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Sample records for african national department

  1. 76 FR 6519 - National African American History Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-04

    ... extraordinary sacrifices to help unite a fractured country and free millions from slavery. These gallant... Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc..., 2011 National African American History Month, 2011 By the President of the United States of America...

  2. HIV/AIDS in African Americans. National Minority AIDS Council.

    PubMed

    1998-06-01

    The National Minority AIDS Council (NMAC) answered the call of the Congressional Black Caucus by asking President Clinton to declare a state of emergency on HIV and AIDS among African-Americans. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that of the seven Americans infected with HIV every hour, three are African-Americans. NMAC is calling on Federal, State, and local government leaders to implement widespread public information and education campaigns that target African-Americans, and that address voluntary HIV testing, dispel the shame and stigma associated with HIV/AIDS, discuss the needs of gay African-American men, address the accessibility of appropriate resources for HIV treatment, coordinate the expansion of drug prevention and treatment programs, implement a national needle exchange policy, and allocate funds for researching HIV treatment in minority populations. Dr. Beny Primm, vice-chair of NMAC, states that efforts to fight HIV/AIDS must be integrated with other obstacles affecting the African-American community.

  3. The African Social Studies Programme: An Effort to Improve Curriculum and Instruction across 17 African Nations. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merryfield, Merry M.

    This ERIC digest examines: (1) the origins and goals of the African Social Studies Programme (ASSP); (2) ASSP's organization and operation; and (3) ASSP's major achievements and current challenges. The ASSP is a non-political, non-profit intergovernmental organization of 17 African nations that stimulates, promotes, and monitors innovative…

  4. Department of Energy national laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Trivelpiece, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is a transcript of the testimony of Alvin W. Travelpiece before the Congressional Subcommittee on Research and Development. Emphasis is placed on the importance of funding nuclear programs to assure national well-being; and, past accomplishments in the nuclear programs are reviewed. (FSD)

  5. The role of the African-American physician in reducing traffic-related injury and death among African Americans: consensus report of the National Medical Association.

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Fernando; Moore, Wayne; Conti, Christopher; Norville Perez, Lucille C.; Gaines, Beverly M.; Hood, Rodney G.; Swain, Ian J. J.; Williams, Rudolph; Burgess, Chaka T.

    2002-01-01

    , its physician members, their patients, and their communities. CONSENSUS PROCESS: A literature review, driven by research instruments from numerous organizations included reports and materials from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), American Academy of Pediatrics, National Committee for Injury Prevention and Control, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD), and the National SAFE KIDS Campaign. Both the Meharry Medical College report, Achieving a Credible Health and Safety Approach to Increasing Seat Belt Use Among African-Americans, and the U.S. Department of Transportation's Blue Ribbon Panel to Increase Seat Belt Use Among African Americans: A Report to the Nation, provided substantial background for the panel. More than 60 pieces of traffic safety literature have been examined to date. Based on the literature review, a short list of the most relevant issues affecting African Americans and traffic safety was devised. It includes: The disproportionately high rate of traffic-related injury and death among African Americans. The cost in health, monetary costs and other associated costs of traffic safety accidents and injuries. The number of traffic-related injuries and deaths that could be prevented if more African Americans observed good traffic safety practices. Barriers to practicing good traffic safety habits among African Americans. Failure of laws and public information campaigns to influence improved traffic safety practices among African Americans sufficient to reduce disparities in traffic-related injury and death. In July 2001, NMA convened a consensus panel of experts in St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, to review a briefing document summarizing the most salient traffic safety issues among African Americans. The panel elaborated on key issues, including existing policy and standards for the use of child restraint devices to secure infants and toddlers, existing data regarding

  6. 3 CFR 8627 - Proclamation 8627 of February 1, 2011. National African American History Month, 2011

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Proclamation 8627 of February 1, 2011. National African American History Month, 2011 8627 Proclamation 8627 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8627 of February 1, 2011 Proc. 8627 National African American History Month, 2011By the President of the United States of America A...

  7. 3 CFR 8776 - Proclamation 8776 of January 31, 2012. National African American History Month, 2012

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Proclamation 8776 of January 31, 2012. National African American History Month, 2012 8776 Proclamation 8776 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8776 of January 31, 2012 Proc. 8776 National African American History Month, 2012By the President of the United States of America A...

  8. 3 CFR 8345 - Proclamation 8345 of February 2, 2009. National African American History Month, 2009

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Proclamation 8345 of February 2, 2009. National African American History Month, 2009 8345 Proclamation 8345 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8345 of February 2, 2009 Proc. 8345 National African American History Month, 2009By the President of the United States of America A...

  9. 3 CFR 8476 - Proclamation 8476 of February 1, 2010. National African American History Month, 2010

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Proclamation 8476 of February 1, 2010. National African American History Month, 2010 8476 Proclamation 8476 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8476 of February 1, 2010 Proc. 8476 National African American History Month, 2010By the President of the United States of America A...

  10. 3 CFR 8930 - Proclamation 8930 of January 31, 2013. National African American History Month, 2013

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Proclamation 8930 of January 31, 2013. National African American History Month, 2013 8930 Proclamation 8930 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8930 of January 31, 2013 Proc. 8930 National African American History Month, 2013By the President of the United States of America A...

  11. Marital Satisfaction among African Americans and Black Caribbeans: Findings from the National Survey of American Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Chalandra M.; Taylor, Robert Joseph; Lincoln, Karen D.; Chatters, Linda M.; Jackson, James S.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the correlates of marital satisfaction using data from a national probability sample of African Americans (N = 962) and Black Caribbeans (N = 560). Findings reveal differences between African Americans and Black Caribbeans, and men and women within those groups, in the predictors of marital satisfaction. Black Caribbean women…

  12. African Americans and Mathematics Outcomes on National Assessment of Educational Progress: Parental and Individual Influences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Richard, III; Morton, Crystal Hill

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated within group differences between African American female and male students who participated in the 2009 National Assessment of Educational Progress mathematics assessment. Using results from participating states, we compare average scale scores of African American students based on home regulatory environment and interest…

  13. Barriers to a Backyard National Park: Case Study of African American Communities in Columbia, SC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le, Yen; Holmes, Nancy C.

    2012-01-01

    We present an exploratory study of the recreational behaviors, preferences, and opinions of African Americans in the Columbia, South Carolina area and identify potential barriers to visiting Congaree National Park. Focus groups with African American residents of the Columbia South Carolina area revealed that inadequate information, detachment from…

  14. Changing Urbanization Trends and Human Needs in Developing African Nations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Willard A.; Ferguson, Ralph E.

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the increasing migration of African tribal members to urban centers and the resulting redefinition of cultural norms, social pressures, and human needs. First, several misconceptions about African societies are examined by briefly reviewing Africa's tribal history. Next, the phenomenon of tribalism is…

  15. 75 FR 6081 - National African American History Month, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ... African American History Month, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation In... slavery and oppression, the hope of progress, and the triumph of the American Dream. African American..., I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in...

  16. Gender Gaps in Political Participation Across Sub-Saharan African Nations.

    PubMed

    Coffe, Hilde; Bolzendahl, Catherine

    2011-06-01

    A substantial literature has studied gender differences in political participation in Western industrialized democracies, but little is known about such gaps in sub-Saharan African nations. Using 2005 Afrobarometer data, this paper presents a systematic investigation of the gender gap in political participation across 18 sub-Saharan African countries. In line with cultural isomorphism, patterns in gender gaps across different types of participation generally mirror those of Western democracies, with small to no gender gaps in registration to vote, but substantial gaps in less institutionalized types of participation. Yet, the remaining large gaps cannot be explained by gender differences in socioeconomic characteristics and political attitudes as suggested in studies on Western industrialized nations. Finally, substantial cross-national differences within the sub-Saharan African are found, substantiating the importance of more fine-grained examinations of variation across sub-Saharan African nations. PMID:21516140

  17. Attitudes of Department of Education District Officials towards Inclusive Education in South African Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motala, Rashid; Govender, Sumeshni; Nzima, Dumisani

    2015-01-01

    Since the inception of inclusive education (IE) much energy has focused on educators and learners. This study addresses a gap in literature by analysing an important component of the transformation process in the South African educational landscape--Department of Education (DoE) district-based officials. This descriptive research project conducted…

  18. Cluster of African trypanosomiasis in travelers to Tanzanian national parks.

    PubMed

    Jelinek, Tomas; Bisoffi, Zeno; Bonazzi, Lucio; van Thiel, Pieter; Bronner, Ulf; de Frey, Albie; Gundersen, Svein Gunnar; McWhinney, Paul; Ripamonti, Diego

    2002-06-01

    Game parks in Tanzania have long been considered to be at low risk for African trypanosomiasis; however, nine cases of the disease associated with these parks were recently reported. The outbreak was detected through TropNetEurop, a sentinel surveillance network of clinical sites throughout Europe.

  19. 77 FR 5375 - National African American History Month, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... long served as champions of social and political change. And from the literary giants who gave voice to... countless African American women who shattered glass ceilings and advanced our common goals. In recognition... of America the two hundred and thirty- sixth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-2616 Filed 2-2-12;...

  20. Factors Affecting African American Counselors' Job Satisfaction: A National Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Cravor; Hohensil, Thomas H.; Burge, Penny

    2009-01-01

    Although there are many job satisfaction studies, research related to the job satisfaction of African American counselors (AACs) is negligible. The purpose of this study was to investigate the job satisfaction of AACs. A total of 182 employed AACs who were members of the American Counseling Association (ACA) completed a modified Minnesota…

  1. U.S. Department of Education Chapter of Blacks In Government's Reaction to the EEOC African American Workgroup Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Wanda E.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Education Chapter of Blacks in Government (BIG) reviewed and responded to the EEOC [Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Office] African American Workgroup Report. The BIG ED Chapter considered whether: There is any evidence indicating that the number and percentage of African Americans employed by any federal government…

  2. Gender, education, and fertility: a cross-national analysis of Sub-Saharan African nations.

    PubMed

    Adamchak, D J; Ntseane, P G

    1992-01-01

    According to the demographic transition theory and the wealth flows model, it is expected that fertility will decline with socioeconomic development, manifested in part through increasingly greater proportions of the population with formal education. Since their independence in the 1960s, most sub-Saharan African nations have experienced rapid changes in educational levels. However, recent estimates indicate that high levels of fertility are being maintained as reflected in the high rates of population increase of approximately 3%/year. Controlling for socioeconomic development as measured by per capita energy consumption and percentage of labor force in agriculture, this article examines the relationship between education and fertility for men and women in 37 sub-Saharan nations. Results indicate that primary school enrollment in 1960 and 1980 for both males and females had a weak negative and nonsignificant relationship with the total fertility rate 15-30 years later. Secondary school enrollment in 1960 for both males and females had weak relationships with the total fertility rate. However, secondary school enrollment for males in 1980 had a significant negative effect on the total fertility rate 10-25 years later. Implications are discussed.

  3. Romantic Relationships among Unmarried African Americans and Caribbean Blacks: Findings from the National Survey of American Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, Karen D.; Taylor, Robert Joseph; Jackson, James S.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the correlates of relationship satisfaction, marriage expectations, and relationship longevity among unmarried African American and Black Caribbean (Caribbean Black) adults who are in a romantic relationship. The study used data from the National Survey of American Life, a national representative sample of African Americans…

  4. The African Development Bank and women's health: a cross-national analysis of structural adjustment and maternal mortality.

    PubMed

    Coburn, Carolyn; Restivo, Michael; Shandra, John M

    2015-05-01

    We conduct a cross-national analysis to test the hypothesis that African Development Bank (AfDB) structural adjustment lending adversely impacts maternal mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa. We analyze data for thirty-five Sub-Saharan African nations with up to four time points (1990, 1995, 2000, and 2005) with generalized least squares random effects regression models and modified two-step Heckman models that correct for potential endogeneity regarding whether or not a Sub-Saharan African nations receives an AfDB structural adjustment loan. We find support for our hypothesis that indicates that Sub-Saharan African nations that receive an AfDB structural adjustment loan tend to have higher levels of maternal mortality than Sub-Saharan African nations that do not receive such a loan. This finding remains stable even when controlling for endogeneity. We conclude by talking about the theoretical and methodological implications along with possible directions for future research.

  5. Uneven South African Private Enterprise Training: The National Skills Survey of 2003

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paterson, Andrew; Du Toit, Jacques L.

    2005-01-01

    The South African workforce is characterised by racial, gender, occupational and sectoral unevenness in the distribution of skills, employment and training opportunities. This article considers how enterprise training in South Africa contributes to ameliorating, sustaining or exacerbating such inequalities. Using data from the National Skills…

  6. Comparative Analyses of Physics Candidates Scores in West African and National Examinations Councils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utibe, Uduak James; Agah, John Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The study is a comparative analysis of physics candidates' scores in West African and National Examinations Councils. It also investigates influence of gender. Results of 480 candidates were randomly selected form three randomly selected Senior Science Colleges using the WASSCE and NECOSSCE computer printout sent to the schools, transformed using…

  7. Gender Gaps in Political Participation across Sub-Saharan African Nations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffe, Hilde; Bolzendahl, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    A substantial literature has studied gender differences in political participation in Western industrialized democracies, but little is known about such gaps in sub-Saharan African nations. Using 2005 Afrobarometer data, this paper presents a systematic investigation of the gender gap in political participation across 18 sub-Saharan African…

  8. National Museum of Dentistry exhibition: the future is now! African Americans in dentistry.

    PubMed Central

    Dummett, Clifton O.

    2003-01-01

    Inspired by recently published NDA II: The Story of America's Second National Dental Association and sponsored jointly by the National Dental Association Foundation and the Colgate-Palmolive Company, an historical exhibit on dentistry in the African-American community was one of the celebrations for the Golden Anniversary of the American Academy of the History of Dentistry. This exhibit premiered on Sept. 27, 2002 in the National Museum of Dentistry located on the medical/dental campus of the University of Maryland in Baltimore. The Museum recently became an affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution. Contents of the exhibit were photographs, charts, artifacts, memorabilia, etc. These materials presented an overview of African-American activities in dental education, research, patient care, general practice, dental specialities, military service, and public health. Also included were inter-racial relationships, socioeconomic developments, and participation in civil rights endeavors that played a major role in changing out-dated accepted customs. The exhibit's purpose was to celebrate dentistry's ministrations as a health professional among African Americans in particular and the nation at large over the past two centuries. Respect for and progress of black dentists paralleled that of black physicians who were instrumental in including dentist and pharmacists as equal members in the National Medical Association since the latter's inception in 1895. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:14527058

  9. Intentions to Donate to a Biobank in a National Sample of African Americans

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Jasmine A.; Vadaparampil, Susan; Bowen, Deborah; Magwood, Gayenell; Obeid, Jihad S.; Jefferson, Melanie; Drake, Richard; Gebregziabher, Mulugeta; Halbert, Chanita Hughes

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Despite the investments being made to develop biobanks, African Americans are under-represented in genomic studies. We identified factors having significant independent associations with intentions to donate personal health information and blood and/or tissue samples to a biobank in a national, random sample of African Americans (n=1,033). Methods National survey conducted from October 2010 through February 2011. Results 23% of respondents reported that it was not at all likely that they would donate to a biobank, 18% reported a little likely, 36% reported somewhat likely, and 23% reported very likely. Respondents who were likely to donate to a biobank had greater positive expectations about participating in cancer genetics research and reported more participation facilitators relative to barriers. Respondents who were distrustful of researchers had a significantly lower likelihood of being willing to donate to a biobank compared to those who were less distrustful. Conclusions African Americans have diverse attitudes about participating in genetics research and many are likely to donate to a biobank based on expectations of positive outcomes. It may be important to address attitudes about genetics research as part of recruitment to enhance the quality of informed consent for participation in biobanks among African Americans. PMID:24942180

  10. The African Development Bank, structural adjustment, and child mortality: a cross-national analysis of Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Pandolfelli, Lauren E; Shandra, John M

    2013-01-01

    We conduct a cross-national analysis to test the hypothesis that African Development Bank (AfDB) structural adjustment adversely impacts child mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa. We use generalized least square random effects regression models and two-step Heckman models that correct for selection bias using data on 35 nations with up to four time points (1990, 1995, 2000, and 2005). We find substantial support for our hypothesis, which indicates that Sub-Saharan African nations that receive an AfDB structural adjustment loan tend to have higher levels of child mortality than Sub-Saharan African nations that do not receive such a loan. This finding remains stable even when controlling for selection bias on whether or not a Sub-Saharan African nation receives an AfDB structural adjustment loan. We conclude by discussing the methodological implications of the article, policy suggestions, and possible directions for future research.

  11. MEDCAN-GRO: Medical Capacity for African Nations - Growing Regional Operability A Case Study in Special Operations Forces Capacity Building.

    PubMed

    Givens, Melissa L; Verlo, April

    2015-01-01

    Medical Capacity for African Nations-Growing Regional Operability (MEDCAN-GRO) is a framework for addressing healthcare engagements that are intended to provide sustainable capacity building with partner nations. MEDCAN-GRO provides SOF units with a model that can be scaled to partner nation needs and aligned with the goals of the TSOC in an effort to enhance partner nation security.

  12. Department of Defense / General Services Administration / National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... (DoD), General Services Administration (GSA), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA...., Washington, DC 20405, (202) 501-4755. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: DoD, GSA, and NASA, under their several... Acquisition Policy. DOD/GSA/NASA (FAR)--Final Rule Stage Regulation Sequence Title Identifier Number...

  13. 20. Photocopy of National Park Service photograph, US Department of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Photocopy of National Park Service photograph, US Department of Interior, Washington, DC. Photograph No. 8005.B, 4 July 1963. CASCADE FROM ABOVE - Meridian Hill Park, Bounded by Fifteenth, Sixteenth, Euclid & W Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  14. 12. Photocopy of photograph, National Park Service, US Department of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photocopy of photograph, National Park Service, US Department of Interior, Washington, DC. Photograph No. 9525-A, 15 December 1965 ARMILLARY SPHERE AT EXEDRA - Meridian Hill Park, Bounded by Fifteenth, Sixteenth, Euclid & W Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  15. Department of Education: Accompanying Report of the National Performance Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of the Vice President, Washington, DC.

    This report details 12 recommendations and actions, agency re-invention activities, and fiscal impact analyses for the Department of Education resulting from the National Performance Review. Overall, the recommendations and analyses show that the Department could save $173.2 million by 1999 and that, by adopting these recommendations to clarify…

  16. In Pursuit of the African PhD: A Critical Survey of Emergent Policy Issues in Select Sub-Saharan African Nations, Ethiopia, Ghana and South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molla, Tebeje; Cuthbert, Denise

    2016-01-01

    After decades of decline, African higher education is now arguably in a new era of revival. With the prevalence of knowledge economy discourse, national governments in Africa and their development partners have increasingly aligned higher education with poverty reduction plans and strategies. Research capacity has become a critical development…

  17. Organizational Religious Behavior among Older African Americans: Findings from the National Survey of American Life

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Robert Joseph; Chatters, Linda M.; Bullard, Kai McKeever; Wallace, John M.; Jackson, James S.

    2010-01-01

    This study utilizes data from the older African American sub-sample of the National Survey of American Life (n=837) to examine the sociodemographic and denominational correlates of organizational religious involvement among older African Americans. Six measures of organizational religious participation are utilized, including two measures of time allocation for organized religious pursuits. The findings indicate significant gender, region, marital status and denominational differences in organizational religiosity. Of particular note, although older black women generally displayed higher levels of religious participation, older black men spent more hours per week in other activities at their place of worship. The findings are discussed in relation to prior work in the area of religious involvement among older adults. New directions for research on religious time allocation are outlined. PMID:21052487

  18. Parental Support, Mental Health, and Alcohol and Marijuana Use in National and High-Risk African-American Adolescent Samples

    PubMed Central

    Maslowsky, Julie; Schulenberg, John; Chiodo, Lisa M.; Hannigan, John H.; Greenwald, Mark K.; Janisse, James; Sokol, Robert J.; Delaney-Black, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    African-American adolescents experience disproportionate rates of negative consequences of substance use despite using substances at average or below-average rates. Due to underrepresentation of African-American adolescents in etiological literature, risk and protective processes associated with their substance use require further study. This study examines the role of parental support in adolescents’ conduct problems (CPs), depressive symptoms (DSs), and alcohol and marijuana use in a national sample and a high-risk sample of African-American adolescents. In both samples, parental support was inversely related to adolescent CPs, DSs, and alcohol and marijuana use. CPs, but not DSs, partially mediated the relation of parental support to substance use. Results were consistent across the national and high-risk samples, suggesting that the protective effect of parental support applies to African-American adolescents from a range of demographic backgrounds. PMID:26843811

  19. Comparative self-concept variances of school children in two English-speaking West African nations.

    PubMed

    Alawiye, O; Alawiye, C Z; Thomas, J I

    1990-03-01

    This study examined the self-concepts of elementary school children in Grades 2, 4, 6, and 8, from two West African nations, Ghana and Gambia. Measures of self-concept in the areas of physical maturity, peer relations, academic success, and school adaptiveness were obtained from 195 Ghanaian and 156 Gambian students. The mean scores of the students were subjected to a series of three-way analyses of variance (ANOVAs). The independent variables were sex, grade level, and nationality. The overall analyses revealed grade level as the most potent variable in the self-concept development of both groups, whereas the sex variable indicated interaction with grade level only in Gambian children. The self-esteem of the children in both nations in the areas of physical maturity, peer relations, and academic success was relatively high and stable. Self-concept developmental patterns showed differences across grade levels in the four self-concept areas being tested.

  20. Comparing the Experiential and Psychosocial Dimensions of Chronic Pain in African Americans and Caucasians: Findings from a National Community Sample

    PubMed Central

    Ruehlman, Linda S.; Karoly, Paul; Newton, Craig

    2005-01-01

    Objectives To ascertain whether non-Hispanic African American and Caucasian chronic pain sufferers differ or converge in their self-reports of pain experience and pain adjustment. Research Design A telephone survey of U.S. English-speaking adults selected via random-digit dialing procedures and constrained to locate persons with chronic pain within selected gender by age groupings. Subjects A national sample of 2,407 participants contained a total of 214 non-Hispanic African Americans. A sample of 214 non-Hispanic Caucasians was randomly selected from the larger set of 1,935 Caucasian participants to serve as a comparison group for the present study. Measures Participants provided responses to interviewer questions that assessed pain experience (severity, interference, and emotional burden) and psychosocial outcomes (coping, attitudes and beliefs, catastrophizing, social support and hindrance, pain’s interference with daily life activities, treatment status, and medication taking). Results Although African American and Caucasian adults with chronic pain did not differ significantly in pain severity, interference, emotional burden, or current treatment status, multivariate analyses revealed differences in several domains of psychosocial functioning. Compared to Caucasians, African Americans reported greater pain-related interference with daily living, deficiencies in coping, and counterproductive attitudes and beliefs. African Americans also reported greater impatience and insensitivity from the most important person in their lives. Conclusions Psychosocial dimensions of chronic pain differed between community-residing African American and Caucasian adults surveyed as part of a national sample. PMID:15669950

  1. Effects of chemical immobilization on survival of African buffalo in the Kruger National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oosthuizen, W.C.; Cross, P.C.; Bowers, J.A.; Hay, C.; Ebinger, M.R.; Buss, P.; Hofmeyr, M.; Cameron, E.Z.

    2009-01-01

    Capturing, immobilizing, and fitting radiocollars are common practices in studies of large mammals, but success is based on the assumptions that captured animals are representative of the rest of the population and that the capture procedure has negligible effects. We estimated effects of chemical immobilization on mortality rates of African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in the Kruger National Park, South Africa. We used a Cox proportional hazards approach to test for differences in mortality among age, sex, and capture classes of repeatedly captured radiocollared buffalo. Capture variables did not improve model fit and the Cox regression did not indicate increased risk of death for captured individuals up to 90 days postcapture [exp (??) = 1.07]. Estimated confidence intervals, however, span from a halving to a doubling of the mortality rate (95% CI = 0.56-2.02). Therefore, capture did not influence survival of captured individuals using data on 875 captures over a 5-year period. Consequently, long-term research projects on African buffalo involving immobilization, such as associated with research on bovine tuberculosis, should result in minimal capture mortality, but monitoring of possible effects should continue.

  2. Prevalence of bovine tuberculosis in African buffalo at Kruger National Park.

    PubMed

    Rodwell, T C; Kriek, N P; Bengis, R G; Whyte, I J; Viljoen, P C; de Vos, V; Boyce, W M

    2001-04-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) was first detected in Kruger National Park (KNP) in a single African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in 1990. In 1991/1992, 2,071 African buffalo were examined for BTB as part of a culling program that removed animals from all known herds in KNP. The prevalence of BTB in 1991/1992 was estimated to be 0%, 4.4% (+/-0.6%), and 27.1% (+/-1.4%), in the north, central, and south zones of KNP, respectively. In 1998, a stratified, two-stage cluster sampling method was used to estimate that the prevalence of BTB was 1.5% (+/-2.5%), 16% (+/-5.3%), and 38.2% (+/-6.3%), in the north, central, and south zones, respectively. This represented a significant increase in prevalence (P < or = 0.05) in the south and central zones, but not in the north zone. Continued monitoring of BTB in KNP is important for understanding disease transmission risks, potential population effects, and the efficacy of disease management strategies. The methodology and sample sizes used in 1998 are appropriate for future BTB monitoring in KNP.

  3. Men who have sex with men inadequately addressed in African AIDS National Strategic Plans.

    PubMed

    Makofane, Keletso; Gueboguo, Charles; Lyons, Daniel; Sandfort, Theo

    2013-01-01

    Through an analysis of AIDS National Strategic Plans (NSPs), this study investigated the responses of African governments to the HIV epidemics faced by men who have sex with men (MSM). NSPs from 46 African countries were systematically analysed, with attention focused on (1) the representation of MSM and their HIV risk, (2) the inclusion of epidemiologic information on the HIV epidemic among MSM and (3) government-led interventions addressing MSM. Out of 46 NSPs, 34 mentioned MSM. While two-thirds of these NSPs acknowledged the vulnerability of MSM to HIV infection, fewer than half acknowledged the role of stigma or criminalisation. Four NSPs showed estimated HIV prevalence among MSM, and one included incidence. Two-thirds of the NSPs proposed government-led HIV interventions that address MSM. Those that did plan to intervene planned to do so through policy interventions, social interventions, HIV-prevention interventions, HIV-treatment interventions and monitoring activities. Overall, the governments of the countries included in the study exhibited little knowledge of HIV disease dynamics among MSM and little knowledge of the social dynamics behind MSM's HIV risk. Concerted action is needed to integrate MSM into NSPs and governmental health policies in a way that acknowledges this population and its specific HIV/AIDS-related needs.

  4. A comparative analysis of national HIV policies in six African countries with generalized epidemics

    PubMed Central

    Kiweewa, Francis; Dasgupta, Aisha; Mwangome, Mary; Mpandaguta, Edith; Gómez-Olivé, Francesc Xavier; Oti, Samuel; Todd, Jim; Wringe, Alison; Geubbels, Eveline; Crampin, Amelia; Nakiyingi-Miiro, Jessica; Hayashi, Chika; Njage, Muthoni; Wagner, Ryan G; Ario, Alex Riolexus; Makombe, Simon D; Mugurungi, Owen; Zaba, Basia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To compare national human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) policies influencing access to HIV testing and treatment services in six sub-Saharan African countries. Methods We reviewed HIV policies as part of a multi-country study on adult mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. A policy extraction tool was developed and used to review national HIV policy documents and guidelines published in Kenya, Malawi, South Africa, Uganda, the United Republic of Tanzania and Zimbabwe between 2003 and 2013. Key informant interviews helped to fill gaps in findings. National policies were categorized according to whether they explicitly or implicitly adhered to 54 policy indicators, identified through literature and expert reviews. We also compared the national policies with World Health Organization (WHO) guidance. Findings There was wide variation in policies between countries; each country was progressive in some areas and not in others. Malawi was particularly advanced in promoting rapid initiation of antiretroviral therapy. However, no country had a consistently enabling policy context expected to increase access to care and prevent attrition. Countries went beyond WHO guidance in certain areas and key informants reported that practice often surpassed policy. Conclusion Evaluating the impact of policy differences on access to care and health outcomes among people living with HIV is challenging. Certain policies will exert more influence than others and official policies are not always implemented. Future research should assess the extent of policy implementation and link these findings with HIV outcomes. PMID:26170503

  5. Distinct age and self-rated health crossover mortality effects for African Americans: Evidence from a national cohort study.

    PubMed

    Roth, David L; Skarupski, Kimberly A; Crews, Deidra C; Howard, Virginia J; Locher, Julie L

    2016-05-01

    The predictive effects of age and self-rated health (SRH) on all-cause mortality are known to differ across race and ethnic groups. African American adults have higher mortality rates than Whites at younger ages, but this mortality disparity diminishes with advancing age and may "crossover" at about 75-80 years of age, when African Americans may show lower mortality rates. This pattern of findings reflects a lower overall association between age and mortality for African Americans than for Whites, and health-related mechanisms are typically cited as the reason for this age-based crossover mortality effect. However, a lower association between poor SRH and mortality has also been found for African Americans than for Whites, and it is not known if the reduced age and SRH associations with mortality for African Americans reflect independent or overlapping mechanisms. This study examined these two mortality predictors simultaneously in a large epidemiological study of 12,181 African Americans and 17,436 Whites. Participants were 45 or more years of age when they enrolled in the national REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study between 2003 and 2007. Consistent with previous studies, African Americans had poorer SRH than Whites even after adjusting for demographic and health history covariates. Survival analysis models indicated statistically significant and independent race*age, race*SRH, and age*SRH interaction effects on all-cause mortality over an average 9-year follow-up period. Advanced age and poorer SRH were both weaker mortality risk factors for African Americans than for Whites. These two effects were distinct and presumably tapped different causal mechanisms. This calls into question the health-related explanation for the age-based mortality crossover effect and suggests that other mechanisms, including behavioral, social, and cultural factors, should be considered in efforts to better understand the age-based mortality

  6. An informatics system to support knowledge management in the health sector--the South African National Health Knowledge Network.

    PubMed

    Louw, J A; Seebregts, C J; Makgoba, W M; Fouché, B

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses the planning and development of a South African national health knowledge network. The methodology is in essence based on the principles of knowledge management and the drivers of a system of innovation. The knowledge network, SA HealthInfo, aims to provide a one-stop interactive forum/resource, for quality-controlled and evidence-based health research information, to a wide spectrum of users, at various levels of aggregation, with the necessary security arrangements and facilities for interaction among users to promote explicit (codified) and tacit knowledge flow. It will therefore stimulate the process of innovation within the South African health system.

  7. Nematodes of the small intestine of African buffaloes, Syncerus caffer, in the Kruger National Park, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Taylor, William A; Skinner, John D; Boomker, Joop

    2013-05-16

    The abundance and distribution of parasitic helminths in populations of African buffaloes, Syncerus caffer, have not been well documented. A total of 28 buffaloes of different ages and sexeswere sampled in the Kruger National Park, South Africa, for nematodes of the small intestine. Three nematode species were identified, namely Cooperia fuelleborni, Cooperia hungi and Trichostrongylus deflexus, with C. hungi being a new country record for African buffalo in South Africa. The overall prevalence was 71%and the average number of worms was 2346 (range: 0-15 980). This is a small burden for such a large mammal. Sex, age and body condition of the buffaloes had no significant effect on worm occurrence.

  8. Factors influencing adherence to an emergency department national protocol.

    PubMed

    Ebben, Remco H A; Vloet, Lilian C M; de Groot, Joke Mintjes; van Achterberg, Theo

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to identify factors that influence emergency nurses' adherence to an emergency department national protocol (EDNP). A survey of emergency nurses (n=200) and physicians with medical end responsibility on an emergency department (n=103) was carried out. Emergency nurses' self-reported adherence to the EDNP was 38%, 55% of the nurses and 44% of the physicians were aware of the protocol. Interference with professional autonomy, insufficient organizational support and the EDNP's applicability were indicated as barriers for adherence. The main influencing factor seems awareness. Other factors related to the individual, the organization and to protocol characteristics. Solely disseminating the EDNP is not enough to get the protocol used in clinical practice. PMID:21552130

  9. Alternative futures for the Department of Energy National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    This Task Force was asked to propose alternate futures for the Department of Energy laboratories noted in the report. The authors` intensive ten months` study revealed multiple missions and sub-missions--traditional missions and new missions--programs and projects--each with factors of merit. They respectively suggest that the essence of what the Department, and particularly the laboratories, should and do stand for: the energy agenda. Under the overarching energy agenda--the labs serving the energy opportunities--they comment on their national security role, the all important energy role, all related environmental roles, the science and engineering underpinning for all the above, a focused economic role, and conclude with governance/organization change recommendations.

  10. Rates and correlates of undetermined deaths among African Americans: results from the National Violent Death Reporting System.

    PubMed

    Huguet, Nathalie; Kaplan, Mark S; McFarland, Bentson H

    2012-04-01

    Little is known about the factors associated with undetermined death classifications among African Americans. In this study, the rates of undetermined deaths were assessed, the prevalence of missing information was estimated, and whether the circumstances preceding death differ by race were examined. Data were derived from the 2005-2008 National Violent Death Reporting System. African Americans had higher prevalence of missing information than Whites. African Americans classified as undetermined deaths were more likely to be older, women, never married/single, to have had a blood alcohol content at or above the legal limit, and to have had a substance abuse problem. The results suggest that racial differences in the preponderance and the type of evidence surrounding the death may affect death classification.

  11. 76 FR 30264 - Department of State Acquisition Regulation; Foreign Nationals and Third Country Nationals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-25

    ... appointment of selected non-U.S. citizen locally employed staff, i.e., Foreign Nationals and Third Country... streamlined procurement processes at applicable Department of State overseas posts. DATES: Effective Date: This rule is effective June 24, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Barbara Latvanas,...

  12. A molecular analysis of African lion (Panthera leo) mating structure and extra-group paternity in Etosha National Park.

    PubMed

    Lyke, M M; Dubach, J; Briggs, M B

    2013-05-01

    The recent incorporation of molecular methods into analyses of social and mating systems has provided evidence that mating patterns often differ from those predicted by group social organization. Based on field studies and paternity analyses at a limited number of sites, African lions are predicted to exhibit a strict within-pride mating system. Extra-group paternity has not been previously reported in African lions; however, observations of extra-group associations among lions inhabiting Etosha National Park in Namibia suggest deviation from the predicted within-pride mating pattern. We analysed variation in 14 microsatellite loci in a population of 164 African lions in Etosha National Park. Genetic analysis was coupled with demographic and observational data to examine pride structure, relatedness and extra-group paternity (EGP). EGP was found to occur in 57% of prides where paternity was analysed (n = 7), and the overall rate of EGP in this population was 41% (n = 34). Group sex ratio had a significant effect on the occurrence of EGP (P < 0.05), indicating that variation in pride-level social structure may explain intergroup variation in EGP. Prides with a lower male-to-female ratio were significantly more likely to experience EGP in this population. The results of this study challenge the current models of African lion mating systems and provide evidence that social structure may not reflect breeding structure in some social mammals.

  13. Gender Blind, Gender-Lite: A Critique of Gender Equity Approaches in the South African Department of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dieltiens, Veerle; Unterhalter, Elaine; Letsatsi, Setungoane; North, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Gender equity is one of the foundational principles of the national Department of Education, but there is not a shared understanding of its meaning. Based on interviews conducted in 2008 with officials in the Department of Education, we argue that there are two basic approaches to gender equity. The first, which we term "gender blind", equates…

  14. National survey of pediatric services available in US emergency departments

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Children account for nearly 20% of all US emergency department (ED) visits, yet previous national surveys found that many EDs lack specialized pediatric care. In response, a 2001 joint policy statement recommended resources needed by EDs for effective pediatric emergency care delivery. We sought to update and enhance previous estimates of pediatric services available in US EDs. Methods We administered a telephone survey to a 5% random sample (n = 279) of all US EDs from the 2007 National Emergency Department Inventory-USA. The survey collected data on local capabilities (including typical management of three clinical scenarios) and prevalence of a coordinator for pediatric emergency care. We used descriptive statistics to summarize data. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the association between survey respondent and ED characteristics as well as the presence of a coordinator for pediatric emergency medicine. Results Data were collected from 238 hospitals (85% response rate). A minority of hospitals had pediatric departments (36%) or intensive care units (12%). The median annual number of ED visits by children was 3,870 (interquartile range 1,500–8,800). Ten percent of hospitals had a separate pediatric ED; only 17% had a designated pediatric emergency care coordinator. Significant positive predictors of a coordinator were an ED pediatric visit volume of ≥1 patient per hour and urban location. Most EDs treated only mild-to-moderate cases of childhood bronchiolitis and asthma exacerbation (77% and 65%, respectively). Less than half (48%) of the hospitals reported the ability to surgically manage a child with acute appendicitis. Conclusion We found little change in pediatric emergency services compared to earlier estimates. Our study results suggest a continued need for improvements to ensure access to emergency care for children. PMID:23618163

  15. The National Dilemma of African American Students: Disparities in Mathematics Achievement and Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Clarence; Kritsonis, William Allan

    2006-01-01

    A significant number of African American students are failing mathematics courses. Identifying the causes of the students failing mathematics courses will solve a problem that has existed for almost a century. Current research will state that disparities in mathematics exist in American schools. The essay will research reasons why African American…

  16. Knowledge, Narrative and National Reconciliation: Storied Reflections on the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Melanie; Unterhalter, Elaine

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers the educational work that narrative does. Against the context of the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission that examined the crimes of apartheid, it discusses the narrative implications of South African poet Antjie Krog's multi-layered text of Truth Commission testimony, and autobiographical and philosophical…

  17. The Rise of Nationalism: Freedom Regained. Through African Eyes: Cultures in Change, Unit V.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Leon E., Ed.

    The exciting period after World War II, when independence movements developed and flourished throughout Africa is the topic of this book, fifth in a series dealing with African culture and intended for secondary level students. Almost all of the selections in the book were written by Africans and come from a variety of sources including…

  18. Provider Adherence to National Guidelines for Managing Hypertension in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Sessoms, Jeanette; Reid, Kathryn; Williams, Ishan; Hinton, Ivora

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate provider adherence to national guidelines for the treatment of hypertension in African Americans. Design. A descriptive, preexperimental, quantitative method. Methods. Electronic medical records were reviewed and data were obtained from 62 charts. Clinical data collected included blood pressure readings, medications prescribed, laboratory studies, lifestyle modification, referral to hypertension specialist, and follow-up care. Findings. Overall provider adherence was 75%. Weight loss, sodium restriction, and physical activity recommendations were documented on 82.3% of patients. DASH diet and alcohol consumption were documented in 6.5% of participants. Follow-up was documented in 96.6% of the patients with controlled blood pressure and 9.1% in patients with uncontrolled blood pressure. Adherence in prescribing ACEIs in patients with a comorbidity of DM was documented in 70% of participants. Microalbumin levels were ordered in 15.2% of participants. Laboratory adherence prior to prescribing medications was documented in 0% of the patients and biannual routine labs were documented in 65% of participants. Conclusion. Provider adherence overall was moderate. Despite moderate provider adherence, BP outcomes and provider adherence were not related. Contributing factors that may explain this lack of correlation include patient barriers such as nonadherence to medication and lifestyle modification recommendations and lack of adequate follow-up. Further research is warranted. PMID:26550489

  19. Identification of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria from three African leguminous trees in Gorongosa National Park.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Helena; Rodríguez-Echeverría, Susana

    2016-07-01

    The symbiosis between leguminous plants and symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria is a key component of terrestrial ecosystems. Woody legumes are well represented in tropical African forests but despite their ecological and socio-economic importance, they have been little studied for this symbiosis. In this study, we examined the identity and diversity of symbiotic-nitrogen fixing bacteria associated with Acacia xanthophloea, Faidherbia albida and Albizia versicolor in the Gorongosa National Park (GNP) in Mozambique. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the identity of symbiotic-nitrogen fixing bacteria in this region. 166 isolates were obtained and subjected to molecular identification. BOX-A1R PCR was used to discriminate different bacterial isolates and PCR-sequencing of 16S rDNA, and two housekeeping genes, glnII and recA, was used to identify the obtained bacteria. The gene nifH was also analyzed to assess the symbiotic capacity of the obtained bacteria. All isolates from F. albida and Al. versicolor belonged to the Bradyrhizobium genus whereas isolates from Ac. xanthophloea clustered with Mesorhizobium, Rhizobium or Ensifer strains. Soil chemical analysis revealed significant differences between the soils occupied by the three studied species. Thus, we found a clear delimitation in the rhizobial communities and soils associated with Ac. xanthophloea, F. albida and Al. versicolor, and higher rhizobial diversity for Ac. xanthophloea than previously reported.

  20. Identification of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria from three African leguminous trees in Gorongosa National Park.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Helena; Rodríguez-Echeverría, Susana

    2016-07-01

    The symbiosis between leguminous plants and symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria is a key component of terrestrial ecosystems. Woody legumes are well represented in tropical African forests but despite their ecological and socio-economic importance, they have been little studied for this symbiosis. In this study, we examined the identity and diversity of symbiotic-nitrogen fixing bacteria associated with Acacia xanthophloea, Faidherbia albida and Albizia versicolor in the Gorongosa National Park (GNP) in Mozambique. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the identity of symbiotic-nitrogen fixing bacteria in this region. 166 isolates were obtained and subjected to molecular identification. BOX-A1R PCR was used to discriminate different bacterial isolates and PCR-sequencing of 16S rDNA, and two housekeeping genes, glnII and recA, was used to identify the obtained bacteria. The gene nifH was also analyzed to assess the symbiotic capacity of the obtained bacteria. All isolates from F. albida and Al. versicolor belonged to the Bradyrhizobium genus whereas isolates from Ac. xanthophloea clustered with Mesorhizobium, Rhizobium or Ensifer strains. Soil chemical analysis revealed significant differences between the soils occupied by the three studied species. Thus, we found a clear delimitation in the rhizobial communities and soils associated with Ac. xanthophloea, F. albida and Al. versicolor, and higher rhizobial diversity for Ac. xanthophloea than previously reported. PMID:27287843

  1. U.S. Department of Education Chapter of Blacks In Government (BIG) Report: The Status of the African American Workforce at the U.S. Department of Education as of the First Quarter of 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Wanda E.

    2013-01-01

    In December 2012, the "U.S. Department of Education Chapter of Blacks In Government (BIG) Report: The Status of the African American Workforce at the U.S. Department of Education" (ED538186) described racial and demographic data by grade levels for Pay Period 11 in 2012 compared to similar data towards the end of the Bush administration. At that…

  2. Technology integration project: Environmental Restoration Technologies Department Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C.V.; Burford, T.D.; Allen, C.A.

    1996-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Restoration Technologies Department is developing environmental restoration technologies through funding form the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Science and Technology. Initially, this technology development has been through the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID). It is currently being developed through the Contaminant Plume containment and Remediation Focus Area, the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area, and the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Cross-Cutting Program. This Technology Integration Project (TIP) was responsible for transferring MWLID-developed technologies for routine use by environmental restoration groups throughout the DOE complex and commercializing these technologies to the private sector. The MWLID`s technology transfer/commercialization successes were achieved by involving private industry in development, demonstration, and technology transfer/commercialization activities; gathering and disseminating information about MWLID activities and technologies; and promoting stakeholder and regulatory involvement. From FY91 through FY95, 30 Technical Task Plans (TTPs) were funded. From these TTPs, the MWLID can claim 15 technology transfer/commercialization successes. Another seven technology transfer/commercialization successes are expected. With the changeover to the focus areas, the TIP continued the technology transfer/commercialization efforts begun under the MWLID.

  3. Religious Participation is Associated with Increases in Religious Social Support in a National Longitudinal Study of African Americans.

    PubMed

    Le, Daisy; Holt, Cheryl L; Hosack, Dominic P; Huang, Jin; Clark, Eddie M

    2016-08-01

    This study reports on the association between religious beliefs and behaviors and the change in both general and religious social support using two waves of data from a national sample of African Americans. The Religion and Health in African Americans (RHIAA) study is a longitudinal telephone survey designed to examine relationships between various aspects of religious involvement and psychosocial factors over time. RHIAA participants were 3173 African American men (1281) and women (1892). A total of 1251 men (456) and women (795) participated in wave 2 of data collection. Baseline religious behaviors were associated with increased overall religious social support from baseline to wave 2 (p < .001) and with increased religious social support from baseline to wave 2 in each of the following religious social support subscales: emotional support received (p < .001), emotional support provided (p < .001), negative interaction (p < .001), and anticipated support (p < .001). Religious beliefs did not predict change in any type of support, and neither beliefs nor behaviors predicted change in general social support. African Americans who are active in faith communities showed increases in all types of religious social support, even the negative aspects, over a relatively modest longitudinal study period. This illustrates the strength of the church as a social network and the role that it plays in people's lives.

  4. The Ebola threat: China's response to the West African epidemic and national development of prevention and control policies and infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hao-Jun; Gao, Hong-Wei; Ding, Hui; Zhang, Bi-Ke; Hou, Shi-Ke

    2015-02-01

    There is growing concern in West Africa about the spread of the Ebola hemorrhagic fever virus. With the increasing global public health risk, a coordinated international response is necessary. The Chinese government is prepared to work in collaboration with West African countries to assist in the containment and control of the epidemic through the contribution of medical expertise and mobile laboratory testing teams. Nationally, China is implementing prevention programs in major cities and provinces, the distribution of Ebola test kits, and the deployment of a new national Ebola research laboratory.

  5. The Ebola threat: China's response to the West African epidemic and national development of prevention and control policies and infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hao-Jun; Gao, Hong-Wei; Ding, Hui; Zhang, Bi-Ke; Hou, Shi-Ke

    2015-02-01

    There is growing concern in West Africa about the spread of the Ebola hemorrhagic fever virus. With the increasing global public health risk, a coordinated international response is necessary. The Chinese government is prepared to work in collaboration with West African countries to assist in the containment and control of the epidemic through the contribution of medical expertise and mobile laboratory testing teams. Nationally, China is implementing prevention programs in major cities and provinces, the distribution of Ebola test kits, and the deployment of a new national Ebola research laboratory. PMID:25563862

  6. Racism and the physical and mental health status of African Americans: a thirteen year national panel study.

    PubMed

    Jackson, J S; Brown, T N; Williams, D R; Torres, M; Sellers, S L; Brown, K

    1996-01-01

    This paper examined the relationships between the experiences and perceptions of racism and the physical and mental health status of African Americans. The study was based upon thirteen year (1979 to 1992), four wave, national panel data (n = 623) from the National Survey of Black Americans. Personal experiences of racism were found to have both adverse and salubrious immediate and cumulative effects on the physical and mental well-being of African Americans. In 1979-80, reports of poor treatment due to race were inversely related to subjective well-being and positively associated with the number of reported physical health problems. Reports of negative racial encounters over the 13-year period were weakly predictive of poor subjective well-being in 1992. A more general measure of racial beliefs, perceiving that whites want to keep blacks down, was found to be related to poorer physical health in 1979-80, better physical health in 1992, and predicted increased psychological distress, as well as, lower levels of subjective well-being in 1992. In conclusion, the authors suggested future research on possible factors contributing to the relationship between racism and health status among African Americans.

  7. Correlates of Spirituality among African Americans and Caribbean Blacks in the United States: Findings from the National Survey of American Life

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Robert Joseph; Chatters, Linda M.; Jackson, James S.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined differences in reports of spirituality among African Americans, Caribbean Blacks (Black Caribbeans), and non-Hispanic whites using data from the National Survey of American Life (NSAL). Bivariate analyses indicated that African Americans were most likely to endorse statements regarding the importance of spirituality in their lives (“How important is spirituality in your life?”) and self-assessments of spirituality (“How spiritual would you say you are?”), followed by Caribbean Blacks and non-Hispanic whites. Regression analyses indicated that African Americans and Caribbean Blacks had significantly higher levels of spirituality than did non-Hispanic whites. However, there were no significant differences in spirituality between African Americans and Caribbean Blacks. Separate regression analyses for African Americans and Caribbean Blacks indicated distinctive patterns of sociodemographic and denominational correlates of spiritual sentiments. Findings are discussed in relation to available survey and ethnographic data on self-assessments of spirituality. PMID:21031157

  8. 76 FR 64108 - Meeting of the Department of Justice's (DOJ's) National Motor Vehicle Title Information System...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Office of Justice Programs Meeting of the Department of Justice's (DOJ's) National Motor Vehicle Title Information System (NMVTIS) Federal Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Justice Programs (OJP),...

  9. 77 FR 10573 - Meeting of the Department of Justice's (DOJ's) National Motor Vehicle Title Information System...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Office of Justice Programs Meeting of the Department of Justice's (DOJ's) National Motor Vehicle Title Information System (NMVTIS) Federal Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Justice Programs (OJP),...

  10. 78 FR 51747 - Meeting of the Department of Justice's (DOJ's) National Motor Vehicle Title Information System...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Office of Justice Programs Meeting of the Department of Justice's (DOJ's) National Motor Vehicle Title Information System (NMVTIS) Federal Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Justice Programs (OJP),...

  11. 76 FR 38209 - Meeting of the Department of Justice's (DOJ's) National Motor Vehicle Title Information System...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Office of Justice Programs Meeting of the Department of Justice's (DOJ's) National Motor Vehicle Title Information System (NMVTIS) Federal Advisory Committee AGENCY: Bureau of Justice Assistance, Justice....

  12. Rapid Increases in Overweight and Obesity Among South African Adolescents: Comparison of Data From the South African National Youth Risk Behaviour Survey in 2002 and 2008

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Sasiragha P.; Resnicow, Ken; James, Shamagonam; Funani, Itumeleng N.; Kambaran, Nilen S.; Omardien, Riyadh G.; Sewpaul, Ronel; Vaughan, Roger D.; Mbewu, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To aid future policy and intervention initiatives, we studied the prevalence and correlates of overweight and obesity among participants in the South African National Youth Risk Behaviour Survey in 2002 and 2008. Methods. The survey collected data from nationally representative cross-sectional samples of students in grades 8 through 11 (n = 9491 in 2002 and 9442 in 2008) by questionnaire and measurement of height and weight. We stratified data on overweight and obesity rates by age, socioeconomic status, and race/ethnicity. Results. Among male adolescents, overweight rates increased from 6.3% in 2002 to 11.0% in 2008 (P < .01); among female adolescents, overweight rates increased from 24.3% in 2002 to 29.0% in 2008 (P < .01). Obesity rates more than doubled among male adolescents from 1.6% in 2002 to 3.3% in 2008 (P < .01) and rose from 5.0% to 7.5% among female adolescents (P < .01). We observed a dose–response relationship in overweight and obesity rates across socioeconomic categories. Rates of overweight and obesity were significantly higher among urban youths than among rural youths (P < .01). Conclusions. South Africa is experiencing a chronic disease risk transition. Further research is needed to better understand and effectively address this rapid change. PMID:21940919

  13. Experiences and perspectives of African American, Latina/o, Asian American, and European American psychology graduate students: A national study.

    PubMed

    Maton, Kenneth I; Wimms, Harriette E; Grant, Sheila K; Wittig, Michele A; Rogers, Margaret R; Vasquez, Melba J T

    2011-01-01

    A national, Web-based survey of 1,219 African American, Latina/o, Asian American, and European American psychology graduate students revealed both similarities and differences in experiences and perspectives. Mentoring was found to be the strongest predictor of satisfaction across groups. Academic supports and barriers, along with perceptions of diversity within the academic environment, were also important predictors of satisfaction. Students of color perceived less fairness of representation of their ethnic group within psychology than European American students, and a greater linkage between aspects of the graduate school experience and their ethnicity. Limitations of the study and implications for future research and action are discussed.

  14. Characterizing Strong Geoscience Departments: Results of a National Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, R. M.

    2005-12-01

    In a follow up to a survey of geoscience departments drawn primarily from American Association of Universities (AAU) institutions, we have expanded the number and type of departments to include a much broader range of institutions and to address key issues about factors that department heads and chairs feel are indicative of strong departments. The previous survey, completed at a very high rate of return, indicated that the biggest opportunities at AAU institutions included large, community-wide initiatives, while the biggest threats included declining resources and associated issues such as faculty retention. The new survey follows on a workshop, Building Strong Geoscience Departments, held in February 2005 at which 25 participants discussed the state of geoscience departments and developed ideas for strengthening departments. The new survey addresses departmental demographics of a much broader range of departments and institutions, including two year, primarily undergraduate, and graduate degree-granting departments/institutions. In addition to perceived threats and opportunities, the survey includes aspects and characteristics of strong departments. For example, department heads and chairs respond to a variety of possible attributes of strong departments, including: 1) Defining the mission of the department in such a way that it is aligned with the institutional vision; 2) Taking a proactive stance in building modern and dynamic geoscience curricula and, as appropriate, research agendas; 3) Working effectively as a department team; 4) Acknowledging that recruitment, development, and retention of students, faculty, and staff are key elements of departmental success and working effectively in these areas; 5) Developing strong departmental leaders now and for the future; 6) Communicating success, using effective metrics, to colleagues, senior administrators, students, donors, and friends; and 7) Forging strategic partnerships within the university (e.g., with

  15. Ruptures in the Rainbow Nation: How Desegregated South African Schools Deal with Interpersonal and Structural Racism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teeger, Chana

    2015-01-01

    Racially diverse schools are often presented as places where students can learn to challenge racist discourse and practice. Yet there are a variety of processes through which such schools reproduce the very hierarchies they are meant to dismantle. Drawing on 18 months of fieldwork in two racially diverse South African high schools, I add to the…

  16. Rainbow Nation's "Ubuntu": Discovering Distinctness as a Spectrum through South African Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Colin Bridges

    2007-01-01

    Apartheid created more than physical distances between color groups; South Africa is made up of people with often separated minds. Leaders of the democratic government draw from and modify the ancient African tribal value called "ubuntu" as the philosophic basis for their cultural strategy of unification. Sandra Chait has pointed out that much of…

  17. A Critical Evaluation of Training within the South African National Public Works Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mccord, Anna

    2005-01-01

    This article explores the ability of the training and work experience offered under public works programmes to promote employment in South Africa. Public works are a key component of South African labour market policy and are ascribed considerable potential in terms of addressing the core challenge of unemployment. However, despite this policy…

  18. Influences on Labor Market Outcomes of African American College Graduates: A National Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strayhorn, Terrell L.

    2008-01-01

    Using an expanded econometric model, this study sought to estimate more precisely the net effect of independent variables (i.e., attending an HBCU) on three measures of labor market outcomes for African American college graduates. Findings reveal a statistically significant, albeit moderate, relationship between measures of background, human and…

  19. Free within Ourselves: African American Artists in the Collection of the National Museum of American Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Regenia A.; And Others

    This document consists of the first two (printed) components of an instructional packet that includes: (1) a 206-page book, "Face Within Ourselves"; (2) a 39-page study guide "African American Artists, Affirmation Today"; (3) 28-minute videotape of five contemporary artists; (4) twenty 35-mm color slides. This packet introduces the significant…

  20. 78 FR 65362 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Capitol...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Capitol Reef National Park, Torrey, UT AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Capitol Reef National Park...

  1. 78 FR 78380 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Fort...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Fort Bowie National Historic Site, Bowie, AZ AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Fort Bowie National...

  2. 75 FR 30428 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Grand...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon, AZ AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION... the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand...

  3. 78 FR 21400 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Grand...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon, AZ AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Grand Canyon National...

  4. 78 FR 21404 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Grand...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon, AZ AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Grand Canyon National...

  5. 78 FR 72703 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-03

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Canyonlands National Park, Moab, UT AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Canyonlands National Park,...

  6. A National Survey of Counselor Education Departments: Course Offerings on Marriage and Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peltier, Steven W.; Vale, Sara O.

    1986-01-01

    Summarizes information gathered in a national survey of the course offerings and programs in marriage and family counseling offered by 244 counselor education departments. Approximately two-thirds of those departments offered such courses. Approximately 90 percent of the departments supported marriage and family course offerings in counselor…

  7. A sub-national scale geospatial analysis of diamond deposit lootability: the case of the Central African Republic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malpeli, Katherine C.; Chirico, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    The Central African Republic (CAR), a country with rich diamond deposits and a tumultuous political history, experienced a government takeover by the Seleka rebel coalition in 2013. It is within this context that we developed and implemented a geospatial approach for assessing the lootability of high value-to-weight resource deposits, using the case of diamonds in CAR as an example. According to current definitions of lootability, or the vulnerability of deposits to exploitation, CAR's two major diamond deposits are similarly lootable. However, using this geospatial approach, we demonstrate that the deposits experience differing political geographic, spatial location, and cultural geographic contexts, rendering the eastern deposits more lootable than the western deposits. The patterns identified through this detailed analysis highlight the geographic complexities surrounding the issue of conflict resources and lootability, and speak to the importance of examining these topics at the sub-national scale, rather than relying on national-scale statistics.

  8. Glass injuries seen in the emergency department of a South African district hospital

    PubMed Central

    Nzaumvila, Doudou; Kramer, Efraim B.

    2015-01-01

    Background The emergency department of Embhuleni Hospital frequently manages patients with glass-related injuries. This study assessed these injuries and the glass that caused them in more detail. Aim The objectives of our study included determining the type of glass causing these injuries and describing the circumstances associated with different types of glass injuries. Setting The emergency department of Embhuleni Hospital in Elukwatini, Mpumalanga province, South Africa. Methods This was a cross-sectional study with a sample size of 104 patients. Descriptive statistics were used to assess the characteristics of the glass injuries. Results Five different types of glass were reported to have caused the injuries, namely car glass (7.69%), glass ampoules (3.85%), glass bottles (82.69%), glass windows (3.85%) and street glass shards (1.92%). Glass bottle injuries were mainly caused by assaults (90.47%) and most victims were mostly young males (80.23%). The assaults occurred at alcohol-licensed premises in 65.11% of cases. These injuries occurred mostly over weekends (83.72%), between 18:00 and 04:00. The face (34.23%) and the scalp (26.84%) were the sites that were injured most often. Conclusion Assault is the most common cause of glass injuries, usually involving young men at alcohol-licensed premises. Glass injuries generally resulted in minor lacerations, with few complications (2.68%).

  9. The effectiveness of the South African Triage Toll use in Mahalapye District Hospital – Emergency Department, Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Ogunbanjo, Gboyega A.; Mbuka, Deogratias O.

    2016-01-01

    Background The study aimed to determine the proportion of each priority level of patients, time of performance in each priority level, and the reliability of the South African Triage Scale (SATS) tool at the Mahalapye District Hospital - Emergency Department (MDH-ED), a setting where the majority of the nurses were not formally trained on the use of the SATS. Methods This was a cross-sectional study using case records in MDH-ED from 1 January 2014 to 31 December 2014. A panel of experts from the Mahalapye site of the Family Medicine Department, University of Botswana, reviewed and scored each selected case record that was compared with the scores previously attributed to the nurse triage. Results From the 315 case records, both the nurse triage and the panel of expert triage assigned the majority of cases in the routine category (green), 146 (46%) and 125 (40%), respectively, or in the urgent category (yellow), they assigned 140 (44%) and 111 (35%) cases, respectively. Overall, there was an adequate agreement between the nurse triage and the panel of expert triage (k = 0.4, 95% confidence interval: 0.3–0.5), although the level of agreement was satisfactory. Conclusion Findings of the study reported that the profile of the priority-level categories in MDH-ED was made in the majority of routine and urgent patients, only the routine and the emergency patients were seen within the targeted time and they had a satisfactory level of reliability (between 0.4 and 0.6). PMID:27543284

  10. The invisibility of men in South African violence prevention policy: national prioritization, male vulnerability, and framing prevention

    PubMed Central

    van Niekerk, Ashley; Tonsing, Susanne; Seedat, Mohamed; Jacobs, Roxanne; Ratele, Kopano; McClure, Roderick

    2015-01-01

    Background South Africa has a significant violence problem. The exposure of girls and women to interpersonal violence is widespread, and the victimization of men, especially to severe and homicidal forms of aggression, is of considerable concern, with male homicide eight times the global rate. In the last two decades, there have been a plethora of South African policies to promote safety. However, indications suggest that the policy response to violence is not coherently formulated, comprehensive, or evenly implemented. Objective This study examines selected South African national legislative instruments in terms of their framing and definition of violence and its typology, vulnerable populations, and prevention. Design This study comprises a directed content analysis of selected legislative documents from South African ministries mandated to prevent violence and its consequences or tasked with the prevention of key contributors to violence. Documents were selected using an electronic keyword search method and analyzed independently by two researchers. Results The legislative documents recognized the high levels of violence, confirmed the prioritization of selected vulnerable groups, especially women, children, disabled persons, and rural populations, and above all drew on criminological perspectives to emphasize tertiary prevention interventions. There is a policy focus on the protection and support of victims and the prosecution of perpetrators, but near absent recognition of men as victims. Conclusions There is a need to broaden the policy framework from primarily criminological and prosecutorial perspectives to include public health contributions. It is likewise important to enlarge the conceptions of vulnerability to include men alongside other vulnerable groups. These measures are important for shaping and resourcing prevention decisions and strengthening primary prevention approaches to violence. PMID:26228996

  11. Vaccination and Malaria Prevention among International Travelers Departing from Athens International Airport to African Destinations.

    PubMed

    Pavli, Androula; Spilioti, Athina; Smeti, Paraskevi; Patrinos, Stavros; Maltezou, Helena C

    2014-01-01

    Background. International travel to Africa has grown dramatically over the last decade along with an increasing need to understand the health issues for travelers. The current survey aimed to assess vaccination and malaria prevention of travelers visiting Africa. Methods. A questionnaire-based survey was conducted from of November 1, 2011 to of April 30, 2013 at Athens International Airport. Results. A total of 360 travelers were studied; 68% were men. Their mean age was 39.9 years. Previous travel to tropical countries was reported by 71.9% of them. Most frequent destination was sub-Saharan Africa (60%). Most of them traveled for ≥1 month (62%). The main reason for travel was work (39.7%). Only 47% sought pretravel consultation. Hepatitis A, typhoid, and meningococcal vaccines were administered to 49.8%, 28%, and 26.6%, respectively, and malaria chemoprophylaxis to 66.8% of those who visited sub-Saharan Africa. A history of previous travel to a tropical country, elementary level of education, and traveling for visiting friends and relatives, and for short duration were significant determinants for not pursuing pretravel consultation. Conclusions. The current survey revealed important inadequacies in vaccine and malaria prophylaxis of travelers departing to Africa. Educational tools should be developed in order to improve awareness of travelers to risk destinations.

  12. Vaccination and Malaria Prevention among International Travelers Departing from Athens International Airport to African Destinations

    PubMed Central

    Pavli, Androula; Spilioti, Athina; Smeti, Paraskevi; Patrinos, Stavros; Maltezou, Helena C.

    2014-01-01

    Background. International travel to Africa has grown dramatically over the last decade along with an increasing need to understand the health issues for travelers. The current survey aimed to assess vaccination and malaria prevention of travelers visiting Africa. Methods. A questionnaire-based survey was conducted from of November 1, 2011 to of April 30, 2013 at Athens International Airport. Results. A total of 360 travelers were studied; 68% were men. Their mean age was 39.9 years. Previous travel to tropical countries was reported by 71.9% of them. Most frequent destination was sub-Saharan Africa (60%). Most of them traveled for ≥1 month (62%). The main reason for travel was work (39.7%). Only 47% sought pretravel consultation. Hepatitis A, typhoid, and meningococcal vaccines were administered to 49.8%, 28%, and 26.6%, respectively, and malaria chemoprophylaxis to 66.8% of those who visited sub-Saharan Africa. A history of previous travel to a tropical country, elementary level of education, and traveling for visiting friends and relatives, and for short duration were significant determinants for not pursuing pretravel consultation. Conclusions. The current survey revealed important inadequacies in vaccine and malaria prophylaxis of travelers departing to Africa. Educational tools should be developed in order to improve awareness of travelers to risk destinations. PMID:24719621

  13. Relationship between religious social support and general social support with health behaviors in a national sample of African Americans.

    PubMed

    Debnam, Katrina; Holt, Cheryl L; Clark, Eddie M; Roth, David L; Southward, Penny

    2012-04-01

    Chronic diseases are the leading cause of death and disability in the United States and have significant behavioral origins. African Americans suffer a disproportionate burden of chronic disease relative to other US racial/ethnic groups. Previous research supports an association between both general and religious social support and health behaviors that impact the risk of chronic disease. The present study examined the relative contributions of these constructs to a variety of health behaviors in a national probability sample of African American men and women (N = 2,370). A telephone interview assessing fruit and vegetable consumption, physical activity, alcohol consumption, and current cigarette use was completed by participants. Results showed that several dimensions of religious social support predicted fruit and vegetable consumption, moderate physical activity, and alcohol use over and above the role of general social support. Findings highlight the unique role of religious support in this population in the context of health behaviors. Implications for health promotion interventions are discussed.

  14. A preliminary investigation of tuberculosis and other diseases in African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in Queen Elizabeth National Park, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Kalema-Zikusoka, G; Bengis, R G; Michel, A L; Woodford, M H

    2005-06-01

    A survey to determine the prevalence of bovine tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium bovis and certain other infectious diseases was conducted on 42 free-ranging African buffaloes, (Syncerus caffer) from May to June 1997 in the Queen Elizabeth National Park, Uganda. Using the gamma interferon test, exposure to M. bovis was detected in 21.6% of the buffaloes. One dead buffalo and an emaciated warthog (Phacochoerus aethiopicus) that was euthanased, were necropsied; both had miliary granulomas from which M. bovis was isolated. None of the buffaloes sampled in Sector A of the park, which has no cattle interface, tested positive for bovine tuberculosis (BTB) exposure. The prevalence and distribution of BTB does not appear to have changed significantly since the 1960s, but this may be due to fluxes in the buffalo population. Serological testing for foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) demonstrated positive exposure of 57.1% of the buffaloes sampled, with types A, O and SAT 1-3, which is the first known report of FMD antibodies to A and O types in free ranging African buffaloes. Foot-and-mouth disease virus types SAT 1 and SAT 3 were isolated from buffalo probang samples. Two percent of the buffaloes had been exposed to brucellosis. None of the buffaloes tested had antibodies to rinderpest, leptospirosis or Q fever. PMID:16137132

  15. 75 FR 11555 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Great...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-11

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, Mosca, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior... and control of the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Great Sand Dunes...

  16. Meet Laurie Hand: Cherokee Nation Child Care and Development Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exchange: The Early Childhood Leaders' Magazine Since 1978, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Cherokee Nation, along with 257 grantees, representing more than 500 Indian Tribes, Alaskan Native Villages, and Native Hawaiian Organizations, receives federal block grant funds to improve child care for Indian children. This article discusses child care, service, relationship between programs, initiative, implementation, cooperation, and setting…

  17. Imprisoned by Empathy: Familial Incarceration and Psychological Distress among African American Men in the National Survey of American Life.

    PubMed

    Brown, Tony N; Bell, Mary Laske; Patterson, Evelyn J

    2016-06-01

    The stress process model predicts that current incarceration of a family member should damage the health status of the inmate's relatives. We address this prediction with data from the National Survey of American Life, focusing exclusively on African American men (n = 1,168). In survey-adjusted generalized linear models, we find that familial incarceration increases psychological distress, but its effect attenuates ostensibly after controlling for other chronic strains. Familial incarceration remains statistically insignificant with the introduction of mastery and family emotional support and their respective interactions with familial incarceration. However, a statistical interaction between familial incarceration and former incarceration reveals that levels of psychological distress are significantly higher among never-incarcerated respondents whose family members are incarcerated but significantly lower among formerly incarcerated respondents whose family members are incarcerated. We conclude that familial incarceration's influence on black men's mental health status may be more complex than extant theory predicts.

  18. Imprisoned by Empathy: Familial Incarceration and Psychological Distress among African American Men in the National Survey of American Life.

    PubMed

    Brown, Tony N; Bell, Mary Laske; Patterson, Evelyn J

    2016-06-01

    The stress process model predicts that current incarceration of a family member should damage the health status of the inmate's relatives. We address this prediction with data from the National Survey of American Life, focusing exclusively on African American men (n = 1,168). In survey-adjusted generalized linear models, we find that familial incarceration increases psychological distress, but its effect attenuates ostensibly after controlling for other chronic strains. Familial incarceration remains statistically insignificant with the introduction of mastery and family emotional support and their respective interactions with familial incarceration. However, a statistical interaction between familial incarceration and former incarceration reveals that levels of psychological distress are significantly higher among never-incarcerated respondents whose family members are incarcerated but significantly lower among formerly incarcerated respondents whose family members are incarcerated. We conclude that familial incarceration's influence on black men's mental health status may be more complex than extant theory predicts. PMID:27257267

  19. Overview of Sandia National Laboratories and Antenna Development Department

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, B.C.

    1994-04-01

    Sandia is a multiprogram R & D laboratory. It has responsibilities in the following areas: (1) defense programs; (2) energy and environment; and (3) work for others (DOD, NSA, etc.). In 1989, the National Competitiveness Technology Transfer Act added another responsibility -- contributions to industrial competitiveness. Sandia has two major laboratory locations, New Mexico and California, and two flight testing locations, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii. The last part of this talk was dedicated to antenna research at Sandia.

  20. Clinical demodicosis in African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in the Kruger National Park.

    PubMed

    Wolhuter, Julie; Bengis, Roy G; Reilly, Brian K; Cross, Paul C

    2009-04-01

    We investigated the relationship between prevalence and severity of clinical signs of Demodex cafferi infection in free-ranging African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) and other factors such as age, sex, pregnancy status, and concomitant infections with bovine tuberculosis (BTB), Rift Valley fever (RVF), and brucellosis (BA). Approximately half of 203 buffalo examined in this study had clinical signs of demodicosis (cutaneous nodules); younger age classes had the highest prevalence and severity of lesions (chi(2)=21.4, df=6, P=0.0015). Nodules were generally limited to the head and neck region, but in severe cases were present over the entire animal. We found no significant association between clinical severity of the Demodex infection and gender, pregnancy status, or infection with BTB, RVF, or BA.

  1. Integrating association data and disease dynamics: an illustration using African Buffalo in Kruger National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, Paul C.; James O, Lloyd-Smith; Bowers, Justin A.; Hay, Craig T.; Hofmeyr, Markus; Getz, Wayne M.

    2004-01-01

    Recognition is a prerequisite for non-random association amongst individuals. We explore how non-random association patterns (i.e. who spends time with whom) affect disease dynamics. We estimated the amount of time individuals spent together per month using radio-tracking data from African buffalo and incorporated these data into a dynamic social network model. The dynamic nature of the network has a strong influence on simulated disease dynamics particularly for diseases with shorter infectious periods. Cluster analyses of the association data demonstrated that buffalo herds were not as well defined as previously thought. Associations were more tightly clustered in 2002 than 2003, perhaps due to drier conditions in 2003. As a result, diseases may spread faster during drought conditions due to increased population mixing. Association data are often collected but this is the first use of empirical data in a network disease model in a wildlife population.

  2. Precious African American memories, post-racial dreams & the American nation.

    PubMed

    Martin, Waldo E

    2011-01-01

    This interdisciplinary essay explores a fundamental paradox at the heart of American race relations since the 1960s: "the changing same." The more things change; the more they remain the same. Combining historical and social-scientific evidence with autobiographical reflections, this discussion critically probes the paradoxical decline and persistence of two dimensions of our enduring racial quagmire: racial inequality and white supremacy. The essay argues that these powerful and interrelated elements of America's continuing racial dilemma demand a massive democratic movement to alleviate both at once. This wide-ranging struggle to realize the promise of American democracy requires more than just a revitalized African American Freedom Struggle that is both intraracial and interracial. Progress toward resolving the seemingly intractable problem of racial inequality in the United States demands far more than intensified efforts to alleviate economic inequality; it requires alleviating white supremacy as well.

  3. Precious African American memories, post-racial dreams & the American nation.

    PubMed

    Martin, Waldo E

    2011-01-01

    This interdisciplinary essay explores a fundamental paradox at the heart of American race relations since the 1960s: "the changing same." The more things change; the more they remain the same. Combining historical and social-scientific evidence with autobiographical reflections, this discussion critically probes the paradoxical decline and persistence of two dimensions of our enduring racial quagmire: racial inequality and white supremacy. The essay argues that these powerful and interrelated elements of America's continuing racial dilemma demand a massive democratic movement to alleviate both at once. This wide-ranging struggle to realize the promise of American democracy requires more than just a revitalized African American Freedom Struggle that is both intraracial and interracial. Progress toward resolving the seemingly intractable problem of racial inequality in the United States demands far more than intensified efforts to alleviate economic inequality; it requires alleviating white supremacy as well. PMID:21469395

  4. 75 FR 56140 - Meeting of the Department of Justice's (DOJ's) National Motor Vehicle Title Information System...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Office of Justice Programs Meeting of the Department of Justice's (DOJ's) National Motor Vehicle Title... Title Information System (NMVTIS) Federal Advisory Committee to discuss the role of the NMVTIS...

  5. 77 FR 44673 - Meeting of the Department of Justice National Motor Vehicle Title Information System Federal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Office of Justice Programs Meeting of the Department of Justice National Motor Vehicle Title Information... Vehicle Title Information System (NMVTIS) Federal Advisory Committee to discuss various issues relating...

  6. 78 FR 9070 - Meeting of the Department of Justice's (DOJ's) National Motor Vehicle Title Information System...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Office of Justice Programs Meeting of the Department of Justice's (DOJ's) National Motor Vehicle Title... Title Information System (NMVTIS) Federal Advisory Committee to discuss various issues relating to...

  7. 10 CFR 431.447 - Department of Energy recognition of nationally recognized certification programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... independence in operating a certification program. (3) Qualifications to operate a certification system... certification programs. 431.447 Section 431.447 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY... Standards § 431.447 Department of Energy recognition of nationally recognized certification programs....

  8. 10 CFR 431.447 - Department of Energy recognition of nationally recognized certification programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... independence in operating a certification program. (3) Qualifications to operate a certification system... certification programs. 431.447 Section 431.447 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY... Standards § 431.447 Department of Energy recognition of nationally recognized certification programs....

  9. Creating a Pipeline for African American Computing Science Faculty: An Innovative Faculty/Research Mentoring Program Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charleston, LaVar J.; Gilbert, Juan E.; Escobar, Barbara; Jackson, Jerlando F. L.

    2014-01-01

    African Americans represent 1.3% of all computing sciences faculty in PhD-granting departments, underscoring the severe underrepresentation of Black/African American tenure-track faculty in computing (CRA, 2012). The Future Faculty/Research Scientist Mentoring (FFRM) program, funded by the National Science Foundation, was found to be an effective…

  10. 75 FR 45656 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Siuslaw National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Siuslaw National Forest, Waldport, OR AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice is.... Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Siuslaw National Forest, Waldport, OR. The human remains...

  11. 22 CFR 51.45 - Department discretion to require evidence of U.S. citizenship or non-citizen nationality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... non-citizen national, including evidence in addition to the evidence specified in 22 CFR 51.42 through....S. citizenship or non-citizen nationality. 51.45 Section 51.45 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE NATIONALITY AND PASSPORTS PASSPORTS Evidence of U.S. Citizenship or Nationality § 51.45 Department...

  12. 22 CFR 51.45 - Department discretion to require evidence of U.S. citizenship or non-citizen nationality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... non-citizen national, including evidence in addition to the evidence specified in 22 CFR 51.42 through....S. citizenship or non-citizen nationality. 51.45 Section 51.45 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE NATIONALITY AND PASSPORTS PASSPORTS Evidence of U.S. Citizenship or Nationality § 51.45 Department...

  13. 22 CFR 51.45 - Department discretion to require evidence of U.S. citizenship or non-citizen nationality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... non-citizen national, including evidence in addition to the evidence specified in 22 CFR 51.42 through....S. citizenship or non-citizen nationality. 51.45 Section 51.45 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE NATIONALITY AND PASSPORTS PASSPORTS Evidence of U.S. Citizenship or Nationality § 51.45 Department...

  14. 22 CFR 51.45 - Department discretion to require evidence of U.S. citizenship or non-citizen nationality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... non-citizen national, including evidence in addition to the evidence specified in 22 CFR 51.42 through....S. citizenship or non-citizen nationality. 51.45 Section 51.45 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE NATIONALITY AND PASSPORTS PASSPORTS Evidence of U.S. Citizenship or Nationality § 51.45 Department...

  15. 22 CFR 51.45 - Department discretion to require evidence of U.S. citizenship or non-citizen nationality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... non-citizen national, including evidence in addition to the evidence specified in 22 CFR 51.42 through....S. citizenship or non-citizen nationality. 51.45 Section 51.45 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE NATIONALITY AND PASSPORTS PASSPORTS Evidence of U.S. Citizenship or Nationality § 51.45 Department...

  16. Evaluating the Impact of National Public Health Department Accreditation - United States, 2016.

    PubMed

    Kronstadt, Jessica; Meit, Michael; Siegfried, Alexa; Nicolaus, Teddi; Bender, Kaye; Corso, Liza

    2016-01-01

    In 2011, the nonprofit Public Health Accreditation Board (PHAB) launched the national, voluntary public health accreditation program for state, tribal, local, and territorial public health departments. As of May 2016, 134 health departments have achieved 5-year accreditation through PHAB and 176 more have begun the formal process of pursuing accreditation. In addition, Florida, a centralized state in which the employees of all 67 local health departments are employees of the state, achieved accreditation for the entire integrated local public health department system in the state. PHAB-accredited health departments range in size from a small Indiana health department that serves approximately 17,000 persons to the much larger California Department of Public Health, which serves approximately 38 million persons. Collectively, approximately half the U.S. population, or nearly 167 million persons, is covered by an accredited health department. Forty-two states and the District of Columbia now have at least one nationally accredited health department. In a survey conducted through a contract with a social science research organization during 2013-2016, >90% of health departments that had been accredited for 1 year reported that accreditation has stimulated quality improvement and performance improvement opportunities, increased accountability and transparency, and improved management processes. PMID:27513206

  17. Technology transfer at the Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Harrer, B.J.; Good, M.S.; Lemon, D.K.; Morgen, G.P.

    1996-12-31

    Over the past 15 years, efforts to move technology generated from government-funded research and development activities at the Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories into commercial application by the private sector have faced an ever-changing environment. This environment has been primarily dictated by changes in the governing political philosophies of the Congress and the Administration that fund the laboratories and direct their activities. To review the role of the DOE laboratories, the following are discussed: the past, current, and potential future legislative and political environment impacting upon technology transfer from the laboratories; mechanisms of technology transfer; and three selected projects involving transfer of nondestructive evaluation technologies to the private sector. The technologies include computer-aided fabric evaluation (CAFE), measurement of the depth to which steel parts are hardened, and compensation for wear variations in the grinding wheel during the fabrication of wood shaper tools. These respectively deal with a large partnership of companies and institutes, a single but large manufacturing company, and a small business.

  18. Use of ministers for a serious personal problem among African Americans: findings from the national survey of American life.

    PubMed

    Chatters, Linda M; Mattis, Jacqueline S; Woodward, Amanda Toler; Taylor, Robert Joseph; Neighbors, Harold W; Grayman, Nyasha A

    2011-01-01

    This study examined use of ministers for assistance with a serious personal problem within a nationally representative sample of African Americans (National Survey of American Life-2001-2003). Different perspectives on the use of ministers-social stratification, religious socialization, and problem-oriented approach-were proposed and tested using logistic regression analyses with demographic, religious involvement, and problem type factors as predictors. Study findings supported religious socialization and problem-oriented explanations indicating that persons who are heavily invested in religious pursuits and organizations (i.e., women, frequent attenders) are more likely than their counterparts to use ministerial assistance. Contrary to expectations from the social stratification perspective, positive income and education effects indicated that higher status individuals were more likely to report use of ministers. Finally, problems involving bereavement are especially suited for assistance from ministers owing to their inherent nature (e.g., questions of ultimate meaning) and the extensive array of ministerial support and church resources that are available to address the issue.

  19. Clinical Pharmacy Services in Canadian Emergency Departments: A National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Wanbon, Richard; Lyder, Catherine; Villeneuve, Eric; Shalansky, Stephen; Manuel, Leslie; Harding, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    Background: Providing clinical pharmacy services in emergency departments (EDs) is important because adverse drug events commonly occur before, during, and after ED encounters. Survey studies in the United States have indicated a relatively low presence of clinical pharmacy services in the ED setting, but a descriptive survey specific to Canada has not yet been performed. Objectives: To describe the current status of pharmacy services in Canadian EDs and potential barriers to implementing pharmacy services in this setting. Methods: All Canadian hospitals with an ED and at least 50 acute care beds were contacted to identify the presence of dedicated ED pharmacy services (defined as at least 0.5 full-time equivalent [FTE] position). Three different electronic surveys were then distributed by e-mail to ED pharmacy team members (if available), pharmacy managers (at hospitals without an ED pharmacy team), and ED managers (all hospitals). The surveys were completed between July and September 2013. Results: Of the 243 hospitals identified, 95 (39%) had at least 0.5 FTE clinical pharmacy services in the ED (based on initial telephone screening). Of the 60 ED pharmacy teams that responded to the survey, 56 had pharmacists (27 of which also had ED pharmacy technicians) and 4 had pharmacy technicians (without pharmacists). Forty-four (79%) of the 56 ED pharmacist services had been established within the preceding 10 years. Order clarification, troubleshooting, medication reconciliation, and assessment of renal dosing were the services most commonly provided. The large majority of pharmacy managers and ED managers identified the need for ED pharmacy services where such services do not yet exist. Inadequate funding, competing priorities, and lack of training were the most commonly reported barriers to providing this service. Conclusions: Although the establishment of ward-based pharmacy services in Canadian EDs has increased over the past 10 years, lack of funding and a lack of

  20. Research programs at the Department of Energy National Laboratories. Volume 2: Laboratory matrix

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    For nearly fifty years, the US national laboratories, under the direction of the Department of Energy, have maintained a tradition of outstanding scientific research and innovative technological development. With the end of the Cold War, their roles have undergone profound changes. Although many of their original priorities remain--stewardship of the nation`s nuclear stockpile, for example--pressing budget constraints and new federal mandates have altered their focus. Promotion of energy efficiency, environmental restoration, human health, and technology partnerships with the goal of enhancing US economic and technological competitiveness are key new priorities. The multiprogram national laboratories offer unparalleled expertise in meeting the challenge of changing priorities. This volume aims to demonstrate each laboratory`s uniqueness in applying this expertise. It describes the laboratories` activities in eleven broad areas of research that most or all share in common. Each section of this volume is devoted to a single laboratory. Those included are: Argonne National Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Los Alamos National Laboratory; National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Pacific Northwest Laboratory; and Sandia National Laboratories. The information in this volume was provided by the multiprogram national laboratories and compiled at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory.

  1. Antibodies against foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus in African buffalos (Syncerus caffer) in selected National Parks in Uganda (2001-2003).

    PubMed

    Ayebazibwe, C; Mwiine, F N; Balinda, S N; Tjørnehøj, K; Masembe, C; Muwanika, V B; Okurut, A R A; Siegismund, H R; Alexandersen, S

    2010-08-01

    In East Africa, the foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus (FMDV) isolates have over time included serotypes O, A, C, Southern African Territories (SAT) 1 and SAT 2, mainly from livestock. SAT 3 has only been isolated in a few cases and only in African buffalos (Syncerus caffer). To investigate the presence of antibodies against FMDV serotypes in wildlife in Uganda, serological studies were performed on buffalo serum samples collected between 2001 and 2003. Thirty-eight samples from African buffalos collected from Lake Mburo, Kidepo Valley, Murchison Falls and Queen Elizabeth National Parks were screened using Ceditest FMDV NS to detect antibodies against FMDV non-structural proteins (NSP). The seroprevalence of antibodies against non-structural proteins was 74%. To characterize FMDV antibodies, samples were selected and titrated using serotype-specific solid phase blocking enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISAs). High titres of antibodies (> or =1 : 160) against FMDV serotypes SAT 1, SAT 2 and SAT 3 were identified. This study suggests that African buffalos in the different national parks in Uganda may play an important role in the epidemiology of SAT serotypes of FMDV.

  2. Examining the relationship between the endorsement of racial/ethnic stereotypes and excess body fat composition in a national sample of African Americans and black Caribbeans.

    PubMed

    Parker, Lauren J; Hunte, Haslyn E R

    2013-01-01

    Using the National Survey of American Life, a nationally representative household survey of non-institutionalized US Blacks, our study examined whether the endorsement of racial/ ethnic stereotypes was associated with excess body fat composition among African Americans (n = 3,265) and Black Caribbeans (n = 1,332) living in the United States. We used ordinary least squares and multinomial logistic regression analyses controlling for potential confounders. Results from the linear regression suggested that the endorsement of racial/ethnic stereotypes was associated with increased body mass index and weight among African American males (b = .57, P < .05) and females (b = .50 P < .05). Further, results from the adjusted multinomial logistic regression suggested that African American males who endorsed racial/ethnic stereotypes were more likely to be obese (odds ratio = 1.33, P < .05), than African American males who did not endorse racial/ethnic stereotypes. Surprising, a positive relationship was not found among Black Caribbeans. Future studies should examine the relationship between internalized discrimination and endorsements of negative racial/ethnic stereotypes and excess fat accumulation among ethnically heterogeneous samples of Blacks.

  3. Arrogant Assimilationism: National Identity Politics and African-Origin Muslim Girls in the Other France

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keaton, Trica

    2005-01-01

    National identity politics in France have taken an interesting turn since the 1980s, a period accentuated by social movements led by youth of immigration who self-asserted in terms of ethnonational origins. Now French-born or -raised youth, stigmatized by those origins, self-identify as French, although they are not so perceived in French society.…

  4. Foregrounding Silences in the South African National Early Learning Standards for Birth to Four Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebrahim, Hasina Banu

    2014-01-01

    The development of standards in early childhood is associated with governments wanting to assert their influence on what young children should know and be able to do before they enter formal schooling. In South Africa the National Early Learning and Development Standards (NELDS), released in 2009, attempts to assert influence in the context of…

  5. Current Educational Topics No. II: Abstracts of Papers Presented at St. Louis, Missouri, February 26-29, 1912, before the National Council of Education of the National Education Association; the Department of Superintendence of the National Education Association; the Department of Normal Schools of the National Education Association; the National Society for the Study of Education; the Society of College Teachers of Education; the National Committee on Agricultural Education. Bulletin, 1912, No. 15. Whole Number 487

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noyes, Frederick K.

    1912-01-01

    This bulletin presents abstracts of papers presented at St. Louis, Missouri, February 26-29, 1912, before the National Council of Education of the National Education Association; the Department of Superintendence of the National Education Association; the Department of Normal Schools of the National Education Association; the National Society for…

  6. 77 FR 59657 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Walnut...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... Service, Walnut Canyon National Monument, Flagstaff, AZ AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Walnut Canyon National... contact Walnut Canyon National Monument. Disposition of the human remains to the tribes stated below...

  7. 77 FR 59655 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Walnut...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... Service, Walnut Canyon National Monument, Flagstaff, AZ AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Walnut Canyon National... contact Walnut Canyon ] National Monument. Disposition of the human remains to the tribes stated below...

  8. 76 FR 7232 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Dinosaur...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... Service, Dinosaur National Monument, Dinosaur, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Dinosaur National Monument, Dinosaur... culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact Dinosaur National Monument. Disposition of the...

  9. 20 CFR 671.130 - When should applications for national emergency grants be submitted to the Department?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... emergency grants be submitted to the Department? 671.130 Section 671.130 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMERGENCY GRANTS FOR DISLOCATED WORKERS § 671.130 When should applications for national emergency grants be submitted to the Department?...

  10. 20 CFR 671.130 - When should applications for national emergency grants be submitted to the Department?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... emergency grants be submitted to the Department? 671.130 Section 671.130 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR NATIONAL EMERGENCY GRANTS FOR DISLOCATED WORKERS § 671.130 When should applications for national emergency grants be submitted to the Department? (a)...

  11. 20 CFR 671.130 - When should applications for national emergency grants be submitted to the Department?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... emergency grants be submitted to the Department? 671.130 Section 671.130 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR NATIONAL EMERGENCY GRANTS FOR DISLOCATED WORKERS § 671.130 When should applications for national emergency grants be submitted to the Department? (a)...

  12. 20 CFR 671.130 - When should applications for national emergency grants be submitted to the Department?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... emergency grants be submitted to the Department? 671.130 Section 671.130 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMERGENCY GRANTS FOR DISLOCATED WORKERS § 671.130 When should applications for national emergency grants be submitted to the Department?...

  13. 20 CFR 671.130 - When should applications for national emergency grants be submitted to the Department?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... emergency grants be submitted to the Department? 671.130 Section 671.130 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMERGENCY GRANTS FOR DISLOCATED WORKERS § 671.130 When should applications for national emergency grants be submitted to the Department?...

  14. Hearing and Report Examine Measures to Reform Energy Department's National Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-07-01

    A new report that calls for reorganizing the management of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) national laboratory system generally received a favorable response during an 11 July hearing of the Subcommittee on Energy of the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. The department is already moving forward with measures to address several recommendations, Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz stated in a 10 July letter to the subcommittee, which was released at the hearing.

  15. Predictors of Outcomes for African Americans in a Rehabilitation State Agency: Implications for National Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balcazar, Fabricio E.; Oberoi, Ashmeet K.; Suarez-Balcazar, Yolanda; Alvarado, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    A review of vocational rehabilitation (VR) data from a Midwestern state was conducted to identify predictors of rehabilitation outcomes for African American consumers. The database included 37,404 African Americans who were referred or self-referred over a period of five years. Logistic regression analysis indicated that except for age and…

  16. A chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) analogue of cross-national generalization of personality structure: zoological parks and an African sanctuary.

    PubMed

    King, James E; Weiss, Alexander; Farmer, Kay H

    2005-04-01

    Six personality factors, including five resembling the human Big Five, had previously been identified in a separate group of zoo-housed chimpanzees. Comparability of chimpanzee personality factor structure was examined in two highly contrasting habitats: zoos and a large African sanctuary. Questionnaires for the zoo chimpanzees were in English, while most for the chimpanzees in the sanctuary were in French. Differences between the two settings were sufficiently extensive to make them analogous to cross-national human personality studies. Internal consistencies for five of the six factors did not differ between the two samples. The patterns of correlations between the unit-weighted factors were also similar for the two samples. Data from these two samples were pooled and factor analyzed. The resulting factor structure was then rotated to the factor structure described in the original study of chimpanzee personality. Dominance, Extraversion, Dependability, and Agreeableness had high congruences. Emotionality and Openness did not, but the items that had the highest loadings were consistent with the factors' definitions. Finally, sex and age effects for all factors generalized across habitats.

  17. The relationship between immigration and depression in South Africa: evidence from the first South African National Income Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Andrew; Labys, Charlotte A; Burns, Jonathan K

    2014-12-01

    Few studies have examined depression among immigrants in post-apartheid South Africa, and factors that strengthen the relationship between immigration and depression. The first wave of the National Income Dynamics Study was used to investigate links between immigration and depression (n = 15,205). Depression symptoms were assessed using a 10-item version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) Scale. Immigrants in South Africa had fewer depressive symptoms (CES-D ≥ 10) than locally-born participants (17.1 vs. 32.4%, F = 13.5, p < 0.01). Multilevel mixed-effects logistic regression analyses found that among immigrant populations, younger age (adjusted OR 1.03, 95% CI 1.01-1.05) and black African ethnicity (adjusted OR 3.72, 95% CI 1.29-10.7) were associated with higher depression. Younger age was associated with lower depression among locally-born study participants (adjusted OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.97-0.98). The varying relationship between certain demographic factors, depression and the different mental health challenges among these groups requires closer attention.

  18. The relationship between immigration and depression in South Africa: evidence from the first South African National Income Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Andrew; Labys, Charlotte A; Burns, Jonathan K

    2014-12-01

    Few studies have examined depression among immigrants in post-apartheid South Africa, and factors that strengthen the relationship between immigration and depression. The first wave of the National Income Dynamics Study was used to investigate links between immigration and depression (n = 15,205). Depression symptoms were assessed using a 10-item version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) Scale. Immigrants in South Africa had fewer depressive symptoms (CES-D ≥ 10) than locally-born participants (17.1 vs. 32.4%, F = 13.5, p < 0.01). Multilevel mixed-effects logistic regression analyses found that among immigrant populations, younger age (adjusted OR 1.03, 95% CI 1.01-1.05) and black African ethnicity (adjusted OR 3.72, 95% CI 1.29-10.7) were associated with higher depression. Younger age was associated with lower depression among locally-born study participants (adjusted OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.97-0.98). The varying relationship between certain demographic factors, depression and the different mental health challenges among these groups requires closer attention. PMID:24526432

  19. The relationship between immigration and depression in South Africa: Evidence from the first South African National Income Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Andrew; Labys, Charlotte A.; Burns, Jonathan K.

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have examined depression among immigrants in post-apartheid South Africa, and factors that strengthen the relationship between immigration and depression. The first wave of the National Income Dynamics Study was used to investigate links between immigration and depression (n=15,205). Depression symptoms were assessed using a 10-item version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) Scale. Immigrants in South Africa had fewer depressive symptoms (CES-D ≥ 10) than locally-born participants (17.1% vs. 32.4%, F = 13.5, p<0.01). Multilevel mixed-effects logistic regression analyses found that among immigrant populations, younger age (adjusted OR=1.03, 95% CI = 1.01-1.05) and black African ethnicity (adjusted OR=3.72, 95% CI = 1.29-10.7) were associated with higher depression. Younger age was associated with lower depression among locally-born study participants (adjusted OR=0.98, 95% CI = 0.97-0.98). The varying relationship between certain demographic factors, depression and the different mental health challenges among these groups requires closer attention. PMID:24526432

  20. Copper, manganese, cobalt and selenium concentrations in liver samples from African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in the Kruger National Park.

    PubMed

    Webb, E C; van Ryssen, J B; Erasmus, M E; McCrindle, C M

    2001-12-01

    Animals may act as bio-indicators for the pollution of soil, air and water. In order to monitor changes over time, a baseline status should be established for a particular species in a particular area. The concentration of minerals in soil is a poor indicator of mineral uptake by plants and thus their availability to animals. The chemical composition of body tissue, particularly the liver, is a better reflection of the dietary status of domestic and wild animals. Normal values for copper, manganese and cobalt in the liver have been established for cattle but not for African buffalo. As part of the bovine tuberculosis (BTB) monitoring programme in the Kruger National Park (KNP) in South Africa, 660 buffalo were culled. Livers (n = 311) were randomly sampled in buffered formalin for mineral analysis. The highest concentrations of copper were measured in the northern and central parts of the KNP, which is downwind of mining and refining activities. Manganese, cobalt and selenium levels in liver samples indicated neither excess nor deficiency; however, there were some significant area, age and gender differences. The results will be useful as a baseline reference when monitoring variations in the level and extent of mineral pollution on natural pastures close to mines and refineries.

  1. 7 CFR Exhibit A to Subpart F of... - National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior Regional Offices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false National Park Service, U.S. Department of the.... A Exhibit A to Subpart F of Part 1901—National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior... Archeological and Historic Preservation, National Park Service. The three Regional Offices are: San...

  2. 7 CFR Exhibit A to Subpart F of... - National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior Regional Offices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false National Park Service, U.S. Department of the.... A Exhibit A to Subpart F of Part 1901—National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior... Archeological and Historic Preservation, National Park Service. The three Regional Offices are: San...

  3. 7 CFR Exhibit A to Subpart F of... - National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior Regional Offices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false National Park Service, U.S. Department of the.... A Exhibit A to Subpart F of Part 1901—National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior... Archeological and Historic Preservation, National Park Service. The three Regional Offices are: San...

  4. 7 CFR Exhibit A to Subpart F of... - National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior Regional Offices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior... to Subpart F of Part 1901—National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior Regional Offices... Historic Preservation, National Park Service. The three Regional Offices are: San Francisco Office:...

  5. 7 CFR Exhibit A to Subpart F of... - National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior Regional Offices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false National Park Service, U.S. Department of the.... A Exhibit A to Subpart F of Part 1901—National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior... Archeological and Historic Preservation, National Park Service. The three Regional Offices are: San...

  6. Virtual special issue on catalysis at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Laboratories

    DOE PAGES

    Pruski, Marek; Sadow, Aaron D.; Slowing, Igor I.; Marshall, Christopher L.; Stair, Peter; Rodriguez, Jose; Harris, Alex; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Biener, Juergen; Matranga, Christopher; et al

    2016-04-21

    Here the catalysis research at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Laboratories covers a wide range of research topics in heterogeneous catalysis, homogeneous/molecular catalysis, biocatalysis, electrocatalysis, and surface science. Since much of the work at National Laboratories is funded by DOE, the research is largely focused on addressing DOE's mission to ensure America's security and prosperity by addressing its energy, environmental, and nuclear challenges through transformative science and technology solutions.

  7. Bovine Tuberculosis and Brucellosis in Cattle and African Buffalo in the Limpopo National Park, Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Tanner, M; Inlameia, O; Michel, A; Maxlhuza, G; Pondja, A; Fafetine, J; Macucule, B; Zacarias, M; Manguele, J; Moiane, I C; Marranangumbe, A S; Mulandane, F; Schönfeld, C; Moser, I; van Helden, P; Machado, A

    2015-12-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) and brucellosis are prevalent in buffaloes of the Kruger National Park (KNP, South Africa). Both diseases were considered to have no or a very low prevalence in wildlife and livestock in and around the Limpopo National Park (LNP, Mozambique). The same applies for tuberculosis in Gonarezhou National Park (GNP, Zimbabwe), but just recently, BTB was detected in buffaloes in the GNP and fears arose that the disease might also spread to the LNP as a result of the partial removal of the fences between the three parks to form the Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park. To assess the status of both diseases in and around LNP, 62 buffaloes were tested for bovine tuberculosis (BTB) and bovine brucellosis. The percentage of positive BTB reactors in buffalo was 8.06% using BovidTB Stat-Pak® and 0% with BOVIGAM® IFN-γ test and IDEXX ELISA. The brucellosis seroprevalence in buffalo was found to be 17.72% and 27.42% using Rose Bengal Test (RBT) and ELISA, respectively. In addition, 2445 cattle in and around the LNP were examined for BTB using the single intradermal cervical comparative tuberculin test (SICCT), and an apparent prevalence of 0.98% was found with no significant difference inside (0.5%) and outside (1.3%) the park. This is the first published report on the presence of positive reactors to BTB and bovine brucellosis in buffalo and cattle in and outside the LNP. Monitoring the wildlife-livestock-human interface of zoonotic high-impact diseases such as BTB and brucellosis is of outmost importance for the successful implementation and management of any transfrontier park that aims to improve the livelihoods of the local communities.

  8. Secondary analysis of anthropometric data from a South African national food consumption survey, using different growth reference standards.

    PubMed

    Bosman, L; Herselman, M G; Kruger, H S; Labadarios, D

    2011-11-01

    The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) references were used to analyse anthropometric data from the 1999 National Food Consumption Survey (NFCS) of South Africa. Since then, however, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 2000 reference and the World Health Organization (WHO) 2006 standards were released. It was anticipated that these reference and standards may lead to differences in the previous estimates of stunting, wasting, underweight and obesity in the study population. The aim was to compare the anthropometric status of children using the 1977 NCHS, the 2000 CDC growth references and the 2006 WHO standards. All children 12-60 months of age with a complete set of anthropometric data were included in the analyses. Data for 1,512 children were analysed with SAS 9.1 for Windows. A Z-score was calculated for each child for weight-for-age (W/A), weight-for-length/height (W/H), length/height-for-age (H/A) and body mass index (BMI)-for-age, using each of the three reference or standards for comparison. The prevalence of stunting, obesity and overweight were significantly higher and the prevalence of underweight and wasting were lower when using the WHO standards compared to the NCHS and the CDC references. The higher than previously established prevalence of stunting at 20.1% and combined overweight/obesity at 30% poses a challenge to South African policy makers to implement nutrition programmes to decrease the prevalence of both stunting and overweight. The 2006 WHO growth standard should be the standard used for assessment of growth of infants and children younger than 5 years in developing countries.

  9. Substance abuse and dependence among low income African Americans: using data from the national survey on drug use & health to demystify assumptions.

    PubMed

    Windsor, Liliane Cambraia; Negi, Nalini

    2009-07-01

    The media has portrayed African Americans as drug users and criminals. The purpose of this study is to test the assumption that low-income African Americans use more alcohol, nicotine, marijuana, and illicit drugs than other racial groups using data from the 2005 National Survey on Drug Use and Health to compare drug abuse and dependence across low income racial groups (N = 20,172). Most respondents were white, female, and older than 26 years of age. The majority completed high school and reported annual family incomes between $10,000 and $19,000. Few participants reported receiving public assistance. Drug abuse and dependence rates varied across drug type and across race. Drug dependence and abuse were measured using the Nicotine Dependence Syndrome Scale and criteria from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Hierarchical regression was conducted to examine the level of association between racial background and drug abuse and dependence after controlling for age and gender. Results reveal that the assumption of high drug and alcohol use and abuse rates among low-income African Americans should be, at best, reexamined. This study has significant implications for both policy and social work practice because it breaks down normalized and biased assumptions of low-income African American drug use. PMID:20155595

  10. Substance abuse and dependence among low income African Americans: using data from the national survey on drug use & health to demystify assumptions.

    PubMed

    Windsor, Liliane Cambraia; Negi, Nalini

    2009-07-01

    The media has portrayed African Americans as drug users and criminals. The purpose of this study is to test the assumption that low-income African Americans use more alcohol, nicotine, marijuana, and illicit drugs than other racial groups using data from the 2005 National Survey on Drug Use and Health to compare drug abuse and dependence across low income racial groups (N = 20,172). Most respondents were white, female, and older than 26 years of age. The majority completed high school and reported annual family incomes between $10,000 and $19,000. Few participants reported receiving public assistance. Drug abuse and dependence rates varied across drug type and across race. Drug dependence and abuse were measured using the Nicotine Dependence Syndrome Scale and criteria from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Hierarchical regression was conducted to examine the level of association between racial background and drug abuse and dependence after controlling for age and gender. Results reveal that the assumption of high drug and alcohol use and abuse rates among low-income African Americans should be, at best, reexamined. This study has significant implications for both policy and social work practice because it breaks down normalized and biased assumptions of low-income African American drug use.

  11. U.S. Department of Energy Commercial Reference Building Models of the National Building Stock

    SciTech Connect

    Deru, M.; Field, K.; Studer, D.; Benne, K.; Griffith, B.; Torcellini, P.; Liu, B.; Halverson, M.; Winiarski, D.; Rosenberg, M.; Yazdanian, M.; Huang, J.; Crawley, D.

    2011-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Technologies Program has set the aggressive goal of producing marketable net-zero energy buildings by 2025. This goal will require collaboration between the DOE laboratories and the building industry. We developed standard or reference energy models for the most common commercial buildings to serve as starting points for energy efficiency research. These models represent fairly realistic buildings and typical construction practices. Fifteen commercial building types and one multifamily residential building were determined by consensus between DOE, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and represent approximately two-thirds of the commercial building stock.

  12. U.S. Department of Defense deems climate change a national security threat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-10-01

    Climate change is a "threat multiplier," according to a new report by the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD). The report, entitled 2014 Climate Change Adaptation Roadmap and released on 13 October, lays out ways in which DOD will work with other nations to combat the challenges associated with, adapt to, and mitigate climate change.

  13. 75 FR 15695 - Renewal of Department of Defense Federal Advisory Committee; Board of Visitors National Defense...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... Defense gives notice that it is renewing the charter for the Board of Visitors National Defense University (hereafter referred to as the Board). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jim Freeman, Deputy Committee... of the Secretary Renewal of Department of Defense Federal Advisory Committee; Board of...

  14. African American Suicide

    MedlinePlus

    ... accounted for 83.8% of Caucasian elderly suicides. • Firearms were the predominant method of suicide among African ... per 100,000 annually. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Vital Statistics System. Mortality Data. ...

  15. Management of information within emergencies departments in developing countries: analysis at the National Emergency Department in Benin

    PubMed Central

    Ahanhanzo, Yolaine Glèlè; Kpozehouen, Alphonse; Sopoh, Ghislain; Sossa-Jérôme, Charles; Ouedraogo, Laurent; Wilmet-Dramaix, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The management of health information is a key pillar in both emergencies reception and handling facilities, given the strategic position and the potential of these facilities within hospitals, and in the monitoring of public health and epidemiology. With the technological revolution, computerization made the information systems evolve in emergency departments, especially in developed countries, with improved performance in terms of care quality, productivity and patient satisfaction. This study analyses the situation of Benin in this field, through the case of the Academic Clinic of Emergency Department of the National University Teaching Hospital of Cotonou, the national reference hospital. Methods The study is cross-sectional and evaluative. Collection techniques are literature review and structured interviews. The components rated are resources, indicators, data sources, data management and the use-dissemination of the information through a model adapted from Health Metrics Network framework. We used quantitative and qualitative analysis. Results The absence of a regulatory framework restricts the operation of the system in all components and accounts for the lack and inadequacy of the dedicated resources. Conclusion Dedication of more resources for this system for crucial needs such as computerization requires sensitization and greater awareness of the administrative authorities about the fact that an effective health information management system is of prime importance in this type of facility. PMID:27800116

  16. Population Parameters and Biomass of African Buffalo(Syncerus caffer) in Kainji Lake National Park, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aremu, O. T.; Onadeko, S. A.; Ola-Adams, B. A.; Inah, E. I.

    The study examined some population parameters such as relative abundance, distribution, population composition and biomass of Syncerus caffer in Kainji Lake National Park. Six, 4x4 km transects were constructed in the Park with an effective study area of 96 km2. Transects were traversed twice a month for 12 months. Estimates were based on direct censusing techniques only. The results revealed that riparian forest and woodland habitat harboured the highest population of Syncerus caffer in both dry and wet seasons 9 and 5 groups, respectively with a total of 149±8.17 individuals, while Diospyros mespliformis dry forest haboured the least of 20±2.84 individuals. Population compositions of Syncerus caffer were significantly difference (p< 0.05) in both dry and wet seasons. A total Syncerus caffer biomass of 54.57±10.9 kg km-2 was recorded in the Park. Measures for adequate conservation of existing Syncerus caffer population in the Park are discussed.

  17. Environmental compliance guide: guidance manual for Department of Energy compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act

    SciTech Connect

    Sharples, F.E.; Salk, M.S.

    1983-07-01

    This manual provides guidance for Department of Energy(DOE) officials who are responsible for complying with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended. This Act requires federal agencies such as DOE to take into account the effects of their undertakings on any historic property that is included in or eligible for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places. DOE is required to afford the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation an opportunity to comment with regard to the effects of agency projects on historic properties. The commenting process consists of identifying potentially affected properties; determining the nature and magnitude of effects, whether beneficial or adverse; and consulting with the Council to define alternatives that would avoid or mitigate adverse effects. In conducting the consultation process, the Department should seek professional advice and assistance from the State Historical Preservation Officers, the National Park Service, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and other professionals in appropriate fields of specialization.

  18. An outbreak of encephalomyocarditis-virus infection in free-ranging African elephants in the Kruger National Park.

    PubMed

    Grobler, D G; Raath, J P; Braack, L E; Keet, D F; Gerdes, G H; Barnard, B J; Kriek, N P; Jardine, J; Swanepoel, R

    1995-06-01

    A cluster of four deaths in late December 1993, marked the onset of an outbreak of disease of African elephants (Loxodonta africana) in the Kruger National Park (KNP) in South Africa, which has an estimated population of 7,500 elephants. Mortalities peaked in January 1994, with 32 deaths, and then declined steadily to reach pre-outbreak levels by September, but sporadic losses continued until November. During the outbreak altogether 64 elephants died, of which 53 (83%) were adult bulls. Archival records revealed that, in addition to the usual losses from known causes such as poaching and intraspecific fighting, sporadic deaths from unexplained causes had, in fact, occurred in widely scattered locations from at least 1987 onwards, and from that time until the perceived outbreak of disease there had been 48 such deaths involving 33 (69%) adult bulls. Carcases had frequently become decomposed or had been scavenged by the time they were found, but seven of eight elephants examined early in 1994 had lesions of cardiac failure suggestive of encephalomyocarditis (EMC)-virus infection, and the virus was isolated from the heart muscles of three fresh carcases. The results of tests for neutralizing antibody on 362 elephant sera collected for unrelated purposes from 1984 onwards and kept frozen, indicated that the virus had been present in the KNP since at least 1987. Antibody prevalences of 62 of 116 (53%) 18 of 139 (13%) and seven of 33 (21%) were found in elephants in three different regions of the KNP in 1993 and 1994. Studies had been conducted on myomorph rodents in the KNP for unrelated purposes since 1984, and trapping attempts were increased during the perceived outbreak of disease in elephants. There was a striking temporal correlation between the occurrence of a population explosion (as evidenced by markedly increased catch rates per trap-night) and a surge in prevalence of antibody to EM virus in rodents, and the occurrence of the outbreak of disease in elephants.

  19. An outbreak of encephalomyocarditis-virus infection in free-ranging African elephants in the Kruger National Park.

    PubMed

    Grobler, D G; Raath, J P; Braack, L E; Keet, D F; Gerdes, G H; Barnard, B J; Kriek, N P; Jardine, J; Swanepoel, R

    1995-06-01

    A cluster of four deaths in late December 1993, marked the onset of an outbreak of disease of African elephants (Loxodonta africana) in the Kruger National Park (KNP) in South Africa, which has an estimated population of 7,500 elephants. Mortalities peaked in January 1994, with 32 deaths, and then declined steadily to reach pre-outbreak levels by September, but sporadic losses continued until November. During the outbreak altogether 64 elephants died, of which 53 (83%) were adult bulls. Archival records revealed that, in addition to the usual losses from known causes such as poaching and intraspecific fighting, sporadic deaths from unexplained causes had, in fact, occurred in widely scattered locations from at least 1987 onwards, and from that time until the perceived outbreak of disease there had been 48 such deaths involving 33 (69%) adult bulls. Carcases had frequently become decomposed or had been scavenged by the time they were found, but seven of eight elephants examined early in 1994 had lesions of cardiac failure suggestive of encephalomyocarditis (EMC)-virus infection, and the virus was isolated from the heart muscles of three fresh carcases. The results of tests for neutralizing antibody on 362 elephant sera collected for unrelated purposes from 1984 onwards and kept frozen, indicated that the virus had been present in the KNP since at least 1987. Antibody prevalences of 62 of 116 (53%) 18 of 139 (13%) and seven of 33 (21%) were found in elephants in three different regions of the KNP in 1993 and 1994. Studies had been conducted on myomorph rodents in the KNP for unrelated purposes since 1984, and trapping attempts were increased during the perceived outbreak of disease in elephants. There was a striking temporal correlation between the occurrence of a population explosion (as evidenced by markedly increased catch rates per trap-night) and a surge in prevalence of antibody to EM virus in rodents, and the occurrence of the outbreak of disease in elephants

  20. A national census of those attending UK accident and emergency departments with asthma. The UK National Asthma Task Force.

    PubMed Central

    Partridge, M R; Latouche, D; Trako, E; Thurston, J G

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To obtain a representative national picture of the type of people with asthma attending accident and emergency (A&E) departments in the UK, the reasons why they attend, and to determine the proportion admitted to hospital. DESIGN: A national census involving questionnaires. SETTING: 100 A&E departments throughout the UK. SUBJECTS: All those with asthma attending because of asthma during a one week period in September 1994. RESULTS: Details were obtained about 1292 attendances. About half of all attendances were by adults and half by children, and 87.8% were previously diagnosed asthmatics; 18.8% of adult attenders were unemployed. Perceived severity of asthma was the reason for attendance in 65.5%, but 11.5% reported non-availability, or perceived non-availability, of the general practitioner (GP) as the reason for attending. One fifth of adults had been kept awake by their asthma for over three nights before attendance. 425 of the 1292 attenders (32.9%) had been admitted to hospital in the previous 12 months and 316 (24.5%) had attended the A&E department in the previous three months. Only 24.6% of attenders had had contact with their general practitioner in the previous 24 h. 61.6% of under-5 attenders (n = 341) were admitted to hospital; the figures for those aged 5-15 and 15+ years and above were 265 (41.4%) and 665 (38.7%). CONCLUSIONS: Many people with asthma attend A&E departments without first having seen their GP. In many adult cases the asthma, while severe, is not acute, but a high proportion of both adults and children are admitted to hospital. Many of these attendances and admissions are repeat attendances. To enhance the quality of care provided to those with asthma may require easier access to primary care, enhanced patient education, or enhanced health professional education. Further study is needed of a variety of potential interventions. PMID:9023616

  1. Final Report: African Power/Energy and Environmental Development Plan, July 1, 1994 - August 21, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, John M.

    1999-08-21

    In 1994 AEF signed a Cooperative Agreement with DOE to address a program called the African Power /Energy and Environmental Development Plan. The Program initially addressed five area: (1) Historical Black Colleges and Universities Energy/Environmental Program; (2) The Department of Energy and United States Private Industry Africa Program; (3) The Annual United States Energy Study Tour; (4) South African Training Program, and (5) South African Environmental Program. The programs were implemented in conjunction with DOE, institutions, agencies and the private sector support in the USA and within African nations. AEF has worked with government and technical representatives from 13 African nations and expanded the program to address sponsorship of South African students in Historical Black Colleges and Universities, supporting DOE trade missions through participation and planning, and giving presentations in the U.S., and Africa regarding business opportunities in the African energy sector. The programs implemented have also opened doors for the US private sector to seek business opportunities in Africa and for African nations to gain exposure to US products and services.

  2. Childhood cancer incidence patterns by race, sex and age for 2000-2006: a report from the South African National Cancer Registry.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, Friederike; Kielkowski, Danuta; Schonfeld, Sara J; Kellett, Patricia; Stanulla, Martin; Dickens, Caroline; Kaatsch, Peter; Singh, Elvira; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-06-01

    Higher childhood cancer incidence rates are generally reported for high income countries although high quality information on descriptive patterns of childhood cancer incidence for low or middle income countries is limited, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa. There is a need to quantify global differences by cancer types, and to investigate whether they reflect true incidence differences or can be attributed to under-diagnosis or under-reporting. For the first time, we describe childhood cancer data reported to the pathology report-based National Cancer Registry of South Africa in 2000-2006 and compare our results to incidence data from Germany, a high income country. The overall age-standardized incidence rate (ASR) for South Africa in 2000-2006 was 45.7 per million children. We observed substantial differences by cancer types within South Africa by racial group; ASRs tended to be 3-4-fold higher in South African Whites compared to Blacks. ASRs among both Black and White South Africans were generally lower than those from Germany with the greatest differences observed between the Black population in South Africa and Germany, although there was marked variation between cancer types. Age-specific rates were particularly low comparing South African Whites and Blacks with German infants. Overall, patterns across South African population groups and in comparison to Germans were similar for boys and girls. Genetic and environmental reasons may probably explain rather a small proportion of the observed differences. More research is needed to understand the extent to which under-ascertainment and under-diagnosis of childhood cancers drives differences in observed rates.

  3. Rates and Correlates of Undetermined Deaths among African Americans: Results from the National Violent Death Reporting System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huguet, Nathalie; Kaplan, Mark S.; McFarland, Bentson H.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the factors associated with undetermined death classifications among African Americans. In this study, the rates of undetermined deaths were assessed, the prevalence of missing information was estimated, and whether the circumstances preceding death differ by race were examined. Data were derived from the 2005-2008 National…

  4. First-Year Students' Perceptions of Extended National Diploma Programmes: The Case of a Comprehensive South African University (2012)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mavunga, George; Cachalia, Fahmida

    2014-01-01

    This study compared how the cohort of extended diploma students enrolled at a comprehensive South African university in 2012 perceived the programmes for which they were enrolled at the beginning of their first year and towards the end of the year. Data were gathered using questionnaires and semi-structured interviews involving students enrolled…

  5. U.S. Department of Education Chapter of Blacks In Government (BIG) Report: The Status of the African American Workforce at the U.S. Department of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Wanda E.

    2012-01-01

    The report includes racial and gender demographic data at the Department of Education [ED] during the Obama administration at the SES [Senior Executive Service] and specific grade levels for Pay period 11 in the year 2012. The report compares this racial and gender demographic data with a pay period towards the end of the George W. Bush…

  6. Optics and photonics research in the Lasers, Optics and Remote Sensing Department at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons-Potter, K.; Meister, D.C.

    1997-04-01

    Photonic system and device technologies have claimed a significant share of the current high-tech market. In particular, laser systems and optical devices impact a broad range of technological areas including telecommunications, optical computing, optical data storage, integrated photonics, remote environmental sensing and biomedical applications. Below we present an overview of photonics research being conducted within the Lasers, Optics and Remote Sensing department of the Physical and Chemical Sciences Center at Sandia National Laboratories. Recent results in the fields of photosensitive materials and devices, binary optics device applications, wavelength generation using optical parametric oscillators, and remote sensing are highlighted. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  7. The epidemiology of tuberculosis in free-ranging African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in the Kruger National Park, South Africa.

    PubMed

    De Vos, V; Bengis, R G; Kriek, N P; Michel, A; Keet, D F; Raath, J P; Huchzermeyer, H F

    2001-06-01

    The presence of bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) in the Kruger National Park (KNP) was determined for the first time in 1990. It was diagnosed in an African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) bull, which was found recumbent and in an emaciated and moribund state near the south-western boundary fence. This prompted an investigation into the bovine tuberculosis (BTB) status of the KNP, with emphasis on its epidemiological determinants and risk factors. This report documents the findings of surveys that were conducted from 1990 to 1996. It was found that BTB had entered the KNP ecosystem relatively recently (+/- 1960), and has found favourable circumstances for survival and propagation in a fully susceptible and immunologically naive buffalo population. Indications are that it entered the KNP from across the southern river boundary, where the presence of infected domestic cattle herds had been documented. From there the infection spread through the southern buffalo population and is currently spreading in a northward direction. It was estimated that this northward spread took place at a rate of about 6 km per year; the prospect being that, if this rate of spread is maintained, the entire KNP may be affected in less than 30 years from now. Spillover from buffalo had already occurred in species such as chacma baboon (Papio ursinus), lion (Panthera leo), cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus), kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) and leopard (Panthera pardus). Although there is no indication yet that these species act as maintenance hosts, the possibility is raised that these, or an as yet overlooked species, might assume such a role in future. In the KNP, BTB manifests itself as a chronic and predominantly subclinical disease in buffalo. It may take years for clinical signs to develop, and then only at a terminal stage, when emaciation is a constant feature. It is suspected that the time from infection to death is variable and dependent on the animal's immune response, which can be

  8. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico's fleet services department.

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Anastasia Dawn

    2003-06-01

    This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico's (SNL/NM) Fleet Services Department between December 2001 and August 2002. This is the third PPOA conducted at Fleet in the last decade. The primary purpose of this PPOA was to review progress of past initiatives and to provide recommendations for future waste reduction measures of hazardous and solid waste streams and increasing the purchase of environmentally friendly products. This report contains a summary of the information collected and analyses performed with recommended options for implementation. The Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Pollution Prevention Group will work with SNL/NM's Fleet Services to implement these options.

  9. United States Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Sandia Field Office NESHAP Annual Report CY2014 for Sandia National Laboratories New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    evelo, stacie; Miller, Mark L.

    2015-05-01

    This report provides a summary of the radionuclide releases from the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration facilities at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) during Calendar Year (CY) 2014, including the data, calculations, and supporting documentation for demonstrating compliance with 40 Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) 61, Subpart H--NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR EMISSIONS OF RADIONUCLIDES OTHER THAN RADON FROM DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FACILITIES. A description is given of the sources and their contributions to the overall dose assessment. In addition, the maximally exposed individual (MEI) radiological dose calculation and the population dose to local and regional residents are discussed.

  10. 20 CFR 669.130 - What unit within the Department administers the National Farmworker Jobs Program funded under WIA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR NATIONAL FARMWORKER JOBS PROGRAM UNDER... Employment and Training Administration, as the organizational unit that administers the NFJP and other MSFW programs at the Federal level....

  11. Use of the National Driver Register in the U.S. Department of Energy Human Reliability Program

    SciTech Connect

    Phillip M. Kannan, Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-01-01

    The National Driver Register (NDR) is a complex information network established and maintained by the Secretary of the Department of Transportation (DOT) under the National Driver Register Act of 1982. This report analyzes the question of whether information from the NDR is available to officials making Human Reliability Program (HRP) certification and recertification decisions and to Department of Energy (DOE) personnel security specialists making access authorization determinations.

  12. Association Of Church-Sponsored Activity Participation And Prevalence Of Overweight And Obesity In African American Protestants, National Survey Of American Life, 2001–2003

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jerome; Belay, Brook; Park, Sohyun; Onufrak, Stephen; Dietz, William

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study examines the relationships between participation in the African American church and overweight/obesity (body mass index (BMI) ≥25 kg/m2). Design: This cross-sectional analysis was based on the National Survey of American Life 2001–2003 and included 2,689 African American Protestant (AAP) adults. Multivariate logistic regression was used to calculate adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for overweight/obesity. Two practices were examined – frequency of participation in church activities (excluding services) and frequency of church service attendance. Each practice was analyzed in separate models. Each model included the following covariates: age, marital status, education, poverty, smoking, and region of country. We also adjusted models for sex. Results After adjustment, African American Protestant men (AAPM) who participated in church activities at least weekly were more likely to be overweight/obese (aOR=2.17; 95% CI=1.25, 3.77) compared to AAPM who did not participate in church activities. There was no statistically significant association between overweight/obesity and participation in church activities for AAPW. There was no association between overweight/obesity and attendance of church services for AAP men and women combined. Conclusions For AAPM, participation in church activities was significantly associated with overweight/obesity. Further studies are required to determine why this association occurs in AAPM but not AAPW. Studies looking at the wider application of the several successful health initiatives targeting the AAP community should also be considered. PMID:23914418

  13. The Pakistan National Emergency Department Surveillance Study (Pak-NEDS): Introducing a pilot surveillance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence-based decision making is essential for appropriate prioritization and service provision by healthcare systems. Despite higher demands, data needs for this practice are not met in many cases in low- and middle-income countries because of underdeveloped sources, among other reasons. Emergency departments (EDs) provide an important channel for such information because of their strategic position within healthcare systems. This paper describes the design and pilot test of a national ED based surveillance system suitable for the Pakistani context. Methods The Pakistan National Emergency Department Surveillance Study (Pak-NEDS) was pilot tested in the emergency departments of seven major tertiary healthcare centres across the country. The Aga Khan University, Karachi, served as the coordinating centre. Key stakeholders and experts from all study institutes were involved in outlining data needs, development of the study questionnaire, and identification of appropriate surveillance mechanisms such as methods for data collection, monitoring, and quality assurance procedures. The surveillance system was operational between November 2010 and March 2011. Active surveillance was done 24 hours a day by data collectors hired and trained specifically for the study. All patients presenting to the study EDs were eligible participants. Over 270,000 cases were registered in the surveillance system over a period of four months. Coverage levels in the final month ranged from 91-100% and were highest in centres with the least volume of patients. Overall the coverage for the four months was 79% and crude operational costs were less than $0.20 per patient. Conclusions Pak-NEDS is the first multi-centre ED based surveillance system successfully piloted in a sample of major EDs having some of the highest patient volumes in Pakistan. Despite the challenges identified, our pilot shows that the system is flexible and scalable, and could potentially be adapted for many other

  14. National Institute of Mental Health Multisite Eban HIV/STD Prevention Intervention for African American HIV Serodiscordant Couples

    PubMed Central

    El-Bassel, Nabila; Jemmott, John B.; Landis, J. Richard; Pequegnat, Willo; Wingood, Gina M.; Wyatt, Gail E.; Bellamy, Scarlett L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has disproportionately affected African Americans. Couple-level interventions may be a promising intervention strategy. Methods To determine if a behavioral intervention can reduce HIV/sexually transmitted disease (STD) risk behaviors among African American HIV serodiscordant couples, a cluster randomized controlled trial (Eban) was conducted in Atlanta, Georgia; Los Angeles, California; New York, New York; and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; with African American HIV serodiscordant heterosexual couples who were eligible if both partners were at least 18 years old and reported unprotected intercourse in the previous 90 days and awareness of each other's serostatus. One thousand seventy participants were enrolled (mean age, 43 years; 40% of male participants were HIV positive). Couples were randomized to 1 of 2 interventions: couple-focused Eban HIV/STD risk-reduction intervention or attention-matched individual-focused health promotion comparison. The primary outcomes were the proportion of condom-protected intercourse acts and cumulative incidence of STDs (chlamydia, gonorrhea, or trichomonas). Data were collected preintervention and postintervention, and at 6- and 12-month follow-ups. Results Data were analyzed for 535 randomized couples: 260 in the intervention group and 275 in the comparison group; 81.9% were retained at the 12-month follow-up. Generalized estimating equation analyses revealed that the proportion of condom-protected intercourse acts was larger among couples in the intervention group (0.77) than in the comparison group (0.47; risk ratio, 1.24; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09 to 1.41; P=.006) when adjusted for the baseline criterion measure. The adjusted percentage of couples using condoms consistently was higher in the intervention group (63%) than in the comparison group (48%; risk ratio, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.24 to 1.70; P<.001). The adjusted mean number of (log)unprotected intercourse acts was lower in

  15. African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) endangered by a canine distemper epizootic among domestic dogs near the Masai Mara National Reserve, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Alexander, K A; Appel, M J

    1994-10-01

    A longitudinal study of canine distemper (CD) among domestic dogs on Malsai communal land to the north of the Masai Mara National Reserve in Kenya was conducted from 1989 to 1991. Prevalence of antibodies to CD was very low among domestic dogs in 1989 and 1990 (4%, n = 49; and 1%, n = 119, respectively) and no African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus; n = 16) collected simultaneously from the same area had detectable antibodies. Among 51 domestic dogs sampled in 1991, however, prevalence of CD antibodies rose significantly (P < 0.01) to 76%. Disease-related mortality rates among domestic dogs were estimated from 1990 to 1992; they rose significantly (P < 0.01) from 21% in 1990 to 50% in 1991 and then decreased significantly (P < 0.01) to 38% in 1992. The 1992 mortality rate remained significantly (P < 0.01) higher than that of 1990. Signs observed in clinically ill domestic dogs were consistent with CD and included listlessness, decreased appetite, bilateral serous to mucopurulent oculonasal discharge, and diarrhea. No carcasses could be retrieved for virus isolation and postmortem examination. Concurrent with this CD epizootic in domestic dogs, the known African wild dog packs in this region disappeared.

  16. African Americans & Hispanics among Physics & Astronomy Faculty: Results from the 2012 Survey of Physics & Astronomy Degree-Granting Departments. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivie, Rachel; Anderson, Garrett; White, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The United States is becoming more and more diverse, but the representation of some minority groups in physics and astronomy lags behind. Although 13% of the US population is African American or black, and 17% is Hispanic (US Census), the representation of these two groups in physics and astronomy is much lower. For this reason, African Americans…

  17. Engineering processes for the African VLBI network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thondikulam, Venkatasubramani L.; Loots, Anita; Gaylard, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The African VLBI Network (AVN) is an initiative by the SKA-SA and HartRAO, business units of the National Research Foundation (NRF), Department of Science and Technology (DST), South Africa. The aim is to fill the existing gap of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI)-capable radio telescopes in the African continent by a combination of new build as well as conversion of large redundant telecommunication antennas through an Inter-Governmental collaborative programme in Science and Technology. The issue of human capital development in the Continent in the techniques of radio astronomy engineering and science is a strong force to drive the project and is expected to contribute significantly to the success of Square Kilometer Array (SKA) in the Continent.

  18. African Americans' Participation in a Comprehensive Intervention College Prep Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sianjina, Rayton R.; Phillips, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The National Center for Educational Statistics, in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Education, compiles statistical data for U.S. schools. As charts indicate, in 2001, it reported that nationwide, 76% of high-income graduates immediately enroll in colleges or trade schools. However, only 49% of Hispanic and 59% of African Americans enroll…

  19. Government Funding as Leverage for Quality Teaching and Learning: A South African Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essack, Sabiha Y.; Naidoo, Indirani; Barnes, Glen

    2010-01-01

    The South African Higher Education Funding Framework uses funding as a lever to achieve equitable student access, quality teaching and research, and improved student retention and success. Maximising a university subsidy from the national Department of Education necessitates innovative strategies at the pre- and post-student admission stages. This…

  20. March toward Excellence: School Success and Minority Student Achievement in Department of Defense Schools. A Report to the National Education Goals Panel. Lessons from the States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smrekar, Claire; Guthrie, James W.; Owens, Debra E.; Sims, Pearl G.

    This study examined how Department of Defense (DoD) schools have attained high achievement levels among all students, emphasizing Hispanics and African Americans. Researchers investigated organizational and governmental structures linking the daily operations of DoD schools and districts to policy-setting authorities; the nature and quality of…

  1. National Trends in Resource Utilization Associated with Emergency Department Visits for Syncope

    PubMed Central

    Probst, Marc A.; Kanzaria, Hemal K.; Gbedemah, Misato; Richardson, Lynne D.; Sun, Benjamin C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Over the last 20 years, numerous research articles and clinical guidelines aimed at optimizing resource utilization for emergency department (ED) patients presenting with syncope have been published. Hypothesis We hypothesized there would be temporal trends in syncope-related ED visits and associated trends in imaging, hospital admissions, and diagnostic frequencies. Methods The ED component of National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey was analyzed from 2001 through 2010, comprising over 358,000 visits (representing an estimated 1.18 billion visits nationally). We selected ED visits with a reason for visit of syncope or fainting and calculated nationally representative weighted estimates for prevalence of such visits, and associated rates of advanced imaging utilization and admission. For admitted patients from 2005 to 2010, the most frequent hospital discharge diagnoses were tabulated. Results During the study period, there were over 3,500 actual ED visits (representing 11.9 million visits nationally) related to syncope, representing roughly 1% of all ED visits. Admission rates for syncope patients ranged from 27% to 35% and showed no significant downward trend (p=0.1). Advanced imaging rates increased from about 21% to 45% and showed a significant upward trend (p < 0.001). For admitted patients, the most common hospital discharge diagnosis was the symptomatic diagnosis of “syncope and collapse” (36.4%). Conclusions Despite substantial efforts by medical researchers and professional societies, resource utilization associated with ED visits for syncope appears to have actually increased. There have been no apparent improvements in diagnostic yield for admissions. Novel strategies may be needed to change practice patterns for such patients. PMID:25943042

  2. Rumen ciliates in the African (Cape) buffalo (Syncerus caffer caffer) living in the vicinity of the Orpen Gate entrance into Kruger National Park, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Booyse, Dirk G; Dehority, Burk A; Reininghaus, Björn

    2014-07-31

    Samples of rumen contents were obtained from 10 African (Cape) buffalo living in the vicinity of the Orpen Gate entrance into Kruger National Park in South Africa. Total number of ciliate protozoa per animal ranged from 3.15 to 23.25 x 103. Forty three different species and forms were observed, of which 35 are a new host record. The total number of species and forms per animal varied from 10 to 17. Eudiplodinium maggii occurred in all 10 animals, followed by Dasytricha ruminantium in nine animals. Diplodinium posterovesiculatum, Eudiplodinium magnodentatum and Ostracodinium mammosum were present in seven animals with all other species and forms occurring in five or less animals. 

  3. Culture Keepers III: Making Global Connections. Proceedings of the Black Caucus of the American Library Association (BCALA) National Conference of African American Librarians (3rd, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, July 31-August 3, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neely, Teresa Y., Ed.

    The 49 papers presented in this volume are evidence of the research, scholarship, and professional nature of the offerings of the third National Conference of African American Librarians, sponsored by the Black Caucus of the American Library Association. The papers are arranged into nine tracks and Pre-Conference topics: I: Library Connections: An…

  4. Departments of corrections as purchasers of community-based treatment: a national study.

    PubMed

    Kubiak, Sheryl Pimlott; Arfken, Cynthia L; Gibson, Erica Shifflet

    2009-06-01

    Community-based substance abuse treatment for offenders has been shown to reduce both substance use and recidivism. One strategy to ensure treatment availability for offenders is to have each state's Department of Corrections (DOC) fund treatment directly. Purchasing treatment implies regulation, but DOC as both a purchaser and regulator of community-based services has been underexamined. This national survey of administrators from the Single State Authority (SSA) and DOC in each state found DOCs purchase treatment in 35 states, with most states purchasing it directly from community-based providers utilizing a variety of funding sources. Fewer states reported DOCs purchased ancillary services than SSAs (68% vs. 81%). Although both DOCs and SSAs had workforce and program requirements, there were differences within and between states. Most (41/42) SSA administrators reported a strong relationship with DOC. This report represents the first step in describing the availability, mechanisms, and regulations of these two publicly funded community-based treatment systems.

  5. Integrating certification into the US Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory Turbine Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Butterfield, C P; Link, H; Smith, B

    1997-07-01

    The Wind Turbine Research Program conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) employs a comprehensive engineering development process which includes regular design, testing, and documentation reviews throughout the process. This process follows accepted international procedures, including the International Standards Organization ISO 9001. International wind turbine certification practice typically requires a review of only the final design and testing results of a wind turbine system. Using this approach, if the design does not meet requirements, the designer is faced with the lengthy and inefficient process of rerunning engineering calculations or tests or even redesigning major components. NREL has recognized the similarity between its development process and international certification practice and has integrated the two. The result is a comprehensive engineering development process, which enables subcontractors participating in the DOE/NREL Wind Turbine Research Program to develop a mature product, which is ready for commercialization and certification.

  6. Patients Prefer Boarding in Inpatient Hallways: Correlation with the National Emergency Department Overcrowding Score

    PubMed Central

    Richards, John R.; Ozery, Gal; Notash, Mark; Sokolove, Peter E.; Derlet, Robert W.; Panacek, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. The boarding of patients in Emergency Department (ED) hallways when no inpatient beds are available is a major cause of ED crowding. One solution is to board admitted patients in an inpatient rather than ED hallway. We surveyed patients to determine their preference and correlated their responses to real-time National Emergency Department Overcrowding Score (NEDOCS). Methods. This was a survey of admitted patients in the ED of an urban university level I trauma center serving a community of 5 million about their personal preferences regarding boarding. Real-time NEDOCS was calculated at the time each survey was conducted. Results. 99 total surveys were completed during October 2010, 42 (42%) patients preferred to be boarded in an inpatient hallway, 33 (33%) preferred the ED hallway, and 24 (24%) had no preference. Mean (±SD) NEDOCS (range 0–200) was 136 ± 46 for patients preferring inpatient boarding, 112 ± 39 for ED boarding, and 119 ± 43 without preference. Male patients preferred inpatient hallway boarding significantly more than females. Preference for inpatient boarding was associated with a significantly higher NEDOCS. Conclusions. In this survey study, patients prefer inpatient hallway boarding when the hospital is at or above capacity. Males prefer inpatient hallway boarding more than females. The preference for inpatient hallway boarding increases as the ED becomes more crowded. PMID:22235374

  7. Patients prefer boarding in inpatient hallways: correlation with the national emergency department overcrowding score.

    PubMed

    Richards, John R; Ozery, Gal; Notash, Mark; Sokolove, Peter E; Derlet, Robert W; Panacek, Edward A

    2011-01-01

    Objective. The boarding of patients in Emergency Department (ED) hallways when no inpatient beds are available is a major cause of ED crowding. One solution is to board admitted patients in an inpatient rather than ED hallway. We surveyed patients to determine their preference and correlated their responses to real-time National Emergency Department Overcrowding Score (NEDOCS). Methods. This was a survey of admitted patients in the ED of an urban university level I trauma center serving a community of 5 million about their personal preferences regarding boarding. Real-time NEDOCS was calculated at the time each survey was conducted. Results. 99 total surveys were completed during October 2010, 42 (42%) patients preferred to be boarded in an inpatient hallway, 33 (33%) preferred the ED hallway, and 24 (24%) had no preference. Mean (±SD) NEDOCS (range 0-200) was 136 ± 46 for patients preferring inpatient boarding, 112 ± 39 for ED boarding, and 119 ± 43 without preference. Male patients preferred inpatient hallway boarding significantly more than females. Preference for inpatient boarding was associated with a significantly higher NEDOCS. Conclusions. In this survey study, patients prefer inpatient hallway boarding when the hospital is at or above capacity. Males prefer inpatient hallway boarding more than females. The preference for inpatient hallway boarding increases as the ED becomes more crowded. PMID:22235374

  8. The impact of family planning on primary school enrolment in sub-national areas within 25 African countries.

    PubMed

    Longwe, Abiba; Smits, Jeroen

    2013-06-01

    We study how the availability and use of family planning services in African countries influences the family planning situation of households and through this the educational participation of young children. A district panel dataset is used for 441 urban and rural areas within 233 districts of 25 countries. Path analysis shows that a decrease in the number of births is associated with an increase in educational participation in the area. The number of births is negatively associated with acceptance, knowledge and actual use of contraceptives in the area. As reversed causality and selection bias seem unlikely, the identified relationship probably is at least partially causal. Hence, investments in family planning services in poor areas are not only important because they allow women to plan their births better, but also because they may lead to higher primary enrolment rates and thus contribute to the region's future economic growth.

  9. US Department of Energy National Lab Activities in Marine Hydrokinetics: Machine Performance Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Neary, Vincent S; Chamorro, Leonardo; Hill, Craig; Gunawan, Budi; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2012-01-01

    Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technology performance testing in the laboratory and field supports the US Department of Energy s MHK program goals to advance the technology readiness levels of MHK machines, to ensure environmentally responsible designs, to identify key cost drivers, and to reduce the cost of energy of MHK technologies. Laboratory testing results from scaled model machine testing at the University of Minnesota s St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) main channel flume are presented, including simultaneous machine power and inflow measurements for a 1:10 scale three-bladed axial flow turbine used to assess machine performance in turbulent flows, and detailed measurements of inflow and wake flow velocity and turbulence, including the assessment of the effects of large energetic organized vortex shedding on machine performance and wake turbulence downstream. Scaled laboratory testing provides accurate data sets for near- and far-field hydrodynamic models, and useful information on technology and environmental readiness levels before full-scale testing and demonstration in open water. This study validated turbine performance for a technology in order to advance its technology readiness level. Synchronized ADV measurements to calculate spatio-temporal characteristics of turbulence supported model development of the inflow turbulence model, Hydro-TurbSim, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate unsteady loading on MHK machines. Wake flow measurements supported model development of the far-field model, SNL-EFDC, developed by Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) to optimize spacing for MHK machine arrays.

  10. U.S. Department of Energy Consequence Management Under the National Response Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Don Van Etten and Paul Guss

    2009-02-03

    Under the Nuclear/Radiological Incident Annex of the National Response Framework, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has specific responsibilities as a coordinating agency and for leading interagency response elements in the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC). Emergency response planning focuses on rapidly providing response elements in stages after being notified of a nuclear/radiological incident. The use of Home Teams during the field team deployment period and recent advances in collecting and transmitting data from the field directly to assessment assets has greatly improved incident assessment times for public protection decisions. The DOE’s Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) based in Las Vegas, Nevada, has successfully deployed technical and logistical support for this mission at national exercises such as Top Officials Exercise IV (TOPOFF IV). In a unique response situation, DOE will provide advance contingency support to NASA during the scheduled launch in the fall of 2009 of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). The MSL rover will carry a radioisotope power system that generates electricity from the heat of plutonium’s radioactive decay. DOE assets and contingency planning will provide a pre-incident response posture for rapid early plume phase assessment in the highly unlikely launch anomaly.

  11. Patterns and correlates of drug-related emergency department visits: Results from a national survey

    PubMed Central

    Perron, Brian E.; Bohnert, Amy S. B.; Monsell, Sarah E.; Vaughn, Michael G.; Epperson, Matthew; Howard, Matthew O.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Drug treatment can be effective in community-based settings, but drug users tend to under-utilize these treatment options and instead seek services in emergency departments (ED) and other acute care settings. The goals of this study were to describe prevalence and correlates of drug-related ED visits. Basic procedures This study used data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), which is a nationally representative survey of 43,093 U.S. residents. Main findings The overall prevalence of drug-related ED visits among lifetime drug users was 1.8%; for those with a lifetime drug use disorder, 3.7%. Persons with heroin dependence and inhalant dependence had the highest rates of ED visits, and marijuana dependence was associated with the lowest rates. Multivariate analyses revealed that being socially connected (i.e., marital status) were protective factors against ED visits, whereas psychopathology (i.e., personality or mood disorders) were risk factors. Conclusions Significant variability exists for risk of ED use for different types of drugs. These findings can help inform where links between EDs with local treatment programs can be formed to provide preventative care and injury-prevention interventions to reduce the risk of subsequent ED visits. PMID:20627209

  12. The Call for an African University: A Critical Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Wyk, Berte; Higgs, Philip

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we draw on philosophy (particularly African philosophy) to analyse the call for an African university. The call for an African university may be viewed as a call that insists that all critical and transformative educators in Africa embrace an indigenous African worldview and root their nation's educational paradigms in an indigenous…

  13. 75 FR 69603 - Privacy Act of 1974: Implementation of Exemptions; Department of Homeland Security National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... National Protection and Programs Directorate--001 National Infrastructure Coordinating Center Records... records titled, ``DHS/NPPD--001 National Infrastructure Coordinating Center (NICC) Records System of... incident management activities, supports information sharing with National Infrastructure Protection...

  14. Tank Closure Progress at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Tank Farm Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Quigley, K.D.; Butterworth, St.W.; Lockie, K.A.

    2008-07-01

    Significant progress has been made at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to empty, clean and close radioactive liquid waste storage tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Tank Farm Facility (TFF). The TFF includes eleven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) underground stainless steel storage tanks and four smaller, 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) stainless steel tanks, along with tank vaults, interconnecting piping, and ancillary equipment. The TFF tanks have historically been used to store a variety of radioactive liquid waste, including wastes associated with past spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. Although four of the large storage tanks remain in use for waste storage, the other seven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) tanks and the four 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) tanks have been emptied of waste, cleaned and filled with grout. A water spray cleaning system was developed and deployed to clean internal tank surfaces and remove remaining tank wastes. The cleaning system was effective in removing all but a very small volume of solid residual waste particles. Recent issuance of an Amended Record of Decision (ROD) in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act, and a Waste Determination complying with Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2005, has allowed commencement of grouting activities on the cleaned tanks. The first three 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) tanks were grouted in the Fall of 2006 and the fourth tank and the seven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) tanks were filled with grout in 2007 to provide long-term stability. It is currently planned that associated tank valve boxes and interconnecting piping, will be stabilized with grout as early as 2008. (authors)

  15. Tank Closure Progress at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Tank Farm Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lockie, K.A.; Suttora, L.C.; Quigley, K.D.; Stanisich, N.

    2007-07-01

    Significant progress has been made at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to clean and close emptied radioactive liquid waste storage tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Tank Farm Facility (TFF). The TFF includes eleven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) underground stainless steel storage tanks and four smaller, 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) stainless steel tanks, along with tank vaults, interconnecting piping, and ancillary equipment. The TFF tanks have historically been used to store a variety of radioactive liquid waste, including wastes associated with past spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. Although four of the large storage tanks remain in use for waste storage, the other seven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) tanks and the four 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) tanks have been emptied of waste and cleaned in preparation of final closure. A water spray cleaning system was developed and deployed to clean internal tank surfaces and remove remaining tank wastes. The cleaning system was effective in removing all but a very small volume of solid residual waste particles. Recent issuance of an Amended Record of Decision (ROD) in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act, and a Waste Determination complying with Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2005, has allowed commencement of grouting activities on the cleaned tanks. In November 2006, three of the 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) tanks were filled with grout to provide long-term stability. It is currently planned that all seven cleaned 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) tanks, as well as the four 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) tanks and all associated tank vaults and interconnecting piping, will be stabilized with grout as early as 2008. (authors)

  16. National Rocket Propulsion Materials Plan: A NASA, Department of Defense, and Industry Partnership

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinton, Raymond G., Jr.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA, Department of Defense, and rocket propulsion industry representatives are working together to create a national rocket propulsion materials development roadmap. This "living document" will facilitate collaboration among the partners, leveraging of resources, and will be a highly effective tool for technology development planning. The structuring of the roadmap, and development plan, which will combine the significant efforts of the Integrated High Payoff Rocket Propulsion Technology (IHPRPT) Program, and NASA's Integrated Space Transportation Plan (ISTP), is being lead by the IHPRPT Materials Working Group (IMWG). The IHPRPT Program is a joint DoD, NASA, and industry effort to dramatically improve the nation's rocket propulsion capabilities. This phased program is structured with increasingly challenging goals focused on performance, reliability, and cost to effectively double rocket propulsion capabilities by 2010. The IHPRPT program is focused on three propulsion application areas: Boost and Orbit Transfer (both liquid rocket engines and solid rocket motors), Tactical, and Spacecraft. Critical to the success of this initiative is the development and application of advanced materials, processes, and manufacturing technologies. NASA's ISTP is a comprehensive strategy focusing on the aggressive safety, reliability, and affordability goals for future space transportation systems established by the agency. Key elements of this plan are the 2 nd and 3 d Generation Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV). The affordability and safety goals of these generational systems are, respectively, 10X cheaper and 100X safer by 2010, and 100X cheaper and 10,000X safer by 2025. Accomplishment of these goals requires dramatic and sustained breakthroughs, particularly in the development and the application of advanced material systems. The presentation will provide an overview of the IHPRPT materials initiatives, NASA's 2nd and 3 rd Generation RLV propulsion materials projects, and the

  17. Race, health, and the African Diaspora.

    PubMed

    Spigner, Clarence

    Health inequalities exist throughout the African Diaspora and are viewed in this article as largely color-coded. In developed, developing, and undeveloped nations today, "racial" stratification is consistently reflected in an inability to provide adequate health regardless of national policy or ideology. For instance, African Americans experience less than adequate health care very similar to Blacks in Britain, in spite of each nations differing health systems. Latin America's Africana Negra communities experience poorer health similar to Blacks throughout the Caribbean. The African continent itself is arguably the poorest on earth. A common history of racism correlates with health disparities across the African Diaspora.

  18. Cancer statistics for African Americans.

    PubMed

    Ghafoor, Asma; Jemal, Ahmedin; Cokkinides, Vilma; Cardinez, Cheryll; Murray, Taylor; Samuels, Alicia; Thun, Michael J

    2002-01-01

    The American Cancer Society provides estimates on the number of new cancer cases and deaths, and compiles health statistics on African Americans in a biennial publication, Cancer Facts and Figures for African Americans. The compiled statistics include cancer incidence, mortality, survival, and lifestyle behaviors using the most recent data on incidence and survival from the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program, mortality data from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), and behavioral information from the Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS), and National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). It is estimated that 132,700 new cases of cancer and 63,100 deaths will occur among African Americans in the year 2003. Although African Americans have experienced higher incidence and mortality rates of cancer than whites for many years, incidence rates have declined by 2.7 percent per year in African-American males since 1992, while stabilizing in African-American females. During the same period, death rates declined by 2.1 percent and 0.4 percent per year among African-American males and females, respectively. The decrease in both incidence and death rates from cancer among African-American males was the largest of any racial or ethnic group. Nonetheless, African Americans still carry the highest cancer burden among US racial and ethnic groups. Most cancers detectable by screening are diagnosed at a later stage and survival rates are lower within each stage of disease in African Americans than in whites. The extent to which these disparities reflect unequal access to health care versus other factors is an active area of research.

  19. Pattern of fall injuries in Pakistan: the Pakistan National Emergency Department Surveillance (Pak-NEDS) study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background We aimed to analyse the frequency and patterns of fall-related injuries presenting to the emergency departments (EDs) across Pakistan. Methods Pakistan National Emergency Departments surveillance system collected data from November 2010 to March 2011 on a 24/7 basis using a standardized tool in seven major EDs (five public and two private hospitals) in six major cities of Pakistan. For all patients presenting with fall-related injuries, we analysed data by intent with focus on unintentional falls. Simple frequencies were run for basic patient demographics, mechanism of falls, outcomes of fall injuries, mode of arrival to ED, investigations, and procedures with outcomes. Results There were 3335 fall-related injuries. In cases where intent was available, two-thirds (n = 1186, 65.3%) of fall injuries were unintentional. Among unintentional fall patients presenting to EDs, the majority (76.9%) were males and between 15-44 years of age (69%). The majority of the unintentional falls (n = 671, 56.6%) were due to slipping, followed by fall from height (n = 338, 28.5%). About two-thirds (n = 675, 66.6%) of fall injuries involved extremities, followed by head/neck (n = 257, 25.4%) and face (n = 99, 9.8%). Most of the patients were discharged from the hospital (n = 1059, 89.3%). There were 17 (1.3%) deaths among unintentional fall cases. Conclusion Falls are an important cause of injury-related visits to EDs in Pakistan. Most of the fall injury patients were men and in a productive age group. Fall injuries pose a burden on the healthcare system, especially emergency services, and future studies should therefore focus on safety measures at home and in workplaces to reduce this burden. PMID:26691821

  20. Evaluating the status of African wild dogs Lycaon pictus and cheetahs Acinonyx jubatus through tourist-based photographic surveys in the Kruger National Park [corrected].

    PubMed

    Marnewick, Kelly; Ferreira, Sam M; Grange, Sophie; Watermeyer, Jessica; Maputla, Nakedi; Davies-Mostert, Harriet T

    2014-01-01

    The Kruger National Park is a stronghold for African wild dog Lycaon pictus and cheetah Acinonyx jubatus conservation in South Africa. Tourist photographic surveys have been used to evaluate the minimum number of wild dogs and cheetahs alive over the last two decades. Photographic-based capture-recapture techniques for open populations were used on data collected during a survey done in 2008/9. Models were run for the park as a whole and per region (northern, central, southern). A total of 412 (329-495; SE 41.95) cheetahs and 151 (144-157; SE 3.21) wild dogs occur in the Kruger National Park. Cheetah capture probabilities were affected by time (number of entries) and sex, whereas wild dog capture probabilities were affected by the region of the park. When plotting the number of new individuals identified against the number of entries received, the addition of new wild dogs to the survey reached an asymptote at 210 entries, but cheetahs did not reach an asymptote. The cheetah population of Kruger appears to be acceptable, while the wild dog population size and density are of concern. The effectiveness of tourist-based surveys for estimating population sizes through capture-recapture analyses is shown.

  1. Evaluating the status of African wild dogs Lycaon pictus and cheetahs Acinonyx jubatus through tourist-based photographic surveys in the Kruger National Park [corrected].

    PubMed

    Marnewick, Kelly; Ferreira, Sam M; Grange, Sophie; Watermeyer, Jessica; Maputla, Nakedi; Davies-Mostert, Harriet T

    2014-01-01

    The Kruger National Park is a stronghold for African wild dog Lycaon pictus and cheetah Acinonyx jubatus conservation in South Africa. Tourist photographic surveys have been used to evaluate the minimum number of wild dogs and cheetahs alive over the last two decades. Photographic-based capture-recapture techniques for open populations were used on data collected during a survey done in 2008/9. Models were run for the park as a whole and per region (northern, central, southern). A total of 412 (329-495; SE 41.95) cheetahs and 151 (144-157; SE 3.21) wild dogs occur in the Kruger National Park. Cheetah capture probabilities were affected by time (number of entries) and sex, whereas wild dog capture probabilities were affected by the region of the park. When plotting the number of new individuals identified against the number of entries received, the addition of new wild dogs to the survey reached an asymptote at 210 entries, but cheetahs did not reach an asymptote. The cheetah population of Kruger appears to be acceptable, while the wild dog population size and density are of concern. The effectiveness of tourist-based surveys for estimating population sizes through capture-recapture analyses is shown. PMID:24465998

  2. Critical and Demographic Effective Population Size of African Buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in Borgu Sector of Kainji Lake National Park, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aremu, O. T.; Onadeko, S. A.; Ola-Adams, B. A.; Inah, E. I.

    Effective population size of African Buffalo (Syncerus caffer) was estimated using Franklin and Frankham model. Buffalo relative abundance was calculated using a 4x4 km transect constructed in each of the identified six vegetation communities in the Park, which were traversed once a month for a period of 24 months. The results revealed that the relative abundance of Buffalo in the Park was 0.372±0.03 groups km-2 consisting of 51±5.827 groups representing 242±16.309 individuals which consist of 30 adult males and 70 adult females representing 12.40 and 28.93%, respectively of the total Buffalo population in the Park which was considered to be the effective breeding population size. The composition of the population structure was significantly different (p< 0.05). The effective population size of Buffalo in the Park was estimated to be 581.34±4.91 which was above the recommended value of 100 which shows that the Buffalo population in the Park was not threatened by demographic stochasticity factors but rather by illegal human activities in the Park. Measures to improve conservation and management of the existing Buffalo population in the Park are also discussed.

  3. Modeling the Distribution of African Savanna Elephants in Kruger National Park: AN Application of Multi-Scale GLOBELAND30 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.; Hays, B.; Fayrer-Hosken, R.; Presotto, A.

    2016-06-01

    The ability of remote sensing to represent ecologically relevant features at multiple spatial scales makes it a powerful tool for studying wildlife distributions. Species of varying sizes perceive and interact with their environment at differing scales; therefore, it is important to consider the role of spatial resolution of remotely sensed data in the creation of distribution models. The release of the Globeland30 land cover classification in 2014, with its 30 m resolution, presents the opportunity to do precisely that. We created a series of Maximum Entropy distribution models for African savanna elephants (Loxodonta africana) using Globeland30 data analyzed at varying resolutions. We compared these with similarly re-sampled models created from the European Space Agency's Global Land Cover Map (Globcover). These data, in combination with GIS layers of topography and distance to roads, human activity, and water, as well as elephant GPS collar data, were used with MaxEnt software to produce the final distribution models. The AUC (Area Under the Curve) scores indicated that the models created from 600 m data performed better than other spatial resolutions and that the Globeland30 models generally performed better than the Globcover models. Additionally, elevation and distance to rivers seemed to be the most important variables in our models. Our results demonstrate that Globeland30 is a valid alternative to the well-established Globcover for creating wildlife distribution models. It may even be superior for applications which require higher spatial resolution and less nuanced classifications.

  4. A National Survey of Parental Leave and Childcare Policies for Graduate Students in Departments of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonneau, David; Women in Astronomy, AAS Committee on Status of

    2013-01-01

    The AAS Committee on the Status of Women in Astronomy conducted a national survey to determine current policies regarding parental leave and childcare for graduate student parents. We sent a letter to the Chair of each U.S. department of astronomy and/or astrophysics that offers the PhD degree. The letter inquired both about leave following the birth or adoption of a child (including questions about eligibility, whether the leave was paid or unpaid, and whether benefits including health care and housing were retained during leave), as well as childcare (including questions about eligibility, access, and financial assistance). The letter sought to determine the official departmental policies, but also inquired about any unofficial policies. We also inquired as to mechanisms to cover costs associated with both parental leave and childcare, and the means by which graduate students were informed about the policies. The response rate was 100%. We will present the results at this special session, and then lead a discussion of the changing landscape of parental leave for graduate students in our field.

  5. U.S. Department of Energy National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, V.; Bennett, M.; Bishop, L.

    1998-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle has recently been established. The vision of this new program is to develop a DOE culture that promotes pollution prevention by considering the recycle and reuse of metal as the first and primary disposition option and burial as a last option. The Center of Excellence takes the approach that unrestricted release of metal is the first priority because it is the most cost-effective disposition pathway. Where this is not appropriate, restricted release, beneficial reuse, and stockpile of ingots are considered. Current recycling activities include the sale of 40,000 tons of scrap metal from the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly K-25 Plant) K-770 scrap yard, K-1064 surplus equipment and machinery, 7,000 PCB-contaminated drums, 12,000 tons of metal from the Y-l2 scrap yard, and 1,000 metal pallets. In addition, the Center of Excellence is developing a toolbox for project teams that will contain a number of specific tools to facilitate metals recycle. This Internet-based toolbox will include primers, computer programs, and case studies designed to help sites to perform life cycle analysis, perform ALARA (As Low As is Reasonably Achievable) analysis for radiation exposures, provide pollution prevention information and documentation, and produce independent government estimates. The use of these tools is described for two current activities: disposition of scrap metal in the Y-12 scrapyard, and disposition of PCB-contaminated drums.

  6. A national survey of emergency department chest pain centers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Zalenski, R J; Rydman, R J; Ting, S; Kampe, L; Selker, H P

    1998-06-01

    Although chest pain centers are promoted as improving emergency cardiac care, no data exist on their structure and processes. This national study determines the 1995 prevalence rate for emergency department (ED)-based chest pain centers in the United States and compares organizational differences of EDs with and without such centers. A mail survey was directed to 476 EDs randomly selected from the American Hospital Association's database of metropolitan hospitals (n = 2,309); the response rate was 63%. The prevalence of chest pain centers was 22.5% (95% confidence interval 18% to 27%), which yielded a projection of 520 centers in the United States in 1995. EDs with centers had higher overall patient volumes, greater use of high-technology testing, lower treatment times for thrombolytic therapy, and more advertising (all p <0.05). Hospitals with centers had greater market competition and more beds per annual admissions, cardiac catheterization, and open heart surgery capability (all p <0.05). Logistic regression identified open heart surgery, high-admission volumes, and nonprofit status as independent predictors of hospitals having chest pain centers. Thus, chest pain centers have a moderate prevalence, offer more services and marketing efforts than standard EDs, and tend to be hosted by large nonprofit hospitals. PMID:9631967

  7. Public Health Staff Development Needs in Informatics: Findings From a National Survey of Local Health Departments

    PubMed Central

    Chester, Kelley; Shah, Gulzar H.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Public health practice is information-intensive and information-driven. Public health informatics is a nascent discipline, and most public health practitioners lack necessary skills in this area. Objective: To describe the staff development needs of local health departments (LHDs) related to informatics. Design: Data came from the 2015 Informatics Capacity and Needs Assessment Survey, conducted by Georgia Southern University in collaboration with the National Association of County & City Health Officials. Participants: A total of 324 LHDs from all 50 states completed the survey (response rate: 50%). Main Outcome Measure(s): Outcome measures included LHDs' specific staff development needs related to informatics. Predictors of interest included jurisdiction size and governance type. Results: Areas of workforce development and improvement in informatics staff of LHDs included using and interpreting quantitative data, designing and running reports from information systems, using and interpreting qualitative data, using statistical or other analytical software, project management, and using geographical information systems. Significant variation in informatics training needs exists depending on the size of the LHD population and governance type. Conclusion: Substantial training needs exist for LHDs across many areas of informatics ranging from very basic to specialized skills and are related to the size of LHD population and governance type. PMID:27684619

  8. Anatomical departments in Bavaria and the corpses of executed victims of National Socialism.

    PubMed

    Noack, Thorsten

    2012-06-01

    While it is known that the bodies of executed victims of National Socialism (NS) were used for anatomical research and teaching, detailed studies are still missing for many anatomical departments. This analysis focuses on the institutes in Bavaria. From 1933 on the institutes of Munich, Würzburg and Erlangen were actively involved in and competed over the procurement of bodies of NS victims, particularly between 1937 and 1941. While the body supply was sufficient thereafter it became again critical in the first years after the war. During that period, anatomists complained about a lack of bodies for dissection courses and tended to use the corpses remaining from the NS-period for teaching purposes. Their position was supported by the popular view that resistance fighters were seen as traitors to the Fatherland and not as honorable political victims. At the same time, relatives and aid organizations were in search of the dead victims of German terror. These conflicting interests created a situation full of tension, in which Philipp Auerbach, state commissioner for religious, political and racial victims of the Nazis in Bavaria, played a crucial role.

  9. Frequency, determinants and impact of overcrowding in emergency departments in Canada: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Bond, Kenneth; Ospina, Maria B; Blitz, Sandra; Afilalo, Marc; Campbell, Sam G; Bullard, Michael; Innes, Grant; Holroyd, Brian; Curry, Gil; Schull, Michael; Rowe, Brian H

    2007-01-01

    Several reports have documented the prevalence and severity of emergency department (ED) overcrowding at specific hospitals or cities in Canada; however, no study has examined the issue at a national level. A 54-item, self-administered, postal and web-based questionnaire was distributed to 243 ED directors in Canada to collect data on the frequency, impact and factors associated with ED overcrowding. The survey was completed by 158 (65% response rate) ED directors, 62% of whom reported overcrowding as a major or severe problem during the past year. Directors attributed overcrowding to a variety of issues including a lack of admitting beds (85%), lack of acute care beds (74%) and the increased length of stay of admitted patients in the ED (63%). They perceived ED overcrowding to have a major impact on increasing stress among nurses (82%), ED wait times (79%) and the boarding of admitted patients in the ED while waiting for beds (67%). Overcrowding is not limited to large urban centres; nor is it limited to academic and teaching hospitals. The perspective of ED directors reinforces the need for further examination of effective policies and interventions to reduce ED overcrowding. PMID:18019897

  10. A national survey of disinfection techniques for flexible nasendoscopes in UK ENT out-patient departments.

    PubMed

    Banfield, G K; Hinton, A E

    2000-03-01

    Flexible fibre-optic nasendoscopes have become a ubiquitous ENT out-patient tool for the inspection of the nasopharynx, larynx and hypopharynx. Disinfection of the instrument between patient use is important to prevent potential spread of infection but the methods used vary considerably. We designed a questionnaire which was piloted and then sent to 115 UK ENT out-patient departments to establish current UK practice. Most units (67 per cent) use a chemical soak system but the type of chemical disinfectant, the method of delivery and the duration of soak varied considerably. A few hospitals use a disposable plastic sheath system and others simply wipe the instrument with an alcohol swab in between patient use. The protocols for disinfection after high risk patients e.g. human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B varied from hospital to hospital. The results demonstrate a lack of standard practice that is wasteful of financial resources and may expose patients to unnecessary risk. There is a need for an authoritative ENT body to publish national guidelines as may be found in other specialties and other countries.

  11. Outreach and Education in the Life Sciences A Case Study of the U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, Richard E.; Burbank, Roberta L.; Mahy, Heidi A.

    2010-03-15

    This project was intended to assess the impact of the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Agency (DOE/NNSA) -sponsored education and outreach activities on the Biological Weapons Convention (BWC) in DOE national laboratories. Key activities focused on a series of pilot education and outreach workshops conducted at ten national laboratories. These workshops were designed to increase awareness of the BWC, familiarize scientists with dual-use concerns related to biological research, and promote the concept of individual responsibility and accountability

  12. Securing America’s Future. Realizing the Potential of the Department of Energy’s National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Glauthier, T. J.; Cohon, Jared L.; Augustine, Norman R.; Austin, Wanda M.; Elachi, Charles; Fleury, Paul A.; Hockfield, Susan J.; Meserve, Richard A.; Murray, Cherry A.

    2015-10-23

    The Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories are national assets that have contributed profoundly to the Nation’s security, scientific leadership, and economic competitiveness. In recognition of the continuing and evolving threats to our security and the dramatic increase in global economic and scientific competition, the laboratories are and will continue to be vitally important. Yet, the contributions of the National Laboratories are not inevitable, nor have they realized their full potential. This final report of the Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories recommends ways the laboratories could overcome challenges to more efficiently and effectively accomplish the work for which they are uniquely suited.

  13. Formal Education: A Catalyst to Nation Building. A Case Study of Nigeria. African Theological Studies. Volume 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chimaka, Anthony Ikechukwu

    2014-01-01

    The smallest and most remote villages in the developing countries are affected by the rapid and seemingly irresistible trend towards globalization. The limitless availability of information however necessitates education to stand out as the key factor for human and national development. But which conditions must be met by societies for education…

  14. South African Teachers Caught between Nation Building and Global Demands: Is There a Way Out/Forward?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bantwini, Bongani D.; Letseka, Moeketsi

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we explore the impact of the nation-building and global demands on teachers' work and how they survive the pressure of, and reconcile, these various demands that impact their work. We draw on two separate data sets that emerged from studies undertaken in the Eastern Cape Province (EC), South Africa. Findings reveal a rift between…

  15. Reading and Creating Critically Leaderful Schools that Make a Difference: The Post-Apartheid South African Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perumal, Juliet

    2009-01-01

    My interest in critical leaderful educational practices emanated from my experiences as a researcher in a South African National Department of Education project that piloted the White Paper on "Inclusive Education Policy from 2001-2003" and in 2006 when I worked as a volunteer consultant with Twenty30, an independent, not for profit organization…

  16. A National Survey of Medical School Obstetrics and Gynecology Departments, 1965 to 1975

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spellacy, William N.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Representatives of 108 departments of obstetrics and gynecology completed a written questionnaire in 1976 designed to assess the changes that had occurred in the teaching resources of the departments for the years 1965, 1970, and 1975.

  17. Best practices in developing a national palliative care policy in resource limited settings: lessons from five African countries.

    PubMed

    Luyirika, Emmanuel Bk; Namisango, Eve; Garanganga, Eunice; Monjane, Lidia; Ginindza, Ntombi; Madonsela, Gugulethu; Kiyange, Fatia

    2016-01-01

    Given the high unmet need for palliative care in Africa and other resource limited settings, it is important that countries embrace the public health approach to increasing access through its integration within existing healthcare systems. To give this approach a strong foundation that would ensure sustainability, the World Health Organisation urges member states to ensure that policy environments are suitable for this intervention. The development, strengthening, and implementation of national palliative care policies is a priority. Given the lack of a critical mass of palliative care professionals in the region and deficiency in documenting and sharing best practices as part of information critical for regional development, policy development becomes a complex process. This article shares experiences with regard to best practices when advocating the national palliative care policies. It also tells about policy development process, the important considerations, and cites examples of policy content outlines in Africa. PMID:27563347

  18. New drug regimens for HIV in pregnancy and a national strategic plan to manage HIV: A South African perspective.

    PubMed

    Ngene, Nnabuike C; Moodley, Jagidesa

    2015-10-01

    In South Africa, new drug regimens (WHO treatment Option B) used to manage HIV infection in pregnancy and the national strategic plan on HIV have resulted in improved health outcomes. Among these outcomes are reductions in the following: mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV to 2.4%; maternal deaths attributable to HIV; and adverse reactions due to antiretroviral therapy (ART). The present article describes these new drug regimens and the national strategic HIV management plan, as well as their challenges and the implications of improved health outcomes. Such outcomes imply that further decreases in MTCT of HIV, and HIV attributable maternal deaths are possible if potential challenges are addressed and treatment option B+ offered. A confidential enquiry into each case of MTCT is advocated to reduce vertical transmission rates to zero levels.

  19. Best practices in developing a national palliative care policy in resource limited settings: lessons from five African countries.

    PubMed

    Luyirika, Emmanuel Bk; Namisango, Eve; Garanganga, Eunice; Monjane, Lidia; Ginindza, Ntombi; Madonsela, Gugulethu; Kiyange, Fatia

    2016-01-01

    Given the high unmet need for palliative care in Africa and other resource limited settings, it is important that countries embrace the public health approach to increasing access through its integration within existing healthcare systems. To give this approach a strong foundation that would ensure sustainability, the World Health Organisation urges member states to ensure that policy environments are suitable for this intervention. The development, strengthening, and implementation of national palliative care policies is a priority. Given the lack of a critical mass of palliative care professionals in the region and deficiency in documenting and sharing best practices as part of information critical for regional development, policy development becomes a complex process. This article shares experiences with regard to best practices when advocating the national palliative care policies. It also tells about policy development process, the important considerations, and cites examples of policy content outlines in Africa.

  20. Best practices in developing a national palliative care policy in resource limited settings: lessons from five African countries

    PubMed Central

    Luyirika, Emmanuel BK; Namisango, Eve; Garanganga, Eunice; Monjane, Lidia; Ginindza, Ntombi; Madonsela, Gugulethu; Kiyange, Fatia

    2016-01-01

    Given the high unmet need for palliative care in Africa and other resource limited settings, it is important that countries embrace the public health approach to increasing access through its integration within existing healthcare systems. To give this approach a strong foundation that would ensure sustainability, the World Health Organisation urges member states to ensure that policy environments are suitable for this intervention. The development, strengthening, and implementation of national palliative care policies is a priority. Given the lack of a critical mass of palliative care professionals in the region and deficiency in documenting and sharing best practices as part of information critical for regional development, policy development becomes a complex process. This article shares experiences with regard to best practices when advocating the national palliative care policies. It also tells about policy development process, the important considerations, and cites examples of policy content outlines in Africa. PMID:27563347

  1. A National Research Council Evaluation of the Department of Energy's Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickson, D.; Holmes, K. J.; Cooke, D.

    2012-12-01

    Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) resources are increasingly becoming part of energy regulatory, planning, and marketing activities in the U.S. and elsewhere. In particular, state-based renewable portfolio standards and federal production and investment tax credits have led to an increased interest in the possible deployment of MHK technologies. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Public Law 109-58) directed the Department of Energy (DOE) to estimate the size of the MHK resource base. In order to help DOE prioritize its overall portfolio of future research, increase the understanding of the potential for MHK resource development, and direct MHK device and/or project developers to locations of greatest promise, the DOE Wind and Water Power Program requested that the National Research Council (NRC) provide an evaluation of the detailed assessments being conducted by five individual resource assessment groups. These resource assessment groups were contracted to estimate the amount of extractable energy from wave, tidal, ocean current, ocean thermal energy conversion, and riverine resources. Performing these assessments requires that each resource assessment group estimate the average power density of the resource base, as well as the basic technology characteristics and spatial and temporal constituents that convert power into electricity for that resource. The NRC committee evaluated the methodologies, technologies, and assumptions associated with each of these resource assessments. The committee developed a conceptual framework for delineating the processes used to develop the assessment results requested by the DOE, with definitions of the theoretical, technical, and practical resource to clarify elements of the overall resource assessment process. This allowed the NRC committee to make a comparison of different methods, terminology, and processes among the five resource assessment groups. The committee concluded that the overall approach taken by the wave resource and

  2. Needs assessment for fire department services and resources for the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-15

    This report has been developed in response to a request from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to evaluate the need for fire department services so as to enable the Laboratory to plan effective fire protection and thereby: meet LANL`s regulatory and contractual obligations; interface with the Department of Energy (DOE) and other agencies on matters relating to fire and emergency services; and ensure appropriate protection of the community and environment. This study is an outgrowth of the 1993 Fire Department Needs Assessment (prepared for DOE) but is developed from the LANL perspective. Input has been received from cognizant and responsible representatives at LANL, DOE, Los Alamos County (LAC) and the Los Alamos Fire Department (LAFD).

  3. Heat Stress Illness Emergency Department Visits in National Environmental Public Health Tracking States, 2005-2010.

    PubMed

    Fechter-Leggett, Ethan D; Vaidyanathan, Ambarish; Choudhary, Ekta

    2016-02-01

    Variability of heat stress illness (HSI) by urbanicity and climate region has rarely been considered in previous HSI studies. We investigated temporal and geographic trends in HSI emergency department (ED) visits in CDC Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (Tracking) states for 2005-2010. We obtained county-level HSI ED visit data for 14 Tracking states. We used the National Center for Health Statistics Urban-Rural Classification Scheme to categorize counties by urbanicity as (1) large central metropolitan (LCM), (2) large fringe metropolitan, (3) small-medium metropolitan, or (4) nonmetropolitan (NM). We also assigned counties to one of six US climate regions. Negative binomial regression was used to examine trends in HSI ED visits over time across all counties and by urbanicity for each climate region, adjusting for pertinent variables. During 2005-2010, there were 98,462 HSI ED visits in the 14 states. ED visits for HSI decreased 3.0% (p < 0.01) per year. Age-adjusted incidence rates of HSI ED visits increased from most urban to most rural. Overall, ED visits were significantly higher for NM areas (IRR = 1.41, p < 0.01) than for LCM areas. The same pattern was observed in all six climate regions; compared with LCM, NM areas had from 14 to 90% more ED visits for HSI. These findings of significantly increased HSI ED visit rates in more rural settings suggest a need to consider HSI ED visit variability by county urbanicity and climate region when designing and implementing local HSI preventive measures and interventions.

  4. Department of Energy review of the National Spallation Neutron Source Project

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    A Department of Energy (DOE) review of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS) was conducted. The NSNS will be a new high-power spallation neutron source; initially, it will operate at 1 megawatt (MW), but is designed to be upgradeable to significantly higher power, at lower cost, when accelerator and target technologies are developed for higher power. The 53-member Review Committee examined the projected cost, schedule, technical scope, and management structure described in the CDR. For each of the major components of the NSNS, the Committee determined that the project team had produced credible designs that can be expected to work well. What remains to be done is to integrate the design of these components. With the exception of the liquid mercury target, the NSNS Project will rely heavily on proven technologies and, thus, will face a relatively low risk to successful project completion. The Total Project Cost (TPC) presented to the Committee in the CDR was $1.266 billion in as-spent dollars. In general, the Committee felt that the laboratory consortium had presented a credible estimate for each of the major components but that value engineering might produce some savings. The construction schedule presented to the Committee covered six years beginning in FY 1999. The Committee questioned whether all parts of the project could be completed according to this schedule. In particular, the linac and the conventional facilities appeared to have overly optimistic schedules. The NSNS project team was encouraged to reexamine these activities and to consider a more conservative seven-year schedule. Another concern of the Committee was the management structure. In summary, the Committee felt that this Conceptual Design Report was a very credible proposal, and that there is a high probability for successful completion of this major project within the proposed budget, although the six-year proposed schedule may be optimistic.

  5. Prevention Programming for African American Youth: A Review of Strategies in CSAP's National Cross-Site Evaluation of High-Risk Youth Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chipungu, Sandra S.; Hermann, John; Sambrano, Soledad; Nistler, Mary; Sale, Elizabeth; Springer, J. Fred

    2000-01-01

    Examined characteristics of 12 substance abuse prevention programs serving African American youth. Findings indicated that African American youth exhibited lower use rates than most other ethnic groups, but by age 16-18 years, use was prevalent. Africentric principles and themes integrated into the prevention programs contributed to higher rates…

  6. Using Examinations To Improve Education: A Study in Fourteen African Countries. World Bank Technical Paper Number 165. Africa Technical Department Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellaghan, Thomas; Greaney, Vincent

    A detailed description is presented of the types, functions, performance levels, governance, administration, and funding of public examinations in 14 Sub-Saharan African countries with different educational traditions, based on English, French, or other backgrounds. The countries are: (1) Kenya; (2) Lesotho; (3) Mauritius; (4) Swaziland; (5)…

  7. Does marital status matter in an HIV hyperendemic country? Findings from the 2012 South African National HIV Prevalence, Incidence and Behaviour Survey.

    PubMed

    Shisana, Olive; Risher, Kathryn; Celentano, David D; Zungu, Nompumelelo; Rehle, Thomas; Ngcaweni, Busani; Evans, Meredith G B

    2016-01-01

    South Africa has experienced declining marriage rates and the increasing practice of cohabitation without marriage. This study aims to improve the understanding of the relationship between marital status and HIV in South Africa, an HIV hyperendemic country, through an analysis of findings from the 2012 South African National HIV Prevalence, Incidence and Behaviour Survey. The nationally representative population-based cross-sectional survey collected data on HIV and socio-demographic and behavioural determinants in South Africa. This analysis considered respondents aged 16 years and older who consented to participate in the survey and provided dried blood spot specimens for HIV testing (N = 17,356). After controlling for age, race, having multiple sexual partners, condom use at last sex, urban/rural dwelling and level of household income, those who were married living with their spouse had significantly reduced odds of being HIV-positive compared to all other marital spouses groups. HIV incidence was 0.27% among respondents who were married living with their spouses; the highest HIV incidence was found in the cohabiting group (2.91%). Later marriage (after age 24) was associated with increased odds of HIV prevalence. Our analysis suggests an association between marital status and HIV prevalence and incidence in contemporary South Africa, where odds of being HIV-positive were found to be lower among married individuals who lived with their spouses compared to all other marital status groups. HIV prevention messages therefore need to be targeted to unmarried populations, especially cohabitating populations. As low socio-economic status, low social cohesion and the resulting destabilization of sexual relationships may explain the increased risk of HIV among unmarried populations, it is necessary to address structural issues including poverty that create an environment unfavourable to stable sexual relationships. PMID:26551532

  8. State of Emergency Medicine in Switzerland: a national profile of emergency departments in 2006

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Emergency departments (EDs) are an essential component of any developed health care system. There is, however, no national description of EDs in Switzerland. Our objective was to establish the number and location of EDs, patient visits and flow, medical staff and organization, and capabilities in 2006, as a benchmark before emergency medicine became a subspecialty in Switzerland. Methods In 2007, we started to create an inventory of all hospital-based EDs with a preliminary list from the Swiss Society of Emergency and Rescue Medicine that was improved with input from ED physicians nationwide. EDs were eligible if they offered acute care 24 h per day, 7 days per week. Our goal was to have 2006 data from at least 80% of all EDs. The survey was initiated in 2007 and the 80% threshold reached in 2012. Results In 2006, Switzerland had a total of 138 hospital-based EDs. The number of ED visits was 1.475 million visits or 20 visits per 100 inhabitants. The median number of visits was 8,806 per year; 25% of EDs admitted 5,000 patients or less, 31% 5,001-10,000 patients, 26% 10,001-20,000 patients, and 17% >20,000 patients per year. Crowding was reported by 84% of EDs with >20,000 visits/year. Residents with limited experience provided care for 77% of visits. Imaging was not immediately available for all patients: standard X-ray within 15 min (70%), non-contrast head CT scan within 15 min (38%), and focused sonography for trauma (70%); 67% of EDs had an intensive care unit within the hospital, and 87% had an operating room always available. Conclusions Swiss EDs were significant providers of health care in 2006. Crowding, physicians with limited experience, and the heterogeneity of emergency care capabilities were likely threats to the ubiquitous and consistent delivery of quality emergency care, particularly for time-sensitive conditions. Our survey establishes a benchmark to better understand future improvements in Swiss emergency care. PMID:23842482

  9. The National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center and Department of the Interior Climate Science Centers annual report for 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Varela Minder, Elda; Padgett, Holly A.

    2015-01-01

    The National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center (NCCWSC) and the Department of the Interior (DOI) Climate Science Centers (CSCs) had another exciting year in 2014. The NCCWSC moved toward focusing their science funding on several high priority areas and, along with the CSCs, gained new agency partners; contributed to various workshops, meetings, publications, student activities, and Tribal/indigenous activities; increased outreach; and more. 

  10. The National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center and Department of the Interior Climate Science Centers annual report for 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Varela Minder, Elda; Padgett, Holly A.

    2015-10-27

    The National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center (NCCWSC) and the Department of the Interior (DOI) Climate Science Centers (CSCs) had another exciting year in 2014. The NCCWSC moved toward focusing their science funding on several high priority areas and, along with the CSCs, gained new agency partners; contributed to various workshops, meetings, publications, student activities, and Tribal/indigenous activities; increased outreach; and more. 

  11. 20 CFR 656.2 - Description of the Immigration and Nationality Act and of the Department of Labor's role thereunder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... regulation at 8 CFR 214.2(h)(5) and (6) and sections 101(a)(15)(H)(ii), 214, and 218 of the Act. See 8 U.S.C... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Description of the Immigration and... Immigration and Nationality Act and of the Department of Labor's role thereunder. (a) Description of the...

  12. 20 CFR 656.2 - Description of the Immigration and Nationality Act and of the Department of Labor's role thereunder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... regulation at 8 CFR 214.2(h)(5) and (6) and sections 101(a)(15)(H)(ii), 214, and 218 of the Act. See 8 U.S.C... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Description of the Immigration and... Immigration and Nationality Act and of the Department of Labor's role thereunder. (a) Description of the...

  13. 20 CFR 656.2 - Description of the Immigration and Nationality Act and of the Department of Labor's role thereunder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... regulation at 8 CFR 214.2(h)(5) and (6) and sections 101(a)(15)(H)(ii), 214, and 218 of the Act. See 8 U.S.C... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Description of the Immigration and... Immigration and Nationality Act and of the Department of Labor's role thereunder. (a) Description of the...

  14. 20 CFR 656.2 - Description of the Immigration and Nationality Act and of the Department of Labor's role thereunder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... regulation at 8 CFR 214.2(h)(5) and (6) and sections 101(a)(15)(H)(ii), 214, and 218 of the Act. See 8 U.S.C... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Description of the Immigration and... Immigration and Nationality Act and of the Department of Labor's role thereunder. (a) Description of the...

  15. 20 CFR 656.2 - Description of the Immigration and Nationality Act and of the Department of Labor's role thereunder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... regulation at 8 CFR 214.2(h)(5) and (6) and sections 101(a)(15)(H)(ii), 214, and 218 of the Act. See 8 U.S.C... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Description of the Immigration and... Immigration and Nationality Act and of the Department of Labor's role thereunder. (a) Description of the...

  16. Department of Energy’s ARM Climate Research Facility External Data Center Operations Plan Located At Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Cialella, A.; Gregory, L.; Lazar, K.; Liang, M.; Ma, L.; Tilp, A.; Wagener, R.

    2015-05-01

    The External Data Center (XDC) Operations Plan describes the activities performed to manage the XDC, located at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), for the Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. It includes all ARM infrastructure activities performed by the Data Management and Software Engineering Group (DMSE) at BNL. This plan establishes a baseline of expectation within the ARM Operations Management for the group managing the XDC.

  17. South African National Cancer Registry: Effect of withheld data from private health systems on cancer incidence estimates

    PubMed Central

    Singh, E; Underwood, J M; Nattey, C; Babb, C; Sengayi, M; Kellett, P

    2015-01-01

    Background The National Cancer Registry (NCR) was established as a pathology-based cancer reporting system. From 2005 to 2007, private health laboratories withheld cancer reports owing to concerns regarding voluntary sharing of patient data. Objectives To estimate the impact of under-reported cancer data from private health laboratories. Methods A linear regression analysis was conducted to project expected cancer cases for 2005 – 2007. Differences between actual and projected figures were calculated to estimate percentage under-reporting. Results The projected NCR case total varied from 53 407 (3.8% net increase from actual cases reported) in 2005 to 54 823 (3.7% net increase) in 2007. The projected number of reported cases from private laboratories in 2005 was 26 359 (19.7% net increase from actual cases reported), 27 012 (18.8% net increase) in 2006 and 27 666 (28.4% net increase) in 2007. Conclusion While private healthcare reporting decreased by 28% from 2005 to 2007, this represented a minimal impact on overall cancer reporting (net decrease of <4%). PMID:26242527

  18. Parasites of South African freshwater fish. VI. Nematode parasites of some fish species in the Kruger National Park.

    PubMed

    Boomker, J

    1994-03-01

    The nematode parasites of 30 spot-tailed robbers, Brycinus imberi, five tiger-fish, Hydrocynus vittatus, 77 large-scaled yellowfish. Barbus marequensis, two mudsuckers, Labeo molybdinus, 114 catfish, Clarias gariepinus, 46 silver barbel, Schilbe intermedius, 66 squeakers, Synodontis zambezensis, three eels, Anguilla spp., 83 Mozambique bream, Oreochromis mossambicus, 81 red-breasted bream, Tilapia rendalli swierstrae and 32 large-mouthed bream, Serranochromis meridianus, caught in the Sabie, Crocodile and Olifants Rivers in the southern and central regions of the Kruger National Park, were collected, identified and counted. A single Camallanus sp. male was recovered from one of the mudsuckers; Capillaria spp. from three catfish and one squeaker; philometrid nematodes from two silver barbel, 15 squeakers and a large-mouthed bream; Paracamallanus cyathopharynx from one tiger-fish, 80 catfish, 28 silver barbel and one squeaker; Procamallanus laeviconchus from a single catfish; Rhabdochona esseniae from six large-scaled yellowfish; Rhabdochona versterae from 14 spot-tailed robbers; Rhabdochona spp. from 20 catfish, 17 silver barbel, eight squeakers, two eels, one large-mouthed bream and two red-breasted bream; Raillietnema synodontisi from 33 squeakers; Spinitectus petterae from 37 catfish; Spinitectus zambezensis from 55 squeakers; Spinitectus spp. from one tiger-fish and four silver barbel, and Spirocamallanus daleneae and Synodontisia thelastomoides from 33 and 35 squeakers, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7898896

  19. The Association between Hypertension and Depression and Anxiety Disorders: Results from a Nationally-Representative Sample of South African Adults

    PubMed Central

    Grimsrud, Anna; Stein, Dan J.; Seedat, Soraya; Williams, David; Myer, Landon

    2009-01-01

    Objective Growing evidence suggests high levels of comorbidity between hypertension and mental illness but there are few data from low- and middle-income countries. We examined the association between hypertension and depression and anxiety in South Africa. Methods Data come from a nationally-representative survey of adults (n = 4351). The Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to measure DSM-IV mental disorders during the previous 12-months. The relationships between self-reported hypertension and anxiety disorders, depressive disorders and comorbid anxiety-depression were assessed after adjustment for participant characteristics including experience of trauma and other chronic physical conditions. Results Overall 16.7% reported a previous medical diagnosis of hypertension, and 8.1% and 4.9% were found to have a 12-month anxiety or depressive disorder, respectively. In adjusted analyses, hypertension diagnosis was associated with 12-month anxiety disorders [Odds ratio (OR) = 1.55, 95% Confidence interval (CI) = 1.10–2.18] but not 12-month depressive disorders or 12-month comorbid anxiety-depression. Hypertension in the absence of other chronic physical conditions was not associated with any of the 12-month mental health outcomes (p-values all <0.05), while being diagnosed with both hypertension and another chronic physical condition were associated with 12-month anxiety disorders (OR = 2.25, 95% CI = 1.46–3.45), but not 12-month depressive disorders or comorbid anxiety-depression. Conclusions These are the first population-based estimates to demonstrate an association between hypertension and mental disorders in sub-Saharan Africa. Further investigation is needed into role of traumatic life events in the aetiology of hypertension as well as the temporality of the association between hypertension and mental disorders. PMID:19440241

  20. A Cost-Effectiveness Tool to Guide the Prioritization of Interventions for Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease Control in African Nations

    PubMed Central

    Lubinga, Solomon J.; Mayosi, Bongani; Babigumira, Joseph B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) prevalence and mortality rates remain especially high in many parts of Africa. While effective prevention and treatment exist, coverage rates of the various interventions are low. Little is known about the comparative cost-effectiveness of different RHD interventions in limited resource settings. We developed an economic evaluation tool to assist ministries of health in allocating resources and planning RHD control programs. Methodology/Principal Findings We constructed a Markov model of the natural history of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and RHD, taking transition probabilities and intervention effectiveness data from previously published studies and expert opinion. Our model estimates the incremental cost-effectiveness of scaling up coverage of primary prevention (PP), secondary prevention (SP) and heart valve surgery (VS) interventions for RHD. We take a healthcare system perspective on costs and measure outcomes as disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs), discounting both at 3%. Univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses are also built into the modeling tool. We illustrate the use of this model in a hypothetical low-income African country, drawing on available disease burden and cost data. We found that, in our hypothetical country, PP would be cost saving and SP would be very cost-effective. International referral for VS (e.g., to a country like India that has existing surgical capacity) would be cost-effective, but building in-country VS services would not be cost-effective at typical low-income country thresholds. Conclusions/Significance Our cost-effectiveness analysis tool is designed to inform priorities for ARF/RHD control programs in Africa at the national or subnational level. In contrast to previous literature, our preliminary findings suggest PP could be the most efficient and cheapest approach in poor countries. We provide our model for public use in the form of a Supplementary File. Our research has

  1. Wild and Domestic Pig Interactions at the Wildlife-Livestock Interface of Murchison Falls National Park, Uganda, and the Potential Association with African Swine Fever Outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Kukielka, Esther A; Jori, Ferran; Martínez-López, Beatriz; Chenais, Erika; Masembe, Charles; Chavernac, David; Ståhl, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Bushpigs (BPs) (Potamochoerus larvatus) and warthogs (WHs) (Phacochoerus africanus), which are widely distributed in Eastern Africa, are likely to cohabitate in the same environment with domestic pigs (DPs), facilitating the transmission of shared pathogens. However, potential interactions between BP, WH, and DP, and the resulting potential circulation of infectious diseases have rarely been investigated in Africa to date. In order to understand the dynamics of such interactions and the potential influence of human behavior and husbandry practices on them, individual interviews (n = 233) and participatory rural appraisals (n = 11) were carried out among Ugandan pig farmers at the edge of Murchison Falls National Park, northern Uganda. In addition, as an example of possible implications of wild and DP interactions, non-linear multivariate analysis (multiple correspondence analyses) was used to investigate the potential association between the aforementioned factors (interactions and human behavior and practices) and farmer reported African swine fever (ASF) outbreaks. No direct interactions between wild pigs (WPs) and DP were reported in our study area. However, indirect interactions were described by 83 (35.6%) of the participants and were identified to be more common at water sources during the dry season. Equally, eight (3.4%) farmers declared exposing their DP to raw hunting leftovers of WPs. The exploratory analysis performed suggested possible associations between the farmer reported ASF outbreaks and indirect interactions, free-range housing systems, dry season, and having a WH burrow less than 3 km from the household. Our study was useful to gather local knowledge and to identify knowledge gaps about potential interactions between wild and DP in this area. This information could be useful to facilitate the design of future observational studies to better understand the potential transmission of pathogens between wild and DPs. PMID:27148545

  2. Seroprevalence of Rift Valley fever and lumpy skin disease in African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in the Kruger National Park and Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Fagbo, Shamsudeen; Coetzer, Jacobus A W; Venter, Estelle H

    2014-01-01

    Rift Valley fever and lumpy skin disease are transboundary viral diseases endemic in Africa and some parts of the Middle East, but with increasing potential for global emergence. Wild ruminants, such as the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer), are thought to play a role in the epidemiology of these diseases. This study sought to expand the understanding of the role of buffalo in the maintenance of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) and lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV) by determining seroprevalence to these viruses during an inter-epidemic period. Buffaloes from the Kruger National Park (n = 138) and Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park (n = 110) in South Africa were sampled and tested for immunoglobulin G (IgG) and neutralising antibodies against LSDV and RVFV using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (I-ELISA) and the serum neutralisation test (SNT). The I-ELISA for LSDV and RVFV detected IgG antibodies in 70 of 248 (28.2%) and 15 of 248 (6.1%) buffaloes, respectively. Using the SNT, LSDV and RVFV neutralising antibodies were found in 5 of 66 (7.6%) and 12 of 57 (21.1%), respectively, of samples tested. The RVFV I-ELISA and SNT results correlated well with previously reported results. Of the 12 SNT RVFV-positive sera, three (25.0%) had very high SNT titres of 1:640. Neutralising antibody titres of more than 1:80 were found in 80.0% of the positive sera tested. The LSDV SNT results did not correlate with results obtained by the I-ELISA and neutralising antibody titres detected were low, with the highest (1:20) recorded in only two buffaloes, whilst 11 buffaloes (4.4%) had evidence of co-infection with both viruses. Results obtained in this study complement other reports suggesting a role for buffaloes in the epidemiology of these diseases during inter-epidemic periods. PMID:25686252

  3. Seroprevalence of Rift Valley fever and lumpy skin disease in African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in the Kruger National Park and Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Fagbo, Shamsudeen; Coetzer, Jacobus A W; Venter, Estelle H

    2014-10-16

    Rift Valley fever and lumpy skin disease are transboundary viral diseases endemic in Africa and some parts of the Middle East, but with increasing potential for global emergence. Wild ruminants, such as the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer), are thought to play a role in the epidemiology of these diseases. This study sought to expand the understanding of the role of buffalo in the maintenance of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) and lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV) by determining seroprevalence to these viruses during an inter-epidemic period. Buffaloes from the Kruger National Park (n = 138) and Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park (n = 110) in South Africa were sampled and tested for immunoglobulin G (IgG) and neutralising antibodies against LSDV and RVFV using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (I-ELISA) and the serum neutralisation test (SNT). The I-ELISA for LSDV and RVFV detected IgG antibodies in 70 of 248 (28.2%) and 15 of 248 (6.1%) buffaloes, respectively. Using the SNT, LSDV and RVFV neutralising antibodies were found in 5 of 66 (7.6%) and 12 of 57 (21.1%), respectively, of samples tested. The RVFV I-ELISA and SNT results correlated well with previously reported results. Of the 12 SNT RVFV-positive sera, three (25.0%) had very high SNT titres of 1:640. Neutralising antibody titres of more than 1:80 were found in 80.0% of the positive sera tested. The LSDV SNT results did not correlate with results obtained by the I-ELISA and neutralising antibody titres detected were low, with the highest (1:20) recorded in only two buffaloes, whilst 11 buffaloes (4.4%) had evidence of co-infection with both viruses. Results obtained in this study complement other reports suggesting a role for buffaloes in the epidemiology of these diseases during inter-epidemic periods.

  4. An Ecological Paradox: The African Wild Dog (Lycaon Pictus) Is Not Attracted to Water Points When Water Is Scarce in Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Ndaimani, Henry; Tagwireyi, Paradzayi; Sebele, Lovelater; Madzikanda, Hillary

    2016-01-01

    In dry biomes, spatio-temporal variation in surface water resource stocks is pervasive, with unknown effects on the ranging behaviour of large predators. This study assessed the effect of spatial variation in surface water resources on the ranging behaviour of the African wild dog (Lycaon pictus). We analyzed data for 1992 (dry year with 20 water points) and 2000 (wet year with 30 water points) against presence-only data for five packs of L. pictus in a part of Hwange National Park and adjacent smallholder communal farming areas in western Zimbabwe. Modelling the potential habitat for L. pictus using Maxent with distance from water points (Dw) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) as predictor variables was successful for 2000 (AUC = 0.793) but not successful for 1992 (AUC = 0.423), with L. pictus probability of occurrence near water points being more for year 2000 than for year 1992. The predicted L. pictus range was wider in 1992 (~13888.1 km2) than in 2000 (~958.4 km2) (Test of Proportions, χ2 = 124.52, df = 1, P = 0.00). Using the 2nd order Multitype Nearest Neighbour Distance Function (Gcross), we also observed significant attraction between L. pictus and water points within only ~1km radius for 1992 but up to ~8km radius for 2000. Our study reinforced the notion that surface water resources attract wild dogs in the savannahs but paradoxically less so when water resources are scarce. In particular, our study furthers current understanding of the effects of changing water availability regimes on the endangered L. pictus, providing evidence that the endangered predator’s home range encroaches into potential ecological traps (i.e., smallholder communal farming areas) when water resources are scarce. PMID:26816321

  5. An Ecological Paradox: The African Wild Dog (Lycaon Pictus) Is Not Attracted to Water Points When Water Is Scarce in Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Ndaimani, Henry; Tagwireyi, Paradzayi; Sebele, Lovelater; Madzikanda, Hillary

    2016-01-01

    In dry biomes, spatio-temporal variation in surface water resource stocks is pervasive, with unknown effects on the ranging behaviour of large predators. This study assessed the effect of spatial variation in surface water resources on the ranging behaviour of the African wild dog (Lycaon pictus). We analyzed data for 1992 (dry year with 20 water points) and 2000 (wet year with 30 water points) against presence-only data for five packs of L. pictus in a part of Hwange National Park and adjacent smallholder communal farming areas in western Zimbabwe. Modelling the potential habitat for L. pictus using Maxent with distance from water points (Dw) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) as predictor variables was successful for 2000 (AUC = 0.793) but not successful for 1992 (AUC = 0.423), with L. pictus probability of occurrence near water points being more for year 2000 than for year 1992. The predicted L. pictus range was wider in 1992 (~13888.1 km2) than in 2000 (~958.4 km2) (Test of Proportions, χ2 = 124.52, df = 1, P = 0.00). Using the 2nd order Multitype Nearest Neighbour Distance Function (Gcross), we also observed significant attraction between L. pictus and water points within only ~1km radius for 1992 but up to ~8km radius for 2000. Our study reinforced the notion that surface water resources attract wild dogs in the savannahs but paradoxically less so when water resources are scarce. In particular, our study furthers current understanding of the effects of changing water availability regimes on the endangered L. pictus, providing evidence that the endangered predator's home range encroaches into potential ecological traps (i.e., smallholder communal farming areas) when water resources are scarce. PMID:26816321

  6. An Ecological Paradox: The African Wild Dog (Lycaon Pictus) Is Not Attracted to Water Points When Water Is Scarce in Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Ndaimani, Henry; Tagwireyi, Paradzayi; Sebele, Lovelater; Madzikanda, Hillary

    2016-01-01

    In dry biomes, spatio-temporal variation in surface water resource stocks is pervasive, with unknown effects on the ranging behaviour of large predators. This study assessed the effect of spatial variation in surface water resources on the ranging behaviour of the African wild dog (Lycaon pictus). We analyzed data for 1992 (dry year with 20 water points) and 2000 (wet year with 30 water points) against presence-only data for five packs of L. pictus in a part of Hwange National Park and adjacent smallholder communal farming areas in western Zimbabwe. Modelling the potential habitat for L. pictus using Maxent with distance from water points (Dw) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) as predictor variables was successful for 2000 (AUC = 0.793) but not successful for 1992 (AUC = 0.423), with L. pictus probability of occurrence near water points being more for year 2000 than for year 1992. The predicted L. pictus range was wider in 1992 (~13888.1 km2) than in 2000 (~958.4 km2) (Test of Proportions, χ2 = 124.52, df = 1, P = 0.00). Using the 2nd order Multitype Nearest Neighbour Distance Function (Gcross), we also observed significant attraction between L. pictus and water points within only ~1km radius for 1992 but up to ~8km radius for 2000. Our study reinforced the notion that surface water resources attract wild dogs in the savannahs but paradoxically less so when water resources are scarce. In particular, our study furthers current understanding of the effects of changing water availability regimes on the endangered L. pictus, providing evidence that the endangered predator's home range encroaches into potential ecological traps (i.e., smallholder communal farming areas) when water resources are scarce.

  7. Wild and Domestic Pig Interactions at the Wildlife–Livestock Interface of Murchison Falls National Park, Uganda, and the Potential Association with African Swine Fever Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Kukielka, Esther A.; Jori, Ferran; Martínez-López, Beatriz; Chenais, Erika; Masembe, Charles; Chavernac, David; Ståhl, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Bushpigs (BPs) (Potamochoerus larvatus) and warthogs (WHs) (Phacochoerus africanus), which are widely distributed in Eastern Africa, are likely to cohabitate in the same environment with domestic pigs (DPs), facilitating the transmission of shared pathogens. However, potential interactions between BP, WH, and DP, and the resulting potential circulation of infectious diseases have rarely been investigated in Africa to date. In order to understand the dynamics of such interactions and the potential influence of human behavior and husbandry practices on them, individual interviews (n = 233) and participatory rural appraisals (n = 11) were carried out among Ugandan pig farmers at the edge of Murchison Falls National Park, northern Uganda. In addition, as an example of possible implications of wild and DP interactions, non-linear multivariate analysis (multiple correspondence analyses) was used to investigate the potential association between the aforementioned factors (interactions and human behavior and practices) and farmer reported African swine fever (ASF) outbreaks. No direct interactions between wild pigs (WPs) and DP were reported in our study area. However, indirect interactions were described by 83 (35.6%) of the participants and were identified to be more common at water sources during the dry season. Equally, eight (3.4%) farmers declared exposing their DP to raw hunting leftovers of WPs. The exploratory analysis performed suggested possible associations between the farmer reported ASF outbreaks and indirect interactions, free-range housing systems, dry season, and having a WH burrow less than 3 km from the household. Our study was useful to gather local knowledge and to identify knowledge gaps about potential interactions between wild and DP in this area. This information could be useful to facilitate the design of future observational studies to better understand the potential transmission of pathogens between wild and DPs. PMID:27148545

  8. Investigation into the Epidemiology of African Swine Fever Virus at the Wildlife - Domestic Interface of the Gorongosa National Park, Central Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Quembo, C J; Jori, F; Heath, L; Pérez-Sánchez, R; Vosloo, W

    2016-08-01

    An epidemiological study of African swine fever (ASF) was conducted between March 2006 and September 2007 in a rural area adjacent to the Gorongosa National park (GNP) located in the Central Mozambique. Domestic pigs and warthogs were sampled to determine the prevalence of antibodies against ASF virus and the salivary antigens of Ornithodoros spp. ticks, while ticks collected from pig pens were tested for the presence of ASFV. In addition, 310 framers were interviewed to gain a better understanding of the pig value chain and potential practices that could impact on the spread of the virus. The sero-prevalence to ASFV was 12.6% on farms and 9.1% in pigs, while it reached 75% in warthogs. Approximately 33% of pigs and 78% of warthogs showed antibodies against salivary antigens of ticks. The differences in sero-prevalence between farms close to the GNP, where there is greater chance for the sylvatic cycle to cause outbreaks, and farms located in the rest of the district, where pig to pig transmission is more likely to occur, were marginally significant. Ornithodoros spp. ticks were found in only 2 of 20 pig pens outside the GNP, and both pens had ticks testing positive for ASFV DNA. Interviews carried out among farmers indicated that biosecurity measures were mostly absent. Herd sizes were small with pigs kept in a free-ranging husbandry system (65%). Only 1.6% of farmers slaughtered on their premises, but 51% acknowledged allowing visitors into their farms to purchase pigs. ASF outbreaks seemed to have a severe economic impact with nearly 36% of farmers ceasing pig farming for at least 1 year after a suspected ASF outbreak. This study provides the first evidence of the existence of a sylvatic cycle in Mozambique and confirms the presence of a permanent source of virus for the domestic pig value chain.

  9. Investigation into the Epidemiology of African Swine Fever Virus at the Wildlife - Domestic Interface of the Gorongosa National Park, Central Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Quembo, C J; Jori, F; Heath, L; Pérez-Sánchez, R; Vosloo, W

    2016-08-01

    An epidemiological study of African swine fever (ASF) was conducted between March 2006 and September 2007 in a rural area adjacent to the Gorongosa National park (GNP) located in the Central Mozambique. Domestic pigs and warthogs were sampled to determine the prevalence of antibodies against ASF virus and the salivary antigens of Ornithodoros spp. ticks, while ticks collected from pig pens were tested for the presence of ASFV. In addition, 310 framers were interviewed to gain a better understanding of the pig value chain and potential practices that could impact on the spread of the virus. The sero-prevalence to ASFV was 12.6% on farms and 9.1% in pigs, while it reached 75% in warthogs. Approximately 33% of pigs and 78% of warthogs showed antibodies against salivary antigens of ticks. The differences in sero-prevalence between farms close to the GNP, where there is greater chance for the sylvatic cycle to cause outbreaks, and farms located in the rest of the district, where pig to pig transmission is more likely to occur, were marginally significant. Ornithodoros spp. ticks were found in only 2 of 20 pig pens outside the GNP, and both pens had ticks testing positive for ASFV DNA. Interviews carried out among farmers indicated that biosecurity measures were mostly absent. Herd sizes were small with pigs kept in a free-ranging husbandry system (65%). Only 1.6% of farmers slaughtered on their premises, but 51% acknowledged allowing visitors into their farms to purchase pigs. ASF outbreaks seemed to have a severe economic impact with nearly 36% of farmers ceasing pig farming for at least 1 year after a suspected ASF outbreak. This study provides the first evidence of the existence of a sylvatic cycle in Mozambique and confirms the presence of a permanent source of virus for the domestic pig value chain. PMID:25483914

  10. Prevalence of pansteatitis in African sharptooth catfish, Clarias gariepinus (Burchell), in the Kruger National Park, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Huchzermeyer, K David A

    2012-11-09

    Pansteatitis was confirmed in sharptooth catfish, Clarias gariepinus (Burchell), from three main locations within the Kruger National Park (KNP); the Olifants River Gorge, Engelhard Dam on the Letaba River and from the Sabie River in the Sabiepoort. An increasing prevalence of pansteatitis was observed in catfish during repeated samplings from the Olifants Gorge from 2009 to 2011 and co-existence of old and recent lesions indicated on-going incitement of pansteatitis. Only a low prevalence of pansteatitis was observed in catfish sampled from the Olifants River upstream of the Gorge in the KNP and no pansteatitis was observed in catfish sampled from a rain-filled dam not connected to the Olifants River. Common to both the Olifants Gorge and the Sabiepoort is the damming of the rivers in Mozambique to form lakes Massingir and Corumana respectively. Anthropogenic activities resulting in potential pollution of the rivers differ greatly between these two catchments, providing argument against a primary pollution-related aetiology of the pansteatitis found at these two sites. Compared with other sites, analysis of stomach contents of catfish from the Olifants Gorge and the Sabiepoort strongly suggested that consumption of a predominantly fish diet was associated with the development of pansteatitis in these fish. In a farmed population of catfish used as positive control, development of pansteatitis could be ascribed to consumption of rancid fish waste from a trout slaughterhouse. In the Olifants Gorge, alien invasive silver carp, Hypophthalmychthys molitrix (Valenciennes), seasonally migrate upstream out of Lake Massingir to spawn. This schooling species is an obligate phytoplankton feeder with consequent high levels of adipose tissue n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. In the Olifants Gorge, at least, this may explain seasonal exposure to levels of polyunsaturated fats in the diets of catfish and crocodiles to which these animals are not adapted. The possible roles of

  11. Prevalence of pansteatitis in African sharptooth catfish, Clarias gariepinus (Burchell), in the Kruger National Park, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Huchzermeyer, K David A

    2012-01-01

    Pansteatitis was confirmed in sharptooth catfish, Clarias gariepinus (Burchell), from three main locations within the Kruger National Park (KNP); the Olifants River Gorge, Engelhard Dam on the Letaba River and from the Sabie River in the Sabiepoort. An increasing prevalence of pansteatitis was observed in catfish during repeated samplings from the Olifants Gorge from 2009 to 2011 and co-existence of old and recent lesions indicated on-going incitement of pansteatitis. Only a low prevalence of pansteatitis was observed in catfish sampled from the Olifants River upstream of the Gorge in the KNP and no pansteatitis was observed in catfish sampled from a rain-filled dam not connected to the Olifants River. Common to both the Olifants Gorge and the Sabiepoort is the damming of the rivers in Mozambique to form lakes Massingir and Corumana respectively. Anthropogenic activities resulting in potential pollution of the rivers differ greatly between these two catchments, providing argument against a primary pollution-related aetiology of the pansteatitis found at these two sites. Compared with other sites, analysis of stomach contents of catfish from the Olifants Gorge and the Sabiepoort strongly suggested that consumption of a predominantly fish diet was associated with the development of pansteatitis in these fish. In a farmed population of catfish used as positive control, development of pansteatitis could be ascribed to consumption of rancid fish waste from a trout slaughterhouse. In the Olifants Gorge, alien invasive silver carp, Hypophthalmychthys molitrix (Valenciennes), seasonally migrate upstream out of Lake Massingir to spawn. This schooling species is an obligate phytoplankton feeder with consequent high levels of adipose tissue n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. In the Olifants Gorge, at least, this may explain seasonal exposure to levels of polyunsaturated fats in the diets of catfish and crocodiles to which these animals are not adapted. The possible roles of

  12. 43 CFR 44.40 - How does the Department process payments for lands in the Redwood National Park or Lake Tahoe Basin?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... for lands in the Redwood National Park or Lake Tahoe Basin? 44.40 Section 44.40 Public Lands: Interior... Governments for Interest in Lands in the Redwood National Park Or Lake Tahoe Basin § 44.40 How does the Department process payments for lands in the Redwood National Park or Lake Tahoe Basin? This...

  13. 43 CFR 44.41 - How does the Department calculate payments for lands in the Redwood National Park or Lake Tahoe...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... for lands in the Redwood National Park or Lake Tahoe Basin? 44.41 Section 44.41 Public Lands: Interior... Governments for Interest in Lands in the Redwood National Park Or Lake Tahoe Basin § 44.41 How does the Department calculate payments for lands in the Redwood National Park or Lake Tahoe Basin? (a) The...

  14. 43 CFR 44.40 - How does the Department process payments for lands in the Redwood National Park or Lake Tahoe Basin?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... for lands in the Redwood National Park or Lake Tahoe Basin? 44.40 Section 44.40 Public Lands: Interior... Governments for Interest in Lands in the Redwood National Park Or Lake Tahoe Basin § 44.40 How does the Department process payments for lands in the Redwood National Park or Lake Tahoe Basin? This...

  15. 43 CFR 44.40 - How does the Department process payments for lands in the Redwood National Park or Lake Tahoe Basin?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... for lands in the Redwood National Park or Lake Tahoe Basin? 44.40 Section 44.40 Public Lands: Interior... Governments for Interest in Lands in the Redwood National Park Or Lake Tahoe Basin § 44.40 How does the Department process payments for lands in the Redwood National Park or Lake Tahoe Basin? This...

  16. 43 CFR 44.41 - How does the Department calculate payments for lands in the Redwood National Park or Lake Tahoe...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... for lands in the Redwood National Park or Lake Tahoe Basin? 44.41 Section 44.41 Public Lands: Interior... Governments for Interest in Lands in the Redwood National Park Or Lake Tahoe Basin § 44.41 How does the Department calculate payments for lands in the Redwood National Park or Lake Tahoe Basin? (a) The...

  17. 43 CFR 44.41 - How does the Department calculate payments for lands in the Redwood National Park or Lake Tahoe...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... for lands in the Redwood National Park or Lake Tahoe Basin? 44.41 Section 44.41 Public Lands: Interior... Governments for Interest in Lands in the Redwood National Park Or Lake Tahoe Basin § 44.41 How does the Department calculate payments for lands in the Redwood National Park or Lake Tahoe Basin? (a) The...

  18. 43 CFR 44.40 - How does the Department process payments for lands in the Redwood National Park or Lake Tahoe Basin?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... for lands in the Redwood National Park or Lake Tahoe Basin? 44.40 Section 44.40 Public Lands: Interior... Governments for Interest in Lands in the Redwood National Park Or Lake Tahoe Basin § 44.40 How does the Department process payments for lands in the Redwood National Park or Lake Tahoe Basin? This...

  19. 43 CFR 44.41 - How does the Department calculate payments for lands in the Redwood National Park or Lake Tahoe...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... for lands in the Redwood National Park or Lake Tahoe Basin? 44.41 Section 44.41 Public Lands: Interior... Governments for Interest in Lands in the Redwood National Park Or Lake Tahoe Basin § 44.41 How does the Department calculate payments for lands in the Redwood National Park or Lake Tahoe Basin? (a) The...

  20. 43 CFR 44.41 - How does the Department calculate payments for lands in the Redwood National Park or Lake Tahoe...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... for lands in the Redwood National Park or Lake Tahoe Basin? 44.41 Section 44.41 Public Lands: Interior... Governments for Interest in Lands in the Redwood National Park Or Lake Tahoe Basin § 44.41 How does the Department calculate payments for lands in the Redwood National Park or Lake Tahoe Basin? (a) The...

  1. 43 CFR 44.40 - How does the Department process payments for lands in the Redwood National Park or Lake Tahoe Basin?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... for lands in the Redwood National Park or Lake Tahoe Basin? 44.40 Section 44.40 Public Lands: Interior... Governments for Interest in Lands in the Redwood National Park Or Lake Tahoe Basin § 44.40 How does the Department process payments for lands in the Redwood National Park or Lake Tahoe Basin? This...

  2. Blood pressure and associated factors in a North African adolescent population. a national cross-sectional study in Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In southern and eastern Mediterranean countries, changes in lifestyle and the increasing prevalence of excess weight in childhood are risk factors for high blood pressure (BP) during adolescence and adulthood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the BP status of Tunisian adolescents and to identify associated factors. Methods A cross-sectional study in 2005, based on a national, stratified, random cluster sample of 1294 boys and 1576 girls aged 15-19 surveyed in home visits. The socio-economic and behavioral characteristics of the adolescents were recorded. Overweight/obesity were assessed by Body Mass Index (BMI) from measured height and weight (WHO, 2007), abdominal obesity by waist circumference (WC). BP was measured twice during the same visit. Elevated BP was systolic (SBP) or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥ 90th of the international reference or ≥ 120/80 mm Hg for 15-17 y., and SBP/DBP ≥ 120/80 mm Hg for 18-19 y.; hypertension was SBP/DBP ≥ 95th for 15-17 y. and ≥ 140/90 mm Hg for 18-19 y. Adjusted associations were assessed by logistic regression. Results The prevalence of elevated BP was 35.1%[32.9-37.4]: higher among boys (46.1% vs. 33.3%; P < 0.0001); 4.7%[3.8-5.9] of adolescents had hypertension. Associations adjusted for all covariates showed independent relationships with BMI and WC: - obesity vs. no excess weight increased elevated BP (boys OR = 2.1[1.0-4.2], girls OR = 2.3[1.3-3.9]) and hypertension (boys OR = 3.5[1.4-8.9], girls OR = 5.4[2.2-13.4]), - abdominal obesity (WC) was also associated with elevated BP in both genders (for boys: 2nd vs. 1st tertile OR = 1.7[1.3-2.3], 3rd vs.1st tertile OR = 2.8[1.9-4.2]; for girls: 2nd vs. 1st tertile OR = 1.6[1.2-2.1], 3rd vs.1st tertile OR = 2.1[1.5-3.0]) but only among boys for hypertension. Associations with other covariates were weaker: for boys, hypertension increased somewhat with sedentary lifestyle, while elevated BP was slightly more prevalent among urban girls and those not

  3. African Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abiodun, Rowland

    2001-01-01

    No single traditional discipline can adequately supply answers to the many unresolved questions in African art history. Because of the aesthetic, cultural, historical, and, not infrequently, political biases, already built into the conception and development of Western art history, the discipline of art history as defined and practiced in the West…

  4. "African Connection."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Cathy; And Others

    This interdisciplinary unit provides students in grades kindergarten through seventh grade an opportunity to understand diversity through a study of Africa as a diverse continent. The project is designed to provide all elementary students with cultural enrichment by exposing them to African music, art, storytelling, and movement. This project can…

  5. An African Perspective on Human Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiman, David

    1992-01-01

    Presents a series of classroom activities comparing differing views of human rights in the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the African Charter on Human and People's Rights. Includes excerpts from the African Charter on Human and People's Rights and the full text of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. (CFR)

  6. Exposure of African-American Youth to Alcohol Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2003

    The marketing of alcohol products in African-American communities has, on occasion, stirred national controversy and met with fierce resistance from African Americans and others. Despite occasional media and community spotlights on the marketing of alcohol products in the African-American community, there has been no systematic review of the…

  7. Gender Differences in African American Attitudes toward Gay Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battle, Juan; Lemelle, Anthony J., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Used data from the 1993 National Black Politics Study to examine the way gender worked in explaining African American attitudes toward gay men. Results indicated that African American females expressed more positive attitudes toward homosexual men than did African American males, and of the variables examined (including age, church attendance,…

  8. Measuring the effectiveness of the national Mental Health Triage Scale in an emergency department.

    PubMed

    Happell, Brenda; Summers, Monica; Pinikahana, Jaya

    2003-12-01

    The mainstreaming process has significantly altered the means of access to mental health services in Australia. Increasingly people seeking mental health care present at general hospital emergency departments. The triage system, which has proven effective for prioritizing physical illness and injury, has proven problematic when applied to mental health-related problems. This paper presents the results of a study undertaken in the emergency department of a Victorian public hospital. The Mental Health Triage Scale was introduced and used independently by triage nurses and the psychiatric nurse consultants employed in the department. Following a 3-month period, the two sets of triage scores for psychiatric presentations (n = 137) were compared. The findings suggest that triage nurses are rating clients experiencing mental health problems as in more urgent need of care than their psychiatric nursing counterparts. This suggests that the introduction of the guidelines alone is insufficient, and that education is required for more effective use of the tool.

  9. Accelerating Ocean Energy to the Marketplace – Environmental Research at the U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Copping, Andrea E.; Cada, G. F.; Roberts, Jesse; Bevelhimer, Mark

    2010-10-06

    The U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) has mobilized its National Laboratories to address the broad range of environmental effects of ocean and river energy development. The National Laboratories are using a risk-based approach to set priorities among environmental effects, and to direct research activities. Case studies will be constructed to determine the most significant environmental effects of ocean energy harvest for tidal systems in temperate estuaries, for wave energy installations in temperate coastal areas, wave installations in sub-tropical waters, and riverine energy installations in large rivers. In addition, the National Laboratories are investigating the effects of energy removal from waves, tides and river currents using numerical modeling studies. Laboratory and field research is also underway to understand the effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF), acoustic noise, toxicity from anti-biofouling coatings, effects on benthic habitats, and physical interactions with tidal and wave devices on marine and freshwater organisms and ecosystems. Outreach and interactions with stakeholders allow the National Laboratories to understand and mitigate for use conflicts and to provide useful information for marine spatial planning at the national and regional level.

  10. The African Pediatric Fellowship Program: Training in Africa for Africans.

    PubMed

    Wilmshurst, Jo M; Morrow, Brenda; du Preez, Avril; Githanga, David; Kennedy, Neil; Zar, Heather J

    2016-01-01

    Africa has a significant burden of childhood disease, with relatively few skilled health care professionals. The African Paediatric Fellowship Programme was developed by the Department of Pediatrics and Child Health at the University of Cape Town to provide relevant training for African child health professionals, by Africans, within Africa. Trainees identified by partner academic institutions spend 6 months to 2 years training in the Department of Pediatrics and allied disciplines. They then return to their home institution to build practice, training, research, and advocacy. From 2008 to 2015, 73 physicians have completed or are completing training in general pediatrics or a pediatric subspecialty. At 1 year posttraining, 98% to 100% are practicing back in their home institution. The impact of the returning fellows is evident from their practice interventions, research collaborations, and positions as stakeholders who can change health care policies. Thirty-three centers in 13 African countries are partners with the program, and the program template is now followed by other partner sites in Africa. Increasing and retaining the skills pool of African child health specialists is building a network of motivated, highly skilled clinicians who are equipped to advance child health in Africa. PMID:26659458

  11. The African Pediatric Fellowship Program: Training in Africa for Africans.

    PubMed

    Wilmshurst, Jo M; Morrow, Brenda; du Preez, Avril; Githanga, David; Kennedy, Neil; Zar, Heather J

    2016-01-01

    Africa has a significant burden of childhood disease, with relatively few skilled health care professionals. The African Paediatric Fellowship Programme was developed by the Department of Pediatrics and Child Health at the University of Cape Town to provide relevant training for African child health professionals, by Africans, within Africa. Trainees identified by partner academic institutions spend 6 months to 2 years training in the Department of Pediatrics and allied disciplines. They then return to their home institution to build practice, training, research, and advocacy. From 2008 to 2015, 73 physicians have completed or are completing training in general pediatrics or a pediatric subspecialty. At 1 year posttraining, 98% to 100% are practicing back in their home institution. The impact of the returning fellows is evident from their practice interventions, research collaborations, and positions as stakeholders who can change health care policies. Thirty-three centers in 13 African countries are partners with the program, and the program template is now followed by other partner sites in Africa. Increasing and retaining the skills pool of African child health specialists is building a network of motivated, highly skilled clinicians who are equipped to advance child health in Africa.

  12. A Call to Action to Raise Achievement for African American Students. Student Achievement Policy Brief #1: African American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kober, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    One out of every six public school students in the U.S. is African American. The achievement of African American students as a group will have a significant impact on the nation's economic strength and social well-being. This brief looks at the performance of African American students on state reading and mathematics tests and considers the policy…

  13. The Efficacy of "Catch-Up Programmes" in South African High Schools: A Legal Jinx

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyoni, Jabulani

    2013-01-01

    The South African State is mandated by Sections 28(2) and 29(1) of the South African Constitution to make provision for the education of a South African child in fulfilment of the child's constitutional rights. Teacher Unions (TUs) and provincial Departments of Basic Education (DBEs) have often promised South African high school student body,…

  14. Policy and procedures for domestic violence patients in Canadian emergency departments: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Hotch, D; Grunfeld, A; Mackay, K; Ritch, L

    1996-08-01

    A cross-sectional research survey aimed to obtain information concerning 1) the proportion of Canadian emergency departments with domestic violence intervention policies and procedures; 2) how hospitals identify and provide service to patients who have been abused; and 3) measures that have been problematic/helpful in implementing domestic violence protocols in emergency departments. The study sample included 230 Canadian hospitals with emergency departments. Results showed that 198 hospitals returned the questionnaires, of which 39% indicated that there were policies and procedures concerning domestic violence for the emergency departments. Large, major hospitals were more likely than smaller community hospitals to have policies or protocols in place. About 26 hospitals reported screening all patients for domestic violence and 61 hospitals provided referral services and 46 hospitals provided on-site counseling. Physicians were principally involved in the physical examination, referral and identification. Follow-up, emotional support, and safety planning were provided by social workers. Findings of this survey encourage hospitals and individual health care providers to adopt guidelines concerning domestic violence to ensure a widespread adoption and implementation.

  15. Suicide Attempts in Israel: Age by Gender Analysis of a National Emergency Departments Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinson, Daphna; Haklai, Ziona; Stein, Nechama; Gordon, Ethel-Sherry

    2006-01-01

    An analysis of all emergency department admissions in Israel classified as an attempted suicide in the years 1996-2002 was done to examine attempted suicide rates by age and gender with particular attention to adolescents and young adults. Gender differences in attempted suicide rates were significant only during adolescence and young adulthood,…

  16. Results from a National Needs Assessment Survey: A View of Assessment Efforts within Chemistry Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emenike, Mary Elizabeth; Schroeder, Jacob; Murphy, Kristen; Holme, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    As is true for virtually all of higher education, chemistry departments are often required to provide evidence of student learning at both course and curricular levels through evaluation and assessment. The ACS Exams Institute conducted a needs assessment survey of 1500 chemistry faculty members from across the country to investigate motivation,…

  17. National Report on School Closing Survey. The Impact on Purchasing Departments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Herbert; Jones, Richard M.

    This paper is a brief report on the impact of school closings on purchasing departments. It opens with a discussion of the trend of declining enrollments in public schools nationwide. The paper notes, however, that demographers expect the total number of children to begin to rise slightly in the mid-80's. Closing schools now is not the answer, it…

  18. Exploring Resource Sharing between Secondary School Teachers of Agriculture and Science Departments Nationally.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dormody, Thomas J.

    1992-01-01

    A survey of 372 secondary agriculture teachers received 274 responses showing a majority of agriculture and science departments share resources, although at low levels. Many more predicted future sharing. Equipment and supplies were most often shared, instructional services least often. (SK)

  19. 78 FR 31955 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security National Protection and Programs Directorate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-28

    ... States Visitor Indicator Technology (US-VISIT) program's biometric identity management functions to the...'s biometric identity management functions to the Office of Biometric Identity Management (OBIM), a... Records (72 FR 47057, August 22, 2007). This system of records allows the Department of Homeland...

  20. 10 CFR 431.20 - Department of Energy recognition of nationally recognized certification programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... conflict of interest for the certification program in operating a certification system for compliance by... certification programs. 431.20 Section 431.20 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY... recognized certification programs. (a) Petition. For a certification program to be classified by...

  1. 10 CFR 431.20 - Department of Energy recognition of nationally recognized certification programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... conflict of interest for the certification program in operating a certification system for compliance by... certification programs. 431.20 Section 431.20 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY... recognized certification programs. (a) Petition. For a certification program to be classified by...

  2. 10 CFR 431.20 - Department of Energy recognition of nationally recognized certification programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the certification program in operating a certification system for compliance by electric motors with... independence in operating a certification program. (3) Qualifications to operate a certification system... certification programs. 431.20 Section 431.20 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY...

  3. 10 CFR 431.20 - Department of Energy recognition of nationally recognized certification programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the certification program in operating a certification system for compliance by electric motors with... independence in operating a certification program. (3) Qualifications to operate a certification system... certification programs. 431.20 Section 431.20 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY...

  4. Post-thyroidectomy hemorrhage: a national study of patients treated at the Danish departments of ENT Head and Neck Surgery.

    PubMed

    Godballe, Christian; Madsen, Anders Rørbaek; Pedersen, Henrik Baymler; Sørensen, Christian Hjort; Pedersen, Ulrik; Frisch, Thomas; Helweg-Larsen, Jens; Barfoed, Lisa; Illum, Peter; Mønsted, Jonas Elmose; Becker, Birgit; Nielsen, Troels

    2009-12-01

    As bleeding in the neck region is a potentially life-threatening complication, we found it imperative to concretize the frequency and to identify possible reasons for this complication. A national database of all thyroid surgery performed inside the specialty of ENT Head and Neck Surgery (THYKIR) was established in January 2001. This nationwide cohort study represents 5,490 patients included until December 2007. Overall hemorrhage frequency was 4.2% with a wide variation among departments. Multiple regression analysis identified age, male gender, malignant histology and extent of surgery as independent risk factors for hemorrhage. Increased hospital stay and infection rates were found in patients treated with drainage. The median time for onset of postoperative hemorrhage was 3 h (range 0-105). Compared with international literature our incidence of post-thyroidectomy hemorrhage is relatively high. Improvement might be reached by the exchange of experience between departments with focus on adequate surgical technique and careful hemostasis. PMID:19301027

  5. KSC kicks off African-American History Month

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Clothed in her traditional African garb, Michelle Amos, mistress of ceremonies, welcomes the audience on Feb. 3 at the kick-off of African-American History Month. The theme for this year's observation is 'Heritage and Horizons: The African-American Legacy and the Challenges of the 21st Century.' February is designated each year as a time to celebrate the achievements and contributions of African Americans to Kennedy Space Center, NASA and the nation.

  6. Local Preparedness for Climate Change among Local Health Department Officials in New York State: A Comparison with National Survey Results

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Jessie L.; Sheffield, Perry E.; Kinney, Patrick L.

    2015-01-01

    Context Climate change adaptation strategies that address locally specific climate hazards are critical for preventing negative health outcomes, and local public health officials are key foci for adaptation planning. Objective To assess New York State Local Health Department officials’ perceptions and preparedness related to climate-sensitive health areas, and compare these with a national sample. Design Online survey instrument, originally used in a national survey of Local Health Department (LHD) officials. Setting New York State Participants Eligible participants included all New York State city and county LHD officials, one respondent per LHD. Main Outcome Measures LHD officials’ perceptions of local 1) climate-related public health effects, 2) preparation status and programming areas of LHDs, and 3) necessary resources to better address climate-related health risks. Results Survey participants, representing a 54% response rate (with 93% of respondents completing more than 90% of the questions), perceived climate change as relevant to public health, and most noted that some of their existing programs already use or are planning to use climate adaptation strategies. Overall, fewer New York State respondents identified concerns or related expertise compared to the previous national survey. Many respondents expressed uncertainty regarding necessary additional resources. Conclusions This type of assessment makes clear the high variability in perceived impacts and capacity at the level of local health department jurisdictions, and underscores the importance of sustained support for local climate change preparedness programming. The implications of these findings are germane to other states with similar decentralized jurisdiction of public health. Findings from such surveys can bolster existing LHD programs, as well as inform long-term and emergency planning for climate change. PMID:22286293

  7. Adoption and implementation of a computer-delivered HIV/STD risk-reduction intervention for African American adolescent females seeking services at county health departments: implementation optimization is urgently needed.

    PubMed

    DiClemente, Ralph J; Bradley, Erin; Davis, Teaniese L; Brown, Jennifer L; Ukuku, Mary; Sales, Jessica M; Rose, Eve S; Wingood, Gina M

    2013-06-01

    Although group-delivered HIV/sexually transmitted disease (STD) risk-reduction interventions for African American adolescent females have proven efficacious, they require significant financial and staffing resources to implement and may not be feasible in personnel- and resource-constrained public health clinics. We conducted a study assessing adoption and implementation of an evidence-based HIV/STD risk-reduction intervention that was translated from a group-delivered modality to a computer-delivered modality to facilitate use in county public health departments. Usage of the computer-delivered intervention was low across 8 participating public health clinics. Further investigation is needed to optimize implementation by identifying, understanding, and surmounting barriers that hamper timely and efficient implementation of technology-delivered HIV/STD risk-reduction interventions in county public health clinics.

  8. A Marriage That Worked: The Department of Defense Dependents Schools and the National Writing Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Mary Ann

    2000-01-01

    Long-term, successful marriages, like that between dependent schools and the National Writing Project, do not always go smoothly. In 1997, DoDDS students performed well on a worldwide assessment of eight different writing modes. Good partnerships avoid shortcuts, use proven models, and reject uniform approaches. (MLH)

  9. 75 FR 69693 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security National Protection and Programs Directorate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... FR 55335). DHS is issuing a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking concurrent with this system of records... Operations Center, to collect, plan, coordinate, report, analyze, and fuse infrastructure information related... National Operations Center (NOC)) to collect, plan, coordinate, report, analyze, and fuse...

  10. U.S. Department of Energy NESHAP Annual Report for CY 2014 Sandia National Laboratories Tonopah Test Range

    SciTech Connect

    Evelo, Stacie; Miller, Mark L.

    2015-05-01

    This National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) Annual Report has been prepared in a format to comply with the reporting requirements of 40 CFR 61.94 and the April 5, 1995 Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). According to the EPA approved NESHAP Monitoring Plan for the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), 40 CFR 61, subpart H, and the MOA, no additional monitoring or measurements are required at TTR in order to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP regulation.

  11. Raising Minority Academic Achievement: The Department of Defense Model. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridglall, Beatrice L.; Gordon, Edmund W.

    In 2001, the National Education Goals Panel commissioned researchers from Vanderbilt University to study the consistent high achievement of African American and Latino students in Department of Defense schools. This digest summarizes the results of their study and presents supporting research that identifies policies and practices that may…

  12. Short communication: Strengthening sub-national communicable disease surveillance in a remote Pacific Island country by adapting a successful African outbreak surveillance model.

    PubMed

    Nelesone, Tekaai; Durrheim, David N; Speare, Richard; Kiedrzynski, Tom; Melrose, Wayne D

    2006-01-01

    Successful communicable disease surveillance depends on effective bidirectional information flow between clinicians at the periphery and communicable disease control units at regional, national and global levels. Resource-poor countries often struggle to establish and maintain the crucial link with the periphery. A simple syndrome-based outbreak surveillance system initially developed and evaluated in Mpumalanga Province, South Africa was adapted for the Pacific island nation of Tuvalu. Eight syndromes were identified for surveillance: acute flaccid paralysis (poliomyelitis), profuse watery diarrhoea (cholera), diarrhoea outbreak, dysentery outbreak, febrile disease with abdominal symptoms and headache (typhoid), febrile disease with generalized non-blistering rash (measles), febrile disease with intense headache and/or neck stiffness with or without haemorrhagic rash (meningococcal meningitis), and outbreaks of other febrile diseases of unknown origin. A user-oriented manual, the Tuvalu Outbreak Manual (http://www.wepi.org/books/tom/), was developed to support introduction of the surveillance system. Nurses working in seven outer island clinics and the hospital outpatient department on the main island rapidly report suspected outbreaks and submit weekly zero-reports to the central communicable disease control unit. An evaluation of the system after 12 months indicated that the Outbreak Manual was regarded as very useful by clinic nurses, and there was early evidence of improved surveillance and response to the disease syndromes under surveillance. PMID:16398751

  13. Obesity and African Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Data > Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Obesity Obesity and African Americans African American women have the ... ss6304.pdf [PDF | 3.38MB] HEALTH IMPACT OF OBESITY More than 80 percent of people with type ...

  14. Department of Energy award DE-SC0004164 Climate and National Security: Securing Better Forecasts

    SciTech Connect

    Reno Harnish

    2011-08-16

    The Climate and National Security: Securing Better Forecasts symposium was attended by senior policy makers and distinguished scientists. The juxtaposition of these communities was creative and fruitful. They acknowledged they were speaking past each other. Scientists were urged to tell policy makers about even improbable outcomes while articulating clearly the uncertainties around the outcomes. As one policy maker put it, we are accustomed to making these types of decisions. These points were captured clearly in an article that appeared on the New York Times website and can be found with other conference materials most easily on our website, www.scripps.ucsd.edu/cens/. The symposium, generously supported by the NOAA/JIMO, benefitted the public by promoting scientifically informed decision making and by the transmission of objective information regarding climate change and national security.

  15. Liberia: America's Closest African Ally.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Samuel; Mowell, Barry

    1997-01-01

    Profiles Liberia, the West African nation patterned after the United States and colonized with freed U.S. slaves in the early 19th century. Reviews the country's history and its eruption into civil strife in 1990, showing how tensions have often characterized relationships between Liberians of different ethnic identities. (MJP)

  16. Department of Homeland Security national planning scenarios: a spectrum of imaging findings to educate the radiologists.

    PubMed

    Burch, Heather; Kitley, Charles A; Naeem, Mohammed

    2010-07-01

    Following the events of the September 11th attack, there has been an increasing concern about the possibility of a future attack on our homeland. In response, the United States Department of Homeland Defense has planned for a future attack by formulating multiple scenarios which may occur in the event of such a disaster. Radiology will play a key role in each of these scenarios, assisting with triage, diagnosis, and therapy of the large populations which potentially could be involved. This article describes some of these scenarios as well the response which will be expected of the radiology community in the event of such a disaster.

  17. Nuclear Materials Management U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO)

    SciTech Connect

    Jesse Schrieber

    2008-07-01

    In light of the changing Defense Complex mission, the high cost to storing and protecting nuclear materials, and in consideration of scarcity of resources, it is imperative that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owned nuclear materials are managed effectively. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Strategic Action Plan outlines the strategy for continuing to meet America’s nuclear security goals, meeting the overall mission challenges of DOE and NNSA as well as giving focus to local missions. The mission of the NNSA/NSO Nuclear Materials Management (NMM) Program is to ensure that nuclear material inventories are accurately assessed and reported, future material needs are adequately planned, and that existing Nevada Test Site (NTS) inventories are efficiently utilized, staged, or dispositioned. The NNSA/NSO understands that the NTS has unique characteristics to serve and benefit the nation with innovative solutions to the complex problems involving Special Nuclear Materials, hazardous materials, and multi-agency, integrated operations. The NNSA/NSO is defining infrastructure requirements for known future missions, developing footprint consolidation strategic action plans, and continuing in the path of facility modernization and improvements. The NNSA/NSO is striving for the NTS to be acknowledged as an ideal location towards mission expansion and growth. The NTS has the capability of providing isolated, large scale construction and development locations for nuclear power or alternate energy source facilities, expanded nuclear material storage sites, and for new development in “green” technology.

  18. National Estimates of Noncanine Bite and Sting Injuries Treated in US Hospital Emergency Departments, 2001–2010

    PubMed Central

    Langley, Ricky; Mack, Karin; Haileyesus, Tadesse; Proescholdbell, Scott; Annest, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Injuries resulting from contact with animals and insects are a significant public health concern. This study quantifies nonfatal bite and sting injuries by noncanine sources using data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System–All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP). Methods The NEISS-AIP is an ongoing nationally representative surveillance system used to monitor all types and causes of injuries treated in US hospital emergency departments (EDs). Cases were coded by trained hospital coders using information from medical records on animal and insect sources of bite and sting injuries being treated. Data were weighted to produce national annualized estimates, percentages, and rates based on the US population. Results From 2001 to 2010 an estimated 10.1 million people visited EDs for noncanine bite and sting injuries, based on an unweighted case count of 169,010. This translates to a rate of 340.1 per 100,000 people (95% CI, 232.9–447.3). Insects accounted for 67.5% (95% CI, 45.8–89.2) of bite and sting injuries, followed by arachnids 20.8% (95% CI, 13.8–27.9). The estimated number of ED visits for bedbug bite injuries increased more than 7-fold—from 2156 visits in 2007 to 15,945 visits in 2010. Conclusions This study provides an update of national estimates of noncanine bite and sting injuries and describes the diversity of animal exposures based on a national sample of EDs. Treatment of nonfatal bite and sting injuries are costly to society. Direct medical and work time lost translates to an estimated $7.5 billion annually. PMID:24433776

  19. Staff Report to the Senior Department Official on Recognition Compliance Issues. Recommendation Page: National Accrediting Commission Of Cosmetology Arts and Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The National Accrediting Commission of Cosmetology Arts and Sciences (NACCAS) is a national accreditor whose scope of recognition is for the accreditation throughout the United States of postsecondary schools and departments of cosmetology arts and sciences and massage therapy. The agency accredits approximately 1,300 institutions offering…

  20. National Dissemination of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depression in the Department of Veterans Affairs Health Care System: Therapist and Patient-Level Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlin, Bradley E.; Brown, Gregory K.; Trockel, Mickey; Cunning, Darby; Zeiss, Antonette M.; Taylor, C. Barr

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system is nationally disseminating and implementing cognitive behavioral therapy for depression (CBT-D). The current article evaluates therapist and patient-level outcomes associated with national training in and implementation of CBT-D in the VA health care system. Method: Therapist…

  1. Africans in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Ayanna; Spangler, Earl

    This book introduces African-American history and culture to children. The first Africans in America came from many different regions and cultures, but became united in this country by being black, African, and slaves. Once in America, Africans began a long struggle for freedom which still continues. Slavery, the Civil War, emancipation, and the…

  2. Therapy with African Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nwadiora, Emeka

    1996-01-01

    Informs helping professionals about the unique history and challenges of African families to guide them toward providing ethnically sensitive psychological services to African immigrant families in need. African families undergo great stress when faced with the alienation of being Black and African in a Euro-American culture. (SLD)

  3. African Outreach Workshop 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Nancy J.

    This report discusses the 1974 African Outreach Workshop planned and coordinated by the African Studies Program at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Its major aim was to assist teachers in developing curriculum units on African using materials available in their local community. A second aim was for the African Studies Program to…

  4. How safe are our paediatric emergency departments? Protocol for a national prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Plint, Amy C; Newton, Amanda; Stang, Antonia; Bhatt, Maala; Barrowman, Nick; Calder, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Adverse events (AEs), defined as unintended patient harm related to healthcare provided rather than an underlying medical condition, represent a significant threat to patient safety and public health. The emergency department (ED) is a high-risk patient safety setting for many reasons including presentation ‘outside of regular hours’, high patient volumes, and a chaotic work environment. Children have also been identified as particularly vulnerable to AEs. Despite the identification of the ED as a high-risk setting and the vulnerability of the paediatric population, little research has been conducted regarding paediatric patient safety in the ED. The study objective is to generate an estimate of the risk and type of AEs, as well as their preventability and severity, for children seen in Canadian paediatric EDs. Methods and analysis This multicentre, prospective cohort study will enrol patients under 18 years of age from nine paediatric EDs across Canada. A stratified cluster random sampling scheme will be used to ensure patients recruited are representative of the overall ED population. A rigorous, standardised two-stage process will be used for AE identification. The primary outcome will be the proportion of children with AEs associated with ED care in the 3 weeks following the ED visit. Secondary outcomes will include the proportion of children with preventable AEs and the types and severity of AEs. We will aim to recruit 5632 patients over 1 year and this will allow us to detect a proportion of patients with an AE of 5% (to within an absolute margin of error of 0.6%). Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval has been obtained from participating sites. Results will be disseminated through presentations, peer review publications, linkages with emergency research network and a webinars for key knowledge user groups. Trial registration number This study is registered at Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02162147; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show

  5. Overview of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory avian research program

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, K.C.; Morrison, M.L.

    1997-06-01

    As wind energy use continues to expand, concern over the possible impacts of wind farms on birds continues to be an issue. The concern includes two primary areas: the effect of avian mortality on bird populations, and possible litigation over the killing of even one bird if it is protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act or the Endangered Species Act or both. In order to address these concerns, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), working collaboratively with all stakeholders including utilities, environmental groups, consumer advocates, utility regulators, government officials, and the wind industry, has an active avian-wind power research program. DOE/NREL is conducting and sponsoring research with the expectation of developing solutions to educe or avoid avian mortality due to wind energy development throughout the US. This paper outlines the DOE/NREL approach and summarizes completed, current, and planned projects.

  6. 75 FR 14460 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ..., National Park Service, Grand Teton National Park, Moose, WY AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION... should contact Mary Gibson Scott, Superintendent, Grand Teton National Park, P.O. Drawer 170, Moose,...

  7. Department of Homeland Security Fellowship Internship Experience at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, J

    2006-08-30

    As a DHS intern at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), I was a member of the Agricultural Domestic Demonstration and Application Program (AgDDAP) under the mentorship of Benjamin Hindson. This group is focused on developing assays for the rapid detection of animal diseases that threaten agriculture in the United States. The introduction of a foreign animal disease to the US could potentially result in devastating economic losses. The 2001 Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) outbreak in the UK cost over 20 billion dollars and resulted in the death of over 6 million animals. FMD virus is considered to be one of greatest threats to agriculture due to its high infectivity, robustness, and broad species range. Thus, export of meat and animal products from FMD endemic countries is strictly regulated. Although the disease is rarely fatal in adult animals, morbidity is close to 100%. FMD also causes overall production (i.e. milk, mass) to decrease dramatically and can reduce it permanently. The rapid and accurate diagnosis of FMD and other foreign animal diseases is essential to prevent these diseases from spreading and becoming endemic to the country. Every hour delay in the detection of FMD is estimated to cost up to 3 million dollars. Diagnosis of FMD is often complicated by other diseases manifesting similar symptoms in the animal, such as vesicular stomatitis, bluetongue, etc. Typically, diagnosis cannot be made by clinical signs alone and samples must be sent away for testing. Depending on the test, such as in virus isolation, this can take several days. AgDDAP had previously developed a high-throughput multiplexed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the rule-out of Foot-and-Mouth Disease and six other look-alike diseases. This assay is intended for use in FMD surveillance, differential diagnosis in an outbreak scenario, and to establish an FMD-clean state after an outbreak. PCR based assays are favorable for multiple reasons. Viral nucleic acids can be

  8. Financing vaccinations - the South African experience.

    PubMed

    Blecher, Mark S; Meheus, Filip; Kollipara, Aparna; Hecht, Robert; Cameron, Neil A; Pillay, Yogan; Hanna, Luisa

    2012-09-01

    South Africa provides a useful country case study for financing vaccinations. It has been an early adopter of new vaccinations and has financed these almost exclusively from domestic resources, largely through general taxation. National vaccination policy is determined by the Department of Health, based on advice from a national advisory group on immunisation. Standard health economic criteria of effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, affordability and burden of disease are used to assess whether new vaccinations should be introduced. Global guidelines and the advice of local and international experts are also helpful in making the determination to introduce new vaccines. In terms of recent decisions to introduce new vaccines against pneumococcal disease and rotavirus diarrhoea in children, the evidence has proved unequivocal. Universal rollout has been implemented even though this has led to a fivefold increase in national spending on vaccines. The total cost to government remains below 1-1.5% of public expenditures for health, which is viewed by the South African authorities as affordable and necessary given the number of lives saved and morbidity averted. To manage the rapid increase in domestic spending, efforts have been made to scale up coverage over several years, give greater attention to negotiating price reductions and, in some cases, obtain initial donations or frontloaded deliveries to facilitate earlier universal rollout. There has been strong support from a wide range of stakeholders for the early introduction of new generation vaccines. PMID:22939027

  9. 78 FR 50093 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ..., National Park Service, Grand Teton National Park, Moose, WY AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION.... ADDRESSES: Mary Gibson Scott, Superintendent, Grand Teton National Park, P.O. Drawer 170, Moose, WY 83012... the Interior, National Park Service, Grand Teton National Park, Moose, WY, that meet the definition...

  10. Physical fitness of South African primary school children, 6 to 13 years of age: discovery vitality health of the nation study.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Miranda E G; Lambert, Estelle V; Lambert, Michael I

    2011-12-01

    Basic physical fitness was measured using 8 different measures for 10,295 South African children and youths (5,611 boys, 4,684 girls) ages 6 to 13 years. These measurements included height, weight, Body Mass Index, standing long jump, shuttle run, sit-and-reach, sit-up (EUROFIT testing battery), and cricket ball throw scores. Due to the effects of earlier apartheid laws on separating communities, it was hypothesized that scores for different ethnic groups may differ. Therefore, in addition to the calculation of basic norms and sex differences, ethnic differences were also tested. Height and weight, relative to age, were different between the various ethnic groups (Black, White, and Mixed ancestry) for boys, with Black boys being shorter and lighter than White boys. There were no differences in sit-and-reach flexibility scores between the groups. With the exception of the cricket ball throw for girls, White children had higher scores in most tests. Although not significantly different from the White children, in the majority of cases, the children of mixed ancestral origin had scores that ranged between the other two ethnic groups. These results suggest a need for encouraging fitness in school children, and the reintroduction of formal physical education into the South African school curriculum, especially into schools in which Black children predominate. PMID:22403942

  11. Parental Depressive Symptoms and Children’s School Attendance and Emergency Department Use: A Nationally Representative Study

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, James P.; Mandell, David; Danagoulian, Shooshan; Reyner, Jacqueline; Pati, Susmita

    2012-01-01

    Objective We sought to assess the association between parental depressive symptoms and school attendance and emergency department (ED) use among children with and without chronic health conditions. Methods Secondary analysis of the 1997–2004 National Health Interview Survey, a nationally representative survey. Parental depressive symptoms were measured by three questions assessing sadness, hopelessness, or worthlessness in the past month. Children with and without asthma or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were identified, and their school attendance and ED visits were reported by adult household respondents. Children with information on parental depressive symptoms, health conditions, and services use were eligible. We incorporated weights available in the survey for each eligible child to reflect the complex sampling design. Results 104,930 eligible children were identified. The point prevalence of parental depressive symptoms was low (1.8%, 95% CI 1.7–2.0), but greater among children with asthma (2.7%, 95% CI 2.4–3.0) and ADHD (3.8%, 95% CI 3.2–4.4) than among other children (1.6%, 95% CI 1.5–1.7). After adjustment for potential confounders, children whose parents reported depressive symptoms most or all of the time were more likely to report an ED visit (adjusted Incident Rate Ratio [IRR] 1.18, 95% CI 1.06–1.32) or school absence (adjusted IRR 1.36, 95% CI 1.14–1.63) than children whose parents did not. The effect of parental depressive symptoms was not modified by child health conditions. Conclusions Parental depressive symptoms were adversely associated with school attendance and ED use in children. These results suggest the importance of measuring depressive symptoms among adult caregivers of children. PMID:22903306

  12. Pattern of presenting complaints recorded as near-drowning events in emergency departments: a national surveillance study from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Drowning is a heavy burden on the health systems of many countries, including Pakistan. To date, no effective large-scale surveillance has been in place to estimate rates of drowning and near-drowning in Pakistan. The Pakistan National Emergency Department Surveillance (Pak-NEDS) study aimed to fill this gap. Methods Patients who presented with a complaint of "near-drowning" were analyzed to explore patterns of true near-drowning (unintentional) and intentional injuries that led to the "near-drowning" complaint. Bivariate analysis was done to establish patterns among patients treated in emergency departments, including socio-demographic information, injury-related information, accompanying injuries, and emergency department resource utilization. Results A total of 133 patients (0.2% of all injury patients) with "near-drowning" as presenting complaints were recorded by the Pak-NEDS system. True near-drowning (50.0%) and intentional injuries that led to "near-drowning" complaints (50.0%) differed in nature of injuries. The highest proportion of true near-drowning incidents occurred among patients aged between 25-44 years (47.5%), and among males (77.5%). True near-drowning patients usually had other accompanying complaints, such as lower limb injury (40.0%). Very few patients were transported by ambulance (5.0%), and triage was done for 15% of patients. Eleven (27.5%) true near-drowning patients received cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Conclusion There was major under-reporting of drowning and near-drowning cases in the surveillance study. The etiology of near-drowning cases should be further studied. Patients who experienced non-fatal drownings were more commonly sent for medical care due to other accompanying conditions, rather than near-drowning event itself. There is also need for recognizing true near-drowning incidents. The results of this study provide information on data source selection, site location, emergency care standardization, and multi

  13. 75 FR 14460 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ..., National Park Service, Grand Teton National Park, Moose, WY AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION.... Drawer 170, Moose, WY ] 83012, telephone (307) 739- 3410, before April 26, 2010. Repatriation of...

  14. Nighttime assaults: using a national emergency department monitoring system to predict occurrence, target prevention and plan services

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Emergency department (ED) data have the potential to provide critical intelligence on when violence is most likely to occur and the characteristics of those who suffer the greatest health impacts. We use a national experimental ED monitoring system to examine how it could target violence prevention interventions towards at risk communities and optimise acute responses to calendar, holiday and other celebration-related changes in nighttime assaults. Methods A cross-sectional examination of nighttime assault presentations (6.01 pm to 6.00 am; n = 330,172) over a three-year period (31st March 2008 to 30th March 2011) to English EDs analysing changes by weekday, month, holidays, major sporting events, and demographics of those presenting. Results Males are at greater risk of assault presentation (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 3.14, 95% confidence intervals [CIs] 3.11-3.16; P < 0.001); with male:female ratios increasing on more violent nights. Risks peak at age 18 years. Deprived individuals have greater risks of presenting across all ages (AOR 3.87, 95% CIs 3.82-3.92; P < 0.001). Proportions of assaults from deprived communities increase midweek. Female presentations in affluent areas peak aged 20 years. By age 13, females from deprived communities exceed this peak. Presentations peak on Friday and Saturday nights and the eves of public holidays; the largest peak is on New Year’s Eve. Assaults increase over summer with a nadir in January. Impacts of annual celebrations without holidays vary. Some (Halloween, Guy Fawkes and St Patrick’s nights) see increased assaults while others (St George’s and Valentine’s Day nights) do not. Home nation World Cup football matches are associated with nearly a three times increase in midweek assault presentation. Other football and rugby events examined show no impact. The 2008 Olympics saw assaults fall. The overall calendar model strongly predicts observed presentations (R2 = 0.918; P < 0

  15. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory safeguards and security quarterly progress report to the US Department of Energy. Quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, G.; Mansur, D.L.; Ruhter, W.D.; Steele, E.; Strait, R.S.

    1994-04-01

    The Safeguards Technology Program (STP) is a program in LLNL`s Nuclear Chemistry Division that develops advanced, nondestructive-analysis (NDA) technology for measurement of special nuclear materials. Our work focuses on R&D relating to x- and gamma-ray spectrometry techniques and to the development of computer codes for interpreting the spectral data obtained by these techniques. A review of the Safeguards Technology Program at LLNL by representatives of the Department of Energy Office of Safeguards and Security and Office of Research was conducted via teleconference on March 4, 1994. Objectives, milestones, and recent accomplishments were presented for each of the four LLNL tasks in NDA, and plans to address user needs in these NDA areas were discussed. An informal presentation on the LLNL Safeguards Technology Program was presented to the JOWOG-30 meeting at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on March 10, 1994. The JOWOG meetings bring together representatives from Laboratories in the DOE complex, as well as their counterparts from the United Kingdom. Within JOWOG-30 a variety of topics are discussed, including NDA and its various applications within the U.S. and U.K. complexes.

  16. Calendar Year 2001 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    2002-03-31

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2001 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The monitoring data were obtained from groundwater and surface water sampling locations within three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2001 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities in the Bear Creek, East Fork, and Chestnut Ridge Regimes. Section 2 identifies the sampling locations in each hydrogeologic regime and the corresponding sampling frequency during CY 2001, along with the associated quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) sampling. Section 3 describes groundwater and surface water sample collection and Section 4 identifies the field measurements and laboratory analytes for each sampling location. Section 5 outlines the data management protocols and data quality objectives (DQOs). Section 6 describes the groundwater elevation monitoring in each regime during CY 2001 and Section 7 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational, regulatory, and technical information.

  17. Tinnitus and hyperacusis therapy in a UK National Health Service audiology department: Patients’ evaluations of the effectiveness of treatments

    PubMed Central

    Aazh, Hashir; Moore, Brian C. J.; Lammaing, Karen; Cropley, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To assess patients’ judgements of the effectiveness of the tinnitus and hyperacusis therapies offered in a specialist UK National Health Service audiology department. Design: Cross-sectional service evaluation questionnaire survey. Patients were asked to rank the effectiveness of the treatment they received on a scale from 1 to 5 (1 = no effect, 5 = very effective). Study sample: The questionnaire was sent to all patients who received treatment between January and March 2014 (n = 200) and 92 questionnaires were returned. Results : The mean score was greatest for counselling (Mean = 4.7, SD = 0.6), followed by education (Mean = 4.5, SD = 0.8), cognitive behavioural therapy - CBT (Mean = 4.4, SD = 0.7), and hearing tests (Mean = 4.4, SD = 0.9). Only 6% of responders rated counselling as 3 or below. In contrast, bedside sound generators, hearing aids, and wideband noise generators were rated as 3 or below by 25%, 36%, and 47% of participants, respectively. Conclusion: The most effective components of the tinnitus and hyperacusis therapy interventions were judged by the patients to be counselling, education, and CBT. PMID:27195947

  18. Parallel Quality Assessment of Emergency Departments by European Foundation for Quality Management Model and Iranian National Program for Hospital Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    IMANI NASAB, Mohammad Hasan; MOHAGHEGH, Bahram; KHALESI, Nader; JAAFARIPOOYAN, Ebrahim

    2013-01-01

    Background European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) model is a widely used quality management system (QMS) worldwide, including Iran. Current study aims to verify the quality assessment results of Iranian National Program for Hospital Evaluation (INPHE) based on those of EFQM. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012 on a sample of emergency departments (EDs) affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Iran. The standard questionnaire of EFQM (V-2010) was used to gather appropriate data. The results were compared with those of INPHE. MS Excel was used to classify and display the findings. Results: The average assessment score of the EDs based on the INPHE and EFQM model were largely different (i.e. 86.4% and 31%, respectively). In addition, the variation range among five EDs’ scores according to each model was also considerable (22% for EFQM against 7% of INPHE), especially in the EDs with and without prior record of applying QMSs. Conclusion: The INPHE’s assessment results were not confirmed by EFQM model. Moreover, the higher variation range among EDs’ scores using EFQM model could allude to its more differentiation power in assessing the performance comparing with INPHE. Therefore, a need for improvement in the latter drawing on other QMSs’ (such as EFQM) strengths, given the results emanated from its comparison with EFQM seems indispensable. PMID:23967429

  19. KSC kicks off African-American History Month

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Michelle Amos, mistress of ceremonies for the kick-off of African-American History Month, works with the audience to assist them in the pronunciation of a few token words in native Swahili. The theme for this year's observation is 'Heritage and Horizons: The African-American Legacy and the Challenges of the 21st Century.' February is designated each year as a time to celebrate the achievements and contributions of African Americans to Kennedy Space Center, NASA and the nation.

  20. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2009 Trial Urban District Snapshot Report. New York City Department of Education. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each district that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2009 Trial Urban District Assessment in reading receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. This report presents the results for New York City Department of Education's student achievement in reading. In…

  1. Indonesian Christian Teachers' Perceptions of the Effectiveness of Professional Development Programs Offered by ACSI-I and Indonesian National Department of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwani, Amy

    2014-01-01

    This is a study to examine Indonesian Christian Teachers' Perceptions of the effectiveness of professional development programs offered by the Association of Christian Schools International Indonesia (ACSI-I) and by the Indonesian National Department of Education. The study was focused on how Indonesian Christian teachers perceived the…

  2. 2003 U.S. Department of Energy Strategic Plan: Protecting National, Energy, and Economic Security with Advanced Science and Technology and Ensuring Environmental Cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    None,

    2003-09-30

    The Department of Energy contributes to the future of the Nation by ensuring energy security, maintaining the safety, security and reliability of the nuclear weapons stockpile, cleaning up the environment from the legacy of the Cold War, and developing innovations in science and technology. After 25 years in existence, the Department now operates 24 preeminent research laboratories and facilities and four power marketing administrations, and manages the environmental cleanup from 50 years of nuclear defense activities that impacted two million acres in communities across the country. The Department has an annual budget of about $23 billion and employs about 14,500 Federal and 100,000 contractor employees. The Department of Energy is principally a national security agency and all of its missions flow from this core mission to support national security. That is true not just today, but throughout the history of the agency. The origins of the Department can be traced to the Manhattan Project and the race to develop the atomic bomb during World War II. Following the war, Congress engaged in a vigorous and contentious debate over civilian versus military control of the atom. The Atomic Energy Act of 1946 settled the debate by creating the Atomic Energy Commission, which took over the Manhattan Project’s sprawling scientific and industrial complex.

  3. The African Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oguntoyinbo, Lekan

    2012-01-01

    From student and faculty exchanges to joint research projects, U.S. universities maintain a broad spectrum of collaborative relationships with African universities. It's unclear how many U.S. colleges and universities have partnerships with African universities. The African Studies Association, an organization of scholars, doesn't keep that kind…

  4. Linguistic Imperialism: African Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillipson, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Responds to an article on aspects of African language policy and discusses the following issues: multilingualism and monolingualism, proposed changes in language policy from the Organization for African Unity and South African initiatives, the language of literature, bilingual education, and whose interests English-language teaching is serving.…

  5. 78 FR 72701 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Natural...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-03

    ... Service, Natural Bridges National Monument, Moab, UT AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION... associated funerary object should submit a written request to Natural Bridges National Monument. If no... request with information in support of the request to Natural Bridges National Monument at the address...

  6. Clinical Data Systems to Support Public Health Practice: A National Survey of Software and Storage Systems Among Local Health Departments

    PubMed Central

    Goodin, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Context: Numerous software and data storage systems are employed by local health departments (LHDs) to manage clinical and nonclinical data needs. Leveraging electronic systems may yield improvements in public health practice. However, information is lacking regarding current usage patterns among LHDs. Objective: To analyze clinical and nonclinical data storage and software types by LHDs. Design: Data came from the 2015 Informatics Capacity and Needs Assessment Survey, conducted by Georgia Southern University in collaboration with the National Association of County and City Health Officials. Participants: A total of 324 LHDs from all 50 states completed the survey (response rate: 50%). Main Outcome Measures: Outcome measures included LHD's primary clinical service data system, nonclinical data system(s) used, and plans to adopt electronic clinical data system (if not already in use). Predictors of interest included jurisdiction size and governance type, and other informatics capacities within the LHD. Bivariate analyses were performed using χ2 and t tests. Results: Up to 38.4% of LHDs reported using an electronic health record (EHR). Usage was common especially among LHDs that provide primary care and/or dental services. LHDs serving smaller populations and those with state-level governance were both less likely to use an EHR. Paper records were a common data storage approach for both clinical data (28.9%) and nonclinical data (59.4%). Among LHDs without an EHR, 84.7% reported implementation plans. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that LHDs are increasingly using EHRs as a clinical data storage solution and that more LHDs are likely to adopt EHRs in the foreseeable future. Yet use of paper records remains common. Correlates of electronic system usage emerged across a range of factors. Program- or system-specific needs may be barriers or facilitators to EHR adoption. Policy makers can tailor resources to address barriers specific to LHD size, governance, service

  7. Calendar Year 2002 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    2003-03-31

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2002 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2002 monitoring data were obtained from groundwater and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12. The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge south of Y-12. The sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2002 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities in the Bear Creek, East Fork, and Chestnut Ridge Regimes. Section 2 describes the monitoring programs implemented by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC during CY 2002. Section 3 identifies the sampling locations in each hydrogeologic regime and the corresponding sampling frequency during CY 2002, along with the associated quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) sampling. Section 4 describes groundwater and surface water sample collection and Section 5 identifies the field measurements and laboratory analytes for each sampling location. Section 6 outlines the data management protocols and data quality objectives (DQOs). Section 7 describes the groundwater elevation monitoring in each regime during CY 2002 and Section 8 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational, regulatory, and technical information.

  8. Los Alamos National Laboratory: A guide to records series supporting epidemiologic studies conducted for the Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to describe each series of records that pertains to the epidemiologic studies conducted by the Epidemiology Section of the Occupational Medicine Group (ESH-2) at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in Los Alamos, New Mexico. The records described in this guide relate to occupational studies performed by the Epidemiology Section, including those pertaining to workers at LANL, Mound Plant, Oak Ridge Reservation, Pantex Plant, Rocky Flats Plant, and Savannah River Site. Also included are descriptions of other health-related records generated or collected by the Epidemiology Section and a small set of records collected by the Industrial Hygiene and Safety Group. This guide is not designed to describe the universe of records generated by LANL which may be used for epidemiologic studies of the LANL work force. History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of its work as the support services contractor for DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project, HAI`s role in the project, the history of LANL the history and functions of LANL`s Health Division and Epidemiology Section, and the various epidemiologic studies performed by the Epidemiology Section. It provides information on the methodology that HAI used to inventory and describe records housed in the offices of the LANL Epidemiology Section in Technical Area 59 and at the LANL Records Center. Other topics include the methodology used to produce the guide, the arrangement of the detailed record series descriptions, and information concerning access to records repositories.

  9. "Workin' on the Railroad": African American Labor History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    In the spring of 2003, the author worked with a team of eighth grade teachers at Asheville Middle School in North Carolina on a project that combined fine art, music, the history of the railroads, and the African American experience in the state and nation. In her classroom, students interviewed a retired train conductor, who was African American,…

  10. Discrimination, Mastery, and Depressive Symptoms among African American Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Daphne C.; Hudson, Darrell L.; Caldwell, Cleopatra Howard; Siefert, Kristine; Jackson, James S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines the influence of discrimination and mastery on depressive symptoms for African American men at young (18-34), middle (35-54), and late (55+) adulthood. Method: Analyses are based on responses from 1,271 African American men from the National Survey of American Life (NSAL). Results: Discrimination was significantly…

  11. A Snapshot of African Americans in Higher Education. Mini Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for Higher Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In recognition of national African-American History Month, the Institute for Higher Education Policy wishes to highlight the trends and present-day experiences of African-American college students. Recognizing that the society benefits tremendously from an educated citizenry, there must be a renewed commitment to ensuring educational opportunity,…

  12. African Higher Education and Training: Opportunities and Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekhaguere, G. O. S.

    2000-01-01

    Details several examples of distance networking initiatives in African higher education, including the African Virtual University. Describes challenges to expanded access and opportunity in tertiary education, including peace, stability, and good governance; national policies on access and equity; certification of off-shore educational providers;…

  13. Their Highest Potential: An African American School Community in the Segregated South.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Vanessa Siddle

    The history of the public schooling of African Americans during legalized segregation has focused almost exclusively on the inferior education that African American students received. In the national memory, African Americans have been victims of Whites who questioned the utility of providing Blacks with anything more than a rudimentary education…

  14. Ending the epidemic of heterosexual HIV transmission among African Americans.

    PubMed

    Adimora, Adaora A; Schoenbach, Victor J; Floris-Moore, Michelle A

    2009-11-01

    This article examines factors responsible for the stark racial disparities in HIV infection in the U.S. and the now concentrated epidemic among African Americans. Sexual network patterns characterized by concurrency and mixing among different subpopulations, together with high rates of other sexually transmitted infections, facilitate dissemination of HIV among African Americans. The social and economic environment in which many African Americans live shapes sexual network patterns and increases personal infection risk almost independently of personal behavior. The African-American HIV epidemic constitutes a national crisis whose successful resolution will require modifying the social and economic systems, structures, and processes that facilitate HIV transmission in this population.

  15. Ending the Epidemic of Heterosexual HIV Transmission Among African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Adimora, Adaora A.; Schoenbach, Victor J.; Floris-Moore, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines factors responsible for the stark racial disparities in HIV infection in the U.S. and the now concentrated epidemic among African Americans. Sexual network patterns characterized by concurrency and mixing among different subpopulations, together with high rates of other sexually transmitted infections, facilitate dissemination of HIV among African Americans. The social and economic environment in which many African Americans live shapes sexual network patterns and increases personal infection risk almost independently of personal behavior. The African American HIV epidemic constitutes a national crisis whose successful resolution will require modifying the social and economic systems, structures, and processes that facilitate HIV transmission in this population. PMID:19840704

  16. What physicians should know about Africanized honeybees.

    PubMed

    Sherman, R A

    1995-12-01

    The Africanized honeybee, popularly known as the "killer bee," is already well established in Texas and has recently entered California and Arizona. As the Africanized honeybee spreads in North America, the medical community must become aware of the problems associated with this insect and ensure that sting emergencies can be handled quickly and appropriately. The major differences between Africanized and European honeybees are that the former are more irritable, they swarm more readily and frequently, they defend their hives more vehemently, and they sting more collectively. It is not the composition nor the volume of an individual bee's venom, but rather the cumulative dose of multiple stings that accounts for the morbidity and mortality associated with Africanized honeybee-sting incidents. Even nonallergic persons are susceptible to the toxic effects of these large combined venom loads. Africanized honeybee-sting victims are treated the same as victims of European honeybee stings. Authorities will prepare for the bees' arrival by expanding public awareness, teaching risk-avoidance behavior, providing for the removal of troublesome hives, and developing sting treatment protocols that can be initiated rapidly in the field or emergency departments. Health care professionals should participate in the educational efforts and in the development of needed emergency response protocols so that the effects of the Africanized honeybee will be merely a nuisance rather than a plague. PMID:8553637

  17. What physicians should know about Africanized honeybees.

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, R A

    1995-01-01

    The Africanized honeybee, popularly known as the "killer bee," is already well established in Texas and has recently entered California and Arizona. As the Africanized honeybee spreads in North America, the medical community must become aware of the problems associated with this insect and ensure that sting emergencies can be handled quickly and appropriately. The major differences between Africanized and European honeybees are that the former are more irritable, they swarm more readily and frequently, they defend their hives more vehemently, and they sting more collectively. It is not the composition nor the volume of an individual bee's venom, but rather the cumulative dose of multiple stings that accounts for the morbidity and mortality associated with Africanized honeybee-sting incidents. Even nonallergic persons are susceptible to the toxic effects of these large combined venom loads. Africanized honeybee-sting victims are treated the same as victims of European honeybee stings. Authorities will prepare for the bees' arrival by expanding public awareness, teaching risk-avoidance behavior, providing for the removal of troublesome hives, and developing sting treatment protocols that can be initiated rapidly in the field or emergency departments. Health care professionals should participate in the educational efforts and in the development of needed emergency response protocols so that the effects of the Africanized honeybee will be merely a nuisance rather than a plague. PMID:8553637

  18. Sisters Together: Move More, Eat Better: a community-based health awareness program for African-American women.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Leslie; Brown, Zaneta G; Gill, Jennifer E

    2008-12-01

    Statistics indicate that African-American women have the highest rate of obesity among all racial groups. In response, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) developed "Sisters Together: Move More, Eat Better," a national program that encourages African-American women to maintain a healthy weight by becoming more physically active and by eating healthier foods. "Sisters Together" programs are run locally by individuals or community groups in locations such as churches and health departments. The NIDDK offers culturally relevant materials and technical assistance to program leaders, including a recently updated program guide. The guide walks leaders through program planning, promotion, implementation, and evaluation. It is based on obesity, nutrition, and physical activity research; evidence-based programs for African-American women; and proven health communication strategies. The guide is consumer friendly, using clear language and real-life examples. "Sisters Together" programs encourage African-American women and their families to improve their eating habits and their physical activity habits. PMID:19397055

  19. Strong Agreement of Nationally Recommended Retention Measures from the Institute of Medicine and Department of Health and Human Services

    PubMed Central

    Rebeiro, Peter F.; Horberg, Michael A.; Gange, Stephen J.; Gebo, Kelly A.; Yehia, Baligh R.; Brooks, John T.; Buchacz, Kate; Silverberg, Michael J.; Gill, John; Moore, Richard D.; Althoff, Keri N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective We sought to quantify agreement between Institute of Medicine (IOM) and Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) retention indicators, which have not been compared in the same population, and assess clinical retention within the largest HIV cohort collaboration in the U.S. Design Observational study from 2008–2010, using clinical cohort data in the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD). Methods Retention definitions used HIV primary care visits. The IOM retention indicator was: ≥2 visits, ≥90 days apart, each calendar year. This was extended to a 2-year period; retention required meeting the definition in both years. The DHHS retention indicator was: ≥1 visit each semester over 2 years, each ≥60 days apart. Kappa statistics detected agreement between indicators and C statistics (areas under Receiver-Operating Characteristic curves) from logistic regression analyses summarized discrimination of the IOM indicator by the DHHS indicator. Results Among 36,769 patients in 2008–2009 and 34,017 in 2009–2010, there were higher percentages of participants retained in care under the IOM indicator than the DHHS indicator (80% vs. 75% in 2008–2009; 78% vs. 72% in 2009–2010, respectively) (p<0.01), persisting across all demographic and clinical characteristics (p<0.01). There was high agreement between indicators overall (κ = 0.83 in 2008–2009; κ = 0.79 in 2009–2010, p<0.001), and C statistics revealed a very strong ability to predict retention according to the IOM indicator based on DHHS indicator status, even within characteristic strata. Conclusions Although the IOM indicator consistently reported higher retention in care compared with the DHHS indicator, there was strong agreement between IOM and DHHS retention indicators in a cohort demographically similar to persons living with HIV/AIDS in the U.S. Persons with poorer retention represent subgroups of interest for retention improvement

  20. Calendar Year 2008 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Elvado Environmental LLC

    2009-12-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2008 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2008 monitoring data were obtained from wells, springs, and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12. Section 2 of this report provides background information pertinent to groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in each hydrogeologic regime, including the topography and bedrock geology, surface water drainage, groundwater system, and extent of groundwater contamination. The CY 2008 groundwater and surface water monitoring data in this report were obtained from sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC (B&W Y-12) and from sampling and analysis activities implemented under several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Cooperative implementation of the monitoring programs directed by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC (i.e., coordinating sample collection and sharing data) ensures that the CY 2008 monitoring results fulfill requirements of all the applicable monitoring drivers with no duplication of sampling and analysis efforts. Section 3 of this report contains a summary of information regarding the

  1. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This document analyzes at a pregrammatic level the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. For pregrammatic spent nuclear fuel management, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, decentralization, regionalization, centralization and the use of the plans that existed in 1992/1993 for the management of these materials. For the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, ten-year plan, minimum and maximum treatment, storage, and disposal of US Department of Energy wastes.

  2. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2, Part A

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This document analyzes at a programmatic level the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. For programmatic spent nuclear fuel management this document analyzes alternatives of no action, decentralization, regionalization, centralization and the use of the plans that existed in 1992/1993 for the management of these materials. For the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, ten-year plan, minimum and maximum and maximum treatment, storage, and disposal of US Department of Energy wastes.

  3. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs draft environmental impact statement. Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This document analyzes at a programmatic level the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. For programmatic spent nuclear fuel management, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, decentralization, regionalization, centralization and the use of the plans that existed in 1992/1993 for the management of these materials. For the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, ten-year plan, minimum and maximum treatment, storage, and disposal of US Department of Energy wastes.

  4. Guidelines for the identification, investigation and treatment of individuals with concomitant tuberculosis and HIV infection. Bureau of Communicable Disease Epidemiology, Canada Department of National Health and Welfare.

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The following recommended guidelines, jointly prepared by the Canadian Thoracic Society, the Tuberculosis Directors of Canada, and the Department of National Health and Welfare in consultation with the provincial and territorial epidemiologists, AIDS coordinators and HIV caregivers, and approved by the Canadian Lung Association and the Canadian Thoracic Society are provided to assist health care workers who are caring for patients in the overlapping group. PMID:8500033

  5. Planning the Social Studies Programme for the Contemporary African Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enaohwo, J. Okpako

    1989-01-01

    Identifies characteristics of a viable social studies program for African nations, urging multidisciplinary and integrated approaches. Offers a cyclical framework for planning a curriculum which includes defining the problem, setting objectives, identifying methods of implementation, evaluation, and regeneration. (LS)

  6. The African superswell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyblade, Andrew A.; Robinson, Scott W.

    1994-01-01

    Maps of residual bathymetry in the ocean basins around the African continent reveal a broad bathymetric swell in the southeastern Atlantic Ocean with an amplitude of about 500 m. We propose that this region of anomalously shallow bathymetry, together with the contiguous eastern and southern African plateaus, form a superswell which we refer to as the African superswell. The origin of the African superswell is uncertain. However, rifting and volcanism in eastern Africa, as well as heat flow measurements in southern Africa and the southeastern Atlantic Ocean, suggest that the superswell may be attributed, at least in part, to heating of the lithosphere.

  7. Adult Illiteracy: The Root of African Underdevelopment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jogwu, C. N. O.

    2010-01-01

    All African Nations belong to the category of third world underdeveloped countries of the world. UNDP Human Development Index uses factors like per capita income, health of the people, and educational attainment to classify countries. Adult literacy and gross enrolment ratios are indicators of education status. This paper uses Nigeria, a typical…

  8. African and Pacific Literature: A Comparative Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Kristine L.

    Literary writing in Africa and the Pacific addresses themes that reflect colonial experience and the struggles of newly independent nations to cope with change and conflicts between traditional and modern existence. The novels of Chinua Achebe of Nigeria and Ngugi Wa Thiong'o of Kenya illustrate many dominant themes of African literature. Achebe…

  9. African Socialism and Educational Practice. Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draisma, Tom

    The relationship between the secondary education system and wider political, economic, and sociocultural developments in Africa is examined. Special emphasis is given to the problems of political ideology and education in Zambia; but as Zambian socialist ideology and educational history show similarities to other African nations, the author's…

  10. Allocation of Students in North African Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Marie Thourson

    1981-01-01

    Student bodies at public universities in Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia have grown rapidly, outside the direct control of university authorities. How the three North African nations differ in their policies regulating which students may study which subjects, and the implications of these policies for the goals of higher education are discussed.…

  11. 77 FR 59652 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Wupatki...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... Indian Reservation, Arizona; Jicarilla Apache Nation, New Mexico; Kaibab Band of Paiute Indians of the...); Mescalero Apache Tribe of the Mescalero Reservation, New Mexico; Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah... Zia, New Mexico; San Carlos Apache Tribe of the San Carlos Reservation, Arizona; San Juan...

  12. 76 FR 43718 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Gila National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... Federal Register for these sites (63 FR 39293-39294, July 22, 1998; 70 FR 44686-44687, August 3, 2005; 70 FR 56483-56484, September 27, 2005; and 71 FR 38413, July 6, 2006). The human remains and associated... National Forest, Silver City, NM and Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL AGENCY: National...

  13. Bayer Facts of Science Education XV: A View from the Gatekeepers--STEM Department Chairs at America's Top 200 Research Universities on Female and Underrepresented Minority Undergraduate STEM Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Science Education and Technology, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Diversity and the underrepresentation of women, African-Americans, Hispanics and American Indians in the nation's science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields are the subjects of the XV: A View from the Gatekeepers--STEM Department Chairs at America's Top 200 Research Universities on Female and Underrepresented Minority…

  14. Indian Nations At Risk: Listening to the People. Summaries of Papers Commissioned by the Indian Nations At Risk Task Force of the U.S. Department of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahape, Patricia, Ed.; Howley, Craig B., Ed.

    This volume contains summaries of 20 papers commissioned by the Indian Nations At Risk Task Force. Based on research, testimony, and written materials submitted to the Task Force by hundreds of educational practitioners and concerned citizens, the papers provide in-depth analyses of current conditions in Native education and set forth rationale,…

  15. Calendar Year 2011 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Elvado Environmental LLC,

    2012-12-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2011 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2011 monitoring data were obtained from wells, springs, and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12. The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12. This report provides background information pertinent to groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in each hydrogeologic regime, including the topography and bedrock geology, surface water drainage, groundwater system, and known extent of groundwater contamination. The CY 2011 groundwater and surface water monitoring data in this report were obtained from sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC (B&W Y-12) and from sampling and analysis activities implemented under several monitoring programs managed by the DOE Environmental Management (EM) contractor responsible for environmental cleanup on the ORR. In August 2011, URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC (UCOR) replaced Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) as the DOE EM contractor. For this report, BJC/UCOR will be referenced as the managing contractor for CY 2011. Cooperative implementation of the monitoring programs directed by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC/UCOR (i.e., coordinating sample collection and sharing data) ensures

  16. Calendar Year 2003 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    2004-09-30

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2003 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2003 monitoring data were obtained from groundwater and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge south of Y-12. The CY 2003 monitoring data were obtained under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (BWXT) and several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Data contained in this report meet applicable requirements of DOE Order 5400.1 and DOE Order 450.1 (Environmental Protection Program), and address requirements of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation (DOE 2003a) regarding evaluation of groundwater and surface water quality: (1) in areas which are, or could be, affected by operations at Y-12 (DOE Order 5400.1 surveillance monitoring) and (2) in areas where contaminants from Y-12 are most likely to migrate beyond the boundaries of the ORR (DOE Order 5400.1 exit pathway/perimeter monitoring). The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2003 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities in the Bear Creek, East Fork, and Chestnut Ridge Regime. Section 2 briefly describes the hydrogeologic context and generalized extent of groundwater

  17. Calendar Year 2005 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    2006-09-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2005 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2005 monitoring data were obtained from groundwater and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge south of Y-12. The CY 2005 monitoring data were obtained under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (BWXT) and several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Data contained in this report meet applicable requirements of DOE Order 450.1 (Environmental Protection Program) regarding evaluation of groundwater and surface water quality in areas: (1) which are, or could be, affected by operations at Y-12 (surveillance monitoring); and (2) where contaminants from Y-12 are most likely to migrate beyond the boundaries of the ORR (exit pathway/perimeter monitoring). However, detailed analysis, evaluation, and interpretation of the CY 2005 monitoring data is deferred to the ''Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater Monitoring Data Compendium'' (BWXT 2006). For each monitoring well, spring, and surface water sampling station included in this report, the GWPP Compendium provides: (1) pertinent well installation and construction information; (2) a complete sampling history, including sampling methods and

  18. Calendar Year 2007 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Elvado Environmental LLC

    2008-12-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2007 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2007 monitoring data were obtained from wells, springs, and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12. Section 2 of this report provides background information pertinent to groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in each hydrogeologic regime, including the topography and bedrock geology, surface water drainage, groundwater system, and extent of groundwater contamination. The CY 2007 groundwater and surface water monitoring data in this report were obtained from sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (BWXT), and from sampling and analysis activities implemented under several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). In December 2007, the BWXT corporate name was changed to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC (B&W Y-12), which is applied to personnel and organizations throughout CY 2007 for this report. Cooperative implementation of the monitoring programs directed by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC (i.e., coordinating sample collection and sharing data) ensures that the CY 2007 monitoring results fulfill requirements of

  19. Calendar Year 2004 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2005-09-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2004 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2004 monitoring data were obtained from groundwater and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge south of Y-12. The CY 2004 monitoring data were obtained under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (BWXT) and several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Data contained in this report meet applicable requirements of DOE Order 450.1 (Environmental Protection Program) regarding evaluation of groundwater and surface water quality in areas: (1) which are, or could be, affected by operations at Y-12 (surveillance monitoring); and (2) where contaminants from Y-12 are most likely to migrate beyond the boundaries of the ORR (exit pathway/perimeter monitoring). However, detailed analysis, evaluation, and interpretation of the CY 2004 monitoring data is deferred to the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater Monitoring Data Compendium (BWXT 2005). For each monitoring well, spring, and surface water sampling station included in this report, the GWPP Compendium provides: (1) pertinent well installation and construction information; (2) a complete sampling history, including sampling methods and

  20. Calendar Year 2010 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department Of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Elvado Environmental LLC

    2011-12-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2010 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2010 monitoring data were obtained from wells, springs, and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12. Section 2 of this report provides background information pertinent to groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in each hydrogeologic regime, including the topography and bedrock geology, surface water drainage, groundwater system, and extent of groundwater contamination. The CY 2010 groundwater and surface water monitoring data in this report were obtained from sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC (B&W Y-12) and from sampling and analysis activities implemented under several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Cooperative implementation of the monitoring programs directed by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC (i.e., coordinating sample collection and sharing data) ensures that the CY 2010 monitoring results fulfill requirements of all the applicable monitoring drivers with no duplication of sampling and analysis efforts. Section 3 of this report contains a summary of information regarding the

  1. 75 FR 68000 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Hiawatha National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ..., Hiawatha National Forest, Escanaba, MI and University of Michigan, Museum of Anthropology, Ann Arbor, MI... Anthropology, Ann Arbor, MI. The human remains were removed from Naomikong Point Site, Chippewa County,...

  2. African American legislators' perceptions of firearm violence prevention legislation.

    PubMed

    Payton, Erica; Thompson, Amy; Price, James H; Sheu, Jiunn-Jye; Dake, Joseph A

    2015-06-01

    Firearm mortality is the leading cause of death for young African American males, however, few studies have focused on racial/ethnic minority populations and firearm violence. The National Black Caucus of State Legislators advocates for legislation that promotes the health of African Americans. Thus, the purpose of this study was to collect baseline data on African American legislators' perceptions regarding firearm violence in the African American community. A cross-sectional study of African American legislators (n = 612) was conducted to investigate the research questions. Of the 612 questionnaires mailed, 12 were not deliverable, and 170 were returned (28%). Utilizing a three wave mailing process, African American legislators were invited to participate in the study. The majority (88%) of respondents perceived firearm violence to be very serious among African Americans. Few (10%) legislators perceived that addressing legislative issues would be an effective strategy in reducing firearm violence among African Americans. The majority (72%) of legislators perceived the most effective strategy to reducing firearm violence in the African American community should focus on addressing societal issues (e.g. crime and poverty). After adjusting for the number of perceived barriers, the number of perceived benefits was a significant predictor of legislators' perceived effectiveness of firearm violence prevention legislation for 8 of the 24 potential firearm violence prevention legislative bills.

  3. How we do it: coblation tonsillectomy complication rates from a single ENT department compared with the National Prospective Tonsillectomy Audit.

    PubMed

    Clark, M P A; Smithard, A; Jervis, P

    2006-04-01

    Coblation tonsillectomy is a relatively new technique, the results of which need auditing within practising units, to justify its continued usage. * The National Prospective Tonsillectomy Audit provides an excellent source of data for individual units to compare their results to. * This retrospective audit of 391 coblation tonsillectomies shows that our units haemorrhage and return to theatre rates are similar to the National rates for cold steel & ties data. * Resolution of training issues and patient selection may lead to increased use of this technique.

  4. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Belize; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-03-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Belize, a Central American country bordering Mexico to the north, Guatemala to the west and south, and the Caribbean Sea to the east. Although not an island nation, Belize is included in this energy snapshot series because it is a member of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), an alliance of 15 Caribbean nations in the region.

  5. 16 Extraordinary African Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobb, Nancy

    This collection for children tells the stories of 16 African Americans who helped make America what it is today. African Americans can take pride in the heritage of these contributors to society. Biographies are given for the following: (1) Sojourner Truth, preacher and abolitionist; (2) Frederick Douglass, abolitionist; (3) Harriet Tubman, leader…

  6. African Studies Computer Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntz, Patricia S.

    African studies computer resources that are readily available in the United States with linkages to Africa are described, highlighting those most directly corresponding to African content. Africanists can use the following four fundamental computer systems: (1) Internet/Bitnet; (2) Fidonet; (3) Usenet; and (4) dial-up bulletin board services. The…

  7. Understanding African American Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Edward Earl

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the socialization skills, self-esteem, and academic readiness of African American males in a school environment. Discussions with students and the School Perceptions Questionnaire provided data for this investigation. The intended targets for this investigation were African American students; however, there…

  8. Africans Away from Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, John Henrik

    Africans who were brought across the Atlantic as slaves never fully adjusted to slavery or accepted its inevitability. Resistance began on board the slave ships, where many jumped overboard or committed suicide. African slaves in South America led the first revolts against tyranny in the New World. The first slave revolt in the Caribbean occurred…

  9. Keeping African Masks Real

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddington, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Art is a good place to learn about our multicultural planet, and African masks are prized throughout the world as powerfully expressive artistic images. Unfortunately, multicultural education, especially for young children, can perpetuate stereotypes. Masks taken out of context lose their meaning and the term "African masks" suggests that there is…

  10. Educating African American Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Edward E.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Schools across America spend money, invest in programs, and sponsor workshops, offer teacher incentives, raise accountability standards, and even evoke the name of Obama in efforts to raise the academic achievement of African American males. Incarceration and college retention rates point to a dismal plight for many African American…

  11. African horse sickness and African carnivores.

    PubMed

    Alexander, K A; Kat, P W; House, J; House, C; O'Brien, S J; Laurenson, M K; McNutt, J W; Osburn, B I

    1995-11-01

    African horse sickness (AHS) is a disease that affects equids, and is principally transmitted by Culicoides spp. that are biological vectors of AHS viruses (AHSV). The repeated spread of AHSV from sub-Saharan Africa to the Middle East, northern Africa and the Iberian peninsula indicate that a better understanding of AHS epizootiology is needed. African horse sickness has long been known to infect and cause mortality among domestic dogs that ingest virus contaminated meat, but it is uncertain what role carnivores play in transmission of the virus. We present evidence of widespread natural AHS infection among a diversity of African carnivore species. We hypothesize that such infection resulted from ingestion of meat and organs from AHS-infected prey species. The effect of AHS on the carnivores is unknown, as is their role in the maintenance cycle of the disease.

  12. Bomb blast injuries: an exploration of patient characteristics and outcome using Pakistan National Emergency Departments Surveillance (Pak-NEDS) data

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Bomb blast injuries result in premature deaths and burdening of healthcare systems. The objective of this study was to explore the characteristics and outcome of patients presenting to the emergency departments in Pakistan with bomb blast injuries. Methods Active surveillance was conducted in seven major emergency departments of Pakistan from November 2010-March 2011. All the sites are tertiary care urban centers. All the patients who presented to the hospital's emergency department (ED) following a bomb blast injury as per self-report or the ambulance personnel were included in the study. Frequency of demographics, injury pattern, and outcomes were calculated. Results A total of 103 patients with bomb blast injuries presented to the selected emergency departments. The median age of patients was 30 years. Around three-fourth of the patients were males (n = 74, 74.7%). Most of the bomb blast patients were seen in Peshawar (n = 41, 39.8%) and Karachi city (n = 31, 30.1%) and the most common mode of arrival was non-ambulance transport (n = 71, 76.3%). Upper limb injuries (n = 12, 40%) were common in the under 18 age group and lower limb injuries (n = 31, 39.2%) in the 18 years and above group. There were a total of 8 (7.7%) deaths reported out of these 103 patients. Conclusion Bomb blast injuries in Pakistan generally affect young males. Non-ambulance transport is the most common way to access emergency departments (ED). Overall ED mortality is high and capturing data during a disaster in an emergency department is challenging. PMID:26692453

  13. Perspectives from the historic African American medical institutions.

    PubMed

    Epps, C H

    1999-05-01

    The historically African American medical schools have been at the center of medical education for African American physicians in the United States since the Howard University College of Medicine opened in 1868. Although there were more than a dozen African American medical schools established during the next few decades, as propriety or church affiliated schools, only two survived the Flexner Report in 1910. Howard University (1868) and Meharry (1876) survived and trained generations of African Americans. These two schools educated approximately 85% of all African American physicians whereas the majority medical schools educated 15% for more than half of the twentieth century. As the result of a series of lawsuits filed by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, civil rights legislation and affirmative action programs, the numbers of the schools that now admitted African Americans increased and the total numbers of African American medical students increased when discrimination was prohibited in 1966. The percentage of African American medical students attending predominantly white institutions increased by 25% in 1948, by 47% in 1968, by 61% in 1983 and to 84% in 1990. Two additional predominantly African American medical schools were established: the Charles R. Drew Medical School, Los Angeles (affiliated with the University of California, Los Angeles) in 1966, and Morehouse Medical School, Atlanta, which admitted its first class in 1978. Recent court decisions prohibiting schools from considering race as factor in admission and the end of affirmative action programs have resulted in a drop in total minority enrollment. The historically African American medical schools, that admitted approximately 15% of the African American medical students during the era of affirmative action programs, will see this percentage decrease as the majority institutions admit fewer African American medical students and minority students. In the United States

  14. Diabetes in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, M

    2005-01-01

    African Americans have a high risk for type 2 diabetes. Genetic traits, the prevalence of obesity, and insulin resistance all contribute to the risk of diabetes in the African American community. African Americans have a high rate of diabetic complications, because of poor glycaemic control and racial disparities in health care in the USA. African Americans with diabetes may have an atypical presentation that simulates type 1 diabetes, but then their subsequent clinical course is typical of type 2 diabetes. Culturally sensitive strategies, structured disease management protocols, and the assistance of nurses, diabetic educators, and other health care professionals are effective in improving the outcome of diabetes in the African American community. PMID:16344294

  15. Medical student radiology education: summary and recommendations from a national survey of medical school and radiology department leadership.

    PubMed

    Straus, Christopher M; Webb, Emily M; Kondo, Kimi L; Phillips, Andrew W; Naeger, David M; Carrico, Caroline W; Herring, William; Neutze, Janet A; Haines, G Rebecca; Dodd, Gerald D

    2014-06-01

    The ACR Task Force on Medical Student Education in Radiology, in partnership with the Alliance of Medical Student Educators in Radiology, investigated the current status of how and to what extent medical imaging was being taught in medical schools. The task force executed a 3-part survey of medical school deans, radiology department chairs, and intern physicians. The results provided an updated understanding of the status of radiology education in medical schools in the United States. This summary includes recommendations about how individual radiology departments and ACR members can assist in advancing the specialty of diagnostic radiology through medical student education. PMID:24713496

  16. African bees to control African elephants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollrath, Fritz; Douglas-Hamilton, Iain

    2002-11-01

    Numbers of elephants have declined in Africa and Asia over the past 30 years while numbers of humans have increased, both substantially. Friction between these two keystone species is reaching levels which are worryingly high from an ecological as well as a political viewpoint. Ways and means must be found to keep the two apart, at least in areas sensitive to each species' survival. The aggressive African bee might be one such method. Here we demonstrate that African bees deter elephants from damaging the vegetation and trees which house their hives. We argue that bees can be employed profitably to protect not only selected trees, but also selected areas, from elephant damage.

  17. 77 FR 32989 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, San Juan National Forest, Durango...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... (73 FR 49485-49486, August 21, 2008). The same human remains in this notice were the subject of two... (66 FR 51472-51474, October 9, 2001, stating that the human remains were under the control of the University of Denver Department of Anthropology; and 73 FR 62533-62535, October 21, 2008, correcting...

  18. Relationship Between U.S. News and World Report's and the National Research Council's Ratings/Rankings of Psychology Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanges, Paul J.; Lyon, Julie S.

    2005-01-01

    Every year, U.S. News and World Report (USNEWS) creates a stir among academics and the public by publishing its ranking of universities and various departments within those universities. Although members of the public rely on the USNEWS rankings when making their academic choices, psychologists and other academics tend to rely on the National…

  19. Rabies and African wild dogs in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kat, P W; Alexander, K A; Smith, J S; Munson, L

    1995-11-22

    Three packs of African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) ranging to the north of the Masai Mara National Reserve in southwestern Kenya were monitored from 1988 to 1990. During a six week period (August 2-September 14, 1989), 21 of 23 members of one of these packs died. Histological examination of two brain samples revealed eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusions (Negri bodies), supporting a diagnosis of rabies viral encephalitis. An additional brain sample tested positive for rabies with a fluorescent antibody test. Nucleotide sequence of the rabies viral N and G genes from isolates of four African wild dogs (including an individual from Tanzania) indicated that infection was with a viral variant common among domestic dogs in Kenya and Tanzania. A hypothesis linking African wild dog rabies deaths to researcher handling is evaluated and considered implausible.

  20. African female sexuality and the heterosexual form.

    PubMed

    Mcfadden, P

    1994-03-01

    All women find sexuality problematical, especially women living in countries that were colonized or colonized others. The stereotype of repressed sexuality in Victorian England found its antithesis in the stereotype of promiscuous African sexuality which had to be "civilized" and controlled through religion and repression. Colonizing nations have seen the discourse on sexuality move from the private to the public domain, while Africa maintains its silence on the subject. Sexuality is a difficult topic because it embraces the most intimate and individual of our human emotions, thus, it is difficult even to voice sexual preferences to a lifetime partner. In addition, especially in Africa, sexuality is a very gender-specific social construct. Africans foster heterosexuality through socialization from early childhood and discourage any sign of sexual stimulation in their children. After teaching that humans are "naturally" heterosexual, Africans teach their children that marriage is essential for the moral uprightness of society, although most Africans are, in fact, raised in many types of alternative families. Critique of the heterosexual form is literally nonexistent in African feminist genre because African sexuality is really male sexuality. When people assert that an African culture exists, they really mean that patriarchal constructs about maleness and femaleness pervade the continent. Women are not expected to experience sexual satisfaction, and, indeed, the practice of female genital mutilation assures that they will never experience sexual pleasure. This practice assures that female sexuality exists only through men. It represents a misogynist point of view about the female body and is equally repulsive whether it takes the form of "excision" of a part of the clitoris or removal of all of the external genitalia. This practice controls female sexuality by depriving women of the opportunity to masturbate or to engage in homosexual relations. The resulting option

  1. The gamma-interferon test: its usefulness in a bovine tuberculosis survey in African buffaloes (Syncerus caffer) in the Kruger National Park.

    PubMed

    Grobler, D G; Michel, Anita L; De Klerk, Lin-Mari; Bengis, R G

    2002-09-01

    A survey to determine the bovine tuberculosis status of buffalo herds north of the Olifants River in the Kruger National Park was conducted, using a new diagnostic approach. Diagnosis of Mycobacterium bovis infection was accomplished using the gamma-interferon assay technique in 608 adult buffaloes out of a total of 29 discreet herds. The animals were immobilized in groups of 10-15, bled, individually marked and then revived and released on site. As soon as test results were available (after 26-36 h), the same buffalo herd was relocated by tracking the frequency of a radio-collar previously fitted to one adult cow per group during the initial operation. Bovine reactors were identified, darted and euthanased from the helicopter. Necropsy and culture findings of all culled buffaloes showed excellent correlation with the results of the ante-mortem gamma-interferon test. The survey revealed that over and above the two positive herds that had been identified during a previous survey carried out in 1996, there were three additional, but previously unidentified, infected herds in the region north of the Olifants River.

  2. Calendar Year 2009 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy, Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Elvado Environmental LLC

    2010-12-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2009 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2009 monitoring data were obtained from wells, springs, and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12. The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12. Section 2 of this report provides background information pertinent to groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in each hydrogeologic regime, including the topography and bedrock geology, surface water drainage, groundwater system, and extent of groundwater contamination. The CY 2009 groundwater and surface water monitoring data in this report were obtained from sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC (B&W Y-12) and from sampling and analysis activities implemented under several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Cooperative implementation of the monitoring programs directed by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC (i.e., coordinating sample collection and sharing data) ensures that the CY 2009 monitoring results fulfill requirements of all the applicable monitoring drivers with no duplication of sampling and analysis efforts. Section 3 of this report contains a summary of information regarding the groundwater and

  3. Calendar Year 2006 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2007-09-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2006 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2006 monitoring data were obtained from wells, springs, and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12. Section 2 of this report provides background information pertinent to groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in each hydrogeologic regime, including the topography and bedrock geology, surface water drainage, groundwater system, and extent of groundwater contamination. The CY 2006 groundwater and surface water monitoring data in this report were obtained from sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (BWXT), and from sampling and analysis activities implemented under several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Cooperative implementation of the monitoring programs directed by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC (i.e., preparing SAPs, coordinating sample collection, and sharing data) ensures that the CY 2006 monitoring results fulfill requirements of all the applicable monitoring drivers with no duplication of sampling and analysis efforts. Section 3 of this report contains a summary of information regarding the groundwater and

  4. The Prevalence of Perceived Discrimination among African American and Caribbean Black Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seaton, Eleanor K.; Caldwell, Cleopatra H.; Sellers, Robert M.; Jackson, James S.

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined ethnic, gender, and age differences in perceived discrimination and the association between perceived discrimination and psychological well-being in a nationally representative sample of Black adolescents. Data are from the National Survey of African Life (NSAL), which includes 810 African American and 360 Caribbean…

  5. Cancer statistics for African Americans, 2013.

    PubMed

    DeSantis, Carol; Naishadham, Deepa; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2013-05-01

    In this article, the American Cancer Society estimates the number of new cancer cases and deaths for African Americans and compiles the most recent data on cancer incidence, mortality, survival, and screening prevalence based upon incidence data from the National Cancer Institute, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries and mortality data from the National Center for Health Statistics. It is estimated that 176,620 new cases of cancer and 64,880 deaths will occur among African Americans in 2013. From 2000 to 2009, the overall cancer death rate among males declined faster among African Americans than whites (2.4% vs 1.7% per year), but among females, the rate of decline was similar (1.5% vs 1.4% per year, respectively). The decrease in cancer death rates among African American males was the largest of any racial or ethnic group. The reduction in overall cancer death rates since 1990 in men and 1991 in women translates to the avoidance of nearly 200,000 deaths from cancer among African Americans. Five-year relative survival is lower for African Americans than whites for most cancers at each stage of diagnosis. The extent to which these disparities reflect unequal access to health care versus other factors remains an active area of research. Overall, progress in reducing cancer death rates has been made, although more can and should be done to accelerate this progress through ensuring equitable access to cancer prevention, early detection, and state-of-the-art treatments.

  6. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Barbados; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Barbados, an independent nation in the Lesser Antilles island chain in the eastern Caribbean. Barbados’ electricity rates are approximately $0.28 per kilowatt-hour (kWh), below the Caribbean regional average of $0.33/kWh.

  7. 77 FR 59651 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Wupatki...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ...; Hualapai Indian Tribe of the Hualapai Indian Reservation, Arizona; Jicarilla Apache Nation, New Mexico... (formerly the Pueblo of Santo Domingo); Mescalero Apache Tribe of the Mescalero Reservation, New Mexico... Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; San Carlos Apache Tribe of the San Carlos...

  8. 78 FR 78378 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Grant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... osteological analysis and likely origin. Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this... National Historic Site has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate... between the human remains and any present-day Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian...

  9. A Comparative Cost Analysis of Commodity Foods from the U. S. Department of Agriculture in the National School Lunch Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Cora

    2009-01-01

    Schools that participate in the National School Lunch Program receive a portion of their federal funding as commodity foods rather than cash payments. This research compared the product costs and estimated total procurement costs of commodity and commercial foods from the school district perspective using data from 579 Minnesota ordering sites in…

  10. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Haiti; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Haiti, an independent nation that occupies the western portion of the island of Hispaniola in the northern Caribbean Sea. Haiti’s utility rates are roughly $0.35 U.S. dollars (USD) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), above the Caribbean regional average of $0.33 USD/kWh.

  11. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Palau; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Palau, an independent island nation geographically located in the Micronesia region. Palau’s residential electricity rates are approximately $0.28 U.S. dollars (USD) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), more than twice the average U.S. residential rate of $0.13 USD/kWh.

  12. 76 FR 80388 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ..., who resided on the Northern Cheyenne Reservation. In 1922, Dr. Thomas B. Marquis, a physician on the..., now known as Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, by Dr. Marquis' daughters, Mrs. Millie Ellen Marquis Hastings and Mrs. Anna Rose Octavia Marquis Heil. The two cultural items described...

  13. HIV Incidence Prior to, during, and after Violent Conflict in 36 Sub-Saharan African Nations, 1990-2012: An Ecological Study

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Brady W.; Marshall, Brandon D. L.; Gjelsvik, Annie; McGarvey, Stephen T.; Lurie, Mark N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the association between violent conflict and HIV incidence within and across 36 sub-Saharan Africa countries between 1990 and 2012. Methods We used generalized linear mixed effect modeling to estimate the effect of conflict periods on country-level HIV incidence. We specified random intercepts and slopes to account for across and within country variation over time. We also conducted a sub-analysis of countries who experienced conflict to assess the effect of conflict intensity on country-level HIV incidence. All models controlled for level of economic development, number of refugees present in the country, and year. Results We found that, compared to times of peace, the HIV incidence rate increased by 2.1 per 1000 infections per year (95%CI: 0.39, 3.87) in the 5 years prior to conflict. Additionally, we found a decrease of 0.7 new infections per 1000 people per year (95%CI: -1.44, -0.01) in conflicts with 25 to 1000 battle-related deaths and a decrease of 1.5 new infections per 1000 people per year (95%CI:-2.50, -0.52) for conflict with more than 1000 battle-related deaths, compared to conflicts with less than 25 battle-related deaths Conclusions Our results demonstrate that HIV infection rates increase in the years immediately prior to times of conflict; however, we did not identify a significant increase during and immediately following periods of violent conflict. Further investigation, including more rigorous data collection, is needed, as is increased aid to nations at risk of violent conflict to help in the fight against HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:26562434

  14. Wind Vision: A New Era for Wind Power in the United States (Highlights); U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-03-01

    This is a four-part Wind Vision project, consisting of Wind Vision Highlights, Executive Summary, a Full Report, and Appendix. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program, in close cooperation with the wind industry, led a comprehensive analysis to evaluate future pathways for the wind industry. The Wind Vision report updates and expands upon the DOE's 2008 report, 20% Wind Energy by 2030, and defines the societal, environmental, and economic benefits of wind power in a scenario with wind energy supplying 10% of national end-use electricity demand by 2020, 20% by 2030, and 35% by 2050.

  15. Discrimination, Mastery, and Depressive Symptoms Among African American Men

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Daphne C.; Hudson, Darrell L.; Caldwell, Cleopatra Howard; Siefert, Kristine; Jackson, James S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study examines the influence of discrimination and mastery on depressive symptoms for African American men at young (18–34), middle (35–54), and late (55+) adulthood. Method Analyses are based on responses from 1,271 African American men from the National Survey of American Life (NSAL). Results Discrimination was significantly related to depressive symptoms for men ages 35 to 54 and mastery was found to be protective against depressive symptoms for all men. Compared to African American men in the young and late adult groups, discrimination remained a statistically significant predictor of depressive symptoms for men in the middle group once mastery was included. Implications Findings demonstrate the distinct differences in the influence of discrimination on depressive symptoms among adult African American males and the need for future research that explores the correlates of mental health across age groups. Implications for social work research and practice with African American men are discussed. PMID:24436576

  16. U.S. Department of the Interior Climate Science Centers and U.S. Geological Survey National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center—Annual report for 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Varela Minder, Elda; Padgett, Holly A.

    2016-01-01

    2015 was another great year for the Department of the Interior (DOI) Climate Science Centers (CSCs) and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center (NCCWSC) network. The DOI CSCs and USGS NCCWSC continued their mission of providing the science, data, and tools that are needed for on-the-ground decision making by natural and cultural resource managers to address the effects of climate change on fish, wildlife, ecosystems, and communities. Our many accomplishments in 2015 included initiating a national effort to understand the influence of drought on wildlife and ecosystems; providing numerous opportunities for students and early career researchers to expand their networks and learn more about climate change effects; and working with tribes and indigenous communities to expand their knowledge of and preparation for the impacts of climate change on important resources and traditional ways of living. Here we illustrate some of these 2015 activities from across the CSCs and NCCWSC.

  17. U.S. Department of the Interior Climate Science Centers and U.S. Geological Survey National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center—Annual report for 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Varela Minder, Elda; Padgett, Holly A.

    2016-04-07

    2015 was another great year for the Department of the Interior (DOI) Climate Science Centers (CSCs) and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center (NCCWSC) network. The DOI CSCs and USGS NCCWSC continued their mission of providing the science, data, and tools that are needed for on-the-ground decision making by natural and cultural resource managers to address the effects of climate change on fish, wildlife, ecosystems, and communities. Our many accomplishments in 2015 included initiating a national effort to understand the influence of drought on wildlife and ecosystems; providing numerous opportunities for students and early career researchers to expand their networks and learn more about climate change effects; and working with tribes and indigenous communities to expand their knowledge of and preparation for the impacts of climate change on important resources and traditional ways of living. Here we illustrate some of these 2015 activities from across the CSCs and NCCWSC.

  18. African-American Male Student Perceptions about Factors Related to Why Black Boys Drop out of Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Anntwanique DeVonne

    2012-01-01

    African-American males are overwhelmingly represented in the nation's dropout rates. Dropping out of school has serious social and economic consequences for our society. The dropout rate is overwhelmingly represented by African-American male students, but limited attention is given to student voice. This study examines African-American male…

  19. Assessment of the Status of African-Americans. Volume III: The Education of African-Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willie, Charles V., Ed.; Garibaldi, Antoine M., Ed.; Reed, Wornie L., Ed.

    In 1987 a project was undertaken to assess the status of African Americans in the United States in the topical areas to be addressed by the National Research Council's Study Committee on the Status of Black Americans: education, employment, income and occupations, political participation and the administration of justice, social and cultural…

  20. Astronomy for African development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govender, Kevindran

    2011-06-01

    In recent years there have been a number of efforts across Africa to develop the field of astronomy as well as to reap benefit from astronomy for African people. This presentation will discuss the case of the SALT (Southern African Large Telescope) Collateral Benefits Programme (SCBP) which was set up to ensure societal benefit from astronomy. With African society as the target, the SCBP has embarked on various projects from school level education to public understanding of science to socio-economic development, the latter mainly being felt in the rural communities surrounding the South African Astronomical Observatory (home to SALT). A development plan for ``Astronomy in Africa'' will also be discussed. This plan has been drawn up with input from all over Africa and themed ``Astronomy for Education''. The Africa case stands as a good example for the IYA cornerstone project ``Developing Astronomy Globally'' which focuses on developing regions.

  1. African American Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... specific health concerns. Differences in the health of groups can result from Genetics Environmental factors Access to care Cultural factors On this page, you'll find links to health issues that affect African Americans.

  2. Dismantling reified African culture through localised homosexualities in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Nyanzi, Stella

    2013-01-01

    Uganda's Anti-Homosexuality Bill of 2009 aimed at protecting the cherished culture of the people against emergent threats to the traditional heterosexual family. The Bill's justification, however, lay in myopic imaginings of a homogenous African-ness and pedestrian oblivion to pluralities within African sexualities. This paper revisits the debate that homosexuality is 'un-African'. Rhetoric analysis of the Anti-Homosexuality Bill exposes how dominant discourses of law, medicine, religion, geography and culture reinforce the view that homosexuality is foreign to Africa. Based on ethnography in contemporary Uganda, I explore how self-identified same-sex-loving individuals simultaneously claim their African-ness and their homosexuality. Their strategies include ethnic belonging, membership to kinship structures, making connections with pre-colonial histories of homosexuality, civic participation in democratic processes, national identity, organising of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and questioning support groups, language and nomenclature, visibility and voice in local communal activities, solidarity and adherence to cultural rituals. In present-day Uganda, same-sex-loving men, women and transgender people variously assert their African-ness.

  3. Dismantling reified African culture through localised homosexualities in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Nyanzi, Stella

    2013-01-01

    Uganda's Anti-Homosexuality Bill of 2009 aimed at protecting the cherished culture of the people against emergent threats to the traditional heterosexual family. The Bill's justification, however, lay in myopic imaginings of a homogenous African-ness and pedestrian oblivion to pluralities within African sexualities. This paper revisits the debate that homosexuality is 'un-African'. Rhetoric analysis of the Anti-Homosexuality Bill exposes how dominant discourses of law, medicine, religion, geography and culture reinforce the view that homosexuality is foreign to Africa. Based on ethnography in contemporary Uganda, I explore how self-identified same-sex-loving individuals simultaneously claim their African-ness and their homosexuality. Their strategies include ethnic belonging, membership to kinship structures, making connections with pre-colonial histories of homosexuality, civic participation in democratic processes, national identity, organising of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and questioning support groups, language and nomenclature, visibility and voice in local communal activities, solidarity and adherence to cultural rituals. In present-day Uganda, same-sex-loving men, women and transgender people variously assert their African-ness. PMID:23767462

  4. S.2058: This act may be cited as the Department of Energy National Security Act for Fiscal Year 1999, introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session, May 11, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    This bill is to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 1999 for defense activities of the Department of Energy, and for other purposes. Topics addressed in the bill include DOE national security programs including recurring general provisions and program authorizations, restrictions,and limitations; defense nuclear facilities safety board; national defense stockpile; naval petroleum reserves; and Panama Canal commission.

  5. African Science Leaders Focus on Key Challenges and Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2014-08-01

    While dozens of African presidents were in Washington, D. C., in early August to meet with U.S. president Barack Obama during the first U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit, African science ministers and science academy officials held their own gathering at the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to focus on challenges and opportunities related to environmental protection, climate change, development, health, poverty, technology, and other issues.

  6. Implementing performance improvement in New Zealand emergency departments: the six hour time target policy national research project protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In May 2009, the New Zealand government announced a new policy aimed at improving the quality of Emergency Department care and whole hospital performance. Governments have increasingly looked to time targets as a mechanism for improving hospital performance and from a whole system perspective, using the Emergency Department waiting time as a performance measure has the potential to see improvements in the wider health system. However, the imposition of targets may have significant adverse consequences. There is little empirical work examining how the performance of the wider hospital system is affected by such a target. This project aims to answer the following questions: How has the introduction of the target affected broader hospital performance over time, and what accounts for these changes? Which initiatives and strategies have been successful in moving hospitals towards the target without compromising the quality of other care processes and patient outcomes? Is there a difference in outcomes between different ethnic and age groups? Which initiatives and strategies have the greatest potential to be transferred across organisational contexts? Methods/design The study design is mixed methods; combining qualitative research into the behaviour and practices of specific case study hospitals with quantitative data on clinical outcomes and process measures of performance over the period 2006-2012. All research activity is guided by a Kaupapa Māori Research methodological approach. A dynamic systems model of acute patient flows was created to frame the study. Consequences of the target (positive and negative) will be explored by integrating analyses and insights gained from the quantitative and qualitative streams of the study. Discussion At the time of submission of this protocol, the project has been underway for 12 months. This time was necessary to finalise both the case study sites and the secondary outcomes through key stakeholder consultation. We

  7. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Veterans Justice programs and the sequential intercept model: case examples in national dissemination of intervention for justice-involved veterans.

    PubMed

    Blue-Howells, Jessica H; Clark, Sean C; van den Berk-Clark, Carissa; McGuire, James F

    2013-02-01

    Veterans are a significant subpopulation in criminal justice populations, comprising between 9% and 10% of arrestee, jail, prison, and community-supervision populations. In order to address the needs of justice-involved veterans, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Veterans Justice Programs (VJP) offer services to veterans at multiple points in their involvement in the criminal justice system. Within the context of the VA's national mandate to develop VJP, this article presents best practice case examples using the Sequential Intercept Model as the intervention frame, and discusses each in context of a community psychology framework for innovation dissemination. The case examples demonstrate how central program guidance is adapted locally to meet the national mandate using strategies that fit the local environment, illustrating the innovations in action orientation, boundary spanning, and flexibility of organizations. This review provides examples of creative reinvention that expand on the mandate and work to meet local needs. To optimize services to veterans released from custody or supervised in the community, future study of the implementation of this national mandate should examine all VJP sites to identify the full range of best practices in local program implementation. PMID:22924802

  8. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Veterans Justice programs and the sequential intercept model: case examples in national dissemination of intervention for justice-involved veterans.

    PubMed

    Blue-Howells, Jessica H; Clark, Sean C; van den Berk-Clark, Carissa; McGuire, James F

    2013-02-01

    Veterans are a significant subpopulation in criminal justice populations, comprising between 9% and 10% of arrestee, jail, prison, and community-supervision populations. In order to address the needs of justice-involved veterans, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Veterans Justice Programs (VJP) offer services to veterans at multiple points in their involvement in the criminal justice system. Within the context of the VA's national mandate to develop VJP, this article presents best practice case examples using the Sequential Intercept Model as the intervention frame, and discusses each in context of a community psychology framework for innovation dissemination. The case examples demonstrate how central program guidance is adapted locally to meet the national mandate using strategies that fit the local environment, illustrating the innovations in action orientation, boundary spanning, and flexibility of organizations. This review provides examples of creative reinvention that expand on the mandate and work to meet local needs. To optimize services to veterans released from custody or supervised in the community, future study of the implementation of this national mandate should examine all VJP sites to identify the full range of best practices in local program implementation.

  9. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2, Part B

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    Two types of projects in the spent nuclear fuel and environmental restoration and waste management activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are described. These are: foreseeable proposed projects where some funding for preliminary planning and/or conceptual design may already be authorized, but detailed design or planning will not begin until the Department of Energy (DOE) has determined that the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act process for the project have been completed; planned or ongoing projects not yet completed but whose National Environmental Policy Act documentation is already completed or is expected to be completed before the Record of Decision for this Envirorunental Impact Statement (EIS) is issued. The section on project summaries describe the projects (both foreseeable proposed and ongoing).They provide specific information necessary to analyze the environmental impacts of these projects. Chapter 3 describes which alternative(s) each project supports. Summaries are included for (a) spent nuclear fuel projects, (b) environmental remediation projects, (c) the decontamination and decommissioning of surplus INEL facilities, (d) the construction, upgrade, or replacement of existing waste management facilities, (e) infrastructure projects supporting waste management activities, and (f) research and development projects supporting waste management activities.

  10. Reduction in in vivo testing at the National Veterinary Services Laboratories of the United States Department of Agriculture.

    PubMed

    Hyde, R L

    1986-01-01

    Efforts are being made at the National Veterinary Services Laboratories to reduce in vivo testing of USDA licensed veterinary vaccines. A hemagglutination test for determining potency of killed parvovirus vaccine is currently being used for canine and swine adjuvanted and nonadjuvanted products; a serum neutralization inhibition test (SNIT) is being developed for potency testing of killed adjuvanted infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR), bovine virus diarrhea (BVD) and parainfluenza (PI3) vaccines: and a tissue culture titration method for live avian encephalomyelitis virus vaccine is being pursued as a replacement for the old hatch-out chick embryo titration method. Difficulties in separating the antigen from oil emulsion products are preventing significant advances in developing in vitro testing procedures for poultry killed-virus vaccines.

  11. The challenges of rescaling South African water resources management: Catchment Management Agencies and interbasin transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourblanc, Magalie; Blanchon, David

    2014-11-01

    The implementation of Catchment Management Agencies (CMAs) was supposed to be the cornerstone of the rescaling process of the South African water reform policy. Yet, less than 10 years after the adoption of the National Water Act, the process was suspended for 4 years and by 2012 only two CMAs had been established. Combining approaches in geography and political science, this paper investigates the reasons for the delays in CMAs' implementation in South Africa. It shows that the construction of interbasin transfers (IBTs) since the 1950s by the apartheid regime and nowadays the power struggles between CMAs and the Department of Water Affairs (DWA) are two of the main obstacles to the creation of CMAs planned by the 1998 National Water Act (NWA). Finally, the paper advocates taking the "hydrosocial cycle" as an analytical framework for designing new institutional arrangements that will include both rectifying the legacy of the past (the specific role of DWA) and acknowledging legitimate local interests.

  12. Application of the Scenario Planning Process - a Case Study: The Technical Information Department at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, J A

    2001-11-26

    When the field of modern publishing was on a collision course with telecommunications, publishing organizations had to come up to speed in fields that were, heretofore, completely foreign and technologically forbidding to them. For generations, the technology of publishing centered on offset lithography, typesetting, and photography--fields that saw evolutionary and incremental change from the time of Guttenberg. But publishing now includes making information available over the World Wide Web--Internet publishing--with its ever-accelerating rate of technological change and dependence on computers and networks. Clearly, we need a methodology to help anyone in the field of Internet publishing plan for the future, and there is a well-known, well-tested technique for just this purpose--Scenario Planning. Scenario Planning is an excellent tool to help organizations make better decisions in the present based on what they identify as possible and plausible scenarios of the future. Never was decision making more difficult or more crucial than during the years of this study, 1996-1999. This thesis takes the position that, by applying Scenario Planning, the Technical Information Department at LLNL, a large government laboratory (and organizations similar to it), could be confident that moving into the telecommunications business of Internet publishing stood a very good chance of success.

  13. The contributions of managed care plans to public health practice: evidence from the nation's largest local health departments.

    PubMed Central

    Mays, G. P.; Halverson, P. K.; Stevens, R.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors examine the extent and nature of managed care plans participating in local public health activities. METHODS: In 1998, the authors surveyed the directors of all US local health departments serving jurisdictions of at least 100,000 residents to collect information about public health activities performed in their jurisdictions and about organizations participating in the activities. Multivariate logistic and linear regression models were used to examine organizational and market characteristics associated with managed care plan participation in public health activities. RESULTS: Managed care plans were reported to participate in public health activities in 164 (46%) of the jurisdictions surveyed, and to contribute to 13% of the public health activities performed in the average jurisdiction. Plans appeared most likely to participate in public health activities involving the delivery or management of personal health services and the exchange of health-related information. Managed care participation was more likely to occur in jurisdictions with higher HMO penetration, fewer competing plans, and larger proportions of plans enrolling Medicaid recipients. Participation was positively associated with the overall scope and perceived effectiveness of local public health activities. CONCLUSIONS: Although plans participate in a narrow range of activities, these contributions may complement the work of public health agencies. PMID:11889275

  14. African-Americans and Alzheimer's

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share Plus on Google Plus African-Americans and Alzheimer's alz.org | IHaveAlz Introduction 10 Warning Signs Brain ... African-Americans are at a higher risk for Alzheimer's disease. Many Americans dismiss the warning signs of ...

  15. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Agency's Use of Geographic Information Systems for Nuclear Emergency Response Support

    SciTech Connect

    A. L. Guber

    2001-06-01

    The U.S, Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Agency's (NNSA) Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) provides Geographic Information System (GIS) support during nuclear emergency response activities. As directed by the NNSA, the RSL GIS staff maintains databases and equipment for rapid field deployment during an emergency response. When on location, GIS operators provide information products to on-site emergency managers as well as to emergency managers at the DOE Headquarters (HQ) Emergency Operations Center (EOC) in Washington, D.C. Data products are derived from multiple information sources in the field including radiological prediction models, field measurements taken on the ground and from the air, and pertinent information researched on the Internet. The GIS functions as a central data hub where it supplies the information to response elements in the field, as well as to headquarters officials at HQ during emergency response activities.

  16. Groundwater Protection Program Management Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    2001-06-01

    This document presents the Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) management plan for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12). The Y-12 GWPP functions as the primary point-of-contact for groundwater-related issues at Y-12, provides stewardship of the extensive network of groundwater monitoring wells at Y-12, and serves as a resource for technical expertise, support, and historical data for groundwater-related activities at Y-12. These organizational functions each serve the primary programmatic purpose of the GWPP, which is to ensure that groundwater monitoring activities within areas under Y-12 administrative control provide representative data in compliance with the multiple purposes of applicable state and federal regulations, DOE orders, and the corporate policies of BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (hereafter referenced as BWXT Y-12), the Y-12 management and operations (M and O) subcontractor for DOE.

  17. Under the Sun or in the Shade? Jua Kali in African Countries. National Policy Definition in Technical and Vocational Education: Beyond the Formal Sector. A Subregional Seminar for Eastern and Southern African Countries (Nairobi, Kenya, September 15-19, 1997). International project on Technical and Vocational Education (UNEVOC).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Berlin (Germany).

    This document is a comprehensive report a subregional seminar for eastern and southern African countries on the Jua Kali movement. (Jua Kali, "hot sun" in Swahili, refers to the informal or nonformal sector of the economy.) Section 1 explains the role of the International Project on Technical and Vocational Education (UNEVOC) in the development of…

  18. 75 FR 18252 - Culturally Significant Object Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Through African Eyes: The...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Object Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Through African Eyes: The European in... 15, 2003 , I hereby determine that the object to be included in the exhibition ``Through African...

  19. Estimation of Promotion, Repetition and Dropout Rates for Learners in South African Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uys, Daniël Wilhelm; Alant, Edward John Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A new procedure for estimating promotion, repetition and dropout rates for learners in South African schools is proposed. The procedure uses three different data sources: data from the South African General Household survey, data from the Education Management Information Systems, and data from yearly reports published by the Department of Basic…

  20. Food Serving Size Knowledge in African American Women and the Relationship with Body Mass Index

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Meena; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Elston, Elizabeth; Hubbard, Stacy; Carson, Kristin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine serving size knowledge in African Americans and how it is related to body mass index (BMI). Design: Serving size knowledge of food commonly consumed by African Americans was assessed by asking the subjects to select the amount of food considered to be a single serving size by the United States Department of Agriculture and…

  1. 75 FR 9423 - Agency Information Collection Activities: African Growth and Opportunity Act Certificate of Origin

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ... Opportunity Act Certificate of Origin AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Department of Homeland... requirement concerning the African Growth and Opportunity Act Certificate of Origin (AGOA). This request for...: Title: African Growth and Opportunity Act Certificate of Origin. OMB Number: 1651-0082. Form...

  2. Embracing the Village and Tribe: Critical Thinking for Social Workers from an African-Centered Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyson, Yarneccia D.; Brice, Tanya Smith

    2016-01-01

    The social work department at a small historically Black college implemented an African-centered approach to the course Critical Thinking for Social Workers for freshmen students who declared social work as their major. We firmly believe that knowing and understanding the history and legacy of people of African descent is extremely important in…

  3. Social Movement Tactics, Organizational Change and the Spread of African-American Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojas, Fabio

    2006-01-01

    Social movement research suggests that protest is effective because it de-legitimizes existing policies and imposes costs on power holders. The author tests this hypothesis with data on African-American student protest and the creation of departments of African-American Studies. The author finds that nondisruptive protest, such as rallies and…

  4. Sun protection behaviors among African Americans.

    PubMed

    Hall, H I; Rogers, J D

    1999-01-01

    The anatomic distribution of some skin cancers suggests that sun exposure may be an etiologic factor for skin cancer among African Americans. Yet little is known about sun protection behaviors among African Americans. We analyzed data from the 1992 National Health Interview Survey (N = 1,583) to determine the prevalence of sun protection behaviors and sun sensitivity. About 6% of African Americans reported being extremely sensitive to the sun and severe sunburning, and 9% reported mild burns. Overall, 53% of respondents (47% of men and 57% of women) reported that they were very likely to wear protective clothing, seek shade, or use sunscreen lotion. Women were more likely than men to report seeking shade and using sunscreen. Sun protection behaviors were more frequently reported by those who sunburn more easily and were positively associated with age. Use of sunscreen was positively associated with income and education. Education about sun protection and early detection may help reduce the morbidity and mortality of skin cancer among African Americans.

  5. Art exhibit focuses on African astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-07-01

    Connections between Africans and astronomy are the focus of a new exhibition in the National Museum of African Art in Washington, D. C. "African Cosmos: Stellar Arts," which includes artwork, cultural items, and scientific displays from ancient to contemporary times, is the first major exhibit "that brings together arts and science focused on Africa's contribution to keen observations of the heavens over time," curator Christine Mullen Kreamer said at a 20 June news briefing. Among the exhibit's nearly 100 objects are an ancient Egyptian mummy board that includes a representation of the sky goddess Nut, sculptures by the Dogon people of Mali depicting figures in relation to the cosmos, a video that uses data from two square degrees of the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Evolution Survey, and a nearly floor-to-ceiling "Rainbow Serpent" constructed of plastic containers by Benin artist Hazoume. An untitled acrylic painting (Figure 1) by South African Gavin Jantjes evokes a myth of the Khoi San people of southern Africa, as it portrays a girl throwing evening fire embers into the night sky, where they remained as the Milky Way.

  6. Risk factors for recurrent nerve palsy after thyroid surgery: a national study of patients treated at Danish departments of ENT Head and Neck Surgery.

    PubMed

    Godballe, Christian; Madsen, Anders Rørbæk; Sørensen, Christian Hjort; Schytte, Sten; Trolle, Waldemar; Helweg-Larsen, Jens; Barfoed, Lisa; Kristiansen, Larry; Sørensen, Vibeke Zederkof; Samuelsen, Grethe; Pedersen, Henrik Baymler

    2014-08-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury is a well-known and serious complication to thyroid surgery. The objective was to estimate the frequency of post-thyroidectomy RLN palsy and to identify possible risk factors. Based on the Danish national thyroid surgery database, 6,859 patients treated with thyroid surgery from 1 January 2001 to the 31 December 2008 at the Danish departments of ENT-HNS were analyzed. Unilateral RLN palsy was found in 2.1 % and bilateral in 0.1 %. In benign histology, RLN palsies were registered in 1.3 %. Malignant histology and accordingly neck dissection were the most predominant risk factors with a relative risk (RR) of 5.4 and 5.8, respectively. In benign cases previous performed thyroid surgery had a RR of 10.4. High volume departments with more than 150 thyroid procedures per year seem to perform significantly better. Malignant histology, neck dissection and previous performed thyroid surgery are the strongest predictors for RLN palsy and patient information should be given accordingly. Incomplete resections should be reserved for isthmectomy only. Centralization of thyroid surgery in larger units might improve quality. PMID:24132654

  7. English as an African Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desai, Gaurav

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the role of the English language in postcolonial African literature, focusing on the politics of language, "Africanized" English, and the social languages used in Chinua Achebe's novels and concludes that English today is as much an African language as a British or American one. (Contains 37 references.) (MDM)

  8. The Struggles over African Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maseko, Pam; Vale, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In this interview, African Language expert Pam Maseko speaks of her own background and her first encounter with culture outside of her mother tongue, isiXhosa. A statistical breakdown of South African languages is provided as background. She discusses Western (originally missionary) codification of African languages and suggests that this approach…

  9. Performance and Passing Rate Differences of African American and White Prospective Teachers on Praxis[TM] Examinations: A Joint Project of the National Education Association (NEA) and Educational Testing Service (ETS). Research Report. ETS RR-11-08

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nettles, Michael T.; Scatton, Linda H.; Steinberg, Jonathan H.; Tyler, Linda L.

    2011-01-01

    This report focuses on two aspects of teacher supply and quality: (a) the under-representation of racial/ethnic minorities, especially African Americans in the teaching pool, and (b) teacher candidates' performance on licensure assessments, including general skills tests in reading, writing, and mathematics (known as Praxis I[R]) and selected…

  10. The Genetic Structure and History of Africans and African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Tishkoff, Sarah A.; Reed, Floyd A.; Friedlaender, Françoise R.; Ehret, Christopher; Ranciaro, Alessia; Froment, Alain; Hirbo, Jibril B.; Awomoyi, Agnes A.; Bodo, Jean-Marie; Doumbo, Ogobara; Ibrahim, Muntaser; Juma, Abdalla T.; Kotze, Maritha J.; Lema, Godfrey; Moore, Jason H.; Mortensen, Holly; Nyambo, Thomas B.; Omar, Sabah A.; Powell, Kweli; Pretorius, Gideon S.; Smith, Michael W.; Thera, Mahamadou A.; Wambebe, Charles; Weber, James L.; Williams, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    Africa is the source of all modern humans, but characterization of genetic variation and of relationships among populations across the continent has been enigmatic. We studied 121 African populations, four African American populations, and 60 non-African populations for patterns of variation at 1327 nuclear microsatellite and insertion/deletion markers. We identified 14 ancestral population clusters in Africa that correlate with self-described ethnicity and shared cultural and/or linguistic properties. We observed high levels of mixed ancestry in most populations, reflecting historical migration events across the continent. Our data also provide evidence for shared ancestry among geographically diverse hunter-gatherer populations (Khoesan speakers and Pygmies). The ancestry of African Americans is predominantly from Niger-Kordofanian (~71%), European (~13%), and other African (~8%) populations, although admixture levels varied considerably among individuals. This study helps tease apart the complex evolutionary history of Africans and African Americans, aiding both anthropological and genetic epidemiologic studies. PMID:19407144

  11. KSC kicks off African-American History Month

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Mack McKinney, chief, program resources management at NASA and chairperson for African-American History Month, presents a plaque to Bhetty Waldron at the kick-off ceremony of African-American History Month on Feb. 3 at the NASA Training Auditorium. The award was given in thanks for Waldron's portrayal of Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune and Zora Neal Hurston during the ceremony. The theme for this year's observation is 'Heritage and Horizons: The African-American Legacy and the Challenges of the 21st Century.' February is designated each year as a time to celebrate the achievements and contributions of African Americans to Kennedy Space Center, NASA and the nation.

  12. Training African-American residents in the 20th century.

    PubMed

    Green-McKenzie, Judith

    2004-03-01

    Bellevue Hospital, the oldest public hospital in the United States and a lineal descendant of an infirmary for slaves, accepted its first African-American resident, Dr. Ubert Conrad Vincent, in 1918. This occurred at a time when many medical centers were not accepting African-American residents. At the end of WWII, one-third of the accredited medical schools still barred African Americans. However, Bellevue Hospital continued to train African-American residents. Between the 1920s and 1940s four African Americans matriculated at Bellevue Hospital. There were six in the 1950s, four in the 1960s, and 25 in the 1970s. By the 1980s, 40 African Americans matriculated, and between 1990 and 1995, 61 matriculated. Despite its historic first, Bellevue lagged slightly behind the national average. While the number of African-American residents occupying U.S. residency slots increased from 2.8% in 1978 to 6.5% in 1996, African Americans comprised 3.6% of residency slots at Bellevue between 1985-1995. Currently, only 7% of practicing physicians and 5% in faculty positions are latino, African-American, and Native American. Increasing the number of under-represented minority (URM) physicians is important to the United States, as URM physicians are more likely to serve the poor and uninsured, therefore improving the overall healthcare of the underprivileged. A study by the Association of American Medical Colleges indicated that minority medical school graduates were five times more likely to report that they planned to serve minority populations than other graduates. In their position paper, the American College of Physicians expressed the belief that increasing the number of URM physicians will help reduce healthcare disparities that can hurt minority populations and lead to poor health outcomes. The Supreme Court acknowledged the importance of racial diversity by upholding the University of Michigan affirmative action admissions policy in its June 2003 ruling. URM physicians are

  13. High-Achieving, Low Socioeconomic Status African-American Males: A Comparative Perspective of Students at Three Urban High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randle, James P.

    2012-01-01

    A recent study by the Council of the Great City Schools reports that "the nation's young African-American males are in a state of crisis" and describes the situation as "a national catastrophe" (Lewis, Simon, Uzzell, Horwitz, & Casserly, 2010; Herbert, 2010). The report indicates that African-American males still lag…

  14. The Other African Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matory, J. Lorand

    Black North America is ethnically and culturally diverse. It contains many groups who do not call themselves or have not always called themselves "Negro,""Black,""African-American," and so forth, such as Louisiana Creoles of color and many of the Indian tribes east of the Mississippi. There are also numerous North American ethnic groups of African…

  15. African Oral Tradition Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Doris

    1985-01-01

    Presents the basic principles of two systems for notating African music and dance: Labanotation (created to record and analyze movements) and Greenotation (created to notate musical instruments of Africa and to parallel Labanotation whereby both music and dance are incorporated into one integrated score). (KH)

  16. Elective: African Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Kenneth V.

    The make-up of a course in African literature for high school students is discussed. It is pointed out that the course can be constructed on already familiar lines. High school students will be able to describe clearly, for example, the relationship between environment and character or the dilemma of characters caught between traditional values…

  17. Indigenous African Knowledge Systems and Innovation in Higher Education in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgs, P.; Higgs, L. G.; Venter, E.

    2003-01-01

    The importance of innovation in higher education is recognised in South African educational discourse. The South African White Paper on Science and Technology, issued in September 1996 and entitled, "Preparing for the 21st Century", states that, "the White Paper is built upon the twin concepts of "innovation" and a "national system of innovation"…

  18. Ideological Alchemy: The Transmutation of South African Didactics (and Fundamental Pedagogics) into "Apartheid Education"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yonge, George D.

    2008-01-01

    In his response to Kruger, Le Grange claims that: (1) the South African discourse of fundamental pedagogics was closely allied with Christian National Education and functioned as a powerful educational doctrine in the service of the South African policy of apartheid education; (2) fundamental pedagogics bracketed political discourse; (3) the…

  19. Teachers' Exodus in South African Schools: A Smoke with Burning Fire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumadi, Mutendwahothe Walter

    2008-01-01

    African teachers in general and South Africans in particular face tremendous challenges, several of which are curriculum related. These challenges manifest themselves at various levels and in various areas, that is, from national level to within the classroom. There are various role players who may make a contribution towards overcoming these…

  20. The HIV/AIDS Epidemic in African American Communities: Lessons from UNAIDS and Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okigbo, Charles; Okigbo, Carol A.; Hall, William B., Jr.; Ziegler, Dhyana

    2002-01-01

    Both African states and African American communities can benefit from a new communication framework that the United Nations Global AIDS Program and the Pennsylvania State University developed to combat the HIV/AIDS pandemic. The framework contains five universal values recommended for AIDS intervention programs worldwide (government policies,…

  1. Accounting for the Attrition of African American Males in an Academic Support Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancia, Ronald R.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation addresses a continuing crisis in our nation's education system. Historically African American students have underperformed academically. This achievement gap is particularly pronounced for African American males. AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination), an academic support program for underachieving students, most…

  2. Research on Migration in Africa: Past, Present, and Future, African Rural Employment Paper No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byerlee, Derek

    African nations have been experiencing rapid rates of urbanization accompanied by serious problems of urban unemployment due to the rate of rural-urban migration and the lack of an adequate understanding of the migration process for economic policy formulation. The aim of this paper was to review the present knowledge of African rural-urban…

  3. Suicide Ideation and Psychosocial Distress in Sub-Saharan African Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Randy M.; West, Joshua H.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To determine if there is an association between psychosocial distress, health-risk behaviors and 12-month suicidal ideation among sub-Saharan African adolescents. Methods: Subjects included a cross-national sample of adolescents (N25,568) representing 7 African countries who completed the Global School-based Student Health Survey…

  4. The South African English Language Scene within a (Global) Holographic Triadic Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Rosemary

    2008-01-01

    The main focus of this paper is on the triangulated work of the 1996 South African Constitution, the Pan South African Language Board (PanSALB), and one of the latter's eleven language subsidiaries: the English National Language Body (ENLB), with special reference to the ENLB's likewise triadic projects on literature; on variation and…

  5. African ancestry protects against Alzheimer's disease-related neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, D; Grinberg, L T; Alba, J G; Naslavsky, M S; Licinio, L; Farfel, J M; Suemoto, C K; de Lucena Ferretti, R E; Leite, R E P; de Andrade, M P; dos Santos, A C F; Brentani, H; Pasqualucci, C A; Nitrini, R; Jacob-Filho, W; Zatz, M

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies in dementia epidemiology have reported higher Alzheimer's disease rates in African-Americans when compared with White Americans. To determine whether genetically determined African ancestry is associated with neuropathological changes commonly associated with dementia, we analyzed a population-based brain bank in the highly admixed city of São Paulo, Brazil. African ancestry was estimated through the use of previously described ancestry-informative markers. Risk of presence of neuritic plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, small vessel disease, brain infarcts and Lewy bodies in subjects with significant African ancestry versus those without was determined. Results were adjusted for multiple environmental risk factors, demographic variables and apolipoprotein E genotype. African ancestry was inversely correlated with neuritic plaques (P=0.03). Subjects with significant African ancestry (n=112, 55.4%) showed lower prevalence of neuritic plaques in the univariate analysis (odds ratio (OR) 0.72, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.55-0.95, P=0.01) and when adjusted for age, sex, APOE genotype and environmental risk factors (OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.21-0.89, P=0.02). There were no significant differences for the presence of other neuropathological alterations. We show for the first time, using genetically determined ancestry, that African ancestry may be highly protective of Alzheimer's disease neuropathology, functioning through either genetic variants or unknown environmental factors. Epidemiological studies correlating African-American race/ethnicity with increased Alzheimer's disease rates should not be interpreted as surrogates of genetic ancestry or considered to represent African-derived populations from the developing nations such as Brazil.

  6. 77 FR 23318 - Culturally Significant Object Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “African Cosmos: Stellar Arts”

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Object Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``African Cosmos: Stellar Arts... Cosmos: Stellar Arts,'' imported from abroad for temporary exhibition within the United States, is...

  7. In Order to Teach Me, You Have to Know Me: A Mixed-Methods Study of African-American Male Classroom Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Jack L.

    2013-01-01

    Nationally, 30% of high school students do not graduate. Among this percentage, 50% are African-American. This study focused on at-promise African-American male classroom engagement where the researcher employed a mixed-methods methodology. Findings reveal that in order to engage and keep at-promise African-American males in high school, educators…

  8. When "Prof" Speaks, Who Listens? The African Elite and the Use of African Languages for Education and Development in African Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trudell, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    The role of African languages in formal and nonformal learning is the subject of increasing local, national and international interests. Cognitive and pedagogical reasons abound for using the language best understood by the learner. However, many nonpedagogical factors related to politics, economics, language attitudes and colonial history are…

  9. Young Africans Tackle Their Continent's Environmental Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olwoch, Jane Mukarugwiza

    2008-11-01

    Young African Scientists Session at the Fourth International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme Congress; Cape Town, South Africa, 7 May 2008; Africa is often described as a unique and diverse continent. This is reflected in its biodiversity, economic and social circumstances, and diversity in culture and environment. The Young African Scientists (YAS) session at the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme Congress was one of the congress's highlights. Global environmental change research in Africa was presented to an audience that included visiting international and national scientists, policy makers, and a group of schoolchildren. From the uniqueness of Africa's paleoclimate to the diversity and complexity of current and future impacts of environmental change on Africa, the session not only provided an overview of current projects but also highlighted the problems that are intertwined with poverty. This session was sponsored by the Global Change System for Analysis, Research, and Training (START).

  10. A Descriptive Report of Academic Departments in Higher Education Institutions. 1988 National Survey of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF-88). Contractor Report. Survey Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Susan H.; And Others

    The report examines university department-level policies regarding faculty hiring, promotions, and benefits. After an introduction, four sections provide information on: (1) faculty composition in departments of instruction (number of faculty per department, percentage of departments with faculty of various types, joint appointments, and teaching…

  11. A decade of experience with renal transplantation in African-Americans.

    PubMed

    Foster, Clarence E; Philosophe, Benjamin; Schweitzer, Eugene J; Colonna, John O; Farney, Alan C; Jarrell, Bruce; Anderson, Leslie; Bartlett, Stephen T

    2002-12-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the strategies instituted by the authors' center to decrease the time to transplantation and increase the rate of transplantation for African-Americans, consisting of a formal education program concerning the benefits of living organ donation that is oriented to minorities; a laparoscopic living donation program; use of hepatitis C-positive donors in documented positive recipients; and encouraging vaccination for hepatitis B, allowing the use of hepatitis B core Ab-positive donors. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA The national shortage of suitable kidney donor organs has disproportional and adverse effects on African-Americans for several reasons. Type II diabetes mellitus and hypertension, major etiologic factors for end-stage renal disease, are more prevalent in African-Americans than in the general population. Once kidney failure has developed, African-Americans are disadvantaged for the following reasons: this patient cohort has longer median waiting times on the renal transplant list; African-Americans have higher rates of acute rejection, which affects long-term allograft survival; and once they are transplanted, the long-term graft survival rates are lower in this population than in other groups. METHODS From March 1990 to November 2001 the authors' center performed 2,167 renal transplants; 944 were in African-Americans (663 primary cadaver renal transplants and 253 primary Living donor renal transplants). The retransplants consisted of 83 cadaver transplants and 17 living donor transplants. Outcome measures of this retrospective analysis included median waiting time, graft and patient survival rates, and the rate of living donation in African-Americans and comparable non-African-Americans. Where applicable, data are compared to United Network for Organ Sharing national statistics. Statistical analysis employed appropriate SPSS applications. RESULTS One- and 5-year patient survival rates for living donor kidneys were 97.1% and 91.3% for non-African

  12. In Our Own Eyes: A New Look at African History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsodzo, Thompson Kumbirai

    1997-01-01

    An informal survey of textbooks used since 1982 in undergraduate classes in the University of Zimbabwe history department shows that only 8% were written by Africans. Relying on records made by foreigners pursuing colonial objectives, European historians view early Africa as a dark place of illiteracy, disease, famine, witchcraft, and cannibalism.…

  13. Creating a Learning Climate: A South African Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrim, Nasima Mohamed Hoosen; Basson, Johan Schutte

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to ascertain whether there were differences in how one public and two private South African organizations created a learning climate. Design/methodology/approach: This article is based on a survey and comparative analysis of specific departments in a chemical and gas company, an insurance company, and a…

  14. African American Male College Athletes' Narratives on Education and Racism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, John N.

    2016-01-01

    This study presents narrative case study vignettes of three elite African American male football athletes at a major historically White institution of higher education with a big-time athletics department. More specifically, I draw from critical race theory to garner insight into their secondary schooling background, what education means to them,…

  15. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity: the Department of Alcohol, Drugs and Addiction at the National Institute for Health and Welfare in Finland: diverse problems, diverse perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hakkarainen, Pekka; Kiianmaa, Kalervo; Kuoppasalmi, Kimmo; Tigerstedt, Christoffer

    2012-10-01

    The Department of Alcohol, Drugs and Addiction started operations on 1 January 2009, when the National Institute of Public Health (KTL) and the National Research and Development Centre for Welfare and Health (STAKES) were merged. The newly formed institute, called the National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), operates under the Finnish Ministry of Social Affairs and Health. The scope of the research and preventive work conducted in the Department covers alcohol, drugs, tobacco and gambling issues. The two main tasks of the Department are (i) to research, produce and disseminate information on alcohol and drugs, substance use, addictions and their social and health-related effects and (ii) to develop prevention and good practices with a view to counteracting the onset and development of alcohol and drug problems and the damaging effects of smoking and other addictions. The number of staff hovers at approximately 60 people. The Department is organized into three units, one specialized in social sciences (the Alcohol and Drug Research Unit), another in laboratory analytics (the Alcohol and Drug Analytics Unit) and the third primarily in preventive work (the Addiction Prevention Unit). These units incorporate a rich variety and long traditions of both research and preventive work. The mixture of different disciplines creates good opportunities for interdisciplinary research projects and collaboration within the Department. Also, the fact that in the same administrative context there are both researchers and people specialized in preventive work opens up interesting possibilities for combining efforts from these two branches. Nationally, the Department is a key player in all its fields of interest. It engages in a great deal of cooperation both nationally and internationally, and among its strengths are the high-quality, regularly collected long-term data sets.

  16. Environmental Compliance Guide. Guidance manual for Department of Energy compliance with the Clean Water Act: National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-07-01

    This manual provides general guidance for Department of Energy (DOE) officials for complying with Sect. 402 of the Clean Water Act (CWA) of 1977 and amendments. Section 402 authorizes the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) or states with EPA approved programs to issue National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits for the direct discharge of waste from a point source into waters of the United States. Although the nature of a project dictates the exact information requirements, every project has similar information requirements on the environmental setting, type of discharge(s), characterization of effluent, and description of operations and wastewater treatment. Additional information requirements for projects with ocean discharges, thermal discharges, and cooling water intakes are discussed. Guidance is provided in this manual on general methods for collecting, analyzing, and presenting information for an NPDES permit application. The NPDES program interacts with many sections of the CWA; therefore, background material on pertinent areas such as effluent limitations, water quality standards, toxic substances, and nonpoint source pollutants is included in this manual. Modifications, variances, and extensions applicable to NPDES permits are also discussed.

  17. Assessing the Burden of Diabetes Mellitus in Emergency Departments in the United States: The National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS)

    PubMed Central

    Asao, Keiko; Kaminski, James; McEwen, Laura N.; Wu, Xiejian; Lee, Joyce M.; Herman, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the performance of three alternative methods to identify diabetes in patients visiting Emergency Departments (EDs), and to describe the characteristics of patients with diabetes who are not identified when the alternative methods are used. Research Design and Methods We used data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) 2009 and 2010. We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of using providers’ diagnoses and diabetes medications (both excluding and including biguanides) to identify diabetes compared to using the checkbox for diabetes as the gold standard. We examined the characteristics of patients whose diabetes was missed using multivariate Poisson regression models. Results The checkbox identified 5,567 ED visits by adult patients with diabetes. Compared to the checkbox, the sensitivity was 12.5% for providers’ diagnoses alone, 20.5% for providers’ diagnoses and diabetes medications excluding biguanides, and 21.5% for providers’ diagnoses and diabetes medications including biguanides. The specificity of all three of the alternative methods was >99%. Older patients were more likely to have diabetes not identified. Patients with self-payment, those who had glucose measured or received IV fluids in the ED, and those with more diagnosis codes and medications, were more likely to have diabetes identified. Conclusions NHAMCS's providers’ diagnosis codes and medication lists do not identify the majority of patients with diabetes visiting EDs. The newly introduced checkbox is helpful in measuring ED resource utilization by patients with diabetes. PMID:24680472

  18. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Monitoring Optimization Plan For Groundwater Monitoring Wells At The U.S. Department Of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-09-01

    This document is the monitoring optimization plan for groundwater monitoring wells associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The plan describes the technical approach that is implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) to focus available resources on the monitoring wells at Y-12 that provide the most useful hydrologic and groundwater quality monitoring data. The technical approach is based on the GWPP status designation for each well. Under this approach, wells granted "active" status are used by the GWPP for hydrologic monitoring and/or groundwater quality sampling, whereas wells granted "inactive" status are not used for either purpose. The status designation also defines the frequency at which the GWPP will inspect applicable wells, the scope of these well inspections, and extent of any maintenance actions initiated by the GWPP. Details regarding the ancillary activities associated with implementation of this plan (e.g., well inspection) are deferred to the referenced GWPP plans. This plan applies to groundwater wells associated with Y-12 and related waste management areas and facilities located within three hydrogeologic regimes.

  19. Changes of crop rotation in Iowa determined from the United States Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service cropland data layer product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Alan J.; Doraiswamy, Paul C.; Raymond Hunt, E.

    2012-01-01

    Crop rotation is one of the important decisions made independently by numerous farm managers, and is a critical variable in models of crop growth and soil carbon. In Iowa and much of the Midwestern United States (US), the typical management decision is to rotate corn and soybean crops for a single field; therefore, the land-cover changes each year even though the total area of agricultural land-use remains the same. The price for corn increased from 2001 to 2010, which increased corn production in Iowa. We tested the hypothesis that the production increase was the result of changes in crop rotation in Iowa using the annual remote sensing classification (the cropland data layer) produced by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service. It was found that the area planted in corn increased from 4.7 million hectares in 2001 to 5.7 million hectares in 2007, which was correlated with the market price for corn. At the county level, there were differences in how the increase in corn production was accomplished. Northern and central counties had little land to expand cultivation and generally increased corn production by converting to a corn-corn rotation from the standard corn-soybean rotation. Southern counties in Iowa increased corn production by expanding into land that was not under recent cultivation. These changes affect the amount of soil carbon sequestration.

  20. Waste management and technologies analytical database project for Los Alamos National Laboratory/Department of Energy. Final report, June 7, 1993--June 15, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-17

    The Waste Management and Technologies Analytical Database System (WMTADS) supported by the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Technology Development (EM-50), was developed and based at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, New Mexico, to collect, identify, organize, track, update, and maintain information related to existing/available/developing and planned technologies to characterize, treat, and handle mixed, hazardous and radioactive waste for storage and disposal in support of EM strategies and goals and to focus area projects. WMTADS was developed as a centralized source of on-line information regarding technologies for environmental management processes that can be accessed by a computer, modem, phone line, and communications software through a Local Area Network (LAN), and server connectivity on the Internet, the world`s largest computer network, and with file transfer protocol (FTP) can also be used to globally transfer files from the server to the user`s computer through Internet and World Wide Web (WWW) using Mosaic.

  1. Calendar Year 2000 Groundwater Monitoring Report for the Groundwater Protection Program, U.S. Department of Energy, Y-12 National Security Complex Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    2001-03-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, during calendar year (CY) 2000. These monitoring data were collected for the specific purposes of DOE Order 5400.1 site surveillance monitoring and exit pathway/perimeter monitoring, as described in the ''Environmental Monitoring Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation'' (DOE 1996). Site surveillance monitoring provides data regarding the quality of groundwater and surface water in areas that are, or could be, affected by operations at Y-12. Exit pathway/perimeter monitoring provides data regarding the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants from Y-12 are most likely to migrate beyond the boundaries of the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The CY 2000 groundwater and surface water monitoring data presented in this report were obtained under the auspices of the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP), managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES) (January-October, 2000) and by BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (November-December, 2000), and the Water Resources Restoration Program (WRRP), which is managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC. Combining the monitoring results obtained under both the Y-12 GWPP and the WRRP enables this report to serve as a consolidated reference for the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained at Y-12 during CY 2000.

  2. Comparative Effectiveness Research Priorities at Federal Agencies: The View from the Department of Veterans Affairs, National Institute on Aging, and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

    PubMed Central

    O’Leary, Timothy J.; Slutsky, Jean R.; Bernard, Marie A.

    2010-01-01

    In the last year increased attention has been focused on translating federally sponsored health research into improved health for Americans. Since the passage of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) on February 17, 2009, this focus has been accelerated by ARRA funds to support Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER). A high proportion of topical areas of interest in CER affect the older segment of the population. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), the National Institute on Aging (NIA), and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) have supported robust research portfolios focused on aging populations that meet the varying definitions of CER. In this short paper we briefly describe the research missions of the AHRQ, NIA, and VA. We then review the various definitions of CER as put forward by the Congressional Budget Office, the Institute of Medicine, and the ARRA established Federal Coordinating Council; as well as important topics for which CER is particularly needed. Finally, we set forth approaches in which the three agencies support CER involving the aging population and outline opportunities for future CER research. PMID:20936736

  3. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory safeguards and security quarterly progress report to the U.S. Department of Energy. Quarter ending December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, G.; Mansur, D.L.; Ruhter, W.D.; Strauch, M.S.

    1997-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) carries out safeguards and security activities for the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Safeguards and Security (OSS), as well as other organizations, both within and outside the DOE. This document summarizes the activities conducted for the OSS during the First Quarter of Fiscal Year 1997 (October through December, 1996). The nature and scope of the activities carried out for OSS at LLNL require a broad base of technical expertise. To assure projects are staffed and executed effectively, projects are conducted by the organization at LLNL best able to supply the needed technical expertise. These projects are developed and managed by senior program managers. Institutional oversight and coordination is provided through the LLNL Deputy Director`s office. At present, the Laboratory is supporting OSS in four areas: (1) safeguards technology; (2) safeguards and material accountability; (3) computer security--distributed systems; and (4) physical and personnel security support. The remainder of this report describes the activities in each of these four areas. The information provided includes an introduction which briefly describes the activity, summary of major accomplishments, task descriptions with quarterly progress, summaries of milestones and deliverables and publications published this quarter.

  4. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory safeguards and security quarterly progress report to the US Department of Energy: Quarter ending September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhter, W.D.; Strait, R.S.; Mansur, D.L.; Davis, G.

    1993-10-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) carries out safeguards and security activities for the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Safeguards and Security (OSS), as well as other organizations, both within and outside the DOE. This document summarizes the activities conducted for the OSS during the fourth quarter of Fiscal Year 1993 (July through September, 1993). The nature and scope of the activities carried out for OSS at LLNL require a broad base of technical expertise. To assure projects are staffed and executed effectively, projects are conducted by the organization at LLNL best able to supply the needed technical expertise. These projects are developed and managed by senior program managers. Institutional oversight and coordination is provided through the LLNL Deputy Director`s office. At present, the Laboratory is supporting OSS in five areas: Safeguards Technology, Safeguard System Studies, Computer Security, DOE Automated Physical Security and DOE Automated Visitor Access Control System. The remainder of this report describes the activities in each of these five areas. The information provided includes an introduction which briefly describes the activity, summary of major accomplishments, task descriptions with quarterly progress, summaries of milestones and deliverables and publications published this quarter.

  5. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Safeguards and Security quarterly progress report to the US Department of Energy: Quarter ending December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, G.; Mansur, D.L.; Ruhter, W.D.; Steele, E.; Strait, R.S.

    1994-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) carries out safeguards and security activities for the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Safeguards and Security (OSS), as well as other organizations, both within and outside the DOE. This document summarizes the activities conducted for the OSS during the first quarter of fiscal year 1994 (October through December, 1993). The nature and scope of the activities carried out for OSS at LLNL require a broad base of technical expertise. To assure projects are staffed and executed effectively, projects are conducted by the organization at LLNL best able to supply the needed technical expertise. These projects are developed and managed by senior program managers. Institutional oversight and coordination is provided through the LLNL Deputy Director`s office. At present, the Laboratory is supporting OSS in five areas: (1) Safeguards Technology, (2) Safeguards and Decision Support, (3) Computer Security, (4) DOE Automated Physical Security, and (5) DOE Automated Visitor Access Control System. This report describes the activities in each of these five areas. The information provided includes an introduction which briefly describes the activity, summary of major accomplishments, task descriptions with quarterly progress, summaries of milestones and deliverables and publications published this quarter.

  6. Understanding traditional African healing

    PubMed Central

    MOKGOBI, M.G.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional African healing has been in existence for many centuries yet many people still seem not to understand how it relates to God and religion/spirituality. Some people seem to believe that traditional healers worship the ancestors and not God. It is therefore the aim of this paper to clarify this relationship by discussing a chain of communication between the worshipers and the Almighty God. Other aspects of traditional healing namely types of traditional healers, training of traditional healers as well as the role of traditional healers in their communities are discussed. In conclusion, the services of traditional healers go far beyond the uses of herbs for physical illnesses. Traditional healers serve many roles which include but not limited to custodians of the traditional African religion and customs, educators about culture, counselors, social workers and psychologists. PMID:26594664

  7. For People of African, Mediterranean, or Southeast Asian Heritage: Important Information about Diabetes Blood Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... p.m. eastern time, M-F For More Information American Diabetes Association National Heart, Lung, and Blood ... of African, Mediterranean, or Southeast Asian Heritage: Important Information about Diabetes Blood Tests Page Content On this ...

  8. Human African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Lejon, Veerle; Bentivoglio, Marina; Franco, José Ramon

    2013-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness is a neglected tropical disease that affects populations in sub-Saharan Africa. The disease is caused by infection with the gambiense and rhodesiense subspecies of the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei, and is transmitted to humans by bites of infected tsetse flies. The disease evolves in two stages, the hemolymphatic and meningoencephalitic stages, the latter being defined by central nervous system infection after trypanosomal traversal of the blood-brain barrier. African trypanosomiasis, which leads to severe neuroinflammation, is fatal without treatment, but the available drugs are toxic and complicated to administer. The choice of medication is determined by the infecting parasite subspecies and disease stage. Clinical features include a constellation of nonspecific symptoms and signs with evolving neurological and psychiatric alterations and characteristic sleep-wake disturbances. Because of the clinical profile variability and insidiously progressive central nervous system involvement, disease staging is currently based on cerebrospinal fluid examination, which is usually performed after the finding of trypanosomes in blood or other body fluids. No vaccine being available, control of human African trypanosomiasis relies on diagnosis and treatment of infected patients, assisted by vector control. Better diagnostic tools and safer, easy to use drugs are needed to facilitate elimination of the disease.

  9. Diversity among African Pygmies

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez Rozzi, Fernando V.; Sardi, Marina L.

    2010-01-01

    Although dissimilarities in cranial and post-cranial morphology among African pygmies groups have been recognized, comparative studies on skull morphology usually pull all pygmies together assuming that morphological characters are similar among them and different with respect to other populations. The main aim of this study is to compare cranial morphology between African pygmies and non-pygmies populations from Equatorial Africa derived from both the Eastern and the Western regions in order to test if the greatest morphological difference is obtained in the comparison between pygmies and non-pygmies. Thirty three-dimensional (3D) landmarks registered with Microscribe in four cranial samples (Western and Eastern pygmies and non-pygmies) were obtained. Multivariate analysis (generalized Procrustes analysis, Mahalanobis distances, multivariate regression) and complementary dimensions of size were evaluated with ANOVA and post hoc LSD. Results suggest that important cranial shape differentiation does occur between pygmies and non-pygmies but also between Eastern and Western populations and that size changes and allometries do not affect similarly Eastern and Western pygmies. Therefore, our findings raise serious doubt about the fact to consider African pygmies as a homogenous group in studies on skull morphology. Differences in cranial morphology among pygmies would suggest differentiation after divergence. Although not directly related to skull differentiation, the diversity among pygmies would probably suggest that the process responsible for reduced stature occurred after the split of the ancestors of modern Eastern and Western pygmies. PMID:21049030

  10. African horse sickness.

    PubMed

    Zientara, S; Weyer, C T; Lecollinet, S

    2015-08-01

    African horse sickness (AHS) is a devastating disease of equids caused by an arthropod-borne virus belonging to the Reoviridae family, genus Orbivirus. It is considered a major health threat for horses in endemic areas in sub-Saharan Africa. African horse sickness virus (AHSV) repeatedly caused large epizootics in the Mediterranean region (North Africa and southern Europe in particular) as a result of trade in infected equids. The unexpected emergence of a closely related virus, the bluetongue virus, in northern Europe in 2006 has raised fears about AHSV introduction into Europe, and more specifically into AHSV-free regions that have reported the presence of AHSV vectors, e.g. Culicoides midges. North African and European countries should be prepared to face AHSV incursions in the future, especially since two AHSV serotypes (serotypes 2 and 7) have recently spread northwards to western (e.g. Senegal, Nigeria, Gambia) and eastern Africa (Ethiopia), where historically only serotype 9 had been isolated. The authors review key elements of AHS epidemiology, surveillance and prophylaxis. PMID:26601437

  11. The South African fertility decline: Evidence from two censuses and a Demographic and Health Survey.

    PubMed

    Moultrie, Tom A; Timaeus, Ian M

    2003-11-01

    Inadequate data and apartheid policies have meant that, until recently, most demographers have not had the opportunity to investigate the level of, and trend in, the fertility of South African women. The 1996 South Africa Census and the 1998 Demographic and Health Survey provide the first widely available and nationally representative demographic data on South Africa since 1970. Using these data, this paper describes the South African fertility decline from 1955 to 1996. Having identified and adjusted for several errors in the 1996 Census data, the paper argues that total fertility at that time was 3.2 children per woman nationally, and 3.5 children per woman for African South Africans. These levels are lower than in any other sub-Saharan African country. We show also that fertility in South Africa has been falling since the 1960s. Thus, fertility transition predates the establishment of a family planning programme in the country in 1974.

  12. Race and Ethnic Differences in Religious Involvement: African Americans, Caribbean Blacks and Non-Hispanic Whites

    PubMed Central

    Chatters, Linda M.; Taylor, Robert Joseph; Bullard, Kai McKeever; Jackson, James S.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined differences in religious participation and spirituality among African Americans, Caribbean Blacks (Black Caribbeans) and non-Hispanic Whites. Data are taken from the National Survey of American Life, a nationally representative study of African Americans, Black Caribbeans and non-Hispanic Whites. Selected measures of organizational, nonorganizational and subjective religious participation were examined. African American and Caribbean Blacks were largely similar in their reports of religious involvement; both groups generally indicated higher levels of religious participation than non-Hispanic Whites. African Americans were more likely than Black Caribbeans to be official members of their places of worship, engage in activities (choirs, church clubs) at their place of worship and request prayer from others. Black Caribbeans reported reading religious materials more frequently than African Americans. The discussion notes the importance of examining ethnic differences within the black American population of the United States. PMID:20975850

  13. East African Rift Valley, Kenya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This rare, cloud free view of the East African Rift Valley, Kenya (1.5N, 35.5E) shows a clear view of the Turkwell River Valley, an offshoot of the African REift System. The East African Rift is part of a vast plate fracture which extends from southern Turkey, through the Red Sea, East Africa and into Mozambique. Dark green patches of forests are seen along the rift margin and tea plantations occupy the cooler higher ground.

  14. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs draft environmental impact statement. Volume 1, Appendix B: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report to assist its management in making two decisions. The first decision, which is programmatic, is to determine the management program for DOE spent nuclear fuel. The second decision is on the future direction of environmental restoration, waste management, and spent nuclear fuel management activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 1 of the EIS, which supports the programmatic decision, considers the effects of spent nuclear fuel management on the quality of the human and natural environment for planning years 1995 through 2035. DOE has derived the information and analysis results in Volume 1 from several site-specific appendixes. Volume 2 of the EIS, which supports the INEL-specific decision, describes environmental impacts for various environmental restoration, waste management, and spent nuclear fuel management alternatives for planning years 1995 through 2005. This Appendix B to Volume 1 considers the impacts on the INEL environment of the implementation of various DOE-wide spent nuclear fuel management alternatives. The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, which is a joint Navy/DOE program, is responsible for spent naval nuclear fuel examination at the INEL. For this appendix, naval fuel that has been examined at the Naval Reactors Facility and turned over to DOE for storage is termed naval-type fuel. This appendix evaluates the management of DOE spent nuclear fuel including naval-type fuel.

  15. 19 CFR 10.178a - Special duty-free treatment for sub-Saharan African countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... African countries. 10.178a Section 10.178a Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT... for sub-Saharan African countries. (a) General. Section 506A of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 2466a... designate a country listed in section 107 of the African Growth and Opportunity Act (19 U.S.C. 3706) as...

  16. Pre-Service Teachers' Reflections of South African Science Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, S. K.; Singh, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of outcomes-based education in South Africa placed many challenges on the transformation of science classrooms. The 2009 National Education Evaluation and Development Unit (NEEDU) Report concluded that South African rural and township schools are largely dysfunctional. This article examined some of the reasons for the "collapse"…

  17. Improving the Diets of African-Americans: Challenges and Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Delores C. S.

    1998-01-01

    Investigated African Americans' dietary patterns in light of national nutrition recommendations. Questionnaires and focus groups indicated that most respondents rated their diets good or excellent, but most had unhealthy eating habits. Most had recently tried to lower fat intake. Milk, whole grains, vegetables, and water were the most difficult…

  18. Welfare Systems and African-Americans: Historical Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Rosetta

    1975-01-01

    An historical discussion of the relationship of American welfare systems to African-Americans, stating that Europeans, primarily from England, reluctantly established meagre, inhumane welfare systems based on seventeenth century English philosophy and tradition for members of their own nationality group after more than two centuries of poverty in…

  19. Environmental Attitudes and Information Sources among African American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, E. Bun

    2008-01-01

    The author examined the environmental attitudes of African American college students by using the 15-item New Ecological Paradigm (NEP) Scale. The author also attempted to determine their everyday environmental behaviors such as recycling and conservation and investigated major information sources for local, national, and international…

  20. Appropriate Management in an African Culture: Implications for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duze, Chinelo O.

    2012-01-01

    Following continued search for reasons on the inability of African nations to realize appreciable economic development through education, the researcher investigated the influence of cultural environment on management in industry. Because input/output measures of productivity are not easily measured in education, the industry was used, hoping that…

  1. The Management of AIDS in South African Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oosthuizen, Izak

    According to the Third National Survey of South African women who attend prenatal clinics, 120,000 more persons are estimated to have become infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) since 1991. This paper compares the teacher-student relationship with that of the confidential doctor-patient relationship, and asks whether a teacher should…

  2. Social Support, Traumatic Events, and Depressive Symptoms among African Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, Karen D.; Chatters, Linda M.; Taylor, Robert Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Structural equation modeling was used to examine the relationships among stress, social support, negative interaction, and mental health in a sample of African American men and women between ages 18 and 54 (N = 591) from the National Comorbidity Study. The study findings indicated that social support decreased the number of depressive symptoms,…

  3. Improving Images of African-Americans in the Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martindale, Carolyn

    The news media are finally seeking ways to portray African-Americans and the nation's other minorities more accurately. Media executives are realizing that within the next several decades the audience for the media and the pool of potential media employees will be increasingly multi-ethnic. To make reporting more accurate, newspapers must include…

  4. Malaria protection measures used by in-flight travelers to South African game parks.

    PubMed

    Waner, S; Durrhiem, D; Braack, L E; Gammon, S

    1999-12-01

    Malaria prevention in travelers depends upon dissemination of accurate information about malaria risk, prevention of mosquito bites, appropriate chemoprophylaxis use and knowledge of the symptoms of malaria. A study was undertaken of travelers to the Kruger National Park and private game parks in Mpumalanga Province, South Africa to investigate travelers knowledge, of malaria, chemoprophylaxis use, and experience of adverse events. In-flight self administered questionnaires were distributed and completed by travelers on flights returning to Johannesburg International Airport, from the malaria areas. The study was conducted during the highest malaria risk period during 1996. The Mpumalanga game parks are those most visited in South Africa and are found in the extreme northeast of the country, which adjoins Mozambique in the east and Zimbabwe in the north. This area is classified by the South African health authorities as being a high risk Malaria area.10 Chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria has been described in this area.2,3 The Department of Health in South Africa recommends the use of mefloquine alone or the combination of chloroquine and proguanil, (doxycycline is prescribed for travelers in which the former antimalarials cannot be utilized), for visitors to this area during the high risk period for malaria, which extends from October to May.4 For the remainder of the year mosquito avoidance measures are recommended. Little is known about travelers' compliance with these recommendations and their knowledge of malaria. A study to explore these factors was undertaken as a joint initiative between the SAIMR travel clinic, Mpumalanga Department of Health, and the South African National Parks.

  5. Reconsolidation of Crushed Salt to 250°C Under Hydrostatic and Shear Stress Conditions Scott Broome, Frank Hansen, and SJ Bauer Sandia National Laboratories, Geomechanics Department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broome, S. T.

    2012-12-01

    . At predetermined differential stress levels the stress is held constant and the salt consolidates. Displacement gages mounted on the samples show little lateral deformation until the samples reach a porosity of ~10%. Interestingly, vapor is vented in tests at 250°C and condenses at the vent port. Release of water is not observed in the lower two test temperatures. It is hypothesized that the water originates from fluid inclusions, which were made accessible by intragranular deformational processes including decrepitation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. A Teacher's Guide to African Narratives. Studies in African Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Sara Talis

    This guide is designed to help secondary school teachers include African literature in their classes. It furnishes English and social studies teachers with a foundation for teaching African literature by offering critical commentary on the texts themselves. A synthesis of anthropological and historical material is presented to help both teachers…

  7. Assessment of the Status of African-Americans. Volume V: Health and Medical Care of African-Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Wornie L.; Darity, William, Sr.; Roman, Stanford; Baquet, Claudia; Roberson, Norma L.

    In 1987 a project was undertaken to assess the status of African Americans in the United States in the topical areas to be addressed by the National Research Council's Study Committee on the Status of Black Americans: education, employment, income and occupations, political participation and the administration of justice, social and cultural…

  8. Soil Sampling to Demonstrate Compliance with Department of Energy Radiological Clearance Requirements for the ALE Unit of the Hanford Reach National Monument

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, Brad G.; Dirkes, Roger L.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2007-04-01

    The Hanford Reach National Monument consists of several units, one of which is the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE) Unit. This unit is approximately 311 km2 of shrub-steppe habitat located to the south and west of Highway 240. To fulfill internal U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements prior to any radiological clearance of land, DOE must evaluate the potential for residual radioactive contamination on this land and determine compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5400.5. Historical soil monitoring conducted on ALE indicated soil concentrations of radionuclides were well below the Authorized Limits. However, the historical sampling was done at a limited number of sampling locations. Therefore, additional soil sampling was conducted to determine if the concentrations of radionuclides in soil on the ALE Unit were below the Authorized Limits. This report contains the results of 50 additional soil samples. The 50 soil samples collected from the ALE Unit all had concentrations of radionuclides far below the Authorized Limits. The average concentrations for all detectable radionuclides were less than the estimated Hanford Site background. Furthermore, the maximum observed soil concentrations for the radionuclides included in the Authorized Limits would result in a potential annual dose of 0.14 mrem assuming the most probable use scenario, a recreational visitor. This potential dose is well below the DOE 100-mrem per year dose limit for a member of the public. Spatial analysis of the results indicated no observable statistically significant differences between radionuclide concentrations across the ALE Unit. Furthermore, the results of the biota dose assessment screen, which used the ResRad Biota code, indicated that the concentrations of radionuclides in ALE Unit soil pose no significant health risk to biota.

  9. Prescription of Opioid and Non-opioid Analgesics for Dental Care in Emergency Departments: Findings from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

    PubMed Central

    Okunseri, Christopher; Okunseri, Elaye; Xiang, Qun; Thorpe, Joshua M.; Szabo, Aniko

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to examine trends and associated factors in the prescription of opioid analgesics, non-opioid analgesics, opioid and non-opioid analgesic combinations and no analgesics by emergency physicians for nontraumatic dental condition (NTDC)-related visits. Our secondary aim was to investigate whether race/ethnicity is a possible predictor of receiving a prescription for either type of medication for NTDC visits in emergency departments (EDs) after adjustment for potential covariates. Methods We analyzed data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey for 1997–2000 and 2003–2007, and used multinomial multivariate logistic regression to estimate the probability of receiving a prescription for opioid analgesics, non-opioid analgesics, or a combination of both compared to receiving no analgesics for NTDC-related visits. Results During 1997–2000 and 2003–2007, prescription of opioid analgesics and combinations of opioid and non-opioid analgesics increased and that of no analgesics decreased over time. The prescription rates for opioid analgesics, non-opioid analgesics, opioid and non-opioid analgesic combinations and no analgesics for NTDC-related visits in EDs were 43%, 20%, 12% and 25% respectively. Majority of patients categorized as having severe pain received prescriptions for opioids for NTDC-related visits in EDs. After adjusting for covariates, patients with self-reported dental reasons for visit and severe pain had a significantly higher probability of receiving prescriptions for opioid analgesics and opioid and non-opioid analgesic combinations. Conclusion Prescription of opioid analgesics increased over time. ED physicians were more likely to prescribe opioid analgesics and opioid and non-opioid analgesic combinations for NTDC-related visits with reported severe pain. PMID:24863407

  10. Relationships among moral distress, level of practice independence, and intent to leave of nurse practitioners in emergency departments: results from a national survey.

    PubMed

    Trautmann, Jennifer; Epstein, Elizabeth; Rovnyak, Virginia; Snyder, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this research study were to investigate moral distress among emergency department (ED) nurse practitioners (NPs) and examine relationships between moral distress and level of practice independence as well as intent to leave a position. Moral distress has been studied regarding registered nurses and physicians (MDs) but less so in NPs. It is important to explore moral distress in NPs because they tread a unique path between nursing and physician roles. Moral distress may play a significant role in staff nurses' intention to leave practice, and level of practice independence is found to have a relationship with NPs' intention to leave. A convenience sample of ED NPs was obtained from a mailing list of a national nursing specialty organization, the Emergency Nurses Association. Using a correlational design, survey methods assessed moral distress with the Moral Distress Scale-Revised (MDS-R), level of practice independence with the Dempster Practice Behavior Scale, and intent to leave with self-report. Correlational and regression analyses of data were conducted to characterize moral distress among ED NPs and associations between moral distress, level of practice independence, and intent to leave. Results found ED NPs do experience moral distress with poor patient care results from inadequate staff communication and working with incompetent coworkers in their practice. The MDS-R was a significant predictor of intention to leave among respondents. This study is the first of its kind to explore moral distress in ED NPs. Results suggest moral distress influences ED NPs' intent to leave their position. Further studies are needed to explore the findings from this research and to formulate interventions to alleviate moral distress in ED NPs and improve retention in the clinical setting.

  11. Dietary intake patterns of low-income urban african-american adolescents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Youfa; Jahns, Lisa; Tussing-Humphreys, Lisa; Xie, Bin; Rockett, Helaine; Liang, Huifang; Johnson, Luann

    2010-09-01

    Unhealthy eating increases risks for chronic disease. Few studies have examined the multifaceted aspects of dietary intake of low-income, urban African-American adolescents. This study aimed to describe dietary patterns including energy, nutrients, food groups, and diet quality and to identify areas to guide future interventions. Baseline data for a school-based obesity prevention study were collected from 382 African-American adolescents (10- to 14-year-olds) from four Chicago, IL, public schools in 2003. Diet was assessed using a 152-item food frequency questionnaire. Diet quality was measured using a modified version of the US Department of Agriculture Healthy Eating Index (HEI) and compared to published estimates for a nationwide sample. Participants reported high energy intakes and several unhealthy eating patterns: 58.6% consumed one or more servings of sweetened beverages per day and 15.7% consumed three or more servings per day; average fried food consumption was high (1.4 servings/day), 58.4% consumed one or more serving per day; and 75% consumed three or more three snacks per day. Only 49% of participants met the recommended three servings of dairy foods per day. Compared to a national, mostly white sample, participants had lower HEI scores (P<0.05); mean score was 66.0+/-12.8 (100=maximum HEI score) vs 70.3+/-13.0 in boys vs girls, one third had scores <60 ("needs improvement") and only 15% scored >80 ("good"). This study reveals key areas of problematic dietary patterns for future interventions targeting low-income African-American adolescents, including frequent intakes of calorie-dense, low nutrient-rich foods, such as fried foods, snacks, and sweetened beverages. PMID:20800126

  12. Managing Teacher Leave and Absence in South African Rural Schools: Implications for Supporting Schools in Contexts of Multiple-Deprivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moletsane, Relebohile; Juan, Andrea; Prinsloo, Cas; Reddy, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Research increasingly points to the negative impacts of teacher absence from school on access to schooling and success in learning in schools, in particular in schools in areas of multiple-deprivation (including rural schools). South African schools are no exception. In this regard, like any other employer, the South African Department of Basic…

  13. African American Administrators and Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Dianne; Taylor, Janice D.; Burrell, Charlotte; Stewart, Gregory

    2006-01-01

    This article explores the issues of African American participation in the administrative ranks of the academy. The authors find that African Americans tend to hold positions that are marginal in academic organizations, lacking power and influence, and that not much has changed over recent decades. Forces influencing this condition are explored,…

  14. African-American Children's Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Lucinda

    This paper examines the history of African American children's literature, the present-day status of it, and ventures predictions about its future. The paper also considers the historic and social factors of the debate about whether an author who is not African American can write a book that will/should be accepted in this category of children's…

  15. African-American Sacred Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, A. Peter

    1991-01-01

    The history of African-American sacred music is traced from the time of slavery to the present interest in gospel music. The religious music of African Americans is geared toward liberation themes. It is important that this music does not dilute its power through cross-over with other music forms. (SLD)

  16. Africanization in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, M. Alice; Rubink, William L.; Patton, John C.; Coulson, Robert N.; Johnston, J. Spencer

    2005-01-01

    The expansion of Africanized honeybees from South America to the southwestern United States in <50 years is considered one of the most spectacular biological invasions yet documented. In the American tropics, it has been shown that during their expansion Africanized honeybees have low levels of introgressed alleles from resident European populations. In the United States, it has been speculated, but not shown, that Africanized honeybees would hybridize extensively with European honeybees. Here we report a continuous 11-year study investigating temporal changes in the genetic structure of a feral population from the southern United States undergoing Africanization. Our microsatellite data showed that (1) the process of Africanization involved both maternal and paternal bidirectional gene flow between European and Africanized honeybees and (2) the panmitic European population was replaced by panmitic mixtures of A. m. scutellata and European genes within 5 years after Africanization. The post-Africanization gene pool (1998–2001) was composed of a diverse array of recombinant classes with a substantial European genetic contribution (mean 25–37%). Therefore, the resulting feral honeybee population of south Texas was best viewed as a hybrid swarm. PMID:15937139

  17. Culturally sensitive oral health educational materials for older African Americans.

    PubMed

    Slaughter, Ann; Evans, Lois K

    2007-11-01

    Oral diseases disproportionately affect older Americans from minority populations. Approaches to reducing such disparities include increasing community-based interventions that target vulnerable older adults. To help in developing and implementing such programs, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services suggests using the MAP-IT technique, from a strategic planning guide to address public health issues in the community. This approach served as the method of investigation for the Take Charge of Your Oral Health educational program, a health promotion initiative targeting older African Americans. This paper describes the development and evaluation of the program. A total of 111 African American elders from 7 senior sites in Philadelphia participated in the program. A 6-item pre-test and post-test indicated a significant improvement in mean test scores from baseline (p,.001). The program demonstrated merit in improving oral health knowledge among community-residing, inner city, older African Americans.

  18. The history of African trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Steverding, Dietmar

    2008-01-01

    The prehistory of African trypanosomiasis indicates that the disease may have been an important selective factor in the evolution of hominids. Ancient history and medieval history reveal that African trypanosomiasis affected the lives of people living in sub-Saharan African at all times. Modern history of African trypanosomiasis revolves around the identification of the causative agents and the mode of transmission of the infection, and the development of drugs for treatment and methods for control of the disease. From the recent history of sleeping sickness we can learn that the disease can be controlled but probably not be eradicated. Current history of human African trypanosomiasis has shown that the production of anti-sleeping sickness drugs is not always guaranteed, and therefore, new, better and cheaper drugs are urgently required. PMID:18275594

  19. Bioenergy and African transformation.

    PubMed

    Lynd, Lee R; Sow, Mariam; Chimphango, Annie Fa; Cortez, Luis Ab; Brito Cruz, Carlos H; Elmissiry, Mosad; Laser, Mark; Mayaki, Ibrahim A; Moraes, Marcia Afd; Nogueira, Luiz Ah; Wolfaardt, Gideon M; Woods, Jeremy; van Zyl, Willem H

    2015-01-01

    Among the world's continents, Africa has the highest incidence of food insecurity and poverty and the highest rates of population growth. Yet Africa also has the most arable land, the lowest crop yields, and by far the most plentiful land resources relative to energy demand. It is thus of interest to examine the potential of expanded modern bioenergy production in Africa. Here we consider bioenergy as an enabler for development, and provide an overview of modern bioenergy technologies with a comment on application in an Africa context. Experience with bioenergy in Africa offers evidence of social benefits and also some important lessons. In Brazil, social development, agricultural development and food security, and bioenergy development have been synergistic rather than antagonistic. Realizing similar success in African countries will require clear vision, good governance, and adaptation of technologies, knowledge, and business models to myriad local circumstances. Strategies for integrated production of food crops, livestock, and bioenergy are potentially attractive and offer an alternative to an agricultural model featuring specialized land use. If done thoughtfully, there is considerable evidence that food security and economic development in Africa can be addressed more effectively with modern bioenergy than without it. Modern bioenergy can be an agent of African transformation, with potential social benefits accruing to multiple sectors and extending well beyond energy supply per se. Potential negative impacts also cut across sectors. Thus, institutionally inclusive multi-sector legislative structures will be more effective at maximizing the social benefits of bioenergy compared to institutionally exclusive, single-sector structures. PMID:25709714

  20. African oil plays

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, A.J. )

    1989-09-01

    The vast continent of Africa hosts over eight sedimentary basins, covering approximately half its total area. Of these basins, only 82% have entered a mature exploration phase, 9% have had little or no exploration at all. Since oil was first discovered in Africa during the mid-1950s, old play concepts continue to bear fruit, for example in Egypt and Nigeria, while new play concepts promise to become more important, such as in Algeria, Angola, Chad, Egypt, Gabon, and Sudan. The most exciting developments of recent years in African oil exploration are: (1) the Gamba/Dentale play, onshore Gabon; (2) the Pinda play, offshore Angola; (3) the Lucula/Toca play, offshore Cabinda; (4) the Metlaoui play, offshore Libya/Tunisia; (5) the mid-Cretaceous sand play, Chad/Sudan; and (6) the TAG-I/F6 play, onshore Algeria. Examples of these plays are illustrated along with some of the more traditional oil plays. Where are the future oil plays likely to develop No doubt, the Saharan basins of Algeria and Libya will feature strongly, also the presalt of Equatorial West Africa, the Central African Rift System and, more speculatively, offshore Ethiopia and Namibia, and onshore Madagascar, Mozambique, and Tanzania.