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Sample records for african craton wac

  1. Paleogeographic Evolution of the Late Neoproterozoic and Early Phanerozoic with New Paleomagnetic Constraints from West African Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, B.; Besse, J.; Blein, O.; Greff-Lefftz, M.; Baudin, T.; Fernando, L.; Meslouh, S.; Belbadaoui, M.

    2015-12-01

    The paleogeographic evolution of the late Neoproterozoic and early Phanerozoic is dominated by the dispersion of Rodinia and the assembly of Gondwana. The timing of these two episodes is still highly debated, partly due to the low number of good quality paleomagnetic data. In order to better constrain the paleogeography for this epoch, we bring new paleomagnetic data on volcanic series from the West African Craton (WAC), which is a key block to understand the evolution of these two supercontinents. We have sampled well dated pyroclastic and lava flows from the groups of Ouarzazate (upper Ediacaran) and Taroudant (lower Cambrian) in the Anti-Atlas (Morocco). 500 samples from 105 sites were thermally demagnetized in laboratory. Our results highlight two major groups of directions, mainly carried by minerals of the titano-hematite family. Magnetite may also contribute sometimes to the magnetization. The first group displays a single polarity direction, with a shallow inclination and a south-east declination. This direction close to the expected direction derived from the Permo-Carboniferous segment of the Gondwana apparent polar wander path (APWP) is due to a remagnetization acquired during the Kiaman reversed polarity superchron (320-262Ma). The second group, observed in the Ouarzazate and Taroudant groups, consists of a dual polarity high inclination direction and may represent the characteristic magnetization. On the basis of geologic and paleomagnetic data from literature, we constructed an APWP for both WAC and Amazonia between 615 and 530Ma, assuming these two blocks were already accreted. We found a paleomagnetic solution in which Laurentia and WAC-Amazonia remained attached from ~615Ma up to the late Ediacaran, Laurentia remaining at low latitude during this period. Around ~550Ma, WAC-Amazonia separated from Laurentia and finally collided with the other Gondwanan blocks during the lower Cambrian, marking the final accretion of Gondwana.

  2. Evolution of a Paleoproterozoic “weak type” orogeny in the West African Craton (Ivory Coast)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, M.; Gumiaux, C.; Cagnard, F.; Pouclet, A.; Ouattara, G.; Pichon, M.

    2009-11-01

    The Paleoproterozoic domain of the Ivory Coast lies in the central part of the West African Craton (WAC) and is mainly constituted by TTG, greenstones, supracrustal rocks and leucogranites. A compilation of metamorphic and radiometric data highlights that: i) metamorphic conditions are rather homogeneous through the domain, without important metamorphic jumps, ii) HP-LT assemblages are absent and iii) important volumes of magmas emplaced during the overall Paleoproterozoic orogeny suggesting the occurrence of long-lived rather hot geotherms. Results of the structural analysis, focused on three areas within the Ivory Coast, suggest that the deformation is homogeneous and distributed through the Paleoproterozoic domain. In details, results of this study point out the long-lived character of vertical movements during the Eburnean orogeny with a two folds evolution. The first stage is characterized by the development of "domes and basins" geometries without any boundary tectonic forces and the second stage is marked by coeval diapiric movements and horizontal regional-scale shortening. These features suggest that the crust is affected by vertical movements during the overall orogeny. The Eburnean orogen can then be considered as an example of long-lived Paleoproterozoic "weak type" orogen.

  3. Were the African and South American cratons part of Rodinia?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröner, A.; Cordani, U. G.; D'Agrella-Filho, M. S.; Brito-Neves, B. B.

    2003-04-01

    The current geochronological and palaeomagnetic database casts doubt on the proposal that the cratons and late Mesoproterozoic and early Neoproterozoic rocks of Africa and South America have played any role in the formation and dispersal of the supercontinent Rodinia, believed to have existed between ˜1000 and 750 Ma ago. First, there is little evidence for the production of large volumes of ˜1.4-1.0 Ga (Kibaran- or Grenvillian-age) continental crust in the Mozambique belt (MB) of East Africa and Madagascar, except, perhaps, in parts of northern Mozambique. This is also valid for most terrains related to West Gondwana, which are made up of basement rocks older than Mesoproterozoic, reworked in the Brasiliano/Pan-African orogenic cycle. This crust cannot be conclusively related to either magmatic accretion processes on the active margin of Rodinia or continental collision leading to amalgamation of the supercontinent. Second, there is no conclusive evidence for a ˜1.0 Ga high-grade metamorphic event in the MB, and the same goes for the Neoproterozoic tectonic belts of South America and West Africa. Third, there is also no evidence for post-1000 Ma sedimentary sequences that were deposited on the passive margin(s) of Rodinia. In contrast, the MB is characterized by extensive structural reworking and metamorphic overprinting of Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic rocks, and these either constitute marginal parts of cratonic domains or represent crustal blocks (terranes or microcontinents?) of unknown derivation. This is also the case for most terrains included in the Borborema/Trans-Saharan belt of northeastern Brazil and West-Central Africa, as well as those of the Central Goiás Massif in central Brazil and the Mantiqueira Province of eastern and southeastern Brazil. There is evidence for extensive granitoid magmatism in the time period ˜950 to <600 Ma whose predominant calc-alkaline chemistry suggests subduction-related active margin processes during the assembly of

  4. African hot spot volcanism: small-scale convection in the upper mantle beneath cratons.

    PubMed

    King, S D; Ritsema, J

    2000-11-10

    Numerical models demonstrate that small-scale convection develops in the upper mantle beneath the transition of thick cratonic lithosphere and thin oceanic lithosphere. These models explain the location and geochemical characteristics of intraplate volcanos on the African and South American plates. They also explain the presence of relatively high seismic shear wave velocities (cold downwellings) in the mantle transition zone beneath the western margin of African cratons and the eastern margin of South American cratons. Small-scale, edge-driven convection is an alternative to plumes for explaining intraplate African and South American hot spot volcanism, and small-scale convection is consistent with mantle downwellings beneath the African and South American lithosphere. PMID:11073447

  5. Lower Cambrian-Ediacaran Paleogeography and True Polar Wander with New Paleomagnetic Constraints from West African Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, B.; Besse, J.; Blein, O.; Greff-Lefftz, M.; Baudin, T.; Fernando, L.; Meslouh, S.; Belbadaoui, M.

    2014-12-01

    Paleomagnetic data from Laurentia and Baltica continents suggest fast large oscillations of the virtual geomagnetic poles (VGP) from high to low latitudes during the Ediacaran (635-542 Ma). These data are interpreted in the literature either as oscillations of the Earth magnetic dipole between polar and equatorial positions, or as True Polar Wander (TPW), implying a very fast tumbling of continents and perhaps, of whole Earth. In this study, we try to test these hypotheses by bringing new paleomagnetic data on volcanic series from another continent, the West African Craton (WAC). We have sampled well dated pyroclastic and lava flows from the Ouarzazate and Taroudant groups in the Anti-Atlas, (Morocco). 480 samples from 105 sites were thermally demagnetized in our laboratory. Our preliminary results highlight two major groups of directions, mainly carried by hematite, magnetite also contributing sometimes to the magnetization. The first group consists of a dual polarity high inclination direction that may represent the original magnetization. The observed paleolatitude is compatible with that predicted by the lower Cambrian-Ediacaran apparent polar wander path (APWP) of Gondwana, assuming that the WAC was already accreted to Gondwana at this age. Nevertheless, a complete agreement between our pole and the APWP needs a local rotation of around 80° on a vertical axis. The second group displays a single polarity direction, with a shallow inclination and a south-east declination. This direction is close to the expected direction derived from the Permo-Carboniferous segment of the Gondwana APWP, and may represent a remagnetization acquired during the Kiaman reversed polarity superchron. Our preliminary paleomagnetic results thus display large changes in the VGP position, as also evidenced by others on Baltica and Laurentia. However, their interpretation does not favor TPW episodes or equatorial Earth magnetic dipole during the lower Cambrian-Ediacaran periods, but

  6. U-Pb baddeleyite and zircon ages of 2040 Ma, 1650 Ma and 885 Ma on dolerites in the West African Craton (Anti-Atlas inliers): Possible links to break-up of Precambrian supercontinents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouyaté, Djiky; Söderlund, Ulf; Youbi, Nasrrddine; Ernst, Richard; Hafid, Ahmid; Ikenne, Moha; Soulaimani, Abderrahmane; Bertrand, Hervé; El Janati, M'hamed; R'kha Chaham, Khalid

    2013-08-01

    Precambrian inliers of the Anti-Atlas belt in the southern part of Morocco contain numerous dolerite dyke and sill swarms which were previously poorly dated. Four dykes and two sills dated by the U-Pb TIMS method on baddeleyite and zircon provide the first steps toward a magmatic ‘barcode' for the West African Craton (WAC) and constraints on the timing of breakup of the WAC from Precambrian supercontinents. A 2040 ± 2 Ma (U-Pb zircon) age for a WNW dyke in the Zenaga inlier, matches the published age of a dyke in the Tagragra of Tata inlier, and also those of Eburnean granites observed in several inliers, which are collectively interpreted to represent ca. 2040 Ma bimodal magmatism due to a mantle plume. Based on the presence of matching 2040 Ma ages, the WAC may have been connected to the North Atlantic Craton at the initial stage of fragmentation of a late Archean continent. U-Pb baddeleyite ages of 1656 ± 9 Ma and ca. 1655 Ma from sills in the Zenaga inlier and 1654 ± 16 Ma from a NE-trending dyke in the Agadir Melloul inlier are similar to intraplate magmatic ages in eastern and northern Baltica, and support the SAMBA reconstruction (part of the Nuna supercontinent) of the WAC adjacent to Baltica. Approximate U-Pb ages of 885 Ma for two dykes in the Iguerda-Taïfast and Zenaga inliers date a NE trending swarm (named herein the Iguerda-Taïfast swarm) which is connected to the initial breakup of the supercontinent Rodinia, and a specific link with the São Francisco/Congo and North China craton is considered.

  7. Mantle insulation beneath the West African craton during the Precambrian-Cambrian transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doblas, Miguel; López-Ruiz, José; Cebriá, José-María; Youbi, Nasrrddine; Degroote, Eugenio

    2002-09-01

    At the time of the Precambrian-Cambrian transition, the West African craton underwent widespread magmatism, hydrothermal activity, and thermal rejuvenation. This tectonothermal event gave rise to an anorogenic “ring of fire” along the rim of this craton, following the Pan-African Brasiliano belt that was reactivated by extension and transtension. The thermal phenomena were due to the progressive peripheral release of mantle heat that had built up beneath this craton because of strong insulating conditions. The West African craton at the Precambrian-Cambrian transition can thus be envisioned in terms of a gigantic pressure-cooker with a thick blanketing lithospheric lid. These insulation processes triggered an unusually hot mantle that was channeled by edge-driven convection toward the peri West African craton extensional corridors and released through magmatic pressure-relief valves. Massive ice melting and outgassing of volcanic CO2 gave rise to a planet-scale sea-level rise, a greenhouse effect, and the end of the icehouse snowball Earth. These processes played an important role in the Phanerozoic explosion of life on Earth.

  8. Tectonic evolution of the Oudalan-Gorouol greenstone belt in NE Burkina Faso and Niger, West African craton.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tshibubudze, Asinne; Hein, Kim A. A.

    2010-05-01

    The Oudalan-Gorouol Greenstone Belt (OGGB) forms part of the Palaeoproterozoic as the Baoulé-Mossi domain of the West African Craton (WAC) and hosts gold deposits at Essakane, Gossey, Korizena, and Falagountou in NE Burkina Faso, and Kossa goldfield in Niger. The Birimian supracrustal sequences in the OGGB are dominated by meta-volcanoclastic greywacke intercalated meta-conglomerate, siltstone and shale, carbonate (dolomite) and volcanic units pillow basalts). The belt is surrounded by plutonic rocks including granite, TTG suite granitoids and granite gneiss. The sequences where subjected to two phases of deformation, and several phases of contact metamorphosed to hornblende-hornfels facies during emplacement of pyroxenite-gabbro-norite, granodiorite-tonalite and gabbro dykes and porphyritic sills. The OGGB is bounded and/or crosscut by several major NNE to NE-trending shear zones including the steeply east-dipping Markoye Shear Zone (western margin of the OGGB), Tin Takanet-Bellekcire Shear Zone, Dori Shear Zone, Kargouna Shear Zone, Takabougou Shear Zone, and Bom Kodjelé Shear Zone (transects the centre of the OGGB). The structures were readily identified using LANDSAT, Aster, aeromagnetic and RTP magnetic data, with follow-up strategic mapping, highlighting the value of interpreting geophysical and remotely sensed data in regional mapping in Burkina Faso and Niger. Structural studies completed in 2007 adjacent to the Essakane gold mine indicated that the NE-trending, first-order crustal-scale Markoye Shear Zone (MSZ) has undergone at least two phases of reactivation concomitant to two phases of regional deformation (Tshibubudze et al., 2009). The first phase of deformation, D1, resulted in the formation of NNW-NW trending folds and thrusts during dextral-reverse displacement on the MSZ. The deformation predates the Eburnean Orogeny is termed the Tangaean Event (meaning low hills in the Moré language of Burkina Faso) and is tentatively dated at ca. 2170

  9. Upper mantle structure beneath southern African cratons from seismic finite-frequency P- and S-body wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssof, M.; Thybo, H.; Artemieva, I. M.; Levander, A.

    2015-06-01

    We present a 3D high-resolution seismic model of the southern African cratonic region from teleseismic tomographic inversion of the P- and S-body wave dataset recorded by the Southern African Seismic Experiment (SASE). Utilizing 3D sensitivity kernels, we invert traveltime residuals of teleseismic body waves to calculate velocity anomalies in the upper mantle down to a 700 km depth with respect to the ak135 reference model. Various resolution tests allow evaluation of the extent of smearing effects and help defining the optimum inversion parameters (i.e., damping and smoothness) for regularizing the inversion calculations. The fast lithospheric keels of the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe cratons reach depths of 300-350 km and 200-250 km, respectively. The paleo-orogenic Limpopo Belt is represented by negative velocity perturbations down to a depth of ˜ 250 km, implying the presence of chemically fertile material with anomalously low wave speeds. The Bushveld Complex has low velocity down to ˜ 150 km, which is attributed to chemical modification of the cratonic mantle. In the present model, the finite-frequency sensitivity kernels allow to resolve relatively small-scale anomalies, such as the Colesberg Magnetic Lineament in the suture zone between the eastern and western blocks of the Kaapvaal Craton, and a small northern block of the Kaapvaal Craton, located between the Limpopo Belt and the Bushveld Complex.

  10. Tectonic evolution of the Oudalan-Gorouol greenstone belt in NE Burkina Faso and Niger, West African craton.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tshibubudze, Asinne; Hein, Kim A. A.

    2010-05-01

    The Oudalan-Gorouol Greenstone Belt (OGGB) forms part of the Palaeoproterozoic as the Baoulé-Mossi domain of the West African Craton (WAC) and hosts gold deposits at Essakane, Gossey, Korizena, and Falagountou in NE Burkina Faso, and Kossa goldfield in Niger. The Birimian supracrustal sequences in the OGGB are dominated by meta-volcanoclastic greywacke intercalated meta-conglomerate, siltstone and shale, carbonate (dolomite) and volcanic units pillow basalts). The belt is surrounded by plutonic rocks including granite, TTG suite granitoids and granite gneiss. The sequences where subjected to two phases of deformation, and several phases of contact metamorphosed to hornblende-hornfels facies during emplacement of pyroxenite-gabbro-norite, granodiorite-tonalite and gabbro dykes and porphyritic sills. The OGGB is bounded and/or crosscut by several major NNE to NE-trending shear zones including the steeply east-dipping Markoye Shear Zone (western margin of the OGGB), Tin Takanet-Bellekcire Shear Zone, Dori Shear Zone, Kargouna Shear Zone, Takabougou Shear Zone, and Bom Kodjelé Shear Zone (transects the centre of the OGGB). The structures were readily identified using LANDSAT, Aster, aeromagnetic and RTP magnetic data, with follow-up strategic mapping, highlighting the value of interpreting geophysical and remotely sensed data in regional mapping in Burkina Faso and Niger. Structural studies completed in 2007 adjacent to the Essakane gold mine indicated that the NE-trending, first-order crustal-scale Markoye Shear Zone (MSZ) has undergone at least two phases of reactivation concomitant to two phases of regional deformation (Tshibubudze et al., 2009). The first phase of deformation, D1, resulted in the formation of NNW-NW trending folds and thrusts during dextral-reverse displacement on the MSZ. The deformation predates the Eburnean Orogeny is termed the Tangaean Event (meaning low hills in the Moré language of Burkina Faso) and is tentatively dated at ca. 2170

  11. Southern African perspectives on the long-term morpho-tectonic evolution of cratonic interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kounov, Alexandre; Viola, Giulio; Dunkl, István; Frimmel, Hartwig E.

    2013-08-01

    We propose a refined conceptual model for the Paleo- and Mesozoic morpho-tectonic evolution of the southern African cratonic interior. Constraints are derived from new zircon and apatite fission-track and (U-Th-[Sm])/He dates (ZFT, AFT, ZHe and AHe) of rocks from the Augrabies Falls and Fish River Canyon regions in South Africa and southern Namibia, respectively. The combined ZFT and ZHe thermochronological results suggest a smooth and simple tectonic evolution, wherein the study area cooled monotonically as one coherent block from the Early Silurian to the Mid Triassic in response to very low denudation rates of less than 5 m/myr. Some of the new zircon ages may indicate a discrete and short-lived period of enhanced cooling interrupting this monotonic cooling during the Mid Devonian-Early Carboniferous. We tentatively correlate this episode to the events that caused the regional hiatus that separates the Cape Supergroup from the overlying Karoo Supergroup. Apatite fission-track and (U-Th-[Sm])/He data joint modeling reveals a period of accelerated regional cooling through 120 to 40 °C between 100 and 65 Ma ago. We interpret the latter as most probably due to regional uplift in combination with high river gradients and enhanced erosion rates in the Orange and Fish River basins, which, during the Cretaceous, were probably part of the greater Kalahari River catchment area. Based on the apatite results, a denudation rate of ca. 25 m/myr was calculated for the Late Cretaceous. At that time the area was probably characterized by an elevated average altitude and low relief, as indicated by the AFT and AHe age patterns.

  12. Analogies Between the East African Rift Around the Tanzania Craton and the Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montesi, L. G.

    2013-12-01

    Continental rifts and oceanic spreading centers both accommodate plate divergence but their morphologies are often quite different. Yet, ultraslow spreading centers, especially the Southwest Indian ridge at the 9 to 16°E area (SWIR), present good analogies for the East African Rift (EAR), including localized volcanism, avolcanic segments, and a continuous but not straight rift axis. The archetypal oceanic spreading center features transform offsets. Volcanism is continuous along the ridge axis and is most vigorous at the center of spreading segments. By contrast, continental rifts do not feature transform offsets. The orientation of the rift can change along strike. Several rift segments are purely tectonic, with relatively isolated volcanic centers. The EAR around the Tanzania Craton clearly shows this kind of morphology. Ultraslow spreading centers share many of these features. The SWIR, in particular, displays dramatic changes in orientation, with volcanism localized at the junction between segments of different obliquity. Melt production and transport are controlled by the effective spreading rate, a combination of plate divergence velocity and rift obliquity. Ultraslow spreading center all have an effective spreading rate less than 13 mm/yr. At that speed the thickness of the thermal boundary layer is similar to the depth from which magma can be effectively extracted, opening the possibility for long-distance transport of magma along axis without extraction. Volcanic centers correspond to the location where the magma transport system first encounters a tectonically damaged zone that enables extraction to the surface. The effective velocity of the EAR in the Kenya dome is less than 4mm/yr firmly on par with ultraslow ridges. In fact, to generate magma by mantle upwelling at such a slow opening rate requires a higher mantle temperature or fertility than in the oceanic domain. Both opening rate and effective velocity increase northward along the Eastern branch

  13. New Constraints on Amazonian Versus West African Cratonic Source Components of the Peri-Gondwanan Sedimentary Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schofield, D. I.; Horstwood, M. S.

    2009-05-01

    Unravelling the Palaeogeography of the Peri-Gondwanan terranes during the Early Palaeozoic is in part predicated on the interpretation of detrital zircon analyses from the continental margin sedimentary basins compared to potential source regions. Recent reviews of available detrital zircon data (e.g. Nance et al., 2008) reflect the strong control of the source regions with Gander, Avalonia, Carolina and the cratonic Central American terranes strongly biased toward an Amazonia-Baltica-Laurentia provenance, shown by the relative abundance of Mesoproterozoic zircon populations. In contrast, Meguma, Florida, Cadomia, Iberia and Bohemia show a relative absence of Mesoproterozoic populations and a bias toward palaeoproterozoic populations characteristic of the Eburnean orogeny of the West African Craton. However, understanding of the age compositions of the source areas is often based on sparse, often quite old data. Here, the source regions of the West African Craton are reviewed in light of new U-Pb LA-MC-ICP-MS data from the Reguibat Shield and adjacent Mauritenide orogenic belt, and the implications for the relative dispersal of the peri-Gondwanan terranes considered. Present understanding of the West African source region is based largely on the, historically more economic and better studied, Man Shield of equatorial West Africa. In common with the Man Shield, the Reguibat comprises a western 'Archaean' domain and an eastern Palaeoproterozoic or 'Eburnean' domain. Published U-Pb zircon age data from the western domain show that the Mesoarchaean nuclei in the SW of the shield is relatively abundant in ca. 2.95 and 2.9 Ga magmatic rocks, but preserves a record of earlier ca. 3.5-3.4 Ma magmatism and metamorphism. However, new data from the eastern margin of this domain indicate the presence of previously unrecorded extensive Neoarchaean granite migmatite terrane, making up approximately 25% of the exposed area of the shield, yielding ages between ca. 2.7 and 2.45 Ga

  14. Modes, tempo, and spatial variability of Cenozoic cratonic denudation: The West African example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauvais, Anicet; Chardon, Dominique

    2013-05-01

    long-term erosion of tropical shields is crucial to constraining the role of lateritic regolith covers as prominent sinks and sources of CO2 and sediments in the context of long-term Cenozoic climate change. It is also a key to understanding long-term landform evolution processes operating over most of the continental surface and their control onto the sediment routing system. We study the surface evolution of West Africa over three erosion periods (~ 45-24, ~ 24-11 and ~ 11-0 Ma) recorded by relicts of three subcontinental-scale lateritic paleolandsurfaces whose age is bracketed by 39Ar/40Ar dating of lateritic K-Mn oxides. Denudation depths and rates compiled from 380 field stations show that despite heterogeneities confined to early-inherited reliefs, the subregion underwent low and homogeneous denudation (~ 2-20 m Ma-1) over most of its surface whatever the considered time interval. This homogeneity is further documented by a worldwide compilation of cratonic denudation rates, over long-term, intermediate and modern Cenozoic time scales (100-107 yr). These results allow defining a steady state cratonic denudation regime that is weathering-limited, i.e., controlled by the thickness of the (lateritic) regolith available for stripping. Steady state cratonic denudation regimes are enabled by maintained compartmentalization of the base levels between river knick points controlled by relief inheritance. Under such regimes, lowering of base levels and their fossilization are primarily imposed by long-term eustatic sea level fall and climate rather than by epeirogeny. The expression of steady state cratonic denudation regimes in clastic sedimentary fluxes remains to be investigated.

  15. Seismic structure of the crust and lithospheric mantle of the southern African cratonic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssof, M.; Thybo, H.; Artemieva, I. M.; Levander, A.

    2013-12-01

    We present a new seismic model for the structure of the crust and lithospheric mantle in southern Africa constrained by a joint study of seismic receiver functions and finite-frequency tomography, using the high-quality data from the South Africa Seismic Experiment (SASE). A) The crust has a highly heterogeneous structure with short wavelength variations in (i) thickness, (ii) composition (reflected in Vp/Vs-ratio calculated for all SASE stations), and (iii) Moho sharpness (which is quantified and mapped for the entire region) (Youssof et al., Tectonophysics, in review). By mapping these three parameters, we distinguish ~20 crustal blocks that do not everywhere coincide with surface tectonic features. Our RFs also demonstrate strong azimuthal anisotropy in the crust, with a typical crustal contribution to the total S-wave splitting of at least 30%. Spatial correlation of the S-wave polarization directions of crustal and mantle anisotropy indicates (i) the presence of three distinct Archean lithospheric terranes and (ii) coupling between the crust and lithospheric mantle in most of the study area, with a strong decoupling in western Kaapvaal where the crustal anisotropy is strongest. The similarity of anisotropy directions in the crust and mantle beneath much of the Kaapvaal craton indicates that (a) the seismic anisotropy originates at the time of cratonization and (b) the observed correspondence between the present direction of absolute plate motion (APM) and lithosphere anisotropy is coincidental. B) A new 3D high-resolution seismic model of the lithospheric mantle has been determined from finite frequency tomographic inversions of teleseismic P- and S- body wave data. The two velocity models are very similar in structure, but differ in the relative P- and S-wave velocity anomalies. We find that: 1) the fast lithospheric keels extends very deep, perhaps to depths of 300-350 km and 250 km beneath the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe cratons, respectively, and 2) the Archean

  16. Geochemistry of Archean Mafic Amphibolites from the Amsaga Area, West African Craton, Mauritania: What Is the Message?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Atrassi, F.; Debaille, V.; Mattielli, N. D. C.; Berger, J.

    2014-12-01

    While Archean terrains are mainly composed of a TTG (Tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite) suite, more mafic lithologies such as amphibolites are also a typical component of those ancient terrains. Although mafic rocks represent only ~10% of the Archean cratons, they may provide key evidence of the role and nature of basaltic magmatism in the formation of the Archean crust as well as the evolution of the Archean mantle. This study focuses on the Archean crust from the West African Craton in Mauritania (Amsaga area). The Amsaga Archean Crust mainly consists of TTG and thrust-imbricated slices of mafic volcanic rocks, which have been affected by polymetamorphic events from the amphibolite to granulite facies. Our main objectives aim to the identification of the mafic lithology origin and a better understanding of their role in the continental crust emplacement. Our petrological observations show that these amphibolites have fine to medium granoblastic and nematoblastic textures. The amphibolites are dominated by amphibolite-facies mineral assemblages (mainly amphibole and plagioclase), but garnet and clinopyroxene occur in a few samples. Two groups are distinct in their geochemical characteristics (major and trace elements), although both have tholeiitic basalt composition. The first group show LREE-enriched patterns and negative Nb-Ta anomalies. The second group is characterized by near-flat LREE patterns and flat HREE patterns. This second group clearly shows no Nb-Ta anomalies. The first group could be related to arc-like basalts, as it is many similarities with some Archean amphibolites probably formed in a supra-subduction zone, for instance the volcanic rocks from the southern edge of the Isua Supracrustal Belt. On the contrary, the second group has a MORB-like signature which is more unusual during the Archean. Different scenarios will be discussed regards to the Archean geodynamics.

  17. The Future of WAC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walvoord, Barbara E.

    1996-01-01

    Draws on social movement literature by Doug McAdam, and others, to examine past, present, and future states of the Writing across the Curriculum (WAC) movement. Looks at both micro and macro organizational levels as a means of bolstering the movement. Concludes by saluting community efforts to change individuals and culture. (TB)

  18. North African petroleum geology: regional structure and stratigraphic overview of a hydrocarbon-rich cratonic area

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, T.E.; Kanes, W.H.

    1985-02-01

    North Africa, including Sinai, contains some of the most important hydrocarbon-producing basins in the world. The North African Symposium is devoted to examining the exploration potential of the North African margin in light of the most recent and promising exploration discoveries. The geologic variety of the region is extraordinary and can challenge any exploration philosophy. Of primary interest are the Sirte basin of Libya, which has produced several billion barrels of oil, and the Gulf of Suez, a narrow, evaporite-capped trough with five fields that will produce more than 5 billion bbl. Both are extensional basins with minimal lateral movement and with good source rocks in direct proximity to reservoirs. Structural models of these basins give firm leads for future exploration. More difficult to evaluate are the Tethyan realm basins of the northern Sinai, and the Western Desert of Egypt, the Cyrenaican Platform of Libya, and the Tunisia-Sicily shelf area, where there are only limited subsurface data. These basins are extensional in origin also, but have been influenced by lateral tectonics. Favorable reservoirs exist, but source rocks have been a problem locally. Structural models with strong stratigraphic response offer several favorable play concepts. The Paleozoic Ghadames basin in Libya, Tunisia, and Algeria has the least complex structural history, and production appears to be limited to small structures. A series of stratigraphic models indicates additional areas with exploration potential. The Paleozoic megabasin of Morocco, with its downfaulted Triassic grabens, remains an untested but attractive area.

  19. African, southern Indian and South American cratons were not part of the Rodinia supercontinent: evidence from field relationships and geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröner, Alfred; Cordani, Umberto

    2003-11-01

    We discuss the question whether the late Mesoproterozoic and early Neoproterozoic rocks of eastern, central and southern Africa, Madagascar, southern India, Sri Lanka and South America have played any role in the formation and dispersal of the supercontinent Rodinia, believed to have existed between about 1000 and 750 Ma ago. First, there is little evidence for the production of significant volumes of ~1.4-1.0 Ga (Kibaran or Grenvillian age) continental crust in the Mozambique belt (MB) of East Africa, except, perhaps, in parts of northern Mozambique. This is also valid for most terranes related to West Gondwana, which are made up of basement rocks older than Mesoproterozoic, reworked in the Brasiliano/Pan-African orogenic cycle. This crust cannot be conclusively related to either magmatic accretion processes on the active margin of Rodinia or continental collision leading to amalgamation of the supercontinent. So far, no 1.4-1.0 Ga rocks have been identified in Madagascar. Secondly, there is no conclusive evidence for a ~1.0 Ga high-grade metamorphic event in the MB, although such metamorphism has been recorded in the presumed continuation of the MB in East Antarctica. In South America, even the Sunsas mobile belt, which is correlated with the Grenville belt of North America, does not include high-grade metamorphic rocks. All terranes with Mesoproterozoic ages seem to have evolved within extensional, aulacogen-type structures, and their compressional deformation, where observed, is normally much younger and is related to amalgamation of Gondwana. This is also valid for the Trans-Saharan and West Congo belts of West Africa. Third, there is also no evidence for post-1000 Ma sedimentary sequences that were deposited on the passive margin(s) of Rodinia. In contrast, the MB of East Africa and Madagascar is characterized by extensive structural reworking and metamorphic overprinting of Archaean rocks, particularly in Tanzania and Madagascar, and these rocks either

  20. Proterozoic history of the Borborema province (NE Brazil): Correlations with neighboring cratons and Pan-African belts and implications for the evolution of western Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, SéRgio Pacheco

    2003-08-01

    Geological and geochronological correlations between Borborema province (NE Brazil) and neighboring cratons and Brasiliano/Pan-African belts indicate that the Amazonian, West African, and São Francisco/Congo cratons and the basement of the Araguaia, Borborema, Nigerian, and Cameroon provinces were part of the Atlantica supercontinent. This continent was established at the end of the Transamazonian/Eburnean cycle (˜2.0 Ga) and, apart from ubiquitous taphrogenesis in the 1.8-1.7 Ga interval, remained largely unaffected for the following 1 Ga. Around 1 Ga an important magmatic event in Borborema province correlates with rifting episodes and anorogenic magmatism in the São Francisco, Congo, and Amazonian cratons. These events are interpreted as failed attempts to break up Atlantica, which at this time may have been part of the larger Rodinia supercontinent. Renewed extensional conditions in Borborema province during the middle and late Neoproterozoic are attributed to far-field stresses transmitted to the interior of Atlantica by outwardly dipping subduction zones that encircled its northern (present day coordinates) portion. The rarity of petrotectonic assemblages typical of subduction zone environments indicates that extension did not evolve enough to form large oceans basins and thus that the Borborema province essentially includes reworked intracontinental domains. Regional deformation and metamorphism, starting at 650-640 Ma, and shear zone development, beginning at 590-595 Ma, were continuously developed through time and were synchronous throughout most of the Borborema, Araguaia, Cameroon, and Nigerian provinces. Postorogenic conditions were reached 540-530 Myr ago, while active deformation was still occurring in other belts that accreted around Atlantica to form western Gondwana.

  1. U-Pb baddeleyite ages and geochemistry of dolerite dykes in the Bas Drâa Inlier of the Anti-Atlas of Morocco: Newly identified 1380 Ma event in the West African Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Bahat, Abdelhakim; Ikenne, Moha; Söderlund, Ulf; Cousens, Brian; Youbi, Nasrrddine; Ernst, Richard; Soulaimani, Abderrahmane; El Janati, M'hamed; Hafid, Ahmid

    2013-08-01

    Atlas region of the West African Craton, WAC) into a single Large Igneous Province (LIP) extending over an area of > 1 million km2, and associated with the final fragmentation of the Columbia (Nuna) supercontinent.

  2. Deformation-driven differentiation during in-situ crystallization of the Iguilid mafic intrusion (West African craton)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Julien; Diot, Hervé; Lo, Khalidou

    2015-04-01

    The 2.7 Ga Iguilid mafic body is a small (9x2 km) magmatic intrusion with preserved igneous textures and not affected by metamorphism and deformation. It intrudes the metamorphic Archean basement of the Amsaga domain in the West African craton in Mauritania. The dominant lithology is a gabbronorite with subordinate gabbros and norites. We investigated 45 oriented samples for fabric analysis, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility and geochemical analyses to explore the link between chemical differentiation and emplacement of the plutonic body. According to the limited variations in modal proportions and in major element compositions within the intrusion, the Iguilid pluton crystallized via an in-situ mechanism where solidification fronts progressively thickens from the rim to the core of the cooling intrusion and where the trace-element composition is controlled by the amount of interstitial liquid (containing most incompatible trace-elements) preserved between cumulus minerals before total solidification. An in-situ crystallization process alone normally does not produce chemical differentiation but the mafic cumulates at Iguilid have been deformed during their crystallization (i.e. when melt was still present). The vertical foliations and the randomly oriented lineations argue for horizontal flattening as the main deformation mechanism. We estimated the amount of trapped interstitial liquid preserved between the network of cumulate minerals with geochemical modelling in 12 samples and found that it is negatively correlated to the anisotropy degree determined by fabric analysis. The rocks located close to the margins of the intrusion were not deformed, probably because the degree of crystallization and, hence, the viscosity of the mush was too high. The most deformed rocks with the lowest trapped interstitial liquid content are found in the center of the intrusion where the crystal mushes were rich enough in melt to record significant strain. Deformation leaded to

  3. Metamorphic record and Thermo-mechanical modelling of lower crust exhumation during the Palaeoproterozoic Eburnean orogeny, West African Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbault, Muriel; Ganne, Jerome; Block, Sylvain

    2014-05-01

    A thermo-mechanical interpretation of the metamorphic evolution of moderate- to high-pressure volcano-sedimentary rocks (6-8 to >10 Kb) in the Birimian Province (2.2-2.0 Ga) of the West African Craton is explored in terms of burial and exhumation processes. Metamorphic data collected in Burkina Faso, southwest Ghana and eastern Senegal suggest that during the Eburnean orogeny (~2.1 Ga),this Palaeoproterozoic Birimian crust was dominated by moderate apparent geothermal gradients of 20-30°C/km (M2a), that produced greenschist- to amphibolite-facies metamorphic assemblages associated with regional shortening and granitoid intrusions. The M2a gradient is superimposed on a colder thermal regime (M1 : <10-15 °C/km) that produced high-P greenschist- to blueschist-facies metamorphic assemblages, and which most likely recorded the earlier formation of the protolith. The geodynamical origin of M1 is not directly addressed here. Thermo-mechanical two-dimensional numerical models were built in order to test whether late-stage compressional tectonics could generate the exhumation of meta-sediments, collected in Ca0-poor granitoids and which record elevated metamorphic pressures (P> 6-8 Kb). The poor data quality provide limited constraints on the appropriate initial setup conditions, and a number of tests have led us to conceptualize the spatial distribution of a hypothezised succession of volcanic island arcs emplaced on top of CaO rich TTG (Tonalite- Trondjhemite-Granodiorite suites) basement, tectonically paired with sedimentary basins. We postulated therefore the preexistence of wide (about 250 km) and thick flexural sedimentary basins (depth 15 km) in an orogenic mafic crust (about 20 km thick), underplated by a more felsic and lighter layer representing a TTG melange. The numerical results show that a mechanism of burial, heating and exhumation of meta-sediments can occur by simultaneous folding and gravitational instabilities within the broad extent of the basin

  4. Petrochemical and petrophysical characterization of the lower crust and the Moho beneath the West African Craton, based on Xenoliths from Kimberlites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, Stephen E.; Toft, Paul B.

    1988-01-01

    Additional evidence to the composition of the lower crust and uppermost mantle was presented in the form of xenolith data. Xenoliths from the 2.7-Ga West African Craton indicate that the Moho beneath this shield is a chemically and physically gradational boundary, with intercalations of garnet granulite and garnet eclogite. Inclusions in diamonds indicate a depleted upper mantle source, and zenolith barometry and thermometry data suggest a high mantle geotherm with a kink near the Moho. Metallic iron in the xenoliths indicates that the uppermost mantle has a significant magnetization, and that the depth to the Curie isotherm, which is usually considered to be at or above the Moho, may be deeper than the Moho.

  5. Geochronology of the Birim Supergroup of the West African craton in the Wa-Bolé region of west-central Ghana: Implications for the stratigraphic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kock, G. S.; Armstrong, R. A.; Siegfried, H. P.; Thomas, E.

    2011-01-01

    The Birim rocks of the West African craton comprise belts of greenschist- to amphibolite-grade gneiss and schist, and subparallel basins of greenschist-grade phyllite of volcaniclastic and epiclastic origin, which were intruded by igneous rocks. The granitoids intruded between 2213 and 2060 Ma and overlap with the volcaniclastic units dated between 2211 and 2064 Ma. The simultaneous occurrence of the magmatic events and irregular distribution of the rock ages hamper the formulation of a stratigraphic succession. SHRIMP spot analyses were done on older cores, crystals and rims from 23 rocks from the Bolé-Wa region in west-central Ghana. The crystallization ages range from 2195 to 2118 Ma, the inherited ages from 2876 to 2130 Ma, and metamorphic ages from 2114 to 2090 Ma. Aided by metamorphic, structural and chemical studies an older geotectonic cycle (2195-2150 Ma), containing the Dole and Guropie Suite and Bolé Group, was established. These units were subjected to several orthogonal and shear deformation events. These events were followed by the contemporaneous Sawla calc-alkaline monzonitic plutonism (2132-2126 Ma) and deposition of the epiclastic Maluwe Group (2137-2125 Ma) of calc-alkaline felsic to tholeiitic volcanic origin. Deformation of the basin beds was succeeded by the intrusion of the Tanina Suite granitoids of 2122-2120 Ma, which, themselves, were deformed prior to 2119 Ma. At 2118 Ma syenite and gabbro intruded along conjugate extension fractures. The gabbro and syenite of the Wakawaka Suite were only affected by three events of brittle strike-slip faulting. The first had significant displacement along NNE- to NE-directed shear zones, while the latter only formed conjugate joint systems with limited transport. Palaeo- to Neoarchaean cores, the oldest yet reported in the Baoulé Mossi domain, are restricted to the gneissic Dole Suite biotite granites. The presence of Dole-, Guropie-, Sawla-, and Tanina-aged older cores and grains in younger rocks

  6. Superposition de la tectonique éburnéenne et panafricaine dans les granitoïdes de la bordure nord du craton ouest africain, boutonniére de Zenaga, Anti-Atlas central, Maroc(Pan-african overprint on Eburnian granitoids at the northern boundary of the West African Craton, Zenaga Inlier, central Anti-Atlas, Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennih, N.; Laduron, D.; Greiling, R. O.; Errami, E.; de Wall, H.; Boutaleb, M.

    2001-05-01

    The Zenaga Inlier shows a comprehensive record of the Eburnian and Pan-African Orogenies. The Eburnian is characterised by high-temperature regional metamorphism and complex magmatism. The early (Azguemerzi) granodiorite has an isotopic mantle signature and was emplaced diapirically during the Eburnian Orogeny causing local thermal metamorphism. The foliation observed in this granitoid is a result of the interference between its primary syn-emplacement foliation and the regional foliation under amphibolite-facies conditions. The northern part of Zenaga has been intruded by the leucocratic granites of Tazenakht. These granites are cut by mylonites and phyllonites, corresponding to the Pan-African shear zones and accompanied with sub-greenschist-facies metamorphism during the Pan-African Orogeny. The deformation was the result of a regional sinistral transpressive event. This study in the northern part of the West African Craton shows the superposition of the Pan-African on the Eburnian Orogeny and the presence of a major fault in the Anti-Atlas.

  7. WIPP WAC REV. 5 applicability

    SciTech Connect

    Bisping, R.L.; Kelley, C.R.

    1996-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing for disposal operations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in 1998. WIPP is a deep geological repository designed for the safe and efficient disposal of transuranic (TRU) wastes. The Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for WIPP were initially developed by a DOE steering committee in 1980. Revision 5 reflects the latest negotiations and permit requirements from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the State of New Mexico Environment Department (NMED), and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The regulatory requirements are combined with the requirements derived from the WIPP safety analysis performed for disposal operations and the original criteria established for safe waste handling operations. The WIPP WAC provides a comprehensive overview of the requirements and basis for developing waste acceptance criteria to meet today`s rules and regulations for transportation and disposal of TRU wastes. The authors believe that it is a comprehensive criteria and a guidance manual for generator/storage sites who must characterize and certify TRU waste for disposal at WIPP. It also provides valuable insight to future projects that may develop their own waste acceptance criteria. The WIPP WAC presents the requirements from the following sources: 1) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit Application; 2) Land Disposal No-migration Variance Petition; 3) 40 CFR 191 Draft Compliance Certification Application; 4) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) from the NRC for a Type B shipping container; 5) Federal Land Withdrawal Act for WIPP; WIPP Safety Analysis Report; 7) WIPP System Design Descriptions (SDDs). The WIPP WAC combines operations and nuclear safety requirements with transportation and hazardous waste regulatory requirements to provide a comprehensive set of criteria and requirements that ensure the safe disposal of TRU waste.

  8. Neotectonic faults and stress field in the East African Rift System around the Tanzanian Craton - A contribution to the seismotectonic map of Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delvaux, Damien; Macheyeki, Athanas Simon; Fernandes, Rui-Manuel; Ayele, Atalay; Meghraoui, Mustapha

    2015-04-01

    As a contribution to the UNESCO-IUGS IGCP 601 project "Seismotectonics and seismic hazards in Africa" and in preparation of the Seismotectonic Map of Africa, we compiled the neotectonic faults related to the East African Rift System around the Tanzanian craton. The initial aim was to identify and map the potentially active faults. Faults are usually defined as active when they show seismogenic displacement during the last 10,000 to 100,000 years, generally on the basis of paleoseismic investigation. In East Africa, however, very few faults have been studied by paleoseismic techniques and even fewer have known historical seismic activation. To address this issue, we mapped faults that show morphological indications of displacement. We used the SRTM DTM (90 and 30 m when available to us), with artificial shading as basis for identify neotectonic faults, in combination with existing data from geological maps, publications and reports, complemented by our own field observations. Thermal springs often occur along tectonically active faults. We use them to distinguish present-day faulting from other mapped faults as they are in most cases structurally controlled. In parallel, we used also the available focal mechanisms and geological fault-slip data to constrain the stress second-order stress field (at the scale of rift segments) and locally also the third-order stress field (at the local scale). All these elements are combined and compared with existing kinematic models for the East African Rift based on earthquake slip vectors, GPS measurements and geologic indicators. The comparison evidences some local discrepancies between the stress field and the direction of opening, probably due to the interactions between different rift segments, as in the Rukwa rift, Mbeya southern junction between the eastern and western rift branches, and in the Manyara-Natron area.

  9. Assessing WAC Elements in Business Syllabi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicolas, Maureen O’Day; Annous, Samer

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates syllabi for evidence of the principles of writing across the curriculum (WAC) in courses offered by the Faculty of Business (FOB) at a university operating in a non–English-speaking country. The research analyzed all syllabi of FOB courses offered in the spring 2010 semester for evidence of WAC looking for indications of…

  10. Support for a Uniformitarian Model of Continental Mantle Lithosphere Formation from the "Near-Cratonic" Composition of Proterozoic Southern African Mantle Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janney, P. E.

    2014-12-01

    The transition at the end of the Archean between the generation of cratonic and mobile belt continental lithosphere is regarded as a first-order change in the mode of generation of continental lithosphere. It is widely debated whether this transition represented a fundamental change in the process by which the lithospheric mantle was generated (i.e., as melting residues of deep-seated mantle upwellings to residues of relatively shallow mantle melting at subduction zones), or whether it primarily reflected a more gradual change in the conditions (i.e., temperatures, depths and degrees of melting) of lithosphere generation in a suprasubduction zone setting. The marked contrast, in many cases, between the major element compositions of peridotite xenoliths from Archean cratons and those from adjacent post-Archean mobile belts has accentuated the significance of this transition. Peridotite xenoliths from the post-Archean mobile belt terranes surrounding the Kaapvaal craton in southern Africa are clearly Proterozoic in age from Re-Os isotope constraints, but they are unusual in that they share several key similarities in composition and mineralogy with Archean Kaapvaal peridotites (e.g., low bulk-rock Al2O3, relatively low modal olivine and high modal orthopyroxene). Although they lack the low FeO and high olivine Mg# values of the most extreme Kaapvaal samples, they show a very large degree of overlap (extending to olivine Mg# values of greater than 93 for example). These similarities support a common mode of origin for cratonic and post-cratonic lithosphere in southern Africa (although varying somewhat in the degrees and depths of melt extraction) and a similar history of post-formation modification. A comparison of the conditions of melt extraction for cratonic and post-cratonic lithosphere inferred from compatible and mildly incompatible trace elements will be presented.

  11. A Qualitative Approach to Integrative WAC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siebert, Debbie L.

    Many educators and researchers are discussing a shift in national education from an "instruction" paradigm emphasizing measuring inputs and providing instruction to a "learning" paradigm emphasizing outputs and producing learning. The question is how can Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) smoothly shift educational paradigms. A clarification of…

  12. A Hybrid Genre for Embracing WAC Contraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, A. Wendy

    Most freshmen who have been introduced to the scientific report are unaware of its rhetorical complexities and problem-solving purpose. Instead, they experience the task of writing lab reports as a perfunctory recording of prescribed activities. In 1994 an instructor, faced with the taks of developing a writing across the curriculum (WAC) sequence…

  13. Kimberlites of the Man craton, West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, E. M. W.; Apter, D. B.; Morelli, C.; Smithson, N. K.

    2004-09-01

    The Man craton in West Africa is an Archaean craton formerly joined to the Guyana craton (South America) that was rifted apart in the Mesozoic. Kimberlites of the Man craton include three Jurassic-aged clusters in Guinea, two Jurassic-aged clusters in Sierra Leone, and in Liberia two clusters of unknown age and one Neoproterozoic cluster recently dated at ˜800 Ma. All of the kimberlites irrespective of age occur as small pipes and prolific dykes. Some of the Banankoro cluster pipes in Guinea, the Koidu pipes in Sierra Leone and small pipes in the Weasua cluster in Liberia contain hypabyssal-facies kimberlite and remnants of the so-called transitional-facies and diatreme-facies kimberlite. Most of the Man craton kimberlites are mineralogically classified as phlogopite kimberlites, although potassium contents are relatively low. They are chemically similar to mica-poor Group 1A Southern African examples. The Jurassic kimberlites are considered to represent one province of kimberlites that track from older bodies in Guinea (Droujba 153 Ma) to progressively younger kimberlites in Sierra Leone (Koidu, 146 Ma and Tongo, 140 Ma). The scarcity of diatreme-facies kimberlites relative to hypabyssal-facies kimberlites and the presence of the so-called transitional-facies indicate that the pipes have been eroded down to the interface between the root and diatreme zones. From this observation, it is concluded that extensive erosion (1-2 km) has occurred since the Jurassic. In addition to erosion, the presence of abundant early crystallizing phlogopite is considered to have had an effect on the relatively small sizes of the Man craton kimberlites.

  14. Photometric normalization of LROC WAC images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, H.; Denevi, B.; Robinson, M. S.; Hapke, B. W.; McEwen, A. S.; LROC Science Team

    2010-12-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Wide Angle Camera (WAC) acquires near global coverage on a monthly basis. The WAC is a push frame sensor with a 90° field of view (FOV) in BW mode and 60° FOV in 7-color mode (320 nm to 689 nm). WAC images are acquired during each orbit in 10° latitude segments with cross track coverage of ~50 km. Before mosaicking, WAC images are radiometrically calibrated to remove instrumental artifacts and to convert at sensor radiance to I/F. Images are also photometrically normalized to common viewing and illumination angles (30° phase), a challenge due to the wide angle nature of the WAC where large differences in phase angle are observed in a single image line (±30°). During a single month the equatorial incidence angle drifts about 28° and over the course of ~1 year the lighting completes a 360° cycle. The light scattering properties of the lunar surface depend on incidence(i), emission(e), and phase(p) angles as well as soil properties such as single-scattering albedo and roughness that vary with terrain type and state of maturity [1]. We first tested a Lommel-Seeliger Correction (LSC) [cos(i)/(cos(i) + cos(e))] [2] with a phase function defined by an exponential decay plus 4th order polynomial term [3] which did not provide an adequate solution. Next we employed a LSC with an exponential 2nd order decay phase correction that was an improvement, but still exhibited unacceptable frame-to-frame residuals. In both cases we fitted the LSC I/F vs. phase angle to derive the phase corrections. To date, the best results are with a lunar-lambert function [4] with exponential 2nd order decay phase correction (LLEXP2) [(A1exp(B1p)+A2exp(B2p)+A3) * cos(i)/(cos(e) + cos(i)) + B3cos(i)]. We derived the parameters for the LLEXP2 from repeat imaging of a small region and then corrected that region with excellent results. When this correction was applied to the whole Moon the results were less than optimal - no surprise given the

  15. Photometric normalization of LROC WAC images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, H.; Boyd, A. K.; Denevi, B. W.; Robinson, M. S.; Hapke, B. W.; McEwen, A. S.; Humm, D. C.; LROC Science Operations Team

    2011-12-01

    Monthly global Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Wide Angle Camera (WAC) observations of the Moon, acquired with varying emission and incidence angles, enable the precise derivation of spatially resolved Hapke photometric parameters [1]. The WAC global mosaics are stacked in a time series to enable phase curve fitting using a tile-by-tile method, with a wide range of phase angle in each tile. Tile-by-tile calculations provide photometric parameters for each tile (currently 1° by 1° from 80° to -80° latitude), resulting in resolved near-global photometric parameter maps (w, xi, Bco, and hc)[2]. Incidence, emission, and phase angles are computed using a new WAC stereometric digital terrain model (100 m/pixel)[3]. In the tile-by-tile method, we obtain low phase observations only near the equator resulting in an inability to accurately estimate Bco at higher latitudes (Hapke parameter controls the y-intercept of phase curve). We interpolated Bco poleward of +/- 5° latitudes, using a negative correlation between w and Bco observed in the equator +/- 5° latitudes. This interpolation method can decrease one free parameter, resulting in short calculation time and much less failed tiles. The normalized image using this parameter map shows almost no tile boundary, which shows that the tile-by-tile method works well. After the tile-by-tile method was applied with twenty months of data over a full range of beta angle, we observed an I/F offset with time. This offset results in reflectance differences at month-to-month boundaries in a global mosaic constructed from sequences acquired over different months (constructed to minimize incidence angle differences as a function of latitude). After significant tests of any possible parameters controlling the residual I/F value, incidence angle was revealed to be a dominant factor, indicating that the photometry model may not completely accounting for incidence angle. The main function dealing with incidence angle is the Lommel

  16. WAC and Engineering, or Why Engineers Can't Write.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Ann

    In response to criticisms from an accrediting agency, the director of the Writing across the Curriculum (WAC) program at the State University of New York, Farmingdale, designed a one-day marathon session and a series of biweekly seminars to bridge the gap between WAC truths and the assumptions of the engineering faculty concerning writing…

  17. Cratons: Why Are The Little Ones So Tough?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, G. R.

    2013-12-01

    Cratons are ancient (>1 Ga) survivors of multiple tectonic events and diverse tectonic regimes. The question that arises is why are they so tough? If one looks around the world at relatively small cratons, the answer at least partly lies in their crustal structure. This is not to say that their lithospheric mantle is not also part of the answer, but mapping the LAB is still a challenge. Some examples of relatively small cratons in North America that are relatively well studied are the Wyoming and SASK cratons. A good example in Africa is the Tanzanian craton, and a good example in China is the North China craton. The Wyoming craton initially formed at ~2.5 Ga and formed has very thick (~50 km) crust that includes a high velocity layer (Vp ~7.5 km/s) at its base. Recent xenolith studies indicate that at least some of this high velocity layer was underplated at ~1.8 Ga. The recently discovered Sask craton in Canada was caught up in the Trans-Hudson orogen and is completely covered by younger rocks. It also has a thick crust. The Tanzanian craton has been strong enough to cause the East African rift system to split into two arms that wrap around it. It has relatively thick crust (and lithospheric keel?). The Colorado plateau in the western U. S. and the Ordos block in north China are very similar in many respects and have resisted deformation in the their interiors while they are bounded on three sides by rifts. A common theme among these examples is relatively thick crust, and in most cases, a unusually fast lower crust.

  18. Petrology and geodynamic significance of the post-collisional Pan-African magmatism in the Eastern Saghro area (Anti-Atlas, Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errami, E.; Bonin, B.; Laduron, D.; Lasri, L.

    2009-09-01

    The Saghro Group consists of a thick volcanic-sedimentary sequence with intercalated basaltic lavas, the first magmatic event in eastern Saghro area. Nd isotopes of basaltic pillow lavas show T DM model ages ranging from 640 to 580 Ma, which represent a maximum age for basalt eruption. Granitoids within the Saghro Group consist of a charnockitic suite, tonalites, granodiorites and monzogranites. They are high-K calc-alkaline (HKCA) with a post-collisional character, and were emplaced at high-levels in the crust. Their ages of emplacement are within the 580-560 Ma bracket, implying that the entire Saghro Group is slightly older than or partly coeval to granitoid emplacement and implying a common geodynamical setting. Sr-Nd isotopic compositions and Nd T DM model ages point to a mixed origin, combining a juvenile mantle source and an Eburnean crustal component, which could be the West African Craton (WAC). The juvenile component in the Saghro granitoids could be the depleted upper mantle that has sourced the earlier basalts. Field observations, geochemical and geochronological data together support that, during the Pan-African orogeny, the Anti-Atlas was subjected to a regional transpressional to transtensional event. This event would have been responsible for the dissection of the northern margin of the WAC into several blocks, the development of deep sedimentary basins and the emplacement of HKCA magmas.

  19. 3D numerical model of the plume-lithosphere interactions near cratonic blocks: Implications for the Tanzanian craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koptev, Alexander; Burov, Evgueni; Calais, Eric; Leroy, Sylvie; Gerya, Taras

    2014-05-01

    We explore the evolution of plume-activated rifting in a heterogeneous continental lithosphere containing embedded cratonic blocks, with a particular focus on the impact of horizontal position of a plume with respect to the craton. We also study the influence of a preexisting far-field stress/strain field on the «active» rifting style by implementing a slow far-field extension during the plume-lithosphere interaction. In the experiments, a «cratonic» block (cold, thick depleted mantle) is embedded into a «normal» lithosphere roughly mimicking the configuration of the Tanzanian craton and of its surroundings. We next varied the far-field extension rates, the thickness of the craton as well as the thermo-rheological profile and the position of the plume with respect to the center of the craton (placed either strictly under the center of the «Tanzanian» craton or slightly shifted in the NE direction). Despite significant disparities in style and timing of rifting process observed in models with different parameters, the common feature for all cases with central plume position refers to the development of largely symmetric diverging rift branches embracing the craton. The models with shifted initial plume position demonstrate a fundamentally different behavior because in this case the cratonic block deflects plume material to one side of the craton, leading to a strongly asymmetric spreading of plume-head material under the bottom of the lithosphere. This asymmetry results in development of two different rift branches: the first one is more pronounced and develops right above the plume head at the north-east of the craton, with a lot of magmatic material arriving to the surface. The second branch appears almost simultaneously but is less pronounced, amagmatic, and propagates northward over the western part of the craton. This evolution resembles the one inferred for east (warm and magmatic) and west (cold and amagmatic) rift braches in the East African rift

  20. Origin of cratonic basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev. Klein, George; Hsui, Albert T.

    1987-12-01

    Tectonic subsidence curves show that the Illinois, Michigan, and Williston basins formed by initial fault-controlled mechanical subsidence during rifting and by subsequent thermal subsidence. Thermal subsidence began around 525 Ma in the Illinois Basin, 520 460 Ma in the Michigan Basin, and 530 500 Ma in the Williston Basin. In the Illinois Basin, a second subsidence episode (middle Mississippian through Early Permian) was caused by flexural foreland subsidence in response to the Alleghanian-Hercynian orogeny. Resurgent Permian rifting in the Illinois Basin is inferred because of intrusion of well-dated Permian alnoites; such intrusive rocks are normally associated with rifting processes. The process of formation of these cratonic basins remains controversial. Past workers have suggested mantle phase changes at the base of the crust, mechanical subsidence in response to isostatically uncompensated excess mass following igneous intrusions, intrusion of mantle plumes into the crust, or regional thermal metamorphic events as causes of basin initiation. Cratonic basins of North America, Europe, Africa, and South America share common ages of formation (around 550 to 500 Ma), histories of sediment accumulation, temporal volume changes of sediment fills, and common dates of interregional unconformities. Their common date of formation suggests initiation of cratonic basins in response to breakup of a late Precambrian super-continent. This supercontinent acted as a heat lens that caused partial melting of the lower crust and upper mantle followed by emplacement of anorogenic granites during extensional tectonics in response to supercontinent breakup. Intrusion of anorogenic granites and other partially melted intrusive rocks weakened continental lithosphere, thus providing a zone of localized regional stretching and permitting formation of cratonic basins almost simultaneously over sites of intrusion of these anorogenic granites and other partially melted intrusive rocks.

  1. Geological evolution of the Antongil Craton, NE Madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schofield, D.I.; Thomas, Ronald J.; Goodenough, K.M.; De Waele, B.; Pitfield, P.E.J.; Key, R.M.; Bauer, W.; Walsh, G.J.; Lidke, D.J.; Ralison, A.V.; Rabarimanana, M.; Rafahatelo, J.-M.; Randriamananjara, T.

    2010-01-01

    interpreted as being the only manifestation of the Pan-African orogeny seen in the craton, which led to the assembly of the tectonic blocks that comprise the island. ?? 2010 NERC.

  2. The electrical structure of the Slave craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Alan G.; Lezaeta, Pamela; Ferguson, Ian J.; Chave, Alan D.; Evans, Rob L.; Garcia, Xavier; Spratt, Jessica

    2003-12-01

    Proceeding, J.B. Dawson Volume, 1, 307-313] on the basis of garnet geochemistry (G10 vs. G9) populations. Deep-probing MT data from the lake bottom instruments infer that the conductor has a total depth-integrated conductivity (conductance) of the order of 2000 Siemens, which, given an internal resistivity of 10-15 Ω m, implies a thickness of 20-30 km. Below the CSMC the electrical resistivity of the lithosphere increases by a factor of 3-5 to values of around 50 Ω m. This change occurs at depths consistent with the graphite-diamond transition, which is taken as consistent with a carbon interpretation for the CSMC. Preliminary three-dimensional MT modelling supports the NE-SW striking geometry for the conductor, and also suggests a NW dip. This geometry is taken as implying that the tectonic processes that emplaced this geophysical-geochemical body are likely related to the subduction of a craton of unknown provenance from the SE (present-day coordinates) during 2630-2620 Ma. It suggests that the lithospheric stacking model of Helmstaedt and Schulze [Helmstaedt, H.H., Schulze, D.J., 1989. Southern African kimberlites and their mantle sample: implications for Archean tectonics and lithosphere evolution. In Ross, J. (Ed.), Kimberlites and Related Rocks, Vol. 1: Their Composition, Occurrence, Origin, and Emplacement. Geological Society of Australia Special Publication, vol. 14, 358-368] is likely correct for the formation of the Slave's current SCLM.

  3. Field, geochemistry and Sr-Nd isotopes of the Pan-African granitoids from the Tifnoute Valley (Sirwa, Anti-Atlas, Morocco): a post-collisional event in a metacratonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toummite, A.; Liegeois, J. P.; Gasquet, D.; Bruguier, O.; Beraaouz, E. H.; Ikenne, M.

    2013-10-01

    In the Tifnoute Valley, three plutonic units have been defined: the Askaoun intrusion, the Imourkhssen intrusion and the Ougougane group of small intrusions. They are made of quartz diorite, granodiorite and granite and all contain abundant mafic microgranular enclaves (MME). The Askaoun granodiorite and the Imourkhssen granite have been dated by LA-ICP-MS on zircon at 558 ± 2 Ma and 561 ± 3 Ma, respectively. These granitic intrusions are subcontemporaneous to the widespread volcanic and volcano-detrital rocks from the Ouarzazate Group (580-545 Ma), marking the post-collisional transtensional period in the Anti-Atlas and which evolved towards alkaline and tholeiitic lavas in minor volume at the beginning of the Cambrian anorogenic intraplate extensional period. Geochemically, the Tifnoute Valley granitoids belong to an alkali-calcic series (high-K calc-alkaline) with typical Nb-Ta negative anomalies and no alkaline affinities. Granitoids and enclaves display positive ɛNd-560Ma (+0.8 to +3.5) with young Nd-TDM between 800 and 1200 Ma and relatively low 87Sr/86Sr initial ratios (Sri: 0.7034 and 0.7065). These values indicate a mainly juvenile source corresponding to a Pan-African metasomatized lithospheric mantle partly mixed with an old crustal component from the underlying West African Craton (WAC). Preservation in the Anti-Atlas of pre-Pan-African lithologies (c. 2.03 Ga basement, c. 800 Ma passive margin greenschist-facies sediments, allochthonous 750-700 Ma ophiolitic sequences) indicates that the Anti-Atlas lithosphere has not been thickened and was never an active margin during the Neoproterozoic. After a transpressive period, the late Ediacaran period (580-545 Ma) is marked by movement on near vertical transtensional faults, synchronous with the emplacement of the huge Ouarzazate Group and the Tifnoute Valley granitoids. We propose here a geodynamical model where the Tifnoute Valley granitoids as well as the Ouarzazate Group were generated during the post

  4. Craton stability and continental lithosphere dynamics during plume-plate interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Van Hunen, J.; Pearson, D.

    2013-12-01

    the craton itself. Given the considerable debate on the uplift history of southern African plateau (Nyblade and Sleep, 2003), our numerical models that encompass lithospheric heterogeneity within cratons could help to achieve a better understanding of this issue.

  5. WAC for the New Millennium: Strategies for Continuing Writing-Across-the-Curriculum Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Susan H., Ed.; Miraglia, Eric, Ed.; Soven, Margot, Ed.; Thaiss, Christopher, Ed.

    Celebrating the achievements of Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) by highlighting the promise of its future, this book presents 12 essays that describe how WAC programs have adapted and continue to adapt to meet new challenges. Essays in the book explain strategies for continuing WAC programs in an atmosphere of change; explore new avenues of…

  6. WAC: A Point of Departure to Full Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanigan, Michael C.

    The problem with various versions of Writing across the Curriculum (WAC) that have emerged since the turn of the century is that they are not self sustaining--they seemed unable to overcome the destructive forces of departmentalization and the entrenched attitudes in the university both toward writing and toward interdepartmental programs. If WAC…

  7. Separating Siamese Twins: Can We Extricate WAC from Writing Centers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumner, Jacob S.

    This paper addresses the culture of writing in higher education from a multicultural perspective of those within the "monolith." The paper first notes that writing programs, more specifically writing across the curriculum (WAC), and writing centers work in similar ways by benefiting each other and sharing the broad mission of improving students'…

  8. WAC Revisited: You Get What You Pay for

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perelman, Les

    2011-01-01

    In 1982, the author wrote an essay for the second issue of "The Writing Instructor," "Approaches to Comprehensive Writing: Integrating Writing into the College Curriculum," reviewing the early stages of the modern Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC)/Writing in the Disciplines (WID) movement. In this article, the author revisits his essay and…

  9. Limiting depth of magnetization in cratonic lithosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toft, Paul B.; Haggerty, Stephen E.

    1988-01-01

    Values of magnetic susceptibility and natural remanent magnetization (NRM) of clino-pyroxene-garnet-plagioclase granulite facies lower crustal xenoliths from a kimberlite in west Africa are correlated to bulk geochemistry and specific gravity. Thermomagnetic and alternating-field demagnetization analyses identify magnetite (Mt) and native iron as the dominant magnetic phases (totaling not more than 0.1 vol pct of the rocks) along with subsidiary sulfides. Oxidation states of the granulites are not greater than MW, observed Mt occurs as rims on coarse (about 1 micron) Fe particles, and inferred single domain-pseudosingle domain Mt may be a result of oxidation of fine-grained Fe. The deepest limit of lithospheric ferromagnetism is 95 km, but a limit of 70 km is most reasonable for the West African Craton and for modeling Magsat anomalies over exposed Precambrian shields.

  10. Opposition effect of the Moon from LROC WAC data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikodsky, Yu. I.; Korokhin, V. V.; Shkuratov, Yu. G.; Kaydash, V. G.; Videen, Gorden

    2016-09-01

    LROC WAC images acquired in 5 bands of the visible spectral range were used to study the opposition effect for two mare and two highland regions near the lunar equator. Opposition phase curves were extracted from the images containing the opposition by separating the phase-curve effect from the albedo pattern by comparing WAC images at different phase angles (from 0° to 30°). Akimov's photometric function and the NASA Digital Terrain Model GLD100 were used in the processing. It was found that phase-curve slopes at small phase angles directly correlate with albedo, while at larger phase angles, they are anti-correlated. We suggest a parameter to characterize the coherent-backscattering component of the lunar opposition surge, which is defined as the maximum phase angle for which the opposition-surge slope increases with growing albedo. The width of the coherent-backscattering opposition effect varies from approximately 1.2° for highlands in red light to 3.9° for maria in blue light. The parameter depends on albedo, which is in agreement with the coherent-backscattering theory. The maximum amplitude of the coherent opposition effect is estimated to be near 8%. Maps of albedo and phase-curve slope at phase angles larger than those, at which the coherent-backscattering occurs, were built for the areas under study. Absolute calibration of WAC images was compared with Earth-based observations: the WAC-determined albedo is very close to the mean lunar albedo calculated using available Earth-based observations.

  11. The State of WAC/WID in 2010: Methods and Results of the U.S. Survey of the International WAC/WID Mapping Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thaiss, Chris; Porter, Tara

    2010-01-01

    As writing across the curriculum (WAC) has matured and diversified as a concept and as an organizational structure in U.S. higher education, there has arisen a need for accurate, up-to-date information on the presence and characteristics of WAC and writing-in-the-disciplines (WID) programs. Following on the only previous nationwide survey of…

  12. Widespread refertilization of cratonic and circum-cratonic lithospheric mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yan-Jie; Zhang, Hong-Fu; Ying, Ji-Feng; Su, Ben-Xun

    2013-03-01

    Studies of mantle xenoliths have confirmed that Archean subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) is highly depleted in basaltic components (such as Al, Ca and Na) due to high-degree extraction of mafic and ultramafic melts and thus is refractory and buoyant, which made it chronically stable as tectonically independent units. However, increasing studies show that ancient SCLM can be refertilized by episodic rejuvenation events like infiltration of upwelling fertile material. The North China Craton is one of the most typical cases for relatively complete destruction of its Archean keel since the eruption of Paleozoic kimberlites, as is evidenced by a dramatic change in the compositions of mantle xenoliths sampled by Paleozoic to Cenozoic magmas, reflecting significant lithospheric thinning and the change in the character of the SCLM. The compositional change has been interpreted as the result of refertilization of Archean SCLM via multiple-stage peridotite-melt reactions, suggested by linear correlations between MgO and indices of fertility, covariations of Al2O3 with CaO, La/Yb, 87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd, 187Os/188Os and Re-depletion ages (TRD), high Re abundances, scatter in Re-Os isotopic plot, variable in situ TRD ages of sulfides, and correlation between TRD ages and olivine Fo of peridotite xenoliths in Paleozoic kimberlites and Cenozoic basalts on the craton. By integrating major and trace element, Sr, Nd and Os isotopic compositions of peridotite xenoliths and orogenic massif peridotites from the continents of Europe, Asia, America, Africa and Australia, together with previous studies of petrology and geochemistry of global peridotites, we suggest that (1) refertilization of cratonic and circum-cratonic lithospheric mantle is widespread; (2) Archean SCLM worldwide has experienced a multi-stage history of melt depletion and refertilization since segregation from the convecting mantle; (3) cratonic SCLM may be more susceptible to compositional change caused by

  13. Three-Dimensional Forward Modeling of Magnetotelluric Data Over Cratonic Lithosphere and Attendent Geological Structures: Case Study of the Zimbabwe Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miensopust, M. P.; Jones, A. G.; Farquharson, C. G.; MT Team

    2007-12-01

    The Southern African MagnetoTelluric Experiment (SAMTEX) is covering a huge area - containing parts of South Africa, Namibia and nearly the whole of Botswana - with acquisition of magnetotelluric (MT) data. The project's aim is to gain more information on the lithospheric geometries of the geological structures of this region which contains some of the oldest lithospheric pieces on Earth - the cratons (e.g. Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe cratons). Since the standard modeling of MT data is only in two-dimensions and the recently developed three-dimensional inversion programs require a lot of computation time and high speed computers with large memories, 3D forward modeling is a good compromise on the way to full 3D interpretation of MT data. Forward modeling of subsurface structures similar to the cratonic areas of study will give some indication of how the MT responses should look like and if they change significantly when the cratons have a different shape or extent or resistivity. The determined synthetic data then can be compared with the real data collected in the SAMTEX project. The area for the case study is the western edge of the Zimbabwe craton in eastern Botswana. The craton is surrounded by the Damara Mobile Belt and the Magondi Mobile Belt to the north and west and the Limpopo belt to the south. The giant northern Botswana dyke swarm is cross cutting the craton in about WNW to ESE direction. Based on this geological information, a 3D model was created to calculate synthetic MT responses using the forward modeling routine implemented in the 3D inversion program MT3Dinv (developed by the Geophysical Inversion Facility, University of British Columbia). We will show the results of this modeling exercise and compare them with the observations.

  14. Report on Analyses of WAC Samples of Evaporator Overheads - 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L

    2005-03-18

    In November and December of 2004, the Tank Farm submitted annual samples from 2F, 2H and 3H Evaporator Overhead streams for characterization to verify compliance with the new Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and to look for organic species. With the exception of slightly high ammonia in the 2F evaporator overheads and high radiation control guide number for the 3H and 2F evaporator overhead samples, all the overheads samples were found to be in compliance with the Effluent Treatment Facility WAC. The ammonium concentration in the 2F-evaporator overhead, at 33 mg/L, was above the ETF waste water collection tank (WWCT) limits of 28 mg/L. The RCG Number for the 3H and 2F evaporator samples at, respectively, 1.38E-02 and 8.24E-03 were higher than the WWCT limit of 7.69E-03. The analytical detection limits for americium-241 and radium-226 in the evaporator samples were not consistently met because of low WWCT detection limits and insufficient evaporator samples.

  15. On the Origin of Cratonic Sag Basins: Did They Sag?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Jason P.

    2015-04-01

    Cratonic sag basins are regions of long-lived, extremely slow (~20-30 m/Myr) shallow water and terrestrial sediment accumulation that have no striking signs of tectonic activity (cf. Allen and Armitage, 2012). In their evolution, hundreds of Myr-long periods of slow sediment accumulation are separated by unconformities. The mechanisms for their formation resist geodynamic characterization by other common hypotheses for basin subsidence because of their extremely slow subsidence and lack of evident tectonic activity. I propose their dynamics are better understood within the geodynamic context of continental cratons that ride over a ~250km-deep sub-asthenospheric mantle with lateral temperature variations between a few wide and persistent 1000s-km broad ~1400C 'superplume' upwelling mantle structures (e.g. currently beneath S. African Atlantic and French Polynesia) and prevalent surrounding ~1150C average temperature sub-asthenospheric mantle. When continents pass over typical mantle plumes, buoyant plume material tends to drain beneath the continent along junctions between cratons where the lithosphere is relatively thin, keeping the lithosphere over regions where plume material drains hotter than the average temperature of ~250km-deep mantle. (e.g., the Cameroon Line.) Regions where melting of plume material occurs during decompression associated with either plume ascent or lateral drainage beneath continents are associated with the addition of a buoyant rind of more depleted mantle to the continent. In addition, regions where plume material can pond in a relatively thin sub-lithospheric 'anti-basin' beneath a continent, or that stay stationary for long times over super plumes will heat to a lithospheric basal temperature of ~1400C instead of ~1150C, with ~700m of associated uplift. (e.g., Southern Africa). In this scenario (cf. Yamamoto, Morgan, and Morgan in "Plumes, Plates, and Paradigms"), it is the relative plume-passage-induced uplift of arches between

  16. Implementation of Writing across the Curriculum (WAC) Learning Approaches in Social Work and Sociology Gerontology Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the goals and methods of the international Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) movement in higher education, and WAC-enriched learning approaches that the author used in teaching a social work gerontology practice course and a sociological theories of aging course. The author's in-class, low-stakes, nongraded writing…

  17. The Paleoproterozoic APWP of the Kalahari Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gose, W. A.; Hanson, R. E.

    2006-05-01

    An apparent polar wander path for the Precambrian of the Kalahari craton, south Africa, still remains an elusive goal. This is not due to the lack of paleomagnetic data but rather the paucity or lack of age control. The need for radiometric ages became particularly clear when we were collecting dolerite dikes of the 1.1 Ga Umkondo suite in an attempt to delineate its areal extent. Seven dikes west of Pietersburg, South Africa, mapped as Umkondo dolerites, yielded a direction of magnetization distinctively different from the Umkondo direction. 300 km to the northeast in the Soutpansberg area, 5 dolerite sills and 3 basalt flows carry a direction antipodal to these dikes at the 1percent significance level. The combined data set has a pole position of 17.4°N, 17.2°E, with an error of A95=8.2°. One of the sampled dikes and two nearby dikes have U-Pb baddeleyite crystallization ages of 1871±1.2 Ma, 1873±0.8 Ma, and 1878±0.5 Ma (Hanson et al. 2004). These data provide an important pole position for defining the Paleoproterozoic segment of the Kalahari APWP. Our results do not support recent suggestions that the geomagnetic field was asymmetrical during the Precambrian. Hanson, R. E. et al., 2004, South African J. Geol., 107,233-254.

  18. Evolution of the South African mantle — A case study of garnet peridotites from the Finsch diamond mine (Kaapvaal craton); part 1: Inter-mineral trace element and isotopic equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarov, Marina; Brey, Gerhard P.; Weyer, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    A thorough assessment of inter-mineral equilibrium is essential for the understanding of trace element partitioning and also for the interpretation of isotopic data. Here we investigated high temperature (~ 1200 °C and 6 GPa) garnet peridotite xenoliths from the Kaapvaal craton (Finsch mine, South Africa), with exceptionally well equilibrated mineral major element compositions, for their trace element and isotopic inter-mineral equilibrium. Trace element compositions for all major mineral phases, i.e. olivine, orthopyroxene (opx), clinopyroxene (cpx) and garnet, were analysed by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Garnet, cpx and opx of selected samples were analysed for their Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf isotope compositions by multi collector ICP-MS. Most important mineral characteristics include: a) olivines from most samples are enriched in high-field-strength elements relative to other incompatible trace elements. Their lithium content correlates negatively with Mg#, indicating a depletion signature; b) all other minerals are depleted in heavy and middle rare earth elements (H- and M-REE) and enriched in light REE and large ion lithophile elements. This implies a complex history of depletion and metasomatic overprint for the Finsch cratonic mantle; c) orthopyroxene has similarly shaped trace element patterns as cpx, with one to two orders of magnitude lower abundances; and d) both, garnet and cpx, display variable, mostly positive ɛHf coupled with moderate variations in ɛNd. Trace element partitioning between garnet/cpx, cpx/opx and garnet/opx, displays only a weak pressure and temperature dependency. However, equilibrium partitioning of most trace elements between garnet and cpx shows a strong compositional dependency, i.e. on the Cr- (and Ca-) content of the garnets. Garnet-cpx partition coefficients follow a second grade polynomial correlation with Cr2O3 of garnet, whereby high chromium garnets (Cr2O3 > 6 wt.%) have generally higher

  19. Metasomatism and the Weakening of Cratons: A Mechanism to Rift Cratons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenker, Stefanie; Beaumont, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    The preservation of cratons is a demonstration of their strength and resistance to deformation. However, several cratons are rifting now (e.g. Tanzania and North China Craton) or have rifted in the past (e.g. North Atlantic Craton). To explain this paradox, we suggest that widespread metasomatism of the originally cold depleted dehydrated craton mantle lithosphere root can act as a potential weakening mechanism. This process, particularly melt metasomatism, increases root density through a melt-peridotite reaction, and reduces root viscosity by increasing the temperature and rehydrating the cratonic mantle lithosphere. Using 2D numerical models, we model silicate-melt metasomatism and rehydration of cold cratonic mantle lithosphere that is positioned beside standard Phanerozoic lithosphere. The models are designed to investigate when a craton is sufficiently weakened to undergo rifting and is no longer protected by the initially weaker adjacent standard Phanerozoic lithosphere. Melt is added to specified layers in the cratonic mantle lithosphere at a uniform volumetric rate determined by the duration of metasomatism (3 Myr, 10 Myr or 30 Myr), until a total of ~30% by volume of melt has been added. During melt addition heat and mass are properly conserved and the density and volume increase by the respective amounts required by the reaction with the peridotite. No extensional boundary conditions are applied to the models during the metasomatism process. As expected, significant refertilization leads to removal and thinning of progressively more gravitationally unstable cratonic mantle lithosphere. We show that the duration of metasomatism dictates the final temperature in the cratonic upper mantle lithosphere. Consequently, when extensional boundary conditions are applied in our rifting tests in most cases the Phanerozoic lithosphere rifts. The craton rifts only in the models with the hottest cratonic upper mantle lithosphere. Our results indicate rifting of cratons

  20. Origin and evolution of the Amazonian craton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, A. K.; Wirth, K. R.

    1986-01-01

    The Amazonian craton appears to be formed and modifed by processes much like those of the better-known Precambrian cratons, but the major events did not always follow conventional sequences nor did they occur synchronously with those of other cratons. Much of the craton's Archean style continental crust formation, recorded in granite-greenstone and high-grade terranes, occurred in the Early Proterozoic: a period of relative quiescence in many other Precambrian regions. The common Archean to Proterozoic transition in geological style did not occur here, but an analogous change from abundant marine volcanism to dominantly continental sedimentary and eruptive styles occurred later. Amazonian geology is summarized, explaining the evolution of the craton.

  1. Speculations on the formation of cratons and cratonic basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Dan; Priestley, Keith

    2016-02-01

    Surface wave tomography using Rayleigh waves has shown that Tibet and the surrounding mountain ranges that are now being shortened are underlain by thick lithosphere, of similar thickness to that beneath cratons. Both their elevation and lithospheric thickness can result from pure shear shortening of normal thickness continental lithosphere by about a factor of two. The resulting thermal evolution of the crust and lithosphere is dominated by radioactive decay in the crust. It raises the temperature of the lower part of the crust and of the upper part of the lithosphere to above their solidus temperatures, generating granites and small volumes of mafic alkaline rocks from beneath the Moho, as well as generating high temperature metamorphic assemblages in the crust. Thermal models of this process show that it can match the P, T estimates determined from metamorphic xenoliths from Tibet and the Pamirs, and can also match the compositions of the alkaline rocks. The seismological properties of the upper part of the lithosphere beneath northern Tibet suggest that it has already been heated by the blanketing effect and radioactivity of the thick crust on top. If the crustal thickness is reduced by erosion alone to its normal value at low elevations, without any tectonic extension, over a time scale that is short compared to the thermal time constant of thick lithosphere, of ∼250 Ma, thermal subsidence will produce a basin underlain by thick lithosphere. Though this simple model accounts for the relevant observations, there is not yet sufficient information available to be able to model in detail the resulting thermal evolution of the sediments deposited in such cratonic basins.

  2. Craton destruction by subduction, collision or plume impingement? Comparisons of some representative cratons in the world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhensheng; Kusky, Timothy; Li, Xiaoyong; Wang, Xu; Fu, Jianmin; Yuan, Yuefeng; Zhu, Peimin

    2015-04-01

    The fact that cratonic lithosphere can be destructed has been demonstrated by numerous studies. However, the driving force of craton destruction and its mechanism are still unclear1,2. Subduction, collision and mantle plumes, the most important driving forces for most geological events, may also be responsible for craton destruction. However, their relationship in the destruction process including which of them is the major driving force and how they interact with each other is not understood sufficiently1,2. In this article, the North China Craton, North Atlantic Craton, Tanzania Craton, Wyoming Craton, Kaapvaal Craton, Yangtze Craton, Yilgarn Craton and Superior Craton are used as examples to study their difference and similarities during subduction, collision, or mantle plume impingement. The work is mainly based on comparison of their tectonic history, geophysical data, as well as xenolith chronology. It is suggested that large-scale craton destruction can be influenced by the interaction of subduction, collision and mantle plumes, acting to different degrees in different examples. Mantle plume related thermal action enhances the chemical stratification or layering of subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM), which can form a weak-coupling mid lithosphere discontinuity (MLD) 3,4,5 and a lower denser SCLM below the MLD. Convergence (subduction and collision), especially when associated with slab rollback 6, leads to the regional thinning of the cratonic margin, which is subsequently linked by extension (mantle plume or slab rollback) related discontinuities. Continuous extension-related discontinuities extend upward to the MLD depth and cut off the shearing resistance from adjacent blocks. Next, the lower part of the chemically stratified SCLM in the cratonic interior is decoupled along the weakly coupled MLD and founders into the deep asthenosphere 7. Then the destruction of the rest of the lithosphere can be affected by upwelling related decompression melting

  3. Ambient Noise Imaging of Craton Modification: Examples from the Kaapvaal craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, R. C.; Shirey, S. B.; Fouch, M. J.; James, D. E.

    2013-12-01

    Mapping of crustal and upper-mantle seismic velocities can give important insight into the geologic evolution of cratonic regions. In order to better understand the formation and evolution of the Kaapvaal craton and surrounding regions, we use ambient noise tomography to produce a new crustal and upper-mantle 3D shear-velocity model for southeastern Africa using data collected during the (1995-1999) Kaapvaal Seismic Experiment. Ambient noise tomography enables imaging of shear-velocity variations at smaller scales (10s of km) and shallower depths (< 10 km) than previously determined using natural-source body- and surface-wave techniques within the region. The goal of this work is to image geological features of the Kaapvaal-Zimbabwe craton such as kimberlite pipe density, flood basalt feeder dike systems, granite-greenstone belts, layered mafic intrusions and craton assembly/collision patterns at mid- lower crustal levels where information is typically lacking. Our results provide important constraints on the evolution of the Kaapvaal craton, including the collision with the Zimbabwe craton and the formation of the Bushveld Complex and Witwatersrand basin, and the impact of these events on lithospheric structure. Preliminary images exhibit key first-order features of the craton. At depth ranges of 4-12 km, reduced shear velocities correlate with the Bushveld-Malopo Farms complexes. At a depth interval of 10-18 km, lower velocities are associated with the Witwatersrand sedimentary basin, and higher velocities may be attributed to unroofed mid-crustal rocks of high metamorphic grade formed during the Kaapvaal-Zimbabwe craton collision. At depths of 36-46 km, velocity patterns reflect Moho topography, with thinner crust associated with the undisturbed regions of the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe cratons and thicker crust associated with the Limpopo Belt and Namaqua-Natal Mobile Belt. At greater depths, higher upper-mantle velocities are observed in the southern Kaapvaal

  4. Cratonic lithosphere: an electrifying view (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. G.

    2013-12-01

    Deep-probing electromagnetic studies reveal the vertical and lateral electrical conductivity structure of cratonic lithosphere. At lithospheric temperatures and for silicate mantle minerals, semi-conduction is from small polaron hopping and, in the presence of water, proton conduction, both of which is thermally-driven and can be described by an Arrhenius equation. There is little compositional sensitivity, save for the far higher water contents prevalent in pyroxenes (typically 200-400 wt ppm) compared to olivine (typically 10-100 wt ppm), with the latter exhibiting a depth dependence and the former none. Seismological methods are sensitive to temperature and composition, and virtually insensitive to low amounts of water. Taken together, the two are highly complementary. Seismological and magnetotelluric studies across Southern Africa can be employed together to constraint temperature and water content, where there is a significant difference at 100 km depth between the Kaapvaal Craton compared to the Angola (Congo) Craton compared to the Zimbabwe Craton. The Congo Craton is driest but hottest, the Kaapvaal Craton exhibits laterally-varying water content and is coldest, and the Zimbabwe Craton is the wettest and intermediate in temperature. Such thermal and water content variation results in lateral rheological variation, with the wettest and warmest being more deformable. For the Canadian Shield, there is again significant lateral variation at 100 km, with the Superior Province being mostly dry, and the Slave Craton and Rae/Hearne Provinces being far wetter. By 200 km however, all of the Canadian Shield is dry, consistent with the xenolith-based observations from the Kaapvaal Craton of far higher water contents in olivine at 100 km (50-100 wt ppm) decreasing with depth to around 10 wt ppm at 200 km. The lithosphere beneath the Kimberley area of the Kaapvaal Craton has been forward modeled in a manner that is self-consistent not only with the seismological and

  5. LAB and other lithospheric discontinuities below Cratons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodoudi, Forough

    2013-04-01

    Cratons are extremely stable continental areas of the Earth's crust, which have been formed and remained largely unchanged since Precambrian. However, their formation and how they survived destruction over billions of years remains a subject of debate. Seismic properties of the cratonic lithosphere reflect its composition and physical state and obtain basic constraints on processes of the formation and evolution of continents. Insight on these issues may be gained by determining the depth and the nature of the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary (LAB), which is a necessary element of the plate tectonic theory. However, It has proved quite "elusive" beneath the oldest continental areas. What is missing to date is a consensus on the feature that would correspond to the LAB and whether such a feature exists everywhere beneath cratons. The relatively recently developed S receiver function technique employing S-to-P conversions appears promising for detecting the LAB with a sufficiently high resolution and density. A growing number of regional observations obtained from S receiver function studies has detected discontinuities characterized by a significant negative velocity contrast in the upper mantle. However, challenges still remain in detecting the S-to-P conversions from the LAB beneath the Precambrian cratons. Some recent SRF studies observed a deep (> 160 km) negative velocity contrast beneath cratons and interpreted it as the LAB. For example, a deep LAB at about 250 km was reported beneath the Kalahari craton by different authors. Similar results were also obtained beneath some parts of the Canadian shield, East European Craton, Australia, the Arabian Shield and Tanzania craton. In contrast, other SRF studies found no evidence for negative discontinuities at these depths in the North American craton, in Kalahari craton or in Australia. Instead they revealed a very sharp negative velocity gradient at much shallower depth (60-150 km), leading some authors to infer

  6. Water in the Cratonic Mantle Lithosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslier, A. H.

    2016-01-01

    The fact that Archean and Proterozoic cratons are underlain by the thickest (>200 km) lithosphere on Earth has always puzzled scientists because the dynamic convection of the surrounding asthenosphere would be expected to delaminate and erode these mantle lithospheric "keels" over time. Although density and temperature of the cratonic lithosphere certainly play a role in its strength and longevity, the role of water has only been recently addressed with data on actual mantle samples. Water in mantle lithologies (primarily peridotites and pyroxenites) is mainly stored in nominally anhydrous minerals (olivine, pyroxene, garnet) where it is incorporated as hydrogen bonded to structural oxygen in lattice defects. The property of hydrolytic weakening of olivine [4] has generated the hypothesis that olivine, the main mineral of the upper mantle, may be dehydrated in cratonic mantle lithospheres, contributing to its strength. This presentation will review the distribution of water concentrations in four cratonic lithospheres. The distribution of water contents in olivine from peridotite xenoliths found in kimberlites is different in each craton (Figure 1). The range of water contents of olivine, pyroxene and garnet at each xenolith location appears linked to local metasomatic events, some of which occurred later then the Archean and Proterozoic when these peridotites initially formed via melting. Although the low olivine water contents (<10 ppm wt H2O) at > 6 GPa at the base of the Kaapvaal cratonic lithosphere may contribute to its strength, and prevent its delamination, the wide range of those from Siberian xenoliths is not compatible with providing a high enough viscosity contrast with the asthenophere. The water content in olivine inclusions from Siberian diamonds, on the other hand, have systematically low water contents (<20 ppm wt H2O). The xenoliths may represent a biased sample of the cratonic lithosphere with an over-­abundance of metasomatized peridotites with

  7. De novo loss-of-function mutations in WAC cause a recognizable intellectual disability syndrome and learning deficits in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Lugtenberg, Dorien; Reijnders, Margot R F; Fenckova, Michaela; Bijlsma, Emilia K; Bernier, Raphael; van Bon, Bregje W M; Smeets, Eric; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; Bosch, Danielle; Eichler, Evan E; Mefford, Heather C; Carvill, Gemma L; Bongers, Ernie M H F; Schuurs-Hoeijmakers, Janneke Hm; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A; Santen, Gijs W E; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Peeters-Scholte, Cacha M P C D; Kuenen, Sabine; Verstreken, Patrik; Pfundt, Rolph; Yntema, Helger G; de Vries, Petra F; Veltman, Joris A; Hoischen, Alexander; Gilissen, Christian; de Vries, Bert B A; Schenck, Annette; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Vissers, Lisenka E L M

    2016-08-01

    Recently WAC was reported as a candidate gene for intellectual disability (ID) based on the identification of a de novo mutation in an individual with severe ID. WAC regulates transcription-coupled histone H2B ubiquitination and has previously been implicated in the 10p12p11 contiguous gene deletion syndrome. In this study, we report on 10 individuals with de novo WAC mutations which we identified through routine (diagnostic) exome sequencing and targeted resequencing of WAC in 2326 individuals with unexplained ID. All but one mutation was expected to lead to a loss-of-function of WAC. Clinical evaluation of all individuals revealed phenotypic overlap for mild ID, hypotonia, behavioral problems and distinctive facial dysmorphisms, including a square-shaped face, deep set eyes, long palpebral fissures, and a broad mouth and chin. These clinical features were also previously reported in individuals with 10p12p11 microdeletion syndrome. To investigate the role of WAC in ID, we studied the importance of the Drosophila WAC orthologue (CG8949) in habituation, a non-associative learning paradigm. Neuronal knockdown of Drosophila CG8949 resulted in impaired learning, suggesting that WAC is required in neurons for normal cognitive performance. In conclusion, we defined a clinically recognizable ID syndrome, caused by de novo loss-of-function mutations in WAC. Independent functional evidence in Drosophila further supported the role of WAC in ID. On the basis of our data WAC can be added to the list of ID genes with a role in transcription regulation through histone modification. PMID:26757981

  8. Implementation of Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) learning approaches in social work and sociology gerontology courses.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the goals and methods of the international Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) movement in higher education, and WAC-enriched learning approaches that the author used in teaching a social work gerontology practice course and a sociological theories of aging course. The author's in-class, low-stakes, nongraded writing assignments facilitated students' development of knowledge about gerontological practice and sociological theories, as well as analytical thinking. The assignments are influenced by WAC's perspective that when students write their reactions to information, their understanding and retention of information improves; that writing can facilitate the application of new content to students' own lives and interests; and that increased frequency of writing increases writing comfort and maintenance and can result in the improvement of writing skills. The students' reactions to the assignments have been very positive. PMID:23383857

  9. Asymmetry and polarity of the South Atlantic conjugated margins related to the presence of cratons: a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés-Martínez, Miguel; Pérez-Gussinyé, Marta; de Monserrat Navarro, Albert; Morgan, Jason P.

    2015-04-01

    Tectonic asymmetry of conjugated passive margins, where one margin is much narrower than the conjugate one, is commonly observed at many passive margins world-wide. Conjugate margin asymmetry has been suggested to be a consequence of lateral changes in rheology, composition, temperature gradient or geometries of the crust and lithosphere. Here we use the South Atlantic margins (from Camamu/Gabon to North Santos/South Kwanza) as a natural laboratory to understand conjugate margin asymmetry. Along this margin sector the polarity of the asymmetry changes. To the North, the Brazilian margin developed in the strong Sao Francisco craton, and this constitutes the narrow side of the conjugate pair. To the South, the Brazilian margin developed in the Ribeira fold belt, and the margin is wide. The opposite is true for the African side. We have thus numerically analysed how the relative distance between the initial location of extension and the craton influences the symmetry/asymmetry and polarity of the conjugate margin system. Our numerical model is 2D visco-elasto-plastic and has a free surface, strain weakening and shear heating. The initial set-up includes a cratonic domain, a mobile belt and a transition area between both. We have run tests with different rheologies, thickness of the lithosphere, and weak seeds at different distances from the craton. Results show asymmetric conjugated margins, where the narrower margin is generally the closest to the craton. Our models also allow us to study how the polarity is controlled by the distance between the initial weakness and the craton, and help to understand how the presence of cratonic domains affects the final architecture of the conjugated margins.

  10. RESULTS FOR THE FOURTH QUARTER 2010 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M

    2011-02-22

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2010 Fourth Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section. (2) The reported detection limits for {sup 94}Nb, {sup 247}Cm and {sup 249}Cf are above the requested limits from Reference 2. However, they are below the limits established in Reference 3. (3) There is an estimated concentration of trimethylbenzene (2.25 mg/L). This is not a WAC analyte, but it is the first time this organic compound has been detected in a quarterly WAC sample from Tank 50. (4) The reported detection limit for Norpar 13 is greater than the limit from Table 4 and Attachment 8.2 of the WAC. (5) The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from Table 3 of the WAC. (6) Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples. The values reported in this memo are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the GC/MS; however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50.

  11. RESULTS FOR THE SECOND QUARTER 2011 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Eibling, R.

    2011-08-25

    The Saltstone Facility is designed and permitted to immobilize and dispose of low-level radioactive and hazardous liquid waste (salt solution) remaining from the processing of radioactive material at the Savannah River Site. Low-level waste (LLW) streams from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), H-Canyon, the DDA (Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment) process, and the decontaminated salt solution product from the Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (ARP/MCU) process are stored in Tank 50 until the LLW can be transferred to the Saltstone Facility for treatment and disposal. The LLW must meet the specified waste acceptance criteria (WAC) before it is processed into saltstone. The specific chemical and radionuclide contaminants and their respective WAC limits are listed in the current Saltstone WAC. Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform quarterly analysis on saltstone samples. The concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants are measured to ensure the saltstone produced during each quarter is in compliance with the current WAC. This report documents the concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants for the 2011 Second Quarter samples collected from Tank 50 on April 4, 2011 and discusses those results in further detail than the previously issued results report. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section. (2) The reported detection limit for {sup 59}Ni is above the requested limit from Reference 2 but below the established limit in Reference 3. (3) The reported detection limit for {sup 94}Nb is above the requested limit from Reference 2; however, it is below the established limits in Reference 3. (4) The reported concentration of

  12. Mesozoic Thermal Evolution of the Kaapvaal Craton Mantle Root.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, D. R.

    2002-12-01

    Recent thermobarometry1 and accessory-mineral thermochronology2 studies on mantle and lower crustal xenoliths proposed a thermal pulse that affected the southern African mantle lithosphere during the Mesozoic and may relate to supercontinent breakup and associated mantle upwelling. Effects are concentrated on the margins of the Archean craton and in the surrounding Proterozoic terrains, but are not obvious within the core of the craton. In order to examine more closely the evidence for a thermal effect within the craton itself, we performed thermobarometry studies of a large suite of peridotite xenoliths from the 114 Ma Newlands orangeite (group II kimberlite). A variety of mineral thermobarometers were applied to analyses of coexisting minerals separated from fifty xenoliths. The resultant P-T arrays lie sub-parallel to those defined by xenoliths from the 84 Ma Kimberley group I kimberlites, some 50 km to the SE, but at temperatures from 60 to 120 C lower (depending on thermobarometer) at a given depth. This result, which is consistent with seismic images of a 250 - 300 km thick mantle root, confirms previous reports3,4 of unusually low temperatures, and inferences from garnet xenocryst studies5 that proposed a change from <37 to 40 mW/m2 model geotherms over this 30 Ma time interval. The corresponding depth difference for Kimberley and Newlands isotherms ranges from 12 - 20 km and exceeds expectations for mid-Cretaceous uplift5. It thus appears that the mantle root of the Kaapvaal craton has been heated, at least in the local regions sampled by Group I kimberlites, and that both the inflected and un-inflected limbs of Mesozoic group-I kimberlite-hosted geotherms on the Kaapvaal Craton may represent a perturbed thermal state of limited lateral extent. Petrologic studies on Kimberley xenoliths have documented the common presence of metasomatic diopside, phlogopite, and amphibole that are not common in the Newlands peridotites. Modal, trace element and isotope data

  13. The Tachakoucht-Iriri-Tourtit arc complex (Moroccan Anti-Atlas): Neoproterozoic records of polyphased subduction-accretion dynamics during the Pan-African orogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triantafyllou, Antoine; Berger, Julien; Baele, Jean-Marc; Diot, Hervé; Ennih, Nasser; Plissart, Gaëlle; Monnier, Christophe; Watlet, Arnaud; Bruguier, Olivier; Spagna, Paul; Vandycke, Sara

    2016-05-01

    We report new mapping, tectonic, metamorphic and U-Pb zircon dating data on the polyphased Tachakoucht-Iriri and Tourtit arc-related units within the Moroccan Pan-African belt (Sirwa window, Anti-Atlas). The studied area contains four different sub-units, from south to north: (1) the Tachakoucht gneisses intruded to its northern part by (2) Iriri intrusions. To the north, the Tachakoucht-Iriri massif is thrusted by (3) the south-verging 760 Ma Khzama ophiolitic sequence intruded by (4) the Tourtit meta-granitic complex. The Tachakoucht gneiss represents former andesitic to dacitic porphyritic rocks crystallized around 740-720 Ma in an intra-oceanic arc setting (IOAS). Subsequently, it has been buried and metamorphosed to 700 °C, 8 kbar in response to early accretion of the arc onto the West African Craton (WAC). This tectono-metamorphic event also led to the dismembering and stacking of back-arc ophiolite onto the arc unit. Subsequently, the Iriri intrusions, a suite of hydrous mafic dykes (hornblende gabbro and fine-grained basalt) and ultramafic (hornblendite) plutons showing subduction zone affinities, intruded the Tachakoucht gneiss under P-T conditions of 750-800 °C and 2-5 kbar. Emplacement of Iriri intrusions led locally to pronounced partial melting of the Tachakoucht gneiss and to the production of leucogranitic melts. These melts crop out into the Iriri-Tachakoucht gneiss contacts as leucogneissic bands (former leucosomes, dated at 651 ± 5 Ma) but also intruded the Khzama ophiolite to form the Tourtit granite (dated at 651 ± 3 Ma). These ages (651-641 Ma) also constrain the timing of Iriri intrusion emplacement. The entire complex has been overprinted by a second deformation event under greenschist to amphibolite facies conditions marked by transposition of primary structures and a development of mylonitic shear zones. These results and those published on the Bou Azzer window show that two phases of subduction-related magmatism occurred in the Anti

  14. Lithospheric Mantle Deformation beneath the Indian Cratons.

    PubMed

    Pandey; Agrawal

    1999-11-01

    The nature of deformation of the deep continental roots beneath the Archean-Early Proterozoic terrains opens the question whether these ancient terrains have had stable roots since the Precambrian or whether recent plate motions have deformed them. In view of this, we make an attempt to study the thermal structure beneath the cratonic regions of the Indian shield, which vary in lithospheric thickness from 65 km in the Singhbhum craton to 148 km in the Archean Dharwars. The average depth of 104 km to the top of the underlying asthenosphere is consistent with other termination methods and is in fact less than half the 200-400-km depth found in other stable areas of the earth. Similarly, the average reduced heat flow of about 35 mW/m2 and Moho temperature of about 550 degrees C (range: 400 degrees -730 degrees C) for the Indian cratons are also much higher than their counterparts elsewhere. Our study indicates a large-scale deformation of the cratonic mantle lithosphere beneath the Indian shield since the Mesoproterozoic caused by various geodynamic causes, challenging the idea of stability of deep continental roots. PMID:10517883

  15. Cyclic Cratonic Carbonates and Phanerozoic Calcite Seas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Bruce H.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses causes of cyclicity in cratonic carbonate sequences and evidence for and potential significance of postulated primary calcite sediment components in past Paleozoic seas, outlining problems, focusing on models explaining existing data, and identifying background. Future sedimentary geologists will need to address these and related areas…

  16. Beyond the L2 Metaphor: Towards a Mutually Transformative Model of ESL/WAC Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsuda, Paul Kei; Jablonski, Jeffrey

    A metaphor sometimes used in teaching discipline-based academic writing is that the experience of learning to write in various academic contexts is like learning a new language (L2). This approach is critically examined here, and its implications for "writing across the curriculum" (WAC) programs at the college level are discussed. It is argued…

  17. Results For The First Quarter 2012 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical And Radionuclide Contaminant Results

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2012-07-16

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2012 First Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this memorandum: The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted; The reported detection limit for {sup 94}Nb is above the requested limit but below the estimated limit; {sup 247}Cm and {sup 249}Cf are above the requested limits. However, they are below the limits established; The reported detection limit for Norpar 13 is greater than the limit from the WAC; The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from WAC; Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples; The values reported in this report are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the instrument, however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50; The low insoluble solids content increases the measurement uncertainty for insoluble species.

  18. RESULTS FOR THE FOURTH QUARTER 2011 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.

    2012-01-31

    The Saltstone Facility is designed and permitted to immobilize and dispose of low-level radioactive and hazardous liquid waste (salt solution) remaining from the processing of radioactive material at the Savannah River Site. Low-level waste (LLW) streams from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), H-Canyon, and the decontaminated salt solution product from the Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (ARP/MCU) process are stored in Tank 50 until the LLW can be transferred to the Saltstone Facility for treatment and disposal. The LLW must meet the specified waste acceptance criteria (WAC) before it is processed into saltstone. The specific chemical and radionuclide contaminants and their respective WAC limits are in the current Saltstone WAC. Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform quarterly analysis on saltstone samples. The concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants are measured to ensure the saltstone produced during each quarter is in compliance with the current WAC. This report documents the concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants for the 2011 Fourth Quarter samples collected from Tank 50 on October 12, 2011 and discusses those results in further detail than the previously issued results report.

  19. RESULTS FOR THE THIRD QUARTER 2011 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.

    2011-10-20

    The Saltstone Facility is designed and permitted to immobilize and dispose of low-level radioactive and hazardous liquid waste (salt solution) remaining from the processing of radioactive material at the Savannah River Site. Low-level waste (LLW) streams from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), H-Canyon, and the decontaminated salt solution product from the Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (ARP/MCU) process are stored in Tank 50 until the LLW can be transferred to the Saltstone Facility for treatment and disposal. The LLW must meet the specified waste acceptance criteria (WAC) before it is processed into saltstone. The specific chemical and radionuclide contaminants and their respective WAC limits are in the current Saltstone WAC. Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform quarterly analysis on saltstone samples. The concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants are measured to ensure the saltstone produced during each quarter is in compliance with the current WAC. This report documents the concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants for the 2011 Third Quarter samples collected from Tank 50 on July 7, 2011 and discusses those results in further detail than the previously issued results report.

  20. Phanerozoic surface history of the Slave craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, Alexis K.; Flowers, Rebecca M.; Bowring, Samuel A.

    2013-09-01

    apatite (U-Th)/He (AHe) thermochronometry data and key geologic constraints from Slave craton kimberlites are used to develop a model for the Phanerozoic burial, unroofing, and hypsometric history of the northwestern Canadian shield. AHe dates range from 210 ± 13 to 382 ± 79 Ma, are older in the eastern Slave craton and decrease westward, and resolve the spatial extent, thickness, and history of now-denuded sedimentary units. Results indicate Paleozoic heating to temperatures ≥85-90°C, suggesting regional burial beneath ≥2.8 km of strata while the region was at sea level, followed by the westward migration of unroofing across the craton. This Paleozoic-Mesozoic history does not correlate with sea level change, instead requiring Paleozoic subsidence of the craton followed by surface uplift. The AHe data restrict Cretaceous burial to ≤1.6 km, followed by unroofing, Eocene terrestrial sediment deposition, and removal of Phanerozoic sedimentary cover across the region by present day. The craton underwent ≥300 m of post-100 Ma elevation gain, based on ~100 Ma marine sedimentary xenoliths entrained in ~75-45 Ma kimberlites at modern elevations of 550-600 m. The transition from Paleozoic-Mesozoic subsidence to surface uplift may signal a change from predominantly northern (Franklinian-Innuitian) to western (Canadian Cordillera) plate boundary controls on continental interior processes, with the latter driving the east-to-west wave of unroofing. Canadian Cordillera evolution also affected the Cretaceous-early Tertiary history. Dynamic topography due to changing mantle flow regimes and proximity to sediment sources influenced the Phanerozoic surface evolution of the northwestern Canadian shield.

  1. RESULTS FOR THE FIRST QUARTER 2009 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.; Diprete, C.; Bibler, N.

    2009-10-06

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2009 First Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The concentrations of the chemical and radioactive contaminants were all less than their respective WAC Targets or Limits except for Am-242m. (2) The radionuclide Am-242m was not detected; however, its detection limit is above the WAC Target given in Attachment 8.4. The higher detection limit was expected based on current analytical capabilities as stated in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP). (3) The reported detection limit of isopropanol was lower than its WAC Limit for accident analysis but higher than its WAC concentration given in Table 4 for vault flammability. The higher detection limit was expected based on current analytical capabilities and is documented in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP). (4) The reported detection limit for Isopar L is lower than its WAC limit for accident analysis in Appendix 8.1 but higher than its WAC concentration given in Table 3 in reference to vault flammability. The higher detection limit was expected based on current analytical capabilities as stated in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP). (5) Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples. The values reported in this memo are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the GC/MS; however, the results may not accurately

  2. Is Nubia plate rigid? A geodetic study of the relative motion of different cratonic areas within Africa.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Njoroge, M. W.; Malservisi, R.; Hugentobler, U.; Mokhtari, M.; Voytenko, D.

    2014-12-01

    Plate rigidity is one of the main paradigms of plate tectonics and a fundamental assumption in the definition of a global reference frame as ITRF. Although still far for optimal, the increased GPS instrumentation of the African region can allow us to understand how rigid one of the major plate can be. The presence of diffused band of seismicity, the Cameroon volcanic line, Pan African Kalahari orogenic belt and East Africa Rift suggest the possibility of relative motion among the different regions within the Nubia. The study focuses on the rigidity of Nubia plate. We divide the plate into three regions: Western (West Africa craton plus Nigeria), Central (approximately the region of the Congo craton) and Southern (Kalahari craton plus South Africa) and we utilize Euler Vector formulation to study internal rigidity and eventual relative motion. Developing five different reference frames with different combinations of the 3 regions, we try to understand the presence of the relative motion between the 3 cratons thus the stability of the Nubia plate as a whole. All available GPS stations from the regions are used separately or combined in creation of the reference frames. We utilize continuous stations with at least 2.5 years of data between 1994 and 2014. Given the small relative velocity, it is important to eliminate eventual biases in the analysis and to have a good estimation in the uncertainties of the observed velocities. For this reason we perform our analysis using both Bernese and Gipsy-oasis codes to generate time series for each station. Velocities and relative uncertainties are analyzed using the Allan variance of rate technique, taking in account for colored noise. An analysis of the color of the noise as function of latitude and climatic region is also performed to each time series. Preliminary results indicate a slight counter clockwise motion of West Africa craton with respect to South Africa Kalahari, and South Africa Kalahari-Congo Cratons. In addition

  3. RESULTS FOR THE SECOND QUARTER 2010 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.; Bibler, N.

    2010-08-04

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2010 Second Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC).1 Information from this characterization will be used by Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section. (2) The reported detection limits for {sup 94}Nb and {sup 144}Ce are above both the established and requested limits from References 4 and 6. (3) The reported detection limits for {sup 247}Cm and {sup 249}Cf are above the requested limits from Reference 4. However, they are below the limits established in Reference 6. (4) The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from Table 3 of the WAC. (5) A measurable concentration of Norpar 13 is present in the sample. The reported concentration is greater than the requested limit from Table 4 and Attachment 8.2 of the WAC. (6) Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples. The values reported in this memo are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the GC/MS; however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50. (7) The detection limit for isopropanol has been lowered from 0.5 mg/L to 0.25 mg/L{sup 7}. This revised limit now satisfies the limit in Table 4 of the WAC.

  4. RESULTS FOR THE THIRD QUARTER 2010 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.; Bibler, N.

    2010-12-09

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2010 Third Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (i) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section. (ii) The reported detection limits for {sup 94}Nb, {sup 247}Cm and {sup 249}Cf are above the requested limits from Reference 4. However, they are below the limits established in Reference 3. (iii) The reported detection limit for {sup 242m}Am is greater than the requested limit from Attachment 8.4 of the WAC. (iv) The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from Table 3 of the WAC. (v) The reported concentration of Isopropanol is greater than the limit from Table 4 of the WAC. (vi) Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples. The values reported in this memo are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the GC/MS; however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50.

  5. The Río de la Plata craton and the assembly of SW Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapela, C. W.; Pankhurst, R. J.; Casquet, C.; Fanning, C. M.; Baldo, E. G.; González-Casado, J. M.; Galindo, C.; Dahlquist, J.

    2007-07-01

    origin within Gondwana-forming blocks, for which the closest identifiable sources are 'Brazilian' and 'African' (Namaqua-Natal). Consequently, the preferred model for the Pampean orogeny is that the Río de la Plata craton reached its present position by large-scale dextral strike-slip movement against fore-arc sedimentary sequences that had developed on the southern and western margins of the Kalahari craton during the Early Cambrian. In the final stage the displaced sedimentary sequences outboard of the RPC collided with the Mesoproterozoic Western Sierras Pampeanas terrane, which was at the time attached to the large Amazonia craton and other smaller continental blocks, such as Arequipa-Antofalla and Río Apa. Protracted relative displacement of the RPC after the Pampean Orogeny led to its final position.

  6. Seismic reflection profiling of Neoarchean cratons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Velden, Arie Jan

    Deep seismic reflection data from the Superior and Slave cratons in Canada and the Yilgarn craton in Australia are processed with similar processing flows and display parameters to facilitate comparative analysis. The profiles are characterized by subhorizontal to shallowly dipping reflection fabrics in the crust and upper mantle. These reflection fabrics are interpreted as ˜2.8-2.6 Ga ductile structural fabrics associated with peak orogenesis that led to cratonization. A re-evaluation of the seismic data has led to alternative interpretations compared to those published previously. In western Ontario, at Red Lake, divergent reflection patterns are interpreted as products of mainly collisional tectonics rather than extensional tectonics, and at Pickle Lake, mantle reflections connect to a mapped suture and strikeslip fault system. In western Quebec, steep structures are interpreted on the north flank of the Opatica domain. In the Kalgoorlie area of western Australia, subhorizontal upper crustal reflections are interpreted as pre-deformational layers within anticlines. A new tectonic model is presented for the western Slave Province in which divergent reflections at Yellowknife are interpreted to be associated with convergence between the Snare arc and the central Slave basement complex. Reflections that project from the reflection Moho into the upper mantle are observed on all profiles and are interpreted as relict subduction zones and/or major terrane-bounding structures. Listric mid-crustal reflections resembling roofing shingles are interpreted as products of underthrusting and subcretion. Strike-slip faults are manifested as near-vertical zones of reflection truncations. Greenstone belts are often poorly reflective. These reflection patterns are consistent with tectonic models in which greenstone belts form adjacent to protocratons and are thickened by protocontinent-dipping subduction, tectonic underplating, formation of nappes, and thrust-and-fold structures

  7. Melt infiltration of the lower lithosphere beneath the Tanzania craton and the Albertine rift inferred from S receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WöLbern, Ingo; Rümpker, Georg; Link, Klemens; Sodoudi, Forough

    2012-08-01

    The transition between the lithosphere and the asthenosphere is subject to numerous contemporary studies as its nature is still poorly understood. The thickest lithosphere is associated with old cratons and platforms and it has been shown that seismic investigations may fail to image the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary in these areas. Instead, several recent studies have proposed a mid-lithospheric discontinuity of unknown origin existing under several cratons. In this study we investigate the Tanzania craton in East Africa which is enclosed by the eastern and western branches of the East African Rift System. We present evidence from S receiver functions for two consecutive discontinuities at depths of 50-100 km and 140-200 km, which correspond to significant S wave velocity reductions under the Tanzania craton and the Albert and Edward rift segments. By comparison with synthetic waveforms we show that the lower discontinuity coincides with the LAB exhibiting velocity reductions of 6-9%. The shallower interface reveals a velocity drop that varies from 12% beneath the craton to 24% below the Albert-Edward rift. It is interpreted as an infiltration front marking the upper boundary of altered lithosphere due to ascending asthenospheric melts. This is corroborated by computing S velocity variations based on xenolith samples which exhibit a dense system of crystallized veins acting as pathways of the infiltrating melt. Mineral assemblages in these veins are rich in phlogopite and pyroxenite which can explain the reduced shear wave velocities. Melt infiltration represents a suitable mechanism to form a mid-lithospheric discontinuity within cratonic lithosphere that is underlain by anomalously hot mantle.

  8. Lithospheric layering in the North American craton.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Huaiyu; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2010-08-26

    How cratons-extremely stable continental areas of the Earth's crust-formed and remained largely unchanged for more than 2,500 million years is much debated. Recent studies of seismic-wave receiver function data have detected a structural boundary under continental cratons at depths too shallow to be consistent with the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, as inferred from seismic tomography and other geophysical studies. Here we show that changes in the direction of azimuthal anisotropy with depth reveal the presence of two distinct lithospheric layers throughout the stable part of the North American continent. The top layer is thick ( approximately 150 km) under the Archaean core and tapers out on the surrounding Palaeozoic borders. Its thickness variations follow those of a highly depleted layer inferred from thermo-barometric analysis of xenoliths. The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary is relatively flat (ranging from 180 to 240 km in depth), in agreement with the presence of a thermal conductive root that subsequently formed around the depleted chemical layer. Our findings tie together seismological, geochemical and geodynamical studies of the cratonic lithosphere in North America. They also suggest that the horizon detected in receiver function studies probably corresponds to the sharp mid-lithospheric boundary rather than to the more gradual lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. PMID:20740006

  9. Lower Crustal Seismicity, Volatiles, and Evolving Strain Fields During the Initial Stages of Cratonic Rifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, C.; Muirhead, J.; Ebinger, C. J.; Tiberi, C.; Roecker, S. W.; Ferdinand-Wambura, R.; Kianji, G.; Mulibo, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    The volcanically active East African rift system in southern Kenya and northern Tanzania transects thick cratonic lithosphere, and comprises several basins characterized by deep crustal seismicity. The US-French-Tanzania-Kenya CRAFTI project aims to understand the role of magma and volatile movement during the initiation and evolution of rifting in cratonic lithosphere. Our 38-station broadband network spans all or parts of fault-bounded rift segments, enabling comparison of lithospheric structure, fault kinematics, and seismogenic layer thickness with age and proximity to the deeply rooted Archaen craton. Seismicity levels are high in all basins, but we find profound differences in seismogenic layer thickness along the length of the rift. Seismicity in the Manyara basin occurs almost exclusively within the lower crust, and in spatial clusters that have been active since 1990. In contrast, seismicity in the ~ 5 My older Magadi basin is localized in the upper crust, and the long border fault bounding the west side of the basin is seismically inactive. Between these two basins lies the Natron rift segment, which shows seismicity between ~ 20 and ~2 km depth, and high concentrations at Oldoinyo Lengai and Gelai volcanoes. Older volcanoes on the uplifted western flank (e.g., Ngorongoro) experience swarms of activity, suggesting that active magmatism and degassing are widespread. Focal mechanisms of the frequent earthquakes recorded across the array are spatially variable, and indicate a stress field strongly influenced by (1) Holocene volcanoes, (2) mechanical interactions between adjacent rift basins, and (3) a far-field ESE-WNW extensional stress regime. We explore the spatial correlation between zones of intense degassing along fault systems and seismicity, and examine the influence of high gas pressures on lower and upper crustal seismicity in this youthful cratonic rift zone.

  10. Cold cratonic roots and thermal blankets: How continents affect mantle convection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trubitsyn, V.P.; Mooney, W.D.; Abbott, D.H.

    2003-01-01

    Two-dimensional convection models with moving continents show that continents profoundly affect the pattern of mantle convection. If the continents are wider than the wavelength of the convection cells (???3000 km, the thickness of the mantle), they cause neighboring deep mantle thermal upwellings to coalesce into a single focused upwelling. This focused upwelling zone will have a potential temperature anomaly of about 200??C, much higher than the 100??C temperature anomaly of upwelling zones generated beneath typical oceanic lithosphere. Extensive high-temperature melts (including flood basalts and late potassic granites) will be produced, and the excess temperature anomaly will induce continental uplift (as revealed in sea level changes) and the eventual breakup of the supercontinent. The mantle thermal anomaly will persist for several hundred million years after such a breakup. In contrast, small continental blocks (<1000 km diameter) do not induce focused mantle upwelling zones. Instead, small continental blocks are dragged to mantle downwelling zones, where they spend most of their time, and will migrate laterally with the downwelling. As a result of sitting over relatively cold mantle (downwellings), small continental blocks are favored to keep their cratonic roots. This may explain the long-term survival of small cratonic blocks (e.g., the Yilgarn and Pilbara cratons of western Australia, and the West African craton). The optimum size for long-term stability of a continental block is <3000 km. These results show that continents profoundly affect the pattern of mantle convection. These effects are illustrated in terms of the timing and history of supercontinent breakup, the production of high-temperature melts, and sea level changes. Such two-dimensional calculations can be further refined and tested by three-dimensional numerical simulations of mantle convection with moving continental and oceanic plates.

  11. RESULTS FOR THE FOURTH QUARTER TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.; Bibler, N.

    2010-01-27

    The Saltstone Facility is designed and permitted to immobilize and dispose of low-level radioactive and hazardous liquid waste (salt solution) remaining from the processing of radioactive material at the Savannah River Site. Low-level waste (LLW) streams from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), H-Canyon, the DDA (Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment) process, and the decontaminated salt solution product from the Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (ARP/MCU) process are stored in Tank 50 until the LLW can be transferred to the Saltstone Facility for treatment and disposal. The LLW must meet the specified waste acceptance criteria (WAC) before it is processed into saltstone. The specific chemical and radionuclide contaminants and their respective WAC limits are listed in the current Saltstone WAC. SRS Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform quarterly analysis on saltstone samples. The concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants are measured to ensure the saltstone produced during each quarter is in compliance with the current WAC. This report documents the concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants for the 2009 Fourth Quarter samples collected from Tank 50 on October 2, 2009 and discusses those results in further detail than the previously issued results report. This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2009 Fourth Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results

  12. RESULTS FOR THE THIRD QUARTER 2009 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.; Diprete, C.; Bibler, N.

    2009-11-13

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2009 Third Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. Recently, a review of the radionuclide inventory in Saltstone Vaults 1 and 4 identified several additional radionuclides, not currently in the WAC, which require quantification ({sup 40}K, {sup 108m}Ag, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 207}Bi, {sup 227}Ac, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 228}Th, {sup 231}Pa, {sup 247}Cm, {sup 249}Cf, {sup 251}Cf). In addition, several of the radionuclides previously reported with minimum detection limits below the requirements listed in the WAC required analysis with reduced detection limits to support future inventory reporting requirements ({sup 22}Na, {sup 26}Al, {sup 59}Ni, {sup 94}Nb, {sup 106}Ru, {sup 144}Ce, {sup 152}Eu, {sup 155}Eu, {sup 226}Ra). This added scope was formally requested in a revision to the standing Technical Task Request for CY2009 Saltstone support and is further discussed in several supporting documents. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants are less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section. (2) The reported detection limits for {sup 59}Ni, {sup 94}Nb, {sup 247}Cm, and {sup 249}Cf are above the limits requested by LWO; however, they are below the achievable limits established by Analytical Development (AD). (3) The reported detection limit of isopropanol is lower than its WAC Limit for accident analysis in Appendix 8.1, but higher than its WAC concentration given in

  13. LROC WAC 100 Meter Scale Photometrically Normalized Map of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, A. K.; Nuno, R. G.; Robinson, M. S.; Denevi, B. W.; Hapke, B. W.

    2013-12-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Wide Angle Camera (WAC) monthly global observations allowed derivation of a robust empirical photometric solution over a broad range of incidence, emission and phase (i, e, g) angles. Combining the WAC stereo-based GLD100 [1] digital terrain model (DTM) and LOLA polar DTMs [2] enabled precise topographic corrections to photometric angles. Over 100,000 WAC observations at 643 nm were calibrated to reflectance (I/F). Photometric angles (i, e, g), latitude, and longitude were calculated and stored for each WAC pixel. The 6-dimensional data set was then reduced to 3 dimensions by photometrically normalizing I/F with a global solution similar to [3]. The global solution was calculated from three 2°x2° tiles centered on (1°N, 147°E), (45°N, 147°E), and (89°N, 147°E), and included over 40 million WAC pixels. A least squares fit to a multivariate polynomial of degree 4 (f(i,e,g)) was performed, and the result was the starting point for a minimum search solving the non-linear function min[{1-[ I/F / f(i,e,g)] }2]. The input pixels were filtered to incidence angles (calculated from topography) < 89° and I/F greater than a minimum threshold to avoid shadowed pixels, and the output normalized I/F values were gridded into an equal-area map projection at 100 meters/pixel. At each grid location the median, standard deviation, and count of valid pixels were recorded. The normalized reflectance map is the result of the median of all normalized WAC pixels overlapping that specific 100-m grid cell. There are an average of 86 WAC normalized I/F estimates at each cell [3]. The resulting photometrically normalized mosaic provides the means to accurately compare I/F values for different regions on the Moon (see Nuno et al. [4]). The subtle differences in normalized I/F can now be traced across the local topography at regions that are illuminated at any point during the LRO mission (while the WAC was imaging), including at polar

  14. REPORT ON THE ANALYSIS OF WAC SAMPLES FROM EVAPORATOR OVERHEADS FOR 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Washington, A.

    2012-03-29

    This report tabulates the chemical analysis of the 3H, 2H and 2F evaporator overhead samples including the inorganic, organic, and radionuclide species according the ETP WAC (rev.4). In addition, the physical properties including pH, total suspended solids, and average particle size are listed for each sample. The report identifies all sample receipt dates, preparation methods, and analyses completed to accumulate these values. All values were found to be within the ETP WAC specifications for WWCT except for the {sup 137}Cs concentration for the 2F sample which was slightly above the limit ({approx}5%). However, tank farm personnel sample each tank overhead for beta/gamma prior to transfer using a pulse height analyzer and these field readings were all well within limits. Additional actions will be taken to help understand the reason in the discrepancy of the field measurement versus laboratory analysis.

  15. Tracing origins of cratonic eclogites by magnesium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Teng, F. Z.; Rudnick, R. L.; Li, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Cratonic eclogites are samples of lithospheric mantle preserved beneath ancient continental cratons. Hence, the origin of cratonic eclogites is closely related to the formation and evolution of cratonic mantle. Here we report Mg isotopic compositions for 27 cratonic eclogites and 52 garnet and clinopyroxene mineral separates from Koidu, Bellsbank and Kaalvallei kimberlite pipes in South and West Africa. Whole-rock Mg isotopic compositions vary widely, with δ26Mg ranging from -1.60 to +0.17, significantly different from the value (δ26Mg = -0.25 ± 0.07) of peridotite xenoliths. Garnet and clinopyroxene in these cratonic eclogites record equilibrium inter-mineral Mg isotope partitioning at mantle temperatures, with Δ26MgCpx-Grt (= δ26MgCpx - δ26MgGrt) in the range of 0.43 - 0.85 ‰. The constructed bulk δ26Mg values based on mineral compositions are identical to the measured whole-rock values, indicating limited influence of kimberlite infiltration on Mg isotopic compositions of cratonic eclogites. As significant Mg isotope fractionation can only occur during low-temperature surface processes, the large Mg isotopic variations of cratonic eclogites suggest the incorporation of subducted materials in their protoliths. Therefore, our Mg isotopic data suggest the cratonic eclogites are the remnants of subducted oceanic crust within the lithospheric mantle. Collectively, Mg isotopes are potentially excellent tracers of the formation and evolution of sub-continental lithospheric mantle.

  16. RESULTS FOR THE FIRST QUARTER 2010 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.; Bibler, N.

    2010-05-05

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2010 First Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section. (2) The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from Table 3 of the WAC. (3) The reported detection limits for {sup 59}Ni and {sup 94}Nb are above the requested limits from Reference 4. However, they are each below the limits established in Reference 6. (4) The reported detection limit for isopropanol is greater than the requested limit from Table 4 of the WAC. (5) The reported detection limits for 247Cm and 249Cf are above the requested limits from Reference 4. However, they are below the limits established in Reference 6. (6) Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples. The values reported in this memo are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the GC/MS; however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50.

  17. RESULTS FOR THE FIRST QUARTER 2012 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.

    2012-06-06

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2012 First Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this memorandum: (1) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section; (2) The reported detection limit for {sup 94}Nb is above the requested limit from Reference 2 but below the estimated limit in Reference 3; (3) {sup 247}Cm and {sup 249}Cf are above the requested limits from Reference 2. however, they are below the limits established in Reference 3; (4) The reported detection limit for Norpar 13 is greater than the limit from Table 4 and Attachment 8.2 of the WAC; (5) The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from Table 3 of the WAC; (6) Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples, the values reported in this report are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the instrument; however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50; and (7) The low insoluble solids content increases the measurement uncertainty for insoluble species.

  18. Activation of ULK Kinase and Autophagy by GABARAP Trafficking from the Centrosome Is Regulated by WAC and GM130.

    PubMed

    Joachim, Justin; Jefferies, Harold B J; Razi, Minoo; Frith, David; Snijders, Ambrosius P; Chakravarty, Probir; Judith, Delphine; Tooze, Sharon A

    2015-12-17

    Starvation-induced autophagy requires activation of the ULK complex at the phagophore. Two Golgi proteins, WAC and GM130, regulate autophagy, however their mechanism of regulation is unknown. In search of novel interaction partners of WAC, we found that GM130 directly interacts with WAC, and this interaction is required for autophagy. WAC is bound to the Golgi by GM130. WAC and GM130 interact with the Atg8 homolog GABARAP and regulate its subcellular localization. GABARAP is on the pericentriolar matrix, and this dynamic pool contributes to autophagosome formation. Tethering of GABARAP to the Golgi by GM130 inhibits autophagy, demonstrating an unexpected role for a golgin. WAC suppresses GM130 binding to GABARAP, regulating starvation-induced centrosomal GABARAP delivery to the phagophore. GABARAP, unlipidated and lipidated, but not LC3B, GABARAPL1, and GATE-16, specifically promotes ULK kinase activation dependent on the ULK1 LIR motif, elucidating a unique non-hierarchical role for GABARAP in starvation-induced activation of autophagy. PMID:26687599

  19. Results For The First Quarter 2013 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical And Radionuclide Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2013-05-14

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2013 First Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: SRR WAC targets or limits were met for all analyzed chemical and radioactive contaminates unless noted in this section; {sup 59}Ni, {sup 94}Nb, {sup 247}Cm, {sup 249}Cf, and {sup 251}Cf are above the requested SRR target concentrations. However, they are below the detection limits established by SRNL; Norpar 13 and Isopar L have higher detection limits compared with the Saltstone WAC. The data provided in this report is based upon the concentrations in the sub-sample, and due to the limited solubility in aqueous solution, may not represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50; and, The low insoluble solids content increases the measurement uncertainty for insoluble species.

  20. RESULTS FOR THE FIRST QUARTER 2011 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.

    2011-06-15

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2011 First Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The concentrations of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC targets or limits unless noted in this section; (2) The reported detection limit for {sup 59}Ni is above both the requested limits from Reference 2 and the established limits in Reference 3; (3) The reported detection limit for {sup 94}Nb is above the requested limit from Reference 2; however, it is below the established limits in Reference 3. This is a change from previously reported results; (4) The reported concentration of {sup 242m}Am is above the target in Listed in Attachment 8.4 of the Saltstone WAC. This is a change from the previously reported results; (5) {sup 247}Cm and {sup 249}Cf are above the requested limits from Reference 2. However, they are below the limits established in Reference 3; (6) The reported detection limit for Norpar 13 is greater than the limit from Table 4 and Attachment 8.2 of the WAC; (7) The reported detection limit for Isopar L is greater than the limit from Table 3 of the WAC; and (8) Isopar L and Norpar 13 have limited solubility in aqueous solutions making it difficult to obtain consistent and reliable sub-samples. The values reported in this memo are the concentrations in the sub-sample as detected by the instrument; however, the results may not accurately represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank

  1. Crustal composition of the Western Australian craton and implications for craton formation tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, H.

    2014-12-01

    The Western Australian craton is composed of two Archean blocks, the early-to-mid Archean Pilbara craton and the late Archean Yilgarn craton, and surrounding Proterozoic orogens. Early seismic studies found that these Archean blocks are characterized as a signature type of simple crust and sharp crust-mantle transition, while the orogenic terranes have rather complex crustal structure and much diffused Moho, posing a question whether a possible change in the crustal forming processes occurred between Archean and Proterozoic. Applying receiver functions to available seismic stations, we estimate the bulk crustal thickness and Vp/Vs ratio across the Western Australian craton. The use of the 3D AuSREM velocity models greatly improves the robustness in the bulk crustal property estimates, especially the Vp/Vs ratio that is essential in deriving the crustal composition as well as inferring the tectonic history of individual tectonic units. Our crustal thickness estimates agree well with early studies. The Pilbara crust is uniformly thin (30 km) with a sharp Moho (20% receiver function relative amplitude), and is inferred as extremely felsic in crustal composition (Vp/Vs ratio 1.70, among the lowest in the craton crust globally). The Yilgarn crust is relatively thick (>35km), and is more toward intermediate (Vp/Vs ratio > 1.73). Lateral variations of the Vp/Vs ratios in Yilgarn correlate well with the sub-terranes, reinforcing the early proposal that individual sub-units had gained their unique seismic originality BEFORE the craton amalgamation. Differences between the Pilbara and Yilgarn crust suggest that the vertical and accretional tectonics may have played different roles in forming the cratons. Along the Proterozoic orogens, thicker crust and weaker and possibly dipping Moho interfaces are observed, agreeing with that the regions have been repeatedly reworked. A 20-km thick lower crustal layer with >1.86 Vp/Vs ratio is observed in the Musgrave orogen, reflecting a

  2. The deep water cycle and origin of cratonic flood basalts: two examples from the Siberian craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. V.

    2014-12-01

    Cratonic flood basalt volcanism is the most puzzling phenomenon compared to all other types of intraplate volcanism. Cratons are thick and cold; the two parameters which suppress melting of either sublithospheric or lithospheric mantle in dry conditions. Fusible eclogites at hot plume geotherm start to melt in sublithospheric depth (~ 230 km), but geochemical arguments require that, in addition to eclogitic component, significant volume of flood basalts are from peridotitic mantle. Dry peridotitic mantle cannot be melted unless the lithospheric thickness reduced to about 60 km. That is why modern plume models incorporate lithospheric delamination and/or initially thinned lithosphere to explain cratonic flood basalts. However, if lithosphere remained thick, which was the case for the Siberian craton by the time of formation of its Devonian (Vilyui) and Permo-Triassic (Siberian) flood basalt provinces, then plume model is unable to explain the flood basalt volcanism. If mantle is wet, the peridotitic solidus lowered such as it can start to melt at sublithospheric depth (for example, 2 wt. % H2O-bearing peridotite starts to melt at ~320 km depth even at a normal mantle geotherm). In this presentation I will show that fluxing of mantle via the deep water cycle process may explain the Siberian craton flood basalts and many other continental flood basalts. According to the deep water cycle model, water is carried to the mantle transition zone by fast subducting slabs (may be in form of solid ice VII), then water is released from the slabs due to warming to the ambient mantle temperature, then localized hydration creates buoyant wet diapirs (or melt-bearing diapirs), the diapirs raise up to the sublithosheric depth were melt accumulates for the following tectonically triggered flood basalt eruptions.

  3. Modeling of craton stability using a viscoelastic rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuchert, Marcus; Podladchikov, Yuri; Simon, Nina; Rüpke, Lars

    2010-05-01

    Archean cratons belong to the most remarkable features of our planet, since they represent continental crust that has avoided reworking for several billions of years. Even more, it has become evident from both geophysical and petrological studies that cratons exhibit deep lithospheric keels which equally remained stable ever since the formation of the cratons in the Archean. Dating of inclusions in diamonds from kimberlite pipes give Archean ages, showing that the Archean lithosphere must have been cold soon after its formation in the Archean, in order to allow for the existence of diamonds, and must have stayed in that state ever since. Yet, whereas the stability of Archean cratonic lithosphere for billions of years is a fact, some numerical models failed to reproduce this observed long-term stability (see review by King, 2005). We devised a viscoelastic mantle convection model for exploring cratonic stability. Our modeling results indicate that the application of sufficiently high temperature-dependent viscosity ratio can provide for the observed cratonic stability for billions of years. From our numerical simulations, we derived a relation between Rayleigh number, viscosity ratio, size of the model craton and time to instability of the cratonic root. The comparison between simulations with viscous and viscoelastic rheology indicates no significant influence of elasticity on craton stability. Yet, stress distributions within the model craton differ significantly between viscous and viscoelastic rheologies. This has important implications for future models that include stress-dependent processes like plasticity, power law creep and shear heating. If those processes are to be modeled accurately in mantle convection models that include the lithosphere, a viscoelastic rheology would have to be applied.

  4. Flat slab subduction, trench suction, and craton destruction: Comparison of the North China, Wyoming, and Brazilian cratons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusky, Timothy M.; Windley, Brian F.; Wang, Lu; Wang, Zhensheng; Li, Xiaoyong; Zhu, Peimin

    2014-09-01

    The mechanisms of growth and destruction of continental lithosphere have been long debated. We define and test a unifying plate tectonic driving mechanism that explains the numerous petrological, geophysical, and geological features that characterize the destruction of cratonic lithospheric roots. Data from three Archean cratons demonstrate that loss of their roots is related to rollback of subducted flat slabs, some along the mantle transition zone, beneath the cratons. During flat slab subduction dehydration reactions add water to the overlying mantle wedge. As the subducting slabs roll back, they suck in mantle material to infill the void space created by the slab roll back, and this fertile mantle becomes hydrated. The roll-back causes concomitant lithospheric thinning of the overlying craton so the flux of newly hydrated mantle material inevitably rises causing adiabatic melting, generating new magmas that gradually destroy the roots of the overlying craton through melt-peridotite reactions. Calculated fluxes of new mantle material beneath cratons that have lost their roots range from 2.7 trillion to 70 million cubic kilometers, which is sufficient to generate enough melt to completely replace the affected parts of the destroyed cratons. Cratonic lithosphere may be destroyed in massive quantities through this mechanism, warranting a re-evaluation of continental growth rates with time.

  5. Disentangling Middle Paleozoic sea level and tectonic events in cratonic margins and cratonic basins of North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Gerard C.; Kominz, Michelle A.

    1991-04-01

    The cratonic margins and basins of North America contain evidence of distinct changes in relative sea level, one of the most intriguing of which occurred in middle Paleozoic time. The change in relative sea level began in Frasnian time (Late Devonian) and continued through Visean time (Middle Mississippian) in the Cordilleran miogeocline, in the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen, in the Appalachian miogeocline and in the Michigan, Illinois, and Williston basins. The synchroneity and wide geographic distribution of this event are striking and would seem to argue for an eustatic mechanism. An estimate of the middle Paleozoic sea level rise relative to the stable craton in Iowa suggests that while a large sea level rise occurred, it is smaller than the magnitude of subsidence in the cratonic basins and margins. Flexural foreland basin models do not appear to account for the all of the events in the cratonic margins, and thermal subsidence mechanisms do not seem appropriate for the subsidence in the cratonic basins. The middle Paleozoic stratigraphic record from the North American craton and its margins, therefore, poses a basic problem of identifying a mechanism for producing a large-amplitude rise in sea level relative to the stable craton at the same time as a synchronous onset of tectonic subsidence in widespread basinal and marginal settings of diverse tectonic origin. One plausible mechanism for the tectonic subsidence in the basins and margins is a pulse of intraplate compressive stress. The origin of the large sea level rise relative to the stable craton could reflect an unusually large eustatic sea level change, but we cannot eliminate the possibility of a small component of subsidence or change in dynamic topography of the North American craton. The synchroneity of the sea level rise relative to the craton with the subsidence of basins and margins may be fortuitous, but it is also predicted by recent mantle convection models for the early stages of accretion of

  6. Results For The Fourth Quarter 2012 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical And Radionuclide Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2013-02-05

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2012 Fourth Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC).Information from this characterization will be used by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: The concentration of the reported chemical and radioactive contaminants were less than their respective WAC Limits and Targets, unless noted in this section; Norpar 13 and Isopar L have higher detection limits compared with the Saltstone WAC. The data provided in this report is based upon the concentrations in the sub-sample, and due to the limited solubility in aqueous solution, may not represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50; Diisooctyl adipate (or diisooctyl hexanedioate) and 5-methyl-3-hexanol, plasticizers, were measured at 1.30E+00 mg/L and 3.00E+00 mg/L, respectively, in one of two replicate measurements conducted on an at-depth sample. The organic analysis of the at-depth sample was conducted at the request of SRR. These analytes were below the detection limits for the surface sample; and, The low insoluble solids content increases the measurement uncertainty for insoluble species.

  7. RESULTS FOR THE FOURTH QUARTER 2013 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.

    2014-04-01

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2013 Fourth Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) in effect at that time. Information from this characterization will be used by DWPF & Saltstone Facility Engineering (DSFE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report:  SRR WAC targets or limits were met for all analyzed chemical and radioactive contaminants unless noted in this section.  {sup 59}Ni, {sup 94}Nb, {sup 247}Cm, {sup 249}Cf, and {sup 251}Cf are above the requested SRR target concentrations. However, they are below the detection limits established by SRNL.  Norpar 13 and Isopar L have higher detection limits compared with the Saltstone WAC. The data provided in this report is based upon the concentrations in the sub-sample, and due to the limited solubility of these materials in aqueous solution, may not represent the concentrations of the analytes in Tank 50.  The low insoluble solids content increases the measurement uncertainty for insoluble species. The semivolatile organic analysis (SVOA) method employed in the measurement of Norpar 13 and tributyl phosphate (TBP) has resulted in the erroneous reporting of a variety of small chain alcohols, including 4-methyl-3-hexanol and 5-methyl-3-hexanol, in previous quarterly sample reports. It has now been determined that these alcohols are an artifact of the sample preparation. Further work is being conducted in SRNL to delineate the conditions that produce these alcohols, and these findings will be reported separately.

  8. Results for the second quarter 2014 tank 50 WAC slurry sample chemical and radionuclide contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.

    2014-09-04

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2014 Second Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) in effect at that time. Information from this characterization will be used by DWPF & Saltstone Facility Engineering (DSFE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System.

  9. Results For The Fourth Quarter 2014 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical And Radionuclide Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.

    2015-09-30

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the Calendar Year (CY) 2014 Fourth Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) in effect at that time. Information from this characterization will be used by DWPF & Saltstone Facility Engineering (DSFE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System.

  10. Results For The Third Quarter 2013 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, Christopher J.

    2013-11-26

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2013 Third Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) in effect at that time. Information from this characterization will be used by DWPF & Saltstone Facility Engineering (DSFE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System.

  11. Results For The Second Quarter 2013 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical And Radionuclide Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, Christopher J.

    2013-07-31

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2013 Second Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) in effect at that time. Information from this characterization will be used by Saltstone Facility Engineering (SFE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System.

  12. Results for the Third Quarter 2012 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical and Radionuclide Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2012-10-26

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2012 Third Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System.

  13. The Building of the Archean Superior Craton: Thermal Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaupart, C. P.; Mareschal, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    The building of a craton involves the extraction of continental crust from the Earth's mantle and the lateral accretion of juvenile volcanic terranes. Ascertaining which conditions allow a newborn continental assemblage to survive requires information on its mechanical strength, which depends on the amount and vertical distribution of radioactive elements in the crust. There is thus a connection between crust formation mechanisms and a successful amalgamation process. To address outstanding questions concerning Archean cratons, the Superior province in Canada is the perfect region because it contains a well preserved geological record of accretion that provides compelling evidence for plate tectonic processes at 2.7 Ga. At almost the same time, the rate of continental growth decreased significantly, which may result from either slower crust formation or enhanced destruction through erosion and subduction. These issues are linked to the strength of the newborn continent. The extensive heat flow data set now available in the Superior Province reveals a clear demarcation between a chemically depleted and differentiated craton core and weakly differentiated enriched juvenile accreted terranes. The Superior craton was thus made of a strong core surrounded by weak terranes. This dichotomy implies that the accretion process could not involve complex imbrication of the accreted belts into the craton core. Subsequently, the craton may have been protected from convective disruption or delamination by its weak margins. Differences between the craton core and accreted terranes may be due to different crustal extraction processes, such as melting in a mantle plume or magmatism in a subduction zone. If subduction started at about 3 Ga, as advocated by several authors, the assembly and survival of large cratons may well be a consequence of this key shift in mantle activity. Alternatively, the chemical depletion of the craton core may be due to a prolonged history of internal

  14. Seismic experiment reveals rifting of craton in Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyblade, Andrew A.; Langston, Charles A.; Last, Robert J.; Birt, Christopher; Owens, Thomas J.

    A research project in Tanzania, East Africa, is being conducted to examine seismic velocities within the crust and upper mantle in an area where cratonic lithosphere is experiencing extensional tectonism. The results will be used to evaluate models of cratonic structure. Waveforms from several hundred teleseismic earthquakes and over 10,000 regional and local earthquakes recorded in 1994 and 1995 by the Tanzania Broadband Seismic Experiment are not only yielding new insights into deep continental structure, but are also helping to determine the tectonic stability of cratons by identifying the locus of rifting within northeastern Tanzania.

  15. Proterozoic granitoids of the Amazonian craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dalĺAgnol, R.; Costi, H. T.; Lamarão, C. N.; Teixeira, N. P.; Bettencourt, J. S.; Fraga, L. M.

    2003-04-01

    Proterozoic granitoids are widespread in all provinces of the Amazonian craton. In the Maroni-Itacaiunas Province, granitoids associated with the Trans-Amazonian event include: subduction related, 2.16 to 2.14 Ga, calc-alkaline tonalites and trondhjemites; 2.10 to 2.08 Ga, syncolisional potassic granites; 2.05 Ga, charnockites. In the Tapajós Province, ˜2.01 Ga, tonalites are followed by ˜2.0 Ga volcanic sequences and ˜1.98 to 1.96 Ga calc-alkaline granitoids. A reappraisal of magmatic activity occurred at ˜1.88 Ga when calc-alkaline granitoids, as well as subalkaline, A-type granites, associated with felsic volcanic sequences were formed. A similar picture is observed in the northern Roraima region, where post-collisional 2.0 to 1.96 Ga calc-alkaline granitoids and associated volcanic sequences are followed by 1.92 Ga A-type granites. The remarkable 1.88 Ga magmatic event has a continental scale and is related to an extensional tectonism. It affected also the Archean Carajás Province, where, at this time, within-plate, shallow-level, A-type granites were emplaced. Coeval intermediate to felsic volcanic sequences are widespread in the Central Amazonian Province. In the Pitinga region, these sequences are intruded by ˜1.82 Ga, tin-mineralized granites. In the Central Guiana Belt and in the northwestern domains of the Guiana shield ˜1.55 Ga rapakivi complexes, locally with associated anorthosites and mangerites, are common. In the Rio Negro Province, 1.8 to 1.60 calc-alkaline (?) granitoids and gneisses are dominant. They are followed by 1.55 to 1.52 Ga, oxidized, titanite-bearing A-type granites and S-type, two-mica granites. The evolution of the southwestern part of the Amazonian craton is characterized by the occurrence of successive tectonic events extending from ˜1.75 Ga to ˜1.0 Ga. The oldest granitoids are dominantly calc-alkaline tonalites, trondhjemites and granodiorites. However, the Rondonia region is marked by the occurrence of 1.6 to 1.0 Ga old

  16. GABARAP activates ULK1 and traffics from the centrosome dependent on Golgi partners WAC and GOLGA2/GM130

    PubMed Central

    Joachim, Justin; Tooze, Sharon A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT WAC and GOLGA2/GM130 are 2 Golgi proteins that affect autophagy; however, their mechanism of action was unknown. We have shown that WAC binding to GOLGA2 at the Golgi displaces GABARAP from GOLGA2 to allow the maintenance of a nonlipidated centrosomal GABARAP pool. Centrosomal GABARAP can traffic to autophagic structures during starvation. In addition GABARAP specifically promotes ULK1 activation and this is independent of GABARAP lipidation but likely requires a LIR-mediated GABARAP-ULK1 interaction. PMID:26986052

  17. Late Precambrian aulacogens of the North China craton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qian, X.

    1985-01-01

    According to tectonic styles, the Precambrian evolution history of the North China craton may be subdivided into four stages: (1) Archean consolidation in 3.5 to 2.5 Ga, (2) Early Proterozoic rifting in 2.5 to 1.8 Ga, (3) Late Precambrian aulacogen in 1.8 to 0.8 Ga and (4) Platform regime after 0.8 Ga. In the Late Precambrian aulacogen stage of the North China craton there were two main aulacogens, Yanliao and Zhongtiao (Y and Z), developed in Middle Proterozoic time with an age 1.8 to 1.0 Ga. Their NE trend caused them to meet together in the central part of the craton and build up one great Y-Z aulacogen throughout the craton.

  18. The Thermal Structure and Strength of Cratons and their Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaupart, C. P.; Mareschal, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The large cratons of today are made of younger terranes that wrap around older cores. Deformation due to accretion did not proceed in homogeneous fashion and was concentrated in the younger belts. This is illustrated clearly in the Archean Superior Province, Canada. In this area, one observes little imbrication of accreted crust and craton core, in contrast to the laterally extensive thrusting that has affected the younger terranes to the South. The boundary between the craton core and accreted belts is a nearly vertical interface delineated by steeply dipping electrical and seismic anomalies extending to the base of the lithosphere. These steeply dipping structures have been interpreted as relicts of the subduction that drove accretion. By contrast, the sub-crustal subduction remnant that is imaged beneath younger terranes to the south shows up as a moderately dipping (≈30°) structure. These observations suggest a stiff craton surrounded by weaker belts. This strength contrast may have affected later events, such as the Keweenawan rifing, which propagated northward through the accreted terranes but stopped short of impinging the craton core. In the Superior Province, crustal heat production is much higher in the accreted terranes than in the craton core, implying higher temperatures and lower mechanical strength. Such a remarkable dichotomy also exists in South Africa, where the Limpopo and Namaqua belts are characterized by higher heat flux and crustal heat production than the adjacent Archean Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe cratons. The generality of this cannot be assessed on the basis of heat flow and heat production data which are scarce in most other cratons. These cratons, however, are characterized by post-orogenic high temperature metamorphism which is best explained by high crustal heat production. This is true, for example, for the Jimperding metamorphic belt at the edge of the Yilgarn craton, Western Australia. Thus, cratons appear to be surrounded, and

  19. Patterns and origin of igneous activity around the Tanzanian craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, S. F.; Link, K.; Tiberindwa, J. V.; Barifaijo, E.

    2012-01-01

    Tertiary and later igneous activity is common on and around the Tanzanian craton, with primitive magma compositions ranging from kimberlites and varieties of picrites through nephelinites, basanites and alkali basalts. This review focuses on elucidating the conditions of origin of the melts, addressing the question of the state and involvement of the Tanzanian cratonic lithosphere in magma genesis. The Tanzanian craton is anomalous with a surface elevation of >1100 m reflecting buoyancy supported by a subcratonic plume whose effects are seen in the volcanics of both western and eastern rift branches. Magmatism on the craton and at its edge has high K/Na and primitive melts show fractionation dominated by olivine. Slightly further from the craton pyroxene fractionation dominates and K/Na ratios in the magmas are lower. Off-craton melts are nephelinites, basanites and alkali basalts with low K/Na. Potassium enrichment in the melts correlates with the occurrence of phlogopite in mantle-derived xenoliths, and also with carbonate in the magmas. This is attributed to melting at >140 km depths of mixed source regions containing phlogopite pyroxenite and peridotite, whereby the carbonate is derived from oxidation of diamonds concentrated near the base of the cratonic lithosphere. Mixed source regions are required by arrays of radiogenic isotopes such as Os and Sr in the volcanic rocks. The temporal progression of lamproites to phlogopite + carbonate-rich rocks to melilitites, nephelinites and alkali basalts seen during the erosion of the North Atlantic craton are seen around the Tanzanian craton as the coeval occurrence kimberlites, kamafugites and related rocks, nephelinites and alkali basalts showing spatial instead of temporal variation. This is due to the different stages of development of rifting around the craton: in northwestern Uganda and northern Tanzania, K-rich volcanism occurs at the craton edge, whereas nephelinites, basanites and alkali basalts occur where

  20. Construction and destruction of some North American cratons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, D. B.; Humphreys, G.

    2015-12-01

    Construction histories of Archean cratons remain poorly understood; their destruction is even less clear because of, by definition, its rarity. By assembling geophysical and geochemical data in 3-D lithosphere models, a clearer understanding of the geometry of major structures within the Rae, Slave and Wyoming cratons of central North America is now possible. Little evidence exists of subducted slabs similar to modern oceanic lithosphere in these construction histories whereas underthrusting and wedging of proto-continental lithosphere is inferred from multiple dipping discontinuities. Archean continental building blocks may resemble the modern lithosphere of Ontong-Java-Hikurangi oceanic plateau. Radiometric dating of xenoliths provides estimates of rock types and ages at depth beneath sparse kimberlite occurrences. These ages can be correlated to surface rocks. The 3.6-2.6 Ga Rae, Slave and Wyoming cratons comprise smaller continental terranes that 'cratonized' during a granitic bloom at 2.61-2.55 ga. Cratonization probably represents the final differentiation of early crust into a relatively homogeneous, uniformly thin (35-42 km), tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite crust with pyroxenite layers near the Moho atop depleted lithospheric mantle. Peak thermo-tectonic events at 1.86-1.7 Ga broadly metasomatized, mineralized and recrystallized mantle and lower crustal rocks, apparently making mantle peridotite more 'fertile' and conductive by introducing or concentrating sulfides or graphite throughout the lithosphere at 80-120 km depths. This metasomatism may have also weakened the lithosphere or made it more susceptible to tectonic or chemical erosion. The arrival of the subducted Shatsky Rise conjugate at the Wyoming craton at 65-75 Ma appears to have eroded and displaced the thus weakened base of the craton below 140-160 km. This replaced old refertilized continental mantle with new depleted oceanic mantle. Is this the same craton?

  1. Archaean Crustal Growth, Proterozoic Terrane Amalgamation and the Pan-African Orogeny, as Recorded in the NE African Sedimentary Record.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najman, Y.; Fielding, L.; Millar, I.; Butterworth, P.; Andò, S.; Padoan, M.; Barfod, D. N.; Kneller, B. C.

    2015-12-01

    The cratons of Central Africa are formed of various blocks of Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic crust, flanked or truncated by Palaeoproterozoic to Mesoproterozoic orogenic belts. The geology of east Africa has largely been shaped by the events of the Pan-African Orogeny when east and west Gondwana collided to form 'Greater Gondwana' at the end of the Neoproterozoic. The Pan-African orogeny in NE Africa involved the collision of Archaean cratons and the Saharan Metacraton with the Arabian Nubian Shield, a terrane comprising Neoproterozoic juvenile oceanic island arcs. Phanerozoic cover sedimentary rocks, eroded from the Pan-African orogenies, blanket much of NE Africa. Detrital data from these Phanerozoic cover sedimentary rocks, and modern rivers draining both the cover the basement, provide a wealth of information on basement evolution, of particular relevance for regions where the basement itself is poorly exposed due to ancient or modern sedimentary cover. From samples collected in Uganda, Ethiopia, Sudan and Egypt, we provide combined U-Pb and Hf-isotope zircon, U-Pb rutile and Ar-Ar mica datasets, heavy mineral analyses, and bulk trace element data, from Archaean basement, Phanerozoic cover and modern river sediment from the Nile and its tributaries to document the evolution of the North African crust. The data document early crust-forming events in the Congo Craton and Sahara Metacraton, phased development of the Arabian Nubian Shield culminating in the Neoproterozoic assembly of Gondwana during the Pan African Orogeny, and the orogen's subsequent erosion, with deposition of voluminous Phanerozoic cover.

  2. Water in the Cratonic Mantle: Insights from FTIR Data on Lac De Gras Xenoliths (Slave Craton, Canada)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslier, Anne H.; Brandon, Alan D.; Schaffer, Lillian Aurora; O'Reilly, Suzanne Yvette; Griffin, William L.; Morris, Richard V.; Graff, Trevor G.; Agresti, David G.

    2014-01-01

    The mantle lithosphere beneath the cratonic part of continents is the deepest (> 200 km) and oldest (>2-3 Ga) on Earth, remaining a conundrum as to how these cratonic roots could have resisted delamination by asthenospheric convection over time. Water, or trace H incorporated in mineral defects, could be a key player in the evolution of continental lithosphere because it influences melting and rheology of the mantle. Mantle xenoliths from the Lac de Gras kimberlite in the Slave craton were analyzed by FTIR. The cratonic mantle beneath Lac de Gras is stratified with shallow (<145 km) oxidized ultradepleted peridotites and pyroxenites with evidence for carbonatitic metasomatism, underlain by reduced and less depleted peridotites metasomatized by kimberlite melts. Peridotites analyzed so far have H O contents in ppm weight of 7-100 in their olivines, 58 to 255 in their orthopyroxenes (opx), 11 to 84 in their garnet, and 139 in one clinopyroxene. A pyroxenite contains 58 ppm H2O in opx and 5 ppm H2O in its olivine and garnet. Olivine and garnet from the deep peridotites have a range of water contents extending to higher values than those from the shallow ones. The FTIR spectra of olivines from the shallow samples have more prominent Group II OH bands compared to the olivines from the deep samples, consistent with a more oxidized mantle environment. The range of olivine water content is similar to that observed in Kaapvaal craton peridotites at the same depths (129-184 km) but does not extend to as high values as those from Udachnaya (Siberian craton). The Slave, Kaapvaal and Siberian cratons will be compared in terms of water content distribution, controls and role in cratonic root longevity.

  3. Majorite Garnet and Lithosphere Evolution: Kaapvaal Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, W. L.; Tessalina, S.; O'Reilly, S. Y.

    2013-12-01

    The uppermost 50-70 km of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) beneath the Kaapvaal Craton (S. Africa) consists largely of highly-depleted chromite harzburgites. These rocks are understudied, mainly because of their uniformity and their lack of indicator minerals such as garnet and clinopyroxene (cpx). Kimberlite-borne xenoliths of these rocks contain rare volumes of cpx-spinel (modal 76/24) symplectite, with smooth grain boundaries; many studies have suggested that these might represent low-pressure breakdown products of garnet (majorite + olivine → cpx + spinel). Our reconstruction of a suite of these grains, using element mapping and EMP analysis of constituent minerals, gives a majoritic garnet with mean composition 21.8% CaO, 15.8% Cr2O3, 9.22% Al2O3, Si=3.118, mg#=0.93. The majorite contents suggest formation at depths of 250-280 km. Ni contents imply temperatures ≥1500 °C, but have large uncertainties related to the subtraction of olivine (ca 20%) during the reconstruction calculation. LAM-ICPMS analyses show strongly sinuous REE patterns with CN Dy/Lu <0.1 and Ce/Dy >100. Most analyses have negative Eu anomalies, consistent with chromite compositions that indicate strongly reducing conditions (ΔfO2(FMQ) = -4 to -5). Melt modeling suggests that the harzburgites are products of 30-40% melting of asthenospheric mantle at 250 km depth, leaving residues of ol+opx+chromite. The presence of the majorites and their overall LREE enrichment are ascribed to the introduction of carbonatitic metasomatic fluids, similar to those recorded by diamond-inclusions (subcalcic garnets), shortly after the depletion. We suggest that the melting, the metasomatism and the ultimate breakdown of the majorite track a process of mantle upwelling, with melt-extraction at depth providing the buoyancy that allowed the residual harzburgites to rise to shallow levels and stabilize the SCLM. Os-isotope analyses of sulfides associated with the majorites give TRD = 2.5-3.4 Ga

  4. RESULTS FOR THE THIRD QUARTER 2007 TANK 50H WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Zeigler, K; Ned Bibler, N

    2008-07-11

    The Saltstone Facility is designed and permitted to immobilize and dispose of low-level radioactive and hazardous liquid waste (salt solution) remaining from the processing of radioactive material at the Savannah River Site. Low activity wastewater streams from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), H-Canyon, and the high level waste (HLW) storage tanks, are stored as a mixture in Tank 50H until it can be pumped to the Saltstone Facility for treatment and disposal. Specific waste acceptance criteria (WAC) must be met for the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50H to the Saltstone Facility. Low level waste which meets the WAC can be transferred, stored and treated in the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) for subsequent disposal as saltstone in the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested through a Technical Task Request (TTR) that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measure the concentrations of chemical and radionuclide contaminants listed in the currently approved Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). A Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan and Analytical Study Plan has been written for this request. WAC determinations are needed on a quarterly basis for chemical contaminants and every first and third quarter for radioactive contaminants. This memorandum presents the results for the chemical and radionuclide contaminants in the third quarter, from the samples taken from Tank 50 in September, 2007.

  5. Magnetotelluric deep soundings, gravity and geoid in the south São Francisco craton: Geophysical indicators of cratonic lithosphere rejuvenation and crustal underplating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Luis Gustavo Rodrigues; de Pádua, Marcelo Banik; Ussami, Naomi; Vitorello, Ícaro; Padilha, Antonio Lopes; Braitenberg, Carla

    2010-09-01

    positive geoid anomaly (+ 10 m) and pre-tholeiites (age > 138 Ma), carbonatites and kimberlites along the west African continental margin (Angola and Namibia) reinforces the presumed age of the São Francisco-Congo craton rejuvenation to be prior to its fragmentation in the Lower Cretaceous.

  6. Photometric parameter maps of the Moon derived from LROC WAC images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, H.; Robinson, M. S.; Hapke, B. W.; Denevi, B. W.; Boyd, A. K.

    2013-12-01

    Spatially resolved photometric parameter maps were computed from 21 months of Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Wide Angle Camera (WAC) images. Due to a 60° field-of-view (FOV), the WAC achieves nearly global coverage of the Moon each month with more than 50% overlap from orbit-to-orbit. From the repeat observations at various viewing and illumination geometries, we calculated Hapke bidirectional reflectance model parameters [1] for 1°x1° "tiles" from 70°N to 70°S and 0°E to 360°E. About 66,000 WAC images acquired from February 2010 to October 2011 were converted from DN to radiance factor (I/F) though radiometric calibration, partitioned into gridded tiles, and stacked in a time series (tile-by-tile method [2]). Lighting geometries (phase, incidence, emission) were computed using the WAC digital terrain model (100 m/pixel) [3]. The Hapke parameters were obtained by model fitting against I/F within each tile. Among the 9 parameters of the Hapke model, we calculated 3 free parameters (w, b, and hs) by setting constant values for 4 parameters (Bco=0, hc=1, θ, φ=0) and interpolating 2 parameters (c, Bso). In this simplification, we ignored the Coherent Backscatter Opposition Effect (CBOE) to avoid competing CBOE and Shadow Hiding Opposition Effect (SHOE). We also assumed that surface regolith porosity is uniform across the Moon. The roughness parameter (θ) was set to an averaged value from the equator (× 3°N). The Henyey-Greenstein double lobe function (H-G2) parameter (c) was given by the 'hockey stick' relation [4] (negative correlation) between b and c based on laboratory measurements. The amplitude of SHOE (Bso) was given by the correlation between w and Bso at the equator (× 3°N). Single scattering albedo (w) is strongly correlated to the photometrically normalized I/F, as expected. The c shows an inverse trend relative to b due to the 'hockey stick' relation. The parameter c is typically low for the maria (0.08×0.06) relative to the

  7. Remagnetized cratonic Cambrian strata from southern Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillett, Stephen L.

    1982-08-01

    Stratigraphic sections of Cambrian strata in southeastern Nevada are akin to thin, cratonic facies exposed in the Grand Canyon; their structural setting is much more complicated, however, from Mesozoic and Cenozoic tectonism. Paleomagnetic samples from two sections through these strata appear to have been completely remagnetized. Coarse-grained, lightcolored sandstone from the Tapeats Sandstone yields scattered magnetizations, residing in hematite, that appear to reflect protracted diagenetic acquisition of remanence. A hematitic sandstone in the Bright Angel Shale yields relatively consistent `Paleozoic' directions of magnetization, but petrographic study shows that the hematite results from diagenetic oxidation, and stratigraphic arguments suggest that the oxidation was not penecontemporaneous. Gray limestones of the Jangle and Muav Limestones yield a magnetization, residing in magnetite, that may reflect late Tertiary remagnetization, being imposed during uplift related to the onset of Basin and Range deformation. In any case, this magnetization differs greatly in direction from a hematite magnetization reported from slightly younger Muav Limestone in the Grand Canyon. Both the sampling sites also appear to have been tectonically rotated, but whether this rotation is true or a geometric artifact of the tilt correction cannot be determined from the present data. These results suggest that paleomagnetic data from rocks as old as Cambrian must be scrutinized very carefully before their magnetizations can be accepted as penecontemporaneous, and such scrutiny must include geologic data.

  8. A Precambrian cratonic block in the west-central Chihuahua - The Sierra del Nido cratonic block

    SciTech Connect

    Goodell, P.C. . Dept. of Geological)

    1993-02-01

    Precambrian rocks in west-central Chihuahua have been recognized by Denison (1969) and Mauger et al. (1983), on the basis of radiometric dating. The rocks are rhyolite clasts, and an allucthonous block, respectively, however their source direction and vergence can be measured. They point back to and are on the edge of a large, uniform, negative Bouguer gravity anomaly, having values greater than 200 milligals. The isotopic geochemical character of several Tertiary felsic fields within this anomalous are has been determined, and initial strontium isotopic ratios are all greater than 0.7055. Outside the anomalous area these ratios are lower, and Basin and Range extension tectonism is more evident. It is proposed that a Precambrian cratonic block, the Sierra del Nido, is present in the crust in west-central Chihuahua. It is reasonable to propose that it was decreted from North America during a Precambrian extensional (1.1. By ) event, from somewhere along the Arizona Transition Zone-Texas Linament region. The Sierra del Nido Block is separated form the ATZ-TL by a region of disrupted craton and extended crust, the Basin and Range Province. Implications of the pressure of the Sierra del Nido Block on other regional tectonic events will be discussed.

  9. Heat flux and topography constraints on thermochemical structure below North China Craton regions and implications for evolution of cratonic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongming; Huang, Jinshui; Zhong, Shijie; Chen, Jiaming

    2016-04-01

    The eastern North China Craton (NCC) has undergone extensive reactivation during the Mesozoic and Cenozoic, while the western NCC has remained stable throughout its geological history. Geophysical and geochemical observations, including heat flux, surface topography, crustal and lithospheric thicknesses, and volcanism, show significant contrast between the eastern and western NCC. These observations provide constraints on thermochemical structure and reactivation process of the eastern NCC, thus helping understand the dynamic evolution of cratonic lithosphere. In this study, we determined the residual topography for the NCC region by removing crustal contribution to the topography. We found that the residual topography of the eastern NCC region is generally 0.3-0.9 km higher than the western NCC. We computed a large number of two-dimension thermochemical convection models for gravitational instability of cratonic lithosphere and quantified surface heat flux and topography contrasts between stable and destabilized parts of cratonic lithosphere. These models consider different chemical buoyancy (i.e., buoyancy number B) and viscosity for the cratonic lithosphere. Our models suggest that to explain the difference in heat flux (25-30 mW/m2) and residual topography (0.3-0.9 km) between the eastern and western NCC regions, the buoyancy number B is required to be ~0.3-0.4. This range of B implies that as much as 50% of the original cratonic lithospheric material remains in the present-day eastern NCC lithosphere and its underlying shallow mantle and that the new lithosphere in the eastern NCC may be a mixture of the relics of old craton materials and the normal mantle.

  10. The Brasiliano São Francisco craton revisited (central Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trompette, R.; Uhlein, A.; da Silva, M. E.; Karmann, I.

    1992-08-01

    The Brasiliano (˜600 Ma) belt of Paramirim divides the São Francisco craton (as defined by Almeida, 1967, 1969) into two parts: to the west is the São Francisco craton proper; to the east is the Salvador craton, forming an extension of the Congo craton. The basement of the Paramirim belt, of Archean and Early Proterozoic age, is intruded by subalkaline granitoids dated around 1700 Ma. The cover, known as the Espinhaço Supergroup, consists of felsic magmatic rocks, overlain by clastic sediments depoited in a continental rift during the time interval ˜1700-1100 Ma. The Espinhaço Supergroup was deformed during the Brasiliano orogeny, at about 600 Ma. It is characterized by shallow-dipping, submeridional, large-scale ductile shear zones with western vergence and mineral and/or extension lineation indicating tectonic transport from east to west. These ductile shear zones extend south into the outer units of the Brasiliano Araçuaí mobile belt and the Lower Proterozoic of the Quadrilatero Ferrifero. There are no structural data supporting the hypothesis of a Middle Proterozoic deformation of the Paramirim belt that should have been obliterated during the Brasiliano orogeny. However, a possible pre-Brasiliano deformation does not affect the question of the division of the Brasiliano-São Francisco craton.

  11. Precambrian Cratons and Fold-Belts in Brazil: Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuck, R.

    2008-05-01

    The main Precambrian terrains recognized in Brazil comprise the Amazonian, São Francisco and Rio de la Plata cratons, surrounded by Neoproterozoic Brasiliano fold belts, making up the Borborema, Mantiqueira and Tocantins provinces. The Amazonian craton comprises an Archean core, surrounded by Paleoproterozoic terrains (Maroni-Itacaiunas, Ventuari-Tapajós, Rio Negro-Juruena), which southwestwards give way to the Mesoproterozoic Rondoniano-San Ignacio and Sunsas belts, the latter thought to be related to the Grenville belt of North America. The São Francisco craton comprises several Archean blocks (Gavião, Serrinha, Jequié) amalgamated by the Paleoproterozoic high-grade Itabuna-Salvador-Curaçá orogen. The Rio de la Plata craton, largely covered by Phanerozoic strata, is made of Paleoproterozoic basement gneiss and several Paleoproterozoic greenstone belts. Other cratonic blocks are hidden below large Phanerozoic basins, like the Paranapanema and Parnaíba blocks below the Paraná and Parnaíba basins, respectively. Several smaller Archean/Paleoproterozoic blocks appear within the Brasiliano provinces: some were strongly reworked during the Neoproterozoic orogenic events (São José do Campestre, Pernambuco-Alagoas, Goiás, Guanhães, Juiz de Fora, Curitiba), others were only marginally affected (São Luiz, Rio Apa, Luís Alves). The Brasiliano provinces are the result of Neoproterozoic to early Paleozoic orogenic events within the framework of West Gondwana amalgamation. The Mantiqueira Province extends from eastern Brazil to southern Uruguay and includes the Araçuaí, Ribeira and Dom Feliciano fold belts, bordering the São Francisco, Paranapanema and Rio de la Plata cratons and surrounding the Luís Alves craton. The Tocantins province in central Brazil includes the Araguaia, Paraguay and Brasília fold belts, the former bordering the Amazonian craton, the second bordering both the southern Amazonian craton and the Rio Apa block, and the last established on

  12. The 3-dimensional construction of the Rae craton, central Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, David B.; Craven, James A.; Pilkington, Mark; Hillier, Michael J.

    2015-10-01

    Reconstruction of the 3-dimensional tectonic assembly of early continents, first as Archean cratons and then Proterozoic shields, remains poorly understood. In this paper, all readily available geophysical and geochemical data are assembled in a 3-D model with the most accurate bedrock geology in order to understand better the geometry of major structures within the Rae craton of central Canada. Analysis of geophysical observations of gravity and seismic wave speed variations revealed several lithospheric-scale discontinuities in physical properties. Where these discontinuities project upward to correlate with mapped upper crustal geological structures, the discontinuities can be interpreted as shear zones. Radiometric dating of xenoliths provides estimates of rock types and ages at depth beneath sparse kimberlite occurrences. These ages can also be correlated to surface rocks. The 3.6-2.6 Ga Rae craton comprises at least three smaller continental terranes, which "cratonized" during a granitic bloom. Cratonization probably represents final differentiation of early crust into a relatively homogeneous, uniformly thin (35-42 km), tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite crust with pyroxenite layers near the Moho. The peak thermotectonic event at 1.86-1.7 Ga was associated with the Hudsonian orogeny that assembled several cratons and lesser continental blocks into the Canadian Shield using a number of southeast-dipping megathrusts. This orogeny metasomatized, mineralized, and recrystallized mantle and lower crustal rocks, apparently making them more conductive by introducing or concentrating sulfides or graphite. Little evidence exists of thin slabs similar to modern oceanic lithosphere in this Precambrian construction history whereas underthrusting and wedging of continental lithosphere is inferred from multiple dipping discontinuities.

  13. Craton stability and longevity: The roles of composition-dependent rheology and buoyancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongliang; van Hunen, Jeroen; Pearson, D. Graham; Allen, Mark B.

    2014-04-01

    Survival of thick cratonic roots in a vigorously convecting mantle system for billions of years has long been studied by the geodynamical community. High strength of the cratonic root is generally considered to be the most important factor, but the role of lithospheric mantle depletion and dehydration in this strengthening is still debated. Geodynamical models often argue for a significant strength or buoyancy contrast between cratonic and non-cratonic mantle lithosphere, induced by mantle depletion and dehydration. But recent laboratory experiments argue for only a modest effect of dehydration strengthening. Can we reconcile laboratory experiments and geodynamical models? We perform and discuss new numerical models to investigate craton stability and longevity with different composition-dependent rheology and buoyancy. Our results show that highly viscous and possibly buoyant cratonic root is essential to stabilise a geometry in which thick cratonic lithosphere and thinner non-cratonic lithosphere coexist for billions of years. Using non-Newtonian rheology, a modest strengthening factor of Δη=3 can protect compositionally buoyant cratonic roots from erosion by mantle convection for over billions of years. A larger strengthening factor (Δη=10) can maintain long term craton stability even with little or no intrinsic buoyancy. Such composition-dependent rheology is comparable to the laboratory experiments. This implies that a strict isopycnic state of cratonic lithosphere may not be necessary for the preservation of a cratonic root, provided a sufficient level of compositional strengthening is present.

  14. Archean crustal evolution of the northern North China Craton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qian, Xianglin; Chen, Yaping; Liu, Jinzhong

    1988-01-01

    The Archean granultie facies rocks of the North China (Sino-Korean) Craton mostly occur inside the northern boundary forming a unique and spectacular granulite belt trending roughly E-W from eastern Hebei, North China in the east to Mt. Daqinchan, western Inner Mongolia in the west, ranging about 1,000 km long. Over the years in the middle portion of this Archean high-grade metamorphic belt a stratigraphic unconformity between the khondalite rock assemblage and the medium in composition granulite assemblage in Datong-Xinghe area is determined. The geological structural properties of the North China Craton are discussed.

  15. The Role of Water in the Stability of Cratonic Keels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslier, Anne H.; Woodland, Alan B.; Bell, David R.; Lazarov, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Cratons are typically underlain by large, deep, and old lithospheric keels (to greater than 200 km depth, greater than 2.5 Ga old) projecting into the asthenosphere (e.g., Jordan, 1978; Richardson et al., 1984). This has mystified Earth scientists as the dynamic and relatively hot asthenosphere should have eroded away these keels over time (e.g., Sleep, 2003; O'Neill et al., 2008; Karato, 2010). Three key factors have been invoked to explain cratonic root survival: 1) Low density makes the cratonic mantle buoyant (e.g., Poudjom Djomani et al., 2001). 2) Low temperatures (e.g., Pollack, 1986; Boyd, 1987), and 3) low water contents (e.g., Pollack, 1986), would make cratonic roots mechanically strong. Here we address the mechanism of the longevity of continental mantle lithosphere by focusing on the water parameter. Although nominally anhydrous , olivine, pyroxene and garnet can accommodate trace amounts of water in the form of H bonded to structural O in mineral defects (e.g., Bell and Rossman, 1992). Olivine softens by orders of magnitude if water (1-1000 ppm H2O) is added to its structure (e.g., Mackwell et al., 1985). Our recent work has placed constraints on the distribution of water measured in peridotite minerals in the cratonic root beneath the Kaapvaal in southern Africa (Peslier et al., 2010). At P greater than 5 GPa, the water contents of pyroxene remain relatively constant while those of olivine systematically decrease from 50 to less than 10 ppm H2O at 6.4 GPa. We hypothesized that at P greater than 6.4 GPa, i.e. at the bottom of the cratonic lithosphere, olivines are essentially dry (greater than 10 ppm H2O). As olivine likely controls the rheology of the mantle, we calculated that the dry olivines could be responsible for a contrast in viscosity between cratonic lithosphere and surrounding asthenosphere large enough to explain the resistance of cratonic root to asthenospheric delamination.

  16. Interaction between an incipient rift and a cratonic lithosphere : The North Tanzania Rift seen from some seismic tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, Stéphanie; Plasman, Matthieu; Tiberi, Christel; Lopez, Marie; Peyrat, Sophie; Perrot, Julie; Albaric, Julie; Déverchère, Jacques; Deschamps, Anne; Ebinger, Cindy; Roecker, Steven; Mulibo, Gabriel; Wambura, Richard Ferdinand; Muzuka, Alfred; Msabi, Michael; Gama, Remigius

    2016-04-01

    The North Tanzania part of the East African Rift is the place of an incipient break up of the lithosphere. This continental rifting happens on the edge of the Tanzanian craton, and their interaction leads to major changes in the surface deformation. The evolution of the rift and its morphology is strongly linked to the inherited structures, particularly the Proterozoic belts and the craton itself. It is thus of prime interest to image the structure of the craton edges to fully understand its impact on the localisation of the current deformation at the surface. Since 2007 different multidisciplinary projects have taken place in this area to address this question. We present here a work based on a collaborative work between French, American and Tanzanian institutes that started in 2013. About 35 seismological stations were installed for 2 years in the Natron lake region, and 10 short period instruments were added for 9 months in the Manyara area to record local and telesismic events. We have analysed more than a hundred teleseismic events to compute the receiver function, and we finally obtain a Moho map of the region as well as azimuthal distribution of converted phases. The stations located on the edge of the rift and near the craton present a continuous evolution of their crustal pattern in the RF signal. Especially, we identify a clear phase at about 7s for those stations that corresponds to an interface separating a normal upper mantle from a very slow mantle at about 70 km depth. We first model those receiver functions to perfectly fit the signal, and more precisely the transverse component, which shows a strong and coherent pattern. Second, the local seismic network we have installed for 9 months in Manyara region advantageously completed the 2007 SEISMOTANZ network. In this part of the rift the seismicity is deep (20-30 km) and clustered without any magmatism record at the surface, opposite to Natron area. We could then relocalize the deep seismicity observed

  17. A de novo 10p11.23-p12.1 deletion recapitulates the phenotype observed in WAC mutations and strengthens the role of WAC in intellectual disability and behavior disorders.

    PubMed

    Abdelhedi, Fatma; El Khattabi, Laila; Essid, Nouha; Viot, Geraldine; Letessier, Dominique; Lebbar, Aziza; Dupont, Jean-Michel

    2016-07-01

    Chromosomal microarray analysis has become a powerful diagnostic tool in the investigation of patients with intellectual disability leading to the discovery of dosage sensitive genes implicated in the manifestation of various genomic disorders. Interstitial deletions of the short arm of chromosome 10 represent rare genetic abnormalities, especially those encompassing the chromosomal region 10p11-p12. To date, only 10 postnatal cases with microdeletion of this region have been described, and all patients shared a common phenotype, including intellectual disability, abnormal behavior, distinct dysmorphic features, visual impairment, and cardiac malformations. WAC was suggested to be the main candidate gene for intellectual disability associated with 10 p11-p12 deletion syndrome. Here, we describe a new case of de novo 10p11.23-p12.1 microdeletion in a patient with intellectual disability, abnormal behavior, and distinct dysmorphic features. Our observation allows us to redefine the smallest region of overlap among patients reported so far, with a size of 80 Kb and which contains only the WAC gene. These findings strengthen the hypothesis that haploinsufficency of WAC gene might be likely responsible for intellectual disability and behavior disorders. Our data also led us to propose a clinical pathway for patients with this recognizable genetic syndrome depending on the facial dysmorphisms. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27119754

  18. Lunar textural analysis based on WAC-derived kilometer-scale roughness and entropy maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Wang, XueQiang; Zhang, Jiang; Chen, Jian; Ling, Zongcheng

    2016-06-01

    In general, textures are thought to be some complicated repeated patterns formed by elements, or primitives which are sorted in certain rules. Lunar surfaces record the interactions between its outside environment and itself, thus, based on high-resolution DEM model or image data, there are some topographic features which have different roughness and entropy values or signatures on lunar surfaces. Textures of lunar surfaces can help us to concentrate on typical topographic and photometric variations and reveal the relationships between obvious features (craters, impact basins, sinuous rilles (SRs) and ridges) with resurfacing processes on the Moon. In this paper, the term surface roughness is an expression of the variability of a topographic or photometric surface at kilometer scale, and the term entropy can characterize the variability inherent in a geological and topographic unit and evaluate the uncertainty of predictions made by a given geological process. We use the statistical moments of gray-level histograms in different-sized neighborhoods (e.g., 3, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 pixels) to compute the kilometer-scale roughness and entropy values, using the mosaic image from 70°N to 70°S obtained by Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Wide Angle Camera (WAC). Large roughness and entropy signatures were only found in the larger scale maps, while the smallest 3-pixel scale map had more disorderly and unsystematic textures. According to the entropy values in 10-pixel scale entropy map, we made a frequency curve and categorized lunar surfaces into three types, shadow effects, maria and highlands. A 2D scatter plot of entropy versus roughness values was produced and we found that there were two point clusters corresponding to the highlands and maria, respectively. In the last, we compared the topographic and photometric signatures derived from Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) data and WAC mosaic image. On the lunar surfaces, the ridges have obvious multilevel

  19. The story of a craton from heart to margins: illuminating cratonic lithosphere with Rayleigh wave phase velocities in Eastern Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrescu, L.; Darbyshire, F. A.; Gilligan, A.; Bastow, I. D.; Totten, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    Cratons are Precambrian continental nuclei that are geologically distinct from modern continental regions and are typically underlain by seismically fast lithospheric roots (keels) to at least 200 km depth. Both plate and non-plate tectonic origin theories such as stacking of subducted slabs or multiple mantle plume underplating have been proposed to explain keel growth.Eastern Canada is an ideal continental region to investigate cratonization processes and the onset of plate tectonics. It comprises part of the largest Archean craton in the world, the Superior Province, flanked by a ~1.1 Ga Himalayan-scale orogenic belt, the Grenville Province, and the 500-300 Ma old Appalachian orogenic province, following the same general SW-NE axial trend. The region is also cross-cut by the Great Meteor Hotspot track, providing an excellent opportunity to study the interaction of hotspot tectonism with progressively younger lithospheric domains.We investigate the lithospheric structure of Precambrian Eastern Canada using teleseismic earthquake data recorded at permanent and temporary networks. We measure interstation dispersion curves of Rayleigh wave phase velocities between ~15 and 220 s, and compare the results to standard continental and cratonic reference models. We combine the dispersion curves via a tomographic inversion which solves for isotropic phase velocity heterogeneity and azimuthal anisotropy across the region at a range of periods. The phase velocity maps indicate variations in lithospheric properties from the heart of the Superior craton to the SE Canadian coast.The new regional-scale models will help to understand the processes that generated, stabilized and reworked the cratonic roots through their billion-year tectonic history. We investigate how surface tectonic boundaries relate to deeper lithospheric structural changes, and consider the effects of the multiple Wilson cycles that affected Laurentia.

  20. Physico-chemical constraints on cratonic lithosphere discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulbach, Sonja; Rondenay, Stéphane; Huismans, Ritske

    2014-05-01

    The origins of the mid-lithospheric discontinuity (MLD) and lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) have received much attention over the recent years. Peculiarities of cratonic lithosphere construction - compositional and rheological stratification due to thickening in collisional settings or by plume subcretion, multiple metasomatic overprints due to longevity - offer a variety of possibilities for the generation of discontinuities. Interconnected small degrees of conductive partial melt (carbonate-rich melts, such as carbonatites and kimberlites, or highly alkaline melts) at the cratonic LAB, which produce seismic discontinuities, may be generated in the presence of volatiles. These depress the peridotite solidus sufficiently to intersect the mantle adiabat at depths near the cratonic LAB at ~160-220 km, i.e. above the depth of metal saturation where carbonatite becomes unstable. The absence of agreement between the different seismic and magnetotelluric estimates for the depth of the LAB beneath Kaapvaal may be due to impingement of a plume, leading to a pervasively, but heterogeneously metasomatised ('asthenospherised') hot and deep root. Such a root and hot sublithosphere may yield conflicting seismic-thermal-geochemical depths for the LAB. The question arises whether the chemical boundary layer should be defined as above or below the asthenospherised part of the SCLM, which has preserved isotopic, compositional (non-primitive olivine forsterite content) and physical evidence (e.g. from teleseismic tomography and receiver functions) for a cratonic heritage and which therefore is still distinguishable from the asthenospheric mantle. If cratonic lithosphere overlies anomalously hot mantle for extended periods of time, the LAB may be significantly thinned, aided by penetration of relatively high-degree Fe-rich partial melts, as has occurred beneath the Tanzanian craton. Xenoliths from the deep Slave craton show little evidence for 'asthenospherisation'. Its root

  1. GLD100: The near-global lunar 100 m raster DTM from LROC WAC stereo image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholten, F.; Oberst, J.; Matz, K.-D.; Roatsch, T.; Wählisch, M.; Speyerer, E. J.; Robinson, M. S.

    2012-03-01

    We derived near-global lunar topography from stereo image data acquired by the Wide-angle Camera (WAC) of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) system. From polar orbit tracks, the LROC WAC provides image data with a mean ground resolution at nadir of 75 m/pixel with substantial cross-track stereo overlap. WAC stereo images from the one-year nominal mission and the first months of the science mission phase are combined to produce a near-global digital terrain model (DTM) with a pixel spacing of 100 m, the Global Lunar DTM 100 m, or “GLD100.” It covers 79°S to 79°N latitudes, 98.2% of the entire lunar surface. We compare the GLD100 with results from previous stereo and altimetry-based products, particularly with the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) altimetry, which is the current topographic reference for the Moon. We describe typical characteristics of the GLD100 and, based upon the comparison to the LOLA data set, assess its vertical and lateral resolution and accuracy. We conclude that the introduced first version of the stereo-based GLD100 is a valuable topographic representation of the lunar surface, complementary to the LOLA altimetry data set. Further improvements can be expected from continuative investigations.

  2. Nature and timing of multiple metasomatic events in the sub-cratonic lithosphere beneath Labait, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koornneef, Janne M.; Davies, Gareth R.; Döpp, Sonja P.; Vukmanovic, Zoja; Nikogosian, Igor K.; Mason, Paul R. D.

    2009-11-01

    Petrography, mineral major- and trace element analyses and Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd systematics of xenoliths from Labait volcano, north-central Tanzania, document multiple metasomatic events after initial depletion of the Archaean sub-lithospheric mantle. Four distinct metasomatic phases occurred during the 2.8-3.2 Ga history of the mantle section of the Tanzanian craton. 1) Garnet and Cr-diopside in two depleted lherzolites record LREE enrichment in an early cryptic metasomatic event (~ 2 Ga) resulting in unradiogenic ɛ Nd (- 6.6) and relatively radiogenic Sr signature ( 87Sr/ 86Sr = 0.7049); 2) Four texturally equilibrated peridotites contain phlogopite and Cr-diopside inferred to be introduced by a hydrous melt/fluid that produced LREE enrichment related to the subduction and collision during the 650 Ma Pan-African Orogeny; 3) Fe-enrichment is observed in many garnet-free wehrlites and dunites having low Mg# olivines. Timing of this enrichment event remains poorly defined; and 4) One spinel lherzolite records orthopyroxene replacing clinopyroxene due to recent infiltration of a rift-related H 2O poor, K-alkaline silicate melt. This ongoing metasomatic reaction caused by rift-related magmatism would result in the conversion of lherzolite to orthopyroxene-rich harzburgite. The reaction possibly represents the mechanism involved in the formation of orthopyroxene-rich sub-continental lithospheric mantle below the Kaapvaal and Siberian cratons. Generally, the rift-related metasomatism beneath Tanzania has caused formation of interstitial clinopyroxene, melt veins and melt pockets and new rims of phlogopite, all of which are in chemical disequilibrium with the original xenolith mineralogy.

  3. Shear wave velocity structure of the southern African upper mantle with implications for the uplift of southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Aubreya; Nyblade, Andrew

    2011-08-01

    Broad-band seismic data from the southern African seismic experiment and the AfricaArray network are used to investigate the seismic velocity structure of the upper mantle beneath southern Africa, and in particular beneath the Kaapvaal Craton. A two-plane approximation method that includes a finite frequency sensitivity kernel is employed to measure Rayleigh wave phase velocities, which are inverted to obtain a quasi-3-D shear wave velocity model of the upper mantle. We find phase velocities for the Kaapvaal Craton and surrounding mobile belts that are comparable to those reported by previous studies, and we find little evidence for variation from east to west across the Namaqua-Natal Belt, a region not well imaged in previous studies. A high-velocity upper-mantle lid is found beneath the Kaapvaal Craton and most of southern Africa. For the Kaapvaal Craton, the thickness of the lid (˜150-200 km) is consistent with the lid thicknesses reported in many previous studies. The cratonic lid is underlain by a ˜100-km thick low-velocity zone with a 3.9 per cent maximum velocity reduction. By comparing the velocity model to those published for other Archean cratons, we find few differences, and therefore conclude that there is little evidence in the shear wave velocity structure of the mantle to indicate that the southern African plateau is supported by an upper-mantle thermal anomaly.

  4. New heat flow determination in northern Tarim Craton, northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shaowen; Lei, Xiao; Wang, Liangshu

    2015-02-01

    Tarim Craton is a Precambrian block situated in northwest China, just north of the Tibetan Plateau, where a large sedimentary basin with abundant hydrocarbon potential has developed. Accurate heat flow data for Tarim is vital for understanding the lithospheric evolution and hydrocarbon generation in this area; however, there were unavailable until now, due to a lack of high quality steady-state temperature logging data. Here, we report 10 new heat flow values derived from steady-state temperature logging and measured thermal conductivity data. New heat flow values range from 40.1 to 49.4 mW m-2, with a mean of 43.1 ± 3.0 mW m-2. In addition, radiogenic heat production from the sediments accounts for 20 per cent of the observed surface heat flow, whilst the mantle heat flow is estimated to be as low as 6-15 mW m-2; this indicates a dominant contribution from crustal heat, to the observed heat flow. The average heat flow and crustal temperature in the Tarim Craton are markedly lower than those in the Tibetan Plateau, whilst the calculated rheological strength of the lithosphere, beneath Tarim, is sufficiently large to resist the elevation-induced gravitational potential energy difference between Tarim and Tibet. This inherited thermal and rheological contrast, between the craton and Plateau, can be traced back to before the India-Asia collision; this accounts for the differential active deformation pattern in the Tarim Craton and adjacent areas.

  5. Recycling lower continental crust in the North China craton.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shan; Rudnick, Roberta L; Yuan, Hong-Ling; Liu, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Yong-Sheng; Xu, Wen-Liang; Ling, Wen-Li; Ayers, John; Wang, Xuan-Che; Wang, Qing-Hai

    2004-12-16

    Foundering of mafic lower continental crust into underlying convecting mantle has been proposed as one means to explain the unusually evolved chemical composition of Earth's continental crust, yet direct evidence of this process has been scarce. Here we report that Late Jurassic high-magnesium andesites, dacites and adakites (siliceous lavas with high strontium and low heavy-rare-earth element and yttrium contents) from the North China craton have chemical and petrographic features consistent with their origin as partial melts of eclogite that subsequently interacted with mantle peridotite. Similar features observed in adakites and some Archaean sodium-rich granitoids of the tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite series have been interpreted to result from interaction of slab melts with the mantle wedge. Unlike their arc-related counterparts, however, the Chinese magmas carry inherited Archaean zircons and have neodymium and strontium isotopic compositions overlapping those of eclogite xenoliths derived from the lower crust of the North China craton. Such features cannot be produced by crustal assimilation of slab melts, given the high Mg#, nickel and chromium contents of the lavas. We infer that the Chinese lavas derive from ancient mafic lower crust that foundered into the convecting mantle and subsequently melted and interacted with peridotite. We suggest that lower crustal foundering occurred within the North China craton during the Late Jurassic, and thus provides constraints on the timing of lithosphere removal beneath the North China craton. PMID:15602559

  6. Longevity and rheology of cratons: key constraints from surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francois, T.; Burov, E. B.; Meyer, B.; Agard, P.

    2011-12-01

    Archean cratons are stable remnants of Earth's early continental lithosphere. Their structure, composition and survival over geological time spans make them ones of the most unique and enigmatic features of the Earth's surface. It has become evident from both geophysical and petrological studies that cratons exhibit deep lithospheric roots, which remained stable ever since their formation in the early Archean. The question of how some of the cratons survived destruction over timescales of billions of years remains a subject of vigorous debate. In order to understand what controls the long-term stability of the cratons, we investigated the impact of the thermo-rheological structure of the lithosphere on the evolution of both surface topography and cratonic roots using fully coupled thermo-mechanical numerical models (600*3000 km, free upper surface topography, layered lithospheric structure). Our model has a particular focus on the Canadian Shield, where considerable structural and thermal data are available from both geological and geophysical studies. In particular, we compare the implications of the "Cratonic" "Jelly-Sandwich" rheology (JS; strong dry olivine mantle, strong crust, cold geotherm with Moho temperature of 400°C, thermal lithosphere thickness of 250 km) with those of the "Crème Brûlée" rheology (CB; strong crust, weak wet olivine mantle, Moho temperature of 600°C, thermal lithosphere thickness of 150 km) (Figure 1). Our experiments show that, in the case of a laterally homogeneous lithosphere and in the absence of tectonic shortening or extension (blocked borders), both JS and CB rheologies may account for the stability of the shield and its surface topography. In this case continental lithosphere remains stable over large time spans, even for the weakest wet olivine mantle (but for "cold" thermal gradients). Nevertheless, for a laterally heterogeneous crust, as is the case for the Canadian Shield and most cratons, dry olivine mantle JS rheology

  7. Temperature-dependent transient creep and dynamics of cratonic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birger, Boris I.

    2013-11-01

    Large-scale mantle convection forms the upper boundary layer (lithosphere) where the vertical temperature drop is about 1300 K. Theoretical rheology and laboratory experiments with rock samples show that transient creep occurs while creep strains are sufficiently small. The transient creep is described by the temperature-dependent Andrade rheological model. Since plate tectonics allows only small deformations in lithospheric plates, creep of the lithosphere plates is transient whereas steady-state creep, described by non-Newtonian power-law rheological model, takes place in the underlying mantle. The solution of stability problem shows that the lithosphere is stable but small-scale convective oscillations are attenuated very weakly in regions of thickened lithosphere beneath continental cratons (subcratonic roots) where the thickness of the lithosphere is about 200 km. These oscillations create small-scale convective cells (the horizontal dimensions of the cells are of the order of the subcratonic lithosphere thickness). Direction of motion within the cells periodically changes (the period of convective oscillations is of the order of 3 × 108 yr). In this study, the oscillations of cratonic lithosphere caused by initial relief perturbation are considered. This relief perturbation is assumed to be created by overthrusting in orogenic belts surrounding cratons. The perturbation of the Earth's surface relief leads to a fast isothermal process of isostatic recovery. In the presence of vertical temperature gradient, vertical displacements, associated with the recovery process in the lithosphere interior, instantly produce the initial temperature perturbations exciting thermoconvective oscillations in the cratonic lithosphere. These small-amplitude convective oscillations cause oscillatory crustal movements which form sedimentary basins on cratons.

  8. Les chaînes de la marge occidentale du Craton Ouest-Africain, modèles géodynamiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villeneuve, Michel; El Archi, Abdelkrim; Nzamba, Juste

    2010-01-01

    Until now, no satisfactory geodynamic model has been delivered concerning the three main West African orogens: Panafrican 1 (Bassaride belt), Panafrican 2 (Rokelide belt) and Hercynian (Mauritanide belt). However, since the last synthetic paper ( Villeneuve, 2008), new geological, geophysical and geochronological data, from the Moroccan Sahara to Sierra Leone, allow us to propose a new geodynamical model. It includes the two Panafrican events in a single model very similar to the present western Pacific margin. An old "West African Neoproterozoic ocean" (WANO) was limited by a set of island arcs separated from the West African craton by a series of "back arc basins". The closure of this first round of back arc basins around 650 Ma led to the Bassaride belt (Panafrican 1). Then the WANO was subducting underneath the island arcs (between 650 and 550 Ma) meanwhile a new generation of "back arc basins" opened to the east between the arcs and the craton margin. The closure of the WANO and associated island arcs and back arc basins (550 to 500 Ma) led to the Rokelide belt (Panafrican 2). The Hercynian structures involving a Palaeozoic cover (made with continental material) associated to a "greeenschist facies" metamorphism is ascribed to an intracontinental belt.

  9. Flat Slab Subduction, Trench Suction, and Craton Destruction: Comparison of the North China, Wyoming, and Brazilian Cratons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusky, Timothy; Windley, Brian; Wang, Lu; Wang, Zhensheng; Li, Xiaoyong; Zhu, Peimin

    2015-04-01

    We define and test a unifying plate tectonic driving mechanism that explains the characteristics of the destruction of cratonic lithospheric roots. We document and model the relationships between flat slab subduction, trench suction, and craton destruction, using examples from the North China and Wyoming cratons, each of which locally lost approximately 100 km of their lithospheric roots in the Cretaceous and which show spatio-temporal relationships with episodes of flat slab subduction in the mantle transition zone associated with deep mantle hydration, coupled with slab rollback and concomitant influx of fertile mantle material to accommodate the space created by slab rollback. A similar process has more recently operated along the western side of the Brazilian craton where it is thrust beneath the thickened crust of the Andes in an area of trench rollback. The importance of the mutual interaction between these processes for destruction of cratonic roots may be greater than currently perceived. Together with the other processes of subduction erosion and arc subduction, larger amounts of continental lithosphere may have been subducted or otherwise returned to the sub-lithospheric mantle than previously appreciated. When oceanic lithosphere subducts, it hydrates the upper mantle beneath an arc from well-known dehydration reactions. However, some hydrous phases (e.g., Phase A, Phase E, and -γt and β-phase olivine) are stable to much greater depths and dehydrate even when a slab is in the mantle transition zone. It is estimated that 40% of the water subducted in hydrated oceanic crust, mantle, sediments, and subducted continental material reaches the mantle transition zone between 410 and 660 km. For instance lawsonite may contain up to 11% water, and is stable up to 11 GPa or about 300 km and serpentinites can contain up to 13% water and are stable up to 7 GPa, and after conversion to denser hydrous phases such as β-phase olivine they can be stable up to 50 GPa

  10. Accretion and reworking beneath the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, J. P.; Griffin, W. L.; Ma, Q.; O'Reilly, S. Y.; Xiong, Q.; Tang, H. Y.; Zhao, J. H.; Yu, C. M.; Su, Y. P.

    2012-09-01

    How has the Earth's continental lithosphere evolved? Most of our knowledge is derived from surface exposures, but xenoliths carried in volcanic rocks can be an important source of information. The North China Craton (NCC) is one of the oldest in the world and Phanerozoic volcanic rocks with abundant xenoliths are widespread, making it an ideal area to study the formation and evolution of continents. New analyses of U-Pb ages and Hf isotopes in zircon were obtained for lower crustal xenoliths from four localities including the Paleozoic Yingxian lamproites, and the basalts of Pingquan (Paleocene), Hebi and Nushan (Neogene). Published ages and compositions of lower crustal and upper mantle xenoliths from the NCC are synthesized to constrain the accretion and reworking processes that have affected the deep lithosphere beneath the craton. The peridotite bodies within the Dabie-Sulu ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) belt, along the southern edge of the NCC, are compared with the xenolith peridotites to constrain early Mesozoic dynamics. The oldest components of the NCC may be ~ 4.0 Ga old. The craton experienced complex accretion and reworking processes in its deep lithosphere, accompanied by the formation (or aggregation) and differentiation of the ancient continental nucleus. The small size of the NCC, compared with many other cratons worldwide, made it more susceptible to the effects of marginal subduction and collision with surrounding blocks. The subcontinental lithosphere mantle (SCLM) was generally coupled with the lower crust through the Paleozoic, while decoupling occurred in late Mesozoic-Cenozoic time, except locally (such as the Neoarchen lower crust and SCLM in Hebi), suggesting strong interactions between the asthenosphere and the lithosphere (both upper mantle and lower crust) in Phanerozoic time. In the lower crust, the ancient components of the craton were re-worked in Paleoarchean (3.80-3.65 Ga) time. The craton also experienced two important accretionary

  11. Contrasting crustal evolution processes in the Dharwar craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, Penelope J.; Dey, Sukanta; Storey, Craig D.; Mitra, Anirban; Bhunia, Rakesh K.

    2015-04-01

    Archaean cratons provide a critical window into early Earth dynamics, preserving a record of crustal evolution processes that include the start of 'modern' plate tectonics and the development of supercontinents. However, these same processes can also destroy or rework substantial volumes of crust, and the oldest extant Archaean terrane is only ~3.9 Ga. Where Archaean rocks are exposed, bulk techniques such as Pb and Nd isotopes can provide considerable information about continental formation, but these may have been altered by later metamorphic events. Another method is to examine sedimentary units, which can preserve fragments of the crust that are no longer exposed at the Earth's surface. Resistant detrital minerals such as zircon have particular use in these studies, as they incorporate a range of isotopic and geochemical tracers and can survive multiple crystallisation and/or sedimentary events. In this manner, a more complete record of a craton's evolution may be obtained, with the benefit of contributions from contrasting isotopic systems. The Dharwar craton of southern India is one such Archaean block, comprising >2.7 Ga trondjhemite-tonalite-granodiorite (TTG) gneisses, volcano-sedimentary belts (>3.0 and 2.9-2.6 Ga) and 2.7-2.5 Ga calc-alkaline to potassic granitoids. These rocks preserve evidence for several cycles of supracrustal formation, deformation, metamorphism and granitic activity during the Precambrian. New in situ U-Pb-Hf analyses of detrital zircons from across the craton indicate significant juvenile crustal extraction events at ~3.3 and 2.7 Ga, and continuous extraction from 3.7-3.3 Ga. Reworking in the older western block at ~3.0 Ga marks the onset of cratonisation, most likely due to 'modern' plate tectonic processes, while reworking in both the western and younger eastern block at 2.55-2.50 Ga indicates accretion of the two terranes and final cratonisation much later than in most other Archaean terranes (~2.7 Ga). Different patterns of

  12. Paleomagnetism of the Wyoming Craton: A Pre-Laurentian Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilian, T.; Chamberlain, K.; Mitchell, R. N.; Evans, D. A.; Bleeker, W.; Lecheminant, A. N.

    2010-12-01

    The Archean Wyoming craton is mostly buried beneath Phanerozoic sediments in the Rocky Mountains of the west central United States. Exposures of the craton are entirely in thrust-bounded Laramide uplifts and contain numerous swarms of Neoarchean-Proterozoic mafic dikes. U-Pb ages from these dikes include ~2685 Ma from a dike in the Owl Creek Mountains (Frost et al., 2006) as well as another in the Bald Mountain region of the Bighorn Mountains (this study), ~2170 Ma from the Wind River Mountain quartz diorite (Harlan et al., 2003), ~2110 Ma from a dike in the Granite Mountains (Bowers and Chamberlain, 2006), ~2010 Ma from a Kennedy dike in the Laramie Range (Cox et al., 2000), and ~780 Ma for dikes in the Beartooth and Teton Mountains (Harlan et al., 1997). These possible age ranges of magmatic events will allow a detailed comparison with other cratons, especially Superior and Slave. Prior to the assembly of Laurentia, Wyoming may have been connected with Slave in supercraton Sclavia (Bleeker, 2003; Frost et al., 2007), or alternatively, Wyoming may have been attached to the present southern margin of Superior in the supercraton Superia, as judged by similarities of the thrice-glaciated Huronian and Snowy Pass sedimentary successions (Roscoe and Card, 1993). Paleomagnetic results will be presented from over 150 dikes in the Wyoming craton. All dikes were from the basement uplifts of the Beartooth Mountains, Bighorn Mountains, Owl Creek Mountains, Granite Mountains, Ferris Mountains and Laramie Range. Dikes range in widths from 1 to >100 meters, and trends vary across all orientations. Stable remanence is observed in majority of sites with at least 8 different directions from the various uplifts. Structural corrections are applied when necessary to restore shallowly dipping Cambrian strata to horizontal. The paleomagnetic study is being integrated with precise U-Pb geochronology of dikes that bear stable remanence directions. Results will eventually allow a

  13. On craton thinning/destruction: Insight from 2D thermal-mechanical numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, J.

    2014-12-01

    Although most cratons maintain stable, some exceptions are present, such as the North China craton, North Atlantic craton, and Wyoming craton, which have experienced dramatic lithospheric deformation/thinning. Mechanisms triggering cratonic thinning remains enigmatic [Lee et al., 2011]. Using a 2D thermo-mechanical coupled numerical model [Gerya and Yuen, 2007], we investigate two possible mechanisms: (1) stratification of cratonic lithospheric mantle, and (2) rheological weakening due to hydration.Lithospheric mantle stratification is a common feature in cratonic areas which has been demonstrated by geophysical and geochemical studies [Thybo and Perchuc, 1997; Griffin et al., 2004; Romanowicz, 2009; Rychert and Shearer, 2009; Yuan and Romanowicz, 2010]. The influence of lithospheric mantle stratification during craton evolution remains poorly understood. A rheologically weak layer representing hydrated and/or metasomatized composition is implemented in the lithospheric mantle. Our results show that the weak mantle layer changes the dynamics of lithospheric extension by enhancing the deformation of the overlying mantle and crust and inhibiting deformation of the underlying mantle [Liao et al., 2013; Liao and Gerya, 2014]. Modeling results are compared with North China and North Atlantic cratons. Our work indicates that although the presence of a weak layer may not be sufficient to initiate craton deformation, it enhances deformation by lowering the required extensional plate boundary force. Rheological weakening due to hydration is a possible mechanism triggering/enhancing craton deformation, especially for cratons jaxtaposing with a subduction, since water can release from a subducting slab. We investigate the influence of wet mantle flow laws [Hirth and Kohlstedt, 2003], in which a water parameter (i.e. constant water content) is involved. Our results show that wet dislocation alone does not accelerate cratonic deformation significantly. However, if wet diffusion

  14. Early Cambrian magmatism in the northeastern Siberian Craton (Olenek Uplift)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, A. I.; Kochnev, B. B.; Yarmolyuk, V. V.; Egorov, K. N.

    2015-12-01

    The Vendian-Lower Cambrian tectonomagmatic activation took place in the northeastern Siberian Craton, within the Olenek Uplift and in the Kharaulakh segment of the Verkhoyansk fold-and-thrust belt (the lower reaches of the Lena River). The Early Paleozoic volcanic activity in the Olenek Uplift is expressed in the form of basitic diatremes, small basaltic covers, and doleritic dikes and sills intruding and covering the Upper Vendian carbonate deposits. The material specificity of the Lower Cambrian basites and their mantle sources, jointly with the Vendian-Cambrian sedimentation history, gives reason to consider the Lower Cambrian riftogenesis and the associated magmatism as a consequence of the plume-lithosphere interaction in the northeastern Siberian Craton.

  15. Isopycnicity, Thermal State and Secular Evolution of Cratonic Mantle Keels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, D. W.; Bastow, I. D.; Kendall, J. M.; Perry, C.

    2010-12-01

    The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) beneath ancient continental nuclei (cratons) is thought to be anomalously deep (> 200 km) due to the presence of cold, compositionally distinct mantle keels that are readily identifiable as high-velocity features in global tomographic models. The empirical concept of isopycnicity, which posits that a pervasive state of near-neutral buoyancy is created by offsetting thermal and compositional effects on density, is often invoked to explain the long-term stability of cratonic mantle keels and general absence of an accompanying long-wavelength gravity signature. Although the concept is appealing, the mechanisms by which an isopycnic state can be sustained are not clear. For example, on a billion-year (Gyr) timescale, secular cooling of a mantle keel could induce a gradual departure from isopycnicity. This possibility is examined by thermal modeling of a cold cratonic keel starting from an approximately isopycnic state near thermal equilibrium. Our models assume that the temperature of the LAB intersects the mantle adiabat, and consider secular cooling (40 K per Gyr) as well as gradual loss of radiogenic heating in the lithosphere. Several scenarios corresponding to ‘average’ Archean and Proterozoic mantle compositions are considered and used to predict seismic and gravitational observables. Our results confirm that, under similar thermal conditions, less-depleted mantle keels of ‘Proterozoic’ composition are less buoyant than Archean keels, but are indistinguishable based on seismic wave velocity. In general, cratonic keels are predicted to founder isostatically at about 1 km / Gyr, which should impose an easily observed epeirogenic signal in the core regions of continents.

  16. Seismic structure and dynamics of cratons: Stability and modification, continental collision and subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Sergei; Meier, Thomas; Schaeffer, Andrew J.; Agius, Matthew R.; Adam, Joanne M.-C.

    2014-05-01

    The Archean crust of stable cratons within today's continents is typically underlain by cold, thick mantle lithosphere. These mechanically strong, compositionally buoyant mantle roots (overall, roughly neutrally buoyant due to the density increase caused by low temperatures) have ensured the survival of cratons since their formation. Global and regional seismic tomography detects cratons readily by the anomalously high seismic velocities within their mantle lithosphere. The increasing resolution of seismic imaging now enables detailed mapping of the locations, boundaries and properties of cratons and offers new insight into their dynamics and evolution. Here, we summarise inferences on cratonic structure and dynamics based on recent multimode-waveform tomography on the global and continental (Europe, N America) scales and from regional, surface-wave array imaging. Where crustal cratonic boundaries can be mapped at the surface, they are, normally, closely matched by the boundaries of the high-velocity (thick and cold) mantle lithosphere beneath. Where the ancient crust is covered by sediments, with crustal block boundaries thus unclear, cratons can be mapped accurately by the seismic imaging of their high-velocity lithosphere. (Important exceptions include cratons that lost their ancient mantle roots in the Phanerozoic, e.g., eastern Sino-Korean Craton). On average, the upper mantle beneath cratons shows shear-wave speeds higher than elsewhere down to depths smaller than 300 km; large shear-speed anomalies are seen down to around 200 km depth only. Layered azimuthal anisotropy within cratonic lithosphere indicates frozen fabric that is probably a record of complex, vertically stratified deformation during the formation and stabilisation of cratons. Lateral variations in seismic velocities within cratonic roots present evidence for their modification and evolution after their formation. Beneath cratons in northern Europe, the locations of kimberlites coincide with

  17. Seismic Anisotropy beneath the African Plate using Shear Wave Splitting Measurements from AfricaArray Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunley, M. E.; Weeraratne, D.; Nyblade, A.

    2011-12-01

    The African continental plate is made up of a series of cratons and fold belts with activation ages ranging from present to Archean. Recent studies have shown that this tectonic assemblage occurred over a long history of accretion and rifting cycles that likely left behind the complex crust and lithospheric fabric that we see today. Here we study seismic anisotropy beneath the African continent using a large array of permanent AfricaArray and Global Seismic Network seismic stations located throughout Africa. We supply shear wave splitting techniques to teleseismic earthquake events using the eigenvalue method where the second eigenvalue is minimized to determine anisotropy. Stations located in the Ethiopian rift zone yield a NE-SW fast direction with the largest delay times of 1.5s. One station (KOWA) located in the west African craton displays a NW-SE fast direction. Stations located near Cameroon, at the coastal edge of the central African shear zone, produce NW-SE fast directions oriented perpendicular to the shear zone axis. . A group of stations located on Archean crust in central Africa skirt the Congo craton and display consistent NNE fast directions and delay times of 1.0s. Two stations, LSZ and TEZI are located in the Damara suture belt between the Congo and Kaapvaal cratons display a NE-SW fast direction parallel to the suture axis. In the Kaapvaal craton region the average anisotropic direction is NNE with a 1.0s delay time. New stations available south of the Kaapvaal craton reveal a NE fast direction with delay times that vary from 0.5 to 1.3 s. Several splitting measurements are made for the southern station HVD which display backazimuth dependence producing NW-SE fast directions for ray paths coming from the east and are consistent with observations at GRM located east of HVD. These results show that seismic anisotropy across the continent is not uniform and shows significant variation between tectonic regions. While mantle flow and lithospheric

  18. Volatile organic compound production and consumption by microbial plankton communities on the NOAA WACS cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannoni, S. J.; Halsey, K.; Thrash, J. C.; De Gouw, J. A.; Graus, M.

    2013-12-01

    Information about biological sources and sinks of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the ocean surface could result in a better understanding of the underlying causes of variation in air/sea VOC fluxes, and potentially could alter predictions about the impact of climate change on ocean surface ecology and air/sea interactions. The goal of this work was to measure rates of biological production, oxidation and assimilation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by microbial plankton communities along the WACS cruise transect from Boston to Bermuda in August 2013. Tangential flow filtration was used to concentrate microbial plankton communities for incubation in environmentally controlled dynamic stripping chambers under simulated ocean surface layer conditions. Gas streams exiting the chambers were monitored in real time with proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). In separate experiments aliquots of plankton suspensions were incubated with 14C-methanol, 14C-TMAO, and 14C-pyruvate, and the assimilation of 14C into biomass and the production of 14C-CO2 were measured. Results showed that the highly productive George's Bank plankton community has a high capacity for methanol and trimethylamine oxide (TMAO) oxidation. Biomass was estimated by counting cells. The rate of incorporation of methanol-carbon into biomass was only 21% of the rate of methanol oxidation to CO2. Similar results were observed for TMAO. These experiments also allowed estimates of kinetic constants for both compounds. The half-saturation constants (Ks) for methanol oxidation were similar in natural populations collected at George's Bank and the Sargasso Sea (12.8 and 9.9 μM, respectively). Interestingly, the Ks values for TMAO oxidation were an order of magnitude lower than for methanol in plankton communities sampled from both sites (0.5 and 0.3 μM, respectively). These results provide additional evidence that microbial plankton have a high capacity for oxidation of these low

  19. Origin of Aristarchus Olivine Deposits Based on M3, WAC, and Diviner Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, S. M.; Mustard, J. F.; Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; Isaacson, P.; Jolliff, B. L.; Besse, S.; Staid, M.; Pieters, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    The Aristarchus region contains geologically diverse deposits and the Aristarchus impact crater, located on the SE margin of the plateau near the contact between plateau materials and western Procellarum basalts, has exposed materials with variable compositions. Of particular interest is the origin of olivine-bearing deposits that occur on the SE portion of the crater rim and ejecta in association with impact melt [1]. NW portions of the rim and ejecta expose plateau materials and are spectrally dominated by pyroxene in the VNIR. Spectra of the NW rim and ejecta are consistent with a noritic composition and with the inferred origin of the plateau as uplifted upper crust [2,3,4]. Therefore, it is unlikely that the olivine- bearing materials, which exhibit a strong 1 micron olivine absorption and only minor pyroxene contributions, are derived from plateau materials similar to those exposed in the NW portion of the crater. Potential sources of the olivine-bearing material excavated by the impact include western Procellarum basalts or buried material associated with the Marius Hills volcanic complex. Alternatively, the olivine-bearing deposits could be derived from a shallow pluton that is not represented by other surface exposures or could have formed as re-crystallized impact melt. Both the western Procellarum basalts [5,6] and some units associated with the Marius Hills [7] are olivine-bearing. In order to differentiate between these hypotheses, we are integrating spectral data in the UV/VIS (LRO WAC), VIS/NIR (Chandrayaan-1 M3), and TIR (LRO Diviner) to further characterize the assemblages of minerals that occur in association with the olivine-bearing deposits in Aristarchus crater, western Procellarum, and units within the Marius Hills volcanic complex. [1] Mustard et al., 2011, JGR 116. [2] McEwen et al., 1994, Science 266. [3] Lucey et al., 1986, LPSC 16. [4] Chevrel et al., 2009, Icarus 199. [5] Staid and Pieters 2001, JGR. [6] Staid et al., 2011, JGR 116. [7

  20. An evaluation of the zircon method of isotopic dating in the Southern Arabian Craton

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooper, J.A.; Stacey, J.S.; Stoeser, D.G.; Fleck, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    A zircon study has been made on eleven samples of igneous rocks from the Saudi Arabian Craton. Ages of sized and magnetic fractions of zircon concentrates show variable degrees of discordance which seem to result from a very young disturbance that produces linear arrays in the Concordia plot. Model age calculations based on a statistically and geologically reasonable lower intercept produce very consistent internal relationships. The Pan African Orogeny, considered to be responsible for loss of radiogenic argon and strontium from minerals of many rocks, does not appear to have affected the zircon data, even though uplift had exposed the rocks of the Arabian Shield at that time. Tonalite, granodiorite, and crosscutting leucoadamellite bodies in the southern part of the An Nimas Bathylith yield ages in the time range 820-760 Ma. A narrow time range of 660 to 665 million years was indicated for ages of widely separated and compositionally different intrusive bodies all to the east of the An Nimas Bathylith. This work suggests that the younger end of the age spectrum established from regional K-Ar and Rb-Sr measurements may be underestimated, and that magmatic activity could be more episodic than previously assumed.

  1. Small-scale upper mantle extension beneath a destroyed craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Zheng, T.; Chen, L.; Ai, Y.; He, Y.; Xu, X.

    2014-12-01

    The North China Craton (NCC), as an unusual craton with part of its thick lithosphere destructed, records the geodynamic processes associated with the convergence of Eurasia and the Pacific and Philippine plates lasting from the Mesozoic to the Cenozoic. How the cratonic lithosphere deformed in response to the extensional tectonics caused by the oceanic plate subduction, however, remains debated. In order to investigate the mantle deformation of the NCC, we present new shear wave splitting measurements and updated tomographic models beneath a 900-km long profile across the north NCC. Compared to our other observations in the NCC, this profile is shorter but also crosses a region that experienced strong lithospheric destruction, therefore provides a good opportunity to improve our understanding of upper mantle deformation during the craton destruction. The upper mantle deformation is studied using SKS data from 60 broadband stations with average spacing of 15 km. For the data from events occurring at distances of 85º-115º, fast polarization directions and delay times (fδt) are retrieved by a routine method, while for the events at distances < 85º, waveform modeling are applied to obtain (fδt) after separating the effects of S and SKS. The measured splitting parameters show small-scale variations from east to west: the major fast directions, trending NE-SW or NW-SE in contrast, distribute intermittently along the profile. We plot the splitting parameters overlapping on the geological map and the tomography image for a depth range of 120-300 km. Comparison shows good consistency of the splitting pattern and structural features both at shallow and deep depths: NW-SE trending fast directions are observed at stations located within the basins or extensional zones like metamorphic core complexes, with the fast direction parallel to the extensional or stretching directions; the fast directions and the shear-wave velocity anomalies within the upper mantle

  2. Nouveau pôle paléomagnétique Stephanien inférieur pour le craton saharien (formation de Merkala, bassin de Tindouf, Algérie). New Lower Stephanian palaeomagnetic pole for the Sabaran craton (Merkala formation, Tindouf basin, Algeria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Bernard; Merabet, Nacer-Eddine; Bouabdallah, Hamza; Maouche, Said

    1999-08-01

    A palaeomagnetic study carried out in the Lower Stephanian Merkala formation (Tindouf basin) pointed out two juxtaposed neighbouring components of the magnetization. The oldest one allowed a new Stephanian pole located at 32.4°S and 56.6°E ( K= 399, A9.5 = 2.3°) to be obtained. The other one results from the superimposition of this old component on a Permian remagnetization. The new Stephanian pole, associated with the previous data from the Saharan craton, allows the Stephano-Autunian segment of the African apparent polar wander path to be specified.

  3. References for HNF-SD-WM-TRD-007, ``System specification for the double-shell tank system: HNF-PROs, CFRs, DOE Orders, WACs``

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, C.P.

    1998-07-30

    HNF-SD-WM-TRD-O07, System Specification for the Double-Shell Tank System, (hereafter referred to as DST Specification), defines the requirements of the double-shell tank system at the Hanford Site for Phase 1 privatization. Many of the sections in this document reference other documents for design guidance and requirements. Referenced documents include Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) procedures (HNF-PROS), Codes of Federal Regulation (CFRs), DOE Orders, and Washington Administrative Codes (WACs). This document provides rationale for the selection and inclusion of HNF-PROS, CFRs, DOE Orders and WACs.

  4. Ferric iron budget of Kaapvaal cratonic mantle peridotite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodland, A.

    2012-04-01

    Oxidation fugacity plays an important role in many geochemical processes, such as partial melting and melt-rock interaction. How mantle peridotite responds during such processes is dependent on the amount of Fe2O3 present, since it occurs in much smaller quantities than Fe2+ and affects buffering capacity. This is particularly the case since redox reactions have been directly implicated in the rejuvenation and eventual breakup of cratons (e.g. Foley 2008, 2011). In addition, oxygen fugacity also influences the incorporation of OH in nominally anhydrous minerals, which can affect the mechanical integrity of cratonic blocks (Peslier et al. 2010). These issues are important for understanding the evolution of the upper mantle beneath the Kaapvaal craton. Canil and coworkers (1994, 1996) reported bulk ferric iron contents for 11 peridotites (10 garnet-bearing and 1 spinel-bearing) from the Kaapvaal. The purpose of this study is to build on their pioneering work to better assess the ferric iron budget of Kaapvaal cratonic mantle and to improve our understanding of how ferric iron is distributed within the peridotitic assemblage. Our data set includes more than 30 additional samples, predominantly garnet peridoites, from 7 localities in South Africa and Lesotho. Bulk Fe2O3 contents were determined by combining measured Fe3+ contents of individual minerals (by Mössbauer spectroscopy) with their respective modal proportion in each sample. Fe3+ contents of garnet and clinopyroxene reported in Woodland & Koch (2003), Lazarov et al. (2009) and Woodland (2009) were combined with new data for orthopyroxene (opx) and modal mineralogy to make this assessment. Opx has Fe3+/Fetot of 0.04-0.1 and Fe3+ contents are comparable between Opx and coexisting Cpx. Calculated whole rock Fe2O3 contents range from 0.02 to 0.29 wt % with contents systematically decreasing with increasing degrees of depletion (as indicated by increasing MgO and decreasing Al2O3 content). For a given MgO content

  5. Numerical modeling of continental rifting: Implications for the East African Rift system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koptev, Alexander; Burov, Evgueni; Calais, Eric; Leroy, Sylvie; Gerya, Taras; Guillou-Frottier, Laurent; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2016-04-01

    The East African Rift system (EARS) provides a unique system with juxtaposition of two contrasting yet simultaneously formed rift branches, the eastern, magma-rich, and the western, magma-poor, on either side of the old thick Tanzanian craton embedded into younger lithosphere. Here we take advantage of the improvements in our understanding of deep structures, geological evolution and recent kinematics, together with new cutting edge numerical modeling techniques to design a three-dimensional ultra-high resolution viscous plastic thermo-mechanical numerical model that accounts for thermo-rheological structure of the lithosphere and hence captures the essential geophysical features of the central EARS. Based on our experiments, we show that in case of the mantle plume seeded slightly to the northeast of the craton center, the ascending plume material is deflected by the cratonic keel and preferentially channeled along the eastern side of the craton, leading to formation of a large rift zone characterized by important magmatic activity with substantial amounts of melts derived from mantle plume material. This model is in good agreement with the observations in the EARS, as it reproduces the magmatic eastern branch and at the same time, anticlockwise rotation of the craton. However, this experiment does not reproduce the observed strain localization along the western margin of the cratonic bloc. To explain the formation of contrasting magmatic and amagmatic rift branches initiating simultaneously on either side of a non-deforming block as observed in the central EARS, we experimentally explored several scenarios of which three can be retained as specifically pertaining to the EARS: (1) The most trivial first scenario assumes rheologically weak vertical interface simulating the suture zone observed in the geological structure along the western border of the craton; (2) The second scenario involves a second smaller plume initially shifted in SW direction; (3) Finally, a

  6. Teleseismic receiver functions modeling of the eastern Indian craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Prantik; Biswas, Koushik

    2016-09-01

    We estimate receiver functions (RFs) through the time-domain deconvolution using three-component broadband data of 100 teleseismic events (30° ⩽ ∧ ⩽ 90°) from 15 seismographs in the eastern Indian craton. Estimated radial RFs show a positive phase at 4.6-5.8 s delay time corresponding to the crustal thicknesses of 37-46 km. Through the differential evolution (DE) waveform inversion modeling of radial receiver functions, we delineate the crustal structure at 15 broadband stations. On an average, the Archean Singhbhum Odisha Craton (SOC) is characterized by a thick crust of 43 ± 3 km in comparison to a relatively thin crust of 41 ± 1 km underlying the Proterozoic Chotanagpur Granite Gneissic terrain (CGGT). While, a thin crust of 38 ± 1 km characterizes the younger Eastern Ghats Mobile Belt (EGMB). The main results of our modeling reveal a 46 km thick Archean crust underlying the Singhbhum granite (SG) of 3.6 Ga, which is characterized by a 3 km crustal thickening probably resulted from the Archean subduction process. Our modeling also detects a 2-3 km crustal thinning with the thinnest crust of 37 km below the region near South Singhbhum Shear Zone, which could be attributed to the 1.6 Ga plume activity associated with Dalma volcanic. Our modeling also led to the delineation of a crustal thinning of 2-3 km underlying the region in EGMB, which was influenced by a much younger (∼117 Ma) Rajmahal magmatism associated with the Gondwana break-up episode. However, our study could not detect any age-dependent variation of crustal thicknesses in the eastern Indian craton. The main result of our modeling suggests a two-phase crustal evolution process for the SOC viz. older E-W crustal thickening due to E-W plate compression and later crustal thinning episodes associated with the Dalma volcanism in the north and the Rajmahal volcanism in the South.

  7. Latest Jurassic-early Cretaceous regressive facies, northeast Africa craton

    SciTech Connect

    van Houten, F.B.

    1980-06-01

    Nonmarine to paralic detrital deposits accumulated in six large basins between Algeria and the Arabo-Nubian shield during major regression in latest Jurassic and Early Cretaceous time. The Ghadames Sirte (north-central Libya), and Northern (Egypt) basins lay along the cratonic margin of northeastern Africa. The Murzuk, Kufra, and Southern (Egypt) basins lay in the south within the craton. Data for reconstructing distribution, facies, and thickness of relevant sequences are adequate for the three northern basins only. High detrital influx near the end of Jurassic time and in mid-Cretaceous time produced regressive nubian facies composed largely of low-sinuosity stream and fahdelta deposits. In the west and southwest the Ghadames, Murzuk, and Kufra basins were filled with a few hundred meters of detritus after long-continued earlier Mesozoic aggradation. In northern Egypt the regressive sequence succeeded earlier Mesozoic marine sedimentation; in the Sirte and Southern basins correlative deposits accumulated on Precambrian and Variscan terranes after earlier Mesozoic uplift and erosion. Waning of detrital influx into southern Tunisia and adjacent Libya in the west and into Israel in the east initiated an Albian to early Cenomanian transgression of Tethys. By late Cenomanian time it had flooded the entire cratonic margin, and spread southward into the Murzuk and Southern basins, as well as onto the Arabo-Nubian shield. Latest Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous, mid-Cretaceous, and Late Cretaceous transgressions across northeastern Africa recorded in these sequences may reflect worldwide eustatic sea-level rises. In contrast, renewed large supply of detritus during each regression and a comparable subsidence history of intracratonic and marginal basins imply regional tectonic control. 6 figures.

  8. Remobilization in the cratonic lithosphere recorded in polycrystalline diamond

    PubMed

    Jacob; Viljoen; Grassineau; Jagoutz

    2000-08-18

    Polycrystalline diamonds (framesites) from the Venetia kimberlite in South Africa contain silicate minerals whose isotopic and trace element characteristics document remobilization of older carbon and silicate components to form the framesites shortly before kimberlite eruption. Chemical variations within the garnets correlate with carbon isotopes in the diamonds, indicating contemporaneous formation. Trace element, radiogenic, and stable isotope variations can be explained by the interaction of eclogites with a carbonatitic melt, derived by remobilization of material that had been stored for a considerable time in the lithosphere. These results indicate more recent formation of diamonds from older materials within the cratonic lithosphere. PMID:10947983

  9. An archean impact layer from the Pilbara and Kaapvaal cratons.

    PubMed

    Byerly, Gary R; Lowe, Donald R; Wooden, Joseph L; Xie, Xiaogang

    2002-08-23

    The Barberton greenstone belt of South Africa and the eastern Pilbara block of Western Australia provide information about Earth's surface environments between 3.2 and 3.5 billion years ago, including evidence for four large bolide impacts that likely created large craters, deformed the target rocks, and altered the environment. We have obtained identical single-zircon uranium-lead ages of 3470 +/- 2 million years ago for the oldest impact events from each craton. These deposits represent a single global fallout layer that is associated with sedimentation by an impact-generated tsunami and in Western Australia is represented by a major erosional unconformity. PMID:12193781

  10. Geophysical constraints on the link between cratonization and orogeny: Evidence from the Tibetan Plateau and the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongjie; Teng, Jiwen; Romanelli, Fabio; Braitenberg, Carla; Ding, Zhifeng; Zhang, Xuemei; Fang, Lihua; Zhang, Sufang; Wu, Jianping; Deng, Yangfan; Ma, Ting; Sun, Ruomei; Panza, Giuliano F.

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the geodynamic process of orogeny and cratonization, and their transition is among the key topics of research in evaluating the link between plate tectonics and continental dynamics. The Tibetan Plateau and the North China Craton (NCC), two key areas in mainland China, offer excellent laboratories to understand continental tectonics over a broad span of Earth history. Particularly, the deep structure of the lithosphere as imaged from geophysical data on the Tibetan Plateau and the NCC provide important clues in understanding orogeny and cratonization. The Tibetan Plateau is the largest and highest plateau on Earth in terms of mean altitude, and is an important region for understanding the mechanisms of continent-continent collision and Cenozoic plateau uplift. The NCC is an Archean craton that underwent lithospheric disruption during the Mesozoic. Here we reconstruct the main features of the structure of the crust and upper mantle from surface wave tomography and gravity modeling in Tibet and its neighboring regions, in order to understand the modality of the convergence and collision process between the Indian and Eurasian plates, and the influence of this process on the uplift of the plateau. In the NCC, geological, geochemical, geophysical and tectonic investigations demonstrate that lithospheric destruction mainly occurred in the Eastern Block. The crustal structure of the NCC is reconstructed from ambient noise surface wave tomography and the different possible disruption mechanisms are evaluated. The Vs (shear-wave velocity) tomography results, and the density (ρ) structure of the crust and upper mantle (to about 350 km depth) demonstrate the lateral variation of the thickness of the metasomatic lid between the south and north of the Bangong-Nujiang suture (BNS) and the west and east of Tibet, which suggest that the leading edge of the subducting Indian slab reaches the BNS. The subduction angle of Indian Plate indicates a transition from steep

  11. Crustal evolution and the eclogite to granulite phase transition in xenoliths from the West African Craton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, S. E.; Hills, D. V.; Toft, P. B.

    1988-01-01

    A suite of eclogite and granulite facies xenoliths from kimberlite pipes in the Archean Man Shield of West Africa is described. The xenoliths include lithologies ranging in composition from komatiite to anorthosite and appear to be geochemically, petrologically, and geophysically related. The suite may represent fractionation of felsic material separated from ancient mantle and added to early Archean crust. The samples can be used to define a xenolith geotherm, which may represent an ancient episode of high heat flow. The samples also imply that the crust-mantle boundary is a gradational and possibly interlayered geochemical, mineralogical, and seismic transition. It is speculated that the depleted subcontinental mantle required by diamond bearing coalescence of smaller depletion cells formed by extraction of ancient crustal components. These depleted zones are surrounded by fertile asthenospheric mantle, which may have given rise to later flood basalts such as the Karroo and Parana Provinces.

  12. Destruction of the North China Craton: Lithosphere folding-induced removal of lithospheric mantle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai-Jun

    2012-01-01

    High heat flow, high surface topography, and widespread volcanism indicate that the lithospheric mantle of typical cratonic character of the North China Craton has been seriously destroyed in its eastern half. However, the mechanism of this process remains open to intense debate. Here lithosphere folding-induced lithospheric mantle removal is proposed as a new mechanism for the destruction of the craton. Four main NNE-SSW-striking lithospheric-scale anticlines and synclines are recognized within North China east of the Helan fold-and-thrust belt. The lithosphere folding occurred possibly during the Late Triassic through Jurassic when the Yangzi Craton collided with the North China Craton. It was accompanied or followed by lithospheric dripping, and could have possibly induced the lithosphere foundering of the North China Craton. The lithosphere folding would have modified the lithosphere morphology, creating significant undulation in the lithospheric base and thus causing variations of the patterns of the small-scale convection. It also could have provoked the formation of new shear zones liable to impregnation of magma, producing linear incisions at the cratonic base and resulting in foundering of lithospheric mantle blocks. Furthermore, it generated thickening of the lithosphere or the lower crust and initiated the destabilization and subsequent removal of the lithospheric mantle.

  13. 3-D Structure of the Slave and Rae Cratons Provides Clues to Their Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    Deep geologic structures within cratons that make up continental cores were long neglected. Recently acquired geophysical data from large observational arrays and geochemical data resulting from exploration for diamond has now made possible co-registration of large-scale (400-km depth), truly 3-dimensional data sets. P-waves, surface waves and magnetotelluric observations provide 3-D wavespeed and conductivity models. Multi-azimuthal receiver functions map seismic discontinuity surfaces in 3-D. Xenolith suites erupted in kimberlites provide rock samples at key lithospheric depths, albeit at sparsely distributed locations. These multi-disciplinary models are becoming available for several key cratons worldwide; here the deep structure of the Slave and Rae cratons of the Canadian Shield is described. Lithospheric layers with tapered, wedge-shaped margins are common. Slave craton layers are sub-horizontal and indicate construction of the craton core at 2.7 Ga by underthrusting and flat stacking of lithosphere. The central Rae craton has predominantly dipping discontinuities that indicate construction at 1.9 Ga by thrusting similar to that observed in crustal ';thick-skinned' fold-and-thrust belts. 3-D mapping of conductivity and metasomatism, the latter via mineral recrystallization and resetting of isotopic ages, overprints primary structures in both cratons. Distribution of more conductivitve mantle suggests that assumed causative pervasive metasomatism occurs at 100-200 km depths with ';chimneys' reaching to shallower depths, typically in locations where kimberlites or mineralization has occurred.

  14. Cratonic root beneath North America shifted by basal drag from the convecting mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaban, Mikhail K.; Mooney, Walter D.; Petrunin, Alexey G.

    2015-10-01

    Stable continental cratons are the oldest geologic features on the planet. They have survived 3.8 to 2.5 billion years of Earth’s evolution. The key to the preservation of cratons lies in their strong and thick lithospheric roots, which are neutrally or positively buoyant with respect to surrounding mantle. Most of these Archaean-aged cratonic roots are thought to have remained stable since their formation and to be too viscous to be affected by mantle convection. Here we use a combination of gravity, topography, crustal structure and seismic tomography data to show that the deepest part of the craton root beneath the North American Superior Province has shifted about 850 km to the west-southwest relative to the centre of the craton. We use numerical model simulations to show that this shift could have been caused by basal drag induced by mantle flow, implying that mantle flow can alter craton structure. Our observations contradict the conventional view of cratons as static, non-evolving geologic features. We conclude that there could be significant interaction between deep continental roots and the convecting mantle.

  15. Diamond genesis, seismic structure, and evolution of the Kaapvaal-Zimbabwe craton.

    PubMed

    Shirey, Steven B; Harris, Jeffrey W; Richardson, Stephen H; Fouch, Matthew J; James, David E; Cartigny, Pierre; Deines, Peter; Viljoen, Fanus

    2002-09-01

    The lithospheric mantle beneath the Kaapvaal-Zimbabwe craton of southern Africa shows variations in seismic P-wave velocity at depths within the diamond stability field that correlate with differences in the composition of diamonds and their syngenetic inclusions. Middle Archean mantle depletion events initiated craton keel formation and early harzburgitic diamond formation. Late Archean accretionary events involving an oceanic lithosphere component stabilized the craton and contributed a younger Archean generation of eclogitic diamonds. Subsequent Proterozoic tectonic and magmatic events altered the composition of the continental lithosphere and added new lherzolitic and eclogitic diamonds to the Archean diamond suite. PMID:12215642

  16. Coeval large-scale magmatism in the Kalahari and Laurentian cratons during Rodinia assembly.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Richard E; Crowley, James L; Bowring, Samuel A; Ramezani, Jahandar; Gose, Wulf A; Dalziel, Ian W D; Pancake, James A; Seidel, Emily K; Blenkinsop, Thomas G; Mukwakwami, Joshua

    2004-05-21

    We show that intraplate magmatism occurred 1106 to 1112 million years ago over an area of two million square kilometers within the Kalahari craton of southern Africa, during the same magnetic polarity chron as voluminous magmatism within the cratonic core of North America. These contemporaneous magmatic events occurred while the Rodinia supercontinent was being assembled and are inferred to be parts of a single large igneous province emplaced across the two cratons. Widespread intraplate magmatism during Rodinia assembly shows that mantle upwellings required to generate such provinces may occur independently of the supercontinent cycle. PMID:15105458

  17. A Sharp Edge of the Cratonic Lithosphere of North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, T. B.; Skryzalin, P. A.; Menke, W. H.; Levin, V. L.; Darbyshire, F. A.

    2015-12-01

    Using teleseismic travel time delays, we develop a tomographic model of the lithosphere beneath northeastern North America, from the shore of James Bay in Quebec to the Atlantic coast of New England and to a depth of 300 km. Three major terranes lie within this cratonic margin: the 2.7 Ga Superior province, the 1 Ga Grenville orogenic belt and the 0.3-0.4 Ga Appalachian terranes, which are bounded by the Grenville Front (GF) and Appalachian Front (AF), respectively. Additionally, the 0.8 Ga Avalon terrain was accreted to coastal New England by strike-skip faulting during the Appalachian orogeny. Our tomographic model uses earthquake seismograms recorded by permanent US and Canadian stations, the Transportable Array and the temporary QMIII deployment. All data were corrected for instrument response and record sections were examined visually to identify gross errors in response and timing. Differential arrival times of P and PKP waves were determined by cross-correlation and have a maximum amplitude of about ±1 second. In our model, lithospheric boundaries do not correlate well with geological boundaries, nor do they strike parallel to them. The seismically-fast (by 5% relative to AK135) cratonic lithosphere of North America is much thicker than that of the younger terranes, extending to 200 km or more depth but with a sharp east-dipping eastern edge located (at Moho depths) 100-250 km northwest of the GF. The lithosphere beneath the Grenville and Appalachian terranes, which were affected by subduction during the Grenville and Appalachian orogenies, is slower (by 4%). A sliver of seismically-fast lithosphere, extending to ~150 km depth, occurs along the Atlantic coast and is interpreted as the Avalonian lithosphere.

  18. Basement control in the development of the early cretaceous West and Central African rift system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurin, Jean-Christophe; Guiraud, René

    1993-12-01

    The structural framework of the Precambrian basement of the West and Central African Rift System (WCARS) is described in order to examine the role of ancient structures in the development of this Early Cretaceous rift system. Basement structures are represented in the region by large Pan-African mobile belts (built at ca. 600 Ma) surrounding the > 2 Ga West African, Congo and Sao Francisco cratons. Except for the small Gao trough (eastern Mali) located near the contact nappe of the Pan-African Iforas suture zone along the edge of the West African craton, the entire WCARS is located within the internal domains of the Pan-African mobile belts. Within these domains, two main structural features occur as the main basement control of the WCARS: (1) an extensive network of near vertical shear zones which trend north-south through the Congo, Brazil, Nigeria, Niger and Algeria, and roughly east-west through northeastern Brazil and Central Africa. The shear zones correspond to intra-continental strike-slip faults which accompanied the oblique collision between the West African, Congo, and Sao Francisco cratons during the Late Proterozoic; (2) a steep metamorphic NW-SE-trending belt which corresponds to a pre-Pan-African (ca. 730 Ma) ophiolitic suture zone along the eastern edge of the Trans-Saharian mobile belt. The post-Pan-African magmatic and tectonic evolution of the basement is also described in order to examine the state of the lithosphere prior to the break-up which occurred in the earliest Cretaceous. After the Pan-African thermo-tectonic event, the basement of the WCARS experienced a long period of intra-plate magmatic activity. This widespread magmatism in part relates to the activity of intra-plate hotspots which have controlled relative uplift, subsidence and occasionally block faulting. During the Paleozoic and the early Mesozoic, this tectonic activity was restricted to west of the Hoggar, west of Aïr and northern Cameroon. During the Late Jurassic

  19. Plume-induced dynamic instabilities near cratonic blocks: Implications for P-T-t paths and metallogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillou-Frottier, L.; Burov, E.; Cloetingh, S.; Le Goff, E.; Deschamps, Y.; Huet, B.; Bouchot, V.

    2012-06-01

    Plume head-lithosphere interactions around cratonic blocks result in thermo-mechanical disturbances that lead to heating and burial phases of crustal rocks. We present results from numerical models of plume head-cratonic blocks interactions where a free upper surface condition and realistic rheologies are accounted for. These models include distinct cratonic blocks embedded within a continental lithosphere and separated by several hundreds of kilometers. Surface topography, thermal field and effective viscosity values are tracked for 20 Myr of interactions. The modeled dynamic interaction of a plume head around cratonic blocks results in two main types of instabilities, each of them resulting in a distinct P-T-t path. The "slab-like" instability, focused on cratonic edges when plume head is away from the craton center, shows a near-isothermal burial phase, while the "drip-like" instability occurring above plume head material results in a near-isobaric heating phase. Consequently, both clockwise and counterclockwise P-T-t paths can be expected around cratons, as actually observed around the Tanzanian craton and other cratonic areas. Metallogenic data from gemstone-bearing rocks in south-east Africa and data from ultrahigh temperature and ultrahigh pressure metamorphism are compatible with our model. It appears that vertical mantle dynamics around cratons may also explain thermobarometric signatures that are often attributed to horizontal tectonics.

  20. On the relations between cratonic lithosphere thickness, plate motions, and basal drag

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Artemieva, I.M.; Mooney, W.D.

    2002-01-01

    An overview of seismic, thermal, and petrological evidence on the structure of Precambrian lithosphere suggests that its local maximum thickness is highly variable (140-350 km), with a bimodal distribution for Archean cratons (200-220 km and 300-350 km). We discuss the origin of such large differences in lithospheric thickness, and propose that the lithospheric base can have large depth variations over short distances. The topography of Bryce Canyon (western USA) is proposed as an inverted analog of the base of the lithosphere. The horizontal and vertical dimensions of Archean cratons are strongly correlated: larger cratons have thicker lithosphere. Analysis of the bimodal distribution of lithospheric thickness in Archean cratons shows that the "critical" surface area for cratons to have thick (>300 km) keels is >6-8 ?? 106 km2 . Extrapolation of the linear trend between Archean lithospheric thickness and cratonic area to zero area yields a thickness of 180 km. This implies that the reworking of Archean crust should be accompanied by thinning and reworking of the entire lithospheric column to a thickness of 180 km in accord with thickness estimates for Proterozoic lithosphere. Likewise, extrapolation of the same trend to the size equal to the total area of all Archean cratons implies that the lithospheric thickness of a hypothesized early Archean supercontinent could have been 350-450 km decreasing to 280-400 km for Gondwanaland. We evaluate the basal drag model as a possible mechanism that may thin the cratonic lithosphere. Inverse correlations are found between lithospheric thickness and (a) fractional subduction length and (b) the effective ridge length. In agreement with theoretical predictions, lithospheric thickness of Archean keels is proportional to the square root of the ratio of the craton length (along the direction of plate motion) to the plate velocity. Large cratons with thick keels and low plate velocities are less eroded by basal drag than small

  1. Composition and Thermal History of the Lower Crust Beneath the Tanzania Craton and the Adjacent Mozambique Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansur, A. T.; Manya, S.; Rudnick, R. L.

    2006-05-01

    (MB) xenolith suite includes both mafic and intermediate granulites. Mafic granulites from Naibor Soito are similar mineralogically to the Labait xenoliths except that they contain gt. Intermediate xenoliths are two pyroxene garnet granulites. All Naibor Soito samples are LREE-enriched, and two of three intermediate xenoliths exhibit positive Eu anomalies. Like Labait, xenoliths from this locality exhibit high K2O (0.5 to 2.7 wt. %), Ba (207 to 1120 ppm), and Sr (241 to 1146 ppm) contents. Equilibration temperatures of all the xenoliths are significantly hotter than projected present-day lower crustal temperatures, and are probably relicts of the last major orogeny (pan-African). Like elsewhere in the world, lower crustal xenoliths from both the craton and MB are dominated by mafic compositions.

  2. African Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abiodun, Rowland

    2001-01-01

    No single traditional discipline can adequately supply answers to the many unresolved questions in African art history. Because of the aesthetic, cultural, historical, and, not infrequently, political biases, already built into the conception and development of Western art history, the discipline of art history as defined and practiced in the West…

  3. The meaning of midlithospheric discontinuities: A case study in the northern U.S. craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopper, Emily; Fischer, Karen M.

    2015-12-01

    Converted wave imaging has revealed significant negative velocity gradients, often termed midlithospheric discontinuities, within the thick, high-velocity mantle beneath cratons. In this study, we investigate the origins and implications of these structures with high-resolution imaging of mantle discontinuities beneath the Archean Wyoming, Superior and Medicine Hat, and Proterozoic Yavapai and Trans-Hudson terranes. Sp phases from 872 temporary and permanent broadband stations, including the EarthScope Transportable Array, were migrated into three-dimensional common conversion point stacks. Four classes of discontinuities were observed. (1) A widespread, near-flat negative velocity gradient occurs largely at 70-90 km depth beneath both Archean and Proterozoic cratons. This structure is consistent with the top of a frozen-in layer of volatile-rich melt. (2) Dipping negative velocity gradients are observed between 85 and 200 km depth. The clearest examples occur at the suture zones between accreted Paleoproterozoic Yavapai arc terranes and the Wyoming and Superior cratons. These interfaces could represent remnant subducting slabs, and together with eclogite in xenoliths, indicate that subduction-related processes likely contributed to cratonic mantle growth. (3) Sporadic positive velocity gradients exist near the base of the lithospheric mantle, perhaps due to laterally variable compositional layering. (4) In contrast to off-craton regions, clear Sp phases are typically not seen at lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary depths beneath Archean and Proterozoic terranes, consistent with a purely thermal contrast between cratonic mantle lithosphere and asthenosphere.

  4. Two modes of extension in the North China Craton: Insights from numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, F.; Liu, M.

    2013-12-01

    The North China Craton was formed around 1.8 Ga by collision and amalgamation of the Eastern and Western blocks. It remained tectonically stable since then until Mesozoic, when its eastern part experienced wide-distributed extension and volcanism. This distributed extension waned down in the early Cenozoic, and was replaced by localized extension (rifting) in the western part of the North China Craton. We have developed a series of viscoplastic finite element models to investigate the lithospheric conditions associated with these changing modes of extension in the North China Craton. Our results show that the wide-distributed extension in North China requires a thin and hot lithosphere, which is probably the result of delamination or thermal erosion of the lithospheric root under the eastern part of the North China Craton. The localized rifting during the late Cenozoic in the western part of the North China Craton indicates a relatively cold and thick lithosphere. Furthermore, preexisting lithospheric weakening was needed to explain the formation of the Late Cenozoic rift zones. These preexisting weakening zones may be inherited from the Paleoprotozoic collision that formed the North China Craton.

  5. Anisotropy structure beneath the eastern edge of the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, R.; Wang, Y.; Wang, W.; Wen, L.; Chen, X.

    2013-12-01

    The North China Craton is one of the most ancient craton which is considered as a perfect area to observe the craton basement destruction, replacement and reconstruction. But the mechanism and kinetics background of the lithospheric thinning of the North China Craton are still under debate. The upper mantle velocity and anisotropy structures, temperature and chemical composition are important for us to understand the destruction process of the North China Craton. Most of previous studies used shear wave splitting or surface wave analysis to study anisotropy structure, which have a poor vertical resolution in upper mantle. Waveform modeling of upper mantle triplication phases can provide a high vertical resolution. We develop a method based on the generalized reflection and transmission method (GRTM) to calculate synthetic seismograms for wave propagating in stratified VTI media, so we can waveform model triplication phases to study the upper mantle anisotropy structures. In this study, we waveform model the tangential and radial seismic triplication data recorded in Chinese digital seismic stations at a epicentral distance of 10-30 degree for several events occurring in southeast of Russia to constrain the fine upper mantle velocity and anisotropy structures beneath the eastern edge of the North China Craton . We also use mineral physic simulation to explore thermal and compositional models that would explain the inferred seismic structures.

  6. Dating Kimberlite Eruption and Erosion Phases Using Perovskite, Zircon, and Apatite (U-Th)/He Geochronology to Link Cratonic Lithosphere Evolution and Surface Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, J. R.; Flowers, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    In many cases it is difficult to evaluate the synchronicity and thus potential connections between disparate geologic events, such as the links between processes in the mantle lithosphere and at the surface. Developing new geochronologic tools and strategies for integrating existing chronologic data with other information is essential for addressing these problems. Here we use (U-Th)/He dating of multiple kimberlitic minerals to date kimberlite eruption and cratonic erosion phases. This approach permits us to more directly assess the link between unroofing and thermomodification of the lithosphere by tying our results to information obtained from mantle-derived clasts in the same pipes. Kimberlites are rich sources of information about the composition of the cratonic lithosphere and its evolution over time. Their xenoliths and xenocrysts can preserve a snapshot of the entire lithosphere and its sedimentary cover at the time of eruption. Accurate geochronology of these eruptions is crucial for interpreting spatiotemporal trends, but kimberlites can be difficult to date using standard techniques. Here we show that the mid-temperature thermochonometers of the zircon and perovskite (U-Th)/He (ZHe, PHe) systems can be viable tools for dating kimberlite eruption. When combined with the low temperature sensitivity of (U-Th)/He in apatite (AHe), the (U-Th)/He system can be used to date both the emplacement and the erosional cooling history of kimberlites. The southern African shield is an ideal location to test the utility of this approach because the region was repeatedly intruded by kimberlites in the Cretaceous, with two major pulses at ~200-110 Ma and ~100-80 Ma. These kimberlites contain a well-studied suite of mantle xenoliths and xenocrysts that document lithospheric heating and metasomatism over this interval. Our ZHe and PHe dates overlap with published eruption ages and add new ages for undated pipes. Our AHe dates constrain the spatial patterns of Cretaceous

  7. Paleoproterozoic postcollisional magmatic belt of the southern Siberian craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salnikova, E. B.; Larin, A. M.; Kotov, A. B.; Levitsky, V. I.; Reznitsky, L. Z.; Kovach, V. P.; Yakovleva, S. Z.

    2003-04-01

    Paleoproterozoic time is characterized by large-scale collisional and postcollisional magmatic activity evidenced in the most of ancient cratons. This global event is related to the Arctic supercontinent assemblage (Rogers, 1996). The formation of postcollisional magmatic belt at 1.9-1.8 Ga within the south-west flanking of the Siberian craton is a remarkable example of these processes happened during overall lithospheric convergence. This belt is extends for about 3000 km from the southern Enisey ridge at the west to the central Aldan shield at the east. Within the central Aldan shield the latest collisional event occurred 1925+/-5 Ma (Kotov et al, 2003) and post-collisional subalkaline S- and I-type granites emplaced at 1916+/-10 Ma (Bibikova et al., 1989), 1901+/-1 Ma (Frost et al., 1998) and 1899+/-6 Ma (Kotov et al, 2003). However at the southern Olekma terrain (western Aldan shield) the syncollisional granites have formed at 1906+/-4 Ma and postcollisional Kodar granitoids were generated at 1876-1873 Ma (Larin et al., 2000). The is a tendency outlined in timing of postcollision processes to the west (in modern coordinates). Ages of postcollisional Kevakta granitoid plutons (1846+/-8 Ma) and volcanics of North-Baikal volcano-plutonic belt (1869+/-6 Ma 1856+/-3 Ma), Baikal folded area, support this tendency. Emplacement of the Primorsky complex postcollisional rapakivi-type granitoids (southern Baikal lake) occurred at 1859+/-16 Ma (Donskaya et al., 2002). New results of U-Pb single zircon and baddeleyite dating demonstrate that formation of late-synkinematic syenite, charnockite and pegmatitic veins (1856±12 Ma, 1853±20 Ma) and calciphyre (1868±2 Ma) within the eastern part of the Sharyzhalgay block (southern Baikal lake) occurred virtually within the same episode. Postcollisional intrusive charnockite of the Shumikha complex from the western Sharyzhalgay block dated at 1861±1 Ma (Donskaya et al., 2001) and 1871±17 Ma (Levitsky et al., 2002). Subalcaline

  8. Upper Mantle Seismic Structure Beneath Southern Africa: Constraints on the Buoyancy Supporting the African Superswell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Martin B. C.; Grand, Stephen P.; Nyblade, Andrew A.; Dirks, Paul H. G. M.

    2012-04-01

    We present new one-dimensional SH-wave velocity models of the upper mantle beneath the Kalahari craton in southern Africa obtained from waveform inversion of regional seismograms from an Mw = 5.9 earthquake located near Lake Tanganyika recorded on broadband seismic stations deployed during the 1997-1999 Southern African Seismic Experiment. The velocity in the lithosphere beneath the Kalahari craton is similar to that of other shields, and there is little evidence for a significant low velocity zone beneath the lithosphere. The lower part of the lithosphere, from 110 to 220 km depth, is slightly slower than beneath other shields, possibly due to higher temperatures or a decrease in Mg number (Mg#). If the slower velocities are caused by a thermal anomaly, then slightly less than half of the unusually high elevation of the Kalahari craton can be explained by shallow buoyancy from a hot lithosphere. However, a decrease in the Mg# of the lower lithosphere would increase the density and counteract the buoyancy effect of the higher temperatures. We obtain a thickness of 250 ± 30 km for the mantle transition zone, which is similar to the global average, but the velocity gradient between the 410 and 660 km discontinuities is less steep than in global models, such as PREM and IASP91. We also obtain velocity jumps of between 0.16 ± 0.1 and 0.21 ± 0.1 km/s across the 410 km discontinuity. Our results suggest that there may be a thermal or chemical anomaly in the mantle transition zone, or alternatively that the shear wave velocity structure of the transition zone in global reference models needs to be refined. Overall, our seismic models provide little support for an upper mantle source of buoyancy for the unusually high elevation of the Kalahari craton, and hence the southern African portion of the African Superswell.

  9. Metasomatic control of water contents in the Kaapvaal cratonic mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peslier, A. H.; Woodland, A. B.; Bell, D. R.; Lazarov, M.; Lapen, T. J.

    2012-11-01

    Water and trace element contents were measured by FTIR and laser ablation-ICPMS on minerals from peridotite xenoliths in kimberlites of the Kaapvaal craton from Finsch, Kimberley, Jagersfontein (South Africa), Letseng-La-Terae, and Liqhobong (Lesotho) mines. The peridotites record a wide range of pressure, temperature, oxygen fugacity, and metasomatic events. Correlations between water content or OH vibration bands with major, minor and trace elements in pyroxene and garnet precludes disturbance during xenolith entrainment by the host kimberlite magma and indicate preservation of mantle water contents. Clinopyroxene water contents (150-400 ppm H2O, by weight) correlate with those of orthopyroxene (40-250 ppm). Olivines (Peslier et al., 2008, 2010) and garnets have 0-86 and 0-20 ppm H2O, respectively. Relations in individual xenolith suites between the amount of water and that of incompatible elements Ti, Na, Fe3+ and rare earths in minerals suggests that metasomatism by oxidizing melts controls the water content of olivine, pyroxene and garnet. At pressures ⩽5.5 GPa, hydrous, alkaline, siliceous fluids or melts metasomatized Liqhobong and Kimberley peridotites, producing high water contents in their olivine, pyroxenes and garnet. At higher pressures, the percolation of ultramafic melts reacting with peridotite resulted in co-variation of Ca, Ti and water at the edge of garnets at Jagersfontein, and the overall crystallization of garnet with lower water contents than those in the original peridotites. The upward migration of these ultramafic melts through the lithospheric mantle also increased the water content of olivines with decreasing pressure at Finsch Mine. H2O/Ce ratios of melts in equilibrium with Kaapvaal peridotites range from 100 to 20,000 and the larger values may indicate metasomatism in subduction zone settings. Metasomatic events in Kaapvaal peridotites are thought to have occurred from the Archean to the Mesozoic. However, circumstantial evidence

  10. Heterogeneously hydrated mantle beneath the late Archean Yilgarn Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanic, T. J.; Nebel, O.; Jourdan, F.; Faure, K.; Kirkland, C. L.; Belousova, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Archean mafic-ultramafic melts, crystallized as layered intrusions in the upper crust and extruded as komatiitic flows, are primary probes of upper mantle chemistry. However, the message from their primary chemical composition can be compromised by different modes of contamination. Contaminants are typically cryptic in terms of their geochemical and isotopic signals but may be related to metasomatised mantle sources, ambient crustal assimilation or subduction-related inputs. In this work we present critical evidence for both dry and wet Archean mantle sources for two juxtaposed layered intrusions in the Australian Yilgarn Craton. The ca. 2813 Ma Windimurra and ca. 2800 Ma Narndee Igneous Complexes in Western Australia are two adjacent layered intrusions and would be expected to derive via similar mantle sections. A key difference in their chemistry is the presence of crystal-bound water in the Narndee Igneous Complex, represented primarily by abundant hornblende. Such a primary hydrous phase is notably absent in the Windimurra Igneous Complex. New 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages for fresh Narndee hornblende (weighted mean: 2805 ± 14 Ma, MSWD = 1.8, probability = 0.18) agrees with the published U-Pb age of 2800 ± 6 Ma for the complex and is consistent with a magmatic origin for this phase. Zircon Hf and whole-rock Hf and Nd isotopes for the Narndee Igneous Complex indicate only minor crustal contamination, in agreement with H and O isotope values in amphibole and O isotope values in rare zircon crystals, plagioclase and pyroxene within both complexes. These findings illustrate a fast temporal transition, in proximal bodies, from anhydrous to hydrous mantle sources with very minor crustal contamination. These large layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions are igneous bodies with a primitive chemical bulk composition that requires large degrees of mantle melting. This has been attributed by many workers to mantle plume activity, yet not without dispute, as subduction-related flux

  11. Extension and evolution of the 2.1 Ga west-central African belt in Cameroon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toteu, S. F.; Penaye, J.; Tchameni, R.; van Schmus, W. R.

    2003-04-01

    Available isotopic and geochronological data, combined with new petrostructural observations in Cameroon, permit discussion of the nature and the extension of the Paleoproterozoic West Central African Belt (WCAB, Feybesse et al., 1998), which resulted from the Eburnean collision between the Congo and São Francisco cratons. The portion of the belt recognized in Cameroon is approximately oriented NNE-SSW and includes the Nyong series along the NW corner of the Congo craton and Paleoproterozoic remnants cropping out further north within the late Neoproterozoic Pan-African belt. The dominant rock units consist of migmatitic orthogneisses associated with amphibolites, felsic gneisses of volcanic to volcano-sedimentary origin, quartzites and banded iron formations. Orthogneisses are mostly TTG compositions within the Nyong series and metadiorites to metagranodiorites to the north in the Pan African belt. Paleoproterozoic evolution is characterized by development of nappe tectonic structures, recognized in the Nyong series, and by high-grade, granulitic facies, metamorphism that was associated with arrested charnockite formation. About 600 Ma the Paleoproterozoic structures and mineral assemblages were subsequently reworked more severely in the Pan African mobile belt than in the Nyong series, where they are locally well preserved. Broadly, the Nyong series may be ascribed to a proximal domain characterized by reworking and recycling of the adjacent Archean cratonic crust, while the occurrences farther north represent a more distal domain characterized by newly formed Paleoproterozoic (Birrimian) crust. This is consistent with the distribution of metamorphic ages, which display a polarity from the internal zones (ca 2.1 Ga) to the external zones (ca 2.03 Ga) and suggest origin of the metamorphic rocks in a modern-type collisional belt during the Paleoproterozoic (Eburnean). Reference: Feybesse J.L., Johan V., Triboulet C., Guerrot C., Mayaga-Mikolo F., Bouchot V, Eko N

  12. Lithospheric Structure of the North American Craton Imaged Using Waveform Inversion of Global and Usarray Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, A. J.; Lebedev, S.

    2014-12-01

    The North American Craton, now forming the stable core of North America, has a long, eventful tectonic history. The assembly of the craton, collisions and accretion at its current boundaries, major rifting episodes within it, and the loss of ancient lithosphere beneath parts of it are type examples of these key components of cratonic dynamics and evolution. Seismic tomography offers rich evidence on the structure and evolution of the cratonic lithosphere. With the deployment of the USArray during the last decade, much of the North American continent has been densely sampled with broadband seismic data. The resolution of regional-scale imaging, however, remains uneven, with important questions regarding deep structure, lateral extent and evolution difficult to answer. Here we present a new high-resolution model of the upper mantle beneath North America constrained by waveform fits of over 700,000 vertical-component broadband seismograms. Automated multimode waveform inversion was used to extract structural information from surface and S waveforms, yielding resolving power from the crust down to the transition zone, and improved resolution for a variety of features in North America. The internal structure of the Craton is resolved in detail. The lithosphere surrounding the 1 Ga failed Mid-Continental Rift shows reduced wavespeeds compared to the surrounding craton, likely indicating thermo-chemical alteration of the sub-continental lithospheric mantle. The sharp northern boundaries of the cratonic lithosphere closely follow the coastlines, with North America's and Greenland's lithospheric roots clearly separated. Strong lateral velocity gradients at depth observed in western Canada indicate the transition from cratonic lithosphere to Cordillera closely follows the surface trace of the Deformation Front. On the eastern margin of the continent, where multiple episodes of continental rifting are superimposed, the craton boundary coincides with the western extent of the

  13. Mantle Discontinuities and the Origins of the U.S. Cratonic Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, K. M.; Hopper, E.

    2014-12-01

    The goals of this work are to probe how mantle lithosphere discontinuity structure varies beneath the cratonic terranes of the northern U.S. and to relate this structure to the processes that created and modified the cratonic mantle. Our region samples the Archean Wyoming, Medicine Hat and Superior cratons, and the Proterozoic terranes that lie between them. We imaged the mantle using Sp phases recorded by permanent and temporary seismic networks, including EarthScope's Transportable Array. Sp receiver functions for individual waveforms were obtained by extended time multi-taper deconvolution, and migrated into a 3D volume using common conversion point stacking, a spline representation of phase Fresnel zones, and 3D models for crust and mantle structure. The stack was bootstrapped. In the cratonic mantle, we observe multiple mid-lithospheric discontinuities (MLDs) that are characterized by three types of structures: a relatively continuous negative discontinuity (velocity decrease with depth) that lies in the 65-100 km depth range; deeper negative MLDs (80-145 km) that are more discontinuous and intermittent; and occasional positive MLDs at the greatest depths (>125 km). In contrast to the tectonically active western U.S., beneath cratonic regions we typically do not observe a strong negative discontinuty at the base of the tomographically-defined lithosphere, indicating that the transition to asthenospheric properties is gradual. The MLDs indicate strong layering in the cratonic mantle lithosphere. In multiple cases, one negative discontinuity dips below another, consistent with a slab of lithosphere imbricated beneath pre-existing cratonic mantle. One of the clearest examples is a north-dipping phase at depths of 80-130 km beneath the Cheyenne Belt, the suture between the Wyoming Craton and the accreted Proterozoic terranes to its south. In Sept. 2013, an unusual earthquake occurred within the high velocity mantle of the Wyoming craton at ~76 km, a depth that

  14. Late Cretaceous to Present evolution of the NW Africa peri-cratonic in the Africa-Eurasia plate convergence context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbal, B.; Bertotti, G.; Andriessen, P. A. M.

    2009-04-01

    Africa-Eurasia plate convergence is the main mechanism to explain topographic evolution and patterns of Tertiary vertical motions recorded around the entire Mediterranean and even further east. However, most of the studies are concentrated on the Eurasian side of the Mediterranean Realm. Along the NW Africa pericratonic zone (western Mediterranean side) extending longitudinally from the Anti-Atlas to the Rif Mountains, the highest topography is observed in the High Atlas intracontinental belt and in the Pan-African Anti-Atlas belt, and not in the youngest belt, the Rif. The combination of AFT and (U-Th)/He low-thermal dating, performed on pre-Cenozoic basement rocks along the Moroccan pericratonic transect (500km) yield ages ranging respectively between 90-9Ma and 65-7Ma, documenting vertical motions of subsidence and exhumation in between Late Cretaceous and Present. Time-Temperature models show that vertical movements are spatially zoned through Morocco, with the highest amplitude of vertical movements in the High Atlas (>4-5km) and more modest amounts in the Anti-Atlas and the Western Meseta (<2.5km) from Late Cretaceous onward. Precious information provided by the AFT and AHe ages indicates that the entire NW African peri-cratonic zone including the Western Meseta and the Anti-Atlas in addition to the Atlas and the Rif systems experienced Tertiary deformation. Two stages of folding are distinguished on the basis of low-thermal dating results along the pericratonic transect. The first is a lithospherical folding of ~500km in the Late Cretaceous (confirming that this process is a primary response to recently induced compressional stress fields) and the second is a crustal folding of ~100-150km wavelength in the Late Eocene that occurred independently to the mantle, requiring therefore the existence of a decoupling in between the base of the crust and the high mantle.

  15. Paleozoic cratonal/miogeoclinal stratigraphy in the western Mojave Desert

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, M.W.; Walker, J.D. )

    1991-02-01

    Detailed mapping of metasedimentary rocks by many workers in the western Mojave Desert, California, has revealed Paleozoic lithologies of cratonal/miogeoclinal affinity. These exposures are metamorphosed, highly strained, and dismembered, and sit as roof pendants to Mesozoic and Tertiary intrusive rocks. In most outcrops no diagnosis fossils are preserved. Age correlation of these units is based, therefore, solely on similarities to lithologic packages outside the region. Despite the complex tectonic history this area has suffered since the late Paleozoic paleogeographic elements trend southwest into the region from where they are last clearly defined near the California-Nevada border. Dolomitic and calcitic marbles, quartzites, and biotite schists make up a major part of the stratigraphy in many areas. The stratigraphy and lithology of these units strongly suggest that they are correlative with late Precambrian-Cambrian units in the Death Valley region. Possible Ordovician and Devonian marbles also are present within some sections; at least one locality contains stromatoporoids of probable Devonian age. Calcite marbles tentatively correlated with lithologically similar Permian units in the Death Valley area are also represented and appear to be depositionally overlain by Mesozoic( ) shallow-marine and are-derived clastic rocks. Although the western Mojave Desert region has experienced compressional, transcurrent, and extensional deformation since late Paleozoic, our current understanding and restoration of this deformation history does not significantly alter the general southwest Paleozoic paleogeographic trends known to exist farther east.

  16. Spatial distribution of eclogite in the Slave cratonic mantle: The role of subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylova, Maya G.; Beausoleil, Yvette; Goncharov, Alexey; Burgess, Jennifer; Strand, Pamela

    2016-03-01

    We reconstructed the spatial distribution of eclogites in the cratonic mantle based on thermobarometry for ~ 240 xenoliths in 4 kimberlite pipes from different parts of the Slave craton (Canada). The accuracy of depth estimates is ensured by the use of a recently calibrated thermometer, projection of temperatures onto well-constrained local peridotitic geotherms, petrological screening for unrealistic temperature estimates, and internal consistency of all data. The depth estimates are based on new data on mineral chemistry and petrography of 148 eclogite xenoliths from the Jericho and Muskox kimberlites of the northern Slave craton and previously reported analyses of 95 eclogites from Diavik and Ekati kimberlites (Central Slave). The majority of Northern Slave eclogites of the crustal, subduction origin occurs at 110-170 km, shallower than in the majority of the Central Slave crustal eclogites (120-210 km). The identical geochronological history of these eclogite populations and the absence of steep suture boundaries between the central and northern Slave craton suggest the lateral continuity of the mantle layer relatively rich in eclogites. We explain the distribution of eclogites by partial preservation of an imbricated and plastically dispersed oceanic slab formed by easterly dipping Proterozoic subduction. The depths of eclogite localization do not correlate with geophysically mapped discontinuities. The base of the depleted lithosphere of the Slave craton constrained by thermobarometry of peridotite xenoliths coincides with the base of the thickened lithospheric slab, which supports contribution of the recycled oceanic lithosphere to formation of the cratonic root. Its architecture may have been protected by circum-cratonic subduction and shielding of the shallow Archean lithosphere from the destructive asthenospheric metasomatism.

  17. Obesity and African Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Data > Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Obesity Obesity and African Americans African American women have the ... ss6304.pdf [PDF | 3.38MB] HEALTH IMPACT OF OBESITY More than 80 percent of people with type ...

  18. High Water Contents in the Siberian Cratonic Mantle: An FTIR Study of Udachnaya Peridotite Xenoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doucet, Luc S.; Peslier, Anne H.; Ionov, Dimitri A.; Brandon, Alan D.; Golovin, Alexander V.; Ashchepkov, Igor V.

    2013-01-01

    Water is believed to be a key factor controlling the long-term stability of cratonic lithosphere, but mechanisms responsible for the water content distribution in the mantle remain poorly constrained. Water contents were obtained by FTIR in olivine, pyroxene and garnet for 20 well-characterized peridotite xenoliths from the Udachnaya kimberlite (central Siberian craton) and equilibrated at 2-7 GPa. Water contents in minerals do not appear to be related to interaction with the host kimberlite. Diffusion modeling indicates that the core of olivines preserved their original water contents. The Udachnaya peridotites show a broad range of water contents in olivine (6.5 +/- 1.1 to 323 +- 65 ppm H2O (2 sigma)), and garnet (0 - 23 +/- 6 ppm H2O). The water contents of olivine and garnet are positively correlated with modal clinopyroxene, garnet and FeO in olivine. Water-rich garnets are also rich in middle rare earth elements. This is interpreted as the result of interaction between residual peridotites and water rich-melts, consistent with modal and cryptic metasomatism evidenced in the Siberian cratonic mantle. The most water-rich Udachnaya minerals contain 2 to 3 times more water than those from the Kaapvaal craton, the only craton with an intact mantle root for which water data is available. The highest water contents in olivine and orthopyroxene in this study (>= 300 ppm) are found at the bottom of the lithosphere (> 6.5 GPa). This is in contrast with the Kaapvaal craton where the olivines of peridotites equilibrated at > 6.4 GPa have < 1 ppm H2O. The latter "dry" olivine may make the base of the Kaapvaal cratonic root strong and thus protects it from erosion by the convective mantle The calculated viscosity for water-rich Udachnaya peridotites at > 6 GPa is lower or similar (8.4× 10(exp 16) to 8.0× 10(exp 18) Pa./s) to that of the asthenosphere (<= 3.7x10(exp 18) Pa./s ). Such lithologies would not be able to resist delamination by the convecting asthenosphere

  19. The Preservation of Meso- Archean Refractory Lithospheric Mantle Underneath the Eastern Margin of the Tanzania Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Q.; Liu, J.; Pearson, G. D.; Gibson, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    Numerous studies on the petrology and geochemistry of peridotite xenoliths from the Tanzanian Craton and its rifted margins have investigated the origin, chemical change and thermal state of the cratonic roots from its core area (Nzega and Mwadui), its Northern (Marsabit) and Eastern margin Labait and Lashaine area (e.g. Dawson, 1964; Henjes-Kunst and Altherr, 1991; Lee & Rudnick, 1999; Chesley et al., 1999; Gibson et al., 2013). These studies suggest that the Tanzanian cratonic mantle formed via high degrees of melt extraction in the Archean (oldest Re-depletion age TRD = 3.4 Ga, Burton et al., 2000) and sev­eral episodes of refertilization. In order to gain further temporal and chemical understanding on the effects of tectonic processes on cratonic roots, we carried out a Re-Os isotopic study on peridotites (n = 11) from Lashaine, which will be followed by Lu-Hf, Sm-Nd and Sr isotope investigations of the constituent minerals of the same samples. The preliminary whole-rock Os isotope data from Lashaine peridotites show a large range of 187Os/188Os (0.1061 - 0.1261), with TRD ages from Meso-Archean to very young (3.1 Ga to 0.3 Ga). There is a negative correlation between TRD and bulk alumina contents. One sample with the lowest Al2O3 yields the oldest age of 3.1 Ga. Five samples range from 2.5 to 2.8 Ga, three give ages close to 2 Ga, and one sample with a high Al2O3 has a TRD at 0.3 Ga. The positive Al2O3-187Os/188Os correlation trend passes above the PM composition may reflect ancient metasomatism by high Re/Os melts or recent metasomatism by very radiogenic Os plume-derived melts. These processes could be related to the evolution of the peripheral Proterozoic mobile belts, or Cenozoic rifting on the Eastern margin. Collectively, our new Os isotope data demonstrate that Meso-Archean (at least 3.1 Ga old) mantle portions are still retained underneath the rifted Eastern margin of the Craton. This is in line with previous results indicating that Archean cratonic

  20. Supercontinents, True Polar Wander, and Paleogeography of the Slave Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Ross Nelson

    evidence in support of a long-lived, Ediacaran-aged hotspot. The consistency of paleocurrent directions derived from the Great Slave Supergroup argues against significant regional vertical-axis rotations and for large and rapid TPW to explain discordant paleomagnetic directions observed within section. The last frontier for paleomagnetic constraints on supercontinents, TPW, and the antiquity of plate tectonics is earliest Proterozoic time. Laurentia, one of Earth's oldest continents that formed at the core supercontinent Nuna, contains several cratons that have adequate paleomagnetic and geochronologic data with which to test for evidence of early TPW and relative plate motion, the hallmark of tectonics. Although past comparisons have been made between the Slave and Superior cratons at each "bookend" of Laurentia, new paleomagnetic data supported by baked contact tests allow for conclusive early Proterozoic reconstructions. Similar to periods following Proterozoic supercontinents Nuna and Rodinia, early Proterozoic time is characterized by large TPW oscillations and large-scale plate reorganizations prior to amalgamation, possibly indicating the presence of `Kenorland', an Archean supercontinent.

  1. Heat Flow, Lower Crustal Thermochronology, and Transient Geotherms in the Mesozoic Southern African Continental Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, M. D.; Bell, D. R.; Bowring, S. A.

    2002-12-01

    There is a well-established debate regarding the role of higher mantle heat flux for accommodating the elevated average surface heat flow in the Proterozoic orogenic belts relative to the Archean cratonic regions of southern Africa1,2. Advocates of steeper off-craton lithospheric mantle thermal gradients commonly support their arguments with thermobarometric data indicating elevated temperatures at a given depth in off-craton versus cratonic mantle xenolith suites3,4, and together such inferences have cemented a paradigm of differential lithospheric thickness between Proterozoic orogenic belts (thin) and Archean cratons (thick). However, this inherently steady-state interpretation of lithospheric thermomechanical structure is at odds with emerging data pointing toward transient thermal perturbations and irreversible chemical modifications to the southern African lithosphere during the Late Mesozoic5,6. This contribution seeks to illustrate how an essentially "cratonic" thermal state in the Proterozoic lithospheric mantle of southern Africa remains compatible with nominally elevated surface heat flow in the same regions. Model geotherms have been constructed utilizing published surface heat flow, heat production and thermal conductivity measurements1, and seismically-derived crustal thickness estimates7. New heat-producing element concentration data for kimberlite-borne high-pressure granulite xenoliths from the Proterozoic domains constrain lower crustal heat production to be in the range of 0.15 to 0.2 μW/m3. A family of geologically realistic crustal heat production models accommodates surface heat flow >50 mW/m2, while maintaining moderate basal mantle heat flux <15 mW/m2, with associated lithospheric mantle geotherms and thickness indistinguishable from those of cratonic mantle. This family of models is further consistent with constraints on pre-Mesozoic lower crustal paleotemperatures of <450°C imposed by rutile U-Pb thermochronology in the craton

  2. The 2.1 Ga West Central African Belt in Cameroon: extension and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penaye, J.; Toteu, S. F.; Tchameni, R.; Van Schmus, W. R.; Tchakounté, J.; Ganwa, A.; Minyem, D.; Nsifa, E. N.

    2004-06-01

    Available isotopic and geochronological data, combined with new petrographic and structural observations in Cameroon, permit discussion of the nature and extension of the Paleoproterozoic West Central African Belt, which resulted from the Eburnean collision between the Congo and São Francisco cratons. The portion of the belt recognized in Cameroon is approximately oriented NNE-SSW and includes the Nyong series along the NW corner of the Congo craton and Paleoproterozoic remnants cropping out further north within the late Neoproterozoic Pan-African belt. The dominant rock units consist of migmatitic orthogneisses associated with amphibolites, felsic gneisses of volcanic to volcano-sedimentary origin, quartzites, and banded iron formations. Orthogneisses are mostly TTG compositions within the Nyong series and metadiorites to metagranodiorites to the north in the Pan-African belt. Paleoproterozoic evolution is characterized by the development of nappe tectonic structures, recognized in the Nyong series, and by high-grade, granulitic facies metamorphism that was associated with arrested charnockite formation. The Paleoproterozoic structures and mineral assemblages were subsequently reworked more severely in the Pan-African mobile belt than in the Nyong series, where they are locally well preserved. Broadly, the Nyong series may be ascribed to a proximal domain characterized by reworking and recycling of the adjacent Archean cratonic crust, while the occurrences farther north represent a more distal domain characterized by newly formed Paleoproterozoic (Birrimian) crust. This is consistent with the distribution of metamorphic ages, which display a polarity from the internal zones (ca. 2.1 Ga) to the external zones (ca. 2.03 Ga) and suggest origin of the metamorphic rocks in a modern-type collisional belt during the Paleoproterozoic (Eburnean).

  3. Layered structure of the lithospheric mantle changes dynamics of craton extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, J.; Gerya, T.; Wang, Q.

    2013-11-01

    Although presence of weak layers due to hydration and/or metasomatism in the lithospheric mantle of cratons has been detected by both geophysical and geochemical studies, its influence on craton evolution remains elusive. Using a 2‒D thermomechanical viscoelastoplastic numerical model, we studied the craton extension of a heterogeneous lithospheric mantle with a rheologically weak layer. Our results demonstrate that the effect of the weak mantle layer is twofold: (1) enhances deformation of the overlying lithosphere and (2) inhibits deformation of the underlying lithospheric mantle. Depending on the weak‒layer depth, the Moho temperature and extension rate, three extension patterns are found (1) localized mantle necking with exposed weak layer, (2) widespread mantle necking with exposed weak layer, and (3) widespread mantle necking without exposed weak layer. The presence of the weak mantle layer reduces long‒term acting boundary forces required to sustain extensional deformation of the lithosphere.

  4. East asian gold: Deciphering the anomaly of phanerozoic gold in precambrian cratons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldfarb, R.J.; Hart, C.; Davis, G.; Groves, D.

    2007-01-01

    Early Cretaceous orogenic gold deposits in eastern Asia are globally unique in that large Phanerozoic lode gold deposits occur in Archean-Paleoproterozoic cratons. In the northern Pacific region, ca. 125 Ma orogenic gold deposits in the North China, Yangzte, and Siberian craton margins, as well as in young terranes in California, may ultimately relate to the giant Cretaceous mantle plume in the southern Pacific basin and the relatively rapid tectonic consequences along both continental margins from resulting Pacific plate reconfigurations. In eastern Asia, such consequences include reactivation of and fluid flow along major fault systems, with fluid focusing into simultaneously forming, isolated core complexes of uncertain genesis. Deposition of gold ores in previously devolatilized high-grade Precambrian metamorphic rocks requires an exotic source of ore fluid, most likely subducted Mesozoic oceanic crust and/or overlying sediment. An implication is that Phanerozoic metamorphic core complexes in other destabilized craton margins could host large gold resources. ?? 2007 by Economic Geology.

  5. PdS Receiver Function Evidence for Mafic Underplating in the Superior Craton: A Discussion About Cratonic Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurner, S.; Niu, F.; Margolis, R. E.; Levander, A.; Lee, C. T.

    2014-12-01

    The Trans-Hudson orogen (THO) in the north central United States represents a major suturing event between the Wyoming and Superior Archean provinces. It is bounded to the south by the NE-SW striking Yavapai province, which was accreted along the southeastern margin of North America between 1.71 and 1.68 Ga and was one of a series of major collisional events responsible for the assembly of Laurentia. In this study, PdS teleseismic receiver functions were used to investigate the deep crustal structure associated with these collisions. Using data from over 800 broadband seismic stations distributed throughout the Great Plains/Midcontinent region, we calculated .5 Hz receiver functions using 245 M > 6.0 teleseismic events. The receiver functions were then CCP (common conversion point) stacked to create a 3D image volume. Profiles through this image volume show evidence of crustal scale thrusting of the Wyoming province in the west over the Superior province in the east and structural underplating associated with the Yavapai-Superior boundary. We also performed a density analysis of the region using the 2p1s and 0p1s receiver function phases from 233 stations. These data indicate a relatively low Moho density contrast throughout the THO and northern Yavapai region associated with a region of thickened crust (> 50 km), which we interpret to be evidence of a dense lower crustal layer that may be the result mafic underplating. Additionally, we investigate the role that this dense layer may have on the stabilization of the Superior craton and others relative to compositionally and thermally derived density variations in the mantle lithosphere.

  6. Passive margin asymmetry and its polarity in the presence of a craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres-Martinez, Miguel; Perez-Gussinye, Marta; Neto-Araujo, Mario; Morgan, Jason

    2016-04-01

    When continental lithosphere is extended to break-up it forms two conjugate passive margins. In many instances these margins are asymmetric: while one is wide and extensively faulted, the conjugate thins more abruptly and exhibits little faulting. Recent observational studies have suggested that this asymmetry results from the formation of an oceanward-younging sequential normal fault array on the future wide margin. Numerical models have shown that fault sequentiality arises as a result of asymmetric uplift of the hot mantle towards the hanging wall of the active fault, which weakens this area and promotes the formation of a new oceanward fault. In numerical models the polarity of the asymmetry is random. It results from spontaneous preferential localization of strain in a given fault, a process reinforced by strain weakening effects. Slight changes in the experiments initial grid result in an opposite polarity of the asymmetry. However, along a long stretch of the South Atlantic margins, from the Camamu-Gabon to the North Santos-South Kwanza conjugates, the polarity is not random and is very well correlated with the distance of the rift to nearby cratons. Here, we use numerical experiments to show that the presence of a thick cratonic root inhibits asthenospheric flow from underneath the craton towards the adjacent fold belt, while flow from underneath the fold belt towards the craton is favoured. This enhances and promotes sequential faulting towards the craton and results in a wide faulted margin located in the fold belt and a narrow conjugate margin in the craton side, thereby determining the polarity of the asymmetry, as observed in nature.

  7. Shear Wave Structure in the Crust and Upper Mantle Beneath the Wyoming Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, R.; Li, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Wyoming craton was pervasively deformed during the Laramide and has been encroached by the Yellowstone hotspot. It is therefore an ideal place to study the survival and evolution of cratonic lithosphere. We have analyzed Rayleigh wave data recorded by the USArray and applied the two-plane-wave tomography method to determine average and 2-D phase velocities in the Wyoming craton area. These phase velocities were inverted to construct 3-D shear wave structure of the crust and upper mantle. Vertical component seismograms from 82 events at 103 stations were filtered at 18 center frequencies with a narrow bandwidth of 10 mHz. The average phase velocity varies from 3.48 km/s at 20 s to 4.36 km/s at 166 s. Compared to the average global phase velocities, these values are lower at longer periods, indicating a generally slower upper mantle. 2-D variation of phase velocity shows significantly low velocities at the hotspot and relatively high velocities in the north of the stable craton. The same pattern of velocity variation is also imaged in the 3-D shear wave model. The lowest velocity tilted to north and east to the current hotspot location with depth, reflecting shearing of the hotspot material due to the relative motion of the North American plate. In addition, a low velocity anomaly is imaged at central-eastern portion of the craton at depths greater than 150 km, correlated with a thin crust. Relative high velocity anomaly is found in between this slow anomaly and the hotspot. This slow-fast-slow velocity variation in the upper mantle could be associated with small-scale mantle convection of upwelling-downwelling-upwelling trigged by the hotspot, which could thermally erode the cratonic lithosphere.

  8. Africans in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Ayanna; Spangler, Earl

    This book introduces African-American history and culture to children. The first Africans in America came from many different regions and cultures, but became united in this country by being black, African, and slaves. Once in America, Africans began a long struggle for freedom which still continues. Slavery, the Civil War, emancipation, and the…

  9. African Outreach Workshop 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Nancy J.

    This report discusses the 1974 African Outreach Workshop planned and coordinated by the African Studies Program at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Its major aim was to assist teachers in developing curriculum units on African using materials available in their local community. A second aim was for the African Studies Program to…

  10. Gondwanan basement terranes of the Variscan-Appalachian orogen: Baltican, Saharan and West African hafnium isotopic fingerprints in Avalonia, Iberia and the Armorican Terranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Bonnie J.; Collins, William Joseph; Murphy, James Brendan; Gutierrez-Alonso, Gabriel; Hand, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Iberia, Avalonia and the "Armorican" terranes form key constituents of the Variscan-Appalachian orogen, but their Neoproterozoic origins along the northern Gondwanan margin continue to be strongly debated. Here, we present a new detrital zircon U-Pb-Hf dataset from Neoproterozoic-Silurian sedimentary sequences in NW Iberia and Avalonia, in conjunction with the comprehensive existing datasets from potential source cratons, to demonstrate that the provenance of each terrane is relatively simple and can be traced back to three major cratons. The enigmatic Tonian-Stenian detrital zircons in autochthonous Iberian rocks were derived from the Saharan metacraton in the latest Neoproterozoic-early Cambrian. Avalonia is commonly considered to have been derived from the Amazonian margin of Gondwana, but the hafnium isotopic characteristics of the detrital zircon grains in early Neoproterozoic rocks bear much stronger similarities to Baltica. The hafnium isotopic array also suggests the early Avalonian oceanic arc was built on a sliver of "Grenvillian-type crust" (~ 2.0-1.0 Ga) possibly of Baltican affinity at ~ 800 Ma, prior to accretion with a continental margin at ~ 640 Ma. The Upper Allochthon of Iberia is frequently linked to the West African Craton in the late Neoproterozoic-early Cambrian, however the hafnium isotopic array presented here does not support this connection; rather it is more similar to the hafnium array from Avalonia. The Armorican terranes have strong detrital zircon isotopic links to the West African Craton during the late Neoproterozoic-Cambrian.

  11. Lithospheric structures and Precambrian terrane boundaries in northeastern Botswana revealed through magnetotelluric profiling as part of the Southern African Magnetotelluric Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miensopust, M. P.; Jones, A. G.; Muller, M. R.; Garcia, X.; Evans, R. L.

    2011-02-01

    Within the framework of the Southern African Magnetotelluric Experiment a focused study was undertaken to gain improved knowledge of the lithospheric geometries and structures of the westerly extension of the Zimbabwe craton (ZIM) into Botswana, with the overarching aim of increasing our understanding of southern African tectonics. The area of interest is located in northeastern Botswana, where Kalahari sands cover most of the geological terranes and very little is known about lithospheric structures and thicknesses. Some of the regional-scale terrane boundary locations, defined based on potential field data, are not sufficiently accurate for local-scale studies. Investigation of the NNW-SSE orientated, 600 km long ZIM line profile crossing the Zimbabwe craton, Magondi mobile belt, and Ghanzi-Chobe belt showed that the Zimbabwe craton is characterized by thick (˜220 km) resistive lithosphere, consistent with geochemical and geothermal estimates from kimberlite samples of the nearby Orapa and Letlhakane pipes (˜175 km west of the profile). The lithospheric mantle of the Ghanzi-Chobe belt is resistive, but its lithosphere is only about 180 km thick. At crustal depths a northward dipping boundary between the Ghanzi-Chobe and the Magondi belts is identified, and two middle to lower crustal conductors are discovered in the Magondi belt. The crustal terrane boundary between the Magondi and Ghanzi-Chobe belts is found to be located further to the north, and the southwestern boundary of the Zimbabwe craton might be further to the west, than previously inferred from the regional potential field data.

  12. Seismic evidence for stratification in composition and anisotropic fabric within the thick lithosphere of Kalahari Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodoudi, F.; Yuan, X.; Kind, R.; Lebedev, S.; Tilmann, F. J.

    2013-12-01

    S receiver functions obtained from the data of 97 seismic stations present evidence for the existence of a layered and thick lithosphere beneath the Kalahari Craton. We identified three negative discontinuities within the lithosphere of the Archean cratons and Proterozoic mobile belts of southern Africa. We also employed a novel combination of SRFs and surface-wave analysis to constrain the anisotropic properties of the lithosphere and its internal layering. Our results show that frozen-in anisotropy and compositional changes can generate sharp Mid-Lithospheric Discontinuities (MLD) at depths of 85 and 150-200 km, respectively. We found that a 50 km thick anisotropic layer containing 3% S wave anisotropy and with a fast-velocity axis different from that in the layer beneath can account for the first MLD at about 85 km depth. This depth is largely consistent with that of 8° discontinuity suggested as a global characteristic of cratonic lithosphere. Significant correlation between the depths of an apparent boundary separating the depleted and metasomatic refertilized lithosphere, as inferred from chemical tomography, and those of our second MLD (at 150-200 km depth) led us to characterize this negative discontinuity as a compositional boundary, most likely due to the modification of the cratonic mantle lithosphere by magma infiltration. We detected this MLD at a depth of about 150 km beneath the Zimbabwe Craton and Limpopo belt with a steep deepening to about 200 km underneath the Kaapvaal Craton and its passive margin. The deepening of this boundary is spatially correlated with the surficial expression of the ancient Thabazimbi-Murchison Lineament (TML). This may imply that the translithospheric TML isolates the lithospheric block of the relatively younger Limpopo terrane from that of the ancient Kaapvaal terrane. Finally, the largest velocity contrast (3.6-4.7%) is observed at a boundary located at depths of 260-280 km beneath the Archean domains and the older

  13. Petrology, 40Ar/39Ar age, Sr-Nd isotope systematics, and geodynamic significance of an ultrapotassic (lamproitic) dyke with affinities to kamafugite from the easternmost margin of the Bastar Craton, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, N. V. Chalapathi; Atiullah; Burgess, R.; Nanda, Purnendu; Choudhary, A. K.; Sahoo, Samarendra; Lehmann, B.; Chahong, Ngazipmi

    2016-04-01

    We report the mineralogy, bulk-rock geochemistry, 40Ar/39Ar (whole-rock) age and radiogenic (Sr and Nd) isotope composition of an ultrapotassic dyke from Sakri (Nuapada lamproite field) located at the tectonic contact between the easternmost margin of the Bastar craton and Eastern Ghats Mobile Belt, India. The Sakri dyke has a mineralogy which strongly resembles a lamproite sensu stricto (viz.,Ti-rich phlogopite, Na-poor diopside, Fe-rich sanidine, ulvospinel trend and Sr-rich apatite). However, its bulk-rock major element geochemical characteristics (viz., extreme silica-undersaturated nature) resemble sensu lato kamafugite from Toro Ankole, Uganda, East African Rift, and Alto Paranaiba Province, Brazil. The Sakri dyke also displays certain compositional peculiarities (viz., high degree of evolution of mica composition from phlogopite to biotite, elevated titanium and aluminum in clinopyroxene and significantly lower bulk Mg#) when compared to the ultrapotassic rocks from various Indian cratons. 40Ar/39Ar dating gave a plateau age of 1045 ± 9 Ma which is broadly similar to that of other Mesoproterozoic (i) lamproites from the Bastar and Bundelkhand cratons, and (ii) kimberlites from the Eastern Dharwar craton. Initial bulk-rock Sr (0.705865-0.709024) and Nd (0.511063-0.511154) isotopic ratios reveal involvement of an `enriched' source region with long-term incompatible element enrichment and a depleted mantle (TDM) Nd model age of 2.56 Ga straddling the Archaean-Proterozoic chronostratigraphic boundary. The bulk-rock incompatible trace element ratios (Ta/Yb, Th/Yb, Rb/Ba and Ce/Y) of the Sakri ultrapotassic dyke negate any significant influence of crustal contamination. Small-degree melting (1 to 1.5 %) of a mixed garnet-facies and spinel-facies phlogopite lherzolite can account for its observed REE concentrations. Whereas the emplacement of the Sakri ultrapotassic dyke is related to the amalgamation of the supercontinent of Rodinia, its overlapping geochemical

  14. SRNL PHASE 1 ASSESSMENT OF THE WAC/DQO AND UNIT OPERATIONS FOR THE WTP WASTE QUALIFICATION PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D.; Adamson, D.; Bannochie, C.; Cozzi, A.; Eibling, R.; Hay, M.; Hansen, E.; Herman, D.; Martino, C.; Nash, C.; Pennebaker, F.; Poirier, M.; Reboul, S.; Stone, M.; Taylor-Pashow, K.; White, T.; Wilmarth, B.

    2012-05-16

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is currently transitioning its emphasis from a design and construction phase toward start-up and commissioning. With this transition, the WTP Project has initiated more detailed assessments of the requirements related to actual processing of the Hanford Site tank waste. One particular area of interest is the waste qualification program to be implemented to support the WTP. Given the successful implementation of similar waste qualification efforts at the Savannah River Site (SRS), based on critical technical support and guidance from the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), WTP requested the utilization of subject matter experts from SRNL to support a technology exchange to perform a review of the WTP waste qualification program, discuss the general qualification approach at SRS, and to identify critical lessons learned through the support of DWPF's sludge batch qualification efforts. As part of Phase 1, SRNL subject matter experts in critical technical and/or process areas reviewed specific WTP waste qualification information. The Phase 1 review was a collaborative, interactive, and iterative process between the two organizations. WTP provided specific analytical procedures, descriptions of equipment, and general documentation as baseline review material. SRNL subject matter experts reviewed the information and, as appropriate, requested follow-up information or clarification to specific areas of interest. This process resulted in multiple teleconferences with key technical contacts from both organizations resolving technical issues that lead to the results presented in this report. This report provides the results of SRNL's Phase 1 review of the WAC-DQO waste acceptance criteria and processability parameters, and the specific unit operations which are required to support WTP waste qualification efforts. The review resulted in SRNL providing concurrence, alternative methods, or gap identification

  15. An Integrated Crustal Analysis of Craton-Terrane Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contenti, S. M.; Gu, Y. J.; Shen, L.

    2012-12-01

    velocities along the Thorsby/Rimbey domains. The proximity of these two domains to the STZ may shed new light on the spatial variability of subduction during the Proterozoic era. The combination of crustal depth, velocity, Vp/Vs ratios and anisotropy enables a careful re-examination of the existing tectonic model regarding the domain formation and reworking near the western edge of the North American Craton.

  16. H2O in olivine and garnet inclusions still trapped in diamonds from the Siberian craton: Implications for the water content of cratonic lithosphere peridotites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novella, Davide; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Nestola, Fabrizio; Harris, Jeffrey W.

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the H2O content of olivine and garnet inclusions still trapped in seven uncut and unpolished kimberlitic diamonds from Udachnaya (Siberain craton). Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analyses of the inclusions show spectra similar to those observed for the same minerals in mantle xenoliths. The olivine inclusions are found to contain 0.5 to 5 ppm wt. H2O while the garnets do not show any clear absorption bands and therefore are considered to be dry. These data contrast with H2O contents reported for olivines and garnets in xenoliths, 300 and 20 ppm wt. H2O respectively, as well as olivine xenocrysts (up to ~ 400 ppm wt. H2O), from the same kimberlite. We interpret the high H2O concentrations in xenolithic minerals or xenocrysts to be the result of interactions with either the kimberlitic magmas or metasomatic fluids/melts, and believe that the inclusions in diamonds investigated here preserve their mantle signature which is not altered during ascent to the surface. Based on the data collected in this study we conclude that the deep roots of the Siberian craton were essentially dry when the diamond formed and that this was possibly the reason for making this portion of the lithosphere stable with respect to the convective mantle. Finally, using H2O partition coefficient data, we estimate that the diamond-forming melts in this cratonic lithosphere contain below 0.1 wt.% H2O.

  17. A comparison of real-time radiography results and visual characterization results with emphasis on WIPP WAC and TRAMPAC compliance issues

    SciTech Connect

    Hailey, S.M.

    1994-11-01

    Visual characterization provides a means of confirming the real-time radiography (RTR) certification process and process knowledge. RTR and visual characterization have been conducted on thirty-three drums containing transuranic (TRU) waste in support of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experimental Test Program (WETP) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Argonne National Laboratory - West (ANL-W) detected a small can of liquid in one of these drums during the visual examination, resulting in a WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (WIPP-WAC) miscertification. The remaining thirty-two drums were certified correctly by the RTR system at the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP) for WIPP-WAC and TRUPACT-II Authorized Methods for Payload Control (TRAMPAC) requirements. TRAMPAC contains restrictions on the weights of specific materials allowed in the waste, based on the shipping category. Items on the restricted list for a given shipping category are allowed in quantities less than 1 percent of the weight of the waste. RTR can estimate the weights of certain broad categories in homogeneous waste forms, however, the capability to estimate weights at the 1 percent level is not presently realistic. Process knowledge forms the basis of conformance to these weight requirements. Visual characterization suggests process knowledge is not completely adequate at this level.

  18. Neoproterozoic geodynamic evolution of SW-Gondwana: a southern African perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frimmel, H. E.; Basei, M. S.; Gaucher, C.

    2011-04-01

    Our current understanding of the tectonic history of the principal Pan-African orogenic belts in southwestern Africa, reaching from the West Congo Belt in the north to the Lufilian/Zambezi, Kaoko, Damara, Gariep and finally the Saldania Belt in the south, is briefly summarized. On that basis, possible links with tectono-stratigraphic units and major structures on the eastern side of the Río de la Plata Craton are suggested, and a revised geodynamic model for the amalgamation of SW-Gondwana is proposed. The Río de la Plata and Kalahari Cratons are considered to have become juxtaposed already by the end of the Mesoproterozoic. Early Neoproterozoic rifting led to the fragmentation of the northwestern (in today's coordinates) Kalahari Craton and the splitting off of several small cratonic blocks. The largest of these ex-Kalahari cratonic fragments is probably the Angola Block. Smaller fragments include the Luis Alves and Curitiba microplates in eastern Brazil, several basement inliers within the Damara Belt, and an elongate fragment off the western margin, named Arachania. The main suture between the Kalahari and the Congo-São Francisco Cratons is suspected to be hidden beneath younger cover between the West Congo Belt and the Lufilian/Zambezi Belts and probably continues westwards via the Cabo Frío Terrane into the Goiás magmatic arc along the Brasilia Belt. Many of the rift grabens that separated the various former Kalahari cratonic fragments did not evolve into oceanic basins, such as the Northern Nosib Rift in the Damara Belt and the Gariep rift basin. Following latest Cryogenian/early Ediacaran closure of the Brazilides Ocean between the Río de la Plata Craton and the westernmost fragment of the Kalahari Craton, the latter, Arachania, became the locus of a more than 1,000-km-long continental magmatic arc, the Cuchilla Dionisio-Pelotas Arc. A correspondingly long back-arc basin (Marmora Basin) on the eastern flank of that arc is recognized, remnants of which

  19. Spatial distribution of ~ 1950-1800 Ma metamorphic events in the North China Craton: Implications for tectonic subdivision of the craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Peng; Wang, Xinping; Windley, Brian F.; Guo, Jinghui; Zhai, Mingguo; Li, Yun

    2014-08-01

    Great progress has been made in the last twenty years in understanding the unification of the North China Craton. According to a prevailing model it developed by amalgamation of four sub-blocks by three spatially and temporally separate orogenic belts: the first at ~ 1950 Ma formed the Western Block, the second at ~ 1900 Ma created the Eastern Block, and the third at ~ 1850 Ma unified the Eastern and Western Blocks. However, new data show that the 1950 Ma orogen was affected by granulite facies reequilibration at 1800 Ma, and parts of the 1850 Ma orogen have evidence of metamorphism at 1950-1900 Ma. New zircon U-Pb ages enable the Paleoproterozoic metamorphic events to be statistically sub-divided into four: at ~ 1955 Ma (M1),~1920 Ma (M2), ~ 1885 Ma (M3) and ~ 1850 Ma (M4). The M1-2 events always appear together, mainly in two belt areas including the Helanshan-Qianlishan, northern Ordos, Yinshan, Liangcheng, Huai'an, Lushan, Jiaobei and Liaodong regions; whereas the M3-4 events are distributed over larger areas and were superimposed on the M1-2 activities. This age distribution is inconsistent with previous models of three separate orogens. It should also be noted that the igneous rocks contemporary with the regional (ultra-)high-temperature/high-pressure granulite facies metamorphisms (M1-2) were previously described as arc-related series, i.e., the gabbro-norites, I-/S-type granites and trimodal volcanics. Based on the spatial distribution of the Paleoproterozoic metamorphic events (M1-4), and of the coeval igneous rocks, we speculate that the assembly of the NCC was created by one orogen, which formed between the Eastern and Western Cratons in two tectonic stages: two marginal arcs, the Korean and Xuwujia, developed against both eastern sides of the two sub-cratons, and were both accreted and deformed at 1965-1900 Ma (M1-2). Subsequently the amalgamation of the two sub-cratons resulted in metamorphism on the western side of the Eastern Craton, and in

  20. Integrated Seismic Arrays for Imaging the North China Craton: the ¡°Destruction of the North China Craton¡± Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. J.; Chen, L.; Zheng, T.; Zhou, S.

    2007-12-01

    It has been known, mostly according to the petrological and geochemical studies particularly the xenolith's data, that the North China craton (NCC), which is part of the Archaean Sino-Korean craton, had been reactivated since Mesozoic, and experienced widespread extension and volcanism through much of the Cenozoic. Currently the NCC is characterized by a thin lithosphere (as thin as 80 km according to published studies) and strong internal deformation, where over half of the eastern China's earthquakes occurred while the two major plate boundaries about China are thousands kilometers away. Although it is seismically quite active this region encompasses the China's capital and several mega cities which together hosts a large population and are very important to China's growing economy. Supported by the Chinese earth science community, the Chinese NSF recently started a major research program, the ¡°Destruction of the North China craton¡± (DNCC). About 150 million RMB (~ 20 million US dollars) will be allocated for this 5-year multi-disciplinary research program which is open for competition for all the earth scientists in China. Here we report one major seismic observation project of ¡°Integrated Seismic Arrays of DNCC¡± just funded during the first phase funding of DNCC. This observation-driven project integrates two groups at the Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Peking University, and both institutions have their own broadband seismometers and have recently conducted pilot portable seismic array studies in North China. Up to seven linear broadband seismic arrays, each consists of 60-100 stations, are planned within the NCC. The principle objectives are to quantify the range and degree of the craton destruction in spatial domain with major focus on the east-west variation from the previously proposed intact craton in the west to the rejuvenated region in the east and the transition zone in the middle. With the expected

  1. New Data From a new Craton : N- and C-Isotopes in Diamonds From the Panda Kimberlite (Canada).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartigny, P.; Harris, J. W.; Javoy, M.

    2002-05-01

    \\delta{13}C \\delta{15}N and N content analyses of 87 known-parageneses diamonds from the Panda mine have been carried out. Seventy-five, 8 and 4 samples belong to the peridotitic, eclogitic and lower-mantle paragenesis respectively. Peridotitic diamonds have a mean \\delta{13}C-value of -5.2 \\permil and range from -6.9 to -3.0 \\permil, with one single extreme value at -14.1 \\permil. Their associated \\delta{15}N values range from -17.0 to +8.5 \\permil for a mean value of -4.0 \\permil. Their N contents range from 0 to 1280 ppm. Eclogitic diamonds have \\delta{13}C-values ranging from -11.2 to -4.4 \\permil with one single extreme value at -19.4 \\permil. Their \\delta{15}N range from -2.1 to +7.9 \\permil and N contents from 0 to 3452 ppm. Lower mantle diamonds are all Type II (nitrogen-free) and contained within a narrow \\delta{13}C-interval of 1 per mil from -4.5 to -3.5 \\permil; these latter values being thus very similar to previous data from other localities. The present dataset shows very strong similarities with results obtained previously. For example, the mode of the \\delta{13}C distribution is strikingly similar to samples suites from yakutian or south-african kimberlites. The study of N-isotopes in peridotitic diamonds which remain limited geographically to the sino-korean and south-african cratons is now extended to a new craton. By showing a similar \\delta{15}N-range and mean value, the present results the {15}N depleted character of the sublithospheric mantle relative to external reservoirs (atmosphere, crust, sediments) of the Earth. Moreover, very evident \\delta{13}C, \\delta{15}N and N-content similarities between eclogitic and peridotitic diamonds further supports the idea that eclogitic and peridotitic diamonds derive from a similar source and that two distinct sources are unlikely. However, one eclogitic diamond displaying a low \\delta{13}C value and high N content cannot be explained by the "fractionation processes" suggested

  2. Lithospheric architecture of the Slave craton, northwest Canada, as determined from an interdisciplinary 3-D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, D. B.; Hillier, M. J.; Kjarsgaard, B. A.; de Kemp, E. A.; Craven, J. A.

    2014-05-01

    geologic structures characteristic of mantle lithosphere within cratons found in continent interiors are interpreted using geo-registered diverse data sets from the Slave craton of northwest Canada. We developed and applied a new method for mapping seismic discontinuities in three dimensions using multiyear observations at sparse, individual broadband receivers. New, fully 3-D conductivity models used all available magnetotelluric data. Discontinuity surfaces and conductivity models were geo-registered with previously published P-wave and surface-wave velocity models to confirm first-order structures such as a midlithosphere discontinuity. Our 3-D model to 400 km depth was calibrated by "drill hole" observations derived from xenolith suites extracted from kimberlites. A number of new structural discontinuities emerge from direct comparison of coregistered data sets and models. Importantly, we distinguish primary mantle layers from secondary features related to younger metasomatism. Subhorizontal Slave craton layers with tapered, wedge-shaped margins indicate construction of the craton core at 2.7 Ga by underthrusting and flat stacking of lithosphere. Mapping of conductivity and metasomatism in 3-D, the latter inferred via mineral recrystallization and resetting of isotopic ages in xenoliths, indicates overprinting of the primary layered structures. The observed distribution of relatively conductive mantle at 100-200 km depths is consistent with pervasive metasomatism; vertical "chimneys" reaching to crustal depths in locations where kimberlites erupted or where Au mineralization is known.

  3. Ambient noise tomography of the Cameroon Volcanic Line and Northern Congo craton: new constraints on the structure of the lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidarelli, M.; Aoudia, A.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the lithospheric structure of Cameroon inverting Rayleigh waves obtained from the cross-correlation of ambient seismic noise. We correlate seismic records between 32 broad-band stations and we obtain good quality Rayleigh waves for 310 interstation paths. We measure group velocity dispersion curves from the reconstructed Rayleigh waves in the period range 10-35 s and we invert the group velocities for tomographic images. After the tomography the group velocities are then inverted, together with longer period group velocity measurements from existing literature, to compute a 3-D S-wave velocity model of the Cameroon lithosphere down to 100 km depth. Our results provide an unprecedented mapping of the physical properties of the different crustal units and their correlations with surface geology, as well as with mantle lithospheric variations. The Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL) appears as a segmented feature exhibiting different physical properties along strike. The active Mt Cameroon volcano is underlain by very low velocities, unlike the other segments of the CVL. The along-strike variations in crustal structure suggest that lateral heterogeneities in lithospheric thickness and physical properties have influenced the location and distribution of magmatism. The crust beneath the Central African Shear Zone exhibits a sizeable low velocity anomaly. The lithosphere beneath Cameroon is characterised by a heterogeneous crust with a relatively constant thickness and a low velocity uppermost mantle at the edge of the Congo Craton. Our results favour processes combining small-scale upwelling at the edge of a thick lithosphere and reactivation of Precambrian basement structures to explain the distribution of Holocene-Recent magmatism and plateau uplift. Our results also indicate that Mt Cameroon and surroundings areas are the most at risk zones for magmatic activity during this stage of CVL development.

  4. Neoproterozoic-Early Paleozoic rifting of the craton margin in eastern Kentucky: Evidence from subsidence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, P.T. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Walker, D. )

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of subsidence along the craton margin in eastern Kentucky indicates a Neoproterozoic to Early through Middle Cambrian rifting event developing on a subsiding passive margin of the Laurentian craton to the Iapetus Ocean. Subsidence associated with rifting is confined to the Rome Trough; an internally broken half-graben within the Laurentian craton; the trough trends sub-parallel to the Appalachian orogenic belt. In cross section the through as an abrupt faulted margin on the carton side and a tapering, gentle extension toward the orogenic belt. The stratigraphic sequence within the Rome Trough and toward the orogen consists of Neoproterozoic or early Cambrian basal sands overlying Grenville basement, and succeeded by silts, shales and discontinuous carbonates of the Rome Fm. that are overlain by shales and carbonates of the Conesauga Fm. Stratigraphic relationships suggest that an out-of-sequence, inboard rift developed along the Laurentian margin adjacent to a drift-phase continental shelf represented by strata of the Blue Ridge and Valley and Ridge. Analysis of the subsidence history of this region reveals trends which support the notion that the subsidence history of this area cannot be accounted for by typical passive-margin development. The subsidence history of the area within the Rome Trough presents a pattern of high thermal subsidence and produces beta values greater than in areas nearer the craton margin. These data indicate that an inboard locus of anomalous crustal extension occurred in the area of the Rome Trough while the remainder of the cratonal margin underwent drift-phase subsidence, and that the timing and magnitude of this event is related to the development of the Iapetan margin.

  5. Multiscale finite-frequency Rayleigh wave tomography of the Kaapvaal craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevrot, S.; Zhao, L.

    2007-04-01

    We have measured phase delays of fundamental-mode Rayleigh waves for 12 events recorded by the Southern Africa Seismic Experiment at frequencies between 0.005 and 0.035 Hz. A novel multiscale finite-frequency tomographic method based on wavelet decomposition of 3-D sensitivity kernels for the phase of Rayleigh waves is used to map the shear velocities in the upper mantle beneath southern Africa. The kernels are computed by summing coupled normal modes over a very fine grid surrounding the seismic array. To estimate and minimize the biases in the model resulting from structures outside the tomographic grid, a jackknife inversion method is implemented. The contribution of heterogeneities outside the target volume is significant, but produces artefacts in the tomographic model that are easily identified and discarded before interpretation. With structures on length scales as short as 100 km retrieved beneath the array, the deep structure of the Kaapvaal craton is revealed with unprecedented detail. Outside the array, the corresponding resolution is 200 km. High velocity cratonic roots are confined to the Archean craton, and extend to depths of at least 250 km. Confirming earlier surface structural studies, we recognize two distinct units in the Kaapvaal craton. The eastern Witwatersrand block and the western Kimberley block are separated by a major near-vertical translithospheric boundary which coincides with the Colesberg Lineament. Lower than average velocities south and east of the Kaapvaal craton reveal extensive metasomatism and heating of the lithosphere, probably related to the Karoo magmatic event and to the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean.

  6. Craton Development and Stabilization: Insights from SE Canada using P and S Wave Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, A.; Bastow, I. D.; Darbyshire, F. A.; Gilligan, A.; Ellwood, A.; Levin, V. L.; Menke, W. H.

    2015-12-01

    Cratons, the ancient cores of the continents, are the longest-lived parts of Earth's surface that have survived thermal and mechanical erosion during multiple Wilson cycles. They are visible in tomographic images due to their thick (>200km), seismically fast keels or roots. The Laurentian keel beneath North America is intriguing since its root is thought to extend beneath both the Archean Superior craton and the Proterozoic Grenville province thus implying that keel formation may not have been restricted to Archean times. In order to address this issue we present a P and S wave relative arrival-time tomographic study using data from seismograph networks in SE Canada and the NE US, stretching from the southern tip of Hudson Bay within the Superior craton to the coastal Phanerozoic Appalachian terranes. The tomographic images display three broad zones of increasing mantle wavespeed from globally "slow" in the Appalachian terranes, to a "fast" Grenville Province and "extremely fast" Superior craton. We observe a linear low-velocity feature resulting from modification of the Laurentian keel by the passage of the Great Meteor hotspot. This feature is progressively offset southwestward with depth, potentially due to viscous coupling with mantle flow. No major plate-scale underthrusting during the Grenville Orogeny is apparent, which contradicts the inferred results from crustal seismic reflection and refraction studies. Our results therefore may have fundamental implications for the nature of the Grenville orogenic collision and cratonic stabilization of North America. The results also support the developing consensus that keels form in two stages: a chemically depleted core of Archean age followed by a thermally developed, less-depleted lithosphere during Proterozoic times, highlighted by an abrupt wavespeed contrast in the tomographic images.

  7. The Vostok-Adventure tectonic corridor in the East Antarctic Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianfarra, Paola; Salvini, Francesco

    2010-05-01

    The East Antarctic craton (EAC) is a fragment of the Gondwanaland Precambrian shield as confirmed from the sea floor geophysical reconstruction. Despite the progress achieved in the last decades for the understanding of the tectonic evolution of the EAC, our knowledge of the subglacial geology mainly derives from geophysical data because the ice sheet (3500m average thickness) prevents from direct investigations. Since the onset of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) (34 Ma), the tectonic activity represents the major modelling agent of the subglacial landscape, due to the dry ice cap-bedrock contact preventing any erosional or sedimentary episodes. Radio echo-sounding (RES) data evidence the existence of an articulated bedrock physiography characterised by elongated valleys. From W to E there are: the Vostok Subglacial Depression, the Aurora Trench, the Concordia Trench and the Adventure Trench. All these valleys have asymmetric shape with the eastern steeper side and the western gentler slope characterised by rounded shape that resemble the morphology observed in the East African rift valleys with half graben geometry. To explore the tectonic origin of the Aurora, Concordia and Adventure depressions a forward modelling approach was followed (Hybrid Cellular Automata technique), in order to best fit the present day bedrock morphology with the topographic expression of normal faults with a given geometry and displacement. The modelling consisted in simulating the development of the present day morphology by the relative movement between the footwall and the hangingwall of faults with normal component. These faults produce the observed asymmetry in their topographic expression. Tuning of fault geometry and displacement allowed to minimise the misfit between the model and the morphology derived from RES data. The Adventure and Aurora Trenches were replicated by the activity of two W dipping, listric faults, both fading into a detachment surface at the depth of 34 km

  8. How stable is the East Antarctic Craton? Clues from the Aurora, Concordia and Adventure Trenches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianfarra, P.; Salvini, F.

    2009-12-01

    The East Antarctic craton (EAC) is a fragment of the Gondwanaland Precambrian shield as confirmed from the sea floor geophysical reconstruction. Despite the progress achieved in the last decades for the understanding of the tectonic evolution of the EAC, our knowledge of the subglacial geology mainly derives from geophysical data because the ice sheet (3500m average thickness) prevents from direct investigations. Since the onset of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) (34 Ma), the tectonic activity represents the major modelling agent of the subglacial landscape, due to the dry ice cap-bedrock contact preventing any erosional or sedimentary episodes. Radio echo-sounding (RES) data evidence the existence of an articulated bedrock physiography characterised by elongated valleys. From W to E there are: the Vostok Subglacial Depression, the Aurora Trench, the Concordia Trench and the Adventure Trench. All these valleys have asymmetric shape with the eastern steeper side and the western gentler slope characterised by rounded shape that resemble the morphology observed in the East African rift valleys with half graben geometry. To explore the tectonic origin of the Aurora, Concordia and Adventure depressions a forward modelling approach was followed (Hybrid Cellular Automata technique), in order to best fit the present day bedrock morphology with the topographic expression of normal faults with a given geometry and displacement. The modelling consisted in simulating the development of the present day morphology by the relative movement between the footwall and the hangingwall of faults with normal component. These faults produce the observed asymmetry in their topographic expression. Tuning of fault geometry and displacement allowed to minimise the misfit between the model and the morphology derived from RES data. The Adventure and Aurora Trenches were replicated by the activity of two W dipping, listric faults, both fading into a detachment surface at the depth of 34 km

  9. Black African Traditional Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaslavsky, Claudia

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the traditional number systems and the origin of the number names used by several African peoples living south of the Sahara. Also included are limitations in African mathematical development, and possible topics for research. (RP)

  10. Shear velocity and anisotropy distributions beneath southern Africa's cratons: Lithospheric structure, deformation, LAB and other discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Joanne; Lebedev, Sergei

    2013-04-01

    Seismic-velocity structure and anisotropy of cratonic lithosphere offer important clues on the enigmatic formation and stabilization of cratons. Broad-band surface waves are highly sensitive to both the isotropic-average shear speeds from the upper crust down to the asthenosphere (characterising the composition and thermal state of the lithosphere) and to radial and azimuthal shear-wave anisotropy (indicative of ancient and recent deformation and flow). Recently, receiver function studies have yielded exciting but puzzling new evidence, revealing multiple discontinuities at different depths within the lithosphere-asthenosphere depth range beneath cratons. While some of the receiver-function signals probably indicate the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), others must be due to sharp radial changes in the mantle-rock composition or anisotropy. We have recently used teleseismic interferometry to measure thousands of inter-station, Rayleigh- and Love-wave, phase-velocity curves across southern Africa (Adam and Lebedev 2012). Here, we invert the very-broadband dispersion data for the profiles of the shear speed and azimuthal and radial anisotropy beneath different parts of the Kaapvaal Craton and the Limpopo Belt. Systematic model space mapping is used to evaluate parameter trade-offs and to ensure the robustness of the anisotropy profiles. Our results, firstly, reconcile the long-debated previous models based on different interpretations of SKS-splitting measurements in southern Africa (one end-member model placing anisotropy primarily into the lithosphere and attributing it to Archean deformation and the other placing it into the asthenosphere, with recently developed fabric). We show that the depth distribution of anisotropy comprises elements of both models: anisotropy in the asthenosphere shows fast-propagation directions parallel to the plate motion; anisotropy in the Limpopo and northern Kaapvaal lithosphere shows fast directions parallel to the Archean

  11. The African Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oguntoyinbo, Lekan

    2012-01-01

    From student and faculty exchanges to joint research projects, U.S. universities maintain a broad spectrum of collaborative relationships with African universities. It's unclear how many U.S. colleges and universities have partnerships with African universities. The African Studies Association, an organization of scholars, doesn't keep that kind…

  12. The Pan-African evolution of NW Angola and peri-atlantic correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monié, P.; Bosch, D.; Bruguier, O.; Vauchez, A.; N'sungani, P.; Rolland, Y.

    2012-04-01

    At the end of Neoproterozoic times, assembly of the Gondwana supercontinent resulted in the closure of several oceanic domains and accretion of large cratons. Various tectono-metamorphic belts developed at the margins of these cratons during the Panafrican orogeny. During this work, we conducted a study combining petro-structural and geochronological investigations on the West Congolian belt (NW Angola) resulting from the collision between the Congo and Sao Francisco cratons. U-Pb zircon/monazite and Ar-Ar amphibole/biotite ages from high-grade metamorphic rocks, migmatites and metagranites indicate that this area underwent two main deformation events at c. 540 and 490 Ma, which were followed by tectonically assisted exhumation during eastward thrusting of the hinterland domain onto the foreland domain. High grade conditions in the West Congo Belt are 20 to 40 Ma younger than in the Ribeira-Araçuai belt of Brazil, its South-American counterpart, or in the westernmost Kaoko belt of Namibia, its African correlative. In the present state of knowledge, a more appropriate counterpart to the West Congo Belt may be restricted to the Cabo Frio Terrane in the eastern Ribeira belt, which yields a broadly similar evolution.

  13. Diachronous evolution of volcano-sedimentary basins north of the Congo craton: Insights from U Pb ion microprobe dating of zircons from the Poli, Lom and Yaoundé Groups (Cameroon)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toteu, Sadrack Félix; Penaye, Joseph; Deloule, Etienne; Van Schmus, William Randall; Tchameni, Rigobert

    2006-04-01

    Ion microprobe U-Pb dating of zircons from Neoproterozoic volcano-sedimentary sequences in Cameroon north of the Congo craton is presented. For the Poli basin, the depositional age is constrained between 700-665 Ma; detrital sources comprise ca. 920, 830, 780 and 736 Ma magmatic zircons. In the Lom basin, the depositional age is constrained between 613 and 600 Ma, and detrital sources include Archaean to Palaeoproterozoic, late Mesoproterozoic to early Neoproterozoic (1100-950 Ma), and Neoproterozoic (735, 644 and 613 Ma) zircons. The Yaoundé Group is probably younger than 625 Ma, and detrital sources include Palaeoproterozoic and Neoproterozoic zircons. The depositional age of the Mahan metavolcano-sedimentary sequence is post-820 Ma, and detrital sources include late Mesoproterozoic (1070 Ma) and early Neoproterozoic volcanic rocks (824 Ma). The following conclusions can be made from these data. (1) The three basins evolved during the Pan-African event but are significantly different in age and tectonic setting; the Poli is a pre- to syn-collisional basin developed upon, or in the vicinity of young magmatic arcs; the Lom basin is post-collisional and intracontinental and developed on old crust; the tectono-metamorphic evolution of the Yaoundé Group resulted from rapid tectonic burial and subsequent collision between the Congo craton and the Adamawa-Yade block. (2) Late Mesoproterozoic to early Neoproterozoic inheritance reflects the presence of magmatic event(s) of this age in west-central Africa.

  14. First U-Pb detrital zircon ages from Numidian sandstones in Southern Apennines (Italy): Evidences of African provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornelli, Annamaria; Micheletti, Francesca; Langone, Antonio; Perrone, Vincenzo

    2015-05-01

    Two samples of quartz-rich sandstones collected in the Numidian Flysch of Southern Apennines (Italy) have been studied to highlight the provenance of detritus using radiometric dating by LA-ICP-MS of detrital zircons and to compare the obtained ages with those of the Betic and Maghrebian Chains. The provenance of quartzose detritus from European or African Plates is still debated in these Chains, accordingly the ages of the detrital zircons can contribute significantly to discriminate the origin of the quartzose supply. The U-Pb zircon ages (n = 47) vary from 3047 ± 13 Ma (Mesoarchean) to 516 ± 19 Ma (Cambrian). The predominance of Paleo-Proteozoic ages (2500-1600 Ma) and the lack of Hercynian and Alpine ones suggest a provenance of the Numidian supply from North-African cratonic areas during the early-middle Langhian, when the Numidian successions of Southern Apennines were deposited. In addition, a cluster of ages at 773 ± 24 Ma and 668 ± 12 Ma in one sample and at 664 ± 17 Ma in the other sample, calculated on zircon domains with magmatic zoning, testify to an important contribution from Neo-proterozoic "granitic" rocks widely outcropping in the North-African Craton. The age data on detrital zircons from Numidian sandstones in Southern Apennines overlap those found in the Numidian sandstones widespread in the Betic Cordillera and in the Maghrebian Chain from south Spain to Sicily. This suggests that the entire depositional zone in which Numidian Flysch deposited, was fed from a southerly source represented by the African Craton where Archean, Proterozoic and Cambrian rocks widely crop out from the Atlantic coast to the Hoggar and Tibesti Massifs. Finally, it must be outlined that a Meso-Archean zircon age (3047 Ma) has been found in the Numidian Flysch of the Southern Apennines whereas in the Numidian Flysch of the Maghrebian Chain, zircons older than Paleo-proterozoic (1840 Ma) have not yet been found.

  15. Density heterogeneity of lithospheric mantle beneath the Siberian craton: testing geophysical models by petrological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepanova, Yulia; Artemieva, Irina

    2015-04-01

    Using free-board modeling, we examine a vertically-averaged mantle density beneath the Archean-Proterozoic Siberian Craton in the layer from the Moho down to base of the chemical boundary layer (CBL). Two models are tested: in Model 1 the base of the CBL coincides with the LAB, whereas in Model 2 the base of the CBL is at a 180 km depth. The uncertainty of density model is < 0.02 t/m3 or < 0.6% with respect to primitive mantle. The results, calculated at in situ and at room temperature (SPT) conditions, indicate a heterogeneous density structure of the Siberian lithospheric mantle with a strong correlation between mantle density variations and the tectonic setting. Three types of cratonic mantle are recognized from mantle density anomalies. 'Pristine' cratonic regions not sampled by kimberlites have the strongest depletion with density deficit of 1.8-3.0% (and SPT density of 3.29-3.33 t/m3 as compared to 3.39 t/m3 of primitive mantle). Cratonic mantle affected by magmatism (including the kimberlite provinces) has a typical density deficit of 1.0-1.5%, indicative of a metasomatic melt-enrichment. Intracratonic sedimentary basins have a high density mantle (3.38-3.40 t/m3 at SPT) which suggests, at least partial, eclogitization. Moderate density anomalies beneath the Tunguska Basin imply that the source of the Siberian LIP lies outside of the Craton. In situ mantle density is used to test the isopycnic condition of the Siberian Craton. Both CBL thickness models indicate significant lateral variations in the isopycnic state, correlated with mantle depletion and best achieved for the Anabar Shield region and other intracratonic domains with a strongly depleted mantle. A comparison of synthetic Mg# for the bulk lithospheric mantle calculated from density with Mg# from petrological studies of peridotite xenoliths from the Siberian kimberlites suggests that melt migration may produce local patches of metasomatic material in the overall depleted mantle.

  16. Tale of three cratons: Tectonostratigraphic anatomy of the Damara orogen in northwestern Namibia and the assembly of Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prave, Anthony R.

    1996-12-01

    The Neoproterozoic Damara orogen in Namibia records the Gondwanan assembly of the Congo Kalahari Rio de la Plata cratons. Sedimentological and stratigraphic analyses of the Otavi (mostly carbonate) and Mulden (siliciclastic molasse) Groups exposed along the southwestern margin of the Congo craton indicate that foreland-basin orogenesis began during middle Otavi (ca. 600 750 Ma); this time frame is earlier than that for the Nama foreland (ca. 550 Ma) on the Kalahari craton. Evidence for this interpretation includes (1) an intra-Otavi angular unconformity; (2) concomitant development of increasing accommodation space, basin segmentation, and backstepping depositional systems composed mostly of deep-basin and slope hemipelagic and sediment gravity-flow deposits; and (3) a near reversal in paleocurrents (initially northward off the Congo craton, then switching to southeastward from a west-northwestern orogen). Thus, Congo Rio de la Plata suturing predated Congo-Kalahari suturing during the assembly of Gondwana.

  17. Ambient noise tomography of the East African Rift in Mozambique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingues, Ana; Silveira, Graça; Ferreira, Ana M. G.; Chang, Sung-Joon; Custódio, Susana; Fonseca, João F. B. D.

    2016-03-01

    Seismic ambient noise tomography is applied to central and southern Mozambique, located in the tip of the East African Rift (EAR). The deployment of MOZART seismic network, with a total of 30 broad-band stations continuously recording for 26 months, allowed us to carry out the first tomographic study of the crust under this region, which until now remained largely unexplored at this scale. From cross-correlations extracted from coherent noise we obtained Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion curves for the period range 5-40 s. These dispersion relations were inverted to produce group velocity maps, and 1-D shear wave velocity profiles at selected points. High group velocities are observed at all periods on the eastern edge of the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe cratons, in agreement with the findings of previous studies. Further east, a pronounced slow anomaly is observed in central and southern Mozambique, where the rifting between southern Africa and Antarctica created a passive margin in the Mesozoic, and further rifting is currently happening as a result of the southward propagation of the EAR. In this study, we also addressed the question concerning the nature of the crust (continental versus oceanic) in the Mozambique Coastal Plains (MCP), still in debate. Our data do not support previous suggestions that the MCP are floored by oceanic crust since a shallow Moho could not be detected, and we discuss an alternative explanation for its ocean-like magnetic signature. Our velocity maps suggest that the crystalline basement of the Zimbabwe craton may extend further east well into Mozambique underneath the sediment cover, contrary to what is usually assumed, while further south the Kaapval craton passes into slow rifted crust at the Lebombo monocline as expected. The sharp passage from fast crust to slow crust on the northern part of the study area coincides with the seismically active NNE-SSW Urema rift, while further south the Mazenga graben adopts an N-S direction

  18. Structural and geochronological constraints on the Pan-African tectonic evolution of the northern Damara Belt, Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Jérémie; Saalmann, Kerstin; Naydenov, Kalin V.; Milani, Lorenzo; Belyanin, George A.; Zwingmann, Horst; Charlesworth, Guy; Kinnaird, Judith A.

    2016-01-01

    The Pan-African Orogen formed by convergence of numerous continental blocks during the Neoproterozoic to early Cambrian. This convergence eventually led to amalgamation of Gondwana, a supercontinent crosscut by a network of highly oblique linear orogenic belts that locally intersect each other, as in NW Namibia, where the NNW trending Kaoko Belt joins the NE trending Damara Belt. The northern Damara Belt has preserved well three regional Pan-African tectonic events due to the dominance of weak Neoproterozoic marine sediments (Damara Supergroup) that have been affected by low-grade metamorphism. A newly discovered early N-S horizontal contraction, dated by 40Ar/39Ar at ~590 Ma, is tentatively linked to convergence between the Congo and Kalahari cratons. This was superseded by collision between the Congo and Rio de la Plata cratons between 580 and 530 Ma that thickened and exhumed the orogenic crust of the Kaoko Belt and produce upper crustal N-S oriented folds of earlier fold trains and associated axial planar schistosities in the northern Damara Belt. A switch from E-W to NW-SE horizontal shortening occurred at ~530 Ma as a result of collision with the Kalahari Craton, triggering extensive syn-orogenic magmatism in the entire Damara Belt. During this last event, southward indentation and underthrusting of the Congo Craton promontory below the Neoproterozoic cover sequences produced a deformation front in the northern Damara Belt. Our results show that highly oblique convergent processes competed over a period of ~120 Ma to build Gondwana in Namibia during the late Neoproterozoic to early Cambrian.

  19. Thermal erosion of cratonic lithosphere as a potential trigger for mass-extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilet, Sebastien; Guex, Jean; Muntener, Othmar; Bartolini, Annachiara; Spangenberg, Jorge; Schoene, Blair; Schaltegger, Urs

    2016-04-01

    The temporal coincidence between large igneous provinces (LIPs) and mass extinctions has led many to pose a causal relationship between the two. However, there is still no consensus on a mechanistic model that explains how magmatism leads to the turnover of terrestrial and marine plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. Here, we present a synthesis of stratigraphic constraints on the Triassic-Jurassic (T-J) and Pliensbachian-Toarcian (Pl-To) boundaries combined with geochronological data in order to establish the sequence of events that initiate two of the major mass extinctions recorded in Earth's history. This synthesis demonstrates that these biotic crises are both associated with rapid change from an initial cool period to greenhouse conditions. The initial regressive events recorded at T-J and Pl-To boundaries seem difficult to reconcile either with large initial CO2 degassing associated with plume activity or by volatile-release (CO2, CH4, Cl2) from deep sedimentary reservoirs during contact metamorphism associated to dykes and sills intrusion because massive CO2 degassing is expected to produce super greenhouse conditions. We evaluate, here, an alternative suggesting that the initial cooling could be due to gas release during the initial thermal erosion of the cratonic lithosphere due to emplacement of the CAMP and Karoo-Ferrar volcanic provinces. Petrological constraints on primary magmas indicate that the mantle is hotter and melts more extensively to produce LIP lavas than for current oceanic islands basalts. However, available data suggest that the Karoo and CAMP areas were underlain by thick lithosphere (>200 km) prior to continental break up. The presence of thick lithosphere excludes significant melting of the asthenospheric mantle without initial stage of thermal erosion of the cratonic lithosphere. This initial step of thermal erosion / thermal heating of the cratonic lithosphere is critical to understand the volatile budget associated with LIPs while

  20. Formation of cratonic mantle keels by arc accretion: Evidence from S receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Meghan S.; Eaton, David W.

    2010-09-01

    Delineating mantle interfaces can provide important clues for understanding the formation of continents. We use S-wave receiver functions to investigate lithospheric structure along a transect extending from Vancouver Island to Baffin Island. Observed Sp converted waves allow for interpretation of boundaries in the depth range expected for tectonic plates. Receiver functions show a distinct negative amplitude feature, interpreted as the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, at shallow depths beneath British Columbia (˜85km), deepening abruptly at the eastern edge of the Cordillera to ˜260km beneath the Canadian Shield. Dipping mid-lithospheric discontinuities extend beneath several giant ca. 1.8 Ga epicontinental magmatic arcs, consistent with formation of cratonic lithosphere by arc accretion. This model provides a plausible explanation for global mid-lithospheric discontinuities within cratons and aids in understanding their formation.

  1. Early Archean sialic crust of the Siberian craton: Its composition and origin of magmatic protoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vovna, G. M.; Mishkin, M. A.; Sakhno, V. G.; Zarubina, N. V.

    2009-12-01

    This study demonstrates that the base of the Archean deep-seated granulite complexes within the Siberian craton consists of a metabasite-enderbite association. The major and trace element distribution patterns revealed that the protoliths of this association are represented by calc-alkaline andesites and dacites, containing several minor sequences of komatiitic-tholeiitic volcanic rocks. The origin of the primary volcanic rocks of the metabasite-enderbite association is inferred on the basis of a model of mantle plume magmatism, which postulates that both andesitic and dacitic melts were derived from the primary basitic crust at the expense of heat generated by ascending mantle plumes. The formation of the protoliths of the Archen metabasite-enderbite association of the Siberian craton began at 3.4 Ga and continued until the late Archean.

  2. First find of biogenic activity in the Palaeoproterozoic of the Singhbhum craton (E India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loon, A. J. van; Mazumder, R.

    2013-09-01

    The Palaeoproterozoic succession of the Singhbhum craton in E. India was hitherto considered as almost entirely siliciclastic and partly volcanogenic. Here we describe, from the fine-grained, tidally influenced shale facies of the Palaeoproterozoic Chaibasa Formation (2.1-1.6 Ga), a fine, originally more or less horizontal, wavy to strongly undulating (later locally deformed) lamination. Investigation of these laminae shows that they must be ascribed to the accumulation of fine particles on microbial mats that covered a sandy substrate. The structures must therefore be considered as stromatolites, features that are accepted as proof of the presence of micro-organisms, in this case most probably cyanobacteria. The interpretation of biogenic activity is supported by microscopic analysis. It is the first description of traces left by biogenic activity that took place in the Palaeoproterozoic of the Singhbhum craton.

  3. Mantle density beneath the Siberian craton based on free board constrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepanova, Yulia; Artemieva, Irina

    2014-05-01

    We present the mantle density model of the Archean-Proterozoic Siberian Craton (SC). The density model is constrained by free-board (buoyancy) modeling (Lachenbruch and Morgan, 1990). The approach assumes isostatic compensation of the region, and is justified by the near-zero free-air gravity for most of the region, except for the flanking orogenic belts with high topography. Despite a relatively uniform topography of the SC (ca. 400 m for most of the region and reaching 700 m in the shields), the craton has a strongly heterogeneous crustal structure with large regional variations in Moho and average crustal Vp (Cherepanova et al., 2013) which reflects its complex tectonic evolution. Formed by amalgamation of several Archean terranes, the craton has been significantly affected by Proterozoic collisional and extensional events, the late- Proterozoic rifting at its margins, the Devonian rifting of the Vilyui rift, several pulses of kimberlite magmatism, and the Permo-Triassic trap basalt magmatism. The strong lateral and vertical heterogeneity of the lithospheric mantle has been documented so far in the studied of the mantle xenoliths from kimberlite pipes and in a limited number of geophysical studies. Here we extend geophysical analysis of mantle compositional heterogeneity by evaluating mantle density structure and interpreting its regional variations in terms of mantle mg#. We link regional large-amplitude variations in mantle depletion to the tectonic evolution of the craton and compare these results with geophysical models and petrologic data. We speculate on the origin of compositional heterogeneity of the lithospheric mantle, which is in overall agreement with results of a joint analysis of seismic and thermal data (Artemieva, 2009) and mantle xenolith studies which provide information on metasomatic enrichment of the depleted lithospheric mantle by the tectonic events. The results indicate the heterogeneous structure of mantle density, with the average

  4. Early proterozoic evolution of the saskatchewan craton and its allochthonous coyer, trans-hudson Orogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chiarenzelli, J.; Aspler, L.; Villeneuve, M.; Lewry, J.

    1998-01-01

    The composition, chronology, and structural relations of the Saskatchewan Craton and enveloping mylonitic rocks exposed in basement windows of the Glennie Domain, Trans-Hudson Orogen, have been determined by geochemical, geochronologic, and structural studies accompanying detailed field mapping. Basement windows lie along the hinge zone of a regional crustal culmination and consist mostly of 2.4-2.5 Ga felsic plutonic rocks enveloped by the Nistowiak Thrust. The Nistowiak Thrust is a folded, 1-2 km thick, upper amphibolite facie??s mylonite zone formed during emplacement of the Flin Flon-Glennie Complex across the Saskatchewan Craton. It is likely correlative to the Pelican Thrust, which envelops basement windows in the Hanson Lake Block -100 km to the east. An internal high strain zone within the overlying nappe pile, the Guncoat Thrust, is composed primarily of mylonitized porphyroclastic pelitic and psammitic migmatites. U-Pb geochronological results suggest calc-alkaline plutonism from 1889-1837 Ma, thrust stacking, peak metamorphism and associated anatexis between 1837 and 1809 Ma, isotopic closure of titanite at 1790-1772 Ma, and intrusion of late granitic rocks at 1770-1762 Ma. This is in agreement with ages from the Hanson Lake Block, and La Ronge, Kisseynew, and Flin-Flon domains in Saskatchewan and Manitoba, and from the Ungava-Baffin portion of Trans-Hudson Orogen, suggesting broadly synchronous thermotectonic processes along a strike length of 2000 km. We speculate that the Saskatchewan Craton, rather than representing an exotic continental fragment, rifted from the Superior and/or Hearne Provinces at ca. 2.1 Ga and that the Trans-Hudson Orogen is an internal orogen. In this scenario the Maniwekan Ocean, developed between the Rae-Hearne and Superior cratons, opened and closed about similar pole(s) of plate motion. ?? 1998 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  5. Magnetotelluric investigations of the lithosphere beneath the central Rae craton, mainland Nunavut, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spratt, Jessica E.; Skulski, Thomas; Craven, James A.; Jones, Alan G.; Snyder, David B.; Kiyan, Duygu

    2014-03-01

    New magnetotelluric soundings at 64 locations throughout the central Rae craton on mainland Nunavut constrain 2-D resistivity models of the crust and lithospheric mantle beneath three regional transects. Responses determined from colocated broadband and long-period magnetotelluric recording instruments enabled resistivity imaging to depths of > 300 km. Strike analysis and distortion decomposition on all data reveal a regional trend of 45-53°, but locally the geoelectric strike angle varies laterally and with depth. The 2-D models reveal a resistive upper crust to depths of 15-35 km that is underlain by a conductive layer that appears to be discontinuous at or near major mapped geological boundaries. Surface projections of the conductive layer coincide with areas of high grade, Archean metasedimentary rocks. Tectonic burial of these rocks and thickening of the crust occurred during the Paleoproterozoic Arrowsmith (2.3 Ga) and Trans-Hudson orogenies (1.85 Ga). Overall, the uppermost mantle of the Rae craton shows resistivity values that range from ~3000 Ω m in the northeast (beneath Baffin Island and the Melville Peninsula) to ~10,000 Ω m beneath the central Rae craton, to >50,000 Ω m in the south near the Hearne Domain. Near-vertical zones of reduced resistivity are identified within the uppermost mantle lithosphere that may be related to areas affected by mantle melt or metasomatism associated with emplacement of Hudsonian granites. A regional decrease in resistivities to values of ~500 Ω m at depths of 180-220 km, increasing to 300 km near the southern margin of the Rae craton, is interpreted as the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary.

  6. Pre- and Post-Cratonization History of the Northern Wyoming Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogk, D.; Mueller, P.; Wooden, J.; Foster, D.

    2004-05-01

    Cratonization of the northern Wyoming Province (NWP) occurred ~2.8-2.9 Ga with the cessation of convergent margin magmatism and the development of passive margin sedimentary sequences. Cratonization was preceded by an extended period of crustal growth via episodic, convergent margin magmatism; major events are dated at 2.8-2.9 and 3.2-3.5 Ga. Earlier events are recorded by numerous detrital zircon and Nd model ages, which indicate felsic magmatism was ongoing by at least 4.0 Ga. TTG magmatism at 2.8-2.9 was the culminating event and is clearly imprinted in the isotopic systems of mantle xenoliths. Cratonization was followed by tectonic and magmatic quiescence from ~2.8-1.9 Ga. Subsequent tectonism is marked by a 2-stage Paleoproterozoic incorporation of the NWP into Laurentia. Stage 1 (~1.8-1.9 Ga) involved the juxtaposition of the NWP with the Archean Superior and Hearne cratons and the production of minor calc-alkaline magmatism (e.g., Little Belt Mountains of the Great Falls Tectonic Zone). Stage-2 (~1.7-1.8 Ga) involved the accretion of Paleoproterozoic terranes (2.4-1.8 Ga) to the amalgamated Wyoming-Laurentian continent, resulting in granulite facies metamorphism, but little magmatism, in the NWP (e.g., Tobacco Root Mountains). Paleoproterozoic tectonism in the NWP is distinctive because of: 1) a paucity of contemporaneous magmatism and 2) a lack of tectonic activity away from the active margins. These observations suggest that the NWP developed a long-lived and structurally robust tectosphere contemporaneously with the stabilization of a felsic crust 2.8-2.9 Ga. This tectosphere appears to have had a substantial impact on the subsequent geologic evolution of the northern Rocky Mountain crust, including the development of the Belt basin, the Yellowstone- Snake River Plain system, and a range of Laramide and Sevier-style structures.

  7. Olivine water contents in the continental lithosphere and the longevity of cratons.

    PubMed

    Peslier, Anne H; Woodland, Alan B; Bell, David R; Lazarov, Marina

    2010-09-01

    Cratons, the ancient cores of continents, contain the oldest crust and mantle on the Earth (>2 Gyr old). They extend laterally for hundreds of kilometres, and are underlain to depths of 180-250 km by mantle roots that are chemically and physically distinct from the surrounding mantle. Forming the thickest lithosphere on our planet, they act as rigid keels isolated from the flowing asthenosphere; however, it has remained an open question how these large portions of the mantle can stay isolated for so long from mantle convection. Key physical properties thought to contribute to this longevity include chemical buoyancy due to high degrees of melt-depletion and the stiffness imparted by the low temperatures of a conductive thermal gradient. Geodynamic calculations, however, suggest that these characteristics are not sufficient to prevent the lithospheric mantle from being entrained during mantle convection over billions of years. Differences in water content are a potential source of additional viscosity contrast between cratonic roots and ambient mantle owing to the well-established hydrolytic weakening effect in olivine, the most abundant mineral of the upper mantle. However, the water contents of cratonic mantle roots have to date been poorly constrained. Here we show that olivine in peridotite xenoliths from the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary region of the Kaapvaal craton mantle root are water-poor and provide sufficient viscosity contrast with underlying asthenosphere to satisfy the stability criteria required by geodynamic calculations. Our results provide a solution to a puzzling mystery of plate tectonics, namely why the oldest continents, in contrast to short-lived oceanic plates, have resisted recycling into the interior of our tectonically dynamic planet. PMID:20811455

  8. Crustal and Lithospheric Structure across the Boundary of the East European Craton from Receiver Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapmeyer-Endrun, B.; Krueger, F.

    2014-12-01

    The Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ), which extends from the North Sea to the Black Sea, marks a fundamental lithospheric boundary in Europe. It separates the East European Craton to the north-east, which has been stable for at least 1.45 Ga, from the younger lithosphere of Phanerozoic Europe to the south-west. In this study we use a large dataset of more than 40,000 teleseismic P- and S-receiver functions from almost 500 seismological stations to image crustal and lithospheric structure across central and eastern Europe between the Benelux and the Baltic countries. An important data source is the PASSEQ project, which deployed close to 200 temporary stations between Germany and Lithuania for two years with the aim to obtain detailed, 3D information on the upper mantle structure across the TESZ. Combining P and S observations, we find a stepwise transition in crustal thickness, spread over 200 km laterally, from on average of 30 km in Phanerozoic Europe to more than 45 km beneath the East European Craton. Individual Paleoproterozoic terranes in Lithuania can also be distinguished based on crustal thickness. Crustal layering is not resolved with the receiver functions, but a high Poisson's ratio of 0.27 is obtained for the craton, compared to 0.25 for Phanerozoic Europe, which is consistent with a thick mafic lower crust. Moho depth results show an excellent correlation with the interpretation of a seismic line in the area, lending confidence to the interpretation of deeper structures. The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), as mapped by S-receiver functions, is located at an average depth of 90 km beneath Phanerozoic Europe. Towards the east, the LAB is dipping to about 125 km depth beneath the Elbe Line. Below the craton, a mid-lithospheric discontinuity is found at about 80 km depth, whereas weak indications of the LAB are found at an average depth of 260 km.

  9. How Did the North China Craton Move from Nuna to Rodinia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.

    2015-12-01

    Several models that include the paleogeographic positions of the North China Craton (NCC) in Precambrian supercontinents Nuna and Rodinia were tested in this study using Proterozoic global paleomagnetic database. During ca. 1.8 - 1.4 Ga, the NCC can be placed far from Laurentia and Baltica. In Nuna, the present southern margin of the NCC faced an open ocean, whilst its present northern margin was likely connected to Indian and Australian cratons. In Rodinia, however, during ca. 1.1 - 0.85 Ga, the paleomagnetic data indicate a proximate connection between the NCC and the arctic side of Laurentia. These two models, if both are right, suggest that the NCC may have moved a long distance since the departure from Nuna to the joining of Rodinia. Moreover, paleomagnetic data and our reconstructions require many cratons to drift away from their connections in Nuna after ca. 1.35 Ga. These reconstructions strongly challenges the currently influential speculation of limited breakup of Nuna, which is mainly based on the observation of low abundance of passive margins that were formed during the boring billion years (ca. 1.75 - 0.75 Ga).

  10. P wave radial anisotropy tomography of the upper mantle beneath the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Wu, Huohua; Zhao, Dapeng

    2014-06-01

    present the first P wave radial anisotropy tomography of the crust and upper mantle beneath the North China Craton (NCC), determined using a large number of high-quality arrival-time data of local earthquakes and teleseismic events. Our results show a prominent high-velocity (high-V) anomaly down to ˜250 km depth beneath the Ordos block, a high-V anomaly in the mantle transition zone beneath the eastern NCC, and a low-velocity (low-V) anomaly down to ˜300 km depth beneath the Trans-North China Orogen (TNCO). The Ordos block exhibits significant negative radial anisotropy (i.e., vertical Vp > horizontal Vp), suggesting that its cratonic lithosphere has kept the frozen-in anisotropy formed by vertical growth via high-degree melting mantle plume in the early Earth. Prominent low-V anomalies with positive radial anisotropy (i.e., horizontal Vp > vertical Vp) exist beneath the Qilian and Qaidam blocks down to ˜400 km depth, suggesting that the horizontal material flow resulting from the Tibetan Plateau is blocked by the Ordos thick lithosphere. Beneath the eastern NCC, high-V anomalies with negative radial anisotropy exist in the upper mantle, possibly reflecting sinking remains of the Archean cratonic lithosphere. A high-V anomaly with positive radial anisotropy is revealed in the mantle transition zone under the eastern NCC, which reflects the stagnant Pacific slab.

  11. Thermal erosion of cratonic lithosphere as a potential trigger for mass-extinction

    PubMed Central

    Guex, Jean; Pilet, Sebastien; Müntener, Othmar; Bartolini, Annachiara; Spangenberg, Jorge; Schoene, Blair; Sell, Bryan; Schaltegger, Urs

    2016-01-01

    The temporal coincidence between large igneous provinces (LIPs) and mass extinctions has led many to pose a causal relationship between the two. However, there is still no consensus on a mechanistic model that explains how magmatism leads to the turnover of terrestrial and marine plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. Here we present a synthesis of ammonite biostratigraphy, isotopic data and high precision U-Pb zircon dates from the Triassic-Jurassic (T-J) and Pliensbachian-Toarcian (Pl-To) boundaries demonstrating that these biotic crises are both associated with rapid change from an initial cool period to greenhouse conditions. We explain these transitions as a result of changing gas species emitted during the progressive thermal erosion of cratonic lithosphere by plume activity or internal heating of the lithosphere. Our petrological model for LIP magmatism argues that initial gas emission was dominated by sulfur liberated from sulfide-bearing cratonic lithosphere before CO2 became the dominant gas. This model offers an explanation of why LIPs erupted through oceanic lithosphere are not associated with climatic and biotic crises comparable to LIPs emitted through cratonic lithosphere. PMID:27009463

  12. Thermal erosion of cratonic lithosphere as a potential trigger for mass-extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guex, Jean; Pilet, Sebastien; Müntener, Othmar; Bartolini, Annachiara; Spangenberg, Jorge; Schoene, Blair; Sell, Bryan; Schaltegger, Urs

    2016-03-01

    The temporal coincidence between large igneous provinces (LIPs) and mass extinctions has led many to pose a causal relationship between the two. However, there is still no consensus on a mechanistic model that explains how magmatism leads to the turnover of terrestrial and marine plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. Here we present a synthesis of ammonite biostratigraphy, isotopic data and high precision U-Pb zircon dates from the Triassic-Jurassic (T-J) and Pliensbachian-Toarcian (Pl-To) boundaries demonstrating that these biotic crises are both associated with rapid change from an initial cool period to greenhouse conditions. We explain these transitions as a result of changing gas species emitted during the progressive thermal erosion of cratonic lithosphere by plume activity or internal heating of the lithosphere. Our petrological model for LIP magmatism argues that initial gas emission was dominated by sulfur liberated from sulfide-bearing cratonic lithosphere before CO2 became the dominant gas. This model offers an explanation of why LIPs erupted through oceanic lithosphere are not associated with climatic and biotic crises comparable to LIPs emitted through cratonic lithosphere.

  13. Geotectonic setting and metallogeny of the northern São Francisco craton, Bahia, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, João Batista Guimarães; da Silva, Maria da Glória; Misi, Aroldo; Cruz, Simone Cerqueira Pereira; da Silva Sá, José Haroldo

    2010-11-01

    This paper aims at establishing a tectonic and temporal framework to characterize the metallogenic processes that contributed to the origin of the mineral provinces in the northern São Francisco Craton. Many Archean mineralizations (eg. massive sulfide zinc, lead, zinc and copper, besides magnesite-talc, iron-titanium-vanadium, iron, chromite and manganese) were generated before the assembly of the Craton. Deposits of chromite, nickel, gold and emerald were produced during the Paleoproterozoic orogenic cycle, when the Craton was amalgamated into the Atlantica paleocontinent. An extension event is recorded in the Neoproterozoic, during the breakup of Rodinia, associated with deposits of phosphorite and uranium. Kimberlite diamond and gold mineralization were generated during the Brasiliano orogenic cycle, coeval with the amalgamation of West Gondwana. A long-lasting and rather uniform crustal stress is recorded in the area during the Cambrian period. Resetting of the isotopic and magnetic systems that affected the Neoproterozoic sediments of the Irecê Basin at about 520 Ma was attributed to the regional-scale fluid migration and mineralization in the aftermath of the Brasiliano orogenic cycle.

  14. Moho offsets beneath the Western Ghat and the contact of Archean crusts of Dharwar Craton, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, Utpal; Rai, S. S.; Meena, Rishikesh; Prasad, B. N. V.; Borah, Kajaljyoti

    2016-03-01

    We present the Moho depth variation along a 600 km long profile from the west to the east coast of South India covering the passive continental margin, and the Western Ghat escarpment created during India-Madagascar separation at ~ 85 Ma; Archean western and eastern Dharwar Craton, and Proterozoic basin. The image is generated through three different approaches: H - vP/vS stacking, common conversion point (CCP) migration and inversion of teleseismic receiver functions at 38 locations. The Moho depth along the profile varies smoothly between 34 and 41 km, except beneath the Western Ghat and at the contact of east and west Dharwar Craton, where it is offset by up to ~ 8 km. The study suggests (i) the possible differential uplift of the Western Ghat, as a consequence of India-Madagascar separation and the prominent role of deep crustal structure in the location of the escarpment, compared to the surface process and (ii) presence of long-lived steeply dipping fault separating the two distinct Archean crustal blocks indicative of mechanically strong continental lithosphere beneath the Dharwar Craton.

  15. Lithospheric Structure of the Northeastern North China Craton Imaged by S Receiver Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingchen; Ding, Zhifeng; Zhu, Lupei

    2016-08-01

    Lithosphere thickness variation is important for understanding the significant tectonic reactivation of the North China Craton (NCC) in the Mesozoic and Cenozoic time. Here, we determined the lithospheric structure in the northeastern NCC using S receiver functions from 305 teleseismic events recorded by 223 seismic stations. The Moho and lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) are imaged clearly beneath the region. The Moho depth decreases from ~45 km beneath the western NCC to ~25 km beneath the eastern NCC. We found that the lithospheric thickness varies from 60 to 80 km beneath the Trans-North China Orogen (TNCO) and eastern NCC with no significant change of the LAB depth. The lithosphere thickness beneath the northwestern Ordos plateau is 100-130 km. In addition, there is a mid-lithosphere discontinuity at a depth of 80 km beneath the plateau that is connected to the base of thinned lithosphere in TNCO and eastern NCC. We suggest that the mid-lithosphere discontinuity represents a mechanically weak zone in the original cratonic lithosphere of the NCC. The material in the lower lithosphere of the craton, when warmed and hydrated by water released from the subducting slab of Western Pacific, became weak due to decrease in viscosity and/or partial melting and was subsequently removed through small-scale mantle convections.

  16. Regional geophysics and the basement of cratonic basins: a comparative study with the Michigan basin

    SciTech Connect

    Hinze, W.J.; Lidiak, E.G.

    1986-08-01

    The basement of the Michigan basin consists of four major provinces - the complex metasedimentary, metavolcanic, and igneous rocks of the Penokean orogenic assemblage in the north, the felsic anorogenic igneous rocks to the south, the highly metamorphosed schists, gneisses, and related igneous intrusions of the Grenville province in the east, and a middle Proterozoic rift zone, which transects the basin from the north to the southeast margin. Sparse basement drill holes and characteristic geophysical patterns support this interpretation. The direct geologic information on the basement of other cratonic basins is not as well known. However, regional geophysical surveys and sparse, poorly distributed basement drill holes provide information on the complex character and structural relationships of the basement of other basins. Like the Michigan basin, many cratonic basins (e.g., Illinois, Williston, and Paris basins) are underlain by dense and commonly more magnetic rocks than adjacent areas. As in the Michigan basin, these rocks are interpreted to have a profound effect on the origin and tectonic development of the basins. Geologic and geophysical evidence indicates that many of these dense basement rocks originated in rifts that formed hundreds of millions of years prior to basin development. A comparison of the basement in cratonic basins provides important constraints on the origin and tectonic development of the Michigan basin.

  17. Thermal erosion of cratonic lithosphere as a potential trigger for mass-extinction.

    PubMed

    Guex, Jean; Pilet, Sebastien; Müntener, Othmar; Bartolini, Annachiara; Spangenberg, Jorge; Schoene, Blair; Sell, Bryan; Schaltegger, Urs

    2016-01-01

    The temporal coincidence between large igneous provinces (LIPs) and mass extinctions has led many to pose a causal relationship between the two. However, there is still no consensus on a mechanistic model that explains how magmatism leads to the turnover of terrestrial and marine plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. Here we present a synthesis of ammonite biostratigraphy, isotopic data and high precision U-Pb zircon dates from the Triassic-Jurassic (T-J) and Pliensbachian-Toarcian (Pl-To) boundaries demonstrating that these biotic crises are both associated with rapid change from an initial cool period to greenhouse conditions. We explain these transitions as a result of changing gas species emitted during the progressive thermal erosion of cratonic lithosphere by plume activity or internal heating of the lithosphere. Our petrological model for LIP magmatism argues that initial gas emission was dominated by sulfur liberated from sulfide-bearing cratonic lithosphere before CO2 became the dominant gas. This model offers an explanation of why LIPs erupted through oceanic lithosphere are not associated with climatic and biotic crises comparable to LIPs emitted through cratonic lithosphere. PMID:27009463

  18. Reactivation and mantle dynamics of North China Craton: insight from P-wave anisotropy tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, You; Zhao, Dapeng

    2013-12-01

    We determined the first 3-D P-wave anisotropic tomography beneath the North China Craton (NCC) using a large number of high-quality arrival-time data from local earthquakes and teleseismic events, which reveals depth-dependent azimuthal anisotropy in the crust and upper mantle down to 600 km depth. In the NCC western block, the fast velocity direction (FVD) varies from east-west in the southern part to northeast-southwest in the northern part, which may reflect either the interaction between the Yangtze block and NCC or fossil lithospheric fabrics in the craton. Under the NCC eastern block, a uniform northwest-southeast FVD is revealed in the lower part of the upper mantle (300-410 km depths) and the mantle transition zone (410-660 km depths), which may reflect horizontal and upwelling flows in the big mantle wedge (BMW) above the stagnant Pacific slab in the mantle transition zone. The NCC central block exhibits a northeast-southwest FVD, consistent with the surface tectonic orientation there, suggesting that the cold and thick (>300 km) cratonic root of the NCC western block may obstruct the northwest-southeast trending mantle flow induced by the Pacific Plate subduction, resulting in a northeast-southwest trending mantle flow under the central block. Our present results indicate that the corner flow in the BMW associated with the deep subduction of the Pacific Plate is the main cause of NCC reactivation and mantle dynamics under East China.

  19. Lithospheric Structure of the Northeastern North China Craton Imaged by S Receiver Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingchen; Ding, Zhifeng; Zhu, Lupei

    2016-04-01

    Lithosphere thickness variation is important for understanding the significant tectonic reactivation of the North China Craton (NCC) in the Mesozoic and Cenozoic time. Here, we determined the lithospheric structure in the northeastern NCC using S receiver functions from 305 teleseismic events recorded by 223 seismic stations. The Moho and lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) are imaged clearly beneath the region. The Moho depth decreases from ~45 km beneath the western NCC to ~25 km beneath the eastern NCC. We found that the lithospheric thickness varies from 60 to 80 km beneath the Trans-North China Orogen (TNCO) and eastern NCC with no significant change of the LAB depth. The lithosphere thickness beneath the northwestern Ordos plateau is 100-130 km. In addition, there is a mid-lithosphere discontinuity at a depth of 80 km beneath the plateau that is connected to the base of thinned lithosphere in TNCO and eastern NCC. We suggest that the mid-lithosphere discontinuity represents a mechanically weak zone in the original cratonic lithosphere of the NCC. The material in the lower lithosphere of the craton, when warmed and hydrated by water released from the subducting slab of Western Pacific, became weak due to decrease in viscosity and/or partial melting and was subsequently removed through small-scale mantle convections.

  20. Visible and infrared properties of unaltered to weathered rocks from Precambrian granite-greenstone terrains of the West African Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metelka, Václav; Baratoux, Lenka; Jessell, Mark W.; Naba, Séta

    2015-12-01

    In situ and laboratory 0.35 μm-2.5 μm spectra of rocks from a Paleoproterozoic granite-greenstone terrain along with its Neoproterozoic sedimentary cover and derived regolith materials were examined in western Burkina Faso. The reflectance spectra show the influence of typical arid to semi-arid weathering with the formation of desert varnish, iron films, and dust coatings. Fe and Mg-OH absorption features related to chlorite, amphibole, pyroxene, epidote, and biotite are observable in the mafic and intermediate meta-volcanic rocks as well as in the granodiorites and tonalites. Al-OH absorption caused by kaolinite, smectite, illite/muscovite are typical for meta-volcano-sedimentary schists, Tarkwaian-type detrital meta-sediments, sandstones of the Taoudeni basin, all of the weathered surfaces and regolith materials. Ferric and ferrous iron absorptions related to both primary rock-forming minerals and secondary weathering minerals (goethite, hematite) were observed in most of the sampled materials. The results show that although weathering alters the spectral signature of the fresh rock, indicative absorption features located in the short wave infrared region remain detectable. In addition, spectra of soils partially reflect the mineral composition of the weathered rock surfaces. The analysis of the hyperspectral data shows the potential of differentiating between the sampled surfaces. The library presents a primary database for the geological and regolith analysis of remote sensing data in West Africa.

  1. Magnetostratigraphic Study of Chengde Basin, Yanshan Area and its Restriction on the Peaking Age of North China Craton Destruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, S.; He, H.; Zhu, R.

    2011-12-01

    The timing of North China Craton destruction has been contineous paid attention to. There have already been plenty of research from Geology, Geophysics and Geochemistry. However, the exact destruction age of North China Craton is still controversial. In this paper, we try to put forward geomagnetic evidence of the peaking destruction age of North China Craton. Yanshan orogen is located at the north edge of North China Craton and affected significantly by its destruction. Chengde Basin is located at the middle section of Yanshan orogen, which makes it an ideal area for studying the basin record of North China Craton destruction. Oriented core samples are collected from Yuanjiazhuang section of Chengde Basin for magnetostratigraphic and rock-magnetic study. Fresh massive volcanic samples are also collected for radiometric dating. The rock-magnetic results show that magnetic minerals of volcanics are complex, including magnetite, maghemite and hematite while sedimentary magnetic minerals are mainly magnetite, possibly including small amount of maghemite and hematite. An age of 128~129Ma is obtained from the radiometric dating result. Magnetostratigraphic result shows three polarity sections: the lower normal section(N2), the reversal section(R1) and the upper normal section(N1). Comparing with the Geologic Time Scale 2004 and combining the radiometric result, it is believed that the N2 section is related to M3n, R1 related to M1r and N1 related to M1n. Therefore, the start age of lacustrine sediment at Yuanjiazhuang section is ~128Ma. According to the magnetostratigraphic study and radiometric dating of Chengde Basin in Yanshan area, the peak destruction age of North China Craton is confirmed to be no later than 128Ma. It is believed that North China Craton destruction is the primary element leading to Mesozoic basin at the Yanshan area changed from Late Triassic-Late Jurassic flexural basin to rift basin. One of the shallow responses accompanying with the peak age of

  2. Melt-Peridotite Reaction Mechanism of North China Craton Destruction: Experimental Constrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Jin, Z.; Gao, S.; Zhang, J.; Zheng, S.

    2009-12-01

    Although the geoscientsts in the world have reached an agreement about the Mesozoic thinning of North China Craton, the dynamics of this process is still under debate, especially the thinning mechanism. There are two popular thinning mechanisms were proposed for the North China Craton, one is the delamination model and the other is thermo-mechanical erosion model. The delamination model has aroused great interests since Gao et al. use it to explain the formation of Xilonggou high Mg# andesite from Liaoxi region of Liaoning Province. These Lavas, which possessed an adakitic signature with high Mg#, were believed to origin by the interaction between silica rich and yttrium delepted melt, which are formed by partile melting of low crust eclogite, and asthenospheric peridotite. The discovery of zoned mantle olivine and pyroxene xenocrysts, especially zoned mantle peridotitic xenoliths in Mesozoic basaltic rocks from eastern North China, indicates that peridotite-melt reaction was widespread in Mesozoic lithospheric mantle beneath the southeastern North China craton. Such interaction could be an important mechanism for the compositional transformation and rapid enrichment of the lithospheric mantle. We conducted a series of experiments at a pressure of 2.0 GPa and temperatures of 1250-1400 °C using Bixiling eclogite and Damaping peridotite as starting materials to study the mechanism of melt-peridotite reaction. Our results show that olivine and orthopyroxene were dissolved in the reacting melts between eclogite and peridotite, resulting in clinopyroxene precipitation along the interface of melts and lherzolite. The experimental run products, possessing a lherzolite-pyroxenite-garnet pyroxenite sequence, are identical to the composite mantle xenoliths in the Neogene Hannuoba basalt of the North China craton. The later is considered as strong evidence of the maffic lower continental crust recycling into the mantle during the Mesozoic Era. The reacting melts have a high

  3. Seismic Tomography of the Arctic: Continental Cratons, Ancient Orogens, Oceanic Lithosphere and Convecting Mantle Beneath (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, S.; Schaeffer, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Lateral variations in seismic velocities in the upper mantle, mapped by seismic tomography, reflect primarily the variations in the temperature of the rock at depth. Seismic tomography thus reveals lateral changes in the temperature and thickness of the lithosphere; it maps deep boundaries between tectonic blocks with different properties and with different age of the lithosphere. Our new global, shear-wave tomographic model of the upper mantle and the crust is constrained by an unprecedentedly large number of broadband waveform fits (nearly one million seismograms, with both surface and S waves included) and provides improved resolution of the lithosphere across the whole of the Arctic region, compared to other available models. The most prominent high-velocity anomalies, seen down to 150-200 km depths, indicate the cold, thick, stable mantle lithosphere beneath Precambrian cratons. The northern boundaries of the Canadian Shield's and Greenland's cratonic lithosphere closely follow the coastlines, with the Greenland and North American cratons clearly separated from each other. In Eurasia, in contrast, cratonic lithosphere extends hundreds of kilometres north of the coast of the continent, beneath the Barents and eastern Kara Seas. The boundaries of the Archean cratons mapped by tomography indicate the likely offshore extensions of major Phanerozoic sutures in northern Eurasia. The old oceanic lithosphere of the Canada Basin is much colder and thicker than the younger lithosphere beneath the adjacent Amundsen Basin, north of the Gakkel Ridge. Beneath the slow-spreading Gakkel Ridge, we detect the expected low-velocity anomaly associated with partial melting in the uppermost mantle; the anomaly is weaker, however, than beneath faster-spreading ridges globally. South of the ridge, the Nansen Basin shows higher seismic velocities in the upper mantle beneath it, compared to the Amundsen Basin. At 150-250 km depth, most of the oceanic portions of the central Arctic (the

  4. Aeromagnetic interpretation in the south-central Zimbabwe Craton: (reappraisal of) crustal structure and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranganai, Rubeni T.; Whaler, Kathryn A.; Ebinger, Cynthia J.

    2015-12-01

    Regional aeromagnetic data from the south-central Zimbabwe Craton have been digitally processed and enhanced for geological and structural mapping and tectonic interpretation integrated with gravity data, to constrain previous interpretations based on tentative geologic maps and provide new information to link these structural features to known tectonic events. The derived maps show excellent correlation between magnetic anomalies and the known geology, and extend lithological and structural mapping to the shallow/near subsurface. In particular, they reveal the presence of discrete crustal domains and several previously unrecognised dykes, faults, and ultramafic intrusions, as well as extensions to others. Five regional structural directions (ENE, NNE, NNW, NW, and WNW) are identified and associated with trends of geological units and cross-cutting structures. The magnetic lineament patterns cut across the >2.7 Ga greenstone belts, which are shown by gravity data to be restricted to the uppermost 10 km of the crust. Therefore, the greenstone belts were an integral part of the lithosphere before much of the upper crustal (brittle) deformation occurred. Significantly, the observed magnetic trends have representatives craton-wide, implying that our interpretation and inferences can be applied to the rest of the craton with confidence. Geological-tectonic correlation suggests that the interpreted regional trends are mainly 2.5 Ga (Great Dyke age) and younger, and relate to tectonic events including the reactivation of the Limpopo Belt at 2.0 Ga and the major regional igneous/dyking events at 1.8-2.0 Ga (Mashonaland), 1.1 Ga (Umkondo), and 180 Ma (Karoo). Thus, their origin is here inferred to be inter- and intra-cratonic collisions and block movements involving the Zimbabwe and Kaapvaal Cratons and the Limpopo Belt, and later lithospheric heating and extension associated with the break-up of Gondwana. The movements produced structures, or reactivated older fractures

  5. The provenance of sub-cratonic mantle beneath the Limpopo Mobile Belt (South Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meer, Quinten H. A.; Klaver, Martijn; Waight, Tod E.; Davies, Gareth R.

    2013-06-01

    Petrological, whole rock major element and mineral chemical analysis of mantle xenoliths from the Venetia kimberlite pipes (533 Ma) in South Africa reveals an apparently stratified cratonic mantle beneath the Central Zone of the Limpopo Mobile Belt (LMB) that separates the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe Cratons. Combined pressure-temperature (P-T) data and petrographic observations indicate that the mantle consists of an upper layer of Low-T coarse-equant garnet + spinel lherzolite (~ 50 to ~ 130 km depth). This layer is underlain by a region of mixed garnet harzburgites and garnet lherzolites that are variably deformed (~ 130 to ~ 235 km depth). An equilibrated geotherm did not exist at the time of kimberlite eruption (533 Ma) and a localised heating event involving the introduction of asthenospheric material to the High-T lithosphere below 130 km is inferred. Low-T garnet-spinel lherzolites are highly melt depleted (40% on average). In contrast, the High-T lithosphere (mostly at diamond stable conditions) consists of a mixed zone of variably sheared and melt depleted (30% on average) garnet harzburgite and mildly melt depleted (20% on average) garnet lherzolite. The chemistry of the High-T xenoliths contrasts with that of minerals included in diamond originating from the same depth. Inclusions suggest diamond crystallisation in a more melt depleted lithosphere than represented by either Low- or High-T xenoliths. High-T xenoliths are proposed to represent formerly melt depleted lithosphere, refertilised by asthenosphere-derived melts during the diapiric rise of a proto-kimberlitic melt pocket. This process is coupled to the positive temperature perturbation observed in the High-T xenoliths and may represent a common process in the lower lithosphere related to localised but intense tectono-magmatic events immediately preceding kimberlite eruption. The presence of clinopyroxene, garnet and abundant orthopyroxene in the Low-T lherzolite implies a history of melt depletion

  6. The building and stabilization of an Archean Craton in the Superior Province, Canada, from a heat flow perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaupart, C.; Mareschal, J.-C.; Bouquerel, H.; Phaneuf, C.

    2014-12-01

    How continental lithosphere responds to tectonic stresses and mantle convective processes is determined in large part by its mechanical strength and temperature distribution, which depend on crustal heat production. In order to establish reliable crustal and thermal models for the Superior Craton, Canadian Shield, new measurements of heat flux and heat production in 28 deep boreholes at 16 sites are combined with a larger set of older data. The Superior Province was assembled by the docking of volcanic/plutonic and metasedimentary terranes and continental fragments to the southern margin of an older core around 2.7 Ga. The average heat flux is much lower in the craton core than in the accreted terranes, 31 versus 43 mW m-2. The major accreted volcanic/plutonic belts share the same heat production characteristics, testifying to the remarkable uniformity of crust-building mechanisms. The marked difference between the crusts of the core and the accreted belts supports the operation of two different crust-forming processes. The crust of the craton core has an enriched upper layer, in contrast to that of the younger belts which lack marked internal differentiation. At the end of amalgamation, the lithosphere of the craton core was colder and mechanically stronger than the lithosphere beneath newly accreted material. Surrounding the craton core with weaker belts may have ensured its stability against tectonic and mantle convection perturbations. This large strength contrast accounts for the lack of lithospheric imbrication at the edge of the craton core as well as for the different characteristics of seismic anisotropy in the lithospheres of the craton core and the younger terranes.

  7. Lithospheric structure of the southern African subcontinent from surface wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raveloson, A.; Nyblade, A.; Mulibo, G.; Mangongolo, A.; Tugume, F.

    2012-12-01

    In this study the lithospheric structure of the southern African subcontinent is examined using a new 3D shear wave velocity model. The lithospheric structure of Africa consists of several Archean cratons and Proterozoic mobile belts. Many intracratonic and rift basin are found within both the Archean and Protozoic terrains. We investigate the 3D shear wave velocity structure of the lithosphere by tomographically modeling Rayleigh wave dispersion curves. Rayleigh waves group velocities from 10 to 125 s period were determined by using multiple-filter and phase-matched techniques. We used seismic events with a magnitude greater than 4.5 and depth shallower than 100 km recorded from 1990 to 2011 on many stations belonging to temporary or permanent networks. We used events and stations within the African plate in an effort to minimize the contributions from outside structure. We constructed the 3D S wave model in two steps. In the first step we measured group velocities of fundamental mode Rayleigh waves. In the second stage we extracted a dispersion curve from the group velocity maps and inverted them to obtain 1D shear wave velocity models. The 1D models are then combined at a regular spatial interval to create a 3D shear wave velocity model. New features revealed in our model include a region of lower wave speeds beneath the cuvette central separating several Archean blocks of the Congo craton and a region of fast lithosphere in northern Mozambique associated with the Ruvuma microplate.

  8. Eclogite xenoliths in west African kimberlites as residues from Archaean granitoid crust formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollinson, Hugh

    1997-09-01

    Eclogites are a comparatively rare but petrologically important member of kimberlite xenolith suites. Their broadly basaltic chemistry has led many authors to propose that they represent ancient, subducted ocean crust. Recent studies, however, have suggested an alternative origin and propose that kimberlitic eclogites are residues from the process of Archaean granitoid crust formation. Geochemical arguments in support of this new model were previously based on the trace-element chemistry of eclogitic minerals. Here I report that the major-element chemistry of eclogite xenoliths also supports a crustal residue model. I examine eclogite xenoliths from kimberlite pipes at Koidu, Sierra Leone, which sample the lithospheric mantle underlying the Archaean (2.8Gyr) granitoid crust of the West African craton. Geochemical plots of major elements measured in unaltered, whole-rock samples of low-silica eclogite demonstrate that they are complementary to the granitoids of the West African craton and have compositions which indicate that both were derived from a common basaltic parent rock.

  9. African and non-African admixture components in African Americans and an African Caribbean population.

    PubMed

    Murray, Tanda; Beaty, Terri H; Mathias, Rasika A; Rafaels, Nicholas; Grant, Audrey Virginia; Faruque, Mezbah U; Watson, Harold R; Ruczinski, Ingo; Dunston, Georgia M; Barnes, Kathleen C

    2010-09-01

    Admixture is a potential source of confounding in genetic association studies, so it becomes important to detect and estimate admixture in a sample of unrelated individuals. Populations of African descent in the US and the Caribbean share similar historical backgrounds but the distributions of African admixture may differ. We selected 416 ancestry informative markers (AIMs) to estimate and compare admixture proportions using STRUCTURE in 906 unrelated African Americans (AAs) and 294 Barbadians (ACs) from a study of asthma. This analysis showed AAs on average were 72.5% African, 19.6% European and 8% Asian, while ACs were 77.4% African, 15.9% European, and 6.7% Asian which were significantly different. A principal components analysis based on these AIMs yielded one primary eigenvector that explained 54.04% of the variation and captured a gradient from West African to European admixture. This principal component was highly correlated with African vs. European ancestry as estimated by STRUCTURE (r(2)=0.992, r(2)=0.912, respectively). To investigate other African contributions to African American and Barbadian admixture, we performed PCA on approximately 14,000 (14k) genome-wide SNPs in AAs, ACs, Yorubans, Luhya and Maasai African groups, and estimated genetic distances (F(ST)). We found AAs and ACs were closest genetically (F(ST)=0.008), and both were closer to the Yorubans than the other East African populations. In our sample of individuals of African descent, approximately 400 well-defined AIMs were just as good for detecting substructure as approximately 14,000 random SNPs drawn from a genome-wide panel of markers. PMID:20717976

  10. The African superswell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyblade, Andrew A.; Robinson, Scott W.

    1994-01-01

    Maps of residual bathymetry in the ocean basins around the African continent reveal a broad bathymetric swell in the southeastern Atlantic Ocean with an amplitude of about 500 m. We propose that this region of anomalously shallow bathymetry, together with the contiguous eastern and southern African plateaus, form a superswell which we refer to as the African superswell. The origin of the African superswell is uncertain. However, rifting and volcanism in eastern Africa, as well as heat flow measurements in southern Africa and the southeastern Atlantic Ocean, suggest that the superswell may be attributed, at least in part, to heating of the lithosphere.

  11. Laurentia and Salvador-Congo: Keystone cratons in Late Proterozoic break-up of Rodinia and assembly of Gondwana supercontinents

    SciTech Connect

    Unrug, R. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The break-up of Rodinia, the supercontinent assembled in the Middle Proterozoic chelogenic cycle (1.65--1.0 Ga), and the simultaneous assembly of the Gondwana Supercontinent were the major tectonic events of the Neoproterozoic. Laurentia occupied a central keystone position in the configuration of Rodinia. Its break-up resulted in rearrangement of Rodinia fragments: some were incorporated in the accreting Gondwana, while Laurentia, Baltica and Siberia drifted independently. Reconstructions of the position of Laurentia in the Rodinia Supercontinent are based on two criteria. The first is the continuity of Middle Proterozoic mobile belts suturing the older cratons and the match of piercing points of the mobile belts at the post- Middle Proterozoic margins of the older cratons. The second is the similarity of sedimentary sequences along Late Proterozoic passive margins formed during break-up of Rodinia. The first criterion allows for several interpretations. The second may be invalid, as conjugate margins developing over an oblique detachment will accumulate dissimilar sedimentary sequences. In reconstructions of the Gondwana Supercontinent the recently redefined Salvador-Congo craton occupied the central keystone position, between the East Gondwana continent and a number of smaller cratons of West Gondwana. It is entirely surrounded by collisional mobile belts, all containing important transcurrent shear zone systems. The margins of the Salvador-Congo craton were facing three major Late Proterozoic oceans.

  12. Late Mesozoic and Cenozoic thermotectonic evolution along a transect from the north China craton through the Qinling orogen into the Yangtze craton, central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shengbiao; Raza, Asaf; Min, Kyoungwon; Kohn, Barry P.; Reiners, Peter W.; Ketcham, Richard A.; Wang, Jiyang; Gleadow, Andrew J. W.

    2006-12-01

    Cretaceous and Cenozoic reactivation of the Triassic Qinling-Dabie orogen between the north China and Yangtze cratons resulted from the combined effects of Pacific subduction-back-arc extension in east China and collisions in west China. We report new apatite fission track and apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He data from east Qinling along a >400-km-long N-S transect from Huashan through the Qinling orogen to Huangling. The ages show a general pattern of younging northward. Three major cooling phases are defined by modeling the multiple thermochronologic data sets. The first phase occurred locally in the North and South Qinling during the late Triassic to early Jurassic, following heating associated with the Triassic Yangtze subduction and exhumation of the Wudang metamorphic core complex on the cratonal edge. A second phase represents regional exhumation between 100 and 60 Ma, coeval with rifting marked by the Late Cretaceous-Eocene (K2-E) red bed deposition in eastern China and possibly indicating a link with Pacific subduction-back-arc extension in eastern China; however, it may also have been superimposed by eastward tectonic escape resulting from the Lhasa-West Burma-Qiangtang-Indochina collision. The third cooling phase was initiated at ˜45 Ma exclusively in the north Qinling and in the footwall of the graben-bounding normal fault of the Weihe graben in the Lesser Qinling. We suggest the third phase was related to reactivation of the Qinling fault system as a result of eastward tectonic escape imposed by the India-Asia collision at ˜50 Ma.

  13. Superplume Under the Siberian Craton: Evidence from Metasomatic Signatures in Kimberlitic Xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhilenko, N.; Taylor, L. A.; Agashev, A. M.; Pokhilenko, L.; Baziotis, I. P.; Carmody, L.; Smith, G. B.

    2012-12-01

    A superplume is proposed to have existed under the Siberian Craton from the mid-Paleozoic to the late Mesozoic. The most dramatic result of this was the eruption of 17 million km3 of the Siberian trap magma at 250 ±2 Ma. However, the effects of this plume were recorded earlier in Devonian (~360 Ma) kimberlitic peridotites, as minor "basaltic" metasomatic overprinting. Indeed, peridotites from later kimberlites (~145 Ma) show evidence for similar, yet extensive, metasomatism, thereby bracketing the major plume climax with possible effects both prior and after this extensive activity. Indeed, a comparative analysis of petrological, mineralogical, and geochemical results from these early and late, Devonian versus Jurassic, peridotites have shown that the thickness of lithosphere of North-Eastern part of Siberian Platform was around 230 km at Middle Paleozoic time and decreased to 140-150 km by Late Mesozoic time. The Devonian Udachnaya kimberlite (central craton), one of the largest diamondiferous pipes in the world, provides a suite of garnet peridotites (>90%), many of which possess a 'sheared' texture. These peridotites possess evidence for a late-stage cryptic metasomatism, particularly in the garnets, exemplified by a notable increase in CaO, with a near constant Cr2O3 content, as the garnet compositions move from the harzburgitic field into that of lherzolites. Conversely, the xenolith suite from the Mesozoic Obnazhennaya kimberlite (north-east craton) is comprised of more pyroxenite xenoliths, with rare peridotite lithologies. The metasomatic over-print on these xenoliths has produced a more fertile chemistry, with the garnets becoming less Cr-rich, following a lherzolitic trend. These two trends in the garnets suggest that a long-lasting metasomatic ultra-event, the same metasomatic processes (and possibly similar sources), operated during both time periods. Changes from harzburgitic in the older Udachnaya peridotite rims to lherzolitic core-rim compositions

  14. 16 Extraordinary African Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobb, Nancy

    This collection for children tells the stories of 16 African Americans who helped make America what it is today. African Americans can take pride in the heritage of these contributors to society. Biographies are given for the following: (1) Sojourner Truth, preacher and abolitionist; (2) Frederick Douglass, abolitionist; (3) Harriet Tubman, leader…

  15. African Studies Computer Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntz, Patricia S.

    African studies computer resources that are readily available in the United States with linkages to Africa are described, highlighting those most directly corresponding to African content. Africanists can use the following four fundamental computer systems: (1) Internet/Bitnet; (2) Fidonet; (3) Usenet; and (4) dial-up bulletin board services. The…

  16. African Literature as Celebration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achebe, Chinua

    1989-01-01

    Describes the Igbo tradition of "Mbari," a communal creative enterprise that celebrates the world and the life lived in it through art. Contrasts the cooperative, social dimension of pre-colonial African culture with the exclusion and denial of European colonialism, and sees new African literature again celebrating human presence and dignity. (AF)

  17. Educating African American Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Edward E.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Schools across America spend money, invest in programs, and sponsor workshops, offer teacher incentives, raise accountability standards, and even evoke the name of Obama in efforts to raise the academic achievement of African American males. Incarceration and college retention rates point to a dismal plight for many African American…

  18. Africans Away from Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, John Henrik

    Africans who were brought across the Atlantic as slaves never fully adjusted to slavery or accepted its inevitability. Resistance began on board the slave ships, where many jumped overboard or committed suicide. African slaves in South America led the first revolts against tyranny in the New World. The first slave revolt in the Caribbean occurred…

  19. Keeping African Masks Real

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddington, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Art is a good place to learn about our multicultural planet, and African masks are prized throughout the world as powerfully expressive artistic images. Unfortunately, multicultural education, especially for young children, can perpetuate stereotypes. Masks taken out of context lose their meaning and the term "African masks" suggests that there is…

  20. Cambrian-Ordovician craton margin section, southern Great Basin: A sequence stratigraphic perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.D. ); Edwards, J.C. )

    1991-02-01

    The Upper Cambrian through Upper Ordovician cratonal to miogeoclinal transition section in southern Nevada and eastern California accumulated on a gentle homoclinal ramp and includes a variety of peritidal and subtidal carbonate facies. This section consists of a westward-thickening wedge assigned to the Nopah and Mountain Springs formations and can be related to one type 1 and least four type 2 sequences. The basal part of the section is the Dunderberg Shale Member of the Nopah Formation, which is composed of meter-scale cyclical shale-carbonate bundles. Carbonate interbeds signify a variety of peritidal to deep subtidal paleoenvironments that comprise shelf margin and transgressive systems tracts. The progradation of a thrombolitic bank complex in the overlying upper Nopah may reflect emergence on the craton, evidenced by the Sauk II-Sauk III cratonic disconformity. The overlying A' member of the Mountain Springs Formation rests in sharp and, in places, slightly discordant contact with the top of the Nopah. This contact is interpreted as a marine flooding surface and type 2 sequence boundary. Member A consists of Lower Ordovician transgressive and highstand systems tracts comprised of oolitic shoal and back-shoal to intertidal carbonates. The type 1 unconformity that separates member A from overlying B' member is the top of the first-order Sauk Sequence. The B' member is a thin stratal interval of late Middle to Late Ordovician age and consists of dark, burrow-mottled skeletal wackestone and mudstone that is part of a transgressive systems tract. It is bounded above by another type 1 unconformity and therefore represents the first-order Tippecanoe sequence of Sloss.

  1. An upper mantle model for a western rim of the East European Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dec, M.; Malinowski, M.; Nita, B.; Perchuc, E.

    2012-04-01

    The upper mantle structure is a subject of many seismological analysis but existent global models are often too general to depict regional variations. Our seismic model is a trial to construct a new reference model for the regional upper mantle structure in the western rim of the East European Craton. It is based on the P-wave traveltime analysis from seismograms recorded on Suwalki (SUW) seismic station belonging to the Polish Seismological Network. SUW station is situated in NE part of Poland on the East European Craton. The data from 249 natural seismic events were divided into four groups referring to the epicenters in the Western Mediterranean Sea region, Greece and Turkey region, Caucasus region and Mid-Atlantic Ridge region. Our analysis is based on the P-wave traveltimes observed up to 3000 km distance, which is sufficient to investigate upper mantle structure down to about 500 km. For each region, we established a single model which was fitted to all sections. 1D model was calculated for all regions except Jan Mayen region, for which we had to estimate 2D model because waves propagate through both oceanic and continental structure. However, the continental part of the Jan Mayen region model is similar to 1D model established for other regions. We also include data from TOR and SVEKALAPKO experiments to check the presence of the 300-km discontinuity. Our model of the upper mantle in the western rim of the East European Craton documents low velocity zone (LVZ), 300-km discontinuity and zone with the reduction of P-wave velocity above 410-km discontinuity. We attribute the existence of the 300-km discontinuity to the paleotectonic interaction between Laurentia, Baltica and Avalonia during the closure of the Tornquist Sea.

  2. Sediment budget of cratons: insights from West Africa over the Cenozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean-Louis, G.; Chardon, D.; Rouby, D.; Beauvais, A.

    2015-12-01

    The sediment load of rivers constitutes the material that builds the stratigraphic successions found from continental margins to the deep ocean. Measure of this flux is relevant to understanding continental controls on denudation, riverine transport and basin filling. An increasing number of sediment yield measures is available but whether these modern values can be extrapolated at geological timescales for large watersheds is still questioned. One reason is the lack of long-term data. Here, we present a sediment budget for Sub-Saharan West Africa over the Cenozoic to compare with the modern rates. The denudation of this cratonic area is constrained using three regional lateritic paleo-landsurfaces that formed during periods of enhanced weathering since the Paleocene-Eocene greenhouse peak. The 3D interpolation of these surfaces allowed building three successive denudation maps for the 45-24, 24-11 and 11-0 Ma intervals together with reconstructions of the paleo-drainage. The regional distribution of erosion suggests the influence of lithospheric deformation, concentrated around a southern marginal upwarp and eastern hotspot swells. The export of large-scale drainages was calculated by converting denudated volumes into sediment fluxes using the porosity and density of lateritic regolith. Exported volumes calculated for the Niger watershed fall within the same range as the Cenozoic clastic accumulations of the Niger delta. Comparisons also show that modern fluxes can be an order of magnitude above the long-term fluxes for moderately large watersheds but that modern and long-term yields are similar for the largest watersheds (e.g. Niger, Volta, Senegal). These results suggest that the export of very large cratonic watersheds is independent of the measurement timescale and that their modern yields can be extrapolated at long-timescale. Finally, it allows assessing the relative contribution of cratons, i.e. non-active orogenic areas, to the global sediment budgets at

  3. "13 BB star" - broadband seismic array at the edge of East European Craton in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, Marcin; Grad, Marek; Wilde-Piórko, Monika; Suchcicki, Jerzy; Arant, Tadeusz

    2014-05-01

    "13 BB star" is a dense array of 13 Reftek 151-120 broadband seismometers located in unpopulated forests in northern Poland - just on the edge of East European Craton. The shape of array was designed as a "star" with one central station and 12 station located on two circles (radius of about 30 and 60 km) around it. This geometry allows us to study seismic waves (in particular surface waves) incoming from all azimuths. Our "13 BB star" array stations are self powered (solar panels and batteries), equipped with local storage system and on-line transmission of seismic and auxiliary data using 2G and 3G cellular network. We also developed on-line application for monitoring array status (transmission, connections, power, temperature, etc.) and on-line data visualization. Main advantages of our array are: 1) 120s broadband seismometers recording with 100Hz sampling, 2) density of array - distances between neighboring stations does not exceed 30 km, 3) station placement in underground wells, 4) stations located in forests far (usually 2-3 km) from industries, roads, villages and other human activity. "13 BB star" started operating in July 2013 and since that time recorded several local, regional, and teleseismic events proving good array functionality. The scientific aim of the "13 BB star" project is development of a quantitative model of the lithosphere-asthenosphere-structure in the marginal zone of the East European Craton in northern Poland. New acquired data will be analyzed using integrated seismic methods, which will yield images of lithosphere-asthenosphere system hitherto unknown for this area. The knowledge of detailed structure of the cratonic lithosphere-asthenosphere system is crucial for the better understanding of the regional, as well as global mantle dynamics and evolution of the Earth's interior. This work was supported by NCN-grant DEC 2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  4. Diabetes in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, M

    2005-01-01

    African Americans have a high risk for type 2 diabetes. Genetic traits, the prevalence of obesity, and insulin resistance all contribute to the risk of diabetes in the African American community. African Americans have a high rate of diabetic complications, because of poor glycaemic control and racial disparities in health care in the USA. African Americans with diabetes may have an atypical presentation that simulates type 1 diabetes, but then their subsequent clinical course is typical of type 2 diabetes. Culturally sensitive strategies, structured disease management protocols, and the assistance of nurses, diabetic educators, and other health care professionals are effective in improving the outcome of diabetes in the African American community. PMID:16344294

  5. The ambient noise and earthquake surface wave tomography of the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, J.; Obrebski, M. J.; Wu, Q.; Li, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The North China Craton (NCC) is unique for its unusual Phanerozoic tectonic activity. The NCC was internally tectonically stable until Jurassic when its southern margin collided with the Yangzte Craton. Subsequently, the eastern and central part of the NCC underwent distinctive evolutions during the Late Mesozoic and Cenozoic. In contrast to the Erdos block located in the western part of NCC and that seems to have preserved the typical features of a stable craton, the eastern NCC has experienced significant lithospheric thinning as evidenced by widespread magmatism activity and normal faulting, among other manifestations. The eastern part of the NCC is also one of the most seismically active intracontinental regions in the world. Here we focus on the region that comprises the North China Basin and the Yanshan-Taihang Mountains, two major tectonic units located to the east and in the center of the NCC, respectively. We combine ambient noise data and ballistic surface wave data recorded by the dense temporary seismic array deployed in the North China to obtain phase velocity maps at periods ranging from 5s to 60s. 1587 and 3667 ray paths were obtained from earthquake surface waves and ambient noise correlations, respectively. The phase velocity distribution was reconstructed with grid size 0.25x0.25 degrees and 0.5x0.5 degrees from ambient noise tomography and earthquake surface wave tomography. For periods shorter than 15s, the phase velocity variations are well correlated with the principal geological units in the NCC, with low-speed anomalies corresponding to the major sedimentary basins and high-speed anomalies coinciding with the main mountain ranges. Within the period range from 20s to 30s, the phase velocity variations seem to be related to the local variations of the crustal thickness. For the periods above 30s, the strength of the phase velocity variations decreases with increasing periods, which may imply that the uppermost mantle is much more homogeneous

  6. Bouguer images of the North American craton and its structural evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, R. E.; Bowring, S.; Eddy, M.; Guinness, E.; Leff, C.; Bindschadler, D.

    1984-01-01

    Digital image processing techniques have been used to generate Bouguer images of the North American craton that diplay more of the granularity inherent in the data as compared with existing contour maps. A dominant NW-SE linear trend of highs and lows can be seen extending from South Dakota, through Nebraska, and into Missouri. The structural trend cuts across the major Precambrian boundary in Missouri, separating younger granites and rhyolites from older sheared granites and gneisses. This trend is probably related to features created during an early and perhaps initial episode of crustal assembly by collisional processes. The younger granitic materials are probably a thin cover over an older crust.

  7. African bees to control African elephants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollrath, Fritz; Douglas-Hamilton, Iain

    2002-11-01

    Numbers of elephants have declined in Africa and Asia over the past 30 years while numbers of humans have increased, both substantially. Friction between these two keystone species is reaching levels which are worryingly high from an ecological as well as a political viewpoint. Ways and means must be found to keep the two apart, at least in areas sensitive to each species' survival. The aggressive African bee might be one such method. Here we demonstrate that African bees deter elephants from damaging the vegetation and trees which house their hives. We argue that bees can be employed profitably to protect not only selected trees, but also selected areas, from elephant damage.

  8. Orogen styles in the East African Orogen: A review of the Neoproterozoic to Cambrian tectonic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, H.; Abdelsalam, M.; Ali, K. A.; Bingen, B.; Collins, A. S.; Fowler, A. R.; Ghebreab, W.; Hauzenberger, C. A.; Johnson, P. R.; Kusky, T. M.; Macey, P.; Muhongo, S.; Stern, R. J.; Viola, G.

    2013-10-01

    The East African Orogen, extending from southern Israel, Sinai and Jordan in the north to Mozambique and Madagascar in the south, is the world´s largest Neoproterozoic to Cambrian orogenic complex. It comprises a collage of individual oceanic domains and continental fragments between the Archean Sahara-Congo-Kalahari Cratons in the west and Neoproterozoic India in the east. Orogen consolidation was achieved during distinct phases of orogeny between ∼850 and 550 Ma. The northern part of the orogen, the Arabian-Nubian Shield, is predominantly juvenile Neoproterozoic crust that formed in and adjacent to the Mozambique Ocean. The ocean closed during a protracted period of island-arc and microcontinent accretion between ∼850 and 620 Ma. To the south of the Arabian Nubian Shield, the Eastern Granulite-Cabo Delgado Nappe Complex of southern Kenya, Tanzania and Mozambique was an extended crust that formed adjacent to theMozambique Ocean and experienced a ∼650-620 Ma granulite-facies metamorphism. Completion of the nappe assembly around 620 Ma is defined as the East African Orogeny and was related to closure of the Mozambique Ocean. Oceans persisted after 620 Ma between East Antarctica, India, southern parts of the Congo-Tanzania-Bangweulu Cratons and the Zimbabwe-Kalahari Craton. They closed during the ∼600-500 Ma Kuungan or Malagasy Orogeny, a tectonothermal event that affected large portions of southern Tanzania, Zambia, Malawi, Mozambique, Madagascar and Antarctica. The East African and Kuungan Orogenies were followed by phases of post-orogenic extension. Early ∼600-550 Ma extension is recorded in the Arabian-Nubian Shield and the Eastern Granulite-Cabo Delgado Nappe Complex. Later ∼550-480 Ma extension affected Mozambique and southern Madagascar. Both extension phases, although diachronous,are interpreted as the result of lithospheric delamination. Along the strike of the East African Orogen, different geodynamic settings resulted in the evolution of

  9. Orogen styles in the East African Orogen: A review of the Neoproterozoic to Cambrian tectonic evolution☆

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, H.; Abdelsalam, M.; Ali, K.A.; Bingen, B.; Collins, A.S.; Fowler, A.R.; Ghebreab, W.; Hauzenberger, C.A.; Johnson, P.R.; Kusky, T.M.; Macey, P.; Muhongo, S.; Stern, R.J.; Viola, G.

    2013-01-01

    The East African Orogen, extending from southern Israel, Sinai and Jordan in the north to Mozambique and Madagascar in the south, is the world́s largest Neoproterozoic to Cambrian orogenic complex. It comprises a collage of individual oceanic domains and continental fragments between the Archean Sahara–Congo–Kalahari Cratons in the west and Neoproterozoic India in the east. Orogen consolidation was achieved during distinct phases of orogeny between ∼850 and 550 Ma. The northern part of the orogen, the Arabian–Nubian Shield, is predominantly juvenile Neoproterozoic crust that formed in and adjacent to the Mozambique Ocean. The ocean closed during a protracted period of island-arc and microcontinent accretion between ∼850 and 620 Ma. To the south of the Arabian Nubian Shield, the Eastern Granulite–Cabo Delgado Nappe Complex of southern Kenya, Tanzania and Mozambique was an extended crust that formed adjacent to theMozambique Ocean and experienced a ∼650–620 Ma granulite-facies metamorphism. Completion of the nappe assembly around 620 Ma is defined as the East African Orogeny and was related to closure of the Mozambique Ocean. Oceans persisted after 620 Ma between East Antarctica, India, southern parts of the Congo–Tanzania–Bangweulu Cratons and the Zimbabwe–Kalahari Craton. They closed during the ∼600–500 Ma Kuungan or Malagasy Orogeny, a tectonothermal event that affected large portions of southern Tanzania, Zambia, Malawi, Mozambique, Madagascar and Antarctica. The East African and Kuungan Orogenies were followed by phases of post-orogenic extension. Early ∼600–550 Ma extension is recorded in the Arabian–Nubian Shield and the Eastern Granulite–Cabo Delgado Nappe Complex. Later ∼550–480 Ma extension affected Mozambique and southern Madagascar. Both extension phases, although diachronous,are interpreted as the result of lithospheric delamination. Along the strike of the East African Orogen, different geodynamic settings

  10. A Pan-African thermal event in southern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jonathan S.; Santosh, M.; Pressley, Rachel A.; Clements, Alina S.; Rogers, John J. W.

    UPb zircon data from five igneous suites confirm previous studies that demonstrated widespread Pan-African magmatism in the Granulite Terrain of southern India. Ages determined here are ˜560 Ma for the Peralimala Granite and ˜555 Ma for the Kalpatta Granite, both north of the Palghat-Cauvery lineament, and ˜585 Ma for a charnockite in the Cardamom massif south of the lineament. Zircon from a pegmatite in the Kerala khondalite belt at Melankode yields an age of 512 Ma. Resetting of zircons in the 2500-Ma Arsikere Granite of the western Dharwar craton probably occurred at ˜450 Ma. These ages and the concentration of Pan-African granitic magmatism around the Indian portion of a broad region of granulite-facies metamorphism in East Gondwana demostrates generation of a restricted area of high temperature either above a rising plume or a zone of rifting. Mantle-derived fluids continued to move upward through the crust of southern India for at least 100 m.y. after the peak of magmatism, and the entire region was still cooling at 400 Ma.

  11. 207Pb-206Pb zircon ages of eastern and western Dharwar craton, southern India : Evidence for contemporaneous Archaean crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maibam, B.; Goswami, J. N.; Srinivasan, R.

    2009-04-01

    Dharwar craton is one of the major Archaean crustal blocks in the Indian subcontinent. The craton is comprised of two blocks, western and eastern. The western domain is underlain by orthogneisses and granodiorites (ca. 2.9-3.3 Ga) collectively termed as Peninsular Gneiss [e.g., 1] interspersed with older tracts of metasedimentary and metamorphosed igneous suites (Sargur Group and Dharwar Group; [2]). The eastern part of the craton is dominated by Late Archaean (2.50-2.75 Ga) granitoids and their gneissic equivalents. They are interspersed with schist belts (also of Sargur Group and Dharwar Group), which are lithologically similar to the Dharwar Supergroup in the western block, but are in different metamorphic dress. Here we report 207Pb-206Pb age of zircons separated from the metasedimentary and gneissic samples from the two blocks to constrain the evolution of the Dharwar craton during the early Archaean. Detrital zircons of the metasedimentary rocks from both the blocks show a wide range of overlapping ages between ~2.9 to >3.5 Ga. Zircon ages of the orthogneisses from the two blocks showed that most of the analysed grains of the eastern Dharwar block are found to be of the age as old as the western Dharwar gneisses. Imprints of younger events could be discerned from the presence of overgrowths in zircons from the studied samples throughout the craton. Our data suggest that crust forming cycles in the two blocks of the Dharwar craton occurred contemporaneously during the Archaean. References [1] Beckinsale, R.D., Drury, S.A., Holt, R.W. (1980) Nature 283, 469-470. [2] Swami Nath J., Ramakrishnan M., Viswanatha M.N. (1976) Rec. Geol. Surv. Ind., 107, 149-175.

  12. Zircon from East Antarctica: evidence for Archean intracrustal recycling in the Kaapvaal-Grunehogna Craton from O and Hf isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschall, H. R.; Hawkesworth, C. J.; Storey, C.; Leat, P. T.; Dhuime, B.

    2010-12-01

    The Grunehogna Craton (GC, East Antarctica) is interpreted as part of the Archean Kaapvaal Craton of southern Africa prior to Gondwana breakup. The basement of the GC is only exposed within a small area comprising the dominantly leucocratic Annandagstoppane (ADT) granite. The granite (and hence the craton) has been dated previously only by Rb-Sr and Pb-Pb mica and whole-rock methods. Here, the crystallisation age of the granite was determined to 3,067 ± 8 Ma by U-Pb dating of zircon. This age is coeval with granitoids and volcanics in the Swaziland and Witwatersrand blocks of the Kaapvaal Craton. Inherited grains in the ADT granite were discovered with ages of up to 3,433 ±7 Ma, and are the first evidence of Palaeoarchean basement in Dronning-Maud Land. The age spectrum of the inherited grains reflects well-known tectono-magmatic events in the Kaapvaal Craton and form important pieces of evidence for the connection of the GC to the Kaapvaal Craton for at least three billion years and probably longer. Whole-rock chemistry and zircon O isotopes demonstrate a supracrustal sedimentary source for the granite, and Hf model ages show that at least two or three different crustal sources were contributing to the magma with model ages of ~3.50, ~3.75 and possibly ~3.90 Ga, respectively. 3.1 Ga granites covering ~60 % of the outcrop area of the Kaapvaal-Grunehogna Craton played a major role in the mechanical stabilisation of the continental crust during the establishment of the craton in the Mesoarchean. Combined zircon Hf-O isotope data and the lack of juvenile additions to the crust in the Mesoarchean strongly suggest that crustal melting and granite formation was caused by the deep burial of clastic sediments and subsequent incubational heating of the crust. Intracrustal recycling of this type may be an important process during cratonisation and the long-term stabilisation of continental crust.

  13. Redox state of deep off-craton lithospheric mantle: new data from garnet and spinel peridotites from Vitim, southern Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, A. G.; Ionov, D. A.

    2012-11-01

    Oxygen fugacity ( fO2) affects melting, metasomatism, speciation of C-O-H fluids and carbon-rich phases in the upper mantle. fO2 of deep off-craton mantle is poorly known because garnet-peridotite xenoliths are rare in alkali basalts. We examine the redox and thermal state of the lithospheric mantle between the Siberian and North China cratons using new Fe3+/ΣFe ratios in garnet and spinel obtained by Mössbauer spectroscopy, major element data and P- T estimates for 22 peridotite xenoliths as well as published data for 15 xenoliths from Vitim, Russia. Shallow spinel-facies mantle is more oxidized than deep garnet peridotites (average, -0.1 vs. -2.5 Δlog fO2(FMQ)). For intermediate garnet-spinel peridotites, fO2 estimates from spinel-based oxybarometers are 1.5-3.2 Δlog fO2(FMQ) lower than those from garnet-based oxybarometers. These rocks may be out of phase and chemical inter-mineral equilibrium because the spinel-garnet reaction and concomitant changes in mineral chemistry do not keep up with P- T changes (e.g., lithospheric heating by recent volcanism) due to slow diffusion of trivalent cations and because gar-, gar-spl and spl-facies rocks may coexist on centimeter-meter scale. The spinel-based fO2 estimates may not be correct while garnet-based fO2 values provide conditions before the heating. The T (780-1,100 °C) and fO2 ranges of the Vitim xenoliths overlap those of coarse garnet and spinel cratonic peridotites. However, because of a higher geothermal gradient, the deepest Vitim garnet peridotites are more reduced (by 0.5-2.0 Δlog fO2(FMQ)) than cratonic garnet peridotites at similar depths, and the "water maximum" conditions (>80 % H2O) in the off-craton mantle exist in a more shallow and narrow depth range (60-85 km) than in cratonic roots (100-170 km). The base of the off-craton lithospheric mantle (≥90 km) at 2.5 GPa and 1,150 °C has fO2 of -3.0 ∆log fO2(FMQ), with dominant CH4 and H2O and minor H2 in the fluid. Melting near the base of off-craton

  14. azimuthal anisotropy underneath western North China Craton from surface wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D.; Liu, Y.; Zhou, S.

    2013-12-01

    Azimuthal anisotropic velocity structure beneath the western North China Craton (NCC) has been extracted using Rayleigh wave data from 69 broad-band seismographs of China Earthquake Networks Center and 23 of Peking University. We get the surface wave structure for period of 20s to 125s of Rayleigh wave. Surface wave velocity in a slight anisotropic media can be expressed as following: v_1=v_0+asinθ+bcosθ Where v_0 is the isotropic velocity and θ is the back azimuth. The primary results indicate that the Ordos Craton, which has been stable since Archean is obviously high-velocity-anomaly for over 200 km depth. While the Central part of NCC, including the Shanxi Rift, has obvious low-velocity-anomaly going down to 200 km. We interpret this enormous velocity changes as an evidence for the apart geologic processes of the eastern and western parts of NCC. The reactivation since Mesozoic of NCC may have caused upwelling of upper mantle right beneath Shanxi Rift.

  15. Archaean ultra-depleted komatiites formed by hydrous melting of cratonic mantle.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A H; Shirey, S B; Carlson, R W

    2003-06-19

    Komatiites are ultramafic volcanic rocks containing more than 18 per cent MgO (ref. 1) that erupted mainly in the Archaean era (more than 2.5 gigayears ago). Although such compositions occur in later periods of Earth history (for example, the Cretaceous komatiites of Gorgona Island), the more recent examples tend to have lower MgO content than their Archaean equivalents. Komatiites are also characterized by their low incompatible-element content, which is most consistent with their generation by high degrees of partial melting (30-50 per cent). Current models for komatiite genesis include the melting of rock at great depth in plumes of hot, diapirically rising mantle or the melting of relatively shallow mantle rocks at less extreme, but still high, temperatures caused by fluxing with water. Here we report a suite of ultramafic lava flows from the Commondale greenstone belt, in the southern part of the Kaapvaal Craton, which represents a previously unrecognized type of komatiite with exceptionally high forsterite content of its igneous olivines, low TiO(2)/Al(2)O(3) ratio, high silica content, extreme depletion in rare-earth elements and low Re/Os ratio. We suggest a model for their formation in which a garnet-enriched residue left by earlier cratonic volcanism was melted by hydration from a subducting slab. PMID:12815428

  16. The Late Triassic and Late Jurassic stress fields and tectonic transmission of North China craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Guiting; Wang, Yanxin; Hari, K. R.

    2010-09-01

    The transmission of the tectonic regime from the Paleo-Asian Ocean to the Pacific Ocean during Mesozoic era was reconstructed using the modeling of Late Triassic (T 3) and Late Jurassic (J 3) stress fields employing two dimensional linear finite element models (2-D FEM). The model at T 3 proposes that Qinling-Dabie-Sulu orogens coevally collided and the model J 3 proposes that Subei block continued to collide with the North China block along the Sulu orogen while the collision of the Qinling-Dabie orogen was terminated. The stress fields at T 3 and J 3 during the two episodes were calculated based on mechanical conditions under different deviatoric stresses acting along the boundaries of the North China craton by elastic finite modeling. The transmission between two episodes of stress fields resulted from Qinling-Dabie-Sulu collision between North China and South China in the Late Triassic period, and from continued collision between the Subei block and North China by the NW-trending movement of Izanagi plate during Late Jurassic. The results from modeling of the Mesozoic stress fields of the North China suggest that late Jurassic was the key transmission period of the tectonic regime of the North China block when large scale thrusting triggered the subsequent destruction of the North China craton.

  17. Neogene cratonic erosion fluxes and landform evolution processes from regional regolith mapping (Burkina Faso, West Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimaud, Jean-Louis; Chardon, Dominique; Metelka, Václav; Beauvais, Anicet; Bamba, Ousmane

    2015-07-01

    The regionally correlated and dated regolith-paleolandform sequence of Sub-Saharan West Africa offers a unique opportunity to constrain continental-scale regolith dynamics as the key part of the sediment routing system. In this study, a regolith mapping protocol is developed and applied at the scale of Southwestern Burkina Faso. Mapping combines field survey and remote sensing data to reconstruct the topography of the last pediplain that formed over West Africa in the Early and Mid-Miocene (24-11 Ma). The nature and preservation pattern of the pediplain are controlled by the spatial variation of bedrock lithology and are partitioned among large drainage basins. Quantification of pediplain dissection and drainage growth allows definition of a cratonic background denudation rate of 2 m/My and a minimum characteristic timescale of 20 Ma for shield resurfacing. These results may be used to simulate minimum export fluxes of drainage basins of constrained size over geological timescales. Background cratonic denudation results in a clastic export flux of ~ 4 t/km2/year, which is limited by low denudation efficiency of slope processes and correlatively high regolith storage capacity of tropical shields. These salient characteristics of shields' surface dynamics would tend to smooth the riverine export fluxes of shields through geological time.

  18. The character of the Moho and lower crust within Archean cratons and the tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Dallas H.; Mooney, Walter D.; VanTongeren, Jill A.

    2013-12-01

    Undisturbed mid Archean crust (stabilized by 3.0-2.9 Ga) has several characteristics that distinguish it from post Archean crust. Undisturbed mid-Archean crust has a low proportion of internal seismic boundaries (as evidenced by converted phases in seismic receiver functions), lacks high seismic velocities in the lower crust and has a sharp, flat Moho. Most of the seismic data on mid-Archean crust comes from the undisturbed portions of the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe (Tokwe segment) cratons. Around 67-74% of younger Archean crust (stabilized by 2.8-2.5 Ga) has a sharp, flat Moho. Much of the crust with a sharp, flat Moho also lacks strong internal seismic boundaries, but there is not a one to one correspondence. In cases where its age is known, basaltic lower crust in Archean terranes is often but not always the result of post Archean underplating. Undisturbed mid-Archean cratons are also characterized by lower crustal thicknesses (Archean median range = 32-39 km vs. post-Archean average = 41 km) and lower crustal seismic velocities. These observations are shown to be distinct from those observed in any modern-day tectonic environment. The data presented here are most consistent with a model in which Archean crust undergoes delamination of dense lithologies at the garnet-in isograd resulting in a flat, sharp Moho reflector and a thinner and more felsic-intermediate crust. We discuss the implications of this model for several outstanding paradoxes of Archean geology.

  19. Thermal evolution of cratonic mantle keels: implications for buoyancy and rheology of continental lithosphere (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, D. W.; Perry, C.

    2013-12-01

    On a billion-year timescale, post-formation cooling or heating of cratonic mantle keels predicts secular changes in lithospheric buoyancy, isopycnicity and rheology that may be expressed as an epeirogenic signal in the core regions of continents. To examine the consequences of these secular changes, we use a finite-difference approach to simulate the thermal evolution of cratonic lithosphere, starting from endmember initial states that represent hot (plume) or cool (slab) formation scenarios. Our models are axisymmetric and assume that the temperature of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) intersects the mantle adiabat. We consider secular cooling (40 K per Gyr) of the mantle as well as gradual loss of radiogenic heating in the lithosphere. Various scenarios are considered, including ';average' Archean and Proterozoic mantle compositions, as well as layering of the lithosphere with several distributions of heat-producing elements. The thermal and compositional models are used to compute seismic wavespeed, density structure, and spatially-varying mantle viscosity, which are compared with observational constraints from metamorphic P-T-t paths, diamond stability and subsidence of intractronic basins in Africa and North America.

  20. Abnormal lithium isotope composition from the ancient lithospheric mantle beneath the North China Craton

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yan-Jie; Zhang, Hong-Fu; Deloule, Etienne; Su, Ben-Xun; Ying, Ji-Feng; Santosh, M.; Xiao, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Lithium elemental and isotopic compositions of olivines in peridotite xenoliths from Hebi in the North China Craton provide direct evidence for the highly variable δ7Li in Archean lithospheric mantle. The δ7Li in the cores of olivines from the Hebi high-Mg# peridotites (Fo > 91) show extreme variation from −27 to +21, in marked deviation from the δ7Li range of fresh MORB (+1.6 to +5.6) although the Li abundances of the olivines are within the range of normal mantle (1–2 ppm). The Li abundances and δ7Li characteristics of the Hebi olivines could not have been produced by recent diffusive-driven isotopic fractionation of Li and therefore the δ7Li in the cores of these olivines record the isotopic signature of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle. Our data demonstrate that abnormal δ7Li may be preserved in the ancient lithospheric mantle as observed in our study from the central North China Craton, which suggest that the subcontinental lithospheric mantle has experienced modification of fluid/melt derived from recycled oceanic crust. PMID:24589693

  1. Abnormal lithium isotope composition from the ancient lithospheric mantle beneath the North China Craton.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan-Jie; Zhang, Hong-Fu; Deloule, Etienne; Su, Ben-Xun; Ying, Ji-Feng; Santosh, M; Xiao, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Lithium elemental and isotopic compositions of olivines in peridotite xenoliths from Hebi in the North China Craton provide direct evidence for the highly variable δ(7)Li in Archean lithospheric mantle. The δ(7)Li in the cores of olivines from the Hebi high-Mg# peridotites (Fo > 91) show extreme variation from -27 to +21, in marked deviation from the δ(7)Li range of fresh MORB (+1.6 to +5.6) although the Li abundances of the olivines are within the range of normal mantle (1-2 ppm). The Li abundances and δ(7)Li characteristics of the Hebi olivines could not have been produced by recent diffusive-driven isotopic fractionation of Li and therefore the δ(7)Li in the cores of these olivines record the isotopic signature of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle. Our data demonstrate that abnormal δ(7)Li may be preserved in the ancient lithospheric mantle as observed in our study from the central North China Craton, which suggest that the subcontinental lithospheric mantle has experienced modification of fluid/melt derived from recycled oceanic crust. PMID:24589693

  2. On-, off-cratonic, orogenic and oceanic mantle roots: lithosphere unite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittig, Nadine; Pearson, D. Graham

    2010-05-01

    Associated with Earth's crust is the underlying lithospheric mantle, which is often categorized according its surface availability for sampling. For example, we frequently describe sub-continental lithospheric peridotite xenoliths as on- or off-cratonic to highlight the approximate lithosphere stabilization age as being Archean or post-Archean and contrast them against the lithospheric peridotites recovered from present-day oceanic basins. Orogenic peridotites and ophiolites are obducted in subduction zones and mark paleo-suture zones in amalgamated continents. Regardless of its present-day occurrence, lithospheric mantle is buoyant as a result of substantial extraction or mafic to ultramafic silicate melts. This depletion and buoyancy results in a thermal and mechanical boundary layer (lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary layer, LAB) and isolates Earth's lithosphere from the convecting mantle. The mineralogical and geochemical similarities of some of the oldest cratonic sub-continental lithosphere and highly-depleted young oceanic peridotites require common geochemical mechanisms that are capable of introducing well-correlated major element variability - until metasomatic enrichment masks the depletion signature. Efficient extraction of basaltic melts from the convecting mantle occurs at mid-ocean ridges and removes clinopyroxene and to some extent garnet leaving the olivine-rich buoyant residual lithospheric mantle. We will examine the oceanic heritage of garnet and spinel-facies sub-continental lithospheric mantle in general, but focus on xenoliths (n = 62) sampled across the North Atlantic Craton (~700km, NAC), West Greenland at c. 600 and 200 Ma. These Greenlandic samples are strongly serpentinized, harzburgitic to dunitic peridotites and generally comprise less than 15% orthopyroxene and very little clinopyroxene (<< 5%). If garnet is present it occurs in variable amounts (12 to 0.3%). Major element systematics of these peridotites are highly refractory with Al

  3. Implications of a simple mantle transition zone beneath cratonic North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, D. A.; Helffrich, G.; Bastow, I. D.; Kendall, J.-M.; Wookey, J.; Eaton, D. W.; Snyder, D. B.

    2011-12-01

    Many areas of old continental interiors have thick roots that extend to depths of 250 km or more, in contrast to the oceans and younger continents, whose lithospheric thickness is less than 100 km. These cratonic roots might perturb temperatures in their surrounding mantle, though the net result could be either cooling or heating; both of which may lead to small-scale convective flow around the root. We show here, using new data from a study of the seismic structure of the Canadian Shield, that the relative positions of the 410 km and 660 km seismic discontinuities are unperturbed beneath one of the deepest and broadest cratonic roots on the Earth. Differential arrival times and internal discontinuity structure are remarkably uniform and simple, varying by little more than ± 0.5 s over the root's 3500 km lateral extent. This implies that the root has no significant thermal effect on the underlying mantle (< 50 K), and any small-scale convection or cold mantle downwelling associated with the large free-air gravity anomaly beneath the shield must be confined to the upper mantle. Our observations are also consistent with phase changes solely in the olivine system ((Mg,Fe) 2SiO 4), with the caveat that our method is dominantly sensitive to S-wave velocity jumps alone.

  4. Origin of garnet peridotites in the lithospheric mantle beneath the Siberian craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doucet, L. S.; Ionov, D. A.; Brey, G. P.; Golovin, A. V.; Ashchepkov, I. V.

    2012-04-01

    Garnet peridotites represent the largest part of the lithospheric mantle beneath Archean crust, yet the origin of garnet in these rocks continues to be debated. The cratonic mantle is believed to be produced by extensive melt extraction indicated by common low Al and Ca (<1%) and high Mg#WR (≥0.92) of cratonic peridotites [1]. However, even though many garnet peridotites are low in Al and Ca, they usually have lower Mg#WR (<0.92) than spinel harzburgites, which together with common high modal cpx and garnet (>5%) appear to be inconsistent with a residual origin by high degrees of partial melting [2]. To better constraint the origin of garnet in cratonic mantle we report modal, major and trace element compositions for >30 garnet peridotites from the Udachnaya kimberlite in central Siberia (as well as preliminary Nd-isotope data for selected samples). These rocks, unlike many other kimberlite-hosted peridotites worldwide, are unusually fresh, with very low LOI (≤1%) and unaltered minerals [3]. The garnet peridotites in this study are coarse (mostly low-T) to sheared (high-T) harzburgites with Mg#WR of 0.90-0.92 and ≤1% Al2O3 and CaO as well as two lherzolites. Their cpx (2-6%) and garnet (1-9%) have complex REE patterns affected by both melt extraction and various enrichment events. Modal and major oxide compositions of spinel harzburgites from Udachnaya indicate an origin by >35% of partial melting in a broad depth range (2-7 GPa) based on experimental results [4]. By comparison, only 5 out 30 garnet harzburgites in this study plot close to the melting trends defined by spinel harzburgites. The majority of garnet harzburgites in this study (especially high-T) show a range of enrichments in Fe, Si, Ti, HREE etc. relative to pristine melting residues. Moreover, the Nd isotope data for the garnet peridotites (calculated from garnet and cpx analyses) yield an isochron age of 0.8-0.7 Ga, which is much younger than whole-rock Re-Os formation ages (2 Ga [5]). The

  5. Diamonds and the african lithosphere.

    PubMed

    Boyd, F R; Gurney, J J

    1986-04-25

    Data and inferences drawn from studies of diamond inclusions, xenocrysts, and xenoliths in the kimberlites of southern Africa are combined to characterize the structure of that portion of the Kaapvaal craton that lies within the mantle. The craton has a root composed in large part of peridotites that are strongly depleted in basaltic components. The asthenosphere boundary shelves from depths of 170 to 190 kilometers beneath the craton to approximately 140 kilometers beneath the mobile belts bordering the craton on the south and west. The root formed earlier than 3 billion years ago, and at that time ambient temperatures in it were 900 degrees to 1200 degrees C; these temperatures are near those estimated from data for xenoliths erupted in the Late Cretaceous or from present-day heat-flow measurements. Many of the diamonds in southern Africa are believed to have crystallized in this root in Archean time and were xenocrysts in the kimberlites that brought them to the surface. PMID:17743571

  6. Black versus Black: The Relationship among African, African American, and African Caribbean Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Jennifer V.; Cothran, Mary E.

    2003-01-01

    Surveyed people of African descent regarding relationships among African, African-American, and African-Caribbean persons, focusing on contact and friendship, travel to countries of the diaspora, cross-cultural communication, thoughts and stereotypes, and education. Most respondents had contacts with the other groups, but groups had preconceived…

  7. Provenances of the Mesozoic sediments in the Ordos Basin and implications for collision between the North China Craton (NCC) and the South China Craton (SCC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Bao; Yuelong, Chen; Dapeng, Li; Shanhui, Wang

    2014-12-01

    To constrain the provenance of the Ordos Basin and the evolution history of the Qinling Orogen Belt from the Triassic to the Jurassic, 10 samples from the Dongsheng area and 28 samples from the Yan'an area were analyzed for U-Pb ages and Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd isotopic compositions. The results indicate that Middle Jurassic sediments in the Dongsheng area were derived from the Khondalite Belt, Langshan Mountain and the Yinshan Terrane. Mesozoic sediments in the Yan'an area consist of two parts. One part is derived from the North China Craton (NCC), which has U-Pb age groups of ∼1.8 Ga and ∼2.5 Ga, and Hf model ages of ∼2.8 Ga. The other part is derived from the Qilian-Qinling Orogenic Belt, which has U-Pb age groups of 600-1500 Ma and 100-500 Ma, and Nd and Hf isotopic model ages of less than 2.2 Ga. Combining the U-Pb ages with the Hf and Nd isotopic model ages, Mesozoic detrital zircons with U-Pb age groups of ∼1.8 Ga and ∼2.5 Ga in the Yan'an area are found to also be derived from the Khondalite Belt, Langshan Mountain and the Yinshan Terrane, not from the Trans-China Orogen Belt. From the late-Late Triassic sediments of the Yan'an area, the low average values of the Hf (2.03 Ga) and Nd (2.03 Ga) model ages and the characteristic age population of 600-1500 Ma reveal that the main collision or continental subduction between the NCC and the South China Craton (SCC) occurred in the late-Late Triassic. After the main collision or continental subduction, the proportion of sediments from the Qinling-Qilian Orogenic Belt began to decrease (recorded in the early Jurassic samples), which may be in response to the gradual slowing of the uplift speed of the Qinling Orogenic Belt. In the early-middle Jurassic, the sediments have a main U-Pb age population of 100-500 Ma, low detrital zircon Hf model ages (average value is 1.17 Ga) and low whole rock Nd model ages (average value is 1.13 Ga), which suggests that the Qilian-Qinling Orogenic Belt may have a fast uplift

  8. Cenozoic Source-to-Sink of the African margin of the Equatorial Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouby, Delphine; Chardon, Dominique; Huyghe, Damien; Guillocheau, François; Robin, Cecile; Loparev, Artiom; Ye, Jing; Dall'Asta, Massimo; Grimaud, Jean-Louis

    2016-04-01

    The objective of the Transform Source to Sink Project (TS2P) is to link the dynamics of the erosion of the West African Craton to the offshore sedimentary basins of the African margin of the Equatorial Atlantic at geological time scales. This margin, alternating transform and oblique segments from Guinea to Nigeria, shows a strong structural variability in the margin width, continental geology and relief, drainage networks and subsidence/accumulation patterns. We analyzed this system combining onshore geology and geomorphology as well as offshore sub-surface data. Mapping and regional correlation of dated lateritic paleo-landscape remnants allows us to reconstruct two physiographic configurations of West Africa during the Cenozoic. We corrected those reconstitutions from flexural isostasy related to the subsequent erosion. These geometries show that the present-day drainage organization stabilized by at least 29 Myrs ago (probably by 34 Myr) revealing the antiquity of the Senegambia, Niger and Volta catchments toward the Atlantic as well as of the marginal upwarp currently forming a continental divide. The drainage rearrangement that lead to this drainage organization was primarily enhanced by the topographic growth of the Hoggar swell and caused a major stratigraphic turnover along the Equatorial margin of West Africa. Elevation differences between paleo-landscape remnants give access to the spatial and temporal distribution of denudation for 3 time-increments since 45 Myrs. From this, we estimate the volumes of sediments and associated lithologies exported by the West African Craton toward different segments of the margin, taking into account the type of eroded bedrock and the successive drainage reorganizations. We compare these data to Cenozoic accumulation histories in the basins and discuss their stratigraphic expression according to the type of margin segment they are preserved in.

  9. The Namuskluft and Dreigratberg sections in southern Namibia (Kalahari Craton, Gariep Belt): a geological history of Neoproterozoic rifting and recycling of cratonic crust during the dispersal of Rodinia until the amalgamation of Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Mandy; Linnemann, Ulf; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Gerdes, Axel; Eckelmann, Katja; Gärtner, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents combined U/Pb, Th/U and Hf isotope analyses on detrital and magmatic zircon grains together with whole-rock geochemical analyses of two basement and eight sedimentary rock samples from the Namuskluft and the Dreigratberg in southern Namibia (Gariep Belt). The sedimentary sections evolved during the Cryogenian on the SW part of the Kalahari Craton and where therefore deposited in an active rift setting during the break-up of Rodinia. Due to insufficient palaeomagnetic data, the position of the Kalahari Craton within Rodinia is still under discussion. There are possibilities to locate Kalahari along the western side of Australia/Mawsonland (Pisarevski et al. in Proterozoic East Gondwana: supercontinent assembly and break-up, Geological Society, London, 2003; Evans in Ancient Orogens and modern analogues. Geological Society, London, 2009; and others) or together with the Congo-Sao Francisco and Rio de la Plata Cratons (Li et al. in Prec Res 45: 203-2014, 2008; Frimmel et al. in Int J Earth Sci (Geol Rundsch) 100: 323-354, 2011; and others). It is sill unclear which craton rifted away from the Kalahari Craton during the Cryogenian. Although Middle to Upper Cryogenian magmatic activity is known for the SE Kalahari Craton (our working area) (Richtersveld Suite, Rosh Pinah Fm), all the presented samples show no U/Pb zircon ages younger than ca. 1.0 Ga and non-older than 2.06 Ga. The obtained U/Pb ages fit very well to the exposed basement of the Kalahari Craton (1.0-1.4 Ga Namaqua Province, 1.7-2.0 Ga Vioolsdrif Granite Suite and Orange River Group) and allow no correlation with a foreign craton such as the Rio de la Plata or Australia/Mawsonland. Lu-Hf isotopic signatures of detrital zircon point to the recycling of mainly Palaeoproterozoic and to a smaller amount of Archean crust in the source areas. ɛHf( t) signatures range between -24 and +14.8, which relate to TDM model ages between 1.05 and 3.1 Ga. Only few detrital zircon grains derived from

  10. Astronomy for African development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govender, Kevindran

    2011-06-01

    In recent years there have been a number of efforts across Africa to develop the field of astronomy as well as to reap benefit from astronomy for African people. This presentation will discuss the case of the SALT (Southern African Large Telescope) Collateral Benefits Programme (SCBP) which was set up to ensure societal benefit from astronomy. With African society as the target, the SCBP has embarked on various projects from school level education to public understanding of science to socio-economic development, the latter mainly being felt in the rural communities surrounding the South African Astronomical Observatory (home to SALT). A development plan for ``Astronomy in Africa'' will also be discussed. This plan has been drawn up with input from all over Africa and themed ``Astronomy for Education''. The Africa case stands as a good example for the IYA cornerstone project ``Developing Astronomy Globally'' which focuses on developing regions.

  11. African American Suicide

    MedlinePlus

    ... accounted for 83.8% of Caucasian elderly suicides. • Firearms were the predominant method of suicide among African ... per 100,000 annually. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Vital Statistics System. Mortality Data. ...

  12. Thermal history and origin of the Tanzanian Craton from Pb isotope thermochronology of feldspars from lower crustal xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, Jeremy J.; McDonough, William F.; Rudnick, Roberta L.

    2011-01-01

    Common and radiogenic Pb isotopic compositions of plagioclase and anti-perthitic feldspars from granulite-facies lower crustal xenoliths from the Labait Volcano on the eastern margin of the Tanzanian Craton have been measured via laser ablation MC-ICP-MS. Common Pb in plagioclase and a single stage Pb evolution model indicate that the lower crust of the Tanzanian Craton was extracted from mantle having a 238U/ 204Pb of 8.1 ± 0.3 and a 232Th/ 238U of 4.3 ± 0.1 at 2.71 ± 0.09 Ga (all uncertainties are 2σ). Since 2.4 Ga, some orthoclase domains within anti-perthites have evolved with a maximum 238U/ 204Pb of 6 and 232Th/ 238U of 4.3. The spread in Pb isotopic composition in the anti-perthitic feldspars yields single crystal Pb-Pb isochrons of ˜ 2.4 Ga, within uncertainty of U-Pb zircon ages from the same sample suite. The Pb isotopic heterogeneities imply that these granulites resided at temperatures < 600 °C in the lower crust of the Tanzanian Craton from ca. 2.4 Ga to the present. In concert with the chemistry of surface samples, mantle xenoliths, and lower crustal xenoliths, our data imply that the cratonic lithosphere in Tanzania formed ca. ˜ 2.7 Ga, in a convergent margin setting, and has remained undisturbed since 2.7 Ga.

  13. A Sm-Nd and Pb isotope study of Archaean greenstone belts in the southern Kaapvaal Craton, South Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. H.; Carlson, R. W.

    1989-01-01

    An Sm-Nd and Pb study on a wide variety of lithologies in Archaean greenstone belt fragments in the southern Kaapvaal Craton reveals a complex petrogenetic history. The fragments are important because they represent a 350 km transect through the craton south of Barberton to its southern margin. The Commondale greenstone belt yields a precise Sm-Nd age of 3334 + or - 18 Ma on an exceptionally well preserved peridotite suite of komatiitic affinity. The wide range of Sm/Nd from 0.6 to 1.0 is attributed to the unusual occurrence of orthopyroxene in the spinifex-bearing rocks. A considerably younger age of about 3.2 Ga is suggested for the Nondweni greenstone belt close to the southern margin of the craton on the basis of separate Sm-Nd isochrons on individual lithologies ranging from komatiite, through komatiitic basalt and basalt to felsic volcanic rocks. On the basis of the present study the greenstone belts appear to have been emplaced at progressively younger ages toward the southern margin of the craton.

  14. Upper mantle anisotropy in SE and Central Brazil from SKS splitting: Evidence of asthenospheric flow around a cratonic keel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assumpção, Marcelo; Heintz, Maggy; Vauchez, Alain; Silva, Marcos Egydio

    2006-10-01

    We present results of upper mantle anisotropy derived from measurements of core refracted shear wave splitting (mainly SKS phases) recorded at 48 stations covering the major tectonic provinces in Central and SE Brazil, such as the Tocantins Province (Paraguay-Araguaia and Brasília belts between the Amazon and São Francisco cratons), the Paraná intracratonic basin, the southern part of the São Francisco craton, and the Mantiqueira province (with the coastal Ribeira belt). Although the fast polarization directions vary across the region, consistent orientations are observed over hundreds of kilometers. The fast polarization directions tend to be close to the absolute plate motion given by the hot-spot reference model HS3-NUVEL1A. However, correlations with geological structures are also observed in the southern Brasilia belt and in the Ribeira belt, respectively located SW and S of the São Francisco craton. On the other hand, in the northern Tocantins province, the fast shear-wave direction (˜ N60°S) is oblique to the SW-NE trend of the geological units and faults, and no anisotropy contribution from lithospheric sources can be clearly identified. Overall, the fast polarization directions show a fan-shaped pattern strongly suggesting asthenosperic flow around a thick and stiff keel in the southern part of the São Francisco craton, consistent with the high-velocity anomaly revealed by recent surface-wave tomography. The observed NW-SE directions in the southern part of the Brasília belt may also be interpreted as resulting from asthenospheric flow channeled between the São Francisco craton and a cratonic block beneath the Paraná basin. The largest splitting delays observed in the southern Brasília belt and in the Ribeira belt (up to 2.4 s) suggest contributions from both lithospheric and asthenospheric sources in those two areas. Our preferred model for the anisotropy causing the observed pattern of SKS splitting consists of flow-induced deformation in the

  15. Moho depth and crustal structure of the Siberian Craton and the West Siberian Basin: An appraisal of existing seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepanova, Yulia; Artemieva, Irina M.; Thybo, Hans

    2013-04-01

    We present a digital model of the crustal structure of the Archean-Proterozoic Siberian craton and the Paleozoic-Mesozoic West Siberian basin, based on seismic profiles published since 1960 in international and Russian journals, books, theses and reports. Data quality was assessed and quantitatively assigned to each profile based on acquisition and interpretation method and completeness of the model. The database represents major improvement in coverage and resolution with a nominal sample interval of 50 km before interpolation onto a uniform grid. It includes depth to Moho, thickness and average P-wave velocity of five crustal layers (sediments, and upper, middle, lower, and lowermost crust) and Pn velocity. Results are presented in maps and cross-sections, which demonstrate strong crustal heterogeneity. Crustal structure shows weak correlation with tectono-thermal age and strong correlation with tectonic setting. Sedimentary thickness varies from 0-3 km in stable craton to 10-20 km in extended regions. Typical Moho depths are 44-46 km in stable Archean crust, 40-42 km in Proterozoic craton and Neoproterozoic/Paleozoic orogens, 35-38 km in extended cratonic crust, and 38-40 km in the West Siberian basin. Average crustal velocity is ~6.2-6.4 km/s, ranging from <5.8 km/s in deep sedimentary basins to ~6.6 km/s around the up-to 54 km thick Anabar shield crust. The cratonic crust generally consists of three layers and has no high-velocity lowermost crust (Vp~7.4 km/s), which is observed only in magmatic areas. Upper mantle Pn velocities are generally ~8.2 km/s in the craton and West Siberian Basin, lower in Baikalian and Caledonian areas, higher in the Tunguska and Viluy basins, and abnormally high (8.6-8.9 km/s) around kimberlite fields. We provide an extensive summary of the tectonic and geodynamic evolution of the region and discuss the origin of crustal heterogeneity and processes of crustal evolution in Precambrian cratons and major Phanerozoic basins and rift

  16. The record of the Amazon craton in two supercontinents: Paleomagnetic and geological constraints for Mesoproterozoic to Paleozoic times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohver, E.

    2008-05-01

    The Amazon craton plays a fundamental role in the evolution of two supercontinents, the late Mesoproterozoic Rodinia, the break-up of which led to thethe late Neoproterozoic-early Paleozoic formation of Gondwana. A recent review of the paleomagnetic database for South America and Africa highlights the different role of the principal elements of western Gondwana elements Amazonia, conjoined with West Africa, versus the more centrally- located pieces of Gondwana; -Congo-São Francisco, Kalahari, the Rio de Plata, and the accreted terranes of the Arabia-Nubia shield. Whereas the Amazon-West Africa conjoined craton appears to have been alongside Laurentia within the framework of Rodinia, the other "central Gondwana" cratons were not part of Rodinia. New paleomagnetic data from the SW Amazon craton demonstrate the transpressive evolution of the Grenvillian collision, which resulted in thousands of kilometers of along-strike between the Amazon and Laurentia cratons. Portions of Amazonian crust stranded within the North American craton, notably the Blue Ridge province of the southern Appalachians, is evidence for this long-lived motion. An extensive review of recent thermochronological data from the North American Grenville Province and new data from the SW Amazon belts of "Grenvillian" age reveals the effects of differential post-orogenic exhumation. Restoration of this exhumation gives us a crustal-scale cross-section of the synorogenic structure, marked by thrust-related imbrication on the North American side, and large-scale, strike-slip faults on the Amazon side. It is this asymmetric structure that accounts for the differences in tectonic style between the two cratons. The timing of the break-up of Rodinia is still mostly unconstrained by geochronological data from rift-related sediments from the Amazon side. The Paraguai belt that marks the SE margin of the Amazon craton is a curved, fold-and-thrust belt that affected the late Neoproterozoic-Cambrian sediments that

  17. Exploiting radiation damage control on apatite (U Th)/He dates in cratonic regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flowers, Rebecca M.

    2009-01-01

    Apatites from four pairs of samples of Precambrian basement from the western Canadian shield were analyzed by (U-Th)/He thermochronometry to test for the influence of radiation damage on apatite (U-Th)/He dates in this cratonic region. Recent studies have demonstrated that the accumulation of radiation damage increases the apatite He retentivity, so that apatites with a span of effective U concentrations, eU, that experienced the same thermal history may be characterized by a range of closure temperatures. In this investigation, each sample pair consisted of a mafic dike cross-cutting felsic gneisses from a single outcrop or nearby outcrops that contained apatites with a span of eU. The apatites yielded (U-Th)/He dates from 846 to 123 Ma, and were positively correlated with eU within each sample pair. These results can be explained using a model that tracks the evolution of He mobility in response to the accumulation of radiation damage. When coupled with regional geological constraints, the data appear to require partial to complete He loss due to burial and reheating in Phanerozoic time. New apatite fission- track dates and length data were obtained for five of these samples. The apatite fission- track dates are Proterozoic regardless of apatite eU. Thermal history simulations indicate that the apatite fission-track data are compatible with the (U-Th)/He results, although the thermal histories are not identical in detail and the fission-track results alone do not require Phanerozoic heating. Together the data are consistent with burial of this region by ≥ 1 km of Phanerozoic strata that were subsequently denuded, thus pointing toward significant Phanerozoic deposition in the North American cratonic interior hundreds of kilometers east of where previously documented. The results suggest that exploiting radiation damage control on apatite (U-Th)/He dates through investigation of surface sample apatites with a span of closure temperatures can impose tighter

  18. Source of Mesozoic intermediate-felsic igneous rocks in the North China craton: Granulite xenolith evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Neng; Carlson, Richard W.; Guo, Jinhui

    2011-07-01

    Four intermediate to felsic igneous rocks from the Zhangjiakou region, along the northern margin of the North China craton, have magmatic zircon U-Pb ages from 122 to 144 Ma. Two of these samples have inherited zircon U-Pb ages of ~ 2.5 Ga, similar to the zircon ages of rocks from the surrounding granulite terrain. Zircons from two intermediate composition granulite xenoliths (JN0811 and JN0919) in the nearby Cenozoic Hannuoba basalts yield two groups of ages. The rims have concordant Mesozoic ages mostly between 120 and 145 Ma, coeval with the Mesozoic intermediate-felsic magmatism in the region, while the cores have discordant U-Pb ages with upper-intercepts of ~ 2.5 Ga, overlapping the zircon ages of granulite terrain rocks, and lower-intercept ages of ~ 130 Ma, approximating the ages of the Mesozoic intermediate-felsic magmatism. The Sr-Nd isotopic compositions of the Mesozoic intermediate-felsic igneous rocks are completely different from those expected for basaltic melts from either the lithospheric mantle or the asthenospheric mantle, precluding a derivation by extensive fractional crystallization of mantle-derived magmas. The lack of correlation between (86Sr/87Sr)i, εNd(t) and SiO2 for the Mesozoic igneous rocks, the very narrow range of zircon εHf(t) for individual intermediate-felsic igneous rocks, and simple binary mixing calculations argue against them being formed by mixing between mantle-derived magma and preexisting crust that has extremely evolved Sr-Nd isotopic compositions like granulite xenoliths JN0811 and JN0919. Hf isotopic compositions of the Mesozoic zircons and whole-rock geochemistry show that the granulite xenoliths with extremely evolved Sr-Nd isotopic compositions have not undergone partial melting during the Mesozoic and thus do not contribute to the Mesozoic intermediate-felsic magmas. Further comparisons show that the source rocks for the Mesozoic intermediate-felsic magmas likely were late Archean lower crustal rocks similar in

  19. Paleogene post-collisional lamprophyres in western Yunnan, western Yangtze Craton: Mantle source and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yong-Jun; Campbell McCuaig, T.; Li, Zheng-Xiang; Jourdan, Fred; Hart, Craig J. R.; Hou, Zeng-Qian; Tang, Suo-Han

    2015-09-01

    A suite of lamprophyres, spatially associated with mafic lavas and potassic felsic intrusive rocks, was emplaced between 36.5 ± 0.2 and 33.7 ± 0.5 Ma (based on phlogopite 40Ar/39Ar dating) on the eastern side of the Ailao Shan-Red River shear zone in the western Yangtze Craton. These shoshonitic and ultrapotassic intrusive rocks post-date the ~ 60-55 Ma collisional event between the Indian and the Asian continents. They are characterized by: (1) enrichment in large-ion lithophile elements and light rare-earth elements with (La/Sm)n = 3.15-7.15; (2) strong positive Pb spikes; (3) depletion in high-field-strength elements (e.g. Nb/La = 0.08-0.98); (4) high initial 87Sr/86Sr (0.706-0.709) with negative εNd(t) values of - 10.5 to - 0.9; (5) old Nd model ages of 1542-945 Ma; and (6) radiogenic (207Pb/204Pb)i of 15.57-15.70 and (208Pb/204Pb)i (38.70-39.06). These features suggest that the mantle source was metasomatized by Proterozoic subduction beneath the Yangtze Craton. The lamprophyres have similar trace element patterns, and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope compositions, as coeval mafic lava, indicating a common source of metasomatized veined continental lithospheric mantle (CLM). Lower degree partial melting of metasomatic veins likely generated the lamprophyres, whereas the coeval mafic lava was likely derived from melting of phlogopite harzburgite. The lamprophyres and mafic lava have similar Sr-Nd isotope systematics as CLM-derived Neoproterozoic mafic rocks and Late Permian Emeishan low-Ti basalt in the region, indicating that they share the same Proterozoic source. We envisage that mantle plumes thermally eroded the Proterozoic metasomatized CLM beneath the western part of the Yangtze Craton during 825-750 Ma and 260-250 Ma, although residual metasomatized domains remained before being tapped by delamination after the India-Asia continental collision during the Paleogene period.

  20. Cover sequences at the northern margin of the Antongil Craton, NE Madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bauer, W.; Walsh, G.J.; De Waele, B.; Thomas, Ronald J.; Horstwood, M.S.A.; Bracciali, L.; Schofield, D.I.; Wollenberg, U.; Lidke, D.J.; Rasaona, I.T.; Rabarimanana, M.H.

    2011-01-01

    The island of Madagascar is a collage of Precambrian, generally high-grade metamorphic basement domains, that are locally overlain by unmetamorphosed sedimentary rocks and poorly understood low-grade metasediments. In the Antalaha area of NE Madagascar, two distinct cover sequences rest on high-grade metamorphic and igneous basement rocks of the Archaean Antongil craton and the Neoproterozoic Bemarivo belt. The older of these two cover sequences, the Andrarona Group, consists of low-grade metasedimentary rocks. The younger sequence, the newly defined Ampohafana Formation, consists of unmetamorphosed sedimentary rocks. The Andrarona Group rests on Neoarchaean granites and monzogranites of the Antongil craton and consists of a basal metagreywacke, thick quartzites and an upper sequence of sericite-chlorite meta-mudstones, meta-sandstones and a volcaniclastic meta-sandstone. The depositional age of the volcaniclastic meta-sandstone is constrained in age by U–Pb laser-ablation ICP-MS analyses of euhedral zircons to 1875 ± 8 Ma (2σ). Detrital zircons of Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic age represent an input from the Antongil craton and a newly defined Palaeoproterozoic igneous unit, the Masindray tonalite, which underlies the Andrarona Group, and yielded a U–Pb zircon age of 2355 ± 11 Ma (2σ), thus constraining the maximum age of deposition of the basal part of the Andrarona Group. The Andrarona Group shows a low-grade metamorphic overprint in the area near Antalaha; illite crystallinity values scatter around 0.17°Δ2Θ CuKα, which is within the epizone. The Ampohafana Formation consists of undeformed, polymict conglomerate, cross-bedded sandstone, and red mudstone. An illite crystallinity value of >0.25°Δ2Θ CuKα obtained from the rocks is typical of the diagenetic zone. Occurrences of rhyodacite pebbles in the Ampohafana Formation and the intrusion of a basaltic dyke suggest a deposition in a WSW-ENE-trending graben system during the opening of the Indian

  1. At the Cratonic Crossroads: A geochronologic and geochemical perspective on the Little Rocky Mountains, Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gifford, J. N.; Mueller, P. A.; Foster, D. A.; Mogk, D. W.

    2012-12-01

    The Medicine Hat Block (MHB) is a poorly constrained structural element in the Paleoproterozoic amalgamation of Laurentia. It lies between the Wyoming and Hearne cratons along the northern margin of the Great Falls Tectonic Zone. The block was caught between the Hearne and Wyoming cratons during the Paleoproterozoic closure of an ocean and subsequent continental collision. The majority of the MHB is concealed by younger material, and it is recognized primarily by its seismic signature and its influence on the geochemistry of younger igneous rocks. The MHB appears to be composed of Archean (2.6-3.1 Ga) and Proterozoic (1.75 Ga) continental crust based on limited data from drill holes and xenoliths. The Little Rocky Mountains (LRM) are the only potential exposure of Precambrian basement rocks in the northeastern GFTZ, and represent unique surface exposure of the MHB. The LRM is cored by a dome-shaped Tertiary syenite intrusion, with Precambrian metamorphic units exposed along the margins of the dome. Limited previous geochronology from the LRM includes K/Ar ages of 1.7-1.75 Ga and a Rb/Sr age of c. 2.55 Ga from a quartzofeldspathic paragneisses. These data leave the affinity of the LRM uncertain, either representing reworked Archean crust and/or Paleoproterozoic material generated during the subduction of oceanic lithosphere and formation of the GFTZ. New U/Pb ages of zircons from the Precambrian meta-igneous rocks in the LRM range from 2.2 - 3.3 Ga, with prominent peaks between 2.6 - 2.8 Ga. Outliers clustering around 1.7 - 1.8 Ga are rare and likely reflect Paleoproterozoic reworking of older material. These ages are consistent with a MHB affinity for the LRM. Pb-isotope data define a 3.1 Ga model age, which suggests some influence of older Wyoming Craton or MHB crust. The dominance of 2.6-2.8 Ga U/Pb ages suggests that the Paleoproterozoic igneous arc was constructed on pre-existing MHB crust. Models for reconciling the high angle junction between the GFTZ and

  2. The Consequences of Uniform High Temperatures in the Cordillera and Other Subduction Backarc Mountain Belts Compared to Cratons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyndman, R. D.

    2012-12-01

    Many if not most continental areas have experienced a period of being in the subduction zone backarc. The thermal regime of the Cordillera and other current and recent subduction backarcs is concluded to be remarkably uniformly hot, 800-900C at Moho, in contrast to cratons, 400-500C at Moho. Constraints come from: heat flow-heat generation models; mantle tomography velocities; xenolith pressure (depth)-temperatures, Te (effective elastic lithosphere thickness); seismic and electrical thickness of lithosphere; maximum depth of seismicity; depth of Curie temperature; and thermal elevation. The consequences of these high temperatures are reviewed: (1) In the Cordillera there is a surprisingly constant 1,600 m elevation contribution due to thermal isostasy compared to the cratons. The thermal expansion contribution results in the Cordillera having a high elevation in spite of having an average thin crust (~35 km), compared to the cratons (~40 km). (2) Weak mobile belts like the Cordillera are a consequence of their high temperatures. Plate boundary forces and elevation potential are sufficient for ongoing lithosphere deformation. Cratons are cold and strong. (3) In the Cordillera and most other back arcs, the lower crust is very weak and commonly acts as a detachment over long distances. Lower crust horizontal reflectors may mark the detachment. Also, foreland basal thrusting often detaches into the backarc lower crust. (4) In backarcs, high metamorphic temperature gradients (e.g., Barrovian metamorphism) predate collision orogeny; there is no "heat of orogeny" required. (5) Cordillera earthquakes occur only in the brittle upper crust, 10-15 km. When subduction terminates, backarcs cool with a time constant of about 300 m.y. and approach a cold craton thermal regime by ~1 Ga. As an example, the former Appalachian backarc has now substantially cooled.

  3. Sone megafan: A non-Himalayan megafan of craton origin on the southern margin of the middle Ganga Basin, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Sudarsan; Saha, Dipankar; Dayal, Shankar

    2015-12-01

    Researchers in the last few decades have focused on the fluvial megafans at the base of Himalayan foothills in the Ganga Basin. No major effort has so far been made to delineate any such large depositional environment at the base of the northern Indian peninsular craton at the distal parts of the basin. In this work, for the first time, we document a megafan, unusually created by the cratonic Sone River in the marginal plains south of the Ganga. The geomorphology of the megafan surface, distribution of palaeochannels, sedimentology, and areal extent of the megafan are described. The study also reconstructs the tectonic and palaeoclimatic conditions, which might have helped in sediment supply from the cratonic catchment areas of the Sone. We suggest tectonic control over the Sone River channel dynamics and development of the megafan. The oval- and fan-shaped, craton-derived sediment body covers an area of around 12,000 km2 in the marginal plains and about 9000 km2 in the central alluvium north of the Ganga River. The megafan is around 190 km long and ~ 240 km wide. The mean slope of the megafan surface is ~ 0.03°. An onlap of Himalayan sediments has occurred over the megafan at its toe parts caused by southward encroachment of the Ganga during the Holocene. The megafan sediments comprise brownish yellow fine to coarse sand and gravels with an admixture of carbonaceous nodules (kankars). The thickness of the megafan sediment, which directly overlies the Precambrian basement, varies from only a few meters in the south near the peninsular craton to ~ 1000 m at the north in the central alluvial plain. The granular zones form prolific aquifer systems in an otherwise poor hydrogeological setting of the marginal plains.

  4. The Precambrian of Transangaria, Yenisei Ridge (Siberia): Neoproterozoic microcontinent, Grenville-age orogen, or reworked margin of the Siberian craton?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmichev, Alexander B.; Sklyarov, Eugene V.

    2016-01-01

    The Yenisei Ridge was traditionally perceived as an uplifted segment of the western Siberian craton affected by Neoproterozoic collision events. However, the suggestions for Archaean or Palaeoproterozoic ('Siberian') basement in Transangaria have not been confirmed by reliable geochronological data. A new view regards most of the Ridge, namely, its Transangarian segment, to be an exotic Neoproterozoic terrane that collided with Siberia in the late Neoproterozoic. This paper presents new U-Pb SHRIMP zircon ages demonstrating that Archaean rocks (2611 ± 12 Ma) actually exist in this territory. We also provide a review of published U-Pb zircon ages for igneous and metamorphic rocks of Transangaria together with our new age data. This geochronological dataset clarifies the geology of the Yenisei Ridge and leads to new conclusions, as follows. (1) It is likely that Transangaria was originally underlain by an Archaean-Palaeoproterozoic basement, similar to that of the Siberian craton. (2) Geochronological data do not confirm the idea of widespread "Greenvillian age" granitoides in Transangaria. (3) The Neoproterozoic evolution of the Yenisei Ridge segment of the Siberian craton margin includes the following events. (i) Collision of an unidentified terrane with the western margin (in recent coordinates) of the Siberian craton during 900-855 Ma. The colliding terrane is no longer present in the current structure. (ii) Dextral shearing during 830-800 Ma may have been caused by counter-clockwise rotation of the Siberian craton. (iii) Extensional conditions prevailed during 800-700 Ma. The Isakovka oceanic basin formed at this time interval. (iv) Thrusting of the Isakovka island arc and accretionary prism onto the Siberian margin occurred during the late Neoproterozoic (650-630 Ma) and caused high-pressure metamorphism.

  5. Thermo-chemical structure of the lithospheric mantle underneath the Siberian craton inferred from long-range seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuskov, O. L.; Kronrod, V. A.; Prokofyev, A. A.; Pavlenkova, N. I.

    2014-03-01

    Based on a self-consistent thermodynamic-geophysical approach and xenolith-based constraints, we map the 2-D seismic, thermal and density structure of the mantle beneath the Siberian craton along the long-range profiles (Craton, Kimberlite, Rift and Meteorite) carried out in Russia with peaceful nuclear explosions. Structural peculiarities of the cratonic mantle are manifested by changes in seismic velocities, the degree and nature of layering and the relief of seismic boundaries. The results predict appreciable lateral temperature variations within the root to a depth of about 200 km, which are the main cause of seismic velocity variations. We find that the cratonic mantle is 300-400 °C colder than the tectonically younger surrounding mantle in this depth range. At greater depths, lateral changes in temperatures have little effect implying that thermal heterogeneity rapidly decreases. The present-day geotherms pass close to the 32.5-35 mW m- 2 conductive models and suggest low mantle heat flow. Within the model resolution, the thickness of the thermal boundary layer, TBL (defined as the depth of the 1300 °C adiabat) beneath Siberia does not depend significantly on the composition and can be estimated as 300 ± 30 km; temperature at the base of the TBL is close to the 1450 ± 100 °C isotherm. Changes in the composition from depleted to fertile material reveal a negligible effect on seismic velocities, which are practically unresolved by seismic methods, but remain the most important factor for the density increase of the cratonic root. Density variations in the lower part of the root due to the chemical composition are greater than those caused by temperature. We find that both compositional and thermal anomalies are required to explain the Siberian mantle by a keel model consisting of depleted garnet peridotite at depths of 100 to 180 km and more fertile material at greater depths.

  6. AfricaArray seismological studies of the structure and evolution of the African continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrheim, Raymond; Nyblade, Andrew; Brandt, Martin; Tugume, Fred; Mulibo, Gabriel; Kgaswane, Eldridge; Mangongolo, Azangi; Manzi, Musa; El Tahir, Nada; Loots, Letticia

    2014-05-01

    The AfricaArray programme was launched in 2005 to conduct research that promotes development in Africa by building human and infrastructural capacity in support of the mineral exploration, mining, geohazard and environmental sectors. The AfricaArray "backbone" network now consists of 51 geophysical observatories in 20 sub-Saharan countries. Most stations are equipped with broadband seismometers, while 25 stations have continuous GPS sensors and 22 stations have meteorological packs. In addition, several temporary seismic arrays have been deployed to investigate the seismotectonics of the East African Rift System, the extent of the Congo craton, and the rifting of Mozambique and Madagascar. In this paper we will present results pertinent to large-scale crustal and mantle geodynamic processes that have been obtained by AfricaArray researchers. Brandt and Mulibo elucidated the relationship between the African Superplume, Superswell and the East African Rift System by studying the seismic velocity structure of the mantle. Kgaswane jointly inverted P-wave receiver functions (PRFs) and surface waves, and found that the Kalahari Craton lower crust is largely mafic, except for a few terrains such as the Kimberley. Kgaswane also produced evidence that supports a link between the eastern and western lobes of the Bushveld Complex. Mangongolo used surface wave tomography to define the south-western boundary of the Congo Craton. El Tahir used PRFs to investigate the crustal structure of the Khartoum Basin, while Tugume determined the Moho depths and Poisson's ratios of the Precambrian crust in East Africa. Manzi reprocessed 3D reflection seismic data covering part of the Witwatersrand goldfields using seismic attribute analysis methods, and has provided new constraints on the evolution of the Basin during the Neoarchean. Loots interpreted a 105 km 2D seismic reflection profile immediately to the north of the Cape Fold Belt, imaging the Karoo and Cape Supergroup rocks and the

  7. Anisotropic structure of the African upper mantle from Rayleigh and Love wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebai, Amal; Stutzmann, Eléonore; Montagner, Jean-Paul; Sicilia, Déborah; Beucler, Eric

    2006-04-01

    The geodynamics of the mantle below Africa is not well understood and anisotropy tomography can provide new insight into the coupling between the African plate and the underlying mantle convection. In order to study the anisotropic structure of the upper mantle beneath Africa, we have measured phase velocities of 2900 Rayleigh and 1050 Love waves using the roller-coaster algorithm [Beucler, E., Stutzmann, E., Montagner, J.-P., 2003. Surface-wave higher mode phase velocity measurments, using a roller-coaster type algorithm. Geophys. J. Int. 155 (1), 289-307]. These phase velocities have been inverted to obtain a new tomographic model that gives access to isotropic S V-wave velocity perturbations, azimuthal and radial anisotropies. Isotropic S V-wave velocity maps have a lateral resolution of 500 km. Anisotropy parameters have a lateral resolution of 1000 km which is uniform over Africa for azimuthal anisotropy but decreases at the West and South of Africa for radial anisotropy. At shallow depth, azimuthal anisotropy varies over horizontal distances much smaller than the continent scale. At 280 km depth, azimuthal anisotropy is roughly N-S, except in the Afar area, which might indicate differential motion between the African plate and the underlying mantle. The three cratons of West Africa, Congo and Kalahari are associated with fast velocities and transverse anisotropy that decrease very gradually down to 300 km depth. On the other hand, we observe a significant change in the direction and amplitude of azimuthal anisotropy at about 180 km depth, which could be the signature of the root of these cratons. The Tanzania craton is a shallower structure than the other African cratons and the slow velocities (-2%) observed on the maps at 180 and 280 km depth could be the signature of hot material such as a plume head below the craton. This slow velocity anomaly extends toward the Afar and azimuthal anisotropy fast directions are N-S at 180 km depth, indicating a possible

  8. A major Archean, gold- and crust-forming event in the Kaapvaal craton, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Jason; Ruiz, Joaquin; Chesley, John; Walshe, John; England, Gavin

    2002-09-13

    The 2.89- to 2.76-gigayear-old conglomerates of the Central Rand Group of South Africa host an immense concentration of gold. The gold and rounded pyrites from the conglomerates yield a rhenium-osmium isochron age of 3.03 +/- 0.02 gigayears and an initial 187Os/188Os ratio of 0.1079 +/- 0.0001. This age is older than that of the conglomerates. Thus, the gold is detrital and was not deposited by later hydrothermal fluids. This Middle Archean gold mineralization event corresponds to a period of rapid crustal growth in which much of the Kaapvaal craton was formed and is evidence for a significant noble metal flux from the mantle. PMID:12228713

  9. The Montesbelos mass-flow (southern Amazonian craton, Brazil): a Paleoproterozoic volcanic debris avalanche deposit?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roverato, M.

    2016-07-01

    The present contribution documents the extremely well-preserved Paleoproterozoic architecture of the Montesbelos breccia (named here for the first time), which is interpreted as a rare example of a subaerial paleoproterozoic (>1.85 Ga) granular-dominated mass-flow deposit, few of which are recorded in the literature. Montesbelos deposit is part of the andesitic Sobreiro Formation located in the São Felix do Xingu region, southern Amazonian craton, northern Brazil. The large volume, high variability of textural features, presence of broken clasts, angular low sphericity fragments, mono- to heterolithic character, and the size of the outcrops point to a volcanic debris avalanche flow. Fluviatile sandy material and debris flows are associated with the deposit as a result of post-depositional reworking processes.

  10. Petrophysical constraints on the seismic properties of the Kaapvaal craton mantle root

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptiste, V.; Tommasi, A.

    2014-01-01

    We calculated the seismic properties of 47 mantle xenoliths from 9 kimberlitic pipes in the Kaapvaal craton based on their modal composition, the crystal-preferred orientations (CPO) of olivine, ortho- and clinopyroxene, and garnet, the Fe content of olivine, and the pressures and temperatures at which the rocks were equilibrated. These data allow constraining the variation of seismic anisotropy and velocities within the cratonic mantle. The fastest P and S2 wave propagation directions and the polarization of fast split shear waves (S1) are always subparallel to olivine [100] axes of maximum concentration, which marks the lineation (fossil flow direction). Seismic anisotropy is higher for high olivine contents and stronger CPO. Maximum P wave azimuthal anisotropy (AVp) ranges between 2.5 and 10.2% and the maximum S wave polarization anisotropy (AVs), between 2.7 and 8%. Changes in olivine CPO symmetry result in minor variations in the seismic anisotropy patterns, mainly in the apparent isotropy directions for shear wave splitting. Seismic properties averaged over 20 km-thick depth sections are, therefore, very homogeneous. Based on these data, we predict the anisotropy that would be measured by SKS, Rayleigh (SV) and Love (SH) waves for five endmember orientations of the foliation and lineation. Comparison to seismic anisotropy data from the Kaapvaal shows that the coherent fast directions, but low delay times imaged by SKS studies, and the low azimuthal anisotropy with with the horizontally polarized S waves (SH) faster than the vertically polarized S wave (SV) measured using surface waves are best explained by homogeneously dipping (45°) foliations and lineations in the cratonic mantle lithosphere. Laterally or vertically varying foliation and lineation orientations with a dominantly NW-SE trend might also explain the low measured anisotropies, but this model should also result in backazimuthal variability of the SKS splitting data, not reported in the

  11. Petrophysical constraints on the seismic properties of the Kaapvaal craton mantle root

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virginie, Baptiste; Andrea, Tommasi

    2014-05-01

    We calculated the seismic properties of 47 mantle xenoliths from 9 kimberlitic pipes in the Kaapvaal craton based on their modal composition, the crystal preferred orientations (CPO) of olivine, ortho- and clinopyroxene, and garnet, the Fe content of olivine, and the pressures and temperatures at which the rocks were equilibrated. These data allow constraining the variation of seismic anisotropy and velocities within the cratonic mantle. The fastest P and S2 waves propagation direction and the polarization of fast split shear wave (S1) are always subparallel to olivine [100] axes maximum concentration, which marks the lineation (fossil flow direction). Seismic anisotropy is higher for high olivine contents and stronger CPO. Maximum P-wave azimuthal anisotropy (AVp) ranges between 2.5 and 10.2% and the maximum S-wave polarization anisotropy (AVs), between 2.7 and 8%. Changes in olivine CPO symmetry result in minor variations in the seismic anisotropy patterns, mainly in the apparent isotropy directions for shear wave splitting. Seismic properties averaged over 20 km thick depth sections are, therefore, very homogeneous. Based on these data, we predict the anisotropy that would be measured by SKS, Rayleigh (SV) and Love (SH) waves for 5 end-member orientations of the foliation and lineation. Comparison to seismic anisotropy data in the Kaapvaal shows that the coherent fast directions, but low delay times imaged by SKS studies and the low azimuthal anisotropy with SH faster than SV measured using surface waves are best explained by a homogeneously dipping (45°) foliation and lineation in the cratonic mantle lithosphere. Laterally or vertically varying foliation and lineation orientations with a dominantly NW-SE trend might also explain the low measured anisotropies, but this model should also result in backazimuthal variability of the SKS splitting data, not reported in the seismological data. The strong compositional heterogeneity of the Kaapvaal peridotite

  12. East-China Geochemistry Database (ECGD):A New Networking Database for North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Ma, W.

    2010-12-01

    North China Craton is one of the best natural laboratories that research some Earth Dynamic questions[1]. Scientists made much progress in research on this area, and got vast geochemistry data, which are essential for answering many fundamental questions about the age, composition, structure, and evolution of the East China area. But the geochemical data have long been accessible only through the scientific literature and theses where they have been widely dispersed, making it difficult for the broad Geosciences community to find, access and efficiently use the full range of available data[2]. How to effectively store, manage, share and reuse the existing geochemical data in the North China Craton area? East-China Geochemistry Database(ECGD) is a networking geochemical scientific database system that has been designed based on WebGIS and relational database for the structured storage and retrieval of geochemical data and geological map information. It is integrated the functions of data retrieval, spatial visualization and online analysis. ECGD focus on three areas: 1.Storage and retrieval of geochemical data and geological map information. Research on the characters of geochemical data, including its composing and connecting of each other, we designed a relational database, which based on geochemical relational data model, to store a variety of geological sample information such as sampling locality, age, sample characteristics, reference, major elements, rare earth elements, trace elements and isotope system et al. And a web-based user-friendly interface is provided for constructing queries. 2.Data view. ECGD is committed to online data visualization by different ways, especially to view data in digital map with dynamic way. Because ECGD was integrated WebGIS technology, the query results can be mapped on digital map, which can be zoomed, translation and dot selection. Besides of view and output query results data by html, txt or xls formats, researchers also can

  13. Low water contents in diamond mineral inclusions: Proto-genetic origin in a dry cratonic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Lawrence A.; Logvinova, Alla M.; Howarth, Geoffrey H.; Liu, Yang; Peslier, Anne H.; Rossman, George R.; Guan, Yunbin; Chen, Yang; Sobolev, Nikolay V.

    2016-01-01

    The mantle is the major reservoir of Earth's water, hosted within Nominally Anhydrous Minerals (NAMs) (e.g., Bell and Rossman, 1992; Peslier et al., 2010; Peslier, 2010; Nestola and Smyth, 2015), in the form of hydrogen bonded to the silicate's structural oxygen. From whence cometh this water? Is the water in these minerals representative of the Earth's primitive upper mantle or did it come from melting events linked to crustal formation or to more recent metasomatic/re-fertilization events? During diamond formation, NAMs are encapsulated at hundreds of kilometers depth within the mantle, thereby possibly shielding and preserving their pristine water contents from re-equilibrating with fluids and melts percolating through the lithospheric mantle. Here we show that the NAMs included in diamonds from six locales on the Siberian Craton contain measurable and variable H2O concentrations from 2 to 34 parts per million by weight (ppmw) in olivine, 7 to 276 ppmw in clinopyroxene, and 11-17 ppmw in garnets. Our results suggest that if the inclusions were in equilibrium with the diamond-forming fluid, the water fugacity would have been unrealistically low. Instead, we consider the H2O contents of the inclusions, shielded by diamonds, as pristine representatives of the residual mantle prior to encapsulation, and indicative of a protogenetic origin for the inclusions. Hydrogen diffusion in the diamond does not appear to have modified these values significantly. The H2O contents of NAMs in mantle xenoliths may represent some later metasomatic event(s), and are not always representative of most of the continental lithospheric mantle. Results from the present study also support the conclusions of Peslier et al. (2010) and Novella et al. (2015) that the dry nature of the SCLM of a craton may provide stabilization of its thickened continental roots.

  14. (142)Nd evidence for an enriched Hadean reservoir in cratonic roots.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Dewashish; Scherer, Erik E; Mezger, Klaus

    2009-06-25

    The isotope (146)Sm undergoes alpha-decay to (142)Nd, with a half-life of 103 million years. Measurable variations in the (142)Nd/(144)Nd values of rocks resulting from Sm-Nd fractionation could therefore only have been produced within about 400 million years of the Solar System's formation (that is, when (146)Sm was extant). The (142)Nd/(144)Nd compositions of terrestrial rocks are accordingly a sensitive monitor of the main silicate differentiation events that took place in the early Earth. High (142)Nd/(144)Nd values measured in some Archaean rocks from Greenland hint at the existence of an early incompatible-element-depleted mantle. Here we present measurements of low (142)Nd/(144)Nd values in 1.48-gigayear-(Gyr)-old lithospheric mantle-derived alkaline rocks from the Khariar nepheline syenite complex in southeastern India. These data suggest that a reservoir that was relatively enriched in incompatible elements formed at least 4.2 Gyr ago and traces of its isotopic signature persisted within the lithospheric root of the Bastar craton until at least 1.48 Gyr ago. These low (142)Nd/(144)Nd compositions may represent a diluted signature of a Hadean (4 to 4.57 Gyr ago) enriched reservoir that is characterized by even lower values. That no evidence of the early depleted mantle has been observed in rocks younger than 3.6 Gyr (refs 3, 4, 7) implies that such domains had effectively mixed back into the convecting mantle by then. In contrast, some early enriched components apparently escaped this fate. Thus, the mantle sampled by magmatism since 3.6 Gyr ago may be biased towards a depleted composition that would be balanced by relatively more enriched reservoirs that are 'hidden' in Hadean crust, the D'' layer of the lowermost mantle or, as we propose here, also within the roots of old cratons. PMID:19553997

  15. Is the Paleoproterozoic Jiao-Liao-Ji Belt (North China Craton) a rift?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhuang; Chen, Bin; Wei, Chunjing

    2016-04-01

    As a typical example of the Paleoproterozoic crust in the Eastern Block of the North China Craton, the Paleoproterozoic Jiao-Liao-Ji Belt consists principally of the Liaohe Group (and its equivalents), Liaoji granites and mafic intrusions. Previous studies indicate that the evolution of the Jiao-Liao-Ji Belt has been mainly attributed to the opening and closing of an intracontinental rift along the eastern continental margin of the North China Craton. Here we synthesize the Paleoproterozoic magmatism, sedimentation, metamorphism and metallogeny against the rift model and propose a process of arc-continent collision between the northern Longgang and the southern Nangrim Blocks. This conclusion is consistent with the observations, including that (a) the 2.0- to 2.2-Ga magmatism shows a typical subalkaline series, rather than a bimodal distribution, since the mafic rocks mostly have arc affinities and the acidic-intermediate rocks belong to the calc-alkaline series; (b) the main source of the 1.9- to 2.0-Ga sedimentary rocks is the Paleoproterozoic arc materials, indicating a fore-arc or back-arc basin setting; (c) a couple of big borate deposits occur in the boron-rich volcanic rocks that were formed in convergent continental margins; (d) the North and South Liaohe Groups show different rock associations and metamorphic histories (P-T paths); and (e) the Nangrim and Longgang Blocks vary in lithological units, geochronology and metamorphic features. Thus, an arc-continent collision tectonic scenario for the Paleoproterozoic Jiao-Liao-Ji Belt is involved: (a) a southward subduction in the period 2.0-2.2 Ga; (b) sedimentation during the period 1.9-2.0 Ga; (c) arc-continent collision at ca. 1.9 Ga; and (d) post-collisional extension at 1.82-1.87 Ga, marking the end of the Paleoproterozoic tectonothermal event.

  16. Wisconsin gravity minimum: Solution of a geologic and geophysical puzzle and implications for cratonic evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.J.; Hinze, W.J. )

    1992-06-01

    An intense Bouguer gravity anomaly minimum extending across much of Wisconsin cannot be explained by the surface Phanerozoic sedimentary strata, the basement Precambrian geology, or the topography of the region. The most intense ({minus}100 mgal) part of the minimum coincides with the 1.47 Ga anorogenic granitic Wolf River batholith of northeastern Wisconsin. In southern Wisconsin, however, the densities of the Precambrian basement rocks, which are older than the batholith, provide no clue to the origin of the anomaly. The gradients of the minimum indicate that the source of the anomaly is in the upper crust. Furthermore, nearby deep seismic reflection data indicate that lower crustal structures do not significantly contribute to the gravity minimum. Thus, the minimum is appropriately interpreted as originating from the low-density Wolf River batholith that crops out only in northeastern Wisconsin but is buried beneath a veneer of older rocks in the southern and central parts of the state. Gravity modeling suggests that the batholith is at least 10 km thick and encompasses an area of {approximately}50,000 km{sup 2}. This interpretation provides an important clue to the origin of similar negative gravity anomalies of the Phanerozoic strata-covered craton. Also, the presence of this massive granitic body appears to have influenced the evolution of the craton - e.g., by controlling the location of the 1.1 Ga Midcontinent rift system and the Paleozoic Wisconsin arch. The fact that the Wolf River batholith is mostly buried suggests that central Wisconsin has been tectonically stable for the past 1.47 b.y. and that the Precambrian basement has been minimally eroded.

  17. Lithosphere formation in the central Slave Craton (Canada): plume subcretion or lithosphere accretion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsen, Stein Rune; Solheim, Inger; Beck, Pieter S. A.; Høgda, Kjell Arild; Wielgolaski, Frans Emil; Tømmervik, Hans

    2007-10-01

    Major-element compositions of minerals in peridotite xenoliths from the Lac de Gras kimberlites provide constraints on the mode of lithosphere formation beneath the central Slave Craton, Canada. Magnesia contents of reconstructed whole rocks correlate positively with NiO and negatively with CaO contents, consistent with variable partial melt extraction. Alumina and Cr2O3 contents are broadly positively correlated, suggestive of melt depletion in the absence of a Cr Al phase. Garnet modes are high at a given Al2O3 content (a proxy for melt depletion), falling about a 7 GPa melt depletion model. These observations, combined with high olivine Mg# and major-element relationships of FeO-poor peridotites (<7.5 wt%) indicative of melt loss at pressures >3 GPa (residual FeO content being a sensitive indicator of melt extraction pressure), and similar high pressures of last equilibration (˜4.2 to 5.8 GPa), provide multiple lines of evidence that the mantle beneath the central Slave Craton has originated as a residue from high-pressure melting, possibly during plume subcretion. Apparent low melt depletion pressures for high-FeO peridotites (>7.5 wt%) could suggest formation in an oceanic setting, followed by subduction to their depth of entrainment. However, these rocks, which are characterised by low SiO2 contents (<43 wt%), are more likely to be the result of post-melting FeO-addition, leading to spuriously low estimates of melt extraction pressures. They may have reacted with a silica-undersaturated melt that dissolved orthopyroxene, or experienced olivine injection by crystallising melts. A secular FeO-enrichment of parts of the deep mantle lithosphere is supported by lower average Mg# in xenolithic olivine (91.7) compared to olivine inclusions in diamond (92.6).

  18. Cryogenian rift-related magmatism and sedimentation: South-western Congo Craton, Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGee, Ben; Halverson, Galen P.; Collins, Alan S.

    2012-11-01

    We present LA-ICPMS U-Pb zircon ages and field data from the rift-related, Cryogenian-aged Toekems Sub-basin in the south-western Welwitschia Inlier on the southern margin of the Congo Craton in the Damara Belt (Northern Margin Zone), Namibia. The Toekems Sub-basin comprises a wedge up to 730 m-thick of dominantly clastic sediments between Palaeoproterozoic basement and the Cryogenian Abenab Subgroup. The base of the succession is a distinct coarsening upward breccia that contains entirely basement clasts. The overlying strata consist of mixed polymictic conglomerates, debris flow diamictites, tuffs, volcaniclastic sandstone, siltstone, and minor carbonates. A pegmatite cross-cutting the basal breccia has yielded a mean weighted average 206Pb/238U age of 763 ± 5 Ma. This age statistically overlaps the nearby 756 ± 2 Ma Oas Syenite and 760 ± 1 Ma ash bed in the Ombombo Subgroup to the north and is somewhat older than the ca. 746 Ma Naauwpoort Volcanics, which underlie the glacigenic Chuos Formation in the Summas Mountains to the south. This indicates that initial sedimentation in the Toekems Sub-basin began prior to 763 Ma. However, the presence of laminae-deforming lonestones, iron-formation and the stratigraphic position relative to the overlying Rasthof cap carbonate suggest that most of the succession is glacially-influenced, and hence correlates with the Chuos Formation. These results imply a significant disconformity beneath the Naauwpoort Volcanics and suggest multi-phase rifting during the breakup of south-western Congo Craton from Rodinia.

  19. African-Americans and Alzheimer's

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share Plus on Google Plus African-Americans and Alzheimer's alz.org | IHaveAlz Introduction 10 Warning Signs Brain ... African-Americans are at a higher risk for Alzheimer's disease. Many Americans dismiss the warning signs of ...

  20. The Struggles over African Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maseko, Pam; Vale, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In this interview, African Language expert Pam Maseko speaks of her own background and her first encounter with culture outside of her mother tongue, isiXhosa. A statistical breakdown of South African languages is provided as background. She discusses Western (originally missionary) codification of African languages and suggests that this approach…

  1. Psychological Misdiagnosis of African Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garretson, Deborah J.

    1993-01-01

    Reviews historical and current problems with making accurate psychological diagnoses of African Americans. Suggests that misdiagnosis is strongly related to pathologization of African-American culture itself. Explores diagnostic process, stereotypes of African-American psychopathology, cultural differences in values and life stressors, and…

  2. Crustal Structure across The North China Craton from long-range seismic wide angle reflection/refraction profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaofeng; Wang, Fuyun; Jia, Shixu; Duan, Yonghong

    2014-05-01

    The North China Craton (NCC) is the oldest craton in China, which formed around 2.5Ga and had a 200 km thick lithosphere during the Paleozoic. The cratonic lithosphere of NCC has experienced strong thinning since the Mesozoic. In the past 30 years, a lot of excellent research about NCC have provided some different tectonic models, however, carton destruction is a sophisticated process. Though there have been many deep seismic sounding profiles in North China, but none of them is long enough to sample the complete section of thinned and preserved Craton. Recent long range seismic wide angle reflection/refraction experiment have provided the best opportunities to obtain better knowledge of seismic structure and properties of lithosphere. A 1500 km long wide angle reflection/refraction profile was completed in 2009. Our long range profile extends from west end of Ordos Plateau, across Shanxi Plateau, Taihang Mountains, to Luxi Uplift. We present a hybrid tomographic and layered velocity model of the crust and uppermost mantle along the profile crossed whole the north China craton. The model shows the crustal thickness of the region is very variable. The Moho topography varies more than 10km in the Central part of the north China craton. In particular, the crust appears the thinnest in the North China Plain, where the crust consists of very thick upper-mid crust and very thin lower crust, and the lower crust is with a lower velocity (~6.8km/s). The Moho dip with thinner lower crust beneath the Shanxi plateau may support the Central NCC has been affected at some time since its formation in the Archean. Furthermore, the TFZ is manifested in the deep structure. Our model provide the seismic evidences supporting that the TFZ extend deep into the uppermost mantle. It is the hypothesis that TFZ is a major channel for asthenosphere upwelling accompanying the tectonic extension and lithospheric reactivation in the Mesozoic-Cenozoic time. The different structural features may

  3. Narcolepsy in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Makoto; O'Hara, Ruth; Einen, Mali; Lin, Ling; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Although narcolepsy affects 0.02–0.05% of individuals in various ethnic groups, clinical presentation in different ethnicities has never been fully characterized. Our goal was to study phenotypic expression across ethnicities in the United States. Design/Setting: Cases of narcolepsy from 1992 to 2013 were identified from searches of the Stanford Center for Narcolepsy Research database. International Classification of Sleep Disorders, Third Edition diagnosis criteria for type 1 and type 2 narcolepsy were used for inclusion, but subjects were separated as with and without cataplexy for the purpose of data presentation. Information extracted included demographics, ethnicity and clinical data, HLA-DQB1*06:02, polysomnography (PSG), multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) data, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hypocretin-1 level. Patients: 182 African-Americans, 839 Caucasians, 35 Asians, and 41 Latinos with narcolepsy. Results: Sex ratio, PSG, and MSLT findings did not differ across ethnicities. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score was higher and age of onset of sleepiness earlier in African Americans compared with other ethnicities. HLA-DQB1*06:02 positivity was higher in African Americans (91.0%) versus others (76.6% in Caucasians, 80.0% in Asians, and 65.0% in Latinos). CSF hypocretin-1 level, obtained in 222 patients, was more frequently low (≤ 110 pg/ml) in African Americans (93.9%) versus Caucasians (61.5%), Asians (85.7%) and Latinos (75.0%). In subjects with low CSF hypocretin-1, African Americans (28.3%) were 4.5 fold more likely to be without cataplexy when compared with Caucasians (8.1%). Conclusions: Narcolepsy in African Americans is characterized by earlier symptom onset, higher Epworth Sleepiness Scale score, higher HLA-DQB1*06:02 positivity, and low cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1 level in the absence of cataplexy. In African Americans, more subjects without cataplexy have type 1 narcolepsy. Citation: Kawai M, O'Hara R, Einen M, Lin L

  4. The Genetic Structure and History of Africans and African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Tishkoff, Sarah A.; Reed, Floyd A.; Friedlaender, Françoise R.; Ehret, Christopher; Ranciaro, Alessia; Froment, Alain; Hirbo, Jibril B.; Awomoyi, Agnes A.; Bodo, Jean-Marie; Doumbo, Ogobara; Ibrahim, Muntaser; Juma, Abdalla T.; Kotze, Maritha J.; Lema, Godfrey; Moore, Jason H.; Mortensen, Holly; Nyambo, Thomas B.; Omar, Sabah A.; Powell, Kweli; Pretorius, Gideon S.; Smith, Michael W.; Thera, Mahamadou A.; Wambebe, Charles; Weber, James L.; Williams, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    Africa is the source of all modern humans, but characterization of genetic variation and of relationships among populations across the continent has been enigmatic. We studied 121 African populations, four African American populations, and 60 non-African populations for patterns of variation at 1327 nuclear microsatellite and insertion/deletion markers. We identified 14 ancestral population clusters in Africa that correlate with self-described ethnicity and shared cultural and/or linguistic properties. We observed high levels of mixed ancestry in most populations, reflecting historical migration events across the continent. Our data also provide evidence for shared ancestry among geographically diverse hunter-gatherer populations (Khoesan speakers and Pygmies). The ancestry of African Americans is predominantly from Niger-Kordofanian (~71%), European (~13%), and other African (~8%) populations, although admixture levels varied considerably among individuals. This study helps tease apart the complex evolutionary history of Africans and African Americans, aiding both anthropological and genetic epidemiologic studies. PMID:19407144

  5. The Other African Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matory, J. Lorand

    Black North America is ethnically and culturally diverse. It contains many groups who do not call themselves or have not always called themselves "Negro,""Black,""African-American," and so forth, such as Louisiana Creoles of color and many of the Indian tribes east of the Mississippi. There are also numerous North American ethnic groups of African…

  6. African American rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Boyette, Jennings R; Stucker, Fred J

    2014-08-01

    Rhinoplasty in patients of African descent requires a patient-specific approach, because the goals and ideal proportions differ from the white nose. This article discusses approaches to surgical correction of common anatomic variations. In addition, common pitfalls are outlined. PMID:25049123

  7. Elective: African Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Kenneth V.

    The make-up of a course in African literature for high school students is discussed. It is pointed out that the course can be constructed on already familiar lines. High school students will be able to describe clearly, for example, the relationship between environment and character or the dilemma of characters caught between traditional values…

  8. Heat flow, heat generation and crustal thermal structure of the northern block of the South Indian Craton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Mohan L.; Sharma, S. R.; Sundar, A.

    1988-01-01

    Heat flow values and heat generation data calculated from the concentration of heat producing radioactive elements, U, Th and K in surface rocks were analyzed. The South Indian Craton according to Drury et al., can be divided into various blocks, separated by late Proterozoic shear belts. The northern block comprises Eastern and Western Dharwar Cratons of Rogers (1986), Naqvi and Rogers (1987) and a part of the South Indian granulite terrain up to a shear system occupying the Palghat-Cauvery low lands. The geothermal data analysis clearly demonstrates that the present thermal characteristics of the above two Archaean terrains of the Indian and Australian Shields are quite similar. Their crustal thermal structures are likely to be similar also.

  9. Heat flow, heat generation and crustal thermal structure of the northern block of the South Indian Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Mohan L.; Sharma, S. R.; Sundar, A.

    Heat flow values and heat generation data calculated from the concentration of heat producing radioactive elements, U, Th and K in surface rocks were analyzed. The South Indian Craton according to Drury et al., can be divided into various blocks, separated by late Proterozoic shear belts. The northern block comprises Eastern and Western Dharwar Cratons of Rogers (1986), Naqvi and Rogers (1987) and a part of the South Indian granulite terrain up to a shear system occupying the Palghat-Cauvery low lands. The geothermal data analysis clearly demonstrates that the present thermal characteristics of the above two Archaean terrains of the Indian and Australian Shields are quite similar. Their crustal thermal structures are likely to be similar also.

  10. 2.6-2.7 Ga continental crust growth in Yangtze craton, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K.; Gao, S.; Wu, Y.

    2013-12-01

    A combined study of zircon U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopes and whole rock major and trace elements and Sr-Nd isotopes has been conducted for 10 granitic and tonalitic-trondhjemitic-granodioritic (TTG) gneisses from the Kongling terrain, the only known Archean microcontinent in the Yangtze craton, South China. The results reveal a significant magmatic event at ~2.6-2.7 Ga (Fig. 1), in addition to the previously reported ~2.9 Ga and ~3.2-3.3 Ga magmatism (Zhang et al., 2006; Jiao et al., 2009; Gao et al., 2011). The ~2.6-2.7 Ga rocks show relatively high REE (530-1074 ppm), apparently negative Eu anomaly (Eu/Eu* = 0.22-0.35), low #Mg (19.51-22.63) and low LaN/YbN (10.3-24.2). Besides, they have high K-feldspar proportion and relatively evaluated (K2O+Na2O)/CaO, TFeO/MgO, Zr, Nb, Ce and Y contents. Their 10000 × Ga/Al ratios range between 3.00 and 3.54. All these features suggest that the protoliths of these gneisses are A-type granites. Most of the ~2.6-2.7 Ga zircon grains have ɛHf(t) values >0 (up to 7.93, close to the depleted mantle value). This clearly indicates a considerably higher proportion of new crustal components in the ~2.6-2.7 Ga granitoids compared to the ~3.2-3.3 Ga and ~2.9 Ga TTGs. Our results support the conclusion of worldwide studies of igneous and detrital zircons that age peaks at 2.65-2.76 Ga represent increases in the volume of juvenile continental crust. The present study also confirms the existence of the two older magmatic events in the Kongling terrain. Both whole rock ɛNd(t) values (-3.74 to 1.59) and the zircon ɛHf(t) values (-11.18 to 3.55) for the ~2.9 Ga TTG and the Hf isotopes of ~3.2-3.3 Ga igneous zircons (-7.37 to 3.12) are chondritic or subchondritic, suggesting that they were mainly generated by reworking of older rocks with a small amount of new crustal additions. References Gao, S., Yang, J., Zhou, L., Li, M., Hu, Z.C., Guo, J.L., Yuan, H.L., Gong, H.J., Xiao, G.Q., Wei, J.Q., 2011. Age and growth of the Archean Kongling terrain

  11. The timing of gold mineralization across the eastern Yilgarn craton using U-Pb geochronology of hydrothermal phosphate minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vielreicher, Noreen; Groves, David; McNaughton, Neal; Fletcher, Ian

    2015-04-01

    The highly mineralized Eastern Goldfields of the eastern Yilgarn craton is an amalgamation of dominantly Neoarchaean granitoid-greenstone terranes and domains that record a history of early rifting, followed by westward directed collision with initial arc formation, collision and clastic basin formation, and final accretion to the western Yilgarn proto-craton between 2.66 and 2.60 billion years ago. The gold deposits that define this region as a world-class gold province are the product of orogenic processes that operated during accretion late in the tectonic history, after initial compressional deformation (D1-D2) and the majority of granitoid magmatism. Minor gold was also deposited throughout the entire tectonic history in magmatic-hydrothermal-related systems. However, such mineralization (mostly < 0.3 g/t gold) is nowhere economic unless it overprints, or is overprinted by, much higher-grade orogenic gold lodes. Robust SHRIMP U-Pb geochronology of gold-related hydrothermal xenotime and monazite supports structural studies that gold mineralization occurred during late transpressional events (D3-D4), shortly before cratonization. However, westward migration of collision and accretion produced a complementary diachroneity in the timing of gold mineralization of 5 to 20 m.y. between c. 2.65 Ma in the east (including Laverton District, Kurnalpi Terrane) to c. 2.63 Ma in the west (including Kalgoorlie Terrane) across the eastern part of the craton. The robust geochronology refutes previous suggestions that significant gold mineralization events extended from DE to D4 in the evolution of the orogen and that the Kalgoorlie gold deposits formed over a period of 45 m.y. The crustal continuum model is applicable within terranes where orogenic gold depositional events were penecontemporaneous, but must be modified to account for diachroneity of orogenic events and gold mineralization across the Eastern Goldfields.

  12. Precambrian Processes, the Trans-Hudson Orogen, and Cratonic Keels: Insights From Teleseismic Tomography in Northern Hudson Bay, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddell, M. V.; Bastow, I. D.; Gilligan, A.; Kendall, J. M.; Darbyshire, F. A.

    2015-12-01

    Earth conditions in the Precambrian, and their effect upon the formation of cratons and orogenies from that era, are not fully understood. For example, the precise onset of modern plate tectonics remains ambiguous; it has been hypothesised to have begun anywhere from ~4.1Ga (Hopkins, 2008) to ~1Ga (Stern, 2005). Also, the exceptional depth to which fast wave-speed and geoid anomalies extend beneath some cratons points to the existence of thick "cratonic keels", the origin of which remains unexplained. To improve our understanding of the early Earth processes, geological evidence preserved within ancient plates that have remained largely unchanged since the Precambrian can be used. The rocks of northern Hudson Bay include Archean domains, the Paleoproterozoic Trans-Hudson Orogen (THO), and lie atop one of the largest cratonic keels on Earth (Bastow et al., 2013), making this region an ideal laboratory for study of Precambrian processes. Here, we use seismological data recorded at Canadian POLARIS and Hudson Bay Lithospheric Experiment (HuBLE) stations to perform a relative arrival-time study of northern Hudson Bay region and the THO. Waveforms are aligned using the adaptive stacking routine of Rawlinson et al. (2004), and inversions are produced using the Fast Marching Tomography (FMTOMO) inversion code of Rawlinson et al. (2006). Our inversions provide an improved velocity model of the lithosphere and upper mantle of northern Canada, suggesting updated boundaries between lithospheric blocks at mantle depths and constituting new body-wave constraints on their structure. The results are used to address a number of outstanding questions regarding the processes that formed the THO and the Laurentian Keel of North America.

  13. Deformation of the Continental Lithosphere at the Margins of the North American Craton: Constraints from Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, M. D.; Benoit, M. H.; Ford, H. A.; Wirth, E. A.; Aragon, J. C.; Abrahams, L.; McNamara, J.; Jackson, K.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's continents exhibit striking properties, including relatively thick and low-density crust and a strong, thick, long-lived mantle lithosphere. Major questions related to the formation, stability, evolution, and dynamics of cratonic lithosphere remain unanswered. One promising avenue for understanding the stability of cratonic lithosphere through geologic time is to understand how their margins are deformed via tectonic processes such as orogenesis and rifting. Here we present results of several recent and ongoing studies which aim to constrain past lithospheric deformation along the eastern margin of the North American craton. Each of these studies focuses on constraining seismic anisotropy, or the directional dependence of seismic wavespeeds, in the lithospheric upper mantle. Because there is a causative link between upper mantle deformation and the resulting seismic anisotropy, studies of anisotropic structure in the upper mantle beneath continental interiors can shed light on the deformation processes associated with past tectonic events. The recent explosion in the availability of seismic data in the eastern United States, largely due to the EarthScope initiative, has enabled detailed studies of lithospheric deformation using anisotropic receiver function (RF) analysis and SKS splitting analysis. A comparison of lithospheric structure inferred from RFs for stations located to the east of the Grenville deformation front with those located within the cratonic interior argues for extensive deformation of the lithosphere during the formation and/or breakup of Rodinia. The pattern of fast SKS splitting directions measured at USArray Transportable Array (TA) stations shows clear evidence for a specific lithospheric anisotropy signature at stations beneath the Appalachian Mountains, indicating strong, coherent lithospheric deformation associated with Appalachian orogenesis. The Mid-Atlantic Geophysical Integrative Collaboration (MAGIC) experiment, a linear array

  14. The record of time in cratonic interior strata: Does exceptionally slow subsidence necessarily result in exceptionally poor stratigraphic completeness?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, Anthony C.; Miller, J.F.; McKay, R.M.; Palmer, A.R.; Taylor, John F.

    2008-01-01

    A newly constructed a high-resolution chronostratigraphic and lithostratigraphic framework for the Upper Cambrian and Lower Ordovician Sauk Sequence in the cratonic interior of North America provides insight into the long-standing question of how time is recorded in sedimentary packages deposited in shallow epeiric seas across regions with exceptionally slow subsidence. It reveals that time is recorded in these strata in a manner fundamentally similar to the way it is in a number of nearshore marine-dominated sedimentary packages that were deposited under conditions of markedly higher subsidence rates. The principal consequence of slow subsidence in the cratonic interior appears largely to be a pronounced shingling of chronostratigraphic units perpendicular to depositional strike. An evaluation of relative stratigraphic completeness of the Upper Cambrian and Lower Ordovician of this region suggests that a number of routine interpretations and assumptions must be re-evaluated. Our results are inconsistent with the common interpretation that: (1) cratonic interior sedimentary packages are exceptionally stratigraphically incomplete; and (2) that conditions of very slow subsidence and a bathymetrically shallow shelf by themselves preclude deposition of a relatively complete record of time. In refuting these conventional assumptions, our conclusions have implications for a variety of approaches that require a fundamental understanding of the stratigraphic record of time, such as efforts to construct eustatic sea level curves and evaluations of the fossil record of evolution.

  15. Metasomatic Control of Water in Garnet and Pyroxene from Kaapvaal Craton Mantle Xenoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslier, Anne H.; Woodland, Alan B.; Bell, David R.; Lazarov, Marina; Lapen, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) were used to determine water, rare earth (REE), lithophile (LILE), and high field strength (HFSE) element contents in garnet and pyroxene from mantle xenoliths, Kaapvaal craton, southern Africa. Water enters these nominally anhydrous minerals as protons bonded to structural oxygen in lattice defects. Pyroxene water contents (150-400 ppm in clinopyroxene; 40-250 ppm in orthopyroxene) correlate with their Al, Fe, Ca and Na and are homogeneous within a mineral grains and a xenolith. Garnets from Jagersfontein are chemically zoned for Cr, Ca, Ti and water contents. Garnets contain 0 to 20 ppm H2 Despite the fast diffusion rate of H in mantle m inerals, the observations above indicate that the water contents of mantle xenolith minerals were not disturbed during kimberlite entrainment and that the measured water data represent mantle values. Trace elements in all minerals show various degrees of light REE and LILE enrichments indicative of minimal to strong metasomatism. Water contents of peridotite minerals from the Kaapvaal lithosphere are not related to the degree of depletion of the peridotites. Instead, metasomatism exerts a clear control on the amount of water of mantle minerals. Xenoliths from each location record specific types of metasomatism with different outcomes for the water contents of mantle minerals. At pressures . 5.5 GPa, highly alkaline melts metasomatized Liqhobong and Kimberley peridotites, and increased the water contents of their olivine, pyroxenes and garnet. At higher pressures, the circulation of ultramafic melts reacting with peridotite resulted in co-variation of Ca, Ti and water at the edge of garnets at Jagersfontein, overall decreasing their water content, and lowered the water content of olivines at Finsch Mine. The calculated water content of these melts varies depending on whether the water content of the peridotite

  16. Late Permian appinite-granite complex from northwestern Liaoning, North China Craton: Petrogenesis and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Xue, Fuhong; Yuan, Lingling; Ma, Yuguang; Wilde, Simon A.

    2012-12-01

    The appinite-granite suite commonly occurs within post-subduction regimes during the final stage of an orogeny and thus holds the key to monitoring critical geodynamic and crustal evolutionary processes. The present zircon U-Pb dating and geochemical study documents the Late Permian appinite-granite complex from northwestern Liaoning, North China Craton. The hornblende-rich appinitic rocks have an SiO2 range from 41.8 to 53.4%, moderate to high alkali contents, enrichment in large ion lithophile elements and depletion in high field strength elements, with initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.7066 to 0.7128, ɛNd(t) of - 8.3 to - 13.3 and zircon ɛHf(t) from - 10.1 to - 18.7. These features suggest that their generation most likely involves metasomatism of mantle peridotites by sediment-derived liquids related to subduction and a later partial melting. The associated monzogranites range in SiO2 from 72.6 to 75.0% and exhibit a high-K calc-alkaline character, with high Sr-Ba abundances and elevated Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios. Such potassic adakitic signatures, plus their evolved isotopic compositions (87Sr/86Sri = 0.7063 to 0.7066, ɛNd(t) = - 15.6 to - 16.3, zircon ɛHf(t) = - 16.5 to - 18.8), are consistent with partial melting of mixed protoliths including newly underplated enriched mafic lower crust and minor old lower crustal materials. Such a mafic and felsic magma association not only attests to a heterogeneously enriched sub-continental lithospheric mantle beneath the northern North China Craton, but also indicates reworking within a post-orogenic transcurrent regime of lithospheric delamination. The temporal coincidence of the present appinite-granite complex with regional transcurrent fault activity leads to the further suggestion that such mafic-felsic magmatic suites could provide spatial markers for monitoring important post-orogenic structural and geodynamic processes.

  17. Biomarkers in Archaean banded iron formations : examples from Pilbara and Dhawar Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orberger, B.; Pinti, D. L.; Cloquet, C.; Hashizume, K.; Soyama, H.; Jayananda, M.; Wirth, R.; Gallien, J. P.; Massault, M.; Rouchon, V.

    The origin of Archeaen banded iron formations (BIF) and the role of biosphere in Fe precipitation is still highly debated. In order to elucidate these processes, detailed mineralogical and textural analyses combined with δ 15 N, δ 56 Fe and δ 13 C data were obtained on Fe-oxide bands from Marble Bar chert Unit (MB, 3.46 Ga, Pilbara craton, W. Australia) and a BIF from the Bababudan Group (BG, 2.7-2.9 Ga, Dhawar Craton, Southern India). Both samples are composed of alternating quartz and Feoxide bands with wavy micro-textures. CI-normalized REE patterns show that MB reflects hydrothermal fluid/basalt interactions, while BG precipitated from a hydrothermal fluid/seawater mixture. In MB, nano-cristalline hematite replaced magnetite, Mgcalcite and Fe-sulfides producing a matlike surface, preserving nanometric N-bearing amorphous carbon nodules. Measured C/N ratios (2.3 to 52) are typical of Precambrian organic matter. The δ 56 Fe of -0.40±0.02% suggests MOR-hydrothermal fluids as a Fe-source, while a δ 15 N of +7.4±0.4% is compatible with nitrification- denitrification processes and δ 13 C of -19.9±0.1% support an organic origin. BG is composed of intergrown magnetite and hematite. Disseminated grunerite and magnetite grew during low T metamorphism. Fe-oxide spherules compose vermicular- filaments that nucleated perpendicular to quartz surfaces. Fe-oxide spherule bunches are perfectly preserved in the silica bands forming micrometric mats, which contain heterogeneously distributed N (˜0.09at.%) and C (0.51 at.%, C/N=5.73). Bulk δ 13 C of -15.35%±0.10 points to an organic origin for C. The ?56 Fe in Fe and Si layers (0.75% to 2.16%) is compatible with a chemical precipitation for BIF. A negative correlation between ?56 Fe and the Th/U ratio suggests that Fe isotopic variations are related to fluid circulation and re-precipitation of Fe-oxides. High ?15 N, on one Feoxide layer, of +21.8±0.7%, corresponds to that observed for Archeaen BIFs and may be related

  18. Synsedimentary deformation and the paleoseismic record in Marinoan cap carbonate of the southern Amazon Craton, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Joelson Lima; Nogueira, Afonso César Rodrigues; Domingos, Fábio; Riccomini, Claudio

    2013-12-01

    Event Layers in Neoproterozoic cap carbonates of Brazil's southwestern Amazon Craton record post-Marinoan synsedimentary seismicity. The 35 m-thick cap carbonates overlie glaciogenic sediments related to the Marinoan glaciation (635 Ma) and are comprised of two units: the lower cap consists of dolomite (˜15 m thick) and the upper cap is limestone (˜25 m thick). The cap dolomite includes pinkish crystalline dolostone with even parallel lamination, stratiform stromatolites, eventual tube structures and megaripple bedded peloidal dolostone interpreted as shallow (euphotic) platform deposits. The cap limestone onlaps the cap dolomite and consists of red marl, gray to black bituminous lime mudstone, bituminous shale with abundant calcite crystal fans (pseudomorphs after aragonite) and even parallel lamination interpreted as moderately deep to deep platform deposits. Five successive events of synsedimentary deformation were recognized in the cap carbonates exposed at Mirassol d'Oeste and Tangará da Serra, in Central Brazil: Event 1 - large to small-scale load cast structures in the contact between dolostones and glaciogenic sediments; Event 2 - stromatolitic lamination truncated by tube structures; Event 3 - vertical to subvertical fractures and faults, and large-scale synclines and anticlines with chevron folds; Event 4 - conglomerate and breccia filling neptunian dykes limited by undeformed beds; and Event 5 - slump and sliding deposits found only in the upper part of the cap limestone. Event 1 was produced by hydroplastic dynamics likely induced by isostatic rebound during ice cap melting in the final stages of the Marinoan glaciation. Events 2 and 5 are autocyclic in nature, and related to depositional processes. Event 2 is linked to fluid and methane escape from organic degradation of microbial mats and domes that formed tubestones; Event 5 is associated to collapse and sliding/slumping in the platform and slope. The reliable orientations of synsedimentary faults

  19. Paleoproterozoic volcanism in the southern Amazon Craton (Brazil): insight into its origin and deposit textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roverato, Matteo; Juliani, Caetano

    2014-05-01

    The Brazilian Amazon craton hosts a primitive volcanic activity that took place in a region completely stable since 1.87 Ga. The current geotectonic context is very different from what caused the huge volcanism that we are presenting in this work. Volcanic rocks in several portions of the Amazon craton were grouped in the proterozoic Uatumã supergroup, a well-preserved magmatic region that covers an area with more than 1,200,000 km2. In this work one specific region is considered, the southwestern Tapajos Gold province (TGP) that is part of the Tapajós-Parina tectonic province (Tassinari and Macambri, 1999). TGP consists of metamorphic, igneous and sedimentary sequences resulted from a ca. 2.10-1.87 Ga ocean-continent orogeny. High-K andesites to felsic volcanic sequences and plutonic bodies, andesitic/rhyolitic epiclastic volcanic rocks and A-type granitic intrusions form part of this volcanism/plutonism. In this work we focus particularly our attention on welded, reomorphic and lava-like rhyolitic ignimbrites and co-ignimbrite brecchas. Fiamme texture of different welding intensity, stretched obsidian fragments, "glassy folds", relict pumices, lithics, rotated crystals of feldspars, bipiramidal quarz, and devetrification spherulites are the common features represented by our samples. Microscopical images are provided to characterize the deposits analyzed during this preliminary research. The lack of continuum outcrops in the field made more difficult the stratigraphic reconstruction, but the superb preservation of the deposits, apparently without any metamorphic evidences (not even low-grade), permits a clearly description of the textures and a differentiation between deposits. A detailed exploration of this ancient andesitic and rhyolitic volcanic activity could contribute greatly to the knowledge of the Amazon territory and in particular for the recognition of the various units that form the supergroup Uatumã, especially in relation to different eruptive

  20. TESZ as a diffuse paleoplate boundary between the East European Craton and Phanerozoic Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecsey, Ludek; Plomerova, Jaroslava; Chyba, Jan; Babuska, Vladislav

    2016-04-01

    The Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ) manifests a broad transition between the Precambrian and Phanerozoic Europe. To contribute to better understanding the upper mantle structure, we analyse isotropic velocity variations by means of standard teleseismic tomography as well as we analyse anisotropic parameters of teleseismic body waves. The velocity perturbations in the tomographic model down to 600 km indicate the Phanerozoic part of Europe thrust over the Precambrian East European Craton (EEC). Depth of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) - modelled as a transition between fossil anisotropy in the mantle lithosphere and anisotropy due to present-day flow in the underlying asthenosphere - increases to ~250 km toward the EEC. For anisotropy study, we examine lateral variations of directional terms of relative P-wave travel-time deviations from about 100 teleseismic events, selected to provide good azimuthal coverage, and evaluate shear-wave splitting parameters from about 20 events recorded during passive seismic experiment PASSEQ (2006-2008). We model in 3D large-scale olivine fabrics of mantle lithosphere domains on a transect from the eastern limit of the Bohemian Massif (BM) through the Polish Paleozoic Platform towards the Teisseyre-Tornquist Zone (TTZ) - the NE limit of the TESZ - to the East European Craton (EEC). Variations of anisotropic signal around the central part of the TESZ are surprisingly moderate. There is no distinct change of the P-residual pattern and shear-wave splitting parameters across the surface trace of the TTZ. The most distinct change of the anisotropic signal occurs at the northern boundary of the BM. Week changes of the mantle lithosphere structure across the TESZ suggest, in accord with results from P-wave tomography, a south-westward continuation of the EEC beneath this broad and diffuse paleoplate boundary. Inferences from seismic tomography as well as seismic anisotropy indicate that this laterally heterogeneous pervasive

  1. African Ancestry Is Associated with Asthma Risk in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Pino-Yanes, María; Wade, Michael S.; Pérez-Méndez, Lina; Kittles, Rick A.; Wang, Deli; Papaiahgari, Srinivas; Ford, Jean G.; Kumar, Rajesh; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2012-01-01

    Background Asthma is a common complex condition with clear racial and ethnic differences in both prevalence and severity. Asthma consultation rates, mortality, and severe symptoms are greatly increased in African descent populations of developed countries. African ancestry has been associated with asthma, total serum IgE and lower pulmonary function in African-admixed populations. To replicate previous findings, here we aimed to examine whether African ancestry was associated with asthma susceptibility in African Americans. In addition, we examined for the first time whether African ancestry was associated with asthma exacerbations. Methodology/Principal Findings After filtering for self-reported ancestry and genotype data quality, samples from 1,117 self-reported African-American individuals from New York and Baltimore (394 cases, 481 controls), and Chicago (321 cases followed for asthma exacerbations) were analyzed. Genetic ancestry was estimated based on ancestry informative markers (AIMs) selected for being highly divergent among European and West African populations (95 AIMs for New York and Baltimore, and 66 independent AIMs for Chicago). Among case-control samples, the mean African ancestry was significantly higher in asthmatics than in non-asthmatics (82.0±14.0% vs. 77.8±18.1%, mean difference 4.2% [95% confidence interval (CI):2.0–6.4], p<0.0001). This association remained significant after adjusting for potential confounders (odds ratio: 4.55, 95% CI: 1.69–12.29, p = 0.003). African ancestry failed to show an association with asthma exacerbations (p = 0.965) using a model based on longitudinal data of the number of exacerbations followed over 1.5 years. Conclusions/Significance These data replicate previous findings indicating that African ancestry constitutes a risk factor for asthma and suggest that elevated asthma rates in African Americans can be partially attributed to African genetic ancestry. PMID:22235241

  2. Heterogeneous lithospheric mantle metasomatism in the eastern North China Craton: He-Ar isotopes in peridotite xenoliths from Cenozoic basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Huayun; Matsumoto, Takuya; Zheng, Jianping; Czuppon, György; Yu, Chunmei; Miyakawa, Chie; Ping, Xianquan

    2014-02-01

    The abundances and isotopic compositions of Helium and Argon have been analyzed in a suite of fresh spinel peridotite xenoliths in Cenozoic basalts from the eastern North China Craton (NCC) by step-wise heating experiments, to investigate the nature of noble gas reservoirs in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle beneath this region. The xenoliths include one harzburgite collected from Hebi in the interior of the NCC, two lherzolites from Hannuoba at the northern margin of the craton, and three lherzolites from Shanwang and Nushan on the eastern margin. 3He/4He ratios in most of the xenoliths are similar to those of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) or slightly lower (2-10.5 Ra, where Ra is the 3He/4He ratio of the atmosphere), suggesting mixing of MORB-like and radiogenic components. One olivine separate from Nushan has a helium value of 25.3 Ra, probably suggesting cosmogenic 3He addition. The 40Ar/36Ar ratios vary from atmospheric value (296) to 1625, significantly lower than the MORB value. Available data of the peridotite xenoliths indicate the He and Ar isotopic systematics of the mantle reservoirs beneath the NCC can be interpreted as mixtures of at least three end-members including MORB-like, radiogenic and atmospheric components. We suggest that the MORB-like noble gases were derived from the underlying asthenosphere during mantle upwelling, whereas the radiogenic and recycled components probably were incorporated into the lithospheric mantle during circum-craton subduction of oceanic crust. Available data suggest that the MORB-like fluids are better preserved in the interior of the NCC, whereas the radiogenic ones are more prevalent at the margins. The Paleo-Asian ocean subduction system probably was responsible for the enriched and recycled noble gas signatures on the northern margin of the craton, while the Pacific subduction system could account for the observed He-Ar isotopic signatures beneath the eastern part. Therefore, integration of helium and

  3. The Hlagothi Complex: The identification of fragments from a Mesoarchaean large igneous province on the Kaapvaal Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumsley, A. P.; de Kock, M. O.; Rajesh, H. M.; Knoper, M. W.; Söderlund, U.; Ernst, R. E.

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we present geochronological, geochemical and palaeomagnetic results from the Hlagothi Complex and a NW-trending dolerite dyke swarm on the southeastern region of the Kaapvaal Craton in northern KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The Hlagothi Complex consists of layered sills of meta-peridotite, pyroxenite and gabbro intruding into the Pongola Supergroup. U-Pb baddeleyite ages on the Hlagothi Complex and a NW-trending dyke of 2866 ± 2 Ma and 2874 ± 2 Ma, respectively, reveal a ca. 2.87 Ga magmatic event on the southeastern Kaapvaal Craton. The geochemical signature of the Hlagothi Complex recognises two discrete groupings, with a magmatic source that is chemically distinct from those of the older rift-related Nsuze and Dominion groups. Additional units on the Kaapvaal Craton can be linked with this new ‘Hlagothi' event based on spatial and temporal association, and geochemistry: 1) the Thole Complex, 2) parts of the Usushwana Complex, and 3) flood basalts within the Mozaan Group and Central Rand Group. The association between all these units suggests a previously unrecognised large igneous province in the southeastern Kaapvaal Craton. Our palaeomagnetic data identifies a possible primary magnetisation within the least-altered lithologies of the Hlagothi Complex (with a virtual geographic pole at 23.4°N, 53.4°E, dp = 8.2° and dm = 11.8°). The bulk of samples however, displayed two episodes of remagnetisation. These are likely to be associated with 2.85 to 2.75 Ga aged granitoids across the southeastern Kaapvaal Craton, and tectonic activity in the nearby Meso- to Neoproterozoic Namaqua-Natal mobile belt. A short-lived (≤ 8 Ma) mantle plume is proposed to have caused the ca. 2.87 Ga magmatism, and also may well have controlled sedimentation within the Pongola-Witwatersrand basin. Volcanism during uplift would have been fed through a series of feeder dykes and sills, of which the Hlagothi Complex and NW-trending dykes are part of.

  4. Paleoproterozoic felsic volcanism of the Tapajós Mineral Province, Southern Amazon Craton, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roverato, M.; Giordano, D.; Echeverri-Misas, C. M.; Juliani, C.

    2016-01-01

    Amazonian rocks record one amongst the most complete and best-preserved Paleoproterozoic magmatic episodes on Earth. The present contribution documents the extremely well preserved paleoproterozoic architecture of a series of felsic rocks found in the Tapajós Mineral Province (TMP), located in the western part of Pará State, southern Amazon Craton, north of Brazil. These rocks are the first to be investigated to comprehend, based on their textural evidences, their emplacement mechanisms. Textural characterization allowed to identify three main facies with, as following reported, 1) chaotic ("Breccia") group, 2) eutaxitic ("Eutax") group and 3) parataxitic ("Paratax") group vitrophyric textures. Given the superb preservation of our samples, the investigated rocks are grouped, according to their grade of welding, into a wide variety of lithofacies from very low-grade to high-grade and rheomorphic ignimbrites. In the "Paratax group" strong similarities with banding in lava flows are observed. Based on the presented data we discuss the effusive or explosive origin of the observed flow mechanisms.

  5. Passive Seismic Experiment "13 BB Star" in the Margin of the East European Craton, Northern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, M.; Grad, M.; Wilde-Piórko, M.; Suchcicki, J.; Arant, T.

    2014-12-01

    Passive experiment "13 BB star" is dedicated to study deep structure of the Earth's interior in the marginal zone of the East European Craton in northern Poland. The seismic network consists of 13 broadband stations on the area of c. 120 km in diameter. The network is located in the area well recognized from the point of view velocities of sedimentary cover and crustal structure. Good records obtained since summer 2013, and expected during next 1.5 years long recording campaign, should yield images of detailed structure of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), „410", "?520", and „660" km discontinuities, as well as mantle-core boundary and inner core. The LAB is investigated recently very effectively, mostly using seismic methods because their deep penetration and relatively good resolution. The nature of LAB is still debated, particularly under "cold" Precambrian shields and platforms. We show examples of local and teleseismic records, array transfer function of "13 BB star" network and preliminary noise analysis. National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work by NCN grant DEC- 2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  6. Crust and Upper-mantle Structure in the Western North China Craton from Receiver Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, M.; Guo, Z.; Wang, X.; Feng, Y.; Chen, Y. J.

    2014-12-01

    North China Craton (NCC) is separated by the Trans-North China Orogen into two parts: the Eastern NCC and the Western NCC. It has been proposed that the Western NCC has remained stable since the Precambrian. Here receiver function (RF) analysis is used to image the crustal structures along an N-S profile (31N-43N) across the Qinling Orogen from the south, through Ordos Block and Yinshan Orogen to the north. The profile consists of 36 portable broadband stations which were deployed by Peking University during June 2012 to June 2014 and 12 permanent seismic stations of CEA. We selected teleseismic P waveforms from events with magnitudes Mw>5.0 and within the epicentral distances of 35-90 degrees and used the iterative time domain deconvolution method to obtain the RFs. Crustal thickness and the average Poison's ratio are obtained by the use of H-k method while the 410 and 660 discontinuity depths are calculated by using common conversion point stacking method from the RF data. The fine structures from this receiver function study should help us to better understand the nature and evolution of the Western NCC.

  7. Thickness of the lithosphere beneath Precambrian cratons and mechanisms of their neotectonic crustal uplift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyushkov, E. V.; Chekhovich, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Up to 70% of the area of continents is occupied by the Precambrian crust. Shortening of this crust finished 0.5 Ga ago or earlier, while Pliocene-Quaternary rises made up of 100-200 to 1000-1500 m. In order to support these uplifts in the absence of shortening, the density in the lithosphere layer had to be considerably decreased. This lower density can be attributed to the replacement of the lower part of the mantle lithosphere with asthenospheric material or to the expansion of the inner parts of the crust resulting from repeated metamorphism. As is shown by our calculations, a decrease in density at depths of 150-250 km beneath the Precambrian cratons can lead to uplifts only up to 100 m in amplitude. Hence, the neotectonic uplifts were caused by expansion at higher crustal levels. This situation required the supply of a large amount of mantle fluid into the crust, and the volume of this fluid should be comparable to that of the new-formed relief

  8. Very early Archean crustal-accretion complexes preserved in the North Atlantic craton

    SciTech Connect

    Nutman, A.P. ); Collerson, K.D. )

    1991-08-01

    The North Atlantic craton contains very early Archean supracrustal rocks, orthogneisses, and massive ultramafic rocks. Most units of supracrustal rocks are dominated by mafic volcanic rocks, layered gabbros, and banded iron formations, bust some also contain abundant felsic volcanic-sedimentary rocks, quartzites, and marbles. Some quartzites contain detrital zircons derived from rocks identical in age to felsic volcanic-sedimentary rocks in these sequences (ca. 3800 Ma) and also from older (ca. 3850 Ma) sources. The presence of the ca. 3850 Ma detrital zircons suggests that the supracrustal units containing them were deposited on, or close to, ca. 3850 Ma sialic crust. The massive ultramafic rocks have chemical affinities to upper mantle rocks. The voluminous suites of tonalitic gneisses are dominated by 3700-3730 Ma bodies that intrude the supracrustal sequences, but they also locally contain components with ages between 3820 and 3920 Ma. The diverse supracrustal units, upper mantle rocks, and {ge} 3820 Ma components in the gneisses were tectonically interleaved in very early Archean convergent plate boundaries, giving rise to accretion complexes. In the period 3700-3730 Ma, voluminous tonalitic magmas produced by partial melting of predominantly mafic rocks in the base of the accretion complexes were emplaced at higher levels, forming juvenile continental crust and leaving behind a refractory lower crustal to upper mantle substrate.

  9. Palaeointensity determinations on rocks from Palaeoproterozoic dykes from the Kaapvaal Craton (South Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakova, V. V.; Shcherbakov, V. P.; Zhidkov, G. V.; Lubnina, N. V.

    2014-06-01

    Palaeointensity study of the Proterozoic-Archean volcanic rocks from the Kaapvaal Craton South Africa) are reported. Palaeomagnetic study of this collection was performed earlier by Olsson et al. Electron microscope observations, thermomagnetic and hysteresis measurements indicate the presence of single-domain and pseudo-single-domain (SD-PSD) magnetite grains as the main magnetic mineral. The samples demonstrated a very good stability to heating, the electron micrograph observations revealed magnetite-ilmenite exsolution structure. Palaeointensity determinations were obtained by Coe-modified Thellier procedure. A total 58 samples from 14 sites were studied but only seven samples from one site NL28 of the Early Proterozoic age of 1.9 Ga passed palaeointensity selection criteria. Reliable palaeointensity determinations were obtained by both Thellier and Wilson methods on 18 cubes (subsamples) from site NL28 yielding rather low mean virtual dipole moment (VDM) = (2.82 ± 0.12) ×1022 Am2 which is in agreement with the suggestion of existence of the `Proterozoic dipole low period'.

  10. Stabilization and breakdown of Archean Cratons: Formation of sedimentary basins, mafic magmatism, and metallogenic productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, O. M.

    2011-01-01

    The Kenorland supercontinent was created as a result of the ascent of the most powerful mantle plumes in the Earth’s geological history and accompanied by the formation of the continental crust and its subsequent accretion into a supercontinent 2.7 Ga ago. The geological phenomena that occurred at that time in Australia, Canada, and South Africa reflecting its features are considered in this paper. The first sedimentary basins resting upon the sialic basement give evidence for long-existing peneplanes formed in the Early Precambrian, i.e., for stabilization of the underlying cratons; this is also supported by the appearance of rapakivi granite 2.8 Ga ago. The platform regime existed as early as the Mesoarchean 3.5 Ga ago. The platform sedimentary basins developed almost continuously over a billion years. Layered mafic intrusions were frequently emplaced into sedimentary sequences. Unique gold, uranium, PGE, chrome, and other deposits are hosted in sedimentary basins and layered intrusions. The extremely high intensity of plume activity determined the origin and breakdown of the Kenorland supercontinent and the cause of transport of ore elements concentrated in unique deposits. In terms of the intensity of plume-related magmatism and ore formation, the considered period of geological history has no more recent analogues and was critical for the Earth’s evolution.

  11. Using Ocean Tidal Load Response to Explore the Elastic Structure of the Amazonian Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, H. R.; Simons, M.; Rivera, L. A.; Owen, S. E.; Ito, T.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate ocean tidal load response in South America using observations of GPS displacements from Brazil, Argentina, and Uruguay. Spatial variations in the tidal loading response allow us to constrain absolute ranges of density and the two elastic moduli through the regional crust and upper mantle. We process 30-second GPS data using the GIPSY-OASIS II software to obtain position estimates every 5-minutes, with special attention paid to removing tropospheric delay effects. We then extract tidal loading response signals from multiple years of processed GPS time series using generalized harmonic analysis techniques, whereby satellite modulation corrections and the astronomical argument are updated at each epoch. To compare with our observations, we construct a range of forward models by convolving modern ocean tidal loading models (e.g., FES2012, TPX08-Atlas) with Greens functions for Earth structure. The development of our own load Love number and Greens function computation code provides us with the facility to explore a wide range of 1D, layered elastic Earth models. Finally, we convert our forward modeling methods into a Bayesian inversion framework to explore the range of density and elastic structural models for the Amazonian Craton that are consistent with our observations.

  12. Upper Devonian-Tournaisian facies and oil resources of the Russian craton's eastern margin

    SciTech Connect

    Ulmishek, G.F.

    1987-01-01

    Upper Devonian-Tournaisian facies on the Russian craton's eastern margin indicate deposition in two distinct paleomorphic environments: bathimetrically expressed basins and shallow platforms. Shallow-water carbonate sedimentation persisted on the platforms, and black, thin-bedded, organic-rich shales and limestones of the Domanik facies were deposited in stagnant basins that stretched more than 2000 km from the Arctic Ocean to the Caspian Sea. Intermittently introduced clastic material and detrital carbonates formed progradational shelves. Barrier reefs along platform edges, atolls and reef mounds on basin margins, and smaller patch reefs on platforms were abundant. The basins were finally filled with Tournaisian (in the Timan-Pechora province) or basal Visean (in the Volga-Ural province) clastics. The North Caspian deep-water basin survived until the end of Early Permian time when it was filled with a thick salt formation. The organic-rich Domanik facies is the major source rock in the Volga-Ural, Timam-Pechora, and North Caspian petroleum provinces. About one-third of oil reserves occurs predominantly in structural traps in Middle Devonian-lower Frasnian clastics that directly underlie Domanik rocks. Most of the remaining two-thirds is found in reefs, especially in drape structures over the reefs in Tournaisian carbonates and basal Visean clastics. 61 refs., 16 figs.

  13. Geochemistry of the Madawara Igneous Complex, Bundelkhand Craton, Central India: Implications for PGE Metallogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manavalan, Satyanarayanan; Singh, Surya Prakash; Balaram, Vysetti; Niranjan, Mohanty

    2015-12-01

    The southern part of the Bundelkhand craton contains a series of a E-W trending mafic and ultramafic rocks, about 40 km in length and 2-4 km wide, that occur as intrusions within the Bundelkhand Gneissic Complex (BnGC). They are confined between the Madawara- Karitoran and Sonrai-Girar shear zones. Dunite, harzburgite, lherzolite and websterite are the commonly occurring ultramafic rocks that have high MgO, Ni, Cr, PGE and low Al2O3, CaO, K2O, TiO2 and V contents, and shows peridotitic affinity. A distinct trend of crystallization from peridotite to komatiitic basalt has been inferred from geochemical plots, which also indicates the occurrence of at least two varieties among the ultramafic suite of the Madawara ultramafic complex, namely, Group I comprising dunite, spinel peridotite, harzburgite and lherzolite, and Group II consisting of pyroxenite, websterite and olivine websterite. In several places, the rocks of Group II have an intrusive relationship with Group I, and are relatively enriched in total platinum group elements (PGE ~ 300 ppb). The discrimination diagrams suggest that the PGE are enriched in low sulphur-fugacity source magma at moderate to deeper depths by high degree of partial melting of the mantle.

  14. Application of multi-dimensional discrimination diagrams and probability calculations to Paleoproterozoic acid rocks from Brazilian cratons and provinces to infer tectonic settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Sanjeet K.; Oliveira, Elson P.

    2013-08-01

    In present work, we applied two sets of new multi-dimensional geochemical diagrams (Verma et al., 2013) obtained from linear discriminant analysis (LDA) of natural logarithm-transformed ratios of major elements and immobile major and trace elements in acid magmas to decipher plate tectonic settings and corresponding probability estimates for Paleoproterozoic rocks from Amazonian craton, São Francisco craton, São Luís craton, and Borborema province of Brazil. The robustness of LDA minimizes the effects of petrogenetic processes and maximizes the separation among the different tectonic groups. The probability based boundaries further provide a better objective statistical method in comparison to the commonly used subjective method of determining the boundaries by eye judgment. The use of readjusted major element data to 100% on an anhydrous basis from SINCLAS computer program, also helps to minimize the effects of post-emplacement compositional changes and analytical errors on these tectonic discrimination diagrams. Fifteen case studies of acid suites highlighted the application of these diagrams and probability calculations. The first case study on Jamon and Musa granites, Carajás area (Central Amazonian Province, Amazonian craton) shows a collision setting (previously thought anorogenic). A collision setting was clearly inferred for Bom Jardim granite, Xingú area (Central Amazonian Province, Amazonian craton) The third case study on Older São Jorge, Younger São Jorge and Maloquinha granites Tapajós area (Ventuari-Tapajós Province, Amazonian craton) indicated a within-plate setting (previously transitional between volcanic arc and within-plate). We also recognized a within-plate setting for the next three case studies on Aripuanã and Teles Pires granites (SW Amazonian craton), and Pitinga area granites (Mapuera Suite, NW Amazonian craton), which were all previously suggested to have been emplaced in post-collision to within-plate settings. The seventh case

  15. Derivation of detrital rutile in the Yaoundé region from the Neoproterozoic Pan-African belt in southern Cameroon (Central Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stendal, Henrik; Toteu, Sadrack Félix; Frei, Robert; Penaye, Joseph; Njel, Urbain Olivier; Bassahak, Jean; Nni, Jean; Kankeu, Boniface; Ngako, Vincent; Hell, Joseph Victor

    2006-04-01

    Rutile, as an important component in alluvial or eluvial heavy mineral deposits, is known in southern Cameroon. These deposits are underlain by the Neoproterozoic low- to high-grade Yaoundé Group. Geochemical, thermometric, fluid inclusion and Pb isotopic studies of the rutile from alluvial and eluvial concentrates and from medium-grade micaschist from the nearby Yaoundé region permit the following conclusions: (1) alluvial and eluvial rutile of the Yaoundé region are derived from the degradation of metapelites, metamafic rocks and pegmatites of the nearby Yaoundé Group; (2) rutile in the Yaoundé Group formed during the Pan-African metamorphism, or was inherited as detrital rutile from a ˜900 Ma source. The study also shows that the rutile can be used to trace the history of the Pan-African belt north of the Congo craton.

  16. On the nature and origin of highly-refractory Archean lithosphere: Petrological and geophysical constraints from the Tanzanian craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, S. A.; McMahon, S. C.; Day, J. A.; Dawson, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    The nature and timescales of garnet formation are important to understanding how subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) has evolved since the Archean, and also to mantle dynamics, because the presence of garnet greatly influences the density of the lower lithosphere and hence the long-term stability of thick (150 to 220 km) subcratonic lithosphere. Nevertheless, the widespread occurrence of garnet in the SCLM remains one of the 'holy grails' of mantle petrology. Garnets found in mantle xenoliths from the eastern margin of the Tanzanian Craton (Lashaine) have diverse compositions and provide major constraints on how the underlying deep (120 to 160 km) mantle evolved during the last 3 billion years. Certain harzburgite members of the xenolith suite contain the first reported occurrence of pyrope garnets with rare-earth element patterns similar to hypothetical garnets proposed to have formed in the Earth's SCLM during the Archean, prior to metasomatism [Stachel et al., 2004]. These rare ultradepleted low-Cr garnets occur in low temperature (~1050 oC) xenoliths derived from depths of ~120 km and coexist in chemical and textural equilibrium with highly-refractory olivine (Fo95.4) and orthopyroxene (Mg#=96.4). These phases are all more magnesian than generally encountered in global mantle harzburgites and diamond inclusions. The ultradepleted garnets form interconnecting networks around grains of orthopyroxene which give the rocks a banded appearance: we propose that the increase in pressure associated with cratonization may have caused isochemical exsolution of ultradepleted garnet from orthopyroxene. These unique garnets have not previously been identified in global suites of mantle xenoliths or diamond inclusions. We believe they are rare because their low concentrations of trace elements make them readily susceptible to geochemical overprinting. This highly-refractory low-density peridotite may be common in the 'shallow' SCLM but not normally brought to the

  17. From Archaean oceans to Late Proterozoic cratons: The origin, evolution and preservation of the continental material on earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celal Şengör, A. M.

    2013-04-01

    The earth's outermost rocky shell consists of two major components: continents and oceans. Oceans are continuously generated along spreading centres and also continuously destroyed by subduction along deep-sea trenches. Because of their ephemeral nature they have an average age of 0.1 Ga. The oceanic crust has an average density of about 2.9 g/cc. It covers nearly 60% of the planet's surface, but makes up only 20% of its crust and a vanishingly small 0.00099% of its total mass. No part of the oceanic crust has any permanence: even its slightly more buoyant parts (oceanic plateaux) are ultimately subducted unless protected within a continental embayment (e.g. the Pre-Caspian Depression). The only exception to this rule may be the Tarim Block, which may be a trapped oceanic plateau of Proterozoic age now functioning as a craton. Whether the Black and the South Caspian oceans will have a similar destiny cannot now be told, although the latter is now being subducted along the Apsheron sill. Continents by contrast seem permanent parts of the crust: Their average density is 2.85g/cc and mean age is 2.0 Ga and in places the oldest rocks are dated to be older than 3.8 Ga. Some individual zircons recovered from continents in a few places are older than 4 Ga; some have yielded evidence for wet mantle melting and reworked continental crust as far back as 4,370 million years ago. In fact, there is now 176Hf/177Hf evidence consistent with the view that a volume of continental crust close to the present one may have formed by 4.4. to 4.5. Ga, but then entirely mixed back into the mantle by the beginning of the Archaean, both by a permobile subduction regime and heavy meteorite bombardment-controlled mixing! The present rock record on continents began to be kept since about 3.8 Ga ago, i.e., since the end of the heavy meteorite bombardment. The preserved Archaean tectonic record shows a great resemblance to the Turkic-type orogens of the Phanerozoic and probably formed in a

  18. Understanding traditional African healing

    PubMed Central

    MOKGOBI, M.G.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional African healing has been in existence for many centuries yet many people still seem not to understand how it relates to God and religion/spirituality. Some people seem to believe that traditional healers worship the ancestors and not God. It is therefore the aim of this paper to clarify this relationship by discussing a chain of communication between the worshipers and the Almighty God. Other aspects of traditional healing namely types of traditional healers, training of traditional healers as well as the role of traditional healers in their communities are discussed. In conclusion, the services of traditional healers go far beyond the uses of herbs for physical illnesses. Traditional healers serve many roles which include but not limited to custodians of the traditional African religion and customs, educators about culture, counselors, social workers and psychologists. PMID:26594664

  19. African horse sickness.

    PubMed

    Zientara, S; Weyer, C T; Lecollinet, S

    2015-08-01

    African horse sickness (AHS) is a devastating disease of equids caused by an arthropod-borne virus belonging to the Reoviridae family, genus Orbivirus. It is considered a major health threat for horses in endemic areas in sub-Saharan Africa. African horse sickness virus (AHSV) repeatedly caused large epizootics in the Mediterranean region (North Africa and southern Europe in particular) as a result of trade in infected equids. The unexpected emergence of a closely related virus, the bluetongue virus, in northern Europe in 2006 has raised fears about AHSV introduction into Europe, and more specifically into AHSV-free regions that have reported the presence of AHSV vectors, e.g. Culicoides midges. North African and European countries should be prepared to face AHSV incursions in the future, especially since two AHSV serotypes (serotypes 2 and 7) have recently spread northwards to western (e.g. Senegal, Nigeria, Gambia) and eastern Africa (Ethiopia), where historically only serotype 9 had been isolated. The authors review key elements of AHS epidemiology, surveillance and prophylaxis. PMID:26601437

  20. East African Rift Valley, Kenya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This rare, cloud free view of the East African Rift Valley, Kenya (1.5N, 35.5E) shows a clear view of the Turkwell River Valley, an offshoot of the African REift System. The East African Rift is part of a vast plate fracture which extends from southern Turkey, through the Red Sea, East Africa and into Mozambique. Dark green patches of forests are seen along the rift margin and tea plantations occupy the cooler higher ground.

  1. The seismotectonics of Southeastern Tanzania: Implications for the propagation of the eastern branch of the East African Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulibo, Gabriel D.; Nyblade, Andrew A.

    2016-04-01

    Seismicity patterns and focal mechanisms in southeastern Tanzania, determined from data recorded on temporary and permanent AfricaArray seismic stations, have been used to investigate the propagation direction of the Eastern branch of the East African Rift System southward from the Northern Tanzania Divergence Zone (NTDZ). Within the NTDZ, the rift zone is defined by three segments, the Eyasi segment to the west, the Manyara segment in the middle, and the Pangani segment to the east. Results show that most of the seismicity (~ 75%) extends to the south of the Manyara segment along the eastern margin of the Tanzania Craton, and at ~ 6-7° S latitude trends to the SE along the northern boundary of the Ruvuma microplate, connecting with a N-S zone of seismicity offshore southern Tanzania and Mozambique. A lesser amount of seismicity (~ 25%) is found extending from the SE corner of the Tanzania Craton at ~ 6-7° S latitude southwards towards Lake Nyasa. This finding supports a model of rift propagation via the Manyara segment to the southeast of the Tanzania Craton along the northern boundary of the Ruvuma microplate. However, given the limited duration of the seismic recordings used in this study, the possibility of another zone of extension developing to the south towards Lake Nyasa (Malawi) cannot be ruled out. Focal mechanisms along the boundary between the Victoria and the Ruvuma microplates and offshore southeastern Tanzania show a combination of normal and strike slip faulting indicating mainly extension with some sinistral motion, consistent with the mapped geologic faults and a clockwise rotation of the Ruvuma microplate.

  2. The Neoproterozoic Trans-Saharan/Trans-Brasiliano shear zones: Suggested Tibetan Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attoh, K.; Brown, L. D.

    2008-05-01

    The Trans-Saharan Borborema (TSB) belt is a product of the assembly of Gondwana, a supercontinent that formed from cratonic fragments derived from Rodinia and other vagrant lithospheric blocks. Recent reconstructions show the West African craton (WAC) and Congo- San-Francisco craton juxtaposed by the closure of the Brasiliano (Pharuside, Adamastor) ocean during early stages of the Pan-African orogenic cycle in northwest Gondwana. The Dahomeyide and Pharuside segments of the resulting orogenic belt preserve well- organized lithotectonic units on the eastern margin of the WAC. The foreland units consist of craton-verging nappe stacks formed from the deformed margin of the WAC and its cover rocks. The near-hinter land is underlain by granitoid gneisses postulated to represent ca 600 Ma juvenile crust, exposed in the Accra-Benin plain. Further east from the suture zone is the Nigerian province, which includes rocks that were extensively reworked apparently during the Pan-African. The Borborema province of northeastern Brasil is the correlative/ extension of Nigerian. It is underlain by rocks intensively reworked during the Brasiliano (Pan-African) orogeny and juxtaposed along a series of shear zones. A distinct feature of the TBS are these extensive shear zones, many of which are typified by dextral wrench shear. In West Africa the prominent examples extend from the Sahara to the coastline and include the Hoggar, which splays into the Kandi fault, which itself has numerous splays in Benin, Togo and southeastern Ghana. In Brazil, nearly all reconstructions show that the continuation of the Kandi Fault is the Sobral fault which is inferred to be the northern segment of the Trans-Brasiliano lineament (TBL). If correct, the TBL and its TBS extensions constitute a 4000 km long dextral shear zone, perhaps the longest coherent shear zone on earth. We suggest that the geometry of these shear zones and associated Pan African sutures have instructive analogs in the Tibet

  3. High-resolution sequence stratigraphy of lower Paleozoic sheet sandstones in central North America: The role of special conditions of cratonic interiors in development of stratal architecture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, Anthony C.; Miller, J.F.; McKay, R.M.; Palmer, A.R.; Taylor, John F.

    2007-01-01

    Well-known difficulties in applying sequence stratigraphic concepts to deposits that accumulated across slowly subsiding cratonic interior regions have limited our ability to interpret the history of continental-scale tectonism, oceanographic dynamics of epeiric seas, and eustasy. We used a multi-disciplinary approach to construct a high-resolution stratigraphic framework for lower Paleozoic strata in the cratonic interior of North America. Within this framework, these strata proved readily amenable to modern sequence stratigraphic techniques that were formulated based on successions along passive margins and in foreland basins, settings markedly different from the cratonic interior. Parasequences, parasequence stacking patterns, systems tracts, maximum flooding intervals, and sequence-bounding unconformities can be confidently recognized in the cratonic interior using mostly standard criteria for identification. The similarity of cratonic interior and foreland basin successions in size, geometry, constituent facies, and local stacking patterns of nearshore parasequences is especially striking. This similarity indicates that the fundamental processes that establish shoreface morphology and determine the stratal expression of retreat and progradation were likewise generally the same, despite marked differences in tectonism, physiography, and bathymetry between the two settings. Our results do not support the widespread perception that Paleozoic cratonic interior successions are so anomalous in stratal geometries, and constitute such a poor record of time, that they are poorly suited for modern sequence stratigraphic analyses. The particular arrangement of stratal elements in the cratonic interior succession we studied is no more anomalous or enigmatic than the variability in architecture that sets all sedimentary successions apart from one another. Thus, Paleozoic strata of the cratonic interior are most appropriately considered as a package that belongs in a

  4. The Tiddiline Formation: An Enigmatic Pan African Molasse of the Anti-Atlas Mountains, Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hefferan, K. P.; Inglis, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    The Tiddiline Formation, once regarded as a post-Pan African Orogeny rift basin unit, is now recognized as a syn-collisional molasse unit recording important regional compression between the Bou Azzer ophiolite and the West African Craton. This coarsening upwards sequence records the uplift and unroofing of a foreland basin and cannabalization of those clasts in an intraformational conglomerate. Over the past ten years, precise U-Pb radiometric dates have provided constraints on the ages of plutonism and metamorphism in the Anti-Atlas Mountains. However, the age of the Tiddiline Formation - and the cessation of the Pan African Orogeny-- continues to elude researchers. Published reports suggest that the Tiddiline Formation may be >650 Ma (Saghro Group) or younger than 560 Ma (Ouarzazate Group). Basin development appears to post-date a regional metamorphism event traditionally associated with arc-continent collision, which is marked by an apparent unconformity between the Tiddiline and deformed metasediments and syn-tectonic intrusions. Subsequent folding and faulting of the Tiddiline Formation indicates that the region underwent renewed shortening after collisional metamorphism. Currently our understanding of the wider tectonic implications associated with the development of the Tiddiline basin and its subsequent deformation is limited. In particular, questions remain about whether the formation records i) a continuum of collision and exhumation of the colliding arc following regional metamorphism; or ii) extension, then, rejuvenation of shortening associated with final oblique suturing. Therefore, understanding the evolution and age of basin development and deformation is of critical importance to our understanding of Latest Neoproterozoic Pan African tectonic events. This study examines field mapping and geochronologic data and proposes that the Tiddiline Formation is a distinct rock Formation, the age of which must be verified through a careful U-Pb analysis of

  5. The African Plate: A history of oceanic crust accretion and subduction since the Jurassic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, C.; Torsvik, T. H.; Labails, C.; van Hinsbergen, D.; Werner, S.; Medvedev, S.

    2012-04-01

    Initially part of Gondwana and Pangea, and now surrounded almost entirely by spreading centres, the African plate moved relatively slowly for the last 200 million years. Yet both Africa's cratons and passive margins were affected by tectonic stresses developed at distant plate boundaries. Moreover, the African plate was partly underlain by hot mantle (at least for the last 300 Ma) - either a series of hotspots or a superswell, or both - that contributed to episodic volcanism, basin-swell topography, and consequent sediment deposition, erosion, and structural deformation. A systematic study of the African plate boundaries since the opening of surrounding oceanic basins is presently lacking. This is mainly because geophysical data are sparse and there are still controversies regarding the ages of oceanic crust. The publication of individual geophysical datasets and more recently, global Digital Map of Magnetic Anomalies (WDMAM, EMAG2) prompted us to systematically reconstruct the ages and extent of oceanic crust around Africa for the last 200 Ma. Location of Continent Ocean Boundary/Continent Ocean Transition and older oceanic crust (Jurassic and Cretaceous) are updates in the light of gravity, magnetic and seismic data and models of passive margin formation. Reconstructed NeoTethys oceanic crust is based on a new model of microcontinent and intr-oceanic subduction zone evolution in this area.The new set of oceanic palaeo-age grid models constitutes the basis for estimating the dynamics of oceanic crust through time and will be used as input for quantifying the paleo-ridge push and slab pull that contributed to the African plate palaeo-stresses and had the potential to influence the formation of sedimentary basins.

  6. LA-SF-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb geochronology of granitic rocks from the central Bundelkhand greenstone complex, Bundelkhand craton, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Sanjeet K.; Verma, Surendra P.; Oliveira, Elson P.; Singh, Vinod K.; Moreno, Juan A.

    2016-03-01

    The central Bundelkhand greenstone complex in Bundelkhand craton, northern India is one of the well exposed Archaean supracrustal amphibolite, banded iron formation (BIF) and felsic volcanic rocks (FV) and associated with grey and pink porphyritic granite, tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG). Here we present high precision zircon U-Pb geochronological data for the pinkish porphyritic granites and TTG. The zircons from the grey-pinkish porphyritic granite show three different concordia ages of 2531 ± 21 Ma, 2516 ± 38 Ma, and 2514 ± 13 Ma, which are interpreted as the best estimate of the magmatic crystallization age for the studied granites. We also report the concordia age of 2669 ± 7.4 Ma for a trondhjemite gneiss sample, which is so far the youngest U-Pb geochronological data for a TTG rock suite in the Bundelkhand craton. This TTG formation at 2669 Ma is also more similar to Precambrian basement TTG gneisses of the Aravalli Craton of north western India and suggests that crust formation in the Bundelkhand Craton occurred in a similar time-frame to that recorded from the Aravalli craton of the North-western India.

  7. A Teacher's Guide to African Narratives. Studies in African Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Sara Talis

    This guide is designed to help secondary school teachers include African literature in their classes. It furnishes English and social studies teachers with a foundation for teaching African literature by offering critical commentary on the texts themselves. A synthesis of anthropological and historical material is presented to help both teachers…

  8. Dynamics of mantle rock metasomatic transformation in permeable lithospheric zones beneath Siberian craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharapov, Victor; Sorokin, Konstantin; Perepechko, Yury

    2015-04-01

    The numerical descriptions of hydrodynamic model of two - velocity heat and mass transfer in permeable zones above the asthenospheric lenses was formulated and solved basing on the study the composition of inclusions in minerals of low crust ultra metamorphic rocks and lithospheric mantle metasomatites and estimation of thermodynamic conditions of the processes. Experimental study of influence of the simulated hot reduced gas flows on the minerals of low crust and mantle xenolith of the Siberian craton platform (SP) give the basic information for this processes. In detail: 1. Thermobarometric study of composition of inclusions in granulite and lithospheric mantle rocks beneath the diamondiferous cratons allowed to estimate the gas phase compositions during the metamorphism and metasomatism as well as products of their re equilibration during decompression. 2. Results of the pilot study of the influence of hot gas impact flows on minerals of mantle xenoliths are taken into account. This allowed to reproduce the elements and heterophase kinetics of interactions within a temperature range of about 300 to 1300o on relative to the interactions between the solid, liquid and gas phases. 3. Correct mathematical two-velocities model of fluid dynamics for compressible multiphase fluid -rock systems. 4. Numerical schemes are simulated and solved for the problems of quantitative description of 2D dynamics behavior of P and T within the permeable zone above the asthenospheric lens. 5. Quantitative description of heterophase non isothermal fluid-rock interaction within the framework of the approximation was obtained on the basis of the parallel solutions of the exchange between the ideal gas flow and solid phase according to the model of multi-reservoir reactors based on minimization of the Gibbs potential. Qualitatively the results of numerical simulation are as follows: 1) appearance in permeable zones of the any composition fluid flows from the upper mantle magma chambers

  9. Neoproterozoic extension in the greater dharwar craton: A reevaluation of the "betsimisaraka suture" in madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tucker, R.D.; Roig, J.-Y.; Delor, C.; Amlin, Y.; Goncalves, P.; Rabarimanana, M.H.; Ralison, A.V.; Belcher, R.W.

    2011-01-01

    The Precambrian shield of Madagascar is reevaluated with recently compiled geological data and new U-Pb sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) geochronology. Two Archean domains are recognized: the eastern Antongil-Masora domain and the central Antananarivo domain, the latter with distinctive belts of metamafic gneiss and schist (Tsaratanana Complex). In the eastern domain, the period of early crust formation is extended to the Paleo-Mesoarchean (3.32-3.15 Ga) and a supracrustal sequence (Fenerivo Group), deposited at 3.18 Ga and metamorphosed at 2.55 Ga, is identified. In the central domain, a Neoarchean period of high-grade metamorphism and anatexis that affected both felsic (Betsiboka Suite) and mafic gneisses (Tsaratanana Complex) is documented. We propose, therefore, that the Antananarivo domain was amalgamated within the Greater Dharwar Craton (India + Madagascar) by a Neoarchean accretion event (2.55-2.48 Ga), involving emplacement of juvenile igneous rocks, high-grade metamorphism, and the juxtaposition of disparate belts of mafic gneiss and schist (metagreenstones). The concept of the "Betsimisaraka suture" is dispelled and the zone is redefined as a domain of Neoproterozoic metasedimentary (Manampotsy Group) and metaigneous rocks (Itsindro-Imorona Suite) formed during a period of continental extension and intrusive igneous activity between 840 and 760 Ma. Younger orogenic convergence (560-520 Ma) resulted in east-directed overthrusting throughout south Madagascar and steepening with local inversion of the domain in central Madagascar. Along part of its length, the Manampotsy Group covers the boundary between the eastern and central Archean domains and is overprinted by the Angavo-Ifanadiana high-strain zone that served as a zone of crustal weakness throughout Cretaceous to Recent times.

  10. Chemical transfers along slowly eroding catenas developed on granitic cratons in southern Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Khomo, Lesego; Bern, Carleton R.; Hartshorn, Anthony S.; Rogers, Kevin H.; Chadwick, Oliver A.

    2013-01-01

    A catena is a series of distinct but co-evolving soils arrayed along a slope. On low-slope, slowly eroding catenas the redistribution of mass occurs predominantly as plasma, the dissolved and suspended constituents in soil water. We applied mass balance methods to track how redistribution via plasma contributed to physical and geochemical differentiation of nine slowly eroding (~ 5 mm ky− 1) granitic catenas. The catenas were arrayed in a 3 × 3 climate by relief matrix and located in Kruger National Park, South Africa. Most of the catenas contained at least one illuviated soil profile that had undergone more volumetric expansion and less mass loss, and these soils were located in the lower halves of the slopes. By comparison, the majority of slope positions were eluviated. Soils from the wetter climates (550 and 730 mm precipitation yr− 1) generally had undergone greater collapse and lost more mass, while soils in the drier climate (470 mm yr− 1) had undergone expansion and lost less mass. Effects of differences in catena relief were less clear. Within each climate zone, soil horizon mass loss and strain were correlated, as were losses of most major elements, illustrating the predominant influence of primary mineral weathering. Nevertheless, mass loss and volumetric collapse did not become extreme because of the skeleton of resistant primary mineral grains inherited from the granite. Colloidal clay redistribution, as traced by the ratio of Ti to Zr in soil, suggested clay losses via suspension from catena eluvial zones. Thus illuviation of colloidal clays into downslope soils may be crucial to catena development by restricting subsurface flow there. Our analysis provides quantitative support for the conceptual understanding of catenas in cratonic landscapes and provides an endmember reference point in understanding the development of slowly eroding soil landscapes.

  11. Ultrahigh-temperature metamorphism under isobaric heating: New evidence from the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qiong-Yan; Santosh, M.; Tsunogae, Toshiaki

    2014-12-01

    The Khondalite Belt within Inner Mongolia Suture Zone (IMSZ) in the North China Craton (NCC) preserves evidence for extreme crustal metamorphism under ultra-high temperature (UHT) conditions at ca. 1.92 Ga, associated with the subduction-collision tectonics between the Yinshan and Ordos Blocks. Here we report a new locality in Hongsigou where cordierite- and spinel-bearing granulites record UHT metamorphism. The prograde, peak, and retrograde mineral assemblages in these pelitic granulites have been identified based on petrography and mineral chemistry as: Bt1 + Grt1 + Sil1 + Kfs1 + Pl1 + Ilm + Qtz1, Grt1 + Sil2 + Kfs2 + Pl2 + Spl + Ilm + Qtz2 + Liq, and Crd + Grt2 + Sil3 + Kfs2 + Pl2 + Ilm + Qtz2 respectively. The peak metamorphic conditions of the pelitic granulite were estimated as 930-1050 °C and 6.5-7.5 kbar based on pseudosection analysis in the system NCKFMASHTO, suggesting extreme thermal metamorphism. We report LA-ICPMS zircon U-Pb data from the granulite which show weighted mean 207Pb/206Pb age of 1881 ± 6.6 Ma, marking the timing of UHT metamorphism. Lu-Hf analyses of the zircons show εHf(t) values within a restricted range of -4.2 to 0.3 and together with Hf model ages, a Paleoproterozoic arc magmatic source is inferred for the detrital zircons. The estimated P-T path for the UHT granulite suggests isobaric heating followed by cooling and decompression along a clockwise trajectory, different from the anti-clockwise P-T paths defined in earlier studies for the 1.92 Ga UHT rocks from the IMSZ. The younger age and the isobaric heating trajectory suggest that the Hongsigou UHT rocks are related to heat input from underplated mafic magmas following continental collision.

  12. The Fazenda Largo off-craton kimberlites of Piauí State, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminsky, Felix V.; Sablukov, Sergei M.; Sablukova, Ludmila I.; Zakharchenko, Olga D.

    2009-10-01

    In the late 1990s, the Fazenda Largo kimberlite cluster was discovered in the Piauí State of Brazil. As with earlier known kimberlites in this area - Redondão, Santa Filomena-Bom Jesus (Gilbues) and Picos - this cluster is located within the Palaeozoic Parnaiba Sedimentary Basin that separates the São Francisco and the Amazonian Precambrian cratons. Locations of kimberlites are controlled by the 'Transbrasiliano Lineament'. The Fazenda Largo kimberlites are intensely weathered, almost completely altered rocks with a fine-grained clastic structure, and contain variable amounts of terrigene admixture (quartz sand). These rocks represent near-surface volcano-sedimentary deposits of the crater parts of kimberlite pipes. By petrographic, mineralogical and chemical features, the Fazenda Largo kimberlites are similar to average kimberlite. The composition of the deep-seated material in the Fazenda Largo kimberlites is quite diverse: among mantle microxenoliths are amphibolitised pyrope peridotites, garnetised spinel peridotites, ilmenite peridotites, chromian spinel + chromian diopside + pyrope intergrowths, and large xenoliths of pyrope dunite. High-pressure minerals are predominantly of the ultramafic suite, Cr-association minerals (purplish-red and violet pyrope, chromian spinel, chromian diopside, Cr-pargasite and orthopyroxene). The Ti-association minerals of the ultramafic suite (picroilmenite and orange pyrope), as well as rare grains of orange pyrope-almandine of the eclogite association, are subordinate. Kimberlites from all four pipes contain rare grains of G10 pyrope of the diamond association, but chromian spinel of the diamond association was not encountered. By their tectonic position, by geochemical characteristics, and by the composition of kimberlite indicator minerals, the Fazenda Largo kimberlites, like the others of such type, are unlikely to be economic.

  13. Upper-mantle tomography and dynamics beneath the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jianshe

    2012-06-01

    A high-resolution tomographic model of the upper mantle beneath the North China Craton (NCC) is determined using a large number of precisely hand-picked teleseismic P wave arrival times. The results are generally consistent with previous results but high-quality arrivals provide new insights into the dynamics beneath the NCC. Obviously north-south trending low-velocity (low-V) zones are revealed down to ˜300-400 km depth under the Shanxi rift and Tanlu fault zone, while a north-south trending high-velocity (high-V) zone representing the remainder of detached lithosphere is visible down to ˜200 km depth under the western portion of eastern NCC. High-V anomalies representing the detached lithosphere are detected at 200-400 km depth under central and eastern NCC. Under the Ordos block high-V anomalies are visible above ˜400 km depth, indicating intact lithosphere. Broad high-V anomalies representing the stagnant Pacific slab are imaged with a low-V anomaly from Datong volcano to the edge of Bohai Sea in the mantle transition zone beneath eastern and central NCC, suggesting that the Pacific slab has subducted to central NCC but with a gap. A continuously Y-shaped low-V structure is clearly imaged under Datong volcano and Bohai Sea from the lower mantle through this gap in the mantle transition zone to the upper mantle, indicating the existence of a lower mantle plume. These results suggest that in addition to the subduction of the Pacific plate, the plume has also played an important role in lithospheric destruction by thermal erosion of the asthenosphere and detachment of the lithosphere beneath the NCC.

  14. Pacific slab subduction-induced carbonatite mantle metasomatism in the eastern North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, L. L.; Liu, Y.; Gao, S.

    2014-12-01

    Trace element and Sr-Li isotopic compositions of pyroxene and olivine in mantle peridotite xenoliths entrained by the Cenozoic Changle basalt from the eastern block of the North China Craton (NCC) were analyzed by LA-(MC)-ICPMS. Calcite and carbonatitic melt inclusions occur in clinopyroxene and olivine. Clinopyroxene in these xenoliths generally have a relatively higher Mg# (92.3-93.0) than that of olivine (Mg# = 90.8). Clinopyroxene is characterized by enrichments in LREE and zonations of REE, Li and Sr increasing from the cores to the rims. Furthermore, they have high Ca/Al (8.4-8.7), Zr/Hf (69.9-78.4) and (La/Yb)N (21-36) ratios and low Ti/Eu (618-755) ratios, which are features of mantle peridotite metasomatized by carbonatitic melt. These observations indicate that the peridotitic mantle beneath the Changle area could have suffered a carbonatitic metasomatism. Clinopyroxene, othopyroxene and olivine in these peridotites exhibit variably low δ7Li (+3.9 to -27.2‰) and slightly high 87Sr/86Sr (0.7030-0.7036), suggesting involvement of recycled crustal material. It has been previously suggested that the Mesozoic destruction of the eastern NCC was closely related to the hydration and mantle upwelling associated with Pacific plate subduction. The Cenozoic Changle basalt locates at the eastern margin of the NCC. Thus, we suggest that the carbonatitic metasomatism of the lithopheric mantle beneath the Changle area could have been induced by the westward subduction of the Pacific plate. The subduction-related carbonatitic metasomatism can transform the depleted harzburgite/dunite mantle to clinopyroxne/orthopyroxene-rich mantle, which could have played an important role in the lithospheric thinning of the NCC.

  15. Cratons formation by global plume-lid tectonics in the early Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerya, Taras; Fischer, Ria; Sizova, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Modern geodynamics and continental growth are critically driven by subduction and plate tectonics, however how this tectonic regime started and what geodynamic regime was before remains controversial. Based on 2D and 3D magmatic-thermo-mechanical numerical experiments we suggest that a distinct Venus-like plume-lid tectonics regime operated on Earth before plate tectonics, which was associated with widespread tectono-magmatic heat and mass exchange between the crust and the mantle. This regime was characterized by the presence of weak internally deformable highly heterogeneous lithosphere with low topography, massive juvenile crust production from mantle derived melts, mantle-flows-driven crustal deformation, magma-assisted crustal convection and widespread development of lithospheric delamination and eclogitic drips. Both proto-continental and proto-oceanic domains were formed in this regime by a combination of eclogitic drips and ultra-slow spreading. Plume-lid tectonics also resulted in growth of hot internally convecting moderately-depleted chemically buoyant eclogite-rich proto-continental mantle layer. Later, this layer could be rapidly cooled by internal convection and consolidated to form eclogite-rich sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) domains. Numerical models also show feasibility of short-lived deep subduction of ultra-depleted eclogite-poor proto-oceanic lithosphere formed by ultra-slow spreading. Subsequent rising and accretion of this highly buoyant lithosphere to the bottom of unrelated heterogeneous crustal terrains may offer another way of Archean cratonization associated with eclogite-poor SCLM formation. Numerical models also suggest that plume-induced subduction may likely played a crucial role for making transition from global plume-lid tectonics to global plate tectonics.

  16. Origin of the Adventure Subglacial Trench linked to Cenozoic extension in the East Antarctic Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianfarra, P.; Salvini, F.

    2016-02-01

    The Antarctic plate occupies a unique geodynamic setting being mostly surrounded by divergent or transform margins. Major intracontinental basins and highlands characterize its bedrock, buried under the 34 Ma East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS). Their formation atop of the cratonic lithosphere in the interior of East Antarctica remains a major open question. Post-Mesozoic intraplate extensional tectonic activity has been proposed for their development and is supported by this work. Here we focus on the Adventure Subglacial Trench (AST) whose origin is poorly constrained and controversial, as currently available geophysical models suggest either extensional or compressional tectonic origin. The AST is an over 250-km-long, 60-km-wide subglacial trough, elongated in the NNW-SSE direction adjacent to the westernmost flank of the Wilkes Subglacial Basin, and is parallel to regional scale alignments of magnetic and gravimetric anomalies. Geophysical campaigns allowed better definition of the AST physiography showing its typical half-graben geometry. The rounded morphology of the western flank of the AST was simulated through tectonic numerical modelling. We consider the subglacial landscape to primarily reflect a preserved relict of the tectonic processes affecting the interior of East Antarctica in the Cenozoic, due to the negligible erosion/deposition capability of the EAIS. The bedrock morphology was replicated through the activity of the listric Adventure Fault, characterized by a basal detachment at the base of the crust (34 km) and a vertical displacement of 2.5 km. This length suggests its regional/crustal importance. The predicted displacement is interpreted either as a newly formed fault or as the partial reactivation of a weaker zone along a major Precambrian crustal-scale tectonic boundary. The extensional regime in the AST is part of a more extensive 800-km long intraplate corridor characterized by nearly along-strike extension in Cenozoic times with a left

  17. Geological Setting of Diamond Drilling for the Archean Biosphere Drilling Project, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, A.

    2004-12-01

    The Archean Biosphere Drilling Project (ABDP) is a collaborative international research project conducting systematic (bio)geochemical investigations to improve our understanding of the biosphere of the early Earth. The Pilbara Craton of Western Australia, which includes exceptionally well preserved 3.52 to 2.70 Ga sedimentary sequences, was selected for an innovative sampling program commencing in 2003. To avoid near-surface alteration and contamination effects, sampling was by diamond drilling to depths of between 150 and 300 m, and was located at sites where the target lithologies were least deformed and had lowest metamorphic grade (below 300°C). The first of five successful drilling sites (Jasper Deposit) targeted red, white and black chert in the 3.46 Ga Marble Bar Chert Member. This chert marks the top of a thick mafic-felsic volcanic cycle, the third of four such cycles formed by mantle plumes between 3.52 and 3.43 Ga. The geological setting was a volcanic plateau founded on 3.72 to 3.60 Ga sialic crust (isotopic evidence). The second hole (Salgash) was sited on the basal section of the fourth cycle, and sampled sulfidic (Cu-Zn-Fe), carbon-rich shale and sandstone units separated by flows of peridotite. The third hole (Eastern Creek) was sited on the margin of a moderately deep-water rift basin, the 2.95 to 2.91 Ga Mosquito Creek Basin. This is dominated by turbidites, but the sandstones and carbon-rich shales intersected at the drilling site were deposited in shallower water. The fourth and fifth holes, located 300 km apart, sampled 2.77 to 2.76 Ga continental formations of the Fortescue Group; both holes included black shales.

  18. Composition of the lithospheric mantle in the Siberian craton : New constraints from fresh peridotites from the Udachnaya-East Kimberlite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doucet, Luc-Serge; Ionov, Dmitri A.; Ashchepkov, Igor

    2010-05-01

    Peridotite xenoliths from the Udachnaya kimberlite pipe represent the major source of lithospheric mantle samples beneath central Siberian craton. An important problem with the availble data [1], however, is that the Udachnaya xenoliths, like many other kimberlite-hosted peridotite suites worldwide, are extensively altered due to interaction with host magma and post-eruption alteration. This alteration causes particular dificulties for whole-rock studies including microstructures, modal estimates and chemical compositions. We report petrographic data and major and trace element compositions for whole-rocks and minerals of some 30 unusually fresh peridotite xenolith from the Udachnaya-East kimberlite. Our study has two goals. The first is to present and discuss trace element data on rocks and minerals from Udachnaya, whose composition remains little known. The other one is to explore how the availability of the fresh peridotites improves our knowledge of petrology and geochemistry of cratonic mantle in relation to published data on altered samples [1]. The xenoliths are spinel, garnet-spinel and garnet facies peridotites including garnet- and cpx-rich lherzolites, garnet and spinel harzburgites and dunites. Thermobarometric estimates for garnet bearing rocks yield T = 800-1350°C and P = 20-70 kbar, low-T spinel facies rocks may originate from shallower levels. Thus, the suite represents a lithospheric profile from the sub-Moho mantle down to ~210 km. The deeper peridotites commonly have porphyroclastic microstructures with mainly neoblast olivine, opx porphyroclasts and cpx and garnet with broadly variable morphologies whereas rocks of shallow origin are commonly protogranular. Trace element compositions in bulk rocks appear to be affected by host magma contamination with enrichments in highly to moderately incompatible elements as well as in alkalis. Nevertheless, the kimberlite-related contamination cannot explain a combination of low Th and U and high Sr

  19. Crustal and uppermost mantle structure of the eastern margin of the Yilgarn Craton (Australia) from passive seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sippl, Christian; Tkalčić, Hrvoje; Kennett, Brian; Spaggiari, Catherine; Gessner, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    The Yilgarn Craton in Western Australia is one of the largest units of Archean lithosphere on earth. Along its southern and southeastern margin, it is bounded by the Albany-Fraser Orogen (AFO), a Paleo- to Mesoproterozoic extensioal-accretionary orogen. In this contribution, we investigate the crustal and upper mantle structure of the AFO and adjacent regions using passive seismic data collected during the recent ALFREX experiment. Since the entire region has not been significantly reactivated since the Mesoproterozoic, the old signature of craton edge modification should have been well preserved until today. From November 2013 until January 2016, we operated a temporary passive seismic network consisting of 70 stations in the eastern Albany-Fraser Orogen. The array had an average station spacing of about 40 km and was designed to fill the gap between recently acquired active seismic profiles. We present results from the analysis of P receiver functions and ambient noise tomography using the ALFREX data. Receiver functions were used to derive a Moho depth map via H-K stacking, for direct imaging (common conversion point stacking) as well as joint inversion with surface wave dispersion data to derive 1D S-velocity profiles beneath the stations. The obtained receiver functions show a marked change of character from west to east across the array. Whereas they feature clear and sharp Moho phases for stations on the Yilgarn Craton, significantly more crustal complexity and fainter Moho phases are seen throughout the AFO. Crustal thickness increases from 36-39 km for the Yilgarn Craton to values between 42 and 48 km across the AFO, decreasing to around 40 km in the east. Ambient noise cross-correlations were used to derive maps of phase and group velocities of Rayleigh waves at periods between 1 and 30 seconds. A three-dimensional model of S wavespeeds throughout the area was then computed by pixelwise inversion of dispersion curves. Obtained S wavespeeds are generally

  20. New Precambrian paleomagnetic and geochronological results from the North China Craton and their implications for supercontinent Nuna reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.

    2013-05-01

    A recent update of available global paleomagnetic data demonstrate that a coherent Nuna formed by ca. 1.75 Ga, and lasted till at least ca. 1.4 Ga (Zhang et al, 2012). This paleomagnetism-based reconstruction of Nuna is also in agreement with those proposed, geologically based models, including the SAMBA connection between Baltica, Amazonia and Western Africa (Johansson, 2009), the Nuna core connection between Laurentia, Baltica and Siberia (Evans and Mitchell, 2011), the proto-SWEAT connection between Laurentia, Mawson block and Australian blocks (Payne et al., 2009) and the NCB-India connection (Zhao et al., 2011). The North China Craton (NCC) is positioned by superimposing its four high quality poles between 1.78 Ga and ~1.44 Ga atop coeval poles from the combined cratonic assemblage, including Laurentia, Baltica, Siberia and Australian blocks. In this reconstruction, the present south margin of the NCB represented an active continental margin in Nuna and likely faced an open ocean, whilst its north margin was connected to a large landmass. Recently, Su et al (2012) reported a precise age of 1611±8 Ma (zircon U-Pb LA-MC- ICPMS) obtained from a tuff bed in the Luoyukou Formation in western Henan Province. This age suggested that two high quality paleomagnetic poles from the Baicaoping and Yunmengshan formations in this region, which were considered as of 1.2-1.3 Ga, should be of ~1.61 - 1.78 Ga. Although with poor age constraint, the two poles also support the NCC's position in the Nuna. In addition, new paleomagnetic results have been obtained from the well dated ~1.33 Ga mafic sills in the northern NCC (Zhang et al, 2011; Chen et al, 2013). However, because there is no coeval pole from other major cratons, whether the NCC had still connected with them is not conclusive.

  1. Phanerozoic orogeny triggers reactivation and exhumation in the northern part of the Archean-Paleoproterozoic North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong-Fu; Zou, Dong-Ya; Santosh, M.; Zhu, Bin

    2016-09-01

    Cratons and orogenic belts are integral components of ancient continents. In some cases, stable continents can be reactivated and even largely destroyed by younger events. The mechanisms of reactivation or destruction of ancient cratons remain equivocal. Here we compile zircon U-Pb data from the metamorphic rocks of the Hongqiyingzi Group in the northern part of the North China Craton (NCC) to evaluate this problem. The results reveal episodic tectonothermal events related to three major periods of Latest Neoarchean-Earliest Paleoproterozoic (2.6-2.4 Ga), Paleoproterozoic (1.85-1.95 Ma) and Phanerozoic (480-220 Ma, with peak at 360-320 Ma). The Neoarchean-Paleoproterozoic crust as represented by the Hongqiyingzi Group was subducted to eclogite facies at ca. 1.95 Ga, followed by the final collision between the Eastern and Western Blocks at ca. 1.85 Ga to produce the Trans-North China Orogen (TNCO). The ubiquitous presence of Phanerozoic concordant zircons in the Hongqiyingzi Group suggests the episodic exhumation of the TNCO in the northern segment during the Phanerozoic. The 460-420 Ma concordant zircons record the onset of exhumation, triggered by the Ordovician-Silurian southward subduction of the Paleoasian Ocean. Widespread occurrence of 360-320 Ma metamorphic and magmatic zircons in the Hongqiyingzi Group demonstrates that the Carboniferous-Permian was an important period of exhumation for the TNCO, possibly related to back-arc extension. A few Permian-Triassic concordant zircons record late Permian accretion and Triassic post-accretional uplifting. Our study demonstrates that the young orogeny during the formation of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt resulted in extensive reactivation of not only the Archean continental crust but also the Paleoproterozoic orogen in the northern NCC.

  2. Contrasting Triassic ferroan granitoids from northwestern Liaoning, North China: Magmatic monitor of Mesozoic decratonization and a craton-orogen boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Yuan, Lingling; Xue, Fuhong; Zhang, Yanbin

    2012-07-01

    The diversity exhibited by ferroan granitoids testifies to multiple distinct crustal and mantle processes generally within extensional environments and thus holds the key to monitoring important geodynamic and crustal evolutionary processes and calibrating terrane tectonic affinity. This study documents three Middle to Late Triassic ferroan granitoid suites from northwestern Liaoning, North China, and proposes distinct petrogenetic scenarios for each. The Middle Triassic (ca. 238 Ma) Ping'andi (PAD) granites are mainly calc-alkali and peraluminous. Their radiogenic whole-rock Nd and zircon Hf isotopic signatures argue for an origin consistent with partial melting of a juvenile quartzofeldspathic crust formed by prior mantle-derived magmatic underplating and their differentiations. By contrast, the Late Triassic (ca. 220 Ma) Dashaoleng (DSL) and Sijiazi (SJZ) suites show an evolved character from alkali-calcic to alkali and from metaluminous to peraluminous. Their variably evolved whole-rock Sr-Nd and mixed zircon Hf isotopic compositions suggest that both suites were formed by variable mixing between depleted mantle-derived mafic magma and old crust-derived felsic magma, with distinctively higher input from juvenile components in the DSL suite. These contrasting ferroan granitoid suites not only provide a spatial marker for monitoring juxtaposition of the North China Craton (NCC) and the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) along a lithospheric-scale boundary fault in the region, but also present a temporal snapshot that records a southwardly-progressing crustal growth scenario possibly in response to lithospheric dripping within a post-orogenic extensional regime. The cratonic scale synthesis further indicates that diachronous decratonization pattern of the NCC might record episodic response of the craton to evolved plate tectonic processes with two contrasting Phanerozoic orogenic systems.

  3. 2480 Ma mafic magmatism in the northern Black Hills, South Dakota: A new link connecting the Wyoming and Superior cratons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dahl, P.S.; Hamilton, M.A.; Wooden, J.L.; Foland, K.A.; Frei, R.; McCombs, J.A.; Holm, D.K.

    2006-01-01

    The Laramide Black Hills uplift of southwest South Dakota exposes a Precambrian crystalline core of ???2560-2600 Ma basement granitoids nonconformably overlain by two Paleoproterozoic intracratonic rift successions. In the northern Black Hills, a 1 km thick, layered sill (the Blue Draw metagabbro) that intrudes the older rift succession provides a key constraint on the timing of mafic magmatism and of older rift-basin sedimentation. Ion microprobe spot analyses of megacrysts of magmatic titanite from a horizon of dioritic pegmatite in the uppermost sill portion yield a 207Pb/206Pb upper-intercept age of 2480 ?? 6 Ma (all age errors ??2??), comparable to two-point 207Pb/206Pb errorchron ages obtained by Pb stepwise leaching of the same titanites. Nearly concordant domains in coexisting magmatic zircon yield apparent spot ages ranging from 2458 ?? 16 to 2284 ?? 20 Ma (i.e., differentially reset along U-Pb concordia), and hornblende from an associated metadiorite yields a partially reset date with oldest apparent-age increments ranging between 2076 ?? 16 and 2010 ?? 8 Ma. We interpret these data as indicating that an episode of gabbroic magmatism occurred at 2480 Ma, in response to earlier rifting of the eastern edge of the Wyoming craton. Layered mafic intrusions of similar thickness and identical age occur along a rifted belt in the southern Superior craton (Sudbury region, Ontario). Moreover, these mafic intrusions are spatially aligned using previous supercontinent restorations of the Wyoming and Superior cratons (Kenorland-Superia configurations). This new "piercing point" augments one previously inferred by spatial-temporal correlation of the Paleoproterozoic Huronian (southern Ontario) and Snowy Pass (southeastern Wyoming) supergroups. We propose that layered mafic intrusions extending from Nemo, South Dakota, to Sudbury, Ontario, delineate an axial rift zone along which Wyoming began to separate from Superior during initial fragmentation of the Neoarchean

  4. African-American Sacred Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, A. Peter

    1991-01-01

    The history of African-American sacred music is traced from the time of slavery to the present interest in gospel music. The religious music of African Americans is geared toward liberation themes. It is important that this music does not dilute its power through cross-over with other music forms. (SLD)

  5. Distinct Thermal and Metasomatic Characteristics of Mantle Lithosphere Beneath Two Proterozoic Terranes Bordering the Kaapvaal Craton of Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janney, P. E.; Shiimi, E. T.

    2015-12-01

    There is a first order contrast in compositional and thermal properties between cold and infertile Archean cratonic mantle and younger, warmer and more fertile Proterozoic lithosphere, but it has also become apparent that coherent thermal and compositional differences exist between adjacent Proterozoic terranes, even in regions that have been stable for over 1 Ga. We report new thermobarometry and in-situ trace element data for garnet peridotite xenoliths from several late Cretaceous (100-70 Ma) kimberlite localities in the western Namaqua-Natal Belt (NNB) and Rehoboth Province (RP), which bound the Archean Kaapvaal craton to the west and south, respectively. The localities include some for which no data have been reported previously. Re-depletion model ages from Os isotopes indicate that the lithosphere beneath the NNB and RP is mainly Early Proterozoic (Pearson et al., Chem. Geol., 2004; Janney et al. J. Petrol., 2010) and there is no evidence from xenolith modal proportions for significant differences in average fertility between lithospheric terranes. Equilibration pressures for garnet peridotites from both terranes fall in a similar range (2 to 5 GPa). However, peridotites from the RP typically have P and T values that fall on or very close to the Kaapvaal cratonic geotherm (apart from a group of peridotites from the Gibeon kimberlites with pressures > 4 GPa that follow an adiabatic gradient; e.g. Franz et al., J. Geol., 1996) whereas peridotites from the western NNB have temperatures roughly 100°C warmer than the cratonic geotherm over the whole depth range. Peridotites from the 140 Ma Melton Wold kimberlite, also in the western NNB, lack these warmer temperatures and suggest that warming was contemporaneous with Late Cretaceous kimberlite magmatism. Metasomatic enrichment in incompatible elements (consistent with interaction with kimberlitic melts) is more pronounced in NNB as compared to RP peridotites. The association of higher temperatures with a greater

  6. Crustal structure of the Siberian craton and the West Siberian basin: An appraisal of existing seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepanova, Yulia; Artemieva, Irina M.; Thybo, Hans; Chemia, Zurab

    2013-12-01

    We present a digital model SibCrust of the crustal structure of the Siberian craton (SC) and the West Siberian basin (WSB), based on all seismic profiles published since 1960 and sampled with a nominal interval of 50 km. Data quality is assessed and quantitatively assigned to each profile based on acquisition and interpretation method and completeness of crustal model. The database represents major improvement in coverage and resolution and includes depth to Moho, thickness and average P-wave velocity of five crustal layers (sediments, and upper, middle, lower, and lowermost crust) and Pn velocity. Maps and cross sections demonstrate strong crustal heterogeneity, which correlates weakly with tectono-thermal age and strongly with tectonic setting. Sedimentary thickness varies from 0-3 km in stable craton to 10-20 km in extended regions. Typical Moho depths are 44-48 km in Archean crust and up-to 54 km around the Anabar shield, 40-42 km in Proterozoic orogens, 35-38 km in extended cratonic crust, and 38-42 km in the West Siberian basin. Average crustal Vp velocity is similar for the SC and the WSB and shows a bimodal distribution with peaks at ca. 5.4 km/s in deep sedimentary basins and ~ 6.2-6.6 km/s in parts of the WSB and SC. Exceptionally high basement Vp velocities (6.8-7.0 km/s) at the northern border between the SC and the WSB indicate the presence of magmatic intrusions and are proposed to mark the source zone of the Siberian LIP. The cratonic crust generally consists of three layers and high-velocity lowermost crust (Vp ~ 7.4 km/s) is observed only locally. Pn velocities are generally ~ 8.2 km/s in the SC and WSB and abnormally high (8.6-8.9 km/s) around kimberlite fields. We discuss the origin of crustal heterogeneity and link it to regional crustal evolution.

  7. Temporal and spatial variations of Mesozoic magmatism and deformation in the North China Craton: Implications for lithospheric thinning and decratonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuan-Hong; Zhao, Yue; Davis, Gregory A.; Ye, Hao; Wu, Fei

    2014-04-01

    Mesozoic (Triassic-Cretaceous) magmatic rocks and structural deformation are widely distributed in the North China Craton (NCC) and are crucial to understanding the timing, location, and geodynamic mechanisms of lithospheric thinning and decratonization of the NCC. Our new geochronological, geochemical and structural data combined with previously published results on Mesozoic magmatic rocks and deformational structures in the NCC indicate a temporal and spatial migration of magmatism and deformation from its margins to its cratonal interior. Triassic and Early Jurassic igneous rocks are only distributed along the northern, southern and eastern margins of the NCC. In contrast, Cretaceous magmatic rocks are widely distributed in whole eastern and central parts of the NCC. There is a younging trend for Mesozoic magmatic rocks from the northern and eastern parts (Yanshan, Jiaodong Peninsula and Liaodong) to the central part of the NCC (Taihangshan). Mesozoic deformation in the NCC exhibits a similar migration trend from craton margins to its inland areas. Triassic-Early Jurassic deformation mainly occurred in the margins of the NCC and transformed from compression during the Early-Middle Triassic to extension during the Late Triassic to Early Jurassic in its northern margin. Middle-Late Jurassic to earliest Cretaceous deformation is widely distributed in the NCC and exhibited non-unique contractional directions usually perpendicular to boundaries of the NCC and its Ordos block, indicating that it was likely controlled by multiple tectonic regimes during the Middle-Late Jurassic to earliest Cretaceous. Early Cretaceous deformation was characterized by near unique NW-SE extension that was likely controlled by unique geodynamic regime that probably related to the far-field effect of Cretaceous Paleo-Pacific plate subduction. The above mentioned temporal and spatial migrations of Mesozoic magmatic rocks and deformation indicate that lithospheric thinning and

  8. Crustal structure of the Archaean granite-greenstone terrane in the northern portion of the Kaapvaal Craton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debeer, J. H.; Stettler, E. H.; Barton, J. M., Jr.; Vanreenen, D. D.; Bearncombe, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    Recent investigations of the electrical resistivity, gravity and aeromagnetic signatures of the various granite-greenstone units in the northern portion of the Kaapvaal craton have revealed three features of significance: (1) the Archean greenstone belts are shallow features, rarely exceeding 5 km in depth; (2) the high resistivity upper crustal layer typical of the lower grade granite-greenstone terranes is absent in the granulite facies terrane; and (3) the aeromagnetic lineation patterns allow the granite-greenstone terrane to be subdivided into geologically recognizable tectono-metamorphic domains on the basis of lineation frequency and direction. A discussion follows.

  9. Assessment of Undiscovered Petroleum Resources of the North and East Margins of the Siberian Craton, Russian Federation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klett, T.R.

    2008-01-01

    Four geologic provinces located along the north and east margins of the Siberian craton were assessed for undiscovered crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids/condensates resources as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Circum-Arctic Oil and Gas Resource Appraisal. Using a geology-based methodology, the USGS estimated the mean undiscovered, conventional petroleum resources in these provinces to be approximately 28 billion barrels of oil equivalent, including approximately 8 billion barrels of crude oil, 106 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 3 billion barrels of natural gas liquids.

  10. Brittle Deformation in the Ordos Basin in response to the Mesozoic destruction of the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.; Jiang, L.

    2012-12-01

    Craton is continental block that has been tectonically stable since at least Proterozoic. Some cratons, however, become unstable for some geodynamic reasons. The North China Craton (NCC) is an example. Structure geological, geochemical, and geophysical works have revealed that the NCC was destructed in Cretaceous and that lithosphere thickness beneath the eastern NCC were thinned by 120 km. The present study will focus on deformation of the western NCC, and to understand the effect of the Mesozoic destruction of the North China Craton (NCC). Structural partitioning of the Ordos Basin, which is located in the western NCC, from the eastern NCC occurred during the Mesozoic. Unlike the eastern NCC where many Cretaceous metamorphic core complexes developed, sedimentary cover of the NCC remains nearly horizontal and deformation is manifested by joint. We visited 216 sites of outcrops and got 1928 joints measurements, among which 270 from Jurassic sandstones, 1378 from the Upper Triassic sandstones, 124 from the Middle and Lower Triassic sandstones, and 156 from Paleozoic sandstones. In the interior of the Ordos Basin, joints developed quite well in the Triassic strata, while joints in the Jurassic stata developed weakly and no joint in the Cretaceous strata. The Mesozoic stratigraphic thickness are: 1000 meters for the Lower Triassic, the Middle Triassic sandstone with thickness of 800 meters, 3000 meters for the Upper Triassic, 4000 meters for the Jurassic, and 1100 meters for the Lower Cretaceous. The vertical difference in joint development might be related to the burying depth of the strata: the higher the strata, the smaller the lithostatic stress, and then the weaker the joint. Joints in all stratigraphic levels showed a similar strain direction with the sigma 1 (the maximum pressure stress) vertical and the sigma 3 (the minimum pressure stress) horizontal and running N-S. The unconformity below the Cretaceous further indicates that joints in Jurassic and Triassic

  11. Petrogenesis and Tectonic Implications of Paleoproterozoic Metapelitic Rocks in the Archean Kongling Complex from the Northern Yangtze Craton, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Zheng, J.; Wang, W.; Xiong, Q.

    2015-12-01

    The Archean Kongling Complex in the northern Yangtze Craton is an ideal target to investigate the Precambrian accretion and evolution of continental crust in South China. This study aims to unravel the crustal evolution and tectonic setting of the Yangtze Craton during the Paleoproterozoic time, using integrated studies of petrography, zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopes and whole-rock geochemistry of Paleoproterozoic metapelitic rocks in the Kongling Complex. These rocks contain garnet, sillimanite, biotite, plagioclase, minor graphite and ilmenite. Zircons from the samples show nebulous sector-zoning and rim-core structure, suggesting both metamorphic origin and detrital origin with metamorphic overprints. The metamorphic zircons and metamorphic overprints have concordant 207Pb/206Pb age at ~2.0 Ga, while detrital grains yield three distinct concordant-age populations of >2.5 Ga, 2.4-2.2 Ga and 2.2-2.1 Ga. The age patterns indicate that the depositional age of the metasedimentary rocks was 2.1-2.0 Ga. Those 2.2-2.1 Ga detrital zircons with variable ɛHf(t) values (-7.28 to 2.97) suggest the addition of juvenile materials from depleted mantle to the crust during 2.2-2.1 Ga. The 2.4-2.2 Ga zircons have Hf model ages (TDM2) of ~2.6-3.5 Ga and >2.5 Ga zircons have TDM2 ages varying from 2.9 Ga to 3.3 Ga. The new data suggest that the Kongling Complex was originally a Paleoarchean (old up to 3.5 Ga) continental nucleus, which experienced multiple episodes of growth and reworking events at 3.3-3.2 Ga, 2.9 Ga, 2.7-2.6 Ga, 2.4-2.2 Ga and 2.2-2.1 Ga. In combination with available data, the new results in this study suggest a continent-arc-continent evolution model to explain the tectonic evolution of the Yangtze Craton during the Paleoproterozoic time: the western margin of Yangtze Craton was originally an individual continent, which underwent a reworking event during 2.4-2.2 Ga and a crust growth event caused by continent-arc collision during 2.2-2.1 Ga; it subsequently collided

  12. The Majorqaq Belt: A record of Neoarchaean orogenesis during final assembly of the North Atlantic Craton, southern West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyck, Brendan; Reno, Barry L.; Kokfelt, Thomas F.

    2015-04-01

    Over the past 4.5 billion years (Ga) the Earth has undergone a secular change in tectonic regimes. Archaean tectonics was a markedly different process than observed today, involving a hotter planet with a thinner lithosphere, thicker oceanic crust, and smaller proto-continents. The transition to a more modern type of plate tectonics required the initiation of subduction of oceanic lithosphere. The onset of subduction in the Meso- to Neoarchaean (ca. 3.2 to 2.5 Ga) is shown by geochemical signatures indicative of crustal recycling and petrologic evidence of tectonically driven thickening of the continental crust. This transition is recorded in the rock record of the North Atlantic Craton, which preserves a history of crust formation through to terrane accretion and the collision of crustal blocks. Here we present petrologic, chronologic, chemical and geophysical evidence from the Majorqaq Belt, a ~ 100 km wide east-west striking zone, defined by a high gravity anomaly, voluminous metasedimentary units, olivine-rich ultramafic enclaves, and anomalously high K2O, Ni, and MgO stream-sediment chemistry. We use a 207Pb/206Pb zircon LA-ICP-MS age of 2.557 ± 0.005 Ga (2σ) from an upper-amphibolite facies metapelitic migmatite to propose Neoarchaean suturing of the Maniitsoq crustal block to the North Atlantic Craton. Ti-in-zircon temperatures and zircon-garnet REE distribution coefficients constrain zircon crystallisation to 815-729 °C, which is at, or near the solidus during leucosome crystallisation. Our data reveal a clockwise P-T path with a high-pressure assemblage of garnet-kyanite-plagioclase-rutile-biotite-quartz which grew at an apparent thermal gradient of ~ 660 °C/GPa during subduction-driven compression of surface-derived sediments to a minimum-peak-pressure of ~ 1.15 GPa at ~ 760 °C followed by the growth of gedrite-cordierite-sillimanite-ilmenite at minimum-peak-temperature conditions of ~ 810 °C at ~ 0.94 GPa. We propose the evolution of the Majorqaq

  13. Paleogeography of the Amazon craton at 1.2 Ga: early Grenvillian collision with the Llano segment of Laurentia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohver, Eric; van der Pluijm, B. A.; Van der Voo, R.; Rizzotto, G.; Scandolara, J. E.

    2002-05-01

    A paleomagnetic, geochronologic and petrographic study was undertaken on the flat-lying gabbros and basalts of the Nova Floresta Formation of Rondônia state, western Brazil in order to constrain the Mesoproterozoic paleogeography of the Amazon craton. Measurement of the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility on the gabbroic samples reveals a flat-lying foliation with a radiating pattern of lineations, supporting the field evidence that the gabbros are part of a large, undeformed sill. Petrographic observations of oxides in the gabbros reveals two populations of magnetite grains produced during the original cooling of the sill: large, oxyexsolved titanomagnetite grains and fine-grained magnetite in igneous reaction rims. New 40Ar/ 39Ar age dating of biotite and plagioclase yield ages of ˜1.2 Ga, which represent the rapid cooling following emplacement of the mafic magma. Whole rock dating of basalt samples yields total gas ages of 1062±3 Ma, similar to the ˜1.0 Ga K/Ar ages reported by previous workers. However, the strong compositional dependence of the age spectrum renders this younger whole rock age unreliable except as a minimum constraint. A single magnetic component is found in the basalts, indistinguishable from the characteristic remanence found in the gabbros that is oriented WNW and steeply upward. This magnetization is considered to be primary and was acquired during the cooling of the sill and associated lavas. A paleomagnetic pole calculated from the Nova Floresta Formation ( n=16 sites, Plat.=24.6°N, Plong.=164.6°E, A95=5.5°, Q=5), the first reported pole for the Amazon craton for the 1200-600 Ma Rodinia time period, constrains the paleogeographic position of Amazonia at ˜1.2 Ga. Juxtaposition of the western Amazon craton with the Llano segment of the Laurentia's Grenville margin causes the NF pole to lie on the 1.2 Ga portion of the combined APWP for Laurentia and Greenland, which indicates that a collision with the Amazon craton could have

  14. Is the Ventersdorp rift system of southern Africa related to a continental collision between the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe Cratons at 2.64 Ga AGO?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, K.; Kidd, W. S. F.; Kusky, T.

    1985-01-01

    Rocks of the Ventersdorp Supergroup were deposited in a system of northeast trending grabens on the Kaapvaal Craton approximately 2.64 Ga ago contemporary with a continental collision between the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe Cratons. It is suggested that it was this collision that initiated the Ventersdorp rifting. Individual grabens strike at high angles toward the continental collision zone now exposed in the Limpopo Province where late orogenic left-lateral strike-slip faulting and anatectic granites are recognized. The Ventersdorp rift province is related to extension in the Kaapvaal Craton associated with the collision, and some analogy is seen with such rifts as the Shansi and Baikal Systems associated with the current India-Asia continental collision.

  15. Cordilleran cratonal-miogeoclinal hinge zone in the Mojave Desert and southern Great Basin: What is it How can it be recognized Where is it

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.D. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Fedo, C.M. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Commonly referred to as hingelines, ancient cratonal-miogeoclinal transitions are best defined by rift-related structures because during the rift-to-drift history of continental margins, hingelines exert their most profound influences as active tectonic and physiographic features. Where rift-related structures are not preserved, stratigraphic development, as the most direct response to early continental margin tectonic activity, is the more sensitive indicator of paleotectonic setting. Accordingly, it is the initial, Neoproterozoic-Early Cambrian basement-cover deposits of the evolving southwestern US Cordilleran passive margin that provide the clear signature of cratonal-miogeoclinal affinity and hinge definition. At a facies scale, the similarities between cratonal and miogeoclinal strata are compelling; thus the major difference between the craton and miogeocline expressed not by lithofacies, but by stratigraphic unit representation and thickness. Throughout the eastern Mojave Desert and southern Great Basin regions, three distinct expressions of Upper Proterozoic-Lower Cambrian stratigraphic unit representation and thickness relate to hinge definition and location. Basal cratonal stratigraphic sections begin with middle member Wood Canyon Formation that rests nonconformably on Proterozoic basement. Basal miogeoclinal stratigraphic sections are typified by a kilometers-thick sub-Wood Canyon Formation interval ([+-]Pahrump Group; Noonday Dolomite, Johnnie Formation, Stirling Quartzite) and the presence of lower member Wood Canyon Formation. A third, transitional stratigraphic succession begins with a comparatively thin, poorly developed sub-Wood Canyon Formation interval and contains no lower member Wood Canyon Formation. This transitional stratigraphic style represents a craton-margin setting and is crucial for constraining a hinge.

  16. African oil plays

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, A.J. )

    1989-09-01

    The vast continent of Africa hosts over eight sedimentary basins, covering approximately half its total area. Of these basins, only 82% have entered a mature exploration phase, 9% have had little or no exploration at all. Since oil was first discovered in Africa during the mid-1950s, old play concepts continue to bear fruit, for example in Egypt and Nigeria, while new play concepts promise to become more important, such as in Algeria, Angola, Chad, Egypt, Gabon, and Sudan. The most exciting developments of recent years in African oil exploration are: (1) the Gamba/Dentale play, onshore Gabon; (2) the Pinda play, offshore Angola; (3) the Lucula/Toca play, offshore Cabinda; (4) the Metlaoui play, offshore Libya/Tunisia; (5) the mid-Cretaceous sand play, Chad/Sudan; and (6) the TAG-I/F6 play, onshore Algeria. Examples of these plays are illustrated along with some of the more traditional oil plays. Where are the future oil plays likely to develop No doubt, the Saharan basins of Algeria and Libya will feature strongly, also the presalt of Equatorial West Africa, the Central African Rift System and, more speculatively, offshore Ethiopia and Namibia, and onshore Madagascar, Mozambique, and Tanzania.

  17. Bioenergy and African transformation.

    PubMed

    Lynd, Lee R; Sow, Mariam; Chimphango, Annie Fa; Cortez, Luis Ab; Brito Cruz, Carlos H; Elmissiry, Mosad; Laser, Mark; Mayaki, Ibrahim A; Moraes, Marcia Afd; Nogueira, Luiz Ah; Wolfaardt, Gideon M; Woods, Jeremy; van Zyl, Willem H

    2015-01-01

    Among the world's continents, Africa has the highest incidence of food insecurity and poverty and the highest rates of population growth. Yet Africa also has the most arable land, the lowest crop yields, and by far the most plentiful land resources relative to energy demand. It is thus of interest to examine the potential of expanded modern bioenergy production in Africa. Here we consider bioenergy as an enabler for development, and provide an overview of modern bioenergy technologies with a comment on application in an Africa context. Experience with bioenergy in Africa offers evidence of social benefits and also some important lessons. In Brazil, social development, agricultural development and food security, and bioenergy development have been synergistic rather than antagonistic. Realizing similar success in African countries will require clear vision, good governance, and adaptation of technologies, knowledge, and business models to myriad local circumstances. Strategies for integrated production of food crops, livestock, and bioenergy are potentially attractive and offer an alternative to an agricultural model featuring specialized land use. If done thoughtfully, there is considerable evidence that food security and economic development in Africa can be addressed more effectively with modern bioenergy than without it. Modern bioenergy can be an agent of African transformation, with potential social benefits accruing to multiple sectors and extending well beyond energy supply per se. Potential negative impacts also cut across sectors. Thus, institutionally inclusive multi-sector legislative structures will be more effective at maximizing the social benefits of bioenergy compared to institutionally exclusive, single-sector structures. PMID:25709714

  18. Transition from a localized to wide deformation along Eastern branch of Central East African Rift: Insights from 3D numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, S. D.; Koptev, A.; Burov, E. B.; Calais, E.; Gerya, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Central East African Rift (CEAR) bifurcates in two branches (eastern, magma-rich and western, magma-poor) surrounding strong Tanzanian craton. Intensive magmatism and continental flood basalts are largely present in many of the eastern rift segments, but other segments, first of all the western branch, exhibit very small volcanic activity. The Eastern rift is characterized by southward progression of the onset of volcanism, the extensional features and topographic expression of the rift vary significantly north-southward: in northern Kenya the deformation is very wide (some 150-250 km in E-W direction), to the south the rift narrows to 60-70 km, yet further to the south the deformation widens again in the so-called Tanzania divergence zone. Widening of the Eastern branch within its southern part is associated with the impingement of the southward-propagating rift on the strong Masai block situated to east of the Tanzanian craton. To understand the mechanisms behind this complex deformation distribution, we implemented a 3Dl ultra-high resolution visco-plastic thermo-mechanical numerical model accounting for thermo-rheological structure of the lithosphere and hence captures essential features of the CEAR. The preferred model has a plume seeded slightly to the northeast of the craton center, consistent with seismic tomography, and produces surface strain distribution that is in good agreement with observed variation of deformation zone width along eastern side of Tanzanian craton: localized above bulk of mantle material deflected by cratonic keel narrow high strain zone (Kenia Rift) is replaced by wide distributed deformations within areas situated to north (northern Kenya, Turkana Rift) and to south (Tanzania divergence, Masai block) of it. These results demonstrate significant differences in the impact of the rheological profile on rifting style in case of dominant active rifting compared to dominant passive rifting. Narrow rifting, conventionally attributed to

  19. Detrital zircon geochronology by LA-ICP-MS of the Neoarchean Manjeri Formation in the Archean Zimbabwe craton- the disappearance of Eoarchean crust by 2.7 Ga?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Hikaru; Maruyama, Shigenori; Sakata, Shuhei; Hirata, Takafumi

    2016-01-01

    For the ca. 2.7 Ga (Neoarchean) clastic rocks in the Belingwe greenstone belt (Manjeri Formation), U-Pb age of detrital zircon grains were analyzed by Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The Manjeri Formation, composed of sandstone, quartzite, and limestone with stromatolites, was deposited in a shallow marine setting along the ancient passive continental margin of the Zimbabwe craton. Nearly 100 detrital zircon grains, for each from two sandstone samples in central Zimbabwe, were separated for U-Pb dating. Age spectra of detrital zircon grains of two analyzed sandstones of the Manjeri Formation show more or less the same multiple age clusters: i.e., ca. 2.9 Ga, ca. 3.15 Ga, ca. 3.3 Ga, and ca. 3.5 Ga. These age spectra reflect nature of the provenance of proto-Zimbabwe, which was considerably different from that of the modern Zimbabwe craton. The age clusters of ca. 2.9 Ga, ca. 3.3 Ga, and ca. 3.5 Ga are correlated with those of extant basement rocks of the present Zimbabwe craton, whereas the ca. 3.15 Ga cluster has no corresponding unit within the craton, except for detrital zircons from the 2.65 Ga Shamvaian Group in a neighboring area of the Zimbabwe craton. The extremely old (3.85 Ga; Eoarchean) detrital zircon grains, previously reported from the ca. 2.9 Ga and ca. 3.4 Ga sandstones elsewhere in the craton, were not detected at all in the present two analyzed samples. As no Eoarchean (>3.8 Ga) basement rocks remain in the Zimbabwe craton at present either, the present study confirmed that the Eoarchean crustal rocks once occurred in the proto-Zimbabwe craton but they had been removed secondarily from the provenance of Neoarchean and younger basins prior to 2.7 Ga. Possible geologic processes for such disappearance of older crusts may include the physiological separation by continental rifting, subduction erosion, and/or other crustal recycling processes.

  20. Assimilation Differences among Africans in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodoo, F. Nii-Amoo

    1997-01-01

    Census data (1990) indicate that male African immigrants earn more than their Caribbean-born counterparts or native-born African Americans, but controlling for relevant earnings-related endowments erases the African advantage and elevates Caribbean earnings above those of the other groups. Also, African (but not Caribbean) university degree…

  1. Successfully Educating Our African-American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moncree-Moffett, Kareem

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this empirical study was to explore the lived experiences of African American retired female teachers who have prior experience with educating urban African American students in public schools. Also explored are the experiences of active African American female teachers of urban African American students and comparisons are…

  2. Fluid-induced martitization of magnetite in BIFs from the Dharwar Craton, India.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Christiane; Orberger, Beate; Tudryn, Alina; Wirth, Richard; Morgan, Rachael

    2013-04-01

    Banded iron formations (BIFs) represent the largest iron deposits on Earth, which mainly formed in the Late Archean and Early Proterozoic. The complex geological history of BIFs makes it difficult to reconstruct the primary mineralogy and thus the initial depositional environment. Magnetite and hematite are the most important iron oxide minerals in BIFs. Magnetite (FeOFe2O3) comprising of both ferrous and ferric iron, easily undergoes transformation at low temperature. Hematite (α-Fe2O3) is often a result of the pseudomorphic replacement of magnetite, in the processus called martitisation. Despite the process of martitization having been widely studied, in both synthetic and natural magnetites, the mechanics of the transformation are poorly understood. What is generally agreed is that the transformation from magnetite to hematite occurs via a maghemite (g-Fe2O3) intermediate. The 2.9 Ga BIF from the Western Dharwar Craton, Southern India (a 500 m thick Archean BIF), is characterized by millimetric to centrimetric alternating white quartz and grey Fe-oxide bands. The Fe-oxide bands consist of martite crystals (~20µm) which represent the hematitisation of euhedral magnetite. The hematite crystals are in part euhedral, cubic shaped pointing to the replacement of magnetite. The crystals show a trellis pattern. Magnetite patches occur within the hematite. Raman spectroscopy, X-Ray diffraction, Curie balance and magnetic hysteresis analyses and FIB-TEM investigation indicate the presence of maghemite, and the presence of subhedral magnetite and interstitial hematite crystal. The latter are characterized by dislocation with fluid inclusions and high porosity zones. The magnetite grains contain lamellae and the interfaces between magnetite-maghemite and hematite are curved suggesting grain boundary migrations with the growth of hematite at the expense of magnetite and maghemite. It is thus suggested that martite result from low-T exsolutions along cleavage resulting in

  3. Models for Circulation Patterns in Epicontinental Seas Applied to Paleozoic Facies of North America Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witzke, Brian J.

    1987-04-01

    Circulation in epicontinental seas develops in response to thermohaline, wind-driven, and tidal motions in various climatic, geographic, and bathymetric settings. Mass balance relations in a seaway are established by the relative rates of outflow, inflow (freshwater and ocean water), and evaporation, which constrain two contrasting styles of epicontinental circulation. Quasietuarine circulation (QEC) is established where rates of freshwater influx exceeds evaporation. Surface outflow from a seaway with QEC typically is balanced by inflow of oceanic water at depth. A density stratification can be established below the limits of vertical mixing. A bottom layer of oxygen poor or anoxic water may develop in a seaway with or without an entrance sill if the bottom waters are derived from the oxygen minimum zone of the open ocean or if organic productivity exceeds the limits of aerobic respiration. Upwelling may be promoted in specific epicontinental settings with QEC. Antiestuarine circulation (AEC) is developed in arid climates where evaporation exceeds freshwater influx. Evaporative concentration in the surface layer causes oxygenated water to sink. Bottom outflow of denser, more saline water is balanced by surface inflow from the open ocean. A sill or barrier may inhibit bottom circulation in seas with AEC, permitting development of a basal brine layer. Stagnation in the brine layer may lead to oxygen depletion. Seas with AEC commonly are characterized by extensive carbonate-evaporite facies. Geographic and stratigraphic syntheses of lithofacies and biofacies provide the empirical basis for interpretations of seaway dynamics in ancient epicontinental settings. Examples from the Upper Ordovician (Maquoketa formation) and Upper Devonian (Lime Creek-Sweetland Creek formations) of cratonic North America are interpreted in the context of stratified QEC patterns. In each case, oxygen poor to anoxic waters appear to have impinged along the basin slope below the margin of an

  4. Paleoproterozoic andesitic volcanism in the southern Amazonian craton (northern Brazil); lithofacies analysis and geodynamic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roverato, Matteo; Juliani, Caetano; Capra, Lucia; Dias Fernandes, Carlos Marcelo

    2016-04-01

    Precambrian volcanism played an important role in geological evolution and formation of new crust. Most of the literature on Precambrian volcanic rocks describes settings belonging to subaqueous volcanic systems. This is likely because subaerial volcanic rocks in Proterozoic and Archean volcano-sedimentary succession are poorly preserved due to erosive/weathering processes. The late Paleoproterozoic Sobreiro Formation (SF) here described, seems to be one of the rare exceptions to the rule and deserves particular attention. SF represents the subaerial expression of an andesitic magmatism that, linked with the upper felsic Santa Rosa F., composes the Uatumã Group. Uatumã Group is an extensive magmatic event located in the Xingú region, southwestern of Pará state, Amazonian Craton (northern Brazil). The Sobreiro volcanism is thought to be related to an ocean-continent convergent margin. It is characterized by ~1880 Ma well-preserved calc-alkaline basaltic/andesitic to andesitic lava flows, pyroclastic rocks and associated reworked successions. The superb preservation of its rock-textures allowed us to describe in detail a large variety of volcaniclastic deposits. We divided them into primary and secondary, depending if they result from a direct volcanic activity (pyroclastic) or reworked processes. Our study reinforces the importance of ancient volcanic arcs and rocks contribution to the terrestrial volcaniclastic sedimentation and evolution of plate tectonics. The volcanic activity that produced pyroclastic rocks influenced the amount of detritus shed into sedimentary basins and played a major role in the control of sedimentary dispersal patterns. This study aims to provide, for the first time, an analysis of the physical volcanic processes for the subaerial SF, based in field observation, lithofacies analysis, thin section petrography and less geochemical data. The modern volcanological approach here used can serve as a model about the evolution of Precambrian

  5. Nature and evolution of the lower crust in the eastern North China craton: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Neng; Guo, Jinghui; Chang, Guohu

    In this paper, published data for granulite terrain rocks exposed at the surface, lower crustal xenoliths, and Mesozoic intermediate-felsic igneous rocks from the eastern North China craton (NCC) are integrated to constrain the nature and evolution of the lower crust in this area. U-Pb zircon dating shows that the protolith ages for most of the granulite terrain rocks are 2500 to 2600 Ma and that many of them experienced 1800-1900 Ma metamorphism. Lower crustal xenoliths entrained in volcanic rocks with ages varying from ~ 460 to ~ 10 Ma suggest that the lower crust is dominated by Neoarchean rocks, although there may be minor rocks with ages of Meso- to Paleoarchean (> 3000 Ma), ~ 45 Ma and possibly ~ 1900 Ma locally. The Mesozoic intrusive rocks, although varying from diorite to granite and spanning from Triassic to Cretaceous, contain ~ 2500 Ma inherited zircons and have magmatic zircons with Hf crust model ages (TDMHf, C) ages of 2500-2700 Ma and whole-rock Sr-Nd isotopic compositions falling within the field of the granulite terrain rocks, pointing to their derivation by the melting of Neoarchean lower crust. The combined data for the granulite terrain rocks, lower crustal xenoliths and Mesozoic intermediate-felsic igneous rocks indicate that the present lower crust is dominated by rocks with Neoarchean ages and is intermediate to mafic in composition (i.e., SiO2 < 62%). The (87Sr/86Sr)i, ɛNd (t) and ɛHf (t) of the lower crust at 130 Ma are considered to be 0.705 to 0.716, - 10 to - 28 and - 13 to - 28, respectively. The ɛNd (t) range is very different from that proposed previously (- 32 to - 44). The large range of ɛHf (t) for the lower crust implies that significant ɛHf (t) variations for magmatic zircons from the Mesozoic intermediate-felsic igneous rocks do not necessarily reflect mixing of mantle- and crustal-magmas as commonly thought, instead they may reflect heterogeneity in the ancient lower crust. Given that the voluminous Mesozoic intermediate

  6. Geophysical Character and Geochemical Evolution of the Mesoproterozoic Figueira Branca Intrusive Suite, SW Amazon Craton (Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louro, Vinicius; Cawood, Peter; Mantovani, Marta

    2016-04-01

    The Jauru Terrain hosts the Figueira Branca Intrusive Suite (FBS) in the SW of the Amazon Craton (Brazil). The FBS is a series of 1425 Ma layered mafic intrusions, previously interpreted as anorogenic. The FBS area is located in foreland to the Santa Helena orogen, formed by the subduction of the Rio Alegre Terrain under the Jauru Terrain. Potential field methods (magnetic and gravity), gamma-ray spectrometry, geochemical and isotope data were used to characterize and to model the extent of FBS magmatism, the distribution of faults and shear zones in the area, to evaluate affinities of the magmatic activity, and the relation between the FBS and the Santa Helena orogen. The geophysical methods identified three anomalies corresponding with FBS outcrops. A fourth anomaly with significantly higher amplitude was observed to the north of the three anomalies. From south to north, the anomalies were named Indiavaí, Azteca, Figueira Branca and Jauru. These anomalies were modeled and indicated a northwest-southeast trend, parallel to regional shear zones. The gamma-ray data enabled the collection of 50 samples from the FBS rocks, the Alto Jauru group that hosts the FBS, from nearby intrusive suites, and the Rio Alegre Terrain. The 30 freshest samples were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence for oxides and some trace elements, 20 by ICP-MS for Rare-Earth Elements and 10 for Nd-Sr isotope analyses. The FBS samples were gabbros and gabbro-norites with Nb/Yb-Th/Yb and TiO2/Yb-Nb/Yb ratios indicating varying degrees of crustal interaction. The TiO2/Yb-Nb/Yb data suggested a subduction related component and the ɛNd-ɛSr indicated a juvenile source. Samples from coeval adjacent intermediate magma suites displayed similar characteristics, which suggest derivation from a bimodal source probably related with the subduction of the Rio Alegre Terrain. We interpreted the tectonic setting of the FBS as a result of a roll-back of the subducted slab, which resulted in rejuvenation of the

  7. Mantle dynamics of the Paleoproterozoic North China Craton: A perspective based on seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santosh, M.; Zhao, Dapeng; Kusky, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the mantle dynamics beneath the North China Craton (NCC) and surrounding regions based on a synthesis of recent P-wave mantle tomographic data down to depths of 600-800 km and their correlation with the surface geological features, with particular reference to the Paleoproterozoic tectonic events associated with the incorporation of the NCC within the Columbia supercontinent amalgam. From the tomographic images, we identify a hot corridor in the mantle transition zone beneath the central region of the Western Block of the NCC sandwiched between two cold corridors. This scenario is similar to the donut-shaped high-velocity anomaly surrounding a region of low-velocity anomaly in the lowermost mantle under the Pacific and suggests that the cold regions might represent slab graveyards which provide the fuel for the plumes rising from the center. A tomographic transect along the collisional suture of the NCC with the Columbia supercontinent, covering the Yinshan-Ordos Blocks in the Western Block through the Central Orogenic Belt and into the Eastern Block of the NCC reveals a ca. 250 km thick lithospheric keel below the Ordos Block defined by a prominent high-velocity anomaly. We identify slab break-off and asthenospheric upwelling in this region and suggest that this process probably initiated the thermal and material erosion of the tectosphere beneath the Eastern Block from the Paleoproterozoic, which was further intensified during the Mesozoic when a substantial part of the sub-continental mantle lithosphere was lost. We visualize heat input from asthenosphere and interaction between asthenosphere and overlying carbonated tectosphere releasing CO 2-rich fluids for the preservation of ultra-high temperature (ca. 1000 °C) metamorphic rocks enriched in CO 2 as well as high-pressure mafic granulites as a paired suite in this region. We also identify a hot swell of the asthenosphere rooted to more than 200 km depth and reaching up to the shallow mantle in

  8. Multifractal spatial organisation in hydrothermal gold systems of the Archaean Yilgarn craton, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, Mark; Ord, Alison; Hobbs, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    A range of factors controls the location of hydrothermal alteration and gold mineralisation in the Earth's crust. These include the broad-scale lithospheric architecture, availability of fluid sources, fluid composition and pH, pressure-temperature conditions, microscopic to macroscopic structural development, the distribution of primary lithologies, and the extent of fluid-rock interactions. Consequently, the spatial distribution of alteration and mineralization in hydrothermal systems is complex and often considered highly irregular. However, despite this, do they organize themselves in a configuration that can be documented and quantified? Wavelets, mathematical functions representing wave-like oscillations, are commonly used in digital signals analysis. Wavelet-based multifractal analysis involves incrementally scanning a wavelet across the dataset multiple times (varying its scale) and recording its degree of fit to the signal at each interval. This approach (the wavelet transform modulus maxima method) highlights patterns of self-similarity present in the dataset and addresses the range of scales over which these patterns replicate themselves (expressed by their range in 'fractal dimension'). Focusing on seven gold ore bodies in the Archaean Yilgarn craton of Western Australia, this study investigates whether different aspects of hydrothermal gold systems evolve to organize themselves spatially as multifractals. Four ore bodies were selected from the Sunrise Dam deposit (situated in the Laverton tectonic zone of the Kurnalpi terrane) in addition to the Imperial, Majestic and Salt Creek gold prospects, situated in the Yindarlgooda dome of the Mount Monger goldfield (approximately 40km due east of Kalgoorlie). The Vogue, GQ, Cosmo East and Astro ore bodies at Sunrise Dam were chosen because they exhibit different structural geometries and relationships between gold and associated host-rock alteration styles. Wavelet-based analysis was conducted on 0.5m and 1m

  9. Tectono-metamorphic evolution of the Paleoproterozoic ultra-high temperatures Khondalite Belt, North China Craton.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobjoie, Cyril; Trap, Pierre; Lin, Wei; Goncalves, Philippe; Marquer, Didier

    2016-04-01

    In the North China Craton, the Khondalite belt is a famous Paleoproterozoic domain where ultra-high temperatures (UHT) metamorphism was extensively documented over an area of 1000 square kilometers. Numerous petrological analyses argue for P-T conditions around 0.6-0.8GPa for temperature above 900°C for peak metamorphism. Unfortunately, the scarcity of available structural data prevents any discussion about thermo-mechanical behavior of the orogenic crust suffering high thermal regime. In this contribution, we present a detail structural analysis of the Khondalite belt that allowed to distinguish two main deformation events, named D1 and D2. The deformation D1 led to the formation of the S1 foliation that dips weakly toward the South-East. S1 holds a N70°E trending mineral and stretching L1 lineation that is sub-horizontal or plunges weakly to the East. The D1 fabrics is reworked by the dextral transpressional D2 deformation responsible for the development of km-scale S2-C2-C'2 system. The N30°E trending S2 foliation is sub-vertical to highly dipping toward the East. Kilometer-scale C2 and C'2 shear zones are sub-vertical and trend N70°E and N90-100°E, respectively. Petrological study and phase diagram modeling suggest that both D1 and D2 developed at UHT conditions. Garnet and spinel-bearing migmatites recording D1 fabric yield 0.7GPa for ca. 950-1015°C P-T conditions. Within D2 shear zones, numerous granitoids and mafic bodies are injected. Mafic intrusions are responsible for UHT contact metamorphism that can occur at low pressure as recorded in an olivine-bearing migmatite. This may suggest that the D2 S-C-C' system form an interconnected network of kilometer scale shear zones that act as pathways for percolation of mafic magmas from the mantle up to the base of the upper crust. Our results allow to discuss the role of localized heat advection along crustal-scale shear zones as a possible mechanism responsible for UHT metamorphism at regional scale, with

  10. Mesoarchean sanukitoid rocks of the Rio Maria Granite-Greenstone Terrane, Amazonian craton, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Marcelo Augusto; Dall'Agnol, Roberto; Althoff, Fernando Jacques; da Silva Leite, Albano Antonio

    2009-02-01

    The Archean sanukitoid Rio Maria Granodiorite yielded zircon ages of ˜2.87 Ga and is exposed in large domains of the Rio Maria Granite-Greenstone Terrane, southeastern Amazonian craton. It is intrusive in the greenstone belts of the Andorinhas Supergroup, in the Arco Verde Tonalite and Caracol Tonalitic Complex (older TTGs). Archean potassic leucogranites, younger TTGs and the Paleoproterozoic granites of Jamon Suite are intrusive in the Rio Maria Granodiorite. The more abundant rocks of the Rio Maria Granodiorite have granodioritic composition and display medium to coarse even-grained textures. These rocks show generally a gray color with greenish shades due to strongly saussuritized plagioclase, and weak WNW-ESE striking foliation. The significant geochemical contrasts between the occurrences of Rio Maria Granodiorite in different areas suggest that this unit corresponds in fact to a granodioritic suite of rocks derived from similar but distinct magmas. Mingling processes involving the Rio Maria Granodiorite and similar mafic to intermediate magmas are able to explain the constant occurrence of mafic enclaves in the granodiorite. The associated intermediate rocks occur mainly near Bannach, where mostly quartz diorite and quartz monzodiorite are exposed. The dominant rocks are mesocratic, dark-green rocks, with fine to coarse even-grained texture. The Rio Maria Granodiorite and associated intermediate rocks show similar textural and mineralogical aspects. They follow the calc-alkaline series trend in some diagrams. However, they have high-Mg#, Cr, and Ni conjugate with high contents of large ion lithophile elements (LILEs), typical of sanukitoids series. The patterns of rare earth elements of different rocks are similar, with pronounced enrichment in light rare earth elements (LREEs) and strong to moderate fractionation of heavy rare earth elements (HREEs). Field aspects and petrographic and geochemical characteristics denote that the granodiorites and

  11. Crust structure of the North China Craton from a long-range seismic wide-angle-reflection/refraction data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaofeng; Zelt, Colin A.; Wang, Fuyun; Jia, Shixu; Liu, Qiaoxia

    2014-11-01

    We present an interpretation of a 1530-km-long wide-angle seismic reflection/refraction profile that extends across the North China Craton (NCC) approximately from east to west. This profile is the longest and the densest wide-angle seismic reflection/refraction profile in China up to now. Parameterizing the velocity model as layers with variable thickness, we perform seismic travel time tomography to resolve the velocity variation within layers and velocity contrast across Moho. Our model shows crustal thickness that varies from 35 km under the Shandong peninsula, to 30 km under the North China Plain (NCP) and 32-40 km under central NCC, to 45 km under the Ordos plateau. These results indicate obvious crustal thinning beneath the NCP in comparison with the ~ 35 km crustal thicknesses typical of most cratonic regions. In particular, an abrupt Moho step of ∼ 10 km is detected at the junction of the eastern block and western block of the NCC. These crustal characteristics are consistent with studies of lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) with the method of receiver function migration, and they indicate a close correlation with lithospheric thickness and surface tectonics of the northeastern NCC. These results provide robust seismological evidence that the lithosphere from NCC to the western edge of the Taihang Mountain, might have been widely affected and thinned since its formation in the Archean era.

  12. Paleoproterozoic high-pressure metamorphism in the northern North China Craton and implications for the Nuna supercontinent.

    PubMed

    Wan, Bo; Windley, Brian F; Xiao, Wenjiao; Feng, Jianyun; Zhang, Ji'en

    2015-01-01

    The connection between the North China Craton (NCC) and contiguous cratons is important for the configuration of the Nuna supercontinent. Here we document a new Paleoproterozoic high-pressure (HP) complex dominated by garnet websterite on the northern margin of the NCC. The peak metamorphism of the garnet websterite was after ∼1.90 Ga when it was subducted to eclogite facies at ∼2.4 GPa, then exhumed back to granulite facies at ∼0.9 GPa before ∼1.82 Ga. The rock associations with their structural relationships and geochemical affinities are comparable to those of supra-subduction zone ophiolites, and supported by subduction-related signatures of gabbros and basalts. We propose that a ∼1.90 Ga oceanic fragment was subducted and exhumed into an accretionary complex along the northern margin of the NCC. Presence of the coeval Sharyzhalgai complex with comparable HP garnet websterites in the southern Siberian active margin favours juxtaposition against the NCC in the Paleoproterozoic. PMID:26388458

  13. Paleoproterozoic high-pressure metamorphism in the northern North China Craton and implications for the Nuna supercontinent

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Bo; Windley, Brian F.; Xiao, Wenjiao; Feng, Jianyun; Zhang, Ji'en

    2015-01-01

    The connection between the North China Craton (NCC) and contiguous cratons is important for the configuration of the Nuna supercontinent. Here we document a new Paleoproterozoic high-pressure (HP) complex dominated by garnet websterite on the northern margin of the NCC. The peak metamorphism of the garnet websterite was after ∼1.90 Ga when it was subducted to eclogite facies at ∼2.4 GPa, then exhumed back to granulite facies at ∼0.9 GPa before ∼1.82 Ga. The rock associations with their structural relationships and geochemical affinities are comparable to those of supra-subduction zone ophiolites, and supported by subduction-related signatures of gabbros and basalts. We propose that a ∼1.90 Ga oceanic fragment was subducted and exhumed into an accretionary complex along the northern margin of the NCC. Presence of the coeval Sharyzhalgai complex with comparable HP garnet websterites in the southern Siberian active margin favours juxtaposition against the NCC in the Paleoproterozoic. PMID:26388458

  14. Velocity-density models of the Earth's crust and upper mantle from the quartz, Craton, and Kimberlite superlong seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yegorova, T. P.; Pavlenkova, G. A.

    2015-03-01

    The unique deep seismic studies carried out in Russia with the use of nuclear explosions provided the possibility to identify the detailed structure of the Earth's crust, upper mantle, and transition zone to the lower mantle to a depth of 700 km in a huge territory of North Eurasia. It is shown that seismic velocities in the upper mantle mainly reflect its temperature regime. The gravity modeling along these profiles showed the absence of a direct relationship between seismic velocity and density. The Siberian Craton, which is marked with a low heat flow and high-velocity mantle, has lower density. The upper mantle of the East European Platform, with almost the same heat flow, is characterized by the highest densities and seismic velocities. Within the West Siberian Plate, high heat flow, lower seismic velocities, and increased density in the upper mantle are revealed. This combination of seismic velocities and densities suggests different composition of the upper mantle beneath the studied structures with the depleted upper mantle beneath the Siberian Craton.

  15. Paleoproterozoic high-pressure metamorphism in the northern North China Craton and implications for the Nuna supercontinent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Bo; Windley, Brian F.; Xiao, Wenjiao; Feng, Jianyun; Zhang, Ji'en

    2015-09-01

    The connection between the North China Craton (NCC) and contiguous cratons is important for the configuration of the Nuna supercontinent. Here we document a new Paleoproterozoic high-pressure (HP) complex dominated by garnet websterite on the northern margin of the NCC. The peak metamorphism of the garnet websterite was after ~1.90 Ga when it was subducted to eclogite facies at ~2.4 GPa, then exhumed back to granulite facies at ~0.9 GPa before ~1.82 Ga. The rock associations with their structural relationships and geochemical affinities are comparable to those of supra-subduction zone ophiolites, and supported by subduction-related signatures of gabbros and basalts. We propose that a ~1.90 Ga oceanic fragment was subducted and exhumed into an accretionary complex along the northern margin of the NCC. Presence of the coeval Sharyzhalgai complex with comparable HP garnet websterites in the southern Siberian active margin favours juxtaposition against the NCC in the Paleoproterozoic.

  16. Geochemistry and mineralogy of sediments from the Ventersdorp and Transvaal supergroups, South Africa: Cratonic evolution during the early proterozoic

    SciTech Connect

    Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Condie, K.C. )

    1990-02-01

    Approximately 100 pelite and 12 quartzite samples from the Ventersdorp ({approx} 2.7 Ga) and Transvaal Supergroups ({approx} 2.6-2.1 Ga) have been analyzed to monitor the early Proterozoic evolution of the Kaapvaal Craton, southern Africa. From oldest to youngest, pelites were sampled from the Ventersdorp-Bothaville (BOT), Transvaal-Selati (SEL), Black Reef (BR), Timeball Hill (TH), Strubenkop (STR), and Silverton (SIL) Formations. Paleocurrent measurements in Transvaal quartzites indicate sources lying predominantly to the north and east. Compositions of TH-STR-SIL pelites suggest a provenance similar to average Phanerozoic upper-continental crust. This source is more evolved than that of BOT-SEL-Br pelites, indicating a transformation from primitive (mafic-rich) to evolved (felsic-rich) upper-crust at 2.2 Ga. This transition follows earlier primitive to evolved trends in Moodies-Pongola (3.3-3.0 Ga) and Witwatersrand ({approx} 2.8 Ga) successions. These data suggest that several cycles of changing upper-continental crust occurred in the Kaapvaal craton between 3.3-2.1 Ga.

  17. A precisely dated Proterozoic palaeomagnetic pole from the North China craton, and its relevance to palaeocontinental reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halls, Henry C.; Li, Jianghai; Davis, Don; Hou, Guiting; Zhang, Baoxing; Qian, Xianglin

    2000-10-01

    A palaeomagnetic pole position, derived from a precisely dated primary remanence, with minimal uncertainties due to secular variation and structural correction, has been obtained for China's largest dyke swarm, which trends for about 1000km in a NNW direction across the North China craton. Positive palaeomagnetic contact tests on two dykes signify that the remanent magnetization is primary and formed during initial cooling of the intrusions. The age of one of these dykes, based on U-Pb dating of primary zircon, is 1769.1+/-2.5Ma. The mean palaeomagnetic direction for 19 dykes, after structural correction, is D=36°, I=-5°, k=63, α95=4°, yielding a palaeomagnetic pole at Plat=36°N, Plong=247°E, dp=2°, dm=4° and a palaeolatitude of 2.6°S. Comparison of this pole position with others of similar age from the Canadian Shield allows a continental reconstruction that is compatible with a more or less unchanged configuration of Laurentia, Siberia and the North China craton since about 1800Ma

  18. Negro, Black, Black African, African Caribbean, African American or what? Labelling African origin populations in the health arena in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Agyemang, Charles; Bhopal, Raj; Bruijnzeels, Marc

    2005-12-01

    Broad terms such as Black, African, or Black African are entrenched in scientific writings although there is considerable diversity within African descent populations and such terms may be both offensive and inaccurate. This paper outlines the heterogeneity within African populations, and discusses the strengths and limitations of the term Black and related labels from epidemiological and public health perspectives in Europe and the USA. This paper calls for debate on appropriate terminologies for African descent populations and concludes with the proposals that (1) describing the population under consideration is of paramount importance (2) the word African origin or simply African is an appropriate and necessary prefix for an ethnic label, for example, African Caribbean or African Kenyan or African Surinamese (3) documents should define the ethnic labels (4) the label Black should be phased out except when used in political contexts. PMID:16286485

  19. The southern and central parts of the "Souttoufide" belt, Northwest Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villeneuve, Michel; Gärtner, Andreas; Youbi, Nasrrddine; El Archi, Abdelkrim; Vernhet, Elodie; Rjimati, Ech-Cherki; Linnemann, Ulf; Bellon, Hervé; Gerdes, Axel; Guillou, Omar; Corsini, Michel; Paquette, Jean-Louis

    2015-12-01

    The Souttoufide belt is situated between the High-Atlas in the north, the Mauritanides in the south and the West African Craton as well as the Tindouf basin in the east. Thus, this belt is a part of the West African fold belt system which surrounds the West African Craton. Outcrops occur only in three areas, while the rest of the Souttoufide belt is covered by Meso- to Cenozoic sediments. These areas are, from the south to the north, the Adrar Souttouf Massif, the Smara Zemmour area, and the western part of the Anti-Atlas. Because of the continuing processing and numerous publications, the Anti-Atlas cannot be dealt with in detail. Fundamental geological work in both of the other areas was mainly done during the second third of the 20th century, followed by several decades of inactivity. Numerous studies were done in the Adrar Souttouf massif during the last decade, while the Smara-Zemmour area still remains poorly investigated. Most of them were focused on geochronological analyses and geochemistry. Accordingly, the obtained data led to a new interpretation. The Adrar Souttouf is interpreted as a Pan-African belt exhibiting a Neoproterozoic island arc reworked by the Variscan collision between the North American Craton (NAC) and the West African Craton (WAC). The Smara-Zemmour area is considered as the external part of this Variscan belt thrusted onto the Palaeozoic Tindouf basin. The western Anti-Atlas as considered as a Pan-African active margin reworked during the Variscan orogen. Together, these three areas, lead to the hypothesis of a Late Pan-African belt capped by the Early and Middle Palaeozoic covers and then affected by the Middle Carboniferous tectonic event (330 Ma) related to the Pangaean assembly. Correlations with adjacent belts (Mauritanides and Anti-Atlas) are considered.

  20. Style of Palaeoarchaean tectonics from the SE Kaapvaal and Singhbhum Cratons: Constraints from Metamorphic Studies and Zircon Geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, L.; Hofmann, A.; Xie, H.

    2012-04-01

    Direct evidence of Palaeoarchaean collisional tectonics in terms of orogenic metamorphism have so far solely been reported from the Barberton, De Kraalen and Witrivier greenstone belts of SE KaapvaalCraton. These terrains record a high-pressure (~14 kbar) metamorphic event at ~3.2 Ga, indicative of a geothermal gradient of ~15°C/km. Clockwise P-T paths have been recorded from these terrains and other medium pressure amphibolite-facies greenstone belts in the SE KaapvaalCraton, providing conclusive evidence for the operation of collisional tectonics during the Palaeoarchaean period. In this study we present new evidence for Palaeoarchaean high-grade metamorphism from the SE Kaapvaalcraton (Ulundi greenstone belt remnant). We also present for the first time evidence of a high-pressure metamorphic event from the SinghbhumCraton, India. In the Ulundi greenstone belt, calc-silicate boudins occur within hornblende-bearing amphibolites that are tectonically interleaved with tonalitic to granitic gneisses dated at between 3.39 and 3.27Ga using SHRIMP U-Pbon zircon. The boudins contain Grt-Cpx-Pl-Qtz. Garnet often contains epidote inclusions. Epidote-quartz bearing symplectites replace garnet-clinopyroxene-plagioclase at their margins. Garnet and clinopyroxeneare mostly homogeneous in composition: Grs65Alm28Sps05 and Di16Hd84 respectively. XAn content of Pl is ~53 mol%. Average P (calculated by THERMOCALC) as obtained from the set of independent reactions formed with garnet-clinopyroxene-plagioclase core compositions and composition of epidote inclusions in garnet indicate that peak metamorphism occurred at ~6.3 kbar. Such pressure value corresponds with a reference temperature of ~500°C. Age of the associated foliated granite indicates that possibly the metamorphic event occurred at ~3.27 Ga The geothermal gradient corresponding to such peak PT conditions is ~30°C/km, similar to that recorded in many other Archaean terrains. In the SinghbhumCraton, supracrustals of the

  1. African swine fever.

    PubMed

    Penrith, Mary-Louise

    2009-03-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a devastating haemorrhagic fever of pigs that causes up to 100% mortality, for which there is no vaccine. It is caused by a unique DNA virus that is maintained in an ancient cycle between warthogs and argasid ticks, making it the only known DNA arbovirus. ASF has a high potential for transboundary spread, and has twice been transported from Africa to other continents--Europe and subsequently the Caribbean and Brazil (1957, 1959) and the Caucasus (2007). It is also a devastating constraint for pig production in Africa. Research at Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute has made and is making important contributions to knowledge of this disease, focusing on the cycle in warthogs and tampans and transmission from that cycle to domestic pigs, resistance to its effects in domestic pigs, and the molecular genetic characterisation and epidemiology of the virus. PMID:19967933

  2. The African Millennium Villages

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Pedro; Palm, Cheryl; Sachs, Jeffrey; Denning, Glenn; Flor, Rafael; Harawa, Rebbie; Jama, Bashir; Kiflemariam, Tsegazeab; Konecky, Bronwen; Kozar, Raffaela; Lelerai, Eliud; Malik, Alia; Modi, Vijay; Mutuo, Patrick; Niang, Amadou; Okoth, Herine; Place, Frank; Sachs, Sonia Ehrlich; Said, Amir; Siriri, David; Teklehaimanot, Awash; Wang, Karen; Wangila, Justine; Zamba, Colleen

    2007-01-01

    We describe the concept, strategy, and initial results of the Millennium Villages Project and implications regarding sustainability and scalability. Our underlying hypothesis is that the interacting crises of agriculture, health, and infrastructure in rural Africa can be overcome through targeted public-sector investments to raise rural productivity and, thereby, to increased private-sector saving and investments. This is carried out by empowering impoverished communities with science-based interventions. Seventy-eight Millennium Villages have been initiated in 12 sites in 10 African countries, each representing a major agroecological zone. In early results, the research villages in Kenya, Ethiopia, and Malawi have reduced malaria prevalence, met caloric requirements, generated crop surpluses, enabled school feeding programs, and provided cash earnings for farm families. PMID:17942701

  3. Larger genetic differences within africans than between Africans and Eurasians.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ning; Chen, Feng-Chi; Ota, Satoshi; Jorde, Lynn B; Pamilo, Pekka; Patthy, Laszlo; Ramsay, Michele; Jenkins, Trefor; Shyue, Song-Kun; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2002-01-01

    The worldwide pattern of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variation is of great interest to human geneticists, population geneticists, and evolutionists, but remains incompletely understood. We studied the pattern in noncoding regions, because they are less affected by natural selection than are coding regions. Thus, it can reflect better the history of human evolution and can serve as a baseline for understanding the maintenance of SNPs in human populations. We sequenced 50 noncoding DNA segments each approximately 500 bp long in 10 Africans, 10 Europeans, and 10 Asians. An analysis of the data suggests that the sampling scheme is adequate for our purpose. The average nucleotide diversity (pi) for the 50 segments is only 0.061% +/- 0.010% among Asians and 0.064% +/- 0.011% among Europeans but almost twice as high (0.115% +/- 0.016%) among Africans. The African diversity estimate is even higher than that between Africans and Eurasians (0.096% +/- 0.012%). From available data for noncoding autosomal regions (total length = 47,038 bp) and X-linked regions (47,421 bp), we estimated the pi-values for autosomal regions to be 0.105, 0.070, 0.069, and 0.097% for Africans, Asians, Europeans, and between Africans and Eurasians, and the corresponding values for X-linked regions to be 0.088, 0.042, 0.053, and 0.082%. Thus, Africans differ from one another slightly more than from Eurasians, and the genetic diversity in Eurasians is largely a subset of that in Africans, supporting the out of Africa model of human evolution. Clearly, one must specify the geographic origins of the individuals sampled when studying pi or SNP density. PMID:12019240

  4. [West African childbirth traditions].

    PubMed

    Hallgren, R

    1983-11-01

    Religious and medical practices are steeped in the traditions of West African culture vis-a-vis childbirth. It is customary for delivery to occur with the woman squatting on the ground surrounded by sisters and female relatives, some of whom function as midwives. Midwives get paid only if delivery is successful. A stool is also often used in childbirth. The name given to a child in the Yoruba tribe in Nigeria has to refer to the circumstances of the individual's birth. The contact with the earth (as in the squatting position) has religious overtones--it indicates the fecundity of the earth, and the mother's contact with it. Infertility is considered the greatest tragedy in traditional African society. In Senegal, a childless woman pays a fertile one a certain sum in return for bearing her a child who would be raised as her own (this tradition is not unlike surrogate motherhood in Western countries). Men are never present at birth; however, in urban settings this practice is changing. The burial of the placenta and umbilical cord is thought to restore the woman's fertility and help heal her womb. This practice was even recorded in 19th century Sweden harkening back to heathen times. In Ghana, an infertile woman urinates on the ground where the placenta is buried in the belief that her fertility will be restored. The birth of twins is regarded as a great blessing, and as a sign of fertility; however, the inability of the mother to breast-feed both twins may result in the death of the weaker child. The harmony of nature, animals, and human beings is paramount in traditional West Africa religion and life, and undoubtedly Western culture could learn from some of these beliefs. PMID:6558064

  5. Timing the structural events in the Palaeoproterozoic Bolé-Nangodi belt terrane and adjacent Maluwe basin, West African craton, in central-west Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kock, G. S.; Théveniaut, H.; Botha, P. M. W.; Gyapong, W.

    2012-04-01

    The Maluwe basin, north-adjacent to the Sunyani basin, is the northernmost of the northeast-trending Eburnean volcaniclastic depositories in Ghana. These basins are separated from one another by remnants of Eoeburnean crust, all formed during the evolution of an arc-backarc basins complex in a Palaeoproterozoic intraoceanic environment. The Bolé-Nangodi belt terrane to the northwest, of mostly Eoeburnean crust is fault bounded with the Maluwe basin along the northeast-trending Bolé-Navrongo fault zone. The stratigraphic sequence, which was the key to unravelling the structural evolution of the study area, was established by means of field observations aided by precision SHRIMP geochronology. The quartzitic, pelitic, quartzofeldspathic and granitic gneisses of the Eoeburnean crust (>2150 Ma) experienced complex metamorphic mineral growth and migmatitization, mostly under static crustal conditions and were subjected to several deformation episodes. The foliated mafic and metasedimentary enclaves within the Ifanteyire granite establish deformation to have taken place prior to ˜2195 Ma, while the tectonically emplaced Kuri amphibolites within the 2187-Ma gneissic Gondo granite indicate a stage of rifting followed by collision. Deformation of granite dykes in the Gondo granites at ˜2150 Ma concluded the development of the Eoeburnean orogenic cycle (DEE). The Sawla Suite, contemporaneous with the deposition of the Maluwe Group, intruded the tectonic exhumed Bolé-Nangodi terrane during extension between ˜2137 and 2125 Ma. The rifting separated the Abulembire fragment from the Bolé-Nangodi terrane. During subsequent northwestward subduction of young back-arc basin oceanic crust the volcaniclastic strata of the Maluwe Group and Sawla granitoids were deformed (DE1) under chlorite/sericite greenschist-grade conditions. The NE-trending folds had subhorizontal axes and subvertical axial planes. Simultaneous to the DE1 orogenesis the molasses of the Banda Group was deposited concordantly on the submerged Sunyani strata after a hiatus of 20 million years. After cessation of the NW-SE-directed compression the early Tanina Suite intruded as batholiths, dykes and sheets and produced garnet, staurolite, sillimanite and kyanite in their thermal aureoles. Docking of the Sunyani basin produced the DE2 thrust related folding and stacking in the deformed and granitoid invaded Maluwe basin as well as the single stage sin- and anticlinoria in the Sunyani and Banda Groups. In the Maluwe basin the Abulembire fragment acted as a resistor and the approaching front rotated anticlockwise and clockwise around the barrier to form west- and north-directed piggy-back thrust-stacking and deformation of the Tanina Suite granitoids. Due to the low metamorphic conditions the DE2 fabric is limited to crenulation cleavages in the more psammitic and pelitic units. The fold axes are double plunging (N-S and E-W) up to 60° with the axial planar fabric subvertical. Post-D2 tectonic relaxation has allowed the emplacement of the last Tanina Suite calc-alkaline melts and was succeeded by N-S extension fracturing (DE3) along which mantle derived Wakawaka gabbroids and syenite intruded. The DE1 folding occurred between 2125 and 2122 Ma and DE2 before 2119 Ma. The tectonic relaxation occurred at 2118 Ma. Around 2100 Ma, NE-SW directed strike-slip shearing (DE4), fractured the Bolé-Nangodi terrane and enhanced the basin-belt boundary. Along the boundary, the displacement was dextral along vertical faults but, southward, it became more east-over-west thrust related. Associated tension gashes are filled with vein quartz and pegmatite and typical of the brittle sector of the crust. Tectonism in this part of the intraoceanic accretionary arc back-arc complex was concluded by limited, right-lateral strike-slip (DE5) movement which formed some breccias.

  6. Vertical movements at the fringe of the West African Craton: First zircon fission track datings from the Anti-Atlas Precambrian basement, Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebti, Samira; Saddiqi, Omar; El Haimer, Fatima Zahra; Michard, André; Ruiz, Geoffrey; Bousquet, Romain; Baidder, Lahssen; Frizon de Lamotte, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    The post-Variscan uplift of the western Anti-Atlas Precambrian core is studied by zircon fission track (ZFT) analysis of ten samples of granites and schists from the Kerdous and Ifni inliers. All samples yield Carboniferous ZFT ages ranging from 358 ± 31 Ma to 319 ± 32 Ma, with nine dates younger than 338 ± 35 Ma. The weighted mean age calculated for these nine samples is 328 ± 30 Ma. These results compare with the available K-Ar datings of white mica and biotite from the same rocks or from the overlying Ediacaran-Cambrian low-grade metasediments. The fact that different systems with distinct closure temperatures yield similar ages suggests the occurrence of a short Carboniferous thermal event followed by rapid cooling. Consistent with the regional geological framework, the thermal event is assigned to the Variscan folding, being followed by rapid exhumation and cooling related to the post-folding erosion.

  7. Early African Hominids: Pedagogic Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, James L.

    1984-01-01

    By studying early African hominids, students can learn about the interactive testing and creative aspects of scientific thinking and sharpen their geographical skills. It is impossible to study this topic without giving prominence to space and time. (RM)

  8. Juvenile accretion (2360-2330 Ma) in the São Francisco Craton, and implications for the Columbia supercontinent: evidence from U-Pb zircon ages, Sr-Nd-Hf and geochemical constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, W.; Ávila, C.

    2012-12-01

    The Mineiro and the Itabuna-Salvador-Curaçá belts are segments of an Early Proterozoic orogen, in the São Francisco/West Congo-North Gabon craton. The latter segment includes island-arc rocks with preserved portions of the accretionary prism and back-arc basins, developed between 2.4 and 2.0 Ga. The Mineiro belt evolved marginally to the Minas passive margin basin (<2.55 to 2.35 Ga). It contains mainly granitoid rocks with ages between 2.25-2.20 Ga and 2.12-2.08 Ga, along with coeval back arc sequences. The overall framework includes regional metamorphism and related faults and shear zones across both belts. Similar tectonic features are portrayed by the West Central African belt (of Eburnean age) by considering the early contiguous African counterpart. We present an integrated geochronologic and geochemical study for the Resende Costa orthogneiss (Mineiro belt): the gneissic rocks are slightly metaluminous to peraluminous, subalkaline, show varied SiO2 (69 to 73wt.%) contents, and low K2O and high- Na2O +CaO ones. Chemically, they are compatible with high Al2O3 trondhjemites. They also show weak positive Eu/Eu* anomalies, low Rb (24 to 70ppm), Ba (500 to 1000ppm), Th (2.1 to 8.5ppm) contents, very high Sr/Y ratios (75 to 158) and variable LREE and low HREE patterns (Yb < 1.23 ppm). The Resende Costa pluton yields two U-Pb (LA-ICPMS) zircon crystallization ages (2358±10 Ma and 2356±12 Ma), while the zircon rims yield 2133±32 Ma, interpreted as the age of metamorphism. The Sm/Nd TDM whole rock model ages are between 2.35-2.50 Ga, whereas the ɛNd(t) values range from +1.2 to +3.0, ɛSr(t) from +10 to -6, and ɛHf(t) in zircon between -3 to +6. The nearby Ramos gneissic pluton gives U-Pb zircon age of 2331±17 Ma, TDM age of 2.4 Ga, ɛNd(t) +2.2, ɛHf(t) (-9/+9) and ɛSr(t) +40 values. The overall signature implies to short crustal residence for the protholiths with minor contamination during the petrogenesis. Published data reveal that the nearby Lagoa Dourada

  9. Paleomagnetism of the Marble Bar Chert Member, Western Australia: Implications for apparent polar wander path for Pilbara craton during Archean time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganuma, Yusuke; Hamano, Yozo; Niitsuma, Sachiko; Hoashi, Masamichi; Hisamitsu, Toshio; Niitsuma, Nobuaki; Kodama, Kazuto; Nedachi, Munetomo

    2006-12-01

    The Archean Biosphere Drilling Project (ABDP) drilled a continuous 270 m long oriented core from the Towers Formation, which includes the Marble Bar Chert Member (3456.1-3476.0 Ma) in the Pilbara craton, northwestern Australia. A paleomagnetic study of 261 discrete specimens, collected from a 158.5 to 182.0 m section of the Marble Bar Chert Member, revealed two distinct magnetic components (LT and MT). The MT component yields seven different mean paleomagnetic directions clustered as MB1 to MB7. These, together with the published paleomagnetic poles of early Archean rocks from the Pilbara craton, draw a continuous paleomagnetic pole path, which likely to be regarded as the early to late Archean apparent polar wander path (APWP) for the Pilbara craton. The APWP implies that the Pilbara craton underwent a latitudinal drift of about 21° during the interval when the magnetization of the Marble Bar Chert Member was acquired. The estimated speed of the lateral drift is 12-112 cm/yr (120-1120 km/Myr), which is large compared with current plate motion velocities, suggesting that continents might have moved during the Archean faster than in the Phanerozoic.

  10. Chapter 27: Geology and petroleum potential of the north and east margins of the Siberian Craton, north of the Arctic Circle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klett, T.R.; Wandrey, C.J.; Pitman, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    The Siberian Craton consists of crystalline rocks and superimposed Precambrian sedimentary rocks deposited in rift basins. Palaeozoic rocks, mainly carbonates, were deposited along the margins of the craton to form an outwardly younger concentric pattern that underlies an outward-thickening Mesozoic sedimentary section. The north and east margins of the Siberian Craton subsequently became foreland basins created by compressi