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Sample records for african trypanosome trypanosoma

  1. Phylogeny and Morphological Variability of Trypanosomes from African Pelomedusid Turtles with Redescription of Trypanosoma mocambicum Pienaar, 1962.

    PubMed

    Dvořáková, Nela; Čepička, Ivan; Qablan, Moneeb A; Gibson, Wendy; Blažek, Radim; Široký, Pavel

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about host specificity, genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships of African turtle trypanosomes. Using PCR targeting the SSU rRNA gene, we detected trypanosomes in 24 of 134 (17.9%) wild caught African pelomedusid turtles: Pelusios upembae (n=14), P. bechuanicus (n=1), P. rhodesianus (n=3) and P. subniger (n=6). Mixed infection of Trypanosoma species was confirmed by PCR in three specimens of P. upembae, and in one specimen each of P. bechuanicus, P. rhodesianus, and P. subniger. Microscopic examination of stained blood smears revealed two distinct forms (broad and slender) of trypomastigotes. The broad form coincided in morphology with T. mocambicumPienaar, 1962. Accordingly, we have designated this form as the neotype of T. mocambicum. In phylogenetic analysis of the SSU rRNA gene, all the new turtle trypanosome sequences grouped in a single clade within the strongly supported "aquatic" clade of Trypanosoma species. The turtle trypanosome clade was further subdivided into two subclades, which did not correlate with host turtle species or trypanosome morphology. This study provides the first sequence data of Trypanosoma species isolated from freshwater turtles from tropical Africa and extends knowledge on diversity of trypanosomes in the Afrotropical zoogeographical realm. PMID:26599723

  2. Genetics of resistance to the African trypanosomes. IV. Resistance of radiation chimeras to Trypanosoma rhodesiense infection

    SciTech Connect

    DeGee, A.L.; Mansfield, J.M.

    1984-08-01

    The cellular bases of resistance to the African trypanosomes were examined in inbred mice. As part of these studies, reciprocal bone marrow cell transplants were performed between H-2 compatible mice which differ in relative resistance to Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense infection. Relatively resistant C57BL/10 mice, intermediate A.By mice, and least resistant C3H.SW mice that were reconstituted after lethal irradiation with syngeneic bone marrow cells displayed resistance and immunity characteristic of the homologous donor strain. When C57BL/10 mice were reconstituted with C3H.SW mouse bone marrow cells they retained the ability to produce antibodies to trypanosome surface antigen but the antibody titers were significantly reduced. Control of parasitemia and mean survival time were reduced in these chimeras, but differed significantly from C3H.SW mice. A. By mice that received cells from C57BL/10 donors exhibited antibody responses and survival times similar to the C57BL/10 mice. Survival times of A.By mice given syngeneic cells or C3H.SW cells were the same, but the antibody responses of A.By mice given C3H.SW cells were lower than those of A.By mice given syngeneic cells. C3H.SW mice reconstituted with C57BL/10 bone marrow cells were capable of making antibodies and controlling parasitemia, in marked contrast to the absence of such responses in C3H.SW mice reconstituted with syngeneic cells. Survival times, however, were indistinguishable from those of C3H.SW mice given syngeneic cells. Thus, resistance to T.B. rhodesiense was shown for the first time to depend on donor bone marrow derived cells as well as upon radiation-resistant cells/factors associated with host genetic background. Also, parasite-specific IgM antibody responses seem to be regulated by a mechanism which does not depend on bone marrow derived cells alone, and the presence of such immune responses is not linked to survival time.

  3. A tsetse and tabanid fly survey of African great apes habitats reveals the presence of a novel trypanosome lineage but the absence of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Votýpka, Jan; Rádrová, Jana; Skalický, Tomáš; Jirků, Milan; Jirsová, Dagmar; Mihalca, Andrei D; D'Amico, Gianluca; Petrželková, Klára J; Modrý, David; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-10-01

    Tsetse and tabanid flies transmit several Trypanosoma species, some of which are human and livestock pathogens of major medical and socioeconomic impact in Africa. Recent advances in molecular techniques and phylogenetic analyses have revealed a growing diversity of previously unidentified tsetse-transmitted trypanosomes potentially pathogenic to livestock and/or other domestic animals as well as wildlife, including African great apes. To map the distribution, prevalence and co-occurrence of known and novel trypanosome species, we analyzed tsetse and tabanid flies collected in the primary forested part of the Dzanga-Sangha Protected Areas, Central African Republic, which hosts a broad spectrum of wildlife including primates and is virtually devoid of domestic animals. Altogether, 564 tsetse flies and 81 tabanid flies were individually screened for the presence of trypanosomes using 18S rRNA-specific nested PCR. Herein, we demonstrate that wildlife animals are parasitized by a surprisingly wide range of trypanosome species that in some cases may circulate via these insect vectors. While one-third of the examined tsetse flies harbored trypanosomes either from the Trypanosoma theileri, Trypanosoma congolense or Trypanosoma simiae complex, or one of the three new members of the genus Trypanosoma (strains 'Bai', 'Ngbanda' and 'Didon'), more than half of the tabanid flies exclusively carried T. theileri. To establish the putative vertebrate hosts of the novel trypanosome species, we further analyzed the provenance of blood meals of tsetse flies. DNA individually isolated from 1033 specimens of Glossina spp. and subjected to high-throughput library-based screening proved that most of the examined tsetse flies engorged on wild ruminants (buffalo, sitatunga, bongo), humans and suids. Moreover, they also fed (albeit more rarely) on other vertebrates, thus providing indirect but convincing evidence that trypanosomes can be transmitted via these vectors among a wide range of

  4. Evolutionary insights from bat trypanosomes: morphological, developmental and phylogenetic evidence of a new species, Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum) erneyi sp. nov., in African bats closely related to Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum) cruzi and allied species.

    PubMed

    Lima, Luciana; Silva, Flávia Maia da; Neves, Luis; Attias, Márcia; Takata, Carmen S A; Campaner, Marta; de Souza, Wanderley; Hamilton, Patrick B; Teixeira, Marta M G

    2012-11-01

    Parasites of the genus Trypanosoma are common in bats and those of the subgenus Schizotrypanum are restricted to bats throughout the world, with the exception of Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum) cruzi that also infects other mammals and is restricted to the American Continent. We have characterized trypanosome isolates from Molossidae bats captured in Mozambique, Africa. Morphology and behaviour in culture, supported by phylogenetic inferences using SSU (small subunit) rRNA, gGAPDH (glycosomal glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase) and Cyt b (cytochrome b) genes, allowed to classify the isolates as a new Schizotrypanum species named Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum) erneyi sp. nov. This is the first report of a Schizotrypanum species from African bats cultured, characterized morphologically and biologically, and positioned in phylogenetic trees. The unprecedented finding of a new species of the subgenus Schizotrypanum from Africa that is closest related to the America-restricted Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum) cruzi marinkellei and T. cruzi provides new insights into the origin and evolutionary history of T. cruzi and closely related bat trypanosomes. Altogether, data from our study support the hypothesis of an ancestor trypanosome parasite of bats evolving to infect other mammals, even humans, and adapted to transmission by triatomine bugs in the evolutionary history of T. cruzi in the New World. PMID:22277804

  5. Antigenic variation in African trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Horn, David

    2014-01-01

    Studies on Variant Surface Glycoproteins (VSGs) and antigenic variation in the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, have yielded a remarkable range of novel and important insights. The features first identified in T. brucei extend from unique to conserved-among-trypanosomatids to conserved-among-eukaryotes. Consequently, much of what we now know about trypanosomatid biology and much of the technology available has its origin in studies related to VSGs. T. brucei is now probably the most advanced early branched eukaryote in terms of experimental tractability and can be approached as a pathogen, as a model for studies on fundamental processes, as a model for studies on eukaryotic evolution or often all of the above. In terms of antigenic variation itself, substantial progress has been made in understanding the expression and switching of the VSG coat, while outstanding questions continue to stimulate innovative new approaches. There are large numbers of VSG genes in the genome but only one is expressed at a time, always immediately adjacent to a telomere. DNA repair processes allow a new VSG to be copied into the single transcribed locus. A coordinated transcriptional switch can also allow a new VSG gene to be activated without any detectable change in the DNA sequence, thereby maintaining singular expression, also known as allelic exclusion. I review the story behind VSGs; the genes, their expression and switching, their central role in T. brucei virulence, the discoveries that emerged along the way and the persistent questions relating to allelic exclusion in particular. PMID:24859277

  6. Environmental sensing by African trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Roditi, Isabel; Schumann, Gabriela; Naguleswaran, Arunasalam

    2016-08-01

    African trypanosomes, which divide their life cycle between mammals and tsetse flies, are confronted with environments that differ widely in temperature, nutrient availability and host responses to infection. In particular, since trypanosomes cannot predict when they will be transmitted between hosts, it is vital for them to be able to sense and adapt to their milieu. Thanks to technical advances, significant progress has been made in understanding how the parasites perceive external stimuli and react to them. There is also a growing awareness that trypanosomes use a variety of mechanisms to exchange information with each other, thereby enhancing their chances of survival. PMID:27131101

  7. Genetics of resistance to African trypanosomes: role of the H-2 locus in determining resistance to infection with Trypanosoma rhodesiense.

    PubMed Central

    Levine, R F; Mansfield, J M

    1981-01-01

    Susceptibility and resistance to Trypanosoma rhodesiense infections in inbred and H-2 congenic strains of mice were studied. Mean survival times and patterns of parasitemia were examined. C3HeB/FeJ mice were highly susceptible; CBA/J, A/J, and BALB/cByJ mice displayed an intermediate level of susceptibility; whereas C57BL/10 mice were highly resistant. H-2 congenic strains with the BL/10 background resembled the BL/10 parental type, thereby suggesting that the major histocompatibility complex does not play a major role in regulating resistance and susceptibility to infection with T. rhodesiense. PMID:7309237

  8. DNA Recombination Strategies During Antigenic Variation in the African Trypanosome.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Richard; Morrison, Liam J; Hall, James P J

    2015-04-01

    Survival of the African trypanosome in its mammalian hosts has led to the evolution of antigenic variation, a process for evasion of adaptive immunity that has independently evolved in many other viral, bacterial and eukaryotic pathogens. The essential features of trypanosome antigenic variation have been understood for many years and comprise a dense, protective Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG) coat, which can be changed by recombination-based and transcription-based processes that focus on telomeric VSG gene transcription sites. However, it is only recently that the scale of this process has been truly appreciated. Genome sequencing of Trypanosoma brucei has revealed a massive archive of >1000 VSG genes, the huge majority of which are functionally impaired but are used to generate far greater numbers of VSG coats through segmental gene conversion. This chapter will discuss the implications of such VSG diversity for immune evasion by antigenic variation, and will consider how this expressed diversity can arise, drawing on a growing body of work that has begun to examine the proteins and sequences through which VSG switching is catalyzed. Most studies of trypanosome antigenic variation have focused on T. brucei, the causative agent of human sleeping sickness. Other work has begun to look at antigenic variation in animal-infective trypanosomes, and we will compare the findings that are emerging, as well as consider how antigenic variation relates to the dynamics of host-trypanosome interaction. PMID:26104717

  9. Haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor independent killing of African trypanosomes by human serum and trypanosome lytic factors

    PubMed Central

    Bullard, Whitney; Kieft, Rudo; Capewell, Paul; Veitch, Nicola J.; Macleod, Annette; Hajduk, Stephen L.

    2012-01-01

    The haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor (HpHbR) of African trypanosomes plays a critical role in human innate immunity against these parasites. Localized to the flagellar pocket of the veterinary pathogen Trypanosoma brucei brucei this receptor binds Trypanosome Lytic Factor-1 (TLF-1), a subclass of human high-density lipoprotein (HDL) facilitating endocytosis, lysosomal trafficking and subsequent killing. Recently, we found that group 1 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense does not express a functional HpHbR. We now show that loss of the TbbHpHbR reduces the susceptibility of T. b. brucei to human serum and TLF-1 by 100- and 10,000-fold, respectively. The relatively high concentrations of human serum and TLF-1 needed to kill trypanosomes lacking the HpHbR indicates that high affinity TbbHpHbR binding enhances the cytotoxicity; however, in the absence of TbbHpHbR, other receptors or fluid phase endocytosis are sufficient to provide some level of susceptibility. Human serum contains a second innate immune factor, TLF-2, that has been suggested to kill trypanosomes independently of the TbbHpHbR. We found that T. b. brucei killing by TLF-2 was reduced in TbbHpHbR-deficient cells but to a lesser extent than TLF-1. This suggests that both TLF-1 and TLF-2 can be taken up via the TbbHpHbR but that alternative pathways exist for the uptake of these toxins. Together the findings reported here extend our previously published studies and suggest that group 1 T. b. gambiense has evolved multiple mechanisms to avoid killing by trypanolytic human serum factors. PMID:22286709

  10. Haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor independent killing of African trypanosomes by human serum and trypanosome lytic factors.

    PubMed

    Bullard, Whitney; Kieft, Rudo; Capewell, Paul; Veitch, Nicola J; Macleod, Annette; Hajduk, Stephen L

    2012-01-01

    The haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor (HpHbR) of African trypanosomes plays a critical role in human innate immunity against these parasites. Localized to the flagellar pocket of the veterinary pathogen Trypanosoma brucei brucei this receptor binds Trypanosome Lytic Factor-1 (TLF-1), a subclass of human high-density lipoprotein (HDL) facilitating endocytosis, lysosomal trafficking and subsequent killing. Recently, we found that group 1 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense does not express a functional HpHbR. We now show that loss of the TbbHpHbR reduces the susceptibility of T. b. brucei to human serum and TLF-1 by 100- and 10,000-fold, respectively. The relatively high concentrations of human serum and TLF-1 needed to kill trypanosomes lacking the HpHbR indicates that high affinity TbbHpHbR binding enhances the cytotoxicity; however, in the absence of TbbHpHbR, other receptors or fluid phase endocytosis are sufficient to provide some level of susceptibility. Human serum contains a second innate immune factor, TLF-2, that has been suggested to kill trypanosomes independently of the TbbHpHbR. We found that T. b. brucei killing by TLF-2 was reduced in TbbHpHbR-deficient cells but to a lesser extent than TLF-1. This suggests that both TLF-1 and TLF-2 can be taken up via the TbbHpHbR but that alternative pathways exist for the uptake of these toxins. Together the findings reported here extend our previously published studies and suggest that group 1 T. b. gambiense has evolved multiple mechanisms to avoid killing by trypanolytic human serum factors. PMID:22286709

  11. African Trypanosomes Find a Fat Haven

    PubMed Central

    Beverley, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    The African trypanosome was thought to primarily develop in the bloodstream and interstitial spaces of its mammalian host. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Trindade et al. (2016) report the surprising finding that during ongoing persistent infections in mice, a major fraction of the parasites reside within fatty tissues. PMID:27281564

  12. African Trypanosomes Find a Fat Haven.

    PubMed

    Beverley, Stephen M

    2016-06-01

    The African trypanosome was thought to primarily develop in the bloodstream and interstitial spaces of its mammalian host. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Trindade et al. (2016) report the surprising finding that during ongoing persistent infections in mice, a major fraction of the parasites reside within fatty tissues. PMID:27281564

  13. Mechanism of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (group 1) resistance to human trypanosome lytic factor.

    PubMed

    Kieft, Rudo; Capewell, Paul; Turner, C Michael R; Veitch, Nicola J; MacLeod, Annette; Hajduk, Stephen

    2010-09-14

    Human innate immunity against most African trypanosomes, including Trypanosoma brucei brucei, is mediated by a minor subclass of toxic serum HDL, called trypanosome lytic factor-1 (TLF-1). This HDL contains two primate specific proteins, apolipoprotein L-1 and haptoglobin (Hp)-related protein, as well as apolipoprotein A-1. These assembled proteins provide a powerful defense against trypanosome infection. Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense causes human African sleeping sickness because it has evolved an inhibitor of TLF-1, serum resistance-associated (SRA) protein. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense lacks the SRA gene, yet it infects humans. As transfection of T. b. gambiense (group 1) is not possible, we initially used in vitro-selected TLF-1-resistant T. b. brucei to examine SRA-independent mechanisms of TLF-1 resistance. Here we show that TLF-1 resistance in T. b. brucei is caused by reduced expression of the Hp/Hb receptor gene (TbbHpHbR). Importantly, T. b. gambiense (group 1) also showed a marked reduction in uptake of TLF-1 and a corresponding decrease in expression of T. b. gambiense Hp/Hb receptor (TbgHpHbR). Ectopic expression of TbbHpHbR in TLF-1-resistant T. b. brucei rescued TLF-1 uptake, demonstrating that decreased TbbHpHbR expression conferred TLF-1 resistance. Ectopic expression of TbgHpHbR in TLF-1-resistant T. b. brucei failed to rescue TLF-1 killing, suggesting that coding sequence changes altered Hp/Hb receptor binding affinity for TLF-1. We propose that the combination of coding sequence mutations and decreased expression of TbgHpHbR directly contribute to parasite evasion of human innate immunity and infectivity of group 1 T. b. gambiense. PMID:20805508

  14. Identification of Trypanosome Proteins in Plasma from African Sleeping Sickness Patients Infected with T. b. rhodesiense

    PubMed Central

    Enyaru, John C.; Carr, Steven A.; Pearson, Terry W.

    2013-01-01

    Control of human African sleeping sickness, caused by subspecies of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, is based on preventing transmission by elimination of the tsetse vector and by active diagnostic screening and treatment of infected patients. To identify trypanosome proteins that have potential as biomarkers for detection and monitoring of African sleeping sickness, we have used a ‘deep-mining” proteomics approach to identify trypanosome proteins in human plasma. Abundant human plasma proteins were removed by immunodepletion. Depleted plasma samples were then digested to peptides with trypsin, fractionated by basic reversed phase and each fraction analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This sample processing and analysis method enabled identification of low levels of trypanosome proteins in pooled plasma from late stage sleeping sickness patients infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense. A total of 254 trypanosome proteins were confidently identified. Many of the parasite proteins identified were of unknown function, although metabolic enzymes, chaperones, proteases and ubiquitin-related/acting proteins were found. This approach to the identification of conserved, soluble trypanosome proteins in human plasma offers a possible route to improved disease diagnosis and monitoring, since these molecules are potential biomarkers for the development of a new generation of antigen-detection assays. The combined immuno-depletion/mass spectrometric approach can be applied to a variety of infectious diseases for unbiased biomarker identification. PMID:23951171

  15. Hydrodynamic gene delivery of baboon trypanosome lytic factor eliminates both animal and human-infective African trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Russell; Molina-Portela, Pilar; Mott, Helen; Carrington, Mark; Raper, Jayne

    2009-11-17

    Several species of African trypanosomes cause fatal disease in livestock, but most cannot infect humans due to innate trypanosome lytic factors (TLFs). Human TLFs are pore forming high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles that contain apolipoprotein L-I (apoL-I) the trypanolytic component, and haptoglobin-related protein (Hpr), which binds free hemoglobin (Hb) in blood and facilitates the uptake of TLF via a trypanosome haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor. The human-infective Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense escapes lysis by TLF by expression of serum resistance-associated (SRA) protein, which binds and neutralizes apoL-I. Unlike humans, baboons are not susceptible to infection by T. b. rhodesiense due to previously unidentified serum factors. Here, we show that baboons have a TLF complex that contains orthologs of Hpr and apoL-I and that full-length baboon apoL-I confers trypanolytic activity to mice and when expressed together with baboon Hpr and human apoA-I, provides protection against both animal infective and the human-infective T. brucei rhodesiense in vivo. We further define two critical lysines near the C terminus of baboon apoL-1 that are necessary and sufficient to prevent binding to SRA and thereby confer resistance to human-infective trypanosomes. These findings form the basis for the creation of TLF transgenic livestock that would be resistant to animal and human-infective trypanosomes, which would result in the reduction of disease and the zoonotic transmission of human infective trypanosomes. PMID:19858474

  16. Trypanosome-induced Interferon-γ production in whole blood stimulation assays is associated with latent Trypanosoma brucei gambiense infections.

    PubMed

    Ilboudo, Hamidou; Jamonneau, Vincent; Koffi, Mathurin; Kaboré, Jacques; Amoussa, Roukiyath; Holzmuller, Philippe; Garcia, André; Bucheton, Bruno; Courtin, David

    2016-06-01

    Control of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is highly dependent on the ability to detect and treat infected individuals. However, a number of individuals exposed to Trypanosoma brucei gambiense are able to control infection to undetectable levels in blood. They are long-term potential reservoirs and thus a threat for control strategies. Cytokine responses in whole blood stimulation assays were quantified in individuals with contrasting HAT status. Trypanosome-induced IFN-γ production was only observed in "trypanotolerant" subjects suspected of harboring latent infections. This result contributes new insights into the immune responses associated with infection control and opens novel diagnosis perspectives regarding HAT elimination. PMID:26993030

  17. A new species of trypanosome, Trypanosoma desterrensis sp. n., isolated from South American bats.

    PubMed

    Grisard, E C; Sturm, N R; Campbell, D A

    2003-09-01

    Trypanosomes isolated from South American bats include the human pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi. Other Trypanosoma spp. that have been found exclusively in bats are not well characterized at the DNA sequence level and we have therefore used the SL RNA gene to differentiate and characterize kinetoplastids isolated from bats in South America. A Trypanosoma sp. isolated from hats in southern Brazil was compared with the geographically diverse isolates T. cruzi marinkellei, T. vespertilionis, and T. dionisii. Analysis of the SL RNA gene repeats revealed size and sequence variability among these bat trypanosomes. We have developed hybridization probes to separate these bat isolates and have analysed the DNA sequence data to estimate their relatedness. A new species, Trypanosoma desterrensis sp. n., is proposed, for which a 5S rRNA gene was also found within the SL RNA repeat. PMID:12964829

  18. Cyclic AMP Regulates Social Behavior in African Trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Oberholzer, Michael; Saada, Edwin A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei engages in surface-induced social behavior, termed social motility, characterized by single cells assembling into multicellular groups that coordinate their movements in response to extracellular signals. Social motility requires sensing and responding to extracellular signals, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here we report that T. brucei social motility depends on cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling systems in the parasite’s flagellum (synonymous with cilium). Pharmacological inhibition of cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) completely blocks social motility without impacting the viability or motility of individual cells. Using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based sensor to monitor cAMP dynamics in live cells, we demonstrate that this block in social motility correlates with an increase in intracellular cAMP levels. RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown of the flagellar PDEB1 phenocopies pharmacological PDE inhibition, demonstrating that PDEB1 is required for social motility. Using parasites expressing distinct fluorescent proteins to monitor individuals in a genetically heterogeneous community, we found that the social motility defect of PDEB1 knockdowns is complemented by wild-type parasites in trans. Therefore, PDEB1 knockdown cells are competent for social motility but appear to lack a necessary factor that can be provided by wild-type cells. The combined data demonstrate that the role of cyclic nucleotides in regulating microbial social behavior extends to African trypanosomes and provide an example of transcomplementation in parasitic protozoa. PMID:25922395

  19. Analysis of host genetic factors influencing African trypanosome species infection in a cohort of Tanzanian Bos indicus cattle.

    PubMed

    Karimuribo, Esron D; Morrison, Liam J; Black, Alana; Turner, C Michael R; Kambarage, Dominic M; Ballingall, Keith T

    2011-06-30

    Trypanosomosis caused by infection with protozoan parasites of the genus Trypanosoma is a major health constraint to cattle production in many African countries. One hundred and seventy one Bos indicus cattle from traditional pastoral Maasai (87) and more intensively managed Boran (84) animals in Tanzania were screened by PCR for the presence of African animal trypanosomes (Trypanosoma congolense, Trypanosoma vivax and Trypanosoma brucei), using blood samples archived on FTA cards. All cattle screened for trypanosomes were also genotyped at the highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II DRB3 locus to investigate possible associations between host MHC and trypanosome infection. Overall, 23.4% of the 171 cattle tested positive for at least one of the three trypanosome species. The prevalence of individual trypanosome species was 8.8% (T. congolense), 4.7% (T. vivax) and 15.8% (T. brucei). The high prevalence of T. brucei compared with T. congolense and T. vivax was unexpected as this species has previously been considered to be of lesser importance in terms of African bovine trypanosomosis. Significantly higher numbers of Maasai cattle were infected with T. brucei (23.0%, p=0.009) and T. congolense (13.8%, p=0.019) compared with Boran cattle (8.3% and 3.6%, respectively). Analysis of BoLA-DRB3 diversity in this cohort identified extensive allelic diversity. Thirty-three BoLA-DRB3 PCR-RFLP defined alleles were identified. One allele (DRB3*15) was significantly associated with an increased risk (odds ratio, OR=2.71, p=0.034) of T. brucei infection and three alleles (DRB3*35, *16 and *23) were associated with increased risk of T. congolense infection. While further work is required to dissect the role of these alleles in susceptibility to T. brucei and T. congolense infections, this study demonstrates the utility of FTA archived blood samples in combined molecular analyses of both host and pathogen. PMID:21377802

  20. Role of expression site switching in the development of resistance to human Trypanosome Lytic Factor-1 in Trypanosoma brucei brucei

    PubMed Central

    Kieft, Rudo; Stephens, Natalie A.; Capewell, Paul; MacLeod, Annette; Hajduk, Stephen L.

    2012-01-01

    Human high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) play an important role in human innate immunity to infection by African trypanosomes with a minor subclass, Trypanosome Lytic Factor-1 (TLF-1), displaying highly selective cytotoxicity to the veterinary pathogen Trypanosoma brucei brucei but not against the human sleeping sickness pathogens Trypanosoma brucei gambiense or Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense. T. b. rhodesiense has evolved the serum resistance associated protein (SRA) that binds and confers resistance to TLF-1 while T. b. gambiense lacks the gene for SRA indicating that these parasites have diverse mechanisms of resistance to TLF-1. Recently, we have shown that T. b. gambiense (group 1) resistance to TLF-1 correlated with the loss of the haptoglobin/hemoglobin receptor (HpHbR) expression, the protein responsible for high affinity binding and uptake of TLF-1. In the course of these studies we also examined TLF-1 resistant T. b. brucei cell lines, generated by long-term in vitro selection. We found that changes in TLF-1 susceptibility in T. b. brucei correlated with changes in variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) expression in addition to reduced TLF-1 binding and uptake. To determine whether the expressed VSG or expression site associated genes (ESAGs) contribute to TLF-1 resistance we prepared a TLF-1 resistant T. b. brucei with a selectable marker in a silent bloodstream expression site (BES). Drug treatment allowed rapid selection of trypanosomes that activated the tagged BES. These studies show that TLF-1 resistance in T. b. brucei is largely independent of the expressed VSG or ESAGs further supporting the central role of HpHbR expression in TLF-1 susceptibility in these cells. PMID:22226682

  1. Role of expression site switching in the development of resistance to human Trypanosome Lytic Factor-1 in Trypanosoma brucei brucei.

    PubMed

    Kieft, Rudo; Stephens, Natalie A; Capewell, Paul; MacLeod, Annette; Hajduk, Stephen L

    2012-05-01

    Human high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) play an important role in human innate immunity to infection by African trypanosomes with a minor subclass, Trypanosome Lytic Factor-1 (TLF-1), displaying highly selective cytotoxicity to the veterinary pathogen Trypanosoma brucei brucei but not against the human sleeping sickness pathogens Trypanosoma brucei gambiense or Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense. T. b. rhodesiense has evolved the serum resistance associated protein (SRA) that binds and confers resistance to TLF-1 while T. b. gambiense lacks the gene for SRA indicating that these parasites have diverse mechanisms of resistance to TLF-1. Recently, we have shown that T. b. gambiense (group 1) resistance to TLF-1 correlated with the loss of the haptoglobin/hemoglobin receptor (HpHbR) expression, the protein responsible for high affinity binding and uptake of TLF-1. In the course of these studies we also examined TLF-1 resistant T. b. brucei cell lines, generated by long-term in vitro selection. We found that changes in TLF-1 susceptibility in T. b. brucei correlated with changes in variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) expression in addition to reduced TLF-1 binding and uptake. To determine whether the expressed VSG or expression site associated genes (ESAGs) contribute to TLF-1 resistance we prepared a TLF-1 resistant T. b. brucei with a selectable marker in a silent bloodstream expression site (BES). Drug treatment allowed rapid selection of trypanosomes that activated the tagged BES. These studies show that TLF-1 resistance in T. b. brucei is largely independent of the expressed VSG or ESAGs further supporting the central role of HpHbR expression in TLF-1 susceptibility in these cells. PMID:22226682

  2. Deforestation does not affect the prevalence of a common trypanosome in African birds.

    PubMed

    Valkiūnas, Gediminas; Iezhova, Tatjana A; Sehgal, Ravinder N M

    2016-10-01

    In spite of numerous reports of avian Trypanosoma spp. in birds throughout the world, patterns of the distribution and prevalence of these blood parasites remains insufficiently understood. It is clear that spatial heterogeneity influences parameters of parasite distributions in natural populations, but data regarding avian trypanosomes are scarce. Using microscopy and molecular diagnostic methods, we analysed the variation of prevalence of avian Trypanosoma parasites in two widespread African bird species, the yellow-whiskered greenbul Andropadus latirostris and the olive sunbird Cyanomitra olivacea. In all, 353 birds were captured in pristine forests and agroforest sites in Cameroon and Ghana. Overall, the prevalence of avian trypanosomes was 51.3%. Five morphospecies were reported (Trypanosoma everetti, T. anguiformis, T. avium, T. naviformis, T. ontarioensis). Trypanosoma everetti predominated, representing 98% of all Trypanosoma spp. reports, and it was present in both avian hosts. The prevalence of T. everetti was significantly less in the yellow-whiskered greenbul (19%) than olive sunbird (83%), and the same pattern of prevalence was reported in these avian hosts at different study sites. We found no interaction between sites and the prevalence of T. everetti. For both avian hosts, the prevalence did not differ significantly between pristine forests and agroforests. This indicates the same pattern of transmission at sites with different levels of deforestation and suggests that spatial heterogeneity related to deforestation does not affect the prevalence of avian Trypanosoma infections. It is likely that host-related factors, but not environmental conditions favour or reduce these parasite infections in forests of sub-Saharan Africa. Microscopic and PCR-based diagnostics showed the same sensitivity in diagnostics of T. everetti. We discuss the implications of these findings for the epidemiology of avian trypanosomiasis in natural populations. PMID:27421797

  3. 25 years of African trypanosome research: From description to molecular dissection and new drug discovery☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Keith R.

    2015-01-01

    The Molecular Parasitology conference was first held at the Marine Biological laboratory, Woods Hole, USA 25 years ago. Since that first meeting, the conference has evolved and expanded but has remained the showcase for the latest research developments in molecular parasitology. In this perspective, I reflect on the scientific discoveries focussed on African trypanosomes (Trypanosoma brucei spp.) that have occurred since the inaugural MPM meeting and discuss the current and future status of research on these parasites. PMID:25736427

  4. Divalent Cation Control of Flagellar Motility in African Trypanosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westergard, Anna M.; Hutchings, Nathan R.

    2005-03-01

    Changes in calcium concentration have been shown to dynamically affect flagellar motility in several eukaryotic systems. The African trypanosome is a monoflagellated protozoan parasite and the etiological agent of sleeping sickness. Although cell motility has been implicated in disease progression, very little is currently known about biochemical control of the trypanosome flagellum. In this study, we assess the effects of extracellular changes in calcium and nickel concentration on trypanosome flagellar movement. Using a flow through chamber, we determine the relative changes in motility in individual trypanosomes in response to various concentrations of calcium and nickel, respectively. Extracellular concentrations of calcium and nickel (as low as 100 micromolar) significantly inhibit trypanosome cell motility. The effects are reversible, as indicated by the recovery of motion after removal of the calcium or nickel from the chamber. We are currently investigating the specific changes in flagellar oscillation and coordination that result from calcium and nickel, respectively. These results verify the presence of a calcium-responsive signaling mechanism(s) that regulates flagellar beat in trypanosomes.

  5. Regulation of surface coat exchange by differentiating African trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Gruszynski, Amy E; van Deursen, Frederick J; Albareda, Maria C; Best, Alexander; Chaudhary, Kshitiz; Cliffe, Laura J; del Rio, Laura; Dunn, Joe Dan; Ellis, Louise; Evans, Krystal J; Figueiredo, Juliana M; Malmquist, Nicholas A; Omosun, Yusuf; Palenchar, Jennifer B; Prickett, Sara; Punkosdy, George A; van Dooren, Giel; Wang, Qian; Menon, Anant K; Matthews, Keith R; Bangs, James D

    2006-06-01

    African trypanosomes (Trypanosoma brucei) have a digenetic lifecycle that alternates between the mammalian bloodstream and the tsetse fly vector. In the bloodstream, replicating long slender parasites transform into non-dividing short stumpy forms. Upon transmission into the fly midgut, short stumpy cells differentiate into actively dividing procyclics. A hallmark of this process is the replacement of the bloodstream-stage surface coat composed of variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) with a new coat composed of procyclin. Pre-existing VSG is shed by a zinc metalloprotease activity (MSP-B) and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (GPI-PLC). We now provide a detailed analysis of the coordinate and inverse regulation of these activities during synchronous differentiation. MSP-B mRNA and protein levels are upregulated during differentiation at the same time as proteolysis whereas GPI-PLC levels decrease. When transcription or translation is inhibited, VSG release is incomplete and a substantial amount of protein stays cell-associated. Both modes of release are still evident under these conditions, but GPI hydrolysis plays a quantitatively minor role during normal differentiation. Nevertheless, GPI biosynthesis shifts early in differentiation from a GPI-PLC sensitive structure to a resistant procyclic-type anchor. Translation inhibition also results in a marked increase in the mRNA levels of both MSP-B and GPI-PLC, consistent with negative regulation by labile protein factors. The relegation of short stumpy surface GPI-PLC to a secondary role in differentiation suggests that it may play a more important role as a virulence factor within the mammalian host. PMID:16564583

  6. Bromodomain Proteins Contribute to Maintenance of Bloodstream Form Stage Identity in the African Trypanosome

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Danae; Mugnier, Monica R.; Paulsen, Eda-Margaret; Kim, Hee-Sook; Chung, Chun-wa W.; Tough, David F.; Rioja, Inmaculada; Prinjha, Rab K.; Papavasiliou, F. Nina; Debler, Erik W.

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness, is transmitted to its mammalian host by the tsetse. In the fly, the parasite’s surface is covered with invariant procyclin, while in the mammal it resides extracellularly in its bloodstream form (BF) and is densely covered with highly immunogenic Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG). In the BF, the parasite varies this highly immunogenic surface VSG using a repertoire of ~2500 distinct VSG genes. Recent reports in mammalian systems point to a role for histone acetyl-lysine recognizing bromodomain proteins in the maintenance of stem cell fate, leading us to hypothesize that bromodomain proteins may maintain the BF cell fate in trypanosomes. Using small-molecule inhibitors and genetic mutants for individual bromodomain proteins, we performed RNA-seq experiments that revealed changes in the transcriptome similar to those seen in cells differentiating from the BF to the insect stage. This was recapitulated at the protein level by the appearance of insect-stage proteins on the cell surface. Furthermore, bromodomain inhibition disrupts two major BF-specific immune evasion mechanisms that trypanosomes harness to evade mammalian host antibody responses. First, monoallelic expression of the antigenically varied VSG is disrupted. Second, rapid internalization of antibodies bound to VSG on the surface of the trypanosome is blocked. Thus, our studies reveal a role for trypanosome bromodomain proteins in maintaining bloodstream stage identity and immune evasion. Importantly, bromodomain inhibition leads to a decrease in virulence in a mouse model of infection, establishing these proteins as potential therapeutic drug targets for trypanosomiasis. Our 1.25Å resolution crystal structure of a trypanosome bromodomain in complex with I-BET151 reveals a novel binding mode of the inhibitor, which serves as a promising starting point for rational drug design. PMID:26646171

  7. Bromodomain Proteins Contribute to Maintenance of Bloodstream Form Stage Identity in the African Trypanosome.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Danae; Mugnier, Monica R; Paulsen, Eda-Margaret; Kim, Hee-Sook; Chung, Chun-wa W; Tough, David F; Rioja, Inmaculada; Prinjha, Rab K; Papavasiliou, F Nina; Debler, Erik W

    2015-12-01

    Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness, is transmitted to its mammalian host by the tsetse. In the fly, the parasite's surface is covered with invariant procyclin, while in the mammal it resides extracellularly in its bloodstream form (BF) and is densely covered with highly immunogenic Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG). In the BF, the parasite varies this highly immunogenic surface VSG using a repertoire of ~2500 distinct VSG genes. Recent reports in mammalian systems point to a role for histone acetyl-lysine recognizing bromodomain proteins in the maintenance of stem cell fate, leading us to hypothesize that bromodomain proteins may maintain the BF cell fate in trypanosomes. Using small-molecule inhibitors and genetic mutants for individual bromodomain proteins, we performed RNA-seq experiments that revealed changes in the transcriptome similar to those seen in cells differentiating from the BF to the insect stage. This was recapitulated at the protein level by the appearance of insect-stage proteins on the cell surface. Furthermore, bromodomain inhibition disrupts two major BF-specific immune evasion mechanisms that trypanosomes harness to evade mammalian host antibody responses. First, monoallelic expression of the antigenically varied VSG is disrupted. Second, rapid internalization of antibodies bound to VSG on the surface of the trypanosome is blocked. Thus, our studies reveal a role for trypanosome bromodomain proteins in maintaining bloodstream stage identity and immune evasion. Importantly, bromodomain inhibition leads to a decrease in virulence in a mouse model of infection, establishing these proteins as potential therapeutic drug targets for trypanosomiasis. Our 1.25Å resolution crystal structure of a trypanosome bromodomain in complex with I-BET151 reveals a novel binding mode of the inhibitor, which serves as a promising starting point for rational drug design. PMID:26646171

  8. A new approach to chemotherapy: drug-induced differentiation kills African trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Wenzler, Tanja; Schumann Burkard, Gabriela; Schmidt, Remo S; Mäser, Pascal; Bergner, Andreas; Roditi, Isabel; Brun, Reto

    2016-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness) is a neglected tropical disease caused by Trypanosoma brucei spp. The parasites are transmitted by tsetse flies and adapt to their different hosts and environments by undergoing a series of developmental changes. During differentiation, the trypanosome alters its protein coat. Bloodstream form trypanosomes in humans have a coat of variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) that shields them from the immune system. The procyclic form, the first life-cycle stage to develop in the tsetse fly, replaces the VSG coat by procyclins; these proteins do not protect the parasite from lysis by serum components. Our study exploits the parasite-specific process of differentiation from bloodstream to procyclic forms to screen for potential drug candidates. Using transgenic trypanosomes with a reporter gene in a procyclin locus, we established a whole-cell assay for differentiation in a medium-throughput format. We screened 7,495 drug-like compounds and identified 28 hits that induced expression of the reporter and loss of VSG at concentrations in the low micromolar range. Small molecules that induce differentiation to procyclic forms could facilitate studies on the regulation of differentiation as well as serving as scaffolds for medicinal chemistry for new treatments for sleeping sickness. PMID:26931380

  9. A new approach to chemotherapy: drug-induced differentiation kills African trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Wenzler, Tanja; Schumann Burkard, Gabriela; S. Schmidt, Remo; Mäser, Pascal; Bergner, Andreas; Roditi, Isabel; Brun, Reto

    2016-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness) is a neglected tropical disease caused by Trypanosoma brucei spp. The parasites are transmitted by tsetse flies and adapt to their different hosts and environments by undergoing a series of developmental changes. During differentiation, the trypanosome alters its protein coat. Bloodstream form trypanosomes in humans have a coat of variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) that shields them from the immune system. The procyclic form, the first life-cycle stage to develop in the tsetse fly, replaces the VSG coat by procyclins; these proteins do not protect the parasite from lysis by serum components. Our study exploits the parasite-specific process of differentiation from bloodstream to procyclic forms to screen for potential drug candidates. Using transgenic trypanosomes with a reporter gene in a procyclin locus, we established a whole-cell assay for differentiation in a medium-throughput format. We screened 7,495 drug-like compounds and identified 28 hits that induced expression of the reporter and loss of VSG at concentrations in the low micromolar range. Small molecules that induce differentiation to procyclic forms could facilitate studies on the regulation of differentiation as well as serving as scaffolds for medicinal chemistry for new treatments for sleeping sickness. PMID:26931380

  10. Anti-trypanosomal effect of Peristrophe bicalyculata extract on Trypanosoma brucei brucei-infected rats

    PubMed Central

    Abimbola, Abdulazeez Mansurah; Baba, Ibrahim Abdulrazak; Yenusa, Edibo Zakari; Omanibe, Sidali Joseph; Oladimeji, Idris Habeeb

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the in vitro and in vivo effect of whole plant extracts of Peristrophe bicalyculata on Trypanosoma brucei brucei-infected rats. Methods The experiment was divided into two phases: In the first phase, the anti-trypanosomal activity of the hot water, cold water, methanol and butanol extracts of the whole plant were determined by incubating with Trypanosoma brucei brucei. The cold water extract was partially-purified and the anti-trypanosomal activity of the fractions determined. In the second phase, Trypanosoma brucei brucei-infected rats were treated with fraction 2c for nine days. Packed cell volume (PCV), high density lipoprotein (HDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL), total cholesterol (TC), triacylglycerol (TAG), aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferases (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total and direct bilirubin levels were determined at the end of the experiment. Results Cold water extract immobilized 90% of the parasites after 60 min of incubation, and fraction 2c completely immobilized the parasites after 35 min. It significantly increased PCV in Trypanosoma brucei brucei-infected rats. Decreased TC, TAG, HDL and LDL levels of infected rats increased significantly when rats were treated with the fraction, while elevated levels of total bilirubin and ALT also decreased. The difference in urea, direct bilirubin and ALP was not significant when infected rats were compared to rats in other groups. Conclusions The ability of the plant to ameliorate the infection-induced biochemical changes calls for detailed investigation of the potentials of the plant for antitrypanosomiasis drug delivery. PMID:23835905

  11. The phylogeography of trypanosomes from South American alligatorids and African crocodilids is consistent with the geological history of South American river basins and the transoceanic dispersal of Crocodylus at the Miocene

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Little is known about the diversity, phylogenetic relationships, and biogeography of trypanosomes infecting non-mammalian hosts. In this study, we investigated the influence of host species and biogeography on shaping the genetic diversity, phylogenetic relationship, and distribution of trypanosomes from South American alligatorids and African crocodilids. Methods Small Subunit rRNA (SSU rRNA) and glycosomal Glyceraldehyde Phosphate Dehydrogenase (gGAPDH) genes were employed for phylogenetic inferences. Trypanosomes from crocodilians were obtained by haemoculturing. Growth behaviour, morphology, and ultrastructural features complement the molecular description of two new species strongly supported by phylogenetic analyses. Results The inferred phylogenies disclosed a strongly supported crocodilian-restricted clade comprising three subclades. The subclade T. grayi comprised the African Trypanosoma grayi from Crocodylus niloticus and tsetse flies. The subclade T. ralphi comprised alligatorid trypanosomes represented by Trypanosoma ralphi n. sp. from Melanosuchus niger, Caiman crocodilus and Caiman yacare from Brazilian river basins. T. grayi and T. ralphi were sister subclades. The basal subclade T. terena comprised alligatorid trypanosomes represented by Trypanosoma terena n. sp. from Ca. yacare sharing hosts and basins with the distantly genetic related T. ralphi. This subclade also included the trypanosome from Ca. crocodilus from the Orinoco basin in Venezuela and, unexpectedly, a trypanosome from the African crocodilian Osteolaemus tetraspis. Conclusion The close relationship between South American and African trypanosomes is consistent with paleontological evidence of recent transoceanic dispersal of Crocodylus at the Miocene/Pliocene boundaries (4–5 mya), and host-switching of trypanosomes throughout the geological configuration of South American hydrographical basins shaping the evolutionary histories of the crocodilians and their trypanosomes

  12. The within-host dynamics of African trypanosome infections

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Keith R.; McCulloch, Richard; Morrison, Liam J.

    2015-01-01

    African trypanosomes are single-celled protozoan parasites that are capable of long-term survival while living extracellularly in the bloodstream and tissues of mammalian hosts. Prolonged infections are possible because trypanosomes undergo antigenic variation—the expression of a large repertoire of antigenically distinct surface coats, which allows the parasite population to evade antibody-mediated elimination. The mechanisms by which antigen genes become activated influence their order of expression, most likely by influencing the frequency of productive antigen switching, which in turn is likely to contribute to infection chronicity. Superimposed upon antigen switching as a contributor to trypanosome infection dynamics is the density-dependent production of cell-cycle arrested parasite transmission stages, which limit the infection while ensuring parasite spread to new hosts via the bite of blood-feeding tsetse flies. Neither antigen switching nor developmental progression to transmission stages is driven by the host. However, the host can contribute to the infection dynamic through the selection of distinct antigen types, the influence of genetic susceptibility or trypanotolerance and the potential influence of host-dependent effects on parasite virulence, development of transmission stages and pathogenicity. In a zoonotic infection cycle where trypanosomes circulate within a range of host animal populations, and in some cases humans, there is considerable scope for a complex interplay between parasite immune evasion, transmission potential and host factors to govern the profile and outcome of infection. PMID:26150654

  13. Mammalian African trypanosome VSG coat enhances tsetse's vector competence.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Emre; Vigneron, Aurélien; Bing, XiaoLi; Zhao, Xin; O'Neill, Michelle; Wu, Yi-Neng; Bangs, James D; Weiss, Brian L; Aksoy, Serap

    2016-06-21

    Tsetse flies are biological vectors of African trypanosomes, the protozoan parasites responsible for causing human and animal trypanosomiases across sub-Saharan Africa. Currently, no vaccines are available for disease prevention due to antigenic variation of the Variant Surface Glycoproteins (VSG) that coat parasites while they reside within mammalian hosts. As a result, interference with parasite development in the tsetse vector is being explored to reduce disease transmission. A major bottleneck to infection occurs as parasites attempt to colonize tsetse's midgut. One critical factor influencing this bottleneck is the fly's peritrophic matrix (PM), a semipermeable, chitinous barrier that lines the midgut. The mechanisms that enable trypanosomes to cross this barrier are currently unknown. Here, we determined that as parasites enter the tsetse's gut, VSG molecules released from trypanosomes are internalized by cells of the cardia-the tissue responsible for producing the PM. VSG internalization results in decreased expression of a tsetse microRNA (mir-275) and interferes with the Wnt-signaling pathway and the Iroquois/IRX transcription factor family. This interference reduces the function of the PM barrier and promotes parasite colonization of the gut early in the infection process. Manipulation of the insect midgut homeostasis by the mammalian parasite coat proteins is a novel function and indicates that VSG serves a dual role in trypanosome biology-that of facilitating transmission through its mammalian host and insect vector. We detail critical steps in the course of trypanosome infection establishment that can serve as novel targets to reduce the tsetse's vector competence and disease transmission. PMID:27185908

  14. [Comparative electron microscope studies on the kinetoplast morphology of bat-trypanosomes and Trypanosoma cruzi (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Mühlpfordt, H

    1981-01-01

    Comparative studies on the ultrastructural morphology of kinetoplasts of trypanosomes belonging to the subgenus Schizotrypanum have been made. Three isolates of Trypanosoma vespertilionis and two strains of Trypanosoma dionisii derived from European bats were tested. Comparison was made also with two isolates from Brasilian bats characterized as T. cruzi and two strains which were derived from two patients suffering from Chagas' disease. In the epimastigote culture form of T. cruzi a typical configuration of kDNA becomes obvious, appearing as a central band at the beginning of cell division. It was investigated whether this morphological character can be used in differentiating between bat-trypanosomes and T. cruzi and on the species characterization of bat-trypanosomes. The central band of kDNA could be demonstrated in all cases of the trypanosomes examined. The special configuration of kDNA makes it possible to distinguish exactly between trypanosomes of the subgenus Schizotrypanum and other trypanosomes. Nevertheless this pecularity alone is not sufficient for characterizing species of that subgenus. PMID:7018104

  15. [Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum) lizae n. sp.: a trypanosome with giant forms from the Michrochiroptera Hipposideros cyclops, in Gabon (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Miltgen, F; Landau, I

    1979-01-01

    Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum) lizae n. sp.: trypanosome with giant forms reaching a length of 1400 micrometers from the Microchiroptera Hipposideros cyclops in Gabon. Because of the peculiar morphology of giant forms and the characteristics of small individuals it is placed in a new species within the subgenus Megatrypanum. PMID:539717

  16. Cyclical Appearance of African Trypanosomes in the Cerebrospinal Fluid: New Insights in How Trypanosomes Enter the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Shtopel, Swetlana; Schraermeyer, Ulrich; Lazarus, Michael; Kubata, Bruno; Wolburg, Hartwig; Duszenko, Michael

    2014-01-01

    It is textbook knowledge that human infective forms of Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of sleeping sickness, enter the brain across the blood-brain barrier after an initial phase of weeks (rhodesiense) or months (gambiense) in blood. Based on our results using an animal model, both statements seem questionable. As we and others have shown, the first infection relevant crossing of the blood brain border occurs via the choroid plexus, i.e. via the blood-CSF barrier. In addition, counting trypanosomes in blood-free CSF obtained by an atlanto-occipital access revealed a cyclical infection in CSF that was directly correlated to the trypanosome density in blood infection. We also obtained conclusive evidence of organ infiltration, since parasites were detected in tissues outside the blood vessels in heart, spleen, liver, eye, testis, epididymis, and especially between the cell layers of the pia mater including the Virchow-Robin space. Interestingly, in all organs except pia mater, heart and testis, trypanosomes showed either a more or less degraded appearance of cell integrity by loss of the surface coat (VSG), loss of the microtubular cytoskeleton and loss of the intracellular content, or where taken up by phagocytes and degraded intracellularly within lysosomes. This is also true for trypanosomes placed intrathecally into the brain parenchyma using a stereotactic device. We propose a different model of brain infection that is in accordance with our observations and with well-established facts about the development of sleeping sickness. PMID:24618708

  17. Selenoproteins of African trypanosomes are dispensable for parasite survival in a mammalian host.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Mariana; Krull, Erika; Irigoín, Florencia; Salinas, Gustavo; Comini, Marcelo A

    2016-01-01

    The trace element selenium is found in polypeptides as selenocysteine, the 21(st) amino acid that is co-translationally inserted into proteins at a UGA codon. In proteins, selenocysteine usually plays a role as an efficient redox catalyst. Trypanosomatids previously examined harbor a full set of genes encoding the machinery needed for selenocysteine biosynthesis and incorporation into three selenoproteins: SelK, SelT and, the parasite-specific, Seltryp. We investigated the selenoproteome of kinetoplastid species in recently sequenced genomes and assessed the in vivo relevance of selenoproteins for African trypanosomes. Database mining revealed that SelK, SelT and Seltryp genes are present in most kinetoplastids, including the free-living species Bodo saltans, and Seltryp was lost in the subgenus Viannia from the New World Leishmania. Homology and sinteny with bacterial sulfur dioxygenases and sulfur transferases suggest a putative role for Seltryp in sulfur metabolism. A Trypanosoma brucei selenocysteine synthase (SepSecS) null-mutant, in which selenoprotein synthesis is abolished, displayed similar sensitivity to oxidative stress induced by a short-term exposure to high concentrations of methylglyoxal or H2O2 to that of the parental wild-type cell line. Importantly, the infectivity of the SepSecS knockout cell line was not impaired when tested in a mouse infection model and compensatory effects via up-regulation of proteins involved in thiol-redox metabolism were not observed. Collectively, our data show that selenoproteins are not required for survival of African trypanosomes in a mammalian host and exclude a role for selenoproteins in parasite antioxidant defense and/or virulence. On this basis, selenoproteins can be disregarded as drug target candidates. PMID:26975431

  18. Action of trypanosomal lipolytic enzymes on the membrane-form variant surface glycoprotein of trypanosoma brucei

    SciTech Connect

    Mellors, A.; Forsberg, C.M.; Hambrey, P.N.

    1986-05-01

    The membrane-form variant surface glycoprotein (mfVSG) of Trypanosoma brucei is anchored in the plasma membrane by myristoyl residues ester-linked to glycerophosphoethanolamine. The authors have extracted (myristoyl-/sup 3/H)-mfVSG from trypanosomes incubated with (/sup 3/H)-myristate and have isolated the protein by reverse phase HPLC. The extraction solvent, 20% acetonitrile in 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid, prevents lipolysis of the mfVSG during isolation. The mfVSG was shown to be homogeneous by SDS-PAGE, with an apparent molecular mass ratio of 66,000. No other proteins were labelled with (/sup 3/H)-myristate. The major lipolytic enzyme of T. brucei, phospholipase A/sub 1/, did not release myristate from mfVSG to any significant extent, though the enzyme readily hydrolyzes ester linkages of myristoyl phospholipids and p-nitrophenylmyristate. Trypanosomal membranes contain a phosphodiesterase which releases (/sup 3/H)-1,2-diglyceride from (/sup 3/H)-myristoyl-mfVSG. The phospholipase A/sub 1/ can be separated from the myristoyl-releasing activity (phosphodiesterase) by centrifugation, affinity chromatography and anion-exchange chromatography.

  19. Lapatinib-Binding Protein Kinases in the African Trypanosome: Identification of Cellular Targets for Kinase-Directed Chemical Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Katiyar, Samiksha; Kufareva, Irina; Behera, Ranjan; Thomas, Sarah M.; Ogata, Yuko; Pollastri, Michael; Abagyan, Ruben; Mensa-Wilmot, Kojo

    2013-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis is caused by the eukaryotic microbe Trypanosoma brucei. To discover new drugs against the disease, one may use drugs in the clinic for other indications whose chemical scaffolds can be optimized via a medicinal chemistry campaign to achieve greater potency against the trypanosome. Towards this goal, we tested inhibitors of human EGFR and/or VEGFR as possible anti-trypanosome compounds. The 4-anilinoquinazolines canertinib and lapatinib, and the pyrrolopyrimidine AEE788 killed bloodstream T. brucei in vitro with GI50 in the low micromolar range. Curiously, the genome of T. brucei does not encode EGFR or VEGFR, indicating that the drugs recognize alternate proteins. To discover these novel targets, a trypanosome lysate was adsorbed to an ATP-sepharose matrix and washed with a high salt solution followed by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). Proteins that remained bound to the column were eluted with drugs, and identified by mass spectrometry/bioinformatics. Lapatinib bound to Tb927.4.5180 (termed T. brucei lapatinib-binding protein kinase-1 (TbLBPK1)) while AEE788 bound Tb927.5.800 (TbLBPK2). When the NAD+ wash was omitted from the protocol, AEE788, canertinib and lapatinib eluted TbLBPK1, TbLBPK2, and Tb927.3.1570 (TbLBPK3). In addition, both canertinib and lapatinib eluted Tb10.60.3140 (TbLBPK4), whereas only canertinib desorbed Tb10.61.1880 (TbCBPK1). Lapatinib binds to a unique conformation of protein kinases. To gain insight into the structural basis for lapatinib interaction with TbLBPKs, we constructed three-dimensional models of lapatinib•TbLBPK complexes, which confirmed that TbLBPKs can adopt lapatinib-compatible conformations. Further, lapatinib, AEE788, and canertinib were docked to TbLBPKs with favorable scores. Our studies (a) present novel targets of kinase-directed drugs in the trypanosome, and (b) offer the 4-anilinoquinazoline and pyrrolopyrimidines as scaffolds worthy of medicinal chemistry and structural

  20. Trypanosome resistance to human innate immunity: targeting Achilles' heel.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Natalie A; Kieft, Rudo; Macleod, Annette; Hajduk, Stephen L

    2012-12-01

    Trypanosome lytic factors (TLFs) are powerful, naturally occurring toxins in humans that provide sterile protection against infection by several African trypanosomes. These trypanocidal complexes predominantly enter the parasite by binding to the trypanosome haptoglobin/hemoglobin receptor (HpHbR), trafficking to the lysosome, causing membrane damage and, ultimately, cell lysis. Despite TLF-mediated immunity, the parasites that cause human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, have developed independent mechanisms of resistance to TLF killing. In this review we describe the parasite defenses that allow trypanosome infections of humans and discuss how targeting these apparent strengths of the parasite may reveal their Achilles' heel, leading to new approaches in the treatment of HAT. PMID:23059119

  1. Trypanosome resistance to human innate immunity: targeting Achilles’ heel

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Natalie A.; Kieft, Rudo; MacLeod, Annette; Hajduk, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosome lytic factors (TLFs) are powerful, naturally-occurring toxins in humans that provide sterile protection against infection by several African trypanosomes. These trypanocidal complexes predominantly enter the parasite by binding to the trypanosome haptoglobin/hemoglobin receptor (HpHbR), trafficking to the lysosome, causing membrane damage and ultimately, cell lysis. Despite TLF-mediated immunity, the parasites that cause human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, have developed independent mechanisms of resistance to TLF killing. Here we describe the parasite defenses that allow trypanosome infections of humans and discuss how targeting these apparent strengths of the parasite may reveal their Achilles’ heel, leading to new approaches in the treatment of HAT. PMID:23059119

  2. Variant surface glycoproteins from Venezuelan trypanosome isolates are recognized by sera from animals infected with either Trypanosoma evansi or Trypanosoma vivax

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Rocío; Izquier, Adriana; Uzcanga, Graciela L.; Perrone, Trina; Acosta-Serrano, Alvaro; Carrasquel, Liomary; Arias, Laura P.; Escalona, José L.; Cardozo, Vanessa; Bubis, José

    2015-01-01

    Salivarian trypanosomes sequentially express only one variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) on their cell surface from a large repertoire of VSG genes. Seven cryopreserved animal trypanosome isolates known as TeAp-ElFrio01, TEVA1 (or TeAp-N/D1), TeGu-N/D1, TeAp-Mantecal01, TeGu-TerecayTrino, TeGu-Terecay03 and TeGu-Terecay323, which had been isolated from different hosts identified in several geographical areas of Venezuela were expanded using adult albino rats. Soluble forms of predominant VSGs expressed during the early infection stages were purified and corresponded to concanavalin A-binding proteins with molecular masses of 48–67 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electropohoresis, and pI values between 6.1 and 7.5. The biochemical characterization of all purified soluble VSGs revealed that they were dimers in their native form and represented different gene products. Sequencing of some of these proteins yielded peptides homologous to VSGs from Trypanosoma (Trypanozoon) brucei and Trypanosoma (Trypanozoon) evansi and established that they most likely are mosaics generated by homologous recombination. Western blot analysis showed that all purified VSGs were cross-reacting antigens that were recognized by sera from animals infected with either T. evansi or Trypanosoma (Dutonella) vivax. The VSG glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol cross-reacting determinant epitope was only partially responsible for the cross-reactivity of the purified proteins, and antibodies appeared to recognize cross-reacting conformational epitopes from the various soluble VSGs. ELISA experiments were performed using infected bovine sera collected from cattle in a Venezuelan trypanosome-endemic area. In particular, soluble VSGs from two trypanosome isolates, TeGu-N/D1 and TeGu-TeracayTrino, were recognized by 93.38% and 73.55% of naturally T. vivax-infected bovine sera, respectively. However, approximately 70% of the sera samples did not recognize all seven purified proteins. Hence

  3. Morphological and molecular characterization and phylogenetic relationships of a new species of trypanosome in Tapirus terrestris (lowland tapir), Trypanosoma terrestris sp. nov., from Atlantic Rainforest of southeastern Brazi

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Lowland tapir (Tapirus terrestris) is the largest Brazilian mammal and despite being distributed in various Brazilian biomes, it is seriously endangered in the Atlantic Rainforest. These hosts were never evaluated for the presence of Trypanosoma parasites. Methods The Lowland tapirs were captured in the Brazilian southeastern Atlantic Rainforest, Espírito Santo state. Trypanosomes were isolated by hemoculture, and the molecular phylogeny based on small subunit rDNA (SSU rDNA) and glycosomal-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gGAPDH) gene sequences and the ultrastructural features seen via light microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy are described. Results Phylogenetic trees using combined SSU rDNA and gGAPDH data sets clustered the trypanosomes of Lowland tapirs, which were highly divergent from other trypanosome species. The phylogenetic position and morphological discontinuities, mainly in epimastigote culture forms, made it possible to classify the trypanosomes from Lowland tapirs as a separate species. Conclusions The isolated trypanosomes from Tapirus terrestris are a new species, Trypanosoma terrestris sp. n., and were positioned in a new Trypanosoma clade, named T. terrestris clade. PMID:24330660

  4. Bats, Trypanosomes, and Triatomines in Ecuador: New Insights into the Diversity, Transmission, and Origins of Trypanosoma cruzi and Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Pinto, C Miguel; Ocaña-Mayorga, Sofía; Tapia, Elicio E; Lobos, Simón E; Zurita, Alejandra P; Aguirre-Villacís, Fernanda; MacDonald, Amber; Villacís, Anita G; Lima, Luciana; Teixeira, Marta M G; Grijalva, Mario J; Perkins, Susan L

    2015-01-01

    The generalist parasite Trypanosoma cruzi has two phylogenetic lineages associated almost exclusively with bats-Trypanosoma cruzi Tcbat and the subspecies T. c. marinkellei. We present new information on the genetic variation, geographic distribution, host associations, and potential vectors of these lineages. We conducted field surveys of bats and triatomines in southern Ecuador, a country endemic for Chagas disease, and screened for trypanosomes by microscopy and PCR. We identified parasites at species and genotype levels through phylogenetic approaches based on 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) and cytochrome b (cytb) genes and conducted a comparison of nucleotide diversity of the cytb gene. We document for the first time T. cruzi Tcbat and T. c. marinkellei in Ecuador, expanding their distribution in South America to the western side of the Andes. In addition, we found the triatomines Cavernicola pilosa and Triatoma dispar sharing shelters with bats. The comparisons of nucleotide diversity revealed a higher diversity for T. c. marinkellei than any of the T. c. cruzi genotypes associated with Chagas disease. Findings from this study increased both the number of host species and known geographical ranges of both parasites and suggest potential vectors for these two trypanosomes associated with bats in rural areas of southern Ecuador. The higher nucleotide diversity of T. c. marinkellei supports a long evolutionary relationship between T. cruzi and bats, implying that bats are the original hosts of this important parasite. PMID:26465748

  5. Bats, Trypanosomes, and Triatomines in Ecuador: New Insights into the Diversity, Transmission, and Origins of Trypanosoma cruzi and Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, C. Miguel; Ocaña-Mayorga, Sofía; Tapia, Elicio E.; Lobos, Simón E.; Zurita, Alejandra P.; Aguirre-Villacís, Fernanda; MacDonald, Amber; Villacís, Anita G.; Lima, Luciana; Teixeira, Marta M. G.; Grijalva, Mario J.; Perkins, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    The generalist parasite Trypanosoma cruzi has two phylogenetic lineages associated almost exclusively with bats—Trypanosoma cruzi Tcbat and the subspecies T. c. marinkellei. We present new information on the genetic variation, geographic distribution, host associations, and potential vectors of these lineages. We conducted field surveys of bats and triatomines in southern Ecuador, a country endemic for Chagas disease, and screened for trypanosomes by microscopy and PCR. We identified parasites at species and genotype levels through phylogenetic approaches based on 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) and cytochrome b (cytb) genes and conducted a comparison of nucleotide diversity of the cytb gene. We document for the first time T. cruzi Tcbat and T. c. marinkellei in Ecuador, expanding their distribution in South America to the western side of the Andes. In addition, we found the triatomines Cavernicola pilosa and Triatoma dispar sharing shelters with bats. The comparisons of nucleotide diversity revealed a higher diversity for T. c. marinkellei than any of the T. c. cruzi genotypes associated with Chagas disease. Findings from this study increased both the number of host species and known geographical ranges of both parasites and suggest potential vectors for these two trypanosomes associated with bats in rural areas of southern Ecuador. The higher nucleotide diversity of T. c. marinkellei supports a long evolutionary relationship between T. cruzi and bats, implying that bats are the original hosts of this important parasite. PMID:26465748

  6. Detection and identification of Trypanosoma of African livestock through a single PCR based on internal transcribed spacer 1 of rDNA.

    PubMed

    Desquesnes, M; McLaughlin, G; Zoungrana, A; Dávila, A M

    2001-05-01

    Primers hybridising with the rDNA cistron have previously been evaluated for PCR diagnosis specific for kinetoplastids, and shown to detect and differentiate the Trypanosoma brucei complex and Trypanosoma cruzi. Kin1 and Kin2 primers, amplifying internal transcribed spacer 1, were subsequently evaluated for the diagnosis of African livestock trypanosomosis. Based on the size of the PCR products obtained, Kin primers allowed detection and identification of three Trypanosoma congolense types (savannah, forest and Kenya Coast), with distinction among themselves and from the subgenus Trypanozoon (T. brucei spp., Trypanosoma evansi and Trypanosoma equiperdum), Trypanosoma vivax, Trypanosoma simiae and Trypanosoma theileri. These primers were shown to be suitable for the sensitive and type-specific diagnosis of African livestock trypanosome isolates through a single PCR even in the case of multi-taxa samples. With field samples (buffy-coat from cattle blood) sensitivity was close to the sensitivity observed in single reactions with the classical specific primers for the Trypanozoon subgenus and T. congolense-type savannah, but was lower for detection of T. vivax. Additional reaction, improvement of DNA preparation, and/or new primers design are necessary to improve the sensitivity for detection of T. vivax in field samples. However, these primers are suitable for isolate typing through a single PCR. PMID:11334950

  7. Field and experimental evidence of a new caiman trypanosome species closely phylogenetically related to fish trypanosomes and transmitted by leeches

    PubMed Central

    Fermino, Bruno R.; Paiva, Fernando; Soares, Priscilla; Tavares, Luiz Eduardo R.; Viola, Laerte B.; Ferreira, Robson C.; Botero-Arias, Robinson; de-Paula, Cátia D.; Campaner, Marta; Takata, Carmen S.A.; Teixeira, Marta M.G.; Camargo, Erney P.

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma terena and Trypanosoma ralphi are known species of the South American crocodilians Caiman crocodilus, Caiman yacare and Melanosuchus niger and are phylogenetically related to the tsetse-transmitted Trypanosoma grayi of the African Crocodylus niloticus. These trypanosomes form the Crocodilian clade of the terrestrial clade of the genus Trypanosoma. A PCR-survey for trypanosomes in caiman blood samples and in leeches taken from caimans revealed unknown trypanosome diversity and frequent mixed infections. Phylogenies based on SSU (small subunit) of rRNA and gGAPDH (glycosomal Glyceraldehyde Phosphate Dehydrogenase) gene sequences revealed a new trypanosome species clustering with T. terena and T. ralphi in the crocodilian clade and an additional new species nesting in the distant Aquatic clade of trypanosomes, which is herein named Trypanosoma clandestinus n. sp. This new species was found in Caiman yacare, Caiman crocodilus and M. niger from the Pantanal and Amazonian biomes in Brazil. Large numbers of dividing epimastigotes and unique thin and long trypomastigotes were found in the guts of leeches (Haementeria sp.) removed from the mouths of caimans. The trypanosomes recovered from the leeches had sequences identical to those of T. clandestinus of caiman blood samples. Experimental infestation of young caimans (Caiman yacare) with infected leeches resulted in long-lasting T. clandestinus infections that permitted us to delineate its life cycle. In contrast to T. terena, T. ralphi and T. grayi, which are detectable by hemoculturing, microscopy and standard PCR of caiman blood, T. clandestinus passes undetected by these methods due to very low parasitemia and could be detected solely by the more sensitive nested PCR method. T. clandestinus n. sp. is the first crocodilian trypanosome known to be transmitted by leeches and positioned in the aquatic clade closest to fish trypanosomes. Our data show that caimans can host trypanosomes of the aquatic or

  8. Field and experimental evidence of a new caiman trypanosome species closely phylogenetically related to fish trypanosomes and transmitted by leeches.

    PubMed

    Fermino, Bruno R; Paiva, Fernando; Soares, Priscilla; Tavares, Luiz Eduardo R; Viola, Laerte B; Ferreira, Robson C; Botero-Arias, Robinson; de-Paula, Cátia D; Campaner, Marta; Takata, Carmen S A; Teixeira, Marta M G; Camargo, Erney P

    2015-12-01

    Trypanosoma terena and Trypanosoma ralphi are known species of the South American crocodilians Caiman crocodilus, Caiman yacare and Melanosuchus niger and are phylogenetically related to the tsetse-transmitted Trypanosoma grayi of the African Crocodylus niloticus. These trypanosomes form the Crocodilian clade of the terrestrial clade of the genus Trypanosoma. A PCR-survey for trypanosomes in caiman blood samples and in leeches taken from caimans revealed unknown trypanosome diversity and frequent mixed infections. Phylogenies based on SSU (small subunit) of rRNA and gGAPDH (glycosomal Glyceraldehyde Phosphate Dehydrogenase) gene sequences revealed a new trypanosome species clustering with T. terena and T. ralphi in the crocodilian clade and an additional new species nesting in the distant Aquatic clade of trypanosomes, which is herein named Trypanosoma clandestinus n. sp. This new species was found in Caiman yacare, Caiman crocodilus and M. niger from the Pantanal and Amazonian biomes in Brazil. Large numbers of dividing epimastigotes and unique thin and long trypomastigotes were found in the guts of leeches (Haementeria sp.) removed from the mouths of caimans. The trypanosomes recovered from the leeches had sequences identical to those of T. clandestinus of caiman blood samples. Experimental infestation of young caimans (Caiman yacare) with infected leeches resulted in long-lasting T. clandestinus infections that permitted us to delineate its life cycle. In contrast to T. terena, T. ralphi and T. grayi, which are detectable by hemoculturing, microscopy and standard PCR of caiman blood, T. clandestinus passes undetected by these methods due to very low parasitemia and could be detected solely by the more sensitive nested PCR method. T. clandestinus n. sp. is the first crocodilian trypanosome known to be transmitted by leeches and positioned in the aquatic clade closest to fish trypanosomes. Our data show that caimans can host trypanosomes of the aquatic or

  9. Two genotypic groups of morphologically similar fish trypanosomes from the Okavango Delta, Botswana.

    PubMed

    Davies, Angela J; Gibson, Wendy; Ferris, Vanessa; Basson, Linda; Smit, Nico J

    2005-09-23

    Blood smears and blood lysate samples from freshwater fishes captured in the Okavango Delta, Botswana, were examined to determine whether their trypanosomes were all Trypanosoma mukasai, a species of supposed broad host specificity and widespread existence across Africa. Trypanosomes and/or babesiosomes occurred in 20/32 blood smears, and morphometric analysis of trypanosomes from 13/32 smears showed features suggestive of T. mukasai, including nuclear indices consistently >1. In 16/32 blood lysate samples from which DNA was extracted, trypanosome DNA was detected in 12/16 by PCR (polymerase chain reaction), using trypanosome-specific ssu rRNA gene primers. Two samples positive for trypanosomes in blood smears yielded no amplifiable trypanosome DNA, but 4 samples with no detectable infection in blood smears were positive for trypanosome DNA, suggesting an overall trypanosome prevalence rate of 17/32 (53%) among fishes and demonstrating the value of PCR in trypanosome recognition. Cloning and sequencing of the 12 amplified fragments revealed 2 genotypic groups among these fish trypanosomes. Group 1 trypanosomes were from cichlids and 3 families of catfishes, Group 2 from 2 types of catfishes. Sequence comparison showed that the consensus Group 1 sequence was most similar to that of Trypanosoma cobitis, representing European fish trypanosomes of the carassii type, while the consensus Group 2 sequence showed similarity with a trypanosome sequence from another African catfish, Clarias angolensis. It was concluded that the identification of T. mukasai remains a problem, but at least 2 genotypic groups of trypanosomes occur in Okavango Delta fishes, and catfishes in this region appear to contain both types. PMID:16261936

  10. Modeling the locomotion of the African trypanosome using multi-particle collision dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, Sujin B.; Stark, Holger

    2012-08-01

    The African trypanosome is a single flagellated micro-organism that causes the deadly sleeping sickness in humans and animals. We study the locomotion of a model trypanosome by modeling the spindle-shaped cell body using an elastic network of vertices with additional bending rigidity. The flagellum firmly attached to the model cell body is either straight or helical. A bending wave propagates along the flagellum and pushes the trypanosome forward in its viscous environment, which we simulate with the method of multi-particle collision dynamics. The relaxation dynamics of the model cell body due to a static bending wave reveals the sperm number from elastohydrodynamics as the relevant parameter. Characteristic cell body conformations for the helically attached flagellum resemble experimental observations. We show that the swimming velocity scales as the root of the angular frequency of the bending wave reminiscent of predictions for an actuated slender rod attached to a large viscous load. The swimming velocity for one geometry collapses on a single master curve when plotted versus the sperm number. The helically attached flagellum leads to a helical swimming path and a rotation of the model trypanosome about its long axis as observed in experiments. The simulated swimming velocity agrees with the experimental value.

  11. Mammalian African trypanosome VSG coat enhances tsetse’s vector competence

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Emre; Vigneron, Aurélien; Bing, XiaoLi; Zhao, Xin; O’Neill, Michelle; Wu, Yi-neng; Bangs, James D.; Weiss, Brian L.; Aksoy, Serap

    2016-01-01

    Tsetse flies are biological vectors of African trypanosomes, the protozoan parasites responsible for causing human and animal trypanosomiases across sub-Saharan Africa. Currently, no vaccines are available for disease prevention due to antigenic variation of the Variant Surface Glycoproteins (VSG) that coat parasites while they reside within mammalian hosts. As a result, interference with parasite development in the tsetse vector is being explored to reduce disease transmission. A major bottleneck to infection occurs as parasites attempt to colonize tsetse’s midgut. One critical factor influencing this bottleneck is the fly’s peritrophic matrix (PM), a semipermeable, chitinous barrier that lines the midgut. The mechanisms that enable trypanosomes to cross this barrier are currently unknown. Here, we determined that as parasites enter the tsetse’s gut, VSG molecules released from trypanosomes are internalized by cells of the cardia—the tissue responsible for producing the PM. VSG internalization results in decreased expression of a tsetse microRNA (mir-275) and interferes with the Wnt-signaling pathway and the Iroquois/IRX transcription factor family. This interference reduces the function of the PM barrier and promotes parasite colonization of the gut early in the infection process. Manipulation of the insect midgut homeostasis by the mammalian parasite coat proteins is a novel function and indicates that VSG serves a dual role in trypanosome biology—that of facilitating transmission through its mammalian host and insect vector. We detail critical steps in the course of trypanosome infection establishment that can serve as novel targets to reduce the tsetse’s vector competence and disease transmission. PMID:27185908

  12. Antigenic variation in African trypanosomes: the importance of chromosomal and nuclear context in VSG expression control

    PubMed Central

    Glover, Lucy; Hutchinson, Sebastian; Alsford, Sam; McCulloch, Richard; Field, Mark C; Horn, David

    2013-01-01

    African trypanosomes are lethal human and animal parasites that use antigenic variation for evasion of host adaptive immunity. To facilitate antigenic variation, trypanosomes dedicate approximately one third of their nuclear genome, including many minichromosomes, and possibly all sub-telomeres, to variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes and associated sequences. Antigenic variation requires transcription of a single VSG by RNA polymerase I (Pol-I), with silencing of other VSGs, and periodic switching of the expressed gene, typically via DNA recombination with duplicative translocation of a new VSG to the active site. Thus, telomeric location, epigenetic controls and monoallelic transcription by Pol-I at an extranucleolar site are prominent features of VSGs and their expression, with telomeres, chromatin structure and nuclear organization all making vitally important contributions to monoallelic VSG expression control and switching. We discuss VSG transcription, recombination and replication control within this chromosomal and sub-nuclear context. PMID:24047558

  13. How Does the VSG Coat of Bloodstream Form African Trypanosomes Interact with External Proteins?

    PubMed Central

    Schwede, Angela; Macleod, Olivia J. S.; MacGregor, Paula; Carrington, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Variations on the statement “the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat that covers the external face of the mammalian bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei acts a physical barrier” appear regularly in research articles and reviews. The concept of the impenetrable VSG coat is an attractive one, as it provides a clear model for understanding how a trypanosome population persists; each successive VSG protects the plasma membrane and is immunologically distinct from previous VSGs. What is the evidence that the VSG coat is an impenetrable barrier, and how do antibodies and other extracellular proteins interact with it? In this review, the nature of the extracellular surface of the bloodstream form trypanosome is described, and past experiments that investigated binding of antibodies and lectins to trypanosomes are analysed using knowledge of VSG sequence and structure that was unavailable when the experiments were performed. Epitopes for some VSG monoclonal antibodies are mapped as far as possible from previous experimental data, onto models of VSG structures. The binding of lectins to some, but not to other, VSGs is revisited with more recent knowledge of the location and nature of N-linked oligosaccharides. The conclusions are: (i) Much of the variation observed in earlier experiments can be explained by the identity of the individual VSGs. (ii) Much of an individual VSG is accessible to antibodies, and the barrier that prevents access to the cell surface is probably at the base of the VSG N-terminal domain, approximately 5 nm from the plasma membrane. This second conclusion highlights a gap in our understanding of how the VSG coat works, as several plasma membrane proteins with large extracellular domains are very unlikely to be hidden from host antibodies by VSG. PMID:26719972

  14. Insect Stage-Specific Adenylate Cyclases Regulate Social Motility in African Trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Miguel A.; Saada, Edwin A.

    2014-01-01

    Sophisticated systems for cell-cell communication enable unicellular microbes to act as multicellular entities capable of group-level behaviors that are not evident in individuals. These group behaviors influence microbe physiology, and the underlying signaling pathways are considered potential drug targets in microbial pathogens. Trypanosoma brucei is a protozoan parasite that causes substantial human suffering and economic hardship in some of the most impoverished regions of the world. T. brucei lives on host tissue surfaces during transmission through its tsetse fly vector, and cultivation on surfaces causes the parasites to assemble into multicellular communities in which individual cells coordinate their movements in response to external signals. This behavior is termed “social motility,” based on its similarities with surface-induced social motility in bacteria, and it demonstrates that trypanosomes are capable of group-level behavior. Mechanisms governing T. brucei social motility are unknown. Here we report that a subset of receptor-type adenylate cyclases (ACs) in the trypanosome flagellum regulate social motility. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of adenylate cyclase 6 (AC6), or dual knockdown of AC1 and AC2, causes a hypersocial phenotype but has no discernible effect on individual cells in suspension culture. Mutation of the AC6 catalytic domain phenocopies AC6 knockdown, demonstrating that loss of adenylate cyclase activity is responsible for the phenotype. Notably, knockdown of other ACs did not affect social motility, indicating segregation of AC functions. These studies reveal interesting parallels in systems that control social behavior in trypanosomes and bacteria and provide insight into a feature of parasite biology that may be exploited for novel intervention strategies. PMID:25416239

  15. Approaches for functional analysis of flagellar proteins in African trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Oberholzer, Michael; Lopez, Miguel A.; Ralston, Katherine S.; Hill, Kent L.

    2013-01-01

    The eukaryotic flagellum is a highly conserved organelle serving motility, sensory and transport functions. Although genetic, genomic and proteomic studies have led to the identification of hundreds of flagellar and putative flagellar proteins, precisely how these proteins function individually and collectively to drive flagellum motility and other functions remains to be determined. In this chapter we provide an overview of tools and approaches available for studying flagellum protein function in the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei. We begin by outlining techniques for in vitro cultivation of both T. brucei lifecycle stages, as well as transfection protocols for the delivery of DNA constructs. We then describe specific assays used to assess flagellum function including flagellum preparation and quantitative motility assays. We conclude the chapter with a description of molecular genetic approaches for manipulating gene function. In summary, the availability of potent molecular tools, as well as the health and economic relevance of T. brucei as a pathogen, combine to make the parasite an attractive and integral experimental system for the functional analysis of flagellar proteins. PMID:20409810

  16. Trypanosoma cruzi-Trypanosoma rangeli co-infection ameliorates negative effects of single trypanosome infections in experimentally infected Rhodnius prolixus.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jennifer K; Graham, Andrea L; Elliott, Ryan J; Dobson, Andrew P; Triana Chávez, Omar

    2016-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, causative agent of Chagas disease, co-infects its triatomine vector with its sister species Trypanosoma rangeli, which shares 60% of its antigens with T. cruzi. Additionally, T. rangeli has been observed to be pathogenic in some of its vector species. Although T. cruzi-T. rangeli co-infections are common, their effect on the vector has rarely been investigated. Therefore, we measured the fitness (survival and reproduction) of triatomine species Rhodnius prolixus infected with just T. cruzi, just T. rangeli, or both T. cruzi and T. rangeli. We found that survival (as estimated by survival probability and hazard ratios) was significantly different between treatments, with the T. cruzi treatment group having lower survival than the co-infected treatment. Reproduction and total fitness estimates in the T. cruzi and T. rangeli treatments were significantly lower than in the co-infected and control groups. The T. cruzi and T. rangeli treatment group fitness estimates were not significantly different from each other. Additionally, co-infected insects appeared to tolerate higher doses of parasites than insects with single-species infections. Our results suggest that T. cruzi-T. rangeli co-infection could ameliorate negative effects of single infections of either parasite on R. prolixus and potentially help it to tolerate higher parasite doses. PMID:27174360

  17. Detection of African animal trypanosomes: the haematocrit centrifugation technique compared to PCR with samples stored on filter paper or in DNA protecting buffer.

    PubMed

    Moti, Y; Fikru, R; Büscher, P; Van Den Abbeele, J; Duchateau, L; Delespaux, V

    2014-07-14

    The present study aimed at comparing the trypanosome specific 18S-PCR-RFLP using samples stored either on Whatman filter papers (PCR-RFLP-fp) or in a commercial cell lysis and DNA protecting buffer (PCR-RFLP-pb) with the haematocrit centrifugation technique (HCT), a method widely used for the diagnosis of African Animal Trypanosomosis. Out of 411 head of cattle, 49 (11.92%) (CI=8.95-15.45) scored positive for the presence of trypanosomes by HCT whereas 75 (18.25%) (CI=14.63-22.33) and 124 (30.17%) (CI=25.77-34.86) scored positive using PCR-RFLP-fp and PCR-RFLP-pb, respectively. Out of the 49 positives by HCT, 14 (28.57%) (CI=16.58-43.26) and 28 (57.14%) (CI=42.21-71.18) were concordant by PCR-RFLP-fp and PCR-RFLP-pb, respectively. None of the PCR techniques detected parasites from the Trypanozoon group. Although HCT detected more cases of Trypanosoma vivax (33), species identification using PCR-RFLP-fp and PCR-RFLP-pb were significantly different (p<0.001) from the HCT technique. The use of DNA protective buffer is thus recommended as the output of the PCR-RFLP-pb is improved and the risk of contamination between samples is reduced. PMID:24836424

  18. First Report of Trypanosoma sp. in Spectacled Caiman (Caiman crocodilus): Morphological and Phylogenetic Relationships

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Andrea P.; Acosta, Igor C. L.; de Lima, Julia T. R.; Minervino, Antonio H. H.; Gennari, Solange M.

    2013-01-01

    In Crocodylidae family three trypanosomes species were described, T. grayi in African crocodilian and T. cecili and Trypanosoma sp. in Caimans species from Brazil. T. grayi was transmitted by tsetse flies and the vector of Brazilian caimans trypanosomes is unknown. We characterized first Brazilian trypanosome isolated in spectacled caiman (Caiman crocodilus) from Mato Grosso State in Brazil. Morphological findings in epimastigotes forms from axenic culture showed high similarity with Trypanosoma sp. described in Caiman yacare from Brazilian Pantanal. Phylogenetic studies performed with SSU rDNA and gGAPDH (glyceraldehydes-3-phosphato dehydrogenase glycosomal) clustering in T. grayi Clade and together to genotype Cay 01 from Trypanosoma unnamed species isolated in C. yacare. This is the first isolate of Trypanosoma sp. from C. crocodilus and the phylogenetic position with isolates in C. yacare from Pantanal region and demonstrates the low host specificity of cayman trypanosomes in Brazil. PMID:27335853

  19. The distribution of the vectors of African pathogenic trypanosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Ford, J.

    1963-01-01

    The author lists the species, subspecies and races of tsetse fly now recognized in three morphologically distinct groups. The distribution of each group is mapped and described in relation to climate and vegetation, with some indication of the part played by past climates and orogenies in determining the modern pattern. The importance of different species as vectors of human or bovine trypanosomiasis, or both, is noted, and examples are given of the part played by human settlement as a secondary limiting factor. The author suggests that many modern problems of control are the consequences of the recent invasion of the African ecosystem by the outside world. Although there are local exceptions, the broad pattern of Glossina distribution has not been significantly changed by the entomological approach to the trypanosomiasis problem. PMID:13958704

  20. Trypanosoma livingstonei: a new species from African bats supports the bat seeding hypothesis for the Trypanosoma cruzi clade

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bat trypanosomes have been implicated in the evolutionary history of the T. cruzi clade, which comprises species from a wide geographic and host range in South America, Africa and Europe, including bat-restricted species and the generalist agents of human American trypanosomosis T. cruzi and T. rangeli. Methods Trypanosomes from bats (Rhinolophus landeri and Hipposideros caffer) captured in Mozambique, southeast Africa, were isolated by hemoculture. Barcoding was carried out through the V7V8 region of Small Subunit (SSU) rRNA and Fluorescent Fragment Length barcoding (FFLB). Phylogenetic inferences were based on SSU rRNA, glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase (gGAPDH) and Spliced Leader (SL) genes. Morphological characterization included light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Results New trypanosomes from bats clustered together forming a clade basal to a larger assemblage called the T. cruzi clade. Barcoding, phylogenetic analyses and genetic distances based on SSU rRNA and gGAPDH supported these trypanosomes as a new species, which we named Trypanosoma livingstonei n. sp. The large and highly polymorphic SL gene repeats of this species showed a copy of the 5S ribosomal RNA into the intergenic region. Unique morphological (large and broad blood trypomastigotes compatible to species of the subgenus Megatrypanum and cultures showing highly pleomorphic epimastigotes and long and slender trypomastigotes) and ultrastructural (cytostome and reservosomes) features and growth behaviour (when co-cultivated with HeLa cells at 37°C differentiated into trypomastigotes resembling the blood forms and do not invaded the cells) complemented the description of this species. Conclusion Phylogenetic inferences supported the hypothesis that Trypanosoma livingstonei n. sp. diverged from a common ancestral bat trypanosome that evolved exclusively in Chiroptera or switched at independent opportunities to mammals of several orders forming the clade T. cruzi

  1. Wild chimpanzees are infected by Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Jirků, Milan; Votýpka, Jan; Petrželková, Klára J; Jirků-Pomajbíková, Kateřina; Kriegová, Eva; Vodička, Roman; Lankester, Felix; Leendertz, Siv Aina J; Wittig, Roman M; Boesch, Christophe; Modrý, David; Ayala, Francisco J; Leendertz, Fabian H; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-12-01

    Although wild chimpanzees and other African great apes live in regions endemic for African sleeping sickness, very little is known about their trypanosome infections, mainly due to major difficulties in obtaining their blood samples. In present work, we established a diagnostic ITS1-based PCR assay that allows detection of the DNA of all four Trypanosoma brucei subspecies (Trypanosoma brucei brucei, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, and Trypanosoma brucei evansi) in feces of experimentally infected mice. Next, using this assay we revealed the presence of trypanosomes in the fecal samples of wild chimpanzees and this finding was further supported by results obtained using a set of primate tissue samples. Phylogenetic analysis of the ITS1 region showed that the majority of obtained sequences fell into the robust T. brucei group, providing strong evidence that these infections were caused by T. b. rhodesiense and/or T. b. gambiense. The optimized technique of trypanosome detection in feces will improve our knowledge about the epidemiology of trypanosomes in primates and possibly also other endangered mammals, from which blood and tissue samples cannot be obtained. Finally, we demonstrated that the mandrill serum was able to efficiently lyse T. b. brucei and T. b. rhodesiense, and to some extent T. b. gambiense, while the chimpanzee serum failed to lyse any of these subspecies. PMID:26110113

  2. Wild chimpanzees are infected by Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Jirků, Milan; Votýpka, Jan; Petrželková, Klára J.; Jirků-Pomajbíková, Kateřina; Kriegová, Eva; Vodička, Roman; Lankester, Felix; Leendertz, Siv Aina J.; Wittig, Roman M.; Boesch, Christophe; Modrý, David; Ayala, Francisco J.; Leendertz, Fabian H.; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-01-01

    Although wild chimpanzees and other African great apes live in regions endemic for African sleeping sickness, very little is known about their trypanosome infections, mainly due to major difficulties in obtaining their blood samples. In present work, we established a diagnostic ITS1-based PCR assay that allows detection of the DNA of all four Trypanosoma brucei subspecies (Trypanosoma bruceibrucei, Trypanosoma bruceirhodesiense, Trypanosoma bruceigambiense, and Trypanosoma bruceievansi) in feces of experimentally infected mice. Next, using this assay we revealed the presence of trypanosomes in the fecal samples of wild chimpanzees and this finding was further supported by results obtained using a set of primate tissue samples. Phylogenetic analysis of the ITS1 region showed that the majority of obtained sequences fell into the robust T. brucei group, providing strong evidence that these infections were caused by T. b. rhodesiense and/or T. b. gambiense. The optimized technique of trypanosome detection in feces will improve our knowledge about the epidemiology of trypanosomes in primates and possibly also other endangered mammals, from which blood and tissue samples cannot be obtained. Finally, we demonstrated that the mandrill serum was able to efficiently lyse T. b. brucei and T. b. rhodesiense, and to some extent T. b. gambiense, while the chimpanzee serum failed to lyse any of these subspecies. PMID:26110113

  3. The use of specific and generic primers to identify trypanosome infections of wild tsetse flies in Tanzania by PCR.

    PubMed

    Malele, Imna; Craske, Lisa; Knight, Claire; Ferris, Vanessa; Njiru, Zablon; Hamilton, Patrick; Lehane, Stella; Lehane, Mike; Gibson, Wendy

    2003-11-01

    The accurate identification of trypanosome species and subspecies remains a challenging task in the epidemiology of human and animal trypanosomiasis in tropical Africa. Currently, there are specific PCR tests to identify about 10 different species, subspecies or subgroups of African tsetse-transmitted trypanosomes. These PCR tests have been used here to identify trypanosomes in four species of tsetse (Glossina brevipalpis, G. pallidipes, G. swynnertoni, G. morsitans morsitans) from two areas of Tanzania. PCR using species-specific primers was performed on 1041 dissection-positive proboscides, giving an overall positive identification in 254 (24%). Of these, 61 proboscides (24%) contained two or more trypanosomes. The trypanosome with the greatest overall prevalence at both field sites was Trypanosoma simiae Tsavo, which was identified in a total of 118 infected tsetse proboscides (46%). At Pangani, T. godfreyi was found in G. pallidipes but not in G. brevipalpis, suggesting that these flies might have different susceptibility to this trypanosome or might have fed on a different range of hosts. A high proportion (about 75%) of trypanosome infections remained unidentified. To investigate the identity of these unidentified samples, we used primers complementary to the conserved regions of trypanosomal small subunit ribosomal RNA (ssu rRNA) genes to amplify variable segments of the gene. Amplified DNA fragments were cloned, sequenced and compared with ssu rRNA genes on database of known trypanosome species. In this way, we have tentatively identified two new trypanosomes: a trypanosome related to Trypanosoma vivax and a trypanosome related to T. godfreyi. The T. godfreyi-related trypanosome occurred frequently in the Tanzanian field samples and appears to be widespread. Molecular identification of these two new trypanosomes should now facilitate their isolation and full biological characterisation. PMID:14636688

  4. A comparative evaluation of PCR- based methods for species- specific determination of African animal trypanosomes in Ugandan cattle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years, PCR has been become widely applied for the detection of trypanosomes overcoming many of the constraints of parasitological and serological techniques, being highly sensitive and specific for trypanosome detection. Individual species-specific multi-copy trypanosome DNA sequences can be targeted to identify parasites. Highly conserved ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes are also useful for comparisons between closely related species. The internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS) in particular are relatively small, show variability among related species and are flanked by highly conserved segments to which PCR primers can be designed. Individual variations in inter-species length makes the ITS region a useful marker for identification of multiple trypanosome species within a sample. Methods Six hundred blood samples from cattle collected in Uganda on FTA cards were screened using individual species-specific primers for Trypanosoma congolense, Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma vivax and compared to a modified (using eluate extracted using chelex) ITS-PCR reaction. Results The comparative analysis showed that the species-specific primer sets showed poor agreement with the ITS primer set. Using species-specific PCR for Trypanozoon, a prevalence of 10.5% was observed as compared to 0.2% using ITS PCR (Kappa = 0.03). For Trypanosoma congolense, the species-specific PCR reaction indicated a prevalence of 0% compared to 2.2% using ITS PCR (Kappa = 0). For T. vivax, species-specific PCR detected prevalence of 5.7% compared to 2.8% for ITS PCR (Kappa = 0.29). Conclusions When selecting PCR based tools to apply to epidemiological surveys for generation of prevalence data for animal trypanosomiasis, it is recommended that species-specific primers are used, being the most sensitive diagnostic tool for screening samples to identify members of Trypanozoon (T. b. brucei s.l). While ITS primers are useful for studying the prevalence of trypanosomes

  5. Zoonotic trypanosomes in South East Asia: Attempts to control Trypanosoma lewisi using veterinary drugs.

    PubMed

    Desquesnes, Marc; Yangtara, Sarawut; Kunphukhieo, Pawinee; Chalermwong, Piangjai; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Herder, Stéphane

    2016-06-01

    A growing number of atypical human infections due to the livestock parasite Trypanosoma evansi, or to the rat parasite Trypanosoma lewisi, are reported in humans in Asia. In some cases, clinical evolutions request treatments, however, so far, there were very few attempts to control T. lewisi using trypanocidal drugs. In a study published elsewhere, the efficacy of human trypanocides is evaluated in laboratory rats, and it concludes that none of them is able to cure rats experimentally infected with T. lewisi. Control of T. lewisi in rat would be a step for identification of drugs against this parasite. In the present study, 4 veterinary drugs: diminazene aceturate, isometamidium chloride, melarsomine hydrochloride and quinapyramine sulfate and chloride, were evaluated at low and high doses, in intra-muscular injections to normal rats experimentally infected with a stock of T. lewisi from Thailand. None of these treatments being efficient, a trial was also made using melarsomine hydrochloride in T. evansi infected rats and in mixed T. lewisi and T. evansi infected rats, in order to demonstrate the efficacy of the drugs under the present protocol. T. evansi was cleared from the rat's blood the day after the treatment, while, T. lewisi remained unaffected until the end of the experiment. These observations clearly demonstrated the efficacy of melarsomine hydrochloride against T. evansi and its inefficacy against T. lewisi. In conclusion none of the veterinary drugs was efficient against this stock of T. lewisi. Other protocols using higher doses or other drugs and T. lewisi stocks should be investigated in further studies. The control of T. lewisi infection in Wistar rats, using veterinary trypanocidal drugs, remains so far unsuccessful. PMID:26988923

  6. African Trypanosome-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction under Shear Stress May Not Require ERK Activation.

    PubMed

    Sumpio, Brandon J; Chitragari, Gautham; Moriguchi, Takeshi; Shalaby, Sherif; Pappas-Brown, Valeria; Khan, Asif M; Sekaran, Shamala Devi; Sumpio, Bauer E; Grab, Dennis J

    2015-03-01

    African trypanosomes are tsetse fly transmitted protozoan parasites responsible for human African trypanosomiasis, a disease characterized by a plethora of neurological symptoms and death. How the parasites under microvascular shear stress (SS) flow conditions in the brain cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is not known. In vitro studies using static models comprised of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC) show that BBB activation and crossing by trypanosomes requires the orchestration of parasite cysteine proteases and host calcium-mediated cell signaling. Here, we examine BMEC barrier function and the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 and ERK5, mitogen-activated protein kinase family regulators of microvascular permeability, under static and laminar SS flow and in the context of trypanosome infection. Confluent human BMEC were cultured in electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) and parallel-plate glass slide chambers. The human BMEC were exposed to 2 or 14 dyn/cm(2) SS in the presence or absence of trypanosomes. Real-time changes in transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) were monitored and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and ERK5 analyzed by immunoblot assay. After reaching confluence under static conditions human BMEC TEER was found to rapidly increase when exposed to 2 dyn/cm(2) SS, a condition that mimics SS in brain postcapillary venules. Addition of African trypanosomes caused a rapid drop in human BMEC TEER. Increasing SS to 14 dyn/cm(2), a condition mimicking SS in brain capillaries, led to a transient increase in TEER in both control and infected human BMEC. However, no differences in ERK1/2 and ERK5 activation were found under any condition tested. African trypanosomiasis alters BBB permeability under low shear conditions through an ERK1/2 and ERK5 independent pathway. PMID:27053915

  7. Repertoire, genealogy and genomic organization of cruzipain and homologous genes in Trypanosoma cruzi, T. cruzi-like and other trypanosome species.

    PubMed

    Lima, Luciana; Ortiz, Paola A; da Silva, Flávia Maia; Alves, João Marcelo P; Serrano, Myrna G; Cortez, Alane P; Alfieri, Silvia C; Buck, Gregory A; Teixeira, Marta M G

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, is a complex of genetically diverse isolates highly phylogenetically related to T. cruzi-like species, Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei and Trypanosoma dionisii, all sharing morphology of blood and culture forms and development within cells. However, they differ in hosts, vectors and pathogenicity: T. cruzi is a human pathogen infective to virtually all mammals whilst the other two species are non-pathogenic and bat restricted. Previous studies suggest that variations in expression levels and genetic diversity of cruzipain, the major isoform of cathepsin L-like (CATL) enzymes of T. cruzi, correlate with levels of cellular invasion, differentiation, virulence and pathogenicity of distinct strains. In this study, we compared 80 sequences of genes encoding cruzipain from 25 T. cruzi isolates representative of all discrete typing units (DTUs TcI-TcVI) and the new genotype Tcbat and 10 sequences of homologous genes from other species. The catalytic domain repertoires diverged according to DTUs and trypanosome species. Relatively homogeneous sequences are found within and among isolates of the same DTU except TcV and TcVI, which displayed sequences unique or identical to those of TcII and TcIII, supporting their origin from the hybridization between these two DTUs. In network genealogies, sequences from T. cruzi clustered tightly together and closer to T. c. marinkellei than to T. dionisii and largely differed from homologues of T. rangeli and T. b. brucei. Here, analysis of isolates representative of the overall biological and genetic diversity of T. cruzi and closest T. cruzi-like species evidenced DTU- and species-specific polymorphisms corroborating phylogenetic relationships inferred with other genes. Comparison of both phylogenetically close and distant trypanosomes is valuable to understand host-parasite interactions, virulence and pathogenicity. Our findings corroborate cruzipain as valuable target for drugs, vaccine

  8. Repertoire, Genealogy and Genomic Organization of Cruzipain and Homologous Genes in Trypanosoma cruzi, T. cruzi-Like and Other Trypanosome Species

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Luciana; Ortiz, Paola A.; da Silva, Flávia Maia; Alves, João Marcelo P.; Serrano, Myrna G.; Cortez, Alane P.; Alfieri, Silvia C.; Buck, Gregory A.; Teixeira, Marta M. G.

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, is a complex of genetically diverse isolates highly phylogenetically related to T. cruzi-like species, Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei and Trypanosoma dionisii, all sharing morphology of blood and culture forms and development within cells. However, they differ in hosts, vectors and pathogenicity: T. cruzi is a human pathogen infective to virtually all mammals whilst the other two species are non-pathogenic and bat restricted. Previous studies suggest that variations in expression levels and genetic diversity of cruzipain, the major isoform of cathepsin L-like (CATL) enzymes of T. cruzi, correlate with levels of cellular invasion, differentiation, virulence and pathogenicity of distinct strains. In this study, we compared 80 sequences of genes encoding cruzipain from 25 T. cruzi isolates representative of all discrete typing units (DTUs TcI-TcVI) and the new genotype Tcbat and 10 sequences of homologous genes from other species. The catalytic domain repertoires diverged according to DTUs and trypanosome species. Relatively homogeneous sequences are found within and among isolates of the same DTU except TcV and TcVI, which displayed sequences unique or identical to those of TcII and TcIII, supporting their origin from the hybridization between these two DTUs. In network genealogies, sequences from T. cruzi clustered tightly together and closer to T. c. marinkellei than to T. dionisii and largely differed from homologues of T. rangeli and T. b. brucei. Here, analysis of isolates representative of the overall biological and genetic diversity of T. cruzi and closest T. cruzi-like species evidenced DTU- and species-specific polymorphisms corroborating phylogenetic relationships inferred with other genes. Comparison of both phylogenetically close and distant trypanosomes is valuable to understand host-parasite interactions, virulence and pathogenicity. Our findings corroborate cruzipain as valuable target for drugs, vaccine

  9. Modulation of the Surface Proteome through Multiple Ubiquitylation Pathways in African Trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Alsford, Sam; Horn, David; Field, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    Recently we identified multiple suramin-sensitivity genes with a genome wide screen in Trypanosoma brucei that includes the invariant surface glycoprotein ISG75, the adaptin-1 (AP-1) complex and two deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) orthologous to ScUbp15/HsHAUSP1 and pVHL-interacting DUB1 (type I), designated TbUsp7 and TbVdu1, respectively. Here we have examined the roles of these genes in trafficking of ISG75, which appears key to suramin uptake. We found that, while AP-1 does not influence ISG75 abundance, knockdown of TbUsp7 or TbVdu1 leads to reduced ISG75 abundance. Silencing TbVdu1 also reduced ISG65 abundance. TbVdu1 is a component of an evolutionarily conserved ubiquitylation switch and responsible for rapid receptor modulation, suggesting similar regulation of ISGs in T. brucei. Unexpectedly, TbUsp7 knockdown also blocked endocytosis. To integrate these observations we analysed the impact of TbUsp7 and TbVdu1 knockdown on the global proteome using SILAC. For TbVdu1, ISG65 and ISG75 are the only significantly modulated proteins, but for TbUsp7 a cohort of integral membrane proteins, including the acid phosphatase MBAP1, that is required for endocytosis, and additional ISG-related proteins are down-regulated. Furthermore, we find increased expression of the ESAG6/7 transferrin receptor and ESAG5, likely resulting from decreased endocytic activity. Therefore, multiple ubiquitylation pathways, with a complex interplay with trafficking pathways, control surface proteome expression in trypanosomes. PMID:26492041

  10. Trypanosomes of Australian mammals: A review.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Craig K; Godfrey, Stephanie S; Thompson, R C Andrew

    2014-08-01

    Approximately 306 species of terrestrial and arboreal mammals are known to have inhabited the mainland and coastal islands of Australia at the time of European settlement in 1788. The exotic Trypanosoma lewisi was the first mammalian trypanosome identified in Australia in 1888, while the first native species, Trypanosoma pteropi, was taxonomically described in 1913. Since these discoveries, about 22% of the indigenous mammalian fauna have been examined during the surveillance of trypanosome biodiversity in Australia, including 46 species of marsupials, 9 rodents, 9 bats and both monotremes. Of those mammals examined, trypanosomes have been identified from 28 host species, with eight native species of Trypanosoma taxonomically described. These native trypanosomes include T. pteropi, Trypanosoma thylacis, Trypanosoma hipposideri, Trypanosoma binneyi, Trypanosoma irwini, Trypanosoma copemani, Trypanosoma gilletti and Trypanosoma vegrandis. Exotic trypanosomes have also been identified from the introduced mammalian fauna of Australia, and include T. lewisi, Trypanosoma melophagium, Trypanosoma theileri, Trypanosoma nabiasi and Trypanosoma evansi. Fortunately, T. evansi was eradicated soon after its introduction and did not establish in Australia. Of these exotic trypanosomes, T. lewisi is the sole representative that has been reported from indigenous Australian mammals; morphological forms were recorded from two indigenous species of rodents (Hydromys chrysogaster and Rattus fuscipes). Numerous Australian marsupial species are potentially at risk from the native T. copemani, which may be chronically pathogenic, while marsupials, rodents and monotremes appear at risk from exotic species, including T. lewisi, Trypanosoma cruzi and T. evansi. This comprehensive review of trypanosome biodiversity in Australia highlights the negative impact of these parasites upon their mammalian hosts, as well as the threatening biosecurity concerns. PMID:25161902

  11. Trypanosomes of Australian mammals: A review

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Craig K.; Godfrey, Stephanie S.; Thompson, R.C. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 306 species of terrestrial and arboreal mammals are known to have inhabited the mainland and coastal islands of Australia at the time of European settlement in 1788. The exotic Trypanosoma lewisi was the first mammalian trypanosome identified in Australia in 1888, while the first native species, Trypanosoma pteropi, was taxonomically described in 1913. Since these discoveries, about 22% of the indigenous mammalian fauna have been examined during the surveillance of trypanosome biodiversity in Australia, including 46 species of marsupials, 9 rodents, 9 bats and both monotremes. Of those mammals examined, trypanosomes have been identified from 28 host species, with eight native species of Trypanosoma taxonomically described. These native trypanosomes include T. pteropi, Trypanosoma thylacis, Trypanosoma hipposideri, Trypanosoma binneyi, Trypanosoma irwini, Trypanosoma copemani, Trypanosoma gilletti and Trypanosoma vegrandis. Exotic trypanosomes have also been identified from the introduced mammalian fauna of Australia, and include T. lewisi, Trypanosoma melophagium, Trypanosoma theileri, Trypanosoma nabiasi and Trypanosoma evansi. Fortunately, T. evansi was eradicated soon after its introduction and did not establish in Australia. Of these exotic trypanosomes, T. lewisi is the sole representative that has been reported from indigenous Australian mammals; morphological forms were recorded from two indigenous species of rodents (Hydromys chrysogaster and Rattus fuscipes). Numerous Australian marsupial species are potentially at risk from the native T. copemani, which may be chronically pathogenic, while marsupials, rodents and monotremes appear at risk from exotic species, including T. lewisi, Trypanosoma cruzi and T. evansi. This comprehensive review of trypanosome biodiversity in Australia highlights the negative impact of these parasites upon their mammalian hosts, as well as the threatening biosecurity concerns. PMID:25161902

  12. JBP1 and JBP2 are two distinct thymidine hydroxylases involved in J biosynthesis in genomic DNA of African trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Cliffe, Laura J; Kieft, Rudo; Southern, Timothy; Birkeland, Shanda R; Marshall, Marion; Sweeney, Kate; Sabatini, Robert

    2009-04-01

    Genomic DNA of African trypanosomes contains a hypermodified thymidine residue termed base J (beta-d-glucosyl-HOMedU). This modified base is localized primarily to repetitive DNA, namely the telomeres, and is implicated in the regulation of antigenic variation. The base is synthesized in a two-step pathway. Initially, a thymidine residue in DNA is hydroxylated by a thymidine hydroxylase (TH). This intermediate (HOMedU) is then glucosylated to form base J. Two proteins involved in J synthesis, JBP1 (J binding protein 1) and JBP2, contain a putative TH domain related to the family of Fe(2+)/2-oxoglutarate-dependent hydroxylases. We have previously shown that mutations in the TH domain of JBP1 kill its ability to stimulate J synthesis. Here we show that mutation of key residues in the TH domain of JBP2 ablate its ability to induce de novo J synthesis. While the individual JBP1 null and JBP2 null trypanosomes have reduced J levels, the deletion of both JBP1 and JBP2 generates a cell line that completely lacks base J but still contains glucosyl-transferase activity. Reintroduction of JBP2 in the J-null trypanosome stimulates HOMedU formation and site-specific synthesis of base J. We conclude that JBP2 and JBP1 are the TH enzymes involved in J biosynthesis. PMID:19136460

  13. Using Fluorescent Proteins to Monitor Glycosome Dynamics in the African Trypanosome

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Sarah; Conlon, Meghan; Morris, Meredith

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is a kinetoplastid parasite that causes human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), or sleeping sickness, and a wasting disease, nagana, in cattle1. The parasite alternates between the bloodstream of the mammalian host and the tsetse fly vector. The composition of many cellular organelles changes in response to these different extracellular conditions2-5. Glycosomes are highly specialized peroxisomes in which many of the enzymes involved in glycolysis are compartmentalized. Glycosome composition changes in a developmental and environmentally regulated manner4-11. Currently, the most common techniques used to study glycosome dynamics are electron and fluorescence microscopy; techniques that are expensive, time and labor intensive, and not easily adapted to high throughput analyses. To overcome these limitations, a fluorescent-glycosome reporter system in which enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP) is fused to a peroxisome targeting sequence (PTS2), which directs the fusion protein to glycosomes12, has been established. Upon import of the PTS2eYFP fusion protein, glycosomes become fluorescent. Organelle degradation and recycling results in the loss of fluorescence that can be measured by flow cytometry. Large numbers of cells (5,000 cells/sec) can be analyzed in real-time without extensive sample preparation such as fixation and mounting. This method offers a rapid way of detecting changes in organelle composition in response to fluctuating environmental conditions. PMID:25177828

  14. Genomic and Proteomic Studies on the Mode of Action of Oxaboroles against the African Trypanosome

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Deuan C.; Foth, Bernardo J.; Urbaniak, Michael D.; Patterson, Stephen; Ong, Han B.; Berriman, Matthew; Fairlamb, Alan H.

    2015-01-01

    SCYX-7158, an oxaborole, is currently in Phase I clinical trials for the treatment of human African trypanosomiasis. Here we investigate possible modes of action against Trypanosoma brucei using orthogonal chemo-proteomic and genomic approaches. SILAC-based proteomic studies using an oxaborole analogue immobilised onto a resin was used either in competition with a soluble oxaborole or an immobilised inactive control to identify thirteen proteins common to both strategies. Cell-cycle analysis of cells incubated with sub-lethal concentrations of an oxaborole identified a subtle but significant accumulation of G2 and >G2 cells. Given the possibility of compromised DNA fidelity, we investigated long-term exposure of T. brucei to oxaboroles by generating resistant cell lines in vitro. Resistance proved more difficult to generate than for drugs currently used in the field, and in one of our three cell lines was unstable. Whole-genome sequencing of the resistant cell lines revealed single nucleotide polymorphisms in 66 genes and several large-scale genomic aberrations. The absence of a simple consistent mechanism among resistant cell lines and the diverse list of binding partners from the proteomic studies suggest a degree of polypharmacology that should reduce the risk of resistance to this compound class emerging in the field. The combined genetic and chemical biology approaches have provided lists of candidates to be investigated for more detailed information on the mode of action of this promising new drug class. PMID:26684831

  15. Increased Trypanosoma brucei cathepsin-L activity inhibits human serum-mediated trypanolysis

    PubMed Central

    Alsford, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Most African trypanosomes, including the veterinary species Trypanosoma brucei brucei and T. congolense are susceptible to lysis by human serum. A recent study by Alsford et al. [PLoS Pathogens (2014) 10, e1004130] has identified a T. b. brucei lysosomal cathepsin with an inhibitory effect on human serum’s trypanolytic action.

  16. Trypanosoma vivax GM6 Antigen: A Candidate Antigen for Diagnosis of African Animal Trypanosomosis in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Pillay, Davita; Izotte, Julien; Fikru, Regassa; Büscher, Philipe; Mucache, Hermogenes; Neves, Luis; Boulangé, Alain; Seck, Momar Talla; Bouyer, Jérémy; Napier, Grant B.; Chevtzoff, Cyrille; Coustou, Virginie; Baltz, Théo

    2013-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of African animal trypanosomosis is vital to controlling this severe disease which hampers development across 10 million km2 of Africa endemic to tsetse flies. Diagnosis at the point of treatment is currently dependent on parasite detection which is unreliable, and on clinical signs, which are common to several other prevalent bovine diseases. Methodology/Principle Findings the repeat sequence of the GM6 antigen of Trypanosoma vivax (TvGM6), a flagellar-associated protein, was analysed from several isolates of T. vivax and found to be almost identical despite the fact that T. vivax is known to have high genetic variation. The TvGM6 repeat was recombinantly expressed in E. coli and purified. An indirect ELISA for bovine sera based on this antigen was developed. The TvGM6 indirect ELISA had a sensitivity of 91.4% (95% CI: 91.3 to 91.6) in the period following 10 days post experimental infection with T. vivax, which decreased ten-fold to 9.1% (95% CI: 7.3 to 10.9) one month post treatment. With field sera from cattle infected with T. vivax from two locations in East and West Africa, 91.5% (95% CI: 83.2 to 99.5) sensitivity and 91.3% (95% CI: 78.9 to 93.1) specificity was obtained for the TvGM6 ELISA using the whole trypanosome lysate ELISA as a reference. For heterologous T. congolense field infections, the TvGM6 ELISA had a sensitivity of 85.1% (95% CI: 76.8 to 94.4). Conclusion/Significance this study is the first to analyse the GM6 antigen of T. vivax and the first to test the GM6 antigen on a large collection of sera from experimentally and naturally infected cattle. This study demonstrates that the TvGM6 is an excellent candidate antigen for the development of a point-of-treatment test for diagnosis of T. vivax, and to a lesser extent T. congolense, African animal trypanosomosis in cattle. PMID:24205263

  17. Cellular Response to Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Induces Secretion of Defensin α-1, Which Damages the Flagellum, Neutralizes Trypanosome Motility, and Inhibits Infection

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Candice A.; Rachakonda, Girish; Kleshchenko, Yuliya Y.; Nde, Pius N.; Madison, M. Nia; Pratap, Siddharth; Cardenas, Tatiana C.; Taylor, Chase; Lima, Maria F.

    2013-01-01

    Human defensins play a fundamental role in the initiation of innate immune responses to some microbial pathogens. Here we show that colonic epithelial model HCT116 cells respond to Trypanosoma cruzi infection by secreting defensin α-1, which reduces infection. We also report the early effects of defensin α-1 on invasive trypomastigotes that involve damage of the flagellar structure to inhibit parasite motility and reduce cellular infection. Short exposure of defensin α-1 to trypomastigotes shows that defensin α-1 binds to the flagellum, resulting in flagellar membrane and axoneme alterations, followed by breaking of the flagellar membrane connected to the trypanosome body, leading to detachment and release of the parasite flagellum. In addition, defensin α-1 induces a significant reduction in parasite motility in a peptide concentration-dependent manner, which is abrogated by anti-defensin α-1 IgG. Preincubation of trypomastigotes with a concentration of defensin α-1 that inhibits 50% trypanosome motility significantly reduced cellular infection by 80%. Thus, human defensin α-1 is an innate immune molecule that is secreted by HCT116 cells in response to T. cruzi infection, inhibits T. cruzi motility, and plays an important role in reducing cellular infection. This is the first report showing a novel cellular innate immune response to a human parasite by secretion of defensin α-1, which neutralizes the motility of a human parasite to reduce cellular infection. The mode of activity of human defensin α-1 against T. cruzi and its function may provide insights for the development of new antiparasitic strategies. PMID:23980110

  18. Extracellular Vesicles from Trypanosoma brucei Mediate Virulence Factor Transfer and Cause Host Anemia.

    PubMed

    Szempruch, Anthony J; Sykes, Steven E; Kieft, Rudo; Dennison, Lauren; Becker, Allison C; Gartrell, Anzio; Martin, William J; Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Almeida, Igor C; Hajduk, Stephen L; Harrington, John M

    2016-01-14

    Intercellular communication between parasites and with host cells provides mechanisms for parasite development, immune evasion, and disease pathology. Bloodstream African trypanosomes produce membranous nanotubes that originate from the flagellar membrane and disassociate into free extracellular vesicles (EVs). Trypanosome EVs contain several flagellar proteins that contribute to virulence, and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense EVs contain the serum resistance-associated protein (SRA) necessary for human infectivity. T. b. rhodesiense EVs transfer SRA to non-human infectious trypanosomes, allowing evasion of human innate immunity. Trypanosome EVs can also fuse with mammalian erythrocytes, resulting in rapid erythrocyte clearance and anemia. These data indicate that trypanosome EVs are organelles mediating non-hereditary virulence factor transfer and causing host erythrocyte remodeling, inducing anemia. PMID:26771494

  19. Inhibitors Incorporating Zinc-Binding Groups Target the GlcNAc-PI de-N-acetylase in Trypanosoma brucei, the Causative Agent of African Sleeping Sickness

    PubMed Central

    Abdelwahab, Nuha Z; Crossman, Arthur T; Sullivan, Lauren; Ferguson, Michael A J; Urbaniak, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Disruption of glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis is genetically and chemically validated as a drug target against the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. The N-acetylglucosamine-phosphatidylinositol de-N-acetylase (deNAc) is a zinc metalloenzyme responsible for the second step of glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis. We recently reported the synthesis of eight deoxy-2-C-branched monosaccharides containing carboxylic acid, hydroxamic acid, or N-hydroxyurea substituents at the C2 position that may act as zinc-binding groups. Here, we describe the synthesis of a glucocyclitol-phospholipid incorporating a hydroxamic acid moiety and report the biochemical evaluation of the monosaccharides and the glucocyclitol-phospholipid as inhibitors of the trypanosome deNAc in the cell-free system and against recombinant enzyme. Monosaccharides with carboxylic acid or hydroxamic acid substituents were found to be the inhibitors of the trypanosome deNAc with IC50 values 0.1–1.5 mm, and the glucocyclitol-phospholipid was found to be a dual inhibitor of the deNAc and the α1-4-mannose transferase with an apparent IC50 = 19 ± 0.5 μm. PMID:22222041

  20. Apolipoprotein L1 Variant Associated with Increased Susceptibility to Trypanosome Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cuypers, Bart; Lecordier, Laurence; Meehan, Conor J.; Van den Broeck, Frederik; Imamura, Hideo; Büscher, Philippe; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Laukens, Kris; Schnaufer, Achim; Dewar, Caroline; Lewis, Michael; Balmer, Oliver; Azurago, Thomas; Kyei-Faried, Sardick; Ohene, Sally-Ann; Duah, Boateng; Homiah, Prince; Mensah, Ebenezer Kofi; Anleah, Francis; Franco, Jose Ramon; Pays, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT African trypanosomes, except Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, which cause human African trypanosomiasis, are lysed by the human serum protein apolipoprotein L1 (ApoL1). These two subspecies can resist human ApoL1 because they express the serum resistance proteins T. b. gambiense glycoprotein (TgsGP) and serum resistance-associated protein (SRA), respectively. Whereas in T. b. rhodesiense, SRA is necessary and sufficient to inhibit ApoL1, in T. b. gambiense, TgsGP cannot protect against high ApoL1 uptake, so different additional mechanisms contribute to limit this uptake. Here we report a complex interplay between trypanosomes and an ApoL1 variant, revealing important insights into innate human immunity against these parasites. Using whole-genome sequencing, we characterized an atypical T. b. gambiense infection in a patient in Ghana. We show that the infecting trypanosome has diverged from the classical T. b. gambiense strains and lacks the TgsGP defense mechanism against human serum. By sequencing the ApoL1 gene of the patient and subsequent in vitro mutagenesis experiments, we demonstrate that a homozygous missense substitution (N264K) in the membrane-addressing domain of this ApoL1 variant knocks down the trypanolytic activity, allowing the trypanosome to avoid ApoL1-mediated immunity. PMID:27073096

  1. Intermediary metabolism of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Urbina, J A

    1994-03-01

    In this article, Julio Urbino discusses the characteristics o f the intermediary metabolism of Trypanosoma cruzi (the causative agent of Chagas disease), which are responsible for the unusual capacity of this parasite to use carbohydrates or amino acids as carbon and energy sources without drastic changes in its catabolic enzyme levels(1-3). Many, but not all, o f the metabolic capabilities of this organism are shared with Leishmania and the procyclic form o f the African trypanosomes, and the reviewer presents a metabolic model which is also consistent with the information available on these other parasites(2,4). PMID:15275492

  2. Conservation and divergence within the clathrin interactome of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Kalb, Ligia Cristina; Frederico, Yohana Camila A; Boehm, Cordula; Moreira, Claudia Maria do Nascimento; Soares, Maurilio José; Field, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosomatids are parasitic protozoa with a significant burden on human health. African and American trypanosomes are causative agents of Nagana and Chagas disease respectively, and speciated about 300 million years ago. These parasites have highly distinct life cycles, pathologies, transmission strategies and surface proteomes, being dominated by the variant surface glycoprotein (African) or mucins (American) respectively. In African trypanosomes clathrin-mediated trafficking is responsible for endocytosis and post-Golgi transport, with several mechanistic aspects distinct from higher organisms. Using clathrin light chain (TcCLC) and EpsinR (TcEpsinR) as affinity handles, we identified candidate clathrin-associated proteins (CAPs) in Trypanosoma cruzi; the cohort includes orthologs of many proteins known to mediate vesicle trafficking, but significantly not the AP-2 adaptor complex. Several trypanosome-specific proteins common with African trypanosomes, were also identified. Fluorescence microscopy revealed localisations for TcEpsinR, TcCLC and TcCHC at the posterior region of trypomastigote cells, coincident with the flagellar pocket and Golgi apparatus. These data provide the first systematic analysis of clathrin-mediated trafficking in T. cruzi, allowing comparison between protein cohorts and other trypanosomes and also suggest that clathrin trafficking in at least some life stages of T. cruzi may be AP-2-independent. PMID:27502971

  3. Conservation and divergence within the clathrin interactome of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Kalb, Ligia Cristina; Frederico, Yohana Camila A.; Boehm, Cordula; Moreira, Claudia Maria do Nascimento; Soares, Maurilio José; Field, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosomatids are parasitic protozoa with a significant burden on human health. African and American trypanosomes are causative agents of Nagana and Chagas disease respectively, and speciated about 300 million years ago. These parasites have highly distinct life cycles, pathologies, transmission strategies and surface proteomes, being dominated by the variant surface glycoprotein (African) or mucins (American) respectively. In African trypanosomes clathrin-mediated trafficking is responsible for endocytosis and post-Golgi transport, with several mechanistic aspects distinct from higher organisms. Using clathrin light chain (TcCLC) and EpsinR (TcEpsinR) as affinity handles, we identified candidate clathrin-associated proteins (CAPs) in Trypanosoma cruzi; the cohort includes orthologs of many proteins known to mediate vesicle trafficking, but significantly not the AP-2 adaptor complex. Several trypanosome-specific proteins common with African trypanosomes, were also identified. Fluorescence microscopy revealed localisations for TcEpsinR, TcCLC and TcCHC at the posterior region of trypomastigote cells, coincident with the flagellar pocket and Golgi apparatus. These data provide the first systematic analysis of clathrin-mediated trafficking in T. cruzi, allowing comparison between protein cohorts and other trypanosomes and also suggest that clathrin trafficking in at least some life stages of T. cruzi may be AP-2-independent. PMID:27502971

  4. Silencing cytokeratin 18 gene inhibits intracellular replication of Trypanosoma cruzi in HeLa cells but not binding and invasion of trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Claser, Carla; Curcio, Marli; de Mello, Samanta M; Silveira, Eduardo V; Monteiro, Hugo P; Rodrigues, Mauricio M

    2008-01-01

    Background As an obligatory intracellular parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease, must invade and multiply within mammalian cells. Cytokeratin 18 (CK18) is among the host molecules that have been suggested as a mediator of important events during T. cruzi-host cell interaction. Based on that possibility, we addressed whether RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated down regulation of the CK18 gene could interfere with the parasite life cycle in vitro. HeLa cells transiently transfected with CK18-RNAi had negligible levels of CK18 transcripts, and significantly reduced levels of CK18 protein expression as determined by immunoblotting or immunofluorescence. Results CK18 negative or positive HeLa cells were invaded equally as well by trypomastigotes of different T. cruzi strains. Also, in CK18 negative or positive cells, parasites recruited host cells lysosomes and escaped from the parasitophorous vacuole equally as well. After that, the growth of amastigotes of the Y or CL-Brener strains, was drastically arrested in CK18 RNAi-treated cells. After 48 hours, the number of amastigotes was several times lower in CK18 RNAi-treated cells when compared to control cells. Simultaneous staining of parasites and CK18 showed that in HeLa cells infected with the Y strain both co-localize. Although the amastigote surface protein-2 contains the domain VTVXNVFLYNR previously described to bind to CK18, in several attempts, we failed to detect binding of a recombinant protein to CK-18. Conclusion The study demonstrates that silencing CK18 by transient RNAi, inhibits intracellular multiplication of the Y and CL strain of T. cruzi in HeLa cells, but not trypanosome binding and invasion. PMID:19087356

  5. Identification of different trypanosome species in the mid-guts of tsetse flies of the Malanga (Kimpese) sleeping sickness focus of the Democratic Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Malanga sleeping sickness focus of the Democratic Republic of Congo has shown an epidemic evolution of disease during the last century. However, following case detection and treatment, the prevalence of the disease decreased considerably. No active survey has been undertaken in this focus for a couple of years. To understand the current epidemiological status of sleeping sickness as well as the animal African trypanosomiasis in the Malanga focus, we undertook the identification of tsetse blood meals as well as different trypanosome species in flies trapped in this focus. Methods Pyramidal traps were use to trap tsetse flies. All flies caught were identified and live flies were dissected and their mid-guts collected. Fly mid-gut was used for the molecular identification of the blood meal source, as well as for the presence of different trypanosome species. Results About 949 Glossina palpalis palpalis were trapped; 296 (31.2%) of which were dissected, 60 (20.3%) blood meals collected and 57 (19.3%) trypanosome infections identified. The infection rates were 13.4%, 5.1%, 3.5% and 0.4% for Trypanosoma congolense savannah type, Trypanosoma brucei s.l., Trypanosoma congolense forest type and Trypanosoma vivax, respectively. Three mixed infections including Trypanosoma brucei s.l. and Trypanosoma congolense savannah type, and one mixed infection of Trypanosoma vivax and Trypanosoma congolense savannah type were identified. Eleven Trypanosoma brucei gambiense infections were identified; indicating an active circulation of this trypanosome subspecies. Of all the identified blood meals, about 58.3% were identified as being taken on pigs, while 33.3% and 8.3% were from man and other mammals, respectively. Conclusion The presence of Trypanosoma brucei in tsetse mid-guts associated with human blood meals is indicative of an active transmission of this parasite between tsetse and man. The considerable number of pig blood meals combined with the circulation of

  6. Pathology of experimental African trypanosomiasis in rabbits infected with Trypanosoma rhodesiense.

    PubMed

    Nagle, R B; Dong, S; Guillot, J M; McDaniel, K M; Lindsley, H B

    1980-11-01

    The pathologic response of New Zealand White rabbits to experimental infection with Trypanosoma rhodesiense is described. Autopsies of 18 rabbits killed from 30-44 days after infection revealed focal perivascular inflammation of the ears, eyes and testes. Examination by electron microscopy revealed extravascular trypanosomes in the dermis of the ear and interstitium of testes. Deposits of IgG, IgM and C3 were in renal glomeruli associated with glomerular hypercellularity; proteinuria was present as evidenced by an increase in tubular hyaline droplets. There was marked hyperplasia of lymph nodes and spleen with generalized increase in the number of macrophage and plasma cells. In contrast there was thymic atrophy. The findings suggest an immunologic host response associated with severe localized vascular injury. PMID:7446810

  7. A Primate APOL1 Variant That Kills Trypanosoma brucei gambiense.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Anneli; Capewell, Paul; Clucas, Caroline; Veitch, Nicola; Weir, William; Thomson, Russell; Raper, Jayne; MacLeod, Annette

    2016-08-01

    Humans are protected against infection from most African trypanosomes by lipoprotein complexes present in serum that contain the trypanolytic pore-forming protein, Apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1). The human-infective trypanosomes, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense in East Africa and T. b. gambiense in West Africa have separately evolved mechanisms that allow them to resist APOL1-mediated lysis and cause human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, in man. Recently, APOL1 variants were identified from a subset of Old World monkeys, that are able to lyse East African T. b. rhodesiense, by virtue of C-terminal polymorphisms in the APOL1 protein that hinder that parasite's resistance mechanism. Such variants have been proposed as candidates for developing therapeutic alternatives to the unsatisfactory anti-trypanosomal drugs currently in use. Here we demonstrate the in vitro lytic ability of serum and purified recombinant protein of an APOL1 ortholog from the West African Guinea baboon (Papio papio), which is able to lyse examples of all sub-species of T. brucei including T. b. gambiense group 1 parasites, the most common agent of human African trypanosomiasis. The identification of a variant of APOL1 with trypanolytic ability for both human-infective T. brucei sub-species could be a candidate for universal APOL1-based therapeutic strategies, targeted against all pathogenic African trypanosomes. PMID:27494254

  8. A Primate APOL1 Variant That Kills Trypanosoma brucei gambiense

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Anneli; Capewell, Paul; Clucas, Caroline; Veitch, Nicola; Weir, William; Thomson, Russell; Raper, Jayne; MacLeod, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Humans are protected against infection from most African trypanosomes by lipoprotein complexes present in serum that contain the trypanolytic pore-forming protein, Apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1). The human-infective trypanosomes, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense in East Africa and T. b. gambiense in West Africa have separately evolved mechanisms that allow them to resist APOL1-mediated lysis and cause human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, in man. Recently, APOL1 variants were identified from a subset of Old World monkeys, that are able to lyse East African T. b. rhodesiense, by virtue of C-terminal polymorphisms in the APOL1 protein that hinder that parasite’s resistance mechanism. Such variants have been proposed as candidates for developing therapeutic alternatives to the unsatisfactory anti-trypanosomal drugs currently in use. Here we demonstrate the in vitro lytic ability of serum and purified recombinant protein of an APOL1 ortholog from the West African Guinea baboon (Papio papio), which is able to lyse examples of all sub-species of T. brucei including T. b. gambiense group 1 parasites, the most common agent of human African trypanosomiasis. The identification of a variant of APOL1 with trypanolytic ability for both human-infective T. brucei sub-species could be a candidate for universal APOL1-based therapeutic strategies, targeted against all pathogenic African trypanosomes. PMID:27494254

  9. Structural basis for ligand and innate immunity factor uptake by the trypanosome haptoglobin-haemoglobin receptor.

    PubMed

    Lane-Serff, Harriet; MacGregor, Paula; Lowe, Edward D; Carrington, Mark; Higgins, Matthew K

    2014-01-01

    The haptoglobin-haemoglobin receptor (HpHbR) of African trypanosomes allows acquisition of haem and provides an uptake route for trypanolytic factor-1, a mediator of innate immunity against trypanosome infection. In this study, we report the structure of Trypanosoma brucei HpHbR in complex with human haptoglobin-haemoglobin (HpHb), revealing an elongated ligand-binding site that extends along its membrane distal half. This contacts haptoglobin and the β-subunit of haemoglobin, showing how the receptor selectively binds HpHb over individual components. Lateral mobility of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored HpHbR, and a ∼50° kink in the receptor, allows two receptors to simultaneously bind one HpHb dimer. Indeed, trypanosomes take up dimeric HpHb at significantly lower concentrations than monomeric HpHb, due to increased ligand avidity that comes from bivalent binding. The structure therefore reveals the molecular basis for ligand and innate immunity factor uptake by trypanosomes and identifies adaptations that allow efficient ligand uptake in the context of the complex trypanosome cell surface. PMID:25497229

  10. Structural basis for ligand and innate immunity factor uptake by the trypanosome haptoglobin-haemoglobin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lane-Serff, Harriet; MacGregor, Paula; Lowe, Edward D; Carrington, Mark; Higgins, Matthew K

    2014-01-01

    The haptoglobin-haemoglobin receptor (HpHbR) of African trypanosomes allows acquisition of haem and provides an uptake route for trypanolytic factor-1, a mediator of innate immunity against trypanosome infection. In this study, we report the structure of Trypanosoma brucei HpHbR in complex with human haptoglobin-haemoglobin (HpHb), revealing an elongated ligand-binding site that extends along its membrane distal half. This contacts haptoglobin and the β-subunit of haemoglobin, showing how the receptor selectively binds HpHb over individual components. Lateral mobility of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored HpHbR, and a ∼50o kink in the receptor, allows two receptors to simultaneously bind one HpHb dimer. Indeed, trypanosomes take up dimeric HpHb at significantly lower concentrations than monomeric HpHb, due to increased ligand avidity that comes from bivalent binding. The structure therefore reveals the molecular basis for ligand and innate immunity factor uptake by trypanosomes and identifies adaptations that allow efficient ligand uptake in the context of the complex trypanosome cell surface. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05553.001 PMID:25497229

  11. Determination of the prevalence of trypanosome species in cattle from Monduli district, northern Tanzania, by loop mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Haji, Isihaka Juma; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Kajino, Kiichi; Malele, Imna; Simukoko, Humphrey; Chitambo, Harrison; Namangala, Boniface

    2015-08-01

    Bovine African trypanosomosis (BAT) remains one of the major vector-borne diseases with serious impediment to cattle production and economic advancement in sub-Saharan Africa. The present study evaluated the performance of the trypanosome-species-specific loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), using parasite DNA obtained from 295 indigenous Tanzanian short horn Zebu (TSHZ) and Boran crosses in Monduli district within northern Tanzania, against routine microscopy on Giemsa-stained blood films. Compared to parasitological data in which the prevalence of BAT was estimated at 2.4% (95% CI 0.7-4.1%), LAMP increased the prevalence to 27.8% (95% CI 22.3-32.5%), of which 11.9% (95% CI 8.2-15.6%) were monolytic infections with Trypanosoma vivax, while 13.6% (95% CI 9.7-17.5%) were coinfections of either T. vivax and Trypanosoma brucei subspecies or T. vivax and Trypanosoma congolense, respectively. Among the T. brucei subspecies detected, 0.7% (95% CI 0-1.7%) were human-infective Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense. Our study is in concordance with previous reports and suggests that LAMP is a potential tool for routine diagnosis of trypanosomes in domestic animals in BAT endemic regions. According to LAMP, T. vivax seems to be the predominant trypanosome species circulating among the indigenous Monduli cattle. Importantly, the detection of T. b. rhodesiense in cattle in such wildlife-domestic-animal-human-interface areas poses a risk of contracting human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) by local communities and tourists. Continuous trypanosome surveillances in domestic animals, humans, and tsetse flies using sensitive and specific tests such as LAMP are recommended. PMID:25953023

  12. Species-Specific Adaptations of Trypanosome Morphology and Motility to the Mammalian Host

    PubMed Central

    McOdimba, Francis A.; Omogo, Collins O.; Adung’a, Vincent O.; Krüger, Timothy; Masiga, Daniel K.; Engstler, Markus

    2016-01-01

    African trypanosomes thrive in the bloodstream and tissue spaces of a wide range of mammalian hosts. Infections of cattle cause an enormous socio-economic burden in sub-Saharan Africa. A hallmark of the trypanosome lifestyle is the flagellate’s incessant motion. This work details the cell motility behavior of the four livestock-parasites Trypanosoma vivax, T. brucei, T. evansi and T. congolense. The trypanosomes feature distinct swimming patterns, speeds and flagellar wave frequencies, although the basic mechanism of flagellar propulsion is conserved, as is shown by extended single flagellar beat analyses. Three-dimensional analyses of the trypanosomes expose a high degree of dynamic pleomorphism, typified by the ‘cellular waveform’. This is a product of the flagellar oscillation, the chirality of the flagellum attachment and the stiffness of the trypanosome cell body. The waveforms are characteristic for each trypanosome species and are influenced by changes of the microenvironment, such as differences in viscosity and the presence of confining obstacles. The distinct cellular waveforms may be reflective of the actual anatomical niches the parasites populate within their mammalian host. T. vivax displays waveforms optimally aligned to the topology of the bloodstream, while the two subspecies T. brucei and T. evansi feature distinct cellular waveforms, both additionally adapted to motion in more confined environments such as tissue spaces. T. congolense reveals a small and stiff waveform, which makes these parasites weak swimmers and destined for cell adherence in low flow areas of the circulation. Thus, our experiments show that the differential dissemination and annidation of trypanosomes in their mammalian hosts may depend on the distinct swimming capabilities of the parasites. PMID:26871910

  13. Population Genetics and Reproductive Strategies of African Trypanosomes: Revisiting Available Published Data

    PubMed Central

    Séré, Modou; Bucheton, Bruno; Simo, Gustave; Njiokou, Flobert; Salim, Bashir; Kaboré, Jacques; MacLeod, Annette; Camara, Mamadou; Solano, Philippe; Belem, Adrien Marie Gaston; Jamonneau, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosomatidae are a dangerous family of Euglenobionta parasites that threaten the health and economy of millions of people around the world. More precisely describing the population biology and reproductive mode of such pests is not only a matter of pure science, but can also be useful for understanding parasite adaptation, as well as how parasitism, specialization (parasite specificity), and complex life cycles evolve over time. Studying this parasite’s reproductive strategies and population structure can also contribute key information to the understanding of the epidemiology of associated diseases; it can also provide clues for elaborating control programs and predicting the probability of success for control campaigns (such as vaccines and drug therapies), along with emergence or re-emergence risks. Population genetics tools, if appropriately used, can provide precise and useful information in these investigations. In this paper, we revisit recent data collected during population genetics surveys of different Trypanosoma species in sub-Saharan Africa. Reproductive modes and population structure depend not only on the taxon but also on the geographical location and data quality (absence or presence of DNA amplification failures). We conclude on issues regarding future directions of research, in particular vis-à-vis genotyping and sampling strategies, which are still relevant yet, too often, neglected issues. PMID:26491968

  14. A genome-wide analysis of C/D and H/ACA-like small nucleolar RNAs in Trypanosoma brucei reveals a trypanosome-specific pattern of rRNA modification

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, XUE-HAI; ULIEL, SHAI; HURY, AVRAHAM; BARTH, SARIT; DONIGER, TIRZA; UNGER, RON; MICHAELI, SHULAMIT

    2005-01-01

    Small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) constitute newly discovered noncoding small RNAs, most of which function in guiding modifications such as 2′-O-ribose methylation and pseudouridylation on rRNAs and snRNAs. To investigate the genome organization of Trypanosoma brucei snoRNAs and the pattern of rRNA modifications, we used a whole-genome approach to identify the repertoire of these guide RNAs. Twenty-one clusters encoding for 57 C/D snoRNAs and 34 H/ACA-like RNAs, which have the potential to direct 84 methylations and 32 pseudouridines, respectively, were identified. The number of 2′-O-methyls (Nms) identified on rRNA represent 80% of the expected modifications. The modifications guided by these RNAs suggest that trypanosomes contain many modifications and guide RNAs relative to their genome size. Interestingly, ~40% of the Nms are species-specific modifications that do not exist in yeast, humans, or plants, and 40% of the species-specific predicted modifications are located in unique positions outside the highly conserved domains. Although most of the guide RNAs were found in reiterated clusters, a few single-copy genes were identified. The large repertoire of modifications and guide RNAs in trypanosomes suggests that these modifications possibly play a central role in these parasites. PMID:15840815

  15. Distribution of lipophosphoglycan-associated epitopes in different Leishmania species and in African trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Tolson, D L; Schnur, L F; Jardim, A; Pearson, T W

    1994-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (mAb) CA7AE binds specifically to the phosphorylated Gal-beta 1,4-Man disaccharide repeat epitope of Leishmania donovani lipophosphoglycan (LPG). This mAb detected the repeat epitope in most but not all of a wide variety of Leishmania species and strains examined. MAb CA7AE also bound to both glycoprotein and carbohydrate antigens in medium from L. donovani promastigote cultures. Specifically, mAb CA7AE bound the delipidated form of LPG, the phosphoglycan, and a glycoprotein both of which are released into the medium by the parasite indicating that both share a specific phosphorylated carbohydrate epitope. The epitope was detected in sera from L. donovani-infected (kala-azar positive) patients when mAb CA7AE was used in an antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). MAb L157 is specific for a protein that is found associated with L. donovani LPG, the lipophosphoglycan-associated protein (LPGAP). This mAb bound to molecules in all 19 strains (representing 9 species) of Leishmania promastigotes and to molecules in 2 species of Trypanosoma procyclic culture forms. This wide distribution of the LPGAP epitope implies that it may have a conserved function, for example, in the biochemistry or arrangement of parasite surface molecules. In addition, since the LPGAP is involved in the stimulation of T lymphocyte proliferation, its wide distribution amongst different Leishmania species suggests that it may be an ideal molecule for testing as a vaccine for leishmaniasis. PMID:7528916

  16. Kinetics of methionine transport and metabolism by Trypanosoma brucei brucei and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, B; Rattendi, D; Lloyd, D; Yarlett, N; Bacchi, C J

    2000-05-01

    Methionine is an essential amino acid for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms; however, little is known concerning its utilization in African trypanosomes, protozoa of the Trypanosoma brucei group. This study explored the Michaelis-Menten kinetic constants for transport and pool formation as well as metabolic utilization of methionine by two divergent strains of African trypanosomes, Trypanosoma brucei brucei (a veterinary pathogen), highly sensitive to trypanocidal agents, and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (a human pathogenic isolate), highly refractory to trypanocidal arsenicals. The Michaelis-Menten constants derived by Hanes-Woolf analysis for transport of methionine for T. b. brucei and T. b. rhodesiense, respectively, were as follows: K(M) values, 1. 15 and 1.75 mM; V(max) values, 3.97 x 10(-5) and 4.86 x 10(-5) mol/L/min. Very similar values were obtained by Lineweaver-Burk analysis (K(M), 0.25 and 1.0 mM; V(max), 1 x 10(-5) and 2.0 x 10(-5) mol/L/min, T. b. brucei and T. b. rhodesiense, respectively). Cooperativity analyses by Hill (log-log) plot gave Hill coefficients (n) of 6 and 2 for T. b. brucei and T. b. rhodesiense, respectively. Cytosolic accumulation of methionine after 10-min incubation with 25 mM exogenous methionine was 1.8-fold greater in T. b. rhodesiense than T. b. brucei (2.1 vs 1.1 mM, respectively). In African trypanosomes as in their mammalian host, S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) is the major product of methionine metabolism. Accumulation of AdoMet was measured by HPLC analysis of cytosolic extracts incubated in the presence of increasing cytosolic methionine. In trypanosomes incubated for 10 min with saturating methionine, both organisms accumulated similar amounts of AdoMet (approximately 23 microM), but the level of trans-sulfuration products (cystathionine and cysteine) in T. b. rhodesiense was double that of T. b. brucei. Methionine incorporation during protein synthesis in T. b. brucei was 2.5 times that of T. b. rhodesiense

  17. The Trypanosoma brucei Flagellum: Moving Parasites in New Directions

    PubMed Central

    Ralston, Katherine S.; Kabututu, Zakayi P.; Melehani, Jason H.; Oberholzer, Michael; Hill, Kent L.

    2013-01-01

    African trypanosomes are devastating human and animal pathogens. Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and T. b. gambiense subspecies cause the fatal human disease known as African sleeping sickness. It is estimated that several hundred thousand new infections occur annually and the disease is fatal if untreated. T. brucei is transmitted by the tsetse fly and alternates between bloodstream-form and insect-form life cycle stages that are adapted to survive in the mammalian host and the insect vector, respectively. The importance of the flagellum for parasite motility and attachment to the tsetse fly salivary gland epithelium has been appreciated for many years. Recent studies have revealed both conserved and novel features of T. brucei flagellum structure and composition, as well as surprising new functions that are outlined here. These discoveries are important from the standpoint of understanding trypanosome biology and identifying novel drug targets, as well as for advancing our understanding of fundamental aspects of eukaryotic flagellum structure and function. PMID:19575562

  18. Sexual differences in prevalence of a new species of trypanosome infecting túngara frogs.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Ximena E; Pinto, C Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Trypanosomes are a diverse group of protozoan parasites of vertebrates transmitted by a variety of hematophagous invertebrate vectors. Anuran trypanosomes and their vectors have received relatively little attention even though these parasites have been reported from frog and toad species worldwide. Blood samples collected from túngara frogs (Engystomops pustulosus), a Neotropical anuran species heavily preyed upon by eavesdropping frog-biting midges (Corethrella spp.), were examined for trypanosomes. Our results revealed sexual differences in trypanosome prevalence with female frogs being rarely infected (<1%). This finding suggests this protozoan parasite may be transmitted by frog-biting midges that find their host using the mating calls produced by male frogs. Following previous anuran trypanosome studies, we examined 18S ribosomal RNA gene to characterize and establish the phylogenetic relationship of the trypanosome species found in túngara frogs. A new species of giant trypanosome, Trypanosoma tungarae n. sp., is described in this study. Overall the morphometric data revealed that the trypomastigotes of T. tungarae n. sp. are similar to other giant trypanosomes such as Trypanosoma rotatorium and Trypanosoma ranarum. Despite its slender and long cell shape, however, 18S rRNA gene sequences revealed that T. tungarae n. sp. is sister to the rounded-bodied giant trypanosome, Trypanosoma chattoni. Therefore, morphological convergence explains similar morphology among members of two non-closely related groups of trypanosomes infecting frogs. The results from this study underscore the value of coupling morphological identification with molecular characterization of anuran trypanosomes. PMID:26977404

  19. Sexual differences in prevalence of a new species of trypanosome infecting túngara frogs

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Ximena E.; Pinto, C. Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosomes are a diverse group of protozoan parasites of vertebrates transmitted by a variety of hematophagous invertebrate vectors. Anuran trypanosomes and their vectors have received relatively little attention even though these parasites have been reported from frog and toad species worldwide. Blood samples collected from túngara frogs (Engystomops pustulosus), a Neotropical anuran species heavily preyed upon by eavesdropping frog-biting midges (Corethrella spp.), were examined for trypanosomes. Our results revealed sexual differences in trypanosome prevalence with female frogs being rarely infected (<1%). This finding suggests this protozoan parasite may be transmitted by frog-biting midges that find their host using the mating calls produced by male frogs. Following previous anuran trypanosome studies, we examined 18S ribosomal RNA gene to characterize and establish the phylogenetic relationship of the trypanosome species found in túngara frogs. A new species of giant trypanosome, Trypanosoma tungarae n. sp., is described in this study. Overall the morphometric data revealed that the trypomastigotes of T. tungarae n. sp. are similar to other giant trypanosomes such as Trypanosoma rotatorium and Trypanosoma ranarum. Despite its slender and long cell shape, however, 18S rRNA gene sequences revealed that T. tungarae n. sp. is sister to the rounded-bodied giant trypanosome, Trypanosoma chattoni. Therefore, morphological convergence explains similar morphology among members of two non-closely related groups of trypanosomes infecting frogs. The results from this study underscore the value of coupling morphological identification with molecular characterization of anuran trypanosomes. PMID:26977404

  20. Tsetse EP Protein Protects the Fly Midgut from Trypanosome Establishment

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Lee R.; Lehane, Stella M.; Pearson, Terry W.; Lehane, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    African trypanosomes undergo a complex developmental process in their tsetse fly vector before transmission back to a vertebrate host. Typically, 90% of fly infections fail, most during initial establishment of the parasite in the fly midgut. The specific mechanism(s) underpinning this failure are unknown. We have previously shown that a Glossina-specific, immunoresponsive molecule, tsetse EP protein, is up regulated by the fly in response to gram-negative microbial challenge. Here we show by knockdown using RNA interference that this tsetse EP protein acts as a powerful antagonist of establishment in the fly midgut for both Trypanosoma brucei brucei and T. congolense. We demonstrate that this phenomenon exists in two species of tsetse, Glossina morsitans morsitans and G. palpalis palpalis, suggesting tsetse EP protein may be a major determinant of vector competence in all Glossina species. Tsetse EP protein levels also decline in response to starvation of the fly, providing a possible explanation for increased susceptibility of starved flies to trypanosome infection. As starvation is a common field event, this fact may be of considerable importance in the epidemiology of African trypanosomiasis. PMID:20221444

  1. Expression and deletion analysis of the Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense cysteine protease in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Pamer, E G; Davis, C E; So, M

    1991-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei, the cause of African sleeping sickness, differentiates in the mammalian bloodstream from a long, slender trypanosome into a short, stumpy trypanosome. This event is necessary for infection of the tsetse fly and maintenance of the life cycle. We have previously shown that the stumpy form contains 10- to 15-fold-greater cysteine protease activity than either the slender form or the insect midgut procyclic, and we have isolated a cDNA encoding the protease. In order to determine whether the cDNA encodes the developmentally regulated cysteine protease, we have purified the protease from trypanosomes and have made a polyclonal antiserum against it. The trypanosomal protease gene was then expressed in Escherichia coli with three different methionines within the pre- and propeptides acting as initiation sites. In each case, a protein was synthesized that was recognized by an antiserum specific for the developmentally regulated trypanosomal cysteine protease. The protein synthesized from the more upstream initiation site within the propeptide was proteolytically active. The recombinant protease and the trypanosomal enzyme were identical with respect to peptide substrates and protease inhibitors. The protein remained active when synthesized in a truncated form lacking the nine consecutive prolines and carboxy-terminus extension, indicating that the terminal 108 amino acids are not necessary for proteolytic activity. Images PMID:1997411

  2. Evolutionary diversification of the trypanosome haptoglobin-haemoglobin receptor from an ancestral haemoglobin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lane-Serff, Harriet; MacGregor, Paula; Peacock, Lori; Macleod, Olivia JS; Kay, Christopher; Gibson, Wendy; Higgins, Matthew K; Carrington, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The haptoglobin-haemoglobin receptor of the African trypanosome species, Trypanosoma brucei, is expressed when the parasite is in the bloodstream of the mammalian host, allowing it to acquire haem through the uptake of haptoglobin-haemoglobin complexes. Here we show that in Trypanosoma congolense this receptor is instead expressed in the epimastigote developmental stage that occurs in the tsetse fly, where it acts as a haemoglobin receptor. We also present the structure of the T. congolense receptor in complex with haemoglobin. This allows us to propose an evolutionary history for this receptor, charting the structural and cellular changes that took place as it adapted from a role in the insect to a new role in the mammalian host. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13044.001 PMID:27083048

  3. Neglected Disease – African Sleeping Sickness: Recent Synthetic and Modeling Advances

    PubMed Central

    Paliwal, Sarvesh K.; Verma, Ankita Narayan; Paliwal, Shailendra

    2011-01-01

    Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) also called sleeping sickness is caused by subspecies of the parasitic hemoflagellate Trypanosoma brucei that mostly occurs in sub-Saharan Africa. The current chemotherapy of the human trypanosomiases relies on only six drugs, five of which have been developed more than 30 years ago, have undesirable toxic side effects and most of them show drug-resistance. Though development of new anti-trypanosomal drugs seems to be a priority area research in this area has lagged far behind. The given review mainly focus upon the recent synthetic and computer based approaches made by various research groups for the development of newer anti-trypanosomal analogues which may have improved efficacy and oral bioavailability than the present ones. The given paper also attempts to investigate the relationship between the various physiochemical parameters and anti-trypanosomal activity that may be helpful in development of potent anti-trypanosomal agents against sleeping sickness. PMID:21886894

  4. Trypanosome Transmission Dynamics in Tsetse

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Serap; Weiss, Brian L.; Attardo, Geoff M.

    2014-01-01

    Tsetse flies (Diptera:Glossinidae) are vectors of African trypanosomes. Tsetse undergo viviparous reproductive biology, and depend on their obligate endosymbiont (genus Wigglesworthia) for the maintenance of fecundity and immune system development. Trypanosomes establish infections in the midgut and salivary glands of the fly. Tsetse’s resistance to trypanosome infection increases as a function of age. Among the factors that mediate resistance to parasites are antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) produced by the Immune deficiency (Imd) signaling pathway, peptidoglycan recognition protein (PGRP) LB, tsetse-EP protein and the integrity of the midgut peritrophic matrix (PM) barrier. The presence of obligate Wigglesworthia during larval development is essential for adult immune system maturation and PM development. Thus, Wigglesworthia prominently influences the vector competency of it’s tsetse host. PMID:25580379

  5. Trypanosoma brucei brucei: endocytic recycling is important for mouse infectivity.

    PubMed

    Natesan, Senthil Kumar A; Black, Alana; Matthews, Keith R; Mottram, Jeremy C; Field, Mark C

    2011-04-01

    Endocytosis in the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, is intimately involved in maintaining homeostasis of the cell surface proteome, morphology of the flagellar pocket and has recently been demonstrated as a bona fide drug target. RNAi-mediated knockdown of many factors required for endocytic transport, including several small GTPases, the major coat protein clathrin and a clathrin-associated receptor, epsinR, results in rapid cell death in vitro. Rapid loss of viability in vitro precludes meaningful investigation by RNAi of the roles of trypanosome endocytosis in vivo. Here we have sought to address this issue using strategies designed to produce milder effects on the endocytic system than complete functional ablation. We created a trypanosome clathrin heavy chain hemizygote and several lines expressing mutant forms of Rab5 and Rab11, described previously. All are viable in in vitro culture, with negligible impact to proliferative rates or cell cycle. Clathrin hemizygotes express clathrin heavy chain at ∼50% of wild type levels, but despite this demonstrate no defect to growth in mice, while none of the Rab5 mutants affected proliferation in vivo, despite clear evidence for effects on endocytosis. By contrast we find that expressing a dominantly active Rab11 mutant led to compromised growth in mice. These data indicate that trypanosomes likely tolerate the effects of partly decreased clathrin expression and alterations in early endocytosis, but are more sensitive to alterations in the recycling arm of the pathway. PMID:21256128

  6. Mechanism of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense resistance to human serum.

    PubMed

    Uzureau, Pierrick; Uzureau, Sophie; Lecordier, Laurence; Fontaine, Frédéric; Tebabi, Patricia; Homblé, Fabrice; Grélard, Axelle; Zhendre, Vanessa; Nolan, Derek P; Lins, Laurence; Crowet, Jean-Marc; Pays, Annette; Felu, Cécile; Poelvoorde, Philippe; Vanhollebeke, Benoit; Moestrup, Soren K; Lyngsø, Jeppe; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Mottram, Jeremy C; Dufourc, Erick J; Pérez-Morga, David; Pays, Etienne

    2013-09-19

    The African parasite Trypanosoma brucei gambiense accounts for 97% of human sleeping sickness cases. T. b. gambiense resists the specific human innate immunity acting against several other tsetse-fly-transmitted trypanosome species such as T. b. brucei, the causative agent of nagana disease in cattle. Human immunity to some African trypanosomes is due to two serum complexes designated trypanolytic factors (TLF-1 and -2), which both contain haptoglobin-related protein (HPR) and apolipoprotein LI (APOL1). Whereas HPR association with haemoglobin (Hb) allows TLF-1 binding and uptake via the trypanosome receptor TbHpHbR (ref. 5), TLF-2 enters trypanosomes independently of TbHpHbR (refs 4, 5). APOL1 kills trypanosomes after insertion into endosomal/lysosomal membranes. Here we report that T. b. gambiense resists TLFs via a hydrophobic β-sheet of the T. b. gambiense-specific glycoprotein (TgsGP), which prevents APOL1 toxicity and induces stiffening of membranes upon interaction with lipids. Two additional features contribute to resistance to TLFs: reduction of sensitivity to APOL1 requiring cysteine protease activity, and TbHpHbR inactivation due to a L210S substitution. According to such a multifactorial defence mechanism, transgenic expression of T. b. brucei TbHpHbR in T. b. gambiense did not cause parasite lysis in normal human serum. However, these transgenic parasites were killed in hypohaptoglobinaemic serum, after high TLF-1 uptake in the absence of haptoglobin (Hp) that competes for Hb and receptor binding. TbHpHbR inactivation preventing high APOL1 loading in hypohaptoglobinaemic serum may have evolved because of the overlapping endemic area of T. b. gambiense infection and malaria, the main cause of haemolysis-induced hypohaptoglobinaemia in western and central Africa. PMID:23965626

  7. A heteromeric potassium channel involved in the modulation of the plasma membrane potential is essential for the survival of African trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Steinmann, Michael E; González-Salgado, Amaia; Bütikofer, Peter; Mäser, Pascal; Sigel, Erwin

    2015-08-01

    Discovery of novel drug targets may lead to improved treatment of trypanosomiasis. We characterize here 2 gene products of Trypanosoma brucei that are essential for the growth of bloodstream form (BSF) parasites, as shown by RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated down-regulation of the individual mRNAs. The primary sequences of the 2 proteins--protein encoded by gene Tb927.1.4450 (TbK1) and protein encoded by gene Tb927.9.4820 (TbK2)--indicate that both belong to the family of putative, Ca(2+)-activated potassium channels. The proteins were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and their functions investigated by use of electrophysiological techniques. Only combined expression of TbK1 and TbK2 results in the formation of sizeable currents, indicating that these proteins probably assemble into a heteromeric ion channel. The current mediated by this channel shows little time and voltage dependence and displays a permeability ratio of K(+)/Na(+) of >20. The known potassium channel blocker barium inhibits this channel with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 98 ± 15 μM. The membrane potential of trypanosomes was measured with a fluorescent dye. Individual RNAi-mediated down-regulation of TbK1 or TbK2 eliminates a potassium conductance in the plasma membrane of BSF. Thus, this heteromeric potassium channel is involved in the modulation of the plasma membrane potential and represents a novel drug target in T. brucei. PMID:25868728

  8. Central Nervous System Parasitosis and Neuroinflammation Ameliorated by Systemic IL-10 Administration in Trypanosoma brucei-Infected Mice.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Jean; Bradley, Barbara; Kennedy, Peter G E; Sternberg, Jeremy M

    2015-01-01

    Invasion of the central nervous system (CNS) by African trypanosomes represents a critical step in the development of human African trypanosomiasis. In both clinical cases and experimental mouse infections it has been demonstrated that predisposition to CNS invasion is associated with a type 1 systemic inflammatory response. Using the Trypanosoma brucei brucei GVR35 experimental infection model, we demonstrate that systemic delivery of the counter-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 lowers plasma IFN-γ and TNF-α concentrations, CNS parasitosis and ameliorates neuro-inflammatory pathology and clinical symptoms of disease. The results provide evidence that CNS invasion may be susceptible to immunological attenuation. PMID:26505761

  9. Interaction of substituted hexose analogues with the Trypanosoma brucei hexose transporter.

    PubMed

    Azema, Laurent; Claustre, Samantha; Alric, Isabelle; Blonski, Casimir; Willson, Michèle; Perié, Jacques; Baltz, Theo; Tetaud, Emmanuel; Bringaud, Frédéric; Cottem, Dominique; Opperdoes, Frederik R; Barrett, Michael P

    2004-02-01

    Glucose metabolism is essential for survival of bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei subspecies which cause human African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness). Hexose analogues may represent good compounds to inhibit glucose metabolism in these cells. Delivery of such compounds to the parasite is a major consideration in drug development. A series of D-glucose and D-fructose analogues were developed to explore the limits of the structure-activity relationship of the THT1 hexose transporter of bloodstream form African trypanosomes, a portal that might be exploited for drug uptake. D-glucose analogues with substituents at the C2 and C6 position continued to interact with the exofacial hexose binding site of the transporter. There was a limit to the size at C6 which still permitted recognition, although compounds carrying large groups at position C2 were still recognised. However, radiolabelled N-acetyl-D-[1-14C] glucosamine was not internalised by trypanosomes, in spite of the ability of this compound to inhibit glucose uptake, indicating that there is a limit to the size of C2 substituent that allows translocation. Addition of an alkylating group (bromoacetyl) at position C2 in the D-glucose series and at position 6 in the D-fructose set, created two analogues which interact with the transporter and kill trypanosomes in vitro. This indicates that inhibition of the transporter may be a good means of killing trypanosomes. PMID:15037198

  10. The Design and Synthesis of Potent and Selective Inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 for the Treatment of Human African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) is a genetically validated drug target for human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), also called African sleeping sickness. We report the synthesis and biological evaluation of aminopyrazole derivatives as Trypanosoma brucei GSK3 short inhibitors. Low nanomolar inhibitors, which had high selectivity over the off-target human CDK2 and good selectivity over human GSK3β enzyme, have been prepared. These potent kinase inhibitors demonstrated low micromolar levels of inhibition of the Trypanosoma brucei brucei parasite grown in culture. PMID:25198388

  11. Development of resazurin-based assay in 384-well format for high throughput whole cell screening of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense strain STIB 900 for the identification of potential anti-trypanosomal agents.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kah Tee; Zahari, Zuriati; Amanah, Azimah; Zainuddin, Zafarina; Adenan, Mohd Ilham

    2016-03-01

    To accelerate the discovery of novel leads for the treatment of Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), it is necessary to have a simple, robust and cost-effective assay to identify positive hits by high throughput whole cell screening. Most of the fluorescence assay was made in black plate however in this study the HTS assay developed in 384-well format using clear plate and black plate, for comparison. The HTS assay developed is simple, sensitive, reliable and reproducible in both types of plates. Assay robustness and reproducibility were determined under the optimized conditions in 384-well plate was well tolerated in the HTS assay, including percentage of coefficient of variation (% CV) of 4.68% and 4.74% in clear and black 384-well plate, signal-to-background ratio (S/B) of 12.75 in clear 384-well plate and 12.07 in black 384-well plate, Z' factor of 0.79 and 0.82 in clear 384-well plate and black 384-well plate, respectively and final concentration of 0.30% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) in both types of plate. Drug sensitivity was found to be comparable to the reported anti-trypanosomal assay in 96-well format. The reproducibility and sensitivity of this assay make it compliant to automated liquid handler use in HTS applications. PMID:26772786

  12. Influence of Pastoralists' Sociocultural Activities on Tsetse-Trypanosome-Cattle Reservoir Interface: The Risk of Human African Trypanosomiasis in North-Central Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Alhaji, N B; Kabir, J

    2016-06-01

    The study investigated socio-cultural characteristics of pastoralists that influenced on the tsetse-trypanosome-cattle reservoir interface thereby predisposing them to HAT in Niger State, North-central Nigeria. It was a cross-sectional survey of adult pastoral herders, aged 30 years and above, and conducted between October 2012 and February 2013. A face-to-face structured questionnaire was administered on the pastoralists nested in 96 cattle herds with questions focused on pastoralists' socio-cultural activities and behavioral practices related to HAT risk. Descriptive and analytic statistics were used to describe the obtained data. A total of 384 pastoralists participated, with mean age of 49.6  ± 10.76 SD years. Male respondents constituted 86.7% of gender, while pastoralists of age group 40-49 years constituted 35.4% of respondents. About 59.4% of the pastoralists had knowledge about HAT and its symptoms and only 33.9% of them believed that cattle served as reservoir of HAT trypanosome. Knowledge/belief levels of the pastoralists about African trypanosomiasis occurrence in humans and animals were statistically significant. Males were four times more likely to be exposed to HAT (OR = 3.67; 95% CI: 1.42, 9.52); age group 60-69 was also four times more likely to be exposed (OR = 3.59; 95% CI: 1.56, 8.28); and nomadic pastoralists were two times more likely to be exposed to HAT (OR = 2.07; 95% CI: 1.37, 3.14). All cultural practices significantly influenced exposure to HAT with extensive husbandry system three times more likely to predisposed pastoralists to HAT (OR = 3.21; 95% CI: 1.65, 6.24). Socio-cultural characteristics of pastoralists influenced exposure to HAT risk and, therefore, there is a need to sensitize them to bring changes to their socio-cultural practices and perceptions to achieve effective and long term sustainable HAT control. Elimination strategies of parasites in animals and vectors should be considered to avoid reintroduction

  13. Illuminating the Prevalence of Trypanosoma brucei s.l. in Glossina Using LAMP as a Tool for Xenomonitoring

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Lucas J.; Lingley, Jessica K.; Haines, Lee R.; Ndung’u, Joseph M.; Torr, Stephen J.; Adams, Emily R.

    2016-01-01

    Background As the reality of eliminating human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) by 2020 draws closer, the need to detect and identify the remaining areas of transmission increases. Here, we have explored the feasibility of using commercially available LAMP kits, designed to detect the Trypanozoon group of trypanosomes, as a xenomonitoring tool to screen tsetse flies for trypanosomes to be used in future epidemiological surveys. Methods and Findings The DNA extraction method was simplified and worked with the LAMP kits to detect a single positive fly when pooled with 19 negative flies, and the absolute lowest limit of detection that the kits were able to work at was the equivalent of 0.1 trypanosome per ml. The DNA from Trypanosoma brucei brucei could be detected six days after the fly had taken a blood meal containing dead trypanosomes, and when confronted with a range of non-target species, from both laboratory-reared flies and wild-caught flies, the kits showed no evidence of cross-reacting. Conclusion We have shown that it is possible to use a simplified DNA extraction method in conjunction with the pooling of tsetse flies to decrease the time it would take to screen large numbers of flies for the presence of Trypanozoon trypanosomes. The use of commercially-available LAMP kits provides a reliable and highly sensitive tool for xenomonitoring and identifying potential sleeping sickness transmission sites. PMID:26890882

  14. First small molecular inhibitors of T. brucei dolicholphosphate mannose synthase (DPMS), a validated drug target in African sleeping sickness

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Terry K.; Young, Benjamin L.; Denton, Helen; Hughes, David L.; Wagner, Gerd K.

    2013-01-01

    Drug-like molecules with activity against Trypanosoma brucei are urgently required as potential therapeutics for the treatment of African sleeping sickness. Starting from known inhibitors of other glycosyltransferases, we have developed the first small molecular inhibitors of dolicholphosphate mannose synthase (DPMS), a mannosyltransferase critically involved in glycoconjugate biosynthesis in T. brucei. We show that these DPMS inhibitors prevent the biosynthesis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors, and possess trypanocidal activity against live trypanosomes. PMID:19217283

  15. Transcript Abundance of Putative Lipid Phosphate Phosphatases During Development of Trypanosoma brucei in the Tsetse Fly.

    PubMed

    Alves e Silva, Thiago Luiz; Savage, Amy F; Aksoy, Serap

    2016-04-01

    African trypanosomes (Trypanosoma brucei spp.) cause devastating diseases in sub-Saharan Africa. Trypanosomes differentiate repeatedly during development in tsetse flies before gaining mammalian infectivity in fly salivary glands. Lipid phosphate phosphatases (LPPs) are involved in diverse biological processes, such as cell differentiation and cell migration. Gene sequences encoding two putative T. brucei LPP proteins were used to search the T. brucei genome, revealing two additional putative family members. Putative structural features and transcript abundance during parasite development in tsetse fly were characterized. Three of the four LPP proteins are predicted to have six transmembrane domains, while the fourth shows only one. Semiquantitative gene expression revealed differential regulation of LPPs during parasite development. Transcript abundance for three of the four putative LPP genes was elevated in parasites infecting salivary glands, but not mammalian-infective metacyclic cells in fly saliva, indicating a potential role of this family in parasite establishment in tsetse salivary glands. PMID:26856918

  16. A multiple aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex that enhances tRNA-aminoacylation in African trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Cestari, Igor; Kalidas, Savitha; Monnerat, Severine; Anupama, Atashi; Phillips, Margaret A; Stuart, Kenneth

    2013-12-01

    The genes for all cytoplasmic and potentially all mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) were identified, and all those tested by RNA interference were found to be essential for the growth of Trypanosoma brucei. Some of these enzymes were localized to the cytoplasm or mitochondrion, but most were dually localized to both cellular compartments. Cytoplasmic T. brucei aaRSs were organized in a multiprotein complex in both bloodstream and procyclic forms. The multiple aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (MARS) complex contained at least six aaRS enzymes and three additional non-aaRS proteins. Steady-state kinetic studies showed that association in the MARS complex enhances tRNA-aminoacylation efficiency, which is in part dependent on a MARS complex-associated protein (MCP), named MCP2, that binds tRNAs and increases their aminoacylation by the complex. Conditional repression of MCP2 in T. brucei bloodstream forms resulted in reduced parasite growth and infectivity in mice. Thus, association in a MARS complex enhances tRNA-aminoacylation and contributes to parasite fitness. The MARS complex may be part of a cellular regulatory system and a target for drug development. PMID:24126051

  17. Improvement of the production of Trypanosoma vivax antigens.

    PubMed

    Staak, C

    1975-09-01

    An improved technique for the production of Trypanosoma vivax antigen from infected cattle is described. This technique is based upon 1. the application of immunosuppressive drug, 2. the isolation of trypanosomes by centrifugation, and 3. the clearing of the trypanosome suspension from non sedimented blood cells by an anti-serum against bovine blood cells, raised in rabbits. PMID:1189022

  18. Immunization of mice with Trypanosoma rhodesiense exposed to ultraviolet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Charoenvit, Y.; Campbell, G.H.

    1981-11-01

    Exposure time of Trypanosoma rhodesiense as short as 1 minute to ultraviolet (uv) light prevents the organisms from causing infection. Live trypanosome challenge of mice immunized with uv-irradiated trypanosomes results in sterile immunity. This allows a method for the induction of protective immunity to experimental trypanosomiasis which can be performed in most laboratories using uv germicidal lamps found in sterile hoods.

  19. Polymerase chain reaction as a diagnosis tool for detecting trypanosomes in naturally infected cattle in Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Solano, P; Michel, J F; Lefrançois, T; de La Rocque, S; Sidibé, I; Zoungrana, A; Cuisance, D

    1999-09-30

    African animal trypanosomoses constitute the most important vector-borne cattle diseases in sub-Saharan Africa. Generally it is considered that there is a great lack of accurate tools for the diagnosis of the disease. During a trypanosomosis survey in the agro-pastoral zone of Sideradougou, Burkina Faso, 1036 cattle were examined for trypanosomes using microscopy. The PCR was applied on a subset of 260 buffy-coat samples using primers specific for Trypanosoma congolense savannah and riverine-forest groups, T. vivax, and T. brucei. Parasitological examination and the molecular technique were compared, showing a better efficiency of the latter. In the near future, the PCR is likely to become an efficient tool to estimate the prevalence of African trypanosomoses in affected areas. PMID:10496693

  20. Meiosis and haploid gametes in the pathogen Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Lori; Bailey, Mick; Carrington, Mark; Gibson, Wendy

    2014-01-20

    In eukaryote pathogens, sex is an important driving force in spreading genes for drug resistance, pathogenicity, and virulence. For the parasitic trypanosomes that cause African sleeping sickness, mating occurs during transmission by the tsetse vector and involves meiosis, but haploid gametes have not yet been identified. Here, we show that meiosis is a normal part of development in the insect salivary glands for all subspecies of Trypanosoma brucei, including the human pathogens. By observing insect-derived trypanosomes during the window of peak expression of meiosis-specific genes, we identified promastigote-like (PL) cells that interacted with each other via their flagella and underwent fusion, as visualized by the mixing of cytoplasmic red and green fluorescent proteins. PL cells had a short, wide body, a very long anterior flagellum, and either one or two kinetoplasts, but only the anterior kinetoplast was associated with the flagellum. Measurement of nuclear DNA contents showed that PL cells were haploid relative to diploid metacyclics. Trypanosomes are among the earliest diverging eukaryotes, and our results support the hypothesis that meiosis and sexual reproduction are ubiquitous in eukaryotes and likely to have been early innovations. PMID:24388851

  1. Kinetoplast adaptations in American strains from Trypanosoma vivax.

    PubMed

    Greif, Gonzalo; Rodriguez, Matías; Reyna-Bello, Armando; Robello, Carlos; Alvarez-Valin, Fernando

    2015-03-01

    The mitochondrion role changes during the digenetic life cycle of African trypanosomes. Owing to the low abundance of glucose in the insect vector (tsetse flies) the parasites are dependent upon a fully functional mitochondrion, capable of performing oxidative phosphorylation. Nevertheless, inside the mammalian host (bloodstream forms), which is rich in nutrients, parasite proliferation relies on glycolysis, and the mitochondrion is partially redundant. In this work we perform a comparative study of the mitochondrial genome (kinetoplast) in different strains of Trypanosoma vivax. The comparison was conducted between a West African strain that goes through a complete life cycle and two American strains that are mechanically transmitted (by different vectors) and remain as bloodstream forms only. It was found that while the African strain has a complete and apparently fully functional kinetoplast, the American T. vivax strains have undergone a drastic process of mitochondrial genome degradation, in spite of the recent introduction of these parasites in America. Many of their genes exhibit different types of mutations that are disruptive of function such as major deletions, frameshift causing indels and missense mutations. Moreover, all but three genes (A6-ATPase, RPS12 and MURF2) are not edited in the American strains, whereas editing takes place normally in all (editable) genes from the African strain. Two of these genes, A6-ATPase and RPS12, are known to play an essential function during bloodstream stage. Analysis of the minicircle population shows that its diversity has been greatly reduced, remaining mostly those minicircles that carry guide RNAs necessary for the editing of A6-ATPase and RPS12. The fact that these two genes remain functioning normally, as opposed to that reported in Trypanosoma brucei-like trypanosomes that restrict their life cycle to the bloodstream forms, along with other differences, is indicative that the American T. vivax strains are

  2. Anuran trypanosomes: phylogenetic evidence for new clades in Brazil.

    PubMed

    da S Ferreira, Juliana I G; da Costa, Andrea P; Ramirez, Diego; Roldan, Jairo A M; Saraiva, Danilo; da S Founier, Gislene F R; Sue, Ana; Zambelli, Erick R; Minervino, Antonio H H; Verdade, Vanessa K; Gennari, Solange M; Marcili, Arlei

    2015-05-01

    Trypanosomes of anurans and fish are grouped into the Aquatic Clade which includes species isolated from fish, amphibians, turtles and platypus, usually transmitted by leeches and phlebotomine sand flies. Trypanosomes from Brazilian frogs are grouped within the Aquatic Clade with other anuran trypanosome species, where there seems to be coevolutionary patterns with vertebrate hosts and association to Brazilian biomes (Atlantic Forest, Pantanal and Amazonia Rainforest). We characterised the anuran trypanosomes from two different areas of the Cerrado biome and examined their phylogenetic relationships based on the SSU rRNA gene. A total of 112 anurans of six species was analysed and trypanosome prevalence evaluated through haemoculture was found to be 7% (8 positive frogs). However, only three isolates (2.7%) from two anuran species were recovered and cryopreserved. Analysis including SSU rDNA sequences from previous studies segregated the anuran trypanosomes into six groups, the previously reported An01 to An04, and An05 and An06 reported herein. Clade An05 comprises the isolates from Leptodactylus latrans (Steffen) and Pristimantis sp. captured in the Cerrado biome and Trypanosoma chattoni Mathis & Leger, 1911. The inclusion of new isolates in the phylogenetic analyses provided evidence for a new group (An06) of parasites from phlebotomine hosts. Our results indicate that the diversity of trypanosome species is underestimated since studies conducted in Brazil and other regions of the world are still few. PMID:25862033

  3. Quantitative methods in the study of trypanosomes and their applications*

    PubMed Central

    Lumsden, W. H. R.

    1963-01-01

    In the first part of this paper the author summarizes and discusses previous quantitative work on trypanosomes, with particular reference to biometrical studies, in vivo and in vitro studies on numbers of trypanosomes, studies on hosts infected with trypanosomes, and physiological studies. The second part discusses recent work done at the East African Trypanosomiasis Research Organization. A method for the measurement of the infectivity of trypanosome suspensions, based on serial dilution and inoculation into test animals, is outlined, and applications likely to improve diagnostic procedures are suggested for it. Such applications might include: the establishment of experimental procedures not significantly reducing the infectivity of trypanosomes under experiment; determination of the effects on the infectivity of preserved material of some of the factors in the process of preservation, important for the preparation of standard material; comparison of the efficiency of different culture media for the isolation of trypanosomes; study of the distribution of trypanosomes in the vertebrate host; and measurement of the susceptibility of trypanosomes to drugs. The author stresses the importance of relating future experimental work with trypanosomes to preserved material for which comprehensive documentation is available. PMID:20604152

  4. Characterization of Calflagin, a Flagellar Calcium-Binding Protein from Trypanosoma congolense

    PubMed Central

    Eyford, Brett A.; Kaufman, Laura; Salama-Alber, Orly; Loveless, Bianca; Pope, Matthew E.; Burke, Robert D.; Matovu, Enock; Boulanger, Martin J.; Pearson, Terry W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of species-specific trypanosome molecules is important for laboratory- and field-based research into epidemiology and disease diagnosis. Although Trypanosoma congolense is the most important trypanosome pathogen of cattle in Africa, no species-specific molecules found in infective bloodstream forms (BSF) of the parasites have been identified, thus limiting development of diagnostic tests. Methods Immuno-mass spectrometric methods were used to identify a protein that is recognized by a T. congolense-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) Tc6/42.6.4. The identified molecule was expressed as a recombinant protein in E. coli and was tested in several immunoassays for its ability to interact with the mAb. The three dimensional structure of the protein was modeled and compared to crystal- and NMR-structures of the homologous proteins from T. cruzi and T. brucei respectively, in order to examine structural differences leading to the different immunoreactivity of the T. congolense molecule. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were used to measure antibodies produced by trypanosome-infected African cattle in order to assess the potential for use of T. congolense calflagin in a serodiagnostic assay. Results The antigen recognized by the T. congolense-specific mAb Tc6/42.6.4 was identified as a flagellar calcium-binding protein, calflagin. The recombinant molecule showed immunoreactivity with the T. congolense-specific mAb confirming that it is the cognate antigen. Immunofluorescence experiments revealed that Ca2+ modulated the localization of the calflagin molecule in trypanosomes. Structural modelling and comparison with calflagin homologues from other trypanosomatids revealed four non-conserved regions on the surface of the T. congolense molecule that due to differences in surface chemistry and structural topography may form species-specific epitopes. ELISAs using the recombinant calflagin as antigen to detect antibodies in trypanosome

  5. Identification of novel trypanosome genotypes in native Australian marsupials.

    PubMed

    Paparini, Andrea; Irwin, Peter J; Warren, Kris; McInnes, Linda M; de Tores, Paul; Ryan, Una M

    2011-12-29

    In the present study, the occurrence and molecular phylogeny of trypanosome parasites were studied in both wild and captive marsupials from Western Australia and Queensland. Blood samples were screened by PCR at the 18S rDNA locus, and the glycosomal glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase gene. Overall, 5.3% of the blood samples were positive at the 18S rDNA locus. All positives belonged to wild-captured Western Australian individuals, where trypanosome-specific DNA was detected in 9.8% of the screened samples from wild marsupials, in common brushtail possums, and woylies. The detection rate of trypanosome DNA in these two host species was 12.5% and 20%, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses based on two loci, indicated that the possum-derived trypanosome isolates were genetically distinct, and most closely related to the Australian marsupial trypanosomes H25 from a kangaroo, and BRA2 from a bush rat. This is the first study to genetically characterise trypanosome isolates from possums. The analysis of the woylie-derived isolates demonstrated that this marsupial host can harbour multiple genotypes within the same geographical location and furthermore multiple genotypes within the same host, indicative of mixed infections. All the woylie-derived genotypes grouped with trypanosomes found in Australian marsupials, suggesting that they are more likely to belong to an endemic or Australasian trypanosome species. This is the first study to genetically characterise trypanosome isolates from possums (Trichosurus vulpecula). Although the clinical significance of these infections is currently unknown, the identification of these novel sequences may support future investigations on transmission, threats to endangered wildlife, and evolutionary history of the genus Trypanosoma. PMID:21802854

  6. Characterization of trypanosomes from the subgenus Schizotrypanum isolated from bats, Eptesicus sp. (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae), captured in Florianópolis, Santa Catarina State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Steindel, M; Grisard, E C; de Carvalho Pinto, C J; Cordeiro, F D; Ribeiro-Rodrigues, R; Romanha, A J

    1998-06-01

    Seven Trypanosoma spp. isolates obtained from bats (Eptesicus sp.) were characterized using experimental infection in mice, triatomines, and culicines; complement lysis; indirect fluorescence assays; as well as isoenzyme and random-amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profiles. The Trypanosoma sp. isolates were compared with Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma rangeli. and 2 other bat trypanosomes species, Trypanosoma vespertilionis and Trypanosoma hastatus. Trypanosoma sp. isolates were different from the other species in all experiments, except in complement lysis. Experimental infection of triatomines and culicines with Trypanosoma sp. proved to be transitory. These parasites were noninfective for both normal and immunosuppressed mice. Isoenzyme and RAPD profiles obtained for Trypanosoma sp. were quite distinct from T. cruzi and T. rangeli and closely related to T. vespertilionis and T. hastatus. No cross-reaction was observed between sera from mice infected with Trypanosoma sp. and the other trypanosomatids and vice-versa. Trypanosoma sp. induced no protection against T. cruzi infection in mice. The very low, or nonsimilarity between Trypanosoma sp. isolates and the other species used in this study suggests that they might be members of a distinct bat trypanosome species. However, further studies should be done to prove their affinities with Trypanosoma cruzi-marinkellei, another trypanosome species from bats. PMID:9645864

  7. Flagellum ontogeny in trypanosomes studied via an inherited and regulated RNA interference system.

    PubMed

    Bastin, P; Ellis, K; Kohl, L; Gull, K

    2000-09-01

    The African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei possesses a large and unique intraflagellar structure called the paraflagellar rod (PFR). The PFR is composed of 2 major proteins, PFRA and PFRC. We have generated an inducible mutant trypanosome cell line (snl-2) that expresses linked inverted copies of a PFRA gene, capable of forming a PFRA double-stranded (ds) RNA. When expression of this dsRNA was induced, new PFRA RNA and PFRA protein quickly disappeared and PFR construction was affected, resulting in cell paralysis. This inducible RNA interference (RNAi) effect was fast-acting, heritable and reversible. It allowed us to demonstrate that PFR proteins are able to enter both mature and growing flagella but appear to concentrate differentially in new flagella because of the construction process. The PFR is constructed by a polar assembly process at the distal end of the flagellum resulting in a stable cytoskeletal structure with low turn-over. The inducible RNAi approach will have widespread applicability in studies of gene function and cellular processes in parasites. PMID:10954429

  8. The roles of 3′-exoribonucleases and the exosome in trypanosome mRNA degradation

    PubMed Central

    Fadda, Abeer; Färber, Valentin; Droll, Dorothea; Clayton, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The degradation of eukaryotic mRNAs can be initiated by deadenylation, decapping, or endonuclease cleavage. This is followed by 5′–3′ degradation by homologs of Xrn1, and/or 3′–5′ degradation by the exosome. We previously reported that, in African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei, most mRNAs are deadenylated prior to degradation, and that depletion of the major 5′–3′ exoribonuclease XRNA preferentially stabilizes unstable mRNAs. We now show that depletion of either CAF1 or CNOT10, two components of the principal deadenylation complex, strongly inhibits degradation of most mRNAs. RNAi targeting another deadenylase, PAN2, or RRP45, a core component of the exosome, preferentially stabilized mRNAs with intermediate half-lives. RRP45 depletion resulted in a 5′ bias of mRNA sequences, suggesting action by a distributive 3′–5′ exoribonuclease. Results suggested that the exosome is involved in the processing of trypanosome snoRNAs. There was no correlation between effects on half-lives and on mRNA abundance. PMID:23697549

  9. Structure and sequence of the gene for the largest subunit of trypanosomal RNA polymerase III.

    PubMed Central

    Köck, J; Evers, R; Cornelissen, A W

    1988-01-01

    As the first step in the analysis of the transcription process in the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, we have started to characterise the trypanosomal RNA polymerases. We have previously described the gene encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II and found that two almost identical RNA polymerase II genes are encoded within the genome of T. brucei. Here we present the identification, cloning and sequence analysis of the gene encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase III. This gene contains a single open reading frame encoding a polypeptide with a Mr of 170 kD. In total, eight encoding a polypeptide with a Mr of 170 kD. In total, eight highly conserved regions with significant homology to those previously reported in other eukaryotic RNA polymerase largest subunits were identified. Some of these domains contain functional sites, which are conserved among all eukaryotic largest subunit genes analysed thus far. Since these domains make up a large part of each polypeptide, independent of the RNA polymerase class, these data strongly support the hypothesis that these domains provide a major part of the transcription machinery of the RNA polymerase complex. The additional domains which are uniquely present in the largest subunit of RNA polymerase I and II, respectively, two large hydrophylic insertions and a C-terminal extension, might be a determining factor in specific transcription of the gene classes. Images PMID:3174432

  10. Detection and identification of pathogenic trypanosome species in tsetse flies along the Comoé River in Côte d’Ivoire

    PubMed Central

    Djohan, Vincent; Kaba, Dramane; Rayaissé, Jean-Baptiste; Dayo, Guiguigbaza-Kossigan; Coulibaly, Bamoro; Salou, Ernest; Dofini, Fabien; Kouadio, Alain De Marie Koffi; Menan, Hervé; Solano, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    In order to identify pathogenic trypanosomes responsible for African trypanosomiasis, and to better understand tsetse-trypanosome relationships, surveys were undertaken in three sites located in different eco-climatic areas in Côte d’Ivoire during the dry and rainy seasons. Tsetse flies were caught during five consecutive days using biconical traps, dissected and microscopically examined looking for trypanosome infection. Samples from infected flies were tested by PCR using specific primers for Trypanosoma brucei s.l., T. congolense savannah type, T. congolense forest type and T. vivax. Of 1941 tsetse flies caught including four species, i.e. Glossina palpalis palpalis, G. p. gambiensis, G. tachinoides and G. medicorum, 513 (26%) were dissected and 60 (12%) were found positive by microscopy. Up to 41% of the infections were due to T. congolense savannah type, 30% to T. vivax, 20% to T. congolense forest type and 9% due to T. brucei s.l. All four trypanosome species and subgroups were identified from G. tachinoides and G. p. palpalis, while only two were isolated from G. p. gambiensis (T. brucei s.l., T. congolense savannah type) and G. medicorum (T. congolense forest, savannah types). Mixed infections were found in 25% of cases and all involved T. congolense savannah type with another trypanosome species. The simultaneous occurrence of T. brucei s.l., and tsetse from the palpalis group may suggest that human trypanosomiasis can still be a constraint in these localities, while high rates of T. congolense and T. vivax in the area suggest a potential risk of animal trypanosomiasis in livestock along the Comoé River. PMID:26035296

  11. Detection and identification of pathogenic trypanosome species in tsetse flies along the Comoé River in Côte d'Ivoire.

    PubMed

    Djohan, Vincent; Kaba, Dramane; Rayaissé, Jean-Baptiste; Dayo, Guiguigbaza-Kossigan; Coulibaly, Bamoro; Salou, Ernest; Dofini, Fabien; Kouadio, Alain De Marie Koffi; Menan, Hervé; Solano, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    In order to identify pathogenic trypanosomes responsible for African trypanosomiasis, and to better understand tsetse-trypanosome relationships, surveys were undertaken in three sites located in different eco-climatic areas in Côte d'Ivoire during the dry and rainy seasons. Tsetse flies were caught during five consecutive days using biconical traps, dissected and microscopically examined looking for trypanosome infection. Samples from infected flies were tested by PCR using specific primers for Trypanosoma brucei s.l., T. congolense savannah type, T. congolense forest type and T. vivax. Of 1941 tsetse flies caught including four species, i.e. Glossina palpalis palpalis, G. p. gambiensis, G. tachinoides and G. medicorum, 513 (26%) were dissected and 60 (12%) were found positive by microscopy. Up to 41% of the infections were due to T. congolense savannah type, 30% to T. vivax, 20% to T. congolense forest type and 9% due to T. brucei s.l. All four trypanosome species and subgroups were identified from G. tachinoides and G. p. palpalis, while only two were isolated from G. p. gambiensis (T. brucei s.l., T. congolense savannah type) and G. medicorum (T. congolense forest, savannah types). Mixed infections were found in 25% of cases and all involved T. congolense savannah type with another trypanosome species. The simultaneous occurrence of T. brucei s.l., and tsetse from the palpalis group may suggest that human trypanosomiasis can still be a constraint in these localities, while high rates of T. congolense and T. vivax in the area suggest a potential risk of animal trypanosomiasis in livestock along the Comoé River. PMID:26035296

  12. Adult blood-feeding tsetse flies, trypanosomes, microbiota and the fluctuating environment in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, Anne; Ponton, Fleur; Simo, Gustave

    2015-01-01

    The tsetse fly vector transmits the protozoan Trypanosoma brucei, responsible for Human African Trypanosomiasis, one of the most neglected tropical diseases. Despite a recent decline in new cases, it is still crucial to develop alternative strategies to combat this disease. Here, we review the literature on the factors that influence trypanosome transmission from the fly vector to its vertebrate host (particularly humans). These factors include climate change effects to pathogen and vector development (in particular climate warming), as well as the distribution of host reservoirs. Finally, we present reports on the relationships between insect vector nutrition, immune function, microbiota and infection, to demonstrate how continuing research on the evolving ecology of these complex systems will help improve control strategies. In the future, such studies will be of increasing importance to understand how vector-borne diseases are spread in a changing world. PMID:25500509

  13. Adult blood-feeding tsetse flies, trypanosomes, microbiota and the fluctuating environment in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Anne; Ponton, Fleur; Simo, Gustave

    2015-07-01

    The tsetse fly vector transmits the protozoan Trypanosoma brucei, responsible for Human African Trypanosomiasis, one of the most neglected tropical diseases. Despite a recent decline in new cases, it is still crucial to develop alternative strategies to combat this disease. Here, we review the literature on the factors that influence trypanosome transmission from the fly vector to its vertebrate host (particularly humans). These factors include climate change effects to pathogen and vector development (in particular climate warming), as well as the distribution of host reservoirs. Finally, we present reports on the relationships between insect vector nutrition, immune function, microbiota and infection, to demonstrate how continuing research on the evolving ecology of these complex systems will help improve control strategies. In the future, such studies will be of increasing importance to understand how vector-borne diseases are spread in a changing world. PMID:25500509

  14. Trypanosome infections in warthogs (Phacochoerus aethiopicus) in the Gambia.

    PubMed

    Claxton, J R; Faye, J A; Rawlings, P

    1992-03-01

    The prevalence of trypanosome infections in warthogs (Phacochoerus aethiopicus) in The Gambia was found to be 11% of a sample of 62 animals. All isolates were identified as Trypanosoma simiae. Serological evidence indicated a higher level of exposure to T. simiae, but results were inconclusive for the presence of Trypanosoma congolense. The course of T. simiae infection in warthog piglets showed a rapidly rising parasitaemia, with a concomitant fall in packed cell volume, and resulted in a prolonged period of low-level parasitaemia. The same infections killed domestic piglets. PMID:1502780

  15. Structure of the trypanosome haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor and implications for nutrient uptake and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Matthew K; Tkachenko, Olga; Brown, Alan; Reed, Jenny; Raper, Jayne; Carrington, Mark

    2013-01-29

    African trypanosomes are protected by a densely packed surface monolayer of variant surface glycoprotein (VSG). A haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor (HpHbR) within this VSG coat mediates heme acquisition. HpHbR is also exploited by the human host to mediate endocytosis of trypanolytic factor (TLF)1 from serum, contributing to innate immunity. Here, the crystal structure of HpHbR from Trypanosoma congolense has been solved, revealing an elongated three α-helical bundle with a small membrane distal head. To understand the receptor in the context of the VSG layer, the dimensions of Trypanosoma brucei HpHbR and VSG have been determined by small-angle X-ray scattering, revealing the receptor to be more elongated than VSG. It is, therefore, likely that the receptor protrudes above the VSG layer and unlikely that the VSG coat can prevent immunoglobulin binding to the receptor. The HpHb-binding site has been mapped by single-residue mutagenesis and surface plasmon resonance. This site is located where it is readily accessible above the VSG layer. A single HbHpR polymorphism unique to human infective T. brucei gambiense has been shown to be sufficient to reduce binding of both HpHb and TLF1, modulating ligand affinity in a delicate balancing act that allows nutrient acquisition but avoids TLF1 uptake. PMID:23319650

  16. Drug target identification using a trypanosome overexpression library.

    PubMed

    Begolo, Daniela; Erben, Esteban; Clayton, Christine

    2014-10-01

    Elucidation of molecular targets is very important for lead optimization during the drug development process. We describe a direct method to find targets of antitrypanosomal compounds against Trypanosoma brucei using a trypanosome overexpression library. As proof of concept, we treated the library with difluoromethylornithine and DDD85646 and identified their respective targets, ornithine decarboxylase and N-myristoyltransferase. The overexpression library could be a useful tool to study the modes of action of novel antitrypanosomal drug candidates. PMID:25049244

  17. NMD3 regulates both mRNA and rRNA nuclear export in African trypanosomes via an XPOI-linked pathway.

    PubMed

    Bühlmann, Melanie; Walrad, Pegine; Rico, Eva; Ivens, Alasdair; Capewell, Paul; Naguleswaran, Arunasalam; Roditi, Isabel; Matthews, Keith R

    2015-05-19

    Trypanosomes mostly regulate gene expression through post-transcriptional mechanisms, particularly mRNA stability. However, much mRNA degradation is cytoplasmic such that mRNA nuclear export must represent an important level of regulation. Ribosomal RNAs must also be exported from the nucleus and the trypanosome orthologue of NMD3 has been confirmed to be involved in rRNA processing and export, matching its function in other organisms. Surprisingly, we found that TbNMD3 depletion also generates mRNA accumulation of procyclin-associated genes (PAGs), these being co-transcribed by RNA polymerase I with the procyclin surface antigen genes expressed on trypanosome insect forms. By whole transcriptome RNA-seq analysis of TbNMD3-depleted cells we confirm the regulation of the PAG transcripts by TbNMD3 and using reporter constructs reveal that PAG1 regulation is mediated by its 5'UTR. Dissection of the mechanism of regulation demonstrates that it is not dependent upon translational inhibition mediated by TbNMD3 depletion nor enhanced transcription. However, depletion of the nuclear export factors XPO1 or MEX67 recapitulates the effects of TbNMD3 depletion on PAG mRNAs and mRNAs accumulated in the nucleus of TbNMD3-depleted cells. These results invoke a novel RNA regulatory mechanism involving the NMD3-dependent nuclear export of mRNA cargos, suggesting a shared platform for mRNA and rRNA export. PMID:25873624

  18. A single amino acid substitution in the group 1 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor abolishes TLF-1 binding.

    PubMed

    DeJesus, E; Kieft, R; Albright, B; Stephens, N A; Hajduk, S L

    2013-01-01

    Critical to human innate immunity against African trypanosomes is a minor subclass of human high-density lipoproteins, termed Trypanosome Lytic Factor-1 (TLF-1). This primate-specific molecule binds to a haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor (HpHbR) on the surface of susceptible trypanosomes, initiating a lytic pathway. Group 1 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense causes human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), escaping TLF-1 killing due to reduced uptake. Previously, we found that group 1 T. b. gambiense HpHbR (TbgHpHbR) mRNA levels were greatly reduced and the gene contained substitutions within the open reading frame. Here we show that a single, highly conserved amino acid in the TbgHpHbR ablates high affinity TLF-1 binding and subsequent endocytosis, thus evading TLF-1 killing. In addition, we show that over-expression of TbgHpHbR failed to rescue TLF-1 susceptibility. These findings suggest that the single substitution present in the TbgHpHbR directly contributes to the reduced uptake and resistance to TLF-1 seen in these important human pathogens. PMID:23637606

  19. A Single Amino Acid Substitution in the Group 1 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Haptoglobin-Hemoglobin Receptor Abolishes TLF-1 Binding

    PubMed Central

    DeJesus, E.; Kieft, R.; Albright, B.; Stephens, N. A.; Hajduk, S. L.

    2013-01-01

    Critical to human innate immunity against African trypanosomes is a minor subclass of human high-density lipoproteins, termed Trypanosome Lytic Factor-1 (TLF-1). This primate-specific molecule binds to a haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor (HpHbR) on the surface of susceptible trypanosomes, initiating a lytic pathway. Group 1 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense causes human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), escaping TLF-1 killing due to reduced uptake. Previously, we found that group 1 T. b. gambiense HpHbR (TbgHpHbR) mRNA levels were greatly reduced and the gene contained substitutions within the open reading frame. Here we show that a single, highly conserved amino acid in the TbgHpHbR ablates high affinity TLF-1 binding and subsequent endocytosis, thus evading TLF-1 killing. In addition, we show that over-expression of TbgHpHbR failed to rescue TLF-1 susceptibility. These findings suggest that the single substitution present in the TbgHpHbR directly contributes to the reduced uptake and resistance to TLF-1 seen in these important human pathogens. PMID:23637606

  20. Independent Analysis of the Flagellum Surface and Matrix Proteomes Provides Insight into Flagellum Signaling in Mammalian-infectious Trypanosoma brucei*

    PubMed Central

    Oberholzer, Michael; Langousis, Gerasimos; Nguyen, HoangKim T.; Saada, Edwin A.; Shimogawa, Michelle M.; Jonsson, Zophonias O.; Nguyen, Steven M.; Wohlschlegel, James A.; Hill, Kent L.

    2011-01-01

    The flagellum of African trypanosomes is an essential and multifunctional organelle that functions in motility, cell morphogenesis, and host-parasite interaction. Previous studies of the trypanosome flagellum have been limited by the inability to purify flagella without first removing the flagellar membrane. This limitation is particularly relevant in the context of studying flagellum signaling, as signaling requires surface-exposed proteins in the flagellar membrane and soluble signaling proteins in the flagellar matrix. Here we employ a combination of genetic and mechanical approaches to purify intact flagella from the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, in its mammalian-infectious stage. We combined flagellum purification with affinity-purification of surface-exposed proteins to conduct independent proteomic analyses of the flagellum surface and matrix fractions. The proteins identified encompass a broad range of molecular functionalities, including many predicted to function in signaling. Immunofluorescence and RNA interference studies demonstrate flagellum localization and function for proteins identified and provide insight into mechanisms of flagellum attachment and motility. The flagellum surface proteome includes many T. brucei-specific proteins and is enriched for proteins up-regulated in the mammalian-infectious stage of the parasite life-cycle. The combined results indicate that the flagellum surface presents a diverse and dynamic host-parasite interface that is well-suited for host-parasite signaling. PMID:21685506

  1. Independent analysis of the flagellum surface and matrix proteomes provides insight into flagellum signaling in mammalian-infectious Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Oberholzer, Michael; Langousis, Gerasimos; Nguyen, HoangKim T; Saada, Edwin A; Shimogawa, Michelle M; Jonsson, Zophonias O; Nguyen, Steven M; Wohlschlegel, James A; Hill, Kent L

    2011-10-01

    The flagellum of African trypanosomes is an essential and multifunctional organelle that functions in motility, cell morphogenesis, and host-parasite interaction. Previous studies of the trypanosome flagellum have been limited by the inability to purify flagella without first removing the flagellar membrane. This limitation is particularly relevant in the context of studying flagellum signaling, as signaling requires surface-exposed proteins in the flagellar membrane and soluble signaling proteins in the flagellar matrix. Here we employ a combination of genetic and mechanical approaches to purify intact flagella from the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, in its mammalian-infectious stage. We combined flagellum purification with affinity-purification of surface-exposed proteins to conduct independent proteomic analyses of the flagellum surface and matrix fractions. The proteins identified encompass a broad range of molecular functionalities, including many predicted to function in signaling. Immunofluorescence and RNA interference studies demonstrate flagellum localization and function for proteins identified and provide insight into mechanisms of flagellum attachment and motility. The flagellum surface proteome includes many T. brucei-specific proteins and is enriched for proteins up-regulated in the mammalian-infectious stage of the parasite life-cycle. The combined results indicate that the flagellum surface presents a diverse and dynamic host-parasite interface that is well-suited for host-parasite signaling. PMID:21685506

  2. The Molecular Dynamics of Trypanosoma brucei UDP-Galactose 4′-Epimerase: A Drug Target for African Sleeping Sickness

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Aaron J; Durrant, Jacob D; Pierce, Levi C T; McCorvie, Thomas J; Timson, David J; McCammon, J Andrew

    2012-01-01

    During the past century, several epidemics of human African trypanosomiasis, a deadly disease caused by the protist Trypanosoma brucei, have afflicted sub-Saharan Africa. Over 10 000 new victims are reported each year, with hundreds of thousands more at risk. As current drug treatments are either highly toxic or ineffective, novel trypanocides are urgently needed. The T. brucei galactose synthesis pathway is one potential therapeutic target. Although galactose is essential for T. brucei survival, the parasite lacks the transporters required to intake galactose from the environment. UDP-galactose 4′-epimerase (TbGalE) is responsible for the epimerization of UDP-glucose to UDP-galactose and is therefore of great interest to medicinal chemists. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the atomistic motions of TbGalE in both the apo and holo states. The sampled conformations and protein dynamics depend not only on the presence of a UDP-sugar ligand, but also on the chirality of the UDP-sugar C4 atom. This dependence provides important insights into TbGalE function and may help guide future computer-aided drug discovery efforts targeting this protein. PMID:22487100

  3. Pharmacological Validation of Trypanosoma brucei Phosphodiesterases B1 and B2 as Druggable Targets for African Sleeping Sickness

    PubMed Central

    Bland, Nicholas D.; Wang, Cuihua; Tallman, Craig; Gustafson, Alden E.; Wang, Zhouxi; Ashton, Trent D.; Ochiana, Stefan O.; McAllister, Gregory; Cotter, Kristina; Fang, Anna P.; Gechijian, Lara; Garceau, Norman; Gangurde, Rajiv; Ortenberg, Ron; Ondrechen, Mary Jo; Campbell, Robert K.; Pollastri, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    Neglected tropical disease drug discovery requires application of pragmatic and efficient methods for development of new therapeutic agents. In this report we describe our target repurposing efforts for the essential phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzymes TbrPDEB1 and TbrPDEB2 of Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent for human African trypanosomiasis (HAT). We describe protein expression and purification, assay development, and benchmark screening of a collection of 20 established human PDE inhibitors. We disclose that the human PDE4 inhibitor piclamilast, and some of its analogs, show modest inhibition of TbrPDEB1 and B2, and quickly kill the bloodstream form of the subspecies T. brucei brucei. We also report the development of a homology model of TbrPDEB1 that is useful for understanding the compound-enzyme interactions and for comparing the parasitic and human enzymes. Our profiling and early medicinal chemistry results strongly suggest that human PDE4 chemotypes represent a better starting point for optimization of TbrPDEB inhibitors than those that target any other human PDEs. PMID:22023548

  4. S-adenosylmethionine synthetase in bloodstream Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Yarlett, N; Garofalo, J; Goldberg, B; Ciminelli, M A; Ruggiero, V; Sufrin, J R; Bacchi, C J

    1993-03-24

    S-adenosylmethionine synthetase was studied from bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei brucei, the agent of African sleeping sickness. Two isoforms of the enzyme were evident from Eadie Hofstee and Hanes-Woolf plots of varying ATP or methionine concentrations. In the range 10-250 microM the Km for methionine was 20 microM, and this changed to 200 microM for the range 0.5-5.0 mM. In the range 10-250 microM the Km for ATP was 53 microM, and this changed to 1.75 mM for the range 0.5-5.0 mM. The trypanosome enzyme had a molecular weight of 145 kDa determined by agarose gel filtration. Methionine analogs including selenomethionine, L-2-amino-4-methoxy-cis but-3-enoic acid and ethionine acted as competitive inhibitors of methionine and as weak substrates when tested in the absence of methionine with [14C]ATP. The enzyme was not inducible in procyclic trypomastigotes in vitro, and the enzyme half-life was > 6 h. T. b. brucei AdoMet synthetase was inhibited by AdoMet (Ki 240 microM). The relative insensitivity of the trypanosome enzyme to control by product inhibition indicates it is markedly different from mammalian isoforms of the enzyme which are highly sensitive to AdoMet. Since trypanosomes treated with the ornithine decarboxylase antagonist DL-alpha-difluoromethylornithine accumulate AdoMet and dcAdoMet (final concentration approximately 5 mM), this enzyme may be the critical drug target linking inhibition of polyamine synthesis to disruption of AdoMet metabolism. PMID:8457607

  5. Unfolded Protein Response Pathways in Bloodstream-Form Trypanosoma brucei?

    PubMed

    Tiengwe, Calvin; Brown, Abigail E N A; Bangs, James D

    2015-11-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a stress mechanism to cope with misfolded proteins in the early secretory pathway, the hallmark being transcriptional upregulation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) molecular chaperones such as BiP and protein disulfide isomerase. Despite the lack of transcriptional regulation and the absence of the classical UPR machinery, African trypanosomes apparently respond to persistent ER stress by a UPR-like response, including upregulation of BiP, and a related spliced leader silencing (SLS) response whereby SL RNA transcription is shut down. Initially observed by knockdown of the secretory protein translocation machinery, both responses are also induced by chemical agents known to elicit UPR in mammalian cells (H. Goldshmidt, D. Matas, A. Kabi, A. Carmi, R. Hope, S. Michaeli, PLoS Pathog 6:e1000731, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1000731). As these findings were generated primarily in procyclic-stage trypanosomes, we have investigated both responses in pathogenic bloodstream-stage parasites. RNA interference (RNAi) silencing of the core translocon subunit Trypanosoma brucei Sec61α (TbSec61α) failed to induce either response. Interestingly, cell growth halted within 16 h of silencing, but sufficient TbSec61α remained to allow full competence for translocation of nascent secretory proteins for up to 24 h, indicating that replication is finely coupled with the capacity to synthesize and transport secretory cargo. Tunicamycin and thapsigargin at concentrations compatible with short-term (4 h) and long-term (24 h) viability also failed to induce any of the indicators of UPR-like or SLS responses. Dithiothreitol (DTT) was lethal at all concentrations tested. These results indicate that UPR-like and SLS responses to persistent ER stress do not occur in bloodstream-stage trypanosomes. PMID:26318397

  6. Unfolded Protein Response Pathways in Bloodstream-Form Trypanosoma brucei?

    PubMed Central

    Tiengwe, Calvin; Brown, Abigail E. N. A.

    2015-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a stress mechanism to cope with misfolded proteins in the early secretory pathway, the hallmark being transcriptional upregulation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) molecular chaperones such as BiP and protein disulfide isomerase. Despite the lack of transcriptional regulation and the absence of the classical UPR machinery, African trypanosomes apparently respond to persistent ER stress by a UPR-like response, including upregulation of BiP, and a related spliced leader silencing (SLS) response whereby SL RNA transcription is shut down. Initially observed by knockdown of the secretory protein translocation machinery, both responses are also induced by chemical agents known to elicit UPR in mammalian cells (H. Goldshmidt, D. Matas, A. Kabi, A. Carmi, R. Hope, S. Michaeli, PLoS Pathog 6:e1000731, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1000731). As these findings were generated primarily in procyclic-stage trypanosomes, we have investigated both responses in pathogenic bloodstream-stage parasites. RNA interference (RNAi) silencing of the core translocon subunit Trypanosoma brucei Sec61α (TbSec61α) failed to induce either response. Interestingly, cell growth halted within 16 h of silencing, but sufficient TbSec61α remained to allow full competence for translocation of nascent secretory proteins for up to 24 h, indicating that replication is finely coupled with the capacity to synthesize and transport secretory cargo. Tunicamycin and thapsigargin at concentrations compatible with short-term (4 h) and long-term (24 h) viability also failed to induce any of the indicators of UPR-like or SLS responses. Dithiothreitol (DTT) was lethal at all concentrations tested. These results indicate that UPR-like and SLS responses to persistent ER stress do not occur in bloodstream-stage trypanosomes. PMID:26318397

  7. Synthesis and evaluation of analogs of the phenylpyridazinone NPD-001 as potent trypanosomal TbrPDEB1 phosphodiesterase inhibitors and in vitro trypanocidals.

    PubMed

    Veerman, Johan; van den Bergh, Toine; Orrling, Kristina M; Jansen, Chimed; Cos, Paul; Maes, Louis; Chatelain, Eric; Ioset, Jean-Robert; Edink, Ewald E; Tenor, Hermann; Seebeck, Thomas; de Esch, Iwan; Leurs, Rob; Sterk, Geert Jan

    2016-04-01

    Trypanosomal phosphodiesterases B1 and B2 (TbrPDEB1 and TbrPDEB2) play an important role in the life cycle of Trypanosoma brucei, the causative parasite of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), also known as African sleeping sickness. Knock down of both enzymes leads to cell cycle arrest and is lethal to the parasite. Recently, we reported the phenylpyridazinone, NPD-001, with low nanomolar IC50 values on both TbrPDEB1 (IC50: 4nM) and TbrPDEB2 (IC50: 3nM) (J. Infect. Dis.2012, 206, 229). In this study, we now report on the first structure activity relationships of a series of phenylpyridazinone analogs as TbrPDEB1 inhibitors. A selection of compounds was also shown to be anti-parasitic. Importantly, a good correlation between TbrPDEB1 IC50 and EC50 against the whole parasite was observed. Preliminary analysis of the SAR of selected compounds on TbrPDEB1 and human PDEs shows large differences which shows the potential for obtaining parasite selective PDE inhibitors. The results of these studies support the pharmacological validation of the Trypanosome PDEB family as novel therapeutic approach for HAT and provide as well valuable information for the design of potent TbrPDEB1 inhibitors that could be used for the treatment of this disease. PMID:26935942

  8. Structure of the trypanosome cyanide-insensitive alternative oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Shiba, Tomoo; Kido, Yasutoshi; Sakamoto, Kimitoshi; Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Tsuge, Chiaki; Tatsumi, Ryoko; Takahashi, Gen; Balogun, Emmanuel Oluwadare; Nara, Takeshi; Aoki, Takashi; Honma, Teruki; Tanaka, Akiko; Inoue, Masayuki; Matsuoka, Shigeru; Saimoto, Hiroyuki; Moore, Anthony L.; Harada, Shigeharu; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    In addition to haem copper oxidases, all higher plants, some algae, yeasts, molds, metazoans, and pathogenic microorganisms such as Trypanosoma brucei contain an additional terminal oxidase, the cyanide-insensitive alternative oxidase (AOX). AOX is a diiron carboxylate protein that catalyzes the four-electron reduction of dioxygen to water by ubiquinol. In T. brucei, a parasite that causes human African sleeping sickness, AOX plays a critical role in the survival of the parasite in its bloodstream form. Because AOX is absent from mammals, this protein represents a unique and promising therapeutic target. Despite its bioenergetic and medical importance, however, structural features of any AOX are yet to be elucidated. Here we report crystal structures of the trypanosomal alternative oxidase in the absence and presence of ascofuranone derivatives. All structures reveal that the oxidase is a homodimer with the nonhaem diiron carboxylate active site buried within a four-helix bundle. Unusually, the active site is ligated solely by four glutamate residues in its oxidized inhibitor-free state; however, inhibitor binding induces the ligation of a histidine residue. A highly conserved Tyr220 is within 4 Å of the active site and is critical for catalytic activity. All structures also reveal that there are two hydrophobic cavities per monomer. Both inhibitors bind to one cavity within 4 Å and 5 Å of the active site and Tyr220, respectively. A second cavity interacts with the inhibitor-binding cavity at the diiron center. We suggest that both cavities bind ubiquinol and along with Tyr220 are required for the catalytic cycle for O2 reduction. PMID:23487766

  9. Structure of the trypanosome cyanide-insensitive alternative oxidase.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Tomoo; Kido, Yasutoshi; Sakamoto, Kimitoshi; Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Tsuge, Chiaki; Tatsumi, Ryoko; Takahashi, Gen; Balogun, Emmanuel Oluwadare; Nara, Takeshi; Aoki, Takashi; Honma, Teruki; Tanaka, Akiko; Inoue, Masayuki; Matsuoka, Shigeru; Saimoto, Hiroyuki; Moore, Anthony L; Harada, Shigeharu; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2013-03-19

    In addition to haem copper oxidases, all higher plants, some algae, yeasts, molds, metazoans, and pathogenic microorganisms such as Trypanosoma brucei contain an additional terminal oxidase, the cyanide-insensitive alternative oxidase (AOX). AOX is a diiron carboxylate protein that catalyzes the four-electron reduction of dioxygen to water by ubiquinol. In T. brucei, a parasite that causes human African sleeping sickness, AOX plays a critical role in the survival of the parasite in its bloodstream form. Because AOX is absent from mammals, this protein represents a unique and promising therapeutic target. Despite its bioenergetic and medical importance, however, structural features of any AOX are yet to be elucidated. Here we report crystal structures of the trypanosomal alternative oxidase in the absence and presence of ascofuranone derivatives. All structures reveal that the oxidase is a homodimer with the nonhaem diiron carboxylate active site buried within a four-helix bundle. Unusually, the active site is ligated solely by four glutamate residues in its oxidized inhibitor-free state; however, inhibitor binding induces the ligation of a histidine residue. A highly conserved Tyr220 is within 4 Å of the active site and is critical for catalytic activity. All structures also reveal that there are two hydrophobic cavities per monomer. Both inhibitors bind to one cavity within 4 Å and 5 Å of the active site and Tyr220, respectively. A second cavity interacts with the inhibitor-binding cavity at the diiron center. We suggest that both cavities bind ubiquinol and along with Tyr220 are required for the catalytic cycle for O2 reduction. PMID:23487766

  10. Schizodeme and zymodeme analysis of trypanosomes of the subgenus Schizotrypanum from the bat.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, L F; Gonçalves, A M; Romanha, A J; Steindel, M; Pinto, A S

    1993-01-01

    Two stocks and nine clones of trypanosomes of the subgenus Schizotrypanum were analyzed based on their electrophoretic pattern of EcoR1 digestion products of kinetoplast DNA (k-DNA) minicircles (schizodeme) and isoenzymes (zymodeme). The trypanosome stocks were isolated from Phyllostomus hastatus bats collected in different locations in Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The k-DNA pattern showed major variations between stocks and microvariations among the clones. Furthermore, in one of several cloning attempts, two different populations could be isolated. Among the six enzymes studied, glucose phosphate isomerase presented different patterns for stocks and clones. No similarity was found among bat trypanosomes and Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum) cruzi standard zymodemes. This shows that bat trypanosomes are distinct from T. (S.) cruzi. PMID:8415566

  11. Structural Characterization and Epitope Mapping of the Glutamic Acid/Alanine-rich Protein from Trypanosoma congolense

    PubMed Central

    Loveless, Bianca C.; Mason, Jeremy W.; Sakurai, Tatsuya; Inoue, Noboru; Razavi, Morteza; Pearson, Terry W.; Boulanger, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosoma congolense is an African trypanosome that causes serious disease in cattle in Sub-Saharan Africa. The four major life cycle stages of T. congolense can be grown in vitro, which has led to the identification of several cell-surface molecules expressed on the parasite during its transit through the tsetse vector. One of these, glutamic acid/alanine-rich protein (GARP), is the first expressed on procyclic forms in the tsetse midgut and is of particular interest because it replaces the major surface coat molecule of bloodstream forms, the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) that protects the parasite membrane, and is involved in antigenic variation. Unlike VSG, however, the function of GARP is not known, which necessarily limits our understanding of parasite survival in the tsetse. Toward establishing the function of GARP, we report its three-dimensional structure solved by iodide phasing to a resolution of 1.65 Å. An extended helical bundle structure displays an unexpected and significant degree of homology to the core structure of VSG, the only other major surface molecule of trypanosomes to be structurally characterized. Immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoaffinity-tandem mass spectrometry were used in conjunction with monoclonal antibodies to map both non-surface-disposed and surface epitopes. Collectively, these studies enabled us to derive a model describing the orientation and assembly of GARP on the surface of trypanosomes. The data presented here suggest the possible structure-function relationships involved in replacement of the bloodstream form VSG by GARP as trypanosomes differentiate in the tsetse vector after a blood meal. PMID:21471223

  12. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) Method for Rapid Detection of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense

    PubMed Central

    Njiru, Zablon Kithinji; Mikosza, Andrew Stanislaw John; Armstrong, Tanya; Enyaru, John Charles; Ndung'u, Joseph Mathu; Thompson, Andrew Richard Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) of DNA is a novel technique that rapidly amplifies target DNA under isothermal conditions. In the present study, a LAMP test was designed from the serum resistance-associated (SRA) gene of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, the cause of the acute form of African sleeping sickness, and used to detect parasite DNA from processed and heat-treated infected blood samples. The SRA gene is specific to T. b. rhodesiense and has been shown to confer resistance to lysis by normal human serum. The assay was performed at 62°C for 1 h, using six primers that recognised eight targets. The template was varying concentrations of trypanosome DNA and supernatant from heat-treated infected blood samples. The resulting amplicons were detected using SYTO-9 fluorescence dye in a real-time thermocycler, visual observation after the addition of SYBR Green I, and gel electrophoresis. DNA amplification was detected within 35 min. The SRA LAMP test had an unequivocal detection limit of one pg of purified DNA (equivalent to 10 trypanosomes/ml) and 0.1 pg (1 trypanosome/ml) using heat-treated buffy coat, while the detection limit for conventional SRA PCR was ∼1,000 trypanosomes/ml. The expected LAMP amplicon was confirmed through restriction enzyme RsaI digestion, identical melt curves, and sequence analysis. The reproducibility of the SRA LAMP assay using water bath and heat-processed template, and the ease in results readout show great potential for the diagnosis of T. b. rhodesiense in endemic regions. PMID:18253475

  13. The spliceosomal PRP19 complex of trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Ambrósio, Daniela L.; Badjatia, Nitika; Günzl, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Summary In trypanosomes, mRNAs are processed by spliced leader (SL) trans splicing, in which a capped SL, derived from SL RNA, is spliced onto the 5′ end of each mRNA. This process is mediated by the spliceosome, a large and dynamic RNA-protein machinery consisting of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) and non-snRNP proteins. Due to early evolutionary divergence, the amino acid sequences of trypanosome splicing factors exhibit limited similarity to those of their eukaryotic orthologs making their bioinformatic identification challenging. Most of the ~ 60 protein components that have been characterized thus far are snRNP proteins because, in contrast to individual snRNPs, purification of intact spliceosomes has not been achieved yet. Here, we characterize the non-snRNP PRP19 complex of Trypanosoma brucei. We identified a complex that contained the core subunits PRP19, CDC5, PRL1, and SPF27, as well as PRP17, SKIP and PPIL1. Three of these proteins were newly annotated. The PRP19 complex was associated primarily with the activated spliceosome and, accordingly, SPF27 silencing blocked the first splicing step. Interestingly, SPF27 silencing caused an accumulation of SL RNA with a hypomethylated cap that closely resembled the defect observed previously upon depletion of the cyclin-dependent kinase CRK9, indicating that both proteins may function in spliceosome activation. PMID:25524563

  14. Detection of multiple drug-resistant Trypanosoma congolense populations in village cattle of south-east Mali

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tsetse fly-transmitted African animal trypanosomosis causes annual losses that run into billions of dollars. The disease is assumed to cause hunger and poverty in most sub-Saharan countries since it represents a serious impediment to sustainable livestock production. Both a cross-sectional and a longitudinal study were carried out from November to December 2007 to evaluate trypanosomosis risk and susceptibility of trypanosomes to trypanocidal drug treatment in village cattle populations in south-east Mali. Methods Eight purposively selected villages participated in the study. In each village, eight traps deployed along drainage lines over 24hour duration were used to catch tsetse. One hundred systematically selected cattle in the study villages were examined for trypanosomes. All trypanosome-positive cattle were randomly allocated into two treatment groups: a group treated with 0.5 mg/kg bw. isometamidium chloride (ISMM) and a group treated with 3.5 mg/kg bw. diminazene aceturate (DIM). The cattle were monitored for trypanosomes at day 14 and 28 post-treatment. Results Of the 796 cattle examined, 125 (15.7%) were trypanosome-positive. Village trypanosome prevalences ranged between 11% and 19%. There were no significant (p > 0.05) differences in the village trypanosome prevalences. Trypanosoma congolense was the dominant trypanosome species accounting for 73% (91/125) of the infections and T. vivax the remainder. Twenty (31.7%) of the 63 cattle on 0.5 mg/kg bw. ISMM treatment were still positive14 days post-treatment. Of the 43 aparasitaemic cattle monitored to day 28, 25.6% (11) became parasitaemic, resulting in a cumulative failure rate of 49.2% (31/63). Trypanosoma congolense accounted for 77.4% (24/31) of failed ISMM treatments. The 62 cattle treated with 3.5 mg/kg bw. DIM resulted in 30.6% (19/62) failed treatments. Although 42.2% (19/45) of T. congolense positive cattle did not respond to DIM treatment, all T. vivax positive cattle

  15. Computer-Aided Identification of Trypanosoma brucei Uridine Diphosphate Galactose 4′-Epimerase Inhibitors: Toward the Development of Novel Therapies for African Sleeping Sickness

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis, affects tens of thousands of sub-Saharan Africans. As current therapeutics are inadequate due to toxic side effects, drug resistance, and limited effectiveness, novel therapies are urgently needed. UDP-galactose 4′-epimerase (TbGalE), an enzyme of the Leloir pathway of galactose metabolism, is one promising T. brucei drug target. We here use the relaxed complex scheme, an advanced computer-docking methodology that accounts for full protein flexibility, to identify inhibitors of TbGalE. An initial hit rate of 62% was obtained at 100 μM, ultimately leading to the identification of 14 low-micromolar inhibitors. Thirteen of these inhibitors belong to a distinct series with a conserved binding motif that may prove useful in future drug design and optimization. PMID:20527952

  16. Cell Surface Proteomics Provides Insight into Stage-Specific Remodeling of the Host-Parasite Interface in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Shimogawa, Michelle M; Saada, Edwin A; Vashisht, Ajay A; Barshop, William D; Wohlschlegel, James A; Hill, Kent L

    2015-07-01

    African trypanosomes are devastating human and animal pathogens transmitted by tsetse flies between mammalian hosts. The trypanosome surface forms a critical host interface that is essential for sensing and adapting to diverse host environments. However, trypanosome surface protein composition and diversity remain largely unknown. Here, we use surface labeling, affinity purification, and proteomic analyses to describe cell surface proteomes from insect-stage and mammalian bloodstream-stage Trypanosoma brucei. The cell surface proteomes contain most previously characterized surface proteins. We additionally identify a substantial number of novel proteins, whose functions are unknown, indicating the parasite surface proteome is larger and more diverse than generally appreciated. We also show stage-specific expression for individual paralogs within several protein families, suggesting that fine-tuned remodeling of the parasite surface allows adaptation to diverse host environments, while still fulfilling universally essential cellular needs. Our surface proteome analyses complement existing transcriptomic, proteomic, and in silico analyses by highlighting proteins that are surface-exposed and thereby provide a major step forward in defining the host-parasite interface. PMID:25963835

  17. Activities of Psilostachyin A and Cynaropicrin against Trypanosoma cruzi In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Cristiane França; Batista, Denise da Gama Jaen; De Araújo, Julianna Siciliano; Batista, Marcos Meuser; Lionel, Jessica; de Souza, Elen Mello; Hammer, Erica Ripoll; da Silva, Patricia Bernardino; De Mieri, Maria; Adams, Michael; Zimmermann, Stefanie; Hamburger, Matthias; Brun, Reto; Schühly, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo activities against Trypanosoma cruzi were evaluated for two sesquiterpene lactones: psilostachyin A and cynaropicrin. Cynaropicrin had previously been shown to potently inhibit African trypanosomes in vivo, and psilostachyin A had been reported to show in vivo effects against T. cruzi, albeit in another test design. In vitro data showed that cynaropicrin was more effective than psilostachyin A. Ultrastructural alterations induced by cynaropicrin included shedding events, detachment of large portions of the plasma membrane, and vesicular bodies and large vacuoles containing membranous structures, suggestive of parasite autophagy. Acute toxicity studies showed that one of two mice died at a cynaropicrin dose of 400 mg/kg of body weight given intraperitoneally (i.p.). Although no major plasma biochemical alterations could be detected, histopathology demonstrated that the liver was the most affected organ in cynaropicrin-treated animals. Although cynaropicrin was as effective as benznidazole against trypomastigotes in vitro, the treatment (once or twice a day) of T. cruzi-infected mice (up to 50 mg/kg/day cynaropicrin) did not suppress parasitemia or protect against mortality induced by the Y and Colombiana strains. Psilostachyin A (0.5 to 50 mg/kg/day given once a day) was not effective in the acute model of T. cruzi infection (Y strain), reaching 100% animal mortality. Our data demonstrate that although it is very promising against African trypanosomes, cynaropicrin does not show efficacy compared to benznidazole in acute mouse models of T. cruzi infection. PMID:23939901

  18. Epidemiology of Sleeping Sickness in Boffa (Guinea): Where Are the Trypanosomes?

    PubMed Central

    Kagbadouno, Moise Saa; Camara, Mamadou; Rouamba, Jeremi; Rayaisse, Jean-Baptiste; Traoré, Ibrahima Sory; Camara, Oumou; Onikoyamou, Mory Fassou; Courtin, Fabrice; Ravel, Sophie; de Meeûs, Thierry; Bucheton, Bruno; Jamonneau, Vincent; Solano, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) in West Africa is a lethal, neglected disease caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense transmitted by the tsetse Glossina palpalis gambiensis. Although the littoral part of Guinea with its typical mangrove habitat is the most prevalent area in West Africa, very few data are available on the epidemiology of the disease in such biotopes. As part of a HAT elimination project in Guinea, we carried a cross-sectional study of the distribution and abundance of people, livestock, tsetse and trypanosomes in the focus of Boffa. An exhaustive census of the human population was done, together with spatial mapping of the area. Entomological data were collected, a human medical survey was organized together with a survey in domestic animals. In total, 45 HAT cases were detected out of 14445 people who attended the survey, these latter representing 50.9% of the total population. Potential additional carriers of T. b. gambiense were also identified by the trypanolysis test (14 human subjects and two domestic animals). No trypanosome pathogenic to animals were found, neither in the 874 tsetse dissected nor in the 300 domestic animals sampled. High densities of tsetse were found in places frequented by humans, such as pirogue jetties, narrow mangrove channels and watering points. The prevalence of T. b. gambiense in humans, combined to low attendance of the population at risk to medical surveys, and to an additional proportion of human and animal carriers of T. b. gambiense who are not treated, highlights the limits of strategies targeting HAT patients only. In order to stop T. b. gambiense transmission, vector control should be added to the current strategy of case detection and treatment. Such an integrated strategy will combine medical surveillance to find and treat cases, and vector control activities to protect people from the infective bites of tsetse. PMID:23272259

  19. Specific Cell Targeting Therapy Bypasses Drug Resistance Mechanisms in African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Unciti-Broceta, Juan D.; Arias, José L.; Maceira, José; Soriano, Miguel; Ortiz-González, Matilde; Hernández-Quero, José; Muñóz-Torres, Manuel; de Koning, Harry P.; Magez, Stefan; Garcia-Salcedo, José A.

    2015-01-01

    African trypanosomiasis is a deadly neglected disease caused by the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies are characterized by high drug toxicity and increasing drug resistance mainly associated with loss-of-function mutations in the transporters involved in drug import. The introduction of new antiparasitic drugs into therapeutic use is a slow and expensive process. In contrast, specific targeting of existing drugs could represent a more rapid and cost-effective approach for neglected disease treatment, impacting through reduced systemic toxicity and circumventing resistance acquired through impaired compound uptake. We have generated nanoparticles of chitosan loaded with the trypanocidal drug pentamidine and coated by a single domain nanobody that specifically targets the surface of African trypanosomes. Once loaded into this nanocarrier, pentamidine enters trypanosomes through endocytosis instead of via classical cell surface transporters. The curative dose of pentamidine-loaded nanobody-chitosan nanoparticles was 100-fold lower than pentamidine alone in a murine model of acute African trypanosomiasis. Crucially, this new formulation displayed undiminished in vitro and in vivo activity against a trypanosome cell line resistant to pentamidine as a result of mutations in the surface transporter aquaglyceroporin 2. We conclude that this new drug delivery system increases drug efficacy and has the ability to overcome resistance to some anti-protozoal drugs. PMID:26110623

  20. Lectins discriminate between pathogenic and nonpathogenic South American trypanosomes

    SciTech Connect

    de Miranda Santos, I.K.; Pereira, M.E.

    1984-09-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates of Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma rangeli, and Trypanosoma conorhini were analyzed by a micro-agglutination assay employing 27 highly purified lectins and by binding assays using various /sup 125/I-labeled lectins. The following seven lectins discriminated between the trypanosomes: 1) tomato lectin (an N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-binding protein), both in purified form and as crude tomato juice; 2) Bauhinea purpurea and Sophora japonica lectins (both N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding proteins), which selectively agglutinated T. cruzi; 3) Vicia villosa (an N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding protein) which was specific for T. rangeli; 4) peanut lectin (a D-galactose-binding protein) both in purified form and as crude saline extract; and 5) Ulex europaeus and Lotus tetragonolobus (both L-fucose-binding proteins) lectins which reacted only with T. conorhini. Binding studies with 125I-labeled lectins were performed to find whether unagglutinated cells of the three different species of trypanosomes might have receptors for these lectins, in which case absence of agglutination could be due to a peculiar arrangement of the receptors. These assays essentially confirmed the agglutination experiments.

  1. Discovery of a Carbazole-Derived Lead Drug for Human African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Sarah M.; Purmal, Andrei; Pollastri, Michael; Mensa-Wilmot, Kojo

    2016-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei causes the fatal illness human African trypanosomiasis (HAT). Standard of care medications currently used to treat HAT have severe limitations, and there is a need to find new chemical entities that are active against infections of T. brucei. Following a “drug repurposing” approach, we tested anti-trypanosomal effects of carbazole-derived compounds called “Curaxins”. In vitro screening of 26 compounds revealed 22 with nanomolar potency against axenically cultured bloodstream trypanosomes. In a murine model of HAT, oral administration of compound 1 cured the disease. These studies established 1 as a lead for development of drugs against HAT. Pharmacological time-course studies revealed the primary effect of 1 to be concurrent inhibition of mitosis coupled with aberrant licensing of S-phase entry. Consequently, polyploid trypanosomes containing 8C equivalent of DNA per nucleus and three or four kinetoplasts were produced. These effects of 1 on the trypanosome are reminiscent of “mitotic slippage” or endoreplication observed in some other eukaryotes. PMID:27561392

  2. Discovery of a Carbazole-Derived Lead Drug for Human African Trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sarah M; Purmal, Andrei; Pollastri, Michael; Mensa-Wilmot, Kojo

    2016-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei causes the fatal illness human African trypanosomiasis (HAT). Standard of care medications currently used to treat HAT have severe limitations, and there is a need to find new chemical entities that are active against infections of T. brucei. Following a "drug repurposing" approach, we tested anti-trypanosomal effects of carbazole-derived compounds called "Curaxins". In vitro screening of 26 compounds revealed 22 with nanomolar potency against axenically cultured bloodstream trypanosomes. In a murine model of HAT, oral administration of compound 1 cured the disease. These studies established 1 as a lead for development of drugs against HAT. Pharmacological time-course studies revealed the primary effect of 1 to be concurrent inhibition of mitosis coupled with aberrant licensing of S-phase entry. Consequently, polyploid trypanosomes containing 8C equivalent of DNA per nucleus and three or four kinetoplasts were produced. These effects of 1 on the trypanosome are reminiscent of "mitotic slippage" or endoreplication observed in some other eukaryotes. PMID:27561392

  3. Isolation and phylogenetic relationships of bat trypanosomes from different biomes in Mato Grosso, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Marcili, Arlei; da Costa, Andrea P; Soares, Herbert S; Acosta, Igor da C L; de Lima, Julia T R; Minervino, Antonio H H; Melo, Andréia T L; Aguiar, Daniel M; Pacheco, Richard C; Gennari, Solange M

    2013-12-01

    In the order Chiroptera, more than 30 trypanosome species belonging to the subgenera Herpetosoma, Schizotrypanum, Megatrypanum, and Trypanozoon have been described. The species Trypanosoma cruzi , Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei, and Trypanosoma dionisii are the most common in bats and belong to the Schizotrypanum subgenus. Bats from 2 different biomes, Pantanal and Amazonia/Cerrado in the state of Mato Grosso, Brazil, were evaluated according to the presence of trypanosome parasites by means of hemoculture and PCR in primary samples (blood samples). A total of 211 bats from 20 different species were caught and the trypanosome prevalence, evaluated through hemoculture, was 9.0% (19), 15.5% (13), and 4.8% (6) in the municipalities of Confresa (Amazonia/Cerrado biome) and Poconé (Pantanal biome). Among the 123 primary samples obtained from the bats, only 3 (2.4%) were positive. Phylogenetic analysis using trypanosomatid barcoding (V7V8 region of SSU rDNA) identified all the isolates and primary samples as T. c. marinkellei. The sequences of the isolates were segregated according to the bat host genus or species and suggest that co-evolutionary patterns exist between hosts and parasites. Further studies in different Brazilian regions and biomes need to be conducted in order to gain real understanding of the diversity of trypanosomes in bats. PMID:23859496

  4. Phylogenetic Analysis of Bolivian Bat Trypanosomes of the Subgenus Schizotrypanum Based on Cytochrome b Sequence and Minicircle Analyses

    PubMed Central

    García, Lineth; Ortiz, Sylvia; Osorio, Gonzalo; Torrico, Mary Cruz; Torrico, Faustino; Solari, Aldo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the phylogenetic relationships of trypanosomes present in blood samples of Bolivian Carollia bats. Eighteen cloned stocks were isolated from 115 bats belonging to Carollia perspicillata (Phyllostomidae) from three Amazonian areas of the Chapare Province of Bolivia and studied by xenodiagnosis using the vectors Rhodnius robustus and Triatoma infestans (Trypanosoma cruzi marenkellei) or haemoculture (Trypanosoma dionisii). The PCR DNA amplified was analyzed by nucleotide sequences of maxicircles encoding cytochrome b and by means of the molecular size of hyper variable regions of minicircles. Ten samples were classified as Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei and 8 samples as Trypanosoma dionisii. The two species have a different molecular size profile with respect to the amplified regions of minicircles and also with respect to Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli used for comparative purpose. We conclude the presence of two species of bat trypanosomes in these samples, which can clearly be identified by the methods used in this study. The presence of these trypanosomes in Amazonian bats is discussed. PMID:22590570

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of Bolivian bat trypanosomes of the subgenus schizotrypanum based on cytochrome B sequence and minicircle analyses.

    PubMed

    García, Lineth; Ortiz, Sylvia; Osorio, Gonzalo; Torrico, Mary Cruz; Torrico, Faustino; Solari, Aldo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the phylogenetic relationships of trypanosomes present in blood samples of Bolivian Carollia bats. Eighteen cloned stocks were isolated from 115 bats belonging to Carollia perspicillata (Phyllostomidae) from three Amazonian areas of the Chapare Province of Bolivia and studied by xenodiagnosis using the vectors Rhodnius robustus and Triatoma infestans (Trypanosoma cruzi marenkellei) or haemoculture (Trypanosoma dionisii). The PCR DNA amplified was analyzed by nucleotide sequences of maxicircles encoding cytochrome b and by means of the molecular size of hyper variable regions of minicircles. Ten samples were classified as Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei and 8 samples as Trypanosoma dionisii. The two species have a different molecular size profile with respect to the amplified regions of minicircles and also with respect to Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli used for comparative purpose. We conclude the presence of two species of bat trypanosomes in these samples, which can clearly be identified by the methods used in this study. The presence of these trypanosomes in Amazonian bats is discussed. PMID:22590570

  6. Morphology and aspects of growth of a trypanosome transmitted by the marine leech Johanssonia arctica (Piscicolidae) from Northern Norway.

    PubMed

    Karlsbakk, Egil; Haugen, Eli; Nylund, Are

    2005-09-01

    The fish leech Johanssonia arctica (Johansson, 1898) was collected from king crabs Paralithodes camtschaticus (Tilesius, 1815) in Finnmark, N Norway, and allowed to feed on experimental fish hosts in the laboratory. This leech ingested blood from laboratory-reared cod (Gadus morhua) and halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus). Some experimental halibut acquired trypanosome infection, with parasitaemia between ca. 500 and 60,000 trypanosomes ml(-1). The trypanosomes were of variable size and measured 39-90 microm (mean 57 microm) ca. 81 days post-infection. Characteristic features are cell striation, refractile cytoplasmic granules, anterior nucleus and a relatively long (ca. 6 microm, max 9 microm) distance from the posterior end to the kinetoplast. Following growth, the trypanosomes became increasingly slender, with fewer striae and a nucleus position less pronounced anterior. The trypanosome is considered distinct from a type transmitted by the leech Calliobdella nodulifera (Malm, 1863) in the NE Atlantic, but is regarded conspecific with a trypanosome transmitted by J. arctica in the NW Atlantic. This trypanosome has in the past been identified as Trypanosoma murmanensis Nikitin, 1927, a poorly described species. T. murmanensis cannot be recognized with certainty among the trypanosomes transmitted by C. nodulifera and J. arctica respectively. We propose that the J. arctica-transmitted species is considered T. murmanensis Nikitin, 1927 sensu stricto. PMID:16270801

  7. Active site mapping, biochemical properties and subcellular localization of rhodesain, the major cysteine protease of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense.

    PubMed

    Caffrey, C R; Hansell, E; Lucas, K D; Brinen, L S; Alvarez Hernandez, A; Cheng, J; Gwaltney, S L; Roush, W R; Stierhof, Y D; Bogyo, M; Steverding, D; McKerrow, J H

    2001-11-01

    Cysteine protease activity of African trypanosome parasites is a target for new chemotherapy using synthetic protease inhibitors. To support this effort and further characterize the enzyme, we expressed and purified rhodesain, the target protease of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (MVAT4 strain), in reagent quantities from Pichia pastoris. Rhodesain was secreted as an active, mature protease. Site-directed mutagenesis of a cryptic glycosylation motif not previously identified allowed production of rhodesain suitable for crystallization. An invariable ER(A/V)FNAA motif in the pro-peptide sequence of rhodesain was identified as being unique to the genus Trypanosoma. Antibodies to rhodesain localized the protease in the lysosome and identified a 40-kDa protein in long slender forms of T. b. rhodesiense and all life-cycle stages of T. b. brucei. With the latter parasite, protease expression was five times greater in short stumpy trypanosomes than in the other stages. Radiolabeled active site-directed inhibitors identified brucipain as the major cysteine protease in T. b. brucei. Peptidomimetic vinyl sulfone and epoxide inhibitors designed to interact with the S2, S1 and S' subsites of the active site cleft revealed differences between rhodesain and the related trypanosome protease cruzain. Using fluorogenic dipeptidyl substrates, rhodesain and cruzain had acid pH optima, but unlike some mammalian cathepsins retained significant activity and stability up to pH 8.0, consistent with a possible extracellular function. S2 subsite mapping of rhodesain and cruzain with fluorogenic peptidyl substrates demonstrates that the presence of alanine rather than glutamate at S2 prevents rhodesain from cleaving substrates in which P2 is arginine. PMID:11704274

  8. Inositol phosphate pathway controls transcription of telomeric expression sites in trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Cestari, Igor; Stuart, Ken

    2015-05-26

    African trypanosomes evade clearance by host antibodies by periodically changing their variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat. They transcribe only one VSG gene at a time from 1 of about 20 telomeric expression sites (ESs). They undergo antigenic variation by switching transcription between telomeric ESs or by recombination of the VSG gene expressed. We show that the inositol phosphate (IP) pathway controls transcription of telomeric ESs and VSG antigenic switching in Trypanosoma brucei. Conditional knockdown of phosphatidylinositol 5-kinase (TbPIP5K) or phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphatase (TbPIP5Pase) or overexpression of phospholipase C (TbPLC) derepresses numerous silent ESs in T. brucei bloodstream forms. The derepression is specific to telomeric ESs, and it coincides with an increase in the number of colocalizing telomeric and RNA polymerase I foci in the nucleus. Monoallelic VSG transcription resumes after reexpression of TbPIP5K; however, most of the resultant cells switched the VSG gene expressed. TbPIP5K, TbPLC, their substrates, and products localize to the plasma membrane, whereas TbPIP5Pase localizes to the nucleus proximal to telomeres. TbPIP5Pase associates with repressor/activator protein 1 (TbRAP1), and their telomeric silencing function is altered by TbPIP5K knockdown. These results show that specific steps in the IP pathway control ES transcription and antigenic switching in T. brucei by epigenetic regulation of telomere silencing. PMID:25964327

  9. Trypanosoma teixeirae: A new species belonging to the T. cruzi clade causing trypanosomosis in an Australian little red flying fox (Pteropus scapulatus).

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Amanda D; Mackie, John T; Stenner, Robyn; Gillett, Amber; Irwin, Peter; Ryan, Una

    2016-06-15

    Little is known about the genetic diversity and pathogenicity of trypanosomes in Australian bats. Recently a novel trypanosome species was identified in an adult female little red flying fox (Pteropus scapulatus) with clinical and pathological evidence of trypanosomosis. The present study used morphology and molecular methods to demonstrate that this trypanosome is a distinct species and we propose the name Trypanosoma teixeirae sp. n. Morphological comparison showed that its circulating trypomastigotes were significantly different from those of Trypanosoma pteropi and Trypanosoma hipposideri, two species previously described from Australian bats. Genetic information was not available for T. pteropi and T. hipposideri but phylogenetic analyses at the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and glycosomal glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase (gGAPDH) loci indicated that T. teixeirae sp. n. was genetically distinct and clustered with other bat-derived trypanosome species within the Trypanosoma cruzi clade. PMID:27198803

  10. Phylogenetic analysis of the Trypanosoma genus based on the heat-shock protein 70 gene.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Jorge; Fernández-Calienes, Aymé; Montalvo, Ana Margarita; Maes, Ilse; Deborggraeve, Stijn; Büscher, Philippe; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Van der Auwera, Gert

    2016-09-01

    Trypanosome evolution was so far essentially studied on the basis of phylogenetic analyses of small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU-rRNA) and glycosomal glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gGAPDH) genes. We used for the first time the 70kDa heat-shock protein gene (hsp70) to investigate the phylogenetic relationships among 11 Trypanosoma species on the basis of 1380 nucleotides from 76 sequences corresponding to 65 strains. We also constructed a phylogeny based on combined datasets of SSU-rDNA, gGAPDH and hsp70 sequences. The obtained clusters can be correlated with the sections and subgenus classifications of mammal-infecting trypanosomes except for Trypanosoma theileri and Trypanosoma rangeli. Our analysis supports the classification of Trypanosoma species into clades rather than in sections and subgenera, some of which being polyphyletic. Nine clades were recognized: Trypanosoma carassi, Trypanosoma congolense, Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma grayi, Trypanosoma lewisi, T. rangeli, T. theileri, Trypanosoma vivax and Trypanozoon. These results are consistent with existing knowledge of the genus' phylogeny. Within the T. cruzi clade, three groups of T. cruzi discrete typing units could be clearly distinguished, corresponding to TcI, TcIII, and TcII+V+VI, while support for TcIV was lacking. Phylogenetic analyses based on hsp70 demonstrated that this molecular marker can be applied for discriminating most of the Trypanosoma species and clades. PMID:27180897

  11. Screening North American plant extracts in vitro against Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent for Human African Trypanosomiasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural products extracts from 522 plants collected from different parts of the North America were screened in vitro against trypamastigote forms of Trypanosoma brucei. The active extracts(150)with >90% inhibition at 20ug/mL concentrations from the plants namely, Alnus rubra, Hoita macrostachya, S...

  12. Widespread occurrence of Trypanosoma vivax in bovines of tsetse- as well as non-tsetse-infested regions of Ethiopia: a reason for concern?

    PubMed

    Fikru, Regassa; Goddeeris, Bruno Maria; Delespaux, Vincent; Moti, Yohannes; Tadesse, Aster; Bekana, Merga; Claes, Filip; De Deken, Reginald; Büscher, Philippe

    2012-12-21

    A cross-sectional study was undertaken to assess the prevalence of bovine trypanosomosis in some tsetse-infested and tsetse-free areas of Ethiopia. From August 2010 till April 2011, a total of 1524 animals were parasitologically examined and compared by the haematocrit centrifugation technique (Woo test) and polymerase chain reaction (ITS-1 PCR). The ITS-1 PCR was more sensitive and more accurate in species identification than the Woo test. In ITS-1 PCR, an overall trypanosome prevalence of 31.0% was observed that is significantly (P<0.001) higher than in the Woo test (5.3%). Trypanosoma vivax was the predominant taxon (24.9%), followed by T. theileri (6.0%), T. congolense (2.9%) and Trypanozoon (1.6%). Mixed infections were quite common (14% of all infections). The overall prevalence of trypanosome infections in tsetse area (32.4%) was not different from non-tsetse area (30.5%) neither were the prevalences of T. vivax in both areas (respectively 22.6% and 25.7%). With these high prevalences, bovine trypanosomosis continues to hinder animal production and productivity in Ethiopia, both in tsetse-infested and non-infested parts of the country. Attempts to control African trypanosomosis should also pay attention to mechanically transmitted pathogenic trypanosomes and should adopt the most advanced molecular tests for species identification. PMID:22858227

  13. A global sensitivity analysis for African sleeping sickness

    PubMed Central

    DAVIS, STEPHEN; AKSOY, SERAP; GALVANI, ALISON

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY African sleeping sickness is a parasitic disease transmitted through the bites of tsetse flies of the genus Glossina. We constructed mechanistic models for the basic reproduction number, R0, of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, respectively the causative agents of West and East African human sleeping sickness. We present global sensitivity analyses of these models that rank the importance of the biological parameters that may explain variation in R0, using parameter ranges based on literature, field data and expertize out of Uganda. For West African sleeping sickness, our results indicate that the proportion of bloodmeals taken from humans by Glossina fuscipes fuscipes is the most important factor, suggesting that differences in the exposure of humans to tsetse are fundamental to the distribution of T. b. gambiense. The second ranked parameter for T. b. gambiense and the highest ranked for T. b. rhodesiense was the proportion of Glossina refractory to infection. This finding underlines the possible implications of recent work showing that nutritionally stressed tsetse are more susceptible to trypanosome infection, and provides broad support for control strategies in development that are aimed at increasing refractoriness in tsetse flies. We note though that for T. b. rhodesiense the population parameters for tsetse – species composition, survival and abundance – were ranked almost as highly as the proportion refractory, and that the model assumed regular treatment of livestock with trypanocides as an established practice in the areas of Uganda experiencing East African sleeping sickness. PMID:21078220

  14. Control of gene expression in trypanosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Vanhamme, L; Pays, E

    1995-01-01

    Trypanosomes are protozoan agents of major parasitic diseases such as Chagas' disease in South America and sleeping sickness of humans and nagana disease of cattle in Africa. They are transmitted to mammalian hosts by specific insect vectors. Their life cycle consists of a succession of differentiation and growth phases requiring regulated gene expression to adapt to the changing extracellular environment. Typical of such stage-specific expression is that of the major surface antigens of Trypanosoma brucei, procyclin in the procyclic (insect) form and the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) in the bloodstream (mammalian) form. In trypanosomes, the regulation of gene expression is effected mainly at posttranscriptional levels, since primary transcription of most of the genes occurs in long polycistronic units and is constitutive. The transcripts are processed by transsplicing and polyadenylation under the influence of intergenic polypyrimidine tracts. These events show some developmental regulation. Untranslated sequences of the mRNAs seem to play a prominent role in the stage-specific control of individual gene expression, through a modulation of mRNA abundance. The VSG and procyclin transcription units exhibit particular features that are probably related to the need for a high level of expression. The promoters and RNA polymerase driving the expression of these units resemble those of the ribosomal genes. Their mutually exclusive expression is ensured by controls operating at several levels, including RNA elongation. Antigenic variation in the bloodstream is achieved through DNA rearrangements or alternative activation of the telomeric VSG gene expression sites. Recent discoveries, such as the existence of a novel nucleotide in telomeric DNA and the generation of point mutations in VSG genes, have shed new light on the mechanisms and consequences of antigenic variation. PMID:7603410

  15. The essential neutral sphingomyelinase is involved in the trafficking of the variant surface glycoprotein in the bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Young, Simon A; Smith, Terry K

    2010-01-01

    Sphingomyelin is the main sphingolipid in Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. In vitro and in vivo characterization of the T. brucei neutral sphingomyelinase demonstrates that it is directly involved in sphingomyelin catabolism. Gene knockout studies in the bloodstream form of the parasite indicate that the neutral sphingomyelinase is essential for growth and survival, thus highlighting that the de novo biosynthesis of ceramide is unable to compensate for the loss of sphingomyelin catabolism. The phenotype of the conditional knockout has given new insights into the highly active endocytic and exocytic pathways in the bloodstream form of T. brucei. Hence, the formation of ceramide in the endoplasmic reticulum affects post-Golgi sorting and rate of deposition of newly synthesized GPI-anchored variant surface glycoprotein on the cell surface. This directly influences the corresponding rate of endocytosis, via the recycling endosomes, of pre-existing cell surface variant surface glycoprotein. The trypanosomes use this coupled endocytic and exocytic mechanism to maintain the cell density of its crucial variant surface glycoprotein protective coat. TbnSMase is therefore genetically validated as a drug target against African trypanosomes, and suggests that interfering with the endocytic transport of variant surface glycoprotein is a highly desirable strategy for drug development against African trypanosomasis. PMID:20398210

  16. The TgsGP gene is essential for resistance to human serum in Trypanosoma brucei gambiense.

    PubMed

    Capewell, Paul; Clucas, Caroline; DeJesus, Eric; Kieft, Rudo; Hajduk, Stephen; Veitch, Nicola; Steketee, Pieter C; Cooper, Anneli; Weir, William; MacLeod, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei gambiense causes 97% of all cases of African sleeping sickness, a fatal disease of sub-Saharan Africa. Most species of trypanosome, such as T. b. brucei, are unable to infect humans due to the trypanolytic serum protein apolipoprotein-L1 (APOL1) delivered via two trypanosome lytic factors (TLF-1 and TLF-2). Understanding how T. b. gambiense overcomes these factors and infects humans is of major importance in the fight against this disease. Previous work indicated that a failure to take up TLF-1 in T. b. gambiense contributes to resistance to TLF-1, although another mechanism is required to overcome TLF-2. Here, we have examined a T. b. gambiense specific gene, TgsGP, which had previously been suggested, but not shown, to be involved in serum resistance. We show that TgsGP is essential for resistance to lysis as deletion of TgsGP in T. b. gambiense renders the parasites sensitive to human serum and recombinant APOL1. Deletion of TgsGP in T. b. gambiense modified to uptake TLF-1 showed sensitivity to TLF-1, APOL1 and human serum. Reintroducing TgsGP into knockout parasite lines restored resistance. We conclude that TgsGP is essential for human serum resistance in T. b. gambiense. PMID:24098129

  17. The TgsGP Gene Is Essential for Resistance to Human Serum in Trypanosoma brucei gambiense

    PubMed Central

    DeJesus, Eric; Kieft, Rudo; Hajduk, Stephen; Veitch, Nicola; Steketee, Pieter C.; Cooper, Anneli; Weir, William; MacLeod, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei gambiense causes 97% of all cases of African sleeping sickness, a fatal disease of sub-Saharan Africa. Most species of trypanosome, such as T. b. brucei, are unable to infect humans due to the trypanolytic serum protein apolipoprotein-L1 (APOL1) delivered via two trypanosome lytic factors (TLF-1 and TLF-2). Understanding how T. b. gambiense overcomes these factors and infects humans is of major importance in the fight against this disease. Previous work indicated that a failure to take up TLF-1 in T. b. gambiense contributes to resistance to TLF-1, although another mechanism is required to overcome TLF-2. Here, we have examined a T. b. gambiense specific gene, TgsGP, which had previously been suggested, but not shown, to be involved in serum resistance. We show that TgsGP is essential for resistance to lysis as deletion of TgsGP in T. b. gambiense renders the parasites sensitive to human serum and recombinant APOL1. Deletion of TgsGP in T. b. gambiense modified to uptake TLF-1 showed sensitivity to TLF-1, APOL1 and human serum. Reintroducing TgsGP into knockout parasite lines restored resistance. We conclude that TgsGP is essential for human serum resistance in T. b. gambiense. PMID:24098129

  18. Establishment of ATP-based luciferase viability assay in 96-well plate for Trypanosoma congolense.

    PubMed

    Suganuma, Keisuke; Allamanda, Puttik; Hakimi, Hassan; Zhou, Mo; Angeles, Jose Ma; Kawazu, Shin-ichiro; Inoue, Noboru

    2014-11-01

    Animal African trypanosomosis (AAT), caused by Trypanosoma congolense, is widespread throughout sub-Saharan Africa. There are significant concerns related to the current drugs available for the treatment of AAT due to their limited effectiveness across species and their adverse effects. Moreover, drug resistant trypanosomes have recently been reported in the field. High throughput screening (HTS) of large chemical compound library collections is a promising approach for identifying novel drug candidates. While HTS for Trypanozoon trypanosomes, T. brucei sspp. and T. evansi is well established, no assays have been developed for T. congolense. In the present study, the authors developed an ATP-based luciferase viability assay for T. congolense in a 96-well plate format. The calculated 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values for pentamidine and diminazene were 10-100 times higher in T. congolense than in T. brucei. This result suggests that the transporters for the 2 tested compounds differ between T. congolense and T. brucei. This assay could further be applied to screen novel chemical compounds for the treatment of AAT caused by T. congolense. PMID:25056575

  19. Establishment of ATP-Based Luciferase Viability Assay in 96-Well Plate for Trypanosoma congolense

    PubMed Central

    SUGANUMA, Keisuke; ALLAMANDA, Puttik; HAKIMI, Hassan; ZHOU, Mo; ANGELES, Jose Ma.; KAWAZU, Shin-ichiro; INOUE, Noboru

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Animal African trypanosomosis (AAT), caused by Trypanosoma congolense, is widespread throughout sub-Saharan Africa. There are significant concerns related to the current drugs available for the treatment of AAT due to their limited effectiveness across species and their adverse effects. Moreover, drug resistant trypanosomes have recently been reported in the field. High throughput screening (HTS) of large chemical compound library collections is a promising approach for identifying novel drug candidates. While HTS for Trypanozoon trypanosomes, T. brucei sspp. and T. evansi is well established, no assays have been developed for T. congolense. In the present study, the authors developed an ATP-based luciferase viability assay for T. congolense in a 96-well plate format. The calculated 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values for pentamidine and diminazene were 10–100 times higher in T. congolense than in T. brucei. This result suggests that the transporters for the 2 tested compounds differ between T. congolense and T. brucei. This assay could further be applied to screen novel chemical compounds for the treatment of AAT caused by T. congolense. PMID:25056575

  20. Catalytic properties, localization, and in vivo role of Px IV, a novel tryparedoxin peroxidase of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ilon; Bogacz, Marta; Schaffroth, Corinna; Dirdjaja, Natalie; Krauth-Siegel, R Luise

    2016-06-01

    Px IV is a distant relative of the known glutathione peroxidase-type enzymes of African trypanosomes. Immunofluorescence microscopy of bloodstream cells expressing C-terminally Myc6-tagged Px IV revealed a mitochondrial localization. Recombinant Px IV possesses very low activity as glutathione peroxidase but catalyzes the trypanothione/tryparedoxin-dependent reduction of hydrogen peroxide and, even more efficiently, of arachidonic acid hydroperoxide. Neither overexpression in bloodstream cells nor the deletion of both alleles in bloodstream or procyclic parasites affected the in vitro proliferation. Trypanosoma brucei Px IV shares 58% of all residues with TcGPXII. The orthologous enzymes have in common their substrate preference for fatty acid hydroperoxides. However, the T. cruzi protein has been reported to be localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and to be specific for glutathione as reducing agent. Taken together, our data show that Px IV is a low abundant tryparedoxin peroxidase of T. brucei that is not essential, at least under culture conditions. PMID:27262262

  1. Post Eclosion Age Predicts the Prevalence of Midgut Trypanosome Infections in Glossina

    PubMed Central

    Walshe, Deirdre P.; Lehane, Michael J.; Haines, Lee R.

    2011-01-01

    The teneral phenomenon, as observed in Glossina sp., refers to the increased susceptibility of the fly to trypanosome infection when the first bloodmeal taken is trypanosome-infected. In recent years, the term teneral has gradually become synonymous with unfed, and thus fails to consider the age of the newly emerged fly at the time the first bloodmeal is taken. Furthermore, conflicting evidence exists of the effect of the age of the teneral fly post eclosion when it is given the infected first bloodmeal in determining the infection prevalence. This study demonstrates that it is not the feeding history of the fly but rather the age (hours after eclosion of the fly from the puparium) of the fly when it takes the first (infective) bloodmeal that determines the level of fly susceptibility to trypanosome infection. We examine this phenomenon in male and female flies from two distinct tsetse clades (Glossina morsitans morsitans and Glossina palpalis palpalis) infected with two salivarian trypanosome species, Trypanosoma (Trypanozoon) brucei brucei and Trypanosoma (Nannomonas) congolense using Fisher's exact test to examine differences in infection rates. Teneral tsetse aged less than 24 hours post-eclosion (h.p.e.) are twice as susceptible to trypanosome infection as flies aged 48 h.p.e. This trend is conserved across sex, vector clade and parasite species. The life cycle stage of the parasite fed to the fly (mammalian versus insect form trypanosomes) does not alter this age-related bias in infection. Reducing the numbers of parasites fed to 48 h.p.e., but not to 24 h.p.e. flies, increases teneral refractoriness. The importance of this phenomenon in disease biology in the field as well as the necessity of employing flies of consistent age in laboratory-based infection studies is discussed. PMID:22087240

  2. Apolipoprotein L-I Promotes Trypanosome Lysis by Forming Pores in Lysosomal Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Morga, David; Vanhollebeke, Benoit; Paturiaux-Hanocq, Françoise; Nolan, Derek P.; Lins, Laurence; Homblé, Fabrice; Vanhamme, Luc; Tebabi, Patricia; Pays, Annette; Poelvoorde, Philippe; Jacquet, Alain; Brasseur, Robert; Pays, Etienne

    2005-07-01

    Apolipoprotein L-I is the trypanolytic factor of human serum. Here we show that this protein contains a membrane pore-forming domain functionally similar to that of bacterial colicins, flanked by a membrane-addressing domain. In lipid bilayer membranes, apolipoprotein L-I formed anion channels. In Trypanosoma brucei, apolipoprotein L-I was targeted to the lysosomal membrane and triggered depolarization of this membrane, continuous influx of chloride, and subsequent osmotic swelling of the lysosome until the trypanosome lysed.

  3. Differentiation of Trypanosoma cruzi Chagas, 1909 and Trypanosoma vespertilionis Battaglia, 1904 by various lectins.

    PubMed

    Schottelius, J; Koch, O; Uhlenbruck, G

    1983-06-01

    Four-days-old culture forms of Trypanosoma cruzi (strain Téhuantépéc, Guatemala) and Trypanosoma vespertilionis (strain P-14, P-9) were tested by 19 carbohydrate-specific agglutinins. The T. cruzi strains are interspecifically distinguishable with the lectins from Euonymus europaeus, Tridacna crocea, Tridacna maxima and the human blood-group testserum anti-B from the T. vespertilionis strains. While the T. vespertilionis strains did react with anti-B and E. europaeus, the T. cruzi strains did not agglutinate. The T. cruzi strains were agglutinated by the lectins from T. crocea and T: maxima while the bat-trypanosomes showed no reactions. Using these lectins it was not possible to distinguish the bat-flagellates intraspecifically. With the lectins from Triticum vulgaris and Arachis hypogaea the T. cruzi strains could be distinguished. While the Ténuantépéc strain did agglutinate with A. hypogaea, T. cruzi strain Guatemala did react only with the lectin from T. vulgaris. The bat-trypanosomes were agglutinated only by A. hypogaea but not by T. vulgaris. The reactions of these trypanosome-species with A. papillata and T. vulgaris demonstrate that both trypanosome species have N-acetylneuraminic acid on their cell surfaces. PMID:6349060

  4. Trypanocidal action of bisphosphonium salts through a mitochondrial target in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Alkhaldi, Abdulsalam A.M.; Martinek, Jan; Panicucci, Brian; Dardonville, Christophe; Zíková, Alena; de Koning, Harry P.

    2015-01-01

    Lipophilic bisphosphonium salts are among the most promising antiprotozoal leads currently under investigation. As part of their preclinical evaluation we here report on their mode of action against African trypanosomes, the etiological agents of sleeping sickness. The bisphosphonium compounds CD38 and AHI-9 exhibited rapid inhibition of Trypanosoma brucei growth, apparently the result of cell cycle arrest that blocked the replication of mitochondrial DNA, contained in the kinetoplast, thereby preventing the initiation of S-phase. Incubation with either compound led to a rapid reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, and ATP levels decreased by approximately 50% within 1 h. Between 4 and 8 h, cellular calcium levels increased, consistent with release from the depolarized mitochondria. Within the mitochondria, the Succinate Dehydrogenase complex (SDH) was investigated as a target for bisphosphonium salts, but while its subunit 1 (SDH1) was present at low levels in the bloodstream form trypanosomes, the assembled complex was hardly detectable. RNAi knockdown of the SDH1 subunit produced no growth phenotype, either in bloodstream or in the procyclic (insect) forms and we conclude that in trypanosomes SDH is not the target for bisphosphonium salts. Instead, the compounds inhibited ATP production in intact mitochondria, as well as the purified F1 ATPase, to a level that was similar to 1 mM azide. Co-incubation with azide and bisphosphonium compounds did not inhibit ATPase activity more than either product alone. The results show that, in T. brucei, bisphosphonium compounds do not principally act on succinate dehydrogenase but on the mitochondrial FoF1 ATPase. PMID:27054061

  5. Trypanocidal action of bisphosphonium salts through a mitochondrial target in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Alkhaldi, Abdulsalam A M; Martinek, Jan; Panicucci, Brian; Dardonville, Christophe; Zíková, Alena; de Koning, Harry P

    2016-04-01

    Lipophilic bisphosphonium salts are among the most promising antiprotozoal leads currently under investigation. As part of their preclinical evaluation we here report on their mode of action against African trypanosomes, the etiological agents of sleeping sickness. The bisphosphonium compounds CD38 and AHI-9 exhibited rapid inhibition of Trypanosoma brucei growth, apparently the result of cell cycle arrest that blocked the replication of mitochondrial DNA, contained in the kinetoplast, thereby preventing the initiation of S-phase. Incubation with either compound led to a rapid reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, and ATP levels decreased by approximately 50% within 1 h. Between 4 and 8 h, cellular calcium levels increased, consistent with release from the depolarized mitochondria. Within the mitochondria, the Succinate Dehydrogenase complex (SDH) was investigated as a target for bisphosphonium salts, but while its subunit 1 (SDH1) was present at low levels in the bloodstream form trypanosomes, the assembled complex was hardly detectable. RNAi knockdown of the SDH1 subunit produced no growth phenotype, either in bloodstream or in the procyclic (insect) forms and we conclude that in trypanosomes SDH is not the target for bisphosphonium salts. Instead, the compounds inhibited ATP production in intact mitochondria, as well as the purified F1 ATPase, to a level that was similar to 1 mM azide. Co-incubation with azide and bisphosphonium compounds did not inhibit ATPase activity more than either product alone. The results show that, in T. brucei, bisphosphonium compounds do not principally act on succinate dehydrogenase but on the mitochondrial FoF1 ATPase. PMID:27054061

  6. A monocistronic transcript for a trypanosome variant surface glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Alarcon, C M; Son, H J; Hall, T; Donelson, J E

    1994-01-01

    Many protein-encoding genes of African trypanosomes are transcribed as large polycistronic pre-mRNAs that are processed into individual mRNAs containing a 5' spliced leader and 3' poly(A). The 45- to 60-kb pre-mRNAs encoding some variant surface glycoproteins (VSGs) contain as many as eight unrelated coding regions. Here we identify the promoter for a metacyclic VSG gene that is expressed without duplication in a bloodstream trypanosome clone. This 70-bp promoter is located 2 kb upstream of the telomere-linked VSG gene and directs the synthesis of a monocistronic VSG pre-mRNA lacking the 5' spliced leader. Its sequence only slightly resembles those of other known trypanosome promoters, but it does cross-hybridize with several related sequences elsewhere in the genome. These results suggest that a new class of trypanosome promoters has been found, whose function is to initiate monocistronic transcription of those VSG genes normally expressed during the metacyclic stage. Images PMID:8035832

  7. Antioxidant Therapy Against Trypanosome Infections: A Review Update.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohammed Auwal; Bindawa Isah, Murtala; Abdullahi Salman, Abdulmalik

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosomiasis is a serious parasitic disease that affects humans and animals resulting in heavy health and economic burdens. Disturbance of redox equilibrium represents a classical challenge for both the host and the parasite during infections with either extracellular African or intracellular American trypanosomes species. This is in spite of existing detoxification mechanisms in both the host and the parasite for maintaining oxidative balance. However, oxidative stress still plays vital roles in the induction of numerous host-associated pathological damages such as anemia, hepatic and renal damages as well as cardiomyopathy while on the other hand, drugs that specifically induce oxidative stress to the parasite have been effective. Therefore, antioxidants have been deemed to play a role in modulating trypanosome infections. This review provides a current update on most of the studies conducted on the potential use of antioxidants as therapeutic agents against trypanosomes. The most frequently studied plant-derived phenolic antioxidants are resveratrol, cucurmin, gallic acid and quercetin while other antioxidants such as vitamins (A, C, E) and trace elements (selenium and iron) have been investigated. Some of the investigations monitored the direct trypanocidal or trypanostatic effects of the antioxidants while others studied the potentials of the antioxidants as adjuncts to trypanocidal drugs. So far, none of these approaches has sufficient data to allow a definite statement on the actual therapeutic potential of antioxidants in the treatment of clinical trypanosomiasis. Therefore, suggestions are made on the most therapeutically and clinically relevant role of antioxidants in trypanosome infections. PMID:27072713

  8. New Insights into the Molecular Mechanisms of Mitosis and Cytokinesis in Trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qing; Hu, Huiqing; Li, Ziyin

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei, a unicellular eukaryote and the causative agent of human sleeping sickness, possesses multiple single-copy organelles that all need to be duplicated and segregated during cell division. Trypanosomes undergo a closed mitosis in which the mitotic spindle is anchored on the nuclear envelope and connects the kinetochores made of novel protein components. Cytokinesis in trypanosomes is initiated from the anterior tip of the new flagellum attachment zone, and proceeds along the longitudinal axis without the involvement of the actomyosin contractile ring, the well-recognized cytokinesis machinery conserved from yeast to humans. Trypanosome appears to employ both evolutionarily conserved and trypanosome-specific proteins to regulate its cell cycle, and has evolved certain cell cycle regulatory pathways that are either distinct between its life cycle stages or different from its human host. Understanding the mechanisms of mitosis and cytokinesis in trypanosomes not only would shed novel light on the evolution of cell cycle control, but also could provide new drug targets for chemotherapy. PMID:24411171

  9. Molecular characterization of Trypanosoma spp. infecting cattle (Bos taurus), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), and elk (Cervus elaphus canadensis) in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The benign trypanosomes of cattle and wild ungulates in the United States are designated Trypanosoma theileri and Trypanosoma cervi, respectively. Historically these parasites have been identified based on morphology, host, and vector, if known. No molecular characterization has been reported for T....

  10. Nitroheterocyclic drug resistance mechanisms in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Wyllie, Susan; Foth, Bernardo J.; Kelner, Anna; Sokolova, Antoaneta Y.; Berriman, Matthew; Fairlamb, Alan H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to identify the mechanisms of resistance to nifurtimox and fexinidazole in African trypanosomes. Methods Bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei were selected for resistance to nifurtimox and fexinidazole by stepwise exposure to increasing drug concentrations. Clones were subjected to WGS to identify putative resistance genes. Transgenic parasites modulating expression of genes of interest were generated and drug susceptibility phenotypes determined. Results Nifurtimox-resistant (NfxR) and fexinidazole-resistant (FxR) parasites shared reciprocal cross-resistance suggestive of a common mechanism of action. Previously, a type I nitroreductase (NTR) has been implicated in nitro drug activation. WGS of resistant clones revealed that NfxR parasites had lost >100 kb from one copy of chromosome 7, rendering them hemizygous for NTR as well as over 30 other genes. FxR parasites retained both copies of NTR, but lost >70 kb downstream of one NTR allele, decreasing NTR transcription by half. A single knockout line of NTR displayed 1.6- and 1.9-fold resistance to nifurtimox and fexinidazole, respectively. Since NfxR and FxR parasites are ∼6- and 20-fold resistant to nifurtimox and fexinidazole, respectively, additional factors must be involved. Overexpression and knockout studies ruled out a role for a putative oxidoreductase (Tb927.7.7410) and a hypothetical gene (Tb927.1.1050), previously identified in a genome-scale RNAi screen. Conclusions NTR was confirmed as a key resistance determinant, either by loss of one gene copy or loss of gene expression. Further work is required to identify which of the many dozens of SNPs identified in the drug-resistant cell lines contribute to the overall resistance phenotype. PMID:26581221

  11. Adaptation of Trypanosoma rhodesiense to hypohaptoglobinaemic serum requires transcription of the APOL1 resistance gene in a RNA polymerase I locus.

    PubMed

    Lecordier, Laurence; Uzureau, Pierrick; Tebabi, Patricia; Brauner, Jonathan; Benghiat, Fleur Samantha; Vanhollebeke, Benoit; Pays, Etienne

    2015-08-01

    Human apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1) kills African trypanosomes except Trypanosoma rhodesiense and Trypanosoma gambiense, the parasites causing sleeping sickness. APOL1 uptake into trypanosomes is favoured by its association with the haptoglobin-related protein-haemoglobin complex, which binds to the parasite surface receptor for haptoglobin-haemoglobin. As haptoglobin-haemoglobin can saturate the receptor, APOL1 uptake is increased in haptoglobin-poor (hypohaptoglobinaemic) serum (HyHS). While T. rhodesiense resists APOL1 by RNA polymerase I (pol-I)-mediated expression of the serum resistance-associated (SRA) protein, T. gambiense resists by pol-II-mediated expression of the T. gambiense-specific glycoprotein (TgsGP). Moreover, in T. gambiense resistance to HyHS is linked to haptoglobin-haemoglobin receptor inactivation by mutation. We report that unlike T. gambiense, T. rhodesiense possesses a functional haptoglobin-haemoglobin receptor, and that like T. gambiense experimentally provided with active receptor, this parasite is killed in HyHS because of receptor-mediated APOL1 uptake. However, T. rhodesiense could adapt to low haptoglobin by increasing transcription of SRA. When assayed in Trypanosoma brucei, resistance to HyHS occurred with pol-I-, but not with pol-II-mediated SRA expression. Similarly, T. gambiense provided with active receptor acquired resistance to HyHS only when TgsGP was moved to a pol-I locus. Thus, transcription by pol-I favours adaptive gene regulation, explaining the presence of SRA in a pol-I locus. PMID:25899052

  12. Proteomic selection of immunodiagnostic antigens for Trypanosoma congolense.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Jennifer R; Sastry, Lalitha; Crozier, Thomas W M; Napier, Grant B; Sullivan, Lauren; Ferguson, Michael A J

    2014-06-01

    Animal African Trypanosomosis (AAT) presents a severe problem for agricultural development in sub-Saharan Africa. It is caused by several trypanosome species and current means of diagnosis are expensive and impractical for field use. Our aim was to discover antigens for the detection of antibodies to Trypanosoma congolense, one of the main causative agents of AAT. We took a proteomic approach to identify potential immunodiagnostic parasite protein antigens. One hundred and thirteen proteins were identified which were selectively recognized by infected cattle sera. These were assessed for likelihood of recombinant protein expression in E. coli and fifteen were successfully expressed and assessed for their immunodiagnostic potential by ELISA using pooled pre- and post-infection cattle sera. Three proteins, members of the invariant surface glycoprotein (ISG) family, performed favorably and were then assessed using individual cattle sera. One antigen, Tc38630, evaluated blind with 77 randomized cattle sera in an ELISA assay gave sensitivity and specificity performances of 87.2% and 97.4%, respectively. Cattle immunoreactivity to this antigen diminished significantly following drug-cure, a feature helpful for monitoring the efficacy of drug treatment. PMID:24922510

  13. Evaluation of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) as therapeutic leads for human African trypanosomiasis (HAT).

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Angela K; Guiguemde, W Armand; Guy, R Kiplin

    2015-08-15

    Two of the histone deacetylases, TbDAC1 and TbDAC3, have been reported to be essential genes in trypanosomes. Therefore, we tested the activity of a panel of human histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) for their ability to block proliferation of Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Among the HDACi's, the hydroxamic acid derivatives panobinostat and belinostat exhibited potency that appeared to make them viable candidates for development due to their reported pharmacokinetic characteristics. However, cellular pharmacodynamic analysis demonstrated that these drugs were unable to kill cultured parasites at exposures seen in patients at their tolerated doses and additionally failed to show any synergistic effects in combination with pentamidine, suramin, melarsoprol, or nifurtimox. Analysis of the potency of the entire HDACi panel revealed no correlations between potency against any human HDAC isoform and inhibition of T. brucei proliferation, suggesting that the trypanosome histone deacetylases possess a unique specificity. These studies confirmed that HDAC inhibitors have potential as leads against human African trypanosomiasis but that none of the current clinical candidates can be directly repurposed. Therefore, development of HDACi's with appropriate specificity and potency may be a viable route to a new class of anti-trypanosomal drugs. PMID:25637120

  14. Drug resistance in African trypanosomiasis: the melarsoprol and pentamidine story

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Nicola; de Koning, Harry P.; Mäser, Pascal; Horn, David

    2013-01-01

    Melarsoprol and pentamidine represent the two main classes of drugs, the arsenicals and diamidines, historically used to treat the diseases caused by African trypanosomes: sleeping sickness in humans and Nagana in livestock. Cross-resistance to these drugs was first observed over sixty years ago and remains the only example of cross-resistance among sleeping sickness therapies. A Trypanosoma brucei adenosine transporter is well-known for its role in the uptake of both drugs. More recently, aquaglyceroporin 2 (AQP2) loss-of-function was linked to melarsoprol-pentamidine cross-resistance. AQP2, a channel that appears to facilitate drug accumulation, may also be linked to clinical cases of resistance. Here, we review these findings and consider some new questions as well as future prospects for tackling the devastating diseases caused by these parasites. PMID:23375541

  15. Trypanosomiasis in Venezuelan water buffaloes: association of packed-cell volumes with seroprevalence and current trypanosome infection.

    PubMed

    García, H; García, M-E; Pérez, G; Bethencourt, A; Zerpa, E; Pérez, H; Mendoza-León, A

    2006-06-01

    The seroprevalence of trypanosomiasis and the prevalence of current trypanosome infection in water buffaloes from the most important livestock areas of Venezuela were evaluated by IFAT and the microhaematocrit centrifugation technique, respectively. The usefulness of a PCR-based assay for identifying the trypanosome species in the buffaloes was also evaluated. Of the 644 animals investigated, 40 (6.2%) were found infected with trypanosomes by blood centrifugation, and 196 (30.4%) were found positive for anti-trypanosome antibodies, by IFAT. The results of the PCR-based assay indicated that 92.5% of the animals with current infections were infected with Trypanosoma vivax and the rest with T. theileri (the first molecular confirmation of T. theileri in Venezuelan water buffaloes). The national programme to treat and prevent trypanosome infections in the buffaloes does not appear to be meeting with great success, even though it is focused on T. vivax. Although the level of parasitaemia was categorized as low for 28 (70%) of the infections detected (and packed-cell volumes appeared to be unassociated with IFAT result, and uncorrelated, in the infected animals, with level of parasitaemia), the 40 infected buffaloes had a significantly lower mean packed-cell volume than the uninfected animals (P<0.05). Farmers should therefore be made aware of the probability of trypanosome-attributable losses in buffalo productivity. PMID:16762110

  16. Host Intracellular Signaling Events and Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Production in African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Kuriakose, Shiby M.; Singh, Rani; Uzonna, Jude E.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens, such as bacteria, viruses, and parasites, possess specific molecules or proteins that are recognized by several host innate immune receptors, leading to the activation of several intracellular signaling molecules and pathways. The magnitude and quality of these events significantly affect the outcome of infection. African trypanosomes, including Trypanosoma congolense, are capable of manipulating the host immune response, including the activity of macrophages, which are the key immune cells that contribute to the immunopathogenesis of African trypanosomiasis. Although it is known that immune hyperactivation and excessive pro-inflammatory cytokine production are the hallmarks of African trypanosomiasis, the mechanisms through which these events are triggered are poorly defined. However, it is known that macrophages may play a significant role in these processes, because phagocytosis of trypanosomes by macrophages initiates intracellular signal transduction cascades that lead to the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and alteration in cell function. This review highlights recent progress in our understanding of the innate immune receptors, signaling pathways, and transcription factors involved in T. congolense-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages. It will reveal the existence of complex signaling events through which the parasite modulates the host immune response, thus identifying novel targets that could aid in designing strategies to effectively control the disease. PMID:27242788

  17. Host Intracellular Signaling Events and Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Production in African Trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Kuriakose, Shiby M; Singh, Rani; Uzonna, Jude E

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens, such as bacteria, viruses, and parasites, possess specific molecules or proteins that are recognized by several host innate immune receptors, leading to the activation of several intracellular signaling molecules and pathways. The magnitude and quality of these events significantly affect the outcome of infection. African trypanosomes, including Trypanosoma congolense, are capable of manipulating the host immune response, including the activity of macrophages, which are the key immune cells that contribute to the immunopathogenesis of African trypanosomiasis. Although it is known that immune hyperactivation and excessive pro-inflammatory cytokine production are the hallmarks of African trypanosomiasis, the mechanisms through which these events are triggered are poorly defined. However, it is known that macrophages may play a significant role in these processes, because phagocytosis of trypanosomes by macrophages initiates intracellular signal transduction cascades that lead to the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and alteration in cell function. This review highlights recent progress in our understanding of the innate immune receptors, signaling pathways, and transcription factors involved in T. congolense-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages. It will reveal the existence of complex signaling events through which the parasite modulates the host immune response, thus identifying novel targets that could aid in designing strategies to effectively control the disease. PMID:27242788

  18. Counterflow Dielectrophoresis for Trypanosome Enrichment and Detection in Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menachery, Anoop; Kremer, Clemens; Wong, Pui E.; Carlsson, Allan; Neale, Steven L.; Barrett, Michael P.; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    2012-10-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness is a deadly disease endemic in sub-Saharan Africa, caused by single-celled protozoan parasites. Although it has been targeted for elimination by 2020, this will only be realized if diagnosis can be improved to enable identification and treatment of afflicted patients. Existing techniques of detection are restricted by their limited field-applicability, sensitivity and capacity for automation. Microfluidic-based technologies offer the potential for highly sensitive automated devices that could achieve detection at the lowest levels of parasitemia and consequently help in the elimination programme. In this work we implement an electrokinetic technique for the separation of trypanosomes from both mouse and human blood. This technique utilises differences in polarisability between the blood cells and trypanosomes to achieve separation through opposed bi-directional movement (cell counterflow). We combine this enrichment technique with an automated image analysis detection algorithm, negating the need for a human operator.

  19. PCR and microsatellite analysis of diminazene aceturate resistance of bovine trypanosomes correlated to knowledge, attitude and practice of livestock keepers in South-Western Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Moti, Y; De Deken, R; Thys, E; Van Den Abbeele, J; Duchateau, L; Delespaux, V

    2015-06-01

    African Animal Trypanosomosis is threatening the agricultural production and cattle breeding more severely than any other livestock disease in the continent, even more since the advent of drug resistance. A longitudinal study was conducted from November 2012 to May 2013 in the Ghibe valley to evaluate diminazene aceturate (DA) resistance and assess livestock owner's perception of trypanocidal drug use. Four Peasant Associations (PAs) were purposively selected and the cattle randomly sampled in each PAs. At the beginning of the study (t0), 106 bovines positive for trypanosomes by the haematocrit centrifugation technique (HCT) and 119 negative control animals were recruited for six months follow-up using HCT, 18S-PCR-RFLP, DpnII-PCR-RFLP and microsatellite analysis. Prevalence of trypanosomosis was 18.1% based on the HCT technique and the mean PCV value was 23.6±5.1% for the 587 sampled cattle. Out of the 106 HCT positive, 64 (60.4%) were positive for the presence of trypanosomes using the 18S-PCR-RFLP. Species detection showed 38 (59.4%) Trypanosoma congolense savannah, 18 (28.1%) Trypanosoma vivax, 5 (7.8%) Trypanosoma theileri and 3 (4.7%) T. congolense Kilifi. Among the T. congolense savannah samples, 31 (81.6%) showed a DA resistant RFLP profile, 2 (5.3%) a mixed profile and 5 did not amplify using the DpnII-PCR-RFLP. A positive HCT had a significant effect on PCV (p<0.001) with the mean PCV value equal to 24.4±0.2% in the absence of trypanosomes and to 20.9±0.3% in the presence of trypanosomes. PCV increased significantly (p<0.001) with 4.4±0.5% one month after treatment. All T. congolense savannah type were analyzed using microsatellite markers TCM1, TCM3 and TCM4. The main events were new infections (40.0%) and relapses (37.5%) with cures lagging at 22.5%. In 10 purposively selected PAs a semi-structured questionnaire was used. The average herd size was the highest in Abelti PA (6.7±1.8 TLU) and the mean herd size was statistically different (p=0.01) in

  20. Global Gene Expression Profiling through the Complete Life Cycle of Trypanosoma vivax

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Andrew P.; Goyard, Sophie; Xia, Dong; Foth, Bernardo J.; Sanders, Mandy; Wastling, Jonathan M.; Minoprio, Paola; Berriman, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The parasitic flagellate Trypanosoma vivax is a cause of animal trypanosomiasis across Africa and South America. The parasite has a digenetic life cycle, passing between mammalian hosts and insect vectors, and a series of developmental forms adapted to each life cycle stage. Each point in the life cycle presents radically different challenges to parasite metabolism and physiology and distinct host interactions requiring remodeling of the parasite cell surface. Transcriptomic and proteomic studies of the related parasites T. brucei and T. congolense have shown how gene expression is regulated during their development. New methods for in vitro culture of the T. vivax insect stages have allowed us to describe global gene expression throughout the complete T. vivax life cycle for the first time. We combined transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of each life stage using RNA-seq and mass spectrometry respectively, to identify genes with patterns of preferential transcription or expression. While T. vivax conforms to a pattern of highly conserved gene expression found in other African trypanosomes, (e.g. developmental regulation of energy metabolism, restricted expression of a dominant variant antigen, and expression of ‘Fam50’ proteins in the insect mouthparts), we identified significant differences in gene expression affecting metabolism in the fly and a suite of T. vivax-specific genes with predicted cell-surface expression that are preferentially expressed in the mammal (‘Fam29, 30, 42’) or the vector (‘Fam34, 35, 43’). T. vivax differs significantly from other African trypanosomes in the developmentally-regulated proteins likely to be expressed on its cell surface and thus, in the structure of the host-parasite interface. These unique features may yet explain the species differences in life cycle and could, in the form of bloodstream-stage proteins that do not undergo antigenic variation, provide targets for therapy. PMID:26266535

  1. Trypanosomes genetic diversity, polyparasitism and the population decline of the critically endangered Australian marsupial, the brush tailed bettong or woylie (Bettongia penicillata).

    PubMed

    Botero, Adriana; Thompson, Craig K; Peacock, Christopher S; Clode, Peta L; Nicholls, Philip K; Wayne, Adrian F; Lymbery, Alan J; Thompson, R C Andrew

    2013-12-01

    While much is known of the impact of trypanosomes on human and livestock health, trypanosomes in wildlife, although ubiquitous, have largely been considered to be non-pathogenic. We describe the genetic diversity, tissue tropism and potential pathogenicity of trypanosomes naturally infecting Western Australian marsupials. Blood samples collected from 554 live-animals and 250 tissue samples extracted from 50 carcasses of sick-euthanized or road-killed animals, belonging to 10 species of marsupials, were screened for the presence of trypanosomes using a PCR of the 18S rDNA gene. PCR results revealed a rate of infection of 67% in blood and 60% in tissues. Inferred phylogenetic trees using 18S rDNA and glycosomal glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase (gGAPDH) sequences showed the presence of eight genotypes that clustered into three clades: a clade including Trypanosoma copemani, a new clade closely related to Trypanosoma gilletti, and a clade including Trypanosoma H25 from an Australian kangaroo. Trypanosome infections were compared in a declining and in a stable population of the endangered Australian marsupial, the brush tailed bettong or woylie (Bettongia penicillata). This marsupial showed high rates of infection with Clade A genotypes (96%) in the declining population, whereas in the stable population, Clade B genotypes were predominant (89%). Mixed infections were common in woylies from the declining but not from the stable population. Histopathological findings associated with either mixed or single infections involving Clade A genotypes, showed a strong inflammatory process and tissue degeneration predominantly in heart, oesophagus and tongue. Trypanosomes were successfully grown in culture and for the first time we demonstrate that a genotype within Clade A has the capacity to not only colonize different tissues in the host but also to invade cells in vitro. These results provide evidence for the potential role of trypanosomes in the decline of a formerly

  2. Trypanosomes genetic diversity, polyparasitism and the population decline of the critically endangered Australian marsupial, the brush tailed bettong or woylie (Bettongia penicillata)

    PubMed Central

    Botero, Adriana; Thompson, Craig K.; Peacock, Christopher S.; Clode, Peta L.; Nicholls, Philip K.; Wayne, Adrian F.; Lymbery, Alan J.; Thompson, R.C. Andrew

    2013-01-01

    While much is known of the impact of trypanosomes on human and livestock health, trypanosomes in wildlife, although ubiquitous, have largely been considered to be non-pathogenic. We describe the genetic diversity, tissue tropism and potential pathogenicity of trypanosomes naturally infecting Western Australian marsupials. Blood samples collected from 554 live-animals and 250 tissue samples extracted from 50 carcasses of sick-euthanized or road-killed animals, belonging to 10 species of marsupials, were screened for the presence of trypanosomes using a PCR of the 18S rDNA gene. PCR results revealed a rate of infection of 67% in blood and 60% in tissues. Inferred phylogenetic trees using 18S rDNA and glycosomal glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase (gGAPDH) sequences showed the presence of eight genotypes that clustered into three clades: a clade including Trypanosoma copemani, a new clade closely related to Trypanosoma gilletti, and a clade including Trypanosoma H25 from an Australian kangaroo. Trypanosome infections were compared in a declining and in a stable population of the endangered Australian marsupial, the brush tailed bettong or woylie (Bettongia penicillata). This marsupial showed high rates of infection with Clade A genotypes (96%) in the declining population, whereas in the stable population, Clade B genotypes were predominant (89%). Mixed infections were common in woylies from the declining but not from the stable population. Histopathological findings associated with either mixed or single infections involving Clade A genotypes, showed a strong inflammatory process and tissue degeneration predominantly in heart, oesophagus and tongue. Trypanosomes were successfully grown in culture and for the first time we demonstrate that a genotype within Clade A has the capacity to not only colonize different tissues in the host but also to invade cells in vitro. These results provide evidence for the potential role of trypanosomes in the decline of a formerly

  3. The evolution of Trypanosoma cruzi: the 'bat seeding' hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Patrick B; Teixeira, Marta M G; Stevens, Jamie R

    2012-04-01

    Recent discussions on the evolution of Trypanosoma cruzi have been dominated by the southern super-continent hypothesis, whereby T. cruzi and related parasites evolved in isolation in the mammals of South America, Antarctica and Australia. Here, we consider recent molecular evidence suggesting that T. cruzi evolved from within a broader clade of bat trypanosomes, and that bat trypanosomes have successfully made the switch into other mammalian hosts in both the New and Old Worlds. Accordingly, we propose an alternative hypothesis--the bat seeding hypothesis--whereby lineages of bat trypanosomes have switched into terrestrial mammals, thereby seeding the terrestrial lineages within the clade. One key implication of this finding is that T. cruzi may have evolved considerably more recently than previously envisaged. PMID:22365905

  4. Mosaic VSGs and the Scale of Trypanosoma brucei Antigenic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Hall, James P. J.; Wang, Huanhuan; Barry, J. David

    2013-01-01

    A main determinant of prolonged Trypanosoma brucei infection and transmission and success of the parasite is the interplay between host acquired immunity and antigenic variation of the parasite variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat. About 0.1% of trypanosome divisions produce a switch to a different VSG through differential expression of an archive of hundreds of silent VSG genes and pseudogenes, but the patterns and extent of the trypanosome diversity phenotype, particularly in chronic infection, are unclear. We applied longitudinal VSG cDNA sequencing to estimate variant richness and test whether pseudogenes contribute to antigenic variation. We show that individual growth peaks can contain at least 15 distinct variants, are estimated computationally to comprise many more, and that antigenically distinct ‘mosaic’ VSGs arise from segmental gene conversion between donor VSG genes or pseudogenes. The potential for trypanosome antigenic variation is probably much greater than VSG archive size; mosaic VSGs are core to antigenic variation and chronic infection. PMID:23853603

  5. Molecular evidence of a Trypanosoma brucei gambiense sylvatic cycle in the human african trypanosomiasis foci of Equatorial Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Cordon-Obras, Carlos; Rodriguez, Yasmin Fermin; Fernandez-Martinez, Amalia; Cano, Jorge; Ndong-Mabale, Nicolas; Ncogo-Ada, Policarpo; Ndongo-Asumu, Pedro; Aparicio, Pilar; Navarro, Miguel; Benito, Agustin; Bart, Jean-Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Gambiense trypanosomiasis is considered an anthroponotic disease. Consequently, control programs are generally aimed at stopping transmission of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (T. b. gambiense) by detecting and treating human cases. However, the persistence of numerous foci despite efforts to eliminate this disease questions this strategy as unique tool to pursue the eradication. The role of animals as a reservoir of T. b. gambiense is still controversial, but could partly explain maintenance of the infection at hypo-endemic levels. In the present study, we evaluated the presence of T. b. gambiense in wild animals in Equatorial Guinea. The infection rate ranged from 0.8% in the insular focus of Luba to more than 12% in Mbini, a focus with a constant trickle of human cases. The parasite was detected in a wide range of animal species including four species never described previously as putative reservoirs. Our study comes to reinforce the hypothesis that animals may play a role in the persistence of T. b. gambiense transmission, being particularly relevant in low transmission settings. Under these conditions the integration of sustained vector control and medical interventions should be considered to achieve the elimination of gambiense trypanosomiasis. PMID:26257727

  6. A Quantitative 3D Motility Analysis of Trypanosoma brucei by Use of Digital In-line Holographic Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Weiße, Sebastian; Heddergott, Niko; Heydt, Matthias; Pflästerer, Daniel; Maier, Timo; Haraszti, Tamás; Grunze, Michael; Engstler, Markus; Rosenhahn, Axel

    2012-01-01

    We present a quantitative 3D analysis of the motility of the blood parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Digital in-line holographic microscopy has been used to track single cells with high temporal and spatial accuracy to obtain quantitative data on their behavior. Comparing bloodstream form and insect form trypanosomes as well as mutant and wildtype cells under varying external conditions we were able to derive a general two-state-run-and-tumble-model for trypanosome motility. Differences in the motility of distinct strains indicate that adaption of the trypanosomes to their natural environments involves a change in their mode of swimming. PMID:22629379

  7. Potential mechanism of the anti-trypanosomal activity of organoruthenium complexes with bioactive thiosemicarbazones.

    PubMed

    Demoro, Bruno; Rossi, Miriam; Caruso, Francesco; Liebowitz, Daniel; Olea-Azar, Claudio; Kemmerling, Ulrike; Maya, Juan Diego; Guiset, Helena; Moreno, Virtudes; Pizzo, Chiara; Mahler, Graciela; Otero, Lucía; Gambino, Dinorah

    2013-06-01

    In the search for new metal-based drugs against diseases produced by trypanosomatid parasites, four organoruthenium(II) compounds [Ru2(p-cymene)2(L)2]X2, where L are bioactive 5-nitrofuryl-containing thiosemicarbazones and X = Cl or PF6, had been previously obtained. These compounds had shown activity on Trypanosoma brucei, the etiological agent of African trypanosomiasis. Because of genomic similarities between trypanosomatides, these ruthenium compounds were evaluated, in the current work, on Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite responsible of American trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease). Two of them showed significant in vitro growth inhibition activity against the infective trypomastigote form of T. cruzi (Dm28c clone, IC50 = 11.69 and 59.42 μM for [Ru2(p-cymene)2(L4)2]Cl2 and [Ru2(p-cymene)2(L1)2]Cl2, respectively, where HL4 = 5-nitrofuryl-N-phenylthiosemicarbazone and HL1 = 5-nitrofurylthiosemicarbazone), showing fairly good selectivities toward trypanosomes with respect to mammalian cells (J774 murine macrophages). Moreover, [Ru2(p-cymene)2(L2)2]Cl2, where HL2 = 5-nitrofuryl-N-methylthiosemicarbazone, was synthesized in order to evaluate the effect of improved solubility on biological behavior. This new chloride salt showed higher activity against T. cruzi than that of the previously synthesized hexafluorophosphate one (Dm28c clone, IC50 = 14.30 μM for the former and 231.3 μM for the latter). In addition, the mode of antitrypanosomal action of the organoruthenium compounds was investigated. The complexes were not only able to generate toxic free radicals through bioreduction but they also interacted with two further potential parasite targets: DNA and cruzipain, a cysteine protease which plays a fundamental role in the biological cycle of these parasites. The results suggest a "multi-target" mechanism of trypanosomicidal action for the obtained complexes. PMID:23564472

  8. First record of trypanosomes from the blood of sculpins (Cottus ricei and C. cognatus) from Lake Superior, WI, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pronina, Svetlana V.; Pronin, Nikolai M.; Selgeby, Jim H.

    1999-01-01

    During parasitological research of fishes in Lake Superior (USA) in August-September 1994, infection with trypanosomes of the blood of sculpins (Cottus ricei and C. cognatus) was recorded for the first time. The descriptions of three morphological groups of the genus Trypanosoma: T. sp. I, found in blood of C. ricei, T. sp. II and T. sp. III from blood of C. cognatus, have been provided.

  9. Intercontinental distribution of a new trypanosome species from Australian endemic Regent Honeyeater (Anthochaera phrygia).

    PubMed

    Šlapeta, Jan; Morin-Adeline, Victoria; Thompson, Paul; McDonell, Denise; Shiels, Michael; Gilchrist, Katrina; Votýpka, Jan; Vogelnest, Larry

    2016-07-01

    Establishing a health screening protocol is fundamental for successful captive breeding and release of wildlife. The aim of this study was to undertake a parasitological survey focusing on the presence of trypanosomes in a cohort of Regent Honeyeaters, Anthochaera phrygia, syn. Xanthomyza phrygia (Aves: Passeriformes) that are part of the breeding and reintroduction programme carried out in Australia. We describe a new blood parasite, Trypanosoma thomasbancrofti sp. n. (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae) with prevalence of 24·4% (20/81) in a captive population in 2015. The sequence of the small subunit rRNA gene (SSU rDNA) and kinetoplast ultrastructure of T. thomasbancrofti sp. n. are the key differentiating characteristics from other Trypanosoma spp. T. thomasbancrofti sp. n. is distinct from Trypanosoma cf. avium found in sympatric Noisy Miners (Manorina melanocephala). The SSU rDNA comparison suggests an intercontinental distribution of T. thomasbancrofti sp. n. and Culex mosquitoes as a suspected vector. Currently, no information exists on the effect of T. thomasbancrofti sp. n. on its hosts; however, all trypanosome-positive birds remain clinically healthy. This information is useful in establishing baseline health data and screening protocols, particularly prior to release to the wild. PMID:27001623

  10. Tsetse immune responses and trypanosome transmission: Implications for the development of tsetse-based strategies to reduce trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Zhengrong; Kasumba, Irene; Lehane, Michael J.; Gibson, Wendy C.; Kwon, Johnny; Aksoy, Serap

    2001-01-01

    Tsetse flies are the medically and agriculturally important vectors of African trypanosomes. Information on the molecular and biochemical nature of the tsetse/trypanosome interaction is lacking. Here we describe three antimicrobial peptide genes, attacin, defensin, and diptericin, from tsetse fat body tissue obtained by subtractive cloning after immune stimulation with Escherichia coli and trypanosomes. Differential regulation of these genes shows the tsetse immune system can discriminate not only between molecular signals specific for bacteria and trypanosome infections but also between different life stages of trypanosomes. The presence of trypanosomes either in the hemolymph or in the gut early in the infection process does not induce transcription of attacin and defensin significantly. After parasite establishment in the gut, however, both antimicrobial genes are expressed at high levels in the fat body, apparently not affecting the viability of parasites in the midgut. Unlike other insect immune systems, the antimicrobial peptide gene diptericin is constitutively expressed in both fat body and gut tissue of normal and immune stimulated flies, possibly reflecting tsetse immune responses to the multiple Gram-negative symbionts it naturally harbors. When flies were immune stimulated with bacteria before receiving a trypanosome containing bloodmeal, their ability to establish infections was severely blocked, indicating that up-regulation of some immune responsive genes early in infection can act to block parasite transmission. The results are discussed in relation to transgenic approaches proposed for modulating vector competence in tsetse. PMID:11592981

  11. Cell surface analysis of trypanosomes of the subgenus Schizotrypanum isolated from bats.

    PubMed

    Pinto, A S; Teixeira, L F; Souto-Padrón, T; Andrade, A F

    1996-06-01

    Two stocks (M5, M29) of trypanosomes of the subgenus Schizotrypanum were isolated from the bat Phyllostomus hastatus and analyzed for cell electrophoretic mobility (EPM) and lectin binding surface sites. Epimastigotes from the M5 and M29 stocks presented a mean EPM of around -0.57 and -0.56 microns. s-1.V-1.cm respectively. Differences in the agglutination profiles were detected between epimastigotes or trypomastigotes from the two parasite populations using lectins with specificity for D-GlcNAc, D-GalNAc, D-Gal and D-Man as probe. Major variation was observed between epimastigote forms. Additionally, the D-GlcNAc binding lectins WGA and BS II strongly interacted with the trypomastigote from both M5 and M29 stocks; this fact is evidence that these trypanosomes are distinct from Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum) cruzi. PMID:8758552

  12. Mitochondrial shape and function in trypanosomes requires the outer membrane protein, TbLOK1

    PubMed Central

    Povelones, Megan L.; Tiengwe, Calvin; Gluenz, Eva; Gull, Keith; Englund, Paul T.; Jensen, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary In an RNAi library screen for loss of kinetoplast DNA (kDNA), we identified an uncharacterized Trypanosoma brucei protein, named TbLOK1, required for maintenance of mitochondrial shape and function. We found the TbLOK1 protein located in discrete patches in the mitochondrial outer membrane. Knockdown of TbLOK1 in procyclic trypanosomes caused the highly interconnected mitochondrial structure to collapse, forming an unbranched tubule remarkably similar to the streamlined organelle seen in the bloodstream form. Following RNAi, defects in mitochondrial respiration, inner membrane potential, and mitochondrial transcription were observed. At later times following TbLOK1 depletion, kDNA was lost and a more drastic alteration in mitochondrial structure was found. Our results demonstrate the close relationship between organelle structure and function in trypanosomes. PMID:23336702

  13. Vector of Trypanosoma copemani identified as Ixodes sp.

    PubMed

    Austen, J M; Ryan, U M; Friend, J A; Ditcham, W G F; Reid, S A

    2011-06-01

    A total of 41 ticks were collected from 15 quokkas on Bald Island and 2 ticks from a Gilbert's potoroo from Two Peoples Bay. Three species of Ixodid ticks Ixodes australiensis, Ixodes hirsti and Ixodes myrmecobii were identified on the quokkas known to have a high prevalence of Trypanosoma copemani. Tick faeces from ticks isolated from 8 individual quokkas and a Gilbert's potoroo were examined with one identified as positive for trypanosomes. Faecal examination revealed trypanosomes similar to in vitro life-cycle stages of T. copemani. In total 12 ticks were dissected and trypanosomes found in sections of their midgut and haemolymph, 49 and 117 days after collection. Tick faeces, salivary glands and midguts from I. australiensis were screened using an 18S rRNA PCR with amplification seen only from the midguts. Sequencing showed 100% homology to T. copemani (genotype A) and 99.9% homology to the wombat (AII) isolate of T. copemani. Trypanosomes were only detected in I. australiensis as neither I. hirsti nor I. myrmecobii survived the initial 30-day storage conditions. We therefore identify a vector for T. copemani as I. australiensis and, given the detection of trypanosomes in the faeces, suggest that transmission is via the faecal-oral route. PMID:21518469

  14. Repurposing human PDE4 inhibitors for neglected tropical diseases. Evaluation of analogs of the human PDE4 inhibitor GSK-256066 as inhibitors of PDEB1 of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Ochiana, Stefan O.; Bland, Nicholas D.; Settimo, Luca; Campbell, Robert K.; Pollastri, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) have been identified as important enzyme targets for drug development in both humans and in Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT). With this in mind, we recently reported the profiling of a range of human PDE inhibitors, showing that human PDE4 (hPDE4) inhibitors tend to display the best potency against the trypanosomal phosphodiesterase TbrPDEB1. Among these was GSK-256066, a potent inhibitor of hPDE4 and a weak inhibitor of TbrPDEB1. In this report, we describe the results of a structure-activity relationship study of this chemotype, leading to the discovery of analogs with improved potency against TbrPDEB1 and micromolar inhibition of T. brucei cellular growth. We rationalize the potency trends via molecular docking of the new inhibitors into a recently reported apo structure of TbrPDEB1. The studies in this article will inform future efforts in repurposing human PDE inhibitors as anti-trypanosomal agents. PMID:25283372

  15. A new member of a family of site-specific retrotransposons is present in the spliced leader RNA genes of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, M S; Williams, S P; Beard, C B; Richards, F F; Aksoy, S

    1991-01-01

    A new member of a family of site-specific retrotransposons is described in the New World trypanosome Trypanosoma cruzi. This element, CZAR (cruzi-associated retrotransposon), resembles two previously described retrotransposons found in the African trypanosome T. brucei gambiense and the mosquito trypanosomatid Crithidia fasciculata in specifically inserting between nucleotides 11 and 12 of the highly conserved 39-mer of the spliced leader RNA (SL-RNA) gene. CZAR is similar in overall organization to the other two SL-RNA-associated elements. It possesses two potential long open reading frames which resemble the gag and pol genes of retroviruses. In the pol open reading frame, all three elements contain similarly arranged endonuclease domains and share extensive amino acid homology in the reverse transcriptase region. All are associated with the SL-RNA gene locus and are present in low copy numbers. They do not appear to have 5' truncated versions. All three retrotransposons are otherwise quite distinct from one another, with no significant overall amino acid homology. The presence of such retroelements inserted into the identical site within SL-RNA gene sequences in at least three evolutionarily distant trypanosomatid species argues for a functional role. Because these elements appear to have a precise target site requirement for integration, we refer to them as SL siteposons. Images PMID:1719380

  16. Identification and lineage genotyping of South American trypanosomes using fluorescent fragment length barcoding.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, P B; Lewis, M D; Cruickshank, C; Gaunt, M W; Yeo, M; Llewellyn, M S; Valente, S A; Maia da Silva, F; Stevens, J R; Miles, M A; Teixeira, M M G

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli are human-infective blood parasites, largely restricted to Central and South America. They also infect a wide range of wild and domestic mammals and are transmitted by a numerous species of triatomine bugs. There are significant overlaps in the host and geographical ranges of both species. The two species consist of a number of distinct phylogenetic lineages. A range of PCR-based techniques have been developed to differentiate between these species and to assign their isolates into lineages. However, the existence of at least six and five lineages within T. cruzi and T. rangeli, respectively, makes identification of the full range of isolates difficult and time consuming. Here we have applied fluorescent fragment length barcoding (FFLB) to the problem of identifying and genotyping T. cruzi, T. rangeli and other South American trypanosomes. This technique discriminates species on the basis of length polymorphism of regions of the rDNA locus. FFLB was able to differentiate many trypanosome species known from South American mammals: T. cruzi cruzi, T. cruzi marinkellei, T. dionisii-like, T. evansi, T. lewisi, T. rangeli, T. theileri and T. vivax. Furthermore, all five T. rangeli lineages and many T. cruzi lineages could be identified, except the hybrid lineages TcV and TcVI that could not be distinguished from lineages III and II respectively. This method also allowed identification of mixed infections of T. cruzi and T. rangeli lineages in naturally infected triatomine bugs. The ability of FFLB to genotype multiple lineages of T. cruzi and T. rangeli together with other trypanosome species, using the same primer sets is an advantage over other currently available techniques. Overall, these results demonstrate that FFLB is a useful method for species diagnosis, genotyping and understanding the epidemiology of American trypanosomes. PMID:21029792

  17. In vivo evaluation of sixteen plant extracts on mice inoculated with Trypanosoma brucei gambiense.

    PubMed Central

    Youan, B. B.; Coulibaly, S.; Miezan, T. B.; Doua, F.; Bamba, M.

    1997-01-01

    After examination of the drugs used by traditional practitioners in Côte d'lvoire, nine formulas prescribed in the treatment of African human trypanosomiasis (AHT) were selected for investigation. These formulas made use of 40 plants, 16 of which were studied because of their properties, as described in the literature, and their frequent use by practitioners. The plant extracts were administered, after maceration or decoction, either orally or intraperitoneally to Swiss mice that had previously been inoculated with Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (Tbg), strain MHOM/Cl/81/Dal 083. The parasitaemia in each mouse was followed for three consecutive days and compared with that in control mice, which had been given either a saline solution (SS: negative control) or well-known drugs (melarsoprol, difluoromethylornithine, and pentamidine: positive control). Our investigations led to the following conclusions. (a) None of the plant extracts revealed trypanocidal or trypanostatic activity relative to SS controls (P > 0.05). In fact, the mice that received the extracts died on the third day after inoculation, with 0% survival and an average parasitaemia of 10.8 +/- 2 x 10(7) trypanosomes/ml. (b) The treated positive controls, relative to SS, showed 100% survival and no parasitaemia (P < 0.05). Melarsoprol appeared to be active when given orally at a dose of 3.6 mg/kg body weight twice a day for 3 days. This method of testing the sensitivity of trypanosomes to plant extracts is easy and inexpensive, and could be applied to other areas of research on tropical diseases. PMID:9342893

  18. High-Throughput Chemical Screening for Antivirulence Developmental Phenotypes in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    MacGregor, Paula; Ivens, Alasdair; Shave, Steven; Collie, Iain; Gray, David; Auer, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    In the bloodstream of mammalian hosts, the sleeping sickness parasite, Trypanosoma brucei, exists as a proliferative slender form or a nonproliferative, transmissible, stumpy form. The transition between these developmental forms is controlled by a density-dependent mechanism that is important for the parasite's infection dynamics, immune evasion via ordered antigenic variation, and disease transmissibility. However, stumpy formation has been lost in most laboratory-adapted trypanosome lines, generating monomorphic parasites that proliferate uncontrolled as slender forms in vitro and in vivo. Nonetheless, these forms are readily amenable to cell culture and high-throughput screening for trypanocidal lead compounds. Here, we have developed and exploited a high-throughput screen for developmental phenotypes using a transgenic monomorphic cell line expressing a reporter under the regulation of gene control signals from the stumpy-specific molecule PAD1. Using a whole-cell fluorescence-based assay to screen over 6,000 small molecules from a kinase-focused compound library, small molecules able to activate stumpy-specific gene expression and proliferation arrest were assayed in a rapid assay format. Independent follow-up validation identified one hit able to induce modest, yet specific, changes in mRNA expression indicative of a partial differentiation to stumpy forms in monomorphs. Further, in pleomorphs this compound induced a stumpy-like phenotype, entailing growth arrest, morphological changes, PAD1 expression, and enhanced differentiation to procyclic forms. This not only provides a potential tool compound for the further understanding of stumpy formation but also demonstrates the use of high-throughput screening in the identification of compounds able to induce specific phenotypes, such as differentiation, in African trypanosomes. PMID:24442893

  19. On the extent and role of the small proteome in the parasitic eukaryote Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although technical advances in genomics and proteomics research have yielded a better understanding of the coding capacity of a genome, one major challenge remaining is the identification of all expressed proteins, especially those less than 100 amino acids in length. Such information can be particularly relevant to human pathogens, such as Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African trypanosomiasis, since it will provide further insight into the parasite biology and life cycle. Results Starting with 993 T. brucei transcripts, previously shown by RNA-Sequencing not to coincide with annotated coding sequences (CDS), homology searches revealed that 173 predicted short open reading frames in these transcripts are conserved across kinetoplastids with 13 also conserved in representative eukaryotes. Mining mass spectrometry data sets revealed 42 transcripts encoding at least one matching peptide. RNAi-induced down-regulation of these 42 transcripts revealed seven to be essential in insect-form trypanosomes with two also required for the bloodstream life cycle stage. To validate the specificity of the RNAi results, each lethal phenotype was rescued by co-expressing an RNAi-resistant construct of each corresponding CDS. These previously non-annotated essential small proteins localized to a variety of cell compartments, including the cell surface, mitochondria, nucleus and cytoplasm, inferring the diverse biological roles they are likely to play in T. brucei. We also provide evidence that one of these small proteins is required for replicating the kinetoplast (mitochondrial) DNA. Conclusions Our studies highlight the presence and significance of small proteins in a protist and expose potential new targets to block the survival of trypanosomes in the insect vector and/or the mammalian host. PMID:24552149

  20. Pyrimidine Salvage in Trypanosoma brucei Bloodstream Forms and the Trypanocidal Action of Halogenated Pyrimidiness

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Juma A. M.; Creek, Darren J.; Burgess, Karl; Allison, Harriet C.; Field, Mark C.; Mäser, Pascal; De Koning, Harry P.

    2016-01-01

    African trypanosomes are capable of both pyrimidine biosynthesis and salvage of preformed pyrimidines from the host. However, uptake of pyrimidines in bloodstream form trypanosomes has not been investigated, making it difficult to judge the relative importance of salvage and synthesis or to design a pyrimidine-based chemotherapy. Detailed characterization of pyrimidine transport activities in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei brucei found that these cells express a high-affinity uracil transporter (designated TbU3) that is clearly distinct from the procyclic pyrimidine transporters. This transporter had low affinity for uridine and 2′deoxyuridine and was the sole pyrimidine transporter expressed in these cells. In addition, thymidine was taken up inefficiently through a P1-type nucleoside transporter. Of importance, the anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil was an excellent substrate for TbU3, and several 5-fluoropyrimidine analogs were investigated for uptake and trypanocidal activity; 5F-orotic acid, 5F-2′deoxyuridine displayed activity in the low micromolar range. The metabolism and mode of action of these analogs was determined using metabolomic assessments of T. brucei clonal lines adapted to high levels of these pyrimidine analogs, and of the sensitive parental strains. The analysis showed that 5-fluorouracil is incorporated into a large number of metabolites but likely exerts toxicity through incorporation into RNA. 5F-2′dUrd and 5F-2′dCtd are not incorporated into nucleic acids but act as prodrugs by inhibiting thymidylate synthase as 5F-dUMP. We present the most complete model of pyrimidine salvage in T. brucei to date, supported by genome-wide profiling of the predicted pyrimidine biosynthesis and conversion enzymes. PMID:23188714

  1. Distinct Phenotypes Caused by Mutation of MSH2 in Trypanosome Insect and Mammalian Life Cycle Forms Are Associated with Parasite Adaptation to Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Bolderson, Jason; Campos, Priscila C.; Miranda, Julia B.; Alves, Ceres L.; Machado, Carlos R.; McCulloch, Richard; Teixeira, Santuza M. R.

    2015-01-01

    Background DNA repair mechanisms are crucial for maintenance of the genome in all organisms, including parasites where successful infection is dependent both on genomic stability and sequence variation. MSH2 is an early acting, central component of the Mismatch Repair (MMR) pathway, which is responsible for the recognition and correction of base mismatches that occur during DNA replication and recombination. In addition, recent evidence suggests that MSH2 might also play an important, but poorly understood, role in responding to oxidative damage in both African and American trypanosomes. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate the involvement of MMR in the oxidative stress response, null mutants of MSH2 were generated in Trypanosoma brucei procyclic forms and in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigote forms. Unexpectedly, the MSH2 null mutants showed increased resistance to H2O2 exposure when compared with wild type cells, a phenotype distinct from the previously observed increased sensitivity of T. brucei bloodstream forms MSH2 mutants. Complementation studies indicated that the increased oxidative resistance of procyclic T. brucei was due to adaptation to MSH2 loss. In both parasites, loss of MSH2 was shown to result in increased tolerance to alkylation by MNNG and increased accumulation of 8-oxo-guanine in the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, indicating impaired MMR. In T. cruzi, loss of MSH2 also increases the parasite capacity to survive within host macrophages. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, these results indicate MSH2 displays conserved, dual roles in MMR and in the response to oxidative stress. Loss of the latter function results in life cycle dependent differences in phenotypic outcomes in T. brucei MSH2 mutants, most likely because of the greater burden of oxidative stress in the insect stage of the parasite. PMID:26083967

  2. Generation of a Nanobody Targeting the Paraflagellar Rod Protein of Trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Obishakin, Emmanuel; Stijlemans, Benoit; Santi-Rocca, Julien; Vandenberghe, Isabel; Devreese, Bart; Muldermans, Serge; Bastin, Philippe; Magez, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosomes are protozoan parasites that cause diseases in humans and livestock for which no vaccines are available. Disease eradication requires sensitive diagnostic tools and efficient treatment strategies. Immunodiagnostics based on antigen detection are preferable to antibody detection because the latter cannot differentiate between active infection and cure. Classical monoclonal antibodies are inaccessible to cryptic epitopes (based on their size-150 kDa), costly to produce and require cold chain maintenance, a condition that is difficult to achieve in trypanosomiasis endemic regions, which are mostly rural. Nanobodies are recombinant, heat-stable, small-sized (15 kDa), antigen-specific, single-domain, variable fragments derived from heavy chain-only antibodies in camelids. Because of numerous advantages over classical antibodies, we investigated the use of nanobodies for the targeting of trypanosome-specific antigens and diagnostic potential. An alpaca was immunized using lysates of Trypanosoma evansi. Using phage display and bio-panning techniques, a cross-reactive nanobody (Nb392) targeting all trypanosome species and isolates tested was selected. Imunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry assays were combined to identify the target recognized. Nb392 targets paraflagellar rod protein (PFR1) of T. evansi, T. brucei, T. congolense and T. vivax. Two different RNAi mutants with defective PFR assembly (PFR2RNAi and KIF9BRNAi) were used to confirm its specificity. In conclusion, using a complex protein mixture for alpaca immunization, we generated a highly specific nanobody (Nb392) that targets a conserved trypanosome protein, i.e., PFR1 in the flagella of trypanosomes. Nb392 is an excellent marker for the PFR and can be useful in the diagnosis of trypanosomiasis. In addition, as demonstrated, Nb392 can be a useful research or PFR protein isolation tool. PMID:25551637

  3. Squalamine analogues as potential anti-trypanosomal and anti-leishmanial compounds.

    PubMed

    Khabnadideh, S; Tan, C L; Croft, S L; Kendrick, H; Yardley, V; Gilbert, I H

    2000-06-01

    This paper concerns the synthesis of various simplified analogues of the novel anti-microbial agent, squalamine. The compounds were then investigated for activity against Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African trypanosomiasis, Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease and Leishmania donovani, the causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis. Several compounds showed in vitro activity, especially against T. brucei and L. donovani. However, one compound showed poor in vivo activity. PMID:10866389

  4. Developmental and Ultrastructural Characterization and Phylogenetic Analysis of Trypanosoma herthameyeri n. sp. of Brazilian Leptodactilydae Frogs.

    PubMed

    Attias, Márcia; Sato, Lyslaine H; Ferreira, Robson C; Takata, Carmen S A; Campaner, Marta; Camargo, Erney P; Teixeira, Marta M G; de Souza, Wanderley

    2016-09-01

    We described the phylogenetic affiliation, development in cultures and ultrastructural features of a trypanosome of Leptodacylus chaquensis from the Pantanal biome of Brazil. In the inferred phylogeny, this trypanosome nested into the Anura clade of the basal Aquatic clade of Trypanosoma, but was separate from all known species within this clade. This finding enabled us to describe it as Trypanosoma herthameyeri n. sp., which also infects other Leptodacylus species from the Pantanal and Caatinga biomes. Trypanosoma herthameyeri multiplies as small rounded forms clumped together and evolving into multiple-fission forms and rosettes of epimastigotes released as long forms with long flagella; scarce trypomastigotes and glove-like forms are common in stationary-phase cultures. For the first time, a trypanosome from an amphibian was observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy, revealing a cytostome opening, well-developed flagellar lamella, and many grooves in pumpkin-like forms. Transmission electron microscopy showed highly developed Golgi complexes, relaxed catenation of KDNA, and a rich set of spongiome tubules in a regular parallel arrangement to the flagellar pocket as confirmed by electron tomography. Considering the basal position in the phylogenetic tree, developmental and ultrastructural data of T. herthameyeri are valuable for evolutionary studies of trypanosome architecture and cell biology. PMID:26932133

  5. Comparative pathogenicity of three genetically distinct types of Trypanosoma congolense in cattle: clinical observations and haematological changes.

    PubMed

    Bengaly, Z; Sidibe, I; Ganaba, R; Desquesnes, M; Boly, H; Sawadogo, L

    2002-08-30

    The pathology of African bovine trypanosomosis was compared in Zebu cattle subcutaneously inoculated with three clones of trypanosomes corresponding to the three genetically distinct types of Trypanosoma congolense; savannah-type, west African riverine/forest-type and kilifi-type. All inoculated animals became parasitaemic between 7 and 11 days post-infection (dpi). The savannah-type showed consistently higher levels of parasitaemia and lower packed red cell volume percentages and leukocyte counts than the other two types. The syndrome was also more severe in the savannah-type and led inexorably to death between 29 and 54 dpi while animals with the forest or the kilifi-types recovered from earlier symptoms and haematological alterations after 3 months of infection. By the end of the experiment, the animals self-cured from the forest-type infection and the kilifi-type passed under control. The results of the present study indicated clear difference in pathogenicity between the three types of T. congolense; the savannah-type was virulent while the forest-type was of low pathogenicity and the kilifi-type was non-pathogenic. PMID:12191895

  6. Glutaredoxin-deficiency confers bloodstream Trypanosoma brucei with improved thermotolerance.

    PubMed

    Musunda, Blessing; Benítez, Diego; Dirdjaja, Natalie; Comini, Marcelo A; Krauth-Siegel, R Luise

    2015-12-01

    As constituents of their unusual trypanothione-based thiol metabolism, African trypanosomes express two dithiol glutaredoxins (Grxs), a cytosolic Grx1 and a mitochondrial Grx2, with so far unknown biological functions. As revealed by gel shift assays, in the mammalian bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei, Grx1 is in the fully reduced state. Upon diamide treatment of the cells, Grx1 forms an active site disulfide bridge that is rapidly re-reduced after stress removal; Cys76, a conserved non-active site Cys remains in the thiol state. Deletion of both grx1 alleles does not result in any proliferation defect of neither the procyclic insect form nor the bloodstream form, even not under various stress conditions. In addition, the Grx1-deficient parasites are fully infectious in the mouse model. A functional compensation by Grx2 is unlikely as identical levels of Grx2 were found in wildtype and Grx1-deficient cells. In the classical hydroxyethyl disulfide assay, Grx1-deficient bloodstream cells display 50-60% of the activity of wildtype cells indicating that the cytosolic oxidoreductase accounts for a major part of the total deglutathionylation capacity of the parasite. Intriguingly, at elevated temperature, proliferation of the Grx1-deficient bloodstream parasites is significantly less affected compared to wildtype cells. When cultured for three days at 39°C, only 51% of the cells in the wildtype population retained normal morphology with single mitochondrial and nuclear DNA (1K1N), whereas 27% of the cells displayed ≥2K2N. In comparison, 64% of the Grx1-deficient cells kept the 1K1N phenotype and only 18% had ≥2K2N. The data suggest that Grx1 plays a role in the regulation of the thermotolerance of the parasites by (in)directly interfering with the progression of the cell cycle, a process that may comprise protein (de)glutathionylation step(s). PMID:26854591

  7. Genetic and Chemical Evaluation of Trypanosoma brucei Oleate Desaturase as a Candidate Drug Target

    PubMed Central

    Gualdrón-López, Melisa; Igoillo-Esteve, Mariana; Nguewa, Paul A.; Deumer, Gladys; Wallemacq, Pierre; Altabe, Silvia G.; Michels, Paul A. M.; Uttaro, Antonio D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Trypanosomes can synthesize polyunsaturated fatty acids. Previously, we have shown that they possess stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) and oleate desaturase (OD) to convert stearate (C18) into oleate (C18:1) and linoleate (C18:2), respectively. Here we examine if OD is essential to these parasites. Methodology Cultured procyclic (insect-stage) form (PCF) and bloodstream-form (BSF) Trypanosoma brucei cells were treated with 12- and 13-thiastearic acid (12-TS and 13-TS), inhibitors of OD, and the expression of the enzyme was knocked down by RNA interference. The phenotype of these cells was studied. Principal Findings Growth of PCF T. brucei was totally inhibited by 100 µM of 12-TS and 13-TS, with EC50 values of 40±2 and 30±2 µM, respectively. The BSF was more sensitive, with EC50 values of 7±3 and 2±1 µM, respectively. This growth phenotype was due to the inhibitory effect of thiastearates on OD and, to a lesser extent, on SCD. The enzyme inhibition caused a drop in total unsaturated fatty-acid level of the cells, with a slight increase in oleate but a drastic decrease in linoleate level, most probably affecting membrane fluidity. After knocking down OD expression in PCF, the linoleate content was notably reduced, whereas that of oleate drastically increased, maintaining the total unsaturated fatty-acid level unchanged. Interestingly, the growth phenotype of the RNAi-induced cells was similar to that found for thiastearate-treated trypanosomes, with the former cells growing twofold slower than the latter ones, indicating that the linoleate content itself and not only fluidity could be essential for normal membrane functionality. A similar deleterious effect was found after RNAi in BSF, even with a mere 8% reduction of OD activity, indicating that its full activity is essential. Conclusions/Significance As OD is essential for trypanosomes and is not present in mammalian cells, it is a promising target for chemotherapy of African trypanosomiasis. PMID

  8. Influence of trypanocidal therapy on the haematology of vervet monkeys experimentally infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense.

    PubMed

    Ngotho, Maina; Kagira, John M; Kariuki, Christopher; Maina, Naomi; Thuita, John K; Mwangangi, David M; Farah, Idle O; Hau, Jann

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise the sequential haematological changes in vervet monkeys infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and subsequently treated with sub-curative diminazene aceturate (DA) and curative melarsoprol (MelB) trypanocidal drugs. Fourteen vervet monkeys, on a serial timed-kill pathogenesis study, were infected intravenously with 10(4) trypanosomes of a stabilate T. b. rhodesiense KETRI 2537. They were treated with DA at 28 days post infection (dpi) and with MelB following relapse of infection at 140 dpi. Blood samples were obtained from the monkeys weekly, and haematology conducted using a haematological analyser. All the monkeys developed a disease associated with macrocytic hypochromic anaemia characterised by a reduction in erythrocytes (RBC), haemoglobin (HB), haematocrit (HCT), mean cell volume (MCV), platelet count (PLT), and an increase in the red cell distribution width (RDW) and mean platelet volume (MPV). The clinical disease was characteristic of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) with a pre-patent period of 3 days. Treatment with DA cleared trypanosomes from both the blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The parasites relapsed first in the CSF and later in the blood. This treatment normalised the RBC, HCT, HB, PLT, MCV, and MPV achieving the pre-infection values within two weeks while RDW took up to 6 weeks to attain pre-infection levels after treatment. Most of the parameters were later characterised by fluctuations, and declined at one to two weeks before relapse of trypanosomes in the haemolymphatic circulation. Following MelB treatment at 140 dpi, most values recovered within two weeks and stabilised at pre-infection levels, during the 223 days post treatment monitoring period. It is concluded that DA and MelB treatments cause similar normalising changes in the haematological profiles of monkeys infected with T. b. rhodesiense, indicating the efficacy of the drugs. The infection related changes in haematology

  9. Evaluation of in vivo antitrypanosomal activity of crude extracts of Artemisia abyssinica against aTrypanosoma congolense isolate

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background African trypanosomiasis is a major disease of economic and public health importance affecting agricultural and human development. The search for alternative compounds against African trypanosomiasis is justified by various limitations of existing chemotherapeutic agents. This study was aimed at screening the hydromethanolic and dichloromethane (DCM) crude extracts of aerial parts of Artemisia abyssinica for in vivo antitrypanosomal activity against Trypanosoma congolense isolate in mice. Methods The aerial parts of the plant were extracted by maceration technique using dichloromethane and 80% methanol to obtain the corresponding crude extracts. The plant extracts at doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight were administered intraperitoneally daily for 7 days to mice infected with Trypanosoma congolense. Diminazene aceturate and distilled water were used as positive and as negative controls respectively. The level of parasitaemia, body weight, packed cell volume, differential leukocyte counts and mean survival period were monitored. Results The study showed that the DCM extract at 200 and 400 mg/kg, and the hydromethanolic extract at 400 mg/kg reduced parasitaemia (p < 0.05), ameliorated anaemia (p < 0.05), prevented body weight loss (p < 0.05) and resulted in significant increase in neutrophil levels (p < 0.05) and marked decrease in lymphocyte levels (p < 0.05) compared to the negative control. Conclusions This study established that aerial parts of A. abyssinica have antitrypanosomal potential and can be considered a potential source of new drugs for the treatment of tropical diseases caused by trypanosomes. PMID:24684992

  10. Regulation of the Cell Division Cycle in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The cell division cycle is tightly regulated by the activation and inactivation of a series of proteins that control the replication and segregation of organelles to the daughter cells. During the past decade, we have witnessed significant advances in our understanding of the cell cycle in Trypanosoma brucei and how the cycle is regulated by various regulatory proteins. However, many other regulators, especially those unique to trypanosomes, remain to be identified, and we are just beginning to delineate the signaling pathways that drive the transitions through different cell cycle stages, such as the G1/S transition, G2/M transition, and mitosis-cytokinesis transition. Trypanosomes appear to employ both evolutionarily conserved and trypanosome-specific molecules to regulate the various stages of its cell cycle, including DNA replication initiation, spindle assembly, chromosome segregation, and cytokinesis initiation and completion. Strikingly, trypanosomes lack some crucial regulators that are well conserved across evolution, such as Cdc6 and Cdt1, which are involved in DNA replication licensing, the spindle motor kinesin-5, which is required for spindle assembly, the central spindlin complex, which has been implicated in cytokinesis initiation, and the actomyosin contractile ring, which is located at the cleavage furrow. Conversely, trypanosomes possess certain regulators, such as cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases, and mitotic centromere-associated kinesins, that are greatly expanded and likely play diverse cellular functions. Overall, trypanosomes apparently have integrated unique regulators into the evolutionarily conserved pathways to compensate for the absence of those conserved molecules and, additionally, have evolved certain cell cycle regulatory pathways that are either different from its human host or distinct between its own life cycle forms. PMID:22865501

  11. VSG switching in Trypanosoma brucei: antigenic variation analysed using RNAi in the absence of immune selection

    PubMed Central

    Aitcheson, Niall; Talbot, Suzanne; Shapiro, Jesse; Hughes, Katie; Adkin, Carl; Butt, Thomas; Sheader, Karen; Rudenko, Gloria

    2006-01-01

    Summary Trypanosoma brucei relies on antigenic variation of its Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG) coat for survival. We show that VSG switching can be efficiently studied in vitro using VSG RNAi in place of an immune system to select for switch variants. Contrary to models predicting an instant switch after inhibition of VSG synthesis, switching was not induced by VSG RNAi and occurred at a rate of 10−4 per division. We find a highly reproducible hierarchy of VSG activation which appears to be capable of resetting, whereby more than half of the switch events over 12 experiments were to one of two VSGs. We characterised switched clones according to switch mechanism using marker genes in the active VSG expression site (ES). Transcriptional switches between ESs were the preferred switching mechanism, whereby at least 10 of the 17 ESs identified in T. brucei 427 can be functionally active in vitro. We could specifically select for switches mediated by DNA rearrangements by inducing VSG RNAi in the presence of drug selection for the active ES. Most of the preferentially activated VSGs could be activated by multiple mechanisms. This VSG RNAi based procedure provides a rapid and powerful means for analysing VSG switching in African trypanosomes entirely in vitro. PMID:16135228

  12. Detection of Trypanosoma brucei spp. in human blood by a nonradioactive branched DNA-based technique.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, E; Detmer, J; Dungan, J; Doua, F; White, T; Kolberg, J A; Urdea, M S; Agabian, N

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a nonradioactive branched DNA (bDNA)-based assay for the diagnosis of the African trypanosomiases in simple buffy coat preparations of human blood. Two repetitive DNA sequences specific to the Trypanosoma brucei complex were chosen as targets of the bDNA assay, a technique which amplifies the signal from a target molecule rather than the target itself. Comparable sensitivities were observed with cloned target sequences, purified T. brucei DNA, procyclic trypanosomes, and bloodstream trypomastigotes. The results of bDNA analysis of human blood samples from Côte d'Ivoire (n = 50) showed excellent agreement with those of buffy coat microscopy. The bDNA technology offers certain advantages over alternative molecular biological techniques, including the simplicity of sample preparation and of the procedure itself, the stability of the reagents, the ability to process large numbers of samples simultaneously, and freedom from crosscontamination artifacts. We have successfully applied the bDNA technique to the detection of T. brucei in clinical samples from regions where T. brucei infection is endemic; to our knowledge, this is the first report of the molecular detection of T. brucei in human blood. PMID:8880488

  13. Phylogeographical, ecological and biological patterns shown by nuclear (ssrRNA and gGAPDH) and mitochondrial (Cyt b) genes of trypanosomes of the subgenus Schizotrypanum parasitic in Brazilian bats.

    PubMed

    Cavazzana, Manzelio; Marcili, Arlei; Lima, Luciana; da Silva, Flávia Maia; Junqueira, Angela C V; Veludo, Heloisa H; Viola, Laerte B; Campaner, Marta; Nunes, Vânia L B; Paiva, Fernando; Coura, José R; Camargo, Erney P; Teixeira, Marta M G

    2010-03-01

    The genetic diversity and phylogeographical patterns of Trypanosoma species that infect Brazilian bats were evaluated by examining 1043 bats from 63 species of seven families captured in Amazonia, the Pantanal, Cerrado and the Atlantic Forest biomes of Brazil. The prevalence of trypanosome-infected bats, as estimated by haemoculture, was 12.9%, resulting in 77 cultures of isolates, most morphologically identified as Trypanosoma cf. cruzi, classified by barcoding using partial sequences from ssrRNA gene into the subgenus Schizotrypanum and identified as T. cruzi (15), T. cruzi marinkellei (37) or T. cf. dionisii (25). Phylogenetic analyses using nuclear ssrRNA, glycosomal glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gGAPDH) and mitochondrial cytochrome b (Cyt b) gene sequences generated three clades, which clustered together forming the subgenus Schizotrypanum. In addition to vector association, bat trypanosomes were related by the evolutionary history, ecology and phylogeography of the bats. Trypanosoma cf. dionisii trypanosomes (32.4%) infected 12 species from four bat families captured in all biomes, from North to South Brazil, and clustered with T. dionisii from Europe despite being separated by some genetic distance. Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei (49.3%) was restricted to phyllostomid bats from Amazonia to the Pantanal (North to Central). Trypanosoma cruzi (18.2%) was found mainly in vespertilionid and phyllostomid bats from the Pantanal/Cerrado and the Atlantic Forest (Central to Southeast), with a few isolates from Amazonia. PMID:19766649

  14. Temporal and spatial dynamics of trypanosomes infecting the brush-tailed bettong (Bettongia penicillata): a cautionary note of disease-induced population decline

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The brush-tailed bettong or woylie (Bettongia penicillata) is on the brink of extinction. Its numbers have declined by 90% since 1999, with their current distribution occupying less than 1% of their former Australian range. Woylies are known to be infected with three different trypanosomes (Trypanosoma vegrandis, Trypanosoma copemani and Trypanosoma sp. H25) and two different strains of T. copemani that vary in virulence. However, the role that these haemoparasites have played during the recent decline of their host is unclear and is part of ongoing investigation. Methods Woylies were sampled from five locations in southern Western Australia, including two neighbouring indigenous populations, two enclosed (fenced) populations and a captive colony. PCR was used to individually identify the three different trypanosomes from blood and tissues of the host, and to investigate the temporal and spatial dynamics of trypanosome infections. Results The spatial pattern of trypanosome infection varied among the five study sites, with a greater proportion of woylies from the Perup indigenous population being infected with T. copemani than from the neighbouring Kingston indigenous population. For an established infection, T. copemani detection was temporally inconsistent. The more virulent strain of T. copemani appeared to regress at a faster rate than the less virulent strain, with the infection possibly transitioning from the acute to chronic phase. Interspecific competition may also exist between T. copemani and T. vegrandis, where an existing T. vegrandis infection may moderate the sequential establishment of the more virulent T. copemani. Conclusion In this study, we provide a possible temporal connection implicating T. copemani as the disease agent linked with the recent decline of the Kingston indigenous woylie population within the Upper Warren region of Western Australia. The chronic association of trypanosomes with the internal organs of its host may be

  15. Infection by trypanosomes in marsupials and rodents associated with human dwellings in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Pinto, C Miguel; Ocaña-Mayorga, Sofía; Lascano, Mauricio S; Grijalva, Mario J

    2006-12-01

    Small mammals trapped in domestic and peridomestic environments of rural Ecuador were screened for trypanosome infection by direct microscopy and hemoculture. Identification of species of trypanosomes was then performed by morphological characteristics and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Of 194 animals collected, 15 were positive for infection (7.73%). Eight (4.12%) were infected with Trypanosoma cruzi (1 of 33 Didelphis marsupialis; 7 of 61 Rattus rattus). Eleven R. rattus (18.03%) harbored T. lewisi, 5 of which presented mixed infections with T. cruzi. Additionally, 1 of 3 Oryzomys xanthaeolus was infected with T. rangeli. No trypanosome infection was detected in Philander opossum (n = 1), Mus musculus (n = 79), Rattus norvegicus (n = 8), Akodon orophilus (n = 4), Sigmodon peruanus (n = 3), or Proechimys decumanus (n = 2). Many of the isolates belong to T. cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, and R. rattus had the highest prevalence. Because of its abundance in the study areas, this species is considered an important reservoir for Chagas disease. This is the first report of T. lewisi and T. rangeli in Ecuador. This study is also the first to describe natural mixed infections of T. cruzi-T. lewisi. PMID:17304802

  16. Lead Optimization of a Pyrazole Sulfonamide Series of Trypanosoma bruceiN-Myristoyltransferase Inhibitors: Identification and Evaluation of CNS Penetrant Compounds as Potential Treatments for Stage 2 Human African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma bruceiN-myristoyltransferase (TbNMT) is an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT). From previous studies, we identified pyrazole sulfonamide, DDD85646 (1), a potent inhibitor of TbNMT. Although this compound represents an excellent lead, poor central nervous system (CNS) exposure restricts its use to the hemolymphatic form (stage 1) of the disease. With a clear clinical need for new drug treatments for HAT that address both the hemolymphatic and CNS stages of the disease, a chemistry campaign was initiated to address the shortfalls of this series. This paper describes modifications to the pyrazole sulfonamides which markedly improved blood–brain barrier permeability, achieved by reducing polar surface area and capping the sulfonamide. Moreover, replacing the core aromatic with a flexible linker significantly improved selectivity. This led to the discovery of DDD100097 (40) which demonstrated partial efficacy in a stage 2 (CNS) mouse model of HAT. PMID:25412409

  17. Identification and functional characterization of Trypanosoma brucei peroxin 16.

    PubMed

    Kalel, Vishal C; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf

    2015-10-01

    Protozoan parasites of the family Trypanosomatidae infect humans as well as livestock causing devastating diseases like sleeping sickness, Chagas disease, and Leishmaniasis. These parasites compartmentalize glycolytic enzymes within unique organelles, the glycosomes. Glycosomes represent a subclass of peroxisomes and they are essential for the parasite survival. Hence, disruption of glycosome biogenesis is an attractive drug target for these Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs). Peroxin 16 (PEX16) plays an essential role in peroxisomal membrane protein targeting and de novo biogenesis of peroxisomes from endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We identified trypanosomal PEX16 based on specific sequence characteristics and demonstrate that it is an integral glycosomal membrane protein of procyclic and bloodstream form trypanosomes. RNAi mediated partial knockdown of Trypanosoma brucei PEX16 in bloodstream form trypanosomes led to severe ATP depletion, motility defects and cell death. Microscopic and biochemical analysis revealed drastic reduction in glycosome number and mislocalization of the glycosomal matrix enzymes to the cytosol. Asymmetry of the localization of the remaining glycosomes was observed with a severe depletion in the posterior part. The results demonstrate that trypanosomal PEX16 is essential for glycosome biogenesis and thereby, provides a potential drug target for sleeping sickness and related diseases. PMID:26025675

  18. Association of Trypanolytic ApoL1 Variants with Kidney Disease in African-Americans

    PubMed Central

    Genovese, Giulio; Friedman, David J.; Ross, Michael D.; Lecordier, Laurence; Uzureau, Pierrick; Freedman, Barry I.; Bowden, Donald W.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Oleksyk, Taras K.; Knob, Andrea Uscinski; Bernhardy, Andrea J.; Hicks, Pamela J.; Nelson, George W.; Vanhollebeke, Benoit; Winkler, Cheryl A.; Kopp, Jeffrey B.; Pays, Etienne; Pollak, Martin R.

    2010-01-01

    African-Americans have higher rates of kidney disease than European-Americans. Here we show that in African-Americans, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) and hypertension-attributed end-stage kidney disease (H-ESKD) are associated with two independent sequence variants in the APOL1 gene on chromosome 22 [FSGS odds ratio = 10.5 (95% CI 6.0–18.4); H-ESKD odds ratio = 7.3 (95% CI 5.6–9.5)]. The two APOL1 variants are common in African chromosomes but absent from European chromosomes and both reside within haplotypes that harbor signatures of positive selection. ApoL1 is a serum factor that lyses trypanosomes. In vitro assays revealed that only the kidney disease-associated ApoL1 variants lysed Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense. We speculate that evolution of a critical survival factor in Africa may have contributed to the high rates of renal disease in African-Americans. PMID:20647424

  19. Effects of dietary selenium supplementation on parasitemia, anemia and serum proteins of Trypanosoma brucei brucei infected rats.

    PubMed

    Eze, J I; Okeke, M C; Ngene, A A; Omeje, J N; Abonyi, F O

    2013-10-01

    Trypanosomosis has been associated with immunosuppression, anemia and oxidative damage while selenium possesses both immunostimulatory and antioxidative effects. This study was designed to assess the effect of dietary selenium supplementation on parasitemia, anemia, survival pattern and serum protein profiles of trypanosome-infected rats. Twenty five rats, divided into five groups (A-E) of 5 each, were treated as follows: 4, 8 and 16 ppm (ppm) of selenium in their feed, respectively throughout the experimental period and were infected with Trypanosoma brucei brucei on day 14 post supplementation, infected not supplemented and the negative control. Supplementation at 4 and 8 ppm increased the packed cell volume (PCV) and hemoglobin (Hb) concentration on day 7 of supplementation (PS) when compared with the unsupplemented groups. Following infection on day 14 PS, the PCV, Hb of 16 ppm and infected not supplemented groups were significantly (P < 0.05) lower than other groups on days 28 and 35 PS. Supplementation did not lead to significant (P > 0.05) changes on the total protein, albumin and globulin by day 14 PS. Infection, however, caused significant (P > 0.05) decrease in the total protein and albumin from day 28. The supplementation did not significantly (P > 0.05) increase the pre-patent period but caused a significant reduction in the parasitemia levels and increased survival intervals. Dietary selenium supplementation, from the results, may show promise in the management of African trypanosomosis as the supplementation was able to: reduce anemia and parasitemia and increase survival intervals of trypanosome infected rats. PMID:23916765

  20. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Group 1 Is Distinguished by a Unique Amino Acid Substitution in the HpHb Receptor Implicated in Human Serum Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sistrom, Mark; Agbebakun, Kehinde; Balmer, Oliver; Gibson, Wendy; Aksoy, Serap; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (Tbr) and T. b. gambiense (Tbg), causative agents of Human African Trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness) in Africa, have evolved alternative mechanisms of resisting the activity of trypanosome lytic factors (TLFs), components of innate immunity in human serum that protect against infection by other African trypanosomes. In Tbr, lytic activity is suppressed by the Tbr-specific serum-resistance associated (SRA) protein. The mechanism in Tbg is less well understood but has been hypothesized to involve altered activity and expression of haptoglobin haemoglobin receptor (HpHbR). HpHbR has been shown to facilitate internalization of TLF-1 in T.b. brucei (Tbb), a member of the T. brucei species complex that is susceptible to human serum. By evaluating the genetic variability of HpHbR in a comprehensive geographical and taxonomic context, we show that a single substitution that replaces leucine with serine at position 210 is conserved in the most widespread form of Tbg (Tbg group 1) and not found in related taxa, which are either human serum susceptible (Tbb) or known to resist lysis via an alternative mechanism (Tbr and Tbg group 2). We hypothesize that this single substitution contributes to reduced uptake of TLF and thus may play a key role in conferring serum resistance to Tbg group 1. In contrast, similarity in HpHbR sequence among isolates of Tbg group 2 and Tbb/Tbr provides further evidence that human serum resistance in Tbg group 2 is likely independent of HpHbR function. PMID:22802982

  1. Phosphoinositides, kinases and adaptors coordinating endocytosis in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Paul T; Field, Mark C

    2015-01-01

    In the kinetoplastid parasite Trypanosoma brucei clathrin-mediated endocytosis is essential for survival and aids immune evasion in the mammalian host. The formation of endocytic clathrin coated vesicles in T. brucei is via a unique mechanism owing to an evolutionarily recent loss of the adaptor protein (AP)2 complex, a central hub in endocytic vesicle assembly. Despite this loss, recent studies examining endocytic clathrin coat assembly have highlighted a high degree of conservation between trypanosomes and their mammalian hosts. In particular phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) and its putative effectors, TbCALM and TbEpsinR, are central to clathrin-mediated endocytosis in the trypanosome, just as they are in animal cells. In addition to providing insights into the cell biology of T. brucei, these studies also suggest an ancient, possibly pan-eukaryotic connection between PtdIns(4,5)P2 and endocytosis. PMID:27064836

  2. PCR analysis and spatial repartition of trypanosomes infecting tsetse flies in Sidéradougou area of Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    De La Rocque, S; Lefrancois, T; Reifenberg, J M; Solano, P; Kabore, I; Bengaly, Z; Augusseau, X; Cuisance, D

    1998-06-29

    A parasitological and entomological survey was conducted in the Sideradougou area (south of Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso) in order to identify transmission factors of African trypanosomosis. A total of 3600 tsetse flies (Glossina tachinoides, Glossina palpalis gambiensis) were captured along 120 km of linear gallery forest and half of them were dissected. PCR analysis was undertaken on parasitologically positive flies (161 G. tachinoides, 92 G. palpalis gambiensis) to characterize the different trypanosomes. All the results were integrated in a GIS (Geographical Information System). Spatial repartition of the characterized trypanosomes enabled to recognize different areas with specific patterns of infection. Relations with environmental factors are discussed. PMID:9668447

  3. Reduced Mitochondrial Membrane Potential Is a Late Adaptation of Trypanosoma brucei brucei to Isometamidium Preceded by Mutations in the γ Subunit of the F1Fo-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Munday, Jane C.; Tagoe, Daniel N. A.; Stelmanis, Valters; Schnaufer, Achim

    2016-01-01

    Background Isometamidium is the main prophylactic drug used to prevent the infection of livestock with trypanosomes that cause Animal African Trypanosomiasis. As well as the animal infective trypanosome species, livestock can also harbor the closely related human infective subspecies T. b. gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense. Resistance to isometamidium is a growing concern, as is cross-resistance to the diamidine drugs diminazene and pentamidine. Methodology/Principal Findings Two isometamidium resistant Trypanosoma brucei clones were generated (ISMR1 and ISMR15), being 7270- and 16,000-fold resistant to isometamidium, respectively, which retained their ability to grow in vitro and establish an infection in mice. Considerable cross-resistance was shown to ethidium bromide and diminazene, with minor cross-resistance to pentamidine. The mitochondrial membrane potentials of both resistant cell lines were significantly reduced compared to the wild type. The net uptake rate of isometamidium was reduced 2-3-fold but isometamidium efflux was similar in wild-type and resistant lines. Fluorescence microscopy and PCR analysis revealed that ISMR1 and ISMR15 had completely lost their kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) and both lines carried a mutation in the nuclearly encoded γ subunit gene of F1 ATPase, truncating the protein by 22 amino acids. The mutation compensated for the loss of the kinetoplast in bloodstream forms, allowing near-normal growth, and conferred considerable resistance to isometamidium and ethidium as well as significant resistance to diminazene and pentamidine, when expressed in wild type trypanosomes. Subsequent exposure to either isometamidium or ethidium led to rapid loss of kDNA and a further increase in isometamidium resistance. Conclusions/Significance Sub-lethal exposure to isometamidium gives rise to viable but highly resistant trypanosomes that, depending on sub-species, are infective to humans and cross-resistant to at least some diamidine drugs. The crucial

  4. The isolation and identification of Trypanosoma cruzi from raccoons in Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walton, B.C.; Bauman, P.M.; Diamond, L.S.; Herman, C.M.

    1958-01-01

    Five raccoons trapped at Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, Maryland, were found to have trypanosomes in the blood which were morphologically indistinguishable from Trypanosoma cruzi on stained smears. The organism grew well in culture. It developed and reproduced in Triatoma protracta, T. infestans, T. phyllosoma, and Rhodnius prolixus. Experimental infections were produced in raccoons, opossums, mice, rats, and monkeys by inoculation of blood, culture, and triatome forms. Typical leishmaniform bodies were found in tissue sections of cardiac muscle fibers from naturally and experimentally infected animals. Cross agglutinations carried out with Iiving cultural forms and rabbit antisera demonstrated a close antigenic relationship between the raccoon trypanosome and T. cruzi (Brazil strain). On the basis of (1) morphology, (2) presence of leishmaniform tissue stages, (3) development in triatomes, (4) infectivity to a variety of mammals, (5) culture characteristics, and (6) cross reactions in serological tests, this parasite is considered conspecific with Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas, 1909), the causative agent of American human trypanosomiasis.

  5. Phenotypic characteristics and trypanosome prevalence of Mursi cattle breed in the Bodi and Mursi districts of South Omo Zone, southwest Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Terefe, Endashaw; Haile, Aynalem; Mulatu, Wudyalew; Dessie, Tadelle; Mwai, Okeyo

    2015-03-01

    The study was conducted to characterize the morphological features of Mursi cattle breed and to identify the species of trypanosome infecting the cattle and its prevalence in these traditionally managed cattle in the Bodi and Mursi pastoral communities. Cattle body description and measurements were made on 201 matured animals. Blood samples were collected from 409 animals into heparin-treated capillary tubes and were centrifuged to 12,000 rpm for 5 min to identify trypanosome species from the wet smeared buffy coat and to estimate the degree of anemia (PCV). Tsetse flies were collected using phenol-treated biconical trap and the caught flies identified to species level. The breed possesses variable coat color pattern, coat color type, and have small to medium hump size on the thoracic vertebrae. Body measurement of Mursi cattle in the two locations did not show significant differences except chest girth, rump width, and horn length. Trypanosome prevalence in the Mursi cattle breed was 6.1%. The highest trypanosome infection was caused by Trypanosoma congolense (56%) followed by Trypanosoma vivax (40%) and Trypanosoma brucei (4%). Trypanosome prevalence significantly varies between dry (2.0%) and late rainy (10.1%) seasons (P < 0.001) and between lean (11.9%) and medium (2.4%) body condition score (P < 0.01). The PCV value was 22.1 ± 0.5%, which is significantly varied with season (P < 0.01) and parasitism (P < 0.001). Parasitaemic cattle show the lowest PCV value (20.4 ± 1%) than aparasitaemic (23.7 ± 0.3%) cattle and cattle with lean BCS showed the lowest (P < 0.0001) PCV value (20.4 ± 0.6%). Tsetse fly species identified in the study area were Glossina pallidipes, Glossina morsitans submorsitans, and Glossina fuscipes. The number of flies captured in late rainy season was higher than in dry season (P < 0.01). Despite the existence of trypanosome and high tsetse fly infestation in the areas, large proportion of the Mursi

  6. Farnesyl diphosphate synthase localizes to the cytoplasm of Trypanosoma cruzi and T. brucei.

    PubMed

    Ferella, Marcela; Li, Zhu-Hong; Andersson, Björn; Docampo, Roberto

    2008-06-01

    The farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS) has previously been characterized in trypanosomes as an essential enzyme for their survival and as the target for bisphosphonates, drugs that are effective both in vitro and in vivo against these parasites. Enzymes from the isoprenoid pathway have been assigned to different compartments in eukaryotes, including trypanosomatids. We here report that FPPS localizes to the cytoplasm of both Trypanosoma cruzi and T. brucei, and is not present in other organelles such as the mitochondria and glycosomes. PMID:18406406

  7. Novel Characteristics of Trypanosoma brucei Guanosine 5'-monophosphate Reductase Distinct from Host Animals

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Chihiro; Shinohara, Takahiro; Tomiyama, Ai; Imamura, Akira; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Nishimura, Kazuhiko; Fujimori, Ko; Shuto, Satoshi; Ishibashi, Osamu; Kubata, Bruno Kilunga; Inui, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic pathway of purine nucleotides in parasitic protozoa is a potent drug target for treatment of parasitemia. Guanosine 5’-monophosphate reductase (GMPR), which catalyzes the deamination of guanosine 5’-monophosphate (GMP) to inosine 5’-monophosphate (IMP), plays an important role in the interconversion of purine nucleotides to maintain the intracellular balance of their concentration. However, only a few studies on protozoan GMPR have been reported at present. Herein, we identified the GMPR in Trypanosoma brucei, a causative protozoan parasite of African trypanosomiasis, and found that the GMPR proteins were consistently localized to glycosomes in T. brucei bloodstream forms. We characterized its recombinant protein to investigate the enzymatic differences between GMPRs of T. brucei and its host animals. T. brucei GMPR was distinct in having an insertion of a tandem repeat of the cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) domain, which was absent in mammalian and bacterial GMPRs. The recombinant protein of T. brucei GMPR catalyzed the conversion of GMP to IMP in the presence of NADPH, and showed apparent affinities for both GMP and NADPH different from those of its mammalian counterparts. Interestingly, the addition of monovalent cations such as K+ and NH4+ to the enzymatic reaction increased the GMPR activity of T. brucei, whereas none of the mammalian GMPR’s was affected by these cations. The monophosphate form of the purine nucleoside analog ribavirin inhibited T. brucei GMPR activity, though mammalian GMPRs showed no or only a little inhibition by it. These results suggest that the mechanism of the GMPR reaction in T. brucei is distinct from that in the host organisms. Finally, we demonstrated the inhibitory effect of ribavirin on the proliferation of trypanosomes in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting the availability of ribavirin to develop a new therapeutic agent against African trypanosomiasis. PMID:26731263

  8. Troglitazone induces differentiation in Trypanosoma brucei

    SciTech Connect

    Denninger, Viola; Figarella, Katherine; Schoenfeld, Caroline; Brems, Stefanie; Busold, Christian; Lang, Florian; Hoheisel, Joerg; Duszenko, Michael . E-mail: michael.duszenko@uni-tuebingen.de

    2007-05-15

    Trypanosoma brucei, a protozoan parasite causing sleeping sickness, is transmitted by the tsetse fly and undergoes a complex lifecycle including several defined stages within the insect vector and its mammalian host. In the latter, differentiation from the long slender to the short stumpy form is induced by a yet unknown factor of trypanosomal origin. Here we describe that some thiazolidinediones are also able to induce differentiation. In higher eukaryotes, thiazolidinediones are involved in metabolism and differentiation processes mainly by binding to the intracellular receptor peroxisome proliferator activated receptor {gamma}. Our studies focus on the effects of troglitazone on bloodstream form trypanosomes. Differentiation was monitored using mitochondrial markers (membrane potential, succinate dehydrogenase activity, inhibition of oxygen uptake by KCN, amount of cytochrome transcripts), morphological changes (Transmission EM and light microscopy), and transformation experiments (loss of the Variant Surface Glycoprotein coat and increase of dihydroliponamide dehydrogenase activity). To further investigate the mechanisms responsible for these changes, microarray analyses were performed, showing an upregulation of expression site associated gene 8 (ESAG8), a potential differentiation regulator.

  9. Mitochondrial pyruvate carrier in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Štáfková, Jitka; Mach, Jan; Biran, Marc; Verner, Zdeněk; Bringaud, Frédéric; Tachezy, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Pyruvate is a key product of glycolysis that regulates the energy metabolism of cells. In Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of sleeping sickness, the fate of pyruvate varies dramatically during the parasite life cycle. In bloodstream forms, pyruvate is mainly excreted, whereas in tsetse fly forms, pyruvate is metabolized in mitochondria yielding additional ATP molecules. The character of the molecular machinery that mediates pyruvate transport across mitochondrial membrane was elusive until the recent discovery of mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC) in yeast and mammals. Here, we characterized pyruvate import into mitochondrion of T. brucei. We identified mpc1 and mpc2 homologs in the T. brucei genome with attributes of MPC protein family and we demonstrated that both proteins are present in the mitochondrial membrane of the parasite. Investigations of mpc1 or mpc2 gene knock-out cells proved that T. brucei MPC1/2 proteins facilitate mitochondrial pyruvate transport. Interestingly, MPC is expressed not only in procyclic trypanosomes with fully activated mitochondria but also in bloodstream trypanosomes in which most of pyruvate is excreted. Moreover, MPC appears to be essential for bloodstream forms, supporting the recently emerging picture that the functions of mitochondria in bloodstream forms are more diverse than it was originally thought. PMID:26748989

  10. Intravital Imaging of a Massive Lymphocyte Response in the Cortical Dura of Mice after Peripheral Infection by Trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Coles, Jonathan A.; Myburgh, Elmarie; Ritchie, Ryan; Hamilton, Alana; Rodgers, Jean; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Barrett, Michael P.; Brewer, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral infection by Trypanosoma brucei, the protozoan responsible for sleeping sickness, activates lymphocytes, and, at later stages, causes meningoencephalitis. We have videoed the cortical meninges and superficial parenchyma of C56BL/6 reporter mice infected with T.b.brucei. By use of a two-photon microscope to image through the thinned skull, the integrity of the tissues was maintained. We observed a 47-fold increase in CD2+ T cells in the meninges by 12 days post infection (dpi). CD11c+ dendritic cells also increased, and extravascular trypanosomes, made visible either by expression of a fluorescent protein, or by intravenous injection of furamidine, appeared. The likelihood that invasion will spread from the meninges to the parenchyma will depend strongly on whether the trypanosomes are below the arachnoid membrane, or above it, in the dura. Making use of optical signals from the skull bone, blood vessels and dural cells, we conclude that up to 40 dpi, the extravascular trypanosomes were essentially confined to the dura, as were the great majority of the T cells. Inhibition of T cell activation by intraperitoneal injection of abatacept reduced the numbers of meningeal T cells at 12 dpi and their mean speed fell from 11.64 ± 0.34 μm/min (mean ± SEM) to 5.2 ± 1.2 μm/min (p = 0.007). The T cells occasionally made contact lasting tens of minutes with dendritic cells, indicative of antigen presentation. The population and motility of the trypanosomes tended to decline after about 30 dpi. We suggest that the lymphocyte infiltration of the meninges may later contribute to encephalitis, but have no evidence that the dural trypanosomes invade the parenchyma. PMID:25881126

  11. Adaptin evolution in kinetoplastids and emergence of the variant surface glycoprotein coat in African trypanosomatids.

    PubMed

    Manna, Paul T; Kelly, Steven; Field, Mark C

    2013-04-01

    The kinetoplastids are an important group of protozoa from the Excavata supergroup, and cause numerous diseases with wide environmental, economic and ecological impact. Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis, expresses a dense variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat, facilitating immune evasion via rapid switching and antigenic variation. Coupled to VSG switching is efficient clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), which removes anti-VSG antibody from the parasite surface. While the precise molecular basis for an extreme CME flux is unknown, genes encoding the AP2 complex, central to CME in most organisms, are absent from T. brucei, suggesting a mechanistic divergence in trypanosome CME. Here we identify the AP complex gene cohorts of all available kinetoplastid genomes and a new Trypanosoma grayi genome. We find multiple secondary losses of AP complexes, but that loss of AP2 is restricted to T. brucei and closest relatives. Further, loss of AP2 correlates precisely with the presence of VSG genes, supporting a model whereby these two adaptations may function synergistically in immune evasion. PMID:23337175

  12. Adaptin evolution in kinetoplastids and emergence of the variant surface glycoprotein coat in African trypanosomatids

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Paul T.; Kelly, Steven; Field, Mark C.

    2013-01-01

    The kinetoplastids are an important group of protozoa from the Excavata supergroup, and cause numerous diseases with wide environmental, economic and ecological impact. Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis, expresses a dense variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat, facilitating immune evasion via rapid switching and antigenic variation. Coupled to VSG switching is efficient clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), which removes anti-VSG antibody from the parasite surface. While the precise molecular basis for an extreme CME flux is unknown, genes encoding the AP2 complex, central to CME in most organisms, are absent from T. brucei, suggesting a mechanistic divergence in trypanosome CME. Here we identify the AP complex gene cohorts of all available kinetoplastid genomes and a new Trypanosoma grayi genome. We find multiple secondary losses of AP complexes, but that loss of AP2 is restricted to T. brucei and closest relatives. Further, loss of AP2 correlates precisely with the presence of VSG genes, supporting a model whereby these two adaptations may function synergistically in immune evasion. PMID:23337175

  13. Ethyl Pyruvate Emerges as a Safe and Fast Acting Agent against Trypanosoma brucei by Targeting Pyruvate Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Worku, Netsanet; Stich, August; Daugschies, Arwid; Wenzel, Iris; Kurz, Randy; Thieme, Rene; Kurz, Susanne; Birkenmeier, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Background Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) also called sleeping sickness is an infectious disease in humans caused by an extracellular protozoan parasite. The disease, if left untreated, results in 100% mortality. Currently available drugs are full of severe drawbacks and fail to escape the fast development of trypanosoma resistance. Due to similarities in cell metabolism between cancerous tumors and trypanosoma cells, some of the current registered drugs against HAT have also been tested in cancer chemotherapy. Here we demonstrate for the first time that the simple ester, ethyl pyruvate, comprises such properties. Results The current study covers the efficacy and corresponding target evaluation of ethyl pyruvate on T. brucei cell lines using a combination of biochemical techniques including cell proliferation assays, enzyme kinetics, phasecontrast microscopic video imaging and ex vivo toxicity tests. We have shown that ethyl pyruvate effectively kills trypanosomes most probably by net ATP depletion through inhibition of pyruvate kinase (Ki = 3.0±0.29 mM). The potential of ethyl pyruvate as a trypanocidal compound is also strengthened by its fast acting property, killing cells within three hours post exposure. This has been demonstrated using video imaging of live cells as well as concentration and time dependency experiments. Most importantly, ethyl pyruvate produces minimal side effects in human red cells and is known to easily cross the blood-brain-barrier. This makes it a promising candidate for effective treatment of the two clinical stages of sleeping sickness. Trypanosome drug-resistance tests indicate irreversible cell death and a low incidence of resistance development under experimental conditions. Conclusion Our results present ethyl pyruvate as a safe and fast acting trypanocidal compound and show that it inhibits the enzyme pyruvate kinase. Competitive inhibition of this enzyme was found to cause ATP depletion and cell death. Due to its ability to

  14. Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification for Detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in Urine and Saliva Samples in Nonhuman Primate Model

    PubMed Central

    Ngotho, Maina; Kagira, John Maina; Gachie, Beatrice Muthoni; Karanja, Simon Muturi; Waema, Maxwell Wambua; Maranga, Dawn Nyawira; Maina, Naomi Wangari

    2015-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a vector-borne parasitic zoonotic disease. The disease caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense is the most prevalent in Africa. Early diagnosis is hampered by lack of sensitive diagnostic techniques. This study explored the potential of loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the detection of T. b. gambiense infection in a vervet monkey HAT model. Six vervet monkeys were experimentally infected with T. b. gambiense IL3253 and monitored for 180 days after infection. Parasitaemia was scored daily. Blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), saliva, and urine samples were collected weekly. PCR and LAMP were performed on serum, CSF, saliva, and urine samples. The detection by LAMP was significantly higher than that of parasitological methods and PCR in all the samples. The performance of LAMP varied between the samples and was better in serum followed by saliva and then urine samples. In the saliva samples, LAMP had 100% detection between 21 and 77 dpi, whereas in urine the detection it was slightly lower, but there was over 80% detection between 28 and 91 dpi. However, LAMP could not detect trypanosomes in either saliva or urine after 140 and 126 dpi, respectively. The findings of this study emphasize the importance of LAMP in diagnosis of HAT using saliva and urine samples. PMID:26504841

  15. Probing the Metabolic Network in Bloodstream-Form Trypanosoma brucei Using Untargeted Metabolomics with Stable Isotope Labelled Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Creek, Darren J.; Mazet, Muriel; Achcar, Fiona; Anderson, Jana; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kamour, Ruwida; Morand, Pauline; Millerioux, Yoann; Biran, Marc; Kerkhoven, Eduard J.; Chokkathukalam, Achuthanunni; Weidt, Stefan K.; Burgess, Karl E. V.; Breitling, Rainer; Watson, David G.; Bringaud, Frédéric; Barrett, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics coupled with heavy-atom isotope-labelled glucose has been used to probe the metabolic pathways active in cultured bloodstream form trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma brucei, a parasite responsible for human African trypanosomiasis. Glucose enters many branches of metabolism beyond glycolysis, which has been widely held to be the sole route of glucose metabolism. Whilst pyruvate is the major end-product of glucose catabolism, its transamination product, alanine, is also produced in significant quantities. The oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway is operative, although the non-oxidative branch is not. Ribose 5-phosphate generated through this pathway distributes widely into nucleotide synthesis and other branches of metabolism. Acetate, derived from glucose, is found associated with a range of acetylated amino acids and, to a lesser extent, fatty acids; while labelled glycerol is found in many glycerophospholipids. Glucose also enters inositol and several sugar nucleotides that serve as precursors to macromolecule biosynthesis. Although a Krebs cycle is not operative, malate, fumarate and succinate, primarily labelled in three carbons, were present, indicating an origin from phosphoenolpyruvate via oxaloacetate. Interestingly, the enzyme responsible for conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to oxaloacetate, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, was shown to be essential to the bloodstream form trypanosomes, as demonstrated by the lethal phenotype induced by RNAi-mediated downregulation of its expression. In addition, glucose derivatives enter pyrimidine biosynthesis via oxaloacetate as a precursor to aspartate and orotate. PMID:25775470

  16. Phylogenetic diversity of bat trypanosomes of subgenus Schizotrypanum based on multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, random amplified polymorphic DNA, and cytochrome b nucleotide sequence analyses.

    PubMed

    Barnabe, C; Brisse, S; Tibayrenc, M

    2003-02-01

    Trypanosome stocks isolated from bats (Chiroptera) and belonging to the subgenus Schizotrypanum were analyzed by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE) at 22 loci, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) with 14 primers and/or cytochrome b nucleotide sequence. Bat trypanosomes belonged to the species Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei (10 stocks), Trypanosoma dionisii (four stocks) and Trypanosoma vespertilionis (three stocks). One T. rangeli stock and seven stocks of T. cruzi sensu stricto, the agent of Chagas disease, were included for comparison. The homology of several RAPD fragments shared by distinct species was verified by hybridization. The sequence of a 516-nucleotide portion of the maxicircle-encoded cytochrome b (CYb) coding region was determined in representative stocks of the species under study. Phylogenetic analysis of the data confirmed the previous taxonomic attribution of these bat trypanosomes based on biological, epidemiological and ecological features. However, a new finding was that within T. cruzi marinkellei two major subdivisions could be distinguished, T.c.m. I, found in the spear-nose bats Phyllostomus discolor and Phyllostomus hastatus, and T.c.m. II, from P. discolor. In addition, the T. c. marinkellei 'Z' stock from a short-tailed bat (Carollia perspicillata) was distantly related to these two subdivisions, and the monophyly of T. c. marinkellei is unclear based on the present data. Based on the present sample, the European species T. dionisii and T. vespertilionis appeared to be more homogeneous. RAPD and CYb data both suggested the monophyly of a group composed of T. cruzi and the two major subdivisions of T. cruzi marinkellei. This study shows that MLEE, RAPD and CYb can be used for taxonomic assignment and provide valuable phylogenetic information for strains and taxa within the subgenus Schizotrypanum. An evolutionary scenario in which the broad host-range parasite T. cruzi would be derived from a bat-restricted trypanosome ancestor

  17. Ribosomal DNA analysis of tsetse and non-tsetse transmitted Ethiopian Trypanosoma vivax strains in view of improved molecular diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Fikru, Regassa; Matetovici, Irina; Rogé, Stijn; Merga, Bekana; Goddeeris, Bruno Maria; Büscher, Philippe; Van Reet, Nick

    2016-04-15

    Animal trypanosomosis caused by Trypanosoma vivax (T. vivax) is a devastating disease causing serious economic losses. Most molecular diagnostics for T. vivax infection target the ribosomal DNA locus (rDNA) but are challenged by the heterogeneity among T. vivax strains. In this study, we investigated the rDNA heterogeneity of Ethiopian T. vivax strains in relation to their presence in tsetse-infested and tsetse-free areas and its effect on molecular diagnosis. We sequenced the rDNA loci of six Ethiopian (three from tsetse-infested and three from tsetse-free areas) and one Nigerian T. vivax strain. We analysed the obtained sequences in silico for primer-mismatches of some commonly used diagnostic PCR assays and for GC content. With these data, we selected some rDNA diagnostic PCR assays for evaluation of their diagnostic accuracy. Furthermore we constructed two phylogenetic networks based on sequences within the smaller subunit (SSU) of 18S and within the 5.8S and internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) to assess the relatedness of Ethiopian T. vivax strains to strains from other African countries and from South America. In silico analysis of the rDNA sequence showed important mismatches of some published diagnostic PCR primers and high GC content of T. vivax rDNA. The evaluation of selected diagnostic PCR assays with specimens from cattle under natural T. vivax challenge showed that this high GC content interferes with the diagnostic accuracy of PCR, especially in cases of mixed infections with T. congolense. Adding betain to the PCR reaction mixture can enhance the amplification of T. vivax rDNA but decreases the sensitivity for T. congolense and Trypanozoon. The networks illustrated that Ethiopian T. vivax strains are considerably heterogeneous and two strains (one from tsetse-infested and one from tsetse-free area) are more related to the West African and South American strains than to the East African strains. The rDNA locus sequence of six Ethiopian T. vivax

  18. Investigation of the morphological diversity of the potentially zoonotic Trypanosoma copemani in quokkas and Gilbert's potoroos.

    PubMed

    Austen, Jill M; Reid, Simon A; Robinson, Derrick R; Friend, James A; Ditcham, William G F; Irwin, Peter J; Ryan, Una

    2015-09-01

    Trypanosomes are blood-borne parasites that can cause severe disease in both humans and animals, yet little is known of the pathogenicity and life-cycles of trypanosomes in native Australian mammals. Trypanosoma copemani is known to be infective to a variety of Australian marsupials and has recently been shown to be potentially zoonotic as it is resistant to normal human serum. In the present study, in vivo and in vitro examination of blood and cultures from Australian marsupials was conducted using light microscopy, immunofluorescence, scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Promastigote, sphaeromastigote and amastigote life-cycle stages were detected in vivo and in vitro. Novel trypanosome-like stages were also detected both in vivo and in vitro representing an oval stage, an extremely thin stage, an adherent stage and a tiny round stage. The tiny round and adherent stages appeared to adhere to erythrocytes causing potential haematological damage with clinical effects similar to haemolytic anaemia. The present study shows for the first time that trypomastigotes are not the only life-cycle stages circulating within the blood stream of trypanosome infected Australian native marsupials and provides insights into possible pathogenic mechanisms of this potentially zoonotic trypanosome species. PMID:26160545

  19. Growth and differentiation on a trypanosome of the subgenus Schizotrypanum from the bat Phyllostomus hastatus.

    PubMed

    Hamanaka, S I; Pinto, A da S

    1993-01-01

    The effects of temperature, pH, osmolarity and aeration on the growth and differentiation of a trypanosome of the subgenus Schizotrypanum isolated from the bat Phyllostomus hastatus were studied. In general, the growth characteristics of the flagellate were similar to those of Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum) cruzi. However, the parasite did not growth at 33 or 37 C. Increase in the osmolarity and aeration promoted growth at 33 C. Significant metacyclogenesis was detected only in the growth condition where maximal growth occurred (28 C, pH 7.3, 380 mOs/kg, in tissue culture flasks), at the end of the exponential growth phase. The beginning of the metacyclogenesis process was coincident with most glucose utilization and lowest pH. During metacyclogenesis both culture medium pH and osmolarity increased steadily. PMID:8159823

  20. Roles of triosephosphate isomerase and aerobic metabolism in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed Central

    Helfert, S; Estévez, A M; Bakker, B; Michels, P; Clayton, C

    2001-01-01

    Kinetoplastid protozoa compartmentalize the first seven enzymes of glycolysis and two enzymes of glycerol metabolism in a microbody, the glycosome. While in its mammalian host, Trypanosoma brucei depends entirely on glucose for ATP generation. Under aerobic conditions, most of the glucose is metabolized to pyruvate. Aerobic metabolism depends on the activities of glycosomal triosephosphate isomerase and a mitochondrial glycerophosphate oxidase, and on glycerophosphate<-->dihydroxyacetone phosphate exchange across the glycosomal membrane. Using a combination of genetics and computer modelling, we show that triosephosphate isomerase is probably essential for bloodstream trypanosome survival, but not for the insect-dwelling procyclics, which preferentially use amino acids as an energy source. When the enzyme level decreased to about 15% of that of the wild-type, the growth rate was halved. Below this level, a lethal rise in dihydroxyacetone phosphate was predicted. Expression of cytosolic triosephosphate isomerase inhibited cell growth. Attempts to knockout the trypanosome alternative oxidase genes (which are needed for glycerophosphate oxidase activity) were unsuccessful, but when we lowered the level of the corresponding mRNA by expressing a homologous double-stranded RNA, oxygen consumption was reduced fourfold and the rate of trypanosome growth was halved. PMID:11415442

  1. Refractory hypoglycaemia in a dog infected with Trypanosoma congolense

    PubMed Central

    Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Desquesnes, Marc; Dorso, Laetitia; Ravel, Sophie; Bossard, Géraldine; Charbonneau, Morgane; Garand, Annabelle; Roux, Françoise A.

    2016-01-01

    A 20 kg German shepherd dog was presented to a French veterinary teaching hospital for seizures and hyperthermia. The dog had returned 1 month previously from a six-month stay in Senegal and sub-Saharan Africa. Biochemistry and haematology showed severe hypoglycaemia (0.12 g/L), anaemia and thrombocytopenia. Despite administration of large amounts of glucose (30 mL of 30% glucose IV and 10 mL of 70% sucrose by gavage tube hourly), 26 consecutive blood glucose measurements were below 0.25 g/L (except one). Routine cytological examination of blood smears revealed numerous free extracytoplasmic protozoa consistent with Trypanosoma congolense. PCR confirmed a Trypanosoma congolense forest-type infection. Treatment consisted of six injections of pentamidine at 48-hour intervals. Trypanosomes had disappeared from the blood smears four days following the first injection. Clinical improvement was correlated with the normalization of laboratory values. The infection relapsed twice and the dog was treated again; clinical signs and parasites disappeared and the dog was considered cured; however, 6 years after this incident, serological examination by ELISA T. congolense was positive. The status of this dog (infected or non-infected) remains unclear. Hypoglycaemia was the most notable clinical feature in this case. It was spectacular in its severity and in its refractory nature; glucose administration seemed only to feed the trypanosomes, indicating that treatment of hypoglycaemia may in fact have been detrimental. PMID:26795063

  2. Feeding sources and trypanosome infection index of Rhodnius pallescens in a Chagas disease endemic area of Amador County, Panama.

    PubMed

    Pineda, Vanessa; Montalvo, Edilma; Alvarez, Dayra; Santamaría, Ana María; Calzada, Jose Eduardo; Saldaña, Azael

    2008-01-01

    The sylvatic triatomine Rhodnius pallescens is considered to be the most important and widespread vector of Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli in Panama. However, its behavior and biological characteristics have only been partially investigated. Thus, to achieve sustainable and efficient control over Chagas disease in Panama, a better understanding of the ecology and biology of R. pallescens is essential. In this study we evaluated R. pallescens host feeding sources using a dot-blot assay, and the trypanosome infection index by PCR analysis in a Chagas disease endemic area of central Panama. It was found that in peridomestic palm trees, 20.3% of the examined bugs had fed on opossums (Didelphis marsupialis). However, we observed an increased anthropophagy (25.4%) for those bugs collected inside houses. Considering the domestic and peridomestic habitats as a whole, the proportion of collected R. pallescens infected with trypanosomes was 87.4%. In the two habitats the predominant infection was with T. cruzi (80-90%). Between 47-51% of the analyzed triatomines were infected with T. rangeli. Mixed infections (40-51%) were also detected. These findings provide a better basis for the implementation of a rational control and surveillance program for Chagas disease in regions where R. pallescens is endemic. PMID:18488091

  3. Size-fractionation of the small chromosomes of Trypanozoon and Nannomonas trypanosomes by pulsed field gradient gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Gibson, W C; Borst, P

    1986-02-01

    We have compared the molecular karyotypes of trypanosomes from different subgroups within subgenus Trypanozoon by pulsed field gradient (PFG) gel electrophoresis. Although the overall karyotype was similar, there was much variation in the size of chromosomes between different stocks. Two of three stocks of Trypanosoma (Trypanozoon) brucei gambiense had remarkably small mini-chromosomes: 25-50 kilobase pairs compared to 50-150 kilobase pairs for the mini-chromosomes of other Trypanozoon stocks. The relative amount of DNA in the mini-chromosomal fraction of different stocks correlated well with the amount of 177 base pair satellite DNA monomer per microgram nuclear DNA. Hybridisation of Southern blots of pulsed field gradient gels with a number of gene probes showed that the loci for tubulin and phosphoglycerate kinase in Trypanozoon probably lie on the same chromosome, together with some variant surface glycoprotein genes; the genes for triose phosphate isomerase and glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase are separately located both with respect to each other and the above housekeeping genes. Therefore, there are at minimum three pairs of chromosomes carrying housekeeping genes in Trypanozoon. In some stocks the chromosomes carrying the tubulin and phosphoglycerate kinase genes are split into two bands, suggesting that homologous chromosomes may differ substantially in size in trypanosomes. One Trypanosoma (Nannomonas) congolense stock examined had a similar pattern of chromosome distribution to that of Trypanozoon, but with very small mini-chromosomes (25-50 kilobase pairs.) PMID:3960051

  4. The trypanosome transcriptome is remodelled during differentiation but displays limited responsiveness within life stages

    PubMed Central

    Koumandou, V Lila; Natesan, Senthil Kumar A; Sergeenko, Tatiana; Field, Mark C

    2008-01-01

    Background Trypanosomatids utilise polycistronic transcription for production of the vast majority of protein-coding mRNAs, which operates in the absence of gene-specific promoters. Resolution of nascent transcripts by polyadenylation and trans-splicing, together with specific rates of mRNA turnover, serve to generate steady state transcript levels that can differ in abundance across several orders of magnitude and can be developmentally regulated. We used a targeted oligonucleotide microarray, representing the strongly developmentally-regulated T. brucei membrane trafficking system and ~10% of the Trypanosoma brucei genome, to investigate both between-stage, or differentiation-dependent, transcriptome changes and within-stage flexibility in response to various challenges. Results 6% of the gene cohort are developmentally regulated, including several small GTPases, SNAREs, vesicle coat factors and protein kinases both consistent with and extending previous data. Therefore substantial differentiation-dependent remodeling of the trypanosome transcriptome is associated with membrane transport. Both the microarray and qRT-PCR were then used to analyse transcriptome changes resulting from specific gene over-expression, knockdown, altered culture conditions and chemical stress. Firstly, manipulation of Rab5 expression results in co-ordinate changes to clathrin protein expression levels and endocytotic activity, but no detectable changes to steady-state mRNA levels, which indicates that the effect is mediated post-transcriptionally. Secondly, knockdown of clathrin or the variant surface glycoprotein failed to perturb transcription. Thirdly, exposure to dithiothreitol or tunicamycin revealed no evidence for a classical unfolded protein response, mediated in higher eukaryotes by transcriptional changes. Finally, altered serum levels invoked little transcriptome alteration beyond changes to expression of ESAG6/7, the transferrin receptor. Conclusion While trypanosomes

  5. Molecular characterization of trypanosome isolates from naturally infected domestic animals in Burkina, Faso.

    PubMed

    Reifenberg, J M; Solano, P; Duvallet, G; Cuisance, D; Simpore, J; Cuny, G

    1997-08-01

    A total of 33 trypanosome cryostabilates isolated from domestic animals (bovine and dogs) were analysed using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The PCR was undertaken on diluted and treated buffy coat solutions according to an easy protocol of purification, using primers specific to Trypanosoma (Nannomonas) congolense of Savannah, Riverine-Forest, Kilifi and Tsavo types, T. (N) simiae, T. (Trypanozoon) brucei and T. (Duttonella) vivax. The results showed a lack of PCR sensitivity when target solutions were simply diluted, probably a reflection of the inaccuracy of the dilution procedure at very low trypanosome numbers. Nine mixed infections were found in purified samples whereas only three were detected in diluted crude solutions. T. congolense Savannah-type was present in all stabilates. Double infections involving this type with the Riverine-Forest type, T. vivax or T. brucei, were found. One stabilate was found to be infected with the three trypanosome types, namely T. congolense Savannah and Riverine-Forest genotypes and T. vivax. No infection attributable to T. congolense Kilifi and Tsavo types or T. simiae was detected in these stabilates. This work confirmed the abundance of mixed infections in the field, which could not have been detected by the classical parasitological methods. Amongst the T. congolense infections, the Savannah genotype was found to be predominant over the Riverine-Forest type; that could be a consequence of differences in genotype virulence in cattle. The detection of T. congolense Riverine-Forest type in vertebrate hosts living in wet areas could be confirmation of the suspected affinity of relationships between this taxa and the riverine forest tsetse fly species. PMID:9299694

  6. Experimental transmission of the parasitic flagellates Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli between triatomine bugs or mice and captive neotropical bats.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Maurice E; Rasweiler Iv, John J; D'Alessandro, Antonio

    2007-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli-like trypanosomes have been found in a variety of neotropical bat species. In this study, bats (Artibeus lituratus, Carollia perspicillata, Desmodus rotundus, Glossophaga soricina, Molossus molossus, Phyllostomus hastatus) were maintained under controlled conditions, and experiments were conducted to determine how they might become infected naturally with trypanosomes. All bats were first screened for existing infections by hemoculture and the examination of blood smears, and only apparently uninfected animals were then used in the experiments. Proof was obtained that the triatomine bug Rhodnius prolixus would readily feed upon some of the bats, and two species became infected after being bitten by bugs infected with T. rangeli. Some bats also became infected by ingesting R. prolixus carrying T. cruzi, or following subcutaneous or intragastic inoculation with fecal suspensions of R. prolixus containing T. cruzi. P. hastatus became infected after ingesting mice carrying T. cruzi. All of the bats studied inhabit roosts that may be occupied by triatomine bugs and, with the exception of D. rotundus, all also feed to at least some extent upon insects. These findings provide further evidence of how bats may play significant roles in the epidemiology of T. cruzi and T. rangeli in the New World tropics. PMID:17710299

  7. Epidemiology of human African trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Jose R; Simarro, Pere P; Diarra, Abdoulaye; Jannin, Jean G

    2014-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), or sleeping sickness, is caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, which is a chronic form of the disease present in western and central Africa, and by Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, which is an acute disease located in eastern and southern Africa. The rhodesiense form is a zoonosis, with the occasional infection of humans, but in the gambiense form, the human being is regarded as the main reservoir that plays a key role in the transmission cycle of the disease. The gambiense form currently assumes that 98% of the cases are declared; the Democratic Republic of the Congo is the most affected country, with more than 75% of the gambiense cases declared. The epidemiology of the disease is mediated by the interaction of the parasite (trypanosome) with the vectors (tsetse flies), as well as with the human and animal hosts within a particular environment. Related to these interactions, the disease is confined in spatially limited areas called “foci”, which are located in Sub-Saharan Africa, mainly in remote rural areas. The risk of contracting HAT is, therefore, determined by the possibility of contact of a human being with an infected tsetse fly. Epidemics of HAT were described at the beginning of the 20th century; intensive activities have been set up to confront the disease, and it was under control in the 1960s, with fewer than 5,000 cases reported in the whole continent. The disease resurged at the end of the 1990s, but renewed efforts from endemic countries, cooperation agencies, and nongovernmental organizations led by the World Health Organization succeeded to raise awareness and resources, while reinforcing national programs, reversing the trend of the cases reported, and bringing the disease under control again. In this context, sustainable elimination of the gambiense HAT, defined as the interruption of the transmission of the disease, was considered as a feasible target for 2030. Since rhodesiense HAT is a zoonosis

  8. Epidemiology of human African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Franco, Jose R; Simarro, Pere P; Diarra, Abdoulaye; Jannin, Jean G

    2014-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), or sleeping sickness, is caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, which is a chronic form of the disease present in western and central Africa, and by Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, which is an acute disease located in eastern and southern Africa. The rhodesiense form is a zoonosis, with the occasional infection of humans, but in the gambiense form, the human being is regarded as the main reservoir that plays a key role in the transmission cycle of the disease. The gambiense form currently assumes that 98% of the cases are declared; the Democratic Republic of the Congo is the most affected country, with more than 75% of the gambiense cases declared. The epidemiology of the disease is mediated by the interaction of the parasite (trypanosome) with the vectors (tsetse flies), as well as with the human and animal hosts within a particular environment. Related to these interactions, the disease is confined in spatially limited areas called "foci", which are located in Sub-Saharan Africa, mainly in remote rural areas. The risk of contracting HAT is, therefore, determined by the possibility of contact of a human being with an infected tsetse fly. Epidemics of HAT were described at the beginning of the 20th century; intensive activities have been set up to confront the disease, and it was under control in the 1960s, with fewer than 5,000 cases reported in the whole continent. The disease resurged at the end of the 1990s, but renewed efforts from endemic countries, cooperation agencies, and nongovernmental organizations led by the World Health Organization succeeded to raise awareness and resources, while reinforcing national programs, reversing the trend of the cases reported, and bringing the disease under control again. In this context, sustainable elimination of the gambiense HAT, defined as the interruption of the transmission of the disease, was considered as a feasible target for 2030. Since rhodesiense HAT is a zoonosis, where

  9. Trypanosome species in neo-tropical bats: biological, evolutionary and epidemiological implications.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Juan David; Tapia-Calle, Gabriela; Muñoz-Cruz, Geissler; Poveda, Cristina; Rendón, Lina M; Hincapié, Eduwin; Guhl, Felipe

    2014-03-01

    Bats (Chiroptera) are the only mammals naturally able to fly. Due to this characteristic they play a relevant ecological role in the niches they inhabit. These mammals spread infectious diseases from enzootic to domestic foci. Rabbies, SARS, fungi, ebola and trypanosomes are the most common pathogens these animals may host. We conducted intensive sampling of bats from the phyllostomidae, vespertilionidae and emballonuridae families in six localities from Casanare department in eastern Colombia. Blood-EDTA samples were obtained and subsequently submitted to analyses of mitochondrial and nuclear genetic markers in order to conduct barcoding analyses to discriminate trypanosome species. The findings according to the congruence of the three molecular markers suggest the occurrence of Trypanosoma cruzi cruzi (51%), T. c. marinkellei (9%), T. dionisii (13%), T. rangeli (21%), T. evansi (4%) and T. theileri (2%) among 107 positive bat specimens. Regarding the T. cruzi DTUs, we observed the presence of TcI (60%), TcII (15%), TcIII (7%), TcIV (7%) and TcBAT (11%) being the first evidence to our concern of the foreseen genotype TcBAT in Colombia. These results allowed us to propose reliable hypotheses regarding the ecology and biology of the bats circulating in the area including the enigmatic question whether TcBAT should be considered a novel DTU. The epidemiological and evolutionary implications of these findings are herein discussed. PMID:23831017

  10. Lysozyme Activity in the Plasma of Rodents Infected With Their Homologous Trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Maraghi, S; Molyneux, DH; Wallbanks, KR

    2012-01-01

    Background In this study the concentration of lysozyme in blood plasma of Microtus agrestis, Clethrinomys glareolus, Apodemus sylvaticus, BK rats and outbred white mice before and after infection with culture forms of Trypanosoma microti, T, evotomys, T. grosi, T. lewisi and T. musculi respectively was measured. Methods Blood samples of rodents, Microtus agrestis, Clethrionomys glareolus, Apodemus sylvaticus, BK rats and outbred mice infected with T. microti, T. evotomys, T. grosi, T. lewisi and T. musculi respectively were collected in heparinized micro- tubes immediately before inoculation and 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 96 and more than 400 days after intra- perituneal inoculation with 5×105of their homologous trypanosome parasites of which more than half were metacyclic trypomastigote in 0.2 ml of culture medium. Micro- tubes were centrifuged and plasma samples were separated and the lysozyme activity was measured by the agar method. Results Levels of lysozyme rose rapidly three to six days after the inoculation to ten to twenty than their pre- infection levels. They then gradually decreased, although after more than one year they were still two to ten folds higher than controls. The highest level measured occurred in rats infected with T. lewisi and the lowest in A. sylvaticus infected with T. grosi. After one year the highest concentration of lysozyme was in mice infected with T. musculi and lowest in A. sylvaticus. Conclusion Persistent enhanced lysozyme levels may prevent re- infection with trypanosomes. PMID:23323096

  11. Structural basis for trypanosomal haem acquisition and susceptibility to the host innate immune system.

    PubMed

    Stødkilde, Kristian; Torvund-Jensen, Morten; Moestrup, Søren K; Andersen, Christian B F

    2014-01-01

    Sleeping sickness is caused by trypanosome parasites, which infect humans and livestock in Sub-Saharan Africa. Haem is an important growth factor for the parasites and is acquired from the host by receptor-mediated uptake of haptoglobin (Hp)-haemoglobin (Hb) complexes. The parasite Hp-Hb receptor (HpHbR) is also a target for a specialized innate immune defence executed by trypanosome-killing lipoprotein particles containing an Hp-related protein in complex with Hb. Here we report the structure of the multimeric complex between human Hp-Hb and Trypanosoma brucei brucei HpHbR. Two receptors forming kinked three-helical rods with small head regions bind to Hp and the β-subunits of Hb (βHb), with one receptor at each end of the dimeric Hp-Hb complex. The Hb β-subunit haem group directly associates with the receptors, which allows for sensing of haem-containing Hp-Hb. The HpHbR-binding region of Hp is conserved in Hp-related protein, indicating an identical recognition of Hp-Hb and trypanolytic particles by HpHbR in human plasma. PMID:25410714

  12. Identification of a Novel Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling RNA Helicase of Trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Alexandre Haruo; Serpeloni, Mariana; Hiraiwa, Priscila Mazzocchi; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli Fumie; Muniz, João Renato Carvalho; Motta, Maria Cristina Machado; Vidal, Newton Medeiros; Goldenberg, Samuel; Ávila, Andréa Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression in trypanosomes is controlled mostly by post-transcriptional pathways. Little is known about the components of mRNA nucleocytoplasmic export routes in these parasites. Comparative genomics has shown that the mRNA transport pathway is the least conserved pathway among eukaryotes. Nonetheless, we identified a RNA helicase (Hel45) that is conserved across eukaryotes and similar to shuttling proteins involved in mRNA export. We used in silico analysis to predict the structure of Trypanosoma cruzi Hel45, including the N-terminal domain and the C-terminal domain, and our findings suggest that this RNA helicase can form complexes with mRNA. Hel45 was present in both nucleus and cytoplasm. Electron microscopy showed that Hel45 is clustered close to the cytoplasmic side of nuclear pore complexes, and is also present in the nucleus where it is associated with peripheral compact chromatin. Deletion of a predicted Nuclear Export Signal motif led to the accumulation of Hel45ΔNES in the nucleus, indicating that Hel45 shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. This transport was dependent on active transcription but did not depend on the exportin Crm1. Knockdown of Mex67 in T. brucei caused the nuclear accumulation of the T. brucei ortholog of Hel45. Indeed, Hel45 is present in mRNA ribonucleoprotein complexes that are not associated with polysomes. It is still necessary to confirm the precise function of Hel45. However, this RNA helicase is associated with mRNA metabolism and its nucleocytoplasmic shuttling is dependent on an mRNA export route involving Mex67 receptor. PMID:25313564

  13. Novel African Trypanocidal Agents: Membrane Rigidifying Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, John M.; Scelsi, Chris; Hartel, Andreas; Jones, Nicola G.; Engstler, Markus; Capewell, Paul; MacLeod, Annette; Hajduk, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The bloodstream developmental forms of pathogenic African trypanosomes are uniquely susceptible to killing by small hydrophobic peptides. Trypanocidal activity is conferred by peptide hydrophobicity and charge distribution and results from increased rigidity of the plasma membrane. Structural analysis of lipid-associated peptide suggests a mechanism of phospholipid clamping in which an internal hydrophobic bulge anchors the peptide in the membrane and positively charged moieties at the termini coordinate phosphates of the polar lipid headgroups. This mechanism reveals a necessary phenotype in bloodstream form African trypanosomes, high membrane fluidity, and we suggest that targeting the plasma membrane lipid bilayer as a whole may be a novel strategy for the development of new pharmaceutical agents. Additionally, the peptides we have described may be valuable tools for probing the biosynthetic machinery responsible for the unique composition and characteristics of African trypanosome plasma membranes. PMID:22970207

  14. The spliceosomal snRNP core complex of Trypanosoma brucei: Cloning and functional analysis reveals seven Sm protein constituents

    PubMed Central

    Palfi, Zsofia; Lücke, Stephan; Lahm, Hans-Werner; Lane, William S.; Kruft, Volker; Bragado-Nilsson, Elisabeth; Séraphin, Bertrand; Bindereif, Albrecht

    2000-01-01

    Each of the trypanosome small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) U2, U4/U6, and U5, as well as the spliced leader (SL) RNP, contains a core of common proteins, which we have previously identified. This core is unusual because it is not recognized by anti-Sm Abs and it associates with an Sm-related sequence in the trypanosome small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs). Using peptide sequences derived from affinity-purified U2 snRNP proteins, we have cloned cDNAs for five common proteins of 8.5, 10, 12.5, 14, and 15 kDa of Trypanosoma brucei and identified them as Sm proteins SmF (8.5 kDa), -E (10 kDa), -D1 (12.5 kDa), -G (14 kDa), and -D2 (15 kDa), respectively. Furthermore, we found the trypanosome SmB (T. brucei) and SmD3 (Trypanosoma cruzi) homologues through database searches, thus completing a set of seven canonical Sm proteins. Sequence comparisons of the trypanosome proteins revealed several deviations in highly conserved positions from the Sm consensus motif. We have identified a network of specific heterodimeric and -trimeric Sm protein interactions in vitro. These results are summarized in a model of the trypanosome Sm core, which argues for a strong conservation of the Sm particle structure. The conservation extends also to the functional level, because at least one trypanosome Sm protein, SmG, was able to specifically complement a corresponding mutation in yeast. PMID:10900267

  15. Identification of the ISWI Chromatin Remodeling Complex of the Early Branching Eukaryote Trypanosoma brucei*

    PubMed Central

    Stanne, Tara; Narayanan, Mani Shankar; Ridewood, Sophie; Ling, Alexandra; Witmer, Kathrin; Kushwaha, Manish; Wiesler, Simone; Wickstead, Bill; Wood, Jennifer; Rudenko, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    ISWI chromatin remodelers are highly conserved in eukaryotes and are important for the assembly and spacing of nucleosomes, thereby controlling transcription initiation and elongation. ISWI is typically associated with different subunits, forming specialized complexes with discrete functions. In the unicellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei, which causes African sleeping sickness, TbISWI down-regulates RNA polymerase I (Pol I)-transcribed variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene expression sites (ESs), which are monoallelically expressed. Here, we use tandem affinity purification to determine the interacting partners of TbISWI. We identify three proteins that do not show significant homology with known ISWI-associated partners. Surprisingly, one of these is nucleoplasmin-like protein (NLP), which we had previously shown to play a role in ES control. In addition, we identify two novel ISWI partners, regulator of chromosome condensation 1-like protein (RCCP) and phenylalanine/tyrosine-rich protein (FYRP), both containing protein motifs typically found on chromatin proteins. Knockdown of RCCP or FYRP in bloodstream form T. brucei results in derepression of silent variant surface glycoprotein ESs, as had previously been shown for TbISWI and NLP. All four proteins are expressed and interact with each other in both major life cycle stages and show similar distributions at Pol I-transcribed loci. They are also found at Pol II strand switch regions as determined with ChIP. ISWI, NLP, RCCP, and FYRP therefore appear to form a single major ISWI complex in T. brucei (TbIC). This reduced complexity of ISWI regulation and the presence of novel ISWI partners highlights the early divergence of trypanosomes in evolution. PMID:26378228

  16. Identification of the ISWI Chromatin Remodeling Complex of the Early Branching Eukaryote Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Stanne, Tara M; Narayanan, Mani Shankar; Ridewood, Sophie; Ling, Alexandra; Witmer, Kathrin; Kushwaha, Manish; Wiesler, Simone; Wickstead, Bill; Wood, Jennifer; Rudenko, Gloria

    2015-11-01

    ISWI chromatin remodelers are highly conserved in eukaryotes and are important for the assembly and spacing of nucleosomes, thereby controlling transcription initiation and elongation. ISWI is typically associated with different subunits, forming specialized complexes with discrete functions. In the unicellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei, which causes African sleeping sickness, TbISWI down-regulates RNA polymerase I (Pol I)-transcribed variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene expression sites (ESs), which are monoallelically expressed. Here, we use tandem affinity purification to determine the interacting partners of TbISWI. We identify three proteins that do not show significant homology with known ISWI-associated partners. Surprisingly, one of these is nucleoplasmin-like protein (NLP), which we had previously shown to play a role in ES control. In addition, we identify two novel ISWI partners, regulator of chromosome condensation 1-like protein (RCCP) and phenylalanine/tyrosine-rich protein (FYRP), both containing protein motifs typically found on chromatin proteins. Knockdown of RCCP or FYRP in bloodstream form T. brucei results in derepression of silent variant surface glycoprotein ESs, as had previously been shown for TbISWI and NLP. All four proteins are expressed and interact with each other in both major life cycle stages and show similar distributions at Pol I-transcribed loci. They are also found at Pol II strand switch regions as determined with ChIP. ISWI, NLP, RCCP, and FYRP therefore appear to form a single major ISWI complex in T. brucei (TbIC). This reduced complexity of ISWI regulation and the presence of novel ISWI partners highlights the early divergence of trypanosomes in evolution. PMID:26378228

  17. Untreated Human Infections by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Are Not 100% Fatal

    PubMed Central

    Jamonneau, Vincent; Ilboudo, Hamidou; Kaboré, Jacques; Kaba, Dramane; Koffi, Mathurin; Solano, Philippe; Garcia, André; Courtin, David; Laveissière, Claude; Lingue, Kouakou; Büscher, Philippe; Bucheton, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    The final outcome of infection by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, the main agent of sleeping sickness, has always been considered as invariably fatal. While scarce and old reports have mentioned cases of self-cure in untreated patients, these studies suffered from the lack of accurate diagnostic tools available at that time. Here, using the most specific and sensitive tools available to date, we report on a long-term follow-up (15 years) of a cohort of 50 human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) patients from the Ivory Coast among whom 11 refused treatment after their initial diagnosis. In 10 out of 11 subjects who continued to refuse treatment despite repeated visits, parasite clearance was observed using both microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Most of these subjects (7/10) also displayed decreasing serological responses, becoming progressively negative to trypanosome variable antigens (LiTat 1.3, 1.5 and 1.6). Hence, in addition to the “classic” lethal outcome of HAT, we show that alternative natural progressions of HAT may occur: progression to an apparently aparasitaemic and asymptomatic infection associated with strong long-lasting serological responses and progression to an apparently spontaneous resolution of infection (with negative results in parasitological tests and PCR) associated with a progressive drop in antibody titres as observed in treated cases. While this study does not precisely estimate the frequency of the alternative courses for this infection, it is noteworthy that in the field national control programs encounter a significant proportion of subjects displaying positive serologic test results but negative results in parasitological testing. These findings demonstrate that a number of these subjects display such infection courses. From our point of view, recognising that trypanotolerance exists in humans, as is now widely accepted for animals, is a major step forward for future research in the field of HAT. PMID:22720107

  18. A Target-Based High Throughput Screen Yields Trypanosoma brucei Hexokinase Small Molecule Inhibitors with Antiparasitic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sharlow, Elizabeth R.; Lyda, Todd A.; Dodson, Heidi C.; Mustata, Gabriela; Morris, Meredith T.; Leimgruber, Stephanie S.; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Kashiwada, Yoshiki; Close, David; Lazo, John S.; Morris, James C.

    2010-01-01

    Background The parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei utilizes glycolysis exclusively for ATP production during infection of the mammalian host. The first step in this metabolic pathway is mediated by hexokinase (TbHK), an enzyme essential to the parasite that transfers the γ-phospho of ATP to a hexose. Here we describe the identification and confirmation of novel small molecule inhibitors of bacterially expressed TbHK1, one of two TbHKs expressed by T. brucei, using a high throughput screening assay. Methodology/Principal Findings Exploiting optimized high throughput screening assay procedures, we interrogated 220,233 unique compounds and identified 239 active compounds from which ten small molecules were further characterized. Computation chemical cluster analyses indicated that six compounds were structurally related while the remaining four compounds were classified as unrelated or singletons. All ten compounds were ∼20-17,000-fold more potent than lonidamine, a previously identified TbHK1 inhibitor. Seven compounds inhibited T. brucei blood stage form parasite growth (0.03≤EC50<3 µM) with parasite specificity of the compounds being demonstrated using insect stage T. brucei parasites, Leishmania promastigotes, and mammalian cell lines. Analysis of two structurally related compounds, ebselen and SID 17387000, revealed that both were mixed inhibitors of TbHK1 with respect to ATP. Additionally, both compounds inhibited parasite lysate-derived HK activity. None of the compounds displayed structural similarity to known hexokinase inhibitors or human African trypanosomiasis therapeutics. Conclusions/Significance The novel chemotypes identified here could represent leads for future therapeutic development against the African trypanosome. PMID:20405000

  19. Induced Resistance to Methionyl-tRNA Synthetase Inhibitors in Trypanosoma brucei Is Due to Overexpression of the Target

    PubMed Central

    Ranade, Ranae M.; Gillespie, J. Robert; Shibata, Sayaka; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Fan, Erkang; Hol, Wim G. J.

    2013-01-01

    New classes of antiparasitic drugs active against Trypanosoma brucei are needed to combat human African trypanosomiasis. Inhibitors of methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MetRS) have excellent potential to be developed for this purpose (S. Shibata, J. R. Gillespie, A. M. Kelley, A. J. Napuli, Z. Zhang, K. V. Kovzun, R. M. Pefley, J. Lam, F. H. Zucker, W. C. Van Voorhis, E. A. Merritt, W. G. Hol, C. L. Verlinde, E. Fan, and F. S. Buckner, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 55:1982–1989, 2011). In order to assess the potential for resistance to develop against this new class of inhibitors, T. brucei cultures were grown in the presence of MetRS inhibitors or comparison drugs. Resistance up to ∼50 times the baseline 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) was induced against a MetRS inhibitor after ∼120 days. A similar level of resistance to the clinical drug eflornithine was induced after ∼50 days and for pentamidine after ∼80 days. Thus, resistance was induced more slowly against MetRS inhibitors than against clinically used drugs. The parasites resistant to the MetRS inhibitor were shown to overexpress MetRS mRNA by a factor of 35 over the parental strain. Southern analysis indicated that the MetRS gene was amplified in the genome by nearly 8-fold. When injected into mice, the MetRS inhibitor-resistant parasites caused a reduced level of infection, indicating that the changes associated with resistance attenuated their virulence. This finding and the fact that resistance to MetRS inhibitors developed relatively slowly are encouraging for further development of this class of compounds. Published studies on other antitrypanosomal drugs have primarily shown that alterations in membrane transporters were the mechanisms responsible for resistance. This is the first published report of induced drug resistance in the African trypanosome due to overexpression of the target enzyme. PMID:23587950

  20. Discovery of Infection Associated Metabolic Markers in Human African Trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Lamour, Sabrina D; Gomez-Romero, Maria; Vorkas, Panagiotis A; Alibu, Vincent P; Saric, Jasmina; Holmes, Elaine; Sternberg, Jeremy M

    2015-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) remains a major neglected tropical disease in Sub-Saharan Africa. As clinical symptoms are usually non-specific, new diagnostic and prognostic markers are urgently needed to enhance the number of identified cases and optimise treatment. This is particularly important for disease caused by Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, where indirect immunodiagnostic approaches have to date been unsuccessful. We have conducted global metabolic profiling of plasma from T.b.rhodesiense HAT patients and endemic controls, using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and ultra-performance liquid chromatography, coupled with mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) and identified differences in the lipid, amino acid and metabolite profiles. Altogether 16 significantly disease discriminatory metabolite markers were found using NMR, and a further 37 lipid markers via UPLC-MS. These included significantly higher levels of phenylalanine, formate, creatinine, N-acetylated glycoprotein and triglycerides in patients relative to controls. HAT patients also displayed lower concentrations of histidine, sphingomyelins, lysophosphatidylcholines, and several polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines. While the disease metabolite profile was partially consistent with previous data published in experimental rodent infection, we also found unique lipid and amino acid profile markers highlighting subtle but important differences between the host response to trypanosome infections between animal models and natural human infections. Our results demonstrate the potential of metabolic profiling in the identification of novel diagnostic biomarkers and the elucidation of pathogenetic mechanisms in this disease. PMID:26505639

  1. Discovery of Infection Associated Metabolic Markers in Human African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Lamour, Sabrina D.; Gomez-Romero, Maria; Vorkas, Panagiotis A.; Alibu, Vincent P.; Saric, Jasmina; Holmes, Elaine; Sternberg, Jeremy M.

    2015-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) remains a major neglected tropical disease in Sub-Saharan Africa. As clinical symptoms are usually non-specific, new diagnostic and prognostic markers are urgently needed to enhance the number of identified cases and optimise treatment. This is particularly important for disease caused by Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, where indirect immunodiagnostic approaches have to date been unsuccessful. We have conducted global metabolic profiling of plasma from T.b.rhodesiense HAT patients and endemic controls, using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and ultra-performance liquid chromatography, coupled with mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) and identified differences in the lipid, amino acid and metabolite profiles. Altogether 16 significantly disease discriminatory metabolite markers were found using NMR, and a further 37 lipid markers via UPLC-MS. These included significantly higher levels of phenylalanine, formate, creatinine, N-acetylated glycoprotein and triglycerides in patients relative to controls. HAT patients also displayed lower concentrations of histidine, sphingomyelins, lysophosphatidylcholines, and several polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines. While the disease metabolite profile was partially consistent with previous data published in experimental rodent infection, we also found unique lipid and amino acid profile markers highlighting subtle but important differences between the host response to trypanosome infections between animal models and natural human infections. Our results demonstrate the potential of metabolic profiling in the identification of novel diagnostic biomarkers and the elucidation of pathogenetic mechanisms in this disease. PMID:26505639

  2. The essential polysome-associated RNA-binding protein RBP42 targets mRNAs involved in Trypanosoma brucei energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anish; Morales, Rachel; Banday, Mahrukh; Garcia, Stacey; Hao, Li; Cross, George A.M.; Estevez, Antonio M.; Bellofatto, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins that target mRNA coding regions are emerging as regulators of post-transcriptional processes in eukaryotes. Here we describe a newly identified RNA-binding protein, RBP42, which targets the coding region of mRNAs in the insect form of the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei. RBP42 is an essential protein and associates with polysome-bound mRNAs in the cytoplasm. A global survey of RBP42-bound mRNAs was performed by applying HITS-CLIP technology, which captures protein–RNA interactions in vivo using UV light. Specific RBP42–mRNA interactions, as well as mRNA interactions with a known RNA-binding protein, were purified using specific antibodies. Target RNA sequences were identified and quantified using high-throughput RNA sequencing. Analysis revealed that RBP42 bound mainly within the coding region of mRNAs that encode proteins involved in cellular energy metabolism. Although the mechanism of RBP42's function is unclear at present, we speculate that RBP42 plays a critical role in modulating T. brucei energy metabolism. PMID:22966087

  3. Repurposing human PDE4 inhibitors for neglected tropical diseases. Evaluation of analogs of the human PDE4 inhibitor GSK-256066 as inhibitors of PDEB1 of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Ochiana, Stefan O; Bland, Nicholas D; Settimo, Luca; Campbell, Robert K; Pollastri, Michael P

    2015-05-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) have been identified as important enzyme targets for drug development in both humans and Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis. With this in mind, we recently reported the profiling of a range of human phosphodiesterase inhibitors, showing that human PDE4 inhibitors tend to display the best potency against the trypanosomal phosphodiesterase TbrPDEB1. Among these was GSK-256066, a potent inhibitor of human PDE4 and a weak inhibitor of TbrPDEB1. In this report, we describe the results of a structure-activity relationship study of this chemotype, leading to the discovery of analogs with improved potency against TbrPDEB1 and micromolar inhibition of T. brucei cellular growth. We rationalize the potency trends via molecular docking of the new inhibitors into a recently reported apo structure of TbrPDEB1. The studies in this article will inform future efforts in repurposing human PDE inhibitors as antitrypanosomal agents. PMID:25283372

  4. Structure and transcription of the actin gene of Trypanosoma brucei

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Amar, M.F.; Pays, A.; Tebabi, P.; Dero, B.; Seebeck, T.; Steinert, M.; Pays, E.

    1988-05-01

    In Trypanosoma brucei, the actin gene is present in a cluster of two, three, or four tandemly linked copies, depending on the strain. Each cluster seems to exist in two allelic versions, as suggested by the polymorphism of both gene number and restriction fragment length in the DNA from cloned trypanosomes. The amplification of the gene copy number probably occurs through unequal sister chromatic exchange. The chromosomes harboring the actin genes belong to the large size class. The coding sequence was 1,128 nucleotides long and showed 60 to 70% homology to other eucaryotic actin genes. Surprisingly, this homology seemed weaker with Trypanosoma congolense, Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma vivax, Trypanosoma mega, or Leishmania acting-specific sequences. The mRNA was around 1.6 kilobases long and was synthesized at the same level in bloodstream and procyclic forms of the parasite. Large RNA precursors, up to 7.7 kilobases, were found in a pattern identical in strains containing either two or three gene copies. Probing of the flanking regions of the gene with either steady-state or in vitro transcripts, as well as S1 nuclease protection and primer extension experiments, allowed mapping of the 3' splice site of the actin mRNA, 38 nucleotides upstream from the translation initiation codon. A variably sized poly(dT) tract was found about 30 base pairs ahead of the splice site. The largest detected actin mRNA precursor seemed to give rise to at least two additional stable mRNAs. The RNA polymerase transcribing the actin gene exhibited the same sensitivity to inhibition by ..cap alpha..-amanitin as that transcribing both the spliced leader and the bulk of polyadenylated mRNAs.

  5. Evaluation of In Vitro Activity of Essential Oils against Trypanosoma brucei brucei and Trypanosoma evansi.

    PubMed

    Habila, Nathan; Agbaji, Abel S; Ladan, Zakari; Bello, Isaac A; Haruna, Emmanuel; Dakare, Monday A; Atolagbe, Taofiq O

    2010-01-01

    Essential oils (EOs) from Cymbopogon citratus (CC), Eucalyptus citriodora (EC), Eucalyptus camaldulensis (ED), and Citrus sinensis (CS) were obtained by hydrodistillation process. The EOs were evaluated in vitro for activity against Trypanosoma brucei brucei (Tbb) and Trypanosoma evansi (T. evansi). The EOs were found to possess antitrypanosomal activity in vitro in a dose-dependent pattern in a short period of time. The drop in number of parasite over time was achieved doses of 0.4 g/ml, 0.2 g/mL, and 0.1 g/mL for all the EOs. The concentration of 0.4 g/mL CC was more potent at 3 minutes and 2 minutes for Tbb and T. evansi, respectively. The GC-MS analysis of the EOs revealed presence of Cyclobutane (96.09%) in CS, 6-octenal (77.11%) in EC, Eucalyptol (75%) in ED, and Citral (38.32%) in CC among several other organic compounds. The results are discussed in relation to trypanosome chemotherapy. PMID:20700425

  6. Evaluation of In Vitro Activity of Essential Oils against Trypanosoma brucei brucei and Trypanosoma evansi

    PubMed Central

    Habila, Nathan; Agbaji, Abel S.; Ladan, Zakari; Bello, Isaac A.; Haruna, Emmanuel; Dakare, Monday A.; Atolagbe, Taofiq O.

    2010-01-01

    Essential oils (EOs) from Cymbopogon citratus (CC), Eucalyptus citriodora (EC), Eucalyptus camaldulensis (ED), and Citrus sinensis (CS) were obtained by hydrodistillation process. The EOs were evaluated in vitro for activity against Trypanosoma brucei brucei (Tbb) and Trypanosoma evansi (T. evansi). The EOs were found to possess antitrypanosomal activity in vitro in a dose-dependent pattern in a short period of time. The drop in number of parasite over time was achieved doses of 0.4 g/ml, 0.2 g/mL, and 0.1 g/mL for all the EOs. The concentration of 0.4 g/mL CC was more potent at 3 minutes and 2 minutes for Tbb and T. evansi, respectively. The GC-MS analysis of the EOs revealed presence of Cyclobutane (96.09%) in CS, 6-octenal (77.11%) in EC, Eucalyptol (75%) in ED, and Citral (38.32%) in CC among several other organic compounds. The results are discussed in relation to trypanosome chemotherapy. PMID:20700425

  7. Enzymatic Targets in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Scotti, Luciana; Mendonça, Francisco J B; da Silva, Marcelo S; Scotti, Marcus T

    2016-01-01

    One of the most neglected disease is the Sleeping sickness or Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), which is mostly restricted to poor regions of Africa. The disease is caused by parasitic infection with Trypanosoma brucei (T. brucei), and is acquired through the bite of the tsetse fly. In the first stage of the disease, the parasite is in the blood, but in stage 2, the infective form reaches the brain, causing great weakness and death. The few existing drugs against this infection, are highly toxic, and can cause the emergence of resistant forms of the parasite. Also, these drugs are not readily available. New drugs are needed. Many researchers are investigating new enzyme targets for the parasite, searching for more efficient and selective inhibitors that are capable to cause the parasite death with less toxicity to the host. Trypanothione reductase, farnesyl diphosphate synthase, 6-phospho-gluconate dehydrogenase, and UDP 4'-galactose epimerase are some of the enzymes involved in the studies reported on this review. In addition, we have applied ligandbased- virtual screening, using Random Forest associated with structure-based-virtual screening (docking), to a small dataset of 225 alkaloids from the Menispermaceae family (in-house data bank). The aim of this study is to select structures with potential inhibitory activity against trypanothione reductase from Trypanosoma brucei. The computer-aided drug design study selected certain alkaloids that might be worth further investigation. PMID:26983886

  8. Trypanosomosis in The Gambia: prevalence in working horses and donkeys detected by whole genome amplification and PCR, and evidence for interactions between trypanosome species

    PubMed Central

    Pinchbeck, Gina L; Morrison, Liam J; Tait, Andy; Langford, Joanna; Meehan, Lucinda; Jallow, Saloum; Jallow, Jibril; Jallow, Amadou; Christley, Robert M

    2008-01-01

    Background The Gambia has an increasing population of equidae largely used for agriculture and transportation. A review of cases at The Gambian Horse and Donkey Trust (GHDT) indicated that a common reason for presentation is a poorly defined medical condition often attributed to trypanosomosis. There are few reports describing the prevalence or the range of clinical signs associated with infection with different species of trypanosomes in horses and donkeys, but given the importance of these animals, the role of trypanosomosis requires investigation. Results In total 241 animals from the Central River Division in The Gambia (183 horses and 58 donkeys) were screened using Whole Genome Amplification (WGA) followed by trypanosome species identification using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The results indicated overall trypanosome prevalence of 91%; with an infection rate of 31% for Trypanosoma congolense Savannah, 87% for Trypanosoma vivax and 18% for Trypanosoma brucei sp. Multiple species were present in 43% of infections. Microscopy had a good specificity (100%) and positive predictive value (100%) for trypanosome detection, but the sensitivity (20%) and negative predictive value (10.5%) were low relative to PCR-based diagnosis. Infection with T congolense showed the greatest negative effect on packed cell volume (PCV), while infection with T. brucei sp also had a significant, although lesser, negative effect on PCV. In addition, cases positive by microscopy were associated with significantly lower PCV. However, concurrent infection with T. vivax appeared to cause less effect on PCV, compared to animals infected with T. congolense alone. Conclusion The prevalence of Trypanosomosis was high in both horses and donkeys. Infection with T. congolense appeared to have the greatest clinical significance, while T. vivax infection may be of limited clinical significance in this population. Indeed, there is evidence of T. vivax co-infection ameliorating the pathology

  9. Trypanosoma vivax Adhesion to Red Blood Cells in Experimentally Infected Sheep.

    PubMed

    Boada-Sucre, Alpidio A; Rossi Spadafora, Marcello Salvatore; Tavares-Marques, Lucinda M; Finol, Héctor J; Reyna-Bello, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosomosis, a globally occurring parasitic disease, poses as a major obstacle to livestock production in tropical and subtropical regions resulting in tangible economic losses. In Latin America including Venezuela, trypanosomosis of ruminants is mainly caused by Trypanosoma vivax. Biologically active substances produced from trypanosomes, as well as host-trypanosome cellular interactions, contribute to the pathogenesis of anemia in an infection. The aim of this study was to examine with a scanning electron microscope the cellular interactions and alterations in ovine red blood cells (RBC) experimentally infected with T. vivax. Ovine infection resulted in changes of RBC shape as well as the formation of surface holes or vesicles. A frequent observation was the adhesion to the ovine RBC by the trypanosome's free flagellum, cell body, or attached flagellum in a process mediated by the filopodia emission from the trypanosome surface. The observed RBC alterations are caused by mechanical and biochemical damage from host-parasite interactions occurring in the bloodstream. The altered erythrocytes are prone to mononuclear phagocytic removal contributing to the hematocrit decrease during infection. PMID:27293960

  10. Trypanosoma vivax Adhesion to Red Blood Cells in Experimentally Infected Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Boada-Sucre, Alpidio A.; Rossi Spadafora, Marcello Salvatore; Tavares-Marques, Lucinda M.; Finol, Héctor J.; Reyna-Bello, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosomosis, a globally occurring parasitic disease, poses as a major obstacle to livestock production in tropical and subtropical regions resulting in tangible economic losses. In Latin America including Venezuela, trypanosomosis of ruminants is mainly caused by Trypanosoma vivax. Biologically active substances produced from trypanosomes, as well as host-trypanosome cellular interactions, contribute to the pathogenesis of anemia in an infection. The aim of this study was to examine with a scanning electron microscope the cellular interactions and alterations in ovine red blood cells (RBC) experimentally infected with T. vivax. Ovine infection resulted in changes of RBC shape as well as the formation of surface holes or vesicles. A frequent observation was the adhesion to the ovine RBC by the trypanosome's free flagellum, cell body, or attached flagellum in a process mediated by the filopodia emission from the trypanosome surface. The observed RBC alterations are caused by mechanical and biochemical damage from host-parasite interactions occurring in the bloodstream. The altered erythrocytes are prone to mononuclear phagocytic removal contributing to the hematocrit decrease during infection. PMID:27293960

  11. Human and sylvatic Trypanosoma cruzi infection in California.

    PubMed Central

    Navin, T R; Roberto, R R; Juranek, D D; Limpakarnjanarat, K; Mortenson, E W; Clover, J R; Yescott, R E; Taclindo, C; Steurer, F; Allain, D

    1985-01-01

    In August 1982, a 56-year-old woman from Lake Don Pedro, California, developed acute Chagas' disease (American trypanosomiasis). She had not traveled to areas outside the United States with endemic Chagas' disease, she had never received blood transfusions, and she did not use intravenous drugs. Trypanosoma cruzi cultured from the patient's blood had isoenzyme patterns and growth characteristics similar to T. cruzi belonging to zymodeme Z1. Triatoma protracta (a vector of Trypanosoma cruzi) infected with T. cruzi were found near the patient's home, a trypanosome resembling T. cruzi was cultured from the blood of two of 19 ground squirrels (Spermophilus beecheyi), and six of 10 dogs had antibody to T. cruzi. A serosurvey of three groups of California residents revealed antibody to T. cruzi by complement fixation in six of 237 (2.5 per cent) individuals living near the patient and in 12 of 1,706 (0.7 per cent) individuals living in a community 20 miles northeast of the patient's home, but in only one of 637 (0.2 per cent) blood donors from the San Francisco Bay area. This is the first case of indigenously acquired Chagas' disease reported from California and the first case recognized in the United States since 1955. This investigation suggests that transmission of sylvatic Trypanosoma cruzi infection to humans occurs in California but that Chagas' disease in humans is rare. PMID:3919598

  12. Vacuolar ATPase depletion affects mitochondrial ATPase function, kinetoplast dependency, and drug sensitivity in trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Baker, Nicola; Hamilton, Graham; Wilkes, Jonathan M; Hutchinson, Sebastian; Barrett, Michael P; Horn, David

    2015-07-21

    Kinetoplastid parasites cause lethal diseases in humans and animals. The kinetoplast itself contains the mitochondrial genome, comprising a huge, complex DNA network that is also an important drug target. Isometamidium, for example, is a key veterinary drug that accumulates in the kinetoplast in African trypanosomes. Kinetoplast independence and isometamidium resistance are observed where certain mutations in the F1-γ-subunit of the two-sector F1Fo-ATP synthase allow for Fo-independent generation of a mitochondrial membrane potential. To further explore kinetoplast biology and drug resistance, we screened a genome-scale RNA interference library in African trypanosomes for isometamidium resistance mechanisms. Our screen identified 14 V-ATPase subunits and all 4 adaptin-3 subunits, implicating acidic compartment defects in resistance; V-ATPase acidifies lysosomes and related organelles, whereas adaptin-3 is responsible for trafficking among these organelles. Independent strains with depleted V-ATPase or adaptin-3 subunits were isometamidium resistant, and chemical inhibition of the V-ATPase phenocopied this effect. While drug accumulation in the kinetoplast continued after V-ATPase subunit depletion, acriflavine-induced kinetoplast loss was specifically tolerated in these cells and in cells depleted for adaptin-3 or endoplasmic reticulum membrane complex subunits, also identified in our screen. Consistent with kinetoplast dispensability, V-ATPase defective cells were oligomycin resistant, suggesting ATP synthase uncoupling and bypass of the normal Fo-A6-subunit requirement; this subunit is the only kinetoplast-encoded product ultimately required for viability in bloodstream-form trypanosomes. Thus, we describe 30 genes and 3 protein complexes associated with kinetoplast-dependent growth. Mutations affecting these genes could explain natural cases of dyskinetoplasty and multidrug resistance. Our results also reveal potentially conserved communication between the

  13. The Trypanosoma brucei protein phosphatase gene: polycistronic transcription with the RNA polymerase II largest subunit gene.

    PubMed Central

    Evers, R; Cornelissen, A W

    1990-01-01

    We have previously described the trypanosomal gene encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) and found that two almost identical genes are encoded within the Trypanosoma brucei genome. Here we show by Southern analyses that the 5' breakpoint between both loci is located approximately 7.5 kb upstream of the RNAP II genes. Northern analyses revealed that the 5' duplicated segment contains at least four other genes, which are transcribed in both bloodstream and procyclic trypanosomes. The gene located immediately upstream of the RNAP II gene in both loci was characterized by sequence analyses. The deduced amino acid sequences show a high degree of similarity to the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase class 1 (PP1) genes. S1 mapping provided strong evidence in support of the fact that the PP1 and RNAP II genes belong to a single transcription unit. Images PMID:2169604

  14. Exocytosis and protein secretion in Trypanosoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Human African trypanosomiasis is a lethal disease caused by the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. The proteins secreted by T. brucei inhibit the maturation of dendritic cells and their ability to induce lymphocytic allogenic responses. To better understand the pathogenic process, we combined different approaches to characterize these secreted proteins. Results Overall, 444 proteins were identified using mass spectrometry, the largest parasite secretome described to date. Functional analysis of these proteins revealed a strong bias toward folding and degradation processes and to a lesser extent toward nucleotide metabolism. These features were shared by different strains of T. brucei, but distinguished the secretome from published T. brucei whole proteome or glycosome. In addition, several proteins had not been previously described in Trypanosoma and some constitute novel potential therapeutic targets or diagnostic markers. Interestingly, a high proportion of these secreted proteins are known to have alternative roles once secreted. Furthermore, bioinformatic analysis showed that a significant proportion of proteins in the secretome lack transit peptide and are probably not secreted through the classical sorting pathway. Membrane vesicles from secretion buffer and infested rat serum were purified on sucrose gradient and electron microscopy pictures have shown 50- to 100-nm vesicles budding from the coated plasma membrane. Mass spectrometry confirmed the presence of Trypanosoma proteins in these microvesicles, showing that an active exocytosis might occur beyond the flagellar pocket. Conclusions This study brings out several unexpected features of the secreted proteins and opens novel perspectives concerning the survival strategy of Trypanosoma as well as possible ways to control the disease. In addition, concordant lines of evidence support the original hypothesis of the involvement of microvesicle-like bodies in the survival strategy allowing

  15. Best-bet integrated strategies for containing drug-resistant trypanosomes in cattle

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background African animal trypanosomosis is a major constraint to the rearing of productive livestock in the sub-humid Sudan-Sahel zone of West Africa where cotton is grown. Trypanosomosis is mainly controlled using trypanocidal drugs, but the effective use of drugs is threatened by the development of widespread resistance. This study tested integrated best-bet strategies for containment and/ or reversal of trypanocide resistance in villages in south-east Mali where resistance has been reported. Methods Four sentinel villages each from an intervention area (along the road from Mali to Burkina Faso) and a control area (along the road from Mali to Côte d’Ivoire) were selected for the study. Tsetse control was based on deltamethrin-treated stationary attractive devices and targeted cattle spraying between March 2008 and November 2009. Trypanosome-positive cattle were selectively treated with 3.5 mg/kg diminazene aceturate. Strategic helminth control using 10 mg/kg albendazole was also undertaken. During the intervention, tsetse densities along drainage lines, trypanosome infections and faecal egg counts in risk cattle (3 to 12 months of age) were monitored. Results Catch reductions of 66.5 % in Glossina palpalis gambiensis and 90 % in G. tachinoides were observed in the intervention area. Trypanosome prevalence was significantly (p < 0.05) lower in the intervention area (2.3 %; 1.3-3.6 %) compared to the control area (17.3 %; 14.8-20.1 %). Albendazole treatment resulted in a faecal egg count reduction of 55.6 % and reduced trypanosome infection risk (2.9 times lower than in the placebo group) although not significantly (p > 0.05). Further studies are required before confirming the existence of albendazole resistant strongyles in the study area. Conclusion Integration of best-bet strategies in areas of multiple drug-resistance is expected to reduce trypanosome infection risk thus contributing to containment of trypanocidal drug resistance

  16. Midgut expression of immune-related genes in Glossina palpalis gambiensis challenged with Trypanosoma brucei gambiense

    PubMed Central

    Hamidou Soumana, Illiassou; Tchicaya, Bernadette; Chuchana, Paul; Geiger, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Tsetse flies from the subspecies Glossina morsitans morsitans and Glossina palpalis gambiensis, respectively, transmit Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and Trypanosoma brucei gambiense. The former causes the acute form of sleeping sickness, and the latter provokes the chronic form. Although several articles have reported G. m. morsitans gene expression following trypanosome infection, no comparable investigation has been performed for G. p. gambiensis. This report presents results on the differential expression of immune-related genes in G. p. gambiensis challenged with T. b. gambiense. The aim was to characterize transcriptomic events occurring in the tsetse gut during the parasite establishment step, which is the crucial first step in the parasite development cycle within its vector. The selected genes were chosen from those previously shown to be highly expressed in G. m. morsitans, to allow further comparison of gene expression in both Glossina species. Using quantitative PCR, genes were amplified from the dissected midguts of trypanosome-stimulated, infected, non-infected, and self-cleared flies at three sampling timepoints (3, 10, and 20 days) after a bloodmeal. At the 3-day sampling point, transferrin transcripts were significantly up-regulated in trypanosome-challenged flies versus flies fed on non-infected mice. In self-cleared flies, serpin-2 and thioredoxin peroxidase-3 transcripts were significantly up-regulated 10 days after trypanosome challenge, whereas nitric oxide synthase and chitin-binding protein transcripts were up-regulated after 20 days. Although the expression levels of the other genes were highly variable, the expression of immune-related genes in G. p. gambiensis appears to be a time-dependent process. The possible biological significance of these findings is discussed, and the results are compared with previous reports for G. m. morsitans. PMID:25426112

  17. Haematological response of snow barbell, Schizothorax plagiostomus Heckel, naturally infected with a new Trypanosoma species.

    PubMed

    Maqbool, Aamir; Ahmed, Imtiaz

    2016-09-01

    The present study deals with the description of a new piscine trypanosome species found infecting the fresh water fish Schizothorax plagiostomus Heckel from river Jhelum, Srinagar, J&K, India and evaluating the haematological parameters of the infected fish. Haematological examination of S. plagiostomus revealed 61.1 % infection with an intensity of 1-9 trypanosomes/100 RBC's. Small (26.9 ± 1.39 µm) and large (47.17 ± 3.50 µm) forms of the trypanosome were observed in light microscopy investigations, revealing the dimorphic nature of the species. The trypanosome species was found to be distinct from the other related dimorphic species in morphometric dimensions including cell length, cell breadth, kinetoplast index, flagellar index, and cytological peculiarities, respectively. The detailed descriptions of the two morphological forms found in the blood of S. plagiostomus are provided. Based on the geographical location, morphometrics, cytological peculiarities, host status and comparative study, the new species is named Trypanosoma kashmirensis n. sp. The parasitic infestation caused a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in red blood cell counts, haematocrit and haemoglobin concentrations while, the leucocyte (WBC) count, mean cellular volume and mean cellular haemoglobin showed a significant increase (p < 0.05) in the infected fish as compared to the non-infected. The above alterations of the haematological parameters could be used as an important tool for the indication of Trypanosoma infection in the fish. PMID:27605786

  18. The presence in salivary secretions of Glossina morsitans of stages of Trypanosoma (Trypanozoon) brucei other than those occurring in the salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Otieno, L H

    1978-01-01

    Using the bat wing membrane technique to study salivary secretions of Glossina morsitans infected with Trypanosoma (Trypanozoon) brucei, it was shown that flies extrude infected salivary secretions as early as day six after an infective blood meal. The non-salivary-gland stages of T. (T.) brucei were extruded intermittently and flies infected with such trypanosomes were not all destined to develop metacyclic infections. Once the salivary glands were involved, the trypanosomes appeared in the secretions each time the flies were tested. Some of the flies with gut infections, but no demonstrable salivary gland involvement, transmitted T. brucei to mice and it is suggested that these infections were intiated by some of the proventricular trypanosomes secreted with saliva. PMID:569915

  19. Identification of an acute-phase reactant in murine infections with Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, S Z; Black, S J

    1992-01-01

    A 42-kDa protein appeared at a much higher concentration in plasma from Trypanosoma brucei-resistant (C57BL/6) mice after infection than in plasma from trypanosome-susceptible (C3H/He) mice. This protein was purified by sequential steps of gel filtration, protein A-Sepharose affinity chromatography, isoelectric focusing, and ammonium sulfate precipitation. The purified protein was identified as a subunit of the acute-phase reactant haptoglobin. Causes of elevated plasma haptoglobin and its implications for resistance to trypanosomiasis are discussed. Images PMID:1500201

  20. In or out? On the tightness of glycosomal compartmentalization of metabolites and enzymes in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Haanstra, Jurgen R; Bakker, Barbara M; Michels, Paul A M

    2014-11-01

    Trypanosomatids sequester large parts of glucose metabolism inside specialised peroxisomes, called glycosomes. Many studies have shown that correct glycosomal compartmentalization of glycolytic enzymes is essential for bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei. The recent finding of pore-forming activities in glycosomal membrane preparations and extensions of the trypanosome glycolysis computer model with size-selective pores sparked again an old debate on the extent of (im)permeability of the glycosomal membrane and whether glycosomally located glycolytic enzymes could and should also be present with some activity in the cytosol. This review presents a critical discussion of the experimental and theoretical evidence for and against the different hypotheses. PMID:25476771

  1. High Local Diversity of Trypanosoma in a Common Bat Species, and Implications for the Biogeography and Taxonomy of the T. cruzi Clade

    PubMed Central

    Kalko, Elisabeth K. V.; Cottontail, Iain; Wellinghausen, Nele; Tschapka, Marco; Perkins, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    The Trypanosoma cruzi clade is a group of parasites that comprises T. cruzi sensu lato and its closest relatives. Although several species have been confirmed phylogenetically to belong to this clade, it is uncertain how many more species can be expected to belong into this group. Here, we present the results of a survey of trypanosome parasites of the bat Artibeus jamaicensis from the Panamá Canal Zone, an important seed disperser. Using a genealogical species delimitation approach, the Poisson tree processes (PTP), we tentatively identified five species of trypanosomes – all belonging to the T. cruzi clade. A small monophyletic group of three putative Trypanosoma species places at the base of the clade phylogeny, providing evidence for at least five independent colonization events of these parasites into the New World. Artibeus jamaicensis presents a high diversity of these blood parasites and is the vertebrate with the highest number of putative trypanosome species reported from a single locality. Our results emphasize the need for continued efforts to survey mammalian trypanosomes. PMID:25268381

  2. High local diversity of Trypanosoma in a common bat species, and implications for the biogeography and taxonomy of the T. cruzi clade.

    PubMed

    Cottontail, Veronika M; Kalko, Elisabeth K V; Cottontail, Iain; Wellinghausen, Nele; Tschapka, Marco; Perkins, Susan L; Pinto, C Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The Trypanosoma cruzi clade is a group of parasites that comprises T. cruzi sensu lato and its closest relatives. Although several species have been confirmed phylogenetically to belong to this clade, it is uncertain how many more species can be expected to belong into this group. Here, we present the results of a survey of trypanosome parasites of the bat Artibeus jamaicensis from the Panamá Canal Zone, an important seed disperser. Using a genealogical species delimitation approach, the Poisson tree processes (PTP), we tentatively identified five species of trypanosomes - all belonging to the T. cruzi clade. A small monophyletic group of three putative Trypanosoma species places at the base of the clade phylogeny, providing evidence for at least five independent colonization events of these parasites into the New World. Artibeus jamaicensis presents a high diversity of these blood parasites and is the vertebrate with the highest number of putative trypanosome species reported from a single locality. Our results emphasize the need for continued efforts to survey mammalian trypanosomes. PMID:25268381

  3. Identification and characterization of cysteine proteinases of Trypanosoma evansi.

    PubMed

    Yadav, S C; Kumar, R; Kumar, S; Tatu, U; Singh, R K; Gupta, A K

    2011-09-01

    Trypanosoma evansi is a causative agent of 'surra', a common haemoprotozoan disease of livestock in India causing high morbidity and mortality in disease endemic areas. The proteinases released by live and dead trypanosomes entail immunosuppression in the infected host, which immensely contribute in disease pathogenesis. Cysteine proteinases are identified in the infectious cycle of trypanosomes such as cruzain from Trypanosoma cruzi, rhodesain or brucipain from Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and congopain from Trypanosoma congelense. These enzymes localised in lysosome-like organelles, flagellar pocket and on cell surface, which play a critical role in the life cycle of protozoan parasites, viz. in host invasion, nutrition and alteration of the host immune response. The paper describes the identification of cysteine proteinases of T. evansi lysate, activity profile at different pH optima and inhibition pattern using a specific inhibitor, besides the polypeptide profile of an antigen. Eight proteinases of T. evansi were identified in the molecular weight (MW) ranges of 28-170 kDa using gelatin substrate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (GS-PAGE), and of these proteinases, six were cysteine proteinases, as they were inhibited by L-3-carboxy-2,3-transepoxypropionyl-lecuylamido (4-guanidino)-butane (E-64), a specific inhibitor. These proteolytic enzymes were most reactive in acidic pH between 3.0 and 5.5 in the presence of dithiothreitol and completely inactive at alkaline pH 10.0. Similarly, the GS-PAGE profile of the serum samples of rats infected with T. evansi revealed strong proteolytic activity only at the 28-kDa zone at pH 5.5, while no proteolytic activity was observed in serum samples of uninfected rats. Further, the other zones of clearance, which were evident in T. evansi antigen zymogram, could not be observed in the serum samples of rats infected with T. evansi. The polypeptide pattern of the whole cell lysate antigen revealed 12-15 polypeptide bands

  4. Pathogenesis of anemia in Trypanosoma brucei-infected mice.

    PubMed Central

    Amole, B O; Clarkson, A B; Shear, H L

    1982-01-01

    The pathogenesis of anemia was studied in trypanosome-infected mice. A strain of Trypanosoma brucei, TREU 667, was used which first produces an acute phase marked by waves of parasitemia. Erythrocytes from infected animals were coated with immunoglobulin M during or just before the waves of anemia and parasitological crises. Erythrocytes from normal animals could be sensitized with "precrisis" sera presumably containing antigen and antibody. These data suggest that anemia during the acute phase is due to sensitization of erythrocytes with immunoglobulin M-antigen complexes. The anemia is partially compensated by a strong erythropoietic response. The acute phase is followed by a chronic phase marked by a constant high parasitemia and immunosuppression. The less marked anemia occurring during this latter phase is due to hemodilution and perhaps a low but significant immune response to the parasites, which causes continuing erythrocyte sensitization by immunoglobulin M-antigen complexes. PMID:7201455

  5. Autoimmunity in Experimental Trypanosoma congolense Infections of Rabbits 1

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, John M.; Kreier, Julius P.

    1972-01-01

    Autoimmunity in rabbits with experimental Trypanosoma congolense infections was investigated. Complement-fixing (CF) and precipitating autoantibodies to normal allogeneic and autologous tissues were found in the sera of all infected rabbits tested; the titers of CF autoantibody occurring during infection were significantly higher than normally occurring titers of autoantibody in pre-infection serum samples. Autoantibody did not cross-react with trypanosome antigens, and Wassermann antibody was not detected in normal or infected rabbit sera. Passive transfer of autoantibody to normal rabbits did not produce observable pathology or death. Physicochemical methods of analysis revealed that the autoantibody was exclusively of the immunoglobulin M class. That cell-mediated autoimmunity to normal tissue antigens did not occur during T. congolense infections was shown by histological analyses, skin tests, migration inhibitory factor, and skin reactive factor tests. Images PMID:4629248

  6. First report of Trypanosoma vegrandis in koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Amanda; Austen, Jill; Gillett, Amber; Warren, Kristin; Paparini, Andrea; Irwin, Peter; Ryan, Una

    2016-08-01

    The present study describes the first report of Trypanosoma vegrandis in koalas using morphology and sequence analysis of the 18S rRNA gene. The prevalence of T. vegrandis in koalas was 13.6% (6/44). It is likely that the small size of T. vegrandis (<10μm in length), coupled with the difficulties in amplifying DNA of this parasite in mixed infections using trypanosome generic primers, are the reason why this organism has not been identified in koalas until now. This study highlights the importance of further research comprising a larger sample size to determine the prevalence of T. vegrandis in koalas as well as its potential impacts upon this marsupial species' health. PMID:26970295

  7. Trypanosoma brucei has a canonical mitochondrial processing peptidase.

    PubMed

    Desy, Silvia; Schneider, André; Mani, Jan

    2012-10-01

    Most mitochondrial matrix and inner membrane proteins have N-terminal presequences which serve as import signals. After import these presequences are cleaved by the heterodimeric mitochondrial processing peptidase. In the parasitic protozoa Trypanosoma brucei mitochondrial protein import relies on presequences that are much shorter than in other eukaryotes. How they are processed is unknown. The trypansomal genome encodes four open reading frames that are annotated as mitochondrial processing peptidase. Here we show that RNAi-mediated ablation of two of these proteins leads to a growth arrest and a concomitant accumulation of mitochondrial precursor proteins inside mitochondria. Import experiments using isolated mitochondria from RNAi cell lines reveals that both proteins are required for efficient import and processing of the tested precursor protein. Reciprocal immunoprecipitation demonstrates that the proteins interact with each other. In summary these results show that we have identified the two subunits of the trypanosomal mitochondrial processing peptidase. PMID:22841752

  8. Beta-interferon inhibits cell infection by Trypanosoma cruzi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierszenbaum, F.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1984-01-01

    Beta interferon has been shown to inhibit the capacity of bloodstream forms of the flagellate Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, to associate with and infect mouse peritoneal macrophages and rat heart myoblasts. The inhibitory effect was abrogated in the presence of specific antibodies to the interferon. Pretreatment of the parasites with interferon reduced their infectivity for untreated host cells, whereas pretreament of either type of host cell did not affect the interaction. The effect of interferon on the trypanosomes was reversible; the extent of the inhibitory effect was significantly reduced afer 20 min, and was undetectable after 60 min when macrophages were used as host cells. For the myoblasts, 60 min elapsed before the inhibitory effect began to subside and 120 min elapsed before it became insignificant or undetectable.

  9. Addition of uridines to edited RNAs in trypanosome mitochondria occurs independently of transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, M.E.; Moore, D.R.; Hajduk, S.L. )

    1990-07-05

    RNA editing is a novel RNA processing event of unknown mechanism that results in the introduction of nucleotides not encoded in the DNA into specific RNA molecules. We have examined the post-transcriptional addition of nucleotides into the mitochondrial RNA of Trypanosoma brucei. Utilizing an isolated organelle system we have determined that addition of uridines to edited RNAs does not require ongoing transcription. Trypanosome mitochondria incorporate CTP, ATP, and UTP into RNA in the absence of transcription. GTP is incorporated into RNA only as a result of the transcription process. Post-transcriptional CTP and ATP incorporation can be ascribed to known enzymatic activities. CTP is incorporated into tRNAs as a result of synthesis or turnover of their 3{prime} CCA sequences. ATP is incorporated into the 3{prime} CCA of tRNAs and into mitochondrial messenger RNAs due to polyadenylation. In the absence of transcription, UTP is incorporated into transcripts known to undergo editing, and the degree of UTP incorporation is consistent with the degree of editing occurring in these transcripts. Cytochrome b mRNAs, which contain a single editing site near their 5{prime} ends, are initially transcribed unedited at that site. Post-transcriptional labeling of cytochrome b mRNAs in the organelle with (alpha-32P)UTP results in the addition of uridines near the 5{prime} end of the RNA but not in a 3{prime} region which lacks an editing site. These results indicate that RNA editing is a post-transcriptional process in the mitochondria of trypanosomes.

  10. Clomipramine kills Trypanosoma brucei by apoptosis.

    PubMed

    de Silva Rodrigues, Jean Henrique; Stein, Jasmin; Strauss, Mariana; Rivarola, Héctor Walter; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Duszenko, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Drug repositioning, i.e. use of existing medicals to treat a different illness, is especially rewarding for neglected tropical diseases (NTD), since in this field the pharmaceutical industry is rather reluctant to spend vast investments for drug development. NTDs afflict primarily poor populations in under-developed countries, which minimizes financial profit. Here we investigated the trypanocidal effect of clomipramine, a commercial antipsychotic drug, on Trypanosoma brucei. The data showed that this drug killed the parasite with an IC50 of about 5μM. Analysis of the involved cell death mechanism revealed furthermore an initial autophagic stress response and finally the induction of apoptosis. The latter was substantiated by a set of respective markers such as phosphatidylserine exposition, DNA degradation, loss of the inner mitochondrial membrane potential and characteristic morphological changes. Clomipramine was described as a trypanothione inhibitor, but as judged from our results it also showed DNA binding capacities and induced substantial morphological changes. We thus consider it likely that the drug induces a multifold adverse interaction with the parasite's physiology and induces stress in a way that trypanosomes cannot cope with. PMID:27086198

  11. Iron Homeostasis and Trypanosoma brucei Associated Immunopathogenicity Development: A Battle/Quest for Iron.

    PubMed

    Stijlemans, Benoit; Beschin, Alain; Magez, Stefan; Van Ginderachter, Jo A; De Baetselier, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    African trypanosomosis is a chronic debilitating disease affecting the health and economic well-being of developing countries. The immune response during African trypanosome infection consisting of a strong proinflammatory M1-type activation of the myeloid phagocyte system (MYPS) results in iron deprivation for these extracellular parasites. Yet, the persistence of M1-type MYPS activation causes the development of anemia (anemia of chronic disease, ACD) as a most prominent pathological parameter in the mammalian host, due to enhanced erythrophagocytosis and retention of iron within the MYPS thereby depriving iron for erythropoiesis. In this review we give an overview of how parasites acquire iron from the host and how iron modulation of the host MYPS affects trypanosomosis-associated anemia development. Finally, we also discuss different strategies at the level of both the host and the parasite that can/might be used to modulate iron availability during African trypanosome infections. PMID:26090446

  12. Iron Homeostasis and Trypanosoma brucei Associated Immunopathogenicity Development: A Battle/Quest for Iron

    PubMed Central

    Stijlemans, Benoit; Beschin, Alain; Magez, Stefan; Van Ginderachter, Jo A.; De Baetselier, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    African trypanosomosis is a chronic debilitating disease affecting the health and economic well-being of developing countries. The immune response during African trypanosome infection consisting of a strong proinflammatory M1-type activation of the myeloid phagocyte system (MYPS) results in iron deprivation for these extracellular parasites. Yet, the persistence of M1-type MYPS activation causes the development of anemia (anemia of chronic disease, ACD) as a most prominent pathological parameter in the mammalian host, due to enhanced erythrophagocytosis and retention of iron within the MYPS thereby depriving iron for erythropoiesis. In this review we give an overview of how parasites acquire iron from the host and how iron modulation of the host MYPS affects trypanosomosis-associated anemia development. Finally, we also discuss different strategies at the level of both the host and the parasite that can/might be used to modulate iron availability during African trypanosome infections. PMID:26090446

  13. Simulating the Complex Cell Design of Trypanosoma brucei and Its Motility

    PubMed Central

    Alizadehrad, Davod; Krüger, Timothy; Engstler, Markus; Stark, Holger

    2015-01-01

    The flagellate Trypanosoma brucei, which causes the sleeping sickness when infecting a mammalian host, goes through an intricate life cycle. It has a rather complex propulsion mechanism and swims in diverse microenvironments. These continuously exert selective pressure, to which the trypanosome adjusts with its architecture and behavior. As a result, the trypanosome assumes a diversity of complex morphotypes during its life cycle. However, although cell biology has detailed form and function of most of them, experimental data on the dynamic behavior and development of most morphotypes is lacking. Here we show that simulation science can predict intermediate cell designs by conducting specific and controlled modifications of an accurate, nature-inspired cell model, which we developed using information from live cell analyses. The cell models account for several important characteristics of the real trypanosomal morphotypes, such as the geometry and elastic properties of the cell body, and their swimming mechanism using an eukaryotic flagellum. We introduce an elastic network model for the cell body, including bending rigidity and simulate swimming in a fluid environment, using the mesoscale simulation technique called multi-particle collision dynamics. The in silico trypanosome of the bloodstream form displays the characteristic in vivo rotational and translational motility pattern that is crucial for survival and virulence in the vertebrate host. Moreover, our model accurately simulates the trypanosome's tumbling and backward motion. We show that the distinctive course of the attached flagellum around the cell body is one important aspect to produce the observed swimming behavior in a viscous fluid, and also required to reach the maximal swimming velocity. Changing details of the flagellar attachment generates less efficient swimmers. We also simulate different morphotypes that occur during the parasite's development in the tsetse fly, and predict a flagellar

  14. Expression of Procyclin mRNAs during Cyclical Transmission of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei, the parasite causing human sleeping sickness, relies on the tsetse fly for its transmission. In the insect, EP and GPEET procyclins are the major surface glycoproteins of procyclic (midgut) forms of the parasite, with GPEET predominating in the early procyclic form and two isoforms of EP in the late procyclic form. EP procyclins were previously detected on salivary gland trypanosomes, presumably epimastigotes, by immunoelectron microscopy. However, no procyclins could be detected by mass spectrometry when parasites were isolated from infected glands. We have used qualitative and quantitative RT-PCR to analyse the procyclin mRNAs expressed by trypanosomes in the tsetse midgut and salivary glands at different time points after infection. The coding regions of the three EP isoforms (EP1, EP2 and EP3) are extremely similar, but their 3′ untranslated regions contain unique sequences that make it possible to assign the cDNAs amplified by this technique. With the exception of EP2, we found that the spectrum of procyclin mRNAs expressed in the midgut mirrors the protein repertoire of early and established procyclic forms. Surprisingly, procyclin mRNAs, including that of GPEET, are present at relatively high levels in salivary gland trypanosomes, although the proteins are rarely detected by immunofluorescence. Additional experiments using transgenic trypanosomes expressing reporter genes or mutant forms of procyclin point to a mechanism of translational or post-translational control, involving the procyclin coding regions, in salivary gland trypanosomes. It is widely accepted that T. brucei always has a coat of either variant surface glycoprotein or procyclin. It has been known for many years that the epimastigote form does not have a variant surface glycoprotein coat. The finding that this life cycle stage is usually negative for procyclin as well is new, and means that the paradigm will need to be revised. PMID:16276404

  15. Activity of Bisnaphthalimidopropyl Derivatives against Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Graça, Nuno A G; Gaspar, Luis; Costa, David M; Loureiro, Inês; Thoo-Lin, Paul Kong; Ramos, Isbaal; Roura, Meritxell; Pruvost, Alain; Pemberton, Ian K; Loukil, Hadjer; MacDougall, Jane; Tavares, Joana; Cordeiro-da-Silva, Anabela

    2016-04-01

    Current treatments for African trypanosomiasis are either toxic, costly, difficult to administer, or prone to elicit resistance. This study evaluated the activity of bisnaphthalimidopropyl (BNIP) derivatives againstTrypanosoma brucei BNIPDiaminobutane (BNIPDabut), the most active of these compounds, showedin vitroinhibition in the single-unit nanomolar range, similar to the activity in the reference drug pentamidine, and presented low toxicity and adequate metabolic stability. Additionally, using a murine model of acute infection and live imaging, a significant decrease in parasite load in BNIPDabut-treated mice was observed. However, cure was not achieved. BNIPDabut constitutes a new scaffold for antitrypanosomal drugs that deserves further consideration. PMID:26787703

  16. Identification of candidate mitochondrial RNA editing ligases from Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed Central

    McManus, M T; Shimamura, M; Grams, J; Hajduk, S L

    2001-01-01

    Most mitochondrial genes of Trypanosoma brucei do not contain the necessary information to make translatable mRNAs. These transcripts must undergo RNA editing, a posttranscriptional process by which uridine residues are added and deleted from mitochondrial mRNAs. RNA editing is believed to be catalyzed by a ribonucleoprotein complex containing endonucleolytic, terminal uridylyl transferase (TUTase), 3' uridine-specific exonucleolytic (U-exo), and ligase activities. None of the catalytic enzymes for RNA editing have been identified. Here we describe the identification of two candidate RNA ligases (48 and 52 kDa) that are core catalytic components of the T. brucei ribonucleoprotein editing complex. Both enzymes share homology to the covalent nucleotidyl transferase superfamily and contain five key signature motifs, including the active site KXXG. In this report, we present data on the proposed 48 kDa RNA editing ligase. We have prepared polyclonal antibodies against recombinant 48 kDa ligase that specifically recognize the trypanosome enzyme. When expressed in trypanosomes as an epitope-tagged fusion protein, the recombinant ligase localizes to the mitochondrion, associates with RNA editing complexes, and adenylates with ATP. These findings provide strong support for the enzymatic cascade model for kinetoplastid RNA editing. PMID:11233974

  17. High-throughput Gene Tagging in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Philip; Dean, Samuel; Sunter, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Improvements in mass spectrometry, sequencing and bioinformatics have generated large datasets of potentially interesting genes. Tagging these proteins can give insights into their function by determining their localization within the cell and enabling interaction partner identification. We recently published a fast and scalable method to generate Trypanosoma brucei cell lines that express a tagged protein from the endogenous locus. The method was based on a plasmid we generated that, when coupled with long primer PCR, can be used to modify a gene to encode a protein tagged at either terminus. This allows the tagging of dozens of trypanosome proteins in parallel, facilitating the large-scale validation of candidate genes of interest. This system can be used to tag proteins for localization (using a fluorescent protein, epitope tag or electron microscopy tag) or biochemistry (using tags for purification, such as the TAP (tandem affinity purification) tag). Here, we describe a protocol to perform the long primer PCR and the electroporation in 96-well plates, with the recovery and selection of transgenic trypanosomes occurring in 24-well plates. With this workflow, hundreds of proteins can be tagged in parallel; this is an order of magnitude improvement to our previous protocol and genome scale tagging is now possible. PMID:27584862

  18. Hematocrit alterations and its effects in naturally infected indigenous cattle breeds due to Trypanosoma spp. on the Adamawa Plateau - Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Mamoudou, A.; Payne, V. K.; Sevidzem, S. L.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: An experimental study was carried out on 148 naturally infected indigenous cattle breeds with either single or mix infections of various species of trypanosomes. The objectives of this study were to determine the species of trypanosomes, observe their hematopathological consequences on host-related risk factors and to determine the packed cell volume (PCV) of the infected group. Materials and Methods: The buffy coat method (BCM) which is a variant of the hematocrit centrifugation method was used for the parasitological and hematological analysis. The May Grünwald-Giemsa method was also used for the identification of different trypanosome species. Results: The infection rate in accordance with the various trypanosomes was as follows: Trypanosoma congolense + Trypanosoma brucei (1.35%), Trypanosoma vivax + T. brucei (1.35%), T. congolense + T. vivax (8.11%), T. congolense + T. vivax + T. brucei (8.78%), T. brucei brucei (11.48%), T. vivax (20.94%), T. congolense (47.97%). The infection rate with respect to breeds showed the following results - Brahman (1.0%), Red Fulani (5.2%), White Fulani (6.5%) and Gudali (16.7%), with no statistical significant difference (p>0.05). The combined mean PCV of single as well as mix infections was not statistically significant (p>0.05). The mean PCV of males (25.64±5.08 standard deviation [SD]) which was lower than that of females (30.82±4.94 SD) was statistically significant (p<0.05). The body condition of infected animals with sex showed that a greater proportion of males with “Poor” and “Medium” conditions showed high prevalence than females with the same conditions, with a significant difference (p<0.05). However, females showed a “Good” condition than males even though it was not statistically significant (p>0.05). The PCV profile of the infected group showed that the highest proportion of infected animals had PCV of ≤31% than PCV >31%. The mean weight of the animals was (265.41±95.36 SD). A scatter

  19. A Novel Rho-Like Protein TbRHP Is Involved in Spindle Formation and Mitosis in Trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Kanwal; DuBois, Kelly N.; Dacks, Joel B.; Field, Mark C.

    2011-01-01

    Background In animals and fungi Rho subfamily small GTPases are involved in signal transduction, cytoskeletal function and cellular proliferation. These organisms typically possess multiple Rho paralogues and numerous downstream effectors, consistent with the highly complex contributions of Rho proteins to cellular physiology. By contrast, trypanosomatids have a much simpler Rho-signaling system, and the Trypanosoma brucei genome contains only a single divergent Rho-related gene, TbRHP (Tb927.10.6240). Further, only a single RhoGAP-like protein (Tb09.160.4180) is annotated, contrasting with the >70 Rho GAP proteins from Homo sapiens. We wished to establish the function(s) of TbRHP and if Tb09.160.4180 is a potential GAP for this protein. Methods/Findings TbRHP represents an evolutionarily restricted member of the Rho GTPase clade and is likely trypanosomatid restricted. TbRHP is expressed in both mammalian and insect dwelling stages of T. brucei and presents with a diffuse cytoplasmic location and is excluded from the nucleus. RNAi ablation of TbRHP results in major cell cycle defects and accumulation of multi-nucleated cells, coinciding with a loss of detectable mitotic spindles. Using yeast two hybrid analysis we find that TbRHP interacts with both Tb11.01.3180 (TbRACK), a homolog of Rho-kinase, and the sole trypanosome RhoGAP protein Tb09.160.4180, which is related to human OCRL. Conclusions Despite minimization of the Rho pathway, TbRHP retains an important role in spindle formation, and hence mitosis, in trypanosomes. TbRHP is a partner for TbRACK and an OCRL-related trypanosome Rho-GAP. PMID:22096505

  20. Trypanosomal TAC40 constitutes a novel subclass of mitochondrial β-barrel proteins specialized in mitochondrial genome inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Schnarwiler, Felix; Niemann, Moritz; Doiron, Nicholas; Harsman, Anke; Käser, Sandro; Mani, Jan; Chanfon, Astrid; Dewar, Caroline E.; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Jackson, Christopher B.; Pusnik, Mascha; Schmidt, Oliver; Meisinger, Chris; Hiller, Sebastian; Warscheid, Bettina; Schnaufer, Achim C.; Ochsenreiter, Torsten; Schneider, André

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria cannot form de novo but require mechanisms allowing their inheritance to daughter cells. In contrast to most other eukaryotes Trypanosoma brucei has a single mitochondrion whose single-unit genome is physically connected to the flagellum. Here we identify a β-barrel mitochondrial outer membrane protein, termed tripartite attachment complex 40 (TAC40), that localizes to this connection. TAC40 is essential for mitochondrial DNA inheritance and belongs to the mitochondrial porin protein family. However, it is not specifically related to any of the three subclasses of mitochondrial porins represented by the metabolite transporter voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), the protein translocator of the outer membrane 40 (TOM40), or the fungi-specific MDM10, a component of the endoplasmic reticulum–mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES). MDM10 and TAC40 mediate cellular architecture and participate in transmembrane complexes that are essential for mitochondrial DNA inheritance. In yeast MDM10, in the context of the ERMES, is postulated to connect the mitochondrial genomes to actin filaments, whereas in trypanosomes TAC40 mediates the linkage of the mitochondrial DNA to the basal body of the flagellum. However, TAC40 does not colocalize with trypanosomal orthologs of ERMES components and, unlike MDM10, it regulates neither mitochondrial morphology nor the assembly of the protein translocase. TAC40 therefore defines a novel subclass of mitochondrial porins that is distinct from VDAC, TOM40, and MDM10. However, whereas the architecture of the TAC40-containing complex in trypanosomes and the MDM10-containing ERMES in yeast is very different, both are organized around a β-barrel protein of the mitochondrial porin family that mediates a DNA–cytoskeleton linkage that is essential for mitochondrial DNA inheritance. PMID:24821793

  1. Trypanosomes Modify the Behavior of Their Insect Hosts: Effects on Locomotion and on the Expression of a Related Gene

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, David; Alves-Silva, Juliana; Rodrigues, Juliana de Oliveira; Ferreira, Luciana de Lima; Lara, Luisa de Melo; Lowenberger, Carl; Guarneri, Alessandra Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    Background As a result of evolution, the biology of triatomines must have been significantly adapted to accommodate trypanosome infection in a complex network of vector-vertebrate-parasite interactions. Arthropod-borne parasites have probably developed mechanisms, largely still unknown, to exploit the vector-vertebrate host interactions to ensure their transmission to suitable hosts. Triatomines exhibit a strong negative phototaxis and nocturnal activity, believed to be important for insect survival against its predators. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we quantified phototaxis and locomotion in starved fifth instar nymphs of Rhodnius prolixus infected with Trypanosoma cruzi or Trypanosoma rangeli. T. cruzi infection did not alter insect phototaxis, but induced an overall 20% decrease in the number of bug locomotory events. Furthermore, the significant differences induced by this parasite were concentrated at the beginning of the scotophase. Conversely, T. rangeli modified both behaviors, as it significantly decreased bug negative phototaxis, while it induced a 23% increase in the number of locomotory events in infected bugs. In this case, the significant effects were observed during the photophase. We also investigated the expression of Rpfor, the triatomine ortholog of the foraging gene known to modulate locomotion in other insects, and found a 4.8 fold increase for T. rangeli infected insects. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrated for the first time that trypanosome infection modulates the locomotory activity of the invertebrate host. T. rangeli infection seems to be more broadly effective, as besides affecting the intensity of locomotion this parasite also diminished negative phototaxis and the expression of a behavior-associated gene in the triatomine vector. PMID:26291723

  2. Phylogenetic relationships of Trypanosoma chelodina and Trypanosoma binneyi from Australian tortoises and platypuses inferred from small subunit rRNA analyses.

    PubMed

    Jakes, K A; O'Donoghue, P J; Adlard, R D

    2001-11-01

    Trypanosome infections are often difficult to detect by conventional microscopy and their pleomorphy often confounds differential diagnosis. Molecular techniques are now being used to diagnose infections and to determine phylogenetic relationships between species. Complete small subunit rRNA gene sequences were determined for isolates of Trypanosoma chelodina from the Brisbane River tortoise (Emydura signata), the saw-shelled tortoise (Elseya latisternum), and the eastern snake-necked tortoise (Chelodina longicollis) from southeast Queensland, Australia. Partial sequence data were also obtained for T. binneyi from a platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) from Tasmania. Phylogenetic relationships between T. chelodina, T. binneyi and other species were examined by maximum parsimony and likelihood methods. The Australian tortoise and platypus trypanosomes did not exhibit any close phylogenetic relationships with those of mammals, reptiles or amphibians, but were closely related to each other, and to fish trypanosomes. This contra-indicates their co-evolution with their vertebrate hosts but does not exclude co-evolution with different groups of invertebrate vectors, notably insects and leeches. PMID:11719959

  3. The crystal structure and activity of a putative trypanosomal nucleoside phosphorylase reveal it to be a homodimeric uridine phosphorylase

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Eric T.; Mudeppa, Devaraja G.; Gillespie, J. Robert; Mueller, Natascha; Napuli, Alberto J.; Arif, Jennifer A.; Ross, Jenni; Arakaki, Tracy L.; Lauricella, Angela; DeTitta, George; Luft, Joseph; Zucker, Frank; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Fan, Erkang; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.; Hol, Wim G. J.; Merritt, Ethan A.

    2010-01-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylases and uridine phosphorylases are closely related enzymes involved in purine and pyrimidine salvage, respectively, which catalyze the removal of the ribosyl moiety from nucleosides so that the nucleotide base may be recycled. Parasitic protozoa generally are incapable of de novo purine biosynthesis so the purine salvage pathway is of potential therapeutic interest. Information about pyrimidine biosynthesis in these organisms is much more limited. Though all seem to carry at least a subset of enzymes from each pathway, the dependency on de novo pyrimidine synthesis versus salvage varies from organism to organism and even from one growth stage to another. We have structurally and biochemically characterized a putative nucleoside phosphorylase from the pathogenic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei and find that it is a homodimeric uridine phosphorylase. This is the first characterization of a uridine phosphorylase from a trypanosomal source despite this activity being observed decades ago. Although this gene was broadly annotated as a putative nucleoside phosphorylase, it was widely inferred to be a purine nucleoside phosphorylase. Our characterization of this trypanosomal enzyme shows that it is possible to distinguish between purine and uridine phosphorylase activity at the sequence level based on the absence or presence of a characteristic uridine phosphorylase-specificity insert. We suggest that this recognizable feature may aid in proper annotation of the substrate specificity of enzymes in the nucleoside phosphorylase family. PMID:20070944

  4. Distinct roles of apolipoprotein components within the trypanosome lytic factor complex revealed in a novel transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Molina-Portela, Maria Pilar; Samanovic, Marie; Raper, Jayne

    2008-08-01

    Humans express a unique subset of high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) called trypanosome lytic factors (TLFs) that kill many Trypanosoma parasite species. The proteins apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, apoL-I, and haptoglobin-related protein, which are involved in TLF structure and function, were expressed through the introduction of transgenes in mice to explore their physiological roles in vivo. Transgenic expression of human apolipoprotein L-I alone conferred trypanolytic activity in vivo. Coexpression of human apolipoprotein A-I and haptoglobin-related protein (Hpr) had an effect on the integration of apolipoprotein L-I into HDL, and both proteins were required to increase the specific activity of TLF, which was measurable in vitro. Unexpectedly, truncated apolipoprotein L-I devoid of the serum resistance gene interacting domain, which was previously shown to kill human infective trypanosomes, was not trypanolytic in transgenic mice despite being coexpressed with human apolipoprotein A-I and Hpr and incorporated into HDLs. We conclude that all three human apolipoproteins act cooperatively to achieve maximal killing capacity and that truncated apolipoprotein L-I does not function in transgenic animals. PMID:18606856

  5. Failure to demonstrate a major role for Kupffer cells and radiosensitive leukocytes in immunoglobulin-mediated elimination of Trypanosoma musculi

    SciTech Connect

    Kongshavn, P.A.; Shaw, K.; Ghadirian, E.; Ulczak, O. )

    1990-06-01

    Previous studies have indicated that elimination of parasitemia in Trypanosoma musculi infection is brought about by immunoglobulin G2a antibodies, C3, and an effector cell. Experiments were designed to identify the putative effector cell by using several approaches. Infected C5-deficient or C5-sufficient mice treated with silica particles or given 900 rads of radiation 3 days earlier effectively eliminated trypanosomes following administration of immune plasma (IP). Silica-treated, noninfected mice given T. musculi preincubated with IP also cleared the parasites. Radiolabeling studies revealed that uptake of the cleared trypanosomes by the liver in normal mice was relatively low and fell only slightly (19%) in silica-treated mice. In contrast, uptake of radiolabeled sheep erythrocytes by the liver was normally much higher and fell drastically (7%) in silica-treated mice. Mice were then immunocompromised by 900 rads of radiation, silica particles, and anti-platelet serum combined before IP-sensitized trypanosomes were given. Leukocyte and platelet counts were both reduced by 95% and sheep erythrocyte uptake by the liver fell from 77 to 5%; however, greater than 99% of the injected trypanosomes were cleared in these mice and uptake of radiolabeled trypanosomes by the liver was similar to that of normal mice. Lastly, in anesthetized mice in which Kupffer cells were excluded surgically from the circulation, greater than 99% of the IP-sensitized trypanosomes disappeared rapidly from the blood. Only 7% of the radiolabel was found in the liver versus 60% in sham-operated mice. The results are interpreted as showing that hepatic Kupffer cells play a minor role in the immune elimination of T. musculi. Likewise, radiosensitive leukocytes and platelets are unlikely to be sole candidates for the putative effector cell that mediates a cure of murine trypanosomiasis.

  6. Semen characteristics and reaction time of Yankasa rams experimentally infected with Trypanosoma evansi infection.

    PubMed

    Ogundele, Francis Abidemi; Okubanjo, Oluyinka Oluseyi; Ajanusi, Olagunju Joseph; Fadason, Samuel Tanko

    2016-08-01

    Trypanosomosis is a serious, often fatal disease of domestic animals and humans, and a major constraint to livestock productivity and agricultural development in areas of Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, and Asia. It is caused by hemoflagelate protozoan of the genus Trypanosoma. Several species of Trypanosoma such as Trypanosoma congolense, Trypanosoma vivax, Trypanosoma brucei, and Trypanosoma evansi are known to infect domestic animals. Trypanosoma evansi is one of the most widespread pathogenic trypanosomes in the world causing disease known as "Surra" in animals. The effects of experimental T evansi infection on some aspects of reproduction in Yankasa rams were investigated over a 108-day period. Rams in the infected group A (n = 7) were each inoculated with 1 × 10(6) trypanosomes in 1 mL of donor blood via the jugular vein, whereas the control group B (n = 5) were administered 1 mL of normal saline. Semen volume, gross motility, live and/or dead sperm ratio, sperm morphologic abnormalities, and concentration as well as reaction time of infected and control rams were evaluated on a weekly basis. The results showed a nonsignificant (P > 0.05) decrease in semen volume and a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in concentration compared to the control rams. Reaction time showed considerable significant (P < 0.05) increase from preinfection values 26.7 ± 4.54 to 94.7 ± 7.54 seconds compared to control 32.9 ± 2.64 to 33.4 ± 4.78 seconds. Furthermore, semen gross motility for infected rams differed significantly (P < 0.05) from those of the control. There was a significant surge (P < 0.05) in the total sperm morphologic abnormalities in the infected rams to 90.75 ± 2.73% by week 20 (14 weeks after infection), compared to preinfection value of 20.9 ± 0.52%. The outcome of this study suggests that infection with T evansi in Yankasa rams has far reaching severe effects on their reproductive performance. PMID:27188633

  7. VEX1 controls the allelic exclusion required for antigenic variation in trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Glover, Lucy; Hutchinson, Sebastian; Horn, David

    2016-01-01

    Allelic exclusion underpins antigenic variation and immune evasion in African trypanosomes. These bloodstream parasites use RNA polymerase-I (pol-I) to transcribe just one telomeric variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene at a time, producing superabundant and switchable VSG coats. We identified trypanosome VSG exclusion-1 (VEX1) using a genetic screen for defects in telomere-exclusive expression. VEX1 was sequestered by the active VSG and silencing of other VSGs failed when VEX1 was either ectopically expressed or depleted, indicating positive and negative regulation, respectively. Positive regulation affected VSGs and nontelomeric pol-I–transcribed genes, whereas negative regulation primarily affected VSGs. Negative regulation by VEX1 also affected telomeric pol-I–transcribed reporter constructs, but only when they contained blocks of sequence sharing homology with a pol-I–transcribed locus. We conclude that restricted positive regulation due to VEX1 sequestration, combined with VEX1-dependent, possibly homology-dependent silencing, drives a “winner-takes-all” mechanism of allelic exclusion. PMID:27226299

  8. VEX1 controls the allelic exclusion required for antigenic variation in trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Glover, Lucy; Hutchinson, Sebastian; Alsford, Sam; Horn, David

    2016-06-28

    Allelic exclusion underpins antigenic variation and immune evasion in African trypanosomes. These bloodstream parasites use RNA polymerase-I (pol-I) to transcribe just one telomeric variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene at a time, producing superabundant and switchable VSG coats. We identified trypanosome VSG exclusion-1 (VEX1) using a genetic screen for defects in telomere-exclusive expression. VEX1 was sequestered by the active VSG and silencing of other VSGs failed when VEX1 was either ectopically expressed or depleted, indicating positive and negative regulation, respectively. Positive regulation affected VSGs and nontelomeric pol-I-transcribed genes, whereas negative regulation primarily affected VSGs. Negative regulation by VEX1 also affected telomeric pol-I-transcribed reporter constructs, but only when they contained blocks of sequence sharing homology with a pol-I-transcribed locus. We conclude that restricted positive regulation due to VEX1 sequestration, combined with VEX1-dependent, possibly homology-dependent silencing, drives a "winner-takes-all" mechanism of allelic exclusion. PMID:27226299

  9. Trypanosome infection establishment in the tsetse fly gut is influenced by microbiome-regulated host immune barriers.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Brian L; Wang, Jingwen; Maltz, Michele A; Wu, Yineng; Aksoy, Serap

    2013-01-01

    Tsetse flies (Glossina spp.) vector pathogenic African trypanosomes, which cause sleeping sickness in humans and nagana in domesticated animals. Additionally, tsetse harbors 3 maternally transmitted endosymbiotic bacteria that modulate their host's physiology. Tsetse is highly resistant to infection with trypanosomes, and this phenotype depends on multiple physiological factors at the time of challenge. These factors include host age, density of maternally-derived trypanolytic effector molecules present in the gut, and symbiont status during development. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms that result in tsetse's resistance to trypanosomes. We found that following parasite challenge, young susceptible tsetse present a highly attenuated immune response. In contrast, mature refractory flies express higher levels of genes associated with humoral (attacin and pgrp-lb) and epithelial (inducible nitric oxide synthase and dual oxidase) immunity. Additionally, we discovered that tsetse must harbor its endogenous microbiome during intrauterine larval development in order to present a parasite refractory phenotype during adulthood. Interestingly, mature aposymbiotic flies (Gmm(Apo)) present a strong immune response earlier in the infection process than do WT flies that harbor symbiotic bacteria throughout their entire lifecycle. However, this early response fails to confer significant resistance to trypanosomes. Gmm(Apo) adults present a structurally compromised peritrophic matrix (PM), which lines the fly midgut and serves as a physical barrier that separates luminal contents from immune responsive epithelial cells. We propose that the early immune response we observe in Gmm(Apo) flies following parasite challenge results from the premature exposure of gut epithelia to parasite-derived immunogens in the absence of a robust PM. Thus, tsetse's PM appears to regulate the timing of host immune induction following parasite challenge. Our results document a

  10. Polypeptide profiles of South Indian isolate of Trypanosoma evansi.

    PubMed

    Sivajothi, S; Rayulu, V C; Bhaskar Reddy, B V; Malakondaiah, P; Sreenivasulu, D; Sudhakara Reddy, B

    2016-09-01

    The field isolates of Trypanosoma evansi was collected from the infected cattle and it was propagated in rats. Trypanosoma evansi parasites were separated from the blood of infected rats by using diethylaminoethyl cellulose column chromatography. Whole cell lysate antigen (WCL) was prepared from purified trypanosomes by ultrasonication and centrifugation. The prepared WCL antigen was further purified by 50 % ammonium sulphate precipitation. Protein concentration of WCL antigen of T. evansi was 60 mg/ml. Protein concentration was adjusted to 1.0 mg/ml in PBS, pH 8.0 and stored at -20(0) C.   Polypeptide profiles of WCL antigen of T. evansi was determined by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A total of eight polypeptide bands of the size ranging from 25 to 85 kDa in WCL antigen of T. evansi were obtained. Five prominent bands with molecular weight of 74, 60, 53, 42 and 37 kDa and three light bands with molecular weight of 85, 34 and 25 kDa were observed. PMID:27605761

  11. Tridimensional ultrastructure and glycolipid pattern studies of Trypanosoma dionisii.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Miriam Pires de Castro; Ramos, Thiago Cesar Prata; Pinheiro, Adriana Maria V N; Bertini, Silvio; Takahashi, Helio Kiyoshi; Straus, Anita Hilda; Haapalainen, Edna Freymuller

    2013-12-01

    Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum) dionisii is a non-pathogenic bat trypanosome closely related to Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chaga's disease. Both kinetoplastids present similar morphological stages and are able to infect mammalian cells in culture. In the present study we examined 3D ultrastructure aspects of the two species by serial sectioning epimastigote and trypomastigote forms, and identified common carbohydrate epitopes expressed in T. dionisii, T. cruzi and Leishmania major. A major difference in 3D morphology was that T. dionisii epimastigote forms present larger multivesicular structures, restricted to the parasite posterior region. These structures could be related to T. cruzi reservosomes and are also rich in cruzipain, the major cysteine-proteinase of T. cruzi. We analyzed the reactivity of two monoclonal antibodies: MEST-1 directed to galactofuranose residues of glycolipids purified from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, and BST-1 directed to glycolipids purified from T. cruzi epimastigotes. Both antibodies were reactive with T. dionisii epimastigotes by indirect immunofluorescense, but we noted differences in the location and intensity of the epitopes, when compared to T. cruzi. In summary, despite similar features in cellular structure and life cycle of T. dionisii and T. cruzi, we observed a unique morphological characteristic in T. dionisii that deserves to be explored. PMID:23933185

  12. Fe/S protein biogenesis in trypanosomes - A review.

    PubMed

    Lukeš, Julius; Basu, Somsuvro

    2015-06-01

    Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of the African sleeping sickness of humans, and other kinetoplastid flagellates belong to the eukarytotic supergroup Excavata. This early-branching model protist is known for a broad range of unique features. As it is amenable to most techniques of forward and reverse genetics, T. brucei was subject to several studies of its iron-sulfur (Fe/S) protein biogenesis and thus represents the best studied excavate eukaryote. Here we review what is known about the Fe/S protein biogenesis of T. brucei, and focus especially on the comparative and evolutionary interesting aspects. We also explore the connections between the well-known and quite conserved ISC and CIA machineries and the tRNA thiolation pathway. Moreover, the Fe/S cluster protein biogenesis is dissected in the procyclic stage of T. brucei which has an active mitochondrion, as well as in its pathogenic bloodstream stage with a metabolically repressed organelle. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Fe/S proteins: Analysis, structure, function, biogenesis and diseases. PMID:25196712

  13. Structures of Trypanosome Vacuolar Soluble Pyrophosphatases: Antiparasitic Drug Targets.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yunyun; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Chen, Chun-Chi; Huang, Guozhong; Zheng, Yingying; Liu, Weidong; Wang, Iren; Ho, Meng-Ru; Hsu, Shang-Te Danny; O'Dowd, Bing; Huff, Hannah C; Huang, Chun-Hsiang; Docampo, Roberto; Oldfield, Eric; Guo, Rey-Ting

    2016-05-20

    Trypanosomatid parasites are the causative agents of many neglected tropical diseases, including the leishmaniases, Chagas disease, and human African trypanosomiasis. They exploit unusual vacuolar soluble pyrophosphatases (VSPs), absent in humans, for cell growth and virulence and, as such, are drug targets. Here, we report the crystal structures of VSP1s from Trypanosoma cruzi and T. brucei, together with that of the T. cruzi protein bound to a bisphosphonate inhibitor. Both VSP1s form a hybrid structure containing an (N-terminal) EF-hand domain fused to a (C-terminal) pyrophosphatase domain. The two domains are connected via an extended loop of about 17 residues. Crystallographic analysis and size exclusion chromatography indicate that the VSP1s form tetramers containing head-to-tail dimers. Phosphate and diphosphate ligands bind in the PPase substrate-binding pocket and interact with several conserved residues, and a bisphosphonate inhibitor (BPH-1260) binds to the same site. On the basis of Cytoscape and other bioinformatics analyses, it is apparent that similar folds will be found in most if not all trypanosomatid VSP1s, including those found in insects (Angomonas deanei, Strigomonas culicis), plant pathogens (Phytomonas spp.), and Leishmania spp. Overall, the results are of general interest since they open the way to structure-based drug design for many of the neglected tropical diseases. PMID:26907161

  14. JBP2, a SWI2/SNF2-like protein, regulates de novo telomeric DNA glycosylation in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Kieft, Rudo; Brand, Verena; Ekanayake, Dilrukshi K; Sweeney, Kate; DiPaolo, Courtney; Reznikoff, William S; Sabatini, Robert

    2007-11-01

    Synthesis of the modified thymine base, beta-d-glucosyl-hydroxymethyluracil or J, within telomeric DNA of Trypanosoma brucei correlates with the bloodstream form specific epigenetic silencing of telomeric variant surface glycoprotein genes involved in antigenic variation. In order to analyze the function of base J in the regulation of antigenic variation, we are characterizing the regulatory mechanism of J biosynthesis. We have recently proposed a model in which chromatin remodeling by a SWI2/SNF2-like protein (JBP2) regulates the developmental and de novo site-specific localization of J synthesis within bloodstream form trypanosome DNA. Consistent with this model, we now show that JBP2 (-/-) bloodstream form trypanosomes contain five-fold less base J and are unable to stimulate de novo J synthesis in newly generated telomeric arrays. PMID:17706299

  15. Human trypanosome infection and the presence of intradomicile Rhodnius pallescens in the western border of the Panama Canal, Panama.

    PubMed

    Calzada, José E; Pineda, Vanessa; Montalvo, Edilma; Alvarez, Dayra; Santamaría, Ana María; Samudio, Franklyn; Bayard, Vicente; Cáceres, Lorenzo; Saldaña, Azael

    2006-05-01

    An entomologic search was carried out to collect intradomicile triatomines in dwellings from rural communities in the western border of the Panama Canal, Panama. Sixty-nine triatomines were collected inside 20 houses of 67 houses investigated. Rhodnius pallescens was the only triatomine species found and included adults of both sexes and nymphs. A significantly high Trypanosoma cruzi (72.7%) and T. rangeli (40%) vector infection rate was detected. Blood meal analysis showed that 68% of R. pallescens had fed on humans. Human serologic analysis and hemoculture performed on inhabitants from triatomine-infested houses showed that 32.1% (18 of 56) of the samples were trypanosome infected. Thirteen samples (23.2%) had antibodies against T. cruzi. Six of these seropositive samples were from children less than 15 years old. Trypanosoma rangeli was isolated in five hemoculture samples, all from children less than 11 years old. The epidemiologic implications of these findings in terms of human infection are discussed. PMID:16687677

  16. Multifunctional class I transcription in Trypanosoma brucei depends on a novel protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Brandenburg, Jens; Schimanski, Bernd; Nogoceke, Everson; Nguyen, Tu N; Padovan, Júlio C; Chait, Brian T; Cross, George A M; Günzl, Arthur

    2007-01-01

    The vector-borne, protistan parasite Trypanosoma brucei is the only known eukaryote with a multifunctional RNA polymerase I that, in addition to ribosomal genes, transcribes genes encoding the parasite's major cell-surface proteins—the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) and procyclin. In the mammalian bloodstream, antigenic variation of the VSG coat is the parasite's means to evade the immune response, while procyclin is necessary for effective establishment of trypanosome infection in the fly. Moreover, the exceptionally high efficiency of mono-allelic VSG expression is essential to bloodstream trypanosomes since its silencing caused rapid cell-cycle arrest in vitro and clearance of parasites from infected mice. Here we describe a novel protein complex that recognizes class I promoters and is indispensable for class I transcription; it consists of a dynein light chain and six polypeptides that are conserved only among trypanosomatid parasites. In accordance with an essential transcriptional function of the complex, silencing the expression of a key subunit was lethal to bloodstream trypanosomes and specifically affected the abundance of rRNA and VSG mRNA. The complex was dubbed class I transcription factor A. PMID:17972917

  17. Differential regulation of two distinct families of glucose transporter genes in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed Central

    Bringaud, F; Baltz, T

    1993-01-01

    A tandemly arranged multigene family encoding putative hexose transporters in Trypanosoma brucei has been characterized. It is composed of two 80% homologous groups of genes called THT1 (six copies) and THT2 (five copies). When Xenopus oocytes are microinjected with in vitro-transcribed RNA from a THT1 gene, they express a glucose transporter with properties similar to those of the trypanosome bloodstream-form protein(s). This THT1-encoded transport system for glucose differs from the human erythrocyte-type glucose transporter by its moderate sensitivity to cytochalasin B and its capacity to transport D-fructose. These properties suggest that the trypanosomal transporter may be a good target for antitrypanosomal drugs. mRNA analysis revealed that expression of these genes was life cycle stage dependent. Bloodstream forms express 40-fold more THT1 than THT2. In contrast, procyclic trypanosomes express no detectable THT1 but demonstrate glucose-dependent expression of THT2. Images PMID:8423781

  18. Structure of the C-terminal Domain of Transcription Facto IIB from Trypanosoma brucei

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, B.; Kanneganti, N; Rieckhof, G; Das, A; Laurents, D; Palenchar, J; Bellofatto, V; Wah, D

    2009-01-01

    In trypanosomes, the production of mRNA relies on the synthesis of the spliced leader (SL) RNA. Expression of the SL RNA is initiated at the only known RNA polymerase II promoter in these parasites. In the pathogenic trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, transcription factor IIB (tTFIIB) is essential for SL RNA gene transcription and cell viability, but has a highly divergent primary sequence in comparison to TFIIB in well-studied eukaryotes. Here we describe the 2.3 A resolution structure of the C-terminal domain of tTFIIB (tTFIIBC). The tTFIIBC structure consists of 2 closely packed helical modules followed by a C-terminal extension of 32 aa. Using the structure as a guide, alanine substitutions of basic residues in regions analogous to functionally important regions of the well-studied eukaryotic TFIIB support conservation of a general mechanism of TFIIB function in eukaryotes. Strikingly, tTFIIBC contains additional loops and helices, and, in contrast to the highly basic DNA binding surface of human TFIIB, contains a neutral surface in the corresponding region. These attributes probably mediate trypanosome-specific interactions and have implications for the apparent bidirectional transcription by RNA polymerase II in protein-encoding gene expression in these organisms.

  19. Suppression by Trypanosoma brucei of anaphylaxis-mediated ion transport in the small intestine of rats.

    PubMed Central

    Gould, S S; Castro, G A

    1994-01-01

    The hypothesis that failure of hosts infected with Trypanosoma brucei to express type 1 hypersensitivity is related to this parasite's ability to down-regulate IgE production, and not to an innate lack of allergenicity of T. brucei antigens, was tested by studying anaphylaxis-induced changes in net epithelial ion transport in rats. Transport changes were quantified electrophysiologically in vitro, as a change in transmural short-circuit current when sensitized intestine was challenged with homologous antigen. Rats injected parenterally with trypanosome antigen elicited intestinal anaphylaxis in response to antigenic challenge, whereas the intestine of rats infected with T. brucei failed to respond. Infection with T. brucei also suppressed the anaphylactic response in rats sensitized to and challenged with ovalbumin and T. spiralis-derived antigens. In these cases suppression was related to the ability of T. brucei to block production of IgE, and not to the physiological failure of the epithelial response. However, in rats sensitized by infection with T. spiralis, neither the anaphylactic response nor IgE production were inhibited by T. brucei. Furthermore, intestinal mastocytosis normally associated with trichinosis was unaffected by the trypanosome infection. Results support the conclusion that the failure to express anaphylaxis in T. brucei-infected rats is due to the inhibition of IgE production and not to the lack of allergenicity of trypanosome antigens. PMID:8206518

  20. Trypanosoma (Herpetosoma) longiflagellum Sp.N. from the tomb bat, Taphozous nudiventris, from Iraq.

    PubMed

    Marinkelle, C J

    1977-07-01

    Trypanosoma (Herpetosoma) longiflagellum sp.n. (Protozoa: Trypanosomatidae) from a bat, Taphozous nudiventris, from Iraq is described. The trypanosome measures 24.0 to 34.2 micron (mean 26.4 micron, SK 2.5) in total length, 13.8 to 18.2 micron (mean 15.2 micron, SD 1.0) in body length, is 1.5 to 2.9 micron (mean 2.0 micron,SD 0.3) in breadth and has a free flagellum of 10.2 to 16.0 micron (mrsn 11.2 micron, SD 1.6). The nuclear index is 1.4 to 2.1 (mean 1.7 SD 0.1) and the kinetoplastic index is 1.5 to 2.6 (mean 1.9, SD 0.2). This is the second report of a bat trypanosome belonging to the subgenus Herpetosoma and the first report of trypanosomes from bats from Iraq. PMID:916139

  1. Trypanosoma (Herpetosoma) longiflagellum sp.n. from the tomb rat, Taphozous nudiventris, from Iraq.

    PubMed

    Marinkelle, C J

    1977-07-01

    Trypanosoma (Herpetosoma) longiflagellum sp.n. (Protozoa: Trypanosomatidae) from a bat, Taphozous nudiventris, from Iraq is described. The trypanosome measures 24.0 to 34.2 micron (mean 26.4 micron, SD 2.5) in total length, 13.8 to 18.2 micron (mean 15.2 micron, SD 1.0) in body length, is 1.5 to 2.9 micron (mean 2.0 micron, SD 0.3) in breadth and has a free flagellum of 10.2 to 16.0 micron (mean 11.2 micron, SD 1.6). The nuclear index is 1.4 to 2.1 (mean 1.7 SD 0.1) and the kinetoplastic index is 1.5 to 2.6 (mean 1.9, SD 0.2). This is the second report of a bat trypanosome belonging to the subgenus Herpetosoma and the first report of trypanosomes from bats from Iraq. PMID:916138

  2. Trypanosoma (Herpetosoma) kuseli sp. n. (Protozoa: Kinetoplastida) in Siberian flying squirrels (Pteromys volans).

    PubMed

    Sato, H; Al-Adhami, B H; Une, Y; Kamiya, H

    2007-07-01

    All trypanosome species classified in the subgenus Herpetosoma in sciurid hosts have been recorded from ground and tree squirrels to date, but not from any flying squirrels. We describe in this paper a novel trypanosome species, Trypanosoma (Herpetosoma) kuseli sp. n., from Siberian flying squirrels (Pteromys volans) imported from China, and compare it with T. (H.) otospermophili in Richardson's ground squirrels (Spermophilus richardsonii) and Columbian ground squirrels (Spermophilus columbianus) from the USA. Due to a short free flagellum, the new species appeared stumpy compared with T. otospermophili (length of free flagellum 7.0 +/- 0.8 microm, total length 32.1 +/- 0.8 microm, n = 13 and length of free flagellum 15.5 +/- 1.6 microm, total length 35.9 +/- 1.0 microm, n = 13, respectively). Another conspicuous morphological feature of the new species was an anteriorly positioned kinetoplast, found approximately at the midpoint between the nucleus and the posterior end. These characters have not been recorded from any squirrel Herpetosoma trypanosome species. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of the small and large subunit rRNA genes indicated that T. kuseli sp. n. was more homologous to T. otospermophili than murid Herpetosoma species, such as T. grosi, T. lewisi, T. musculi, T. microti and T. evotomys. PMID:17334786

  3. Unique behavior of Trypanosoma dionisii interacting with mammalian cells: invasion, intracellular growth, and nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Miriam Pires de Castro; Cortez, Mauro; Maeda, Fernando Yukio; Fernandes, Maria Cecilia; Haapalainen, Edna Freymuller; Yoshida, Nobuko; Mortara, Renato Arruda

    2009-04-01

    The phylogenetic proximity between Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum) dionisii suggests that these parasites might explore similar strategies to complete their life cycles. T. cruzi is the etiological agent of the life-threatening Chagas' disease, whereas T. dionisii is a bat trypanosome and probably not capable of infecting humans. Here we sought to compare mammalian cell invasion and intracellular traffic of both trypanosomes and determine the differences and similarities in this process. The results presented demonstrate that T. dionisii is highly infective in vitro, particularly when the infection process occurs without serum and that the invasion is similarly affected by agents known to interfere with T. cruzi invasion process. Our results indicate that the formation of lysosomal-enriched compartments is part of a cell-invasion mechanism retained by related trypanosomatids, and that residence and further escape from a lysosomal compartment may be a common requisite for successful infection. During intracellular growth, parasites share a few epitopes with T. cruzi amastigotes and trypomastigotes. Unexpectedly, in heavily infected cells, amastigotes and trypomastigotes were found inside the host cell nucleus. These findings suggest that T. dionisii, although sharing some features in host cell invasion with T. cruzi, has unique behaviors that deserve to be further explored. PMID:19283898

  4. Silent Human Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Infections around the Old Gboko Sleeping Sickness Focus in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Solomon Ngutor, Karshima; Idris, Lawal A.; Oluseyi Oluyinka, Okubanjo

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei gambiense causes Gambian trypanosomosis, a disease ravaging affected rural parts of Sub-Saharan Africa. We screened 1200 human blood samples for T. b. gambiense using the card agglutination test for trypanosomosis, characterized trypanosome isolates with Trypanosoma gambiense serum glycoprotein-PCR (TgsGP-PCR), and analyzed our data using Chi square and odds ratio at 95% confidence interval for statistical association. Of the 1200 samples, the CATT revealed an overall infection rate of 1.8% which ranged between 0.0% and 3.5% across study sites. Age and sex based infection rates ranged between 1.2% and 2.3%. We isolated 7 (33.3%) trypanosomes from the 21 seropositive samples using immunosuppressed mice which were identified as T. b. gambiense group 1 by TgsGP-PCR. Based on study sites, PCR revealed an overall infection rate of 0.6% which ranged between 0.0% and 1.5%. Females and males revealed PCR based infection rates of 0.3% and 0.8%, respectively. Infection rates in adults (1.3%) and children (0.1%) varied significantly (p < 0.05). We observed silent T. b. gambiense infections among residents of this focus. Risks of disease development into the second fatal stage in these patients who may also serve as reservoirs of infection in the focus exist. PMID:26941995

  5. Effects of Infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli on the Reproductive Performance of the Vector Rhodnius prolixus

    PubMed Central

    Fellet, Maria Raquel; Lorenzo, Marcelo Gustavo; Elliot, Simon Luke; Carrasco, David; Guarneri, Alessandra Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    The insect Rhodnius prolixus is responsible for the transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi, which is the etiological agent of Chagas disease in areas of Central and South America. Besides this, it can be infected by other trypanosomes such as Trypanosoma rangeli. The effects of these parasites on vectors are poorly understood and are often controversial so here we focussed on possible negative effects of these parasites on the reproductive performance of R. prolixus, specifically comparing infected and uninfected couples. While T. cruzi infection did not delay pre-oviposition time of infected couples at either temperature tested (25 and 30°C) it did, at 25°C, increase the e-value in the second reproductive cycle, as well as hatching rates. Meanwhile, at 30°C, T. cruzi infection decreased the e-value of insects during the first cycle and also the fertility of older insects. When couples were instead infected with T. rangeli, pre-oviposition time was delayed, while reductions in the e-value and hatching rate were observed in the second and third cycles. We conclude that both T. cruzi and T. rangeli can impair reproductive performance of R. prolixus, although for T. cruzi, this is dependent on rearing temperature and insect age. We discuss these reproductive costs in terms of potential consequences on triatomine behavior and survival. PMID:25136800

  6. Activation of Benznidazole by Trypanosomal Type I Nitroreductases Results in Glyoxal Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Belinda S.

    2012-01-01

    Benznidazole, a 2-nitroimidazole, is the front-line treatment used against American trypanosomiasis, a parasitic infection caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. Despite nearly 40 years of use, the trypanocidal activity of this prodrug is not fully understood. It has been proposed that benznidazole activation leads to the formation of reductive metabolites that can cause a series of deleterious effects, including DNA damage and thiol depletion. Here, we show that the key step in benznidazole activation involves an NADH-dependent trypanosomal type I nitroreductase. This catalyzes an oxygen-insensitive reaction with the interaction of enzyme, reductant, and prodrug occurring through a ping-pong mechanism. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis of the resultant metabolites identified 4,5-dihydro-4,5-dihydroxyimidazole as the major product of a reductive pathway proceeding through hydroxylamine and hydroxy intermediates. The breakdown of this product released the reactive dialdehyde glyoxal, which, in the presence of guanosine, generated guanosine-glyoxal adducts. These experiments indicate that the reduction of benznidazole by type I nitroreductase activity leads to the formation of highly reactive metabolites and that the expression of this enzyme is key to the trypanocidal properties displayed by the prodrug. PMID:22037852

  7. Divergence of Erv1-Associated Mitochondrial Import and Export Pathways in Trypanosomes and Anaerobic Protists

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Somsuvro; Leonard, Joanne C.; Desai, Nishal; Mavridou, Despoina A. I.; Tang, Kong Ho; Goddard, Alan D.

    2013-01-01

    In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and animals, the sulfhydryl oxidase Erv1 functions with Mia40 in the import and oxidative folding of numerous cysteine-rich proteins in the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS). Erv1 is also required for Fe-S cluster assembly in the cytosol, which uses at least one mitochondrially derived precursor. Here, we characterize an essential Erv1 orthologue from the protist Trypanosoma brucei (TbERV1), which naturally lacks a Mia40 homolog. We report kinetic parameters for physiologically relevant oxidants cytochrome c and O2, unexpectedly find O2 and cytochrome c are reduced simultaneously, and demonstrate that efficient reduction of O2 by TbERV1 is not dependent upon a simple O2 channel defined by conserved histidine and tyrosine residues. Massive mitochondrial swelling following TbERV1 RNA interference (RNAi) provides evidence that trypanosome Erv1 functions in IMS protein import despite the natural absence of the key player in the yeast and animal import pathways, Mia40. This suggests significant evolutionary divergence from a recently established paradigm in mitochondrial cell biology. Phylogenomic profiling of genes also points to a conserved role for TbERV1 in cytosolic Fe-S cluster assembly. Conversely, loss of genes implicated in precursor delivery for cytosolic Fe-S assembly in Entamoeba, Trichomonas, and Giardia suggests fundamental differences in intracellular trafficking pathways for activated iron or sulfur species in anaerobic versus aerobic eukaryotes. PMID:23264646

  8. Molecular characterization of native Australian trypanosomes in quokka (Setonix brachyurus) populations from Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Austen, Jill M; Paparini, Andrea; Reid, Simon A; Friend, James A; Ditcham, William G F; Ryan, Una

    2016-06-01

    The quokka, Setonix brachyurus, is a vulnerable, small marsupial endemic to Western Australia. Blood samples were collected from quokkas from three different geographical locations; Two Peoples Bay, Bald Island and Rottnest Island. The overall prevalence of trypanosomes by nested PCR at the 18S ribosomal RNA gene was 57.3% (63/110) with prevalences of 91.4%, 85.3% and 4.9% respectively for Two Peoples Bay, Bald Island and Rottnest Island. Phylogenetic analysis conducted on 47 18S PCR positives identified two Trypanosoma copemani genotypes, with T. copemani genotype B, the most prevalent genotype infecting quokka populations from the three locations with an overall prevalence of 51.8% (24/47) compared to 34% for T. copemani genotype A (16/47). The overall prevalence of mixed T. copemani genotype A and B infections was 14.9% (7/47). Phylogenetic analysis of 26 quokka isolates at the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) locus, largely supported the 18S analysis but identified a mixed infection in one quokka isolate (Q4112-4117 from Two Peoples Bay). T. copemani genotype B has previously only been isolated from quokkas and the Gilbert's potoroo whereas T. copemani genotype A has a wide host range and may be pathogenic. Further work is required to determine the clinical impact of T. copemani on marsupial populations. PMID:26697991

  9. New anti-trypanosomal active tetracyclic iridoid isolated from Morinda lucida Benth.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Mitsuko; Tung, Nguyen Huu; Kwofie, Kofi D; Adegle, Richard; Amoa-Bosompem, Michael; Sakyiamah, Maxwell; Ayertey, Frederick; Owusu, Kofi Baffour-Awuah; Tuffour, Isaac; Atchoglo, Philip; Frempong, Kwadwo Kyereme; Anyan, William K; Uto, Takuhiro; Morinaga, Osamu; Yamashita, Taizo; Aboagye, Frederic; Appiah, Alfred Ampomah; Appiah-Opong, Regina; Nyarko, Alexander K; Yamaoka, Shoji; Yamaguchi, Yasuchika; Edoh, Dominic; Koram, Kwadwo; Ohta, Nobuo; Boakye, Daniel A; Ayi, Irene; Shoyama, Yukihiro

    2015-08-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), commonly known as sleeping sickness has remained a serious health problem in many African countries with thousands of new infected cases annually. Chemotherapy, which is the main form of control against HAT has been characterized lately by the viewpoints of toxicity and drug resistance issues. Recently, there have been a lot of emphases on the use of medicinal plants world-wide. Morinda lucida Benth. is one of the most popular medicinal plants widely distributed in Africa and several groups have reported on its anti-protozoa activities. In this study, we have isolated one novel tetracyclic iridoid, named as molucidin, from the CHCl3 fraction of the M. lucida leaves by bioassay-guided fractionation and purification. Molucidin was structurally elucidated by (1)H and (13)C NMR including HMQC, HMBC, H-H COSY and NOESY resulting in tetracyclic iridoid skeleton, and its absolute configuration was determined. We have further demonstrated that molucidin presented a strong anti-trypanosomal activity, indicating an IC50 value of 1.27 μM. The cytotoxicity study using human normal and cancer cell lines indicated that molucidin exhibited selectivity index (SI) against two normal fibroblasts greater than 4.73. Furthermore, structure-activity relationship (SAR) study was undertaken with molucidin and oregonin, which is identical to anti-trypanosomal active components of Alnus japonica. Overlapping analysis of the lowest energy conformation of molucidin with oregonin suggested a certain similarities of aromatic rings of both oregonin and molucidin. These results contribute to the future drug design studies for HAT. PMID:26048790

  10. Trypanosomes and haemosporidia in the buzzard (Buteo buteo) and sparrowhawk (Accipiter nisus): factors affecting the prevalence of parasites.

    PubMed

    Svobodová, Milena; Weidinger, Karel; Peške, Lubomír; Volf, Petr; Votýpka, Jan; Voříšek, Petr

    2015-02-01

    The prevalences of heteroxenous parasites are influenced by the interplay of three main actors: hosts, vectors, and the parasites themselves. We studied blood protists in the nesting populations of raptors in two different areas of the Czech Republic. Altogether, 788 nestlings and 258 adult Eurasian sparrowhawks (Accipiter nisus) and 321 nestlings and 86 adult common buzzards (Buteo buteo) were screened for parasites by the microscopic examination of blood smears and by cultivation. We examined the role of shared vectors and parasite phylogenetic relationships on the occurrence of parasites. In different years and hosts, trypanosome prevalence ranged between 1.9 and 87.2 %, that of Leucocytozoon between 1.9 and 100 %, and Haemoproteus between 0 and 72.7 %. Coinfections with Leucocytozoon and Trypanosoma, phylogenetically distant parasites but both transmitted by blackflies (Simuliidae), were more frequent than coinfections with Leucocytozoon and Haemoproteus, phylogenetically closely related parasites transmitted by different vectors (blackflies and biting midges (Ceratopogonidae), respectively). For example, 16.6 % buzzard nestlings were coinfected with Trypanosoma and Leucocytozoon, while only 4.8 % with Leucocytozoon and Haemoproteus and 0.3 % with Trypanosoma and Haemoproteus. Nestlings in the same nest tended to have the same infection status. Furthermore, prevalence increased with the age of nestlings and with Julian date, while brood size had only a weak negative/positive effect on prevalence at the individual/brood level. Prevalences in a particular avian host species also varied between study sites and years. All these factors should thus be considered while comparing prevalences from different studies, the impact of vectors being the most important. We conclude that phylogenetically unrelated parasites that share the same vectors tend to have similar distributions within the host populations of two different raptor species. PMID:25403377

  11. The diversity and expansion of the trans-sialidase gene family is a common feature in Trypanosoma cruzi clade members.

    PubMed

    Chiurillo, Miguel Angel; Cortez, Danielle R; Lima, Fábio M; Cortez, Caroline; Ramírez, José Luis; Martins, Andre G; Serrano, Myrna G; Teixeira, Marta M G; da Silveira, José Franco

    2016-01-01

    Trans-sialidase (TS) is a polymorphic protein superfamily described in members of the protozoan genus Trypanosoma. Of the eight TS groups recently described, TS group I proteins (some of which have catalytic activity) are present in the distantly related Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi phylogenetic clades, whereas other TS groups have only been described in some species belonging to the T. cruzi clade. In the present study we analyzed the repertoire, distribution and phylogenetic relationships of TS genes among species of the T. cruzi clade based on sequence similarity, multiple sequence alignment and tree-reconstruction approaches using TS sequences obtained with the aid of PCR-based strategies or retrieved from genome databases. We included the following representative isolates of the T. cruzi clade from South America: T. cruzi, T. cruzi Tcbat, Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei, Trypanosoma dionisii, Trypanosoma rangeli and Trypanosoma conorhini. The cloned sequences encoded conserved TS protein motifs Asp-box and VTVxNVxLYNR but lacked the FRIP motif (conserved in TS group I). The T. conorhini sequences were the most divergent. The hybridization patterns of TS probes with chromosomal bands confirmed the abundance of these sequences in species in the T. cruzi clade. Divergence and relationship analysis placed most of the TS sequences in the groups defined in T. cruzi. Further examination of members of TS group II, which includes T. cruzi surface glycoproteins implicated in host cell attachment and invasion, showed that sequences of T. cruzi Tcbat grouped with those of T. cruzi genotype TcI. Our analysis indicates that different members of the T. cruzi clade, with different vertebrate hosts, vectors and pathogenicity, share the extensive expansion and sequence diversification of the TS gene family. Altogether, our results are congruent with the evolutionary history of the T. cruzi clade and represent a contribution to the understanding of the molecular

  12. The Dermis as a Delivery Site of Trypanosoma brucei for Tsetse Flies

    PubMed Central

    Caljon, Guy; Van Reet, Nick; De Trez, Carl; Vermeersch, Marjorie; Pérez-Morga, David; Van Den Abbeele, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Tsetse flies are the sole vectors of Trypanosoma brucei parasites that cause sleeping sickness. Our knowledge on the early interface between the infective metacyclic forms and the mammalian host skin is currently highly limited. Glossina morsitans flies infected with fluorescently tagged T. brucei parasites were used in this study to initiate natural infections in mice. Metacyclic trypanosomes were found to be highly infectious through the intradermal route in sharp contrast with blood stream form trypanosomes. Parasite emigration from the dermal inoculation site resulted in detectable parasite levels in the draining lymph nodes within 18 hours and in the peripheral blood within 42 h. A subset of parasites remained and actively proliferated in the dermis. By initiating mixed infections with differentially labeled parasites, dermal parasites were unequivocally shown to arise from the initial inoculum and not from a re-invasion from the blood circulation. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated intricate interactions of these skin-residing parasites with adipocytes in the connective tissue, entanglement by reticular fibers of the periadipocytic baskets and embedment between collagen bundles. Experimental transmission experiments combined with molecular parasite detection in blood fed flies provided evidence that dermal trypanosomes can be acquired from the inoculation site immediately after the initial transmission. High resolution thermographic imaging also revealed that intradermal parasite expansion induces elevated skin surface temperatures. Collectively, the dermis represents a delivery site of the highly infective metacyclic trypanosomes from which the host is systemically colonized and where a proliferative subpopulation remains that is physically constrained by intricate interactions with adipocytes and collagen fibrous structures. PMID:27441553

  13. The Dermis as a Delivery Site of Trypanosoma brucei for Tsetse Flies.

    PubMed

    Caljon, Guy; Van Reet, Nick; De Trez, Carl; Vermeersch, Marjorie; Pérez-Morga, David; Van Den Abbeele, Jan

    2016-07-01

    Tsetse flies are the sole vectors of Trypanosoma brucei parasites that cause sleeping sickness. Our knowledge on the early interface between the infective metacyclic forms and the mammalian host skin is currently highly limited. Glossina morsitans flies infected with fluorescently tagged T. brucei parasites were used in this study to initiate natural infections in mice. Metacyclic trypanosomes were found to be highly infectious through the intradermal route in sharp contrast with blood stream form trypanosomes. Parasite emigration from the dermal inoculation site resulted in detectable parasite levels in the draining lymph nodes within 18 hours and in the peripheral blood within 42 h. A subset of parasites remained and actively proliferated in the dermis. By initiating mixed infections with differentially labeled parasites, dermal parasites were unequivocally shown to arise from the initial inoculum and not from a re-invasion from the blood circulation. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated intricate interactions of these skin-residing parasites with adipocytes in the connective tissue, entanglement by reticular fibers of the periadipocytic baskets and embedment between collagen bundles. Experimental transmission experiments combined with molecular parasite detection in blood fed flies provided evidence that dermal trypanosomes can be acquired from the inoculation site immediately after the initial transmission. High resolution thermographic imaging also revealed that intradermal parasite expansion induces elevated skin surface temperatures. Collectively, the dermis represents a delivery site of the highly infective metacyclic trypanosomes from which the host is systemically colonized and where a proliferative subpopulation remains that is physically constrained by intricate interactions with adipocytes and collagen fibrous structures. PMID:27441553

  14. Optical trapping reveals propulsion forces, power generation and motility efficiency of the unicellular parasites Trypanosoma brucei brucei

    PubMed Central

    Stellamanns, Eric; Uppaluri, Sravanti; Hochstetter, Axel; Heddergott, Niko; Engstler, Markus; Pfohl, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Unicellular parasites have developed sophisticated swimming mechanisms to survive in a wide range of environments. Cell motility of African trypanosomes, parasites responsible for fatal illness in humans and animals, is crucial both in the insect vector and the mammalian host. Using millisecond-scale imaging in a microfluidics platform along with a custom made optical trap, we are able to confine single cells to study trypanosome motility. From the trapping characteristics of the cells, we determine the propulsion force generated by cells with a single flagellum as well as of dividing trypanosomes with two fully developed flagella. Estimates of the dissipative energy and the power generation of single cells obtained from the motility patterns of the trypanosomes within the optical trap indicate that specific motility characteristics, in addition to locomotion, may be required for antibody clearance. Introducing a steerable second optical trap we could further measure the force, which is generated at the flagellar tip. Differences in the cellular structure of the trypanosomes are correlated with the trapping and motility characteristics and in consequence with their propulsion force, dissipative energy and power generation. PMID:25269514

  15. Optical trapping reveals propulsion forces, power generation and motility efficiency of the unicellular parasites Trypanosoma brucei brucei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stellamanns, Eric; Uppaluri, Sravanti; Hochstetter, Axel; Heddergott, Niko; Engstler, Markus; Pfohl, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Unicellular parasites have developed sophisticated swimming mechanisms to survive in a wide range of environments. Cell motility of African trypanosomes, parasites responsible for fatal illness in humans and animals, is crucial both in the insect vector and the mammalian host. Using millisecond-scale imaging in a microfluidics platform along with a custom made optical trap, we are able to confine single cells to study trypanosome motility. From the trapping characteristics of the cells, we determine the propulsion force generated by cells with a single flagellum as well as of dividing trypanosomes with two fully developed flagella. Estimates of the dissipative energy and the power generation of single cells obtained from the motility patterns of the trypanosomes within the optical trap indicate that specific motility characteristics, in addition to locomotion, may be required for antibody clearance. Introducing a steerable second optical trap we could further measure the force, which is generated at the flagellar tip. Differences in the cellular structure of the trypanosomes are correlated with the trapping and motility characteristics and in consequence with their propulsion force, dissipative energy and power generation.

  16. Differential expression of midgut proteins in Trypanosoma brucei gambiense-stimulated vs. non-stimulated Glossina palpalis gambiensis flies

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, Anne; Hamidou Soumana, Illiassou; Tchicaya, Bernadette; Rofidal, Valérie; Decourcelle, Mathilde; Santoni, Véronique; Hem, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    The unicellular pathogenic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei gambiense is responsible for the chronic form of sleeping sickness. This vector-borne disease is transmitted to humans by the tsetse fly of the group Glossina palpalis, including the subspecies G. p. gambiensis, in which the parasite completes its developmental cycle. Sleeping sickness control strategies can therefore target either the human host or the fly vector. Indeed, suppression of one step in the parasite developmental cycle could abolish parasite transmission to humans, with consequences on the spreading of the disease. In order to develop this type of approach, we have identified, at the proteome level, events resulting from the tripartite interaction between the tsetse fly G. p. gambiensis, its microbiome, and the trypanosome. Proteomes were analyzed from four biological replicates of midguts from flies sampled 3 days post-feeding on either a trypanosome-infected (stimulated flies) or a non-infected (non-stimulated flies) bloodmeal. Over 500 proteins were identified in the midguts of flies from both feeding groups, 13 of which were shown to be differentially expressed in trypanosome-stimulated vs. non-stimulated flies. Functional annotation revealed that several of these proteins have important functions that could be involved in modulating the fly infection process by trypanosomes (and thus fly vector competence), including anti-oxidant and anti-apoptotic, cellular detoxifying, trypanosome agglutination, and immune stimulating or depressive effects. The results show a strong potential for diminishing or even disrupting fly vector competence, and their application holds great promise for improving the control of sleeping sickness. PMID:26029185

  17. ABCG-like transporter of Trypanosoma cruzi involved in benznidazole resistance: gene polymorphisms disclose inter-strain intragenic recombination in hybrid isolates.

    PubMed

    Franco, Jaques; Ferreira, Renata C; Ienne, Susan; Zingales, Bianca

    2015-04-01

    Benznidazole (BZ) is one of the two drugs for Chagas disease treatment. In a previous study we showed that the Trypanosoma cruzi ABCG-like transporter gene, named TcABCG1, is over-expressed in parasite strains naturally resistant to BZ and that the gene of TcI BZ-resistant strains exhibited several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) as compared to the gene of CL Brener BZ-susceptible strain. Here we report the sequence of TcABCG1 gene of fourteen T. cruzi strains, with diverse degrees of BZ sensitivity and belonging to different discrete typing units (DTUs) and Tcbat group. Although DTU-specific SNPs and amino acid changes were identified, no direct correlation with BZ-resistance phenotype was found. Thus, it is plausible that the transporter abundance is a determinant factor for drug resistance, as pointed out above. Sequence data were used for Bayesian phylogenies and network genealogy analysis. The network showed a high degree of reticulation suggesting genetic exchange between the parasites. TcI and TcII clades were clearly separated. Tcbat sequences were close to TcI. A fourth clade clustered TcABCG1 haplotypes of TcV, TcVI and TcIII strains, with closer proximity to TcI. Analysis of the recombination patterns indicated that hybrid strains contain haplotypes that are mosaics most likely derived by intragenic recombination of parental sequences. The data confirm that TcII and TcIII as the parentals of TcV and TcVI DTUs. Since genetic fingerprint of TcI was found in TcIII, we sustain the previously proposed "Two Hybridization model" for the origin of hybrid strains. Among the twenty best BLASTP hits in databases, orthologues of TcABCG1 transporter were found in Leishmania spp. and African trypanosomes, though their function remains undescribed. PMID:25660041

  18. Lysis of Trypanosoma brucei by a toxic subspecies of human high density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Hajduk, S L; Moore, D R; Vasudevacharya, J; Siqueira, H; Torri, A F; Tytler, E M; Esko, J D

    1989-03-25

    Trypanosoma brucei brucei is an important pathogen of domestic cattle in sub-Saharan Africa and is closely related to the human sleeping sickness parasites, Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense. However, T. b. brucei is non-infectious to humans. The restriction of the host range of T. b. brucei results from the sensitivity of the parasite to lysis by toxic human high density lipoproteins (HDL) (Rifkin, M. R. (1978) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 75, 3450-3454). We show in this report that trypanosome lytic activity is not a universal feature of all human HDL particles but rather that it is associated with a minor subclass of HDL. We have purified the lytic activity about 8,000-fold and have identified and characterized the subspecies of HDL responsible for trypanosome lysis. This class of HDL has a relative molecular weight of 490,000, a buoyant density of 1.21-1.24 g/ml, and a particle diameter of 150-210 A. It contains apolipoproteins AI, AII, CI, CII, and CIII, and monoclonal antibodies against apo-AI and apo-AII inhibit trypanocidal activity. In addition to these common apolipoproteins, the particles also contain at least three unique proteins, as measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under nonreducing conditions. Treatment of the particles with dithiothreitol resulted in the disappearance of two of the proteins and abolished trypanocidal activity. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that these proteins were a disulfide-linked trimer of 45,000, 36,000, and 13,500-Da polypeptides and dimers of the 36,000- and 13,500-Da polypeptides or of 65,000- and 8,500-Da polypeptides. Studies on the lysis of T. b. brucei by the purified particle suggest that the lytic pathway may involve the uptake of the trypanocidal subspecies of HDL by endocytosis. PMID:2494183

  19. High prevalence of trypanosome co-infections in freshwater fishes.

    PubMed

    Grybchuk-Ieremenko, Anastasiia; Losev, Alexander; Kostygov, Alexei Yu; Lukeš, Julius; Yurchenko, Vyacheslav

    2014-12-01

    One thousand three hundred seventy three fish specimens of eight different species from the vicinity of Kyiv, Ukraine, were examined for the presence of trypanosomes and 921 individuals were found to be infected. The prevalence of infection ranged from 24% in freshwater bream, Abramis brama (Linnaeus), to 100% in spined loach, Cobitis 'taenia' Linnaeus. The level of parasitaemia also varied significantly between generally mild infections in pikeperch, Sander lucioperca (Linnaeus), and heavy ones in C. 'taenia'. In most cases the infections with trypanosomes were asymptomatic. Cases of co-infection with species of Trypanoplasma Laveran et Mesnil, 1901 were documented for five out of eight examined host species. Molecular analysis of the 18S rDNA sequences revealed that four hosts, namely northern pike, Esox lucius Linnaeus, freshwater bream, spined loach and European perch, Perca fluviatilis Linnaeus, were simultaneously infected with two different trypanosome species. Our findings advocate the view that to avoid the risk posed by mixed infections, subsequent molecular taxonomic studies should be performed on clonal lines derived from laboratory cultures of fish trypanosomes. PMID:25651690

  20. Trypanosoma rangeli isolates of bats from Central Brazil: genotyping and phylogenetic analysis enable description of a new lineage using spliced-leader gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Maia da Silva, F; Marcili, A; Lima, L; Cavazzana, M; Ortiz, P A; Campaner, M; Takeda, G F; Paiva, F; Nunes, V L B; Camargo, E P; Teixeira, M M G

    2009-03-01

    Trypanosoma rangeli infects several mammalian orders but has never confidently been described in Chiroptera, which are commonly parasitized by many trypanosome species. Here, we described trypanosomes from bats captured in Central Brazil identified as T. rangeli, T. dionisii, T. cruzimarinkellei and T. cruzi. Two isolates, Tra643 from Platyrrhinus lineatus and Tra1719 from Artibeus planirostris were identified as T. rangeli by morphological, biological and molecular methods, and confirmed by phylogenetic analyses. Analysis using SSU rDNA sequences clustered these bat trypanosomes together with T. rangeli from other hosts, and separated them from other trypanosomes from bats. Genotyping based on length and sequence polymorphism of PCR-amplified intergenic spliced-leader gene sequences assigned Tra1719 to the lineage A whereas Tra643 was shown to be a new genotype and was assigned to the new lineage E. To our knowledge, these two isolates are the earliest T. rangeli from bats and the first isolates from Central Brazil molecularly characterized. Rhodnius stali captured for this study was found infected by T. rangeli and T. cruzi. PMID:19063857

  1. Structural Insights into Inhibition of Sterol 14[alpha]-Demethylase in the Human Pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Lepesheva, Galina I.; Hargrove, Tatiana Y.; Anderson, Spencer; Kleshchenko, Yuliya; Furtak, Vyacheslav; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Villalta, Fernando; Waterman, Michael R.

    2010-09-02

    Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis), which threatens the lives of millions of people and remains incurable in its chronic stage. The antifungal drug posaconazole that blocks sterol biosynthesis in the parasite is the only compound entering clinical trials for the chronic form of this infection. Crystal structures of the drug target enzyme, Trypanosoma cruzi sterol 14{alpha}-demethylase (CYP51), complexed with posaconazole, another antifungal agent fluconazole and an experimental inhibitor, (R)-4{prime}-chloro-N-(1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-2-(1H-imid-azol-1-yl)ethyl)biphenyl-4-carboxamide (VNF), allow prediction of important chemical features that enhance the drug potencies. Combined with comparative analysis of inhibitor binding parameters, influence on the catalytic activity of the trypanosomal enzyme and its human counterpart, and their cellular effects at different stages of the Trypanosoma cruzi life cycle, the structural data provide a molecular background to CYP51 inhibition and azole resistance and enlighten the path for directed design of new, more potent and selective drugs to develop an efficient treatment for Chagas disease.

  2. Regulation of innate and acquired immunity in African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, J M; Paulnock, D M

    2005-01-01

    African trypanosomes are well known for their ability to avoid immune elimination by switching the immunodominant variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat during infection. However, antigenic variation is only one of several means by which trypanosomes manipulate the immune system of their hosts. In this article, the role of parasite factors such as GPI anchor residues of the shed VSG molecule and the release of CpG DNA, in addition to host factors such as IFN-gamma, in regulating key aspects of innate and acquired immunity during infection is examined. The biological relevance of these immunoregulatory events is discussed in the context of host and parasite survival. PMID:16179030

  3. Regulating a Post-Transcriptional Regulator: Protein Phosphorylation, Degradation and Translational Blockage in Control of the Trypanosome Stress-Response RNA-Binding Protein ZC3H11

    PubMed Central

    Minia, Igor; Clayton, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The life cycle of the mammalian pathogen Trypanosoma brucei involves commuting between two markedly different environments: the homeothermic mammalian host and the poikilothermic invertebrate vector. The ability to resist temperature and other stresses is essential for trypanosome survival. Trypanosome gene expression is mainly post-transcriptional, but must nevertheless be adjusted in response to environmental cues, including host-specific physical and chemical stresses. We investigate here the control of ZC3H11, a CCCH zinc finger protein which stabilizes stress response mRNAs. ZC3H11 protein levels increase at least 10-fold when trypanosomes are stressed by heat shock, proteasome inhibitors, ethanol, arsenite, and low doses of puromycin, but not by various other stresses. We found that increases in protein stability and translation efficiency both contribute to ZC3H11 accumulation. ZC3H11 is an in vitro substrate for casein kinase 1 isoform 2 (CK1.2), and results from CK1.2 depletion and other experiments suggest that phosphorylation of ZC3H11 can promote its instability in vivo. Results from sucrose density centrifugation indicate that under normal culture conditions translation initiation on the ZC3H11 mRNA is repressed, but after suitable stresses the ZC3H11 mRNA moves to heavy polysomes. The ZC3H11 3'-UTR is sufficient for translation suppression and a region of 71 nucleotides is required for the regulation. Since the control works in both bloodstream forms, where ZC3H11 translation is repressed at 37°C, and in procyclic forms, where ZC3H11 translation is activated at 37°C, we predict that this regulatory RNA sequence is targeted by repressive trans acting factor that is released upon stress. PMID:27002830

  4. Differential Trypanosome Surface Coat Regulation by a CCCH Protein That Co-Associates with procyclin mRNA cis-Elements

    PubMed Central

    Walrad, Pegine; Paterou, Athina; Acosta-Serrano, Alvaro; Matthews, Keith R.

    2009-01-01

    The genome of Trypanosoma brucei is unusual in being regulated almost entirely at the post-transcriptional level. In terms of regulation, the best-studied genes are procyclins, which encode a family of major surface GPI-anchored glycoproteins (EP1, EP2, EP3, GPEET) that show differential expression in the parasite's tsetse-fly vector. Although procyclin mRNA cis-regulatory sequences have provided the paradigm for post-transcriptional control in kinetoplastid parasites, trans-acting regulators of procyclin mRNAs are unidentified, despite intensive effort over 15 years. Here we identify the developmental regulator, TbZFP3, a CCCH-class predicted RNA binding protein, as an isoform-specific regulator of Procyclin surface coat expression in trypanosomes. We demonstrate (i) that endogenous TbZFP3 shows sequence-specific co-precipitation of EP1 and GPEET, but not EP2 and EP3, procyclin mRNA isoforms, (ii) that ectopic overexpression of TbZFP3 does not perturb the mRNA abundance of procyclin transcripts, but rather that (iii) their protein expression is regulated in an isoform-specific manner, as evidenced by mass spectrometric analysis of the Procyclin expression signature in the transgenic cell lines. The TbZFP3 mRNA–protein complex (TbZFP3mRNP) is identified as a trans-regulator of differential surface protein expression in trypanosomes. Moreover, its sequence-specific interactions with procyclin mRNAs are compatible with long-established predictions for Procyclin regulation. Combined with the known association of TbZFP3 with the translational apparatus, this study provides a long-sought missing link between surface protein cis-regulatory signals and the gene expression machinery in trypanosomes. PMID:19247446

  5. Regulating a Post-Transcriptional Regulator: Protein Phosphorylation, Degradation and Translational Blockage in Control of the Trypanosome Stress-Response RNA-Binding Protein ZC3H11.

    PubMed

    Minia, Igor; Clayton, Christine

    2016-03-01

    The life cycle of the mammalian pathogen Trypanosoma brucei involves commuting between two markedly different environments: the homeothermic mammalian host and the poikilothermic invertebrate vector. The ability to resist temperature and other stresses is essential for trypanosome survival. Trypanosome gene expression is mainly post-transcriptional, but must nevertheless be adjusted in response to environmental cues, including host-specific physical and chemical stresses. We investigate here the control of ZC3H11, a CCCH zinc finger protein which stabilizes stress response mRNAs. ZC3H11 protein levels increase at least 10-fold when trypanosomes are stressed by heat shock, proteasome inhibitors, ethanol, arsenite, and low doses of puromycin, but not by various other stresses. We found that increases in protein stability and translation efficiency both contribute to ZC3H11 accumulation. ZC3H11 is an in vitro substrate for casein kinase 1 isoform 2 (CK1.2), and results from CK1.2 depletion and other experiments suggest that phosphorylation of ZC3H11 can promote its instability in vivo. Results from sucrose density centrifugation indicate that under normal culture conditions translation initiation on the ZC3H11 mRNA is repressed, but after suitable stresses the ZC3H11 mRNA moves to heavy polysomes. The ZC3H11 3'-UTR is sufficient for translation suppression and a region of 71 nucleotides is required for the regulation. Since the control works in both bloodstream forms, where ZC3H11 translation is repressed at 37°C, and in procyclic forms, where ZC3H11 translation is activated at 37°C, we predict that this regulatory RNA sequence is targeted by repressive trans acting factor that is released upon stress. PMID:27002830

  6. Predominance of Trypanosoma rangeli infection in children from a Chagas disease endemic area in the west-shore of the Panama canal.

    PubMed

    Saldaña, Azael; Samudio, Franklyn; Miranda, Aracelis; Herrera, Lissette M; Saavedra, Sara P; Cáceres, Lorenzo; Bayard, Vicente; Calzada, José E

    2005-11-01

    A total of 206 serum samples from children (3-14 years old) living in the Amador County (La Chorrera District, Province of Panama) were screened by indirect immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT) for the presence of antibodies against Trypanosoma cruzi. Positive sera were confirmed by recombinant enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blot analysis. The presence of blood trypanosomes was investigated by hemoculture and subsequently identify by a duplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by dot blot hybridization. The results indicated a prevalence of 9.7% for trypanosome infections, a seroprevalence of 2.9% against T. cruzi and a predominance of T. rangeli infection (6.8%). The immunological and clinical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:16410959

  7. PNT1 is a C11 cysteine peptidase essential for replication of the Trypanosome Kinetoplast

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Grewal, Jaspreet S.; McLuskey, Karen; Das, Debanu; Myburgh, Elmarie; Wilkes, Jonathan; Brown, Elaine; Lemgruber, Leandro; Gould, Matthew K.; Burchmore, Richard J.; Coombs, Graham H.; et al

    2016-03-03

    The structure of a C11 peptidase PmC11 from the gut bacterium, Parabacteroides merdae, has recently been determined, enabling the identification and characterization of a C11 orthologue, PNT1, in the parasitic protozoon Trypanosoma brucei. A phylogenetic analysis identified PmC11 orthologues in bacteria, archaea, Chromerids, Coccidia, and Kinetoplastida, the latter being the most divergent. A primary sequence alignment of PNT1 with clostripain and PmC11 revealed the position of the characteristic His-Cys catalytic dyad (His99 and Cys136), and an Asp (Asp134) in the potential S1 binding site. Immunofluorescence and cryoelectron microscopy revealed that PNT1 localizes to the kinetoplast, an organelle containing the mitochondrialmore » genome of the parasite (kDNA), with an accumulation of the protein at or near the antipodal sites. Depletion of PNT1 by RNAi in the T. brucei bloodstream form was lethal both in in vitro culture and in vivo in mice and the induced population accumulated cells lacking a kinetoplast. In contrast, overexpression of PNT1 led to cells having mislocated kinetoplasts. RNAi depletion of PNT1 in a kDNA independent cell line resulted in kinetoplast loss but was viable, indicating that PNT1 is required exclusively for kinetoplast maintenance. Expression of a recoded wild-type PNT1 allele, but not of an active site mutant restored parasite viability after induction in vitro and in vivo confirming that the peptidase activity of PNT1 is essential for parasite survival. Furthermore, these data provide evidence that PNT1 is a cysteine peptidase that is required exclusively for maintenance of the trypanosome kinetoplast.« less

  8. PNT1 Is a C11 Cysteine Peptidase Essential for Replication of the Trypanosome Kinetoplast.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Jaspreet S; McLuskey, Karen; Das, Debanu; Myburgh, Elmarie; Wilkes, Jonathan; Brown, Elaine; Lemgruber, Leandro; Gould, Matthew K; Burchmore, Richard J; Coombs, Graham H; Schnaufer, Achim; Mottram, Jeremy C

    2016-04-29

    The structure of a C11 peptidase PmC11 from the gut bacterium, Parabacteroides merdae, has recently been determined, enabling the identification and characterization of a C11 orthologue, PNT1, in the parasitic protozoon Trypanosoma brucei. A phylogenetic analysis identified PmC11 orthologues in bacteria, archaea, Chromerids, Coccidia, and Kinetoplastida, the latter being the most divergent. A primary sequence alignment of PNT1 with clostripain and PmC11 revealed the position of the characteristic His-Cys catalytic dyad (His(99) and Cys(136)), and an Asp (Asp(134)) in the potential S1 binding site. Immunofluorescence and cryoelectron microscopy revealed that PNT1 localizes to the kinetoplast, an organelle containing the mitochondrial genome of the parasite (kDNA), with an accumulation of the protein at or near the antipodal sites. Depletion of PNT1 by RNAi in the T. brucei bloodstream form was lethal both in in vitro culture and in vivo in mice and the induced population accumulated cells lacking a kinetoplast. In contrast, overexpression of PNT1 led to cells having mislocated kinetoplasts. RNAi depletion of PNT1 in a kDNA independent cell line resulted in kinetoplast loss but was viable, indicating that PNT1 is required exclusively for kinetoplast maintenance. Expression of a recoded wild-type PNT1 allele, but not of an active site mutant restored parasite viability after induction in vitro and in vivo confirming that the peptidase activity of PNT1 is essential for parasite survival. These data provide evidence that PNT1 is a cysteine peptidase that is required exclusively for maintenance of the trypanosome kinetoplast. PMID:26940875

  9. PNT1 Is a C11 Cysteine Peptidase Essential for Replication of the Trypanosome Kinetoplast*

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debanu; Myburgh, Elmarie; Wilkes, Jonathan; Brown, Elaine; Lemgruber, Leandro; Gould, Matthew K.; Burchmore, Richard J.; Coombs, Graham H.; Schnaufer, Achim

    2016-01-01

    The structure of a C11 peptidase PmC11 from the gut bacterium, Parabacteroides merdae, has recently been determined, enabling the identification and characterization of a C11 orthologue, PNT1, in the parasitic protozoon Trypanosoma brucei. A phylogenetic analysis identified PmC11 orthologues in bacteria, archaea, Chromerids, Coccidia, and Kinetoplastida, the latter being the most divergent. A primary sequence alignment of PNT1 with clostripain and PmC11 revealed the position of the characteristic His-Cys catalytic dyad (His99 and Cys136), and an Asp (Asp134) in the potential S1 binding site. Immunofluorescence and cryoelectron microscopy revealed that PNT1 localizes to the kinetoplast, an organelle containing the mitochondrial genome of the parasite (kDNA), with an accumulation of the protein at or near the antipodal sites. Depletion of PNT1 by RNAi in the T. brucei bloodstream form was lethal both in in vitro culture and in vivo in mice and the induced population accumulated cells lacking a kinetoplast. In contrast, overexpression of PNT1 led to cells having mislocated kinetoplasts. RNAi depletion of PNT1 in a kDNA independent cell line resulted in kinetoplast loss but was viable, indicating that PNT1 is required exclusively for kinetoplast maintenance. Expression of a recoded wild-type PNT1 allele, but not of an active site mutant restored parasite viability after induction in vitro and in vivo confirming that the peptidase activity of PNT1 is essential for parasite survival. These data provide evidence that PNT1 is a cysteine peptidase that is required exclusively for maintenance of the trypanosome kinetoplast. PMID:26940875

  10. Flagellar membrane fusion and protein exchange in trypanosomes; a new form of cell-cell communication?

    PubMed Central

    Imhof, Simon; Fragoso, Cristina; Hemphill, Andrew; von Schubert, Conrad; Li, Dong; Legant, Wesley; Betzig, Eric; Roditi, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Diverse structures facilitate direct exchange of proteins between cells, including plasmadesmata in plants and tunnelling nanotubes in bacteria and higher eukaryotes.  Here we describe a new mechanism of protein transfer, flagellar membrane fusion, in the unicellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. When fluorescently tagged trypanosomes were co-cultured, a small proportion of double-positive cells were observed. The formation of double-positive cells was dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium and was enhanced by placing cells in medium supplemented with fresh bovine serum. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that double-positive cells arose by bidirectional protein exchange in the absence of nuclear transfer.  Furthermore, super-resolution microscopy showed that this process occurred in ≤1 minute, the limit of temporal resolution in these experiments. Both cytoplasmic and membrane proteins could be transferred provided they gained access to the flagellum. Intriguingly, a component of the RNAi machinery (Argonaute) was able to move between cells, raising the possibility that small interfering RNAs are transported as cargo. Transmission electron microscopy showed that shared flagella contained two axonemes and two paraflagellar rods bounded by a single membrane. In some cases flagellar fusion was partial and interactions between cells were transient. In other cases fusion occurred along the entire length of the flagellum, was stable for several hours and might be irreversible. Fusion did not appear to be deleterious for cell function: paired cells were motile and could give rise to progeny while fused. The motile flagella of unicellular organisms are related to the sensory cilia of higher eukaryotes, raising the possibility that protein transfer between cells via cilia or flagella occurs more widely in nature. PMID:27239276

  11. Functionally related transcripts have common RNA motifs for specific RNA-binding proteins in trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Noé, Griselda; De Gaudenzi, Javier G; Frasch, Alberto C

    2008-01-01

    Background Trypanosomes mostly control gene expression by post-transcriptional events such as modulation of mRNA stability and translational efficiency. These mechanisms involve RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), which associate with transcripts to form messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complexes. Results In this study, we report the identification of mRNA targets for Trypanosoma cruzi U-rich RBP 1 (TcUBP1) and T. cruzi RBP 3 (TcRBP3), two phylogenetically conserved proteins among Kinetoplastids. Co-immunoprecipitated RBP-associated RNAs were extracted from mRNP complexes and binding of RBPs to several targets was confirmed by independent experimental assays. Analysis of target transcript sequences allowed the identification of different signature RNA motifs for each protein. Cis-elements for RBP binding have a stem-loop structure of 30–35 bases and are more frequently represented in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of mRNAs. Insertion of the correctly folded RNA elements to a non-specific mRNA rendered it into a target transcript, whereas substitution of the RNA elements abolished RBP interaction. In addition, RBPs competed for RNA-binding sites in accordance with the distribution of different and overlapping motifs in the 3'-UTRs of common mRNAs. Conclusion Functionally related transcripts were preferentially associated with a given RBP; TcUBP1 targets were enriched in genes encoding proteins involved in metabolism, whereas ribosomal protein-encoding transcripts were the largest group within TcRBP3 targets. Together, these results suggest coordinated control of different mRNA subsets at the post-transcriptional level by specific RBPs. PMID:19063746

  12. Trypanosome Alternative Oxidase Possesses both an N-Terminal and Internal Mitochondrial Targeting Signal

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, VaNae; Singha, Ujjal K.; Smith, Joseph T.; Weems, Ebony

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of mitochondrial targeting signals (MTS) by receptor translocases of outer and inner membranes of mitochondria is one of the prerequisites for import of nucleus-encoded proteins into this organelle. The MTS for a majority of trypanosomatid mitochondrial proteins have not been well defined. Here we analyzed the targeting signal for trypanosome alternative oxidase (TAO), which functions as the sole terminal oxidase in the infective form of Trypanosoma brucei. Deleting the first 10 of 24 amino acids predicted to be the classical N-terminal MTS of TAO did not affect its import into mitochondria in vitro. Furthermore, ectopically expressed TAO was targeted to mitochondria in both forms of the parasite even after deletion of first 40 amino acid residues. However, deletion of more than 20 amino acid residues from the N terminus reduced the efficiency of import. These data suggest that besides an N-terminal MTS, TAO possesses an internal mitochondrial targeting signal. In addition, both the N-terminal MTS and the mature TAO protein were able to target a cytosolic protein, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), to a T. brucei mitochondrion. Further analysis identified a cryptic internal MTS of TAO, located within amino acid residues 115 to 146, which was fully capable of targeting DHFR to mitochondria. The internal signal was more efficient than the N-terminal MTS for import of this heterologous protein. Together, these results show that TAO possesses a cleavable N-terminal MTS as well as an internal MTS and that these signals act together for efficient import of TAO into mitochondria. PMID:24562910

  13. Development and evaluation of an ITS1 "Touchdown" PCR for assessment of drug efficacy against animal African trypanosomosis.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thao; Napier, Grant; Rowan, Tim; Cordel, Claudia; Labuschagne, Michel; Delespaux, Vincent; Van Reet, Nick; Erasmus, Heidi; Joubert, Annesca; Büscher, Philippe

    2014-05-28

    Animal African trypanosomoses (AAT) are caused by flagellated protozoa of the Trypanosoma genus and contribute to considerable losses in animal production in Africa, Latin America and South East Asia. Trypanosoma congolense is considered the economically most important species. Drug resistant T. congolense strains present a threat to the control of AAT and have triggered research into discovery of novel trypanocides. In vivo assessment of trypanocidal efficacy relies on monitoring of treated animals with microscopic parasite detection methods. Since these methods have poor sensitivity, follow-up for up to 100 days after treatment is recommended to increase the chance of detecting recurrent parasitaemia waves. Molecular techniques are more amendable to high throughput processing and are generally more sensitive than microscopic detection, thus bearing the potential of shortening the 100-day follow up period. The study presents a "Touchdown" PCR targeting the internal transcribed spacer 1 of the ribosomal DNA (ITS1 TD PCR) that enables detection and discrimination of different Trypanosoma taxa in a single run due to variations in PCR product sizes. The assay achieves analytical sensitivity of 10 parasites per ml of blood for detection of T. congolense savannah type and T. brucei, and 100 parasites per ml of blood for detection of T. vivax in infected mouse blood. The ITS1 TD PCR was evaluated on cattle experimentally infected with T. congolense during an investigational new veterinary trypanocide drug efficacy study. ITS1 TD PCR demonstrated comparable performance to microscopy in verifying trypanocide treatment success, in which parasite DNA became undetectable in cured animals within two days post-treatment. ITS1 TD PCR detected parasite recrudescence three days earlier than microscopy and had a higher positivity rate than microscopy (84.85% versus 57.58%) in 66 specimens of relapsing animals collected after treatments. Therefore, ITS1 TD PCR provides a useful tool

  14. Extra glycosomal localization of Trypanosoma brucei hexokinase 2

    PubMed Central

    Joice, April C.; Lyda, Todd L.; Sayce, Andrew C.; Verplaetse, Emilie; Morris, Meredith T.; Michels, Paul A. M.; Robinson, Derrick R.; Morris, James C.

    2012-01-01

    The majority of the glycolytic enzymes in the African trypanosome are compartmentalized within peroxisome-like organelles, the glycosomes. Polypeptides harboring peroxisomal targeting sequences (PTS type 1 or 2) are targeted to these organelles. This targeting is essential to parasite viability, as compartmentalization of glycolytic enzymes prevents unregulated ATP-dependent phosphorylation of intermediatemetabolites. Here, we report the surprising extra-glycosomal localization of aPTS-2 bearing trypanosomal hexokinase, TbHK2. In bloodstream form parasites, the protein localizes to both glycosomes and to the flagellum. Evidence for this includes fractionation and immunofluorescence studies using antisera generated against the authentic protein as well as detection of epitope-tagged recombinant versions of the protein. In the insect stage parasite, distribution is different, with the polypeptide localized to glycosomes and proximal to the basal bodies. The function of the extra-glycosomal protein remains unclear. While its association with the basal body suggests that it may have a role in locomotion in the insect stage parasite, no detectable defect indirectional motility or velocity of cell movement were observed for TbHK2-deficient cells, suggesting that protein may have a different function in the cell. PMID:22619756

  15. Human African Trypanosomiasis Transmission, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Diabakana, Philemon Mansinsa; Mesu, Victor Kande Betu Ku; Manzambi, Emile Zola; Ollivier, Gaelle; Asonganyi, Tazoacha; Cuny, Gerard; Grébaut, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the epidemiology of human African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness) in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo, 2 entomologic surveys were conducted in 2005. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and human-blood meals were found in tsetse fly midguts, which suggested active disease transmission. Vector control should be used to improve human African trypanosomiasis control efforts. PMID:17326955

  16. Genotyping of Trypanosoma cruzi DTUs and Trypanosoma rangeli genetic groups in experimentally infected Rhodnius prolixus by PCR-RFLP.

    PubMed

    Sá, Amanda R N; Dias, Greicy B M; Kimoto, Karen Y; Steindel, Mário; Grisard, Edmundo C; Toledo, Max Jean O; Gomes, Mônica L

    2016-04-01

    The specific detection and genetic typing of trypanosomes that infect humans, mammalian reservoirs, and vectors is crucial for diagnosis and epidemiology. We utilized a PCR-RFLP assay that targeted subunit II of cytochrome oxidase and 24Sα-rDNA to simultaneously detect and discriminate six Trypanosoma cruzi discrete typing units (DTUs) and two genetic groups of Trypanosoma rangeli (KP1+/KP1-) in intestinal contents of experimentally infected Rhodnius prolixus. The PCR assays showed that in 23 of 29 (79.4%) mixed infections with the six T. cruzi DTUs and mixed infections with individual DTUs and/or groups KP1+ and KP1-, both parasites were successfully detected. In six mixed infections that involved TcIII, the TcI, TcII, TcV, and TcVI DTUs predominated to the detriment of TcIII, indicating the selection of genetic groups. Interactions between different genetic groups and vectors may lead to genetic selection over TcIII. The elimination of this DTU by the immune system of the vector appears unlikely because TcIII was present in other mixed infections (TcIII/TcIV and TcIII/KP1+). Both molecular markers used in this study were sensitive and specific, demonstrating their usefulness in a wide geographical area where distinct genotypes of these two species are sympatric. Although the cellular and molecular mechanisms that are involved in parasite-vector interactions are still poorly understood, our results indicate a dynamic selection toward specific T. cruzi DTUs in R. prolixus during mixed genotype infections. PMID:26792202

  17. Nuclear pore complex evolution: a trypanosome Mlp analogue functions in chromosomal segregation but lacks transcriptional barrier activity

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Jennifer M.; Koreny, Ludek; Obado, Samson; Ratushny, Alexander V.; Chen, Wei-Ming; Chiang, Jung-Hsien; Kelly, Steven; Chait, Brian T.; Aitchison, John D.; Rout, Michael P.; Field, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) has dual roles in nucleocytoplasmic transport and chromatin organization. In many eukaryotes the coiled-coil Mlp/Tpr proteins of the NPC nuclear basket have specific functions in interactions with chromatin and defining specialized regions of active transcription, whereas Mlp2 associates with the mitotic spindle/NPC in a cell cycle–dependent manner. We previously identified two putative Mlp-related proteins in African trypanosomes, TbNup110 and TbNup92, the latter of which associates with the spindle. We now provide evidence for independent ancestry for TbNup92/TbNup110 and Mlp/Tpr proteins. However, TbNup92 is required for correct chromosome segregation, with knockout cells exhibiting microaneuploidy and lowered fidelity of telomere segregation. Further, TbNup92 is intimately associated with the mitotic spindle and spindle anchor site but apparently has minimal roles in control of gene transcription, indicating that TbNup92 lacks major barrier activity. TbNup92 therefore acts as a functional analogue of Mlp/Tpr proteins, and, together with the lamina analogue NUP-1, represents a cohort of novel proteins operating at the nuclear periphery of trypanosomes, uncovering complex evolutionary trajectories for the NPC and nuclear lamina. PMID:24600046

  18. JVG9, a benzimidazole derivative, alters the surface and cytoskeleton of Trypanosoma cruzi bloodstream trypomastigotes

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Chiguer, Dylan L; Hernández-Luis, Francisco; Nogueda-Torres, Benjamín; Castillo, Rafael; Reynoso-Ducoing, Olivia; Hernández-Campos, Alicia; Ambrosio, Javier R

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi has a particular cytoskeleton that consists of a subpellicular network of microtubules and actin microfilaments. Therefore, it is an excellent target for the development of new anti-parasitic drugs. Benzimidazole 2-carbamates, a class of well-known broad-spectrum anthelmintics, have been shown to inhibit the in vitro growth of many protozoa. Therefore, to find efficient anti-trypanosomal (trypanocidal) drugs, our group has designed and synthesised several benzimidazole derivatives. One, named JVG9 (5-chloro-1H-benzimidazole-2-thiol), has been found to be effective against T. cruzi bloodstream trypomastigotes under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. Here, we present the in vitro effects observed by laser scanning confocal and scanning electron microscopy on T. cruzi trypomastigotes. Changes in the surface and the distribution of the cytoskeletal proteins are consistent with the hypothesis that the trypanocidal activity of JVG9 involves the cytoskeleton as a target. PMID:25317703

  19. Trypanosoma brucei FKBP12 Differentially Controls Motility and Cytokinesis in Procyclic and Bloodstream Forms

    PubMed Central

    Brasseur, Anaïs; Rotureau, Brice; Vermeersch, Marjorie; Blisnick, Thierry; Salmon, Didier; Bastin, Philippe; Pays, Etienne; Vanhamme, Luc

    2013-01-01

    FKBP12 proteins are able to inhibit TOR kinases or calcineurin phosphatases upon binding of rapamycin or FK506 drugs, respectively. The Trypanosoma brucei FKBP12 homologue (TbFKBP12) was found to be a cytoskeleton-associated protein with specific localization in the flagellar pocket area of the bloodstream form. In the insect procyclic form, RNA interference-mediated knockdown of TbFKBP12 affected motility. In bloodstream cells, depletion of TbFKBP12 affected cytokinesis and cytoskeleton architecture. These last effects were associated with the presence of internal translucent cavities limited by an inside-out configuration of the normal cell surface, with a luminal variant surface glycoprotein coat lined up by microtubules. These cavities, which recreated the streamlined shape of the normal trypanosome cytoskeleton, might represent unsuccessful attempts for cell abscission. We propose that TbFKBP12 differentially affects stage-specific processes through association with the cytoskeleton. PMID:23104568

  20. Assembly Mechanism of Trypanosoma brucei BILBO1, a Multidomain Cytoskeletal Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Vidilaseris, Keni; Shimanovskaya, Ekaterina; Esson, Heather J.; Morriswood, Brooke; Dong, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei BILBO1 (TbBILBO1) is an essential component of the flagellar pocket collar of trypanosomes. We recently reported the high resolution structure of the N-terminal domain of TbBILBO1. Here, we provide further structural dissections of its other three constituent domains: EF-hand, coiled coil, and leucine zipper. We found that the EF-hand changes its conformation upon calcium binding, the central coiled coil forms an antiparallel dimer, and the C-terminal leucine zipper appears to contain targeting information. Furthermore, interdimer interactions between adjacent leucine zippers allow TbBILBO1 to form extended filaments in vitro. These filaments were additionally found to condense into fibers through lateral interactions. Based on these experimental data, we propose a mechanism for TbBILBO1 assembly at the flagellar pocket collar. PMID:25031322

  1. The role of antibody and complement in the cellular response to Trypanosoma congolense.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, B; Gehrung, M; Thornton, M; Speth, V

    1984-01-01

    The in vitro cytotoxic response of bovine granulocytes and monocytes and of murine peritoneal macrophages against Trypanosoma congolense in the presence of antibody, antibody plus complement or complement alone was assessed using luminol aided chemiluminescence as a second parameter for effector cell activation. Neither cell type exhibited any trypanolysis exceeding that of antibodies and complement alone. The kinetics of the chemiluminescence response in the course of these reactions closely correlated with the trypanocidal activity of the antibody preparation used, suggesting effector cell activation as a response to antibody-mediated immobilization and damage of the trypanosomes. From these results and electron microscopic investigations we conclude that antibody- or complement-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxic reactions do not play a significant role in the defence of T. congolense infection, neither by extracellular lysis nor killing of ingested parasites. PMID:6713731

  2. Trypanosoma brucei Parasites Occupy and Functionally Adapt to the Adipose Tissue in Mice.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Sandra; Rijo-Ferreira, Filipa; Carvalho, Tânia; Pinto-Neves, Daniel; Guegan, Fabien; Aresta-Branco, Francisco; Bento, Fabio; Young, Simon A; Pinto, Andreia; Van Den Abbeele, Jan; Ribeiro, Ruy M; Dias, Sérgio; Smith, Terry K; Figueiredo, Luisa M

    2016-06-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is an extracellular parasite that causes sleeping sickness. In mammalian hosts, trypanosomes are thought to exist in two major niches: early in infection, they populate the blood; later, they breach the blood-brain barrier. Working with a well-established mouse model, we discovered that adipose tissue constitutes a third major reservoir for T. brucei. Parasites from adipose tissue, here termed adipose tissue forms (ATFs), can replicate and were capable of infecting a naive animal. ATFs were transcriptionally distinct from bloodstream forms, and the genes upregulated included putative fatty acid β-oxidation enzymes. Consistent with this, ATFs were able to utilize exogenous myristate and form β-oxidation intermediates, suggesting that ATF parasites can use fatty acids as an external carbon source. These findings identify the adipose tissue as a niche for T. brucei during its mammalian life cycle and could potentially explain the weight loss associated with sleeping sickness. PMID:27237364

  3. Complement activating factor(s) of Trypanosoma lewisi: some physiochemical characteristics of the active components.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, K; Sheppard, J; Tizard, I; Holmes, W

    1978-01-01

    Of the complement activating factors present in Trypanosoma lewisi, the major component, a carbohydrate containing substance was further investigated. This component was found to have a lag time of complete activation of 2 CH50 units of bovine complement of approximately 15 minutes while 1% trypsin (a known activator of complement, used as a control system) was capable of instant consumption of a similar quantity of complement. In addition, the complement activating factor of trypanosomes was observed to be stable at 100 degrees C for 15 minutes and over a pH range of 3.0 to 11.0. Thin layer chromatography studies suggested that at least part of the active component contained lipid, perhaps indicating that it may be glycolipid in nature. PMID:25701

  4. Iron superoxide dismutases in eukaryotic pathogens: new insights from Apicomplexa and Trypanosoma structures

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Isabelle Q. H.; Davies, Douglas R.; Moretti, Nilmar Silvio; Shanmugam, Dhanasekaran; Cestari, Igor; Anupama, Atashi; Fairman, James W.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Stuart, Kenneth; Schenkman, Sergio; Myler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies have highlighted the potential of superoxide dismutases as drug targets in eukaryotic pathogens. This report presents the structures of three iron-dependent superoxide dismutases (FeSODs) from Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania major and Babesia bovis. Comparison with existing structures from Plasmodium and other trypanosome isoforms shows a very conserved overall fold with subtle differences. In particular, structural data suggest that B. bovis FeSOD may display similar resistance to peroxynitrite-mediated inactivation via an intramolecular electron-transfer pathway as previously described in T. cruzi FeSOD isoform B, thus providing valuable information for structure-based drug design. Furthermore, lysine-acetylation results in T. cruzi indicate that acetylation occurs at a position close to that responsible for the regulation of acetylation-mediated activity in the human enzyme. PMID:25961325

  5. Motility modes of the parasite Trypanosoma brucei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temel, Fatma Zeynep; Qu, Zijie; McAllaster, Michael; de Graffenried, Christopher; Breuer, Kenneth

    2015-11-01

    The parasitic single-celled protozoan Trypanosoma brucei causes African Sleeping Sickness, which is a fatal disease in humans and animals that threatens more than 60 million people in 36 African countries. Cell motility plays a critical role in the developmental phases and dissemination of the parasite. Unlike many other motile cells such as bacteria Escherichia coli or Caulobacter crescentus, the flagellum of T. brucei is attached along the length of its awl-like body, producing a unique mode of motility that is not fully understood or characterized. Here, we report on the motility of T. brucei, which swims using its single flagellum employing both rotating and undulating propulsion modes. We tracked cells in real-time in three dimensions using fluorescent microscopy. Data obtained from experiments using both short-term tracking within the field of view and long-term tracking using a tracking microscope were analyzed. Motility modes and swimming speed were analyzed as functions of cell size, rotation rate and undulation pattern. Research supported by NSF.

  6. The predominant calcimedins from Trypanosoma brucei comprise a family of flagellar EF-hand calcium-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Y; Haghighat, N G; Ruben, L

    1992-01-01

    The cellular complement of calcimedins was identified in Trypanosoma brucei by Ca(2+)-dependent association with phenyl-Sepharose. Predominant calcimedins with molecular mass of 23-26 kDa and 44 kDa, along with minor calcimedins of 96, 120 and 230 kDa, were obtained. The trypanosome calcimedins were unrelated to vertebrate annexins, based upon antibody cross-reactivity and an inability to associate in a Ca(2+)-dependent way with phospholipid vesicles comprised of phosphatidylserine or phosphatidylethanolamine/phosphatidylcholine (1:1, w/w). Partial sequence analysis demonstrated that 44 kDa calcimedin (Tb-44) contained an EF-hand calcium-binding loop. Five CNBr/tryptic fragments exhibited a total of 93% similarity with Tb-17, a 23 kDa EF-hand protein in T. brucei. The trypanosome calcimedins appeared to comprise a family of proteins, based on sequence similarities and antibody cross-reactivity of affinity-purified anti-Tb44 with the 23-26 kDa cluster. No evidence was found for Tb-44 in the related species T. cruzi, Leishmania taraentolae or Crithidia fasciculata. Antibodies against Tb-44 were localized by immunofluorescence along the flagellum of T. brucei. Immunoblot analysis of flagella-enriched preparations demonstrated that Tb-44 and the 23-26 kDa cluster were present in this structure. We conclude that annexin family members are not among the predominant trypanosome proteins that associate with phenyl-Sepharose in a Ca(2+)-dependent way. Instead, the major trypanosome calcimedins comprise a family of flagellar EF-hand calcium-binding proteins. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:1417772

  7. [Digestive tract dilation in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi].

    PubMed

    Guillén-Pernía, B; Lugo-Yarbuh, A; Moreno, E

    2001-09-01

    This paper will analyze alterations in the digestive tract (DT) of mice with chronic Chagas' disease infection produced by Trypanosoma cruzi from different sources. X-rays of the DT of 18 mice infected with T. cruzi and 6 control mice were compared after the ingestion of a barium sulfate solution over a period of 6 hours. 120 days post-infection (pi) the X-rays of the DT of the 5 mice of group 1A infected with trypanosomes DMI isolated from the opossum Didelphis marsupialis, and 4 mice in group 2A infected with the isolate EP taken from a patient with acute Chagas' disease, showed swelling of the stomach and the colon (C). 180 days pi, the X-rays of the DT of the 5 mice of group 1B infected with isolated DMI and the 4 mice in group 2B infected with isolate EP, showed an even greater swelling of the C. Histological examination of the DT of all infected mice showed extensive changes of the intestinal muscle layer, such as the diminution of the muscular and mucous layers and the loss of colonic folds and myoenteric plexus. These results suggest that T. cruzi populations caused severe alterations in the digestive system of the mice used in the experiment, and that the same alterations could occur in the digestive organs of humans, especially those living in areas where Chagas' disease is endemic, but where these abnormalities have not yet been reported. PMID:11552508

  8. Dynamic Localization of Trypanosoma brucei Mitochondrial DNA Polymerase ID

    PubMed Central

    Concepción-Acevedo, Jeniffer; Luo, Juemin

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosomes contain a unique form of mitochondrial DNA called kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) that is a catenated network composed of minicircles and maxicircles. Several proteins are essential for network replication, and most of these localize to the antipodal sites or the kinetoflagellar zone. Essential components for kDNA synthesis include three mitochondrial DNA polymerases TbPOLIB, TbPOLIC, and TbPOLID). In contrast to other kDNA replication proteins, TbPOLID was previously reported to localize throughout the mitochondrial matrix. This spatial distribution suggests that TbPOLID requires redistribution to engage in kDNA replication. Here, we characterize the subcellular distribution of TbPOLID with respect to the Trypanosoma brucei cell cycle using immunofluorescence microscopy. Our analyses demonstrate that in addition to the previously reported matrix localization, TbPOLID was detected as discrete foci near the kDNA. TbPOLID foci colocalized with replicating minicircles at antipodal sites in a specific subset of the cells during stages II and III of kDNA replication. Additionally, the TbPOLID foci were stable following the inhibition of protein synthesis, detergent extraction, and DNase treatment. Taken together, these data demonstrate that TbPOLID has a dynamic localization that allows it to be spatially and temporally available to perform its role in kDNA replication. PMID:22286095

  9. Sensitivity and Specificity of a Prototype Rapid Diagnostic Test for the Detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Infection: A Multi-centric Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Bisser, Sylvie; Lumbala, Crispin; Nguertoum, Etienne; Kande, Victor; Flevaud, Laurence; Vatunga, Gedeao; Boelaert, Marleen; Büscher, Philippe; Josenando, Theophile; Bessell, Paul R.; Biéler, Sylvain; Ndung’u, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    Background A major challenge in the control of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is lack of reliable diagnostic tests that are rapid and easy to use in remote areas where the disease occurs. In Trypanosoma brucei gambiense HAT, the Card Agglutination Test for Trypanosomiasis (CATT) has been the reference screening test since 1978, usually on whole blood, but also in a 1/8 dilution (CATT 1/8) to enhance specificity. However, the CATT is not available in a single format, requires a cold chain for storage, and uses equipment that requires electricity. A solution to these challenges has been provided by rapid diagnostic tests (RDT), which have recently become available. A prototype immunochromatographic test, the SD BIOLINE HAT, based on two native trypanosomal antigens (VSG LiTat 1.3 and VSG LiTat 1.5) has been developed. We carried out a non-inferiority study comparing this prototype to the CATT 1/8 in field settings. Methodology/Principal Findings The prototype SD BIOLINE HAT, the CATT Whole Blood and CATT 1/8 were systematically applied on fresh blood samples obtained from 14,818 subjects, who were prospectively enrolled through active and passive screening in clinical studies in three endemic countries of central Africa: Angola, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the Central African Republic. One hundred and forty nine HAT cases were confirmed by parasitology. The sensitivity and specificity of the prototype SD BIOLINE HAT was 89.26% (95% confidence interval (CI) = 83.27–93.28) and 94.58% (95% CI = 94.20–94.94) respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the CATT on whole blood were 93.96% (95% CI = 88.92–96.79) and 95.91% (95% CI = 95.58–96.22), and of the CATT 1/8 were 89.26% (95% CI = 83.27–93.28) and 98.88% (95% CI = 98.70–99.04) respectively. Conclusion/Significance After further optimization, the prototype SD BIOLINE HAT could become an alternative to current screening methods in primary healthcare settings in remote, resource

  10. A novel protein kinase is essential in bloodstream Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Bryan C; Booster, Nick; Vidadala, Rama Subba Rao; Maly, Dustin J; Parsons, Marilyn

    2016-07-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis a fatal disease for which no vaccines exist and treatment regimens are difficult. Here, we evaluate a Trypanosoma brucei protein kinase, AEK1, as a potential drug target. Conditional knockouts confirmed AEK1 essentiality in bloodstream forms. For chemical validation, we overcame the lack of AEK1 inhibitors by creating parasites expressing a single, functional analog-sensitive AEK1 allele. Analog treatment of mice infected with this strain delayed parasitemia and death, with one-third of animals showing no parasitemia. These studies validate AEK1 as a drug target and highlight the need for further understanding of its function. PMID:27018127

  11. Non-natural acetogenin analogues as potent Trypanosoma brucei inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Florence, Gordon J.; Fraser, Andrew L.; Gould, Eoin R.; King, Elizabeth F.; Menzies, Stefanie K.; Morris, Joanne C.; Tulloch, Lindsay B.; Smith, Terry K.

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel bis-tetrahydropyran 1,4-triazole analogues based on the acetogenin framework display low micromolar trypanocidal activities towards both bloodstream and insect forms of Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. A divergent synthetic strategy was adopted for the synthesis of the key tetrahydropyran intermediates to enable rapid access to diastereochemical variation either side of the 1,4-triazole core. The resulting diastereomeric analogues displayed varying degrees of trypanocidal activity and selectivity in structure activity relationship studies. PMID:25145275

  12. Interaction of nutrition and infection: effect of copper deficiency on resistance to Trypanosoma lewisi.

    PubMed Central

    Crocker, A.; Lee, C.; Aboko-Cole, G.; Durham, C.

    1992-01-01

    The copper-deficient rat-trypanosome system was used to study copper deficiency in Sprague Dawley rats infected with Trypanosoma lewisi. Throughout the observational period, animals on the deficient diet had lower plasma and liver copper concentrations compared with complete and pair-fed animals. In all dietary groups, the food intake and body weight changes of rats inoculated with T lewisi showed significant increases over the noninoculated controls. The rate of these indices were significantly less in the copper-deficient animals compared with the animals fed complete diets. Copper-deficient and pair-fed control rats showed greater numbers of parasites than controls throughout the infection. The duration of the trypanosomal infection was longer in copper-deficient rats compared with other groups. In all of the dietary groups, severe depression in the primary and secondary antibody responses (IgM and IgG) to in vivo immunization with sheep erythrocytes was observed in infected animals over noninfected controls. The results of the present study indicate that during copper deficiency, there are significant changes in food consumption and body weight and enhanced susceptibility to infection as measured by an increased parasitemia and depression in the antibody responses. PMID:1507261

  13. Phagocytosis and killing of Trypanosoma dionisii by human neutrophils, eosinophils and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Thorne, K J; Glauert, A M; Svvennsen, R J; Franks, D

    1979-12-01

    The cell-mediated resistance of human leucocytes to Trypanosoma dionisii, a bat parasite related to T. cruzi, was investigated. Human peripheral blood neutrophils and monocytes were cytotoxic to T. dionisii as assessed by electron microscopy and by induction of 99mTc release from trypanosomes pre-labelled with [99mTc] pertechnetate. The enhancement of cytotoxicity by specific antiserum varied considerably from one individual to another. Neither blood lymphocytes nor blood eosinophils induced 99mTc release from T. dionisii. The trypanosomes were readily phagocytosed by neutrophils and monocytes even in the absence of added antiserum but the rate was enchanced when antiserum was present. Eosinophils also phagocytosed T. dionisii but only in the presence of antiserum. Investigation by electron microscopy revealed that T. dionisii is rapidly destroyed in the phagocytic vacuole of enutrophils and monocytes and by eosinophils. Phagocytosis, ultrastructural damage and induction of 99mTc release occurred more rapidly in neutrophils than in monocytes. PMID:542324

  14. THE RACK1 HOMOLOGUE FROM Trypanosoma brucei IS REQUIRED FOR THE ONSET AND PROGRESSION OF CYTOKINESIS*

    PubMed Central

    Rothberg, Karen G.; Burdette, Dara L.; Pfannstiel, Joy; Jetton, Neal; Singh, Rashmi; Ruben, Larry

    2007-01-01

    The Receptor for Activated C-Kinase 1 (RACK1) is a conserved scaffold protein that helps regulate a range of cell activities including cell growth, shape, and protein translation. We report that a homologue of RACK1 is required for cytokinesis in pathogenic Trypanosoma brucei. The protein, referred to as TRACK is comprised of WD repeat elements and can complement cpc2 null mutants of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. TRACK is expressed throughout the trypanosome life cycle and is distributed predominantly in a perinuclear region and the cytoplasm, but not along the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondrion or cleavage furrow of dividing cells. When tetracycline inducible RNA interference (RNAi) is used to deplete the cellular content of TRACK, the cells remain metabolically active, but growth is inhibited. In bloodstream forms (BF), growth arrest is due to a delay in the onset of cytokinesis. By contrast, procyclic forms (PF) are able to initiate cytokinesis in the absence of TRACK, but arrest midway through cell cleavage. The RNAi cells undergo multiple rounds of partial cytokinesis and accumulate nuclei, and cytoplasmic extensions with attached flagella. The TRACK RNAi construct is also inducible within infected mice. Under these conditions parasites are eliminated from peripheral blood within three days post-infection. Taken as a whole, these data indicate that trypanosomes utilize a RACK1 homologue to regulate the final stages of mitosis. Moreover, disrupting the interaction between TRACK and its partners might be targeted in the design of novel therapies. PMID:16469736

  15. Purification, cloning and characterization of a GPI inositol deacylase from Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Güther, Maria Lucia Sampaio; Leal, Simone; Morrice, Nicholas A.; Cross, George A.M.; Ferguson, Michael A.J.

    2001-01-01

    Inositol acylation is an obligatory step in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis whereas mature GPI anchors often lack this modification. The GPI anchors of Trypanosoma brucei variant surface glycoproteins (VSGs) undergo rounds of inositol acylation and deacylation during GPI biosynthesis and the deacylation reactions are inhibited by diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP). Inositol deacylase was affinity labelled with [3H]DFP and purified. Peptide sequencing was used to clone GPIdeAc, which encodes a protein with significant sequence and hydropathy similarity to mammalian acyloxyacyl hydrolase, an enzyme that removes fatty acids from bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Both contain a signal sequence followed by a saposin domain and a GDSL-lipase domain. GPIdeAc–/– trypanosomes were viable in vitro and in animals. Affinity-purified HA-tagged GPIdeAc was shown to have inositol deacylase activity. However, total inositol deacylase activity was only reduced in GPIdeAc–/– trypanosomes and the VSG GPI anchor was indistinguishable from wild type. These results suggest that there is redundancy in T.brucei inositol deacylase activity and that there is another enzyme whose sequence is not recognizably related to GPIdeAc. PMID:11532956

  16. Notes on the occurrence of Trypanosoma sp. (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae) in freshwater fishes from South Africa.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Maryke L; Avenant-Oldewage, Annemariè

    2013-01-01

    A total of 257 fishes from four families, Clariidae, Cichlidae, Cyprinidae and Schilbeidae were collected from three localities: the Sand River Dam, Swaziland; the Nylsvlei Nature Reserve, South Africa and the Vaal Dam and Vaal River Barrage, South Africa. Only fishes (n= 154) from Clariidae and Cichlidae were found to be infected with trypanosomes. A total of 221 Clarias gariepinus (Burchell 1822) were collected from the Vaal Dam and Vaal Barrage area, South Africa. Of these, 74%(89/121) were infected with trypanosomes from the Vaal Dam and 63%(63/100) from the Vaal River Barrage, with no seasonal infection pattern. A prevalence of 25%(1/4) was found in C. gariepinus from the Sand River Dam, Swaziland, and a 50% (1/2) prevalence was found in Tilapia sparrmanii from the Nylsvlei Nature Reserve, South Africa. Standard measurements conformed closely to the morphometric and morphological descriptions of Trypanosoma mukasai. This article provides new locality records for T. mukasai from the Vaal Dam, Vaal River Barrage and Nylsvlei Nature Reserve (South Africa) and the Sand River Dam (Swaziland). Tilapia sparrmanii collected in the Sand River Dam in Swaziland is also noted as a new host record. PMID:23718161

  17. Food web connections and the transmission cycles of Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma evansi (Kinetoplastida, Trypanosomatidae) in the Pantanal Region, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Herrera, H M; Rocha, F L; Lisboa, C V; Rademaker, V; Mourão, G M; Jansen, A M

    2011-07-01

    We examined by parasitological tests (hemocultures and buffy coat) infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and T. evansi in blood samples from Leopardus pardalis, Cerdocyon thous and domestic dogs. Besides, 25 T. cruzi isolates previously derived from feral pigs and small wild mammals were here characterized by miniexon gene and demonstrated to be in the TcI genotype. Herein, we make an overall analysis of the transmission cycle of both trypanosome species in the light of the assemblage of data collected over the last seven years. The carnivore Nasua nasua was confirmed to play a major role in the transmission cycles of both T. cruzi and T. evansi since it was the species that had the higher prevalence and higher parasitemias by both flagellate species. In addition, our results show that both trypanosomatid species may be found throughout the Pantanal landscape, in all forest strata, as shown by the infection of carnivore, arboreal and terrestrial scansorial marsupial species in complex and seasonal transmission cycles. We propose that transmission of T. cruzi and T. evansi in the southern Pantanal region takes place via an intricate ecological trophic network involving generalist and specialist mammal species that are linked through a robust food-web connection. PMID:21600622

  18. De Novo Genome Assembly Shows Genome Wide Similarity between Trypanosoma brucei brucei and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense

    PubMed Central

    Sistrom, Mark; Evans, Benjamin; Benoit, Joshua; Balmer, Oliver; Aksoy, Serap; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2016-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma brucei is a eukaryotic pathogen which causes African trypanosomiasis. It is notable for its variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat, which undergoes antigenic variation enabled by a large suite of VSG pseudogenes, allowing for persistent evasion of host adaptive immunity. While Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (Tbr) and T. b gambiense (Tbg) are human infective, related T. b. brucei (Tbb) is cleared by human sera. A single gene, the Serum Resistance Associated (SRA) gene, confers Tbr its human infectivity phenotype. Potential genetic recombination of this gene between Tbr and non-human infective Tbb strains has significant epidemiological consequences for Human African Trypanosomiasis outbreaks. Results Using long and short read whole genome sequencing, we generated a hybrid de novo assembly of a Tbr strain, producing 4,210 scaffolds totaling approximately 38.8 megabases, which comprise a significant proportion of the Tbr genome, and thus represents a valuable tool for a comparative genomics analyses among human and non-human infective T. brucei and future complete genome assembly. We detected 5,970 putative genes, of which two, an alcohol oxidoreductase and a pentatricopeptide repeat-containing protein, were members of gene families common to all T. brucei subspecies, but variants specific to the Tbr strain sequenced in this study. Our findings confirmed the extremely high level of genomic similarity between the two parasite subspecies found in other studies. Conclusions We confirm at the whole genome level high similarity between the two Tbb and Tbr strains studied. The discovery of extremely minor genomic differentiation between Tbb and Tbr suggests that the transference of the SRA gene via genetic recombination could potentially result in novel human infective strains, thus all genetic backgrounds of T. brucei should be considered potentially human infective in regions where Tbr is prevalent. PMID:26910229

  19. Control of human African trypanosomiasis in the Quiçama focus, Angola.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, José Antonio; Simarro, Pere P.; Josenando, Teofilo

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To update the epidemiological status of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), also known as sleeping sickness, in the Quiçama focus, province of Bengo, Angola, and to establish a HAT control programme. METHODS: In 1997, 8796 people (the population of 31 villages) were serologically screened for Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, the causative agent of HAT. In 1998 and 1999, surveys were carried out in villages where HAT cases had been identified in 1997. Individuals were screened using the card agglutination trypanosomiasis test (CATT), and then examined for the presence of the parasite. CATT- positive individuals in whom the presence of the parasite could not be confirmed were further tested with the CATT using serum dilutions, and those with a positive antibody end titre of 1-in-4 or above were followed-up. Patients with < or =10 white cells/micro l and no trypanosomes in their cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were classified as being in the first stage of the disease. Vector control was not considered necessary or feasible. FINDINGS: The main transmission areas were on the Kwanza riverbanks, where 5042 inhabitants live. In 1997, the HAT prevalence was 1.97%, but this decreased to 0.55% in 1998 and to 0.33% in 1999. The relapse rate was 3% in patients treated with pentamidine and 3.5% in patients treated with melarsoprol. In patients treated with pentamidine, there was no difference in the relapse rate for patients with initial CSF white cell counts of 0-5 cells/ micro l or 6-10 cells/micro l. The overall mortality rate was 0.6% and the rate of reactive arsenical encephalopathy among the melarsoprol-treated patients was 1.7%. CONCLUSION: The epidemiological status of the disease was updated and the transmission areas were defined. The control methods implemented allowed the disease prevalence to be reduced. PMID:12378293

  20. Trypanosoma evansi kDNA minicircle found in the Venezuelan nectar-feeding bat Leptonycteris curasoae (Glossophaginae), supports the hypothesis of multiple origins of that parasite in South America.

    PubMed

    Silva-Iturriza, Adriana; Nassar, Jafet M; García-Rawlins, Ariany M; Rosales, Romel; Mijares, Alfredo

    2013-04-01

    Trypanosoma evansi is a mammal generalist protozoon which causes negative effects on health and productivity in bovine and equine herds in South America, Europe, Asia and Africa. By molecular methods, we screened the presence of that parasite together with other trypanosome species in 105 bats of 10 species collected in arid zones of northern Venezuela. The first molecular approach was fluorescent fragment length barcoding (FFLB), which relies on amplification of relative small regions of rRNA genes (four loci) and fluorescence detection. By FFLB, 17 samples showed patterns of possible trypanosomatid infections. These samples were used to test presence of trypanosomes by PCR using the following DNA markers: V7-V8 SSU rRNA, gGAPDH and kDNA minicircle regions. Only in one individual of the nectar-feeding bat, Leptonycteris curasoae, we were able to amplify 1000bp of the trypanosome kDNA minicircle. That PCR product was sequenced and the parasite species was determined by NCBI-BLAST and phylogenetic analysis. Both analyses showed that the minicircle sequence corresponds to Trypanosoma evansi. The phylogenetic analysis of the sequence obtained in this study clustered with a T. evansi sequence obtained in a Venezuelan capybara, Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris, and distant of others two T. evansi sequences obtained in a Colombian capybara and horse. This result supports the hypothesis of multiple origins of T. evansi in South America. PMID:23111094

  1. Incidence of trypanosomes in the Canada goose as revealed by bone marrow culture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diamond, L.S.; Herman, C.M.

    1954-01-01

    1. Techniques are described for the cultural isolation of trypanosomes from avian bone marrow obtained from living birds or at autopsy. A new medium SNB-9 (saline-neopeptone-blood) is described. In addition to being a good medium for growing avian trypanosomes, it is excellent for growing trypanosomes of amphibians and mammals. 2. Evidence is presented demonstrating the superiority of (a) cultures over stained smears for detecting the presence of trypanosomes in the Canada goose, and (b) bone marrow over heart blood of this species as a source of trypanosomes for culture. 3. In April 1952, from cultures of bone marrow collected at autopsy it was demonstrated that trypanosome infection occurred in 33 (40.2%) of 82 Canada geese from the Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge. On February 17, 1953, cultures of bone marrow obtained from living birds revealed presence of trypanosomes in 12 (20.7%) of 58 geese from the same refuge. On February 26, 1953, by employing the latter method, 9 (20.4%) of 44 geese from Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge were shown to harbor the parasites. In another survey ninety-two geese from seven national wildlife refuges subjected to the biopsy technique showed evidence of infection in 13 (14.1 %) birds and indicated that trypanosome infection is widely distributed in this host.

  2. Trypanosoma Infection Rates in Glossina Species in Mtito Andei Division, Makueni County, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Nthiwa, Daniel Mutiso; Odongo, David O.; Ochanda, Horace; Khamadi, Samoel; Gichimu, Bernard M.

    2015-01-01

    African Animal Trypanosomiasis (AAT) transmitted cyclically by tsetse fly (Glossina spp.) is a major obstacle to livestock production in the tropical parts of Africa. The objective of this study was to determine the infection rates of trypanosomes in Glossina species in Mtito Andei Division, Makueni County, Kenya. Tsetse fly species, G. longipennis and G. pallidipes, were trapped and DNA was isolated from their dissected internal organs (proboscis, salivary glands, and midguts). The DNA was then subjected to a nested PCR assay using internal transcribed spacer primers and individual trypanosome species were identified following agarose gel electrophoresis. Out of the 117 flies trapped in the area 39 (33.3%) were teneral while 78 (67%) were nonteneral. G. pallidipes constituted the largest percentage of 58% while G. longipennis were 42%. The overall trypanosomes infection rate in all nonteneral Glossina spp. was 11.53% with G. longipennis recording the highest infection rate of 23.08% while G. pallidipes had an infection rate of 5.77%. T. vivax was the most infectious (10.26%) compared to T. congolense (1.28%). Mean apparent densities were strongly positively correlated with infection rates (r = 0.95) confirming the importance of this parameter as an indicator of AAT transmission risk. PMID:26617992

  3. Quantitative Proteomics Uncovers Novel Factors Involved in Developmental Differentiation of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Dejung, Mario; Subota, Ines; Bucerius, Ferdinand; Dindar, Gülcin; Freiwald, Anja; Engstler, Markus; Boshart, Michael; Butter, Falk; Janzen, Christian J.

    2016-01-01

    Developmental differentiation is a universal biological process that allows cells to adapt to different environments to perform specific functions. African trypanosomes progress through a tightly regulated life cycle in order to survive in different host environments when they shuttle between an insect vector and a vertebrate host. Transcriptomics has been useful to gain insight into RNA changes during stage transitions; however, RNA levels are only a moderate proxy for protein abundance in trypanosomes. We quantified 4270 protein groups during stage differentiation from the mammalian-infective to the insect form and provide classification for their expression profiles during development. Our label-free quantitative proteomics study revealed previously unknown components of the differentiation machinery that are involved in essential biological processes such as signaling, posttranslational protein modifications, trafficking and nuclear transport. Furthermore, guided by our proteomic survey, we identified the cause of the previously observed differentiation impairment in the histone methyltransferase DOT1B knock-out strain as it is required for accurate karyokinesis in the first cell division during differentiation. This epigenetic regulator is likely involved in essential chromatin restructuring during developmental differentiation, which might also be important for differentiation in higher eukaryotic cells. Our proteome dataset will serve as a resource for detailed investigations of cell differentiation to shed more light on the molecular mechanisms of this process in trypanosomes and other eukaryotes. PMID:26910529

  4. Nucleologenesis in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Nepomuceno-Mejía, Tomás; Lara-Martínez, Reyna; Hernández, Roberto; Segura-Valdez, María de Lourdes; Jiménez-García, Luis F

    2016-06-01

    Nucleolar assembly is a cellular event that requires the synthesis and processing of ribosomal RNA, in addition to the participation of pre-nucleolar bodies (PNBs) at the end of mitosis. In mammals and plants, nucleolar biogenesis has been described in detail, but in unicellular eukaryotes it is a poorly understood process. In this study, we used light and electron microscopy cytochemical techniques to investigate the distribution of nucleolar components in the pathway of nucleolus rebuilding during closed cell division in epimastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of American trypanosomiasis. Silver impregnation specific for nucleolar organizer regions and an ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid regressive procedure to preferentially stain ribonucleoprotein revealed the conservation and dispersion of nucleolar material throughout the nucleoplasm during cell division. Furthermore, at the end of mitosis, the argyrophilic proteins were concentrated in the nucleolar organizer region. Unexpectedly, accumulation of nucleolar material in the form of PNBs was not visualized. We suggest that formation of the nucleolus in epimastigotes of T. cruzi occurs by a process that does not require the concentration of nucleolar material within intermediate nuclear bodies such as mammalian and plant PNBs. PMID:27126372

  5. Ribose 5-Phosphate Isomerase B Knockdown Compromises Trypanosoma brucei Bloodstream Form Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Loureiro, Inês; Faria, Joana; Clayton, Christine; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Santarém, Nuno; Roy, Nilanjan; Cordeiro-da-Siva, Anabela; Tavares, Joana

    2015-01-01

    Ribose 5-phosphate isomerase is an enzyme involved in the non-oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway, and catalyzes the inter-conversion of D-ribose 5-phosphate and D-ribulose 5-phosphate. Trypanosomatids, including the agent of African sleeping sickness namely Trypanosoma brucei, have a type B ribose-5-phosphate isomerase. This enzyme is absent from humans, which have a structurally unrelated ribose 5-phosphate isomerase type A, and therefore has been proposed as an attractive drug target waiting further characterization. In this study, Trypanosoma brucei ribose 5-phosphate isomerase B showed in vitro isomerase activity. RNAi against this enzyme reduced parasites' in vitro growth, and more importantly, bloodstream forms infectivity. Mice infected with induced RNAi clones exhibited lower parasitaemia and a prolonged survival compared to control mice. Phenotypic reversion was achieved by complementing induced RNAi clones with an ectopic copy of Trypanosoma cruzi gene. Our results present the first functional characterization of Trypanosoma brucei ribose 5-phosphate isomerase B, and show the relevance of an enzyme belonging to the non-oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway in the context of Trypanosoma brucei infection. PMID:25568941

  6. Epigenetic Regulation of Polymerase II Transcription Initiation in Trypanosoma cruzi: Modulation of Nucleosome Abundance, Histone Modification, and Polymerase Occupancy by O-Linked Thymine DNA Glucosylation▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ekanayake, Dilrukshi; Sabatini, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Very little is understood regarding how transcription is initiated/regulated in the early-diverging eukaryote Trypanosoma cruzi. Unusually for a eukaryote, genes transcribed by RNA polymerase (Pol) II in T. cruzi are arranged in polycistronic transcription units (PTUs). On the basis of this gene organization, it was previously thought that trypanosomes rely solely on posttranscriptional processes to regulate gene expression. We recently localized a novel glucosylated thymine DNA base, called base J, to potential promoter regions of PTUs throughout the trypanosome genome. Loss of base J, following the deletion of JBP1, a thymidine hydroxylase involved with synthesis, led to a global increase in the Pol II transcription rate and gene expression. In order to determine the mechanism by which base J regulates transcription, we have characterized changes in chromatin structure and Pol II recruitment to promoter regions following the loss of base J. The loss of base J coincides with a decrease in nucleosome abundance, increased histone H3/H4 acetylation, and increased Pol II occupancy at promoter regions, including the well-characterized spliced leader RNA gene promoter. These studies present the first direct evidence for epigenetic regulation of Pol II transcription initiation via DNA modification and chromatin structure in kinetoplastids as well as provide a mechanism for regulation of trypanosome gene expression via the novel hypermodified base J. PMID:21926332

  7. Trypanosoma vivax, T. congolense “forest type” and T. simiae: prevalence in domestic animals of sleeping sickness foci of Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Nimpaye, H.; Njiokou, F.; Njine, T.; Njitchouang, G.R.; Cuny, G.; Herder, S.; Asonganyi, T.; Simo, G.

    2011-01-01

    In order to better understand the epidemiology of Human and Animal trypanosomiasis that occur together in sleeping sickness foci, a study of prevalences of animal parasites (Trypanosoma vivax, T. congolense “forest type”, and T. simiae) infections was conducted on domestic animals to complete the previous work carried on T. brucei gambiense prevalence using the same animal sample. 875 domestic animals, including 307 pigs, 264 goats, 267 sheep and 37 dogs were sampled in the sleeping sickness foci of Bipindi, Campo, Doumé and Fontem in Cameroon. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based method was used to identify these trypanosome species. A total of 237 (27.08%) domestic animals were infected by at least one trypanosome species. The prevalence of T. vivax, T. congolense “forest type” and T. simiae were 20.91%, 11.42% and 0.34% respectively. The prevalences of T. vivax and T. congolense “forest type” differed significantly between the animal species and between the foci (p < 0.0001); however, these two trypanosomes were found in all animal species as well as in all the foci subjected to the study. The high prevalences of T. vivax and T. congolense “forest type” in Bipindi and Fontem-Center indicate their intense transmission in these foci. PMID:21678793

  8. [Serological evidence of the existence of a wild reservoir of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in the Pendjari biosphere reservation in the Republic of Benin].

    PubMed

    Guedegbe, B; Verhulst, A; Van Meirvenne, N; Pandey, V S; Doko, A

    1992-06-01

    In the national park of Pendjari, situated in the North-West of Benin, 91 wild animals, belonging to seven species, were darted. Thick and thin blood smears were examined for trypanosomes and plasma for trypanolytic antibodies against 6 antigenic variants of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense. Parasites were found in 13.92% and trypanolytic antibodies in 20.88% of the samples. A total of 28.57% of animals were positive by at least one of the two test systems used. Morphologically Trypanosoma congolense, T. vivax and T. brucei were identified. Overall prevalence was 40% in Adenota kob (n: 50), 13.63% in Alcelaphus buselaphus (n: 22), 10% in Hippotragus equinus (n: 10), 33% in Kobus defassa (n: 3), 0% in Phacochoerus aethiopicus (n: 3) and in Syncerus caffer (n: 2). The only lion (Panthera leo) examined was serologically positive. The results indicate that the wild animals are reservoirs of animal trypanosomes and suggest that among them Adenota kob and Panthera leo are carriers of T. brucei gambiense, one of the etiological aspects of human trypanosomiasis. PMID:1417158

  9. A Glycosylation Mutant of Trypanosoma brucei Links Social Motility Defects In Vitro to Impaired Colonization of Tsetse Flies In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Imhof, Simon; Vu, Xuan Lan; Bütikofer, Peter; Roditi, Isabel

    2015-06-01

    Transmission of African trypanosomes by tsetse flies requires that the parasites migrate out of the midgut lumen and colonize the ectoperitrophic space. Early procyclic culture forms correspond to trypanosomes in the lumen; on agarose plates they exhibit social motility, migrating en masse as radial projections from an inoculation site. We show that an Rft1(-/-) mutant needs to reach a greater threshold number before migration begins, and that it forms fewer projections than its wild-type parent. The mutant is also up to 4 times less efficient at establishing midgut infections. Ectopic expression of Rft1 rescues social motility defects and restores the ability to colonize the fly. These results are consistent with social motility reflecting movement to the ectoperitrophic space, implicate N-glycans in the signaling cascades for migration in vivo and in vitro, and provide the first evidence that parasite-parasite interactions determine the success of transmission by the insect host. PMID:25862152

  10. An evaluation of Minor Groove Binders as anti-Trypanosoma brucei brucei therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Scott, Fraser J; Khalaf, Abedawn I; Giordani, Federica; Wong, Pui Ee; Duffy, Sandra; Barrett, Michael; Avery, Vicky M; Suckling, Colin J

    2016-06-30

    A series of 32 structurally diverse MGBs, derived from the natural product distamycin, was evaluated for activity against Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Four compounds have been found to possess significant activity, in the nanomolar range, and represent hits for further optimisation towards novel treatments for Human and Animal African Trypanosomiases. Moreover, SAR indicates that the head group linking moiety is a significant modulator of biological activity. PMID:27060763

  11. A Protein Complex Map of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Vaibhav; Najafabadi, Hamed S.; Moshiri, Houtan; Jardim, Armando; Salavati, Reza

    2016-01-01

    The functions of the majority of trypanosomatid-specific proteins are unknown, hindering our understanding of the biology and pathogenesis of Trypanosomatida. While protein-protein interactions are highly informative about protein function, a global map of protein interactions and complexes is still lacking for these important human parasites. Here, benefiting from in-depth biochemical fractionation, we systematically interrogated the co-complex interactions of more than 3354 protein groups in procyclic life stage of Trypanosoma brucei, the protozoan parasite responsible for human African trypanosomiasis. Using a rigorous methodology, our analysis led to identification of 128 high-confidence complexes encompassing 716 protein groups, including 635 protein groups that lacked experimental annotation. These complexes correlate well with known pathways as well as for proteins co-expressed across the T. brucei life cycle, and provide potential functions for a large number of previously uncharacterized proteins. We validated the functions of several novel proteins associated with the RNA-editing machinery, identifying a candidate potentially involved in the mitochondrial post-transcriptional regulation of T. brucei. Our data provide an unprecedented view of the protein complex map of T. brucei, and serve as a reliable resource for further characterization of trypanosomatid proteins. The presented results in this study are available at: www.TrypsNetDB.org. PMID:26991453

  12. Isolation and purification of a neutral alpha(1,2)-mannosidase from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Bonay, P; Fresno, M

    1999-05-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is an obligatory intracellular protozoan parasite that causes Chagas' disease in humans. Although a fair amount is known about the biochemistry of certain trypanosomes, very little is known about the enzymic complement of synthesis and processing of glycoproteins and/or functions of the subcellular organelles in this parasite. There have been very few reports on the presence of acid and neutral hydrolases in Trypanosoma cruzi. Here we report the first purification and characterization of a neutral mannosidase from the epimastigote stage of Trypanosoma cruzi. The neutral mannosidase was purified nearly 800-fold with an 8% recovery to apparent homogeneity from a CHAPS extract of epimastigotes by the following procedures: (1) metal affinity chromatography on Co+2-Sepharose, (2) anion exchange, and (3) hydroxylapatite. The purified enzyme has a native molecular weight of 150-160 kDa and is apparently composed of two subunits of 76 kDa. The purified enzyme exhibits a broad pH profile with a maximum at pH 5.9-6.3. It is inhibited by swainsonine (Ki, 0.1 microM), D-mannono-delta-lactam (Ki, 20 microM), kifunensine (Ki, 60 microM) but not significantly by deoxymannojirimycin. The enzyme is activated by Co2+and Ni2+and strongly inhibited by EDTA and Fe2+. The purified enzyme is active against p-nitrophenyl alpha-D-mannoside (km = 87 microM). High-mannose Man9GlcNAc substrate was hydrolyzed by the purified enzyme to Man7GlcNAc at pH 6.1. The purified enzyme does not show activity against alpha1,3- or alpha1,6-linked mannose residues. Antibodies against the recently purified lysosomal alpha-mannosidase from T.cruzi did not react with the neutral mannosidase reported here. PMID:10207175

  13. Secondary metabolites from Vietnamese marine invertebrates with activity against Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi.

    PubMed

    Thao, Nguyen Phuong; No, Joo Hwan; Luyen, Bui Thi Thuy; Yang, Gyongseon; Byun, Soo Young; Goo, Junghyun; Kim, Kyung Tae; Cuong, Nguyen Xuan; Nam, Nguyen Hoai; Van Minh, Chau; Schmidt, Thomas J; Kang, Jong Seong; Kim, Young Ho

    2014-01-01

    Marine-derived natural products from invertebrates comprise an extremely diverse and promising source of the compounds from a wide variety of structural classes. This study describes the discovery of five marine natural products with activity against Trypanosoma species by natural product library screening using whole cell in vitro assays. We investigated the anti-trypanosomal activity of the extracts from the soft corals and echinoderms living in Vietnamese seas. Of the samples screened, the methanolic extracts of several marine organisms exhibited potent activities against cultures of Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi (EC50 < 5.0 μg/mL). Among the compounds isolated from these extracts, laevigatol B (1) from Lobophytum crassum and L. laevigatum, (24S)-ergost-4-ene-3-one (2) from Sinularia dissecta, astropectenol A (3) from Astropecten polyacanthus, and cholest-8-ene-3β,5α,6β,7α-tetraol (4) from Diadema savignyi showed inhibitory activity against T. brucei with EC50 values ranging from 1.57 ± 0.14 to 14.6 ± 1.36 μM, relative to the positive control, pentamidine (EC50 = 0.015 ± 0.003 μM). Laevigatol B (1) and 5α-cholest-8(14)-ene-3β,7α-diol (5) exhibited also significant inhibitory effects on T. cruzi. The cytotoxic activity of the pure compounds on mammalian cells was also assessed and found to be insignificant in all cases. This is the first report on the inhibitory effects of marine organisms collected in Vietnamese seas against Trypanosoma species responsible for neglected tropical diseases. PMID:24962391

  14. Tsetse GmmSRPN10 Has Anti-complement Activity and Is Important for Successful Establishment of Trypanosome Infections in the Fly Midgut

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Cher-Pheng; Haines, Lee R.; Southern, Daniel M.; Lehane, Michael J.; Acosta-Serrano, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The complement cascade in mammalian blood can damage the alimentary tract of haematophagous arthropods. As such, these animals have evolved their own repertoire of complement-inactivating factors, which are inadvertently exploited by blood-borne pathogens to escape complement lysis. Unlike the bloodstream stages, the procyclic (insect) stage of Trypanosoma brucei is highly susceptible to complement killing, which is puzzling considering that a tsetse takes a bloodmeal every 2–4 days. In this study, we identified four tsetse (Glossina morsitans morsitans) serine protease inhibitors (serpins) from a midgut expressed sequence tag (EST) library (GmmSRPN3, GmmSRPN5, GmmSRPN9 and GmmSRPN10) and investigated their role in modulating the establishment of a T. brucei infection in the midgut. Although not having evolved in a common blood-feeding ancestor, all four serpins have an active site sharing remarkable homology with the human complement C1-inhibitor serpin, SerpinG1. RNAi knockdown of individual GmmSRPN9 and GmmSRPN10 genes resulted in a significant decreased rate of infection by procyclic form T. brucei. Furthermore, recombinant GmmSRPN10 was both able to inhibit the activity of human complement-cascade serine proteases, C1s and Factor D, and to protect the in vitro killing of procyclic trypanosomes when incubated with complement-activated human serum. Thus, the secretion of serpins, which may be part of a bloodmeal complement inactivation system in tsetse, is used by procyclic trypanosomes to evade an influx of fresh trypanolytic complement with each bloodmeal. This highlights another facet of the complicated relationship between T. brucei and its tsetse vector, where the parasite takes advantage of tsetse physiology to further its chances of propagation and transmission. PMID:25569180

  15. Tsetse GmmSRPN10 has anti-complement activity and is important for successful establishment of trypanosome infections in the fly midgut.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Cher-Pheng; Haines, Lee R; Southern, Daniel M; Lehane, Michael J; Acosta-Serrano, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The complement cascade in mammalian blood can damage the alimentary tract of haematophagous arthropods. As such, these animals have evolved their own repertoire of complement-inactivating factors, which are inadvertently exploited by blood-borne pathogens to escape complement lysis. Unlike the bloodstream stages, the procyclic (insect) stage of Trypanosoma brucei is highly susceptible to complement killing, which is puzzling considering that a tsetse takes a bloodmeal every 2-4 days. In this study, we identified four tsetse (Glossina morsitans morsitans) serine protease inhibitors (serpins) from a midgut expressed sequence tag (EST) library (GmmSRPN3, GmmSRPN5, GmmSRPN9 and GmmSRPN10) and investigated their role in modulating the establishment of a T. brucei infection in the midgut. Although not having evolved in a common blood-feeding ancestor, all four serpins have an active site sharing remarkable homology with the human complement C1-inhibitor serpin, SerpinG1. RNAi knockdown of individual GmmSRPN9 and GmmSRPN10 genes resulted in a significant decreased rate of infection by procyclic form T. brucei. Furthermore, recombinant GmmSRPN10 was both able to inhibit the activity of human complement-cascade serine proteases, C1s and Factor D, and to protect the in vitro killing of procyclic trypanosomes when incubated with complement-activated human serum. Thus, the secretion of serpins, which may be part of a bloodmeal complement inactivation system in tsetse, is used by procyclic trypanosomes to evade an influx of fresh trypanolytic complement with each bloodmeal. This highlights another facet of the complicated relationship between T. brucei and its tsetse vector, where the parasite takes advantage of tsetse physiology to further its chances of propagation and transmission. PMID:25569180

  16. Novel drug design for Chagas disease via targeting Trypanosoma cruzi tubulin: Homology modeling and binding pocket prediction on Trypanosoma cruzi tubulin polymerization inhibition by naphthoquinone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ogindo, Charles O; Khraiwesh, Mozna H; George, Matthew; Brandy, Yakini; Brandy, Nailah; Gugssa, Ayele; Ashraf, Mohammad; Abbas, Muneer; Southerland, William M; Lee, Clarence M; Bakare, Oladapo; Fang, Yayin

    2016-08-15

    Chagas disease, also called American trypanosomiasis, is a parasitic disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). Recent findings have underscored the abundance of the causative organism, (T. cruzi), especially in the southern tier states of the US and the risk burden for the rural farming communities there. Due to a lack of safe and effective drugs, there is an urgent need for novel therapeutic options for treating Chagas disease. We report here our first scientific effort to pursue a novel drug design for treating Chagas disease via the targeting of T. cruzi tubulin. First, the anti T. cruzi tubulin activities of five naphthoquinone derivatives were determined and correlated to their anti-trypanosomal activities. The correlation between the ligand activities against the T. cruzi organism and their tubulin inhibitory activities was very strong with a Pearson's r value of 0.88 (P value <0.05), indicating that this class of compounds could inhibit the activity of the trypanosome organism via T. cruzi tubulin polymerization inhibition. Subsequent molecular modeling studies were carried out to understand the mechanisms of the anti-tubulin activities, wherein, the homology model of T. cruzi tubulin dimer was generated and the putative binding site of naphthoquinone derivatives was predicted. The correlation coefficient for ligand anti-tubulin activities and their binding energies at the putative pocket was found to be r=0.79, a high correlation efficiency that was not replicated in contiguous candidate pockets. The homology model of T. cruzi tubulin and the identification of its putative binding site lay a solid ground for further structure based drug design, including molecular docking and pharmacophore analysis. This study presents a new opportunity for designing potent and selective drugs for Chagas disease. PMID:27345756

  17. Epigenetic Regulation of Transcription and Virulence in Trypanosoma cruzi by O-Linked Thymine Glucosylation of DNA ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ekanayake, Dilrukshi K.; Minning, Todd; Weatherly, Brent; Gunasekera, Kapila; Nilsson, Daniel; Tarleton, Rick; Ochsenreiter, Torsten; Sabatini, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Unlike other eukaryotes, the protein-coding genes of Trypanosoma cruzi are arranged in large polycistronic gene clusters transcribed by polymerase II (Pol II). Thus, it is thought that trypanosomes rely solely on posttranscriptional processes to regulate gene expression. Here, we show that the glucosylated thymine DNA base (β-d-glucosyl-hydroxymethyluracil or base J) is present within sequences flanking the polycistronic units (PTUs) in T. cruzi. The loss of base J at sites of transcription initiation, via deletion of the two enzymes that regulate base J synthesis (JBP1 and JBP2), correlates with an increased rate of Pol II transcription and subsequent genome-wide increase in gene expression. The affected genes include virulence genes, and the resulting parasites are defective in host cell invasion and egress. These studies indicate that base J is an epigenetic factor regulating Pol II transcription initiation in kinetoplastids and provides the first biological role of the only hypermodified DNA base in eukaryotes. PMID:21321080

  18. Epigenetic regulation of transcription and virulence in Trypanosoma cruzi by O-linked thymine glucosylation of DNA.

    PubMed

    Ekanayake, Dilrukshi K; Minning, Todd; Weatherly, Brent; Gunasekera, Kapila; Nilsson, Daniel; Tarleton, Rick; Ochsenreiter, Torsten; Sabatini, Robert

    2011-04-01

    Unlike other eukaryotes, the protein-coding genes of Trypanosoma cruzi are arranged in large polycistronic gene clusters transcribed by polymerase II (Pol II). Thus, it is thought that trypanosomes rely solely on posttranscriptional processes to regulate gene expression. Here, we show that the glucosylated thymine DNA base (β-d-glucosyl-hydroxymethyluracil or base J) is present within sequences flanking the polycistronic units (PTUs) in T. cruzi. The loss of base J at sites of transcription initiation, via deletion of the two enzymes that regulate base J synthesis (JBP1 and JBP2), correlates with an increased rate of Pol II transcription and subsequent genome-wide increase in gene expression. The affected genes include virulence genes, and the resulting parasites are defective in host cell invasion and egress. These studies indicate that base J is an epigenetic factor regulating Pol II transcription initiation in kinetoplastids and provides the first biological role of the only hypermodified DNA base in eukaryotes. PMID:21321080

  19. Experimental chemotherapy of Trypanosoma cruzi infection: persistence of parasite antigens and positive serology in parasitologically cured mice.

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, S. G.; Freitas, L. A.; Peyrol, S.; Pimentel, A. R.; Sadigursky, M.

    1991-01-01

    Mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, but parasitologically cured after specific chemotherapy, continued to exhibit positive indirect immunofluorescence serological tests 3-6 months after the therapy. Treatment of trypanosome antigens with monospecific antisera produced in rabbits, and examination by immunoelectron-microscopy following peroxidase labelling disclosed the presence of membrane deposits in cell processes in the spleens of the mice. Similar deposits were observed in the external membranes of T. cruzi amastigotes in the spleens of acutely infected mice, but not in normal control mice. No reaction occurred in tissues not previously treated with the monospecific anti-T. cruzi serum. Positive cells in treated and cured mice, as well as in the not cured or untreated control mice, were located in germinal centres of the splenic white pulp and presented long and branching cytoplasmic processes, which are indicative of dendritic cells of the lymphoid follicles of the spleen. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:1907221

  20. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase CRK9, Required for Spliced Leader trans Splicing of Pre-mRNA in Trypanosomes, Functions in a Complex with a New L-Type Cyclin and a Kinetoplastid-Specific Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ambrósio, Daniela L.; Kirkham, Justin K.; Günzl, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) control the cell cycle and critical steps in gene expression. The lethal parasite Trypanosoma brucei, member of the phylogenetic order Kinetoplastida, possesses eleven CDKs which, due to high sequence divergence, were generically termed CDC2-related kinases (CRKs). While several CRKs have been implied in the cell cycle, CRK9 was the first trypanosome CDK shown to control the unusual mode of gene expression found in kinetoplastids. In these organisms, protein-coding genes are arranged in tandem arrays which are transcribed polycistronically. Individual mRNAs are processed from precursor RNA by spliced leader (SL) trans splicing and polyadenylation. CRK9 ablation was lethal in cultured trypanosomes, causing a block of trans splicing before the first transesterification step. Additionally, CRK9 silencing led to dephosphorylation of RNA polymerase II and to hypomethylation of the SL cap structure. Here, we tandem affinity-purified CRK9 and, among potential CRK9 substrates and modifying enzymes, discovered an unusual tripartite complex comprising CRK9, a new L-type cyclin (CYC12) and a protein, termed CRK9-associated protein (CRK9AP), that is only conserved among kinetoplastids. Silencing of either CYC12 or CRK9AP reproduced the effects of depleting CRK9, identifying these proteins as functional partners of CRK9 in vivo. While mammalian cyclin L binds to CDK11, the CRK9 complex deviates substantially from that of CDK11, requiring CRK9AP for efficient CRK9 complex formation and autophosphorylation in vitro. Interference with this unusual CDK rescued mice from lethal trypanosome infections, validating CRK9 as a potential chemotherapeutic target. PMID:26954683

  1. In vivo experimental drug resistance study in Trypanosoma vivax isolates from tsetse infested and non-tsetse infested areas of Northwest Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Dagnachew, Shimelis; Terefe, Getachew; Abebe, Getachew; Barry, Dave; McCulloch, Richard; Goddeeris, Bruno

    2015-06-01

    Ethiopia, particularly in the Northwest region, is affected by both tsetse fly and non-tsetse fly transmitted trypanosomosis with a significant impact on livestock productivity. The control of trypanosomosis in Ethiopia relies on either curative or prophylactic treatment of animals with diminazene aceturate (DA) or isometamidium chloride (ISM), respectively. However, since these two trypanocides have been on the market for more than 40 years, this may have resulted in drug-resistance. Therefore, in vivo drug resistance tests on two Ethiopian isolates of Trypanosoma vivax were completed, one from an area where tsetse flies are present and one from an area where tsetse flies are not present. Twenty four cattle (Bos indicus) aged between 6 and 12 months, purchased from a trypanosome-free area (Debre Brehan: Northcentral Ethiopia) and confirmed to be trypanosome-negative, were randomly assigned into four groups of six animals, which were infected with T. vivax isolated from a tsetse-infested or non-tsetse infested area, and in each case treated with curative doses of DA or ISM. Each animal were inoculated intravenously 3×10(6) trypanosomes from donor animals. Parasitaemia became patent earlier in infections with non-tsetse T. vivax (∼7 days post-infection) than tsetse (∼14 days post-infection). Both groups were treated at the highest peak parasitaemia with DA or ISM and nine cattle, four with non-tsetse T. vivax (two ISM- and two DA-treated) and five with tsetse T. vivax (three ISM- and two DA-treated) showed relapses of parasitaemia. Moreover, treatment did not improve diagnostic host markers of trypanosome infections in these animals. In conclusion, in vivo drug tests indicated the presence of resistant parasites (>20% of treated animals in each group relapsed) against recommended doses of both available trypanocidal drugs. PMID:25792418

  2. Biology of Trypanosoma (Trypanozoon) evansi in experimental heterologous mammalian hosts.

    PubMed

    Misra, K K; Roy, S; Choudhury, A

    2016-09-01

    Trypanosoma (Trypanozoon) evansi is a causative agent of the dreadful mammalian disease trypanosomiasis or 'Surra' and carried as a latent parasite in domestic cattle but occasionally proves fatal when transmitted to horses and camel. Sporadic outbreak of 'Surra' to different animals (beside their natural hosts) reminds that T. evansi may be zoonotic, as their close relative cause sleeping sickness to human being. This haemoflagellate is mechanically transmitted by horse fly and its effect on different host varies depending on certain factors including the effectiveness of transmission by mechanical vector, the suitability and susceptibility of the host as well as most importantly the ability of the disease establishment of parasite to adapt itself to the host's resistance, etc. The course of the disease caused by T. evansi is similar to that of human sleeping sickness caused by T. (T.) brucei gambiense. The target organs and symptoms show close similarity. T. evansi can successfully be transmitted among unnatural hosts i.e., other classes of vertebrates, like chicken. In transmission experiments, the unnatural hosts may sometimes induce profound changes in the biology of trypanosomes. Hence, in present study the observations are the biology of different morphological changes of T. evansi as well as its ability of disease formation within some heterologous mammal viz., albino rat, guineapig, bandicoot, mongoose, domestic cat and common monkey. Blood smears of infected albino rats, bandicoot, and mongoose revealed only monomorphic form. Interestingly, blood smears of infected cat and monkey, T. evansi shows slender trypomastigote form and short intermediate form whereas organ smears shows other two forms of haemoflagellate viz., sphaeromastigote and amastigote form. The haemoflagellate maintains a common reproductive cycle in all the experimental heterologous hosts whereas disease symptoms differ. T. evansi infected cat and monkey shows nervous symptoms. Infected

  3. Composition and sensory function of the trypanosome flagellar membrane

    PubMed Central

    Maric, Danijela; Epting, Conrad L.; Engman, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary A cilium is an extension of the cell that contains an axonemal complex of microtubules and associated proteins bounded by a membrane which is contiguous with the cell body membrane. Cilia may be nonmotile or motile, the latter having additional specific roles in cell or fluid movement. The term flagellum refers to the motile cilium of free-living single cells (e.g., bacteria, archaea, spermatozoa and protozoa). In eukaryotes, both nonmotile and motile cilia possess sensory functions. The ciliary interior (cilioplasm) is separated from the cytoplasm by a selective barrier that prevents passive diffusion of molecules between the two domains. The sensory functions of cilia reside largely in the membrane and signals generated in the cilium are transduced into a variety of cellular responses. In this review we discuss the structure and biogenesis of the cilium, with special attention to the trypanosome flagellar membrane, its lipid and protein composition and its proposed roles in sensing and signaling. PMID:20580599

  4. Novel genotypes of Trypanosoma binneyi from wild platypuses (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and identification of a leech as a potential vector.

    PubMed

    Paparini, Andrea; Macgregor, James; Irwin, Peter J; Warren, Kristin; Ryan, Una M

    2014-10-01

    Little is known about the prevalence and pathogenesis of trypanosomes in Australian monotremes, and few genetic characterisation studies have been conducted with these haemoparasites. During the present investigation, molecular and microscopic methods were used to screen peripheral blood (n=28) and ectoparasites (n=10 adult ticks; n=5 tick nymphs; n=1 leech; and n>500 tick eggs) collected from wild Tasmanian platypuses (Ornithorhynchus anatinus), for the presence of trypanosomatid-specific DNA and/or trypomastigotes. The genes for the small ribosomal subunit RNA (18S rDNA) and glycosomal glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase (gGAPDH) were amplified and sequenced, prior to conducting phylogenetic analyses. The detection rate of the parasite-specific 18S rDNA in platypus blood was 85.7% (n=24/28), and the leech was also positive at both loci. Microscopically, high parasitaemia and the presence of abundant trypomastigotes, morphologically consistent with Trypanosoma binneyi Mackerras (1959), were observed in the blood films. Phylogenetic analyses at the 18S locus revealed the existence of four trypanosomatid-like genotypes, with variable similarity to two previously-described genotypes of T. binneyi (range of genetic p-distance: 0.0-0.5%). For the gGAPDH locus, for which only one T. binneyi sequence is available in GenBank, three genotypes closely related T. binneyi were identified (range of genetic p-distance: 0.1-0.4%). The leech-derived trypanosome isolate was virtually identical (at the two loci studied) to the other parasites sequenced from infected platypuses; however, the molecular or morphological identification of the leech species was not possible. Although further studies are required, the molecular detection of trypanosomes in an aquatic leech removed from a platypus, suggests the possibility that these haematophagous hirudineans may be a vector for T. binneyi (and closely related genotypes). PMID:25045852

  5. Biological and immunological studies on a low virulence isolate of the Tulahuén strain of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Dusanic, D G; Testa, J M; Chao, D

    1994-02-01

    Reduced virulence for mice was characterized in an isolate (LV1) of a clone of the Tulahuén strain of Trypanosoma cruzi. LV1 caused long term chronic parasitemias which were measured for 140 days in both C3H/He and BALB/c mice inoculated with 1 x 10(5) trypanosomes/mouse. In contrast to the acute and rapidly lethal Tulahuén strain infections in both strains of mice, all of the animals survived the LV1 infections. Sera of C3H/He mice infected with the Tulahuén strain or LV1 isolate displayed similar titers in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) when reacted against homologous or heterologous extracts of epimastigote stages of the trypanosomes. Western blot reactions of the Tulahuén, Raccoon V, LV1 isolates, and the closely related European bat parasite, Trypanosoma dionisii defined shared antigens between the strains and species, while some appeared to be strain- and species-specific. The studies indicate a mutational event(s) resulted in reduced virulence and suggest that survival of the mice infected with T. cruzi is not correlated with high ELISA antibody titers. Since lower antibody titers are exhibited by mice infected with LV1 than mice infected with the Tulahuén strain, survival may be dependent on the specificities of the antibodies synthesized during the infections, cell mediated immune responses, and/or biochemical factors of the LV1 isolate which control virulence and differ from those of the original Tulahuén strain. PMID:9747330

  6. Crovirin, a Snake Venom Cysteine-Rich Secretory Protein (CRISP) with Promising Activity against Trypanosomes and Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Adade, Camila M.; Carvalho, Ana Lúcia O.; Tomaz, Marcelo A.; Costa, Tatiana F. R.; Godinho, Joseane L.; Melo, Paulo A.; Lima, Ana Paula C. A.; Rodrigues, Juliany C. F.; Zingali, Russolina B.; Souto-Padrón, Thaïs

    2014-01-01

    Background The neglected human diseases caused by trypanosomatids are currently treated with toxic therapy with limited efficacy. In search for novel anti-trypanosomatid agents, we showed previously that the Crotalus viridis viridis (Cvv) snake venom was active against infective forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. Here, we describe the purification of crovirin, a cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP) from Cvv venom with promising activity against trypanosomes and Leishmania. Methodology/Principal Findings Crude venom extract was loaded onto a reverse phase analytical (C8) column using a high performance liquid chromatographer. A linear gradient of water/acetonitrile with 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid was used. The peak containing the isolated protein (confirmed by SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry) was collected and its protein content was measured. T. cruzi trypomastigotes and amastigotes, L. amazonensis promastigotes and amastigotes and T. brucei rhodesiense procyclic and bloodstream trypomastigotes were challenged with crovirin, whose toxicity was tested against LLC-MK2 cells, peritoneal macrophages and isolated murine extensor digitorum longus muscle. We purified a single protein from Cvv venom corresponding, according to Nano-LC MS/MS sequencing, to a CRISP of 24,893.64 Da, henceforth referred to as crovirin. Human infective trypanosomatid forms, including intracellular amastigotes, were sensitive to crovirin, with low IC50 or LD50 values (1.10–2.38 µg/ml). A considerably higher concentration (20 µg/ml) of crovirin was required to elicit only limited toxicity on mammalian cells. Conclusions This is the first report of CRISP anti-protozoal activity, and suggests that other members of this family might have potential as drugs or drug leads for the development of novel agents against trypanosomatid-borne neglected diseases. PMID:25330220

  7. The crystal structure of an oligo(U):pre-mRNA duplex from a trypanosome RNA editing substrate.

    PubMed

    Mooers, Blaine H M; Singh, Amritanshu

    2011-10-01

    Guide RNAs bind antiparallel to their target pre-mRNAs to form editing substrates in reaction cycles that insert or delete uridylates (Us) in most mitochondrial transcripts of trypanosomes. The 5' end of each guide RNA has an anchor sequence that binds to the pre-mRNA by base-pair complementarity. The template sequence in the middle of the guide RNA directs the editing reactions. The 3' ends of most guide RNAs have ∼15 contiguous Us that bind to the purine-rich unedited pre-mRNA upstream of the editing site. The resulting U-helix is rich in G·U wobble base pairs. To gain insights into the structure of the U-helix, we crystallized 8 bp of the U-helix in one editing substrate for the A6 mRNA of Trypanosoma brucei. The fragment provides three samples of the 5'-AGA-3'/5'-UUU-3' base-pair triple. The fusion of two identical U-helices head-to-head promoted crystallization. We obtained X-ray diffraction data with a resolution limit of 1.37 Å. The U-helix had low and high twist angles before and after each G·U wobble base pair; this variation was partly due to shearing of the wobble base pairs as revealed in comparisons with a crystal structure of a 16-nt RNA with all Watson-Crick base pairs. Both crystal structures had wider major grooves at the junction between the poly(U) and polypurine tracts. This junction mimics the junction between the template helix and the U-helix in RNA-editing substrates and may be a site of major groove invasion by RNA editing proteins. PMID:21878548

  8. Elucidating the role of C/D snoRNA in rRNA processing and modification in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Barth, Sarit; Shalem, Boaz; Hury, Avraham; Tkacz, Itai Dov; Liang, Xue-Hai; Uliel, Shai; Myslyuk, Inna; Doniger, Tirza; Salmon-Divon, Mali; Unger, Ron; Michaeli, Shulamit

    2008-01-01

    Most eukaryotic C/D small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) guide 2'-O methylation (Nm) on rRNA and are also involved in rRNA processing. The four core proteins that bind C/D snoRNA in Trypanosoma brucei are fibrillarin (NOP1), NOP56, NOP58, and SNU13. Silencing of NOP1 by RNA interference identified rRNA-processing and modification defects that caused lethality. Systematic mapping of 2'-O-methyls on rRNA revealed the existence of hypermethylation at certain positions of the rRNA in the bloodstream form of the parasites, suggesting that this modification may assist the parasites in coping with the major temperature changes during cycling between their insect and mammalian hosts. The rRNA-processing defects of NOP1-depleted cells suggest the involvement of C/D snoRNA in trypanosome-specific rRNA-processing events to generate the small rRNA fragments. MRP RNA, which is involved in rRNA processing, was identified in this study in one of the snoRNA gene clusters, suggesting that trypanosomes utilize a combination of unique C/D snoRNAs and conserved snoRNAs for rRNA processing. PMID:17981991

  9. In Vitro Effect of Aqueous Extract and Fraction IV Portion of Ximenia americana Stem Bark on Trypanosoma congolense DNA

    PubMed Central

    Maikai, Victor Ambrose; Maikai, Beatty Viv; Kobo, Patricia Ishyaku

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosomosis is a debilitating disease affecting mainly livestock and humans in tropical Africa. Chemically synthesized drugs and medicinal plants have been used in the treatment and control of this disease. In this study, the in vitro effect of aqueous extracts and fraction IV extract of Ximenia americana stem bark on Trypanosoma congolense DNA was investigated. The extracts were incubated with the parasites in vitro at 300 mg/mL aqueous extract and 25 mg/mL fraction IV portion for 30, 60, and 120 mins. The DNA of the trypanosomes was isolated and digested using ECOR1 enzyme and subsequently PCR was carried out. Results showed that aqueous extract and fraction IV portion immobilized 55% and 90% of the trypanosomes after 30-minute incubation. Subsequent isolation of the parasite DNA and agarose gel electrophoresis did not reveal that cell death was as a result of DNA fragmentation. This suggests that cell death was by another mechanism of action. PMID:24587898

  10. (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignment of the cytosolic dithiol glutaredoxin 1 from the pathogen Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Stefani, Monica; Sturlese, Mattia; Manta, Bruno; Löhr, Frank; Mammi, Stefano; Comini, Marcelo; Bellanda, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    Trypanosomatids are parasites responsible for several tropical and subtropical diseases, such as Chaga's disease, sleeping sickness and Leishmaniasis. In contrast to the mammalian host, the thiol-redox metabolism of these pathogens depends on trypanothione [bis-glutathionylspermidine, T(SH)2] instead of glutathione (GSH) providing a set of lineage-specific proteins as drug target candidates. Glutaredoxins (Grx) are ubiquitous small thiol-disulfide oxidoreductases that belong to the thioredoxin-fold family. They play a central role in redox homeostasis and iron sulfur-cluster biogenesis. Each species, including trypanosomes, possesses its own set of isoforms distributed in different subcellular compartments. The genome of trypanosomatids encodes for two class I (dithiolic) Grxs named 2-C-Grx1 and 2-C-Grx2. Both proteins were shown to efficiently reduce different disulfides at the expenses of T(SH)2 using a mechanism that involves the two cysteines in the active site. Moreover, the cytosolic Trypanosoma brucei 2-C-Grx1 but not the mitochondrial 2-C-Grx2 was able to coordinate an iron-sulfur cluster with T(SH)2 or GSH as ligand. As a first step to unravel the structural basis for the specificity observed in the trypanosomal glutaredoxins, we present here the NMR resonance assignment of 2-C-Grx1 from the parasite T. brucei brucei. PMID:26386962

  11. Characterization of two different Asf1 histone chaperones with distinct cellular localizations and functions in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Pascoalino, Bruno; Dindar, Gülcin; Vieira-da-Rocha, João P.; Machado, Carlos Renato; Janzen, Christian J.; Schenkman, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    The anti-silencing function protein 1 (Asf1) is a chaperone that forms a complex with histones H3 and H4 facilitating dimer deposition and removal from chromatin. Most eukaryotes possess two different Asf1 chaperones but their specific functions are still unknown. Trypanosomes, a group of early-diverged eukaryotes, also have two, but more divergent Asf1 paralogs than Asf1 of higher eukaryotes. To unravel possible different functions, we characterized the two Asf1 proteins in Trypanosoma brucei. Asf1A is mainly localized in the cytosol but translocates to the nucleus in S phase. In contrast, Asf1B is predominantly localized in the nucleus, as described for other organisms. Cytosolic Asf1 knockdown results in accumulation of cells in early S phase of the cell cycle, whereas nuclear Asf1 knockdown arrests cells in S/G2 phase. Overexpression of cytosolic Asf1 increases the levels of histone H3 and H4 acetylation. In contrast to cytosolic Asf1, overexpression of nuclear Asf1 causes less pronounced growth defects in parasites exposed to genotoxic agents, prompting a function in chromatin remodeling in response to DNA damage. Only the cytosolic Asf1 interacts with recombinant H3/H4 dimers in vitro. These findings denote the early appearance in evolution of distinguishable functions for the two Asf1 chaperons in trypanosomes. PMID:24322299

  12. RNA-seq analysis of small RNPs in Trypanosoma brucei reveals a rich repertoire of non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Michaeli, Shulamit; Doniger, Tirza; Gupta, Sachin Kumar; Wurtzel, Omri; Romano, Mali; Visnovezky, Damian; Sorek, Rotem; Unger, Ron; Ullu, Elisabetta

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of a plethora of small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) has fundamentally changed our understanding of how genes are regulated. In this study, we employed the power of deep sequencing of RNA (RNA-seq) to examine the repertoire of ncRNAs present in small ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs) of Trypanosoma brucei, an important protozoan parasite. We identified new C/D and H/ACA small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), as well as tens of putative novel non-coding RNAs; several of these are processed from trans-spliced and polyadenylated transcripts. The RNA-seq analysis provided information on the relative abundance of the RNAs, and their 5′- and 3′-termini. The study demonstrated that three highly abundant snoRNAs are involved in rRNA processing and highlight the unique trypanosome-specific repertoire of these RNAs. Novel RNAs were studied using in situ hybridization, association in RNP complexes, and ‘RNA walk’ to detect interaction with their target RNAs. Finally, we showed that the abundance of certain ncRNAs varies between the two stages of the parasite, suggesting that ncRNAs may contribute to gene regulation during the complex parasite’s life cycle. This is the first study to provide a whole-genome analysis of the large repertoire of small RNPs in trypanosomes. PMID:21976736

  13. Cattle movements and trypanosomes: restocking efforts and the spread of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense sleeping sickness in post-conflict Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The northwards spread of acute T. b. rhodesiense sleeping sickness in Uganda has been linked to cattle movements associated with restocking following the end to military conflict in 2006. This study examined the number of cattle traded from T. b. rhodesiense endemic districts, the prevalence of the parasite in cattle being traded and the level of trypanocidal treatment at livestock markets. Methods Between 2008 and 2009 interviews were carried out with government veterinarians from 20 districts in Uganda, 18 restocking organisations and numerous livestock traders and veterinarians. Direct observations, a review of movement permit records (2006 to 2008) and blood sampling of cattle (n = 1758) for detection of parasites were also conducted at 10 livestock markets in T. b. rhodesiense endemic districts. Results Records available from 8 out of 47 identified markets showed that 39.5% (5,238/13,267) of the inter-district cattle trade between mid-2006 and mid-2008 involved movement from endemic areas to pathogen-free districts. PCR analysis showed a prevalence of 17.5% T. brucei s.l. (n = 307/1758 [95% CI: 15.7-19.2]) and 1.5% T. b. rhodesiense (n = 26/1758 [95% CI: 0.9-2.0]) from these same markets. In a two-year period, between late-2006 to late-2008, an estimated 72,321 to 86,785 cattle (57, 857 by 18 restocking organisations and 10,214 to 24,679 by private traders) were imported into seven pathogen-free northern districts, including districts that were endemic for T. b. gambiense. Between 281 and 1,302 of these cattle were likely to have carried T. b. rhodesiense. While governmental organisations predominantly adhered to trypanocidal treatment, most Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) and private traders did not. Inadequate market infrastructure, poor awareness, the need for payment for drug treatments, and the difficulty in enforcing a policy of treatment at point of sale contributed to non-compliance. Conclusion With increasing private trade, preventing the spread of Rhodesian sleeping sickness in Uganda requires government support to ensure mandatory trypanocidal treatment at livestock markets, investment in market infrastructure and possible drug subsidy. Mapping the northern reaches of T. b. rhodesiense in livestock and preparation of risk assessments for cattle trading could mitigate future outbreaks. PMID:24289452

  14. ATPaseTb2, a Unique Membrane-bound FoF1-ATPase Component, Is Essential in Bloodstream and Dyskinetoplastic Trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Šubrtová, Karolína; Panicucci, Brian; Zíková, Alena

    2015-01-01

    In the infectious stage of Trypanosoma brucei, an important parasite of humans and livestock, the mitochondrial (mt) membrane potential (Δψm) is uniquely maintained by the ATP hydrolytic activity and subsequent proton pumping of the essential FoF1-ATPase. Intriguingly, this multiprotein complex contains several trypanosome-specific subunits of unknown function. Here, we demonstrate that one of the largest novel subunits, ATPaseTb2, is membrane-bound and localizes with monomeric and multimeric assemblies of the FoF1-ATPase. Moreover, RNAi silencing of ATPaseTb2 quickly leads to a significant decrease of the Δψm that manifests as a decreased growth phenotype, indicating that the FoF1-ATPase is impaired. To further explore the function of this protein, we employed a trypanosoma strain that lacks mtDNA (dyskinetoplastic, Dk) and thus subunit a, an essential component of the proton pore in the membrane Fo-moiety. These Dk cells generate the Δψm by combining the hydrolytic activity of the matrix-facing F1-ATPase and the electrogenic exchange of ATP4- for ADP3- by the ATP/ADP carrier (AAC). Surprisingly, in addition to the expected presence of F1-ATPase, the monomeric and multimeric FoF1-ATPase complexes were identified. In fact, the immunoprecipitation of a F1-ATPase subunit demonstrated that ATPaseTb2 was a component of these complexes. Furthermore, RNAi studies established that the membrane-bound ATPaseTb2 subunit is essential for maintaining normal growth and the Δψm of Dk cells. Thus, even in the absence of subunit a, a portion of the FoF1-ATPase is assembled in Dk cells. PMID:25714685

  15. Occurrence of Trypanosoma cruzi in Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Bruce, J.I., Jr.

    1962-01-01

    During 1954-1960, 2005 mammals of 18 species collected at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Maryland, were examined for trypanosomes. T. cruzi was found in 10 raccoons between October 31 and November 30. Infection occurred in 2 percent of all raccoons sampled, and in 11.3 percent of the 80 raccoons sampled in November. Examination was by direct smears, stained smears and cultures of heart blood. Although, in previous studies, at least two experimentally infected raccoons exhibited extended parasitemia (14 and 8 weeks), no such continuing parasitemia was observed in the natural infections. No trypanosomes were found in any of the other mammals examined.

  16. The Flagellum Attachment Zone: 'The Cellular Ruler' of Trypanosome Morphology.

    PubMed

    Sunter, Jack D; Gull, Keith

    2016-04-01

    A defining feature of Trypanosoma brucei cell shape is the lateral attachment of the flagellum to the cell body, mediated by the flagellum attachment zone (FAZ). The FAZ is a complex cytoskeletal structure that connects the flagellum skeleton through two membranes to the cytoskeleton. The FAZ acts as a 'cellular ruler' of morphology by regulating cell length and organelle position and is therefore critical for both cell division and life cycle differentiations. Here we provide an overview of the advances in our understanding of the composition, assembly, and function of the FAZ. PMID:26776656

  17. Specific primers for PCR amplification of the ITS1 (ribosomal DNA) of Trypanosoma lewisi.

    PubMed

    Desquesnes, Marc; Marc, Desquesnes; Kamyingkird, Ketsarin; Ketsarin, Kamyingkird; Yangtara, Sarawut; Sarawut, Yangtara; Milocco, Cristina; Cristina, Milocco; Ravel, Sophie; Sophie, Ravel; Wang, Ming-Hui; Ming-Hui, Wang; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Zhao-Rong, Lun; Morand, Serge; Serge, Morand; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Sathaporn, Jittapalapong

    2011-08-01

    Trypanosoma lewisi is a mild or non-pathogenic parasite of the sub-genus Herpetosoma transmitted by fleas to rats. In a previous study we described pan-trypanosome specific primers TRYP1 which amplify the ITS1 of ribosomal DNA by hybridizing in highly conserved regions of 18S and 5.8S genes. These primers proved to be useful for detecting T. lewisi DNA in laboratory rats, but a recent large scale survey in wild rodents demonstrated a lack of specificity. In the present study, we designed and evaluated mono-specific primers LEW1S and LEW1R, for the detection and identification of T. lewisi by a single-step PCR. These primers were designed inside the highly variable region of the ITS1 sequence of T. lewisi ribosomal DNA. The product size of 220 bp is specific to T. lewisi. The sensitivity limit was estimated between 0.055 and 0.55 pg of DNA per reaction, equivalent to 1-10 organisms per reaction. All the PCR products obtained from 6 different T. lewisi isolates were more than 98% similar with each other and similar to the sequences of T. lewisi already published in Genbank. All DNA of 7 T. lewisi stocks from China gave the specific 220 bp product. We showed that LEW1S and LEW1R primers enabled sensitive detection and identification of T. lewisi infection in laboratory and wild rats. This assay is recommended for monitoring T. lewisi infections in rat colonies or for studying infections in the wild fauna. An absence of cross reaction with human DNA means that these primers can be used to investigate atypical trypanosome infections in humans. Given the risk of T. lewisi infection in human, we believe that these primers will be beneficial for public health diagnosis and rodents investigation programmes. PMID:21570489

  18. Comparative virulence of three Trypanosoma evansi isolates from water buffaloes in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Verdillo, John Christian M; Lazaro, Jonathan V; Abes, Nancy S; Mingala, Claro N

    2012-02-01

    The virulence of three Trypanosoma evansi isolates in Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao water buffaloes was compared determining the mortality rate, parasitemia level, clinical signs, and lesions on mice. A total of 51 inbred Balb/c mice (5-6 weeks old) were used and divided into two sets. Set A had three groups corresponding to three trypanosomes isolates (Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao) with seven mice each whose parasitemia level, clinical signs, and lesions were noted at necropsy. Set B had three groups corresponding to the three isolates with ten mice each whose mortality was monitored. Each infected mouse was inoculated with 0.2 ml of T. evansi intraperitoneally and blood was examined under high power magnification. Their parasitemia level was determined using "Rapid Matching Method". Dead mice were subjected to necropsy and the lungs, liver, spleen, brain and heart were subjected to histopathological processing. Results showed that the mortality rate was highest at Day 3 for the Visayas isolates (70%), while at Day 5 for Luzon (90%) and Mindanao (70%) isolates. The parasitemia level of Visayas isolates (1×10(8.7)) reached the earliest peak at Day 4 while Luzon isolates (1×10(9)) at Day 6 and Mindanao isolates (1×10(8.7)) at Day 8. Statistical analysis using Least significant difference (LSD) revealed significant difference among treatment means at Days 2 and 4. All of the affected mice showed rough hair coat, decreased body weight, and decreased packed cell volume. The most obvious gross lesions observed were pale liver with petechiations and pale muscles. Histopathological examination revealed depletion of the red pulp and extramedullary hematopoiesis in the spleen. Congestion, intralesional trypanosomes in blood vessel and extramedullary hematopoiesis were observed in the liver. In the lungs non-specific lesions observed were pulmonary edema, congestion and hemosiderosis. PMID:22154978

  19. In Silico Investigation of Flavonoids as Potential Trypanosomal Nucleoside Hydrolase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Christina Hung Hung; Fatima, Ayesha; Gaurav, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Human African Trypanosomiasis is endemic to 37 countries of sub-Saharan Africa. It is caused by two related species of Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies suffer from resistance and public accessibility of expensive medicines. Finding safer and effective therapies of natural origin is being extensively explored worldwide. Pentamidine is the only available therapy for inhibiting the P2 adenosine transporter involved in the purine salvage pathway of the trypanosomatids. The objective of the present study is to use computational studies for the investigation of the probable trypanocidal mechanism of flavonoids. Docking experiments were carried out on eight flavonoids of varying level of hydroxylation, namely, flavone, 5-hydroxyflavone, 7-hydroxyflavone, chrysin, apigenin, kaempferol, fisetin, and quercetin. Using AutoDock 4.2, these compounds were tested for their affinity towards inosine-adenosine-guanosine nucleoside hydrolase and the inosine-guanosine nucleoside hydrolase, the major enzymes of the purine salvage pathway. Our results showed that all of the eight tested flavonoids showed high affinities for both hydrolases (lowest free binding energy ranging from −10.23 to −7.14 kcal/mol). These compounds, especially the hydroxylated derivatives, could be further studied as potential inhibitors of the nucleoside hydrolases. PMID:26640486

  20. The Trypanosome Flagellar Pocket Collar and Its Ring Forming Protein—TbBILBO1

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo, Doranda; Bonhivers, Mélanie; Robinson, Derrick R.

    2016-01-01

    Sub-species of Trypanosoma brucei are the causal agents of human African sleeping sickness and Nagana in domesticated livestock. These pathogens have developed an organelle-like compartment called the flagellar pocket (FP). The FP carries out endo- and exocytosis and is the only structure this parasite has evolved to do so. The FP is essential for parasite viability, making it an interesting structure to evaluate as a drug target, especially since it has an indispensible cytoskeleton component called the flagellar pocket collar (FPC). The FPC is located at the neck of the FP where the flagellum exits the cell. The FPC has a complex architecture and division cycle, but little is known concerning its organization. Recent work has focused on understanding how the FP and the FPC are formed and as a result of these studies an important calcium-binding, polymer-forming protein named TbBILBO1 was identified. Cellular biology analysis of TbBILBO1 has demonstrated its uniqueness as a FPC component and until recently, it was unknown what structural role it played in forming the FPC. This review summarizes the recent data on the polymer forming properties of TbBILBO1 and how these are correlated to the FP cytoskeleton. PMID:26950156

  1. The Trypanosome Flagellar Pocket Collar and Its Ring Forming Protein-TbBILBO1.

    PubMed

    Perdomo, Doranda; Bonhivers, Mélanie; Robinson, Derrick R

    2016-01-01

    Sub-species of Trypanosoma brucei are the causal agents of human African sleeping sickness and Nagana in domesticated livestock. These pathogens have developed an organelle-like compartment called the flagellar pocket (FP). The FP carries out endo- and exocytosis and is the only structure this parasite has evolved to do so. The FP is essential for parasite viability, making it an interesting structure to evaluate as a drug target, especially since it has an indispensible cytoskeleton component called the flagellar pocket collar (FPC). The FPC is located at the neck of the FP where the flagellum exits the cell. The FPC has a complex architecture and division cycle, but little is known concerning its organization. Recent work has focused on understanding how the FP and the FPC are formed and as a result of these studies an important calcium-binding, polymer-forming protein named TbBILBO1 was identified. Cellular biology analysis of TbBILBO1 has demonstrated its uniqueness as a FPC component and until recently, it was unknown what structural role it played in forming the FPC. This review summarizes the recent data on the polymer forming properties of TbBILBO1 and how these are correlated to the FP cytoskeleton. PMID:26950156

  2. The Oral Antimalarial Drug Tafenoquine Shows Activity against Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Luis; Martínez-García, Marta; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Manzano, José Ignacio; Yardley, Vanessa; Gamarro, Francisco; Pérez-Victoria, José M

    2015-10-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei causes human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, a neglected tropical disease that requires new, safer, and more effective treatments. Repurposing oral drugs could reduce both the time and cost involved in sleeping sickness drug discovery. Tafenoquine (TFQ) is an oral antimalarial drug belonging to the 8-aminoquinoline family which is currently in clinical phase III. We show here that TFQ efficiently kills different T. brucei spp. in the submicromolar concentration range. Our results suggest that TFQ accumulates into acidic compartments and induces a necrotic process involving cell membrane disintegration and loss of cytoplasmic content, leading to parasite death. Cell lysis is preceded by a wide and multitarget drug action, affecting the lysosome, mitochondria, and acidocalcisomes and inducing a depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, elevation of intracellular Ca(2+), and production of reactive oxygen species. This is the first report of an 8-aminoquinoline demonstrating significant in vitro activity against T. brucei. PMID:26195527

  3. The Oral Antimalarial Drug Tafenoquine Shows Activity against Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Luis; Martínez-García, Marta; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Manzano, José Ignacio; Yardley, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei causes human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, a neglected tropical disease that requires new, safer, and more effective treatments. Repurposing oral drugs could reduce both the time and cost involved in sleeping sickness drug discovery. Tafenoquine (TFQ) is an oral antimalarial drug belonging to the 8-aminoquinoline family which is currently in clinical phase III. We show here that TFQ efficiently kills different T. brucei spp. in the submicromolar concentration range. Our results suggest that TFQ accumulates into acidic compartments and induces a necrotic process involving cell membrane disintegration and loss of cytoplasmic content, leading to parasite death. Cell lysis is preceded by a wide and multitarget drug action, affecting the lysosome, mitochondria, and acidocalcisomes and inducing a depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, elevation of intracellular Ca2+, and production of reactive oxygen species. This is the first report of an 8-aminoquinoline demonstrating significant in vitro activity against T. brucei. PMID:26195527

  4. SURVEILLANCE OF TRYPANOSOMA SPP OF RODENTS AND STUDIES IN THEIR TRANSMISSION PROBABILITY BY FLEAS IN SOME RURAL EGYPTIAN AREAS.

    PubMed

    Dahesh, Salwa M A; Mikhail, Micheal W

    2016-04-01

    A new public health problem arises from animal trypanosomes that afflict human by a disease called atypical human trypanosomiasis. Although humans have an innate protection against most Trypanosoma species, nineteen cases of atypical human trypanosomiasis caused by the animal trypanosome as T. b. brucei, T. vivax, T. congolense, T. evansi and T. lewisi have been recorded. Some of theserecorded cases were transient, six required trypanocidal treatments however two patients died. Rodent trypanosome, T. lewisi is transmitted via ingestion of fleas or their feces containing the infective stage, the metacyclic trypomastigote. Because of the high densities of various species of rodents and their distribution all over the country especially in rural areas, the present work aimed to evaluate the trypanosomiasis among rodents collected from November to March 2016 and study transmission probability by their fleas in some rural areas in Abu Alnomros Center, Giza. The overall trypanosomiasis prevalence among the different rodent species was (21 rats) 24.7%. All the infected rats belonged to Rattus r. spp where the prevalence of infection with Trypanosoma lewisi among that species was very high 51.2% while none of rats belonged to Rattus norvegicus were infected. That may be attributed to the solid immunity gained by the R. norvegicus where most of the collected norvegicus were aged and weighed more than 200 grams. There was an inverse significant correlation between the densities of parasites and the weights of the losts. The rat which recorded the highest parasite density (60,000 parasites/microliter) was a female Rattus r. captured indoor (inside house). As to sex of Rattus rattus spp no significant difference was found between males and females in trypanosomiasis. Also there was no significant correlation between the densities of parasites and the number of white blood cells among Rattus rattus spp. All positive rats were collected indoors (from houses) and all the rats

  5. Trypanosome Letm1 Protein Is Essential for Mitochondrial Potassium Homeostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Hashimi, Hassan; McDonald, Lindsay; Stříbrná, Eva; Lukeš, Julius

    2013-01-01

    Letm1 is a conserved protein in eukaryotes bearing energized mitochondria. Hemizygous deletion of its gene has been implicated in symptoms of the human disease Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. Studies almost exclusively performed in opisthokonts have attributed several roles to Letm1, including maintaining mitochondrial morphology, mediating either calcium or potassium/proton antiport, and facilitating mitochondrial translation. We address the ancestral function of Letm1 in the highly diverged protist and significant pathogen, Trypanosoma brucei. We demonstrate that Letm1 is involved in maintaining mitochondrial volume via potassium/proton exchange across the inner membrane. This role is essential in the vector-dwelling procyclic and mammal-infecting bloodstream stages as well as in Trypanosoma brucei evansi, a form of the latter stage lacking an organellar genome. In the pathogenic bloodstream stage, the mitochondrion consumes ATP to maintain an energized state, whereas that of T. brucei evansi also lacks a conventional proton-driven membrane potential. Thus, Letm1 performs its function in different physiological states, suggesting that ion homeostasis is among the few characterized essential pathways of the mitochondrion at this T. brucei life stage. Interestingly, Letm1 depletion in the procyclic stage can be complemented by exogenous expression of its human counterpart, highlighting the conservation of protein function between highly divergent species. Furthermore, although mitochondrial translation is affected upon Letm1 ablation, it is an indirect consequence of K+ accumulation in the matrix. PMID:23893410

  6. Trypanosome Letm1 protein is essential for mitochondrial potassium homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hashimi, Hassan; McDonald, Lindsay; Stríbrná, Eva; Lukeš, Julius

    2013-09-13

    Letm1 is a conserved protein in eukaryotes bearing energized mitochondria. Hemizygous deletion of its gene has been implicated in symptoms of the human disease Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. Studies almost exclusively performed in opisthokonts have attributed several roles to Letm1, including maintaining mitochondrial morphology, mediating either calcium or potassium/proton antiport, and facilitating mitochondrial translation. We address the ancestral function of Letm1 in the highly diverged protist and significant pathogen, Trypanosoma brucei. We demonstrate that Letm1 is involved in maintaining mitochondrial volume via potassium/proton exchange across the inner membrane. This role is essential in the vector-dwelling procyclic and mammal-infecting bloodstream stages as well as in Trypanosoma brucei evansi, a form of the latter stage lacking an organellar genome. In the pathogenic bloodstream stage, the mitochondrion consumes ATP to maintain an energized state, whereas that of T. brucei evansi also lacks a conventional proton-driven membrane potential. Thus, Letm1 performs its function in different physiological states, suggesting that ion homeostasis is among the few characterized essential pathways of the mitochondrion at this T. brucei life stage. Interestingly, Letm1 depletion in the procyclic stage can be complemented by exogenous expression of its human counterpart, highlighting the conservation of protein function between highly divergent species. Furthermore, although mitochondrial translation is affected upon Letm1 ablation, it is an indirect consequence of K(+) accumulation in the matrix. PMID:23893410

  7. Malleable mitochondrion of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Verner, Zdeněk; Basu, Somsuvro; Benz, Corinna; Dixit, Sameer; Dobáková, Eva; Faktorová, Drahomíra; Hashimi, Hassan; Horáková, Eva; Huang, Zhenqiu; Paris, Zdeněk; Peña-Diaz, Priscila; Ridlon, Lucie; Týč, Jiří; Wildridge, David; Zíková, Alena; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-01-01

    The importance of mitochondria for a typical aerobic eukaryotic cell is undeniable, as the list of necessary mitochondrial processes is steadily growing. Here, we summarize the current knowledge of mitochondrial biology of an early-branching parasitic protist, Trypanosoma brucei, a causative agent of serious human and cattle diseases. We present a comprehensive survey of its mitochondrial pathways including kinetoplast DNA replication and maintenance, gene expression, protein and metabolite import, major metabolic pathways, Fe-S cluster synthesis, ion homeostasis, organellar dynamics, and other processes. As we describe in this chapter, the single mitochondrion of T. brucei is everything but simple and as such rivals mitochondria of multicellular organisms. PMID:25708462

  8. In vitro production of Trypanosoma equiperdum antigen and its evaluation for use in serodiagnosis of dourine.

    PubMed

    Bassarak, Björn; Moser, Irmgard; Menge, Christian

    2016-06-15

    A modified Baltz's in vitro cultivation system for the propagation of Trypanosoma equiperdum strain OVI was established to develop a replacement for the conventional production procedure of dourine diagnostic antigen in rats. To increase trypanosome yields we designed an optimized culture medium by addition of supplemental compounds. Trypanosomes were adapted to this medium by two succeeding cultivation steps which led to a substantial proliferation rate and an increased cell density tolerance, respectively. As a result, adapted parasites could be propagated to maximum cell densities of >2×10(6) cells/ml, facilitating in vitro antigen production in preparative quantities comparable to the conventional method. A panel of 180 horse field sera, previously sent for testing to the German National Reference Laboratory for Dourine, was tested by complement fixation test using culture-derived as well as conventionally produced dourine antigen. Cohen's kappa values for results obtained with two batches of culture-derived antigen as compared to conventional antigen were 0.91 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 82.2-99.7) and 0.83 (95% CI: 70.3-95.3), respectively. Performance of antigens for diagnostic purposes was characterized in an inter-laboratory comparative study deploying 14 sera from horses with defined dourine statuses. Complement fixation test results from 15 participating European laboratories showed a diagnostic sensitivity of 94.1% (95% CI: 89.4-98.7) and a diagnostic specificity of 96.2% (95% CI: 92.5-99.9) for conventional antigen and a slightly higher diagnostic sensitivity of 96.0% (95% CI: 92.2-99.8) and a diagnostic specificity of 97.1% (95% CI: 94.0-100) for culture-derived antigen. We conclude that our novel approach for dourine antigen production from in vitro-grown trypanosomes described and evaluated herein meets the requirements for the prospective purpose in quantitative and qualitative terms and should be considered by the competent authorities as an

  9. Trypanosoma evansi and Surra: A Review and Perspectives on Transmission, Epidemiology and Control, Impact, and Zoonotic Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Desquesnes, Marc; Dargantes, Alan; Lai, De-Hua; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Holzmuller, Philippe; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the transmission modes of Trypanosoma evansi. Its worldwide distribution is attributed to mechanical transmission. While the role of tabanids is clear, we raise questions on the relative role of Haematobia sp. and the possible role of Stomoxys sp. in delayed transmission. A review of the available trypanocidal drugs and their efficacy in various host species is useful for understanding how they interact in disease epidemiology, which is complex. Although there are similarities with other mechanically transmitted trypanosomes, T. evansi has a more complex epidemiology due to the diversity of its hosts and vectors. The impact of clinical and subclinical disease is difficult to establish. A model was developed for buffaloes in the Philippines, which could be transferred to other places and livestock systems. Since Trypanosoma evansi was reported in humans, further research is required to investigate its zoonotic potential. Surra remains a potentially emerging disease that is a threat to Australia, Spain, and France. A number of questions about the disease have yet to be resolved. This brief review of the basic knowledge of T. evansi suggests that there is renewed interest in the parasite, which is spreading and has a major economic impact. PMID:24151595

  10. Trypanosoma evansi and Surra: A Review and Perspectives on Origin, History, Distribution, Taxonomy, Morphology, Hosts, and Pathogenic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Desquesnes, Marc; Holzmuller, Philippe; Lai, De-Hua; Dargantes, Alan; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Jittaplapong, Sathaporn

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma evansi, the agent of “surra,” is a salivarian trypanosome, originating from Africa. It is thought to derive from Trypanosoma brucei by deletion of the maxicircle kinetoplastic DNA (genetic material required for cyclical development in tsetse flies). It is mostly mechanically transmitted by tabanids and stomoxes, initially to camels, in sub-Saharan area. The disease spread from North Africa towards the Middle East, Turkey, India, up to 53° North in Russia, across all South-East Asia, down to Indonesia and the Philippines, and it was also introduced by the conquistadores into Latin America. It can affect a very large range of domestic and wild hosts including camelids, equines, cattle, buffaloes, sheep, goats, pigs, dogs and other carnivores, deer, gazelles, and elephants. It found a new large range of wild and domestic hosts in Latin America, including reservoirs (capybaras) and biological vectors (vampire bats). Surra is a major disease in camels, equines, and dogs, in which it can often be fatal in the absence of treatment, and exhibits nonspecific clinical signs (anaemia, loss of weight, abortion, and death), which are variable from one host and one place to another; however, its immunosuppressive effects interfering with intercurrent diseases or vaccination campaigns might be its most significant and questionable aspect. PMID:24024184

  11. Trypanosoma evansi and surra: a review and perspectives on origin, history, distribution, taxonomy, morphology, hosts, and pathogenic effects.

    PubMed

    Desquesnes, Marc; Holzmuller, Philippe; Lai, De-Hua; Dargantes, Alan; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Jittaplapong, Sathaporn

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma evansi, the agent of "surra," is a salivarian trypanosome, originating from Africa. It is thought to derive from Trypanosoma brucei by deletion of the maxicircle kinetoplastic DNA (genetic material required for cyclical development in tsetse flies). It is mostly mechanically transmitted by tabanids and stomoxes, initially to camels, in sub-Saharan area. The disease spread from North Africa towards the Middle East, Turkey, India, up to 53° North in Russia, across all South-East Asia, down to Indonesia and the Philippines, and it was also introduced by the conquistadores into Latin America. It can affect a very large range of domestic and wild hosts including camelids, equines, cattle, buffaloes, sheep, goats, pigs, dogs and other carnivores, deer, gazelles, and elephants. It found a new large range of wild and domestic hosts in Latin America, including reservoirs (capybaras) and biological vectors (vampire bats). Surra is a major disease in camels, equines, and dogs, in which it can often be fatal in the absence of treatment, and exhibits nonspecific clinical signs (anaemia, loss of weight, abortion, and death), which are variable from one host and one place to another; however, its immunosuppressive effects interfering with intercurrent diseases or vaccination campaigns might be its most significant and questionable aspect. PMID:24024184

  12. Structural and Functional Highlights of Vacuolar Soluble Protein 1 from Pathogen Trypanosoma brucei brucei.

    PubMed

    Jamwal, Abhishek; Round, Adam R; Bannwarth, Ludovic; Venien-Bryan, Catherine; Belrhali, Hassan; Yogavel, Manickam; Sharma, Amit

    2015-12-18

    Trypanosoma brucei (T. brucei) is responsible for the fatal human disease called African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness. The causative parasite, Trypanosoma, encodes soluble versions of inorganic pyrophosphatases (PPase), also called vacuolar soluble proteins (VSPs), which are localized to its acidocalcisomes. The latter are acidic membrane-enclosed organelles rich in polyphosphate chains and divalent cations whose significance in these parasites remains unclear. We here report the crystal structure of T. brucei brucei acidocalcisomal PPases in a ternary complex with Mg(2+) and imidodiphosphate. The crystal structure reveals a novel structural architecture distinct from known class I PPases in its tetrameric oligomeric state in which a fused EF hand domain arranges around the catalytic PPase domain. This unprecedented assembly evident from TbbVSP1 crystal structure is further confirmed by SAXS and TEM data. SAXS data suggest structural flexibility in EF hand domains indicative of conformational plasticity within TbbVSP1. PMID:26494625

  13. Insect antimicrobial peptides act synergistically to inhibit a trypanosome parasite.

    PubMed

    Marxer, Monika; Vollenweider, Vera; Schmid-Hempel, Paul

    2016-05-26

    The innate immune system provides protection from infection by producing essential effector molecules, such as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) that possess broad-spectrum activity. This is also the case for bumblebees, Bombus terrestris, when infected by the trypanosome, Crithidia bombi Furthermore, the expressed mixture of AMPs varies with host genetic background and infecting parasite strain (genotype). Here, we used the fact that clones of C. bombi can be cultivated and kept as strains in medium to test the effect of various combinations of AMPs on the growth rate of the parasite. In particular, we used pairwise combinations and a range of physiological concentrations of three AMPs, namely Abaecin, Defensin and Hymenoptaecin, synthetized from the respective genomic sequences. We found that these AMPs indeed suppress the growth of eight different strains of C. bombi, and that combinations of AMPs were typically more effective than the use of a single AMP alone. Furthermore, the most effective combinations were rarely those consisting of maximum concentrations. In addition, the AMP combination treatments revealed parasite strain specificity, such that strains varied in their sensitivity towards the same mixtures. Hence, variable expression of AMPs could be an alternative strategy to combat highly variable infections.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolutionary ecology of arthropod antimicrobial peptides'. PMID:27160603

  14. Genome of the Avirulent Human-Infective Trypanosome—Trypanosoma rangeli

    PubMed Central

    Stoco, Patrícia Hermes; Wagner, Glauber; Talavera-Lopez, Carlos; Gerber, Alexandra; Zaha, Arnaldo; Thompson, Claudia Elizabeth; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Lückemeyer, Débora Denardin; Bahia, Diana; Loreto, Elgion; Prestes, Elisa Beatriz; Lima, Fábio Mitsuo; Rodrigues-Luiz, Gabriela; Val