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Sample records for african dust transport

  1. Chemical characterisation of african dust transported to Canary Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelado, M. D.; López, P.; Prieto, S.; Collado, C.; Hernández, J. J.

    2009-04-01

    African dust pulses have important effects on the climate conditions and the marine biogeochemistry in the Canary Region. Aerosol samples have been collected at three stations on Gran Canaria Island (Taliarte at sea level, Tafira 269 m a.s.l. and Pico de la Gorra 1930 m a.s.l.) during 2000-2008. Elemental characterisation of the collected mineral aerosol and back trajectories of the air masses are used to distinguish regional African sources of dust. Dust aerosol samples from North Sahara (Morocco, North Algeria and Tunisia), West and Central Sahara (20°-30°N, 18°W-50°E) and Sahel (0°-20°N, 18°W-50°E) have shown different Ca/Ti, Al/Ti and Fe/Al ratios. Ti appears as a better tracer element of specific source of dust than Fe, probably due to a less mineral alteration during the atmospheric transport.

  2. No change in African dust transport over past 45 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-09-01

    The long-distance transport of dust around the planet has important implications for ecosystem stability and global climate dynamics. In some cases, most prominently the vast Amazon rainforest, travelling dust is the primary source of iron and phosphorous to otherwise nutrient-limited regions. Wind-swept sediments can affect the planetary albedo and sully the surface of icy regions driving increased melting. Therefore, understanding how ongoing climate change may affect the wind circulation patterns in major dust-generating regions is particularly important. Unfortunately, hostile environmental conditions in many of the important sources of dust mean that long-term wind speed and direction records from on-the-ground anemometers are nonexistent.

  3. Long-range transport of North African dust to the eastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Kevin D.; Cahill, Thomas A.; Eldred, Robert A.; Dutcher, Dabrina D.; Gill, Thomas E.

    1997-05-01

    The long-range transport of North African dust to the Middle East, Europe, South America, and the Caribbean has been well documented during the past 25 years. With the advent of routine collection and analysis of fine aerosols at national parks, monuments, and wilderness areas in the continental United States, these North African dust incursions can now be tracked, characterized, and quantified across much of the eastern half of the United States. Identification of the North African source of these dust episodes is confirmed by mass distribution measurements, a characteristic Al/Ca ratio, isentropic backward air mass trajectories, and sequential plots of the spatial distribution of the dust plumes. North African dust incursions into the continental United States persist for ˜10 days and occurred, on average, 3 times per year from 1992 to 1995. Fine soil mass usually exceeds 10 μg m-3 during these dust episodes and dominates local fine soil dust by an order of magnitude or more, even in the so-called "dust bowl" states of the central United States. Size-resolved measurements of elemental composition taken during July 1995 indicate that the mass mean diameter of the transported North African dust is <1 μm. The high mass scattering efficiency and abundant particle surface area associated with these submicron soil aerosols could have important consequences for both the radiative balance of the region and the chemistry of the local aerosols during summer when the long-range transport of North African dust to the United States is most common.

  4. Identifying African dust sources that contribute to the seasonal cycles of dust transport to the Caribbean Basin and South America.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prospero, J. M.; Ginoux, P. A.; Molinie, J.

    2014-12-01

    Decades of aerosol measurements on Barbados have yielded a detailed picture of African mineral dust transport to the Caribbean Basin that shows a strong seasonal cycle with a maximum in boreal summer and a minimum in winter. Recently Prospero et al. (Global Biogeochemical Cycles, 2014) presented 10 years (2002 - 2011) of aerosol measurements made at Cayenne, French Guiana, along with concurrent dust measurements on Barbados. The Cayenne study, coupled with satellite products and other evidence, shows that during spring African dust is carried to a broad region of northeastern South America in quantities comparable to, or greater than, those measured at Barbados in summer. Various lines of evidence suggest that the sources that impact on Cayenne in spring are mainly in the Sahel region, including the Bodélé Depression. In summer transport to Barbados is believed to be most affected by emissions that lie in more northerly regions. Thus the record of measurements at Cayenne and Barbados provide a data set that could be used to test the ability of dust transport models to replicate the seasonal shift of dust sources and the consequent impact on transport to these two sites. Here we attempt to link the measurements at Cayenne and Barbados to specific source regions using the GFDL global climate model (Donner et al., 2011) which simulates aerosol mass distributions for dust and other aerosol components. Winds are nudged with the NCEP re-analysis as in Li et al. (2008). The model is run repeatedly over the years 1999-2010, activating dust sources in only one North African country in each run (e.g., Mali, Mauritania, Algeria, Niger, etc.). The model accurately depicts the strong seasonal contrast in dust transport to Barbados and Cayenne and shows the changing impact of African sources over the course of the year. In our presentation we will discuss the model results and compare them to the measurements at the receptor sites. It is notable that during the dust seasons at

  5. Comparison of the mixing state of long-range transported Asian and African mineral dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, Elizabeth; Ault, Andrew P.; Zauscher, Melanie D.; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.; Prather, Kimberly A.

    2015-08-01

    Mineral dust from arid regions represents the second largest global source of aerosols to the atmosphere. Dust strongly impacts the radiative balance of the earth's atmosphere by directly scattering solar radiation and acting as nuclei for the formation of liquid droplets and ice nuclei within clouds. The climate effects of mineral dust aerosols are poorly understood, however, due to their complex chemical and physical properties, which continuously evolve during atmospheric transport. This work focuses on characterizing atmospheric mineral dust from the two largest global dust sources: the Sahara Desert in Africa and the Gobi and Taklamakan Deserts in Asia. Measurements of individual aerosol particle size and chemical mixing state were made at El Yunque National Forest, Puerto Rico, downwind of the Sahara Desert, and Gosan, South Korea, downwind of the Gobi and Taklamakan Deserts. In general, the chemical characterization of the individual dust particles detected at these two sites reflected the dominant mineralogy of the source regions; aluminosilicate-rich dust was more common at El Yunque (∼91% of El Yunque dust particles vs. ∼69% of Gosan dust particles) and calcium-rich dust was more common at Gosan (∼22% of Gosan dust particles vs. ∼2% of El Yunque dust particles). Furthermore, dust particles from Africa and Asia were subjected to different transport conditions and atmospheric processing; African dust showed evidence of cloud processing, while Asian dust was modified via heterogeneous chemistry and direct condensation of secondary species. A larger fraction of dust detected at El Yunque contained the cloud-processing marker oxalate ion compared to dust detected at Gosan (∼20% vs ∼9%). Additionally, nearly 100% of dust detected at Gosan contained nitrate, showing it was aged via heterogeneous reactions with nitric acid, compared to only ∼60% of African dust. Information on the distinct differences in the chemical composition of mineral dust

  6. Optical, physical and chemical properties of transported African mineral dust aerosols in the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denjean, Cyrielle; Di Biagio, Claudia; Chevaillier, Servanne; Gaimoz, Cécile; Grand, Noel; Loisil, Rodrigue; Triquet, Sylvain; Zapf, Pascal; Roberts, Greg; Bourrianne, Thierry; Torres, Benjamin; Blarel, Luc; Sellegri, Karine; Freney, Evelyn; Schwarzenbock, Alfons; Ravetta, François; Laurent, Benoit; Mallet, Marc; Formenti, Paola

    2014-05-01

    The transport of mineral dust aerosols is a global phenomenon with strong climate implications. Depending on the travel distance over source regions, the atmospheric conditions and the residence time in the atmosphere, various transformation processes (size-selective sedimentation, mixing, condensation of gaseous species, and weathering) can modify the physical and chemical properties of mineral dust, which, in turn, can change the dust's optical properties. The model predictions of the radiative effect by mineral dust still suffer of the lack of certainty of these properties, and their temporal evolution with transport time. Within the frame of the ChArMex project (Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean experiment, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/), two intensive airborne campaigns (TRAQA, TRansport and Air QuAlity, 18 June - 11 July 2012, and ADRIMED, Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact in the regional climate in the MEDiterranean region, 06 June - 08 July 2013) have been performed over the Central and Western Mediterranean, one of the two major transport pathways of African mineral dust. In this study we have set up a systematic strategy to determine the optical, physical and optical properties of mineral dust to be compared to an equivalent dataset for dust close to source regions in Africa. This study is based on airborne observations onboard the SAFIRE ATR-42 aircraft, equipped with state of the art in situ instrumentation to measure the particle scattering and backscattering coefficients (nephelometer at 450, 550, and 700 nm), the absorption coefficient (PSAP at 467, 530, and 660 nm), the extinction coefficient (CAPS at 530 nm), the aerosol optical depth (PLASMA at 340 to 1640 nm), the size distribution in the extended range 40 nm - 30 µm by the combination of different particle counters (SMPS, USHAS, FSSP, GRIMM) and the chemical composition obtained by filter sampling. The chemistry and transport model CHIMERE-Dust have been used to classify the air masses according to

  7. Properties of transported African mineral dust aerosols in the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denjean, Cyrielle; Chevaillier, Servanne; Gaimoz, Cécile; Grand, Noel; Triquet, Sylvain; Zapf, Pascal; Loisil, Rodrigue; Bourrianne, Thierry; Freney, Evelyn; Dupuy, Regis; Sellegri, Karine; Schwarzenbock, Alfons; Torres, Benjamin; Mallet, Marc; Cassola, Federico; Prati, Paolo; Formenti, Paola

    2015-04-01

    The transport of mineral dust aerosols is a global phenomenon with strong climate implications. Depending on the travel distance over source regions, the atmospheric conditions and the residence time in the atmosphere, various transformation processes (size-selective sedimentation, mixing, condensation of gaseous species, and weathering) can modify the physical and chemical properties of mineral dust, which, in turn, can change the dust's optical properties. The model predictions of the radiative effect by mineral dust still suffer of the lack of certainty of these properties, and their temporal evolution with transport time. Within the frame of the ChArMex project (Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean experiment, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/), one intensive airborne campaign (ADRIMED, Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact in the regional climate in the MEDiterranean region, 06 June - 08 July 2013) has been performed over the Central and Western Mediterranean, one of the two major transport pathways of African mineral dust. In this study we have set up a systematic strategy to determine the optical, physical and optical properties of mineral dust to be compared to an equivalent dataset for dust close to source regions in Africa. This study is based on airborne observations onboard the SAFIRE ATR-42 aircraft, equipped with state of the art in situ instrumentation to measure the particle scattering and backscattering coefficients (nephelometer at 450, 550, and 700 nm), the absorption coefficient (PSAP at 467, 530, and 660 nm), the extinction coefficient (CAPS at 530 nm), the aerosol optical depth (PLASMA at 340 to 1640 nm), the size distribution in the extended range 40 nm - 30 µm by the combination of different particle counters (SMPS, USHAS, FSSP, GRIMM) and the chemical composition obtained by filter sampling. The chemistry and transport model CHIMERE-Dust have been used to classify the air masses according to the dust origin and transport. Case studies of dust transport

  8. Long-range transport across the Atlantic in summertime does not enhance the hygroscopicity of African mineral dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denjean, C.; Caquineau, S.; Desboeufs, K.; Laurent, B.; Maille, M.; Quiñones Rosado, M.; Vallejo, P.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.; Formenti, P.

    2015-09-01

    We present the first direct evidence that the hygroscopic properties of super micron (>1 µm) African dust particles did not change despite undergoing long-range transport across the Atlantic toward the Caribbean. Concurrent measurements of chemical composition show that most of mineral dust was chemically unprocessed and externally mixed. A minor portion of mineral dust was internally mixed with sulfate and chloride (~13-24% by number) or aggregated with sea-salt particles (~3-6%). Only dust particles aggregated with sea salt showed significant hygroscopic growth above 75% relative humidity (RH), resulting in a decrease in extinction mass efficiency by up to a factor 2.2. All other dust particles did not take up significant amounts of water when exposed to up to 94% RH. These results demonstrate that the direct radiative effect of African dust in this region remained independent of RH and an external mixing state could be considered for evaluating the climate effects of dust.

  9. Long-range transport of mineral dust in the global atmosphere: Impact of African dust on the environment of the southeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Prospero, Joseph M.

    1999-01-01

    Soil dust is a major constituent of airborne particles in the global atmosphere. Dust plumes frequently cover huge areas of the earth; they are one of the most prominent and commonly visible features in satellite imagery. Dust is believed to play a role in many biogeochemical processes, but the importance of dust in these processes is not well understood because of the dearth of information about the global distribution of dust and its physical, chemical, and mineralogical properties. This paper describes some features of the large-scale distribution of dust and identifies some of the geological characteristics of important source areas. The transport of dust from North Africa is presented as an example of possible long-range dust effects, and the impact of African dust on environmental processes in the western North Atlantic and the southeastern United States is assessed. Dust transported over long distances usually has a mass median diameter <10 μm. Small wind-borne soil particles show signs of extensive weathering; consequently, the physical and chemical properties of the particles will greatly depend on the weathering history in the source region and on the subsequent modifications that occur during transit in the atmosphere (typically a period of a week or more). To fully understand the role of dust in the environment and in human health, mineralogists will have to work closely with scientists in other disciplines to characterize the properties of mineral particles as an ensemble and as individual particles especially with regard to surface characteristics. PMID:10097049

  10. Long-Range Transport of Mineral Dust in the Global Atmosphere: Impact of African Dust on the Environment of the Southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prospero, Joseph M.

    1999-03-01

    Soil dust is a major constituent of airborne particles in the global atmosphere. Dust plumes frequently cover huge areas of the earth; they are one of the most prominent and commonly visible features in satellite imagery. Dust is believed to play a role in many biogeochemical processes, but the importance of dust in these processes is not well understood because of the dearth of information about the global distribution of dust and its physical, chemical, and mineralogical properties. This paper describes some features of the large-scale distribution of dust and identifies some of the geological characteristics of important source areas. The transport of dust from North Africa is presented as an example of possible long-range dust effects, and the impact of African dust on environmental processes in the western North Atlantic and the southeastern United States is assessed. Dust transported over long distances usually has a mass median diameter <10 μ m Small wind-borne soil particles show signs of extensive weathering; consequently, the physical and chemical properties of the particles will greatly depend on the weathering history in the source region and on the subsequent modifications that occur during transit in the atmosphere (typically a period of a week or more). To fully understand the role of dust in the environment and in human health, mineralogists will have to work closely with scientists in other disciplines to characterize the properties of mineral particles as an ensemble and as individual particles especially with regard to surface characteristics.

  11. Trace-metal concentrations in African dust: effects of long-distance transport and implications for human health

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrison, Virginia; Lamothe, Paul; Morman, Suzette; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Gilkes, Robert; Prakongkep, Nattaporn

    2010-01-01

    The Sahara and Sahel lose billions of tons of eroded mineral soils annually to the Americas and Caribbean, Europe and Asia via atmospheric transport. African dust was collected from a dust source region (Mali, West Africa) and from downwind sites in the Caribbean [Trinidad-Tobago (TT) and U.S. Virgin Islands (VI)] and analysed for 32 trace-elements. Elemental composition of African dust samples was similar to that of average upper continental crust (UCC), with some enrichment or depletion of specific trace-elements. Pb enrichment was observed only in dust and dry deposition samples from the source region and was most likely from local use of leaded gasoline. Dust particles transported long-distances (VI and TT) exhibited increased enrichment of Mo and minor depletion of other elements relative to source region samples. This suggests that processes occurring during long-distance transport of dust produce enrichment/depletion of specific elements. Bioaccessibility of trace-metals in samples was tested in simulated human fluids (gastric and lung) and was found to be greater in downwind than source region samples, for some metals (e.g., As). The large surface to volume ratio of the dust particles (<2.5 µm) at downwind sites may be a factor.

  12. Size distribution and optical properties of African mineral dust after intercontinental transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denjean, Cyrielle; Formenti, Paola; Desboeufs, Karine; Chevaillier, Servanne; Triquet, Sylvain; Maillé, Michel; Cazaunau, Mathieu; Laurent, Benoit; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.; Vallejo, Pamela; Quiñones, Mariana; Gutierrez-Molina, Ian E.; Cassola, Federico; Prati, Paolo; Andrews, Elisabeth; Ogren, John

    2016-06-01

    The transatlantic transport of mineral dust from Africa is a persistent atmospheric phenomenon, clue for understanding the impacts of dust at the global scale. As part of the DUST Aging and Transport from Africa to the Caribbean (Dust-ATTACk) intensive field campaign, the size distribution and optical properties of mineral dust were measured in June-July 2012 on the east coast of Puerto Rico, more than 5000 km from the west coast of Africa. During the recorded dust events, the PM10 (particulate matter 10 micrometers or less in diameter) concentrations increased from 20 to 70 µg m-3. Remote sensing observations and modeling analysis were used to identify the main source regions, which were found in the Western Sahara, Mauritania, Algeria, Niger, and Mali. The microphysical and optical properties of the dust plumes were almost independent of origin. The size distribution of mineral dust after long-range transport may have modal diameters similar to those on the eastern side of the Atlantic short time after emission, possibly depending on height of transport. Additional submicron particles of anthropogenic absorbing aerosols (likely from regional marine traffic activities) can be mixed within the dust plumes, without affecting in a significant way the PM10 absorption properties of dust observed in Puerto Rico. The Dust-ATTACk experimental data set may be useful for modeling the direct radiative effect of dust. For accurate representation of dust optical properties over the Atlantic remote marine region, we recommend mass extinction efficiency (MEE) and single-scattering albedo values in the range 1.1-1.5 m2 g-1 and 0.97-0.98, respectively, for visible wavelengths.

  13. High-resolution regional modeling of summertime transport and impact of African dust over the Red Sea and Arabian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalenderski, Stoitchko; Stenchikov, Georgiy

    2016-06-01

    Severe dust outbreaks and high dust loading over Eastern Africa and the Red Sea are frequently detected in the summer season. Observations suggest that small-scale dynamic and orographic effects, from both the Arabian and African sides, strongly contribute to dust plume formation. To better understand these processes, we present here the first high-resolution modeling study of a dust outbreak in June 2012 developed over East Africa, the Red Sea, and the Arabian Peninsula. Using the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) component, we identified several dust generating dynamical processes that range from convective to synoptic scales, including synoptic cyclones, nocturnal low-level jets, and cold pools of mesoscale convective systems. The simulations reveal an eastward transport of African dust across the Red Sea. Over the northern part of the Red Sea, most of the dust transport occurs above 2 km height, whereas across the central and southern parts of the sea; dust is mostly transported below 2 km height. Dust is the dominant contributor (87%) to the aerosol optical depth, producing a domain average cooling effect of -12.1 W m-2 at the surface, a warming of 7.1 W m-2 in the atmosphere, and a residual cooling of -4.9 W m-2 at the top of the atmosphere. Both dry and wet deposition processes contribute significantly to dust removal from the atmosphere. Model results compare well with available ground-based and satellite observations but generally underestimate the observed maximum values of aerosol optical depth. The satellite-retrieved mean optical depth at some locations is underestimated by a factor of 2. A sensitive experiment suggests that these large local differences may result from poor characterization of dust emissions in some areas of the modeled domain. In this case study we successfully simulate the major fine-scale dust generating dynamical processes, explicitly resolving convection and haboob formation. The future

  14. The Role of African Easterly Wave on Dust Transport and the Interaction Between Saharan Dust Layer and Atlantic ITCZ During Boreal Summer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the relationships among Saharan dust outbreak and transport, African easterly waves (AEW), African easterly jet (AEJ) and associated convective activities of Atlantic Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) using Cloudsat-Calipso, MODIS and MERRA data. We find that a major Saharan dust outbreak is associated with the formation of a westward propagating strong cyclone around 15-25N over the western part northern Saharan. The strong cyclonic flow mobilizes and lifts the dust from the desert surface to a high elevation. As the cyclone propagate westward, it transports a thick elevated dust layer between 900 -500 hPa from the African continent to the eastern Atlantic. Cloudiness is reduced within the warm, dry dusty layer, but enhanced underneath it, possibly due to the presence of a shallow inversion layer over the marine boundary layer. The dust outbreak is linked to enhanced deep convection in the northern part of Atlantic ITCZ, abutting the southern flank of the dust layer, and a strengthening of the northward flank of the AEJ. As the dust layer spreads westward, it loses elevation and becomes increasing diffused as it reaches the central and western Atlantic. Using band pass filtered EOF analysis of MERRA winds, we find that AEWs propagating westward along two principal tracks, centered at 15-25N and 5-10N respectively. The easterly waves in the northern track are highly correlated with major dust outbreak over North Africa and associated with slower moving systems, with a quasi-periodicity of 6-9 day. On the other hand, easterly waves along the southern track are faster, with quasi-periodicity of 3-5 days. These faster easterly waves are closely tied to rainfall/cloud variations along the Atlantic ITCZ. Dust transport along the southern track by the faster waves generally leads rainfall/cloud anomalies in the same region by one or two days, suggesting the southern tracks of dust outbreak are regions of strong interaction between

  15. Does the long-range transport of African mineral dust across the Atlantic enhance their hygroscopicity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denjean, Cyrielle; Caquineau, Sandrine; Desboeufs, Karine; Laurent, Benoit; Quiñones Rosado, Mariana; Vallejo, Pamela; Mayol-Bracero, Olga; Formenti, Paola

    2015-04-01

    Influence of mineral dust on radiation balance is largely dependent on their ability to interact with water. While fresh mineral dusts are highly hydrophobic, various transformation processes (coagulation, heterogeneous chemical reaction) can modify the dust physical and chemical properties during long-range transport, which, in turn, can change the dust hygroscopic properties. The model predictions of the radiative effect by mineral dust still suffer of the lack of certainty of dust hygroscopic properties, and their temporal evolution during long-range transport. We present the first direct surface measurements of the hygroscopicity of Saharan dust after long-range transport over the Atlantic Ocean, their relationship with chemical composition, their influence on particle size and shape and implications for optical properties. Particles were collected during the DUST Aging and TransporT from Africa to the Caribbean (Dust-AttaCk) campaign at the Cape San Juan Puerto Rico station in June-July 2012. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was used to analyze the size, shape, chemical composition and hygroscopic properties of individual particles. At different levels of concentrations in summertime, the coarse mode of atmospheric aerosols in Puerto Rico is dominated by Saharan mineral dust. Most of aged dust particles survived atmospheric transport intact with no observed internal mixture with other species and did not show hygroscopic growth up to 94% relative humidity. This is certainly due to the fact that in summertime dust is mostly transported above the marine boundary layer. A minor portion of mineral dust (approximately 19-28% by number) were involved in atmospheric heterogeneous reactions with acidic gases (likely SO2 and HCl) and sea salt aggregation. While sulfate- and chloride-coated dust remained extremely hydrophobic, dust particles in internal mixing with NaCl underwent profound changes in their hygroscopicity, therefore in size and shape. We

  16. Soil genesis on the island of Bermuda in the Quaternary: the importance of African dust transport and deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Budahn, James R.; Prospero, Joseph M.; Skipp, Gary; Herwitz, Stanley R.

    2012-01-01

    The origin of terra rossa, red or reddish-brown, clay-rich soils overlying high-purity carbonate substrates, has intrigued geologists and pedologists for decades. Terra rossa soils can form from accumulation of insoluble residues during dissolution of the host limestones, addition of volcanic ash, or addition of externally derived, long-range-transported (LRT) aeolian particles. We studied soils and paleosols on high-purity, carbonate aeolianites of Quaternary age on Bermuda, where terra rossa origins have been debated for more than a century. Potential soil parent materials on this island include sand-sized fragments of local volcanic bedrock, the LRT, fine-grained (N/YbN, GdN/YbN that can be distinguished from African dust and lower Mississippi River valley loess. Bermuda soils have Sc-Th-La, Cr-Ta-Nd, and Eu/Eu*, LaN/YbN, GdN/YbN that indicate derivation from a combination of LRT dust from Africa and local volcanic bedrock. Our results indicate that soils on islands in a very broad latitudinal belt of the western Atlantic margin have been influenced by African LRT dust inputs over much of the past –500 ka.

  17. Soil genesis on the island of Bermuda in the Quaternary: The importance of African dust transport and deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Budahn, James R.; Prospero, Joseph M.; Skipp, Gary; Herwitz, Stanley R.

    2012-09-01

    The origin of terra rossa, red or reddish-brown, clay-rich soils overlying high-purity carbonate substrates, has intrigued geologists and pedologists for decades. Terra rossa soils can form from accumulation of insoluble residues during dissolution of the host limestones, addition of volcanic ash, or addition of externally derived, long-range-transported (LRT) aeolian particles. We studied soils and paleosols on high-purity, carbonate aeolianites of Quaternary age on Bermuda, where terra rossa origins have been debated for more than a century. Potential soil parent materials on this island include sand-sized fragments of local volcanic bedrock, the LRT, fine-grained (<20μm) component of distal loess from the lower Mississippi River Valley, and LRT dust from Africa. These parent materials can be characterized geochemically using trace elements that are immobile in the soil-forming environment. Results indicate that local volcanic bedrock on Bermuda has Sc-Th-La, Cr-Ta-Nd, and Eu/Eu*, LaN/YbN, GdN/YbNthat can be distinguished from African dust and lower Mississippi River valley loess. Bermuda soils have Sc-Th-La, Cr-Ta-Nd, and Eu/Eu*, LaN/YbN, GdN/YbN that indicate derivation from a combination of LRT dust from Africa and local volcanic bedrock. Our results indicate that soils on islands in a very broad latitudinal belt of the western Atlantic margin have been influenced by African LRT dust inputs over much of the past ˜500 ka.

  18. Mechanisms and Effects of Summertime Transport of African Dust Through the Tokar Mountain Gap to the Red Sea and Arabian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalenderski, S.; Stenchikov, G. L.

    2015-12-01

    Very high dust loading over the Red Sea region in summer strongly affects the nutrition balance and thermal and dynamic regimes of the sea. The observations suggest that small-scale local dynamic and orographic effects, from both the Arabian and African sides, strongly contribute to dust plume formation. To better understand and quantify these processes we present here the first high resolution modeling study of the dust outbreak phenomena in June 2012 over East Africa, the Red Sea, and the Arabian Peninsula using the WRF-Chem model. We identified several dust generating dynamical processes that range from convective to synoptic scales, including: synoptic cyclones, nocturnal low-level jets, and cold pools of mesoscale convective systems. The simulations reveal an eastward transport of African dust across the Red Sea. Over the northern part of the Red Sea most of the dust transport occurs beyond 2 km above ground level and is strengthened by a pressure gradient formed by low pressure over the eastern Mediterranean and high pressure over the Arabian Peninsula. Across the central and southern parts of the Red Sea dust is mostly transported below 2 km height. During the study period dust is a dominant contributor (87%) to aerosol optical depth (AOD), producing a domain average cooling effect of -12.1 W m-2 at surface, a warming of 7.1 W m-2 in the atmosphere, and a residual cooling of -4.9 W m-2 at the top of the atmosphere. WRF-Chem simulations demonstrate that both dry and wet deposition processes contribute significantly to dust removal from the atmosphere. During the dust outbreak 49.2 Tg of dust deposits within the calculation domain, which is approximately 90% of the total dust emission of 54.5 Tg. Model results compare well with available ground-based and satellite observations but generally underestimate the observed AOD maximum values.

  19. Semidirect Dynamical and Radiative Impact of North African Dust Transport on Lower Tropospheric Clouds over the Subtropical North Atlantic in CESM 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    DeFlorio, Mike; Ghan, Steven J.; Singh, Balwinder; Miller, Arthur J.; Cayan, Dan; Russell, Lynn M.; Somerville, Richard C.

    2014-07-16

    This study uses a century length pre-industrial climate simulation by the Community Earth System Model (CESM 1.0) to explore statistical relationships between dust, clouds and atmospheric circulation, and to suggest a dynamical, rather than microphysical, mechanism linking subtropical North Atlantic lower tropospheric cloud cover with North African dust transport. The length of the run allows us to account for interannual variability of dust emissions and transport downstream of North Africa in the model. CESM’s mean climatology and probability distribution of aerosol optical depth in this region agrees well with available AERONET observations. In addition, CESM shows strong seasonal cycles of dust burden and lower tropospheric cloud fraction, with maximum values occurring during boreal summer, when a strong correlation between these two variables exists downstream of North Africa over the subtropical North Atlantic. Calculations of Estimated Inversion Strength (EIS) and composites of EIS on high and low downstream North Africa dust months during boreal summer reveal that dust is likely increasing inversion strength over this region due to both solar absorption and reflection. We find no evidence for a microphysical link between dust and lower tropospheric clouds in this region. These results yield new insight over an extensive period of time into the complex relationship between North African dust and lower tropospheric clouds over the open ocean, which has previously been hindered by spatiotemporal constraints of observations. Our findings lay a framework for future analyses using sub-monthly data over regions with different underlying dynamics.

  20. Characterizing the annual cycle of African dust transport to the Caribbean Basin and South America and its impact on the environment and air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prospero, Joseph M.; Collard, François-Xavier; Molinié, Jack; Jeannot, Alexis

    2014-07-01

    Decades of aerosol measurements on Barbados have yielded a detailed picture of African mineral dust transport to the Caribbean Basin that shows a strong seasonal cycle with a maximum in boreal summer and a minimum in winter. Satellite aerosol products suggest that in spring, there is a comparable transport to northeastern South America. Here we characterize the complete annual cycle of dust transport to the western Atlantic by linking the Barbados record to multiyear records of airborne particulate matter less than 10 µm diameter (PM10) measured in air quality programs at Cayenne (French Guiana) and Guadeloupe. Comparisons of PM10 at these sites with concurrent dust measurements at Barbados demonstrate that high PM10 levels are almost entirely due to dust. Cayenne PM10 peaks in spring in a cycle which is consistent with satellite aerosol optical depth and suggests that the Sahel is the dominant source. The persistent transport of dust during much of the year could impact a wide range of environmental processes over a broad region that extends from the southern United States to the Amazon Basin. Finally, the average 24 h PM10 concentrations at Cayenne and Guadeloupe frequently exceed the World Health Organization air quality guideline. Thus soil dust PM10 could be a significant, but generally unrecognized, health factor at western Atlantic sites and also in other relatively remote regions affected by long-range dust from Africa. Because dust emissions and transport are highly sensitive to climate variability, climate change in coming decades could greatly affect a wide range of biogeochemical processes and human health in this region.

  1. Mesoscale modeling and satellite observation of transport and mixing of smoke and dust particles over northern sub-Saharan African region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhifeng; Wang, Jun; Ichoku, Charles; Hyer, Edward; Zeng, Jing

    2013-11-01

    transport and vertical distribution of smoke and dust aerosols over the northern sub-Saharan African region are simulated in the Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem), which uses hourly dynamic smoke emissions from the Fire Locating and Modeling of Burning Emissions database derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) fire products. Model performance for February 2008 is evaluated using MODIS true color images, aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements from the Aerosol Robotic Network, MODIS AOD retrievals, and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar data with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) atmospheric backscattering and extinction products. Specification of smoke injection height of 650 m in WRF-Chem yields aerosol vertical profiles that are most consistent with CALIOP observations of aerosol layer height. Between the equator and 10°N, Saharan dust is often mixed with smoke near the surface, and their transport patterns manifest the interplay of trade winds, subtropical highs, precipitation associated with the Intertropical Convergence Zone, and the high mountains located near the Great Rift Valley region. At the 700 hPa level and above, smoke layers spread farther to the north and south and are often above the dust layers over the Sahel region. In some cases, transported smoke can also be mixed with dust over the Saharan region. Statistically, 5% of the CALIOP valid measurements in February 2007-2011 show aerosol layers either above or between the clouds, reinforcing the importance of the aerosol vertical distribution for quantifying aerosol impact on climate in the Sahel region.

  2. Iron mobilization in North African dust.

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, A.; Feng, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for phytoplankton. Although iron-containing dust mobilized from arid regions supplies the majority of the iron to the oceans, the key flux in terms of the biogeochemical response to atmospheric deposition is the amount of soluble or bioavailable iron. Atmospheric processing of mineral aerosols by anthropogenic pollutants (e.g. sulfuric acid) may transform insoluble iron into soluble forms. Previous studies have suggested higher iron solubility in smaller particles, as they are subject to more thorough atmospheric processing due to a longer residence time than coarse particles. On the other hand, the specific mineralogy of iron in dust may also influence the particulate iron solubility in size. Compared to mineral dust aerosols, iron from combustion sources could be more soluble, and found more frequently in smaller particles. Internal mixing of alkaline dust with iron-containing minerals could significantly reduce iron dissolution in large dust aerosols due to the buffering effect, which may, in contrast, yield higher solubility in smaller particles externally mixed with alkaline dust (Ito and Feng, 2010). Here, we extend the modeling study of Ito and Feng (2010) to investigate atmospheric processing of mineral aerosols from African dust. In contrast to Asian dust, we used a slower dissolution rate for African dust in the fine mode. We compare simulated fractional iron solubility with observations. The inclusion of alkaline compounds in aqueous chemistry substantially limits the iron dissolution during long-range transport to the Atlantic Ocean: only a small fraction of iron (<0.2%) dissolves from illite in coarsemode dust aerosols with 0.45% soluble iron initially. In contrast, a significant fraction (1-1.5%) dissolves in fine-mode dust aerosols due to the acid mobilization of the iron-containing minerals externally mixed with carbonate minerals. Consequently, the model generally reproduces higher iron solubility in smaller particles

  3. The past, present and future of African dust.

    PubMed

    Evan, Amato T; Flamant, Cyrille; Gaetani, Marco; Guichard, Françoise

    2016-03-24

    African dust emission and transport exhibits variability on diurnal to decadal timescales and is known to influence processes such as Amazon productivity, Atlantic climate modes, regional atmospheric composition and radiative balance and precipitation in the Sahel. To elucidate the role of African dust in the climate system, it is necessary to understand the factors governing its emission and transport. However, African dust is correlated with seemingly disparate atmospheric phenomena, including the El Niño/Southern Oscillation, the North Atlantic Oscillation, the meridional position of the intertropical convergence zone, Sahelian rainfall and surface temperatures over the Sahara Desert, all of which obfuscate the connection between dust and climate. Here we show that the surface wind field responsible for most of the variability in North African dust emission reflects the topography of the Sahara, owing to orographic acceleration of the surface flow. As such, the correlations between dust and various climate phenomena probably arise from the projection of the winds associated with these phenomena onto an orographically controlled pattern of wind variability. A 161-year time series of dust from 1851 to 2011, created by projecting this wind field pattern onto surface winds from a historical reanalysis, suggests that the highest concentrations of dust occurred from the 1910s to the 1940s and the 1970s to the 1980s, and that there have been three periods of persistent anomalously low dust concentrations--in the 1860s, 1950s and 2000s. Projections of the wind pattern onto climate models give a statistically significant downward trend in African dust emission and transport as greenhouse gas concentrations increase over the twenty-first century, potentially associated with a slow-down of the tropical circulation. Such a dust feedback, which is not represented in climate models, may be of benefit to human and ecosystem health in West Africa via improved air quality and

  4. The past, present and future of African dust.

    PubMed

    Evan, Amato T; Flamant, Cyrille; Gaetani, Marco; Guichard, Françoise

    2016-03-24

    African dust emission and transport exhibits variability on diurnal to decadal timescales and is known to influence processes such as Amazon productivity, Atlantic climate modes, regional atmospheric composition and radiative balance and precipitation in the Sahel. To elucidate the role of African dust in the climate system, it is necessary to understand the factors governing its emission and transport. However, African dust is correlated with seemingly disparate atmospheric phenomena, including the El Niño/Southern Oscillation, the North Atlantic Oscillation, the meridional position of the intertropical convergence zone, Sahelian rainfall and surface temperatures over the Sahara Desert, all of which obfuscate the connection between dust and climate. Here we show that the surface wind field responsible for most of the variability in North African dust emission reflects the topography of the Sahara, owing to orographic acceleration of the surface flow. As such, the correlations between dust and various climate phenomena probably arise from the projection of the winds associated with these phenomena onto an orographically controlled pattern of wind variability. A 161-year time series of dust from 1851 to 2011, created by projecting this wind field pattern onto surface winds from a historical reanalysis, suggests that the highest concentrations of dust occurred from the 1910s to the 1940s and the 1970s to the 1980s, and that there have been three periods of persistent anomalously low dust concentrations--in the 1860s, 1950s and 2000s. Projections of the wind pattern onto climate models give a statistically significant downward trend in African dust emission and transport as greenhouse gas concentrations increase over the twenty-first century, potentially associated with a slow-down of the tropical circulation. Such a dust feedback, which is not represented in climate models, may be of benefit to human and ecosystem health in West Africa via improved air quality and

  5. The past, present and future of African dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evan, Amato T.; Flamant, Cyrille; Gaetani, Marco; Guichard, Françoise

    2016-03-01

    African dust emission and transport exhibits variability on diurnal to decadal timescales and is known to influence processes such as Amazon productivity, Atlantic climate modes, regional atmospheric composition and radiative balance and precipitation in the Sahel. To elucidate the role of African dust in the climate system, it is necessary to understand the factors governing its emission and transport. However, African dust is correlated with seemingly disparate atmospheric phenomena, including the El Niño/Southern Oscillation, the North Atlantic Oscillation, the meridional position of the intertropical convergence zone, Sahelian rainfall and surface temperatures over the Sahara Desert, all of which obfuscate the connection between dust and climate. Here we show that the surface wind field responsible for most of the variability in North African dust emission reflects the topography of the Sahara, owing to orographic acceleration of the surface flow. As such, the correlations between dust and various climate phenomena probably arise from the projection of the winds associated with these phenomena onto an orographically controlled pattern of wind variability. A 161-year time series of dust from 1851 to 2011, created by projecting this wind field pattern onto surface winds from a historical reanalysis, suggests that the highest concentrations of dust occurred from the 1910s to the 1940s and the 1970s to the 1980s, and that there have been three periods of persistent anomalously low dust concentrations—in the 1860s, 1950s and 2000s. Projections of the wind pattern onto climate models give a statistically significant downward trend in African dust emission and transport as greenhouse gas concentrations increase over the twenty-first century, potentially associated with a slow-down of the tropical circulation. Such a dust feedback, which is not represented in climate models, may be of benefit to human and ecosystem health in West Africa via improved air quality and

  6. Mineral dust transport toward Hurricane Helene (2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwendike, Juliane; Jones, Sarah C.; Vogel, Bernhard; Vogel, Heike

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates the transport of mineral dust from its source regions in West Africa toward the developing tropical cyclone Helene (2006) and diagnoses the resulting properties of the air influencing the tropical cyclonegenesis. The model system COSMO-ART (Consortium for Small-Scale Modelling-Aerosols and Reactive Trace gases) in which the emission and transport of mineral dust as well as the radiation feedback are taken into account, was used. The emission of mineral dust between 9 and 14 September 2006 occurred in association with the relatively strong monsoon flow and northeasterly trade winds, with gust fronts of convective systems over land, and with the Atlantic inflow. Additionally, increased surface wind speed was linked to orographical effects at the Algerian Mountains, Atlas Mountains, and the Hoggar. The dust, as part of the Saharan air layer, is transported at low levels by the monsoon flow, the Harmattan, the northeasterly trade winds, and the monsoon trough, and is transported upward in the convergence zone between Harmattan and monsoon flow, in the baroclinic zone along the West African coastline, and by convection. At around 700 hPa the dust is transported by the African easterly jet. Dry and dust-free air is found to the north-northwest of the developing tropical depression due to descent in an anticyclone. Based on the model data, it was possible to distinguish between dry (from the anticyclone), dry and dusty (from the Harmattan and northeasterly trade winds), and dusty and moist air (from the monsoon flow and in the tropical depression due to convection).

  7. Atmospheric transport of mold spores in clouds of desert dust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shinn, E.A.; Griffin, Dale W.; Seba, D.B.

    2003-01-01

    Fungal spores can be transported globally in clouds of desert dust. Many species of fungi (commonly known as molds) and bacteria--including some that are human pathogens--have characteristics suited to long-range atmospheric transport. Dust from the African desert can affect air quality in Africa, Europe, the Middle East, and the Americas. Asian desert dust can affect air quality in Asia, the Arctic, North America, and Europe. Atmospheric exposure to mold-carrying desert dust may affect human health directly through allergic induction of respiratory stress. In addition, mold spores within these dust clouds may seed downwind ecosystems in both outdoor and indoor environments.

  8. Atmospheric transport of mold spores in clouds of desert dust.

    PubMed

    Shinn, Eugene A; Griffin, Dale W; Seba, Douglas B

    2003-08-01

    Fungal spores can be transported globally in clouds of desert dust. Many species of fungi (commonly known as molds) and bacteria--including some that are human pathogens--have characteristics suited to long-range atmospheric transport. Dust from the African desert can affect air quality in Africa, Europe, the Middle East, and the Americas. Asian desert dust can affect air quality in Asia, the Arctic, North America, and Europe. Atmospheric exposure to mold-carrying desert dust may affect human health directly through allergic induction of respiratory stress. In addition, mold spores within these dust clouds may seed downwind ecosystems in both outdoor and indoor environments.

  9. Sources, Sinks, and Transatlantic Transport of North African Dust Aerosol: A Multimodel Analysis and Comparison With Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Dongchul; Chin, Mian; Yu, Hongbin; Diehl, Thomas; Tan, Qian; Kahn, Ralph A.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Bauer, Susanne E.; Takemura, Toshihiko; Pozzoli, Luca; Bellouin, Nicolas; Schulz, Michael; Peyridieu, Sophie; Chedin, Alain; Koffi, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates model-simulated dust aerosols over North Africa and the North Atlantic from five global models that participated in the Aerosol Comparison between Observations and Models phase II model experiments. The model results are compared with satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) data from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), and Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor, dust optical depth (DOD) derived from MODIS and MISR, AOD and coarse-mode AOD (as a proxy of DOD) from ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network Sun photometer measurements, and dust vertical distributions/centroid height from Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization and Atmospheric Infrared Sounder satellite AOD retrievals. We examine the following quantities of AOD and DOD: (1) the magnitudes over land and over ocean in our study domain, (2) the longitudinal gradient from the dust source region over North Africa to the western North Atlantic, (3) seasonal variations at different locations, and (4) the dust vertical profile shape and the AOD centroid height (altitude above or below which half of the AOD is located). The different satellite data show consistent features in most of these aspects; however, the models display large diversity in all of them, with significant differences among the models and between models and observations. By examining dust emission, removal, and mass extinction efficiency in the five models, we also find remarkable differences among the models that all contribute to the discrepancies of model-simulated dust amount and distribution. This study highlights the challenges in simulating the dust physical and optical processes, even in the best known dust environment, and stresses the need for observable quantities to constrain the model processes.

  10. Far-Reaching Impacts of African Dust- A Calipso Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Hongbin; Chin, Mian; Yuan, Tianle; Bian, Huisheng; Prospero, Joseph; Omar, Ali; Remer, Lorraine; Winker, David; Yang, Yuekui; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Zhibo

    2014-01-01

    African dust can transport across the tropical Atlantic and reach the Amazon basin, exerting far-reaching impacts on climate in downwind regions. The transported dust influences the surface-atmosphere interactions and cloud and precipitation processes through perturbing the surface radiative budget and atmospheric radiative heating and acting as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei. Dust also influences biogeochemical cycle and climate through providing nutrients vital to the productivity of ocean biomass and Amazon forests. Assessing these climate impacts relies on an accurate quantification of dust transport and deposition. Currently model simulations show extremely large diversity, which calls for a need of observational constraints. Kaufman et al. (2005) estimated from MODIS aerosol measurements that about 144 Tg of dust is deposited into the tropical Atlantic and 50 Tg of dust into the Amazon in 2001. This estimated dust import to Amazon is a factor of 3-4 higher than other observations and models. However, several studies have argued that the oversimplified characterization of dust vertical profile in the study would have introduced large uncertainty and very likely a high bias. In this study we quantify the trans-Atlantic dust transport and deposition by using 7 years (2007-2013) observations from CALIPSO lidar. CALIPSO acquires high-resolution aerosol extinction and depolarization profiles in both cloud-free and above-cloud conditions. The unique CALIPSO capability of profiling aerosols above clouds offers an unprecedented opportunity of examining uncertainties associated with the use of MODIS clear-sky data. Dust is separated from other types of aerosols using the depolarization measurements. We estimated that on the basis of 7-year average, 118142 Tg of dust is deposited into the tropical Atlantic and 3860 Tg of dust into the Amazon basin. Substantial interannual variations are observed during the period, with the maximum to minimum ratio of about 1

  11. Transport of Dust Particles in Tokamak Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Pigarov, A Y; Smirnov, R D; Krasheninnikov, S I; Rognlien, T D; Rozenberg, M

    2006-06-06

    Recent advances in the dust transport modeling in tokamak devices are discussed. Topics include: (1) physical model for dust transport; (2) modeling results on dynamics of dust particles in plasma; (3) conditions necessary for particle growth in plasma; (4) dust spreading over the tokamak; (5) density profiles for dust particles and impurity atoms associated with dust ablation in tokamak plasma; and (6) roles of dust in material/tritium migration.

  12. African Dust Blows over the Caribbean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Shuttle astronauts frequently track Saharan dust storms as they blow from north Africa across the Atlantic Ocean. Dust palls blowing from Africa take about a week to cross the Atlantic. Recently, researchers have linked Saharan dust to coral disease, allergic reactions in humans, and red tides. The top photograph, a classic image showing African dust over the Caribbean, was taken at a time when few scientists had considered the possibility. The image was taken by Space Shuttle astronauts on July 11, 1994 (STS065-75-47). This photograph looks southwest over the northern edge of a large trans-Atlantic dust plume that blew off the Sahara desert in Africa. In this view, Caicos Island in the Bahamas and the mountainous spines of Haiti are partly obscured by the dust. Closer to the foreground, (about 26 degrees north latitude), the skies are clear. The lower photograph (STS105-723-7) was taken by Space Shuttle astronauts while docked to the International Space Station on August 19, 2001. The spacecraft is over the Atlantic Ocean at roughly 45oN, 60oW. The astronauts were looking obliquely to the south; the boundaries of the dust plumes can be traced visually by the abrupt change from clear to hazy atmosphere-the hazy line marks the northern edge of the dust pall near the Caribbean. Images provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.

  13. The Modulation of Hurricanes by African Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco Herrera, Victor Manuel; Perez-Peraza, Jorge Alberto; Velasco Herrera, Graciela

    Here we apply cross-wavelet, the global wavelet spectra and a new wavelet coherency signal-noise method to theavailable data of African Dust for the period 1966-2004 and Database of hurricanes, from the National Weather Service (http:// weather.unisys. com/ hurricane/). Hurricane data was transformed into a series of Pulses Width modulation (PWM) of the type: n = number of hurricanes, 0 no hurricane. We apply the analysis to all categories of tropical cyclones. Results indicate that among the different periodicities common to both series, the more promi-nent is the decadal modulation of dust over hurricanes of category 5, and a annual modulation for all the other categories of Hurricanes. Hurricanes of category 5 develop in the minimums of the decadal variation of African dust, and preferable in areas of deep water of the Atlantic ocean, where the centre of the hurricane has the lowest pressure. If this tendency is sustained , tropical cyclones will not evolve to category 5 up to the next decadal minimum which will take place around the year 2015 2. This is an important result concerning the prediction of floods and for minimizing the human and economical lost provoked for hurricanes of category 5.

  14. The global transport of dust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Dale W.; Kellogg, C.A.; Garrison, V.H.; Shinn, E.A.

    2002-01-01

    By some estimates as much as two billion metric tons of dust are lifted into the Earth's atmosphere every year. Most of this dust is stirred up by storms, the more dramatic of which are aptly named dust storms. But more than mere dirt is carried aloft. Drifting with the suspended dust particles are soil pollutants such as herbicides and pesticides and a significant number of microorganisms-bacteria, viruses and fungi. We can gain some appreciation of how much microbial life is actually floating in our atmosphere by performing a quick calculation. There are typically about one million bacteria per gram of soil, but let's be conservative and suppose there are only 10,000 bacteria per gram of airborne sediment. Assuming a modest one billion metric tons of sediment in the atmosphere, these numbers translate into a quintillion (1018) sediment-borne bacteria moving around the planet each year-enough to form a microbial bridge between Earth and Jupiter. Here we consider what we've learned about the airborne transport of sediment across the globe, and review some of the remarkable studies in this reemerging field that had it origins more than 100 years ago.

  15. Trans boundary transport of pollutants by atmospheric mineral dust.

    PubMed

    Erel, Yigal; Dayan, Uri; Rabi, Reut; Rudich, Yinon; Stein, Mordechai

    2006-05-01

    The transport of anthropogenic pollution by desert dust in the Eastern Mediterranean region was studied by analyzing major and trace element composition, organic species, and Pb isotope ratios in suspended dust samples collected in Jerusalem, Israel. Dust storms in this region are associated with four distinct synoptic conditions (Red Sea Trough (RS), Eastern High (EH), Sharav Cyclone (SC), and Cold Depression (Cyprus low, CD)) that carry dust mostly from North African (SC, CD, EH) and Arabian and Syrian (RS, EH) deserts. Substantial contamination of dust particles by Pb, Cu, Zn, and Ni is observed, while other elements (Na, Ca, Mg, Mn, Sr, Rb, REE, U, and Th) display natural concentrations. Sequential extraction of the abovementioned elements from the dust samples shows that the carbonate and sorbed fractions contain most of the pollution, yet the Al-silicate fraction is also contaminated, implying that soils and sediments in the source terrains of the dust are already polluted. We identified the pollutant sources by using Pb isotopes. It appears that before the beginning of the dust storm, the pollutants in the collected samples are dominated by local sources but with the arrival of dust from North Africa, the proportion of foreign pollutants increases. Organic pollutants exhibit behavior similar and complementary to that of the inorganic tracers, attesting to the importance of anthropogenic-pollutant addition en route of the dust from its remote sources. Pollution of suspended dust is observed under all synoptic conditions, yet it appears that easterly winds carry higher proportions of local pollution and westerly winds carry pollution emitted in the Cairo basin. Therefore, pollution transport by mineral dust should be accounted for in environmental models and in assessing the health-related effects of mineral dust.

  16. Atmospheric microbiology in the northern Caribbean during African dust events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Dale W.; Kellogg, C.A.; Garrison, V.H.; Lisle, J.T.; Borden, T.C.; Shinn, E.A.

    2003-01-01

    Between July 2000 and August 2001 forty-three air samples were collected in the northern Caribbean: Twenty-six in the US Virgin Islands, and 17 samples aboard ship during two 1-week cruises. Samples were collected during African dust events and non-dust conditions and screened for the presence of culturable bacteria and fungi. A total of 3,652 liters of air were collected during non-dust conditions, with 19 bacteria and 28 fungi being recovered. During dust conditions a total of 2,369 liters of air were screened resulting in the recovery of 171 bacteria and 76 fungi. A statistically significant difference was found between the two data sets. These results support previous African dust research and further demonstrate that dust particles can serve as a vessel for the global dispersion of bacteria and fungi. Dustborne microorganisms may play a significant role in the ecology and health of downwind ecosystems.

  17. Transportation in African Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altschul, Robert D.

    1980-01-01

    Examines the structure, role, and needs of Africa's national and intracontinental transportation system. Characteristics of rail, water, road, and air transportation are examined. The conclusion is that high investment in transportation systems is essential to the development process. (Author/KC)

  18. African dust carries microbes across the ocean: are they affecting human and ecosystem health?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kellogg, Christina A.; Griffin, Dale W.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric transport of dust from northwest Africa to the western Atlantic Ocean region may be responsible for a number of environmental hazards, including the demise of Caribbean corals; red tides; amphibian diseases; increased occurrence of asthma in humans; and oxygen depletion (eutrophication) in estuaries. Studies of satellite images suggest that hundreds of millions of tons of dust are trans-ported annually at relatively low altitudes across the Atlantic Ocean to the Caribbean Sea and southeastern United States. The dust emanates from the expanding Sahara/Sahel desert region in Africa and carries a wide variety of bacteria and fungi. The U.S. Geological Survey, in collaboration with the NASA/Goddard Spaceflight Center, is conducting a study to identify microbes--bacteria, fungi, viruses--transported across the Atlantic in African soil dust. Each year, millions of tons of desert dust blow off the west African coast and ride the trade winds across the ocean, affecting the entire Caribbean basin, as well as the southeastern United States. Of the dust reaching the U.S., Florida receives about 50 percent, while the rest may range as far north as Maine or as far west as Colorado. The dust storms can be tracked by satellite and take about one week to cross the Atlantic.

  19. Derivation of an observation-based map of North African dust emission

    SciTech Connect

    Evan, Amato T.; Fiedler, Stephanie; Zhao, Chun; Menut, Laurent; Schepanski, Kerstin; Flamant, C.; Doherty, Owen

    2015-03-01

    Changes in the emission, transport and deposition of aeolian dust have profound effects on regional climate, so that characterizing the lifecycle of dust in observations and improving the representation of dust in global climate models is necessary. A fundamental aspect of characterizing the dust cycle is quantifying surface dust fluxes, yet no spatially explicit estimates of this flux exist for the World’s major source regions. Here we present a novel technique for creating a map of the annual mean emitted dust flux for North Africa based on retrievals of dust storm frequency from the Meteosat Second Generation Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) and the relationship between dust storm frequency and emitted mass flux derived from the output of five models that simulate dust. Our results suggest that 64 (±16)% of all dust emitted from North Africa is from the Bodélé depression, and that 13 (±3)% of the North African dust flux is from a depression lying in the lee of the Aïr and Hoggar Mountains, making this area the second most important region of emission within North Africa.

  20. Dust transport into Martian polar latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, J. R.; Pollack, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    The presence of suspended dust in the Martian atmosphere, and its return to the planet's surface, is implicated in the formation of the polar layered terrain and the dichotomy in perennial CO2 polar cap retention in the two hemispheres. A three dimensional model was used to study Martian global dust storms. The model accounts for the interactive feedbacks between the atmospheric thermal and dynamical states and an evolving radiatively active suspended dust load. Results from dust storm experiments, as well as from simulations in which there is interest in identifying the conditions under which surface dust lifting occurs at various locations and times, indicate that dust transport due to atmospheric eddy motions is likely to be important in the arrival of suspended dust at polar latitudes. The layered terrain in both polar regions of Mars is interpreted as the reality of cyclical episodes of volatile (CO2, H2O) and dust deposition.

  1. Dust Charging and Transport on Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Robertson, S.; Horanyi, M.

    2011-11-29

    In this paper, we review laboratory studies of dust transport on surfaces in plasmas, performed for a number of different mechanisms: 1) Dust particles were levitated in plasma sheaths by electrostatic forces balancing the gravitational force. 2) Dust was observed to spread over and lift off a surface that repels electrons in a plasma. 3) Dust was transported on surfaces having different secondary electron yields in plasma with an electron beam as a consequence of differential charging. 4) We also report a mechanism of dust transport by electric fields occurring at electron beam impact/shadow boundaries. These processes are candidates to explain the formation of dust ponds that were recently observed in craters on the asteroid Eros by the NEAR Shoemaker spacecraft.

  2. Hf-Nd-Sr isotopic fingerprinting of mineral dust from Asian and North African deserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, J.; Zhao, W.; Balsam, W.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral dust accounts for more than 50% of the atmospheric dust loading and plays an important role in the marine and terrestrial geochemical cycles. The deserts in North Africa, Northern China and Southern Mongolia are the major sources of mineral dust and have been studied intensively over past decades, especially with Sr, Nd and recently Hf isotopes which are seen as powerful tools to identify source areas. However, the isotopic compositions of dust are highly dependent on particle size hindering the ability to accurately identify dust provenance. The clay fraction (<2 μm) comprises about half of all mineral dust and has unique minerals phases dominanted by clay minerals. Once the clay-sized particles are deflated to the upper troposphere, they are transported over long distances and are removed from the atmosphere mainly by wet deposition. Thus, the clay-sized isotopic fingerprints from deserts may be ideal targets not only for tracking the provenance tracing of long-distance transported mineral dust, but also to provide an unparalleled window for understanding the global dust cycle, especially eolian dust preserved in deep-sea sediments and ice cores. In this work we investigate multivariate joint radiogenic Sr, Nd, and Hf isotopic compositions obtained from complete dissolution of clay-sized fractions of surface sediments from Asian and North African deserts. Asian dust source samples included the ten Northern China deserts and sandy lands - the Taklimakan, Gurbantunggut, Qaidam, Badaim Jaran, Tengger and Mu Us deserts, and the Hobq, Hulun Buirm, Onqin Daga and Horqin sandy land - and Mongolian Gobi desert. North African dust samples were from four transects in the Sahara and Sahel from Mali, Togo, Egypt and Morocco . Our results on the clay-sized isotopic measurements of these samples describe (1) the general characteristics of dusts from the Asian with ɛNd from -17.3 to 0.98, ɛHf from -5.95 to 3.68 and 87Sr/86Sr from 0.710113 to 0.73306, and North

  3. African Dust Aerosols as Atmospheric Ice Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMott, Paul J.; Brooks, Sarah D.; Prenni, Anthony J.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Sassen, Kenneth; Poellot, Michael; Rogers, David C.; Baumgardner, Darrel

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of the ice nucleating ability of aerosol particles in air masses over Florida having sources from North Africa support the potential importance of dust aerosols for indirectly affecting cloud properties and climate. The concentrations of ice nuclei within dust layers at particle sizes below 1 pn exceeded 1/cu cm; the highest ever reported with our device at temperatures warmer than homogeneous freezing conditions. These measurements add to previous direct and indirect evidence of the ice nucleation efficiency of desert dust aerosols, but also confirm their contribution to ice nuclei populations at great distances from source regions.

  4. Bulk composition of northern African dust and its source sediments — A compilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuvens, Dirk; Schütz, Lothar; Kandler, Konrad; Ebert, Martin; Weinbruch, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a review of bulk compositional data of northern African dust and its potential source sediments and includes elemental, isotope and mineralogical data. Northern African dust represents about one half of the total global atmospheric mineral dust burden, and its uplift, transport and deposition have strong impacts on climate and various terrestrial and marine ecosystems. The chemical data set shows, that an 'average northern African dust' exhibits comparable Si, Fe and Mn contents with respect to the average composition of the upper continental crust, is slightly depleted in the alkali metals K and Na, and enriched in Ti and P. However, the complete data set yields clear evidence that northern African dust and its source sediments are compositionally heterogeneous on a regional scale and that this heterogeneity can be used to differentiate between major potential source areas on the basis of so-called source markers. An evaluation of these compositional fingerprints shows that the following parameters and especially their combination are effective in the discrimination of the most active source areas in northern Africa: ratio of (Ca + Mg)/Fe [wt.%], calcite (or carbonate) content, palygorskite occurrence and abundance, illite/kaolinite ratio, ?Nd(0) value, and 87Sr/86Sr ratio. For example, the data set corroborates previous ideas, which assign carbonate-, illite- and palygorskite-rich mineral dusts to north(west)ern source regions. Because most of the above listed source markers do not change substantially during transport, even far-traveled dusts may be assigned to specific potential source areas in northern Africa. Some limitations of the presented data set are also discussed. Our compilation reveals some substantial gaps in the knowledge of the composition of source sediments and mineral dusts from important potential source areas that should be filled in the future. The here compiled data set can be used as a reference frame, when

  5. The transatlantic dust transport from North Africa to the Americas—Its characteristics and source regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gläser, Gregor; Wernli, Heini; Kerkweg, Astrid; Teubler, Franziska

    2015-11-01

    Transport of Saharan dust over the Atlantic to the Americas is a relevant process since dust is a nutrient for marine and terrestrial ecosystems. It is therefore important to better quantify the frequency and amount of transatlantic dust transport, its preferred altitude and duration, and the regions of dust origin. This study uses a novel combination of Eulerian and Lagrangian diagnostics, applied to a previously validated 5 year simulation of the fifth generation European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast-Hamburg-model (ECHAM5)/Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) Atmospheric Chemistry model, to quantify these dust transport characteristics and their seasonal variations. Results confirm the previously found preferred transatlantic dust pathways: in boreal winter and spring, African dust is mainly transported below 800 hPa toward South America, whereas in summer and autumn the preferred pathway is to the Caribbean and occurs in a layer up to 500 hPa. The averaged transport duration from dust emission to deposition is 10 days in winter for deposition in the Amazon region and almost 12 days in summer for deposition in the Caribbean. These estimates were obtained by combining correlation analyses of Eulerian dust fluxes and trajectory calculations. The latter were also essential to identify the main source regions of transatlantic dust transport, which were found in all seasons in northwestern Africa (Algeria, Mali, and Mauritania) but not farther east, e.g., in the Bodélé Depression. A specific Lagrangian analysis for this dust emission hot spot suggests that wet deposition associated with the Intertropical Convergence Zone in winter and the African monsoon in summer inhibits Bodélé dust to leave the African continent.

  6. Saharan Dust, Transport Processes, and Possible Impacts on Hurricane Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, K. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present observational evidence of significant relationships between Saharan dust outbreak, and African Easterly wave activities and hurricane activities. We found two dominant paths of transport of Saharan dust: a northern path, centered at 25degN associated with eastward propagating 6-19 days waves over northern Africa, and a southern path centered at 15degN, associated with the AEW, and the Atlantic ITCZ. Seasons with stronger dust outbreak from the southern path are associated with a drier atmosphere over the Maximum Development Region (MDR) and reduction in tropical cyclone and hurricane activities in the MDR. Seasons with stronger outbreak from the northern path are associated with a cooler N. Atlantic, and suppressed hurricane in the western Atlantic basin.

  7. The relationship between gorgonian coral (Cnidaria: Gorgonacea) diseases and African dust storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weir-Brush, J. R.; Garrison, V.H.; Smith, G.W.; Shinn, E.A.

    2004-01-01

    The number of reports of coral diseases has increased throughout the world in the last 20 years. Aspergillosis, which primarily affects Gorgonia ventalina and G. flabellum, is one of the few diseases to be characterized. This disease is caused by Aspergillus sydowii, a terrestrial fungus with a worldwide distribution. Upon infection, colonies may lose tissue, and ultimately, mortality may occur if the infection is not sequestered. The spores of A. sydowii are <5 ??m, small enough to be easily picked up by winds and dispersed over great distances. Aspergillosis is prevalent in the Caribbean, and it appears that this primarily terrestrial fungus has adapted to a marine environment. It has been proposed that dust storms originating in Africa may be one way in which potential coral pathogens are distributed and deposited into the marine environments of the Caribbean. To test the hypothesis that African dust storms transport and deposit pathogens, we collected air samples from both dust storms and periods of nondust in St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands. Because we focused on fungal pathogens and used A. sydowii as a model, we isolated and cultured fungi on various types of media. Fungi including Aspergillus spp. were isolated from air samples taken from dust events and non-dust events. Twenty-three separate cultures and seven genera were isolated from dust event samples whereas eight cultures from five genera were isolated from non-dust air samples. Three isolates from the Virgin Islands dust event samples morphologically identified as Aspergillus spp. produced signs of aspergillosis in seafans, and the original pathogens were re-isolated from those diseased seafans fulfilling Koch's Postulates. This research supports the hypothesis that African dust storms transport across the Atlantic Ocean and deposit potential coral pathogens in the Caribbean.

  8. Aeolian dust as a transport hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baddock, M. C.; Strong, C. L.; Murray, P. S.; McTainsh, G. H.

    2013-06-01

    The effects of blowing dust on transport operations are often mentioned as one of the significant impacts of aeolian processes on human welfare. However, few studies have been presented to demonstrate this impact. This research examined official air traffic incident reports in Australia for inclusively 1969-2010 to characterise the hazard of blowing dust to aviation in the country, the first such study of its kind. For the 42 year record, 61 incidents were identified (mean 1.4 per annum), with the large majority occurring in the first half of the 1970s. Only 20% of incidents occurred from 1984 onwards. Australian dust activity has not decreased over time, and the reduction in incidents is partly explained by improvements in aviation technology. The centralisation of Air Traffic Control operations to major coastal cities may however have reduced pilot reporting of dust-induced aviation incidents. By type of dust activity, dust storms were associated with nearly half of the reported incidents and dust hazes produced around a quarter. Only 5% of incidents resulted in any physical damage to aircraft and only one case involving personal injury was reported. The majority of the adverse effects on aviation due to dust (nearly 60% of reported incidents) were related to difficulties for navigation and completion of scheduled journey. Since aircraft damage and bodily harm were rare, the impact of dust in Australia is mostly that of inconvenience and associated raised economic costs. From 1990, the temporal pattern of incidents does not show any significant increase despite several intensely dusty years associated with recent droughts. This suggests that Australian aviation safety may be relatively resistant to the adverse effects of atmospheric dust as a hazard.

  9. Modulation of Saharan dust export by the North African dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, S.; Cuevas, E.; Prospero, J. M.; Alastuey, A.; Querol, X.; López-Solano, J.; García, M. I.; Alonso-Pérez, S.

    2015-07-01

    We have studied the relationship between the long-term interannual variability in large-scale meteorology in western North Africa - the largest and most active dust source worldwide - and Saharan dust export in summer, when enhanced dust mobilization in the hyper-arid Sahara results in maximum dust impacts throughout the North Atlantic. We address this issue by analyzing 28 years (1987-2014) of summer averaged dust concentrations at the high-altitude Izaña observatory (~ 2400 m a.s.l.) on Tenerife, and satellite and meteorological reanalysis data. The summer meteorological scenario in North Africa (aloft 850 hPa) is characterized by a high over the the subtropical Sahara and a low over the tropics linked to the monsoon. We measured the variability of this high-low dipole-like pattern in terms of the North African dipole intensity (NAFDI): the difference of geopotential height anomalies averaged over the subtropics (30-32° N, Morocco) and the tropics (10-13° N, Bamako region) close to the Atlantic coast (at 5-8° W). We focused on the 700 hPa standard level due to dust export off the coast of North Africa tending to occur between 1 and 5 km a.s.l. Variability in the NAFDI is associated with displacements of the North African anticyclone over the Sahara and this has implications for wind and dust export. The correlations we found between the 1987-2014 summer mean of NAFDI with dust at Izaña, satellite dust observations and meteorological re-analysis data indicate that increases in the NAFDI (i) result in higher wind speeds at the north of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone that are associated with enhanced dust export over the subtropical North Atlantic, (ii) influence the long-term variability of the size distribution of exported dust particles (increasing the load of coarse dust) and (iii) are associated with enhanced rains in the tropical and northern shifts of the tropical rain band that may affect the southern Sahel. Interannual variability in NAFDI is also

  10. African Dust Concentrations in the Caribbean Island of Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayol-Bracero, O. L.; Morales-Garcia, F.; Santos-Figueroa, G.; Custals, L.; Izaguirre, M.; Prospero, J. M.; McDowell, W. H.

    2015-12-01

    African dust carried to the Tropical Atlantic and Caribbean was measured during the summer months of 2015. Atmospheric particles during dust events were collected at Cape San Juan, Puerto Rico on stacked-filter units and a high-volume sampler for the fine and coarse fractions and on a low-pressure impactor for size-resolved characterization. The filter ash gravimetric method was used to determine bulk dust mass concentrations for the first time in Puerto Rico. The method was validated analyzing same filter portions at CIAM/ACAR University of Puerto Rico and at RSMAS/MAC University of Miami. Filter's extracts were analyzed for ionic species measured by ion chromatography. The water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) was determined with a total organic carbon (TOC) analyzer. Mineral dust concentrations in Puerto Rico were compared to those reported at Miami during summer periods. Comparison between dust concentration and regional PM10 data and results on size-resolved dust concentration will also be presented.

  11. Modeling the processing of mineral iron during dust transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelsberg, Ulrike; Wolke, Ralf; Tilgner, Andreas; Tegen, Ina; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2014-05-01

    The Saharan desert and the Gobi desert are the main contributors to Aeolian desert dust, which is a major source of micronutrients to the remote ocean regions. Micronutrients, such as transition metals like iron or copper, are regarded essential for biological processes of different marine species. In this context recent studies have shown that soluble iron, since it is generally the most abundant transition metal in dust particles, has the ability to control marine productivity and thereby likely influence the CO2- budget. Nevertheless, the processing of desert dust leading to the release of soluble iron still lacks sufficient understanding since several factors control the solubilization process. Especially anthropogenic emissions are regarded to significantly add to the amount of soluble iron by acidification of dust particles or by the direct emission of soluble iron comprised, e.g. in coal fly ash. For the investigation of the dissolution process of iron that takes place during dust transportation the spectral air parcel model SPACCIM is used. A mechanism describing the precipitation and dissolution of mineral particles by heterogeneous surface reactions has been implemented. Trajectory properties were derived from COSMO-MUSCAT simulations or from re-analysis data by HYSPLIT. Differences in the chemical composition and the amount of anthropogenic and naturally emitted species on the North African continent and the highly industrialized region of South-East Asia have considerable impact on the acidification of the desert dust. Under this aspect, special cases of dust outbreaks of the Saharan desert and the Gobi desert are investigated and compared with focus on soluble iron produced.

  12. The Impact of African Dust on PM10 Air Quality in the Caribbean Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prospero, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Decades of aerosol measurements on Barbados and Miami have yielded a broad picture of African mineral dust transport to the Caribbean Basin. These measurements show that in summer the aerosol mass is often dominated by dust. At such times over 90% of the dust mass is comprised of particles less than 10 μm aerodynamic diameter and thus fits the EPA criteria for PM10. A number of sites in the Caribbean monitor PM10 using the same instrumentation commonly deployed in European and United States networks. By comparing data from individual islands that have multiple monitoring sites (e.g., Puerto Rico, Martinique, Guadeloupe), it is shown that during dust events PM10 concentrations track very closely and that local sources have a minor impact on PM10 above about 15 to 20 μg m-3. Moreover the PM10 measurements are coherent with the movement of dust clouds over the islands as observed by satellites. In this way dust movement can be tracked at PM10 sites along the Gulf and southeast coasts of the United States. To assess the specific impact of African dust on PM10 in the region, I compare the daily records of dust measurements at Miami and Barbados with concurrent measurements made at proximate PM10 sites. I then use these relationships and the long term dust measurements at Barbados and Miami to assess the long-term variability of PM10 across the region. At Barbados the record goes back 50 years and provides a basis of assessing the effects of climate variability on PM10 transport. This study shows that there is great variability on scales ranging from daily to decadal. The impact of the droughts in the 1970s and 1980s was particularly significant. Across the Caribbean, the rates of exceedances of the WHO PM10 guideline is comparable to those observed in many major urban areas in Europe and the US. The dominance of dust in large PM10 events and the absence of major pollution sources on many islands offers the opportunity to study the health impacts of desert dust in

  13. Dust exposure and pneumoconiosis in a South African pottery. 1. Study objectives and dust exposure.

    PubMed

    Rees, D; Cronje, R; du Toit, R S

    1992-07-01

    Dust exposure and pneumoconiosis were investigated in a South African pottery that manufactured wall tiles and bathroom fittings. This paper describes the objectives of the investigation and presents dust measurement data. x Ray diffraction showed that the clays used by the pottery had a high quartz content (range 58%-23%, mean 38%). Exposure to respirable dust was measured for 43 workers and was highest (6.6 mg/m3) in a bathroom fitting fettler. Quartz concentrations in excess of 0.1 mg/m3 were found in all sections of the manufacturing process from slip production to biscuit firing and sorting. The proportion of quartz in the respirable dust of these sections was 24% to 33%. This is higher than is usually reported in English potteries. Four hundred and six (80%) of the 509 workers employed at the pottery were potentially at risk of occupational lung disease. The finding of large numbers of pottery workers exposed to unacceptable dust concentrations is not surprising as poor dust control was found in all six wall tile and sanitary ware factories surveyed by the National Centre for Occupational Health between 1973 and 1989. Dust related occupational disease can be expected in potters for many years to come.

  14. Changes in North African dust deposition: 35 ka through the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsley, C. W.; McGee, D.; Winckler, G.; deMenocal, P. B.; Stuut, J. W.; Bradtmiller, L. I.

    2013-12-01

    Past changes in atmospheric circulation and aridity in the North African region can be explored by examining continuous records of reconstructed eolian dust accumulation in West African margin sediments. Recent high-resolution reconstructions of dust deposition by McGee et al. (2013) from a meridional transect of cores stretching from 27°N to 19°N along the northwest African margin indicate dramatic changes in North African dust emissions over the last 20 ka. Times of high dust emissions were documented during Heinrich Stadial 1 and the Younger Dryas, and lower dust emissions during the African Humid Period. Here we present a continuation of these records, combining grain size endmember modeling with 230Th-normalized fluxes in these cores to document spatial and temporal changes in dust loads and grain size distributions within the North African dust plume from 20 to ~35 ka. Our results provide quantitative estimates of the magnitude of dust flux changes associated with previous Heinrich Stadials, and lend insight to the nature of the North African dust plume through the entirety of the Last Glacial Maximum. References: McGee, D., deMenocal, P.B., Winckler, G., Stuut, J.B.W., Bradtmiller, L.I., 2013. The magnitude, timing and abruptness of changes in North African dust deposition over the last 20,000 yr. Earth And Planetary Science Letters 371-372, 163-176.

  15. Dust Transport in Low Voltage Glow Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Talamas, C. A.; Bates, E. M.; Rivera, W. F.; Birmingham, W.

    2014-10-01

    Results from experiments of dust hopping under different electrode configurations are presented. The purpose of these experiments is to investigate conditions that lead to the dust in a low voltage dusty plasma to be transported and clumped on the lower electrode, by hopping throughout the bottom electrode. The setup consists of a pair of parallel electrode plates that can be oriented with respect to gravity and can have their separation changed without breaking vacuum. The electrodes are suspended by insulating rings in the vacuum chamber, away from walls, and both the top and bottom of each conducting plate is exposed. This configuration allows a glow discharge on all faces of the electrodes, with the glow between the plates having a low enough voltage to charge, but not to levitate the dust grains. Several initial conditions are tested, including the amount of dust on the plate, its distribution, and the presence of any obstacles. This research is relevant to the transport and accumulation of dust in high temperature plasma discharge chambers, as well as in airless planetary bodies.

  16. Back-trajectory analysis of African dust outbreaks at a coastal city in southern Spain: Selection of starting heights and assessment of African and concurrent Mediterranean contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabello, M.; Orza, J. A. G.; Dueñas, C.; Liger, E.; Gordo, E.; Cañete, S.

    2016-09-01

    The present study uses a back-trajectory analysis at multiple heights for better interpretation of the impact of the African dust outbreaks in the coastal Mediterranean city of Málaga (Spain), the southernmost large city in Europe. Throughout a 3-year period, 363 days were identified as dusty days by atmospheric transport models. During these events, PM10, SO2, O3, temperature, AOD and Ångström exponent showed statistically significant differences compared to days with no African dust. It was found that under African dust events, the study site was influenced by Mediterranean air masses at the lowermost heights and by Atlantic advections at high altitudes, while African air masses mostly reached Málaga at intermediate levels. Specifically, the lowest heights at which air masses reached the study site after having resided over Africa are confined into the 1000-2000 m range. The decoupling between the lowest heights and the ones for dust transport may explain the presence of aged air masses at the time of the African outbreak. Additionally, with the aim of studying the influence of the air mass origin and history on air quality, a new procedure based on Principal component analysis (PCA) is proposed to determine which altitudes are best suited as starting points for back-trajectory calculations, as they maximize the differences in residence time over different areas. Its application to Málaga identifies three altitudes (750, 2250 and 4500 m) and a subsequent analysis of back-trajectories for African dust days provided the main source areas over Africa as well as further insight on the Mediterranean contribution.

  17. African dust and the demise of Caribbean coral reefs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shinn, E.A.; Smith, G.W.; Prospero, J.M.; Betzer, P.; Hayes, M.L.; Garrison, V.; Barber, R.T.

    2000-01-01

    The vitality of Caribbean coral reefs has undergone a continual state of decline since the late 1970s, a period of time coincidental with large increases in transatlantic dust transport. It is proposed that the hundreds of millions of tons/year of soil dust that have been crossing the Atlantic during the last 25 years could be a significant contributor to coral reef decline and may be affecting other ecosystems. Benchmark events, such as near synchronous Caribbean-wide mortalities of acroporid corals and the urchin Diadema in 1983, and coral bleaching beginning in 1987, correlate with the years of maximum dust flux into the Caribbean. Besides crustal elements, in particular Fe, Si, and aluminosilicate clays, the dust can serve as a substrate for numerous species of viable spores, especially the soil fungus Aspergillus. Aspergillus sydowii, the cause of an ongoing Caribbean-wide seafan disease, has been cultured from Caribbean air samples and used to inoculate sea fans.

  18. Red-ox speciation and mixing state of iron in individual African dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deboudt, Karine; Gloter, Alexandre; Mussi, Alexandre; Flament, Pascal

    2012-06-01

    The Fe distribution in African dust particles collected in Senegal (North-Western Africa) during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis Special Observation Period 0 (AMMA-"SOP 0," February 2006) was assessed using individual particle analysis (Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy respectively equipped with X-ray Spectrometry (SEM-EDX) and Electron Energy Loss Spectrometry (TEM-EELS)). Senegal is not a dust source area; the chemical composition of collected dusts indicates that they originate primarily in the North-Western Sahara, which is consistent with previous studies of the area. Fe can be present inside dust particles as a substitution element in the crystalline lattice of aluminosilicate, but a high proportion (62%) of aluminosilicate Fe-containing particles are also found as an internal mixture of aluminosilicate with Fe oxide grains (including both oxide and hydroxide species). The 3D structure of such particles obtained by tomography reveals that these Fe-rich inclusions are often found at the surface of aluminosilicate particles but that some are also included inside particles. These Fe oxide grains can result from crustal earth or atmospheric processes during long-range transport. FeIII is dominant in both the aluminosilicate matrix and the Fe oxide grains (FeIII/Σ Fe ratio = 76.8% and 90.0%, respectively, on average), with notable heterogeneities of Fe valence inside grains at a nanometer scale.

  19. The Dust at Altitude Recovery Technology (DART) System was Developed to Recover Plant, Human, and Animal Pathogens in Asian and African Dust Storms over North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuerger, A. C.; Tench, B.; Nehr, A.; Emmons, T.; Valbuena, F.; Palaia, J.; Sugars, C.

    2014-12-01

    Dust emanates year-round from Africa and Asia and impacts air quality in North America. Asian dust plumes deliver up to 64 million tonnes of dust over the NW of the USA, and African dust storms deliver over 50 million tonnes of dust over Florida each year. Several recent studies have demonstrated that human and plant pathogens from Asian [1] African [2] aerosols can be transported to N. America in naturally occurring dust storms. What is unknown is whether these 'presumptive pathogens' impact human, plant, or animal health in the USA. In order to initiate a long-term monitoring program of pathogens in Asian and African dust plumes, we have developed a dust collection system called DART (Dust at Altitude Recovery Technology) (figure). The DART dust sampler can be mounted on a F104 Starfighter jet (figure) and a T6 Texan propeller driven airplane (not shown), and was test flown over FL in Dec. 2013 on the F104 and on the T6 in the summer of 2014. The DART system utilizes a high-volume pump to pass air through 6 separate filtration units where both aerosols and microbial cells are captured. The filtration systems exhibit flow rates from 25-142 L/min depending on the pore size and brand of filters used. Flow rates are directly correlated to increased air speed, and are inversely correlated to increased altitude. Filtration units can be turned on and off individually as required for specific science flight objectives. The DART dust sampler has performed nominally up to 7600 m, 0.92 Mach, and 3.5 +G's. During initial test flights in Dec. 2013, 5 of 8 genera of fungi recovered from the lower atmosphere over FL contained plant pathogens including species in the genera: Acremonium, Aspergillus, Cladosporium, Curvularia, and Fusarium. Numbers of recovered fungi, but not bacteria, increased significantly when 5 or 10 µm filters were used in the DART system compared to filter pore sizes ≤ 1.2 µm. Future sampling programs for both Asian and African dust events will be

  20. Relationship between African dust carried in the Atlantic trade winds and surges in pediatric asthma attendances in the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prospero, Joseph M.; Blades, Edmund; Naidu, Raana; Mathison, George; Thani, Haresh; Lavoie, Marc C.

    2008-11-01

    Asthma is epidemic in developed and developing countries including those in the Caribbean where it is widely believed that African dust, transported in high concentrations in the Trade Winds every year, is a major causative factor. The link between asthma and dust in the Caribbean is based largely on anecdotal evidence that associates sharp increases in the occurrence of asthma symptoms with hazy conditions often caused by dust. Here we report on a 2-year study of the relationship between the daily concentrations of dust measured in on-shore Trade Winds at Barbados and pediatric asthma attendance rates at Queen Elizabeth Hospital (QEH). We looked for large increases in QEH daily attendances in relation to daily dust concentrations as previously suggested by anecdotal observations. We could not find any obvious relationship although there may be more subtle linkages between dust and asthma. Our measurements show, however, that the concentration of dust in the size range under 2.5 μm diameter is sufficiently high as to challenge United States Environmental Protection Agency air quality standards for respirable particles. Thus, African dust may constitute a health threat of a different nature, producing symptoms less obvious than those of asthma.

  1. Relationship between African dust carried in the Atlantic trade winds and surges in pediatric asthma attendances in the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Prospero, Joseph M; Blades, Edmund; Naidu, Raana; Mathison, George; Thani, Haresh; Lavoie, Marc C

    2008-11-01

    Asthma is epidemic in developed and developing countries including those in the Caribbean where it is widely believed that African dust, transported in high concentrations in the Trade Winds every year, is a major causative factor. The link between asthma and dust in the Caribbean is based largely on anecdotal evidence that associates sharp increases in the occurrence of asthma symptoms with hazy conditions often caused by dust. Here we report on a 2-year study of the relationship between the daily concentrations of dust measured in on-shore Trade Winds at Barbados and pediatric asthma attendance rates at Queen Elizabeth Hospital (QEH). We looked for large increases in QEH daily attendances in relation to daily dust concentrations as previously suggested by anecdotal observations. We could not find any obvious relationship although there may be more subtle linkages between dust and asthma. Our measurements show, however, that the concentration of dust in the size range under 2.5 microm diameter is sufficiently high as to challenge United States Environmental Protection Agency air quality standards for respirable particles. Thus, African dust may constitute a health threat of a different nature, producing symptoms less obvious than those of asthma.

  2. Potential Impacts of Saharan Dust on the African Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichoku, C. M.; Petrenko, M.; El-Askary, H. M.; Wang, J.; Yang, Z.; Yue, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The largest dust source in the world is the Sahara desert, which occupies most of the northern half of Africa. A recent international modeling experiment conducted under the auspices of the Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models (AEROCOM) initiative estimated that the annual dust generation from the Sahara and its peripheries is in the range of 400 to 2200 Tg yr-1. It is estimated that about 240±80 Tg yr-1 of the dust leaves the western shores of Africa on its way across the Atlantic. Therefore, a majority of the dust emitted from and around the Sahara remains and circulates within Africa, potentially affecting the environment, air quality, and human health, among other effects. Given the apparent scarcity of ground-based air-quality monitoring networks in Africa, we are exploring approaches that utilize satellite measurements and regional models to estimate the air-quality impacts of aerosols (particularly those of biomass burning and dust) in northern Hemisphere Africa. Some of the model simulations evaluated using ground-based and satellite observations show that the regional models deliver a high performance in capturing the mixing and transport of biomass-burning (smoke) and dust aerosols. In this presentation, we will share our preliminary results and future perspectives.

  3. Source Characterization of African Dust Using CCSEM Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, R.; Hunt, A.; Oldfield, F.

    2013-12-01

    A preliminary investigation is underway to determine whether African dust is developed through Pedogenic or Aeolian processes. 85 dust samples were taken from the Sahel and Saharan region of Africa and analyzed using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy (CCSEM). Optimized secondary electron detectors (SED) and back-scattered electron detectors (BSED) with adjustable quadrants was used with a light element Peltier-cooled energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer. A variable pressure system was utilized for the analysis of insulating materials, which eliminated the need for special specimen coating to dissipate charge and remove artifacts. Data from these samples are being used to address two primary questions: (1) Can CCSEM technology accurately describe elemental compounds derived from dust samples and therefore derive mineral content and (2) Are African dusts created through Pedogenic or Aeolian processes. The creation of a 19-point elemental classification system was used to separate and analyze each of the 4000 data points that were taken from 85 samples. Initial findings show large amounts of Fe, Si, and Al-rich minerals. The Al-Si-rich minerals show a close correlation in relative elemental amounts. This is to be expected from clay minerals of the pyroxene group. The Fe, Si-rich minerals trend towards an inverse relationship, which is also consistent with iron oxides of the spinel group that generally consist of magnetite. Other elemental constituents within the samples include varying amounts of Ti, Ca, and K. An initial run of samples, 6 Burkina Soils and 6 Burkina Laterites, show a similarity in chemical composition, leading to the hypothesis that the Burkina Soils originated from the Burkina Laterites. As the experiment progresses we expect to see similar Aeolian processes contributing to the mineral content of other surface dusts. Further research on the effects of these wind driven dusts is needed to assess the potential health impacts and

  4. African and Asian dust: from desert soils to coral reefs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrison, Virginia H.; Shinn, Eugene A.; Foreman, William T.; Griffin, Dale W.; Holmes, Charles W.; Kellogg, Christina A.; Majewski, Michael S.; Richardson, Laurie L.; Ritchie, Kim B.; Smith, Garriet W.

    2003-01-01

    Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain the decline of coral reefs throughout the world, but none adequately accounts for the lack of recovery of reefs or the wide geographical distribution of coral diseases. The processes driving the decline remain elusive. Hundreds of millions of tons of dust transported annually from Africa and Asia to the Americas may be adversely affecting coral reefs and other downwind ecosystems. Viable microorganisms, macro- and micronutrients, trace metals, and an array of organic contaminants carried in the dust air masses and deposited in the oceans and on land may play important roles in the complex changes occurring on coral reefs worldwide.

  5. Modeling Saharan dust emissions, transport, deposition, and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colarco, Peter Richard

    We simulate Saharan dust emissions, transport, and removal with a three-dimensional aerosol transport model driven by assimilated meteorology. We explore dust distributions and optical properties for model runs over the tropical North Atlantic for time periods covering the ACE-2 (summer 1997, Canary Islands) and PRIDE (summer 2000, Puerto Rico) field experiments. Modeled dust fields are compared to ground-based, in situ, and satellite observations. Dust imaginary refractive index and single scatter albedo at UV wavelengths are inferred near source regions by computing the TOMS Aerosol Index from modeled dust fields. Our results indicate a dust aerosol that is considerably less absorbing than previous estimates. The timing of downwind dust events is generally uncorrelated with the details of the dust source process, indicating the dust exists in a persistent reservoir over source regions and the timing of its transport to remote regions is most strongly controlled by the transporting dynamics. Our model simulates the complicated vertical distributions of dust observed over Puerto Rico. The dust vertical distribution is controlled by sedimentation of dust particles and a general descending air motion over the tropical North Atlantic. Low-level dust can be transported directly from source regions, but the majority of it is efficiently eroded away in transit by wet removal processes. Our computed estimates of iron deposition fluxes into the North Atlantic are in reasonable agreement with estimates based on station data.

  6. Radiogenic isotope evidence for transatlantic atmospheric dust transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ashwini; Abouchami, Wafa; Garrison, Virginia H.; Galer, Stephen J. G.; Andreae, Meinrat O.

    2013-04-01

    Early studies by Prospero and colleagues [1] have shown that African dust reaches all across the Atlantic and into the Caribbean. It may contribute to fertilizing the Amazon rainforest [2,3,4], in addition to enhancing the ocean biological productivity via delivery of iron, a key nutrient element[5]. Radiogenic isotope ratios (Sr, Nd, Pb) are robust tracers of dust sources and can thus provide information on provenance and pathways of dust transport. Here we report Sr, Nd and Pb isotope data on atmospheric aerosols, collected in 2008 on quartz filters, from three different locations in Mali (12.6° N, 8.0° W; 555 m a.s.l.), Tobago (11.3° N, 60.5° W; 329 m a.s.l.) and the U.S. Virgin Islands (17.7° N, 64.6° W; 27 m a.s.l.) to investigate the hypothesis of dust transport across the Atlantic. About 2 cm2 of filter were acid-leached in 0.5 N HBr for selective removal of the anthropogenic labile Pb component (leachate) and possibly the fine soluble particle fraction. The remainder of the filter was subsequently dissolved using a mixture of HF and HNO3 acids, and should be representative of the silicate fraction. Isotopic compositions were measured by TIMS on a ThermoFisher Triton at MPIC, with Pb isotope ratios determined using the triple-spike method. Significant Pb isotope differences between leachates and residues were observed. The variability in Pb isotopic composition among leachates may be attributed to variable and distinct anthropogenic local Pb sources from Africa and South America [6], however, residues are imprinted by filter blank contribution suggesting to avoid the quartz fiber filter for isotopic study of aerosols. The Nd and Sr isotope ratios of aerosol leachates show similar signatures at all three locations investigated. The nearly identical Nd and Sr isotopic compositions in the Mali, Tobago and Virgin islands leachates are comparable to those obtained on samples from the Bodélé depression, Northern Chad [7] and suggest a possible common

  7. Increase in African dust flux at the onset of commercial agriculture in the Sahel region.

    PubMed

    Mulitza, Stefan; Heslop, David; Pittauerova, Daniela; Fischer, Helmut W; Meyer, Inka; Stuut, Jan-Berend; Zabel, Matthias; Mollenhauer, Gesine; Collins, James A; Kuhnert, Henning; Schulz, Michael

    2010-07-01

    The Sahara Desert is the largest source of mineral dust in the world. Emissions of African dust increased sharply in the early 1970s (ref. 2), a change that has been attributed mainly to drought in the Sahara/Sahel region caused by changes in the global distribution of sea surface temperature. The human contribution to land degradation and dust mobilization in this region remains poorly understood, owing to the paucity of data that would allow the identification of long-term trends in desertification. Direct measurements of airborne African dust concentrations only became available in the mid-1960s from a station on Barbados and subsequently from satellite imagery since the late 1970s: they do not cover the onset of commercial agriculture in the Sahel region approximately 170 years ago. Here we construct a 3,200-year record of dust deposition off northwest Africa by investigating the chemistry and grain-size distribution of terrigenous sediments deposited at a marine site located directly under the West African dust plume. With the help of our dust record and a proxy record for West African precipitation we find that, on the century scale, dust deposition is related to precipitation in tropical West Africa until the seventeenth century. At the beginning of the nineteenth century, a sharp increase in dust deposition parallels the advent of commercial agriculture in the Sahel region. Our findings suggest that human-induced dust emissions from the Sahel region have contributed to the atmospheric dust load for about 200 years.

  8. On the decadal scale correlation between African dust and Sahel rainfall: The role of Saharan heat low–forced winds

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weijie; Evan, Amato T.; Flamant, Cyrille; Lavaysse, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    A large body of work has shown that year-to-year variations in North African dust emission are inversely proportional to previous-year monsoon rainfall in the Sahel, implying that African dust emission is highly sensitive to vegetation changes in this narrow transitional zone. However, such a theory is not supported by field observations or modeling studies, as both suggest that interannual variability in dust is due to changes in wind speeds over the major emitting regions, which lie to the north of the Sahelian vegetated zone. We reconcile this contradiction showing that interannual variability in Sahelian rainfall and surface wind speeds over the Sahara are the result of changes in lower tropospheric air temperatures over the Saharan heat low (SHL). As the SHL warms, an anomalous tropospheric circulation develops that reduces wind speeds over the Sahara and displaces the monsoonal rainfall northward, thus simultaneously increasing Sahelian rainfall and reducing dust emission from the major dust “hotspots” in the Sahara. Our results shed light on why climate models are, to date, unable to reproduce observed historical variability in dust emission and transport from this region. PMID:26601301

  9. The Fertilizing Role of African Dust in the Amazon Rainforest: A First Multiyear Assessment Based on CALIPSO Lidar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Hongbin; Chin, Mian; Yuan, Tianle; Bian, Huisheng; Remer, Lorraine A.; Prospero, Joseph M.; Omar, Ali; Winker, David; Yang, Yuekui; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Zhibo; Zhao, Chun

    2015-01-01

    The productivity of the Amazon rainforest is constrained by the availability of nutrients, in particular phosphorus (P). Deposition of long-range transported African dust is recognized as a potentially important but poorly quantified source of phosphorus. This study provides a first multiyear satellite-based estimate of dust deposition into the Amazon Basin using three dimensional (3D) aerosol measurements over 2007-2013 from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). The 7-year average of dust deposition into the Amazon Basin is estimated to be 28 (8 to approximately 48) Tg a(exp -1) or 29 (8 to approximately 50) kg ha(exp -1) a(exp -1). The dust deposition shows significant interannual variation that is negatively correlated with the prior-year rainfall in the Sahel. The CALIOP-based multi-year mean estimate of dust deposition matches better with estimates from in-situ measurements and model simulations than a previous satellite-based estimate does. The closer agreement benefits from a more realistic geographic definition of the Amazon Basin and inclusion of meridional dust transport calculation in addition to the 3D nature of CALIOP aerosol measurements. The imported dust could provide about 0.022 (0.0060.037) Tg P of phosphorus per year, equivalent to 23 (7 to approximately 39) g P ha(exp -1) a(exp -1) to fertilize the Amazon rainforest. This out-of-Basin P input largely compensates the hydrological loss of P from the Basin, suggesting an important role of African dust in preventing phosphorus depletion on time scales of decades to centuries.

  10. Geochemical evidence for African dust inputs to soils of western Atlantic islands: Barbados, the Bahamas, and Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Budahn, James R.; Prospero, Joseph M.; Carey, Steven N.

    2007-06-01

    We studied soils on high-purity limestones of Quaternary age on the western Atlantic Ocean islands of Barbados, the Florida Keys, and the Bahamas. Potential soil parent materials in this region, external to the carbonate substrate, include volcanic ash from the island of St. Vincent (near Barbados), volcanic ash from the islands of Dominica and St. Lucia (somewhat farther from Barbados), the fine-grained component of distal loess from the lower Mississippi River Valley, and wind-transported dust from Africa. These four parent materials can be differentiated using trace elements (Sc, Cr, Th, and Zr) and rare earth elements that have minimal mobility in the soil-forming environment. Barbados soils have compositions that indicate a complex derivation. Volcanic ash from the island of St. Vincent appears to have been the most important influence, but African dust is a significant contributor, and even Mississippi River valley loess may be a very minor contributor to Barbados soils. Soils on the Florida Keys and islands in the Bahamas appear to have developed mostly from African dust, but Mississippi River valley loess may be a significant contributor. Our results indicate that inputs of African dust are more important to the genesis of soils on islands in the western Atlantic Ocean than previously supposed. We hypothesize that African dust may also be a major contributor to soils on other islands of the Caribbean and to soils in northern South America, central America, Mexico, and the southeastern United States. Dust inputs to subtropical and tropical soils in this region increase both nutrient-holding capacity and nutrient status and thus may be critical in sustaining vegetation.

  11. Geochemical evidence for African dust inputs to soils of western Atlantic islands: Barbados, the Bahamas, and Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Budahn, J.R.; Prospero, J.M.; Carey, S.N.

    2007-01-01

    We studied soils on high-purity limestones of Quaternary age on the western Atlantic Ocean islands of Barbados, the Florida Keys, and the Bahamas. Potential soil parent materials in this region, external to the carbonate substrate, include volcanic ash from the island of St. Vincent (near Barbados), volcanic ash from the islands of Dominica and St. Lucia (somewhat farther from Barbados), the fine-grained component of distal loess from the lower Mississippi River Valley, and wind-transported dust from Africa. These four parent materials can be differentiated using trace elements (Sc, Cr, Th, and Zr) and rare earth elements that have minimal mobility in the soil-forming environment. Barbados soils have compositions that indicate a complex derivation. Volcanic ash from the island of St. Vincent appears to have been the most important influence, but African dust is a significant contributor, and even Mississippi River valley loess may be a very minor contributor to Barbados soils. Soils on the Florida Keys and islands in the Bahamas appear to have developed mostly from African dust, but Mississippi River valley loess may be a significant contributor. Our results indicate that inputs of African dust are more important to the genesis of soils on islands in the western Atlantic Ocean than previously supposed. We hypothesize that African dust may also be a major contributor to soils on other islands of the Caribbean and to soils in northern South America, central America, Mexico, and the southeastern United States. Dust inputs to subtropical and tropical soils in this region increase both nutrient-holding capacity and nutrient status and thus may be critical in sustaining vegetation. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Poleward transport of Saharan dust initiated by a Saharan cyclone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karam Francis, Diana Bou; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Cuesta, Juan

    2016-04-01

    To enhance the understanding of the role of Saharan mineral dust in the Arctic climate system, this study focuses on dust emission and poleward transport associated with an intense Saharan cyclone that occurred over North Africa in early April 2011. Satellites observations at high spatio-temporal resolution are used in this study in order to characterize qualitatively (using MSG-SEVIRI and CALIPSO/CloudSat) and quantitatively (using MODIS and OMI) the dust activity over North Africa associated with the Saharan cyclone as well as the transport of dust toward the northern pole. Beside the observations, a simulation at high resolution is performed using the MesoNh model in order to estimation the dust load transported northward and to evaluate the dust deposition north to 60°N and its impact on the Albedo. In this study, we identify in new and important mechanism for the transport of dust over long distances toward the northern pole: the poleward migration of Saharan cyclones, in which the dust is transported toward the Arctic following a newly identified path; across the Northern Atlantic Ocean around the Icelandic Low. This path is to be added to the two preferable paths mentioned in previous studies i.e. through transport across Northern Europe and across the Atlantic Ocean around the Bermuda High. Key words: Arctic, North Africa, dust storm, dust deposition, surface albedo.

  13. Dust Transport and Deposition Observed from the Terra-MODIS Space Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Koren, I.; Remer, L. A.; Tanre, D.; Fan, Ginoux; Fan, S.

    2004-01-01

    Meteorological observations, in situ data and satellite images of dust episodes were used already in the 1970s to estimate that 100 tg of dust are transported from Africa over the Atlantic Ocean every year between June and August and deposited in the Atlantic Ocean and the Americas. Desert dust is a main source of nutrients to oceanic biota and the Amazon forest, but deteriorates air quality and caries pathogens as shown for Florida. Dust affects the Earth radiation budget, thus participating in climate change and feedback mechanisms. There is an urgent need for new tools for quantitative evaluation of the dust distribution, transport and deposition. The Terra spacecraft launched at the dawn of the last millennium provides first systematic well calibrated multispectral measurements from the MODIS instrument, for daily global analysis of aerosol. MODIS data are used here to distinguish dust from smoke and maritime aerosols and evaluate the African dust column concentration, transport and deposition. We found that 230+/-80 tg of dust are transported annually from Africa to the Atlantic Ocean, 30 tg return to Africa and Europe, 70 tg reach the Caribbean, 45 tg fertilize the Amazon Basin, 4 times as previous estimates thus explaining a paradox regarding the source of nutrition to the Amazon forest, and 120+/-40 tg are deposited in the Atlantic Ocean. The results are compared favorably with dust transport models for particle radius less than or equal to 12 microns. This study is a first example of quantitative use of MODIS aerosol for a geophysical study.

  14. Dust Transport and Deposition Observed from the Terra-Moderate Image Spectrometer (MODIS) Space Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Meteorological observations, in situ data and satellite images of dust episodes were used already in the 1970s to estimate that 100 tg of dust are transported from Africa over the Atlantic Ocean every year between June and August and deposited in the Atlantic Ocean and the Americas. Desert dust is a main source of nutrients to oceanic biota and the Amazon forest, but deteriorates air quality and caries pathogens as shown for Florida. Dust affects the Earth radiation budget, thus participating in climate change and feedback mechanisms. There is an urgent need for new tools for quantitative evaluation of the dust distribution, transport and deposition. The Terra spacecraft launched at the dawn of the last millennium provides first systematic well calibrated multispectral measurements from the MODIS instrument, for daily global analysis of aerosol. MODIS data are used here to distinguish dust from smoke and maritime aerosols and evaluate the African dust column concentration, transport and deposition. We found that 230 plus or minus 80 tg of dust are transported annually from Africa to the Atlantic Ocean, 30 tg return to Africa and Europe, 70 tg reach the Caribbean, 45 tg fertilize the Amazon Basin, 4 times as previous estimates thus explaining a paradox regarding the source of nutrition to the Amazon forest, and 120 plus or minus 40 tg are deposited in the Atlantic Ocean. The results are compared favorably with dust transport models for particle radius less than or equal to 12 microns. This study is a first example of quantitative use of MODIS aerosol for a geophysical study.

  15. Dust-Particle Transport in Tokamak Edge Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pigarov, A Y; Krasheninnikov, S I; Soboleva, T K; Rognlien, T D

    2005-09-12

    Dust particulates in the size range of 10nm-100{micro}m are found in all fusion devices. Such dust can be generated during tokamak operation due to strong plasma/material-surface interactions. Some recent experiments and theoretical estimates indicate that dust particles can provide an important source of impurities in the tokamak plasma. Moreover, dust can be a serious threat to the safety of next-step fusion devices. In this paper, recent experimental observations on dust in fusion devices are reviewed. A physical model for dust transport simulation, and a newly developed code DUSTT, are discussed. The DUSTT code incorporates both dust dynamics due to comprehensive dust-plasma interactions as well as the effects of dust heating, charging, and evaporation. The code tracks test dust particles in realistic plasma backgrounds as provided by edge-plasma transport codes. Results are presented for dust transport in current and next-step tokamaks. The effect of dust on divertor plasma profiles and core plasma contamination is examined.

  16. Mixing state of aerosols and direct observation of carbonaceous and marine coatings on African dust by individual particle analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deboudt, Karine; Flament, Pascal; ChoëL, Marie; Gloter, Alexandre; Sobanska, Sophie; Colliex, Christian

    2010-12-01

    The mixing state of aerosols collected at M'Bour, Senegal, during the Special Observing Period conducted in January-February 2006 (SOP-0) of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis project (AMMA), was studied by individual particle analysis. The sampling location on the Atlantic coast is particularly adapted for studying the mixing state of tropospheric aerosols since it is (1) located on the path of Saharan dust plumes transported westward over the northern tropical Atlantic, (2) influenced by biomass burning events particularly frequent from December to March, and (3) strongly influenced by anthropogenic emissions from polluted African cities. Particle size, morphology, and chemical composition were determined for 12,672 particles using scanning electron microscopy (automated SEM-EDX). Complementary analyses were performed using transmission electron microscopy combined with electron energy loss spectrometry (TEM-EELS) and Raman microspectrometry. Mineral dust and carbonaceous and marine compounds were predominantly found externally mixed, i.e., not present together in the same particles. Binary internally mixed particles, i.e., dust/carbonaceous, carbonaceous/marine, and dust/marine mixtures, accounted for a significant fraction of analyzed particles (from 10.5% to 46.5%). Western Sahara was identified as the main source of mineral dust. Two major types of carbonaceous particles were identified: "tar balls" probably coming from biomass burning emissions and soot from anthropogenic emissions. Regarding binary internally mixed particles, marine and carbonaceous compounds generally formed a coating on mineral dust particles. The carbonaceous coating observed at the particle scale on African dust was evidenced by the combined use of elemental and molecular microanalysis techniques, with the identification of an amorphous rather than crystallized carbon structure.

  17. African desert dust in the Caribbean atmosphere: Microbiology and public health

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Dale W.; Garrison, V.H.; Herman, J.R.; Shinn, E.A.

    2001-01-01

    Air samples collected on St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands were screened for the presence of viable bacteria and fungi to determine if the number of cultivatable microbes in the atmosphere differed between "clear atmospheric conditions" and "African dust-events." Results indicate that during "African dust-events," the numbers of cultivatable airborne microorganisms can be 2 to 3 times that found during "clear atmospheric conditions." Direct microbial counts of air samples using an epifluorescent microscopy assay demonstrated that during an "African dust-event," bacteria-like and virus-like particle counts were approximately one log greater than during "clear atmospheric conditions." Bacteria-like particles exhibiting autofluoresence, a trait of phototrophs, were only detected during an "African dust-event.".

  18. Synoptic conditions favouring the occurrence of dust transport from Africa toward Sardinia Island.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canu, Annalisa; Pellizzaro, Grazia; Pintus, Gabriella; Duce, Pierpaolo

    2016-04-01

    Dust events that reach Italy have usually origin in the Sahara and Sahel regions (north-western part of Africa), which represent the dust sources nearest to Italy. In those regions the dust-lifting activity occurs in a remarkable way. Every dust event is different from the others; in fact dust transport and dust concentration in the air can vary remarkably depending on the synoptic situation. In Sardinia, dust events are more frequent in the May-November period, but they can also take place in the December-April period. The main aim of this work was to describe dust outbreaks in Sardinia and to identify the main meteorological scenarios that originate the transport of dust towards the central and western Mediterranean Basin. The evaluation of the geographical dispersion of Saharan dust was performed by using MODIS satellite data and Meteosat imagery combined with SKIRON forecasting model. The origin and the trajectory of the dust carried by winds towards Italy were inferred by the NOAA HYSPLIT model (Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model). In addition, PM10 (particulate matter with a diameter of less than 10 μm) and meteorological data registered by the ARPAS (Regional Environmental Protection Agency of Sardinia) monitoring stations were used to highlight the arrival of African air masses in Sardinia. The study was carried out during the 2014. A total of five events occurred during the year (two in spring and three in autumn) were analyzed. The origin of air masses loaded with dust from North Africa was confirmed by satellite imagery and 3-days air mass backward trajectories calculated by the NOAA HYSPLIT model. The analysis of the PM10 daily pattern registered at northern and southern Sardinia sites showed a rising of values during the dust event. The arrival of air masses from Africa caused the daily mean air temperature to rise whereas relative humidity values decreased. Finally, the results showed that all the event analyzed were

  19. Analyse of direct and indirect effects of Saharan dust on convection and on the African monsoon circulation during the FENNEC project using WRF-CHEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavaysse, Christophe; Flamant, Cyrille; Grabowski, Wojciech; Morisson, Hugh; Banks, Jamie

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse the local impacts of dust on convection and on the West African monsoon circulation. Using the regional models WRF-CHEM, different dust schemes have been tested to quantify the impacts of dust on convection and on the main components of the West African monsoon, such as the West African Heat Low (WAHL), African Easterly Waves (AEWs), monsoon and harmatan winds. The specific pre-onset period of the monsoon precipitation over the Sahel has been simulated, in 2011 during the FENNEC project. We have investigated a 15-day period from June 10th to 25th. During this period, high dust concentration over the Sahara has been detected using satellite observations and the WAHL settled in its summer Saharan location. In this study, we have observed that WRF-CHEM is able to reproduce dust outbreaks and transport as detected in the satellite and airborne observations. This study also highlights the two effects of dust on the monsoon circulation over the Sahara: a so-called direct effect associated with dust radiative heating, which increases the WAHL thickness, and a so called indirect effect that modifies mid-level and deep convection over the Sahel.

  20. Rain chemistry and cloud composition and microphysics in a Caribbean tropical montane cloud forest under the influence of African dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Delgado, Elvis; Valle-Diaz, Carlos J.; Baumgardner, Darrel; McDowell, William H.; González, Grizelle; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.

    2015-04-01

    It is known that huge amounts of mineral dust travels thousands of kilometers from the Sahara and Sahel regions in Africa over the Atlantic Ocean reaching the Caribbean, northern South America and southern North America; however, not much is understood about how the aging process that takes place during transport changes dust properties, and how the presence of this dust affects cloud's composition and microphysics. This African dust reaches the Caribbean region mostly in the summer time. In order to improve our understanding of the role of long-range transported African dust (LRTAD) in cloud formation processes in a tropical montane cloud forest (TMCF) in the Caribbean region we had field campaigns measuring dust physical and chemical properties in summer 2013, as part of the Puerto Rico African Dust and Cloud Study (PRADACS), and in summer 2014, as a part of the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory (LCZO) and in collaboration with the Saharan Aerosol Long-Range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE). Measurements were performed at the TMCF of Pico del Este (PE, 1051 masl) and at the nature reserve of Cabezas de San Juan (CSJ, 60 masl). In both stations we monitored meteorological parameters (e.g., temperature, wind speed, wind direction). At CSJ, we measured light absorption and scattering at three wavelengths (467, 528 and 652 nm). At PE we collected cloud and rainwater and monitored cloud microphysical properties (e.g., liquid water content, droplet size distribution, droplet number concentration, effective diameter and median volume diameter). Data from aerosol models, satellites, and back-trajectories were used together with CSJ measurements to classify air masses and samples collected at PE in the presence or absence of dust. Soluble ions, insoluble trace metals, pH and conductivity were measured for cloud and rainwater. Preliminary results for summer 2013 showed that in the presence of LRTAD (1) the average conductivity of cloud water

  1. Mineral dust transport in the Arctic modelled with FLEXPART

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groot Zwaaftink, Christine; Grythe, Henrik; Stohl, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Aeolian transport of mineral dust is suggested to play an important role in many processes. For instance, mineral aerosols affect the radiation balance of the atmosphere, and mineral deposits influence ice sheet mass balances and terrestrial and ocean ecosystems. While many efforts have been done to model global dust transport, relatively little attention has been given to mineral dust in the Arctic. Even though this region is more remote from the world's major dust sources and dust concentrations may be lower than elsewhere, effects of mineral dust on for instance the radiation balance can be highly relevant. Furthermore, there are substantial local sources of dust in or close to the Arctic (e.g., in Iceland), whose impact on Arctic dust concentrations has not been studied in detail. We therefore aim to estimate contributions of different source regions to mineral dust in the Arctic. We have developed a dust mobilization routine in combination with the Lagrangian dispersion model FLEXPART to make such estimates. The lack of details on soil properties in many areas requires a simple routine for global simulations. However, we have paid special attention to the dust sources on Iceland. The mobilization routine does account for topography, snow cover and soil moisture effects, in addition to meteorological parameters. FLEXPART, driven with operational meteorological data from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, was used to do a three-year global dust simulation for the years 2010 to 2012. We assess the model performance in terms of surface concentration and deposition at several locations spread over the globe. We will discuss how deposition and dust load patterns in the Arctic change throughout seasons based on the source of the dust. Important source regions for mineral dust found in the Arctic are not only the major desert areas, such as the Sahara, but also local bare-soil regions. From our model results, it appears that total dust load in the

  2. The Influence of African Dust on Air Quality in the Caribbean Basin: An Integrated Analysis of Satellite Retrievals, Ground Observations, and Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Prospero, J. M.; Chin, M.; Randles, C. A.; da Silva, A.; Bian, H.

    2015-12-01

    Long-term surface measurements in several locations extending from northeastern coast of South America to Miami in Florida have shown that African dust arrives in the Greater Caribbean Basin throughout a year. This long-range transported dust frequently elevates the level of particulate matter (PM) above the WHO guideline for PM10, which raises a concern of possible adverse impact of African dust on human health in the region. There is also concern about how future climate change might affect dust transport and its influence on regional air quality. In this presentation we provide a comprehensive characterization of the influence of African dust on air quality in the Caribbean Basin via integrating the ground observations with satellite retrievals and model simulations. The ground observations are used to validate and evaluate satellite retrievals and model simulations of dust, while satellite measurements and model simulations are used to extend spatial coverage of the ground observations. An analysis of CALIPSO lidar measurements of three-dimensional distribution of aerosols over 2007-2014 yields altitude-resolved dust mass flux into the region. On a basis of 8-year average and integration over the latitude zone of 0°-30°N, a total of 76 Tg dust is imported to the air above the Greater Caribbean Basin, of which 34 Tg (or 45%) is within the lowest 1 km layer and most relevant to air quality concern. The seasonal and interannual variations of the dust import are well correlated with ground observations of dust in Cayenne, Barbados, Puerto Rico, and Miami. We will also show comparisons of the size-resolved dust amount from both NASA GEOS-5 aerosol simulation and MERRA-2 aerosol reanalysis (i.e., column aerosol loading being constrained by satellite measurements of radiance at the top of atmosphere) with the ground observations and satellite measurement.

  3. Summer African Dust and Florida Thunder Storms: Are CRYSTAL-FACE Anvils Typical of the Subtropics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassen, K.; Campbell, J. R.; Prospero, J. M.

    2003-12-01

    The Florida peninsula can be viewed as an outdoor laboratory for the study of the indirect effects of aerosols on the properties of deep convective clouds, and the possible subsequent impact on precipitation. Depending on the seasonal weather patters affecting the area, sources of aerosols can be continental, smoke-produced, oceanic, and, as long known, of Saharan Desert origin. During the recent CRYSTAL-FACE field campaign, a variety of in situ and remote sensing evidence shows that after transport across the mid-Atlantic Ocean, episodes of African dust were widespread in the region. This is a well-known summer-time phenomenon. In one study using aircraft ice nuclei (IN) data and ground-based polarization lidar measurements, the dust was observed to induce the glaciation of a slightly (about -5.0 to -8.0 degrees C) supercooled altocumulus cloud. Extrapolating the finding that African dust particles are especially active IN, it follows that the ingestion of boundary-layer Saharan aerosol could have a strong potential for modifying the microphysical content, dynamics and precipitation of summer thunderstorms in southern Florida. In the current study, we will attempt to identify connections between the characteristics of the intensively-studied thunderstorms and the nature of the dominant aerosols involved in cloud particle formation. As a first step, the near-continuous data record from the Micropulse Lidar, supplemented by Polarization Diversity Lidar data, will be used to monitor aerosol conditions. Backtrack and satellite analyzes, along with the University of Miami surface aerosol sampling record, will identify their source and likely cloud particle forming characteristics. The final stage of this research will search for correlations in in situ-derived cloud microphysical properties such as ice crystal concentration and type. If such connections are found, it must be recognized that the CRYSTAL-FACE dataset may not be representative of subtropical thunderstorms

  4. The Role of African Dust Particles on Cloud Chemistry and Microphysics in a Tropical Montane Cloud Forest in the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Delgado, E.; Valle-Diaz, C. J.; Baumgardner, D.; McDowell, W. H.; Gonzalez, G.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.

    2015-12-01

    Huge amounts of African dust travels thousands of kilometers from the Sahara and Sahel regions to the Caribbean, northern South America and southern North America. However, not much is understood about how the aging process that takes place during transport changes dust properties, and how it affects cloud's composition and microphysics. In order to improve our understanding of the role of long-range transported African dust (LRTAD) in cloud formation processes we had field campaigns measuring dust physical and chemical properties in summers of 2013, 2014 and 2015, as part of the Puerto Rico African Dust and Cloud Study (PRADACS), and of the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory (LCZO). Measurements were performed at the tropical montane cloud forest (TMCF) of Pico del Este (PE, 1051 masl) and at the nature reserve of Cabezas de San Juan (CSJ, 60 masl). In both ground stations we monitored meteorological parameters (e.g., temperature, wind speed, wind direction). At CSJ, we measured light absorption and scattering at three wavelengths (467, 528 and 652 nm). At PE we collected cloud and rainwater for chemical analyses and monitored cloud microphysical properties (e.g., liquid water content, droplet size distribution, droplet number concentration, effective diameter and median volume diameter). Summer 2015 was the first attempt to characterize microphysical properties of the summer period (June to August) at PE, where dust is in its higher concentrations of the year. Samples were classified using data from models and satellites together with CSJ measurements as low or high dust influenced. Soluble ions, insoluble trace metals, pH, conductivity, total and dissolved organic carbon and total and dissolved nitrogen were measured for cloud and rainwater. Enrichment factor analysis was used to determine sea and crustal contribution of species by sample, as well as the neutralization factor and fractional acidity. Some preliminary results show cloud water conductivity for low

  5. CALIPSO observations of changes in dust properties during transatlantic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshak, A.; Yang, W.; Varnai, T.; Kostinski, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    The vertical distribution of dust shape and size is highly important for understanding and estimating dust radiative forcing. We used CALIPSO nighttime datasets to examine the vertical structure and evolution of Saharan dust during transatlantic transport. The results show that most Saharan dust is lifted to high altitude and descends after traveling thousands of km-s. Initially, the depolarization ratio and color ratio of Saharan dust are uniformly distributed along altitude, suggesting vertically constant particle size and shape distributions. During transport, the depolarization ratio of Saharan dust drops at lower altitudes, suggesting that particle shapes become less irregular; while at relatively high altitudes, the depolarization ratio of dust increases during transport. The changes observed during transport likely come from the effects of gravitational sorting caused by variations in particle shape and size. A simple model with only two shapes qualitatively captures these features and confirms that shape-induced differential settling contribute significantly to the observed vertical stratification of dust properties. In addition, the effect of clouds on dust properties will be also discussed.

  6. Can Transport of Saharan Dust Explain Extensive Clay Deposits in the Amazon Basin? A Test Using Radiogenic Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreae, M. O.; Abouchami, W.; Näthe, K.; Kumar, A.; Galer, S. J.; Jochum, K. P.; Williams, E.; Horbe, A. M.; Rosa, J. W.; Adams, D. K.; Balsam, W. R.

    2012-12-01

    The Bodélé Depression, located in the Southern Sahara, is a huge source of atmospheric dust and thus an important element in biogeochemical cycles and the radiative budget of Earth's atmosphere. Previous studies have shown that Saharan dust transport across the Atlantic acts as an important source of mineral nutrients to the Amazon rainforest. The Belterra Clay, which outcrops extensively across the Amazon Basin in Brazil, has been proposed to result from dry deposition of African dusts. We have investigated this hypothesis by measuring the radiogenic isotopic composition (Sr, Nd and Pb) of a suite of samples from the Belterra Clay, the Bodélé Depression, dusts deposits collected at various locations along the airmass transport trajectory, as well as loess from the Cape Verde Islands. Radiogenic isotope systems are powerful tracers of provenance and can be used to fingerprint dust sources and atmospheric transport patterns. Our results identify distinct isotopic signatures in the Belterra Clay samples and the African sources. The Belterra Clay display radiogenic Sr and Pb isotope ratios associated with non-radiogenic Nd isotope signatures. In contrast, Bodélé samples and dusts deposits show lower Pb isotope ratios, variable 87Sr/86Sr, and relatively homogeneous Nd isotopic compositions, albeit more radiogenic than those of the Belterra Clay. Our data show unambiguously that the Belterra Clay is not derived from African dust deposition, nor from the Andean chain, as originally suggested by W. Sombroek. Rather, isotopic compositions and Nd model ages are consistent with simple mixing of Archean and younger Proterozoic terranes within the Amazon Basin as a result of weathering and erosion under humid tropical conditions. Whether Saharan dusts contribute to the fertilization in the Amazon Basin cannot be ruled out, however, since the African dust isotopic signature is expected to be entirely overprinted by local sources. Radiogenic isotope data obtained on

  7. Microbiological fingerprint of African dust deposition in alpine snow pack, Mont Blanc summit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuvochina, Maria; Alekhina, Irina; Normand, Philippe; Petit, Jean-Robert; Bulat, Sergey

    2010-05-01

    The biogeochemical effect of African dust transport has been reported mostly with respect to nutrient budget change in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and global transport of microorganisms, including pathogens. However, its potential to seed or colonize the remote environments by transported microorganisms is poorly understood. This study has focused on bacterial content and diversity of Saharan dust deposition from 2006, 2008 and 2009 in snow pack of Mont Blanc (MtBl) glacier as well as recognition of bacteria which could be involved in establishing microbiota in this icy environment. Four snow samples recorded Saharan dust events from June 2006 (SDm06/2006 - 3,5 months aged), May and June 2008 (SDm05/2008 and SDm06/2008 - 1 month in between and 1 week aged each) and May 2009 (SDm05/2009 - 1 week aged) were collected at Col du Dome area (4250m a.s.l.). Bacterial community structure was assessed by ribotyping and subsequent sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. To exclude human-associated and laboratory contamination several controls were run in parallel updating our contaminant library. The obtained phylotypes were tested against this library keeping only those which successfully passed through this exam. Of 176 selected clones from four clone libraries 29.8% were met in our contaminant library. The ‘true' sequences were assigned to 57 phylotypes (>97.5% sequence similarity) originating mostly from soil. The prevalent phylotypes recovered were belonging to different bacterial divisions: Deinococcus-Thermus, Alpha-proteobacteria and CFB groups for SDm06/2006; Actinobacteria, Alpha-proteobacteria and CFB for SDm05/2008 and SDm06/2008; Actinobacteria and chloroplasts/plastids for SDm05/2009. Phylogenetic analysis of all phylotypes showed no shared species amongst all 4 dust layers in MtBl snow pack in 2006, 2008 and 2009. However, two phylotypes (Blastococcus saxobsidens sp. - 99%, Geodermatophilus obscurus sp. - 99%) were shared between 2008 and 2009

  8. Lunar dust transport and potential interactions with power system components

    SciTech Connect

    Katzan, C.M.; Edwards, J.L.

    1991-11-01

    The lunar surface is covered by a thick blanket of fine dust. This dust may be readily suspended from the surface and transported by a variety of mechanisms. As a consequence, lunar dust can accumulate on sensitive power components, such as photovoltaic arrays and radiator surfaces, reducing their performance. In addition to natural mechanisms, human activities on the Moon will disturb significant amounts of lunar dust. Of all the mechanisms identified, the most serious is rocket launch and landing. The return of components from the Surveyor III provided a rare opportunity to observe the effects of the nearby landing of the Apollo 12 lunar module. The evidence proved that significant dust accumulation occurred on the Surveyor at a distance of 155 m. From available information on particle suspension and transport mechanisms, a series of models was developed to predict dust accumulation as a function of distance from the lunar module. The accumulation distribution was extrapolated to a future lunar lander scenario. These models indicate that accumulation is expected to be substantial even as far as 2 km from the landing site. Estimates of the performance penalties associated with lunar dust coverage on radiators and photovoltaic arrays are presented. Because of the lunar dust adhesive and cohesive properties, the most practical dust defensive strategy appears to be the protection of sensitive components from the arrival of lunar dust by location, orientation, or barriers.

  9. Lunar dust transport and potential interactions with power system components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzan, Cynthia M.; Edwards, Jonathan L.

    1991-01-01

    The lunar surface is covered by a thick blanket of fine dust. This dust may be readily suspended from the surface and transported by a variety of mechanisms. As a consequence, lunar dust can accumulate on sensitive power components, such as photovoltaic arrays and radiator surfaces, reducing their performance. In addition to natural mechanisms, human activities on the Moon will disturb significant amounts of lunar dust. Of all the mechanisms identified, the most serious is rocket launch and landing. The return of components from the Surveyor 3 provided a rare opportunity to observe the effects of the nearby landing of the Apollo 12 Lunar Module. The evidence proved that significant dust accumulation occurred on the Surveyor at a distance of 155 m. From available information on particle suspension and transport mechanisms, a series of models was developed to predict dust accumulation as a function of distance from the lunar module. The accumulation distribution was extrapolated to a future Lunar Lander scenario. These models indicate that accumulation is expected to be substantial even as far as 2 km from the landing site. Estimates of the performance penalties associated with lunar dust coverage and photovoltaic arrays are presented. Because of the lunar dust adhesive and cohesive properties, the most practical dust defensive strategy appears to be the protection of sensitive components from the arrival of lunar dust by location, orientation, or barriers.

  10. Dust Plume Position and Transport in the NASA GEOS-4 Model Compared With MODIS, TOMS, AERONET, and Ground-Based Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowottnick, E.; Colarco, P. R.; da Silva, A.

    2006-12-01

    Annually, about 240 Tg of Saharan dust is transported across the Atlantic Ocean. Dust deposited to the surface provides nutrients that support the aquatic ecosystems of the Atlantic Ocean as well as the terrestrial ecosystems of South America, the Caribbean, and North America. Additionally, the long-range transport of dust is a potential source of pollutant particulate matter. Dust has an influence on the Earth radiation budget through scattering and absorption of radiation and modification of cloud properties. These radiative feedbacks potentially influence the cyclogenesis occurring off the west African coast. In order to investigate the impacts of dust on the Earth system we employ a newly developed dust model implemented in the NASA GEOS-4 general circulation model and data assimilation system. Here we present a 27 year simulation (1979-2005) of dust transport. We find that our model consistently transports dust further south in the Caribbean then is seen in space-based imagery from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS). This misplacement of the dust plume is also found in our comparisons to in situ surface measurements of dust mass concentration. Our model accurately simulates surface dust mass concentrations in Barbados (South Caribbean), but inaccurately simulates concentrations in Bermuda (Atlantic) and Miami (North Caribbean), particularly in summer months. We suspect that our model is not accurately simulating the lifting processes for dust over Africa, so that the dust is not positioned properly in the vertical to be correctly transported westward within the Saharan Air Layer (SAL) and the African Easterly Jet (AEJ). Here we consider constraints provided by MODIS and TOMS, ground-based sun photometer observations from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), and in situ surface measurements of dust mass concentration to evaluate the location of the dust plume in our model simulations. Further

  11. African dust outbreaks over the Mediterranean Basin during 2001-2011: concentrations, phenomenology and trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pey, Jorge; Querol, Xavier; Alastuey, Andres; Forastiere, Franceso; Stafoggia, Massimo

    2013-04-01

    Concentrations, phenomenology and trends of African dust outbreaks over the whole Mediterranean Basin werestudied on an 11-year period (2001-2011). This work has been performed in the context of the MED-PARTICLES (LIFE programme, EU) project, devoted to quantify short-term health effects of particulate matter over the Mediterranean region by distinguishing different particle sizes, chemical components and sources, with emphasis in the effects of African dust. In order to evaluate conduct this investigation, PM10 data from 19 regional and suburban background sites West to East in the Mediterranean area were compiled. After identifying the daily occurrence of African dust outbreaks, a methodology for estimating natural dust contributions on daily PM10 concentrations was applied. Our findings point out that African dust outbreaks are sensibly more frequent in southern sitesacross the Mediterranean, from 30 to 37 % of the annual days, whereas they occur less than 20% of the annual days in northern sites. The central Mediterranean emerges as a transitional area, with slightly higher frequency of dust episodes in its lower extreme when compared to similar latitudinal positions in western and eastern sides of the Basin. A decreasing south to north gradient of African dust contribution to PM10, driven by the latitudinal position of the monitoring sites at least 25°E westwards across the Basin,is patent across the Mediterranean. From 25°E eastwards, higher annual dust contributions are encountered due to the elevated annual occurrence of severe episodesof dust but also because of inputs from Middle Eastern deserts. Concerning seasonality patterns and intensity characteristics, a clear summer prevalence is observed in the western part, with low occurrence of severe episodes (daily dust averages over 100 µg m-3 in PM10); no seasonal trend is detected in the central region, with moderate-intensity episodes; and significantly higher contributions are common in autumn

  12. Evaluating global atmospheric transport of plutonium with dust aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velarde, R.; Arimoto, R.; Gill, T. E.; Kang, C.; Goodell, P.

    2009-12-01

    The resuspension of soils contaminated with radionuclides from nuclear weapons tests is a mechanism by which plutonium can be re-distributed throughout the environment. To better understand the global atmospheric transport of plutonium, we measured the activity of Pu in aerosol samples from four widely separated sites that receive dust from distant sources in both Asia and Africa. High-volume aerosol samples were collected from Barbados (2005 - 2006); Gosan, South Korea (2005 - 2006); Izaña, Canary Islands (1989 - 1996); and Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii (2005 - 2006) to evaluate the relationship between Pu activity and mineral dust concentrations (using crustal elements such as aluminum as a dust proxy). The activity of 239,240Pu (239Pu + 240Pu) in the aerosol samples was determined by alpha spectrometry following a series of chemical separations. Concentrations of other elements were determined by a variety of techniques. Pu activity was below the detection limit in many samples. In those samples where it was detected, the Gosan site had the highest dust concentrations and highest total plutonium activity, while Mauna Loa Observatory had the lowest dust concentrations and lowest 239,240Pu activity. The Izaña samples had the second highest concentrations of dust and plutonium activity, while Barbados had the third highest levels of both crustal aerosols and plutonium activity. The dust concentrations are consistent with previous observations at these remote sites, and we propose that the plutonium (primarily from past atmospheric nuclear weapons testing, much of which took place in arid lands) was deposited on erodible soil surfaces and subsequently transported as part of the overall mineral dust load. The results of this study have implications for the global transport and fate of Pu through its association with dust, the biogeochemical and environmental impacts of other substances associated with dust, and the workings of the dust cycle itself.

  13. Fungal Spore Concentrations and Ergosterol Content in Aerosol Samples in the Caribbean During African Dust Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Figueroa, G.; Bolaños-Rosero, B.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.

    2015-12-01

    Fungal spores are a major component of primary biogenic aerosol particles that are emitted to the atmosphere, are ubiquitous, and play an important role in the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere, climate, and public health. Every year, during summer months, African dust (AD) particles are transported to the Caribbean region causing an increase in the concentrations of particulate matter in the atmosphere. AD is one of the most important natural sources of mineral particulate matter at the global scale, and many investigations suggest that it has the ability to transport dust-associated biological particles through long distances. The relationship between AD incursions and the concentration of fungal spores in the Caribbean region is poorly understood. In order to investigate the effects of AD incursions on fungal spore's emissions, fungal spore concentrations were monitored using a Burkard spore trap at the tropical montane cloud forest of Pico del Este at El Yunque National Forest, Puerto Rico. The presence of AD was supported with satellite images of aerosol optical thickness, and with the results from the air masses backward trajectories calculated with the NOAA HYSPLIT model. Basidiospores and Ascospores comprised the major components of the total spore's concentrations, up to a maximum of 98%, during both AD incursions and background days. A considerably decrease in the concentration of fungal spores during AD events was observed. Ergosterol, biomarker for measuring fungal biomass, concentrations were determined in aerosols that were sampled at a marine site, Cabezas de San Juan Nature Reserve, in Fajardo Puerto Rico, and at an urban site, Facundo Bueso building at the University of Puerto Rico. Additional efforts to understand the relationship between the arrival of AD to the Caribbean and a decrease in spore's concentrations are needed in order to investigate changes in local spore's vs the contribution of long-range spores transported within the AD.

  14. Sahara's dust transport from Bodele to French Guiana by dust characteristic and Back Trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobinddass, M.; Molinie, J.; Panechou-Pulcherie, K.; Roussas, A.

    2013-12-01

    Desert dust particles present the ability to be transported over far distances and impact large regions of the earth. Back trajectories analysis and ground validations allow us to approach the dust physical characteristics on a large scale. Here we were interested to the Saharan dust transport event in 2010 to the Amazonian Bassin and in particular French Guiana. The dust particles were collected at ground level and have been analyzed by the SEM. First results point out a valley in a central Region of Bodele in the oldest Tchad's Lake. In fact, diatoms (Bacillariophyta) presence and their particular physical aspect seem to correspond to Bodele Lakes. We compared the ground based results and back trajectories to try to determine the exact origin of these aerosols. The Bodele is known as the major source of dust for Amazonian Bassin, however the back trajectories identified don't really show a departure of the dust from this site. A discussion about links between uplift of the dust and the specific settlement in Africa and resuspension of these particles will be drawn. The few sample of diatome obtained in 2010 will be described and an experiment on Bodele site will be proposed to confirm our hypotesis.

  15. DUSTTRAFFIC: Transatlantic Transport and Deposition of Saharan Dust and its Effects on the Marine Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuut, J. B. W.; Guerreiro, C. V.; Munday, C. I.; Brummer, G. J. A.; Korte, L.; Van der Does, M.

    2015-12-01

    Massive amounts of Northwest African dust are transported westward over the Atlantic Ocean towards the Americas each year. These dust particles are thought to feed back on climate through a number of mechanisms including reflection of solar energy at the top of the atmosphere, absorption of energy that was reflected at the Earth's surface in the lower atmosphere, changes of the Earth's albedo, and fertilisation of both terrestrial and marine ecosystems. We are monitoring Saharan dust transport and deposition using an array of instruments that was deployed along a transect between Northwest Africa and the Caribbean at 12°N. In October 2012, we deployed five moorings along this transect between 23°W and 57°W with sediment traps that collect all material settling down through the water column on a temporal resolution of about two weeks. In November 2013, we added three dust-collecting buoys to the transect. The instruments on these buoys filter air to collect the dust particles that are suspended in the air just above sea level. In January 2015, the instruments were recovered and re-deployed for the third time, so that two years of sampling can help us understand the temporal and spatial variability of Saharan-dust deposition and its marine environmental effects. In this presentation, we will introduce the projects in the framework of which this study is carried out, and present preliminary data on grain-size trends as well as marine-environmental observations. See: www.nioz.nl/dust

  16. Dust resuspension as a contaminant source and transport pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Loosmore, G.A,; Hunt, J.R.

    1999-07-01

    Numerous environmental contaminants sorb to dust particles or exist as particles, including metals, hydrophobic organic compounds, asbestos, pollens, and microbial pathogens. Wind resuspension of dust and other particulate matter provides a dust source for the atmosphere and a contaminant transport pathway. Not only do these materials pose a risk to human health, but also, resuspended dust particles are believed to play a role in global climate change and chemical reactions in the atmosphere. The conditions under which contaminated sites are vulnerable to wind resuspension are not generally known, as the basic physics of the problem are poorly understood. Field data show tremendous variability. Conventional dust flux models assume that dust resuspension occurs only for high winds and then only temporarily, with a transient dust flux occurring only when the bed is first exposed to the high wind. The surface is then assumed to stabilize such that no further dust moves until the surface is disturbed or a higher wind occurs. Recent wind tunnel experiments demonstrate that surfaces yield continuous steady dust fluxes under steady wind conditions well beyond the initial high transient flux, even when no erosion is visible and the velocity is below the predicted threshold velocity for movement. This average steady-state dust flux increases with average wind speed. Ongoing work is investigating the influence of air relative humidity on these processes. Contaminant resuspension models capture trends only and fail to predict sporadic high flux events that may control doses. Successful modeling of contaminant resuspension will depend on development of better dust flux predictions. Risk analyses require better predictive modeling, necessitating a deeper understanding of the underlying phenomena.

  17. Evaluation of coral pathogen growth rates after exposure to atmospheric African dust samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lisle, John T.; Garrison, Virginia H.; Gray, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to assess if exposure to atmospheric African dust stimulates or inhibits the growth of four putative bacterial coral pathogens. Atmospheric dust was collected from a dust-source region (Mali, West Africa) and from Saharan Air Layer masses over downwind sites in the Caribbean [Trinidad and Tobago and St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI)]. Extracts of dust samples were used to dose laboratory-grown cultures of four putative coral pathogens: Aurantimonas coralicida (white plague type II), Serratia marcescens (white pox), Vibrio coralliilyticus, and V. shiloi (bacteria-induced bleaching). Growth of A. coralicida and V. shiloi was slightly stimulated by dust extracts from Mali and USVI, respectively, but unaffected by extracts from the other dust sources. Lag time to the start of log-growth phase was significantly shortened for A. coralicida when dosed with dust extracts from Mali and USVI. Growth of S. marcescens and V. coralliilyticus was neither stimulated nor inhibited by any of the dust extracts. This study demonstrates that constituents from atmospheric dust can alter growth of recognized coral disease pathogens under laboratory conditions.

  18. What is driving changes in long-range transport of dust from Africa to the Americas? A 30 year synthesis of the GEOS-Chem model and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridley, D. A.; Heald, C. L.

    2012-12-01

    The Sahara and Sahelian regions produce approximately half of the world's dust emissions, resulting in significant radiative effects, air quality issues and mineral deposition, not only in Africa, but across the Atlantic and in the Americas. Determining how these impacts may change in the future requires a thorough understanding of the processes controlling emission, transport and deposition of dust. Long-term records of dust concentration measured in the Caribbean have, until the nineties, correlated with Sahelian precipitation and climatic indicators, potentially providing ways to predict changes in dust. However, this relationship is no longer clear and there are significant changes in the seasonality of dust transported to the Americas currently with no obvious explanation. We use the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model with NASA GMAO meteorological re-analyses (MERRA) to simulate the 30 year period 1979 - 2008. A synthesis of observations from multiple satellite and surface-based platforms is used to evaluate the model, primarily in terms of its ability to simulate the long-range transport of mineral dust from Africa. We then investigate what drives the changes in long-range transport of African dust to the Americas over diurnal to decadal timescales. This enables understanding of the relative importance of the individual processes controlling these changes, and the sensitivity of air quality and dust deposition downwind. This work aims to determine 1) how sensitive air quality and dust deposition in the Americas is to changes in African dust emissions, 2) the role of meteorological variables affecting the inter-annual variability of dust emission and deposition, and 3) the impact that land use changes and desertification in the Sahel may have in terms of the influence on dust transported to the Americas.

  19. Composite analysis of dust impacts on African easterly waves in the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jury, Mark R.; Santiago, Myrna J.

    2010-08-01

    This study examines the synoptic scale impacts of African dust on easterly waves in the tropical northeast Atlantic. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer aerosol optical depth (AOD), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration products, and National Center for Environmental Prediction reanalysis fields in the Atlantic main hurricane development region (MDR) form the basis for statistical analysis of a limited set of cases objectively selected for the 2000-2008 hurricane seasons when thresholds are exceeded for sea surface temperature (SST), easterly wind shear, cyclonic vorticity, and upward motion. After ranking African easterly waves by AOD, the top (dusty) and bottom (clean) cases are studied as composite differences. African dust and subsidence cause temperatures to warm ˜3°C in the 700 hPa layer, while SSTs cause temperatures to cool, stabilizing the atmosphere. Increased AOD and strong (10 m s-1) 600 hPa easterly winds limit cloud efficiency through shear and oversupply of condensation nuclei. Vertical section composites demonstrate that warm dry subsident air coincides with the African dust plume in the latitudes 18°N-30°N. Hurricane reanalysis data indicate that higher AOD in the MDR reduces chances for the intensification of African easterly waves.

  20. Radiative Effect of Saharan Mineral Dust on the Nonlinear Dynamics of African Easterly Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grogan, D.; Nathan, T. R.; Chen, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    The radiative effects of Saharan mineral dust aerosols on the nonlinear dynamics of African easterly waves (AEWs) are examined using the Weather Research and Forecasting Dust (WRFD) model. The WRFD model is governed by the Advanced Research WRF dynamical core, and continuity equations for twelve dust particle sizes that represent the spectrum of mineral dust aerosols observed in the atmosphere. To incorporate dust radiative effects in the model, aerosol optical properties (i.e. optical depth, single scattering albedo, and asymmetric parameters) for all dust sizes are inputted into the shortwave and longwave radiation schemes. By choosing zonal-mean distributions of zonal wind and temperature that are consistent with summer over Northwest Africa, idealized dry simulations explore the nonlinear behavior of AEWs in the presence of dust. The initial zonal-mean dust fields are represented as simple distributions that vary in structure and concentration, which are consistent with observed dust events over Africa. Specific AEW features investigated in the simulations include the evolution of wave energy, Eliassen-Palm fluxes, and spatial structures. Among the questions to be addressed are the following: How does the concentration and spatial distribution of the dust field affect the strength and timing of AEW amplitude saturation? What impact will the dust induced wave fluxes have on the horizontal or vertical shear of the zonal-mean AEJ? Does the interaction between the AEJ, AEW and dust affect the timing and location of the AEW trough, and thus the formation of critical latitudes? Answers to these questions will aid in the understanding and forecasting of AEWs, and their possible subsequent development into tropical storms.

  1. A Theoretical Framework for Understanding the Effects of Saharan Mineral Dust Aerosols on African Easterly Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathan, T. R.; Grogan, D.; Chen, S.

    2013-12-01

    Studies have shown that a large fraction of the intense hurricanes observed over the Atlantic Ocean originate as African easterly waves (AEWs). Of the many processes that affect the propagation, growth and structure of AEWs, the effects of Saharan mineral dust aerosols on AEWs remains an outstanding scientific problem. With this in mind, a new theoretical framework is presented that illuminates causal relationships between Saharan dust and the linear dynamics of AEWs. The framework is built on a quasi-geostrophic system governed by coupled equations for potential vorticity, temperature, and dust continuity. The radiative-dust heating rate accounts for both shortwave and longwave radiative transfer. The source of dust is due to surface emission, which depends on surface wind; the sinks of dust are due to sedimentation and dry deposition. A perturbation analysis yields analytical expressions for the propagation and growth characteristics of the model's AEWs. These expressions are functions of vertically and meridionally averaged wave activity, which depends on wave spatial structure, dust-radiative heating, and the background distributions of wind, temperature, and dust mixing ratio. More specifically, the propagation and growth of the AEWs depend on the amount of dust lofted from the surface by the wind, and the meridional and vertical gradients of the basic state dust distribution, which are modulated by the Doppler-shifted frequency. Idealized cases are presented that show the effects of Saharan dust on the propagation, group velocity, growth, structure, and wave fluxes of AEWs. The clarity of the expressions connecting dust aerosols to the linear properties of AEWs provides an important interpretive tool for analyzing results obtained from comprehensive model simulations of AEWs, such as those produced by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model.

  2. Fertilizing the Amazon and equatorial Atlantic with West African dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, Charlie S.; Hudson-Edwards, Karen A.; Chappell, Adrian

    2010-07-01

    Atmospheric mineral dust plays a vital role in Earth's climate and biogeochemical cycles. The Bodélé Depression in Chad has been identified as the single biggest source of atmospheric mineral dust on Earth. Dust eroded from the Bodélé is blown across the Atlantic Ocean towards South America. The mineral dust contains micronutrients such as Fe and P that have the potential to act as a fertilizer, increasing primary productivity in the Amazon rain forest as well as the equatorial Atlantic Ocean, and thus leading to N2 fixation and CO2 drawdown. We present the results of chemical analysis of 28 dust samples collected from the source area, which indicate that up to 6.5 Tg of Fe and 0.12 Tg of P are exported from the Bodélé Depression every year. This suggests that the Bodélé may be a more significant micronutrient supplier than previously proposed.

  3. Synoptic-scale dust transport events in the southern Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchi, R.; Cristofanelli, P.; Marinoni, A.; Bourcier, L.; Laj, P.; Calzolari, F.; Adhikary, B.; Verza, G. P.; Vuillermoz, E.; Bonasoni, P.

    2014-06-01

    The variability of long-range dust transport events observed in the southern Himalaya and its relation with source areas have been studied thanks to five years’ continuous measurements which were carried out at the “Nepal Climate Observatory-Pyramid” (NCO-P, 27°57‧N, 86°48‧E), the highest Northern Hemisphere GAW-WMO global station sited at 5079 m a.s.l. in the high Khumbu valley (Nepal) on the southern Himalaya. During the period March 2006-February 2011, the analyses of the aerosol particle concentrations and LAGRANTO three-dimensional backward trajectories indicated the occurrence of 275 days affected by synoptic-scale dust transport, which account for 22.2% of the investigated period. The frequency of dust transport days (DTDs) showed a clear seasonal cycle, with the highest seasonal value observed during pre-monsoon season (33.5% of the pre-monsoon’s days are DTDs). Large enhancements in coarse aerosol number concentration N1-10 (average: +689%) and mass PM1-10 (average: +1086%) were observed during the dust transport events as compared to the days without dust (dust-free days, DFDs). In addition, the single scattering albedo (SSA) also showed higher values, ranging from 0.87 to 0.90, during DTDs with respect to DFDs (0.80-0.87). The predominant source of mineral dust reaching the measurement site was identified in the arid regions of the north-western Indian subcontinent (Thar desert), which accounted for 41.6% of the trajectories points associated with DTDs. Seasonal analysis also indicated that the winter season was significantly influenced by far western desert regions, such as North Africa and the Arabic Peninsula.

  4. A rock-magnetic study of coral skeletons: A record of African dust deposition in the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigro, P. M.; Clement, B. M.; Halley, R.; Helmle, K.; Swart, P.; Dodge, R.

    2008-05-01

    Aeolian African dust from the Saharan-Sahel deserts significantly influences the climate and ecology of the Caribbean region. Large summer dust storms produce mass quantities of air-born, clay-rich material (containing significant iron-oxide components), that are transported over the Atlantic Ocean and deposited in the Caribbean. We present here the results of a rock magnetic study of cores of Scleractinian corals, including a Montastraea annularis collected in Culebra, Puerto Rico on July of 1991, a M. faveolata collected off the coast of St. Vincent (Bequia) on November of 2002, and a Siderastrea radians collected off the coast of Cape Verde on July of 2002. Thin slabs (~5mm) were cut from these cores and x-rayed to reveal annual density banding. Small samples centered over each annual high-density band were cut from the slabs. These samples were then subjected to a series of standard rock magnetic experiments, including Anhysteretic Remanent Magnetization (ARM) acquisition and demagnetization, and Isothermal Remanent Magnetization (IRM) acquisition and demagnetization. Records of both ARMs and IRMs reveal coherent signals that vary with coral age. The IRM acquisition curves demonstrate the presence of two carriers of magnetization in most samples; a low-coercivity component consistent with the presence of magnetite or maghemite and a high-coercivity component consistent with the presence of hematite. Unmixing the IRM acquisition curves differentiates the magnetic components and yields a record of high-coercivity input that we interpret as a record of African dust. Preliminary data from the M. annularis core show a link between high and low variability in the high-coercivity component when compared with the historical record of dust flux to the Caribbean and with the Soudano-Sahel Precipitation Index (SSPI) over a time period of fifty years (1941-1990). High variability is displayed from 1941 through 1950 and 1965 through 1990 whereas low variability is displayed

  5. Geochemical and isotopic characterization of the Bodélé Depression dust source and implications for transatlantic dust transport to the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouchami, Wafa; Näthe, Kerstin; Kumar, Ashwini; Galer, Stephen J. G.; Jochum, Klaus Peter; Williams, Earle; Horbe, Adriana M. C.; Rosa, João W. C.; Balsam, William; Adams, David; Mezger, Klaus; Andreae, Meinrat O.

    2013-10-01

    The Bodélé Depression (Chad) in the central Sahara/Sahel region of Northern Africa is the most important source of mineral dust to the atmosphere globally. The Bodélé Depression is purportedly the largest source of Saharan dust reaching the Amazon Basin by transatlantic transport. Here, we have undertaken a comprehensive study of surface sediments from the Bodélé Depression and dust deposits (Chad, Niger) in order to characterize geochemically and isotopically (Sr, Nd and Pb isotopes) this dust source, and evaluate its importance in present and past African dust records. We similarly analyzed sedimentary deposits from the Amazonian lowlands in order to assess postulated accumulation of African mineral dust in the Amazon Basin, as well as its possible impact in fertilizing the Amazon rainforest. Our results identify distinct sources of different ages and provenance in the Bodélé Depression versus the Amazon Basin, effectively ruling out an origin for the Amazonian deposits, such as the Belterra Clay Layer, by long-term deposition of Bodélé Depression material. Similarly, no evidence for contributions from other potential source areas is provided by existing isotope data (Sr, Nd) on Saharan dusts. Instead, the composition of these Amazonian deposits is entirely consistent with derivation from in-situ weathering and erosion of the Precambrian Amazonian craton, with little, if any, Andean contribution. In the Amazon Basin, the mass accumulation rate of eolian dust is only around one-third of the vertical erosion rate in shield areas, suggesting that Saharan dust is "consumed" by tropical weathering, contributing nutrients and stimulating plant growth, but never accumulates as such in the Amazon Basin. The chemical and isotope compositions found in the Bodélé Depression are varied at the local scale, and have contrasting signatures in the "silica-rich" dry lake-bed sediments and in the "calcium-rich" mixed diatomites and surrounding sand material. This

  6. Aerobiology and the global transport of desert dust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kellogg, Christina A.; Griffin, Dale W.

    2006-01-01

    Desert winds aerosolize several billion tons of soil-derived dust each year, including concentrated seasonal pulses from Africa and Asia. These transoceanic and transcontinental dust events inject a large pulse of microorganisms and pollen into the atmosphere and could therefore have a role in transporting pathogens or expanding the biogeographical range of some organisms by facilitating long-distance dispersal events. As we discuss here, whether such dispersal events are occurring is only now beginning to be investigated. Huge dust events create an atmospheric bridge over land and sea, and the microbiota contained within them could impact downwind ecosystems. Such dispersal is of interest because of the possible health effects of allergens and pathogens that might be carried with the dust.

  7. Dust charging and transport on airless planetary bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Schwan, J.; Hsu, H.-W.; Grün, E.; Horányi, M.

    2016-06-01

    We report on laboratory experiments to shed light on dust charging and transport that have been suggested to explain a variety of unusual phenomena on the surfaces of airless planetary bodies. We have recorded micron-sized insulating dust particles jumping to several centimeters high with an initial speed of ~0.6 m/s under ultraviolet illumination or exposure to plasmas, resulting in an equivalent height of ~0.11 m on the lunar surface that is comparable to the height of the so-called lunar horizon glow. Lofted large aggregates and surface mobilization are related to many space observations. We experimentally show that the emission and re-absorption of photoelectron and/or secondary electron at the walls of microcavities formed between neighboring dust particles below the surface are responsible for generating unexpectedly large negative charges and intense particle-particle repulsive forces to mobilize and lift off dust particles.

  8. Lunar dust transport by photoelectric charging at sunset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelizzari, M. A.; Criswell, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    The motion of dust grains from a photoelectrically charged object at the moon's sunset terminator is studied with the aid of a simple model. It is shown that sunlit objects ranging in size from less than 0.01 cm to 5 cm in radius are responsible for the levitation of dust grains to heights of observed horizon glow. The transverse displacement of these grains is observed to be at least twice their maximum altitude, so that fitting the latter to horizon glow implies horizontal particle ranges typically 6 to 60 cm. Detachment of these grains from the sunlit areas takes place mainly along the contracting sunlight boundaries as the areas shrink during sunset. A high ratio of intergrain adhesion force to dust-grain weight is essential for the occurrence of horizon glow and significant dust transport from the subcentimeter sized sunlit areas.

  9. Saharan dust long-range transport across the Atlantic studied by an airborne Doppler wind lidar and the MACC model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouza, Fernando; Reitebuch, Oliver; Benedetti, Angela; Weinzierl, Bernadett

    2016-09-01

    A huge amount of dust is transported every year from north Africa into the Caribbean region. This paper presents an investigation of this long-range transport process based on airborne Doppler wind lidar (DWL) measurements conducted during the SALTRACE campaign (June-July 2013), as well as an evaluation of the ability of the MACC (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate) global aerosol model to reproduce it and its associated features. Although both the modeled winds from MACC and the measurements from the DWL show a generally good agreement, some differences, particularly in the African easterly jet (AEJ) intensity, were noted. The observed differences between modeled and measured wind jet speeds are between 5 and 10 m s-1. The vertical aerosol distribution within the Saharan dust plume and the marine boundary layer is investigated during the June-July 2013 period based on the MACC aerosol model results and the CALIOP satellite lidar measurements. While the modeled Saharan dust plume extent shows a good agreement with the measurements, a systematic underestimation of the marine boundary layer extinction is observed. Additionally, three selected case studies covering different aspects of the Saharan dust long-range transport along the west African coast, over the North Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean are presented. For the first time, DWL measurements are used to investigate the Saharan dust long-range transport. Simultaneous wind and backscatter measurements from the DWL are used, in combination with the MACC model, to analyze different features associated with the long-range transport, including an African easterly wave trough, the AEJ and the intertropical convergence zone.

  10. A radiogenic isotope tracer study of transatlantic dust transport from Africa to the Caribbean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kumar, A.; Abouchami, W.; Galer, S.J.G.; Garrison, V.H.; Williams, E.; Andreae, M.O.

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have suggested that long-range transport of African desert dusts across the Atlantic Ocean occurs, delivering key nutrients and contributing to fertilization of the Amazon rainforest. Here we utilize radiogenic isotope tracers – Sr, Nd and Pb – to derive the provenance, local or remote, and pathways of dust transport from Africa to the Caribbean. Atmospheric total suspended particulate (TSP) matter was collected in 2008 on quartz fibre filters, from both sides of the Atlantic Ocean at three different locations: in Mali (12.6°N, 8.0°W; 555 m a.s.l.), Tobago (11.3°N, 60.5°W; 329 m a.s.l.) and the U.S. Virgin Islands (17.7°N, 64.6°W; 27 m a.s.l.). Both the labile phase, representative of the anthropogenic signal, and the refractory detrital silicate fraction were analysed. Dust deposits and soils from around the sampling sites were measured as well to assess the potential contribution from local sources to the mineral dust collected. The contribution from anthropogenic sources of Pb was predominant in the labile, leachate phase. The overall similarity in Pb isotope signatures found in the leachates is attributed to a common African source of anthropogenic Pb, with minor inputs from other sources, such as from Central and South America. The Pb, Sr and Nd isotopic compositions in the silicate fraction were found to be systematically more radiogenic than those in the corresponding labile phases. In contrast, Nd and Sr isotopic compositions from Mali, Tobago, and the Virgin Islands are virtually identical in both leachates and residues. Comparison with existing literature data on Saharan and Sahelian sources constrains the origin of summer dust transported to the Caribbean to mainly originate from the Sahel region, with some contribution from northern Saharan sources. The source regions derived from the isotope data are consistent with 7-day back-trajectory analyses, demonstrating the usefulness of radiogenic isotopes in tracing dust provenance and

  11. Trans-Pacific transport of Saharan dust to western North America: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKendry, Ian G.; Strawbridge, Kevin B.; O'Neill, Norman T.; MacDonald, Anne Marie; Liu, Peter S. K.; Leaitch, W. Richard; Anlauf, Kurt G.; Jaegle, Lyatt; Fairlie, T. Duncan; Westphal, Douglas L.

    2007-01-01

    The first documented case of long-range transport of Saharan dust over a pathway spanning Asia and the Pacific to western North America is described. Crustal material generated by North African dust storms during the period 28 February to 3 March 2005 reached western Canada on 13-14 March 2005 and was observed by lidar and sunphotometer in the Vancouver region and by high-altitude aerosol instrumentation at Whistler Peak. Global chemical models (GEOS-Chem and NRL NAAPS) confirm the transport pathway and suggest source attribution was simplified in this case by the distinct, and somewhat unusual, lack of dust activity over Eurasia (Gobi and Takla Makan deserts) at this time. Over western North America the dust layer, although subsiding close to the boundary layer, did not appear to contribute to boundary layer particulate matter concentrations. Furthermore, sunphotometer observations (and associated inversion products) suggest that the dust layer had only subtle optical impact (aerosol optical thickness (τa500) and Ångström exponent (α440-870) were 0.1 and 1.2, respectively) and was dominated by fine particulate matter (modes in aerodynamic diameter at 0.3 and 2.5 μm). High-altitude observations at Whistler, British Columbia, confirm the crustal origin of the layer (rich in Ca++ ions) and the bimodal size distribution. Although a weak event compared to the Asian trans-Pacific dust events of 1998 and 2001, this novel case highlights the possibility that Saharan sources may contribute episodically to the aerosol burden in western North America.

  12. Trans-Pacific Transport of Saharan Dust to Western North America: A Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendry, Ian G. M.; Strawbridge, Kevin B.; O'Neill, Norman; Macdonald, Anne Marie; Liu, Peter S. K.; Leaitch, W. Richard; Anlauf, Kurt G.; Jaegle, Lyatt; Fairlie, T. Duncan; Westphal, Douglas L.

    2007-01-01

    The first documented case of long range transport of Saharan dust over a pathway spanning Asia and the Pacific to Western North America is described. Crustal material generated by North African dust storms during the period 28 February - 3 March 2005 reached western Canada on 13-14 March 2005 and was observed by lidar and sunphotometer in the Vancouver region and by high altitude aerosol instrumentation at Whistler Peak. Global chemical models (GEOS-CHEM and NRL NAAPS) confirm the transport pathway and suggest source attribution was simplified in this case by the distinct, and somewhat unusual, lack of dust activity over Eurasia (Gobi and Takla Makan deserts) at this time. Over western North America, the dust layer, although subsiding close to the boundary layer, did not appear to contribute to boundary layer particulate matter concentrations. Furthermore, sunphotometer observations (and associated inversion products) suggest that the dust layer had only subtle optical impact (Aerosol Optical Thickness (Tau(sub a500)) and Angstrom exponent (Alpha(sub 440-870) were 0.1 and 1.2 respectively) and was dominated by fine particulate matter (modes in aerodynamic diameter at 0.3 and 2.5microns). High Altitude observations at Whistler BC, confirm the crustal origin of the layer (rich in Ca(++) ions) and the bi-modal size distribution. Although a weak event compared to the Asian Trans-Pacific dust events of 1998 and 2001, this novel case highlights the possibility that Saharan sources may contribute episodically to the aerosol burden in western North America.

  13. Geochemical Fingerprinting of Trans-Atlantic African Dust Based on Radiogenic Sr-Nd-Hf Isotopes and Rare Earth Element Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourmand, Ali; Prospero, Joseph; Sharifi, Arash

    2015-04-01

    Mineral dust is an important component of Earth's climate system and biogeochemical cycles on a global scale. In order to understand the relationship between climate processes in the source areas and the properties of aerosols at distant receptor sites, we must be able to identify the source provenance of dust. Here we present a multiproxy study that characterizes the temporal variability in the geochemical composition of long-range African dust (LRAD) collected between 2003 and 2011 in the trade winds on the Caribbean island of Barbados. We find systematic differences between Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic composition and rare earth element anomalies of individual dust events and evidence of seasonal shifts in dust source activity and transport. These results indicate that coherent geochemical source signatures of LRAD can be preserved even after transport across thousands of kilometers. We investigated the possibility of identifying the potential source areas through comparisons with literature data. However, these data are almost entirely based on measurements of soil and sediment samples; this could lead to biases because of soil-aerosol particle size and composition differences. Nonetheless, our data suggest that many samples are linked to sources in Mali and sub-Saharan regions. Radiogenic Nd-Hf composition of aerosols can potentially be a useful proxy to study the proximity of mineral dust sources to depositional sites. In order to establish firmer links between LRAD and dust source areas, however, we require much more data on the geochemical composition of aerosols from potential source areas in North Africa.

  14. Geochemical Fingerprinting of Trans-Atlantic African Dust Based on Radiogenic Sr-Nd-Hf Isotopes and Rare Earth Element Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourmand, A.; Prospero, J. M.; Sharifi, A.

    2014-12-01

    Mineral dust is an important component of Earth's climate system and biogeochemical cycles on a global scale. In order to understand the relationship between climate processes in the source areas and the properties of aerosols at distant receptor sites, we must be able to identify the source provenance of dust. Here we present a multiproxy study that characterizes the temporal variability in the geochemical composition of long-range African dust (LRAD) collected between 2003 and 2011 in the trade winds on the Caribbean island of Barbados. We find systematic differences between Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic composition and rare earth element anomalies of individual dust events and evidence of seasonal shifts in dust source activity and transport. These results indicate that coherent geochemical source signatures of LRAD can be preserved even after transport across thousands of kilometers. We investigated the possibility of identifying the potential source areas through comparisons with literature data. However, these data are almost entirely based on measurements of soil and sediment samples; this could lead to biases because of soil-aerosol particle size and composition differences. Nonetheless, our data suggest that many samples are linked to sources in Mali and sub-Saharan regions. Radiogenic Nd-Hf composition of aerosols can potentially be a useful proxy to study the proximity of mineral dust sources to depositional sites. In order to establish firmer links between LRAD and dust source areas, however, we require much more data on the geochemical composition of aerosols from potential source areas in North Africa.

  15. Electrostatic dust transport on the surfaces of airless bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Schwan, J.; Hsu, H. W.; Horanyi, M.

    2015-12-01

    The surfaces of airless bodies are charged due to the exposure to solar wind plasma and UV radiation. Dust particles on the regolith of these surfaces can become charged, and may move and even get lofted due to electrostatic force. Electrostatic dust transport has been a long-standing problem that may be related to many observed phenomena on the surfaces of airless planetary bodies, including the lunar horizon glow, the dust ponds on asteroid Eros, the spokes in Saturn's rings, and more recently, the collection of dust particles ejected off Comet 67P, observed by Rosetta. In order to resolve these puzzles, a handful of laboratory experiments have been performed in the past and demonstrated that dust indeed moves and lifts from surfaces exposed to plasma. However, the exact mechanisms for the mobilization of dust particles still remain a mystery. Current charging models, including the so-called "shared charge model" and the charge fluctuation theory, will be discussed. It is found that neither of these models can explain the results from either laboratory experiments or in-situ observations. Recently, single dust trajectories were captured with our new dust experiments, enabling novel micro-scale investigations. The particles' initial launch speeds and size distributions are analyzed, and a new so-called "patched charge model" is proposed to explain our findings. We identify the role of plasma micro-cavities that are formed in-between neighboring dust particles. The emitted secondary or photo- electrons are proposed to be absorbed inside the micro-cavities, resulting in significant charge accumulation on the exposed patches of the surfaces of neighboring particles. The resulting enhanced Coulomb force (repulsion) between particles is likely the dominant force to mobilize and lift them off the surface. The role of other properties, including surface morphology, cohesion and photoelectron charging, will also be discussed.

  16. The Relationship between Aerosol Composition and Concentration and Visual Range on Barbados, West Indies: The Impact of African Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Prospero, J.; Zhang, C.; Arimoto, R.

    2006-12-01

    concentrations suggests that VR records could be used to develop a proxy record of African dust transport to the western Atlantic. Unfortunately as yet we have not been able to find a suitable VR record that could be used for this purpose.

  17. The Fertilizing Role of African Dust in the Amazon Rainforest. A First Multiyear Assessment Based on Data from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hongbin; Chin, Mian; Yuan, Tianle; Bian, Huisheng; Remer, L. A.; Prospero, J.; Omar, Ali; Winker, D.; Yang, Yuekui; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Zhibo; Zhao, Chun

    2015-03-18

    The productivity of the Amazon rainforest is constrained by the availability of nutrients, in particular phosphorus (P). Deposition of long-range transported African dust is recognized as a potentially important but poorly quantified source of phosphorus. This study provides a first multiyear satellite-based estimate of dust deposition into the Amazon Basin using three dimensional (3D) aerosol measurements over 2007-2013 from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). The 7-year average of dust deposition into the Amazon Basin is estimated to be 28 (8~48) Tg a-1 or 29 (8~50) kg ha-1 a-1. The dust deposition shows significant interannual variation that is negatively correlated with the prior-year rainfall in the Sahel. The CALIOP-based multi-year mean estimate of dust deposition matches better with estimates from in-situ measurements and model simulations than a previous satellite-based estimate does. The closer agreement benefits from a more realistic geographic definition of the Amazon Basin and inclusion of meridional dust transport calculation in addition to the 3D nature of CALIOP aerosol measurements. The imported dust could provide about 0.022 (0.006~0.037) Tg P of phosphorus per year, equivalent to 23 (7~39) g P ha-1 a-1 to fertilize the Amazon rainforest. This out-of-Basin P input is comparable to the hydrological loss of P from the Basin, suggesting an important role of African dust in preventing phosphorus depletion on time scales of decades to centuries.

  18. Increasing trend of African dust, over 49 years, in the eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganor, Eliezer; Osetinsky, Isabella; Stupp, Amnon; Alpert, Pinhas

    2010-04-01

    Dust observations in Israel were carried out since 1958. During 1958-2006, 966 dust days were observed. The dust days have been analyzed through their association with the regional eastern Mediterranean synoptic types, as classified by the Tel Aviv University method. Among the synoptic types, the most contributing were winter lows (with 368 days), Red Sea Troughs (214 days), and highs (211 dust days). Association of dust with highs is a new result, not found in the literature to date. Out of the total occurrences of Sharav lows, 36% are associated with dust, out of total winter lows 13%, with a winter low south to Cyprus having a 30% probability to produce a dust day, and of Red Sea Trough days 6% were associated with dust. Annual occurrence of dust days follows the changes in the occurrence of the regional synoptic systems: the number of dust days associated with Red Sea Troughs has increased by 2.3 d/10 yr, and with highs by 0.9 d/10 yr. The total incidence of dust days has increased with an average rate of 2.7 days per decade. This increasing trend in dust storm occurrence fits with previous results for the eastern Mediterranean and south Europe. Since dust storms are a regional phenomenon and reach south, central, and western Europe, this increase has implications for the entire Mediterranean and European regions. The results show potential for statistical forecasting of dust 1 day in advance. Such forecasts are important for public health warnings and for air transportation.

  19. The Mid-Holocene West African Monsoon strength modulated by Saharan dust and vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pausata, F. S. R.; Messori, G.; Zhang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    The West African Monsoon (WAM) is crucial for the socio-economic stability of millions of people living in the Sahel. Severe droughts have ravaged the region in the last three decades of the 20th century, highlighting the need for a better understanding of the WAM dynamics. One of the most dramatic changes in the WAM occurred between 15,000-5,000 years BP, when increased summer precipitation led to the so-called "Green Sahara" and to a reduction in dust emissions from the region. Previous studies have shown that variations in vegetation and soil type can have major impacts on precipitation. However, model simulations are still unable to fully reproduce the intensification and geographical expansion of the African monsoon during that period, even when vegetation over the Sahara is simulated. Here, we use a fully coupled simulation for 6000 years BP in which prescribed Saharan vegetation and dust concentrations are changed in turn. A close agreement with proxy records is obtained only when both Saharan vegetation and dust decrease are taken into account (Fig. 1). The dust reduction extends the monsoon's northern limit further than the vegetation-change case only (Fig. 2), by strengthening vegetation-albedo feedbacks and driving a deeper Saharan Heat Low. The dust reduction under vegetated Sahara conditions leads to a northward shift of the WAM extension that is about twice as large as the shift due to the changes in orbital forcing alone. We therefore conclude that accounting for changes in Saharan dust loadings is essential for improving model simulations of the MH WAM. The role of dust is also relevant when looking into the future, since Saharan dust emission may decrease owing to both direct and indirect anthropogenic impacts on land cover.

  20. On the cause of the correlation between West African dust outbreaks and Sahelian rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evan, A. T.; Flamant, C.

    2014-12-01

    A large body of work has shown, using both in-situ data and remote sensing products, that there is a negative correlation between Sahelian rainfall and African dust outbreaks that traverse the tropical Atlantic. One theory for this relationship is that drying out of the Sahel results in the activation of new dust sources. However, there is no direct evidence to support this theory, nor has any modeling study conclusively shown this to be the case. Another theory is that changes in the regional circulation associated with wet and dry periods of the Sahel results in this inverse proportionality between dust and rainfall. A new modeling study has provided compelling evidence to show that this latter theory may be closer to the truth. Here we show that the recent trends in dust from western Africa can be explained by examining changes in surface winds over source regions near the Air, Adrar, and Ouaddai mountains, and the Bodélé depression. Our analysis shows that the recent trends in dust are due to a slow down of the surface winds over the Air and Adrar source regions, and that this is a result of the simultaneous intensification of the low-level circulation of the Sahara Heat Low. Thus, coupling of Sahel rainfall and the Sahara Heat Low results in the correlation between dust and Sahel drought. Furthermore, we estimate future changes in dust from climate models via analysis of modeled changes in wind speeds over these regions. We find that one model in the Fifth Phase Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, the GFDL-CM3, accurately represents historical changes in wind speeds over these key source regions, and that in future scenarios this model shows a large and statistically significant increase in surface windspeeds over the Bodélé, suggesting an increase in African dust emission throughout the 21st Century.

  1. Quiescence of Asian dust events in South Korea and Japan during 2012 spring: Dust outbreaks and transports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yun Gon; Ho, Chang-Hoi; Kim, Joo-Hong; Kim, Jhoon

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the quiescence of Asian dust events in South Korea and Japan during the spring of 2012, presenting a synoptic characterization and suggesting possible causes. Synoptic observation reports from the two countries confirmed that spring 2012 had the lowest number of dust events in 2000-2012. The monthly dust frequency (DF) in March 2012 over the dust source regions, i.e., deserts in northern China and Mongolia, indicated a significant decrease compared to the 12 year (2000-2011) March climatology. The DF in April 2012 was comparable to the 12 year climatology values, but in May 2012 it was slightly lower. The daily Ozone Monitoring Instrument Aerosol Index and the Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System simulations revealed stagnant dust movement in March and May 2012. Anomalous anticyclones north of the source regions decreased the dust outbreaks and enhanced the southeasterly winds, resulting in few dust events over the downwind countries (i.e., South Korea and Japan). By contrast, in April 2012, a strong anomalous cyclone east of Lake Baikal slightly increased the dust outbreaks over northeastern China. However, the major dust outbreaks were not transported downwind because of exceptional dust pathways, i.e., the southeastward pathway of dust transport was unusually blocked by the expansion of an anomalous anticyclonic circulation over the Sea of Okhotsk, with dust being transported northeast.

  2. Lidar and sunphotometry observations on the long-range transport of smoke and dust events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strawbridge, K. B.; Thulasiraman, S.; O'Neill, N. T.; McKendry, I. G.

    2006-09-01

    The remote sensing techniques of Lidar and Sunphotometry are well suited for understanding the optical characteristics of aerosol layers aloft. Lidar has the ability to detect the complex vertical structure of the atmosphere and can therefore identify the existence and extent of aerosols that have undergone long-range transport. Inversion techniques applied to Sunphotometry data can extract information about the aerosol fine and coarse modes. As part of the REALM network (Regional East Atmospheric Lidar Mesonet), routine measurements are made with a vertically-pointing lidar at the Centre For Atmospheric Research Experiments (CARE). In addition, a CIMEL sunphotometer resides at CARE (part of AERONET) yielding an opportunity to achieve an optical climatology of aerosol activity over the site. Environment Canada's mobile lidar facility called RASCAL (Rapid Acqusition SCanning Aerosol Lidar), operating in zenith mode only, was also deployed to Western Canada during the months of March and April, 2005 to provide an opportunity to measure the long-range transport of trans-Pacific pollutants that impact the coastal areas of British Columbia frequently. During that time a long-range transport event was observed on 13-14 of March 2005. Further analysis has shown the event originated from North African dust storms during the period 28 February to 3 March. The optical coherency of these active and passive remote sensors will be presented, along with other supporting observations, for forest fire smoke plumes transported over CARE (in 2003) and the first documented case of Saharan dust to impact Western North America.

  3. Survivability of dust in tokamaks: Dust transport in the divertor sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Delzanno, Gian Luca; Tang, Xianzhu

    2014-02-15

    The survivability of dust being transported in the magnetized sheath near the divertor plate of a tokamak and its impact on the desired balance of erosion and redeposition for a steady-state reactor are investigated. Two different divertor scenarios are considered. The first is characterized by an energy flux perpendicular to the plate q{sub 0}≃1 MW/m{sup 2} typical of current short-pulse tokamaks. The second has q{sub 0}≃10 MW/m{sup 2} and is relevant to long-pulse machines like ITER or Demonstration Power Plant. It is shown that micrometer dust particles can survive rather easily near the plates of a divertor plasma with q{sub 0}≃1 MW/m{sup 2} because thermal radiation provides adequate cooling for the dust particle. On the other hand, the survivability of micrometer dust particles near the divertor plates is drastically reduced when q{sub 0}≃10 MW/m{sup 2}. Micrometer dust particles redeposit their material non-locally, leading to a net poloidal mass migration across the divertor. Smaller particles (with radius ∼0.1 μm) cannot survive near the divertor and redeposit their material locally. Bigger particle (with radius ∼10 μm) can instead survive partially and move outside the divertor strike points, thus causing a net loss of divertor material to dust accumulation inside the chamber and some non-local redeposition. The implications of these results for ITER are discussed.

  4. Transport of mineral dust derived from airborne wind lidar measurements during SALTRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouza, Fernando; Reitebuch, Oliver; Groß, Silke; Rahm, Stephan; Freudenthaler, Volker; Toledano, Carlos; Weinzierl, Bernadett

    2015-04-01

    During the SALTRACE field experiment conducted between the 10 of June and the 15 of July 2013, the transport and properties of Saharan dust were characterized by a 2-µm Doppler wind lidar (DWL) deployed on the DLR Falcon 20 research aircraft. Unlike aerosol lidars, the DLW is able to simultaneously measure wind fields and -by means of an adequate calibration- aerosol optical properties, which is more adequate for aerosol transport studies. The retrieved horizontal and vertical wind speed provide a direct observation of dust long range transport mechanisms across the Atlantic (e.g. by the African easterly jet) from Western Africa to the Caribbean. Vertical wind observations revealed the structure of island induced lee waves in the Cape Verde and Barbados regions. A novel method for the calibration of DWLs based on simultaneous measurements with a ground-based aerosol lidar and sun photometer was developed. After being calibrated, the system is able to retrieve quantitative aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficients, which is usually not obtained from coherent lidars. Results from the validation with a ground-based aerosol lidar in Barbados and the CALIPSO satellite instrument will be discussed.

  5. The Impact of Desert Dust Aerosol Radiative Forcing on Global and West African Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, A.; Zaitchik, B. F.; Gnanadesikan, A.; Dezfuli, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Desert dust aerosols exert a radiative forcing on the atmosphere, influencing atmospheric temperature structure and modifying radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and surface. As dust aerosols perturb radiative fluxes, the atmosphere responds by altering both energy and moisture dynamics, with potentially significant impacts on regional and global precipitation. Global Climate Model (GCM) experiments designed to characterize these processes have yielded a wide range of results, owing to both the complex nature of the system and diverse differences across models. Most model results show a general decrease in global precipitation, but regional results vary. Here, we compare simulations from GFDL's CM2Mc GCM with multiple other model experiments from the literature in order to investigate mechanisms of radiative impact and reasons for GCM differences on a global and regional scale. We focus on West Africa, a region of high interannual rainfall variability that is a source of dust and that neighbors major Sahara Desert dust sources. As such, changes in West African climate due to radiative forcing of desert dust aerosol have serious implications for desertification feedbacks. Our CM2Mc results show net cooling of the planet at TOA and surface, net warming of the atmosphere, and significant increases in precipitation over West Africa during the summer rainy season. These results differ from some previous GCM studies, prompting comparative analysis of desert dust parameters across models. This presentation will offer quantitative analysis of differences in dust aerosol parameters, aerosol optical properties, and overall particle burden across GCMs, and will characterize the contribution of model differences to the uncertainty of forcing and climate response affecting West Africa.

  6. Forecasting the North African dust outbreak towards Europe in April 2011: a model intercomparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huneeus, N.; Basart, S.; Fiedler, S.; Morcrette, J.-J.; Benedetti, A.; Mulcahy, J.; Terradellas, E.; Pérez García-Pando, C.; Pejanovic, G.; Nickovic, S.; Arsenovic, P.; Schulz, M.; Cuevas, E.; Baldasano, J. M.; Pey, J.; Remy, S.; Cvetkovic, B.

    2015-10-01

    In the framework of the World Meteorological Organisation's Sand and Dust Storm Warning Advisory and Assessment System, we evaluated the predictions of five state-of-the-art dust forecast models during an intense Saharan dust outbreak affecting Western and Northern Europe in April 2011. We assessed the capacity of the models to predict the evolution of the dust cloud with lead-times of up to 72 h using observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and dust surface concentrations from a ground-based measurement network. In addition, the predicted vertical dust distribution was evaluated with vertical extinction profiles from the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). To assess the diversity in forecast capability among the models, the analysis was extended to wind field (both surface and profile), synoptic conditions, emissions and deposition fluxes. Models predict the onset and evolution of the AOD for all analysed lead-times. On average, differences among the models are larger than differences among lead-times for each individual model. In spite of large differences in emission and deposition, the models present comparable skill for AOD. In general, models are better in predicting AOD than near-surface dust concentration over the Iberian Peninsula. Models tend to underestimate the long-range transport towards Northern Europe. Our analysis suggests that this is partly due to difficulties in simulating the vertical distribution dust and horizontal wind. Differences in the size distribution and wet scavenging efficiency may also account for model diversity in long-range transport.

  7. Forecasting the northern African dust outbreak towards Europe in April 2011: A model intercomparison

    DOE PAGES

    Huneeus, N.; Basart, S.; Fiedler, S.; Morcrette, J. -J.; Benedetti, A.; Mulcahy, J.; Terradellas, E.; Garcia-Pando, C. Perez; Pejanovic, G.; Nickovic, S.; et al

    2016-04-21

    In the framework of the World Meteorological Organisation's Sand and Dust Storm Warning Advisory and Assessment System, we evaluated the predictions of five state-of-the-art dust forecast models during an intense Saharan dust outbreak affecting western and northern Europe in April 2011. We assessed the capacity of the models to predict the evolution of the dust cloud with lead times of up to 72 h using observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and dust surface concentrations from a ground-based measurement network. In addition, the predicted vertical dust distributionmore » was evaluated with vertical extinction profiles from the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). To assess the diversity in forecast capability among the models, the analysis was extended to wind field (both surface and profile), synoptic conditions, emissions and deposition fluxes. Models predict the onset and evolution of the AOD for all analysed lead times. On average, differences among the models are larger than differences among lead times for each individual model. In spite of large differences in emission and deposition, the models present comparable skill for AOD. In general, models are better in predicting AOD than near-surface dust concentration over the Iberian Peninsula. Models tend to underestimate the long-range transport towards northern Europe. In this paper, our analysis suggests that this is partly due to difficulties in simulating the vertical distribution dust and horizontal wind. Differences in the size distribution and wet scavenging efficiency may also account for model diversity in long-range transport.« less

  8. Forecasting the Northern African Dust Outbreak Towards Europe in April 2011: A Model Intercomparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huneeus, N.; Basart, S.; Fiedler, S.; Morcrette, J.-J.; Benedetti, A.; Mulcahy, J.; Terradellas, E.; Pérez García-Pando, C.; Pejanovic, G.; Nickovic, S.

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of the World Meteorological Organisation's Sand and Dust Storm Warning Advisory and Assessment System, we evaluated the predictions of five state-of-the-art dust forecast models during an intense Saharan dust outbreak affecting western and northern Europe in April 2011. We assessed the capacity of the models to predict the evolution of the dust cloud with lead times of up to 72 hours using observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and dust surface concentrations from a ground-based measurement network. In addition, the predicted vertical dust distribution was evaluated with vertical extinction profiles from the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). To assess the diversity in forecast capability among the models, the analysis was extended to wind field (both surface and profile), synoptic conditions, emissions and deposition fluxes. Models predict the onset and evolution of the AOD for all analysed lead times. On average, differences among the models are larger than differences among lead times for each individual model. In spite of large differences in emission and deposition, the models present comparable skill for AOD. In general, models are better in predicting AOD than near-surface dust concentration over the Iberian Peninsula. Models tend to underestimate the long-range transport towards northern Europe. Our analysis suggests that this is partly due to difficulties in simulating the vertical distribution dust and horizontal wind. Differences in the size distribution and wet scavenging efficiency may also account for model diversity in long-range transport.

  9. Forecasting the northern African dust outbreak towards Europe in April 2011: a model intercomparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huneeus, N.; Basart, S.; Fiedler, S.; Morcrette, J.-J.; Benedetti, A.; Mulcahy, J.; Terradellas, E.; Pérez García-Pando, C.; Pejanovic, G.; Nickovic, S.; Arsenovic, P.; Schulz, M.; Cuevas, E.; Baldasano, J. M.; Pey, J.; Remy, S.; Cvetkovic, B.

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the World Meteorological Organisation's Sand and Dust Storm Warning Advisory and Assessment System, we evaluated the predictions of five state-of-the-art dust forecast models during an intense Saharan dust outbreak affecting western and northern Europe in April 2011. We assessed the capacity of the models to predict the evolution of the dust cloud with lead times of up to 72 h using observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and dust surface concentrations from a ground-based measurement network. In addition, the predicted vertical dust distribution was evaluated with vertical extinction profiles from the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). To assess the diversity in forecast capability among the models, the analysis was extended to wind field (both surface and profile), synoptic conditions, emissions and deposition fluxes. Models predict the onset and evolution of the AOD for all analysed lead times. On average, differences among the models are larger than differences among lead times for each individual model. In spite of large differences in emission and deposition, the models present comparable skill for AOD. In general, models are better in predicting AOD than near-surface dust concentration over the Iberian Peninsula. Models tend to underestimate the long-range transport towards northern Europe. Our analysis suggests that this is partly due to difficulties in simulating the vertical distribution dust and horizontal wind. Differences in the size distribution and wet scavenging efficiency may also account for model diversity in long-range transport.

  10. Aeolian transport of biota with dust: A wind tunnel experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivas, J. A., Jr.; Gill, T. E.; Van Pelt, R. S.; Walsh, E.

    2015-12-01

    Ephemeral wetlands are ideal sources for dust emission, as well as repositories for dormant stages of aquatic invertebrates. An important component of invertebrate dispersal and colonization to new areas is the ability to be entrained into the atmosphere. Aquatic invertebrate eggs fall within the size of dust and sand grains (30-600μm), are less dense and aerodynamically shaped. We have shown previously that aquatic invertebrates can be dispersed long distances in dust storms but the extent of transport of taxa based on diapausing egg size/morphology has not been investigated. Here, we control the wind erosion process in a wind tunnel to test entrainment of diapausing stages of brine shrimp, clam shrimp, tadpole shrimp, fairy shrimp, Daphnia, and the rotifers Brachionus plicatilis and B. calyciflorus into the air by saltation. Diapausing eggs were mixed with sterilized wind-erodible soil. The soil/egg mixture was moistened with distilled water and air dried to form a crust. Dust was generated in a wind tunnel by releasing sand grains that act as saltator material similar to wind-entrained natural sands. Maximum wind velocity was 10m/s and entrained particles were sampled through an isokinetic horizontal intake opening. Aeolian sediment was collected from three points in the system; transfer section for coarse sediment, the pan subtending a settling chamber for finer saltation-sized sediment, and two paper filters for suspension-sized sediment. Samples were then passed through 250 and 350 μm sieves to remove abrader sand and rehydrated with various sterile media depending on the type of organism. We retrieved viable brine, fairy, and tadpole shrimp, ostracods, Daphnia, and diapausing eggs of the rotifers after hydration. This experiment demonstrates that resting stages of many invertebrates can be wind-eroded due to size and egg morphology and remain viable under controlled conditions mimicking dust emission.

  11. Beyond Orbital-Motion-Limited theory effects for dust transport in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Delzanno, Gian Luca; Tang, Xianzhu

    2015-05-29

    Dust transport in tokamaks is very important for ITER. Can many kilograms of dust really accumulate in the device? Can the dust survive? The conventional dust transport model is based on Orbital-Motion-Limited theory (OML). But OML can break in the limit where the dust grain becomes positively charged due to electron emission processes because it overestimates the dust collected power. An OML+ approximation of the emitted electrons trapped/passing boundary is shown to be in good agreement with PIC simulations.

  12. Electrostatic Transport and Manipulation of Lunar Soil and Dust

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamoto, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-21

    Transport and manipulation technologies of lunar soil and dust are under development utilizing the electrostatic force. Transport of particles is realized by an electrostatic conveyer consisting of parallel electrodes. Four-phase traveling electrostatic wave was applied to the electrodes to transport particles upon the conveyer and it was demonstrated that particles were efficiently transported under conditions of low frequency, high voltage, and the application of rectangular wave. Not only linear but also curved and closed transport was demonstrated. Numerical investigation was carried out with a three-dimensional hard-sphere model of the Distinct Element Method to clarify the mechanism of the transport and to predict performances in the lunar environment. This technology is expected to be utilized not only for the transport of bulk soil but also for the cleaning of a solar panel and an optical lens. Another technology is an electrostatic manipulation system to manipulate single particle. A manipulator consisted of two parallel pin electrodes. When voltage was applied between the electrodes, electrophoresis force generated in non-uniform electrostatic field was applied to the particle near the tip of the electrode. The particle was captured by the application of the voltage and released from the manipulator by turning off the voltage. It was possible to manipulate not only insulative but also conductive particles. Three-dimensional electrostatic field calculation was conducted to calculate the electrophoresis force and the Coulomb force.

  13. Particle Size Distribution of Airborne Microorganisms and Pathogens during an Intense African Dust Event in the Eastern Mediterranean

    PubMed Central

    Polymenakou, Paraskevi N.; Mandalakis, Manolis; Stephanou, Euripides G.; Tselepides, Anastasios

    2008-01-01

    Background The distribution of microorganisms, and especially pathogens, over airborne particles of different sizes has been ignored to a large extent, but it could have significant implications regarding the dispersion of these microorganisms across the planet, thus affecting human health. Objectives We examined the microbial quality of the aerosols over the eastern Mediterranean region during an African storm to determine the size distribution of microorganisms in the air. Methods We used a five-stage cascade impactor for bioaerosol collection in a coastal city on the eastern Mediterranean Sea during a north African dust storm. Bacterial communities associated with aerosol particles of six different size ranges were characterized following molecular culture–independent methods, regardless of the cell culturability (analysis of 16S rRNA genes). Results All 16S rDNA clone libraries were diverse, including sequences commonly found in soil and marine ecosystems. Spore-forming bacteria such as Firmicutes dominated large particle sizes (> 3.3 μm), whereas clones affiliated with Actinobacteria (found commonly in soil) and Bacteroidetes (widely distributed in the environment) gradually increased their abundance in aerosol particles of reduced size (< 3.3 μm). A large portion of the clones detected at respiratory particle sizes (< 3.3 μm) were phylogenetic neighbors to human pathogens that have been linked to several diseases. Conclusions The presence of aerosolized bacteria in small size particles may have significant implications to human health via intercontinental transportation of pathogens. PMID:18335093

  14. Effects of Saharan Mineral Dust Aerosols on the Dynamics of an Idealized African Easterly Jet-African Easterly Wave System over North Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grogan, Dustin Francis Phillip

    The central objective of this work is to examine the direct radiative effects of Saharan mineral dust aerosols on the dynamics of African easterly waves (AEWs) and the African easterly jet (AEJ). Achieving this objective is built around two tasks that use the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled to an online dust model (WRF-dust model). The first task (Chapter 2) examines the linear dynamics of AEWs; the second task (Chapter 3) examines the nonlinear evolution of AEWs and their interactions with the AEJ. In Chapter 2, the direct radiative effects of dust on the linear dynamics of AEWs are examined analytically and numerically. The analytical analysis combines the thermodynamic equation with a dust continuity equation to form an expression for the generation of eddy available potential energy (APE) by the dust field. The generation of eddy APE is a function of the transmissivity and spatial gradients of the dust, which are modulated by the Doppler-shifted frequency. The expression predicts that for a fixed dust distribution, the wave response will be largest in regions where the dust gradients are maximized and the Doppler-shifted frequency vanishes. The numerical analysis calculates the linear dynamics of AEWs using zonally averaged basic states for wind, temperature and dust consistent with summertime conditions over North Africa. For the fastest growing AEW, the dust increases the growth rate from ~15% to 90% for aerosol optical depths ranging from tau=1.0 to tau=2.5. A local energetics analysis shows that for tau=1.0, the dust increases the maximum barotropic and baroclinic energy conversions by ~50% and ~100%, respectively. The maxima in the generation of APE and conversions of energy are co-located and occur where the meridional dust gradient is maximized near the critical layer, i.e., where the Doppler-shifted frequency is small, in agreement with the prediction from the analytical analysis. In Chapter 3, the direct radiative effects of dust

  15. Aerosol Optical Thickness in the Presence and Absence of African Dust using AERONET and Microtops II Sunphotometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, A.; Raizada, S.; Tepley, C. A.; Venero, I.; Zurcher, F.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.

    2011-12-01

    As part of the Puerto Rico African Dust and Cloud Study (PRADACS) Project, we present a comparison of the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) between the AERONET sunphotometer (CIMEL Electronique 318A) located at Cape San Juan (CSJ, 18° 23' N, 65° 37' E), Puerto Rico, and the radiometers (Microtops II) of the Arecibo Observatory. Data were collected at CSJ during the summer period of 2011, when African dust was present most of the time. Preliminary results showed, for both instruments, AOT values around of 0.4 when there were high concentrations of African dust over the island Puerto Rico. The AOT correlations between the two instruments were very good, with a slope of 0.8 and r2 of 0.9 for all wavelengths. The main differences observed were on the values above 0.6. We will show the temporal behavior of AOT for the two instruments and the spatial differences between them.

  16. Principle Component Analysis of the Evolution of the Saharan Air Layer and Dust Transport: Comparisons between a Model Simulation and MODIS Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, S.; Colarco, P. R.; Dessler, A.

    2006-01-01

    The onset and evolution of Saharan Air Layer (SAL) episodes during June-September 2002 are diagnosed by applying principal component analysis to the NCEP reanalysis temperature anomalies at 850 hPa, where the largest SAL-induced temperature anomalies are located. The first principal component (PC) represents the onset of SAL episodes, which are associated with large warm anomalies located at the west coast of Africa. The second PC represents two opposite phases of the evolution of the SAL. The positive phase of the second PC corresponds to the southwestward extension of the warm anomalies into the tropical-subtropical North Atlantic Ocean, and the negative phase corresponds to the northwestward extension into the subtropical to mid-latitude North Atlantic Ocean and the southwest Europe. A dust transport model (CARMA) and the MODIS retrievals are used to study the associated effects on dust distribution and deposition. The positive (negative) phase of the second PC corresponds to a strengthening (weakening) of the offshore flows in the lower troposphere around 10deg - 20degN, causing more (less) dust being transported along the tropical to subtropical North Atlantic Ocean. The variation of the offshore flow indicates that the subseasonal variation of African Easterly Jet is associated with the evolution of the SAL. Significant correlation is found between the second PC time series and the daily West African monsoon index, implying a dynamical linkage between West African monsoon and the evolution of the SAL and Saharan dust transport.

  17. Atmospheric Fate and Transport of Agricultural Dust and Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiranuma, N.; Brooks, S. D.; Thornton, D. C.; Auvermann, B. W.; Fitz, D. R.

    2008-12-01

    Agricultural fugitive dust and odor are significant sources of localized air pollution in the semi-arid southern Great Plains. Daily episodes of ground-level fugitive dust emissions from the cattle feedlots associated with increased cattle activity in the early evenings are routinely observed, while consistently high ammonia is observed throughout the day. Here we present measurements of aerosol size distributions and concentrations of gas and particulate phase ammonia species collected at a feedlot in Texas during summers of 2006, 2007 and 2008. A GRIMM sequential mobility particle sizer and GRIMM 1.108 aerosol spectrometer were used to determine aerosol size distributions in the range of 10 nm to 20 µm aerodynamic diameter at the downwind and upwind edges of the facility. Using aqueous scrubbers, simultaneous measurements of both gas phase and total ammonia species present in the gas and particle phases were also collected. In addition to the continuous measurements at the edges of the facility, coincident aerosol and ammonia measurements were obtain at an additional site further downwind (~3.5 km). Taken together our measurements will be used to quantify aerosol and ammonia dispersion and transport. Relationships between the fate and transport of the aerosols and ammonia will be discussed.

  18. Short-cut transport path for Asian dust directly to the Arctic: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhongwei; Huang, Jianping; Hayasaka, Tadahiro; Wang, Shanshan; Zhou, Tian; Jin, Hongchun

    2015-11-01

    Asian dust can be transported long distances from the Taklimakan or Gobi desert to North America across the Pacific Ocean, and it has been found to have a significant impact on ecosystems, climate, and human health. Although it is well known that Asian dust is transported all over the globe, there are limited observations reporting Asian dust transported to the Arctic. We report a case study of a large-scale heavy dust storm over East Asia on 19 March 2010, as shown by ground-based and space-borne multi-sensor observations, as well as NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data and HYSPLIT trajectories. Our analysis suggests that Asian dust aerosols were transported from northwest China to the Arctic within 5 days, crossing eastern China, Japan and Siberia before reaching the Arctic. The results indicate that Asian dust can be transported for long distances along a previously unreported transport path. Evidence from other dust events over the past decade (2001-2010) also supports our results, indicating that dust from 25.2% of Asian dust events has potentially been transported directly to the Arctic. The transport of Asian dust to the Arctic is due to cyclones and the enhanced East Asia Trough (EAT), which are very common synoptic systems over East Asia. This suggests that many other large dust events would have generated long-range transport of dust to the Arctic along this path in the past. Thus, Asian dust potentially affects the Arctic climate and ecosystem, making climate change in the Arctic much more complex to be fully understood.

  19. Quantifying the contribution of long-range Saharan dust transport on particulate matter concentrations in Houston, Texas, using detailed elemental analysis.

    PubMed

    Bozlaker, Ayse; Prospero, Joseph M; Fraser, Matthew P; Chellam, Shankararaman

    2013-09-17

    The trans-Atlantic transport of North African dust by summertime trade winds occasionally increases ambient particulate matter (PM) concentrations in Texas above air quality standards. Exemptions from such exceedences can be sought for episodic events that are beyond regulatory control by providing qualitative supportive information such as satellite images and back-trajectories. Herein we demonstrate that chemical mass balancing can successfully isolate, differentiate, and quantify the relative contributions from local and global mineral dust sources through detailed measurements of a wide suite of elements in ambient PM. We identified a major dust storm originating in Northwest Africa in mid-July 2008 which eventually impacted air quality in Houston during July 25, 26, and 27, 2008. Daily PM2.5 and PM10 samples were collected at two sites in Houston over a 2-week period encompassing the Saharan dust episode to quantify the transported mineral dust concentrations during this peak event. Average PM concentrations more than doubled during the Saharan intrusion compared with non-Saharan. Relative concentrations of several elements often associated with anthropogenic sources were significantly diluted by crustal minerals coincident with the large-scale Saharan dust intrusion. During non-Saharan days, local mineral dust sources including cement manufacturing and soil and road dust contributed in total 26% to PM2.5 mass and 50% to PM10 mass; during the three-day Saharan episode the total dust contribution increased to 64% for PM2.5 and 85% for PM10. Importantly, this approach was also able to determine that local emissions of crustal minerals dominated the period immediately following the Saharan dust episode: simple quantification of bulk crustal materials may have misappropriated this elevated PM to trans-Atlantic transport of Saharan dust. PMID:23957269

  20. Quantifying the contribution of long-range Saharan dust transport on particulate matter concentrations in Houston, Texas, using detailed elemental analysis.

    PubMed

    Bozlaker, Ayse; Prospero, Joseph M; Fraser, Matthew P; Chellam, Shankararaman

    2013-09-17

    The trans-Atlantic transport of North African dust by summertime trade winds occasionally increases ambient particulate matter (PM) concentrations in Texas above air quality standards. Exemptions from such exceedences can be sought for episodic events that are beyond regulatory control by providing qualitative supportive information such as satellite images and back-trajectories. Herein we demonstrate that chemical mass balancing can successfully isolate, differentiate, and quantify the relative contributions from local and global mineral dust sources through detailed measurements of a wide suite of elements in ambient PM. We identified a major dust storm originating in Northwest Africa in mid-July 2008 which eventually impacted air quality in Houston during July 25, 26, and 27, 2008. Daily PM2.5 and PM10 samples were collected at two sites in Houston over a 2-week period encompassing the Saharan dust episode to quantify the transported mineral dust concentrations during this peak event. Average PM concentrations more than doubled during the Saharan intrusion compared with non-Saharan. Relative concentrations of several elements often associated with anthropogenic sources were significantly diluted by crustal minerals coincident with the large-scale Saharan dust intrusion. During non-Saharan days, local mineral dust sources including cement manufacturing and soil and road dust contributed in total 26% to PM2.5 mass and 50% to PM10 mass; during the three-day Saharan episode the total dust contribution increased to 64% for PM2.5 and 85% for PM10. Importantly, this approach was also able to determine that local emissions of crustal minerals dominated the period immediately following the Saharan dust episode: simple quantification of bulk crustal materials may have misappropriated this elevated PM to trans-Atlantic transport of Saharan dust.

  1. Radiative Effects of African Dust and Smoke Observed from CERES and CALIOP Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorks, J. E.; McGill, M. J.; Rodier, S. D.; Hlavka, D. L.; Vaughan, M. A.; Hu, Y.

    2009-05-01

    Cloud and aerosol effects have a significant impact on the atmospheric radiation budget in the Tropical Atlantic because of the spatial and temporal extent of desert dust and smoke from biomass burning in the atmosphere. The influences of African dust and smoke aerosols on cloud radiative properties over the Tropical Atlantic Ocean were analyzed for the month of July for three years (2006-2008) using collocated data collected by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments on the CALIPSO and Aqua satellites. On average, clouds below 5 km had a daytime instantaneous shortwave (SW) radiative flux of about 270 W/m2 and thin cirrus clouds had a SW radiative flux of about 208 W/m2. When dust and smoke aerosols interacted with clouds below 5 km, as determined from CALIPSO, the SW radiative flux decreased to as low as roughly 205 W/m2. These decreases in SW radiative flux were likely attributed to the aerosol layer height and changes in cloud microphysics (semi- direct effect). CALIOP lidar observations, which more accurately identify aerosol layer height than passive instruments, appear essential for better understanding of cloud-aerosol interactions, a major uncertainty in predicting the climate system.

  2. Prevailing Dust-transport Directions on Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Tobias; Noack, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    Dust transport and deposition behind larger boulders on the comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko (67P/C–G) have been observed by the Rosetta mission. We present a mechanism for dust-transport vectors based on a homogeneous surface activity model incorporating in detail the topography of 67P/C–G. The combination of gravitation, gas drag, and Coriolis force leads to specific dust transfer pathways, which for higher dust velocities fuel the near-nucleus coma. By distributing dust sources homogeneously across the whole cometary surface, we derive a global dust-transport map of 67P/C–G. The transport vectors are in agreement with the reported wind-tail directions in the Philae descent area.

  3. PREVAILING DUST-TRANSPORT DIRECTIONS ON COMET 67P/CHURYUMOV–GERASIMENKO

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Tobias; Noack, Matthias

    2015-11-10

    Dust transport and deposition behind larger boulders on the comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko (67P/C–G) have been observed by the Rosetta mission. We present a mechanism for dust-transport vectors based on a homogeneous surface activity model incorporating in detail the topography of 67P/C–G. The combination of gravitation, gas drag, and Coriolis force leads to specific dust transfer pathways, which for higher dust velocities fuel the near-nucleus coma. By distributing dust sources homogeneously across the whole cometary surface, we derive a global dust-transport map of 67P/C–G. The transport vectors are in agreement with the reported wind-tail directions in the Philae descent area.

  4. Size distribution and optical properties of mineral dust aerosols transported in the western Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denjean, C.; Cassola, F.; Mazzino, A.; Triquet, S.; Chevaillier, S.; Grand, N.; Bourrianne, T.; Momboisse, G.; Sellegri, K.; Schwarzenbock, A.; Freney, E.; Mallet, M.; Formenti, P.

    2016-02-01

    This study presents in situ aircraft measurements of Saharan mineral dust transported over the western Mediterranean basin in June-July 2013 during the ChArMEx/ADRIMED (the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment/Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact on the regional climate in the MEDiterranean region) airborne campaign. Dust events differing in terms of source region (Algeria, Tunisia and Morocco), time of transport (1-5 days) and height of transport were sampled. Mineral dust were transported above the marine boundary layer, which conversely was dominated by pollution and marine aerosols. The dust vertical structure was extremely variable and characterized by either a single layer or a more complex and stratified structure with layers originating from different source regions. Mixing of mineral dust with pollution particles was observed depending on the height of transport of the dust layers. Dust layers carried a higher concentration of pollution particles below 3 km above sea level (a.s.l.) than above 3 km a.s.l., resulting in a scattering Ångström exponent up to 2.2 below 3 km a.s.l. However, the optical properties of the dust plumes remained practically unchanged with respect to values previously measured over source regions, regardless of the altitude. Moderate absorption of light by the dust plumes was observed with values of aerosol single scattering albedo at 530 nm ranging from 0.90 to 1.00. Concurrent calculations from the aerosol chemical composition revealed a negligible contribution of pollution particles to the absorption properties of the dust plumes that was due to a low contribution of refractory black carbon in regards to the fraction of dust and sulfate particles. This suggests that, even in the presence of moderate pollution, likely a persistent feature in the Mediterranean, the optical properties of the dust plumes could be assumed similar to those of native dust in radiative transfer simulations, modelling studies and satellite retrievals

  5. Transport of Alaskan Dust into the Gulf of Alaska and Comparison with Similar High-Latitude Dust Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crusium, John; Levy, Rob; Wang, Jun; Campbell, Rob; Schroth, Andrew W.

    2012-01-01

    Transport of Alaskan dust into the Gulf of Alaska and comparison with similar high-latitude dust environments. An airborne flux of the micronutrient iron, derived from dust originating from coastal regions may be an important contributor of iron to the Gulf of Alaska's (GoA) oligotrophic waters. Dust blowing off glacier termini and dry riverbeds is a recurring phenomenon in Alaska, usually occurring in the autumn. Since previous studies assumed that dust originating in the deserts of Asia was the largest source of . airborne iron to the GoA, the budget of aeolian deposition of iron needs to be reassessed. Since late 20 I 0, our group has been monitoring dust activity using satellites over the Copper River Delta (CRD) where the most vigorous dust plumes have been observed. Since 2011, sample aerosol concentration and their composition are being collected at Middleton Island (100km off shore of CRD). This presentation will show a summary of the ongoing dust observations and compare with other similar environments (Patagonia, Iceland) by showing case studies. Common features will be highlighted

  6. Variations on morphology and elemental composition of mineral dust particles from local, regional, and long-range transport meteorological scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coz, Esther; Gómez-Moreno, Francisco J.; Casuccio, Gary S.; ArtíñAno, BegoñA.

    2010-06-01

    Mineral dust is the second major source of PM10 in Madrid, reaching up to 80% of the PM10 mass during certain long-range dust transport events. Three different types of scenarios have been found to be associated with the high particle concentration episodes in the city: local anthropogenic, regional recirculation, and African dust transport processes. The present study focuses on the characterization of the individual mineral dust particles related to some chemical and morphological features during these three types of episodes, with special attention to local and regional episodes. To achieve this purpose, four different samples were selectively collected during the 2004-2005 period campaigns, one corresponding to each type of scenario and other sample from an Atlantic ventilated one. Meteorological situation, dust source identification, impact on ambient concentrations, size range distribution, and particle individual analysis have been characterized for each of them. Elemental composition and morphology of more than 30,000 mineral particles were analyzed by computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy. Particles were grouped into clusters based on their elemental composition, and the aspect ratio (AR) of each cluster or category was compared for each type of episode. The AR was related to the mineralogical crystal structure of each chemical cluster. The dates chosen for microscopy analysis were in good agreement in size distribution and chemical composition with the average of the dates in the entire campaign and with those from previous campaigns. Major differences between local/regional and long-range transported mineral dust were found in the relative abundance between carbonates and silicates, with much higher abundance of calcium carbonates in the first ones. These differences between silicate and carbonate contents were consistent with the results found in previous campaigns and were directly related to the composition of the parent topsoil by studying

  7. Size distribution and optical properties of mineral dust aerosols transported in the western Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denjean, C.; Cassola, F.; Mazzino, A.; Triquet, S.; Chevaillier, S.; Grand, N.; Bourrianne, T.; Momboisse, G.; Sellegri, K.; Schwarzenbock, A.; Freney, E.; Mallet, M.; Formenti, P.

    2015-08-01

    This study presents in situ aircraft measurements of Saharan mineral dust transported over the western Mediterranean basin in June-July 2013 during the ChArMEx/ADRIMED (the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment/Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact on the regional climate in the MEDiterranean region) airborne campaign. Dust events differing in terms of source region (Algeria, Tunisia and Morocco), time of tranport (1-5 days) and height of transport were sampled. Mineral dust were transported above the marine boundary layer, which conversely was dominated by pollution and marine aerosols. The dust vertical structure was extremely variable and characterized by either a single layer or a more complex and stratified structure with layers originating from different source regions. Mixing of mineral dust with pollution particles was observed depending on the height of transport of the dust layers. Dust layers carried higher concentration of pollution particles at intermediate altitude (1-3 km) than at elevated altitude (> 3 km), resulting in scattering Angstrom exponent up to 2.2 within the intermediate altitude. However, the optical properties of the dust plumes remained practically unchanged with respect to values previously measured over source regions, regardless of the altitude. Moderate light absorption of the dust plumes was observed with values of aerosol single scattering albedo at 530 nm ranging from 0.90 to 1.00 ± 0.04. Concurrent calculations from the aerosol chemical composition revealed a negligible contribution of pollution particles to the absorption properties of the dust plumes that was due to a low contribution of refractory black carbon in regards to the fraction of dust and sulfate particles. This suggests that, even in the presence of moderate pollution, likely a persistent feature in the Mediterranean, the optical properties of the dust plumes could be assimilated to those of native dust in radiative transfer simulations, modeling studies and

  8. Dust Devil Sediment Transport: From Lab to Field to Global Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, Martina; Jemmett-Smith, Bradley C.; Kahanpää, Henrik; Kahre, Melinda; Knippertz, Peter; Lemmon, Mark T.; Lewis, Stephen R.; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Neakrase, Lynn D. V.; Newman, Claire; Patel, Manish R.; Reiss, Dennis; Spiga, Aymeric; Whelley, Patrick L.

    2016-07-01

    The impact of dust aerosols on the climate and environment of Earth and Mars is complex and forms a major area of research. A difficulty arises in estimating the contribution of small-scale dust devils to the total dust aerosol. This difficulty is due to uncertainties in the amount of dust lifted by individual dust devils, the frequency of dust devil occurrence, and the lack of statistical generality of individual experiments and observations. In this paper, we review results of observational, laboratory, and modeling studies and provide an overview of dust devil dust transport on various spatio-temporal scales as obtained with the different research approaches. Methods used for the investigation of dust devils on Earth and Mars vary. For example, while the use of imagery for the investigation of dust devil occurrence frequency is common practice for Mars, this is less so the case for Earth. Modeling approaches for Earth and Mars are similar in that they are based on the same underlying theory, but they are applied in different ways. Insights into the benefits and limitations of each approach suggest potential future research focuses, which can further reduce the uncertainty associated with dust devil dust entrainment. The potential impacts of dust devils on the climates of Earth and Mars are discussed on the basis of the presented research results.

  9. Concentrations of Semivolatile Organic Compounds Associated with African Dust Air Masses in Mali, Cape Verde, Trinidad and Tobago, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, 2001-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrison, Virginia H.; Foreman, William T.; Genualdi, Susan A.; Majewski, Michael S.; Mohammed, Azad; Simonich, Staci Massey

    2011-01-01

    Every year, billions of tons of fine particles are eroded from the surface of the Sahara Desert and the Sahel of West Africa, lifted into the atmosphere by convective storms, and transported thousands of kilometers downwind. Most of the dust is carried west to the Americas and the Caribbean in the Saharan Air Layer (SAL). Dust air masses predominately impact northern South America during the Northern Hemisphere winter and the Caribbean and Southeastern United States in summer. Dust concentrations vary considerably temporally and spatially. In a dust source region (Mali), concentrations range from background levels of 575 micrograms per cubic meter (mu/u g per m3) to 13,000 mu/u g per m3 when visibility degrades to a few meters (Gillies and others, 1996). In the Caribbean, concentrations of 200 to 600 mu/u g per m3 in the mid-Atlantic and Barbados (Prospero and others, 1981; Talbot and others, 1986), 3 to 20 mu/u g per m3 in the Caribbean (Prospero and Nees, 1986; Perry and others, 1997); and >100 mu/u g per m3 in the Virgin Islands (this dataset) have been reported during African dust conditions. Mean dust particle size decreases as the SAL traverses from West Africa to the Caribbean and Americas as a result of gravitational settling. Mean particle size reaching the Caribbean is <1 micrometer (mu/u m) (Perry and others, 1997), and even finer particles are carried into Central America, the Southeastern United States, and maritime Canada. Particles less than 2.5 mu/u m diameter (termed PM2.5) can be inhaled deeply into human lungs. A large body of literature has shown that increased PM2.5 concentrations are linked to increased cardiovascular/respiratory morbidity and mortality (for example, Dockery and others, 1993; Penn and others, 2005).

  10. Extreme detached dust layers near Martian volcanoes: Evidence for dust transport by mesoscale circulations forced by high topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heavens, N. G.; Cantor, B. A.; Hayne, P. O.; Kass, D. M.; Kleinböhl, A.; McCleese, D. J.; Piqueux, S.; Schofield, J. T.; Shirley, J. H.

    2015-05-01

    Modeling suggests that thermal circulations over Mars's highest volcanoes transport water vapor and dust from the surface into the middle atmosphere, forming detached layers in these constituents. Intense vertical mixing also takes place in regional and global dust storms, which can generate detached layers that are extreme in both altitude and magnitude. Here we employ observations by the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) on board Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, taking advantage of improved vertical coverage in MCS's aerosol retrievals, to discover a new class of extreme detached dust layers (EDDLs). Observed during minimal dust storm activity and furthermore distinguished by their potentially large and measurable horizontal extent (>1000 km), these EDDLs cluster near Olympus Mons and the Tharsis Montes, from which they likely originate. The existence of these EDDLs suggests that vertical mixing by topographic circulations can be much stronger than previously modeled and more frequent than previously observed.

  11. Radiative Effects of African Dust and Smoke Observed from CERES and CALIOP Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorks, John E.; McGill, Matt; Rodier, Sharon; Vaughan, Mark; Xu, Yongxiang; Hlavka, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Cloud and aerosol effects have a significant impact on the atmospheric radiation budget in the Tropical Atlantic because of the spatial and temporal extent of desert dust and smoke from biomass burning in the atmosphere. The influences of African dust and smoke aerosols on cloud radiative properties over the Tropical Atlantic Ocean were analyzed for the month of July for three years (2006-2008) using collocated data collected by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and Clouds and the Earth s Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments on the CALIPSO and Aqua satellites. Aerosol layer height and type can be more accurately determined using CALIOP data, through parameters such as cloud and aerosol layer height, optical depth and depolarization ratio, than data from atmospheric imagers used in previous cloud-aerosol interaction studies. On average, clouds below 5 km had a daytime instantaneous shortwave (SW) radiative flux of 270.2 +/- 16.9 W/sq m and thin cirrus clouds had a SW radiative flux of 208.0 +/- 12.7 W/sq m. When dust aerosols interacted with clouds below 5 km, as determined from CALIPSO, the SW radiative flux decreased to 205.4 +/- 13.0 W/sq m. Similarly, smoke aerosols decreased the SW radiative flux of low clouds to a value of 240.0 +/- 16.6 W/sq m. These decreases in SW radiative flux were likely attributed to the aerosol layer height and changes in cloud microphysics. CALIOP lidar observations, which more accurately identify aerosol layer height than passive instruments, appear essential for better understanding of cloud-aerosol interactions, a major uncertainty in predicting the climate system.

  12. Dust Emissions, Transport, and Deposition Simulated with the NASA Finite-Volume General Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colarco, Peter; daSilva, Arlindo; Ginoux, Paul; Chin, Mian; Lin, S.-J.

    2003-01-01

    Mineral dust aerosols have radiative impacts on Earth's atmosphere, have been implicated in local and regional air quality issues, and have been identified as vectors for transporting disease pathogens and bringing mineral nutrients to terrestrial and oceanic ecosystems. We present for the first time dust simulations using online transport and meteorological analysis in the NASA Finite-Volume General Circulation Model (FVGCM). Our dust formulation follows the formulation in the offline Georgia Institute of Technology-Goddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport Model (GOCART) using a topographical source for dust emissions. We compare results of the FVGCM simulations with GOCART, as well as with in situ and remotely sensed observations. Additionally, we estimate budgets of dust emission and transport into various regions.

  13. Experiments on dust transport in plasma to investigate the origin of the lunar horizon glow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Horányi, M.; Robertson, S.

    2009-05-01

    Dust grains on the lunar surface are exposed to UV radiation and solar wind plasma and can collect electrical charges, leading to their possible lift-off and transport in the presence of near-surface electric fields. Motivated by the long-standing open questions about the physics of electrostatic lunar dust transport, we investigated the dynamics of dust grains on a conducting surface in a laboratory plasma. The dust used in these experiments was a nonconducting JSC-Mars-1 sample with particle size of less than 25 microns. We found that dust grains placed on a conducting surface, which is biased more negatively than its floating potential, charge positively, and an initial pile spreads to form a dust ring. Dust particles were observed to land on insulating blocks, indicating the height of their hopping motion. The measured electrostatic potential distribution above the dust pile shows that an outward pointing electric field near the edge of the pile is responsible for spreading the positively charged grains. A nonmonotonic potential dip was measured in the sheath above an insulating patch, indicating a localized upward electric field causing the dust lift-off from the surface. Faraday cup measurements showed that the grains near the boundary of the dust pile collect more charge than those closer to the center of the dust pile and can be more readily lifted and moved in the radial direction, leading to the formation of a spreading ring.

  14. Stress in African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) following overland transportation.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Remy; Boerrigter, Jeroen; Roques, Jonathan; van der Heul, Jan; van den Bos, Ruud; Flik, Gert; van de Vis, Hans

    2014-02-01

    Of the many stressors in aquaculture, transportation of fish has remained poorly studied. The objective of this study was therefore to assess the effects of a (simulated) commercial transportation on stress physiology of market-size African catfish (Clarias gariepinus). Catfish weighing approximately 1.25 kg were returned to the farm after 3 h of truck-transportation, and stress-related parameters were measured for up to 72 h following return. Recovery from transportation was assessed through blood samples measuring plasma cortisol, glucose and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and gill histology. Also, the number of skin lesions was compared before and after transport. Pre-transport handling and sorting elevated plasma cortisol levels compared to unhandled animals (before fasting). Plasma cortisol levels were further increased due to transportation. In control fish, plasma cortisol levels returned to baseline values within 6 h, whereas it took 48 h to reach baseline values in transported catfish. Plasma glucose and NEFA levels remained stable and were similar across all groups. Transported catfish did not, on average, have more skin lesions than the handling group, but the number of skin lesions had increased compared to unhandled animals. The macroscopic condition of the gills was similar in control, transported and unhandled catfish; however, light microscopy and immunohistochemistry revealed atypical morphology and chloride cell migration normally associated with adverse water conditions. From our data, we conclude that transportation may be considered a strong stressor to catfish that may add to other stressors and thus inflict upon the welfare of the fish.

  15. A Trend in the Northward Transport of Saharan Dust and Its Links to the Trend in North Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, S.; Dessler, A. E.; Mahowald, N.; Colarco, P.; da Silva, A.

    2007-05-01

    During late spring and early fall, Saharan dust is transported toward the tropical North Atlantic Ocean by African easterly waves. The warm and dry anomalies associated with the Saharan dust, the Saharan air layer, can suppress the tropical cyclone (TC) activity over the tropical North Atlantic Ocean. On the other hand, it is well known that increasing sea surface temperatures (SSTs) over the tropical North Atlantic Ocean is responsible for the increasing tropical cyclone intensity in the last two decades. In this study, we analyze two 27-year simulations (MATCH and GEOS-4) of dust transport over the tropical North Atlantic Ocean using, respectively, NCEP reanalysis and GMAO assimilated winds and temperatures for 1979-2005. We evaluate the trends in the transport of Saharan dust together with the trends in surface temperatures and TC energy over the North Atlantic Ocean. We find that the increasing trend in TC energy has a spatial pattern similar to the trend in covective available potential energy (CAPE), which is further related to both increasing trends in sea surface temperatures and in northward transport of Saharan dust over the North Atlantic Ocean.

  16. Asian dust transport during the last century recorded in Lake Suigetsu sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagashima, Kana; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Irino, Tomohisa; Nakagawa, Takeshi; Tada, Ryuji; Hara, Yukari; Yamada, Kazuyoshi; Kurosaki, Yasunori

    2016-03-01

    Asian dust has a significant impact on the natural environment. Its variability on multiple timescales modulates the ocean biogeochemistry and climate. We demonstrate that temporal changes in the deposition flux of Aeolian dust recorded in sediments from Lake Suigetsu, central Japan, during the last century exhibit a continuous decreasing trend and a decadal-scale decrease in 1952-1974. The former decreasing trend can be explained by a decrease in the dust storm frequency at source regions due to the warming of Mongolia in the twentieth century, suggesting future decrease of Asian dust transport with further warming in Mongolia. Decadal-scale decrease of Aeolian dust is explained by weaker westerlies in lower latitudes in central Japan, reflecting a weaker Aleutian Low during the corresponding period. Decadal-scale westerly change probably causes north-south shifts of the dominant dust transport path, which affects subarctic northern Pacific Ocean biogeochemistry by changing the micronutrient iron supply.

  17. Impacts of dust reduction on the northward expansion of the African monsoon during the Green Sahara period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pausata, Francesco S. R.; Messori, Gabriele; Zhang, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    The West African Monsoon (WAM) is crucial for the socio-economic stability of millions of people living in the Sahel. Severe droughts have ravaged the region in the last three decades of the 20th century, highlighting the need for a better understanding of the WAM dynamics. One of the most dramatic changes in the West African Monsoon (WAM) occurred between 15000-5000 yr BP, when increased summer rainfall led to the so-called "Green Sahara" and to a reduction in dust emissions from the region. However, model experiments are unable to fully reproduce the intensification and geographical expansion of the WAM during this period, even when vegetation over the Sahara is considered. Here, we use a fully coupled simulation for 6000 yr BP (Mid-Holocene) in which prescribed Saharan vegetation and dust concentrations are changed in turn. A closer agreement with proxy records is obtained only when both the Saharan vegetation changes and dust decrease are taken into account. The dust reduction strengthens the vegetation-albedo feedback, extending the monsoon's northern limit approximately 500 km further than the vegetation-change case only. We therefore conclude that accounting for changes in Saharan dust loadings is essential for improving model simulations of the WAM during the Mid-Holocene.

  18. Airborne Sunphotometry of African Dust and Marine Boundary Layer Aerosols in PRIDE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingston, John M.; Redemann, Jens; Russell, Philip; Schmid, Beat; Reid, Jeff; Pilewskie, Peter; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Puerto Rico Dust Experiment (PRIDE) was conducted during summer 2000 to study the radiative, microphysical and transport properties of Saharan dust in the Caribbean region. During PRIDE, NASA Ames Research Center's six-channel airborne autotracking sunphotometer (AATS-6) was operated aboard a Piper Navajo airplane based at Roosevelt Roads Naval Station on the northeast coast of Puerto Rico. AATS-6 measurements were taken during 21 science flights off the coast of Puerto Rico in the western Caribbean. Data were acquired within and above the Marine Boundary Layer (MBL) and the Saharan Aerosol Layer (SAL) up to 5.5 km altitude tinder a wide range of dust loadings. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) spectra and columnar water vapor (CWV) values have been calculated from the AATS-6 measurements by using sunphotometer calibration data obtained at Mauna Loa Observatory (3A kin ASL) before (May) and after (October) PRIDE. Mid-visible AOD values measured near the surface during PRIDE ranged from 0.07 on the cleanest day to 0.55 on the most turbid day. Values measured above the MBL were as high as 0.35; values above the SAL were as low as 0.01. The fraction of total column AOD due to Saharan dust cannot be determined precisely from AATS-6 AOD data alone due to the uncertainty in the extent of vertical mixing of the dust down through the MBL. However, analyses of ground-based and airborne in-situ aerosol sampling measurements and ground-based aerosol lidar backscatter data should yield accurate characterization of the vertical mixing that will enable calculation of the Saharan dust AOD component from the sunphotometer data. Examples will be presented showing measured AATS-6 AOD spectra, calculated aerosol extinction and water vapor density vertical profiles, and aerosol size distributions retrieved by inversion of the AOD spectra. Near sea-surface AOD spectra acquired by AATS-6 during horizontal flight legs at 30 m ASL are available for validation of AOD derived from coincident

  19. Laboratory study of PCB transport from primary sources to settled dust

    EPA Science Inventory

    Transport of house dust and Arizona Test Dust on polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-containing panels and PCB-free panels was investigated in a 30-m3 stainless steel chamber. The PCB-containing panels were aluminum sheets coated with a PCB-spiked, oil-based primer or two-part polysul...

  20. Soil derived dust as a source of silica: aerosol properties, emissions, deposition, and transport.

    PubMed

    Gillette, D

    1997-01-01

    Quartz is an abundant mineral in wind generated dust throughout the United States. Of the 18.9 million tons of particles smaller than 10 microns (PM10) dust emitted into the atmosphere by the wind, a significant fraction is silica. Transport of some of this silica to populated areas is possible.

  1. Assessment of African and local wind-blown dust contributions at three rural sites in SE Spain: aerosol size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orza, J. A. G.; Cabello, M.; Lidón, V.; Martínez, J.

    2009-04-01

    Aerosol number size distribution and meteorological parameters were measured at three rural sites in semiarid southeastern Spain. Number concentrations of suspended particles in 31 size bins between 0.25 and 32 m diameter were continuosly recorded with a GRIMM 190 aerosol spectrometer at: (i) a rural background (RB) location in a perennial tussock grassland, from July to October 2006; (ii) a rural site surrounded by abandoned croplands, and influenced by mineral industries and by a small paved road having a small traffic load located 30 m to the East (RA), from June to December 2007; and (iii) a rural (R) location in an agricultural plot previously cleared and then lightly leveled and compacted for future lemon-tree cultivation, from February to June 2008. Events of long range transport from North Africa to the study area (African dust outbreaks, ADOs) were identified by aerosol transport models, back-trajectories and satellite imagery. There is an increase in the concentration of particles larger than 2 m with increasing wind speed while the concentrations decrease for smaller particles at the RB and R sites. At the RA location, that increase is observed for particles in the range 1.6 - 3.5 m (the precise value depends on the wind speed) when there are West winds. Particulate resuspension is found to occur at all wind speeds, although wind threshold values can be identified by a sharp increase in particle concentrations for a range of particle sizes. Light winds entrain large particles while stronger winds additionally entrain particles of smaller size (down to 2.5 m for the highest winds). The size distributions present maxima at 1.6 and 3 m on days with ADO. Concentration for almost every particle size is higher on ADOs than on days without such events, due in part to the associated meteorological situation. This work was partially supported by the Spanish Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia under grant CGL2004-04419 (RESUSPENSE Project).

  2. Direct Radiative Effect of Mineral Dust on the Development of African Easterly Waves in Late Summer, 2003-07

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Po-Lun; Zhang, Kai; Shi, Jainn Jong; Matsui, Toshihisa; Arking, Albert

    2012-12-19

    Episodic events of both Saharan dust outbreaks and African easterly waves (AEWs) are observed to move westward over the eastern tropical Atlantic Ocean. The relationship between the warm, dry, and dusty Saharan air layer on the nearby storms has been the subject of considerable debate. In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting model is used to investigate the radiative effect of dust on the development of AEWs during August and September, the months of maximumtropical cyclone activity, in years 2003–07. The simulations show that dust radiative forcing enhances the convective instability of the environment. As a result, mostAEWsintensify in the presence of a dust layer. The Lorenz energy cycle analysis reveals that the dust radiative forcing enhances the condensational heating, which elevates the zonal and eddy available potential energy. In turn, available potential energy is effectively converted to eddy kinetic energy, in which local convective overturning plays the primary role. The magnitude of the intensification effect depends on the initial environmental conditions, including moisture, baroclinity, and the depth of the boundary layer. The authors conclude that dust radiative forcing, albeit small, serves as a catalyst to promote local convection that facilitates AEW development.

  3. Direct Radiative Effect of Mineral Dust on the Development of African Easterly Wave in Late Summer, 2003-2007

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Po-Lun; Zhang, Kai; Shi, Jainn Jong; Matsui, Toshihisa; Arking, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Episodic events of both Saharan dust outbreaks and African Easterly Waves (AEWs) are observed to move westward over the eastern tropical Atlantic Ocean. The relationship between the warm, dry, and dusty Saharan Air Layer (SAL) on the nearby storms has been the subject of considerable debate. In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used to investigate the radiative effect of dust on the development of AEWs during August and September, the months of maximum tropical cyclone activity, in years 2003-2007. The simulations show that dust radiative forcing enhances the convective instability of the environment. As a result, most AEWs intensify in the presence of a dust layer. The Lorenz energy cycle analysis reveals that the dust radiative forcing enhances the condensational heating, which elevates the zonal and eddy available potential energy. In turn, available potential energy is effectively converted to eddy kinetic energy, in which local convective overturning plays the primary role. The magnitude of the intensification effect depends on the initial environmental conditions, including moisture, baroclinity, and the depth of the boundary layer. We conclude that dust radiative forcing, albeit small, serves as a catalyst to promote local convection that facilitates AEW development.

  4. Modeling of mineral dust in the atmosphere: Sources, transport, and optical thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tegen, Ina; Fung, Inez

    1994-01-01

    A global three-dimensional model of the atmospheric mineral dust cycle is developed for the study of its impact on the radiative balance of the atmosphere. The model includes four size classes of minearl dust, whose source distributions are based on the distributions of vegetation, soil texture and soil moisture. Uplift and deposition are parameterized using analyzed winds and rainfall statistics that resolve high-frequency events. Dust transport in the atmosphere is simulated with the tracer transport model of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies. The simulated seasonal variations of dust concentrations show general reasonable agreement with the observed distributions, as do the size distributions at several observing sites. The discrepancies between the simulated and the observed dust concentrations point to regions of significant land surface modification. Monthly distribution of aerosol optical depths are calculated from the distribution of dust particle sizes. The maximum optical depth due to dust is 0.4-0.5 in the seasonal mean. The main uncertainties, about a factor of 3-5, in calculating optical thicknesses arise from the crude resolution of soil particle sizes, from insufficient constraint by the total dust loading in the atmosphere, and from our ignorance about adhesion, agglomeration, uplift, and size distributions of fine dust particles (less than 1 micrometer).

  5. Establishing a Functional Link Between African Dust and Region-wide Coral Reef Decline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, M. L.; Barber, R. T.

    2003-12-01

    For nearly thirty years, coral reefs in the Western Atlantic and Caribbean basin have experienced historically unprecedented declines. Algal blooms, mass coral bleaching, disease outbreaks and shifts in the dominance of benthic coral-competitors were first documented in the 1970s and have increased in frequency, intensity, variety and range over the past two decades. Recent studies of decreasing coral cover document regional losses averaging nearly 80% over this period. Here, we provide experimental evidence that increased supplies of iron-rich eolian dust from Africa to typically iron-poor marine environments throughout the region could have played a key role in these profound changes. Atmospheric inputs of "new" micronutrients, especially iron, have the potential to overcome limitations to the growth of opportunistic coral-competitors and the virulence of coral pathogens. Microcosm and mesocosm experiments with a putative bacterial pathogen of stony corals, Aurantimonas coralicida, and a temperate stony coral, Oculina arbuscula, provide a means to test the functional relationship between iron availability, microbial growth and coral health. Iron limitation of A. coralicida growth rates is readily induced by the addition of synthetic chelators such as 2,2' Dipyridyl to bacterial cultures at relatively low concentrations (e.g. 10 μ M). This growth limitation is reversed by 100 nM over-enrichments of pure reagent-grade iron as well as iron-rich "synthetic dust" derived from African lake-bed sediments. The Chrome-azurol S assay demonstrates that A. coralicida also synthesizes high-affinity iron-capture mechanisms (i.e. siderophores) that may serve as critical determinants of virulence. Finally, our experimental mesocosms are based on oligotrophic Mediterranean seawater and permit controlled experimentation under relatively low iron ( ˜5 nM) conditions. Using this system, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of PCR-amplified ribosomal DNA

  6. Impact of Long-Range Dust Transport on Northern California in Spring 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron-Smith, P; Bergmann, D; Chuang, C; Bench, G; Cliff, S; Kelly, P; Perry, K; VanCuren, T

    2005-02-10

    It has been well documented that spectacular dust storms in Asia (e.g. the events in 1998 and 2001) can affect the USA through long-range transport of dust across the Pacific. However, our observations and modeling show that the majority of dust at sites in Lassen National Park and Trinity Alps (Northern California) in spring 2002 (a year with no spectacular Asian dust events) is still from long-range intercontinental transport across the Pacific. We implemented the interactive dust emission algorithm of Ginoux et al. (2004) into the LLNL 3-D global atmospheric chemistry and aerosol transport model (IMPACT), then ran the model using a separate tracer for each dust emission region, using hi-resolution (1 x 1 degree) meteorological data from the NASA GMAO GEOS-3 assimilation system for 2001 and 2002. We also experimentally analyzed size- and time-resolved aerosol samples at Lassen National Park and Trinity Alps in the spring of 2002, which were taken as part of NOAA's ITCT 2k2 measurement campaign. The model-predicted time-series of soil dust over Northern California agrees remarkably well with our measurements, with a strong temporal correlation between the observations and intercontinental transport of dust across the Pacific in the model. Hence, we conclude that the majority of dust we sampled in Northern California in spring 2002, with aerodynamic diameters of 0.56-5 microns, is from long-range intercontinental transport across the Pacific. The strong correlations also strongly validate atmospheric transport in the IMPACT model over the Northern Pacific in spring.

  7. Observation of the simultaneous transport of Asian mineral dust aerosols with anthropogenic pollutants using a POPC during a long-lasting dust event in late spring 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xiaole; Uno, Itsushi; Hara, Yukari; Kuribayashi, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Shigekazu; Shimohara, Takaaki; Wang, Zifa

    2015-03-01

    We observed a long-lasting dust event from 25 May to 2 June 2014, using a polarization optical particle counter (POPC). The transport of dust plumes over East Asia was verified on the basis of observations of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, a lidar network, and surface synoptic observation stations. Mixing of dust and anthropogenic pollutants was investigated according to the variation in the depolarization ratio as a function of particle size. The nonsphericity of dust particles varied due to the impact of anthropogenic pollutants on their pathway. In the coarse mode, dust particles always had a clear nonspherical configuration, although large amounts of nitrate were also present. Supermicron particles are occasionally present in a spherical configuration, possibly due to the complex mixing of natural dust and anthropogenic particles. Statistically, ~64% of the total nitrate mass was deemed to be transported from outside of Japan due to a trapping effect in the dust plume.

  8. Observation of Dust Aging Processes During Transport from Africa into the Caribbean - A Lagrangian Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinzierl, B.; Sauer, D. N.; Walser, A.; Dollner, M.; Reitebuch, O.; Gross, S.; Chouza, F.; Ansmann, A.; Toledano, C.; Freudenthaler, V.; Kandler, K.; Schäfler, A.; Baumann, R.; Tegen, I.; Heinold, B.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol particles are regularly transported over long distances impacting air quality, health, weather and climate thousands of kilometers downwind of the source. During transport, particle properties are modified thereby changing the associated impact on the radiation budget. Although mineral dust is of key importance for the climate system many questions such as the change of the dust size distribution during long-range transport, the role of wet and dry removal mechanisms, and the complex interaction between mineral dust and clouds remain open. In June/July 2013, the Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE: http://www.pa.op.dlr.de/saltrace) was conducted to study the transport and transformation of Saharan mineral dust. Besides ground-based lidar and in-situ instruments deployed on Cape Verde, Barbados and Puerto Rico, the DLR research aircraft Falcon was equipped with an extended aerosol in-situ instrumentation, a nadir-looking 2-μm wind lidar and instruments for standard meteorological parameters. During SALTRACE, five large dust outbreaks were studied by ground-based, airborne and satellite measurements between Senegal, Cape Verde, the Caribbean, and Florida. Highlights included the Lagrangian sampling of a dust plume in the Cape Verde area on 17 June which was again measured with the same instrumentation on 21 and 22 June 2013 near Barbados. Between Cape Verde and Barbados, the aerosol optical thickness (500 nm) decreased from 0.54 to 0.26 and the stratification of the dust layers changed significantly from a rather homogenous structure near Africa to a 3-layer structure with embedded cumulus clouds in the Caribbean. In the upper part of the dust layers in the Caribbean, the aerosol properties were similar to the observations near Africa. In contrast, much more variability in the dust properties was observed between 0.7 and 2.5 km altitude probably due to interaction of the mineral dust with clouds. In our

  9. North African dust deposition and hydroclimate over the last 60 ka: A combined view from the east and west of the continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsley, C. W.; McGee, D.; Bradtmiller, L. I.; Tierney, J. E.; Winckler, G.; Stuut, J. B. W.; deMenocal, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    Past changes in atmospheric circulation and hydroclimate over North Africa can be explored by reconstructing eolian dust accumulation in both East and West African margin sediments. Recent high-resolution reconstructions of dust deposition from West Africa (1) indicate dramatic changes in North African dust emissions over the last 20 ka, with comparable results to those found in the terrigenous accumulation rates at nearby ODP Hole 658C (2). A high-resolution record of aridity from East Africa using δDwax indicates dramatic changes in hydroclimate over the past 40 ka (3). The records show similar trends with arid conditions/high dust emissions seen during the Last Glacial Maximum, the Younger Dryas and Heinrich Event 1 (H1), and the wettest conditions of the past 40,000 years with accompanying low dust emissions during the African Humid Period. This study has two goals: 1) Extend the dust flux and terrigeneous accumulation records from West Africa back to 35 ka and 60 ka respectively, to provide quantitative estimates of the magnitude of eolian deposition changes associated with previous Heinrich Stadials (H2 to H6) and summer insolation minima/maxima; 2) Construct a high-resolution record of eolian dust accumulation rates off the East African margin over the past 20 ka using the same sample material as (3) allowing quantitative estimates of the magnitude of dust flux changes associated with abrupt changes in hydroclimate and provide a direct comparison of dust flux and δDwax. The combination of these study areas from both sides of the African continent, and comparison of the dust and leaf wax proxies promises to provide a more complete picture of hydroclimate changes accompanying orbital- and millennial-scale climate changes in North Africa over the last 60,000 years. 1. EPSL 371-372, 163-176. 2. Paleoceanography 21, PA4203. 3. Science 342, 843-846.

  10. Properties and transport of Asian dust from 10 years of MISR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikova, O. V.; Sokolik, I. N.; Garay, M. J.; Wu, D. L.

    2009-12-01

    We use the 10-year aerosol data record from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) aboard the Terra satellite to investigate climatological linkages between the dust source activities, mid-range, and long-range transport of Asian dust. The inter-annual and seasonal variability of Asian dust loadings and properties as retrieved by MISR at selected regions along the transport routes was investigated. In particular, we examine the Taklamakan and East and Central Gobi regions (dust sources), South Korea and Japan regions (mid-range transport), and the North Pacific region along the northwestern U.S. coast (long-range transport). To avoid the gridding and averaging effects in Level 3 products, we use the Level 2 MISR swath data. Within each selected region, the analysis was performed to examine the multi-annual mean and variability of the aerosol optical depth and particle nonsphericity as well as time-lag correlation between the regions, taking into account the effects of MISR sampling and cloud screening. The results will be presented and interpreted in the context of atmospheric dynamics variability, including variability of meteorological regimes in dust sources and the large-scale atmospheric circulation features controlling the trans-Pacific transport of Asian dust.

  11. Biogeochemical Impact of Long-Range Transported Dust over Northern South China Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee; Wang, S. H.; Hsu, N. C.

    2011-01-01

    Transpacific transport and impact of Asian dust aerosols have been well documented (e.g., results from ACE-Asia and regional follow-on campaigns), but little is known about dust invasion to the South China Sea (SCS). On 19-21 March 2010, a fierce Asian dust storm affected large areas from the Gobi deserts to the West Pacific, including Taiwan and Hong Kong. As a pilot study of the 7-SEAS (Seven South East Asian Studies) in the northern SCS, detailed characteristics of long-range transported dust aerosols were first observed by a comprehensive set of ground-based instruments deployed at the Dongsha islands (20deg42'52" N, 116deg43'51" E). Aerosol measurements such as particle mass concentrations, size distribution, optical properties, hygroscopicity, and vertical profiles help illustrate the evolution of this dust outbreak. Our results indicate that these dust particles were mixed with anthropogenic and marine aerosols, and transported near the surface. Satellite assessment of biogeochemical impact of dust deposition into open oceans is hindered by our current inability in retrieving areal dust properties and ocean colors over an extensive period of time, particularly under the influence of cloudy conditions. In this paper, we analyze the changes of retrieved Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration over the northern SCS, considered as oligotophic waters in the spring, from long-term SeaWiFS measurements since 1997. Over the past decade, six long-range transported dust events are identified based on spatiotemporal evolutions of PM10 measurements from regional monitoring stations, with the aid of trajectory analysis. Multi-year composites of Chl-a imagery for dust event and non-dust background during March-April are applied to overcome insufficient retrievals of Chl-a due to cloudy environment. Due to anthropogenic modification within a shallow boundary layer off the densely populated and industrial southeast coast of China, the iron ion activation of deliquescent dust

  12. The effects of transported Asian dust on the composition and concentration of ambient fungi in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, H. Jasmine; Chan, Chang-Chuan; Rao, Carol Y.; Lee, Chung-Te; Chuang, Ying-Chih; Chiu, Yueh-Hsiu; Hsu, Hsiao-Hsien; Wu, Yi-Hua

    2012-03-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of transported Asian dust and other environmental parameters on the levels and compositions of ambient fungi in the atmosphere of northern Taiwan. We monitored Asian dust events in Taipei County, Taiwan from January 2003 to June 2004. We used duplicate Burkard portable air samplers to collect ambient fungi before, during, and after dust events. Six transported Asian dust events were monitored during the study period. Elevated concentrations of Aspergillus ( A. niger, specifically), Coelomycetes, Rhinocladiella, Sporothrix and Verticillium were noted ( p < 0.05) during Asian dust periods. Botryosporium and Trichothecium were only recovered during dust event days. Multiple regression analysis showed that fungal levels were positively associated with temperature, wind speed, rainfall, non-methane hydrocarbons and particulates with aerodynamic diameters ≤10 μm (PM10), and negatively correlated with relative humidity and ozone. Our results demonstrated that Asian dust events affected ambient fungal concentrations and compositions in northern Taiwan. Ambient fungi also had complex dynamics with air pollutants and meteorological factors. Future studies should explore the health impacts of ambient fungi during Asian dust events, adjusting for the synergistic/antagonistic effects of weather and air pollutants.

  13. Dust exposure and pneumoconiosis in a South African pottery. 2. Pneumoconiosis and factors influencing reading of radiological opacities.

    PubMed

    Rees, D; Steinberg, M; Becker, P J; Solomon, A

    1992-07-01

    A cross sectional radiological survey of workers exposed to pottery dust during the manufacture of wall tiles and bathroom fittings was conducted in a South African factory. Roughly one third of workers with 15 or more years of service in high dust sections of the factory had pneumoconiosis. Previously undiagnosed advanced cases, including two with progressive massive fibrosis, were working in dusty occupations. A firm diagnosis of potters' pneumoconiosis was made in 11 of the 358 workers radiographed; all had served more than 10 years suggesting that radiography of workers with more than 10 years service would be a successful case finding strategy in South Africa. A combination of rounded and irregular opacities was the most common radiological finding in the workers with pneumoconiosis (55%). Three readers reported on the chest radiographs, and all found an association between small radiological opacities, which were usually irregular or a combination of irregular and rounded, and exposure to pottery dust. The occurrence of irregular radiological opacities in workers exposed to pottery dust deserves further study. The least experienced reader significantly associated age with small opacities when duration of service (years) was used to measure exposure to dust. Sex was not an important predictor of radiological changes consistent with pneumoconiosis. Breast shadows were not an important cause of false positive readings and participating women did not develop pneumoconiosis after less exposure than men.

  14. Transport and trapping of dust particles in a potential well created by inductively coupled diffused plasmas.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Mukherjee, S; Bandyopadhyay, P

    2016-05-01

    A versatile linear dusty (complex) plasma device is designed to study the transport and dynamical behavior of dust particles in a large volume. Diffused inductively coupled plasma is generated in the background of argon gas. A novel technique is used to introduce the dust particles in the main plasma by striking a secondary direct current glow discharge. These dust particles are found to get trapped in an electrostatic potential well, which is formed due to the combination of the ambipolar electric field caused by diffusive plasma and the field produced by the charged glass wall of the vacuum chamber. According to the requirements, the volume of the dust cloud can be controlled very precisely by tuning the plasma and discharge parameters. The present device can be used to address the underlying physics behind the transport of dust particles, self-excited dust acoustic waves, and instabilities. The detailed design of this device, plasma production and characterization, trapping and transport of the dust particle, and some of the preliminary experimental results are presented.

  15. Transport and trapping of dust particles in a potential well created by inductively coupled diffused plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Mukherjee, S.; Bandyopadhyay, P.

    2016-05-01

    A versatile linear dusty (complex) plasma device is designed to study the transport and dynamical behavior of dust particles in a large volume. Diffused inductively coupled plasma is generated in the background of argon gas. A novel technique is used to introduce the dust particles in the main plasma by striking a secondary direct current glow discharge. These dust particles are found to get trapped in an electrostatic potential well, which is formed due to the combination of the ambipolar electric field caused by diffusive plasma and the field produced by the charged glass wall of the vacuum chamber. According to the requirements, the volume of the dust cloud can be controlled very precisely by tuning the plasma and discharge parameters. The present device can be used to address the underlying physics behind the transport of dust particles, self-excited dust acoustic waves, and instabilities. The detailed design of this device, plasma production and characterization, trapping and transport of the dust particle, and some of the preliminary experimental results are presented.

  16. Transport and trapping of dust particles in a potential well created by inductively coupled diffused plasmas.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Mukherjee, S; Bandyopadhyay, P

    2016-05-01

    A versatile linear dusty (complex) plasma device is designed to study the transport and dynamical behavior of dust particles in a large volume. Diffused inductively coupled plasma is generated in the background of argon gas. A novel technique is used to introduce the dust particles in the main plasma by striking a secondary direct current glow discharge. These dust particles are found to get trapped in an electrostatic potential well, which is formed due to the combination of the ambipolar electric field caused by diffusive plasma and the field produced by the charged glass wall of the vacuum chamber. According to the requirements, the volume of the dust cloud can be controlled very precisely by tuning the plasma and discharge parameters. The present device can be used to address the underlying physics behind the transport of dust particles, self-excited dust acoustic waves, and instabilities. The detailed design of this device, plasma production and characterization, trapping and transport of the dust particle, and some of the preliminary experimental results are presented. PMID:27250421

  17. Atmospheric transport and deposition of mineral dust to the ocean: implications for research needs.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Michael; Prospero, Joseph M; Baker, Alex R; Dentener, Frank; Ickes, Luisa; Liss, Peter S; Mahowald, Natalie M; Nickovic, Slobodan; García-Pando, Carlos Pérez; Rodríguez, Sergio; Sarin, Manmohan; Tegen, Ina; Duce, Robert A

    2012-10-01

    This paper reviews our knowledge of the measurement and modeling of mineral dust emissions to the atmosphere, its transport and deposition to the ocean, the release of iron from the dust into seawater, and the possible impact of that nutrient on marine biogeochemistry and climate. Of particular concern is our poor understanding of the mechanisms and quantities of dust deposition as well as the extent of iron solubilization from the dust once it enters the ocean. Model estimates of dust deposition in remote oceanic regions vary by more than a factor of 10. The fraction of the iron in dust that is available for use by marine phytoplankton is still highly uncertain. There is an urgent need for a long-term marine atmospheric surface measurement network, spread across all oceans. Because the southern ocean is characterized by large areas with high nitrate but low chlorophyll surface concentrations, that region is particularly sensitive to the input of dust and iron. Data from this region would be valuable, particularly at sites downwind from known dust source areas in South America, Australia, and South Africa. Coordinated field experiments involving both atmospheric and marine measurements are recommended to address the complex and interlinked processes and role of dust/Fe fertilization on marine biogeochemistry and climate.

  18. Differential Natural Selection of Human Zinc Transporter Genes between African and Non-African Populations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Li, Jing; Tian, Lei; Lu, Dongsheng; Yuan, Kai; Yuan, Yuan; Xu, Shuhua

    2015-01-01

    Zinc transporters play important roles in all eukaryotes by maintaining the rational zinc concentration in cells. However, the diversity of zinc transporter genes (ZTGs) remains poorly studied. Here, we investigated the genetic diversity of 24 human ZTGs based on the 1000 Genomes data. Some ZTGs show small population differences, such as SLC30A6 with a weighted-average FST (WA-FST = 0.015), while other ZTGs exhibit considerably large population differences, such as SLC30A9 (WA-FST = 0.284). Overall, ZTGs harbor many more highly population-differentiated variants compared with random genes. Intriguingly, we found that SLC30A9 was underlying natural selection in both East Asians (EAS) and Africans (AFR) but in different directions. Notably, a non-synonymous variant (rs1047626) in SLC30A9 is almost fixed with 96.4% A in EAS and 92% G in AFR, respectively. Consequently, there are two different functional haplotypes exhibiting dominant abundance in AFR and EAS, respectively. Furthermore, a strong correlation was observed between the haplotype frequencies of SLC30A9 and distributions of zinc contents in soils or crops. We speculate that the genetic differentiation of ZTGs could directly contribute to population heterogeneity in zinc transporting capabilities and local adaptations of human populations in regard to the local zinc state or diets, which have both evolutionary and medical implications. PMID:25927708

  19. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in household dust near diesel transport routes.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chung-Yih; Chen, Heng-Chun; Cheng, Fang-Ching; Huang, Li-Ru; Chien, Po-Shan; Wang, Jing-Ya

    2012-02-01

    A river-dredging project has been undertaken in Nantou, Taiwan. A large number of diesel vehicles carrying gravel and sand shuttle back and forth on the main roads. Ten stations along major thoroughfares were selected as the exposure sites for testing, while a small village located about 9 km from a main traffic route was selected as the control site. Levels of household dust loading at the exposure sites (60.3 mg/m(2)) were significantly higher than those at the control site (38.2 mg/m(2)). The loading (μg/m(2)) of t-PAHs (total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) in the household dust at the exposure sites was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than was the case at the control site. The diagnostic ratios of PAHs showed that diesel emissions were the dominant source of PAHs at the exposure sites. The lack of a significant correlation between the concentrations of Fe and t-PAHs suggested that the t-PAHs in household dust might come from diverse sources. However, a significant correlation (P = 0.003) between the concentrations of Mo and t-PAHs implied that the most of the t-PAHs in the household dust might have resulted from diesel emissions. The lifetime cancer risks of BaP(eq) from household dust exposure were markedly higher than those resulting from inhalation exposure.

  20. Characteristics and transport of organochlorine pesticides in urban environment: air, dust, rain, canopy throughfall, and runoff.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Ye, Youbin; Hu, Dan; Ou, Langbo; Wang, Xuejun

    2010-11-01

    Characteristics and transport of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in urban multiple environments, including air, dust, rain, canopy throughfall, and runoff water, are explored in this study. Hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) dominated in both air and rain water, and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) related substances showed a higher affinity to dust. Relatively high concentrations of DDT and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) in air, rain and dust imply that technical DDT in the environment has been degrading, and there may be unknown local or regional emission sources that contain DDTs in the study area. Source identification showed that DDTs in Beijing urban environments with a fresh signature may originate from the atmospheric transport from remote areas. The ratio of α-/γ-HCH in dust, rain, canopy throughfall and runoff were close to 1, indicating the possible use of lindane. OCPs in runoff were transported from various sources including rain, dust, and canopy throughfall. In runoff, DDTs and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) were mainly transported from dust, and HCHs were mainly from rain and canopy throughfall.

  1. Understanding the Transport of Patagonian Dust and Its Influence on Marine Biological Activity in the South Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Matthew; Meskhidze, Nicholas; Kiliyanpilakkil, Praju; Gasso, Santiago

    2010-01-01

    Modeling and remote sensing techniques were applied to examine the horizontal and vertical transport pathways of Patagonian dust and quantify the effect of soluble-iron- laden mineral dust deposition on marine primary productivity in the South Atlantic Ocean (SAO) surface waters. The global chemistry transport model GEOS-Chem, implemented with an iron dissolution scheme, was applied to evaluate the atmospheric transport and deposition of mineral dust and bioavailable iron during two dust outbreaks originating in the source regions of Patagonia. In addition to this "rapidly released" iron, offline calculations were also carried out to estimate the amount of bioavailable iron leached during the residence time of dust in the ocean mixed layer. Model simulations showed that the horizontal and vertical transport pathways of Patagonian dust plumes were largely influenced by the synoptic meteorological patterns of high and low pressure systems. Model-predicted horizontal and vertical transport pathways of Patagonian dust over the SAO were in reasonable agreement with remotely-sensed data. Comparison between remotely-sensed and offline calculated ocean surface chlorophyll-a concentrations indicated that, for the two dust outbreaks examined in this study, the deposition of bioavailable iron in the SAO through atmospheric pathways was insignificant. As the two dust transport episodes examined here represent typical outflows of mineral dust from South American sources, our study suggests that the atmospheric deposition of mineral dust is unlikely to induce large scale marine primary productivity and carbon sequestration in the South Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean.

  2. Long-range transport of Saharan dust and chemical transformations over the Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanasopoulou, E.; Protonotariou, A.; Papangelis, G.; Tombrou, M.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Gerasopoulos, E.

    2016-09-01

    Three recent Saharan dust outbreaks during different seasons (4-6 days in winter of 2009, late autumn of 2010 and summer of 2011) are selected in order to study the chemical footprint and aging processes of dust intrusions over the Eastern Mediterranean (EM). The applied model system (PMCAMx, WRF and GEOS-CHEM) and methodology are found competent to reproduce dust production, long-range transport and chemical transformations over the EM, with the synergistic use of synoptic patterns analysis, optical depth retrievals, back-trajectories, surface and satellite aerosol measurements. The dust loads were high during the cold period events and much lighter during summertime, when transport was mainly in the free troposphere. In all cases, dust originated from the northwest and/or west Saharan desert and reached the EM from the west/southwest. Sensitivity runs underlie the effect of dust transport on the chemical constituents of aerosols over the EM and show a large impact on calcium (70-90% of maximum daily values 2-5 μg m-3), with its gradient at surface level being around -10% per 100 km along the dust pathway. For the cold period cases, this value can also be considered analogous to the dust dissipation ratio, because the plume is vertically extended down to the surface layers. Interestingly, the surface particulate nitrate concentrations over the EM are reversely affected by the approaching dust loads, exhibiting the highest values (up to 6 μg m-3) and the largest dust fraction (ca. 70%) during summertime. This is attributed to the enhanced nitric acid formation under high atmospheric temperature and insolation, its uptake onto the carbonate dust particles, and their effective accumulation, due to low deposition rates over the sea and scarce precipitation. Sulfate formation onto dust particles is found insignificant (rapid reaction with ammonia and/or sea-salt), while the influence of dust and sea-salt on sodium, when spatio-temporal averages are calculated, is

  3. Review of dust transport and mitigation technologies in lunar and Martian atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshar-Mohajer, Nima; Wu, Chang-Yu; Curtis, Jennifer Sinclair; Gaier, James R.

    2015-09-01

    Dust resuspension and deposition is a ubiquitous phenomenon in all lunar and Martian missions. The near-term plans to return to the Moon as a stepping stone to further exploration of Mars and beyond bring scientists' attention to development and evaluation of lunar and Martian dust mitigation technologies. In this paper, different lunar and Martian dust transport mechanisms are presented, followed by a review of previously developed dust mitigation technologies including fluidal, mechanical, electrical and passive self-cleaning methods for lunar/Martian installed surfaces along with filtration for dust control inside cabins. Key factors in choosing the most effective dust mitigation technology are recognized to be the dust transport mechanism, energy consumption, environment, type of surface materials, area of the surface and surface functionality. While electrical methods operating at higher voltages are identified to be suitable for small but light sensitive surfaces, pre-treatment of the surface is effective for cleaning thermal control surfaces, and mechanical methods are appropriate for surfaces with no concerns of light blockage, surface abrasion and 100% cleaning efficiency. Findings from this paper can help choose proper surface protection/cleaning for future space explorations. Hybrid techniques combining the advantages of different methods are recommended.

  4. Aging process of Saharan dust during transport over the Atlantic Ocean: Calcite reactivity and sulfate coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desboeufs, K. V.; Cautenet, G.; Minvielle, F.; Lasserre, F.

    2003-04-01

    Several field measurements emphasized that dust particles are mixed with sulfate during their transport. This state of mixing could be important on the climatic effect of these particles, since the optical properties of particles are not conservative in the case of internal mixing, and the addition of soluble species on the dust can modify their capacity to act as CCN. The aging process of dust particles in Tropical Africa and Atlantic Ocean is investigated using the three dimensional transport RAMS and chemistry model coupled on line. To describe the mixing process of dust, we considered the chemical reaction occurring between the calcite (calcium carbonate) in the Saharan dust and the various sulfur species to yield sulfate coating. The results by the model predictions are consistent with field and observations studies. We will discuss about the potential consequences of this coating on the direct and indirect effect of mineral dust in the Earth radiative budget. An analysis of cloud occurrence observed by satellites and mixed dust content will be presented.

  5. AP-42 ADDITIONS AND REVISIONS - TRANSPORTABILITY FACTORS FOR FUGITIVE DUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    The product is a table of factors, one for each county in the US, reflecting the portion of fugitive dust removed very close to the source via impaction on vegetation and similar mechanisms. Factors were based on land cover in area (county or grid cell) A praft final product was...

  6. Regional modeling of natural dust in the United State: Source emission, transport, and photochemical impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, D. Q.; Mathur, R.; Mobley, D.; Wong, D.; Yu, S.

    2008-12-01

    We developed a dust emission module to estimate the wind-blown dust emissions from dessert and agricultural land using local wind speed, threshold wind speed to initiate erosion, soil texture and moisture, land use type, and vegetation coverage. The estimated dust is then partitioned to create a fraction of the total sediment mobilized by the wind for vertical transport and subsequent regional circulation. This dust module also included detailed chemical speciation and size distribution, and a geographic filter to eliminate unrealistic emission sources (e.g., mountain peaks with dry soil and strong winds). We then couple the dust module with a regional air quality model CMAQ to: (1) study if the WRF-CMAQ national air quality forecasting system can accurately predict major dust storms occurring in the United States; 2) estimate the annual budget of natural dust emissions from agricultural and dessert lands and their relative importance for total PM2.5 over different U.S. regions; and 3) examine the effects of dust emissions on photolysis rates and consequently on levels of tropospheric O3 and atmospheric oxidants.

  7. Transport of Australian Continental Dust to Australia's Great Barrier Reef Region: First Results From Sampling, Remote Sensing, Synoptic and Trajectory Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapper, N.; O'Loingsigh, T.; de Deckker, P.; Cohen, D.

    2009-04-01

    As part of a large multi-disciplinary project funded by the Australian Research Council and in collaboration with the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, we established in mid-2008 three PM 2.5 samplers in eastern Australia to determine possible transport of continental dust from the major dust source region of the Lake Eyre Basin (LEB). These samplers were located at Fowlers Gap, New South Wales [NSW] (31.09S, 141.70E), Mount Stromlo, NSW (35.30S, 149.00E) and Heron Island, Queensland (23.44S, 151.83E). The latter location is of particular significance because of its proximity to the World Heritage Great Barrier Reef (GBR) and to the tropical rainforest of coastal North Queensland. In previous studies, dust and associated organic material of African origin has been associated with rainforest fertilisation in Amazonia and coral bleaching in the Carribean. In this presentation three case studies of continental dust transport to Heron Island that occurred in the first four months of sampling are examined. In each case transport of soil material from the LEB region and/or western NSW is confirmed by the nature of material sampled, by remote sensing of the dust, by forward and backward air parcel trajectory analysis and by synoptic analysis. In each case the dust arrived over Heron Island 3-7 days after passing over the southern samplers, generally having followed an anti-clockwise curved path to approach Heron Island from the southeast. The potential significance of this finding for the GBR is briefly discussed.

  8. Long-range transport and vertical structure of Asian dust from CALIPSO and surface measurements during PACDEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianping; Minnis, Patrick; Chen, Bin; Huang, Zhongwei; Liu, Zhaoyan; Zhao, Qingyun; Yi, Yuhong; Ayers, J. Kirk

    2008-12-01

    Knowledge of long-range transport and vertical distribution of Asian dust aerosols in the free troposphere is important for estimating their impact on climate. Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO), surface micropulse lidar (MPL), and standard surface measurements are used to directly observe the long-range transport and vertical distribution of Asian dust aerosols in the free troposphere during the Pacific Dust Experiment (PACDEX). The MPL measurements were made at the Loess Plateau (35.95°N, 104.1°E) near the major dust source regions of the Taklamakan and Gobi deserts. Dust events are more frequent in the Taklamakan, where floating dust dominates, while more intensive, less frequent dust storms are more common in the Gobi region. The vertical distribution of the CALIPSO backscattering/depolarization ratios indicate that nonspherically shaped dust aerosols floated from near the ground to an altitude of approximately 9 km around the source regions. This suggests the possible long-range transport of entrained dust aerosols via upper tropospheric westerly jets. A very distinct large depolarization layer was also identified between 8 and 10 km over eastern China and the western Pacific Ocean corresponding to dust aerosols transported from the Taklamakan and Gobi areas, as confirmed by back trajectory analyses. The combination of these dust sources results in a two-layer or multilayered dust structure over eastern China and the western Pacific Ocean.

  9. Columnar Aerosol Single-Scattering Albedo and Phase Function Retrieved from Sky Radiance Over the Ocean: Measurements of African Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cattrall, Christopher; Carder, Kendall L.; Gordon, Howard R.

    2001-01-01

    The single-scattering albedo and phase function of African mineral dust are retrieved from ground-based measurements of sky radiance collected in the Florida Keys. The retrieval algorithm employs the radiative transfer equation to solve by iteration for these two properties which best reproduce the observed sky radiance using an assumed aerosol vertical structure and measured aerosol optical depth. Thus, no assumptions regarding particle size, shape, or composition are required. The single-scattering albedo, presented at fourteen wavelengths between 380 and 870 nm, displays a spectral shape expected of iron-bearing minerals but is much higher than current dust models allow. This indicates the absorption of light by mineral dust is significantly overestimated in climate studies. Uncertainty in the retrieved albedo is less than 0.02 due to the small uncertainty in the solar-reflectance-based calibration (12.2%) method employed. The phase function retrieved at 860 nm is very robust under simulations of expected experimental errors, indicating retrieved phase functions at this wavelength may be confidently used to describe aerosol scattering characteristics. The phase function retrieved at 443 nm is very sensitive to expected experimental errors and should not be used to describe aerosol scattering. Radiative forcing by aerosol is the greatest source of uncertainty in current climate models. These results will help reduce uncertainty in the absorption of light by mineral dust. Assessment of the radiative impact of aerosol species is a key component to NASA's Earth System Enterprise.

  10. A Comparative Study of Mesoscale Modeling of Smoke and Dust Direct Radiative Effects over Northern Sub-Saharan African Region.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Y.; Wang, J.; Ichoku, C. M.; Zhang, F.

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to investigate the radiative effects of smoke and dust aerosols and of the underlying surface in the Northern Sub-Saharan African (NSSA) region using the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem). We performed a yearlong (from September 2009 to September 2010) WRF-Chem simulation using hourly emissions from the Fire Energetics and Emissions Research (FEER) emission dataset derived by multiplying emission coefficients based on aerosol and fire observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments aboard Terra and Aqua with fire radiative energy (FRE) measurements from the geostationary Meteosat Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI). The geographic distribution and vertical profiles of simulated dust and smoke aerosols were evaluated with MODIS true color images and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar data with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIPSO) total attenuated backscatter, aerosol extinction coefficient and depolarization data. We found that simulated aerosol vertical concentration profiles are consistent with the above CALIPSO data. Surface albedo and columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD) sensitivity to smoke and dust simulations are performed with WRF-Chem. The simulated surface albedo and AOD were compared with MODIS albedo product (MODIS43) and AOD measurements from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). The modeled smoke/dust clear-sky and all-sky radiative impacts were analyzed in this study and reveal interesting results that will be discussed.

  11. Cross-shift peak expiratory flow changes are unassociated with respirable coal dust exposure among South African coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Naidoo, R.N.; Robins, T.G.; Becklake, M.; Seixas, N.; Thompson, M.L.

    2007-12-15

    he objectives of this study were to determine whether cross-shift changes in peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) were related to respirable dust exposure in South African coalminers. Fifty workers were randomly selected from a cohort of 684 miners from 3 bituminous coal mines in Mpumalanga, South Africa. Peak expiratory efforts were measured prior to the commencement of the shift, and at the end of the shift on at least two occasions separated by at least 2 weeks, with full shift personal dust sampling being conducted on each occasion for each participant. Interviews were conducted, work histories were obtained and cumulative exposure estimates were constructed. Regression models examined the associations of cross-shift changes in PEFR with current and cumulative exposure, controlling for shift, smoking and past history of tuberculosis. There were marginal differences in cross-shift PEFR (ranging from 0.1 to 2 L/min). Linear regression analyses showed no association between cross-shift change in PEFR and current or cumulative exposure. The specific shift worked by participants in the study showed no effect. Our study showed no association between current respirable dust exposure and cross-shift changes in PEFR. There was a non-significant protective effect of cumulative dust exposure on the outcome, suggesting the presence of a 'healthy worker survivor effect' in this data.

  12. Potential transport pathways of dust emanating from the playa of Ebinur Lake, Xinjiang, in arid northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Yongxiao; Abuduwaili, Jilili; Ma, Long; Wu, Na; Liu, Dongwei

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the HYSPLIT model, driven with reanalysis meteorological data from 1978 to 2013, was used to understand the potential transport characteristics of dust and salt dust emanating from the playa of Ebinur Lake in arid northwest China. Daily air parcel trajectories were computed forward for 8 days from an origin centered over Ebinur Lake at 100 m above ground level. Air parcel trajectory density plots were mapped for seven levels: 0-100 m agl., 100-500 m agl., 500-1000 m agl., 1000-1500 m agl., 1500-2000 m agl., 2000-3000 m agl., and 3000-5000 m agl. These show that potential dust transport pathways have clear seasonal differentiation. The potential transport distance of dust and salt dust is greatest in spring and summer. In autumn and winter, the potential transport of the high-density air trajectory is below 1000 m traveling a shorter distance. Potential dust transport pathways showed notifying directivity in different seasons and heights. Southeast in spring and summer, and north to northeast in autumn and winter are the two main potential transport channels of dust and salt dust. Accordingly, dust and salt dust from the playa of Ebinur Lake may influence the atmospheric processes and biogeochemical cycles of a vast region. The main area of influence of dust and salt dust is close to the source area, and will significantly accelerate the melting of snow and ice in the Tianshan Mountains. This highlights the urgent need to combine remote sensing, isotope and other methods to further research the transport characteristics of dust and salt dust from the playa of the Ebinur Lake.

  13. Simulation of windblown dust transport from a mine tailings impoundment using a computational fluid dynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stovern, Michael; Felix, Omar; Csavina, Janae; Rine, Kyle P.; Russell, MacKenzie R.; Jones, Robert M.; King, Matt; Betterton, Eric A.; Sáez, A. Eduardo

    2014-09-01

    Mining operations are potential sources of airborne particulate metal and metalloid contaminants through both direct smelter emissions and wind erosion of mine tailings. The warmer, drier conditions predicted for the Southwestern US by climate models may make contaminated atmospheric dust and aerosols increasingly important, due to potential deleterious effects on human health and ecology. Dust emissions and dispersion of dust and aerosol from the Iron King Mine tailings in Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona, a Superfund site, are currently being investigated through in situ field measurements and computational fluid dynamics modeling. These tailings are heavily contaminated with lead and arsenic. Using a computational fluid dynamics model, we model dust transport from the mine tailings to the surrounding region. The model includes gaseous plume dispersion to simulate the transport of the fine aerosols, while individual particle transport is used to track the trajectories of larger particles and to monitor their deposition locations. In order to improve the accuracy of the dust transport simulations, both regional topographical features and local weather patterns have been incorporated into the model simulations. Results show that local topography and wind velocity profiles are the major factors that control deposition.

  14. Simulation of windblown dust transport from a mine tailings impoundment using a computational fluid dynamics model

    PubMed Central

    Stovern, Michael; Felix, Omar; Csavina, Janae; Rine, Kyle P.; Russell, MacKenzie R.; Jones, Robert M.; King, Matt; Betterton, Eric A.; Sáez, A. Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Mining operations are potential sources of airborne particulate metal and metalloid contaminants through both direct smelter emissions and wind erosion of mine tailings. The warmer, drier conditions predicted for the Southwestern US by climate models may make contaminated atmospheric dust and aerosols increasingly important, due to potential deleterious effects on human health and ecology. Dust emissions and dispersion of dust and aerosol from the Iron King Mine tailings in Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona, a Superfund site, are currently being investigated through in situ field measurements and computational fluid dynamics modeling. These tailings are heavily contaminated with lead and arsenic. Using a computational fluid dynamics model, we model dust transport from the mine tailings to the surrounding region. The model includes gaseous plume dispersion to simulate the transport of the fine aerosols, while individual particle transport is used to track the trajectories of larger particles and to monitor their deposition locations. In order to improve the accuracy of the dust transport simulations, both regional topographical features and local weather patterns have been incorporated into the model simulations. Results show that local topography and wind velocity profiles are the major factors that control deposition. PMID:25621085

  15. Dust-storm dynamics over Sistan region, Iran: Seasonality, transport characteristics and affected areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashki, A.; Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Francois, P.; Kosmopoulos, P. G.; Legrand, M.

    2015-03-01

    The present work examines the seasonality, dust-plume altitudinal variation and affected areas for dust storms originated from the Sistan region, southeastern Iran during the summer (June-September) months of the period 2001-2012 synthesizing local meteorological records, satellite observations (TOMS, OMI, METEOSAT, MODIS) and HYSPLIT forward trajectories. Dust-storm days (356 in total) are associated with visibility below 1 km at Zabol, Iran meteorological station with higher frequency and intensity in June and July. Monthly-mean composite maps of TOMS and OMI AI show high (>3-3.5) values over Sistan and nearby downwind areas. HYSPLIT forward-trajectory analysis at 500 m for air masses originated from Sistan on the dust-storm days shows that they usually follow an anti-clockwise transport direction at elevations usually below 2 km, initially moving southwards and then shifting to east-northeast when they are approaching the Arabian Sea coast. This is the result of the influence of the local topography and formation of thermal low-pressure systems over the arid lands. It is found that in few cases the dust storms from Sistan affect central/south Arabian Sea and India, while they control the aerosol loading over northernmost Arabian Sea. The Infrared Difference Dust Index (IDDI) images, which represent brightness temperature reduction due to dust presence over land, are used at specific periods of persistent dust storms over Sistan, confirming the main pathways of the dust plumes and illustrating the importance of the region as one of the most active dust sources in southwest Asia.

  16. Sensitivity Study of Cross-Atlantic Dust Transport to Dust Emissions, Chemical Aging and Removal Processes and Comparison with Ground and Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelkader, Mohamed; Metzger, Swen; Klingmüller, Klaus; Steil, Benedikt; Lelieveld, Jos

    2016-04-01

    Representing transatlantic dust transport is one of the challenges in climate modeling and of key importance, because of its large impact on the Earth's radiation budget. Desert dust, emitted from the Sahara, is regularly transported westwards across the Atlantic Ocean towards the Caribbean. The balance between emissions and removal processes, as well as the manifold chemical reactions control the impact of dust on the atmospheric composition and the interaction of dust with climate change. During transatlantic transport, dust undergoes chemical aging, which involves various heterogeneous reactions that strongly depend on the mineral composition of dust (alkalinity), the surface chemistry and the associated aerosol water uptake. In this study, different parameters affecting the long-range dust transport are studied with the atmospheric chemistry-climate model EMAC. We consider chemical speciation of primary sea salt and dust particles and account for major cations (Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2) and anions (Cl-, SO42-, HSO4-), calculated online with meteorology, i.e., feeding back onto precipitation and changing surface wind speed and roughness. We resolve the chemical aging of primary particles through explicit neutralization reactions of the cations and anions with major oxidation products (H2SO4, HNO3, HCl, NH3) from natural and anthropogenic air pollution sources, which can condense on the particles surface during long-range transport and undergo gas-liquid-solid aerosol partitioning, depending on the concentration level of emissions and the transport processes of the primary and secondary aerosols and their precursor gases. Comprehensive analysis of the different parameters affecting the long-range transport, which include the emission flux and particle size distributions, aging mechanism, convection scheme, wet and dry scavenging, show a strong dependence of the dust concentration and optical properties over the Caribbean mainly on the chemical aging of dust during long

  17. Sensitivity Study of Cross-Atlantic Dust Transport to Dust Emissions, Chemical Aging and Removal Processes and Comparison with Ground and Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, A.; Metzger, S. M.; Klingmüller, K.; Lelieveld, J.

    2015-12-01

    Representing trans-Atlantic dust transport is one of the challenges in climate modeling and of key importance, because of its large impact on the Earth's radiation budget. Desert dust, emitted from the Sahara, is regularly transported westwards across the Atlantic Ocean towards the Caribbean. The balance between emissions and removal processes, as well as the manifold chemical reactions control the impact of dust on the atmospheric composition and the interaction of dust with climate change. During trans-Atlantic transport, dust undergoes chemical aging, which involves various heterogeneous reactions that strongly depend on the mineral composition of dust (alkalinity), the surface chemistry and the associated aerosol water uptake. In this study, different parameters affecting the long-range dust transport are studied with the atmospheric chemistry-climate model EMAC. We consider chemical speciation of primary sea salt and dust particles and account for major cations (Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2) and anions (Cl-, SO42-, HSO4-), calculated online with meteorology, i.e., feeding back onto precipitation and changing surface wind speed and roughness. We resolve the chemical aging of primary particles through explicit neutralization reactions of the cations and anions with major oxidation products (H2SO4, HNO3, HCl, NH3) from natural and anthropogenic air pollution sources, which can condense on the particles surface during long-range transport and undergo gas-liquid-solid aerosol partitioning, depending on the concentration level of emissions and the transport processes of the primary and secondary aerosols and their precursor gases. Comprehensive analysis of the different parameters affecting the long-range transport, which include the emission flux and particle size distributions, aging mechanism, convection scheme, wet and dry scavenging, show a strong dependence of the dust concentration and optical properties over the Caribbean mainly on the chemical aging of dust during

  18. DUST TRANSPORT IN PROTOSTELLAR DISKS THROUGH TURBULENCE AND SETTLING

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, N. J.; Carballido, A.; Sano, T.

    2010-01-01

    We apply ionization balance and magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) calculations to investigate whether magnetic activity moderated by recombination on dust grains can account for the mass accretion rates and the mid-infrared spectra and variability of protostellar disks. The MHD calculations use the stratified shearing-box approach and include grain settling and the feedback from the changing dust abundance on the resistivity of the gas. The two-decade spread in accretion rates among solar-mass T Tauri stars is too large to result solely from variations in the grain size and stellar X-ray luminosity, but can plausibly be produced by varying these parameters together with the disk magnetic flux. The diverse shapes and strengths of the mid-infrared silicate bands can come from the coupling of grain settling to the distribution of the magnetorotational turbulence, through the following three effects. First, recombination on grains 1 mum or smaller yields a magnetically inactive dead zone extending more than two scale heights from the midplane, while turbulent motions in the magnetically active disk atmosphere overshoot the dead zone boundary by only about one scale height. Second, grains deep in the dead zone oscillate vertically in wave motions driven by the turbulent layer above, but on average settle at the rates found in laminar flow, so that the interior of the dead zone is a particle sink and the disk atmosphere will become dust-depleted unless resupplied from elsewhere. Third, with sufficient depletion, the dead zone is thinner and mixing dredges grains off the midplane. The last of these processes enables evolutionary signatures such as the degree of settling to sometimes decrease with age. The MHD results also show that the magnetic activity intermittently lifts clouds of small grains into the atmosphere. Consequently the photosphere height changes by up to one-third over timescales of a few orbits, while the extinction along lines of sight grazing the disk surface

  19. Constraints on the sources of branched GDGTs in open ocean sediments: dust transport or in situ production?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijers, J.; Schefuss, E.; Kim, J.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.; Schouten, S.

    2012-12-01

    Branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (brGDGTs) are membrane lipids synthesized by soil bacteria that, upon soil erosion, are transported by rivers to the ocean where they accumulate in the near shore sedimentary archive. The degrees of cyclisation (CBT) and methylation (MBT) of these compounds have been shown to relate to soil pH and annual mean air temperature [1]. Therefore, brGDGTs in near shore sedimentary archives can be used to estimate past continental air temperatures and enable a direct comparison of these to marine sea surface temperature estimates obtained from the same samples. In addition, brGDGT abundance relative to crenarchaeol, an isoprenoid GDGT synthesized by marine pelagic Thaumarchaeota, quantified in the branched vs. isoprenoid tetraether (BIT) index, is an indicator of the relative input of soil organic matter in near shore sediments [2]. High BIT values near river outflows testify of relative strong soil organic matter input and generally the BIT index will decrease off shore to values near 0, the marine end-member value. Even in remote open ocean sediments, however, the BIT index will rarely reach 0 as small amounts of brGDGTs are often present. The occurrence of these brGDGTs in open marine settings might be a result of i) dust input, ii) sediment dispersion from near coastal areas, or iii) in situ production in marine sediments. In order to constrain the origin of branched GDGTs in open marine sediments we analyzed i) atmospheric dust samples taken along an equatorial African coastal transect, ii) marine surface waters near and away of the Congo river outflow, iii) a series of surface sediments at and around the Congo deep sea fan, and iv) a series of open marine surface sediments from different oceans with BIT values < 0.08. Our results show that brGDGTs are present, though in relative low amounts, in dust. Their distribution resembles that of soil input as also found in the Congo deep sea fan, with MBT and CBT values that

  20. Characteristics of the long-range transport dust events in Chengdu, Southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuan; Luo, Bin; Xie, Shao-dong

    2015-12-01

    Chengdu is an inland megacity in the Sichuan Basin, where dust influence remained an open question. During a one-year haze campaign, two dust events were identified in March 2013, indicating that desert dust can be transported to Chengdu and impacted local air quality strongly. The suggested low SO2/PM10, NO2/PM10 and PM2.5/PM10 ratios of 0.15, 0.27 and 0.40 could be used as immediate indicators for dust days. On typical dust day of March 12, PM10 was as high as 359.1 μg m-3, and crustal matter contributed 80.5% to total PM2.5 mass (106.6 μg m-3). Enrichment factors of most elements have decreased due to the dilution effect except for Ca and Mg. The dust was mainly from western and northern dust regions in China, including the "Northerly Mongolia Path", "Western Desert Path" and "Northwestern Desert Path". Due to the obstruction of Qinghai-Tibet Plateau on the west, the dust air to Chengdu was mostly from the northeastward direction after passing over Qinling Mountain. Moreover, the air experienced obvious elevation from its source regions driven by the cold front synoptic pattern. The spatial distribution of high AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth) values over 1.2 but low Ångström exponent of 0.5-0.6 around Chengdu verified the coarse pollution patterns. However, the dust pollution was not serious in nearby Chongqing and Guizhou and exhibited weak regional feature, a result different from those in Beijing and Shanghai.

  1. Impacts of long range transported dust and biological particles on clouds and precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, K. A.; Creamean, J.; Suski, K. J.; Cuadra-Rodriguez, L. A.; Fitzgerald, E.; DeMott, P. J.; Cazorla, A.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols play a profound role in impacting cloud properties and precipitation processes. Some studies suggest air pollution aerosols suppress orographic precipitation, whereas other studies show a precipitation enhancement during periods with long range dust transport. To gain a more complete understanding of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions, we have performed two field studies, CalWater and ICE-T, probing clouds over California and the Caribbean. Ground and aircraft measurements were used to characterize the sources of aerosols seeding clouds and the resulting impact on cloud microphysics. This presentation will focus on how dust and biological aerosols transported from the Sahara, Middle East, and Asia appeared in glaciated high-altitude clouds coincident with elevated ice nuclei (IN) concentrations. Our results suggest that dust and biological IN are persistent components of the upper atmosphere and thus could be playing important roles in affecting orographic precipitation processes over many regions of the world.

  2. Asian dust event observed in Seoul, Korea, during 29-31 May 2008: analysis of transport and vertical distribution of dust particles from lidar and surface measurements.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Yoon, Soon-Chang; Kim, Jiyoung; Kang, Jung-Yoon; Sugimoto, Nobuo

    2010-03-01

    In this study, we investigate the transport of dust particles, its vertical distribution, and the associated meteorological conditions during an Asian dust event that was observed in Seoul, Korea on May 29-31, 2008. This study analyzes data from ground-based and space-borne 2-wavelength polarization lidars, particulate mass concentrations, and synoptic weather data. Surface meteorological station observations of dust phenomena, dust transport model, and weather maps consistently show that the dust particles were transported from the source regions (Inner Mongolia, Man-Ju, and Ordos areas) to Korea via the northeastern part of China. Network observations of the PM(10) concentrations in Korea revealed that a majority of the heavy dust particles traveled across South Korea from the northwest to the southeast direction with a horizontal scale of 250-300km and a traveling speed of approximately 40kmh(-1). This extraordinary dust event, in terms of its intensity and timing during the year, occurred due to the blockage of an unusually intensified low-pressure system in the northeastern part of China as well as high-pressure system centered over the Sea of Okhotsk and the Kuril Islands. The low values of the particle depolarization ratio (delta(532)) (dust period indicate the presence of spherical, non-dust, and relatively small particles. The mean delta(532) value was approximately 0.123+/-0.069 between altitudes of ground approximately 2.8km, and 0.161+/-0.049 for near-surface dust layer (ground approximately 1.2km). This value is quite similar to that obtained during the 3-year SNU-Lidar measurements in Seoul (delta(532) approximately 0.136+/-0.027). The value of delta(532) during the 2nd multilayered dust episode ranged between 0.081 and 0.120 for near-surface dust layers, and between 0.076 and 0.114 for elevated dust layers. The CALIPSO measurements of beta(532), delta(532), and CR also revealed the presence of dense dust

  3. Modeling the emission, transport and deposition of contaminated dust from a mine tailing site.

    PubMed

    Stovern, Michael; Betterton, Eric A; Sáez, A Eduardo; Villar, Omar Ignacio Felix; Rine, Kyle P; Russell, Mackenzie R; King, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Mining operations are potential sources of airborne particulate metal and metalloid contaminants through both direct smelter emissions and wind erosion of mine tailings. The warmer, drier conditions predicted for the Southwestern US by climate models may make contaminated atmospheric dust and aerosols increasingly important, due to potential deleterious effects on human health and ecology. Dust emissions and dispersion of contaminants from the Iron King Mine tailings in Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona, a Superfund site, are currently being investigated through in situ field measurements and computational fluid dynamics modeling. These tailings are significantly contaminated with lead and arsenic with an average soil concentration of 1616 and 1420 ppm, respectively. Similar levels of these contaminants have also been measured in soil samples taken from the area surrounding the mine tailings. Using a computational fluid dynamics model, we have been able to model dust transport from the mine tailings to the surrounding region. The model includes a distributed Eulerian model to simulate fine aerosol transport and a Lagrangian approach to model fate and transport of larger particles. In order to improve the accuracy of the dust transport simulations both regional topographical features and local weather patterns have been incorporated into the model simulations.

  4. Modeling the emission, transport and deposition of contaminated dust from a mine tailing site

    PubMed Central

    Stovern, Michael; Betterton, Eric A.; Sáez, A. Eduardo; Villar, Omar Ignacio Felix; Rine, Kyle P.; Russell, MacKenzie R.; King, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Mining operations are potential sources of airborne particulate metal and metalloid contaminants through both direct smelter emissions and wind erosion of mine tailings. The warmer, drier conditions predicted for the Southwestern US by climate models may make contaminated atmospheric dust and aerosols increasingly important, due to potential deleterious effects on human health and ecology. Dust emissions and dispersion of contaminants from the Iron King Mine tailings in Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona, a Superfund site, are currently being investigated through in situ field measurements and computational fluid dynamics modeling. These tailings are significantly contaminated with lead and arsenic with an average soil concentration of 1616 and 1420 ppm, respectively. Similar levels of these contaminants have also been measured in soil samples taken from the area surrounding the mine tailings. Using a computational fluid dynamics model, we have been able to model dust transport from the mine tailings to the surrounding region. The model includes a distributed Eulerian model to simulate fine aerosol transport and a Lagrangian approach to model fate and transport of larger particles. In order to improve the accuracy of the dust transport simulations both regional topographical features and local weather patterns have been incorporated into the model simulations. PMID:24552963

  5. From transport to disorder: thermodynamic properties of finite dust clouds.

    PubMed

    Schella, André; Mulsow, Matthias; Melzer, André; Schablinski, Jan; Block, Dietmar

    2013-06-01

    The quantities entropy and diffusion are measured for two- and three-dimensional (3D) dust clusters in the fluid state. Entropy and diffusion are predicted to be closely linked via unstable modes. The method of instantaneous normal modes is applied for various laser-heated clusters to determine these unstable modes and the corresponding diffusive properties. The configurational entropy is measured for 2D and 3D clusters from structural rearrangements. The entropy shows a threshold behavior at a critical temperature for the 2D clusters, allowing us to estimate a configurational melting temperature. Further, the entropic disorder increases for larger clusters. Finally, the predicted relation between entropy and unstable modes has been confirmed from our experiments for 2D systems, whereas 3D systems do not show such a clear correlation.

  6. The transport of sand and dust on Mars, its importance to science and exploration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrison, J. P.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Nørnberg, P.; Rasmussen, K. R.

    2009-04-01

    The transport of particulate matter across a planets surface is a powerful erosion mechanism and a significant factor affecting atmospheric dynamics by the creation of particulate aerosols. In this sense Mars is a test bed for the study of dust aerosols since it lacks the active circulation of water through the atmosphere, as we see on earth. Dust transport has therefore become the dominant process on Mars for both atmospheric contamination and evolution of the surface. Laboratory simulations have shown that dust electrification and aggregation is crucial to the transport of dust on Mars [1,2]. Similarly, on earth electric fields and electrification can play an important role in sand and dust circulation. Even on airless bodies such as the lunar surface dust sized particulates can be emitted and suspended by electrification processes. Granular electrification is being studied in detail in all of these environments, though is still far from being understood [3]. Recently observations by the NASA MER mission have revealed, for the first time, active transport of sand on the surface (saltation). It is becoming clear that, although such sand transport is periodic and at a low rate, it may be an extremely important process for the properties of the surface with regard to bacterial survival and habitation. Similarly with regard to exploration it is clear that a deeper understanding of how dust behaves at the Martian (and lunar) surface, especially under the influence of humans/robots, is essential. New laser and optoelectronic instrumentation is being developed in the study of particulate transport on Mars, specifically for the ESA ExoMars mission [4]. These technologies have potential application on earth, the moon and other solar system environments where granular material may be transported. References: [1] Merrison, J.P. et al., Planet. Space. Sci., (2008) 56, 426-437 [2] Merrison J.P., et al., Icarus, (2007), 191, 568 [3] Merrison J.P., et al., Planet. Space. Sci

  7. Dust transport from glacierized rivers of southern Alaska to the Gulf of Alaska: Interannual variability in magnitude and sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crusius, J.; Schroth, A. W.; Campbell, R. W.; Resing, J.; Gasso, S.

    2014-12-01

    Dust from high latitudes is underappreciated and little studied. We recently identified new sites of dust formation, and a new dust generation mechanism, from the southern AK coastline, in Crusius et al, 2011. Dust is generated each autumn from glacierized river valleys as river levels and discharge decrease following summer peak glacier melt. The most prominent such river is the Copper River, the single largest freshwater source to the Gulf of Alaska. Each autumn the exposed river floodplains contain abundant, fine glacial flour and represent a large dust source region, prior to significant snowfall. Strong katabatic winds channeled down mountain river valleys generate dust from the fine glacial flour, which is transported as much as several hundred kilometers into the ocean. This dust is an important source of Fe to the Gulf of Alaska, where phytoplankton growth is limited by available Fe (a micronutrient). Glaciers are rapidly losing mass in this region, so there is an increasing supply of fine glacial flour during the summer melt season, and possibly increased deposition of fine glacial flour in the dust source regions. We initiated continuous, year-round time-series measurements of dust concentration, and its geochemical composition, in August of 2011 on Middleton Island, AK, which lies in the path of the dust plume extending from the Copper River valley. Dust is clearly generated from other glacierized river valleys along the southern coast of AK, as well. We will discuss results from our continuous record spanning three dust seasons, which prominently shows these events each autumn, and displays substantial interannual variability. Dust appears to remain in the boundary layer, but is transported hundreds of kilometers into the ocean, into Fe-limited waters. It is also possible that some of this dust is redeposited on snow or glacier surfaces, enhancing melting. This dust source is not accounted for in typical global dust models.

  8. Electrostatic dust transport and its consequences for the lunar ranging experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverberg, E. C.

    1975-01-01

    Attempts made to qualitatively model the available data concerning the electrostatic transport of dust on the lunar surface are noted. Charged dust grains, held in place by adhesive forces, are shot into space at velocities of hundreds of meters per second. Larger particles, because of their greater charge, are quickly decelerated in the nearby fields, while the smaller grains travel in ballistic trajectories for hundreds of kilometers. Flux estimates indicate that there is little danger to the optical corner reflectors for the next few decades.

  9. Dust transport and abrasion assessment within simulated standing vegetation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop residues are useful in protecting the top soil from depletion and abrasion due to wind erosion. A wind tunnel study was done to measure sand transport and abrasion energies within the simulated artificial standing vegetation. Wind profiles, relative abrasion energies and rates of sand dischar...

  10. Transport Properties of the Dust Components in Weakly Ionized Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Vaulina, O. S.; Adamovich, X. G.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.

    2008-09-07

    The experimental study of transport processes are presented for the dusty plasma in radio-frequency (RF-) capacitive discharge. Validity of the Langevin and Green-Kubo equations for the description of dynamics of dusty grains is verified. Experimental examination of the Einstein-Stokes relation between the viscosity and diffusion constants is carried out.

  11. The Coupled Mars Dust and Water Cycles: Understanding How Clouds Affect the Vertical Distribution and Meridional Transport of Dust and Water.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahre, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    The dust and water cycles are crucial to the current Martian climate, and they are coupled through cloud formation. Dust strongly impacts the thermal structure of the atmosphere and thus greatly affects atmospheric circulation, while clouds provide radiative forcing and control the hemispheric exchange of water through the modification of the vertical distributions of water and dust. Recent improvements in the quality and sophistication of both observations and climate models allow for a more comprehensive understanding of how the interaction between the dust and water cycles (through cloud formation) affects the dust and water cycles individually. We focus here on the effects of clouds on the vertical distribution of dust and water, and how those vertical distributions control the net meridional transport of water. For this study, we utilize observations of temperature, dust and water ice from the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) combined with the NASA ARC Mars Global Climate Model (MGCM). We demonstrate that the magnitude and nature of the net meridional transport of water between the northern and southern hemispheres during NH summer is sensitive to the vertical structure of the simulated aphelion cloud belt. We further examine how clouds influence the atmospheric thermal structure and thus the vertical structure of the cloud belt. Our goal is to identify and understand the importance of radiative/dynamic feedbacks due to the physical processes involved with cloud formation and evolution on the current climate of Mars.

  12. The Coupled Mars Dust and Water Cycles: Understanding How Clouds Affect the Vertical Distribution and Meridional Transport of Dust and Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahre, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The dust and water cycles are crucial to the current Martian climate, and they are coupled through cloud formation. Dust strongly impacts the thermal structure of the atmosphere and thus greatly affects atmospheric circulation, while clouds provide radiative forcing and control the hemispheric exchange of water through the modification of the vertical distributions of water and dust. Recent improvements in the quality and sophistication of both observations and climate models allow for a more comprehensive understanding of how the interaction between the dust and water cycles (through cloud formation) affects the dust and water cycles individually. We focus here on the effects of clouds on the vertical distribution of dust and water, and how those vertical distributions control the net meridional transport of water. For this study, we utilize observations of temperature, dust and water ice from the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) combined with the NASA ARC Mars Global Climate Model (MGCM). We demonstrate that the magnitude and nature of the net meridional transport of water between the northern and southern hemispheres during NH summer is sensitive to the vertical structure of the simulated aphelion cloud belt. We further examine how clouds influence the atmospheric thermal structure and thus the vertical structure of the cloud belt. Our goal is to identify and understand the importance of radiative/dynamic feedbacks due to the physical processes involved with cloud formation and evolution on the current climate of Mars.

  13. The Mars Dust and Water Cycles: Investigating the Influence of Clouds on the Vertical Distribution and Meridional Transport of Dust and Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahre, Melinda A.; Haberle, Robert M.; Hollingsworth, Jeffery L.; Brecht, Amanda S.; Urata, Richard A.

    2015-11-01

    The dust and water cycles are critical to the current Martian climate, and they interact with each other through cloud formation. Dust modulates the thermal structure of the atmosphere and thus greatly influences atmospheric circulation. Clouds provide radiative forcing and control the net hemispheric transport of water through the alteration of the vertical distributions of water and dust. Recent advancements in the quality and sophistication of both climate models and observations enable an increased understanding of how the coupling between the dust and water cycles (through cloud formation) impacts the dust and water cycles. We focus here on the effects of clouds on the vertical distributions of dust and water and how those vertical distributions control the net meridional transport of water. We utilize observations of temperature, dust and water ice from the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) and the NASA ARC Mars Global Climate Model (MGCM) to show that the magnitude and nature of the hemispheric exchange of water during NH summer is sensitive to the vertical structure of the simulated aphelion cloud belt. Further, we investigate how clouds influence atmospheric temperatures and thus the vertical structure of the cloud belt. Our goal is to isolate and understand the importance of radiative/dynamic feedbacks due to the physical processes involved with cloud formation and evolution on the current climate of Mars.

  14. Heat transport in confined strongly coupled two-dimensional dust clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kudelis, Giedrius; Thomsen, Hauke; Bonitz, Michael

    2013-07-15

    Dusty plasmas are a model system for studying strong correlation. The dust grains’ size of a few micro-meters and their characteristic oscillation frequency of a few hertz allow for an investigation of many-particle effects on an “atomic” level. In this article, we model the heat transport through an axially confined 2D dust cluster from the center to the outside. The system behaves particularly interesting since heat is not only conducted within the dust component but also transferred to the neutral gas. Fitting the analytical solution to the radial temperature profiles obtained in molecular dynamics simulations allows to determine the heat conductivity k. The heat conductivity is found to be constant over a wide range of coupling strengths even including the phase transition from solid to liquid here, as it was also found in extended systems by Nosenko et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 025003 (2008)].

  15. Transport, Evolution and Entrainment of Asian Dust/Pollution into the Pacific Marine Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, A. D.; McNaughton, C. S.; Kapustin, V.; Vetter, O.; Dibb, J. E.; Anderson, B. E.; Browell, E. V.; Carmichael, G.; Landing, B.

    2007-05-01

    Various airborne and ship based studies over the past several years have allowed us to measure Asian dust and pollution aerosol from near its source to locations up to 10,000km downwind where it was entrained into the marine boundary layer (MBL). Dust was found to accumulate up to half of the soluble species such as sulfate and nitrate during passage through pollution regions in Asia before being lofted into the free troposphere near Japan. At times, transport in the free troposphere included regions of subsidence in high pressure regions that brought these "rivers" of dust and pollution down to the top of the MBL. Shipboard measurements and lidar data indicated both clear air entrainment and convective activity, associated with the passage of low pressure systems, facilitated dust transport through the inversion. High temperature volatilization of particles in the MBL up to 900C was used to remove most sulfates, nitrates, carbon and sea-salt to leave only dust measured and sized by an optical particle counter. These shipboard data and concurrent chemical measurements revealed the relation between entrainment of pollution and dust into the MBL associated with passage of high pressure systems. Subsequent passage of low pressure systems also revealed scavenging and removal of aerosol through precipitation to the ocean surface. This process appears to be a common removal pathway for dust over the Pacific and a mechanism for supplying the ocean surface with soluble iron and aluminum to the ocean surface. Measurements in the free troposphere and MBL also captured various aspects of these processes. Airborne missions flown north of Hawaii during the NASA PEM-Tropics and IMPEX missions characterized the vertical structure of subsiding dust and pollution. In-flight mapping of the dust/pollution layers and structure using the NASA Langley DIAL LIDAR show a sloping, subsiding Asian air-mass entraining into the marine boundary layer (MBL). In-situ measurements of the aerosol

  16. Interannual Modulation of Subtropical Atlantic Boreal Summer Dust Variability by ENSO

    SciTech Connect

    DeFlorio, Mike; Goodwin, Ian D.; Cayan, Dan; Miller, Arthur J.; Ghan, Steven J.; Pierce, David; Russell, Lynn M.; Singh, Balwinder

    2016-01-01

    Dust variability in the climate system has been studied for several decades, yet there remains an incomplete understanding of the dynamical mechanisms controlling interannual and decadal variations in dust transport. The sparseness of multi-year observational datasets has limited our understanding of the relationship between climate variations and atmospheric dust. We use available observations and a century-length fully coupled Community Earth System Model (CESM) simulation to show that the El Niño- Southern Oscillation (ENSO) exerts a control on North African dust transport during boreal summer. In CESM, this relationship is stronger over the dusty tropical North Atlantic than near Barbados, one of the few sites having a multi-decadal observed record. During strong La Niña summers in CESM, a statistically significant increase in lower tropospheric easterly wind is associated with an increase in North African dust transport over the Atlantic. Barbados dust and Pacific SST variability are only weakly correlated in both observations and CESM, suggesting that other processes are controlling the crossbasin variability of dust. We also use our CESM simulation to show that the relationship between downstream North African dust transport and ENSO fluctuates on multidecadal timescales and may be modulated by the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). Our findings indicate that existing observations of dust over the tropical North Atlantic are not extensive enough to completely describe the variability of dust and dust transport, and demonstrate the importance of global models to supplement and interpret observational records.

  17. Dust transport in a magnetized radio-frequency discharge under microgravity conditions.

    PubMed

    Land, V; Goedheer, W J; Akdim, M R

    2005-10-01

    Dust is found in plasmas used in industrial applications, such as microelectronics and solar cell manufacturing, in fusion plasmas, where it is usually the result of plasma-wall interactions, and in plasmas in space, such as planetary atmospheres, cometary tails, planetary rings, interstellar molecular clouds, and star and planet formation regions. In plasma applications, magnetic fields are occasionally used, mainly to confine the plasma. In space, however, magnetic fields are very often present and they may strongly influence the behavior of dusty plasma, for instance in the formation of stars and planets. We extended a fully self-consistent two-dimensional fluid model for radio-frequency discharges by adding a homogeneous axial magnetic field and the effect it has on the transport of plasma species in a low-temperature dusty discharge. We show that the magnetic field has an important effect on the (ambipolar) diffusion of ions and electrons in the bulk of the discharge. This causes an important change in the force balance of the dust particles and in the time scales of the formation of a dust-free void. Finally, we compare the parameters of the modeled discharge with the parameters of a planet formation region around a young stellar object (YSO). We conclude that a magnetic field in both low-temperature rf discharges under micro-gravity conditions and dusty plasmas around YSO's has an important effect on the transport of dust and must be important for the formation of planets and stars.

  18. Dust transport in a magnetized radio-frequency discharge under microgravity conditions.

    PubMed

    Land, V; Goedheer, W J; Akdim, M R

    2005-10-01

    Dust is found in plasmas used in industrial applications, such as microelectronics and solar cell manufacturing, in fusion plasmas, where it is usually the result of plasma-wall interactions, and in plasmas in space, such as planetary atmospheres, cometary tails, planetary rings, interstellar molecular clouds, and star and planet formation regions. In plasma applications, magnetic fields are occasionally used, mainly to confine the plasma. In space, however, magnetic fields are very often present and they may strongly influence the behavior of dusty plasma, for instance in the formation of stars and planets. We extended a fully self-consistent two-dimensional fluid model for radio-frequency discharges by adding a homogeneous axial magnetic field and the effect it has on the transport of plasma species in a low-temperature dusty discharge. We show that the magnetic field has an important effect on the (ambipolar) diffusion of ions and electrons in the bulk of the discharge. This causes an important change in the force balance of the dust particles and in the time scales of the formation of a dust-free void. Finally, we compare the parameters of the modeled discharge with the parameters of a planet formation region around a young stellar object (YSO). We conclude that a magnetic field in both low-temperature rf discharges under micro-gravity conditions and dusty plasmas around YSO's has an important effect on the transport of dust and must be important for the formation of planets and stars. PMID:16383541

  19. Dust transport in a magnetized radio-frequency discharge under microgravity conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Land, V.; Goedheer, W.J.; Akdim, M.R.

    2005-10-01

    Dust is found in plasmas used in industrial applications, such as microelectronics and solar cell manufacturing, in fusion plasmas, where it is usually the result of plasma-wall interactions, and in plasmas in space, such as planetary atmospheres, cometary tails, planetary rings, interstellar molecular clouds, and star and planet formation regions. In plasma applications, magnetic fields are occasionally used, mainly to confine the plasma. In space, however, magnetic fields are very often present and they may strongly influence the behavior of dusty plasma, for instance in the formation of stars and planets. We extended a fully self-consistent two-dimensional fluid model for radio-frequency discharges by adding a homogeneous axial magnetic field and the effect it has on the transport of plasma species in a low-temperature dusty discharge. We show that the magnetic field has an important effect on the (ambipolar) diffusion of ions and electrons in the bulk of the discharge. This causes an important change in the force balance of the dust particles and in the time scales of the formation of a dust-free void. Finally, we compare the parameters of the modeled discharge with the parameters of a planet formation region around a young stellar object (YSO). We conclude that a magnetic field in both low-temperature rf discharges under micro-gravity conditions and dusty plasmas around YSO's has an important effect on the transport of dust and must be important for the formation of planets and stars.

  20. Characterization of Microphysical Properties of Saharan Dust Aerosols During Trans-Atlantic Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldan, L.; Morris, V. R.

    2005-12-01

    The NOAA Center in Atmospheric Sciences (NCAS) Trans-Atlantic Saharan Dust AERosol and Ocean Science Expedition (AEROSE) 2004 was a 27 day mission aboard the NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown (RHB). The AEROSE mission took place during February 29th thru March 26th, departing from Barbados to the Canary Islands and ending in Puerto Rico. The cruise tracks for AEROSE 2004 coincided with one of the biggest dust storms to date for this season. One of the goals of the mission was to provide a set of critical measurements to characterize the impacts and microphysical evolution of Saharan dust aerosol during Trans-Atlantic transport. A Laser Particle Counter (LPC) was used to retrieve in-situ number density distribution. A Quartz Crystal Microbalance Cascade Impactor (QCM) was used to retrieve in-situ mass density distributions. The QCM also provides a sampling platform for post analysis to determine morphological properties and elemental chemical composition. The morphological properties were determined with the use of a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The combination of the SEM with an Energy Dispersive X-Ray Microanalysis system provides the elemental composition details. I will present the evolution of the chemical elements as a function of size as they are transported. The elemental analysis has identified elements such as Fe, Al, Si, Zn, Ti, Co, S, and C all which are characteristics of Saharan dust origin.

  1. Study of African Dust with Multi-Wavelength Raman Lidar During "Shadow" Campaign in Senegal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselovskii, Igor; Goloub, Philippe; Podvin, Thierry; Bovchaliuk, Valentyn; Tanre, Didier; Derimian, Yevgeny; Korenskiy, Mikhail; Dubovik, Oleg

    2016-06-01

    West Africa and the adjacent oceanic regions are very important locations for studying dust properties and their influence on weather and climate. The SHADOW (Study of SaHAran Dust Over West Africa) campaign is performing a multi-scale and multi-laboratory study of aerosol properties and dynamics using a set of in situ and remote sensing instruments at an observation site located at IRD (Institute for Research and Development) Center, Mbour, Senegal (14°N, 17°W). In this paper, we present the results of lidar measurements performed during the first phase of SHADOW which occurred in March-April, 2015. The multiwavelength Mie-Raman lidar acquired 3β+2α+1δ measurements during this period. This set of measurements has permitted particle intensive properties such as extinction and backscattering Ångström exponents (BAE) for 355/532 nm wavelengths corresponding lidar ratios and depolarization ratio at 532 nm to be determined. The backscattering Ångström exponent during the dust episodes decreased to ~-0.7, while the extinction Ångström exponent though being negative, was greater than -0.2. Low values of BAE can likely be explained by an increase in the imaginary part of the dust refractive index at 355 nm compared to 532 nm.

  2. Dependence of simulations of long range transport on meteorology, model and dust size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahowald, N. M.; Albani, S.; Smith, M.; Losno, R.; Marticorena, B.; Ridley, D. A.; Heald, C. L.; Qu, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral aerosols interact with radiation directly, as well as modifying climate, and provide important micronutrients to ocean and land ecosystems. Mineral aerosols are transported long distances from the source regions to remote regions, but the rates at which this occurs can be difficult to deduce from either observations or models. Here we consider interactions between the details of the simulation of dust size and long-range transport. In addition, we compare simulations of dust using multiple reanalysis datasets, as well as different model basis to understand how robust the mean, seasonality and interannual variability are in models. Models can provide insight into how long observations are required in order to characterize the atmospheric concentration and deposition to remote regions.

  3. A Combined Observational and Modeling Approach to Study Modern Dust Transport from the Patagonia Desert to East Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasso, S.; Stein, A.; Marino, F.; Castellano, E.; Udisti, R.; Ceratto, J.

    2010-01-01

    The understanding of present atmospheric transport processes from Southern Hemisphere (SH) landmasses to Antarctica can improve the interpretation of stratigraphic data in Antarctic ice cores. In addition, long range transport can deliver key nutrients normally not available to marine ecosystems in the Southern Ocean and may trigger or enhance primary productivity. However, there is a dearth of observational based studies of dust transport in the SH. This work aims to improve current understanding of dust transport in the SH by showing a characterization of two dust events originating in the Patagonia desert (south end of South America). The approach is based on a combined and complementary use of satellite retrievals (detectors MISR, MODIS, GLAS ,POLDER, OMI,), transport model simulation (HYSPLIT) and surface observations near the sources and aerosol measurements in Antarctica (Neumayer and Concordia sites). Satellite imagery and visibility observations confirm dust emission in a stretch of dry lakes along the coast of the Tierra del Fuego (TdF) island (approx.54deg S) and from the shores of the Colihue Huapi lake in Central Patagonia (approx.46deg S) in February 2005. Model simulations initialized by these observations reproduce the timing of an observed increase in dust concentration at the Concordia Station and some of the observed increases in atmospheric aerosol absorption (here used as a dust proxy) in the Neumayer station. The TdF sources were the largest contributors of dust at both sites. The transit times from TdF to the Neumayer and Concordia sites are 6-7 and 9-10 days respectively. Lidar observations and model outputs coincide in placing most of the dust cloud in the boundary layer and suggest significant de- position over the ocean immediately downwind. Boundary layer dust was detected as far as 1800 km from the source and approx.800 km north of the South Georgia Island over the central sub-Antarctic Atlantic Ocean. Although the analysis suggests the

  4. Airborne dust transport to the eastern Pacific Ocean off southern California: Evidence from San Clemente Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Budahn, J.; Reheis, M.; Beann, J.; Skipp, G.; Fisher, E.

    2007-01-01

    Islands are natural dust traps, and San Clemente Island, California, is a good example. Soils on marine terraces cut into Miocene andesite on this island are clay-rich Vertisols or Alfisols with vertic properties. These soils are overlain by silt-rich mantles, 5-20 cm thick, that contrast sharply with the underlying clay-rich subsoils. The silt mantles have a mineralogy that is distinct from the island bedrock. Silt mantles are rich in quartz, which is rare in the island andesite. The clay fraction of the silt mantles is dominated by mica, also absent from local andesite, and contrasts with the subsoils, dominated by smectite. Ternary plots of immobile trace elements (Sc-Th-La and Ta-Nd-Cr) show that the island andesite has a composition intermediate between average upper continental crust and average oceanic crust. In contrast, the silt and, to a lesser extent, clay fractions of the silt mantles have compositions closer to average upper continental crust. The silt mantles have particle size distributions similar to loess and Mojave Desert dust, but are coarser than long-range-transported Asian dust. We infer from these observations that the silt mantles are derived from airborne dust from the North American mainland, probably river valleys in the coastal mountains of southern California and/or the Mojave Desert. Although average winds are from the northwest in coastal California, easterly winds occur numerous times of the year when "Santa Ana" conditions prevail, caused by a high-pressure cell centered over the Great Basin. Examination of satellite imagery shows that easterly Santa Ana winds carry abundant dust to the eastern Pacific Ocean and the California Channel Islands. Airborne dust from mainland North America may be an important component of the offshore sediment budget in the easternmost Pacific Ocean, a finding of potential biogeochemical and climatic significance.

  5. Dust in the wind: long range transport of dust in the atmosphere and its implications for global public and ecosystem health

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Dale W.; Kellogg, Christina A.; Shinn, Eugene A.

    2001-01-01

    Movement of soil particles in atmospheres is a normal planetary process. Images of Martian dust devils (wind-spouts) and dust storms captured by NASA's Pathfinder have demonstrated the significant role that storm activity plays in creating the red atmospheric haze of Mars. On Earth, desert soils moving in the atmosphere are responsible for the orange hues in brilliant sunrises and sunsets. In severe dust storm events, millions of tons of soil may be moved across great expanses of land and ocean. An emerging scientific interest in the process of soil transport in the Earth's atmosphere is in the field of public and ecosystem health. This article will address the benefits and the potential hazards associated with exposure to particle fallout as clouds of desert dust traverse the globe.

  6. CALIPSO Measurements of Saharan Dust Properties near Source and Transport Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, A. H.; Liu, Z.; Tackett, J. L.; Vaughan, M.; Trepte, C. R.; Winker, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) mission, a collaboration between NASA and Centre National d'Études Spatiales (CNES), was launched in April 2006 to provide vertically resolved measurements of cloud and aerosol distributions. The primary instrument on the CALIPSO satellite is the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), a near-nadir viewing two-wavelength polarization-sensitive instrument. The unique nature of CALIOP measurements make it quite challenging to validate backscatter profiles, aerosol type, and cloud phase, all of which are used to retrieve extinction and optical depth. We exploit the large data set generated by CALIPSO between 2006 - 2013 to determine a multi-year climatology of the properties of Saharan dust, in particular seasonal optical depths, layer frequencies, and layer heights of Saharan dust gridded in accordance with the Level 3 data products protocol. The data are screened using standard CALIPSO quality assurance flags, cloud aerosol discrimination (CAD) scores, overlying features and layer properties. To evaluate the effects of transport on the morphology, vertical extent and size of Saharan dust layers, we compare probability distribution functions of the layer integrated volume depolarization ratios, geometric depths and integrated attenuated color ratios near the source (Lat 0o to 40o Lon -20o to 20o) to the same distributions in the far field or transport region (Lat 0o to 40o Lon -80o to -20o). To evaluate the uncertainty in the lidar ratios, we compare the values computed from dust layers overlying opaque water clouds, considered nominal, with the constant lidar ratio value used in the CALIOP algorithms for dust. We also explore the effects of noise on the CALIOP retrievals at daytime by comparing the distributions of the properties at daytime to the nighttime distributions.

  7. Multi-year model simulations of mineral dust distribution and transport over the Indian subcontinent during summer monsoon seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sijikumar, S.; Aneesh, S.; Rajeev, K.

    2016-08-01

    Aerosol distribution over the Arabian Sea and the Indian subcontinent during the northern hemispheric summer is dominated by mineral dust transport from the West Asian desert regions. The radiative impact of these dust plumes is expected to have a prominent role in regulating the Asian Summer Monsoon circulation. While satellite observations have provided information in the spatial distribution of aerosols over the oceanic regions during the season, their utility over the land is rather limited. This study examines the transport of mineral dust over the West Asian desert, the Indian subcontinent and the surrounding oceanic regions during the summer monsoon season with the help of a regional scale model, WRF-Chem. Geographical locations of prominent dust sources, altitude ranges of mineral dust transport and their inter-annual variations are examined in detail. Multi-year model simulations were carried out during 2007 to 2012 with a model integration from 15 May to 31 August of each year. Six-year seasonal mean (June to August) vertically integrated dust amount from 1000 to 300 hPa level shows prominent dust loading over the eastern parts of Arabian desert and the northwestern part of India which are identified as two major sources of dust production. Large latitudinal gradient in dust amount is observed over the Arabian Sea with the largest dust concentration over the northwestern part and is primarily caused by the prevailing northwesterly wind at 925 hPa level from the Arabian desert. The model simulations clearly show that most of the dust distributed over the Indo-Gangetic plane originates from the Rajasthan desert located in the northwestern part of India, whereas dust observed over the central and south peninsular India and over the Arabian Sea are mainly transported from the Arabian desert. Abnormal dust loading is observed over the north Arabian Sea during June 2008. This has been produced as a result of the low pressure system (associated with the onset of

  8. Mapping of Fugitive Dust Generation, Transport, and Deposition in the Nogales, Arizona Region Using Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanov, W. L.; Stefanov, W. L.; Ramsey, M. S.; Christensen, P. R.

    2001-05-01

    Urban centers located along the U.S.-Mexico border represent significant sources of fugitive (airborne) dust. This dust, which can lead to adverse health effects, arises from several factors including construction activities related to land use conversion (i.e., agricultural to residential), unpaved roadways, agricultural activities, and human disturbance of the soil. Fundamental baseline data needed for modeling and monitoring of particulate generation and transport are accurate regional classification of land cover, degree of disturbance, and a metric of land cover change. Identification and delineation of fugitive dust source regions using a purely field-based approach is time and labor intensive and can lead to errors over time as land use changes. Further, restrictions on access to specific areas (such as private lands and reservations) may impede or prevent site investigations in these areas. Remotely gathered information can be used to circumvent these difficulties and provide rapid dust source region identification with quantitative area measurements required in transport models. Landsat ETM+ data was used to identify and delineate surficial materials that were either potential fugitive dust source regions or were important factors in dust transport and deposition. Using a knowledge-based system, land cover was classified into three generalized types: natural and disturbed soils (dust generation sites); asphalt, concrete, and urban materials (dust transport areas); and vegetated areas (dust deposition sites). Accuracy of the land cover classification was assessed using field verification, comparison of field and image reflectance spectra, and digital aerial orthophotographs. Results of image classification and field verification for Landsat data acquired during the winter of 2000 show a strong correlation, and will be used with data collected during the summer dry season for change detection analysis. The digital format of the classified data is optimal for

  9. Characterization of long-range transported Saharan dust across the Atlantic Ocean; dual-wavelength lidar measurements during SALTRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Silke; Freudenthaler, Volker; Schäfler, Andreas; Schepanski, Kerstin; Heinold, Bernd; Toledano, Carlos; Wiegner, Matthias; Weinzierl, Bernadett

    2015-04-01

    Mineral dust is a major component of the atmospheric aerosol load which main source region is the Saharan desert. Dust layers can be transported over thousands of kilometers and thus they cannot be considered as regional phenomenon. During long-range transport the particles are influenced by aging and mixing processes altering the microphysical and thus the optical properties of Saharan dust. But the influence of long-range transport on the particle properties and their effect on the Earth's radiation budget is still not well understood. To study aging processes of transported Saharan dust as well as the microphysical, optical and radiative properties of long-range transported dust the Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE) took place at Barbados in June and July 2013. SALTRACE was designed as closure study combining ground-based and airborne lidar and in-situ measurements with Satellite observations, long-term measurements at Barbados, and model calculations. During SALTRACE four main dust events occurred with column integrated AOD of up to 0.6. The vertical aerosol distribution was characterized by a three layer structure consisting of a marine dominated boundary layer, a highly variable mixing layer often affected by clouds, and a Saharan dust layer in heights between 2 km and 3.5 km in some cases even up to 5 km. We will present first results of the ground-based measurements with the dual-wavelength lidar system POLIS of the Meteorological Institute of the Ludwig-Maximilians Universität, München. In particular we will investigate measurements of the particle linear depolarization ratio and the lidar ratio of the different aerosol layers. We compare our findings with results of the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment (SAMUM) studying Saharan dust close to the source region in Morocco and at the beginning of the long-range transport on the Cape Verde Islands. In addition, we assess the influence of long

  10. Seasonal and Secular Variation of the Solis Lacus Albedo Feature: Relation to the Martian Dust-transport Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. W.

    1985-01-01

    As documented over the course of thirty-six Martian years, dramatic seasonal and secular variations occur in albedo features in the Solis Planum region of Mars. The most striking of these is the classical dark albedo features, Solis Lacus. Solis Lacus is generally most distinct during southern spring and summer. Mariner 9 and Viking Orbiter images reveal that Solis Lacus contains and is surrounded by a conspicuous pattern of bright and dark wind streaks. A seasonal dust-transport cycle is proposed to explain these observations. During later southern spring or early summer, dust is eroded from the surface and transported from the region by local dust storms which may become a global dust storm. Removal of dust over a wide area results in the dark Solis Lacus feature. During the cessation stage of global dust-storm activity (typically mid- to late-southern summer), enhanced deposition in the lee of obstacles forms the prominent patterns of bright streaks observed within and around Solis Lacus. As the year progresses (southern fall and winter), sedimentation from the atmospheric dust load occurs over the entire region, decreasing the contrast of the albedo features to their surroundings. Dust-storm activity the following year renews the cycle by again removing dust from the region.

  11. Comparing dust flux records from the Subarctic North Pacific and Greenland: Implications for atmospheric transport to Greenland and for the application of dust as a chronostratigraphic tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serno, Sascha; Winckler, Gisela; Anderson, Robert F.; Maier, Edith; Ren, Haojia; Gersonde, Rainer; Haug, Gerald H.

    2015-06-01

    We present a new record of eolian dust flux to the western Subarctic North Pacific (SNP) covering the past 27,000 years based on a core from the Detroit Seamount. Comparing the SNP dust record to the North Greenland Ice Core Project (NGRIP) ice core record shows significant differences in the amplitude of dust changes to the two regions during the last deglaciation, while the timing of abrupt changes is synchronous. If dust deposition in the SNP faithfully records its mobilization in East Asian source regions, then the difference in the relative amplitude must reflect climate-related changes in atmospheric dust transport to Greenland. Based on the synchronicity in the timing of dust changes in the SNP and Greenland, we tie abrupt deglacial transitions in the 230Th-normalized 4He flux record to corresponding transitions in the well-dated NGRIP dust flux record to provide a new chronostratigraphic technique for marine sediments from the SNP. Results from this technique are complemented by radiocarbon dating, which allows us to independently constrain radiocarbon paleoreservoir ages. We find paleoreservoir ages of 745 ± 140 years at 11,653 year B.P., 680 ± 228 years at 14,630 year B.P., and 790 ± 498 years at 23,290 year B.P. Our reconstructed paleoreservoir ages are consistent with modern surface water reservoir ages in the western SNP. Good temporal synchronicity between eolian dust records from the Subantarctic Atlantic and equatorial Pacific and the ice core record from Antarctica supports the reliability of the proposed dust tuning method to be used more widely in other global ocean regions.

  12. Long-term variability in Saharan dust transport and its link to North Atlantic sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Sun; Dessler, Andrew E.; Mahowald, Natalie M.; Colarco, Peter R.; da Silva, Arlindo

    2008-04-01

    An understanding of the atmospheric distribution of Saharan dust is crucial for understanding many Earth-system processes. We demonstrate here a model simulation indicating that the August-September dust amount in the Tropical Atlantic is linked to the basin-wide North Atlantic sea surface temperature (SST). The increasing SSTs from 1979 to 2005 are associated with a strengthening cyclonic anomaly at 700 hPa in the tropical East Atlantic, reducing Saharan dust outflow into the Tropical Atlantic at latitudes between 10°-20°N. A decreasing dust amount over the same region is also observed by the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer. Given the previously observed anti-correlation between dust and tropical cyclone (TC) activity, the long-term variation of North Atlantic SST can then directly influence TC activity by changing a TC's maximum potential intensity and indirectly by modulating the transport of the dust-laden Saharan Air Layer.

  13. Wind Transport of Radionuclide- Bearing Dust, Peña Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velarde, R.; Goodell, P. C.; Gill, T. E.; Arimoto, R.

    2007-05-01

    This investigation evaluates radionuclide fractionation during wind erosion of high-grade uranium ore storage piles at Peña Blanca (50km north of Chihuahua City), Chihuahua, Mexico. The aridity of the local environment promotes dust resuspension by high winds. Although active operations ceased in 1983, the Peña Blanca mining district is one of Mexico`s most important uranium ore reserves. The study site contains piles of high grade ore, left loose on the surface, and separated by the specific deposits from which they were derived (Margaritas, Nopal I, and Puerto I). Similar locations do not exist in the United States, since uranium mining sites in the USA have been reclaimed. The Peña Blanca site serves as an analog for the Yucca Mountain project. Dust deposition is collected at Peña Blanca with BSNE sediment catchers (Fryrear, 1986) and marble dust traps (Reheis, 1999). These devices capture windblown sediment; subsequently, the sample data will help quantify potentially radioactive short term field sediment loss from the repository surface and determine sediment flux. Aerosols and surface materials will be analyzed and radioactivity levels established utilizing techniques such as gamma spectroscopy. As a result, we will be able to estimate how much radionuclide contaminated dust is being transported or attached geochemically to fine grain soils or minerals (e.g., clays or iron oxides). The high-grade uranium-bearing material is at secular equilibrium, thus the entire decay series is present. Of resulting interest is not only the aeolian transport of uranium, but also of the other daughter products. These studies will improve our understanding of geochemical cycling of radionuclides with respect to sources, transport, and deposition. The results may also have important implications for the geosciences and homeland security, and potential applications to public health. Funding for this project is provided in part via a NSF grant to Arimoto.

  14. Dust transport: Wind blown and mechanical resuspension, July 1983 to December 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Langer, G.

    1986-09-20

    This study defines the processes that resuspend plutonium (Pu) particles from Pu-contaminated soil at Rocky Flats. Such knowledge can predict the transport of Pu particles from the site and the population dose. A vertical dust flux tower profiled the plume of Pu particles from the site. The data show a 70% reduction between 1 and 10 m in the concentration of coarse and inhalable Pu particles. The respirable particle concentration remained steady at both heights, slightly above background levels. High winds visually resuspend large amounts of dust for short periods, but we suspected that present sampling devices do not function properly above 50 km/h. During a windstorm reaching 80 km/h, the size-selective sampler used seriously underestimated the dust(Pu) concentration. Wind tunnel studies measured resuspension versus wind speed from our prairie grass covered, arid soil. We failed to find a good correlation between resuspension and wind speed. This led to a search for alternative mechanisms of resuspension besides wind erosion. Resuspension of dust(Pu) from grass proved to be important, as well as resuspension from rain splash.

  15. Dust emission and transport over Iraq associated with the summer Shamal winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karam Francis, Diana Bou; Flamant, Cyrille; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Banks, Jamie

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we investigate the diurnal evolution of the summer Shamal wind (a quasi-permanent low-level northwesterly wind feature) and its role in dust emission and transport over Iraq, using ground-based and space-borne observations together with a numerical simulation performed with the mesoscale model Meso-NH. A 6-year dataset from the synoptic stations over Iraq allows establishing the prominence of the link between strong near surface winds and reduced visibility in the summer. The detailed processes at play during Shamal events are explored on the basis of a Meso-NH simulation for a given, representative case study (25 June-3 July 2010). The Shamal exhibits an out-of-phase relationship between the surface wind and winds in the lower troposphere (typically 500 m above ground level), the maximum surface wind speeds being observed during the day while in altitude the maximum wind speeds are observed at night. The daytime near surface winds, at the origin of dust emission, are associated with the downward transfer of momentum from the nocturnal low-level jet to the surface due to turbulent mixing after solar heating commences each day. For the first time, an estimate of the dust load associated with summer Shamal events over Iraq has been made using aerosol optical depths derived from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, and the simulation. The dust load exhibits a large diurnal variability, with a daily minimum value of 1 Tg around 0600 UTC and a daily peak of 2.5 Tg or more around 1500 UTC, and is driven by the diurnal cycle of the near surface wind speed. The daily dust load peak associated with the summer Shamal over Iraq is in the same order of magnitude as those derived from simulations downstream of the Bodélé depression in Chad, known to be the world's largest dust source. Keywords: Dust, Low Level Jet, Shamal winds, Middle East, dust sources.

  16. Provenance of Asian Dust Delivered to the Philippine Sea and Its Transport Pathways: Isotopic and Mineralogical Evidences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SEO, I.; Lee, Y. I.; Yoo, C. M.; Kim, H. J.; Hyeong, K.

    2014-12-01

    Most dust studies using deep-sea sediment archives from the North Pacific have focused on understanding the mass flux variation of Asian dust in terms of long-term climate variability, but have not considered specific transport pathways or dust source regions (e.g., central/East Asian deserts versus northern Chinese deserts). To characterize the provenance and transport pathways of eolian dust deposited in the western tropical/subtropical Pacific, and to investigate changes over the late Quaternary, we used the clay mineral assemblage, together with the 143Nd/144Nd and 87Sr/86Sr composition of the inorganic silicate fractions of a deep-sea sediment core retrieved from the Palau-Kyushu Ridge in the Philippine Sea. The analyzed attributes of the core resemble those of dust from the central Asian deserts (CADs; e.g., the Taklimakan Desert) as in the North Central Pacific, but published aerosol data collected near the study site during winter/spring has the mineralogical signature of dust originating from the East Asian deserts (EADs; e.g., the Chinese Loess Plateau and nearby deserts). These data indicate that the relative contribution of EAD dust increases with the northeasterly surface winds associated with the East Asian Winter Monsoon (EAWM) during winter/spring, but the Prevailing Westerlies and Trade Winds that carry dust from the CADs have been the dominant transport agent for the last 600 kyr. The results of this study contradict the prevailing view that direct dust transport by the EAWM winds in spring dominates the annual flux of eolian dust in the northwest Pacific.

  17. Modification of Saharan Mineral Dust during Transport across the Atlantic Ocean - Overview and Results from the SALTRACE Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinzierl, Bernadett; Ansmann, Albert; Reitebuch, Oliver; Freudenthaler, Volker; Müller, Thomas; Kandler, Konrad; Groß, Silke; Sauer, Daniel; Althausen, Dietrich; Toledano, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    At present one of the largest uncertainties in our understanding of global climate concerns the interaction of aerosols with clouds and atmospheric dynamics. In the climate system, mineral dust aerosol is of key importance, because mineral dust contributes to about half of the global annual particle emissions by mass. Although our understanding of the effects of mineral dust on the atmosphere and the climate improved during the past decade, many questions such as the change of the dust size distribution during transport across the Atlantic Ocean and the associated impact on the radiation budget, the role of wet and dry dust removal mechanisms during transport, and the complex interaction between mineral dust and clouds remain open. The Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE: http://www.pa.op.dlr.de/saltrace) was conducted in June/July 2013 to investigate the transport and transformation of Saharan mineral dust during long-range transport from the Sahara across the Atlantic Ocean into the Caribbean. SALTRACE is a German initiative combining ground-based and airborne in-situ and lidar measurements with meteorological data, long-term measurements, satellite remote sensing and modeling which involved many national and international partners. During SALTRACE, the DLR Falcon research aircraft was based at Sal, Cape Verde, between 11 and 17 June 2013, and at Barbados between 18 June and 11 July 2013. The Falcon was equipped with a suite of in-situ instruments for the measurement of microphysical and optical aerosol properties, with sampling devices for offline particle analysis, with a nadir-looking 2-µm wind lidar, with dropsondes and instruments for standard meteorological parameters. Ground-based lidar and in-situ instruments were deployed in Cape Verde, Barbados and Puerto Rico. During SALTRACE, mineral dust from five dust outbreaks was studied by the Falcon research aircraft between Senegal, the Caribbean and Florida

  18. Saharan Dust over Senegal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Airborne African dust regularly reaches northeastern South America and the Caribbean. Westward dust transport from the Sahara across the central Atlantic has been a common occurrence this spring, with major events visible in both satellite images and photographs. Cap Vert, the westernmost point of Senegal, is dimly visible beneath the dust mass (center); the Arquipelago dos Bijagos in Guinea Bissau lies opposite the mouth of the sediment-laden Rio Corubal. This photo (ISS004-E-12080) was taken by the crew of the International Space Station on May 18, 2002, using a digital camera with a 35-mm lens. Image provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.

  19. Characteristics of Asian dust transport based on synoptic meteorological analysis over Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoo-Keun; Song, Sang-Keun; Lee, Hwa Woon; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Oh, In-Bo; Moon, Yun-Seob; Shon, Zang-Ho

    2006-03-01

    Classification of synoptic patterns and their correlation with dust events over East Asia were performed by means of cluster analysis. The average linkage and K-means clustering techniques were used to identify two major weather types during Asian dust events (ADEs; total 26 ADEs with 47 dusty days) of six spring seasons from 1996 to 2001. The first weather type mainly influenced neighboring Asian countries and frequently occurred with ADEs (approximately 23% of ADE cases). It mostly occurred under a surface high (low)-pressure system over the west (east) of the Korean peninsula coupled with an upper-level trough and cutoff low passage over the center of the Korean peninsula. It showed strong advection in the middle/ upper troposphere with both a high aerosol index and enhanced coarse particulate matter (PM) loading over Korea. In contrast, the second weather type was mostly associated with long distance or continental-scale transport and occurred less frequently with ADEs (approximately 15%). It appeared with an upper-level trough and a cutoff low vertically connected with a surface low system that was formed by a strong cyclonic vortex over the north of the Korean peninsula. There were weak advection, low aerosol index, and low coarse PM concentration over the Korean peninsula during the second weather type. In addition, it was found to be mostly associated with the trans-Pacific transport of Asian dust to the western coast of North America.

  20. Fate and Transport of Dust-borne Trace Metals and Solutes during Snowmelt Runoff in the Provo River, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carling, G. T.; Dastrup, D.; Fernandez, D. P.; Tingey, D. G.; Aanderud, Z.; Nelson, S.

    2015-12-01

    Aeolian dust is an important physical and chemical flux to mountain snowpack, with potentially significant contributions of trace metals and solutes to mountain streams during snowmelt. However, it is difficult to differentiate element contributions from dust relative to inputs from soil erosion and weathering. Sr isotopes show promise as a tracer of the soluble fraction of dust from snowpack to snowmelt runoff. We analyzed 87Sr/86Sr ratios, Sr and trace metal concentrations, and other parameters in bulk snowpack (wet and dry deposition), dust, and snowmelt runoff in the upper Provo River watershed in the Uinta Mountains (Utah, USA) over three years (2013-2015). In 2014 snowpack and dust samples had the same 87Sr/86Sr ratio (~0.7110), indicating that dust was responsible for the majority of Sr deposition to snowpack. Preliminary results using a two end-member mixing model (end-members of bulk snowpack and river baseflow) indicate that dust contributed up to 40% of Sr riverine load during peak runoff in 2014. In contrast, in 2013 there were no visible dust layers in the snowpack and mixing models indicate a different Sr source (e.g., soil water). Analyses are still underway on the 2015 samples. Sequential leaching experiments on dust samples suggest that Sr is likely associated with the highly soluble carbonate mineral fraction in dust, but other elements such as Cr, Cu, Pb, and U are associated with the relatively insoluble organic fraction. Additional work is underway to investigate transport of the less soluble dust-borne metals during snowmelt by complexation with organic matter or other mechanisms. These results suggest that dust on snowpack is an important but variable source of soluble elements during snowmelt, and that dust should be considered when investigating solute loads in mountain streams.

  1. Bacterial Composition and Survival on Sahara Dust Particles Transported to the European Alps.

    PubMed

    Meola, Marco; Lazzaro, Anna; Zeyer, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Deposition of Sahara dust (SD) particles is a frequent phenomenon in Europe, but little is known about the viability and composition of the bacterial community transported with SD. The goal of this study was to characterize SD-associated bacteria transported to the European Alps, deposited and entrapped in snow. During two distinct events in February and May 2014, SD particles were deposited and promptly covered by falling snow, thus preserving them in distinct ochre layers within the snowpack. In June 2014, we collected samples at different depths from a snow profile at the Jungfraujoch (Swiss Alps; 3621 m a.s.l.). After filtration, we performed various microbiological and physicochemical analyses of the snow and dust particles therein that originated in Algeria. Our results show that bacteria survive and are metabolically active after the transport to the European Alps. Using high throughput sequencing, we observed distinct differences in bacterial community composition and structure in SD-layers as compared to clean snow layers. Sporulating bacteria were not enriched in the SD-layers; however, phyla with low abundance such as Gemmatimonadetes and Deinococcus-Thermus appeared to be specific bio-indicators for SD. Since many members of these phyla are known to be adapted to arid oligotrophic environments and UV radiation, they are well suited to survive the harsh conditions of long-range airborne transport. PMID:26733988

  2. Bacterial Composition and Survival on Sahara Dust Particles Transported to the European Alps

    PubMed Central

    Meola, Marco; Lazzaro, Anna; Zeyer, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Deposition of Sahara dust (SD) particles is a frequent phenomenon in Europe, but little is known about the viability and composition of the bacterial community transported with SD. The goal of this study was to characterize SD-associated bacteria transported to the European Alps, deposited and entrapped in snow. During two distinct events in February and May 2014, SD particles were deposited and promptly covered by falling snow, thus preserving them in distinct ochre layers within the snowpack. In June 2014, we collected samples at different depths from a snow profile at the Jungfraujoch (Swiss Alps; 3621 m a.s.l.). After filtration, we performed various microbiological and physicochemical analyses of the snow and dust particles therein that originated in Algeria. Our results show that bacteria survive and are metabolically active after the transport to the European Alps. Using high throughput sequencing, we observed distinct differences in bacterial community composition and structure in SD-layers as compared to clean snow layers. Sporulating bacteria were not enriched in the SD-layers; however, phyla with low abundance such as Gemmatimonadetes and Deinococcus-Thermus appeared to be specific bio-indicators for SD. Since many members of these phyla are known to be adapted to arid oligotrophic environments and UV radiation, they are well suited to survive the harsh conditions of long-range airborne transport. PMID:26733988

  3. PM10 composition during an intense Saharan dust transport event over Athens (Greece).

    PubMed

    Remoundaki, E; Bourliva, A; Kokkalis, P; Mamouri, R E; Papayannis, A; Grigoratos, T; Samara, C; Tsezos, M

    2011-09-15

    The influence of Saharan dust on the air quality of Southern European big cities became a priority during the last decade. The present study reports results on PM(10) monitored at an urban site at 14 m above ground level during an intense Saharan dust transport event. The elemental composition was determined by Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (EDXRF) for 12 elements: Si, Al, Fe, K, Ca, Mg, Ti, S, Ni, Cu, Zn and Mn. PM(10) concentrations exceeded the EU limit (50 μg/m(3)) several times during the sampling period. Simultaneous maxima have been observed for the elements of crustal origin. The concentrations of all the elements presented a common maximum, corresponding to the date where the atmosphere was heavily charged with particulate matter permanently for an interval of about 10h. Sulfur and heavy metal concentrations were also associated to local emissions. Mineral dust represented the largest fraction of PM(10) reaching 79%. Seven days back trajectories have shown that the air masses arriving over Athens, originated from Western Sahara. Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX) revealed that particle agglomerates were abundant, most of them having sizes <2 μm. Aluminosilicates were predominant in dust particles also rich in calcium which was distributed between calcite, dolomite, gypsum and Ca-Si particles. These results were consistent with the origin of the dust particles and the elemental composition results. Sulfur and heavy metals were associated to very fine particles <1 μm. PMID:21724238

  4. African dust phosphorus fertilizing the Amazon and the Atlantic Ocean is derived from marine sediments and igneous rocks - no indication for Bodélé diatomite contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Avner; Castido, Danilo; Pio, Casimero; Angert, Alon

    2013-04-01

    signatures. The diatomite in the Bodélé depression have lower P concentrations (550-900 µg P g/dust) and fall off the mixing line describe by our samples. These findings implies that the bio-available P delivered by dust from West Africa to the Central Atlantic Ocean and later to the Amazon basin is derived from a mixture of igneous origin and marine sedimentary origin, and that in contrast to previous claims, the Bodélé diatomite is not a major dust-P source. In addition, we found that African dust-P concentrations are between 2 folds to 10 folds higher then generally accounted for in modeling studies.

  5. Chinese mineral dust and anthropogenic aerosol inter-continental transport: a Greenland perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bory, A.; Abouchami, W.; Galer, S.; Svensson, A.; Biscaye, P.

    2012-04-01

    Impurities contained in snow and ice layers in Greenland provide a record of the history of atmospheric dustiness and pollution in the Northern Hemisphere. The source of the particles deposited onto the ice cap may be investigated using specific intrinsic tracers. Provenance discrimination may then provide valuable constraints for the validation of atmospheric transport models as well as for the monitoring of natural and anthropogenic aerosols emissions at a global scale. Clay mineralogy combined with the strontium and neodymium isotope composition of the insoluble particles extracted from recent snow deposits at NorthGRIP (75.1°N, 042.3°W), for instance, enabled us to demonstrate that the Taklimakan desert of North-western China was the main source of mineral dust reaching central Greenland at present [Bory et al., EPSL, 2002 ; GRL, 2003a]. Here we report the lead isotopic signature of these snow-pit samples, covering the 1989-1995 and 1998-2001 time periods. Unradiogenic lead isotopic composition of our Greenland samples, compared to Asian dust isotopic fingerprints, implies that most of the insoluble lead reaching the ice cap is of anthropogenic origin. Lead isotopes reveal likely contributions from European/Canadian and, to a lesser extent, US sources, as well as a marked overprinted signature typical of Chinese anthropogenic lead sources. The relative contribution of the latter appears to have been increasing steadily over the last decade of the 20th century. Quantitative estimates suggest that, in addition to providing most of the dust, China may have already become the most important supplier of anthropogenic lead deposited in Greenland by the turn of the 20th to the 21st century. The close timing between dust and anthropogenic particles deposition onto the ice cap provides new insights for our understanding of Chinese aerosols transport to Greenland.

  6. The role of African dust in the formation of Quaternary soils on Mallorca, Spain and implications for the genesis of Red Mediterranean soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Budahn, J.; Avila, A.; Skipp, G.; Freeman, J.; Patterson, D.

    2010-01-01

    African dust additions explain the origin of terra rossa soils that are common on the carbonate-platform island of Mallorca, Spain. Mineralogical and geochemical analyses indicate that Quaternary carbonate eolianites on Mallorca have a very high purity, usually composed of more than 90% carbonate minerals (calcite, dolomite, and aragonite). In contrast, terra rossa soils developed on these eolianites have lower carbonate contents and contain higher concentrations of quartz and other silicates. Analyses of immobile trace elements indicate that the non-carbonate fractions of the eolianites have distinctive Zr/Hf, La/Yb, Cr/Sc and Th/Ta values that differ from the superjacent terra rossa soils. These observations indicate that even if sufficient dissolution of the eolianite had taken place to create the soils by residual accumulation, immobile element ratios in the soils require an external source. However, Zr/Hf, La/Yb, Cr/Sc and Th/Ta values in the soils fall within the range of values for these element ratios in African dust collected on Barbados and mainland Spain. We conclude that the silicate fractions of terra rossa soils on Mallorca are derived mainly, though not wholly, from far-traveled African dust, and this process may explain the origin of other terra rossa soils found in southern Europe. ?? 2010.

  7. Transport of dusts from East Asian and non-East Asian sources to Hong Kong during dust storm related events 1996-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y. C.; Yang, Xun; Wenig, Mark

    2010-09-01

    Over a twelve year period from 1996 to 2007, 76 dust storm related events (as days) in Hong Kong were selected for study, based on Aluminium and Calcium concentrations in PM 10. Four of the 76 events reach episodic levels with exceedances of the Hong Kong air quality standards. The purpose of the study is to identify and characterize dust sources impacting Hong Kong. Global distribution of aerosols in NASA's daily aerosol index images from TOMS and OMI, are compared to plots generated by NRL(US)'s Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System. Possible source areas are assigned by computing air parcel backward trajectories to Hong Kong using the NOAA HYSPLIT model. PM 10 and elemental data are analyzed for crustal mass concentrations and element mass ratios. Our analysis reveals that 73 out of the 76 dust events (96%) involve non-East Asian sources-the Thar, Central/West Asian, Arabian and Sahara deserts (Saharan influence is found in 63 events), which are previously not known to affect Hong Kong. The Gobi desert is the most frequent origin of dust, affecting 68 dust events while the Taklamakan desert impacts only 30 of the dust events. The impact of the Gobi desert in March and December is apparently associated with the northeast monsoon in East Asia. Our results also show a seasonal pattern in dust impact from both East Asian and more remote sources, with a maximum in March. Dust event occurrences are conspicuously absent from summer. Dust transport to Hong Kong is commonly associated with the passage of frontal low-pressure systems. The coarse size fraction of PM 10 concentrations were, as indicated by Al, Ca and Fe concentrations, about 4-8 times higher during dust events. The mean Ca/Al ratios of sources involving the Taklamakan desert are notably higher than those for non-East Asian sources owing to a higher Ca content of most of the East Asian deserts. The Fe/Al ratios follow a similar trend. Contributions from the desert sources are grossly estimated where

  8. Linking Endotoxins, African Dust PM10 and Asthma in an Urban and Rural Environment of Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Martínez, Mario G.; Rodríguez-Cotto, Rosa I.; Ortiz-Rivera, Mónica A.; Pluguez-Turull, Cedric W.; Jiménez-Vélez, Braulio D.

    2015-01-01

    African Dust Events (ADE) are a seasonal phenomenon that has been suggested to exacerbate respiratory and proinflammatory diseases in Puerto Rico (PR). Increases in PM10 concentration and the effects of biological endotoxins (ENX) are critical factors to consider during these storms. ENX promote proinflammatory responses in lungs of susceptible individuals through activation of the Toll-like receptors (TLR2/4) signaling pathways. The objective of the study was to evaluate the toxicological and proinflammatory responses stimulated by ADE PM10 ENX reaching PR using human bronchial epithelial cells. PM10 organic extracts from a rural and urban site in PR (March 2004) were obtained from ADE and non-ADE and compared. A retrospective data analysis (PM10 concentration, aerosol images, and pediatric asthma claims) was performed from 2000 to 2012 with particular emphasis in 2004 to classify PM samples. Urban extracts were highly toxic, proinflammatory (IL-6/IL-8 secretion), and induced higher TLR4 expression and NF-κB activation compared to rural extracts. ENX were found to contribute to cytotoxicity and inflammatory responses provoked by urban ADE PM10 exposure suggesting a synergistic potency of local and natural ENX incoming from ADE. The contribution of ADE PM10 ENX is valuable in order to understand interactions and action mechanisms of airborne pollutants as asthma triggers in PR. PMID:26681839

  9. A new dust transport approach to quantify anthropogenic sources of atmospheric PM10 deposition on lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Lee; Thé, Jesse; Gharabaghi, Bahram; Stainsby, Eleanor A.; Winter, Jennifer G.

    2014-10-01

    Windblown dust simulations are one of the most uncertain types of atmospheric transport models. This study presents an integrated PM10 emission, transport and deposition model which has been validated using monitored data. This model characterizes the atmospheric phosphorus load focusing on the major local sources within the Lake Simcoe airshed including paved and unpaved roads, agricultural sources, construction sites and aggregate mining sources. This new approach substantially reduces uncertainty by providing improved estimates of the friction velocities than those developed previously. Modeling improvements were also made by generating and validating an hourly windfield using detailed meteorology, topography and land use data for the study area. The model was used to estimate dust emissions generated in the airshed and to simulate the long-range transport and deposition of PM10 to Lake Simcoe. The deposition results from the model were verified against observed bulk collector phosphorus concentration data for both wet and dry deposition. Bulk collector data from stations situated outside the airshed in a remote, undeveloped area were also compared to determine the background contribution from distant sources.

  10. Life in Darwin's dust: intercontinental transport and survival of microbes in the nineteenth century.

    PubMed

    Gorbushina, Anna A; Kort, Renate; Schulte, Anette; Lazarus, David; Schnetger, Bernhard; Brumsack, Hans-Jürgen; Broughton, William J; Favet, Jocelyne

    2007-12-01

    Charles Darwin, like others before him, collected aeolian dust over the Atlantic Ocean and sent it to Christian Gottfried Ehrenberg in Berlin. Ehrenberg's collection is now housed in the Museum of Natural History and contains specimens that were gathered at the onset of the Industrial Revolution. Geochemical analyses of this resource indicated that dust collected over the Atlantic in 1838 originated from the Western Sahara, while molecular-microbiological methods demonstrated the presence of many viable microbes. Older samples sent to Ehrenberg from Barbados almost two centuries ago also contained numbers of cultivable bacteria and fungi. Many diverse ascomycetes, and eubacteria were found. Scanning electron microscopy and cultivation suggested that Bacillus megaterium, a common soil bacterium, was attached to historic sand grains, and it was inoculated onto dry sand along with a non-spore-forming control, the Gram-negative soil bacterium Rhizobium sp. NGR234. On sand B. megaterium quickly developed spores, which survived for extended periods and even though the numbers of NGR234 steadily declined, they were still considerable after months of incubation. Thus, microbes that adhere to Saharan dust can live for centuries and easily survive transport across the Atlantic.

  11. Use of MODIS Satellite Images and an Atmospheric Dust Transport Model to Evaluate Juniperus spp. Pollen Phenology and Dispersal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luvall, Jeffrey C.

    2011-01-01

    Pollen can be transported great distances. Van de Water et. al. reported Juniperus spp. pollen was transported 200-600 km. Hence local obse rvations of plant phenology may not be consistent with the timing and source of pollen collected by pollen sampling instruments. The DREAM (Dust REgional Atmospheric Model, Nickovic et al. 2001) is a verified model for atmospheric dust transport modeling using MODIS data produ cts to identify source regions and quantities of dust. We are modifyi ng the DREAM model to incorporate pollen transport. Pollen release wi ll be estimated based on MODIS derived phenology of Juniperus spp. communities. Ground based observations records of pollen release timing and quantities will be used as verification. This information will be used to support the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention?s Nat ional Environmental Public Health Tracking Program and the State of New Mexico environmental public health decision support for asthma and allergies alerts.

  12. Use of MODIS Satellite Images and an Atmospheric Dust Transport Model To Evaluate Juniperus spp. Pollen Phenology and Dispersal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luvall, J. C.; Sprigg, W. A.; Levetin, Estelle; Huete, Alfredo; Nickovic, S.; Pejanovic, G. A.; Vukovic, A.; VandeWater, P. K.; Myers, O. B.; Budge, A. M.; Zelicoff, A. P.; Bunderson, L.; Crimmins, T. M.

    2011-01-01

    Pollen can be transported great distances. Van de Water et. al., 2003 reported Juniperus spp. pollen was transported 200-600 km. Hence local observations of plant phenology may not be consistent with the timing and source of pollen collected by pollen sampling instruments. The DREAM (Dust REgional Atmospheric Model, Nickovic et al. 2001) is a verified model for atmospheric dust transport modeling using MODIS data products to identify source regions and quantities of dust. We are modifying the DREAM model to incorporate pollen transport. Pollen release will be estimated based on MODIS derived phenology of Juniperus spp. communities. Ground based observational records of pollen release timing and quantities will be used as verification. This information will be used to support the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Environmental Public Health Tracking Program and the State of New Mexico environmental public health decision support for asthma and allergies alerts.

  13. Use of MODIS Satellite Images and an Atmospheric Dust Transport Model to Evaluate Juniperus spp. Pollen Phenology and Dispersal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luvall, J. C.; Sprigg, W. A.; Levetin, E.; Huete, A.; Nickovic, S.; Pejanovic, G. A.; Vukovic, A.; VandeWater, P. K.; Myers, O. B.; Budge, A. M.; Zelicoff, A. P.; Bunderson, L.; Crimmins, T. M.

    2011-01-01

    Pollen can be transported great distances. Van de Water et. al. reported Juniperus spp. pollen was transported 200-600 km. Hence local observations of plant phenology may not be consistent with the timing and source of pollen collected by pollen sampling instruments. The DREAM (Dust REgional Atmospheric Model) is a verified model for atmospheric dust transport modeling using MODIS data products to identify source regions and quantities of dust. We are modifying the DREAM model to incorporate pollen transport. Pollen release will be estimated based on MODIS derived phenology of Juniperus spp. communities. Ground based observational records of pollen release timing and quantities will be used as verification. This information will be used to support the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Environmental Public Health Tracking Program and the State of New Mexico environmental public health decision support for asthma and allergies alerts.

  14. Airborne microorganisms in the African desert dust corridor over the mid-Atlantic ridge, Ocean Drilling Program, Leg 209

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Dale W.; Westphal, Douglas L.; Gray, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to enhance our understanding of the fate and trans-Atlantic transport of dustborne microorganisms from Northern Africa to the Caribbean and Americas, and more specifically to determine if culturable populations could be detected at a mid-ocean site, closer to the source of dust relative to land-based Caribbean sites, during the early summer months of May and June. Between the dates of 22 May and 30 June 2003, daily air samples were collected and evaluated for the presence of culturable bacterial and fungal colony-forming units (CFU). Here we report a statistically significant correlation between daily atmospheric CFU counts at a mid-ocean research site (???15??N, 45??W) and daily desert dust concentrations as determined by the U.S. Navy's Naval Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) Global Aerosol Model (Honrath et al. (2004). Journal of Geophysical Research, 109; Johnson et al. (2003). Global Biogeochemical Cycles, 17, 1063; Reid et al. (2004). Geophysical Research Letters, 31; Schollaert, Yoder, Westphal, & O'Reilly (2003). Journal of Geophysical Research, 108, 3191). ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006.

  15. Vertical Structure of Aerosols and Mineral Dust Transport Over the Bay of Bengal Using Multi-Satellite Observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naduparambil Bharathan, L.

    2015-12-01

    Bay-of-Bengal (BoB), a small oceanic region Eat to Indian land mass, surrounded by heavily inhabited land masses, experiences different types of air-masses in different seasons of contrasting wind patterns, which makes it a region of large heterogeneity in the context of regional climate forcing due to atmospheric aerosols. Heterogeneity of aerosol system over the Bay of Bengal is mainly determined by three distinct source regions, which are east coast of India/central India, China/east Asia and Arabian region. Continental aerosols transported through higher elevations over BoB lead to significant impacts in regional climate by modifying the vertical thermal structure of the atmosphere and associated circulation dynamics. The study aims at a comprehensive understanding on the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of elevated aerosol over the BoB using the observations of Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) aboard Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO). Being capable of short wave scattering and long wave absorption, mineral dust aerosols can affects the energetics of the atmosphere over any region.Owing to its influence on Indian monsoon rainfall and regional climate, the study aims to comprehend on the spatial and seasonal variation of mineral dust transport over the Bay of Bengal. vertical distribution of the dust extinction coefficient over the Bay of Bengal for all seasons, is derived, using a dust separation scheme that uses the depolarization measurements, a priori information on lidar ratio of dust, depolarization ratio of dust and that of non-dust aerosols. Being highly non-spherical, mineral dust significantly depolarize the radiation and possess distinct range of depolarization ratio. This property of dust is made use to identify and quantify dust over the study region. Seasonal variation of dust fraction over the Bay of Bengal is estimated seperately from CALIPSO back scattering coefficients

  16. Use of MODIS Satellite Images and an Atmospheric Dust Transport Model to Evaluate Juniperus spp. Pollen Phenology and Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luvall, J. C.; Sprigg, W. A.; Levetin, E.; Huete, A.; Nickovic, S.; Pejanovic, G. A.; Vukovic, A.; Van de Water, P. K.; Myers, O. B.; Budge, A. M.; Zelicoff, A. P.; Bunderson, L.; Ponce-Campos, G.; Crimmins, T. M.

    2011-01-01

    Pollen can be transported great distances. Van de Water et al., 2003 reported Juniperus spp. pollen, a significant aeroallergen was transported 200-600 km. Hence local observations of plant phenology may not be consistent with the timing and source of pollen collected by pollen sampling instruments. Direct detection of pollen via satellite is not practical. A practical alternative combines modeling and phenological observations using ground based sampling and satellite data. The DREAM (Dust REgional Atmospheric Model) is a verified model for atmospheric dust transport modeling using MODIS data products to identify source regions and quantities of dust (Nickovic et al. 2001). The use of satellite data products for studying phenology is well documented (White and Nemani 2006). In the current project MODIS data will provide critical input to the PREAM model providing pollen source location, timing of pollen release, and vegetation type. We are modifying the DREAM model (PREAM - Pollen REgional Atmospheric Model) to incorporate pollen transport. The linkages already exist with DREAM through PHAiRS (Public Health Applications in Remote Sensing) to the public health community. This linkage has the potential to fill this data gap so that the potential association of health effects of pollen can better be tracked for possible linkage with health outcome data which may be associated with asthma, respiratory effects, myocardial infarction, and lost workdays. Juniperus spp. pollen phenology may respond to a wide range of environmental factors such as day length, growing degree-days, precipitation patterns and soil moisture. Species differences are also important. These environmental factors vary over both time and spatial scales. Ground based networks such as the USA National Phenology Network have been established to provide national wide observations of vegetation phenology. However, the density of observers is not adequate to sufficiently document the phenology variability

  17. Characterization of the Temporal-Spatial Variability of Trans-Atlantic Dust Transport Based on CALIPSO Lidar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    The trans-Atlantic dust transport has important implications for human and ecosystem health, the terrestrial and oceanic biogeochemical cycle, weather systems, and climate. A reliable assessment of these influences requires the characterization of dust distributions in three dimensions and over long time periods. We provide an observation-based multiyear estimate of trans-Atlantic dust transport by using a 7-year (2007 - 2013) lidar record from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) in both cloud-free and above-cloud conditions. We estimate that on a basis of the 7-year average and integration over 10S - 30N, 182 Tg a-1 dust leaves the coast of North Africa at 15W, of which 132 Tg a-1 and 43 Tg a-1 reaches 35W and 75W, respectively. These flux estimates have an overall known uncertainty of (45 - 70). The 7-year average of dust deposition into the Amazon Basin is estimated to be 28 (8 - 48) Tg a-1 or 29 (8 - 50) kg ha-1 a-1. This imported dust could provide about 0.022 (0.006 - 0.037) Tg P of phosphorus per year, equivalent to 23 (7 - 39) g P ha-1 a-1 to fertilize the Amazon rainforest, which is comparable to the loss of phosphorus to rainfall. Significant seasonal variations are observed in both the magnitude of total dust transport and its meridional and vertical distributions. The observed large interannual variability of annual dust transport is highly anti-correlated with the prior-year Sahel Precipitation Index. Comparisons of CALIPSO measurements with surface-based observations and model simulations will also be discussed.

  18. Size-resolved Chemical Composition of Cloud and Rain Water Collected during the Puerto Rico African Dust and Clouds Study (PRADACS) Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, E.; Valle Diaz, C. J.; Zurcher, F.; Lee, T.; Collett, J. L.; Fitzgerald, E.; Cuadra, L.; Prather, K. A.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.

    2011-12-01

    The underlying physico-chemical processes of dust-aerosol interactions are poorly understood; even less understood is how aging impacts cloud properties and climate as the particles travel from Africa to the Caribbean region. Caribbean landmasses have tropical montane cloud forests (TMCFs) that are tightly coupled to the atmospheric hydrologic cycle. Small-scale shifts in temperature and precipitation could have serious ecological consequences. Therefore, this makes TMCFs an interesting ecosystem to see the effects African Dust (AD) might have on cloud formation and precipitation. As part of the Puerto Rico African Dust and Clouds Study (PRADACS) cloud and rain water samples for subsequent chemical analysis were collected at Pico del Este (PE) station in Luquillo, PR (1051 masl) during summer 2011. At PE, two cloud collectors (i.e., single stage (Aluminum version) and 2-stage (Teflon version) Caltech Active Strand Cloudwater Collector (CASCC)), and a rainwater collector were operated. Measurements such as the liquid water content (LWC), pH, conductivity., and composition of single particles using an aerosol time of flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) were performed. Preliminary results showed that days with the influence of African dust (AD), had LWC values that ranged from 300 to 500 mg/m3, pH values up to 5.7,, and conductivity up to 180 μS/cm. The ATOFMS showed titanium and iron ions, suggesting the presence of AD as well as, occasionally, sulfate and nitrate ions suggesting the influence of anthropogenic pollution. Results on the chemical composition and the physical properties of cloud, rainwater, and aerosol for the inorganic as well as the organic fraction and how these properties change for the different air masses observed will also be presented.

  19. Transport of mineral dust to Nepal Climate Observatory - Pyramid (5079 m a.s.l., South Himalayas)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchi, Rocco; Cristofanelli, Paolo; Marinoni, Angela; Calzolari, Francescopiero; Decesari, Stefano; Laj, Paolo; Vuillermoz, Elisa; Sprenger, Michael; Bonasoni, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    Desert dust is one of the greatest sources of natural aerosol in atmosphere, representing about 37% of the total (natural and anthropogenic) emission of atmospheric primary aerosols. Mineral dust can impact climate through many complex processes, i.e. by scattering and absorbing solar and infrared radiation and by affecting the variability of cloud aerosol optical properties. Moreover, mineral dust can also affect the concentrations of other climate-altering species (e.g. surface ozone) in troposphere. South Asia is a region frequently affected by major dust transport from Africa and Asia. In particular, these "dust clouds" can reach the Himalayas also mixed with the heavy anthropogenic pollution present within the so-called Asian Brown Cloud. With the purpose to define the frequency of long-range mineral dust transport towards the Himalayan range and to evaluate their influence on the atmospheric aerosol background level, in this work we analyse the first 2-year (from March 2006 to February 2008) of coarse (Dp > 1 micron) aerosol number concentration observed at the WMO - GAW station "Nepal Climate Observatory - Pyramid" (NCO-P, 5079 m a.s.l., Nepal). This measurement station, part of UNEP-ABC and EV-K2-CNR SHARE projects, is not far from the Everest Base Camp and the observation here conducted can be considered representative for the South-Eastern slope of the Himalayan range. During the investigated period we detect more than 80 days/year as possibly affected by mineral dust transport. As deduced by the NCO-P measurements, these events significantly influenced the seasonal variation of coarse aerosol number concentration as well as the number and volumetric aerosol size distribution over South Himalayas. Due to the combination of the large-scale westerly circulation and the higher frequency of dust out-breaks, the majority of the identified events occurred during the pre-monsoon season. Although of lesser intensity and frequency, a significant amount of dust

  20. Mass Influx of Cosmic Dust Estimated From Vertical Transport of Meteoric Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Alan Z.; Guo, Yafang; Gardner, Chester S.

    2016-04-01

    The mesospheric metal layers are formed by the vaporization of high-speed cosmic dust particles in the lower thermosphere and upper mesosphere. The vaporized atoms and ions are transported downward by waves and turbulence to chemical sinks below 85 km, where they form stable compounds. These compounds condense onto meteoric smoke particles and are then transported to the winter pole where they eventually settle onto the surface. The downward fluxes of the metal atoms are directly related to their meteoric influxes and chemical loss rates. In this paper we use Doppler lidar measurements of Na and Fe fluxes made by the University of Illinois and University of Colorado groups, and a chemical ablation model (CABMOD) developed at the University of Leeds, to constrain the velocity/mass distribution of the meteoroids entering the atmosphere and to derive an improved estimate for the global influx of cosmic dust. We find that the particles responsible for injecting a large fraction of the ablated material into the Earth's upper atmosphere, enter at relatively slow speeds and originate primarily from the Jupiter Family of Comets. The global mean Na influx is 21,500±1,100 atoms/cm2/s, which equals 372±18 kg/d for the global input of Na vapor and 186±24 t/d for the global influx of cosmic dust. The global mean Fe influx is 131,000±36,000 atoms/cm2/s, which equals 5.5±1.5 t/d for the global input of Na vapor.

  1. Evidence for dust-driven, radial plasma transport in Saturn's inner radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Kollmann, P.; Paranicas, C.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Andriopoulou, M.

    2016-08-01

    between the magnetosphere and Saturn's faint rings that may drive such radial transport processes may also exist in previously reported measurements of plasma density by Cassini. Alternative explanations that do not involve enhanced plasma transport near the rings require the presence of a transient absorbing medium, such as E-ring clumps. Such clumps may form at the L-shell range where microsignatures have been observed due to resonances between charged dust and corotating magnetospheric structures, but remote imaging observations of the E-ring are not consistent with such a scenario.

  2. Satellite Monitoring of Long-Range Transport of Asian Dust Storms from Sources to Sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, N.; Tsay, S.; Jeong, M.; King, M.; Holben, B.

    2007-05-01

    Among the many components that contribute to air pollution, airborne mineral dust plays an important role due to its biogeochemical impact on the ecosystem and its radiative-forcing effect on the climate system. In East Asia, dust storms frequently accompany the cold and dry air masses that occur as part of spring-time cold front systems. China's capital, Beijing, and other large cities are on the primary pathway of these dust storm plumes, and their passage over such popu-lation centers causes flight delays, pushes grit through windows and doors, and forces people indoors. Furthermore, during the spring these anthropogenic and natural air pollutants, once generated over the source regions, can be transported out of the boundary layer into the free troposphere and can travel thousands of kilometers across the Pacific into the United States and beyond. In this paper, we will demonstrate the capability of a new satellite algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical thickness and single scattering albedo over bright-reflecting surfaces such as urban areas and deserts. Such retrievals have been dif-ficult to perform using previously available algorithms that use wavelengths from the mid-visible to the near IR because they have trouble separating the aerosol signal from the contribution due to the bright surface reflectance. The new algorithm, called Deep Blue, utilizes blue-wavelength measurements from instruments such as SeaWiFS and MODIS to infer the properties of aerosols, since the surface reflectance over land in the blue part of the spectrum is much lower than for longer wavelength channels. Deep Blue algorithm has recently been integrated into the MODIS processing stream and began to provide aerosol products over land as part of the opera-tional MYD04 products. In this talk, we will show the comparisons of the MODIS Deep Blue products with data from AERONET sunphotometers on a global ba-sis. The results indicate reasonable agreements between these two. These new

  3. Transport, vertical structure and radiative properties of dust events in southeast China determined from ground and space sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianjun; Zheng, Youfei; Li, Zhanqing; Flynn, Connor; Welton, E. J.; Cribb, Mareen

    2011-11-01

    Two dust events were detected over the Yangtze Delta region of China during March 14-17 and April 25-26 in 2009 where such dust events are uncommon. The transport behavior, spatio-temporal evolution, vertical structure, direct radiative effects, as well as induced heating rates, are investigated using a combination of ground-based and satellite-based measurements, a back-trajectory analysis, an aerosol model and a radiative transfer model. Back-trajectories, wind fields and aerosol model analyses show that the first dust originated in northern/northwestern China and the second generated in the Taklimakan desert in northwest China, and traveled across the Hexi corridor and Loess Plateau to the Yangtze Delta region (the so-called "dust corridor"). The mean lidar extinction-to-backscatter ratio (LR) during the two dust events was 38.7 ± 10.4 sr and 42.7 ± 15.2 sr, respectively. The mean aerosol depolarization ratio ( δa) for the first dust event was 0.16 ± 0.07, with a maximum value of 0.32. For the second, the mean δa was around 0.19 ± 0.06, with a maximum value of 0.29. Aerosol extinction coefficient and δa profiles for the two events were similar: two aerosol layers consisting of dust aerosols and a mixture of dust and anthropogenic pollution aerosols. The topmost aerosol layer is above 3.5 km. The maximum mean aerosol extinction coefficients were 0.5 km -1 and 0.54 km -1 at about 0.7 km and 1.1 km, respectively. Significant effects of cooling at the surface and heating in the atmosphere were found during these dust events. Diurnal mean shortwave radiative forcings (efficiencies) at the surface, the top-of-the-atmosphere and within the atmosphere were -36.8 (-80.0), -13.6 (-29.6) and 23.2 (50.4) W m -2, respectively, during the first dust event, and -48.2 (-70.9), -21.4 (-31.5) and 26.8 (39.4) W m -2, respectively, during the second dust event. Maximum heating rates occurred at 0.7 km during the first dust event and at 1.1 km during the second dust event

  4. Size-resolved Chemical Composition of Cloud and Rain Water Collected during the Puerto Rico African Dust and Clouds Study (PRADACS) Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle Diaz, C. J.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.; Zurcher, F.; Gioda, A.; Lee, T.; Collett, J. L.; Pradacs Team

    2010-12-01

    The underlying physico-chemical processes of dust-aerosol interactions are poorly understood; even less understood is how aging impacts cloud properties and climate as the particles travel from Africa to the Caribbean region. Caribbean landmasses have Tropical Montane Cloud Forests (TMCFs) that are tightly coupled to the atmospheric hydrologic cycle. Small-scale shifts in temperature and precipitation could have serious ecological consequences. Therefore, this makes TMCFs an interesting ecosystem to see the effects African Dust (AD) might have on cloud formation and precipitation. The first field measurements of the Puerto Rico African Dust and Clouds Study (PRADACS) were from July 22 to August 12, 2010. Measurements were performed at East Peak (EP) station at Luquillo, PR (1051 masl) and Cape San Juan Station (CSJ), a coastal station at Fajardo, PR (~60 masl). At EP, two cloud collectors (i.e., single stage (Aluminum version) and 2-stage (Teflon version) Caltech Active Strand Cloudwater Collector (CASCC)), and a rainwater collector were operated. Chemical composition (water-soluble ions and carbonaceous, organic nitrogen and metals) and pH were determined for the cloud water and rainwater samples. Here we present preliminary results for EP station. For cloud water and rainwater sampling, pH was 5.5 in average, but during dust events pH values were higher due to the presence of cations that form hydroxides in aqueous solution. Conductivity measurements ranged from 20 to 120 μs/cm; being higher on dust events and lower for rain samples. The values of pH and conductivity in the first stage (large droplets of approximately 15 μm are collected) indicate a higher content of dust than in the second stage (small droplets of approximately 5 μm). This is consistent with the larger sizes of dust particles as well as their lower hygroscopicity which requires more water to serve as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN). Additional results for physical properties and chemical

  5. Respirable coal dust exposure and respiratory symptoms in South-African coal miners: A comparison of current and ex-miners

    SciTech Connect

    Naidoo, R.N.; Robins, T.G.; Seixas, N.; Lalloo, U.G.; Becklake, M.

    2006-06-15

    Dose-response associations between respirable dust exposure and respiratory symptoms and between symptoms and spirometry outcomes among currently employed and formerly employed South-African coal miners were investigated. Work histories, interviews, and spirometry and cumulative exposure were assessed among 684 current and 212 ex-miners. Results: Lower prevalences of symptoms were found among employed compared with ex-miners. Associations with increasing exposure for symptoms of phlegm and past history of tuberculosis were observed, whereas other symptom prevalences were higher in the higher exposure categories. Symptomatic ex-miners exhibited lower lung-function compared to the nonsymptomatic. Compared with published data, symptoms rates were low in current miners but high in ex-miners. Although explanations could include the low prevalence of smoking and/or reporting/selection bias, a 'Survivor' and/or a 'hire' effect is more likely, resulting in an underestimation of the dust-related effect.

  6. Aging of mineral dust during transport from the Sahara into the Cape Verde area - results from airborne measurements during SAMUM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinzierl, B.; Sauer, D.; Esselborn, M.; Petzold, A.; Veira, A.; Rose, M.; Mund, S.; Wirth, M.; Ansmann, A.; Tesche, M.; Groß, S.; Freudenthaler, V.

    2012-04-01

    aerosol layers in the Cape Verde region and compare the properties of aged dust with those of fresh dust observed close the Sahara. Changes in the size distribution during transport will be discussed and the impact of the changed size distribution on the radiation budget will be evaluated.

  7. Variability of the infrared complex refractive index of African mineral dust: experimental estimation and implications for radiative transfer and satellite remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Biagio, C.; Boucher, H.; Caquineau, S.; Chevaillier, S.; Cuesta, J.; Formenti, P.

    2014-10-01

    Experimental estimations of the infrared refractive index of African mineral dust have been retrieved from laboratory measurements of particle transmission spectra in the wavelength range 2.5-25 μm. Five dust samples collected at Banizoumbou (Niger) and Tamanrasset (Algeria) during dust events originated from different Western Saharan and Sahelian areas have been investigated. The real (n) and imaginary (k) parts of the refractive index obtained for the different dust samples vary in the range 1.1-2.7 and 0.05-1.0, respectively, and are strongly sensitive to the mineralogical composition of the particles, especially in the 8-12 and 17-25 μm spectral intervals. Dust absorption is controlled mainly by clays (kaolinite, illite, smectite) and, to a lesser extent, by quartz and calcium-rich minerals (e.g. calcite, gypsum). Significant differences are obtained when comparing our results with existing experimental estimations available in the literature, and with the values of the OPAC (Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds) database. The different data sets appear comparable in magnitude, with our values of n and k falling within the range of variability of past studies. However, literature data fail in accurately reproducing the spectral signatures of the main minerals, in particular clays, and they significantly overestimate the contribution of quartz. Furthermore, the real and the imaginary parts of the refractive index from some literature studies are found not to verify the Kramers-Kronig relations, thus being theoretically incorrect. The comparison between our results, from western Africa, and literature data, from different locations in Europe, Africa, and the Caribbean, nonetheless, confirms the expected large variability of the dust infrared refractive index. This highlights the necessity for an extended systematic investigation of dust properties at infrared wavelengths. For the five analysed dust samples, aerosol intensive optical properties relevant to

  8. Loss of lung function associated with exposure to silica dust and with smoking and its relation to disability and mortality in South African gold miners.

    PubMed Central

    Hnizdo, E

    1992-01-01

    The data from a lung function study on 2209 white 45-54 year old South African gold miners in 1968-71 and at a five year follow up examination, were analysed to establish the actual loss of lung function associated with exposure to silica dust and with smoking. Ex-smokers were excluded from the analysis. Of the remaining 1625 subjects, 1249 had the five year follow up test of lung function. The estimated excess loss of lung function for a 50 year old gold miner, associated with 24 years of underground dust exposure of an average respirable dust concentration of 0.30 mg m-3 (14.4 ghm-3) was 236 ml of FEV1 (95% confidence interval (95% CI 134-337) and 217 ml of FVC (95% CI 110-324). By comparison, the effect of smoking one packet of cigarettes a day over 30 years was associated with an estimated loss of 552 ml of FEV1 (95% CI 461-644) and 335 ml of FVC (95% CI 170-500). The cumulative dust exposure was not associated with the longitudinal loss of FEV1 or FVC when the initial FEV1 and FVC were adjusted in the models. According to the predicted values, however, gold miners appear to have a greater loss of lung function from 50 to 55 years of age than that predicted for a general population. PMID:1322158

  9. Observational evidence for the convective transport of dust over the Central United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corr, C. A.; Ziemba, L. D.; Scheuer, E.; Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Chen, G.; Crosbie, E.; Moore, R. H.; Shook, M.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E.; Lawson, R. P.; Barth, M. C.; Schroeder, J. R.; Blake, D. R.; Dibb, J. E.

    2016-02-01

    Bulk aerosol composition and aerosol size distributions measured aboard the DC-8 aircraft during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment mission in May/June 2012 were used to investigate the transport of mineral dust through nine storms encountered over Colorado and Oklahoma. Measurements made at low altitudes (<5 km mean sea level (MSL)) in the storm inflow region were compared to those made in cirrus anvils (altitude > 9 km MSL). Storm mean outflow Ca2+ mass concentrations and total coarse (1 µm < diameter < 5 µm) aerosol volume (Vc) were comparable to mean inflow values as demonstrated by average outflow/inflow ratios greater than 0.5. A positive relationship between Ca2+, Vc, ice water content, and large (diameter > 50 µm) ice particle number concentrations was not evident; thus, the influence of ice shatter on these measurements was assumed small. Mean inflow aerosol number concentrations calculated over a diameter range (0.5 µm < diameter < 5.0 µm) relevant for proxy ice nuclei (NPIN) were ~15-300 times higher than ice particle concentrations for all storms. Ratios of predicted interstitial NPIN (calculated as the difference between inflow NPIN and ice particle concentrations) and inflow NPIN were consistent with those calculated for Ca2+ and Vc and indicated that on average less than 10% of the ingested NPIN were activated as ice nuclei during anvil formation. Deep convection may therefore represent an efficient transport mechanism for dust to the upper troposphere where these particles can function as ice nuclei cirrus forming in situ.

  10. Occurrence, distribution and health risk from polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAHs, oxygenated-PAHs and azaarenes) in street dust from a major West African Metropolis.

    PubMed

    Bandowe, Benjamin A Musa; Nkansah, Marian Asantewah

    2016-05-15

    Scientific evidence suggests that the burden of disease on urban residents of sub-Saharan African Countries is increasing, partly as a result of exposure to elevated concentrations of toxic environmental chemicals. However, characterization of the levels, composition pattern and sources of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) in environmental samples from African cities is still lacking. This study measured the PAHs, oxygenated-PAHs (OPAHs) and azaarene (AZAs) content of street dusts collected from Kumasi, Ghana (a major metropolis located in the tropical forest zone of West Africa). The ∑Alkyl+parent-PAHs, ∑OPAHs and ∑AZAs concentration in street dust averaged 2570 ng g(-1) (range: 181-7600 ng g(-1)), 833 ng g(-1) (57-4200 ng g(-1)) and 73 ng g(-1) (3.3-240 ng g(-1)), respectively. The concentrations of ∑Alkyl+parent-PAHs were strongly correlated (n=25) with ∑OPAHs (r=0.96, p<0.01) and ∑AZAs (r=0.94, p<0.01). The ∑OPAHs concentrations were also strongly correlated with ∑AZAs (r=0.91, p<0.01). Concentrations of individual PAHs in these street dusts were enriched at between 12 and 836 compared to their average concentrations in background soils from same city, demonstrating the high influence of traffic emissions. Several individual OPAHs and AZAs had higher concentrations than their related and often monitored parent-PAHs. The estimated incremental lifetime cancer risks due to the parent-PAHs in street dusts was >10(-6) indicating high risk of contracting cancer from exposure to street dust from Kumasi. The contribution of OPAHs, AZAs, and alkyl-PAHs in street dust to cancer risk could not be quantified because of lack of toxicity equivalency factors for these compounds; however this could be significant because of their high concentration and known higher toxicity of some polar PACs and alkyl-PAHs than their related parent-PAHs.

  11. Holocene dust records from the West African Sahel and their implications for changes in climate and land surface conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockerton, Helen E.; Holmes, Jonathan A.; Street-Perrott, F. Alayne; Ficken, Katherine J.

    2014-07-01

    We reconstructed aeolian dust accumulation during the Holocene from two radiocarbon-dated lake-sediment sequences from the Manga Grasslands in northeastern Nigeria in order to investigate long-term changes in the Harmattan dust system over West Africa and evaluate their possible causes. Flux values were low in the early Holocene, decreasing further to a minimum at around 6.2 kyr B.P. after which time they increased, steadily until around 2 kyr B.P. and then more sharply after this time. The long-term variations in dust flux agree broadly with changes in the exposed area of the Lake Chad Basin to the northeast of the study sites, which vary inversely with the volume of Paleolake Megachad. More proximal sources of dust, including the fine fraction of local dune sand and floodplains of nearby rivers, have also made a contribution to the total dust load during times of enhanced dune and fluvial activity. Sharp rises in dust flux over the past century may be related to human activity. Broad patterns of change in dust flux during the Holocene agree with other reconstructions over the same period. However, we see no evidence for a stepped rise during the middle Holocene, as seen at some sites from the northeastern tropical Atlantic, suggesting that controls on the Harmattan dust system have differed from those affecting dust deposition elsewhere across northern Africa.

  12. Radiative forcing of Sahara dust and its impacts on the hydrological cycle in the West African monsoon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, C.; Liu, X.; Leung, L.; Hagos, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    The WRF-Chem model is applied to simulate the radiative forcing of dust and its impacts on the hydrological cycle during the monsoon season over West Africa (WA). The GOCART dust emission scheme is coupled into two aerosol models (MADE/SORGAM and MOSAIC) in WRF-Chem. During the monsoon season, dust is a dominant contributor to AOD near the dust source regions. Dust heats the atmosphere, and warms the surface in the nighttime through trapping the longwave radiation but cools the surface in the daytime through reducing the shortwave radiation. Dust modifies the surface energy budget through changing radiation, latent heat, and sensible heat fluxes, and results in large surface cooling effect in the afternoon but warming effect in the early morning during the monsoon season over WA. In the standard model configuration, the dust effect on total daily precipitation is small in both strong and weak monsoon years, but is sensitive to the dust absorbing properties. On the other hand, the dust-driven change of the stability of atmosphere significantly reduces the diurnal variation of precipitation during the monsoon season over WA, and improves the model simulation when compared to available observations.

  13. Long-range-transported Saharan dust in the Caribbean - an electron microscopy perspective of aerosol composition and modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandler, Konrad; Hartmann, Markus; Ebert, Martin; Weinbruch, Stephan; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Walser, Adrian; Sauer, Daniel; Wadinga Fomba, Khanneh

    2015-04-01

    From June to July in 2013, the Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE) was performed in the Caribbean. Airborne aerosol sampling was performed onboard the DLR Falcon aircraft in altitudes between 300 m and 5500 m. Ground-based samples were collected at Ragged Point (Barbados, 13.165 °N, 59.432 °W) and at the Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory (Sao Vicente, 16.864 °N, 24.868 °W). Different types of impactors and sedimentation samplers were used to collect particles between 0.1 µm and 4 µm (airborne) and between 0.1 µm and 100 µm (ground-based). Particles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy with attached energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, yielding information on particle size, particle shape and chemical composition for elements heavier than nitrogen. A particle size correction was applied to the chemical data to yield better quantification. A total of approximately 100,000 particles were analyzed. For particles larger than 0.7 µm, the aerosol in the Caribbean during the campaign was a mixture of mineral dust, sea-salt at different aging states, and sulfate. Inside the Saharan dust plume - outside the marine boundary layer (MBL) - the aerosol is absolutely dominated by mineral dust. Inside the upper MBL, sea-salt exists as minor component in the aerosol for particles smaller than 2 µm in diameter, larger ones are practically dust only. When crossing the Soufriere Hills volcano plume with the aircraft, an extremely high abundance of small sulfate particles could be observed. At Ragged Point, in contrast to the airborne measurements, aerosol is frequently dominated by sea-salt particles. Dust relative abundance at Ragged Point has a maximum between 5 µm and 10 µm particles diameter; at larger sizes, sea-salt again prevails due to the sea-spray influence. A significant number of dust particles larger than 20 µm was encountered. The dust component in the Caribbean - airborne as well as ground

  14. Variability of the infrared complex refractive index of African mineral dust: experimental estimation and implications for radiative transfer and satellite remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Biagio, C.; Boucher, H.; Caquineau, S.; Chevaillier, S.; Cuesta, J.; Formenti, P.

    2014-04-01

    Experimental estimations of the infrared refractive index of African mineral dust have been retrieved from laboratory measurements of particle transmission spectra in the wavelength range 2.5-25 μm. Five dust samples collected at Banizoumbou (Niger) and Tamanrasset (Algeria) during dust events originated from different Western Saharan and Sahelian areas have been investigated. The obtained real (n) and imaginary (k) parts of the refractive index for the different dust cases vary in the range 1.1-2.7 and 0.05-1.0, respectively, and appear to be strongly sensitive to the mineralogical composition of the particles, especially in the 8-12 μm and 17-25 μm spectral intervals. Dust absorption is controlled mainly by clays, and, in minor fraction, by quartz and Ca-rich minerals. Size distribution, and the coarse fraction in particular, plays also a role in determining the refractive index. Significant differences are obtained when comparing our results with existing experimental estimations available in the literature, and with the values of the OPAC (Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds) database. The different datasets appear comparable in magnitude, with our values of n and k falling in the range of variability of past studies. However, literature data fail in accurately reproducing the spectral signatures of main minerals, in particular clays, and they significantly overestimate the contribution of quartz. We also found that the real and the imaginary parts of the refractive index from part of literature studies do not verify Kramers-Kronig relations, thus resulting theoretically incorrect. The comparison between our results, from Western Africa, and literature data, from different locations in Europe, Africa, and the Caribbean, nonetheless, confirms the expected large variability of the infrared refractive index of dust, thus highlighting the necessity for an extended systematic investigation. Aerosol intensive optical properties relevant to radiative transfer

  15. The effects of combined application of inorganic Martian dust simulant and carbon dots on glutamate transport rat brain nerve terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Krisanova, Natalia; Nazarova, Anastasiya; Borysov, Arseniy; Pastukhov, Artem; Pozdnyakova, Natalia; Dudarenko, Marina

    2016-07-01

    During inhalation, nano-/microsized particles are efficiently deposited in nasal, tracheobronchial, and alveolar regions and can be transported to the central nervous system (Oberdorster et al., 2004). Recently, the research team of this study found the minor fractions of nanoparticles with the size ~ 50 -60 nm in Lunar and Martian dust stimulants (JSC-1a and JSC, ORBITEC Orbital Technologies Corporation, Madison, Wisconsin), whereas the average size of the simulants was 1 mm and 4mm, respectively (Krisanova et al., 2013). Also, the research team of this study discovered new phenomenon - the neuromodulating and neurotoxic effect of carbon nano-sized particles - Carbon dots (C-dots), originated from ash of burned carbon-containing product (Borisova et al, 2015). The aims of this study was to analyse acute effects of upgraded stimulant of inorganic Martian dust derived from volcanic ash (JSC-1a/JSC, ORBITEC Orbital Technologies Corporation, Madison, Wisconsin) by the addition of carbon components, that is, carbon dots, on the key characteristic of synaptic neurotransmission. Acute administration of carbon-containing Martian dust analogue resulted in a significant decrease in transporter-mediated uptake of L-[14C]glutamate (the major excitatory neurotransmitter) by isolated rat brain nerve terminals. The ambient level of the neurotransmitter in the preparation of nerve terminals increased in the presence of carbon dot-contained Martian dust analogue. These effects were associated with action of carbon component of the upgraded Martian dust stimulant but not with its inorganic constituent.

  16. The role of convection, overshoot, and gravity waves for the transport of dust in M dwarf and brown dwarf atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freytag, B.; Allard, F.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Homeier, D.; Steffen, M.

    2010-04-01

    Context. Observationally, spectra of brown dwarfs indicate the presence of dust in their atmospheres while theoretically it is not clear what prevents the dust from settling and disappearing from the regions of spectrum formation. Consequently, standard models have to rely on ad hoc assumptions about the mechanism that keeps dust grains aloft in the atmosphere. Aims: We apply hydrodynamical simulations to develop an improved physical understanding of the mixing properties of macroscopic flows in M dwarf and brown dwarf atmospheres, in particular of the influence of the underlying convection zone. Methods: We performed two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations including a description of dust grain formation and transport with the CO5BOLD code. The simulations cover the very top of the convection zone and the photosphere including the dust layers for a sequence of effective temperatures between 900 K and 2800 K, all with log g = 5 assuming solar chemical composition. Results: Convective overshoot occurs in the form of exponentially declining velocities with small scale heights, so that it affects only the region immediately above the almost adiabatic convective layers. From there on, mixing is provided by gravity waves that are strong enough to maintain thin dust clouds in the hotter models. With decreasing effective temperature, the amplitudes of the waves become smaller but the clouds become thicker and develop internal convective flows that are more efficient in transporting and mixing material than gravity waves. The presence of clouds often leads to a highly structured appearance of the stellar surface on short temporal and small spatial scales (presently inaccessible to observations). Conclusions: We identify convectively excited gravity waves as an essential mixing process in M dwarf and brown dwarf atmospheres. Under conditions of strong cloud formation, dust convection is the dominant self-sustaining mixing component.

  17. Long-range Transport of Asian Dust Storms: A Satellite/Surface Perspective on Societal and Scientific Influence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Among the many components contributing to air pollution, airborne mineral dust plays an important role due to its biogeochemical impact on the ecosystem and its radiative forcing effect on the weather/climate system. As much as one-third to half of the global dust emissions, estimated about 800 Tg, are introduced annually into Earth's atmosphere from various deserts in China. Asian dust storm outbreaks are believed to have persisted for hundreds and thousands years over the vast territory of north and northwest China, but not until recent decades that many studies reveal the compelling evidence in recognizing the importance of these eolian dust particles for forming Chinese Loess Plateau and for biogeochemical cycling in the North Pacific Ocean to as far as in the Greenland ice-sheets through long-range transport. The Asian dust and air pollution aerosols can be detected by its colored appearance on current Earth observing satellites and its evolution monitored by satellite and surface network. In this paper, we will demonstrate the capability of a new satellite algorithm, called Deep Blue, to retrieve aerosol properties, particularly but not limited to, over bright-reflecting surfaces such as urban areas and deserts. Recently, many field campaigns were designed and executed to study the compelling variability in spatial and temporal scale of both pollution-derived and naturally occurring aerosols, which often exist in high concentrations over eastern Asia and along the rim of the western Pacific. We will provide an overview of the outbreak of Asian dust storms, near source/sink and their evolution along transport pathway, from space and surface observations. The climatic effects and societal impacts of the Asian dusts will be addressed in depth. (to be presented in the International Workshop on Semi-Arid Land Surface-

  18. Transport of carbon-bearing dusts from Iraq to Japan during Iraq's War

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tazaki, Kazue; Wakimoto, Rie; Minami, Yukiya; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Miyata, Koshirou; Sato, Kazuhiro; Saji, Ichiro; Chaerun, S. Khodijah; Zhou, Guoping; Morishita, Tomoaki; Asada, Ryuji; Segawa, Hiromi; Imanishi, Hiroki; Kato, Rie; Otani, Yusuke; Watanabe, Tomoko

    Rainwater collected during the period of February-April, 2003 in Kanazawa University and Hakui, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan, was investigated by ion chromatography of the dissolved ions, and Scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive analyzer (SEM-EDX), electron microprobe analyzer (EPMA), transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) analyses of the filtered samples. The pH, Eh, EC, dissolved oxygen (DO) and depleted U (DU) of the rainwater were also measured. The results show a rare case with low pH value of rain and high value of electrical conductivity (EC) in the rainwater during certain period. The NO 3-, SO 42- and NH 4+ concentrations on 26th March, show quite high values after oil field fires on 21st March 2003. The powdery dust and carbon-bearing nm sized particles contained in the rainwater have characteristics different from that of the Asian dust (Kosa). Since 21 March, 2003 the Iraq plunged into the war, the 9 oil field fires were reported on 25 March, 2003 in Rumaylah oil field near the borderline of Kuwait. The first precipitation was caught in Kanazawa on 24 March, 2003. The pH value of the rainwater indicated a strong acid rain (pH 3.6) with black powdery dusts. The acid rain on 27th March to 2nd April (pH 3.4-4.3; 5-17 mm) associated with WNW wind (2.7-4.1 m/s) has continued to the first 10 days of April in Kanazawa, during the 9 oil fields were burning in Iraq. The EC in rainwater collected from 24 March to 15 April, 2003, shows high concentrations of ions, suggesting high contents of water soluble-carbon particles and soot. In the meantime, it was the highest season of sandstorms at bare dried land in Iraq from the end of March to the beginning of April. Westerly wind blew around 5500 m high, and the sandstorm with 2000 m wide was transported by strong wind to Zagros 3000 m high mountains. The hot wind hit the Zagros Mountains and easily to join and rise to Westerly wind high by a rising air current. The

  19. Laboratory study of PCB transport from primary sources to settled dust.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Guo, Zhishi; Krebs, Kenneth A; Greenwell, Dale J; Roache, Nancy F; Stinson, Rayford A; Nardin, Joshua A; Pope, Robert H

    2016-04-01

    Dust is an important sink for indoor air pollutants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) that were used in building materials and products. In this study, two types of dust, house dust and Arizona Test Dust, were tested in a 30-m(3) stainless steel chamber with two types of panels. The PCB-containing panels were aluminum sheets coated with a PCB-spiked primer or caulk. The PCB-free panels were coated with the same materials but without PCBs. The dust evenly spread on each panel was collected at different times to determine its PCB content. The data from the PCB panels were used to evaluate the PCB migration from the source to the dust through direct contact, and the data from the PCB-free panels were used to evaluate the sorption of PCBs through the dust/air partition. Settled dust can adsorb PCBs from air. The sorption concentration was dependent on the congener concentration in the air and favored less volatile congeners. When the house dust was in direct contact with the PCB-containing panel, PCBs migrated into the dust at a much faster rate than the PCB transfer rate due to the dust/air partition. The dust/source partition was not significantly affected by the congener's volatility. For a given congener, the ratio between its concentration in the dust and in the source was used to estimate the dust/source partition coefficient. The estimated values ranged from 0.04 to 0.16. These values are indicative of the sink strength of the tested house dust being in the middle or lower-middle range.

  20. Laboratory study of PCB transport from primary sources to settled dust.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Guo, Zhishi; Krebs, Kenneth A; Greenwell, Dale J; Roache, Nancy F; Stinson, Rayford A; Nardin, Joshua A; Pope, Robert H

    2016-04-01

    Dust is an important sink for indoor air pollutants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) that were used in building materials and products. In this study, two types of dust, house dust and Arizona Test Dust, were tested in a 30-m(3) stainless steel chamber with two types of panels. The PCB-containing panels were aluminum sheets coated with a PCB-spiked primer or caulk. The PCB-free panels were coated with the same materials but without PCBs. The dust evenly spread on each panel was collected at different times to determine its PCB content. The data from the PCB panels were used to evaluate the PCB migration from the source to the dust through direct contact, and the data from the PCB-free panels were used to evaluate the sorption of PCBs through the dust/air partition. Settled dust can adsorb PCBs from air. The sorption concentration was dependent on the congener concentration in the air and favored less volatile congeners. When the house dust was in direct contact with the PCB-containing panel, PCBs migrated into the dust at a much faster rate than the PCB transfer rate due to the dust/air partition. The dust/source partition was not significantly affected by the congener's volatility. For a given congener, the ratio between its concentration in the dust and in the source was used to estimate the dust/source partition coefficient. The estimated values ranged from 0.04 to 0.16. These values are indicative of the sink strength of the tested house dust being in the middle or lower-middle range. PMID:26849196

  1. Dust transport over the eastern Mediterranean derived from Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer, Aerosol Robotic Network, and surface measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalivitis, N.; Gerasopoulos, E.; Vrekoussis, M.; Kouvarakis, G.; Kubilay, N.; Hatzianastassiou, N.; Vardavas, I.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2007-02-01

    Multiyear surface PM10 measurements performed on Crete Island, Greece, have been used in conjunction with satellite (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS)) and ground-based remote sensing measurements (Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)) to enhance our understanding of the evolution of mineral dust events over the eastern Mediterranean. An analysis of southerly air masses at altitudes of 1000 and 3000 m over a 5 year period (2000-2005), showed that dust can potentially arrive over Crete, either simultaneously in the lower free troposphere and inside the boundary layer (vertical extended transport (VET)) or initially into the free troposphere with the heavier particles gradually being scavenged inside the boundary layer (free troposphere transport (FTT)). Both pathways present significant seasonal variations but on an annual basis contribute almost equally to the dust transport in the area. During VET the aerosol index (AI) derived from TOMS was significantly correlated with surface PM10, and in general AI was found to be adequate for the characterization of dust loadings over the eastern Mediterranean on a climatological basis. A significant covariance between PM10 and AOT was observed during VET as well, indicating that AOT levels from AERONET may be estimated by PM10 levels at the surface. Surface measurements are thus crucial for the validation of remote sensing measurements and hence are a powerful tool for the investigation of the impact of aerosols on climate.

  2. Saharan Dust Fertilizing Atlantic Ocean and Amazon Rainforest via Long-range Transport and Deposition: A Perspective from Multiyear Satellite Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Chin, M.; Yuan, T.; Bian, H.; Remer, L. A.; Prospero, J. M.; Omar, A. H.; Winker, D. M.; Yang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.

    2015-12-01

    Massive dust emitted from Sahara desert is carried by trade winds across the tropical Atlantic Ocean, reaching the Amazon Rainforest and Caribbean Sea. Airborne dust degrades air quality and interacts with radiation and clouds. Dust falling to land and ocean adds essential nutrients that could increase the productivity of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and modulate the biogeochemical cycles and climate. The resultant climate change will feed back on the production of dust in Sahara desert and its subsequent transport and deposition. Understanding the connections among the remote ecosystems requires an accurate quantification of dust transport and deposition flux on large spatial and temporal scales, in which satellite remote sensing can play an important role. We provide the first multiyear satellite-based estimates of altitude-resolved across-Atlantic dust transport and deposition based on eight-year (2007-2014) record of aerosol three-dimensional distributions from the CALIPSO lidar. On a basis of the 8-year average, 179 Tg (million tons) of dust leaves the coast of North Africa and is transported across Atlantic Ocean, of which 102, 20, and 28 Tg of dust is deposited into the tropical Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, and Amazon Rainforest, respectively. The dust deposition adds 4.3 Tg of iron and 0.1 Tg of phosphorus to the tropical Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea where the productivity of marine ecosystem depends on the availability of these nutrients. The 28 Tg of dust provides about 0.022 Tg of phosphorus to Amazon Rainforest yearly that replenishes the leak of this plant-essential nutrient by rains and flooding, suggesting an important role of Saharan dust in maintaining the productivity of Amazon rainforest on timescales of decades or centuries. We will also discuss seasonal and interannual variations of the dust transport and deposition, and comparisons of the CALIOP-based estimates with model simulations.

  3. Aircraft observations of dust and pollutants over northeast China: Insight into the meteorological mechanisms of transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, R. R.; Li, C.; Li, Z.; Marufu, L. T.; Stehr, J. W.; McClure, B.; Krotkov, N.; Chen, H.; Wang, P.; Xia, X.; Ban, X.; Gong, F.; Yuan, J.; Yang, J.

    2007-12-01

    The meteorological mechanisms for lofting trace gases and aerosols out of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) into the free troposphere are key to understanding local air pollution problems as well as regional and global atmospheric chemistry and climate issues. Over the North American continent, convective storms and lifting in warm conveyor belts transport pollutants into the free troposphere. Little is known about the vertical distribution of pollutants and dust over east Asia, and the processes leading to transport, transformation, and removal of these species remain uncertain. To provide insight into these mechanisms, we report on eight flights based out of Shenyang in NE China as part of the U.S./China EAST-AIRE project conducted in April 2005. We evaluate profiles of trace species, along with back trajectories and satellite data, in the meteorological context of cyclonic systems. The warm-sector PBL air ahead of a cold front was highly polluted, while in the free troposphere concentrations of trace gases and aerosols were lower, but well above background; we measured ˜300 ppb CO, ˜2 ppb SO2, ˜70 ppb O3, and ˜ 8 × 10-5 m-1 aerosol scattering between ˜1000 and 4000 m altitude. Satellite observations indicate that the entire plume contained almost 105 tons of SO2 and that the gas decayed with a lifetime of 3-5 d. Roughly the same mass of aerosol was transported into the free troposphere. Over the east Asian continent, dry convection appears to dominate with warm conveyor belts first coming into play as the cyclonic systems move off the coast.

  4. Airborne bacteria transported with Sahara dust particles from Northern Africa to the European Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzaro, A.; Meola, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Sahara Desert is the most important source of aerosols transported across the Mediterranean towards Europe. Airborne microorganisms associated with aerosols may be transported over long distances and act as colonizers of distant habitats. However, little is known on the composition and viability of such microorganisms, due to difficulties related to their detection, collection and isolation. Here we describe an in-depth assessment of the bacterial communities associated with Sahara dust (SD) particles deposited on snow. Two distinct SD events reaching the European Alps in February and May 2014 were preserved as distinct ochre-coloured layers within the snowpack. In June 2014, we collected samples from a snow profile at 3621 m a.s.l. close to the Jungfraujoch (Swiss Alps). SD particles were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDX). Backward trajectories were calculated using the NOAA HYSPLIT model. Bacterial communities were charac-terized by MiSeq Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Microbial physiological profiles were assessed by incubation of samples on BIOLOG plates. The SD-layers were generally enriched in illite and kaolinite particles as compared to the adjacent snow layers. The source of SD could be traced back to Algeria. We observed distinct bacterial community structures in the SD-layers as compared to the clean snow layers. While sporulating bacteria were not enriched in the SD-layers, low abundant (<1%) phyla such as Gemmatimonadetes and Deinococcus-Thermus appeared to be specific bioindicators for SD. Both phyla are adapted to arid oligotrophic environments and UV radiation and thus are well suited to survive the harsh conditions of long-distance airborne transport. Our results show that bacteria are viable and metabolically active after the trek to the European Alps.

  5. Mineral dust deposition in Western Mediterranean basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Julie; Laurent, Benoit; Bergmatti, Gilles; Losno, Rémi; Bon Nguyen, Elisabeth; Chevaillier, Servanne; Roulet, Pierre; Sauvage, Stéphane; Coddeville, Patrice; Ouboulmane, Noura; Siour, Guillaume; Tovar Sanchez, Antonio; Massanet, Ana; Morales Baquero, Rafael; Di Sarra, Giogio; Sferlazzo, Damiano; Dulac, François; Fornier, Michel; Coursier, Cyril

    2014-05-01

    North African deserts are the world's largest sources of atmospheric mineral dust produced by aeolian erosion. Saharan dust is frequently transported toward Europe over the Mediterranean basin. When deposited in oceanic areas, mineral dust can constitute a key input of nutrients bioavailable for the oceanic biosphere. For instance, Saharan dust deposited in the in the Mediterranean Sea can be a significant source of nutrient like Fe, P and N during summer and autumn. Our objective is to study the deposition Saharan mineral dust in the western Mediterranean basin and to improve how deposition processes are parameterized in 3D regional models. To quantify the deposition flux of Saharan dust in the western Mediterranean region a specific collector (CARAGA) to sample automatically the insoluble atmospheric particle deposition was developed (LISA-ICARE) and a network of CARAGA collectors have been set up. Since 2011, eight CARAGA are then deployed in Frioul, Casset, Montandon and Ersa in France, Mallorca and Granada in Spain, Lampedusa in Italia, and Medenine in Tunisia, along a South-North gradient of almost 2000km from the North African coast to the South of Europe. We observe 10 well identified dust Saharan deposition events at Lampedusa and 6 at Mallorca for a 1-yr sampling period. These dust events are sporadic and the South-North gradient of deposition intensity and frequency is observed (the highest dust mass sampled at the stations are : 2,66 g.m-2 at Lampedusa ; 0,54 g.m-2 at Majorque ; 0,33 g.m-2 at Frioul ; 0,16 g.m-2 at Casset). The ability of the CHIMERE model to reproduce the deposition measurements is tested. The mineral dust plumes simulated over the western Mediterranean basin are also compared to satellite observations (OMI, MODIS) and in-situ measurements performed during the ChArMEx campaign and in the AERONET stations.

  6. Intercomparison of Satellite Dust Retrieval Products over the West African Sahara During the Fennec Campaign in June 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, J.R.; Brindley, H. E.; Flamant, C.; Garay, M. J.; Hsu, N. C.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; Klueser, L.; Sayer, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Dust retrievals over the Sahara Desert during June 2011 from the IASI, MISR, MODIS, and SEVIRI satellite instruments are compared against each other in order to understand the strengths and weaknesses of each retrieval approach. Particular attention is paid to the effects of meteorological conditions, land surface properties, and the magnitude of the dust loading. The period of study corresponds to the time of the first Fennec intensive measurement campaign, which provides new ground-based and aircraft measurements of the dust characteristics and loading. Validation using ground-based AERONET sunphotometer data indicate that of the satellite instruments, SEVIRI is most able to retrieve dust during optically thick dust events, whereas IASI and MODIS perform better at low dust loadings. This may significantly affect observations of dust emission and the mean dust climatology. MISR and MODIS are least sensitive to variations in meteorological conditions, while SEVIRI tends to overestimate the aerosol optical depth (AOD) under moist conditions (with a bias against AERONET of 0.31), especially at low dust loadings where the AOD<1. Further comparisons are made with airborne LIDAR measurements taken during the Fennec campaign, which provide further evidence for the inferences made from the AERONET comparisons. The effect of surface properties on the retrievals is also investigated. Over elevated surfaces IASI retrieves AODs which are most consistent with AERONET observations, while the AODs retrieved by MODIS tend to be biased low. In contrast, over the least emissive surfaces IASI significantly underestimates the AOD (with a bias of -0.41), while MISR and SEVIRI show closest agreement.

  7. Nearly a Decade of CALIPSO Observations of Asian and Saharan Dust Properties Near Source and Transport Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omar, Ali H.; Liu, Z.; Tackett, J.; Vaughan, M.; Trepte, C.; Winker, D.; H. Yu,

    2015-01-01

    The lidar on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) mission, makes robust measurements of dust and has generated a length of record that is significant both seasonally and inter-annually. We exploit this record to determine a multi-year climatology of the properties of Asian and Saharan dust, in particular seasonal optical depths, layer frequencies, and layer heights of dust gridded in accordance with the Level 3 data products protocol, between 2006-2015. The data are screened using standard CALIPSO quality assurance flags, cloud aerosol discrimination (CAD) scores, overlying features and layer properties. To evaluate the effects of transport on the morphology, vertical extent and size of the dust layers, we compare probability distribution functions of the layer integrated volume depolarization ratios, geometric depths and integrated attenuated color ratios near the source to the same distributions in the far field or transport region. CALIPSO is collaboration between NASA and Centre National D'études Spatiales (CNES), was launched in April 2006 to provide vertically resolved measurements of cloud and aerosol distributions. The primary instrument on the CALIPSO satellite is the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), a near-nadir viewing two-wavelength polarization-sensitive instrument. The unique nature of CALIOP measurements make it quite challenging to validate backscatter profiles, aerosol type, and cloud phase, all of which are used to retrieve extinction and optical depth. To evaluate the uncertainty in the lidar ratios, we compare the values computed from dust layers overlying opaque water clouds, considered nominal, with the constant lidar ratio value used in the CALIOP algorithms for dust. We also explore the effects of noise on the CALIOP retrievals at daytime by comparing the distributions of the properties at daytime to the nighttime distributions.

  8. Nearly a Decade of CALIPSO Observations of Asian and Saharan Dust Properties near Source and Transport Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, A. H.; Tackett, J. L.; Liu, Z.; Vaughan, M. A.; Trepte, C. R.; Winker, D. M.; Yu, H.

    2015-12-01

    The lidar on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) mission, makes robust measurements of dust and has generated a length of record that is significant both seasonally and inter-annually. We exploit this record to determine a multi-year climatology of the properties of Asian and Saharan dust, in particular seasonal optical depths, layer frequencies, and layer heights of dust gridded in accordance with the Level 3 data products protocol between 2006 and 2015. The data are screened using standard CALIPSO quality assurance flags, cloud aerosol discrimination (CAD) scores, overlying features and layer properties. To evaluate the effects of transport on small-scale phenomena such as morphology, vertical extent and size of the dust layers, we compare probability distribution functions of the layer integrated volume depolarization ratios, geometric depths and integrated attenuated color ratios near the source to the same distributions in the far field or transport region. CALIPSO is collaboration between NASA and Centre National d'Études Spatiales (CNES), was launched in April 2006 to provide vertically resolved measurements of cloud and aerosol distributions. The primary instrument on the CALIPSO satellite is the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), a near-nadir viewing two-wavelength polarization-sensitive instrument. The unique nature of CALIOP measurements make it quite challenging to validate backscatter profiles, aerosol type, and cloud phase, all of which are used to retrieve extinction and optical depth. To evaluate the uncertainty in the lidar ratios, we compare the values computed from dust layers overlying opaque water clouds, considered nominal, with the constant lidar ratio value used in the CALIOP algorithms for dust. We also explore the effects of noise on the CALIOP retrievals at daytime by comparing the distributions of the properties at daytime to the nighttime distributions.

  9. Characterization of Saharan dust properties transported towards Europe in the frame of the FENNEC project: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marnas, F.; Chazette, P.; Flamant, C.; Royer, P.; Sodemman, H.; Derimian, Y.

    2012-04-01

    In the framework of the FENNEC experiment (6 to 30 June 2011) an effort has been dedicated to characterize Saharan dust plumes transported towards southern Europe. Hence, a multi instrumented field campaign has been conducted. Ground based nitrogen Raman LIDAR (GBNRL) has been deployed in southern Spain close to Marbella, simultaneously with airborne lidar (AL) performing measurements over both the tropical Atlantic Ocean and the western Africa (from 2 to 23 June). The GBNRL was equipped with co-polar and cross-polar channels to perform continuous measurements of the dust aerosols trapped in the troposphere. It was developed by LSCE with the support of the LEOSPHERE Company. The French FALCON 20 research aircraft operated by SAFIRE (Service des Avions Francais Instrumentés pour la Recherche en Environnement) carried the AL Leandre Nouvelle Generation (LNG) as well as a dropsonde releasing system and radiometers. A major, one week long, dust event has been sampled over Spain from 25 June to 1 July with high optical depth (>0.5 at 355nm) and particular depolarization ratios (15 to 25%). Backtrajectory studies suggest that the dust particles observed were from dust uplifts that occurred in Southern Morocco and Northern Mauritania. The event has been also documented 3 days before by the AL flying over Mauritania. AERONET sunphotometer measurements of aerosol properties, along the dust plume transport path appear to be coherent with both the lidar and the backtrajectory analysis. These analysis exhibit a likely major contribution from the Western Sahara sources to the Southern Europe. Such a contribution may impact the visibility and then the airtrafic, modify the tropospheric chemistry, and add nutrients to both the Mediterranean Sea and the continental surfaces. It can also affect the health of European populations. We will present strategy of the experiment and the case study built from measurements performed at the end of June.

  10. Road dust as an indicator for air pollution transport and deposition: An application of SPOT imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, J.; Lamprecht, R.

    1995-10-01

    A simulation model for atmospheric diffusion and dry deposition of coarse dust particles developed at the Paul Scherrer Institute was recently applied to calculate the dispersion and deposition of road-generated dust from the Dalton Highway, which is a high-speed gravel road in arctic Alaska traveled mainly by large vehicles. The propelled dust is deposited on the adjacent vegetation where it may cause detrimental effects to the plants of the highly fragile tundra. During a field experiment in 1991, all meteorological parameters as well as the size distribution of the deposited dust particles were measured. The scope of this article is to identify and, as far as possible, to quantify this dust deposition pattern along the Dalton Highway by multispectral SPOT imagery. The spatial distribution of the dust on both sides of the road is distinctly visible in the XS3 channel (0.79--0.89 {micro}m) of a SPOT satellite image. On the basis of the ground reflectance and the reflectances of pure dust and pure vegetation, the dust load can be calculated. The dust load depends on the particle size distribution, which can be derived from the size spectra measured in the field experiment. The spatial dust load obtained from the SPOT data is compared with the distribution computed with the simulation model. As the simulation is based on only a limited number of days, the dust load scaling is arbitrary. Taking this fact into account, the general shapes of the two distributions agree remarkably well within a strip of about 1 km width along the road. Apart from this application on a local scale, suspended dust might also be detected on larger scales.

  11. African dust clouds are associated with increased paediatric asthma accident and emergency admissions on the Caribbean island of Trinidad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyan, K.; Henry, W.; Lacaille, S.; Laloo, A.; Lamsee-Ebanks, C.; McKay, S.; Antoine, R. M.; Monteil, M. A.

    2005-07-01

    A retrospective ecological study of paediatric asthma patients who attended the Accident and Emergency (A&E) department of the Paediatric Priority Care Facility at the Eric Williams Medical Sciences Complex in relation to Saharan dust visibility and other climatic variables for the period 23 May 2001 to 13 May 2002 was undertaken to determine if there is an association between paediatric A&E asthma visits and Saharan dust cloud cover. A Poisson regression model was used to determine the statistical relationship between acute paediatric asthma A&E visits and Saharan dust cover with and without other variables such as climatic parameters and month. During the study period, there were 2,655 A&E visits for acute asthma. There was an association between increased paediatric asthma admissions and increased Saharan dust cover. The best fitting model estimated that in one month, such as June, a deterioration of visibility due to increased Saharan dust cover from no dust (visibility =16 km) to very dusty (visibility =7 km) would increase a daily admission rate of 7.8 patients to 9.25 when climate variables such as barometric pressure and humidity were kept constant.

  12. African dust clouds are associated with increased paediatric asthma accident and emergency admissions on the Caribbean island of Trinidad.

    PubMed

    Gyan, K; Henry, W; Lacaille, S; Laloo, A; Lamsee-Ebanks, C; McKay, S; Antoine, R M; Monteil, M A

    2005-07-01

    A retrospective ecological study of paediatric asthma patients who attended the Accident and Emergency (A and E) department of the Paediatric Priority Care Facility at the Eric Williams Medical Sciences Complex in relation to Saharan dust visibility and other climatic variables for the period 23 May 2001 to 13 May 2002 was undertaken to determine if there is an association between paediatric A and E asthma visits and Saharan dust cloud cover. A Poisson regression model was used to determine the statistical relationship between acute paediatric asthma A and E visits and Saharan dust cover with and without other variables such as climatic parameters and month. During the study period, there were 2,655 A and E visits for acute asthma. There was an association between increased paediatric asthma admissions and increased Saharan dust cover. The best fitting model estimated that in one month, such as June, a deterioration of visibility due to increased Saharan dust cover from no dust (visibility =16 km) to very dusty (visibility =7 km) would increase a daily admission rate of 7.8 patients to 9.25 when climate variables such as barometric pressure and humidity were kept constant.

  13. Dust photophoretic transport in a disk irradiated by an evolving PMS star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, D.; Moroni, P.; Tognelli, E.

    2014-04-01

    As reported by Tielens et al. (2005) [14] the interstellar medium (ISM) is very poor in crystalline solids. For instance, Kemper et al. (2004) [7] well reproduce the interstellar absorption band using a mixture of 15.1% amorphous pyroxene and 84.9% of amorphous olivine by mass, leading to a crystalline fraction of the interstellar silicates around 0.2% by mass. The proto-solar nebula is supposed to be formed from the material coming from the ISM. As a consequence, the primordial dust in the solar system should be composed of amorphous solids excepted grains which have undergone thermal annealing in high temperature regions (i.e. around 1000-1500 K) close to the star (i.e. r . 1 - 2 AU). Besides this, comets are presumed to have formed in the cold outer part of the solar nebula. Campins & Ryan (1989) have found that crystalline olivine is a major component of the silicates in comet Halley. Stardust samples of comet 81P/Wild 2 include large singleminerals crystals and X-raymicroscopic analysis leads to a crystal mass fraction fcryst larger than ~ 50% (Ogliore et al. 2009, Brownlee et al. 2006). More generally comets have a fcryst larger than ~ 20% (Lindsay et al. 2013, Kelley & Wooden, 2009). This discrepancy between ISMgrains crystallinity and comets one is the mark of a radial transport process occuring in the accretion disk. Several transport processes have been proposed to explain the presence of these refractory material in comets: annealing by shock waves in the outer solar nebula (Harker & Desch 2002) [3], radial mixing processes by turbulent diffusion (Gail, 2001; Wehrstedt & Gail, 2002; Bockelée-Morvan et al., 2002) or transport by photophoresis (Mousis et al., 2007 andMoudens et al., 2011). In this paper, we focus on this last process for which we employ a 1+1D accretion disk model irradiated by a pre-main sequence (PMS) star. The model of nebula and the model of star are both evolving. Concerning the photophoresis itself, essentially, we have followed the

  14. Impact of atmospheric transport on the evolution of microphysical and optical properties of Saharan dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, C. L.; Highwood, E. J.; Lai, T. M.; Sodemann, H.; Marsham, J. H.

    2013-05-01

    Saharan dust affects the climate by altering the radiation balance and by depositing minerals to the Atlantic Ocean. Both are dependent on particle size. We present aircraft measurements comprising 42 profiles of size distribution (0.1-300 µm), representing freshly uplifted dust, regional aged dust, and dust in the Saharan Air Layer (SAL) over the Canary Islands. The mean effective diameter of dust in SAL profiles is 4.5 µm smaller than that in freshly uplifted dust, while the vertical structure changes from a low shallow layer (0-1.5 km) to a well-mixed deep Saharan dust layer (0-5 km). Size distributions show a loss of 60 to 90% of particles larger than 30 µm 12 h after uplift. The single scattering albedo (SSA) increases from 0.92 to 0.94 to 0.95 between fresh, aged, and SAL profiles: this is enough to alter heating rates by 26%. Some fresh dust close to the surface shows SSA as low as 0.85.

  15. Retrieval of optical and physical properties of African dust from multiwavelength Raman lidar measurements during the SHADOW campaign in Senegal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselovskii, I.; Goloub, P.; Podvin, T.; Bovchaliuk, V.; Derimian, Y.; Augustin, P.; Fourmentin, M.; Tanre, D.; Korenskiy, M.; Whiteman, D. N.; Diallo, A.; Ndiaye, T.; Kolgotin, A.; Dubovik, O.

    2016-06-01

    West Africa and the adjacent oceanic regions are very important locations for studying dust properties and their influence on weather and climate. The SHADOW (study of SaHAran Dust Over West Africa) campaign is performing a multiscale and multilaboratory study of aerosol properties and dynamics using a set of in situ and remote sensing instruments at an observation site located at the IRD (Institute for Research and Development) in Mbour, Senegal (14° N, 17° W). In this paper, we present the results of lidar measurements performed during the first phase of SHADOW (study of SaHAran Dust Over West Africa) which occurred in March-April 2015. The multiwavelength Mie-Raman lidar acquired 3β + 2α + 1δ measurements during this period. This set of measurements has permitted particle-intensive properties, such as extinction and backscattering Ångström exponents (BAE) for 355/532 nm wavelengths' corresponding lidar ratios and depolarization ratio at 532 nm, to be determined. The mean values of dust lidar ratios during the observation period were about 53 sr at both 532 and 355 nm, which agrees with the values observed during the SAMUM-1 and SAMUM-2 campaigns held in Morocco and Cabo Verde in 2006 and 2008. The mean value of the particle depolarization ratio at 532 nm was 30 ± 4.5 %; however, during strong dust episodes this ratio increased to 35 ± 5 %, which is also in agreement with the results of the SAMUM campaigns. The backscattering Ångström exponent during the dust episodes decreased to ˜ -0.7, while the extinction Ångström exponent, though negative, was greater than -0.2. Low values of BAE can likely be explained by an increase in the imaginary part of the dust refractive index at 355 nm compared to 532 nm. The dust extinction and backscattering coefficients at multiple wavelengths were inverted to the particle microphysics using the regularization algorithm and the model of randomly oriented spheroids. The analysis performed has demonstrated that the

  16. Atmospheric transport of mineral dust from the Indo-Gangetic Plain: Temporal variability, acid processing, and iron solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, Bikkina; Sarin, M. M.; Rengarajan, R.

    2014-08-01

    transport of chemical constituents from the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) to the Bay of Bengal is a conspicuous seasonal feature that occurs during the late NE-monsoon (December-March). With this perspective, aerosol composition and abundance of mineral dust have been studied during November 2009 to March 2010 from a sampling site (Kharagpur: 22.3°N, 87.3°E) in the IGP, representing the atmospheric outflow to the Bay of Bengal. The chemical composition of PM2.5 suggests the dominance of nss-SO42- (6.9-24.3 µg m-3); whereas the abundance of mineral dust varied from 3 to 18 µg m-3. The concentration of aerosol iron (FeTot) and its fractional solubility (Fews % = Fews/FeTot *100, where Fews is the water-soluble fraction of FeTot) varied from 60 to 1144 ng m-3 and from 6.7 to 26.5%, respectively. A striking similarity in the temporal variability of total inorganic acidity (TIA = NO3- + nss-SO42-) and Fews (%) provides evidence for acid processing of mineral dust (alluvium) during atmospheric transport from the IGP. The contribution of TIA to water-soluble inorganic species [(nss-SO42- + NO3-)/ΣWSIS], mass ratios of Ca/Al and Fe/Al, and abundance of dust (%) and Fews (%) in the IGP-outflow are similar to the aerosol composition over the Bay of Bengal. With the rapid increase in anthropogenic activities over south and south-east Asia, the enhanced fractional solubility of aerosol iron (attributed to acid processing of mineral dust) has implications to further increase in the air-sea deposition of Fe to the Ocean surface.

  17. Tracing dust transport from Middle-East over Delhi in March 2012 using metal and lead isotope composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Aggarwal, S. G.; Malherbe, J.; Barre, J. P. G.; Berail, S.; Gupta, P. K.; Donard, O. F. X.

    2016-05-01

    A severe dust-storm which was originated in Middle-East crossed over Delhi during March 20-22, 2012. We have collected these dust-storm (DS) aerosol samples, and analyzed them for selected metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, Sr, V and Zn) together with after dust-storm (ADS) and winter (WS) samples. High aerosol mass loadings were observed in DS samples (1097-1965 μg/m3). On the contrary, metals derived prominently from the anthropogenic sources were found lower in concentration compared to that of ADS and WS aerosols. We observed significantly high concentrations of Ni and V (which are abundantly found in crude oils of Middle-East origin) in the DS samples than that of ADS and WS samples. Also enrichment factor (EF) of these metals with respect to Fe shows no significant enrichment (<10). Fe (and Sr) concentrations were also 3-5 fold higher in DS samples compared to ADS and WS. These results suggest that Ni and V can be used as tracers for dust aerosols transported from Middle-East region. Lead isotope signatures can tell about the variation in the sources of urban aerosols. Therefore Pb isotope analyses of these samples were performed using MC-ICP-MS. The isotope ratios, 208Pb/206Pb is determined to be (mean ± sd) 2.1315 ± 0.0018, 2.1370 ± 0.0022 and 2.1389 ± 0.0016, whereas 206Pb/207Pb is 1.1311 ± 0.0022, 1.1244 ± 0.0017 and 1.1233 ± 0.0016 in DS, ADS and WS aerosols, respectively. There is a clear distinction in Pb isotope composition between DS and urban (ADS and WS) aerosols. Further, these results suggest that in urban aerosols, Pb is less radiogenic in nature compared to that of in transported dust aerosols collected in New Delhi.

  18. Dust feed mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Milliman, Edward M.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a dust feed device for delivery of a uniform supply of dust for long periods of time to an aerosolizing means for production of a dust suspension. The device utilizes at least two tandem containers having spiral brushes within the containers which transport the dust from a supply to the aerosolizer means.

  19. Saharan dust deposition in the Carpathian Basin and its possible effects on interglacial soil formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, György; Cserháti, Csaba; Kovács, János; Szalai, Zoltán

    2016-09-01

    Several hundred tons of windblown dust material are lifted into the atmosphere and are transported every year from Saharan dust source areas towards Europe having an important climatic and other environmental effect also on distant areas. According to the systematic observations of modern Saharan dust events, it can be stated that dust deflated from North African source areas is a significant constituent of the atmosphere of the Carpathian Basin and Saharan dust deposition events are identifiable several times in a year. Dust episodes are connected to distinct meteorological situations, which are also the determining factors of the different kinds of depositional mechanisms. By using the adjusted values of dust deposition simulations of numerical models, the annual Saharan dust flux can be set into the range of 3.2-5.4 g/m2/y. Based on the results of past mass accumulation rates calculated from stratigraphic and sedimentary data of loess-paleosol sequences, the relative contribution of Saharan dust to interglacial paleosol material was quantified. According to these calculations, North African exotic dust material can represent 20-30% of clay and fine silt-sized soil components of interglacial paleosols in the Carpathian Basin. The syngenetic contribution of external aeolian dust material is capable to modify physicochemical properties of soils and hereby the paleoclimatic interpretation of these pedogene stratigraphic units.

  20. Safety improvements through Intelligent Transport Systems: a South African case study based on microscopic simulation modelling.

    PubMed

    Vanderschuren, Marianne

    2008-03-01

    Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) can facilitate the delivery of a wide range of policy objectives. There are six main objectives/benefits identified in the international literature: Safety (reduction of (potential) crashes), mobility (reduction of delays and travel times), efficiency (optimise the use of existing infrastructure), productivity (cost saving), energy/environment and customer satisfaction [Mitretek Systems, 2001. Intelligent Transport System Benefits: 2001 update, Under Contract to the Federal Highway Administration, US Department of Transportation, Washington, DC, US]. In the South African context, there is an interest for measures that can reduce (potential) crashes. In South Africa the number of year on year traffic related fatalities is still increasing. In 2005 the number of fatalities was 15393 (from 14135 in 2004) while the estimated costs for the same period increased from R8.89-billion to R9.99-billion [RTMC, 2007. Interim Road Traffic and Fatal Crash Report 2006, Road Traffic Management Corporation, Pretoria, SA]. Given the extent of the road safety problem and the potential benefits of ITS, the need for further research is apparent. A study with regards to the potential of different types of models (macroscopic, mesoscopic and miscroscopic simulation models) led to the use of Paramics. Two corridors and three types of ITS measures were investigated and safety benefits were estimated.

  1. Modeling the global emission, transport and deposition of trace elements associated with mineral dust

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Y.; Mahowald, N.; Scanza, R.; Journet, E.; Desboeufs, K.; Albani, S.; Kok, J.; Zhuang, G.; Chen, Y.; Cohen, D. D.; et al

    2014-12-17

    Trace element deposition from desert dust has important impacts on ocean primary productivity. In this study, emission inventories for 8 elements, which are primarily of soil origin, Mg, P, Ca, Mn, Fe, K, Al, and Si were determined based on a global mineral dataset and a soils dataset. Datasets of elemental fractions were used to drive the desert dust model in the Community Earth System Model (CESM) in order to simulate the elemental concentrations of atmospheric dust. Spatial variability of mineral dust elemental fractions was evident on a global scale, particularly for Ca. Simulations of global variations in the Camore » / Al ratio, which typically ranged from around 0.1 to 5.0 in soil sources, were consistent with observations, suggesting this ratio to be a good signature for dust source regions. The simulated variable fractions of chemical elements are sufficiently different that estimates of deposition should include elemental variations, especially for Ca, Al and Fe. The model results have been evaluated with observational elemental aerosol concentration data from desert regions and dust events in non-dust regions, providing insights into uncertainties in the modeling approach. The ratios between modeled and observed elemental fractions ranged from 0.7 to 1.6 except for 3.4 and 3.5 for Mg and Mn, respectivly. Using the soil data base improved the correspondence of the spatial hetereogeneity in the modeling of several elements (Ca, Al and Fe) compared to observations. Total and soluble dust associated element fluxes into different ocean basins and ice sheets regions have been estimated, based on the model results. Annual inputs of soluble Mg, P, Ca, Mn, Fe and K associated with dust using mineral dataset were 0.28 Tg, 16.89 Gg, 1.32 Tg, 22.84 Gg, 0.068 Tg, and 0.15 Tg to global oceans and ice sheets.« less

  2. Modeling the global emission, transport and deposition of trace elements associated with mineral dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Mahowald, N.; Scanza, R.; Journet, E.; Desboeufs, K.; Albani, S.; Kok, J.; Zhuang, G.; Chen, Y.; Cohen, D. D.; Paytan, A.; Patey, M. D.; Achterberg, E. P.; Engelbrecht, J. P.; Fomba, K. W.

    2014-12-01

    Trace element deposition from desert dust has important impacts on ocean primary productivity. In this study, emission inventories for 8 elements, which are primarily of soil origin, Mg, P, Ca, Mn, Fe, K, Al, and Si were determined based on a global mineral dataset and a soils dataset. Datasets of elemental fractions were used to drive the desert dust model in the Community Earth System Model (CESM) in order to simulate the elemental concentrations of atmospheric dust. Spatial variability of mineral dust elemental fractions was evident on a global scale, particularly for Ca. Simulations of global variations in the Ca / Al ratio, which typically ranged from around 0.1 to 5.0 in soil sources, were consistent with observations, suggesting this ratio to be a good signature for dust source regions. The simulated variable fractions of chemical elements are sufficiently different that estimates of deposition should include elemental variations, especially for Ca, Al and Fe. The model results have been evaluated with observational elemental aerosol concentration data from desert regions and dust events in non-dust regions, providing insights into uncertainties in the modeling approach. The ratios between modeled and observed elemental fractions ranged from 0.7 to 1.6 except for 3.4 and 3.5 for Mg and Mn, respectivly. Using the soil data base improved the correspondence of the spatial hetereogeneity in the modeling of several elements (Ca, Al and Fe) compared to observations. Total and soluble dust associated element fluxes into different ocean basins and ice sheets regions have been estimated, based on the model results. Annual inputs of soluble Mg, P, Ca, Mn, Fe and K associated with dust using mineral dataset were 0.28 Tg, 16.89 Gg, 1.32 Tg, 22.84 Gg, 0.068 Tg, and 0.15 Tg to global oceans and ice sheets.

  3. Modeling the Transport and Radiative Forcing of Taklimakan Dust over the Tibetan Plateau: A case study in the summer of 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Siyu; Huang, J.; Zhao, Chun; Qian, Yun; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Yang, Ben

    2013-01-30

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem) is used to investigate an intense dust storm event during 26 to 30 July 2006 that originated over the Taklimakan Desert (TD) and transported to the northern slope of Tibetan Plateau (TP). The dust storm is initiated by the approach of a strong cold frontal system over the TD. In summer, the meridional transport of TD dust to the TP is favored by the thermal effect of the TP and the weakening of the East Asian westerly winds. During this dust storm, the transport of TD dust over the TP is further enhanced by the passage of the cold front. As a result, TD dust breaks through the planetary boundary layer and extends to the upper troposphere over the northern TP. TD dust flux arrived at the TP with a value of 6.6 Gg/day in this 5 day event but decays quickly during the southward migration over the TP due to dry deposition. The simulations show that TD dust cools the atmosphere near the surface and heats the atmosphere above with a maximum heating rate of 0.11 K day-1 at ~7 km over the TP. The event-averaged net radiative forcings of TD dust over the TP are -3.97, 1.61, and -5.58 Wm-2 at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), in the atmosphere, and at the surface, respectively. The promising performance of WRF-Chem in simulating dust and its radiative forcing provides confidence for use in further investigation of climatic impact of TD dust over the TP.

  4. Observation of Dust and Smoke Plume Transport and Impact on Remote Sensing of Air Quality in New York City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshary, F.; Wu, Y.; Han, Z. T.; Nazmi, C.; Gross, B.

    2015-12-01

    Long-range transport of aloft aerosol plumes affects both air quality and climate on regional and continental scales. Asian dust impacts on the western US and Canada have been extensively analyzed, yet such quantitative demonstrations are not well documented in the northeastern US. Similarly, episodes of continental transport of smoke plumes from forest fires in western US and Canada impact visibility and air quality in the US east coast. In this study, we present the synergistic observation of transported dust and smoke aerosol plumes in New York City (NYC, 40.821ºN, 73.949ºW), using a combination of a ground-based multiple-wavelength lidar, a CIMEL sunphotometer/radiometer, satellite sensors such as CALIOP and MODIS/VIIRS, and NAAPS aerosol forecast model. We show case studies of trans-Pacific Asian dust transport to the northeast US driven by the strong western or polar jets. The potential impact of the plumes on the local air quality is indicated by the plumes mixing down into boundary layer and the coincident increase of the ground PM measurement. Using multi-year lidar and sunphotometer observations, range-resolved monthly occurrence frequency of aloft aerosol plumes and modification of local aerosol optical properties are presented. The transport paths and the optical properties of aerosol for each clustered path are characterized. We further demonstrate the impact of these aloft plumes on the surface PM2.5 estimates from MODIS and VIIRS derived aerosol optical depth (AOD), and observe that when the aloft plumes-layer AODs are filtered out using lidar, the correlation between AOD-PM2.5 is much improved.

  5. Radiative effects of African dust and smoke observed from Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorks, John E.; McGill, Matt; Rodier, Sharon; Vaughan, Mark; Hu, Yongxiang; Hlavka, Dennis

    2009-09-01

    Cloud and aerosol effects have a significant impact on the atmospheric radiation budget in the tropical Atlantic because of the spatial and temporal extent of desert dust and smoke from biomass burning in the atmosphere. The influences of African dust and smoke aerosols on cloud radiative properties over the tropical Atlantic Ocean were analyzed for the month of July for 3 years (2006-2008) using colocated data collected by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) and Aqua satellites. Aerosol layer height and type can be accurately determined using CALIOP data through directly measured parameters such as optical depth, volume depolarization ratio, attenuated backscatter, and color ratio. On average, clouds below 5 km had a daytime instantaneous shortwave (SW) radiative flux of 270.2 ± 16.9 W/m2 and thin cirrus clouds had a SW radiative flux of 208.0 ± 12.7 W/m2. When dust aerosols interacted with clouds below 5 km, as determined from CALIPSO, the SW radiative flux decreased to 205.4 ± 13.0 W/m2. Similarly, smoke aerosols decreased the SW radiative flux of low clouds to a value of 240.0 ± 16.6 W/m2. These decreases in SW radiative flux were likely attributed to the aerosol layer height and changes in cloud microphysics. CALIOP lidar observations, which more accurately identify aerosol layer height than passive instruments, appear essential for better understanding of cloud-aerosol interactions, a major uncertainty in predicting the climate system.

  6. Long-range Transport of Dust and Smoke towards Barbados during Summer and Winter Season Measured with Three-Wavelength Polarization Lidar during SALTRACE-1, 2 and 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haarig, Moritz; Ansmann, Albert; Althausen, Dietrich; Klepel, André; Baars, Holger; Farrell, David; Toledano, Carlos

    2015-04-01

    The annual cycle of the north-south movement of the intertropical convergence zone has an impact on the sources and mixture of the dust transported to the Caribbean. In summer, pure Saharan dust from northern Africa dominates, while in winter the dust originates from southern West Africa and is mixed with biomass burning smoke. The island of Barbados (13°N, 59°W) is an ideal site to investigate the long-range transport of Saharan dust because it is advected more than 5000 km across the Atlantic Ocean without any disturbance by anthropogenic aerosol sources. To investigate these seasonal changes in dust transport we extended the Saharan Aerosol Long-Range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE) in June-July 2013 by further two campaigns in February-March 2014 (SALTRACE-2) and June-July 2014 (SALTRACE-3). Additionally a ship cruise with a Raman polarization lidar on board from the Caribbean to the Cape Verde islands was performed in April-May 2013. Dual-polar sun photometer observations were performed continuously from June 2013 to July 2014 (see AERONET Barbados_SALTRACE site). For SALTRACE, we used a complex lidar system equipped with two Raman channels and a 532 nm high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) channel to obtain daytime (HSRL) and nighttime (Raman) extinction profiles. For the first time the dust linear depolarization ratios at 355, 532 and 1064 nm were measured simultaneously. The linear depolarization ratio provides information about the presence and amount of dust. The spectrum yields information about the dust size distribution. Combined with the extinction-to-backscatter ratio (lidar ratio) a separation of mineral dust (fine-mode and coarse-mode fractions), biomass burning smoke and maritime aerosols is possible. The measurements are presently used for understanding of long-range transported dust and provide insight into the aerosol composition over the western Atlantic. The classification of different aerosol types will be

  7. Investigation of near-surface lunar dust transport in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Zoltan; Horanyi, Mihaly; Gruen, Eberhard; Robertson, Scott; Wang, Xu; Dove, Adrienne; Munsat, Tobin; Poppe, Andrew; Duncan, Nicole; Drake, Keith; Auer, Siegfried

    The lunar surface is a natural dusty plasma laboratory. The solar UV radiation and the solar wind charge the surface and differential charging due to light/shadow boundaries may enhance the electrostatic field intensity locally. The lunar surface is also exposed to the continual bombardment by interplanetary dust particles with an estimated influx of mass at about 5103 kg/day and impact speed ¿ 2 km/s. Besides a small impact plasma cloud, the micrometeoroid impacts also generate secondary ejecta particles with an estimated mass yield of 10e3 that form a permanently present dust exosphere about the Moon. The combination of these processes may be responsible for a mobilization and lofting of small grains from the surface to explain historical data sets from in situ and remote sensing observations that indicate the presence of lofted dust populations, possibly reaching high altitudes over the lunar surface. Our laboratory has over a decade long history of simulating the lunar surface environment and the charging and dynamics of dust. The recent work include: 1) the dust charging and the mobilization of dust pile on negatively biased surface exposed to low density plasma. Individual grains can lift from the surface and move outward from the pile to transform the pile of dust into a ring shape. 2) The development of a strong UV source using Xe excimer lamps that can generate sufficient photoelectron emission to create a photoelectron sheath. 3) Development of a 3 MV dust accelerator facility to study the generation of impact plasmas and the charging of the surface in the vicinity of the impact. The accelerator will be able to provide particles with speeds up to 50 km/s. 4) The development of the Electrostatic Lunar Dust Analyzer instrument to measure the abundance, charge, size and velocity of dust particles mobilized near the lunar surface. The instrument employs an array of wire electrodes, each connected to sensitive electronics to measure the induced charge from a

  8. Distinct synoptic patterns and air masses responsible for long-range desert dust transport and sea spray in Palermo, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriou, K.; Paschalidou, A. K.; Kassomenos, P. A.

    2016-09-01

    Undoubtedly, anthropogenic emissions carry a large share of the risk posed on public health by particles exposure in urban areas. However, natural emissions, in the form of desert dust and sea spray, are well known to contribute significantly to the PM load recorded in many Mediterranean environments, posing an extra risk burden on public health. In the present paper, we examine the synoptic climatology in a background station in Palermo, Italy, through K-means clustering of the mean sea-level pressure (MSLP) maps, in an attempt to associate distinct synoptic patterns with increased PM10 levels. Four-day backward trajectory analysis is then applied, in order to study the origins and pathways of air masses susceptible of PM10 episodes. It is concluded that a number of atmospheric patterns result in several kind of flows, namely south, west, and slow-moving/stagnant flows, associated with long-range dust transport and sea spray.

  9. A case study for Saharan dust transport over Turkey via RegCM4.1 model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agacayak, Tugba; Kindap, Tayfun; Unal, Alper; Pozzoli, Luca; Mallet, Marc; Solmon, Fabien

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate a dust transport episode using atmospheric 3D modeling, satellite data, and in-situ observations. 3D simulations have been used to determine the aerosol optical properties and direct radiative effects of dust particles. In this study, the number of daily exceedances due to dust transport is estimated and, performance of RegCM4.1 model tested quantitatively with the aid of AOD data from AERONET network and PM10 ground measurements. The impact of dust on radiation estimated by the model for the 4-day period. PM10 values for Istanbul for the period between 2004-2010, and Marmara and Aegean Region for March 2008 provided by the Turkish Ministry of Environment were used to select an important episode. Exceedance days were evaluated according to the BSC-DREAM8b model output. We have used the RegCM4.1 model to further investigate the Saharan dust transport in the selected episode 21-24 March 2008. First, observed daily mean PM10 concentrations reach up to 180 μg/m3 in Marmara Region and 160 μg/m3 in Aegean Region, respectively. According to the RegCM4.1 model outputs, station Erdemli presents the highest AOD on 23rd March 2008, around 1.2, which is found to be highest than AERONET observations (AOD of 0.7). In parallel, daily mean AOD in Marmara Region is around 1.0 on the same day. Corresponding simulated column burden is about 1000 mg/m2 in Marmara Region and 750 mg/m2 in Aegean Region, respectively. In terms of radiative effect, daily mean shortwave (all-sky) radiative effect at surface (ToA) is - 62 W/m2 (- 29 W/m2) in Marmara and - 71 W/m2 (- 33 W/m2) in Aegean Region, respectively. In parallel, longwave all-sky direct forcing at surface (ToA) is + 7 W/m2 and (+ 4 W/m2) in Marmara, + 11 W/m2 (+ 4 W/m2) in Aegean Region.

  10. A global satellite view of the seasonal distribution of mineral dust and its correlation with atmospheric circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh-Choobari, O.; Sturman, A.; Zawar-Reza, P.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosols make a considerable contribution to the climate system through their radiative and cloud condensation nuclei effects, which underlines the need for understanding the origin of aerosols and their transport pathways. Seasonal distribution of mineral dust around the globe and its correlation with atmospheric circulation is investigated using satellite data, and meteorological data from ECMWF. The most important sources of dust are located in North Africa, the Middle East and Southwest Asia with an observed summer maximum, and East Asia with a spring peak. Maximum dust activity over North Africa and the Middle East in summer is attributed to dry convection associated with the summertime low-pressure system, while unstable weather and dry conditions are responsible for the spring peak in dust emission in East Asia. Intercontinental transport of mineral dust by atmospheric circulation has been observed, including trans-Atlantic transport of North African dust, trans-Pacific transport of Asian dust, and transport of dust from the Middle East across the Indian Ocean. The extent of African dust over the Atlantic Ocean and its latitudinal variation with season is related to the large-scale atmospheric circulation, including seasonal changes in the position of the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) and variation of wind patterns. North African aerosols extend over longer distances across the North Atlantic in summer because of greater dust emission, an intensified easterly low level jet (LLJ) and strengthening of the Azores-Bermuda anticyclonic circulation. Transport of East Asian aerosol is facilitated by the existence of a LLJ that extends from East Asia to the west coast of North America.

  11. Modeling the global emission, transport and deposition of trace elements associated with mineral dust

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Y.; Mahowald, N.; Scanza, R. A.; Journet, E.; Desboeufs, K.; Albani, S.; Kok, J. F.; Zhuang, G.; Chen, Y.; Cohen, D. D.; et al

    2015-10-12

    Trace element deposition from desert dust has important impacts on ocean primary productivity, the quantification of which could be useful in determining the magnitude and sign of the biogeochemical feedback on radiative forcing. However, the impact of elemental deposition to remote ocean regions is not well understood and is not currently included in global climate models. In this study, emission inventories for eight elements primarily of soil origin, Mg, P, Ca, Mn, Fe, K, Al, and Si are determined based on a global mineral data set and a soil data set. The resulting elemental fractions are used to drive themore » desert dust model in the Community Earth System Model (CESM) in order to simulate the elemental concentrations of atmospheric dust. Spatial variability of mineral dust elemental fractions is evident on a global scale, particularly for Ca. Simulations of global variations in the Ca / Al ratio, which typically range from around 0.1 to 5.0 in soils, are consistent with observations, suggesting that this ratio is a good signature for dust source regions. The simulated variable fractions of chemical elements are sufficiently different; estimates of deposition should include elemental variations, especially for Ca, Al and Fe. The model results have been evaluated with observations of elemental aerosol concentrations from desert regions and dust events in non-dust regions, providing insights into uncertainties in the modeling approach. The ratios between modeled and observed elemental fractions range from 0.7 to 1.6, except for Mg and Mn (3.4 and 3.5, respectively). Using the soil database improves the correspondence of the spatial heterogeneity in the modeling of several elements (Ca, Al and Fe) compared to observations. Total and soluble dust element fluxes to different ocean basins and ice sheet regions have been estimated, based on the model results. The annual inputs of soluble Mg, P, Ca, Mn, Fe and K associated with dust using the mineral data set are

  12. Modeling the global emission, transport and deposition of trace elements associated with mineral dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Mahowald, N.; Scanza, R. A.; Journet, E.; Desboeufs, K.; Albani, S.; Kok, J. F.; Zhuang, G.; Chen, Y.; Cohen, D. D.; Paytan, A.; Patey, M. D.; Achterberg, E. P.; Engelbrecht, J. P.; Fomba, K. W.

    2015-10-01

    Trace element deposition from desert dust has important impacts on ocean primary productivity, the quantification of which could be useful in determining the magnitude and sign of the biogeochemical feedback on radiative forcing. However, the impact of elemental deposition to remote ocean regions is not well understood and is not currently included in global climate models. In this study, emission inventories for eight elements primarily of soil origin, Mg, P, Ca, Mn, Fe, K, Al, and Si are determined based on a global mineral data set and a soil data set. The resulting elemental fractions are used to drive the desert dust model in the Community Earth System Model (CESM) in order to simulate the elemental concentrations of atmospheric dust. Spatial variability of mineral dust elemental fractions is evident on a global scale, particularly for Ca. Simulations of global variations in the Ca / Al ratio, which typically range from around 0.1 to 5.0 in soils, are consistent with observations, suggesting that this ratio is a good signature for dust source regions. The simulated variable fractions of chemical elements are sufficiently different; estimates of deposition should include elemental variations, especially for Ca, Al and Fe. The model results have been evaluated with observations of elemental aerosol concentrations from desert regions and dust events in non-dust regions, providing insights into uncertainties in the modeling approach. The ratios between modeled and observed elemental fractions range from 0.7 to 1.6, except for Mg and Mn (3.4 and 3.5, respectively). Using the soil database improves the correspondence of the spatial heterogeneity in the modeling of several elements (Ca, Al and Fe) compared to observations. Total and soluble dust element fluxes to different ocean basins and ice sheet regions have been estimated, based on the model results. The annual inputs of soluble Mg, P, Ca, Mn, Fe and K associated with dust using the mineral data set are 0.30 Tg

  13. Effects of two Asian sand dusts transported from the dust source regions of Inner Mongolia and northeast China on murine lung eosinophilia

    SciTech Connect

    He, Miao; Ichinose, Takamichi; Song, Yuan; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Arashidani, Keiichi; Yoshida, Seiichi; Liu, Boying; Nishikawa, Masataka; Takano, Hirohisa; and others

    2013-11-01

    The quality and quantity of toxic materials adsorbed onto Asian sand dust (ASD) are different based on dust source regions and passage routes. The aggravating effects of two ASDs (ASD1 and ASD2) transported from the source regions of Inner Mongolia and northeast China on lung eosinophilia were compared to clarify the role of toxic materials in ASD. The ASDs contained different amounts of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and β-glucan (ASD1 < ASD2) and SiO{sub 2} (ASD1 > ASD2). CD-1 mice were instilled intratracheally with ASD1, ASD2 and/or ovalbumin (OVA) four times at 2-week intervals. ASD1 and ASD2 enhanced eosinophil recruitment induced by OVA in the submucosa of the airway, with goblet cell proliferation in the bronchial epithelium. ASD1 and ASD2 synergistically increased OVA-induced eosinophil-relevant cytokines interleukin-5 (IL-5), IL-13 (ASD1 < ASD2) and chemokine eotaxin (ASD1 > ASD2) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. ASD2 aggravating effects on lung eosinophilia were greater than ASD1. The role of LPS and β-glucan in ASD2 on the production of pro-inflammatory mediators was assessed using in vitro bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) from wild type, Toll-like receptor 2-deficient (TLR2 −/−), TLR4 −/−, and MyD88 −/− mice (on Balb/c background). ASD2-stimulated TLR2 −/− BMDMs enhanced IL-6, IL-12, TNF-α, MCP-1 and MIP-1α secretion compared with ASD2-stimulated TLR4 −/− BMDMs. Protein expression from ASD2-stimulated MyD88 −/− BMDM were very low or undetectable. The in vitro results indicate that lung eosinophilia caused by ASD is TLR4 dependent. Therefore, the aggravation of OVA-related lung eosinophilia by ASD may be dependent on toxic substances derived from microbes, such as LPS, rather than SiO{sub 2}. - Highlights: • Asian sand dust (ASD) from the deserts of China causes serious respiratory problems. • The aggravating effects of two ASDs on lung eosinophilia were compared. • The ASDs contained different LPS and β-glucan (ASD1

  14. Characterizing Dust Inputs to the Caribbean Region Using Radiogenic Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pett-Ridge, J. C.; Derry, L. A.

    2007-12-01

    The long-range transport of mineral aerosols (dust) in the atmosphere influences radiative transfer in the atmosphere and affects ocean productivity via Fe fertilization. Dust transport also affects terrestrial systems by contributing to geochemical fluxes of both sediments and solutes, adding nutrients and nutrient-holding capacity to ecosystems, and neutralizing acidic components of atmospheric deposition. The largest atmospheric dust source is the Sahara-Sahel region of Northern Africa. Of the dust derived from the Sahara-Sahel region, 50 million tons are transported west each year on the trade winds into the Caribbean atmosphere1. Ratios of relatively immobile trace elements provide geochemical evidence that confirms the expected presence of African dust in soils of the Caribbean region. However, estimates of dust deposition fluxes to land in the Caribbean are lacking2. A promising approach for calculating deposition fluxes is to quantify the streamwater Sr flux for a small monolithologic catchment, and then quantify contributions from local substrate, sea salt aerosols, volcanic ash, and long-range transported dust using their unique isotopic signatures. This approach has the advantage of giving a spatially and temporally integrated estimate of the dust deposition flux, which is necessary for assessing the importance of dust to geochemical fluxes and biogeochemical cycling. Many factors will control the importance of dust inputs for a given site. Local soil characteristics will determine the rate at which dust weathers once it enters the soil, and the extent to which dust may contribute to the nutrient budget of the ecosystem. The amount and style of rainfall will affect the rate at which dust particles are scrubbed from the atmosphere. Further, local erosion rates will determine the extent of dust accumulation over time. 87Sr/86Sr ratios are used to calculate the deposition flux of African dust into the small montane Rio Icacos watershed in Puerto Rico of 13

  15. Decadal variability of NAO during the last millennium inferred from Saharan dust in Alpine ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwikowski, Margit; Sigl, Michael; Gäggeler, Heinz W.; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Barbante, Carlo; Boutron, Claude

    2010-05-01

    Interannual variability of North African atmospheric dust is strongly linked to drought conditions in the Sahel and to the winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). Dust generation and transport are enhanced during winter NAO(+) phases when the North African dust source regions are controlled by high pressure situations leading to less precipitation, and thus to stronger wind erosion of soil material. However, direct Saharan dust observations are limited to the last decades only. Here, we present a first highly resolved ice core record of Saharan dust from the Alps, spanning the last 1,000 years. We focus thereby on concentrations of Fe, Al, Sr, and Ca which are typical elements present in long-range transported Saharan dust. We show that the mineral dust transport to the Southern Alps is primarily controlled by drought conditions in Northern Africa and by the winter NAO. Mean dust concentrations of the last 20 years are unprecedented in the context of the last 1,000 years. These elevated Saharan dust concentrations are consistent with the observed widespread increase in dustiness and dust storm frequencies over Northern Africa from direct measurements or from satellite based observations over the last decades. In contrast, between AD 1050 and 1400, when persistent arid conditions in the main source regions of dust in Northern Africa were deduced from tree-ring data and linked to a pervasive positive NAO mode over centuries, no according imprint is recorded in the ice core mineral dust record. We assume that the low-frequency variability of the tree-ring based reconstruction of Moroccan droughts (which also form the basis for the NAO reconstruction) is biased by the method applied to remove the non-climatic growth trends from the tree-ring series. Based on the ice core data we suggest that decadal-scale variability of the NAO (Moroccan droughts) prevailed over the last 1,000 years.

  16. Impact of Radiatively Interactive Dust Aerosols in the NASA GEOS-5 Climate Model: Sensitivity to Dust Particle Shape and Refractive Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colarco, Peter R.; Nowottnick, Edward Paul; Randles, Cynthia A.; Yi, Bingqi; Yang, Ping; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Smith, Jamison A.; Bardeen, Charles D.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the radiative effects of dust aerosols in the NASA GEOS-5 atmospheric general circulation model. GEOS-5 is improved with the inclusion of a sectional aerosol and cloud microphysics module, the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA). Into CARMA we introduce treatment of the dust and sea salt aerosol lifecycle, including sources, transport evolution, and sinks. The aerosols are radiatively coupled to GEOS-5, and we perform a series of multi-decade AMIP-style simulations in which dust optical properties (spectral refractive index and particle shape distribution) are varied. Optical properties assuming spherical dust particles are from Mie theory, while those for non-spherical shape distributions are drawn from a recently available database for tri-axial ellipsoids. The climatologies of the various simulations generally compare well to data from the MODIS, MISR, and CALIOP space-based sensors, the ground-based AERONET, and surface measurements of dust deposition and concentration. Focusing on the summertime Saharan dust cycle we show significant variability in our simulations resulting from different choices of dust optical properties. Atmospheric heating due to dust enhances surface winds over important Saharan dust sources, and we find a positive feedback where increased dust absorption leads to increased dust emissions. We further find that increased dust absorption leads to a strengthening of the summertime Hadley cell circulation, increasing dust lofting to higher altitudes and strengthening the African Easterly Jet. This leads to a longer atmospheric residence time, higher altitude, and generally more northward transport of dust in simulations with the most absorbing dust optical properties. We find that particle shape, although important for radiance simulations, is a minor effect compared to choices of refractive index, although total atmospheric forcing is enhanced by greater than 10 percent for simulations incorporating a

  17. The DEAD SEA VALLEY as a trap for Saharan dust transported by west winds, based on COSMO-ART high-resolution modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishcha, Pavel; Vogel, Bernhard; Bangert, Max; Schaettler, Ulrich; Starobinets, Boris; Alpert, Pinhas

    2015-04-01

    The Dead Sea is a unique place on the Earth which is located at approximately 400 m below sea level. It is surrounded by the Judean Mountains to the west and by the Moab Mountains to the east. The Dead Sea Valley is quite often affected by Saharan dust intrusions. It is also characterized by changeable meteorology, particularly by unsteady winds blowing along the valley. High-resolution modeling was used for studying Saharan dust transport over this region with complex topography and unsteady winds. It was the purpose of the current study to determine space - time variations of Saharan dust over the Dead Sea Valley using the COSMO-ART model with 3-km resolution. This was carried out for the extreme dust event observed on March 22, 2013, when PM10 measurements in the Dead Sea Valley showed surface dust concentration exceeding 6,000 µg m-3. An intensive low-pressure system, centered over the Eastern Mediterranean, created favorable conditions for dust transport by south-west winds from the Eastern Sahara into the Eastern Mediterranean and particularly into Israel and Jordan. In the middle of the dust event, when the low-pressure system shifted eastward, dust was transported by strong west winds towards the Dead Sea Valley, across the Judean Mountains. It is reasonable to suggest that the greater the height of the Judean Mountains - the lower the dust concentration on the downwind slope of the mountains, in the Dead Sea Valley. The high-resolution COSMO-ART model shows the opposite result: the greater the height of the Judean Mountains - the higher the dust concentration in the Dead Sea Valley. COSMO-ART shows that the height of the Judean Mountains leads to high dust concentration of over 15,000 µg m-3 in the Dead Sea Valley. We analyzed east-west cross-sections of dust concentration and topography at different latitudes across the Dead Sea Valley. Our analysis showed that, over the North of the Dead Sea Valley, where the height of the Judean Mountains is greater

  18. Climatic controls on the interannual to decadal variability in Saudi Arabian dust activity: Toward the development of a seasonal dust prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yan; Notaro, Michael; Liu, Zhengyu; Wang, Fuyao; Alkolibi, Fahad; Fadda, Eyad; Bakhrjy, Fawzieh

    2015-03-01

    The observed climatic controls on springtime and summertime Saudi Arabian dust activities during 1975-2012 are analyzed, leading to development of a seasonal dust prediction model. According to empirical orthogonal function analysis, dust storm frequency exhibits a dominantly homogeneous pattern across Saudi Arabia, with distinct interannual and decadal variability. The previously identified positive trend in remotely sensed aerosol optical depth since 2000 is shown to be a segment of the decadal oscillation in dust activity, according to long-duration station record. Regression and correlation analyses reveal that the interannual variability in Saudi Arabian dust storm frequency is regulated by springtime rainfall across the Arabian Peninsula and summertime Shamal wind intensity. The key drivers of Saudi Arabian dust storm variability are identified. Winter-to-spring La Niña enhances subsequent spring dust activity by decreasing rainfall across the country's primary dust source region, the Rub' al Khali Desert. A relatively cool tropical Indian Ocean favors frequent summer dust storms by producing an anomalously anticyclonic circulation over the central Arabian Peninsula, which enhances the Shamal wind. Decadal variability in Saudi Arabian dust storm frequency is associated with North African rainfall and Sahel vegetation, which regulate African dust emissions and transport to Saudi Arabia. Mediterranean sea surface temperatures (SSTs) also regulate decadal dust variability, likely through their influence on Sahel rainfall and Shamal intensity. Using antecedent-accumulated rainfall over the Arabian Peninsula and North Africa, and Mediterranean SSTs, as low-frequency predictors, and tropical eastern Pacific and tropical Indian Ocean SSTs as high-frequency predictors, Saudi Arabia's seasonal dust activity is well predicted.

  19. Soluble iron dust export in the high altitude Saharan Air Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravelo-Pérez, L. M.; Rodríguez, S.; Galindo, L.; García, M. I.; Alastuey, A.; López-Solano, J.

    2016-05-01

    Every summer huge amounts of desert dust particles are exported from the hyperarid subtropical Sahara to the North Atlantic the so-called Saharan Air Layer (SAL), a dry, warm and dust-laden corridor that expands from the North African coast (1-5 km.a.s.l.) to the Americas above the marine boundary layer. Because of the potential impact of the dust deposited on the ocean on marine biogeochemistry and climate, we studied the Fe solubility (in seawater) of atmospheric aerosols samples directly collected in the SAL off the North African coast, i.e. the fresh aerosols recently exported from the Sahara in the SAL. The aerosol sampling was performed at ˜2400 m.a.s.l. in Izaña observatory in Tenerife island. In the total aerosols, we found low Fe concentrations and high fractional Fe solubility (FFS ˜2%) in the North Atlantic free troposphere airflows and high Fe concentrations and low FFS (˜0.7%) within the SAL; the resulting FFS versus total dust (or total Fe) plot shows a hyperbolic trend attributed to the conservative mixing of 'fine combustion aerosols' and 'lithogenic mineral dust'. We then focused on the soluble Fe in the SAL. Our results indicate that ˜70% of soluble Fe is associated with the dissolution of submicron dust particles, probably involving Fe-bearing clays. We found a FFS of submicron dust (˜6%) higher than that typically observed in submicron particles of soil dust samples (<1%). The correlation between FFS and the ammonium-sulphate/dust ratio and the low variability in the Fe/Al ratio in the dust samples, suggests that the increase in the FFS of submicron dust aerosols (with respect to soil dust particles) may be related to the presence of acid pollutants mixed with dust. Previous studies had focused on dust processing and changes of Fe solubility during the trans-Atlantic transport of dust in the SAL. We found that submicron dust exported off the coast of North Africa may have already experienced acid processing over the Sahara, i.e. before

  20. Association between SLC2A9 transporter gene variants and uric acid phenotypes in African American and white families

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Mariza; Matsumoto, Martha; Mosley, Tom H.; Kardia, Sharon; Turner, Stephen T.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. SLC2A9 gene variants associate with serum uric acid in white populations, but little is known about African American populations. Since SLC2A9 is a transporter, gene variants may be expected to associate more closely with the fractional excretion of urate, a measure of renal tubular transport, than with serum uric acid, which is influenced by production and extrarenal clearance. Methods. Genotypes of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) distributed across the SLC2A9 gene were obtained in the Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy cohorts. The associations of SNPs with serum uric acid, fractional excretion of urate and urine urate-to-creatinine ratio were assessed with adjustments for age, sex, diuretic use, BMI, homocysteine and triglycerides. Results. We identified SLC2A9 gene variants that were associated with serum uric acid in 1155 African American subjects (53 SNPs) and 1132 white subjects (63 SNPs). The most statistically significant SNPs in African American subjects (rs13113918) and white subjects (rs11723439) were in the latter half of the gene and explained 2.7 and 2.8% of the variation in serum uric acid, respectively. After adjustment for this SNP in African Americans, 0.9% of the variation in serum uric acid was explained by an SNP (rs1568318) in the first half of the gene. Unexpectedly, SLC2A9 gene variants had stronger associations with serum uric acid than with fractional excretion of urate. Conclusions. These findings support two different loci by which SLC2A9 variants affect uric acid levels in African Americans and suggest SLC2A9 variants affect serum uric acid level via renal and extrarenal clearance. PMID:21186168

  1. Organic Extracts from African Dust Storms Stimulate Oxidative Stress and Induce Inflammatory Responses in human lung cells through Nrf2 but not NF-kB

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Cotto, Rosa I.; Ortiz-Martínez, Mario G.; Jiménez-Vélez, Braulio D.

    2015-01-01

    The health impact of the global African dust event (ADE) phenomenon in the Caribbean has been vaguely investigated. Heavy metals in ADE and Non-ADE extracts were evaluated for the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant capacity by cells using, deferoxamine mesylate (DF) and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Results show that ADE particulate matter 2.5 (PM2.5) induces ROS and stimulates oxidative stress. Pre-treatment with DF reduces ROS in ADE and Non-ADE extracts and in lung cells demonstrating that heavy metals are of utmost importance. Glutathione-S-transferase and Heme Oxygenase 1 mRNA levels are induced with ADE PM and reduced by DF and NAC. ADE extracts induced Nrf2 activity and IL-8 mRNA levels significantly more than Non-ADE. NF-κB activity was not detected in any sample. Trace elements and organic constituents in ADE PM2.5 enrich the local environment load, inducing ROS formation and activating antioxidant-signaling pathways increasing pro-inflammatory mediator expressions in lung cells. PMID:25769104

  2. Vertical Variation of Optical Properties of Mixed Asian Dust/Pollution Plumes According to Pathway of Airmass Transport Over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sung-Kyun; Müller, Detlef; Lee, K. H.; Shin, D.; Kim, Y. J.; Noh, Y. M.

    2016-06-01

    We use five years (2009 - 2013) of multiwavelength Raman lidar measurements at Gwangju, Korea (35.10° N, 126.53° E) for the identification of changes of optical properties of East Asian dust in dependence of its transport path over China. Profiles of backscatter and extinction coefficients, lidar ratios, and backscatter-related Ångström exponents (wavelength pair 355/532nm) were measured at Gwangju. Linear particle depolarization ratios were used to identify East Asian dust layers. We used backward trajectory modelling to identify the pathway and the vertical position of dust-laden air masses over China during long-range transport. Most cases of Asian dust events can be described by the emission of dust in desert areas and subsequent transport over highly polluted regions of China. The Asian dust plumes could be categorized into two classes according to the height above ground in which these plumes were transported: (I) the dust layers passed over China at high altitude levels until arrival over Gwangju, and (II) the Asian dust layers were transported near the surface and the lower troposphere over industrialized areas before they arrived over Gwangju. We find that the optical characteristics of these mixed Asian dust layers over Gwangju differ in dependence of their vertical position above ground over China and the change of height above ground during transport. The mean linear particle depolarization ratio was 0.21±0.06 (at 532 nm), the mean lidar ratios were 52±7 sr at 355 nm and 53±8 sr at 532 nm, and the mean Ångström exponent was 0.74±0.31 in case I. In contrast, plumes transported at lower altitudes (case II) showed low depolarization ratios, and higher lidar ratio and Ångström exponents. The mean linear particle depolarization ratio was 0.13 ± 0.04, the mean lidar ratios were 63±9 sr at 355 nm and 62±8 sr at 532 nm, respectively, and the mean Ångström exponent was 0.98±0.51. These numbers show that the optical characteristics of mixed

  3. Synthesis of organic compounds in interstellar dust and their transport to earth via comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo Greenberg, J.

    It now appears that the chemical evolution of the pre-solar system interstellar dust ensures that a major fraction of comets is in the form of complex organic molecules at least partially of a prebiotic nature and that the submicron interstellar dust preserves its chemical integrity as a result of forming a very tenuous low density comet structure whose solid matter occupies ~ 1/5 of the total volume. This low density micro structure further provides a physical basis for comets bringing a significant fraction of the original interstellar organic molecules to the earth unmodified by the impact event. Finally, the evidence for a large number of comet collisions with the early earth ensured that the major organic molecular budget on the earth's surface was ``continuously'' supplied along with water well before 3.8 billion years ago which is the earliest date for life.

  4. Synergy of multispectral and multisensors satellite observations to evaluate desert aerosol transport and impact of dust deposition on inland waters: study case of Lake Garda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Nicolantonio, Walter; Cazzaniga, Ilaria; Cacciari, Alessandra; Bresciani, Mariano; Giardino, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    The capabilities of different Earth Observation multispectral satellites are employed for detecting and tracking of desert dust coming from North Africa toward the Northern Italy area and for evaluating the impact of Saharan dust deposition in inland waters, such as those of Lake Garda. Absorbing and scattering spectral optical properties of desert aerosol in the atmospheric windows in the ultraviolet, visible-near-infrared, and infrared spectral ranges are exploited in the dust retrieval performed by OMI/Aura, MODIS/Terra-Aqua, and SEVIRI/MSG satellite sensors. Therefore, the direct link between dust deposition and increase in phytoplankton abundance has been assessed retrieving MERIS-based chlorophyll-a (chl-a) concentration for the desert dust events. Estimates of the increased chl-a in the lake have been derived with values in concentration from 30% to 170%. AERONET sun-photometer measurements, gravimetric particulate matter samplings, in situ chl-a concentration and surface temperature are employed to select events and assess the presence of desert dust and recognize a corresponding increase of the phytoplankton abundance in the analyzed inland waters. The improved observational features that will be provided by the next European Sentinels missions, namely Sentinel-2, 3, 4, 5P, together with MTG-I (Imager) and MTG-S (Sounder) will allow better monitoring atmospheric constituents and studying the environmental impacts of desert dust transport.

  5. Characterization of long-range transported Saharan dust by means of ground-based Raman and depolarization lidar measurements at Barbados

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, S.; Freudenthaler, V.; Schäfler, A.; Toledano, C.; Wiegner, M.; Weinzierl, B.; Ehret, G.

    2014-12-01

    In June and July 2013 the Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE) took place at Barbados to investigate long-range transported dust after its transport over the Atlantic Ocean. Ground-based lidar measurements were performed to characterize the optical properties of long-range transported dust, and to investigate possible changes of the optical properties during transport. Measurements of the particle linear depolarization ratio (PLDR) at 355 nm and 532 nm and of the vibrational Raman signals at 387 nm and 607 nm were conducted with the small portable lidar system POLIS of the Meteorological Institute (MIM) of the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München in cooperation with the Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IPA) of the German Aerospace Centre (DLR). The measurements were performed in a routine manner every day for 3 hours starting at sunrise and another 3 hours starting at sunset (combined Raman and PLDR). During heavy dust events or during the formation of tropical storm Chantal measurements were performed continuously up to 48 hours. During SALTRACE the vertical aerosol distribution was dominated by a three layer structure. The boundary layer was dominated by marine air masses in most of the cases. Above the boundary layer a mixing layer with very variable structure was found up to heights of 1.5 km to 2 km. This layer was often affected by cumulus clouds. The Saharan dust layer was observed in a height range of about 2 km to about 3.5 km. In some cases the upper boundary was even 5 km. In our presentation we will give an overview over the general measurement situation and the POLIS measurements. We will present first results of the PLDR and the lidar ratio of long-range transported dust, as well as of the marine dominated air masses in the boundary layer. Furthermore we will compare our findings with results found for fresh Saharan dust and dust at the beginning of the long-range transport investigated during

  6. Equatorial transport of Saturn's ionosphere as driven by a dust-ring current system

    SciTech Connect

    Ip, W.; Mendis, D.A.

    1983-03-01

    The diurnal modulation of the dust ring current of Saturn's D-ring causes field-aligned Birkeland currents ot flow near the dawn and dusk terminators and close across the mid-latitude ionosphere. One consequence of this current system is the establishment of a global convection pattern in the equatorial outer ionosphere. Outward motion of the dayside ionosheric plasma as well as the corresponding absorption effect of the inner ring system might be one physical cause of the depletion of the ionospheric content of Saturn.

  7. On the equatorial transport of Saturn's ionosphere as driven by a dust-ring current system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, W.-H.; Mendis, D. A.

    1983-03-01

    The diurnal modulation of the dust ring current of Saturn's D-ring causes field-aligned Birkeland currents to flow near the dawn and dusk terminators and close across the mid-latitude ionosphere. One consequence of this current system is the establishment of a global convection pattern in the equatorial outer ionosphere. Outward motion of the dayside ionospheric plasma as well as the corresponding absorption effect of the inner ring system might be one physical cause of the depletion of the ionospheric content of Saturn.

  8. Gas outflow and dust transport of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Ian-Lin; Su, Cheng-Chin; Ip, Wing-Huen; Lee, Jui-Chi; Lin, Zhong-Yi; Wu, Jong-Shinn

    2016-04-01

    Because of the diurnal thermal cycle and the irregular shape of the nucleus, gas outflow of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko could be highly anisotropic as possibly indicated by the colliminated dust jet structures on the sunlit side. Based on the preliminary study of the outgassing effect from the early phase of the Rosetta mission, a simple model of surface sublimation can be constructed by taking into account the dependence on the solar insolation. By implementing the time variability of the global gas production rate, a sequence of gas coma models can be generated at different epochs before and after perihelion by using an advanced DSMC code [1, 2] to calculate the gas flow near the cometary nucleus. At selected time intervals, we will also investigate the size change of the cometary ionosphere as the nucleus rotates as well as the ejection of dust particles dragged by the gas flow into bounded and unbounded trajectories. Reference: 1. Wu, J.-S., Tseng, K.-C. and Wu, F.-Y., "Parallel three-dimensional DSMC method using mesh refinement and variable time-step scheme", Comput. Phys. Comm., 162, pp. 166-187, 2004. 2. Su, C.-C., Tseng, K.-C., Cave, H.M., Wu, J.-S., Lian, Y.-Y., Kuo, T.-C. and Jermy, M.C., "Implementation of a Transient Adaptive Sub-Cell Module for the Parallel DSMC Code Using Unstructured Grids," Computers & Fluids, Vol. 39, pp. 1136-1145, 2010.

  9. Radioactive Iron Rain: Transporting 60Fe in Supernova Dust to the Ocean Floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, Brian J.; Fields, Brian D.; Ellis, John R.

    2016-08-01

    Several searches have found evidence of {}60{{Fe}} deposition, presumably from a near-Earth supernova (SN), with concentrations that vary in different locations on Earth. This paper examines various influences on the path of interstellar dust carrying {}60{{Fe}} from an SN through the heliosphere, with the aim of estimating the final global distribution on the ocean floor. We study the influences of magnetic fields, angle of arrival, wind, and ocean cycling of SN material on the concentrations at different locations. We find that the passage of SN material through the mesosphere/lower thermosphere has the greatest influence on the final global distribution, with ocean cycling causing lesser alteration as the SN material sinks to the ocean floor. SN distance estimates in previous works that assumed a uniform distribution are a good approximation. Including the effects on surface distributions, we estimate a distance of {46}-6+10 pc for an 8{--}10 {M}ȯ SN progenitor. This is consistent with an SN occurring within the Tuc-Hor stellar group ˜2.8 Myr ago, with SN material arriving on Earth ˜2.2 Myr ago. We note that the SN dust retains directional information to within 1◦ through its arrival in the inner solar system, so that SN debris deposition on inert bodies such as the Moon will be anisotropic, and thus could in principle be used to infer directional information. In particular, we predict that existing lunar samples should show measurable {}60{{Fe}} differences.

  10. Analysis of the particles transported with dust-clouds reaching Cordoba, southwestern Spain.

    PubMed

    Cariñanos, Paloma; Galán, Carmen; Alcázar, Purificación; Domínguez, Eugenio

    2004-02-01

    Dust-cloud episodes were detected in summer 1999 in the city of Cordoba, southwestern Spain, with a higher frequency than usual. Solid airborne particles were collected using a suction volumetric sampler and analyzed to determine both their nature and their origin. Nonbiological material was mostly identified as mineral sand and partially burned remains of hydrocarbons and stubble. Amounts were estimated in terms of the percentage of microscopic field of view covered. Biological materials, in this case pollen grains, were identified and classified as belonging to either autochthonous or remote flora; in the latter case, the possibility was examined that they might originate in North Africa. Some pollen types were also used as tracers to chart the path followed by the sand clouds within the Iberian Peninsula. Meteorological conditions on the days in which episodes occurred were analyzed. In all cases, very dry southwesterly winds were recorded, at moderate to high speeds, together with temperatures of over 35 degrees C. The increase in airborne pollen detected, together with the large amount of particles collected, could have an adverse effect on health, particularly in pollen allergy sufferers, for whom dust-clouds represent an added risk.

  11. Radioactive Iron Rain: Transporting 60Fe in Supernova Dust to the Ocean Floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, Brian J.; Fields, Brian D.; Ellis, John R.

    2016-08-01

    Several searches have found evidence of {}60{{Fe}} deposition, presumably from a near-Earth supernova (SN), with concentrations that vary in different locations on Earth. This paper examines various influences on the path of interstellar dust carrying {}60{{Fe}} from an SN through the heliosphere, with the aim of estimating the final global distribution on the ocean floor. We study the influences of magnetic fields, angle of arrival, wind, and ocean cycling of SN material on the concentrations at different locations. We find that the passage of SN material through the mesosphere/lower thermosphere has the greatest influence on the final global distribution, with ocean cycling causing lesser alteration as the SN material sinks to the ocean floor. SN distance estimates in previous works that assumed a uniform distribution are a good approximation. Including the effects on surface distributions, we estimate a distance of {46}-6+10 pc for an 8{--}10 {M}⊙ SN progenitor. This is consistent with an SN occurring within the Tuc-Hor stellar group ˜2.8 Myr ago, with SN material arriving on Earth ˜2.2 Myr ago. We note that the SN dust retains directional information to within 1◦ through its arrival in the inner solar system, so that SN debris deposition on inert bodies such as the Moon will be anisotropic, and thus could in principle be used to infer directional information. In particular, we predict that existing lunar samples should show measurable {}60{{Fe}} differences.

  12. Historic records of organic compounds from a high Alpine glacier: influences of biomass burning, anthropogenic emissions, and dust transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller-Tautges, C.; Eichler, A.; Schwikowski, M.; Pezzatti, G. B.; Conedera, M.; Hoffmann, T.

    2016-01-01

    Historic records of α-dicarbonyls (glyoxal, methylglyoxal), carboxylic acids (C6-C12 dicarboxylic acids, pinic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, phthalic acid, 4-methylphthalic acid), and ions (oxalate, formate, calcium) were determined with annual resolution in an ice core from Grenzgletscher in the southern Swiss Alps, covering the time period from 1942 to 1993. Chemical analysis of the organic compounds was conducted using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled to electrospray ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry (ESI-HRMS) for dicarbonyls and long-chain carboxylic acids and ion chromatography for short-chain carboxylates. Long-term records of the carboxylic acids and dicarbonyls, as well as their source apportionment, are reported for western Europe. This is the first study comprising long-term trends of dicarbonyls and long-chain dicarboxylic acids (C6-C12) in Alpine precipitation. Source assignment of the organic species present in the ice core was performed using principal component analysis. Our results suggest biomass burning, anthropogenic emissions, and transport of mineral dust to be the main parameters influencing the concentration of organic compounds. Ice core records of several highly correlated compounds (e.g., p-hydroxybenzoic acid, pinic acid, pimelic, and suberic acids) can be related to the forest fire history in southern Switzerland. P-hydroxybenzoic acid was found to be the best organic fire tracer in the study area, revealing the highest correlation with the burned area from fires. Historical records of methylglyoxal, phthalic acid, and dicarboxylic acids adipic acid, sebacic acid, and dodecanedioic acid are comparable with that of anthropogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The small organic acids, oxalic acid and formic acid, are both highly correlated with calcium, suggesting their records to be affected by changing mineral dust transport to the drilling site.

  13. Analysis of Measurements of Saharan Dust by Airborne and Ground-based Remote Sensing Methods during the Puerto Rico Dust Experiment (PRIDE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Jeffrey S.; Kinney, James E.; Westphal, Douglas L.; Holben, Brent N.; Welton, E. Judd; Tsay, Si-Chee; Eleuterio, Daniel P.; Campbell, James; Christopher, Sundar A.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.

    2003-01-01

    For 26 days in mid-June and July 2000, a research group comprised of U.S. Navy, NASA, and university scientists conducted the Puerto Rico Dust Experiment (PRIDE). In this paper we give a brief overview of mean meteorological conditions during the study. We focus on findings on African dust transported into the Caribbean utilizing Navajo aircraft and AERONET Sun photometer data. During the study midvisible aerosol optical thickness (AOT) in Puerto Rico averaged 0.25, with a maximum less than 0.5 and with clean marine periods of _0.08. Dust AOTs near the coast of Africa (Cape Verde Islands and Dakar) averaged _0.4, 30% less than previous years. By analyzing dust vertical profiles in addition to supplemental meteorology and MPLNET lidar data we found that dust transport cannot be easily categorized into any particular conceptual model. Toward the end of the study period, the vertical distribution of dust was similar to the commonly assumed Saharan Air Layer (SAL) transport. During the early periods of the study, dust had the highest concentrations in the marine and convective boundary layers with only a, weak dust layer in the SAL being present, a state usually associated with wintertime transport patterns. We corroborate the findings of Maring et al. that in most cases, there was an unexpected lack of vertical stratification of dust particle size. We systematically analyze processes which may impact dust vertical distribution and determine and speculate that dust vertical distribution predominately influenced by flow patterns over Africa and differential advection couple with mixing by easterly waves and regional subsidence.

  14. African Dust Storms Reaching Puerto Rican Coast Stimulate the Secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 and Cause Cytotoxicity to Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells (BEAS-2B).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cotto, Rosa I; Ortiz-Martínez, Mario G; Rivera-Ramírez, Evasomary; Méndez, Loyda B; Dávila, Julio C; Jiménez-Vélez, Braulio D

    2013-10-01

    African dust storm events (ADE) travel across the Atlantic Ocean (ADEAO) and reach the Puerto Rican coast (ADEPRC), potentially impacting air quality and human health. To what extent seasonal variations in atmospheric particulate matter (PM) size fractions, composition and sources trigger respiratory-adverse effects to Puerto Ricans is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated the pro-inflammatory and cytotoxic effects of PM samples harvested during ADEAO (PM10), ADEPRC (PM2.5 and PM10) and Non-ADE (Preand Post-ADEAO and Non-ADEPRC), using BEAS-2B cells. Endotoxins (ENX) in PM2.5 and PM10 extracts and traces of metals (TMET) in PM2.5 extracts were also examined. IL-6 and IL-8 secretion and cytotoxicity were used as endpoints. ADEAO and ADEPRC extracts were found to be more cytotoxic than Non-ADE and ADEAO were more toxic than ADEPRC extracts. PM10 extracts from ADEAO and Post-ADEAO caused significant secretion of IL-8. IL-6 and IL-8 secretion was higher following treatment with PM10 and PM2.5 ADEPRC than with Non-ADEPRC extracts. ENX levels were found to be higher in PM10 ADEAO than in the rest of the samples tested. TMET levels were higher in PM2.5 ADEPRC than in Non-ADEPRC extracts. Deferoxamine significantly reduced cytotoxicity and IL-6 and IL-8 secretion whereas Polymyxin B did not. TMET in PM2.5 fractions is a major determinant in ADEPRC-induced toxicity and work in conjunction with ENX to cause toxicity to lung cells in vitro. ENX and TMET may be responsible, in part, for triggering PM-respiratory adverse responses in susceptible and predisposed individuals. PMID:25002916

  15. A height resolved global view of dust aerosols from the first year CALIPSO lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong; Wang, Zhien; Liu, Zhaoyan; Winker, Dave; Trepte, Charles

    2008-08-01

    Based on the first year of CALIPSO lidar measurements under cloud-free conditions, a height-resolved global distribution of dust aerosols is presented for the first time. Results indicate that spring is the most active dust season, during which ˜20% and ˜12% of areas between 0 and 60°N are influenced by dust at least 10% and 50% of the time, respectively. In summer within 3-6 km, ˜8.3% of area between 0 and 60°N is impacted by dust at least 50% of the time. Strong seasonal cycles of dust layer vertical extent are observed in major source regions, which are similar to the seasonal variation of the thermally driven boundary layer depth. The arid and semiarid areas in North Africa and the Arabian Peninsula are the most persistent and prolific dust sources. African dust is transported across the Atlantic all yearlong with strong seasonal variation in the transport pathways mainly in the free troposphere in summer and at the low altitudes in winter. However, the trans-Atlantic dust is transported at the low altitudes is important for all seasons, especially transported further cross the ocean. The crossing Atlantic dusty zones are shifted southward from summer to winter, which is accompanied by a similar southward shift of dust-generating areas over North Africa. The Taklimakan and Gobi deserts are two major dust sources in East Asia with long-range transport mainly occurring in spring. The large horizontal and vertical coverage of dust aerosols indicate their importance in the climate system through both direct and indirect aerosol effects.

  16. Influence of the inter tropical discontinuity on Harmattan dust deposition in Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyngsie, G.; Olsen, J. L.; Awadzi, T. W.; Fensholt, R.; Breuning-Madsen, H.

    2013-09-01

    The Harmattan is a dry dust-laden continental wind, and in the boreal winter Harmattan dust plumes affects many West African countries, including Ghana. When the Harmattan is strongest the southern part of Ghana is affected by the Inter Tropical Discontinuity (ITD). In this study, we investigate if the ITD functions as a barrier, preventing long transported Harmattan dust to settle south of, and below, it. This is done by analyzing a Harmattan dust outbreak, mapped using Earth observation (EO) data from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) onboard the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) platform, coupled with data from West African AERONET stations, and comparing these observations with wind data from NOAA's Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) program and the mineral suite of samples from seasonal dust deposits in north and south Ghana. In northern Ghana traces of minerals indicate a weak influence of particles from an arid environment, which is found consistent with the mapped dust plumes and NE wind directions. In southern Ghana the mineral composition show no sediments of an arid origin, the mapped dust plumes is less intense, and the surface wind directions and wind mass trajectories are more varying with lower wind speeds. Based on the results of this study it is concluded that dust deposited, or measured near ground, in the Harmattan period under the ITD, and south of it, does not contain material from the Chad Basin due to the local winds conditions.

  17. Relative Importance of Dust, Splash, and Sheet/Rill Transport Processes on Off-Highway Vehicle Trails in the Ouachita Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marion, D.; Phillips, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Sheet/rill erosion, dust displacement, and vehicle induced splash are the primary sediment transport processes on off-highway vehicle (OHV) trails in the Ouachita Mountains of the central United States. The relative importance of these three processes is assessed by comparing the area affected and the sediment connectivity of each process to affected streams using field data from the Wolf Pen Gap Trail Complex. The occurrence and areal extent of erosion processes were assessed using systematic transect measurements, feature inventories, and visual observation over representative trail segments. Sheet/rill erosion affects the entire denunded surface of the trail system, an area of 2,820 m2 km-1 of trail. Distinct erosion features created by sheet/rill erosion occur 16.3 times per km. Dust transport extends a mean travel distance of 3.7 m off-trail. Dust transport affects both the entire trail area and an additional 6,640 m2 km-1 of off-trail area. In contrast, splash transport was restricted to trail dips, and extends 1.6 m off-trail. Splash transport affects 60 m2 km-1of off-trail area.The impact of trail erosion increases where sediment sources are connected to drainageways. Of 480 sheet/rill erosion features rated, 69.4% had high to very high connectivity to channels. All sampled dips were directly connected to drainage ways. Dust transport affected 99% of dips on one trail side and 90% on both sides. About 80% of the dips had splash transport on one trail side and 42% on both sides.Sheet/rill, dust, and splash transport processes are all important in the Trail Complex, but for different reasons. Sheet/rill erosion affects the entire trail surface, is well connected to area drainageways, but only occurs after rainfall. Dust transport affects the largest area and occurs most often throughout the year, but the sediment is deposited diffusely, and the ratio delivered to the drainage network is relatively low. Splash affects the smallest area

  18. Spatial heterogeneity of Greenland ice-core dust composition and provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bory, A.; Biscaye, P.; Piotrowski, A.; Steffensen, J. P.

    2003-04-01

    By comparing mineralogical and isotopic (Sr and Nd) composition of mineral dust extracted from Greenland ice-cores and snow deposits with that of fine particles in sediment samples from potential source areas (PSA) for Greenland dust, it has been shown that eastern Asia was the source for central Greenland dust during several intervals of the last Glacial period [Biscaye et al., 1997; Svensson et al., 2000], in two intervals of the Holocene [Svensson, 1998], and through the present day [Bory et al., 2002; Bory et al., in press]. Based on transport patterns, it has often been suggested, however, that North American and African dust could reach the Greenland ice cap. Mosher et al. [1993], for instance, claimed to have identified an African source for a dust event at Dye 3 in southern Greenland. Identifying possible non-Asian dust sources to Greenland is important since it would bear on the large temporal variability of ice-core dust concentration, whose causes remain largely unexplained, as well as on the validation of dust transport models. Determining the degree of spatial heterogeneity of Greenland dust composition, and therefore provenance, can be done by analyzing contemporaneous dust samples in as many locations as possible. Here we report on six samples from six Greenland ice-cores, representing several decades of dust deposition each, all expect one within the 17th and 18th century. The six locations (Dye 3, A8-Crete region, Renland, GRIP, NorthGRIP, Hans Tausen) range from 65-82^oN and 27-43^oW. Variations in tracers composition (mineralogical and isotopic) are apparent, particularly between sites located on top of the ice cap and those located around the periphery, reflecting a distribution with altitude of dust sources and transport patterns to the ice-cap. The lower altitude sites are likely to be influenced by proximal dust sources. These results, however, confirm that long-range dust transport from eastern Asia is the main source of dust deposited on

  19. Potential Climate Effects of Dust Aerosols' over West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    JI, Z.; Wang, G.; Pal, J. S.; Yu, M.

    2014-12-01

    Climate in West Africa is under the influence of the West African monsoon circulation and mineral dust emitted from the Sahara desert (which is the world's largest source of mineral dust emission). Dust aerosols alter the atmospheric radiative fluxes and act as cloud condensation nuclei in the process of emission, transportation and deposition. However, our understanding regarding how dust aerosols influence the present-day and future climate of West Africa is very limited. In this study, a regional climate model RegCM4.3.4-CLM4.5 is used to investigate the potential climatic effects of dust aerosols both in present (1981-2000) and future (2081-2100) periods over WA. First, the model performance and dust climatic effects are evaluated. The contribution of dust climatic effects under RCP8.5 scenario and their confounding effects with land use change are assessed. Our results indicate that the model can reproduce with reasonable accuracy the spatial and temporal distribution of climatology, aerosol optical depth and surface concentration over WA. The shortwave radiative forcing of dust is negative in the surface and positive in the atmosphere, with greater changes in JJA and MAM compared to those in SON and DJF. Over most of West Africa, cooling is the dominant effect on temperature. Their impact on precipitation features a dipole pattern, with decrease in the north and increase in the south of West Africa. Despite the dust-induced decrease of precipitation amount, dusts cause extreme precipitation to increase. To evaluate the uncertainties surrounding our modeling results, sensitivity experiments driven by ICBC from MIROC-ESM and CESM and their dynamic downscaling results are used for comparisons. Results from these sensitivity experiments indicate that the impact of dust aerosols on present and future climate is robust.

  20. Regional transport of a chemically distinctive dust: Gypsum from White Sands, New Mexico (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Warren H.; Hyslop, Nicole P.; Trzepla, Krystyna; Yatkin, Sinan; Rarig, Randy S.; Gill, Thomas E.; Jin, Lixin

    2015-03-01

    The White Sands complex, a National Monument and adjoining Missile Range in southern New Mexico, occupies the dry bed of an ice-age lake where an active gypsum dunefield abuts erodible playa sediments. Aerosols entrained from White Sands are sometimes visible on satellite images as distinct, light-colored plumes crossing the Sacramento Mountains to the east and northeast. The IMPROVE network (Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environments) operates long-term aerosol samplers at two sites east of the Sacramento range. In recent years a spring pulse of sulfate aerosol has appeared at these sites, eclipsing the regional summer peak resulting from atmospheric reactions of sulfur dioxide emissions. A significant fraction of this spring sulfate is contributed by gypsum and other salts from White Sands, with much of the sulfur in coarse particles and concentrations of calcium and strontium above regional levels. The increase in these gypsiferous species coincides with a drought following a period of above-average precipitation. White Sands and the IMPROVE samplers together provide a natural laboratory: a climatically sensitive dust source that is both well characterized and chemically distinct from its surroundings, with a signature that remains identifiable at long-term observatories 100-200 km downwind.

  1. Dust transport and palaeoclimate during the Oldest Dryas in Central Europe - implications from varves (Lake Constance)

    SciTech Connect

    Niessen, F.; Lister, G.; Giovanoli, F.

    1992-10-01

    This paper evaluates evidence for seasonal loess deposits in peri-Alpine Lake Constance at the end of the last Glacial (Oldest Dryas chronozone). The sedimentology of laminated couplets comprising yellow and grey silts evaluates the couplets as varves comprising alternations of loess and glacial silt and clay. The laminae, less than 1 mm thick, include from bottom to top: (1) a matrix of well-sorted, non-graded fine yellow silt with sand-size intraclasts, (2) coarsening-upward grey silt with a cap of fining-upward silt to clay. This is typical and reflects summer and winter deposits (silt and clay, respectively). The authors propose that the lack of grading and the matrix supported fabric is indicative of aeolian transport and interpret the yellow laminae as loess deposits. Volcanic glass intraclasts in the loess layers are probably derived from volcanic terrain to the west of the lake, indicating an easterly palaeowind direction. Deposition of loess in the lake occurred regularly at the beginning of each annual cycle, suggesting the palaeowinds were associated with winter and/or spring conditions. Two transport scenarios are suggested to explain the sand grains scattered in this deep-water lacustrine record. 1. The grains may have been transported as bedload over the annual winter ice-cover of the lake under moderate wind strengths, frozen into the ice, and released for deposition during spring melt. 2. The sand grains were blown directly out onto the lake water by very strong winds during spring. The first scenario is contrary to the general view that loess was transported during summer, and that loess deposits thus reflect summer conditions only. Loess input to the lake shows a transitional decrease after ca. 14.3 kyr BP and cessation at ca. 14 kyr BP, probably as a result of a change of wind behaviour, increased humidity and/or vegetational changes during the Oldest Dryas in central Europe. 62 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Aerosol Impacts on California Winter Clouds and Precipitation during CalWater 2011: Local Pollution versus Long-Range Transported Dust

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; DeMott, Paul J.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Singh, Balwinder; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Tomlinson, Jason M.; White, Allen B.; Prather, Kimberly; Minnis, Patrick; Ayers, J. K.; Min, Qilong

    2014-01-03

    Mineral dust aerosols often observed over California in winter and spring, associated with long-range transport from Asia and Sahara, have been linked to enhanced precipitation based on observations. Local anthropogenic pollution, on the other hand, was shown in previous observational and modeling studies to reduce precipitation. Here we incorporate recent developments in ice nucleation parameterizations to link aerosols with ice crystal formation in a spectral-bin cloud microphysical model coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, to examine the relative and combined impacts of dust and local pollution particles on cloud properties and precipitation type and intensity. Simulations are carried out for two cloud cases with contrasting meteorology and cloud dynamics that occurred on February 16 (FEB16) and March 02 (MAR02) from the CalWater 2011 field campaign. In both cases, observations show the presence of dust and biological particles in a relative pristine environment. The simulated cloud microphysical properties and precipitation show reasonable agreement with aircraft and surface measurements. Model sensitivity experiments indicate that in the pristine environment, the dust and biological aerosol layers increase the accumulated precipitation by 10-20% from the Central Valley to the Sierra Nevada Mountains for both FEB16 and MAR02 due to a ~40% increase in snow formation, validating the observational hypothesis. Model results show that local pollution increases precipitation over the windward slope of the mountains by few percent due to increased snow formation when dust is present but reduces precipitation by 5-8% if dust is removed on FEB16. The effects of local pollution on cloud microphysics and precipitation strongly depend on meteorology including the strength of the Sierra Barrier Jet, and cloud dynamics. This study further underscores the importance of the interactions between local pollution, dust, and environmental conditions for

  3. 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy investigations of iron oxidation states in the Harmattan dust nutrient contribution to West African soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adetunji, Jacob

    2014-12-01

    A variety of investigations have been carried out on Harmattan dust over many decades demonstrating the continuing importance of the Harmattan dust phenomenon. The investigations have included elemental enrichment factors, mineralogical nutrient input through dust deposition on the soil, meteorological studies, etc. Harmattan dust is important, not only for its impact on radio communication and low visibility in the shipping lanes over the Atlantic, but also on the livelihood and health of people living in countries over which the dust-laden Harmattan wind blows. However, so far, the aspect of nutrient mineral deposition on the soil has not been thoroughly investigated and requires attention, since the majority of people living in West Africa rely heavily on agriculture. It is therefore relevant to know the useful nutrients in the Harmattan dust deposited on soils of the region. This study is therefore aimed at determining the ferric-ferrous ratio of the iron-bearing minerals contained in the Harmattan dust, so their nutritional contribution can be considered. The Mössbauer technique is a powerful tool for studying the ferric-ferrous ratio and has therefore been used, for the first time, to determine the oxidation states of iron in the dust samples. The results of the analysis show that the Harmattan dust is seriously deficient in ferrous iron, which is the more soluble Fe-ion, needed in the soil for healthy crops and plants in general.

  4. Physical and Radiative Properties of Aerosol Particles across the Caribbean Basin: A Comparison between Clean and Perturbed African Dust and Volcanic Ash Air Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, H.; Ogren, J. A.; Sheridan, P. J.; Mayol-Bracero, O.

    2009-12-01

    Aerosol’s optical and physical properties were measured during year 2007 at Cape San Juan, a ground-based station located at the northeastern tip of Puerto Rico. The three cases investigated were classified according to the origin of the air masses: clean (C), African dust (AD), and volcanic ash (VA). The instrumentation used included a sunphotometer to determine volume size distributions and aerosol optical thickness (AOT), a 3-wavelength nephelometer to determine the scattering coefficient (σsp), and a 3-wavelength particle/soot absorption photometer (PSAP) to measure the absorption coefficient (σap). The average volume size distributions were trimodal for the C (peaks at 0.14, 0.99 and 4.25 µm radius) and AD (peaks at 0.11, 1.30 and 2.00 µm radius) cases and bimodal for the VA (peaks at 0.19 and 2.75 µm radius) case. Fine and coarse modes maxima for AD occurred at radii smaller than for VA, confirming the different origins of those particles. The average values for the total σsp were higher for AD (82.9 Mm-1) and VA (33.7 Mm-1) compared to C (16.6 Mm-1). The same happened for the AOT maximum values at 500 nm with 0.92, 0.30, and 0.06 for AD, VA, and C, respectively. The observed increase in the values of the Angstrom exponent (å) is indicative of a decrease in the size of the particles associated to VA (å= 0.27) and AD (å =0.89) when compared to C (å =0.24). The volume size distributions and thus the mass were dominated by the coarse mode (> 1.0 µm) especially for the AD case. Results have shown that AD as well as VA has a significant impact on the physical and radiative properties across Puerto Rico and the Caribbean. Additional results on the AOT wavelength dependence and on the annual variability of the properties under study will be presented.

  5. Principal component analysis of the evolution of the Saharan air layer and dust transport: Comparisons between a model simulation and MODIS and AIRS retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Sun; Colarco, Peter R.; Dessler, Andrew E.

    2006-10-01

    The onset and evolution of Saharan air layer (SAL) episodes during June-September 2002 are diagnosed by applying principal component analysis to the NCEP reanalysis temperature anomalies at 850 hPa, where the largest SAL-induced temperature anomalies are located along the west coast of Africa. The first principal component (PC) represents the onset of SAL episodes, which are associated with large warm anomalies located at the west coast of Africa. The second PC represents two opposite phases of the evolution of the SAL. The positive phase corresponds to the southwestward migration of the warm anomalies into the tropical-subtropical North Atlantic Ocean, and the negative phase corresponds to the northwestward migration into the subtropical to midlatitude North Atlantic Ocean and the southwest Europe. AIRS retrievals of temperatures in September 2002 verify the migration depicted by the second PC. In addition, a dust transport model (CARMA) and the MODIS retrievals of aerosol optical thickness are used to study the associated effects on dust distribution and deposition. The positive (negative) phase of the second PC corresponds to a strengthening (weakening) of the offshore flows in the lower troposphere around 10-20°N, causing more (less) dust being transported toward the tropical North Atlantic Ocean. The 700-hPa anticyclonic circulation associated with the warm anomalies plays a role in connecting the dust with the warm anomalies.

  6. Role of volcanic dust in the atmospheric transport and deposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and mercury.

    PubMed

    Stracquadanio, Milena; Dinelli, Enrico; Trombini, Claudio

    2003-12-01

    The role of volcanic ash as scavenger of atmospheric pollutants, in their transport and final deposition to the ground is examined. Attention is focused on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and on particulate mercury (Hgp). The ash-fall deposits studied belong to the 2001 and 2002 eruptive activity of Mount Etna, Southern Italy, and were investigated at three (2001) and four (2002) sites downwind of the major tephra dispersal pattern. The dry deposition of mercury and PAHs was determined, and, in particular, a downward flux to the ground of PAHs (approximately 7.29 microg m(-2) per day) and mercury (750 ng m(-2) per day) was estimated in Catania from October 26 to October 28, 2002. Finally, evidence on the anthropogenic origin of PAHs scavenged from the troposphere by volcanic ash is supported by the analysis of PAH compositions in granulometrically homogeneous fractions.

  7. Evolution of particulate sulfate and nitrate along the Asian dust pathway: Secondary transformation and primary pollutants via long-range transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiongzhen; Zhuang, Guoshun; Huang, Kan; Liu, Tingna; Lin, Yanfen; Deng, Congrui; Fu, Qingyan; Fu, Joshua S.; Chen, Jiakuan; Zhang, Wenjie; Yiming, Mijiti

    2016-03-01

    Both PM2.5 and TSP over Yulin, a rural site near the Asian dust source region, were collected from 2007 to 2009. Characteristics, sources, and formation mechanisms of sulfate and nitrate were investigated. SO42 - displayed a distinct seasonal variation with the highest average concentration observed in summer when SO42 - accounted for an average of 14.1% and 13.7% of the PM2.5 and PMcoarse mass concentrations, respectively. Ambient temperature and relative humidity were two important factors influencing the formation processes of SO42 - and NO3-. In summer, the high concentrations of SO42 - in PM2.5 were probably from the gas phase oxidation of SO2, while the low concentrations of NO3- in PM2.5 were attributed to the high temperature that was not favorable for the formation of NH4NO3. In spring, autumn, and winter, SO42 - and NO3- were significantly enhanced in those days with high relative humidity, implying that in-cloud/aqueous processing dominated the formations of SO42 - and NO3-. Different from PM2.5 in which NH4+ acted as the dominant neutralizer for acids, alkaline species such as Ca2 + and Mg2 + played an important role in the formation of sulfate and nitrate salts in coarse particles throughout the whole year. During the dust event days, SO42 - in coarse particles significantly increased, while black carbon and NO3- largely decreased, suggesting that the primary mineral dust could be one of the major sources of SO42 -. By comparing the mass ratio of SO42 -/3/S in the dust aerosols of Yulin with different dust source regions (i.e., Taklimakan Desert and Gobi Desert) and the application of air mass backward trajectory analysis, it was found the long-range transported dust from the Taklimakan Desert, which was rich in primary sulfate due to its paleo-ocean characteristics, was a non-negligible source of SO42 - over Yulin. In spring and winter, the prevailing northerlies and northwesterlies promoted chemical interaction between alkaline mineral dust and acid

  8. ABCC5 transporter is a novel type 2 diabetes susceptibility gene in European and African American populations.

    PubMed

    Direk, Kenan; Lau, Winston; Small, Kerrin S; Maniatis, Nikolas; Andrew, Toby

    2014-09-01

    Numerous functional studies have implicated PARL in relation to type 2 diabetes (T2D). We hypothesised that conflicting human association studies may be due to neighbouring causal variants being in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with PARL. We conducted a comprehensive candidate gene study of the extended LD genomic region that includes PARL and transporter ABCC5 using three data sets (two European and one African American), in relation to healthy glycaemic variation, visceral fat accumulation and T2D disease. We observed no evidence for previously reported T2D association with Val262Leu or PARL using array and fine-map genomic and expression data. By contrast, we observed strong evidence of T2D association with ABCC5 (intron 26) for European and African American samples (P = 3E-07) and with ABCC5 adipose expression in Europeans [odds ratio (OR) = 3.8, P = 2E-04]. The genomic location estimate for the ABCC5 functional variant, associated with all phenotypes and expression data (P = 1E-11), was identical for all samples (at Chr3q 185,136 kb B36), indicating that the risk variant is an expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) with increased expression conferring risk of disease. That the association with T2D is observed in populations of disparate ancestry suggests the variant is a ubiquitous risk factor for T2D. PMID:25117150

  9. The global distribution of mineral dust and its impacts on the climate system: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choobari, O. Alizadeh; Zawar-Reza, P.; Sturman, A.

    2014-03-01

    Mineral dust aerosols, the tiny soil particles suspended in the atmosphere, have a key role in the atmospheric radiation budget and hydrological cycle through their radiative and cloud condensation nucleus effects. Current understanding of spatial and temporal variations of mineral dust, as well as its impacts on the climate system and cloud properties is outlined. Mineral dust aerosols are blown into the atmosphere mainly from arid and semi-arid regions where annual rainfall is extremely low and substantial amounts of alluvial sediment have been accumulated over long periods. They are subject to long-range transport of an intercontinental scale, including North African dust plumes over the Atlantic Ocean, summer dust plumes from the Arabian Peninsula over the Arabian Sea and Indian Ocean and spring dust plumes from East Asia over the Pacific Ocean. Mineral dust aerosols influence the climate system and cloud microphysics in multiple ways. They disturb the climate system directly by scattering and partly absorbing shortwave and longwave radiation, semi-directly by changing the atmospheric cloud cover through evaporation of cloud droplets (i.e. the cloud burning effect), and indirectly by acting as cloud and ice condensation nuclei, which changes the optical properties of clouds (i.e. the first indirect effect), and may decrease or increase precipitation formation (i.e. the second indirect effect). Radiative forcing by mineral dust is associated with changes in atmospheric dynamics that may change the vertical profile of temperature and wind speed, through which a feedback effect on dust emission can be established.

  10. Grain-size signature of Saharan dust over the Atlantic Ocean at 12°N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Does, Michelle; Korte, Laura; Munday, Chris; Brummer, Geert-Jan; Stuut, Jan-Berend

    2015-04-01

    Every year, an estimated 200 million tons of Saharan dust are deposited in the Atlantic Ocean. On its way from source to sink, the dust can be influenced by many climatic processes, but it also affects climate itself in various ways that are far from understood. In order to constrain the relations between atmospheric dust and climate, we deployed ten submarine sediment traps along a transect in the Atlantic Ocean at 12˚N, at 1200m and 3500m water depth. These have been sampling Saharan dust settling in the ocean since October 2012. Samples of seven of these sediment traps have been successfully recovered during RV Pelagia cruise 64PE378 in November 2013. The transect also includes three floating dust collectors and two on-land dust collectors, and all the instruments lie directly underneath the largest dust plume originating from the African continent. This study focuses on the size of the dust particles, which can have an effect on the positive or negative radiation balance in the atmosphere. Small particles in the high atmosphere can reflect incoming radiation and therefore have a cooling effect on climate. Large particles in the lower atmosphere have the opposite effect by absorbing reflected radiation from the Earth's surface. Mineral dust also affects carbon export to the deep ocean by providing mineral ballast for organic particles, and the size of the dust particles directly relates to the downward transport velocity. Here I will present the measured grain-size distributions of samples from seven sediment traps recovered from the 12°N-latitude transect. The data show seasonal variations, with finer grained dust particles during winter and spring, and coarser grained particles during summer and fall. Samples from multiple years should give more details about the dust's seasonality. Also a fining trend of the grain sizes of the dust particles from source (Africa) to sink (Caribbean) is observed, which is also expected due to intuitive relationships between

  11. The global dispersion of microorganisms and pollutants in clouds of desert dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, D. W.; Kellogg, C. A.; Garrison, V. H.; Kubilay, N.; Kocak, M.; Shinn, E.

    2003-12-01

    A current estimate of the quantity of dust that is transported some distance in Earth's atmosphere each year is approximately two billion metric tons. Whereas various research projects have been undertaken to understand this planetary process, little has been done to address public and ecosystem health issues. Our research group is currently investigating long-range transport of microorganisms associated with desert dust clouds at various points on the globe via the integration of remote sensing, modeling and microbiological assays. Using a suite of molecular biology techniques, we are identifying cultivable bacteria and fungi and enumerating total bacteria and viruses. Research results indicate that approximately 30% of the microorganisms found in Earth's atmosphere during `African dust events' are species of bacteria or fungi that have previously been identified as disease causing agents in terrestrial plants, trees, and animals. This presentation will cover historical research in this field and the implications of microbial and pollutant \\(metals, pesticides, etc.\\) transport to downwind ecosystems.

  12. Dust Episodes in Hong Kong (South China) and their Relationship with the Sharav and Mongolian Cyclones and Jet Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Y. C.; Wenig, Mark; Zhang, Zhenxi; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Larko, Dave; Diehl, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The study presented in this paper analyses two dust episodes in Hong Kong, one occurring in March 2006 and the other on 22 March 2010. The latter is the worst dust episode on Hong Kong record. The focus is on the relationship between the dust episodes and the Sharav/Mongolian cyclones and jet streams. The 16 March 2006 episode is traceable to a continental-scale Saharan dust outbreak of 5-9 March 2006 caused by the cold front of an East Mediterranean Sharav cyclone arriving at north-west Africa on 5 March 2006. The eastward movement of the cyclone along the North African coast is clearly illustrated in the geopotential height contours. Simulations by the chemistry transport model GOCART provide a visible evidence of the transport as well as an estimate of contributions from the Sahara to the aerosol concentration levels in Hong Kong. The transport simulations suggest that the dust is injected to the polar jet north of the Caspian Sea, while it is transported eastward simultaneously by the more southerly subtropical jet. The major source of dust for Hong Kong is usually the Gobi desert. Despite the effect of remote sources, the 16 March 2006 dust episode was still mainly under the influence of the Mongolian cyclone cold fronts. In the recent episode of 22 March 2010, the influence of the Mongolian cyclone predominated as well. It appears that the concurrent influence of the Sharav and Mongolian cyclones on Hong Kong and East Asia is not a common occurrence. Besides transporting dusts from non-East Asian sources to Hong Kong and East Asia, the strong subtropical jet on 21 March 2010 (i.e. 1 day prior to the major dust episode) is believed to have strengthened an easterly monsoon surge to South China causing the transport of voluminous dusts to Taiwan and Hong Kong the following day.

  13. Dust aerosol characterization and transport features based on combined ground-based, satellite and model-simulated data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, K.; Devara, P. C. S.; Rao, S. Vijaya Bhaskara; Jayasankar, C. K.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we study aerosol characteristics over an urban station in Western India, during a dust event that occurred between 19 and 26 March 2012, with the help of ground-based and satellite measurements and model simulation data. The aerosol parameters are found to change significantly during dust events and they suggest dominance of coarse mode aerosols. The fine mode fraction, size distribution and single scattering albedo reveal that dust (natural) aerosols dominate the anthropogenic aerosols over the study region. Ground-based measurements show drastic reduction in visibility on the dust-laden day (22 March 2012). Additionally, HYSPLIT model and satellite daily data have been used to trace the source, path and spatial extent of dust storm events. Most of the dust aerosols, during the study period, travel from west-to-east pathway from source-to-sink region. Furthermore, aerosol vertical profiles from CALIPSO and synoptic meteorological parameters from ECMWF re-analysis data reveal a layer of thick dust extending from surface to an altitude of about 4 km, and decrease in temperature and increase in specific humidity, respectively. The aerosol radiative forcing calculations indicate more cooling at the surface and warming in the atmosphere during dust event. The results of satellite observations are found to have good consistency with ground-based air quality measurements. Synthesis of satellite data integrated with ground-based observations, supplemented by model analysis, is found to be a promising technique for improved understanding of dust storm phenomenon and its impact on regional climate.

  14. Sources and transport of dust to East Antarctica: new insights from high-resolution terrestrial and marine aerosol records from the Talos Dome ice core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüpbach, S.; Federer, U.; Albani, S.; Barbante, C.; Stocker, T. F.; Fischer, H.

    2013-06-01

    In this study we report on new non-sea salt calcium (nssCa2+, mineral dust proxy) and sea salt sodium (ssNa+, sea ice proxy) records along the East Antarctic Talos Dome deep ice core in centennial resolution reaching back 150 thousand years before present. During glacial conditions nssCa2+ fluxes in Talos Dome are strongly related to temperature as has been observed before in other deep Antarctic ice core records, and has been associated with synchronous changes in the main source region (southern South America) during climate variations in the last glacial. However, during warmer climate conditions Talos Dome mineral dust input is clearly elevated compared to other records mainly due to the contribution of additional local dust sources in the Ross Sea area. Based on a simple transport model we compare nssCa2+ fluxes of different East Antarctic ice cores. From this multi-site comparison we conclude that changes in transport efficiency or atmospheric lifetime of dust particles do have a minor effect compared to source strength changes on the large scale concentration changes observed in Antarctic ice cores during climate variations of the past 150 thousand years. Our transport model applied on ice core data only so far is further validated by climate model data. The availability of multiple East Antarctic nssCa2+ records allows for a revision of a former estimate on the atmospheric CO2 sensitivity to reduced dust induced iron fertilisation in the Southern Ocean (SO) during the transition from the Last Glacial Maximum to the Holocene (T1). While the former estimate based on the EDC record only suggested 20 ppm, we find reduced dust induced iron fertilisation in the SO to be responsible for up to 40 ppm of the total atmospheric CO2 increase during T1. During the last interglacial, ssNa+ levels of EDC and EDML are only half of the Holocene levels, in line with higher temperatures during that period, indicating much reduced sea ice extent in the Atlantic as well as the

  15. Saharan dust clouds and human health in the English-speaking Caribbean: what we know and don't know.

    PubMed

    Monteil, Michele A

    2008-08-01

    Dust clouds travel across the Atlantic to the Americas and the Caribbean Islands. This long-range transport of dust leads to clouds that are enriched with small particles less than 10 microm aerodynamic diameter (PM10) which can reach human airways. The dust clouds also bring pollen, microbes, insects and chemicals, all of which could potentially have a negative impact on human health. This has led to a small number of retrospective studies being conducted on the islands of Barbados and Trinidad to look at possible associations between dust cover and acute asthma admissions to Emergency Rooms. The results have been conflicting. This review examines these studies, offers possible explanations for the differences in results, and suggests that there is a need for a prospective Caribbean-wide study to assess fully any relationship between African dust clouds and human respiratory and cardiovascular diseases.

  16. Mineral dust events over the Mediterranean: Multi-platform characterization and comparison with GEOS-Chem simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, K. S.; Luo, G.; Yu, F.; Aerosol Microphysics Research Group

    2011-12-01

    Kevin S. Bartlett, Gan Luo, and Fangqun Yu Atmospheric Sciences Research Center, State University of New York, 251 Fuller Road, Albany, New York 12203, USA Abstract. The Mediterranean Basin (MB) has a population of 210 million with approximately 50% living within the eastern half of the MB where seasonal lows tracking southeastward across Italy transport climate impacting, visibility and air quality reducing mineral dust from North African deserts. Located 1000 km NE of African dust and 400 km SE of Greek population centers, Crete is uniquely located at a crossroads of the seasonal storm track and a mineral dust pathway recording some of the highest average AODs within the region, and is well instrumented to observe this trend. Investigating dust transport using NCEP reanalysis data, surface based METAR, AERONET and SMPS as well as space based MODIS, MISR and CALIPSO observations coupled with nested GEOS-Chem-APM simulations, this study exploits sensor strengths while noting weaknesses to characterize seasonal trends and individual dust events. To verify seasonal trends, METAR, AERONET and NCEP data were collected over Crete from 2003-2010. This 8 year period showed that the majority of large aerosol events occurred during late winter and early spring during passage of transitional low pressure systems. During 2009, newly released, SMPS particle size distribution measurements were acquired from Finokalia. These in situ measurements coupled with the observation collective were key to confirming dust events and for comparing the nested GEOS-Chem's particle size distribution and AOD simulations, which showed some skill capturing dust events as well as the seasonal dust peaks early in the year. In this study we exploited the strengths of the observation collective and model runs to prove seasonal North African dust transport across Crete. We also noted the limitations of surface based: point observations, limited to localized conditions of transport and fallout, where

  17. Haul road dust control

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, W.R.; Organiscak, J.A.

    2007-10-15

    A field study was conducted to measure dust from haul trucks at a limestone quarry and a coal preparation plant waste hauling operation. The study found that primarily wind, distance and road treatment conditions notably affected the dust concentrations at locations next to, 50 ft from, and 100 ft away from the unpaved haulage road. Airborne dust measured along the unpaved haul road showed that high concentrations of fugitive dust can be generated with these concentrations rapidly decreasing to nearly background levels within 100 ft of the road. Instantaneous respirable dust measurements illustrated that the trucks generate a real-time dust cloud that has a peak concentration with a time-related decay rate as the dust moves past the sampling locations. The respirable dust concentrations and peak levels were notably diminished as the dust cloud was transported, diluted, and diffused by the wind over the 100 ft distance from the road. Individual truck concentrations and peak levels measured next to the dry road surface test section were quite variable and dependent on wind conditions, particularly wind direction, with respect to reaching the sampling location. The vast majority of the fugitive airborne dust generated from unpaved and untreated haulage roads was non-respirable. 6 figs.

  18. A new offline dust cycle model that includes dynamic vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Sarah; Lunt, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Current offline dust cycle models are unable to predict variability in the extent of arid and semi-arid regions caused by the transient response of vegetation cover to the climate. As a consequence, it is not possible to test whether inter-annual variability in the dust loading is caused by vegetation changes or other processes. A new dust cycle model is presented which uses the Lund-Potsdam-Jena dynamic global vegetation model (Sitch et al., 2003) to calculate time varying dust sources. Surface emissions are calculated by simulating the processes of saltation and sandblasting (Tegen et al., 2002). Dust particles are transported as independent tracers within the TOMCAT chemical transport (Chipperfield, 2006). Dust is removed from the atmosphere by gravitational settling and sub-cloud scavenging. To improve the performance of the model, threshold values for vegetation cover, soil moisture, snow depth and threshold friction velocity, used to determine surface emissions are tuned. The effectiveness of three sub-cloud scavenging schemes are also tested. The tuning experiments are evaluated against multiple measurement datasets. The tuned model is used to investigate whether changes in vegetation cover in the Sahel can explain the four-fold increase in dust concentrations measured at Barbados during the 1980s relative to the 1960s (Prospero and Nees, 1986). Results show there was an expansion of the Sahara in 1984 relative to 1966 resulting in a doubling of emissions from the Sahel. However, this alone is not enough to account for the high dust concentrations measured at Barbados. This finding adds strength to the hypothesis that human induced soil degradation in North Africa may be responsible for the increase in high dust concentrations at Barbados during the 1980s relative to the 1960s. Chipperfield, M. P. (2006). "New version of the TOMCAT/SLIMCAT off-line chemical transport model: Intercomparison of stratospheric tracer experiments." Quarterly Journal of the Royal

  19. Global dust model intercomparison in AeroCom phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Huneeus, N.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Griesfeller, J.; Prospero, J.; Kinne, S.; Bauer, S.; Boucher, O.; Chin, M.; Dentener, F.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R.; Fillmore, D.; Ghan, S.; Ginoux, P.; Grini, A.; Horowitz, L.; Koch, D.; Krol, M. C.; Landing, W.; Liu, X.; Mahowald, N.; Miller, R.; Morcrette, J. -J.; Myhre, G.; Penner, J.; Perlwitz, J.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Zender, C. S.

    2011-08-01

    This study presents the results of a broad intercomparison of a total of 15 global aerosol models within the AeroCom project. Each model is compared to observations related to desert dust aerosols, their direct radiative effect, and their impact on the biogeochemical cycle, i.e., aerosol optical depth (AOD) and dust deposition. Additional comparisons to Angström exponent (AE), coarse mode AOD and dust surface concentrations are included to extend the assessment of model performance and to identify common biases present in models. These data comprise a benchmark dataset that is proposed for model inspection and future dust model development. There are large differences among the global models that simulate the dust cycle and its impact on climate. In general, models simulate the climatology of vertically integrated parameters (AOD and AE) within a factor of two whereas the total deposition and surface concentration are reproduced within a factor of 10. In addition, smaller mean normalized bias and root mean square errors are obtained for the climatology of AOD and AE than for total deposition and surface concentration. Characteristics of the datasets used and their uncertainties may influence these differences. Large uncertainties still exist with respect to the deposition fluxes in the southern oceans. Further measurements and model studies are necessary to assess the general model performance to reproduce dust deposition in ocean regions sensible to iron contributions. Models overestimate the wet deposition in regions dominated by dry deposition. They generally simulate more realistic surface concentration at stations downwind of the main sources than at remote ones. Most models simulate the gradient in AOD and AE between the different dusty regions. However the seasonality and magnitude of both variables is better simulated at African stations than Middle East ones. The models simulate the offshore transport of West Africa throughout the year but they

  20. Observation of chemical modification of Asian Dust particles during long-range transport by the combined use of quantitative ED-EPMA and ATR-FT-IR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Young-Chul; Eom, Hyo-Jin; Jung, Hae-Jin; Malek, Md Abdul; Kim, HyeKyeong; Ro, Chul-Un

    2012-10-01

    In our previous works, it was demonstrated that the combined use of quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA), which is also known as low-Z particle EPMA, and attenuated total reflectance FT-IR (ATR-FT-IR) imaging has great potential for a detailed characterization of individual aerosol particles. In this study, individual Asian Dust particles collected during an Asian Dust storm event on 11 November 2011 in Korea were characterized by the combined use of low-Z particle EPMA and ATR-FT-IR imaging. The combined use of the two single-particle analytical techniques on the same individual particles showed that Asian Dust particles had experienced extensive chemical modification during long-range transport. Overall, 109 individual particles were classified into four particle types based on their morphology, elemental concentrations, and molecular species and/or functional groups of individual particles available from the two analytical techniques: Ca-containing (38%); NaNO3-containing (30%); silicate (22%); and miscellaneous particles (10%). Among the 41 Ca-containing particles, 10, 8, and 14 particles contained nitrate, sulfate, and both, respectively, whereas only two particles contained unreacted CaCO3. Airborne amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) particles were observed in this Asian Dust sample for the first time, where their IR peaks for the insufficient symmetric environment of CO32- ions of ACC were clearly differentiated from those of crystalline CaCO3. This paper also reports the field observations of CaCl2 particles converted from CaCO3 for the Asian Dust sample collected in the planetary boundary layer. Thirty three particles contained NaNO3, which are the reaction products of sea-salt and NOx/HNO3, whereas no genuine sea-salt particles were encountered, indicating that sea-salt particles are more reactive than CaCO3 particles. Some silicate particles were observed to contain nitrate, sulfate, and water. Among 24 silicate

  1. Dust storm monitoring: effects on the environment, human health, and potential security conflicts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davara, Fernando; de la Cruz, Antonio

    2004-10-01

    Monitoring dust storms with recently available medium and moderate resolution satellites (Meris, Modis and SeaWiFS) is providing new global information regarding the sources, transportation tracks and affected areas. Saharan dust plumes reach the SE region of the United States and the Caribbean region in summer and the Amazon basin in winter. Generally these Saharan plumes branch off in dust tracks along the North Atlantic reaching Western Europe as far north as the Scandinavian countries. Furthermore, dust storms originating in the Eastern Sahara and Northern African deserts form dust plumes propagated by the Sirocco winds that, after crossing the Mediterranean Sea, affect Southern and Central Europe particularly during spring and summer. Dust storms originating in the Gobi and Taklamakan deserts blow in an easterly direction propagating dust plumes affecting Korea, Japan and reach the United States after crossing the Pacific Ocean. The large amount of cyclic deposition generated by dust storms produces an environmental impact that causes the decay of coral reefs in the Caribbean, the origin and distribution of red tides and the disappearance of sea grasses. The relationship of dust plumes with the increasing number of asthma and allergy cases in the Caribbean correlates well with the appearance of similar cases in Europe and elsewhere during the mid 1980s. The recurrence presence of insecticides in regions where these products were banned long ago, or where they were never used, may be partly due to Saharan dust plumes. The loss of agricultural soil, literally blown away by dust storms in the source areas, creates hardship, hunger and forced-migration. Dust storms should be considered as an important security issue.

  2. Ice Nucleating Particle Properties in the Saharan Air Layer Close to the Dust Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boose, Y.; Garcia, I. M.; Rodríguez, S.; Linke, C.; Schnaiter, M.; Nickovic, S.; Lohmann, U.; Kanji, Z. A.; Sierau, B.

    2015-12-01

    In August 2013 and 2014 measurements of ice nucleating particle (INP) concentrations, aerosol particle size distributions, chemistry and fluorescence were conducted at the Izaña Atmospheric Observatory located at 2373 m asl on Tenerife, west off the African shore. During summer, the observatory is frequently within the Saharan Air Layer and thus often exposed to dust. Absolute INP concentrations and activated fractions at T=-40 to -15°C and RHi=100-150 % were measured. In this study, we discuss the in-situ measured INP properties with respect to changes in the chemical composition, the biological content, the source regions as well as transport pathways and thus aging processes of the dust aerosol. For the first time, ice crystal residues were also analyzed with regard to biological content by means of their autofluorescence signal close to a major dust source region. Airborne dust samples were collected with a cyclone for additional offline analysis in the laboratory under similar conditions as in the field. Both, in-situ and offline dust samples were chemically characterized using single-particle mass spectrometry. The DREAM8 dust model extended with dust mineral fractions was run to simulate meteorological and dust aerosol conditions for ice nucleation. Results show that the background aerosol at Izaña was dominated by carbonaceous particles, which were hardly ice-active under the investigated conditions. When Saharan dust was present, INP concentrations increased by up to two orders of magnitude even at water subsaturated conditions at T≤-25°C. Differences in the ice-activated fraction were found between different dust periods which seem to be linked to variations in the aerosol chemical composition (dust mixed with changing fractions of sea salt and differences in the dust aerosol itself). Furthermore, two biomass burning events in 2014 were identified which led to very low INP concentrations under the investigated temperature and relative humidity

  3. The link between marine sediment records and changes in Holocene Saharan landscape: simulating the dust cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egerer, Sabine; Claussen, Martin; Reick, Christian; Stanelle, Tanja

    2016-04-01

    Marine sediment records reveal an abrupt and strong increase in dust deposition in the North Atlantic at the end of the African Humid Period about 4.9 to 5.5 ka ago. The change in dust flux has been attributed to varying Saharan land surface cover. Alternatively, the enhanced dust accumulation is linked to enhanced surface winds and a consequent intensification of coastal upwelling. Here we demonstrate for the first time the direct link between dust accumulation in marine cores and changes in Saharan land surface. We simulate the mid-Holocene (6 ka BP) and pre-industrial (1850 AD) dust cycle as a function of Saharan land surface cover and atmosphere-ocean conditions using the coupled atmosphere-aerosol model ECHAM6.1-HAM2.1. Mid-Holocene surface characteristics, including vegetation cover and lake surface area, are derived from proxy data and simulations. In agreement with data from marine sediment cores, our simulations show that mid-Holocene dust deposition fluxes in the North Atlantic were two to three times lower compared with pre-industrial fluxes. We identify Saharan land surface characteristics to be the main control on dust transport from North Africa to the North Atlantic. We conclude that the increase in dust accumulation in marine cores is directly linked to a transition of the Saharan landscape during the Holocene and not due to changes in atmospheric or ocean conditions alone.

  4. Neurotoxic Potential of Lunar and Martian Dust: Influence on Em, Proton Gradient, Active Transport, and Binding of Glutamate in Rat Brain Nerve Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Krisanova, Natalia; Kasatkina, Ludmila; Sivko, Roman; Borysov, Arseniy; Nazarova, Anastasiya; Slenzka, Klaus; Borisova, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The harmful effects of lunar dust (LD) on directly exposed tissues are documented in the literature, whereas researchers are only recently beginning to consider its effects on indirectly exposed tissues. During inhalation, nano-/microsized particles are efficiently deposited in nasal, tracheobronchial, and alveolar regions and transported to the central nervous system. The neurotoxic potential of LD and martian dust (MD) has not yet been assessed. Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter involved in most aspects of normal brain function, whereas disturbances in glutamate homeostasis contribute to the pathogenesis of major neurological disorders. The research was focused on the analysis of the effects of LD/MD simulants (JSC-1a/JSC, derived from volcanic ash) on the key characteristics of glutamatergic neurotransmission. The average size of LD and MD particles (even minor fractions) before and after sonication was determined by dynamic light scattering. With the use of radiolabeled l-[14C]glutamate, it was shown that there is an increase in l-[14C]glutamate binding to isolated rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) in low [Na+] media and at low temperature in the presence of LD. MD caused significantly lesser changes under the same conditions, whereas nanoparticles of magnetite had no effect at all. Fluorimetric experiments with potential-sensitive dye rhodamine 6G and pH-sensitive dye acridine orange showed that the potential of the plasma membrane of the nerve terminals and acidification of synaptic vesicles were not altered by LD/MD (and nanoparticles of magnetite). Thus, the unique effect of LD to increase glutamate binding to the nerve terminals was shown. This can have deleterious effects on extracellular glutamate homeostasis in the central nervous system and cause alterations in the ambient level of glutamate, which is extremely important for proper synaptic transmission. During a long-term mission, a combination of constant irritation

  5. Effects of Spatial Resolution on the Simulated Dust Aerosol Lifecycle: Implications for Dust Event Magnitude and Timing in the NASA GEOS-5 AGCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowottnick, E.; Colarco, Peter R.; daSilva, A.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA GEOS-5 atmospheric transport model simulates global aerosol distributions with an online aerosol module. GEOS-5 may be run at various horizontal spatial resolutions depending on the research application. For example, long integration climate simulations are typically run at 2 deg or 1 deg grid spacing, whereas aerosol reanalysis and forecasting applications may be performed at O.5 deg or 0.25 deg resolutions. In this study, we assess the implications of varying spatial resolution on the simulated aerosol fields, with a particular focus on dust. Dust emissions in GEOS-5 are calculated with one of two parameterizations, one based on the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport (GO CART) model and another based on the Dust Entrainment and Deposition (DEAD) model. Emission fluxes are parameterized in terms of the surface wind speed, either the 10-m (GO CART) or friction (DEAD) wind speed. We consider how surface wind speeds and thus the dust emission rates are a function of the model spatial resolution. We find that spatial resolution has a significant effect on the magnitude of dust emissions, as higher resolution versions of the model have typically higher surface wind speeds. Utilizing space-borne observations from MISR, MODIS, and CALIOP, we find that simulated Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) distributions respond differently to spatial resolution over the African and Asian source regions, highlighting the need to regional dust emission tuning. When compared to ground-based observations from AERONET, we found improved timing of dust events with as spatial resolution was increased. In an attempt to improve the representation of the dust aerosol lifecycle at coarse resolutions, we found that incorporating the effects of sub-grid wind variability in a course resolution simulation led to improved agreement with observed AOT magnitudes, but did not impact the timing of simulated dust events.

  6. The long-range transport of southern African aerosols to the tropical South Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swap, R.; Garstang, M.; Macko, S. A.; Tyson, P. D.; Maenhaut, W.; Artaxo, P.; KâLlberg, P.; Talbot, R.

    1996-10-01

    Two episodes of long-range aerosol transport (4000 km) from southern Africa into the central tropical South Atlantic are documented. Stable nitrogen isotope analysis, multielemental analysis, and meteorological observations on local and regional scales are used to describe the observed surface aerosol chemistry during these transport episodes. The chemical, kinematic, and thermodynamic analyses suggest that for the central tropical South Atlantic, west Africa between 0° and 10°S is the primary air mass source region (over 50%) during austral spring. Over 70% of all air arriving in the lower and middle troposphere in the central tropical South Atlantic comes from a broad latitudinal band extending from 20°S to 10°N. Air coming from the east subsides and is trapped below the midlevel and trade wind inversion layers. Air from the west originates at higher levels (500 hPa) and contributes less than 30% of the air masses arriving in the central tropical South Atlantic. The source types of aerosols and precursor trace gases extend over a broad range of biomes from desert and savanna to the rain forest. During austral spring, over this broad region, processes include production from vegetation, soils, and biomass burning. The aerosol composition of air masses over and the atmospheric chemistry of the central South Atlantic is a function of the supply of biogenic, biomass burning, and aeolian emissions from tropical Africa. Rainfall is a common controlling factor for all three sources. Rain, in turn, is governed by the large-scale circulations which show pronounced interannual variability. The field measurements were taken in an extremely dry year and reflect the circulation and transport fields typical of these conditions.

  7. The interaction of the sea breezes with the boundary layer along the Red Sea coast and its effect on the dust transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Basit Ali; Stenchikov, Georgiy; Abualnaja, Yasser

    2013-04-01

    Sea and land breezes are common meteorological phenomena in most coastal regions of the world. The thermally induced mesoscale circulation of sea breezes modifies the planetary boundary layer (PBL) by forming a convective internal boundary layer (CIBL), which can trap dust and other pollutants in the thin convective layer while the return flow can transport dust and pollutants from the land towards the sea. We used the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) modeling system to study the structure and dynamics of sea breezes in the middle region of the Red Sea (around 25°N) on the western coast of Saudi Arabia. Results showed the existence of two thermal circulations on both the western and eastern coasts of the Red Sea. The modeling results are consistent with observations from buoys and meteorological towers along the Saudi Arabian coast and suggest that the onset of the sea breeze in this area typically occurs at about 0800 Local Standard Time (LST). The sea breeze decays after 1700 LST, although the timing of the onset and decay could be affected by the sea-land thermal gradient, topography, the sea-land orientation and the direction and strength of the wind. The depth of the predicted inflow layer reaches one kilometer while the height of sea breeze head may reach three kilometers. The rocky mountain range of Al-Sarawat, along the Saudi coast line, restricts the inland propagation of the sea breeze and significantly affects the structure of the flow. We conducted a detailed process analysis of our simulation results to understand the sea breeze and PBL interaction and its effect on local meteorology and dust transport.

  8. Variability of mineral dust deposition in the western Mediterranean basin and south-east of France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Julie; Laurent, Benoit; Losno, Rémi; Bon Nguyen, Elisabeth; Roullet, Pierre; Sauvage, Stéphane; Chevaillier, Servanne; Coddeville, Patrice; Ouboulmane, Noura; di Sarra, Alcide Giorgio; Tovar-Sánchez, Antonio; Sferlazzo, Damiano; Massanet, Ana; Triquet, Sylvain; Morales Baquero, Rafael; Fornier, Michel; Coursier, Cyril; Desboeufs, Karine; Dulac, François; Bergametti, Gilles

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have provided some insight into the Saharan dust deposition at a few specific locations from observations over long time periods or intensive field campaigns. However, no assessment of the dust deposition temporal variability in connection with its regional spatial distribution has been achieved so far from network observations over more than 1 year. To investigate dust deposition dynamics at the regional scale, five automatic deposition collectors named CARAGA (Collecteur Automatique de Retombées Atmosphériques insolubles à Grande Autonomie in French) have been deployed in the western Mediterranean region during 1 to 3 years depending on the station. The sites include, from south to north, Lampedusa, Majorca, Corsica, Frioul and Le Casset (southern French Alps). Deposition measurements are performed on a common weekly period at the five sites. The mean dust deposition fluxes are higher close to the northern African coasts and decrease following a south-north gradient, with values from 7.4 g m-2 year-1 in Lampedusa (35°31' N, 12°37' E) to 1 g m-2 year-1 in Le Casset (44°59' N, 6°28' E). The maximum deposition flux recorded is of 3.2 g m-2 wk-1 in Majorca with only two other events showing more than 1 g m-2 wk-1 in Lampedusa, and a maximum of 0.5 g m-2 wk-1 in Corsica. The maximum value of 2.1 g m-2 year-1 observed in Corsica in 2013 is much lower than existing records in the area over the 3 previous decades (11-14 g m-2 year-1). From the 537 available samples, 98 major Saharan dust deposition events have been identified in the records between 2011 and 2013. Complementary observations provided by both satellite and air mass trajectories are used to identify the dust provenance areas and the transport pathways from the Sahara to the stations for the studied period. Despite the large size of African dust plumes detected by satellites, more than 80 % of the major dust deposition events are recorded at only one station, suggesting that the dust

  9. Adhesion of Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, Otis R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the physical characteristics of lunar dust and the effects of various fundamental forces acting on dust particles on surfaces in a lunar environment. There are transport forces and adhesion forces after contact. Mechanical forces (i.e., from rover wheels, astronaut boots and rocket engine blast) and static electric effects (from UV photo-ionization and/or tribo-electric charging) are likely to be the major contributors to the transport of dust particles. If fine regolith particles are deposited on a surface, then surface energy-related (e.g., van der Walls) adhesion forces and static-electric-image forces are likely to be the strongest contributors to adhesion. Some measurement techniques are offered to quantify the strength of adhesion forces. And finally some dust removal techniques are discussed.

  10. Airborne desert dust and aeromicrobiology over the Turkish Mediterranean coastline

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Dale W.; Kubilay, Nilgün; Kocak, Mustafa; Gray, Mike A.; Borden, Timothy C.; Shinn, Eugene A.

    2007-01-01

    Between 18 March and 27 October 2002, 220 air samples were collected on 209 of 224 calendar days, on top of a coastal atmospheric research tower in Erdemli, Turkey. The volume of air filtered for each sample was 340 liters. Two hundred fifty-seven bacterial and 2598 fungal colony forming units (CFU) were enumerated from the samples using a low-nutrient agar. Ground-based dust measurements demonstrated that the region is routinely impacted by dust generated regionally and from North Africa and that the highest combined percent recovery of total CFU and African dust deposition occurred in the month of April (93.4% of CFU recovery and 91.1% of dust deposition occurred during African dust days versus no African dust present, for that month). A statistically significant correlation was observed (peak regional African dust months of March, April and May; rs=0.576, P=0.000) between an increase in the prevalence of microorganisms recovered from atmospheric samples on dust days (regional and African as determined by ground-based dust measurements), versus that observed on non-dust days. Given the prevalence of atmospherically suspended desert dust and microorganisms observed in this study, and that culture-based studies typically only recover a small fraction (

  11. Dust storms: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Goudie, Andrew S

    2009-01-01

    Dust storms have a number of impacts upon the environment including radiative forcing, and biogeochemical cycling. They transport material over many thousands of kilometres. They also have a range of impacts on humans, not least on human health. In recent years the identification of source areas for dust storms has been an important area or research, with the Sahara (especially Bodélé) and western China being recognised as the strongest sources globally. Another major development has been the recognition of the degree to which dust storm activity has varied at a range of time scales, millennial, century, decadal, annual and seasonal.

  12. Dust resuspension without saltation.

    PubMed

    Loosmore, Gwen A; Hunt, James R

    2000-01-01

    Wind resuspension (or entrainment) provides a source of dust and contaminants for the atmosphere. Conventional wind erosion models parameterize dust resuspension flux with a threshold velocity or with a horizontal abrasion flux; in the absence of abrasion the models assume dust flux is transient only. Our experiments with an uncrusted, fine material at relative humidities exceeding 40% show a long-term steady dust flux in the absence of abrasion, which fits the approximate form: F(d) = 3.6(u*)(3), where F(d) is the dust flux (in mug/m(2) s), and u* is the friction velocity (in m/s). These fluxes are generally too small to be significant sources of dust in most models of dust emission. However, they provide a potential route to transport contaminants into the atmosphere. In addition, dust release is substantial during the initial transient phase. Comparison with field data suggests that the particle friction Reynolds number may prove a better parameter than u* for correlating fluxes and understanding the potential for abrasion.

  13. Dust resuspension without saltation

    PubMed Central

    Loosmore, Gwen A.; Hunt, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Wind resuspension (or entrainment) provides a source of dust and contaminants for the atmosphere. Conventional wind erosion models parameterize dust resuspension flux with a threshold velocity or with a horizontal abrasion flux; in the absence of abrasion the models assume dust flux is transient only. Our experiments with an uncrusted, fine material at relative humidities exceeding 40% show a long-term steady dust flux in the absence of abrasion, which fits the approximate form: Fd = 3.6(u*)3, where Fd is the dust flux (in μg/m2 s), and u* is the friction velocity (in m/s). These fluxes are generally too small to be significant sources of dust in most models of dust emission. However, they provide a potential route to transport contaminants into the atmosphere. In addition, dust release is substantial during the initial transient phase. Comparison with field data suggests that the particle friction Reynolds number may prove a better parameter than u* for correlating fluxes and understanding the potential for abrasion. PMID:20336175

  14. Dust in fusion plasmas: theory and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, R. D.; Pigarov, A. Yu.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Mendis, D. A.; Rosenberg, M.; Rudakov, D.; Tanaka, Y.; Rognlien, T. D.; Soboleva, T. K.; Shukla, P. K.; Bray, B. D.; West, W. P.; Roquemore, A. L.; Skinner, C. H.

    2008-09-07

    Dust may have a large impact on ITER-scale plasma experiments including both safety and performance issues. However, the physics of dust in fusion plasmas is very complex and multifaceted. Here, we discuss different aspects of dust dynamics including dust-plasma, and dust-surface interactions. We consider the models of dust charging, heating, evaporation/sublimation, dust collision with material walls, etc., which are suitable for the conditions of fusion plasmas. The physical models of all these processes have been incorporated into the DUST Transport (DUSTT) code. Numerical simulations demonstrate that dust particles are very mobile and accelerate to large velocities due to the ion drag force (cruise speed >100 m/s). Deep penetration of dust particles toward the plasma core is predicted. It is shown that DUSTT is capable of reproducing many features of recent dust-related experiments, but much more work is still needed.

  15. Variability in Vertical Profiles of Water Vapor Associated with African Aerosol over the Tropical Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Zhang, C.; Prospero, J. M.

    2007-12-01

    We used four years (2003-2006) of MODIS aerosol optical depth and concurrent AIRS profiled water vapor to explore how the vertical distribution of water vapor may systematically change with outbreaks of African aerosol over the tropical Atlantic Ocean. The first step was to look for a relationship in the Barbados region using in-situ Barbados dust record and the profiled relative humidity from meteorological soundings. We extended the study to the synoptic scale in the West Indies using the MODIS and AIRS products. In the tropical Atlantic, preliminary results indicate that water vapor at 850-1000 hPa is significantly less in July on dusty days than clean days over the northeastern tropical Atlantic [5-25N, 30-20W] where African dust is predominant. In contrast, over the southeastern tropical Atlantic [15S-0, 5W-10E], where African biomass burning smoke prevails, water vapor at 600-1000 hPa is significantly higher in August on smoky days than clean days. Additionally, in January when African mixed aerosol (dust and smoke) is anomalously high over the equatorial eastern tropical Atlantic [5S-5N, 15W-5E], less water vapor is observed at two levels: 925-1000 hPa and 500-600 hPa. It is hypothesized that these results are associated with the non-hygroscopic nature of African dust, the hygroscopic properties of African smoke, and their transport pathways over the tropical Atlantic. These results are useful in the design and diagnostics of model simulations of climate effects of aerosols such as aerosol related precipitation change.

  16. Dust Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. C.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss a recent sounding rocket experiment which found charged dust in the Earth's tropical mesosphere. The dust detector was designed to measure small (5000 - 10000 amu.) charged dust particles, most likely of meteoric origin. A 5 km thick layer of positively charged dust was found at an altitude of 90 km, in the vicinity of an observed sporadic sodium layer and sporadic E layer. The observed dust was positively charged in the bulk of the dust layer, but was negatively charged near the bottom.

  17. Twisted dust acoustic waves in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, P. K.

    2012-08-15

    We examine linear dust acoustic waves (DAWs) in a dusty plasma with strongly correlated dust grains, and discuss possibility of a twisted DA vortex beam carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM). For our purposes, we use the Boltzmann distributed electron and ion density perturbations, the dust continuity and generalized viscoelastic dust momentum equations, and Poisson's equation to obtain a dispersion relation for the modified DAWs. The effects of the polarization force, strong dust couplings, and dust charge fluctuations on the DAW spectrum are examined. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the DAW can propagate as a twisted vortex beam carrying OAM. A twisted DA vortex structure can trap and transport dust particles in dusty plasmas.

  18. Ground-based Measurement Of Saharan Dust In Marine Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, M. J.; Ji, Q.; Tsay, S.; Hsu, C.; Hansell, R. A.; Augustine, D.

    2007-12-01

    An extensive field experiment, named NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (NAMMA) was conducted during August-September of 2006 to investigate the genesis and development of hurricanes. Two ground-based mobile laboratories, Surface-sensing Measurements for Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SMART) and Chemical, Optical, Microphysical Measurements of In-situ Troposphere (COMMIT), were deployed at Sal Island, Cape Verde to continuously monitor the structure and composition of the atmosphere in the major path of the Saharan Air Layer and the African Easterly Waves. A Micro-Pulse Lidar in SMART, which measures the vertical profiles of backscatter from the atmospheric particulates continuously, caught several episodes of Saharan dust layers reached the surface site. Simultaneously, physical and optical properties of aerosols (e.g., mixture of the Saharan dust and maritime aerosols) were captured by several instruments in COMMIT. In this study, we propose a novel method to separate dust properties from those of marine background aerosols by utilizing the synergy of a suite of in-situ measurements. Derived parameters are mass scattering coefficients and single scattering albedo (SSA) for dust near the surface (~10m). As a crosscheck, the SSA based on the surface measurements is compared with the result of Deep Blue satellite-based aerosol retrievals, which is now incorporated in the operational MODIS aerosol product. The presented preliminary results will be useful in studying the properties of Saharan dust originated from various source regions, which, in turns, can be used as inputs to aerosol transport models to help better understand the interactions between aerosol and cloud water cycle.

  19. Investigation of aged aerosols in size-resolved Asian dust storm particles transported from Beijing, China to Incheon, Korea using low-Z particle EPMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, H.; Hwang, H. J.; Liu, X.; Dong, S.; Ro, C.-U.

    2013-10-01

    , allophite, vermiculite, illite, and montmorillonite) were observed frequently in samples S2 and S3; and furthermore, both the atomic concentration ratios of [Mg]/[Al] and [Mg]/[Si] were elevated compared to that in sample S1. This shows that a great evolution or aging process must have occurred on the mineral dust. This indicates that the number abundance, reactivity with gaseous pollutants, and ratios of [Mg]/[Al] and [Mg]/[Si] of Mg-containing aluminosilicates are promising indices of the aging process of ADS particles during long-range transport.

  20. Radiative Effects and Feedbacks of Saharan Dust and Biomass Burning Aerosol over West Africa and the Northern Tropical Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinold, Bernd; Tegen, Ina; Bauer, Stefan; Wendisch, Manfred

    2010-05-01

    Soil dust aerosol from the world's arid and semi-arid regions and land fire smoke represent major components of the atmospheric aerosol load. They influence the climate system by changing the atmospheric radiation balance through direct and indirect effects and play an important role in the biogeochemical and hydrological cycle. However, in particular the magnitude and sign of the radiative effects are highly uncertain due to still existing uncertainties in their optical properties and the variability and complexity of the spatio-temporal distribution. The dust and biomass burning aerosol from Africa is of particular interest since the continent harbours the largest and most active sources of both aerosol types. The Saharan and Sahel regions contribute at least 50% to the global dust emissions and a considerable amount of smoke originates from active biomass burning areas in west and central Africa. Within continuous aerosol outbreaks, the Saharan dust and land fire smoke are transported towards the West African Monsoon region and across the tropical Atlantic Ocean. In boreal winter, when the most land fires are active, the Saharan dust layer merges with the West African smoke plumes resulting in a complex aerosol layering. Here, the results of a regional model study on direct radiative forcing and dynamic atmospheric response due to dust and biomass burning aerosol will be presented. Particular focus will be on radiative impacts on regional circulation patterns and implications for the aerosol transport. For simulations of the complex spatial distribution of the West African aerosol and estimates of direct radiative effects and feedbacks, the regional model system COSMO-MUSCAT is used. The model allows online interaction of the computed dust and biomass burning aerosol load with the solar and thermal radiation and with the model dynamics. The simulations are performed for the second field campaign of the SAharan Mineral dUst experiMent (SAMUM) that was conducted

  1. Modeling the Emission, Transport, and Dispersion of Post-wildfire Dust from Western Sagebrush Landscapes within a Regional Air Quality Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, S. H.; Wagenbrenner, N. S.; Lamb, B. K.

    2014-12-01

    Millions of hectares are burned by wildfires each year in the western US. The resulting burn scars are extremely wind erodible surfaces with high loadings of easily entrained ash and soil. Previous work has demonstrated that wind erosion from these burn scars can release large amounts of dust and ash as particulate matter (PM) into the atmosphere, resulting in large impacts on downwind air quality and visibility. Sagebrush-dominated landscapes, where often essentially all vegetation is consumed by the fire, appear to be particularly vulnerable. Climate change predictions indicate more wildfire activity in the western US and, hence, more potential for wind erosion from burn scars. However, these PM sources are not yet accounted for in regional air quality models. Here we describe a modification to the AIRPACT regional air quality modeling framework for simulating the emission, transport and dispersion of PM from post-wildfire burn scars. We present results from a 2012 sagebrush fire in southeast Oregon as a case study. Modeled PM emission rates and downwind concentrations are compared against observations for two major dust events, one which resulted in exceedances of the PM10 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in Boise, Idaho the month after the fire and another which resulted in a significant dust on snow event and subsequent snowmelt in the Owyhee Mountains of southwest Idaho the following spring. Additionally, we present model estimates of annual emissions from all wildfires that occurred in sagebrush landscapes of the western US during the 2012 fire year as an estimate of annual post-fire PM loading potential.

  2. Dust Storm

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  Massive Dust Storm over Australia     View ... at JPL September 22, 2009 - Massive dust storm over Australia. project:  MISR category:  ... Sep 22, 2009 Images:  Dust Storm location:  Australia and New Zealand ...

  3. Dust, Climate, and Human Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2003-01-01

    Air pollution from both natural and anthropogenic causes is considered to be one of the most serious world-wide environment-related health problems, and is expected to become worse with changes in the global climate. Dust storms from the atmospheric transport of desert soil dust that has been lifted and carried by the winds - often over significant distances - have become an increasingly important emerging air quality issue for many populations. Recent studies have shown that the dust storms can cause significant health impacts from the dust itself as well as the accompanying pollutants, pesticides, metals, salt, plant debris, and other inorganic and organic materials, including viable microorganisms (bacteria, viruses and fungi). For example, thousands of tons of Asian desert sediments, some containing pesticides and herbicides from farming regions, are commonly transported into the Arctic during dust storm events. These chemicals have been identified in animal and human tissues among Arctic indigenous populations. Millions of tons of airborne desert dust are being tracked by satellite imagery, which clearly shows the magnitude as well as the temporal and spatial variability of dust storms across the "dust belt" regions of North Africa, the Middle East, and China. Ths paper summarizes the most recent findings on the effects of airborne desert dust on human health as well as potential climate influences on dust and health.

  4. Dust, Climate, and Human Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2003-01-01

    Air pollution from both natural and anthropogenic causes is considered to be one of the most serious world-wide environment-related health problems, and is expected to become worse with changes in the global climate. Dust storms from the atmospheric transport of desert soil dust that has been lifted and carried by the winds - often over significant distances - have become an increasingly important emerging air quality issue for many populations. Recent studies have shown that the dust storms can cause significant health impacts from the dust itself as well as the accompanying pollutants, pesticides, metals, salt, plant debris, and other inorganic and organic materials, including viable microorganisms (bacteria, viruses and fungi). For example, thousands of tons of Asian desert sediments, some containing pesticides and herbicides from farming regions, are commonly transported into the Arctic during dust storm events. These chemicals have been identified in animal and human tissues among Arctic indigenous populations. Millions of tons of airborne desert dust are being tracked by satellite imagery, which clearly shows the magnitude as well as the temporal and spatial variability of dust storms across the "dust belt" regions of North Africa, the Middle East, and China. This paper summarizes the most recent findings on the effects of airborne desert dust on human health as well as potential climate influences on dust and health.

  5. Dust, Climate, and Human Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, N. G.

    2003-12-01

    Air pollution from both natural and anthropogenic causes is considered to be one of the most serious world-wide environment-related health problems, and is expected to become worse with changes in the global climate. Dust storms from the atmospheric transport of desert soil dust that has been lifted and carried by the winds - often over significant distances - have become an increasingly important emerging air quality issue for many populations. Recent studies have shown that the dust storms can cause significant health impacts from the dust itself as well as the accompanying pollutants, pesticides, metals, salt, plant debris, and other inorganic and organic materials, including viable microorganisms (bacteria, viruses and fungi). For example, thousands of tons of Asian desert sediments, some containing pesticides and herbicides from farming regions, are commonly transported into the Arctic during dust storm events. These chemicals have been identified in animal and human tissues among Arctic indigenous populations. Millions of tons of airborne desert dust are being tracked by satellite imagery, which clearly shows the magnitude as well as the temporal and spatial variability of dust storms across the "dust belt" regions of North Africa, the Middle East, and China. This paper summarizes the most recent findings on the effects of airborne desert dust on human health as well as potential climate influences on dust and health

  6. The Martian dust cycle: A proposed model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald

    1987-01-01

    Despite more than a decade of study of martian dust storms, many of their characteristics and associated processes remain enigmatic, including the mechanisms for dust raising, modes of settling, and the nature of dust deposits. However, observations of Mars dust, considerations of terrestrial analogs, theoretical models, and laboratory simulations permit the formulation of a Martian Dust Cycle Model, which consists of three main processes: (1) suspension threshold, (2) transportation, and (3) deposition; two associated processes are also included: (4) dust removal and (5) the addition of new dust to the cycle. Although definitions vary, dust includes particles less than 4 to approx. 60 microns in diameter, which by terrestrial usage includes silt, loess, clay, and aerosolic dust particles. The dust cycle model is explained.

  7. Neurotoxic potential of lunar and martian dust: influence on em, proton gradient, active transport, and binding of glutamate in rat brain nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Krisanova, Natalia; Kasatkina, Ludmila; Sivko, Roman; Borysov, Arseniy; Nazarova, Anastasiya; Slenzka, Klaus; Borisova, Tatiana

    2013-08-01

    The harmful effects of lunar dust (LD) on directly exposed tissues are documented in the literature, whereas researchers are only recently beginning to consider its effects on indirectly exposed tissues. During inhalation, nano-/microsized particles are efficiently deposited in nasal, tracheobronchial, and alveolar regions and transported to the central nervous system. The neurotoxic potential of LD and martian dust (MD) has not yet been assessed. Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter involved in most aspects of normal brain function, whereas disturbances in glutamate homeostasis contribute to the pathogenesis of major neurological disorders. The research was focused on the analysis of the effects of LD/MD simulants (JSC-1a/JSC, derived from volcanic ash) on the key characteristics of glutamatergic neurotransmission. The average size of LD and MD particles (even minor fractions) before and after sonication was determined by dynamic light scattering. With the use of radiolabeled l-[(14)C]glutamate, it was shown that there is an increase in l-[(14)C]glutamate binding to isolated rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) in low [Na(+)] media and at low temperature in the presence of LD. MD caused significantly lesser changes under the same conditions, whereas nanoparticles of magnetite had no effect at all. Fluorimetric experiments with potential-sensitive dye rhodamine 6G and pH-sensitive dye acridine orange showed that the potential of the plasma membrane of the nerve terminals and acidification of synaptic vesicles were not altered by LD/MD (and nanoparticles of magnetite). Thus, the unique effect of LD to increase glutamate binding to the nerve terminals was shown. This can have deleterious effects on extracellular glutamate homeostasis in the central nervous system and cause alterations in the ambient level of glutamate, which is extremely important for proper synaptic transmission. During a long-term mission, a combination of constant irritation due

  8. Neurotoxic potential of lunar and martian dust: influence on em, proton gradient, active transport, and binding of glutamate in rat brain nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Krisanova, Natalia; Kasatkina, Ludmila; Sivko, Roman; Borysov, Arseniy; Nazarova, Anastasiya; Slenzka, Klaus; Borisova, Tatiana

    2013-08-01

    The harmful effects of lunar dust (LD) on directly exposed tissues are documented in the literature, whereas researchers are only recently beginning to consider its effects on indirectly exposed tissues. During inhalation, nano-/microsized particles are efficiently deposited in nasal, tracheobronchial, and alveolar regions and transported to the central nervous system. The neurotoxic potential of LD and martian dust (MD) has not yet been assessed. Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter involved in most aspects of normal brain function, whereas disturbances in glutamate homeostasis contribute to the pathogenesis of major neurological disorders. The research was focused on the analysis of the effects of LD/MD simulants (JSC-1a/JSC, derived from volcanic ash) on the key characteristics of glutamatergic neurotransmission. The average size of LD and MD particles (even minor fractions) before and after sonication was determined by dynamic light scattering. With the use of radiolabeled l-[(14)C]glutamate, it was shown that there is an increase in l-[(14)C]glutamate binding to isolated rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) in low [Na(+)] media and at low temperature in the presence of LD. MD caused significantly lesser changes under the same conditions, whereas nanoparticles of magnetite had no effect at all. Fluorimetric experiments with potential-sensitive dye rhodamine 6G and pH-sensitive dye acridine orange showed that the potential of the plasma membrane of the nerve terminals and acidification of synaptic vesicles were not altered by LD/MD (and nanoparticles of magnetite). Thus, the unique effect of LD to increase glutamate binding to the nerve terminals was shown. This can have deleterious effects on extracellular glutamate homeostasis in the central nervous system and cause alterations in the ambient level of glutamate, which is extremely important for proper synaptic transmission. During a long-term mission, a combination of constant irritation due

  9. The Lunar Dust Pendulum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, Kip; Collier, Michael R.; Stubbs, Timothy J.; Farrell, William M.

    2011-01-01

    Shadowed regions on the lunar surface acquire a negative potential. In particular, shadowed craters can have a negative potential with respect to the surrounding lunar regolith in sunlight, especially near the terminator regions. Here we analyze the motion of a positively charged lnnar dust grain in the presence of a shadowed crater at a negative potential in vacuum. Previous models describing the transport of charged lunar dust close to the surface have typically been limited to one-dimensional motion in the vertical direction, e.g. electrostatic levitation; however. the electric fields in the vicinity of shadowed craters will also have significant components in the horizontal directions. We propose a model that includes both the horizontal and vertical motion of charged dust grains near shadowed craters. We show that the dust grains execute oscillatory trajectories and present an expression for the period of oscillation drawing an analogy to the motion of a pendulum.

  10. The Lunar Dust Pendulum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Michael R.; Stubbs, Timothy J.; Farrell, William M.

    2011-01-01

    Shadowed regions on the lunar surface acquire a negative potential. In particular, shadowed craters can have a negative potential with respect to the surrounding lunar regolith in sunlight, especially near the terminator regions. Here we analyze the motion of a positively charged lunar dust grain in the presence of a shadowed crater at a negative potential in vacuum. Previous models describing the transport of charged lunar dust close to the surface have typically been limited to one-dimensional motion in the vertical direction, e.g. electrostatic levitation; however, the electric fields in the vicinity of shadowed craters will also have significant components in the horizontal directions. We propose a model that includes both the horizontal and vertical motion of charged dust grains near shadowed craters. We show that the dust grains execute oscillatory trajectories and present an expression for the period of oscillation drawing an analogy to the motion of a pendulum.

  11. Geochemical evidence for African dust and volcanic ash inputs to terra rossa soils on carbonate reef terraces, northern Jamaica, West Indies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Budahn, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    The origin of red or reddish-brown, clay-rich, "terra rossa" soils on limestone has been debated for decades. A traditional qualitative explanation for their formation has been the accumulation of insoluble residues as the limestone is progressively dissolved over time. However, this mode of formation often requires unrealistic or impossible amounts of carbonate dissolution. Therefore, where this mechanism is not viable and where local fluvial or colluvial inputs can be ruled out, an external source or sources must be involved in soil formation. On the north coast of the Caribbean island of Jamaica, we studied a sequence of terra rossa soils developed on emergent limestones thought to be of Quaternary age. The soils become progressively thicker, redder, more Fe- and Al-rich and Si-poor with elevation. Furthermore, although kaolinite is found in all the soils, the highest and oldest soils also contain boehmite. Major and trace element geochemistry shows that the host limestones and local igneous rocks are not likely source materials for the soils. Other trace elements, including the rare earth elements (REE), show that tephra from Central American volcanoes is not a likely source either. However, trace element geochemistry shows that airborne dust from Africa plus tephra from the Lesser Antilles island arc are possible source materials for the clay-rich soils. A third, as yet unidentified, source may also contribute to the soils. We hypothesize that older, more chemically mature Jamaican bauxites may have had a similar origin. The results add to the growing body of evidence of the importance of multiple parent materials, including far-traveled dust, to soil genesis.

  12. Saharan Dust Aerosol Radiative Forcing Measured from Space.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F.; Vogelmann, A. M.; Ramanathan, V.

    2004-07-01

    This study uses data collected from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments to determine Saharan dust broadband shortwave aerosol radiative forcing over the Atlantic Ocean near the African coast (15° 25°N, 45° 15°W). The clear-sky aerosol forcing is derived directly from these data, without requiring detailed information about the aerosol properties that are not routinely observed such as chemical composition, microphysical properties, and their height variations. To determine the diurnally averaged Saharan dust radiative forcing efficiency (i.e., broadband shortwave forcing per unit optical depth at 550 nm, W m-2 τ-1a), two extreme seasons are juxtaposed: the high-dust months [June August (JJA)] and the low-dust months [November January (NDJ)]. It is found that the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) diurnal mean forcing efficiency is -35 ± 3 W m-2 τ-1a for JJA, and -26 ± 3 W m-2 τ-1a for NDJ. These efficiencies can be fit by reducing the spectrally varying aerosol single-scattering albedo such that its value at 550 nm is reduced from 0.95 ± 0.04 for JJA to about 0.86 ± 0.04 for NDJ. The lower value for the low-dust months might be influenced by biomass-burning aerosols that were transported into the study region from equatorial Africa. Although the high-dust season has a greater (absolute value of the) TOA forcing efficiency, the low-dust season may have a greater surface forcing efficiency. Extrapolations based on model calculations suggest the surface forcing efficiencies to be about -65 W m-2 τ-1a for the high-dust season versus -81 W m-2 τ-1a for the low-dust season. These observations indicate that the aerosol character within a region can be readily modified, even immediately adjacent to a powerful source region such as the Sahara. This study provides important observational constraints for models of dust radiative forcing.


  13. Long-range transport of the April 2001 dust clouds over the subtropical East Asia and the North Pacific and its impacts on ground-level air pollution: A Lagrangian simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kuo-Ying

    2007-05-01

    One of the most remarkable Asian dust storms occurred in April 2001, during the periods of the Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE)-Asia and the Transport and Chemical Evolution Over the Pacific (TRACE-P) field experiments. Our high-resolution Lagrangian simulations and the detailed comparisons with the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS)-Aerosol Index (AI) data, the Geostationary Meteorological Satellite (GMS)-5 derived dust distribution, and the ground-level ambient air particulate matter measurements over Taiwan in the subtropical East Asia reveal several features which were not reported before. We found that (1) the trans-Pacific long-range transport was dominated by the dust emissions from the natural source over the Gobi desert and the anthropogenic source over east China before 6-7 April, while the southward long-range transport to the subtropical East Asia were mainly contributed by the dust emissions from natural source over the Taklamakan and the Gobi, and the anthropogenic source over east China after 6-7 April; (2) the southward long-range transport implies that the anthropogenic pollution is ahead of the cold front (where the precipitation washes out the particulate matter), while the dust is behind the cold front. (3) The dust emissions from the Gobi during 7-9 April, anthropogenic emissions from east China during 9-10 April, and dust emissions from the Taklamakan during 1-4 April appear to have the most significant impacts on the ground-level particulate matter concentrations over Taiwan. The simulated particle emitted from desert regions before 6-7 April mainly confined to the Gobi and the Taklamakan regions until 6 April when they became highly mobile for the long-range transport by the large-scale cyclonic activity and its associated cold air outbreak. The southward transport characteristics simulated here are consistent with the aerosol characterization observed at Taiwan during this period. Our simulations reveal that the rapid trans

  14. Desert Dust Properties, Modelling, and Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaskaoutis, Dimitris G.; Kahn, Ralph A.; Gupta, Pawan; Jayaraman, Achuthan; Bartzokas, Aristides

    2013-01-01

    This paper is just the three-page introduction to a Special Issue of Advances in Meteorology focusing on desert dust. It provides a paragraph each on 13 accepted papers, most relating to the used of satellite data to assess attributes or distribution of airborne desert dust. As guest Associate Editors of this issue, we organized the papers into a systematic whole, beginning with large-scale transport and seasonal behavior, then to regional dust transport, transport history, and climate impacts, first in the Mediterranean region, then India and central Asia, and finally focusing on transport model assessment and the use of lidar as a technique to constrain dust spatial-temporal distribution.

  15. Modeling of dust deposition in central Asia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The deposition of dust particles has a significant influence on the global bio-geochemical cycle. Currently, the lack of spatiotemporal data creates great uncertainty in estimating the global dust budget. To improve our understanding of the fate, transport and cycling of airborne dust, there is a ne...

  16. Protoplanetary Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apai, Dániel; Lauretta, Dante S.

    2010-01-01

    Preface; 1. Planet formation and protoplanetary dust Daniel Apai and Dante Lauretta; 2. The origins of protoplanetary dust and the formation of accretion disks Hans-Peter Gail and Peter Hope; 3. Evolution of protoplanetary disk structures Fred Ciesla and Cornelius P. Dullemond; 4. Chemical and isotopic evolution of the solar nebula and protoplanetary disks Dmitry Semenov, Subrata Chakraborty and Mark Thiemens; 5. Laboratory studies of simple dust analogs in astrophysical environments John R. Brucato and Joseph A. Nuth III; 6. Dust composition in protoplanetaty dust Michiel Min and George Flynn; 7. Dust particle size evolution Klaus M. Pontoppidan and Adrian J. Brearly; 8. Thermal processing in protoplanetary nebulae Daniel Apai, Harold C. Connolly Jr. and Dante S. Lauretta; 9. The clearing of protoplanetary disks and of the protosolar nebula Ilaira Pascucci and Shogo Tachibana; 10. Accretion of planetesimals and the formation of rocky planets John E. Chambers, David O'Brien and Andrew M. Davis; Appendixes; Glossary; Index.

  17. Protoplanetary Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apai, D.´niel; Lauretta, Dante S.

    2014-02-01

    Preface; 1. Planet formation and protoplanetary dust Daniel Apai and Dante Lauretta; 2. The origins of protoplanetary dust and the formation of accretion disks Hans-Peter Gail and Peter Hope; 3. Evolution of protoplanetary disk structures Fred Ciesla and Cornelius P. Dullemond; 4. Chemical and isotopic evolution of the solar nebula and protoplanetary disks Dmitry Semenov, Subrata Chakraborty and Mark Thiemens; 5. Laboratory studies of simple dust analogs in astrophysical environments John R. Brucato and Joseph A. Nuth III; 6. Dust composition in protoplanetaty dust Michiel Min and George Flynn; 7. Dust particle size evolution Klaus M. Pontoppidan and Adrian J. Brearly; 8. Thermal processing in protoplanetary nebulae Daniel Apai, Harold C. Connolly Jr. and Dante S. Lauretta; 9. The clearing of protoplanetary disks and of the protosolar nebula Ilaira Pascucci and Shogo Tachibana; 10. Accretion of planetesimals and the formation of rocky planets John E. Chambers, David O'Brien and Andrew M. Davis; Appendixes; Glossary; Index.

  18. Intergalactic Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, A.

    2002-12-01

    We study the composition and sizes of intergalactic dust based on the expulsion of interstellar dust from the galactic disk. Interstellar grains in the Galactic disk are modelled as a mixture of amorphous silicate dust and carbonaceous dust consisting of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules and larger graphitic grains (Li & Draine 2001) with size distributions like those of the Milky Way dust (Weingartner & Draine 2001). We model their dynamic evolution in terms of the collective effects caused by (1) radiative acceleration, (2) gravitational attraction, (3) gas drag, (4) thermal sputtering, and (5) Lorenz force from the galactic magnetic field (Ferrara et al. 1991). Radiation pressure from the stellar disk exerts an upward force on dust grains and may ultimately expel them out of the entire galaxy. Gravitational force from the stellar, dust and gas disk as well as the dark matter halo exerts a downward force. Thermal sputtering erodes all grains to some degree but more efficiently destroys small grains. This, together with the fact that (1) very small grains (with small radiation pressure efficiencies) are not well coupled to starlight; (2) for large grains the radiative force to the gravitational force is approximately inversely proportional to grain size, acts as a size ``filter'' for dust leaking into the intergalactic space. Since the radiation pressure efficiency and the grain destruction rate are sensitive to dust composition, the relative importance of carbon dust compared to silicate dust expelled into the intergalactic space differs from that in the galactic plane. We derive the size distributions of both silicate and carbonaceous dust finally getting into the intergalactic space and obtain an intergalactic extinction curve. The predicted intergalactic infrared emission spectrum is calculated. References: Ferrara, A., Ferrini, F., Franco, J., & Barsella, B. 1991, ApJ, 381, 137 Li, A., & Draine, B.T. 2001, ApJ, 554, 778 Weingartner, J

  19. Investigation of aged aerosols in size-resolved Asian dust storm particles transported from Beijing, China, to Incheon, Korea, using low-Z particle EPMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, H.; Hwang, H.; Liu, X.; Dong, S.; Ro, C.-U.

    2014-04-01

    This is the first study of Asian dust storm (ADS) particles collected in Beijing, China, and Incheon, Korea, during a spring ADS event. Using a seven-stage May impactor and a quantitative electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA, also known as low-Z particle EPMA), we examined the composition and morphology of 4200 aerosol particles at stages 1-6 (with a size cut-off of 16, 8, 4, 2, 1, and 0.5 μm in equivalent aerodynamic diameter, respectively) collected during an ADS event on 28-29 April 2005. The results showed that there were large differences in the chemical compositions between particles in sample S1 collected in Beijing immediately after the peak time of the ADS and in samples S2 and S3, which were collected in Incheon approximately 5 h and 24 h later, respectively. In sample S1, mineral dust particles accounted for more than 88% in relative number abundance at stages 1-5; and organic carbon (OC) and reacted NaCl-containing particles accounted for 24% and 32%, respectively, at stage 6. On the other hand, in samples S2 and S3, in addition to approximately 60% mineral dust, many sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles reacted with airborne SO2 and NOx (accounting for 24% and 14% on average in samples S2 and S3, respectively), often mixed with mineral dust, were encountered at stages 1-5, and (C, N, O, S)-rich particles (likely a mixture of water-soluble organic carbon with (NH4)2SO4 and NH4NO3) were abundantly observed at stage 6 (accounting for 68% and 51% in samples S2 and S3, respectively). This suggests that an accumulation of sea-salt components on individual ADS particles larger than 1 μm in diameter occurred and many secondary aerosols smaller than 1 μm in diameter were formed when the ADS particles passed over the Yellow Sea. In the reacted or aged mineral dust and SSA particles, nitrate-containing and both nitrate- and sulfate-containing species vastly outnumbered the sulfate-containing species, implying that ambient NOx had a greater influence on the

  20. Saharan Dust Particle Size And Concentration Distribution In Central Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunnu, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    A.K. Sunnu*, G. M. Afeti* and F. Resch+ *Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) Kumasi, Ghana. E-mail: albertsunnu@yahoo.com +Laboratoire Lepi, ISITV-Université du Sud Toulon-Var, 83162 La Valette cedex, France E-mail: resch@univ-tln.fr Keywords: Atmospheric aerosol; Saharan dust; Particle size distributions; Particle concentrations. Abstract The Saharan dust that is transported and deposited over many countries in the West African atmospheric environment (5°N), every year, during the months of November to March, known locally as the Harmattan season, have been studied over a 13-year period, between 1996 and 2009, using a location at Kumasi in central Ghana (6° 40'N, 1° 34'W) as the reference geographical point. The suspended Saharan dust particles were sampled by an optical particle counter, and the particle size distributions and concentrations were analysed. The counter gives the total dust loads as number of particles per unit volume of air. The optical particle counter used did not discriminate the smoke fractions (due to spontaneous bush fires during the dry season) from the Saharan dust. Within the particle size range measured (0.5 μm-25 μm.), the average inter-annual mean particle diameter, number and mass concentrations during the northern winter months of January and February were determined. The average daily number concentrations ranged from 15 particles/cm3 to 63 particles/cm3 with an average of 31 particles/cm3. The average daily mass concentrations ranged from 122 μg/m3 to 1344 μg/m3 with an average of 532 μg/m3. The measured particle concentrations outside the winter period were consistently less than 10 cm-3. The overall dust mean particle diameter, analyzed from the peak representative Harmattan periods over the 13-year period, ranged from 0.89 μm to 2.43 μm with an average of 1.5 μm ± 0.5. The particle size distributions exhibited the typical distribution pattern for

  1. Investigations of the March 2006 African dust storm using ground-based column-integrated high spectral resolution infrared (8-13 μm) and visible aerosol optical thickness measurements: 1. Measurement procedures and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, M.; Gautier, C.; Ricchiazzi, P.

    2009-06-01

    The infrared (IR) aerosol optical thickness (AOT) spectra of Saharan dust measured during the Portable Infrared Aerosol Transmission Experiment (PIRATE) are reported. Saharan dust optical thickness (extinction) spectra from 8 to 13 μm were obtained using column-integrated solar transmission measurements in Puerto Rico in July 2005 and Senegal in January and March 2006 (during a dust plume) using a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. The FTIR measured the solar spectral irradiance in the IR in the presence of Saharan dust, and the AOT was determined by comparing the measured spectra to modeled downwelling spectra without dust for the same atmospheric temperature profile, solar zenith angle, water vapor, and ozone concentrations. The modeled dust-free spectra are generated using the Santa Barbara Disort Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) program. The measured dust AOT is compared with modeled AOT spectra obtained using Mie theory with dust indices of refraction from Volz and Fouquart with assumed lognormal size distributions. When the visible AOT values from nearby Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sensors are compared to the IR AOT values, results from various dust loadings show that the IR dust AOT at 9.5 μm is typically only one third that of the visible (670 nm) dust AOT, but there is some evidence that this ratio could increase for larger dust size distributions. The surface IR dust forcing is determined to be about -0.4 W/m2 by summing the dusty and clear irradiance differences.

  2. Combined aerosol in-situ measurements during the SALTRACE field experiment for the investigation of Saharan mineral dust microphysical and CCN properties and their spatial-temporal evolution during trans-Atlantic long-range transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walser, Adrian; Dollner, Maximilian; Sauer, Daniel; Weinzierl, Bernadett

    2015-04-01

    The Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE) was a field experiment conducted in June/July 2013, which aimed to investigate the transport and modification of Saharan mineral dust from the Sahara across the Atlantic Ocean to the Caribbean. In addition to ground-based measurements and satellite remote sensing, the DLR Falcon research aircraft was equipped with a number of aerosol in-situ instruments to gain direct information on the properties of airborne aerosol such as size distributions, microphysical, optical and cloud-condensation nuclei (CCN) properties. For the first time, several outbreaks of Saharan dust were probed with the same airborne instrumentation on both sides of the Atlantic. During transport, various processes may take place that modify the aerosol composition. Dry and wet deposition lead to a size-dependent aerosol removal. In case of wet deposition, the removal additionally depends on the particle's ability to act as CCN. Processes in the aqueous phase in subsequently re-evaporating cloud droplets can further alter microphysical and CCN properties of re-released particles. All resulting changes in the size distribution and particle properties impact the radiative feedback and CCN activity of the aged aerosol. This study aims to use combined airborne in-situ measurements to retrieve and compare vertically resolved aerosol size distributions, microphysical and CCN properties for both, short-range transported Saharan dust in the Cape Verde region and long-range transported dust in the Caribbean. We use this data to investigate the influence of long-range transport and associated processes on those properties. We will present vertical profiles of size-resolved aerosol concentrations and volatile fractions as well as CCN activated fractions and draw conclusions for aerosol mixing state, CCN activation diameters and particle hygroscopicities. We will discuss differences in vertical profiles and

  3. Dust devils as observed by Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferri, Francesca; Smith, Peter H.; Lemmon, Mark; Rennó, Nilton O.

    2003-12-01

    Dust devils are localized meteorological phenomena frequently observed in terrestrial dry lands and desert landscapes as well as on Mars. They are low-pressure, warm core vortices that form at the bottom of convective plumes and loft dust from the surface. They move with the speed of the ambient wind and are tilted by wind shears. The Mars Pathfinder detected dust devils as dust plumes in the Imager for Mars Pathfinder images and as low-pressure convective vortices in the meteorological Mars Pathfinder Atmospheric Structure Investigation/Meteorology (ASI/MET) experiment data. The Pathfinder data have been analyzed in terms of dust devil size, spatial distribution, and frequency of occurrence. The results show that the Pathfinder imaging and MET observations are consistent with each other and with the observations made by the Viking 1 Orbiter and Mars Global Surveyor. The dust devil's ability to loft dust into the atmosphere has been investigated and a thermodynamic theory for dust devils has been used to calculate their physical parameters relevant to dust transport. The dust devils observed in an active day provide a pumping rate larger than the dust-settling rate derived from the optical obscuration of the Pathfinder rover solar panels. Therefore dust devils are a major factor in transporting dust from the surface to the atmosphere at the Pathfinder site.

  4. China Dust

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... SpectroRadiometer (MISR) nadir-camera images of eastern China compare a somewhat hazy summer view from July 9, 2000 (left) with a ... arid and sparsely vegetated surfaces of Mongolia and western China pick up large quantities of yellow dust. Airborne dust clouds from the ...

  5. Dust Storm

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... April 11, 2004 (top panels) contrast strongly with the dust storm that swept across Iraq and Saudi Arabia on May 13, 2004 (bottom panels). ... Apr 11 and May 13, 2004 Images:  Dust Storm location:  Middle East thumbnail:  ...

  6. Airborne Dust, "The Good Guy or the Bad Guy": How Much do We Know?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee

    2010-01-01

    Processes in generating, transporting, and dissipating the airborne dust particles are global phenomena -African dust regularly reaching the Alps; Asian dust seasonally crossing the Pacific into North America, and ultimately the Atlantic into Europe. One of the vital biogeochemical roles dust storms play in Earth's ecosystem is routinely mobilizing mineral dust, as a source of iron, from deserts into oceans for fertilizing the growth of phytoplankton -the basis of the oceanic food chain. Similarly, these dust-laden airs also supply crucial nutrients for the soil of tropical rain forests, the so-called womb of life that hosts 50-90% of the species on Earth. With massive amounts of dust lifted from desert regions and injected into the atmosphere, however, these dust storms often affect daily activities in dramatic ways: pushing grit through windows and doors, forcing people to stay indoors, causing breathing problems, reducing visibility and delaying flights, and by and large creating chaos. Thus, both increasing and decreasing concentrations of doses result in harmful biological effects; so do the airborne dust particles to our Living Earth. Since 1997 NASA has been successfully launching a series of satellites - the Earth Observing System - to intensively study, and gain a better understanding of, the Earth as an integrated system. Through participation in many satellite remote-sensing/retrieval and validation projects over the years, we have gradually developed and refined the SMART (Surface-sensing Measurements for Atmospheric Radiative Transfer) and COMMIT (Chemical, Optical & Microphysical Measurements of In-situ Troposphere) mobile observatories, a suite of surface remote sensing and in-situ instruments that proved to be vital in providing high temporal measurements, which complement the satellite observations. In this talk, we will present SMART-COMMIT which has played key roles, serving as network or supersite, in major international research projects such

  7. The Fate of Saharan Dust Across the Atlantic and Implications for a Central American Dust Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowottnick, E.; Colarco, P.; da Silva, A.; Hlavka, D.; McGill, M.

    2011-01-01

    Saharan dust was observed over the Caribbean basin during the summer 2007 NASA Tropical Composition, Cloud, and Climate Coupling (TC4) field experiment. Airborne Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) and satellite observations from MODIS suggest a barrier to dust transport across Central America into the eastern Pacific. We use the NASA GEOS-5 atmospheric transport model with online aerosol tracers to perform simulations of the TC4 time period in order to understand the nature of this barrier. Our simulations are driven by the Modem Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) meteorological analyses. We evaluate our baseline simulated dust distributions using MODIS and CALIOP satellite and ground-based AERONET sun photometer observations. GEOS-5 reproduces the observed location, magnitude, and timing of major dust events, but our baseline simulation does not develop as strong a barrier to dust transport across Central America as observations suggest. Analysis of the dust transport dynamics and lost processes suggest that while both mechanisms play a role in defining the dust transport barrier, loss processes by wet removal of dust are about twice as important as transport. Sensitivity analyses with our model showed that the dust barrier would not exist without convective scavenging over the Caribbean. The best agreement between our model and the observations was obtained when dust wet removal was parameterized to be more aggressive, treating the dust as we do hydrophilic aerosols.

  8. Inventory of African desert dust events in the north-central Iberian Peninsula in 2003-2014 based on sun-photometer-AERONET and particulate-mass-EMEP data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachorro, Victoria E.; Burgos, Maria A.; Mateos, David; Toledano, Carlos; Bennouna, Yasmine; Torres, Benjamín; de Frutos, Ángel M.; Herguedas, Álvaro

    2016-07-01

    June and PM10 in August) and another in March (0.02 for AOD and 2.2 µg m-3 for PM10) - both displaying a similar evolution with exceptions in July and September. The seasonal cycle of the DD contribution to AOD does not follow the pattern of the total AOD (close to a bell shape), whereas both PM10 cycles (total and DD contribution) are more similar to each other in shape, with an exception in September. The interannual evolution of the DD contribution to AOD and PM10 has evidenced a progressive decrease. This decline in the levels of mineral dust aerosols can explain up to 30 % of the total aerosol load decrease observed in the study area during the period 2003-2014. The relationship between columnar and surface DD contribution shows a correlation coefficient of 0.81 for the interannual averages. Finally, synoptic conditions during DD events are also analysed, observing that the north African thermal low causes most of the events ( ˜ 53 %). The results presented in this study highlight the relevance of the area studied since it can be considered representative of the clean background in the western Mediterranean Basin where DD events have a high impact on aerosol load levels.

  9. Dust aerosol optical properties using ground-based and airborne lidar in the framework of FENNEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marnas, Fabien; Chazette, Patrick; Flamant, Cyrille; Royer, Philippe; Boytard, Mai-Lan; Genau, Pascal; Doira, Pascal; Bruneau, Didier; Pelon, Jacques; Sanak, Joseph

    2013-04-01

    The FENNEC program aims to improve our knowledge of both the role of the Saharan Heat Low (SHL) on the West African monsoon and the interactions between the African continent and the Mediterranean basin through the Saharan dust transport. The Saharan desert is the major source of mineral dust in the world and may significantly impact the air quality over the Western Europe by increasing the particular matter content. Two lidar systems were operated by the French component of the FENNEC project: an airborne lidar which was flown aboard the French Falcon 20 research aircraft and a ground-based lidar which was located in the southeastern part of Spain, close to Marbella. The presence of dust in the Saharan atmospheric boundary layer has been easily highlighted using the lidars and confirmed by ground-based sunphotometer and observations from both MODIS and SEVIRI spaceborne instruments. The simultaneous use of the sunphotometer-derived Angstrom exponent and the lidar-derived backscatter to extinction ratio is appeared to be a good approach to separate the optical contribution of dust from local aerosols for the coastal site. Over Spain, the dust layer was mainly located above the planetary boundary layer with several kilometers thick. Over the tropical Atlantic Ocean and the Mauritania the airborne lidar shows a high planetary boundary layer (~5 km above the mean sea level) associated to strong aerosol optical thickness (> 0.8 at 532 nm). The airborne lidar data have been inverted using both MODIS and SEVIRI-derived aerosol optical thickness. The differences between dust optical properties close to and remote from the sources will be discussed.

  10. A New Look to Interactions of Saharan Dust with Waves in the Tropical Atlantic Storm Track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinpour, F.; Wilcox, E. M.; Colarco, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    This study addresses mechanisms of the interactions between light-absorbing aerosols and transient atmospheric waves, including their feedback onto the mean-circulation in one of the most meteorologically sensitive areas of the world: the tropical western African/eastern Atlantic Ocean. Evidence of these interactions are presented based on analyses of an ensemble of NASA satellite data sets, including aerosol optical thickness (AOT) observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) and the Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS), as well as an atmospheric reanalysis from the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and a simulation of The Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model. We analyzed the components of the rate of change of eddy kinetic energy (EKE) to explore the possible role of dust aerosol radiative forcing on reinforcing energetic terms associated with the African easterly waves (AEWs) during boreal summer seasons when the activity of AEWs peaks. This study shows that the anomalous perturbations in concentration of dust in the oceanic Saharan Air Layer (OSAL) precede amplified growth and decay of the subsequent waves compared to waves occurring prior to dust outbreaks. The amplified EKE associated with dust outbreaks are followed by seeding of new wave packets through enhanced divergence and convergence of ageostrophic geopotential height fluxes in the tropical Atlantic storm track. Meanwhile, the enhanced forcing of the mean-circulation associated with the increased momentum fluxes of the high frequency eddies at the northern track of AEWs occurs with a time-lag after the peak of dust concentration in the OSAL. We suggest that dust radiative heating in the OSAL may act as an additional energy source to amplify the thermal/mechanical activity of eddies in the northern track of the AEWs.

  11. Desert dust deposition on Mt. Elbrus, Caucasus Mountains, Russia in 2009-2012 as recorded in snow and shallow ice core: high-resolution "provenancing", transport patterns, physical properties and soluble ionic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutuzov, S.; Shahgedanova, M.; Mikhalenko, V.; Lavrentiev, I.; Kemp, S.

    2013-04-01

    A record of dust deposition events between 2009 and 2012 on Mt. Elbrus, Caucasus Mountains derived from a snow pit and a shallow ice core is presented for the first time for this region. A combination of isotopic analysis, SEVIRI red-green-blue composite imagery, MODIS atmospheric optical depth fields derived using the Deep Blue algorithm, air mass trajectories derived using the HYSPLIT model and analysis of meteorological data enabled identification of dust source regions with high temporal (hours) and spatial (cf. 20-100 km) resolution. Seventeen dust deposition events were detected; fourteen occurred in March-June, one in February and two in October. Four events originated in the Sahara, predominantly in north-eastern Libya and eastern Algeria. Thirteen events originated in the Middle East, in the Syrian Desert and northern Mesopotamia, from a mixture of natural and anthropogenic sources. Dust transportation from Sahara was associated with vigorous Saharan depressions, strong surface winds in the source region and mid-tropospheric south-westerly flow with daily winds speeds of 20-30 m s-1 at 700 hPa level and, although these events were less frequent, they resulted in higher dust concentrations in snow. Dust transportation from the Middle East was associated with weaker depressions forming over the source region, high pressure centered over or extending towards the Caspian Sea and a weaker southerly or south-easterly flow towards the Caucasus Mountains with daily wind speeds of 12-18 m s-1 at 700 hPa level. Higher concentrations of nitrates and ammonium characterise dust from the Middle East deposited on Mt. Elbrus in 2009 indicating contribution of anthropogenic sources. The modal values of particle size distributions ranged between 1.98 μm and 4.16 μm. Most samples were characterised by modal values of 2.0-2.8 μm with an average of 2.6 μm and there was no significant difference between dust from the Sahara and the Middle East.

  12. Sahara Dust

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-15

    article title:  Casting Light and Shadows on a Saharan Dust Storm   ... CA, for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Terra spacecraft is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, ...

  13. Atmospheric dust modeling from meso to global scales with the online NMMB/BSC-Dust model - Part 2: Experimental campaigns in Northern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haustein, K.; Pérez, C.; Baldasano, J. M.; Jorba, O.; Basart, S.; Miller, R. L.; Janjic, Z.; Black, T.; Nickovic, S.; Todd, M. C.; Washington, R.; Müller, D.; Tesche, M.; Weinzierl, B.; Esselborn, M.; Schladitz, A.

    2012-03-01

    The new NMMB/BSC-Dust model is intended to provide short to medium-range weather and dust forecasts from regional to global scales. It is an online model in which the dust aerosol dynamics and physics are solved at each model time step. The companion paper (Pérez et al., 2011) develops the dust model parameterizations and provides daily to annual evaluations of the model for its global and regional configurations. Modeled aerosol optical depth (AOD) was evaluated against AERONET Sun photometers over Northern Africa, Middle East and Europe with correlations around 0.6-0.7 on average without dust data assimilation. In this paper we analyze in detail the behavior of the model using data from the Saharan Mineral dUst experiment (SAMUM-1) in 2006 and the Bodélé Dust Experiment (BoDEx) in 2005. AOD from satellites and Sun photometers, vertically resolved extinction coefficients from lidars and particle size distributions at the ground and in the troposphere are used, complemented by wind profile data and surface meteorological measurements. All simulations were performed at the regional scale for the Northern African domain at the expected operational horizontal resolution of 25 km. Model results for SAMUM-1 generally show good agreement with satellite data over the most active Saharan dust sources. The model reproduces the AOD from Sun photometers close to sources and after long-range transport, and the dust size spectra at different height levels. At this resolution, the model is not able to reproduce a large haboob that occurred during the campaign. Some deficiencies are found concerning the vertical dust distribution related to the representation of the mixing height in the atmospheric part of the model. For the BoDEx episode, we found the diurnal temperature cycle to be strongly dependant on the soil moisture, which is underestimated in the NCEP analysis used for model initialization. The low level jet (LLJ) and the dust AOD over the Bodélé are well reproduced

  14. Atmospheric Dust Modeling from Meso to Global Scales with the Online NMMB/BSC-Dust Model Part 2: Experimental Campaigns in Northern Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haustein, K.; Perez, C.; Baldasano, J. M.; Jorba, O.; Basart, S.; Miller, R. L.; Janjic, Z.; Black, T.; Nickovic, S.; Todd, M. C.; Washington, R.; Muller, D.; Tesche, M.; Weinzierl, B.; Esselborn, M.; Schladitz, A.

    2012-01-01

    The new NMMB/BSC-Dust model is intended to provide short to medium-range weather and dust forecasts from regional to global scales. It is an online model in which the dust aerosol dynamics and physics are solved at each model time step. The companion paper (Perez et al., 2011) develops the dust model parameterizations and provides daily to annual evaluations of the model for its global and regional configurations. Modeled aerosol optical depth (AOD) was evaluated against AERONET Sun photometers over Northern Africa, Middle East and Europe with correlations around 0.6-0.7 on average without dust data assimilation. In this paper we analyze in detail the behavior of the model using data from the Saharan Mineral dUst experiment (SAMUM-1) in 2006 and the Bodele Dust Experiment (BoDEx) in 2005. AOD from satellites and Sun photometers, vertically resolved extinction coefficients from lidars and particle size distributions at the ground and in the troposphere are used, complemented by wind profile data and surface meteorological measurements. All simulations were performed at the regional scale for the Northern African domain at the expected operational horizontal resolution of 25 km. Model results for SAMUM-1 generally show good agreement with satellite data over the most active Saharan dust sources. The model reproduces the AOD from Sun photometers close to sources and after long-range transport, and the dust size spectra at different height levels. At this resolution, the model is not able to reproduce a large haboob that occurred during the campaign. Some deficiencies are found concerning the vertical dust distribution related to the representation of the mixing height in the atmospheric part of the model. For the BoDEx episode, we found the diurnal temperature cycle to be strongly dependant on the soil moisture, which is underestimated in the NCEP analysis used for model initialization. The low level jet (LLJ) and the dust AOD over the Bodélé are well reproduced

  15. Re-Evaluation of Dust Radiative Forcing Using Remote Measurements of Dust Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)