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Sample records for african seismic experiment

  1. Active seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, R. L.; Watkins, J. S.; Talwani, P.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 16 active seismic experiment (ASE) was designed to generate and monitor seismic waves for the study of the lunar near-surface structure. Several seismic energy sources are used: an astronaut-activated thumper device, a mortar package that contains rocket-launched grenades, and the impulse produced by the lunar module ascent. Analysis of some seismic signals recorded by the ASE has provided data concerning the near-surface structure at the Descartes landing site. Two compressional seismic velocities have so far been recognized in the seismic data. The deployment of the ASE is described, and the significant results obtained are discussed.

  2. Seismicity of the Earth 1900-2013 East African Rift

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, Gavin P.; Jones, Eric S.; Stadler, Timothy J.; Barnhart, William D.; McNamara, Daniel E.; Benz, Harley M.; Furlong, Kevin P.; Villaseñor, Antonio; Hayes, Gavin P.; Jones, Eric S.; Stadler, Timothy J.; Barnhart, William D.; McNamara, Daniel E.; Benz, Harley M.; Furlong, Kevin P.; Villaseñor, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Rifting in East Africa is not all coeval; volcanism and faulting have been an ongoing phenomenon on the continent since the Eocene (~45 Ma). The rifting began in northern East Africa, and led to the separation of the Nubia (Africa) and Arabia plates in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden, and in the Lake Turkana area at the Kenya-Ethiopia border. A Paleogene mantle superplume beneath East Africa caused extension within the Nubia plate, as well as a first order topographic high known as the African superswell which now includes most of the eastern and southern sectors of the Nubia plate. Widespread volcanism erupted onto much of the rising plateau in Ethiopia during the Eocene-Oligocene (45–29 Ma), with chains of volcanoes forming along the rift separating Africa and Arabia. Since the initiation of rifting in northeastern Africa, the system has propagated over 3,000 km to the south and southwest, and it experiences seismicity as a direct result of the extension and active magmatism.

  3. Seismic Constraints on Geometry, Seismic Velocity and Anisotropy of the "African Anomaly"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Wen, L.

    2006-05-01

    Seismic evidence shows that the "African Anomaly", a prominent low-velocity structure in the lower mantle beneath Africa, has a broad base near the core-mantle boundary (CMB) and extends at least 1000 km upward into the mid-lower mantle. Waveform modeling results indicate that its base is a very-low velocity province (VLVP) in the lowermost 200-300 km of the Earth's mantle with rapidly varying geometries and a strong Vs reduction gradient of -2% - -12% from top to bottom. These features unambiguously indicate the VLVP is compositionally distinct and can be best explained by partial melting driven by a compositional change produced in the early Earth's history [Wen, 2001; Wen et. al, 2001; Wang and Wen, 2004]. Seismic structure for the mid-lower mantle portion of the "African Anomaly" and the anisotropic behavior related to the VLVP remain unclear. In this presentation, we will present seismic data to constrain geometry and both P- and S- velocity perturbations for the "African Anomaly" along the great arc from the East Pacific Rise to the Japan Sea, and discuss seismic anisotropic behavior inside the VLVP and in the surrounding areas. We collected direct S, ScS, SKS, and SKKS waveforms data sets for 9 earthquakes recorded at the temporary broadband Kaapvaal, Tanzania, and Ethiopia/Kenya seismic arrays in Africa. These seismic data provide reasonably good coverage for the "African Anomaly" along a great circle path in opposite directions. We corrected for the effects of the earthquake mislocation and the seismic heterogeneities outside the anomaly. Seismic data suggest that the "African Anomaly" exhibits a "cusp-like" shape along the great arc and continuously extends from the CMB to about 1300 km above the CMB with both sides tilting toward its center beneath southern Africa. The magnitude of these travel time residuals can be best explained by a shear velocity structure with average Vs reductions of -5% for the basal layer and -2% - -3% for the portion in the

  4. The Apollo passive seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, G. V.; Dorman, H. J.; Horvath, P.; Ibrahim, A. K.; Koyama, J.; Nakamura, Y.

    1979-01-01

    The completed data set obtained from the 4-station Apollo seismic network includes signals from approximately 11,800 events of various types. Four data sets for use by other investigators, through the NSSDC, are in preparation. Some refinement of the lunar model based on seismic data can be expected, but its gross features remain as presented two years ago. The existence of a small, molten core remains dependent upon the analysis of signals from a single, far-side impact. Analysis of secondary arrivals from other sources may eventually resolve this issue, as well as continued refinement of the magnetic field measurements. Evidence of considerable lateral heterogeneity within the moon continues to build. The mystery of the much meteoroid flux estimate derived from lunar seismic measurements, as compared with earth-based estimates, remains; although, significant correlations between terrestrial and lunar observations are beginning to emerge.

  5. Experiences of African American College Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Aundria Chephan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the reasons that African-American alumni from a historically Black university (HBCU) and a predominantly White university (PWI) chose to attend, remain in, and graduate from college. The central research question was how do African Americans describe their college experiences? The secondary research…

  6. Experiments on seismic metamaterials: molding surface waves.

    PubMed

    Brûlé, S; Javelaud, E H; Enoch, S; Guenneau, S

    2014-04-04

    Materials engineered at the micro- and nanometer scales have had a tremendous and lasting impact in photonics and phononics. At much larger scales, natural soils civil engineered at decimeter to meter scales may interact with seismic waves when the global properties of the medium are modified, or alternatively thanks to a seismic metamaterial constituted of a mesh of vertical empty inclusions bored in the initial soil. Here, we show the experimental results of a seismic test carried out using seismic waves generated by a monochromatic vibrocompaction probe. Measurements of the particles' velocities show a modification of the seismic energy distribution in the presence of the metamaterial in agreement with numerical simulations using an approximate plate model. For complex natural materials such as soils, this large-scale experiment was needed to show the practical feasibility of seismic metamaterials and to stress their importance for applications in civil engineering. We anticipate this experiment to be a starting point for smart devices for anthropic and natural vibrations.

  7. Apollo 14 active seismic experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, J. S.; Kovach, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Explosion seismic refraction data indicate that the lunar near-surface rocks at the Apollo 14 site consist of a regolith 8.5 meters thick and characterized by a compressional wave velocity of 104 meters per second. The regolith is underlain by a layer with a compressional wave velocity of 299 meters per second. The thickness of this layer, which we interpret to be the Fra Mauro Formation, is between 16 and 76 meters. The layer immediately beneath this has a velocity greater than 370 meters per second. We found no evidence of permafrost.

  8. African American cancer patients' pain experience.

    PubMed

    Im, Eun-Ok; Lim, Hyun-Ju; Clark, Maresha; Chee, Wonshik

    2008-01-01

    Although very little is known about African American cancer patients' pain experience, a few studies have indicated that their cancer pain experience is unique and somewhat different from that of other ethnic groups. The purpose of the study reported in this article was to explore African American cancer patients' pain experience using an online forum. This study was a qualitative online forum designed from a feminist perspective and conducted among 11 African American cancer patients who were recruited through both Internet and real settings. Nine online forum topics were used to administer the 6-month online forum, and the data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Four themes emerged through the data analysis process. First, participants viewed cancer as a challenge in life that they should fight against. Second, cancer pain was differentiated from ordinary pain because cancer was stigmatized in their culture. Third, participants viewed that African Americans, especially women, were culturally raised to be strong, and this African American cultural heritage inhibited cancer patients from expressing pain and seeking help for pain management. Finally, the findings indicated certain changes in perspectives among African American cancer patients during the disease process, which might make them tolerate pain through praying to God and reading the Bible. Based on the findings, we suggest further studies among diverse groups of African American cancer patients, with a focus on cultural attitudes toward cancer pain and influences of family on cancer pain experience.

  9. Permafrost Active Layer Seismic Interferometry Experiment (PALSIE).

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, Robert; Knox, Hunter Anne; James, Stephanie; Lee, Rebekah; Cole, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We present findings from a novel field experiment conducted at Poker Flat Research Range in Fairbanks, Alaska that was designed to monitor changes in active layer thickness in real time. Results are derived primarily from seismic data streaming from seven Nanometric Trillium Posthole seismometers directly buried in the upper section of the permafrost. The data were evaluated using two analysis methods: Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR) and ambient noise seismic interferometry. Results from the HVSR conclusively illustrated the method's effectiveness at determining the active layer's thickness with a single station. Investigations with the multi-station method (ambient noise seismic interferometry) are continuing at the University of Florida and have not yet conclusively determined active layer thickness changes. Further work continues with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to determine if the ground based measurements can constrain satellite imagery, which provide measurements on a much larger spatial scale.

  10. Lunar seismic profiling experiment natural activity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duennebier, F. K.

    1976-01-01

    The Lunar Seismic Experiment Natural Activity Study has provided a unique opportunity to study the high frequency (4-20 Hz) portion to the seismic spectrum on the moon. The data obtained from the LSPE was studied to evaluate the origin and importance of the process that generates thermal moonquakes and the characteristics of the seismic scattering zone at the lunar surface. The detection of thermal moonquakes by the LSPE array made it possible to locate the sources of many events and determine that they are definitely not generated by astronaut activities but are the result of a natural process on the moon. The propagation of seismic waves in the near-surface layers was studied in a qualitative manner. In the absence of an adequate theoretical model for the propagation of seismic waves in the moon, it is not possible to assign a depth for the scattering layer. The LSPE data does define several parameters which must be satisfied by any model developed in the future.

  11. The SEIS Experiment: A Mars Seismic Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schibler, P.; Lognonne, P.; Giardini, D.; Banerdt, B.; Karczewski, J. F.; Mimoun, D.; Zweifel, P.; Pike, T.; Ammann, J.; Anglade, A.

    2003-01-01

    This experiment will integrate a VBB (Very Broad Band) two axis seismometer, a three axis Short Period seismometer and a series of environmental sensors for pressure, infra-sounds and temperature. IPGP (France) has the overall responsibility of the experiment and is responsible for the VBB and environmental sensors. ETHZ (Switzerland) is responsible for the electronics of the experiment and JPL (USA) for the SP (Short Period) sensors. SEIS instrument was first proposed and accepted for NetLander mission (and will also be in charge of data acquisition for SPICE experiment). This seismic package should also be proposed for future missions.

  12. Deployment of the Oklahoma borehole seismic experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Harben, P.E.; Rock, D.W.

    1989-01-20

    This paper discusses the Oklahoma borehole seismic experiment, currently in operation, set up by members of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Treaty Verification Program and the Oklahoma Geophysical Observatory to determine deep-borehole seismic characteristics in geology typical of large regions in the Soviet Union. We evaluated and logged an existing 772-m deep borehole on the Observatory site by running caliper, cement bonding, casing inspection, and hole-deviation logs. Two Teledyne Geotech borehole-clamping seismometers were placed at various depths and spacings in the deep borehole. Currently, they are deployed at 727 and 730 m. A Teledyne Geotech shallow-borehole seismometer was mounted in a 4.5-m hole, one meter from the deep borehole. The seismometers' system coherency were tested and found to be excellent to 35 Hz. We have recorded seismic noise, quarry blasts, regional earthquakes and teleseisms in the present configuration. We will begin a study of seismic noise and attenuation as a function of depth in the near future. 7 refs., 18 figs.

  13. Role of Pan-African Structures in Intraplate Seismicity in Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attoh, K.

    2004-05-01

    The setting for intraplate seismicity in southeastern Ghana has been cited as an analog to the even more destructive earthquakes in eastern North America such as at Charleston 1886 (Sykes 1978). Although located far away from any plate boundary, major earthquakes have occurred near Accra, the capital of Ghana in 1939 (M6.4), 1964, 1969, and most recently in 1997 (M4.8) and 2003 (M3.8). The setting for this seismic activity, near the eastern termination of the Romanche Fracture Zone (RFZ), presents the opportunity to investigate the relationship among Pan-African (Neoproterozoic) orogenic structures, transform tectonics, and neotectonic activity. Across the Ghana seismic zone prominent structures of the Pan-African orogen include: i) the Pan-African front (PF) representing the western limit of deformation, ii) the Pan-African suture zone (PS) represented by a ductile shear zone at the base of mafic granulites which comprise the suture zone nappes, and iii) a dexteral shear zone that projects into the RFZ represented by a prominent submarine canyon. Epicentral data compiled from local and teleseismic networks reveal clusters along the PF, a remarkable alignment of epicenters along the PS, and events along the coastline parallel Accra fault. Seismic reflection data offshore Ghana confirm active displacement along the Accra fault and, for the first time, provide direct evidence for neotectonic activity along the Pan-African front. The normal sense of displacement along the PF, inferred from the seismic sections, suggests that reactivation of the Pan-African structures involved inversion. The available data provide no support for active tectonics associated with the termination of the RFZ. However, reported seismic activity along the conjugate margin in northeastern Brazil suggests that far-field stresses related to active plate displacements in the Atlantic may contribute to the intraplate seismicity on these nominally passive paleo-transform margins.

  14. Cataloging the Pan-African Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Of all the honors and accolades bibliophile and noted authority on the Underground Railroad Charles Blockson has received, being bequeathed recently with some of Harriet Tubman's personal items by her great-niece is one of the most significant experiences of his life. A longtime collector of books and rare items by and about African-Americans,…

  15. The LaBarge Passive Seismic Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, G. M.; Schmedes, J.; Saltzer, R. L.; Roth, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    Accurate large-scale seismic velocity models provide critical support for subsurface imaging, particularly for migration and inversion. However, conventional seismic sources typically do not provide significant information below 5-10Hz. Further, alternative methods to obtain a reference velocity model such as normal move-out analysis may be ambiguous or misleading in complicated tectonic settings like fold-and-thrust belts. To address these challenges, we investigated the potential of using naturally occurring earthquakes to obtain a seismic velocity model for shallow sediment structure (above 5 km). Passive seismic data were continuously recorded at 55 stations in LaBarge, Wy for six months in early 2009. We employed two widely used techniques, relative travel-time tomography and teleseismic receiver functions, more commonly used to image deep crustal and mantle structure. The resulting structural image and velocity model compares favorably with local well control, suggesting seismic models obtained by this method would provide viable support for imaging and inversions.

  16. South African TOPEX/Poseidon altimeter experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruendlingh, Marten L.; Shannon, L. V.; Lutjeharms, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    The area surrounding the southern tip of Africa contains a juxtaposition of a variety of interesting and climatically relevant features. On the Indian Ocean side, the Agulhas Current with its tributaries form a conduit through which much of the southern Indian Ocean surface flow is focused. South of the continent, this flow is fragmented and partially injected into the Atlantic Ocean and across the Subtropical Convergence into the Southern Ocean. To the west of the subcontinent, the circulation of the South Atlantic subtropical gyre in the Cape Basin interacts with the vigorous Benguela upwelling regime. The creation, transformation, and transport of water masses and the intra-annual and climatic importance of all these processes have been specifically recognized by the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE). The South African TOPEX/POSEIDON Altimeter Experiment addresses many of these issues through four mutually complementary and interrelated subprojects.

  17. The Northern Walker Lane Seismic Refraction Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louie, J. N.; Smith, S. B.; Thelen, W.; Scott, J. B.; Clark, M.

    2002-12-01

    We are developing a three-dimensional reference seismic velocity model for the western Great Basin region of Nevada and eastern California. The northern Walker Lane had not been characterized well by previous work. In May 2002 we collected a new crustal refraction profile from Battle Mountain, Nev. across western Nevada, the Reno area, Lake Tahoe, and the northern Sierra to Auburn, Calif. Mine blasts and earthquakes were recorded by 199 Texan instruments (loaned by the PASSCAL Instrument Center) extending across this more than 450-km-long transect. The seismic sources at the eastern end were mining blasts at Barrick's GoldStrike pit. We recorded additional blasts at the Florida Canyon and other mines between Lovelock and Battle Mountain, Nevada. The GoldStrike mine produced several ripple-fired blasts using 10,000-40,000 kg of ANFO each. First arrivals from the larger blasts are obvious to distances exceeding 250 km in the raw records. A M2.4 earthquake near Bridgeport, Calif. also produced pickable P-wave arrivals across at least half the transect, providing fan-shot data. We recorded only during working hours, and so missed an M4 earthquake that occurred at night. Events of M2 occurred during our recording to the west on the San Andreas fault near Pinnacles, Calif.; M3 events occurred near Portola and Mammoth Lakes, Calif. Arrivals from M5 events in the Mariana and Kuril Islands also appear in the records. Time-picks from these earthquakes may be possible after more work on synthetic-time modeling, data filtering, and display. We plan to record blasts at quarries in the western Sierra in future experiments, for a direct refraction reversal. We will compare our time picks against times generated from regional velocity models, to identify potential crustal and upper-mantle velocity anomalies. Such anomalies may be associated with the Battle Mountain heat-flow high, the northern Walker Lane belt, or the northern Sierran block.

  18. Shallow lunar structure determined from the passive seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Dorman, J.; Duennebier, F.; Lammlein, D.; Latham, G.

    1975-01-01

    Data relevant to the shallow structure of the moon obtained at the Apollo seismic stations are compared with previously published results of the active seismic experiments. It is concluded that the lunar surface is covered by a layer of low seismic velocity which appears to be equivalent to the lunar regolith defined previously by geological observations. This layer is underlain by a zone of distinctly higher seismic velocity at all of the Apollo landing sites. The regolith thicknesses at the Apollo 11, 12, and 15 sites are estimated from the shear-wave resonance to be 4.4, 3.7, and 4.4 m, respectively. These thicknesses and those determined at the other Apollo sites by the active seismic experiments appear to be correlated with the age determinations and the abundances of extralunar components at the sites.

  19. Observational studies in South African mines to mitigate seismic risks: implications for mine safety and tectonic earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrheim, Raymond; Ogaswara, Hiroshi; Nakatani, Masao; Yabe, Yasuo; Milev, Alexander; Cichowicz, Artur; Kawakata, Hironori; Moriya, Hirokazu; Naoi, Makoto; Kgarume, Thabang; Murakami, Osamu; Mngadi, Siyanda

    2014-05-01

    Seismicity poses a significant risk to workers in deep and overstressed mines, such as the gold mines in the Witwatersrand basin of South Africa, as well as inhabitants of earthquake-prone regions such as Japan. A 5-year collaborative project entitled "Observational studies in South African mines to mitigate seismic risks" was launched in 2010 to address these risks, drawing on over a century of South African and Japanese research experience with respect to mining-related and tectonic earthquakes, respectively. The project has three main aims: (1) to learn more about earthquake preparation and triggering mechanisms by deploying arrays of sensitive sensors within rock volumes where mining is likely to induce seismic activity; (2) to learn more about earthquake rupture and rockburst damage phenomena by deploying robust strong ground motion sensors close to potential fault zones and on stope hangingwalls; and (3) to upgrade the South African surface national seismic network in the mining districts. Research sites have been established at mines operated by Sibanye Gold (Hlanganani Shaft and Cooke #4 Shaft) and Anglogold Ashanti (Moab-Khotsong). More than 70 boreholes (totalling more than 2.8 km in length) have been drilled to locate "capable" faults i.e. faults that are considered likely to become seismically active as a result of mining activity and to deploy sensors. Acoustic emission sensors, strain- and tilt meters, and controlled seismic sources were installed to monitor the deformation of the rock mass, the accumulation of damage during the earthquake preparation phase, and changes in dynamic stress produced by the propagation of the rupture front. These data are being integrated with measurements of rock properties, stope closure, stope strong motion, seismic data recorded by the mine-wide network, and stress modelling. The mid-point of the 5-year project has passed. New observations of stress and the response of the rock mass to mining have already been made

  20. 2013 East Bay Seismic Experiment (EBSE): implosion data, Hayward, Calif

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, Rufus D.; Strayer, Luther M.; Goldman, Mark R.; Criley, Coyn J.; Garcia, Susan; Sickler, Robert R.; Catchings, Marisol K.; Chan, Joanne; Gordon, Leslie C.; Haefner, Scott; Blair, James Luke; Gandhok, Gini; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2015-01-01

    In August 2013, the California State University, East Bay (CSUEB) in Hayward, California imploded a 13-story building (Warren Hall) that was deemed unsafe because of its immediate proximity to the active trace of the Hayward Fault. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the CSUEB collaborated on a program to record the seismic waves generated by the collapse of the building. We refer to this collaboration as the East Bay Seismic Experiment (EBSE). The principal objective of recording the seismic energy was to observe ground shaking as it radiated from the source, but the data also may be useful for other purposes. For example, the seismic data may be useful in evaluating the implosion process as it relates to structural engineering purposes. This report provides the metadata needed to utilize the seismic data.

  1. Mammoth Mountain, California broadband seismic experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, P. B.; Pitt, A. M.; Wilkinson, S. K.; Chouet, B. A.; Hill, D. P.; Mangan, M.; Prejean, S. G.; Read, C.; Shelly, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Mammoth Mountain is a young cumulo-volcano located on the southwest rim of Long Valley caldera, California. Current volcanic processes beneath Mammoth Mountain are manifested in a wide range of seismic signals, including swarms of shallow volcano-tectonic earthquakes, upper and mid-crustal long-period earthquakes, swarms of brittle-failure earthquakes in the lower crust, and shallow (3-km depth) very-long-period earthquakes. Diffuse emissions of C02 began after a magmatic dike injection beneath the volcano in 1989, and continue to present time. These indications of volcanic unrest drive an extensive monitoring effort of the volcano by the USGS Volcano Hazards Program. As part of this effort, eleven broadband seismometers were deployed on Mammoth Mountain in November 2011. This temporary deployment is expected to run through the fall of 2013. These stations supplement the local short-period and broadband seismic stations of the Northern California Seismic Network (NCSN) and provide a combined network of eighteen broadband stations operating within 4 km of the summit of Mammoth Mountain. Data from the temporary stations are not available in real-time, requiring the merging of the data from the temporary and permanent networks, timing of phases, and relocation of seismic events to be accomplished outside of the standard NCSN processing scheme. The timing of phases is accomplished through an interactive Java-based phase-picking routine, and the relocation of seismicity is achieved using the probabilistic non-linear software package NonLinLoc, distributed under the GNU General Public License by Alomax Scientific. Several swarms of shallow volcano-tectonic earthquakes, spasmodic bursts of high-frequency earthquakes, a few long-period events located within or below the edifice of Mammoth Mountain and numerous mid-crustal long-period events have been recorded by the network. To date, about 900 of the ~2400 events occurring beneath Mammoth Mountain since November 2011 have

  2. The Mars SEIS Experiment: A Mars Seismic Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mimoun, D.; Lognonne, P.; Banerdt, W. B.; Schibler, P.; Giardini, D.; Pont, G.

    2005-01-01

    The Mars SEIS experiment. The SEIS experiment was first proposed by IPGP (and accepted) for the NetLander mission. It integrates two VBB (Very Broad Band) seismometers, a three axis Short Period seismometer and a series of environmental sensors for pressure, infra-sounds and temperature. IPGP (France) has the overall responsibility of the experiment and is responsible for the seismic and environmental sensors. ETHZ (Switzerland) is responsible for the electronics of the experiment and JPL (USA) for the SP (Short Period) sensors. As NetLander mission has been cancelled (while fortunately the development still goes on), this seismic package can be proposed for future Mars missions.

  3. Northern Cascadia Seismicity From Ocean Floor Observations -- Campaign and Permanent Seismic Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heesemann, M.; Scherwath, M.; Kodaira, S.; Obana, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Spence, G.; Riedel, M.; Rogers, G. C.; Wang, K.; McGuire, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Continuous seismic monitoring of offshore seismicity is a challenge. Land-based networks can only detect the larger offshore earthquakes but the estimation of low-magnitude regional or local offshore seismicity requires ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs). At the Cascadia margin these challenges have been addressed with both campaign based as well as seafloor cabled OBS monitoring. The most recent campaigns in Cascadia have been the regional (70-km OBS spacing) U.S. Cascadia Initiative and the local (20-km OBS spacing) Seafloor Earthquake Array Japan-Canada Cascadia Experiment (SeaJade) offshore Vancouver Island. In addition, the Cascadia margin has two regional seafloor cabled observatories: NEPTUNE Canada from Ocean Networks Canada (ONC) and the Regional Scale Nodes (RSN) of the U.S. Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI), both with OBS spacings of 50-100 km. We show results from the SeaJade experiment from 2010 which had the densest available station spacing. Except for the Nootka fault zone in the north, the observed seismicity was relatively low which is consistent with a fully locked megathrust. We compare the seismic data from the dense SeaJade array with the broader spaced NEPTUNE cabled data and speculate if it would be possible to detect a change in seismicity with NEPTUNE and land stations only or if a higher density of permanent seafloor stations like the 15-20 km spacing of the Japanese DONET cabled observatories is required.

  4. Black African Parents' Experiences of an Educational Psychology Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Zena

    2014-01-01

    The evidence base that explores Black African parents' experiences of an Educational Psychology Service (EPS) is limited. This article describes an exploratory mixed methods research study undertaken during 2009-2011, that explored Black African parents' engagement with a UK EPS. Quantitative data were gathered from the EPS preschool database and…

  5. Results from the Apollo passive seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, G.; Nakamura, Y.; Dorman, J.; Duennebier, F.; Ewing, M.; Lammlein, D.

    1977-01-01

    Recent results from the Apollo Seismic Network suggest that primitive differentiation occurred in the outer shell of the moon to a depth of approximately 300 km and the central region of the moon is presently molten to a radius of between 200 and 300 km. If early melting to a depth of 300 to 400 km was a consequence of accretional energy, very short accretion times are required. It was shown that the best model for the zone of original differentiation is a crust 40 to 80 km thick, ranging in composition from anorthositic gabbro to gabbro, and overlying an ultramafic cumulate about 250 km thick. The best candidate for the molten core appears to be iron or iron sulphide. A new class of seismic signals recently were identified that may correspond to shallow moonquakes. These are rare, but much more energetic than the more numerous, deep moonquakes.

  6. Participation in the Apollo passive seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Press, F.; Toksoez, M. N.; Dainty, A.

    1972-01-01

    Computer programs which were written to read digital tapes containing lunar seismic data were studied. Interpreting very early parts of the lunar seismogram as seismic body-wave phases enabled the determination of the structure of the outer part of the moon in the Fra Mauro region. The crust in the Fra Mauro region is 60 to 65 km-thick, overlaying a high velocity mantle. The crust is further divided into an upper part, 25 km thick, apparently made of material similar to the surficial basalts, and a lower part of seemingly different composition, possibly an anorthositic gabbro. The generation of the exceedingly long reverberating wave-train observed in lunar seismogram was also studied. This is believed to be due to an intense scattering layer with very high quality coefficient overlying a more homogeneous elastic medium. Titles and abstracts of related published papers are included.

  7. Results from the Apollo passive seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathum, G.; Nakamura, Y.; Dorman, J.; Duennebier, F.; Ewing, M.; Lammlein, D.

    1974-01-01

    Recent results from the Apollo seismic network suggest that primitive differentiation occurred in the outer shell of the moon to a depth of approximately 300 km; and the central region of the moon is presently molten to a radius of between 200 and 300 km. If early melting to a depth of 300 to 400 km was a consequence of accretional energy, very short accretion times are required. The best model for the zone of original differentiation appears to be a crust 40 to 80 km thick, ranging in composition from anorthositic gabbro to gabbro; overlying an ultramafic cumulate (olivine-pyroxene) about 250 km thick. The best candidate for the molten core appears to be iron or iron sulphide. A new class of seismic signals has recently been identified that may correspond to shallow moonquakes. These are rare, but much more energetic than the more numerous, deep moonquakes.

  8. The Lusi seismic experiment: An initial study to understand the effect of seismic activity to Lusi

    SciTech Connect

    Karyono; Mazzini, Adriano; Sugiharto, Anton; Lupi, Matteo; Syafri, Ildrem; Masturyono,; Rudiyanto, Ariska; Pranata, Bayu; Muzli,; Widodo, Handi Sulistyo; Sudrajat, Ajat

    2015-04-24

    The spectacular Lumpur Sidoarjo (Lusi) eruption started in northeast Java on the 29 of May 2006 following a M6.3 earthquake striking the island [1,2]. Initially, several gas and mud eruption sites appeared along the reactivated strike-slip Watukosek fault system [3] and within weeks several villages were submerged by boiling mud. The most prominent eruption site was named Lusi. The Lusi seismic experiment is a project aims to begin a detailed study of seismicity around the Lusi area. In this initial phase we deploy 30 seismometers strategically distributed in the area around Lusi and along the Watukosek fault zone that stretches between Lusi and the Arjuno Welirang (AW) complex. The purpose of the initial monitoring is to conduct a preliminary seismic campaign aiming to identify the occurrence and the location of local seismic events in east Java particularly beneath Lusi.This network will locate small event that may not be captured by the existing BMKG network. It will be crucial to design the second phase of the seismic experiment that will consist of a local earthquake tomography of the Lusi-AW region and spatial and temporal variations of vp/vs ratios. The goal of this study is to understand how the seismicity occurring along the Sunda subduction zone affects to the behavior of the Lusi eruption. Our study will also provide a large dataset for a qualitative analysis of earthquake triggering studies, earthquake-volcano and earthquake-earthquake interactions. In this study, we will extract Green’s functions from ambient seismic noise data in order to image the shallow subsurface structure beneath LUSI area. The waveform cross-correlation technique will be apply to all of recordings of ambient seismic noise at 30 seismographic stations around the LUSI area. We use the dispersive behaviour of the retrieved Rayleigh waves to infer velocity structures in the shallow subsurface.

  9. The Lusi seismic experiment: An initial study to understand the effect of seismic activity to Lusi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karyono, Mazzini, Adriano; Lupi, Matteo; Syafri, Ildrem; Masturyono, Rudiyanto, Ariska; Pranata, Bayu; Muzli, Widodo, Handi Sulistyo; Sudrajat, Ajat; Sugiharto, Anton

    2015-04-01

    The spectacular Lumpur Sidoarjo (Lusi) eruption started in northeast Java on the 29 of May 2006 following a M6.3 earthquake striking the island [1,2]. Initially, several gas and mud eruption sites appeared along the reactivated strike-slip Watukosek fault system [3] and within weeks several villages were submerged by boiling mud. The most prominent eruption site was named Lusi. The Lusi seismic experiment is a project aims to begin a detailed study of seismicity around the Lusi area. In this initial phase we deploy 30 seismometers strategically distributed in the area around Lusi and along the Watukosek fault zone that stretches between Lusi and the Arjuno Welirang (AW) complex. The purpose of the initial monitoring is to conduct a preliminary seismic campaign aiming to identify the occurrence and the location of local seismic events in east Java particularly beneath Lusi.This network will locate small event that may not be captured by the existing BMKG network. It will be crucial to design the second phase of the seismic experiment that will consist of a local earthquake tomography of the Lusi-AW region and spatial and temporal variations of vp/vs ratios. The goal of this study is to understand how the seismicity occurring along the Sunda subduction zone affects to the behavior of the Lusi eruption. Our study will also provide a large dataset for a qualitative analysis of earthquake triggering studies, earthquake-volcano and earthquake-earthquake interactions. In this study, we will extract Green's functions from ambient seismic noise data in order to image the shallow subsurface structure beneath LUSI area. The waveform cross-correlation technique will be apply to all of recordings of ambient seismic noise at 30 seismographic stations around the LUSI area. We use the dispersive behaviour of the retrieved Rayleigh waves to infer velocity structures in the shallow subsurface.

  10. The MARINER Integrated Seismic and Geophysical Mapping Experiment (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, R. A.; Canales, J.; Sohn, R. A.; Paulatto, M.; Arai, R.; Szitkar, F.

    2013-12-01

    The MARINER (Mid-Atlantic Ridge INtegrated Experiments at Rainbow) seismic and geophysical mapping experiment was designed to examine the relationship between tectonic rifting, heat/melt supply, and oceanic core complex formation at a non-transform offset (NTO) of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 36°N, the site of the ultramafic-hosted Rainbow hydrothermal system. We present an overview of the components of the experiment and the various projects stemming from it. The 5-week experiment was carried out aboard the R/V M. G. Langseth in April-May 2013, and consisted of a 3D active-source seismic tomography experiment, 2D multi-channel seismic profiles, an on-going nine month passive micro-seismicity study, dense acoustic mapping of the seafloor (including depth and amplitude information), gravity field mapping, and magnetic field mapping. During the tomography experiment, we deployed 46 ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) over a 35 x 80 sq. km area centered on Rainbow. Twenty-six wide-angle seismic lines were carried out using the Langseth's 36-element source, generating ~175,000 seismic records. The MCS experiment, which was also recorded on 20 OBS, consisted of twenty-one densely spaced seismic lines using an 8-km-long hydrophone streamer. Bathymetry, gravity, and magnetic surveys were carried out over a broader, 80x105 sq. km, area centered on Rainbow. Overall, the experiment extends across two segments of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge separated by the Rainbow NTO massif. MARINER multi-beam bathymetry and acoustic imagery provide a broad view of the geologic and geophysical character of the ridge system, emphasizing the strong variability of ridge morphology, tectonics, and lava emplacement. The magnetization map shows a clear central anomaly with normal polarity, flanked by regions of negative polarity, consistent with the Brunhes-Matuyama reversal (~780,000 Ma). Rainbow itself lies in a region of weaker magnetization strength, which could be linked to a decrease in the depth of the

  11. Bighorns Arch Seismic Experiment (BASE): Amplitude Response to Different Seismic Charge Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Harder, S. H., Killer, K. C., Worthington, L. L., Snelson, C. M.

    2010-09-02

    Contrary to popular belief, charge weight is not the most important engineering parameter determining the seismic amplitudes generated by a shot. The scientific literature has long claimed that the relationship, A ~R2L1/2, where A is the seismic amplitude generated by a shot, R is the radius of the seismic charge and L is the length of that charge, holds. Assuming the coupling to the formation and the pressure generated by the explosive are constants, this relationship implies that the one should be able to increase the charge radius while decreasing the charge length and obtain more seismic amplitude with less charge weight. This has significant implications for the economics of lithospheric seismic shots, because shallower holes and small charge sizes decrease cost. During the Bighorns Array Seismic Experiment (BASE) conducted in the summer of 2010, 24 shots with charge sizes ranging from 110 to 900 kg and drill hole diameters of 300 and 450 mm were detonated and recorded by an array of up to 2000 single-channel Texan seismographs. Maximum source-receiver offset of 300 km. Five of these shots were located within a one-acre square in an effort to eliminate coupling effects due to differing geological formations. We present a quantitative comparison of the data from these five shots to experimentally test the equation above.

  12. Small Arrays for Seismic Intruder Detections: A Simulation Based Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitarka, A.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic sensors such as geophones and fiber optic have been increasingly recognized as promising technologies for intelligence surveillance, including intruder detection and perimeter defense systems. Geophone arrays have the capability to provide cost effective intruder detection in protecting assets with large perimeters. A seismic intruder detection system uses one or multiple arrays of geophones design to record seismic signals from footsteps and ground vehicles. Using a series of real-time signal processing algorithms the system detects, classify and monitors the intruder's movement. We have carried out numerical experiments to demonstrate the capability of a seismic array to detect moving targets that generate seismic signals. The seismic source is modeled as a vertical force acting on the ground that generates continuous impulsive seismic signals with different predominant frequencies. Frequency-wave number analysis of the synthetic array data was used to demonstrate the array's capability at accurately determining intruder's movement direction. The performance of the array was also analyzed in detecting two or more objects moving at the same time. One of the drawbacks of using a single array system is its inefficiency at detecting seismic signals deflected by large underground objects. We will show simulation results of the effect of an underground concrete block at shielding the seismic signal coming from an intruder. Based on simulations we found that multiple small arrays can greatly improve the system's detection capability in the presence of underground structures. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344

  13. Third Party Borehole Seismic Experiments During the Ocean Drilling Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, S. A.; Stephen, R. A.; Hoskins, H.; Bolmer, T.

    2003-12-01

    Third party borehole seismic experiments on the Ocean Drilling Program began with an oblique seismic experiment on Leg 102 at Site 418 in the Western Atlantic. Upper ocean crust here is characterized by a normal seismic layer 2 vertical velocity gradient, lateral velocity variations, azimuthal anisotropy, and azimuth dependent scattering. A normal incidence VSP was run on Leg 118 in the gabbro sequence at Hole 735B on the Southwest Indian Ridge. The vertical seismic velocity inferred from arrival times is similar to that observed horizontally by refraction in ocean layer 3, but attenuation is anomalously high, which prompted the hypothesis that the gabbro cored may not actually represent the bulk of Layer 3 material. The VSP data acquired at Hole 504B in the eastern equatorial Pacific on Legs 111 and 148 helped to constrain the P and S velocity structure at the site and showed that upper layer 3 at this site, at a depth of over 2 km into the crust, consisted of the lower portion of the sheeted dikes rather than gabbro. Both offset and normal incidence VSPs were run on Leg 164 to study the seismic velocity structure of gas hydrates on the Blake Ridge. A new innovation on ODP was the deployment of broadband seismometers in boreholes. Whereas the conventional VSPs and offset VSPs mentioned above operate in the frequency range from 1 to 100Hz, broadband seismometers are used in earthquake seismology and operate in the range from 0.001 to 10Hz. The first broadband seismometer test was carried out from the drill ship on Leg 128 in the Japan Sea. Subsequently 4 permanent broadband borehole seismic observatories were installed in the Western Pacific and Japan Trench on Legs 186, 191 and 195. The ODP era also saw the development of systems for re-entering boreholes from conventional research vessels after the drill ship left the site. Borehole seismic experiments and installations that used this wireline re-entry technology were carried out in DSDP Holes 534 (Blake

  14. The LUSI Seismic Experiment: Deployment of a Seismic Network around LUSI, East Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karyono, Karyono; Mazzini, Adriano; Lupi, Matteo; Syafri, Ildrem; Haryanto, Iyan; Masturyono, Masturyono; Hadi, Soffian; Rohadi, Suprianto; Suardi, Iman; Rudiyanto, Ariska; Pranata, Bayu

    2015-04-01

    The spectacular Lusi eruption started in northeast Java, Indonesia the 29 of May 2006 following a M6.3 earthquake striking the island. Initially, several gas and mud eruption sites appeared along the reactivated strike-slip Watukosek fault system and within weeks several villages were submerged by boiling mud. The most prominent eruption site was named Lusi. Lusi is located few kilometres to the NE of the Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex. Lusi sits upon the Watukosek fault system. From this volcanic complex originates the Watukosek fault system that was reactivated by the M6.3 earthquake in 2006 and is still periodically reactivated by the frequent seismicity. To date Lusi is still active and erupting gas, water, mud and clasts. Gas and water data show that the Lusi plumbing system is connected with the neighbouring Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex. This makes the Lusi eruption a "sedimentary hosted geothermal system". To verify and characterise the occurrence of seismic activity and how this perturbs the connected Watukosek fault, the Arjuno-Welirang volcanic system and the ongoing Lusi eruption, we deployed 30 seismic stations (short-period and broadband) in this region of the East Java basin. The seismic stations are more densely distributed around LUSI and the Watukosek fault zone that stretches between Lusi and the Arjuno Welirang (AW) complex. Fewer stations are positioned around the volcanic arc. Our study sheds light on the seismic activity along the Watukosek fault system and describes the waveforms associated to the geysering activity of Lusi. The initial network aims to locate small event that may not be captured by the Indonesian Agency for Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics (BMKG) seismic network and it will be crucial to design the second phase of the seismic experiment that will consist of a local earthquake tomography of the Lusi-Arjuno Welirang region and temporal variations of vp/vs ratios. Such variations will then be ideally related to

  15. Apollo 14 and 16 Active Seismic Experiments, and Apollo 17 Lunar Seismic Profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Seismic refraction experiments were conducted on the moon by Apollo astronauts during missions 14, 16, and 17. Seismic velocities of 104, 108, 92, 114 and 100 m/sec were inferred for the lunar regolith at the Apollo 12, 14, 15, 16, and 17 landing sites, respectively. These data indicate that fragmentation and comminution caused by meteoroid impacts has produced a layer of remarkably uniform seismic properties moonwide. Brecciation and high porosity are the probable causes of the very low velocities observed in the lunar regolith. Apollo 17 seismic data revealed that the seismic velocity increases very rapidly with depth to 4.7 km/sec at a depth of 1.4 km. Such a large velocity change is suggestive of compositional and textural changes and is compatible with a model of fractured basaltic flows overlying anorthositic breccias. 'Thermal' moonquakes were also detected at the Apollo 17 site, becoming increasingly frequent after sunrise and reaching a maximum at sunset. The source of these quakes could possibly be landsliding.

  16. The African Experience with Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ajayi, J. F. Ade; And Others

    This book covers the history and politics of higher education in Africa south of the Sahara, as well as contemporary issues, problems, and weaknesses of African universities. The need for a new look at the mission of the university in the 21st century is also addressed. Chapters cover the following topics: (1) higher education in Africa before…

  17. African American Women's Breastfeeding Experiences: Cultural, Personal, and Political Voices.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Becky; Wambach, Karen; Domain, Elaine Williams

    2015-07-01

    The low rate of breastfeeding among African American women in the United States is a poorly understood, persistent disparity. Our purpose in this study was to gain an understanding of how African American women experience breastfeeding in the context of their day-to-day lives. The Sequential-Consensual Qualitative Design (SCQD), a 3-stage qualitative methodology aimed at exploring the cultural, personal, and political context of phenomena, was used to explore the experiences of African American women who felt successful with breastfeeding. An integration of qualitative content analysis and Black feminist theory was used to analyze the data. Themes that emerged from Stage-2 data analysis included self-determination, spirituality and breastfeeding, and empowerment. In Stage 3 of the study, participant recommendations regarding breastfeeding promotion and support initiatives for African American breastfeeding were categorized into three themes, including engaging spheres of influence, sparking breastfeeding activism, and addressing images of the sexual breast vs. the nurturing breast.

  18. Results from the apollo-12 passive seismic experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Latham, G.

    1971-01-01

    The objective of the passive seismic experiment is to measure vibrations of the lunar surface produced by all natural and artificial sources of seismic energy and to use these data to deduce the internal structure and composition of the moon, the nature of forces which may cause deformation of the moon and moonquakes, and the numbers and masses of meteoroids striking the lunar surface. The ALSEP* seismometers can magnify lunar surface vibrations 10 million times. No instrument can operate on earth with this sensitivity, because weather and man produce too much seismic noise. To obtain answers to the above questions, seismic data must be combined with data from laboratory measurements of the physical and chemical properties of surface rocks, and many other geophyiscal and geochemical measurements. Thus far, we have had the opportunity to record data from two lunar seismic stations which were installed by the astronauts during Apollo misions  and 12. The combined recording time from the stations is presently over 12 months, but there was no overlap to permit recording of the same event at two stations. 

  19. The Lived Experience of African American Caregivers Caring for Adult African American Patients With Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Heather

    2016-04-01

    Assistance from informal caregivers such as family members, friends, or neighbors is crucial to adequately managing the complex care of heart failure (HF) patients. This study examined the lived experience of African American caregivers caring for African American patients with HF. Purposive sampling was used to recruit 10 participants who were formally interviewed. The interviews, analyzed using Colaizzi's steps, revealed six themes: layers of support, realization of self-neglect, experiencing the "blues," connecting with healthcare providers, unmet financial needs, and perception of nonadherence. The information regarding the experience of African American caregivers of HF patients obtained through this research will inform the delivery of culturally competent support to caregivers, thereby improving quality of life for both the HF patients and their caregivers.

  20. Seismic imaging of sandbox experiments - laboratory hardware setup and first reflection seismic sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, C. M.; Buddensiek, M.-L.; Oncken, O.; Kukowski, N.

    2012-10-01

    With the study and technical development introduced here, we combine analogue sandbox simulation techniques with seismic physical modelling of sandbox models. For that purpose, we designed and developed a new mini-seismic facility for laboratory use, comprising a seismic tank, a PC-driven control unit, a positioning system, and piezo-electric transducers used here the first time in an array mode. To assess the possibilities and limits of seismic imaging of small-scale structures in sandbox models, different geometry setups were tested in the first experiments that also tested the proper functioning of the device and studied the seismo-elastic properties of the granular media used. Simple two-layer models of different materials and layer thicknesses as well as a more complex model comprising channels and shear zones were tested using different acquisition geometries and signal properties. We suggest using well sorted and well rounded grains with little surface roughness (glass beads). Source receiver-offsets less than 14 cm for imaging structures as small as 2.0-1.5 mm size have proven feasible. This is the best compromise between wide beam and high energy output, and being applicable with a consistent waveform. Resolution of the interfaces of layers of granular materials depends on the interface preparation rather than on the material itself. Flat grading of interfaces and powder coverage yields the clearest interface reflections. Finally, sandbox seismic sections provide images of very good quality showing constant thickness layers as well as predefined channel structures and fault traces from shear zones. Since these can be regarded in sandbox models as zones of decompaction, they behave as reflectors and can be imaged. The multiple-offset surveying introduced here improves the quality with respect to S/N-ratio and source signature even more; the maximum depth penetration in glass bead layers thereby amounts to 5 cm. Thus, the presented mini-seismic device is

  1. Early Academic Experiences of Recently Incarcerated African American Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffers, Adam R.

    2010-01-01

    This project examines the early educational experiences of 6 young African American males (ages 18-25) who attended urban schools in San Diego, California. All 6 men were incarcerated for at least 1-year before participating in a pre-release program. The participants were part of a pre-release program in San Diego, California, which was selected…

  2. African American Women's Sexual Objectification Experiences: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Laurel B.; Robinson, Dawn; Dispenza, Franco; Nazari, Negar

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate African American women's experiences with sexual objectification. Utilizing grounded theory methodology as well as Black feminist thought and objectification theory as the research lenses, the results of this study uncovered how racist, sexist, and classist ideologies contributed to sexual…

  3. Financing vaccinations - the South African experience.

    PubMed

    Blecher, Mark S; Meheus, Filip; Kollipara, Aparna; Hecht, Robert; Cameron, Neil A; Pillay, Yogan; Hanna, Luisa

    2012-09-07

    South Africa provides a useful country case study for financing vaccinations. It has been an early adopter of new vaccinations and has financed these almost exclusively from domestic resources, largely through general taxation. National vaccination policy is determined by the Department of Health, based on advice from a national advisory group on immunisation. Standard health economic criteria of effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, affordability and burden of disease are used to assess whether new vaccinations should be introduced. Global guidelines and the advice of local and international experts are also helpful in making the determination to introduce new vaccines. In terms of recent decisions to introduce new vaccines against pneumococcal disease and rotavirus diarrhoea in children, the evidence has proved unequivocal. Universal rollout has been implemented even though this has led to a fivefold increase in national spending on vaccines. The total cost to government remains below 1-1.5% of public expenditures for health, which is viewed by the South African authorities as affordable and necessary given the number of lives saved and morbidity averted. To manage the rapid increase in domestic spending, efforts have been made to scale up coverage over several years, give greater attention to negotiating price reductions and, in some cases, obtain initial donations or frontloaded deliveries to facilitate earlier universal rollout. There has been strong support from a wide range of stakeholders for the early introduction of new generation vaccines.

  4. Deep crustal structure of the North-West African margin from combined wide-angle and reflection seismic data (MIRROR seismic survey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biari, Y.; Klingelhoefer, F.; Sahabi, M.; Aslanian, D.; Schnurle, P.; Berglar, K.; Moulin, M.; Mehdi, K.; Graindorge, D.; Evain, M.; Benabdellouahed, M.; Reichert, C.

    2015-08-01

    The structure of the Moroccan and Nova Scotia conjugate rifted margins is of key importance for understanding the Mesozoic break-up and evolution of the northern central Atlantic Ocean basin. Seven combined multichannel reflection (MCS) and wide-angle seismic (OBS) data profiles were acquired along the Atlantic Moroccan margin between the latitudes of 31.5° and 33° N during the MIRROR seismic survey in 2011, in order to image the transition from continental to oceanic crust, to study the variation in crustal structure, and to characterize the crust under the West African Coast Magnetic Anomaly (WACMA). The data were modeled using a forward modeling approach. The final models image crustal thinning from 36 km thickness below the continent to approximately 8 km in the oceanic domain. A 100 km wide zone characterized by rough basement topography and high seismic velocities up to 7.4 km/s in the lower crust is observed westward of the West African Coast Magnetic Anomaly. No basin underlain by continental crust has been imaged in this region, as has been identified north of our study area. Comparison to the conjugate Nova Scotian margin shows a similar continental crustal thickness and layer geometry, and the existence of exhumed and serpentinized upper mantle material on the Canadian side only. The oceanic crustal thickness is lower on the Canadian margin.

  5. IRIS Controlled Source Seismic Experiments: Continental Structure, Instrumentation, and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, W. D.; Keller, G. R.

    2004-12-01

    The controlled-source seismology program of IRIS/PASSCAL has made major contributions to the study of continental structure and evolution. It has also undergone major developments in seismic instrumentation. The first PASSCAL experiments (1984/85) targeted the Basin and Range Province and the Ouachita orogenic belt. The Basin and Range study provided remarkably clear images of this thin, highly-extended crust, while the Ouachita experiment tested competing hypotheses for the deep structure of this Paleozoic orogen. However, both of these projects were limited by a lack of seismic instruments. The situation improved in the late 1980's with the benefit of a mixed array of 600 seismic recorders from the USGS, Stanford, and the Geological Survey of Canada. The resolution achieved with these instruments was revolutionary. Results include the imaging of such remarkable features as crustal-scale duplexes in the Brooks Range compressional orogen of northern Alaska, and of crustal "core complexes" in the extended crust of southwest Arizona. The 3-channel PASSCAL Jr. instrument was developed, leading to experiments in which ˜1000 instruments were deployed, including three-component recording. This complex mix of instruments served the community well for several years, but required large, complex instrument centers and lots of technical support. With input from PASSCAL and the international community, a newly designed, compact instrument (the Texan) was finalized in the spring of 1998, and the first 200 instruments was delivered to the Univ. of Texas-El Paso in late 1998. The present instrument pool of Texans exceeds 1,400 and these have been used on such projects as the high-resolution imaging of the Los Angeles and San Fernando basins (LARSE I and II experiments), where active thrust faults have been imaged. Controlled-source seismic experiments are now very numerous. During calendar year 2004 alone, portable Texan instruments have traveled from Venezuela to Denmark

  6. Full seismic waveform inversion of the African crust and Mantle - Initial Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasiev, Michael; Ermert, Laura; Staring, Myrna; Trampert, Jeannot; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    We report on the progress of a continental-scale full-waveform inversion (FWI) of Africa. From a geodynamic perspective, Africa presents an especially interesting case. This interest stems from the presence of several anomalous features such as a triple junction in the Afar region, a broad region of high topography to the south, and several smaller surface expressions such as the Cameroon Volcanic Line and Congo Basin. The mechanisms behind these anomalies are not fully clear, and debate on their origin spans causative mechanisms from isostatic forcing, to the influence of localized asthenospheric upwelling, to the presence of deep mantle plumes. As well, the connection of these features to the African LLSVP is uncertain. Tomographic images of Africa present unique challenges due to uneven station coverage: while tectonically active areas such as the Afar rift are well sampled, much of the continent exhibits a severe dearth of seismic stations. As well, while mostly surrounded by tectonically active spreading plate boundaries (a fact which contributes to the difficulties in explaining the South's high topography), sizeable seismic events (M > 5) in the continent's interior are relatively rare. To deal with these issues, we present a combined earthquake and ambient noise full-waveform inversion of Africa. The noise component serves to boost near-surface sensitivity, and aids in mitigating issues related to the sparse source / station coverage. The earthquake component, which includes local and teleseismic sources, aims to better resolve deeper structure. This component also has the added benefit of being especially useful in the search for mantle plumes: synthetic tests have shown that the subtle scattering of elastic waves off mantle plumes makes the plumes an ideal target for FWI [1]. We hope that this new model presents a fresh high-resolution image of sub-African geodynamic structure, and helps advance the debate regarding the causative mechanisms of its surface

  7. African Mask-Making Workshop: Professional Development Experiences of Diverse Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Audrey C.; Montgomery, Sarah E.; Kirkland-Holmes, Gloria; Watson, Dwight C.; Ayesiga, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Diverse education professionals learned about African cultures in a workshop experience by making African masks using authentic symbolism. Analysis of reflections to evaluate the workshop for applicability to participants with and without African heritage showed that both groups expanded their cultural knowledge of traditional African ethnic…

  8. 3D Seismic Reflection Experiment over the Galicia Deep Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, D. S.; Jordan, B.; Reston, T. J.; Minshull, T. A.; Klaeschen, D.; Ranero, C.; Shillington, D. J.; Morgan, J. K.

    2014-12-01

    In June thru September, 2013, a 3D reflection and a long offset seismic experiment were conducted at the Galicia rifted margin by investigators from the US, UK, Germany, and Spain. The 3D multichannel experiment covered 64 km by 20 km (1280 km2), using the RV Marcus Langseth. Four streamers 6 km long were deployed at 12.5 m hydrophone channel spacing. The streamers were 200 m apart. Two airgun arrays, each 3300 cu in, were fired alternately every 37.5 m, to collectively yield a 400 m wide sail line consisting of 8 CMP lines at 50 m spacing. The long offset seismic experiment included 72 short period OBS's deployed below the 3D reflection survey box. Most of the instruments recorded all the shots from the airgun array shots. The 3D seismic box covered a variety of geologic features. The Peridotite Ridge (PR), is associated with the exhumation of upper mantle rocks to the seafloor during the final stage of the continental separation between the Galicia Bank and the Grand Banks of Newfoundland. The S reflector is present below most of the continental blocks under the deep Galicia basin. S is interpreted to be a low-angle detachment fault formed late in the rifting process, and a number of rotated fault block basins and ranges containing pre and syn-rift sediments. Initial observations from stacked 3D seismic data, and samples of 2D pre-stack time migrated (PSTM) 3D seismic data show that the PR is elevated above the present seafloor in the South and not exposed through the seafloor in the North. The relative smoothness of the PR surface for the entire 20 km N-S contrasts with the more complex, shorter wavelength, faulting of the continental crustal blocks to the east. The PR does not seem to show offsets or any apparent internal structure. The PSTM dip lines show substantial improvement for the structures in the deep sedimentary basin East of the PR. These seem to extend the S reflector somewhat farther to the West. The migrated data show a substantial network of

  9. Seismic tomography Technology for the Water Infiltration Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    J. Descour

    2001-04-30

    NSA Engineering, Inc., conducted seismic tomography surveys in Niche No.3 in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and Alcove No.8 in the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) cross drift as part of the Infiltration Experiment being conducted in Niche No.3. NSA Engineering is a direct support contractor to the Yucca Mountain Project. This report documents the work performed from August 14 through 30, 2000, prior to the beginning of the infiltration experiment. The objective of the seismic tomography survey was to investigate the flow path of water between access drifts and more specifically to (Kramer 2000): (1) Conduct a baseline seismic tomography survey prior to the infiltration experiment; (2) Produce 2-D and 3-D tomographic images of the rock volume between Alcove No.8 and Niche No.3; (3) Correlate tomography results with published structural and lithological features, and with other geophysical data such as ground penetrating radar (GPR); and (4) Results of this survey will form a baseline with which to compare subsequent changes to the rock mass. These changes may be as a result of the water infiltration tests that could be conducted in Alcove No.8 in 2001. The scope of this reported work is to use the velocity tomograms to: (a) assess the structures and lithologic features within the surveyed area and/or volume between the two access drifts; and (b) provide information on the structural state of the rock mass as inferred by the velocity signatures of the rock prior to the beginning of the infiltration experiment.

  10. Seismicity Patterns and Magmatic Processes in the Rwenzori Region, East-African Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindenfeld, M.; Rumpker, G.; Schmeling, H.; Wallner, H.

    2010-12-01

    The 5000m high Rwenzori Mountains are situated within the western branch of the East African Rift System (EARS), at the border between Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo. They represent a basement block located within the rift valley whose origin and relation to the evolution of the EARS are highly puzzling. During a recent seismological campaign we located more than 800 earthquakes per month with magnitudes ranging from 0.5 to 5.1. Vertical sections across the northern parts of the Rwenzoris show, that west of the mountains (towards the rift valley) the focal depths range from 10 to 20 km, whereas the hypocentres go as deep as 30 km on the eastern side. This is in good agreement with Moho-depths derived from receiver functions and implies that all of these events are located within the crust. However, about 30 km east of the northern mountain ridge we located a cluster of 7 events that exhibit an anomalous depth of about 60 km. We can confidently locate these earthquakes within the mantle lithosphere beneath the rift. The existence of earthquakes at this depth is enigmatic, especially within a rifting regime were one expects hot and weak material relatively close to the surface. We think that these events are possibly related to the evolution of the Rwenzori Mountains. A recent hypothesis to explain the extreme uplift of the Rwenzori Mountains is rift induced delamination (RID) of mantle lithosphere. Here we show that the RID-process is indeed capable of explaining the seismic energy release in the mantle. However, in view of the specific hypocentral location of the event cluster, magmatic impregnation processes associated with dyke propagation into the mantle lithosphere may be a more realistic cause for seismic radiation at the observed depth. Crustal earthquakes northeast of the Rwenzori area are relocated with a double-difference algorithm to improve the spatial resolution of seismicity pattern. Several event clusters in the vicinity of the Fort

  11. Looking for seismic scatterers: summer research experience for undergraduate students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimenko, I.; Bagchi, S.; Toteva, T.; Peng, Z.

    2008-12-01

    This project was part of collaboration between Randolph College (VA) and Georgia Institute of Technology (GA). It was designed as summer research experience for undergraduate students. The duration of the project was eight weeks. The aim of this study was to search for fault zone scatterers in the Parkfield section of the San Andreas Fault, and examine the presence or absence of physical changes in the scattering intensity before and after the 2004 M6 Parkfield earthquake. The two students visited Georgia Tech for a week and were trained to manipulate seismic data in Seismic Analysis Code (SAC) format. They assembled a data base of over a thousand events that occurred before and after the M6 earthquake and were recorded by the USGS Parkfield, California, dense seismograph array (UPSAR). They manually picked the arrivals for the P and S waves. Additional signal processing such as frequency filtering and semblance analysis were applied to the records in search for isolated scatterers in the seismic coda. While the eight-week-long research was not enough for the students to complete their project, it was certainly enough to sparkle excitement for conducting seismological research. Currently both students are enrolled in a research topics class and continue to work on this project. Their past and future work will be presented at the meeting.

  12. The Lived Experience of Depression in Elderly African American Women

    PubMed Central

    Black, Helen K.; White, Tracela; Hannum, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This article focuses on the lived experience of depression in 20 elderly African American women. Methods Data on depression emerged from research that qualitatively explored experiences of depression, sadness, and suffering in 120 community-dwelling persons aged 80 and older, stratified by gender, ethnicity, and self-reported health. Results We placed women’s narratives under three general themes: Depression was (a) linked with diminishment of personal strength, (b) related to sadness and suffering, and (c) preventable or resolvable through personal responsibility. Brief accounts illustrate how themes emerged in women’s discussion of depression. Discussion African American women created a language for depression that was rooted in their personal and cultural history and presented in vivid vignettes through their life stories. Their belief systems and the language they used to describe depression are integral aspects of the lived experience of depression. PMID:18079427

  13. Results of a seismic forecasting experiment for the Kamchatka region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doda, L. N.; Natyaganov, V. L.; Shopin, S. A.

    2016-08-01

    The integral results of a seismic forecasting experiment for the powerful M > 7 earthquakes in the Kamchatka region are presented. According to the empirical scheme of the short-term earthquake prediction, since 2002 all officially recorded forecasts, including five deep-focus earthquakes in the Sea of Okhotsk, have been predicted without missing events. The specific character of the features of the earthquake preparation and the annular cloud structures that began to be observed in satellite images near the coast of Japan at the boundary of the Okhotsk plate are analyzed.

  14. Seismic amplification within the Seattle Basin, Washington State: Insights from SHIPS seismic tomography experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snelson, C.M.; Brocher, T.M.; Miller, K.C.; Pratt, T.L.; Trehu, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Recent observations indicate that the Seattle sedimentary basin, underlying Seattle and other urban centers in the Puget Lowland, Washington, amplifies long-period (1-5 sec) weak ground motions by factors of 10 or more. We computed east-trending P- and S-wave velocity models across the Seattle basin from Seismic Hazard Investigations of Puget Sound (SHIPS) experiments to better characterize the seismic hazard the basin poses. The 3D tomographic models, which resolve features to a depth of 10 km, for the first time define the P- and S-wave velocity structure of the eastern end of the basin. The basin, which contains sedimentary rocks of Eocene to Holocene, is broadly symmetric in east-west section and reaches a maximum thickness of 6 km along our profile beneath north Seattle. A comparison of our velocity model with coincident amplification curves for weak ground motions produced by the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake suggests that the distribution of Quaternary deposits and reduced velocity gradients in the upper part of the basement east of Seattle have significance in forecasting variations in seismic-wave amplification across the basin. Specifically, eastward increases in the amplification of 0.2- to 5-Hz energy correlate with locally thicker unconsolidated deposits and a change from Crescent Formation basement to pre-Tertiary Cascadia basement. These models define the extent of the Seattle basin, the Seattle fault, and the geometry of the basement contact, giving insight into the tectonic evolution of the Seattle basin and its influence on ground shaking.

  15. The planning of a passive seismic experiment: the Ketzin case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, G.; Petronio, L.

    2009-04-01

    In the last years, it has been recognized the importance of using microseismic activity data to gain information on the state and dynamics of a reservoir, notwithstanding the difficulties of recording, localizing the events, interpret them correctly, in terms of developing fractures, or thermal effects. The increasing number of CO2 storage experiments, with the necessity of providing efficient, economic, and long-term monitoring methods, both in the injection and post-injection phases, further encourage the development and improvement of recording and processing techniques. Microseismic signals are typically recorded with downhole sensors. Monitoring with surface sensors is problematic due to increased noise levels and signal attenuation particularly in the near surface. The actual detection distance depends on background noise conditions, seismic attenuation and the microseismic source strength. In the frame of the European project Co2ReMoVe and of the European Network of Excellence Co2GeoNet, a passive seismic experiment was planned in the Ketzin site for geological storage of CO2, a former gas store near Potsdam, object of the CO2SINK European project and inserted also in the European project Co2ReMoVe. Aim of the survey is to complement the CO2-SINK active seismic downhole experiments, adding precious information on the microseismicity induced by stress field changes at the reservoir level and in the overburden, due to the CO2 injection. The baseline survey was done in May 2008 by the Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale-OGS (Italy), with the support of the Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum-GFZ (Germany) and the collaboration of the Institut für Geowissenschaftliche Gemeinschaftsaufgaben-GGA (Germany), shortly before the starting of the CO2 injection (June 30th 2008). A continuous monitoring (about 5 days) was performed by 2 downhole 3C geophones, and 3 surface 3C geophones located around the wells. This paper, based on the analysis of

  16. 3D Seismic Reflection Experiment Over the Galicia Deep Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, Dale; Jordan, Brian; Tesi Sanjurjo, Mari; Alexanian, Ara; Morgan, Julia; Shillington, Donna; Reston, Timothy; Minshull, Timothy; Klaeschen, Dirk; Ranero, César

    2014-05-01

    In June thru September, 2013, a 3D reflection and a long offset seismic experiment were conducted at the Galicia rifted margin by investigators from the US, UK, Germany, and Spain. The 3D multichannel experiment covered 64 km by 20 km (1280 km2), using the RV Marcus Langseth. Four streamers 6 km long were deployed at 12.5 m hydrophone channel spacing. The streamers were 200 m apart. Two airgun arrays, each 3300 cu in, were fired alternately every 37.5 m, to collectively yield a 400 m wide sail line consisting of 8 CMP lines at 50 m spacing. The long offset seismic experiment included 72 short period OBS's deployed below the 3D reflection survey box. Most of the instruments recorded all the shots from the airgun array shots. The 3D seismic box covered a variety of geologic features. The Peridotite Ridge (PR), is associated with the exhumation of upper mantle rocks to the seafloor during the final stage of the continental separation between the Galicia Bank and the Grand Banks of Newfoundland. The S reflector is present below most of the continental blocks under the deep Galicia basin. S is interpreted to be a low-angle detachment fault formed late in the rifting process, and a number of rotated fault block basins and ranges containing pre and syn-rift sediments. Initial observations from stacked, but not yet migrated, 3D seismic data show that the PR is elevated above the present seafloor in the South and not exposed through the seafloor in the North. The relative smoothness of the PR surface for the entire 20 km N-S contrasts with the more complex, shorter wavelength, faulting of the continental crustal blocks to the east. The PR does not seem to show offsets or any apparent internal structure. However, migration will be required to see internal structure of the PR. Between the PR and the western most rifted continental crustal blocks, is a sedimentary basin about as wide as the PR and very different from the sedimentary basins bounded by the continental crustal

  17. The KRISP 90 seismic experiment-a technical review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prodehl, C.; Mechie, J.; Achauer, U.; Keller, Gordon R.; Khan, M.A.; Mooney, W.D.; Gaciri, S.J.; Obel, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    On the basis of a preliminary experiment in 1985 (KRISP 85), a seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection survey and a teleseismic tomography experiment were jointly undertaken to study the lithospheric structure of the Kenya rift down to depths of greater than 200 km. This report serves as an introduction to a series of subsequent papers and will focus on the technical description of the seismic surveys of the main KRISP 90 effort. The seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection survey was carried out in a 4-week period in January and February 1990. It consisted of three profiles: one extending along the rift valley from Lake Turkana to Lake Magadi, one crossing the rift at Lake Baringo, and one located on the eastern flank of the rift proper. A total of 206 mobile vertical-component seismographs, with an average station interval of about 2 km, recorded the energy of underwater and borehole explosions to distances of up to about 550 km. During the teleseismic survey an array of 65 seismographs was deployed to record teleseismic, regional and local events for a period of about 7 months from October 1989 to April 1990. The elliptical array spanned the central portion of the rift, with Nakuru at its center, and covered an area about 300 ?? 200 km, with an average station spacing of 10-30 km. Major scientific goals of the project were to reveal the detailed crustal and upper-mantle structure under the Kenya rift, to study the relationship between deep crustal and mantle structure and the development of sedimentary basins and volcanic features within the rift, to understand the role of the Kenya rift within the Afro-Arabian rift system, and to answer fundamental questions such as the mode and mechanism of continental rifting. ?? 1994.

  18. Older African American Women’s Lived Experiences with Depression

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Earlise C.; Mengesha, Maigenete; Issa, Fathiya

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about older African American women’s lived experiences with depression. What does depression mean to this group? What are they doing about their depression? Unfortunately, these questions are unanswered. This study examined older African American women’s lived experiences with depression and coping behaviours. The common sense model provided the theoretical framework for present study. Thirteen community-dwelling African American women aged 60 and older (M =71 years) participated. Using qualitative phenomenological data analysis, results showed the women held beliefs about factors that can cause depression including experiences of trauma, poverty, and disempowerment. Results also indicated the women believed that depression is a normal reaction to life circumstances and did not see the need to seek professional treatment for depression. They coped by use of culturally-sanctioned behaviours including religious practices and resilience. It appears these women’s beliefs about depression and use of culturally-sanctioned coping behaviours might potentially be a barrier to seeking professional mental health care, which could result in missed opportunities for early diagnosis and treatment of depression among this group. Implications for research, educational and clinical interventions are discussed. PMID:23742034

  19. The Meaning of African American College Women's Experiences Attending a Predominantly White Institution: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannon, Christine R.; Woodside, Marianne; Pollard, Brittany L.; Roman, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Because both race and gender are important to the development of African American women, student affairs professionals need to understand the unique experiences of African American women within the context of the college environment. In this phenomenological study, we examined African American women's lived experiences as college students at a…

  20. Pedagogies of Experience: A Case of the African American Male Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Anthony L.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous scholars have illustrated how African American teachers' past experiences provide them a philosophical vision committed to teaching for social and educational change for African American students. This article draws from this body of work by looking at the diverse ways five African American male teachers used their past experiences to…

  1. An Examination of African American Female College Presidents' Professional Ascendancy and Mentoring Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith-Ligon, Pamela

    2011-01-01

    There is a large disparity in the number of African American women leaders in higher education, specifically in the presidency. Much of the literature negates the experiences of the African American woman, often fusing their experiences with those of all women, or those of African American men, which often disregards the challenges and successes…

  2. The BOrborema Deep Electromagnetic and Seismic (BODES) Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julià, J.; Garcia, X.; Medeiros, W. E.; Farias do Nascimento, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Borborema Province of NE Brazil is a large Precambrian domain of the Brazilian shield located in the Northeasternmost corner of South America. It is bounded by the Parnaíba basin to the West and by the São Francisco craton to the South. Its structuration in the Precambrian has been related to compressional processes during the Brasiliano-Pan African orogeny (600-550 Ma). In the Mesozoic, extensional stresses eventually leading to continental breakup, left a number of aborted rift basins within the Province. After continental breakup, the evolution of the Province was marked by episodes of uplift, which might have been coeval with episodes of Cenozoic volcanism. The most prominent expression of those uplift processes is the Borborema Plateau, an elliptically shaped topographic feature in the eastern half of the Province with maximum elevations of ~1200 m. The origin of uplift in the Plateau has been the focus of a number of multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary studies in the past few years, which have imaged the deep structure of the eastern Province with unprecedented detail. The origin of uplift in the western Province, which includes a superb example of basin inversion demonstrated by the ~1000 km elevations of the Chapada do Araripe, however, has been seldom investigated. With the goal of investigating the deep structure of the western Province, a temporary network of 10 collocated seismic and magnetotelluric stations was deployed in the region. The collocated stations were arranged in an approximately NS direction, with an interspation spacing of ~70 km and spanning a total length of ~600 km. The seismic stations consisted of broadband sensors (RefTek 151B-120 "Observer") sampling at 100 Hz and were deployed in January 2015; the MT stations consisted of long-period magnetotelluric (LEMI) systems, sampling at 1 Hz and 4 Hz, and were deployed in April 2015 for a period of ~2 weeks. Preliminary results based on teleseismic P-wave receiver functions

  3. High resolution reverse VSP and interwell seismic experiments at the Buckhorn test site in Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, J.O.; Bangs, J.H.

    1992-07-01

    Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiling VSP and interwell seismic experiments were conducted at the Western Kentucky Petroleum Buckhorn test site near Quincy, Illinois. The RVSP data were acquired using a 3-component pneumatic probe and the interwell seismic data were acquired using a 24-element hydrophone array. The experiments were conducted to analyze high resolution seismic waveforms and to perform travel time velocity inversion for mapping the Silurian Kankakee formation which is the more prolific oil producer in the Mt. Sterling area. Reverse VSP and interwell seismic measurements together with log data have yielded information on the anisotropic characteristic of the shale formation and in the compressional wave velocity distribution of the limestone formation. These results inferred that reverse VSP (using several 3-component detectors in shallow boreholes) and interwell seismic measurements integrated with log data and seismic modeling can delineate the hydrocarbon reservoir and geological structures at the Buckhorn test site.

  4. High resolution reverse VSP and interwell seismic experiments at the Buckhorn test site in Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, J.O.; Bangs, J.H.

    1992-01-01

    Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiling VSP and interwell seismic experiments were conducted at the Western Kentucky Petroleum Buckhorn test site near Quincy, Illinois. The RVSP data were acquired using a 3-component pneumatic probe and the interwell seismic data were acquired using a 24-element hydrophone array. The experiments were conducted to analyze high resolution seismic waveforms and to perform travel time velocity inversion for mapping the Silurian Kankakee formation which is the more prolific oil producer in the Mt. Sterling area. Reverse VSP and interwell seismic measurements together with log data have yielded information on the anisotropic characteristic of the shale formation and in the compressional wave velocity distribution of the limestone formation. These results inferred that reverse VSP (using several 3-component detectors in shallow boreholes) and interwell seismic measurements integrated with log data and seismic modeling can delineate the hydrocarbon reservoir and geological structures at the Buckhorn test site.

  5. Experiences of HIV-Positive African-American and African Caribbean Childbearing Women: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Njie-Carr, Veronica; Sharps, Phyllis; Campbell, Doris; Callwood, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the experiences of HIV-positive African-American and African Caribbean childbearing women related to decisions about HIV testing, status disclosure, adhering to treatment, decisions about childbearing, and experiences in violent intimate relationships. Twenty-three women completed a 60-minute in-depth interview. Six themes emerged: perceived vulnerability to HIV infection; feelings about getting tested for HIV; knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors after HIV diagnosis; disclosure of HIV status; living with HIV (positivity, strength, and prayer); and, experiences with physical and sexual violence. Three women (13%) reported perinatal abuse and 10 women (n = 23, 43.4%) reported lifetime abuse. Positive experiences and resilience were gained from faith and prayer. Most important to the women were the perceived benefits of protecting the health of their baby. Findings suggest that policies supporting early identification of HIV-positive childbearing women are critical in order to provide counseling and education in forming their decisions for safety precautions in violent intimate partner relationships. PMID:23061166

  6. The experiences of African American graduate students: A cultural transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Joretta

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) have long been an intellectual resource for the African American community. HBCUs have provided and continue to provide an educational pathway for many Black students, particularly women who seek graduate and advanced degrees. However, despite the overwhelmingly positive presence of HBCU in the African American community, the academic training of students who graduate from HBCUs may be perceived as insufficient by predominantly White graduate institutions (PWIs). As a result, African American students who are not well integrated into their respective departmental communities and cultures at PW/is are likely to leave graduate school. Thus the continuing loss of talented people, potential research, role models for society, and the next generation of African American students in the fields of math, engineering, and the sciences (STEM) create a segregated and limited university environment. Studies in the field that attempt to provide insight in to experiences of underrepresented students are ultimately beneficial. However, often such studies do not address the process of adapting to the culture of a predominantly white institution (PWI), particularly within white and male dominated fields such as mathematics and the sciences. Research has also indicated that the first two years at a predominantly white graduate institution is the crucial transitional period for students of color, and it is this transitional moment in time that is the focus of this study. I consider how students make the transition from HBCU to majority institutions, and what impact this transition has on their persistence and commitment to their discipline. The limited amount of research that does address the experiences of minority doctoral students in math and science is usually coupled with the experiences of women. However, race and gender are not linear or additive. It cannot be assumed that the same factors that effect the under representation

  7. African Americans' Perceptions of Their Teaching Experiences in Urban Schools Primarily Consisting of Hispanic Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Joffery, III.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined African American teachers' perceptions of their teaching experiences in schools that were once primarily populated with African American students but have experienced shifts in demographics to primarily consisting of Hispanic students. The study focused on three areas. The first area was African American teachers'…

  8. The Meaning of KMT (Ancient Egyptian) History for Contemporary African American Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilliard, Asa G., III

    1992-01-01

    Explores the history of KMT (ancient Egypt) and its importance for contemporary African-American experience. Reviews evidence that ancient Egypt was a black African population bound by history and culture to the rest of Africa. The rescue of Kemetic history can restore a sense of heritage to African Americans. (SLD)

  9. Resiliency in Physics: The Lived Experiences of African-American Women Who Completed Doctoral Physics Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnette, Samara Fleming

    2013-01-01

    Currently, little is known about African-American women with doctoral degrees in physics. This study examined the lived experiences of African-American women who completed doctoral programs in physics. Due to factors of race and gender, African-American women automatically enter a double-bind in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics…

  10. Overview of Results from the Endeavour Seismic Tomography Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E.; Wilcock, W. S.; Weekly, R. T.; Wells, A. E.; Soule, D. C.

    2011-12-01

    We report on our continuing analyses of a multi-scale seismic tomography experiment of the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. In August 2009 we deployed 68 four-component ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) at 64 sites throughout a 90x50 km2 area to record seismic energy from 5567 shots of the 36-element, 6600 in.3 airgun array of the R/V Marcus G. Langseth. The experimental geometry utilized 3 nested scales and was designed to image (1) crustal thickness variations within 25 km of the axial high (0 to 900 kyr); (2) the map view heterogeneity and anisotropy of the topmost mantle beneath the spreading axis; (3) the three-dimensional structure of the crustal magmatic system and (4) the detailed three-dimensional, shallow crustal thermal structure beneath the Endeavour vent fields. The 90-km-long Endeavour segment lies between the Cobb and Endeavour overlapping spreading centers (OSCs), which are converging and thus shortening the Endeavour segment. Previous seismic reflection studies indicate that the central Endeavour segment is on a 40-km-wide plateau of greater crustal thickness that is interpreted to have developed when the ridge overrode the mantle melt anomaly associated with the Heckle seamount chain. The central Endeavour is also underlain by an axial magma chamber (AMC) reflector that is shallowest and most prominent beneath the hydrothermal fields. Geophysical studies of Endeavour thus permit investigation of the competing effects of tectonic, magmatic and hydrothermal processes on crustal structure and architecture. Ongoing analyses include tomographic inversion of first-arriving P waves that sample the upper- and mid-crustal regions, characterization of off-axis magma bodies via travel time and amplitude anomalies of crustal phases, estimation of regional-scale crustal thickness variations from analysis of PmP arrivals and imaging of mantle structure using Pn to constrain mantle flow and melt distribution [Weekly et al.; Wells et al.; Soule et al

  11. OSI Passive Seismic Experiment at the Former Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, J J; Harben, P

    2010-11-11

    its effectiveness for OSI purposes has yet to be determined. For this experiment, we took a broad approach to the definition of ''resonance seismometry''; stretching it to include any means that employs passive seismic methods to infer the character of underground materials. In recent years there have been a number of advances in the use of correlation and noise analysis methods in seismology to obtain information about the subsurface. Our objective in this experiment was to use noise analysis and correlation analysis to evaluate these techniques for detecting and characterizing the underground damage zone from a nuclear explosion. The site that was chosen for the experiment was the Mackerel test in Area 4 of the former Nevada Test Site (now named the Nevada National Security Site, or NNSS). Mackerel was an underground nuclear test of less than 20 kT conducted in February of 1964 (DOENV-209-REV 15). The reason we chose this site is because there was a known apical cavity occurring at about 50 m depth above a rubble zone, and that the site had been investigated by the US Geological Survey with active seismic methods in 1965 (Watkins et al., 1967). Note that the time delay between detonation of the explosion (1964) and the time of the present survey (2010) is nearly 46 years - this would not be typical of an expected OSI under the CTBT.

  12. Factors Influencing Dating Experiences Among African American Emerging Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Naomi M.; Lee, Anna K.; Witherspoon, Daphne D.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined sociocultural factors that impact dating and sexual experiences of heterosexual African American undergraduate college students attending a historically Black institution in the Southeastern United States. Specifically, mate availability and relationship involvement were analyzed to document students’ experiences, and how these influences may be associated with sexual decision making and behavior. Data from nine focus groups (N = 57) were aggregated and four subthemes were identified: competition among women, acceptability of mates, high prevalence of casual relationships, and lowered expectations for commitment. Power dynamics emerged as a contributing factor to the types of relationship involvement, sexual decision-making, and behavior among participants. The importance of prevention programs focusing on situational and cultural variables is highlighted. Additionally, implications for professionals working with emerging adults to consider the impact of the gender ratio imbalance, and perceived power distributions on perceptions of dating relationships, and sexual decision making and behavior are addressed. PMID:25530924

  13. Achievement and Underachievement: The Experiences of African Caribbeans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhamie, Jasmine

    2012-01-01

    The disproportionate representation of African Caribbeans in all the negative educational statistics has been well documented. Despite this, there are African Caribbeans who achieve academically but relatively few studies have explored this area. This study aimed to investigate the factors that contribute to African Caribbean academic success,…

  14. Diversifying the secondary school curriculum: The African experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sifuna, Daniel N.

    1992-01-01

    The paper discusses some African experiences in the diversification of secondary education, which is taken to mean curriculum change in a practical or vocational direction. This approach is intended to provide a wider set of future career options than is offered in the more uniform academic curriculum. The diversification policy has generally been seen as a solution to a number of economic and social problems facing the independent African countries, notably the increasing youth unemployment and the escalating costs of formal education. Studies which have so far been carried out have, however, revealed that diversification programmes have not met the intended objectives, although there is sustained interest in vocationalising formal education. Problems which commonly face these programmes include high unit costs, an absence of clarity in aims and objectives, a shortage of qualified teachers and the low status of vocational subjects as viewed by the students and the community. For future development, it is suggested that diversification programmes be reorganised to relate to more realistic goals through wider community participation and through the work-orientation of post-school training programmes.

  15. US Geological Survey begins seismic ground response experiments in Washington State

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tarr, A.C.; King, K.W.

    1988-01-01

    This article briefly describes the experimental monitoring of minor seismic features caused by distant nuclear explosions, mining blasts and rhythmic human pushing against wooden homes. Some means of response prediction are outlined in Washington State and some effects of seismic amplification by weak clayey sediments are described. The results of several experiments are described. -A.Scarth

  16. Simulation of Seismic Tunnel Detection Experiments in Heterogeneous Geological Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, C. S.; Glaser, S. D.; Rector, J.

    2013-12-01

    Detecting covert tunnels and other underground openings is an important yet challenging problem for geophysicists, especially where geological heterogeneity is pronounced. A number of geophysical methods have been employed to solve this problem, each with varying degrees of success. We focus on the near-surface seismic techniques of surface wave backscattering, surface wave attenuation tomography, body wave diffraction imaging, and resonant imaging. We use the elastodynamic wave propagation code E3D to simulate tunnel detection experiments completed at this site for a range of synthetic fractal velocity models. The Black Diamond mine, located near Pittsburg California, is used for the field test of our analysis. Our results show that for the relatively low-frequency surface wave attenuation and backscattering methods, the maximum detectable tunnel depth in a homogenous medium is approximately equal to the wavelength of the probing Rayleigh wave. The higher-frequency body wave diffraction and resonant imaging techniques are able to locate tunnels at greater depths, but require more sophisticated analysis and are prone to greater attenuation losses. As is expected, for large values of heterogeneity amplitude, ɛ, the percent standard deviation from the mean velocity model, the average observed surface wave attenuation signal decreases and the maximum detectable tunnel depth decreases. However, for moderate values of heterogeneity amplitude (ɛ < 3%), the average surface wave attenuation signal increases and the maximum detectable tunnel depth increases. For the body wave diffraction and resonant imaging experiments, as ɛ increases the complexity of the observed signal increases, resulting in more difficult processing and interpretation. The additional scattering attenuation tends to degrade the signals significantly due to their reliance on lower amplitude and higher frequency waves.

  17. Cage experiments in an East African mangrove forest: a synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrijvers, J.; Vincx, M.

    1997-12-01

    The impact of epibenthos on endobenthos has frequently been investigated for temperate saltmarsh regions by using cage exclusion experiments. Although the insight into the function of the endobenthos of mangrove forests is crucial for their management, very few cage experiments have so far been carried out in such areas. The present paper summaries the results of such experiments in a typical East African mangrove forest at Gazi Bay about 60 km south of Mombasa, Kenya. Epibenthic animals were excluded for one year in two mangrove zones which differed in forest morphology and intertidal position ( Ceriops tagal and Avicennia marina). Environmental factors and meiobenthic and macrobenthic densities were followed in a randomised block design, and procedural and exclusion effects were statistically detected. In confronting the separate responses of all faunal groups in the two mangrove zones, this synthesis gives a better insight into the tropho-dynamical interactions than the earlier separate reports on the same experiment. The ecosystem of the mangrove zones and the competitive interactions within this system provided an ideal opportunity to discover the existence of two food systems. This confirmed a strong involvement of the majority of the endobenthos in an isolated decompositional pathway in the mangrove sediment. It became clear that this exploitative competition was more important than the epibenthic predation in structuring and regulating the global endobenthic community. This synthesis therefore both demonstrates the decisive role of the endobenthos as regenators of mangrove material, and suggests that endobenthos plays a minor role as prey for the demersal or pelagic carnivores.

  18. Representations of the Racialized Experiences of African Americans in Developmental Reading Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Jeanine L.

    2013-01-01

    Race plays a major role in the lived experiences of African Americans. Consequently, race significantly impacts the identities and educational experiences of African American college students--many of whom require developmental reading courses. These courses, which are gateway courses in higher education, should address race along with reading…

  19. The Perceived Undergraduate Classroom Experiences of African American Women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Kimberly Monique

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation study was to explore African-American women's perceptions of undergraduate STEM classroom experiences, and the ways in which those experiences have supported or hindered their persistence in physics majors. The major research question guiding this study was: How do African-American women perceive the climate and…

  20. Bandung seismic experiment: Towards tomographic imaging by using ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pranata, Bayu; Yudistira, Tedy; Saygin, Erdinc; Cummins, Phil R.; Widiyantoro, Sri; Zulfakriza, Nugraha, Andri D.

    2016-05-01

    Bandung is one of the most densely populated cities in Indonesia with vital infrastructures. On the other hand, this area is surrounded by potential sources of earthquakes that make Bandung vulnerable to earthquakes. Structure of seismic velocity and sediment thickness are crucially needed in the earthquake hazard reduction program for Bandung. Based on this consideration, we deployed 64 seismic stations over the Bandung basin to record seismic ambient noise. In this study, we employed a cross-correlation method to the simultaneously recorded data to retrieve interstation Green's functions. We measured group velocity of the retrieved Green's functions by using frequency-time analysis technique. By the end of this project, the set of interstation group velocity will be inverted to image the shallow seismic velocity structure of the Bandung basin and its surrounding areas including Mt. Tangkuban Parahu and Lembang fault. As the first stage of this work, currently we focus on Green ' s function calculation as well as the interstation group velocity measurements. The general characteristics of group velocity can be evaluated from the plot of cross-correlation function as a function of its interstation distance.

  1. Local seismic events in area of Poland based on data from PASSEQ 2006-2008 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, Marcin; Plesiewicz, Beata; Wiszniowski, Jan; Wilde-Piórko, Monika; Passeq Working Group

    2014-05-01

    PASSEQ 2006-2008 (Passive Seismic Experiment in TESZ; Wilde-Piórko et al, 2008) was the biggest so far passive seismic experiment in the area of Central Europe (Poland, Germany, Czech Republic and Lithuania). 196 seismic stations (including 49 broadband seismometers) worked simultaneously for over two years. During experiment multiple types of data recorders and seismometers were used making analysis more complex and time consuming. Dataset was unified and repaired to start the detection of local seismic events. Two different approaches for detection were applied for stations located in Poland. One used standard STA/LTA triggers (Carl Johnson's STA/LTA algorithm) and grid search to classify and locate events. Result was manually verified. Other approach used Real Time Recurrent Network (RTRN) detection (Wiszniowski et al, 2014). Both methods gave similar results showing four previously unknown seismic events located in area of Gulf Of Gdańsk in southern Baltic Sea. The investigation of local seismicity is a good opportunity for verification of new seismic models of lithosphere in the area. In this paper we discuss both detection methods with their pros and cons (accuracy, efficiency, manual work required, scalability). We also show details of all detected and previously unknown events in discussed area. This work was partially supported by NCN grant UMO-2011/01/B/ST10/06653.

  2. EPEC-O - Plenary AA - Cancer & the African American Experience

    Cancer.gov

    The first plenary of the EPEC-O (Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology) Self-Study: Cultural Considerations When Caring for African Americans explores the many factors that lead to inequalities in cancer care outcomes for African Americans.

  3. Prospective Teachers Experiences Teaching Mathematics to African American Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, Peter

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an effort to provide prospective teachers opportunities to better understand African American male students and better focus on how they learn mathematics. Prospective teachers spent 15 hours over an eight week span mentoring and tutoring African American males without the guise of practicing teachers. Qualitative data drawn…

  4. High Resolution Near Surface 3D Seismic Experiments: A Carbonate Platform vs. a Siliciclastic Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippidou, N.; Drijkoningen, G.; Braaksma, H.; Verwer, K.; Kenter, J.

    2005-05-01

    Interest in high-resolution 3D seismic experiments for imaging shallow targets has increased over the past years. Many case studies presented, show that producing clear seismic images with this non-evasive method, is still a challenge. We use two test-sites where nearby outcrops are present so that an accurate geological model can be built and the seismic result validated. The first so-called natural field laboratory is located in Boulonnais (N. France). It is an upper Jurassic siliciclastic sequence; age equivalent of the source rock of N. Sea. The second one is located in Cap Blanc,to the southwest of the Mallorca island(Spain); depicting an excellent example of Miocene prograding reef platform (Llucmajor Platform); it is a textbook analog for carbonate reservoirs. In both cases, the multidisciplinary experiment included the use of multicomponent and quasi- or 3D seismic recordings. The target depth does not exceed 120m. Vertical and shear portable vibrators were used as source. In the center of the setups, boreholes were drilled and Vertical Seismic Profiles were shot, along with core and borehole measurements both in situ and in the laboratory. These two geologically different sites, with different seismic stratigraphy have provided us with exceptionally high resolution seismic images. In general seismic data was processed more or less following standard procedures, a few innovative techniques on the Mallorca data, as rotation of horizontal components, 3D F-K filter and addition of parallel profiles, have improved the seismic image. In this paper we discuss the basic differences as seen on the seismic sections. The Boulonnais data present highly continuous reflection patterns of extremenly high resolution. This facilitated a high resolution stratigraphic description. Results from the VSP showed substantial wave energy attenuation. However, the high-fold (330 traces ) Mallorca seismic experiment returned a rather discontinuous pattern of possible reflectors

  5. Emerging from the Pipeline: African American Students, Socioeconomic Status, and College Experiences and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walpole, MaryBeth

    2008-01-01

    This study focuses on how social class affects the college experiences and outcomes for African American students in 4-year colleges and universities. Using a national, longitudinal data base, the findings indicate that low SES African American students have less contact with faculty, study less, are less involved with student organizations, work…

  6. The Experiences of African American Women Faculty and Administrators in Higher Education: Has Anything Changed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patitu, Carol Logan; Hinton, Kandace G.

    2003-01-01

    This chapter explores factors of concern for, and overall experiences of, African American female faculty and administrators, including salary issues, affirmative action, racism, sexism, homophobia, campus climate, isolation, tenure and promotion processes, and salary. The data reported here were gathered during a study of African American women…

  7. An Examination of the Lived Experiences of Successful African American Men Attending a Historically Black University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Clark R.

    2013-01-01

    This phenomenological research explored the lived experiences of successful African American men attending a Historically Black College and University (HBCU) in the Midwest. The guiding questions for the study were (a) What positive characteristics do successful African American men demonstrate at HBCUs that offset major problems, concerns, and…

  8. African American Male High School Student's Experiences: Success in Urban High School's College Preparation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huff, Carlton L.

    2016-01-01

    Although there are more African American male students in higher education, they do not succeed to the same extent as other demographic groups. The purpose of this Action Research qualitative interpretative phenomenological analysis is to explore the lived experiences of African American male high school students in regards to their academic…

  9. Exploring the Meaning African American PETE Teacher Candidates Ascribe to Their Aquatic Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Takahiro; Hodge, Samuel R.

    2012-01-01

    Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) programs typically require their graduates to learn to swim proficiently. However, the research base is underdeveloped regarding the aquatic experiences of African Americans in PETE programs. The purpose of this study was to explore the meaning African American PETE teacher candidates ascribe to their…

  10. Unheard and Unseen: How Housing Insecure African American Adolescents Experience the Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Addie Lucille; Geller, Kathy D.

    2016-01-01

    This narrative study is based on stories told by African American adolescents experiencing homelessness. It offers insights into their lived experiences and describes the challenges faced in negotiating the urban education system. African American youth are disproportionately represented in the adolescent homeless demographic. "Unheard and…

  11. Study of Local Seismic Events in Lithuania and Adjacent Areas Using Data from the PASSEQ Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janutyte, Ilma; Kozlovskaya, Elena; Motuza, Gediminas

    2013-05-01

    The territory of Lithuania and adjacent areas of the East European Craton have always been considered a region of low seismicity. Two recent earthquakes with magnitudes of more than 5 in the Kaliningrad District (Russian Federation) on 21 September 2004 motivated re-evaluation of the seismic hazard in Lithuania and adjacent territories. A new opportunity to study seismicity in the region is provided by the PASSEQ (Pasive Seismic Experiment) project that aimed to study the lithosphere-asthenosphere structure around the Trans-European Suture Zone. Twenty-six seismic stations of the PASSEQ temporary seismic array were installed in the territory of Lithuania. The stations recorded a number of local and regional seismic events originating from Lithuania and adjacent areas. This data can be used to answer the question of whether there exist seismically active tectonic zones in Lithuania that could be potentially hazardous for critical industrial facilities. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to find any natural tectonic seismic events in Lithuania and to obtain more general view of seismicity in the region. In order to do this, we make a manual review of the continuous data recorded by the PASSEQ seismic stations in Lithuania. From the good quality data, we select and relocate 45 local seismic events using the well-known LocSAT and VELEST location algortithms. In order to discriminate between possible natural events, underwater explosions and on-shore blasts, we analyse spatial distribution of epicenters and temporal distribution of origin times and perform both visual analysis of waveforms and spectral analysis of recordings. We show that the relocated seismic events can be grouped into five clusters (groups) according to their epicenter coordinates and origin and that several seismic events might be of tectonic origin. We also show that several events from the off-shore region in the Baltic Sea (at the coasts of the Kaliningrad District of the Russian Federation) are

  12. Deep seismic exploration into the Arctic Lithosphere: Arctic-2012 Russian wide-angle seismic experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashubin, S.

    2013-12-01

    Integrated geological and geophysical studies of the Earth's crust and upper mantle (the Russian project 'Arctic-2012') were carried out in 2012 in the Mendeleev Rise, central Arctic. The set of studies included wide-angle seismic observations along the line crossing the Mendeleev Rise in its southern part. The DSS seismic survey was aimed at the determination of the Mendeleev Rise crust type. A high-power air gun (120 liters or 7320 cu.in) and ocean stations with multi-component recording (X, Y, Z geophone components and a hydrophone) were used for the DSS. The line was studied using a dense system of observation: bottom station spacing was from 10 to 20 km, excitation point spacing (seismic traces interval) was 315 m. Observation data were obtained in 27 location points of bottom stations, the distance between the first and the last stations was 480 km, the length of the excitation line was 740 km. In DSS wave fields, in the first and later arrivals, there are refracted and reflected waves associated with boundaries in the sedimentary cover, with the top of the basement, and with boundaries in the consolidated crust, including its bottom (Moho discontinuity). The waves could be traced for offsets up to 170-240 km. The DSS line coincides with the near-vertical CMP line worked out with the use of a 4500-m-long seismic streamer and with a 50 m shot point interval that allowed essential detalization of the upper part of the section and taking it into account in the construction of a deep crust model. The deep velocity model was constructed using ray-trace modeling of compressional, shear, and converted waves with the use of the SeisWide program. Estimates were obtained for Vp/Vs velocity ratios, which played an important role in determining the type of crust. The results of the interpretation show that the Mendeleev Rise section corresponds to sections of a thin continental crust of shelf seas and a thinned continental crust of submarine ridges and rises.

  13. The Will to Achieve: A Phenomenological Study of the Experiences of African American High Achieving Students and Their Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Natalie Faye

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to understand the experiences of high achieving African American students and their parents. The experiences of high achieving African American students and their parents have been missing from literature on the academic achievement of African American students. Much of the literature that has been published…

  14. The Soul of Leadership: African American Students' Experiences in Historically Black and Predominantly White Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hotchkins, Bryan K.

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses African American students' leadership experiences at predominantly White institutions. Findings indicated participants utilized servant leadership in historically Black organizations and transformational leadership in predominantly White organizations. The differences displayed showed that participants' leadership perceptions…

  15. The experience of mental health service use for African American mothers and youth.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Richard; Dancy, Barbara L; Wiley, Tisha R A; Perry, Sylvia P; Najdowski, Cynthia J

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about African American families' experiences with mental health services. A purposive sample of 40 dyads of African American youth (aged 13 to 19) and their mothers participated in a cross-sectional qualitative research design using semi-structured interviews that elicited information about their past experiences and satisfaction with mental health services. Though rarely received, group and family therapy were perceived favorably. However, both mothers and youth reported dissatisfaction centered on medication and lack of professionalism, confidentiality, and concern by providers. The failure of mental health services providers to meet basic standards of quality and professionalism may explain the low rate of service use by African Americans.

  16. Extension and Basin Evolution of the East Kivu Graben, Rwanda, East African Rift: Results of New Multichannel Seismic Reflection Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, C. A.; Zhang, X.; Wood, D.; Mburu, D.

    2012-12-01

    The East Kivu Graben resides within the eastern part of Lake Kivu, the highest Great Lake in the western branch of the East African Rift. The lake is more than 440 m deep in the East Kivu Basin, with a catchment comprised of Precambrian metasedimentary rocks and late-Cenozoic volcanics. Lake Kivu is renowned for its uniquely stratified water column, which is charged with considerable quantities of dissolved CO2 and methane, the former due to magmatic degassing. In February and March 2012 514 km of single- and multi-channel seismic reflection data were acquired in the Rwandan waters of Lake Kivu. The 24-fold multichannel seismic data were acquired aboard a modular research vessel, using a 600 m-long hydrophone streamer and single 40 cubic inch airgun. Extension in the East Kivu basin is largely accommodated along a major N-S striking, east-dipping boundary fault observed along the eastern edge of Iwawa Island, and extending for ~40 km along the length of the basin. Numerous intrabasinal normal faults occur to the east of the boundary fault, commonly displacing the lake floor and controlling the location of modern sublacustrine channels. The deepest sedimentary reflections observed on the new MCS data are 1.2-1.5 km below lake floor, near the center of the basin and boundary fault. Crystalline basement is not observed in these deepest areas however, suggesting the presence of a substantial sedimentary section below the imaged strata. Stratal surfaces dip steeply to the west over large areas of the half-graben basin. An acoustically transparent seismic sequence up to ~25 m thick is observed at the lake floor, which overlies a pronounced erosional unconformity over much of the basin. Some intrabasinal normal faults are draped by and do not penetrate the upper sequences, indicating several generations of fault activity in the basin. The late-Pleistocene exposure surface likely correlates to the previous lake level low stage that persisted prior to volcanic damming by

  17. Probing the edge of the West African Craton: A first seismic glimpse from Niger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Leo, Jeanette F.; Wookey, James; Kendall, J.-Michael; Selby, Neil D.

    2015-03-01

    Constraints on crustal and mantle structure of the Eastern part of the West African Craton have to date been scarce. Here we present results of P receiver function and SK(K)S wave splitting analyses of data recorded at International Monitoring System array TORD in SW Niger. Despite lacking in lateral coverage, our measurements sharply constrain crustal thickness (˜41 km), VP/VS ratio (1.69 ± 0.03), mantle transition zone (MTZ) thickness (˜247 km), and a midlithospheric discontinuity at ˜67 km depth. Splitting delay times are low with an average of 0.63 ± 0.01 s. Fast directions follow the regional surface geological trend with an average of 57 ± 1°. We suggest that splitting is due to fossil anisotropic fabrics in the crust and lithosphere, incurred during the Paleoproterozoic Eburnean Orogeny, with possible contributions from the later Pan-African Orogeny and present-day mantle flow. The MTZ appears to be unperturbed, despite the proximity of the sampled region to the deep cratonic root.

  18. A Comparison of Seismicity Characteristics and Fault Structure Between Stick-Slip Experiments and Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebel, T. H. W.; Sammis, C. G.; Becker, T. W.; Dresen, G.; Schorlemmer, D.

    2015-08-01

    Fault zones contain structural complexity on all scales. This complexity influences fault mechanics including the dynamics of large earthquakes as well as the spatial and temporal distribution of small seismic events. Incomplete earthquake records, unknown stresses, and unresolved fault structures within the crust complicate a quantitative assessment of the parameters that control factors affecting seismicity. To better understand the relationship between fault structure and seismicity, we examined dynamic faulting under controlled conditions in the laboratory by creating saw-cut-guided natural fractures in cylindrical granite samples. The resulting rough surfaces were triaxially loaded to produce a sequence of stick-slip events. During these experiments, we monitored stress, strain, and seismic activity. After the experiments, fault structures were imaged in thin sections and using computer tomography. The laboratory fault zones showed many structural characteristics observed in upper crustal faults, including zones of localized slip embedded in a layer of fault gouge. Laboratory faults also exhibited a several millimeter wide damage zone with decreasing micro-crack density at larger distances from the fault axis. In addition to the structural similarities, we also observed many similarities between our observed distribution of acoustic emissions (AEs) and natural seismicity. The AEs followed the Gutenberg-Richter and Omori-Utsu relationships commonly used to describe natural seismicity. Moreover, we observed a connection between along-strike fault heterogeneity and variations of the Gutenberg-Richter b value. As suggested by natural seismicity studies, areas of low b value marked the nucleation points of large slip events and were located at large asperities within the fault zone that were revealed by post-experimental tomography scans. Our results emphasize the importance of stick-slip experiments for the study of fault mechanics. The direct correlation of

  19. Large-N Seismic Deployment at the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T.; Snelson, C. M.; Mellors, R. J.; Pitarka, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary project that consists of a series of chemical explosion experiments at the Nevada National Security Site. The goal of SPE is to understand the complicated effect of earth structures on source energy partitioning and seismic wave propagation, develop and validate physics-based monitoring, and ultimately better discriminate low-yield nuclear explosions from background seismicity. Deployment of a large number of seismic sensors is planned for SPE to image the full 3-D wavefield with about 500 three-component sensors and 500 vertical component sensors. This large-N seismic deployment will operate near the site of SPE-5 shot for about one month, recording the SPE-5 shot, ambient noise, and additional controlled-sources. This presentation focuses on the design of the large-N seismic deployment. We show how we optimized the sensor layout based on the geological structure and experiment goals with a limited number of sensors. In addition, we will also show some preliminary record sections from deployment. This work was conducted under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  20. Immersion and Identity: Experiences of an African American Preschool Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, Ruanda Garth; Reyes, Sharon Adelman

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the benefits and challenges of a Spanish language immersion preschool from the perspective of a non-Spanish speaking African American family. Data explored include the decision to enroll, reactions from peers and family, home-school communication issues, language development, and family involvement. In addition,…

  1. Leadership Development and the African American Male College Student Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oaks, D'Arcy John; Duckett, Kirstan; Suddeth, Todd; Kennedy-Phillips, Lance

    2013-01-01

    Qualitative interviews were employed to assess the effectiveness of a leadership program geared toward African American male personal and professional development, and to examine the relationship between program participation and connectedness. Elements of both social engagement (mentoring and being mentored, peer-to-peer relationships, and…

  2. The South African Experience: Beyond the CIDA Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruton, John M.

    2008-01-01

    The Community and Individual Development Association (CIDA) City Campus is presented by Heaton as an innovative African alternative to traditional business education. However, he considers the model in isolation from the unique educational and economic circumstances of postapartheid South Africa. As a response, this article goes beyond the CIDA…

  3. An induced seismicity experiment across a creeping segment of the Philippine Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prioul, R.; Cornet, F. H.; Dorbath, C.; Dorbath, L.; Ogena, M.; Ramos, E.

    2000-06-01

    The location of seismicity induced by forced fluid flow provides information about domains of pore pressure variation, while changes in fluid content are identified through changes in seismic velocity. These effects have been investigated in the geothermal field of Tongonan, which lies on a creeping portion of the Philippine Fault on Ley te Island. Locally, the left-lateral strike-slip Philippine Fault branches out into three subparallel segments (Eastern, Central and Western Fault Lines). In June-July 1997, a water stimulation was undertaken in a well that intersects the Central Fault Line 1980 m below ground surface; 36,000 m3 were injected between the casing shoe at 1308 m and the well bottom at 2177 m. The seismicity was monitored with a surface station network of 18 stations. More than 400 events, induced by the injection experiment as well as by routine injections associated with the geothermal field exploitation, were recorded in the vicinity of the well. They have been located through a simultaneous three-dimensional (3-D) velocity-hypocenter inversion procedure. None of the microearthquakes are located along the Central Fault Line, they all occurred below the casing shoe to the east of the fault line, i.e., within the geothermal reservoir and mostly below the bottom of the well. Results from the injection experiment and the 18 months of seismic monitoring along the Central and West Fault Lines suggest an aseismic behavior of this major continental fault at this location. The 3-D velocity model, determined from the travel time inversion for seismic events observed during injections, is compared to that obtained from seismic monitoring conducted prior to any injection activities. An increase of P wave velocity is observed during the water injection. This velocity increase is localized within the seismicity cloud and is interpreted as an increase in liquid content within the initial liquid-vapor multiphase part of the reservoir.

  4. Seismic structure of the Rivera subduction zone - the MARS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grand, S. P.; Yang, T.; Sudharja, S.; Wilson, D.; Guzman Speziale, M.; Gomez Gonzalez, J.; Leon-Soto, G.; Ni, J.; Dominguez Reyes, T.

    2007-05-01

    The subduction zone of western Mexico is a unique region on Earth where microplate capture and overriding plate disruption are occurring today. The small Rivera plate is subducting beneath western most Mexico primarily beneath Jalisco state while to the east it is the Cocos plate that is subducting. Above the Rivera plate the Jalisco block of Mexico is bounded by the north trending Colima Rift and the northwest trending Tepic-Chapala Rift and may form a microplate in its own right. Magmatism is present throughout the region and is unusual for a subduction zone in that geochemical analyses indicate an ocean island basalt component to some of the lavas. Also, Colima volcano is offset trenchward from other volcanoes in the Mexican Volcanic Belt. Little is known of the subducting Rivera plate geometry due to the paucity of seismicity within the plate yet the geometry of the Rivera and Cocos plates at depth are likely critical for understanding the tectonic evolution of western Mexico. The MARS (MApping the Rivera Subduction zone) project consists of the deployment of 50 broadband seismometers covering the Jalisco block from the coast to the Tepic-Chapala rift in the north and about 150 km to the west of the Colima rift. The instruments were deployed in January, 2006 and will be removed in June, 2007. The goal of the project is to seismically image the subducting Rivera and Cocos plates at depth as well as the mantle wedge above the plates. A number of different analyses of MARS data are underway including teleseismic tomography, receiver function analysis, and shear wave splitting analysis. The preliminary tomography results clearly show both subducting plates with a sharp change in dip to the east of the Colima rift probably indicating a tear between the two plates along a trend more eastward than the trend of the rift. The images also show extremely slow shallow mantle velocities beneath the Tepic-Chapala rift but not beneath the Colima rift. Receiver functions

  5. Experiences of African American Young Women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolo, Yovonda Ingram

    African American women are underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields throughout the United States. As the need for STEM professionals in the United States increases, it is important to ensure that African American women are among those professionals making valuable contributions to society. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to describe the experiences of African American young women in relation to STEM education. The research question for this study examined how experiences with STEM in K-10 education influenced African American young women's academic choices in their final years in high school. The theory of multicontextuality was used to provide the conceptual framework. The primary data source was interviews. The sample was composed of 11 African American young women in their junior or senior year in high school. Data were analyzed through the process of open coding, categorizing, and identifying emerging themes. Ten themes emerged from the answers to research questions. The themes were (a) high teacher expectations, (b) participation in extra-curricular activities, (c) engagement in group-work, (d) learning from lectures, (e) strong parental involvement, (f) helping others, (g) self-efficacy, (h) gender empowerment, (i) race empowerment, and (j) strategic recruitment practices. This study may lead to positive social change by adding to the understanding of the experiences of African American young women in STEM. By doing so, these findings might motivate other African American young women to pursue advanced STEM classes. These findings may also provide guidance to parents and educators to help increase the number of African American women in STEM.

  6. Shallow Seismic Imaging of an Oil Field Using Broadband Data: LaBarge Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biryol, C. B.; Leahy, G. M.; Zandt, G.; Beck, S. L.; Saltzer, R. L.; Lewallen, K. T.

    2011-12-01

    The frequency content of the broadband seismic records makes them a suitable candidate for frequency based analysis of the Earth's shallow crustal structure. Frequency band dependent analysis and inversion of Pg- and Pn-wave travel-time residuals from regional/local earthquakes can yield valuable information on the shallow seismic structure of the crust. Hence, we investigate the shallow crustal seismic structure beneath the LaBarge oil production field in western Wyoming. We picked and inverted Pg- and Pn-wave travel-times from regional/local earthquakes in multiple frequency bands. Our dataset is composed of travel-time observations from 55 densely spaced (250m) broadband seismic stations of the LaBarge Experiment array. These stations were deployed in LaBarge, WY, between November 2008-June 2009 and recorded continuously with a sampling rate of 100 samples-per-second. We used arrival-time residuals from approximately 90 regional earthquakes located between the distances of 1.8° - 3.5° and 120 local earthquakes located closer than 1.8° from the LaBarge array. This yielded over 35,000 observations of relative travel-time residuals summed over all of the analyzed frequency bands. The results of our analysis consistently yielded negative relative residual times (-0.05 seconds) in all frequency bands for the stations in the NW branch of the network indicating presence of seismically faster structures beneath this region. We observe that the residuals gradually increase towards the eastern branch of the array (up to 0.1 seconds) where major structural boundaries are transected. The results of various inversions consistently indicated the presence of a seismically faster structural anomaly underlying the western branch of the array at depths between 3 and 5 km. In general, our results indicate that frequency dependent analyses of broadband data can be used to resolve the shallow seismic structure of the upper-crust within a spatially limited region.

  7. Psychopathology, adversity, and creativity: diversifying experiences in the development of eminent African Americans.

    PubMed

    Damian, Rodica Ioana; Simonton, Dean Keith

    2015-04-01

    Symptoms associated with mental illness have been hypothesized to relate to creative achievement because they act as diversifying experiences. However, this theory has only been tested on predominantly majority-culture samples. Do tendencies toward mental illness still predict eminent creativity when they coexist with other diversifying experiences, such as early parental death, minority-status, or poverty? These alternative diversifying experiences can be collectively referred to as examples of developmental adversity. This conjecture was tested on a significant sample of 291 eminent African Americans who, by the nature of their status as long-term minorities, would experience more developmental adversity. Replicating majority-culture patterns, African American artists showed higher mental illness rates than African American scientists. Yet the absolute percentages were significantly lower for the African Americans, regardless of profession. Furthermore, mental illness predicted higher eminence levels only for the African American artists, an effect that diminished when controlling for developmental adversity. Because the latter predicted eminence for both artists and scientists, the "madness-to-genius" link probably represents just 1 of several routes by which diversifying experiences can influence eminence. The same developmental ends can be attained by different means. This inference warrants further research using other eminent creators emerging from minority culture populations.

  8. Imaging the deep seismic structure beneath a mid-ocean ridge: the MELT experiment

    PubMed

    1998-05-22

    The Mantle Electromagnetic and Tomography (MELT) Experiment was designed to distinguish between competing models of magma generation beneath mid-ocean ridges. Seismological observations demonstrate that basaltic melt is present beneath the East Pacific Rise spreading center in a broad region several hundred kilometers across and extending to depths greater than 100 kilometers, not just in a narrow region of high melt concentration beneath the spreading center, as predicted by some models. The structure of the ridge system is strongly asymmetric: mantle densities and seismic velocities are lower and seismic anisotropy is stronger to the west of the rise axis.

  9. An Idea for an Active Seismic Experiment on Mars in 2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lognonne, Ph.; Banerdt, B.; Giardini, D.; Costard, F.

    2001-01-01

    The detection of liquid water is of prime interest and should have deep implications in the understanding of the Martian hydrological cycle and also in exobiology. In the frame of the 2007 joint CNES-NASA mission to Mars, a set of 4 NETLANDERS developed by an European consortium is expected to be launched in June 2007. We propose to use a second spacecraft going or landing to Mars to release near one of the Netlander a series of artificial metallic meteorites, in order to perform an active seismic experiment providing a seismic profile of the crust and subsurface.

  10. Impact of Petrophysical Experiments on Quantitative Interpretation of 4D Seismic Data at Ketzin, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, A.; Lueth, S.

    2015-12-01

    Petrophysical investigations for CCS concern relationships between physical properties of rocks and geophysical observations for understanding behavior of injected CO2 in a geological formation. In turn 4D seismic surveying is a proven tool for CO2 monitoring. At the Ketzin pilot site (Germany) 4D seismic data have been acquired by means of a baseline (pre-injection) survey in 2005 and monitor surveys in 2009 and 2012. At Ketzin CO2 was injected in supercritical state from 2008 to 2013 in a sandstone saline aquifer (Stuttgart Formation) at a depth of about 650 m. The 4D seismic data from Ketzin reflected a pronounced effect of this injection. Seismic forward modeling using results of petrophysical experiments on two core samples fromthe target reservoir confirmed that effects of the injected CO2 on the 4D seismic data are significant. The petrophysical data were used in that modeling in order to reflect changes due to the CO2 injection in acoustic parameters of the reservoir. These petrophysical data were further used for a successful quantitative interpretation of the 4D seismic data at Ketzin. Now logs from a well (drilled in 2012) penetrating the reservoir containing information about changes in the acoustic parameters of the reservoir due to the CO2 injection are available. These logs were used to estimate impact of the petrophysical data on the qualitative and quantitative interpretation of the 4D seismic data at Ketzin. New synthetic seismograms were computed using the same software and the same wavelet as the old ones apart from the only difference and namely the changes in the input acoustic parameters would not be affected with any petrophysical experiments anymore. Now these changes were put in computing directly from the logs. In turn the new modelled changes due to the injection in the newly computed seismograms do not include any effects of the petrophysical data anymore. Key steps of the quantitative and qualitative interpretation of the 4D seismic

  11. Passive seismic monitoring of hydraulic fracture experiments at the Multiwell Experiment site

    SciTech Connect

    Thorne, B.J.; Morris, H.E.

    1988-08-01

    Redesign of hardware, software, and data-reduction techniques associated with the Sandia National Laboratories' Borehole Seismic System (BSS) have made possible better estimates of hydraulic fracture geometry at the Multiwell Experiment (MWX) site. The redesigned system now incorporates four geophones per axis and provides up to 112 dB of downhole gain, for 100 times the sensitivity of the original system. Improved signal-to-noise ratios, extended frequency response and increased digitization rates have made possible the acquisition and processing of data which were previously inaccessible. A maximum likelihood event location scheme, which incorporates an algorithm based on the use of spherical statistics, is used to compute the location of microseismic events and error estimates for these locations. Accuracy estimates for the redesigned system, based on the ability to locate perforation shots, indicates a 25 ft (7.6 m) uncertainty in the location of individual microseismic events using data from two BSS receivers. This resulted in a high level of confidence in determination of the azimuth of the November 1, 1986, hydraulic fracture in the Fluvial B sandstone. A reasonable determination of the azimuth, propped wing length and height for the September 23, 1987, hydraulic fracture in the Fluvial E sandstone was possible using data from only one BSS receiver. 15 refs., 32 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Martian Ambient Seismic Noise: from the first modeling to the future data of the InSight Seismic experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lognonne, P. H.; Banerdt, W. B.; Mimoun, D.; Kobayashi, N.; Panning, M. P.; Pike, W. T.; Giardini, D.; Christensen, U. R.; Nishikawa, Y.; Murdoch, N.; Kawamura, T.; Kedar, S.; Spiga, A.

    2014-12-01

    The InSight NASA Discovery mission is expected to deploy a 3 axis VBB and a 3 axis SP seismometer on Mars by late september 2016. This seismic station will explore the Martian ambient noise, in addition to more classical science goals related to the detection of Marsquakes, Meteoritic Impacts and Tides. Mars, in contrast with the Earth (with both atmosphere and ocean) and the Moon (with no atmosphere nor ocean) is expected to have ambient noise only related to its atmosphere. Mars seismic data are therefore expecting to reveal the atmospheric coupling for a different atmospheric dynamics than Earth, especially in the 0.1-1 Hz bandwidth, dominated by oceanic microseisms on Earth. We rapidly present the expected performances of the SEIS experiment onboard InSight. This experiment is based on two 3 axis seismometers, one covering the tide and low seismic frequencies (up to 10 Hz) and a second one covering the high frequencies (from 0.1 Hz to 50 Hz). Both sensors are mounted on a sensors plateform, deployed by a robotic arm 1-2 meters from the lander and covered by thermal protection and a wind protection. The expected performances indicates that signal as low as 10**(-9) m/s**2/Hz**(1/2) will be detected in the 0.005-2 Hz bandwidth. We then focus on the modeling of this ambient atmospheric noise.This modeling has been done not only from constraints gathered by the atmospheric sensors of previous Mars missions (e.g. Viking and Pathfinder) but also by numerical modeling of the atmospheric perturbations, both at global scale and mesoscale. Theoretical estimation of the ambient noise has then been obtained for the pressure-correlated surface loading and the stochastic excitation of surface waves, at both long and very long period (e.g. Mars hum) and at medium or short period (e.g. regional and local generated surface waves). Results shows that most of these source of ambient noise will be detected, likely during the day for those generated locally and possibly during the

  13. The Lived Experiences of African American Women with Breast Cancer: Implications for Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clay, LaTasha K.

    2013-01-01

    Qualitative phenomenological methodology was used to explore the lived experiences of African American women diagnosed with breast cancer. Phenomenology focuses on the meaning of the lived experiences of individuals experiencing a concept, structure, or phenomenon (Creswell, 2007). The purpose of phenomenological research is to identify phenomena…

  14. Caregiver Experiences of Discrimination and African American Adolescents' Psychological Health over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Kahlil R.; Hurd, Noelle M.; Jagers, Robert J.; Sellers, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the effect of caregivers' experiences of racial discrimination on their adolescent children's psychological functioning among a sample of 264 African American dyads. Potential relations between caregiver discrimination experiences and a number of indicators of adolescents' (aged 12-17) psychological functioning over time…

  15. Discrimination at School: Latino and African American Male High School Students' Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakefield, W. David; Fajardo, Gabriela

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated male Latino and African American adolescents' experiences with racial discrimination at school. Participants (N = 85) were recruited from an urban public high school in southern California. Students completed paper and pencil measures assessing their experiences with racial discrimination. Overall, Latino and African…

  16. Creating Supportive Learning Environments: Experiences of Lesbian and Gay-Parented Families in South African Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breshears, Diana; Lubbe-De Beer, Carien

    2016-01-01

    Through in-depth interviews with 21 parents and 12 children in lesbian/gay-parented families, we explored the experiences of this unique family form in South African schools. Specifically, families reflected on their positive and negative experiences in the children's education and used these reflections to offer advice to teachers and…

  17. We fall down: the African American experience of coping with the homicide of a loved one.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Tanya L; Boyas, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Rates of homicide among African Americans are much higher than those of other racial or ethnic groups. Research has demonstrated that homicide can be psychologically debilitating for surviving family members. Yet, exploring the experiences of homicide victims’ surviving loved ones has received little attention. This study examined the coping strategies of African American survivors of homicide. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 8 African American family members (ages 18-82) of homicide victims. Survivors were recruited from the Massachusetts Office of Victim Services and from homicide survivor support, school, and community groups throughout the New England area. Interviews were conducted using open-ended questions derived from coping, support network, grief, and bereavement literatures. Results indicate that the primary coping strategies utilized by African American survivors of homicide victims are spiritual coping and meaning making, maintaining a connection to the deceased, collective coping and caring for others, and concealment. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  18. The Millikan shaking experiments and high-frequency seismic wave propagation in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Toshiro; Okamoto, Taro

    2014-08-01

    In order to study high-frequency seismic wave propagation, seismic wavefields generated by resonant-shaking experiments of the Millikan Library, on the campus of California Institute Technology (Pasadena, California, USA), were analysed. Because the resonant shaking frequencies are 1.12 Hz (the east-west direction) and 1.64 Hz (the north-south direction), this active-source experiment can provide opportunities for studying high-frequency seismic wave propagation in Southern California. Because they are very narrow frequency band data, the analyses must be quite different from ordinary time-domain analyses. We show, theoretically, that the signals must be dominated by surface waves. Adopting this surface wave assumption, we proceed to make two separate analyses, one on spectral amplitude and the other on phase. We present a new method to derive group velocity from phase based on the cross correlations between the station in the Millikan Library (MIK) and stations in the regional network. Our results support that an active-source experiment by resonant shaking of a building is a feasible approach for high-frequency seismic wave studies.

  19. The Experience of African Students Studying Nursing in the United States in Relation to Their Use of Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyson, Donald Lee

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the critical thinking experiences of African nursing students enrolled in several universities in the U.S. Using a semi-structured interview approach, twelve African students discussed their experiences using and learning a western critical thinking approach, as well as described their educational experiences in…

  20. A wide-angle seismic survey of the Hecataeus Ridge, south of Cyprus: a microcontinental block from the African plate docked in a subduction zone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Ayda; Welford, Kim; Hall, Jeremy; Hübscher, Christian; Louden, Keith; Ehrhardt, Axel

    2013-04-01

    Cyprus lies at the southern edge of the Aegean-Anatolian microplate, caught in the convergence of Africa and Eurasia. Subduction of the African plate below Cyprus has probably ceased and this has been attributed to the docking in the subduction zone of the Eratosthenes Seamount microcontinental fragment on the northern edge of the African plate. In early 2010, on R.V. Maria S. Merian, we conducted a wide-angle seismic survey to test the hypothesis that the Hecataeus Ridge, another possible microcontinental block lying immediately offshore SE Cyprus, might be related to an earlier docking event. The upper crust of southern Cyprus is dominated by ophiolites, with seismic velocities of up to 7 km s-1. A wide angle seismic profile along Hecataeus Ridge was populated with 15 Canadian and German ocean-bottom seismographs at 5 km intervals and these recorded shots from a 6000 cu. in. air gun array, fired approximately every 100 m. Rough topography of the seabed has made picking of phases and their modelling a demanding task. Bandpass and coherency filtering have enabled us to pick phases out to around 80 km. Tomographic inversion of short-range first arrivals provided an initial model of the shallow sub-seabed structure. Forward modelling by ray-tracing, using the code of Zelt and Smith, was then used to model crustal structure down to depths of around 20 km, with occasional evidence of reflections from deeper boundaries (Moho?). Modelling results provide good control on P-wave velocities in the top 20 km and some indications of deeper events. There is no evidence of true velocities approaching 7 km/s in the top 20 km below the Ridge that might indicate the presence of ophiolitic rocks. Regional gravity and magnetic field data tend to support this proposition. We thus conclude that Hecataeus Ridge is not composed of characteristically ophiolitic, Cyprus (upper plate) crust, and it might well be derived from the African (lower) plate.

  1. Seismic images of the Brooks Range fold and thrust belt, Arctic Alaska, from an integrated seismic reflection/refraction experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levander, A.; Fuis, G.S.; Wissinger, E.S.; Lutter, W.J.; Oldow, J.S.; Moore, T.E.

    1994-01-01

    We describe results of an integrated seismic reflection/refraction experiment across the Brooks Range and flanking geologic provinces in Arctic Alaska. The seismic acquisition was unusual in that reflection and refraction data were collected simultaneously with a 700 channel seismograph system deployed numerous times along a 315 km profile. Shot records show continuous Moho reflections from 0-180 km offset, as well as numerous upper- and mid-crustal wide-angle events. Single and low-fold near-vertical incidence common midpoint (CMP) reflection images show complex upper- and middle-crustal structure across the range from the unmetamorphosed Endicott Mountains allochthon (EMA) in the north, to the metamorphic belts in the south. Lower-crustal and Moho reflections are visible across the entire reflection profile. Travel-time inversion of PmP arrivals shows that the Moho, at 33 km depth beneath the North Slope foothills, deepens abruptly beneath the EMA to a maximum of 46 km, and then shallows southward to 35 km at the southern edge of the range. Two zones of upper- and middle-crustal reflections underlie the northern Brooks Range above ~ 12-15 km depth. The upper zone, interpreted as the base of the EMA, lies at a maximum depth of 6 km and extends over 50 km from the range front to the north central Brooks Range where the base of the EMA outcrops above the metasedimentary rocks exposed in the Doonerak window. We interpret the base of the lower zone, at ~ 12 km depth, to be from carbonate rocks above the master detachment upon which the Brooks Range formed. The seismic data suggest that the master detachment is connected to the faults in the EMA by several ramps. In the highly metamorphosed terranes south of the Doonerak window, the CMP section shows numerous south-dipping events which we interpret as a crustal scale duplex involving the Doonerak window rocks. The basal detachment reflections can be traced approximately 100 km, and dip southward from about 10-12 km

  2. Experiences of African Students in Predominantly White Institutions: A Literature Overview

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, Kay

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine research conducted on the experiences of African health sciences students in predominantly white higher education institutions/environments. The main elements of cross-cultural adaptation models were adopted to discuss the amalgamated themes under the auspices of adjustment, integration, and conditioning. The overview revealed that African students encounter unique experiences, with isolation and “feeling different” being commonly mentioned. Recommendations for future research are presented, including programmatic implications for higher education and student affairs professionals. PMID:27525115

  3. Joint seismic-geodynamic-mineral physical modelling of African geodynamics: A reconciliation of deep-mantle convection with surface geophysical constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Forte, A M; Quere, S; Moucha, R; Simmons, N A; Grand, S P; Mitrovica, J X; Rowley, D B

    2008-08-22

    Recent progress in seismic tomography provides the first complete 3-D images of the combined thermal and chemical anomalies that characterise the unique deep mantle structure below the African continent. With these latest tomography results we predict flow patterns under Africa that reveal a large-scale, active hot upwelling, or superplume, below the western margin of Africa under the Cape Verde Islands. The scale and dynamical intensity of this West African superplume (WASP) is comparable to that of the south African superplume (SASP) that has long been assumed to dominate the flow dynamics under Africa. On the basis of this new tomography model, we find the dynamics of the SASP is strongly controlled by chemical contributions to deep mantle buoyancy that significantly compensate its thermal buoyancy. In contrast, the WASP appears to be entirely dominated by thermal buoyancy. New calculations of mantle convection incorporating these two superplumes reveal that the plate-driving forces due to the flow generated by the WASP is as strong as that due to the SASP. We find that the chemical buoyancy of the SASP exerts a strong stabilising control on the pattern and amplitude of shallow mantle flow in the asthenosphere below the southern half of the African plate. The asthenospheric flow predictions provide the first high resolution maps of focussed upwellings that lie below the major centres of Late Cenozoic volcanism, including the Kenya domes and Hoggar massif that lies above a remnant plume head in the upper mantle. Inferences of sublithospheric deformation from seismic anisotropy data are shown to be sensitive to the contributions of chemical buoyancy in the SASP.

  4. Academic attainment and the high school science experiences among high-achieving African American males

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trice, Rodney Nathaniel

    This study examines the educational experiences of high achieving African American males. More specifically, it analyzes the influences on their successful navigation through high school science. Through a series of interviews, observations, questionnaires, science portfolios, and review of existing data the researcher attempted to obtain a deeper understanding of high achieving African American males and their limitations to academic attainment and high school science experiences. The investigation is limited to ten high achieving African American male science students at Woodcrest High School. Woodcrest is situated at the cross section of a suburban and rural community located in the southeastern section of the United States. Although this investigation involves African American males, all of whom are successful in school, its findings should not be generalized to this nor any other group of students. The research question that guided this study is: What are the limitations to academic attainment and the high school science experiences of high achieving African American males? The student participants expose how suspension and expulsion, special education placement, academic tracking, science instruction, and teacher expectation influence academic achievement. The role parents play, student self-concept, peer relationships, and student learning styles are also analyzed. The anthology of data rendered three overarching themes: (1) unequal access to education, (2) maintenance of unfair educational structures, and (3) authentic characterizations of African American males. Often the policies and practices set in place by school officials aid in creating hurdles to academic achievement. These policies and practices are often formed without meaningful consideration of the unintended consequences that may affect different student populations, particularly the most vulnerable. The findings from this study expose that high achieving African American males face major

  5. Structure of the Crust and Mantle Lithosphere underneath NW Namibia Revealed by the WALPASS Seismic Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, X.; Jokat, W.; Weber, M. H.; Geissler, W.; Heit, B.; Eken, T.; Pandey, S.; Lushetile, B.; Hoffmann, K.

    2013-12-01

    The amphibian Walvis Ridge Passive-Source Seismic Experiment (WALPASS) have been operated for a period of two years from 2010 to 2012 in the area where the Walvis Ridge intersects the continental margin of northwestern Namibia. The deployment was intended to study the lithospheric and upper mantle structure in the ocean-continent transition area beneath the passive continental margin. The main idea is to find seismic anomalies related to the postulated hotspot track from the continent to the ocean along the Walvis Ridge that links the Etendeka continental flood-basalt province to the Tristan da Cunha hotspot in the mid Atlantic ocean. This could provide clues of the role of plume-lithosphere interaction during the continental break-up. We present here seismic structures of the crustal and mantle lithosphere in this geophysically little studied region using seismic methods including P and S receiver functions and shear wave splitting. The average crustal thickness in the continental Namibia is ~35 km with a relatively low Vp/Vs ratio of 1.7. Underneath the NE extension of the Walvis Ridge the crust is the thickest (45 km) with a high Vp/Vs ratio (>1.80). The thick crust and high Vp/Vs ratio beneath the Walvis Ridge are consistent with high Vp derived by controlled source seismics, implying a magmatic underplating. A low velocity zone in the mantle is observed at depths of 60-120 km, possibly representing the base of the lithosphere. The P-to-S converted phases at the 410 and 660 km discontinuities arrive 2-3 s earlier, indicating higher upper mantle velocities (+5%). Seismic anisotropy in the mantle derived by the SKS splitting exhibits a pattern of the plume and plate interaction.

  6. Deep seismic refraction experiment in northeast Brazil: New constraints for Borborema province evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Marcus Vinicius A. G. de; Berrocal, Jesus; Soares, José E. P.; Fuck, Reinhardt A.

    2015-03-01

    The Borborema Province of northeastern Brazil is a major Proterozoic crustal province that, until now, has never been explored using deep crustal seismic methods. Here are reported the first results obtained from a high-quality seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profile that has defined the internal seismic velocity structure and thickness of the crust in this region. Almost 400 recording stations were deployed in the Deep Seismic Refraction (DSR) experiment through an NW-SE ca. 900 km linear array and 19 shots were exploded at every 50 km along the line. Data from the 10 southeastern most shots of the seismic profile were processed in this work. The main features and geological structures crossed by the studied portion of the profile belong to the so-called Central Sub-province of the Borborema tectonic province. The crustal model obtained is compatible with a typical structure of extended crust. The model was essentially divided into three layers: upper crust, lower crust, and a half-space represented by the shallower portion of the mantle. The Moho is an irregular interface with depth ranging between 31.7 and 34.5 km, and beneath the Central Sub-province it varies from 31.5 to 33 km depth, where its limits are related to major crustal discontinuities. The distribution of velocities within the crust is heterogeneous, varying vertically from 5.7 to 6.3 km/s in the upper crust and from 6.45 to 6.9 km/s in the lower crust. From the average crustal velocity distribution it is evident that the Central Sub-province has seismic characteristics different from neighboring domains. The crust is relatively thin and crustal thickness variations in the profile are subtle due to stretching that occurred in the Cretaceous, during the fragmentation of Pangaea, opening of the South Atlantic Ocean and separation of South America from Africa.

  7. Advancing Explosion Source Theory through Experimentation: Results from Seismic Experiments Since the Moratorium on Nuclear Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonner, J. L.; Stump, B. W.

    2011-12-01

    On 23 September 1992, the United States conducted the nuclear explosion DIVIDER at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). It would become the last US nuclear test when a moratorium ended testing the following month. Many of the theoretical explosion seismic models used today were developed from observations of hundreds of nuclear tests at NTS and around the world. Since the moratorium, researchers have turned to chemical explosions as a possible surrogate for continued nuclear explosion research. This talk reviews experiments since the moratorium that have used chemical explosions to advance explosion source models. The 1993 Non-Proliferation Experiment examined single-point, fully contained chemical-nuclear equivalence by detonating over a kiloton of chemical explosive at NTS in close proximity to previous nuclear explosion tests. When compared with data from these nearby nuclear explosions, the regional and near-source seismic data were found to be essentially identical after accounting for different yield scaling factors for chemical and nuclear explosions. The relationship between contained chemical explosions and large production mining shots was studied at the Black Thunder coal mine in Wyoming in 1995. The research led to an improved source model for delay-fired mining explosions and a better understanding of mining explosion detection by the International Monitoring System (IMS). The effect of depth was examined in a 1997 Kazakhstan Depth of Burial experiment. Researchers used local and regional seismic observations to conclude that the dominant mechanism for enhanced regional shear waves was local Rg scattering. Travel-time calibration for the IMS was the focus of the 1999 Dead Sea Experiment where a 10-ton shot was recorded as far away as 5000 km. The Arizona Source Phenomenology Experiments provided a comparison of fully- and partially-contained chemical shots with mining explosions, thus quantifying the reduction in seismic amplitudes associated with partial

  8. Capacity development for health research in Africa: experiences managing the African Doctoral Dissertation Research Fellowship Program

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Africa's progress depends on her capacity to generate, adapt, and use scientific knowledge to meet regional health and development needs. Yet, Africa's higher education institutions that are mandated to foster this capacity lack adequate resources to generate and apply knowledge, raising the need for innovative approaches to enhance research capacity. In this paper, we describe a newly-developed program to support PhD research in health and population sciences at African universities, the African Doctoral Dissertation Research Fellowship (ADDRF) Program. We also share our experiences implementing the program. As health research capacity-strengthening in Africa continues to attract attention and as the need for such programs to be African-led is emphasized, our experiences in developing and implementing the ADDRF offer invaluable lessons to other institutions undertaking similar initiatives. PMID:20587016

  9. Characterization of granular flows from seismic signal: insights from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farin, M.; Mangeney, A.; Toussaint, R.; de Rosny, J.

    2015-12-01

    Landslides, rock avalanche and debris flows represent a major natural hazard in steep landscapes. Recent studies showed that the seismic signal generated by these events can provide quantitative information on their location and amplitude. However, owing to the lack of visual observations, the dynamics of gravitational events is still not well understood. A burning challenge is to establish relations between the characteristics of the landslide (volume, speed, runout distance,...) and that of the emitted seismic signal (maximum amplitude, seismic energy, frequencies,...) Laboratory experiments of granular columns collapse are conducted on an inclined plane. The seismic signal generated by the collapse is recorded by piezoelectric accelerometers sensitive in a wide frequency range (1 Hz - 56 kHz). The granular column is constituted with steel beads of same diameter, between 1 mm and 3 mm that are initially contained in a cylinder. The column collapses when the cylinder is removed. A layer of steel beads is glued on the surface of the plane to provide basal roughness. For horizontal granular flows, we show that it is possible to distinguish the phases of acceleration and deceleration of the flow in the emitted seismic signal. Indeed, the signal envelope is symmetrical with respect to its maximum, separating the acceleration from the deceleration. When the slope angle increases, we observe that the signal envelope looses its symmetry: it stays unchanged during the acceleration but it is significantly extended during the deceleration. In addition, we propose a semi-empirical scaling law to describe the increase of the elastic energy radiated by a granular flow when the slope angle increases. The fit of this law with the seismic data allows us to retrieve the friction angle of the granular material, which is a crucial rheological parameter. Finally, we show that the ratio of the radiated elastic energy over the potential energy lost of granular flows, i.e. their seismic

  10. The Lived Experience of the Adult African American Female Who Has Lived in Multiple Foster Care Placements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Avonda C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine and describe the lived experiences of the adult African American woman who had lived in multiple foster care placements. Eleven adult African American women ages 22-25 participated in semi-structured, face-to-face interviews to tell their stories and provide data of the memories of the experience. The…

  11. African American Women Coping with the Lived Experiences of Limited Mental Healthcare Access in Rural North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesane, Everick S.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the impact of lived experiences among African American women with limited mental healthcare access in rural North Carolina. The research examined how those lived experiences-due to limited transportation, low socioeconomic status, and limited healthcare access-further exacerbate emotional challenges among African American…

  12. Community among African American Students on Small, Predominantly White Campuses: The Unforeseen "Minority within a Minority" Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littleton, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the experiences of 16 African American students who attended four small, predominantly White colleges in the Southern Appalachian region of the United States. The African American community at these small colleges can sometimes be an unforeseen cultural experience especially for Black male and female nonathletes. Qualitative methodology…

  13. Re-evaluation of Apollo 17 Lunar Seismic Profiling Experiment data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffels, Alexandra; Knapmeyer, Martin; Oberst, Jürgen; Haase, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    We re-analyzed Apollo 17 Lunar Seismic Profiling Experiment (LSPE) data to improve our knowledge of the subsurface structure of this landing site. We use new geometrically accurate 3-D positions of the seismic equipment deployed by the astronauts, which were previously derived using high-resolution images by Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) in combination with Apollo astronaut photography. These include coordinates of six Explosive Packages (EPs) and four geophone stations. Re-identified P-wave arrival times are used to calculate two- and three-layer seismic velocity models. A strong increase of seismic velocity with depth can be confirmed, in particular, we suggest a more drastic increase than previously thought. For the three-layer model the P-wave velocities were calculated to 285, 580, and 1825 m/s for the uppermost, second, and third layer, respectively, with the boundaries between the layers being at 96 and 773 m depth. When compared with results obtained with previously published coordinates, we find (1) a slightly higher velocity (+4%) for the uppermost layer, and (2) lower P-wave velocities for the second and third layers, representing a decrease of 34% and 12% for second and third layer, respectively. Using P-wave arrival time readings of previous studies, we confirm that velocities increase when changing over from old to new coordinates. In the three-layer case, this means using new coordinates alone leads to thinned layers, velocities rise slightly for the uppermost layer and decrease significantly for the layers below.

  14. Understanding the African-American Student Experience in Higher Education through a Relational Dialectics Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Jake; Lowery-Hart, Russell; Wahl, Shawn T.; McBride, M. Chad

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we sought to understand African-American students' higher-education experiences in predominantly White universities. We utilized Baxter's relational dialectics theory to study components of focus-group discussions in order to understand the discourse and meaning-making process of participants. Our findings provide insight into the…

  15. Educational Change in Post-Conflict Contexts: Reflections on the South African Experience 20 Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Pam

    2016-01-01

    Reflecting on South African experience, this paper develops an analytical framework using the work of Henri Lefebvre and Nancy Fraser to understand why socially just arrangements may be so difficult to achieve in post-conflict reconstruction. The paper uses Lefebvre's analytic to trace three sets of entangled practices…

  16. African American Women Aspiring to the Superintendency: Lived Experiences and Barriers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angel, Roma B.; Killacky, Jim; Johnson, Patricia R.

    2013-01-01

    Focused on the absence of a viable population of African American women in the superintendency, this study addressed barriers described by 10 credentialed, district-level Southern women who hold advanced education degrees coupled with years of leadership experience. This phenomenological study used interview methodology to uncover the lived…

  17. Resilience Post Tenure: The Experience of an African American Woman in a PWI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S.; West-Olatunji, Cirecie A.; Moore, Thomas E.; Houchen, Deidre F.; Roberts, Kellie W.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was: 1) to explore the pre-tenure experiences of an African American female faculty member in a counselor education program; and 2) to compare the themes that ascended from a precursor study to the current one. By using critical ethnography and case study format, this research gave voice to the participant by prompting…

  18. Illuminating the Experiences of African-American Nursing Faculty Seeking Employment in Higher Education in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loyd, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    This study explored and described the experience of female African-American nursing faculty seeking employment in higher education in nursing. The lack of diversity in the nursing workforce has been attributed as a major underlying cause of disparity in healthcare in the United States. The importance of increasing the number of minority nursing…

  19. Sub-Saharan African Students and Their Experiences in American Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osikomaiya, Olujide

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research project is to study the experiences of Sub-Saharan African students, who have earned professional degrees from American institutions and are currently living in the United States. Acculturative stressors have been identified by researchers as predictors of loneliness, depression, homesickness, and poor mental health…

  20. In Their Own Voices: Adolescent African American Males' Experiences of the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Natasha S.; Singh, Anneliese A.

    2015-01-01

    The authors use a phenomenological research tradition grounded in CRT tenets to describe the daily lived experiences that 12 male African American youth had in relation to the achievement gap. Researchers collected individual semi-structured interviews and focus group data related to the study phenomenon. There were five themes identified in…

  1. African American Female College and University Presidents: Experiences and Perceptions of Barriers to the Presidency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Sandra; Harris, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    This study was an investigation of the experiences and perceptions of barriers to the presidency of 43 African American female college and university presidents. Findings suggested that exclusion from informal networks, lack of preparation and lack of career goals were primary barriers. Strategies to overcome these barriers included exceeding job…

  2. African-American School Counselors in Majority School Districts: A Qualitative Perspective of Their Lived Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wingate, Crystal Nicole

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation will focus on the lived experiences of African-American school counselors in majority school districts and the lack of retention among this population. The lack of retention and representation of ethnic minorities in the workforce has been the subject of much discussion throughout the United States (Ingersoll, 2004). The…

  3. Missed Opportunities: Examining the Literacy Experiences of African American Students Displaced by Hurricane Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollard, Tamica McClarty

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how five African American middle school students, who were displaced by Hurricane Katrina represent their literacy experiences before, during, and after their displacement. Specifically, the two research questions were: (a) What are the stories that these middle school students tell about their lives,…

  4. Problematic Situations Associated with Dating Experiences and Relationships among Urban African American Adolescents: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Terri N.; Erwin, Elizabeth H.; Helms, Sarah W.; Masho, Saba W.; Farrell, Albert D.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study focused on the identification of problem situations associated with adolescent dating experiences and relationships, including those that placed youth at risk for dating violence perpetration or victimization. Interviews were conducted with 44 African American middle and high school students in an urban school system.…

  5. Experiences of the Single Low-Income African American Mothers in Their Maternal Protective Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivory, Shirley Clark

    2010-01-01

    This study was an IRB approved qualitative investigation of experiences of the single low-income African American mothers in their maternal protective role. In-depth interviews and a focus group were conducted with 13 single-low income women who met the criteria for participation in the study, in an effort to understand the social context in which…

  6. African American College Students' Experience of Racial Discrimination and the Role of College Hassles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Kira Hudson

    2010-01-01

    The current study examines the relationship between racial discrimination and depressive symptoms. In particular, it investigated whether college hassles moderated or mediated the relationship. Participants included 194 African American students from a large, Midwestern, state university. Participants provided self-report of their experience of…

  7. Being There: Exploring the Fatherhood Experiences and Beliefs of Low-Income Urban African American Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, James

    This study examined the fatherhood experiences of 50 low-income, urban, African American fathers and father figures whose children were enrolled in an Early Head Start Program. Information was gathered via qualitative interviews conducted within participants' homes and communities and participant observation. Quantitative methods were used to…

  8. Ring of Silence: African American Women's Experiences Related to Their Breasts and Breast Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Eileen

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore women's memories and feelings concerning their breasts and breast cancer screening experiences in relation to their current breast cancer screening behaviors. Twelve African American women shared stories that were generated in written narratives and individual interviews. Two core themes emerged from the…

  9. Toddler Feeding: Expectations and Experiences of Low-Income African American Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horodynski, Mildred A.; Brophy-Herb, Holly; Henry, Michelle; Smith, Katharine A.; Weatherspoon, Lorraine

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain maternal expectations and experiences with mealtimes and feeding of toddlers among low-income African American mothers in two mid- to large-size cities in the United States. Design: Qualitative focus group study. Setting: Two Early Head Start programme sites in a Midwestern state which serve low income families. Method:…

  10. Underserved, Underrepresented, Unprepared: Experiences of African American Females in Community College with Barriers to Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobe, LaWanda D.

    2013-01-01

    African American women are enrolling and returning to college in large numbers across many community college campuses, especially those women who would be characterized as nontraditional students. This qualitative study examined and analyzed the experiences, stresses, and coping mechanisms of first generation, nontraditional, single parent,…

  11. Personal, Professional, and Sociocultural Experiences of African American Female School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Armentress D.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore and gain an in-depth understanding of the personal, professional, and sociocultural experiences of ten African American female school leaders serving as assistant principals, principals, and central office administrators in four suburban school districts in the southeast region of the…

  12. On the Outside Looking in: An African American Family's Experience in an Individualized Education Plan Meeting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angelov, Azure D. S.; Anderson, Sheri L.

    2012-01-01

    The current laws that mandate special education originated through the advocacy of families (Turnbull & Turnbull, 1990). Over the years, families have challenged the system to provide free and appropriate public educations for their children. We share, through qualitative measures, the experiences of one African American family and the…

  13. Racial Identity, Language Attitudes and Educational Experiences: The Voices of African American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Gail A.

    2012-01-01

    The current study examines the language attitudes, racial identity and educational experiences of 75 African American university and community college students. This study is motivated by the hypothesis that the power of language attitudes dictates, to a large extent, the language one speaks, which is intimately tied to one's sense of…

  14. Ethical issues in genomic research on the African continent: experiences and challenges to ethics review committees.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Michèle; de Vries, Jantina; Soodyall, Himla; Norris, Shane A; Sankoh, Osman

    2014-08-21

    This is a report on a workshop titled 'Ethics for genomic research across five African countries: Guidelines, experiences and challenges', University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa, 10 and 11 December 2012. The workshop was hosted by the Wits-INDEPTH partnership, AWI-Gen, as part of the H3Africa Consortium.

  15. Exploring Crustal Structure and Mantle Seismic Anisotropy Associated with the Incipient Southern and Southwestern Branches of the East African Rift System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y.; Reed, C. A.; Gao, S. S.; Liu, K. H.; Massinque, B.; Mdala, H. S.; Chindandali, P. R. N.; Moidaki, M.; Mutamina, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    In spite of numerous geoscientific studies, the mechanisms responsible for the initiation and development of continental rifts are still poorly understood. The key information required to constrain various geodynamic models on rift initiation can be derived from the crust/mantle structure and anisotropy beneath incipient rifts such as the Southern and Southwestern branches of the East African Rift System. As part of a National Science Foundation funded interdisciplinary project, 50 PASSCAL broadband seismic stations were deployed across the Malawi, Luangwa, and Okavango rift zones from the summer of 2012 to the summer of 2014. Preliminary results from these 50 SAFARI (Seismic Arrays for African Rift Initiation) and adjacent stations are presented utilizing shear-wave splitting (SWS) and P-S receiver function techniques. 1109 pairs of high-quality SWS measurements, consisting of fast polarization orientations and splitting times, have been obtained from a total of 361 seismic events. The results demonstrate dominantly NE-SW fast orientations throughout Botswana as well as along the northwestern flank of the Luangwa rift valley. Meanwhile, fast orientations beneath the eastern Luangwa rift flank rotate from NNW to NNE along the western border of the Malawi rift. Stations located alongside the western Malawi rift border faults yield ENE fast orientations, with stations situated in Mozambique exhibiting more E-W orientations. In the northern extent of the study region, fast orientations parallel the trend of the Rukwa and Usangu rift basins. Receiver function results reveal that, relative to the adjacent Pan-African mobile belts, the Luangwa rift zone has a thin (30 to 35 km) crust. The crustal thickness within the Okavango rift basin is highly variable. Preliminary findings indicate a northeastward thinning along the southeast Okavango border fault system congruent with decreasing extension toward the southwest. The Vp/Vs measurements in the Okavango basin are roughly

  16. Hand replantation: First experience in a sub-Saharan African country (Togo)

    PubMed Central

    Amouzou, Komla Sena; Amakoutou, Komla; Bakriga, Batarabadja; Abalo, Anani; Dossim, Assang

    2016-01-01

    Fifty years after Chen has performed the first forearm replantation, we report our first case of hand replantation in a sub-Saharan African country. The etiology of the amputation was machete due to interpersonal violence. The amputation was trans-carpal, guillotine-type, subtotal non-viable maintained with a small skin bridge. The replantation procedure was successful. At one year follow-up, the functional result according to Chen's criteria was excellent. Through this first experience, we can state that hand replantation can be performed successfully both in survival and function in a non-specialized hospital of a sub-Saharan African country. PMID:27274133

  17. African-American Women’s Perceptions and Experiences About Breastfeeding

    PubMed Central

    Obeng, Cecilia S.; Emetu, Roberta E.; Curtis, Terry J.

    2015-01-01

    There are health benefits to breastfeeding for both mothers and their children. The preventive health effects of breastfeeding continue into adulthood, lowering rate of various chronic illnesses. African-American women, especially of lower socioeconomic status, are less likely to breastfeed in comparison to their racial and ethnic counterparts. The purpose of this study is to explore how African-American women experience breastfeeding in the early stages of postpartum care. Two focus groups (N = 20, 10 in each group) were conducted with African-American mothers. Results revealed that participants felt that there were health benefits to breastfeeding, and organizations such as Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) provided support. However, participants stated that lack of information, negative perceptions, and unforeseen circumstances were barriers to breastfeeding. This study proposes support and interventions for this group to increase breastfeeding among this population. PMID:26734597

  18. Coparenting experiences in African American families: an examination of single mothers and their nonmarital coparents.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Michelle; Jones, Deborah; Parent, Justin

    2014-03-01

    African American youth from single-mother homes continue to be overrepresented in statistics on risk behavior and delinquency, a trend that many be attributed to father-absence, socioeconomic disadvantage, and compromises in parenting more typical of single than two-parent families. Yet, this risk-focused perspective ignores a long-standing strength of the African American community, the involvement and potential protective impact of extended family members in childrearing. This study describes the experiences of 95 African American single mothers and their nonmarital coparents who participated in a study of African American single-mother families with an 11-16-year-old child. Specifically, the study examines: (a) the extent to which nonmarital coparents are involved in childrearing; (b) the relative levels of risk (i.e., depression, mother-coparent conflict) and protective (i.e., parenting) associated with maternal and coparent involvement; and (c) how similarly and/or differently coparent and mother variables operate with regard to youth externalizing problems. Findings reveal that a range of family members and other adults actively participate in childrearing in African American single-mother families, coparents do not differ from mothers on certain study variables (i.e., depression and mother-coparent conflict) but do for others (parenting), and coparent involvement is associated with youth adjustment in ways that are similar to our more established understanding of maternal involvement. The potential clinical implications of the findings are discussed and future research directions are highlighted.

  19. Racism experiences and psychological functioning in African American college freshmen: is racial socialization a buffer?

    PubMed

    Bynum, Mia Smith; Burton, E Thomaseo; Best, Candace

    2007-01-01

    Previous research has documented the negative effects of racism on the psychological health of African Americans. However, consideration of racial socialization as a potential buffer against racism experiences has received limited attention. The present study investigated whether two types of parental racial socialization messages reduced the impact of racism on psychological functioning in a sample of 247 African American college freshmen (M=18.30). Results indicated that students who reported more racism experiences also had poorer levels of psychological functioning as indicated by higher levels of psychological stress and psychological distress. Parental messages emphasizing the use of African American cultural resources to cope with racism reduced the impact of racism on psychological stress only. Cultural pride messages predicted less psychological distress while messages emphasizing the use of cultural resources predicted greater psychological distress. However, neither message type moderated the relationship between racism experiences and psychological distress. These results suggest that racial socialization messages have complex relations to psychological functioning in African American college students.

  20. Martian seismicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Roger J.; Grimm, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    The design and ultimate success of network seismology experiments on Mars depends on the present level of Martian seismicity. Volcanic and tectonic landforms observed from imaging experiments show that Mars must have been a seismically active planet in the past and there is no reason to discount the notion that Mars is seismically active today but at a lower level of activity. Models are explored for present day Mars seismicity. Depending on the sensitivity and geometry of a seismic network and the attenuation and scattering properties of the interior, it appears that a reasonable number of Martian seismic events would be detected over the period of a decade. The thermoelastic cooling mechanism as estimated is surely a lower bound, and a more refined estimate would take into account specifically the regional cooling of Tharsis and lead to a higher frequency of seismic events.

  1. The African American Youth Smoking Experience: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Bridgette E.; Gardiner, Phillip S.; Wright, La Tanisha C.; Pechacek, Terry F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Beginning in the late 1970s, a very sharp decline in cigarette smoking prevalence was observed among African American (AA) high school seniors compared with a more modest decline among whites. This historic decline resulted in a lower prevalence of cigarette smoking among AA youth that has persisted for several decades. Methods We synthesized information contained in the research literature and tobacco industry documents to provide an account of past influences on cigarette smoking behavior among AA youth to help understand the reasons for these historically lower rates of cigarette smoking. Results While a number of protective factors including cigarette price increases, religiosity, parental opposition, sports participation, body image, and negative attitudes towards cigarette smoking may have all played a role in maintaining lower rates of cigarette smoking among AA youth as compared to white youth, the efforts of the tobacco industry seem to have prevented the effectiveness of these factors from carrying over into adulthood. Conclusion Continuing public health efforts that prevent cigarette smoking initiation and maintain lower cigarette smoking rates among AA youth throughout adulthood have the potential to help reduce the negative health consequences of smoking in this population. Implications While AA youth continue to have a lower prevalence of cigarette smoking than white youth, they are still at risk of increasing their smoking behavior due to aggressive targeted marketing by the tobacco industry. Because AAs suffer disproportionately from tobacco-related disease, and have higher incidence and mortality rates from lung cancer, efforts to prevent smoking initiation and maintain lower cigarette smoking rates among AA youth have the potential to significantly lower lung cancer death rates among AA adults. PMID:26980860

  2. Tackling the African "poverty trap": the Ijebu-Ode experiment.

    PubMed

    Mabogunje, Akin L

    2007-10-23

    An experiment in poverty reduction began in 1998 in the city of Ijebu-Ode, Nigeria (estimated 1999 population 163,000), where, without the remittances from relatives abroad, an estimated 90% of the population lived below the poverty line of $1.00 (U.S.) per person per day. Central to the experiment was whether poverty can be dramatically reduced through a city consultation process that seeks to mobilize the entire community along with its diaspora. With 7 years of experience, the Ijebu-Ode experiment has been successful in many ways. There is increasing evidence that poverty in the city has been reduced significantly through the microfinancing of existing and new productive activities and the estimated >8,000 jobs these activities have created. Training based on both sustainability science and technology and indigenous practitioner knowledge has been a critical factor in the establishment of cooperatives and the development of new enterprises in specialty crops, small animal, and fish production. Much of this success has been possible as a result of harnessing social capital, especially through the dynamic leadership of the traditional authorities of the city and by the provision of ample loanable funds through the National Poverty Eradication Program of the federal government. The city consultation process itself engendered a participatory focus to the experiment from the beginning and has encouraged sustainability. Yet long-term sustainability is still in question as the initial leadership needs replacement, and credit, the heart of the experiment, lacks sufficient collateral.

  3. Reflections on Our South African Experience (January-February 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Carl R.; Sanford, Ruth

    1987-01-01

    Describes a seven-week experience working with groups composed of diverse races in South Africa. Reflects on the human drama of direct and honest confrontation and proposes that major changes are precipitated from great stress or crisis. Presents evidence of the potential of person-centered communication in conflict resolution. (Author/NB)

  4. Teacher and Parent Perceptions of Classroom Experiences of African American Male Students in a High School Alternative Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Kimberly C.

    2013-01-01

    A major concern in the public schools is the low academic achievement of African American males. This mixed methods study examined the classroom experiences of African American male students in an alternative program. The dual purpose was to investigate the teachers' perceptions and their ability to provide best learning environments for…

  5. Not Merely a Matter of Academics: Student Experiences of a South African University as Study-Abroad Destination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paola, R. J.; Lemmer, E. M.

    2013-01-01

    Study abroad programmes attract considerable numbers of American college students; however, very few select an African country as their study-abroad destination. This article explores the experiences of American undergraduates who made the uncommon choice of a South African university as destination for a mid-length immersion type programme. The…

  6. Familial Factors in the Early Life Experiences of a Population of African American Crack-Cocaine Users: The Father Link?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Patricia

    1998-01-01

    Explored factors contributing to addiction in 140 African-American males in an inner-city homeless shelter. A common theme in their life stories is that of negative and painful experiences with father figures. Suggestions are made for research into this area and policy strategies to enhance the African-American father's role. (SLD)

  7. Community among African American Students on Small, Predominantly White Campuses: The Unforeseen "Minority within a Minority" Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of American College Health, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Sixteen African American students participated in semi-structured, open-ended interviews about their experiences at small, predominantly white colleges in the Appalachian region. Two main themes emerged from the interviews: community among minorities and minority within a minority. The students described community among African Americans on campus…

  8. "A Fly in the Ointment": African American Male Preservice Teachers' Experiences with Stereotype Threat in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Sonya V.; Rodriguez, Louie F.

    2015-01-01

    This study draws from a larger phenomenological study on African American academic persistence and career aspirations in education. This article highlights three African American males' experiences with concentrated forms of stereotype threat in teacher education. Their voices revealed dimensions of how power and privilege operate in teacher…

  9. Seismic mapping of shallow fault zones in the San Gabriel Mountains from the Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuis, G.S.; Ryberg, T.; Lutter, W.J.; Ehlig, P.L.

    2001-01-01

    During the Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment (LARSE), a reflection/refraction survey was conducted along a profile (line 1) extending from Seal Beach, California, northeastward to the Mojave Desert and crossing the Los Angeles and San Gabriel Valley basins and San Gabriel Mountains. In most shot gathers from the southern and central San Gabriel Mountains, clear secondary arrivals are seen that merge, or appear to merge, with first arrivals at three locations, including the location of the Vincent thrust fault, an exposed late Mesozoic/early Cenozoic megathrust. These secondary arrivals are interpretable as reflections in the shallow crust (<5 km depth) from a concave-upward interface that projects to the surface in the north near the Vincent thrust fault, is offset in its central part at the San Gabriel fault (an old branch of the San Andreas fault), and terminates in the south at 1 to 2 km depth at the southern mountain front. The velocity structure above and below this interface strongly suggests it is the Vincent thrust fault: intermediate velocities (6.2 km/s), consistent with mylonites overlying the Vincent thrust fault, are observed above it; lower velocities (5.8 km/s), consistent with the Pelona Schist underlying the Vincent thrust fault, are observed below it. Problems arise, however, in attempting to match this reflector to the exposed Vincent thrust fault, which is seen in outcrops east of line 1. The Vincent thrust fault is shallower than the reflector in most places. An unmapped structure (steep fault, monocline, or thrust fault) is required between line 1 and the outcrops that either drops the Vincent thrust fault down to the depths of the reflector or repeats the Vincent thrust fault beneath line 1 in the footwall of another thrust fault. An alternative interpretation of the reflector is a deep greenstone horizon within the Pelona Schist, although this alternative is not favored by the velocity structure. Copyright 2001 by the American

  10. Developing and Exploiting a Unique Seismic Data Set from South African Gold Mines for Source Characterization and Wave Propagation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    the University of the Witwatersrand . RESEARCH ACCOMPLISHED Three complimentary data sets are being assembled in this project: (1) high...frequency in-mine seismic data from three mines along the northwestern edge of the Witwatersrand basin, (2) seismograms from mine events recorded at...Seismicity The Witwatersrand basin is part of a granite-greenstone complex constituting the basement of the Kaapvaal craton. The basement evolved

  11. Caracas Seismological Museum: A space to develop an interactive experience between community and Venezuelan seismic culture.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, D.; Galindo, L.; Granado, C.

    2009-05-01

    Caracas is a city with a relative high seismic hazard. The last damaged earthquake occurred in 1967. This is a fundamental fact to favor a policy that promote a scientific popularization center having as a prime mission, to spread knowledge about earth sciences, particularly seismology. Another face of this main purpose is to educate people about how to protect themselves in case of a natural seismic event occur. We present the characteristics and social impact of an effort to create in Caracas an open and alive space able to transform a visit in a meaningful experience, stimulating the interest in the natural history, the singular geological features and promoting dialogue and reflection among the visitors as a participants in a reality where awareness about the geological risks is a need to preserved live and ensure a right attitude towards decrease vulnerability among the population. One of the highlights of this project was to recover and to restore a diverse set of obsolete instruments as well as an old construction and its surrounding area, to design a playful and recreational spot to learn about seismic culture and vulnerability reduction with the community as a protagonist of their own social evolution by means of bolstering local resilience and improving earthquake preparedness.

  12. Data report for the 1985 seismic-refraction experiment at Yucca Mountain and vicinity, southwestern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, V.D.

    1985-12-31

    In February 1985, the US Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a seismic-refraction survey in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, southwestern Nevada to better define the P(compressional)-wave velocity structure of the upper crust in this area. This experiment is a continuation of seismic investigations at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) by the USGS on behalf of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project (NNWSI) to assess the feasibility of a proposed nuclear waste disposal site at Yucca Mountain. The 1985 seismic-refraction survey consisted of three separate deployments: two East-West profiles, Line A and Line B, and a North-South profile (Plate 1). Thirty-one shots were recorded by 120 portable seismographs, where recorder station spacing averaged .3 km, and the shotpoints averaged 5 to 8 km apart. Additionally, off set shots were fired at shotpoints located about 7 to 15 km from the endpoints of the deployment lines. This report includes record sections from the twenty-nine shotpoints (Plates 2 to 17), a list of seismograph locations (Appendix A), a list of shotpoint locations and shot times, DKDAT data files and Tape Grade Code (Appendix B), and a list of first-arrival traveltime picks (Appendix C). Detailed interpretation of these data will be published in a subsequent report.

  13. TOMO-ETNA MED-SUV.ISES an active seismic and passive seismic experiment at Mt. Etna volcano. An integrated marine and onland geophysical survey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibáñez, Jesus. M.; Patane, Domenico; Puglisi, Guisseppe; Zuccarello, Lucciano; Bianco, Francesca; Luehr, Birger; Diaz-Moreno, Alejandro; Prudencio, Janire; Koulakov, Ivan; Del Pezzo, Edoardo; Cocina, Ornella; Coltelli, Mauro; Scarfi, Lucciano; De Gori, Pascuale; Carrion, Francisco

    2014-05-01

    An active seismic experiment to study the internal structure of Etna Volcano is going to carried out on Sicily and Aeolian islands. The main objective of the TOMO-ETNA MED-SUV.ISES experiment, beginning in summer 2014, is to perform a high resolution seismic tomography, in velocity and attenuation, in Southern Italy, by using active and passive seismic data, in an area encompassing outstanding volcanoes as Mt. Etna, and Aeolian volcanoes. The achievement of this objective is based on the integration and sharing of the in-situ marine and land experiments and observations and on the implementation of new instruments and monitoring systems. For the purpose, onshore and offshore seismic stations and passive and active seismic data generated both in marine and terrestrial environment will be used. Additionally, other geophysical data, mainly magnetic and gravimetric data will be considered to obtain a joint Upper Mantle-Crust structure that could permit to make progress in the understanding of the dynamic of the region. This multinational experiment which involves institutions from Spain, Italy, Germany, United Kingdom, Ireland, France, Malta, Portugal, Russia, USA and Mexico. During the experiment more than 6.600 air gun shots performed by the Spanish Oceanographic vessel "Sarmiento de Gamboa" will be recorder on a dense local seismic network consisting of 100 on land non-permanent stations, 70 on land permanent stations and 20-25 OBSs. Contemporaneously other marine geophysical measures will be performed using a marine Gravimeter LaCoste&Romberg Air-Sea Gravity System II and a Marine Magnetometer SeaSPY. The experiments will provide a unique data set in terms of data quantity and quality, and it will provide a detailed velocity and attenuation structural image of volcano edifice. The results will be essential in the development and interpretation of future volcanic models. It is noteworthy that this project is fully transversal, multidisciplinary and crosses several

  14. African American Perspectives and Experiences of Domestic Violence in a Rural Community.

    PubMed

    Valandra; Murphy-Erby, Yvette; Higgins, Brandon M; Brown, Lucy M

    2016-09-21

    Relatively few studies have explored domestic violence from a multiplicity of African American perspectives, experiences, and socio-demographic backgrounds within rural African American communities. Community-based participatory action research methods were used to explore domestic violence perceptions of African Americans with heterogeneous backgrounds and experiences of violence. Ten focus groups were held throughout the community with 52 diverse women (n = 33) and men (n = 19) living in the northwest region of Arkansas. Demographic data were collected from 47 women (n = 28) and men (n = 19) participating in focus groups regarding their perceptions and experiences of domestic violence, media messages, help-seeking behaviors, and services. Data were analyzed using grounded theory methods. Three major themes emerged, including (a) a heightened awareness of race, gender, and class differences; (b) imbalanced and mixed messages from media; and (c) multi-systemic dynamics influencing abusive behavior and relationships. Results indicate that study participants' perspectives and experiences with domestic violence reflect a complex interrelated gamut of societal, community, familial, and individual dynamics. Participant recommendations related to interpersonal dynamics, media messages, and societal influences are reported with implications for practice, policy, and future research.

  15. The perspectives and experiences of African American students in an informal science program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulls, Domonique L.

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields are the fastest growing sectors of the economy, nationally and globally. In order for the United States (U.S.) to maintain its competitiveness, it is important to address STEM experiences at the precollege level. In early years, science education serves as a foundation and pipeline for students to pursue STEM in college and beyond. Alternative approaches to instruction in formal classrooms have been introduced to engage more students in science. One alternative is informal science education. Informal science education is an avenue used to promote science education literacy. Because it is less regulated than science teaching in formal classroom settings, it allows for the incorporation of culture into science instruction. Culturally relevant science teaching is one way to relate science to African American students, a population that continually underperforms in K-12 science education. This study explores the science perspectives and experiences of African American middle school students participating in an informal science program. The research is framed by the tenets of culturally relevant pedagogy and shaped by the following questions: (1) What specific aspects of the Carver Program make it unique to African American students? (2) How is culturally relevant pedagogy incorporated into the informal science program? (3) How does the incorporation of culturally relevant pedagogy into the informal science program influence African American students' perceptions about science? The findings to the previously stated questions add to the limited research on African American students in informal science learning environments and contribute to the growing research on culturally relevant science. This study is unique in that it explores the cultural components of an informal science program.

  16. Investigation of River Seismic Signal Induced by Sediment Transport and Water Flow: Controlled Dam Breaking Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. Y.; Chen, S. C.; Chao, W. A.

    2015-12-01

    Natural river's bedload often hard to measure, which leads numerous uncertainties for us to predict the landscape evolution. However, the measurement of bedload flux has its certain importance to estimate the river hazard. Thus, we use seismometer to receive the seismic signal induced by bedload for partially fill the gap of field measurement capabilities. Our research conducted a controlled dam breaking experiments at Landao River, Huisun Forest since it has advantage to well constraining the spatial and temporal variation of bedload transport. We set continuous bedload trap at downstream riverbed of dam to trap the transport bedload after dam breaking so as to analyze its grain size distribution and transport behavior. In the meantime we cooperate with two portable velocity seismometers (Guralp CMG6TD) along the river to explore the relationship between bedload transport and seismic signal. Bedload trap was divided into three layers, bottom, middle, and top respectively. After the experiment, we analyzed the grain size and found out the median particle size from bottom to top is 88.664mm, 129.601mm, and 214.801mm individually. The median particle size of top layer is similar with the upstream riverbed before the experiment which median particle size is 230.683mm. This phenomena indicated that as the river flow become stronger after dam breaking, the sediment size will thereupon become larger, which meant the sediment from upstream will be carried down by the water flow and turned into bedload. Furthermore, we may tell apart the seismic signal induced by water flow and bedload by means of two different position seismometers. Eventually, we may estimate the probable error band of bedload quantity via accurately control of water depth, time-lapse photography, 3D LiDAR and other hydrology parameters.

  17. Passive seismic experiment. [Apollo 17 flight contributions to determining lunar structure by analyzing moonquake and meteoroid impact seismic signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, G. V.; Ewing, M.; Press, F.; Dorman, J.; Nakamura, Y.; Toksoz, N.; Lammlein, D.; Duennebier, F.; Dainty, A.

    1973-01-01

    The network of seismometers installed by the Apollo 17 and other Apollo missions is described. The effects of the impacts of lunar modules and S-4B stages on the lunar surfaces are discussed. The information concerning lunar composition which is obtained by analyzing the seismic signals generated by moonquakes and meteoroid impacts are analyzed. It is concluded that the seismic activity within the moon is extremely low compared to that with the earth. The moon is characterized by a rigid, dynamically inactive outer shell, approximately 1000 kilometers thick, surrounding a core that has markedly different elastic properties.

  18. A Gravity data along LARSE (Los Angeles Regional Seismic Experiment) Line II, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wooley, R.J.; Langenheim, V.E.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a detailed gravity study along part of the Los Angeles Regional Seismic Experiment (LARSE) transect across the San Fernando Basin and Transverse Ranges to help characterize the structure underlying this area. 249 gravity measurements were collected along the transect and to augment regional coverage near the profile. An isostatic gravity low of 50-60 mGal reflects the San Fernando-East Ventura basin. Another prominent isostatic gravity with an amplitude of 30 mGal marks the Antelope Valley basin. Gravity highs occur over the Santa Monica Mountains and the Transverse Ranges. The highest isostatic gravity values coincide with outcrops of Pelona schist.

  19. Exploring tsunamis with non-traditional dataset: array recordings from temporary ocean-bottom seismic experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, A. F.; Yang, Z.; Nicolsky, D.; Mungov, G.; Eakins, B.

    2011-12-01

    We observe clear tsunami signals generated by the July 15, 2009 magnitude 7.8 Dusky Sound (Fiordland) New Zealand earthquake on seafloor differential pressure gauges (DPGs). The dataset was collected during the ocean-bottom seismic experiment, Marine Observations of Anisotropy Near Aotearoa (MOANA). This experiment deployed 30 broadband ocean-bottom seismometers (Trillium 240) and differential pressure gauges (DPGs) for a year (2009/01-2010/02) both in deep ocean (greater than 4000 m water depth) and on the continental shelf (550 m to 1300 m) offshore of the South Island of New Zealand. The DPGs are used in many US National Ocean Bottom Seismograph Instrument Pool (OBSIP) experiments and are designed to record seismic signals. In this study, we demonstrate that DPGs can effectively record open-ocean tsunami signals and the tsunami signals on DPG records can be used for tsunami studies. We carry out waveform and spectral analysis for DPG data recordings of the Fiordland tsunami event. The arrival times of tsunami signals on DPG recordings can be directly used to constrain tsunami wave propagation models. We calibrate the DPGs to obtain better control on the amplitude of the tsunami signals on the DPG records. Calibrations are done over frequency bands of both Rayleigh wave and tidal signals. Synthetic pressure waveforms are calculated to be compared with the DPG recorded signals.

  20. Sms1: Seismic Wave Velocities Variations With Tectonic Stress From Controlled Source Experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chastin, Sebastien; Crampin, Stuart; Shear-Wave Analysis Group

    -observed relaxation in seismic velocities has been observed following seismicity. This high-resolution experiment shows a sensitivity of seismic velocity to variations in stress of the order of 10-2/bar. This is over an order of magnitude higher than sensitivity measured in laboratory experiments. These results confirm that SMS technology has the sensitivity, and resolution to carry out shear-wave splitting monitoring described in paper SMS3. Make a better instrument or measure in a place where no one else has been and a great discovery will come your way." Frank Press, 1979. EOS, 60, 30, 540.

  1. The influences and experiences of African American undergraduate science majors at predominately White universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blockus, Linda Helen

    The purpose of this study is to describe and explore some of the social and academic experiences of successful African American undergraduate science majors at predominately White universities with the expectation of conceptualizing emerging patterns for future study. The study surveyed 80 upperclass African Americans at 11 public research universities about their perceptions of the influences that affect their educational experiences and career interests in science. The mailed survey included the Persistence/ voluntary Dropout Decision Scale, the Cultural Congruity Scale and the University Environment Scale. A variety of potential influences were considered including family background, career goals, psychosocial development, academic and social connections with the university, faculty relationships, environmental fit, retention factors, validation, participation in mentored research projects and other experiences. The students' sources of influences, opportunities for connection, and cultural values were considered in the context of a research university environment and investigated for emerging themes and direction for future research. Results indicate that performance in coursework appears to be the most salient factor in African American students' experience as science majors. The mean college gpa was 3.01 for students in this study. Challenging content, time demands, study habits and concern with poor grades all serve to discourage students; however, for most of the students in this study, it has not dissuaded them from their educational and career plans. Positive course performance provided encouragement. Science faculty provide less influence than family members, and more students find faculty members discouraging than supportive. Measures of faculty relations were not associated with academic success. No evidence was provided to confirm the disadvantages of being female in a scientific discipline. Students were concerned with lack of minority role models

  2. Preliminary Results from the iMUSH Active Source Seismic Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levander, Alan; Kiser, Eric; Palomeras, Imma; Zelt, Colin; Schmandt, Brandon; Hansen, Steve; Harder, Steven; Creagar, Kenneth; Vidale, John; Abers, Geoffrey

    2015-04-01

    iMUSH (imaging Magma Under Saint Helens) is a US NSF sponsored multi-disciplinary investigation of Mount Saint Helens (MSH), currently the most active volcano in the Cascades arc in the northwestern United States. The project consists of active and passive seismic experiments, extensive magnetotelluric sounding, and geological/geochemical studies involving scientists at 7 institutions in the U.S. and Europe. The long-term goal of the seismic project is to combine analysis of the active source data with that of data from the 70 element broadband seismograph operating from summer 2014 until 2016. Combining seismic and MT analyses with other data, we hope to image the MSH volcanic plumbing system from the surface to the subducting Juan de Fuca slab. Here we describe preliminary results of the iMUSH active source seismic experiment, conducted in July and August 2014. The active source experiment consisted of twenty-three 454 or 908 kg weight shots recorded by ~3500 seismographs deployed at ~6,000 locations. Of these instruments, ~900 Nodal Seismic instruments were deployed continuously for two weeks in an areal array within 10 km of the MSH summit. 2,500 PASSCAL Texan instruments were deployed twice for five days in 3 areal arrays and 2 dense orthogonal linear arrays that extended from MSH to distances > 80 km. Overall the data quality from the shots is excellent. The seismograph arrays also recorded dozens of micro-earthquakes beneath the MSH summit and along the MSH seismic zone, and numerous other local and regional earthquakes. In addition, at least one low frequency event beneath MSH was recorded during the experiment. At this point we have begun various types of analysis of the data set: We have determined an average 1D Vp structure from stacking short-term/long-term average ratios, we have determined the 2-D Vp structure from ray-trace inversions along the two orthogonal profiles (in the NW-SE and NE-SW directions), and we have made low-fold CMP stacks of the

  3. An Intersectional Social Capital Analysis of the Influence of Historically Black Sororities on African American Women's College Experiences at a Predominantly White Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greyerbiehl, Lindsay; Mitchell, Donald, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Research exploring the college experiences of African American women at predominantly White institutions (PWI) continues to be a necessity as African American women graduate at lower rates than their racial/ethnic peers. This qualitative study explored the influence historically Black sororities had on the college experiences of African American…

  4. Field Report on the iMUSH Active Source Seismic Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiser, E.; Levander, A.; Schmandt, B.; Palomeras, I.; Harder, S. H.; Creager, K. C.; Vidale, J. E.; Malone, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    In the second half of July we completed the iMUSH active source seismic experiment, one component of the Imaging Magma Under Saint Helens project. A team of ~75 volunteers deployed 3500 seismographs to ~5920 locations on and around Mount St. Helens over the course of 3 weeks. This instrument deployment was accompanied by 23 shots distributed around the volcano. Instrumentation consisted of ~2550 Reftek 125A (Texan) seismographs with 4.5 Hz geophones, and 920 Nodal Seismic recorders with 10 Hz geophones. The shots were also recorded by the permanent stations of the Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network and 70 iMUSH broadband seismographs. Fifteen of the shots, 424 kg each, formed two rings around Mount Saint Helens at 15 km and 30 km radius from the summit. Eight of the shots, 828 kg each, were fired at distances of 50 to 80 km from MSH on NW-SE and NE-SW azimuths. The deployment geometry consisted of two lines oriented NW/SE and NE/SW, and three arrays. The offset of the lines ranged from 150 km to 190 km with an average spacing of 200 m. The first array was centered on the volcano with a radius of 30 km, and required both driving and hiking to deploy. Arrays two and three were set out with, and centered on, the NW/SE line. These arrays had a distance range from MSH of 30-75 km and an azimuth range of about 100 degrees. In addition to this large-scale deployment, we set out 7 beamforming arrays approximately collocated with iMUSH broadband seismographs, and above clusters of seismicity in the region. The aperture of these arrays was about 1 km with an instrument spacing of 100 m. The final deployment ended only days before the AGU abstract deadline, so we have not yet examined all of the data. However, the preliminary indications are that signal to noise is excellent: The shots, several of which registered on PNSN as ML>2.1, carried across the entire array, and were recorded as far away as Seattle and Corvallis on permanent stations. The array also recorded a

  5. Striving to be in the profession and of It: the African American experience in physical education and kinesiology.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, David K; Wiggins, Brenda P

    2011-06-01

    This study analyzes the experiences of African Americans in the physical education and kinesiology profession since the late 1850s. Using a variety of primary and secondary source material, we place special emphasis on the experiences of African American physical educators in higher education and in the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance and its southern, regional, and state chapters. Apparent from this examination is that African Americans have experienced various forms of racially discriminatory practices in physical education and kinesiology and have found it extraordinarily difficult to assume leader ship positions in the profession and be acknowledged for their scholarly and academic accomplishments.

  6. African American eighth-grade female students' perceptions and experiences as learners of science literacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crim, Sharan R.

    The National Assessment of Educational Progress (2000) reports an achievement gap between male and female students and majority and minority students in science literacy. Rutherford and Algren (2000) describe a scientifically literate person as one who is aware that science, mathematics, and technology are interdependent human enterprises with strengths and limitations; understands key concepts and principles of science; is familiar with the natural world and recognizes both its diversity and unity; and uses scientific knowledge and scientific ways of thinking for individual and social purposes. The purpose of this qualitative case study research was to investigate African American eighth grade female students' perceptions and experiences as learners of science literacy. A social learning theory (Bandura, 1986) and constructivist theory (Vygotsky, 1977) served as a guide for the researcher. Two questions were explored: (1) What are African American eighth grade female students' perceptions and experiences as learners of science literacy? (2) In what ways do the perceptions and experiences of African American eighth grade female students influence their learning of science literacy? Purposeful sampling (Merriam, 1998) was used with four African American eighth grade female students selected as participants for the study. Data collection and analysis occurred between February and August in a single year. Data sources included an open-ended questionnaire, two in-depth interviews with each participant (Seidman, 1991); classroom observations, participant reflective journals, student artifacts, and a researcher's log. Data were analyzed through the constant comparative method (Glaser & Strauss, 1967), and richly descriptive participant portraits and qualitative case studies (Merriam, 1998) were used to report the findings. Three themes emerged from the study that positively affected the perceptions and experiences of African American eighth grade female students as

  7. Crustal structure variations along the NW-African continental margin: A comparison of new and existing models from wide-angle and reflection seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingelhoefer, Frauke; Biari, Youssef; Sahabi, Mohamed; Aslanian, Daniel; Schnabel, Michael; Matias, Luis; Benabdellouahed, Massinissa; Funck, Thomas; Gutscher, Marc-André; Reichert, Christian; Austin, James A.

    2016-04-01

    Deep seismic data represent a key to understand the geometry and mechanism of continental rifting. The passive continental margin of NW-Africa is one of the oldest on earth, formed during the Upper Triassic-Lower Liassic rifting of the central Atlantic Ocean over 200 Ma. We present new and existing wide-angle and reflection seismic data from four study regions along the margin located in the south offshore DAKHLA, on the central continental margin offshore Safi, in the northern Moroccan salt basin, and in the Gulf of Cadiz. The thickness of unthinned continental crust decreases from 36 km in the North to about 27 km in the South. Crustal thinning takes place over a region of 150 km in the north and only 70 km in the south. The North Moroccan Basin is underlain by highly thinned continental crust of only 6-8 km thickness. The ocean-continent transition zone shows a variable width between 40 and 70 km and is characterized by seismic velocities in between those of typical oceanic and thinned continental crust. The neighbouring oceanic crust is characterized by a thickness of 7-8 km along the complete margin. Relatively high velocities of up to 7.5 km/s have been imaged between magnetic anomalies S1 and M25, and are probably related to changes in the spreading velocities at the time of the Kimmeridgian/Tithonian plate reorganization. Volcanic activity seems to be mostly confined to the region next to the Canary Islands, and is thus not related to the initial opening of the ocean, which was associated to only weak volcanism. Comparison with the conjugate margin off Nova Scotia shows comparable continental crustal structures, but 2-3 km thinner oceanic crust on the American side than on the African margin.

  8. Expecting the Unexpected: a Comparative Study of African-American Women's Experiences in Science during the High School Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Sandra L.; Johnson, Elizabeth Palmer

    Data from the National Educational Longitudinal Study (NELS) for the years 1988 to 1992 are used to explore the science experiences of young African-American women during the high school years. The comparison groups we use in trying to understand these experiences involve White women (for a race contrast) and African-American men (for a gender contrast). Within the context of a critical feminist perspective, it is argued that gender is constructed in a different way in White and African-American communities. Instead of expecting a disadvantage for young African-American women because of their gender and minority statuses, it is suggested that unique gender ideologies and work-family arrangements in the African-American community give these young women the resources and agency that allow them to compete with their White female counterparts and their African-American male counterparts in the science domain. Results from our analyses of the NELS data confirm these expectations. We find that on a majority of science measures, African-American women do as well as - and sometimes better than - White women and African-American men. For example, there are no differences between African-American women and men on attitudes toward science. And when compared with White women, African-American women tend to have more positive attitudes. When disadvantages appear for these young African-American women, they are more likely to be race effects then gender effects. The minimal gender effects in the science experiences of young African-Americans is in contrast to the more frequent male advantage in the White sample. A careful examination of family and individual resources shows that African-American families compensate for disadvantages on some resources (e.g., family socioeconomic status) by providing young women with an excess of other resources (e.g., unique gender ideologies, work expectations, and maternal expectations and involvement). And, unlike White parents, they sometimes

  9. From their own voices: the lived experience of African American registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Deborah W

    2007-04-01

    This phenomenological study described the lived experience of African American registered nurses providing nursing care to individuals, families, and communities in southeast Louisiana. Data were collected from 13 African American registered nurses using semistructured interviews and a focus group. Analysis of the phenomenological data revealed two essential themes, (a) connecting with the patient and (b) proving yourself; and four incidental themes, (a) a fulfilling dream, (b) being invisible and voiceless, (c) surviving and persevering, and (d) mentoring and role modeling. The findings revealed that the general perception among participants was that they were not fully accepted as equal professionals by their Caucasian nurse colleagues, other health care providers, and sometimes patients. The findings of the study indicate the immediate need to address and resolve the issues of diversity within the nursing profession. Nursing will also have to reform its system and practices to embrace and support diversity.

  10. African American women's experience of infection with HIV in the rural southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Mallory, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    The design of effective behavioral interventions to prevent HIV infection among African American women requires a more complete understanding of the context and circumstances that precipitate infection with the virus. A descriptive study was designed to explore African American women's experiences of infection with HIV in the rural southeastern United States. Ten women living with HIV participated in interviews. All were infected through sex with a man or men; three had engaged in high-risk activities associated with HIV infection including sex trading; seven described themselves as at low risk for infection related to serial monogamy, no injection drug use, and no history of addiction. Participants reported that desire for intimacy coupled with inaccurate risk appraisal of sex partners contributed to their infection. These results provide insight into the role of intimacy in sexual risk taking. Inquiry into how women can be assisted to protect themselves in the context of intimate relationships may improve interventions to prevent HIV.

  11. Seismic and Geodynamic Constraints on Compositional Heterogeneity in the Lower Mantle: Implications for Deeply-Rooted Hot Upwellings Under the African and Pacific Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, A. M.; Glisovic, P.; Rowley, D. B.; Simmons, N. A.; Grand, S. P.; Lu, C.

    2014-12-01

    We present the results of a series of tests that probe the possible existence of compositionally distinct material in the central core of the LLSVPs under the African and Pacific plates using tomography-based mantle flow models that employ several independently-derived viscosity profiles (Mitrovica & Forte 2004, Behn et al. 2004, Steinberger & Calderwood 2006, Forte et al. 2010). We also consider four global tomography models derived from seismic shear velocity data alone (Grand 2002, Panning & Romanowicz 2006, Kustowski et al. 2008, Ritsema et al. 2011). The possible combinations of viscosity and tomography models yield 16 different tests for compositional heterogeneity inside the LLSVPs. In all tests we begin with a mineral physical scaling between lower-mantle shear velocity and density anomalies that assumes thermal effects are dominant everywhere, including within the LLSVPs. We find it is not possible, in any of the tests, to obtain a satisfactory fit to surface geodynamic data, especially the global, long-wavelength gravity anomalies and space-geodetic inferences of excess CMB flattening with a purely thermal interpretation of lower-mantle heterogeneity. If we introduce compositionally-distinct material in the central portions of the LLSVPs, all tests show a notable improvement in the fit to the gravity anomaly and CMB ellipticity data. An optimal reconciliation of the gravity and CMB data is obtained by extending compositional heterogeneity upwards, with maximum-amplitude in the seismic D"-layer and tapering off to negligible values in the mid-mantle. A robust assessment of the dynamical impact of this deeply-rooted compositional heterogeneity is obtained with maps of "mean" convective flow, by averaging the results of all 16 test cases. We find (see map below) dominant lower-mantle upwellings below the axis of the East Pacific Rise (EPR), and under the Caroline Islands in the Western Pacific. Under the African plate we find large-scale upwellings under the

  12. Archiving and Exchange of a Computerized Marine Seismic Database: The ROSE (Rivera Ocean Seismic Experiment) Data Archive System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    The participating institutions provided their data to the facility where the data were catalogued and distributed. This report describes in detail ...distributed. This report describes in detail the processes and computer programs used to catalog, store and distribute the ROSE seismic data. The...of the Data Base 1 II. The Rose Storage and Exchange Format 2 A. The Tape Header File 2 B. File Header Record and Data Structure 6 C. Shot

  13. Multichannel seismic-reflection profiling on the R/V Maurice Ewing during the Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment (LARSE), California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, Thomas M.; Clayton, Robert W.; Klitgord, Kim D.; Bohannon, Robert G.; Sliter, Ray; McRaney, John K.; Gardner, James V.; Keene, J.B.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the acquisition of deep-crustal multichannel seismic-reflection data in the Inner California Borderland aboard the R/V Maurice Ewing, conducted in October 1994 as part of the Los Angeles Regional Seismic Experiment (LARSE). LARSE is a cooperative study of the crustal structure of southern California involving earth scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, Caltech, the University of Southern California, the University of California Los Angeles, and the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC). During LARSE, the R/V Ewing's 20- element air gun array, totaling 137.7 liters (8470 cu. in.), was used as the primary seismic source for wide-angle recording along three main onshore-offshore lines centered on the Los Angeles basin and the epicenters of the 1933 Long Beach and 1994 Northridge earthquakes. The LARSE onshore-offshore lines were each 200-250 km long, with the offshore portions being between 90 and 150 km long. The nearly 24,000 air gun signals generated by the Ewing were recorded by an array of 170 PASSCAL REFTEK recorders deployed at 2 km intervals along all three of the onshore lines and 9 ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) deployed along two of the lines. Separate passes over the OBS-deployment lines were performed with a long air gun repetition rate (60 and 90 seconds) to minimize acoustic-wave interference from previous shots in the OBS data. The Ewing's 4.2-km, 160-channel, digital streamer was also used to record approximately 1250 km of 40-fold multichannel seismic-reflection data. To enhance the fold of the wide-angle data recorded onshore, mitigating against cultural and wind noise in the Los Angeles basin, the entire ship track was repeated at least once resulting in fewer than about 660 km of unique trackline coverage in the Inner Borderland. Portions of the seismic-reflection lines were repeated up to 6 times. A variety of other geophysical data were also continuously recorded, including 3.5 kHz bathymetry, multi

  14. The perceived racism scale: a multidimensional assessment of the experience of white racism among African Americans.

    PubMed

    McNeilly, M D; Anderson, N B; Armstead, C A; Clark, R; Corbett, M; Robinson, E L; Pieper, C F; Lepisto, E M

    1996-01-01

    The experience of racism is a complex, multidimensional phenomenon. At present, there are few instruments that attempt to capture the experience of racism in all of its complexity. For this study, a new instrument, the Perceived Racism Scale, has been constructed to assess the experience of racism in African Americans in a multidimensional manner. The scale not only provides a measure of the frequency of exposure to many manifestations of racism (including individual and institutional, overt and covert, attitudinal, behavioral, and cultural), but takes a step forward in more comprehensively measuring the experience of racism by assessing emotional and behavioral coping responses to racism. These responses are measured with respect to exposure to racism in three situational domains: on the job, in academic settings, and in the public realm. Measurement of responses to a fourth domain, that of exposure to racist statements, is also included. It is hoped that the Perceived Racism Scale will facilitate a more comprehensive understanding of the experience of racism among African Americans and, through its use in research and clinical settings, will ultimately move us closer to reducing the prevalence and potentially untoward effects of racism.

  15. ENAM: A community seismic experiment targeting rifting processes and post-rift evolution of the Mid Atlantic US margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Avendonk, H. J.; Magnani, M. B.; Shillington, D. J.; Gaherty, J. B.; Hornbach, M. J.; Dugan, B.; Long, M. D.; Lizarralde, D.; Becel, A.; Benoit, M. H.; Harder, S. H.; Wagner, L. S.; Christeson, G. L.

    2014-12-01

    The continental margins of the eastern United States formed in the Early Jurassic after the breakup of supercontinent Pangea. The relationship between the timing of this rift episode and the occurrence of offshore magmatism, which is expressed in the East Coast Magnetic Anomaly, is still unknown. The possible influence of magmatism and existing lithospheric structure on the rifting processes along margin of the eastern U.S. was one of the motivations to conduct a large-scale community seismic experiment in the Eastern North America (ENAM) GeoPRISMS focus site. In addition, there is also a clear need for better high-resolution seismic data with shallow penetration on this margin to better understand the geological setting of submarine landslides. The ENAM community seismic experiment is a project in which a team of scientists will gather both active-source and earthquake seismic data in the vicinity of Cape Hatteras on a 500 km wide section of the margin offshore North Carolina and Virginia. The timing of data acquisition in 2014 and 2015 facilitates leveraging of other geophysical data acquisition programs such as Earthscope's Transportable Array and the USGS marine seismic investigation of the continental shelf. In April of 2014, 30 broadband ocean-bottom seismometers were deployed on the shelf, slope and abyssal plain of the study site. These instruments will record earthquakes for one year, which will help future seismic imaging of the deeper lithosphere beneath the margin. In September and October of 2014, regional marine seismic reflection and refraction data will be gathered with the seismic vessel R/V Marcus Langseth, and airgun shots will also be recorded on land to provide data coverage across the shoreline. Last, in the summer of 2015, a land explosion seismic refraction study will provide constraints on the crustal structure in the adjacent coastal plain of North Carolina and Virginia. All seismic data will be distributed to the community through IRIS

  16. A comparative study of seismicity statistics in laboratory stick-slip experiments and nature: Implications for fault mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebel, Thomas; Kwiatek, Grzegorz; Becker, Thorsten; Sammis, Charles; Dresen, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Fault properties can rarely be monitored under in-situ conditions at seismogenic depth. At these depths seismicity records are possibly the only high-resolution data that can provide insight into state of stress and mechanics of faulting. We analyze series of laboratory experiments on faults that developed during stick-slip on saw-cut and fractured surfaces under upper crustal stress conditions. Stick-slip experiments were performed on surfaces with varying roughness and fracture surfaces that evolved into fault zones with pronounced damage zones. We monitor and analyze acoustic emission events that exhibit many striking similarities to natural seismicity across all examined scales. These similarities include pronounced Gutenberg-Richter-type magnitude distributions, Omori-type aftershock decay, and off-fault seismicity distributions that decay as a power law with distance. In the laboratory, fault roughness and heterogeneity are critical in concentrating stresses that lead to local AE clustering, and differences in off-fault activities and lower b-values. Similar observations of earthquake clustering and b-value variations were made for natural faults such as the Parkfield segment of the San Andreas fault. In addition to seismicity statistics, we conducted a detailed analysis of moment tensors, focusing on relative contributions from isotropic and deviatoric components to laboratory seismicity. In contrast to natural seismicity, our results revealed a larger contribution from isotropic components. These contributions are a result of ongoing fracture processes within the evolving fault which are most pronounced after stick-slip events. Our study shows, that seismicity analyses in laboratory experiments can significantly advance our understanding of fault mechanics from the scale of single asperities to large fault zones.

  17. Local Seismic Events in the Area of Poland Based on Data from the PASSEQ 2006-2008 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, Marcin; Plesiewicz, Beata; Wiszniowski, Jan; Wilde-Piórko, Monika

    2016-12-01

    PASSEQ 2006-2008 (Passive Seismic Experiment in TESZ; Wilde-Piórko et al. 2008) was the biggest passive seismic experiment carried out so far in the area of Central Europe (Poland, Germany, the Czech Republic and Lithuania). 196 seismic stations (including 49 broadband seismometers) worked simultaneously for over two years. During the experiment, multiple types of data recorders and seismometers were used, making the analysis more complex and time consuming. The dataset was unified and repaired to start the detection of local seismic events. Two different approaches for detection were applied for stations located in Poland. The first one used standard STA/LTA triggers (Carl Johnson's STA/LTA algorithm) and grid search to classify and locate the events. The result was manually verified. The second approach used Real Time Recurrent Network (RTRN) detection (Wiszniowski et al. 2014). Both methods gave similar results, showing four previously unknown seismic events located in the Gulf of Gdańsk area, situated in the southern Baltic Sea. In this paper we discuss both detection methods with their pros and cons (accuracy, efficiency, manual work required, scalability). We also show details of all detected and previously unknown events in the discussed area.

  18. A passive seismic experiment and ground penetration radar to characterize subsurface cavities in Eastern Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmaidi Chan, Septriandi; Ismail Kaka, SanLinn

    2014-05-01

    We have carried out a small-scale passive seismic experiment over a known shallow cavity at King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals in an attempt to characterize the near surface cavities. This experiment was conducted as part of a larger study to develop an integrated geophysical approach (i.e. seismic, gravity, resistivity and ground penetration radar) in detecting and characterizing shallow subsurface cavities. Characterizing shallow cavities is of particular interest in the eastern province of Saudi Arabia where many cavities were discovered during a number of construction projects. We used a Geospace passive seismic recording system to collect continuous data over a partly dolomitized limestone bed with several fractures and cavities. Systematically selected time series data at different times of the day were processed using Geopsy software developed by the SESAME (Site Effects Assessment using Ambient Excitations) project. Data from the 10 Hz geophone was used in this experiment and we extracted part of the data recorded during the night as this has been found to exclude most of the anthropologic noise that usually masks signals on data recorded during the day time. We analyzed time series data and performed spectral analysis. Horizontal-to-vertical ratio (H/V) and power spectral density (PSD) were performed as an enhancement tool to determine the resonance frequencies possibly associated with the shallow cavity. Various processing windows with 5% cosine tapers were applied to reduce spectral leakage. To retain the analysis at frequency range of interest between 0.1 to 20 Hz, a band-pass-filter with smoothing procedure described by Kamo and Omachi (1998) was applied. Moreover, the same frequency peaks were picked at each measuring point to check the stability of the H/V curve. The preliminary results (frequency peaks in the spectral H/V ambient ground motions as well as PSD plots) do not uniquely define the near surface cavity. However, further

  19. Too Important to Fail: Assessing the Role of a First Year Experience Program in the Persistence of African American Male Students at a Predominantly White University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Craig A.

    2016-01-01

    Continued research on the first-year experience of African American male students entering institutions of higher learning is necessary and can provide a deeper look at institutional and individual factors that African American male students may encounter, and impact their academic success. Understanding the issues that affect African American…

  20. Problematic situations associated with dating experiences and relationships among urban African American adolescents: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Terri N; Erwin, Elizabeth H; Helms, Sarah W; Masho, Saba W; Farrell, Albert D

    2010-12-01

    This qualitative study focused on the identification of problem situations associated with adolescent dating experiences and relationships, including those that placed youth at risk for dating violence perpetration or victimization. Interviews were conducted with 44 African American middle and high school students in an urban school system. Qualitative analysis identified 18 individual themes representing six categories of problem situations: (a) approach and initiation; (b) conflict, conflict resolution, and break-ups; (c) communication, connection, and emotion; (d) aggression and victimization; (e) the role of others; and (f) media and technology. Identification of these problem situation themes has important implications for developing and evaluating prevention efforts designed to foster healthy adolescent dating relationships.

  1. Disability and Health: Exploring the Disablement Experience of Young Adult African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Tracie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to examine disablement as experienced by young adult African American men and women with permanent mobility impairment. Methods This study included a sample of 5 male and 5 female participants ranging in age from 22 to 39. An exploratory descriptive design and qualitative methods, including interviews and fieldnotes, were used. Interview data was analyzed using the process of inductive qualitative content analysis. Results Basic desires for independence, shared intimacy, and psychological and physical health were not diminished by physical limitations. The disablement experience of this group is reflected in the themes of “Cumulative Losses” and “Sustained Desires.” The findings of this study describe the high level of motivation that young adult African American men and women with disabilities have to improve levels of health and well-being within the context of their impairments. Conclusion This study provides a better understanding of the contextual factors and experiences that may contribute to the development of further disability and subsequent health-related problems over time. Increased knowledge of the disablement experience of these young men and women may assist health care entities and social service providers in improving health care and rehabilitation efforts targeting this group. PMID:23745770

  2. Subduction processes off chile (SPOC) - results from The amphibious wide-angle seismic experiment across The chilean subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueth, S.; Spoc Resaerch Group

    2003-04-01

    One component of the onshore-offshore, active-passive seismic experiment SPOC (Krawczyk et al., Stiller et al., this vol.) was a 2-D wide-angle seismic experiment covering the Chilean subduction zone from the Nazca Plate to the Magmatic Arc in the main cordillera. Three W-E-profiles of 52 stations each and up to 240 km long were deployed between 36° and 39° S. These profiles recorded chemical shots at their ends and, in order to extend the onshore profiles, the airgun pulses from RV SONNE cruising simultaneously on offshore profiles. On the southernmost of the three profiles OBHs/OBSs were deployed offshore, thus providing continuous wide-angle seismic data from the Nazca Plate to the South-American continent. Data examples, correlations, and velocity models along the three transects will be presented. The Moho of the subducted oceanic crust can be constrained by PmP-reflections down to 45 km depth under the coastal cordillera. The P-wave velocity field of the crust of the upper plate is characterized by gradually increasing P-wave velocities from East to West. Low seismic velocities (Vp < ~5 km/s) indicate the location of a young accretionary complex at the western tip of the continent. The highest seismic velocities (Vp > ~6.5 km/s below 10 km depth) are observed at the eastern margin of the investigated area.

  3. Infected Lives: Lived Experiences of Young African American HIV-Positive Women.

    PubMed

    Peltzer, Jill N; Domian, Elaine W; Teel, Cynthia S

    2016-02-01

    This hermeneutic phenomenological study explored the lived experiences of young African American HIV-infected women. Eleven women between the ages of 21 and 35 participated. One pattern, Infected Lives, and three themes--Living Alone With HIV, Living With Unresolved Conflicts, and Living With Multiple Layers of Betrayal--emerged. The pattern and themes portray the very complex and challenging experiences faced by these young women living with HIV infection. They have experienced isolation, abandonment, betrayal, and discrimination in their interpersonal and social systems. They often dealt with conflicts of hope and anguish in the relationships with their children, and portraying strength, while feeling fragile. These complexities negatively influence the ability to fully engage in self-care activities. Implications for future research include further investigation about the experiences of psychological distress experienced post-diagnosis, development and evaluation of holistic nursing interventions, and evaluative research on mass media educational campaigns to reduce HIV-related stigma.

  4. African American Elders' Serious Illness Experiences: Narratives of "God Did," "God Will," and "Life Is Better".

    PubMed

    Coats, Heather; Crist, Janice D; Berger, Ann; Sternberg, Esther; Rosenfeld, Anne G

    2015-12-22

    The foundation of culturally sensitive patient-centered palliative care is formed from one's social, spiritual, psychological, and physical experiences of serious illness. The purpose of this study was to describe categories and patterns of psychological, social, and spiritual healing from the perspectives of aging seriously ill African American (AA) elders. Using narrative analysis methodology, 13 open-ended interviews were collected. Three main patterns were "prior experiences," "I changed," and "across past, present experiences and future expectations." Themes were categorized within each pattern: been through it . . . made me strong, I thought about . . . others, went down little hills . . . got me down, I grew stronger, changed priorities, do things I never would have done, quit doing, God did and will take care of me, close-knit relationships, and life is better. "Faith" in God helped the aging seriously ill AA elders "overcome things," whether their current illness or other life difficulties.

  5. Early-stage rifting in the southwest East African Rift: Insights from new reflection seismic data from Lakes Tanganyika and Malawi (Nyasa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, C. A.; Wood, D. A.; Shillington, D. J.; McCartney, T.; Accardo, N. J.

    2015-12-01

    The western branch of the East African Rift is characterized by modest amounts of mainly amagmatic extension; deeply-subsided, fault-controlled basins; and large-magnitude, deep seismicity. Lakes Tanganyika and Malawi are two of the world's largest lakes, with maximum water depths of 1450 and 700 m respectively. Newly acquired seismic reflection data, along with newly reprocessed legacy data reveal thick sedimentary sections, in excess of 5 km in some localities. The 1980's vintage legacy data from Project PROBE have been reprocessed through pre-stack depth migration in Lake Tanganyika, and similar reprocessing of legacy data from Lake Malawi is forthcoming. New high-fold and large-source commercial and academic data have recently been collected in southern Lake Tanganyika, and in the northern and central basins of Lake Malawi as part of the 2015 SEGMeNT project. In the case of Lake Tanganyika, new data indicate the presence of older sediment packages that underlie previously identified "pre-rift" basement (the "Nyanja Event"). These episodes of sedimentation and extension may substantially predate the modern lake. These deep stratal reflections are absent in many localites, possibly on account of attenuation of the acoustic signal. However in one area of southern Lake Tanganyika, the newly-observed deep strata extend axially for ~70 km, likely representing deposits from a discrete paleolake. The high-amplitude Nyanja Event is interpreted as the onset of late-Cenozoic rifting, and the changing character of the overlying depositional sequences reflects increasing relief in the rift valley, as well as the variability of fluvial inputs, and the intermittent connectivity of upstream lake catchments. Earlier Tanganyika sequences are dominated by shallow lake and fluvial-lacustrine facies, whereas later sequences are characterized by extensive gravity flow deposition in deep water, and pronounced erosion and incision in shallow water depths and on littoral platforms. The

  6. A study of the lived experiences of African American women STEM doctoral degree completers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squires, Stephanie Michelle

    This study examined the lived experiences of African American women (AAW) who completed doctoral degrees in a STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) discipline in the United States. This study sought to fill the gap in the literature by examining how AAW described and made meaning of lived STEM educational experiences during doctoral degree completion in the context of the intersection of being African American and a woman. This study utilized a theoretical perspective based upon three theories: (a) critical race theory as a framework to gather AAW's narratives about STEM doctorate education, (b) Black feminist thought as a framework to view the intersection of being African American and a woman in the United States, and (c) the science identity model as a framework to view how women of color successfully complete scientific graduate degrees. Participants revealed that being an African American and a woman in a STEM doctoral program often complicated an already difficult process of completing the doctoral degree. The participants described the educational experience as challenging, particularly the writing of the dissertation. The challenges that the participants faced were due to various factors such as difficult advisor/advisee relationships, tedious writing and revision processes, politics, and lack of information regarding the doctoral degree process. The findings suggested that AAW participants confronted intrinsic bias while completing STEM doctoral degrees, which led to isolation and feelings of being an impostor---or feelings of not belonging in scientific studies. The findings also indicated that the women in this study ascribed success in dissertation writing and degree completion to one or more of the following attributes: (a) having a clear plan, (b) taking ownership of the writing process, (c) having an engaged advisor, (d) learning the writing style of the advisor, (e) understanding the temperament of the advisor, (f) personal will

  7. African American women's preventative care usage: the role of social support and racial experiences and attitudes.

    PubMed

    Pullen, Erin; Perry, Brea; Oser, Carrie

    2014-09-01

    Research suggests that African Americans are less likely to utilise preventative care services than Americans of European descent, and that these patterns may contribute to racial health disparities in the United States. Despite the persistence of inequalities in preventative care utilisation, culturally relevant factors influencing the use of these gateway health services have been understudied among marginalised groups. Using a stratified sample of 205 low-income African American women, this research examines the predictors of receiving a physical exam, with a particular emphasis on how differing levels of social support from friend and family networks and experiences of racial discrimination and cultural mistrust shape utilisation. The findings underscore the importance of traditional predictors of utilisation, including insurance status and having a usual physician. However, they also indicate that supportive ties to friendship networks are associated with higher predicted rates of having an annual physical exam, while social support from family and sentiments of cultural mistrust are associated with lower rates of utilisation. Broadly, the findings indicate that even as traditional predictors of help-seeking become less relevant, it will be critical to explore how variations in discrimination experiences and social relationships across marginalised groups drive patterns of preventative care utilisation.

  8. Racism at the intersections: Gender and socioeconomic differences in the experience of racism among African Americans.

    PubMed

    Kwate, Naa Oyo A; Goodman, Melody S

    2015-09-01

    Several studies investigating the health effects of racism have reported gender and socioeconomic differences in exposures to racism, with women typically reporting lower frequencies, and individuals with greater resources reporting higher frequencies. This study used diverse measures of socioeconomic position and multiple measures and methods to assess experienced racism. Socioeconomic position included education and financial and employment status. Quantitative racism measures assessed individual experiences with day-to-day and with major lifetime incidents and perceptions of the extent to which African Americans as a group experience racism. A brief qualitative question asked respondents to describe a racist incident that stood out in recent memory. Participants comprised a probability sample of N = 144 African American adults aged 19 to 87 residing in New York City. Results suggested that women reported fewer lifetime incidents but did not differ from men on everyday racism. These differences appear to be partly because of scale content. Socioeconomic position as measured by years of education was positively associated with reported racism in the total sample but differently patterned across gender; subjective social status showed a negative association. Qualitative responses describing memorable incidents fell into 5 key categories: resources/opportunity structures, criminal profiling, racial aggression/assault, interpersonal incivilities, and stereotyping. In these narratives, men were more likely to offer accounts involving criminal profiling, and women encountered incivilities more often. The findings highlight the need for closer attention to the intersection of gender and socioeconomic factors in investigations of the health effects of racism.

  9. Experiences of racist events are associated with negative health consequences for African American women.

    PubMed Central

    Kwate, Naa Oyo A.; Valdimarsdottir, Heiddis B.; Guevarra, Josephine S.; Bovbjerg, Dana H.

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated whether experiences of racist events were related to psychological distress, negative health behaviors, and health problems. Participants were 71 African American women (mean age 44.4) who were recruited from an urban cancer-screening clinic as part of a larger longitudinal study on familial risk of breast cancer. Participants completed three study assessments, approximately one month apart, and data were collected via self-report. Correlational analyses revealed that past year and lifetime racism were both related to psychological distress. Among smokers and drinkers, past year racism was positively correlated with number of cigarettes and drinks consumed. Lifetime racism was negatively related to perceived health, and positively related to lifetime history of physical disease and frequency of recent common colds. Analyses using a general linear model revealed that these relationships were largely unaccounted for by other variables. In addition, demographic variables such as income and education were not related to experiences of racism. The results suggest that racism can be detrimental to African American's well being and should be investigated in health disparities research. PMID:12856911

  10. The North East Italy (NI) broadband seismic network run by OGS: experience in improving the long period performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesaresi, D.

    2009-04-01

    experimented and routinely used by the world wide GEOFON seismic network and the German regional seismic network: examples and performances of a typical OGS installation will be shown.

  11. African American Adolescents' Discrimination Experiences and Academic Achievement: Racial Socialization as a Cultural Compensatory and Protective Factor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neblett, Enrique W., Jr.; Philip, Cheri L.; Cogburn, Courtney D.; Sellers, Robert M.

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the interrelationships among racial discrimination experiences, parent race socialization practices, and academic achievement outcomes in a sample of 548 African American adolescents. Adolescents' racial discrimination experiences were associated with a decrease in academic curiosity, persistence, and student self-reported…

  12. The Experience of First-Year African American Male College Students Who Did Not Achieve Academic Success: Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haywood, Jerry L.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the experience of African American males who did not achieve academic success in their first year of college at a predominately White institution (PWI) in Southwestern Georgia. This study used a qualitative case study design to investigate the experience held by this target group. The qualitative case study…

  13. Transition from slab to slabless: Results from the 1993 Mendocino triple junction seismic experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beaudoin, B.C.; Godfrey, N.J.; Klemperer, S.L.; Lendl, C.; Trehu, A.M.; Henstock, T.J.; Levander, A.; Holl, J.E.; Meltzer, A.S.; Luetgert, J.H.; Mooney, W.D.

    1996-01-01

    Three seismic refraction-reflection profiles, part of the Mendocino triple junction seismic experiment, allow us to compare and contrast crust and upper mantle of the North American margin before and after it is modified by passage of the Mendocino triple junction. Upper crustal velocity models reveal an asymmetric Great Valley basin overlying Sierran or ophiolitic rocks at the latitude of Fort Bragg, California, and overlying Sierran or Klamath rocks near Redding, California. In addition, the upper crustal velocity structure indicates that Franciscan rocks underlie the Klamath terrane east of Eureka, California. The Franciscan complex is, on average, laterally homogeneous and is thickest in the triple junction region. North of the triple junction, the Gorda slab can be traced 150 km inboard from the Cascadia subduction zone. South of the triple junction, strong precritical reflections indicate partial melt and/or metamorphic fluids at the base of the crust or in the upper mantle. Breaks in these reflections are correlated with the Maacama and Bartlett Springs faults, suggesting that these faults extend at least to the mantle. We interpret our data to indicate tectonic thickening of the Franciscan complex in response to passage of the Mendocino triple junction and an associated thinning of these rocks south of the triple junction due to assimilation into melt triggered by upwelling asthenosphere. The region of thickened Franciscan complex overlies a zone of increased scattering, intrinsic attenuation, or both, resulting from mechanical mixing of lithologies and/or partial melt beneath the onshore projection of the Mendocino fracture zone. Our data reveal that we have crossed the southern edge of the Gorda slab and that this edge and/or the overlying North American crust may have fragmented because of the change in stress presented by the edge.

  14. Victimization Experiences, Substance Misuse and Mental Health Problems in Relation to Risk for Lethality among African-American and African-Caribbean Women

    PubMed Central

    Sabri, Bushra; Stockman, Jamila K.; Betrand, Desiree; Campbell, Doris W.; Callwood, Gloria B.; Campbell, Jacquelyn C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of intimate partner victimization experiences, mental health, and substance misuse problems with the risk for lethality among women of African descent. Data for this cross-sectional study were derived from a large case-control study examining the relationship between abuse status and health consequences. Women were recruited from primary care, prenatal or family planning clinics in Baltimore and the US Virgin Islands. Logistic regression was used to generate the study findings. Among 543 abused women, physical and psychological abuse by intimate partners, comorbid PTSD and depression symptoms, and PTSD-only problems significantly increased the likelihood of lethality risk. However victims’ substance misuse and depression-only problems were not associated with the risk for lethality. Additionally, PTSD symptoms mediated the relationship between severe victimization experiences and risk for lethality. Practitioners should pay attention to victimization experiences and mental health issues when developing treatment and safety plans. Policies to fund integrated services for African-American and African-Caribbean women with victimization and related mental health issues, and training of providers to identify at-risk women may help reduce the risk for lethality in intimate partner relationships. PMID:23929602

  15. Regional Seismic Signals from Chemical Explosions, Nuclear Explosions and Earthquakes: Results from the Arizona Source Phenomenology Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, W R; Gok, R; Mayeda, K; Sicherman, A; Bonner, J; Leidig, M

    2005-09-02

    Routine industrial mining explosions play two important roles in seismic nuclear monitoring research: (1) they are a source of background events that need to be discriminated from potential nuclear explosions; (2) as some of the only explosions occurring in the current de facto global moratoria on nuclear testing, their signals should be exploited to improve the calibration of seismic m monitoring systems. A common issue monitoring arising in both of these roles is our limited physical understanding of the causes behind observed differences and similarities in the seismic signals produced by routine industrial mining blasts and small underground nuclear tests. In 2003 a consortium (Weston, SMU, LLNL, LANL and UTEP) carried out a Source Phenomenology Experiment (SPE), a series of dedicated explosions designed to improve this physical understanding, particularly as it relates to seismic methods of discriminating between signals from three different source types: earthquakes, industrial blasts, and nuclear tests. Here we very briefly review prior field experimental work that examined the seismic relationships between these source types.

  16. Psychometric Testing of the Daily Spiritual Experiences Scale Among African Americans in the Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Loustalot, Fleetwood; Wyatt, Sharon B.; Sims, Mario; Ellison, Christopher G.; Taylor, Herman A.; Underwood, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    This study provided the first examination of the psychometric properties of the 6-item Daily Spiritual Experiences Scale (DSES) in a large African American sample, the Jackson Heart Study (JHS). The JHS included measures of spiritual (DSES) and religious practices. Internal reliability, dimensionality, fit indices, and correlation were assessed. DSES scores reflected frequent daily spiritual experiences (12.84 ± 4.72) and reliability scores were high (α = 0.85; 95% CI 0.84–0.86). The DSES loaded on a single factor, with significant goodness-of-fit scores (RMSEA = 0.094, P < 0.01). Moderate significant correlations were noted among DSES items. Our findings confirm that the 6-item DSES had excellent psychometric properties in this sample. PMID:19693673

  17. Seismicity of the diffusive Iberian/African plate boundary at the eastern terminus of the Azores-Gibraltar Transform fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, D.; Grevemeyer, I.; Matias, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    The plate boundary at the eastern terminus of the Azores-Gibraltar transform fault between Africa and Iberia is poorly defined. The deformation in the area is forced by the slow NW-SE convergence of 4 mm/yr between the oceanic domains of Iberia/Eurasia and Africa and is accommodated over a 200 km broad tectonically-active deformation zone. The region, however, is also characterized by large earthquakes, such as the 1969 Mw=7.9 Horseshoe event and the November 1, 1755 Great Lisbon earthquake with an estimated magnitude of Mw~8.5. The exact location of the source of the 1755 Lisbon earthquake is still unknown. Recent work may suggest that the event occurred in the vicinity of the Horseshoe fault, an oblique thrust fault. However, estimates of tsunami arrival times suggested a source near the Gorringe Bank, a ~180 km-long and ~70 km-wide ridge that has a relieve of ~5000 m. Deep Sea Drilling (DSDP) and rock samples indicated that the bank is mainly composed of serpentinized peridotites with gabbroic intrusions, perhaps being created by overthrusting of the Horseshoe Abyssal Plain onto the Tagus Abyssal Plain in NW direction. Further, the Horseshoe Abyssal Plain is marked by the presence of compressive structures with a roughly NE-SW orientation and E-W trending, segmented, crustal-scale, strike slip faults that extend from the Gorringe Bank to the Gibraltar Arc in the eastern Gulf of Cadiz, which were called "South West Iberian Margin" or SWIM faults. The fault system may mark a developing Eurasia-Africa plate boundary. Two local seismic networks were operated in the area. First, a network of 14 ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) was operated between April and October 2012 in the vicinity of the Horseshoe fault between 10°W to 11°W, and 35°50'N to 36°10'N. From October 2013 to March 2014 a second network of 15 OBS monitored seismicity at the Gorringe Bank. Both networks benefitted from seismic stations operated in Portugal. The first network provided in the order of

  18. Seismicity and seismotectonics of the diffusive Iberian/African plate boundary: Horseshoe Abyssal Plain and Gorringe Bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevemeyer, Ingo; Lange, Dietrich; Matias, Luis

    2014-05-01

    In the area to the west of the Gibraltar Arc the plate boundary between Africa and Iberia is poorly defined. The deformation in the area is forced by the slow NW-SE convergence of 4 mm/yr between the oceanic domains of Iberia/Eurasia and Africa and is accommodated over a 200 km broad tectonically-active deformation zone. The region, however, is also characterized by large earthquakes and tsunamis, such as the 1969 Mw=7.9 Horseshoe Abyssal Plain earthquake and the November 1, 1755 Great Lisbon earthquake with an estimated magnitude of Mw~8.5. The exact location of the source of the 1755 Lisbon earthquake is still unknown. Recent work may suggest that the event occurred in the vicinity of the Horseshoe fault, an oblique thrust fault. However, estimates of tsunami arrival times suggested a source near the Gorringe Bank, a ~180 km-long and ~70 km-wide ridge that has a relieve of ~5000 m. Deep Sea Drilling (DSDP) and rock samples indicated that the bank is mainly composed of serpentinized peridotites with gabbroic intrusions, perhaps being created by overthrusting of the Horseshoe Abyssal Plain onto the Tagus Abyssal Plain in NW direction. Further, the Horseshoe Abyssal Plain is marked by the presence of compressive structures with a roughly NE-SW orientation and E-W trending, segmented, crustal-scale, strike slip faults that extend from the Gorringe Bank to the Gibraltar Arc in the eastern Gulf of Cadiz, which were called "South West Iberian Margin" or SWIM faults. The fault system may mark a developing Eurasia-Africa plate boundary. Two local seismic networks were operated in the area. First, a network of 14 ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) was operated between April and October 2012 in the vicinity of the Horseshoe fault between 10°W to 11°W, and 35°50'N to 36°10'N. From October 2013 to March 2014 a second network of 15 OBS monitored seismicity at the Gorringe Bank. Both networks benefitted from seismic stations operated in Portugal. The first network provided in

  19. Seafloor bathymetry and gravity from the ALBACORE marine seismic experiment offshore southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shintaku, N.; Weeraratne, D. S.; Kohler, M. D.

    2010-12-01

    Although the North America side of the plate boundary surrounding the southern California San Andreas fault region is well studied and instrumented, the Pacific side of this active tectonic boundary is poorly understood. In order to better understand this complex plate boundary offshore, its microplate structures, deformation, and the California Borderland formation, we have recently conducted the first stage of a marine seismic experiment (ALBACORE - Asthenospheric and Lithospheric Broadband Architecture from the California Offshore Region Experiment) deploying 34 ocean bottom seismometers offshore southern California in August 2010. We present preliminary data consisting of seafloor bathymetry and free air gravity collected from this experiment. We present high-resolution maps of bathymetry and gravity from the ALBACORE experiment compiled with previous ship track data obtained from the NGDC (National Geophysical Data Center) and the USGS. We use gravity data from Smith and Sandwell and study correlations with ship track bathymetry data for the features described below. We observe new seafloor geomorphological features far offshore and within the Borderland. Steep canyon walls which line the edges of the Murray fracture zone with possible volcanic flows along the canyon floor were mapped by multibeam bathymetry for the first time. Deep crevices juxtaposed with high edifices of intensely deformed plateaus indicate high strain deformation along the arcuate boundary of the Arguello microplate. Small volcanic seamounts are mapped which straddle the Ferrelo fault (Outer Borderland) and San Pedro fault (Inner Borderland), and appear to exhibit fracture and fault displacement of a portion of the volcanic centers in a left-lateral sense. A large landslide is also imaged extending approximately 6 miles in length and 3 miles in width in the Santa Cruz basin directly south of Santa Rosa Island. Deformation associated with capture of Arguello and Patton microplates by the

  20. Evaluation and developmental studies of possible active seismic experiments during the post-Apollo period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Seismic velocity studies pertinent to the lunar crust and mantle are briefly summarized. The compressional and shear wave velocities in loose aggregates are discussed along with the effects of temperature on seismic velocity in compacted powders. Abstracts of papers concerning the lunar structure are included.

  1. Africa Bibliographic Centre (ABC): An Experiment in African Documentation and Library Resource Sharing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mascarenhas, O. C.

    This description of the Africa Bibliographic Centre (ABC) concept--which is still in a formative stage--provides brief summaries of the 12 components of the system, including an African lending library, bibliographic publishing, a commission on information and bibliographic systems, an African microfiche publications center, African abstracting…

  2. The South African Experience of Conservation and Social Forestry Outreach Nurseries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botha, Jenny; Witkowski, Ed T. F.; Cock, Jacklyn

    2006-11-01

    Outreach nurseries are favored conservation and social forestry tools globally, but, as with many integrated conservation and development programs (ICDPs), they do not always produce anticipated results. A synopsis of the experience of South African practitioners is provided in this study of 65 outreach nurseries. South African outreach nurseries frequently include financial objectives, creating additional challenges in simultaneously attaining conservation and socioeconomic goals. Progress was hindered by biophysical problems (e.g., lack of water, poor soils, etc.) as well as the harsh socioeconomic conditions facing most communities in which nurseries had been established. Attaining financial viability was challenging. Business management skills were often restricted, and few viability studies included adequate market research. Costs to community participants were usually high, and benefits were limited. Conservation objectives were frequently lost in the struggle to attain financial viability. The management of social processes also proved challenging. Although small scale and relatively straightforward compared with many ICDPs, nurseries usually require substantial institutional support, including a range of technical, business, and development services. Project time frames need to be reconsidered, as practitioners estimate that it takes 5-10 years for nurseries to start meeting objectives, and donors and implementing agencies often operate on 2-3-year project cycles. Detailed viability studies are essential, incorporating a social probe and an assessment of potential impacts of projects on community participants. Progress needs to be continuously evaluated to enable institutions and community participants to adapt to changing conditions as well as ensure that the spectrum of objectives are being achieved.

  3. Comparison of Abuse Experiences of Rural and Urban African American Women During Perinatal Period

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Shreya; Bullock, Linda F. C.; Richardson, Jeanita W.; Kimeto, Pamela; Campbell, Jacquelyn C.; Sharps, Phyllis W.

    2015-01-01

    A subsample of 12 African American women (6 urban and 6 rural) were selected from a larger longitudinal, randomized control trial, Domestic Violence Enhanced Home Visitation (DOVE-R01 900903 National Institute of Nursing Research [NINR]/National Institutes of Health [NIH]). All African American women were chosen to control for any racial- and/or race-related cultural differences that may exist among women across geographical areas. The experiences of abuse during the perinatal period are drawn from in-depth interviews conducted at five points in time during pregnancy and the post-partum period. The analysis describes three major themes that highlight the similarities and differences among rural and urban women. The main themes found were (1) types of abuse, (2) location of abuse, and (3) response to abuse. In addition, two sub-themes (a) defiance and compliance and (b) role of children were also identified. Implications for universal screening for women of reproductive age, safer gun laws, and the need for further research are discussed. PMID:25315478

  4. Comparison of abuse experiences of rural and urban African American women during perinatal period.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Shreya; Bullock, Linda F C; Richardson, Jeanita W; Kimeto, Pamela; Campbell, Jacquelyn C; Sharps, Phyllis W

    2015-07-01

    A subsample of 12 African American women (6 urban and 6 rural) were selected from a larger longitudinal, randomized control trial, Domestic Violence Enhanced Home Visitation (DOVE-R01 900903 National Institute of Nursing Research [NINR]/National Institutes of Health [NIH]). All African American women were chosen to control for any racial- and/or race-related cultural differences that may exist among women across geographical areas. The experiences of abuse during the perinatal period are drawn from in-depth interviews conducted at five points in time during pregnancy and the post-partum period. The analysis describes three major themes that highlight the similarities and differences among rural and urban women. The main themes found were (1) types of abuse, (2) location of abuse, and (3) response to abuse. In addition, two sub-themes (a) defiance and compliance and (b) role of children were also identified. Implications for universal screening for women of reproductive age, safer gun laws, and the need for further research are discussed.

  5. Regulatory challenges for GM crops in developing economies: the African experience.

    PubMed

    Nang'ayo, Francis; Simiyu-Wafukho, Stella; Oikeh, Sylvester O

    2014-12-01

    Globally, transgenic or genetically modified (GM) crops are considered regulated products that are subject to regulatory oversight during trans-boundary movement, testing and environmental release. In Africa, regulations for transgenic crops are based on the outcomes of the historic Earth Summit Conference held in Rio, Brazil two decades ago, namely, the adoption of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and the subsequent adoption of the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety. To exploit the potential benefits of transgenic crops while safeguarding the potential risks on human health and environment, most African countries have signed and ratified the CBD and the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety. Consequently, these countries are required to take appropriate legal, administrative and other measures to ensure that the handling and utilization of living modified organisms are undertaken in a manner that reduces the risks to humans and the environment. These countries are also expected to provide regulatory oversight on transgenic crops through functional national biosafety frameworks (NBFs). While in principle this approach is ideal, NBFs in most African countries are steeped in a host of policy, legal and operational challenges that appear to be at cross-purposes with the noble efforts of seeking to access, test and deliver promising GM crops for use by resource-limited farmers in Africa. In this paper we discuss the regulatory challenges faced during the development and commercialization of GM crops based on experiences from countries in Sub-Saharan Africa.

  6. The Seismic Aftershock Monitoring System (SAMS) for OSI - Experiences from IFE14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gestermann, Nicolai; Sick, Benjamin; Häge, Martin; Blake, Thomas; Labak, Peter; Joswig, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    An on-site inspection (OSI) is the third of four elements of the verification regime of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The sole purpose of an OSI is to confirm whether a nuclear weapon test explosion or any other nuclear explosion has been carried out in violation of the treaty and to gather any facts which might assist in identifying any possible violator. It thus constitutes the final verification measure under the CTBT if all other available measures are not able to confirm the nature of a suspicious event. The Provisional Technical Secretariat (PTS) carried out the Integrated Field Exercise 2014 (IFE14) in the Dead Sea Area of Jordan from 3 November to 9. December 2014. It was a fictitious OSI whose aim was to test the inspection capabilities in an integrated manner. The technologies allowed during an OSI are listed in the Treaty. The aim of the Seismic Aftershock Monitoring System (SAMS) is to detect and localize aftershocks of low magnitudes of the triggering event or collapses of underground cavities. The locations of these events are expected in the vicinity of a possible previous explosion and help to narrow down the search area within an inspection area (IA) of an OSI. The success of SAMS depends on the main elements, hardware, software, deployment strategy, the search logic and not least the effective use of personnel. All elements of SAMS were tested and improved during the Built-Up Exercises (BUE) which took place in Austria and Hungary. IFE14 provided more realistic climatic and hazardous terrain conditions with limited resources. Significant variations in topography of the IA of IFE14 in the mountainous Dead Sea Area of Jordan led to considerable challenges which were not expected from experiences encountered during BUE. The SAMS uses mini arrays with an aperture of about 100 meters and with a total of 4 elements. The station network deployed during IFE14 and results of the data analysis will be presented. Possible aftershocks of

  7. Siting of USArray Seismic Stations in North Carolina and southern Virginia: Experience of NC-1 Team

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P.; Howard, J.; Horne, T.

    2012-12-01

    The USArray component of the EarthScope, a transportable array of 400 seismometers installed in a grid about 70 km apart, is in the next two years entering its final stage with station deployment along the Atlantic coast of the United States. Here, we present the experience of the student-faculty team from North Carolina Central University (NCCU) in finding and documenting the suitable sites for the twenty five USArray stations in North Carolina and southern Virginia. The ideal sites are easily accessible yet far from traffic and other sources of noise, with good cell phone coverage, sun exposure and out of flood-prone areas. Although the initial selection of potential locations was done using geospatial mapping and analysis software provided by EarthScope, finding and finalizing the sites involved driving more then 1,000 miles each week for over two months inspecting possible site locations. Aside from driving, the majority of time was spent talking about the EarthScope project and hosting of USArray stations to mostly reluctant landowners. In addition to facing various challenges in finding appropriate sites due to land use issues, such as suburban sprawl of central North Carolina, or topography factors, such as low lying flood prone coastal areas, by far the major challenge was finding the landowners willing to host the seismic station for the necessary three years. In addition to involving students from an HBCU in seismology related project and increasing the visibility of NCCU geophysics program in the University and local community through publicity releases in local media and on university web site, the project had an important outreach component. As North Carolina is located along the seismically quiet, passive Atlantic margin, most residents are not familiar with earthquakes and seismology and the siting experience provided students an opportunity to practice explaining the earthquake research to the general public. The dialog also highlighted science

  8. Characterization and comparison of seismic signals emitted during field scale sheer box experiments and artificially induced landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yfantis, Georgios; Martinez Carvajal, Hernan Eduardo; Pytharouli, Stella; Lunn, Rebecca

    2014-05-01

    The identification and detection of landslide induced seismic signals, recorded by deployed seismometers on active landslides has been the subject of many studies. The most commonly faced problem is the uncertainty in identifying which of the recorded signals are representing a movement or a failure in the landslide's body. In this paper we present two novel experimental campaigns; 1) field scale laboratory experiments of a 65cm diameter sheer box, 2) artificially induced failure of two, two-meter high vertical soil slopes. Using a field scale sheer box we recorded seismic signals emitted during soil slippage events, a phenomenon observed at a landslide's failure plain. This was implemented by displacing, a few centimeters at a time (1-10cm), a concrete cylinder filled with soil along a corridor free from vegetation. The field scale sheer box methodology allows control over a large number of parameters that affect a landslide. For example, it is possible to control soil saturation thus simulating different rain events or control the stress field on the soil's slippage surface simulating displacement events at different depths. More than 40 displacement events were induced under four different loading conditions between 472kg to 829kg. All soil slippage events were recorded above the levels of background seismic noise. Repetition of the methodology under the same experimental conditions resulted in similar seismic signals allowing us to define a 'characteristic seismic response' for soils. In the second experimental campaign, two controlled landslides were experimentally induced by increasing the vertical load on top of a 2m soil scarp. We were able to detect from 1 to 10 centimeter wide crack propagations and displacements, and approximately 20x20x10cm to 100x50x20cm block failure events based on microseismic recordings, field notes, video recordings and displacement measurements of the landslide's crown that failed during the experiments. Direct correlation

  9. Conceptual Design and Architecture of Mars Exploration Rover (MER) for Seismic Experiments Over Martian Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Akshay; Singh, Amit

    2012-07-01

    Keywords: MER, Mars, Rover, Seismometer Mars has been a subject of human interest for exploration missions for quite some time now. Both rover as well as orbiter missions have been employed to suit mission objectives. Rovers have been preferentially deployed for close range reconnaissance and detailed experimentation with highest accuracy. However, it is essential to strike a balance between the chosen science objectives and the rover operations as a whole. The objective of this proposed mechanism is to design a vehicle (MER) to carry out seismic studies over Martian surface. The conceptual design consists of three units i.e. Mother Rover as a Surrogate (Carrier) and Baby Rovers (two) as seeders for several MEMS-based accelerometer / seismometer units (Nodes). Mother Rover can carry these Baby Rovers, having individual power supply with solar cells and with individual data transmission capabilities, to suitable sites such as Chasma associated with Valles Marineris, Craters or Sand Dunes. Mother rover deploys these rovers in two opposite direction and these rovers follow a triangulation pattern to study shock waves generated through firing tungsten carbide shells into the ground. Till the time of active experiments Mother Rover would act as a guiding unit to control spatial spread of detection instruments. After active shock experimentation, the babies can still act as passive seismometer units to study and record passive shocks from thermal quakes, impact cratering & landslides. Further other experiments / payloads (XPS / GAP / APXS) can also be carried by Mother Rover. Secondary power system consisting of batteries can also be utilized for carrying out further experiments over shallow valley surfaces. The whole arrangement is conceptually expected to increase the accuracy of measurements (through concurrent readings) and prolong life cycle of overall experimentation. The proposed rover can be customised according to the associated scientific objectives and further

  10. The social context of the aeronautical education experience of African-American civilian, commercial, and military pilots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Taurean Mashawn

    The purpose of this research is to explore the social context (the nature and cultural environment) of the aeronautical training experience of African-American civilian, commercial, and military pilots. This research highlights the challenges African-American pilots are exposed to in addition to drawing parallels between the social context and the obstacles they are subjected to along the way. This study is valuable for stakeholders, African-American pilot aspirants, aviation corporations, Federal Aviation Administration, flight schools - in the aviation industry in understanding ways to initiate a paradigm shift and increase awareness about representation and participation of African-American aviation professionals. The qualitative approach was selected to gather a better understanding of the sociological hurdles black aviators face while going through the journey of becoming a pilot. Hardiman (2010) states, "While quantitative research is valuable, qualitative research provides the researcher the ability to view real world situations as they naturally unfold" ( p. 25). According to OBAP (2014), less than 2% of pilots in the United States are African-American. The experiences shared by the participants can provide helpful insight of possible policy implications for the aeronautical industry. There were three research questions in the study: 1) What factors hindered pilot training? 2) What were the resilience factors experienced during pilot training? 3) What were the defining features of the social context surrounding pilot training? Semi-structured, face-to-face interviews were conducted of six professional pilots. A qualitative data analysis was conducted to illustrate the context of the social challenges during the course of pilot training. Three themes were revealed: 1) access, 2) perception of inferiority, and 3) support. Implications of the significance of providing social networks to expose African-Americans to aviation were discussed. Additional means of

  11. Investigating the lithospheric structure of Queen Maud Land, East-Antarctica: a year-round seismic experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, Denis; Camelbeeck, Thierry; Rapagnani, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    The recently launched LISSA project is dedicated to imaging the lithospheric structure of East-Antarctica in relation with the past geodynamics of Gondwana by probing the Sør Rondane Mountains, Queen Maud Land, a belt formed from various metamorphosed terranes mobilized during the Proterozoic Pan-African orogeny. The project benefits from the establishment in 2009 of the Belgian Princess Elisabeth base built at the northern tip of the mountain chain. Our aim is to investigate the deep lithospheric structure of the region by setting up in January 2014 6 broadband seismic stations along a 100 km long North-South profile through the mountain belt striking perpendicular to the various geological terranes. All stations are set up to be year-round autonomously powered, all but one being on rock outcrops and only one being remotely accessible. We describe the technical developpment for year-round operation and the installation site conditions. Then we present the first collected data by analyzing the background seismic noise providing data quality and finally we provide a first inventory of a 1 month event dataset.

  12. Childhood leukaemia and lymphoma: African experience supports a role for environmental factors in leukaemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Christopher Ko; Foroni, Letizia; Luzzatto, Lucio; Saliu, Idris; Levine, Arthur; Greaves, Mel F

    2014-01-01

    Major differences exist in the nature of leukaemia and lymphoma in low-income African children compared to those in the high-income countries. These include the absence of the peak incidence of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in under-five-year olds that characterizes the disease in high-income countries. Conversely, chloroma association with acute myelogenous leukaemia (CA-AML/AMML) and Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) are rare in the high-income countries. This report describes clinical and laboratory as well as epidemiological features of childhood leukaemia and lymphoma reported betwen 1982 and 1984 in the city of Ibadan, Nigeria. The observed pattern of distribution of childhood haematological malignancies in the city is more consistent with the observations of Ludwik Gross's experiments on environmental influences, such as malnutrition and infections, animal leukaemogenesis, and mirroring the consequences of the primordial pressures that have shaped human genetics and pathophysiology.

  13. Childhood leukaemia and lymphoma: African experience supports a role for environmental factors in leukaemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Christopher KO; Foroni, Letizia; Luzzatto, Lucio; Saliu, Idris; Levine, Arthur; Greaves, Mel F

    2014-01-01

    Major differences exist in the nature of leukaemia and lymphoma in low-income African children compared to those in the high-income countries. These include the absence of the peak incidence of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in under-five-year olds that characterizes the disease in high-income countries. Conversely, chloroma association with acute myelogenous leukaemia (CA-AML/AMML) and Burkitt’s lymphoma (BL) are rare in the high-income countries. This report describes clinical and laboratory as well as epidemiological features of childhood leukaemia and lymphoma reported betwen 1982 and 1984 in the city of Ibadan, Nigeria. The observed pattern of distribution of childhood haematological malignancies in the city is more consistent with the observations of Ludwik Gross’s experiments on environmental influences, such as malnutrition and infections, animal leukaemogenesis, and mirroring the consequences of the primordial pressures that have shaped human genetics and pathophysiology. PMID:25435906

  14. A New Generation of Large Seismic Refraction Experiments in Central Europe (1997-2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guterch, A.; Grad, M.; Spicak, A.; Brueckl, E.; Hegedus, E.; Keller, G. R.; Thybo, H.

    2003-12-01

    Beginning in 1997, Central Europe has been covered by an unprecedented network of seismic refraction experiments. These experiments (POLONAISE'97, CELEBRATION 2000, ALP 2002, SUDETES 2003) have only been possible due a massive international cooperative effort. The total length of all profiles is about 19,000 km, and over 300 explosive sources were employed. The result is a network of seismic refraction profiles that extends along the Trans-European Suture Zone region of Poland and the Bohemian massif, Pannonian basin, trough the Carpathians and Alps to the Adriatic Sea and the Dinarides. As reflected in structures within these areas, Central Europe has experienced a complex tectonic history that includes the Caledonian, Variscan, and Alpine orogenies. The related TESZ region is a broad zone of deformation that extends across Europe from British Isles to the Black Sea region that formed as Europe was assembled from a complex collage of terranes during the late Palaeozoic. For example, the Bohemian massif is mostly located in the Czech Republic and is a large, complex terrane whose origin can be traced to northern Gondwana (Africa). These terranes were accreted along the margin of Baltica that was formed during the break-up of Rodinia. The tectonic evolution of this region shares many attributes with the Appalachian/Ouachita origin and is certainly of global important to studies in terrane tectonics and continental evolution. In southern Poland, several structural blocks are located adjacent to Baltica and were probably transported laterally along it similar to the Cenozoic movement of terranes along the western margin of North America. The younger Carpathian arc and Pannonian back-arc basin were also targeted by these experiments. Thickness of the crust in the area of investigations changes from 22-25 km in the Pannonian basin to about 55 km in the Trans-European Suture Zone in SE Poland. Together, these experiments are providing an unprecedented 3-D image of the

  15. "I thought we are safe": Southern African lesbians' experiences of living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Matebeni, Zethu; Reddy, Vasu; Sandfort, Theo; Southey-Swartz, Ian

    2013-01-01

    HIV-prevention and service programmes have long either ignored or overlooked lesbians. The experiences of lesbians with HIV have similarly been unrecognised and unreported. This erasure has contributed to the invisibility of lesbians in relation to HIV and related health risks. This community participatory study, based on in-depth interviews with 24 self-identifying African lesbians living with HIV in South Africa, Zimbabwe and Namibia, focuses on their personal experiences and circumstances. Women's experiences shed light and challenge popular notions around lesbian risk. In particular among this group are lesbians who self-report exclusive sexual relationships with women. For these women, experiences of living with HIV are challenging as they struggle to understand the possibility of female-to-female transmission. While battling with their own perceptions of invulnerability and accepting their HIV-positive status, they have to deal also with wide-ranging misconceptions about risk. The paper argues that within the context of HIV, lesbians cannot be regarded as a 'no-risk' group. Health services and health providers are encouraged to respond to the health needs of lesbians living with HIV.

  16. Schooling Experiences and Perceptions of Resettled Sub-Saharan African Refugee Middle School Students in a Southwest U.S. State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sallu, Adama

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the schooling experiences and perceptions of resettled sub-Saharan African middle school refugee students in a metropolitan area of the United States Southwest. The research questions underpinning this study included: What are the schooling experiences and perceptions of resettled sub-Saharan African middle school refugee…

  17. Moving Heaven and Earth: Administrative Search and Selection Processes and the Experience of an African American Woman Senior Administrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett-Johnson, Kim R.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this case/phenomenological study was to examine a collegiate administrative search and selection process and the experience of an African American woman who was selected to the position of chancellor. A case concerning the search process of a regional campus of Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana was identified and chosen.…

  18. My American Dream: The Interplay Between Structure and Agency in West African Immigrants' Educational Experiences in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Michelle G.; Roegman, Rachel; Edstrom, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    This article presents findings of a qualitative, interpretive case study of the experiences of 1.5- and 2nd-generation West African immigrants who self-identify as pursuing the American Dream, defined by them as academic attainment and career success. Employing structuration theory, the authors examine the interplay between structures and agency…

  19. Sex-Role Egalitarian Attitudes and Gender Role Socialization Experiences of African American Men and Women: A Mixed Methods Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heard, Courtney Christian Charisse

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the sex-role egalitarian attitudes and gender role socialization experiences of African American men and women. A sequential mixed-methods design was employed to research this phenomenon. The Sex-Role Egalitarianism Scale-Short Form BB (SRES-BB) was utilized to assess sex-role egalitarian attitudes (King…

  20. Resistance and Assent: How Racial Socialization Shapes Black Students' Experience Learning African American History in High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornhill, Theodore E.

    2016-01-01

    African American history is often taught poorly in high school U.S. history courses. However, we know little about how Black students perceive and experience this situation. I use a refined racial socialization framework and interview data with 32 Black college students in the Northeast to investigate how familial racial socialization shapes their…

  1. Negotiating Worlds, Managing Subjectivities, and Redefining Selves: The Lived Experiences of African American Undergraduate Females at Predominately White Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Ayana Ma-el

    2010-01-01

    A narrative analysis of the lived experiences of seven undergraduate African American females at Predominately White Institutions (PWIs) is presented in this study. The purpose of the study was to explore the ways the seven women constructed their identity and self-concept in the context of their PWI environment. Other key purposes of the study…

  2. "It's Not Like a Job Now; It's Part of Me": Exploring African Women's Experiences in the Irish Childcare Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrity, Sheila; McGrath, Brian

    2011-01-01

    A small-scale qualitative research study was recently carried out in the West of Ireland to explore the experiences of African childminders who had established new childcare services. The intention of the study was to explore the issues, concerns and challenges of this group of providers given their unique position as recently settled, ethnic…

  3. Comparison of seismic and hydrodynamic yield determinations for the Soviet joint verification experiment of 1988

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, Lynn R.; Ekström, Göran

    1989-01-01

    Seismic magnitudes determined from surface and body waves for the Soviet underground nuclear explosion of September 14, 1988, are used to calculate the yield of that event from previously derived calibration curves. The yield obtained by combining the two seismic estimates is 113 kilotons, which is very close to those obtained by hydrodynamic measurements made on-site. This comparison substantiates previous conclusions about the sizes of past Soviet weapons tests and compliance with the Threshold Test Ban Treaty. The factor of uncertainty in the combined seismic yield is 1.28 at the 68% and 1.62 at the 95% confidence levels, demonstrating that accuracies considerably better than a factor of 2 can be obtained by combining seismic determinations of yield. PMID:16594040

  4. Experiments on the Brazil-nut effect due to seismic shakings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciel, A.; Tancredi, G.; Lluch, N.

    2014-07-01

    Size segregation processes have been identified as relevant when studying the behaviour of rocks and boulders on the surface and in the interior of a rubble-pile asteroid. The size segregation as a consequence of repeated shakings is also known as the Brazil-nut effect (BNE). These processes might be really important when studying rubble-pile -type asteroids, which may have suffered seisms as a consequence of repeated collisions; such as in the case of asteroid Itokawa. Size segregation processes can be studied using laboratory experiments as well as computational models, the first case being the one initially considered in this work. Previous studies of the BNE were performed using a sinusoidal vertical or horizontal vibration of the containers. Since we are interested in the effects of repeated seismic shakes, we have used in our experiments a sequence of repeated knocks of the container. We built a resin and polycarbonate box, which is filled with marbles of different sizes. Vacuum up to 0.5 % of ambient pressure is established inside the box. The box is subjected to repeated free-falls from heights up to 1m, with impact velocities on the ground up to 4m/s. We have chosen these low velocities since they are comparable to the escape velocities of km-size asteroids; and they are on the order of the displacement velocities of surface material as a consequence of a small impact (far from the impact point; Tancredi et al. 2012). We study the dependence of size segregation processes with the size rate among the spheres and the impact speed of the box. We observe that, when effectively occurs, size segregation mostly depends on the size rate of the particles and very little on the impact speed, even though this slight dependence has been recorded in our experiments. The laboratory experiments have been also numerically simulated using the Discrete Element Method (DEM) package known as ESyS-particle. The results of the numerical simulations are compared to the

  5. A decade of experience with renal transplantation in African-Americans.

    PubMed

    Foster, Clarence E; Philosophe, Benjamin; Schweitzer, Eugene J; Colonna, John O; Farney, Alan C; Jarrell, Bruce; Anderson, Leslie; Bartlett, Stephen T

    2002-12-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the strategies instituted by the authors' center to decrease the time to transplantation and increase the rate of transplantation for African-Americans, consisting of a formal education program concerning the benefits of living organ donation that is oriented to minorities; a laparoscopic living donation program; use of hepatitis C-positive donors in documented positive recipients; and encouraging vaccination for hepatitis B, allowing the use of hepatitis B core Ab-positive donors. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA The national shortage of suitable kidney donor organs has disproportional and adverse effects on African-Americans for several reasons. Type II diabetes mellitus and hypertension, major etiologic factors for end-stage renal disease, are more prevalent in African-Americans than in the general population. Once kidney failure has developed, African-Americans are disadvantaged for the following reasons: this patient cohort has longer median waiting times on the renal transplant list; African-Americans have higher rates of acute rejection, which affects long-term allograft survival; and once they are transplanted, the long-term graft survival rates are lower in this population than in other groups. METHODS From March 1990 to November 2001 the authors' center performed 2,167 renal transplants; 944 were in African-Americans (663 primary cadaver renal transplants and 253 primary Living donor renal transplants). The retransplants consisted of 83 cadaver transplants and 17 living donor transplants. Outcome measures of this retrospective analysis included median waiting time, graft and patient survival rates, and the rate of living donation in African-Americans and comparable non-African-Americans. Where applicable, data are compared to United Network for Organ Sharing national statistics. Statistical analysis employed appropriate SPSS applications. RESULTS One- and 5-year patient survival rates for living donor kidneys were 97.1% and 91.3% for non-African

  6. Establishing of cancer units in low or middle income african countries: angolan experience - a preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Miguel, Fernando; Conceição, Ana Vaz; Lopes, Lygia Vieira; Bernardo, Dora; Monteiro, Fernando; Bessa, Fernanda; Santos, Cristina; Oliveira, João Blasques; Santos, Lúcio Lara

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The number of cancer cases and related deaths worldwide is expected to double over the next 20-30 years. African countries will be the most affected by the burden of cancer. The improving economic situation of Angola creates conditions for an increase in life expectancy which by itself is associated with an increased risk of oncological diseases. Because cancer therapy requires a multidisciplinary approach, trained health professionals, satisfactory infrastructure and appropriate facilities, the availability of effective cancer therapy is a difficult task that requires support. The aim of this article is to share our experience achieved in the establishment of cancer units in Angola and to validate our checklist for this action. Methods The survey method was a questionnaire addressed to Angolan cancer units, in order to evaluate the usefulness and feasibility of a checklist developed by the authors - The Cancer Units Assessment Checklist for low or middle income African countries - which was used previously in the establishment of those units. Afterwards, the crucial steps taken for the establishing of the main sites of each cancer unit considering, facilities, resources and professionals, were also recorded. Results All cancer units reported that the checklist was a useful tool in the development of the cancer program for the improvement of the unit or the establishing of cancer unit sites. This instrument helped identifying resources, defining the best practice and identifying barriers. Local experts, who know the best practices in oncology and who are recognized by the local heads, are also important and they proved to be the major facilitators. Conclusion The fight against cancer has just started in Angola. The training, education, advocacy and legislation are ongoing. According to our results, the assessment checklist for the establishment of cancer units is a useful instrument. PMID:25883719

  7. A Pilot Near-vertical Seismic Reflection Experiment In Central Chile Landward of The Offshore Spoc Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, C. M.; Onshore Nvr Party, Spoc

    Between 36 and 39 S, the multi-disciplinary offshore project SPOC (Subduction Processes Off Chile) was extended landwards in November 2001 by different active and passive seismic experiments, with the zone of seismic coupling, generally located between 20-40 km depth, as the prime target. Here, we report the first results from the near-vertical incidence reflection (NVR) seismic experiment component that was designed to image that part of the subduction zone between the S-America and over- riding Nazca-Plate that is located in the offshore-onshore transition zone. The NVR profile was located at 37 15`S. Covering the westernmost part of a long E-W refrac- tion seismic line (one amongst three), the profile spread was 54 km long, with three sections of 18 km length each, and extended from the coast in the west to the east. 180 geophone-groups were deployed with 100 m spacing which recorded the offshore pro- file shot by the R/V SONNE with the airgun array. Furthermore, 2 small shots in the Pacific Ocean (50 kg and 25 kg charge), 11 small shots (75 kg charge) at 7 different lo- cations within the onshore reflection seismic line, and 1 shot (150 kg charge) ca. 22.5 km east of the active spread were shot. This active NVR-experiment thereby resulted in a 45 km long 2-fold CDP line, and single-fold coverage along 72 km profile length. The preliminary data processing of single shots gives an image of different reflection bands in the upper and middle crust. On the entire profile, a 1 s TWT thick strong reflection band is observed between 3 and 4 s TWT, which shows almost no dip. On the western half of the profile, prominent reflections dip eastward from ca. 6 s TWT down to ca. 8 s TWT. Finally, in the central part of the seismic reflection profile, some relatively weaker reflections are found between 10 to 14 s TWT. All theses eastward dipping reflection bands between 6 and 14 s TWT could be interpreted as indications for the downgoing plate.

  8. Understanding the experiences and perceptions of African American female STEM majors at a single-sex HBCU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Rahshida S.

    This study uses qualitative methods to explore and understand the experiences of African American female STEM majors at a single-sex historically Black university (HBCU). The study focuses on the perspectives of Black women and how they perceive the strategies and practices utilized at a single-sex HBCU that aid in fostering the successful development of Black women in STEM fields. Although limited to one institution, the findings shed light on the ways in which African American women experience the single-sex HBCU, and how the institution aids in their persistence in STEM majors. This study also discusses how such strategies and practices at a single-sex HBCU aid in mitigating the challenges and barriers that limit the attainment of African American women in STEM fields, and provides an opportunity for them to develop strong identities in STEM. Drawing on the findings, the paper concludes with recommendations for improving implementation of strategies revealed in historically Black colleges/universities and predominantly White colleges/ universities (PWIs). Recommendations for future research suggest that the experiences of African American women in single-sex and co-educational historically Black and predominantly White institutions could be further explored.

  9. High-resolution shallow-seismic experiments in sand. Part 1: Water table, fluid flow, and saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Bachrach, R.; Nur, A.

    1998-07-01

    A high-resolution, very shallow seismic reflection and refraction experiment was conducted to investigate the seismic response of groundwater level changes in beach sand in situ. A fixed 10-m-long receiver array was used for repeated seismic profiling. Direct measurements of water level in a monitoring well and moisture content in the sand were taken as well. The water table in the well changed by about 1 m in slightly delayed response to the nearby ocean tides. In contrast, inversion of the seismic data yielded a totally different picture. The reflection from the water table at high tide appeared at a later time than the reflection at low tide. This unexpected discrepancy can be reconciled using Gassmann`s equation: a low-velocity layer must exist between the near-surface dry sand and the deeper and much faster fully saturated sand. This low-velocity layer coincides with the newly saturated zone and is caused by a combination of the sand`s high density (close to that of fully saturated sand), and its high compressibility (close to that of dry sand). This low-velocity zone causes a velocity pull-down for the high-frequency reflections, and causes a high-tide reflection to appear later in time than low-tide reflection. The calculated velocities in the dry layer show changes with time that correlate with sand dryness, as predicted by the temporal changes of the sand`s density due to changing water/air ratio. The results show that near-surface velocities in sand are sensitive to partial saturation in the transition zone between dry and saturated sand. The authors were able to extract the saturation of the first layer and the depth to the water table from the seismic velocities.

  10. Anatomy of a Metamorphic Core Complex: Preliminary Results of Ruby Mountains Seismic Experiment, Northeastern Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiltz, K. K.; Litherland, M.; Klemperer, S. L.

    2010-12-01

    The Ruby Mountains Seismic Experiment is a 50-station deployment of Earthscope’s Flexible Array installed in June 2010 to study the Ruby Mountain metamorphic core complex, northeastern Nevada. Competing theories of metamorphic core complexes stress the importance of either (1) low-angle detachment faulting and lateral crustal flow, likely leading to horizontal shearing and anisotropy, or (2) vertical diapirism creating dominantly vertical shearing and anisotropy. Our experiment aims to distinguish between these two hypotheses using densely spaced (5 to 10 km) broadband seismometers along two WNW-ESE transects across the Ruby Range and one NNE-SSW transect along the axis of the range. When data acquisition is complete we will image crustal structures and measure velocity and anisotropy with a range of receiver function, shear-wave splitting and surface-wave tomographic methods. In addition to the newly acquired data, existing data can also be used to build understanding of the region. Previous regional studies have interpreted shear-wave splitting in terms of single-layer anisotropy in the mantle, related to a complex flow structure, but previous controlled source studies have identified measurable crustal anisotropy. We therefore attempted to fit existing data to a two-layer model consisting of a weakly anisotropic crustal layer and a more dominant mantle layer. We used “SplitLab” to measure apparent splitting parameters from ELK (a USGS permanent station) and 3 Earthscope Transportable Array stations. There is a clear variation in the splitting parameters with back-azimuth, but existing data do not provide a stable inversion for a two-layer model. Our best forward-model solution is a crustal layer with a fast axis orientation of 357° and 0.3 second delay time and a mantle layer with a 282° fast axis and 1.3 s delay time. Though the direction of the fast axis is consistent with previously published regional results, the 1.3 s delay time is larger than

  11. Spoc-experiment: Seismic Imaging and Bathymetry of The Central Chile Margin - First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladage, S.; Reichert, C.; Schreckenberger, B.; Block, M.; Bönnemann, C.; Canuta, J.; Damaske, D.; Diaz-Naveas, J.; Gaedicke, C.; Krawczyk, C.; Kus, J.; Urbina, O.; Sepulveda, J.

    During the RV SONNE cruise 161 Leg 1 to 5 (October 2001 to January 2002) Sub- duction Processes Off Chile (SPOC) have been investigated using a multi-disciplinary geoscientific approach. Here we report first results of multi channel seismic (MCS) experiments and high-resolution swath bathymetry data from Leg 3, south of Val- paraiso. 24 MCS profiles with a total length of 3670 km were run between 36 S to 4020' S, providing a detailed view of the structures related to the subduction of the Nazca Plate under the Chile Margin. The oceanic crust of the Nazca Plate shows at least three sets of structural trends associated with the Mocha and Valdivia Fractures Zones, the spreading lineations and subduction related horst and graben structures. In the study area the trench is filled with well stratified turbidites up to 2 seconds TWT thick. Along the trench axis a turbidite channel exceeding 80 m relief exists. Several large deep sea fan complexes are developed at the slope toe. Their distributary canyons cut deep into the slope and shelf and can be traced back to major river mouths. The deformation front is coincident with the slope toe; compressional structures of the trench fill are uncommon. The deformation front is curved and offset along strike, caused presumably by collision and indentation of structures of the Nazca Plate. The most remarkable features of the MCS - profiles, yet, are the only very rudimentary developed modern accretionary prism as well as the high variability of the lower slope angles. Lower slope angles locally exceed 10. The continental crust extends seawards to the middle slope and acts as a backstop. Several profiles reveal landward dipping reflectors above the downgoing slab, possibly depicting a subduction channel beneath the slope. Thus, the geometry of the subduction units U a young thick trench fill, only rudimental frontal accretion and a subduction channel U argues for subduction of the bulk of the sediments.

  12. "You learn to go last": perceptions of prenatal care experiences among African-American women with limited incomes.

    PubMed

    Salm Ward, Trina C; Mazul, Mary; Ngui, Emmanuel M; Bridgewater, Farrin D; Harley, Amy E

    2013-12-01

    African American infants die at higher rates and are at greater risk of adverse birth outcomes than White infants in Milwaukee. Though self-reported experiences of racism have been linked to adverse health outcomes, limited research exists on the impact of racism on women's prenatal care experiences. The purpose of this study was to examine the experiences of racial discrimination during prenatal care from the perspectives of African American women in a low income Milwaukee neighborhood. Transcripts from six focus groups with twenty-nine women and two individual interviews were analyzed to identify important emergent themes. Validity was maintained using an audit trail, peer debriefing, and two individual member validation sessions. Participants identified three areas of perceived discrimination based on: (1) insurance or income status, (2) race, and (3) lifetime experiences of racial discrimination. Women described being treated differently by support staff and providers based on type of insurance (public versus private), including perceiving a lower quality of care at clinics that accepted public insurance. While some described personally-mediated racism, the majority of women described experiences that fit within a definition of institutionalized racism-in which the system was designed in a way that worked against their attempts to get quality prenatal care. Women also described lifetime experiences of racial discrimination. Our findings suggest that African American women with limited incomes perceive many provider practices and personal interactions during prenatal care as discriminatory. Future studies could explore the relationship between perceptions of discrimination and utilization of prenatal care.

  13. Evaluating Survivorship Experiences and Needs Among Rural African American Breast Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Adams, Natasia; Gisiger-Camata, Silvia; Hardy, Claudia M; Thomas, Tammi F; Jukkala, Angela; Meneses, Karen

    2015-10-24

    Disparities in cancer survivorship exist among specific populations of breast cancer survivors, specifically rural African American breast cancer survivors (AA-BCS). While effective survivorship interventions are available to address and improve quality of life, interventions must be culturally tailored for relevance to survivors. Here, we report the results of our formative research using focus groups and in-depth interview to better understand unique rural AA-BCS survivorship experiences and needs in the Alabama Black Belt. Surveys were used to gather sociodemographic and cancer treatment data. Fifteen rural AA-BCS shared their experiences and concerns about keeping their cancer a secret, lack of knowledge about survivorship, lingering symptoms, religion and spirituality, cancer surveillance, and general lack of survivorship education and support. Rural AA-BCS were unwilling to share their cancer diagnosis, preferring to keep it a secret to protect family and friends. Quality-of-life issues like lymphedema body image and sexuality were not well understood. They viewed spirituality and religion as essential in coping and accepting cancer. Participants also discussed the importance of and barriers to maintaining health through regular check-ups. They needed social support from family and friends and health care providers. Overall, rural AA-BCS expressed their need for knowledge about survivorship self-management by providing a vivid picture of the realities of cancer survival based on shared concerns for survivorship support and education within the context of culture.

  14. Patterns of Sexual Experience Among Urban Latino and African American Ninth Grade Students.

    PubMed

    Donatello, Robin A; De Rosa, Christine J; Moulton, Bret D; Chung, Emily Q; Viola, Rachel; Rohrbach, Louise Ann; Afifi, Abdelmonem A

    2016-05-02

    This analysis assessed patterns of sexual experience, the order in which behaviors were initiated, and associated factors, among Latino and African American ninth grade students (average age 15.2) who self-administered audio-computer-assisted surveys on netbooks in classes at 10 Los Angeles-area public high schools. Lifetime experiences with vaginal and oral sex were most common (19% and 16%, respectively); fewer reported anal sex (6%). Of the 23% reporting any sex, 91% fell into four categories: 36% reporting both oral and vaginal sex; 23% vaginal only; 18% all three; and 13% oral only. Most sexually experienced students (88%) initiated with vaginal or oral sex (46% vaginal, 33% oral, 9% both same day). No dominant pathway of sexual onset emerged for those reporting all three types of sex. We found no evidence that oral or anal sex substituted for or delayed vaginal sex. Males, those with a current partner, and those reporting multiple partners were more likely than others to report all three sexual behaviors versus vaginal only (odds ratios [ORs] 2.0, 1.5, 3.0; p = .02, .06, < .01, respectively). Although vaginal intercourse dominated their early sexual behavior, one-fifth of sexually experienced students reported anal intercourse, highlighting the need for specific prevention messages surrounding this higher-risk behavior.

  15. Experiments on seismic behavior of back-fill gravel layer as liquefaction countermeasure of buried gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Takada, Shiro; Ogawa, Yasuo; Shimizu, Kenji; Ueno, Junichi

    1995-12-31

    Experiments on seismic behavior of back-fill gravel layer as a back-fill material for buried pipelines was experimented with to investigate the effectiveness against liquefaction with a scaled model using a shaking table. A non-liquefied sandy surface layer was made with a steel mold divided into several pieces for a model. The back-fill gravel was found to be efficient for drainage but didn`t prevent liquefaction from occurring in the below layer. It was also found that the pipe doesn`t move up by buoyancy but subsides following the settlement of the back-fill gravel.

  16. Identification with Academics: The Early School Experiences of Six African American Boys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vescio, Vicki A.

    2010-01-01

    As a group, African American males face some pervasive obstacles to school success. Collectively they are expelled, suspended, disciplined, retained, and referred to special education at disproportionately high percentages when compared to their peers. As a result of this persistent treatment, African American males have a tendency to disidentify…

  17. Experiences of High School Teachers and Administrators Regarding Suspension of African American Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Corwin

    2014-01-01

    The large number of suspensions of African American high school males is one of the primary concerns facing high school administrators nationwide. At high schools in the southern United States, African American males are suspended at greater rates than their counterparts. Suspensions affect their levels of achievement, attitudes towards school,…

  18. Leading the Way: Inside the Experiences of High-Achieving African-American Male Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Shaun R.

    2005-01-01

    More than two-thirds of all African American males who begin college never finish. This and a legion of other discouraging facts about African American males are the usual headlines. Sharon Fries-Britt suggests that "the disproportionate focus on Black underachievement in the literature not only distorts the image of the community of Black…

  19. Teaching White Students Black History: The African-American Experience in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrell, Leon F.; Walsh, Robert L.

    2001-01-01

    Many white students are barely exposed to African-American history throughout their schooling. When students do examine the other side of American history, the one not generally found in their textbooks, they often wonder why they have not learned this before. An understanding of African-American history is central to any effort to eliminate…

  20. When Aspiration Meets Opportunity: Examining Transitional Experiences of African American Males in College Readiness Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baber, Lorenzo DuBois

    2014-01-01

    The lack of postsecondary success for African American males has garnered significant attention from academic scholars and public policy leaders. While this scholarship provides a strong portrait on issues related to African American males, there are still significant gaps to be addressed. Most notably, current research tends to focus on students…

  1. Faculty Perceptions of, and Experiences with, African American Male Students at a Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Shantelle K.

    2013-01-01

    Many studies involving African American male students have focused on achievement gaps and student retention models of those attending four-year institutions. However, there are limited investigations of African American male students at the community college and very few that focus on faculty perceptions. This study employed a mixed Delphi…

  2. Health Behaviors and Breast Cancer: Experiences of Urban African American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolley, Melinda R.; Sharp, Lisa K.; Wells, Anita M.; Simon, Nolanna; Schiffer, Linda

    2006-01-01

    Breast-cancer survival rates are lower among African American women compared to White women. Obesity may contribute to this disparity. More than 77% of African American women are overweight or obese. Adopting health behaviors that promote a healthy weight status may be beneficial because obesity increases risk for recurrence. Studies among White…

  3. Gender and Racial Experiences in Executive School Leadership: Perceptions of African American Female Superintendents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colbert, Daveda Jean

    2009-01-01

    There is a leadership crisis that exists in our schools creating an urgent need for effective leadership. Even though African American women have made slight gains, throughout the country people of color and women are dramatically underrepresented in the superintendency. Therefore, the primary purpose of this study is to provide African American…

  4. Jumping through Hoops: College Choice Experiences of African American Male Community College Club Basketball Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Kimberly Carlotta

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to learn what factors influenced the college choice decision-making process of African American male club basketball players in the community college. To understand how the participants determined their educational path, face-to-face interviews were conducted with 21 African American male students who were enrolled in at least six…

  5. Frictional Behavior of Amphibolite at Seismic Slip Rates from High-velocity Rotary Shear Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, S.; Ree, J.; Hirose, T.; Lee, S.

    2012-12-01

    Gabbroic rocks of oceanic crust transform into amphibolite with depth at subduction zone, and thus frictional property of amphibolite may be important for a better understanding of subduction zone earthquakes. We report preliminary results of high-velocity rotary shear experiments on amphibolite at a seismic slip rate (~1.05 m/s) and normal stresses of 2-15 MPa. Amphibolite from the Imjingang belt of South Korea is composed of hornblende (0.5-1.5 mm) and plagioclase (0.25-0.5 mm) with rare occurrence of quartz. The frictional behavior of the amphibolite is characterized by two phases of unstable slip weakening separated by strengthening, followed by a final weakening with a very low steady-state friction coefficient of 0.07. The average coefficient of the first, second and final peak frictions is 0.48, 0.36 and 0.22, respectively. The fault zone consists of a principal slip zone (PSZ, 200-300 μm thick) with molten material mantled by damage zone (1-3 mm thick). In the damage zone, the color of hornblende grains becomes darker toward the PSZ and thin, black stripes occur along cleavage planes of hornblende in plane-polarized light. Also fracture density of hornblende and plagioclase increases relative to those of wall rock. The PSZ comprises molten material and mineral clasts (25-50 μm) and the clasts tend to concentrate along the center of the PSZ. The surface temperature of the fault zones measured by a radiation thermography during experiments is about 1060°C and the internal temperature of the fault zones could be higher than the measured temperature in view of the melting of hornblende and plagioclase. The frictional behavior of amphibolite is much different from that of gabbro where the overall friction is much higher with the final peak friction of 0.84-1.09 and steady-state friction of ~0.6 (Hirose and Shimamoto, 2005 in Journal of Geophysical Research). This difference may be due to dehydration of hornblende by frictional heating and lower viscosity of

  6. Fault rupture as a series of nano-seismic events during high-velocity shear experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, X.; Reches, Z.; Chen, X.; Chang, J. C.; Carpenter, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    The rupture process of experimental faults is investigated here by monitoring nano-seismic events (NSE) during slip in a rotary shear apparatus. Our experimental faults are made of two rock blocks with one to four miniature 3D accelerometers that are glued to the stationary block at distance of ~ 2 cm from the fault surface. Accelerations in the frequency range of 1 Hz to 200 kHz are recorded in slip-parallel (x), slip-transverse (y), and slip-vertical (z) directions. We conducted a series of 45 experiments on diorite and dolomite samples in two loading styles: classical velocity controlled loading, and power-density loading, in which the power-density (shear stress times slip velocity) is selected, and stick-slip events develop spontaneously according to the experimental fault response. The 3D accelerometer data were recorded at 106 samples/s, with acceleration resolution of 10 mV/g in recoding range of +/- 5 V. The experiments were conducted at slip-velocity of 0.001-0.8 m/s and slip distance up to 1.38 m. The accelerometer observations revealed tens to hundreds of NSEs per slip in both loading styles; peak acceleration ranged from 1g to over 500g. A typical stick-slip with tens of NSEs in Fig. 1, shows: (1) An initial NSE at ~59.72 s (green) that coincides with a small stress drop (~10%, red); (2) Simultaneous macroscopic slip initiation (blue); (3) A swarm of NSEs occur as the fault slips, each NSE lasts 1-2 milliseconds; and (4) Details of the initial NSE are shown in Fig. 2. Based on waveform cross-correlation between frequency band from 20 kHz to 70kHz, we identify several groups of NSE clusters, and apply empirical Green's function method to analyze event source spectra based on Brune-type source model. These NSEs are indicators of rupture propagation during the experimental fault slip.

  7. U. S. Geological Survey begins seismic ground response experiments in Washington State

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tarr, A.C.; King, K.W.

    1987-01-01

    The men were Denver-based U.S Geological Survey (USGS) geophysicists working on the Urban Hazards Field Investigations project. On the previous day they had recorded two events on their seismographs-a distant nuclear explosion in Nevada and a blast at amine near Centralia, Washington. On another day, they used seismic refraction equipment to locate the depth of bedrock and seismic velocity to it at several locations in West Seattle and in the Seward Park-Brighton district of southeast Seattle. 

  8. Planning the improvement of seismic monitoring in a volcanic supersite: experience on Mt. Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessandro, Antonino; Scarfi, Luciano; Scaltrito, Antonio; Aiesi, Giampiero; Di Prima, Sergio; Ferrari, Ferruccio; Rapisarda, Salvatore

    2013-04-01

    Etna is one of the most active volcanoes in the world and one of the most intriguing natural laboratories for the understanding of eruptive processes and lava uprising in basalt-type volcanic environments; indeed, it is considered, by the scientific international community, together with the Vesuvius and the Hawaiian Islands, as a volcanic supersite. Its activity is continuously monitored by the Osservatorio Etneo of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), by means of an array of integrated multidisciplinary techniques. In particular, Etna seismicity is recorded by a dense local seismic network (ESN- Etna Seismic Network), which, nowadays, consists of about 40 real-time seismic stations, many of which equipped with broadband velocity and accelerometer sensors. The data are analyzed routinely in detail by the Osservatorio Etneo staff, producing daily and periodic reports and bulletins of the earthquakes located in the whole Sicily and southern Calabria region. In the last decades, seismological observations provided important information on both the dynamics and internal structure of the volcano, in addition to their interaction with the regional tectonic structures. In the last year, in the framework of the VULCAMED project, an INGV workgroup has taken on the task of developing the existing seismic network through the installation of new measurement stations. By considering the spatial distribution of earthquakes in the area, the presence of structures known as seismically active and through extensive geological-geophysical surveys, ten potential new sites were identified. In the following months, some of these sites will complement the existing network. The choice of optimal sites must clearly be made through a careful analysis of environmental noise, of the possible logistics, technical and broadcast problems, but must also take into account the geometry of the existing seismic network. For this purpose, we applied the Seismic Network

  9. Ghana's experience in the establishment of a national digital seismic network observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahulu, Sylvanus; Danuor, Sylvester Kojo

    2015-07-01

    The Government of Ghana has established a National Digital Seismic Network Observatory in Ghana with the aim of monitoring events such as earthquakes, blasts from mining and quarrying, nuclear tests, etc. The Digital Observatory was commissioned on 19 December 2012, and was dedicated to Geosciences in Ghana. Previously Ghana did not have any operational, digital seismic network acquisition system with the capability of monitoring and analysing data for planning and research purposes. The Ghana Geological Survey has been monitoring seismic events with an analogue system which was not efficient and does not deliver real-time data. Hence, the importance of setting up the National Digital Seismic Network System which would enable the Geological Survey to constantly monitor, manage and coordinate both natural and man-made seismic activities in the country and around the globe, to some extent on real-time basis. The Network System is made up of six remote digital stations that transmit data via satellite to the central observatory. Sensors used are 3× Trillium Compact and 3× Trillium 120PA with Trident digitizers. The department has also acquired strong motion equipment: Titan accelerometers with Taurus digitizers from Nanometrics. Three of each of these instruments have been installed at the Akosombo and Kpong hydrodams, and also at the Weija water supply dam. These instruments are used to monitor dams. The peak ground acceleration (PGA) values established from the analysed data from the accelerometers will be used to retrofit or carry out maintenance work of the dam structures to avoid collapse. Apart from these, the observatory also assesses and analyses seismic waveforms relevant to its needs from the Global Seismographic Network (GSN) system operated by the US Geological Survey. The Ghana Geological Survey, through its Seismic Network Observatory makes data available to its stakeholder institutions for earthquake disaster mitigation; reports on all aspects of

  10. "Ain't Nobody Gonna Get Me down": An Examination of the Educational Experiences of Four African American Women Labeled with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Amy J.

    2009-01-01

    This study used qualitative research methods to explore the educational experiences of four African American women with disabilities, revealing how each participant developed a critical consciousness in response to the dominant ideology surrounding the discourses of African American, woman, and disabled. The development of a critical consciousness…

  11. Experimenting in Distance Education: The African Virtual University (AVU) and the Paradox of the World Bank in Kenya--A Rejoinder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munene, Ishmael I.

    2007-01-01

    This rejoinder is in response to criticism against the African Virtual University (AVU), an internet-based education modality, by Amutabi and Oketch [2003. Experimenting in distance education: the African Virtual University (AVU) and the Paradox of World Bank in Kenya. International Journal of Educational Development 23, 57-73]. By closely…

  12. Navigating Race and Cultural Identity: A Phenomenological Study of the Lived Experiences of African American Secondary Principals on the U.S.-Mexico Border of El Paso, Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Natashia J.

    2013-01-01

    Presently the paucity of scholarship available is often unitary in nature and usually focuses on the lived experiences of African Americans principals in a predominately African American urban context and as well as emphasizes the necessity of same race principals for the purpose of mentorship and racial representation. Race and cultural identity…

  13. A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Study of the Experiences of Female African American Undergraduate Engineering Students at a Predominantly White and an Historically Black Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frillman, Sharron Ann

    2011-01-01

    This phenomenological study examined the experiences of twelve female African Americans enrolled as fulltime undergraduate engineering students at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, an historically Black university, and seven female African Americans enrolled as undergraduate engineering students at Purdue University in…

  14. Exploring How African American Males from an Urban Community Navigate the Interracial and Intra-Racial Dimensions of Their Experiences at an Urban Jesuit High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Robert W., III

    2012-01-01

    African American males from urban communities have been attending Jesuit high schools in urban spaces for many years, yet little to no literature exists that explores their experiences while attending these elite private schools. This qualitative study of 10 African American males from an urban community attending a similarly positioned Jesuit…

  15. Modelling Active Faults in Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) with OpenQuake: Definition, Design and Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherill, Graeme; Garcia, Julio; Poggi, Valerio; Chen, Yen-Shin; Pagani, Marco

    2016-04-01

    The Global Earthquake Model (GEM) has, since its inception in 2009, made many contributions to the practice of seismic hazard modeling in different regions of the globe. The OpenQuake-engine (hereafter referred to simply as OpenQuake), GEM's open-source software for calculation of earthquake hazard and risk, has found application in many countries, spanning a diversity of tectonic environments. GEM itself has produced a database of national and regional seismic hazard models, harmonizing into OpenQuake's own definition the varied seismogenic sources found therein. The characterization of active faults in probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) is at the centre of this process, motivating many of the developments in OpenQuake and presenting hazard modellers with the challenge of reconciling seismological, geological and geodetic information for the different regions of the world. Faced with these challenges, and from the experience gained in the process of harmonizing existing models of seismic hazard, four critical issues are addressed. The challenge GEM has faced in the development of software is how to define a representation of an active fault (both in terms of geometry and earthquake behaviour) that is sufficiently flexible to adapt to different tectonic conditions and levels of data completeness. By exploring the different fault typologies supported by OpenQuake we illustrate how seismic hazard calculations can, and do, take into account complexities such as geometrical irregularity of faults in the prediction of ground motion, highlighting some of the potential pitfalls and inconsistencies that can arise. This exploration leads to the second main challenge in active fault modeling, what elements of the fault source model impact most upon the hazard at a site, and when does this matter? Through a series of sensitivity studies we show how different configurations of fault geometry, and the corresponding characterisation of near-fault phenomena (including

  16. Improving detection and identification of seismic signals due to landslides: a methodology based on field scale controlled experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yfantis, G.; Carvajal, H. E.; Pytharouli, S.; Lunn, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    A number of published studies use seismic sensors to understand the physics involved in slope deformation. In this research we artificially induce failure to two meter scaled slopes in the field and use 12 short period 3D seismometers to monitor the failure. To our knowledge there has been no previous controlled experiments that can allow calibration and validation of the interpreted seismic signals. Inside the body of one of the artificial landslides we embed a pile of glass shards. During movement the pile deforms emitting seismic signals due to friction among the glass shards. Our aim is twofold: First we investigate whether the seismic sensors can record pre-cursory and failure signals. Secondly, we test our hypothesis that the glass shards produce seismic signals with higher amplitudes and a distinct frequency pattern, compared to those emitted by common landslide seismicity and local background noise. Two vertical faces, 2m high, were excavated 3m apart in high porous tropical clay. This highly attenuating material makes the detection of weak seismic signals challenging. Slope failure was induced by increasing the vertical load at the landslide's crown. Special care was taken in the design of all experimental procedures to not add to the area's seismic noise. Measurements took place during 18 hours (during afternoon and night) without any change in soil and weather conditions. The 3D sensors were placed on the ground surface close to the crown, forming a dense microseismic network with 5-to-10m spacing and two nanoseismic arrays, with aperture sizes of 10 and 20 m. This design allowed a direct comparison of the recorded signals emitted by the two landslides. The two faces failed for loading between 70 and 100kN and as a result the pile of glass shards was horizontally deformed allowing differential movement between the shards. After the main failure both landslides were continuing to deform due to soil compaction and horizontal displacement. We apply signal

  17. The WALPASS - Walvis Ridge Passive-Source Seismic Experiment in Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heit, B.; Yuan, X.; Geissler, W.; Lushetile, B.; Weber, M.; Jokat, W.

    2012-04-01

    The Etendeka continental flood-basalt province in northern Namibia, linked by the Walvis Ridge to the Tristan da Cunha hotspot, has a great importance in global plate tectonic concepts, and is an ideal place to understand the roll of the plume-lithosphere interaction during the break-up of the Southern Atlantic Ocean. Within this frame we are operating an amphibian passive-source seismic network (WALPASS) at the position, where the Walvis Ridge intersects with the continental margin of northern Namibia. The broadband seismic network is composed of 28 three-component land stations and 12 ocean-bottom stations, and will be operating for two year. This configuration of stations will allow us to map the lithospheric and deeper upper mantle structure in the ocean-continent transition beneath the passive continental margin of northern Namibia and to find seismic anomalies related to the postulated hotspot track from the continent to the ocean along the Walvis Ridge. The acquired should help us to study the velocity anomaly in the lowermost mantle caused by the Africa super plume and to improve the distribution of seismicity in this geophysically little studied region. We present here some receiver function results in the first attempt to map the lithosphere and the upper mantle in an area known to be the place of a plume/flood basalt province that has the potential to unravel the impact of a continental break-up in the lower crust and mantle lithosphere.

  18. Azimuthal Seismic Anisotropy From a Multi-Component PS-wave Experiment West of Svalbard.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haacke, R. R.; Westbrook, G. K.; Peacock, S.; Long, C.

    2005-12-01

    A high-resolution seismic experiment, using an array of closely spaced ocean-bottom seismometers, was conducted by the HYDRATECH project at a site near the intersection of the Knipovich ridge and the Molloy transform at the base of the continental slope west of Svalbard. A series of novel techniques were used to detect and characterise azimuthal anisotropy from PS waves generated on reflection to reveal the presence of horizontal transverse isotropy with depth-variable symmetry orientation. Two independent techniques for layer-stripping converted-wave data to derive the lag and orientation of the split S waves were developed, one of them an adaptation of the Alford rotation technique normally used with VSPs. The techniques were tested using synthetic anisotropic waveforms generated with the Aniseis software. These techniques were successfully applied to the experimental data, and revealed two primary anisotropic zones; an upper zone (from 30-140 mbsf) with the fast symmetry plane oriented at an azimuth of 130-140°, parallel to the local strike of the dipping seabed and which appears likely to be caused by down-slope gravitational stresses, and a lower zone (from 180 mbsf to the limit of the sampled depths) with fast symmetry plane oriented at 50-60°, near-parallel to the maximum principal stress of the tectonic regime associated with the nearby Knipovich ridge and Molloy transform zone. The shear-wave splitting accumulated at a rate of ~200 ms/km in the upper zone and at a rate of ~120 ms/km in the lower zone. Because of the nearly 90° difference in orientation of the symmetry axes of the two anisotropic layers, the net shear-wave splitting observed at the seabed increased to a peak at around 160 mbsf before decreasing again in the lower anisotropic zone as the dominant stress regime changed. A region with no azimuthal anisotropy (but which may still have VTI symmetry) centred at 160 mbsf, separates the competing stress regimes dominant in the two anisotropic

  19. Localization of short-range acoustic and seismic wideband sources: Algorithms and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafsudd, J. Z.; Asgari, S.; Hudson, R.; Yao, K.; Taciroglu, E.

    2008-04-01

    We consider the determination of the location (source localization) of a disturbance source which emits acoustic and/or seismic signals. We devise an enhanced approximate maximum-likelihood (AML) algorithm to process data collected at acoustic sensors (microphones) belonging to an array of, non-collocated but otherwise identical, sensors. The approximate maximum-likelihood algorithm exploits the time-delay-of-arrival of acoustic signals at different sensors, and yields the source location. For processing the seismic signals, we investigate two distinct algorithms, both of which process data collected at a single measurement station comprising a triaxial accelerometer, to determine direction-of-arrival. The direction-of-arrivals determined at each sensor station are then combined using a weighted least-squares approach for source localization. The first of the direction-of-arrival estimation algorithms is based on the spectral decomposition of the covariance matrix, while the second is based on surface wave analysis. Both of the seismic source localization algorithms have their roots in seismology; and covariance matrix analysis had been successfully employed in applications where the source and the sensors (array) are typically separated by planetary distances (i.e., hundreds to thousands of kilometers). Here, we focus on very-short distances (e.g., less than one hundred meters) instead, with an outlook to applications in multi-modal surveillance, including target detection, tracking, and zone intrusion. We demonstrate the utility of the aforementioned algorithms through a series of open-field tests wherein we successfully localize wideband acoustic and/or seismic sources. We also investigate a basic strategy for fusion of results yielded by acoustic and seismic arrays.

  20. Experiences of African immigrant women living with HIV in the U.K.: implications for health professionals.

    PubMed

    Ndirangu, Eunice W; Evans, Catrin

    2009-04-01

    In the U.K. immigrant women from Africa constitute an increasingly large proportion of newly diagnosed cases of HIV. A significant minority of these are refugees and asylum seekers. Very little is known about their experiences of living with HIV/AIDS, their psychosocial needs or their views of health care provision. This paper reports the results of a qualitative study that explored these issues by interviewing eight African women living with HIV in the British city of Nottingham. Women's ability to live positively with HIV was found to be strongly shaped by their migration history, their legal status, their experience of AIDS-related stigma and their Christian faith. Significantly, health services were represented as a safe social space, and were highly valued as a source of advice and support. The findings indicate that non-judgemental, personalised health care plays a key role in encouraging migrant African women to access psychosocial support and appropriate HIV services.

  1. Health Care Experiences and Perceived Barriers to Health Care Access: A Qualitative Study Among African Migrants in Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Katherine B.; Yu, Fan; Yang, Jingqi; Wang, Jason; Schrock, Joshua M.; Bodomo, Adams B.; Yang, Ligang; Yang, Bin; Nehl, Eric J.; Tucker, Joseph D.; Wong, Frank Y.

    2014-01-01

    Guangzhou, one of China's largest cities and a main trading port in South China, has attracted many African businessmen and traders migrating to the city for financial gains. Previous research has explored the cultural and economic roles of this newly emerging population; however, little is known about their health care experiences while in China. Semi-structured interviews and focus groups were used to assess health care experiences and perceived barriers to health care access among African migrants in Guangzhou, China. Overall, African migrants experienced various barriers to accessing health care and were dissatisfied with local health services. The principal barriers to care reported included affordability, legal issues, language barriers, and cultural differences. Facing multiple barriers, African migrants have limited access to care in Guangzhou. Local health settings are not accustomed to the African migrant population, suggesting that providing linguistically and culturally appropriate services may improve access to care for the migrants. PMID:25294415

  2. Health Care Experiences and Perceived Barriers to Health Care Access: A Qualitative Study Among African Migrants in Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, China.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lavinia; Brown, Katherine B; Yu, Fan; Yang, Jingqi; Wang, Jason; Schrock, Joshua M; Bodomo, Adams B; Yang, Ligang; Yang, Bin; Nehl, Eric J; Tucker, Joseph D; Wong, Frank Y

    2015-10-01

    Guangzhou, one of China's largest cities and a main trading port in South China, has attracted many African businessmen and traders migrating to the city for financial gains. Previous research has explored the cultural and economic roles of this newly emerging population; however, little is known about their health care experiences while in China. Semi-structured interviews and focus groups were used to assess health care experiences and perceived barriers to health care access among African migrants in Guangzhou, China. Overall, African migrants experienced various barriers to accessing health care and were dissatisfied with local health services. The principal barriers to care reported included affordability, legal issues, language barriers, and cultural differences. Facing multiple barriers, African migrants have limited access to care in Guangzhou. Local health settings are not accustomed to the African migrant population, suggesting that providing linguistically and culturally appropriate services may improve access to care for the migrants.

  3. The African Experience. After Nairobi: New Horizons for Social Studies. Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barth, James L.

    1994-01-01

    Reports on the Third International Social Studies Conference held in Nairobi, Kenya, in 1994. Asserts that problems facing U.S. social studies, such as multiculturalism and individual rights, are not as important as development issues for African nations. (CFR)

  4. Research Lumbar Punctures among African Americans and Caucasians: Perception Predicts Experience

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Jennifer C.; Parker, Monica W.; Watts, Kelly D.; Kollhoff, Alexander; Tsvetkova, Dobromira Z.; Hu, William T.

    2016-01-01

    African Americans are under-represented in Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-related biomarker studies, and it has been speculated that mistrust plays a major factor in the recruitment of African Americans for studies involving invasive procedures such as the lumbar puncture (LP). We set out to determine factors associated with non-participation in a biomarker study aiming to explore cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) AD biomarker differences between older African Americans and Caucasians. We also surveyed participants’ procedure-related perception (a standard medical procedure vs. a frightening invasive procedure) and reluctance, as well as the rate and type of post-procedure discomfort and complications. Among 288 subjects approached for study participation, 145 (50.3%) refused participation with concerns over LP being the most commonly reported reason. Relatively more African Americans than Caucasians reported concerns over LP as the main reason for non-participation (46% vs. 25%, p = 0.03), but more African Americans also did not provide a specific reason for non-participation. Among those who completed study participation (including the LP), African Americans and Caucasians were similar in pre-LP perceptions and reluctance, as well as post-LP rates of discomfort or complication. Perceiving LP as a frightening invasive procedure, not race, is associated with increased likelihood of post-LP discomfort or complication (RR 6.2, 95% confidence interval 1.1–37.0). Our results indicate that LP is a well perceived procedure in a cohort of African American and Caucasian research participants, and is associated with few serious complications. The pre-procedure perception that the LP is a frightening invasive procedure significantly increases the risk of self-reported discomfort of complications, and African Americans may be more likely to turn down study participation because of the LP. Future studies will need to address factors associated with negative LP perceptions to further

  5. Surgical experience on chronic constrictive pericarditis in African setting: review of 35 years’ experience in Cote d’Ivoire

    PubMed Central

    Tanauh, Yves; Meneas, Christophe; Diby, Florent; Adoubi, Anicet; Diomande, Manga

    2016-01-01

    Background Surgical experience with chronic constrictive pericarditis (CCP) is rarely documented in Africa; the aim of this study is therefore to review our African experience with CCP from 1977 to 2012 in terms of clinical and surgical outcomes and risk factors of early death after pericardiectomy. Methods This retrospective study is related to 120 patients with CCP; there were 72 men and 48 women with an average age at 28.8±10.4 years standard deviation (SD) (8–51 years). The main etiology was tuberculosis (99%). Symptoms secondary to systemic venous congestion were always present: patient were functionally classified according New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classification: 63 patients presented in class II NYHA and 57 in class III or IV NYHA. The diagnosis confirmed by surgical report was: sub-acute CCP (n=12; 10%), fibrous CCP (n=36; 30%), calcified CCP (n=72; 60%). A pericardiectomy including an epicardiectomy with a systematic release of the ventricles was carried out in every case. Median sternotomy was frequently performed (n=117; 97.5%). Results Fifteen early deaths (12.5%) were observed, the cause of hospital deaths was due to a low cardiac output (n=12) and to a hepatic failure (n=3). Class III or IV (NYHA) (P=0.01), mitral regurgitation (P<0.05), persistent a diastolic syndrome after surgery (P<0.05) and low cardiac index (CI) (P<0.02) were the important risk factors. Age, size of cardiac X-ray silhouette, right and left ventricular diastolic pressures, ejection fraction (EF), atrial fibrillation and pericardial calcifications had no impact on early survival. The average follow up was 4 years (1–10 years); we lost 22 patients during follow-up. Among survivors, there was no late death; the patients were in class I or II NYHA. Post-operative catheterization evaluation (n=30) shown a significant decrease of the right and left ventricular end-diastolic pressures (P<0.05), of the pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) (P<0.05) and of

  6. Time-frequency-wavenumber Decomposition To Investigate Seismic Wavefield: Application To The Annot Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schissele, E.; Cansi, Y.; Gaffet, S.

    Many observations and studies as well as numerical simulations have been done in order to completely understand the whole seismogram recorded during an earthquake. At regional distances, the seismic wavefield is strongly influenced by crustal hetero- geneities. The primary wavefield constituted by Pn, Pg, Sn, Sg, Rg, Lg.... phases is diffracted and refracted by these heterogeneities and hence forms the coda of the seis- mogram. But the different mechanisms of propagation in a heterogeneous medium are not fully understood. The identification of the different phases contributing to the coda seems to be essential to progress in the comprehension of the seismic wavefield propagation. Seismic arrays are then well-adapted tools since they provide the spatio-temporal evo- lution of the wavefield. In 1998, 4 small-scales arrays were deployed for 2 months around the Annot region, located in the southern French Alps. Each array was constituted by 9 short-period seismometers, recording frequencies greater than 0.2 Hz. Its aperture was 250 meters, with a minimal distance between 2 adjacent sensors of 20 meters. That allows us to study the seismic wavefield for very low wavelength without any problem of spatial aliasing. It will be interesting to characterize in terms of wavefield deformation the signature of the different kinds of heterogeneities (fault system, topographic relief, impedance contrast...) surrounding this area. We expect the primary wavefield to be diffracted or refracted by all these heterogeneities. A time-frequency-wavenumber technique which allows us to characterize the whole coherent part of the energy which prop- agates through the seismic array has been derived. Such a characterization involves, for each coherent wavelet, an estimate of: (i) an arrival time and a frequency content and (ii) an azimuth and an apparent velocity. This way, the principal phases will be described. What will be more interesting, is the extraction of the deterministic part of the

  7. Crust structure across the Rif Cordillera from 'RIFSIS' seismic refraction and wide-angle reflection experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Alba; Gallart, Josep; Díaz, Jordi; Carbonell, Ramon; Harnafi, Mimoun; Levander, Alan

    2013-04-01

    The Rif Cordillera, located in North Morocco forms, together with the Betic Range, the Gibraltar Arc around the Alboran Sea. This asymmetric curved mountain belt originated during a Miocene continent-continent collision as a result of the westward motion of the Alboran domain between northwest Africa and Iberia. The complexity of the area favored the proposition of diverse tectonic models, such as roll-back, accompanied and followed by lithospheric convective down-welling, and delamination. In this study, we present models of crustal structure derived from a seismic refraction and wide-angle reflection experiment which took place in October 2011 within the Spanish project RIFSIS complemented by the US-PICASSO one. Two profiles oriented N-S and E-W respectively were carried out across the Rif domains. Five shots of 1 Tn each were detonated along the lines and at the crossing point, recorded by about 900 stations from US-Iris pool deployed at an average spacing of 750 m. The N-S line was extended northwards by a 70 km long segment in Spain, in the Betic Range. Southwards, this profile connects with the one recorded in 2010 across the Atlas Mountains, within the SIMA project. The interpreted crustal structure differentiates two sedimentary layers on top of the basement, inferred from the observed first arrivals at short offsets, followed by upper, mid and lower crustal levels constrained by reflected phases visible in the record sections. The bottom of the crust is well defined from PmP phases, although the absence of Pn arrivals prevents to constrain upper mantle velocities. Average velocity values for the different layers in the models are respectively: 3.5 and 4.2 km/s for the sediments, 5.9, 6.3 and 6.6 km/s within the crust, and 8 km/s below Moho. These velocity depth models obtained at the Rif Cordillera hold major variations in crustal thickness, especially along the E-W profile, that shows a rapid change of 15-20 km in Moho depths within 30 km horizontal

  8. Rocky Mountain evolution: Tying Continental Dynamics of the Rocky Mountains and Deep Probe seismic experiments with receiver functions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rumpfhuber, E.-M.; Keller, Gordon R.; Sandvol, E.; Velasco, A.A.; Wilson, D.C.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we have determined the crustal structure using three different receiver function methods using data collected from the northern transect of the Continental Dynamics of the Rocky Mountains (CD-ROM) experiment. The resulting migrated image and crustal thickness determinations confirm and refine prior crustal thickness measurements based on the CD-ROM and Deep Probe experiment data sets. The new results show a very distinct and thick lower crustal layer beneath the Archean Wyoming province. In addition, we are able to show its termination at 42??N latitude, which provides a seismic tie between the CD-ROM and Deep Probe seismic experiments and thus completes a continuous north-south transect extending from New Mexico into Alberta, Canada. This new tie is particularly important because it occurs close to a major tectonic boundary, the Cheyenne belt, between an Archean craton and a Proterozoic terrane. We used two different stacking techniques, based on a similar concept but using two different ways to estimate uncertainties. Furthermore, we used receiver function migration and common conversion point (CCP) stacking techniques. The combined interpretation of all our results shows (1) crustal thinning in southern Wyoming, (2) strong northward crustal thickening beginning in central Wyoming, (3) the presence of an unusually thick and high-velocity lower crust beneath the Wyoming province, and (4) the abrupt termination of this lower crustal layer north of the Cheyenne belt at 42??N latitude. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Passive seismic experiment - A summary of current status. [Apollo-initiated lunar surface station data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, G. V.; Dorman, H. J.; Horvath, P.; Ibrahim, A. K.; Koyama, J.; Nakamura, Y.

    1978-01-01

    The data set obtained from the four-station Apollo seismic network including signals from approximately 11,800 events, is surveyed. Some refinement of the lunar model will result, but its gross features remain the same. Attention is given to the question of a small, molten lunar core, the answer to which remains dependent on analysis of signals from a far side impact. Seventy three sources of repeating, deep moonquakes have been identified, thirty nine of which have been accurately located. Concentrated at depths from 800 to 1000 km, the periodicities of these events have led to the hypothesis that they are generated by tidal stresses. Lunar seismic data has also indicated that the meteoroid population is ten times lower than originally determined from earth based observations. Lunar seismic activity is much lower and mountainous masses show no sign of sinking, in contrast to earth, as a result of the lunar crust being four times thicker. While much work remains to be done, significant correlation between terrestrial and lunar observations can be seen.

  10. Factors Linking Childhood Experiences to Adult Romantic Relationships among African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Leslie Gordon; Simons, Ronald L.; Landor, Antoinette M.; Bryant, Chalandra M.; Beach, Steven R.H.

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that a high quality relationship with a romantic partner is related to a variety of positive outcomes associated with health and well-being. Establishing such relationships is an important developmental task for young adults and past research indicates that there is a link between experiences in the family of origin and the success of later intimate relationships. It has been suggested that this association can be explained by the acquisition of social competencies (e.g., emotions, schemas, traits) that are acquired during childhood in the family of origin and, in turn, influence interaction with adult romantic partners. The current study builds on this foundation by identifying particular competencies expected to explain the association between childhood exposure to supportive and harsh parenting and later patterns of interaction with romantic partners. Specifically, we examine anger management, attachment style, hostile attribution bias, and self-control as potential mediators using prospective, longitudinal data from a sample of 345 African American young adults. Results from structural equation modeling indicate that each of the mediators in our study accounts for a significant portion of the effect of parenting on the quality of adult romantic relationships although the constructs linking parenting to warm interactions with romantic partners are somewhat different from those that link parenting to hostile interactions with romantic partners. Even after accounting for the effect of the mediators, there is still a direct effect of parenting on both warm/loving and hostile/aggressive interactions with romantic partner. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. PMID:24730381

  11. The crustal structure of southern Baffin Bay: implications from a seismic refraction experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suckro, Sonja K.; Gohl, Karsten; Funck, Thomas; Heyde, Ingo; Ehrhardt, Axel; Schreckenberger, Bernd; Gerlings, Joanna; Damm, Volkmar; Jokat, Wilfried

    2012-07-01

    Baffin Bay represents the northern extension of the extinct rift system in the Labrador Sea. While the extent of oceanic crust and magnetic spreading anomalies are well constrained in the Labrador Sea, no magnetic spreading anomalies have yet been identified in Baffin Bay. Thus, the nature and evolution of the Baffin Bay crust remain uncertain. To clearly characterize the crust in southern Baffin Bay, 42 ocean bottom seismographs were deployed along a 710-km-long seismic refraction line, from Baffin Island to Greenland. Multichannel seismic reflection, gravity and magnetic anomaly data were recorded along the same transect. Using forward modelling and inversion of observed traveltimes from dense airgun shots, a P-wave velocity model was obtained. The detailed morphology of the basement was constrained using the seismic reflection data. A 2-D density model supports and complements the P-wave modelling. Sediments of up to 6 km in thickness with P-wave velocities of 1.8-4.0 km s-1 are imaged in the centre of Baffin Bay. Oceanic crust underlies at least 305 km of the profile. The oceanic crust is 7.5 km thick on average and is modelled as three layers. Oceanic layer 2 ranges in P-wave velocity from 4.8 to 6.4 km s-1 and is divided into basalts and dykes. Oceanic layer 3 displays P-wave velocities of 6.4-7.2 km s-1. The Greenland continental crust is up to 25 km thick along the line and divided into an upper, middle and lower crust with P-wave velocities from 5.3 to 7.0 km s-1. The upper and middle continental crust thin over a 120-km-wide continent-ocean transition zone. We classify this margin as a volcanic continental margin as seaward dipping reflectors are imaged from the seismic reflection data and mafic intrusions in the lower crust can be inferred from the seismic refraction data. The profile did not reach continental crust on the Baffin Island margin, which implies a transition zone of 150 km length at most. The new information on the extent of oceanic crust is

  12. Fault structure, stress, or pressure control of the seismicity in shale? Insights from a controlled experiment of fluid-induced fault reactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Barros, Louis; Daniel, Guillaume; Guglielmi, Yves; Rivet, Diane; Caron, Hervé; Payre, Xavier; Bergery, Guillaume; Henry, Pierre; Castilla, Raymi; Dick, Pierre; Barbieri, Ernesto; Gourlay, Maxime

    2016-06-01

    Clay formations are present in reservoirs and earthquake faults, but questions remain on their mechanical behavior, as they can vary from ductile (aseismic) to brittle (seismic). An experiment, at a scale of 10 m, aims to reactivate a natural fault by fluid pressure in shale materials. The injection area was surrounded by a dense monitoring network comprising pressure, deformation, and seismicity sensors, in a well-characterized geological setting. Thirty-two microseismic events were recorded during several injection phases in five different locations within the fault zone. Their computed magnitude ranged between -4.3 and -3.7. Their spatiotemporal distribution, compared with the measured displacement at the injection points, shows that most of the deformation induced by the injection is aseismic. Whether the seismicity is controlled by the fault architecture, mineralogy of fracture filling, fluid, and/or stress state is then discussed. The fault damage zone architecture and mineralogy are of crucial importance, as seismic slip mainly localizes on the sealed-with-calcite fractures which predominate in the fault damage zone. As no seismicity is observed in the close vicinity of the injection areas, the presence of fluid seems to prevent seismic slips. The fault core acts as an impermeable hydraulic barrier that favors fluid confinement and pressurization. Therefore, the seismic behavior seems to be strongly sensitive to the structural heterogeneity (including permeability) of the fault zone, which leads to a heterogeneous stress response to the pressurized volume.

  13. Self-reported experiences of discrimination and visceral fat in middle-aged African-American and Caucasian women.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Tené T; Kravitz, Howard M; Janssen, Imke; Powell, Lynda H

    2011-06-01

    The authors examined the association between self-reported experiences of discrimination and subtypes of abdominal fat (visceral, subcutaneous) in a population-based cohort of African-American and Caucasian women. Prior studies examining associations between discrimination and abdominal fat have yielded mixed results. A major limitation of this research has been the reliance on waist circumference, which may be a poor marker of visceral fat, particularly for African-American women. Participants were 402 (45% African-American, 55% Caucasian) middle-aged women from the Chicago, Illinois, site of the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation. Visceral and subcutaneous fat were assessed via computed tomography scans between 2002 and 2005. Linear regression models were conducted to test associations among discrimination and visceral and subcutaneous fat. After adjustment for age and race, every one-point increase on the discrimination scale was associated with a 13.03-cm(2) higher amount of visceral fat (P = 0.04). This association remained significant after further adjustments for total body fat and relevant risk factors, including depressive symptoms. Discrimination was not associated with subcutaneous fat in minimally (P = 0.95) or fully adjusted models. Associations did not differ by race. Findings suggest that visceral fat may be one potential pathway through which experiences of discrimination increase cardiovascular risk.

  14. Experiences and perspectives of African American, Latina/o, Asian American, and European American psychology graduate students: A national study.

    PubMed

    Maton, Kenneth I; Wimms, Harriette E; Grant, Sheila K; Wittig, Michele A; Rogers, Margaret R; Vasquez, Melba J T

    2011-01-01

    A national, Web-based survey of 1,219 African American, Latina/o, Asian American, and European American psychology graduate students revealed both similarities and differences in experiences and perspectives. Mentoring was found to be the strongest predictor of satisfaction across groups. Academic supports and barriers, along with perceptions of diversity within the academic environment, were also important predictors of satisfaction. Students of color perceived less fairness of representation of their ethnic group within psychology than European American students, and a greater linkage between aspects of the graduate school experience and their ethnicity. Limitations of the study and implications for future research and action are discussed.

  15. African American women's limited knowledge and experiences with genetic counseling for hereditary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Vanessa B; Graves, Kristi D; Christopher, Juleen; Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Talley, Costellia; Williams, Karen Patricia

    2014-06-01

    Genetic counseling and testing for hereditary breast cancer have the potential benefit of early detection and early interventions in African American women. However, African American women have low use of these services compared to White women. We conducted two focus groups with African American women diagnosed with breast cancer (affected group, n = 13) and women with at least one first-degree relative with breast/ovarian cancer (unaffected group, n = 8). A content analysis approach was employed to analyze interview data. Breast cancer survivors had more knowledge about genetic counseling and testing than participants who were unaffected with cancer. However, knowledge about genetic counseling was limited in both groups. Barriers to pursuing genetic counseling and testing included poor understanding of the genetic counseling and testing process, fear of carrying the mutation, concerns about discrimination, and cost. Motivators to participate in genetic counseling and testing included desire to help family members, insurance coverage, and potential of benefiting the larger African American community. Education efforts are needed to increase genetic counseling and testing awareness in the African American community.

  16. A passive and active seismic experiment near the Boso triple junction in the far northwestern part of the Pacific plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, T.; Mochizuki, K.; Shinohara, M.; Machida, Y.; Shinbo, T.; Nakahigashi, K.; Yagi, T.; Abe, H.; Hashimoto, S.; Shoji, W.; Sato, T.; Mizuno, M.; Uehira, K.; Hino, R.; Murai, Y.; Oguma, K.

    2011-12-01

    The Pacific Plate subducts beneath northeastern Japan along the Japan Trench and beneath the Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc along the Mariana Trench. The Boso triple junction is located at between the Japan Trench and the Mariana Trench, and the southeastern end of the Sagami Trough where the Philippine Sea Plate subducts beneath northeastern Japan. It is thus a trench-trench-trench type triple junction. For the purpose of understanding the interaction between three plates and its effect to the Pacific Plate, we have performed a passive and active seismic experiment near the Boso triple junction in the far northwestern part of the Pacific plate. We deployed 10 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBSs) equipped with a three-componet 1Hz geophone mounted on gimbabl systems on KH09-3 cruise of R/V Hakuho-maru on July 2009, and recovered the OBSs by using M/V Shinchou-maru on October 2010.During the KH09-3 cruise, we shot by using an airgun array (6000 cubic inch in total) during 18 hours on three profiles. We obtained 442days' seismic data from July 29, 2009 to October 13, 2010 in the experiment. More than 2000 earthquakes were detected, and the foci form some clusters.

  17. Sexual Decision Making in the Absence of Choice: The African American Female Dating Experience

    PubMed Central

    Andrasik, Michele P.; Nguyen, Hong V.; George, William H.; Kajumulo, Kelly F.

    2016-01-01

    Although links between low mate availability and increased HIV and STI risk for African American women have been documented in the literature, we know little about the impact of limited mate choices on the quality of relationships between Black men and women and how these relationship dynamics impact risk for young Black women. We conducted a qualitative study with African American female young adults (N=12) to explore the perceived impact of structural forces on African American female young adults’ dating and sexual behavior. Participants reported (1) perceptions of Black men as untrustworthy and manipulative, (2) the limited and often negative roles for Black men in the larger Black community, and (3) heterosexual relationships in the Black community as increasingly influenced by economics and commerce. Recommendations for HIV prevention interventions that include micro and macro level approaches are discussed. PMID:27182463

  18. Experiences of and responses to HIV among African and Caribbean communities in Toronto, Canada.

    PubMed

    Gardezi, F; Calzavara, L; Husbands, W; Tharao, W; Lawson, E; Myers, T; Pancham, A; George, C; Remis, R; Willms, D; McGee, F; Adebajo, S

    2008-07-01

    African and Caribbean communities in Canada and other developed countries are disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS. This qualitative study of African and Caribbean communities in Toronto sought to understand HIV-related stigma, discrimination, denial and fear, and the effects of multiple intersecting factors that influence responses to the disease, prevention practices and access to treatment and support services. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 30 HIV-positive men and women and focus groups were conducted with 74 men and women whose HIV status was negative or unknown. We identified a range of issues faced by African and Caribbean people that may increase the risk for HIV infection, create obstacles to testing and treatment and lead to isolation of HIV-positive people. Our findings suggest the need for greater sensitivity and knowledge on the part of healthcare providers; more culturally specific support services; community development; greater community awareness; and expanded efforts to tackle housing, poverty, racism and settlement issues.

  19. In/dependent Collaborations: Perceptions and Experiences of African Scientists in Transnational HIV Research

    PubMed Central

    Moyi Okwaro, Ferdinand; Geissler, P. W.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines collaboration in transnational medical research from the viewpoint of African scientists working in partnerships with northern counterparts. It draws on ethnographic fieldwork in an HIV laboratory of an East African state university, with additional data from interviews with scientists working in related research institutions. Collaboration is today the preferred framework for the mechanisms by which northern institutions support research in the south. The concept signals a shift away from the legacy of unequal (post‐) colonial power relations, although, amid persisting inequalities, the rhetorical emphasis on equality might actually hinder critical engagement with conflicts of interest and injustice. To collaborate, African scientists engage various strategies: They establish a qualified but flexible, non‐permanent workforce, diversify collaborators and research areas, source complementary funding to assemble infrastructures, and maintain prospective research populations to attract transnational clinical trials. Through this labor of collaboration, they sustain their institutions under prevailing conditions of scarcity. PMID:25800667

  20. In/dependent Collaborations: Perceptions and Experiences of African Scientists in Transnational HIV Research.

    PubMed

    Moyi Okwaro, Ferdinand; Geissler, P W

    2015-12-01

    This article examines collaboration in transnational medical research from the viewpoint of African scientists working in partnerships with northern counterparts. It draws on ethnographic fieldwork in an HIV laboratory of an East African state university, with additional data from interviews with scientists working in related research institutions. Collaboration is today the preferred framework for the mechanisms by which northern institutions support research in the south. The concept signals a shift away from the legacy of unequal (post-) colonial power relations, although, amid persisting inequalities, the rhetorical emphasis on equality might actually hinder critical engagement with conflicts of interest and injustice. To collaborate, African scientists engage various strategies: They establish a qualified but flexible, non-permanent workforce, diversify collaborators and research areas, source complementary funding to assemble infrastructures, and maintain prospective research populations to attract transnational clinical trials. Through this labor of collaboration, they sustain their institutions under prevailing conditions of scarcity.

  1. Preliminary results of the CRISP 3D seismic experiment, offshore Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangs, N. L.; McIntosh, K. D.; Silver, E. A.; Ranero, C. R.; Kluesner, J. W.; von Huene, R.; Cavanaugh, S.; Graf, S.; Cameselle, A. L.; Baracco, A. M.; Nuñez, E.

    2011-12-01

    In April and May of 2011, we acquired a new 3D seismic reflection data volume offshore Costa Rica, northwest of the Osa Peninsula. The goal of the survey was to examine the crustal structure and deformation history of this collision zone, and to clearly image the plate-boundary fault from the trench and into the seismogenic zone. These data will also help locate a deep site for riser drilling as part of the CRISP drilling program. The 3D survey covered 55 km across the upper shelf and slope, and into the trench. It extended 11 km along strike for a total survey area of 11 x 55 km. These data were acquired with the R/V Langseth using a 3300 cubic inch source shot every 50 m. We recorded the data on four 6-km-long, 468-channel streamers with 150m separation. We have preliminary results from processing 2D seismic lines extracted from the 3D volume, and from initial 3D volume processing. In the preliminary images we can trace strong seismic reflections from the plate-boundary fault down to 3 s two-way travel time (approx. 5 km depth) below the seafloor and 26 km landward from the trench. The plate-boundary fault reflection amplitudes decrease substantially with depth and are difficult to depict on these preliminary profiles. The upper plate structure shows numerous faults, many extending down to the plate-interface, and intense folding and faulting of the slope cover sequences. Currently these data are being processed by the Spanish oil company, Repsol, and should reveal far more detail with complete 3D processing.

  2. Lithology, stress or pressure control of the seismicity in shale? Insights from a controlled experiment of fluid-induced fault reactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivet, D.; De Barros, L.; Daniel, G.; Guglielmi, Y.; Castilla, R.

    2015-12-01

    Shale materials are important components in petroleum systems (e.g. sealing and source rocks) and play an important role in earthquake faults. However, their mechanical behavior is still poorly understood, as it can vary from plastic to brittle. The role of fluid pressure in seismicity triggering is also not fully understood. A unique, decametric scale experiment, which aims at reactivating a natural fault by high pressure injection, was performed in shale. The injection interval was surrounded by a dense monitoring network of pressure, deformation and seismic sensors, in a well-characterized geological setting. 37 seismic events, with very small magnitude (about -4) were recorded during five series of injections within the fault zone. The spatio-temporal distribution of these events, compared with the measured displacement at the injection points, shows that most of the induced deformation is aseismic. The locations of the microseismic events are strongly asymmetrical, with most events distributed East of the fault and South of the injection area. Focal mechanisms are predominantly consistent with shear slip on a family of calcified fractures. The shale mineralogy appears to be a critical parameter governing the seismogenic character of deformation, as only calcified structures slipped seismically. As no seismic event occurs in the close vicinity of the injection, high-fluid content seems to inhibit seismic slip. Consequently, stress changes induced by this highly-pressurized volume should more likely influence the spatial distribution of seismicity. Finally, the main fault, acting as a fluid flow and/or stress barrier, strongly modifies the stress transfer. From the monitoring point of view, this experiment reflects the difficulty in quantitatively following fluid propagation in a shale formation, as seismicity will be strongly influenced by the presence of calcified fractures and by the interaction between stress transfer and lithological heterogeneities.

  3. Effect of the surface roughness on the seismic signal generated by a single rock impact: insight from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachelet, Vincent; Mangeney, Anne; de Rosny, Julien; Toussaint, Renaud

    2016-04-01

    The seismic signal generated by rockfalls, landslides or avalanches is a unique tool to detect, characterize and monitor gravitational flow activity, with strong implication in terms of natural hazard monitoring. Indeed, as natural flows travel down the slope, they apply stresses on the ground, generating seismic waves in a wide frequency band. Our ultimate objective is to relate the granular flow properties to the generated signals that result from the different physical processes involved. We investigate here the more simple process: the impact of a single bead on a rough surface. Farin et al. [2015] have already shown theoretically and experimentally the existence of a link between the properties of an impacting bead (mass and velocity) on smooth surfaces, and the emitted signal (radiated elastic energy and mean frequency). This demonstrates that the single impactor properties can be deduced from the form of the emitted signal. We extend this work here by investigating the impact of single beads and gravels on rough and erodible surfaces. Experimentally, we drop glass and steel beads of diameters from 2 mm to 10 mm on a PMMA plate. The roughness of this last is obtained by gluing 3mm-diameter glass beads on one of its face. Free beads have been also added to get erodible beds. We track the dropped impactor motion, times between impacts and the generated acoustic waves using two fast cameras and 8 accelerometers. Cameras are used in addition to estimate the impactor rotation. We investigate the energy balance during the impact process, especially how the energy restitution varies as a function of the energy lost through acoustic waves. From these experiments, we clearly observe that even if more dissipative processes are involved (friction, grain reorganization, etc.), the single bead scaling laws obtained on smooth surfaces remain valid. A main result of this work is to quantify the fluctuations of the characteristic quantities such as the bounce angle, the

  4. Termination of the Batholiths marine seismic experiment: the scientific method loses to hearsay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollister, L. S.

    2007-12-01

    The marine seismic component of the NSF-Continental Dynamics funded project Batholiths was terminated by Canadian authorities due to environmental concerns. Socioeconomic benefits of the project were not taken into account, nor were findings by the National Research Council on effects of ocean noise on marine mammal populations. The marine seismic component of Batholiths was to have been done using sound from airguns towed behind the R/V Langseth in order to seismically image the geologic structures below the Coast Mountains of British Columbia. The project was nearly identical in timing, location, and scope to the ACCRETE project, which was successfully permitted and done in the early fall of 1994, with no detected or known damage to the environment. However, what changed in the last 13 years was a dramatic increase of concern by eNGOs (environmental non- government organizations) that airguns produced sound that might be harmful to marine species, marine mammals in particular. The marine noise concerns were amplified by eNGO agendas and campaigns to prevent oil exploration along continental margins and to shut down naval exercises involving sonar to detect submarines. Compared to these agendas, Batholiths was an easy target because the PIs (Principal Investigators) did not have the manpower or financial or legal resources (in contrast to the Navy and oil companies) to push back against an organized campaign set on stopping Batholiths. The main concern used to mobilize public opinion against Batholiths was that, if we were permitted, then oil exploration in the nearby region would be permitted; and, if oil were found, drilling would proceed: the slippery slope argument. Thus, by stopping Batholiths with the speculation that airgun noise, as used in a marine seismic study, might damage marine life, the eNGOs believe they have stopped oil exploration in British Columbia coastal waters. It is widely recognized that everything was done right to get the permits for

  5. A Survey of the Experiences of African Librarians in American Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibraheem, Abiodun I.; Devine, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    A national research study was undertaken to identify and clarify issues related to the employment in academic settings of African librarians who have relocated to the United States. It examined, by means of a survey, employment issues concerned with education, credentialing, language skills and cultural bias from the perspective of those…

  6. What Makes African American Health Disparities Newsworthy? An Experiment among Journalists about Story Framing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinnant, Amanda; Oh, Hyun Jee; Caburnay, Charlene A.; Kreuter, Matthew W.

    2011-01-01

    News stories reporting race-specific health information commonly emphasize disparities between racial groups. But recent research suggests this focus on disparities has unintended effects on African American audiences, generating negative emotions and less interest in preventive behaviors (Nicholson RA, Kreuter MW, Lapka C "et al." Unintended…

  7. The Experiences of African American Physical Education Teacher Candidates at Secondary Urban Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Takahiro; Fisette, Jennifer; Walton, Theresa

    2013-01-01

    Presently, most physical education teachers in the United States are White Americans and from middle class families. In fact, 83% of all teachers in public schools are White Americans, whereas approximately 10% of all African American teachers are representative of all teachers in the United States. A student might feel cultural dissonance that…

  8. Towards a Meaningful Curriculum Implementation in South African Schools: Senior Phase Teachers' Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taole, Matshidiso Joyce

    2015-01-01

    Different sectors of society register complaints about schooling in South Africa. Given that curriculum reform has such a poor record of implementation in the country, there is clearly a need for research that identifies factors that hinder or facilitate curriculum implementation in South African schools and identifies strategies to address the…

  9. A Dream Deferred: The Experience of an African American Student in a Doctoral Program in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Andre M.

    2008-01-01

    Due to a negative stigma that has been established about African Americans, many live their entire lives trying to "refute the degrading, humiliating and offensive racial images and stereotypes" that have plagued their race in scientific fields and in other areas of life. The images that are perpetuated have caused frustration as well as…

  10. Strong Teens: A School-Based Small Group Experience for African American Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Nathan J.; Rayle, Andrea Dixon

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the school-based, small group adaptation of the existing Strong Teens Curriculum (STC) for African American male adolescents in high schools. The STC was created to equip adolescents with skills that promote more effective social interaction and enhance personal emotional and psychological wellness. The authors present a…

  11. "I Understand the Struggle": Leveraging the Lived Experiences of African American Teachers in TESOL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siefert, Bobbi; Salas, Spencer; D'amico, Mark M.

    2015-01-01

    Although TESOL in-service teacher education committed to "culturally sustaining pedagogy" (Paris, 2012) has underscored the critical role of teachers' professional subjectivities for student achievement, relatively few studies have attempted to capture the perspectives of African American classroom teachers working with English language…

  12. African American Faculty Women Experiences of Underrepresentation in Computer Technology Positions in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Dolores

    2013-01-01

    African American women are underrepresented in computer technology disciplines in institutions of higher education throughout the United States. Although equitable gender representation is progressing in most fields, much less information is available on why institutions are still lagging in workforce diversity, a problem which can be lessened by…

  13. Early Educational Foundations for the Development of Civic Responsibility: An African Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serpell, Robert; Mumba, Paul; Chansa-Kabali, Tamara

    2011-01-01

    An innovative curriculum designed to foster the development of social responsibility among pre-adolescent children was introduced at a rural Zambian primary school. The curriculum invoked Child-to-Child principles focusing on health education, advancing a synthesis of Western psychological theories and African cultural traditions. The teacher…

  14. The Stuff of Stereotypes: Toward Unpacking Identity Threats amid African American Students' Learning Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larnell, Gregory V.; Boston, Denise; Bragelman, John

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to shed light on scenarios in which threatening stereotypes unfold, specifically in an institutional context in which African Americans are overrepresented. Drawing on data and findings from a recent study examining mathematics learning and identity in non-credit-bearing remedial math courses, we present three…

  15. The Invisible Wall: Exploring the Experiences of African-American Students at CCCU Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Timothy Perry

    2013-01-01

    African-American students who attend a CCCU institution do not complete their degrees as frequently as other student groups. The average gap at CCCU institutions between "overall and Black graduation rates is more than 19%. This is greater than the gap at other private institutions" (Smith, 2009, p.80). While the six-year graduation rate…

  16. From Victory to Freedom: The African American Experience. Curriculum Guide: Secondary School Course of Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Historical Society, Columbus.

    This secondary school curriculum guide contains three sections of instructional materials about three areas of African American life. The section "Community Life" includes detailed lessons on family, the church, education, business, and organizations. The section "Public Life" provides in-depth lessons on media, science and…

  17. Till Death Do Us Part: Lived Experiences of HIV-Positive Married African American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Lorece V.; Irving, Shalon M.; Hawkins, Anita S.

    2011-01-01

    HIV/AIDS disease continues to be an escalating health problem, particularly among women. However, African American women are among the leading demographic groups for HIV prevalence in the United States. The typical woman with HIV/AIDS is young, in her late twenties, economically challenged, and of childbearing age. Participants were recruited from…

  18. Calibration formulae and values for velocity seismometers used in the 1998 Santa Clara Valley, California seismic experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindh, Allan G.; Eaton, Jerry P.; O'Neill Allen, Mary; Healy, John H.; Stewart, Samuel W.; Damerell, Lu

    1999-01-01

    Eaton (1975), Bakun and Dratler (1976), Eaton (1977), Healy and O’Neil (1977), Asten (1977), Stewart and O'Neill (1980), Liu and Peselnick (1986), Eaton (1991), Rodgers et al. (1995), and many others (see Asten (1977) for a list of earlier references) have presented formulae for calculating the damped generator constant (or motor constant), and the damping constant (or fractional damping ratio) for magnetically damped velocity seismometers. Unfortunately the notation varies between authors, and not all the formulae allow for some of the significant variables -- differences in input impedance of the recording system in particular. This has become particularly relevant because the USGS seismic networks in California have traditionally set up their velocity sensors for the 10K Ohm impedance of the standard USGS analog telemetry systems (Eaton, 1977), but modern digital recording systems are usually set up with high input impedances, often of a megaohm or greater. Thus the nominal calibration values valid for USGS velocity sensors in their “normal” configuration are incorrect when they are recorded on other systems. In this short note we have collected the relevant formulae needed, and computed the seismometer responses for the various velocity sensors used in the recent Santa Clara Valley Seismic Experiment (SCVSE, see Lindh et al., 1999).

  19. Men of the Cloth: African-American Clergy's Knowledge and Experience in Providing Pastoral Care to African-American Elders with Late-Life Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stansbury, Kim L.

    2011-01-01

    African-American clergy's ability to recognize late-life depression and their capacity to provide support with this illness have been neglected in the literature. Using a mental health literacy framework, the purpose of this research was to explore African-American clergy's knowledge of and treatments for late-life depression. In-depth interviews…

  20. Theoretical and practical considerations for the design of the iMUSH active-source seismic experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiser, E.; Levander, A.; Harder, S. H.; Abers, G. A.; Creager, K. C.; Vidale, J. E.; Moran, S. C.; Malone, S. D.

    2013-12-01

    The multi-disciplinary imaging of Magma Under St. Helens (iMUSH) experiment seeks to understand the details of the magmatic system that feeds Mount St. Helens using active- and passive-source seismic, magnetotelluric, and petrologic data. The active-source seismic component of this experiment will take place in the summer of 2014 utilizing all of the 2600 PASSCAL 'Texan' Reftek instruments which will record twenty-four 1000-2000 lb shots distributed around the Mount St. Helens region. The instruments will be deployed as two consecutive refraction profiles centered on the volcano, and a series of areal arrays. The actual number of areal arrays, as well as their locations, will depend strongly on the length of the experiment (3-4 weeks), the number of instrument deployers (50-60), and the time it will take per deployment given the available road network. The current work shows how we are balancing these practical considerations against theoretical experiment designs in order to achieve the proposed scientific goals with the available resources. One of the main goals of the active-source seismic experiment is to image the magmatic system down to the Moho (35-40 km). Calculating sensitivity kernels for multiple shot/receiver offsets shows that direct P waves should be sensitive to Moho depths at offsets of 150 km, and therefore this will likely be the length of the refraction profiles. Another primary objective of the experiment is to estimate the locations and volumes of different magma accumulation zones beneath the volcano using the areal arrays. With this in mind, the optimal locations of these arrays, as well as their associated shots, are estimated using an eigenvalue analysis of the approximate Hessian for each possible experiment design. This analysis seeks to minimize the number of small eigenvalues of the approximate Hessian that would amplify the propagation of data noise into regions of interest in the model space, such as the likely locations of magma

  1. Simulation of complete seismic surveys for evaluation of experiment design and processing

    SciTech Connect

    Oezdenvar, T.; McMechan, G.A.; Chaney, P.

    1996-03-01

    Synthesis of complete seismic survey data sets allows analysis and optimization of all stages in an acquisition/processing sequence. The characteristics of available survey designs, parameter choices, and processing algorithms may be evaluated prior to field acquisition to produce a composite system in which all stages have compatible performance; this maximizes the cost effectiveness for a given level of accuracy, or for targets with specific characteristics. Data sets synthesized for three salt structures provide representative comparisons of time and depth migration, post-stack and prestack processing, and illustrate effects of varying recording aperture and shot spacing, iterative focusing analysis, and the interaction of migration algorithms with recording aperture. A final example demonstrates successful simulation of both 2-D acquisition and processing of a real data line over a salt pod in the Gulf of Mexico.

  2. The Tectonic Evolution of SE Canada: Seismic Evidence from the QM-III Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastow, I. D.; Boyce, A.; Darbyshire, F. A.; Levin, V. L.; Menke, W. H.; Ellwood, A.

    2014-12-01

    Much of the geological record can be interpreted in the context of processes operating today at plate boundaries. This works well to explain processes and products during the Phanerozoic era; during Precambrian times when the oldest rocks were forming, however, conditions on the younger, hotter, more ductile Earth were likely very different, making analogies with modern day tectonics less certain. Gathering evidence preserved deep within the plates in the shields is thus essential to improve our understanding of the early Earth. Shields are usually underlain by thick, seismically fast roots that are absent beneath younger portions of Earth's surface. The thermochemically distinct nature of cratonic roots is often associated with Archean processes such as the extraction of komatiitic magmas. However, the cratonic core of North America does not fit easily into this Archean formation paradigm: part of the Canadian shield extends beneath the Archean Superior craton, but much of it persists beneath younger Proterozoic crust as well. We present here a relative arrival-time tomographic study of mantle seismic structure using data from a new seismograph network operating in SE Canada. Our stations extend from the Archean Superior craton around the southern tip of Hudson Bay, through Proterozoic Grenville terranes, and into Paleozoic coastal Maine and Nova Scotia. Tomographic images display three broad zones of mantle wavespeed: slow in the Appalachian terranes; fast in the Grenville Province; very fast within the Superior craton. Archean lithosphere has been modified by the Great Meteor hotspot, but we find no evidence for major plate-scale underthrusting during the Grenville orogeny. The abrupt wavespeed transition from Archean to Proterozoic mantle is thus consistent with the emerging consensus that keels form in two stages: a chemically depleted layer in Archean times followed by the thermal development of a less-depleted lithosphere during Proterozoic times.

  3. Deviant bodies, stigmatized identities, and racist acts: examining the experiences of African-American gamers in Xbox Live

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, K. L.

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to illustrate how minority gamers, particularly African-American males, are subject to the label of deviant within the virtual gaming community of Xbox Live. They are labeled deviant based on the stigma of their physical identity - blackness, through a process of linguistic profiling. By employing virtual ethnography, the author identifies a process that leads to racism based on how the black gamer sounds within the space. The act of racism emerges through a process involving questioning, provoking, instigating, and ultimately racism. Many black gamers have normalized these racist experiences and have accepted the label of deviant placed upon their bodies.

  4. The Impact of African American Parents' Racial Discrimination Experiences and Perceived Neighborhood Cohesion on their Racial Socialization Practices.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Farzana T; English, Devin; Busby, Danielle R; Lambert, Sharon F; Harrison, Aubrey; Stock, Michelle L; Gibbons, Frederick X

    2016-07-01

    Parental racial socialization is a parenting tool used to prepare African American adolescents for managing racial stressors. While it is known that parents' racial discrimination experiences affect the racial socialization messages they provide, little is known about the influence of factors that promote supportive and communal parenting, such as perceived neighborhood cohesion. In cohesive neighborhoods, neighbors may help parents address racial discrimination by monitoring youth and conveying racial socialization messages; additionally, the effect of neighborhood cohesion on parents' racial socialization may differ for boys and girls because parents socialize adolescents about race differently based on expected encounters with racial discrimination. Therefore, the current study examines how parents' perception of neighborhood cohesion and adolescents' gender moderate associations between parents' racial discrimination experiences and the racial socialization messages they deliver to their adolescents. Participants were a community sample of 608 African American adolescents (54 % girls; mean age = 15.5) and their primary caregivers (86 % biological mothers; mean age = 42.0). Structural equation modeling indicated that parental racial discrimination was associated with more promotion of mistrust messages for boys and girls in communities with low neighborhood cohesion. In addition, parental racial discrimination was associated with more cultural socialization messages about racial pride and history for boys in neighborhoods with low neighborhood cohesion. The findings suggest that parents' racial socialization messages are influenced by their own racial discrimination experiences and the cohesiveness of the neighborhood; furthermore, the content of parental messages delivered varies based on adolescents' gender.

  5. The Impact of African American Parents’ Racial Discrimination Experiences and Perceived Neighborhood Cohesion on their Racial Socialization Practices

    PubMed Central

    English, Devin; Busby, Danielle R.; Lambert, Sharon F.; Harrison, Aubrey; Stock, Michelle L.; Gibbons, Frederick X.

    2016-01-01

    Parental racial socialization is a parenting tool used to prepare African American adolescents for managing racial stressors. While it is known that parents’ racial discrimination experiences affect the racial socialization messages they provide, little is known about the influence of factors that promote supportive and communal parenting, such as perceived neighborhood cohesion. In cohesive neighborhoods, neighbors may help parents address racial discrimination by monitoring youth and conveying racial socialization messages; additionally, the effect of neighborhood cohesion on parents’ racial socialization may differ for boys and girls because parents socialize adolescents about race differently based on expected encounters with racial discrimination. Therefore, the current study examines how parents’ perception of neighborhood cohesion and adolescents’ gender moderate associations between parents’ racial discrimination experiences and the racial socialization messages they deliver to their adolescents. Participants were a community sample of 608 African American adolescents (54 % girls; mean age = 15.5) and their primary caregivers (86 % biological mothers; mean age = 42.0). Structural equation modeling indicated that parental racial discrimination was associated with more promotion of mistrust messages for boys and girls in communities with low neighborhood cohesion. In addition, parental racial discrimination was associated with more cultural socialization messages about racial pride and history for boys in neighborhoods with low neighborhood cohesion. The findings suggest that parents’ racial socialization messages are influenced by their own racial discrimination experiences and the cohesiveness of the neighborhood; furthermore, the content of parental messages delivered varies based on adolescents’ gender. PMID:27189721

  6. Crustal structure of the SW-Moroccan margin from wide-angle and reflection seismic data (the DAKHLA experiment) Part A: Wide-angle seismic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingelhoefer, F.; Labails, C.; Cosquer, E.; Rouzo, S.; Géli, L.; Aslanian, D.; Olivet, J.-L.; Sahabi, M.; Nouzé, H.; Unternehr, P.

    2009-04-01

    A total 1500 km of seismic reflection and wide-angle profiles were acquired off the southern Moroccan margin during the DAKHLA cruise, a joint project of Ifremer, the Universities of Brest, El Jadida and Lisbon and Total. The shots along two profiles parallel to the margin and two profiles perpendicular to the margin were also recorded by ocean bottom seismometers (OBS). The profiles perpendicular to the margin were additionally extended on land using 14 stations on the northern profile and 11 stations on the southern profile. Modelling of the reflection and wide-angle seismic data reveals a 10 km deep sedimentary basin including two high velocity carbonate layers. Lateral crustal thinning is observed from a 27 km thick crystalline continental crust to a 7 km thick oceanic crust occurring over less than 100 km. The crystalline continental crust can be divided into two distinct layers of 12 and 15 km thickness. The oceanic crust east of the magnetic anomaly M25 displays higher velocities in layer 3 than west of the magnetic anomaly. The change in seismic velocity suggests a possible link to changes in accretionary processes of the oceanic crust. Some regions show seismic velocities between 6.8 and 7.4 km/s which could be explained by slightly elevated mantle temperatures during accretion of the crust.

  7. An in-situ stimulation experiment in crystalline rock - assessment of induced seismicity levels during stimulation and related hazard for nearby infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gischig, Valentin; Broccardo, Marco; Amann, Florian; Jalali, Mohammadreza; Esposito, Simona; Krietsch, Hannes; Doetsch, Joseph; Madonna, Claudio; Wiemer, Stefan; Loew, Simon; Giardini, Domenico

    2016-04-01

    A decameter in-situ stimulation experiment is currently being performed at the Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland by the Swiss Competence Center for Energy Research - Supply of Electricity (SCCER-SoE). The underground research laboratory lies in crystalline rock at a depth of 480 m, and exhibits well-documented geology that is presenting some analogies with the crystalline basement targeted for the exploitation of deep geothermal energy resources in Switzerland. The goal is to perform a series of stimulation experiments spanning from hydraulic fracturing to controlled fault-slip experiments in an experimental volume approximately 30 m in diameter. The experiments will contribute to a better understanding of hydro-mechanical phenomena and induced seismicity associated with high-pressure fluid injections. Comprehensive monitoring during stimulation will include observation of injection rate and pressure, pressure propagation in the reservoir, permeability enhancement, 3D dislocation along the faults, rock mass deformation near the fault zone, as well as micro-seismicity. The experimental volume is surrounded by other in-situ experiments (at 50 to 500 m distance) and by infrastructure of the local hydropower company (at ~100 m to several kilometres distance). Although it is generally agreed among stakeholders related to the experiments that levels of induced seismicity may be low given the small total injection volumes of less than 1 m3, detailed analysis of the potential impact of the stimulation on other experiments and surrounding infrastructure is essential to ensure operational safety. In this contribution, we present a procedure how induced seismic hazard can be estimated for an experimental situation that is untypical for injection-induced seismicity in terms of injection volumes, injection depths and proximity to affected objects. Both, deterministic and probabilistic methods are employed to estimate that maximum possible and the maximum expected induced

  8. The experience of the Antarctic Seismic Data Library System (SDLS) as a hub for researchers in antarctic crustal studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diviacco, Paolo; Wardell, Nigel

    2010-05-01

    The SDLS was created in April 1991 under the auspices of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research to provide open access to Antarctic multichannel seismic-reflection data (MCS) for use in cooperative research projects. The SDLS operates under the mandates of the Antarctic Treaty System, by which all institutions that collect MCS data in Antarctica must submit their MCS data to the SDLS. The SDLS has library branches worldwide at which researchers may view and study the MCS data. MCS data are submitted to the SDLS within 4 years of collection and remain in the library under SDLS guidelines until 8 years after collection. Thereafter, the data go to World Data Centers or equivalents for unrestricted use. The SDLS offers a clearing house, based at Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale (OGS) where data are processed when needed and georeferenced, so that the end user can be provided with usable, although basic, post-stack seismic sections. Re-processing of data is beyond the scope of the SDLS, so that if a researcher is interested in reviewing pre-stack data he/she must resort to the data owner. So far 228,000 km of seismic data have been made public in all sectors of the Antarctic region. To augment the concept of physical repositories where data can be accessed by researchers travelling to one of the branches or from where data could be copied to digital media and sent to users, in 2003 it was decided to develop a web interface where data could be searched for and accessed directly. At that moment no previous non-commercial experience was available in this data field, so that the system was designed from scratch. Several technologies were introduced, tested, and after a period of use, reviewed and tuned. Particular attention was devoted to the seismic data viewing facility, which was tailored to the needs of a community with specific practices and legacies. Seismic data are sensitive data that are very important for the E&P industry, so

  9. Wide-Angle Seismic Experiment Across the Oeste Fault Zone, Central Andes, Northern Chile.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo, J. M.; Yáñez, G. A.; Vera, E. E.; Sepúlveda, J.

    2008-12-01

    From December 6-21, 2007, we conducted a 3-component, radio-telemetric, seismic survey along a ~ 15-km wide E-W transect in the Central Andes, at a latitude of ~ 22.41° S, centered north of the city of Calama (68.9° W), Chile. The study area is sandwiched between the Central Depression in the west and the Andean Western Cordillera of Chile. Recording stations, nominally spaced at intervals of either 125 or 250 m collected up to 3.5 s of refracted seismic arrivals at maximum source-receiver offsets exceeding 15 km. Ten shothole sources, spaced 2-6 km apart focused energy on the shallow (0-3 km), crustal, Paleogene-age structures. Preliminary, tomographic inversions of refracted first arrivals show the top of a shallow (< 1km), high- velocity (VP, ~5 km/s) crust, deepening sharply eastward to at least 2 km. At the surface, this central basement step correlates to a regionally extensive (> 600 km), strike-slip fault zone known as the Oeste fault. Turning ray densities suggest the base of the overlying velocity gradient unit (VP, 2-4 km/s) dips inwardly from both east and west directions toward the Oeste fault to depths of almost 1 km. Plate reorganization commencing at least by the latter half of the Oligocene led from oblique to more orthogonal convergence between the South American and the Nazca (Farallon) Plates. We interpret previously mapped, older, minor faults as being generated within the right-lateral, orogen-parallel, Oeste strike-slip fault zone, and postdated by Neogene, N-S striking thrust faults. In this context we also interpret that the spatial distribution of velocity units requires an period of extensional activity that may (1) postdate the transpressional strike slip fault activity of the Neogene, (2) be related to a later releasing bend through the translation and interaction of rigid blocks hidden at depth or even (3) be the consequence of inelastic failure from the result of flexural loading.

  10. Seismic velocity structure and spatial distribution of reflection intensity off the Boso Peninsula, Central Japan, revealed by an ocean bottom seismographic experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Akihiro; Sato, Toshinori; Shinohara, Masanao; Mochizuki, Kimihiro; Yamada, Tomoaki; Uehira, Kenji; Shinbo, Takashi; Machida, Yuuya; Hino, Ryota; Azuma, Ryosuke

    2016-04-01

    Off the Boso Peninsula, central Japan, where the Sagami Trough is in the south and the Japan Trench is in the east, there is a triple junction where the Pacific plate (PAC), the Philippine Sea plate (PHS) and the Honshu island arc (HIA) meet each other. In this region, the PAC subducts beneath the PHS and the HIA, and the PHS subducts beneath the HIA. Due to the subduction of 2 oceanic plates, numerous seismic events took place in the past. In order to understand these events, it is important to image structure of these plates. Hence, many researchers attempted to reveal the substructure from natural earthquakes and seismic experiments. Because most of the seismometers are placed inland area and the regular seismicity off Boso is inactive, it is difficult to reveal the precise substructure off Boso area using only natural earthquakes. Although several marine seismic experiments using active sources were conducted, vast area remains unclear off Boso Peninsula. In order to improve the situation, a marine seismic experiment, using airgun as an active source, was conducted from 30th July to 4th of August, 2009. The survey line has 216 km length and 20 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBSs) were placed on it. We estimated 2-D P-wave velocity structure from the airgun data using the PMDM (Progressive Model Development Method; Sato and Kenett, 2000) and the FAST (First Arrival Seismic Tomography ; Zelt and Barton, 1998). Furthermore, we identified the probable reflection phases from the data and estimated the location of reflectors using Travel time mapping method (Fujie et al. 2006). We found some reflection phases from the data, and the reflectors are located near the region where P-wave velocity is 5.0 km/s. We interpret that the reflectors indicate the plate boundary between the PHS and the HIA. The variation of the intensity of reflection along the upper surface of PHS seems to be consistent with the result from previous reflection seismic experiment conducted by Kimura et

  11. THE CHALLENGES OF SCHOOL-BASED YOUTH SUICIDE PREVENTION: EXPERIENCES AND PERCEPTIONS OF MENTAL HEALTH PROFESSIONALS IN SOUTH AFRICAN SCHOOLS

    PubMed Central

    Woolf, Maryke; Bantjes, Jason; Kagee, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Youth suicidal behaviour poses a significant public health concern. Mental health care professionals working in schools have an important role to play in youth suicide prevention initiatives, although little is known of the experiences of this group of professionals in the developing world. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of mental health professionals working in South African schools and document their insights, attitudes and beliefs regarding youth suicidal behaviour. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with seven school-based mental health care professionals and data were analysed using Thematic Analysis. Participants reported that they relied on a reactive strategy by responding to youths who were in crisis. They were challenged by a lack of support from faculty staff, lack of access to resources, and heavy caseloads. Findings highlight the need for a proactive and collaborative approach to suicide prevention among mental health care professionals, teachers and parents in South African schools and improved training and supervision. PMID:27990493

  12. When Failing Doesn't Matter: A Narrative Inquiry into the Social Work Practice Learning Experiences of Black African Students in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tedam, Prospera

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a small-scale empirical study into the practice learning experiences of black African students of social work in England. Undertaken in the form of a pilot study, the findings reveal that practice learning experiences can be beneficial in enhancing skills and knowledge but can also cause distress, lower…

  13. School Characteristics and Experiences of African American, Hispanic/Latino, and Native American Youth in Rural Communities: Relation to Educational Aspirations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvin, Matthew J.; Byun, Soo-yong; Meece, Judith L.; Reed, Karla S.; Farmer, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine differences in the school characteristics and experiences of African American, Hispanic/Latino, and Native American youth in rural high schools as well as their relation to educational aspirations. We also investigated the characteristics and experiences of students and their families given that…

  14. Seismic hazard assessment of the Kivu rift segment based on a new sismo-tectonic zonation model (Western Branch of the East African Rift system)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havenith, Hans-Balder; Delvaux, Damien

    2015-04-01

    In the frame of the Belgian GeoRisCA multi-risk assessment project focused on the Kivu and Northern Tanganyika Region, a seismic hazard map has been produced for this area. It is based on a on a recently re-compiled catalogue using various local and global earthquake catalogues. The use of macroseismic epicenters determined from felt earthquakes allowed to extend the time-range back to the beginning of the 20th century, thus spanning about 100 years. The magnitudes have been homogenized to Mw and the coherence of the catalogue has been checked and validated. The seismo-tectonic zonation includes 10 seismic source areas that have been defined on the basis of the regional geological structure, neotectonic fault systems, basin architecture and distribution of earthquake epicenters. The seismic catalogue was filtered by removing obvious aftershocks and Gutenberg-Richter Laws were determined for each zone. On the basis of this seismo-tectonic information and existing attenuation laws that had been established by Twesigomwe (1997) and Mavonga et al. (2007) for this area, seismic hazard has been computed with the Crisis 2012 (Ordaz et al., 2012) software. The outputs of this assessment clearly show higher PGA values (for 475 years return period) along the Rift than the previous estimates by Twesigomwe (1997) and Mavonga (2007) while the same attenuation laws had been used. The main reason for these higher PGA values is likely to be related to the more detailed zonation of the Rift structure marked by a strong gradient of the seismicity from outside the rift zone to the inside. Mavonga, T. (2007). An estimate of the attenuation relationship for the strong ground motion in the Kivu Province, Western Rift Valley of Africa. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 62, 13-21. Ordaz M, Martinelli F, Aguilar A, Arboleda J, Meletti C, D'Amico V. (2012). CRISIS 2012, Program for computing seismic hazard. Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de M

  15. The Grenville Front Tectonic Zone: Results from the 1986 Great Lakes Onshore Seismic Wide-Angle Reflection and Refraction Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epili, Duryodhan; Mereu, Robert F.

    1991-09-01

    The Grenville Front, which marks the orogenic boundary between the Archean Superior Structural Province and the much younger Grenville Province to the southeast, is one of the major tectonic features of the Canadian Shield. Within Canada, it is approximately 1900 km in length extending from the north shore of Lake Huron across Ontario and Quebec to Labrador. In 1986, a major coincident onship near-vertical reflection and onshore wide-angle reflection/refraction experiment (GLIMPCE-Great Lakes International Multidisciplinary Program on Crustal Evolution) was conducted along a series of lines across the Great lakes. One of the lines, line J, ran across Georgian Bay and Lake Huron for a distance of 350 km and crossed the Grenville Front Tectonic Zone (GFTZ). The seismic signals from the air gun array source were well recorded by the onshore stations up to distances of 250 km with a seismic trace spacing of 50-62.5 m. The GFTZ had a profound effect on the nature of the reflector patterns observed on the onshore seismic sections. Data recorded by the stations on the east end of the line indicate that the crustal P phases are very complex and form a "shinglelike" pattern of reflected waves. Data recorded by stations at the center and at the western end of the line show that the Pg phases are normal and lack the shinglelike appearance. This character of arrivals was also observed on the corresponding S wave sections. A combined P and S wave forward modeling analysis shows that the GFTZ is composed of bands of reflectors dipping at angles of 20°-35° extending to the lower crust. These reflectors were also well imaged on the coincident near-vertical reflection data. Reflectors under the Britt domain to the east of the GFTZ have a shallower dip than those along the zone. The structure of the crust under the Manitoulin terrane to the west of the GFTZ is laterally homogeneous with a major intracrustal reflector at a depth of 17-20 km below the surface. Poisson's ratio is

  16. Amplitude and phase normalization of seismograms from multiple seismograph recording systems for the Yellowstone-Snake River Plain seismic refraction experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, M.R.; Braile, L.W.; Smith, R.B.

    1982-04-10

    A z transform filter theory method for the normalization of the instrument responses of several seismographs is presented. In this method, an inverse filter is derived by consideration of the seismometer/recorder characteristics which may be applied to a given seismogram to convert the system frequency response to that of a reference system. Inverse filters are derived for the seismographs used on the 1978 Yellowstone-Snake River Plain seismic profiling experiment. It is shown by application to these data that the inverse filters are effective in amplitude normalization and that their use allows improvement in the amplitude and waveform character of seismic record sections.

  17. Lithospheric structure beneath Central Europe from the POLONAISE'97, CELEBRATION 2000, ALP 2002, and SUDETES 2003 seismic refraction experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guterch, A.; Grad, M.; Keller, G. R.

    2005-12-01

    Beginning in 1997, Central Europe between the Baltic and Adriatic Seas, has been covered by an unprecedented network of seismic refraction experiments POLONAISE'97, CELEBRATION 2000, ALP 2002, and SUDETES 2003, have only been possible due to a massive international consortium consisted of more than 30 institutions from 16 countries in Europe and North America. The majority of recording instruments was provided by the IRIS/PASSCAL Instrument Center and the University of Texas at El Paso (USA), and several other countries also provided instrumentation. Total length of seismic profiles in all experiments is about 20,000 km. The main results of these experiments are: 1) the delineation of the deep structure of the southwestern margin of the East European Craton (southern Baltica) and its relationship to younger terranes; delineation of the major terranes and crustal blocks in the Trans European Suture Zone; determination of the structural framework of the Pannonian basin; elucidation of the deep structure and evolution of the Western Carpathian Mountains and Eastern Alps; determination of the structural relationships between the structural elements of the Bohemian massif and adjacent features; construction of 3-D models of the lithospheric structure; and evaluation and develop geodynamic models for the tectonic evolution of the region. Experiment Working Groups Members: K. Aric, M. Behm, E. Brueckl, W. Chwatal, H. Grassl, S. Hock, V. Hoeck, F. Kohlbeck, E.-M. Rumpfhuber, Ch. Schmid, R. Schmoller, C. Tomek, Ch. Ullrich, F.Weber (Austria), A.A. Belinsky (Belarus), I. Asudeh, R. Clowes, Z. Hajnal (Canada), F. Sumanova (Croatia), M. Broz , P. Hrubcova, M. Korn, O. Karousova, J. Malek, A. Spicak (Czech Republic), S.L. Jensen, P. Joergensen, H. Thybo (Denmark), K. Komminaho, U. Luosto, T. Tiira, J. Yliniemi (Finland), F. Bleibinhaus, R. Brinkmann, B. Forkmann, H. Gebrande, H. Geissler, A. Hemmann, G. Jentzsch, D. Kracke, A. Schulze, K. Schuster (Germany), T. Bodoky, T

  18. Experiences and effects of psychiatric stigma: Monologues of the stigmatizers and the stigmatized in an African setting

    PubMed Central

    Egbe, Catherine O.

    2015-01-01

    People with mental illness (PWMI) are faced with a number of social and health-related challenges especially stigma and discrimination which tend to have negative effects on their lives. This paper presents narrative monologues portraying the experiences and effects of psychiatric stigma and discrimination on PWMI in South Africa. These narratives voice out the concerns of the stigmatizers (specifically family members and significant others of PWMI) and the stigmatized in a poetic fashion. The society is still not very sympathetic to the plights of PWMI and this affects their general health and well-being. Traditional beliefs and prejudice still drive public attitude towards PWMI especially in African settings. These narratives presented in a poetic fashion in this paper highlight some salient issues relating to the experience and effects of stigma and the desires of PWMI to be treated with love and respect and helped to lead healthy normal lives. PMID:26088367

  19. Masculinity and the body: how African American and White men experience cancer screening exams involving the rectum.

    PubMed

    Winterich, Julie A; Quandt, Sara A; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Clark, Peter E; Miller, David P; Acuña, Joshua; Arcury, Thomas A

    2009-12-01

    Past research on prostate and colorectal cancer disparities finds that barriers to screening, such as embarrassment and offensiveness, are often reported. Yet none of this literature investigates why. This study uses masculinity and health theory to examine how men experience two common screenings: digital rectal exams (DREs) and colonoscopies. In-depth interviews were conducted with 64 African American and White men from diverse backgrounds, aged 40 to 64, from North Carolina. Regardless of race or education, men experienced DREs more negatively than colonoscopies because penetration with a finger was associated with a gay sexual act. Some men disliked colonoscopies, however, because they associated any penetration as an affront to their masculinity. Because beliefs did not differ by race, future research should focus on structural issues to examine why disparities persist with prostate and colorectal cancer. Recommendations are provided for educational programs and physicians to improve men's experiences with exams that involve the rectum.

  20. Sub-Saharan African ground water protection-building on international experience.

    PubMed

    Kreamer, David K; Usher, Brent

    2010-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa faces significant challenges in dealing with ground water pollution. These countries can look to successes and missteps on other continents to help choose their own individual paths to ensuring reliable and clean supplies of ground water. In the large view, sub-Saharan Africa can define specific levels of acceptable risk in water quality that drive cleanup efforts and are amenable to acceptance across national and geographic boundaries. Ground water quality databases must be expanded, and data must be available in an electronic form that is flexible, expandable, and uniform, and that can be used over wide geographic areas. Guidance from other continents is available on well construction, sampling and monitoring, interim remediation, technical impracticability, monitored natural attenuation, and many specific issues such as how to deal with small waste generators and septic contamination of water supply wells. It is important to establish a common African view on the appropriateness of other nations' ground water quality guidance for African issues, economic conditions, and community circumstances. Establishing numerical, concentration-based, water quality action levels for pollutants in ground water, which many neighboring African nations could hold comparable, would set the stage for risk-based remediation of contaminated sites. Efforts to gain public, grass-roots understanding and support for stable and balanced enforcement of standards are also key. Finally, effective capacity building in the region could be an eventual solution to ground water quality problems; with increased numbers of trained environmental professionals, ground water throughout the region can be protected and contaminated sites cleaned up.

  1. Lower crustal deformation beneath the central Transverse Ranges, southern California: Results from the Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godfrey, N.J.; Fuis, G.S.; Langenheim, V.; Okaya, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    We present a P wave velocity model derived from active source seismic data collected during the 1994 Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment. Our model extends previously published upper crustal velocity models to mantle depths. Our model was developed by both ray tracing through a layered model and calculating travel times through a gridded model. It includes an 8-km-thick crustal root centered beneath the surface trace of the San Andreas fault, north of the highest topography in the San Gabriel Mountains. A simple mass balance calculation suggests that ???36 km of north-south shortening across the San Andreas fault in the central Transverse Ranges could have formed this root. If north-south compression began when the "Big Bend" in the San Andreas fault formed at ???5 Ma, 36 km of shortening implies a north-south contraction rate of ???7.1 mm/yr across the central Transverse Ranges. If, instead, north-south compression began when the Transverse Ranges formed at 3.4-3.9 Ma, 36 km of shortening implies a contraction rate of 9.2-10.6 mm/yr. North of the San Andreas fault, the Mojave Desert crust has a low-velocity (6.3 km/s) mid and lower crust and a 28-km-deep Moho. South of the San Andreas fault, beneath the Los Angeles and San Gabriel Valley basins, there is a fast (6.6-6.8 km/s), thick (10-12 km) lower crust with a 27-km-deep Moho. Farther south still, the lower crust of the Continental Borderland is fast (6.6-6.8 km/s) and thin (5 km) with a shallow (22 km deep) Moho.

  2. Drawing the line: how African, Caribbean and White British women live out psychologically abusive experiences.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Carol; Kelly, Moira; Feder, Gene

    2013-09-01

    This study explores how African, Caribbean and White British women worked to hide psychological partner abuse as they experienced it, "do gender," and appear competent in social roles. They prioritized negotiated competencies as "good partners," actively setting socially and culturally embedded boundaries to their abuser's behaviors: an inner boundary encompassing normal behaviors and an outer one of "acceptable" behaviors projected as normal through remedial work. Behaviors breaching the outer boundary (e.g., if the women narrowed the bounds of the "acceptable") compromised the women's competence. This sometimes led them to actively use support services. Appropriate advice and support may change the boundaries.

  3. The association between disaster-related experiences and mental health outcomes among drug using African American Hurricane Katrina evacuees.

    PubMed

    Cepeda, Alice; Saint Onge, Jarron M; Kaplan, Charles; Valdez, Avelardo

    2010-12-01

    This article provides a detailed examination of the relationship between disaster-related experiences and mental health outcomes among a sample of drug using African American Hurricane Katrina evacuees. Face-to-face structured interviews were administered to Hurricane Katrina evacuees (n = 350) residing in voucher assisted apartment complexes in Houston, Texas (2006-2007). We use Ordinary Least Squares and logistic regression models to examine both the relevance of disaster-related experiences and the interactive relationships between disaster-related experiences and post-disaster mental health outcomes including psychological distress, severe depression, somatic symptoms, and posttraumatic stress disorder. Results indicate that disaster-related experiences including negative life changes, disaster exposure, post-disaster stressors, and resource loss, have unique, inverse relationships with mental health. While resource loss has the strongest inverse relationship with mental health, disaster exposure has a negative interactive effect on psychological distress and anxiety. Although highly vulnerable populations report low levels of mental health nearly 2 years following a disaster experience, there is a convergence in mental health outcomes with high levels of disaster experiences and disaster exposure that suggests mental resiliency.

  4. Crustal Structure, Seismic Anisotropy and Deformations of the Ediacaran/Cambrian of the Małopolska Block in SE Poland Based on Data from Two Seismic Wide-Angle Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Środa, Piotr

    2017-03-01

    The area of SE Poland represents a complex contact of tectonic units of different consolidation age—from the Precambrian East European Craton, through Palaeozoic West European Platform (including Małopolska Block) to Cenozoic Carpathians and Carpathian Foredeep. In order to investigate the anisotropic properties of the upper crust of the Małopolska Block and their relation to tectonic evolution of the area, two seismic datasets were used: seismic wide-angle off-line recordings from POLCRUST-01 deep seismic reflection profile and recordings from active deep seismic experiment CELEBRATION 2000. During acquisition of deep reflection seismic profile POLCRUST-01 in 2010, a 35-km-long line of 14 recorders (PA-14), oriented perpendicularly to the profile, was deployed to record the refractions from the upper crust (Pg) at wide range of azimuths. These data were used for an analysis of the azimuthal anisotropy of the MB with the modified delay-time inversion method. The results of modelling of the off-line refractions from the MB suggest 6% HTI anisotropy of the Cambrian/Ediacaran basement, with 130º azimuth of the fast velocity axis and mean Vp of 4.9 km/s. To compare this result with previous, independent information about anisotropy at larger depth, a subset of previously modelled data from CELEBRATION 2000 experiment, recorded in the MB area, was also analysed by inversion. The recordings of Pg phase at up to 120 km offsets were analysed using anisotropic delay-time inversion, providing information down to 12 km depth. The CELEBRATION 2000 model shows 9% HTI anisotropy with 126º orientation of the fast axis. Thus, local-scale anisotropy of this part of MB confirms the large-scale anisotropy suggested by previous studies based on data from a broader area and larger depth interval. The azimuthal anisotropy (i.e. HTI symmetry of the medium) is interpreted as a result of strong compressional deformation during the accretion of terranes to the EEC margin, leading to

  5. "Are You Sure You Know What You Are Doing?"--The Lived Experiences of an African American Male Kindergarten Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Nathaniel; Browder, Jamison K.

    2013-01-01

    As of 2012, data indicate that only one percent of public school teachers are African American males. Numerous reports urge decision makers and higher education professionals to aggressively recruit and retain African American males as teachers in an effort to improve the academic outcomes of African American children in our educational system…

  6. Results from the latest SN-4 multi-parametric benthic observatory experiment (MARsite EU project) in the Gulf of Izmit, Turkey: oceanographic, chemical and seismic monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embriaco, Davide; Marinaro, Giuditta; Frugoni, Francesco; Giovanetti, Gabriele; Monna, Stephen; Etiope, Giuseppe; Gasperini, Luca; Çağatay, Namık; Favali, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    An autonomous and long-term multiparametric benthic observatory (SN-4) was designed to study gas seepage and seismic energy release along the submerged segment of the North Anatolian Fault (NAF). Episodic gas seepage occurs at the seafloor in the Gulf of Izmit (Sea of Marmara, NW Turkey) along this submerged segment of the NAF, which ruptured during the 1999 Mw7.4 Izmit earthquake. The SN-4 observatory already operated in the Gulf of Izmit at the western end of the 1999 Izmit earthquake rupture for about one-year at 166 m water depth during the 2009-2010 experiment (EGU2014-13412-1, EGU General Assembly 2014). SN-4 was re-deployed in the same site for a new long term mission (September 2013 - April 2014) in the framework of MARsite (New Directions in Seismic Hazard assessment through Focused Earth Observation in the Marmara Supersite, http://marsite.eu/ ) EC project, which aims at evaluating seismic risk and managing of long-term monitoring activities in the Marmara Sea. A main scientific objective of the SN-4 experiment is to investigate the possible correlations between seafloor methane seepage and release of seismic energy. We used the same site of the 2009-2010 campaign to verify both the occurrence of previously observed phenomena and the reliability of results obtained in the previous experiment (Embriaco et al., 2014, doi:10.1093/gji/ggt436). In particular, we are interested in the detection of gas release at the seafloor, in the role played by oceanographic phenomena in this detection, and in the association of gas and seismic energy release. The scientific payload included, among other instruments, a three-component broad-band seismometer, and gas and oceanographic sensors. We present a technical description of the observatory, including the data acquisition and control system, results from the preliminary analysis of this new multidisciplinary data set, and a comparison with the previous experiment.

  7. "She Told Them, Oh That Bitch Got AIDS": Experiences of Multilevel HIV/AIDS-Related Stigma Among African American Women Living with HIV/AIDS in the South.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Faith; Ingram, Lucy Annang; Kerr, Jelani; Buchberg, Meredith; Bogdan-Lovis, Libby; Philpott-Jones, Sean

    2016-07-01

    African American women bear a disproportionate burden of HIV/AIDS in the United States. Although they constitute only 13% of the US population, African Americans account for nearly 65% of all new HIV infections among American women. In addition, this population suffers comparatively greater adverse health outcomes related to HIV status. African American women living with HIV in the South may be further burdened by HIV/AIDS stigma, which is comparatively more pronounced in this region. To further explore this burden, we used narrative data and the Social Ecological Model to explore how African American women living with HIV in the US South recount, conceptualize, and cope with HIV/AIDS stigma at interpersonal, community, and institutional levels. Our narrative analysis suggests that HIV-positive African American women living in the South are vulnerable to experiences of multilevel HIV stigma in various settings and contexts across multiple domains of life. Stigma subsequently complicated disclosure decisions and made it difficult for women to feel supported in particular social, professional and medical settings that are generally regarded as safe spaces for noninfected individuals. Findings suggest that the debilitating and compounded effect of multilevel HIV/AIDS stigma on HIV-positive African American women in the South warrants closer examination to tailor approaches that effectively address the unique needs of this population.

  8. How astronauts would conduct a seismic experiment on the planet Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletser, V.; Lognonne, P.; Dehant, V.

    During the Summer 2001 Flashline Mars Arctic Research Station (M.A.R.S.) campaign in Devon Island, Nunavut, Canada, the crew of the second rotation conducted a geophysics experiment aiming at assessing the feasibility of an active seismology method to detect subsurface water on Mars. A crew of three deployed a line of 24 sensors. Reflected and refracted signals produced by mini-quakes generated by a sledge hammer were recorded by a seismograph. The experiment was conducted three times, once in a dry run and twice during simulated Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) on the edge of the Haughton crater, allowing a three dimensional characterization of the subsurface ground to a depth of several hundred meters. Data were recorded for later detailed processing. A third EVA attempt inside the crater had to be aborted because of the poor weather and terrain conditions. Despite this failed attempt, a large amount of results were collected. Several operational lessons were learned from conducting this experiment under simulated EVA conditions. This paper presents the experiment and the methodology used, reviews the experiment performance and summarizes the results obtained and the operational lessons learned.

  9. West African monsoon decadal variability and surface-related forcings: second West African Monsoon Modeling and Evaluation Project Experiment (WAMME II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yongkang; De Sales, Fernando; Lau, William K.-M.; Boone, Aaron; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Mechoso, Carlos R.; Wang, Guiling; Kucharski, Fred; Schiro, Kathleen; Hosaka, Masahiro; Li, Suosuo; Druyan, Leonard M.; Sanda, Ibrah Seidou; Thiaw, Wassila; Zeng, Ning; Comer, Ruth E.; Lim, Young-Kwon; Mahanama, Sarith; Song, Guoqiong; Gu, Yu; Hagos, Samson M.; Chin, Mian; Schubert, Siegfried; Dirmeyer, Paul; Ruby Leung, L.; Kalnay, Eugenia; Kitoh, Akio; Lu, Cheng-Hsuan; Mahowald, Natalie M.; Zhang, Zhengqiu

    2016-12-01

    The second West African Monsoon Modeling and Evaluation Project Experiment (WAMME II) is designed to improve understanding of the possible roles and feedbacks of sea surface temperature (SST), land use land cover change (LULCC), and aerosols forcings in the Sahel climate system at seasonal to decadal scales. The project's strategy is to apply prescribed observationally based anomaly forcing, i.e., "idealized but realistic" forcing, in simulations by climate models. The goal is to assess these forcings' effects in producing/amplifying seasonal and decadal climate variability in the Sahel between the 1950s and the 1980s, which is selected to characterize the great drought period of the last century. This is the first multi-model experiment specifically designed to simultaneously evaluate such relative contributions. The WAMME II models have consistently demonstrated that SST forcing is a major contributor to the twentieth century Sahel drought. Under the influence of the maximum possible SST forcing, the ensemble mean of WAMME II models can produce up to 60 % of the precipitation difference during the period. The present paper also addresses the role of SSTs in triggering and maintaining the Sahel drought. In this regard, the consensus of WAMME II models is that both Indian and Pacific Ocean SSTs greatly contributed to the drought, with the former producing an anomalous displacement of the Intertropical Convergence Zone before the WAM onset, and the latter mainly contributes to the summer WAM drought. The WAMME II models also show that the impact of LULCC forcing on the Sahel climate system is weaker than that of SST forcing, but still of first order magnitude. According to the results, under LULCC forcing the ensemble mean of WAMME II models can produces about 40 % of the precipitation difference between the 1980s and the 1950s. The role of land surface processes in responding to and amplifying the drought is also identified. The results suggest that catastrophic

  10. Inorganic and carbonaceous aerosols during the Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000) experiment: Chemical characteristics, physical properties, and emission data for smoke from African biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formenti, P.; Elbert, W.; Maenhaut, W.; Haywood, J.; Osborne, S.; Andreae, M. O.

    2003-07-01

    We collected filter samples of the atmospheric aerosol during the Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000) experiment onboard the UK Met Office C-130 aircraft. The main operational area was the Atlantic Ocean offshore of Namibia and Angola, where biomass-smoke haze at least 1-2 days old was widespread. The size-fractionated aerosol samples were analyzed for the major inorganic ions, carbonaceous material (elemental and organic carbon), and elements with atomic numbers between 11 (Na) and 82 (Pb). The regional haze aerosol was composed mostly of carbonaceous aerosols (on the average, 81% of the submicron mass), with secondary inorganic aerosols (sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate) accounting for another 14%. K+ and Cl-, typical pyrogenic species, constituted only 2% of the mass. The aerosol chemical data were used to estimate mass emission fluxes for various aerosol components. For African savanna/grassland burning, the estimated emission flux of carbonaceous particles (particulate organic matter plus elemental carbon) is 14 ± 1 Tg yr-1, and that of the nitrogen species (nitrate and ammonium) is 2 ± 2 Tg yr-1. For the flight segments in regional haze, the mean particle scattering coefficient at 550 nm was σs = 101 ± 56 Mm-1 and the mean particle absorption coefficient σa at 565 nm averaged 8 ± 5 Mm-1 (mean single scattering albedo of 0.93 ± 0.06 at 550 nm). The dry mass scattering efficiency αs, calculated from the linear regression of the mean scattering versus the estimated submicron mass, is estimated to be between 4.2 ± and 4.6 ± 0.6 m2 g-1, depending on the assumptions made in calculating the aerosol mass. The dependence of the scattering enhancement ratios Δσs/ΔCO on the distance from the burning regions suggests that the evolution of particle size with time influences the light scattering efficiency. Fresh smoke was sampled during a dedicated flight in the proximity and within the plume of an active biomass burning fire. Here the

  11. African swine fever virus introduction into the EU in 2014: Experience of Latvia.

    PubMed

    Oļševskis, Edvīns; Guberti, Vittorio; Seržants, Mārtiņš; Westergaard, Jørgen; Gallardo, Carmina; Rodze, Ieva; Depner, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    African swine fever (ASF) virus was introduced in Latvia in June 2014. Thirty-two outbreaks in domestic pigs and 217 cases in wild boar were notified in 2014. Twenty-eight outbreaks (87.5%) were primary outbreaks. The contagiosity within pig herds was low. Failure to use simple biosecurity measures to reduce the chance of virus introduction, for example by inadvertent feeding of locally produced virus contaminated fodder were the main causes for the outbreaks in backyard holdings. The infection in wild boar survived locally in two different areas with a low prevalence and a slow spread. The persistence of the infection in wild boar within an area was most probably linked to wild boar scavenging the carcasses of infected wild boar.

  12. Surviving oppression under the Rock: The intersection of New York’s drug, welfare, and educational polices in the lived experiences of low-income African-Americans

    PubMed Central

    Windsor, Liliane Cambraia; Dunlap, Eloise; Armour, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on standpoint and intersectionality theories, this study explores the degree to which interactions among New York State’s Rockefeller Drug Laws, educational and welfare policies have contributed to the maintenance of a culture of surveillance in which the lives of impoverished African Americans are overseen and influenced by oppressive policies and governmental institutions. Qualitative secondary analysis of longitudinal ethnographic data was conducted. Findings demonstrate multiple disadvantages that impoverished African American families struggling with substance use and/or sale experience. These disadvantages accumulated intergenerationally, in a snowball effect making it difficult for participants to maintain stable lives. Findings explored the tension between participants’ experiences with oppression and the multiple ways they either assimilated or resisted their oppression. New sensitive policies informed by standpoint, intersectionality, and Afrocentric perspectives must be developed to increase the availability of meaningful employment and strengthening impoverished African American communities. PMID:23216440

  13. Sexual victimization among African American adolescent females: examination of the reliability and validity of the Sexual Experiences Survey.

    PubMed

    Cecil, Heather; Matson, Steven C

    2006-01-01

    Adolescent females are disproportionately represented among reported cases of sexual victimization. Because sexual victimization is associated with an array of negative sequelae (e.g., depression, alcohol abuse), psychometrically sound instruments are urgently needed to assess sexual victimization or coercion. The investigation conducts a preliminary analysis of the reliability and validity of the Sexual Experiences Survey (SES) for a sample drawn from a high-risk population-African American adolescent females. Our analyses indicate good internal consistency for the SES with this sample. Convergent validity is demonstrated. Specifically, scores on the SES are associated with significantly lower levels of self-esteem and mastery, higher levels of depression, lower levels of family cohesion, higher levels of family conflict, and higher levels of using alcohol and being a smoker. Preliminary support for discriminant validity is also obtained. This study is a stepping stone for future investigations into the psychometric evaluation of the SES.

  14. Traditional healing, biomedicine and the treatment of HIV/AIDS: contrasting south african and native American experiences.

    PubMed

    Flint, Adrian

    2015-04-20

    Traditional healing remains an important aspect of many people's engagement with healthcare and, in this, responses to the treatment of HIV/AIDS are no different. However, given the gravity of the global HIV/AIDS pandemic, there has been much debate as to the value of traditional healing in this respect. Accordingly, this paper explores the extent to which meaningful accommodation between the biomedical and traditional sectors is possible (and/or even desirable). It does this through a consideration of Native American and South African experiences, looking at how the respective groups, in which medical pluralism is common, have addressed the issue of HIV/AIDS. The paper points to the importance of developing "culturally appropriate" forms of treatment that emphasise complementary rather than adversarial engagement between the traditional and biomedical systems and how policymakers can best facilitate this.

  15. Enduring consequences of early experiences: 40 year effects on survival and success among African elephants (Loxodonta africana).

    PubMed

    Lee, Phyllis C; Bussière, Luc F; Webber, C Elizabeth; Poole, Joyce H; Moss, Cynthia J

    2013-04-23

    Growth from conception to reproductive onset in African elephants (Loxodonta africana) provides insights into phenotypic plasticity, individual adaptive plastic responses and facultative maternal investment. Using growth for 867 and life histories for 2652 elephants over 40 years, we demonstrate that maternal inexperience plus drought in early life result in reduced growth rates for sons and higher mortality for both sexes. Slow growth during early lactation was associated with smaller adult size, later age at first reproduction, reduced lifetime survival and consequently limited reproductive output. These enduring effects of trading slow early growth against immediate survival were apparent over the very long term; delayed downstream consequences were unexpected for a species with a maximum longevity of 70+ years and unpredictable environmental experiences.

  16. Traditional Healing, Biomedicine and the Treatment of HIV/AIDS: Contrasting South African and Native American Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Flint, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Traditional healing remains an important aspect of many people’s engagement with healthcare and, in this, responses to the treatment of HIV/AIDS are no different. However, given the gravity of the global HIV/AIDS pandemic, there has been much debate as to the value of traditional healing in this respect. Accordingly, this paper explores the extent to which meaningful accommodation between the biomedical and traditional sectors is possible (and/or even desirable). It does this through a consideration of Native American and South African experiences, looking at how the respective groups, in which medical pluralism is common, have addressed the issue of HIV/AIDS. The paper points to the importance of developing “culturally appropriate” forms of treatment that emphasise complementary rather than adversarial engagement between the traditional and biomedical systems and how policymakers can best facilitate this. PMID:25903057

  17. An integrated petrophysical approach to the sub-basalt imaging problem using well logging data to link measurements from cores and seismic experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagstein, R.; Boldreel, L. O.; Andersen, C.

    2003-04-01

    Flood basalt covered basins exist world wide along continental margins and are increasingly coming into the focus of the hydrocarbon industry as more accessible fields are being depleted. However, it has proved difficult in many places to look through the basalt cover by conventional seismic reflection methods. This stresses the need for a better understanding of the acoustic properties of basalt. The Seismic Faroes Basalt Project (SeiFaBa) was established in 2002 as an integrated study of the sub-basalt image problem. It involves 9 scientific institutions and individuals and is funded collectively by all oil companies operating in the Faroes sector (the Sindri group). The planned fieldwork includes core drilling, wire-line logging, multi-azimuth VSP and surface seismic experiments at land and sea. It is mainly centred around Glyvursnes, a relatively flat promontory near Tórshavn that allows optimal layout of seismic lines and integration of core, log and seismic data. We present the initial task of drilling and logging, which was performed in Oct.-Nov. 2002. A 700 m slim borehole was drilled on the shore of Glyvursnes with wire-line coring technique and an old 660 m borehole (Vestmanna-1) 30 km farther northwest partly blocked by calcite fillings was reopened using the same equipment. An extensive wire-line logging program was subsequently run in both holes. These two holes, together with the existing 3.65-km Lopra-1/1A hole in the southernmost island Suduroy, cover all three Faroes basalt formations and a range of lava compositions and morphologies. We show examples of the correlation of lava flow sequences and wire-logging measurements. Detailed analysis of the new logs is being planned together with laboratory studies of the petrography, rock chemistry and petrophysical properties of core samples with the aim of establishing a log stratigraphy and scale core data to seismic scales.

  18. Notes on some experiments on the application of subtractive compensation to USGS seismic magnetic tape recording and playback systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eaton, Jerry P.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of these experiments is to lay the groundwork for the implementation of subtractive compensation of the USGS seismic network tape playbacks utilizing the Develco model 6203 discriminators at a x1 playback speed. Although the Develco discriminators were designed for this application and a matching Develco compensation discriminator was purchased, effective use of this system for subtractive compensation has been blocked by the inadequate (frequency dependent) matching of the phase of the compensation signal to that of the data signal at the point compensation is carried out in the data discriminators. John Van Schaack has ameliorated the phase mismatch problem by an empirical alteration of the compensation discriminator input bandpass filter. We have selected a set (of eight) Develco discriminators and adjusted their compensation signal input levels to minimize spurious signals (noise) originating from tape speed irregularities. The sensitivity of the data discriminators was adjusted so that deviations of +125 Hz and -125 Hz produced output signals of +2.00 volts and -2.00 volts, respectively. The eight data discriminators are driven by a multiplex signal on a single tape track (subcarriers 680, 1020, 1360, 1700, 2040, 2380, 2720, and 3060 Hz). The Develco-supplied compensation discriminator requires an unmodulated 3125 Hz signal on a separate tape track.

  19. Mining-Induced Stress Transfer and Its Relation to a {M}_w 1.9 Seismic Event in an Ultra-deep South African Gold Mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Moritz; Reiter, Karsten; Heidbach, Oliver; Zang, Arno; Kwiatek, Grzegorz; Stromeyer, Dietrich; Dahm, Torsten; Dresen, Georg; Hofmann, Gerhard

    2015-10-01

    On 27 December 2007, a {M}_w 1.9 seismic event occurred within a dyke in the deep-level Mponeng Gold Mine, South Africa. From the seismological network of the mine and the one from the Japanese-German Underground Acoustic Emission Research in South Africa (JAGUARS) group, the hypocentral depth (3,509 m), focal mechanism and aftershock location were estimated. Since no mining activity took place in the days before the event, dynamic triggering due to blasting can be ruled out as the cause. To investigate the hypothesis that stress transfer, due to excavation of the gold reef, induced the event, we set up a small-scale (450× 300× 310{m}^3) high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) geomechanical numerical model. The model consisted of the four different rock units present in the mine: quartzite (footwall), hard lava (hanging wall), conglomerate (gold reef) and diorite (dykes). The numerical solution was computed using a finite-element method with a discretised mesh of approximately 10^6 elements. The initial stress state of the model is in agreement with in situ data from a neighbouring mine, and the step-wise excavation was simulated by mass removal from the gold reef. The resulting 3D stress tensor and its changes due to mining were analysed based on the Coulomb failure stress changes on the fault plane of the event. The results show that the seismic event was induced regardless of how the Coulomb failure stress changes were calculated and of the uncertainties in the fault plane solution. We also used the model to assess the seismic hazard due to the excavation towards the dyke. The resulting curve of stress changes shows a significant increase in the last {˜}50 {m} in front of the dyke, indicating that small changes in the mining progress towards the dyke have a substantial impact on the stress transfer.

  20. The Everyday Mathematical Experiences and Understandings of Three, 4-Year-Old, African-American Children from Working-Class Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benigno, Grace Marie R.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the everyday mathematical experiences and understandings of three, 4-year-old, African-American children from working-class backgrounds. The study drew on Street, Baker, and Tomlin's (2005) broad, ideological model of mathematics as "social" and their analytic concepts of mathematical events (units of…

  1. Life Experiences of People Who Stutter, and the Perceived Impact of Stuttering on Quality of Life: Personal Accounts of South African Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klompas, Michelle; Ross, Eleanor

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the life experiences of a group of South African adults who stutter and the impact of stuttering on their quality of life. Participants were 16 adults with a mean age of 28.9 and ranging from 20 to 59 years. Methods involved individual interviews designed to explore the life domains of education; social…

  2. Discrimination between NTS explosions, earthquakes and the non-proliferation experiment at the Pinedale Seismic Research Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, D.

    1994-09-01

    As the United States moves into an atmosphere of concern about the spread of nuclear weapons to non-nuclear countries, the focus on monitoring nuclear explosions is changing from looking at specific test sites and yields to looking for tests of large and small yields from anywhere in the world. Discrimination of small events then becomes important and regional seismic monitoring the best method to detect and identify suspicious events. At the Pinedale Seismic Research Facility (PSRF) in Wyoming we have the opportunity to try different regional discriminants with nuclear tests from NTS, western US (W-US) earthquakes and the Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE). Four discriminants that gave the best results in a study by Taylor et al. were tried: m{sub b}:M{sub s}, M{sub b}:M{sub s}{sup h}, log(L{sub g}/P{sub g}) and spectral ratios. The different discriminants were applied to the data (14 NTS explosions, the NPE, one Department of Defense (DOB) explosion and 34 NWS earthquakes) regardless of signal-to-noise. When the NTS explosions and NPE were only compared to four earthquakes located on or near the Test Site, all the discriminants except log(L{sub g}/P{sub g}) worked fairly well at PSRF. When the other WUS earthquakes and DOD explosion are included, only m{sub b}:M{sub s} shows any promise. Because of frequent physical variations in the earth`s crust, regional signals are complex and easily influenced by site and path characteristics. Looking at events from one specific area reduces the effects of the path, which is why three discriminants work well when the data set is restricted to events on or near NTS. The only discriminant not adversely affected from variations in path is m{sub b}:M{sub s}. This is probably because it is believed that source dimension, source time function and/or source mechanism is the cause for the differences between earthquakes and explosions with this discriminant, rather than any path effects.

  3. Factors affecting student success in a first-year mathematics course: a South African experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizito, Rita; Munyakazi, Justin; Basuayi, Clement

    2016-01-01

    In spite of sustained efforts tertiary institutions implement to try and improve student academic performance, the number of students succeeding in first-year mathematics courses remains disturbingly low. For most students, the gap between their mathematical capability and the competencies they are expected and need to develop to function effectively in these courses persists even after course instruction. In this study, an instrument for identifying and examining factors affecting student performance and success in a first-year Mathematics university course was developed and administered to 86 students. The overall Cronbach's Alpha coefficient for the questionnaire was found to be 0.916. Having identified variables from prior research known to affect student performance, factor analysis was used to identify variables exhibiting the greatest impact on student performance. The variables included prior academic knowledge, workload, student approaches to learning, assessment, student support teaching quality, methods and resources. From the analysis, students' perceptions of their workload emerged as the factor having the greatest impact on student's performance, followed by the matriculation examination score. The findings are discussed and strategies that can be used to improve teaching and contribute to student success in a first-year mathematics course in a South African context are presented.

  4. The Subjective Experience of Social Class and Upward Mobility Among African American Men in Graduate School

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Francisco J.; Liu, William Ming; Leathers, Leslie; Goins, Joyce; Vilain, Eric

    2011-01-01

    We used Consensual Qualitative Research Methodology to analyze responses from 14 African American men (MdnAge = 25 years-old) in graduate school at a predominantly-White university in the Midwestern region of the United Sates regarding how they acquired awareness of their social-class status; how social class was related to their sense of masculinity; how social class was related to race and skin tone; and the role that education and a romantic partner could play in upward mobility. School peers were the main source for their early awareness of social class. Many believed that discrimination maintains social class stratification that disadvantages racial minorities and that one's race will always trump any personal characteristics—including having light-complected skin and an advanced degree. Finally many overcame several obstacles during their educational career, and most believed that a romantic relationship with a woman from a privileged background could facilitate upward mobility. Psychological scientists and practitioners are encouraged to consider the role that social class plays when examining men's well-being. PMID:22058659

  5. Experiences with new generation vaccines against equine viral arteritis, West Nile disease and African horse sickness.

    PubMed

    MacLachlan, N James; Balasuriya, Udeni B; Davis, Nancy L; Collier, Martha; Johnston, Robert E; Ferraro, Gregory L; Guthrie, Alan J

    2007-07-26

    Viral diseases constitute an ever growing threat to the horse industry worldwide because of the rapid movement of large numbers of horses for competition and breeding. A number of different types of vaccines are available for protective immunization of horses against viral diseases. Traditional inactivated and live-attenuated (modified live virus, MLV) virus vaccines remain popular and efficacious but recombinant vaccines are increasingly being developed and used, in part because of the perceived deficiencies of some existing products. New generation vaccines include MLVs with deletions and/or mutations of critical genes, subunit vaccines that incorporate immunogenic proteins (or portions thereof) or expression vectors that produce these proteins as immunogens, and DNA vaccines. New generation vaccines have been developed for several viral diseases of horses. We recently have developed an alphavirus replicon-vectored equine arteritis virus (EAV) vaccine, and evaluated a commercial canary pox virus-vectored vaccine for West Nile disease. The success of these new-generation vaccines has catalyzed efforts to develop improved vaccines for the prevention of African horse sickness, a disease of emerging global significance.

  6. Site Characterization of the Source Physics Experiment Phase II Location Using Seismic Reflection Data

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, Emily; Snelson, Catherine M; Chipman, Veraun D; Emer, Dudley; White, Bob; Emmit, Ryan; Wright, Al; Drellack, Sigmund; Huckins-Gang, Heather; Mercadante, Jennifer; Floyd, Michael; McGowin, Chris; Cothrun, Chris; Bonal, Nedra

    2013-12-05

    An objective of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is to identify low-yield nuclear explosions from a regional distance. Low-yield nuclear explosions can often be difficult to discriminate among the clutter of natural and man-made explosive events (e.g., earthquakes and mine blasts). The SPE is broken into three phases. Phase I has provided the first of the physics-based data to test the empirical models that have been used to discriminate nuclear events. The Phase I series of tests were placed within a highly fractured granite body. The evolution of the project has led to development of Phase II, to be placed within the opposite end member of geology, an alluvium environment, thereby increasing the database of waveforms to build upon in the discrimination models. Both the granite and alluvium sites have hosted nearby nuclear tests, which provide comparisons for the chemical test data. Phase III of the SPE is yet to be determined.

  7. Planning the improvement of a seismic network for monitoring active volcanic areas: the experience on Mt. Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessandro, A.; Scarfì, L.; Scaltrito, A.; Di Prima, S.; Rapisarda, S.

    2013-10-01

    Seismology and geodesy are generally seen as the most reliable diagnostic tools for monitoring highly active or erupting volcanoes, like Mt. Etna. From the early 1980's, seismic activity was monitored at Mt. Etna by a permanent seismic network, progressively improved in the following years. This network has been considerably enhanced since 2005 by 24-bit digital stations equipped with broad-band (40 s) sensors. Today, thanks to a configuration of 33 broad-band and 12 short-period stations, we have a good coverage of the volcanic area as well as a high quality of the collected data. In the framework of the VULCAMED project a workgroup of Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia has taken on the task of developing the seismic monitoring system, through the installation of other seismic stations. The choice of optimal sites must be clearly made through a careful analysis of the geometry of the existing seismic network. In this paper, we applied the Seismic Network Evaluation through Simulation in order to evaluate the performance of the Etna Seismic Network before and after the addition of the stations in the candidate sites. The main advantage of the adopted method is that we can evaluate the improvement of the network before the actual installation of the stations. Our analysis has permitted to identify some critical issues of the current permanent seismic network related to the lack of stations in the southern sector of the volcano, which is nevertheless affected by a number of seismogenic structures. We have showed that the addition of stations at the candidate sites would greatly extend the coverage of the network to the south by significantly reducing the errors in the hypocenter parameters estimation.

  8. Psychosocial and Career Mentoring: Female African American Social Work Education Administrators' Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Cassandra E.; Perry, Armon R.; Roff, Lucinda L.

    2008-01-01

    There is a scarcity of knowledge on the mentoring experiences of Black women in social work academia. Using a survey methodology, this pilot study examines the mentoring experiences of 10 Black, female leaders in social work education as protegees. It also examines how they describe their current mentoring behavior toward recent proteges. The…

  9. Crustal structure variations along the NW-African continental margin: a comparison of new and existing models from wide angle and reflection seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biari, Y.; Klingelhoefer, F.; Sahabi, M.; Aslanian, D.; Philippe, S.; Louden, K. E.; Berglar, K.; Moulin, M.; Mehdi, K.; Graindorge, D.; Evain, M.; Benabellouahed, M.; Reichert, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Deep seismic data represent a key to understand the geometry and mechanism of continental rifting. The passive continental margin of NW-Africa is one of the oldest on earth, formed during the Upper Triassic-Lower Liassic rifting of the central Atlantic Ocean over 200 Ma. We present new and existing wide-angle and reflection seismic data from three study regions along the margin located in the North Moroccan salt basin, on the central continental margin offshore Safi and in the south, offshore Dakhla. In each of the study areas several combined wide-angle and reflection seismic profiles perpendicular and parallel to the margin have been acquired and forward modelled using comparable methods. The thickness of unthinned continental crust decreases from 36 km in the North to about 27 km in the South. In the North Moroccan Basin continental crust thins from originally 36 km to about 8 km in a 150 km wide zone. The basin itself is underlain by highly thinned continental crust. Offshore safi thinning of the continental crust is confined to a 130 km wide zone with no neighboring sedimentary basin underlain by continental crust. In both areas the zone of crustal thinning is characterised by the presence of large blocks and abundant salt diapirs. In the south crustal thinning is more rapid in a zone of 90 km and asymmetric with the upper crust thinning more closely to the continent than the lower crust, probably due to depth-dependent stretching and the presence of the precambrian Reguibat Ridge on land. Oceanic crust is characterised by a thickness of 7-8 km along the complete margin. Relatively high velocities of up to 7.5 km/s have been imaged between magnetic anomalies S1 and M25, and are probably related to changes in the spreading velocities at the time of the Kimmeridgian/Tithonian plate reorganisation. Volcanic activity seems to be confined to the region next to the Canary Islands, and is thus not related to the initial opening of the oceanic, which was related to no

  10. Kick & cook experiments on natural dunite: simulating episodic creep below the seismogenic zone during the seismic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druiventak, A.; Trepmann, C.; Matysiak, A. K.; Renner, J.

    2010-12-01

    The microfabric development in dunite is analyzed in deformation and annealing experiments, which are designed to simulate the natural stress history in the upper mantle of the oceanic lithosphere just below the seismogenic zone during the seismic cycle. The samples are deformed in a servohydraulically-controlled solid medium deformation apparatus at 600°C, a constant strain rate of 10-4s-1 and confining pressure of 1.0 GPa and 2.0 GPa (“kick” experiment). In some experiments deformation is followed by annealing for 15 h to 70 h at zero nominal differential stress, temperatures of 700°C to 1000°C and 2.0 GPa confining pressure (“kick & cook” experiment). We use coarse-grained dunite from the Almklovdalen peridotite complex (Western Norway) as starting material. The dunite comprises ca. 90% olivine, <10% orthopyroxene and small amounts of clinopyroxene, spinel and chlorite. The “kick” experiments yield maximum differential stresses of ca. 1.2 GPa to 1.6 GPa. The resulting microfabrics are analyzed by optical and electron microscopic techniques. Shear zones and microcracks developed in the dunites during deformation. The microfabric indicates brittle and crystal-plastic deformation of olivine. Intragranular microfaults, which can be crystallographically controlled, and deformation lamellae parallel to (100) occur in deformed olivine crystals. In TEM, the optical visible deformation lamellae are represented by a high density of straight dislocations aligned parallel to [001], indicating that they are [001] screw dislocations. Thus, the deformation lamellae in (100) imply an operating glide system of (100)[001]. Cataclastically deformed olivine is characterized in TEM by domains with a high dislocation density, which are bound by poorly-ordered dislocation walls. After annealing at 1000°C, the microfabric is characterized by very fine-grained (a few µm in diameter) recrystallized olivine grains arranged along microfaults and surrounding olivine

  11. Seafloor surface processes and subsurface paleo-channel unconformities mapped using multi-channel seismic and multi-beam sonar data from the Galicia 3D seismic experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, J. C.; Shillington, D. J.; Sawyer, D. S.; Jordan, B.; Morgan, J. K.; Ranero, C.; Reston, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    In this study we use geophysical methods, stratigraphic relationships, and coring/drilling leg results to assess possible controls on deep-sea channel formation in order to further constrain paleo-channel (PC) and associated unconformity timing/source processes. A series of cut and fill PC are mapped in 3D multi-channel seismic (MCS) data and compared with multi-beam (MB) sonar bathymetry/backscatter data collected during the Galicia 3D survey with the R/V Marcus G. Langseth (2013). The MCS data were collected using four 6 km streamers spaced at 200 m resulting in 25 m x 25 m common mid-point bins within the ~67 km x 20 km 3D volume. The MB data were collected at an average depth of ~4900 m with a constrained swath width of 4.5 km resulting in 11.25x overlap while enabling 25-m bathymetry and 10-m backscatter grids. The PC lie below the mouth of a submarine canyon at the edge of the Galicia abyssal plain and cut pre/syn-rift sediments; they are bound by a rift block to the north and paleo-levees to the south (maximum height of ~180m). From drilling results, the most recent PC is late Miocene in age. In this study, four PC are traced into the basin as unconformities. Several of the PC/unconformities are tentatively correlated with previously interpreted Pyrenean orogeny/compressional Miocene/Oligocene tectonic events. However, one PC/unconformity within this interval has not been previously interpreted. In order test the hypothesis that the unconformities are the result of a significant change in base level indicated by a low shale/sand (SS) ratio, we use seismic surface attributes to calculate the SS ratio and trace the horizontal extent of the unconformities. Additionally, the MB/MCS seafloor morphology reveals sedimentary waves outboard of the canyon mouth. We use backscatter data to compare the extent of recent processes (e.g., Pleistocene glaciation/de-glaciation) with the unconformities by mapping the surface/shallow subsurface SS ratio (volume scattering).

  12. The GLIMPCE seismic experiment: Onshore refraction and wide-angle reflection observations from a fan line over the Lake Superior Midcontinent Rift System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epili, Duryodhan; Mereu, Robert F.

    The 1986 GLIMPCE experiment (Great Lakes International Multidisciplinary Program for Crustal Evolution) was a combined on-ship seismic reflection and onshore seismic refraction experiment designed to determine the structure of the crust beneath the Great Lakes. The main tectonic targets of interest were the Midcontinent Rift System, the Grenville Front, the Penokean and Huronian Fold Belts and the Michipicoten Greenstone Belt. The source of the seismic energy came from a large air gun array fired at closely spaced intervals (50-350 m) over several long lines (150-350 km) crossing the lakes. Major participants of this experiment were the Geological Survey of Canada, the United States Geological Survey and a number of universities and research institutes on both sides of the border. The University of Western Ontario (UWO) collected data at five separate land stations using portable seismic refraction instruments. In this paper we present the results of a fan profile which was recorded from a UWO station on Michipicoten Island for the N-S line A which crossed the axis of the Lake Superior Synclinal Basin. The azimuth and distance ranges for this profile were 237 to 321 degrees and 120 to 170 km respectively. Detailed observations of the record sections show that p. is not a simple arrival but forms a rather complex pattern of irregular multiple arrivals. The wide-angle PmP reflection signals from the Moho are strong and well obilerved only for the shots fired near the ends of the line. The signals from the middle of the profile arrive relatively late and form very weak complex wave trains. These results indicate that the Moho in that area is probably greatly disrupted and gives added support to the rift theory for the structure under the lake. The observations also support the results of earlier crustal studies of Lake Superior which showed that the crust under the eastern part of the lake was exceedingly thick.

  13. Tackling the African “poverty trap”: The Ijebu-Ode experiment

    PubMed Central

    Mabogunje, Akin L.

    2007-01-01

    An experiment in poverty reduction began in 1998 in the city of Ijebu-Ode, Nigeria (estimated 1999 population 163,000), where, without the remittances from relatives abroad, an estimated 90% of the population lived below the poverty line of $1.00 (U.S.) per person per day. Central to the experiment was whether poverty can be dramatically reduced through a city consultation process that seeks to mobilize the entire community along with its diaspora. With 7 years of experience, the Ijebu-Ode experiment has been successful in many ways. There is increasing evidence that poverty in the city has been reduced significantly through the microfinancing of existing and new productive activities and the estimated >8,000 jobs these activities have created. Training based on both sustainability science and technology and indigenous practitioner knowledge has been a critical factor in the establishment of cooperatives and the development of new enterprises in specialty crops, small animal, and fish production. Much of this success has been possible as a result of harnessing social capital, especially through the dynamic leadership of the traditional authorities of the city and by the provision of ample loanable funds through the National Poverty Eradication Program of the federal government. The city consultation process itself engendered a participatory focus to the experiment from the beginning and has encouraged sustainabaility. Yet long-term sustainability is still in question as the initial leadership needs replacement, and credit, the heart of the experiment, lacks sufficient collateral. PMID:17942687

  14. 1978 Yellowstone-eastern Snake River Plain seismic profiling experiment: Data and upper crustal structure of the Yellowstone region

    SciTech Connect

    Schilly, M.M.; Smith, R.B.; Braile, L.W.; Ansorge, J.

    1982-04-10

    Eleven in-line refraction profiles, recorded to distances of 300 km, and one azimuthal fan plot were constructed from data recorded with a 150-station array in the Yellowstone National Park area during the 1978 Yellowstone-Snake River Plain seismic experiment. Interpretations of the data suggest that the crustal P wave velocity model for the Yellowstone region is characterized by (1) an averaged 10-km-thick upper crustal layer, V/sub p/ = 6.0 km/s, (2) an average crustal velocity of 6.3 km/s, and (3) a total crustal thickness of 44 km. Velocity models are presented for profiles that emphasize the upper crust and show (1) a decrease in the depth to the top of the upper crustal crystalline basement from 5 km in southwestern Yellowstone near Island Park to 1 km at the northeast side of the Yellowstone Plateau that is interpreted as a progressive thinning of the silicic surface volcanic layer to the northeast and (2) evidence for a large lateral inhomogeneity interpreted to be a low-velocity body, with a decrease of at least 10% in P wave velocity, located beneath the northeast corner of the Yellowstone Plateau. The low-velocity zone coincides with a local -30-mgal residual gravity anomaly and is located beneath part of the Sour Creek resurgent dome and part of the Hot Springs Basin, the largest hydrothermal system in Yellowstone. The low-velocity body has a maximum depth to the top of 3 km and a minimum depth to the bottom of 9 km and may represent a zone of partial melt. In comparison to the thermally undisturbed upper crust of the surrounding Rocky Mountains the upper crust of the northeastern Yellowstone plateau appears laterally inhomogeneous in velocity and layer thickness, suggesting effects of thermal and magma intrusion, whereas the lower crust appears relatively homogeneous.

  15. Monitoring of glacial seismic events from Greenland at regional distances: experience from the POLENET/LAPNET experiment during the IPY 2007-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovskaya, E.; Pedersen, H.; Plomerova, J.; Achauer, U.; Kissling, E. H.; Sanina, I.; Jämsen, T.; Silvennoinen, H.; Pequegnat, C.; Hurskainen, R.; Hausmann, H.; Jedlicka, P.; Aleshine, I.; Bourova, E.; Bodvarsson, R.; Brueckl, E. P.; Eken, T.; Heikkinen, P. J.; Houseman, G. A.; Johnsen, H.; Kari, K.; Munzarova, H.; Roberts, R.; Ruzek, B.; Hosein Shomali, Z.; Schweitzer, J.; Shaumyan, A.; Vecsey, L.; Volosov, S.

    2010-12-01

    Monitoring of glacial earthquakes from Greenland was one of the major targets of the POLENET/LAPNET passive seismic experiment in northern Fennoscandia (northern parts of Finland, Sweden, Norway and Russian Karelia) during the IPY 2007-2009. The POLENET/LAPNET array, with the average spacing between stations of 70 km, was designed to solve specific tasks of polar seismology. The collected POLENET/LAPNET dataset includes high-frequency continuous data (sampling rate from 50 to 100 sps) of 37 temporary stations, which were in operation during the time frame from 01.05.2008 to 31.09.2009, and of 21 stations of selected permanent networks in Fennoscandia. The first results of the experiment have shown that the POLENET/LAPNET array, located at regional distances from Greenland, recorded more such events than it has been recorded by the Global Seismographic Network during the same observation period. The waveforms of events recorded by the array differ from both long-period waveforms of glacial earthquakes recorded at teleseismic distances and from short-period glacial rumblings recorded at local distances. Recordings of glacial earthquakes obtained by the array contain the long-period energy only. In many cases the events were recorded in groups within the time interval of up to 1 hour. Generally, the waveforms of events within the same group are different and the events not always originate from the same location. For some of the events it was possible to recognize not only dispersed long-period surface wave, but also the first arrival of a long-period P-wave. This suggests that source duration of these events was long. Diversity of the waveforms of glacial events recorded by the POLENET/LAPNET array can be considered as evidence for diversity of source mechanisms of these events.

  16. How African-American Elementary Students in High-Poverty Schools Experience Creative Expression: A Case Study Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Belinda F.

    2016-01-01

    Literature that addresses how the arts enhance student learning through creative expression is minimal. This is especially true for African-American elementary students from high-poverty backgrounds. The purpose of this study was to employ a case study design to explore how African-American elementary students in high-poverty schools experience…

  17. Understanding the Relationships and Experiences That Contribute to African Americans' Decision to Enroll in Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCallum, Carmen Michelle

    2012-01-01

    African Americans have made great advancements in postsecondary education. Over the last thirty years, enrollment and degree attainment has increased over 65% at undergraduate and graduate degree levels (National Center for Education Statistics, 2008). Yet despite these gains, African Americans continue to severely trail behind other racial and…

  18. Exploring the Lived Experiences of African American and White Female Faculty toward Tenure-Granting and Promotion Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Ralphilia C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose:The purpose of this study was to explore African American and White female faculty members' perceptions about tenure and promotion processes at research universities. As more women enter the ranks of academia, the difficulties encountered toward attainment of tenure continue to prevail, specifically for African American women. It is hoped…

  19. A Grounded Theory of the College Experiences of African American Males in Black Greek-Letter Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, David Julius, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Studies have shown that involvement in a student organization can improve the academic and psychosocial outcomes of African American male students (Harper, 2006b; Robertson & Mason, 2008; Williams & Justice, 2010). Further, Harper, Byars, and Jelke (2005) stated that African American fraternities and sororities (i.e., Black Greek-letter…

  20. Cultural Self Meets Cultural Other in the African American Experience: Teachers' Responses to a Curriculum Content Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shujaa, Mwalimu J.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses certain complexities of personal transformation among people implementing African and African American curriculum content reform in the Buffalo (New York) public schools, highlighting individual teachers' understanding of and responses to the reform and noting that attitudes about their own and other people's ethnicity proved important…

  1. Passive seismic experiment and receiver functions analysis to determine crustal structure at the contact of the northern Dinarides and southwestern Pannonian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šumanovac, Franjo; Hegedűs, Endre; Orešković, Jasna; Kolar, Saša; Kovács, Attila C.; Dudjak, Darko; Kovács, István J.

    2016-06-01

    Passive seismic experiment was carried out at the SW contact of the Dinarides and Pannonian basin to determine the crustal structure and velocity discontinuities. The aim of the experiment was to define the relationship between the Adriatic microplate and the Pannonian segment as a part of the European plate. Most of the temporary seismic stations were deployed in Croatia along the Alp07 profile-a part of the active-source ALP 2002 project. About 300-km-long profile stretches from Istra peninsula to the Drava river, in a WSW-ESE direction. Teleseismic events recorded on 13 temporary seismic stations along the profile were analysed by P-receiver function method. Two types of characteristic receiver functions (RF) have been identified, belonging to Dinaridic and Pannonian crusts as defined on the Alp07 profile, while in transitional zone there are both types. Three major crustal discontinuities can be identified for the Dinaridic type: sedimentary basement, intracrustal discontinuity and Mohorovičić discontinuity, whereas the Pannonian type revealed only two discontinuities. The intracrustal discontinuity was not observed in the Pannonian type, thus pointing to a single-layered crust in the Pannonian basin. Two interpretation methods were applied: forward modelling of the receiver functions and H-κ stacking method, and the results were compared with the active-source seismic data at deep refraction profile Alp07. The receiver function modelling has given reliable results of the Moho depths that are in accordance with the seismic refraction results at the end of the Alp07 profile, that is in the area of Pannonian crust characterized by simple crustal structure and low seismic velocities (Vp between 5.9 and 6.2 km s-1). In the Dinarides and its peripheral parts, receiver function modelling regularly gives greater Moho depths, up to +15 per cent, due to more complex crustal structure. The depths of the Moho calculated by the H-κ stacking method vary within wide

  2. Report for borehole explosion data acquired in the 1999 Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment (LARSE II), Southern California; Part II, Data tables and plots

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, Janice M.; Fuis, Gary S.; Okaya, D.A.; Thygesen, Kristina; Baher, Shirley A.; Rybert, Trond; Kaip, Galen; Fort, Michael D.; Asudeh, Isa; Sell, Russell

    2002-01-01

    The Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment (LARSE), a joint project of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC), was conducted to produce seismic images of the subsurface in the Los Angeles region. Primary targets were major fault systems and sedimentary basins; the goal of the project was to address the earthquake hazard posed by these geologic features. The first phase of data collection (LARSE 1) was completed in 1994; the second phase (LARSE 2) was completed in 1999. A description of the 1999 survey and an overview of both phase I and II is given in Fuis and others (2001). In this report, we present the technical details for the explosion data collected in 1999.

  3. Learning to Play and Teach West African Drumming: An Exploratory Experience for Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCord, Kimberly A.

    2004-01-01

    Illinois State University (ISU), located in central Illinois, serves a large population of rural, suburban, and urban students. students are predominantly white. The music education curriculum requires multicultural music study, and students have opportunities for authentic experiences. During the semester before this course, students in…

  4. Experiences of Discrimination among African American, Asian American, and Latino Adolescents in an Urban High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbloom, Susan Rakosi; Way, Niobe

    2004-01-01

    Interviews and participant observation are used to describe how ethnic minority students in an urban high school experience discrimination. The findings suggest critical variations among students that contributed to a hostile school environment. Asian American students discussed physical and verbal harassment by peers, while Black and Latino…

  5. Predicting Substance Use Behavior among South African Adolescents: The Role of Leisure Experiences across Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Erin Hiley; Coffman, Donna L.; Caldwell, Linda L.; Smith, Edward A.; Wegner, Lisa; Vergnani, Tania; Mathews, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Using seven waves of data, collected twice a year from the 8th through the 11th grades in a low-resource community in Cape Town, South Africa, we aimed to describe the developmental trends in three specific leisure experiences (leisure boredom, new leisure interests, and healthy leisure) and substance use (cigarettes, alcohol, and marijuana)…

  6. Examining the Cultural Adjustment Experiences of African International College Students: A Qualitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constantine, Madonna G.; Anderson, Gregory M.; Berkel, LaVerne A.; Caldwell, Leon D.; Utsey, Shawn O.

    2005-01-01

    The authors examined the cultural adjustment experiences of 12 Kenyan, Nigerian, and Ghanaian international college students through semistructured interviews. Using consensual qualitative research methodology (C. E. Hill, B. J. Thompson, & E. N. Williams, 1997), 7 primary domains or themes related to these students' cultural adjustment…

  7. The derivation of an anisotropic velocity model from combined surface and borehole seismic experiments at the COSC-1 borehole, central Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Helge; Krauß, Felix; Hedin, Peter; Buske, Stefan; Giese, Rüdiger; Juhlin, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    The Scandinavian Caledonides provide a well preserved example of a Paleozoic continent-continent collision, where the surface geology in combination with geophysical data provide control of the geometry of parts of the Caledonian structure. The project COSC (Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides) investigates the structure and physical conditions of the orogen units and the underlying basement with two approximately 2.5 km deep fully cored boreholes in western Jämtland, central Sweden. In 2014 the COSC-1 borehole was successfully drilled through the Seve Nappe Complex. This unit, mainly consisting of gneisses, belongs to the so-called Middle Allochthons and has been ductilely deformed and transported during collisional orogeny. A major seismic survey was conducted in and around the COSC-1 borehole which comprised both seismic reflection and transmission experiments. Combined with core analysis and downhole logging, the survey will allow extrapolation of the structures away from the borehole. The survey consisted of three parts: 1) a high-resolution zero-offset Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP), 2) a multi-azimuthal walkaway VSP in combination with three long offset surface receiver lines, and 3) a limited 3D seismic survey. Data from the multi-azimuthal walkaway VSP experiment and the long offset surface lines were used to derive a detailed velocity model around the borehole from the inversion of first arrival traveltimes. The comparison of velocities from these tomography results with a velocity function calculated from the zero-offset VSP revealed clear differences in velocities for mainly horizontally and vertically traveling waves. Therefore, an anisotropic VTI model was constructed, using the P-wave velocity function from zero-offset VSP and the Thomson parameters ɛ and δ. The latter were partly derived from ultrasonic lab measurements on COSC-1 core samples. Traveltimes were calculated with an anisotropic eikonal solver and serve as the basis

  8. Using diaries to explore the work experiences of primary health care nursing managers in two South African provinces

    PubMed Central

    Munyewende, Pascalia O.; Rispel, Laetitia C.

    2014-01-01

    Background South Africa is on the brink of another wave of major health system reforms that underscore the centrality of primary health care (PHC). Nursing managers will play a critical role in these reforms. Objective The aim of the study was to explore the work experiences of PHC clinic nursing managers through the use of reflective diaries, a method hitherto under-utilised in health systems research in low- and middle-income countries. Design During 2012, a sub-set of 22 PHC nursing managers was selected randomly from a larger nurses’ survey in two South African provinces. After informed consent, participants were requested to keep individual diaries for a period of 6 weeks, using a clear set of diary entry guidelines. Reminders consisted of weekly short message service reminders and telephone calls. Diary entries were analysed using thematic content analysis. A diary feedback meeting was held with all the participants to validate the findings. Results Fifteen diaries were received, representing a 68% response rate. The majority of respondents (14/15) were female, each with between 5 and 15 years of nursing experience. Most participants made their diary entries at home. Diaries proved to be cathartic for individual nursing managers. Although inter-related and not mutually exclusive, the main themes that emerged from the diary analysis were health system deficiencies; human resource challenges; unsupportive management environment; leadership and governance; and the emotional impact of clinic management. Conclusions Diaries are an innovative method of capturing the work experiences of managers at the PHC level, as they allow for confidentiality and anonymity, often not possible with other qualitative research methods. The expressed concerns of nursing managers must be addressed to ensure the success of South Africa's health sector reforms, particularly at the PHC level. PMID:25537937

  9. Comparative sequence stratigraphy of low-latitude versus high-latitude lacustrine rift basins: Seismic data examples from the East African and Baikal rifts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholz, C.A.; Moore, T.C.; Hutchinson, D.R.; Golmshtok, A. Ja; Klitgord, Kim D.; Kurotchkin, A.G.

    1998-01-01

    Lakes Baikal, Malawi and Tanganyika are the world's three largest rift valley lakes and are the classic modem examples of lacustrine rift basins. All the rift lakes are segmented into half-graben basins, and seismic reflection datasets reveal how this segmentation controls the filling of the rift basins through time. In the early stages of rifting, basins are fed primarily by flexural margin and axial margin drainage systems. At the climax of syn-rift sedimentation, however, when the basins are deeply subsided, almost all the margins are walled off by rift shoulder uplifts, and sediment flux into the basins is concentrated at accommodation zone and axial margin river deltas. Flexural margin unconformities are commonplace in the tropical lakes but less so in high-latitude Lake Baikal. Lake levels are extremely dynamic in the tropical lakes and in low-latitude systems in general because of the predominance of evaporation in the hydrologic cycle in those systems. Evaporation is minimized in relation to inflow in the high-latitude Lake Baikal and in most high-latitude systems, and consequently, major sequence boundaries tend to be tectonically controlled in that type of system. The acoustic stratigraphies of the tropical lakes are dominated by high-frequency and high-amplitude lake level shifts, whereas in high-latitude Lake Baikal, stratigraphic cycles are dominated by tectonism and sediment-supply variations.

  10. Building effective public-private partnerships: experiences and lessons from the African Comprehensive HIV/AIDS Partnerships (ACHAP).

    PubMed

    Ramiah, Ilavenil; Reich, Michael R

    2006-07-01

    This paper examines the processes for building highly collaborative public-private partnerships for public health, with a focus on the efforts to manage the complex relationships that underlie these partnerships. These processes are analyzed for the African Comprehensive HIV/AIDS Partnerships (ACHAP), a 5-year partnership (2001-2005) between the government of Botswana, Merck & Co., Inc. (and its company foundation), and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. ACHAP is a highly collaborative initiative. The ACHAP office in Botswana engages intensively (on a daily basis) with the government of Botswana (an ACHAP partner and ACHAP's main grantee) to support HIV/AIDS control in that country, which had an adult prevalence of 38.5% HIV infection in 2000 when ACHAP was being established. The paper discusses the development of ACHAP in four stages: the creation of ACHAP, the first year, the second and third years, and the fourth year. Based on ACHAP's experiences over these four years, the paper identifies five lessons for managing relationships in highly collaborative public-private partnerships for public health.

  11. Measuring conditions and trends in ecosystem services at multiple scales: the Southern African Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (SAfMA) experience

    PubMed Central

    van Jaarsveld, A.S; Biggs, R; Scholes, R.J; Bohensky, E; Reyers, B; Lynam, T; Musvoto, C; Fabricius, C

    2005-01-01

    The Southern African Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (SAfMA) evaluated the relationships between ecosystem services and human well-being at multiple scales, ranging from local through to sub-continental. Trends in ecosystem services (fresh water, food, fuel-wood, cultural and biodiversity) over the period 1990–2000 were mixed across scales. Freshwater resources appear strained across the continent with large numbers of people not securing adequate supplies, especially of good quality water. This translates to high infant mortality patterns across the region. In some areas, the use of water resources for irrigated agriculture and urban–industrial expansion is taking place at considerable cost to the quality and quantity of freshwater available to ecosystems and for domestic use. Staple cereal production across the region has increased but was outstripped by population growth while protein malnutrition is on the rise. The much-anticipated wood-fuel crisis on the subcontinent has not materialized but some areas are experiencing shortages while numerous others remain vulnerable. Cultural benefits of biodiversity are considerable, though hard to quantify or track over time. Biodiversity resources remain at reasonable levels, but are declining faster than reflected in species extinction rates and appear highly sensitive to land-use decisions. The SAfMA sub-global assessment provided an opportunity to experiment with innovative ways to assess ecosystem services including the use of supply–demand surfaces, service sources and sink areas, priority areas for service provision, service ‘hotspots’ and trade-off assessments. PMID:15814355

  12. Pathways to success in science: A phenomenological study, examining the life experiences of African-American women in higher education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giscombe, Claudette Leanora

    This study is a qualitative investigation in which five African American women science faculty, in higher education, within the age range of 45--60, were the participants. The data that was collected, over twelve months, was primarily obtained from the in-depth phenomenological interviewing method (Seidman, 1991). The interpretation of the data was the result of ongoing cross analysis of the participants' life experiences, perceptions, and beliefs of the how they navigated and negotiated pathways to careers in the natural sciences, and the meanings they attach to these experiences. The software Ethnograph (V5.0) was used to organize the participants' responses into patterns and emergent themes. The Black women in this study articulated several themes that were critical determinants of their successes and achievements in science careers. From the analysis of the data set, four major findings were identified: (1) "Black Intentional Communities" acted as social agencies for the positive development of the participants; (2) "My World Reality" which was described by the participants as their acceptance of their segregated worlds, not being victims of inequities and injustices, but being resilient and determined to forge on to early academic successes. Early academic successes were identified as precursors and external motivational stimuli to their interests and achievements in science; (3) Their experiences of "Tensions and Double Consciousness" from race and gender negative images and career stereotypes, required the women to make "intra-cultural deviations" from stereotypic career roles and to develop "pragmatic coping strategies" to achieve in science careers and; (4) "Meaning-making"---Significant to the meaning of their journey was the fact that the participants grounded their experiences in a social context rather than in a scientific context and that they ended their journey with expressions of personal satisfactions about their journey and their unique drive and

  13. SEG Advances in Rotational Seismic Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, Robert; Laughlin, Darren; Brune, Bob

    2016-10-17

    Significant advancements in the development of sensors to enable rotational seismic measurements have been achieved. Prototypes are available now to support experiments that help validate the utility of rotational seismic measurements.

  14. Various Approaches to Forward and Inverse Wide-Angle Seismic Modelling Tested on Data from DOBRE-4 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janik, Tomasz; Środa, Piotr; Czuba, Wojciech; Lysynchuk, Dmytro

    2016-12-01

    The interpretation of seismic refraction and wide angle reflection data usually involves the creation of a velocity model based on an inverse or forward modelling of the travel times of crustal and mantle phases using the ray theory approach. The modelling codes differ in terms of model parameterization, data used for modelling, regularization of the result, etc. It is helpful to know the capabilities, advantages and limitations of the code used compared to others. This work compares some popular 2D seismic modelling codes using the dataset collected along the seismic wide-angle profile DOBRE-4, where quite peculiar/uncommon reflected phases were observed in the wavefield. The 505 km long profile was realized in southern Ukraine in 2009, using 13 shot points and 230 recording stations. Double PMP phases with a different reduced time (7.5-11 s) and a different apparent velocity, intersecting each other, are observed in the seismic wavefield. This is the most striking feature of the data. They are interpreted as reflections from strongly dipping Moho segments with an opposite dip. Two steps were used for the modelling. In the previous work by Starostenko et al. (2013), the trial-and-error forward model based on refracted and reflected phases (SEIS83 code) was published. The interesting feature is the high-amplitude (8-17 km) variability of the Moho depth in the form of downward and upward bends. This model is compared with results from other seismic inversion methods: the first arrivals tomography package FAST based on first arrivals; the JIVE3D code, which can also use later refracted arrivals and reflections; and the forward and inversion code RAYINVR using both refracted and reflected phases. Modelling with all the codes tested showed substantial variability of the Moho depth along the DOBRE-4 profile. However, SEIS83 and RAYINVR packages seem to give the most coincident results.

  15. First-Year Village: Experimenting with an African Model for First-Year Adjustment and Support in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speckman, McGlory

    2016-01-01

    Predicated on the principles of success and contextuality, this chapter shares an African perspective on a first-year adjustment programme, known as First-Year Village, including its potential and challenges in establishing it.

  16. SOAR Telescope seismic performance II: seismic mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Jonathan H.; Muñoz, Freddy; Warner, Michael; Rivera, Rossano; Martínez, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    We describe design modifications to the SOAR telescope intended to reduce the impact of future major earthquakes, based on the facility's experience during recent events, most notably the September 2015 Illapel earthquake. Specific modifications include a redesign of the encoder systems for both azimuth and elevation, seismic trigger for the emergency stop system, and additional protections for the telescope secondary mirror system. The secondary mirror protection may combine measures to reduce amplification of seismic vibration and "fail-safe" components within the assembly. The status of these upgrades is presented.

  17. Blockage and flow: intimate experiences of condoms and microbicides in a South African clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Jonathan; Saethre, Eirik

    2011-01-01

    Based on qualitative research undertaken during a phase-three microbicide gel trial, this paper explores female participants' experiences and perceptions of gel and condom use and the opinions of their male partners and community members. Participants were aware that condoms were effective in preventing HIV infection and that the efficacy of the microbicide was unproven. Yet, in narratives about gel and condom use, participants ascribed improvements to their reproductive health and intimate relationships with men to gel use. In contrast, condoms were believed to prevent disease, yet also embodied mistrust, were believed to contain dangerous substances and were felt to block the womb. These apparently contradictory views about condoms and gels are explored in the light of conceptions of flow and blockage. Health is achieved by maintaining a steady balance of substances within the body, while preventing fluid flow results in illness. We argue that women enrolled in the trial broadened the meaning of the gel beyond its primary intended effect of preventing HIV. Through their accounts of gel use, women 'reinvented' the gel as a substance that transformed their bodies and sexual relations. This has implications for understanding how local knowledge of health and illness intersects with biomedical knowledge.

  18. TB infection prevention and control experiences of South African nurses - a phenomenological study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The tuberculosis (TB) epidemic in South Africa is characterised by one of the highest levels of TB/HIV co-infection and growing multidrug-resistant TB worldwide. Hospitals play a central role in the management of TB. We investigated nurses' experiences of factors influencing TB infection prevention and control (IPC) practices to identify risks associated with potential nosocomial transmission. Methods The qualitative study employed a phenomenological approach, using semi-structured interviews with a quota sample of 20 nurses in a large tertiary academic hospital in Cape Town, South Africa. The data was subjected to thematic analysis. Results Nurses expressed concerns about the possible risk of TB transmission to both patients and staff. Factors influencing TB-IPC, and increasing the potential risk of nosocomial transmission, emerged in interconnected overarching themes. Influences related to the healthcare system included suboptimal IPC provision such as the lack of isolation facilities and personal protective equipment, and the lack of a TB-IPC policy. Further influences included inadequate TB training for staff and patients, communication barriers owing to cultural and linguistic differences between staff and patients, the excessive workload of nurses, and a sense of duty of care. Influences related to wider contextual conditions included TB concerns and stigma, and the role of traditional healers. Influences related to patient behaviour included late uptake of hospital care owing to poverty and the use of traditional medicine, and poor adherence to IPC measures by patients, family members and carers. Conclusions Several interconnected influences related to the healthcare system, wider contextual conditions and patient behavior could increase the potential risk of nosocomial TB transmission at hospital level. There is an urgent need for the implementation and evaluation of a comprehensive contextually appropriate TB IPC policy with the setting and

  19. Involving lay community researchers in epidemiological research: experiences from a seroprevalence study among sub-Saharan African migrants.

    PubMed

    Nöstlinger, Christiana; Loos, Jasna

    2016-01-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) has received considerable attention during past decades as a method to increase community ownership in research and prevention. We discuss its application to epidemiological research using the case of second-generation surveillance conducted among sub-Saharan African (SSA) migrants in Antwerp city. To inform evidence-based prevention planning for this target group, this HIV-prevalence study used two-stage time-location sampling preceded by formative research. Extensive collaborative partnerships were built with community organizations, a Community Advisory Board provided input throughout the project, and community researchers were trained to participate in all phases of the seroprevalence study. Valid oral fluid samples for HIV testing were collected among 717 SSA migrants and linked to behavioural data assessed through an anonymous survey between December 2013 and August 2014. A qualitative content analysis of various data sources (extensive field notes, minutes of intervision, and training protocols) collected at 77 data collection visits in 51 settings was carried out to describe experiences with challenges and opportunities inherent to the CBPR approach at three crucial stages of the research process: building collaborative partnerships; implementing the study; dissemination of findings including prevention planning. The results show that CBPR is feasible in conducting scientifically sound epidemiological research, but certain requirements need to be in place. These include among others sufficient resources to train, coordinate, and supervise community researchers; continuity in the implementation; transparency about decision-taking and administrative procedures, and willingness to share power and control over the full research process. CBPR contributed to empowering community researchers on a personal level, and to create greater HIV prevention demand in the SSA communities.

  20. Involving lay community researchers in epidemiological research: experiences from a seroprevalence study among sub-Saharan African migrants

    PubMed Central

    Nöstlinger, Christiana; Loos, Jasna

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Community-based participatory research (CBPR) has received considerable attention during past decades as a method to increase community ownership in research and prevention. We discuss its application to epidemiological research using the case of second-generation surveillance conducted among sub-Saharan African (SSA) migrants in Antwerp city. To inform evidence-based prevention planning for this target group, this HIV-prevalence study used two-stage time-location sampling preceded by formative research. Extensive collaborative partnerships were built with community organizations, a Community Advisory Board provided input throughout the project, and community researchers were trained to participate in all phases of the seroprevalence study. Valid oral fluid samples for HIV testing were collected among 717 SSA migrants and linked to behavioural data assessed through an anonymous survey between December 2013 and August 2014. A qualitative content analysis of various data sources (extensive field notes, minutes of intervision, and training protocols) collected at 77 data collection visits in 51 settings was carried out to describe experiences with challenges and opportunities inherent to the CBPR approach at three crucial stages of the research process: building collaborative partnerships; implementing the study; dissemination of findings including prevention planning. The results show that CBPR is feasible in conducting scientifically sound epidemiological research, but certain requirements need to be in place. These include among others sufficient resources to train, coordinate, and supervise community researchers; continuity in the implementation; transparency about decision-taking and administrative procedures, and willingness to share power and control over the full research process. CBPR contributed to empowering community researchers on a personal level, and to create greater HIV prevention demand in the SSA communities. PMID:26885938

  1. Establishing a community network for recruitment of African Americans into a clinical trial. The African-American antiplatelet stroke Prevention Study (AAASPS) experience.

    PubMed Central

    Gorelick, P. B.; Richardson, D.; Hudson, E.; Perry, C.; Robinson, D.; Brown, N.; Harris, Y.

    1996-01-01

    A major aspect of a clinical trial is the ability to successfully recruit patients. There is a paucity of information concerning the nuances of recruiting study patients, especially those from minority communities. As minorities generally have been underrepresented in the health-care system, they may be less likely to participate in clinical trials or other studies. Thus, a strategy is needed to overcome this potential shortfall. One of our solutions has been the development of a community network to help disseminate information about our program. We believe that a key aspect has been the involvement of community members during pre-trial planning, community awareness programs, and our Community Advisory Panel. We also believe that it may be a major error to bring a health-care initiative unannounced into a targeted community without extensive pre-program planning in cooperation with that community. As our community awareness scheme suggests (Figure), there are many possible avenues to heighten awareness about a health-care program. While the church remains an important institution for religious and cultural activities in the African-American community, we have found that the news, television, and radio media also can be a powerful source for spreading awareness. Thus, we recommend creating awareness about an initiative through a "grassroots" approach of church and community organizations, along with a global approach through news, television, and radio media. As part of the awareness promotion campaign, it must be emphasized that the study is safe and provides benefits to enrollees. The success of health programs is largely dependent on community acceptance, which must be established in the pre-program planning stages of the initiative. This concept of obtaining community approval and acceptance prior to program initiation is not a new one, nor does it exclusively apply to the African-American community. Community leaders and members need to have a vested interest

  2. A hermeneutic phenomenological study of the experiences of female African American undergraduate engineering students at a predominantly White and an historically Black institution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frillman, Sharron Ann

    2011-12-01

    This phenomenological study examined the experiences of twelve female African Americans enrolled as fulltime undergraduate engineering students at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, an historically Black university, and seven female African Americans enrolled as undergraduate engineering students at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana, a traditionally White institution. Interviews provided insights into the "lived" experiences of these young women and the factors they believe have contributed to their success in their respective engineering programs. Data analysis involved coding each participant's responses to interview questions using Atlas.ti, a powerful qualitative data analysis tool. This generated 181 codes that were further categorized into nine emergent themes, indicating the potential for extensive associations among the variables. The emergent themes are as follows: (1) Demographic information/special circumstances, (2) Personal attributes and characteristics, (3) Personal insights, (4) Sense of mission, (5) Sources of negative stress, (6) Success strategies, (7) Various forms of support, (8) Would/would not have made it to where she is now, and (9) Being African American and female in engineering. Analysis of these themes and their relationships led to the development of the Frillman Model of Emergent Themes in Female African American Engineering Students. Success. In addressing similarities and differences, three overriding theme categories emerged. These were: (1) Four personhood themes and dual social identity theme; (2) Environmental input and response theme; and (3) Outcome emergent theme of Would/Would not have made it to where she is now. Recommendations were made for future research to expand upon this exploratory study.

  3. Seismic reflection data imaging and interpretation from Braniewo2014 experiment using additional wide-angle refraction and reflection and well-logs data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trzeciak, Maciej; Majdański, Mariusz; Białas, Sebastian; Gaczyński, Edward; Maksym, Andrzej

    2015-04-01

    Braniewo2014 reflection and refraction experiment was realized in cooperation between Polish Oil and Gas Company (PGNiG) and the Institute of Geophysics (IGF), Polish Academy of Sciences, near the locality of Braniewo in northern Poland. PGNiG realized a 20-km-long reflection profile, using vibroseis and dynamite shooting; the aim of the reflection survey was to characterise Silurian shale gas reservoir. IGF deployed 59 seismic stations along this profile and registered additional full-spread wide-angle refraction and reflection data, with offsets up to 12 km; maximum offsets from the seismic reflection survey was 3 km. To improve the velocity information two velocity logs from near deep boreholes were used. The main goal of the joint reflection-refraction interpretation was to find relations between velocity field from reflection velocity analysis and refraction tomography, and to build a velocity model which would be consistent for both, reflection and refraction, datasets. In this paper we present imaging results and velocity models from Braniewo2014 experiment and the methodology we used.

  4. Emergency preparedness activities during an ongoing seismic swarm: the experience of the 2011-2012 Pollino (Southern Italy) sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masi, A.; Mucciarelli, M.; Chiauzzi, L.; De Costanzo, G.; Loperte, G.

    2012-04-01

    Facing natural disasters effects can be a very difficult task lacking suitable activities and tools to preventively prepare the involved community (people, authorities, professionals, …) to the expected events. Therefore, a suite of preventive actions should be carried out to mitigate natural risks, in particular working to reduce the territorial vulnerability with respect to the specific natural hazard at hand, and to increase people response capacity. In fact, building social capacity helps to increase the risk perception and the people capacity to adapt to and cope with natural hazards. Since October 2011 a seismic swarm is affecting the Pollino mountain range, Southern Italy. At present the sequence is still ongoing, with more than 500 events with M>1, at least 40 well perceived by the population and a maximum magnitude at 3.6. The area mainly affected by the seismic sequence includes 12 villages, with a total population of about 50.000 inhabitants and, according to the current seismic hazard map it has high seismicity level. Such area was hit by a magnitude Ml=5.7 event in 1998 that produced macroseismic intensity not higher that VII-VIII degree of MCS scale and caused one dead, some injured and widespread damage in at least six municipalities. During the sequence, the National Department of Civil Protection (DPC) and the Civil Protection of Basilicata Region decided to put in action some measures aimed at verifying and enhancing emergency preparedness. These actions have been carried out with a constant and fruitful collaboration among the main stakeholders involved (scientific community, local and national governmental agencies, civil protection volunteers, etc) trough the following main activities: 1. collaboration between scientific community and the local and national offices of Civil Protection especially in the relationship with local authorities (e.g. mayors, which are civil protection authorities in their municipality); 2. interaction between DPC

  5. Recent Seismicity in Southern Illinois and Southern Missouri: Initial Results from the EarthScope OIINK Flexible Array Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Pavlis, G. L.; Hamburger, M. W.; Gilbert, H. J.; Marshak, S.; Rupp, J.; Larson, T. H.

    2012-12-01

    We examined 175 days' continuous seismic records, from July 29, 2011 through January 20, 2012, from stations in a study area encompassing the eastern Ozark Plateau in Missouri and the southern Illinois Basin. The records came from 23 flexible-array stations of the OIINK (Ozark, Illinois, INdiana and Kentucky) network, 21 transportable array stations of USArray, 7 New Madrid array stations, and 1 GSN station. These records yielded thousands of events, of which, 44 earthquakes with mb ≥ 2.0 occurred within the study area. Active quarries and coal mines dominate the catalog. To focus primarily on earthquakes, we generally ignored events that happened during the hours of 16:00 to 23:00 UTC, the time interval during which most blasting takes place. Of the remaining events, 443 events were classified as blasts because their records displayed relatively large amplitude, low frequency Rg waves compared to those of unambiguous earthquakes. About 25 of the 44 earthquakes were located within the New Madrid seismic zone, south of the array. A significant number of the remaining events cluster along the boundary between the Ozark Plateau and the Illinois Basin. Notably, these events occur at depths of between 10 and 20 km, the transition zone from upper to middle crust. This depth range is greater than that of the earthquakes elsewhere in and around the Ozark Plateau, where foci generally lie at depths of < 5 km. Our preliminary results indicate that the character of seismicity varies across the study area, and that the boundary between Ozark Plateau and the Illinois Basin, which has served as a significant tectonic boundary throughout the Phanerozoic, remains active.

  6. African American Preschoolers' Language, Emergent Literacy Skills, and Use of African American English: A Complex Relation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, Carol McDonald; Craig, Holly K.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the relation between African American preschoolers' use of African American English (AAE) and their language and emergent literacy skills in an effort to better understand the perplexing and persistent difficulties many African American children experience learning to read proficiently. Method: African American…

  7. Next-generation seismic experiments: wide-angle, multi-azimuth, three-dimensional, full-waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Joanna; Warner, Michael; Bell, Rebecca; Ashley, Jack; Barnes, Danielle; Little, Rachel; Roele, Katarina; Jones, Charles

    2013-12-01

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) is an advanced seismic imaging technique that has recently become computationally feasible in three dimensions, and that is being widely adopted and applied by the oil and gas industry. Here we explore the potential for 3-D FWI, when combined with appropriate marine seismic acquisition, to recover high-resolution high-fidelity P-wave velocity models for subsedimentary targets within the crystalline crust and uppermost mantle. We demonstrate that FWI is able to recover detailed 3-D structural information within a radially faulted dome using a field data set acquired with a standard 3-D petroleum-industry marine acquisition system. Acquiring low-frequency seismic data is important for successful FWI; we show that current acquisition techniques can routinely acquire field data from airguns at frequencies as low as 2 Hz, and that 1 Hz acquisition is likely to be achievable using ocean-bottom hydrophones in deep water. Using existing geological and geophysical models, we construct P-wave velocity models over three potential subsedimentary targets: the Soufrière Hills Volcano on Montserrat and its associated crustal magmatic system, the crust and uppermost mantle across the continent-ocean transition beneath the Campos Basin offshore Brazil, and the oceanic crust and uppermost mantle beneath the East Pacific Rise mid-ocean ridge. We use these models to generate realistic multi-azimuth 3-D synthetic seismic data, and attempt to invert these data to recover the original models. We explore resolution and accuracy, sensitivity to noise and acquisition geometry, ability to invert elastic data using acoustic inversion codes, and the trade-off between low frequencies and starting velocity model accuracy. We show that FWI applied to multi-azimuth, refracted, wide-angle, low-frequency data can resolve features in the deep crust and uppermost mantle on scales that are significantly better than can be achieved by any other geophysical technique, and

  8. High-resolution seismic imaging in deep sea from a joint deep-towed/OBH reflection experiment: application to a Mass Transport Complex offshore Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ker, S.; Marsset, B.; Garziglia, S.; Le Gonidec, Y.; Gibert, D.; Voisset, M.; Adamy, J.

    2010-09-01

    We assess the feasibility of high-resolution seismic depth imaging in deep water based on a new geophysical approach involving the joint use of a deep-towed seismic device (SYSIF) and ocean bottom hydrophones (OBHs). Source signature measurement enables signature deconvolution to be used to improve the vertical resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. The source signature was also used to precisely determine direct traveltimes that were inverted to relocate source and receiver positions. The very high accuracy of the positioning that was obtained enabled depth imaging and a stack of the OBH data to be performed. The determination of the P-wave velocity distribution was realized by the adaptation of an iterative focusing approach to the specific acquisition geometry. This innovative experiment combined with advanced processing succeeded in reaching lateral and vertical resolution (2.5 and 1 m) in accordance with the objectives of imaging fine scale structures and correlation with in situ measurements. To illustrate the technological and processing advances of the approach, we present a first application performed during the ERIG3D cruise offshore Nigeria with the seismic data acquired over NG1, a buried Mass Transport Complex (MTC) interpreted as a debris flow by conventional data. Evidence for a slide nature of a part of the MTC was provided by the high resolution of the OBH depth images. Rigid behaviour may be inferred from movement of coherent material inside the MTC and thrust structures at the base of the MTC. Furthermore, a silt layer that was disrupted during emplacement but has maintained its stratigraphic position supports a short transport distance.

  9. Executive University Managers' Experiences of Strike and Protest Activity: A Qualitative Case Study of a South African University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominguez-Whitehead, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Strike and protest activity at South African universities continues to be prevalent nearly two decades after the dismantling of apartheid, although there has been a shift away from directing strikes and protests against the government (during the apartheid era), to directing them against higher education institutions and management (since the…

  10. Narratives of Agency: The Experiences of Braille Literacy Practitioners in the "Kha Ri Gude" South African Mass Literacy Campaign

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Veronica I.; Romm, Norma R. A.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we locate the "Kha Ri Gude" South African Mass Literacy Campaign within the context of the problem of illiteracy and exclusion in South Africa, while concentrating on various post-apartheid initiatives designed to give visually challenged adults the opportunity to become literate. We shall provide a detailed account of…

  11. Racism Stress Management: Racial Socialization Beliefs and the Experience of Depression and Anger in African American Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Howard C.; Reed, Jocelyn; Bodison, Preston; Bishop, Angela

    1997-01-01

    Studied the relationship between racial socialization and racial identity attitudes in 287 low-income inner-city African American adolescents. Results suggest that beliefs in various types of racial socialization differentially contribute to positive psychological outcomes for adolescents. Gender differences are discussed, and a cultural…

  12. A Peculiar Sensation: Double Consciousness and the Lived Experiences of African American Art Historians at Predominately White Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swaidan, Christina Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Double consciousness is the identity conflict of being Black and being an American (Du Bois, 1903). Double consciousness leads to "identity confusion and inherent contradictions in the collective psyche of people of African descent" (Benjamin, 2005, p. 21.). This study employed grounded theory to collect and analyze the data that emerged from the…

  13. Operating in the Middle: The Experiences of African American Female Transfer Students in STEM Degree Programs at HBCUs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Dimitra Jackson

    2016-01-01

    Increasing the representation of African American females is essential to ensure the United States (U.S.) remains a viable competitor in the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) workforce. With minorities anticipated to represent half of the resident U.S population by 2050, fostering STEM talent among this population is vital.…

  14. Ethnic Identity, Neighborhood Risk, and Adolescent Drug and Sex Attitudes and Refusal Efficacy: The Urban African American Girls' Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corneille, Maya A.; Belgrave, Faye Z.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the impact of ethnic identity and neighborhood risk on drug and sex attitudes and refusal efficacy among early adolescent urban African American females (n = 175). The model also predicted a moderating relationship of ethnic identity on neighborhood risk for drug and sex attitudes and refusal efficacy. Data were collected as…

  15. The African Experience. Volume I: Syllabus Lectures; Volume II: Bibliographic References; Volume IIIA: Introductory Essays; Volume IIIB: Introductory Essays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paden, John N.; Soja, Edward W.

    In response to demands for more and better teaching about Africa in American higher education, the US Office of Education requested that the Program of African Studies at Northwestern University generate a set of teaching materials which could be used in introductory undergraduate courses. Included in these volumes, these materials provide…

  16. From Victory to Freedom: The African American Experience. Curriculum Guide: Elementary and Middle School Course of Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Historical Society, Columbus.

    This elementary and middle school curriculum guide contains three sections of instructional materials about three areas of African American life. The section "Community Life" includes detailed lessons on family, the church, education, business, and organizations. The section "Public Life" provides in-depth lessons on media,…

  17. Retaining and Reclaiming Ourselves: Reflections on a Peer Mentoring Group Experience for New African American Women Professors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Packer-Williams, Catherine L.; Evans, Kathy M.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on the results of a qualitative study of new African American female professors' participation in a peer mentoring group. Three key themes that emerged from the data included peer mentoring as a vehicle to process and cope effectively with microaggressions, increase positive self-identity and self-efficacy as a scholar, and…

  18. Cooperation between scientists, NGOs and industry in support of sustainable fisheries: the South African hake Merluccius spp. trawl fishery experience.

    PubMed

    Field, J G; Attwood, C G; Jarre, A; Sink, K; Atkinson, L J; Petersen, S

    2013-10-01

    This paper examines the increasingly close interaction between natural and social scientists, non-governmental organizations (NGO) and industry, in pursuit of responsible ecosystem-based management of fisheries. South Africa has committed to implementing an ecosystem approach to fisheries management. Management advice stems from multi-stakeholder representation on government-led scientific and management working groups. In the hake Merluccius capensis and Merluccius paradoxus fishery, the primary management measure is an annual total allowable catch (TAC), the level of which is calculated using a management procedure (MP) that is revised approximately every 4 years. Revision of the MP is a consultative process involving most stakeholders, and is based on simulation modelling of projected probable scenarios of resource and fishery dynamics under various management options. NGOs, such as the Worldwide Fund for Nature in South Africa (WWF-SA), have played an important role in influencing consumers, the fishing industry and government to develop responsible fishing practices that minimize damage to marine ecosystems. Cooperation between industry, government and scientists has helped to improve sustainability and facilitated the meeting of market-based incentives for more responsible fisheries. Research includes ecosystem modelling, spatial analysis and ecosystem risk assessment with increasing research focus on social and economic aspects of the fishery. A four-year cooperative experiment to quantify the effect of trawling on benthic community structure is being planned. The food requirements of top predators still need to be included in the TAC-setting formulae and more social and economic research is needed. This paper also demonstrates how NGO initiatives such as Marine Stewardship Council certification and the Southern African Sustainable Seafood Initiative, a traffic light system of classifying seafood for consumers, have contributed to responsible fishing

  19. Lower Crustal Seismicity, Volatiles, and Evolving Strain Fields During the Initial Stages of Cratonic Rifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, C.; Muirhead, J.; Ebinger, C. J.; Tiberi, C.; Roecker, S. W.; Ferdinand-Wambura, R.; Kianji, G.; Mulibo, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    The volcanically active East African rift system in southern Kenya and northern Tanzania transects thick cratonic lithosphere, and comprises several basins characterized by deep crustal seismicity. The US-French-Tanzania-Kenya CRAFTI project aims to understand the role of magma and volatile movement during the initiation and evolution of rifting in cratonic lithosphere. Our 38-station broadband network spans all or parts of fault-bounded rift segments, enabling comparison of lithospheric structure, fault kinematics, and seismogenic layer thickness with age and proximity to the deeply rooted Archaen craton. Seismicity levels are high in all basins, but we find profound differences in seismogenic layer thickness along the length of the rift. Seismicity in the Manyara basin occurs almost exclusively within the lower crust, and in spatial clusters that have been active since 1990. In contrast, seismicity in the ~ 5 My older Magadi basin is localized in the upper crust, and the long border fault bounding the west side of the basin is seismically inactive. Between these two basins lies the Natron rift segment, which shows seismicity between ~ 20 and ~2 km depth, and high concentrations at Oldoinyo Lengai and Gelai volcanoes. Older volcanoes on the uplifted western flank (e.g., Ngorongoro) experience swarms of activity, suggesting that active magmatism and degassing are widespread. Focal mechanisms of the frequent earthquakes recorded across the array are spatially variable, and indicate a stress field strongly influenced by (1) Holocene volcanoes, (2) mechanical interactions between adjacent rift basins, and (3) a far-field ESE-WNW extensional stress regime. We explore the spatial correlation between zones of intense degassing along fault systems and seismicity, and examine the influence of high gas pressures on lower and upper crustal seismicity in this youthful cratonic rift zone.

  20. Using climate model experiments to explore difference between degrees of global warming: lessons from a study of African precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Rachel; Washington, Richard

    2015-04-01

    A 2°C increase in global mean temperature (ΔTg) has been widely adopted as a benchmark for dangerous climate change, and is currently being reviewed under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. However, there has been relatively little research into the implications of 2°C, or any other degree of global warming, for regional climate. This lack of research is particularly pressing in the case of vulnerable regions, including many in Africa. In recognition of this research gap, we conducted an in depth study of changes in African temperature and precipitation associated with 1°C, 1.5°C, 2°C, 3°C, 4°C, and beyond, using output from almost 400 climate model experiments: simulations from international modelling centres (CMIP3 and CMIP5), two perturbed physics ensembles, and a group of five regional models. The implications of global warming are different depending on which models are consulted, but each model consistently shows that temperature and precipitation anomalies are enhanced progressively with global warming. At 1°C, there is little significant change, but from 1.5°C or 2°C anomalies develop which grow in magnitude and spatial extent with global temperature, for example drying over Angola, and wetting in East Africa. The main difference between ΔTg intervals is in the magnitude and spatial extent of change. There do not appear to be rapid accelerations in the rate of change or trend reversals. This is not only true for lower levels of anthropogenic forcing, but also at higher degrees of warming up to 6°C. This finding has potential implications for policy. Given that larger changes in climate are likely to generate greater challenges for society, it suggests that global temperature should be limited to the lowest level possible. It does not imply that 2°C, or any other ΔTg increment, should be a preferred target from the perspective of regional climate. However, it is important to consider whether the approximately linear

  1. Technical Consulting: The African-American Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitfield, Tracy N.

    2010-01-01

    The qualitative research study explored the organizational characteristics necessary in addressing the low concentration of African American technical consultants employed in the information technology industry. Using research participants' professional experience, participants responded to a developed questionnaire. African American technical…

  2. Crustal structures from the Wuyi-Yunkai orogen to the Taiwan orogen: The onshore-offshore wide-angle seismic experiments of the TAIGER and ATSEE projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Yao-Wen; Wang, Chien-Ying; Kuo-Chen, Hao; Jin, Xin; Cai, Hui-Teng; Lin, Jing-Yi; Wu, Francis T.; Yen, Horng-Yuan; Huang, Bor-Shouh; Liang, Wen-Tzong; Okaya, David; Brown, Larry

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge of the crustal structure is important for understanding the tectonic framework and geological evolution of southeastern China and adjacent areas. In this study, we integrated the datasets from the TAIGER (TAiwan Integrated GEodynamic Research) and ATSEE (Across Taiwan Strait Explosion Experiment) projects to resolve onshore-offshore deep crustal seismic profiles from the Wuyi-Yunkai orogen to the Taiwan orogen in southeastern China. Three seismic profiles were resolved, and the longest profile was 850 km. Unlike 2D and 3D first arrival travel-time tomography from previous studies, we used both refracted and reflected phases (Pg, Pn, PcP, and PmP) to model the crustal structures and the crustal reflectors. In total, data from 40 shots, 2 earthquakes, and approximately 1,950 stations were used; 15,612 arrivals were selected among three transects. Using these data, we determined the complex crustal evolution since the Paleozoic era , involving the closed Paleozoic rift basin in central Fujian, the Cenozoic extension due to the South China Sea opening beneath the coastline of southern Fujian, and the on-going collision of the Taiwan orogen. The shape of the Moho, which also reflects the crustal evolution, can be summarized as follows: 30 km deep to the west of Fujian, deepening toward central Fujian ( 35 km), becoming shallower toward the Taiwan Strait ( 28 km), deepening again toward the mountain belt of Taiwan ( 42 km), and becoming shallower toward the Pacific Ocean ( 10 km).

  3. Dynamic Assessment of Seismic Risk (DASR) by Multi-parametric Observations: Preliminary Results of PRIME experiment within the PRE-EARTHQUAKES EU-FP7 Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramutoli, V.; Inan, S.; Jakowski, N.; Pulinets, S. A.; Romanov, A.; Filizzola, C.; Shagimuratov, I.; Pergola, N.; Ouzounov, D. P.; Papadopoulos, G. A.; Parrot, M.; Genzano, N.; Lisi, M.; Alparlsan, E.; Wilken, V.; Tsybukia, K.; Romanov, A.; Paciello, R.; Zakharenkova, I.; Romano, G.

    2012-12-01

    The integration of different observations together with the refinement of data analysis methods, is generally expected to improve our present knowledge of preparatory phases of earthquakes and of their possible precursors. This is also the main goal of PRE-EARTHQUAKES (Processing Russian and European EARTH observations for earthQUAKE precursors Studies) the FP7 Project which, to this aim, committed together, different international expertise and observational capabilities, in the last 2 years. In the learning phase of the project, different parameters (e.g. thermal anomalies, total electron content, radon concentration, etc.), measured from ground and satellite systems and analyzed by using different data analysis approaches, have been studied for selected geographic areas and specific seismic events in the past. Since July 2012 the PRIME (PRE-EARTHQUAKES Real-time Integration and Monitoring Experiment) started attempting to perform, on the base of independent observations collected and integrated in real-time through the PEG (PRE-EARTHQUAKES Geo-portal), a Dynamic Assessment of Seismic Risk (DASR) on selected geographic areas of Europe (Italy-Greece-Turkey) and Asia (Kamchatka, Sakhalin, Japan). In this paper, results so far achieved as well as the potential and opportunities they open for a worldwide Earthquake Observation System (EQuOS) - as a dedicated component of GEOSS (Global Earth Observation System of Systems) - will be presented.

  4. Nonstructural seismic restraint guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, D.M.; Czapinski, R.H.; Firneno, M.J.; Feemster, H.C.; Fornaciari, N.R.; Hillaire, R.G.; Kinzel, R.L.; Kirk, D.; McMahon, T.T.

    1993-08-01

    The Nonstructural Seismic Restraint Guidelines provide general information about how to secure or restrain items (such as material, equipment, furniture, and tools) in order to prevent injury and property, environmental, or programmatic damage during or following an earthquake. All SNL sites may experience earthquakes of magnitude 6.0 or higher on the Richter scale. Therefore, these guidelines are written for all SNL sites.

  5. Next-generation seismic experiments: wide-angle, multi-azimuth, three-dimensional, full-waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Rebecca; Morgan, Joanna; Warner, Michael

    2016-04-01

    There are many outstanding plate-tectonic scale questions that require us to know information about sub-surface physical properties, for example ascertaining the geometry and location of magma chambers and estimating the effective stress along plate boundary faults. These important scientific targets are often too deep, impractical and expensive for extensive academic drilling. Full-waveform inversion (FWI) is an advanced seismic imaging technique that has recently become feasible in three dimensions, and has been widely adopted by the oil and gas industry to image reservoir-scale targets at shallow-to-moderate depths. In this presentation we explore the potential for 3-D FWI, when combined with appropriate marine seismic acquisition, to recover high-resolution high-fidelity P-wave velocity models for sub-sedimentary targets within the crystalline crust and uppermost mantle. Using existing geological and geophysical models, we construct P-wave velocity models over three potential sub-sedimentary targets: the Soufrière Hills Volcano on Montserrat and its associated crustal magmatic system, the downgoing oceanic plate beneath the Nankai subduction margin, and the oceanic crust-uppermost mantle beneath the East Pacific Rise mid-ocean ridge. We use these models to generate realistic multi-azimuth 3-D synthetic seismic data, and attempt to invert these data to recover the original models. We explore the resolution and accuracy, sensitivity to noise and acquisition geometry, ability to invert elastic data using acoustic inversion codes, and the trade-off between low frequencies and starting velocity model accuracy. We will show that FWI applied to multi-azimuth, refracted, wide-angle, low-frequency data can resolve features in the deep crust and uppermost mantle on scales that are significantly better than can be achieved by any other geophysical technique, and that these results can be obtained using relatively small numbers (60-90) of ocean-bottom receivers combined

  6. Seismic Discrimination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-31

    for second-order Sturm - Liouville boundary-value problems, such a count of eigenvalues may be established in terms of the number of zero crossings of...will be operational during the next six months. Section 11 describes a series of activities in the development and imple- mentation of the seismic...element of seismic research. with emphasis on those areas directly related to tho operations of the SDC. Substantial progress has been made in the

  7. Seismic seiches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGarr, Arthur; Gupta, Harsh K.

    2011-01-01

    Seismic seiche is a term first used by Kvale (1955) to discuss oscillations of lake levels in Norway and England caused by the Assam earthquake of August 15, 1950. This definition has since been generalized to apply to standing waves set up in closed, or partially closed, bodies of water including rivers, shipping channels, lakes, swimming pools and tanks due to the passage of seismic waves from an earthquake.

  8. Ethnic identity, neighborhood risk, and adolescent drug and sex attitudes and refusal efficacy: the urban African American girls' experience.

    PubMed

    Corneille, Maya A; Belgrave, Faye Z

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the impact of ethnic identity and neighborhood risk on drug and sex attitudes and refusal efficacy among early adolescent urban African American females (n = 175). The model also predicted a moderating relationship of ethnic identity on neighborhood risk for drug and sex attitudes and refusal efficacy. Data were collected as part of a larger drug education program and analyzed via hierarchical multiple regression. The analyses controlled for household structure and menarche. Results indicated a direct relationship of higher ethnic identity and higher sexual refusal efficacy, higher disapproval of drug use, and lowered intentions to use drugs. Neighborhood risk was directly related to lower disapproval of drug use. There was a small moderating effect of ethnic identity on neighborhood risk for intention to use drugs. Findings provide support for prevention programs for African American youth that seek to reduce risk behaviors by increasing ethnic identity, particularly in low resource communities.

  9. High-Frequency Seismic Waves generated by Building-Shaking Experiments and Surface Wave Group Velocity Estimates from the Cross-Correlation of Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, T.; Okamoto, T.

    2013-12-01

    Modeling high-frequency (>1 Hz) seismic waves is known to be difficult but it is extremely important for earthquake hazard mitigation as many buildings have resonant frequencies above 1 Hz. In this study, we examine high-frequency waves at 1.64 Hz, generated by building-shaking experiments in California. The specific data we will examine are seismic data generated by shaking experiments of the Millikan Library between 2000 and 2002, located on the campus of California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, California. The excited wavefields were recorded by the broadband seismic network in the region (~150 stations), Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN). There were about 60 stations with good signal-to-noise ratios among SCSN stations. The maximum distance for signal detection was 323 km (station GRA). Based on numerical calculations for a regional seismic structure model (SCEC Community Velocity Model 11.9), we can show that the signals are dominated by surface waves (at 1.11 Hz and 1.64 Hz), whose energy is confined to shallow depths. The focus of this report will be on the cross-correlated signals between a station in the building (station MIK) and other stations. This cross-correlation may be viewed as a source deconvolution process and will let us focus on propagation in the medium. This cross-correlated phase can be expressed as a line integral of wavenumber along a propagation path for a direct (ballistic) phase, although it may contain complexity from the caustics (the Maslov index). Somewhat to our surprise, despite the fact that we are dealing with high frequency waves (1.64 Hz), we observe well-defined constant phase in many cross-correlated seismograms. If we knew the number of cycles between the source (Millikan) and a station, we could estimate phase velocity in principle but this is not possible and seems extremely hard because the number of cycles is about 50-100 or more. However, our signals do show frequency-dependence within a narrow (signal

  10. Juan de Fuca Plate Ridge-to-Trench Experiment: initial results from active source seismic imaging of the Juan de Fuca plate and Cascadia fore-arc (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbotte, S. M.; Canales, J.; Carton, H. D.; Han, S.; Gibson, J. C.; Janiszewski, H. A.; Horning, G.; Nedimovic, M. R.; Abers, G. A.; Trehu, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Active source seismic data were acquired during the Juan de Fuca Ridge-to-Trench experiment (June-July 2012) to characterize the evolution and structure of the Juan de Fuca plate from formation at the ridge, through evolution in the plate interior, to subduction at the Cascadia trench. The survey provides plate-scale images of the sediments, crust, and shallowest mantle along two ridge-perpendicular transects, one extending from Axial seamount to the Oregon margin near Hydrate Ridge and the other from near Endeavour segment to Grays Harbor offshore Washington. In addition, a 450 km long trench-parallel line ~10 km seaward of the Cascadia deformation front was acquired to characterize variations in plate structure along the margin. Coincident long-streamer (8 km) multi-channel seismic (MCS) and wide-angle ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) data were collected along each transect. Using these data, our current investigations focus on the properties of the thick sediment blanket covering the Juan de Fuca plate and evidence for fluid flow at the deformation front, crustal structure within the plate interior and near the deformation front, and tracking the downgoing plate beneath the margin. Highlights include the discovery of numerous pockmarks on the seafloor providing evidence of active fluid flow up to 60 km west of the deformation front. Along the Oregon transect, a bright decollement horizon is imaged at ~1sec twtt above basement whereas at the Washington margin, protothrusts of the deformation front reach to the top of the oceanic crust. Variations in sediment properties are documented within the margin-parallel transect with changes in the stratigraphic level of decollement. While crustal thickness is quite uniform along the margin (~ 6 km), variations in crustal reflectivity and in shallowest mantle velocities are observed over ~30-50 km length scales that could be related to structural variations in the Cascadia subduction zone. Further landward, the top of the

  11. Topography and tectonics of the central New Madrid seismic zone: Results of numerical experiements using a three-dimensional boundary element program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomberg, Joan; Ellis, Michael

    1994-01-01

    We present results of a series of numerical experiments designed to test hypothetical mechanisms that derive deformation in the New Madrid seismic zone. Experiments are constrained by subtle topography and the distribution of seismicity in the region. We use a new boundary element algorithm that permits calcuation of the three-dimensional deformation field. Surface displacement fields are calculated for the New Madrid zone under both far-field (plate tectonics scale) and locally derived driving strains. Results demonstrate that surface displacement fields cannot distinguish between either a far-field simple or pure shear strain field or one that involves a deep shear zone beneath the upper crustal faults. Thus, neither geomorphic nor geodetic studies alone are expected to reveal the ultimate driving mechanism behind the present-day deformation. We have also tested hypotheses about strain accommodation within the New Madrid contractional step-over by including linking faults, two southwest dipping and one vertical, recently inferred from microearthquake data. Only those models with step-over faults are able to predict the observed topography. Surface displacement fields for long-term, relaxed deformation predict the distribution of uplift and subsidence in the contractional step-over remarkably well. Generation of these displacement fields appear to require slip on both the two northeast trending vertical faults and the two dipping faults in the step-over region, with very minor displacements occurring during the interseismic period when the northeast trending vertical faults are locked. These models suggest that the gently dippling central step-over fault is a reverse fault and that the steeper fault, extending to the southeast of the step-over, acts as a normal fault over the long term.

  12. The Tanami deep seismic reflection experiment: An insight into gold mineralization and Paleoproterozoic collision in the North Australian Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goleby, Bruce R.; Huston, David L.; Lyons, Patrick; Vandenberg, Leon; Bagas, Leon; Davies, Brett M.; Jones, Leonie E. A.; Gebre-Mariam, Musie; Johnson, Wade; Smith, Tim; English, Luc

    2009-07-01

    Imaging of a major collision zone between the Tanami region and Aileron Province of the Arunta Orogen in Northern Australia, and recognition that several of the major gold deposits within the Tanami region are within near-surface antiformal stacks or uplifted and exhumed crustal sections associated with major crustal-penetrating shear zones, are fundamental results from the 2005 Tanami Seismic Collaborative Research Project. The suture, which is interpreted to have resulted from collision, separates the northwest-dipping structural grain of the Aileron Province crust in the south from the southeast-dipping structural grain of the Tanami crust in the northwest. The collision between the Tanami region and the Aileron Province is interpreted to have occurred prior to ca. 1840 Ma. The correlation between the surface extension of crustal-penetrating shear zones that extend to the Moho boundary and the locations of known gold-rich mineral fields is significant and has implications for minerals explorers within the Tanami region, and elsewhere. In the near-surface, where the crustal-penetrating structures cut relatively shallow upper crustal Tanami Group rocks, there is a significant increase in the degree of local deformation and results in through-going thrust faults, associated pop-up structures, ramp anticlines and antiformal stacking. All known ore deposits appear to be located within these more complexly deformed zones and therefore have a direct association with larger-scale structures.

  13. Seismic Studies

    SciTech Connect

    R. Quittmeyer

    2006-09-25

    This technical work plan (TWP) describes the efforts to develop and confirm seismic ground motion inputs used for preclosure design and probabilistic safety 'analyses and to assess the postclosure performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. As part of the effort to develop seismic inputs, the TWP covers testing and analyses that provide the technical basis for inputs to the seismic ground-motion site-response model. The TWP also addresses preparation of a seismic methodology report for submission to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The activities discussed in this TWP are planned for fiscal years (FY) 2006 through 2008. Some of the work enhances the technical basis for previously developed seismic inputs and reduces uncertainties and conservatism used in previous analyses and modeling. These activities support the defense of a license application. Other activities provide new results that will support development of the preclosure, safety case; these results directly support and will be included in the license application. Table 1 indicates which activities support the license application and which support licensing defense. The activities are listed in Section 1.2; the methods and approaches used to implement them are discussed in more detail in Section 2.2. Technical and performance objectives of this work scope are: (1) For annual ground motion exceedance probabilities appropriate for preclosure design analyses, provide site-specific seismic design acceleration response spectra for a range of damping values; strain-compatible soil properties; peak motions, strains, and curvatures as a function of depth; and time histories (acceleration, velocity, and displacement). Provide seismic design inputs for the waste emplacement level and for surface sites. Results should be consistent with the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) for Yucca Mountain and reflect, as appropriate, available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at

  14. Next-generation seismic experiments - II: wide-angle, multi-azimuth, 3-D, full-waveform inversion of sparse field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Joanna; Warner, Michael; Arnoux, Gillean; Hooft, Emilie; Toomey, Douglas; VanderBeek, Brandon; Wilcock, William

    2016-02-01

    3-D full-waveform inversion (FWI) is an advanced seismic imaging technique that has been widely adopted by the oil and gas industry to obtain high-fidelity models of P-wave velocity that lead to improvements in migrated images of the reservoir. Most industrial applications of 3-D FWI model the acoustic wavefield, often account for the kinematic effect of anisotropy, and focus on matching the low-frequency component of the early arriving refractions that are most sensitive to P-wave velocity structure. Here, we have adopted the same approach in an application of 3-D acoustic, anisotropic FWI to an ocean-bottom-seismometer (OBS) field data set acquired across the Endeavour oceanic spreading centre in the northeastern Pacific. Starting models for P-wave velocity and anisotropy were obtained from traveltime tomography; during FWI, velocity is updated whereas anisotropy is kept fixed. We demonstrate that, for the Endeavour field data set, 3-D FWI is able to recover fine-scale velocity structure with a resolution that is 2-4 times better than conventional traveltime tomography. Quality assurance procedures have been employed to monitor each step of the workflow; these are time consuming but critical to the development of a successful inversion strategy. Finally, a suite of checkerboard tests has been performed which shows that the full potential resolution of FWI can be obtained if we acquire a 3-D survey with a slightly denser shot and receiver spacing than is usual for an academic experiment. We anticipate that this exciting development will encourage future seismic investigations of earth science targets that would benefit from the superior resolution offered by 3-D FWI.

  15. Drill-rig noise suppression using the Karhunen-Loéve transform for seismic-while-drilling experiment at Brukunga, South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Baichun; Bóna, Andrej; Zhou, Binzhong; King, Andrew; Dupuis, Christian; Kepic, Anton

    2016-02-01

    Diamond-impregnated drill bits are known to be low energy vibration seismic sources. With the strong interference from the drill rig, it is difficult to obtain the drill-bit wavefield with a surface receiver array. To overcome the challenge of surface wave interference generated from the rig for seismic-while-drilling (SWD), we need to separate the rig- and bit-generated signals. To this end, we apply two wavefield separation methods, the Karhunen-Loéve (KL) transform and the f - k filter, and compare their performance. The applicability of these methods is based on the drill rig and drill bit having different spatial positions. While the drill-bit spatial position changes during the process of drilling, the drill rig remains stationary. This results in the source wavefields from the drill rig and the drill-bit having different characteristics, and allows us to separate and extract the drill-bit signal. We use a synthetic model to compare the KL transform and f - k filter. Both techniques are robust when the noise wavefield has consistent amplitude moveout. However, for changing amplitudes, such as the rig noise, which has an unrepeatable wavefield due to power amplitude variation, we show that the KL transform performs better in such situations. We also show the results of signal analysis of the SWD experiment data acquired from Brukunga, South Australia. We demonstrate the feasibility of the KL transform in separating the coherent noises from the stationary drill rig in a hard rock drilling environment, particularly emphasising the suppression of the surface and direct waves from the rig. The results show that drill-rig noise can be effectively suppressed in the correlation domain.

  16. Underthrusting of Tarim beneath the Tien Shan and deep structure of their junction zone: Main results of seismic experiment along MANAS Profile Kashgar-Song-Köl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, V. I.; Alekseev, D. V.; Batalev, V. Yu.; Bataleva, E. A.; Belyaev, I. V.; Bragin, V. D.; Dergunov, N. T.; Efimova, N. N.; Leonov, M. G.; Munirova, L. M.; Pavlenkin, A. D.; Roecker, S.; Roslov, Yu. V.; Rybin, A. K.; Shchelochkov, G. G.

    2010-03-01

    The results of reflection CMP seismic profiling of the Central Tien Shan in the meridional tract 75-76° E from Lake Song-Köl in Kyrgyzstan to the town of Kashgar in China are considered. The seismic section demonstrating complex heterogeneous structure of the Earth’s crust and reflecting its near-horizontal delamination with vertical and inclined zones of compositional and structural differentiation was constructed from processing of initial data of reflection CMP seismic profiling, earthquake converted-wave method (ECWM), and seismic tomography. The most important is the large zone of underthrusting of the Tarim Massif beneath the Tien Shan.

  17. "Give a Brotha a Break!": The Experiences and Dilemmas of Middle-Class African American Male Students in White Suburban Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Beverly M.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Context: Today, in the era of the first African American president, approximately one third of all African Americans live in suburban communities, and their children are attending suburban schools. Although most research on the education of African American students, particularly males, focuses on their plight in urban schooling, what…

  18. Oncology pharmacy units: a safety policy for handling hazardous drugs and related waste in low- and middle-income African countries—Angolan experience

    PubMed Central

    da Conceição, Ana Vaz; Bernardo, Dora; Lopes, Lygia Vieira; Miguel, Fernando; Bessa, Fernanda; Monteiro, Fernando; Santos, Cristina; Oliveira, Blasques; Santos, Lúcio Lara

    2015-01-01

    In African countries, higher rates of late-stage cancers at the time of first diagnosis are a reality. In this context, hazardous drugs (HDs), such as chemotherapy, play an important role and have immense benefits for patients’ treatment. HDs should be handled under specific conditions. At least a class 5 environment primary engineering control (PEC), physically located in an appropriate buffer area, is mandatory for sterile HDs compounding, as well as administrative control, personal protective equipment, work practices and other engineering and environmental controls, in order to protect the environment, patient, and worker. The aim of this study is to describe the Angolan experience regarding the development of oncology pharmacy units and discuss international evidence-based guidelines on handling HDs and related waste. Measures to incorporate modern and economical solutions to upgrade or build adequate and safe facilities and staff training, in order to comply with international guidelines in this area, are crucial tasks for African countries of low and middle income. PMID:26557873

  19. Experiences of racial discrimination and relation to sexual risk for HIV among a sample of urban black and African American men.

    PubMed

    Reed, E; Santana, M C; Bowleg, L; Welles, S L; Horsburgh, C R; Raj, A

    2013-04-01

    This study aimed to examine racial discrimination and relation to sexual risk for HIV among a sample of urban black and African American men. Participants of this cross-sectional study were black and African American men (N = 703) between the ages of 18 and 65 years, recruited from four urban clinical sites in the northeast. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to analyze the relation of reported racial discrimination to the following: (1) sex trade involvement, (2) recent unprotected sex, and (3) reporting a number of sex partners in the past 12 months greater than the sample average. The majority of the sample (96%) reported racial discrimination. In adjusted analyses, men reporting high levels of discrimination were significantly more likely to report recent sex trade involvement (buying and/or selling) (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) range = 1.7-2.3), having recent unprotected vaginal sex with a female partner (AOR = 1.4, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.1-2.0), and reporting more than four sex partners in the past year (AOR = 1.4, 95% CI, 1.1-1.9). Findings highlight the link between experiences of racial discrimination and men's sexual risk for HIV.

  20. Seismic Discrimination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-12-31

    dyn-cm. It can be seen that there is a wide range of the potential con- tribution of different seismic zones to excitation of the Chandler wobble ...Correction to the Excitation of the Chandler Wobble by Earthquakes," Geophys. J. R. Astron. Soc. 32, 203-217 (1973). 22. S. C. Solomon, N. H. Sleep

  1. Seismic Tomography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Don L.; Dziewonski, Adam M.

    1984-01-01

    Describes how seismic tomography is used to analyze the waves produced by earthquakes. The information obtained from the procedure can then be used to map the earth's mantle in three dimensions. The resulting maps are then studied to determine such information as the convective flow that propels the crustal plates. (JN)

  2. Seismic Symphonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strinna, Elisa; Ferrari, Graziano

    2015-04-01

    The project started in 2008 as a sound installation, a collaboration between an artist, a barrel organ builder and a seismologist. The work differs from other attempts of sound transposition of seismic records. In this case seismic frequencies are not converted automatically into the "sound of the earthquake." However, it has been studied a musical translation system that, based on the organ tonal scale, generates a totally unexpected sequence of sounds which is intended to evoke the emotions aroused by the earthquake. The symphonies proposed in the project have somewhat peculiar origins: they in fact come to life from the translation of graphic tracks into a sound track. The graphic tracks in question are made up by copies of seismograms recorded during some earthquakes that have taken place around the world. Seismograms are translated into music by a sculpture-instrument, half a seismograph and half a barrel organ. The organ plays through holes practiced on paper. Adapting the documents to the instrument score, holes have been drilled on the waves' peaks. The organ covers about three tonal scales, starting from heavy and deep sounds it reaches up to high and jarring notes. The translation of the seismic records is based on a criterion that does match the highest sounds to larger amplitudes with lower ones to minors. Translating the seismogram in the organ score, the larger the amplitude of recorded waves, the more the seismogram covers the full tonal scale played by the barrel organ and the notes arouse an intense emotional response in the listener. Elisa Strinna's Seismic Symphonies installation becomes an unprecedented tool for emotional involvement, through which can be revived the memory of the greatest disasters of over a century of seismic history of the Earth. A bridge between art and science. Seismic Symphonies is also a symbolic inversion: the instrument of the organ is most commonly used in churches, and its sounds are derived from the heavens and

  3. Report for borehole explosion data acquired in the 1999 Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment (LARSE II), Southern California: Part I, description of the survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuis, Gary S.; Murphy, Janice M.; Okaya, David A.; Clayton, Robert W.; Davis, Paul M.; Thygesen, Kristina; Baher, Shirley A.; Ryberg, Trond; Benthien, Mark L.; Simila, Gerry; Perron, J. Taylor; Yong, Alan K.; Reusser, Luke; Lutter, William J.; Kaip, Galen; Fort, Michael D.; Asudeh, Isa; Sell, Russell; Van Schaack, John R.; Criley, Edward E.; Kaderabek, Ronald; Kohler, Will M.; Magnuski, Nickolas H.

    2001-01-01

    The Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment (LARSE) is a joint project of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC). The purpose of this project is to produce seismic images of the subsurface of the Los Angeles region down to the depths at which earthquakes occur, and deeper, in order to remedy a deficit in our knowledge of the deep structure of this region. This deficit in knowledge has persisted despite over a century of oil exploration and nearly 70 years of recording earthquakes in southern California. Understanding the deep crustal structure and tectonics of southern California is important to earthquake hazard assessment. Specific imaging targets of LARSE include (a) faults, especially blind thrust faults, which cannot be reliably detected any other way; and (b) the depths and configurations of sedimentary basins. Imaging of faults is important in both earthquake hazard assessment but also in modeling earthquake occurrence. Earthquake occurrence cannot be understood unless the earthquake-producing "machinery" (tectonics) is known (Fuis and others, 2001). Imaging the depths and configurations of sedimentary basins is important because earthquake shaking at the surface is enhanced by basin depth and by the presence of sharp basin edges (Wald and Graves, 1998, Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities, 1995; Field and others, 2001). (Sedimentary basins are large former valleys now filled with sediment eroded from nearby mountains.) Sedimentary basins in the Los Angeles region that have been investigated by LARSE include the Los Angeles, San Gabriel Valley, San Fernando Valley, and Santa Clarita Valley basins. The seismic imaging surveys of LARSE include recording of earthquakes (both local and distant earthquakes) along several corridors (or transects) through the Los Angeles region and also recording of man-made sources along these same corridors. Man-made sources have included airguns offshore and borehole

  4. Seismicity of the eastern Hellenic Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruestle, A.; Kueperkoch, L.; Rische, M.; Meier, T.; Friederich, W.; Egelados Working Group

    2012-04-01

    The Hellenic Subduction Zone (HSZ) is the seismically most active region of Europe. The African plate is subducting beneath the Aegean lithosphere with a relative velocity of 4 cm per year. A detailed picture of the microseismicity of the eastern HSZ was obtained by the recordings of the temporary networks CYCNET (September 2002 - September 2005) and EGELADOS (October 2005 - March 2007). In total, nearly 7000 earthquakes were located with a location uncertainty of less than 20 km. The SE Aegean is dominated by (1) shallow intraplate seismicity within the Aegean plate, by (2) interplate seismicity at the plate contact and by (3) intermediate deep seismicity along the subducting African slab. Strong shallow seismicity in the upper plate is observed along the Ptolemy graben south of Crete extending towards the Karpathos Basin, indicating intense recent deformation of the forearc. In contrary, low shallow seismicity around Rhodes indicates only minor seismic crustal deformation of the upper plate. An almost NS-striking zone of microseismicity has been located, running from the Karpathos basin via the Nisyros volcanic complex towards the EW striking Gökova graben. In the SE Aegean the geometry of the Wadati-Benioff-Zone (WBZ) within the subducting African plate is revealed in detail by the observed microseismicity. Between about 50 to 100 km depth a continuous band of intermediate deep seismicity describes the strongly curved geometry of the slab. From the central to the eastern margin of the HSZ, the dip direction of the WBZ changes from N to NW with a strong increase of the dip angle beneath the eastern Cretan Sea. The margin of the dipping African slab is marked by an abrupt end of the observed WBZ beneath SW Anatolia. Below 100 km depth, the WBZ of the eastern HSZ is dominated by an isolated cluster of intense intermediate deep seismicity (at 100-180 km depth) beneath the Nisyros volcanic complex. It has an extension of about 100x80 km and is build up of 3 parallel

  5. Initial constraints on crustal structure across the Suwanee Suture and South Georgia Basin from the SUGAR seismic refraction experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shillington, D. J.; Lizarralde, D.; Harder, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    Some of the most important unresolved questions in plate tectonics concern the formation and rupture of continents. How does the accretion of terranes contribute to the construction of continental lithosphere, and what processes enable continental lithosphere to rupture? The South Georgia Basin was at the center of the most recent sequence of continental collision and rifting events to shape eastern North America. It is the largest of the failed Mesozoic rift basins that formed during the breakup of Pangea. It straddles the Suwannee Suture, the only well-defined remnant of the Alleghenian suture that joined North America and Gondwana, forming Pangea. The South Georgia Basin also lies at the center of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP). Here we present initial results from the first phase of the SUwanee Suture and GA Rift basin (SUGAR) project, an active-source seismic refraction project to image the crustal structure across these features. During March 2014, we acquired data along a ~325-km-long, NW-SE oriented profile that crossed the Suwanne Suture and western part of South Georgia Basin, extending from north of Columbus, GA to northernmost Florida east of Jasper, FL. The profile was densely instrumented with single-channel RekTek 125A seismometers ("Texans") spaced at ~250 m and deployed along state and country roads, yielding a total of 1193 seismometers along the profile. Thirty-three students and young scientists were involved in the deployment and recovery. The sources were 100 to 1800 lb shots spaced at ~20-50 km. The data are of exceptionally high quality. On nearly all shots, we observe arrivals out to the largest shot-receiver offsets. Within the basin, refractions through the sedimentary section with apparent velocities of ~3-4 km/s are observed to maximum offsets of 7 km. Crustal refractions are observed at a wide-range of offsets with apparent velocities increasing from ~5.5 km/s to as high as ~7.25 km/s. At offsets greater than 150-180 km

  6. Extension and magmatism across the Suwanee Suture and South Georgia Basin from the SUGAR seismic refraction experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shillington, D. J.; Lizarralde, D.; Harder, S. H.; Marzen, R.; Kaip, G.; Accardo, N. J.; Gibson, J. C.; Nauer, A.

    2015-12-01

    The South Georgia Basin was at the center of the most recent sequence of continental collision and rifting events to shape eastern North America. It is the largest of the failed Mesozoic rift basins that formed during the breakup of Pangea, and it straddles the Suwannee Suture, the only well-defined remnant of the Alleghenian suture that joined North America and Gondwana. The South Georgia Basin also lies at the center of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP). It is thus an excellent location to examine the importance of magmatism and pre-existing structures on continental extension. Here we present preliminary results from the SUwanee Suture and GA Rift basin (SUGAR) project, an active-source seismic refraction project to image the crustal structure across these features. In March 2014, we acquired data along SUGAR Line 1, a ~325-km-long, NW-SE oriented profile that crossed the Suwanee Suture and western part of South Georgia Basin. The profile was densely instrumented with 1193 single-channel RekTek 125A seismographs ("Texans") spaced at ~250 m. The sources were 100 to 1800 lb shots spaced at ~20-50 km. In August 2015, we will acquire data along SUGAR Lines 2 and 3. SUGAR Line 2 is a ~450-km-long profile spanning the eastern part of the South Georgia Basin and two possible locations for the Suwanee Suture. We will deploy 1983 "Texans" spaced at 250 m and detonate seventeen 400 to 1600 lb shots spaced at ~16-50 km. SUGAR Line 3 targets the Brunswick magnetic anomaly; we plan to instrument a 100-km-long profile with 700 Texans spaced at 150 m and eleven 200 lb shots spaced at ~10 km. Over 68 students participated in field work for SUGAR. Preliminary models of SUGAR Line 1 indicate that the crust thins to ~33 km beneath the South Georgia Basin. Anomalously high lower crustal velocities occur beneath the basin in the area of the greatest crustal thinning and may represent mafic intrusions from CAMP/synrift magmatism. We will present initial velocity models of

  7. "Come on Baby. You Know I Love You": African American Women's Experiences of Communication with Male Partners and Disclosure in the Context of Unwanted Sex.

    PubMed

    Gutzmer, Kyle; Ludwig-Barron, Natasha T; Wyatt, Gail E; Hamilton, Alison B; Stockman, Jamila K

    2016-05-01

    We examined African American women's experiences of communication with their male intimate partners a couple of hours before and after an incident of unwanted sex. We also examined women's experiences of disclosure following an incident of unwanted sex. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with a community-based sample of sexually active African American women (n = 19) reporting at least one incident of sexual coercion (i.e., being pressured into unwanted sex without consent) by an intimate male partner since the age of 18. Our analysis was guided by "the sexual division of power" from Connell's (1987) theory of gender and power. Data were analyzed inductively by examining the interviews for common themes in the following domains: communication before the unwanted sex, communication after the unwanted sex, and disclosure to others. Men pressured partners for unwanted sex through verbal and non-verbal tactics, ranging from pestering and blunt requests for sex to verbal bullying and violence. Many women responded by clearly saying no. However, many women also described eventually ceasing to resist their partners and engaging in unwanted sex. After the unwanted sex, men actively and passively avoided discussing the incident. Although many women discussed the unwanted sex with family and friends, less women disclosed to trained professionals. In some cases, women did not discuss the incident with anyone at all. These findings indicate that, when addressing sexual violence against women, there is a need to target men as well as the norms of masculinity that underpin physical and sexual violence against women.

  8. Analysis of the seismic signals generated by controlled single-block rockfalls on soft clay shales sediments: the Rioux Bourdoux slope experiment (French Alps).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibert, Clément; Provost, Floriane; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Bourrier, Franck; Berger, Frédéric; Bornemann, Pierrick; Borgniet, Laurent; Tardif, Pascal; Mermin, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the dynamics of rockfalls is critical to mitigate the associated hazards but is made very difficult by the nature of these natural disasters that makes them hard to observe directly. Recent advances in seismology allow to determine the dynamics of the largest landslides on Earth from the very low-frequency seismic waves they generate. However, the vast majority of rockfalls that occur worldwide are too small to generate such low-frequency seismic waves and thus these methods cannot be used to reconstruct their dynamics. However, if seismic sensors are close enough, these events will generate high-frequency seismic signals. Unfortunately we cannot yet use these high-frequency seismic records to infer parameters synthetizing the rockfall dynamics as the source of these waves is not well understood. One of the first steps towards understanding the physical processes involved in the generation of high-frequency seismic waves by rockfalls is to study the link between the dynamics of a single block propagating along a well-known path and the features of the seismic signal generated. We conducted controlled releases of single blocks of limestones in a gully of clay-shales (e.g. black marls) in the Rioux Bourdoux torrent (French Alps). 28 blocks, with masses ranging from 76 kg to 472 kg, were released. A monitoring network combining high-velocity cameras, a broadband seismometer and an array of 4 high-frequency seismometers was deployed near the release area and along the travel path. The high-velocity cameras allow to reconstruct the 3D trajectories of the blocks, to estimate their velocities and the position of the different impacts with the slope surface. These data are compared to the seismic signals recorded. As the distance between the block and the seismic sensors at the time of each impact is known, we can determine the associated seismic signal amplitude corrected from propagation and attenuation effects. We can further compare the velocity, the

  9. Seismic Discrimination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-03-31

    Determining Phase and Group Velocities of Surface Seismic Waves 21 B. Group-Velocity Measurements Across Eurasia from Mashad SRO 22 C. Group-Velocity...Albuquerque), MAIO ( Mashad ), GUMO (Guam), NWAO (Australia), SNZO (New Zealand), and TATO (Taiwan). Fairly extensive data are now a|ailable for the...include a new rapid algorithm for the determination of group and phase velocity, a series of observations of Rayleigh-wave dispersion at the Mashad

  10. Seismic testing

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, S.

    1981-10-01

    Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) research programs in seismic testing to improve earthquake design guidelines lowers the safety-design costs of nuclear power plants. Explosive tests that simulate earthquakes help to determine how structures respond to ground motion and how these are related to soil and geologic conditions at a specific site. Explosive tests develop data for simulation using several computer codes. Photographs illustrate testing techniques. 6 references. (DCK)

  11. High Voltage Seismic Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogacz, Adrian; Pala, Damian; Knafel, Marcin

    2015-04-01

    This contribution describes the preliminary result of annual cooperation of three student research groups from AGH UST in Krakow, Poland. The aim of this cooperation was to develop and construct a high voltage seismic wave generator. Constructed device uses a high-energy electrical discharge to generate seismic wave in ground. This type of device can be applied in several different methods of seismic measurement, but because of its limited power it is mainly dedicated for engineering geophysics. The source operates on a basic physical principles. The energy is stored in capacitor bank, which is charged by two stage low to high voltage converter. Stored energy is then released in very short time through high voltage thyristor in spark gap. The whole appliance is powered from li-ion battery and controlled by ATmega microcontroller. It is possible to construct larger and more powerful device. In this contribution the structure of device with technical specifications is resented. As a part of the investigation the prototype was built and series of experiments conducted. System parameter was measured, on this basis specification of elements for the final device were chosen. First stage of the project was successful. It was possible to efficiently generate seismic waves with constructed device. Then the field test was conducted. Spark gap wasplaced in shallowborehole(0.5 m) filled with salt water. Geophones were placed on the ground in straight line. The comparison of signal registered with hammer source and sparker source was made. The results of the test measurements are presented and discussed. Analysis of the collected data shows that characteristic of generated seismic signal is very promising, thus confirms possibility of practical application of the new high voltage generator. The biggest advantage of presented device after signal characteristics is its size which is 0.5 x 0.25 x 0.2 m and weight approximately 7 kg. This features with small li-ion battery makes

  12. Salt Tectonics of the Abenaki Graben and Central Sable Subbasin: Insights from Regional Seismic Interpretation and Four-Dimensional Scaled Physical Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Clarke

    The tectono-stratigraphic evolution of the Abenaki graben and central Sable Subbasin of the north-central Scotian margin has been highly influenced by salt deformation. Shimeld (2004) has identified five salt subprovinces defined by varying salt structural styles across the margin. Although it has been hypothesized these varying structural styles are the result of complex salt basin morphologies and variable Mesozoic post-rift sedimentation patterns, there is still a lack of understanding of how these first order controlling factors specifically controlled the tectono-stratigraphic evolution across the margin. Disappointing petroleum exploration results from the last round of deepwater drilling supports the further need to investigate how variable salt basin morphologies, and depositional rates and patterns controlled salt deformation as well as the evolution of the margin. The purpose of this project is to integrate regional 2D seismic reflection data including the ION-GXT NovaSPAN dataset, with 4D scaled physical experiments to better understand the tectono-stratigraphic evolution of the Abenaki Graben and central Sable Subbasin. The study area is located in Shimeld's salt Subprovince III that comprises an extensive salt tongue-canopy system that has spread upwards of 80 km on the secondary detachment level. Seismic interpretation indicates an original salt basin characterized by a landward tapering wedge representing the Abenaki Graben, an intermediate high referred to as the North Sable High (NSH), and a symmetric graben with basin step representing the Sable Subbasin. The geometry of the salt basin floor is composed of rifted basement blocks and syn-rift fill that was originally been infilled with upwards of 2 km of Argo salt. Scaled 4D physical experiments simulating the study area indicate the presence of 4 kinematic domains from the shelf to slope including a: (1) Salt Weld and Pillow, (2) Normal Fault and Reactive Diapir, (3) Passive Diapir and Expulsion

  13. The potential impact of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in Africa: Considerations and early lessons learned from the South African experience.

    PubMed

    Madhi, Shabir A; Nunes, Marta C

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) into the South African public immunization program since 2009 adopted a novel vaccination schedule of 3 doses at 6, 14 and 40 weeks of age. Over the past 5 y it has been shown that infant PCV immunization in South Africa is effective in reducing the burden of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected children. Furthermore, indirect protection of unvaccinated age-groups (including high risk groups such as HIV-infected adults) against IPD was demonstrated despite the absence of any substantial catch-up campaign of older children. This indirect effect against IPD is corroborated by the temporal reduction in vaccine-serotype colonization among age-groups targeted for PCV immunization as well as unvaccinated HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected adults, which was evident within 2 y of PCV introduction into the immunization program. Vaccine effectiveness has also been demonstrated in children against presumed bacterial pneumonia. The evaluation of the impact of PCV in South Africa, however, remains incomplete. The knowledge gaps remaining include the evaluation of PCV on the incidence of all-cause pneumonia hospitalization among vaccinated and unvaccinated age-groups. Furthermore, ongoing surveillance is required to determine whether there is ongoing replacement disease by non-vaccine serotypes, which could offset the early gains associated with the immunization program in the country.

  14. Did African Americans experience the 'Antebellum Puzzle'? Evidence from the United States Colored Troops during the Civil War.

    PubMed

    Haines, Michael R; Craig, Lee A; Weiss, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The "Antebellum Puzzle" has been the subject of comment since the 1980s. It involves the paradox that, although the American economy was experiencing rapid economic growth in the several decades prior to the Civil War (1861-1865), the stature of native-born white males had been declining for the birth cohorts from the late 1820s. This was also true for free blacks (Komlos, 1992), but was apparently not true for slaves. This paper uses a sample of 8592 adult back males who were recruits to the United States Colored Troops during the Civil War. They were recruited significantly among ex-slaves. Recruits from the birth cohorts of 1838-1842 were then linked to characteristics of their counties of birth from the 1840 and 1850 U.S. Censuses. Unlike slaves in the coastal manifests, these African American recruits showed evidence of a decline in heights from the birth cohorts of the 1820s onwards. Unlike the native-white recruits, however, the characteristics of their counties of birth had relatively less power in explaining differences in heights. There was some support for the mortality hypothesis, but the nutrition hypothesis needs to be interpreted in light of the fact that slave owners has a strong interest in monitoring and controlling the diet of their slaves.

  15. Adolescent experiences of violence and relation to violence perpetration beyond young adulthood among an urban sample of Black and African American males.

    PubMed

    Reed, Elizabeth; Lawrence, Danielle A; Santana, M C; Welles, C Seth L; Horsburgh, C Robert; Silverman, Jay G; Rich, John A; Raj, Anita

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine if experiences of physical violence during early and late adolescence (12-21 years) places urban Black males at increased risk for interpersonal violence perpetration beyond young adulthood (30 years and older). Participants of this cross-sectional study were Black and African American men (N = 455) between the ages of 30 and 65 years, recruited from four urban clinical sites in the Northeast. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to analyze the relation of adolescent experiences of violence to: (1) past 6 month street violence involvement and (2) past year intimate partner violence perpetration. Ten percent of the sample reported that they experienced adolescent victimization. Men reporting adolescent victimization were significantly more likely to report past 6-month street violence involvement (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) = 3.2, 95 % CI = 1.7-6.3) and past 6 month intimate partner violence perpetration (AOR = 2.8, 95 % CI = 1.8-5.4) compared to men who did not report such victimization. Study findings suggest that in order to prevent adulthood perpetration of violence, more work is needed to address experiences of victimization among young Black males, particularly violence experienced during adolescence.

  16. Upper crustal structure from the Santa Monica Mountains to the Sierra Nevada, Southern California: Tomographic results from the Los Angeles Regional Seismic Experiment, Phase II (LARSE II)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lutter, W.J.; Fuis, G.S.; Ryberg, T.; Okaya, D.A.; Clayton, R.W.; Davis, P.M.; Prodehl, C.; Murphy, J.M.; Langenheim, V.E.; Benthien, M.L.; Godfrey, N.J.; Christensen, N.I.; Thygesen, K.; Thurber, C.H.; Simila, G.; Keller, Gordon R.

    2004-01-01

    In 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey and the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) collected refraction and low-fold reflection data along a 150-km-long corridor extending from the Santa Monica Mountains northward to the Sierra Nevada. This profile was part of the second phase of the Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment (LARSE II). Chief imaging targets included sedimentary basins beneath the San Fernando and Santa Clarita Valleys and the deep structure of major faults along the transect, including causative faults for the 1971 M 6.7 San Fernando and 1994 M 6.7 Northridge earthquakes, the San Gabriel Fault, and the San Andreas Fault. Tomographic modeling of first arrivals using the methods of Hole (1992) and Lutter et al. (1999) produces velocity models that are similar to each other and are well resolved to depths of 5-7.5 km. These models, together with oil-test well data and independent forward modeling of LARSE II refraction data, suggest that regions of relatively low velocity and high velocity gradient in the San Fernando Valley and the northern Santa Clarita Valley (north of the San Gabriel Fault) correspond to Cenozoic sedimentary basin fill and reach maximum depths along the profile of ???4.3 km and >3 km , respectively. The Antelope Valley, within the western Mojave Desert, is also underlain by low-velocity, high-gradient sedimentary fill to an interpreted maximum depth of ???2.4 km. Below depths of ???2 km, velocities of basement rocks in the Santa Monica Mountains and the central Transverse Ranges vary between 5.5 and 6.0 km/sec, but in the Mojave Desert, basement rocks vary in velocity between 5.25 and 6.25 km/sec. The San Andreas Fault separates differing velocity structures of the central Transverse Ranges and Mojave Desert. A weak low-velocity zone is centered approximately on the north-dipping aftershock zone of the 1971 San Fernando earthquake and possibly along the deep projection of the San Gabriel Fault. Modeling of gravity data, using

  17. Investigating Instructional Practices of an African American Male Mathematics Teacher with Underachieving African American Male Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muhammad, Rhonda K.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the instructional practices of an experienced African American mathematics teacher to determine his perceived capabilities in augmenting academic proficiency for his African American male students. Provided in this descriptive case study are the lived experiences of an African American male teacher working to move…

  18. The boundary conditions for simulations of a shake-table experiment on the seismic response of 3D slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Liang; Cong, Shengyi; Ling, Xianzhang; Ju, Nengpan

    2017-01-01

    Boundary conditions can significantly affect a slope's behavior under strong earthquakes. To evaluate the importance of boundary conditions for finite element (FE) simulations of a shake-table experiment on the slope response, a validated three-dimensional (3D) nonlinear FE model is presented, and the numerical and experimental results are compared. For that purpose, the robust graphical user-interface "SlopeSAR", based on the open-source computational platform OpenSees, is employed, which simplifies the effort-intensive pre- and post-processing phases. The mesh resolution effect is also addressed. A parametric study is performed to evaluate the influence of boundary conditions on the FE model involving the boundary extent and three types of boundary conditions at the end faces. Generally, variations in the boundary extent produce inconsistent slope deformations. For the two end faces, fixing the y-direction displacement is not appropriate to simulate the shake-table experiment, in which the end walls are rigid and rough. In addition, the influence of the length of the 3D slope's top face and the width of the slope play an important role in the difference between two types of boundary conditions at the end faces (fixing the y-direction displacement and fixing the ( y, z) direction displacement). Overall, this study highlights that the assessment of a comparison between a simulation and an experimental result should be performed with due consideration to the effect of the boundary conditions.

  19. Deformation experiments under conditions of the blueschist- to eclogite-facies transition: implications for the upper Wadati-Benioff plane of seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Incel, S.; Schubnel, A.; Hilairet, N.; Labrousse, L.; Chopin, C.; Renner, J.; Wang, Y.; Ferrand, T. P.; John, T.

    2015-12-01

    Blueschist samples were experimented on a Griggs, a piston-cylinder (PC) and a D-DIA apparatus. Starting materials were sieved powders (<30 μm) from a natural sample collected on Alpine Corsica which initially contained approx. 60 % glaucophane and 40 % lawsonite. After mineral separation, we produced powders with a high (80 % glaucophane, 20 % lawsonite) and a low (30 % glaucophane, 70 % lawsonite) glaucophane content. Samples of cold-pressed powders of the two compositions were deformed in the Griggs and D-DIA apparatus at low temperatures (<550 °C) at which lawsonite is stable but glaucophane should decompose into jadeite and talc, and at high temperatures (up to 850 °C) at which lawsonite dehydrates. Powders were also isostatically annealed at comparable experimental conditions in the PC-apparatus to provide a microstructural reference. The use of synchrotron X-rays during the D-DIA experiments enables us to follow the strain evolution (radiography) while deforming the sample, but also to monitor phase changes in-situ using X-ray diffraction. We also monitored acoustic emissions (AE). Depending on the sample mineralogy and the applied pressure, AEs were either observed at low temperature around 380-420 °C or in a range from 610-850 °C. In some samples AEs were triggered in both ranges. Microstructural observations (SEM, Raman, Microprobe, X-ray tomography) on retrieved samples reveal that samples deformed under deviatoric stress exhibit faults almost exclusively, whereas those under hydrostatic conditions do not. Our preliminary interpretation of stress, strain, microstructural and mineralogical evolution during deformation, is that the two temperature ranges of AE activity correspond to transformational faulting due to the glaucophane breakdown into jadeite and talc and lawsonite dehydration. We interpret these micro-earthquakes as possible laboratory analogs of intermediate depth earthquakes occurring within the upper Wadati-Benioff plane of seismicity

  20. Experiences and Perceptions of Interpersonal, Environmental, and Institutional Racism among African-American Students in Psychology Graduate Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrell, Tracey

    Racist incidents that graduate students in psychology may experience can be reflective of Eurocentric values and forces which permeate present institutions. To better understand these forces, the experiences and perceptions of racism as experienced by minority graduate students are explored. Seventeen doctoral students in psychology, who…

  1. Palliative care and support for persons with HIV/AIDS in 7 African countries: implementation experience and future priorities.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Carla S; Memiah, Peter; Henley, Yvonne B; Kaiza-Kangalawe, Angela; Shumbusho, Anna Joyce; Obiefune, Michael; Enejoh, Victor; Stanis-Ezeobi, Winifred; Eze, Charity; Odion, Ehekhaye; Akpenna, Donald; Effiong, Amana; Miriti, Kenneth; Aduda, Samson; Oko, John; Melaku, Gebremedhin D; Baribwira, Cyprien; Umutesi, Hassina; Shimabale, Mope; Mugisa, Emmanuel; Amoroso, Anthony

    2012-06-01

    To combat morbidity and mortality from the worldwide epidemic of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the United States Congress implemented a President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) in 30 resource-limited countries to integrate combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) for both prevention and cure. Over 35% of eligible persons have been successfully treated. Initial legislation cited palliative care as an essential aspect of this plan but overall health strengthening became critical to sustainability of programming and funding priorities shifted to assure staffing for care delivery sites; laboratory and pharmaceutical infrastructure; data collection and reporting; and financial management as individual countries are being encouraged to assume control of in-country funding. Given infrastructure requisites, individual care delivery beyond ART management alone has received minimal funding yet care remains necessary for durable viral suppression and overall quality of life for individuals. Technical assistance staff of one implementing partner representing seven African countries met to clarify domains of palliative care compared with the substituted term "care and support" to understand potential gaps in on-going HIV care. They prioritized care needs as: 1) mental health (depression and other mood disorders); 2) communication skills (age-appropriate disclosure of HIV status); 3) support of care-providers (stress management for sustainability of a skilled HIV workforce); 4) Tied Priorities: symptom management in opportunistic infections; end-of-life care; spiritual history-taking; and 5) Tied Priorities: attention to grief-related needs of patients, their families and staff; and management of HIV co-morbidities. This process can inform health policy as funding transitions to new priorities.

  2. The quality of life of HIV-infected South African university students: Experiences with the WHOQOL-HIV-Bref.

    PubMed

    Cronje, Johan Herman; Williams, Margaret; Steenkamp, Liana; Venter, Danie; Elkonin, Diane

    2017-05-01

    HIV and AIDS has serious repercussions on psychological, social and physical well-being, and the assessment of Quality of Life (QoL) of people living with HIV and AIDS is essential to gauge how these challenges are met. The WHOQoL-HIV Bref forms part of a suite of instruments developed by the World Health Organisation. The purpose of this paper is to describe the quality of life of a sample of HIV-infected students at a South African university, as well as explain the internal consistency between questions within each of the QoL domains. A descriptive, cross-sectional study design using a quantitative approach was applied. A non-probability, purposive sampling approach was utilized and students enrolled in the antiretroviral therapy or wellness programme were invited to voluntarily participate in this study. The WHOQOL-HIV Bref was self-administered after explanation of the questions by a registered, trained health care professional. A total of 63 students returned completed questionnaires that were included in the analysis. Acceptable to good reliability scores were established for the following domains: Level of Independence; Social Relations; Environment and Spiritual or Personal Beliefs. Assessing QoL in the sample, the lowest score was for "Spirituality" and the highest "Social Relations". The "Physical" and "Psychological" domain scores for females were significantly lower than the score for males. There was no significant difference between any of the domain scores among participants with CD4 cell counts above or below 350 cells/mm(3). In general the performance of this sample is encouraging and it is recommended that the measure be utilized for QoL screening, and further research. The WHOQOL-HIV Bref for students does not contain an academic wellness component which should be added considering the significant effects of HIV on neuropsychological functioning. Also further investigation into the reasons for poor scores obtained in physical and psychological

  3. Testing the Accuracy of Aerial Surveys for Large Mammals: An Experiment with African Savanna Elephants (Loxodonta africana)

    PubMed Central

    Schlossberg, Scott; Chase, Michael J.; Griffin, Curtice R.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate counts of animals are critical for prioritizing conservation efforts. Past research, however, suggests that observers on aerial surveys may fail to detect all individuals of the target species present in the survey area. Such errors could bias population estimates low and confound trend estimation. We used two approaches to assess the accuracy of aerial surveys for African savanna elephants (Loxodonta africana) in northern Botswana. First, we used double-observer sampling, in which two observers make observations on the same herds, to estimate detectability of elephants and determine what variables affect it. Second, we compared total counts, a complete survey of the entire study area, against sample counts, in which only a portion of the study area is sampled. Total counts are often considered a complete census, so comparing total counts against sample counts can help to determine if sample counts are underestimating elephant numbers. We estimated that observers detected only 76% ± SE of 2% of elephant herds and 87 ± 1% of individual elephants present in survey strips. Detectability increased strongly with elephant herd size. Out of the four observers used in total, one observer had a lower detection probability than the other three, and detectability was higher in the rear row of seats than the front. The habitat immediately adjacent to animals also affected detectability, with detection more likely in more open habitats. Total counts were not statistically distinguishable from sample counts. Because, however, the double-observer samples revealed that observers missed 13% of elephants, we conclude that total counts may be undercounting elephants as well. These results suggest that elephant population estimates from both sample and total counts are biased low. Because factors such as observer and habitat affected detectability of elephants, comparisons of elephant populations across time or space may be confounded. We encourage survey teams to

  4. The role of fluid pressure in induced vs. triggered seismicity: insights from rock deformation experiments on carbonates.

    PubMed

    Scuderi, Marco M; Collettini, Cristiano

    2016-04-26

    Fluid overpressure is one of the primary mechanisms for tectonic fault slip, because fluids lubricate the fault and fluid pressure reduces the effective normal stress that holds the fault in place. However, current models of earthquake nucleation, based on rate- and state- friction laws, imply that stable sliding is favoured by the increase of pore fluid pressure. Despite this controversy, currently, there are only a few studies on the role of fluid pressure under controlled, laboratory conditions. Here, we use laboratory experiments, to show that the rate- and state- friction parameters do change with increasing fluid pressure. We tested carbonate gouges from sub hydrostatic to near lithostatic fluid pressure conditions, and show that the friction rate parameter (a - b) evolves from velocity strengthening to velocity neutral behaviour. Furthermore, the critical slip distance, Dc, decreases from about 90 to 10 μm. Our data suggest that fluid overpressure plays an important role in controlling the mode of fault slip. Since fault rheology and fault stability parameters change with fluid pressure, we suggest that a comprehensive characterization of these parameters is fundamental for better assessing the role of fluid pressure in natural and human induced earthquakes.

  5. The role of fluid pressure in induced vs. triggered seismicity: insights from rock deformation experiments on carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuderi, Marco M.; Collettini, Cristiano

    2016-04-01

    Fluid overpressure is one of the primary mechanisms for tectonic fault slip, because fluids lubricate the fault and fluid pressure reduces the effective normal stress that holds the fault in place. However, current models of earthquake nucleation, based on rate- and state- friction laws, imply that stable sliding is favoured by the increase of pore fluid pressure. Despite this controversy, currently, there are only a few studies on the role of fluid pressure under controlled, laboratory conditions. Here, we use laboratory experiments, to show that the rate- and state- friction parameters do change with increasing fluid pressure. We tested carbonate gouges from sub hydrostatic to near lithostatic fluid pressure conditions, and show that the friction rate parameter (a ‑ b) evolves from velocity strengthening to velocity neutral behaviour. Furthermore, the critical slip distance, Dc, decreases from about 90 to 10 μm. Our data suggest that fluid overpressure plays an important role in controlling the mode of fault slip. Since fault rheology and fault stability parameters change with fluid pressure, we suggest that a comprehensive characterization of these parameters is fundamental for better assessing the role of fluid pressure in natural and human induced earthquakes.

  6. The role of fluid pressure in induced vs. triggered seismicity: insights from rock deformation experiments on carbonates

    PubMed Central

    Scuderi, Marco M.; Collettini, Cristiano

    2016-01-01

    Fluid overpressure is one of the primary mechanisms for tectonic fault slip, because fluids lubricate the fault and fluid pressure reduces the effective normal stress that holds the fault in place. However, current models of earthquake nucleation, based on rate- and state- friction laws, imply that stable sliding is favoured by the increase of pore fluid pressure. Despite this controversy, currently, there are only a few studies on the role of fluid pressure under controlled, laboratory conditions. Here, we use laboratory experiments, to show that the rate- and state- friction parameters do change with increasing fluid pressure. We tested carbonate gouges from sub hydrostatic to near lithostatic fluid pressure conditions, and show that the friction rate parameter (a − b) evolves from velocity strengthening to velocity neutral behaviour. Furthermore, the critical slip distance, Dc, decreases from about 90 to 10 μm. Our data suggest that fluid overpressure plays an important role in controlling the mode of fault slip. Since fault rheology and fault stability parameters change with fluid pressure, we suggest that a comprehensive characterization of these parameters is fundamental for better assessing the role of fluid pressure in natural and human induced earthquakes. PMID:27112408

  7. Infrasound Generation from the HH Seismic Hammer.

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Kyle Richard

    2014-10-01

    The HH Seismic hammer is a large, "weight-drop" source for active source seismic experiments. This system provides a repetitive source that can be stacked for subsurface imaging and exploration studies. Although the seismic hammer was designed for seismological studies it was surmised that it might produce energy in the infrasonic frequency range due to the ground motion generated by the 13 metric ton drop mass. This study demonstrates that the seismic hammer generates a consistent acoustic source that could be used for in-situ sensor characterization, array evaluation and surface-air coupling studies for source characterization.

  8. Near-surface Fun with Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, M.

    2015-12-01

    What is happening in the near-surface often has a direct effect on human activity. Seismic exploration has routinely targeted geology at depths of kilometers to tens of kilometers. However, these techniques can be applied to answer questions about shallower targets. Several recent experiments demonstrate seismic applicability to near-surface problems. One example is passive seismic monitoring using ambient noise to identify shallow changes and potential hazards in a producing hydrocarbon field. Another example is the use of seismic reflection data from within the water column to determine layering caused by temperature and salinity differences in depth. A third example is identifying historical elevation changes along coast lines using seismic reflection data. These examples show that exploration seismic methods can be effectively used for a variety of near-surface applications.

  9. The Underrepresentation of African American Women Faculty: A Phenomenological Study Exploring the Experiences of McKnight Doctoral Fellow Alumna Serving in the Professoriate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Dionne J.

    2013-01-01

    While African American women have been participating in higher education for more than a century, they remain significantly underrepresented among college and university professors in America. This study was pursued in an attempt to address the underrepresentation of African American women faculty at public and private universities within the…

  10. Diagnosed but Not Defeated: The Experiences of African-American Males with Past Histories of Enrollment in Special Education Who Successfully Attend Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickland-Dixon, Kennedi

    2013-01-01

    African-American males are disappearing at alarming rates before our eyes through racially driven practices that secure their position in the penal system and special education. Though many scholars in the field of education have highlighted alarming rates of incarceration and overrepresentation in special education for African-American males,…

  11. The Role of Race and Gender in the Mentoring Experiences and Career Success of African American Female Senior Executive Administrators in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, Taffye Benson

    2009-01-01

    From 1995 to 2005 education doctoral degrees conferred to African American females increased by 92%, however the increase in availability among this population for higher education administrator positions has not kept pace with the growth of African American female higher education doctoral graduates (Ryu, 2008). Such data have spurred inquiry…

  12. Seismic velocity anisotropy and heterogeneity beneath the Mantle Electromagnetic and Tomography Experiment (MELT) region of the East Pacific Rise from analysis of P and S body waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammond, W.C.; Toomey, D.R.

    2003-01-01

    We use teleseismic P and S delay times and shear wave splitting measurements to constrain isotropic and anisotropic heterogeneity in the mantle beneath the southern East Pacific Rise (SEPR). The data comprise 462 P and S delay times and 18 shear wave splitting observations recorded during the Mantle Electromagnetic and Tomography (MELT) Experiment. We estimate the mantle melt content (F) and temperature (T) variation from the isotropic velocity variation. Our results indicate that the maximum variation in F beneath our array is between zero and ???1.2%, and maximum variation in T is between zero and ???100 K. We favor an explanation having partial contributions from both T and F. We approximate the seismic anisotropy of the upper mantle with hexagonal symmetry, consistent with the assumption of two dimensionality of mantle flow. Our new tomographic technique uses a nonlinear inversion of P and slow S polarization delay times to simultaneously solve for coupled VP and VS heterogeneity throughout the model and for the magnitude of anisotropy within discrete domains. The domain dimensions and the dip of the anisotropy are fixed for each inversion but are varied in a grid search, obtaining the misfit of the models to the body wave delay data and to split times of vertically propagating S waves. The data misfit and the isotropic heterogeneity are sensitive to domain dimensions and dip of anisotropy. In a region centered beneath the SEPR the best average dip of the hexagonal symmetry axis is horizontal or dipping shallowly (<30??) west. Given the resolution of our data, a subaxial region characterized by vertically aligned symmetry axes may exist but is limited to be <80 km deep. We infer that the mantle flow beneath the SEPR is consistent with shallow asthenospheric return flow from the direction of the South Pacific superswell.

  13. Seismic anisotropy of the lithosphere around the Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ) based on teleseismic body-wave data of the TOR experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plomerová, J.; Babuška, V.; Vecsey, L.; Kouba, D.; TOR Working Group

    2002-12-01

    A passive teleseismic experiment (TOR), traversing the northern part of the Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ) in Germany, Denmark and Sweden, recorded data for tomography of the upper mantle with a lateral resolution of few tens of kilometers as well as for a detailed study of seismic anisotropy. A joint inversion of teleseismic P-residual spheres and shear-wave splitting parameters allows us to retrieve the 3D orientation of dipping anisotropic structures in different domains of the sub-crustal lithosphere. We distinguish three major domains of different large-scale fabric divided by first-order sutures cutting the whole lithosphere thickness. The Baltic Shield north of the Sorgenfrei-Tornquist Zone (STZ) is characterised by lithosphere thickness around 175 km and the anisotropy is modelled by olivine aggregate of hexagonal symmetry with the high-velocity (ac) foliation plane striking NW-SE and dipping to NE. Southward of the STZ, beneath the Norwegian-Danish Basin, the lithosphere thins abruptly to about 75 km. In this domain, between the STZ and the so-called Caledonian Deformation Front (CDF), the anisotropic structures strike NE-SW and the high-velocity (ac) foliation dips to NW. To the south of the CDF, beneath northern Germany, we observe a heterogeneous lithosphere with variable thickness and anisotropic structures with high velocity dipping predominantly to SW. Most of the anisotropy observed at TOR stations can be explained by a preferred olivine orientation frozen in the sub-crustal lithosphere. Beneath northern Germany, a part of the shear-wave splitting is probably caused by a present-day flow in the asthenosphere.

  14. Segmented African Lithosphere Beneath Anatolia Imaged by Teleseismic P-Wave Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biryol, Cemal; Zandt, George; Beck, Susan; Ozacar, Atilla

    2010-05-01

    Anatolia, a part of the Alpine-Himalayan orogenic belt, is shaped by a variety of complex tectonic processes that define the major tectonic provinces across which different deformation regimes exist. Collision related plateau formation dominates the present lithospheric deformation to the east and slab roll-back related back-arc extension takes place in the west. The two zones are connected at the northern part of the region by strike-slip faulting along the right-lateral North Anatolian Fault Zone. Recent seismological studies show that the Eastern Anatolian Plateau (EAP) is supported by hot asthenosphereric material that was emplaced beneath the plateau following the detachment of subducted Arabian lithosphere. The westward continuation of the deeper structure of Anatolia was previously less well constrained due to the lack of geophysical observations. In order to study the deeper lithosphere and mantle structure beneath Anatolia, we used teleseismic P-wave tomography and data from several temporary and permanent seismic networks deployed in the region. A major part of the data comes from the North Anatolian Fault passive seismic experiment (NAF) that consists of 39 broadband seismic stations operated at the north central part of Anatolia between 2005 and 2008. We also used data collected from permanent seismic stations of the National Earthquake Monitoring Center (NEMC) and stations from the Eastern Turkey Seismic Experiment (ETSE). Approximately 34,000 P-wave travel time residuals, measured in multiple frequency bands, are inverted using approximate finite-frequency sensitivity kernels. Our tomograms reveal a fast anomaly that corresponds to the subducted portion of the African lithosphere along the Cyprean Arc. This fast anomaly dips northward beneath central Anatolia with an angle of approximately 45 degrees. However, the anomaly disappears rather sharply to the east beneath the western margin of the EAP and to the west beneath the Isparta Angle. The western

  15. If They Come, We Should Listen: African American Education Majors' Perceptions of a Predominantly White University Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Anna Marie

    2003-01-01

    The recruitment and retention of minority students in teacher education programs has received the attention of schools of education. For those minority students who choose to pursue a career in teaching and decide to attend a predominantly white university, their experience must be appreciated for the challenges it presents. This study was…

  16. "I'm Used to It Now": Experiences of Homophobia among Queer Youth in South African Township Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Msibi, Thabo

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores how sexually marginalised black high-school students from conservative schooling contexts in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, experience schooling. It draws on queer theories through life narratives in presenting findings from a small-scale interventionist project designed by the author. The project involved 14 participants…

  17. High resolution seismic data coupled to Multibeam bathymetry of Stromboli island collected in the frame of the Stromboli geophysical experiment: implications with the marine geophysics and volcanology of the Aeolian Arc volcanic complex (Sicily, Southern Tyrrhenian sea, Italy).

    PubMed

    Aiello, Gemma; Di Fiore, Vincenzo; Marsella, Ennio; Passaro, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    New high resolution seismic data (Subbottom Chirp) coupled to high resolution Multibeam bathymetry collected in the frame of the Stromboli geophysical experiment aimed at recording active seismic data and tomography of the Stromboli Island are here presented. The Stromboli geophysical experiment has been already carried out based on onshore and offshore data acquisition in order to investigate the deep structure and the location of the magma chambers of the Stromboli volcano. A new detailed swath bathymetry of Stromboli Island is here shown and discussed to reconstruct an up-to-date morpho-bathymetry and marine geology of the area compared to the volcanologic setting of the Aeolian Arc volcanic complex. Due to its high resolution the new Digital Terrain Model of the Stromboli Island gives interesting information about the submerged structure of the volcano, particularly about the volcano-tectonic and gravitational processes involving the submarine flanks of the edifice. Several seismic units have been identified based on the geologic interpretation of Subbottom Chirp profiles recorded around the volcanic edifice and interpreted as volcanic acoustic basement pertaining to the volcano and overlying slide chaotic bodies emplaced during its complex volcano-tectonic evolution. They are related to the eruptive activity of Stromboli, mainly poliphasic and to regional geological processes involving the intriguing geology of the Aeolian Arc, a volcanic area still in activity and needing improved research interest.

  18. Race, health, and the African Diaspora.

    PubMed

    Spigner, Clarence

    Health inequalities exist throughout the African Diaspora and are viewed in this article as largely color-coded. In developed, developing, and undeveloped nations today, "racial" stratification is consistently reflected in an inability to provide adequate health regardless of national policy or ideology. For instance, African Americans experience less than adequate health care very similar to Blacks in Britain, in spite of each nations differing health systems. Latin America's Africana Negra communities experience poorer health similar to Blacks throughout the Caribbean. The African continent itself is arguably the poorest on earth. A common history of racism correlates with health disparities across the African Diaspora.

  19. Observational study of rock mass response to mining induced seismic events and controlled blasting experiments at deep level gold mines in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milev, A.; Durrheim, R. J.; Nakatani, M.; Yabe, Y.; Naoi, M. M.; Ogasawara, H.

    2012-12-01

    The strong ground motion generated by mining induced seismic events was studied to characterize the rock mass response and to estimate the site effect on the surface of the underground excavations. A stand-alone instruments, especially designed for recording strong ground motions, were installed underground at a number of deep level gold mines in South Africa. The instruments were recording data at the surface of the stope hangingwalls. A maximum value of 3 m/s was measured. Therefore data were compared to the data recorded in the solid rock by the mine seismic networks to determine the site response. The site response was defined as the ratio of the peak ground velocity measured at the surface of the excavations to the peak ground velocity inferred from the mine seismic data measured in the solid rocks. The site response measured at all mines studied was found to be 9 ± 3 times larger on average. In addition a number of simulated rockbursts were conducted underground in order to estimate the rock mass response when subjected to strong ground motion. The rockbursts were simulated by means of large blasts detonated in solid rock close to the sidewall of a tunnel. The numerical models used in the design of the simulated rockbursts were calibrated by small blasts taking place at each experimental site. A dense array of shock type accelerometers was installed along the blasting wall to monitor the attenuation of the strong ground motion as a function of the distance from the source. The attenuation of peak particle velocity was found to be proportional to R-1.7. In order to improve the understanding of the rock mass behaviour around deep level mining the rate of tilt was monitor and then compare to the seismic ground motion. A good correspondence between the rate of tilt and seismic ground motion was found. The rate of coseismic and aseismic tilt, as well as seismicity recorded by the mine seismic network, are approximately constant until the daily blasting time

  20. Seismic sources

    DOEpatents

    Green, M.A.; Cook, N.G.W.; McEvilly, T.V.; Majer, E.L.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1987-04-20

    Apparatus is described for placement in a borehole in the earth, which enables the generation of closely controlled seismic waves from the borehole. Pure torsional shear waves are generated by an apparatus which includes a stator element fixed to the borehole walls and a rotor element which is electrically driven to rapidly oscillate on the stator element to cause reaction forces transmitted through the borehole walls to the surrounding earth. Longitudinal shear waves are generated by an armature that is driven to rapidly oscillate along the axis of the borehole, to cause reaction forces transmitted to the surrounding earth. Pressure waves are generated by electrically driving pistons that press against opposite ends of a hydraulic reservoir that fills the borehole. High power is generated by energizing the elements for more than about one minute. 9 figs.

  1. A three-dimensional tomographic velocity model above Mid Atlantic magma chamber from simulated seafloor multi-channel seismic refraction experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnulf, A. F.; Harding, A. J.; Kent, G.; Singh, S. C.

    2009-12-01

    With multi-channel seismic (MCS) data recorded on the sea surface, refraction arrivals from the upper crust typically arrive as secondary arrivals after the seafloor reflection, and therefore they do not contain any information on near seafloor velocity. Here we use a Synthetic On Bottom Experiment (SOBE) method to downward continue both shots and receivers to a depth close to the seafloor, which causes refraction arrivals from the upper crust to become first arrivals that can be followed to close to zero source receiver offsets, providing information about near surface velocity. Moreover, the high density of shots and receivers in MCS-based travel-time tomography produces a multiplicity of ray paths never reached by classical travel time tomography methods based on OBS datasets, and hence providing a high-resolution velocity of the sub-surface. We have applied this new technique to the MCS data from the SISMOMAR 3D seismic reflection survey carried out in 2005 over the Lucky Strike Segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The survey area was 18.55 km by 3.8 km, with a shot spacing of 37.5 m, receiver spacing of 12.5 m and the line spacing of 100 m. It has been the first segment of the MAR to be shown to have a quasi-steady state magma chamber, and we are creating now a high resolution velocity model to investigate in detail the links between magmatism, hydrothermal circulation and faulting in this segment. First, the data was downward continued to 1.0-1.7 km below the sea surface. Then a highly efficient algorithm was used to pick ~800,000 travel times. Because of the the high density of ray paths (up to 7 million), the first arrivals of every fifth shots was picked. To control the picking consistency along a line, picks from the preceding shot was used to guide the current one. Travel time residuals, ~10 ms, and chi-squared of the final 2D model testify to excellent picking accuracy. A 3D velocity cube was then interpolated using ten equi-spaced 2D velocity models

  2. African Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abiodun, Rowland

    2001-01-01

    No single traditional discipline can adequately supply answers to the many unresolved questions in African art history. Because of the aesthetic, cultural, historical, and, not infrequently, political biases, already built into the conception and development of Western art history, the discipline of art history as defined and practiced in the West…

  3. African Pentecostalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrard, David J.

    2009-01-01

    The diversity of African Pentecostalism, its early colonial and missionary history and its current characteristics are described and analysed. Reference is made to methods of training and forms of leadership, and suggestions are made about the reasons for its growth and persistence. (Contains 19 notes.)

  4. First Generation U.S.-Born Africans and the Expanded Nigrescence Theory: The Stretching of a Theory for a "Different" African American Experience at a Predominantly White Institution of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Walt, Patrick S.

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation explores the applicability of a "stretched" Expanded Nigrescence theory (Cross and Vandiver 2001; NT-E) to the racial identities/attitudes of six First Generation U.S.-Born Africans (FGAs) at a predominantly White institution (PWI). This instrumental case study blended ethnographic techniques and surveys to tell the stories of…

  5. New Methodology for Rapid Seismic Risk Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melikyan, A. E.; Balassanian, S. Y.

    2002-05-01

    Seismic risk is growing worldwide and is, increasingly, a problem of developing countries. Along with growing urbanization future earthquakes will have more disastrous social and economic consequences. Seismic risk assessment and reduction are important goals for each country located in seismically active zone. For Armenia these goals are of primary importance because the results of studies carried out by Armenian NSSP for assessment of the losses caused by various types of disasters in Armenia had shown that earthquakes are the most disastrous hazard for Armenia. The strategy for seismic risk reduction in 1999 was adopted by the Government of Armenia as a high priority state program. The world experience demonstrates that for efficient response the rapid assessment of seismic losses is necessary. There are several state-of-the-art approaches for seismic risk assessment (Radius, Hazus, etc.). All of them required large amount of various input data, which is impossible to collect in many developing countries, in particular in Armenia. Taking into account this very serious problem existing for developing countries, as well as rapid seismic risk assessment need immediately after strong earthquake the author undertake the attempt to contribute into a new approach for rapid seismic risk assessment under the supervision of Prof. S. Balassanian. The analysis of numerous factors influencing seismic risk in Armenia shows that the following elements contribute most significantly to the possible losses: seismic hazard; density of population; vulnerability of structures. Proposed approach for rapid seismic risk assessment based on these three factors has been tested for several seismic events. These tests have shown that such approach might represent from 80 to 90 percent of real losses.

  6. Southern Africa seismic structure and source studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ming

    1998-09-01

    The upper mantle seismic velocity structure beneath southern Africa is investigated using travel time and waveform data. Waveform and travel time data used in this study come mainly from a large mine tremor in South Africa (msb{b} 5.6) recorded on stations of the southern Africa and the Tanzania Broadband Seismic Experiment. Auxiliary data along similar profiles are obtained from other moderate events within eastern and southern Africa. The waveform data from the large tremor show upper mantle triplications for both the 400 and 670-km discontinuities between 18sp° and 27sp° distance. The most notable feature of the data is a large, late P phase that propagates to at least 27sp°. This phase is striking because of its late arrival time (as much as 15 seconds after direct P at 27sp°) and high amplitude relative to the first arrival. Travel times from all available stations are used to invert for the P wave velocity structure down to 800 km depth and S wave velocity structure down to 200 km using the Wiechert-Herglotz (W-H) inversion technique. The P wave velocities from the uppermost mantle down to 300 km are as much as 3% higher than the global average and are slightly slower than the global average between 300 and 400 km depths. The velocity gradient between 300 and 400 km is 0.0015 1/s. The S wave travel time data yield fast velocities above 200-km depth. The S wave velocity structure appears inconsistent with the P wave structure model indicating varying Poisson's ratio in the upper mantle. Little evidence is found for a pronounced upper mantle low velocity zone. Both sharp and gradual-change 400-km discontinuities are favored by the waveform data. The 670-km discontinuity appears as a gradual-change zone. The source mechanism of the mb 5.6 mining tremor itself is important for seismic discrimination and insight into mining tremor sources. Source parameters for this event as well as some other large mining tremors from the South African gold mines are studied

  7. The ENAM Explosive Seismic Source Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, S. H.; Magnani, M. B.

    2013-12-01

    We present the results of the pilot study conducted as part of the eastern North American margin (ENAM) community seismic experiment (CSE) to test an innovative design of land explosive seismic source for crustal-scale seismic surveys. The ENAM CSE is a community based onshore-offshore controlled- and passive-source seismic experiment spanning a 400 km-wide section of the mid-Atlantic East Coast margin around Cape Hatteras. The experiment was designed to address prominent research questions such as the role of the pre-existing lithospheric grain on the structure and evolution of the ENAM margin, the distribution of magmatism, and the along-strike segmentation of the margin. In addition to a broadband OBS deployment, the CSE will acquire multichannel marine seismic data and two major onshore-offshore controlled-source seismic profiles recording both marine sources (airguns) and land explosions. The data acquired as part of the ENAM CSE will be available to the community immediately upon completion of QC procedures required for archiving purposes. The ENAM CSE provides an opportunity to test a radically new and more economical design for land explosive seismic sources used for crustal-scale seismic surveys. Over the years we have incrementally improved the performance and reduced the cost of shooting crustal seismic shots. These improvements have come from better explosives and more efficient configuration of those explosives. These improvements are largely intuitive, using higher velocity explosives and shorter, but larger diameter explosive configurations. However, recently theoretical advances now allow us to model not only these incremental improvements, but to move to more radical shot designs, which further enhance performance and reduce costs. Because some of these designs are so radical, they need experimental verification. To better engineer the shots for the ENAM experiment we are conducting an explosives test in the region of the ENAM CSE. The results of

  8. Design of the IPIRG-2 simulated seismic forcing function

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R.; Scott, P.; Wilkowski, G.

    1996-02-01

    A series of pipe system experiments was conducted in IPIRG-2 that used a realistic seismic forcing function. Because the seismic forcing function was more complex than the single-frequency increasing-amplitude sinusoidal forcing function used in the IPIRG-1 pipe system experiments, considerable effort went into designing the function. This report documents the design process for the seismic forcing function used in the IPIRG-2 pipe system experiments.

  9. How Forgetful are Seismic Waves ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milkereit, B.

    2005-05-01

    3D surface seismic and vertical seismic profiling (VSP) techniques can be employed to image crustal structures in complex geological settings. The effects of heterogeneities on seismic wave propagation can be described in terms of different propagation regimes (Wu, 1989): quasi-homogeneous for heterogeneities too small to be seen by seismic waves, Rayleigh scattering, Mie scattering and small-angle scattering. These scattering regimes cause characteristic amplitude, phase and travel time fluctuation, which can be used to obtain estimates of scale length. Horizontal resolution of exploration seismic data is often discussed in terms of Fresnel zone. For surface and VSP data, the Fresnel radius increases with increasing depth of investigation. In addition, the lateral resolution is limited by the effective frequency content of the seismic signal. Based on strong contrast in petrophysical data, crustal exploration targets (such as gas-hydrates, permafrost or massive sulfide ores) should make strong P-wave, S-wave and converted wave reflectors against most background velocity models. In the context of realistic geological models, 3D numerical simulations are required to better assess elastic wave interactions with high acoustic impedance targets. In addition, it is important to study the influence of composition and shape of high acoustic impedance targets on the full scattered wavefield through a series of numerical modeling experiments based on the 3D elastic finite-difference (FD) method. Massive sulfide ores consisting of the end-member sulfide minerals pyrite, sphalerite, and galena, which span the full range of observed P- and S- wave velocities and densities in ore rocks, as well as gabbro inclusions, are investigated for different shapes which represent the complex morphologies often observed for ore deposits. 3D FD modeling reveals that large ore deposits lead to a strong and complex scattering response that is often dominated by shear-wave events (Bohlen et al

  10. "Out of All of this Mess, I Got a Blessing": Perceptions and Experiences of Reproduction and Motherhood in African American Women Living With HIV.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Faith; Ingram, Lucy Annang; Kerr, Jelani; Buchberg, Meredith; Richter, Donna L; Sowell, Richard

    2016-01-01

    HIV disproportionately impacts African American women of childbearing age residing in the southern United States. Antiretroviral therapy has increased the quantity and quality of life for people living with HIV and produced viable and safe reproduction possibilities for women living with HIV. However, little is known about reproductive decision-making processes for African American women living with HIV. The overall goal of our study was to qualitatively explore perspectives related to reproduction and motherhood in HIV-infected African American women of childbearing capacity. HIV-infected African American women of childbearing capacity in South Carolina (N = 42) participated in in-depth interviews. Our respondents held positive views about pregnancy and motherhood, despite nonsupportive pregnancy messages from interpersonal influences, including health care providers. Study findings uncovered the need for programs and interventions to support women's reproductive autonomy and focus on reducing conception- and pregnancy-related transmission risks to infants and uninfected sexual partners.

  11. Multiple Intimate Partner Violence Experiences: Knowledge, Access, Utilization and Barriers to Utilization of Resources by Women of the African Diaspora

    PubMed Central

    Sabri, Bushra; Huerta, Julia; Alexander, Kamila A.; St.Vil, Noelle M.; Campbell, Jacquelyn C.; Callwood, Gloria B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study examined knowledge, access, utilization, and barriers to use of resources among Black women exposed to multiple types of intimate partner violence in Baltimore, Maryland and the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI). Methods We analyzed quantitative survey data collected by 163 women recruited from primary care, prenatal or family planning clinics in Baltimore and the USVI. In addition we analyzed qualitative data from in-depth interviews with 11 women. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and qualitative data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Results A substantial proportion of Black women with multiple types of violence experiences lacked knowledge of, did not have access to, and did not use resources. Barriers to resource use were identified at the individual, relationship, and community levels. Conclusion There is need for programs to develop awareness, promote access and utilization of resources, and eliminate barriers to resource use among abused Black women. PMID:26548679

  12. Perception, experience, and indigenous knowledge of climate change and variability: the case of Accra, a sub-Saharan African city

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Codjoe, Samuel N.A.; Owusu, George; Burkett, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Several recent international assessments have concluded that climate change has the potential to reverse the modest economic gains achieved in many developing countries over the past decade. The phenomenon of climate change threatens to worsen poverty or burden populations with additional hardships, especially in poor societies with weak infrastructure and economic well-being. The importance of the perceptions, experiences, and knowledge of indigenous peoples has gained prominence in discussions of climate change and adaptation in developing countries and among international development organizations. Efforts to evaluate the role of indigenous knowledge in adaptation planning, however, have largely focused on rural people and their agricultural livelihoods. This paper presents the results of a study that examines perceptions, experiences, and indigenous knowledge relating to climate change and variability in three communities of metropolitan Accra, which is the capital of Ghana. The study design is based on a three-part conceptual framework and interview process involving risk mapping, mental models, and individual stressor cognition. Most of the residents interviewed in the three communities of urban Accra attributed climate change to the combination of deforestation and the burning of firewood and rubbish. None of the residents associated climate change with fossil fuel emissions from developed countries. Numerous potential adaptation strategies were suggested by the residents, many of which have been used effectively during past drought and flood events. Results suggest that ethnic residential clustering as well as strong community bonds in metropolitan Accra have allowed various groups and long-settled communities to engage in the sharing and transmission of knowledge of weather patterns and trends. Understanding and building upon indigenous knowledge may enhance the design, acceptance, and implementation of climate change adaptation strategies in Accra and

  13. Midget Seismic in Sandbox Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, C. M.; Buddensiek, M. L.; Philipp, J.; Kukowski, N.; Oncken, O.

    2008-12-01

    Analog sandbox simulation has been applied to study geological processes to provide qualitative and quantitative insights into specific geological problems. In nature, the structures, which are simulated in those sandbox models, are often inferred from seismic data. With the study introduced here, we want to combine the analog sandbox simulation techniques with seismic physical modeling of those sandbox models. The long-term objectives of this approach are (1) imaging of seismic and seismological events of actively deforming and static 3D analogue models, and (2) assessment of the transferability of the model data to field data in order to improve field data acquisition and interpretation according to the addressed geological problem. To achieve this objective, a new midget-seismic facility for laboratory use was designed and developed, comprising a seismic tank, a PC control unit including piezo-electric transducers, and a positioning system. The first experiments are aimed at studying the wave field properties of the piezo- transducers in order to investigate their feasibility for seismic profiling. The properties investigated are their directionality and the change of waveform due to their size (5-12 mm) compared to the wavelengths (< 1.5 mm). The best quality signals and least directionality and waveform change are achieved when the center source frequency is between 350-500 kHz, and the offset is less than 8 cm for a reflector depth of 10 cm. With respect to the technical hardware reflection processing on such a small scale is feasible as long as the offset does not exceed a certain value, which is dependent on the reflector depth and frequency. The next steps will include a study of material properties and the effects of wave propagation in an-/isotropic media by physical studies, before we finally start using different seismic imaging and processing techniques on static and actively deforming 3D analog models.

  14. A deployment of broadband seismic stations in two deep gold mines, South Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGarr, Arthur F.; Boettcher, Margaret S.; Fletcher, Jon Peter B.; Johnston, Malcolm J.; Durrheim, R.; Spottiswoode, S.; Milev, A.

    2009-01-01

    In-mine seismic networks throughout the TauTona and Mponeng gold mines provide precise locations and seismic source parameters of earthquakes. They also support small-scale experimental projects, including NELSAM (Natural Earthquake Laboratory in South African Mines), which is intended to record, at close hand, seismic rupture of a geologic fault that traverses the project region near the deepest part of TauTona. To resolve some questions regarding the in-mine and NELSAM networks, we deployed four portable broadband seismic stations at deep sites within TauTona and Mponeng for one week during September 2007 and recorded ground acceleration. Moderately large earthquakes within our temporary network were recorded with sufficiently high signal-to-noise that we were able to integrate the acceleration to ground velocity and displacement, from which moment tensors could be determined. We resolved the questions concerning the NELSAM and in-mine networks by using these moment tensors to calculate synthetic seismograms at various network recording sites for comparison with the ground motion recorded at the same locations. We also used the peak velocity of the S wave pulse, corrected for attenuation with distance, to estimate the maximum slip within the rupture zone of an earthquake. We then combined the maximum slip and seismic moment with results from laboratory friction experiments to estimate maximum slip rates within the same high-slip patches of the rupture zone. For the four largest earthquakes recorded within our network, all with magnitudes near 2, these inferred maximum slips range from 4 to 27 mm and the corresponding maximum slip rates range from 1 to 6 m/s. These results, in conjunction with information from previous ground motion studies, indicate that underground support should be capable of withstanding peak ground velocities of at least 5 m/s.

  15. African-American Biography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Ron

    1995-01-01

    Suggests sources of information for African American History Month for library media specialists who work with students in grades four through eight. Gale Research's "African-American Reference Library," which includes "African-America Biography,""African-American Chronology," and "African-American Almanac,"…

  16. The impact of sexual activity and fertility timing on African American high school graduates' later life experiences.

    PubMed

    Murry, V M

    1997-01-01

    There has been national concern since the early 1980s over the need to prevent teen pregnancy. Much of that concern has stemmed from concerns over the notion that families formed as a result of adolescent parenthood are often poor and welfare dependent. Much of the research on adolescent childbearing implies that having a child disadvantages adolescents in terms of future life options. The author examined the life experiences of 1666 Black female high school graduates of average age 25.4 years 5 years out of high school using data from the National Survey of Family Growth Cycle IV. 474 virgins, 570 never-pregnant women, 65 ever-pregnant women, and 557 adolescent mothers were examined. Most of the women had never married, with virgins and adolescent mothers the least likely to be in marital relationships. Relative to the other subgroups, virgins reported higher educational, financial, and occupational achievement. However, a significant proportion of adolescent mothers were more successful than conventional stereotypes suggest. Several had secured professional jobs, had middle-income status, and were pursuing additional educational training. The implications for future research, education, and policy are discussed.

  17. Seismic sources

    DOEpatents

    Green, Michael A.; Cook, Neville G. W.; McEvilly, Thomas V.; Majer, Ernest L.; Witherspoon, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus is described for placement in a borehole in the earth, which enables the generation of closely controlled seismic waves from the borehole. Pure torsional shear waves are generated by an apparatus which includes a stator element fixed to the borehole walls and a rotor element which is electrically driven to rapidly oscillate on the stator element to cause reaction forces transmitted through the borehole walls to the surrounding earth. Logitudinal shear waves are generated by an armature that is driven to rapidly oscillate along the axis of the borehole relative to a stator that is clamped to the borehole, to cause reaction forces transmitted to the surrounding earth. Pressure waves are generated by electrically driving pistons that press against opposite ends of a hydraulic reservoir that fills the borehole. High power is generated by energizing the elements at a power level that causes heating to over 150.degree. C. within one minute of operation, but energizing the elements for no more than about one minute.

  18. African Trypanosomiasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    infection by protozoan hemo- flagellates of the Trypanosoma brucei complex, 2 subspe- cies of which cause disease in humans: Trypanosoma bru- cei gambiense...public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES See also ADA545141. Chapter 3 from e-book, Topics on the Pathology of Protozoan and...the brief ferry crossing. 2 3 • Topics on The paThology of proTozoan and invasive arThropod diseases Three severe epidemics of African trypanosomiasis

  19. Monitoring seismic wave speed by an active seismic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, K.; Kawakata, H.; Doi, I.; Okubo, M.; Saiga, A.

    2012-12-01

    Decreases in elastic wave speed around cracked zones prior to faulting in rock fracture experiments have been reported (e.g., Yukutake, 1989; Yoshimitsu et al., 2009). These decreases in wave speed have been considered to be associated with crack and fault growth based on non-destructive observation using X-ray CT scan (Kawakata et al., 1999). Meanwhile, there were some reports on the decreases in seismic wave speed along paths that cross the hypocentral area in periods including some large earthquakes. Uchida et al. (2002) analyzed