located along the southern margin of the Archean-Paleoproterozoic North China Craton. The deposit consists of six orebodies that are hosted in Paleoproterozoic andesites to basaltic andesites and structurally controlled by roughly EW-trending faults. Individual orebodies comprise auriferous quartz veins and disseminated Au-bearing pyrite within hydrothermally altered rocks on both sides of, or close to, the veins. Ore-related hydrothermal alteration has produced various mixtures of K-feldspar, quartz, sericite, chlorite, epidote, carbonate, and sulfides. Pyrite is the most important ore mineral, associated with minor amounts of galena, sphalerite, and chalcopyrite. Other trace minerals include molybdenite, arsenopyrite, scheelite, rutile, xenotime, and parisite. Gold occurs mostly as native gold and electrum enclosed in pyrite or along microfractures of sulfides and quartz. Microthermometric measurements of primary inclusions in auriferous quartz suggest that gold and associated minerals were precipitated in the range of 160-305 °C from aqueous or carbonic-aqueous fluids with salinities of 6-22 wt% NaCl equiv. Samples of molybdenite coexisting with Au-bearing pyrite have Re-Os model ages of 134-135 Ma, whereas ore-related hydrothermal sericite separates yield 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages between 127 and 124 Ma. The Re-Os and 40Ar/39Ar ages are remarkably consistent with zircon U-Pb ages (134.5 ± 1.5 and 127.2 ± 1.4 Ma; 1 σ) of the biotite monzogranite from the Heyu-intrusive complex and granitic dikes in and close to the Qianhe gold mine, indicating a close temporal and thus possibly genetic relationship between gold mineralization and granitic magmatism in the area. Fluid inclusion waters extracted from auriferous quartz have δD values of -80 to -72 ‰, whereas the calculated δ 18OH2O values range from 3.1 to 3.8 ‰. The hydrogen and oxygen isotopes from this study and previous work indicate that ore fluids

  20. Crustal structure of the Archaean granite-greenstone terrane in the northern portion of the Kaapvaal Craton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debeer, J. H.; Stettler, E. H.; Barton, J. M., Jr.; Vanreenen, D. D.; Bearncombe, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    Recent investigations of the electrical resistivity, gravity and aeromagnetic signatures of the various granite-greenstone units in the northern portion of the Kaapvaal craton have revealed three features of significance: (1) the Archean greenstone belts are shallow features, rarely exceeding 5 km in depth; (2) the high resistivity upper crustal layer typical of the lower grade granite-greenstone terranes is absent in the granulite facies terrane; and (3) the aeromagnetic lineation patterns allow the granite-greenstone terrane to be subdivided into geologically recognizable tectono-metamorphic domains on the basis of lineation frequency and direction. A discussion follows.

  1. The Western Edge of Cratonic North America and Topography of the Northern U.S. Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, D. A.; Russo, R. M.; van der Lee, S.; Mueller, P. A.

    2009-12-01

    We used seismic structure of the upper mantle determined via waveform inversions of surface and regional shear waves (Beadle and van der Lee, 2007) to examine the 3-D geometry of the base of North American lithosphere at the junction between thick, stable cratonic eastern North America and the thinner, recently tectonized western part of the continent. This boundary has been affected by long-term subduction beneath North America. Variability in convergence rates and directions, and especially in slab dip, have been postulated as important controls on the configuration of the transition from thick to thin lithosphere, and on the distribution and degree of crustal deformation and volcanism in the western U.S. We show that the lithospheric thickness transition at depths of 70-130 km - defined as contours of zero shear velocity anomaly - correlates strongly with the high topography of Laramide uplifts in the northern Rockies, which lie west of this seismically defined craton edge. The transition from thick to thin lithosphere also includes an embayment symmetrically centered on the Yellowstone hotspot, offset cratonward from the surface position of the hotspot by ca. 140-180 km at depths of 130-150 km. We interpret this structure as a reduction of cratonic seismic velocities reflecting the thermal halo around the hotspot, and perhaps associated with the separation of the lower lithosphere. The steep velocity gradient (boundary) east of the hotspot occurs along the Big Horn Mountains, and distributed mountain ranges of southwestern Montana. The steep transition between thin and thick lithosphere turns sharply west along the northern margin of the Helena thrust salient-Lewis and Clark fault zone, where it may reflect the edge of the Archean Medicine Hat Block and/or the northern termination of the influence shallow Farallon slab subduction the during Laramide time. Laramide-style basement uplifts are absent north of this zone and the eastern front ranges of the Rockies

  2. Diversity among African Pygmies

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez Rozzi, Fernando V.; Sardi, Marina L.

    2010-01-01

    Although dissimilarities in cranial and post-cranial morphology among African pygmies groups have been recognized, comparative studies on skull morphology usually pull all pygmies together assuming that morphological characters are similar among them and different with respect to other populations. The main aim of this study is to compare cranial morphology between African pygmies and non-pygmies populations from Equatorial Africa derived from both the Eastern and the Western regions in order to test if the greatest morphological difference is obtained in the comparison between pygmies and non-pygmies. Thirty three-dimensional (3D) landmarks registered with Microscribe in four cranial samples (Western and Eastern pygmies and non-pygmies) were obtained. Multivariate analysis (generalized Procrustes analysis, Mahalanobis distances, multivariate regression) and complementary dimensions of size were evaluated with ANOVA and post hoc LSD. Results suggest that important cranial shape differentiation does occur between pygmies and non-pygmies but also between Eastern and Western populations and that size changes and allometries do not affect similarly Eastern and Western pygmies. Therefore, our findings raise serious doubt about the fact to consider African pygmies as a homogenous group in studies on skull morphology. Differences in cranial morphology among pygmies would suggest differentiation after divergence. Although not directly related to skull differentiation, the diversity among pygmies would probably suggest that the process responsible for reduced stature occurred after the split of the ancestors of modern Eastern and Western pygmies. PMID:21049030

  3. Human African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Lejon, Veerle; Bentivoglio, Marina; Franco, José Ramon

    2013-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness is a neglected tropical disease that affects populations in sub-Saharan Africa. The disease is caused by infection with the gambiense and rhodesiense subspecies of the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei, and is transmitted to humans by bites of infected tsetse flies. The disease evolves in two stages, the hemolymphatic and meningoencephalitic stages, the latter being defined by central nervous system infection after trypanosomal traversal of the blood-brain barrier. African trypanosomiasis, which leads to severe neuroinflammation, is fatal without treatment, but the available drugs are toxic and complicated to administer. The choice of medication is determined by the infecting parasite subspecies and disease stage. Clinical features include a constellation of nonspecific symptoms and signs with evolving neurological and psychiatric alterations and characteristic sleep-wake disturbances. Because of the clinical profile variability and insidiously progressive central nervous system involvement, disease staging is currently based on cerebrospinal fluid examination, which is usually performed after the finding of trypanosomes in blood or other body fluids. No vaccine being available, control of human African trypanosomiasis relies on diagnosis and treatment of infected patients, assisted by vector control. Better diagnostic tools and safer, easy to use drugs are needed to facilitate elimination of the disease.

  4. Is the Ventersdorp rift system of southern Africa related to a continental collision between the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe Cratons at 2.64 Ga AGO?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, K.; Kidd, W. S. F.; Kusky, T.

    1985-01-01

    Rocks of the Ventersdorp Supergroup were deposited in a system of northeast trending grabens on the Kaapvaal Craton approximately 2.64 Ga ago contemporary with a continental collision between the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe Cratons. It is suggested that it was this collision that initiated the Ventersdorp rifting. Individual grabens strike at high angles toward the continental collision zone now exposed in the Limpopo Province where late orogenic left-lateral strike-slip faulting and anatectic granites are recognized. The Ventersdorp rift province is related to extension in the Kaapvaal Craton associated with the collision, and some analogy is seen with such rifts as the Shansi and Baikal Systems associated with the current India-Asia continental collision.

  5. East African Rift Valley, Kenya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This rare, cloud free view of the East African Rift Valley, Kenya (1.5N, 35.5E) shows a clear view of the Turkwell River Valley, an offshoot of the African REift System. The East African Rift is part of a vast plate fracture which extends from southern Turkey, through the Red Sea, East Africa and into Mozambique. Dark green patches of forests are seen along the rift margin and tea plantations occupy the cooler higher ground.

  6. Paleoproterozoic rejuvenation and replacement of Archaean lithosphere: Evidence from zircon U-Pb dating and Hf isotopes in crustal xenoliths at Udachnaya, Siberian craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyen, J.-F.; Paquette, J.-L.; Ionov, D. A.; Gannoun, A.; Korsakov, A. V.; Golovin, A. V.; Moine, B. N.

    2017-01-01

    Cratons represent the oldest preserved lithospheric domains. Their lithosphere (lithospheric mantle welded to overlying Precambrian crystalline basement) is considered to be particularly robust and long-lived due to the protecting presence of buoyant and rigid "keels" made up of residual harzburgites. Although the cratons are mostly assumed to form in the Archaean, the timing of their formation remains poorly constrained. In particular, there are very few datasets describing concurrently the age of both the crustal and mantle portions of the lithosphere. In this study, we report new U-Pb ages and Hf isotope compositions for zircons in crustal xenoliths from the Udachnaya kimberlite in the central Siberian craton; this dataset includes samples from both the upper and lower portions of the crust. The zircon ages agree well with model melt-extraction Re-Os ages on refractory peridotite xenoliths from the same pipe; taken together they allow an integrated view of lithosphere formation. Our data reveal that the present day upper crust is Archaean, whereas both the lower crust and the lithospheric mantle yield Paleoproterozoic ages. We infer that the deep lithosphere beneath the Siberian craton was not formed in a single Archaean event, but grew in at least two distinct events, one in the late Archaean and the other in the Paleoproterozoic. Importantly, a complete or large-scale delamination and rejuvenation of the Archaean lower lithosphere (lower crust and lithospheric mantle) took place in the Paleoproterozoic. This further demonstrates that craton formation can be a protracted, multi-stage process, and that the present day crust and mantle may not represent complementary reservoirs formed through the same tectono-magmatic event. Further, deep cratonic lithosphere may be less robust and long living than often assumed, with rejuvenation and replacement events throughout its history.

  7. Cordilleran cratonal-miogeoclinal hinge zone in the Mojave Desert and southern Great Basin: What is it How can it be recognized Where is it

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.D. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Fedo, C.M. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Commonly referred to as hingelines, ancient cratonal-miogeoclinal transitions are best defined by rift-related structures because during the rift-to-drift history of continental margins, hingelines exert their most profound influences as active tectonic and physiographic features. Where rift-related structures are not preserved, stratigraphic development, as the most direct response to early continental margin tectonic activity, is the more sensitive indicator of paleotectonic setting. Accordingly, it is the initial, Neoproterozoic-Early Cambrian basement-cover deposits of the evolving southwestern US Cordilleran passive margin that provide the clear signature of cratonal-miogeoclinal affinity and hinge definition. At a facies scale, the similarities between cratonal and miogeoclinal strata are compelling; thus the major difference between the craton and miogeocline expressed not by lithofacies, but by stratigraphic unit representation and thickness. Throughout the eastern Mojave Desert and southern Great Basin regions, three distinct expressions of Upper Proterozoic-Lower Cambrian stratigraphic unit representation and thickness relate to hinge definition and location. Basal cratonal stratigraphic sections begin with middle member Wood Canyon Formation that rests nonconformably on Proterozoic basement. Basal miogeoclinal stratigraphic sections are typified by a kilometers-thick sub-Wood Canyon Formation interval ([+-]Pahrump Group; Noonday Dolomite, Johnnie Formation, Stirling Quartzite) and the presence of lower member Wood Canyon Formation. A third, transitional stratigraphic succession begins with a comparatively thin, poorly developed sub-Wood Canyon Formation interval and contains no lower member Wood Canyon Formation. This transitional stratigraphic style represents a craton-margin setting and is crucial for constraining a hinge.

  8. The southern and central parts of the "Souttoufide" belt, Northwest Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villeneuve, Michel; Gärtner, Andreas; Youbi, Nasrrddine; El Archi, Abdelkrim; Vernhet, Elodie; Rjimati, Ech-Cherki; Linnemann, Ulf; Bellon, Hervé; Gerdes, Axel; Guillou, Omar; Corsini, Michel; Paquette, Jean-Louis

    2015-12-01

    The Souttoufide belt is situated between the High-Atlas in the north, the Mauritanides in the south and the West African Craton as well as the Tindouf basin in the east. Thus, this belt is a part of the West African fold belt system which surrounds the West African Craton. Outcrops occur only in three areas, while the rest of the Souttoufide belt is covered by Meso- to Cenozoic sediments. These areas are, from the south to the north, the Adrar Souttouf Massif, the Smara Zemmour area, and the western part of the Anti-Atlas. Because of the continuing processing and numerous publications, the Anti-Atlas cannot be dealt with in detail. Fundamental geological work in both of the other areas was mainly done during the second third of the 20th century, followed by several decades of inactivity. Numerous studies were done in the Adrar Souttouf massif during the last decade, while the Smara-Zemmour area still remains poorly investigated. Most of them were focused on geochronological analyses and geochemistry. Accordingly, the obtained data led to a new interpretation. The Adrar Souttouf is interpreted as a Pan-African belt exhibiting a Neoproterozoic island arc reworked by the Variscan collision between the North American Craton (NAC) and the West African Craton (WAC). The Smara-Zemmour area is considered as the external part of this Variscan belt thrusted onto the Palaeozoic Tindouf basin. The western Anti-Atlas as considered as a Pan-African active margin reworked during the Variscan orogen. Together, these three areas, lead to the hypothesis of a Late Pan-African belt capped by the Early and Middle Palaeozoic covers and then affected by the Middle Carboniferous tectonic event (330 Ma) related to the Pangaean assembly. Correlations with adjacent belts (Mauritanides and Anti-Atlas) are considered.

  9. Mantle dynamics of the Paleoproterozoic North China Craton: A perspective based on seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santosh, M.; Zhao, Dapeng; Kusky, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the mantle dynamics beneath the North China Craton (NCC) and surrounding regions based on a synthesis of recent P-wave mantle tomographic data down to depths of 600-800 km and their correlation with the surface geological features, with particular reference to the Paleoproterozoic tectonic events associated with the incorporation of the NCC within the Columbia supercontinent amalgam. From the tomographic images, we identify a hot corridor in the mantle transition zone beneath the central region of the Western Block of the NCC sandwiched between two cold corridors. This scenario is similar to the donut-shaped high-velocity anomaly surrounding a region of low-velocity anomaly in the lowermost mantle under the Pacific and suggests that the cold regions might represent slab graveyards which provide the fuel for the plumes rising from the center. A tomographic transect along the collisional suture of the NCC with the Columbia supercontinent, covering the Yinshan-Ordos Blocks in the Western Block through the Central Orogenic Belt and into the Eastern Block of the NCC reveals a ca. 250 km thick lithospheric keel below the Ordos Block defined by a prominent high-velocity anomaly. We identify slab break-off and asthenospheric upwelling in this region and suggest that this process probably initiated the thermal and material erosion of the tectosphere beneath the Eastern Block from the Paleoproterozoic, which was further intensified during the Mesozoic when a substantial part of the sub-continental mantle lithosphere was lost. We visualize heat input from asthenosphere and interaction between asthenosphere and overlying carbonated tectosphere releasing CO 2-rich fluids for the preservation of ultra-high temperature (ca. 1000 °C) metamorphic rocks enriched in CO 2 as well as high-pressure mafic granulites as a paired suite in this region. We also identify a hot swell of the asthenosphere rooted to more than 200 km depth and reaching up to the shallow mantle in

  10. Geophysical Character and Geochemical Evolution of the Mesoproterozoic Figueira Branca Intrusive Suite, SW Amazon Craton (Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louro, Vinicius; Cawood, Peter; Mantovani, Marta

    2016-04-01

    The Jauru Terrain hosts the Figueira Branca Intrusive Suite (FBS) in the SW of the Amazon Craton (Brazil). The FBS is a series of 1425 Ma layered mafic intrusions, previously interpreted as anorogenic. The FBS area is located in foreland to the Santa Helena orogen, formed by the subduction of the Rio Alegre Terrain under the Jauru Terrain. Potential field methods (magnetic and gravity), gamma-ray spectrometry, geochemical and isotope data were used to characterize and to model the extent of FBS magmatism, the distribution of faults and shear zones in the area, to evaluate affinities of the magmatic activity, and the relation between the FBS and the Santa Helena orogen. The geophysical methods identified three anomalies corresponding with FBS outcrops. A fourth anomaly with significantly higher amplitude was observed to the north of the three anomalies. From south to north, the anomalies were named Indiavaí, Azteca, Figueira Branca and Jauru. These anomalies were modeled and indicated a northwest-southeast trend, parallel to regional shear zones. The gamma-ray data enabled the collection of 50 samples from the FBS rocks, the Alto Jauru group that hosts the FBS, from nearby intrusive suites, and the Rio Alegre Terrain. The 30 freshest samples were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence for oxides and some trace elements, 20 by ICP-MS for Rare-Earth Elements and 10 for Nd-Sr isotope analyses. The FBS samples were gabbros and gabbro-norites with Nb/Yb-Th/Yb and TiO2/Yb-Nb/Yb ratios indicating varying degrees of crustal interaction. The TiO2/Yb-Nb/Yb data suggested a subduction related component and the ɛNd-ɛSr indicated a juvenile source. Samples from coeval adjacent intermediate magma suites displayed similar characteristics, which suggest derivation from a bimodal source probably related with the subduction of the Rio Alegre Terrain. We interpreted the tectonic setting of the FBS as a result of a roll-back of the subducted slab, which resulted in rejuvenation of the

  11. Paleoproterozoic andesitic volcanism in the southern Amazonian craton (northern Brazil); lithofacies analysis and geodynamic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roverato, Matteo; Juliani, Caetano; Capra, Lucia; Dias Fernandes, Carlos Marcelo

    2016-04-01

    Precambrian volcanism played an important role in geological evolution and formation of new crust. Most of the literature on Precambrian volcanic rocks describes settings belonging to subaqueous volcanic systems. This is likely because subaerial volcanic rocks in Proterozoic and Archean volcano-sedimentary succession are poorly preserved due to erosive/weathering processes. The late Paleoproterozoic Sobreiro Formation (SF) here described, seems to be one of the rare exceptions to the rule and deserves particular attention. SF represents the subaerial expression of an andesitic magmatism that, linked with the upper felsic Santa Rosa F., composes the Uatumã Group. Uatumã Group is an extensive magmatic event located in the Xingú region, southwestern of Pará state, Amazonian Craton (northern Brazil). The Sobreiro volcanism is thought to be related to an ocean-continent convergent margin. It is characterized by ~1880 Ma well-preserved calc-alkaline basaltic/andesitic to andesitic lava flows, pyroclastic rocks and associated reworked successions. The superb preservation of its rock-textures allowed us to describe in detail a large variety of volcaniclastic deposits. We divided them into primary and secondary, depending if they result from a direct volcanic activity (pyroclastic) or reworked processes. Our study reinforces the importance of ancient volcanic arcs and rocks contribution to the terrestrial volcaniclastic sedimentation and evolution of plate tectonics. The volcanic activity that produced pyroclastic rocks influenced the amount of detritus shed into sedimentary basins and played a major role in the control of sedimentary dispersal patterns. This study aims to provide, for the first time, an analysis of the physical volcanic processes for the subaerial SF, based in field observation, lithofacies analysis, thin section petrography and less geochemical data. The modern volcanological approach here used can serve as a model about the evolution of Precambrian

  12. Fluid-induced martitization of magnetite in BIFs from the Dharwar Craton, India.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Christiane; Orberger, Beate; Tudryn, Alina; Wirth, Richard; Morgan, Rachael

    2013-04-01

    Banded iron formations (BIFs) represent the largest iron deposits on Earth, which mainly formed in the Late Archean and Early Proterozoic. The complex geological history of BIFs makes it difficult to reconstruct the primary mineralogy and thus the initial depositional environment. Magnetite and hematite are the most important iron oxide minerals in BIFs. Magnetite (FeOFe2O3) comprising of both ferrous and ferric iron, easily undergoes transformation at low temperature. Hematite (α-Fe2O3) is often a result of the pseudomorphic replacement of magnetite, in the processus called martitisation. Despite the process of martitization having been widely studied, in both synthetic and natural magnetites, the mechanics of the transformation are poorly understood. What is generally agreed is that the transformation from magnetite to hematite occurs via a maghemite (g-Fe2O3) intermediate. The 2.9 Ga BIF from the Western Dharwar Craton, Southern India (a 500 m thick Archean BIF), is characterized by millimetric to centrimetric alternating white quartz and grey Fe-oxide bands. The Fe-oxide bands consist of martite crystals (~20µm) which represent the hematitisation of euhedral magnetite. The hematite crystals are in part euhedral, cubic shaped pointing to the replacement of magnetite. The crystals show a trellis pattern. Magnetite patches occur within the hematite. Raman spectroscopy, X-Ray diffraction, Curie balance and magnetic hysteresis analyses and FIB-TEM investigation indicate the presence of maghemite, and the presence of subhedral magnetite and interstitial hematite crystal. The latter are characterized by dislocation with fluid inclusions and high porosity zones. The magnetite grains contain lamellae and the interfaces between magnetite-maghemite and hematite are curved suggesting grain boundary migrations with the growth of hematite at the expense of magnetite and maghemite. It is thus suggested that martite result from low-T exsolutions along cleavage resulting in

  13. Tectono-metamorphic evolution of the Paleoproterozoic ultra-high temperatures Khondalite Belt, North China Craton.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobjoie, Cyril; Trap, Pierre; Lin, Wei; Goncalves, Philippe; Marquer, Didier

    2016-04-01

    In the North China Craton, the Khondalite belt is a famous Paleoproterozoic domain where ultra-high temperatures (UHT) metamorphism was extensively documented over an area of 1000 square kilometers. Numerous petrological analyses argue for P-T conditions around 0.6-0.8GPa for temperature above 900°C for peak metamorphism. Unfortunately, the scarcity of available structural data prevents any discussion about thermo-mechanical behavior of the orogenic crust suffering high thermal regime. In this contribution, we present a detail structural analysis of the Khondalite belt that allowed to distinguish two main deformation events, named D1 and D2. The deformation D1 led to the formation of the S1 foliation that dips weakly toward the South-East. S1 holds a N70°E trending mineral and stretching L1 lineation that is sub-horizontal or plunges weakly to the East. The D1 fabrics is reworked by the dextral transpressional D2 deformation responsible for the development of km-scale S2-C2-C'2 system. The N30°E trending S2 foliation is sub-vertical to highly dipping toward the East. Kilometer-scale C2 and C'2 shear zones are sub-vertical and trend N70°E and N90-100°E, respectively. Petrological study and phase diagram modeling suggest that both D1 and D2 developed at UHT conditions. Garnet and spinel-bearing migmatites recording D1 fabric yield 0.7GPa for ca. 950-1015°C P-T conditions. Within D2 shear zones, numerous granitoids and mafic bodies are injected. Mafic intrusions are responsible for UHT contact metamorphism that can occur at low pressure as recorded in an olivine-bearing migmatite. This may suggest that the D2 S-C-C' system form an interconnected network of kilometer scale shear zones that act as pathways for percolation of mafic magmas from the mantle up to the base of the upper crust. Our results allow to discuss the role of localized heat advection along crustal-scale shear zones as a possible mechanism responsible for UHT metamorphism at regional scale, with

  14. Paleomagnetism of the Mississippian HP pipe and the western margin of the North American craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symons, D. T. A.; Lewchuk, M. T.

    The HP pipe is a small oval (80m×40m) kimberlitic diatreme near Golden, B.C., in the fold-and-thrust belt of the Rocky Mountains. The pipe intrudes gently-dipping (˜10°S) Late Cambrian to Middle Ordovician limestones with nearly vertical contacts. It is comprised of carbonate breccia fragments and pyroxenite nodules in a light-green serpentine matrix and gives a Rb-Sr age of 348±7 Ma. A later phase of dark-green dikes cut the breccia and adjacent limestones. AF and thermal step demagnetization of 168 specimens from 42 oriented blocks was done using an automated cryogenic magnetometer in a shielded room for remanence measurement. The diatreme breccia and dikes retain a stable A remanence component after thermal cleaning above ˜400°C and AF cleaning above ˜20 mT. Their combined mean direction of 129.8°, -44.3° (α95 = 6.5°) after tilt correction gives a concordant Mississippian pole position of 138.5°E, 44.5°N (Dp = 5.1°, Dm = 8.2°). The limestones provide a positive contact test by giving a stable B component direction of 114.4°, -22.7° (α95 = 12.4°) with a concordant Late Cambrian to Middle Ordovician pole of 141.0°E, 24.3°N (δp = 7.0°, δm = 13.3°). These concordant poles indicate that the fold-and-thrust belt is part of the North American craton. Thus the suture with allochthonous terranes to the west must be located at or west of the Rocky Mountain Trench. Both the diatreme and limestones retain a low-coercivity and unblocking-temperature C component, isolated by vector subtraction without tilt correction, that records a minor overprint from the Laramide Orogeny combined with Pleistocene viscous remanence.

  15. Multifractal spatial organisation in hydrothermal gold systems of the Archaean Yilgarn craton, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, Mark; Ord, Alison; Hobbs, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    A range of factors controls the location of hydrothermal alteration and gold mineralisation in the Earth's crust. These include the broad-scale lithospheric architecture, availability of fluid sources, fluid composition and pH, pressure-temperature conditions, microscopic to macroscopic structural development, the distribution of primary lithologies, and the extent of fluid-rock interactions. Consequently, the spatial distribution of alteration and mineralization in hydrothermal systems is complex and often considered highly irregular. However, despite this, do they organize themselves in a configuration that can be documented and quantified? Wavelets, mathematical functions representing wave-like oscillations, are commonly used in digital signals analysis. Wavelet-based multifractal analysis involves incrementally scanning a wavelet across the dataset multiple times (varying its scale) and recording its degree of fit to the signal at each interval. This approach (the wavelet transform modulus maxima method) highlights patterns of self-similarity present in the dataset and addresses the range of scales over which these patterns replicate themselves (expressed by their range in 'fractal dimension'). Focusing on seven gold ore bodies in the Archaean Yilgarn craton of Western Australia, this study investigates whether different aspects of hydrothermal gold systems evolve to organize themselves spatially as multifractals. Four ore bodies were selected from the Sunrise Dam deposit (situated in the Laverton tectonic zone of the Kurnalpi terrane) in addition to the Imperial, Majestic and Salt Creek gold prospects, situated in the Yindarlgooda dome of the Mount Monger goldfield (approximately 40km due east of Kalgoorlie). The Vogue, GQ, Cosmo East and Astro ore bodies at Sunrise Dam were chosen because they exhibit different structural geometries and relationships between gold and associated host-rock alteration styles. Wavelet-based analysis was conducted on 0.5m and 1m

  16. No coincidence? Exploring the connection between the Great Oxidation Event and craton stabilization during the Archean-Proterozoic transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kump, L. R.

    2014-12-01

    As geochronological constraints on the timing of the Great Oxidation Event (here defined as the passage of atmospheric oxygen levels through the proposed upper limit of 10-5 of present) have improved, it has become increasingly clear that this event is somehow tied to the tectonic factors that have defined the Archean-Proterozoic boundary for decades, namely the stabilization of continental cratons allowing for the growth of large continents. We have proposed two connections in the past: 1) elevated late Archean mantle plume activity brought oxidized material from the lithospheric graveyard to the upper mantle, reducing the oxygen fugacity of post-Archean volcanism, and 2) that the stabilization of the cratons allowed for a proportional increase in less-reducing, subaerial volcanism at the expense of more reducing, submarine volcanism. Critiques of these two proposals will be addressed in the context of subsequent work by the geosciences community on the geodynamics and geochemistry of the Archean-Proterozoic transition, and a synthetic hypothesis for a tectonic driver for atmospheric oxygenation will be presented.

  17. Paleoproterozoic high-pressure metamorphism in the northern North China Craton and implications for the Nuna supercontinent

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Bo; Windley, Brian F.; Xiao, Wenjiao; Feng, Jianyun; Zhang, Ji'en

    2015-01-01

    The connection between the North China Craton (NCC) and contiguous cratons is important for the configuration of the Nuna supercontinent. Here we document a new Paleoproterozoic high-pressure (HP) complex dominated by garnet websterite on the northern margin of the NCC. The peak metamorphism of the garnet websterite was after ∼1.90 Ga when it was subducted to eclogite facies at ∼2.4 GPa, then exhumed back to granulite facies at ∼0.9 GPa before ∼1.82 Ga. The rock associations with their structural relationships and geochemical affinities are comparable to those of supra-subduction zone ophiolites, and supported by subduction-related signatures of gabbros and basalts. We propose that a ∼1.90 Ga oceanic fragment was subducted and exhumed into an accretionary complex along the northern margin of the NCC. Presence of the coeval Sharyzhalgai complex with comparable HP garnet websterites in the southern Siberian active margin favours juxtaposition against the NCC in the Paleoproterozoic. PMID:26388458

  18. Paleoproterozoic high-pressure metamorphism in the northern North China Craton and implications for the Nuna supercontinent.

    PubMed

    Wan, Bo; Windley, Brian F; Xiao, Wenjiao; Feng, Jianyun; Zhang, Ji'en

    2015-09-21

    The connection between the North China Craton (NCC) and contiguous cratons is important for the configuration of the Nuna supercontinent. Here we document a new Paleoproterozoic high-pressure (HP) complex dominated by garnet websterite on the northern margin of the NCC. The peak metamorphism of the garnet websterite was after ∼1.90 Ga when it was subducted to eclogite facies at ∼2.4 GPa, then exhumed back to granulite facies at ∼0.9 GPa before ∼1.82 Ga. The rock associations with their structural relationships and geochemical affinities are comparable to those of supra-subduction zone ophiolites, and supported by subduction-related signatures of gabbros and basalts. We propose that a ∼1.90 Ga oceanic fragment was subducted and exhumed into an accretionary complex along the northern margin of the NCC. Presence of the coeval Sharyzhalgai complex with comparable HP garnet websterites in the southern Siberian active margin favours juxtaposition against the NCC in the Paleoproterozoic.

  19. Antiquity of the Rı´o de la Plata craton in Tandilia, southern Buenos Aires province, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankhurst, R. J.; Ramos, A.; Linares, E.

    2003-05-01

    Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd whole-rock data for granitoids and orthogneisses from the western part of the Sierras Septentrionales of the southern Buenos Aires province yield an errorchron of 2009±71 Ma (initial 87Sr/ 86Sr=0.7041, MSWD=69) and an isochron of 2140±88 Ma (initial 143Nd/ 144Nd=0.50977), respectively. As in previous investigations, the Rb-Sr data are clearly disturbed, but the Sm-Nd isochron may record the age of emplacement of igneous precursors. These results reaffirm that this region is the southern extension of the crystalline basement of the Rı´o de la Plata craton. The Sm-Nd age, though not very precise, is slightly older than previously demonstrated but consistent with most recent U-Pb studies of the craton exposed in Uruguay and Brazil. Crust-derived Sm-Nd model ages averaging 2620±80 Ma indicate that, though the principal rock-forming events were Paleoproterozoic, a Late Archaean prehistory is possible. However, the data place strict constraints on the nature and intensity of post-2000 Ma activity in this area, which seems to be confined to tholeiitic dyke emplacement and hydrothermal reactivation.

  20. Deciphering relative timing of fabric development in granitoids with similar absolute ages based on AMS study (Dharwar Craton, South India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Sandeep; Rana, Virendra; Mamtani, Manish A.

    2017-01-01

    Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) data are presented from the Koppal Granitoid (Dharwar Craton, South India) that has U-Pb zircon age of 2528 ± 9 Ma. The magnetic fabric is oriented in NNE-SSW direction. This is parallel to the planar structures that developed during regional D3 deformation, but oblique to the NNW-SSE oriented magnetic foliation as well as field foliation (D1/D2 deformation) recorded in the country rock Peninsular Gneiss. Variation in the intensity of fabric within the granitoid is mapped. It is inferred that the emplacement of Koppal Granitoid took place by ballooning and fabric development within the pluton was syntectonic with regional D3. These results are compared with the time-relationship between emplacement/fabric development and regional deformation reported from the Mulgund Granite (2555 ± 6 Ma; U-Pb zircon), which is also located in the Dharwar Craton and is equivalent to the Koppal Granitoid in age. This granite is known to have emplaced syntectonically with regional D1/D2 deformation, and is thus not related to the same deformation event as the Koppal Granitoid, despite their similar absolute ages. It is argued that in the study area, D3 is ≤2537 Ma, while D1/D2 is ≥2549 Ma in age. Thus, this study highlights the use of AMS in (a) deciphering the relative timing of regional deformation and emplacement of granitoids of equivalent age and (b) constraining the timing of regional superposed deformation events.

  1. OH Fluorescence and Prompt Emission in comet 103P/Hartley 2 observed by EPOXI mission and expected results for comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko observed by Rosetta/OSIRIS WAC camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Forgia, F.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Lazzarin, M.; Magrin, S.; Bodewits, D.; Bertini, I.; Pajola, M.; Barbier, C.; Sierks, H.

    2014-04-01

    possibility that this OH structure could be partially associated with OH PE has been performed. This is strongly supported by the agreement of the OH spatial distribution with the water spatial distribution derived from HRI IR spectrometer observations (A'Hearn et al. 2011). Given the results on comet Hartley 2, we present our expectations and preliminary analysis of OH fluorescence and prompt emission mechanisms in the coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, target of the Rosetta mission. The OSIRIS WAC camera on board Rosetta is equipped with 7 narrowband filters centered on molecular emission bands, including the OH gas filter. This will enable us to investigate OH fluorescence and PE at increasing resolution as Rosetta will approach the comet. This analysis, supported by accompanying observations acquired by OSIRIS WAC camera in the forbidden OI band at 630 nm, will help in further constrain the water photochemistry and the fluorescence and PE processes occurring in the cometary comae.

  2. Recoupling the Nd-Hf isotope record of the early Earth? Evidence from the Pilbara craton, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, T.; Vervoort, J. D.; Smithies, H.; Hickman, A.; Van Kranendonk, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    Geochemical evidence has long been used to argue for mass exchange between the earliest terrestrial crust and mantle, yet the apparently decoupled Nd-Hf isotope record preserved by the oldest rocks implicates differentiation processes unlike those associated with modern plate tectonics. This debate has, however, been staged in areas of great geological complexity, where the veracity of whole rock radiogenic isotope data is questionable, or involved inferences from ancient detrital zircons whose provenance is enigmatic. Here, we report the Nd and Hf isotope compositions of samples from the Paleoarchaean to Neoarchaean Pilbara craton, a superbly preserved, archetypal granite-greenstone belt in Western Australia. We have analyzed Nd-Hf isotopes in mafic rocks and Hf isotopes in zircons of interleaved felsic units to monitor the effects of whole-rock isotope disturbance and to track the evolution of crust and mantle reservoirs. Mafic samples range from ~3.52 Ga komatiites and basalts of the Warrawoona Group, whose eruption is attributed to mantle plume activity, through to younger (3.12-2.95 Ga) basalts, calc-alkaline basalts and boninites similar to those of intra-oceanic volcanic arcs. Felsic rocks (3.48-2.85 Ga) include dacite and rhyolite units from the greenstone belts and their coeval plutonic counterparts in the granitic complexes. Additionally, the Hf isotope composition of the oldest (3.65-3.73 Ga) detrital zircons from intra-cratonic basins were measured to explore the pre-3.5 Ga history of the craton and to test whether this developed on an older, but unexposed, continental substrate. Results are summarized as follows. Collectively, the Pilbara samples exhibit greater variability in initial 143Nd/144Nd than in 176Hf/177Hf, as has been observed in other ancient Archaean terranes (J. Vervoort et al. Nature 379,1996). Epsilon Hf values of the mafic samples increase from +1.1 at 3.53 Ga to +3.0 at 3.2 Ga, before falling sharply to -3.3 by 2.95 Ga. Epsilon Nd

  3. Elder Abuse among African Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tauriac, Jesse J.; Scruggs, Natoschia

    2006-01-01

    Perceptions of extreme, moderate, and mild forms of elder abuse among African-American women (n=25) and men (n=10) were examined. African-American respondents emphasized physical abuse when giving examples of extremely abusive behavior. Along with physical abuse, verbal abuse was the most frequently identified form of abuse, and was significantly…

  4. African ethics and voluntary euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Omonzejele, P F

    2004-01-01

    This paper outlines the relationship between euthanasia and its ethical norms and practices in a part of West Africa. The various sub-types of euthanasia are described in detail, parallel with the role of African ethical theories in determining their relevance. The author discusses the implications of this approach relative to the social and economic state of African communities.

  5. African American Administrators and Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Dianne; Taylor, Janice D.; Burrell, Charlotte; Stewart, Gregory

    2006-01-01

    This article explores the issues of African American participation in the administrative ranks of the academy. The authors find that African Americans tend to hold positions that are marginal in academic organizations, lacking power and influence, and that not much has changed over recent decades. Forces influencing this condition are explored,…

  6. African-Americans and Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigmon, Scott B.

    To better serve people in a counseling relationship, it is useful to understand them not only culturally, but demographically as well. This paper traces historical, religious, demographic aspects and treatment of alcohol abuse in African Americans. Historically, alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence have varied for African Americans. During the…

  7. Africanization in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, M. Alice; Rubink, William L.; Patton, John C.; Coulson, Robert N.; Johnston, J. Spencer

    2005-01-01

    The expansion of Africanized honeybees from South America to the southwestern United States in <50 years is considered one of the most spectacular biological invasions yet documented. In the American tropics, it has been shown that during their expansion Africanized honeybees have low levels of introgressed alleles from resident European populations. In the United States, it has been speculated, but not shown, that Africanized honeybees would hybridize extensively with European honeybees. Here we report a continuous 11-year study investigating temporal changes in the genetic structure of a feral population from the southern United States undergoing Africanization. Our microsatellite data showed that (1) the process of Africanization involved both maternal and paternal bidirectional gene flow between European and Africanized honeybees and (2) the panmitic European population was replaced by panmitic mixtures of A. m. scutellata and European genes within 5 years after Africanization. The post-Africanization gene pool (1998–2001) was composed of a diverse array of recombinant classes with a substantial European genetic contribution (mean 25–37%). Therefore, the resulting feral honeybee population of south Texas was best viewed as a hybrid swarm. PMID:15937139

  8. Cancer statistics for African Americans.

    PubMed

    Ghafoor, Asma; Jemal, Ahmedin; Cokkinides, Vilma; Cardinez, Cheryll; Murray, Taylor; Samuels, Alicia; Thun, Michael J

    2002-01-01

    The American Cancer Society provides estimates on the number of new cancer cases and deaths, and compiles health statistics on African Americans in a biennial publication, Cancer Facts and Figures for African Americans. The compiled statistics include cancer incidence, mortality, survival, and lifestyle behaviors using the most recent data on incidence and survival from the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program, mortality data from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), and behavioral information from the Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS), and National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). It is estimated that 132,700 new cases of cancer and 63,100 deaths will occur among African Americans in the year 2003. Although African Americans have experienced higher incidence and mortality rates of cancer than whites for many years, incidence rates have declined by 2.7 percent per year in African-American males since 1992, while stabilizing in African-American females. During the same period, death rates declined by 2.1 percent and 0.4 percent per year among African-American males and females, respectively. The decrease in both incidence and death rates from cancer among African-American males was the largest of any racial or ethnic group. Nonetheless, African Americans still carry the highest cancer burden among US racial and ethnic groups. Most cancers detectable by screening are diagnosed at a later stage and survival rates are lower within each stage of disease in African Americans than in whites. The extent to which these disparities reflect unequal access to health care versus other factors is an active area of research.

  9. East African ROAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekle, Kelali

    2016-10-01

    In the developing world astronomy had been treated as the science of elites. As a result of this overwhelming perception, astronomy compared with other applied sciences has got less attention and its role in development has been insignificant. However, the IAU General Assembly decision in 2009 opened new opportunity for countries and professionals to deeply look into Astronomy and its role in development. Then, the subsequent establishment of regional offices in the developing world is helping countries to integrate astronomy with other earth and space based sciences so as to progressively promote its scientific and development importance. Gradually nations have come to know that space is the frontier of tomorrow and the urgency of preeminence on space frontier starts at primary school and ascends to tertiary education. For this to happen, member nations in east African region have placed STEM education at the center of their education system. For instance, Ethiopian has changed University enrollment strategy to be in favor of science and engineering subjects, i.e. every year seventy percent of new University entrants join science and engineering fields while thirty percent social science and humanities. Such bold actions truly promote astronomy to be conceived as gateway to science and technology. To promote the concept of astronomy for development the East African regional office has actually aligned it activities to be in line with the focus areas identified by the IAU strategy (2010 to 2020).

  10. African oil plays

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, A.J. )

    1989-09-01

    The vast continent of Africa hosts over eight sedimentary basins, covering approximately half its total area. Of these basins, only 82% have entered a mature exploration phase, 9% have had little or no exploration at all. Since oil was first discovered in Africa during the mid-1950s, old play concepts continue to bear fruit, for example in Egypt and Nigeria, while new play concepts promise to become more important, such as in Algeria, Angola, Chad, Egypt, Gabon, and Sudan. The most exciting developments of recent years in African oil exploration are: (1) the Gamba/Dentale play, onshore Gabon; (2) the Pinda play, offshore Angola; (3) the Lucula/Toca play, offshore Cabinda; (4) the Metlaoui play, offshore Libya/Tunisia; (5) the mid-Cretaceous sand play, Chad/Sudan; and (6) the TAG-I/F6 play, onshore Algeria. Examples of these plays are illustrated along with some of the more traditional oil plays. Where are the future oil plays likely to develop No doubt, the Saharan basins of Algeria and Libya will feature strongly, also the presalt of Equatorial West Africa, the Central African Rift System and, more speculatively, offshore Ethiopia and Namibia, and onshore Madagascar, Mozambique, and Tanzania.

  11. Bioenergy and African transformation.

    PubMed

    Lynd, Lee R; Sow, Mariam; Chimphango, Annie Fa; Cortez, Luis Ab; Brito Cruz, Carlos H; Elmissiry, Mosad; Laser, Mark; Mayaki, Ibrahim A; Moraes, Marcia Afd; Nogueira, Luiz Ah; Wolfaardt, Gideon M; Woods, Jeremy; van Zyl, Willem H

    2015-01-01

    Among the world's continents, Africa has the highest incidence of food insecurity and poverty and the highest rates of population growth. Yet Africa also has the most arable land, the lowest crop yields, and by far the most plentiful land resources relative to energy demand. It is thus of interest to examine the potential of expanded modern bioenergy production in Africa. Here we consider bioenergy as an enabler for development, and provide an overview of modern bioenergy technologies with a comment on application in an Africa context. Experience with bioenergy in Africa offers evidence of social benefits and also some important lessons. In Brazil, social development, agricultural development and food security, and bioenergy development have been synergistic rather than antagonistic. Realizing similar success in African countries will require clear vision, good governance, and adaptation of technologies, knowledge, and business models to myriad local circumstances. Strategies for integrated production of food crops, livestock, and bioenergy are potentially attractive and offer an alternative to an agricultural model featuring specialized land use. If done thoughtfully, there is considerable evidence that food security and economic development in Africa can be addressed more effectively with modern bioenergy than without it. Modern bioenergy can be an agent of African transformation, with potential social benefits accruing to multiple sectors and extending well beyond energy supply per se. Potential negative impacts also cut across sectors. Thus, institutionally inclusive multi-sector legislative structures will be more effective at maximizing the social benefits of bioenergy compared to institutionally exclusive, single-sector structures.

  12. Chapter 27: Geology and petroleum potential of the north and east margins of the Siberian Craton, north of the Arctic Circle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klett, T.R.; Wandrey, C.J.; Pitman, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    The Siberian Craton consists of crystalline rocks and superimposed Precambrian sedimentary rocks deposited in rift basins. Palaeozoic rocks, mainly carbonates, were deposited along the margins of the craton to form an outwardly younger concentric pattern that underlies an outward-thickening Mesozoic sedimentary section. The north and east margins of the Siberian Craton subsequently became foreland basins created by compressional deformation during collision with other tectonic plates. The Tunguska Basin developed as a Palaeozoic rift/sag basin over Proterozoic rifts. The geological provinces along the north and east margins of the Siberian Craton are immature with respect to exploration, so exploration-history analysis alone cannot be used for assessing undiscovered petroleum resources. Therefore, other areas from around the world having greater petroleum exploration maturity and similar geological characteristics, and which have been previously assessed, were used as analogues to aid in this assessment. The analogues included those of foreland basins and rift/sag basins that were later subjected to compression. The US Geological Survey estimated the mean undiscovered, technically recoverable conventional petroleum resources to be approximately 28 billion barrels of oil equivalent, including approximately 8 billion barrels of crude oil, 103 trillion cubic feet of natural gas and 3 billion barrels of natural gas liquids. ?? 2011 The Geological Society of London.

  13. Proterozoic evolution of the western margin of the Wyoming craton: Implications for the tectonic and magmatic evolution of the northern Rocky Mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, D.A.; Mueller, P.A.; Mogk, D.W.; Wooden, J.L.; Vogl, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    Defining the extent and age of basement provinces west of the exposed western margin of the Archean Wyoming craton has been elusive because of thick sedimentary cover and voluminous Cretaceous-Tertiary magmatism. U-Pb zircon geochronological data from small exposures of pre-Belt supergroup basement along the western side of the Wyoming craton, in southwestern Montana, reveal crystallization ages ranging from ???2.4 to ???1.8 Ga. Rock-forming events in the area as young as ???1.6 Ga are also indicated by isotopic (Nd, Pb, Sr) signatures and xenocrystic zircon populations in Cretaceous-Eocene granitoids. Most of this lithosphere is primitive, gives ages ???1.7-1.86 Ga, and occurs in a zone that extends west to the Neoproterozoic rifted margin of Laurentia. These data suggest that the basement west of the exposed Archean Wyoming craton contains accreted juvenile Paleoproterozoic arc-like terranes, along with a possible mafic underplate of similar age. This area is largely under the Mesoproterozoic Belt basin and intruded by the Idaho batholith. We refer to this Paleoproterozoic crust herein as the Selway terrane. The Selway terrane has been more easily reactivated and much more fertile for magma production and mineralization than the thick lithosphere of the Wyoming craton, and is of prime importance for evaluating Neoproterozoic continental reconstructions. ?? 2006 NRC Canada.

  14. Structural setting of gold deposits in the Oudalan-Gorouol volcano-sedimentary belt east of the Markoye Shear Zone, West African Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tshibubudze, Asinne; Hein, Kim A. A.

    2013-04-01

    The Oudalan-Gorouol volcano-sedimentary belt (OGB) of Burkina Faso and Niger hosts meta-volcanic and metasedimentary sequences of the Birimian Supergroup that were folded and deformed during emplacement of the Dori Batholith (D1-x), the Tangaean Event (D1) and the Eburnean Orogeny (D2). The emplacement of the Dori Batholith accompanied aureole deformation (D1-x) and the development of proto-mylonite, migmatite, gneiss and schist on the northern margin of the batholith. Contact metamorphic grade reached granulite facies with partial melting of the supracrustal sequences. Emplacement of the Dori Batholith was succeeded by emplacement of monzonite dykes and sills through the OGB. The Tangaean Event (D1) accompanied formation of (a) the Saoga Branch of the Markoye Shear Zone (MSZ), (b) the Mukosi and Billiata mylonite zones that are hosted in the MSZ, (c) the Afu Branch of the Kargouna Shear Zone Complex (KSZC), and (d) northwest-trending thrust-folds (F1) that crosscut the OGB and coalesce with the MSZ. Metamorphic grade attained amphibolite facies in mylonite or proto-mylonite zones in the Saoga and Afu branches. D1 was succeeded by emplacement of alkali-granite plutons of the Dolbel Batholith. The Eburnean Orogeny, D2, accompanied formation of (a) the Korizéna Branch of the MSZ, (b) the Waho Branch of the KSZC, and (c) northeast-trending shear-faults that crosscut the OGB. D2 is manifested by refolding of F1 by northeast-trending F2, and development of a pervasive northeast-trending S2 to S2-C. Metamorphic grade attained greenschist facies during D2 with development of the mineral assemblage quartz-chlorite-muscovite ± actinolite. D2 was succeeded by emplacement of northwest-trending gabbro and dolerite dykes. The OGB hosts structurally-controlled gold deposits that are sited along five metallogenic corridors and include the Essakane, Tin-Fal, Bom Kodjelé, Kossa and Tassiri Trends. Gold mineralisation is preferentially located where northeast-trending faults and shears crosscut northwest-trending thrust-folds, or where northwest-trending thrust-folds coalesce with north-northeast trending shears. An intimate relationship thus exists between D1 and D2 structures and gold mineralisation in the OGB. Gold in sheeted-stockwork veins is hosted in competent rocks units including conglomerate beds, greywacke, quartzite, monzonite dykes, pyroxenite-gabbro sills and D1 buck quartz veins. Gold in fine veinlets may also be hosted in massive shale units.

  15. Timing the structural events in the Palaeoproterozoic Bolé-Nangodi belt terrane and adjacent Maluwe basin, West African craton, in central-west Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kock, G. S.; Théveniaut, H.; Botha, P. M. W.; Gyapong, W.

    2012-04-01

    The Maluwe basin, north-adjacent to the Sunyani basin, is the northernmost of the northeast-trending Eburnean volcaniclastic depositories in Ghana. These basins are separated from one another by remnants of Eoeburnean crust, all formed during the evolution of an arc-backarc basins complex in a Palaeoproterozoic intraoceanic environment. The Bolé-Nangodi belt terrane to the northwest, of mostly Eoeburnean crust is fault bounded with the Maluwe basin along the northeast-trending Bolé-Navrongo fault zone. The stratigraphic sequence, which was the key to unravelling the structural evolution of the study area, was established by means of field observations aided by precision SHRIMP geochronology. The quartzitic, pelitic, quartzofeldspathic and granitic gneisses of the Eoeburnean crust (>2150 Ma) experienced complex metamorphic mineral growth and migmatitization, mostly under static crustal conditions and were subjected to several deformation episodes. The foliated mafic and metasedimentary enclaves within the Ifanteyire granite establish deformation to have taken place prior to ˜2195 Ma, while the tectonically emplaced Kuri amphibolites within the 2187-Ma gneissic Gondo granite indicate a stage of rifting followed by collision. Deformation of granite dykes in the Gondo granites at ˜2150 Ma concluded the development of the Eoeburnean orogenic cycle (DEE). The Sawla Suite, contemporaneous with the deposition of the Maluwe Group, intruded the tectonic exhumed Bolé-Nangodi terrane during extension between ˜2137 and 2125 Ma. The rifting separated the Abulembire fragment from the Bolé-Nangodi terrane. During subsequent northwestward subduction of young back-arc basin oceanic crust the volcaniclastic strata of the Maluwe Group and Sawla granitoids were deformed (DE1) under chlorite/sericite greenschist-grade conditions. The NE-trending folds had subhorizontal axes and subvertical axial planes. Simultaneous to the DE1 orogenesis the molasses of the Banda Group was deposited concordantly on the submerged Sunyani strata after a hiatus of 20 million years. After cessation of the NW-SE-directed compression the early Tanina Suite intruded as batholiths, dykes and sheets and produced garnet, staurolite, sillimanite and kyanite in their thermal aureoles. Docking of the Sunyani basin produced the DE2 thrust related folding and stacking in the deformed and granitoid invaded Maluwe basin as well as the single stage sin- and anticlinoria in the Sunyani and Banda Groups. In the Maluwe basin the Abulembire fragment acted as a resistor and the approaching front rotated anticlockwise and clockwise around the barrier to form west- and north-directed piggy-back thrust-stacking and deformation of the Tanina Suite granitoids. Due to the low metamorphic conditions the DE2 fabric is limited to crenulation cleavages in the more psammitic and pelitic units. The fold axes are double plunging (N-S and E-W) up to 60° with the axial planar fabric subvertical. Post-D2 tectonic relaxation has allowed the emplacement of the last Tanina Suite calc-alkaline melts and was succeeded by N-S extension fracturing (DE3) along which mantle derived Wakawaka gabbroids and syenite intruded. The DE1 folding occurred between 2125 and 2122 Ma and DE2 before 2119 Ma. The tectonic relaxation occurred at 2118 Ma. Around 2100 Ma, NE-SW directed strike-slip shearing (DE4), fractured the Bolé-Nangodi terrane and enhanced the basin-belt boundary. Along the boundary, the displacement was dextral along vertical faults but, southward, it became more east-over-west thrust related. Associated tension gashes are filled with vein quartz and pegmatite and typical of the brittle sector of the crust. Tectonism in this part of the intraoceanic accretionary arc back-arc complex was concluded by limited, right-lateral strike-slip (DE5) movement which formed some breccias.

  16. An integrated petrological, geochemical and Re-Os isotope study of peridotite xenoliths from the Argyle lamproite, Western Australia and implications for cratonic diamond occurrences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luguet, A.; Jaques, A. L.; Pearson, D. G.; Smith, C. B.; Bulanova, G. P.; Roffey, S. L.; Rayner, M. J.; Lorand, J.-P.

    2009-11-01

    An integrated study of the petrology and Re-Os geochemistry of a suite of peridotite xenoliths, some carrying abundant diamonds, from the richly diamondiferous Argyle AK1 lamproite pipe provides definitive evidence for a depleted lithospheric root of Neoarchean age (T RD eruption ˜ 2.2-3.1 Ga) beneath the Proterozoic Halls Creek Orogen at the margin of the Kimberley Craton, Western Australia. The microdiamonds from the peridotitic xenoliths are similar in their properties to the minor population of small, commercial sized, peridotitic diamonds from Argyle, both formed in the Archean from isotopically mantle-like carbon. The major element bulk chemistry and mineral chemistry of the Argyle peridotites are slightly less depleted than Archean cratonic peridotites as a whole but similar to those reported from Neoarchean-Paleoproterozoic cratonic provinces. The Argyle peridotite xenoliths were derived from within the diamond stability field (1050-1300 °C and 4.9-5.9 GPa) near the base of the lithosphere (typically 160-200 km depth) with a geothermal gradient of 41.5 mW/m 2. This thick diamondiferous lithosphere, estimated at up to 225 km thick from present day seismic S-wave tomography, appears to have persisted since the time of eruption of the Argyle lamproite (˜ 1180 Ma). The existence of late Archean age lithosphere beneath the Argyle diamond pipe, in a region where no crustal rocks of Archean age are known, suggests a decoupling of the crust and mantle in the region of the Halls Creek Orogen, perhaps as a consequence of Paleoproterozoic (˜ 1.85 Ga) reworking and/or subduction at the margin of the Kimberley Craton. The confirmation of an Archean lithospheric root beneath the Argyle pipe at the margin of the Kimberley Craton seemingly conforms with "Clifford's Rule", regarding the restriction of economic diamond deposits to those underlain by Archean cratons. However, Argyle owes its rich diamond grades not to its Neoarchean mantle roots but to the presence of

  17. Zircon from Mesoproterozoic sediments sheds light on the subduction-collision history at the eastern active continental margin of the Archaean Kalahari-Grunehogna Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschall, H.; Hawkesworth, C. J.; Leat, P. T.; Dhuime, B.; Storey, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Grunehogna Craton (East Antarctica) was a part of the Archean Kalahari Craton of southern Africa prior to Gondwana breakup. Granite from the basement of the craton has been dated by U-Pb zircon dating to 3,067 Ma with inherited grains showing ages of up to 3,433 Ma [1]. At the eastern margin of the craton, the Ahlmannryggen nunataks comprise an ~2000 m thick pile of clastic and volcanic sediments of the Ritscherflya Supergroup. These were sourced from eroding a proximal active continental arc as demonstrated through the age distribution and internal zoning of detrital zircon [2]. Detrital zircon grains from the Ritscherflya Supergroup show an age distribution with a dominant age peak at ~1,130 Ma, i.e., close to the sedimentation age. Older age peaks include those at 1370 Ma, 1725 Ma, 1880 Ma, 2050 Ma, and 2700 Ma. Palaeo- and Mesoarchaean zircon grains (2800-3445 Ma) were also discovered, corresponding to the age of the Kalahari-Grunehogna Craton basement. Most significantly we found a number of inherited Archaean cores in ~1130 Ma zircons. They demonstrate that the volcanic arc was indeed located on Archaean continental crust, rather than in Mesoproterozoic, intra-oceanic island arcs. The age spectrum of the zircons bears strong evidence for (i) derivation of the entire Ritscherflya sediment sequence from an active continental convergent margin; (ii) a cratonic provenance of part of the sediments from population peaks coinciding with major tectono-thermal events in the Kalahari Craton; (iii) at least some of the active volcanism being located on cratonic basement rather than a juvenile island arc. Detrital zircons in the ~1130 Ma age group show several distinct populations in their Hf isotopic compositions. The dominant group shows negative ɛHf values of -11.5 corresponding to a model age (TDM) of ~2700 Ma (average crustal 176Lu/177Hf = 0.015). A smaller group shows ɛHf values of +2 to +6, which may represent mantle-derived subduction-zone volcanism at

  18. A Bibliography of African Languages and Linguistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, John D., Comp.; Goff, Harry, Comp.

    The present bibliography of African languages and linguistics includes not only works relating to the "Negro-African" languages, but also those dealing with the African varieties of Arabic, the Hamitic languages, Malagasy, Afrikaans, and various Creoles. (The greater part of the entries relate to the indigenous languages of the African continent…

  19. Aeromagnetic signatures reveal a back-arc basin imposed upon the inherited rifted margin of the East Antarctic craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armadillo, E.; Ferraccioli, F.; Jordan, T. A.; Bozzo, E.

    2009-12-01

    The Wilkes Subglacial Basin (WSB) represents a largely unexplored, approximately 1400 km-long and up to 600 km-wide subglacial depression, buried beneath the over 3 km-thick East Antarctic Ice Sheet. During the 2005-06 austral summer an extensive aerogeophysical survey was flown to investigate the WSB adjacent to northern Victoria Land (NVL), and included the acquisition of new airborne radar, aeromagnetic and aerogravity data. Several contrasting models for the origin of the basin have been previously proposed, and are based primarily on relatively sparse gravity data. These range from Cenozoic flexure, to distributed crustal extension of unknown age (possibly Mesozoic to Cenozoic), and even compression along the margin of craton. Our recent aeromagnetic data reveal that the basin is structurally controlled and has a tectonic origin, at least adjacent to NVL. The eastern margin of the basin is imposed upon an Early Paleozoic thrust fault belt, which can be traced under the ice using aeromagnetic signatures from exposures in Oates Land and the Ross Sea coast. Aeromagnetic patterns reveal that the western margin of the basin is imposed upon a Proterozoic-age shear zone mapped in the Mertz Glacier, and that is interpreted from geological studies to represent the continuation of a coeval shear zone in Australia. The broad aeromagnetic and satellite magnetic low over the WSB contrasts with the high over the un-reworked Proterozoic craton to the west of the basin, and is interpreted to reflect Neoproterozoic-age sediments deposited along the rifted margin of the craton. Magnetic intrusions within the WSB are interpreted as back-arc plutons that formed later in response to Cambrian-Ordovician age subduction along the paleo-Pacific margin of Gondwana. The aeromagnetic interpretation for a former broad back-arc basin in the WSB is supported by the occurrence of low-grade metasedimentary rocks of back-arc affinity in Oates Land, and also by the similarity in long

  20. The Presence of a Stable Block bounded by Active Zones (Mobile Belts) in the southwestern North American Proterozoic craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodell, P.; Martinez P, C.; Mahar, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Bouguer gravity data, initial Sr isotope values, zircon U-Pb, and multiple occurrences of felsic Proterozoic rocks, have revealed an elevated, less deformed, felsic cratonic block in the northern Mexico. The block is situated in western Chihuahua and is bounded by active zones or mobile belts on three sides, and is here referred to as the Western Chihuahua Cratonic Block (WCCB). Bouguer gravity data clearly indicate a region of a highly negative anomaly (< -200 mgal) in contrast to adjoining areas. The region is large and the anomaly is relatively smooth over broad areas; the WCCB appears as a smaller version of the Colorado Plateau. The block is characterized by high initial Sr isotope ratios (<0.706). Several occurrences of Proterozoic rocks are located within or next to the WCCB, and they reveal the character of the Bouguer anomaly. On the east, at Los Filtros, Proterozoic rocks crop out in a basement cored uplift interpreted to having been derived from the WCCB during the Ouachita orogeny. At Sierra La Mojina boulders of 1.1 Ga granites are found in Permian conglomerates. And at Basasiachic, xenoliths of 1.1 Ga granites are present in ash flow tuffs. Establishment of the Precambrian character of the WCCB is of importance, and these multiple occurrences are evidence. Prior studies of the Sierra Madre Occidental suggest that the region was uplifted because of a vast Cenozoic batholith presumed to lie under the SLIP (Silicic Large Igneous Province), the Upper Volcanic Series. The present study challenges that conclusion and maintains the SMO is underlain by Proterozoic silicic crust. The geology of age dated samples supports this. The WCCB is surrounded on three sides by Active Zones or Mobile Belts, which have been active extensional and translational zones periodically over a long period of time. On the east are the Paleozoic Pedrogosa Basin, Mesozoic Chihuahua Trough and Cenozoic Rio Grande Rift, the first two of which also continue around the northern border

  1. EarthScope in Midcontinent North America: Investigating the Architecture and Tectonic History of Cratonic-Platform Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshak, S.; Larson, T.; Hamburger, M. W.; Pavlis, G. L.; Gilbert, H. J.; Parke, M.

    2010-12-01

    The transportable array of EarthScope will sweep across the Midcontinent of North America during 2011 and 2012. The central portion of this swath, between latitudes 36°N and 38°N, covers a "type example" of cratonic-platform lithosphere, where a veneer of Paleozoic sedimentary strata overlies Precambrian crystalline basement. In anticipating this scientific opportunity, we have compiled a unique suite of geologic, geophysical, subsurface, and topographic data sets for this area. The maps emphasize that, in spite of low topographic relief, the region has large subsurface structural relief. Specifically, its western portion includes a large intracratonic uplift (the Ozark Plateau), whereas its central portion includes a major intracratonic basin (the Illinois Basin). The elevation difference between the Cambrian-Precambrian unconformity at the crest of the Ozark Plateau and the same horizon at the base of the Illinois Basin (< 100 km to the east) is over 7.5 km. The region also includes the northern end of the Mississippi embayment (an anomalous depression), three major Proterozoic lithosphere accretionary boundaries (borders of the Yavapai, Mazatzal, and Grenville belts), one of the world's largest anorogenic igneous provinces (the Eastern Granite-Rhyolite Province), pronounced gravity and magnetic anomalies, and numerous fault-and-fold zones. Many of the zones remain active, both within and outside the notorious New Madrid seismic zone, making the central Midcontinent one of the most seismically active examples of cratonic platform lithosphere anywhere. As part of the USArray deployment in this region, a number of research groups (some of whom met at an EarthScope Workshop held in Urbana) have proposed dense, Flex-Array networks that would densify the sparser Transportable Array network. We propose an experiment that would span the Ozark Dome and the Illinois Basin, the Rough Creek Graben and other fault zones including the Wabash Valley seismic zone. This

  2. Traces of the crustal units and the upper-mantle structure in the southwestern part of the East European Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janutyte, I.; Kozlovskaya, E.; Majdanski, M.; Voss, P. H.; Budraitis, M.; Passeqworking Group

    2014-08-01

    The presented study is a part of the passive seismic experiment PASSEQ 2006-2008, which took place around the Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ) from May 2006 to June 2008. The data set of 4195 manually picked arrivals of teleseismic P waves of 101 earthquakes (EQs) recorded in the seismic stations deployed to the east of the TESZ was inverted using the non-linear teleseismic tomography algorithm TELINV. Two 3-D crustal models were used to estimate the crustal travel time (TT) corrections. As a result, we obtain a model of P-wave velocity variations in the upper mantle beneath the TESZ and the East European Craton (EEC). In the study area beneath the craton, we observe up to 3% higher and beneath the TESZ about 2-3% lower seismic velocities compared to the IASP91 velocity model. We find the seismic lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) beneath the TESZ at a depth of about 180 km, while we observe no seismic LAB beneath the EEC. The inversion results obtained with the real and the synthetic data sets indicate a ramp shape of the LAB in the northern TESZ, where we observe values of seismic velocities close to those of the craton down to about 150 km. The lithosphere thickness in the EEC increases going from the TESZ to the NE from about 180 km beneath Poland to 300 km or more beneath Lithuania. Moreover, in western Lithuania we find an indication of an upper-mantle dome. In our results, the crustal units are not well resolved. There are no clear indications of the features in the upper mantle which could be related to the crustal units in the study area. On the other hand, at a depth of 120-150 km we indicate a trace of a boundary of proposed palaeosubduction zone between the East Lithuanian Domain (EL) and the West Lithuanian Granulite Domain (WLG). Also, in our results, we may have identified two anorogenic granitoid plutons.

  3. Geochemical Evolution of Cratonic Lithospheric Mantle: A 3.6 Ga Story of Persistence and Transformation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, S. Y.; Griffin, W. L.; Pearson, N. J.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last decade, our view of the Earth has changed dramatically with the rapid development of planetary- and lithosphere-scale seismic tomography at increasingly higher resolution, and other global datasets such as gravity, magnetic and magnetotellurics. We now have access to geochemical (including isotopic) data for a large proportion of the elements in the periodic table, at very low levels in bulk rocks and in tiny volumes of tiny volumes. These advances, along with imaging of microstructures, enormous databanks for tectonic syntheses, and robust geodynamic modelling, have generated new concepts in understanding lithosphere evolution, structure and processes. The 4-D Lithosphere Mapping methodology introduced the integration of geophysical and geochemical datasets to construct geologically realistic sections of rock types and major boundaries in the deep lithosphere, in different timeslices. Correlation of petrological and geophysical data allows broader extrapolation of Lithosphere Mapping beyond xenolith sampling sites. The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) is a first-order Earth discontinuity: it may shallow due to extension and metasomatism, or deepen due to vertical accretion. Its (paleo-)location can be traced geochemically (a proxy for paleogeophysics), and cratonic LAB is commonly marked by significant concentrations of eclogites. Convergent geochronology datasets of Hf isotopic model ages for zircons and Re-Os model ages for mantle sulfides and PGMs, reinforced by other geochemical and tectonic criteria, indicate that over 70% of the SCLM and its overlying crust (now mostly lower crust) formed at about 3.5 Ga, probably in a series of global overturn events that marked a change in Earth's fundamental geodynamic behaviour. This primitive SCLM, the roots of the Archean cratons up to 300km deep, was geochemically highly depleted, and subsequently played a major role in crustal metallogeny for many ore types. Firstly, the high degree of buoyancy

  4. Major influences on the evolution of the 2.67-2.1 Ga Transvaal basin, Kaapvaal craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, P. G.; Altermann, W.; Catuneanu, O.; van der Merwe, R.; Bumby, A. J.

    2001-06-01

    The Transvaal is one of three structural basins of the Transvaal Supergroup preserved on the Kaapvaal craton. The evolution of the Neoarchaean-Palaeoproterozoic Transvaal basin is ascribed predominantly to magmatism, palaeoclimate and eustasy, with plate tectonics playing a sporadic role. The supergroup comprises basal 'protobasinal' rocks, followed by the Black Reef Formation, Chuniespoort Group and uppermost Pretoria Group. Immature siliciclastic and bimodal volcanic rocks of the protobasinal unit reflect a wide zone of rifting related to the c. 2.7 Ga Ventersdorp (Supergroup) mantle plume. Individual protobasinal successions were laid down in separate fault-bounded basins, controlled at least partially by greenstone belt orientations in the Kaapvaal basement. Post-magmatic, post-rifting thermal subsidence accommodated Black Reef fluvial sheet sandstones and the subsequent thick carbonate-BIF epeiric platform succession of the Chuniespoort Group. Subordinate mechanical subsidence accompanied this long-lived thermal relaxation. Intense weathering due to Neoarchaean atmosphere composition greatly reduced clastic sedimentation and the greenhouse palaeoclimate further encouraged carbonate sedimentation. Globally enhanced sea levels, due to enhanced mid-ocean ridge growth consequent upon either global magmatic events or supercontinent break-up, also played a pivotal role in Chuniespoort epeiric basin evolution. Pretoria Group sedimentation is ascribed to two cycles of rifting and subsequent thermal subsidence. The first cycle appears to reflect plate tectonically induced rifting, with an epeiric sea drowning the rift basin despite reduced sea levels due to the first major global glaciation. The second Pretoria cycle is most likely related to a major continental flood basalt event, with thermal subsidence allowing a second and probably larger epeiric sea to advance onto the northern Kaapvaal craton. Evaluation of the inferred relatively minor importance of plate

  5. Boron isotopes reveal multiple metasomatic events in the mantle beneath the eastern North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong-Yan; Zhou, Zhou; Ryan, Jeffrey G.; Wei, Gang-Jian; Xu, Yi-Gang

    2016-12-01

    Linkages inferred between the geochemical heterogeneity of the mantle beneath eastern Eurasia and the stagnant Pacific slab documented geophysically in its mantle transition zone are as yet not clearly characterized. In this paper we report new elemental and isotopic data for boron (B) on a suite of well-characterized Cenozoic basalts (alkali basalts, basanites and nephelinites), with ocean island basalt (OIB)-like trace element signatures from western Shandong of the eastern North China Craton (NCC). Correlations between major elements (e.g., FeOT versus SiO2), trace elements (e.g., CeN/PbN versus BaN/ThN) and radiogenic isotopes (e.g., 206Pb/204Pb versus 87Sr/86Sr) suggest these basalts are derived via the mixing of melts from two mantle components: a fluid mobile element (FME; such as Ba, K, Pb and Sr) enriched component, which is most evident in the alkali basalts, and a FME depleted mantle component that is more evident in the basanites and nephelinites. The alkali basalts in this study have lower B concentrations (1.4-2.2 μg/g) but higher δ11B (-4.9 to -1.4) values than the basanites and nephelinites (B = 2.1-5.0 μg/g; δ11B = -6.9 to -3.9), and all the samples have nearly constant B/Nb ratios between 0.03 and 0.07, similar to the observed range in B/Nb for intraplate lavas. Our high-SiO2 samples have higher δ11B than that of our low SiO2 samples, indicating that the B isotopic differences among our samples do not result from the addition of a continental crustal component in the mantle source, or direct crustal assimilation during the eruption process. The positive B versus Nb correlation suggests the B isotopic compositions of the western Shandong basalts primarily reflect the pre-eruptive compositions of their mantle sources. Correlations among B, Nd and Sr isotope signatures of the western Shandong basalts differ from those among basalts from plume settings (e.g., Azores and Hawaii), and are inconsistent with models suggesting single-step metasomatic

  6. New data for Eclogites and mantle xenocrysts and megacrysts from kimberlites of Dharwar craton , southern India.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashchepkov, Igor; Ravi, Subramanian; Shankar Nayak, Shiva; Kaminsky, , Felix; Naflos, Theodoros; Vladykin, Nikolai

    2013-04-01

    Eclogitic mantle xenoliths from Proterozoic (1100) Kalyandurg kimberlite field (KL-4 pipe) Dharwar craton, India as well as the xenocrysts from pipes Wajrakarur kimberlite field pipes and others were analyzed by EPMA and LAM ICP MS methods. The eclogites (often with kyanite) (Patel et al., 2006) are composed mainly from garnet and Cpx, intergrain material is mainly represented by the carbonates and Ca- silicates. Garnets reveal Hi- CaO content to (10-12%) and Cpx are omphacites very low in FeO (1-3%) high Al2O3 (8-14% ) and Na2O (2-6 %) differing from the studied samples (Patel et al., 2009). The typical grosspidites (with kyanites coesite, K-Cpx and sanidine) have irregular compositions of minerals and fingerprint structures probably related to the crystallization from fluid. The compositions of the Cpx from Wajrakarur and other pipes reveal Hi - Cr2O3 (5%) content often higher then FeO and Na2O (4%). Garnets are in Lherzolite field in CaO - Cr2O3 (to 12%) diagram. Ilmenites with TiO2 variations (58-42%) show two trends of Cr2O3 enrichments accompanied by the general NiO and V2O5 decrease. Trace element s for eclogitic Cpx reveal high La/Ybn ratios, Eu peaks and flattened HREE. Garnet REE are not equilibrated and highly inclined. The TRE spiderdiagrams show depletion in HFSE (Ta>Nb), the most depleted show Y through for most depleted varieties. Garnets reveal U peak but low Sr CPx peaks in both Ba and Sr. The REE patterns Cpx xenocrysts from Wajrakarur are very similar in shape with varying incompatible part. They are showing high La/Ybn by the order of 2 and small humps in Ce-Pr. Spidergrams show small depletion in Zr- Hf and U and all incompatible elements and through in Pb . The REE of ilmenite xenocrysts show two models: high La/Ybn by 2 orders or nearly flattened patterns. Chromites show depletion in La-Pr elements. Ilmenite's TRE spiderrams show peaks in Nb-Ta and Pb and Zr- Hf . PTXFO2 diagrams for SCLM beneath the Wajrakarur and nearby fields show rather

  7. Dynamics of metasomatic transformation of lithospheric mantle rocks under Siberian Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharapov, Victor; Perepechko, Yury; Tomilenko, Anatoly; Chudnenko, Konstantin; Sorokin, Konstantin

    2014-05-01

    Numerical problem for one- and two-velocity hydrodynamics of heat and mass transfer in permeable zones over 'asthenospheric lenses' (with estimates for dynamics of non-isothermal metasomatosis of mantle rocks, using the approximation of flow reactor scheme) was formulated and solved based on the study of inclusion contents in minerals of metamorphic rocks of the lithosphere mantle and earth crust, estimates of thermodynamic conditions of inclusions appearance, and the results of experimental modeling of influence of hot reduced gases on rocks and minerals of xenoliths in mantle rocks under the cratons of Siberian Platform (SP): 1) the supply of fluid flows of any composition from upper mantle magma sources results in formation of zonal metasomatic columns in ultrabasic lithosphere mantle in permeable zones of deep faults; 2) when major element or petrogenetic components are supplied from magma source, depleted ultrabasic rocks of the lithosphere mantle are transformed into substrates which can be regarded as deep analogs of crust rodingites; 3) other fluid compositions cause deep calcinations and noticeable salination of metasomated substrate, or garnetization (eclogitization) of primary ultrabasic matrix develops; 4) above these zones the zone of basification appears; it is changed by the area of pyroxenitization, amphibolization, and biotitization; 5) modeling of thermo and mass exchange for two-velocity hydrodynamic problem showed that hydraulic approximation increases velocities of heat front during convective heating and decreases pressure in fluid along the flow. It was shown that grospydites, regarded earlier as eclogites, in permeable areas of lithosphere mantle, are typical zones draining upper mantle magma sources of metasomatic columns. As a result of the convective melting the polybaric magmatic sources may appear. Thus the formation of the (kimberlites?) melilitites or carbonatites is possible at the base of the lithospheric plates. It is shown that

  8. The Rondonian-San Ignacio Province in the SW Amazonian Craton: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettencourt, Jorge Silva; Leite, Washington Barbosa; Ruiz, Amarildo Salina; Matos, Ramiro; Payolla, Bruno Leonelo; Tosdal, Richard M.

    2010-01-01

    .50 Ga), Santo Antonio Intrusive Suite (1.40-1.36 Ga), and the Teotônio Intrusive Suite (1.38 Ga). Magmatism of these types also occur at the end of the Rondonian-San Ignacio Orogeny, and are represented by the Alto Candeias Intrusive Suite (1.34-1.36 Ga), and the São Lourenço-Caripunas Intrusive Suite (1.31-1.30 Ga). The cratonization of the province occurred between 1.30 and 1.25 Ga.

  9. The influence of Middle Paleozoic Yakutian plume on the geochemical modification of Siberian craton lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovjeva, L.; Goncharov, A.; Kalashnikova, T.

    2012-04-01

    The most promising for diamond potential the Middle Paleozoic kimberlite magmatism on Siberian Craton was due to upwelling of the Yakutian deep plume [Ernst, Buchan, 1997], that resulted to extensive event of the fluid and magma transfer in upper mantle. The plume approached to the base of rigid continental plate produced asthenospheric melts parental to Cr-poor megacrysts and high-temperature deformed peridotites. The melts realized simultaneous magmatic substitution of matter in the upper part of asthenospheric layer and in lower lithosphere [Solovjeva et al., 2008]. The distributions of incompatible trace elements in Grt megacrysts and Grt from high-temperature deformed Grt lherzolites of coarse-porphyroclastic type agree with magmatic trend with maxima of HFSE against REE. Grt from deformed peridotites of fine-porphyroclastic type show the sinusoidal REE curves and minima HFSE against REE. The latter rocks are thought to be lower lithosphere slices trapped by plume. The obtained data fit the model of reworking of asthenosphere and the lowermost lithosphere by the plume melts and agree with the mechanism of percolative fractional melt crystallization [Burgess & Harte, 2004; Harte et al., 1993]. The material of the plume source is belived to be been enriched in majorite and silicate-perovskite in transition zone and lower mantle. Trace elements distribution in garnet and clinopyroxene grains from low-temperature coarse-grained Grt and Sp-Grt peridotites suggests that lithospheric mantle located above the infiltration zone of asthenospheric melts was "washing out" by redox fluids deriving from chambers of asthenospheric liquids [Solovjeva, 2007]. It is verified by sharp depletion of garnet and clinopyroxene in incompatible trace elements from xenoliths with the most low logfO2 calculated by method of Gudmundsson & Wood [1995] (content Fe+3 in garnet). There are pale-green and colorless olivine in rocks with most low contents of incompatible trace elements. On the

  10. Titanite evidence for Triassic thickened lower crust along southeastern margin of North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jing-Liang; Gao, Shan; Wu, Yuan-Bao; Hu, Zhao-Chu; Xu, Wen-Liang; Zong, Ke-Qing; Liu, Yong-Sheng; Yuan, Hong-Lin

    2014-10-01

    Titanite U-Pb isotopic and major and trace element compositions of one mafic garnet granulite from a rare suite of lower crustal xenoliths (e.g., eclogite, garnet pyroxenite, and mafic garnet granulite) hosted in Early Cretaceous dioritic porphyries in the Xu-Huai area along the southeastern margin of the North China Craton (NCC) were analyzed by laser ablation ICP-MS. Titanite occurs as granular grains or coronary rims on rutile. The coronary titanite is clearly a secondary product of rutile decomposition. The granular titanite exhibits zonation in U-Pb age and chemical composition. Petrographic and geochemical evidence suggests that the zonation was formed by thermal diffusion and later fluid-assisted recrystallization. Occurrences of granular titanite between garnet grains point to a pressure of > 10 kbar, while inclusions of rutile inside granular titanite rims imply that the pressure might have reached 15 kbar. Granular titanite cores give U-Pb ages of 237-241 Ma and Zr-temperatures of 794-831 °C at 10 kbar and 850-892 °C at 15 kbar, indicating high-pressure granulite-facies metamorphism. Together with previous P-T estimates of coeval eclogite-facies xenoliths, a geotherm of above 60 mW m- 2 is implied. The geotherm plots below the temperature field of amphibole dehydration melting, consistent with presence of abundant amphibole. This geotherm is similar to that of the Kohistan arc, which has preserved a 12-km-thick dense lower crust, but significantly cooler than the geotherm of the Talkeetna arc, where most of the dense lower crust has been foundered. Our results provide new evidence for Triassic thickened dense lower crust along the southeastern margin of the NCC. By comparison with the Kohistan and Talkeetna arc crusts, we suggest that this dense lower crust was not hot enough to be foundered in the Triassic. Foundering must have occurred in the Jurassic-Cretaceous in order to explain the present-day seismic velocity structure characterized by a sharp

  11. The African Millennium Villages

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Pedro; Palm, Cheryl; Sachs, Jeffrey; Denning, Glenn; Flor, Rafael; Harawa, Rebbie; Jama, Bashir; Kiflemariam, Tsegazeab; Konecky, Bronwen; Kozar, Raffaela; Lelerai, Eliud; Malik, Alia; Modi, Vijay; Mutuo, Patrick; Niang, Amadou; Okoth, Herine; Place, Frank; Sachs, Sonia Ehrlich; Said, Amir; Siriri, David; Teklehaimanot, Awash; Wang, Karen; Wangila, Justine; Zamba, Colleen

    2007-01-01

    We describe the concept, strategy, and initial results of the Millennium Villages Project and implications regarding sustainability and scalability. Our underlying hypothesis is that the interacting crises of agriculture, health, and infrastructure in rural Africa can be overcome through targeted public-sector investments to raise rural productivity and, thereby, to increased private-sector saving and investments. This is carried out by empowering impoverished communities with science-based interventions. Seventy-eight Millennium Villages have been initiated in 12 sites in 10 African countries, each representing a major agroecological zone. In early results, the research villages in Kenya, Ethiopia, and Malawi have reduced malaria prevalence, met caloric requirements, generated crop surpluses, enabled school feeding programs, and provided cash earnings for farm families. PMID:17942701

  12. U-Pb ID-TIMS zircon ages of TTG gneisses of the Aravalli Craton of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Hiredya; Saikia, Ashima; Kaulina, Tatiana; Bayanova, Tamara; Ahmad, Talat

    2015-04-01

    The crystalline basement of the Aravalli Craton is a heterogeneous assemblage dominated by granitic gneisses and granites with sporadic occurrences of amphibolites and dismembered sedimentary enclaves (Upadhyaya et al., 1992). This assemblage is known to have experienced multiple deformation and metamorphic events followed by emplacement of voluminous granites and basaltic dykes. Based on Sm-Nd whole rock data on the basement Mewar orthogneisses of Jhamarkotra region (Gopalan et al., 1990) and Pb/Pb ages of zircon from Gingla Granites which intrudes the basement (Wiedenbeck et al., 1996), it has been inferred that the whole magmatic episode leading to the formation of the basement spanned from 3300 to 2400 Ma and that the Aravalli cratonic block had broadly stabilized by 2500 Ma on which the younger Aravalli and Delhi Supergroup unconformably deposited. However, no comprehensive age data on the basement gneisses from the study area spanning the entire magmatic episode is available. This work attempts to provide a time frame work for evolution of the basement gneisses of the Aravalli Craton. We present here U-Pb zircon ages from the Precambrian basement TTG gneisses of the Aravalli Craton of north western India. Pb and U were measured on multicollector Finnigan-MAT 262 mass spectrometer. The temperatures of measurements were 1300°C for Pb and 1500°C for U. Pb isotope ratios were corrected for mass fractionation with a factor of 0.10% per amu, based on repeat analyses of the standard NBS SRM 982. The U analyses were corrected for mass fractionation with a factor of 0.003% per amu, based on repeat analyses of the NBS U 500 standard. Reproducibility of the U-Pb ratios was determined from the repeated analysis of standard zircon IGFM-87 (Ukraine) and taken as 0.5% for 207Pb/235U and 206Pb/238U ratios, respectively, at 95% confidence level. All calculations were done using the programs PBDAT and ISOPLOT (Ludwig 1991, 2008). Four zircon fractions corresponding to four

  13. Complex evolution of the lower crust beneath the southeastern North China Craton: The Junan xenoliths and xenocrysts: Reply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Huayun; Zheng, Jianping; Griffin, William L.; O‧Reilly, Suzanne Y.; Yu, Chunmei; Pearson, Norman J.; Ping, Xianquan; Xia, Bing; Yang, Huaben

    2015-10-01

    In our paper, we suggested that the Junan granulite xenoliths and xenocrysts record evolution of the Precambrian lower crust beneath the southeastern North China Craton (NCC). Yuan and Xia (2015) disagree with us. However, they have not fully considered the evolutional histories of the NCC lithosphere, and geochemical and isotopic compositions of the Junan xenoliths. We also contend that they have misinterpreted the available geophysical data. Synthesizing the geochronological characteristics of the NCC lower crust, nature of the Junan granulite xenoliths, and reinterpretation of the resistivity profile, we again emphasize that the Junan granulite xenoliths are tectonically affiliated to the NCC lower crust, and the Junan zircon data could reflect the complex evolution of the lower crust beneath the southeastern NCC.

  14. The Archean Dongwanzi ophiolite complex, North China craton: 2.505-billion-year-old oceanic crust and mantle.

    PubMed

    Kusky, T M; Li, J H; Tucker, R D

    2001-05-11

    We report a thick, laterally extensive 2505 +/- 2.2-million-year-old (uranium-lead ratio in zircon) Archean ophiolite complex in the North China craton. Basal harzburgite tectonite is overlain by cumulate ultramafic rocks, a mafic-ultramafic transition zone of interlayered gabbro and ultramafic cumulates, compositionally layered olivine-gabbro and pyroxenite, and isotropic gabbro. A sheeted dike complex is rooted in the gabbro and overlain by a mixed dike-pillow lava section, chert, and banded iron formation. The documentation of a complete Archean ophiolite implies that mechanisms of oceanic crustal accretion similar to those of today were in operation by 2.5 billion years ago at divergent plate margins and that the temperature of the early mantle was not extremely elevated, as compared to the present-day temperature. Plate tectonic processes similar to those of the present must also have emplaced the ophiolite in a convergent margin setting.

  15. Polyphase neotectonic movements in the Gavilgarh Fault Zone, central Indian craton: evidences from geomorpho-tectonic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Dipanjan; Chattopadhyay, Anupam; Jain, Vikrant

    2014-05-01

    The central part of Indian craton is believed to be a stable continental region with low strain build-up and long earthquake recurrence periods. It comprises two major Archean cratonic fragments (i.e. the Bundelkhand and the Bastar Cratons) and a Proterozoic mobile belt called Central Indian Tectonic Zone (CITZ), along which the cratonic fragments were amalgamated in the Proterozoic. Gavilgarh Fault Zone (GFZ) is an important component of CITZ and is represented by a >250 km long, ENE-WSW trending fault line which demarcates the southern boundary of the Satpura mountains. Although the eastern part of the lineament shows evidences of polyphase tectonic movements in the Meso-Neoproterozic (Chattopadhyay and Khasdeo, 2011), there is no focussed analysis of neotectonic activity in this fault zone although a number of earthquakes have been recorded within the CITZ in last 100 years or so. The present study comprises structural mapping and geomorphological analysis of a 200 km long stretch of the GFZ lineament. GFZ shows evidences of reverse fault-slip movements that possibly resulted in an uplift of the northern side, as deeper level rocks (e.g. Paleozoic Gondwana sandstones) are juxtaposed against the overlying Deccan Trap basalts of Mesozoic age along the fault line. Crushing of basalts along the lineament, asymmetric folds within Gondwana sandstone, inclination of Anisotropic Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) axes etc. provide evidences for fault-drag folding related to the post-Deccan reverse faulting. Drainages crosscutting the lineament adjusted with the tectonic uplift either by incising their own sediments and bed rock or by increasing their sinuosity, only in the northern side, as seen in the satellite images. Hypsometric Integral values suggest that the immature/in-equilibrated drainage basins were restricted in the north while mature/equilibrated basins developed in the south of the lineament. Longitudinal profiles and S-L Index of the river profiles, prepared

  16. [African population in history].

    PubMed

    Yang, S

    1984-11-29

    The growth rate of the African population has been fluctuating throughout history, affected by political, social, and economic events. 6000 years ago, the majority of the population was based in North Africa, because farming had been developed there. However, between the 11th and the 16th centuries, there was a constant decline in the population of that region, due to invasions from Europe and the black plague. During the same period, the population in the area south of the Sahara grew rapidly, as people there had gone into the iron tool period and farming had been developed. From the 16th to the mid-17th Century, population growth was considerable in Africa; more people had learned the technology of irrigation, corn and potatoes had been introduced from South America, and colonialism was not yet an issue. From the mid-17th to the mid-19th Century, there was no growth, due to the slave trade and wars between tribes. One estimate sets the direct and indirect loss during this period, as a result of the slave trade, at 100 million people. From the 1850s to the end of World War I, population growth started up again, chiefly influenced by the fact that the slave trade had essentially come to a half and modern medical care had become available on the continent. However, in central Africa, the region which suffered the worst blow from the slave trade, growth was very slow, while in East Africa the population was declining because of wars between colonists and natives, as well as natural disasters. Increases in population during this period were a result of immigration from Europe and India. From the end of World War I to the present, growth has been rapid, given improvements in medical services and standards of living, while most of the former colonies became independent after the 1950s. Consequently, almost all African countries are under great pressure now with regard to their populations.

  17. Central African Republic.

    PubMed

    1989-11-01

    The Central African Republic contains 242,000 square miles, which rolling terrain almost 2000 feet above sea level. The climate is tropical, and it has a population of 2.8 million people with a 2.5% growth rate. There are more than 80 ethnic groups including Baya 34%, Banda 28%, Sara 10%, Mandja 9%, Mboum 9%, and M'Baka 7%. The religions are traditional African 35%, protestant 25%, Roman Catholic 25%, and Muslim 15%, and the languages are French and Sangho. The infant mortality rate is 143/1000, with expectancy at 49 years and a 40% literacy rate. The work force of 1 million is 70% agricultural, industry 6% and commerce and service 6% and government 3%. The government consists of a president assisted by cabinet ministers and a single party. Natural resources include diamonds, uranium, timber, gold, and oil, and major industries are beverages, textiles, and soap. Agricultural products feature coffee, cotton, peanuts, tobacco, food crops and livestock. Most of the population live in rural areas and most of the 80 ethnic groups have their own language. This is one of the world's least developed countries, with a per capita income of $375/year. The main problems with development are the poor transportation infrastructure, and the weak internal and international marketing systems. The US and various international organizations have aided in agriculture development, health programs, and family planning. US investment is mainly in diamond and gold mining, and although oil drilling has been successful it is not economically feasible at current prices.

  18. Remagnetization in bituminous limestones of the Neoproterozoic Araras Group (Amazon craton): Hydrocarbon maturation, burial diagenesis, or both?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font, E.; Trindade, R. I. F.; NéDéLec, A.

    2006-06-01

    Neoproterozoic carbonates of the Araras Group exhibit two distinct magnetic components across the same carbonate succession in a cross-section between the Amazon craton and the Paraguay fold belt. Pink dolostones of the Mirassol d'Oeste Formation carry a dual polarity, primary component, whereas black bituminous limestones of the Guia Formation yield a secondary postfolding component. Magnetic signatures of the Guia limestones, such as high anhysteretic remanence magnetization/saturation isothermal remanence magnetization ratios, high-frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility and contradictory Lowrie-Fuller and Cisowski tests, are typical of remagnetized carbonates. Unblocking temperatures suggest that the stable high-temperature remanence is carried by both pyrrhotite and magnetite for which an authigenic origin is suggested by scanning electron microscope observations. The different magnetic properties noted between dolostones with or without bitumen and between dolostones and limestones in the same metamorphic conditions lead to the hypothesis that the amount of hydrocarbon as well as the lithology influence nucleation of authigenic magnetic minerals in these rocks. Presence of magnetite pseudoframboids and euhedral iron sulphide crystals occurring in fracture and voids are in favor of a chemical remanence (CRM). The presence of pyrrhotite as one of the main carriers of CRM in these rocks, and its association with bitumen in fractures is probably related to an epigenetic enrichment of sulfur due to hydrocarbon seepage. However, hydrocarbon maturation solely could not explain the differences of the magnetic mineralogy observed in the craton and the fold belt. Enhanced magnetite formation in the thrust and fold belt is interpreted to be the result of higher temperatures leading to stronger diagenesis of clay minerals.

  19. Study on the genesis of Yishui banded iron formation (BIF) in the North China Craton: geochemical characteristics and tectonic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, I.; Lee, I.; Yang, X.

    2015-12-01

    The Yishui BIFs are located in the Taishan Group, Shandong province of Eastern Block of North China Craton. The iron ore samples were collected from the mine pits. Major elements were analyzed by X-ray Fluoresence Spectromemter (XRF). Trace elements and REY (REE + Y) were analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). Petrological, mineralogical and geochemical analyses of iron ores and their wall rock (amphibolite) were conducted to trace the genesis of Yishui BIF. Iron ores of Yishui BIF are mainly composed of SiO2 and Fe2O3T (SiO2+ Fe2O3T= 85.8 to 98.8 wt%) and consistent with major mineral components which are quartz and iron oxide such as magnetite and hematite. Low contents of TiO2 (0.01 to 0.09 wt%) , Al2O3 (0.42 to 1.18 wt%) and HFSE indicate no or little effect of detrital contamination. Iron ores have positive La, Eu, Gd, Er and Y anomalies with enriched HREE in PAAS normalized REY graph. The REY patterns of iron ores were used as a fingerprint to trace the source of iron and silica. Distinctive positive Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu*= 2.44-4.19), Y anomalies (Y/Y*=0.97 - 4.19), slightly negative Ce anomalies (Ce/Ce*= 0.87-0.97) and enriched HREE ((La/Yb)SN= 0.17-0.32) indicate that mixture of seawater and high-temperature hydrothermal fluid (>250 ◦C). Depositional environment in North China Craton implies that Yishui BIFs were formed at Neoarchean and associated arc-related tectonic setting. All these data suggest that Yishui BIFs belong to typical Algoma-type BIF.

  20. Superposed folding and associated fracturing influence hypogene karst development in Neoproterozoic carbonates, São Francisco Craton, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennes-Silva, Renata A.; Bezerra, Francisco H. R.; Nogueira, Francisco C. C.; Balsamo, Fabrizio; Klimchouk, Alexander; Cazarin, Caroline L.; Auler, Augusto S.

    2016-01-01

    Porosity and permeability along fractured zones in carbonates could be significantly enhanced by ascending fluid flow, resulting in hypogene karst development. This work presents a detailed structural analysis of the longest cave system in South America to investigate the relationship between patterns of karst conduits and regional deformation. Our study area encompasses the Toca da Boa Vista (TBV) and Toca da Barriguda (TBR) caves, which are ca. 107 km and 34 km long, respectively. This cave system occurs in Neoproterozoic carbonates of the Salitre Formation in the northern part of the São Francisco Craton, Brazil. The fold belts that are around and at the craton edges were deformed in a compressive setting during the Brasiliano orogeny between 750 and 540 Ma. Based on the integrated analysis of the folds and brittle deformation in the caves and in outcrops of the surrounding region, we show the following: (1) The caves occur in a tectonic transpressive corridor along a regional thrust belt; (2) major cave passages, at the middle storey of the system, considering both length and frequency, developed laterally along mainly (a) NE-SW to E-W and (b) N to S oriented anticline hinges; (3) conduits were formed by dissolutional enlargement of subvertical joints, which present a high concentration along anticline hinges due to folding of competent grainstone layers; (4) the first folding event F1 was previously documented in the region and corresponds with NW-SE- to N-S-trending compression, whereas the second event F2, documented for the first time in the present study, is related to E-W compression; and (5) both folding events occurred during the Brasiliano orogeny. We conclude that fluid flow and related dissolution pathways have a close relationship with regional deformation events, thus enhancing our ability to predict karst patterns in layered carbonates.

  1. The Ufa indenter: stratigraphic and geophysic evidences for an actual indentation of the Southern Urals by the East European craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefort, Jean-Pierre; Danukalova, Guzel

    2014-07-01

    Study of the altitudes of the lowest part of the Upper Cretaceous-Eocene and Aktschagylian-Quaternary stratigraphic ensembles known on the western slope of the Southern Urals evidences the existence of an East-West elongated dome which follows the N53° latitude. This ridge is superimposed at depth with the remnants of the Sernovodsk-Abdulino Aulacogen and with the Belaya tear fault, which support the existence of a recent rejuvenation of these old structures. North of these disruptions the Southern Urals display a clear bent towards the East. Detailed microstructural studies show that this curvature is associated with a typical stress pattern which suggests the existence of an indentation of the fold belt by the East European craton. The hypothesis of an Ufa indenter is not supported by an equivalent East-West deep fault north of the bend. However, a long N100° magnetic anomaly, interpreted as a shear zone, suggests that the indenter is a reality. Quaternary uplift and crustal thickening at its front as well as seismological data support our interpretation. It is not stressed that the curvature of the Urals observed at 56° latitude results solely from this recent indentation. It is only assumed that the actual indentation is rejuvenating a former unevenness which existed before in the East European craton. Study of the inner part of the indenter shows that this type of structure is not necessarily rigid and undeformed. Some of the structures described on the URSEIS deep seismic line could be much younger than previously expected.

  2. A modern analogue for tectonic, eustatic, and climatic processes in cratonic basins: Gulf of Carpentaria, northern Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edgar, N. Terence; Cecil, C. Blaine; Mattick, R.E.; de Deckker, Patrick; Djajadihardja, Yusuf S.

    2003-01-01

    The Gulf of Carpentaria is a tropical, silled epicontinental sea and may be a modern analogue for ancient cratonic basins. For the purpose of this study, the Gulf of Carpentaria is compared to Pennsylvanian cratonic basins of the United States. During the Pennsylvanian, the North American continent moved from the Southern Hemisphere, through the Equator, into the Northern Hemisphere. Today, the Gulf of Carpentaria–New Guinea region is a few degrees south of the Equator and is moving towards it. During the Pennsylvanian, the world was subjected to major glaciations and associated sea-level changes. The island of New Guinea and the Gulf of Carpentaria have undergone similar processes during the Quaternary. A reconnaissance seismic survey of the gulf conducted by the USGS and the Australian National University (ANU), combined with oil-exploration well data, provided the first step in a systematic evaluation of a modern tropical epicontinental system. During the Cenozoic, the region was dominated by terrestrial sedimentation in a temperate climate. At the same time, carbonates were being deposited on the northern shelf edge of the Australian Plate. During the Miocene, carbonate deposition expanded southward into the gulf region. Then in the Late Miocene, carbonate sedimentation was replaced by terrigenous clastics derived from the developing Central Range of the island of New Guinea, which developed a wetter climate while moving northwards into the tropics. At least 14 basin-wide transgressive–regressive cycles are identified by channels that were eroded under subaerial conditions since about the Miocene. Comparison of the modern Gulf of Carpentaria sequences with those of the Pennsylvanian reveals many similarities.

  3. Magnetic mineralogy of pyroxenite xenoliths from Hannuoba basalts, northern North China Craton: Implications for magnetism in the continental lower crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiyong; Zheng, Jianping; Zeng, Qingli; Liu, Qingsheng; Griffin, W. L.

    2014-02-01

    Studies of the petrology, mineral chemistry, and rock magnetic properties of nine pyroxenite xenoliths from Hannuoba basalts, northern North China Craton, have been made to determine the magnetization signature of the continental lower crust. These pyroxenites are weakly magnetic with low average susceptibility (χ) and saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (Mrs) of 39.59 × 10-8 m3 kg-1 and 12.05 × 10-3 Am2 kg-1, respectively. The magnetic minerals are mainly magnetite, pyrrhotite, and Fe-rich spinel, which significantly contribute to χ and natural remanent magnetization. Magnetite occurs as interstitial microcrystals together with zeolite aggregates, indicating a secondary origin in a supergene environment. In contrast, pyrrhotite and Fe-rich spinel were formed prior to the xenoliths' ascent to the surface, as evidenced by their dominant occurrence as tiny inclusions and thin exsolution lamellae in pyroxene. The Fe-rich spinel has ~ 50% mole fraction of Fe3O4 and corresponds to the strongest magnetization, and its coexistence with Mg-rich spinel implies a reheating event due to the underplating of basaltic magma. Besides, armalcolite and ilmenite were found in the reaction rims between xenoliths and the basalt, but they contribute little to the whole rock magnetization. However, these pyroxenite xenoliths would be nonmagnetic at in situ depths, as well as peridotite and mafic granulite xenoliths derived from the crust-mantle transition zone (~ 32-42 km). Therefore, we suggest the limiting depth of magnetization at the boundary between weakly magnetic deep-seated (lower crust and upper mantle) xenoliths and strongly magnetic Archean granulite facies rocks (~ 32 km) in Hannuoba, northern North China Craton.

  4. Upper mantle dynamics and quaternary climate in cratonic areas (DynaQlim)—Understanding the glacial isostatic adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poutanen, Markku; Ivins, Erik R.

    2010-07-01

    A substantial material flow, deep within the solid Earth, is caused by the periodic ocean-continent water transport of the Quaternary ice ages. That lateral transport is enormous, causing 120-135 m of equivalent global sea-level rise and fall, or about 45-50 Peta tonnes (1 Peta tonne = 10 18 kg) of surface mass transfer. The global manifestation of the slow mantle flow response to this surface load is glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). Measurements of this phenomenon offer a unique opportunity to retrieve information pertaining to both the Earth's upper mantle and the changing mass of glaciers and ice sheets during the past. The waxing and waning of ice mass is driven by long-term variations in climate. DynaQlim (upper mantle dynamics and quaternary climate in cratonic areas), a regional coordination committee of the International Lithosphere Program (ILP) since 2007, is focused on studying the relations between upper mantle dynamics, its composition and physical properties, temperature, rheology, and Quaternary climate. Combining historical and modern terrestrial and space-borne geodetic observations with seismological investigations, studies of the postglacial faults and continuum mechanical modelling of GIA, the research goal of DynaQlim is to offer new insights into properties of the lithosphere and upper mantle. The joint inversion of different types of observational data is an important step toward providing a better understanding of GIA on all levels of Earth sciences. A primary regional focus of DynaQlim is the study of cratonic areas of northern Canada and Scandinavia. Greenland and Antarctica are also of great interest, as they represent observational examples of ice sheet dynamics and mass change in response to relatively strong present-day climate forcing.

  5. Modes, tempo and spatial variability of Cenozoic cratonic denudation: morphoclimatic constraints from West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauvais, Anicet; Chardon, Dominique

    2010-05-01

    After the onset of Gondwana break-up in the Early Mesozoic, the emerged part of the African plate underwent long Greenhouse effect climatic periods and epeirogeny. The last Greenhouse effect period in the Early Cenozoic and the alternation of wet and dry climatic periods since the Eocene enhanced episodes of rock chemical weathering and laterite production, forming bauxites and ferricretes, interrupted by drier periods of dominantly mechanical denudation, shaping glacis [1]. In Sub-Saharan West Africa, this evolution resulted in pulsate and essentially climatically-forced denudation that has shaped an ubiquitous sequence of five stepped lateritic paleosurfaces that synchronously developed over Cenozoic times. The modes, timing and spatial variability of continental denudation of the region are investigated by combining geomorphologic and geochronological data sets. The geomorphologic data set comprises the altitudinal distribution of the lateritic paleosurfaces relicts and their differential elevation from 42 locations in Sub-Saharan West Africa where the sequence (or part of it) has been documented. The geochronological data set consists in the age ranges of each paleosurface tackled by radiometric 39Ar-40Ar dating of the neoformed oxy-hydroxides (i.e., cryptomelane, K1-2Mn8O16, nH2O, [4]) carried by their laterites at the Tambao reference site, Burkina Faso [1, 3]. Five groups of 39Ar-40Ar ages, ~ 59 - 45 Ma, ~ 29 - 24 Ma, ~ 18 - 11.5 Ma, ~ 7.2 - 5.8 Ma, and ~ 3.4 - 2.9 Ma, characterize periods of chemical weathering whereas the time laps between these groups of ages correspond to episodes of mechanical denudation that reflect physical shaping of the paleosurfaces. For the last 45 Ma, the denudation rate estimates (3 to 8 m Ma-1) are comparable with those derived on shorter time scale (103 to 106 y.) in the same region by the cosmogenic radionuclide method [2]. Combined with the geomorphologic data set, these age ranges allow the visualization of the regional

  6. African Passages: Journaling through Archetypes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Patricia

    1990-01-01

    Explores how students (through an awareness of literary archetypes and journal writing) can use African stories to cross cultures, time, and continents, making connections between their worlds and the worlds of others. (MG)

  7. Early African Hominids: Pedagogic Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, James L.

    1984-01-01

    By studying early African hominids, students can learn about the interactive testing and creative aspects of scientific thinking and sharpen their geographical skills. It is impossible to study this topic without giving prominence to space and time. (RM)

  8. African-Americans and Alzheimer's

    MedlinePlus

    ... African-Americans are at a higher risk for Alzheimer's disease. Many Americans dismiss the warning signs of Alzheimer's, ... two times more likely to develop late-onset Alzheimer's disease than whites and less likely to have a ...

  9. Structural analysis of the Itapucumí Group in the Vallemí region, northern Paraguay: Evidence of a new Brasiliano/Pan-African mobile belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanha, Ginaldo Ademar da Cruz; Warren, Lucas; Boggiani, Paulo César; Grohmann, Carlos Henrique; Cáceres, Alberto Arias

    The Neoproterozoic (Ediacaran) Itapucumí Group in northern Paraguay is composed of carbonate and siliciclastic rocks, including ooid grainstones, marls, shales and sandstones, containing Cloudina fossils in the eastern region. It is almost undeformed over the Rio Apa Cratonic Block but shows a strong deformational pattern at its western edge. A detailed structural analysis of the Itapucumí Group was conducted in the Vallemí Mine, along with a regional survey in other outcrops downstream in the Paraguay River and in the San Alfredo, Cerro Paiva and Sargento José E. López regions. In the main Vallemí quarry, the structural style is characterized by an axial-plane slaty cleavage in open to isoclinal folds, sometimes overturned, associated with N-S trending thrust faults and shear zones of E-vergence and with a low-grade chlorite zone metamorphism. The structural data presented here are compatible with the hypothesis of a newly recognized mobile belt on the western side of the Rio Apa Cratonic Block, with opposite vergence to that of the Paraguay Mobile Belt in Brazil. Both belts are related to the Late Brasiliano/Pan-African tectonic cycle with a Lower Cambrian deformation and metamorphism age. The deformation could be due to the late collision of the Amazonian Craton with the remainder of Western Gondwana or to the western active plate boundary related to the Pampean Belt. The structural and lithologic differences between the western Itapucumí Group in the Vallemí and Paraguay River region and the eastern region, near San Alfredo and Cerro Paiva, suggest that this group could be divided into two lithostratigraphic units, but more stratigraphic and geochronological analyses are required to confirm this possibility.

  10. Hepatitis C in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Saab, Sammy; Jackson, Christian; Nieto, Jose; Francois, Fritz

    2014-10-01

    The care of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in African Americans represents an opportunity to address a major health disparity in medicine. In all facets of HCV infection, African Americans are inexplicably affected, including in the prevalence of the virus, which is higher among them compared with most of the racial and ethnic groups. Ironically, although fibrosis rates may be slow, hepatocellular carcinoma and mortality rates appear to be higher among African Americans. Sustained viral response (SVR) rates have historically significantly trailed behind Caucasians. The reasons for this gap in SVR are related to both viral and host factors. Moreover, low enrollment rates in clinical trials hamper the study of the efficacy of anti-viral therapy. Nevertheless, the gap in SVR between African Americans and Caucasians may be narrowing with the use of direct-acting agents. Gastroenterologists, hepatologists, primary care physicians, and other health-care providers need to address modifiable risk factors that affect the natural history, as well as treatment outcomes, for HCV among African Americans. Efforts need to be made to improve awareness among health-care providers to address the differences in screening and referral patterns for African Americans.

  11. Significance of the Nova Brasilândia metasedimentary belt in western Brazil: Redefining the Mesoproterozoic boundary of the Amazon craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohver, Eric; van der Pluijm, Ben; Mezger, Klaus; Essene, Eric; Scandolara, Jaime; Rizzotto, Gilmar

    2004-12-01

    The Nova Brasilândia metasedimentary belt (NBMB) of western Brazil marks a fundamental crustal boundary in the Amazon craton. The metasedimentary rocks of the NBMB (calc-silicates, metapelites, quartzites, metabasites) contrast strongly with the older, polycyclic granitoid rocks of the adjacent Amazon craton. Aeromagnetic anomalies indicate that the belt is continuous for at least 1000 km in an E-W direction, although the easternmost extent of the NBMB is covered by the Cretaceous sediments of the Parecis Formation. Additional geologic evidence suggests that the belt extends along an E-W trend for ~2000 km. The northern portion of the NBMB preserves vestiges of an early high pressure-temperature (P-T) assemblage (kyanite + staurolite) overprinted by sillimanite during prograde metamorphism. A higher metamorphic grade is observed in the southern portion of the belt, with peak conditions calculated to be 800 MPa and 800°C for granulitic assemblages. The combined P-T path demonstrates that the competing processes of imbrication (northern domain) and magma generation (southern domain) are responsible for regional metamorphism and crustal thickening. Cooling from peak metamorphic conditions is recorded by U-Pb monazite ages of 1090 Ma and titanite ages of ~1060 Ma. Integrated cooling rates of 2°-3°C/Myr from regional metamorphism are calculated from these U/Pb ages combined with 40Ar/39Ar ages of hornblende (~970 Ma) and biotite (~910 Ma). The NBMB marks the Mesoproterozoic limit of the SW Amazon craton. The discordance of the NBMB to the NNW structural trend of the younger Aguapeí belt (200 km SE of NBMB), together with marked differences between the two belts in sedimentary environment, metamorphic grade, and timing of deformation, signify that these two belts are not geologically continuous. The ``Grenvillian'' deformation recorded by the NBMB belt marks the final docking of the Amazon craton and Paragua craton within the Rodinia framework. The Aguapeí belt, in

  12. Proterozoic Stability of the Kaapvaal Craton from Titanite (U-Th)/He Thermochronology and Strong Influence of Radiation Damage on this Underutilized Thermochronometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baughman, J. S.; Flowers, R. M.; Dhansay, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Kaapvaal craton of southern Africa is an archetypal Archean craton that formed and initially stabilized between 3.7 and 2.7 Ga. Geochronology and isotopic studies have constrained periods of lithospheric growth and stabilization, and low temperature thermochronology has yielded information about the Mesozoic-Cenozoic history of burial and erosion across the craton. However, there is a substantial thermal history gap between these end-member events, because few thermochronometers provide access to temperatures of ~300-120°C. Such data are critical for evaluating Kaapvaal's response to Proterozoic lateral accretion and intracontinental magmatism. Our study assesses cratonic stability by applying a little-utilized but promising mid-temperature thermochronologic technique, titanite (U-Th)/He dating, to decipher cooling through 230-190°C (based on early diffusion studies). We obtained titanite (U-Th)/He data for Archean basement samples across an ~200,000 km2 area of the northern Kaapvaal craton. Multiple samples with titanite eU values < 70 ppm yield He dates as old as 1200-800 Ma. In contrast, titanites with eU of 70-700 ppm yield younger dates (350-20 Ma) that display a dramatic correlation between date and eU. This pattern clearly manifests the influence of radiation damage on titanite He retentivity that has been observed in other He thermochronometers, but never previously documented for titanite. There is strong future potential to exploit this effect to decipher more detailed thermal histories, as has been done for apatite and zircon He thermochronometry. In our dataset, the oldest titanite results postdate extensive ~1.4-1.2 Ga carbonatite and kimberlite magmatism across the Kaapvaal craton, and overlap with ~1.2-1.1 Ga Namaqua-Natal arc accretion and ~1.1 Ga Umkondo intraplate large igneous province activity. The volcanic character of many of the northern Kaapvaal alkaline and carbonatite complexes indicates that the basement was exhumed to the surface

  13. Provenance and reconnaissance study of detrital zircons of the Palaeozoic Cape Supergroup in South Africa: revealing the interaction of the Kalahari and Río de la Plata cratons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourie, Pieter H.; Zimmermann, Udo; Beukes, Nicolas J.; Naidoo, Thanusha; Kobayashi, Katsuro; Kosler, Jan; Nakamura, Eizo; Tait, Jenny; Theron, Johannes N.

    2011-04-01

    In order to facilitate the understanding of the geological evolution of the Kalahari Craton and its relation to South America, the provenance of the first large-scale cratonic cover sequence of the craton, namely the Ordovician to Carboniferous Cape Supergroup was studied through geochemical analyses of the siliciclastics, and age determinations of detrital zircon. The Cape Supergroup comprises mainly quartz-arenites and a Hirnantian tillite in the basal Table Mountain Group, subgreywackes and mudrocks in the overlying Bokkeveld Group, while siltstones, interbedded shales and quartz-arenites are typical for the Witteberg Group at the top of the Cape Supergroup. Palaeocurrent analyses indicate transport of sediment mainly from northerly directions, off the interior of the Kalahari Craton with subordinate transport from a westerly source in the southwestern part of the basin near Cape Town. Geochemical provenance data suggest mainly sources from passive to active continental margin settings. The reconnaissance study of detrital zircons reveals a major contribution of Mesoproterozoic sources throughout the basin, reflecting the dominance of the Namaqua-Natal Metamorphic Belt, situated immediately north of the preserved strata of Cape Supergroup, as a source with Archaean-aged zircons being extremely rare. We interpret the Namaqua-Natal Metamorphic Belt to have been a large morphological divide at the time of deposition of the Cape Supergroup that prevented input of detrital zircons from the interior early Archaean Kaapvaal cratonic block of the Kalahari Craton. Neoproterozoic and Cambrian zircons are abundant and reflect the basement geology of the outcrops of Cape strata. Exposures close to Cape Town must have received sediment from a cratonic fragment that was situated off the Kalahari Craton to the west and that has subsequently drifted away. This cratonic fragment predominantly supplied Meso- to Neoproterozoic, and Cambrian-aged zircon grains in addition to minor

  14. Evidences for multiple remagnetization of Proterozoic dykes from Iguerda inlier (Anti-Atlas Belt, Southern Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neres, Marta; Silva, Pedro F.; Ikene, Moha; Martins, Sofia; Hafid, Ahmid; Mata, João; Almeida, Francisco; Youbi, Nasrrddine; Boumehdi, Ahmed

    2016-04-01

    Paleomagnetic data able to constrain the paleoposition of the West African Craton (WAC) during Paleo-Mesoproterozoic are absent, mainly due to gaps on the sedimentary record and intense remagnetizations. Dykes that intrude several Proterozoic inliers of WAC in the Anti-Atlas Belt (southern Morocco) have recently been subjected to geochronological studies, which revealed ages between Paleoproterozoic and early Neoproterozoic. Therefore, these dykes represent a window of opportunity for paleomagnetic studies aiming to infer about the paleoposition of WAC during Proterozoic. On this scope we conducted a paleomagnetic study on seven Proterozoic dykes of the Iguerda inlier. We determined the paleomagnetic directions and evaluated their meaning by rock magnetic and mineral analyses, complemented by petrographic observations. Results revealed that these rocks record the presence of a complex history of remagnetization events, mostly assigned to several Phanerozoic thermal/chemical events. In particular, we found components assigned to the late stages of Pan African orogeny (s.l.), to the Late Carboniferous Variscan orogeny, and to more recent events. The recognized remagnetization processes are related to widespread metamorphic events under greenschist facies followed by low-temperature oxidation, both responsible for the formation of new magnetic phases (magnetite and hematite). The primary (magmatic) thermo-remanent magnetization of the dykes was obliterated during these events through multiple thermal and chemical remagnetizations. For only one dyke the presence of primary magnetization is possible to infer, though not to confirm, and would place WAC at an equatorial position around 1750 Ma. The authors wish to acknowledge FCT (Portugal) - CNRST (Morocco) bilateral agreement for its major contribution without which this work wouldn't be possible. Publication supported by project FCT UID/GEO/50019/2013 - Instituto Dom Luiz.

  15. Contrasting geochemical and Sm-Nd isotopic compositions of Archean metasediments from the Kongling high-grade terrain of the Yangtze craton: Evidence for cratonic evolution and redistribution of REE during crustal anatexis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shan; Ling, Wenli; Qiu, Yumin; Lian, Zhou; Hartmann, Gerald; Simon, Klaus

    1999-07-01

    Twenty-three clastic metasediments from the Kongling high-grade terrain of the Yangtze craton, South China were analyzed for major, trace and rare earth elements and Sm-Nd isotopic ratios. Associated dioritic-tonalitic-trondhjemitic (DTT) and granitic gneisses as well as amphibolites were also analyzed in order to constrain provenance. The results show that the clastic metasediments can be classified into 3 distinct groups in terms of mineralogical, geochemical and Sm-Nd isotopic compositions. Group A is characterized by having no to slight negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu∗ = 0.82-1.07), being high in Cr (191-396 ppm) and Ni (68-137 ppm), and low in Th (3.3-7.8 ppm) and REE (ΣREE = 99-156 ppm). These characteristics are similar to those of metasediments from Archean greenstone belts. In addition, the Group A metasediments have the value of the Chemical Index of Alteration (CIW) close to felsic gneisses. Their Sm-Nd isotopic, REE and trace element compositions can be interpreted by mixtures of the DTT gneisses and amphibolites. Dating of detrital zircons from 2 Group A samples by SHRIMP reveals a major concordant age group of 2.87-3.0 Ga, which is identical to the age of the trondhjemitic gneiss. These results strongly suggest that Group A was principally the first-cycle erosion product of the local Kongling DTT gneiss and amphibolite. Moreover, the higher than amphibolite Cr content and slight Eu depletion exhibited by some samples from this group infer that ultramafic rocks like komatiite and granite of probably 3.0-3.3 Ga in age also played a role. Group B is characterized by the presence of graphite and shows a more evolved composition similar to post-Archean shales with a prominent negative Eu anomaly (Eu/Eu∗ = 0.48-0.77) and high CIW. On paired Cr/Th vs La/Co and Co/Th plots, Group B samples conform to a two-end member mixing line of the Kongling granitic gneiss and amphibolite. However, data on Nd model age and CIW suggest that the granite component should

  16. The African Pediatric Fellowship Program: Training in Africa for Africans.

    PubMed

    Wilmshurst, Jo M; Morrow, Brenda; du Preez, Avril; Githanga, David; Kennedy, Neil; Zar, Heather J

    2016-01-01

    Africa has a significant burden of childhood disease, with relatively few skilled health care professionals. The African Paediatric Fellowship Programme was developed by the Department of Pediatrics and Child Health at the University of Cape Town to provide relevant training for African child health professionals, by Africans, within Africa. Trainees identified by partner academic institutions spend 6 months to 2 years training in the Department of Pediatrics and allied disciplines. They then return to their home institution to build practice, training, research, and advocacy. From 2008 to 2015, 73 physicians have completed or are completing training in general pediatrics or a pediatric subspecialty. At 1 year posttraining, 98% to 100% are practicing back in their home institution. The impact of the returning fellows is evident from their practice interventions, research collaborations, and positions as stakeholders who can change health care policies. Thirty-three centers in 13 African countries are partners with the program, and the program template is now followed by other partner sites in Africa. Increasing and retaining the skills pool of African child health specialists is building a network of motivated, highly skilled clinicians who are equipped to advance child health in Africa.

  17. Phylogenomics of African guenons.

    PubMed

    Moulin, Sibyle; Gerbault-Seureau, Michèle; Dutrillaux, Bernard; Richard, Florence Anne

    2008-01-01

    The karyotypes of 28 specimens belonging to 26 species of Cercopithecinae have been compared with each other and with human karyotype by chromosome banding and, for some of them, by Zoo-FISH (human painting probes) techniques. The study includes the first description of the karyotypes of four species and a synonym of Cercopithecus nictitans. The chromosomal homologies obtained provide us with new data on a large number of rearrangements. This allows us to code chromosomal characters to draw Cercopithecini phylogenetic trees, which are compared to phylogenetic data based on DNA sequences. Our findings show that some of the superspecies proposed by Kingdon (1997 The Kingdon Field Guide to African Mammals, Academic Press.) and Groves (2001 Primates Taxonomy, Smithsonian Institution Press) do not form homogeneous groups and that the genus Cercopithecus is paraphyletic, in agreement with previous molecular analyses. The evolution of Cercopithecini karyotypes is mainly due to non-centromeric chromosome fissions and centromeric shifts or inversions. Non-Robertsonian translocations occurred in C. hamlyni and C. neglectus. The position of chromosomal rearrangements in the phylogenetic tree leads us to propose that the Cercopithecini evolution proceeded by either repeated fission events facilitated by peculiar genomic structures or successive reticulate phases, in which heterozygous populations for few rearranged chromosomes were present, allowing the spreading of chromosomal forms in various combinations, before the speciation process.

  18. An African ethic for nursing?

    PubMed

    Haegert, S

    2000-11-01

    This article derives from a doctoral thesis in which a particular discourse was used as a 'paradigm case'. From this discourse an ethic set within a South African culture arose. Using many cultural 'voices' to aid the understanding of this narrative, the ethic shows that one can build on both a 'justice' and a 'care' ethic. With further development based on African culture one can take the ethic of care deeper and reveal 'layers of understanding'. Care, together with compassion, forms the foundation of morality. Nursing ethics has followed particular western moral philosophers. Often nursing ethics has been taught along the lines of Kohlberg's theory of morality, with its emphasis on rules, rights, duties and general obligations. These principles were universalistic, masculine and noncontextual. However, there is a new ethical movement among Thomist philosophers along the lines to be expounded in this article. Nurses such as Benner, Bevis, Dunlop, Fry and Gadow--to name but a few--have welcomed the concept of an 'ethic of care'. Gilligan's work gave a feminist view and situated ethics in the everyday aspects of responsiveness, responsibility, context and concern. Shutte's search for a 'philosophy for Africa' has resulted in finding similarities in Setiloane and in Senghor with those of Thomist philosophers. Using this African philosophy and a research participant's narrative, an African ethic evolves out of the African proverb: 'A person is a person through other persons', or its alternative rendering: 'I am because we are: we are because I am.' This hermeneutic narrative reveals 'the way affect imbues activity with ethical meaning' within the context of a black nursing sister in a rural South African hospital. It expands upon the above proverb and incorporates the South African constitutional idea of 'Ubuntu' (compassion and justice or humanness).

  19. 3D structural cartography based on magnetic and gravity data inversion - Case of South-West Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hichem, Boubekri; Mohamed, Hamoudi; Abderrahmane, Bendaoud; Ivan, Priezzhev; Karim, Allek

    2015-12-01

    This article presents the results of 3D aeromagnetic and gravity data inversion across the West African Craton (WAC) in South West Algeria. Although the used data have different origins and resolutions, the performed manual and automatic interpretation for each dataset shows a good correlation with some earlier geological studies of the region, major structural aspects of the locality, as well as other new structural features. Many curved faults parallel to the suture zone indicate the presence of terranes or the metacratonization of the WAC and a related fault network of great importance with NE-SW and NW-SE directions. The mega shear zones from north to south, which are visible at the surface in the Hoggar, are also observed along the Saharan Platform. The fact that these faults are observed since the Cambro-Ordovician in all crust (including the Saharan Basins) indicates that this area, which is situated on the border of the WAC, remained active during the entire period of time.

  20. The Diamondiferous Lithospheric Mantle Underlying the Eastern Superior Craton: Evidence From Mantle Xenoliths From the Renard Kimberlites, Quebec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, L.; Stachel, T.; Armstrong, J. P.; Simonetti, A.

    2009-05-01

    The Renard kimberlite cluster consists of nine pipes located within a 2km2 area in the northern Otish Mountains of Quebec. The pipes are named Renards 1 to 10, with subsequent investigation revealing Renards 5 and 6 to join at depth (now Renard 65). The pipes are located within the eastern portion of the Superior craton, emplaced into Archean granitic and gneissic host rocks of the Opinica Subprovince (Percival, 2007). Amphibolite grade metamorphism, locally passing into the granulite facies (Percival et al., 1994) occurred in late Archean time (Moorhead et al., 2003). Radiometric dating of the hypabyssal Renard 1 kimberlite indicates Neoproterozoic emplacement, with a 206Pb/238U model age of 631.6±3.5 Ma (2σ) (Birkett et al., 2004). A later study on the main phases in Renard 2 and 3 gave a similar emplacement, with a 206Pb/238U model age of 640.5±2.8Ma (Fitzgerald et al., 2008). This makes this kimberlite district one of the oldest in Canada, similar in eruption age to the Wemindji kimberlites (629±29Ma: Letendre et al., 2003). These events are broadly coeval with the conversion from subduction magmatism to rifting in northern Laurentia (Birkett et al., 2004). The bodies are part of a late Neoproterozoic to Cambrian kimberlite field in eastern Canada (Girard, 2001; Moorhead et al, 2002; Letendre et al., 2003) and fit into the north-east of the Eocambrian/Cambrian Labrador Sea Province of Heaman et al. (2004). To better understand the diamondiferous lithospheric mantle beneath the Renard kimberlites, 116 microxenoliths and xenocrysts were analysed. The samples were dominantly peridotitic, composed primarily of purple garnet, emerald green clinopyroxene and olivine, with a few pink and red garnets. A minor eclogitic component comprises predominantly orange garnets and lesser amounts of clinopyroxene. A detailed study on the major, minor and trace element composition of xenolith minerals is currently underway. All but three of the clinopyroxenes analysed to date

  1. Multiple accretion at the eastern margin of the Rio de la Plata craton: the prolonged Brasiliano orogeny in southernmost Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saalmann, K.; Gerdes, A.; Lahaye, Y.; Hartmann, L. A.; Remus, M. V. D.; Läufer, A.

    2011-04-01

    The Neoproterozoic-Eoplalaeozoic Brasiliano orogeny at the eastern margin of the Rio de la Plata craton in southernmost Brazil and Uruguay comprises a complex tectonic history over 300 million years. The southern Brazilian Shield consists of a number of tectono-stratigraphic units and terranes. The São Gabriel block in the west is characterized by c.760-690 Ma supracrustal rocks and calc-alkaline orthogneisses including relics of older, c. 880 Ma old igneous rocks. Both igneous and metasedimentary rocks have positive ɛ Nd(t) values and Neoproterozoic TDM model ages; they formed in magmatic arc settings with only minor input of older crustal sources. A trondhjemite from the São Gabriel block intruding dioritc and tonalitic gneisses during the late stages of deformation (D3) yield an U-Pb zircon age (LA-ICP-MS) of 701 ± 10 Ma giving the approximate minimum age of the São Gabriel accretionary event. The Encantadas block further east, containing the supracrustal Porongos belt and the Pelotas batholith, is in contrast characterized by reworking of Neoarchean to Palaeoproterozoic crust. The 789 ± 7 Ma zircon age of a metarhyolite intercalated with the metasedimentary succession of the Porongos belt provides a time marker for the basin formation. Zircons of a sample from tonalitic gneisses, constituting the Palaeoproterozoic basement of the Porongos belt, form a cluster at 2,234 ± 28 Ma, interpreted as the tonalite crystallization age. Zircon rims show ages of 2,100-2,000 Ma interpreted as related to a Palaeoproterozoic metamorphic event. The Porongos basin formed on thinned continental crust in an extensional or transtensional regime between c. 800-700 Ma. The absence of input from Neoproterozoic juvenile sources into the Porongos basin strongly indicates that the Encantadas and São Gabriel blocks were separated terranes that became juxtaposed next to each other during the Brasiliano accretional events. The tectonic evolution comprises two episodes of magmatic

  2. Geochemical and Isotopic Evidence for Melting and Erosion of Wyoming Craton Mantle Lithosphere Prior to 48 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, G. I.; Carlson, R. W.; Frost, C. D.

    2010-12-01

    Trace-element geochemistry of Cretaceous-Tertiary Great Plains igneous rocks supports isotopic data that reveal a sequence of digestion of lithospheric mantle followed by intrusion of dominantly asthenospheric magmas. Multiple Archean, Proterozoic, and Phanerozoic subduction events beneath the Wyoming craton concentrated Ba and K within the underlying mantle lithosphere, resulting in earliest Cretaceous-Tertiary lithospheric melts with fingerprints of high K, high Ba/Nb and negative epsilon-Nd, but low U, Th, total REE, and less extreme values of LREE/HREE. Youngest (Eocene-Oligocene) magmas were kimberlite and carbonatite, with high U, Th, LREE, extremely high LREE/HREE, and positive epsilon-Nd, but with high-T xenoliths from depths of only 150 km (Carlson et al., 1999). Importantly, in the entire Wyoming craton, the Homestead kimberlite is the only one of K-T age that has transported a diamond—a single micro-diamond discovered. The shallow low-T to high-T xenolith transition, lack of diamonds, and changing magma geochemistry, suggest that a significant portion of the mantle lithosphere beneath the Wyoming Archean craton must have been consumed prior to the ≤48 Ma kimberlite eruptions. In contrast, the earliest phase of Cretaceous magmatism in Arkansas was explosive diamond-containing lamproite (~102 Ma) with a Proterozoic lithospheric isotopic signature (Lambert et al., 1995). In Arkansas, there was no earlier subalkalic magmatism, and no evidence of slow digestion of the mantle lithosphere, although later magmatism trended toward higher positive epsilon-Nd values (i.e. larger asthenospheric component). Removal by melting of a significant portion of the Wyoming mantle lithosphere during late Cretaceous-early Tertiary magmatism, along with heating, may have helped promote lithospheric “relaxation” related to extension further west between 53 Ma and 49 Ma, followed by more facile penetration by asthenospheric magmas, an idea proposed to explain the time

  3. Roberts Victor Eclogites: The MacGregor Legacy of Archean Oceanic Lithosphere Subduction and its Role in Craton Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirey, S. B.; Schmitz, M. D.; Wiechert, U.; Carlson, R. W.

    2005-12-01

    Eclogite xenoliths from the 125 Ma old, Group II, Roberts Victor kimberlite have long been of interest (MacGregor et al, 1968) because of their diversity, abundance, large size, occurrence with peridotite and their high carbon/diamond content. Coesite, corundum, kyanite, Ca-, Mg-, and Fe- rich eclogites are available but those classified as Group I, Group II (as defined by MacGregor, 1970) or diamondiferous were selected with the goal to better understand eclogite petrogenesis, Kaapvaal cratonic keel evolution, diamond formation, and eclogite metasomatism. Recent laser fluorination oxygen isotope data (δ18O) on gt (GI = 5.8 to 6.9; GII = 2.1 to 5.1) match earlier data (Garlick et al, 1971; MacGregor and Manton, 1986), while ion-probe trace element contents of gt (e.g. chondrite normalized Ce G1 = 0.2 to 0.5; GII = 0.002 to 0.07) and cpx (G1 = 7 to 20; GII = 0.2 to 2) and whole-rock Re-Os (G1 Re = 0.19 to 3.41 ppb; GII Re = 0.006 to 0.38 ppb) highlight even more distinct differences between Groups I and II. These differences must be a pre-metamorphic signature of their original protoliths and not just due to pressure differences or partial melting during emplacement. Using ophiolites and composites of oceanic crust as a guide (e.g. MacGregor and Manton, 1986), Group I eclogites could represent the volcanic rocks of Layer 2 of Archean oceanic crust whereas Group II might represent the cumulate, intrusive rocks of Layer 3. Group II eclogites have positive Eu anomalies and lower REE and Re contents which support this idea. The Re-Os systematics of the oceanic lithosphere is poorly known, especially in the Archean, but Roberts Victor eclogite Re-Os and trace element abundances and major element compositions suggest a basaltic komatiitic protolith as might typify slightly hotter ocean ridges in the Archean. A U-Pb age of 3.061±0.006 Ga on zircon grains separated from a Group I Roberts Victor eclogite and a same-age but scattered whole-rock Re-Os isotope array

  4. Numerical modeling of convective erosion and peridotite-melt interaction in big mantle wedge: Implications for the destruction of the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lijuan

    2014-04-01

    The deep subduction of the Pacific Plate underneath East Asia is thought to have played a key role in the destruction of the North China Craton (NCC). To test this hypothesis, this paper presents a new 2-D model that includes an initial stable equilibrated craton, the formation of a big mantle wedge (BMW), and erosion by vigorous mantle convection. The model shows that subduction alone cannot thin the cold solid craton, but it can form a low-viscosity BMW. The amount of convective erosion is directly proportional to viscosity within the BMW (η0bmw), and the rheological boundary layer thins linearly with decreasing log10(η0bmw), thereby contributing to an increase in heat flow at the lithospheric base. This model also differs from previous modeling in that the increase in heat flow decays linearly with t1/2, meaning that the overall thinning closely follows a natural log relationship over time. Nevertheless, convection alone can only cause a limited thinning due to a minor increase in basal heat flow. The lowering of melting temperature by peridotite-melt interaction can accelerate thinning during the early stages of this convection. The two combined actions can thin the craton significantly over tens of Myr. This modeling, combined with magmatism and heat flow data, indicates that the NCC evolution has involved four distinct stages: modification in the Jurassic by Pacific Plate subduction and BMW formation, destruction during the Early Cretaceous under combined convective erosion and peridotite-melt interaction, extension in the Late Cretaceous, and cooling since the late Cenozoic.

  5. Cretaceous potassic intrusives with affinities to aillikites from Jharia area: Magmatic expression of metasomatically veined and thinned lithospheric mantle beneath Singhbhum Craton, Eastern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Rajesh K.; Chalapathi Rao, N. V.; Sinha, Anup K.

    2009-11-01

    Cretaceous potassic dykes and sills at the Jharia area intrude the Permo-carboniferous coal-bearing Gondwana sediments of the Eastern Damodar Valley, Singhbhum craton. These intrusives are widely regarded as a part of the Mesozoic alkaline and Rajmahal flood basalt magmatism in the Eastern Indian shield. Jharia intrusives display a wide petrographic diversity; olivine, phlogopite and carbonate are the predominant phases whereas apatite and rutile constitute important accessories. Impoverishment in sodium, silica and alumina and enrichment in potassium, titanium and phosphorous are the hallmark of these rocks and in this aspect they are strikingly similar to the rift-related aillikites (ultramafic lamprophyres) of Aillik Bay, Labrador. Crustal contamination of the Jharia magmas is minimal and the incompatible trace element ratios demonstrate (i) their generation by greater degrees of partial melting of a sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) source similar to that of the kimberlites of Dharwar craton, southern India, and (ii) retention of long-term memories of ancient (Archaean) subduction experienced by their source regions. We infer that a metasomatically veined and thinned lithosphere located at the margin of the Singhbhum craton and the inheritance of an ancient (Archaean) subducted component has played a significant role in deciding the diverging petrological and geochemical characters displayed by the Jharia potassic intrusives: those of kimberlites (orangeites) and lamproites (cratonic signature) and those of aillikites (rift-related signature). A substantial melt component of Jharia potassic intrusives was derived from the SCLM and the melt contribution of the Kerguelen plume is inferred to be minimal.

  6. African American Preschoolers' Language, Emergent Literacy Skills, and Use of African American English: A Complex Relation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, Carol McDonald; Craig, Holly K.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the relation between African American preschoolers' use of African American English (AAE) and their language and emergent literacy skills in an effort to better understand the perplexing and persistent difficulties many African American children experience learning to read proficiently. Method: African American…

  7. Technical Consulting: The African-American Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitfield, Tracy N.

    2010-01-01

    The qualitative research study explored the organizational characteristics necessary in addressing the low concentration of African American technical consultants employed in the information technology industry. Using research participants' professional experience, participants responded to a developed questionnaire. African American technical…

  8. African N Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekunda, M.; Galford, G. L.; Hickman, J. E.; Palm, C.

    2011-12-01

    Africa's smallholder agricultural systems face unique challenges in planning for reducing poverty, concurrent with adaptation and mitigation to climate change. At continental level, policy seeks to promote a uniquely African Green Revolution to increase crop yields and food production, and improve local livelihoods. However, the consequences on the environment and climate are not clear; these pro-economic development measures should be linked to climate change adaptation and mitigation measures, and research is required to help achieve these policy proposals by identifying options, and testing impacts. In particular, increased nitrogen (N) inputs are essential for increasing food production in Africa, but are accompanied by inevitable increases in losses to the environment. These losses appear to be low at input levels promoted in agricultural development programs, while the increased N inputs both increase current food production and appear to reduce the vulnerability of food production to changes in climate. We present field and remote sensing evidence from Malawi that subsidizing improved seed and fertilizers increases resilience to drought without adding excess N to the environment. In Kenya, field research identified thresholds in N2O losses, where emissions are very low at fertilization rates of less than 200 kg ha-1. Village-scale models have identified potential inefficiencies in the food production process where the largest losses of reactive N occur, and which could be targeted to reduce the amount of N released to the environment. We further review some on-going research activities and progress in Africa that compare different methods of managing resources that target resilience in food production and adaptation to climate change, using nutrient N as an indicator, while evaluating the effects of these resource management practices on ecosystems and the environment.

  9. Triassic mafic and intermediate magmatism associated with continental collision between the North and South China Cratons in the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Sang-Bong; Oh, Chang Whan; Lee, Seung-Yeol; Choi, Seon-Gyu; Kim, Taesung; Yi, Keewook

    2016-03-01

    Triassic coeval mafic and intermediate magmatism occurred in the area suggested to be the southern margin of the North China Craton (NCC) in the Gyeonggi Massif (GM) of the Korean Peninsula. This study investigates aspects of the mafic and intermediate magmatism using SHRIMP zircon ages and whole-rock chemical and isotopic Sr-Nd data. The mafic and intermediate rocks intruded into a basement paragneiss in three areas (Yangpyeong, Odesan and Yangyang) within the GM at ca. 230 Ma. The paragneiss was metamorphosed in both the Paleoproterozoic and Triassic. Gabbros (hornblende gabbro and pyroxene-mica gabbro) from the study areas exhibit strong light REE (LREE) enrichment relative to chondrite (LaN/YbN = 11.1-30.6) and a high LILE/HFSE pattern, Ta-Nb-P-Ti troughs and positive Ba-K-Pb-Sr spikes on the N-MORB-normalized multi-element variation diagram. These features are typical characteristics of arc-related gabbros. The gabbros also show strongly enriched initial isotopic compositions (87Sr/86Sr(i) = 0.7100-0.7137; εNd(t) = - 13.1 to - 19.7). The coeval intermediate intrusive rocks also exhibit whole-rock chemical and isotopic features (87Sr/86Sr(i) = 0.7099-0.7143; εNd(t) = - 10.8 to - 18.6) similar to those of the gabbros. The mafic and intermediate intrusive rocks plot in the within-plate and/or post-collisional fields on tectonic discrimination diagrams. These data indicate that the mafic and intermediate magmatism in the study areas occurred during the Triassic post-collisional relaxation period via partial melting of sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) that was enriched in a subduction environment prior to (or during) the Permo-Triassic continental collision between the NCC and the South China Craton (SCC). The highly enriched mantle signatures revealed by the gabbros from the study areas are matched to the enriched features identified in Cretaceous mafic igneous rocks (ca. 130 Ma) on the southern margin of the NCC. Thus, this study suggests that the

  10. Geochemistry and mineralogy of sediments from the Ventersdorp and Transvaal Supergroups, South Africa: Cratonic evolution during the early Proterozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wronkiewicz, David J.; Condie, Kent C.

    1990-02-01

    Approximately 100 pelite and 12 quartzite samples from the Ventersdorp (~2.7 Ga) and Transvaal Supergroups (~2.6-2.1 Ga) have been analyzed to monitor the early Proterozoic evolution of the Kaapvaal Craton, southern Africa. From oldest to youngest, pelites were sampled from the Ventersdorp-Bothaville (BOT), Transvaal-Selati (SEL), Black Reef (BR), Timeball Hill (TH), Strubenkop (STR), and Silverton (SIL) Formations. Paleocurrent measurements in Transvaal quartzites indicate sources lying predominantly to the north and east. Relative to the BOT-SEL-BR, pelites from the TH-STR-SIL are enriched in heavy-REE, LILE, Zr, Hf, Nb, and Ta, depleted in K 2O, MgO, Ni, and Cr, and have lower Cr/Zr, Sc/Th, K 2O/Na 2O, and K/ Rb ratios. Compared to SEL-BR, BOT-TH-STR-SIL pelites have higher light-REE contents and La/Yb ratios, and lower Eu/Eu∗ ratios (0.61-0.66). Relative to NASC (North American Shale Composite), THSTR-SIL pelites are enriched in light-REE, Th, U, Ta, Nb, Sc, Cs, have higher La/Yb ratios, and are depleted in K 2O and MgO. BOT-SEL-BR pelites are enriched in K 2O, MgO, Cr, and Ni, have higher K 2O/Na 2O, Sc/Th, and Eu/Eu∗ ratios, and are depleted in Th, U, heavy-REE, and High Field Strength Elements (HFSE) relative to NASC. Compositions of TH-STR-SIL pelites suggest a provenance similar to average Phanerozoic uppercontinental crust. This source is more evolved than that of BOT-SEL-BR pelites, indicating a transformation from primitive (mafic-rich) to evolved (felsic-rich) upper-crust at 2.2 Ga. This transition follows earlier primitive to evolved trends in Moodies-Pongola (3.3-3.0 Ga) and Witwatersrand (~2.8 Ga) successions. These data suggest that several cycles of changing upper-continental crust occurred in the Kaapvaal craton between 3.3-2.1 Ga.

  11. Research on lithospheric density distributions beneath North China Craton and its destruction mechanism by gravity and seismic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Fang, J.; Hsu, H.

    2011-12-01

    North China Craton (NCC) has been a research hotspot for geoscientists all over the world. Partial North China Craton (NCC) has lost its lithospheric keel since Mesozoic. Researchers have reached a consensus on destruction of NCC' lithosphere, however, the destruction mechanism and dynamic processes still remain controversy. In this study, a three-dimensional density distribution of lithosphere beneath NCC is determined using gravity datum combined with P-wave travel times by sequential inversion method. After the analyses and discussions on our density results referred to other geophysical and geochemical researches and then gave our viewpoint about destruction mechanisms of NCC lithosphere from the standpoint of density distribution. A linear velocity-density relationship is used to achieve mutual transformations and constraints between density and velocity. As we know, the gravity anomalies measured on the ground surface are the integrated reflection of the interface undulations and underground density inhomogeneous. In order to invert the lithospheric density structures, we firstly separated the gravity effects of lithospheric density inhomogeneous by removing the effects of other contributions to the gravity field from the observed integrated gravity filed before density inversion. The method of Zhao et al.,(1994) is used for seismic tomography, while Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) is applied in density inversion, which highly improved the calculation velocity compared to common least squares method. The inversion results indicate that, the lithospheric density beneath NCC is extremely inhomogeneous and its distributions are coherent with surface regional tectonics; Low density anomalies exist in lower crust beneath rift basins around Ordos block. High poisson' ratios are found in these regions (about 3.0), which may indicate partial melting occurred. Receive function studies prevailed thinned (<100km) lithosphere beneath Hetao graben. We consider

  12. Group velocity dispersion characteristics and one-dimensional regional shear velocity structure of the eastern Indian craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Prantik

    2017-02-01

    In the past three years, a semi-permanent network of fifteen 3-component broadband seismographs has become operational in the eastern Indian shield region occupying the Archean (∼2.5-3.6 Ga) Singhbhum-Odisha craton (SOC) and the Proterozoic (∼1.0-2.5 Ga) Chotanagpur Granitic Gneissic terrane (CGGT). The reliable and accurate broadband data for the recent 2015 Nepal earthquake sequence from 10 broadband stations of this network enabled us to estimate the group velocity dispersion characteristics and one-dimensional regional shear velocity structure of the region. First, we measure fundamental mode Rayleigh- and Love-wave group velocity dispersion curves in the period range of 7-70 s and then invert these curves to estimate the crustal and upper mantle structure below the eastern Indian craton (EIC). We observe that group velocities of Rayleigh and Love waves in SOC are relatively high in comparison to those of CGGT. This could be attributed to a relatively mafic-rich crust-mantle structure in SOC resulting from two episodes of magmatism associated with the 1.6 Ga Dalma and ∼117 Ma Rajmahal volcanisms. The best model for the EIC from the present study is found to be a two-layered crust, with a 14-km thick upper-crust (UC) of average shear velocity (Vs) of 3.0 km/s and a 26-km thick lower-crust (LC) of average Vs of 3.6 km/s. The present study detects a sharp drop in Vs (∼-2 to 3%) at 120-260 km depths, underlying the EIC, representing the probable seismic lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) at 120 km depth. Such sharp fall in Vs below the LAB indicates a partially molten layer. Further, a geothermal gradient extrapolated from the surface heat flow shows that such a gradient would intercept the wet basalt solidus at 88-103 km depths, suggesting a 88-103 km thick thermal lithosphere below the EIC. This could also signal the presence of small amounts of partial melts. Thus, this 2-3% drop in Vs could be attributed to the presence of partial melts in the

  13. Infrared spectral and carbon isotopic characteristics of micro- and macro-diamonds from the Panda kimberlite (Central Slave Craton, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melton, G. L.; Stachel, T.; Stern, R. A.; Carlson, J.; Harris, J. W.

    2013-09-01

    One hundred and twenty-one micro-diamonds (< 1 mm) and 90 macro-diamonds (2.5 mm to 3.4 mm) from the Panda kimberlite (Ekati mine, Central Slave Craton, Canada) were analyzed for nitrogen content, nitrogen aggregation state (%B) and platelet and hydrogen peak areas (cm- 2). Micro-diamond nitrogen concentrations range from < 10 at. ppm to 1696 at. ppm (median = 805 at. ppm) and the median aggregation state is 23%B. Macro-diamonds range from < 10 at. ppm to 1260 at. ppm (median = 187 at. ppm) nitrogen and have a median nitrogen aggregation of 26%B. Platelet and hydrogen peaks were observed in 37% and 79% of the micro-diamonds and 79% and 56% of the macro-diamonds, respectively. Nitrogen based time averaged residence temperatures indicate that micro- and macro-diamonds experienced similar thermal mantle residence histories, both populations displaying bimodal residence temperature distributions with a gap between 1130 °C and 1160 °C (at 3.5 Ga residence). In addition, SIMS carbon isotopic analyses for the micro-diamonds were obtained: δ13C compositions range from - 6.9‰ to + 1.8‰ (median = - 4.3‰). CL imaging reveals distinct growth layers that in some samples differ by > 2‰, but mostly vary by < 0.5‰. Comparison of only the “gem-quality” samples (n = 49 micro- and 90 macro-diamonds) between the two diamond sets, indicates a statistically significant shift of + 1.3‰ in average δ13C from macro- to micro-diamonds and this shift documents distinct diamond forming fluids, fractionation process or growth histories. A broad transition to heavier isotopic values is also observed in connection to decreasing mantle residence temperatures. The bimodal mantle residence temperature distribution may coincide with the transition from highly depleted shallow to more fertile deep lithospheric mantle observed beneath the Central Slave Craton. The increase in δ13C with decreasing residence temperature (proxy for decreasing depth) is interpreted to reflect diamond

  14. Large magnesium isotope fractionation in peridotite xenoliths from eastern North China craton: Product of melt-rock interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yan; Teng, Fang-Zhen; Zhang, Hong-Fu; Yang, Wei

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the effects of melt-rock interaction on Mg isotope fractionation and mantle Mg isotopic heterogeneity, we report high-precision Mg isotopic data of olivine (Ol), orthopyroxene (Opx), clinopyroxene (Cpx) and spinel (Spl) for 25 peridotite xenoliths from the eastern North China craton. These xenoliths range from lherzolites, Cpx-rich lherzolites to wehrlites, and are variably metasomatised. The lherzolites have Ol with Fo contents from 89 to 90 and have a homogeneous Mg isotopic composition (δ26Mg = -0.26 to -0.20), similar to the typical mantle value. By contrast, Cpx-rich lherzolites and wehrlites have lower Ol with Fo contents (78-88) and exhibit larger Mg isotopic variations, with δ26Mg ranging from -0.39 to +0.09. The δ26Mg values of minerals in these xenoliths are also variable and range from -0.45 to -0.03 in Ol, from -0.26 to -0.01 in Opx, from -0.34 to +0.22 in Cpx and from -0.16 to +0.25 in Spl. Inter-mineral fractionations between coexisting pyroxene and Ol in lherzolites and most isotopically light wehrlites (Δ26MgOpx-Ol = -0.04 to +0.09‰; Δ26MgCpx-Ol = + 0.02 to +0.25‰) vary as a function of temperature and are consistent with equilibrium inter-mineral isotope fractionations. By contrast, large disequilibrium Mg isotope fractionation occurs between coexisting pyroxene and Ol in the majority of Cpx-rich lherzolites (Δ26MgOpx-Ol = +0.16 to +0.32‰; Δ26MgCpx-Ol = +0.04 to +0.34‰). Both types of isotope fractionations also occur between Spl and Ol, with Spl being consistently heavier than Ol (Δ26MgSpl-Ol = +0.15 to +0.55‰). Overall, the isotopically equilibrated but light wehrlites may result from mantle metasomatism by isotopically light melt, whereas large disequilibrium isotope fractionations in Cpx-rich peridotites likely reflect kinetic isotope fractionation during melt-peridotite interaction. Both processes result in the heterogeneous Mg isotopic composition of the lithospheric mantle beneath the eastern North China

  15. Gold deposits of the northern margin of the North China craton: Multiple late Paleozoic-Mesozoic mineralizing events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, C.J.R.; Goldfarb, R.J.; Qiu, Y.; Snee, L.; Miller, L.D.; Miller, M.L.

    2002-01-01

    The northern margin of the North China craton is well-endowed with lode gold deposits hosting a resource of approximately 900 tonnes (t) of gold. The ???1,500-km-long region is characterized by east-trending blocks of metamorphosed Archean and Proterozoic strata that were episodically uplifted during Variscan, Indosinian, and Yanshanian deformational and magmatic events. At least 12 gold deposits from the Daqinshan, Yan-Liao (includes the Zhangjiakou, Yanshan, and Chifeng gold districts), and Changbaishan gold provinces contain resources of 20-100 t Au each. Most deposits are hosted in uplifted blocks of Precambrian metamorphic rocks, although felsic Paleozoic and Mesozoic plutons are typically proximal and host ???30% of the deposits. The lodes are characterized by sulfide-poor quartz veins in brittle structures with low base metal values and high Au:Ag ratios. Although phyllic alteration is most common, intensive alkali feldspar metasomatism characterizes the Wulashan, Dongping, and Zhongshangou deposits, but is apparently coeval with Variscan alkalic magmatism only at Wulashan. Stepwise 40Ar-39Ar geochronology on 16 samples from gangue and alteration phases, combined with unpublished SHRIMP U-Pb dates on associated granitoids, suggest that gold mineralizing events occured during Variscan, Indosinian, and Yanshanian orogenies at circa 350, 250, 200, 180, 150, and 129 Ma. However, widespread Permo-Triassic (???250 Ma) and Early Jurassic (???180 Ma) thermal events caused variable resetting of most of the white mica and K-feldspar argon spectra, as well as previously reported K-Ar determinations. Compiled and new stable isotope and fluid inclusion data show that most ??18O values for ore-stage veins range from 8 to 14???, indicating a fluid in equilibrium with the Precambrian metamorphic basement rocks; ??D values from fluid inclysions range widely from -64 to -154???, which is indicative of a local meteoric component in some veins; and highly variable ??34S data

  16. Radioelemental, petrological and geochemical characterization of the Bundelkhand craton, central India: implication in the Archaean geodynamic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Labani; Nagaraju, P.; Singh, S. P.; Ravi, G.; Roy, Sukanta

    2016-06-01

    We have carried out radioelemental (232Th, 238U, 40K), petrological and geochemical analyses on granitoids and gneisses covering major rock formations of the Bundelkhand craton, central India. Our data reveal that above characteristics are distinct among granitoids (i.e. pink, biotite and grey granitoids) and gneisses (i.e. potassic and sodic types). Pink granitoid is K-feldspar-rich and meta-aluminous to per-aluminous in character. Biotite granitoid is meta-aluminous in character. Grey granitoid is rich in Na-feldspar and mafic minerals, granodiorite to diorite in composition and meta-aluminous in character. Among these granitoids, radioelements (Th, U, K) are highest in pink granitoid (45.0 ± 21.7 ppm, 7.2 ± 3.4 ppm, 4.2 ± 0.4 %), intermediate in biotite granitoid (44.5 ± 28.2 ppm, 5.4 ± 2.8 ppm, 3.4 ± 0.7 %) and lowest in grey granitoid (17.7 ± 4.3 ppm, 4.4 ± 0.6 ppm, 3.0 ± 0.4 %). Among gneisses, potassic-type gneisses have higher radioelements (11.8 ± 5.3 ppm, 3.1 ± 1.2 ppm, 2.0 ± 0.5 %) than the sodic-type gneisses (5.6 ± 2.8 ppm, 1.3 ± 0.5 ppm, 1.4 ± 0.7 %). Moreover, the pink granitoid and the biotite granitoid have higher Th/U (6 and 8, respectively) compared to the grey granitoid (Th/U: 4), implying enrichment of Th in pink and biotite granitoids relative to grey granitoid. K/U among pink, biotite and grey granitoids shows little variation (0.6 × 104, 0.6 × 104, 0.7 × 104, respectively), indicating relatively similar increase in K and U. Therefore, mineralogical and petrological data along with radioelemental ratios suggest that radioelemental variations in these lithounits are mainly related to abundances of the radioactive minerals that have formed by the fractionation of LILE from different magma sources. Based on present data, the craton can be divided into three distinct zones that can be correlated with its evolution in time and space. The central part, where gneisses are associated with metavolcanics of greenstone belt, is

  17. Mesoproterozoic evolution of the Río de la Plata Craton in Uruguay: at the heart of Rodinia?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaucher, Claudio; Frei, Robert; Chemale, Farid; Frei, Dirk; Bossi, Jorge; Martínez, Gabriela; Chiglino, Leticia; Cernuschi, Federico

    2011-04-01

    Mesoproterozoic volcanosedimentary units and tectonic events occurring in the Río de la Plata Craton (RPC) are reviewed. A belt consisting of volcanosedimentary successions exhibiting greenschist-facies metamorphism is exposed in the eastern RPC (Nico Pérez Terrane) in Uruguay. The Parque UTE Group consists of basic volcanics and gabbros at the base (1,492 ± 4 Ma, U-Pb on zircon), carbonates in its middle part and interbedded carbonates, shales and acid volcanics (1,429 ± 21 Ma, U-Pb on zircon) at the top. The Mina Verdún Group is made up of rhyolites and acid pyroclastics at its base and top, and Conophyton-bearing limestones and massive dolostones in the middle. A U-Pb LA-ICP MS zircon age of 1,433 ± 6 Ma is reported here for lapilli-tuffs at the base of the Mina Verdún Group (Cerro de las Víboras Formation). This age shows that the Mina Verdún Group immediately postdates the Parque UTE Group, a fact supported by carbon isotope chemostratigraphy. Both units were deformed and metamorphosed between 1.25 and 1.20 Ga, as shown by K-Ar and Ar-Ar ages. This tectonic event affected most of the RPC and led to the accretion of the Nico Pérez Terrane to the remainder of the RPC along the Sarandí del Yí megashear. We report a U-Pb LA-ICP MS zircon age (upper intercept) of 3,096 ± 45 Ma for metatonalites of the La China Complex (Nico Pérez Terrane), which yield a lower intercept age of 1,252 Ma. A proto-Andean, Mesoproterozoic belt is envisaged to account for abundant Mesoproterozoic detrital zircon ages occurring in Ediacaran sandstones of the RPC. If the RPC is fringed at both sides by Mesoproterozoic, Grenville-aged belts it is likely that it occupied a rather central position in Rodinia. A possible location between Laurentia and the Kalahari Craton, and to the south of Amazonia, is suggested.

  18. Growth faulting and syntectonic casting of the Dawson Creek Graben Complex: A North American craton-marginal trough; Carboniferous-Permian Peace River Embayment, western Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Barclay, J.E.; Utting, J. ); Krause, F.F.; Campbell, R.I. )

    1991-06-01

    The Dawson Creek Graben Complex was a 150 {times} 300 km, craton-perpendicular trough near the western North American craton margin. Sedimentary infill spanned 100 million years, and this tectonically controlled basin provides a comparison with other craton-marginal troughs or aulacogens, such as the Big Snowy, Uinta, Delaware, and Southern Oklahoma. The authors suspect that the graben complex was controlled by outboard, Antler-like orogeny and perhaps some strike-slip control. This syntectonic graben infill model provides a basis for developing new structural-stratigraphic plays in this mature basin. This extensional trough rests on a former basement arch and is centered in the broadly downwarped Peace River embayment. Sediment infill records several graben casting stages beginning with westernmost down-dropping, which then extended eastward and was accompanied by an increase in growth-type block faulting. Subsidence and faulting decay was followed by a retreat to western areas and tectonic stabilization. The complex was an arcuate half-graben, steep to the north, that widened asymmetrically and increased in depth to the west through time. The complex contained a principal half-graben with neighboring satellite grabens; throughout the complex are numerous kilometer-scale horst and graben blocks. The horsts subsided slower than neighboring grabens. This differential subsidence along block-bounding syn- and postdepositional growth-type normal faults controlled formation and bed thickness, as did inter- and intraformational unconformities.

  19. [Study on the Micro-FTIR Spectra of the Euhedral Faceted Polycrystalline Diamonds (EFPCDs) from Western Yangtze Craton and Its Geological Significance].

    PubMed

    Hu, Piao-ye; Zeng, Liang-liang; Yang, Zhi-jun; Fu, Hai-fu; Liu, Si-wei; Shen, Wen-jie; Peng, Zhuo-lun

    2015-06-01

    The results of Micro-FTIR spectra analysis of the euhedral faceted polycrystalline diamonds (EFPCDs) from the Western Yangtze Craton show that the EFPCDs are mostly IaAB type, the concentration of nitrogen.varies greatly from 25. 70- 358.35 μg x g(-1). Different nitrogen content distributes in different diamond grains or position in same sample. The C Center was not found in the samples and the conversion from A center to B center is incomplete, in the meanwhile, B% value concentrated in 40%. Thus, polycrystalline diamonds are not formed in the stage of nucleation but gathered together after formation of the individual diamond grains during the residence time in the mantle. And its formation environment is. more complex than the euhedral faceted polycrystalline diamonds from Mengyin kimberlite, the Eastern of North China Craton. The diamonds extremely possibly originated in the deep mantle from 160 to 180 km, reaching the depth of the core of the Yangtze Craton, at the same time it is close to the bottom of the lithosphere. The C-H bond of sp2 hybridization are conducive to the formation of platelets in diamonds. Meanwhile, its concentrations are generally higher than the C-H bond of sp3 hybridization in the samples.

  20. Sequence stratigraphy of the Upper Cambrian (Furongian; Jiangshanian and Sunwaptan) Tunnel City Group, Upper Mississippi Valley: Transgressing assumptions of cratonic flooding

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eoff, Jennifer D.

    2014-01-01

    New data from detailed measured sections permit comprehensive analysis of the sequence framework of the Furongian (Upper Cambrian; Jiangshanian and Sunwaptan stages) Tunnel City Group (Lone Rock Formation and Mazomanie Formation) of Wisconsin and Minnesota. The sequence-stratigraphic architecture of the lower part of the Sunwaptan Stage at the base of the Tunnel City Group, at the contact between the Wonewoc Formation and Lone Rock Formation, records the first part of complex polyphase flooding (Sauk III) of the Laurentian craton, at a scale smaller than most events recorded by global sea-level curves. Flat-pebble conglomerate and glauconite document transgressive ravinement and development of a condensed section when creation of accommodation exceeded its consumption by sedimentation. Thinly-bedded, fossiliferous sandstone represents the most distal setting during earliest highstand. Subsequent deposition of sandstone characterized by hummocky or trough cross-stratification records progradational pulses of shallower, storm- and wave-dominated environments across the craton before final flooding of Sauk III commenced with carbonate deposition during the middle part of the Sunwaptan Stage. Comparison of early Sunwaptan flooding of the inner Laurentian craton to published interpretations from other parts of North America suggests that Sauk III was not a single, long-term accommodation event as previously proposed.

  1. Plio-pleistocene African climate

    SciTech Connect

    deMenocal, P.B.

    1995-10-06

    Marine records of African climate variability document a shift toward more arid conditions after 2.8 million years ago (Ma), evidently resulting from remote forcing by cold North Atlantic sea-surface temperatures associated with the onset of Northern Hemisphere glacial cycles. African climate before 2.8 Ma was regulated by low-latitude insolation forcing of monsoonal climate due to Earth orbital precession. Major steps in the evolution of African hominids and other vertebrates are coincident with shifts to more arid, open conditions near 2.8 Ma, 1.7 Ma, and 1.0 Ma, suggesting that some Pliocene (Plio)-Pleistocene speciation events may have been climatically mediated. 65 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Plio-Pleistocene African Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demenocal, Peter B.

    1995-10-01

    Marine records of African climate variability document a shift toward more arid conditions after 2.8 million years ago (Ma), evidently resulting from remote forcing by cold North Atlantic sea-surface temperatures associated with the onset of Northern Hemisphere glacial cycles. African climate before 2.8 Ma was regulated by low-latitude insolation forcing of monsoonal climate due to Earth orbital precession. Major steps in the evolution of African hominids and other vertebrates are coincident with shifts to more arid, open conditions near 2.8 Ma, 1.7 Ma, and 1.0 Ma, suggesting that some Pliocene (Plio)-Pleistocene speciation events may have been climatically mediated.

  3. African perceptions of female attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, Vinet; Faerber, Stella J; Greeff, Jaco M; Lefevre, Carmen E; Re, Daniel E; Perrett, David I

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about mate choice preferences outside Western, educated, industrialised, rich and democratic societies, even though these Western populations may be particularly unrepresentative of human populations. To our knowledge, this is the first study to test which facial cues contribute to African perceptions of African female attractiveness and also the first study to test the combined role of facial adiposity, skin colour (lightness, yellowness and redness), skin homogeneity and youthfulness in the facial attractiveness preferences of any population. Results show that youthfulness, skin colour, skin homogeneity and facial adiposity significantly and independently predict attractiveness in female African faces. Younger, thinner women with a lighter, yellower skin colour and a more homogenous skin tone are considered more attractive. These findings provide a more global perspective on human mate choice and point to a universal role for these four facial cues in female facial attractiveness.

  4. The African Cultural Astronomy Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urama, Johnson O.; Holbrook, Jarita C.

    2011-06-01

    Indigenous, endogenous, traditional, or cultural astronomy focuses on the many ways that people and cultures interact with celestial bodies. In most parts of Africa, there is very little or no awareness about modern astronomy. However, like ancient people everywhere, Africans wondered at the sky and strugg