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Sample records for african-asian-australian monsoon analysis

  1. RAMA: Research Moored Array for African - Asian - Australian Monsoon Analysis and Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhaden, M. J.

    2008-12-01

    The Indian Ocean is unique among the three tropical oceans in that it is blocked at 25N by the Asian land mass. Seasonal heating and cooling over this land mass sets the stage for dramatic monsoon wind reversals and intense summer rains over areas surrounding the basin. These climate variations have significant societal and economic impacts that affect half the world's population. Despite the importance of the Indian Ocean for both the regional and global climate though, it is the most poorly observed and least well understood of the three tropical oceans. This presentation describes the Research Moored Array for African-Asian-Australian Monsoon Analysis and Prediction (RAMA), which has been designed to provide sustained, basin scale time series data in the Indian Ocean for climate research and forecasting. RAMA is intended to complement other satellite and in situ components of the Indian Ocean Observing System and it is being implemented through a coordinated multi- national effort involving institutions in several countries. We will review the scientific rationale, design criteria, and implementation status of RAMA. We will also illustrate some of the important intraseasonal to interannual time scale phenomena in the region observed with new RAMA time series data. Potential applications of the data for forecasting purposes will also be discussed.

  2. RAMA: Research Moored Array for African-Asian-Australian Monsoon Analysis and Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhaden, M. J.

    2009-05-01

    The Indian Ocean is unique among the three tropical ocean basins in that it is blocked at 25°N by the Asian land mass. Seasonal heating and cooling over this land mass sets the stage for dramatic monsoon wind reversals and intense rains over areas surrounding the basin. These climate variations have significant societal and economic impacts that affect half the world's population. Despite the importance of the Indian Ocean for both the regional and global climate though, it is the most poorly observed and least well understood of the three tropical oceans. This presentation describes the Research Moored Array for African-Asian- Australian Monsoon Analysis and Prediction (RAMA), which has been designed to provide sustained, basin scale time series data in the Indian Ocean for climate research and forecasting. RAMA is intended to complement other satellite and in situ components of the Indian Ocean Observing System and it is being implemented through a coordinated multi-national effort involving institutions in several countries. We will review the scientific rationale, design criteria, and implementation status of RAMA. We will also illustrate some of the important intraseasonal to interannual time scale phenomena in the region observed with new RAMA time series data. Potential applications of the data for forecasting purposes will also be discussed.

  3. Global sensitivity analysis of the Indian monsoon during the Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya-Melo, P. A.; Crucifix, M.; Bounceur, N.

    2015-01-01

    The sensitivity of the Indian monsoon to the full spectrum of climatic conditions experienced during the Pleistocene is estimated using the climate model HadCM3. The methodology follows a global sensitivity analysis based on the emulator approach of Oakley and O'Hagan (2004) implemented following a three-step strategy: (1) development of an experiment plan, designed to efficiently sample a five-dimensional input space spanning Pleistocene astronomical configurations (three parameters), CO2 concentration and a Northern Hemisphere glaciation index; (2) development, calibration and validation of an emulator of HadCM3 in order to estimate the response of the Indian monsoon over the full input space spanned by the experiment design; and (3) estimation and interpreting of sensitivity diagnostics, including sensitivity measures, in order to synthesise the relative importance of input factors on monsoon dynamics, estimate the phase of the monsoon intensity response with respect to that of insolation, and detect potential non-linear phenomena. By focusing on surface temperature, precipitation, mixed-layer depth and sea-surface temperature over the monsoon region during the summer season (June-July-August-September), we show that precession controls the response of four variables: continental temperature in phase with June to July insolation, high glaciation favouring a late-phase response, sea-surface temperature in phase with May insolation, continental precipitation in phase with July insolation, and mixed-layer depth in antiphase with the latter. CO2 variations control temperature variance with an amplitude similar to that of precession. The effect of glaciation is dominated by the albedo forcing, and its effect on precipitation competes with that of precession. Obliquity is a secondary effect, negligible on most variables except sea-surface temperature. It is also shown that orography forcing reduces the glacial cooling, and even has a positive effect on precipitation

  4. Global sensitivity analysis of Indian Monsoon during the Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya-Melo, P. A.; Crucifix, M.; Bounceur, N.

    2014-04-01

    The sensitivity of Indian Monsoon to the full spectrum of climatic conditions experienced during the Pleistocene is estimated using the climate model HadCM3. The methodology follows a global sensitivity analysis based on the emulator approach of Oakley and O'Hagan (2004) implemented following a three-step strategy: (1) develop an experiment plan, designed to efficiently sample a 5-dimensional input space spanning Pleistocene astronomical configurations (3 parameters), CO2 concentration and a Northern Hemisphere glaciation index, (2) develop, calibrate and validate an emulator of HadCM3, in order to estimate the response of the Indian Monsoon over the full input space spanned by the experiment design, and (3) estimate and interpret sensitivity diagnostics, including sensitivity measures, in order to synthesize the relative importance of input factors on monsoon dynamics, estimate the phase of the monsoon intensity response with respect to that of insolation, and detect potential non-linear phenomena. Specifically, we focus on four variables: summer (JJAS) temperature and precipitation over North India, and JJAS sea-surface temperature and mixed-layer depth over the north-western side of the Indian ocean. It is shown that precession controls the response of four variables: continental temperature in phase with June to July insolation, high glaciation favouring a late-phase response, sea-surface temperature in phase with May insolation, and continental precipitation in phase with July insolation, and mixed-layer depth in antiphase with the latter. CO2 variations controls temperature variance with an amplitude similar to that of precession. The effect of glaciation is dominated by the albedo forcing, and its effect on precipitation competes with that of precession. Obliquity is a secondary effect, negligible on most variables except sea-surface temperature. It is also shown that orography forcing reduces the glacial cooling, and even has a positive effect on

  5. Analysis of Vegetation Index Variations and the Asian Monsoon Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Sunhung; Leptoukh, Gregory G.; Gerasimov, Irina

    2012-01-01

    Vegetation growth depends on local climate. Significant anthropogenic land cover and land use change activities over Asia have changed vegetation distribution as well. On the other hand, vegetation is one of the important land surface variables that influence the Asian Monsoon variability through controlling atmospheric energy and water vapor conditions. In this presentation, the mean and variations of vegetation index of last decade at regional scale resolution (5km and higher) from MODIS have been analyzed. Results indicate that the vegetation index has been reduced significantly during last decade over fast urbanization areas in east China, such as Yangtze River Delta, where local surface temperatures were increased significantly in term of urban heat Island. The relationship between vegetation Index and climate (surface temperature, precipitation) over a grassland in northern Asia and over a woody savannas in southeast Asia are studied. In supporting Monsoon Asian Integrated Regional Study (MAIRS) program, the data in this study have been integrated into Giovanni, the online visualization and analysis system at NASA GES DISC. Most images in this presentation are generated from Giovanni system.

  6. Asian summer monsoon rainfall predictability: a predictable mode analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Lee, June-Yi; Xiang, Baoqiang

    2015-01-01

    To what extent the Asian summer monsoon (ASM) rainfall is predictable has been an important but long-standing issue in climate science. Here we introduce a predictable mode analysis (PMA) method to estimate predictability of the ASM rainfall. The PMA is an integral approach combining empirical analysis, physical interpretation and retrospective prediction. The empirical analysis detects most important modes of variability; the interpretation establishes the physical basis of prediction of the modes; and the retrospective predictions with dynamical models and physics-based empirical (P-E) model are used to identify the "predictable" modes. Potential predictability can then be estimated by the fractional variance accounted for by the "predictable" modes. For the ASM rainfall during June-July-August, we identify four major modes of variability in the domain (20°S-40°N, 40°E-160°E) during 1979-2010: (1) El Niño-La Nina developing mode in central Pacific, (2) Indo-western Pacific monsoon-ocean coupled mode sustained by a positive thermodynamic feedback with the aid of background mean circulation, (3) Indian Ocean dipole mode, and (4) a warming trend mode. We show that these modes can be predicted reasonably well by a set of P-E prediction models as well as coupled models' multi-model ensemble. The P-E and dynamical models have comparable skills and complementary strengths in predicting ASM rainfall. Thus, the four modes may be regarded as "predictable" modes, and about half of the ASM rainfall variability may be predictable. This work not only provides a useful approach for assessing seasonal predictability but also provides P-E prediction tools and a spatial-pattern-bias correction method to improve dynamical predictions. The proposed PMA method can be applied to a broad range of climate predictability and prediction problems.

  7. Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis of monsoon rainfall and satellite-observed outgoing long-wave radiation for Indian monsoon: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, C. V.

    The present study involves the use of Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis/Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to compare the dominant rainfall patterns from normal rainfall records over India, coupled with the major modes of the Outgoing Long-wave Radiation (OLR) data for the period (1979-1988) during the monsoon period (June-September). To understand the intraseasonal and interannual variability of the monsoon rainfall, daily and seasonal anomalies have been obtained by using the (EOF) analysis. Importantly, pattern characteristics of seasonal monsoon rainfall covering 68 stations in India are highlighted. The purpose is to ascertain the nature of rainfall distribution over the Indian continent. Based on this, the percentage of variance for both the rainfall and OLR data is examined. OLR has a higher spatial coherence than rainfall. The first principal component of rainfall data shows high positive values, which are concentrated over northeast as well as southeast, whereas for the OLR, the area of large positive values is concentrated over northwest and lower value over south India apart from the Indian ocean. The first five principal components explain 92.20% of the total variance for the rainfall and 99.50% of the total variance for the outgoing long-wave radiation. The relationship between monsoon rainfall and Southern Oscillations has also been examined and for the Southern Oscillations, it is 0.69 for the monsoon season. The El-Niño events mostly occurred during Southern Oscillations, i.e. Walker circulation. It has been found that the average number of low pressure system/low pressure system days play an important role during active (flood) or inactive (drought) monsoon year, but low pressure system days play more important role in comparison to low pressure systems and their ratio are (16:51) and (13:25) respectively. Significantly, the analysis identifies the spatial and temporal pattern characteristics of possible physical significance.

  8. Entropy analysis of stable isotopes in precipitation: tracing the monsoon systems in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Chen, Jiansheng; Li, Ling

    2016-08-01

    Due to the complexity of monsoon systems and random behaviors of isotope tracers, conventional methods are not adequate for uncovering detailed information about monsoon activities from typically limited precipitation isotope data. We developed a new approach based on the entropy theory to analyze such data with a focus on the monsoon systems in China, dealing with the complexity of these systems and data deficiency. Using precipitation isotope data from 42 selected stations in and around China within the GNIP network, we computed entropies associated with D and 18O. These entropies were found to relate linearly to each other with a proportionality factor close to unity. The spatial variations of the D and 18O entropy in the study area revealed the origins, extents and pathways of the Chinese monsoon systems, as well as their interactions. While further investigation is needed at a greater (global) scale, this study has demonstrated how the entropy theory enables an in-depth analysis of precipitation isotope data to trace the pathway and determine the range of a monsoon system.

  9. Entropy analysis of stable isotopes in precipitation: tracing the monsoon systems in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Chen, Jiansheng; Li, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Due to the complexity of monsoon systems and random behaviors of isotope tracers, conventional methods are not adequate for uncovering detailed information about monsoon activities from typically limited precipitation isotope data. We developed a new approach based on the entropy theory to analyze such data with a focus on the monsoon systems in China, dealing with the complexity of these systems and data deficiency. Using precipitation isotope data from 42 selected stations in and around China within the GNIP network, we computed entropies associated with D and 18O. These entropies were found to relate linearly to each other with a proportionality factor close to unity. The spatial variations of the D and 18O entropy in the study area revealed the origins, extents and pathways of the Chinese monsoon systems, as well as their interactions. While further investigation is needed at a greater (global) scale, this study has demonstrated how the entropy theory enables an in-depth analysis of precipitation isotope data to trace the pathway and determine the range of a monsoon system. PMID:27507656

  10. Entropy analysis of stable isotopes in precipitation: tracing the monsoon systems in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Chen, Jiansheng; Li, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Due to the complexity of monsoon systems and random behaviors of isotope tracers, conventional methods are not adequate for uncovering detailed information about monsoon activities from typically limited precipitation isotope data. We developed a new approach based on the entropy theory to analyze such data with a focus on the monsoon systems in China, dealing with the complexity of these systems and data deficiency. Using precipitation isotope data from 42 selected stations in and around China within the GNIP network, we computed entropies associated with D and (18)O. These entropies were found to relate linearly to each other with a proportionality factor close to unity. The spatial variations of the D and (18)O entropy in the study area revealed the origins, extents and pathways of the Chinese monsoon systems, as well as their interactions. While further investigation is needed at a greater (global) scale, this study has demonstrated how the entropy theory enables an in-depth analysis of precipitation isotope data to trace the pathway and determine the range of a monsoon system. PMID:27507656

  11. Entropy analysis of stable isotopes in precipitation: tracing the monsoon systems in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Chen, Jiansheng; Li, Ling

    2016-08-10

    Due to the complexity of monsoon systems and random behaviors of isotope tracers, conventional methods are not adequate for uncovering detailed information about monsoon activities from typically limited precipitation isotope data. We developed a new approach based on the entropy theory to analyze such data with a focus on the monsoon systems in China, dealing with the complexity of these systems and data deficiency. Using precipitation isotope data from 42 selected stations in and around China within the GNIP network, we computed entropies associated with D and (18)O. These entropies were found to relate linearly to each other with a proportionality factor close to unity. The spatial variations of the D and (18)O entropy in the study area revealed the origins, extents and pathways of the Chinese monsoon systems, as well as their interactions. While further investigation is needed at a greater (global) scale, this study has demonstrated how the entropy theory enables an in-depth analysis of precipitation isotope data to trace the pathway and determine the range of a monsoon system.

  12. Predictability of the Indian Summer Monsoon onset through an analysis of variations in surface air temperature and relative humidity during the pre-monsoon season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolbova, V.; Surovyatkina, E.; Bookhagen, B.; Kurths, J.

    2014-12-01

    The prediction of the Indian Summer monsoon (ISM) onset is one of the vital questions for the Indian subcontinent, as well as for areas directly or indirectly affected by the ISM. In previous studies, the areas used for ISM-onset prediction were often too large (or too small), or did not include all necessary information for the ISM-onset forecasting. Here, we present recent findings that suggest that a climate network approach may help to provide better definitions for areas used for ISM-onset prediction and an overall better ISM-onset prediction. Our analysis focuses on the following domains: North West Pakistan (NP) and the Eastern Ghats (EG) as they have been identified to include important pre-monsoon information for predicting ISM onset dates. Specifically, we focus on the analysis of surface air temperature and relative humidity in both areas that allows us to derive temporal trends and to estimate the ISM onset. We propose an approach, which allows to determine ISM onset in advance in 67% of all considered years. Our proposed approach is less effective during the anomalous years, which are associated with weak/strong monsoons, e.g. El-Nino, La-Nina or positive Indian Ocean Dipole events. ISM onset is predicted for 23 out of 27 normal monsoon years (85%) during the past 6 decades. In addition, we show that time series analysis in both areas during the pre-monsoon period reveals indicators whether the forthcoming ISM will be normal or weaker/stronger.

  13. Regional analysis of convective systems during the West African monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Bradley Nicholas

    The West African monsoon (WAM) occurs during the boreal summer and is responsible for a majority of precipitation in the northern portion of West Africa. A distinct shift of precipitation, often driven by large propagating mesoscale convective systems, is indicated from satellite observations. Excepting the coarser satellite observations, sparse data across the continent has prevented understanding of mesoscale variability of these important systems. The interaction between synoptic and mesoscale features appears to be an important part of the WAM system. Without an understanding of the mesoscale properties of precipitating systems, improved understanding of the feedback mechanism between spatial scales cannot be attained. Convective and microphysical characteristics of West African convective systems are explored using various observational data sets. Focus is directed toward meso -alpha and -beta scale convective systems to improve our understanding of characteristics at this spatial scale and contextualize their interaction with the larger-scale. Ground-based radar observations at three distinct geographical locations in West Africa along a common latitudinal band (Niamey, Niger [continental], Kawsara, Senegal [coastal], and Praia, Republic of Cape Verde [maritime]) are analyzed to determine convective system characteristics in each domain during a 29 day period in 2006. Ancillary datasets provided by the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA) and NASA-AMMA (NAMMA) field campaigns are also used to place the radar observations in context. Results show that the total precipitation is dominated by propagating mesoscale convective systems. Convective characteristics vary according to environmental properties, such as vertical shear, CAPE, and the degree of synoptic forcing. Data are bifurcated based on the presence or absence of African easterly waves. In general, African easterly waves appear to enhance mesoscale convective system strength

  14. Temporal analysis of rainfall (1871-2012) and drought characteristics over a tropical monsoon-dominated State (Kerala) of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Jobin; Prasannakumar, V.

    2016-03-01

    The climate of Kerala is controlled by the monsoon, and the analysis of rainfall and drought scenario, for a period of 141 years (1871-72 to 2011-12), reveals a decreasing trend in southwest monsoon, and increasing trends for post-monsoon-, winter- and pre-monsoon-rainfall. The inconsistent periodicity (2-8 years) of annual- and seasonal-rainfall agrees with the periodicity of El-Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The annual rainfall shows an irregular distribution, and is concentrated roughly in half of the year, which is due to the monsoon-driven climatic seasonality. The rainfall concentration at annual-, southwest monsoon-, and winter-scales exhibits significant decreasing trends, implying decline in the degree of irregularity in annual- and seasonal-rainfall. Temporal distribution as well as severity of the drought events have been analyzed using various drought indicators. The drought pattern is not only related to the rainfall trends, but also to the rainfall concentration (or monthly rainfall heterogeneity). The decreasing rainfall during southwest monsoon contributes to short-term meteorological droughts, which have serious implications on the agricultural sector and water resources of Kerala, while the increasing rainfall during other seasons helps to reduce the drought severity.

  15. Multi-Satellite Synergy for Aerosol Analysis in the Asian Monsoon Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichoku, Charles; Petrenko, Maksym

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols represent one of the greatest uncertainties in environmental and climate research, particularly in tropical monsoon regions such as the Southeast Asian regions, where significant contributions from a variety of aerosol sources and types is complicated by unstable atmospheric dynamics. Although aerosols are now routinely retrieved from multiple satellite Sensors, in trying to answer important science questions about aerosol distribution, properties, and impacts, researchers often rely on retrievals from only one or two sensors, thereby running the risk of incurring biases due to sensor/algorithm peculiarities. We are conducting detailed studies of aerosol retrieval uncertainties from various satellite sensors (including Terra-/ Aqua-MODIS, Terra-MISR, Aura-OMI, Parasol-POLDER, SeaWiFS, and Calipso-CALIOP), based on the collocation of these data products over AERONET and other important ground stations, within the online Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS) framework that was developed recently. Such analyses are aimed at developing a synthesis of results that can be utilized in building reliable unified aerosol information and climate data records from multiple satellite measurements. In this presentation, we will show preliminary results of. an integrated comparative uncertainly analysis of aerosol products from multiple satellite sensors, particularly focused on the Asian Monsoon region, along with some comparisons from the African Monsoon region.

  16. Analysis of remote measurements of tropospheric carbon monoxide concentrations made during the 1979 Summer Monsoon Experiment (MONEX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, G. M.; Newell, R. E.; Reichle, H. G., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Mixing ratios of tropospheric CO as measured by an aircraft-mounted radiometer over Saudi Arabia, the Arabian Sea, and northern India during May and June 1979 are reported. During early May, exceptionally high CO levels were detected over Saudi Arabia, and strong horizontal gradients in CO mixing ratios were seen to develop over a period of several days. Over the Arabian Sea, mixing ratios of the order of 150 parts per billion by volume were observed before the monsoon onset, and a pronounced decrease in CO was detected toward the equator. Subsequent measurements after the monsoon had become established revealed a consistent decrease in CO mixing ratio across this region. Analysis of aircraft dropsonde data and constant pressure daily streamline charts lend strong support to the hypothesis that this reduction is associated with the influx of CO-poor Southern Hemisphere air in the monsoon southwesterlies.

  17. Online Time Series Analysis of Land Products over Asia Monsoon Region via Giovanni

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Suhung; Leptoukh, Gregory G.; Gerasimov, Irina

    2011-01-01

    Time series analysis is critical to the study of land cover/land use changes and climate. Time series studies at local-to-regional scales require higher spatial resolution, such as 1km or less, data. MODIS land products of 250m to 1km resolution enable such studies. However, such MODIS land data files are distributed in 10ox10o tiles, due to large data volumes. Conducting a time series study requires downloading all tiles that include the study area for the time period of interest, and mosaicking the tiles spatially. This can be an extremely time-consuming process. In support of the Monsoon Asia Integrated Regional Study (MAIRS) program, NASA GES DISC (Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center) has processed MODIS land products at 1 km resolution over the Asia monsoon region (0o-60oN, 60o-150oE) with a common data structure and format. The processed data have been integrated into the Giovanni system (Goddard Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure) that enables users to explore, analyze, and download data over an area and time period of interest easily. Currently, the following regional MODIS land products are available in Giovanni: 8-day 1km land surface temperature and active fire, monthly 1km vegetation index, and yearly 0.05o, 500m land cover types. More data will be added in the near future. By combining atmospheric and oceanic data products in the Giovanni system, it is possible to do further analyses of environmental and climate changes associated with the land, ocean, and atmosphere. This presentation demonstrates exploring land products in the Giovanni system with sample case scenarios.

  18. Monsoon driven changes in phytoplankton populations in the eastern Arabian Sea as revealed by microscopy and HPLC pigment analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parab, Sushma G.; Prabhu Matondkar, S. G.; Gomes, H. do R.; Goes, J. I.

    2006-12-01

    Like the rest of the Arabian Sea, the west coast of India is subject to semi-annual wind reversals associated with the monsoon cycle that result in two periods of elevated phytoplankton productivity, one during the northeast (NE) monsoon (November-February) and the other during the southwest (SW) monsoon (June-September). Although the seasonality of phytoplankton biomass in these coastal waters is well known, the abundance and composition of phytoplankton populations associated with this distinct and predictable seasonal cycle is poorly known. Here we present for the first time, the results of a study on the community structure of phytoplankton for this region, derived from HPLC pigment analysis and microscopic cell counts. Our sampling strategy allowed for large spatial and temporal coverage over regions representative of the coastal and offshore waters, and over seasons that included the NE and the SW monsoon. Monthly observations at a fixed coastal station in particular, allowed us to follow changes in phytoplankton community structure associated with the development of anoxia. Together these measurements helped establish a pattern of seasonal change of three major groups of phytoplankton: diatoms, dinoflagellates and cyanobacteria that appeared to be tightly coupled with hydrographic and chemical changes associated with the monsoonal cycle. During the SW monsoon when nitrate concentrations were high, diatoms were dominant but prymnesiophytes were present as well. By October, as nitrate fell to below detection levels and anoxic conditions began to develop on the shelf below the shallow pycnocline, both diatom and prymensiophytes declined sharply giving way to dinoflagellates. In the well oxygenated surface waters, where both nitrate and ammonium were below detection limits, pico-cyanobacterial populations became dominant. During the NE monsoon, a mixed diatom-dinoflagellate population was quickly replaced by blooms of Trichodesmium erythraeum and Noctiluca

  19. Trend analysis and ARIMA modelling of pre-monsoon rainfall data for western India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Priya; Basistha, Ashoke; Sarkar, Sumana; Kamna, Sachdeva

    2013-01-01

    Spatial and temporal variability of rainfall over different seasons influence physical, social and economic parameters. Pre-monsoon (March, April and May - MAM) rainfall over the country is highly variable. Since heat lows and convective rainfall in MAM have an impact on the intensity of the ensuing monsoons, hence the pre-monsoon period was chosen for the study. The pre-whitened Mann Kendall test was used to explore presence of rainfall trend during MAM. The results indicate presence of significant (at 10% level) increasing trend in two stations (Ajmer, Bikaner). The practical significance of the change in rainfall was also explored as percentage changes over long term mean, using Theil and Sen's median slope estimator. Forecast using univariate ARIMA model for pre-monsoon months indicates that there is a significant rise in the pre-monsoon rainfall over the northwest part of the country.

  20. The concept of global monsoon applied to the last glacial maximum: A multi-model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dabang; Tian, Zhiping; Lang, Xianmei; Kageyama, Masa; Ramstein, Gilles

    2015-10-01

    The last glacial maximum (LGM, ca. 21,000 years ago) has been extensively investigated for better understanding of past glacial climates. Global-scale monsoon changes, however, have not yet been determined. In this study, we examine global monsoon area (GMA) and precipitation (GMP) as well as GMP intensity (GMPI) at the LGM using the experiments of 17 climate models chosen from the Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project (PMIP) according to their ability to reproduce the present global monsoon climate. Compared to the reference period (referring to the present day, ca. 1985, for three atmospheric plus two atm-slab ocean models and the pre-industrial period, ca. 1750, for 12 fully coupled atmosphere-ocean or atmosphere-ocean-vegetation models), the LGM monsoon area increased over land and decreased over the oceans. The boreal land monsoon areas generally shifted southward, while the northern boundary of land monsoon areas retreated southward over southern Africa and South America. Both the LGM GMP and GMPI decreased in most of the models. The GMP decrease mainly resulted from the reduced monsoon precipitation over the oceans, while the GMPI decrease was derived from the weakened intensity of monsoon precipitation over land and the boreal ocean. Quantitatively, the LGM GMP deficit was due to, first, the GMA reduction and, second, the GMPI weakening. In response to the LGM large ice sheets and lower greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere, the global surface and tropospheric temperatures cooled, the boreal summer meridional temperature gradient increased, and the summer land-sea thermal contrast at 40°S - 70°N decreased. These are the underlying dynamic mechanisms for the LGM monsoon changes. Qualitatively, simulations agree with reconstructions in all land monsoon areas except in the western part of northern Australia where disagreements occur and in South America and the southern part of southern Africa where there is uncertainty in reconstructions

  1. Analysis of the seasonal ozone budget and the impact of the summer monsoon on the northeastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Bin; Hou, Xuewei; Kang, Hanqing

    2016-02-01

    Seasonal variations in ozone (O3) and the impact of the East Asian summer monsoon at Mount Waliguan (WLG) in the northeastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (TP) and in the surrounding regions were analyzed for 1997-2007 using a global chemical transport model coupled with O3 tagging simulations. The model-simulated O3 and its precursors agreed well with observed values. An O3 budget analysis combined with O3 tagging results implied that photochemistry over the TP and long-range transport of O3 from East Asia, Europe, and Africa were responsible for the surface O3 summer maximum at WLG. In June, the contribution of O3 from the TP was 11.8 ppbv, and the total contribution of O3 transport from eastern China, Japan, Korean Peninsula, Europe, and Africa was 22.7 ppbv. At 400 mb, the O3 exports from the stratosphere, Europe, Africa, and the Americas seemed to be the main sources of O3 at WLG. The contributions to surface O3 from deep convection process and lightning-induced photochemistry at WLG were both low in summer and are unlikely to be the key processes or contributors for the O3 peak. At several mountain sites in southeast East Asia, the increasing summer monsoon index was related to a decreasing trend for O3 from spring onward at Mount Tai and Mount Huang. At Mount Hua and WLG, regional O3 accumulated over the monsoon's northernmost marginal zone under the influence of the East Asian summer monsoon and TP thermal circulation; this is most likely a key reason for the O3 summer maxima.

  2. A climatological analysis of the southwest monsoon rainfall in the Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, F. T.; Narisma, G. T.; Villafuerte, M. Q.; Cheng Chua, K. U.; Olaguera, L. M.

    2013-03-01

    The historical behavior of the southwest monsoon (SWM) rainfall in the Philippines is described using observed rainfall during the months of June to September from 1961 to 2010. Data are obtained from meteorological stations situated in the western half of the country where the impact of SWM is well pronounced. Time series analysis indicates significant decreasing trends from 0.026% to 0.075% per decade in the total SWM rainfall in six of the nine stations (Ambulong, Baguio, Coron, Dagupan, Iba and Vigan) in the past 50 years. A rainfall anomaly index is derived to characterize the inter-annual variability and the influence of the El Niño Southern Oscillation on the SWM rainfall. Results show no above normal rainfall events associated with La Niña years and few occurrences of below normal rainfall associated with El Niño events. Years where the SWM rainfall significantly deviates from its climate mean are also identified. Furthermore, an examination of the rainfall extremes indicate an increasing trend in the number of days without rain, which can be detected with statistical confidence in Ambulong (2.9% per decade), Baguio (5.9% per decade) and Dagupan (4.0% per decade), as well as a decreasing trend in the heavy rainfall days. These findings suggest a climatic change towards a prolonged dry period and an overall decreasing trend in rainfall during the SWM season over western Philippines in the recent decades, which can have serious implications on the country's agricultural sector.

  3. Detailed Analysis of Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall Processes with Modern/High-Quality Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Kuo, Kwo-Sen; Mehta, Amita V.; Yang, Song

    2007-01-01

    We examine, in detail, Indian Summer Monsoon rainfall processes using modernhigh quality satellite precipitation measurements. The focus here is on measurements derived from three NASA cloud and precipitation satellite missionslinstruments (TRMM/PR&TMI, AQUNAMSRE, and CLOUDSATICPR), and a fourth TRMM Project-generated multi-satellite precipitation measurement dataset (viz., TRMM standard algorithm 3b42) -- all from a period beginning in 1998 up to the present. It is emphasized that the 3b42 algorithm blends passive microwave (PMW) radiometer-based precipitation estimates from LEO satellites with infi-ared (IR) precipitation estimates from a world network of CEO satellites (representing -15% of the complete space-time coverage) All of these observations are first cross-calibrated to precipitation estimates taken from standard TRMM combined PR-TMI algorithm 2b31, and second adjusted at the large scale based on monthly-averaged rain-gage measurements. The blended approach takes advantage of direct estimates of precipitation from the PMW radiometerequipped LEO satellites -- but which suffer fi-om sampling limitations -- in combination with less accurate IR estimates from the optical-infrared imaging cameras on GEO satellites -- but which provide continuous diurnal sampling. The advantages of the current technologies are evident in the continuity and coverage properties inherent to the resultant precipitation datasets that have been an outgrowth of these stable measuring and retrieval technologies. There is a wealth of information contained in the current satellite measurements of precipitation regarding the salient precipitation properties of the Indian Summer Monsoon. Using different datasets obtained from the measuring systems noted above, we have analyzed the observations cast in the form of: (1) spatially distributed means and variances over the hierarchy of relevant time scales (hourly I diurnally, daily, monthly, seasonally I intra-seasonally, and inter

  4. The Indian Summer Monsoon onset revisited: new approach based on the analysis of historical wind observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordoñez, Paulina; Gallego, David; Ribera, Pedro; Peña-Ortiz, Cristina; Garcia-Herrera, Ricardo; Vega, Inmaculada; Gómez, Francisco de Paula

    2016-04-01

    The Indian Summer Monsoon onset is one of the meteorological events most anticipated in the world. Due to its relevance for the population, the India Meteorological Department has dated the onset over the southern tip of the Indian Peninsula (Kerala) since 1901. The traditional method to date the onset was based in the judgment of skilled meteorologist and because of this, the method was considered subjective and not adequate for the study of long-term changes in the onset. A new method for determining the monsoon onset based solely on objective criteria has been in use since 2006. Unfortunately, the new method relies -among other variables- on OLR measurements. This requirement impedes the construction of an objective onset series before the satellite era. An alternative approach to establish the onset by objective methods is the use of the wind field. During the last decade, some works have demonstrated that the changes in the wind direction in some areas of the Indian Ocean can be used to determine the monsoon onset rather precisely. However, this method requires precise wind observations over a large oceanic area which has limited the periods covered for such kind of indices to those of the reanalysis products. In this work we present a new approach to track the Indian monsoon onset based solely on historical wind direction measurements taken onboard ships. Our new series provides an objective record of the onset since the last decade of the 19th century and perhaps more importantly, it can incorporate any new historical wind record not yet known in order to extend the series length. The new series captures quite precisely the rapid precipitation increase associated to the monsoon onset, correlates well with previous approaches and it is robust against anomalous (bogus) onsets. Although no significant trends in the onset date were detected, a tendency to later than average onsets during the 1900-1925 and 1970-1990 periods and earlier than average onsets between

  5. Variability and risk analysis of Hong Kong air quality based on Monsoon and El Niño conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong-Suk; Zhou, Wen; Cheung, Ho Nam; Chow, Chak Hang

    2013-03-01

    This study presents an exploratory analysis aimed at improving understanding of the variability of Hong Kong air quality associated with different climate conditions. Significantly negative correlations were found when Niño 3 led particulate matter ⩽10 μm PM10) and NO2 by 2-3 months over the Hong Kong territory, while the other pollutants (e.g., O3, SO2) showed modest correlations. A significant decreasing trend in visibility was observed during the autumn and winter, which has potential implications for the air-quality degradation and the endangerment of human health in Hong Kong. In an El Niño summer, the visibility was relatively better, while visibility in other seasons was diminished. On the other hand, in La Niña events, significant changes occurred in visibility in winter and autumn. Air pollution indices were less sensitive to the South China Summer Monsoon (SCSM), but a relatively high correlation existed between the East Asian Winter Monsoon (EAWM) and air pollutants. Rainfall was lower during most of the strong EAWM years compared to the weak years. This result suggests that the pollutants that accumulate in Hong Kong are not easy to wash out, so concentrations remain at a higher level. Finally, based on the conditional Air Pollution Index (API) risk assessment, site-specific vulnerabilities were analyzed to facilitate the development of the air-quality warning systems in Hong Kong.

  6. Analysis of the bimodal diurnal rainfall pattern during the summer monsoon over the Hong Kong Archipelago

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, P.T.; Wai, M.M.K.

    1994-12-31

    A complete year`s record of hourly surface measurements was used to examine the atmospheric diurnal secondary circulations over the Hong Kong Archipelago in conjunction with spatial and temporal variations of surface temperature, wind speed and rainfall. The two objectives in this study are to identify both the spatial and temporal variations of diurnal temperature, wind speed and rainfall over the entire Hong Kong area, and to link these variations to the forcing mechanisms and their scales of action. In this way, the authors can establish some useful understanding of the forcing and response, leading toward a systematic method to identify inappropriate parameterization schemes in otherwise potentially useful numerical models. This study focuses on the occurrence of a summer biomodal rainfall maximum which results from the interaction of summer monsoon flow and local mesoscale secondary circulations. The result is a dominant morning rainfall maximum and a secondary afternoon peak. Evidence of atmospheric diurnal secondary circulations are found at 10 local data stations. Though system strength and timing vary, these secondary circulation systems behave like a classic sea breeze circulation, complicated by superimposed slope effects, but dominated by the summer monsoon flow.

  7. Analysis and evaluation of Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) forecast data for Indian summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Medha; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Masutani, Michiko; Ma, Zaizhong; Riishojgaard, Lars Peter; Hardesty, Michael; Emmitt, Dave; Krishnamurti, T. N.; Goswami, B. N.

    2016-05-01

    An attempt is made here to evaluate the skill of forecast during boreal summer monsoon regime over the Indian region using the Observation Simulation System Experiment (OSSE) with Doppler Wind LIDAR (DWL) onboard International Space Station (ISS), assimilated in the initial condition. Through various techniques such as pattern correlation, root mean square error etc, we found that there is some positive impact of assimilating the DWL data on the forecast particularly at the lower tropospheric level. Impact on lowering the RMSE is seen for wind fields in the 850 and 500 hPa over Indian domain but not much impact is seen over larger domain. The moisture field and cloud also show marginal impact due to assimilation of DWL. This indicates that possibly due to lower spatial resolution of DWL data and more data gap over Indian and surrounding oceanic region, the impact on forecast is less. However, it shows the promise that monsoon being a convectively coupled system; increase in spatial data by DWL may better resolve the low level wind and subsequently the low level shear which is important for convection trigger in boundary layer.

  8. Dehydration processes in the Indian monsoon anticyclone : Lagrangian analysis and sensitivity to vertical wind fields.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, R.; Bonazzola, M.; Legras, B.; Surbled, K.; Fueglistaler, S.

    2007-12-01

    During Asian monsoon season, the large-scale monsoon flux generates a persistent anticyclonic circulation at the tropopause over the sub-tropical part of Asia (15°N to 40°N). The anticyclonic region is associated with a large water vapor maxima, which can hardly be explained by the seasonal variation of tropopause temperatures alone. In the upper troposphere, the moistening effect of deep convective events in the anticyclone has been pointed out by Randel and Park (JGR, 10.1029/2005JD006490, 2006). However, at higher levels the deep convective area is separated from the anticyclonic region (Park et al., JGR, 10.1029/2006JD008294, 2007). The large-scale circulation (slow ascent and anticyclonic barrier) seems hence essential to explain the water vapor distribution observed at 100 hPa (MLS/AURA or MIPAS). In this context, the ability of the large-scale wind fields to represent the water vapor distribution has been studied from back-trajectories. The calculations have been performed over three summers (1998, 1999 and 2000) using two representations of the vertical wind in the ERA-40 dataset and the new ERA-Interim: the "classical" wind (from divergence equation) and the diabatic wind (from temperature tendency equation). Coupled to a simple microphysical model, back-trajectories can reconstruct water vapor maps (Fueglistaler et al., JGR, 10.1029/2004JD005516, 2005). Here, the comparison to MLS/AURA retrievements at 100 hPa shows that : if "classical" wind calculations exhibit large discrepancies, diabatic winds accurately reconstruct the location and the concentration of the indian monsoon water vapor maxima without represented small-scale micro-physic. Investigating transport and dehydration processes along trajectories (intersection with isentrops, clouds from CLAUS,...) the Lagrangian approach offers a synthetic scenario. After being quickly lifted by deep convection over the Bay of Bengal until 350-360 K, most of the parcels are freezed-dry around 370 K above

  9. Phenology Analysis of Forest Vegetation to Environmental Variables during - and Post-Monsoon Seasons in Western Himalayan Region of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, S.; Latifi, H.; Ghosh, K.

    2016-06-01

    To assess the phenological changes in Moist Deciduous Forest (MDF) of western Himalayan region of India, we carried out NDVI time series analysis from 2013 to 2015 using Landsat 8 OLI data. We used the vegetation index differencing method to calculate the change in NDVI (NDVIchange) during pre and post monsoon seasons and these changes were used to assess the phenological behaviour of MDF by taking the effect of a set of environmental variables into account. To understand the effect of environmental variables on change in phenology, we designed a linear regression analysis with sample-based NDVIchange values as the response variable and elevation aspect, and Land Surface Temperature (LST) as explanatory variables. The Landsat-8 derived phenology transition stages were validated by calculating the phenology variation from Nov 2008 to April 2009 using Landsat-7 which has the same spatial resolution as Landsat-8. The Landsat-7 derived NDVI trajectories were plotted in accordance with MODIS derived phenology stages (from Nov 2008 to April 2009) of MDF. Results indicate that the Landsat -8 derived NDVI trajectories describing the phenology variation of MDF during spring, monsoon autumn and winter seasons agreed closely with Landsat-7 and MODIS derived phenology transition from Nov 2008 to April 2009. Furthermore, statistical analysis showed statistically significant correlations (p < 0.05) amongst the environmental variables and the NDVIchange between full greenness and maximum frequency stage of Onset of Greenness (OG) activity.. The major change in NDVI was observed in medium (600 to 650 m) and maximum (650 to 750 m) elevation areas. The change in LST showed also to be highly influential. The results of this study can be used for large scale monitoring of difficult-to-reach mountainous forests, with additional implications in biodiversity assessment. By means of a sufficient amount of available cloud-free imagery, detailed phenological trends across mountainous

  10. The monsoon experiment MONEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, P. K.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of monsoons in different parts of the world on the Earth's atmosphere were studied by MONEX, India's Monsoon Experiment program. Data were gathered from meteorological satellites, sounding rockets, aircraft, land and shipborne stations.

  11. Global aspects of monsoons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, T.

    1985-01-01

    Recent developments are studied in three areas of monsoon research: (1) global aspects of the monsoon onset, (2) the orographic influence of the Tibetan Plateau on the summer monsoon circulations, and (3) tropical 40 to 50 day oscillations. Reference was made only to those studies that are primarily based on FGGE Level IIIb data. A brief summary is given.

  12. Feedback of observed interannual vegetation change: a regional climate model analysis for the West African monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Cornelia; Bliefernicht, Jan; Heinzeller, Dominikus; Gessner, Ursula; Klein, Igor; Kunstmann, Harald

    2016-06-01

    West Africa is a hot spot region for land-atmosphere coupling where atmospheric conditions and convective rainfall can strongly depend on surface characteristics. To investigate the effect of natural interannual vegetation changes on the West African monsoon precipitation, we implement satellite-derived dynamical datasets for vegetation fraction (VF), albedo and leaf area index into the Weather Research and Forecasting model. Two sets of 4-member ensembles with dynamic and static land surface description are used to extract vegetation-related changes in the interannual difference between August-September 2009 and 2010. The observed vegetation patterns retain a significant long-term memory of preceding rainfall patterns of at least 2 months. The interannual vegetation changes exhibit the strongest effect on latent heat fluxes and associated surface temperatures. We find a decrease (increase) of rainy hours over regions with higher (lower) VF during the day and the opposite during the night. The probability that maximum precipitation is shifted to nighttime (daytime) over higher (lower) VF is 12 % higher than by chance. We attribute this behaviour to horizontal circulations driven by differential heating. Over more vegetated regions, the divergence of moist air together with lower sensible heat fluxes hinders the initiation of deep convection during the day. During the night, mature convective systems cause an increase in the number of rainy hours over these regions. We identify this feedback in both water- and energy-limited regions of West Africa. The inclusion of observed dynamical surface information improved the spatial distribution of modelled rainfall in the Sahel with respect to observations, illustrating the potential of satellite data as a boundary constraint for atmospheric models.

  13. Analysis of cross-hemispheric influences on the monsoon trough and tropical cyclone genesis during FGGE and diurnal subsidence differences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, W. M.; Lee, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    For a number of years our project has been studying the cross-equatorial (winter to summer hemisphere) processs that can lead to the day-to-day alterations in the strength of the monsoon trough. These processes are also related to the genesis and intensification of tropical storms. The cross-hemispheric processes that occurred during the FGGE year are currently being studied with the use of the ECMWF analysis. How the winter hemisphere can affect low level cold surge penetration across the equator following cold front passage, and how upper tropospheric anticyclones of the winter hemisphere can produce an intensification of a tropical cyclone of the opposite hemisphere is described. ECMWF analysis of the 00Z versus 12Z diurnal difference in the clear region (10 deg diameter) subsidence occurring in the subtropical Pacific Ocean during FGGE is presented. The general reliability of the FGGE ECMWF analysis with regard to the specification of the large scale structure of tropical cyclones is shown.

  14. New approach for aerosol profiling with a lidar onboard an ultralight aircraft: application to the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chazette, Patrick; Sanak, Joseph; Dulac, François

    2007-12-15

    A new airborne instrumental payload has been designed for an ultralight aircraft to determine the vertical profile of aerosol optical properties. It is based on Lidar Aérosols UltraViolet Aéroporté (LAUVA), a compact backscattering lidar system emitting at the wavelength of 355 nm. We operated this airborne configuration in the Sahel from the city of Niamey (Niger) during the first campaign of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) in January-February 2006, when aerosols from both soil dust and savannah fires cause large visibility reductions. We take advantage of the lidar capability of pointing in different directions for retrieving the vertical profile of the aerosol backscatter to extinction ratio (BER). A synergy with a scatterometer (880 nm) and a ground-based sunphotometer allows us to further determine the vertical profile of Angström exponent (a). We identify three types of aerosol layers up to about 5 km below the free troposphere, dominated by biomass burning (BB) particles, mineral dust (D) particles, and a mixing between BB and D particles, respectively, associated with BER (a) values close to 0.008 sr(-1) (1.5), 0.025 sr(-1) (0), and 0.015 sr(-1) (0.4-1).

  15. Cause Resolving of Typhoon Precipitation Using Principle Component Analysis under Complex Interactive Effect of Terrain, Monsoon and Typhoon Vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. L.; Hsu, N. S.

    2015-12-01

    This study develops a novel methodology to resolve the cause of typhoon-induced precipitation using principle component analysis (PCA) and to develop a long lead-time precipitation prediction model. The discovered spatial and temporal features of rainfall are utilized to develop a state-of-the-art descriptive statistical model which can be used to predict long lead-time precipitation during typhoons. The time series of 12-hour precipitation from different types of invasive moving track of typhoons are respectively precede the signal analytical process to qualify the causes of rainfall and to quantify affected degree of each induced cause. The causes include: (1) interaction between typhoon rain band and terrain; (2) co-movement effect induced by typhoon wind field with monsoon; (3) pressure gradient; (4) wind velocity; (5) temperature environment; (6) characteristic distance between typhoon center and surface target station; (7) distance between grade 7 storm radius and surface target station; and (8) relative humidity. The results obtained from PCA can detect the hidden pattern of the eight causes in space and time and can understand the future trends and changes of precipitation. This study applies the developed methodology in Taiwan Island which is constituted by complex diverse terrain formation and height. Results show that: (1) for the typhoon moving toward the direction of 245° to 330°, Causes (1), (2) and (6) are the primary ones to generate rainfall; and (2) for the direction of 330° to 380°, Causes (1), (4) and (6) are the primary ones. Besides, the developed precipitation prediction model by using PCA with the distributed moving track approach (PCA-DMT) is 32% more accurate by that of PCA without distributed moving track approach, and the former model can effectively achieve long lead-time precipitation prediction with an average predicted error of 13% within average 48 hours of forecasted lead-time.

  16. Isentropic analysis of the Indian Summer Monsoon circulation and its implications for the active and break periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauluis, O. M.; Sandeep, S.; Ravindran, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    The atmospheric flow during the Indian Summer Monsoon here is analyzed in isentropic coordinates in two different ways. First, the lateral mass transport fo air is separated in terms of both the potential temperature and equivalent potential temperature. This approach, originally developed to analyze the global meridional circulation, makes it possible to identify the thermodynamic properties of the inflow and outflow. It is shown here how the properties of various air masses, such as the inflow of warm moist air in the boundary layer, upper tropospheric outflow, and midlatitudes dry air intrusion, can be systematically identified. Second, we analyze the vertical overturning in terms of terms of the equivalent potential temperature of the ascending and subsiding air parcels over the indian subcontinent, which allows us to further infer the thermodynamic transformation occurring during the monsoon. This technique is first used to look at the evolution of the flow through the seasonal cycle. We then further analyze the circulation patterns associated with monsoon breaks and active periods. In doing so, we identify midtropospheric in usions of dry air from the midlatitudes as a key precursor of monsoon breaks. The meteorological conditions associated for such intrusion to reach the subcontinent are then discussed.

  17. Long range transport of acidic species over East Asia and the western Pacific Ocean in winter monsoon - a numerical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kitada, Toshihiro; Nishizawa, Masato; Isogawa, Seiji; Kondo, Yutaka

    1996-12-31

    In winter season, wind system in East Asia is generally dominated by monsoon. The monsoon is caused by persistent high pressure over Siberia and low pressure over Sea of Okhotsk and Bering Sea, the high pressure which is formed by radiative cooling of air mass over the continent. In Japan area, the monsoon appears as westerly or northwesterly, and usually brings heavy snow over the Japan Sea side of Japanese islands. Since the air mass associated with the monsoon passes over strong emission sources of the East Asia continent, it carries much air pollutants. Significant part of the pollutants should fall to the surface with snow over Japanese islands, and the rest of the pollutants would be distributed into troposphere over the western Pacific Ocean. In this study, to estimate mass budget of air pollutants released over countries in East Asia we have performed 3-D transport/chemistry/deposition simulations for the area of East Asia and the western Pacific Ocean for one month of March, 1994, when an extensive field observation campaign called TEM-WEST Phase B (Pacific Exploratory Mission-West){close_quotes} was conducted. The simulation model includes most of the important chemical species such as NO{sub x}, HNO{sub 3}, SO{sub 2}, sulfate, hydrocarbons, O{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, etc., and covers 3-D region from 80 to 180 degrees east in longitude, 10 degrees south to 60 degrees north in latitude, and earth`s surface to 10 hPa in vertical. The simulation results will be discussed in connection with the PEM-WEST(B) observation.

  18. Trends in global monsoon area and precipitation over the past 30 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Pang-chi; Li, Tim; Wang, Bin

    2011-04-01

    The analysis of the GPCP and CMAP datasets during the past 30 years (1979-2008) indicates that there are consistent increasing trends in both the global monsoon area (GMA) and the global monsoon total precipitation (GMP). This positive monsoon rainfall trend differs from previous studies that assumed a fixed global monsoon domain. Due to the increasing trends in both the GMA and GMP, a global monsoon intensity (GMI) index, which measures the global monsoon precipitation amount per unit area, is introduced. The GMI measures the strength of the global monsoon. Our calculations with both the GPCP and CMAP datasets show a consistent downward trend in the GMI over the past 30 years. This decreasing trend is primarily attributed to a greater percentage increase in the GMA than in the GMP. A further diagnosis reveals that the decrease of the GMI is primarily attributed to the land monsoon in the GPCP, but to the oceanic monsoon in the CMAP.

  19. Pacific freshening drives Pliocene cooling and Asian monsoon intensification.

    PubMed

    Nie, Junsheng; Stevens, Thomas; Song, Yougui; King, John W; Zhang, Rui; Ji, Shunchuan; Gong, Lisha; Cares, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    The monsoon is a fundamental component of Earth's climate. The Pliocene warm period is characterized by long-term global cooling yet concurrent monsoon dynamics are poorly known. Here we present the first fully quantified and calibrated reconstructions of separate Pliocene air temperature and East Asian summer monsoon precipitation histories on the Chinese Loess Plateau through joint analysis of loess/red clay magnetic parameters with different sensitivities to air temperature and precipitation. East Asian summer monsoon precipitation shows an intensified trend, paradoxically at the same time that climate cooled. We propose a hitherto unrecognized feedback where persistently intensified East Asian summer monsoon during the late Pliocene, triggered by the gradual closure of the Panama Seaway, reinforced late Pliocene Pacific freshening, sea-ice development and ice volume increase, culminating in initiation of the extensive Northern Hemisphere glaciations of the Quaternary Ice Age. This feedback mechanism represents a fundamental reinterpretation of the origin of the Quaternary glaciations and the impact of the monsoon.

  20. A solar variability driven monsoon see-saw: switching relationships of the Holocene East Asian-Australian summer monsoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eroglu, Deniz; Ozken, Ibrahim; McRobie, Fiona; Stemler, Thomas; Marwan, Norbert; Wyrwoll, Karl-Heinz; Kurths, Juergen

    2016-04-01

    The East Asian-Indonesian-Australian monsoon is the predominant low latitude monsoon system, providing a major global scale heat source. Here we apply newly developed non-linear time series techniques on speleothem climate proxies, from eastern China and northwestern Australia and establish relationships between the two summer monsoon regimes over the last ˜9000 years. We identify significant variations in monsoonal activity, both dry and wet phases, at millennial to multi-centennial time scales and demonstrate for the first time the existence of a see-saw antiphase relationship between the two regional monsoon systems. Our analysis attributes this inter-hemispheric linkage to the solar variability that is effecting both monsoon systems.

  1. Energetics and monsoon bifurcations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadri, Ashwin K.

    2016-04-01

    Monsoons involve increases in dry static energy (DSE), with primary contributions from increased shortwave radiation and condensation of water vapor, compensated by DSE export via horizontal fluxes in monsoonal circulations. We introduce a simple box-model characterizing evolution of the DSE budget to study nonlinear dynamics of steady-state monsoons. Horizontal fluxes of DSE are stabilizing during monsoons, exporting DSE and hence weakening the monsoonal circulation. By contrast latent heat addition (LHA) due to condensation of water vapor destabilizes, by increasing the DSE budget. These two factors, horizontal DSE fluxes and LHA, are most strongly dependent on the contrast in tropospheric mean temperature between land and ocean. For the steady-state DSE in the box-model to be stable, the DSE flux should depend more strongly on the temperature contrast than LHA; stronger circulation then reduces DSE and thereby restores equilibrium. We present conditions for this to occur. The main focus of the paper is describing conditions for bifurcation behavior of simple models. Previous authors presented a minimal model of abrupt monsoon transitions and argued that such behavior can be related to a positive feedback called the `moisture advection feedback'. However, by accounting for the effect of vertical lapse rate of temperature on the DSE flux, we show that bifurcations are not a generic property of such models despite these fluxes being nonlinear in the temperature contrast. We explain the origin of this behavior and describe conditions for a bifurcation to occur. This is illustrated for the case of the July-mean monsoon over India. The default model with mean parameter estimates does not contain a bifurcation, but the model admits bifurcation as parameters are varied.

  2. Monsoon abrupt change and its dominant factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Qiang; Fu, Conbin

    2010-05-01

    Abrupt changes of monsoon are apparent in the geological record of climate over various timescales. During Holocene and last glacial period, rainfall in India and China has undergone strong and abrupt changes. In this context, we regard monsoon as dissipative system, which has many characteristic times, to contrive various factors and corresponding mechanism dominated in monsoon's abrupt change. The abrupt change of monsoon over inter-decadal to century timescales may be resulting from different fluctuation's competition, which impose on the inner basic physic processes. In order to find out the key factors which control the monsoon's abrupt change, starting from the seminar works by Leith, who proposed to employ the Fluctuation-dissipation Response theory(FDR) to study the response of climatic systems to changes in the external forcing, many authors applied this relation to different geophysical problems, ranging from simplified models to general circulation models and to the covariance of satellite radiance spectra. The FDR has been originally developed in the framework of statistical mechanics of Hamiltonian systems, nevertheless a generalized FDR holds under rather general hypotheses, regardless of the Hamiltonian, or equilibrium nature of the system. Our work verify the FDR theory' applicability in monsoon systems, which demonstrates that it can reveal clear and fundamental factors that control monsoon's abrupt change. By making use of FDR theory, combined with observational data analysis, we have already seen how monsoon systems with many characteristics times, different correlation functions behave differently and a variety of timescales emerges, which correspond to the different decay times of the correlation functions. Via theoretical and data analysis, it is suggested that each monsoon system has experienced several significant abrupt changes in 20th century. The global main monsoon rainfall has undergone an obvious abrupt jump in the mid- and late 1970s

  3. Understanding Dry Bias in the Simulations of Indian Monsoon by CFSv2 Through Analysis of Moisture Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saheer, Sahana; Pathak, Amey; Mathew, Roxy; Ghosh, Subimal

    2016-04-01

    Simulations of Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) with its seasonal and subseasonal characteristics is highly crucial for predictions/ projections towards sustainable agricultural planning and water resources management. The Climate forecast system version 2 (CFSv2), the state of the art coupled climate model developed by National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), is evaluated here for the simulations of ISM. Even though CFSv2 is a fully coupled ocean-atmosphere-land model with advanced physics, increased resolution and refined initialization, its ISM simulations/ predictions/ projections, in terms of seasonal mean and variability are not satisfactory. Numerous works have been done for verifying the CFSv2 forecasts in terms of the seasonal mean, its mean and variability, active and break spells, and El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-monsoon interactions. Underestimation of JJAS precipitation over the Indian land mass is one of the major drawbacks of CFSv2. ISM gets the moisture required to maintain the precipitation from different oceanic and land sources. In this work, we find the fraction of moisture supplied by different sources in the CFSv2 simulations and the findings are compared with observed fractions. We also investigate the possible variations in the moisture contributions from these different sources. We suspect that the deviation in the relative moisture contribution from different sources to various sinks over the monsoon region has resulted in the observed dry bias. We also find that over the Arabian Sea region, which is the key moisture source of ISM, there is a premature built up of specific humidity during the month of May and a decline during the later months of JJAS. This is also one of the reasons for the underestimation of JJAS mean precipitation.

  4. Spatial and Temporal Variations in Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall and Temperature: An Analysis Based on RegCM3 Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, S. K.; Mamgain, Ashu; Pattnayak, K. C.; Giorgi, F.

    2013-04-01

    Regional climate models are important tools to examine the spatial and temporal characteristics of rainfall and temperature at high resolutions. Such information has potential applications in sectors like agriculture and health. In this study, the Regional Climate Model Version 3 (RegCM3) has been integrated in the ensemble mode at 55 km resolution over India for the summer monsoon season during the years 1982-2009. Emphasis has been given on the validation of the model simulation at the regional level. In Central India, both rainfall and temperature show the best correlations with respective observed values. The model gives rise to large wet biases over Northwest and Peninsular India. RegCM3 slightly underestimates the summer monsoon precipitation over the Central and Northeast India. Nevertheless, over these regions, RegCM3 simulated rainfall is closer to the observations when compared to the other regions where rainfall is overestimated. The position of the monsoon trough simulated by the model lies to the north of its original observed position. This is similar to the usual monsoon break conditions leading to less rainfall over Central India. RegCM3 simulated surface maximum temperature shows a large negative bias over the country while the surface minimum temperature is close to the observation. Nevertheless, there is a strong correlation between the all India weighted average surface temperature simulated by RegCM3 and IMD observed values. While examining the extreme weather conditions in Central India, it is found that RegCM3 simulated frequencies of occurrence of very wet days, extremely wet days, warm days and warm nights more often as compared to those in IMD observed values. However, these are systematic biases. The model biases in the frequencies of distribution of rainfall extremes explain the wet and dry biases in different regions in the country. Overall, the inter-annual characteristics of both the rainfall and temperature extremes simulated by Reg

  5. A comparison of regional monsoon variability using monsoon indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, So-Young; Wang, Bin; Liu, Jian; Wu, Zhiwei

    2014-09-01

    The present study aims to (a) examine meteorological basis for construction of regional monsoon indices and (b) explore the commonality and differences among tropical regional monsoons, especially the teleconnection and monsoon-ENSO relationship. We show that the area-averaged summer precipitation intensity is generally a meaningful precipitation index for tropical monsoons because it represents very well both the amplitude of annual cycle and the leading mode of year-to-year rainfall variability with a nearly uniform spatial pattern. The regional monsoon circulation indices can be defined in a unified way (measuring monsoon trough vorticity) for seven tropical monsoon regions, viz.: Indian, Australian, western North Pacific, North and South American, and Northern and Southern African monsoons. The structures of the tropical monsoons are commonly characterized by a pair of upper-level double anticyclones residing in the subtropics of both hemispheres; notably the winter hemispheric anticyclone has a barotropic structure and is a passive response. Two types of upper-level teleconnection patterns are identified. One is a zonal wave train emanating from the double anticyclones downstream along the westerly jets in both hemispheres, including Indian, Northern African and Australian monsoons; the other is a meridional wave train emanating from the double anticyclones polewards, such as the South American and western North Pacific monsoons. Over the past 55 years all regional summer monsoons have non-stationary relationship with ENSO except the Australian monsoon. The regional monsoon-ENSO relationship is found to have common changing points in 1970s. The relationships were enhanced for the western North Pacific, Northern African, North American and South American summer monsoons, but weakened for the Indian summer monsoon (with a recovery in late 1990s). Regardless the large regional differences, the monsoon precipitations over land areas of all tropical monsoon regions

  6. Non-stationary analysis of dry spells in monsoon season of Senegal River Basin using data from Regional Climate Models (RCMs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraldo Osorio, J. D.; García Galiano, S. G.

    2012-07-01

    SummaryThe Senegal River Basin, located in West Africa, has been affected by several droughts since the end of the 1960s. In its valley, which is densely populated and highly vulnerable to climate variability and water availability, agricultural activities provide the livelihood for thousands of people. Increasing the knowledge about plausible trends of drought events will allow to improve the adaptation and mitigation measures in order to build "adaptive capacity" to climate change in West Africa. An innovative methodology for the non-stationary analysis of droughts events, which allows the prediction of regional trends associated to several return periods, is presented. The analyses were based on Regional Climate Models (RCMs) provided by the European ENSEMBLES project for West Africa, together with observed data. A non-stationary behaviour of the annual series of maximum length of dry spells (AMDSL) in the monsoon season is reflected in temporal changes in mean and variance. The non-stationary nature of hydrometeorological series, due to climate change and anthropogenic activities, is the main criticism to traditional frequency analysis. Therefore, in this paper, the modelling tool GAMLSS (Generalized Additive Models for Location, Scale and Shape), is applied to develop regional probability density functions (pdfs) fitted to AMDSL series for the monsoon season in the Senegal River Basin. The skills of RCMs in the representation of maximum length of dry spells observed for the period 1970-1990, are evaluated considering observed data. Based on the results obtained, a first selection of the RCMs with which to apply GAMLSS to the AMDSL series identified, for the time period 1970-2050, is made. The results of GAMLSS analysis exhibit divergent trends, with different value ranges for parameters of probability distributions being detected. Therefore, in the second stage of the paper, regional pdfs are constructed using bootstrapping distributions based on probabilistic

  7. Past dynamics of the Australian monsoon: precession, phase and links to the global monsoon concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaufort, L.; van der Kaars, S.; Bassinot, F. C.; Moron, V.

    2010-10-01

    Past variations in the dynamics of the Australian monsoon have been estimated from multi-proxy analysis of a core retrieved in the Eastern Banda Sea. Records of coccolith and pollen assemblages, spanning the last 150 000 years, allow reconstruction of past primary production in the Banda Sea, summer moisture availability, and the length of the dry season in northern Australia and southeastern Indonesia. The amount of moisture available during the summer monsoon follows typical glacial/interglacial dynamics with a broad asymmetrical 100-kyr cycle. Primary production and length of the dry season appear to be closely related, given that they follow the precessional cycle with the same phase. This indicates their independence from ice-volume variations. The present inter-annual variability of both parameters is related to El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), which modulates the Australian Winter Monsoon (AWM). The precessional pattern observed in the past dynamics of the AWM is found in ENSO and monsoon records of other regions. A marked shift in the monsoon intensity occurring during the mid Holocene during a period of constant ice volume, suggests that low latitude climatic variation precedes increases in global ice volume. This precessional pattern suggests that a common forcing mechanism underlies low latitude climate dynamics, acting specifically and synchronously on the different monsoon systems.

  8. Past dynamics of the Australian monsoon: precession, phase and links to the global monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaufort, L.; van der Kaars, S.; Bassinot, F. C.; Moron, V.

    2010-06-01

    Past variations in the dynamics of the Australian monsoon have been estimated from multi-proxy analysis of a core retrieved in the Eastern Banda Sea. Records of coccolith and pollen assemblages, spanning the last 150,000 years, allow reconstruction of past primary production in the Banda Sea, summer moisture availability, and the length of the dry season in Northern Australia and Southeastern Indonesia. The amount of moisture available during the summer monsoon follows typical glacial/interglacial dynamics with a broad asymmetrical 100-kyr cycle. Primary production and length of the dry season appear to be closely related, given that they follow the precessional cycle with the same phase (August insolation). This indicates their independence from ice-volume variations. The present inter-annual variability of both parameters is related to El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), which modulates the Australian Winter Monsoon (AWM). The precessional pattern observed in the past dynamics of the AWM is found in ENSO and monsoon records of other regions. A marked shift in the monsoon intensity occurring during the mid Holocene during a period of constant ice volume, suggest that low latitude climatic variation precedes global ice volume. This precessional pattern suggests that a common forcing mechanism underlies low latitude climate dynamics, acting specifically and synchronically on the different monsoon systems.

  9. Parametric Sensitivity Analysis for the Asian Summer Monsoon Precipitation Simulation in the Beijing Climate Center AGCM Version 2.1

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ben; Zhang, Yaocun; Qian, Yun; Wu, Tongwen; Huang, Anning; Fang, Yongjie

    2015-07-15

    In this study, we apply an efficient sampling approach and conduct a large number of simulations to explore the sensitivity of the simulated Asian summer monsoon (ASM) precipitation, including the climatological state and interannual variability, to eight parameters related to the cloud and precipitation processes in the Beijing Climate Center AGCM version 2.1 (BCC_AGCM2.1). Our results show that BCC_AGCM2.1 has large biases in simulating the ASM precipitation. The precipitation efficiency and evaporation coefficient for deep convection are the most sensitive parameters in simulating the ASM precipitation. With optimal parameter values, the simulated precipitation climatology could be remarkably improved, e.g. increased precipitation over the equator Indian Ocean, suppressed precipitation over the Philippine Sea, and more realistic Meiyu distribution over Eastern China. The ASM precipitation interannual variability is further analyzed, with a focus on the ENSO impacts. It shows the simulations with better ASM precipitation climatology can also produce more realistic precipitation anomalies during El Niño decaying summer. In the low-skill experiments for precipitation climatology, the ENSO-induced precipitation anomalies are most significant over continents (vs. over ocean in observation) in the South Asian monsoon region. More realistic results are derived from the higher-skill experiments with stronger anomalies over the Indian Ocean and weaker anomalies over India and the western Pacific, favoring more evident easterly anomalies forced by the tropical Indian Ocean warming and stronger Indian Ocean-western Pacific tele-connection as observed. Our model results reveal a strong connection between the simulated ASM precipitation climatological state and interannual variability in BCC_AGCM2.1 when key parameters are perturbed.

  10. Reconciling societal and scientific definitions for the monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeve, Mathew; Stephenson, David

    2014-05-01

    Science defines the monsoon in numerous ways. We can apply these definitions to forecast data, reanalysis data, observations, GCMs and more. In a basic research setting, we hope that this work will advance science and our understanding of the monsoon system. In an applied research setting, we often hope that this work will benefit a specific stakeholder or community. We may want to inform a stakeholder when the monsoon starts, now and in the future. However, what happens if the stakeholders cannot relate to the information because their perceptions do not align with the monsoon definition we use in our analysis? We can resolve this either by teaching the stakeholders or learning from them about how they define the monsoon and when they perceive it to begin. In this work we reconcile different scientific monsoon definitions with the perceptions of agricultural communities in Bangladesh. We have developed a statistical technique that rates different scientific definitions against the people's perceptions of when the monsoon starts and ends. We construct a probability mass function (pmf) around each of the respondent's answers in a questionnaire survey. We can use this pmf to analyze the time series of monsoon onsets and withdrawals from the different scientific definitions. We can thereby quantitatively judge which definition may be most appropriate for a specific applied research setting.

  11. On the Origin of Monsoon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Winston C.; Chen, Baode; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    It is a long-held fundamental belief that the basic cause of a monsoon is land-sea thermal contrast on the continental scale. Through general circulation model experiments we demonstrate that this belief should be changed. The Asian and Australian summer monsoon circulations are largely intact in an experiment in which Asia, maritime continent, and Australia are replaced by ocean. It is also shown that the change resulting from such replacement is in general due more to the removal of topography than to the removal of land-sea contrast. Therefore, land-sea contrast plays only a minor modifying role in Asian and Australian summer monsoons. This also happens to the Central American summer monsoon. However, the same thing cannot be said of the African and South American summer monsoons. In Asian and Australian winter monsoons land-sea contrast also plays only a minor role. Our interpretation for the origin of monsoon is that the summer monsoon is the result of ITCZ's (intertropical convergence zones) peak being substantially (more than 10 degrees) away from the equator. The origin of the ITCZ has been previously interpreted by Chao. The circulation around thus located ITCZ, previously interpreted by Chao and Chen through the modified Gill solution and briefly described in this paper, explains the monsoon circulation. The longitudinal location of the ITCZs is determined by the distribution of surface conditions. ITCZ's favor locations of higher SST as in western Pacific and Indian Ocean, or tropical landmass, due to land-sea contrast, as in tropical Africa and South America. Thus, the role of landmass in the origin of monsoon can be replaced by ocean of sufficiently high SST. Furthermore, the ITCZ circulation extends into the tropics in the other hemisphere to give rise to the winter monsoon circulation there. Also through the equivalence of land-sea contrast and higher SST, it is argued that the basic monsoon onset mechanism proposed by Chao is valid for all monsoons.

  12. Pre-monsoon/monsoon thunderstorm characteristics over Pune—An investigation using Doppler Sodar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, B. S.; Latha, R.; Sreeja, P.; Kalapureddy, M. C. R.; Dharmaraj, T.; Waghmare, R. T.

    2011-10-01

    Doppler sodar observations of three dimensional (3D) wind fields and thermal structure of convective boundary layer (CBL) on a few thunderstorm days of 2009 during pre-monsoon (May and June; June due to delayed arrival of monsoon over Pune) and monsoon (July and August) are analyzed. They reveal the typical signatures of wind fields for the late afternoon thunderstorm (TS) such as deceleration of winds with or without change in direction leading to convergence a few minutes (˜15-30 min) prior to the onset of TS. Pre-monsoon TS are characterized by broad updrafts and narrow downdrafts in CBL in contrast to the narrow updrafts and broad downdrafts of a normal day (i.e. No-TS day). Mean vertical velocity averaged over CBL period shows net updraft on TS days and net downdraft on No-TS day for the pre-monsoon cases. Similarly calm winds are observed in the CBL on TS-days that support enhanced free convection. During the monsoon period updrafts are observed on both TS and No-TS days with higher values on TS days in comparison, due to the dominance of large-scale monsoon flow over local convection. Relatively higher turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) in CBL is observed on all TS days. Analysis shows that TKE maximum for the day is attained about 1.5-2.0 h prior to the onset of afternoon TS. Mixed-layer depth, determined from TKE profile, is higher than lifting condensation level (LCL) on TS days in May and June indicating saturation of air parcels in updrafts.

  13. Monsoon '90 - Preliminary SAR results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubois, Pascale C.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.; Guerra, Abel G.

    1992-01-01

    Multifrequency polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the Walnut Gulch watershed near Tombstone, Arizona were acquired on 28 Mar. 1990 and on 1 Aug. 1990. Trihedral corner reflectors were deployed prior to both overflights to allow calibration of the two SAR data sets. During both overflights, gravimetric soil moisture and dielectric constant measurements were made. Detailed vegetation height, density, and water content measurements were made as part of the Monsoon 1990 Experiment. Preliminary results based on analysis of the multitemporal polarimetric SAR data are presented. Only the C-band data (5.7-cm wavelength) radar images show significant difference between Mar. and Aug., with the strongest difference observed in the HV images. Based on the radar data analysis and the in situ measurements, we conclude that these differences are mainly due to changes in the vegetation and not due to the soil moisture changes.

  14. Monsoon 1990: Preliminary SAR results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzyl, Jakob J.; Dubois, Pascale; Guerra, Abel

    1991-01-01

    Multifrequency polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the Walnut Gulch watershed near Tombstone, Arizona were acquired on 28 Mar. 1990 and on 1 Aug. 1990. Trihedral corner reflectors were deployed prior to both overflights to allow calibration of the two SAR data sets. During both overflights, gravimetric soil moisture and dielectric constant measurements were made. Detailed vegetation height, density, and water content measurements were made as part of the Monsoon 1990 Experiment. Preliminary results based on analysis of the multitemporal polarimetric SAR data are presented. Only the C-band data (5.7-cm wavelength) radar images show significant difference between Mar. and Aug., with the strongest difference observed in the HV images. Based on the radar data analysis and the in situ measurements, we conclude that these differences are mainly due to changes in the vegetation and not due to the soil moisture changes.

  15. Is precipitation a predictor of mortality in Bangladesh? A multi-stratified analysis in a South Asian monsoon climate.

    PubMed

    Burkart, Katrin; Kinney, Patrick

    2016-05-15

    While numerous studies have assessed the association between temperature and mortality in various locations, few have addressed the relationship between precipitation and mortality. Given the high amounts of rainfall in many tropical monsoon areas and the often seasonally pronounced differences, there might be a potentially strong impact on health outcomes and death. In this study, we investigated the association between precipitation and daily death counts in Bangladesh from 2003 to 2007 using regression models with a quasipoisson distribution adjusting for long-term time and seasonal trends, day of the month, age and perceived temperature. Effects were assessed for all ages, the elderly and by gender. During the dry season a sharp increase in death risk was found at very high precipitation amounts which are most likely to be cyclone-related. This cyclone effect was most pronounced for females at the immediate day with an increase of 18.7% (3.8-35.6%) in non-external cause mortality per mm precipitation above 5mm. At longer lags we found a negative association between precipitation and mortality indicating some kind of dry effect which was more pronounced for the elderly with a mortality increase of 4.4% (2.6-6.2%) per mm decrease in precipitation. During the rainy season, we observed a protective effect of rainfall which was strongest during periods of seasonally high equivalent temperatures with a decrease in mortality of 4.0% (2.3-5.6%) per mm increase in precipitation on the immediate day. The observed associations between precipitation and mortality differed by season, age and gender. Generally, a strong short-term increase in mortality was associated with cyclonic activity during the dry season, while ongoing low rainfall seemed to have an adverse impact at higher lags. During the rainy season, precipitation seemed to mitigate heat effects.

  16. Association of the East Asian subtropical westerly jet with the Southwest Asian summer monsoon: A diagnostic analysis on heavy rain events in Yunnan province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Yunnan province, China is a typical area that is influenced by Southwest Asian summer monsoon (SASM) during boreal summer. Although the interannual variation of summer precipitation in Yunnan Province is closely related to that of the SASM, the East Asian subtropical westerly jet (EASWJ) may have an important role in heavy rainfall events in Yunnan Province during boreal summer. By using daily observations and the NACAR/NCEP data during 1960-2011, a diagnostic analysis is performed to investigate the association of the EASWJ with the SASM on heavy rain events in Yunnan Province during boreal summer. The analysis shows an anomalous divergence circulation pattern at upper level (200 hPa) over Eurasian continent that corresponds well to the negative anomaly of EASWJ during heavy rain events in boreal summer in Yunnan Province. At the same time, a low-level jet stream with abundant water vapor originated from the Arabian Sea and Bengal gulf provides necessarily dynamic and water conditions for heavy rain mechanism. The study further shows that the weakening of the EASWJ during heavy rain events in Yunnan Province is associated with the decrease in the meridional temperature gradient in northern mid-latitude (30o-40o N).

  17. Desert Dust and Monsoon Rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong

    2014-01-01

    For centuries, inhabitants of the Indian subcontinent have know that heavy dust events brought on by strong winds occur frequently in the pre-monsoon season, before the onset of heavy rain. Yet scientists have never seriously considered the possibility that natural dust can affect monsoon rainfall. Up to now, most studies of the impacts of aerosols on Indian monsoon rainfall have focused on anthropogenic aerosols in the context of climate change. However, a few recent studies have show that aerosols from antropogenic and natural sources over the Indian subcontinent may affect the transition from break to active monsoon phases on short timescales of days to weeks. Writing in Nature Geoscience, Vinoj and colleagues describe how they have shown that desert dust aerosols over the Arabian Sea and West Asia can strenghten the summer monsoon over the Indial subcontinent in a matter of days.

  18. Observational and modeling studies of impacts of the South China Sea monsoon on the monsoon rainfall in the middle-lower reaches of the Yangtze River during summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Lijun; Zhao, Ping

    2012-04-01

    Based on the ERA-40 and NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data, the NOAA Climate Prediction Center's merged analysis of precipitation (CMAP), and the fifth-generation PSU/NCAR Mesoscale Model version 3 (MM5v3), we defined a monsoon intensity index over the East Asian tropical region and analyzed the impacts of summer (June-July) South China Sea (SCS) monsoon anomaly on monsoon precipitation over the middle-lower reaches of the Yangtze River (MLRYR) using both observational data analysis and numerical simulation methods. The results from the data analysis show that the interannual variations of the tropical monsoon over the SCS are negatively correlated with the southwesterly winds and precipitation over the MLRYR during June-July. Corresponding to stronger (weaker) tropical monsoon and precipitation, the southwesterly winds are weaker (stronger) over the MLRYR, with less (more) local precipitation. The simulation results further exhibit that when changing the SCS monsoon intensity, there are significant variations of monsoon and precipitation over the MLRYR. The simulated anomalies generally consist with the observations, which verifies the impact of the tropical monsoon on the monsoon precipitation over the MLRYR. This impact might be supported by certain physical processes. Moreover, when the tropical summer monsoon is stronger, the tropical anomalous westerly winds and positive precipitation anomalies usually maintain in the tropics and do not move northward into the MLRYR, hence the transport of water vapor toward southern China is weakened and the southwest flow and precipitation over southern China are also attenuated. On the other hand, the strengthened tropical monsoon may result in the weakening and southward shift of the western Pacific subtropical high through self-adjustment of the atmospheric circulation, leading to the weakening of the monsoon flows and precipitation over the MLRYR.

  19. Eocene precipitation: a global monsoon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, D. R.; Huber, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Eocene was the warmest part of the Cenozoic, with warm climates extending across all continents including Antarctica, and extending into the Arctic. Substantive paleobotanical evidence (leaf floras and palynofloras) has demonstrated the existence of broadleaf and coniferous polar forests - a circumpolar rain forest - at both poles. North and South America, Australia, and China in the Eocene were well-forested and humid continents, in contrast to today where 2/3 of these continental areas are arid or semi-arid and lack forests. Each of these regions reflect past climate states - mesothermal moist climates with low thermal seasonality at high latitudes - that have no analog in the modern world. Recent modelling and paleontological proxy data, however, is revealing a high degree of seasonality to precipitation for these continental areas, indicating a monsoon-type precipitation regime may have characterized Eocene 'greenhouse climates'. Paleobotanical proxies offer 2 methods for estimated paleo-precipitation; leaf physiognomy (including both CLAMP and leaf area analysis), and quantitative analysis of nearest living relatives ('NLRs') of macrofloras. Presented here are 1) an updated leaf area analysis calibration with smaller errors of the estimate than previously provided, and 2) analyses of fossil floras from North America, Canada, the Arctic, and Australia. Analysis of the Canadian floras indicate moist climates (MAP >100cm/a) in the early and middle Eocene at middle and high paleolatitudes. Precipitation for western North America at mid-latitudes is also estimated as high, but a seasonally dry interior and south-east is indicated. For Australia, precipitation in the south-east is estimated >120 cm/a, but the macrofloras indicate a drier interior (MAP ~60 cm/a) and seasonal drought, contradicting estimates of ~120 cm/a based on NLR analysis of pollen floras. Recently published data show that north-eastern China in the Eocene had a monsoonal-type seasonality for

  20. Pacific freshening drives Pliocene cooling and Asian monsoon intensification

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Junsheng; Stevens, Thomas; Song, Yougui; King, John W.; Zhang, Rui; Ji, Shunchuan; Gong, Lisha; Cares, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    The monsoon is a fundamental component of Earth's climate. The Pliocene warm period is characterized by long-term global cooling yet concurrent monsoon dynamics are poorly known. Here we present the first fully quantified and calibrated reconstructions of separate Pliocene air temperature and East Asian summer monsoon precipitation histories on the Chinese Loess Plateau through joint analysis of loess/red clay magnetic parameters with different sensitivities to air temperature and precipitation. East Asian summer monsoon precipitation shows an intensified trend, paradoxically at the same time that climate cooled. We propose a hitherto unrecognized feedback where persistently intensified East Asian summer monsoon during the late Pliocene, triggered by the gradual closure of the Panama Seaway, reinforced late Pliocene Pacific freshening, sea-ice development and ice volume increase, culminating in initiation of the extensive Northern Hemisphere glaciations of the Quaternary Ice Age. This feedback mechanism represents a fundamental reinterpretation of the origin of the Quaternary glaciations and the impact of the monsoon. PMID:24969361

  1. Early warnings and missed alarms for abrupt monsoon transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Z. A.; Kwasniok, F.; Boulton, C. A.; Cox, P. M.; Jones, R. T.; Lenton, T. M.; Turney, C. S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Palaeo-records from China demonstrate that the East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM) is dominated by abrupt and large magnitude monsoon shifts on millennial timescales, switching between periods of high and weak monsoon rains. It has been hypothesized that over these timescales, the EASM exhibits two stable states with bifurcation-type tipping points between them. Here we test this hypothesis by looking for early warning signals of past bifurcations in speleothem δ18O records from Sanbao Cave and Hulu Cave, China, spanning the penultimate glacial cycle. We find that although there are increases in both autocorrelation and variance preceding some of the monsoon transitions during this period, it is only immediately prior to the abrupt monsoon shift at the penultimate deglaciation (Termination II) that statistically significant increases are detected. To supplement our data analysis, we produce and analyse multiple model simulations that we derive from these data. We find hysteresis behaviour in our model simulations with transitions directly forced by solar insolation. However, signals of critical slowing down, which occur on the approach to a bifurcation, are only detectable in the model simulations when the change in system stability is sufficiently slow to be detected by the sampling resolution of the data set. This raises the possibility that the early warning "alarms" were missed in the speleothem data over the period 224-150 kyr and it was only at the monsoon termination that the change in the system stability was sufficiently slow to detect early warning signals.

  2. Possible role of pre-monsoon sea surface warming in driving the summer monsoon onset over the Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kuiping; Liu, Yanliang; Yang, Yang; Li, Zhi; Liu, Baochao; Xue, Liang; Yu, Weidong

    2016-08-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) reaches its annual maximum just before the summer monsoon onset and collapses soon after in the central areas of the Bay of Bengal (BoB). Here, the impact of the peak in the pre-monsoon SST on triggering the earliest monsoon onset in the BoB is investigated, with a focus on the role they play in driving the first-branch northward-propagating intra-seasonal oscillations (FNISOs) over the equatorial Eastern Indian Ocean (EIO). During the calm pre-monsoon period, sea surface warming in the BoB could increase the surface equivalent potential temperature (θe) in several ways. Firstly, warming of the sea surface heats the surface air through sensible heating, which forces the air temperature to follow the SST. The elevated air surface temperature accounts for 30 % of the surface θe growth. Furthermore, the elevated air temperature raises the water vapor capacity of the surface air to accommodate more water vapor. Constrained by the observation that the surface relative humidity is maintained nearly constant during the monsoon transition period, the surface specific humidity exhibits a significant increase, according to the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship. Budget analysis indicates that the additional moisture is primarily obtained from sea surface evaporation, which also exhibits a weak increasing trend due to the sea surface warming. In this way, it contributes about 70 % to the surface θe growth. The rapid SST increase during the pre-monsoon period preconditions the summer monsoon onset over the BoB through its contributions to significantly increase the surface θe, which eventually establishes the meridional asymmetry of the atmospheric convective instability in the EIO. The pre-established greater convective instability leads to the FNISO convections, and the summer monsoon is triggered in the BoB region.

  3. Spatiotemporal variability of rainfall extremes in monsoonal climates - examples from the South American Monsoon and the Indian Monsoon Systems (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookhagen, B.; Boers, N.; Marwan, N.; Malik, N.; Kurths, J.

    2013-12-01

    Monsoonal rainfall is the crucial component for more than half of the world's population. Runoff associated with monsoon systems provide water resources for agriculture, hydropower, drinking-water generation, recreation, and social well-being and are thus a fundamental part of human society. However, monsoon systems are highly stochastic and show large variability on various timescales. Here, we use various rainfall datasets to characterize spatiotemporal rainfall patterns using traditional as well as new approaches emphasizing nonlinear spatial correlations from a complex networks perspective. Our analyses focus on the South American (SAMS) and Indian (ISM) Monsoon Systems on the basis of Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) using precipitation radar and passive-microwave products with horizontal spatial resolutions of ~5x5 km^2 (products 2A25, 2B31) and 25x25 km^2 (3B42) and interpolated rainfall-gauge data for the ISM (APHRODITE, 25x25 km^2). The eastern slopes of the Andes of South America and the southern front of the Himalaya are characterized by significant orographic barriers that intersect with the moisture-bearing, monsoonal wind systems. We demonstrate that topography exerts a first-order control on peak rainfall amounts on annual timescales in both mountain belts. Flooding in the downstream regions is dominantly caused by heavy rainfall storms that propagate deep into the mountain range and reach regions that are arid and without vegetation cover promoting rapid runoff. These storms exert a significantly different spatial distribution than average-rainfall conditions and assessing their recurrence intervals and prediction is key in understanding flooding for these regions. An analysis of extreme-value distributions of our high-spatial resolution data reveal that semi-arid areas are characterized by low-frequency/high-magnitude events (i.e., are characterized by a ';heavy tail' distribution), whereas regions with high mean annual rainfall have a

  4. Global Monsoon Dynamics and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhisheng, An; Guoxiong, Wu; Jianping, Li; Youbin, Sun; Yimin, Liu; Weijian, Zhou; Yanjun, Cai; Anmin, Duan; Li, Li; Jiangyu, Mao; Hai, Cheng; Zhengguo, Shi; Liangcheng, Tan; Hong, Yan; Hong, Ao; Hong, Chang; Juan, Feng

    2015-05-01

    This article provides a comprehensive review of the global monsoon that encompasses findings from studies of both modern monsoons and paleomonsoons. We introduce a definition for the global monsoon that incorporates its three-dimensional distribution and ultimate causes, emphasizing the direct drive of seasonal pressure system changes on monsoon circulation and depicting the intensity in terms of both circulation and precipitation. We explore the global monsoon climate changes across a wide range of timescales from tectonic to intraseasonal. Common features of the global monsoon are global homogeneity, regional diversity, seasonality, quasi-periodicity, irregularity, instability, and asynchroneity. We emphasize the importance of solar insolation, Earth orbital parameters, underlying surface properties, and land-air-sea interactions for global monsoon dynamics. We discuss the primary driving force of monsoon variability on each timescale and the relationships among dynamics on multiple timescales. Natural processes and anthropogenic impacts are of great significance to the understanding of future global monsoon behavior.

  5. Tohono O'odham Monsoon Climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, G.

    2006-12-01

    The North American monsoon is a summertime weather phenomenon that develops over the southwestern North America. For thousands of years the Tohono O'odham people of this area have depended on the associated rainy season (Jukiabig Masad) to grow traditional crops using runoff agriculture. Today, the high incidence of Type II diabetes among native people has prompted many to return to their traditional agricultural diets. Local monsoon onset dates and the North American Regional Reanalysis dataset were used to develop a 24-year Tohono O'odham Nation (TON) monsoon and pre-monsoon climatology that can be used as a tool for planning runoff agriculture. Using monsoon composite datasets, temporal and spatial correlations between antecedent period meteorological variables, monsoon onset dates and total monsoon precipitation were examined to identify variables that could be useful in predicting the onset and intensity of the monsoon. The results suggest additional research is needed to identify variables related to monsoon onset and intensity.

  6. Investigation of summer monsoon rainfall variability in Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Mian Sabir; Lee, Seungho

    2016-08-01

    This study analyzes the inter-annual and intra-seasonal rainfall variability in Pakistan using daily rainfall data during the summer monsoon season (June to September) recorded from 1980 to 2014. The variability in inter-annual monsoon rainfall ranges from 20 % in northeastern regions to 65 % in southwestern regions of Pakistan. The analysis reveals that the transition of the negative and positive anomalies was not uniform in the investigated dataset. In order to acquire broad observations of the intra-seasonal variability, an objective criterion, the pre-active period, active period and post-active periods of the summer monsoon rainfall have demarcated. The analysis also reveals that the rainfall in June has no significant contribution to the increase in intra-seasonal rainfall in Pakistan. The rainfall has, however, been enhanced in the summer monsoon in August. The rainfall of September demonstrates a sharp decrease, resulting in a high variability in the summer monsoon season. A detailed examination of the intra-seasonal rainfall also reveals frequent amplitude from late July to early August. The daily normal rainfall fluctuates significantly with its maximum in the Murree hills and its minimum in the northwestern Baluchistan.

  7. Testing a flexible method to reduce false monsoon onsets.

    PubMed

    Stiller-Reeve, Mathew Alexander; Spengler, Thomas; Chu, Pao-Shin

    2014-01-01

    To generate information about the monsoon onset and withdrawal we have to choose a monsoon definition and apply it to data. One problem that arises is that false monsoon onsets can hamper our analysis, which is often alleviated by smoothing the data in time or space. Another problem is that local communities or stakeholder groups may define the monsoon differently. We therefore aim to develop a technique that reduces false onsets for high-resolution gridded data, while also being flexible for different requirements that can be tailored to particular end-users. In this study, we explain how we developed our technique and demonstrate how it successfully reduces false onsets and withdrawals. The presented results yield improved information about the monsoon length and its interannual variability. Due to this improvement, we are able to extract information from higher resolution data sets. This implies that we can potentially get a more detailed picture of local climate variations that can be used in more local climate application projects such as community-based adaptations.

  8. The use of fractional accumulated precipitation for the evaluation of the annual cycle of monsoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperber, Kenneth R.; Annamalai, H.

    2014-12-01

    Using pentad rainfall data we demonstrate the benefits of using accumulated rainfall and fractional accumulated rainfall for the evaluation of the annual cycle of rainfall over various monsoon domains. Our approach circumvents issues related to using threshold-based analysis techniques for investigating the life-cycle of monsoon rainfall. In the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project-5 models we find systematic errors in the phase of the annual cycle of rainfall. The models are delayed in the onset of summer rainfall over India, the Gulf of Guinea, and the South American Monsoon, with early onset prevalent for the Sahel and the North American Monsoon. This, in combination with the rapid fractional accumulation rate, impacts the ability of the models to simulate the fractional accumulation observed during summer. The rapid fractional accumulation rate and the time at which the accumulation begins are metrics that indicate how well the models concentrate the monsoon rainfall over the peak rainfall season, and the extent to which there is a phase error in the annual cycle. The lack of consistency in the phase error across all domains suggests that a "global" approach to the study of monsoons may not be sufficient to rectify the regional differences. Rather, regional process studies are necessary for diagnosing the underlying causes of the regionally-specific systematic model biases over the different monsoon domains. Despite the afore-mentioned biases, most models simulate well the interannual variability in the date of monsoon onset, the exceptions being models with the most pronounced dry biases. Two methods for estimating monsoon duration are presented, one of which includes nonlinear aspects of the fractional accumulation. The summer fractional accumulation of rainfall provides an objective way to estimate the extent of the monsoon domain, even in models with substantial dry biases for which monsoon is not defined using threshold-based techniques.

  9. Relationship between the Indian summer monsoon and the large-scale circulation variability over the Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizou, Despoina; Flocas, Helena A.; Athanasiadis, Panos; Bartzokas, Aristides

    2015-01-01

    In this study the impact of the Indian summer monsoon on the large scale variability of the atmospheric circulation over the Mediterranean is investigated on an inter-annual time scale. Composite and correlation analysis results are presented, outlining different circulation patterns in the upper and lower troposphere for strong and weak monsoon years respectively. For this purpose ERA-40 Reanalysis monthly mean data at various isobaric levels together with the standardized All India Rainfall Index for boreal summer (June-July-August-September) of a 44-year period were employed. During strong monsoon years many atmospheric circulation systems appear strengthened over Eurasia, resembling a well-organized Rossby wave train over the area. In the upper troposphere a meridional shift of the jet streams over the examined area was also identified during extreme monsoon years. On the other hand, in the lower troposphere enhanced northerlies (Etesians) appear to dominate over Eastern Mediterranean along with intensified subsidence during strong monsoon years.

  10. See-saw relationship of the Holocene East Asian-Australian summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eroglu, Deniz; McRobie, Fiona H.; Ozken, Ibrahim; Stemler, Thomas; Wyrwoll, Karl-Heinz; Breitenbach, Sebastian F. M.; Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    The East Asian-Indonesian-Australian summer monsoon (EAIASM) links the Earth's hemispheres and provides a heat source that drives global circulation. At seasonal and inter-seasonal timescales, the summer monsoon of one hemisphere is linked via outflows from the winter monsoon of the opposing hemisphere. Long-term phase relationships between the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) and the Indonesian-Australian summer monsoon (IASM) are poorly understood, raising questions of long-term adjustments to future greenhouse-triggered climate change and whether these changes could `lock in' possible IASM and EASM phase relationships in a region dependent on monsoonal rainfall. Here we show that a newly developed nonlinear time series analysis technique allows confident identification of strong versus weak monsoon phases at millennial to sub-centennial timescales. We find a see-saw relationship over the last 9,000 years--with strong and weak monsoons opposingly phased and triggered by solar variations. Our results provide insights into centennial- to millennial-scale relationships within the wider EAIASM regime.

  11. See–saw relationship of the Holocene East Asian–Australian summer monsoon

    PubMed Central

    Eroglu, Deniz; McRobie, Fiona H.; Ozken, Ibrahim; Stemler, Thomas; Wyrwoll, Karl-Heinz; Breitenbach, Sebastian F. M.; Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The East Asian–Indonesian–Australian summer monsoon (EAIASM) links the Earth's hemispheres and provides a heat source that drives global circulation. At seasonal and inter-seasonal timescales, the summer monsoon of one hemisphere is linked via outflows from the winter monsoon of the opposing hemisphere. Long-term phase relationships between the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) and the Indonesian–Australian summer monsoon (IASM) are poorly understood, raising questions of long-term adjustments to future greenhouse-triggered climate change and whether these changes could ‘lock in' possible IASM and EASM phase relationships in a region dependent on monsoonal rainfall. Here we show that a newly developed nonlinear time series analysis technique allows confident identification of strong versus weak monsoon phases at millennial to sub-centennial timescales. We find a see–saw relationship over the last 9,000 years—with strong and weak monsoons opposingly phased and triggered by solar variations. Our results provide insights into centennial- to millennial-scale relationships within the wider EAIASM regime. PMID:27666662

  12. Asian summer monsoon onset barrier and its formation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Boqi; Liu, Yimin; Wu, Guoxiong; Yan, Jinghui; He, Jinhai; Ren, Suling

    2015-08-01

    The onset process of Asian summer monsoon (ASM) is investigated based on diagnostic analysis of observations of precipitation and synoptic circulation. Results show that after the ASM commences over the eastern Bay of Bengal (BOB) around early May, the onset can propagate eastwards towards the South China Sea and western Pacific but is blocked on its westward propagation along the eastern coast of India. This blocking, termed the "monsoon onset barrier (MOB)", presents a Gill-type circulation response to the latent heating released by BOB monsoon convection. This convective condensation heating generates summertime (wintertime) vertical easterly (westerly) shear to its east (west) and facilitates air ascent (descent). The convection then propagates eastward but gets trapped on its westward path. To the east of the central BOB, the surface air temperature (SAT) cools faster than the underlying sea surface temperature (SST) due to monsoon onset. Thus more sensible heat flux supports the onset convection to propagate eastward. To the west of the central BOB, however, the land surface sensible heating over the Indian Peninsula is strengthened by the enhanced anticyclone circulation and air descent induced by the BOB monsoon heating. The strengthened upstream warm horizontal advection then produces a warm SAT center over the MOB region, which together with the in situ cooled SST reduces the surface sensible heating and atmospheric available potential energy to prevent the occurrence of free convection. Therefore, it is the change in both large-scale circulation and air-sea interaction due to BOB summer monsoon onset that contributes to the MOB formation.

  13. Indian Monsoon Depression: Climatology and Variability

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jin-Ho; Huang, Wan-Ru

    2012-03-09

    The monsoon climate is traditionally characterized by large seasonal rainfall and reversal of wind direction (e.g., Krishnamurti 1979). Most importantly this rainfall is the major source of fresh water to various human activities such as agriculture. The Indian subcontinent resides at the core of the Southeast Asian summer monsoon system, with the monsoon trough extended from northern India across Indochina to the Western Tropical Pacific (WTP). Large fraction of annual rainfall occurs during the summer monsoon season, i.e., June - August with two distinct maxima. One is located over the Bay of Bengal with rainfall extending northwestward into eastern and central India, and the other along the west coast of India where the lower level moist wind meets the Western Ghat Mountains (Saha and Bavardeckar 1976). The rest of the Indian subcontinent receives relatively less rainfall. Various weather systems such as tropical cyclones and weak disturbances contribute to monsoon rainfall (Ramage 1971). Among these systems, the most efficient rain-producing system is known as the Indian monsoon depression (hereafter MD). This MD is critical for monsoon rainfall because: (i) it occurs about six times during each summer monsoon season, (ii) it propagates deeply into the continent and produces large amounts of rainfall along its track, and (iii) about half of the monsoon rainfall is contributed to by the MDs (e.g., Krishnamurti 1979). Therefore, understanding various properties of the MD is a key towards comprehending the veracity of the Indian summer monsoon and especially its hydrological process.

  14. A Mesoscale Analysis of Column-Integrated Aerosol Properties in Northern India During the TIGERZ 2008 Pre-Monsoon Period and a Comparison to MODIS Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Tripathi, S. N.; Eck, T. F.; Newcomb, W. W.; Slutsker, I.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Wang, S.-H.; Singh, R. P.; Sinyuk, A.

    2010-01-01

    opportunity to measure the spatial and temporal variations of aerosol loading in the IGP. The strong aerosol absorption derived from ground-based sun/sky radiometer measurements suggested the presence of a predominately black carbon and dust mixture during the pre-monsoon period. Consistent with the elevated heat-pump hypothesis, these absorbing aerosols found across Kanpur and the greater IGP region during the pre-monsoon period likely induced regional atmospheric warming, which lead to a more rapid advance of the southwest Asian monsoon and above normal precipitation over northern India in June 2008.

  15. Monsoon-Enso Relationships: A New Paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, K. M.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This article is partly a review and partly a new research paper on monsoon-ENSO relationship. The paper begins with a discussion of the basic relationship between the Indian monsoon and ENSO dating back to the work of Sir Gilbert Walker up to research results in more recent years. Various factors that may affect the monsoon-ENSO, relationship, including regional coupled ocean-atmosphere processes, Eurasian snow cover, land-atmosphere hydrologic feedback, intraseasonal oscillation, biennial variability and inter-decadal variations, are discussed. The extreme complex and highly nonlinear nature of the monsoon-ENSO relationship is stressed. We find that for regional impacts on the monsoon, El Nino and La Nina are far from simply mirror images of each other. These two polarities of ENSO can have strong or no impacts on monsoon anomalies depending on the strength of the intraseasonal oscillations and the phases of the inter-decadal variations. For the Asian-Australian monsoon (AAM) as a whole, the ENSO impact is effected through a east-west shift in the Walker Circulation. For rainfall anomalies over specific monsoon areas, regional processes play important roles in addition to the shift in the Walker Circulation. One of the key regional processes identified for the boreal summer monsoon is the anomalous West Pacific Anticyclone (WPA). This regional feature has similar signatures in interannual and intraseasonal time scales and appears to determine whether the monsoon-ENSO relationship is strong or weak in a given year. Another important regional feature includes a rainfall and SST dipole across the Indian Ocean, which may have strong impact on the austral summer monsoon. Results are shown indicating that monsoon surface wind forcings may induce a strong biennial signal in ENSO and that strong monsoon-ENSO coupling may translate into pronounced biennial variability in ENSO. Finally, a new paradigm is proposed for the study of monsoon variability. This paradigm provides

  16. Global Monsoon Rainfall - What the future holds?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, H.; Kitoh, A.; Kumar, K.; Cavalcanti, I. F.; Goswami, P.; Zhou, T.

    2012-12-01

    We provide a latest view of global as well as regional monsoonal rainfall and their changes in the twenty-first century as projected by state-of-the-art climate models participated in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). The global monsoon area (GMA) defined based on the annual range in precipitation will expand mainly over the central to eastern tropical Pacific, the southern Indian Ocean, and eastern Asia. The global monsoon intensity (GMI) and the global monsoon total precipitation (GMP) are likely to increase, implying that monsoon-related precipitation will remarkably increase in a warmer climate. Heavy precipitation indices are projected to increase much more than the mean precipitation, and their percentage changes depend more on the emission scenario compared to those for mean precipitation. Over the Asian monsoon domain, median increase rate for precipitation is larger than that over other monsoon domains, indicating that the sensitivity of Asian monsoon to global warming is stronger than that of other monsoons. For seasonal progress of monsoon rainfall, CMIP5 models project that the monsoon retreat dates will delay, while the onset dates will either advance or show no change, resulting in lengthening of the monsoon season. It is found that the increase of the global monsoon precipitation can be attributed to the increases of moisture convergence due to increased water vapor in the air column and surface evaporation, offset to a certain extent by the weakening of the monsoon circulation (Figure 1).Figure 1: Time series of anomalies during summer season (%; 20 years running mean) relative to the base period average (1986-2005) over the land global monsoon domain for (a) precipitation (mm day-1), (b) evaporation (mm day-1), (c) water vapor flux convergence in the lower (below 500hPa) troposphere (mm day-1), and (d) wind convergence in the lower troposphere (10-3 kg m-2 s-1), based on 23 CMIP5 model monthly outputs. Historical (grey

  17. Workshop on Monsoon Climate Systems: Toward Better Prediction of the Monsoon

    SciTech Connect

    Sperber, K R; Yasunari, T

    2005-12-20

    The Earth's monsoon systems are the life-blood of more than two-thirds of the world's population through the rainfall they provide to the mainly agrarian societies they influence. More than 60 experts gathered to assess the current understanding of monsoon variability and to highlight outstanding problems simulating the monsoon.

  18. Interannual variability of South American monsoon circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso Gan, Manoel; Rafaele Araújo Lima, Jeane

    2016-04-01

    The South America Monsoon System (SAMS) is responsible for influencing the atmospheric circulation and precipitation over most of tropical South America (SA) during the summer season. Studies for aiming to understand the temporal variability of this system have great value to the scientific community, because the processes that control the monsoon climate are not totally clear. Thus, the main objective of this research is to investigate the possible large-scale climatic factors and the remote interaction mechanisms, which may be associated with summer season interannual variability focusing on identifying the main differences between dry and wet extremes rainy season in the South-eastern Amazon Basin (SAB), Central-West (WC) and Southeast (SE) of Brazil, which are areas influenced by the summer monsoon regime. For such analyzes, Pearson correlations, quantile method and composite analysis were used during the period from 1979 to 2014. The correlation between precipitation anomaly in SAB and the sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA) and wind at 850hPa and 300hPa indicate El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) influence. Precipitation anomalies in WC did not show significant correlation with SSTA. However, a pattern similar to ENSO Modoki type was observed in the composite analysis. At 850 hPa, the presence of an anomalous cyclonic (anticyclonic) circulation was observed over the central region of SA during wet (dry) summers seasons. Over SE region of Brazil, a dipole SSTA pattern over the South Atlantic was identified, as well the presence of anomalous circulations with an equivalent barotropic structure over these SSTA areas. This pattern is more evident in case of dry summer on the SE. At 300 hPa, the wave train between 30°S-60°S was observed presenting a feature curvature from 120°W reaching SA, similar to the Pacific-South American pattern (PSA). Analysis of the summer interannual variability indicated the manifestation of wet summers more frequently than dry

  19. A seamless approach to assessing monsoon simulations in the Met Office Unified Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, R. C.; Boo, K. O.; Martin, G. M.; Milton, S. F.; Mitra, A.; Sellar, A. A.; Willett, M. R.

    2009-04-01

    We present an assessment of monsoons as simulated by the latest configurations of the Met Office Unified Model. These consist of models of varying complexity that are used for Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP), climate, and seasonal prediction. A comparison is made between the model biases in different monsoon regions for the different configurations, giving an insight into the nature of the main systematic errors, and also of the time-scales involved in their development. Both the mean state and the variability are assessed using a metric-based approach. The main model bias in the Indian monsoon region is the relatively low precipitation over Indian land. This has been significantly improved in the latest atmospheric component of the climate model, mainly due to changes in the CAPE closure in the convection scheme, which are aimed at reducing the tendency for strong intermittent deep convection. A more detailed comparison of the model with ERA re-analysis data is made for the onset and the pre-monsoon period of the Indian summer monsoon, giving an insight into the impact of various changes to the model. The emphasis is placed on the impacts of the timing of convection, the development of the monsoon jet, the impact of cyclonic vortices, and the moistening rates over India. The interannual variability is further examined through analysis of the ENSO-monsoon teleconnection, the link between El Nino/La Nina events and below/above average rainfall over India, which is assessed using a metric-based approach.

  20. Spatiotemporal patterns and trends of Indian monsoonal rainfall extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Nishant; Bookhagen, Bodo; Mucha, Peter J.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we provide a comprehensive analysis of trends in the extremes during the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) months (June to September) at different temporal and spatial scales. Our goal is to identify and quantify spatiotemporal patterns and trends that have emerged during the recent decades and may be associated with changing climatic conditions. Our analysis primarily relies on quantile regression that avoids making any subjective choices on spatial, temporal, or intensity pattern of extreme rainfall events. Our analysis divides the Indian monsoon region into climatic compartments that show different and partly opposing trends. These include strong trends toward intensified droughts in Northwest India, parts of Peninsular India, and Myanmar; in contrast, parts of Pakistan, Northwest Himalaya, and Central India show increased extreme daily rain intensity leading to higher flood vulnerability. Our analysis helps explain previously contradicting results of trends in average ISM rainfall.

  1. Monsoon-extratropical circulation interactions in Himalayan extreme rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vellore, Ramesh K.; Kaplan, Michael L.; Krishnan, R.; Lewis, John M.; Sabade, Sudhir; Deshpande, Nayana; Singh, Bhupendra B.; Madhura, R. K.; Rama Rao, M. V. S.

    2016-06-01

    Extreme precipitation and flood episodes in the Himalayas are oftentimes traced to synoptic situations involving connections between equatorward advancing upper level extratropical circulations and moisture-laden tropical monsoon circulation. While previous studies have documented precipitation characteristics in the Himalayan region during severe storm cases, a comprehensive understanding of circulation dynamics of extreme precipitation mechanisms is still warranted. In this study, a detailed analysis is performed using rainfall observations and reanalysis circulation products to understand the evolution of monsoon-extratropical circulation features and their interactions based on 34 extreme precipitation events which occurred in the Western Himalayas (WEH) during the period 1979-2013. Our results provide evidence for a common large-scale circulation pattern connecting the extratropics and the South Asian monsoon region, which is favorable for extreme precipitation occurrences in the WEH region. This background upper level large-scale circulation pattern consists of a deep southward penetrating midlatitude westerly trough, a blocking high over western Eurasia and an intensifying Tibetan anticyclone. It is further seen from our analysis that the key elements of monsoon-midlatitude interactions, responsible for extreme precipitation events over the WEH region, are: (1) midlatitude Rossby wave breaking, (2) west-northwest propagation of monsoon low-pressure system from the Bay of Bengal across the Indian subcontinent, (3) eddy shedding of the Tibetan anticyclone, (4) ageostrophic motions and transverse circulation across the Himalayas, and (5) strong moist convection over the Himalayan foothills. Furthermore, high-resolution numerical simulations indicate that diabatic heating and mesoscale ageostrophic effects can additionally amplify the convective motions and precipitation in the WEH region.

  2. Non-local Impact of South and East Asian Aerosols on Monsoon Onset and Withdrawal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollasina, M. A.; Bartlett, R. E.; Booth, B.; Dunstone, N. J.; Marenco, F.

    2015-12-01

    The powerful Asian monsoon is of vital importance to the billions of people who are reliant on its rainfall, especially considering that society within its domain is largely agrarian. This monsoon system comprises smaller regional components, including the Indian monsoon and East Asian monsoon. These components are linked to one another through large scale circulation. The impacts of rapidly increasing anthropogenic aerosols over Asia on the monsoon have been widely studied. However, most studies consider only regional impacts, and not the subsequent effects on other geographical components of the system. We use observational and modelling methods to investigate the links between the regional components of the Asian monsoon and how they are affected by aerosols. Satellite observations of aerosol optical depth are used in conjunction with precipitation and atmospheric reanalysis data to investigate the problem at interannual timescales. Modelling experiments using HadGEM2-ES and GFDL CM3 are used to look at longer timescales and the potential influence of long term feedbacks. The HadGEM2 experiments use three time-evolving future anthropogenic aerosol emissions scenarios with the same time-evolving greenhouse gases. The GFDL CM3 experiments are forced by historical regional anthropogenic aerosol emissions. Using these methods, we look at the separate impact that South and East Asian aerosols have on monsoon onset and withdrawal. We focus on impacts in regions non-local to the aerosol source. We will also present proposed mechanisms for the apparent effects based on analysis of large scale circulation and atmospheric heating.

  3. Monsoon rainfall interannual variability over China and its association with the Euasian circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Samel, A.N.; Wang, Wei-Chyung

    1997-11-01

    This study has two goals. The first is to determine annual observed initial and final dates of east Asian summer monsoon rainfall. To accomplish this, a semi-objective analysis is developed and applied to daily rainfall station data throughout China. The resulting values are used to calculate monsoon duration and total rainfall. The second goal is to identify relationships between these rainfall characteristics and circulation features in the Eurasian sea level pressure. The analysis of the duration of monsoon rainfall events produced results that are consistent with those found in previous studies. Total monsoon rainfall over south China, the Yangtze River valley, and north China was then correlated with the Eurasian sea level pressure and 500 millibar height fields. The results indicate that summer rainfall interannual variability over each region is governed by the interaction of several circulation features. These findings are also consistent with those of other studies. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Dominating Controls for Wetter South Asian Summer Monsoon in the Twenty-First Century

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Rui; Ashfaq, Moetasim; Rastogi, Deeksha; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Dominguez, Francina

    2015-04-01

    We analyze a suite of Global Climate Models from the 5th Phase of Coupled Models Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) archives to understand the mechanisms behind a net increase in the South Asian summer monsoon precipitation in response to enhanced radiative forcing during the 21st century despite a robust weakening of dynamics governing the monsoon circulation. Combining the future changes in the contributions from various sources, which contribute to the moisture supply over South Asia, with those in monsoon dynamics and atmospheric moisture content, we establish a pathway of understanding that partly explains these counteracting responses to increase in radiative forcing. Our analysis suggests that both regional (local recycling, Arabian Sea, Bay of Bengal) and remote (mainly Indian Ocean) sources contribute to the moisture supply for precipitation over South Asia during the summer season that is facilitated by the monsoon dynamics. Increase in radiative forcing fuels an increase in the atmospheric moisture content through warmer temperatures. For regional moisture sources, the effect of excessive atmospheric moisture is offset by weaker monsoon circulation and uncertainty in the response of the evapotranspiration over land, so anomalies in their contribution to the total moisture supply are either mixed or muted. In contrast, weakening of the monsoon dynamics has less influence on the moisture supply from remote sources that not only is a dominant moisture contributor in the historical period, but is also the net driver of the positive summer monsoon precipitation response in the 21st century. Our results also indicate that historic measures of the monsoon dynamics may not be well suited to predict the non-stationary moisture driven South Asian summer monsoon precipitation response in the 21st century.

  5. Sea surface height anomaly and upper ocean temperature over the Indian Ocean during contrasting monsoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gera, Anitha; Mitra, A. K.; Mahapatra, D. K.; Momin, I. M.; Rajagopal, E. N.; Basu, Swati

    2016-09-01

    Recent research emphasizes the importance of the oceanic feedback to monsoon rainfall over the Asian landmass. In this study, we investigate the differences in the sea surface height anomaly (SSHA) and upper ocean temperature over the tropical Indian Ocean during multiple strong and weak monsoons. Analysis of satellite derived SSHA, sea surface temperature (SST) and ocean reanalysis data reveals that patterns of SSHA, SST, ocean temperature, upper ocean heat content (UOHC) and propagations of Kelvin and Rossby waves differ during strong and weak monsoon years. During strong monsoons positive SSH, SST and UOHC anomalies develop over large parts of north Indian Ocean whereas during weak monsoons much of the north Indian Ocean is covered with negative anomalies. These patterns can be used as a standard tool for evaluating the performance of coupled and ocean models in simulating & forecasting strong and weak monsoons. The rainfall over central India is found to be significantly correlated with SSHA over the regions (Arabian Sea and West central Indian Ocean and Bay of Bengal) where SSHA is positively large during strong monsoons. The SST-SSHA correlation is also very strong over the same area. The study reveals that much convection takes place over these regions during strong monsoons. In contrast during weak monsoons, convection takes place over eastern equatorial region. These changes in SST are largely influenced by oceanic Kelvin and Rossby waves. The Rossby waves initiated in spring at the eastern boundary propagate sub-surface heat content in the ocean influencing SST in summer. The SST anomalies modulate the Hadley circulation and the moisture transport thereby contributing to rainfall over central India. Therefore oceanic Kelvin and Rossby waves influence the rainfall over central India.

  6. Dominating Controls for Wetter South Asian Summer Monsoon in the Twenty-First Century

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Rui; Ashfaq, Moetasim; Rastogi, Deeksha; Leung, L. Ruby; Dominguez, Francina

    2015-04-07

    This study analyzes a suite of global climate models from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) archives to understand the mechanisms behind a net increase in the South Asian summer monsoon precipitation in response to enhanced radiative forcing during the twenty-first century. An increase in radiative forcing fuels an increase in the atmospheric moisture content through warmer temperatures, which overwhelms the weakening of monsoon circulation and results in an increase of moisture convergence and therefore summer monsoon precipitation over South Asia. Moisture source analysis suggests that both regional (local recycling, the Arabian Sea, the Bay of Bengal) and remote (including the south Indian Ocean) sources contribute to the moisture supply for precipitation over South Asia during the summer season that is facilitated by the monsoon dynamics. For regional moisture sources, the effect of excessive atmospheric moisture is offset by weaker monsoon circulation and uncertainty in the response of the evapotranspiration over land, so anomalies in their contribution to the total moisture supply are either mixed or muted. In contrast, weakening of the monsoon dynamics has less influence on the moisture supply from remote sources that not only is a dominant moisture contributor in the historical period but is also the net driver of the positive summer monsoon precipitation response in the twenty-first century. Finally, the results also indicate that historic measures of the monsoon dynamics may not be well suited to predict the nonstationary moisture-driven South Asian summer monsoon precipitation response in the twenty-first century.

  7. Dominating Controls for Wetter South Asian Summer Monsoon in the Twenty-First Century

    DOE PAGES

    Mei, Rui; Ashfaq, Moetasim; Rastogi, Deeksha; Leung, L. Ruby; Dominguez, Francina

    2015-04-07

    This study analyzes a suite of global climate models from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) archives to understand the mechanisms behind a net increase in the South Asian summer monsoon precipitation in response to enhanced radiative forcing during the twenty-first century. An increase in radiative forcing fuels an increase in the atmospheric moisture content through warmer temperatures, which overwhelms the weakening of monsoon circulation and results in an increase of moisture convergence and therefore summer monsoon precipitation over South Asia. Moisture source analysis suggests that both regional (local recycling, the Arabian Sea, the Bay of Bengal)more » and remote (including the south Indian Ocean) sources contribute to the moisture supply for precipitation over South Asia during the summer season that is facilitated by the monsoon dynamics. For regional moisture sources, the effect of excessive atmospheric moisture is offset by weaker monsoon circulation and uncertainty in the response of the evapotranspiration over land, so anomalies in their contribution to the total moisture supply are either mixed or muted. In contrast, weakening of the monsoon dynamics has less influence on the moisture supply from remote sources that not only is a dominant moisture contributor in the historical period but is also the net driver of the positive summer monsoon precipitation response in the twenty-first century. Finally, the results also indicate that historic measures of the monsoon dynamics may not be well suited to predict the nonstationary moisture-driven South Asian summer monsoon precipitation response in the twenty-first century.« less

  8. BOBMEX: The Bay of Bengal Monsoon Experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, G. S.; Gadgil, S.; Hareesh Kumar, P. V.; Kalsi, S. R.; Madhusoodanan, P.; Murty, V. S. N.; Prasada Rao, C. V. K.; Babu, V. Ramesh; Rao, L. V. G.; Rao, R. R.; Ravichandran, M.; Reddy, K. G.; Sanjeeva Rao, P.; Sengupta, D.; Sikka, D. R.; Swain, J.; Vinayachandran, P. N.

    2001-10-01

    The first observational experiment under the Indian Climate Research Programme, called the Bay of Bengal Monsoon Experiment (BOBMEX), was carried out during July-August 1999. BOBMEX was aimed at measurements of important variables of the atmosphere, ocean, and their interface to gain deeper insight into some of the processes that govern the variability of organized convection over the bay. Simultaneous time series observations were carried out in the northern and southern Bay of Bengal from ships and moored buoys. About 80 scientists from 15 different institutions in India collaborated during BOBMEX to make observations in most-hostile conditions of the raging monsoon. In this paper, the objectives and the design of BOBMEX are described and some initial results presented. During the BOBMEX field phase there were several active spells of convection over the bay, separated by weak spells. Observation with high-resolution radiosondes, launched for the first time over the northern bay, showed that the magnitudes of the convective available potential energy (CAPE) and the convective inhibition energy were comparable to those for the atmosphere over the west Pacific warm pool. CAPE decreased by 2-3 kJ kg-1 following convection, and recovered in a time period of 1-2 days. The surface wind speed was generally higher than 8 m s-1. The thermohaline structure as well as its time evolution during the BOBMEX field phase were found to be different in the northern bay than in the southern bay. Over both the regions, the SST decreased during rain events and increased in cloud-free conditions. Over the season as a whole, the upper-layer salinity decreased for the north bay and increased for the south bay. The variation in SST during 1999 was found to be of smaller amplitude than in 1998. Further analysis of the surface fluxes and currents is expected to give insight into the nature of coupling.

  9. Space-Time Structure of Monsoon Interannual Variability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terray, Pascal

    1995-11-01

    The analysis of corrected ship reports [sea level pressure (SLP), sea surface temperature (SST), air temperature (AT)] and corrected land data (SLP, AT, rainfall) in the Indian sector reveals the existence of two low-frequency modes of monsoon variability during the 1900-1970 period. A definite biennial (B) mode exists on the SLP fields. This B oscillation is unambiguously linked with a southwest-northeast SLP anomaly gradient. During the summer monsoon, the B SLP pattern can be interpreted as an expansion/contraction of the monsoon activity since this mode is strongly coupled with rainfall variations over peninsular India. A strong low-frequency (LF) mode with period spanning 4-6 years is also seen on SLP fields over the Indian Ocean and subcontinent. The variance associated with this band is typically more important than the one observed for the B mode, and its spatial mark is also strikingly different since it is linked with a global pattern of variation. This mode has also a strong influence on the Indian summer rainfall fluctuations, particularly on the Ghats and in the Indo-Gangetic plains.The amplitude of these oscillations varies widely during the 1900-1970 period. The LF mode is well defined during 1900-1923 and 1947-1970. There is a tendency for the energy associated with the B mode to decrease on the land while it increases over the Indian Ocean during the whole 1900-1970 interval.Although these two timescales exist also on SST fields, cross-spectral analysis shows that ocean-atmosphere interactions are much stronger at the B timescale. This result stresses the B nature of the monsoon system.The existence of these interannual signals in the Indian areas where the annual cycle is so strong raises difficult problems: How can climatic anomalies persist for several years in spite of strong seasonality? Or, still more intriguing, how can be explained the persistence of climatic anomalies during one year and the appearance of opposite sign climatic anomalies

  10. TIGERZ I: Aerosols, Monsoon and Synergism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holben, B. N.; Tripathi, S. N.; Schafer, J. S.; Giles, D. M.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Smirnov, A.; Krishnmoorthy, K.; Sorokin, M. G.; Newcomb, W. W.; Tran, A. K.; Sikka, D. R.; Goloub, P.; O'Neill, N. T.; Abboud, I.; Randles, C.; Niranjan, K.; Dumka, U. C.; Tiwari, S.; Devara, P. C.; Kumar, S.; Remer, L. A.; Kleidman, R.; Martins, J. V.; Kahn, R.

    2008-12-01

    The Indo-Gangetic Plain of northern India encompasses a vast complex of urban and rural landscapes, cultures that serve as anthropogenic sources of fine mode aerosols mixed with coarse mode particles transported from SW Asia. The summer monsoon and fall Himalayan snowmelt provide the agricultural productivity to sustain an extremely high population density whose affluence is increasing. Variations in the annual monsoon precipitation of 10% define drought, normal and a wet season; the net effects on the ecosystems and quality of life can be dramatic. Clearly investigation of anthropogenic and natural aerosol impacts on the monsoon, either through the onset, monsoon breaks or end points are a great concern to understand and ultimately mitigate. Many national and international field campaigns are being planned and conducted to study various aspects of the Asian monsoon and some coordinated under the Asian Monsoon Years (AMY) umbrella. A small program called TIGERZ conducted during the pre-monsoon of 2008 in North Central India can serve as a model for contributing significant resources to existing field programs while meeting immediate project goals. This poster will discuss preliminary results of the TIGERZ effort including ground-based measurements of aerosol properties in the I-G from AERONET and synergism with various Indian programs, satellite observations and aerosol modeling efforts.

  11. Surface layer temperature inversion in the Bay of Bengal: Main characteristics and related mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thadathil, Pankajakshan; Suresh, I.; Gautham, S.; Prasanna Kumar, S.; Lengaigne, Matthieu; Rao, R. R.; Neetu, S.; Hegde, Akshay

    2016-08-01

    Surface layer temperature inversion (SLTI), a warm layer sandwiched between surface and subsurface colder waters, has been reported to frequently occur in conjunction with barrier layers in the Bay of Bengal (BoB), with potentially commensurable impacts on climate and postmonsoon tropical cyclones. Lack of systematic measurements from the BoB in the past prevented a thorough investigation of the SLTI spatiotemporal variability, their formation mechanisms, and their contribution to the surface temperature variations. The present study benefits from the recent Research Moored Array for African-Asian-Australian Monsoon Analysis and Prediction (RAMA) buoys located in BoB along 90°E at 4°N, 8°N, 12°N, and 15°N over the 2006-2014 period. Analysis of data from these RAMA buoys indicates that SLTI forms after the summer monsoon and becomes fully developed during winter (December-February). SLTI exhibits a strong geographical dependency, with more frequent (80% times during winter) and intense inversions (amplitude, ΔT ˜ 0.7°C) occurring only in the northern BoB compared to central and southern Bay. SLTI also exhibits large interannual and intraseasonal variations, with intraseasonal amplitude significantly larger (ΔT ˜ 0.44°C) than the interannual amplitude (˜0.26°C). Heat budget analysis of the mixed layer reveals that the net surface heat loss is the most dominant process controlling the formation and maintenance of SLTI. However, there are instances of episodic advection of cold, low-saline waters over warm-saline waters leading to the formation of SLTI as in 2012-2013. Vertical processes contribute significantly to the mixed layer heat budget during winter, by warming the surface layer through entrainment and vertical diffusion.

  12. An assessment of Indian monsoon seasonal forecasts and mechanisms underlying monsoon interannual variability in the Met Office GloSea5-GC2 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Stephanie J.; Turner, Andrew; Woolnough, Steven; Martin, Gill; MacLachlan, Craig

    2016-06-01

    We assess Indian summer monsoon seasonal forecasts in GloSea5-GC2, the Met Office fully coupled subseasonal to seasonal ensemble forecasting system. Using several metrics, GloSea5-GC2 shows similar skill to other state-of-the-art seasonal forecast systems. The prediction skill of the large-scale South Asian monsoon circulation is higher than that of Indian monsoon rainfall. Using multiple linear regression analysis we evaluate relationships between Indian monsoon rainfall and five possible drivers of monsoon interannual variability. Over the time period studied (1992-2011), the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Indian Ocean dipole (IOD) are the most important of these drivers in both observations and GloSea5-GC2. Our analysis indicates that ENSO and its teleconnection with Indian rainfall are well represented in GloSea5-GC2. However, the relationship between the IOD and Indian rainfall anomalies is too weak in GloSea5-GC2, which may be limiting the prediction skill of the local monsoon circulation and Indian rainfall. We show that this weak relationship likely results from a coupled mean state bias that limits the impact of anomalous wind forcing on SST variability, resulting in erroneous IOD SST anomalies. Known difficulties in representing convective precipitation over India may also play a role. Since Indian rainfall responds weakly to the IOD, it responds more consistently to ENSO than in observations. Our assessment identifies specific coupled biases that are likely limiting GloSea5-GC2 Indian summer monsoon seasonal prediction skill, providing targets for model improvement.

  13. Interactive Aspects of the Indian and the African Summer Monsoon Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanjeeva Rao, P.; Sikka, D. R.

    2007-09-01

    This study addresses an understanding of the possible mutual interactions of sub-seasonal variability of the two neighboring regional monsoon systems through data analysis. The NCEP/NCAR re-analysis and OLR data for three years was used to reveal the large-scale organization of convective episodes on synoptic (~5 days) and low frequency (15 50 day) scales. It is found that synoptic scale organization over both the sectors is influenced by the eastward migration of large-scale convective episodes associated with the Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) on the low frequency scale. The organization of convection associated with the African monsoon on the synoptic scale is influenced by the pulsatory character of lower mid-troposphere and upper troposphere wind regimes moving westward over the African sector. Over the Indian region formation of low pressure areas and depressions in the monsoon trough occur in an overlapping manner under an envelope of low frequency seasonal oscillation. We have also found some correspondence between the summer monsoon rainfall over tropical North Africa and India on a decadal basis, which would suggest a common mode of multi-decadal variability in the two monsoon systems. The study points out the need to organize simultaneous field campaigns over the Indian and the African monsoon regions so as to bring out observational features of possible interactions between the two neighboring systems, which could then be validated through modeling studies.

  14. Fingerprinting the Impacts of Aerosols on Long-Term Trends of the Indian Summer Monsoon Regional Rainfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laul, K. M.; Kim, K. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present corroborative observational evidences from satellites, in-situ observations, and re-analysis data showing possible impacts of absorbing aerosols (black carbon and dust) on subseasonal and regional summer monsoon rainfall over India. We find that increased absorbing aerosols in the Indo-Gangetic Plain in recent decades may have lead to long-term warming of the upper troposphere over northern India and the Tibetan Plateau, enhanced rainfall in northern India and the Himalayas foothill regions in the early part (may-June) of the monsoon season, followed by diminished rainfall over central and southern India in the latter part (July-August) of the monsoon season. These signals which are consistent with current theories of atmospheric heating and solar dimming by aerosol and induced cloudiness in modulating the Indian monsoon, would have been masked by conventional method of using al-India rainfall averaged over the entire monsoon season.

  15. A qualitative study on sea surface temperature over the tropical Indian Ocean and performance of Indian summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Umesh Kumar; Singh, Gyan Prakash

    2012-08-01

    A careful analysis of the sea surface temperature (SST) over the tropical Indian Ocean using the available SST data sets (namely, Hadley Center Ice SST, tropical rainfall measuring mission microwave imager SST, and optimum interpolation SST) at different time scales has been presented in the present study. By simple visual inspection of the SST plots, it has been shown that the qualitative prediction of Indian summer monsoon condition (weak/normal) and northern limit of monsoon (NLM) can be possible a month in advance using SST. The present qualitative study may be useful for common man to know the behavior of summer monsoon well a month in advance. Therefore, the qualitative study may enable the common man to show the application of satellite data to bring out the information regarding the onset of summer monsoon and related performance of Indian summer monsoon well in advance.

  16. The East Asian subtropical summer monsoon: Recent progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jinhai; Liu, Boqi

    2016-04-01

    The East Asian subtropical summer monsoon (EASSM) is one component of the East Asian summer monsoon system, and its evolution determines the weather and climate over East China. In the present paper, we firstly demonstrate the formation and advancement of the EASSM rainbelt and its associated circulation and precipitation patterns through reviewing recent studies and our own analysis based on JRA-55 (Japanese 55-yr Reanalysis) data and CMAP (CPC Merged Analysis of Precipitation), GPCP (Global Precipitation Climatology Project), and TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) precipitation data. The results show that the rainy season of the EASSM starts over the region to the south of the Yangtze River in early April, with the establishment of strong southerly wind in situ. The EASSM rainfall, which is composed of dominant convective and minor stratiform precipitation, is always accompanied by a frontal system and separated from the tropical summer monsoon system. It moves northward following the onset of the South China Sea summer monsoon. Moreover, the role of the land-sea thermal contrast in the formation and maintenance of the EASSM is illustrated, including in particular the effect of the seasonal transition of the zonal land-sea thermal contrast and the influences from the Tibetan Plateau and midlatitudes. In addition, we reveal a possible reason for the subtropical climate difference between East Asia and East America. Finally, the multi-scale variability of the EASSM and its influential factors are summarized to uncover possible reasons for the intraseasonal, interannual, and interdecadal variability of the EASSM and their importance in climate prediction.

  17. GMMIP (v1.0) contribution to CMIP6: Global Monsoons Model Inter-comparison Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tianjun; Turner, Andrew G.; Kinter, James L.; Wang, Bin; Qian, Yun; Chen, Xiaolong; Wu, Bo; Wang, Bin; Liu, Bo; Zou, Liwei; He, Bian

    2016-10-01

    The Global Monsoons Model Inter-comparison Project (GMMIP) has been endorsed by the panel of Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project (CMIP) as one of the participating model inter-comparison projects (MIPs) in the sixth phase of CMIP (CMIP6). The focus of GMMIP is on monsoon climatology, variability, prediction and projection, which is relevant to four of the "Grand Challenges" proposed by the World Climate Research Programme. At present, 21 international modeling groups are committed to joining GMMIP. This overview paper introduces the motivation behind GMMIP and the scientific questions it intends to answer. Three tiers of experiments, of decreasing priority, are designed to examine (a) model skill in simulating the climatology and interannual-to-multidecadal variability of global monsoons forced by the sea surface temperature during historical climate period; (b) the roles of the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation and Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation in driving variations of the global and regional monsoons; and (c) the effects of large orographic terrain on the establishment of the monsoons. The outputs of the CMIP6 Diagnostic, Evaluation and Characterization of Klima experiments (DECK), "historical" simulation and endorsed MIPs will also be used in the diagnostic analysis of GMMIP to give a comprehensive understanding of the roles played by different external forcings, potential improvements in the simulation of monsoon rainfall at high resolution and reproducibility at decadal timescales. The implementation of GMMIP will improve our understanding of the fundamental physics of changes in the global and regional monsoons over the past 140 years and ultimately benefit monsoons prediction and projection in the current century.

  18. A hemispheric climatology of monsoon depressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, J. V.; Boos, W.

    2012-12-01

    Monsoon depressions are large (1000-2000 km diameter) cyclonic low pressure systems having organized deep convection, best known for forming in the Bay of Bengal and migrating northwest over northern India in the monsoon trough. About 3 to 5 of these systems occur during each monsoon season, contributing about half of the Indian summer rainfall. Despite their importance as a precipitation source, their dynamics are poorly constrained. Furthermore, although they do occur elsewhere, such as around Australia and in the southern Indian Ocean, there does not exist a collective inventory of these systems outside of the Bay of Bengal region. Here we present a climatology of monsoon depressions produced from the ERA-Interim Reanalysis. Feature tracks are identified using an automated tracking algorithm (K. Hodges' TRACK code) applied to the 850 hPa relative vorticity field for local summer, 1989 to 2003. Using criteria based on relative vorticity and sea level pressure, cyclonic low pressure systems are separated into different intensity categories, one of which corresponds to the definition for monsoon depressions used by the India Meteorological Department. The resultant distribution of storms obtained for the Bay of Bengal region compares well with a previously compiled climatology of monsoon depressions that was limited to the region surrounding India. Having validated our ability to identify monsoon depressions in their classic genesis region near India, we then extend the methods to include the western Pacific, Australia, and the southern Indian Ocean. Track distributions and composite structures of monsoon depressions for these different regions will be presented.

  19. Mid-Holocene global monsoon area and precipitation from PMIP simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dabang; Tian, Zhiping; Lang, Xianmei

    2015-05-01

    Towards a better insight into orbital-scale changes in global monsoon, here we examine global monsoon area (GMA) and precipitation (GMP) as well as GMP intensity (GMPI) in the mid-Holocene, approximately 6,000 years ago, using all available numerical experiments from the Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project. Compared to the reference period, both the mid-Holocene GMA and GMP increased in the majority of the 35 models chosen for analysis according to their ability, averaging 5.5 and 4.2 %, respectively, which were mainly due to the increase in monsoon area and precipitation over the boreal land and austral ocean. The mid-Holocene GMPI decreased in most models and by an average of 1.2 %, mainly due to the decrease in monsoon precipitation intensity over the boreal ocean and austral land. The mid-Holocene GMA, GMP, and GMPI all showed opposite changes both between the land and ocean in the northern or southern hemisphere and between the boreal and austral land or ocean. Orbital-induced changes in large-scale meridional temperature gradient and land-sea thermal contrast are the underlying mechanisms, and the presence of an interactive ocean has an amplifying effect in the boreal land monsoon areas overall. Qualitatively, the model-data comparison indicates agreement in the boreal land monsoon areas and South America but disagreement in southern Africa and northern Australia.

  20. Basic mechanism for abrupt monsoon transitions

    PubMed Central

    Levermann, Anders; Schewe, Jacob; Petoukhov, Vladimir; Held, Hermann

    2009-01-01

    Monsoon systems influence the livelihood of hundreds of millions of people. During the Holocene and last glacial period, rainfall in India and China has undergone strong and abrupt changes. Though details of monsoon circulations are complicated, observations reveal a defining moisture-advection feedback that dominates the seasonal heat balance and might act as an internal amplifier, leading to abrupt changes in response to relatively weak external perturbations. Here we present a minimal conceptual model capturing this positive feedback. The basic equations, motivated by observed relations, yield a threshold behavior, robust with respect to addition of other physical processes. Below this threshold in net radiative influx, R c, no conventional monsoon can develop; above R c, two stable regimes exist. We identify a nondimensional parameter l that defines the threshold and makes monsoon systems comparable with respect to the character of their abrupt transition. This dynamic similitude may be helpful in understanding past and future variations in monsoon circulation. Within the restrictions of the model, we compute R c for current monsoon systems in India, China, the Bay of Bengal, West Africa, North America, and Australia, where moisture advection is the main driver of the circulation. PMID:19858472

  1. Influence of the Atlantic zonal mode on monsoon depressions in the Bay of Bengal during boreal summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottapinjara, Vijay; Girishkumar, M. S.; Ravichandran, M.; Murtugudde, R.

    2014-06-01

    The influence of the Atlantic Zonal Mode (AZM) or the Atlantic Niño on monsoon depressions in the Bay of Bengal during the boreal summer (June-August) is studied. Our analysis shows that there is a statistically significant difference in the number of monsoon depressions in the Bay of Bengal between the warm and cold phases of the AZM; more (fewer) monsoon depressions form during the cold (warm) phase of AZM. It also shows that there are differences in spatial pattern of trajectories of monsoon depressions; during the cold phase of AZM, the tracks are relatively long and seem to cluster along the axis of core monsoon region compared to the warm phase of AZM. The analysis indicates an increase (a reduction) in low-level cyclonic vorticity and midtropospheric humidity but a reduction (an increase) in vertical wind shear due to anomalous circulation pattern. All of these changes are favorable for the enhancement (suppression) of monsoon depressions during the cold (warm) phase of the AZM. Our analysis further shows a teleconnection pathway by which the AZM can influence the remote Indian Ocean. This could have implications for enhancing monsoon prediction skill, especially during non-El Niño-Southern Oscillation years.

  2. The First Pan-WCRP Workshop on Monsoon Climate Systems: Toward Better Prediction of the Monsoons

    SciTech Connect

    Sperber, K R; Yasunari, T

    2005-07-27

    In 2004 the Joint Scientific Committee (JSC) that provides scientific guidance to the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) requested an assessment of (1) WCRP monsoon related activities and (2) the range of available observations and analyses in monsoon regions. The purpose of the assessment was to (a) define the essential elements of a pan-WCRP monsoon modeling strategy, (b) identify the procedures for producing this strategy, and (c) promote improvements in monsoon observations and analyses with a view toward their adequacy, and addressing any undue redundancy or duplication. As such, the WCRP sponsored the ''1st Pan-WCRP Workshop on Monsoon Climate Systems: Toward Better Prediction of the Monsoons'' at the University of California, Irvine, CA, USA from 15-17 June 2005. Experts from the two WCRP programs directly relevant to monsoon studies, the Climate Variability and Predictability Programme (CLIVAR) and the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX), gathered to assess the current understanding of the fundamental physical processes governing monsoon variability and to highlight outstanding problems in simulating the monsoon that can be tackled through enhanced cooperation between CLIVAR and GEWEX. The agenda with links to the presentations can be found at: http://www.clivar.org/organization/aamon/WCRPmonsoonWS/agenda.htm. Scientific motivation for a joint CLIVAR-GEWEX approach to investigating monsoons includes the potential for improved medium-range to seasonal prediction through better simulation of intraseasonal (30-60 day) oscillations (ISO's). ISO's are important for the onset of monsoons, as well as the development of active and break periods of rainfall during the monsoon season. Foreknowledge of the active and break phases of the monsoon is important for crop selection, the determination of planting times and mitigation of potential flooding and short-term drought. With a few exceptions simulations of ISO are typically poor in all classes of

  3. Pleistocene Indian Monsoon rainfall variability dominated by obliquity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebregiorgis, D.; Hathorne, E. C.; Giosan, L.; Collett, T. S.; Nuernberg, D.; Frank, M.

    2015-12-01

    The past variability of the Indian Monsoon is mostly known from records of wind strength over the Arabian Sea while Quaternary proxy records of Indian monsoon precipitation are still lacking. Here we utilize scanning x-ray fluorescence (XRF) data from a sediment core obtained by the IODP vessel JOIDES Resolution in the Andaman Sea (Site 17) to investigate changes in sediment supply from the peak monsoon precipitation regions to the core site. We use Ti/Ca and K/Rb ratios to trace changes in terrigenous flux and weathering regime, respectively, while Zr/Rb ratios suggest grain size variations. The age model of Site 17 is based on correlation of benthic C. wuellerstorfi/C. mundulus δ18O data to the LR04 global benthic δ18O stack at a resolution of ~3 kyr (Lisiecki and Raymo, 2005) for the last 2 Myrs. In its youngest part the age model is supported by five 14C ages on planktic foraminifera and the youngest Toba ash layer (Ali et al., 2015) resulting in a nearly constant sedimentation rate of ~6.5 cm/kyr. Frequency analysis of the 4 mm resolution Ti/Ca, K/Rb, and Zr/Rb time series using the REDFIT program (Schulz and Mudelsee, 2002), reveals the three main Milankovitch orbital cycles above the 90% confidence level. Depth domain spectral analysis reveals the presence of significant cyclicity at wavelengths of 28.5 and 2.8 m corresponding to the ~400 kyr and ~41 kyr cycles, respectively, during the last 2 Myr. These records suggest that Indian monsoon variability has varied in the obliquity and eccentricity bands, the latter in particular after the mid Pleistocene transition (MPT), while strong precession forcing is lacking in this super-high resolution record. Northern summer insolation and Southern Hemisphere latent heat export are out of phase during precessional cycles, but in phase in the obliquity band, which indicates that Indian monsoon precipitation has likely been more sensitive to both NH pull and SH push mechanisms (Clemens and Prell, 2003). References Ali

  4. The Joint Aerosol-Monsoon Experiment: A New Challenge to Monsoon Climate Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.

    2008-01-01

    Aerosol and monsoon related droughts and floods are two of the most serious environmental hazards confronting more than 60% of the population of the world living in the Asian monsoon countries. In recent years, thanks to improved satellite and in-situ observations, and better models, great strides have been made in aerosol, and monsoon research respectively. There is now a growing body of evidence suggesting that interaction of aerosol forcing with water cycle dynamics in monsoon regions may substantially alter the redistribution of energy at the earth surface and in the atmosphere, and therefore significantly impact monsoon rainfall variability and long term trends. In this talk, I will describe issues related to societal needs, scientific background, and challenges in studies of aerosol-water cycle interaction in Asian monsoon regions. As a first step towards addressing these issues, the authors call for an integrated observation and modeling research approach aimed at the interactions between aerosol chemistry and radiative effects and monsoon dynamics of the coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system. A Joint Aerosol-Monsoon Experiment (JAMEX) is proposed for 2007-2011, with an enhanced observation period during 2008-09, encompassing diverse arrays of observations from surface, aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicles, and satellites of physical and chemical properties of aerosols, long range aerosol transport as well as meteorological and oceanographic parameters in the Indo-Pacific Asian monsoon region. JAMEX will leverage on coordination among many ongoing and planned national programs on aerosols and monsoon research in China, India, Japan, Nepal, Italy, US, as well as international research programs of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

  5. Impact of biennial SST oscillation on the Southeast Asian summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Kim, K. Y.

    2014-12-01

    How the biennial oscillation of global SST, one of the main components of ENSO, affects the Southeast Asia summer monsoon is analyzed. The biennial mode is extracted from the 142-year (1871-2012) Extended Reconstruction SST version 3 data using cyclostationary EOF (CSEOF) analysis. Based on regression analysis in CSEOF space, evolutions of key atmospheric variables are obtained to be consistent with the long-term variation of the biennial mode. Atmospheric variables are derived from the twentieth century (20C) reanalysis version 2 data. The biennial oscillation, primarily in the tropical Pacific, influences the monsoons in the Indo-Pacific region. Summer monsoonal change can be explained in terms of the change in monsoon precipitation accompanied with low-level moisture convergence and large-scale atmospheric circulation. In the equatorial region, SST anomaly directly triggers the vertical motion and horizontal wind such that zonal circulation across the Pacific and Indian Oceans is set up. In the subtropical Asian region, both cyclonic or anticyclonic circulation over the northwestern Pacific and the meridional circulation over the Indo-Pacific region induced by the equatorial SST change affects the Southeast Asian monsoon, and henceforth the monsoon precipitation. When positive SST anomaly develops in the eastern tropical Pacific, precipitation decreases over the tropical Indian Ocean and the Maritime Continent (10°S-5°N, 40°-150°E) and increases over Southeast Asia (5°N-20°N, 90°-150°E). With negative SST anomaly in the eastern tropical Pacific, the situation reverses. Based on the spatio-temporal evolution patterns for key physical variables and corresponding long-term variability, physical link through atmosphere-ocean interactions is explored between the biennial mode of SST and the Southeast Asian summer monsoon.

  6. Astronomical and Hydrological Perspective of Mountain Impacts on the Asian Summer Monsoon.

    PubMed

    He, Bian; Wu, Guoxiong; Liu, Yimin; Bao, Qing

    2015-01-01

    The Asian summer monsoon has great socioeconomic impacts. Understanding how the huge Tibetan and Iranian Plateaus affect the Asian summer monsoon is of great scientific value and has far-reaching significance for sustainable global development. One hypothesis considers the plateaus to be a shield for monsoon development in India by blocking cold-dry northerly intrusion into the tropics. Based on astronomical radiation analysis and numerical modeling, here we show that in winter the plateaus cannot block such a northerly intrusion; while in summer the daily solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface, and the surface potential temperature to the north of the Tibetan Plateau, are higher than their counterparts to its south, and such plateau shielding is not needed. By virtue of hydrological analysis, we show that the high energy near the surface required for continental monsoon development is maintained mainly by high water vapor content. Results based on potential vorticity-potential temperature diagnosis further demonstrate that it is the pumping of water vapor from sea to land due to the thermal effects of the plateaus that breeds the Asian continental monsoon. PMID:26620727

  7. Astronomical and Hydrological Perspective of Mountain Impacts on the Asian Summer Monsoon

    PubMed Central

    He, Bian; Wu, Guoxiong; Liu, Yimin; Bao, Qing

    2015-01-01

    The Asian summer monsoon has great socioeconomic impacts. Understanding how the huge Tibetan and Iranian Plateaus affect the Asian summer monsoon is of great scientific value and has far-reaching significance for sustainable global development. One hypothesis considers the plateaus to be a shield for monsoon development in India by blocking cold-dry northerly intrusion into the tropics. Based on astronomical radiation analysis and numerical modeling, here we show that in winter the plateaus cannot block such a northerly intrusion; while in summer the daily solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface, and the surface potential temperature to the north of the Tibetan Plateau, are higher than their counterparts to its south, and such plateau shielding is not needed. By virtue of hydrological analysis, we show that the high energy near the surface required for continental monsoon development is maintained mainly by high water vapor content. Results based on potential vorticity–potential temperature diagnosis further demonstrate that it is the pumping of water vapor from sea to land due to the thermal effects of the plateaus that breeds the Asian continental monsoon. PMID:26620727

  8. Astronomical and Hydrological Perspective of Mountain Impacts on the Asian Summer Monsoon.

    PubMed

    He, Bian; Wu, Guoxiong; Liu, Yimin; Bao, Qing

    2015-12-01

    The Asian summer monsoon has great socioeconomic impacts. Understanding how the huge Tibetan and Iranian Plateaus affect the Asian summer monsoon is of great scientific value and has far-reaching significance for sustainable global development. One hypothesis considers the plateaus to be a shield for monsoon development in India by blocking cold-dry northerly intrusion into the tropics. Based on astronomical radiation analysis and numerical modeling, here we show that in winter the plateaus cannot block such a northerly intrusion; while in summer the daily solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface, and the surface potential temperature to the north of the Tibetan Plateau, are higher than their counterparts to its south, and such plateau shielding is not needed. By virtue of hydrological analysis, we show that the high energy near the surface required for continental monsoon development is maintained mainly by high water vapor content. Results based on potential vorticity-potential temperature diagnosis further demonstrate that it is the pumping of water vapor from sea to land due to the thermal effects of the plateaus that breeds the Asian continental monsoon.

  9. Astronomical and Hydrological Perspective of Mountain Impacts on the Asian Summer Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bian; Wu, Guoxiong; Liu, Yimin; Bao, Qing

    2015-12-01

    The Asian summer monsoon has great socioeconomic impacts. Understanding how the huge Tibetan and Iranian Plateaus affect the Asian summer monsoon is of great scientific value and has far-reaching significance for sustainable global development. One hypothesis considers the plateaus to be a shield for monsoon development in India by blocking cold-dry northerly intrusion into the tropics. Based on astronomical radiation analysis and numerical modeling, here we show that in winter the plateaus cannot block such a northerly intrusion; while in summer the daily solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface, and the surface potential temperature to the north of the Tibetan Plateau, are higher than their counterparts to its south, and such plateau shielding is not needed. By virtue of hydrological analysis, we show that the high energy near the surface required for continental monsoon development is maintained mainly by high water vapor content. Results based on potential vorticity-potential temperature diagnosis further demonstrate that it is the pumping of water vapor from sea to land due to the thermal effects of the plateaus that breeds the Asian continental monsoon.

  10. Relationship between tropospheric temperature and Indian summer monsoon rainfall as simulated by RegCM3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattnayak, K. C.; Panda, S. K.; Saraswat, Vaishali; Dash, S. K.

    2016-05-01

    Relationship between rainfall and tropospheric temperature (TT) has been examined over the Indian subcontinent during four seasons of the year using Regional Climate Model Version 3.0 (RegCM3). The model has been integrated at 55 km horizontal resolution over India during the years 1980-2000 with prescribed lateral boundary forcing from the 40 years re-analysis (ERA40) of the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts. Results of this study show that RegCM3 in general is able to capture the spatial distributions of rainfall in all the seasons as compared to the corresponding IMD0.5 gridded rainfall. The model has simulated warmer TT over the Himalayan region in all the seasons as compared to ERA40. However, it is well captured over the peninsular India and the oceanic regions. In the model, larger warming by about 0.5 °C over the northwest and Central India in the summer monsoon months might have lead to lower surface pressure there. Also, the vertical extent of the monsoon trough is found to be up to 500 hPa in the model as compared to that in NCEP/NCAR reanalysis. As a consequence, the simulated monsoon circulation and rainfall are stronger than those observed. The two most important rainfall seasons, the summer monsoon and winter are reasonably well simulated with correlation coefficients (CC) of 0.60 and 0.59 respectively significant at 99 % confidence level with the corresponding observed values of IMD0.5. Further, Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) and TT during the contrasting monsoon years are also close to their respective observed values. Temporal CCs between the TT over Tibet, Pakistan and Central India during the summer monsoon season and gridded ISMR values reveals that the TT over Pakistan has been better correlated with the ISMR than those over Tibet and Central India. This relationship has been well supported by the model simulations.

  11. Monsoon control on faunal composition of planktic foraminifera in the Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munz, P.; Siccha, M.; Kucera, M.; Schulz, H.

    2013-12-01

    Being among the most productive open ocean basins, sea surface properties in the Arabian Sea are highly influenced by the seasonal reversal of the monsoonal wind system. During boreal summer wind direction from the southwest induces strong upwelling along the coast off Somalia and Oman. Vertical transport of cold and nutrient-rich deep-water masses by Ekman pumping reduces sea surface temperature and triggers primary productivity. Reversed cold and dry winds during boreal winter lead to cooling of the surface- and subsurface-waters and hereby to deep convective mixing, bringing nutrients into the photic zone and enhancing primary productivity especially in the northern part of the Arabian Sea. Here, we study the influence of the different seasonal monsoon systems on the faunal composition of planktic foraminifera, in order to improve our understanding how the faunal community record is influenced by the respective monsoon systems and to provide baseline information for the reconstruction of ancient monsoon conditions. We used published core-top foraminiferal databases, significantly increased in spatial coverage by new contributions. The resulting combined database consists of 413 core-top samples spanning the Arabian Sea and the Northern Indian Ocean to 10° S. The seasonal sea surface properties at these stations could be binned into categories of different monsoon influence, based on satellite-derived chlorophyll-a concentrations. Interpretation of species response to environmental control is based on multivariate statistical analyses of each of the categorical bins. First results show that samples influenced only by winter- and summer monsoon conditions, respectively, feature specifiable faunal composition. Globigerina bulloides is mostly associated with summer upwelling conditions, whereas Globigerina falconensis and Pulleniatina obliquiloculata are typical species of winter conditions. Redundancy analysis reveals preferences of species populations with

  12. Understanding land surface response to changing South Asian monsoon in a warming climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramarao, M. V. S.; Krishnan, R.; Sanjay, J.; Sabin, T. P.

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies have drawn attention to a significant weakening trend of the South Asian monsoon circulation and an associated decrease in regional rainfall during the last few decades. While surface temperatures over the region have steadily risen during this period, most of the CMIP (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project) global climate models have difficulties in capturing the observed decrease of monsoon precipitation, thus limiting our understanding of the regional land surface response to monsoonal changes. This problem is investigated by performing two long-term simulation experiments, with and without anthropogenic forcing, using a variable resolution global climate model having high-resolution zooming over the South Asian region. The present results indicate that anthropogenic effects have considerably influenced the recent weakening of the monsoon circulation and decline of precipitation. It is seen that the simulated increase of surface temperature over the Indian region during the post-1950s is accompanied by a significant decrease of monsoon precipitation and soil moisture. Our analysis further reveals that the land surface response to decrease of soil moisture is associated with significant reduction in evapotranspiration over the Indian land region. A future projection, based on the representative concentration pathway 4.5 (RCP4.5) scenario of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), using the same high-resolution model indicates the possibility for detecting the summer-time soil drying signal over the Indian region during the 21st century in response to climate change. Given that these monsoon hydrological changes have profound socio-economic implications the present findings provide deeper insights and enhance our understanding of the regional land surface response to the changing South Asian monsoon. While this study is based on a single model realization, it is highly desirable to have multiple realizations to establish the robustness

  13. Future projection of mean and variability of the Asian Summer Monsoon and Indian Ocean Climate systems

    SciTech Connect

    Annamalai, H.

    2014-09-15

    The overall goal of this project is to assess the ability of the CMIP3/5 models to simulate the Indian-Ocean monsoon systems. The PI along with post-docs investigated research issues ranging from synoptic systems to long-term trends over the Asian monsoon region. The PI applied diagnostic tools such as moist static energy (MSE) to isolate: the moist and radiative processes responsible for extended monsoon breaks over South Asia, precursors in the ENSO-monsoon association, reasons for the drying tendency over South Asia and the possible effect on tropical Indian Ocean climate anomalies influencing certain aspects of ENSO characteristics. By diagnosing various observations and coupled model simulations, we developed working hypothesis and tested them by carrying out sensitivity experiments with both linear and nonlinear models. Possible physical and dynamical reasons for model sensitivities were deduced. On the teleconnection front, the ability of CMIP5 models in representing the monsoon-desert mechanism was examined recently. Further more, we have applied a suite of diagnostics and have performed an in depth analysis on CMIP5 integrations to isolate the possible reasons for the ENSO-monsoon linkage or lack thereof. The PI has collaborated with Dr. K.R. Sperber of PCMDI and other CLIVAR Asian-Australian monsoon panel members in understanding the ability of CMIP3/5 models in capturing monsoon and its spectrum of variability. The objective and process-based diagnostics aided in selecting models that best represent the present-day monsoon and its variability that are then employed for future projections. Two major highlights were an invitation to write a review on present understanding monsoons in a changing climate in Nature Climate Change, and identification of an east-west shift in observed monsoon rainfall (more rainfall over tropical western Pacific and drying tendency over South Asia) in the last six decades and attributing that shift to SST rise over the tropical

  14. Interannual variability of the Indian monsoon and the Southern Oscillation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, M.; Hastenrath, S.

    1986-01-01

    Years with abundant Southwest monsoon rainfall in India are characterized by anomalously low pressure over South Asia and the adjacent waters, enhanced cross-equatorial flow in the western, and increased cloudiness over the northern portion of the Indian Ocean, continuing from the pre-monsoon through the post-monsoon season; positive temperature anomalies over land and in the Arabian Sea in the pre-monsoon season, changing to negative departures after the monsoon onset. The following causality chain is suggested: the anomalously warm surfaces of south Asia and the adjacent ocean in the pre-monsoon season induce a thermal low, thus enhancing the northward directed pressure gradient, and favoring a vigorous cross-equatorial flow over the Indian Ocean. After the monsoon onset the land surfaces are cooled by evaporation, and the Arabian Sea surface waters by various wind stress effects. However, latent heat release over South Asia can now maintain the meridional topography gradients essential to the monsoon circulation. The positive phase of the Southern Oscillation (high pressure over the Eastern South Pacific) is associated with circulation departures in the Indian Ocean sector similar to those characteristic of years with abundant India monsoon rainfall. Abundant rainfall over India during the northern summer monsoon leads the positive mode of the southern Oscillation, and this in turn leads Java rainfall, whose peak is timed about half a year after that of India. A rising Southern Oscillation tendency presages abundant India Southwest Monsoon rainfall but a late monsoon onset. 46 references, 9 figures, 4 tables.

  15. Indian monsoon variations during three contrasting climatic periods: The Holocene, Heinrich Stadial 2 and the last interglacial-glacial transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorzi, Coralie; Sanchez Goñi, Maria Fernanda; Anupama, Krishnamurthy; Prasad, Srinivasan; Hanquiez, Vincent; Johnson, Joel; Giosan, Liviu

    2015-10-01

    In contrast to the East Asian and African monsoons the Indian monsoon is still poorly documented throughout the last climatic cycle (last 135,000 years). Pollen analysis from two marine sediment cores (NGHP-01-16A and NGHP-01-19B) collected from the offshore Godavari and Mahanadi basins, both located in the Core Monsoon Zone (CMZ) reveals changes in Indian summer monsoon variability and intensity during three contrasting climatic periods: the Holocene, the Heinrich Stadial (HS) 2 and the Marine Isotopic Stage (MIS) 5/4 during the ice sheet growth transition. During the first part of the Holocene between 11,300 and 4200 cal years BP, characterized by high insolation (minimum precession, maximum obliquity), the maximum extension of the coastal forest and mangrove reflects high monsoon rainfall. This climatic regime contrasts with that of the second phase of the Holocene, from 4200 cal years BP to the present, marked by the development of drier vegetation in a context of low insolation (maximum precession, minimum obliquity). The historical period in India is characterized by an alternation of strong and weak monsoon centennial phases that may reflect the Medieval Climate Anomaly and the Little Ice Age, respectively. During the HS 2, a period of low insolation and extensive iceberg discharge in the North Atlantic Ocean, vegetation was dominated by grassland and dry flora indicating pronounced aridity as the result of a weak Indian summer monsoon. The MIS 5/4 glaciation, also associated with low insolation but moderate freshwater fluxes, was characterized by a weaker reduction of the Indian summer monsoon and a decrease of seasonal contrast as recorded by the expansion of dry vegetation and the development of Artemisia, respectively. Our results support model predictions suggesting that insolation changes control the long term trend of the Indian monsoon precipitation, but its millennial scale variability and intensity are instead modulated by atmospheric

  16. Indian monsoon variations during three contrasting climatic periods: the Holocene, Heinrich Stadial 2 and the last interglacial-glacial transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorzi, Coralie; Fernanda Sanchez Goñi, Maria; Anupama, Krishnamurthy; Prasad, Srinivasan; Hanquiez, Vincent; Johnson, Joel; Giosan, Liviu

    2016-04-01

    In contrast to the East Asian and African monsoons the Indian monsoon is still poorly documented throughout the last climatic cycle (last 135,000 years). Pollen analysis from two marine sediment cores (NGHP-01-16A and NGHP-01-19B) collected from the offshore Godavari and Mahanadi basins, both located in the Core Monsoon Zone (CMZ) reveals changes in Indian summer monsoon variability and intensity during three contrasting climatic periods: the Holocene, the Heinrich Stadial (HS) 2 and the Marine Isotopic Stage (MIS) 5/4 during the ice sheet growth transition. During the first part of the Holocene between 11,300 and 4,200 cal years BP, characterized by high insolation (minimum precession, maximum obliquity), the maximum extension of the coastal forest and mangrove reflects high monsoon rainfall. This climatic regime contrasts with that of the second phase of the Holocene, from 4,200 cal years BP to the present, marked by the development of drier vegetation in a context of low insolation (maximum precession, minimum obliquity). The historical period in India is characterized by an alternation of strong and weak monsoon centennial phases that may reflect the Medieval Climate Anomaly and the Little Ice Age, respectively. During the HS 2, a period of low insolation and extensive iceberg discharge in the North Atlantic Ocean, vegetation was dominated by grassland and dry flora indicating pronounced aridity as the result of a weak Indian summer monsoon. The MIS 5/4 glaciation, also associated with low insolation but moderate freshwater fluxes, was characterized by a weaker reduction of the Indian summer monsoon and a decrease of seasonal contrast as recorded by the expansion of dry vegetation and the development of Artemisia, respectively. Our results support model predictions suggesting that insolation changes control the long term trend of the Indian monsoon precipitation, but its millennial scale variability and intensity are instead modulated by atmospheric

  17. Simulation of the Indian and East-Asian summer monsoon in the ECMWF model: Sensitivity to horizontal resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Sperber, K.R.; Potter, G.L.; Boyle, J.S.; Hameed, S.

    1993-11-01

    The ability of the ECMWF model (Cycle 33) to simulate the Indian and East Asian summer monsoon is evaluated at four different horizontal resolutions: T21, T42, T63, and T106. Generally, with respect to the large scale features of the circulation, the largest differences among the simulations occur at T42 relative to T21. However, on regional scales, important differences among the high frequency temporal variabilitY serve as a further critical test of the model`s ability to simulate the monsoon. More generally, the results indicate the importance of evaluating high frequency time scales as a component of the climate system. T106 best captures both the spatial and temporal characteristics of the Indian and East Asian Monsoon, while T42 fails to correctly simulate the sequence and development of synoptic scale milestones that characterize the monsoon flow. In particular, T106 is superior at simulating the development and migration of the monsoon trough over the Bay of Bengal. In the T42 simulation, the development of the monsoon occurs one month earlier than typically observed. At this time the trough is incorrectly located adjacent to the east coast of India which results in an underestimate of precipitation over the Burma/Thailand region. This early establishment of the monsoon trough affects the evolution of the East-Asian monsoon and yields excessive preseason rainfall over the Mei-yu region. EOF analysis of precipitation over China indicates that T106 best simulates the Mei-yu mode of variability associated with an oscillation of the rainband that gives rise to periods of enhanced rainfall over the Yangize River Valley. The coarse resolution of T21 precludes simulation of the aforementioned regional scale monsoon flows.

  18. Non-linear regime shifts in Holocene Asian monsoon variability: potential impacts on cultural change and migratory patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donges, J. F.; Donner, R. V.; Marwan, N.; Breitenbach, S. F. M.; Rehfeld, K.; Kurths, J.

    2015-05-01

    The Asian monsoon system is an important tipping element in Earth's climate with a large impact on human societies in the past and present. In light of the potentially severe impacts of present and future anthropogenic climate change on Asian hydrology, it is vital to understand the forcing mechanisms of past climatic regime shifts in the Asian monsoon domain. Here we use novel recurrence network analysis techniques for detecting episodes with pronounced non-linear changes in Holocene Asian monsoon dynamics recorded in speleothems from caves distributed throughout the major branches of the Asian monsoon system. A newly developed multi-proxy methodology explicitly considers dating uncertainties with the COPRA (COnstructing Proxy Records from Age models) approach and allows for detection of continental-scale regime shifts in the complexity of monsoon dynamics. Several epochs are characterised by non-linear regime shifts in Asian monsoon variability, including the periods around 8.5-7.9, 5.7-5.0, 4.1-3.7, and 3.0-2.4 ka BP. The timing of these regime shifts is consistent with known episodes of Holocene rapid climate change (RCC) and high-latitude Bond events. Additionally, we observe a previously rarely reported non-linear regime shift around 7.3 ka BP, a timing that matches the typical 1.0-1.5 ky return intervals of Bond events. A detailed review of previously suggested links between Holocene climatic changes in the Asian monsoon domain and the archaeological record indicates that, in addition to previously considered longer-term changes in mean monsoon intensity and other climatic parameters, regime shifts in monsoon complexity might have played an important role as drivers of migration, pronounced cultural changes, and the collapse of ancient human societies.

  19. Transport pathways of peroxyacetyl nitrate in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere from different monsoon systems during the summer monsoon season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadnavis, S.; Semeniuk, K.; Schultz, M. G.; Kiefer, M.; Mahajan, A.; Pozzoli, L.; Sonbawane, S.

    2015-10-01

    The Asian summer monsoon involves complex transport patterns with large-scale redistribution of trace gases in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS). We employ the global chemistry-climate model ECHAM5-HAMMOZ in order to evaluate the transport pathways and the contributions of nitrogen oxide species peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), NOx and HNO3 from various monsoon regions, to the UTLS over southern Asia and vice versa. Simulated long-term seasonal mean mixing ratios are compared with trace gas retrievals from the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding aboard ENVISAT(MIPAS-E) and aircraft campaigns during the monsoon season (June-September) in order to evaluate the model's ability to reproduce these transport patterns. The model simulations show that there are three regions which contribute substantial pollution to the South Asian UTLS: the Asian summer monsoon (ASM), the North American monsoon (NAM) and the West African monsoon (WAM). However, penetration due to ASM convection reaches deeper into the UTLS compared to NAM and WAM outflow. The circulation in all three monsoon regions distributes PAN into the tropical latitude belt in the upper troposphere (UT). Remote transport also occurs in the extratropical UT where westerly winds drive North American and European pollutants eastward where they can become part of the ASM convection and lifted into the lower stratosphere. In the lower stratosphere the injected pollutants are transported westward by easterly winds. Sensitivity experiments with ECHAM5-HAMMOZ for simultaneous NOx and non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) emission change (-10 %) over ASM, NAM and WAM confirm similar transport. Our analysis shows that a 10 % change in Asian emissions transports ~ 5-30 ppt of PAN in the UTLS over Asia, ~ 1-10 ppt of PAN in the UTLS of northern subtropics and mid-latitudes, ~ 7-10 ppt of HNO3 and ~ 1-2 ppb of ozone in UT over Asia. Comparison of emission change over Asia, North

  20. Meridional Propagation of the MJO/ISO and Prediction of Off-equatorial Monsoon Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Man Li C.; Schubert, S.; Suarez, M.; Pegion, P.; Bacmeister, J.; Waliser, D.

    2004-01-01

    In this study we examine the links between tropical heating, the Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO)/Intraseasonal Oscillation (ISO), and the off-equatorial monsoon development. We examine both observations and idealized "MJO heating" experiments employing the NASA Seasonal-Interannual Prediction Project (NSIPP) atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM). In the simulations, the model is forced by climatological SST and an idealized eastward propagating heating profile that is meant to mimic the canonical heating associated with the MJO in the Indian Ocean and western Pacific. The observational analysis highlights the strong link between the Indian summer monsoon and the tropical ISO/MJO activity and heating. Here we focus on the potential for skillful predictions of the monsoon on subseasonal time scales associated with the meridional propagation of the ISOMJO. In particular, we show that the variability of the Indian summer monsoon lags behind the variability of tropical ISOMJO heating by about 15 days when the tropical heating is around 60E and 90E. This feature of the ISOMJO is reproduced in the AGCM experiments with the idealized eastward propagating MJO-like heating, suggesting that models with realistic ISOM0 variability should provide useful skill of monsoon breaks and surges on subseasonal time scales.

  1. Meridional Propagation of the MJO/ISO and Prediction of Off-equatorial Monsoon Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Man Li C.; Schubert, S.; Suarez, M.; Pegion, P.; Waliser, D.

    2003-01-01

    This study was examine the links between tropical heating, the Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO)/Intraseasonal Oscillation (ISO), and the off-equatorial monsoon development. We examine both observations and idealized "MJO heating" experiments employing the NASA Seasonal-Interannual Prediction Project (NSIPP) atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM). In the simulations, the model is forced by climatological SST and an idealized eastward propagating heating profile that is meant 'to mimic the canonical heating associated with the MJO in the Indian Ocean and western Pacific. The observational analysis highlights the strong link between the Indian summer monsoon and the tropical ISO/MJO activity and heating. Here we focus on the potential for skillful predictions of the monsoon on sub-seasonal time scales associated with the meridional propagation of the ISO/MJO. In particular, we show that the variability of the Indian summer monsoon lags behind the variability of tropical ISO/MJO heating by about 15 days when the tropical heating is around 60E and 90E. This feature of the ISO/MJO is reproduced in the AGCM experiments with the idealized eastward propagating MJO-like heating, suggesting that models with realistic ISO/MJO variability should provide useful skill of monsoon breaks and surges on sub-seasonal time scales.

  2. Monsoon-driven vertical fluxes of organic pollutants in the western Arabian Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Dachs, J.; Bayona, J.M.; Ittekkot, V.; Albaiges, J.

    1999-11-15

    A time series of sinking particles from the western Arabian Sea was analyzed for aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, 4,4{prime}-DDT and 4,4{prime}-DDE, to assess the role of monsoons on their vertical flux in the Indian Ocean. Concurrently, molecular markers such as sterols and linear and branched alkanes were analyzed enabling the characterization of the biogenic sources and biogeochemical processes occurring during the sampling period. Hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) of the data set of concentrations and fluxes of these compounds confirmed a seasonal variability driven by the SW and NE monsoons. Moreover, the influence of different air masses is evidenced by the occurrence of higher concentrations of DDT, PCBs, and pyrolytic PAHs during the NE monsoon and of fossil hydrocarbons during the SW monsoon. Total annual fluxes to the deep Arabian Sea represent an important removal contribution of persistent organic pollutants, thus not being available for the global distillation process (volatilization and atmospheric transport from low or mid latitudes to cold areas). Therefore, monsoons may play a significant role on the global cycle of organic pollutants.

  3. Water vapor transport from the Indian monsoon region: the phenomenon of Atmospheric River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghav R., Sree; Mrudula, G.

    2016-05-01

    An Atmospheric/Tropospheric River (AR/TR) is a relatively narrow corridor of concentrated moisture where horizontal transport occurs in the lower atmosphere. They transport moisture from tropical regions towards the poles across the mid latitudes. Research of Atmospheric River over the Indian Monsoon region is not reported in literature. In this paper an attempt is made to examine the existence of AR in Indian Ocean and surrounding region. Meteorological parameters such as precipitable water, rainfall, air temperature and wind have been analyzed for the same. Analysis shows a clear evidence of the presence of Atmospheric River during the pre-monsoon and monsoon period. It is seen that there are variations in the origin, orientation, duration and also the formation of the river according to the vapor content in the Indian Ocean. During Elnino phase there is a pronounced transport of moisture through an Atmospheric River and also a high intensity transport occurs during monsoon period (JJA), even if moisture prevails over Indian monsoon region during other seasons also. Detailed results and extension to model forecasts will be presented in the paper.

  4. Ecosystem Response to Monsoon Rainfall Variability in Southwestern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forzieri, Giovanni; Feyen, Luc; Vivoni, Enrique

    2013-04-01

    Due to its marked plant phenology driven by precipitation, the North American Monsoon System (NAMS) can serve to reveal ecological responses to climate variability and change in water-controlled regions. This study attempts to elucidate the effects of monsoon rainfall variability on vegetation dynamics over the North American Monsoon Experiment (NAME) tier I domain (20°-35° N, 105°-115° W). To this end, we analyze long-term dynamics (1982-2004) in seasonal precipitation (Pr), net primary production (NPP) and rain-use efficiency (RUE) based on phenological and biophysical memory metrics from NOAA CPC daily 1° gridded precipitation data and satellite GIMMS semi-monthly NDVI images at 8-km resolution. We focus our analysis on six diverse ecosystems spanning from semi-arid and desert environments to tropical deciduous forests to investigate: 1) the spatially averaged NPP/RUE profiles along the regional Pr gradient, 2) the linkage between NPP and Pr inter-annual variations and 3) the long-term trends of Pr, NPP and RUE. All the biomes show an increase (decrease) in mean NPP (RUE) along the mean seasonal precipitation gradient ranging from 100 to 900 mm. Variations in NPP/RUE profiles differ strongly across ecosystems and show threshold behaviors likely resulting from different physiological responses to climate effects and landscape features. Statistical analysis suggests that the inter-annual variability in NPP is significantly related to the temporal variability in precipitation. In particular, we found that forest biomes are more sensitive to inter-annual variations in precipitation regimes. Semi-arid ecosystems appear to be more resilient, probably because they are more exposed to extreme conditions and consequently better adapted to greater inter and intra-annual climate variability. The long-term positive signal in RUE imposed on its inter-annual variability, which results from a constant NPP under negative long-term trends of Pr, indicates an improved

  5. Warm Indian Ocean, Weak Asian Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koll Roxy, Mathew; Ritika, Kapoor; Terray, Pascal; Murtugudde, Raghu; Ashok, Karumuri; Nath Goswami, Buphendra

    2015-04-01

    There are large uncertainties looming over the status and fate of the South Asian monsoon in a changing climate. Observations and climate models have suggested that anthropogenic warming in the past century has increased the moisture availability and the land-sea thermal contrast in the tropics, favoring an increase in monsoon rainfall. In contrast, we notice that South Asian subcontinent experienced a relatively subdued warming during this period. At the same time, the tropical Indian Ocean experienced a nearly monotonic warming, at a rate faster than the other tropical oceans. Using long-term observations and coupled model experiments, we suggest that the enhanced Indian Ocean warming along with the suppressed warming of the subcontinent weaken the land-sea thermal contrast throughout the troposphere, dampen the monsoon Hadley circulation, and reduce the rainfall over South Asia. As a result, the summer monsoon rainfall during 1901-2012 shows a significant weakening trend over South Asia, extending from Pakistan through central India to Bangladesh.

  6. Decadal Prediction and Stochastic Simulation of Hydroclimate Over Monsoonal Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Ghil, Michael; Robertson, Andrew W.; Cook, Edward R.; D’Arrigo, Rosanne; Lall, Upmanu; Smyth, Padhraic J.

    2015-01-18

    We developed further our advanced methods of time series analysis and empirical model reduction (EMR) and applied them to climatic time series relevant to hydroclimate over Monsoonal Asia. The EMR methodology was both generalized further and laid on a rigorous mathematical basis via multilayered stochastic models (MSMs). We identified easily testable conditions that imply the existence of a global random attractor for MSMs and allow for non-polynomial predictors. This existence, in turn, guarantees the numerical stability of the MSMs so obtained. We showed that, in the presence of low-frequency variability (LFV), EMR prediction can be improved further by including information from selected times in the system’s past. This prediction method, dubbed Past-Noise Forecasting (PNF), was successfully applied to the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). Our time series analysis and forecasting methods, based on singular-spectrum analysis (SSA) and its enhancements, were applied to several multi-centennial proxy records provided by the Lamont team. These included the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) for 1300–2005 from the Monsoonal Asia Drought Atlas (MADA), and a 300-member ensemble of pseudo-reconstructions of Indus River discharge for 1702–2005. The latter was shown to exhibit a robust 27-yr low-frequency mode, which helped multi-decadal retroactive forecasts with no look-ahead over this 300-year interval.

  7. Land-Climate Feedbacks in Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asharaf, Shakeel; Ahrens, Bodo

    2016-04-01

    In an attempt to identify how land surface states such as soil moisture influence the monsoonal precipitation climate over India, a series of numerical simulations including soil moisture sensitivity experiments was performed. The simulations were conducted with a nonhydrostatic regional climate model (RCM), the Consortium for Small-Scale Modeling (COSMO) in climate mode (CCLM) model, which was driven by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Interim reanalysis (ERA-Interim) data. Results showed that pre-monsoonal soil moisture has a significant impact on monsoonal precipitation formation and large-scale atmospheric circulations. The analysis revealed that even a small change in the processes that influence precipitation via changes in local evapotranspiration was able to trigger significant variations in regional soil moisture-precipitation feedback. It was observed that these processes varied spatially from humid to arid regions in India, which further motivated an examination of soil-moisture memory variation over these regions and determination of the ISM seasonal forecasting potential. A quantitative analysis indicated that the simulated soil-moisture memory lengths increased with soil depth and were longer in the western region than those in the eastern region of India. Additionally, the subsequent precipitation variance explained by soil moisture increased from east to west. The ISM rainfall was further analyzed in two different greenhouse gas emission scenarios: the Special Report on Emissions Scenario (SRES: B1) and the new Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs: RCP4.5). To that end, the CCLM and its driving global-coupled atmospheric-oceanic model (GCM), ECHAM/MPIOM were used in order to understand the driving processes of the projected inter-annual precipitation variability and associated trends. Results inferred that the projected rainfall changes were the result of two largely compensating processes: increase of remotely

  8. Future precipitation extremes during summer monsoon in southern Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahid, Maida; Lucarini, Valerio

    2016-04-01

    Extreme precipitation events are considered as a hydro-meteorological hazard resulting in colossal damage worldwide. In Pakistan, the extreme precipitation events have increased in the recent decades particularly in the southern part (Sindh province). This region did not receive substantial amount of precipitation earlier, but now experiencing urban flooding almost every year causing loss of life, property, crops and infrastructure. The region lacks the information regarding the recurrence of extreme precipitation events. Therefore, there is a strong need for a reliable information of extremes over the upcoming decades for better regional planning. Although statistical methods based on extreme value theory (EVT) are the most relevant ones to study the extremes, but they are never been applied in Pakistan. To address this shortcoming, we use the peak over threshold (POT) approach to compute the return levels (RLs) of precipitation extremes, and also identify the regions most prone to them. In this study, we analyzed the summer monsoon daily precipitation measured at nine weather stations of Pakistan Meteorological Department over the period 1980-2013. The summer monsoon (JJAS) is preferred for the analysis, because most of the extreme precipitation occurs during this period. We apply POT approach to model the daily precipitation above a selected threshold for each station. Then, we estimate return levels (RLs) of precipitation extremes during summer monsoon in southern Pakistan (Sindh) for the next 5, 25, 50 and 100-years. Lastly, we compare the 5-years with 100-years RLs to indicate the stations most vulnerable to precipitation extremes in future. This work is funded by the Climate KIC, European Institute of Innovation and Technology, Germany.

  9. Orbital control of the western North Pacific summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chi-Hua; Chiang, John C. H.; Hsu, Huang-Hsiung; Lee, Shih-Yu

    2016-02-01

    Orbital forcing exerts a strong influence on global monsoon systems, with higher summer insolation leading to stronger summer monsoons in the Northern Hemisphere. However, the associated regional and seasonal changes, particularly the interaction between regional monsoon systems, remain unclear. Simulations using the Community Earth System Model demonstrate that the western North Pacific (WNP) summer monsoon responds to orbital forcing opposite to that of other major Northern Hemisphere monsoon systems. Compared with its current climate state, the simulated WNP monsoon and associated lower-tropospheric trough is absent in the early Holocene when the precession-modulated Northern Hemisphere summer insolation is higher, whereas the summer monsoons in South and East Asia are stronger and shift farther northward. We attribute the weaker WNP monsoon to the stronger diabatic heating of the summer Asian monsoon—in particular over the southern Tibetan Plateau and Maritime Continent—that in turn strengthens the North Pacific subtropical high through atmospheric teleconnections. By contrast, the impact of the midlatitude circulation changes on the WNP monsoon is weaker when the solar insolation is higher. Prior to the present WNP monsoon onset, the upper-tropospheric East Asian jet stream weakens and shifts northward; the monsoon onset is highly affected by the jet-induced high potential vorticity intrusion. In the instance of the extreme perihelion-summer, the WNP monsoon is suppressed despite a stronger midlatitude precursor than present-day, and the midlatitude circulation response to the enhanced South Asian precipitation is considerable. These conditions indicate internal monsoon interactions of an orbital scale, implying a potential mechanistic control of the WNP monsoon.

  10. The Monsoon as a Self-regulating Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, P. J.; Clark, C.; Cherikova, G.; Fasullo, J.; Han, W.; Loschnigg, J.; Sahami, K.

    INTRODUCTION REGULATION OF THE MONSOON ANNUAL CYCLE The Climatological Annual Cycle Processes Determining the Annual Cycle of the Monsoon Role of Ocean Dynamics in the Annual Heat Balance of the Indian - Ocean Regulation of the Annual Cycle of the Monsoon: an Ocean-Atmosphere - Feedback System INTERANNUAL VARIABILITY OF THE MONSOON Modes of Interannual Variability in the Monsoon Interannual Modes in Ocean Heat Transport Interannual Regulation of the Monsoon GENERAL THEORY OF REGULATION OF THE COUPLED OCEAN-ATMOSPHERIC MONSOON - SYSTEM CONCLUSIONS REFERENCES

  11. Dirtier Air from a Weaker Monsoon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian

    2012-01-01

    The level of air pollution in China has much increased in the past decades, causing serious health problems. Among the main pollutants are aerosols, also known as particulate matter: tiny, invisible particles that are suspended in the air. These particles contribute substantially to premature mortality associated with cardiopulmonary diseases and lung cancer1. The increase of the aerosol level in China has been commonly attributed to the fast rise in pollutant emissions from the rapid economic development in the region. However, writing in Geophysical Research Letters, Jianlei Zhu and colleagues2 tell a different side of the story: using a chemical transport model and observation data, they show that the decadal scale weakening of the East Asian summer monsoon has also contributed to the increase of aerosol concentrations in China. The life cycle of atmospheric aerosols starts with its emission or formation in the atmosphere. Some aerosol components such as dust, soot and sea salt are emitted directly as particles to the atmosphere, but others are formed there by way of photochemical reactions. For example, sulphate and nitrate aerosols are produced from their respective precursor gases, sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. Aerosol particles can be transported away from their source locations by winds or vertical motion of the air. Eventually, they are removed from the atmosphere by means of dry deposition and wet scavenging by precipitation. Measurements generally show that aerosol concentrations over Asia are lowest during the summer monsoon season3, because intense rainfall efficiently removes them from the air. The East Asian summer monsoon extends over subtropics and mid-latitudes. Its rainfall tends to concentrate in rain belts that stretch out for many thousands of kilometres and affect China, Korea, Japan and the surrounding area. Observations suggest that the East Asian summer monsoon circulation and precipitation have been in decline since the 1970s4. In

  12. South Asian Summer Monsoon and Its Relationship with ENSO in the IPCC AR4 Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Annamalai, H; Hamilton, K; Sperber, K R

    2005-09-07

    In this paper we use the extensive integrations produced for the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) to examine the relationship between ENSO and the monsoon at interannual and decadal timescales. We begin with an analysis of the monsoon simulation in the 20th century integrations. Six of the 18 models were found to have a reasonably realistic representation of monsoon precipitation climatology. For each of these six models SST and anomalous precipitation evolution along the equatorial Pacific during El Nino events display considerable differences when compared to observations. Out of these six models only four (GFDL{_}CM{_}2.0, GFDL{_}CM{_}2.1, MRI, and MPI{_}ECHAM5) exhibit a robust ENSO-monsoon contemporaneous teleconnection, including the known inverse relationship between ENSO and rainfall variations over India. Lagged correlations between the all-India rainfall (AIR) index and Nino3.4 SST reveal that three models represent the timing of the teleconnection, including the spring predictability barrier which is manifested as the transition from positive to negative correlations prior to the monsoon onset. Furthermore, only one of these three models (GFDL{_}CM{_}2.1) captures the observed phase lag with the strongest anticorrelation of SST peaking 2-3 months after the summer monsoon, which is partially attributable to the intensity of simulated El Nino itself. We find that the models that best capture the ENSO-monsoon teleconnection are those that correctly simulate the timing and location of SST and diabatic heating anomalies in the equatorial Pacific, and the associated changes to the equatorial Walker Circulation during El Nino events. The strength of the AIR-Nino3.4 SST correlation in the model runs waxes and wanes to some degree on decadal timescales. The overall magnitude and timescale for this decadal modulation in most of the models is similar to that seen in observations. However, there is little consistency in the phase among the realizations

  13. On the Onset of the Planetary Scale Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasch, Richard Joseph

    A hypothesis, concerning the spatial scale of the onset of the Asian southwest monsoon of the Northern Hemispheric summer, is put forth. It is implied, from the large scale climatology of the tropospheric motion and temperature fields in May and June, that the monsoon onset is characterized by radical changes in the tropical circulations on a planetary scale. A suitable framework for the quantitative definition of this phenomenon, i.e., the atmospheric energetics in the zonal wavenumber domain, is reviewed. Global tropospheric wind and temperature data for periods surrounding the Indian monsoon onset cases of 1973, 1977 and 1979 are utilized. It is found that the kinetic and available potential energy of the sum of zonal wavenumbers 1, 2 and 3 (defined as the planetary scale waves) increase by about 30 to 50% on the time scale of about 1 week, corresponding to Indian (regional) onset. This increase characterizes the planetary scale onset. From the point of view of scale interactions, the observational calculations show that the planetary scale eddies, in general, supply available potential and kinetic energy to other (zonal mean and sub-planetary) scales during the onset although there are some interesting time variations. It is concluded that additional mechanisms must play the dominant roles in the planetary scale onset. To determine a more complete energetics for the onset using a dynamically more consistent set of atmospheric observations, an NWP experiment, for the 1979 onset case, is conducted. A global, multi-level, primitive equation spectral model containing a variety of physical effects parameterizations is described in detail. The results of a 96-hour prediction are compared to the observed circulation and rainfall patterns over the Indian Ocean region and the model is seen to reproduce the broad scale synoptic features of the onset fairly well. An analysis of the model diagnosed energetics (for the planetary scale waves) reveals that deep cumulus

  14. East Asian Monsoon Signals Reflected in Temperature and Precipitation Changes over the Past 300 Years in the Middle and Lower Reaches of the Yangtze River

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Zhixin; Sun, Di; Zheng, Jingyun

    2015-01-01

    Based on observational data and Asian monsoon intensity datasets from China, the relationships between the East Asian winter monsoon index and winter temperature, the East Asian summer monsoon index and Meiyu precipitation over the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River, were analyzed. We found that the monsoon signals were reflected in the temperature and Meiyu precipitation variations. Thus, we used the reconstructed Meiyu precipitation and winter temperature series for the past 300 years and detected the summer/winter monsoon intensity signals using multi-taper spectral estimation method and wavelet analysis. The main periodicities of Meiyu precipitation and winter temperature, such as interannual cycle with 2–7-year, interdecadal-centennial cycles with 30–40-year and 50–100-year, were found. The good relationships between the East Asian summer and winter monsoons suggested that they were in phase at 31-year cycle, while out of phase at 100-year cycle, but with 20-year phase difference. In addition, the winter monsoon intensity may be regulated by the North Atlantic Oscillation, the Arctic Oscillation and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation, and the summer monsoon is closely related to the signal intensities of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. PMID:26107375

  15. Atmospheric circulation feedback on west Asian dust and Indian monsoon rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaskaoutis, Dimitris; Houssos, Elias; Gautam, Ritesh; Singh, Ramesh; Rashki, Alireza; Dumka, Umesh

    2016-04-01

    Classification of the atmospheric circulation patterns associated with high aerosol loading events over the Ganges valley, via the synergy of Factor and Cluster analysis techniques, has indicated six different synoptic weather patterns, two of which mostly occur during late pre-monsoon and monsoon seasons (May to September). The current study focuses on examining these two specific clusters that are associated with different mean sea level pressure (MSLP), geopotential height at 700 hPa (Z700) and wind fields that seem to affect the aerosol (mostly dust) emissions and precipitation distribution over the Indian sub-continent. Furthermore, the study reveals that enhanced aerosol presence over the Arabian Sea is positively associated with increased rainfall over the Indian landmass. The increased dust over the Arabian Sea and rainfall over India are associated with deepening of the northwestern Indian and Arabian lows that increase thermal convection and convergence of humid air masses into Indian landmass, resulting in larger monsoon precipitation. For this cluster, negative MSLP and Z700 anomalies are observed over the Arabian Peninsula that enhance the dust outflow from Arabia and, concurrently, the southwesterly air flow resulting in increase in monsoon precipitation over India. The daily precipitation over India is found to be positively correlated with the aerosol loading over the Arabian Sea for both weather clusters, thus verifying recent results from satellite observations and model simulations concerning the modulation of the Indian summer monsoon rainfall by the Arabian dust. The present work reveals that in addition to the radiative impacts of dust on modulating the monsoon rainfall, differing weather patterns favor changes in dust emissions, accumulation as well as rainfall distribution over south Asia.

  16. Modern monsoon extent and moisture dynamics over eastern Asian: evidence from precipitation and water vapor isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongfang; Kei, Yoshimura; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Tian, Lide

    2013-04-01

    The climate of eastern Asia is dominated by the Asia monsoon (AM) system, which controls seasonal patterns of moisture sources and transport to the region. Measurements of water isotopes can provide insight into monsoon extent and moisture dynamics. Here we present an analysis of a spatially dense network of precipitation isotopes (d18O and dD) from a ground-based network and water vapor dD retrieved from satellite measurements. The results show that isotopic seasonality for both precipitation and water vapor exhibits two distinctly different, spatially coherent modes. Summer-season isotope ratios are relatively low to the south of ~35°N and high to the north, with the transition between these zones reflecting the approximate northward extent of Asia summer monsoon influence. In the southern monsoon domain, low isotope values with relatively low precipitation d-excess (9.4‰ in SE China) in summer appear not to reflect the amount effect, but rather the dominance of monsoon moisture with long-distance transport from the Indian and southern Pacific oceans and continental convective recycling (contribute to about 30-48% moisture in SE China). In contrast, other seasons are dominated by dry continental masses, characterized by high d-excess (12.7‰) and isotope values. In northern China, a region that is beyond extent of monsoon, the moisture is derived overwhelmingly from the dry continental air masses. Here, water isotope ratios exhibit stronger temperature dependence, with enriched values in summer and depleted values in other seasons. The relatively low precipitation d-excess (<8‰) in northern China and inverse spatial isotope patterns between precipitation and water vapor across China during the summer further suggest that re-evaporation of falling raindrops is a key driver of water isotope behavior in northern China.

  17. Role of Anomalous States of Upper Tropospheric Circulation on Extremely Dry and Wet Summer Monsoon Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, S.; Koike, T.; Nishii, K.; Shrestha, M.

    2011-12-01

    Seasonal changes in wind pattern, monsoon, sometimes result in severe droughts and intense flooding in many parts of the world including South Asian countries like Pakistan. The livelihood of a vast population in Pakistan depends on agriculture and land use is strongly influenced by water-based ecosystems that depend on the monsoon rains. Furthermore, climate change studies undertaken so far reveal that action is essential in order to prevent long term damage to water cycle and thus of great concern to the community and stakeholders. Pakistan Summer Monsoon (PSM) is affected by both the disturbances from the tropical and the extratropical regions; however there is lack of understanding of physical mechanisms of PSM compared to other regional studies i.e. Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) and South-East Asian Monsoon (SEAM). In our study, we applied heat and vorticity budgets, and wave train analysis to reveal the mechanisms of the extremely dry and wet PSM events associated with the anomalous upper tropospheric conditions. We found that the extremely dry (wet) PSM events were closely related with the anomalous cyclonic (anticyclonic) upper-tropospheric circulation around northwest of Pakistan, and mid-upper tropospheric cooling (warming) anomaly around Pakistan and to its north/northwest. We also found in addition to Rossby wave response due to the suppressed (enhanced) convective activities around monsoon regions, the midlatitude wave energy propagation emanating around cyclonic/anticyclonic anomaly around northwestern Atlantic, northeastern Atlantic, Europe or Mediterranean regions induced/reinforced/maintained the anomalous upper tropospheric cyclonic (anticyclonic) circulation around northwest of Pakistan during extremely dry (wet) PSM events. Therefore, devastating drought (flood) events over the PSM region resulting from weak (strong) convection anomalies are induced by both the tropical and extratropical processes.

  18. Regime shifts in Holocene Asian monsoon dynamics inferred from speleothems: Potential impacts on cultural change and migratory patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donges, Jonathan F.; Donner, Reik V.; Marwan, Norbert; Breitenbach, Sebastian F. M.; Rehfeld, Kira; Kurths, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    The Asian monsoon system has been recognized as an important potential tipping element in Earth's climate. A global warming-driven change in monsoonal circulation, potentially towards a drier and more irregular regime, would profoundly affect up to 60% of the global human population. Hence, to improve our understanding of this major climate system, it is mandatory to investigate evidence for nonlinear transitions in past monsoonal dynamics and the underlying mechanisms that are contained in the available palaeoclimatic record. For this purpose, speleothems are among the best available high-resolution archives of Asian palaeomonsoonal variability during the Holocene and well beyond. In this work, we apply recurrence networks, a recently developed technique for nonlinear time series analysis of palaeoclimate data (Donges et al., PNAS 108, 20422-20427, 2011), for detecting episodes with pronounced changes in Asian monsoon dynamics during the last 10 ka in oxygen isotope records from spatially distributed cave deposits covering the different branches of the Asian monsoon system. Our methodology includes multiple archives, explicit consideration of dating uncertainties with the COPRA approach and rigorous significance testing to ensure the robust detection of continental-scale changes in monsoonal dynamics. We identify several periods characterised by nonlinear changes in Asian monsoon dynamics (e.g., ~0.5, 2.2-2.8, 3.6-4.1, 5.4-5.7, and 8.0-8.5 ka before present [BP]), the timing of which suggests a connection to extra-tropical Bond events and rapid climate change (RCC) episodes during the Holocene. Interestingly, we furthermore detect an epoch of significantly increased regularity of monsoonal variations around 7.3 ka BP, a timing that is consistent with the typical 1.0-1.5 ka periodicity of Bond events but has been rarely reported in the literature so far. Furthermore, we find that the detected epochs of nonlinear regime shifts in Asian monsoon dynamics partly

  19. Effect of El-Nino on Southwest Monsoon 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    K. U., Vidhulakshmi; Mrudula, G.

    2016-05-01

    Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall (ISMR) of 2015 showed a deficit of 14% in the seasonal rainfall. Many researchers connected this deficit to the El-Nino which developed in late May. In this study an analysis of major ENSO events and its influence on ISMR during the period 1975 till present have been carried out. The behavior of ISMR during the previous El-Nino/La-Nina years has been compared with that of 2015. Preliminary analysis shows the effects of El-Nino on ISMR of 2015 started mainly from July. This is attributed to Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) by many scientists. Analysis of spatial and temporal correlations of SST of various Nino regions with the ISMR and of MJO will also be presented in detail.

  20. The Diurnal Cycle of the Boundary Layer, Convection, Clouds, and Surface Radiation in a Coastal Monsoon Environment (Darwin Australia)

    SciTech Connect

    May, Peter T.; Long, Charles N.; Protat, Alain

    2012-08-01

    The diurnal variation of convection and associated cloud and radiative properties remains a significant issue in global NWP and climate models. This study analyzes observed diurnal variability of convection in a coastal monsoonal environment examining the interaction of convective rain clouds, their associated cloud properties, and the impact on the surface radiation and corresponding boundary layer structure during periods where convection is suppressed or active on the large scale. The analysis uses data from the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) as well as routine measurements from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology and the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. Both active monsoonal and large-scale suppressed (buildup and break) conditions are examined and demonstrate that the diurnal variation of rainfall is much larger during the break periods and the spatial distribution of rainfall is very different between the monsoon and break regimes. During the active monsoon the total net radiative input to the surface is decreased by more than 3 times the amount than during the break regime - this total radiative cloud forcing is found to be dominated by the shortwave (SW) cloud effects because of the much larger optical thicknesses and persistence of long-lasting anvils and cirrus cloud decks associated with the monsoon regime. These differences in monsoon versus break surface radiative energy contribute to low-level air temperature differences in the boundary layer over the land surfaces.

  1. Assessment of South Asian Summer Monsoon Simulation in CMIP5-Coupled Climate Models During the Historical Period (1850-2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanna, Venkatraman

    2016-04-01

    This paper evaluates the performance of 29 state-of-art CMIP5-coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCM) in their representation of regional characteristics of monsoon simulation over South Asia. The AOGCMs, despite their relatively coarse resolution, have shown some reasonable skill in simulating the mean monsoon and precipitation variability over the South Asian monsoon region. However, considerable biases do exist with reference to the observed precipitation and also inter-model differences. The monsoon rainfall and surface flux bias with respect to the observations from the historical run for the period nominally from 1850 to 2005 are discussed in detail. Our results show that the coupled model simulations over South Asia exhibit large uncertainties from one model to the other. The analysis clearly brings out the presence of large systematic biases in coupled simulation of boreal summer precipitation, evaporation, and sea surface temperature (SST) in the Indian Ocean, often exceeding 50 % of the climatological values. Many of the biases are common to many models. Overall, the coupled models need further improvement in realistically portraying boreal summer monsoon over the South Asian monsoon region.

  2. Status of NCEP CFS vis-a-vis IPCC AR4 models for the simulation of Indian summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, Samir; Dhakate, Ashish; Chaudhari, Hemantkumar S.; Saha, Subodh K.

    2013-01-01

    National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Coupled Forecast System (CFS) is selected to play a lead role for monsoon research (seasonal prediction, extended range prediction, climate prediction, etc.) in the ambitious Monsoon Mission project of Government of India. Thus, as a prerequisite, a detail analysis for the performance of NCEP CFS vis-a-vis IPCC AR4 models for the simulation of Indian summer monsoon (ISM) is attempted. It is found that the mean monsoon simulations by CFS in its long run are at par with the IPCC models. The spatial distribution of rainfall in the realm of Indian subcontinent augurs the better results for CFS as compared with the IPCC models. The major drawback of CFS is the bifurcation of rain types; it shows almost 80-90 % rain as convective, contrary to the observation where it is only 50-65 %; however, the same lacuna creeps in other models of IPCC as well. The only respite is that it realistically simulates the proper ratio of convective and stratiform rain over central and southern part of India. In case of local air-sea interaction, it outperforms other models. However, for monsoon teleconnections, it competes with the better models of the IPCC. This study gives us the confidence that CFS can be very well utilized for monsoon studies and can be safely used for the future development for reliable prediction system of ISM.

  3. Earlier North American Monsoon Onset in a Warmer World?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauscher, S. A.; Seth, A.; Ringler, T.; Rojas, M.; Liebmann, B.

    2009-12-01

    Analysis of twenty-first century projections indicate substantial drying over the American Southwest and the potential for “Dust Bowl” conditions to be the norm by the middle of century. Closer examination of monthly precipitation data from the CMIP3 models indicates that the annual cycle is actually amplified over the North American Monsoon (NAMS) region, with drier conditions during the winter and an increase in monsoon rains during the later part of the rainy season. Importantly, the projected decrease in winter precipitation extends into the spring season, suggesting a delayed onset of the NAMS. Consistent thermodynamic changes, including a decrease in low-level relative humidity and an increase in the vertical gradient of moist static energy, accompany this spring precipitation decrease. Here we examine daily precipitation data from the CMIP3 archive to determine if this reduced spring precipitation represents a true delay in the NAMS onset. We further analyze the hydrological cycle over the NAMS region in several of the CMIP3 models, focusing on changes in net moisture divergence, surface evaporation, and soil moisture in order to fully understand how the hydrological cycle will change in the future based on the CMIP3 simulations, and how these changes may be translated into the timing and intensity of the NAMS. The combination of a delayed NAMS onset and earlier and reduced snowmelt runoff in the western US could substantially change the availability of water resources over the NAMS region.

  4. The Influence of Somalia and Oman Upwellings on the Indian Summer Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumo, T.; de Boyer Montégut, C.; Luo, J.; Behera, S. K.; Masson, S.; Yamagata, T.

    2006-12-01

    What controls the strength of the Indian summer monsoon is not well known yet. The Somalia and Oman upwellings peak during the summer monsoon and strongly cool the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) in the Western Arabian Sea. A slight change in their strength can thus have strong impacts on the SST and extent of the Indian ocean warm pool, which is the main source of moisture for the monsoon. Here the role of Somalia and Oman upwellings on the strength of the Indian monsoon is evidenced using both observations and the high resolution SINTEX-F Coupled Global Circulation Model (CGCM), which accurately simulates the monsoon. Within the CGCM, the spring increase and summer maximum of the Western Arabian Sea coastal upwellings are removed in a sensitivity experiment (SENS) by imposing over the Indian Ocean the mean windstress, instead of the temporally varying one of the control experiment (CTL). The ocean circulation becomes nearly stationnary. In summer, the main change in SST in SENS is a strong warming (up to 2°C) along the East African coast where coastal upwelling and off-shore horizontal advection of upwelled waters usually cool SST. This SST warming leads to a strong increase in the monsoon extent and strength along the West coast of India up to 5 mm/day (about 25% of CTL). The mechanism is as follow: in SENS, summer SST warming in the upwelling region causes anomalous evaporation, which increases specific humidity of the air masses going over the upwelling region. The humidity transport thus increases all over the Arabian sea towards the coastal Ghats mountains of India. This finally leads to enhanced moisture convergence and precipitations along the West coast of India. This role of coastal upwelling and associated SST variations on the Indian monsoon is confirmed by observations since 1980. Correlation analysis shows that enhanced summer precipitations on the West Indian coast are usually associated with warmer SST in summer East of Somalia-Oman and North

  5. Interaction of Convective Organization and Monsoon Precipitation, Atmosphere, Surface and Sea (INCOMPASS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Andrew; Bhat, Gs; Evans, Jonathan; Marsham, John; Martin, Gill; Parker, Douglas; Taylor, Chris; Bhattacharya, Bimal; Madan, Ranju; Mitra, Ashis; Mrudula, Gm; Muddu, Sekhar; Pattnaik, Sandeep; Rajagopal, En; Tripathi, Sachida

    2015-04-01

    The monsoon supplies the majority of water in South Asia, making understanding and predicting its rainfall vital for the growing population and economy. However, modelling and forecasting the monsoon from days to the season ahead is limited by large model errors that develop quickly, with significant inter-model differences pointing to errors in physical parametrizations such as convection, the boundary layer and land surface. These errors persist into climate projections and many of these errors persist even when increasing resolution. At the same time, a lack of detailed observations is preventing a more thorough understanding of monsoon circulation and its interaction with the land surface: a process governed by the boundary layer and convective cloud dynamics. The INCOMPASS project will support and develop modelling capability in Indo-UK monsoon research, including test development of a new Met Office Unified Model 100m-resolution domain over India. The first UK detachment of the FAAM research aircraft to India, in combination with an intensive ground-based observation campaign, will gather new observations of the surface, boundary layer structure and atmospheric profiles to go with detailed information on the timing of monsoon rainfall. Observations will be focused on transects in the northern plains of India (covering a range of surface types from irrigated to rain-fed agriculture, and wet to dry climatic zones) and across the Western Ghats and rain shadow in southern India (including transitions from land to ocean and across orography). A pilot observational campaign is planned for summer 2015, with the main field campaign to take place during spring/summer 2016. This project will advance our ability to forecast the monsoon, through a programme of measurements and modelling that aims to capture the key surface-atmosphere feedback processes in models. The observational analysis will allow a unique and unprecedented characterization of monsoon processes that

  6. The Misnomer of East Asia Summer Monsoon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Winston C.; Chen, Baode

    2004-01-01

    The terminology East Asian summer monsoon is used to refer to the heavy rainfall in southeast China including the Yangtze River Valley starting in May and ending in August (e.g., Chen and Chang 1980, Tao and Chen 1987, Ding 1992, Chang et al. 2000a.) This rainfall region is associated with the Mei-Yu front, which extends to Japan and its neighborhood and is called Baiu there. The Mei-Yu front becomes prominent in May and has a slow northward movement. From May to July the elongated rain belt moves from the southeast coast of China to the Yangtze River Valley. The rain belt extends north-east-ward to south of Japan in May and later covers Korea also. The purpose of this note is to point out that the terminology of East Asian summer monsoon is a misnomer to refer to the portion of this rainbelt residing over East Asia, in the sense that it is not a monsoon.

  7. Evaluation of Dynamics of the West African Monsoon Jump Simulated by the MIT Regional Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eltahir, Elfatih A. B.; Im, Eun-Soon

    2015-04-01

    The seasonal advance and retreat of the West African monsoon behaves abrupt northward jump of maximum rainfall from the Guinean coast to the Sahel region. Both global and regional climate models have difficulties in accurately reproducing such a behavior due to its complexity combined the dynamical and physical processes. In this study, we evaluate the performance of the MIT Regional Climate Model (MRCM) in simulating the West African monsoon. For this, 20-year long-term simulation (1989-2008) is performed using the ERAInterim reanalysis as the initial and boundary condition, and the analysis primarily focuses on the dynamics associated with abrupt phase transitions of the monsoon rainfall. We first examine detailed characteristics in terms of the onset, maximum, and retreat of the monsoon rainfall using daily precipitation. We then present the dynamical explanation behind rainfall variability from the analysis of the absolute vorticity near the tropopause and the meridional gradient of boundary-layer entropy within the dynamical theory proposed by Eltahir and Gong (1996). Acknowledgements : This research was supported by the National Research Foundation Singapore through the Singapore MIT Alliance for Research and Technology's Center for Environmental Sensing and Modeling interdisciplinary research program.

  8. Holocene Monsoon Changes Inferred from Lake Sediment Pollen and Carbonate Records, Northeastern Cambodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Andrew Lee

    2001-11-01

    Major Holocene monsoon changes in continental Southeast Asia are reconstructed from analysis of 14C-dated changes in pollen and organic/inorganic carbon in sediment cores taken from permanent, closed-basin, volcanic lakes in Ratanakiri Province, northeastern Cambodia. Analysis focuses on the nature and timing of monsoon changes, inferred from changes in vegetation and lake conditions. These data provide the first well-dated palynological record, covering most of the Holocene and continuous up to the present, from a terrestrial site in mainland Southeast Asia. The record from a 15-m core retrieved from Kara Lake, representing the last 9300 years, shows that the late Glacial conditions ended about 8500 14C yr B.P., more than 1000 years later than sites in southwest China. Summer monsoon intensity increased over the period ca. 8400-5300 14C yr B.P., similar to most other sites in the Asian monsoon region. A subsequent expansion of secondary forests at the expense of dense semievergreen forests suggest a drier climate leading to more frequent fire disturbance. After ca. 3500 14C yr B.P. disturbance frequency may have increased further with increasing seasonality. From ca. 2500 14C yr B.P. to the present, dense forest has recovered in a mosaic with annually burned dry forest, but climate may not be the main control on local vegetation dynamics in the late Holocene.

  9. Tropospheric ozone variability during the monsoon season in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahamad, Fatimah; Latif, Mohd Talib

    2013-11-01

    Vertical ozone (O3) profiles obtained from ozonesondes launched at Kuala Lumpur International Airport (KLIA), Malaysia were analyzed. Results of soundings between January to March 2011 and July to September 2011 are presented along with meteorological parameters (temperature and relative humidity (RH)). The overall O3 concentration range between the soundings made during the northeast monsoon (January - March) and the southwest monsoon (July - September) were not far from each other for altitudes below 8 km. However O3 variability is less pronounced between 2 km and 12 km during the southwest monsoon compared to the northeast monsoon season.

  10. Simulation of South-Asian Summer Monsoon in a GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajayamohan, R. S.

    2007-10-01

    Major characteristics of Indian summer monsoon climate are analyzed using simulations from the upgraded version of Florida State University Global Spectral Model (FSUGSM). The Indian monsoon has been studied in terms of mean precipitation and low-level and upper-level circulation patterns and compared with observations. In addition, the model's fidelity in simulating observed monsoon intraseasonal variability, interannual variability and teleconnection patterns is examined. The model is successful in simulating the major rainbelts over the Indian monsoon region. However, the model exhibits bias in simulating the precipitation bands over the South China Sea and the West Pacific region. Seasonal mean circulation patterns of low-level and upper-level winds are consistent with the model's precipitation pattern. Basic features like onset and peak phase of monsoon are realistically simulated. However, model simulation indicates an early withdrawal of monsoon. Northward propagation of rainbelts over the Indian continent is simulated fairly well, but the propagation is weak over the ocean. The model simulates the meridional dipole structure associated with the monsoon intraseasonal variability realistically. The model is unable to capture the observed interannual variability of monsoon and its teleconnection patterns. Estimate of potential predictability of the model reveals the dominating influence of internal variability over the Indian monsoon region.

  11. Predicting Indian Summer Monsoon onset through variations of surface air temperature and relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolbova, Veronika; Surovyatkina, Elena; Kurths, Jurgen

    2015-04-01

    Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) rainfall has an enormous effect on Indian agriculture, economy, and, as a consequence, life and prosperity of more than one billion people. Variability of the monsoonal rainfall and its onset have a huge influence on food production, agricultural planning and GDP of the country, which on 22% is determined by agriculture. Consequently, successful forecasting of the ISM onset is a big challenge and large efforts are being put into it. Here, we propose a novel approach for predictability of the ISM onset, based on critical transition theory. The ISM onset is defined as an abrupt transition from sporadious rainfall to spatially organized and temporally sustained rainfall. Taking this into account, we consider the ISM onset as is a critical transition from pre-monsoon to monsoon, which take place in time and also in space. It allows us to suggest that before the onset of ISM on the Indian subcontinent should be areas of critical behavior where indicators of the critical transitions can be detected through an analysis of observational data. First, we identify areas with such critical behavior. Second, we use detected areas as reference points for observation locations for the ISM onset prediction. Third, we derive a precursor for the ISM onset based on the analysis of surface air temperature and relative humidity variations in these reference points. Finally, we demonstrate the performance of this precursor on two observational data sets. The proposed approach allows to determine ISM onset in advance in 67% of all considered years. Our proposed approach is less effective during the anomalous years, which are associated with weak/strong monsoons, e.g. El-Nino, La-Nina or positive Indian Ocean Dipole events. The ISM onset is predicted for 23 out of 27 normal monsoon years (85%) during the past 6 decades. In the anomalous years, we show that time series analysis in both areas during the pre-monsoon period reveals indicators whether the

  12. Stable isotopes in monsoon precipitation and water vapour in Nagqu, Tibet, and their implications for monsoon moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Siyuan; Richards, Keith

    2016-09-01

    Understanding climate variations over the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau has become essential because the high plateau sustains various ecosystems and water sources, and impacts on the Asian monsoon system. This paper provides new information from isotopic signals in meteoric water and atmospheric water vapour on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau using high frequency observation data over a relatively short period. The aim is to explore temporal moisture changes and annual variations at the onset and during the summer monsoon season at a transitional site with respect to the monsoon influence. Data show that high frequency and short period observations can reveal typical moisture changes from the pre-monsoon to the monsoon seasons (2010), and the large variation in isotopic signals in different years with respect to active/inactive periods during a mature phase of the monsoon (2011), especially inferring from the temporal changes in the d-excess of precipitation and its relationship with δ18O values, when higher d-excess is found in the pre-monsoon precipitation. In this transition zone on a daily basis, δ18O values in precipitation are controlled mainly by the amount of rainfall during the monsoon season, while temperature seems more important before the onset of monsoon. Furthermore, the "amount effect" is significant for night-time rain events. From comparison of signals in both the precipitation and water vapour, an inconsistent relationship between d-excess values suggests various moisture fluxes are active in a short period. The temporal pattern of isotopic signal change from the onset of the monsoon to the mature monsoon phase provides information about the larger circulation dynamics of the Asian monsoon.

  13. Variability in AIRS CO2 during active and break phases of Indian summer monsoon.

    PubMed

    Revadekar, J V; Ravi Kumar, K; Tiwari, Yogesh K; Valsala, Vinu

    2016-01-15

    Due to human activities, the atmospheric concentration of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) has been rising extensively since the Industrial Revolution. Indian summer monsoon (ISM) has a dominant westerly component from ocean to land with a strong tendency to ascend and hence may have role in CO2 distribution in lower and middle troposphere over Indian sub-continent. A substantial component of ISM variability arises from the fluctuations on the intra-seasonal scale between active and break phases which correspond to strong and weak monsoon circulation. In view of the above, an attempt is made in this study to examine the AIRS/AQUA satellite retrieved CO2 distribution in response to atmospheric circulation with focus on active and break phase. Correlation analysis indicates the increase in AIRS CO2 linked with strong monsoon circulation. Study also reveals that anomalous circulation pattern during active and break phase show resemblance with high and low values of AIRS CO2. Homogeneous monsoon regions of India show substantial increase in CO2 levels during active phase. Hilly regions of India show strong contrast in CO2 and vertical velocity during active and break phases.

  14. A correlated shortening of the North and South American monsoon seasons in the past few decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, Paola A.; Fu, Rong; Vera, Carolina; Rojas, Maisa

    2015-12-01

    Our observational analysis shows that the wet seasons of the American monsoon systems have shortened since 1978 due to correlated earlier retreats of the North American monsoon (NAM) and late onsets of the southern Amazon wet season, an important part of the South American monsoon (SAM). These changes are related to the combination of the global sea surface temperature (SST) warming mode, the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), the westward shift of the North Atlantic subtropical high (NASH), and the enhancement of Pacific South American and Pacific North American wave train patterns, which induces variations of the regional circulation at interannual and decadal scales. The joint contributions from these forcing factors are associated with a stronger and more equatorward regional Hadley cell, which enhances convergence towards the equator, strengthening and possibly delaying the retreat of the tropical part of the NAM. This in turn accelerates the demise of the northern NAM and delays the reversal of the cross-equatorial flow over South America, reducing moisture transport to the SAM and delaying its onset. In addition, the thermodynamic response to warming appears to cause local drier land conditions over both regions, reinforcing the observed changes in these monsoons. Although previous studies have identified the isolated influence of the regional Hadley cell, ENSO, AMO, global SST warming, and NASH on the NAM, the correlated changes between NAM and SAM through variations of the cross-equatorial flow had not been established before.

  15. The Indian summer monsoon rainfall: interplay of coupled dynamics, radiation and cloud microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, P. K.; Behera, S. K.; Herman, J. R.; Maksyutov, S.; Akimoto, H.; Yamagata, T.

    2005-05-01

    The Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR), which has a strong connection to agricultural food production, has been less predictable by conventional models in recent times. Two distinct years 2002 and 2003 with lower and higher July rainfall, respectively, are selected to help understand the natural and anthropogenic influences on ISMR. We show that heating gradients along the meridional monsoon circulation are reduced due to aerosol radiative forcing and the Indian Ocean Dipole in 2002. An increase in the dust and biomass-burning component of the aerosols through the zonal monsoon circulation resulted in reduction of cloud droplet growth in July 2002. These conditions were opposite to those in July 2003 which led to an above average ISMR. In this study, we have utilized NCEP/NCAR reanalyses for meteorological data (e.g. sea-surface temperature, horizontal winds, and precipitable water), NOAA interpolated outgoing long-wave radiation, IITM constructed all-India rainfall amounts, aerosol parameters as observed from the TOMS and MODIS satellites, and ATSR fire count maps. Based on this analysis, we suggest that monsoon rainfall prediction models should include synoptic as well as interannual variability in both atmospheric dynamics and chemical composition.

  16. The Indian summer monsoon rainfall: interplay of coupled dynamics, radiation and cloud microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, P. K.; Behera, S. K.; Herman, J. R.; Maksyutov, S.; Akimoto, H.; Yamagata, Y.

    2005-08-01

    The Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR), which has a strong connection to agricultural food production, has been less predictable by conventional models in recent times. Two distinct years 2002 and 2003 with lower and higher July rainfall, respectively, are selected to help understand the natural and anthropogenic influences on ISMR. We show that heating gradients along the meridional monsoon circulation are reduced due to aerosol radiative forcing and the Indian Ocean Dipole in 2002. An increase in the dust and biomass-burning component of the aerosols through the zonal monsoon circulation resulted in reduction of cloud droplet growth in July 2002. These conditions were opposite to those in July 2003 which led to an above average ISMR. In this study, we have utilized NCEP/NCAR reanalyses for meteorological data (e.g. sea-surface temperature, horizontal winds, and precipitable water), NOAA interpolated outgoing long-wave radiation, IITM constructed all-India rainfall amounts, aerosol parameters as observed from the TOMS and MODIS satellites, and ATSR fire count maps. Based on this analysis, we suggest that monsoon rainfall prediction models should include synoptic as well as interannual variability in both atmospheric dynamics and chemical composition.

  17. Studies on MODIS NDVI and its relation with the south west monsoon, western ghats, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi Kumar, Tv; Barbosa, Humberto; Uma, R.; Rao, Koteswara

    2012-07-01

    Eleven years (2000 to 2010) of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data, derived from Moderate Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra with 250m resolution are used in the present study to discuss the changes in the trends of vegetal cover. The interannual variability of NDVI over western ghats (number of test sites are 17) showed increasing trend and the pronounced changes are resulted due to the monsoon variability in terms of its distribution (wide spread/fairly wide spread/scattered/isolated) and activity (vigorous/normal/weak) and are studied in detail. The NDVI progression is observed from June with a minimum value of 0.179 and yielded to maximum at 0.565 during September/October, on average. The study then relates the NDVI with the no of light, moderate and heavy rainfall events via statistical techniques such as correlation and regression to understand the connection in between the ground vegetation and the south west monsoon. The results of the study inferred i) NDVI, Antecedent Precipitation Index (API) are in good agreement throughout the monsoon which is evidenced by correlation as well as by Morlett Wavelet Analysis, ii) NDVI maintained good correlation with no of Light Rainy and Moderate Rainy alternatively but not with no of Heavy Rainy days, iii) Relation of NDVI with Isolated, Scattered distributions and active monsoons is substantial and iv) Phenological stages captured the Rate of Green Up during the crop season over western ghats.

  18. Prediction of dominant intraseasonal modes in the East Asian-western North Pacific summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Hyoeun; Ha, Kyung-Ja

    2016-10-01

    Intraseasonal monsoon prediction is the most imperative task, but there remains an enduring challenge in climate science. The present study aims to provide a physical understanding of the sources for prediction of dominant intraseasonal modes in the East Asian-western North Pacific summer monsoon (EA-WNPSM): pre-Meiyu&Baiu, Changma&Meiyu, WNPSM, and monsoon gyre modes classified by the self-organizing map analysis. Here, we use stepwise regression to determine the predictors for the four modes in the EA-WNPSM. The selected predictors are based on the persistent and tendency signals of the sea surface temperature (SST)/2m air temperature and sea level pressure fields, which reflect the asymmetric response to the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the ocean and land surface anomalous conditions. For the pre-Meiyu&Baiu mode, the SST cooling tendency over the western North Pacific (WNP), which persists into summer, is the distinguishing contributor that results in strong baroclinic instability. A major precursor for the Changma&Meiyu mode is related to the WNP subtropical high, induced by the persistent SST difference between the Indian Ocean and the western Pacific. The WNPSM mode is mostly affected by the Pacific-Japan pattern, and monsoon gyre mode is primarily associated with a persistent SST cooling over the tropical Indian Ocean by the preceding ENSO signal. This study carries important implications for prediction by establishing valuable precursors of the four modes including nonlinear characteristics.

  19. Prediction of dominant intraseasonal modes in the East Asian-western North Pacific summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Hyoeun; Ha, Kyung-Ja

    2015-12-01

    Intraseasonal monsoon prediction is the most imperative task, but there remains an enduring challenge in climate science. The present study aims to provide a physical understanding of the sources for prediction of dominant intraseasonal modes in the East Asian-western North Pacific summer monsoon (EA-WNPSM): pre-Meiyu&Baiu, Changma&Meiyu, WNPSM, and monsoon gyre modes classified by the self-organizing map analysis. Here, we use stepwise regression to determine the predictors for the four modes in the EA-WNPSM. The selected predictors are based on the persistent and tendency signals of the sea surface temperature (SST)/2m air temperature and sea level pressure fields, which reflect the asymmetric response to the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the ocean and land surface anomalous conditions. For the pre-Meiyu&Baiu mode, the SST cooling tendency over the western North Pacific (WNP), which persists into summer, is the distinguishing contributor that results in strong baroclinic instability. A major precursor for the Changma&Meiyu mode is related to the WNP subtropical high, induced by the persistent SST difference between the Indian Ocean and the western Pacific. The WNPSM mode is mostly affected by the Pacific-Japan pattern, and monsoon gyre mode is primarily associated with a persistent SST cooling over the tropical Indian Ocean by the preceding ENSO signal. This study carries important implications for prediction by establishing valuable precursors of the four modes including nonlinear characteristics.

  20. Direct radiative effects of anthropogenic aerosols on Indian summer monsoon circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sushant; Dey, Sagnik; Dash, S. K.

    2016-05-01

    The direct radiative impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on the dynamics of Indian summer monsoon circulation are examined using the regional climate model version 4.1 (RegCM4.1). High anthropogenic aerosol optical depth (AAOD >0.1) and surface shortwave cooling (<-6 W m-2) are simulated over the Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB), northeast India, east coast of India, and its outflow to the Bay of Bengal (BoB) during the monsoon season (June to September) in the period 2001 to 2010. The analysis reveals a decrease in near surface air temperature at 2 m over the IGB and east coast of India by >0.2 °C due to the dimming effect of anthropogenic aerosols. The aerosol-induced cooling leads to an increase in surface pressure over the local hotspots in the Indian landmass, which reduces the land-sea pressure contrast resulting in weakening of summer monsoon circulation. The simulated surface pressure anomaly also inhibits moisture transport from the BoB towards Indian landmass thereby enhancing precipitation over the BoB and parts of the east coast of India. The impacts are interpreted as conservative estimates because of the underestimation of AAOD by the model due to uncertainties in emission inventory and biases in simulated meteorology. Our results demonstrate the direct radiative impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on the Indian monsoon circulation and call for future studies combining the dynamical and microphysical impacts, which are not considered in this study.

  1. Atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of southern Taiwan in relation to monsoons.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jing-O; Ko, Fung-Chi; Lee, Chon-Lin; Fang, Meng-Der

    2016-08-01

    The concentrations and gas-particle partitioning of atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were intensively measured in the Hengchun Peninsula of southern Taiwan. The concentrations of total PAH (Σ38PAH), including gas and particle phases, ranged from 0.85 to 4.40 ng m(-3). No significant differences in the PAH levels and patterns were found between the samples taken at day and at night. The gas phase PAH concentrations were constant year-round, but the highest levels of particle-associated PAHs were found during the northeast monsoon season. Long-range transport and rainfall scavenging mechanisms contributed to the elevated levels in aerosols andΣ38PAH concentrations. Results from principal component analysis (PCA) indicated that the major sources of PAHs in this study were vehicular emissions. The back trajectories demonstrated that air mass movement driven by the monsoon system was the main influence on atmospheric PAH profiles and concentrations in the rural region of southern Taiwan. Gas-particle partition coefficients (K p ) of PAHs were well-correlated with sub-cooled liquid vapor pressures (P (o) L ) and demonstrated significant seasonal variation between the northeast (NE) and the southwest (SW) monsoon seasons. This study sheds light on the role of Asian monsoons regarding the atmospheric transport of PAHs. PMID:27137192

  2. Indian summer monsoon precipitating clouds: role of microphysical process rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Anupam; Chaudhari, Hemantkumar S.; Pokhrel, Samir; Saha, Subodh K.

    2016-04-01

    The budget analysis of microphysical process rates based on Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) products are presented in the study. The relative importance of different microphysical process rates, which is crucial for GCMs, is investigated. The autoconversion and accretion processes are found to be vital for Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM). The map-to-map correlations are examined between observed precipitation and MERRA reanalysis. The pattern correlations connote the fidelity of the MERRA datasets used here. Results of other microphysical parameters (e.g. ice water content from CloudSat, high cloud fraction from CALIPSO and MODIS, latent heating from TRMM, cloud ice mixing ratio from MERRA) are presented in this study. The tropospheric temperature from reanalysis product of MERRA and NCEP are also analyzed. Furthermore, the linkages between cloud microphysics production rates and dynamics, which are important for North-South tropospheric temperature gradient for maintaining the ISM circulation, are also discussed. The study demonstrates the microphysical process rates, which are actually responsible for the cloud hydrometeors and precipitation formation on the monsoon intraseasonal oscillations timescale. Cloud to rain water auto-conversion and snow accretion rates are the dominant processes followed by the rain accretion. All these tendency terms replicates the similar spatial patterns as that of precipitation. The quantification of microphysical process rates and precipitation over different regions are shown here. The freezing rate is also imperative for the formation of cloud ice as revealed by the observation. Freezing rates at upper level and snow accretion at middle level may have effect on latent heating release. Further it can modulate the north-south temperature gradient which can influence the large-scale monsoon dynamics. The rain water evaporation is also considered as a key aspect for controlling the low level

  3. Distribution and sources of particulate organic matter in the Indian monsoonal estuaries during monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, V. V. S. S.; Krishna, M. S.; Prasad, V. R.; Kumar, B. S. K.; Naidu, S. A.; Rao, G. D.; Viswanadham, R.; Sridevi, T.; Kumar, P. P.; Reddy, N. P. C.

    2014-11-01

    The distribution and sources of particulate organic carbon (POC) and nitrogen (PN) in 27 Indian estuaries were examined during the monsoon using the content and isotopic composition of carbon and nitrogen. Higher phytoplankton biomass was noticed in estuaries with deeper photic zone than other estuaries receiving higher suspended matter. The δ13CPOC and δ15NPN data suggest that relatively higher δ13CPOC (-27.9 to -22.6‰) and lower δ15NPN (0.7 to 5.8‰) were noticed in the estuaries located in the northern India, north of 16°N, and lower δ13CPOC (-31.4 to -28.2‰) and higher δ15NPN (5 to 10.3‰) in the estuaries located in the southern India. This is associated with higher Chl a in the northern than southern estuaries suggesting that in situ production contributed significantly to the POC pool in the former, whereas terrestrial sources are important in the latter estuaries. The spatial distribution pattern of δ15NPN is consistent with fertilizer consumption in the Indian subcontinent, which is twice as much in the northern India as in the south whereas δ13CPOC suggests that in situ production is a dominant source in the southern and terrestrial sources are important in the northern estuaries. Based on the Stable Isotope Analysis in R model, 40-90% (70-90%) of organic matter is contributed by C3 plants (freshwater algae) in the estuaries located in the northern (southern) India.

  4. Asian Eocene monsoons as revealed by leaf architectural signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spicer, Robert A.; Yang, Jian; Herman, Alexei B.; Kodrul, Tatiana; Maslova, Natalia; Spicer, Teresa E. V.; Aleksandrova, Galina; Jin, Jianhua

    2016-09-01

    The onset and development of the Asian monsoon systems is a topic that has attracted considerable research effort but proxy data limitations, coupled with a diversity of definitions and metrics characterizing monsoon phenomena, have generated much debate. Failure of geological proxies to yield metrics capable of distinguishing between rainfall seasonality induced by migrations of the Inter-tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) from that attributable to topographically modified seasonal pressure reversals has frustrated attempts to understand mechanisms underpinning monsoon development and dynamics. Here we circumvent the use of such single climate parameter metrics in favor of detecting directly the distinctive attributes of different monsoon regimes encoded in leaf fossils. Leaf form adapts to the prevailing climate, particularly under the extreme seasonal stresses imposed by monsoons, so it is likely that fossil leaves carry a unique signature of past monsoon regimes. Leaf form trait spectra obtained from fossils from Eocene basins in southern China were compared with those seen in modern leaves growing under known climate regimes. The fossil leaf trait spectra, including those derived from previously published fossil floras from northwestern India, were most similar to those found in vegetation exposed to the modern Indonesia-Australia Monsoon (I-AM), which is largely a product of seasonal migrations of the ITCZ. The presence of this distinctive leaf physiognomic signature suggests that although a monsoon climate existed in Eocene time across southern Asia the characteristics of the modern topographically-enhanced South Asia Monsoon had yet to develop. By the Eocene leaves in South Asia had become well adapted to an I-AM type regime across many taxa and points to the existence of a pervasive monsoon climate prior to the Eocene. No fossil trait spectra typical of exposure to the modern East Asia monsoon were seen, suggesting the effects of this system in southern

  5. CMIP5 model-simulated onset, duration and intensity of the Asian summer monsoon in current and future climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Guangtao; Zhang, H.; Moise, A.; Hanson, L.; Liang, P.; Ye, H.

    2016-01-01

    A number of significant weaknesses existed in our previous analysis of the changes in the Asian monsoon onset/retreat from coupled model intercomparison project phase 3 (CMIP3) models, including a lack of statistical significance tests, a small number of models analysed, and limited understanding of the causes of model uncertainties. Yet, the latest IPCC report acknowledges limited confidence for projected changes in monsoon onset/retreat. In this study we revisit the topic by expanding the analysis to a large number of CMIP5 models over much longer period and with more diagnoses. Daily 850 hPa wind, volumetric atmospheric precipitable water and rainfall data from 26 CMIP5 models over two sets of 50-year periods are used in this study. The overall model skill in reproducing the temporal and spatial patterns of the monsoon development is similar between CMIP3 and CMIP5 models. They are able to show distinct regional characteristics in the evolutions of Indian summer monsoon (ISM), East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) and West North Pacific summer monsoon (WNPSM). Nevertheless, the averaged onset dates vary significantly among the models. Large uncertainty exists in model-simulated changes in onset/retreat dates and the extent of uncertainty is comparable to that in CMIP3 models. Under global warming, a majority of the models tend to suggest delayed onset for the south Asian monsoon in the eastern part of tropical Indian Ocean and Indochina Peninsula and nearby region, primarily due to weakened tropical circulations and eastward shift of the Walker circulation. The earlier onset over the Arabian Sea and part of the Indian subcontinent in a number of the models are related to an enhanced southwesterly flow in the region. Weak changes in other domains are due to the offsetting results among the models, with some models showing earlier onsets but others showing delayed onsets. Different from the analysis of CMIP3 model results, this analysis highlights the importance of SST

  6. Logit-normal mixed model for Indian monsoon precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietz, L. R.; Chatterjee, S.

    2014-09-01

    Describing the nature and variability of Indian monsoon precipitation is a topic of much debate in the current literature. We suggest the use of a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM), specifically, the logit-normal mixed model, to describe the underlying structure of this complex climatic event. Four GLMM algorithms are described and simulations are performed to vet these algorithms before applying them to the Indian precipitation data. The logit-normal model was applied to light, moderate, and extreme rainfall. Findings indicated that physical constructs were preserved by the models, and random effects were significant in many cases. We also found GLMM estimation methods were sensitive to tuning parameters and assumptions and therefore, recommend use of multiple methods in applications. This work provides a novel use of GLMM and promotes its addition to the gamut of tools for analysis in studying climate phenomena.

  7. The role of East Asian monsoon system in shaping population divergence and dynamics of a constructive desert shrub Reaumuria soongarica

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hengxia; Yan, Xia; Shi, Yong; Qian, Chaoju; Li, Zhonghu; Zhang, Wen; Wang, Lirong; Li, Yi; Li, Xiaoze; Chen, Guoxiong; Li, Xinrong; Nevo, Eviatar; Ma, Xiao-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Both of the uplift of Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP) and the development of East Asian monsoon system (EAMS) could have comprehensively impacted the formation and evolution of Arid Central Asia (ACA). To understand how desert plants endemic to ACA responded to these two factors, we profiled the historical population dynamics and distribution range shift of a constructive desert shrub Reaumuria soongarica (Tamaricaceae) based on species wide investigation of sequence variation of chloroplast DNA and nuclear ribosomal ITS. Phylogenetic analysis uncovered a deep divergence occurring at ca. 2.96 Mya between the western and eastern lineages of R. soongarica, and ecological niche modeling analysis strongly supported that the monsoonal climate could have fragmented its habitats in both glacial and interglacial periods and impelled its intraspecific divergence. Additionally, the population from the east monsoonal zone expanded rapidly, suggesting that the local monsoonal climate significantly impacted its population dynamics. The isolation by distance tests supported strong maternal gene flow along the direction of the East Asian winter monsoon, whose intensification induced the genetic admixture along the latitudinal populations of R. soongarica. Our results presented a new case that the development of EAMS had prominently impacted the intraspecific divergence and population dynamics of this desert plant. PMID:26510579

  8. The role of East Asian monsoon system in shaping population divergence and dynamics of a constructive desert shrub Reaumuria soongarica.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hengxia; Yan, Xia; Shi, Yong; Qian, Chaoju; Li, Zhonghu; Zhang, Wen; Wang, Lirong; Li, Yi; Li, Xiaoze; Chen, Guoxiong; Li, Xinrong; Nevo, Eviatar; Ma, Xiao-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Both of the uplift of Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP) and the development of East Asian monsoon system (EAMS) could have comprehensively impacted the formation and evolution of Arid Central Asia (ACA). To understand how desert plants endemic to ACA responded to these two factors, we profiled the historical population dynamics and distribution range shift of a constructive desert shrub Reaumuria soongarica (Tamaricaceae) based on species wide investigation of sequence variation of chloroplast DNA and nuclear ribosomal ITS. Phylogenetic analysis uncovered a deep divergence occurring at ca. 2.96 Mya between the western and eastern lineages of R. soongarica, and ecological niche modeling analysis strongly supported that the monsoonal climate could have fragmented its habitats in both glacial and interglacial periods and impelled its intraspecific divergence. Additionally, the population from the east monsoonal zone expanded rapidly, suggesting that the local monsoonal climate significantly impacted its population dynamics. The isolation by distance tests supported strong maternal gene flow along the direction of the East Asian winter monsoon, whose intensification induced the genetic admixture along the latitudinal populations of R. soongarica. Our results presented a new case that the development of EAMS had prominently impacted the intraspecific divergence and population dynamics of this desert plant. PMID:26510579

  9. East Asian Monsoon controls on the inter-annual variability in precipitation isotope ratio in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, N.; Fujiyoshi, Y.; Nakayama, T.; Matsumi, Y.; Kitagawa, H.

    2015-02-01

    To elucidate the mechanism for how the East Asian Monsoon (EAM) variability have influenced the isotope proxy records in Japan, we explore the primary driver of variations of precipitation isotopes at multiple temporal scales (event, seasonal and inter-annual scales). Using a new 1-year record of the isotopic composition of event-based precipitation and continuous near-surface water vapor at Nagoya in central Japan, we identify the key atmospheric processes controlling the storm-to-storm isotopic variations through an analysis of air mass sources and rainout history during the transport of moisture to the site, and then apply the identified processes to explain the inter-annual isotopic variability related to the EAM variability in the historical 17-year long Tokyo station record in the Global Network of Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP). In the summer, southerly flows transport moisture with higher isotopic values from subtropical marine regions and bring warm rainfall enriched with heavy isotopes. The weak monsoon summer corresponds to enriched isotopic values in precipitation, reflecting higher contribution of warm rainfall to the total summer precipitation. In the strong monsoon summer, the sustaining Baiu rainband along the southern coast of Japan prevents moisture transport across Japan, so that the contribution of warm rainfall is reduced. In the winter, storm tracks are the dominant driver of storm-to-storm isotopic variation and relatively low isotopic values occur when a cold frontal rainband associated with extratropical cyclones passes off to the south of the Japan coast. The weak monsoon winter is characterized by lower isotopes in precipitation, due to the distribution of the cyclone tracks away from the southern coast of Japan. In contrast, the northward shift of the cyclone tracks and stronger development of cyclones during the strong monsoon winters decrease the contribution of cold frontal precipitation, resulting in higher isotopic values in

  10. Remote Sensing of Arizona Monsoons: Application of GOES Infrared Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, S.; Christensen, P. R.; Cerveny, R. S.

    2013-12-01

    Large, violent thunder and dust storms occur in the Phoenix area during monsoon season. Currently, the best ways to predict these dangerous and potentially damaging storms are not very accurate. The primary goal of this investigation is to attempt to develop a new technique to identify and predict these storms before they reach Phoenix. In order to address this question, two data sets (remote sensing satellite imagery and ground-based weather information) will be analyzed and compared against one another using time as a corresponding variable. The goal is to discern any correlations between data sets which be used as an indicator of imminent large monsoons. The moisture needed for the storms is carried to Arizona by events known as gulf surges (from the California Gulf); these will be the target of investigation. These chutes of moisture surge through Arizona, primarily up through Yuma in a northeasterly direction towards central/south central Arizona. The main goal is to identify if satellite imagery can be used as an accurate identifier of moisture movements preceding a storm in areas where ground measurements are not available. Presently, ground measurements of dew points are the primary technique by which these moisture surges are identified. However, while these measurements do have a fairly high temporal resolution (once an hour) they cover an awfully poor spacial range. Furthermore, it is suspected that because of interference to the instruments, the ground point data may not be as accurate as is preferred. On the other hand, satellite imagery such as GOES - the instrument used in this investigation - has both a remarkably high temporal resolution and spacial coverage. If a correlation can be demonstrated, then the high temporal resolution of the remote sensing data could be used as an identifier of oncoming monsoon storms. In order to proceed in this research, a software package known as Java Mission-planning and Analysis for Remote Sensing (JMARS) for

  11. New statistical models for long-range forecasting of southwest monsoon rainfall over India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeevan, M.; Pai, D. S.; Anil Kumar, R.; Lal, B.

    2007-06-01

    The India Meteorological Department (IMD) has been issuing long-range forecasts (LRF) based on statistical methods for the southwest monsoon rainfall over India (ISMR) for more than 100 years. Many statistical and dynamical models including the operational models of IMD failed to predict the recent deficient monsoon years of 2002 and 2004. In this paper, we report the improved results of new experimental statistical models developed for LRF of southwest monsoon seasonal (June September) rainfall. These models were developed to facilitate the IMD’s present two-stage operational forecast strategy. Models based on the ensemble multiple linear regression (EMR) and projection pursuit regression (PPR) techniques were developed to forecast the ISMR. These models used new methods of predictor selection and model development. After carrying out a detailed analysis of various global climate data sets; two predictor sets, each consisting of six predictors were selected. Our model performance was evaluated for the period from 1981 to 2004 by sliding the model training period with a window length of 23 years. The new models showed better performance in their hindcast, compared to the model based on climatology. The Heidke scores for the three category forecasts during the verification period by the first stage models based on EMR and PPR methods were 0.5 and 0.44, respectively, and those of June models were 0.63 and 0.38, respectively. Root mean square error of these models during the verification period (1981 2004) varied between 4.56 and 6.75% from long period average (LPA) as against 10.0% from the LPA of the model based on climatology alone. These models were able to provide correct forecasts of the recent two deficient monsoon rainfall events (2002 and 2004). The experimental forecasts for the 2005 southwest monsoon season based on these models were also found to be accurate.

  12. Rapid weakening of Typhoon Chan-Hom (2015) in a monsoon gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jia; Wu, Liguang; Gu, Guojun; Liu, Qingyuan

    2016-08-01

    A monsoon gyre is a low-frequency cyclonic circulation over the western North Pacific, which plays important roles in tropical cyclone formation and motion. This study shows that the interaction between a monsoon gyre and a tropical cyclone can lead to a sudden weakening of the tropical cyclone through an observational analysis of Typhoon Chan-Hom (2015). Typhoon Chan-Hom (2015) initially moved westward along ~10°N and sharply turned northeastward in the Philippine Sea at 0000 UTC 3 July. Its intensity decreased by 10.3 m s-1 within 12 h during the sudden northward turn. Such a rapid weakening event was failed to predict in all of the operational forecasts. It is found that Chan-Hom was coalescing with a large-scale monsoon gyre on the intraseasonal (15-30 day) timescale, while it experienced the sudden track change and rapid intensity weakening. The weak and loosely organized convection on the eastern side of the monsoon gyre at 1200 UTC 2 July rapidly enhanced into the well-organized convection within 6 h. The strong convection maintaining from 1800 UTC 2 July to 0600 UTC 3 July enhanced inflows outside the radius of 500 km from the tropical cyclone center, which prevented the inward transportation of mass and moisture into Chan-Hom, leading to the collapsing of the eastern part of the eyewall. As a result, Chan-Hom underwent the rapid weakening even under a large-scale environment favorable for intensification. The study suggests that the rapid weakening of a tropical cyclone can result from its interaction with a monsoon gyre.

  13. Monsoon extremes and society over the past millennium on mainland Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Brendan M.; Fletcher, Roland; Wang, Shi-Yu Simon; Zottoli, Brian; Pottier, Christophe

    2014-07-01

    The early 21st century has seen vigorous scientific interest in the Asian monsoon and significant development of paleo-proxies of monsoon strength. These include the Monsoon Asian Drought Atlas - a 700-year, gridded reconstruction of hydroclimate derived from 327 tree ring records - and several long speleothem records from China and India. Similar progress has been made on the study of monsoon climate dynamics through re-analysis data products and General Circulation Model diagnostics. The story has emerged of a variable monsoon over the latter Holocene, with extended droughts and anomalously wet episodes that occasionally and profoundly influenced the course of human history. We focus on Southeast Asia where an anomalous period of unstable climate coincided with the demise of the capital of the Khmer Empire at Angkor between the 14th and the 16th centuries, and we suggest that protracted periods of drought and deluge rain events, the latter of which damaged Angkor's extensive water management systems, may have been a significant factor in the subsequent transfer of the political capital away from Angkor. The late 16th and early 17th century experienced climate instability and the collapse of the Ming Dynasty in China under a period of drought, while Tonkin experienced floods and droughts throughout the 17th century. The 18th century was a period of great turmoil across Southeast Asia, when all of the region's polities saw great unrest and rapid realignment during one of the most extended periods of drought of the past millennium. New paleo-proxy records and the incorporation of historical documentation will improve future analyses of the interaction between climate extremes, social behavior and the collapse or disruption of regional societies, a subject of increasing concern given the uncertainties surrounding projections for future climate.

  14. Autoencoder-based identification of predictors of Indian monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Moumita; Mitra, Pabitra; Nanjundiah, Ravi S.

    2016-10-01

    Prediction of Indian summer monsoon uses a number of climatic variables that are historically known to provide a high skill. However, relationships between predictors and predictand could be complex and also change with time. The present work attempts to use a machine learning technique to identify new predictors for forecasting the Indian monsoon. A neural network-based non-linear dimensionality reduction technique, namely, the sparse autoencoder is used for this purpose. It extracts a number of new predictors that have prediction skills higher than the existing ones. Two non-linear ensemble prediction models of regression tree and bagged decision tree are designed with identified monsoon predictors and are shown to be superior in terms of prediction accuracy. Proposed model shows mean absolute error of 4.5 % in predicting the Indian summer monsoon rainfall. Lastly, geographical distribution of the new monsoon predictors and their characteristics are discussed.

  15. Asian monsoons in a late Eocene greenhouse world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licht, A.; van Cappelle, M.; Abels, H. A.; Ladant, J.-B.; Trabucho-Alexandre, J.; France-Lanord, C.; Donnadieu, Y.; Vandenberghe, J.; Rigaudier, T.; Lécuyer, C.; Terry, D., Jr.; Adriaens, R.; Boura, A.; Guo, Z.; Soe, Aung Naing; Quade, J.; Dupont-Nivet, G.; Jaeger, J.-J.

    2014-09-01

    The strong present-day Asian monsoons are thought to have originated between 25 and 22 million years (Myr) ago, driven by Tibetan-Himalayan uplift. However, the existence of older Asian monsoons and their response to enhanced greenhouse conditions such as those in the Eocene period (55-34 Myr ago) are unknown because of the paucity of well-dated records. Here we show late Eocene climate records revealing marked monsoon-like patterns in rainfall and wind south and north of the Tibetan-Himalayan orogen. This is indicated by low oxygen isotope values with strong seasonality in gastropod shells and mammal teeth from Myanmar, and by aeolian dust deposition in northwest China. Our climate simulations support modern-like Eocene monsoonal rainfall and show that a reinforced hydrological cycle responding to enhanced greenhouse conditions counterbalanced the negative effect of lower Tibetan relief on precipitation. These strong monsoons later weakened with the global shift to icehouse conditions 34 Myr ago.

  16. Satellite observations of a monsoon depression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, C.

    1984-01-01

    The exploration of a monsoon depression over Burma and the Bay of Bengal is discussed. Aircraft and satellite data were examined, with an emphasis on the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) aboard TIROS-N and the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) aboard Nimbus-7. The structure of the monsoon depression was found to be dominated by cumulus convection. The only systematic large scale behavior discerned was a propagation of the depression westward, and diurnal migration of contours of brightness temperature. These contours in the middle troposphere showed a gradient toward the north with the patterns migrating northward at night. From SMMR and dropwindsonde data, water vapor contents were found to be near 65 mm, increasing to more than 70 mm in the northeast Bay of Bengal. Cloud water contents reached about three mm. Rainfall rates exceeding 5.7 mm/h occurred over a small part of the storm area, while mean rainfall rates in areas of order 20,000 sq km reached approximately 0.5 mm/h. Measured MSU brightness temperatures were reconciled very well with dropwindsonde data and with airborne in situ observations of clouds (by photography) and hydrometeors (by radar). Diffuse scattering was determined to be important in computing brightness temperature.

  17. Annual monsoon rains recorded by Jurassic dunes.

    PubMed

    Loope, D B; Rowe, C M; Joeckel, R M

    2001-07-01

    Pangaea, the largest landmass in the Earth's history, was nearly bisected by the Equator during the late Palaeozoic and early Mesozoic eras. Modelling experiments and stratigraphic studies have suggested that the supercontinent generated a monsoonal atmospheric circulation that led to extreme seasonality, but direct evidence for annual rainfall periodicity has been lacking. In the Mesozoic era, about 190 million years ago, thick deposits of wind-blown sand accumulated in dunes of a vast, low-latitude desert at Pangaea's western margin. These deposits are now situated in the southwestern USA. Here we analyse slump masses in the annual depositional cycles within these deposits, which have been described for some outcrops of the Navajo Sandstone. Twenty-four slumps, which were generated by heavy rainfall, appear within one interval representing 36 years of dune migration. We interpret the positions of 20 of these masses to indicate slumping during summer monsoon rains, with the other four having been the result of winter storms. The slumped lee faces of these Jurassic dunes therefore represent a prehistoric record of yearly rain events.

  18. Possible shift in the ENSO-Indian monsoon rainfall relationship under future global warming

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Sarita; Rajeevan, M.

    2016-01-01

    EI Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Indian monsoon rainfall are known to have an inverse relationship, which we have observed in the rainfall spectrum exhibiting a spectral dip in 3–5 y period band. It is well documented that El Nino events are known to be associated with deficit rainfall. Our analysis reveals that this spectral dip (3–5 y) is likely to shift to shorter periods (2.5–3 y) in future, suggesting a possible shift in the relationship between ENSO and monsoon rainfall. Spectral analysis of future climate projections by 20 Coupled Model Intercomparison project 5 (CMIP5) models are employed in order to corroborate our findings. Change in spectral dip speculates early occurrence of drought events in future due to multiple factors of global warming. PMID:26837459

  19. Possible shift in the ENSO-Indian monsoon rainfall relationship under future global warming.

    PubMed

    Azad, Sarita; Rajeevan, M

    2016-02-03

    EI Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Indian monsoon rainfall are known to have an inverse relationship, which we have observed in the rainfall spectrum exhibiting a spectral dip in 3-5 y period band. It is well documented that El Nino events are known to be associated with deficit rainfall. Our analysis reveals that this spectral dip (3-5 y) is likely to shift to shorter periods (2.5-3 y) in future, suggesting a possible shift in the relationship between ENSO and monsoon rainfall. Spectral analysis of future climate projections by 20 Coupled Model Intercomparison project 5 (CMIP5) models are employed in order to corroborate our findings. Change in spectral dip speculates early occurrence of drought events in future due to multiple factors of global warming.

  20. Three exceptionally strong East-Asian summer monsoon events during glacial times in the past 470 kyr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, D.-D.; Wu, N.; Pei, Y.; Li, F.

    2009-04-01

    Chinese loess sequences are interpreted as a reliable record of the past variation of the East Asian monsoon regime through the alternation of loess and paleosols units, dominated by the winter and summer monsoon, respectively. Different proxies have been used to describe this system, mostly geophysical, geochemical or sedimentological. Terrestrial mollusks are also a reliable proxy of past environmental conditions and are often preserved in large numbers in loess deposits. The analysis of the mollusk remains in the Luochuan sequence, comprising L5 loess to S0 soil, i.e. the last 500 ka, shows that for almost all identified species, the abundance is higher at the base of the interval (L5 to L4) than in the younger deposits. Using the present ecological requirements of the identified mollusk species in the Luochuan sequence allows the definition of two main mollusk groups varying during the last 500 kyr. The cold-aridiphilous individuals indicate the so-called Asian winter monsoon regime and predominantly occur during glacials, when dust is deposited. The thermal-humidiphilous mollusks are prevalent during interglacial or interstadial conditions of the Asian summer monsoon, when soil formation takes place. In the sequence, three events with exceptionally high abundance of the Asian summer monsoon indicators are recorded during the L5, L4 and L2 glacial intervals, i.e., at about 470, 360 and 170 kyr, respectively. The L5 and L4 events appear to be the strongest (high counts). Similar variations have also been identified in the Xifeng sequence, distant enough from Luochuan, but also in Lake Baikal further North, to suggest that this phenomenon is regional rather than local. The indicators of the summer monsoon within the glacial intervals imply a strengthened East-Asian monsoon interpreted as corresponding to marine isotope stages 12, 10 and 6, respectively. The L5 and L2 summer monsoons are coeval with Mediterranean sapropels S12 and S6, which characterize a strong

  1. Three exceptionally strong East-Asian summer monsoon events during glacial conditions in the past 470 kyr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, D.-D.; Wu, N.; Pei, Y.; Li, F.

    2008-12-01

    Chinese loess sequences are interpreted as a reliable record of the past variation of the East Asian monsoon regime through the alternation of loess and paleosols units, dominated by the winter and summer monsoon, respectively. Different proxies have been used to describe this system, mostly geophysical, geochemical or sedimentological. Terrestrial mollusks are also a reliable proxy of past environmental conditions and are often preserved in large numbers in loess deposits. The analysis of the mollusk remains in the Luochuan sequence, comprising L5 loess to S0 soil, i.e. the last 500 ka, shows that for almost all identified species, the abundance is higher at the base of the interval (L5 to L4) than in the younger deposits. Using the present ecological requirements of the identified mollusk species in the Luochuan sequence allows the definition of two main mollusk groups varying during the last 500 kyr. The cold-aridiphilous individuals indicate the so-called Asian winter monsoon regime and predominantly occur during glacials, when dust is deposited. The thermal-humidiphilous mollusks are prevalent during interglacial or interstadial conditions of the Asian summer monsoon, when soil formation takes place. In the sequence, three events with exceptionally high abundance of the Asian summer monsoon indicators are recorded during the L5, L4 and L2 glacial intervals, i.e., at about 470, 360 and 170 kyr, respectively. The L5 and L4 events appear to be the strongest (high counts). Similar variations have also been identified in the Xifeng sequence, distant enough from Luochuan, but also in Lake Baikal further North, to suggest that this phenomenon is regional rather than local. The indicators of the summer monsoon within the glacial intervals imply a strengthened East-Asian monsoon interpreted as corresponding to marine isotope stages 6, 10 and 12, respectively. The L5 and L2 summer monsoons are coeval with Mediterranean sapropels S12 and S6, which characterize a strong

  2. Prediction and monitoring of monsoon intraseasonal oscillations over Indian monsoon region in an ensemble prediction system using CFSv2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abhilash, S.; Sahai, A. K.; Borah, N.; Chattopadhyay, R.; Joseph, S.; Sharmila, S.; De, S.; Goswami, B. N.; Kumar, Arun

    2014-05-01

    An ensemble prediction system (EPS) is devised for the extended range prediction (ERP) of monsoon intraseasonal oscillations (MISO) of Indian summer monsoon (ISM) using National Centers for Environmental Prediction Climate Forecast System model version 2 at T126 horizontal resolution. The EPS is formulated by generating 11 member ensembles through the perturbation of atmospheric initial conditions. The hindcast experiments were conducted at every 5-day interval for 45 days lead time starting from 16th May to 28th September during 2001-2012. The general simulation of ISM characteristics and the ERP skill of the proposed EPS at pentad mean scale are evaluated in the present study. Though the EPS underestimates both the mean and variability of ISM rainfall, it simulates the northward propagation of MISO reasonably well. It is found that the signal-to-noise ratio of the forecasted rainfall becomes unity by about 18 days. The potential predictability error of the forecasted rainfall saturates by about 25 days. Though useful deterministic forecasts could be generated up to 2nd pentad lead, significant correlations are found even up to 4th pentad lead. The skill in predicting large-scale MISO, which is assessed by comparing the predicted and observed MISO indices, is found to be ~17 days. It is noted that the prediction skill of actual rainfall is closely related to the prediction of large-scale MISO amplitude as well as the initial conditions related to the different phases of MISO. An analysis of categorical prediction skills reveals that break is more skillfully predicted, followed by active and then normal. The categorical probability skill scores suggest that useful probabilistic forecasts could be generated even up to 4th pentad lead.

  3. Impacts of East Asian aerosols on the Asian monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Rachel; Bollasina, Massimo; Booth, Ben; Dunstone, Nick; Marenco, Franco

    2016-04-01

    Over recent decades, aerosol emissions from Asia have increased rapidly. Aerosols are able to alter radiative forcing and regional hydroclimate through direct and indirect effects. Large emissions within the geographical region of the Asian monsoon have been found to impact upon this vital system and have been linked to observed drying trends. The interconnected nature of smaller regional monsoon components (e.g. the Indian monsoon and East Asian monsoon) presents the possibility that aerosol sources could have far-reaching impacts. Future aerosol emissions are uncertain and may continue to dominate regional impacts on the Asian monsoon. Standard IPCC future emissions scenarios do not take a broad sample of possible aerosol pathways. We investigate the sensitivity of the Asian monsoon to East Asian aerosol emissions. Experiments carried out with HadGEM2-ES use three time-evolving future anthropogenic aerosol emissions scenarios with similar time-evolving greenhouse gases. We find a wetter summer over southern China and the Indochina Peninsula associated with increased sulfate aerosol over China. The southern-flood-northern-drought pattern seen in observations is reflected in these results. India is found to be drier in the summer overall, although wetter in June. These precipitation changes are linked to the increase in sulfate through the alteration of large scale dynamics. Sub-seasonal changes are also seen, with an earlier withdrawal of the monsoon over East Asia.

  4. Influence of Aerosols on Monsoon Circulation and Hydroclimate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K.M.

    2007-01-01

    Long recognized as a major environmental hazard, aerosol is now known to have strong impacts on both regional and global water cycles and climate change. In the Asian monsoon regions, the response of the regional water cycle and climate to aerosol forcing is very complex, not only because of presence of diverse mix of aerosol species with vastly different radiative properties, but also because the monsoon is strongly influenced by ocean and land surface processes, land use, land change, as well as regional and global greenhouse warming effects. Thus, sorting out the impacts of aerosol forcing, and interaction with the monsoon water cycle is a very challenging problem. Up to now, besides the general notion that aerosols may significantly impact monsoon through altering large scale radiative heating gradients, there has been very little information regarding the specific signatures, and mechanisms of aerosol-monsoon water cycle interaction. In this talk, based on preliminary results from observations and climate model experiments, I will offer some insights into how aerosols may impact the Asian monsoon water cycle, in particular the effects of absorbing aerosols (dust and black carbon), and the role of the Tibetan Plateau. The influence of aerosol forcing relative to those due to sea surface temperature and land surface processes, and impact on potential predictability of the monsoon climate system will also be discussed.

  5. Influence of Aerosols on Monsoon Circulation and Hydroclimate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K.

    2006-01-01

    Long recognized as a major environmental hazard, aerosol is now known to have strong impacts on both regional and global water cycles and climate change. In the Asian monsoon regions, the response of the regional water cycle and climate to aerosol forcing is very complex, not only because of presence of diverse mix of aerosol species with vastly different radiative properties, but also because the monsoon is strongly influenced by ocean and land surface processes, land use, land change, as well as regional and global greenhouse warming effects. Thus, sorting out the impacts of aerosol forcing, and interaction with the monsoon water cycle is a very challenging problem. Up to now, besides the general notion that aerosols may significantly impact monsoon through altering large scale radiative heating gradients, there has been very little information regarding the specific signatures, and mechanisms of aerosol-monsoon water cycle interaction. In this talk, based on preliminary results from observations and climate model experiments, I will offer some insights into how aerosols may impact the Asian monsoon water cycle, in particular the effects of absorbing aerosols (dust and black carbon), and the role of the Tibetan Plateau. The influence of aerosol forcing relative to those due to sea surface temperature and land surface processes, and impact on potential predictability of the monsoon climate system will also be discussed.

  6. Extracting the vegetation phenology of tropical monsoon forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, R.; Xu, M.; Zuo, L.

    2015-12-01

    The monsoon forests cover over 40% of tropical forests, and play a significant role in terrestrial ecosystem carbon exchange and water-use efficiency of tropical ecosystems. The monsoons are changing under the global changes, and then impact the vegetation growth. However, the vegetation phenology in this area are difficult to describe, where the "V"-shaped seasonal growth trajectories of tropical monsoon forests are totally different from the normal seasonal trajectories such as the boreal forests. In this paper, a "V"-shaped curve is proposed to simulate the "V"-shaped seasonal trajectory. Current extractions of the onset of greenness are not suitable for "V"-shaped seasonal trajectory, which are seriously affected by the gaps in the rapid growth stage due to the heavy rain. For its insensitivity to the gaps or noise, the whole "V"-shaped curve was used to determine the phenology of tropical monsoon forest, and the lowest point in "V"-shaped curve was regarded as the phenology. The extracted phenology was showed to be correlated with the precipitation, and the validations with ground observations demonstrated that this new methodology has the ability to extract the phenology of tropical monsoon forest correctly. These phenology maps of tropical monsoon forest assist to understand the impact of climate changes in the monsoon regions.

  7. The North American Monsoon Forecast Forum at CPC/NCEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schemm, J. E.; Higgins, W.; Long, L.; Shi, W.; Gochis, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    In 2008, CPC introduced a new operational product to provide users a forum to monitor the North American monsoon (NAM). The NAME Forecast Forum (NAME FF) was proposed and endorsed by the North American Monsoon Experiment (NAME) Project Science Working Group as a natural extension to the NAME modeling activities coordinated under the NAME Climate Process Team project. It provided an opportunity to consolidate and assess, in real-time, the skill of intra-seasonal and seasonal monsoon forecasts. The NAME FF has continued in 2009 and three modeling groups collaborate with CPC to provide model simulated seasonal precipitation forecasts in the monsoon region. The website includes spatial maps and accumulated precipitation area-averaged over eight sub-regions of the NAM domain and is updated daily to include the current observed precipitation. A weekly update of the current conditions of the NAM system has been added to CPC’s American Monsoons monitoring webpage at, http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/Global_Monsoons/American_Monsoons/NAME/index.shtml. A highlight for the 2009 season is the inclusion of the NCEP CFS forecasts in T382 horizontal resolution. These special high-resolution runs were made with initial conditions in mid-April to accommodate the CPC’s hurricane season outlook. Some results based on the T382 CFS runs also will be presented with emphasis on the prediction of precipitation and accompanying atmospheric circulation over the NAM region.

  8. Book Review: Late Cenozoic Climate Change in Asia: Loess, Monsoon and Monsoon-arid Environment Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Loess-Paleosol deposits drape >500,000 km2 of eastern China, spanning environments from the humid, monsoon-influenced regions near the coast to the arid, westerlies-dominated regions inland. Sections, up to hundreds of meters thick, are exposed in deeply incised river valleys and can be accessed as well by drilling. Combined, the high sedimentation rates and extensive geographic coverage make these sections unique among global terrestrial sediment archives. The Chinese loess-paleosol sequences, and the arid interior regions to the northwest, record diverse aspects of geologic and environmental change ranging from the tectonic evolution of the Tibetan Plateau (106 year time scale) through glacial-interglacial scale changes in global ice volume and greenhouse gasses (105 year time scale) on down through the orbital (104 years) to millennial and centennial scale events (103-102 year) relevant to the underpinnings of human interactions with changing environmental pressures. 'Late Cenozoic Climate Chang in Asia: Loess, Monsoon and Monsoon-arid Environment Evolution' is a timely contribution that synthesizes findings derived from the extensive work in these areas, places the findings in the broader context of global climate change and helps to define avenues for future research.

  9. Predictability of global monsoon rainfall in NCEP CFSv2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Subodh Kumar; Sujith, K.; Pokhrel, Samir; Chaudhari, Hemantkumar S.; Hazra, Anupam

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluates the actual and potential prediction skill of the global monsoon rainfall using hindcast simulations by NCEP CFSv2 at zero to three lead forecast months (L0-L3). It is shown that the model has moderate skill in global monsoon rainfall (GMR) prediction, where the boreal summer monsoon rainfall forecast is more skillful than that of the austral summer. In general, the prediction skill of the GMR (actual and potential) increases with the decrease in lead forecast time, which is true for the all major regional monsoons, except the Australian monsoon. Over the Australian monsoon region, both actual and potential prediction skills in rainfall increase with increase in lead forecast. The forecast skill of tropical SST during austral summer is a maximum at 3 months lead forecast (i.e. July initial conditions) and that is associated with spring predictability barrier. Using partial least square (PLS) regression method, it is shown that the major predictor (first latent vector) of the boreal and austral summer monsoon rainfall variability is ENSO, and the influence of ENSO on rainfall variability is much stronger in the model as compared to the observation. The second PLS regression mode is associated with the non-ENSO variability like tropical Atlantic, Indian, subtropical northwest Pacific Ocean variability, midlatitude interactions etc. However, the model has very poor skill in reproducing the second mode, particularly during the boreal summer monsoon season. It is also shown that a significant part of the Indian summer monsoon rainfall variability is controlled by other than ENSO variability and the model has limited success in capturing that.

  10. Land-surface processes and monsoon climate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Differential thermal heating of land and ocean and heat release into the atmosphere are important factors that determine the onset, strength, duration and spatial distribution of large-scale monsoons. A global and seasonal assessment of land surface process (LSP) effects on the monsoon system has been made based on general circulation models (GCM) coupled to different benchmark land models, which physically represent either comprehensive, or partial, or minimal LSP representations. Observed precipitation is applied as constrain and differences in simulation error are used to assess the effect of the LSP with different complexity. The AGCM results indicate that the land/atmosphere interaction has substantial impact on global water cycle, while the monsoon regions have had strongest impact at intraseasonal to decadal scales. Among monsoon regions, West Africa, South Asia, East Asia, and Amazon regions have largest impact while some monsoon regions have less impact due to strong air/sea interactions and narrow land mass. LSP reduces the annual precipitation error by 58% over global monsoon regions, about 35% observed precipitation. The partial LSP effect (excluding soil moisture and vegetation albedo) reduces annual precipitation error over monsoon region that equals to about 13% of observed precipitation. It has also been suggested that LSP contribute to the abrupt jump in latitude of the East Asian monsoon as well as general circulation turning in some monsoon regions in its early stages. The LSP effects have also been assessed in the land use land cover change experiment. Based on recently compiled global land-use data from 1948-2005, the GCM simulation results indicate the degradation in Mexico, West Africa, south and East Asia and South America produce substantial precipitation anomalies, some of which are consistent with observed regional precipitation anomalies. More comprehensive studies with multi-models are imperatively necessary.

  11. Recent trends and tele-connections among South and East Asian summer monsoons in a warming environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preethi, B.; Mujumdar, M.; Kripalani, R. H.; Prabhu, Amita; Krishnan, R.

    2016-06-01

    Recent trends, variations and tele-connections between the two large regional sub-systems over the Asian domain, the South Asian and the East Asian monsoons are explored using data for the 1901-2014 period. Based on trend analysis a dipole-type configuration with north-drought and south-flood over South as well as East Asia is observed. Two regions over South Asia, one exhibiting a significant decreasing trend in summer monsoon rainfall over northeast India and the other significant increasing trend over the northern parts of the west coast of India are identified. Similarly two regions over East Asia, one over South Korea-southern parts of Japan and the other over South China are also identified both indicating a significant increasing trend in the summer monsoon rainfall. These trends are examined post 1970s. Possible factors associated with the recent trends are explored. Analysis of sea surface temperature (SST), mean sea level pressure and winds at lower troposphere indicates that the entire monsoon flow system appears to have shifted westwards, with the monsoon trough over South Asia indicating a westward shift by about 2-3° longitudes and the North Pacific Subtropical High over East Asia seems to have shifted by about 5-7° longitudes. These shifts are consistent with the recent rainfall trends. Furthermore, while the West Indian Ocean SSTs appear to be related with the summer monsoon rainfall over northern parts of India and over North China, the West Pacific SSTs appear to be related with the rainfall over southern parts of India and over South Korea- southern Japan sector.

  12. MONSOON: Image Acquisition System or "Pixel Server"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starr, Barry M.; Buchholz, Nick C.; Rahmer, Gustavo; Penegor, Gerald; Schmidt, Ricardo E.; Warner, Michael; Merrill, Michael; Claver, Charles F.; Ho, Y.; Chopra, K. N.; Shroff, C.; Shroff, D.

    2003-03-01

    The MONSOON Image Acquisition System has been designed to meet the need for scalable, multichannel, high-speed image acquisition required for the next-generation optical and infared detectors and mosaic projects currently under development at NOAO as described in other papers at this proceeding such as ORION, NEWFIRM, QUOTA, ODI and LSST. These new systems with their large scale (64 to 2000 channels) and high performance (up to 1Gbyte/s) raise new challenges in terms of communication bandwidth, data storage and data processing requirements which are not adequately met by existing astronomical controllers. In order to meet this demand, new techniques for not only a new detector controller, but rather a new image acquisition architecture, have been defined. These extremely large scale imaging systems also raise less obvious concerns in previously neglected areas of controller design such as physical size and form factor issues, power dissipation and cooling near the telescope, system assembly/test/ integration time, reliability, and total cost of ownership. At NOAO we have taken efforts to look outside of the astronomical community for solutions found in other disciplines to similar classes of problems. A large number of the challenges raised by these system needs are already successfully being faced in other areas such as telecommunications, instrumentation and aerospace. Efforts have also been made to use true commercial off the shelf (COTS) system elements, and find truly technology independent solutions for a number of system design issues whenever possible. The Monsoon effort is a full-disclosure development effort by NOAO in collaboration with the CARA ASTEROID project for the benefit of the astronomical community.

  13. The Aerosol-Monsoon Climate System of Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kyu-Myong, Kim

    2012-01-01

    In Asian monsoon countries such as China and India, human health and safety problems caused by air-pollution are worsening due to the increased loading of atmospheric pollutants stemming from rising energy demand associated with the rapid pace of industrialization and modernization. Meanwhile, uneven distribution of monsoon rain associated with flash flood or prolonged drought, has caused major loss of human lives, and damages in crop and properties with devastating societal impacts on Asian countries. Historically, air-pollution and monsoon research are treated as separate problems. However a growing number of recent studies have suggested that the two problems may be intrinsically intertwined and need to be studied jointly. Because of complexity of the dynamics of the monsoon systems, aerosol impacts on monsoons and vice versa must be studied and understood in the context of aerosol forcing in relationship to changes in fundamental driving forces of the monsoon climate system (e.g. sea surface temperature, land-sea contrast etc.) on time scales from intraseasonal variability (weeks) to climate change ( multi-decades). Indeed, because of the large contributions of aerosols to the global and regional energy balance of the atmosphere and earth surface, and possible effects of the microphysics of clouds and precipitation, a better understanding of the response to climate change in Asian monsoon regions requires that aerosols be considered as an integral component of a fully coupled aerosol-monsoon system on all time scales. In this paper, using observations and results from climate modeling, we will discuss the coherent variability of the coupled aerosol-monsoon climate system in South Asia and East Asia, including aerosol distribution and types, with respect to rainfall, moisture, winds, land-sea thermal contrast, heat sources and sink distributions in the atmosphere in seasonal, interannual to climate change time scales. We will show examples of how elevated

  14. A predictive monsoon signal in the surface level thermal field over India

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooley, D. A.; Paolino, D. A.

    1988-01-01

    The mean monthly surface thermal field over India during the premonsoon months March-May, based on mean monthly-temperature/minimum-temperature/maximum-temperature data from the network of 119 stations, was examined with the objective of locating significant predictor parameters for forecasting Indian monsoon rainfall. The results of linear correlation analysis bring out three areas for which the relationships between Indian monsoon rainfalls and the area average of mean monthly minimum temperature for April or for May were found to be significant. The best correlation was found for the southern peninsular area, where the mean May minimum temperature is significantly related to the 500 mB April ridge, a tendency in the Southern Oscillation Index, and a tendency in eastern equatorial Pacific SST.

  15. Linkages of Remote Sea Surface Temperatures and Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Activity Mediated by the African Monsoon

    SciTech Connect

    Taraphdar, Sourav; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Hagos, Samson M.

    2015-01-28

    Warm sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in North Atlantic and Mediterranean (NAMED) can influence tropical cyclone (TC) activity in the tropical East Atlantic by modulating summer convection over western Africa. Analysis of 30 years of observations show that the NAMED SST is linked to a strengthening of the Saharan heat low and enhancement of moisture and moist static energy in the lower atmosphere over West Africa, which favors a northward displacement of the monsoonal front. These processes also lead to a northward shift of the African easterly jet that introduces an anomalous positive vorticity from western Africa to the main development region (50W–20E; 10N–20N) of Atlantic TC. By modulating multiple processes associated with the African monsoon, this study demonstrates that warm NAMED SST explains 8% of interannual variability of Atlantic TC frequency. Thus NAME SST may provide useful predictability for Atlantic TC activity on seasonal-to-interannual time scale.

  16. The Dominant Synoptic-Scale Modes of North American Monsoon Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, Y. L.; Seastrand, S.; Castro, C. L.; Ritchie, E.

    2014-12-01

    In this study we explore the mechanisms of synoptic rainfall variability using observations from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite. While previously shown to have an important impact on North American monsoon rainfall, tropical cyclones are excluded from this analysis, in order to focus on more frequent synoptic disturbances within the region. A rotated empirical orthogonal function analysis of North American monsoon rainfall for June through September 2002-2009 suggests low-level tropical disturbances contribute to the leading two modes of precipitation variability within this region. The low-level disturbances result in gulf surges, or low-level surges of moisture up the Gulf of California, and provide a key low-level moisture source to facilitate development of organized convection. In the first mode the low-level trough brings precipitation to lower elevations along the western slopes of the Sierra Madre Occidental south of Hermosillo, Mexico and over the southern Baja Peninsula. In the second mode the low-level trough interacts with an upper-level inverted trough enhancing precipitation into the southwestern United States and northwest Mexico. In particular, the upper-level trough contributes to the easterly-northeasterly shear across the region, favoring mesoscale convective organization and enhanced deep convection over the Sierra Madre Occidental and higher elevations in southeast Arizona. The EOF methodology offers an objective approach for determining the dominant modes of precipitation for the monsoon region useful for identifying past and monitoring future low-frequency impacts on these modes.

  17. Asian Monsoon Changes and the Role of Aerosol and Greenhouse Gas Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, M.; Li, X.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in Asian summer (June to August) monsoon in response to aerosol and greenhouse gas forcing are examined using observations and the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project - Phase 5 (CMIP5) multi-model, multi-realization ensemble. Results show that during the historical period, CMIP5 models show a predominantly drying trend in Asian monsoon, while in the 21st Century under representative concentration pathway 8.5 (rcp8.5) scenario, monsoon rainfall enhances across the entire Asian domain. The thermodynamic and dynamic mechanisms causing the changes are evaluated using the moisture budget analysis. The drying trend in the CMIP5 historical simulations and the wetting trend in the rcp8.5 projections can be explained by the relative importance of dynamical and thermodynamical contributions to the total moisture convergence. While thermodynamic mechanism dominates in the future, the historical rainfall changes are dominated by the changes in circulation. The relative contributions of aerosols and greenhouse gases (GHGs) on the historical monsoon change are further examined using CMIP5 single-forcing simulations. Rainfall reduces under aerosol forcing and increases under greenhouse gas (GHG) forcing. Aerosol forcing dominates over the greenhouse effect during the historical period, leading to the general drying trend in the all-forcing simulations. While the thermodynamic change of mean moisture convergence in the all-forcing case is dominated by the GHG forcing, the dynamic change in mean moisture convergence in the all-forcing case is dominated by the aerosol forcing. Further analysis using atmospheric GCM with prescribed aerosol and GHG radiative forcing versus those with the prescribed sea surface temperature (SST) warming suggests that the weak circulation changes due to GHG forcing is a result of the cancellation between CO2 radiative forcing and the SST warming, while aerosol radiative effect tends to enhance the circulation response due to SST forcing.

  18. On the dynamical basis for the Asian summer monsoon rainfall-El Nino relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Nigam, S.

    1994-11-01

    The dynamical basis for the Asian summer monsoon rainfall-El Nino linkage is explored through diagnostic calculations with a linear steady-state multilayer primitive equation model. The contrasting monsoon circulation during recent El Nino (1987) and La Nina (1988) years is first simulated using orography and the residually diagnosed heating (from the thermodynamic equation and the uninitialized, but mass-balanced, ECMWF analysis) as forcings, and then analyzed to provide insight into the importance of various regional forcings, such as the El Nino-related heating anomalies over the tropical Indian and Pacific Oceans. The striking simulation of the June-August (1987-1988) near-surface and upper-air tropical circulation anomalies indicates that tropical anomaly dynamics during northern summer is essentially linear even at the 150-mb level. The vertical structure of the residually diagnosed heating anomaly that contributes to this striking simulation differs significantly from the specified canonical vertical structure (used in generating 3D heating from OLR/precipitation distributions) near the tropical tropopause. The dynamical diagnostic analysis of the anomalous circulation during 1987 and 1988 March-May and June-August periods shows the orographically forced circulation anomaly (due to changes in the zonally averaged basic-state flow) to be quite dominant in modulating the low-level moisture-flux convergence and hence monsoon rainfall over Indochina. The El Nino-related persistent (spring-to-summer) heating anomalies over the tropical Pacific and Indian Ocean basins, on the other hand, mostly regulate the low-level westerly monsoon flow intensity over equatorial Africa and the northern Indian Ocean and, thereby, the large-scale moisture flux into Sahel and Indochina. 38 refs., 12 figs.

  19. Mutual interaction between the West African Monsoon on the summer Mediterranean climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaetani, M.; Baldi, M.; Dalu, G. A.

    2009-04-01

    Many studies have show that the West African Monsoon (WAM) is teleconnected with neighbouring regions, as the Mediterranean (Med) basin and the Tropical Atlantic, but also it is sensitive to the perturbations occurring even in remote regions, as the Indian sub-continent and the Tropical Pacific, these teleconnections being active on several time-scales, from intraseasonal to multidecadal. The WAM plays also an active role in the regional atmospheric circulation, inducing significant changes in rainfall, moisture, temperature, and wind distribution up to the North Africa. Within this framework, recent works were focused on the teleconnection between WAM and Med. WAM is strengthened by the north-easterly advection of moisture from the Med Sea, and, since the subsiding monsoonal air often invades the Med, there is a 2-way interaction between WAM and Med summer circulation. We study these interactions, applying SVD analysis to global NCEP Reanalysis and to rainfall data from CMAP, during the extended monsoonal season from May to October, on interannual and on intraseasonal time-scale. Dynamical features are explored using composite analysis, focusing on the role of this connection in the heat waves occurrence in the Med. We find that a strong WAM intensifies the Hadley meridional circulation, with a strengthening of the north Atlantic anticyclone and a weakening, even blocking, of the westerly flow in the Med. A deep inland penetration of WAM produces a northern shift of the Libyan anticyclone, with subsidence and high pressure affecting mainly the western Med. The positive feedback is due to the intensification of north-easterly flow from the eastern Med, which, reaching the Sahara desert, intensifies the intertropical front, favouring abundant monsoonal precipitation because of the added moist air.

  20. Investigating Effects of Monsoon Winds on Hydrodynamics in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, V. P.

    2013-12-01

    The South China Sea is a large marginal sea surrounded by land masses and island chains, and characterized by complex bathymetry and irregular coastlines. The circulation in South China Sea is subjected to seasonal and inter-annual variations of tidal and meteorological conditions. The effects of monsoon winds on hydrodynamics is investigated by applying spectral and harmonic analysis on surface elevation and wind data at stations located in the South China Sea. The analysis indicates varying responses to the seasonal monsoon depending on the location of the station. At Kaohsiung (located in northern South China Sea off Taiwan coast), tides from the Pacific Ocean and the southwest monsoon winds are found to be dominant mechanisms. The Kota Kinabalu and Bintulu stations, located to the east of South China Sea off Borneo coast, are influenced by low energy complex winds, and the shallow bottom bathymetry at these locations leads to tidal energy damping compared to other stations. The tidal dynamics at Tioman, located in southern South China Sea off Malaysia coast, are most responsive to the effects of the northeast monsoon. The complexity of our problem together with the limited amount of available data in the region presents a challenging research topic. An unstructured-grid SUNTANS model is employed to perform three-dimensional simulations of the circulation in South China Sea. Skill assessment of the model is performed by comparing model predictions of the surface elevations and currents with observations. The results suggest that the quality of the model prediction is highly dependent on horizontal grid resolution and coastline accuracy. The model may be used in future applications to investigate seasonal and inter-annual variations in hydrodynamics.

  1. Impact of anthropogenic aerosols on Indian summer monsoon

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chien; Kim, Dongchul; Ekman, Annica; Barth, Mary; Rasch, Philip J.

    2009-11-05

    Using an interactive aerosol-climate model we find that absorbing anthropogenic aerosols, whether coexisting with scattering aerosols or not, can significantly affect the Indian summer monsoon system. We also show that the influence is reflected in a perturbation to the moist static energy in the sub-cloud layer, initiated as a heating by absorbing aerosols to the planetary boundary layer. The perturbation appears mostly over land, extending from just north of the Arabian Sea to northern India along the southern slope of the Tibetan Plateau. As a result, during the summer monsoon season, modeled convective precipitation experiences a clear northward shift, coincidently in agreement with observed monsoon precipitation changes in recent decades particularly during the onset season. We demonstrate that the sub-cloud layer moist static energy is a useful quantity for determining the impact of aerosols on the northward extent and to a certain degree the strength of monsoon convection.

  2. GPM Sees Slow Start of India's 2015 Monsoon Season

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows the GPM core observatory total rainfall that fell from June 1 to 8. 2015 at the start of India's Monsoon Season as calculated by Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (...

  3. Multi-Scale Interactions Associated with the Monsoon Onset Over South China Sea and Adjacent Regions during SCSMEX-98

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.; Li, X.; Wu, H.-T.

    1999-01-01

    Using data collected during The South China Sea Monsoon Experiment (SCSMEX) (1998) as well as from the TRMM Microwave-Imager (TMI) and precipitation radar (PR), we have studied the multi-scale interactions (meso-synoptic-intraseasonal) associated with monsoon onset over South China Sea (SCS) and its subsequent evolution. Results show that the monsoon onset (defined by development of steady wind direction and heavy precipitation) over the northern SCS occurred around May 15 -17. Prevailing southerlies and southwesterlies developed over the central SCS after May 20. Shortly after, monsoon convection developed over the whole SCS region around May 23-27. The entire onset process appeared to be delayed by about a week to 10 days compared with climatology. During late spring of 1998, mid-latitude frontal systems were particularly active. These systems strongly impacted the northern SCS convection and may have been instrumental in triggering the onset of the SCS monsoon. The Tropical Oceans and Global Atmosphere (TOGA) and Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre (BMRC) radar showed a wide variety of convective systems over the Intensive Flux Array, from frontal bands to shear-banded structure, deep convection, pop-corn type shallow convection, slow moving "fine lines" to water spout. Analysis of SSM/I wind and moisture data suggested that the delayed convective activity over the SCS may be linked to the weakened northward propagation of monsoon rain band, hence contributing to a persistence of the rainband south of the Yangtze River and the disastrous flood that occurred over this region during mid to late June, 1998.

  4. The Role of Stratiform and Convective heating in modifying the northward phase propagation of Monsoon Intraseasonal Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, R.; Goswami, B.; Sahai, A. K.

    2009-12-01

    In this study, contribution of stratiform and convective rain rate to total rain rate during different phases of the northward propagating boreal summer monsoon Intraseasonal Oscillation (ISO) is brought out using the TRMM data. Two new insights have emerged from this analysis as shown in Fig.1. It may be noted from Fig.1 that the convective component seems to grow and decay in situ during evolution of active/break phases, the northward propagation of the monsoon ISO is contributed by organized movement of the stratiform component. Further, the trade mark meridional dipole pattern of total rainfall between monsoon trough zone (MTZ) and equatorial Indian Ocean (EIO) also arises largely from contribution stratiform anomalies. The northward propagation of the monsoon intraseasonal oscillation is known to be due to the anomalous response of the atmosphere to heating in the presence of mean easterly vertical shear. Modification of vertical profile of heating due to contribution from stratiform rain could influence the northward propagation of monsoon ISO. We test this using a simple dynamical model known as PUMA (Portable Unified Model of Atmosphere) developed by University of Hamburg, Germany to study the response of the ‘convective’ and ‘stratiform’ heating profiles on the modification of the mean condition which facilitates the northward propagation. Such modification in the large scale response (e.g. vertical shear, barotropic vorticity) seen clearly to be related with the structure of the heating profile (convective or stratiform). The presence of stratiform heating favors the northward phase propagation of monsoon ISO. These results underline the importance simulating the partitioning of convective and stratiform rain by cumulous parameterization in climate models if they have to get the space-time structure of the summer ISOs correctly. Fig. 1 Figure showing the northward propagation of total (top), convective (middle) and stratiform (bottom) rainrate

  5. Bipolar modulation of millennial-scale West African monsoon variability during the last glacial (75,000-25,000 years ago)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weldeab, Syee

    2012-04-01

    Time series of planktonic foraminiferal δ18O and Ba/Ca-based sea surface salinity (SSS) estimates from the eastern Gulf of Guinea (eastern equatorial Atlantic) indicate changes in runoff that reflect variability of spatially integrated precipitation over the equatorial West African monsoon area. Millennial-scale and recurring runoff-induced SSS rises and declines in the range of 1.5 and 2 psu (practical salinity unit) reveal rapid oscillation between dry and wet phases. The timing of decreased runoff coincides with oscillation of Dansgaard-Oeschger stadials and Heinrich events, the most severe monsoon weakening correlating with the latter. δ18Oresidual time series, derived by removing temperature, ice volume, and salinity components from the foraminiferal δ18O record, suggest that weak monsoon precipitation during stadials and Heinrich events was accompanied by significant shifts in δ18Oprecipitation toward higher values. Furthermore, δ18O analysis of individual tests of Globigerinoides ruber pink (δ18Oindiv) during dry episodes show a total range and variance of 2.3‰ and 0.25 (n = 121), indicating that seasonal contrast of sea surface freshening was significantly reduced during Heinrich events relative to that of interstadials which show a total range and variance of 3.35‰ and 0.42 (n = 140). On the basis of the timing and magnitude of changes in the monsoon record, it is evident that northern high latitude climate was the most dominant control on the West African monsoon variability. However, a southern high latitude imprint is also apparent during some episodes. This centennially resolved climate record demonstrates that the equatorial West African monsoon experienced profound changes in the amount, seasonal contrast, and moisture source of summer monsoon precipitation during the last glacial. The most plausible mechanism is a large-scale southward displacement of the monsoon trough, most likely initiated by large-scale reorganization of atmospheric

  6. Asian Summer Monsoon Intraseasonal Variability in General Circulation Models

    SciTech Connect

    Sperber, K R; Annamalai, H

    2004-02-24

    The goals of this report are: (1) Analyze boreal summer Asian monsoon intraseasonal variability general circulation models--How well do the models represent the eastward and northward propagating components of the convection and how well do the models represent the interactive control that the western tropical Pacific rainfall exerts on the rainfall over India and vice-versa? (2) Role of air-sea interactions--prescribed vs. interactive ocean; and (3) Mean monsoon vs. variability.

  7. South Asian Summer Monsoon in CMIP5 GCMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashfaq, M.; Rastogi, D.; Touma, D. E.

    2012-12-01

    Many Global Climate Models (GCMs) in the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) suffered from substantial biases in their simulation of processes that govern summer monsoon dynamics in South Asia, leading to uncertainties in the simulation of monsoon response to future increases in greenhouse forcing. In order to test the ability of the current generation of GCMs that are part of the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) in the simulation of South Asian summer monsoon dynamics, we analyze the outputs from their historic simulations that correspond to 1970-1999 period. The analyses include the comparison of multiple monsoon indices including those representing monsoon onset, local circulations and global teleconnections, at seasonal, intra-seasonal and inter-annual time scales. We find that most of the GCMs are unable to simulate the timing of the summer monsoon onset over land, leading to substantial biases in seasonal precipitation means and variability, and intra-seasonal precipitation distribution. These errors are partly due to the fact that the majority of the GCMs exhibit a shift in the annual monsoon cycle with most of them exhibiting a precipitation peak in August in contrast to the observed peak in July, and that most of the GCMs substantially underestimate the strength of meridional troposhepric temperature gradient and vertical easterly shear during the summer season. We also find many models with low skill in the simulation of intra-seasonal temperature variability, and monsoon connection with local Hadley circulation and ENSO variability. These results have important implications for the reliability of future climate projections and impact assessments over South Asia.

  8. Transient coupling relationships of the Holocene Australian monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McRobie, F. H.; Stemler, T.; Wyrwoll, K.-H.

    2015-08-01

    The northwest Australian summer monsoon owes a notable degree of its interannual variability to interactions with other regional monsoon systems. Therefore, changes in the nature of these relationships may contribute to variability in monsoon strength over longer time scales. Previous attempts to evaluate how proxy records from the Indonesian-Australian monsoon region correspond to other records from the Indian and East Asian monsoon regions, as well as to El Niño-related proxy records, have been qualitative, relying on 'curve-fitting' methods. Here, we seek a quantitative approach for identifying coupling relationships between paleoclimate proxy records, employing statistical techniques to compute the interdependence of two paleoclimate time series. We verify the use of complex networks to identify coupling relationships between modern climate indices. This method is then extended to a set of paleoclimate proxy records from the Asian, Australasian and South American regions spanning the past 9000 years. The resulting networks demonstrate the existence of coupling relationships between regional monsoon systems on millennial time scales, but also highlight the transient nature of teleconnections during this period. In the context of the northwest Australian summer monsoon, we recognise a shift in coupling relationships from strong interhemispheric links with East Asian and ITCZ-related proxy records in the mid-Holocene to significantly weaker coupling in the later Holocene. Although the identified links cannot explain the underlying physical processes leading to coupling between regional monsoon systems, this method provides a step towards understanding the role that changes in teleconnections play in millennial-to orbital-scale climate variability.

  9. Recent change of the global monsoon precipitation (1979-2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Liu, Jian; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Webster, Peter J.; Yim, So-Young

    2012-09-01

    The global monsoon (GM) is a defining feature of the annual variation of Earth's climate system. Quantifying and understanding the present-day monsoon precipitation change are crucial for prediction of its future and reflection of its past. Here we show that regional monsoons are coordinated not only by external solar forcing but also by internal feedback processes such as El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). From one monsoon year (May to the next April) to the next, most continental monsoon regions, separated by vast areas of arid trade winds and deserts, vary in a cohesive manner driven by ENSO. The ENSO has tighter regulation on the northern hemisphere summer monsoon (NHSM) than on the southern hemisphere summer monsoon (SHSM). More notably, the GM precipitation (GMP) has intensified over the past three decades mainly due to the significant upward trend in NHSM. The intensification of the GMP originates primarily from an enhanced east-west thermal contrast in the Pacific Ocean, which is coupled with a rising pressure in the subtropical eastern Pacific and decreasing pressure over the Indo-Pacific warm pool. While this mechanism tends to amplify both the NHSM and SHSM, the stronger (weaker) warming trend in the NH (SH) creates a hemispheric thermal contrast, which favors intensification of the NHSM but weakens the SHSM. The enhanced Pacific zonal thermal contrast is largely a result of natural variability, whilst the enhanced hemispherical thermal contrast is likely due to anthropogenic forcing. We found that the enhanced global summer monsoon not only amplifies the annual cycle of tropical climate but also promotes directly a "wet-gets-wetter" trend pattern and indirectly a "dry-gets-drier" trend pattern through coupling with deserts and trade winds. The mechanisms recognized in this study suggest a way forward for understanding past and future changes of the GM in terms of its driven mechanisms.

  10. Land-surface processes and monsoon climate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yongkang; De Sales, Fernando; Lau, William; Boone, Arron; Mechoso, Carlos

    2015-04-01

    Yongkang Xue, F. De Sales, B. Lau, A. Boone, C. R. Mechoso Differential thermal heating of land and ocean and heat release into the atmosphere are important factors that determine the onset, strength, duration and spatial distribution of large-scale monsoons. A global and seasonal assessment of land surface process (LSP) effects on the monsoon system has been made based on general circulation models (GCM) coupled to different benchmark land models, which physically represent either comprehensive, or partial, or minimal LSP representations. Observed precipitation is applied as constrain and differences in simulation error are used to assess the effect of the LSP with different complexity. The AGCM results indicate that the land/atmosphere interaction has substantial impact on global water cycle, while the monsoon regions have had strongest impact at intraseasonal to decadal scales. Among monsoon regions, West Africa, South Asia, East Asia, and Amazon regions have largest impact while some monsoon regions have less impact due to strong air/sea interactions and narrow land mass there. LSP reduces the annual precipitation error by 58% over global monsoon regions, about 35% observed precipitation. The partial LSP effect (excluding soil moisture and vegetation albedo) reduces annual precipitation error over monsoon region that equals to about 13% of observed precipitation. The LSP affects the monsoon evolution through different mechanisms at different scales. It affects the surface energy balance and energy partitioning in latent and sensible heat, the atmospheric heating rate, and general circulation. The LSP effects have also been assessed in the land use land cover change experiment. Based on recently compiled global land-use data from 1948-2005, the GCM simulation results indicate the degradation in Mexico, West Africa, south and East Asia and South America produce substantial precipitation anomalies, some of which are consistent with observed regional precipitation

  11. Variations in optical properties of aerosols on monsoon seasonal change and estimation of aerosol optical depth using ground-based meteorological and air quality data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, F.; Lim, H. S.; Abdullah, K.; Yoon, T. L.; Holben, B.

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the optical properties of aerosols in Penang, Malaysia were analyzed for four monsoonal seasons (northeast monsoon, pre-monsoon, southwest monsoon, and post-monsoon) based on data from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) from February 2012 to November 2013. The aerosol distribution patterns in Penang for each monsoonal period were quantitatively identified according to the scattering plots of the aerosol optical depth (AOD) against the Angstrom exponent. A modified algorithm based on the prototype model of Tan et al. (2014a) was proposed to predict the AOD data. Ground-based measurements (i.e., visibility and air pollutant index) were used in the model as predictor data to retrieve the missing AOD data from AERONET because of frequent cloud formation in the equatorial region. The model coefficients were determined through multiple regression analysis using selected data set from in situ data. The predicted AOD of the model was generated based on the coefficients and compared against the measured data through standard statistical tests. The predicted AOD in the proposed model yielded a coefficient of determination R2 of 0.68. The corresponding percent mean relative error was less than 0.33% compared with the real data. The results revealed that the proposed model efficiently predicted the AOD data. Validation tests were performed on the model against selected LIDAR data and yielded good correspondence. The predicted AOD can beneficially monitor short- and long-term AOD and provide supplementary information in atmospheric corrections.

  12. Interannual and Interdecadal Variability of Thailand Summer Monsoon Season.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhrattna, Nkrintra; Rajagopalan, Balaji; Krishna Kumar, K.; Clark, Martyn

    2005-06-01

    Summer monsoon rains are a critical factor in Thailand's water resources and agricultural planning and management. In fact, they have a significant impact on the country's economic health. Consequently, understanding the variability of the summer monsoon rains over Thailand is important for instituting effective mitigating strategies against extreme rainfall fluctuations. To this end, the authors systematically investigated the relationships between summer monsoon precipitation from the central and northern regions of Thailand and large-scale climate features. It was found that Pacific sea surface temperatures (SSTs), in particular, El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), have a negative relationship with the summer monsoon rainfall over Thailand in recent decades. However, the relationship between summer rainfall and ENSO was weak prior to 1980. It is hypothesized that the ENSO teleconnection depends on the SST configuration in the tropical Pacific Ocean, that is, an eastern Pacific-based El Niño pattern, such as is the case in most of the post-1980 El Niño events, tends to place the descending limb of the Walker circulation over the Thailand-Indonesian region, thereby significantly reducing convection and consequently, rainfall over Thailand. It is believed that this recent shift in the Walker circulation is instrumental for the nonstationarity in ENSO-monsoon relationships in Thailand. El Niños of 1997 and 2002 corroborate this hypothesis. This has implications for monsoon rainfall forecasting and, consequently, for resources planning and management.

  13. What is the timing of orbital-scale monsoon changes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruddiman, William F.

    2006-04-01

    A major (but little noted) divergence of opinion has developed among climate scientists over the orbital-scale periodicity and phasing of tropical monsoon variations. Kutzbach (1981. Monsoon climate of the early Holocene: climate experiment with Earth's orbital parameters for 9000 years ago. Science 214, 59-61) proposed that monsoons are driven by northern summer insolation at the precession period, but Clemens and Prell (1990. Late Pleistocene variability of Arabian Sea summer monsoon winds and continental aridity: eolian records from the lithogenic component of deep-sea sediments. Paleoceanography 5, 109-145; 2003. A 350,000-year summer-monsoon multi-proxy stack from the Owen Ridge, Northern Arabian Sea. Marine Geology 201, 35-51) inferred a more complicated response tied to latent heat transfer from the Southern Hemisphere. Because tropical monsoons affect climate over a vast area, resolving this divergence is an important task for the climate community. The purpose of this note is to highlight definitive evidence from high-resolution dating of speleothem calcite that provides unambiguous support for the Kutzbach hypothesis.

  14. Causal evidence between monsoon and evolution of rhizomyine rodents

    PubMed Central

    López-Antoñanzas, Raquel; Knoll, Fabien; Wan, Shiming; Flynn, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    The modern Asian monsoonal systems are currently believed to have originated around the end of the Oligocene following a crucial step of uplift of the Tibetan-Himalayan highlands. Although monsoon possibly drove the evolution of many mammal lineages during the Neogene, no evidence thereof has been provided so far. We examined the evolutionary history of a clade of rodents, the Rhizomyinae, in conjunction with our current knowledge of monsoon fluctuations over time. The macroevolutionary dynamics of rhizomyines were analyzed within a well-constrained phylogenetic framework coupled with biogeographic and evolutionary rate studies. The evolutionary novelties developed by these rodents were surveyed in parallel with the fluctuations of the Indian monsoon so as to evaluate synchroneity and postulate causal relationships. We showed the existence of three drops in biodiversity during the evolution of rhizomyines, all of which reflected elevated extinction rates. Our results demonstrated linkage of monsoon variations with the evolution and biogeography of rhizomyines. Paradoxically, the evolution of rhizomyines was accelerated during the phases of weakening of the monsoons, not of strengthening, most probably because at those intervals forest habitats declined, which triggered extinction and progressive specialization toward a burrowing existence. PMID:25759260

  15. Summer climate of Madagascar and monsoon pulsing of its vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jury, Mark R.

    2016-02-01

    This study analyzes the climate of Madagascar (12°-26°S, 43°-50°E) and its relation to the Indian Ocean during austral summer (Dec-Mar). Moisture converges onto a standing easterly wave and floods are prevalent in late summer. All-island daytime land temperatures exceed 38 °C in October and are ~4 °C above sea temperatures during summer. Analysis of thermally induced diurnal convection and circulation revealed inflow during the afternoon recirculated from the southeastern mountains and the warm Mozambique Channel. Summer rainfall follows latent and sensible heat flux during the first half of the day, and gains a surplus by evening via thunderstorms over the western plains. At the inter-annual time-scale, 2.3 years oscillations in all-island rainfall appear linked with the stratospheric quasi-biennial oscillation and corresponding 80 Dobson Unit ozone fluctuations during flood events. Wet spells at frequencies from 11-27 days derive from locally-formed tropical cyclones and NW-cloud bands. Flood case studies exhibit moisture recycling in the confluence zone between the sub-tropical anticyclone and the lee-side vortex. Hovmoller analysis of daily rainfall reinforces the concept of local generation and pulsing by cross-equatorial (Indian winter) monsoon flow rather than zonal atmospheric waves. Since the surface water budget is critical to agriculture in Madagascar, this study represents a further step to understand its meso-scale summer climate.

  16. The decadal-scale variation of the South Asian summer monsoon onset and its connection with the PDO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, T.; Yamazaki, K.

    2013-12-01

    The summer Asian monsoon shows the abrupt increase of precipitation on the onset phase. It is an interesting and important problem when the summer monsoon onset occurs because natural resources, such as water and renewable energy agricultural product, are influenced by the variation of the summer Asian monsoon. Some researchers suggested the advance of the Asian summer monsoon onset in recent decades. We investigated the variation of the Asian monsoon onset using the long-term onset data over Kerala, a state in the southwest region of India, for 1948-2011. We discuss three main questions: 1) how is the variation of the monsoon onset date in the long-term period, 2) how the variation of the onset date is related to variations of atmospheric circulation and SST, and 3) what is the mechanism of such variation. Our main method is composite analysis using monthly-mean data. Though the onset date over Kerala shows the trend toward the early onset in recent three decades, such a trend is not observed in the whole period. It is noteworthy that the onset over Kerala shows the interannual variation on a multi-decadal scale. As regards the early onset years of Kerala, the summer monsoon onset is early over the following regions: the region from the southern Arabian Sea to southwestern India, the region from the southern Bay of Bengal to the Indochina Peninsula and the western North Pacific Ocean. On the other hand, the onset is late over southern China, Taiwan and the northern Philippine Sea. In early onset years of Kerala, the sea surface temperature over the northern Pacific Ocean is very similar to the negative PDO. The stationary wave train related with the negative PDO reaches into the Central Asia region, generates warm anomaly there and hence intensifies the land-sea thermal contrast there, which promotes the summer monsoon onset over South and Southeast Asia. Though the correlation between the onset over Kerala and the PDO is weak before 1976, it becomes high after

  17. Empirical prediction of Indian summer monsoon rainfall with different lead periods based on global SST anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, D. S.; Rajeevan, M.

    2006-02-01

    The main objective of this study was to develop empirical models with different seasonal lead time periods for the long range prediction of seasonal (June to September) Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR). For this purpose, 13 predictors having significant and stable relationships with ISMR were derived by the correlation analysis of global grid point seasonal Sea-Surface Temperature (SST) anomalies and the tendency in the SST anomalies. The time lags of the seasonal SST anomalies were varied from 1 season to 4 years behind the reference monsoon season. The basic SST data set used was the monthly NOAA Extended Reconstructed Global SST (ERSST) data at 2° × 2° spatial grid for the period 1951 2003. The time lags of the 13 predictors derived from various areas of all three tropical ocean basins (Indian, Pacific and Atlantic Oceans) varied from 1 season to 3 years. Based on these inter-correlated predictors, 3 predictor sub sets A, B and C were formed with prediction lead time periods of 0, 1 and 2 seasons, respectively, from the beginning of the monsoon season. The selected principal components (PCs) of these predictor sets were used as the input parameters for the models A, B and C, respectively. The model development period was 1955 1984. The correct model size was derived using all-possible regressions procedure and Mallow’s “Cp” statistics.

  18. Inter-annual Variability of Monsoon Low Pressure Systems in Reanalysis and Climate model Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praveen, V.; Sandeep, S.; Ravindran, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Monsoon Low Pressure Systems (LPS) play an important role in the Indian summer monsoon by bringing rainfall to the interior parts of Indian subcontinent. The detection and tracking of this weakly structured north north-west propagating system in reanalysis products and climate model simulations are challenging compared to the tropical and extra tropical cyclones. A robust method to objectively identify and track the LPS, which mimics the conventional LPS tracking technique, is presented. The algorithm showed its robustness in detecting and tracking LPS in ERA and MERRA reanalysis products. The algorithm fairly well captured inter-annual variability in ERA/MERRA LPSs against observations from Indian Meteorological Department (IMD). An analysis of the LPS in historical CMPI5 model simulation reveal, the models' skill in simulating a realistic mean monsoon precipitation and its relation to the LPS activity. Further, this inter-model variability in the LPS is found to be linked to the mid-tropospheric stability over the Bay of Bengal region.

  19. Experimental Seasonal Forecast of Monsoon 2005 Using T170L42 AGCM on PARAM Padma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnam, J. Venkata; Sikka, D. R.; Kaginalkar, Akshara; Kesarkar, Amit; Jyothi, N.; Banerjee, Sudipta

    2007-09-01

    As a part of the Experimental Extended Range Monsoon Prediction Experiment, ensemble mode seasonal runs for the monsoon season of 2005 were made using the National Centre for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), T170L42 AGCM. The seasonal runs were made using six initial atmospheric conditions based on the NCEP operational analysis and with forecast monthly sea-surface temperature (SST) of the NCEP Coupled forecast system (CFS). These simulations were carried out on the PARAM Padma supercomputer of Centre for Development of Advanced Computing (C-DAC), India. The model climatology was prepared by integrating the model for ten years using climatological SST as the lower boundary. The climatology of the model compares well with the observed, in terms of the spatial distribution of rainfall over the Indian land mass. The model-simulated rainfall compares well with the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) estimates for the 2005 monsoon season. Compared to the model climatology (7.81 mm/day), the model had simulated a normal rainfall (7.75 mm/day) for the year 2005 which is in agreement with the observations (99% of long-term mean). However, the model could not capture the observed increase in September rainfall from that of a low value in August 2005. The circulation patterns simulated by the model are also comparable to the observed patterns. The ensemble mean onset is found to be nearer to the observed onset date within one pentad.

  20. Interhemispheric Changes in Atlantic Ocean Heat Content and Their Link to Global Monsoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, H.; Lee, S. K.; Dong, S.; Goni, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    This study tested the hypothesis whether low frequency decadal variability of the South Atlantic meridional heat transport (SAMHT) influences decadal variability of the global monsoons. A multi-century run from a state-of-the-art coupled general circulation model is used as basis for the analysis. Our findings indicate that multi-decadal variability of the South Atlantic Ocean plays a key role in modulating atmospheric circulation via interhemispheric changes in Atlantic Ocean heat content. Weaker SAMHT produces anomalous ocean heat divergence over the South Atlantic resulting in negative ocean heat content anomaly about 15 years later. This, in turn, forces a thermally direct anomalous interhemispheric Hadley circulation in the atmosphere, transporting heat from the northern hemisphere (NH) to the southern hemisphere (SH) and moisture from the SH to the NH, thereby intensify (weaken) summer (winter) monsoon in the NH and winter (summer) monsoon in the SH. Results also show that anomalous atmospheric eddies, both transient and stationary, transport heat northward in both hemispheres producing eddy heat flux convergence (divergence) in the NH (SH) around 15-30°, reinforcing the anomalous Hadley circulation. The effect of eddies on the NH (SH) poleward of 30° is opposite with heat flux divergence (convergence), which must be balanced by sinking (rising) motion, consistent with a poleward (equatorward) displacement of the jet stream and mean storm track. The mechanism described here could easily be interpreted for the case of strong SAMHT, with the reverse influence on the interhemispheric atmospheric circulation and monsoons. Overall, SAMHT decadal variability leads its atmospheric response by about 15 years, suggesting that the South Atlantic is a potential predictor of global climate variability.

  1. Meridional Propagation of the MJO/ISO and Asian Monsoon Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Man Li C.; Schubert, Siegfried; Suarez, Max; Pegion, Phil; Waliser, D.

    2003-01-01

    In this study we examine the links between tropical heating, the Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO)/Intraseasonal Oscillation (ISO), and the Asian monsoon. We are particularly interested in isolating the nature of the poleward propagation of the ISO/MJO in the monsoon region. We examine both observations and idealized "MJO heating" experiments employing the NASA Seasonal-Interannual Prediction Project (NSIPP) atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM). In the idealized 10-member ensemble simulations, the model is forced by climatological SST and an idealized eastward propagating heating profile that is meant to mimic the canonical heating associated with the MJO in the Indian Ocean and western Pacific. In order to understand the impact of SST on the off equatorial convection (or Rossby-wave response), a second set of 10-member ensemble simulations is carried out with the climatological SSTs shifted in time by 6-months. The observational analysis highlights the strong link between the Indian summer monsoon and the tropical ISO/MJO activity and heating. This includes the well-known meridional propagation that affects the summer monsoons of both hemispheres. The AGCM experiments with the idealized eastward propagating MJO-like heating reproduce the observed meridional propagation including the observed seasonal differences. The impact of the SSTs are to enhance the magnitude of the propagation into the summer hemispheres. The results suggest that the winter/summer differences associated with the MJO/ISO are auxiliary features that depend on the MJO's environment (basic state and boundary conditions) and are not the result of fundamental differences in the MJO itself.

  2. The role of ocean salinity in the water cycle associated with Indian monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, W.; Yueh, S. H.; Liu, W. T.

    2014-12-01

    Indian monsoon is one of the most important of all tropical climate systems. Its onset and spatial/temporal variability have strong economic impact and may cause severe human suffering. Using sea surface salinity (SSS) data from Aquarius/SAC-D satellite mission, we study the seasonal and interannual variability of SSS, to identify the potential sources for the monsoon moisture supply. Preliminary analysis shows the rainfall integrated over India subcontinent, which often used as an indicator for the monsoon onset and intensity, is correlated higher with Aquarius SSS in Indian Ocean than the state-of-art estimate of evaporation (OAflux) minus precipitation (GPCP), indicating the important role of the oceanic processes. We also examine the relative importance of salinity tendency (dSSS/dt) and salinity advection at various stages of the monsoon. Ocean current data from OSCAR project is used to estimate the salinity advection. The role of ocean processes relative to other components of the water cycle is investigated in conjunction with data from multiple satellite missions. The atmospheric integrated moisture transport (IMT) is derived from ocean vector wind (OceanSAT2) and atmospheric precipitable water (SSMIS F17). Moisture in and out of the continent can be estimated by integrating IMT along the coasts, providing a quantitative description of moisture supply in the water budget. We analyze how IMT is influenced by oceanic processes and further related with large-scale circulation. This study underscores the importance of continuous good-quality and high-resolution spacebased observations towards the characterization, understanding, and prediction of the global water cycle.

  3. Seasonal Changes of DOC Composition of Rivers in Temperate Monsoon Climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, N. H.; Shin, Y.; Lee, E. J.; Hur, J.

    2014-12-01

    The spatial and seasonal dynamics of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) composition and biodegradability were investigated for the five largest rivers in the Republic of Korea during the years 2012 - 2013 using dark incubation experiments and spectroscopic measurements, including parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). The DOC concentrations of the rivers in relatively steep and forest-dominated basins were <~2 mg L-1, and remained relatively constant over the seasons. In contrast, those of the rivers influenced by urban and agricultural activities rose up to 5.4 mg L-1, which was decreased to ~2 mg L-1 during the summer monsoon period, indicating that increased precipitation had the effect of dilution. Among the fluorescence components, terrestrial humic-like components were dominant in all the rivers except for one, where tyrosine- or tryptophan-like compounds were the major component. However, terrestrial humic-like components became dominant in all five of the rivers after high precipitation which occurred during the monsoon season, during which ~76% of the annual precipitation was received. Considering that 64% of South Korea is forested, our results suggest that the forests could be a large source of riverine DOC, elevating the DOC loads during monsoon rainfall. Although more DOC could be degraded when DOC input increased, regardless of its sources, the percent biodegradability was reduced with increased proportions of terrestrially derived and aromatic compounds. These results suggest that the relatively stable and terrestrial humic-like compounds released during the monsoon rainfall could reduce the potential of microbial respiration of riverine DOC and evasion of river CO2 to the atmosphere, despite of the increase in the DOC load.

  4. Hydrological changes of DOM composition and biodegradability of rivers in temperate monsoon climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Yera; Lee, Eun-Ju; Jeon, Young-Joon; Hur, Jin; Oh, Neung-Hwan

    2016-09-01

    The spatial and hydrological dynamics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition and biodegradability were investigated for the five largest rivers in the Republic of Korea (South Korea) during the years 2012-2013 using incubation experiments and spectroscopic measurements, which included parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). The lower reaches of the five rivers were selected as windows showing the integrated effects of basin biogeochemistry of different land use under Asian monsoon climates, providing an insight on consistency of DOM dynamics across multiple sites which could be difficult to obtain from a study on an individual river. The mean dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations of the five rivers were relatively low, ranging from 1.4 to 3.4 mg L-1, due to the high slope and low percentage of wetland cover in the basin. Terrestrial humic- and fulvic-like components were dominant in all the rivers except for one, where protein-like compounds were up to ∼80%. However, terrestrial components became dominant in all five of the rivers after high precipitation during the summer monsoon season, indicating the strong role of hydrology on riverine DOM compositions for the basins under Asian monsoon climates. Considering that 64% of South Korea is forested, our results suggest that the forests could be a large source of riverine DOM, elevating the DOM loads during monsoon rainfall. Although more DOM was degraded when DOM input increased, regardless of its sources, the percent biodegradability was reduced with increased proportions of terrestrially derived aromatic compounds. The shift in DOM quality towards higher percentages of aromatic terrestrial compounds may alter the balance of the carbon cycle of coastal ecosystems by changing microbial metabolic processes if climate extremes such as heavy storms and typhoons become more frequent due to climate change.

  5. Variability of West African monsoon patterns generated by a WRF multi-physics ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Cornelia; Heinzeller, Dominikus; Bliefernicht, Jan; Kunstmann, Harald

    2015-11-01

    The credibility of regional climate simulations over West Africa stands and falls with the ability to reproduce the West African monsoon (WAM) whose precipitation plays a pivotal role for people's livelihood. In this study, we simulate the WAM for the wet year 1999 with a 27-member multi-physics ensemble of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. We investigate the inter-member differences in a process-based manner in order to extract generalizable information on the behavior of the tested cumulus (CU), microphysics (MP), and planetary boundary layer (PBL) schemes. Precipitation, temperature and atmospheric dynamics are analyzed in comparison to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) rainfall estimates, the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) gridded gauge-analysis, the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN) gridded temperature product and the forcing data (ERA-Interim) to explore interdependencies of processes leading to a certain WAM regime. We find that MP and PBL schemes contribute most to the ensemble spread (147 mm month-1) for monsoon precipitation over the study region. Furthermore, PBL schemes have a strong influence on the movement of the WAM rainband because of their impact on the cloud fraction, that ranges from 8 to 20 % at 600 hPa during August. More low- and mid-level clouds result in less incoming radiation and a weaker monsoon. Ultimately, we identify the differing intensities of the moist Hadley-type meridional circulation that connects the monsoon winds to the Tropical Easterly Jet as the main source for inter-member differences. The ensemble spread of Sahel precipitation and associated dynamics for August 1999 is comparable to the observed inter-annual spread (1979-2010) between dry and wet years, emphasizing the strong potential impact of regional processes and the need for a careful selection of model parameterizations.

  6. A Pleistocene Indian Monsoon record from Heqing Basin, SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, X.; An, Z.; Shen, J.; Jin, Z.; Sun, Y.; Tong, G.; Chang, H.; Liu, X.; Liu, W.; Wang, S.; Zhou, W.; Song, Y.; Xiao, X.; Xiao, H.

    2008-12-01

    Heqing Basin (100°06'-100°16'E, 26°28'-26°46'N) is situated in southeastern margin of Tibetan Plateau, a geological conjunction zone of three tectonic units separated by Jinshajiang, Honghe and Xiaojinhe-Lijiang fault belts. Modern climate in this region is mainly influenced by Indian monsoon circulation. In Year 2002, a 665.83 m long core was retrieved from the Heqing basin under the support of Chinese Environmental Scientific Drilling program, which permits a high-resolution reconstruction of the Indian monsoon evolution from a continental perspective. The core mainly consists of gray clay, silty clay and silt. Magnetostratographic result generated by both thermal and alternating-field demagnetization methods indicates that the bottom age of the Heqing core is about 2.78 Myr. Multiple proxies (magnetic susceptibility, grain size, CaCO3 content, loss of ignite, pollen concentrations, and major/trace elements) were generated to reconstruct regional climate change and its dynamical links to Indian summer monsoon and solar insolation forcing. The results suggest that during glacial periods, this region is characterized by reduced vegetation cover (e.g., low total pollen concentration) and enhanced physical weathering (e.g., high Rb/Sr ratio), whereas during interglacial times, vegetation cover was extensive and chemical weathering is relatively strong around Heqing basin. Good correlation between variations in proxy indicators from Heqing core and stacked Indian summer monsoon record from Arabian Sea (Clemens and Prell, 2003) indicates that over the last 0.35 Myr, Heqing basin is predominantly influenced by Indian summer monsoon. Unlike Indian monsoon records from the Arabian Sea and Indian Ocean which resolution is relatively low, our high-resolution proxy variations permit a robust understanding of the Indian summer monsoon variations over the last 2.6 Myr. Comparisons of monsoon proxies from land and ocean indicate that solar insolation is the dominant factor

  7. The Impact of Local Meridional Circulations and Madden-Julian Oscillation on the Asian Summer Monsoon Precipitation in Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamide, M.; Koike, T.

    2013-12-01

    Since Pakistan locates in the west edge of Asian Summer Monsoon Region, the amount of precipitation there is severely influenced by the variability of monsoon activity. In some dry years such as in 1991 or 2002, Pakistan suffered from strong drought, causing great economic and life losses, while, in wet years such as 1994 or 2003, flood came to Pakistan, washing away whole cities. In order to reduce the damage of these water hazards, seasonal prediction is greatly effective, but due to the complicated mechanism of monsoon, it is still very challenging problem. In this research, we suppose ocean as one of the sources for seasonal precipitation trend, concentrating on the impact of atmospheric circulations on monsoonal precipitation, which is essential for the improvement of seasonal prediction. This research utilizes JRA25 reanalysis dataset and NOAA's OLR datasets. Correlation analysis between sea surface temperature and OLR over Pakistan on July showed that there is significant relationship between Arabian Sea and monsoonal precipitation in Pakistan. From the empirical Orthogonal Functions analysis conducted on zonally averaged mass stream function over Arabian Sea, the anomaly of atmospheric circulations over Arabian Sea is mainly composed of the anomaly of subtropical jets in Northern and Southern Hemisphere (Northern Hemisphere; Figure), and of the jet in lower troposphere around equator. Especially, the strength of Northern subtropical jet with Hadley-like circulation, which is derived from principle component, is strongly correlated with precipitation activity in Pakistan. On July of extremely dry (wet) years, downdraft in mid-latitude region associated with subtropical jet and Hadley-like circulation are strengthened (weakened), so that monsoonal precipitation is suppressed (enhanced). The strength of those circulations greatly changes intra-seasonally, and, as Sajani et al. (2007) indicates, Madden-Julian Oscillation is a good source of these intra

  8. Asian Black Carbon Influence on East Asian Summer Monsoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, R.; Li, S.

    2011-12-01

    Since the black carbon (BC) emission in East and South Asia has increased significantly during the last decades of the 20th century, there is an ever growing concern about its impact on Asian monsoon. In this study we provide an in-depth analysis of the influence by performing several ensemble sensitive experiments with or without historical BC concentrations over East Asia, South Asia, and the combined East and South Asia in an atmospheric general circulation model, GFDL AM2.1. The results show that: (a) The East Asian summer climate is sensitive to the East Asian BC (EABC) concentrations in a sense that EABC contributes significantly to the frequently occurring north-drought and south-flood patterns in Eastern China. In detail, the large scale precipitation anomalies induced by EABC characterize more rainfalls over central/south China, East China Sea and southern Japan and less rainfall over northern China and the west Pacific region between 10N to 20N. These anomalous precipitation patterns are mainly attributed to the EABC induced large scale circulation changes including the weakened Western Pacific Subtropical High (WPSH), anomalous ascent motions over central-southern China (centering over the Yangtze River valley (YRV)) and the subsequent descent motions over northern China and the South China Sea. These modeled results suggest that the EABC experiment reproduces the climate shift event of eastern China during the late 1970s, including intensified rainfall in the YRV and the weakened summer monsoonal circulation. (b) The anomalous results of South Asian BC (SABC) experiment signify a tri-polar precipitation response over East Asia, with a reduction from the YRV to East China Sea and southern Japan sandwiched with increases over a northern domain from northern China/ Korea to northern Japan and over southern China. As for southern China, particularly the YRV, the impact of SABC is to offset a fraction of intensified rainfall induced by local BC of East Asia

  9. Improving GEFS Weather Forecasts for Indian Monsoon with Statistical Downscaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Ankita; Salvi, Kaustubh; Ghosh, Subimal

    2014-05-01

    Weather forecast has always been a challenging research problem, yet of a paramount importance as it serves the role of 'key input' in formulating modus operandi for immediate future. Short range rainfall forecasts influence a wide range of entities, right from agricultural industry to a common man. Accurate forecasts actually help in minimizing the possible damage by implementing pre-decided plan of action and hence it is necessary to gauge the quality of forecasts which might vary with the complexity of weather state and regional parameters. Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall (ISMR) is one such perfect arena to check the quality of weather forecast not only because of the level of intricacy in spatial and temporal patterns associated with it, but also the amount of damage it can cause (because of poor forecasts) to the Indian economy by affecting agriculture Industry. The present study is undertaken with the rationales of assessing, the ability of Global Ensemble Forecast System (GEFS) in predicting ISMR over central India and the skill of statistical downscaling technique in adding value to the predictions by taking them closer to evidentiary target dataset. GEFS is a global numerical weather prediction system providing the forecast results of different climate variables at a fine resolution (0.5 degree and 1 degree). GEFS shows good skills in predicting different climatic variables but fails miserably over rainfall predictions for Indian summer monsoon rainfall, which is evident from a very low to negative correlation values between predicted and observed rainfall. Towards the fulfilment of second rationale, the statistical relationship is established between the reasonably well predicted climate variables (GEFS) and observed rainfall. The GEFS predictors are treated with multicollinearity and dimensionality reduction techniques, such as principal component analysis (PCA) and least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO). Statistical relationship is

  10. Subtropical circulation, Tibetan Plateau, and Asian Summer Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, G. X.

    2015-12-01

    The characteristics of the land-air-sea interaction in summer subtropics and their impacts on climate were revealed. It was shown that different kind of diabatic heating plays different roles in the formation of the subtropical circulation where the surface sensible heating associated with the land-sea distribution plays a fundamentally important role, and the three spatial- scales of atmospheric forcing contribute in various ways to the formation of aridity/desert over the western parts of continents and wet/monsoon over the eastern parts. Thus monsoon and desert coexist as twin features. It was identified that the onset of the Asian summer monsoon (ASM) consists of three dynamically consequential stages: the onset first occurs over the eastern Bay of Bengal (BOB) in early May, which is followed by the onset over the South China Sea in mid-May, and the Indian Monsoon onset in early June. During such an onset progression, the formation, maintenance and evolution of the South Asian High (SAH) play a significant role in generating the upper tropospheric dumping. In the lower troposphere, the development of the BOB monsoon onset vortex, the ASM onset barrier, the cross equatorial SST gradient and the forced convection over the eastern Arabian Sea also regulate the onset evolution. In winter the Tibetan Plateau (TP) can inspire a stationary dipole-type atmospheric wave, forming a specific climate pattern in Asia. In spring, such a dipole circulation forms the unique persistent rainfall over Southern China. The TP forcing can also anchor the ASM onset over the BOB by generating the unique short- life BOB SST warm pool and modulating the SAH in the upper troposphere. In summer the thermal forcing of the Tibetan-Iranian Plateau plays a significant role in controlling the Asian monsoon by transporting water vapor from the sea to the land for the genesis of continental monsoon. The TP thermal forcing also modulates the regional climate variability in different time scales.

  11. Asian Monsoon Variability from the Monsoon Asia Drought Atlas (MADA) and Links to Indo-Pacific Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ummenhofer, Caroline; D'Arrigo, Rosanne; Anchukaitis, Kevin; Hernandez, Manuel; Buckley, Brendan; Cook, Edward

    2014-05-01

    Drought patterns across monsoon and temperate Asia over the period 1877-2005 are linked to Indo-Pacific climate variability associated with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD). Using the Monsoon Asia Drought Atlas (MADA) composed of a high-resolution network of hydroclimatically sensitive tree-ring records with a focus on the June-August months, spatial drought patterns during El Niño and IOD events are assessed as to their agreement with an instrumental drought index and consistency in the drought response amongst ENSO/IOD events. Spatial characteristics in drought patterns are related to regional climate anomalies over the Indo-Pacific basin, using reanalysis products, including changes in the Asian monsoon systems, zonal Walker circulation, moisture fluxes, and precipitation. A weakening of the monsoon circulation over the Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia during El Niño events, along with anomalous subsidence over monsoon Asia and reduced moisture flux, is reflected in anomalous drought conditions over India, Southeast Asia and Indonesia. When an IOD event co-occurs with an El Niño, severe drought conditions identified in the MADA for Southeast Asia, Indonesia, eastern China and central Asia are associated with a weakened South Asian monsoon, reduced moisture flux over China, and anomalous divergent flow and subsidence over Indonesia. Variations in the strength of the South Asian monsoon can also be linked to the Strange Parallels Drought (1756-1768) affecting much of Southeast Asia and the Indian subcontinent in the mid-18th Century. Large-scale climate anomalies across the wider region during years with an anomalously strengthened/weakened South Asian monsoon are discussed with implications for severe droughts prior to the instrumental period. Insights into the relative influences of Pacific and Indian Ocean variability for Asian monsoon climate on interannual to decadal and longer timescales, as recorded in the

  12. Holocene Climatic Variability in the Indian Monsoon Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Praveen Kumar; Anoop, Ambili; Menzel, Philip; Gaye, Birgit; Basavaiah, Nathani; Jehangir, Arshid; Prasad, Sushma

    2013-04-01

    The available data on Holocene climate variability from Asia indicates spatio-temporal changes in the precipitation over this vast region. Detailed information on the timing, duration, regionality, and causes of these fluctuations is not well understood, especially over the Indian subcontinent. My work focuses on long core sediments from lake Tso Moriri (78°14'-78°25'N and 32°40'-33°02'E; altitude: 4500 m) situated in climatically sensitive zone of NW Himalayas affected by both mid-latitude westerlies and Indian summer monsoon. Two cores ca.7 m were retrieved from the lake at different water depths (ca. 40m and 105m) in July 2011. Investigations reveal marked changes in grain size, lamination quality, mineralogy, organic and carbonate content suggesting changes in lake level, direction of inflow, and biological productivity that in turn are influenced by regional climate. As the lake lies in a tectonically active region, I have also undertaken detailed geomorphometric (knick-point, Hack index), and drainage pattern analysis of the major inflowing streams to decipher the active tectonics in the region. Sharp changes in river course and slope gradient indicates the presence of an active N-S trending fault in western flank of the lake. The data from lake Tso Moriri will be compared with other high-resolution records from lake Lonar and stalagmites in NE India to reconstruct the forcing mechanism of Holocene climatic variability.

  13. The Joint Aerosol-Monsoon Experiment (JAMEX): A Core Element for the Asian Monsoon Year (2008-2009)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, WIlliam K. M.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the Joint Aerosol-Monsoon Experiment (JAMEX) is to unravel the physical mechanisms and multi-scale interactions associated with aerosol-monsoon water cycle in the Asian Indo-Paczj?c region towards improved prediction of rainfall in land regions of the Asian monsoon. JAMEX will be planned as a five-year (2007-201 1) multi-national aerosol-monsoon research project, aimed at promoting collaboration, partnership and alignment of ongoing and planned national and international programs. Two coordinated special observing periods (SOP), covering the pre-monsoon (April-May) and the monsoon (June-August) periods is tentatively targeted for 2008 and 2009. The major work on validation and reference site coordination will take place in 2007 through the spring of 2008. A major science workshop is planned after SOP-I1 in 2010. Modeling and satellite data utilization studies will continue throughout the entire period to help in design of the observation arrays and measurement platforms for SOPS. The tentative time schedule, including milestones and research activities is shown in Fig. 1. One of the unique aspects of JAMEX is that it stems from grass-root scientific and societal imperatives, and it bridges a gap in existing national and international research programs. Currently we have identified 10 major national and international projects/programs separately for aerosols and monsoon research planned in the next five years in China, India, Japan, Italy, and the US, that could be potential contributors or partners with JAMEX. These include the Asian-Indo- Pacific Ocean (AIPO) Project and Aerosol Research Project from China, Monsoon Asian Hydro- Atmospheric Science Research and predication Initiative (MAHASRI) from Japan, Continental Tropical Convergence Zone (CTCZ) and Severe Thunderstorm: Observations and Regional Modeling (STORM) from India, Share-Asia from Italy, Atmospheric Brown Cloud (ABC), Pacific Aerosol-Cloud-Dust Experiment (PACDEX), East Asia Study of

  14. The Joint Aerosol-Monsoon Experiment (JAMEX): A Core Element for the Asian Monsoon Year (2008-2009)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K.M.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the Joint Aerosol-Monsoon Experiment (JAMEX) is to unravel the physical mechanisms and multi-scale interactions associated with aerosol-monsoon water cycle in the Asian Indo-Pacific region towards improved prediction of rainfall in land regions of the Asian monsoon. JAMEX will be planned as a five-year (2007-201 1) multi-national aerosol-monsoon research project, aimed at promoting collaboration, partnership and alignment of ongoing and planned national and international programs. Two coordinated special observing periods (SOP), covering the pre-monsoon (April-May) and the monsoon (June-August) periods is tentatively targeted for 2008 and 2009. The major work on validation and reference site coordination will take place in 2007 through the spring of 2008. A major science workshop is planned after SOP-I1 in 2010. Modeling and satellite data utilization studies will continue throughout the entire period to help in design of the observation arrays and measurement platforms for SOPS. The tentative time schedule, including milestones and research activities is shown in Fig. 1. One of the unique aspects of JAMEX is that it stems from grass-root scientific and societal imperatives, and it bridges a gap in existing national and international research programs. Currently we have identified 10 major national and international projects/programs separately for aerosols and monsoon research planned in the next five years in China, India, Japan, Italy, and the US, that could be potential contributors or partners with JAMEX. These include the Asian-Indo- Pacific Ocean (AIPO) Project and Aerosol Research Project from China, Monsoon Asian Hydro- Atmospheric Science Research and predication Initiative (MAHASRI) from Japan, Continental Tropical Convergence Zone (CTCZ) and Severe Thunderstorm: Observations and Regional Modeling (STORM) from India, Share-Asia from Italy, Atmospheric Brown Cloud (ABC), Pacific Aerosol-Cloud-Dust Experiment (PACDEX), East Asia Study of

  15. Characteristics of clouds and precipitation in the Western Indian monsoon regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, K.; Pandithurai, G.

    2013-12-01

    The rainfall and raindrop size distribution measured with JW-Disdrometer has been utilized to study the characteristic features of precipitation during the monsoon and post-monsoon months over two tropical stations of India, i.e., Pune (sea-surface height = 560 m; annual rainfall = 660 mm) and Mahabaleshwar (sea-surface height = 1438 m; annual average rainfall = 8000mm) along the Western Ghat mountain range. The stations show distinct pattern of raindrop size distribution and other integrated rainfall parameters during the two seasons. The factors affecting these variations have also been discussed in the present paper. A case study of two rain events over Pune on July 31, 2012 and October 26, 2012 of nearly same rain rate (~ 60 mm/hr) have been made to characterize the monsoon and post monsoon rainfall respectively. It is clearly seen from the analysis that the drops of larger diameter dominates the post monsoon month over Pune whereas smaller drops shows its prominent presence in the monsoon months for nearly same rain rate. This is because, the rain in the month of October is basically convective in nature, as result of which the presence of strong updraft carries the smaller drops that are having the fall velocities smaller than the drafts to the higher altitude, thereby allowing the bigger drops to precipitate locally Such conditions are very rarely seen in the monsoon rainfall i.e. during the month of July. In order to get into the more insight about the rainfall pattern, 4 different rain events have been chosen from the above two stations, i.e Pune and Mahabaleshwar and they are classified as convective and stratiform rainfall on the basis of certain parameters. The events which has been considered as stratiform rainfall have the rain rate in the range of 0.5-5 mm/hr and standard deviation of rain < 1.5 whereas the rain events which has been considered as convective rainfall has the rain rate > 5 mm/hr and standard deviation of rain > 1.5. By taking the

  16. Modelling Monsoons: Understanding and Predicting Current and Future Behaviour

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, A; Sperber, K R; Slingo, J M; Meehl, G A; Mechoso, C R; Kimoto, M; Giannini, A

    2008-09-16

    The global monsoon system is so varied and complex that understanding and predicting its diverse behaviour remains a challenge that will occupy modellers for many years to come. Despite the difficult task ahead, an improved monsoon modelling capability has been realized through the inclusion of more detailed physics of the climate system and higher resolution in our numerical models. Perhaps the most crucial improvement to date has been the development of coupled ocean-atmosphere models. From subseasonal to interdecadal timescales, only through the inclusion of air-sea interaction can the proper phasing and teleconnections of convection be attained with respect to sea surface temperature variations. Even then, the response to slow variations in remote forcings (e.g., El Nino-Southern Oscillation) does not result in a robust solution, as there are a host of competing modes of variability that must be represented, including those that appear to be chaotic. Understanding the links between monsoons and land surface processes is not as mature as that explored regarding air-sea interactions. A land surface forcing signal appears to dominate the onset of wet season rainfall over the North American monsoon region, though the relative role of ocean versus land forcing remains a topic of investigation in all the monsoon systems. Also, improved forecasts have been made during periods in which additional sounding observations are available for data assimilation. Thus, there is untapped predictability that can only be attained through the development of a more comprehensive observing system for all monsoon regions. Additionally, improved parameterizations - for example, of convection, cloud, radiation, and boundary layer schemes as well as land surface processes - are essential to realize the full potential of monsoon predictability. Dynamical considerations require ever increased horizontal resolution (probably to 0.5 degree or higher) in order to resolve many monsoon features

  17. Strong modulations on the Bay of Bengal monsoon onset vortex by the first northward-propagating intra-seasonal oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kuiping; Li, Zhi; Yang, Yang; Xiang, Baoqiang; Liu, Yanliang; Yu, Weidong

    2016-07-01

    Monsoon onset vortex (OV) in the form of tropical cyclone is often observed in the pre-monsoon period and contributes to the subsequent abrupt establishment of summer monsoon over the Bay of Bengal (BoB). It is identified here that all historical OVs occurred during the convection-enhanced phase of the first northward-propagating intra-seasonal oscillation (FNISO). The individual contributions from the four large scale environmental fields associated with the intra-seasonal variations to the cyclone genesis are diagnosed with the aid of the genesis potential index. The significant moistening of mid-level atmosphere, which is embedded in the FNISO convection-enhanced phase, is shown to be the primary factor leading to the cyclone genesis. The water vapor budget analysis is further done to understand the governing process for the mid-level humidity increase. It is clearly seen that the vertical advection process, dominated by the anomalous vertical advection of the mean vertical water vapor gradient, plays the critical role. Hence the OVs are shown to be strongly modulated by FNISOs, both of which are important elements of the complex story of the BoB monsoon onset.

  18. Linear Prediction of Indian Monsoon Rainfall(.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delsole, Timothy; Shukla, J.

    2002-12-01

    This paper proposes a strategy for selecting the best linear prediction model for Indian monsoon rainfall. In this strategy, a cross-validation procedure first screens out all models that perform poorly on independent data, then the error variance of every remaining model is compared to that of every other model to test whether the difference in error variances is statistically significant. This strategy is shown to produce better forecasts on average than selecting either the model that utilizes all predictors, the model that explains the most variance in the independent data, or the model with the most favorable statistic suggested by Mallow. All of the model selection criteria suggest that regression models based on two to three predictors produce better forecasts on average than regression models using a larger number of predictors. For the period up to 1967, the forecast strategy selected the prior climatology as the best predictor. For the period 1967 to the present, the strategy performed better than forecasts based on the prior climatology and all other methodologies investigated. Indexes of Pacific Ocean temperature in the Tropics (called Niño-3) and indexes of pressure fluctuations in the Northern Atlantic (called NAO), at 1-6 lead months, failed to provide prediction models that performed better on average than a prediction based on the antecedent climatology. Forecasts based on the prior 25-yr climatology had especially high skill during the recent period 1989-2000, a fact that appears to be a mere coincidence, but which may be relevant to interpreting the skill of the power regression model currently used by the India Meteorological Department.

  19. Entrainment and mixing mechanism in monsoon clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Sudarsan; Prabhakaran, Thara; Pandithurai, Govindan; Brenguier, Jean-Louis

    2015-04-01

    Entrainment and consequent mixing impacts the cloud microphysical parameters and droplet size distribution (DSD) significantly which are very important for cloud radiative properties and the mechanism for first rain drop formation. The entrainment and mixing mechanisms are investigated in this study using in situ observations in warm cumulus clouds over monsoon region. Entrainment is discussed in the framework of the homogeneous and inhomogeneous mixing concepts and their effects on cloud droplet size distribution, number concentration, liquid water content and mean radius are described. The degree of homogeneity increases with droplet number concentration and adiabatic fraction, indicating homogeneous type mixing in the cloud core where dilution is less. Inhomogeneous mixing is found to be a dominating process at cloud edges where dilution is significant. Cloud droplet size distribution (DSD) is found to shift towards lower sizes during a homogeneous mixing event in the cloud core whereas spectral width of DSD decreases due to inhomogeneous mixing at cloud edges. Droplet size spectra suggests that largest droplets are mainly formed in the less diluted cloud core while diluted cloud edges have relatively smaller droplets, so that raindrop formation occurs mainly in the core of the cloud. The origin of the entrained parcels in deep cumulus clouds is investigated using conservative thermodynamical parameters. The entrained parcels originate from a level close to the observation level or slightly below through lateral edges. Cloud edges are significantly diluted due to entrainment of sub-saturated environmental air which can penetrate several hundred meters inside the cloud before it gets mixed completely with the cloud mass. Less diluted parcels inside the cloud core originates from a level much below the cloud base height. Penetrating downdraft from cloud top is seldom observed at the observation level and strong downdrafts may be attributed to in-cloud oscillation

  20. Monsoons in a changing world: A regional perspective in a global context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitoh, Akio; Endo, Hirokazu; Krishna Kumar, K.; Cavalcanti, Iracema F. A.; Goswami, Prashant; Zhou, Tianjun

    2013-04-01

    provide a new view of global and regional monsoonal rainfall, and their changes in the 21st century under RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 scenarios as projected by 29 climate models that participated in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5. The model results show that the global monsoon area defined by the annual range in precipitation is projected to expand mainly over the central to eastern tropical Pacific, the southern Indian Ocean, and eastern Asia. The global monsoon precipitation intensity and the global monsoon total precipitation are also projected to increase. Indices of heavy precipitation are projected to increase much more than those for mean precipitation. Over the Asian monsoon domain, projected changes in extreme precipitation indices are larger than over other monsoon domains, indicating the strong sensitivity of Asian monsoon to global warming. Over the American and African monsoon regions, projected future changes in mean precipitation are rather modest, but those in precipitation extremes are large. Models project that monsoon retreat dates will delay, while onset dates will either advance or show no change, resulting in lengthening of the monsoon season. However, models' limited ability to reproduce the present monsoon climate and the large scatter among the model projections limit the confidence in the results. The projected increase of the global monsoon precipitation can be attributed to an increase of moisture convergence due to increased surface evaporation and water vapor in the air column although offset to a certain extent by the weakening of the monsoon circulation.

  1. Numerical Simulation of the Large-Scale North American Monsoon Water Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Sud, Yogesh C.; Schubert, Siegfried D.; Walker, Gregory K.

    2002-01-01

    A general circulation model (GCM) that includes water vapor tracer (WVT) diagnostics is used to delineate the dominant sources of water vapor for precipitation during the North American monsoon. A 15-year model simulation carried out with one-degree horizontal resolution and time varying sea surface temperature is able to produce reasonable large-scale features of the monsoon precipitation. Within the core of the Mexican monsoon, continental sources provide much of the water for precipitation. Away from the Mexican monsoon (eastern Mexico and Texas), continental sources generally decrease with monsoon onset. Tropical Atlantic Ocean sources of water gain influence in the southern Great Plains states where the total precipitation decreases during the monsoon onset. Pacific ocean sources do contribute to the monsoon, but tend to be weaker after onset. Evaluating the development of the monsoons, soil water and surface evaporation prior to monsoon onset do not correlate with the eventual monsoon intensity. However, the most intense monsoons do use more local sources of water than the least intense monsoons, but only after the onset. This suggests that precipitation recycling is an important factor in monsoon intensity.

  2. East Asian summer monsoon precipitation variability since the last deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fahu; Xu, Qinghai; Chen, Jianhui; Birks, H. John B.; Liu, Jianbao; Zhang, Xiaojian; Jin, Liya

    2016-04-01

    The lack of a precisely-dated, unequivocal climate proxy from northern China, where precipitation variability is traditionally considered as an East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) indicator, impedes our understanding of the behaviour and dynamics of the EASM. Here we present a well-dated, pollen-based, ~20-yr-resolution quantitative precipitation reconstruction (derived using a transfer function) from an alpine lake in North China, which provides for the first time a direct record of EASM evolution since 14.7 ka (ka=thousands of years before present, where the "present" is defined as the year AD 1950). Our record reveals a gradually intensifying monsoon from 14.7-7.0 ka, a maximum monsoon (30% higher precipitation than present) from ~7.8-5.3 ka, and a rapid decline since ~3.3 ka. These insolation-driven EASM trends were punctuated by two millennial-scale weakening events which occurred synchronously to the cold Younger Dryas and at ~9.5-8.5 ka, and by two centennial-scale intervals of enhanced (weakened) monsoon during the Medieval Warm Period (Little Ice Age). Our precipitation reconstruction, consistent with temperature changes but quite different from the prevailing view of EASM evolution, points to strong internal feedback processes driving the EASM, and may aid our understanding of future monsoon behaviour under ongoing anthropogenic climate change.

  3. East Asian summer monsoon precipitation variability since the last deglaciation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fahu; Xu, Qinghai; Chen, Jianhui; Birks, H John B; Liu, Jianbao; Zhang, Shengrui; Jin, Liya; An, Chengbang; Telford, Richard J; Cao, Xianyong; Wang, Zongli; Zhang, Xiaojian; Selvaraj, Kandasamy; Lu, Houyuan; Li, Yuecong; Zheng, Zhuo; Wang, Haipeng; Zhou, Aifeng; Dong, Guanghui; Zhang, Jiawu; Huang, Xiaozhong; Bloemendal, Jan; Rao, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    The lack of a precisely-dated, unequivocal climate proxy from northern China, where precipitation variability is traditionally considered as an East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) indicator, impedes our understanding of the behaviour and dynamics of the EASM. Here we present a well-dated, pollen-based, ~20-yr-resolution quantitative precipitation reconstruction (derived using a transfer function) from an alpine lake in North China, which provides for the first time a direct record of EASM evolution since 14.7 ka (ka = thousands of years before present, where the "present" is defined as the year AD 1950). Our record reveals a gradually intensifying monsoon from 14.7-7.0 ka, a maximum monsoon (30% higher precipitation than present) from ~7.8-5.3 ka, and a rapid decline since ~3.3 ka. These insolation-driven EASM trends were punctuated by two millennial-scale weakening events which occurred synchronously to the cold Younger Dryas and at ~9.5-8.5 ka, and by two centennial-scale intervals of enhanced (weakened) monsoon during the Medieval Warm Period (Little Ice Age). Our precipitation reconstruction, consistent with temperature changes but quite different from the prevailing view of EASM evolution, points to strong internal feedback processes driving the EASM, and may aid our understanding of future monsoon behaviour under ongoing anthropogenic climate change.

  4. Indian monsoon variability on millennial-orbital timescales.

    PubMed

    Kathayat, Gayatri; Cheng, Hai; Sinha, Ashish; Spötl, Christoph; Edwards, R Lawrence; Zhang, Haiwei; Li, Xianglei; Yi, Liang; Ning, Youfeng; Cai, Yanjun; Lui, Weiguo Lui; Breitenbach, Sebastian F M

    2016-04-13

    The Indian summer monsoon (ISM) monsoon is critical to billions of people living in the region. Yet, significant debates remain on primary ISM drivers on millennial-orbital timescales. Here, we use speleothem oxygen isotope (δ(18)O) data from Bittoo cave, Northern India to reconstruct ISM variability over the past 280,000 years. We find strong coherence between North Indian and Chinese speleothem δ(18)O records from the East Asian monsoon domain, suggesting that both Asian monsoon subsystems exhibit a coupled response to changes in Northern Hemisphere summer insolation (NHSI) without significant temporal lags, supporting the view that the tropical-subtropical monsoon variability is driven directly by precession-induced changes in NHSI. Comparisons of the North Indian record with both Antarctic ice core and sea-surface temperature records from the southern Indian Ocean over the last glacial period do not suggest a dominant role of Southern Hemisphere climate processes in regulating the ISM variability on millennial-orbital timescales.

  5. Asian monsoons in a late Eocene greenhouse world.

    PubMed

    Licht, A; van Cappelle, M; Abels, H A; Ladant, J-B; Trabucho-Alexandre, J; France-Lanord, C; Donnadieu, Y; Vandenberghe, J; Rigaudier, T; Lécuyer, C; Terry, D; Adriaens, R; Boura, A; Guo, Z; Soe, Aung Naing; Quade, J; Dupont-Nivet, G; Jaeger, J-J

    2014-09-25

    The strong present-day Asian monsoons are thought to have originated between 25 and 22 million years (Myr) ago, driven by Tibetan-Himalayan uplift. However, the existence of older Asian monsoons and their response to enhanced greenhouse conditions such as those in the Eocene period (55-34 Myr ago) are unknown because of the paucity of well-dated records. Here we show late Eocene climate records revealing marked monsoon-like patterns in rainfall and wind south and north of the Tibetan-Himalayan orogen. This is indicated by low oxygen isotope values with strong seasonality in gastropod shells and mammal teeth from Myanmar, and by aeolian dust deposition in northwest China. Our climate simulations support modern-like Eocene monsoonal rainfall and show that a reinforced hydrological cycle responding to enhanced greenhouse conditions counterbalanced the negative effect of lower Tibetan relief on precipitation. These strong monsoons later weakened with the global shift to icehouse conditions 34 Myr ago.

  6. Asian summer monsoon variability during the last two millennia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawchai, Sakonvan; Chabangborn, Akkaneewut; Fritz, Sherilyn; Blaauw, Maarten; Löwemark, Ludvig; Reimer, Paula J.; Krusic, Paul J.; Väliranta, Minna; Mörth, Carl-Magnus; Wohlfarth, Barbara

    2014-05-01

    The Southeast Asian mainland is located in the central path of the Asian summer monsoon, a region where paleoclimatic data are still sparse. Here we report a new detailed reconstruction of monsoon variability during the past 2000 years from a multi-proxy sediment record (TOC, C/N, δ13C, δ15N, Si, K, Ti elemental data, biogenic silica and fossil plant remains) from Lake Pa Kho in northeast Thailand. We infer a stronger summer monsoon between BC 200 - AD 400 and AD 800 - 1350, a weaker summer monsoon AD 400 - 800, and fluctuating moisture availability AD 1350 - 1550. Increased run-off after AD 1750 can be linked to agricultural intensification in the region. Placed in a wider context our high-resolution data set contributes important information regarding abrupt shifts in hydroclimatic conditions, spatial patterns of monsoon variability, and variations in the position of the ITCZ across SE Asia during the last two millennia. These paleoclimatic shifts may have contributed to the rise and fall of Iron Age and Khmer societies.

  7. Asian monsoons in a late Eocene greenhouse world.

    PubMed

    Licht, A; van Cappelle, M; Abels, H A; Ladant, J-B; Trabucho-Alexandre, J; France-Lanord, C; Donnadieu, Y; Vandenberghe, J; Rigaudier, T; Lécuyer, C; Terry, D; Adriaens, R; Boura, A; Guo, Z; Soe, Aung Naing; Quade, J; Dupont-Nivet, G; Jaeger, J-J

    2014-09-25

    The strong present-day Asian monsoons are thought to have originated between 25 and 22 million years (Myr) ago, driven by Tibetan-Himalayan uplift. However, the existence of older Asian monsoons and their response to enhanced greenhouse conditions such as those in the Eocene period (55-34 Myr ago) are unknown because of the paucity of well-dated records. Here we show late Eocene climate records revealing marked monsoon-like patterns in rainfall and wind south and north of the Tibetan-Himalayan orogen. This is indicated by low oxygen isotope values with strong seasonality in gastropod shells and mammal teeth from Myanmar, and by aeolian dust deposition in northwest China. Our climate simulations support modern-like Eocene monsoonal rainfall and show that a reinforced hydrological cycle responding to enhanced greenhouse conditions counterbalanced the negative effect of lower Tibetan relief on precipitation. These strong monsoons later weakened with the global shift to icehouse conditions 34 Myr ago. PMID:25219854

  8. Indian monsoon variability on millennial-orbital timescales

    PubMed Central

    Kathayat, Gayatri; Cheng, Hai; Sinha, Ashish; Spötl, Christoph; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Zhang, Haiwei; Li, Xianglei; Yi, Liang; Ning, Youfeng; Cai, Yanjun; Lui, Weiguo Lui; Breitenbach, Sebastian F. M.

    2016-01-01

    The Indian summer monsoon (ISM) monsoon is critical to billions of people living in the region. Yet, significant debates remain on primary ISM drivers on millennial-orbital timescales. Here, we use speleothem oxygen isotope (δ18O) data from Bittoo cave, Northern India to reconstruct ISM variability over the past 280,000 years. We find strong coherence between North Indian and Chinese speleothem δ18O records from the East Asian monsoon domain, suggesting that both Asian monsoon subsystems exhibit a coupled response to changes in Northern Hemisphere summer insolation (NHSI) without significant temporal lags, supporting the view that the tropical-subtropical monsoon variability is driven directly by precession-induced changes in NHSI. Comparisons of the North Indian record with both Antarctic ice core and sea-surface temperature records from the southern Indian Ocean over the last glacial period do not suggest a dominant role of Southern Hemisphere climate processes in regulating the ISM variability on millennial-orbital timescales. PMID:27071753

  9. Global monsoon precipitation responses to large volcanic eruptions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fei; Chai, Jing; Wang, Bin; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Climate variation of global monsoon (GM) precipitation involves both internal feedback and external forcing. Here, we focus on strong volcanic forcing since large eruptions are known to be a dominant mechanism in natural climate change. It is not known whether large volcanoes erupted at different latitudes have distinctive effects on the monsoon in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and the Southern Hemisphere (SH). We address this issue using a 1500-year volcanic sensitivity simulation by the Community Earth System Model version 1.0 (CESM1). Volcanoes are classified into three types based on their meridional aerosol distributions: NH volcanoes, SH volcanoes and equatorial volcanoes. Using the model simulation, we discover that the GM precipitation in one hemisphere is enhanced significantly by the remote volcanic forcing occurring in the other hemisphere. This remote volcanic forcing-induced intensification is mainly through circulation change rather than moisture content change. In addition, the NH volcanic eruptions are more efficient in reducing the NH monsoon precipitation than the equatorial ones, and so do the SH eruptions in weakening the SH monsoon, because the equatorial eruptions, despite reducing moisture content, have weaker effects in weakening the off-equatorial monsoon circulation than the subtropical-extratropical volcanoes do. PMID:27063141

  10. Global monsoon precipitation responses to large volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei; Chai, Jing; Wang, Bin; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Zhiyuan

    2016-04-01

    Climate variation of global monsoon (GM) precipitation involves both internal feedback and external forcing. Here, we focus on strong volcanic forcing since large eruptions are known to be a dominant mechanism in natural climate change. It is not known whether large volcanoes erupted at different latitudes have distinctive effects on the monsoon in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and the Southern Hemisphere (SH). We address this issue using a 1500-year volcanic sensitivity simulation by the Community Earth System Model version 1.0 (CESM1). Volcanoes are classified into three types based on their meridional aerosol distributions: NH volcanoes, SH volcanoes and equatorial volcanoes. Using the model simulation, we discover that the GM precipitation in one hemisphere is enhanced significantly by the remote volcanic forcing occurring in the other hemisphere. This remote volcanic forcing-induced intensification is mainly through circulation change rather than moisture content change. In addition, the NH volcanic eruptions are more efficient in reducing the NH monsoon precipitation than the equatorial ones, and so do the SH eruptions in weakening the SH monsoon, because the equatorial eruptions, despite reducing moisture content, have weaker effects in weakening the off-equatorial monsoon circulation than the subtropical-extratropical volcanoes do.

  11. Global monsoon precipitation responses to large volcanic eruptions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Chai, Jing; Wang, Bin; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Climate variation of global monsoon (GM) precipitation involves both internal feedback and external forcing. Here, we focus on strong volcanic forcing since large eruptions are known to be a dominant mechanism in natural climate change. It is not known whether large volcanoes erupted at different latitudes have distinctive effects on the monsoon in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and the Southern Hemisphere (SH). We address this issue using a 1500-year volcanic sensitivity simulation by the Community Earth System Model version 1.0 (CESM1). Volcanoes are classified into three types based on their meridional aerosol distributions: NH volcanoes, SH volcanoes and equatorial volcanoes. Using the model simulation, we discover that the GM precipitation in one hemisphere is enhanced significantly by the remote volcanic forcing occurring in the other hemisphere. This remote volcanic forcing-induced intensification is mainly through circulation change rather than moisture content change. In addition, the NH volcanic eruptions are more efficient in reducing the NH monsoon precipitation than the equatorial ones, and so do the SH eruptions in weakening the SH monsoon, because the equatorial eruptions, despite reducing moisture content, have weaker effects in weakening the off-equatorial monsoon circulation than the subtropical-extratropical volcanoes do. PMID:27063141

  12. Rethinking the Recent Advance of Asian Summer Monsoon Onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, B.; Wang, B.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the monsoon onset change is of utmost importance especially for agriculture planning and water management. In the last three decades, Asian Summer Monsoon (ASM) onset has remarkably advanced, but the physical mechanisms remain elusive. Since the overall ASM onset occurs in May, we focus on the change of mean fields in May and consider enhanced mean precipitation and monsoon westerly winds as signs of advanced onset. Results show that the advanced ASM onset mainly represents a robust decadal shift in the mid-to-late 1990s, which is attributed to the mean state change in the Pacific basin characterized by a grand La Niña-like pattern. The La Niña-like mean state change controls the ASM onset through the westward propagation of Rossby waves and its interaction with the asymmetric background mean states in the Indian Ocean and western Pacific, which facilitates the amplification of the northern hemispheric perturbations as well as intensified westerly winds. Intriguingly, the abrupt decadal shifts of monsoon onset in the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal occur in 1999, in contrast to the South China Sea with decadal shift in 1994. Numerical experiments demonstrate that the advanced monsoon onset in the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal is governed by the enhanced zonal sea surface temperature (SST) gradients in the equatorial Pacific, while that in the South China Sea is primarily determined by the abrupt SST warming near the Philippine Sea.

  13. Indian monsoon variability on millennial-orbital timescales.

    PubMed

    Kathayat, Gayatri; Cheng, Hai; Sinha, Ashish; Spötl, Christoph; Edwards, R Lawrence; Zhang, Haiwei; Li, Xianglei; Yi, Liang; Ning, Youfeng; Cai, Yanjun; Lui, Weiguo Lui; Breitenbach, Sebastian F M

    2016-01-01

    The Indian summer monsoon (ISM) monsoon is critical to billions of people living in the region. Yet, significant debates remain on primary ISM drivers on millennial-orbital timescales. Here, we use speleothem oxygen isotope (δ(18)O) data from Bittoo cave, Northern India to reconstruct ISM variability over the past 280,000 years. We find strong coherence between North Indian and Chinese speleothem δ(18)O records from the East Asian monsoon domain, suggesting that both Asian monsoon subsystems exhibit a coupled response to changes in Northern Hemisphere summer insolation (NHSI) without significant temporal lags, supporting the view that the tropical-subtropical monsoon variability is driven directly by precession-induced changes in NHSI. Comparisons of the North Indian record with both Antarctic ice core and sea-surface temperature records from the southern Indian Ocean over the last glacial period do not suggest a dominant role of Southern Hemisphere climate processes in regulating the ISM variability on millennial-orbital timescales. PMID:27071753

  14. East Asian summer monsoon precipitation variability since the last deglaciation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fahu; Xu, Qinghai; Chen, Jianhui; Birks, H John B; Liu, Jianbao; Zhang, Shengrui; Jin, Liya; An, Chengbang; Telford, Richard J; Cao, Xianyong; Wang, Zongli; Zhang, Xiaojian; Selvaraj, Kandasamy; Lu, Houyuan; Li, Yuecong; Zheng, Zhuo; Wang, Haipeng; Zhou, Aifeng; Dong, Guanghui; Zhang, Jiawu; Huang, Xiaozhong; Bloemendal, Jan; Rao, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    The lack of a precisely-dated, unequivocal climate proxy from northern China, where precipitation variability is traditionally considered as an East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) indicator, impedes our understanding of the behaviour and dynamics of the EASM. Here we present a well-dated, pollen-based, ~20-yr-resolution quantitative precipitation reconstruction (derived using a transfer function) from an alpine lake in North China, which provides for the first time a direct record of EASM evolution since 14.7 ka (ka = thousands of years before present, where the "present" is defined as the year AD 1950). Our record reveals a gradually intensifying monsoon from 14.7-7.0 ka, a maximum monsoon (30% higher precipitation than present) from ~7.8-5.3 ka, and a rapid decline since ~3.3 ka. These insolation-driven EASM trends were punctuated by two millennial-scale weakening events which occurred synchronously to the cold Younger Dryas and at ~9.5-8.5 ka, and by two centennial-scale intervals of enhanced (weakened) monsoon during the Medieval Warm Period (Little Ice Age). Our precipitation reconstruction, consistent with temperature changes but quite different from the prevailing view of EASM evolution, points to strong internal feedback processes driving the EASM, and may aid our understanding of future monsoon behaviour under ongoing anthropogenic climate change. PMID:26084560

  15. Extratropical anticyclonic Rossby wave breaking and Indian summer monsoon failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Dhrubajyoti; Dash, M. K.; Goswami, B. N.; Pandey, P. C.

    2016-03-01

    Interactions between midlatitude disturbances and the monsoonal circulation are significant for the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) rainfall. This paper presents examples of monsoon-midlatitude linkage through anticyclonic Rossby wave breaking (RWB) over West Asia during June, July and August of the years 1998-2010. RWB events over West Asia are identified by the inversion of the potential vorticity air mass at three different isentropic levels (340, 350, and 360 K) using daily NCEP-NCAR reanalysis. It is observed that RWB took place over West Asia before/during breaks in the ISM. Further, these events occur on the anticyclonic shear side of the subtropical jet, where the gradient of the zonal wind is found to be high. RWB is responsible for the southward movement of high potential vorticity air from the westerly jet, leading to the formation of a blocking high over the Arabian region. In turn, this blocking high advects and causes the descent of upper tropospheric cold and dry air towards Central India. Such an air mass with low moist static energy inhibits deep monsoonal convection and thereby leads to a dry spell. In fact, we find that RWB induced blocking over West Asia to be one of the major causes of dry spell/break episodes in ISM. Additionally, the presence of cold air over Central India reduces the north-south thermal contrast over the monsoon region thereby modifying the local Hadley circulation over the region.

  16. Indian monsoon variability on millennial-orbital timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kathayat, Gayatri; Cheng, Hai; Sinha, Ashish; Spötl, Christoph; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Zhang, Haiwei; Li, Xianglei; Yi, Liang; Ning, Youfeng; Cai, Yanjun; Lui, Weiguo Lui; Breitenbach, Sebastian F. M.

    2016-04-01

    The Indian summer monsoon (ISM) monsoon is critical to billions of people living in the region. Yet, significant debates remain on primary ISM drivers on millennial-orbital timescales. Here, we use speleothem oxygen isotope (δ18O) data from Bittoo cave, Northern India to reconstruct ISM variability over the past 280,000 years. We find strong coherence between North Indian and Chinese speleothem δ18O records from the East Asian monsoon domain, suggesting that both Asian monsoon subsystems exhibit a coupled response to changes in Northern Hemisphere summer insolation (NHSI) without significant temporal lags, supporting the view that the tropical-subtropical monsoon variability is driven directly by precession-induced changes in NHSI. Comparisons of the North Indian record with both Antarctic ice core and sea-surface temperature records from the southern Indian Ocean over the last glacial period do not suggest a dominant role of Southern Hemisphere climate processes in regulating the ISM variability on millennial-orbital timescales.

  17. Global monsoon precipitation responses to large volcanic eruptions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Chai, Jing; Wang, Bin; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Zhiyuan

    2016-04-11

    Climate variation of global monsoon (GM) precipitation involves both internal feedback and external forcing. Here, we focus on strong volcanic forcing since large eruptions are known to be a dominant mechanism in natural climate change. It is not known whether large volcanoes erupted at different latitudes have distinctive effects on the monsoon in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and the Southern Hemisphere (SH). We address this issue using a 1500-year volcanic sensitivity simulation by the Community Earth System Model version 1.0 (CESM1). Volcanoes are classified into three types based on their meridional aerosol distributions: NH volcanoes, SH volcanoes and equatorial volcanoes. Using the model simulation, we discover that the GM precipitation in one hemisphere is enhanced significantly by the remote volcanic forcing occurring in the other hemisphere. This remote volcanic forcing-induced intensification is mainly through circulation change rather than moisture content change. In addition, the NH volcanic eruptions are more efficient in reducing the NH monsoon precipitation than the equatorial ones, and so do the SH eruptions in weakening the SH monsoon, because the equatorial eruptions, despite reducing moisture content, have weaker effects in weakening the off-equatorial monsoon circulation than the subtropical-extratropical volcanoes do.

  18. East Asian summer monsoon precipitation variability since the last deglaciation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fahu; Xu, Qinghai; Chen, Jianhui; Birks, H. John B.; Liu, Jianbao; Zhang, Shengrui; Jin, Liya; An, Chengbang; Telford, Richard J.; Cao, Xianyong; Wang, Zongli; Zhang, Xiaojian; Selvaraj, Kandasamy; Lu, Houyuan; Li, Yuecong; Zheng, Zhuo; Wang, Haipeng; Zhou, Aifeng; Dong, Guanghui; Zhang, Jiawu; Huang, Xiaozhong; Bloemendal, Jan; Rao, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    The lack of a precisely-dated, unequivocal climate proxy from northern China, where precipitation variability is traditionally considered as an East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) indicator, impedes our understanding of the behaviour and dynamics of the EASM. Here we present a well-dated, pollen-based, ~20-yr-resolution quantitative precipitation reconstruction (derived using a transfer function) from an alpine lake in North China, which provides for the first time a direct record of EASM evolution since 14.7 ka (ka = thousands of years before present, where the “present” is defined as the year AD 1950). Our record reveals a gradually intensifying monsoon from 14.7–7.0 ka, a maximum monsoon (30% higher precipitation than present) from ~7.8–5.3 ka, and a rapid decline since ~3.3 ka. These insolation-driven EASM trends were punctuated by two millennial-scale weakening events which occurred synchronously to the cold Younger Dryas and at ~9.5–8.5 ka, and by two centennial-scale intervals of enhanced (weakened) monsoon during the Medieval Warm Period (Little Ice Age). Our precipitation reconstruction, consistent with temperature changes but quite different from the prevailing view of EASM evolution, points to strong internal feedback processes driving the EASM, and may aid our understanding of future monsoon behaviour under ongoing anthropogenic climate change. PMID:26084560

  19. Variation in the Asian monsoon intensity and dry-wet conditions since the Little Ice Age in central China revealed by an aragonite stalagmite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, J.-J.; Yuan, D.-X.; Li, H.-C.; Cheng, H.; Li, T.-Y.; Edwards, R. L.; Lin, Y.-S.; Qin, J.-M.; Tang, W.; Zhao, Z.-Y.; Mii, H.-S.

    2014-10-01

    This paper focuses on the climate variability in central China since AD 1300, involving: (1) a well-dated, 1.5-year resolution stalagmite δ18O record from Lianhua Cave, central China (2) links of the δ18O record with regional dry-wet conditions, monsoon intensity, and temperature over eastern China (3) correlations among drought events in the Lianhua record, solar irradiation, and ENSO (El Niño-Southern Oscillation) variation. We present a highly precise, 230Th / U-dated, 1.5-year resolution δ18O record of an aragonite stalagmite (LHD1) collected from Lianhua Cave in the Wuling Mountain area of central China. The comparison of the δ18O record with the local instrumental record and historical documents indicates that (1) the stalagmite δ18O record reveals variations in the summer monsoon intensity and dry-wet conditions in the Wuling Mountain area. (2) A stronger East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) enhances the tropical monsoon trough controlled by ITCZ (Intertropical Convergence Zone), which produces higher spring quarter rainfall and isotopically light monsoonal moisture in the central China. (3) The summer quarter/spring quarter rainfall ratio in central China can be a potential indicator of the EASM strength: a lower ratio corresponds to stronger EASM and higher spring rainfall. The ratio changed from <1 to >1 after 1950, reflecting that the summer quarter rainfall of the study area became dominant under stronger influence of the Northwestern Pacific High. Eastern China temperatures varied with the solar activity, showing higher temperatures under stronger solar irradiation, which produced stronger summer monsoons. During Maunder, Dalton and 1900 sunspot minima, more severe drought events occurred, indicating a weakening of the summer monsoon when solar activity decreased on decadal timescales. On an interannual timescale, dry conditions in the study area prevailed under El Niño conditions, which is also supported by the spectrum analysis. Hence, our record

  20. Reconstructing monsoon dynamics on the Tibetan Plateau using ostracod shell chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerner, N.; De Baere, B.; Yang, Q.; Francois, R. H. G. M.; Jochum, K. P.; Frenzel, P.; Schwalb, A.

    2014-12-01

    Ostracod shells have widely been used as source material for geochemical analysis of stable isotope and trace element composition in paleolimnological reconstruction of lake hydrochemistry and climate as they provide insight into past water balance and solute evolution of lakes. During five fieldtrips to the Tibetan Plateau, taking place between 2008 and 2012, we collected live and sub-recent ostracods from 333 sites. Hydrochemical parameters, such as temperature, electrical conductivity, pH as well as major and minor ion concentrations were measured at each site and show high variability between sites. Adult intact individuals from the most common ostracod taxa were selected and their shell chemistry analyzed. The trace elemental data for the living ostracods compared to the hydrological data provides a calibration dataset for further hydrological and thus climatological reconstruction. Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios in ostracod shells provide information about past water temperature and salinity resulting from changes in precipitation vs. evaporation ratios and monsoon activity. Furthermore, Mn/Ca, Fe/Ca and U/Ca ratios are being explored as redox indicators to reconstruct oxygenation cycles. To reconstruct the monsoon dynamics on the Tibetan Plateau, sediment cores from different lakes on an east-west transect were taken: two long sediment cores from lakes Nam Co and Tangra Yumco, covering the past 20,000 years, and a short core from Lake Taro Co. The lakes feature an alkaline environment but show significant differences in their electrical conductivity ranging from 0.99 mS/cm (Taro Co) and 1.8 mS/cm (Nam Co) to 12 mS/cm (Tangra Yumco). The chemical composition of valves of the most common ostracod species in these lakes, Leucocytherella sinensis, was analyzed using laser ablation ICP-MS. The reconstruction provides a more extensive insight in past precipitation - evaporation balance and lake level change and provides clues about the interaction between the

  1. The West African Monsoon: variability and teleconnection with ENSO during the years 1948-57

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stickler, Alexander; Brönnimann, Stefan

    2010-05-01

    The intensity of the West African Monsoon (WAM) has been shown to be influenced by different factors. Most important for the existence of the monsoon system is the land-sea thermal contrast between the North African landmass and the Gulf of Guinea. ENSO plays an important role for its interannual variability via an atmospheric teleconnection bridging the Pacific and Atlantic oceanic basins and favouring either descent/weak low-level monsoon flow or ascent/strong low-level monsoon flow over tropical West Africa. Most published studies on the WAM variability are based on reanalysis datasets. However, while reproducing quite well the interannual variability, reanalysis products have been found to contain major biases in certain tropical regions before 1968. These lead to an unrealistic low frequency behaviour and might be explained by the lack of observations assimilated into the reanalyses, as is the case e.g. for tropical Africa where only the much sparser radiosonde data have been assimilated into the NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis (NNR). Here we present an analysis of the interannual WAM variability and its teleconnection with ENSO for the years 1948-57 which is not based on a reanalysis, but on early pilot balloon observational wind data from the Comprehensive Historical Upper Air Network (CHUAN). We have examined wind data from all 36 stations located in the domain (10°S-30°N, 20°W-20°E) on 5 levels up to the mid troposphere (corresponding roughly to the 925, 850, 700, 600 and 500 hPa pressure levels). This analysis shows that 7 subregions can be defined which are characterised by similar vertical wind profiles as well as seasonality: the NW (Mauritania, northern Senegal), the SW (southern Senegal to coastal Guinea), central sub-Saharan West Africa (SSWA, from interior Guinea in the W to coastal Cameroon and southern Niger in the E), central and eastern Niger, western Chad, the western Central African Republic, and the southern coastal regions east of the Gulf of

  2. Implications of East Asian summer and winter monsoons for interannual aerosol variations over central-eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xugeng; Zhao, Tianliang; Gong, Sunling; Xu, Xiangde; Han, Yongxiang; Yin, Yan; Tang, Lili; He, Hongchang; He, Jinhai

    2016-03-01

    Air quality change is generally driven by two factors: pollutant emissions and meteorology, which are difficult to distinguish via observations. To identify the contribution of meteorological factor to air quality change, an aerosol simulation from 1995 to 2004 with the global air quality model GEM-AQ/EC was designed without year-to-year changes in the anthropogenic aerosol (including sulfate and organic and black carbon) emissions over the 10-year span. To assess the impact of interannual variations of East Asian monsoon (EAM) on air quality change in China, this modeling study focused on the region of central-eastern China (CEC), a typical East Asian monsoon (EAM) region with high anthropogenic aerosol emissions. The simulation analysis showed that the interannual variability in surface aerosols over CEC was driven by fluctuation in meteorological factors associated with EAM changes. Large amplitudes of interannual variability in surface aerosol concentrations reaching 20-30% relative to the 10-year averages were found over southern CEC in summer and over northern CEC in winter. The weakened near-surface winds of EAMs in both summer and winter were significantly correlated with aerosol increases over most areas of CEC. The summer and winter monsoon changes enhance the surface aerosol concentrations with increasing trend rates exceeding 30% and 40% over the southern and northern CEC region, respectively, during the 10 years. The composite analyses of aerosol concentrations in weak and strong monsoon years revealed that positive anomalies in surface aerosol concentrations during weak summer monsoon years were centered over the vast CEC region from the North China Plain to the Sichuan Basin, and the anomaly pattern with "northern higher" and "southern lower" surface aerosol levels was distributed over CEC in weak winter monsoon years. Aerosol washout by summer monsoon rainfall exerted an impact on CEC aerosol distribution in summer; aerosol dry depositions in

  3. Spatial Reconstructions of Asian Monsoon Climate Variability Over the Past Millennium from Long Tree-Ring Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, E. R.; Anchukaitis, K. J.; Buckley, B. M.; D'Arrigo, R. D.; Jacoby, G. C.; Wright, W. E.

    2008-12-01

    We present the first spatial reconstructions of Asian monsoon climate variability over the past millennium from long tree-ring records. The reconstructions, for both the monsoon (JJA) and pre-monsoon (MAM) seasons, are based on a 534-point grid of instrumental Palmer Drought Severity Indices (PDSI) covering all of monsoon Asia and an irregular network of 312 annual tree-ring chronologies over most of the same domain. The seasonal reconstructions were initially estimated at each grid point using a local "point-by-point regression" (PPR) method that has been used successfully in reconstructing drought over North America. Different levels of predictor variable screening applied in PPR produced a 5-member ensemble of reconstructions for each season. The estimated noise level in these reconstructions was relatively high (average cross-validation R2 over the 534 grid point domain typically <0.30). In addition, the lengths of the grid point reconstructions varied over space due to the variable length tree-ring series available for use in PPR. For these reasons, each ensemble member was iteratively refined using a local variant of PPR to improve its reconstructions, with missing values imputed as necessary, to produce complete fields extending back to AD 1000 over all 534 grid point locations. An ensemble average for each season, with estimated uncertainties, was then calculated and used for analysis. The reconstructions reveal the occurrence of some persistent "megadroughts" in the past that appear to be unprecedented in the instrumental records. These megadroughts are not restricted to any particular part of "Monsoon Asia", but the ones in Southeast Asia stand out particularly strong. Comparisons made between these drought reconstructions and a companion field of SST reconstructions for the tropical Pacific back to AD 1400, based on independent tree-ring data from the American Southwest and Mexico, suggest that unusual ENSO variability is a contributor to the development

  4. Projections of Active and Break Spells of the Indian Summer Monsoon using Original and Statistical Downscaled CMIP5 GCMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S.; Salvi, K.; Ghosh, S.; Karmakar, S.

    2014-12-01

    The dual nature of Indian monsoon system viz. south-west and the north-east is a potent advantage for Indian economy, which is mainly supported by agriculture industry. Out of these, the south-west monsoon contributes around 70% of the total annual rainfall over India and hence, forms the major source of water for agriculture. However, the south-west monsoon possesses variability on different temporal scales such as daily, intra-seasonal, annual and decadal time-scales. Among these, understanding of the intra-seasonal variability of south-west monsoon, which is characterized by spells of good/excess rainfall (active spells) and spells of less/no rainfall (break spells) over core monsoon zone in the peak monsoon months (July and August), is the most important for crop cycle planning. Long and intense active (break) spells may lead to flood (drought) and both these situations are crucial for the critical (initial) growth period of the crops and these situations may lead to reduced yield. So, accurate prediction of these events is essential for better agricultural planning. Therefore, we evaluate the ability of, General Circulation Models (GCMs) and statistically downscaled rainfall simulations at 0.5˚ resolution, to capture the intra-seasonal variability (in terms of active and break spells) revealed by observed rainfall data. We also project the duration and frequency of active and break spells with original and downscaled GCM simulations. The analysis is performed over spatially averaged rainfall time series (over core monsoon zone) for July and August, simulated with five GCMs simulations (both with original and downscaled) over historic period (1951-2005) and extreme future (RCP45, 2071-2100). Comparison results revealed that the GCMs simulations (original and downscaled) lack the skills to reproduce active/break spells shown by observed data. Both original and downscaled GCMs showed increase/decrease in active/break spells in future and changes are more in

  5. Abnormal monsoon years and their control on erosion and sediment flux in the high, arid northwest Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookhagen, Bodo; Thiede, Rasmus C.; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2005-02-01

    The interplay between topography and Indian summer monsoon circulation profoundly controls precipitation distribution, sediment transport, and river discharge along the Southern Himalayan Mountain Front (SHF). The Higher Himalayas form a major orographic barrier that separates humid sectors to the south and arid regions to the north. During the Indian summer monsoon, vortices transport moisture from the Bay of Bengal, swirl along the SHF to the northwest, and cause heavy rainfall when colliding with the mountain front. In the eastern and central parts of the Himalaya, precipitation measurements derived from passive microwave analysis (SSM/I) show a strong gradient, with high values at medium elevations and extensive penetration of moisture along major river valleys into the orogen. The end of the monsoonal conveyer belt is near the Sutlej Valley in the NW Himalaya, where precipitation is lower and rainfall maxima move to lower elevations. This region thus comprises a climatic transition zone that is very sensitive to changes in Indian summer monsoon strength. To constrain magnitude, temporal, and spatial distribution of precipitation, we analyzed high-resolution passive microwave data from the last decade and identified an abnormal monsoon year (AMY) in 2002. During the 2002 AMY, violent rainstorms conquered orographic barriers and penetrated far into otherwise arid regions in the northwest Himalaya at elevations in excess of 3 km asl. While precipitation in these regions was significantly increased and triggered extensive erosional processes (i.e., debris flows) on sparsely vegetated, steep hillslopes, mean rainfall along the low to medium elevations was not significantly greater in magnitude. This shift may thus play an important role in the overall sediment flux toward the Himalayan foreland. Using extended precipitation and sediment flux records for the last century, we show that these events have a decadal recurrence interval during the present-day monsoon

  6. Anomalies in the South American Monsoon Induced by Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, K. M. William; Kyu-Mong, Kim

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the direct effects of aerosols on the water cycle of the South American monsoon using the NASA finite-volume general circulation model (fvGCM). Global aerosol forcings are computed from radiative transfer functions derived from global distributions of five species of aerosols, i.e., dust, black carbon, organic carbon, sulphate and sea salt from the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation Transport (GOCART) model. Comparing fvGCM experiments without aerosol forcing, and with different combinations of aerosol forcing, we evaluate the impacts of aerosol direct heating on the onset, maintenance and evolution of the South American summer monsoon. We find that during the pre-monsoon season (September-October-November) Saharan dust contribute to heating of the atmosphere over the central and eastern equatorial Atlantic/Africa region through the elevated heat pump mechanism. The heating generates an anomalous Walker circulation with sinking motion, and low level northeasterlies over the Caribbean and northwestern South America. The low level flow is blocked by the Andes, and turn south and southeastward, increasing the low level jet (LLJ) along the eastern slope of the Andes. The increased LLJ transports more moisture from the Atlantic and the Amazon, enhancing the moisture convergence over subtropical land regions of South America. The moisture convergence was further accelerated by atmospheric heating by biomass burning over the Amazon. The net results of the dust and biomass heating are: a) an advance of the monsoon rainy season, b) an enhanced LLJ and c) a shifting the South America monsoon land precipitation equatorward, with increased rain over southern Brazil and reduced rain over the La Plata basin. ramifications of this elevated heating heat pump mechanism in aerosol monsoon water cycle on climate variability and change will be discussed. The ramifications of this "elevated heating heat pump" mechanism in aerosol monsoom water cycle on climate

  7. Monsoon dynamics over the past millennium on the southern-central Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlborn, Marieke; Haberzettl, Torsten; Kasper, Thomas; Henkel, Karoline; Doberschütz, Stefan; Daut, Gerhard; Reinwarth, Bastian; Ju, Jianting; Wang, Junbo; Zhu, Liping; Mäusbacher, Roland

    2013-04-01

    The Tibetan Plateau has experienced abrupt climate change superimposed by a gradual weakening of the summer monsoon systems during the Holocene. Although lake sediment records from the Tibetan Plateau are considered to be particularly sensitive to climate variations a holistic picture of the spatial and temporal monsoon evolution is still lacking due to the interplay of different moisture-transporting wind systems (Indian summer monsoon, East Asian summer monsoon, Westerlies). Closing this data gap is important since the Tibetan Plateau is a key area for understanding the climate evolution and its impact on the availability of current and future water resources in Central Asia. Hence, well-dated and high-resolution records are essential to improve the understanding of the spatial and temporal monsoonal evolution. To investigate the hydrological cycle indicating past monsoon variability on the southern-central Tibetan Plateau, records of several lakes were studied along an E-W-transect including Nam Co, Tangra Yumco, Taro Co and a small lake named TT Lake. In this study, a high-resolution sediment record from TT Lake (31.10° N, 86.57° E; 4,745 m asl) was investigated to reveal monsoonal dynamics and northern hemispheric climate oscillations over the past millennium. The 9 m deep TT Lake has a surface area of ~14,500 sqm and is located ~1,500 m west and 205 m above the recent western shoreline of Tangra Yumco. Terraces of former lake level highstands indicate that the TT Lake was part of the Tangra Yumco, but the timing remains unknown. Three sediment gravity cores, obtained in 2011 and 2012, were investigated with geochemical and sedimentological methods. By now a sedimentological core description, magnetic susceptibility data, radiocarbon age determinations, XRF scanning data, and grain size data are available. Further bio-geochemical as well as magnetostratigraphic analyses are in progress. The sedimentological description of the 50 to 89 cm long cores revealed

  8. Earth's eccentricity cycles and Indian Summer Monsoon variability over the past 2 million years: Evidence from deep-sea benthic foraminifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anil K.; Dhingra, Hitesh; Mélice, Jean-Luc; Anderson, David M.

    Spectral analysis of a Uvigerina proboscidea time series from DSDP Site 214 using the Lomb-Scargle method for unevenly sampled data, exhibits two dominant power peaks at 412 and 94 kyrs over the last 2 million years, which correspond to the Earth's eccentricity cycles. The results indicate that the SW monsoon varied at about 100 kyr and 400 kyr periodicities within Earth's eccentricity domain (Milankovitch range) over the past 2 million years. Wavelet transform analysis reveals the non-stationary nature of monsoon upwelling over this interval. The amplitude of the 400 kyr cycle in the U. proboscidea time series began to increase at ∼900 kyrs as has also been observed in few recent studies. We do not see a strong relation between eccentricity highs and intense summer monsoons over the studied interval.

  9. A Study on the Influence of the Land Surface Processes on the Southwest Monsoon Simulations using a Regional Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, C. V.; Bhaskar Rao, D. V.; Hari Prasad, D.; Hari Prasad, K. B. R. R.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2015-10-01

    Influence of the land surface processes as an important mechanism in the development of the Indian Summer Monsoon is studied by performing simulations with a regional atmospheric model. Seasonal scale simulations are conducted for two contrasting summer monsoons (MJJAS months) in 2008 & 2009 with the Weather Research and Forecasting-Advanced Research regional model at a high resolution of 15 km using the boundary conditions derived from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis data and using the NOAH land surface parameterization scheme. Simulations are evaluated by comparison of precipitation with 0.5° India Meteorological Department gridded rainfall data over land, atmospheric circulation fields with 1° resolution NCEP global final analysis, and surface fluxes with 0.75° resolution Era-Interim reanalysis. Results indicated significant variation in the evolution of the surface fluxes, air temperatures and flux convergence in the 2 contrasting years. A lower albedo, higher heating (sensible, latent heat fluxes), higher air temperatures, stronger flow and higher moisture flux convergence are noted over the subcontinent during the monsoon 2008 relative to the monsoon 2009. The simulated surface fluxes are in good comparison with observations. The stronger flow in 2008 is found to be associated with stronger heat flux gradients as well as stronger north-south geopotential/pressure gradients. The simulations revealed notable differences in many features such as zonal and meridional surface sensible heat gradients which, in turn, influenced the low-level pressure gradients, wind flow, and moisture transport. The present study reveals that, even at a regional scale, the physical processes of land-surface energy partitioning do influence the regional behavior of the monsoon system to a certain extent.

  10. ITCZ and ENSO pacing on East Asian winter monsoon variation during the Holocene: Sedimentological evidence from the Okinawa Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xufeng; Li, Anchun; Wan, Shiming; Kao, Shuhji; Kuhn, Gerhard

    2016-04-01

    Deep-sea fan sediments provide an excellent geological archive for paleoenvironment reconstruction. Grain size, clay mineral and elemental (Ti, Fe, Ca) compositions were measured for a core retrieved from a submarine fan in the Okinawa Trough. Varimax-rotated Principal Component Analysis (V-PCA) on time-evolution of grain size spectrum reveals that, since the Holocene, sediment was transported mainly by the benthic nepheloid layer (33%) and upper layers (33%) which is driven by the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM). The intensification of the Kuroshio Current during the Holocene, masks the fluvial signal of the summer monsoon and obstructs clay minerals derived from the Yellow River, a major contributor prior to 12 ka BP. A new grain size index (GSI), which represents the EAWM well, exhibits a negative correlation with the δ18O record in Dongge Cave, China during the Holocene when sea level was relatively steady. This anticorrelation suggests the southward migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). The consistency among our records and rainfall records in Peru, Ti counts in the Cariaco Basin, monsoon records in Oman and the averaged summer insolation pattern at 30°N further support the ITCZ's impact on monsoon systems globally. Cross-Correlation Analyses for GSI and log(Ti/Ca) against δ18O record in Dongge Cave reveal a decoupling between the East Asian winter and summer monsoon during 5500-2500 cal yr BP, with greater complexity in the last 2500 years. This can be attributed to exacerbated ENSO mode fluctuations and possibly anthropogenic interference superimposed on insolation and ITCZ forcing.

  11. The resolution sensitivity of the South Asian monsoon and Indo-Pacific in a global 0.35° AGCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Stephanie J.; Levine, Richard C.; Turner, Andrew G.; Martin, Gill M.; Woolnough, Steven J.; Schiemann, Reinhard; Mizielinski, Matthew S.; Roberts, Malcolm J.; Vidale, Pier Luigi; Demory, Marie-Estelle; Strachan, Jane

    2016-02-01

    The South Asian monsoon is one of the most significant manifestations of the seasonal cycle. It directly impacts nearly one third of the world's population and also has substantial global influence. Using 27-year integrations of a high-resolution atmospheric general circulation model (Met Office Unified Model), we study changes in South Asian monsoon precipitation and circulation when horizontal resolution is increased from approximately 200-40 km at the equator (N96-N512, 1.9°-0.35°). The high resolution, integration length and ensemble size of the dataset make this the most extensive dataset used to evaluate the resolution sensitivity of the South Asian monsoon to date. We find a consistent pattern of JJAS precipitation and circulation changes as resolution increases, which include a slight increase in precipitation over peninsular India, changes in Indian and Indochinese orographic rain bands, increasing wind speeds in the Somali Jet, increasing precipitation over the Maritime Continent islands and decreasing precipitation over the northern Maritime Continent seas. To diagnose which resolution-related processes cause these changes, we compare them to published sensitivity experiments that change regional orography and coastlines. Our analysis indicates that improved resolution of the East African Highlands results in the improved representation of the Somali Jet and further suggests that improved resolution of orography over Indochina and the Maritime Continent results in more precipitation over the Maritime Continent islands at the expense of reduced precipitation further north. We also evaluate the resolution sensitivity of monsoon depressions and lows, which contribute more precipitation over northeast India at higher resolution. We conclude that while increasing resolution at these scales does not solve the many monsoon biases that exist in GCMs, it has a number of small, beneficial impacts.

  12. Evaluation of the Indian monsoon generated by four regional climate models during the period 1981-2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas-Picher, P.; Christensen, J.; Kumar, P.; Saeed, F.; Asharaf, S.; Wiltshire, A.; Ahrens, B.; Hagemann, S.

    2010-09-01

    The EU project Water and Global Change (WATCH) is coming to an end. The main objectives of this project are to analyze, quantify and predict the components of the current and future global water cycles and evaluate their uncertainties. As part of this project, regional climate model (RCM) simulations over Europe and South Asia were generated to feed several different hydrological models. This work presents the results of 4 different RCMs over South Asia driven with ERA-40 reanalysis. The analysis focuses on the ability of the RCMs to simulate the Indian monsoon. Generally, the RCMs are able to simulate the characteristics and processes of the Indian monsoon. The better definition of the topography, due to the higher horizontal resolution, allows RCMs to develop a spatial distribution of precipitation, which is closer to the observation than for ERA40. However, at the regional scale, many differences between the RCM simulations can be observed. The RCMs are in general too warm in Northern India and this has an impact on the large scale circulation as shown by the wind spatial distribution. Using a precipitation index to determine the monsoon onset and withdrawal, the RCMs are able to determine well the beginning of the monsoon but have more difficulties capturing the end of the monsoon season compared with observations. While the spatial distribution of precipitation shows some mismatches with observations, the annual cycle of the water budget over 5 basins compares well with observations. Finally, the assessment of added value, investigated using a spatial filter, shows similar small scales features between the RCMs.

  13. Quaternary Indus River Terraces as Archives of Summer Monsoon Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonell, Tara N.; Clift, Peter D.

    2013-04-01

    If we are to interpret the marine stratigraphic record in terms of evolving continental environmental conditions or tectonics, it is essential to understand the transport processes that bring sediment from mountain sources to its final marine depocenter. We investigate the role that climate plays in modulating this flux by looking at the Indus River system, which is dominated by the strong forcing of the Asian monsoon and the erosion of the western Himalaya. Lake, paleoceanographic, and speleothem records offer high-resolution reconstructions of monsoon intensity over millennial timescales. These proxies suggest the monsoon reached peak intensity at ~9-10 ka in central India, followed by a steady decline after ~7 ka, with a steep decline after 4 ka. New lake core records (Tso Kar and Tso Moriri), however, suggest a more complex pattern of monsoon weakening between 7-8 ka in the Greater Himalayan region, which contrasts with a time of strong monsoon in central India. This indicates that the floodplains of the major river systems may not experience the same climatic conditions as their mountain sources, resulting in different geomorphologic responses to climate change. Earlier research has established that the northern part of the Indus floodplain adjacent to the mountains experienced incision after ~10 ka. Incision and reworking is even more intense in the Himalayas but its timing is not well-constrained. High altitude river valleys, at least north of the Greater Himalaya, appear to be sensitive to monsoon strength because they lie on the periphery of the Himalayan rain shadow. These valleys may be affected by landslide damming during periods of strong monsoonal precipitation, such as slightly after the monsoon maximum from 9-10 ka. Damming of these river valleys provides sediment storage through valley-filling and later sediment release through gradual incision or dam-bursting. Terraces of a major tributary to the Indus, the Zanskar River, indicate valley

  14. Impacts of Urbanization on Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shastri, H. K.; Ghosh, S.; Karmakar, S.

    2013-12-01

    Rapid urbanisation all around the world is a matter of concern to the scientific community. The fast growing urban areas carries out huge anthropogenic activities that burdens natural environment and its resources like air-water quality and space, thus have different climatology to their rural surroundings. World Urbanization Prospects 2005 annual report described 20th century as witnessing a rapid urbanization of the world's population. Though urbanization is a worldwide phenomenon, it is especially prevalent in India, where urban areas have experienced an unprecedented rate of growth with level of urbanization increased from 17.23 % to 31.16% in year 1951 to 2011and the number of cities with population more than one million has grown from 5 to 53 over the same time. We take up an observational study to understand influence of urbanisation on mesoscale circulations and resulting convection, thus nature of precipitation around urban areas. The spatially distributed analysis of gridded daily precipitation data over the country is carried out to identify nature of trends in selected statistics of Indian summer monsoon precipitation and examine its association with urban land cover to have an impact on precipitation statistics. We evaluate explicit changes around urban land use in context of 40 large Indian urban areas. Further we assess local-urban climatic signals in the point level rainfall observations with model based analysis of two nearby locations under similar climatic conditions but differing largely in terms of urbanisation. The results of gridded data analysis indicate an overall tendency towards decrease in mean precipitation however, rainfall activities are enhanced around urban areas across different climate zones of the country. Though trends observed in selected climatic parameters revealed great degree of spatial inter variability in selected precipitation statistics over the country, they accounts a greater degree of inclination for occurrence under

  15. Impact of the modulated annual cycle and intraseasonal oscillation on daily-to-interannual rainfall variability across monsoonal India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moron, Vincent; Robertson, Andrew W.; Ghil, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Variability of the Indian summer monsoon is decomposed into an interannually modulated annual cycle (MAC) and a northward-propagating, intraseasonal (30-60-day) oscillation (ISO). To achieve this decomposition, we apply multi-channel singular spectrum analysis (M-SSA) simultaneously to unfiltered daily fields of observed outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) and to reanalyzed 925-hPa winds over the Indian region, from 1975 to 2008. The MAC is essentially given by the year-to-year changes in the annual and semi-annual components; it displays a slow northward migration of OLR anomalies coupled with an alternation between the northeast winter and southwest summer monsoons. The impact of these oscillatory modes on rainfall is then analyzed using a 1-degree gridded daily data set, focusing on Monsoonal India (north of 17°N and west of 90°E) during the months of June to September. Daily rainfall variability is partitioned into three states using a Hidden Markov Model. Two of these states are shown to agree well with previous classifications of "active" and "break" phases of the monsoon, while the third state exhibits a dipolar east-west pattern with abundant rainfall east of about 77°E and low rainfall to the west. Occurrence of the three rainfall states is found to be an asymmetric function of both the MAC and ISO components. On average, monsoon active phases are favored by large positive anomalies of MAC, and breaks by negative ones. ISO impact is decisive when the MAC is near neutral values during the onset and withdrawal phases of the monsoon. Active monsoon spells are found to require a synergy between the MAC and ISO, while the east-west rainfall dipole is less sensitive to interactions between the two. The driest years, defined from spatially averaged June-September rainfall anomalies, are found to be mostly a result of breaks occurring during the onset and withdrawal stages of the monsoon, e.g., mid-June to mid-July, and during September. These breaks are in turn

  16. Utilizing Higher Resolution Land Surface Remote Sensing Data for Assessing Recent Trends over Asia Monsoon Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Suhung; Leptoukh, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    The slide presentation discusses the integration of 1-kilometer spatial resolution land temperature data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), with 8-day temporal resolution, into the NASA Monsoon-Asia Integrated Regional Study (MAIRS) Data Center. The data will be available for analysis and visualization in the Giovanni data system. It discusses the NASA MAIRS Data Center, presents an introduction to the data access tools, and an introduction of Products available from the service, discusses the higher resolution Land Surface Temperature (LST) and presents preliminary results of LST Trends over China.

  17. An Early Assessment of Medium Range Monsoon Precipitation Forecasts from the Latest High-Resolution NCEP-GFS (T1534) Model over South Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Satya; Momin, Imranali M.; Mitra, Ashis K.; Bhattacharjee, Partha S.; Yang, Fanglin; Tallapragada, Vijay

    2016-06-01

    Reliable prediction of the South Asian monsoon rainfall and its variability is crucial for various hydrological applications and early warning systems. The National Centers for Environmental Prediction-Global Forecast System (NCEP-GFS) is one of the popular global deterministic numerical weather prediction models, which is recently upgraded from T574 to T1534. In this paper, medium range monsoon precipitation forecasts from both the T1534 and T574 models are critically evaluated over the South Asia for the peak monsoon months (July and August) of 2015. Although both the versions of GFS model show similar large-scale monsoon rainfall patterns, the dry bias over the northwest India and equatorial Indian Ocean is noticeably improved in day-1 through day-5 forecasts in the new high-resolution T1534 model. The error decomposition analysis shows similar error characteristics in the monsoon rainfall prediction from both the versions of GFS model, in general. However, forecast improvement factor shows 10-30 % improvement in precipitation forecast from the latest T1534 model over most parts of the South Asia. These preliminary analyses suggest that a suitable bias-correction to the GFS model precipitation forecasts will be useful for any specific application.

  18. Sun-Sky Radiometer Synthesis of Interplay Between Aerosols and Monsoon Activity Over Pune, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devara, P. C. S.; Kumar, Sumit; Vijayakumar, K.; Pandithurai, G.

    2014-09-01

    Besides several thematic campaigns, utilizing a variety of platforms including satellites, ground-based networks have been established to improve our understanding of the role of aerosols in the changing monsoon climate. Two such widely known networks over the globe are `SKYNET' and `AERONET' with sun-sky radiometers as the principal equipment that characterizes aerosols and gases over different geographical locations under varied air mass conditions. Pune (18°43'N, 73°51'E, 559 m above mean sea level), a fast growing low-latitude, urban city in India, is one of the sites where Prede (POM-01L, SKYNET) and Cimel (CE-318, AERONET) Sun-sky radiometers have been in operation since 2004. These radiometers have been extensively used in several studies related to stand-alone and coupled aerosol-cloud-climate processes. The Prede instrument at this site is being augmented for the network of the Global Atmospheric Watch program of the World Meteorological Organization to facilitate data coordination through the World Data Center for Aerosols. The present study envisages understanding the response of atmospheric constituents, through simultaneous operation of the radiometers amongst others, for the rainfall activity over Pune during two contrasting monsoon years of 2008 (active, 98 % of long period average (LPA) rainfall over the whole country) and 2009 (weak, 78 % of LPA). The synthesis of data indicates that, apart from excellent agreement between the direct Sun observations, both radiometers capture well the monsoon features within the instrument density and efficacy of data retrieval algorithms involved. The meteorological fields from the ECMWF re-analysis and NOAA-HYSPLIT air-mass back-trajectory analysis during the study period have been utilized to explain the variations observed in the radiometer products.

  19. Spatial and temporal variations in ecosystem response to monsoon precipitation variability in southwestern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forzieri, Giovanni; Feyen, Luc; Cescatti, Alessandro; Vivoni, Enrique R.

    2014-10-01

    Due to its marked vegetation phenology and precipitation gradients, the North American Monsoon Region (NAMR) is a useful domain for studying ecosystem responses to climate variability and change. To this end, we analyze long-term dynamics (1982-2004) in monsoon precipitation (Pr), time-integrated Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (TINDVI) used as proxy of net primary productivity, and rain-use efficiency (RUE). The analysis focuses on six ecoregions, spanning from desert environments to tropical dry forests, to investigate (1) how net primary productivity and rain-use efficiency vary along a precipitation gradient, (2) if interannual variability in net primary productivity is linked to the interannual variability in precipitation, and (3) if there is evidence of a long-term signal imposed on the interannual variability in rain-use efficiency. Variations in TINDVI and RUE with Pr along the NAMR precipitation gradient differ among ecoregions exhibiting intensive or extensive water use strategies. We explain the nonlinear behaviors along the precipitation gradient as resulting from different physiological responses to climatological means and the impact of topographic effects. Statistical analysis indicates that the interannual variability in vegetation response is significantly related to the interannual variability in Pr, but their correlation declines with time. A long-term positive signal in RUE imposed on its interannual variability is identified and results from a constant TINDVI under negative long-term trends of Pr. This important finding suggests the combined long-term effects of ecosystem acclimation to reduced water availability and increasing CO2 concentration across the varied ecosystems of the North American Monsoon Region.

  20. Investigation of the "elevated heat pump" hypothesis of the Asian monsoon using satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wonsick, M. M.; Pinker, R. T.; Ma, Y.

    2014-08-01

    The "elevated heat pump" (EHP) hypothesis has been a topic of intensive research and controversy. It postulates that aerosol-induced anomalous mid- and upper-tropospheric warming in the Himalayan foothills and above the Tibetan Plateau leads to an early onset and intensification of Asian monsoon rainfall. This finding is primarily based on results from a NASA finite-volume general circulation model run with and without radiative forcing from different types of aerosols. In particular, black carbon emissions from sources in northern India and dust from Western China, Afghanistan, Pakistan, the Thar Desert, and the Arabian Peninsula drive the modeled anomalous heating. Since the initial discussion of the EHP hypothesis in 2006, the aerosol-monsoon relationship has been investigated using various modeling and observational techniques. The current study takes a novel observational approach to detect signatures of the "elevated heat pump" effect on convection, precipitation, and temperature for contrasting aerosol content years during the period of 2000-2012. The analysis benefits from unique high-resolution convection information inferred from Meteosat-5 observations as available through 2005. Additional data sources include temperature data from the NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis and the European Reanalysis (ERA-Interim) precipitation data from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP), aerosol optical depth from the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and aerosol optical properties from the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) aerosol reanalysis. Anomalous upper-tropospheric warming and the early onset and intensification of the Indian monsoon were not consistently observed during the years with high loads of absorbing aerosols. Possibly, model assumptions and/or unaccounted semi-direct aerosol effects caused the disagreement between observed and hypothesized

  1. Titan's Methane Monsoon : Evidence of Catastrophic Hydrology from Cassini RADAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R. D.; Cassini RADAR Team

    2005-08-01

    Radar imagery from the October 2004 TA encounter (1) indicated a number of bright, narrow, sinuous features that might be cracks or canyons - two of these appeared to connect to the apices of triangular radar-bright striated features that may be alluvial fans rendered radar-bright by wavelength-scale (>2cm) cobbles or boulders. The findings of the Huygens probe seem to support the idea of pluvial and fluvial activity on Titan. The February 2005 T3 encounter provided radar imagery of another region with two areas of dendritic networks of bright sinuous features, one being a remarkable collection of apparently braided channels draining into a radar-bright plain. We present analysis of the topological properties (branching ratios, tortuosity etc.) of these networks and channels, supporting an origin via erosion by heavy rainfall on a relatively uncohesive terrain, and present some terrestrial analogs. We consider these observations in the context of a paradigm for Titan (2,3,4) reminiscent of the hydrology of the US desert southwest, where long droughts are punctuated by catastrophic downpours. Even though the annual average rainfall is modest (energetically limited to 1cm/yr (3)) pluvial/fluvial erosion is a major agent of geomorphological change. Although perhaps climatologically inaccurate, the term ``Methane Monsoon" coined by Arthur C. Clarke (5) is an evocative name for the paradigm. References (1) C. Elachi et al., Science, 308, 970-974, 2005. (2) R. D. Lorenz, Science, 290, 467-468, 2000. (3) R. D. Lorenz and J. Mitton, Lifting Titan's Veil, Cambridge University Press, 2002. (4) R. D. Lorenz et al., Geophysical Review Letters, 32, L01201, 2005 (5). A. C. Clarke, Imperial Earth, , Victor Gollancz, London, 1975

  2. Solar cycle effects on Indian summer monsoon dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnam, M. Venkat; Santhi, Y. Durga; Kishore, P.; Rao, S. Vijaya Bhaskara

    2014-12-01

    Solar activity associated with sunspot number influences the atmospheric circulation on various time scales. As Indian summer monsoon (ISM) is the manifestation between warmer Asian continent and the cooler Indian Ocean, changes in the solar cycle are expected to influence the ISM characteristics. Among several elements of ISM, Tropical Easterly Jet (TEJ), Low Level Jet (LLJ), and rainfall are important features. As a part of CAWSES India Phase II theme 1 (solar influence on climate (0-100 km)) programme, we made an attempt to investigate the role of solar cycle variability on these ISM features using long-term data available from NECP/NCAR (1948-2010) and ERA-Interim (1979-2010) re-analysis products. To check the suitability of these data sets, ground based observations available over the Indian region are also considered. ISM characteristics are studied separately for the maximum and minimum as well as increasing and decreasing solar cycle conditions. Amplitudes corresponding to the solar cycle observed in TEJ, LLJ and rainfall are extracted using advanced statistical tool known as intrinsic mode function. Long-term trends in TEJ reveal decreasing trend at the rate of 0.13 m/s/yr (between 1948 and 2000) and no perceptible trend in LLJ. There exists inverse relation between TEJ strength and Central India rainfall. Large difference of 2 m/s (5 m/s) in the zonal winds of TEJ between solar maximum and minimum (increasing and decreasing trend) is noticed. There exists a difference of ~2 m/s in LLJ winds between solar maximum and minimum and increasing and decreasing trend of the solar cycle. However, no consistent relation between the ISM rainfall and solar cycle is noticed over Indian region unlike reported earlier but there exists a delayed effect around 13 years. We attribute the observed features as linear and non-linear relation between dynamics of ISM, rainfall and solar cycle, respectively.

  3. Modelling the distribution of domestic ducks in Monsoon Asia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Bockel, Thomas P.; Prosser, Diann; Franceschini, Gianluca; Biradar, Chandra; Wint, William; Robinson, Tim; Gilbert, Marius

    2011-01-01

    Domestic ducks are considered to be an important reservoir of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI), as shown by a number of geospatial studies in which they have been identified as a significant risk factor associated with disease presence. Despite their importance in HPAI epidemiology, their large-scale distribution in Monsoon Asia is poorly understood. In this study, we created a spatial database of domestic duck census data in Asia and used it to train statistical distribution models for domestic duck distributions at a spatial resolution of 1km. The method was based on a modelling framework used by the Food and Agriculture Organisation to produce the Gridded Livestock of the World (GLW) database, and relies on stratified regression models between domestic duck densities and a set of agro-ecological explanatory variables. We evaluated different ways of stratifying the analysis and of combining the prediction to optimize the goodness of fit of the predictions. We found that domestic duck density could be predicted with reasonable accuracy (mean RMSE and correlation coefficient between log-transformed observed and predicted densities being 0.58 and 0.80, respectively), using a stratification based on livestock production systems. We tested the use of artificially degraded data on duck distributions in Thailand and Vietnam as training data, and compared the modelled outputs with the original high-resolution data. This showed, for these two countries at least, that these approaches could be used to accurately disaggregate provincial level (administrative level 1) statistical data to provide high resolution model distributions.

  4. Arsenic release from paddy soils during monsoon flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Linda C.; Hug, Stephan J.; Dittmar, Jessica; Voegelin, Andreas; Kretzschmar, Ruben; Wehrli, Bernhard; Cirpka, Olaf A.; Saha, Ganesh C.; Ashraf Ali, M.; Badruzzaman, A. Borhan M.

    2010-01-01

    Bangladesh relies heavily on groundwater for the irrigation of dry-season rice. However, the groundwater used for irrigation often contains high concentrations of arsenic, potentially jeopardizing the future of rice production in the country. In seasonally flooded fields, topsoil arsenic concentrations decrease during the monsoon season, suggesting that flooding attenuates arsenic accumulation in the soils. Here we examine the chemistry of soil porewater and floodwater during the monsoon season in rice paddies in Munshiganj, Bangladesh, to assess whether flooding releases significant quantities of arsenic from the soils. We estimate that between 51 and 250mgm-2 of soil arsenic is released into floodwater during the monsoon season. This corresponds to a loss of 13-62% of the arsenic added to soils through irrigation each year. The arsenic was distributed throughout the entire floodwater column by vertical mixing and was laterally removed when the floodwater receded. We conclude that monsoon floodwater removes a large amount of the arsenic added to paddy soils through irrigation, and suggest that non-flooded soils are particularly at risk of arsenic accumulation.

  5. Monsoonal differences and probability distribution of PM(10) concentration.

    PubMed

    Md Yusof, Noor Faizah Fitri; Ramli, Nor Azam; Yahaya, Ahmad Shukri; Sansuddin, Nurulilyana; Ghazali, Nurul Adyani; Al Madhoun, Wesam

    2010-04-01

    There are many factors that influence PM(10) concentration in the atmosphere. This paper will look at the PM(10) concentration in relation with the wet season (north east monsoon) and dry season (south west monsoon) in Seberang Perai, Malaysia from the year 2000 to 2004. It is expected that PM(10) will reach the peak during south west monsoon as the weather during this season becomes dry and this study has proved that the highest PM(10) concentrations in 2000 to 2004 were recorded in this monsoon. Two probability distributions using Weibull and lognormal were used to model the PM(10) concentration. The best model used for prediction was selected based on performance indicators. Lognormal distribution represents the data better than Weibull distribution model for 2000, 2001, and 2002. However, for 2003 and 2004, Weibull distribution represents better than the lognormal distribution. The proposed distributions were successfully used for estimation of exceedences and predicting the return periods of the sequence year. PMID:19365611

  6. Aerosol impact on the Asian Summer Monsoon oberved by CALIPSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlmann, J.; Quaas, J.; Devasthale, A.; Kinne, S.

    2009-04-01

    Different, sometimes opposed theories about the impact of aerosols above and around the Tibetan Plateau on the Asian Summer Monsoon exist, one being the "Elevated Heat Pump" (EHP) proposed by Lau et al. (2006) which holds local aerosol induced heating close to the Tibetan Plateau during pre-monsoon season responsible for an advance and intensification of the monsoon. However, observational evidence for mechanisms of aerosols either strengthening or weakening the monsoon are still lacking. CALIPSO satellite data provides a three-dimensional view of aerosols and a classification into six different aerosol types according to their radiative properties. We use this data to examine possible aerosol sources, ways of transportation and patterns of concentration in the region. Combination with wind data shows that especially dusts from Taklamakan and Thar deserts possibly contribute to an EHP-like regime, but long-range transport from the Arabian peninsula cannot be excluded either. Furthermore, we use the CALIPSO aerosol data as an input to a radiative transfer model and compute resulting heating rates in order to quantify aerosol impacts on the atmosphere in the region.

  7. Early warnings and missed alarms for abrupt monsoon transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Z. A.; Kwasniok, F.; Boulton, C. A.; Cox, P. M.; Jones, R. T.; Lenton, T. M.; Turney, C. S. M.

    2015-04-01

    Palaeo-records from China (Cheng et al., 2009; Wang et al., 2008, 2001) demonstrate the East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM) is dominated by abrupt and large magnitude monsoon shifts on millennial timescales, switching between periods of high and weak monsoon rains. It has been hypothesised that over these timescales, the EASM exhibits two stable states with bifurcation-type tipping points between them (Schewe et al., 2012). Here we test this hypothesis by looking for early warning signals of past bifurcations in speleothem records from Sanbao Cave and Hulu Cave, China (Wang et al., 2008, 2001), spanning the penultimate glacial cycle, and in multiple model simulations derived from the data. We find hysteresis behaviour in our model simulations with transitions directly forced by solar insolation. We detect critical slowing down prior to an abrupt monsoon shift during the penultimate deglaciation consistent with long-term orbital forcing. However, such signals are only detectable when the change in system stability is sufficiently slow to be detected by the sampling resolution of the dataset, raising the possibility that the alarm was missed and a similar forcing drove earlier EASM shifts.

  8. Long-term change of precipitation in summer monsoon with a quasi bi-weekly (QBW) period over and around the Tibet-Himalaya region and its association to the climate change in monsoon Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasunari, T.; Fujinami, H.; Morimoto, A.

    2010-12-01

    The Asian summer monsoon has intraseasonal variability in precipitation and associated atmospheric circulations with two dominant time scales: one is 30-50 day period, and the other is 10-20 day period or quasi-biweekly (QBW) period. Some recent studies (e.g., Fujinami and Yasunari, 2004, 2009; Fujinami et al., 2010; Murata et al., 2008) have revealed that particularly the QBW oscillation is dominant over and around the Tibet-Himalaya region including the northeast India (the Assam/Meghalaya) and Bangladesh. An essential issue is that this QBW oscillation plays a key role in the maintaining the heaviest monsoon rainfall region in the world. This oscillation also plays a dominant role in determining interannual activity of monsoon precipitation over this region (Fujinami et al., 2010). The atmospheric circulation of the QBW oscillation has also proved to involve the modulation of the East Asian monsoon activitiy (Meiyu/Baiu) (Fujinami and Yasunari, 2009). However, why and how the QBW oscillation is so dominant over this particularly region, and the origin and dynamics of the QBW oscillation are still an open question. Our preliminary analysis has suggested that the dynamical effect of the Tibet-Himalayan mountain range may play a key role, including the interaction between tropical and mid-latitude circulation over and around there. This study will report our further analysis on the the dynamics of the QBW oscillation, and its association to the recent climate change in the Asian monsoon region. References: Fujinami, H. and T. Yasunari, 2004: Fujinami H. and T. Yasunari, 2004: Submonthly Variability of Convection and Circulation over and around the Tibetan Plateau during the Boreal Summer. J. Meteor. Soc. Japan, 82, 1545-1564. Fujinami, H. and T. Yasunari, 2009: H. Fujinami and T. Yasunari 2009: The Effects of Midlatitude Waves over and around the Tibetan Plateau on Submonthly Variability of the East Asian Summer Monsoon, Monthly Weather Review, 137, 2286

  9. An Assessment of Monsoon Triggered Landslides in Western Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudan Acharya, Madhu

    2010-05-01

    Due to heavy monsoon rain, rugged topography and very young mountains, frequent slope failures and soil erosion are very common in Nepal but in most of cases the natural slopes are disturbed by men to construct a road through it and the situation further aggravated by the Monsoon rain. Summer usually tests the disaster response capacity of Nepal, when the monsoons trigger water induced disasters. This year Nepal's Western regions were most severely affected by floods and landslides. Every year, sadly, it is the same story of mostly poor people living in remote villages succumbing to landslides and flooding and those who survive facing hardships brought on by the disaster. The tail end of the monsoon in October has triggered flood and landslides in Nepal which affected a total of 14 districts in the mid and far-west regions, of which Kailali, Bardiya, Banke, Dadeldhura, Accham and Kanchapur district are most affected. The affected areas are geographically scattered and remote, and are therefore difficult to access. In this year (2009), flood and landslides have claimed 62 lives, affecting more than 152,000 individuals from 27,000 families. More than 4,000 families are displaced and are taking shelter in schools, open space and forest areas with no protection from the external elements. In the above context the prevention and mitigation measures for landslides is a great challenge for Nepal. Nepal has been investing its huge amount of resources to stabilize landslides and roadside slope failures, still then it has become unmanageable during Monsoon time. Considering the above facts, an assessment of landslides which were occurred during the Monsoon (July-October 2009), along Khodpe - Jhota - Chainpur road in far western region of Nepal has been carried out based on the field observation of various landslides. The paper presents the causes and mechanisms of failures of different landslides which are mostly triggered by Monsoon rain. It also suggests some low cost

  10. Monsoon response of the Somali Current and associated upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schott, Friedrich

    The Somali Current typically develops in different phases in response to the onset of the summer monsoon. Each of these phases exists quasistationary for some time ranging from weeks to months. These periods of rather constant circulation patterns are separated by periods of rapid transition. In the early phase of the monsoon response, during May, with weak southerly winds off Somalia, a cross equatorial inertial current develops which turns offshore a few degrees north of the equator with a coastal upwelling wedge just north of the offshore flow. North of that region, an Ekman upwelling regime exists all the way up the coast. At the onset of strong winds in June, a northern anticyclonic gyre develops north of 5°N and a second cold wedge forms north of 8°-9°N, where that current turns offshore. The most drastic change of upwelling pattern occurs in the late phase of the summer monsoon, August/September, when the southern cold wedge propagates northward, indicating a break-down of the two-gyre pattern and development of a continuous boundary current from south of the equator to about 10°N. The wedge propagation during 1976-1978 is discussed, based on satellite observations (EVANS and BROWN, 1981), moored station data during 1978, 1979 and shipboard hydrographic data during 1979. A simple relation between the decrease of local monsoon winds offshore and wedge propagation cannot be determined. The southward coastal undercurrent, which is part of the Ekman upwelling regime north of 5° during the early summer monsoon, seems to turn offshore between 3° and 5°, probably due to a zonal excursion of depth contours in that area. With the spin-up of the deep-reaching northern gyre the undercurrent is extinguished during July to August but seems to get reestablished after the coalescence of the two gyres.

  11. Interactions between Super Typhoon Megi (2010) and the Monsoon Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, M.; Li, T.; Bi, M.; Shen, X.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate prediction of tropical cyclone track is critical for high-impact weather preparedness, especially as the storm is near the coastal region. The track prediction for super typhoon Megi (2010) in the western Pacific was notoriously bad as most operational models predicated a mainly westward movement while Megi actually made a northward turning after it has crossed the Philippines islands. In this study, we try to understand this rather irregular motion for Megi. Examination of NCEP reanalyzed fields indicated that during this period a low-frequency (10-60-day) monsoon gyre in the vicinity of Megi may have interactions with the latter. To understand the effect of the low-frequency mode on the movement of Megi, numerical experiments were designed and conducted. The total flow from the analyzed field is separated into 1) a slowly varying background state, 2) a 10-60-day low frequency component representing the monsoon gyre, and 3) a 10-day high-pass filtered component representing Megi. In the control experiment, the total field containing all three components is used as the initial and lateral boundary conditions, and the WRF model is able to simulate Megi's sharp northward turning successfully. In the second experiment, the 10-60-day mode is removed from the initial and lateral boundary fields. In the absence of the low-frequency mode, Megi moves westward and only slightly northwestward without turning north. When the vortex representing Megi was removed, the movement of the monsoon gyre was also affected. These experiments indicated strong interactions between Megi and the monsoon gyre. The interactions and the way the monsoon gyre actually affected the track of Megi will be discussed in the presentation.

  12. 2.1 Pan-WCRP Monsoon Modelling Workshop Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Sperber, K R

    2005-06-28

    Ken Sperber led a discussion of the outcome of the Pan-WCRP Monsoon Modelling Workshop that was held at the University of California at Irvine from 15-17 June 2005. At the workshop presentations from key CLIVAR and GEWEX panels were presented to highlight the outstanding problems in modelling the Earth's monsoons. Additionally, presentations from invited experts were given to highlight important aspects of monsoon phenomena and processes, such as low-level jets, air-sea interaction, predictability, observational networks/studies, and model test beds etc. Since all persons attending the CLIVAR AAMP meeting were present for all, or most, of the monsoon workshop, a detailed description of the workshop presentations was not given. Rather, the discussion was focused on the recommendations of the workshop breakout groups and their relevance to CLIVAR AAMP. CLIVAR AAMP endorsed the near-term workshop recommendation of investigating the diurnal cycle using a hierarchy of models a key way forward for promoting CLIVAR/GEWEX interactions. In GCM studies CLIVAR researchers have identified the diurnal cycle as a forced ''mode'' of variability that is poorly represented in terms of amplitude and phase, especially in the case of precipitation. Typical phase errors of 6-12 hours are noted over both land and ocean in GCMs. CLIVAR views adequate simulation of the diurnal cycle as key aspect of variability in its own right, but also because of its potential rectification on to subseasonal variability (e.g., the Madden-Julian oscillation). It is hypothesized that improvement of diurnal variability may lead to an improved representation of intraseasonal variability and improved skill of monsoon forecasts on medium-range to seasonal time scales.

  13. The South Asian Monsoon Circulation in Moist Isentropic coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thazhe Purayil, Sabin; Pauluis, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    The atmospheric circulation and thermodynamic structure during the South Asian Summer Monsoon season is analyzed in isentropic coordinates through the mass transport represented in terms of the potential temperature and equivalent potential temperature. This approach, originally developed to analyze the global meridional circulation, makes it possible to identify the thermodynamic properties of the inflow and outflow of different air mass. To understand the thermodynamic properties of air mass in south Asian monsoon region, we have used three diagnostics; a) the joint distribution of the mass transport as a function of dry and moist entropy, b) the vertical mass flux over the monsoon domain and c) the mass transport and isentropic thickness for different moist ventilation range of tropical atmosphere. The thermodynamic properties of the various air masses, such as the inflow of warm moist air in the boundary layer, upper tropospheric outflow, and midlatitude dry air intrusion are being systematically identified. The isentropic distribution of the vertical mass flux transport in terms of equivalent potential temperature is used to explain the characteristics of ascending and descending air parcels over the Indian subcontinent. Diagnosis based on the isentropic thickness reveals that the regional monsoon circulation and associated precipitation features can be systematically explained by this method. This technique is used to study the evolution of the monsoon flow in the seasonal scale. We used the data from AMIP-type simulations carried out with prescribed Sea Surface Temperature and sea ice for a 25 year period (1981-2005) from the GFDL High-resolution atmospheric model (HiRAM) with an average grid spacing of ~25km over the globe.

  14. Diatom community dynamics in a tropical, monsoon-influenced environment: West coast of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Costa, Priya M.; Anil, Arga Chandrashekar

    2010-07-01

    Diatom communities are influenced by environmental perturbations, such as the monsoon system that impact the niche opportunities of species. To discern the influence of the monsoon system on diatom community structure, we sampled during two consecutive post-monsoons (2001 and 2002) and the intervening pre-monsoon at Mumbai and Jawaharlal Nehru ports along the central west coast of India. Characteristic temporal shifts in diatom community structure were observed across the sampling periods; these were mainly driven by temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen saturation. The nutrient-poor pre-monsoon period supported low abundance yet high species richness and diversity of diatoms. Coscinodiscus, Cyclotella, Thalassiosira, Triceratium, Pleurosigma, Skeletonema and Surirella were the most dominant genera. Both the post-monsoon periods, following dissimilar monsoon events, were dominated by Skeletonema costatum, but differed in some of the residual species . Thalassiosira and Thalassionema spp. dominated mostly during post-monsoon I whereas Triceratium and Pleurosigma spp. dominated during post-monsoon II. To understand the underlying ecological mechanisms involved in such dynamics, we focus on the dominant diatom species in post-monsoon periods, S. costatum, that contributes up to 60% to total diatom cell numbers. This research is relevant in light of the fluctuating monsoon regimes over the Asian continent, the confounding effects of anthropogenic eutrophication and the resulting cascading effects on trophic web dynamics.

  15. How can aerosols affect the Asian summer monsoon? Assessment during three consecutive pre-monsoon seasons from CALIPSO satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlmann, J.; Quaas, J.

    2010-05-01

    The impact of aerosols above and around the Tibetan Plateau on the Asian Summer Monsoon during pre-monsoon seasons March-April-May 2007, 2008, and 2009 is investigated by means of remote sensing and radiative transfer modelling. Four source regions are found to be responsible for the high aerosol loading around the Tibetan Plateau: the Taklamakan Desert, the Ganges Plains, the Indus Plains, and the Arabian Sea. CALIPSO lidar satellite data, providing vertically resolved images of aerosols, shows aerosol concentrations to be highest in the lower 5 km of the atmosphere with only little amounts reaching the Tibetan Plateau altitude. Using a radiative transfer model we find that aerosol plumes reduce shortwave radiation throughout the Monsoon region in the seasonal average by between 20 and 30 W/m2. Peak shortwave heating in the lower troposphere reaches 0.2 K/day. In higher layers this shortwave heating is partly balanced by longwave cooling. Although high-albedo surfaces, such as deserts or the Tibetan Plateau, increase the shortwave heating by around 10%, the overall effect is strongest close to the aerosol sources. A strong elevated heating which could influence large-scale monsoonal circulations as suggested by previous studies is not found.

  16. How can aerosols affect the Asian summer monsoon? Assessment during three consecutive pre-monsoon seasons from CALIPSO satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlmann, J.; Quaas, J.

    2010-02-01

    The impact of aerosols above and around the Tibetan Plateau on the Asian Summer Monsoon during pre-monsoon seasons March-April-May 2007, 2008, and 2009 is investigated by means of remote sensing and radiative transfer modelling. Four source regions are found to be responsible for the high aerosol loading around the Tibetan Plateau: the Taklamakan Desert, the Ganges Plains, the Indus Plains, and the Arabian Sea. CALIPSO lidar satellite data, providing vertically resolved images of aerosols, shows aerosol concentrations to be highest in the lower 5 km of the atmosphere with only little amounts reaching the Tibetan Plateau altitude. Using a radiative transfer model we find that aerosol plumes reduce shortwave radiation throughout the Monsoon region in the seasonal average by between 20 and 30 W/m2. Peak shortwave heating in the lower troposphere reaches 0.2 K/day. In higher layers this shortwave heating is partly balanced by longwave cooling. Although high-albedo surfaces, such as deserts or the Tibetan Plateau, increase the shortwave heating by around 10%, the overall effect is strongest close to the aerosol sources. A strong elevated heating which could influence large-scale monsoonal circulations as suggested by previous studies is not found.

  17. Succession of phytoplankton functional groups regulated by monsoonal hydrology in a large canyon-shaped reservoir.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Li-Juan; Wang, Tian; Hu, Ren; Han, Bo-Ping; Wang, Sheng; Qian, Xin; Padisák, Judit

    2011-10-15

    Liuxihe reservoir is a deep, monomictic, oligo-mesotrophic canyon-reservoir in the subtropical monsoon climate region of southern China. Phytoplankton functional groups in the reservoir were investigated and a comparison made between the succession observed in 2008, an exceptionally wet year, and 2009, an average year. The reservoir shows strong annual fluctuations in water level caused by monsoon rains and artificial drawdown. Altogether 28 functional groups of phytoplankton were identified, including 79 genera. Twelve of the groups were analyzed in detail using redundancy analysis. Because of the oligo-mesotrophic and P-limited condition of the reservoir, the dominant functional groups were those tolerant of nutrient (phosphorus) deficiency. The predominant functional groups in the succession process were Groups A (Cyclotella with greatest axial linear dimension<10 μm), B (Cyclotella with greatest axial linear dimension>10 μm), LO (Peridinium), LM (Ceratium and Microcystis), E (Dinobryon and Mallomonas), F (Botryococcus), X1 (Ankistrodesmus, Ankyra, Chlorella and Monoraphidium) and X2 (Chlamydomonas and Chroomonas). The development of groups A, B and LO was remarkably seasonal. Group A was dominant during stratification, when characteristic small size and high surface/volume ratio morphology conferred an advantage. Group LO was dominant during dry stratification, when motility was advantageous. Group B plankton exhibited a high relative biomass during periods of reduced euphotic depth and isothermy. Groups LM, E, F, X1 and X2 occasionally exhibited high relative biomasses attributable to specific environmental events (e.g. drawdown, changes in zooplankton community). A greater diversity of phytoplankton functional groups was apparent during isothermy. This study underscores the usefulness of functional algal groups in studying succession in subtropical impoundments, in which phytoplankton succession can be significantly affected by external factors such as

  18. A match-up database for satellite-borne ocean salinity validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emelianov, Mikhail V.; Gourrion, Jérôme; Aretxabaleta, Alfredo L.; Konstantinidou, Anna; Rosell, Miquel; Martínez, Justino; Pérez, Fernando; Salvador, Joaquín.; Fernández, Pere; Ballabrera-Poy, Joaquim

    2010-05-01

    Since its launch on November 2, 2009, the Microwave Imaging Radiometer using Aperture Synthesis (MIRAS) onboard the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission is acquiring unprecedented measurements of Earth emissivity at L-band on a global scale. Over oceanic areas, an essential step in validating the inferred surface salinity is the systematic comparison with available in-situ observations. A match-up database is an efficient tool to select remote and in-situ observations acquired within the same temporal and spatial intervals which may be used either for validation of SMOS along-track data (level 2) or spatio-temporally averaged (Level 3/4) fields. Such a tool has been developed at the SMOS Barcelona Expert Center (BEC) using different types of in-situ data downloaded from open-access Oceanographic databases. The match-up contains the recent Array for Real-time Geostrophic Oceanography (ARGO) dataset downloaded from the CORIOLIS Global Data Archiving Centre (GDAC) facility, thermosalinograph measurements onboard research vessels or Voluntary Observing Ships (VOS) from the Global Ocean Surface Underway Data (GOSUD) program, as well as observations from various mooring arrays (the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean - TAO, the Prediction and Research Moored Array in the Atlantic -PIRATA- and The Research Moored Array for African-Asian-Australian Monsoon Analysis and Prediction -RAMA) and surface drifters equipped with CTD sensors. Apart from the surface drifter observations available from external databases, a set of drifters equipped with temperature and salinity sensors has been developed as part of the SMOS-BEC activities. The deployment of the drifters is underway and additional releases are planned for the near future. The combination of the various datasets allows the resulting database to benefit from the sampling properties of each individual source providing some important statistical characteristics: global coverage of the deep ocean through ARGO, long

  19. The effect of the Asian Monsoon to the atmospheric boundary layer over the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Maoshan; Su, Zhongbo; Chen, Xuelong; Zheng, Donghai; Sun, Fanglin; Ma, Yaoming; Hu, Zeyong

    2016-04-01

    Modulation of the diurnal variations in the convective activities associated with day-by-day changes of surface flux and soil moisture was observed in the beginning of the monsoon season on the central Tibetan plateau (Sugimoto et al., 2008) which indicates the importance of land-atmosphere interactions in determining convective activities over the Tibetan plateau. Detailed interaction processes need to be studied by experiments designed to evaluate a set of hypotheses on mechanisms and linkages of these interactions. A possible function of vegetation to increase precipitation in cases of Tibetan High type was suggested by Yamada and Uyeda (2006). Use of satellite derived plateau scale soil moisture (Wen et al., 2003) enables the verification of these hypotheses (e.g. Trier et al. 2004). To evaluate these feedbacks, the mesoscale WRF model will be used because several numerical experiments are being conducted to improve the soil physical parameterization in the Noah land surface scheme in WRF so that the extreme conditions on the Tibetan plateau could be adequately represented (Van der Velde et al., 2009) such that the impacts on the structure of the atmospheric boundary layer can be assessed and improved. The Tibetan Observational Research Platform (TORP) operated by the Institute of Tibetan Plateau (Ma et al., 2008) will be fully utilized to study the characteristics of the plateau climate and different aspects of the WRF model will be evaluated using this extensive observation platform (e.g. Su et al., 2012). Recently, advanced studies on energy budget have been done by combining field and satellite measurements over the Tibetan Plateau (e.g. Ma et al., 2005). Such studies, however, were based on a single satellite observation and for a few days over an annual cycle, which are insufficient to reveal the relation between the land surface energy budget and the Asian monsoon over the Tibetan plateau. Time series analysis of satellite observations will provide the

  20. Relationship between summer monsoon rainfall and cyclogenesis over Bay of Bengal during post-monsoon (October-December) season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadhuram, Y.; Maneesha, K.

    2016-09-01

    In this study, an attempt has been made to examine the relationship between summer monsoon rainfall (June-September) and the total number of depressions, cyclones and severe cyclones (TNDC) over Bay of Bengal during the post-monsoon (October-December) season. The seasonal rainfall of the subdivisions (located in south India) (referred as rainfall index - RI), is positively and significantly correlated (r=0.59; significant at >99% level) with the TNDC during the period, 1984-2013. By using the first differences (current season minus previous season), the correlations are enhanced and a remarkably high correlation of 0.87 is observed between TNDC and RI for the recent period, 1993-2013. The average seasonal genesis potential parameter (GPP) showed a very high correlation of 0.84 with the TNDC. A very high correlation of 0.83 is observed between GPP and RI for the period, 1993-2013. The relative vorticity and mid-tropospheric relative humidity are found to be the dominant terms in GPP. The GPP was 3.5 times higher in above (below) normal RI in which TNDC was 4 (2). It is inferred that RI is playing a key role in TNDC by modulating the environmental conditions (low level vorticity and relative humidity) over Bay of Bengal during post-monsoon season which could be seen from the very high correlation of 0.87 (which explains 76% variability in TNDC). For the first time, we show that RI is a precursor for the TNDC over Bay of Bengal during post-monsoon season. Strong westerlies after the SW monsoon season transport moisture over the subdivisions towards Bay of Bengal due to cyclonic circulation. This circulation favours upward motion and hence transport moisture vertically to mid-troposphere which causes convective instability and this in turn favour more number of TNDC, under above-normal RI year.

  1. Evaluation of NCEP TIGGE short-range forecast for Indian summer monsoon intraseasonal oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirkey, Snehlata; Mukhopadhyay, P.

    2016-04-01

    This study focuses on the short-range prediction of Monsoon Intraseasonal Oscillations (MISOs) using the National Centers for Environmental Prediction(NCEP) Ensemble Prediction System (EPS) data from The Observing System Research and Predictability Experiment (THORPEX) Interactive Grand Global Ensemble (TIGGE) archive. The Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall (ISMR), which plays an important role in the socio-economic growth of the country, is highly variable and is mostly governed by the MISOs. In addition to this, deterministic forecasts of ISMR are not very reliable. Hence, a probabilistic approach at daily scale is required. Keeping this in mind, the present analysis is done by using daily forecast data for up to 7-day lead time and compared with observations. The analysis shows that the ensemble forecast well captures the variability as compared to observations even up to 7 days. The spatial characteristics and the northward propagation of MISO are observed thoroughly in the EPS. The evolution of dynamical and thermodynamical parameters such as specific humidity, moist static energy, moisture divergence, and vorticity is also captured well but show deviation from the observation from 96 h lead time onwards. The tropospheric temperature forecast captures the observed gradient but with certain bias in magnitude whereas the wind shear is simulated quite well both in pattern and magnitude. These analyses bring out the biases in TIGGE EPS forecast and also point out the possible moist processes which needs to be improved.

  2. Calibration of CE-QUAL-W2 for a monomictic reservoir in a monsoon climate area.

    PubMed

    Chung, S W; Oh, J K

    2006-01-01

    The impact of inflow mixing on reservoir stratification is significant for reservoirs situated in a monsoon climate area. It cause difficulty in the calibration of a two-dimensional hydrodynamic and water quality model, CE-QUAL-W2 that was recently adopted for a real-time turbidity monitoring and modelling system (RTMMS) for a reservoir in Korea. This paper presents a systematic calibration and verification processe of the model for the reservoir. A sensitivity analysis showed that wind sheltering, Chezy, and sediment heat exchange coefficients are most sensitive to stratification structure. Inflow temperature was very sensitive during a year of normal precipitation, but it is not significant during a year of drought. Residual analysis revealed that the model has shortcomings in the simulation of water temperature near the metalimnetic zone without calibration. After calibration, however, the absolute mean errors between observed and simulated values were placed within 0.116-1.190 degrees C. Its performance was maintained under heavy flood events during the verification stage, which implies that the model is ready to use for the simulation of turbidity plume in the RTMMS under various hydrologic conditions. The suggested model calibration strategy and relevant results may be adopted for other reservoirs located in a monsoon climate area.

  3. Effects of volcanic eruptions on China's monsoon precipitation over the past 700 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Z.; Gao, C.

    2013-12-01

    Tropical volcanic eruptions were found to affect precipitation especially in Asia and Africa monsoon region. However, studies with different types of eruptions suggested different impacts as well as the spatial patterns. In this study, we combined the Monsoon Asia Drought Atlas (MADA, [Cook et al., 2010]) and the Chinese Historical Drought Disaster Index (CHDDI) compiled from the historic meteorological records to study the effect of volcanic eruptions on China's monsoon precipitation over the past 700 years. Histories of past volcanism were compiled from the IVI2[Gao et al., 2008] and Crowley2013[Crowley and Unterman, 2013] reconstructions. Volcanic events were classified into 2×Pinatubo, 1×Pinatubo , ≥5 Tg sulfate aerosols injection in the northern hemisphere (NH) stratosphere for IVI2; and NH sulfate flux more than 20/15/10/5 kg km-2 for Crowley2013. In both cases, average MADA show a drying trend over mainland China from year zero(0) to year three(+3) after the eruption; and the more sulfate aerosol injected into the NH stratosphere or the larger the sulfate flux, the more severe this drying trend seem to reveal. In comparison, a wetting trend was found in the eruption year with Southern Hemisphere (SH) only injections. Superposed epoch analysis with a 10,000 Monte Carlo resampling procedure showed that 97.9% (96.9%) of the observed MADA values are statistically significant at the 95% (99%) confidence level. The drying is probably caused by a reduction of the latent heat flux due to volcanic aerosol' cooling effect, leading to the weakening of south Asian monsoon and decrease of moisture vapor over tropical oceans, which contribute to a reduced moisture flux over china. Spatial distribution of the average MADA show a southward movement of the driest areas in eastern China from year zero to year three after the 1×Pinatubo and 2×Pinatubo eruptions, whereas part of north china experienced unusual wetting condition. This is in good agreement with CHDDI, which

  4. The forced and free response of the South China Sea to the large scale monsoon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Tkalich, P.; Malanotte-Rizzoli, P.

    2012-04-01

    Non-tidal sea level anomalies (SLAs) can be produced by many different dynamical phenomena over many time scales, and they can induce serious damages in coastal regions especially during extreme events. In this work we focus on the SLAs in the South China Sea (SCS) to understand whether and how they can be related to the large scale, seasonal monsoon system which dominates the SCS circulation and dynamics. We have two major objectives. The first one is to understand whether the NE (winter) and SW (summer) monsoons can be responsible for the persistent SLAs, both positive and negative, observed at the SCS ends along the main monsoon path. The second objective is to understand the SCS response as a free system upon onset/relaxation or sudden changes in the forcing wind. It is well known that sudden changes in the forcing mechanism induce free oscillations, or seiches, in closed, semi-enclosed basins and harbors, and we want to identify the possible seiche modes of the SCS. To our knowledge, these two objectives have not been previously addressed. We address these objectives both through observational analysis and modeling simulations. Multi-year tide-gauge data from stations along the coastal regions of the SCS are analyzed examining their spatial correlations. Strong negative correlations are found between the northeast and southwest stations at the two ends of the SCS under the path of the NE/SW monsoons. They correspond to wind-induced positive/negative sea level set-ups lasting for the entire monsoon season and changing sign from winter to summer. Short periods of negative correlations are also found between the SLAs at eastern and western stations during El Nino years in which the monsoons are weaker and have an enhanced E/W component inducing corresponding sea level set-ups. The tide gauge station at Tanjong Pagar at the southwest SCS end near Singapore is chosen to study four extreme SLAs events in the observational record during 1999. Modeling simulations are

  5. [Spatial heterogeneity of soil organic carbon and total nitrogen in a monsoon evergreen broadleaf forest in Dinghushan, Guangdong, China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-Ru; Ouyang, Xu; Chu, Guo-Wei; Zhang, Qian-Mei; Liu, Shi-Zhong; Zhang, De-Qiang; Li, Yue-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Geostatistical techniques were used to quantify the spatial heterogeneity of soil organic carbon and total nitrogen of one monsoon evergreen broadleaf forest area in Dinghushan, Guangdong, China. The results demonstrated that a significant spatial autocorrelation existed between soil organic carbon and total nitrogen contents in the Dinghushan monsoon evergreen broadleaf forest, such that 93.6% and 53.7% of their total spatial heterogeneity originated from their spatial autocorrelation. This observation agreed with a traditional statistics analysis showing a significant linear correlation between soil organic carbon and total nitrogen, and also their spatial autocorrelation existed at a landscape level. The best fit from an exponential model showed that soil organic carbon had high degree of spatial heterogeneity at a scale of 17.4 m.

  6. Assessment of the Indian summer monsoon in the WRF regional climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Attada; Parekh, Anant; Chowdary, J. S.; Gnanaseelan, C.

    2014-08-01

    The performance of the regional climate model, Weather Research and Forecasting in simulating the three dimensional moist and thermodynamic structure of Indian summer monsoon (ISM) during 2001-2011 is examined in this study. The model could simulate monsoon elements and convective precipitation zones over ISM region with some overestimation. Statistical analysis of sub-regional precipitation indicates that model has better skill over the monsoon core region with correlation of 0.7 and root mean square error of 2.3 mm day-1 with respect to observations. The model simulated seasonal mean vertical structures of temperature and water vapour mixing ratio (WVMR) are consistent with the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder observations. However, the core of low level jet is shifted southward in the model due to unrealistic convective heating over the lower latitudes of Indian Ocean and southern peninsular India. The tropical easterly jet is confined to 15°N in the model, which is due to the midtropospheric cold bias over the Tibetan region. The meridional asymmetric bias of sea level pressure (SLP) in model leads to weaker vertical wind shear, limiting the northward migration of maximum rain band to south of 23°N. These discrepancies have marked effects on the proper simulation of monsoon climate. The large scale spatial patterns of SLP, precipitation and winds during active and break spells are well simulated by the model. The lead-lag evolution of vertical structure of model temperature shows baroclinic structure during the active phase. It is evident from the observations that enhanced (suppressed) convection is generally preceded by a low-level moist (dry) anomaly and followed by a low-level dry (moist) anomaly. The model is inadequately representing the temporal evolution of vertical moist and thermodynamic processes. The evolution of vertical structures of temperature and WVMR is better simulated in the break phase compared to that of active phase. The evolution of

  7. Interdecadal Variations of East Asian Monsoon as Inferred by Tree-ring Data From Northeastern Qaidam Basin, Northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, X.; Huang, L.; Yin, Z.; Guo, Q.

    2006-12-01

    East Asian monsoon is crucial for modulating the climate in China. Especially, the summer monsoon is closely related to the severe flood and drought events in eastern China. To study the characteristics of summer monsoon a long-term record is needed. In this study we attempted to examine the interdecadal variations of East Asian monsoon by using tree-ring data. The summer monsoon index (Ism) for the period of 1873- 2000 was calculated using sea level pressure data. Firstly, we calculated the difference (ΔP) of the sea level pressure between the land (110ºE) and sea (160ºE) from 10ºN to 50ºN with 5º intervals. Then the ΔP values that are smaller than or equal to -5 hPa in June, July and August were summed and defined as the Ism. By this definition Ism values greater than 1.0 represent strong monsoon conditions, and vice versa. Sea level pressure data prior to 1951 were obtained from the Meteorological Office of United Kingdom, and that afterwards were from the NCEP data set. The tree ring data of Qilian junipers (Sabina przewalskii Kom.) are from the northeastern part of the Qaidam Basin, located along the northeastern margin of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. These tree-ring data have been used to reconstruct local precipitation and soil moisture conditions. Previous studies have revealed that there was a teleconnection in rainfall between eastern China and the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. We examined the relationships of the ring-width series with the Ism series over the common period of 1873-2000 AD. We found that the tree-ring widths were statistical significantly correlated with Ism. These negative correlations increased significantly after a low-pass filter was used for both data sets, indicating very good potential for reconstruction of low-frequency variations of Ism in the past. Variability of the Ism series and ring-width series were examined using power spectrum analysis and wavelet transformation. The reconstructed Ism values during the period 1440

  8. Trapping, chemistry, and export of trace gases in the South Asian summer monsoon observed during CARIBIC flights in 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauthe-Schöch, Armin; Baker, Angela K.; Schuck, Tanja J.; Brenninkmeijer, Carl A. M.; Zahn, Andreas; Hermann, Markus; Stratmann, Greta; Ziereis, Helmut; van Velthoven, Peter F. J.; Lelieveld, Jos

    2016-03-01

    The CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the Atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container) passenger aircraft observatory performed in situ measurements at 10-12 km altitude in the South Asian summer monsoon anticyclone between June and September 2008. These measurements enable us to investigate this atmospheric region (which so far has mostly been observed from satellites) using the broad suite of trace gases and aerosol particles measured by CARIBIC. Elevated levels of a variety of atmospheric pollutants (e.g. carbon monoxide, total reactive nitrogen oxides, aerosol particles, and several volatile organic compounds) were recorded. The measurements provide detailed information about the chemical composition of air in different parts of the monsoon anticyclone, particularly of ozone precursors. While covering a range of 3500 km inside the monsoon anticyclone, CARIBIC observations show remarkable consistency, i.e. with distinct latitudinal patterns of trace gases during the entire monsoon period. Using the CARIBIC trace gas and aerosol particle measurements in combination with the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART, we investigated the characteristics of monsoon outflow and the chemical evolution of air masses during transport. The trajectory calculations indicate that these air masses originated mainly from South Asia and mainland Southeast Asia. Estimated photochemical ages of the air were found to agree well with transport times from a source region east of 90-95° E. The photochemical ages of the air in the southern part of the monsoon anticyclone were systematically younger (less than 7 days) and the air masses were mostly in an ozone-forming chemical mode. In its northern part the air masses were older (up to 13 days) and had unclear ozone formation or destruction potential. Based on analysis of forward trajectories, several receptor regions were identified. In addition to predominantly westward transport, we found evidence for

  9. Trapping, chemistry and export of trace gases in the South Asian summer monsoon observed during CARIBIC flights in 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauthe-Schöch, A.; Baker, A. K.; Schuck, T. J.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; Zahn, A.; Hermann, M.; Stratmann, G.; Ziereis, H.; van Velthoven, P. F. J.; Lelieveld, J.

    2015-03-01

    The CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the Atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container) passenger aircraft observatory performed in situ measurements at 10-12 km altitude in the South Asian summer monsoon anticyclone between June and September 2008. These measurements enable us to investigate this atmospheric region, which so far has mostly been observed from satellites, using the broad suite of trace gases and aerosols measured by CARIBIC. Elevated levels of a range of atmospheric pollutants were recorded e.g. carbon monoxide, total reactive nitrogen oxides, aerosol particles and several volatile organic compounds. The measurements provide detailed information about the chemical composition of air in different parts of the monsoon anticyclone, particularly of ozone precursors. While covering a range of 3500 km inside the monsoon anticyclone, CARIBIC observations show remarkable consistency, i.e. with regular latitudinal patterns of trace gases during the entire monsoon period. Trajectory calculations indicate that these air masses originated mainly from South Asia and Mainland Southeast Asia. Using the CARIBIC trace gas and aerosol measurements in combination with the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART we investigated the characteristics of monsoon outflow and the chemical evolution of air masses during transport. Estimated photochemical ages of the air were found to agree well with transport times from a source region east of 95° E. The photochemical ages of the air in the southern part of the monsoon anticyclone were consistently younger (less than 7 days) and the air masses mostly in an ozone forming chemical regime. In its northern part the air masses were older (up to 13 days) and had unclear ozone formation or destruction potential. Based on analysis of forward trajectories several receptor regions were identified. In addition to predominantly westward transport, we found evidence for efficient transport (within 10 days) to

  10. Reconstructing Holocene hematite and goethite variations in the Indus Canyon to trace changes in the Asian monsoon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, Cornelia; Clift, Peter; Pressling, Nicola; Limmer, David; Giosan, Liviu; Tabrez, Ali

    2010-05-01

    In order to study Holocene Asian monsoon variations, we reconstructed changes in chemical weathering by examining sediments from the Indus Canyon. During the late Holocene, the Asian monsoon system had periods of high and low intensities that influenced the civilisations living in its realm. For example, the demise of the Harappan civilisation has been linked to a weakened monsoon system around 4 ka. The sediments in the Indus Canyon, which originate from the River Indus and its Himalayan tributaries, provide an ideal, natural environmental archive of the South Asian monsoon system. In order to investigate the alternation between arid and humid monsoonal climatic conditions, variations are traced using the magnetic minerals hematite and goethite, which form under distinct environmental conditions: goethite is stable under humid conditions, whereas hematite forms from the dehydration of goethite under arid conditions. The two minerals are characterised and quantified using environmental magnetic measurements, as well as diffuse reflectance spectrometry. Combining both approaches will enable us to reconstruct variations in chemical weathering over time. Furthermore, because this is governed by temperature and the availability of moisture, our weathering record will allow us to understand monsoon variability during the Holocene and test whether summer rain intensity has been decreasing in SW Asia since 8 ka. In addition, the multi-component analysis of colour reflectance spectra identifies different mineral components including hematite/goethite, clay mineral mixtures, calcite and organics. We will present our results from the multi-sensor core logger equipped with a Minolta spectrometer, measuring both magnetic susceptibility and the optical properties of the split sediment cores. Initial results indicate the presence of hematite and goethite in the sediment. There is an increasing hematite content up the cores, indicating an aridification trend during the Holocene

  11. Role of vertical structure of cloud microphysical properties on cloud radiative forcing over the Asian monsoon region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi Kiran, V.; Rajeevan, M.; Gadhavi, H.; Rao, S. Vijaya Bhaskara; Jayaraman, A.

    2015-12-01

    Five years (2006-2010) of clouds and earth's radiant energy system (CERES) and CloudSat data have been analyzed to examine the role of vertical structure of cloud microphysical properties on cloud radiative forcing (CRF) parameters at the top-of-the atmosphere over the Asian monsoon region during the summer monsoon season (June-September) and the Pacific warm pool region during April. Vertical profile of cloud properties (optical depth, cloud liquid water content and cloud ice water content) derived from CloudSat data has been used for the present analysis. Shortwave, longwave and net CRF derived from the CERES data have been used. The results suggest an imbalance between shortwave cloud radiative forcing and longwave cloud radiative forcing over the Asian monsoon region consistent with the results reported earlier. The present analysis suggests that over the Bay-of-Bengal (BoB), vertical profile of cloud microphysical properties determine more than 50 % of variance in CRF. However, over the Pacific warm pool region, cloud microphysical property profiles does not contribute significantly to variance in net CRF (<10 %). Over the BoB, large asymmetry between shortwave and longwave CRF is caused by large amounts of cloud liquid water content in the layer between the surface and 9 km. The present study highlights the importance of accurate representation of cloud microphysical properties in determining the influence of clouds on the radiative balance over the top-of-the atmosphere.

  12. Active and break spells of the Indian summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeevan, M.; Gadgil, Sulochana; Bhate, Jyoti

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, we suggest criteria for the identification of active and break events of the Indian summer monsoon on the basis of recently derived high resolution daily gridded rainfall dataset over India (1951-2007). Active and break events are defined as periods during the peak monsoon months of July and August, in which the normalized anomaly of the rainfall over a critical area, called the monsoon core zone exceeds 1 or is less than -1.0 respectively, provided the criterion is satisfied for at least three consecutive days. We elucidate the major features of these events. We consider very briefly the relationship of the intraseasonal fluctuations between these events and the interannual variation of the summer monsoon rainfall. We find that breaks tend to have a longer life-span than active spells. While, almost 80% of the active spells lasted 3-4 days, only 40% of the break spells were of such short duration. A small fraction (9%) of active spells and 32% of break spells lasted for a week or longer. While active events occurred almost every year, not a single break occurred in 26% of the years considered. On an average, there are 7 days of active and break events from July through August. There are no significant trends in either the days of active or break events. We have shown that there is a major difference between weak spells and long intense breaks. While weak spells are characterized by weak moist convective regimes, long intense break events have a heat trough type circulation which is similar to the circulation over the Indian subcontinent before the onset of the monsoon. The space-time evolution of the rainfall composite patterns suggests that the revival from breaks occurs primarily from northward propagations of the convective cloud zone. There are important differences between the spatial patterns of the active/break spells and those characteristic of interannual variation, particularly those associated with the link to ENSO. Hence, the interannual

  13. Simulation skill of APCC set of global climate models for Asian summer monsoon rainfall variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, U. K.; Singh, G. P.; Singh, Vikas

    2015-04-01

    The performance of 11 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Climate Center (APCC) global climate models (coupled and uncoupled both) in simulating the seasonal summer (June-August) monsoon rainfall variability over Asia (especially over India and East Asia) has been evaluated in detail using hind-cast data (3 months advance) generated from APCC which provides the regional climate information product services based on multi-model ensemble dynamical seasonal prediction systems. The skill of each global climate model over Asia was tested separately in detail for the period of 21 years (1983-2003), and simulated Asian summer monsoon rainfall (ASMR) has been verified using various statistical measures for Indian and East Asian land masses separately. The analysis found a large variation in spatial ASMR simulated with uncoupled model compared to coupled models (like Predictive Ocean Atmosphere Model for Australia, National Centers for Environmental Prediction and Japan Meteorological Agency). The simulated ASMR in coupled model was closer to Climate Prediction Centre Merged Analysis of Precipitation (CMAP) compared to uncoupled models although the amount of ASMR was underestimated in both models. Analysis also found a high spread in simulated ASMR among the ensemble members (suggesting that the model's performance is highly dependent on its initial conditions). The correlation analysis between sea surface temperature (SST) and ASMR shows that that the coupled models are strongly associated with ASMR compared to the uncoupled models (suggesting that air-sea interaction is well cared in coupled models). The analysis of rainfall using various statistical measures suggests that the multi-model ensemble (MME) performed better compared to individual model and also separate study indicate that Indian and East Asian land masses are more useful compared to Asia monsoon rainfall as a whole. The results of various statistical measures like skill of multi-model ensemble, large spread

  14. Tropospheric ozone variability during the East Asian summer monsoon as observed by satellite (IASI), aircraft (MOZAIC) and ground stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safieddine, Sarah; Boynard, Anne; Hao, Nan; Huang, Fuxiang; Wang, Lili; Ji, Dongsheng; Barret, Brice; Ghude, Sachin D.; Coheur, Pierre-François; Hurtmans, Daniel; Clerbaux, Cathy

    2016-08-01

    Satellite measurements from the thermal Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), aircraft data from the MOZAIC/IAGOS project, as well as observations from ground-based stations, are used to assess the tropospheric ozone (O3) variability during the East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM). Six years 2008-2013 of IASI data analysis reveals the ability of the instrument to detect the onset and the progression of the monsoon seen by a decrease in the tropospheric 0-6 km O3 column due to the EASM, and to reproduce this decrease from one year to the other. The year-to-year variability is found to be mainly dependent on meteorology. Focusing on the period of May-August 2011, taken as an example year, IASI data show clear inverse relationship between tropospheric 0-6 km O3 on one hand and meteorological parameters such as cloud cover, relative humidity and wind speed, on the other hand. Aircraft data from the MOZAIC/IAGOS project for the EASM of 2008-2013 are used to validate the IASI data and to assess the effect of the monsoon on the vertical distribution of the tropospheric O3 at different locations. Results show good agreement with a correlation coefficient of 0.73 (12 %) between the 0-6 km O3 column derived from IASI and aircraft data. IASI captures very well the inter-annual variation of tropospheric O3 observed by the aircraft data over the studied domain. Analysis of vertical profiles of the aircraft data shows a decrease in the tropospheric O3 that is more important in the free troposphere than in the boundary layer and at 10-20° N than elsewhere. Ground station data at different locations in India and China show a spatiotemporal dependence on meteorology during the monsoon, with a decrease up to 22 ppbv in Hyderabad, and up to 5 ppbv in the North China Plain.

  15. Circumglobal wave train and the summer monsoon over northwestern India and Pakistan: the explicit role of the surface heat low

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Sajjad; Müller, Wolfgang A.; Hagemann, Stefan; Jacob, Daniela

    2011-09-01

    This study examines the influence of the mid-latitude circulation on the surface heat low (HL) and associated monsoon rainfall over northwestern India and Pakistan using the ERA40 data and high resolution (T106L31) climate model ECHAM5 simulation. Special emphasis is given to the surface HL which forms over Pakistan and adjoining areas of India, Iran and Afghanistan during the summer season. A heat low index (HLI) is defined to depict the surface HL. The HLI displays significant correlations with the upper level mid-latitude circulation over western central Asia and low level monsoon circulation over Arabian Sea and acts as a bridge connecting the mid-latitude wave train to the Indian summer monsoon. A time-lagged singular value decomposition analysis reveals that the eastward propagation of the mid-latitude circumglobal wave train (CGT) influences the surface pressure anomalies over the Indian domain. The largest low (negative) pressure anomalies over the western parts of the HL region (i.e., Iran and Afghanistan) occur in conjunction with the upper level anomalous high that develops over western-central Asia during the positive phase of the CGT. The composite analysis also reveals a significant increase in the low pressure anomalies over Iran and Afghanistan during the positive phase of CGT. The westward increasing low pressure anomalies with its north-south orientation provokes enormous north-south pressure gradient (lower pressure over land than over sea). This in turn enables the moist southerly flow from the Arabian Sea to penetrate farther northward over northwestern India and Pakistan. A monsoon trough like conditions develops over northwestern India and Pakistan where the moist southwesterly flow from the Arabian Sea and the Persian Gulf converge. The convergence in association with the orographic uplifting expedites convection and associated precipitation over northwestern India and Pakistan. The high resolution climate model ECHAM5 simulation also

  16. A Study on Extremely Dry and Wet Summer Monsoon in Pakistan by Focusing on the Anomalous States of the Upper Troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, S.; Koike, T.; Nishii, K.

    2012-04-01

    Seasonally-changes in wind pattern, monsoon, sometimes results in severe droughts and intense flooding in many parts of the world including South Asian countries like Pakistan. The livelihood of a vast population in Pakistan depends on agriculture and land use is strongly influenced by water-based ecosystems that depend on the monsoon rains. Furthermore, climate change studies undertaken so far reveal that action is essential in order to prevent long term damage to water cycle and thus of great concern to the community and stakeholders. Pakistan Summer Monsoon (PSM) is generally affected by both the disturbances from the tropical and the extratropical regions; however there is lack of understanding of physical mechanisms of PSM compared to other regional studies i.e. Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) and South-East Asian Monsoon (SEAM). In our study, we applied heat and vorticity budgets and wave train analysis to reveal the mechanisms of the extremely dry and wet PSM events associated with the anomalous upper tropospheric circulation. We found that the extremely dry (wet) PSM events are closely related with the strengthening(weakening) of the upper-tropospheric central Asian high. We also found that in addition to Rossby-wave (Matsuno-Gill) type atmospheric response, the Rossby wave train along the Asian Jet originating from northwestern Europe or North Atlantic Ocean strengthened(weakened) the upper-tropospheric central Asian high. Therefore strong convection anomalies resulting in severe flooding (drought) events over the PSM region are induced by both the tropical and extratropical processes. Key Words: Pakistan, Extremes Monsoon Events, Physical Processes, Heat Budget, Vorticity, Wave Train

  17. Evolution of dynamic and thermodynamic fields during the Indian summer monsoon onset in the initialised atmosphere-ocean seasonal forecasting model of the UK Met Office

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Arathy; Turner, Andrew; Martin, Gill

    2016-04-01

    The onset of the Indian summer monsoon has significant influence on the agricultural planning that affects food production and the gross domestic product of the country. Hence understanding and prediction of the monsoon onset is of paramount importance. Here we use hindcast simulations from the Met Office fully coupled atmosphere-ocean Global Seasonal Forecast System 5 (GloSea5) to study the monsoon onset over India. The GloSea5 hindcast simulations are produced for three different start dates in late April or early May prior to the monsoon season and the atmosphere and ocean components are both initialized. Rather than focus on skill metrics of the performance at simulating the onset timing, we use common objective indices of the onset circulation and wind shears in the meridional (Wang-Fan) and vertical (Webster-Yang) directions to determine the monsoon onset over India. We find that the dynamic indices obtained from GloSea5 ensemble mean are consistent with those from the ERA-Interim reanalysis dataset. GloSea5 is also very effective in capturing the spatial pattern of the monsoon rainfall progression following the onset. We next analyse the composite evolution of various dynamic and thermodynamic fields associated with these indices, focusing on recent findings suggesting the importance of dry air incursions above the surface from the northwest. We further extend our analysis by looking at the physical mechanisms leading to onset in the GloSea5 simulations, and examine case studies comparing late and early onset years in both the model hindcasts and reanalysis data.

  18. Monsoonal variations in aerosol optical properties and estimation of aerosol optical depth using ground-based meteorological and air quality data in Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, F.; Lim, H. S.; Abdullah, K.; Yoon, T. L.; Holben, B.

    2015-04-01

    Obtaining continuous aerosol-optical-depth (AOD) measurements is a difficult task due to the cloud-cover problem. With the main motivation of overcoming this problem, an AOD-predicting model is proposed. In this study, the optical properties of aerosols in Penang, Malaysia were analyzed for four monsoonal seasons (northeast monsoon, pre-monsoon, southwest monsoon, and post-monsoon) based on data from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) from February 2012 to November 2013. The aerosol distribution patterns in Penang for each monsoonal period were quantitatively identified according to the scattering plots of the Ångström exponent against the AOD. A new empirical algorithm was proposed to predict the AOD data. Ground-based measurements (i.e., visibility and air pollutant index) were used in the model as predictor data to retrieve the missing AOD data from AERONET due to frequent cloud formation in the equatorial region. The model coefficients were determined through multiple regression analysis using selected data set from in situ data. The calibrated model coefficients have a coefficient of determination, R2, of 0.72. The predicted AOD of the model was generated based on these calibrated coefficients and compared against the measured data through standard statistical tests, yielding a R2 of 0.68 as validation accuracy. The error in weighted mean absolute percentage error (wMAPE) was less than 0.40% compared with the real data. The results revealed that the proposed model efficiently predicted the AOD data. Performance of our model was compared against selected LIDAR data to yield good correspondence. The predicted AOD can enhance measured short- and long-term AOD and provide supplementary information for climatological studies and monitoring aerosol variation.

  19. Morphodynamics of rivers strongly affected by monsoon precipitation: Review of depositional style and forcing factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plink-Björklund, Piret

    2015-06-01

    Rivers that receive significant amounts of their surface water supply from monsoon precipitation characteristically experience seasonal floods, and display seasonally highly variable discharge, controlled by the monsoon trough passage and its related cyclones. The intense summer rainfall causes high-magnitude floods, whereas rivers only transmit a low base flow during the dry winters. For many rivers in the sub-humid to arid subtropics, bordering the monsoon domain, the monsoon rain is also the main source of surface water recharge. However, such rivers may receive monsoon rain and transmit discharge only during abnormal or strengthened monsoon seasons. This annual discharge variability or range, as compared to the mean annual discharge, distinguishes the monsoonal and subtropical rivers from the rivers in equatorial tropics and temperate perennial precipitation zones, where the annual range is relatively small compared to the annual mean discharge. This review explores the effects of this seasonal and yearly variable rainfall, and the resultant highly peaked discharge pattern on river morphodynamics, and presents a comparison of modern and ancient monsoonal and subtropical river deposits. The field datasets and literature analyses discussed herein provide recognition criteria for monsoon-controlled river deposits, by documenting the diversity of the sedimentary facies, macroforms (bar forms), and architectural elements common in ancient and modern monsoon-controlled rivers. The review demonstrates that seasonal and inter-annual precipitation range is a key control on river morphodynamics, and resultant sedimentary facies characteristics, rather than the specific climate zone or average annual precipitation.

  20. Shifting covariability of North American summer monsoon precipitation with antecedent winter precipitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, G.J.; Clark, M.P.

    2006-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that a general inverse relation exists between winter precipitation in the southwestern United states (US) and summer monsoon precipitation. In addition, it has been suggested that this inverse relation between winter precipitation and the magnitude of the southwestern US monsoon breaks down under certain climatic conditions that override the regional winter/monsoon precipitation relations. Results from this new study indicate that the winter/monsoon precipitation relations do not break down, but rather shift location through time. The strength of winter/monsoon precipitation relations, as indexed by 20-year moving correlations between winter precipitation and monsoon precipitation, decreased in Arizona after about 1970, but increased in New Mexico. The changes in these correlations appear to be related to an eastward shift in the location of monsoon precipitation in the southwestern US. This eastward shift in monsoon precipitation and the changes in correlations with winter precipitation also appear to be related to an eastward shift in July/August atmospheric circulation over the southwestern US that resulted in increased monsoon precipitation in New Mexico. Results also indicate that decreases in sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) in the central North Pacific Ocean also may be associated with th changes in correlations between winter and monsoon precipitation. Copyright ?? 2006 Royal Meteorological Society.

  1. An assessment of monsoon precipitation changes during 1901-2001: Observation and Model Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, T.; Zhang, L.

    2010-12-01

    Changes of global land monsoon precipitation are examined by using three sets of rain-gauge precipitation data for the period of 1901-2001 compiled by GPCC, CRU and Dai, respectively. The three datasets show consistent long-term changes of precipitation over the monsoon region with slightly different amplitudes. During 1901-2001, global land monsoon precipitation (GMI) exhibits multi-decadal variations, with an overall increasing trend from 1901 to 1955, followed by a decreasing trend up to 2001. The upward trends during 1901-1955 of global and northern hemispheric land monsoon precipitation are mainly resulted from the increased precipitation over the North African, Indian and East Asian monsoon domains. For the whole period of 1901-2001, precipitation averaged over the Northern Hemisphere and global land monsoon areas all exhibit a decreasing trends, although it is only statistically significant at the 5% level for the Northern Hemisphere. The robust decreasing trend of northern hemispheric land monsoon precipitations during the 20th century mainly comes from the downward trend of North African and eastern part of Indian monsoon precipitation and occurs mainly after the 1950s. The first leading mode of Empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analyses of precipitation annual range features a coherent change of North African, South Asian, Northeast China, southern South African, eastern Australian and western American monsoon, and a coherent change over the equatorial South African monsoon and eastern American monsoon. The corresponding principal component time series also indicates that the majority of global land monsoon precipitation has experienced an increasing tendency from 1901 to 1950s and a decreasing trend since 1950s. The results of observational data diagnosis are compared with the results of AGCM simulations forced by historical sea surface temperature. Possible mechanisms for global land monsoon changes are discussed.

  2. Connections Between Stratospheric Pollution and the Asian Summer Monsoon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Susanne E.; Tsigaridis, Konstas

    2015-01-01

    The Asian Monsoon leads to rapid vertical transport of gases and aerosols into the upper troposphere. Some of the pollution might be transported above cloud levels, which will allow it to spread globally and possibly at some occasions reach into the stratosphere. In this study we will use the GISS climate model to investigate the interactions between pollution and convective transport as well as secondary aerosol formation. Pollution resulting from anthropogenic activity as well as from natural sources such as small and large volcanic eruptions, dust storms and forest fires will be quantified. This modeling study will be accompanied by satellite observations from space that monitor aerosol optical thickness (AOT), and absorption AOT (AAOT) in two and three dimensions. Our goal is a better process level understanding of the evolution of natural and anthropogenic aerosol plumes in conjunction with the Asian Monsoon. Hence, we aim to explain their large-scale expansion, which eventually determines their impacts on climate.

  3. Connections between Pollution and the Asian Monsoon Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Asian Monsoon leads to rapid vertical transport of gases and aerosols into the upper troposphere. Some of the pollution might be transported above cloud levels, which will allow it to spread globally and possibly at some occasions reach into the stratosphere. In this study we will use the GISS climate model to investigate the interactions between pollution and convective transport as well as secondary aerosol formation. Pollution resulting from anthropogenic activity as well as from natural sources such as small and large volcanic eruptions, dust storms and forest fires will be quantified. This modeling study will be accompanied by satellite observations from space that monitor aerosol optical thickness (AOT), and absorption AOT (AAOT) in two and three dimensions. Our goal is a better process level understanding of the evolution of natural and anthropogenic aerosol plumes in conjunction with the Asian Monsoon. Hence, we aim to explain their large-scale expansion, which eventually determines their impacts on climate.

  4. Monsoon oscillations regulate fertility of the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitsos, Dionysios E.; Yi, Xing; Platt, Trevor; Racault, Marie-Fanny; Brewin, Robert J. W.; Pradhan, Yaswant; Papadopoulos, Vassilis P.; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2015-02-01

    Tropical ocean ecosystems are predicted to become warmer, more saline, and less fertile in a future Earth. The Red Sea, one of the warmest and most saline environments in the world, may afford insights into the function of the tropical ocean ecosystem in a changing planet. We show that the concentration of chlorophyll and the duration of the phytoplankton growing season in the Red Sea are controlled by the strength of the winter Arabian monsoon (through horizontal advection of fertile waters from the Indian Ocean). Furthermore, and contrary to expectation, in the last decade (1998-2010) the winter Red Sea phytoplankton biomass has increased by 75% during prolonged positive phases of the Multivariate El Niño-Southern Oscillation Index. A new mechanism is reported, revealing the synergy of monsoon and climate in regulating Red Sea greenness.

  5. Weakening of Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall due to Changes in Land Use Land Cover

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Supantha; Ghosh, Subimal; Oglesby, Robert; Pathak, Amey; Chandrasekharan, Anita; Ramsankaran, RAAJ

    2016-01-01

    Weakening of Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) is traditionally linked with large-scale perturbations and circulations. However, the impacts of local changes in land use and land cover (LULC) on ISMR have yet to be explored. Here, we analyzed this topic using the regional Weather Research and Forecasting model with European Center for Medium range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) reanalysis data for the years 2000–2010 as a boundary condition and with LULC data from 1987 and 2005. The differences in LULC between 1987 and 2005 showed deforestation with conversion of forest land to crop land, though the magnitude of such conversion is uncertain because of the coarse resolution of satellite images and use of differential sources and methods for data extraction. We performed a sensitivity analysis to understand the impacts of large-scale deforestation in India on monsoon precipitation and found such impacts are similar to the observed changes in terms of spatial patterns and magnitude. We found that deforestation results in weakening of the ISMR because of the decrease in evapotranspiration and subsequent decrease in the recycled component of precipitation. PMID:27553384

  6. Moisture and heat budgets of the south American monsoon system: climatological aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Sâmia R.; Kayano, Mary T.; Calheiros, Alan J. P.; Andreoli, Rita Valéria; de Souza, Rodrigo Augusto Ferreira

    2016-08-01

    The climatology of the moisture and heat budget equation terms for subareas within the South American Monsoon System (SAMS) region is investigated for the 1958-2014 period considering the distinct phases of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). These budget equations are applied to the data from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Reanalysis project. Sources or sinks of moisture and heat are equation residues, referred to as residue and diabatic terms, respectively. Analyses are done for the Central Amazon Basin (CAM) and Western-Central Brazil (WCB) for three distinct periods, 1958-1976, 1977-1995, and 1996-2014, that correspond to the cold, warm, and undefined PDO phases. The differences among the PDO phases for each term are discussed. The CAM region acts dominantly as a moisture sink and heat source in all months during the three phases. On the other hand, in the WCB region, the monsoon characteristics are better defined, with a moisture sink (source) and a heat source (sink) during the wet (dry) season. The main result of the present analysis is the persistence of SAMS intensification signs in both CAM and WCB areas up to the last analyzed period (1996-2014), which is consistent with intense flooding in the Amazon Basin in 2008/2009, 2012, and 2014.

  7. Weakening of Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall due to Changes in Land Use Land Cover.

    PubMed

    Paul, Supantha; Ghosh, Subimal; Oglesby, Robert; Pathak, Amey; Chandrasekharan, Anita; Ramsankaran, Raaj

    2016-01-01

    Weakening of Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) is traditionally linked with large-scale perturbations and circulations. However, the impacts of local changes in land use and land cover (LULC) on ISMR have yet to be explored. Here, we analyzed this topic using the regional Weather Research and Forecasting model with European Center for Medium range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) reanalysis data for the years 2000-2010 as a boundary condition and with LULC data from 1987 and 2005. The differences in LULC between 1987 and 2005 showed deforestation with conversion of forest land to crop land, though the magnitude of such conversion is uncertain because of the coarse resolution of satellite images and use of differential sources and methods for data extraction. We performed a sensitivity analysis to understand the impacts of large-scale deforestation in India on monsoon precipitation and found such impacts are similar to the observed changes in terms of spatial patterns and magnitude. We found that deforestation results in weakening of the ISMR because of the decrease in evapotranspiration and subsequent decrease in the recycled component of precipitation. PMID:27553384

  8. Impact of surface meteorological observations on RAMS forecast of monsoon weather systems over the Indian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, P.; Sanjay, J.; Cotton, W. R.; Singh, S. S.

    2005-09-01

    An attempt has been made to study the impact of surface meteorological observations on the Regional Atmospheric Modelling System (RAMS) simulation of a monsoon depression and two low pressure systems. The surface observations are blended with the GEWEX Asian Monsoon Experiment (GAME) gridded analyses for these cases. In one set of experiments the model is run in 12 hour nudging mode initially and then in forecast mode using GAME gridded data without incorporating surface observations. In another set of experiments surface data are incorporated to enhance the signature of the systems in the large scale GAME analyses and nudging is applied initially for twelve hours. Subsequently the model is run in forecast mode to see the temporal and spatial evolution of different meteorological features associated with the systems. It is found that inclusion of the surface data has in general enhanced the signature of the systems in the analysis and subsequently shows improvement in the forecast of sea-level pressure, geopotential, wind field, etc. and the associated forecast of heavy rainfall, in particular. To make a quantitative comparison of the predicted rainfall with the observed one, equitable threat score and bias are calculated for different threshold values of rainfall. It is clearly noted that inclusion of surface data has improved the precipitation forecast over the Indian land mass as indicated by the equitable threat score and bias for all the threshold rainfall categories.

  9. The East Asian Summer Monsoon in pacemaker experiments driven by ENSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hui; Greatbatch, Richard; Lu, Jian

    2014-05-01

    The variability of the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) is studied using a pacemaker technique in a atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) coupled to a slab mixed layer model. In the pacemaker experiment, sea surface temperature (sst) is constrained to observations in the eastern equatorial Pacific throughout a q-flux that measures the contribution of ocean dynamics to SST variability, while the AGCM is still coupled to the slab model. An ensemble of pacemaker experiments is analysed using a multivariate EOF analysis to identify the two major modes of variability of the EASM. Results show that the pacemaker experiments simulate part of the variability of the first mode seen in the ERA40 reanalysis (correlation up to 0.67 for the model ensemble mean), as expected. Different from previous study, the pacemaker experiments also simulate part of the variabilty (correlation up to 0.51 for the model ensemble mean) of the second mode, a mode of variability that is related to that of the Indian Summer Monsoon. A possible reason is the success of the pacemaker experiments at reproducing the relationship between El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the second mode of EASM.

  10. South American Summer Monsoon of 1997/1998 and 1998/1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K.-M.; Zhou, Jiayu

    2000-01-01

    It is well known that during El Nino years severe drought occurs in the area of Amazon and northeastern Brazil. According to the linear model result the reduced latent heating over the Amazon may lead to a weaker than normal upper tropospheric Bolivian high. As a result, some studies have suggested a weaker South American summer monsoon (SASM) during El Nino years. Using re-analysis. Zhou and Lau data found a statistically significant positive correlation between the tropical eastern Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) and the strength of low-level jet (LLJ) along the eastern foothills of the tropical-subtropical Andes. Douglas also showed a strong LLJ at Santa Cruz, Bolivia during a special pilot balloon observation period in 1997/98 El Nino austral summer. Since this LLJ is an integral part of the monsoon system in the summertime, these results indicated that SASM could be stronger than normal in El Nino years. To clarify this issue, we conducted an investigation on SASM anomaly in the recent ENSO event of 1997/98 El Nino and 1998/99 La Nina In the following we first give a brief review on SASM and the interannual variability of summer rainfall over South America. Then, the impact of 1997-99 ENSO on the South American regional thermal structure and its dynamical consequences to SASM will be discussed.

  11. Weakening of Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall due to Changes in Land Use Land Cover.

    PubMed

    Paul, Supantha; Ghosh, Subimal; Oglesby, Robert; Pathak, Amey; Chandrasekharan, Anita; Ramsankaran, Raaj

    2016-08-24

    Weakening of Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) is traditionally linked with large-scale perturbations and circulations. However, the impacts of local changes in land use and land cover (LULC) on ISMR have yet to be explored. Here, we analyzed this topic using the regional Weather Research and Forecasting model with European Center for Medium range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) reanalysis data for the years 2000-2010 as a boundary condition and with LULC data from 1987 and 2005. The differences in LULC between 1987 and 2005 showed deforestation with conversion of forest land to crop land, though the magnitude of such conversion is uncertain because of the coarse resolution of satellite images and use of differential sources and methods for data extraction. We performed a sensitivity analysis to understand the impacts of large-scale deforestation in India on monsoon precipitation and found such impacts are similar to the observed changes in terms of spatial patterns and magnitude. We found that deforestation results in weakening of the ISMR because of the decrease in evapotranspiration and subsequent decrease in the recycled component of precipitation.

  12. Extratropical Influences on the Inter-Annual Variability of South-Asian Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed, F. S.; Yoo, J.; Körnich, H.; Kucharski, F.

    2010-12-01

    The effects of extratropical dynamics on the interannual variations in South-Asian Monsoon are examined. Based on NCEP/NCAR reanalysis, conditional maximum covariance analysis is performed on sea level pressure, 200 hPa geopotential heights and the south Asian monsoon (SAM) rainfall by removing the linear effects of El-Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) from the reanalysis fields. Summer North Atlantic Oscillation-SNAO(ENSO) index are defined as the principal component of first EOF of SLP(SST) over north Atlantic(Pacific) for July-August. The classification of 3 cells of the Circumglobal Teleconnection (CGT) pattern at 200 hPa level, located over the northeast Atlantic, Europe and northwest of India and Pakistan revealed that the SNAO is also significantly influencing the north western parts of SAM along with CGT. However CGT is linearly independent of SNAO. It is found that CGT(SNAO) is the leading(second) mode in the extratropics responsible for primary variability in SAM. Although both modes produce similar 200 hPa geopotential anomalies in the northeast Atlantic but the responses are different in the SAM rainfall. We quantified the relative influence of SNAO and CGT on the variance of SAM rainfall and proposed the dynamical mechanism for the effects of SNAO on SAM.

  13. Malaria epidemics and the influence of the tropical South Atlantic on the Indian monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cash, B. A.; Rodó, X.; Ballester, J.; Bouma, M. J.; Baeza, A.; Dhiman, R.; Pascual, M.

    2013-05-01

    The existence of predictability in the climate system beyond the relatively short timescales of synoptic weather has provided significant impetus to investigate climate variability and its consequences for society. In particular, relationships between the relatively slow changes in sea surface temperature (SST) and climate variability at widely removed points across the globe provide a basis for statistical and dynamical efforts to predict numerous phenomena, from rainfall to disease incidence, at seasonal to decadal timescales. We describe here a remote influence, identified through observational analysis and supported through numerical experiments with a coupled atmosphere-ocean model, of the tropical South Atlantic (TSA) on both monsoon rainfall and malaria epidemics in arid northwest India. Moreover, SST in the TSA is shown to provide the basis for an early warning of anomalous hydrological conditions conducive to malaria epidemics four months later, therefore at longer lead times than those afforded by rainfall. We find that the TSA is not only significant as a modulator of the relationship between the monsoon and the El Niño/Southern Oscillation, as has been suggested by previous work, but for certain regions and temporal lags is in fact a dominant driver of rainfall variability and hence malaria outbreaks.

  14. Weakening of Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall due to Changes in Land Use Land Cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Supantha; Ghosh, Subimal; Oglesby, Robert; Pathak, Amey; Chandrasekharan, Anita; Ramsankaran, Raaj

    2016-08-01

    Weakening of Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) is traditionally linked with large-scale perturbations and circulations. However, the impacts of local changes in land use and land cover (LULC) on ISMR have yet to be explored. Here, we analyzed this topic using the regional Weather Research and Forecasting model with European Center for Medium range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) reanalysis data for the years 2000–2010 as a boundary condition and with LULC data from 1987 and 2005. The differences in LULC between 1987 and 2005 showed deforestation with conversion of forest land to crop land, though the magnitude of such conversion is uncertain because of the coarse resolution of satellite images and use of differential sources and methods for data extraction. We performed a sensitivity analysis to understand the impacts of large-scale deforestation in India on monsoon precipitation and found such impacts are similar to the observed changes in terms of spatial patterns and magnitude. We found that deforestation results in weakening of the ISMR because of the decrease in evapotranspiration and subsequent decrease in the recycled component of precipitation.

  15. Transport pathways from the Asian monsoon anticyclone to the stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garny, Hella; Randel, William

    2016-04-01

    The upper tropospheric Asian monsoon anticyclone emerges in response to persistent deep convection over India and southeast Asia in northern summer. The monsoon circulation is associated with rapid transport from the surface to the upper troposphere within convective updrafts, leading to tracer anomalies within the anticyclone. Possibly air is transported further into the stratosphere, but the exact pathways of air from the upper tropospheric anticyclone to the stratosphere are currently under debate. While air is thought to be confined to the anticyclone by its surrounding wind jets, large variability in the anticyclone results in shedding of air from the anticyclone to its surrounding, and possibly air might reach the extratropical lower stratosphere by isentropic mixing. On the other hand, positive vertical velocities in the anticyclone region suggests upward transport of air into the tropical lower stratosphere. In this study, we investigate transport pathways of air originating in the upper tropospheric Asian monsoon anticyclone based on isentropic and three-dimensional trajectories. Trajectories are driven by ERA-Interim reanalysis data, and three-dimensional results are based both on kinematic and diabatic transport calculations. Isentropic calculations show that air parcels are typically confined within the anticyclone for 10-20 days, and spread over the tropical belt within a month of their initialization. However, only few parcels (3 % at 360 K, 8 % at 380 K) reach the extratropical stratosphere by isentropic transport. When considering vertical transport we find that 31 % (48 %) of the trajectories reach the stratosphere within 60 days when using vertical velocities or diabatic heating rates to calculate vertical transport, respectively. In both cases, most parcels that reach the stratosphere are transported upward within the anticyclone and enter the stratosphere in the tropics, typically 10-20 days after their initialization at 360 K. This suggests

  16. The impact of natural aerosols on Indian summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinoj, V.; Wang, H.; Yoon, J.; Rasch, P.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols emitted from a variety of natural and anthropogenic sources impact the earth's radiation and water budget. Most of the studies in the recent past have been focusing on anthropogenic aerosols and their impact. However, natural aerosols like sea-salt and dust form the bulk of the aerosol mass loading in the atmosphere. For example, oceans cover about 70% of the earth's surface area and are a major source of sea-salt aerosols in the atmosphere. Sea-salt emission is the single largest contributor to natural aerosols and accounts for nearly half of the global aerosol optical depth. Dust emission, the counterpart over land, also contributes substantially to natural atmospheric aerosols. In addition to their direct effect on solar radiation, these aerosols also actively participate in cloud formation by acting as cloud condensation and ice nuclei and have indirect effects on clouds. Both sea-salt and dust particles are primarily formed by the action of winds that largely determine seasonal/annual variations in their source strength and atmospheric loading. Over the Indian Ocean region, especially the Arabian Sea is characterized by high winds during the monsoon that generate a large amount of sea-salt aerosols. Also these high winds mobilize large amount of dust aerosols in the northern Arabian Sea depending on wind direction. These natural aerosols together with anthropogenic emissions impact Indian monsoon precipitation. We use satellite observation of precipitation and column aerosol loading along with a global climate model (Community Atmosphere Model version 5, CAM5) to show that the variability of natural aerosols (i.e., sea-salt and dust) play an important role in modulating the Indian monsoon precipitation and the response of the monsoon system to anthropogenic aerosols. The effect of dust and sea-salt on precipitation is found to be opposite to each other. Our study suggests that the observed spatial and temporal trends in precipitation

  17. The pace of East African monsoon evolution during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weldeab, Syee; Menke, Valerie; Schmiedl, Gerhard

    2014-03-01

    African monsoon precipitation experienced a dramatic change in the course of the Holocene. The pace with which the African monsoon shifted from a strong early to middle to a weak late Holocene is critical for our understanding of climate dynamics, hydroclimate-vegetation interaction, and shifts of prehistoric human settlements, yet it is controversially debated. On the basis of planktonic foraminiferal Ba/Ca time series from the eastern Mediterranean Sea, here we present a proxy record of Nile River runoff that provides a spatially integrated measure of changes in East African monsoon (EAM) precipitation. The runoff record indicates a markedly gradual middle to late Holocene EAM transition that lasted over 3500 years. The timing and pace of runoff change parallels those of insolation and vegetation changes over the Nile basin, indicating orbitally forced variation of insolation as the main EAM forcing and the absence of a nonlinear precipitation-vegetation feedback. A tight correspondence between a threshold level of Nile River runoff and the timing of occupation/abandonment of settlements suggests that along with climate changes in the eastern Sahara, the level of Nile River and intensity of summer floods were likely critical for the habitability of the Nile Valley (Egypt).

  18. CMIP5/AMIP GCM simulations of East Asian summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jinming; Wei, Ting; Dong, Wenjie; Wu, Qizhong; Wang, Yongli

    2014-07-01

    The East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) is a distinctive component of the Asian climate system and critically influences the economy and society of the region. To understand the ability of AGCMs in capturing the major features of EASM, 10 models that participated in Coupled Model Intercomparison Project/Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5/AMIP), which used observational SST and sea ice to drive AGCMs during the period 1979-2008, were evaluated by comparing with observations and AMIP II simulations. The results indicated that the multi-model ensemble (MME) of CMIP5/AMIP captures the main characteristics of precipitation and monsoon circulation, and shows the best skill in EASM simulation, better than the AMIP II MME. As for the Meiyu/Changma/Baiyu rainbelt, the intensity of rainfall is underestimated in all the models. The biases are caused by a weak western Pacific subtropical high (WPSH) and accompanying eastward southwesterly winds in group I models, and by a too strong and west-extended WPSH as well as westerly winds in group II models. Considerable systematic errors exist in the simulated seasonal migration of rainfall, and the notable northward jumps and rainfall persistence remain a challenge for all the models. However, the CMIP5/AMIP MME is skillful in simulating the western North Pacific monsoon index (WNPMI).

  19. Aerosols and contrasting monsoon conditions over the Himalayan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Charu; Ganguly, Dilip; Dash, S. K.

    2016-05-01

    Impact of aerosols on the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) variability is well documented; however there are limited studies which have quantified the role of aerosols in modifying the amount of rainfall. To address this research problem, we make use of the remotely sensed data set of precipitation and aerosols from different observations. In the present study remotely sensed precipitation data set has been utilised to define contrasting monsoon conditions over the Himalayan region. As per the classical definition, active and break spells are defined over the central part of the Indian land region, and during the break spells over the central Indian region, the Himalayan region receives substantial amount of rainfall. It is found that accumulation of more dust over the Uttarakhand region significantly (negative correlation with rainfall; significant at 5% significance level) suppresses the rainfall during break spells. We propose that the substantial aerosol loading and its associated dynamical feedback over the Himalayan foothills may have considerable impact on the amount of rainfall over the mountainous regions of the Indian subcontinent. Results presented in this paper are supported by the statistically robust significance test and would be useful to develop the understanding of the role of aerosols in modulating the rainfall intensity during the summer monsoon season.

  20. On the Structure and Dynamics of Indian Monsoon Depressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Kieran; Turner, Andrew; Inness, Peter; Parker, David; Levine, Richard

    2016-04-01

    ERA-Interim reanalysis data from the past 35 years have been used with a newly-developed feature tracking algorithm to identify Indian monsoon depressions originating in or near the Bay of Bengal. These were then rotated, centralised and combined to give a fully three-dimensional 106-depression composite structure - a considerably larger sample than any previous detailed study on monsoon depressions and their structure. Many known features of depression structure are confirmed, particularly the existence of a maximum to the southwest of the centre in rainfall and other fields, and a westward axial tilt in others. Additionally, the depressions are found to have significant asymmetry due to the presence of the Himalayas; a bimodal mid-tropospheric potential vorticity core; a separation into thermally cold- (-1.5K) and neutral- (~0K) cores near the surface with distinct properties; and that the centre has very large CAPE and very small CIN. Variability as a function of background state has also been explored, with land/coast/sea, diurnal, ENSO, active/break and Indian Ocean Dipole contrasts considered. Depressions are found to be markedly stronger during the active phase of the monsoon, as well as during La Nina. Depressions on land are shown to be more intense and more tightly constrained to the central axis. A detailed schematic diagram of a vertical cross-section through a composite depression is also presented, showing its inherent asymmetric structure.

  1. Three million years of monsoon variability over the northern Sahara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larrasoana, J. C.; Roberts, A. P.; Rohling, E. J.; Winklhofer, M.; Wehausen, R.

    2003-04-01

    We present a 3 million-year record of aeolian dust supply into the eastern Mediterranean Sea, based on hematite contents derived from magnetic properties of sediments form ODP Site 967. Our record has an average temporal resolution of ˜400~years. We deduce that the aeolian hematite in eastern Mediterranean sediments derived from eastern Algerian, Libyan, and western Egyptian lowlands located north of the central Saharan watershed (˜21o~N). We relate dust-flux minima to penetration of the African summer monsoon front to the north of the central Saharan watershed. This would have enhanced soil humidity and vegetation cover in the source regions, in agreement with results from "green Sahara" climate models. Our results indicate that this northward monsoon penetration occured pervasively during insolation maxima throughout the last 3 million years. As would be expected, this orbital precession-scale mechanism is modulated on both short (95 kyr) and long (406 kyr) eccentricity time scales. We also observe a strong expression of the 41-kyr obliquity cycle. There is a marked increase in sub-Milankovitch variability around the Mid-Pleistocene transition (˜0.95~Ma), which suggests a link between millennial-scale variability, including monsoon dynamics, and the size of the northern hemisphere ice sheets.

  2. A numerical model study on the behaviour of Asian summer monsoon and AMOC due to orographic forcing of Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallah, Bijan; Cubasch, Ulrich; Prömmel, Kerstin; Sodoudi, Sahar

    2016-09-01

    Simulations using the ECHAM5/MPI-OM coupled atmosphere-ocean model both with and without the Tibetan Plateau are performed in order to study the large scale effects of orographic forcing on the behaviour of the Asian summer monsoon system. Our analysis emphasises the significant impact of plateau forcing on the atmosphere-ocean interactions. It is argued that, in addition to the orographic forcing of the Tibetan Plateau on the climate of Asia such as sensible heat pumping and thermal insulation, other significant direct processes exist, which link the Asian summer monsoon to the sea surface temperatures in the North Atlantic Ocean. The removal of the Tibetan Plateau modifies the wind-driven ocean circulations over the North Atlantic, which leads to a decrease in the surface heat advection over the North Atlantic Ocean and a decrease in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. This, in turn, affects, via teleconnections, both the monsoon rainfall and the position of the intertropical convergence zone.

  3. The Origin of Moisture Sources for the North American Monsoon Using a Numerical Model and Precipitation Stable Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, H.; Dominguez, F.

    2014-12-01

    This work evaluates the moisture sources that contribute to North American Monsoon precipitation over a 34-year period. The modified analytical dynamic recycling model (DRM) is used to evaluate the contributions from both oceanic and terrestrial regions. This computationally-efficient modeling framework reveals previously overlooked moisture source regions such as Central America and the Caribbean Sea in addition to the well-known Gulf of California and Gulf of Mexico source regions. Our results show that terrestrial evapotranspiration is as important as oceanic evaporation for NAM precipitation, and terrestrial sources contribute to approximately 40% of monsoonal moisture. There is a northward progression of moisture sources, beginning with Central America during the early season and transitioning north into the NAM region itself during the peak of the monsoon season. The most intense precipitation occurs towards the end of the season and tends to originate in the Gulf of California and tropical Pacific associated with tropical cyclones and gulf surges. Heavy stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in precipitation (δD and δ18O) collected for every precipitation event measured in Tucson, AZ for the period 1981-2013 complement our numerical results. Our analysis shows that precipitation events linked to sources from the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea have a more positive isotopic composition than sources from the Gulf of California and Tropical Pacific. We also see that terrestrial regions that derive their precipitation from the Gulf of Mexico have more positive isotopic composition than those that derive their moisture from the Pacific.

  4. Minor changes in soil bacterial and fungal community composition occur in response to monsoon precipitation in a semiarid grassland.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Theresa A; Koch, George W; Schwartz, Egbert

    2014-08-01

    Arizona and New Mexico receive half of their annual precipitation during the summer monsoon season, making this large-scale rain event critical for ecosystem productivity. We used the monsoon rains to explore the responses of soil bacterial and fungal communities to natural moisture pulses in a semiarid grassland. Through 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and ITS region, we phylogenetically characterized these communities at 22 time points during a summer season. Relative humidity increased before the rains arrived, creating conditions in soil that allowed for the growth of microorganisms. During the course of the study, the relative abundances of most bacterial phyla showed little variation, though some bacterial populations responded immediately to an increase in soil moisture once the monsoon rains arrived. The Firmicutes phylum experienced over a sixfold increase in relative abundance with increasing water availability. Conversely, Actinobacteria, the dominant taxa at our site, were negatively affected by the increase in water availability. No relationship was found between bacterial diversity and soil water potential. Bacterial community structure was unrelated to all environmental variables that we measured, with the exception of a significant relationship with atmospheric relative humidity. Relative abundances of fungal phyla fluctuated more throughout the season than bacterial abundances did. Variation in fungal community structure was unrelated to soil water potential and to most environmental variables. However, ordination analysis showed a distinct fungal community structure late in the season, probably due to plant senescence.

  5. A palaeo-ecological assessment of the resilience of south-east Asian dry forests to monsoon extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, R. J.; Penny, D.; Maxwell, A.

    2014-12-01

    Predictions that the frequency and intensity of monsoon extremes will rise in coming decades are being made with increasing confidence. There is concern that these climatic changes may drive tropical monsoon forests across critical thresholds, triggering ecological regime shifts. The global consequences of such shifts, coupled with knowledge gaps around the nature and intensity of drivers needed to instigate ecosystem reorganization, highlights the need for research that analyses the resilience of these seasonal forest to future climatic change. While work has indicated that these forests may be susceptible to reorganization to savanna under changing precipitation regimes, the interactions between climatic drivers and ecosystem response is still poorly understood, particularly in the seasonal forests outside of the neo- and afro-tropics. This study presents results on the threshold dynamics of the extensive south-east Asian seasonally dry tropical forest ecoregion (SASDTF) through analysis of plant microfossils and charcoal archived in sediment cores extracted from two tropical crater lakes in Cambodia. These data are compared with regional paleoclimatic reconstructions to gauge past forest response to monsoon extremes, and provide insight into the magnitude and duration of climatic events most likely to result in the breaching of critical thresholds. Our results suggest that, at a biome level, the SASDTF appears resilient to low-amplitude climatic variations over millennia, despite instrumental observations of strong precipitation-tree cover coupling in global dry forest resilience models.

  6. Recent intensification of the South and East Asian monsoon contrast associated with an increase in the zonal tropical SST gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Kyung-Sook; Lee, June-Yi; Ha, Kyung-Ja

    2014-07-01

    Observed analysis of the 35 years of 1979-2013 reveals considerable interdecadal change and significant recent intensification in the difference of convective precipitation between the South Asian monsoon (SAM) and East Asian monsoon (EAM) systems during the major summer monsoon season (June-July). We propose that the recent strengthening of the zonal gradient of sea surface temperature (SST) between the Indian Ocean, western Pacific, and eastern Pacific is a possible cause for the intensification of the convective precipitation contrast. It is noted that the strengthening of the zonal SST gradient associated with the recent mega-La Niña trend tends to reinforce the negative connection between SAM and EAM systems by inducing enhanced convection over the maritime continent and then facilitating the northwestward emanation of Rossby waves. Consequently, a cyclonic circulation anomaly that effectively changes the local Hadley circulation has been formed over the SAM region, resulting in the noticeable difference between the SAM and EAM. The years 2013 and 1983 are further investigated as the strongest extreme years for positive and negative phases of submonsoon contrast, respectively. The result confirms that the meridional dipole height pattern along the Asian Jet stream, which is caused by the strong zonal gradient of tropical SST, serves as a key trigger in strengthening the submonsoon contrast.

  7. East China Sea δ18O Record Detects Millennial-Scale Changes in the East Asian Summer Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleeman, E.; Clemens, S. C.; Lawman, A. E.; Kubota, Y.; Holbourn, A. E.; Martin, A.

    2015-12-01

    The East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM) brings heavy summer rainfall to some of Asia's most densely-populated areas, impacting agricultural production and water resources. Sediment cores were recovered from International Ocean Drilling Program Site U1429 in the East China Sea (31° 37.04' N, 128° 59.50' E, 732 mbsl). This location receives runoff from the Yangtze River, which serves as a major drainage system for monsoon-induced precipitation. Hence, the δ18O record of planktonic foraminifera at Site U1429 reflects changes in regional, monsoon-driven salinity. The top 100 meters of core at Site U1429 were sampled at a preliminary resolution of 15 cm and processed to isolate the planktonic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber for δ18O mass spectrometry analyses. Abrupt, millennial-scale regional climate variability in the EASM and its linkage to orbital forcings have been reconstructed using stratigraphic analysis of δ18O. The sub-orbital scale structure of the δ18O record over the past 400 kyr matches the structures of both the composite speleothem δ18O from eastern China (Sanbao and Hulu caves) and the planktonic δ18O record from northern South China Sea Site 1146. The similarities between these δ18O records indicate a strong regional response to monsoon forcing. Removal of the temperature component of the δ18O signal by using Mg/Ca (G. ruber) paleothermometry will provide a record of changes in the δ18O composition of seawater in response to Yangtze River runoff.

  8. Reduction of uncertainty associated with future changes in Indian summer monsoon projected by climate models and assessment of monsoon teleconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendran, Kavirajan; Surendran, Sajani; Kitoh, Akio; Varghese, Stella Jes

    2016-05-01

    Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) coupled global climate model (CGCM) Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) simulations project clear future temperature increase but diverse changes in Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) with substantial inter-model spread. Robust signals of projected changes are derived based on objective criteria and the physically consistent simulations with the highest reliability suggest future reduction in the frequency of light rainfall but increase in high to extreme rainfall. The role of equatorial Indian and Pacific Oceans on the projected changes in monsoon rainfall is investigated. The results of coupled model projections are also compared with the corresponding projections from high resolution AGCM time-slice, multi-physics and multi-forcing ensemble experiments.

  9. Fluctuations in the deficiency of the summer monsoon over India, and their effect on economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooley, D. A.; Parthasarathy, B.

    1982-04-01

    To assess the deficiency in the activity of the monsoon over India during the season, an index for the country based on the percentage area with a specified percentage seasonal rainfall deficiency and termed the Monsoon Deficiency Index (MDI), has been utilized. The statistical properties of the MDI series for the period 1871 1978 have been examined. The series which can be taken to be homogeneous and random has a high variability. MDI is generally not observed to persist at a high level; a high value is invariably followed by a low value. The deficiency over the country is considered as largescale and is termed as monsoon failure when the MDI value equals or exceeds the nineth decile viz. 40, of the mixed gamma distribution fitted to the MDI series. Using this criterion, the years of monsoon failure have been identified. The monsoon failures are found to occur randomly. The effect of monsoon deficiency on the Indian economy has been assessed.

  10. Effects of large-scale deforestation on precipitation in the monsoon regions: Remote versus local effects

    PubMed Central

    Devaraju, N.; Bala, Govindasamy; Modak, Angshuman

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, using idealized climate model simulations, we investigate the biogeophysical effects of large-scale deforestation on monsoon regions. We find that the remote forcing from large-scale deforestation in the northern middle and high latitudes shifts the Intertropical Convergence Zone southward. This results in a significant decrease in precipitation in the Northern Hemisphere monsoon regions (East Asia, North America, North Africa, and South Asia) and moderate precipitation increases in the Southern Hemisphere monsoon regions (South Africa, South America, and Australia). The magnitude of the monsoonal precipitation changes depends on the location of deforestation, with remote effects showing a larger influence than local effects. The South Asian Monsoon region is affected the most, with 18% decline in precipitation over India. Our results indicate that any comprehensive assessment of afforestation/reforestation as climate change mitigation strategies should carefully evaluate the remote effects on monsoonal precipitation alongside the large local impacts on temperatures. PMID:25733889

  11. Effects of large-scale deforestation on precipitation in the monsoon regions: remote versus local effects.

    PubMed

    Devaraju, N; Bala, Govindasamy; Modak, Angshuman

    2015-03-17

    In this paper, using idealized climate model simulations, we investigate the biogeophysical effects of large-scale deforestation on monsoon regions. We find that the remote forcing from large-scale deforestation in the northern middle and high latitudes shifts the Intertropical Convergence Zone southward. This results in a significant decrease in precipitation in the Northern Hemisphere monsoon regions (East Asia, North America, North Africa, and South Asia) and moderate precipitation increases in the Southern Hemisphere monsoon regions (South Africa, South America, and Australia). The magnitude of the monsoonal precipitation changes depends on the location of deforestation, with remote effects showing a larger influence than local effects. The South Asian Monsoon region is affected the most, with 18% decline in precipitation over India. Our results indicate that any comprehensive assessment of afforestation/reforestation as climate change mitigation strategies should carefully evaluate the remote effects on monsoonal precipitation alongside the large local impacts on temperatures.

  12. Has the number of Indian summer monsoon depressions decreased over the last 30 years?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Naftali Y.; Boos, William R.

    2014-11-01

    Monsoon depressions are cyclonic atmospheric vortices with outer radii near 1000 km that form within the larger-scale monsoon circulations of India and other regions. Recent studies have reported a downward trend in recent decades in the number of Indian summer monsoon depressions. In particular, the years 2002, 2010, and 2012 were noted for having the first summers, in over a century, in which no depressions formed. Here satellite and reanalysis data are used to document the existence of multiple storms in the summers of 2002, 2010, and 2012 that meet traditional criteria for classification as monsoon depressions. Furthermore, the number of extreme synoptic events occurring each summer over the Bay of Bengal is estimated from satellite scatterometers and exhibits no statistically significant trend over the last three decades. These results raise questions about the validity of previously claimed large trends in monsoon depression activity in the Indian summer monsoon.

  13. A study on the decreasing trend in tropical easterly jet stream (TEJ) and its impact on Indian summer monsoon rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreekala, P. P.; Bhaskara Rao, S. V.; Arunachalam, M. S.; Harikiran, C.

    2014-10-01

    Using the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis wind and temperature data (1948-2011) and India Meteorological Department (IMD) rainfall data, a long-term trend in the tropical easterly jet stream and its effect on Indian summer monsoon rainfall has been explained in the present study. A decreasing trend in zonal wind speed at 100 mb (maximum decrease), 150 mb, and 200 mb (minimum) is observed. The upper-level (100, 150, and 200 mb) zonal wind speed has been correlated with the surface air temperature anomaly index (ATAI) in the month of May, which is taken as the difference in temperature anomaly over land (22.5°N-27.5°N, 80°E-90°E) and Ocean (5°S-0°S, 75°E-85°E). Significant high correlation is observed between May ATAI and tropical easterly jet stream (TEJ) which suggests that the decreasing land-sea temperature contrast could be one major reason behind the decreasing trend in TEJ. The analysis of spatial distribution of rainfall over India shows a decreasing trend in rainfall over Jammu and Kashmir, Arunachal Pradesh, central Indian region, and western coast of India. Increasing trend in rainfall is observed over south peninsular and northeastern part of India. From the spatial correlation analysis of zonal wind with gridded rainfall, it is observed that the correlation of rainfall is found to be high with the TEJ speed over the regions where the decreasing trend in rainfall is observed. Similarly, from the analysis of spatial correlation between rainfall and May ATAI, positive spatial correlation is observed between May ATAI and summer monsoon rainfall over the regions such as south peninsular India where the rainfall trend is positive, and negative correlation is observed over the places such as Jammu and Kashmir where negative rainfall trend is observed. The decreased land-sea temperature contrast in the pre-monsoon month could be one major reason behind the decreased trend in TEJ as well as the observed spatial variation in the summer monsoon rainfall trend. Thus

  14. Probing orographic controls in the Himalayas during the monsoon using satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, A. P.; Kim, G.; Williams, E.; Nesbitt, S. W.

    2004-03-01

    activity in the Bay of Bengal, and the modulating role of orography. Empirical orthogonal function (EOF) and canonical correlation (CC) analysis suggest that joint modes of variability of monsoon weather and topography, which we call orographic land-atmosphere interactions, modulate the space-time variability of cloudiness in the region. Finally, scaling analysis of cloudiness suggests three different scaling regimes of orographic land-atmosphere interactions: 1) a synoptic-scale regime (≥70-80km); 2) an orographic meso-β regime (30-70km) associated with the succession of wide valleys and bulky terrain features; and 3) an orographic meso-α regime (≤30km) associated with the complex succession of protruding south-facing ridges and narrow valleys that characterize the Himalayan foothills between altitudes of 3000 and 5000m elevations.

  15. Possible relationship between East Asian summer monsoon and western North Pacific tropical cyclone genesis frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ki-Seon; Cha, Yumi; Kim, Hae-Dong; Kang, Sung-Dae

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, the fact that strong positive correlations have existed between East Asian summer monsoons (EASMs) and western North Pacific tropical cyclone (TC) genesis frequency over the last 37 years was found. To figure out the cause of these correlations, 7 years (positive East Asian summer monsoon index (EASMI) phase) that have the highest values and 7 years (negative EASMI phase) that have the lowest values in the normalized EASM index were selected and the differences in averages between the two phases were analyzed. In the positive EASMI phase, TCs mainly occurred in the northwestern waters of the tropical and subtropical western North Pacific and showed a tendency to move from the far eastern waters of the Philippines, pass the East China Sea, and move northward toward Korea and Japan. On the 500 hPa streamline, whereas anomalous anticyclones developed in the East Asia middle-latitude region, anomalous cyclones developed in the tropical and subtropical western North Pacific. Therefore, in this phase, whereas EASMs were weakened, western North Pacific summer monsoons (WNPSMs) were strengthened so that some more TCs could occur. In addition, in the case of the East China Sea and the southern waters of Japan located between the two anomalous pressure systems, TCs could move some more toward the East Asia middle-latitude region in this phase. According to an analysis of the 850 hPa relative vorticity, negative anomalies were strengthened in the East Asia middle-latitude region while positive anomalies were strengthened in the region south to 25 N. Therefore, in the positive EASMI phase, whereas EASMs were weakened, WNPSMs were strengthened so that some more TCs could occur. According to an analysis of the 850 and 200 hPa horizontal divergence, whereas anomalous downward flows were strengthened in the East Asia middle-latitude region, anomalous upward flows were strengthened in the tropical and subtropical western North Pacific. According to an analysis

  16. On the Dynamics of Extreme Meteorological Droughts during Pakistan Summer Monsoon by Focusing the Anomalous States of Upper Troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, S.; Koike, T.; Nishii, K.

    2012-12-01

    The lack of summer monsoon sometimes brings severe droughts in many parts of the world including South Asian countries like Pakistan. Human life and economy in Pakistan considerably depends on the summer monsoon. So, an essential question arises "how can we contribute better to manage the water resources during drought conditions for the societal needs". To address the concern as a hydrologist, we need to develop a basis of the scientific understanding of the different contrast of the climatology during extremely dry rainfall events over Pakistan region. However, compared to other regional studies i.e. Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) and South-East Asian Monsoon (SEAM), the basis of the thermodynamical structure and the processes associated with upper tropospheric conditions during the climatological mean Pakistan Summer Monsoon (PSM) and its extreme events have not been addressed deeply yet and need to be investigated, because it is immensely vital for the hydrologist as a first step to develop the basis of scientific understanding. By data analysis, an attempt has been made to accomplish this objective. Firstly, the climatological tropospheric conditions and the associated processes from pre-monsoon phase to the PSM mature phase are investigated. During the PSM mature phase (mid July), the climatological-mean structure of the atmosphere favors convective activity compared to the pre-monsoon phase (late June) with weakening of the subsidence in the upper troposphere and also with increasing of incoming moisture flux in the lower troposphere from Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal around Pakistan. Specifically, in the upper troposphere, the upper-level subsidence and convergence observed over Pakistan during pre-monsoon phase shifts and reallocates to the northwest of Pakistan during mature phase, which results in weakening of the subsidence just over Pakistan, and then the PSM mature phase initiated. Secondly, comparing the PSM mature phase climatological mean

  17. The verification of millennial-scale monsoon water vapor transport channel in northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu; Zhang, Chengqi; Wang, Yue

    2016-05-01

    Long-term changes of the Asian summer monsoon water vapor transport play a pivotal role in the variability of monsoon precipitation. Paleo-climate simulations have shown that there is an important monsoon vapor transport channel in western China. Previous studies mostly focused on the correlation between monsoon precipitation and intensity. Little research has been done on the verification of the water vapor channel. Compared with speleothem and lacustrine systems, the hydrological cycle of land surface sediments is more directly related to the monsoon water vapor. In this study, we used carbonate δ18O and organic matter δ13C of the surface eolian sediments from the piedmont of the northern Qilian Mountains to verify the monsoon water vapor on the Holocene millennial-scale. Two surface sedimentary sections were selected to study paleo-monsoon water vapor transport. Proxy data, including carbonate δ18O and organic matter δ13C of surface eolian sediments, as well as total organic matter and carbonate content were obtained from the two eolian sections. We also synthesized transient simulations of the CCSM3 and the Kiel climate models. The PMIP 3.0 project and TRACE isotopic simulations were also compared with the reconstructed monsoon water vapor transport. Our findings indicate that the strength of the Holocene Asian summer monsoon is consistent with the water vapor transport in western China that has significant impacts to long-term monsoon precipitation in northern China. This study verifies a significant millennial-scale correlation between the monsoon strength and monsoon water vapor transport intensity along the eastern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau.

  18. Near-linear response of mean monsoon strength to a broad range of radiative forcings.

    PubMed

    Boos, William R; Storelvmo, Trude

    2016-02-01

    Theoretical models have been used to argue that seasonal mean monsoons will shift abruptly and discontinuously from wet to dry stable states as their radiative forcings pass a critical threshold, sometimes referred to as a "tipping point." Further support for a strongly nonlinear response of monsoons to radiative forcings is found in the seasonal onset of the South Asian summer monsoon, which is abrupt compared with the annual cycle of insolation. Here it is shown that the seasonal mean strength of monsoons instead exhibits a nearly linear dependence on a wide range of radiative forcings. First, a previous theory that predicted a discontinuous, threshold response is shown to omit a dominant stabilizing term in the equations of motion; a corrected theory predicts a continuous and nearly linear response of seasonal mean monsoon strength to forcings. A comprehensive global climate model is then used to show that the seasonal mean South Asian monsoon exhibits a near-linear dependence on a wide range of isolated greenhouse gas, aerosol, and surface albedo forcings. This model reproduces the observed abrupt seasonal onset of the South Asian monsoon but produces a near-linear response of the mean monsoon by changing the duration of the summer circulation and the latitude of that circulation's ascent branch. Thus, neither a physically correct theoretical model nor a comprehensive climate model support the idea that seasonal mean monsoons will undergo abrupt, nonlinear shifts in response to changes in greenhouse gas concentrations, aerosol emissions, or land surface albedo. PMID:26811462

  19. Study of aerosol transport through precipitation chemistry over Arabian Sea during winter and summer monsoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praveen, P. S.; Rao, P. S. P.; Safai, P. D.; Devara, P. C. S.; Chate, D. M.; Ali, K.; Momin, G. A.

    Precipitation samples over the Arabian Sea collected during Arabian Sea Monsoon Experiment (ARMEX) in 2002-2003 were examined for major water soluble components and acidity of aerosols during the period of winter and summer monsoon seasons. The pH of rain water was alkaline during summer monsoon and acidic during winter monsoon. Summer monsoon precipitation showed dominance of sea-salt components (˜90%) and significant amounts of non-sea salt (nss) Ca 2+ and SO 42-. Winter monsoon precipitation samples showed higher concentration of NO 3- and NH 4+ compared to that of summer monsoon, indicating more influence of anthropogenic sources. The rain water data is interpreted in terms of long-range transport and background pollution. In summer monsoon, air masses passing over the north African and Gulf continents which may be carrying nss components are advected towards the observational location. Also, prevailing strong southwesterly winds at surface level produced sea-salt aerosols which led to high sea-salt contribution in precipitation. While in winter monsoon, it was observed that, air masses coming from Asian region towards observational location carry more pollutants like NO 3-and nss SO 42- that acidify the precipitation.

  20. Circulation effect: response of precipitation δ18O to the ENSO cycle in monsoon regions of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ming

    2014-02-01

    Inter-annual variation in the ratio of 18O to 16O of precipitation (δ18Op) in the monsoon regions of China (MRC, area approximately east of 100°E) has not yet been fully analyzed. Based on an analysis of the relationships between the time series of amount-weighted mean annual δ18O in precipitation (δ18Ow) and meteorological variables such as temperature, precipitation as well as atmospheric/oceanic circulation indices, it is recognized that the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) cycle appears to be the dominant control on the inter-annual variation in δ18Op in the MRC. Further analysis shows that the trade wind plays a role in governing δ18Ow through affecting the intensity of the different summer monsoon circulations which are closely linked to the weakening (weaker than normal) and strengthening (stronger than normal) of the trade wind and gives the δ18Ow different values at or over inter-annual timescales. The southwest monsoon (SWM) drives long-distance transport of water vapor from Indian Ocean to the MRC, and along this pathway increasing rainout leads to more negative δ18Ow via Rayleigh distillation processes. In contrast, the southeast monsoon (SEM), which is consistent with the changes in the strength of the West Pacific subtropical high, drives short-distance water vapor transport from the West Pacific Ocean to the MRC and leads to less negative δ18Ow. Therefore, the δ18Ow value directly reflects the differences in influence between the SWM, which is strong when the SE trade wind is strong, and the SEM, which is strong when the SE trade wind is weak. In addition, the South China Sea Monsoon also transports local water vapor as well as plays a role in achieving the synchronization between the δ18Ow and ENSO. The author thus terms the δ18Op rhythm in the MRC the "circulation effect". In turn, the δ18Op variation in the MRC has the potential to provide information on atmospheric circulation and the signal of δ18Op recorded in natural archives

  1. South American Monsoon variability during the past 2,000 years from stable isotopic proxies and model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuille, M.; Cruz, F. W.; Abbott, M.; Bird, B. W.; Burns, S. J.; Cheng, H.; Colose, C. M.; Kanner, L. C.; LeGrande, A. N.; Novello, V. F.; Taylor, B. L.

    2012-12-01

    The rapidly growing number of high-resolution stable isotopic proxies from speleothems, ice cores and lake sediments, located in the South American summer monsoon (SASM) belt, will soon allow for a comprehensive analysis of climate variability in the South American tropics and subtropics over the past ~ 2000 years. In combination with isotope-enabled General Circulation Models (GCMs) this offers new prospects for better understanding the spatiotemporal dynamics of the South American monsoon system and for diagnosing its sensitivities to external forcing mechanisms (solar, volcanic) and modes of ocean-atmosphere variability (e.g. ENSO and AMO). In this presentation we will discuss the rationale for interpreting isotopic excursions recorded in various proxies from the Andes, northeastern and southeastern Brazil as indicative of changes in monsoon intensity. We will focus on the past 2 millenia when isotopic proxies from the SASM region show a very coherent behavior regardless of the type of archive or their location. All proxies exhibit significant decadal to multidecadal variability, superimposed on large excursions during three key periods, the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA), the Little Ice Age (LIA) and the Current Warm Period (CWP). We interpret these three periods as times when the SASM mean state was significantly weakened (MCA and CWP) and strengthened (LIA), respectively. During the LIA each of the proxy archives considered contains the most negative delta-18O values recorded during the entire record length. On the other hand the monsoon strength is currently rather weak in a 2000- year historical perspective, rivaled only by the low intensity during the MCA. One interpretation of these centennial-scale climate anomalies suggests that they were at least partially driven by temperature changes in the northern hemisphere and in particular over the North Atlantic, leading to a latitudinal displacement of the ITCZ and a change in monsoon intensity and degree of

  2. Prediction of Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall: A comparison of SST indices in the Indo-Pacific region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschat, Ghyslaine; Terray, Pascal; Masson, Sébastien

    2010-05-01

    The focus of this study is to document and discuss the variability and predictability of the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) rainfall at interannual time scales. Various SST indices have already been proposed in literature in order to understand the variability of ISM rainfall (Ashok et al. 2004; Goswami et al. 2005, Terray et al. 2007; Yang et al. 2007). However, the forecast skills and dynamics of these different indices have never been compared in detail. The present analysis is based on monthly mean rainfall fields from the CPC Merged Analysis of precipitation (CMAP), SST fields from the Hadley Centre Global Sea Surface Temperature data set (HadISST), and atmospheric data from NCEP-DOE Reanalysis 2, for the period 1979-2007. Four SST indices are computed in different regions of the Indian and Pacific oceans - Nino3.4 SST index in December-January, South East Indian Ocean SST (SEIO) in February-March, the Indian Ocean Basin Mode (IOB) in April-May, the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) averaged from September to November - and compared through composite analyses of SST and atmospheric fields, and correlation with ISM rainfall, onset and withdrawal. The results show that SEIO SSTs during late boreal winter or IOB SSTs during boreal spring are significant precursors for both the late ISM (August-September) and withdrawal of the monsoon, while the early part of the monsoon (June-July) and the monsoon onset are mostly influenced by a late ENSO withdrawal and equatorial Pacific variability during spring. Furthermore, correlation and regression analyses show that the IOB index is associated with the decay of ENSO events in one hand, while the SEIO index is linked to developing El Nino/La Nina episodes on the other. Despite different spatio-temporal definitions and relationships with ENSO, IOB and SEIO SSTs can thus both impact ISM rainfall, mainly through air-sea interactions within the Indian Ocean. With comparable predicting skills, the choice of the better index then hinges on

  3. Impact of Satellite Radiance Data Assimilation on Seasonal Predictability of Monsoon Rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesarkar, Amit; Jayaraman, Achuthan; Bhate, Jyoti

    2012-07-01

    The dynamical prediction of Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall is one of the challenging initial value problems partially due to unknown subgrid scale microphysical processes, limited accuracy of initial and boundary conditions and partially due to the course resolution of global models. Assimilation of satellite data using 3DVAR technique is found useful to improve the quality of initial conditions. Therefore to understand the impact of satellite radiance data assimilation on seasonal predictability of Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall we have used Global version of Weather Research and Forecast Model version 3.3.1 (G-WRF). We have carried out simulations of Indian Summer Monsoon for 11 years (2000-2010) with the resolution of 60 Km. The initial conditions are obtained from Final Analysis Dataset of 00 UTC 1st May of each year. The lower boundary conditions are initialized using Optimally Interpolated Sea Surface Temperatures (OISST) data and TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) data. The simulations are carried out from 1st May till 15th October for each year. The observations including satellite radiance observation obtained using satellites SSMI, ARIS, QSCAT, WindSAT and AMSR-E are assimilated in the initial conditions using 3DVAR technique. The sensitivity experiments with USGS and MODIS Land surface dataset are carried out to understand their influence of land surface dataset on the seasonal predictability of ISMR. The simulated outputs are compared with the observed rainfall from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM 3G68), IMD daily gridded rainfall dataset and Water-Cycle dataset obtained from SSMI. The skill of the forecast for various sensitivity experiments are evaluated for different IMD rainfall categories as well as quantitative precipitation forecast. It has been found that the radiance data assimilation is useful to strengthen the magnitude of the winds over sea surface and lower tropospheric region however there is no much impact on wind direction. It is also

  4. Comparative Hydrology Over Monsoonal Regions Using Seasonal Distributions of Stable Water Isotopes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. P.; Worden, J.; Noone, D. C.

    2007-12-01

    The hydrologic regimes of monsoonal regions contain complex balances of large-scale advective supply of water, surface exchange and atmospheric condensation, which are important for the regional energy balance and climate. Stable water isotopes are powerful tools for studying such processes, as isotopic fractionations occurring during evaporation and condensation give rise to measurable variations in the isotopic composition that reflects the history of moist processes for each observed air parcel. The HDO/H2O data set from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) on NASA's Aura spacecraft offers a unique global view of the isotopic composition of water vapor. The TES data set, and the analysis here, is complimentary to previous work using isotopic ratios in precipitation; however it need not be that the simple relationships found in the precipitation data hold for the atmospheric vapor case because of the variability induced by atmospheric mixing and convection. Over tropical continents, the intensity of water vapor recycling, precipitation rates and circulation patterns are thought to dominate the seasonal isotopic composition of water vapor and rainfall. By examining and contrasting the isotopic budgets of the Amazon, north Australia, and Asian monsoon regions, we gain insight into these hydrological processes, show which processes are regionally robust, and expose those processes that are regionally unique. To establish the importance of local processes on the regional isotopic composition, we first examine the relationship between the measured isotopic composition and meteorological parameters that capture the strength of the local processes. Secondly, we use the history of condensation, evaporation and air mass mixing during transport from five-day origin locations to the local TES observations, and the isotopic ratios of vapor at both locations, to examine isotopic changes that occur upstream. Using this information, as well as a simple isotopic exchange

  5. Transport pathways of peroxyacetyl nitrate in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere from different monsoon systems during the summer monsoon season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadnavis, S.; Semeniuk, K.; Schultz, M. G.; Mahajan, A.; Pozzoli, L.; Sonbawane, S.; Kiefer, M.

    2014-08-01

    The Asian summer monsoon involves complex transport patterns with large scale redistribution of trace gases in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS). We employ the global chemistry-climate model ECHAM5-HAMMOZ in order to evaluate the transport pathways and the contributions of nitrogen oxide reservoir species PAN, NOx, and HNO3 from various monsoon regions, to the UTLS over Southern Asia and vice versa. The model is evaluated with trace gas retrievals from the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS-E) and aircraft campaigns during the monsoon season (June-September). There are three regions which contribute substantial pollution to the UTLS during the monsoon: the Asian summer monsoon (ASM), the North American Monsoon (NAM) and the West African monsoon (WAM). However, penetration due to ASM convection is deeper into the UTLS as compared to NAM and WAM outflow. The circulation in these monsoon regions distributes PAN into the tropical latitude belt in the upper troposphere. Remote transport also occurs in the extratropical upper troposphere where westerly winds drive North American and European pollutants eastward to partly merge with the ASM plume. Strong ASM convection transports these remote and regional pollutants into the lower stratosphere. In the lower stratosphere the injected pollutants are transported westward by easterly winds. The intense convective activity in the monsoon regions is associated with lightning generation and thereby the emission of NOy species. This will affect the distribution of PAN in the UTLS. The estimates of lightning produced PAN, HNO3, NOx and ozone obtained from control and lightning-off simulations shows high percentage changes over the regions of convective transport especially equatorial Africa and America and comparatively less over the ASM. This indicates higher anthropogenic pollution transport from the ASM region into the UTLS.

  6. Simulations of summer monsoon climate over East Asia with a Regional Climate Model (RegCM) using Tiedtke convective parameterization scheme (CPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yan

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we implemented the Tiedtke convective parameterization scheme (CPS) into the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) Regional Climate Model version 3 (RegCM3) and simulated the East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM) climate. A 6-year experiment was completed, from September 1996 through August 2002, and compared with an analogous experiment employing the Grell CPS option available in RegCM3. The ability of the model to represent the average climatology was investigated. Our results indicate that the Tiedtke CPS shows a generally good performance in describing surface climate and large-scale circulation throughout the summer monsoon period. Compared to the simulation with Grell CPS, the simulation with Tiedtke scheme shows a number of improvements, including a better distribution of summer monsoon precipitation due to a better positioning of the Western Pacific Subtropical High (WPSH) in the middle troposphere and the southwesterly jet in the lower troposphere, and more realistic seasonal evolution of the monsoon precipitation. The cold surface air temperature bias characteristic frequently seen in Grell scheme over this region is also reduced. Generally, the Tiedtke scheme simulates warm and wet atmospheric conditions in the middle and lower tropospheres, a result more in agreement with the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) 40 Years analysis (ERA-40). The Tiedtke scheme is more prone to activate convection in the lower troposphere than the Grell scheme due to more moist static energy available for activating and supporting the development of convection systems.

  7. On the relationship between Indian Ocean Dipole-Indian Summer Monsoon and Summer North Atlantic Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaram, S.; Stenchikov, G. L.

    2013-12-01

    Using 60 years of observed and re-analysis data sets a link between positive Indian Ocean dipole (PIOD), Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) and Summer North Atlantic Oscillation (SNAO) is proposed. When positive IOD years occur independently without Elnino the presence of positive phase of SNAO is noticed. In such cases over the Atlantic region the centers of action associated with SNAO is shifted northward leading to the change in the mean position of Atlantic jet and storm tracks. Persistence of storm tracks at the new location amounts to a stationary waves, which have a barotropic structure in the vertical. Therefore, the temperature anomalies associated with the stationary wave influences the Tropospheric Temperature (TT), which is clearly seen in the average TT anomaly, showing warming over southern Eurasia and India. This affects the north-south TT gradient in the monsoon region and influences the ISM (Goswami et al., 2006). Concurrently the local Hadley cell associated with PIOD strengthens and enhances the anomalous subsidence over the Mediterranean/Sahara region which in turn strengthens the Azores high and the hence the SNAO itself. Thus the combined influence of PIOD and SNAO produces a positive feed back mechanism for ISM. On the other hand most of the PIOD years co-occurring with Elnino years are accompanied by the negative phase of SNAO. The analysis of the atmospheric circulation clearly indicates the Pacific North American (PNA) type pattern, which negatively influence the SNAO (Huang et al., 1998). This is consistent with the observation that ISM is not enhanced in all PIOD years. The analysis of 60 years historic sea surface temperature runs with the high resolution atmospheric model shows that the model is able to reproduce these teleconnections.

  8. Residual estuarine circulation in the Mandovi, a monsoonal estuary: A three-dimensional model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijith, V.; Shetye, S. R.; Baetens, K.; Luyten, P.; Michael, G. S.

    2016-05-01

    Observations in the Mandovi estuary, located on the central west coast of India, have shown that the salinity field in this estuary is remarkably time-dependent and passes through all possible states of stratification (riverine, highly-stratified, partially-mixed and well-mixed) during a year as the runoff into the estuary varies from high values (∼1000 m3 s-1) in the wet season to negligible values (∼1 m3 s-1) at end of the dry season. The time-dependence is forced by the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) and hence the estuary is referred to as a monsoonal estuary. In this paper, we use a three-dimensional, open source, hydrodynamic, numerical model to reproduce the observed annual salinity field in the Mandovi. We then analyse the model results to define characteristics of residual estuarine circulation in the Mandovi. Our motivation to study this aspect of the Mandovi's dynamics is derived from the following three considerations. First, residual circulation is important to long-term evolution of an estuary; second, we need to understand how this circulation responds to strongly time-dependent runoff forcing experienced by a monsoonal estuary; and third, Mandovi is among the best studied estuaries that come under the influence of ISM, and has observations that can be used to validate the model. Our analysis shows that the residual estuarine circulation in the Mandovi shows four distinct phases during a year: a river like flow that is oriented downstream throughout the estuary; a salt-wedge type circulation, with flow into the estuary near the bottom and out of the estuary near the surface restricted close to the mouth of the estuary; circulation associated with a partially-mixed estuary; and, the circulation associated with a well-mixed estuary. Dimensional analysis of the field of residual circulation helped us to establish the link between strength of residual circulation at a location and magnitude of river runoff and rate of mixing at the location. We then

  9. Elevated aerosol layers and their radiative impact over Kanpur during monsoon onset period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarangi, Chandan; Tripathi, S. N.; Mishra, A. K.; Goel, A.; Welton, E. J.

    2016-07-01

    Accurate information about aerosol vertical distribution is needed to reduce uncertainties in aerosol radiative forcing and its effect on atmospheric dynamics. The present study deals with synergistic analyses of aerosol vertical distribution and aerosol optical depth (AOD) with meteorological variables using multisatellite and ground-based remote sensors over Kanpur in central Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP). Micro-Pulse Lidar Network-derived aerosol vertical extinction (σ) profiles are analyzed to quantify the interannual and daytime variations during monsoon onset period (May-June) for 2009-2011. The mean aerosol profile is broadly categorized into two layers viz., a surface layer (SL) extending up to 1.5 km (where σ decreased exponentially with height) and an elevated aerosol layer (EAL) extending between 1.5 and 5.5 km. The increase in total columnar aerosol loading is associated with relatively higher increase in contribution from EAL loading than that from SL. The mean contributions of EALs are about 60%, 51%, and 50% to total columnar AOD during 2009, 2010, and 2011, respectively. We observe distinct parabolic EALs during early morning and late evening but uniformly mixed EALs during midday. The interannual and daytime variations of EALs are mainly influenced by long-range transport and convective capacity of the local emissions, respectively. Radiative flux analysis shows that clear-sky incoming solar radiation at surface is reduced with increase in AOD, which indicates significant cooling at surface. Collocated analysis of atmospheric temperature and aerosol loading reveals that increase in AOD not only resulted in surface dimming but also reduced the temperature (˜2-3°C) of lower troposphere (below 3 km altitude). Radiative transfer simulations indicate that the reduction of incoming solar radiation at surface is mainly due to increased absorption by EALs (with increase in total AOD). The observed cooling in lower troposphere in high aerosol loading

  10. Fine particulate matter in the tropical environment: monsoonal effects, source apportionment, and health risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. F.; Latif, M. T.; Saw, W. H.; Amil, N.; Nadzir, M. S. M.; Sahani, M.; Tahir, N. M.; Chung, J. X.

    2016-01-01

    The health implications of PM2.5 in the tropical region of Southeast Asia (SEA) are significant as PM2.5 can pose serious health concerns. PM2.5 concentration and sources here are strongly influenced by changes in the monsoon regime from the south-west quadrant to the north-east quadrant in the region. In this work, PM2.5 samples were collected at a semi-urban area using a high-volume air sampler at different seasons on 24 h basis. Analysis of trace elements and water-soluble ions was performed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and ion chromatography (IC), respectively. Apportionment analysis of PM2.5 was carried out using the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) positive matrix factorization (PMF) 5.0 and a mass closure model. We quantitatively characterized the health risks posed to human populations through the inhalation of selected heavy metals in PM2.5. 48 % of the samples collected exceeded the World Health Organization (WHO) 24 h PM2.5 guideline but only 19 % of the samples exceeded 24 h US EPA National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS). The PM2.5 concentration was slightly higher during the north-east monsoon compared to south-west monsoon. The main trace metals identified were As, Pb, Cd, Ni, Mn, V, and Cr while the main ions were SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, and Na. The mass closure model identified four major sources of PM2.5 that account for 55 % of total mass balance. The four sources are mineral matter (MIN) (35 %), secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA) (11 %), sea salt (SS) (7 %), and trace elements (TE) (2 %). PMF 5.0 elucidated five potential sources: motor vehicle emissions coupled with biomass burning (31 %) were the most dominant, followed by marine/sulfate aerosol (20 %), coal burning (19 %), nitrate aerosol (17 %), and mineral/road dust (13 %). The hazard quotient (HQ) for four selected metals (Pb, As, Cd, and Ni) in PM2.5 mass was highest in PM2.5 mass from the coal burning source and least in PM2.5 mass

  11. Modelling Suspended Sediment Transport in Monsoon Season: A Case Study of Pahang River Estuary, Pahang, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakariya, Razak; Ahmad, Zuhairi; Saad, Shahbudin; Yaakop, Rosnan

    2013-04-01

    Sediment transport based on 2-dimensional real time model was applied to Pahang River estuary, Pahang, Malaysia and has been evaluated and verified with time series of tidal elevation, flow and suspended sediment load. Period of modelling was during highest high tide and lowest low tide in Northeast Monsoon (NE) which happened in December 2010 and Southwest Monsoon (SW) in July 2011. Simulated model outputs has been verify using Pearson's coefficient and has showed high accuracy. The validated model was used to simulate hydrodynamic and sediment transport of extreme conditions during both monsoon seasons. Based on field measurement and model simulation, tidal elevation and flow velocity, freshwater discharge of Pahang River were found to be higher during NE Monsoon. Based on the fluxes, the estuary also showed 'ebb-dominant' characteristic during highest high tide and lowest low tide in NE monsoon and normal ebbing-flooding characteristics during SW monsoon. In the Pahang River estuary, inflow and outflow patterns were perpendicular to the open boundary with circular flow formed at the shallow area in the middle of estuary during both monsoons. Referring to sea water intrusion from the river mouth, both seasons show penetration of more than 9 km (upstream input boundary) during higher high water tide. During higher lower water tide, the water intrusion stated varies which 5.6km during NE monsoon and 7.8km during SW monsoon. Regarding to the times lap during high tide, the sea water takes 2.8 hours to reach 9km upstream during NE monsoon compared to 1.9 hour during SW monsoon. The averages of suspended sediment concentration and suspended sediment load were higher during Northeast monsoon which increased the sedimentation potentials.Total of suspended sediment load discharged to the South China Sea yearly from Pahang River is approximately 96727.5 tonnes/day or 3.33 tonnes/km2/day which 442.6 tonnes/day during Northeast Monsoon and 25.3 tonnes/day during Southwest

  12. O the Interannual Variability of the Indian Monsoon and the Southern Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming Chin

    The mechanisms of the interannual variability of the Indian monsoon and the Southern Oscillation are investigated from observations in the Indian Ocean sector. On this diagnostic basis, a statistical forecasting scheme is developed for all-India rainfall anomalies. A good summer monsoon is characterized by the following aspects. (1) Arabian Sea: higher sea surface temperature (SST) in the pre-monsoon season but lower SST in the monsoon and post -monsoon seasons, lower sea level pressure (SLP) throughout the year, strong surface wind and more cloudiness from the pre-monsoon through the post-monsoon seasons; (2) Indian subcontinent: higher surface temperature in the pre-monsoon season but lower surface temperature afterward, decreased lower-tropospheric constant pressure topographies and higher in the North but lower in the South upper-tropospheric topographies, stronger lower-tropospheric inflow from the South and upper-tropospheric outflow toward the South, and more northward position of the upper-air ridge; and (3) Tibetan Plateau: a warm and dry concurrent summer and a warm and wet preceding winter. An early monsoon onset is heralded by oceanic -atmospheric conditions around the Indian subcontinent similar to those for a good monsoon year. However, conditions immediately following an early monsoon onset are characterized in the Arabian Sea by high SST, strong surface wind, less cloudiness, and high SLP, and in India by an anomalously cold and then warm surface environment. A cool equatorial Pacific Ocean episode of the southern Oscillation is characterized in the Indian Ocean by higher SST in the antecedent seasons but lower SST in the concurrent and following seasons, lower SLP from the preceding throughout the following seasons, stronger surface wind in the western part of the ocean but weaker surface wind in the eastern part during the summer, and more cloudiness. Both large positive values of the Southern Oscillation index and its tendency foreshadow a good

  13. Three exceptionally strong East-Asian summer monsoon events during glacial times in the past 470 kyr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, D.; Wu, N.; Pei, Y.; Li, F.

    2009-12-01

    Chinese loess sequences are interpreted as a reliable record of the past variation of the East Asian monsoon regime through the alternation of loess and paleosols units, dominated by the winter and summer monsoon respectively. Different proxies have been used to describe this system, mostly geophysical, geochemical or sedimentological. Terrestrial mollusks are also a reliable proxy of past environmental conditions and are often preserved in large numbers in loess deposits. The analysis of the mollusk remains in the Luochuan sequence, comprising L5 loess to S0 soil, i.e. the last 500 ka, shows that for almost all identified species, the abundance is higher at the base of the interval (L5 to L4) than in the younger deposits. Using the present ecological requirements of the identified mollusk species in the Luochuan sequence allows the definition of two main mollusk groups varying during the last 500 kyr. In the sequence, three events with exceptionally high abundance of the Asian summer monsoon indicators (thermal-humidiphilous mollusks) are recorded during the L5, L4 and L2 glacial intervals, i.e., at about 470, 360 and 170 kyr respectively. The L5 and L4 events appear to be the strongest (high counts). Similar variations have also been identified in E Asia to suggest that this phenomenon is regional rather than local. The L5 and L2 summer monsoons are coeval with Mediterranean sapropels S12 and S6, which characterize a strong African summer monsoon with relatively low surface water salinity in the Indian Ocean. Changes in the precipitation regime could correspond to a response to a particular astronomical configuration (low obliquity, low precession, summer solstice at perihelion) leading to an increased summer insolation gradient between the tropics and the high latitudes and resulting in enhanced atmospheric water transport from the tropics to the African and Asian continents. However, other climate drivers such as reorganization of marine and atmospheric

  14. Stable isotope ratios in rainfall and water vapour at Bangalore, Southern India during the monsoon period of 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peethambaran, Rahul; Ghosh, Prosenjit

    2015-04-01

    Rainwater and water vapour were collected during monsoon rainfall from Bangalore station to identifying the signature of moisture sources. Moisture responsible for the rainfall originates from Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal and advected to the station together with vapour generated from the local . Total no of samples includes 72 for water vapour and 81 for rainwater respectively. The mean difference between water vapour and rainwater was found to be -13.27±2.5 ‰ for δ18O, -100±9 ‰ for δD, which was calculated from monthly mean values of water vapour and rainwater. The most enriched samples of rainwater and water vapour were found during the pre monsoon months which correspond to temperature maximum at the study location. Lighter isotopic ratios were recorded in samples collected during the starting of monsoon showers which goes to further depletion in δ18O during the period of post monsoon. This was mainly due to the change in the prevailing wind direction from southwest to northeast. Local Meteoric Water Line (LMWL) generated for rainwater (d = 7.49 δ 18O + 5.2555, R² = 0.93) equation suggesting enrichment due to evaporation. Local Vapour Line (LVL) (d = 7.5248 δ 18O + 6.6534,R² = 0.8957) indicates the dominance of vapor from local source. The time series of d-xcess of rainwater and water vapor reveals large variability, coinciding with the presence of transported and local sources. It was observed that rainwater and water vapor exhibits higher values indicating re-evaporation from the region. Repetition of this feature demonstrated pattern of moisture recycling in the atmosphere and the contribution of continental evaporation and transpiration. The sensitivity of isotopes to the sudden change in wind direction was documented by an abrupt variations in the isotope values. Such changes in wind patterns were mostly associated with the prevalence of low pressure depression systems during the monsoon periods. Detailed analysis on role of wind patterns and

  15. Circumglobal wave train and the summer monsoon over South Asia: The explicit role of the surface heat low

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Sajjad; Müller, Wolfgang A.; Hagemann, Stefan; Jacob, Daniela

    2010-05-01

    This study examines the influence of mid-latitude circulation on the surface heat low and associated monsoon rainfall over South Asia using the ERA40 data. A heat low index is defined to depict the surface heat low which forms over Pakistan and adjoining areas of India, Iran and Afghanistan during the summer season. The heat low divulges significant correlations with the upper level 200 hPa geopotential height anomalies over western central Asia and East Asian region and acts as a bridge connecting the mid-latitude wave train to the Indian summer monsoon. During the positive phase of the mid-latitude circumglobal wave train, anomalous upper level high pressure develops over western central Asia. The subsidence associated with the anomalous high reduces the surface pressure in the heat low by raising the mean air temperature and anomalous uplift in the middle and lower troposphere. The increasing middle tropospheric temperature creates an inversion between the lower and upper troposphere which consequently restricts the middle and low level cloud formation above the heat low. Further, the upper level subsidence also minimizes the high cloud cover above the heat low region and hence favors more solar radiation to this area. The accruing surface heating reduces the surface pressure, resulting in further intensification of the heat low and associated monsoon circulation. Moreover, the westward accruing surface air temperature shifts the anomalous core of the heat low to the West over Iran. The westward shift in the anomalous core of the intensified heat low with its north-south orientation provokes enormous north-south pressure gradient (lower pressure over land than over sea). This in turn enables the moist southerly flow from the Arabian Sea to penetrate farther northward over northwestern India and Pakistan, where convective heating and orographic lifting expedites the convection and hence the precipitation. Composite analysis reveals a dipole teleconnection pattern

  16. Predictability of the 1997 and 1998 South Asian Summer Monsoons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, Siegfred D.; Wu, Man Li

    2000-01-01

    The predictability of the 1997 and 1998 south Asian summer monsoon winds is examined from an ensemble of 10 Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM) simulations with prescribed sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and soil moisture, The simulations are started in September 1996 so that they have lost all memory of the atmospheric initial conditions for the periods of interest. The model simulations show that the 1998 monsoon is considerably more predictable than the 1997 monsoon. During May and June of 1998 the predictability of the low-level wind anomalies is largely associated with a local response to anomalously warm Indian Ocean SSTs. Predictability increases late in the season (July and August) as a result of the strengthening of the anomalous Walker circulation and the associated development of easterly low level wind anomalies that extend westward across India and the Arabian Sea. During these months the model is also the most skillful with the observations showing a similar late-season westward extension of the easterly CD wind anomalies. The model shows little predictability or skill in the low level winds over southeast Asia during, 1997. Predictable wind anomalies do occur over the western Indian Ocean and Indonesia, however, over the Indian Ocean they are a response to SST anomalies that were wind driven and they show no skill. The reduced predictability in the low level winds during 1997 appears to be the result of a weaker (compared with 1998) simulated anomalous Walker circulation, while the reduced skill is associated with pronounced intraseasonal activity that is not well captured by the model. Remarkably, the model does produce an ensemble mean Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) response that is approximately in phase with (though weaker than) the observed MJ0 anomalies. This is consistent with the idea that SST coupling may play an important role in the MJO.

  17. Seasonal prediction of Indian summer monsoon: Sensitivity to persistent SST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sukanta Kumar; Deb, Sanjib Kumar; Kishtawal, C. M.; Pal, Pradip Kumar

    2013-10-01

    In the present study, the assessment of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) developed at National Centre for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) for seasonal forecasting of Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) with different persistent SST is reported. Towards achieving the objective, 30-year model climatology has been generated using observed SST. Upon successful simulation of climatological features of ISM, the model is tested for the simulation of ISM 2011 in forecast mode. Experiments have been conducted in three different time-phases, viz., April, May and June; using different sets of initial conditions (ICs) and the persistent SSTs of the previous months of the time-phases. The spatial as well as temporal distribution of model simulated rainfall suggest a below normal monsoon condition throughout the season in all the experiments. However, the rainfall anomaly shows some positive signature over north-east part of India in the month of June and August whereas the central Indian landmass had positive anomaly during August and September. The monthly accumulated All-India rainfall (AIR) over land for June to September 2011 are predicted to be 101% (17.6 cm), 86% (24.3 cm), 83% (21.0 cm) and 95% (15.5 cm) of normal AIR, respectively. This makes the seasonal accumulated AIR 78.4 cm which is 11% below the normal rainfall of 87.6 cm. The model prediction for the months of June and July is comparable with the observation; however, the simulation would not be able to capture the high rainfall during August and September. The intention behind this work is to assess the shortcomings in the CAM model prediction, which can later be improved for future monsoon forecast experiments.

  18. Transport pathways from the Asian monsoon anticyclone to the stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garny, Hella; Randel, William J.

    2016-03-01

    Transport pathways of air originating in the upper-tropospheric Asian monsoon anticyclone are investigated based on three-dimensional trajectories. The Asian monsoon anticyclone emerges in response to persistent deep convection over India and southeast Asia in northern summer, and this convection is associated with rapid transport from the surface to the upper troposphere and possibly into the stratosphere. Here, we investigate the fate of air that originates within the upper-tropospheric anticyclone from the outflow of deep convection, using trajectories driven by ERA-interim reanalysis data. Calculations include isentropic estimates, plus fully three-dimensional results based on kinematic and diabatic transport calculations. Isentropic calculations show that air parcels are typically confined within the anticyclone for 10-20 days and spread over the tropical belt within a month of their initialization. However, only few parcels (3 % at 360 K, 8 % at 380 K) reach the extratropical stratosphere by isentropic transport. When considering vertical transport we find that 31 % or 48 % of the trajectories reach the stratosphere within 60 days when using vertical velocities or diabatic heating rates to calculate vertical transport, respectively. In both cases, most parcels that reach the stratosphere are transported upward within the anticyclone and enter the stratosphere in the tropics, typically 10-20 days after their initialization at 360 K. This suggests that trace gases, including pollutants, that are transported into the stratosphere via the Asian monsoon system are in a position to enter the tropical pipe and thus be transported into the deep stratosphere. Sensitivity calculations with respect to the initial altitude of the trajectories showed that air needs to be transported to levels of 360 K or above by deep convection to likely (≧ 50 %) reach the stratosphere through transport by the large-scale circulation.

  19. Univariate modelling of summer-monsoon rainfall time series: Comparison between ARIMA and ARNN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Surajit; Chattopadhyay, Goutami

    2010-02-01

    The present article reports studies to develop a univariate model to forecast the summer monsoon (June-August) rainfall over India. Based on the data pertaining to the period 1871-1999, the trend and stationarity within the time series have been investigated. After revealing the randomness and non-stationarity within the time series, the autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models have been attempted and the ARIMA(0,1,1) has been identified as a suitable representative model. Consequently, an autoregressive neural network (ARNN) model has been attempted and the neural network has been trained as a multilayer perceptron with the extensive variable selection procedure. Sigmoid non-linearity has been used while training the network. Finally, a three-three-one architecture of the ARNN model has been obtained and after thorough statistical analysis the supremacy of ARNN has been established over ARIMA(0,1,1). The usefulness of ARIMA(0,1,1) has also been described.

  20. A composite study of onset of the Australian summer monsoon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendon, Harry H.; Liebmann, Brant

    1990-01-01

    The circulation changes that accompany an onset (defined as the first occurrence of wet 850-mb westerly winds at Darwin, Australia) of the Australian summer monsoon are documented by a composite study for the years 1957-1987. Composites of atmospheric fields at stations in and about the Australian tropics are constructed relative to the onset data at Darwin. It is shown that the composite onset is dominated by a slow eastward migration of a deep-baroclinic convective circulation displaced south of the equator. This propagating anomaly exhibited many features of the so-called 40-50 day oscillation, including an upper level anticyclone that accompanies the convective anomaly.

  1. Extended Range Prediction of Indian Summer Monsoon: Current status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, A. K.; Abhilash, S.; Borah, N.; Joseph, S.; Chattopadhyay, R.; S, S.; Rajeevan, M.; Mandal, R.; Dey, A.

    2014-12-01

    The main focus of this study is to develop forecast consensus in the extended range prediction (ERP) of monsoon Intraseasonal oscillations using a suit of different variants of Climate Forecast system (CFS) model. In this CFS based Grand MME prediction system (CGMME), the ensemble members are generated by perturbing the initial condition and using different configurations of CFSv2. This is to address the role of different physical mechanisms known to have control on the error growth in the ERP in the 15-20 day time scale. The final formulation of CGMME is based on 21 ensembles of the standalone Global Forecast System (GFS) forced with bias corrected forecasted SST from CFS, 11 low resolution CFST126 and 11 high resolution CFST382. Thus, we develop the multi-model consensus forecast for the ERP of Indian summer monsoon (ISM) using a suite of different variants of CFS model. This coordinated international effort lead towards the development of specific tailor made regional forecast products over Indian region. Skill of deterministic and probabilistic categorical rainfall forecast as well the verification of large-scale low frequency monsoon intraseasonal oscillations has been carried out using hindcast from 2001-2012 during the monsoon season in which all models are initialized at every five days starting from 16May to 28 September. The skill of deterministic forecast from CGMME is better than the best participating single model ensemble configuration (SME). The CGMME approach is believed to quantify the uncertainty in both initial conditions and model formulation. Main improvement is attained in probabilistic forecast which is because of an increase in the ensemble spread, thereby reducing the error due to over-confident ensembles in a single model configuration. For probabilistic forecast, three tercile ranges are determined by ranking method based on the percentage of ensemble members from all the participating models falls in those three categories. CGMME further

  2. The dominant intraseasonal mode of intraseasonal South Asian summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Ravi P.

    2014-01-01

    From June through September, the intraseasonal variability of the Asian summer monsoon is dominated by the so-called "monsoon intraseasonal oscillation (MISO)." This paper provides a comprehensive description of the MISO based on outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) data. The MISO is characterized by alternating active periods, in which the primary rain area of the Asian summer monsoon that stretches from the northern Arabian Sea east southeastward almost all the way to the northwest Pacific Intertropical Convergence Zone is relatively intense, and break periods, in which the heaviest rainfall shifts from south Asia to the central and eastern equatorial Indian Ocean. The MISO is attended by well-defined but weak sea surface temperature (SST) perturbations whose phase is indicative of a negative feedback upon the atmospheric perturbations. Meridional profile of variables on the various regression maps shown in this paper averaged along a set of tilted axes parallel to the west-northwest to east-southeast (WNW-ESE) sloping lines in empirical orthogonal function 1 of OLR have been made, and it is found that the strongest westerly 850 hPa wind anomalies are located two grid points (5° of latitude) to the south of the reference latitude. At the 150 hPa level, the meridional profile of divergence is closely aligned with the OLR profile. SST profile is lowest at approximately 2.5° of latitude to the south of the minimum OLR and 2.5° to the north of the strongest westerly 850 hPa wind anomalies. The sea level pressure profiles and the midlower tropospheric geopotential height profiles are almost in phase. It is observed that in most years, there are two-three bands of intensified and suppressed rainfall that cross the reference line from south to north (northward propagating) at the interval of 30-60 days over South Asia. The degree of correspondence between the MISO and active and break spells of the Indian summer monsoon rainfall is also documented.

  3. Linking hemispheric radiation budgets, ITCZ shifts, and monsoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGee, D.; Donohoe, A.; Marshall, J.; Ferreira, D.

    2014-12-01

    We explore the relationship between the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), hemispheric heat budgets, and monsoon strength in past climates. Modern seasonal and interannual variability in the globally-averaged position of the ITCZ (as estimated by the tropical precipitation centroid) reflects the interhemispheric heat balance, with the ITCZ's displacement toward the warmer hemisphere directly proportional to atmospheric heat transport into the cooler hemisphere. Model simulations suggest that ITCZ shifts are likely to have obeyed the same relationship with interhemispheric heat transport in response to past changes in orbital parameters, ice sheets, and ocean circulation. This relationship implies that even small (±1 degree) shifts in the mean (annually and zonally averaged) ITCZ require large changes in hemispheric heat budgets, placing tight bounds on mean ITCZ shifts in past climates. To test this energetic argument, we use the observed relationship between mean ITCZ position and tropical sea surface temperature (SST) gradients in combination with proxy-based estimates of past SST gradients to show that mean ITCZ shifts for the mid-Holocene, Heinrich Stadial 1 and Last Glacial Maximum are not likely to have been more than 1 degree latitude from its present mean position. In exploring these results, we provide brief descriptions of the estimated radiation budgets of past climates that help demonstrate how different climate forcings change the interhemispheric heat balance and thus the ITCZ's global-mean position. We also address the seeming inconsistency between the small ITCZ shifts indicated by energetic constraints and the large changes in monsoon rainfall suggested by proxy data. We compare global-average and regional-scale tropical precipitation in observations and explore their responses to a variety of forcings (orbital changes, ice sheets, hosing) in models. These comparisons make clear that monsoon precipitation can change substantially even in the

  4. Isotopic cycling in a tropical treeline environment: North American monsoon dynamics at Nevado de Colima, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartsough, Peter Christopher

    temperature rising above 3.6°C well before the onset of the monsoon, while growth continues in response to the arrival of monsoon precipitation and the associated rise in relative humidity. Monitoring has better characterized the climate that is being recorded physically and chemically by the trees. Both carbon and oxygen isotopes have shown sensitivity to vapor pressure deficit (VPD), a good surrogate for changes in gas exchange boundary conditions at the leaf surface, in addition to changes in temperature and photoperiod. High temporal resolution measurement of tree growth led to the development of a growth model used to facilitate interpretation of spatial patterns in stable isotope records recorded by the trees. To this end, we have also undertaken an isotope-sampling program to characterize changes in the seasonal isotope signal of water available to the trees. Two samplers for precipitation chemistry analysis were added to the weather station in March 2003. Bi-annual sampling of soil, stem and leaf water, have characterized the isotopic path of the water as it moves through the soil/tree continuum and is eventually incorporated into wood as cellulose. Precipitation was sampled over two seasons, 2004 and 2005 during the course of the monsoon and these values were used as input parameters for modeling the path taken from precipitation to cellulose at the site. The model was calibrated using high resolution (30mum) sampling of wood from the site over a four year period. These monitoring efforts have contributed to a more complete understanding of the phenology of high elevation trees with application to other tropical sites. Much of the tree the growth in the period 2002-2005 took place before the onset of the monsoon ranging from 33% in 2002 to 70% in 2005, a year when the Monsoon arrived late. Stable isotope analysis of tree ring cellulose have also been employed to generate measures of past climate variability and processes over a longer timescale. Stable isotopic

  5. Examining Spatio-Temporal Intensity-Frequency Variations in Extreme Monsoon Rainfall using High Resolution Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devak, M.; Rajendran, V.; C T, D.

    2015-12-01

    The study of extreme events has gained the attention of hydrologists in recent times. Though these events are rare, the effects are catastrophic. It is reported that the frequency of the occurrence of these events has increased in recent decades, and is attributed to the recent revelation of climate change. Numerous studies have pointed out significant changes in extremely heavy precipitation over India, using coarse resolution data. Though there are disagreements in the results and its spatial uniformity, all these studies emphasize the need of fine resolution analysis. Fine resolution analysis is necessary mainly due to the highly heterogeneous characteristics of Indian monsoon, and for the proper employment in flood hazard preparedness and water resources management. The present study aims to analyse the spatio-temporal variation and trends in the intensity and frequency of heavy precipitation during Indian monsoon using 0.25°×0.25° resolution gridded data for a period of 113 years (1901-2013). The exceedance threshold is fixed at 90th percentile of rainfall over 113 years and parameters are defined accordingly. The maximum intensity of each extreme rainfall episode of 30 year moving window has been modelled using Peak Over Threshold based Extreme Value Theory to compute return level (considered for intensity). In addition, the number of such episodes in a particular year has been termed as frequency. Non-parametric Mann-Kendall test has been carried out for both intensity and frequency, to compute the statistical trend. In addition, moving block bootstrap approach has been used to incorporate the serial correlation. The significance of the trend has been evaluated at different significance levels and finally, change in trend over last century has been examined.

  6. A persistent northern boundary of Indian Summer Monsoon precipitation over Central Asia during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramisch, Arne; Lockot, Gregori; Haberzettl, Torsten; Hartmann, Kai; Kuhn, Gerhard; Lehmkuhl, Frank; Schimpf, Stefan; Schulte, Philipp; Stauch, Georg; Wang, Rong; Wünnemann, Bernd; Yan, Dada; Zhang, Yongzhan; Diekmann, Bernhard

    2016-05-01

    Extra-tropical circulation systems impede poleward moisture advection by the Indian Summer Monsoon. In this context, the Himalayan range is believed to insulate the south Asian circulation from extra-tropical influences and to delineate the northern extent of the Indian Summer Monsoon in central Asia. Paleoclimatic evidence, however, suggests increased moisture availability in the Early Holocene north of the Himalayan range which is attributed to an intensification of the Indian Summer Monsoon. Nevertheless, mechanisms leading to a surpassing of the Himalayan range and the northern maximum extent of summer monsoonal influence remain unknown. Here we show that the Kunlun barrier on the northern Tibetan Plateau [~36°N] delimits Indian Summer Monsoon precipitation during the Holocene. The presence of the barrier relocates the insulation effect 1,000 km further north, allowing a continental low intensity branch of the Indian Summer Monsoon which is persistent throughout the Holocene. Precipitation intensities at its northern extent seem to be driven by differentiated solar heating of the Northern Hemisphere indicating dependency on energy-gradients rather than absolute radiation intensities. The identified spatial constraints of monsoonal precipitation will facilitate the prediction of future monsoonal precipitation patterns in Central Asia under varying climatic conditions.

  7. A persistent northern boundary of Indian Summer Monsoon precipitation over Central Asia during the Holocene.

    PubMed

    Ramisch, Arne; Lockot, Gregori; Haberzettl, Torsten; Hartmann, Kai; Kuhn, Gerhard; Lehmkuhl, Frank; Schimpf, Stefan; Schulte, Philipp; Stauch, Georg; Wang, Rong; Wünnemann, Bernd; Yan, Dada; Zhang, Yongzhan; Diekmann, Bernhard

    2016-05-13

    Extra-tropical circulation systems impede poleward moisture advection by the Indian Summer Monsoon. In this context, the Himalayan range is believed to insulate the south Asian circulation from extra-tropical influences and to delineate the northern extent of the Indian Summer Monsoon in central Asia. Paleoclimatic evidence, however, suggests increased moisture availability in the Early Holocene north of the Himalayan range which is attributed to an intensification of the Indian Summer Monsoon. Nevertheless, mechanisms leading to a surpassing of the Himalayan range and the northern maximum extent of summer monsoonal influence remain unknown. Here we show that the Kunlun barrier on the northern Tibetan Plateau [~36°N] delimits Indian Summer Monsoon precipitation during the Holocene. The presence of the barrier relocates the insulation effect 1,000 km further north, allowing a continental low intensity branch of the Indian Summer Monsoon which is persistent throughout the Holocene. Precipitation intensities at its northern extent seem to be driven by differentiated solar heating of the Northern Hemisphere indicating dependency on energy-gradients rather than absolute radiation intensities. The identified spatial constraints of monsoonal precipitation will facilitate the prediction of future monsoonal precipitation patterns in Central Asia under varying climatic conditions.

  8. A brief survey on climate change effects on the Indian Monsoon

    SciTech Connect

    Bala, G

    2007-02-06

    Each year, Indian summer monsoon season begins in June and ends in September. Surface winds blow from the southwest during this season. The Indian summer monsoon typically covers large areas of India with western and central India receiving more than 90% of their total annual precipitation during this period, and southern and northwestern India receiving 50%-75% of their total annual rainfall. Overall, monthly totals average 200-300 mm over the country as a whole, with the largest values observed during the heart of the monsoon season in July and August. In all total, India receives about 870 mm of rainfall in a normal summer monsoon season. This summary discusses the effects of climate change on the frequency, mean rainfall, duration and the variability of the Indian Monsoon. East Asian Monsoon in the southeastern part of Asia is not discussed in this summary. Changes in monsoon characteristics are mainly inferred from climate model simulations submitted to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)'s Fourth Assessment Report (AR4). It should be cautioned that there is a large range in the results from these models. For instance, the range of mean monsoon precipitation as simulated by the AR4 models over India is from 500 mm to 900 mm for the present-day climate (Kirpalani et al. 2006).

  9. The Response of the North American Monsoon to Increased Greenhouse Gas Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, B. I.; Seager, R.

    2013-01-01

    [1] We analyze the response of the North American Monsoon (NAM) to increased greenhouse gas (GHG) forcing (emissions scenario RCP 8.5) using new simulations available through the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project version 5 (CMIP5). Changes in total monsoon season rainfall with GHG warming are small and insignificant. The models do, however, show significant declines in early monsoon season precipitation (June-July) and increases in late monsoon season (September-October) precipitation, indicating a shift in seasonality toward delayed onset and withdrawal of the monsoon. Early in the monsoon season, tropospheric warming increases vertical stability, reinforced by reductions in available surface moisture, inhibiting precipitation and delaying the onset of the monsoon. By the end of the monsoon season, moisture convergence is sufficient to overcome the warming induced stability increases, and precipitation is enhanced. Even with no change in total NAM rainfall, shifts in the seasonal distribution of precipitation within the NAM region are still likely to have significant societal and ecological consequences, reinforcing the need to not only understand the magnitude, but also the timing, of future precipitation changes.

  10. A persistent northern boundary of Indian Summer Monsoon precipitation over Central Asia during the Holocene.

    PubMed

    Ramisch, Arne; Lockot, Gregori; Haberzettl, Torsten; Hartmann, Kai; Kuhn, Gerhard; Lehmkuhl, Frank; Schimpf, Stefan; Schulte, Philipp; Stauch, Georg; Wang, Rong; Wünnemann, Bernd; Yan, Dada; Zhang, Yongzhan; Diekmann, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Extra-tropical circulation systems impede poleward moisture advection by the Indian Summer Monsoon. In this context, the Himalayan range is believed to insulate the south Asian circulation from extra-tropical influences and to delineate the northern extent of the Indian Summer Monsoon in central Asia. Paleoclimatic evidence, however, suggests increased moisture availability in the Early Holocene north of the Himalayan range which is attributed to an intensification of the Indian Summer Monsoon. Nevertheless, mechanisms leading to a surpassing of the Himalayan range and the northern maximum extent of summer monsoonal influence remain unknown. Here we show that the Kunlun barrier on the northern Tibetan Plateau [~36°N] delimits Indian Summer Monsoon precipitation during the Holocene. The presence of the barrier relocates the insulation effect 1,000 km further north, allowing a continental low intensity branch of the Indian Summer Monsoon which is persistent throughout the Holocene. Precipitation intensities at its northern extent seem to be driven by differentiated solar heating of the Northern Hemisphere indicating dependency on energy-gradients rather than absolute radiation intensities. The identified spatial constraints of monsoonal precipitation will facilitate the prediction of future monsoonal precipitation patterns in Central Asia under varying climatic conditions. PMID:27173918

  11. A persistent northern boundary of Indian Summer Monsoon precipitation over Central Asia during the Holocene

    PubMed Central

    Ramisch, Arne; Lockot, Gregori; Haberzettl, Torsten; Hartmann, Kai; Kuhn, Gerhard; Lehmkuhl, Frank; Schimpf, Stefan; Schulte, Philipp; Stauch, Georg; Wang, Rong; Wünnemann, Bernd; Yan, Dada; Zhang, Yongzhan; Diekmann, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Extra-tropical circulation systems impede poleward moisture advection by the Indian Summer Monsoon. In this context, the Himalayan range is believed to insulate the south Asian circulation from extra-tropical influences and to delineate the northern extent of the Indian Summer Monsoon in central Asia. Paleoclimatic evidence, however, suggests increased moisture availability in the Early Holocene north of the Himalayan range which is attributed to an intensification of the Indian Summer Monsoon. Nevertheless, mechanisms leading to a surpassing of the Himalayan range and the northern maximum extent of summer monsoonal influence remain unknown. Here we show that the Kunlun barrier on the northern Tibetan Plateau [~36°N] delimits Indian Summer Monsoon precipitation during the Holocene. The presence of the barrier relocates the insulation effect 1,000 km further north, allowing a continental low intensity branch of the Indian Summer Monsoon which is persistent throughout the Holocene. Precipitation intensities at its northern extent seem to be driven by differentiated solar heating of the Northern Hemisphere indicating dependency on energy-gradients rather than absolute radiation intensities. The identified spatial constraints of monsoonal precipitation will facilitate the prediction of future monsoonal precipitation patterns in Central Asia under varying climatic conditions. PMID:27173918

  12. Assessment of CMIP5 Model Simulation of the North American Monsoon System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geil, K. L.; Serra, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The ability of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) models to simulate the North American Monsoon System (NAMS) over the historical period of 1979-2005 is examined using a core NAMS domain centered on the Sierra Madre Occidental in northern Mexico. Root mean square error, bias, and phase lag are used to assess the amplitude and phasing of the annual cycle of precipitation at monthly time resolution and results show some improvement over the CMIP3 suite of models. A more detailed evaluation of monsoon season phasing uses daily precipitation magnitude and duration threshold criteria to define yearly monsoon onset and retreat dates for each model. Results reveal that monsoon onset is generally well-captured, while monsoon retreat is poorly captured, as most models produce excessive fall and winter precipitation causing a muddled transition from the monsoon to post-monsoon season in the daily precipitation field. Large-scale field composites of models with the best and worst simulations of onset and retreat provide insight as to the causes of well-simulated onset and poorly-simulated retreat. Model simulation of the NAMS in the future is briefly discussed with an emphasis on the cautious use of models for monsoon projections.

  13. Simulations of the Asian monsoon using a regionally coupled-global model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Ravi P.; Kinter, James L.

    2015-02-01

    This study examines the simulation of June-September mean of the Asian monsoon in three different numerical experiments with a global climate model in which the atmosphere and ocean are coupled (coupled general circulation model, CGCM), regionally coupled ("Pacemaker"), and with specified sea surface temperature as in the Atmospheric Model Inter-comparison Project (AMIP) applied to a global atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM). The main features of the climatology for wind at 850 hPa, rainfall and zonal wind shear (U200-U850 hPa) over the South China Sea, subtropical western Pacific and Arabian Sea regions are remarkably well simulated in the Pacemaker experiment, compared with observations, whereas the CGCM and AGCM experiments either underestimate or overestimate magnitude of anomalies. The observed relationships between NINO3.4 (an index of El Niño and the Southern Oscillation, ENSO) and the Indian summer monsoon indices are remarkably better captured in the Pacemaker experiment than in the CGCM or AGCM/AMIP experiments. The pattern correlations between the first empirical orthogonal function (EOF) of the model simulations and that of the observed precipitation is higher in the Pacemaker experiment than in the CGCM or AGCM experiments over a large region (40°E-80°W, 20°S-30°N). The temporal correlation between the first principal component of the model simulation and the observations is also higher for the Pacemaker experiment than for the AGCM experiment. The northward/eastward propagation features and the spectral peaks (30-60 days) of rainfall are significantly more realistically captured by Pacemaker in comparison to CGCM and AGCM/AMIP. Based on the correlation coefficient between seasonal and pentad EOF1 and the related composite analysis, we have found that the Pacemaker is able to reproduce the relationship between the intraseasonal and interannual variability of the South Asian monsoon. The observed improvement in simulation in the Pacemaker

  14. Interaction of the terrestrial and atmospheric hydrological cycles in the context of the North American southwest summer monsoon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    Work under this grant has used information on precipitation and water vapor fluxes in the area of the Mexican Monsoon to analyze the regional precipitation climatology, to understand the nature of water vapor transport during the monsoon using model and observational data, and to analyze the ability of the TRMM remote sensing algorithm to characterize precipitation. An algorithm for estimating daily surface rain volumes from hourly GOES infrared images was developed and compared to radar data. Estimates were usually within a factor of two, but different linear relations between satellite reflectances and rainfall rate were obtained for each day, storm type and storm development stage. This result suggests that using TRMM sensors to calibrate other satellite IR will need to be a complex process taking into account all three of the above factors. Another study, this one of the space-time variability of the Mexican Monsoon, indicate that TRMM will have a difficult time, over the course of its expected three year lifetime, identifying the diurnal cycle of precipitation over monsoon region. Even when considering monthly rainfalls, projected satellite estimates of August rainfall show a root mean square error of 38 percent. A related examination of spatial variability of mean monthly rainfall using a novel method for removing the effects of elevation from gridded gauge data, show wide variation from a satellite-based rainfall estimates for the same time and space resolution. One issue addressed by our research, relating to the basic character of the monsoon circulation, is the determination of the source region for moisture. The monthly maps produced from our study of monsoon variability show the presence of two rainfall maxima in the analysis normalized to sea level, one in south-central Arizona associated with the Mexican monsoon maximum and one in southeastern New Mexico associated with the Gulf of Mexico. From the point of view of vertically-integrated fluxes and

  15. Reanalysis Study of the North American Monsoon and its Effect on Convective Injection of Water Vapor from the Troposphere to the Stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, C.; Leroy, S. S.; Anderson, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    The presence of elevated stratospheric water vapor concentrations poses significant consequences for stratospheric ozone. With high concentrations of water vapor at low temperatures, inorganic chlorine can enter a heterogeneous chemical regime in which it becomes processed into the chlorine radical. The chlorine radical drives the catalytic destruction of ozone in the stratosphere. Historically the intersection of low temperatures and high water vapor concentrations has been isolated to the polar vortexes. However, convection over the mid-latitude United States has been observed in isotopic data to inject water vapor from the troposphere into the stratosphere (Hanisco et al. 2007). The consequent elevated levels of stratospheric water vapor may lead to catalytic destruction of stratospheric ozone in the mid-latitudes thereupon resulting in increased UV exposure at the Earth's surface and increased risk to public health (Anderson et al. 2012). It is therefore critical to identify the climatology of the stratosphere that may exacerbate or mitigate the elevated water vapor conditions. Specifically we investigate the North American monsoon and its effect on perpetuating conditions of high water vapor concentrations. An analysis of relative vorticity from the ERA-interim and MERRA reanalyses over the United States from 2000 to 2013 reveal the consistent formation of the monsoon during the months of July and August and frequently June. An examination of circulation during the same time period allows us to estimate the monsoon's stability. Furthermore, using potential vorticity as a tracer we see further evidence of the monsoon's effect on keeping moist air masses over the United States. Finally, the analyzed dynamics of the North American Monsoon may explain the fact that NEXRAD observations of convective injection of water occur most strongly in the Spring months while the EOS MLS instrument detects the majority of high water vapor observations during the Summer months.

  16. Transport pathways of peroxyacetyl nitrate in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere from different monsoon systems during the summer monsoon season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadnavis, S.; Semeniuk, K.; Schultz, M. G.; Kiefer, M.; Mahajan, A.; Pozzoli, L.; Sonbawane, S.

    2015-06-01

    The Asian summer monsoon involves complex transport patterns with large scale redistribution of trace gases in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS). We employ the global chemistry-climate model ECHAM5-HAMMOZ in order to evaluate the transport pathways and the contributions of nitrogen oxide species PAN, NOx, and HNO3 from various monsoon regions, to the UTLS over Southern Asia and vice versa. Simulated long term seasonal mean mixing ratios are compared with trace gas retrievals from the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding aboard ENVISAT(MIPAS-E) and aircraft campaigns during the monsoon season (June-September) in order to evaluate the model's ability to reproduce these transport patterns. The model simulations show that there are three regions which contribute substantial pollution to the South Asian UTLS: the Asian summer monsoon (ASM), the North American Monsoon (NAM) and the West African monsoon (WAM). However, penetration due to ASM convection reaches deeper into the UTLS as compared to NAM and WAM outflow. The circulation in all three monsoon regions distributes PAN into the tropical latitude belt in the upper troposphere. Remote transport also occurs in the extratropical upper troposphere where westerly winds drive North American and European pollutants eastward where they can become part of the ASM convection and be lifted into the lower stratosphere. In the lower stratosphere the injected pollutants are transported westward by easterly winds. The intense convective activity in the monsoon regions is associated with lightning and thereby the formation of additional NOx. This also affects the distribution of PAN in the UTLS. According to sensitivity simulations with and without lightning, increase in concentrations of PAN (~ 40%), HNO3 (75%), NOx (70%) and ozone (30%) over the regions of convective transport, especially over equatorial Africa and America and comparatively less over the ASM. This indicates that PAN in the

  17. The aerosol-monsoon climate system of Asia: A new paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, William K. M.

    2016-02-01

    This commentary is based on a series of recent lectures on aerosol-monsoon interactions I gave at the Beijing Normal University in August 2015. A main theme of the lectures is on a new paradigm of "An Aerosol-Monsoon-Climate-System", which posits that aerosol, like rainfall, cloud, and wind, is an integral component of the monsoon climate system, influencing monsoon weather and climate on all timescales. Here, salient issues discussed in my lectures and my personal perspective regarding interactions between atmospheric dynamics and aerosols from both natural and anthropogenic sources are summarized. My hope is that under this new paradigm, we can break down traditional disciplinary barriers, advance a deeper understanding of weather and climate in monsoon regions, as well as entrain a new generation of geoscientists to strive for a sustainable future for one of the most complex and challenging human-natural climate sub-system of the earth.

  18. Orbital Asian summer monsoon dynamics revealed using an isotope-enabled global climate model.

    PubMed

    Caley, Thibaut; Roche, Didier M; Renssen, Hans

    2014-01-01

    The Asian summer monsoon dynamics at the orbital scale are a subject of considerable debate. The validity of Asian speleothem δ(18)O records as a proxy for summer monsoon intensity is questioned together with the ultimate forcing and timing of the monsoon. Here, using the results of a 150,000-year transient simulation including water isotopes, we demonstrate that Asian speleothem δ(18)O records are not a valid proxy for summer monsoon intensity only at the orbital timescale. Rather, our results show that these records reflect annual variations in hydrologic processes and circulation regime over a large part of the Indo-Asian region. Our results support the role of internal forcing, such as sea surface temperature in the equatorial Pacific, to modulate the timing of monsoon precipitation recorded in paleo-proxies inside the Asian region.

  19. Orbital Asian summer monsoon dynamics revealed using an isotope-enabled global climate model.

    PubMed

    Caley, Thibaut; Roche, Didier M; Renssen, Hans

    2014-01-01

    The Asian summer monsoon dynamics at the orbital scale are a subject of considerable debate. The validity of Asian speleothem δ(18)O records as a proxy for summer monsoon intensity is questioned together with the ultimate forcing and timing of the monsoon. Here, using the results of a 150,000-year transient simulation including water isotopes, we demonstrate that Asian speleothem δ(18)O records are not a valid proxy for summer monsoon intensity only at the orbital timescale. Rather, our results show that these records reflect annual variations in hydrologic processes and circulation regime over a large part of the Indo-Asian region. Our results support the role of internal forcing, such as sea surface temperature in the equatorial Pacific, to modulate the timing of monsoon precipitation recorded in paleo-proxies inside the Asian region. PMID:25373794

  20. Glacial aridity in central Indonesia coeval with intensified monsoon circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konecky, Bronwen; Russell, James; Bijaksana, Satria

    2016-03-01

    The Last Glacial Maximum was cool and dry over the Indo-Pacific Warm Pool (IPWP), a key region driving global oceanic-atmospheric circulation. Both low- and high-latitude teleconnections with insolation, ice sheets, and sea level have been suggested to explain the pervasive aridity observed in paleoecological and geomorphic data. However, proxies tracking the H- and O-isotopic composition of rainfall (e.g., speleothems, sedimentary biomarkers) suggest muted aridity or even wetter conditions than the present, complicating interpretations of glacial IPWP climate. Here we use multiproxy reconstructions from lake sediments and modern rainfall isotopic measurements from central Indonesia to show that, contrary to the classical "amount effect," intensified Australian-Indonesian monsoon circulation drove lighter H- and O-isotopic composition of IPWP rainfall during the LGM, while at the same time, dry conditions prevailed. Precipitation isotopes are particularly sensitive to the apparent increase in monsoon circulation and perhaps also decreased moisture residence time implied by our data, explaining contrasts among proxy records while illuminating glacial IPWP atmospheric circulation, a key target for climate models.

  1. Asian monsoon extremes and humanity's response over the past millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, B. M.; Lieberman, V. B.; Zottoli, B.

    2012-12-01

    The first decade of the 21st century has seen significant development in the production of paleo proxies for the Asian monsoon, exemplified by the Monsoon Asian Drought Atlas that was comprised of more than 300 tree ring chronologies. Noteworthy among them is the Vietnamese cypress tree-ring record which reveals that the two worst droughts of the past 7 centuries, each more than a decade in length, coincided with the demise of the Khmer civilization at Angkor in the early 15th century CE. The 18th century was nearly as tumultuous a period across Southeast Asia, where several polities fell against a backdrop of epic decadal-scale droughts. At this time all of the region's charter states saw rapid realignment in the face of drought, famine, disease and a raft of related and unrelated social issues. Several other droughts, some more extreme but of lesser duration, punctuate the past millennium, but appear to have had little societal impact. Historical documentation is being used not only to provide corroborative evidence of tree-ring reconstructed climate extremes, but to attempt to understand the dynamics of the coupled human-natural systems involved, and to define what kinds of thresholds need to be reached before societies respond. This paleo perspective can assist our analyses of the role of climate extremes in the collapse or disruption of regional societies, a subject of increasing concern given the uncertainties surrounding projections for future climate across the highly populated areas of Asia.

  2. The abrupt onset of the modern South Asian Monsoon winds.

    PubMed

    Betzler, Christian; Eberli, Gregor P; Kroon, Dick; Wright, James D; Swart, Peter K; Nath, Bejugam Nagender; Alvarez-Zarikian, Carlos A; Alonso-García, Montserrat; Bialik, Or M; Blättler, Clara L; Guo, Junhua Adam; Haffen, Sébastien; Horozal, Senay; Inoue, Mayuri; Jovane, Luigi; Lanci, Luca; Laya, Juan Carlos; Mee, Anna Ling Hui; Lüdmann, Thomas; Nakakuni, Masatoshi; Niino, Kaoru; Petruny, Loren M; Pratiwi, Santi D; Reijmer, John J G; Reolid, Jesús; Slagle, Angela L; Sloss, Craig R; Su, Xiang; Yao, Zhengquan; Young, Jeremy R

    2016-07-20

    The South Asian Monson (SAM) is one of the most intense climatic elements yet its initiation and variations are not well established. Dating the deposits of SAM wind-driven currents in IODP cores from the Maldives yields an age of 12. 9 Ma indicating an abrupt SAM onset, over a short period of 300 kyrs. This coincided with the Indian Ocean Oxygen Minimum Zone expansion as revealed by geochemical tracers and the onset of upwelling reflected by the sediment's content of particulate organic matter. A weaker 'proto-monsoon' existed between 12.9 and 25 Ma, as mirrored by the sedimentary signature of dust influx. Abrupt SAM initiation favors a strong influence of climate in addition to the tectonic control, and we propose that the post Miocene Climate Optimum cooling, together with increased continentalization and establishment of the bipolar ocean circulation, i.e. the beginning of the modern world, shifted the monsoon over a threshold towards the modern system.

  3. Forecasting of monsoon heavy rains: challenges in NWP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Kuldeep; Ashrit, Raghavendra; Iyengar, Gopal; Bhatla, R.; Rajagopal, E. N.

    2016-05-01

    Last decade has seen a tremendous improvement in the forecasting skill of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. This is attributed to increased sophistication in NWP models, which resolve complex physical processes, advanced data assimilation, increased grid resolution and satellite observations. However, prediction of heavy rains is still a challenge since the models exhibit large error in amounts as well as spatial and temporal distribution. Two state-of-art NWP models have been investigated over the Indian monsoon region to assess their ability in predicting the heavy rainfall events. The unified model operational at National Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (NCUM) and the unified model operational at the Australian Bureau of Meteorology (Australian Community Climate and Earth-System Simulator -- Global (ACCESS-G)) are used in this study. The recent (JJAS 2015) Indian monsoon season witnessed 6 depressions and 2 cyclonic storms which resulted in heavy rains and flooding. The CRA method of verification allows the decomposition of forecast errors in terms of error in the rainfall volume, pattern and location. The case by case study using CRA technique shows that contribution to the rainfall errors come from pattern and displacement is large while contribution due to error in predicted rainfall volume is least.

  4. Impact of irrigation on the South Asian summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Fahad; Hagemann, Stefan; Jacob, Daniela

    2009-10-01

    The Indian subcontinent is one of the most intensely irrigated regions of the world and state of the art climate models do not account for the representation of irrigation. Sensitivity studies with the regional climate model REMO show distinct feedbacks between the simulation of the monsoon circulation with and without irrigation processes. We find that the temperature and mean sea level pressure, where the standard REMO version without irrigation shows a significant bias over the areas of Indus basin, is highly sensitive to the water used for irrigation. In our sensitivity test we find that removal of this bias has caused less differential heating between land and sea masses. This in turns reduces the westerlies entering into land from Arabian Sea, hence creating conditions favorable for currents from Bay of Bengal to intrude deep into western India and Pakistan that have been unrealistically suppressed before. We conclude that the representation of irrigated water is unavoidable for realistic simulation of south Asian summer monsoon and its response under global warming.

  5. Interannual variation of East Asian Winter Monsoon and ENSO

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yi; Sperber, Kenneth R.; Boyle, James S.

    1996-12-01

    This paper examines the interannual variation of the East Asian winter monsoon and its relationship with EJSO based on the 1979-1995 NCEP/NCAR reanalysis. Two stratifications of cold surges are used. The first one, described as the conventional cold surges, indicates that the surge frequency reaches a urn one year after El Nino events. The second one, originated from the same region as the first, is defined as the maximum wind events near the South China Sea. The variation of this stratification of surges is found to be in good agreement with the South Oscillation Index (SOI). Low SOI (high SOI) events coincide with years of low (high) surge frequency. The interannual variation of averaged meridional wind near the South China Sea and western Pacific is dominated by the South China Sea cold surges, and is also well correlated (R--O.82) with the SOI. Strong wind seasons are associated with La Nina and high SOI events; likewise, weak wind years are linked with El Nino and low SOI cases. This pattern is restricted north of the equator within the region of (OON-20 N, 11OOE-1300E), and is confined to the near surface layer. The surface Siberian high, 500 hPa trough and 200 hPa jetstream, all representing the large-scale monsoon flow, are found to be weaker than normal during El Nino years. In particular, the interannual variation of the Siberian high is in general agreement with the SOL.

  6. Transport of sulfonamide antibiotics in small fields during monsoon season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. Y.; Huwe, B.; Kolb, A.; Tenhunen, J.

    2012-04-01

    Transport and fate of 3 sulfonamide antibiotics (sulfamethoxazole, sulfadimethoxine and sulfamethazine) were studied in small agricultural land during monsoon period. The experiment has been conducted in 2 typical sandy loam potato fields of South Korea after application of the veterinary antibiotics and bromide. Precipitation was measured by AWS (Automatic Weather Station) near the fields during the whole monsoon season. Runoff generation was estimated by multislot divisors in combination with pressure sensor. Concentration of the target antibiotics and the conservative tracer in runoff, soil-water and soil was determined using HPLC-MS-MS and Br selected electrode. Transport simulation has been performed with Hydrus-2D program which can consider soil characteristics, climate condition, adsorption/desorption and degradation. Results from the measurements and modeling focus on the role of heavy rainfall, of related the ratio of runoff and infiltration in terms of the selected antibiotics distribution and fate. Bromide on topsoil was moved into soil as increasing rainfall loading. On the contrary, the sulfonamides were relatively retarded in upper soil layer owing to adsorption onto soil particles. Different patterns of runoff were observed, and slope and rain intensity was representative factor in this study. Distribution of target pharmaceuticals was strongly dependent on constitution of furrow and ridge in the agricultural fields. Modeling results positively matched with background studies that describe physico-chemical properties of the sulfonamides, interaction between soil and the antibiotic group, solute transport through vadose zone and runoff induction by storm events.

  7. The abrupt onset of the modern South Asian Monsoon winds.

    PubMed

    Betzler, Christian; Eberli, Gregor P; Kroon, Dick; Wright, James D; Swart, Peter K; Nath, Bejugam Nagender; Alvarez-Zarikian, Carlos A; Alonso-García, Montserrat; Bialik, Or M; Blättler, Clara L; Guo, Junhua Adam; Haffen, Sébastien; Horozal, Senay; Inoue, Mayuri; Jovane, Luigi; Lanci, Luca; Laya, Juan Carlos; Mee, Anna Ling Hui; Lüdmann, Thomas; Nakakuni, Masatoshi; Niino, Kaoru; Petruny, Loren M; Pratiwi, Santi D; Reijmer, John J G; Reolid, Jesús; Slagle, Angela L; Sloss, Craig R; Su, Xiang; Yao, Zhengquan; Young, Jeremy R

    2016-01-01

    The South Asian Monson (SAM) is one of the most intense climatic elements yet its initiation and variations are not well established. Dating the deposits of SAM wind-driven currents in IODP cores from the Maldives yields an age of 12. 9 Ma indicating an abrupt SAM onset, over a short period of 300 kyrs. This coincided with the Indian Ocean Oxygen Minimum Zone expansion as revealed by geochemical tracers and the onset of upwelling reflected by the sediment's content of particulate organic matter. A weaker 'proto-monsoon' existed between 12.9 and 25 Ma, as mirrored by the sedimentary signature of dust influx. Abrupt SAM initiation favors a strong influence of climate in addition to the tectonic control, and we propose that the post Miocene Climate Optimum cooling, together with increased continentalization and establishment of the bipolar ocean circulation, i.e. the beginning of the modern world, shifted the monsoon over a threshold towards the modern system. PMID:27436574

  8. Insolation and Abrupt Climate Change Effects on the Western Pacific Maritime Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, J. W.; Quinn, T. M.; Shen, C.; Cardenas, M. B.; Siringan, F. P.; Banner, J. L.; lin, K.; Taylor, F. W.

    2012-12-01

    The response of the Asian-Australian monsoon system to changes in summer insolation over the Holocene is recorded in many monsoon-sensitive paleoclimate reconstructions. The response is commonly direct; more summer insolation leads to increased monsoon rainfall over land as captured in stalagmite δ18O records from Oman and China. We evaluate this direct response using a maritime stalagmite record from the island of Palawan, Philippines (10 N, 119 E). The wet season in Palawan occurs over the same months (June-October) as in Oman, India and China. Therefore, we expected the stalagmite δ18O record from Palawan, a proxy of rainfall, to have a similar trend of decreasing monsoon rainfall over the Holocene. However, the Holocene trend in stalagmite δ18O is opposite to that expected: rainfall increases over the Holocene. Our explanation for the Holocene trend observed at Palawan is that the increase in the maritime monsoon balances the reduction in the land monsoon; an explanation that is consistent with previously published coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model results. Seawater δ18O reconstructions from marine sediment cores in the western tropical Pacific contain a freshening trend over the Holocene, also supporting the hypothesis of increase maritime monsoon rainfall. However, the decrease in maritime monsoon rainfall during the Younger Dryas at Palawan matches that observed in Chinese stalagmite records, meeting our original expectation of a similar wet season response in the various Asian-Australian monsoon records. One explanation for the similar Younger Dryas response in these monsoon records is the influence of seasonal changes in sea ice coverage, as previously suggested. A stalagmite δ18O record from Borneo (~800 km SE of Palawan), which lacks evidence of the Younger Dryas, provides supporting evidence for this explanation.

  9. Community level perceptions of the monsoon onset, withdrawal and climatic trends in Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeve, M. A.; Abu Syed, M. D.; Hossain, P. R.; Maainuddi, G.; Mamnun, N.

    2012-04-01

    A structured questionnaire study was carried out in 6 different regions in Bangladesh in order to give insight into how the different communities define the monsoon. The respondents were asked how they define the monsoon onset and withdrawal, and by how much these can vary from year to year. They were also asked about how they perceive changes in onset and withdrawal dates and total monsoonal rainfall during the past 20 years. Bangladesh is a developing country with a large proportion of the population living in rural areas and employed in the agricultural sector. It is foreseen that these communities will be most affected by changes in the climate. These groups were considered to be the main stakeholders when considering climate change, due to the direct influence the monsoon has on their livelihood and the food supply for the entire nation. Agricultural workers were therefore the main group targeted in this study. The main aim of the study was to create a framework for defining the monsoon in order to increase the usability of results in future impact-related studies. Refining definitions according to the perceptions of the main stakeholders helps to achieve this goal. Results show that rainfall is the main parameter used in defining the monsoon onset and withdrawal. This is possibly intuitive, however the monsoon onset was considered to be considerably earlier than previous scientific studies. This could be due to pre-monsoonal rainfall, however the respondents defined this type of rainfall separately to what they called the monsoon. The monsoon is considered to start earliest in the Sylhet region in northeast Bangladesh.

  10. An assessment of improvements in global monsoon precipitation simulation in FGOALS-s2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lixia; Zhou, Tianjun

    2014-01-01

    The performance of Version 2 of the Flexible Global Ocean-Atmosphere-Land System model (FGOALS-s2) in simulating global monsoon precipitation (GMP) was evaluated. Compared with FGOALS-s1, higher skill in simulating the annual modes of climatological tropical precipitation and interannual variations of GMP are seen in FGOALS-s2. The simulated domains of the northwestern Pacific monsoon (NWPM) and North American monsoon are smaller than in FGOALS-s1. The main deficiency of FGOALS-s2 is that the NWPM has a weaker monsoon mode and stronger negative pattern in spring-fall asymmetric mode. The smaller NWPM domain in FGOALS-s2 is due to its simulated colder SST over the western Pacific warm pool. The relationship between ENSO and GMP is simulated reasonably by FGOALS-s2. However, the simulated precipitation anomaly over the South African monsoon region-South Indian Ocean during La Niña years is opposite to the observation. This results mainly from weaker warm SST anomaly over the maritime continent during La Niña years, leading to stronger upper-troposphere (lower-troposphere) divergence (convergence) over the Indian Ocean, and artificial vertical ascent (descent) over the Southwest Indian Ocean (South African monsoon region), inducing local excessive (deficient) rainfall. Comparison between the historical and pre-industrial simulations indicated that global land monsoon precipitation changes from 1901 to the 1970s were caused by internal variation of climate system. External forcing may have contributed to the increasing trend of the Australian monsoon since the 1980s. Finally, it shows that global warming could enhance GMP, especially over the northern hemispheric ocean monsoon and southern hemispheric land monsoon.

  11. Elucidating the role of topological pattern discovery and support vector machine in generating predictive models for Indian summer monsoon rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Manojit; Chattopadhyay, Surajit

    2016-10-01

    The present paper reports a study, where growing hierarchical self-organising map (GHSOM) has been applied to achieve a visual cluster analysis to the Indian rainfall dataset consisting of 142 years of Indian rainfall data so that the yearly rainfall can be segregated into small groups to visualise the pattern of clustering behaviour of yearly rainfall due to changes in monthly rainfall for each year. Also, through support vector machine (SVM), it has been observed that generation of clusters impacts positively on the prediction of the Indian summer monsoon rainfall. Results have been presented through statistical and graphical analyses.

  12. Principal modes of Asian summer monsoon variability: Detection and changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasutomi, N.; Kimoto, M.

    2009-12-01

    Principal modes of Asian summer monsoon variability are identified. By using vertically integrated moisture flux, principal modes represent better separation than commonly used variables such as rainfall, winds and outgoing longwave radiation. An empirical orthogonal function of vertically integrated moisture flux within the South, Southeast and East Asia during summertime is analysed. Results of various analyses let us convince that the first and second EOFs of the moisture flux are the principal modes of the Asian monsoon variability. In summer, there are two modes dominant in the Asian monsoon region; one consists of low-level circulation over the subtropical western Pacific near Philippines and associated convective dipole centers located over the western Pacific and Indonesia. The other consists of El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) signal and the Pacific-Japan (PJ) pattern, called ENSO-PJ mixed mode. This pattern is detected as the first EOF mode of a simulation with an atmospheric general circulation model giving the climatological mean sea surface temperature. Furthermore, the pattern is dominant in both present climate simulation and global warming simulation using coupled GCM. A projected change shows increasing of precipitation over South China and Japan. The Pacific-Indo dipole pattern is found out to be excited without external forcing like a specific sea surface temperature anomaly. Moreover, the Pacific-Indo dipole pattern appears as the preferred structure of variability by giving small perturbations to a three-dimensionally varying basic state in summertime by using a linear baroclinic model. Factors of the basic state which help to excite and maintain the Pacific-Indo dipole pattern are examined. Free, stationary Rossby waves can be excited in the region of low-level westerly extending from the Indian Ocean to the South China Sea which blows as a part of the monsoonal flow in summer. Rossby waves at the eastern end of the low-level westerly where

  13. Monsoonal Variations of Supraglacial Lakes, Langtang Khola, Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, E. S.; Willis, I. C.; Arnold, N. S.; Pellicciotti, F.

    2013-12-01

    As Himalayan debris-covered glaciers retreat and thin in response to climate warming, their long, low-gradient tongues and undulating surfaces tend to form supraglacial lakes. The conceptual response of debris-covered valley glaciers progresses from thinning and stagnation to the development of supraglacial ponds, which eventually may coalesce into very large lakes bounded by terminal moraines. Large terminal lakes are a topic of frequent study due to the public safety hazard of glacier lake outburst floods (GLOFs). However, smaller, transient ponds that form on the glacier's surface may play an important role in determining annual mass balance. Development of surpaglacial ponds may be controlled by the magnitudes of surface undulations, meltwater inputs, and the glacier's general surface gradient. These lakes are not necessarily permanent: they enlarge by enhanced ice-cliff ablation, they are advected and deformed by glacial strain, they may disappear due to englacial drainage or prolonged evaporation, and they may not recur in the same locations each year due to changes in surface topography and hydrologic routing. The prevalence and character of such lakes varies greatly throughout the year. In the cold, dry winter (October-March), the debris surface is largely snow-covered and supraglacial lakes are frozen. During the arid premonsoon (April-May), lakes thaw and the debris surface is dry and free of snow. The debris surface becomes nearly-saturated by monsoonal rains (June-September) leading to surface runoff and widespread lake-filling. During this dynamic monsoon period, ponded water substantially alters the glacier's specific energy balance by increasing the effective thermal conductivity between atmosphere and ice, acting as a heat reservoir, and reducing albedo. Additionally, supraglacial ponds often enhance ablation processes in proximal areas by initiating lake-marginal calving and exposing debris-free ice cliffs. Through these processes supraglacial

  14. Extratropical influences on the inter-annual variability of South-Asian monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed, F. S.; Yoo, J. H.; Körnich, H.; Kucharski, F.

    2012-04-01

    The effects of extratropical dynamics on the interannual variations in South-Asian Monsoon (SAM) are examined. Based on NCEP/NCAR reanalysis and CRU precipitation data, a conditional maximum covariance analysis is performed on sea level pressure, 200 hPa geopotential heights and the SAM rainfall by removing the linear effects of El-Niño Southern Oscillation from the fields. It is found that two modes provide a strong connection between the upper-level circulation in the Atlantic/European region and SAM rainfall: the Circumglobal Teleconnection (CGT) and the Summer North Atlantic Oscillation (SNAO). The structures in the 200 hPa heights of both modes in the Atlantic region are similar in the Atlantic region, and their southeastward extension to South Asia (SA) also corresponds to upper-level ridges (in their positive phases) in slightly different positions. Nevertheless, the influence of both modes on SAM rainfall is distinct. Whereas a positive CGT is related to a widespread increase of rainfall in SAM, a positive SNAO is related to a precipitation dipole with its positive phase over Pakistan and the negative phase over northern India. The physical mechanisms for the influence of CGT and SNAO on SAM are related to the upper-level geopotential anomaly which affects the amplitude and position of the low-level convergence. The small displacements of the centers of these responses and the low level cold advection from the north east of SA in case of SNAO explain the differences in the corresponding SAM rainfall distributions. These findings are confirmed with the relatively high-resolution coupled climate model EC-Earth, which gives confidence in the physical basis and robustness of these extratropical variability modes and their influence on the South-Asian monsoon rainfall.

  15. Effects of water table dynamics on regional climate: A case study over east Asian monsoon area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xing; Xie, Zhenghui; Zheng, Jing; Tian, Xiangjun; Yang, Zongliang

    2008-11-01

    Groundwater is an important component of the hydrologic cycle, and its anomaly will result in variations of soil moisture, water, and energy balances between the land surface and atmosphere, which ultimately influence climate. In this study, we implement a groundwater model into the regional climate model RegCM3, which is called RegCM3_GW, and investigate the effects of water table dynamics on regional climate. Numerical experiments by RegCM3_GW and RegCM3 over the east Asian monsoon area show that incorporating the water table dynamics into the regional climate model reduces the systematic biases of the simulated precipitation by 38.5% and 39.8% over semiarid and humid regions, respectively, and increases the bias slightly by 5.6% over semihumid regions. To seek the reasons for the differences of simulated precipitation, we analyze the atmospheric water vapor budget and the local water cycle among the water table, soil moisture, evapotranspiration (ET), and convective precipitation. It is found that the top and root zone soil layers become wetter and enhance the bare soil evaporation but do not always increase the transpiration. Because of the variations of each ET's component, the obvious enhancements of ET occur in semiarid regions and contribute to more instable profiles of pseudoequivalent potential temperature. The atmospheric moisture budget analysis indicates that the recycling rate and precipitation efficiency increase greatly over semiarid regions, which presents a local aquifer-atmosphere feedback, while the variations of atmospheric water vapor transport control the development of precipitation over semihumid and humid regions. Therefore, the effects of water table dynamics on regional climate consist of the local aquifer-atmosphere interaction and the changes of circulation originated from ambient aquifer-atmosphere interaction, and the latter factor plays an important role in the monsoon area. Sensitivity of the results to a change in convection

  16. Evaluation of Forecast Performance on Asian Summer Monsoon Low Level Wind Using TIGGE Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruoyun, Niu

    2016-04-01

    The forecast performance of EASM (East Asia summer monsoon) and SASM (South Asia summer monsoon) for six TIGGE (the THORPEX Interactive Grand Global Ensemble) centers in the summers of 2008-2013 are evaluated to reflect the current predictability of the state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction. The results show that EASM is overestimated by all the TIGGE centers (except the Canadian Meteorological Center, CMC). SASM is also over-predicted by ECMWF (the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts), CMA (the China Meteorological Administration) and CMC but conversely under-predicted by JMA (the Japan Meteorological Agency), Additionally, SASM is overestimated for the early lead times and underestimated for the longer lead times by NCEP (the National Centers for Environmental Prediction) and UKMO (the United Kingdom Meteorological Office (UKMO). Further analysis suggests such biases are likely to the associated with those in the related land-sea thermal contrasts. EASM surge is basically overestimated by NCEP and CMA and mainly underestimated by the others. The bias predictabilities for SASM surge are similar to that of SASM. The peaks of SASM and EASM including their surges are mainly underestimated while the valleys are mostly overestimated. By comparison, ECMWF and UKMO have overall the highest forecast skills in predicting SASM and EASM and both have respective advantages. All the TIGGE centers generally show higher skills in predicting SASM than EASM. The forecast skills of SASM and EASM are superior to that of their respective surges. Moreover, the bias-correction forecast skills tend to be improved with higher correlation coefficients in raw forecast verification.

  17. Litterfall production along successional and altitudinal gradients of subtropical monsoon evergreen broadleaved forests in Guangdong, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhou, G.; Guan, L.; Wei, X.; Zhang, Dongxiao; Zhang, Q.; Yan, J.; Wen, D.; Liu, J.; Liu, S.; Huang, Z.; Kong, G.; Mo, J.; Yu, Q.

    2007-01-01

    Evaluation of litterfall production is important for understanding nutrient cycling, forest growth, successional pathways, and interactions with environmental variables in forest ecosystems. Litterfall was intensively studied during the period of 1982-2001 in two subtropical monsoon vegetation gradients in the Dinghushan Biosphere Reserve, Guangdong Province, China. The two gradients include: (1) a successional gradient composed of pine forest (PF), mixed pine and broadleaved forest (MF) and monsoon evergreen broadleaved forest (BF), and (2) an altitudinal gradient composed of Baiyunci ravine rain forest (BRF), Qingyunci ravine rain forest (QRF), BF and mountainous evergreen broadleaved forest (MMF). Mean annual litterfall production was 356, 861 and 849 g m-2 for PF, MF and BF of the successional gradient, and 1016, 1061, 849 and 489 g m-2 for BRF, QRF, BF and MMF of the altitudinal gradient, respectively. As expected, mean annual litterfall of the pioneer forest PF was the lowest, but rapidly increased over the observation period while those in other forests were relatively stable, confirming that forest litterfall production is closely related to successional stages and growth patterns. Leaf proportions of total litterfall in PF, MF, BF, BRF, QRF and MMF were 76.4%, 68.4%, 56.8%, 55.7%, 57.6% and 69.2%, respectively, which were consistent with the results from studies in other evergreen broadleaved forests. Our analysis on litterfall monthly distributions indicated that litterfall production was much higher during the period of April to September compared to other months for all studied forest types. Although there were significant impacts of some climate variables (maximum and effective temperatures) on litterfall production in some of the studied forests, the mechanisms of how climate factors (temperature and rainfall) interactively affect litterfall await further study. ?? 2006 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  18. Representation of Monsoon Intraseasonal Oscillations in Regional Climate Model: Sensitivity to Convective Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    U, U.

    2015-12-01

    We use latest version of International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) regional climate model RegCM4.4 for the study of seasonal mean and monsoon intraseasonal oscillations (MISOs) during Indian summer monsoon season over south Asian CORDEX domain. First time we have done detailed analysis to evaluate RegCM4.4 for space-time evolution characteristics of MISOs. The model is initialized at 1st January, 2000 for a 13-year continuous simulation at a spatial resolution of 50km. The sensitivity of the model performance to cumulus physics in simulating MISOs has been evaluated by considering three different combinations of Grell (G) and Emanuel (E) cumulus schemes. The models reasonably simulate the seasonal mean precipitation and 850-hPa wind with a notable bias in precipitation over Indian subcontinent and Equatorial Indian Ocean (EIO). The models exhibit higher skill in simulating seasonal mean wind than moisture and precipitation. On seasonal scale, the performance of RegCM-EG is more close to observation. However, on intraseasonal time scales, RegCM-EG fails to capture 25-90 day filtered precipitation variance over EIO which reflects in improper representation of features of MISOs. The space-time characteristics of MISOs are well captured by RegCM-EE over RegCM-GE, however it fails to show the eastward propagation of the convection across the Maritime Continent. Except RegCM-EE all other models completely underestimated the moisture advection from EIO onto Indian land region throughout the life-cycle of MISOs. It is found that the improvement in the representation of moist processes in RegCM-EE makes it useful for the study of characteristics of MISOs at regional scales. Figure below is lag composite of vertically integrated 25-90 day filtered horizontal moisture advection (shaded) and precipitation (black contour).

  19. Poleward shift in Indian summer monsoon low level jetstream under global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandeep, S.; Ajayamohan R., S.

    2015-04-01

    The low level jetstream (LLJ) transports moisture from the surrounding Oceans to Indian land mass and hence an important component of the Indian summer monsoon (ISM). Widening of tropical belt and poleward shifts in mid-latitude jetstreams have been identified as major impacts of global warming on large-scale atmospheric dynamics. A general northward shift in ISM circulation has been suggested recently, based on the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) simulations. Here, we investigate the current and projected future changes in LLJ in observations as well as the coupled model (CMIP3/CMIP5) simulations. A poleward shift in the monsoon LLJ has been detected both in the observations and coupled model simulations. The poleward shift is also reflected in the future projections in a warming scenario, with the magnitude of shift depending on the degree of warming. Consistent with the LLJ shift, a drying (wet) trend in the southern (northern) part of the western coast of India is also observed in the last three decades. Further analysis reveals that enhanced land-sea contrast resulted in a strengthening of the cross-equatorial sea level pressure gradient over Indian Ocean, which in turn resulted in the northward shift of the zero absolute vorticity contour from its climatological position. The poleward shift in zero absolute vorticity contour is consistent with that of LLJ core (location of maximum low-level zonal winds). Possible uncertainties in the results are discussed in the context of known model biases and ensemble sample sizes. These results assume significance in the context of the concerns over ecologically fragile Western Ghats region in a warming scenario.

  20. Poleward shift in Indian summer monsoon low level jetstream under global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandeep, S.; Ajayamohan, R. S.

    2015-07-01

    The low level jetstream (LLJ) transports moisture from the surrounding Oceans to Indian land mass and hence an important component of the Indian summer monsoon (ISM). Widening of tropical belt and poleward shifts in mid-latitude jetstreams have been identified as major impacts of global warming on large-scale atmospheric dynamics. A general northward shift in ISM circulation has been suggested recently, based on the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project (CMIP5) simulations. Here, we investigate the current and projected future changes in LLJ in observations as well as the coupled model (CMIP3/CMIP5) simulations. A poleward shift in the monsoon LLJ has been detected both in the observations and coupled model simulations. The poleward shift is also reflected in the future projections in a warming scenario, with the magnitude of shift depending on the degree of warming. Consistent with the LLJ shift, a drying (wet) trend in the southern (northern) part of the western coast of India is also observed in the last three decades. Further analysis reveals that enhanced land-sea contrast resulted in a strengthening of the cross-equatorial sea level pressure gradient over Indian Ocean, which in turn resulted in the northward shift of the zero absolute vorticity contour from its climatological position. The poleward shift in zero absolute vorticity contour is consistent with that of LLJ core (location of maximum low-level zonal winds). Possible uncertainties in the results are discussed in the context of known model biases and ensemble sample sizes. These results assume significance in the context of the concerns over ecologically fragile Western Ghats region in a warming scenario.

  1. ITCZ-monsoonal association during the last glacial (Cariaco Basin, Northern Arabian Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deplazes, G.; Haug, G. H.; Lueckge, A.

    2010-12-01

    The anoxic Cariaco Basin on the northern shelf of Venezuela preserves detailed records of past tropical climate variability. The sediment formation in this basin is controlled by the migration of the Atlantic Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and the corresponding rain belt and trade winds. In the oxygen minimum zone off Pakistan in the northeastern Arabian Sea sediment archives of low-latitude monsoonal climate are preserved. In this study sediments from the two settings that cover the last 80,- to 110,000 years were analysed. Sediment color analysis resulted in reflectance records with a down to annual resolution. An age model was set up by correlation of these records to the δ18O record of Greenland ice (NGRIP). The major element chemistry of the sediments was analysed with X-ray fluorescence scanning. The new high resolution proxy records indicate an unbroken association between warm climate conditions over Greenland, a northerly position of the Atlantic Intertropical Convergence Zone, and a strong Indian summer monsoon since the last glacial. The tight coupling is explained by a dominant role of the North Atlantic that is communicated largely through the atmosphere. New insights of dynamical mechanisms arise from comparison of individual Dansgaard-Oeschger events. The tropical records and the Greenland δ18O record show both an abrupt change at the beginning of an interstadial. The δ18O of Greenland ice peaks early in the interstadials and then decreases more or less constantly toward stadial values. However, the tropical records have a tendency to maintain dark interstadial color on a similar level over several centuries. The following centennial-scale lightening toward the next stadial appears to be delayed compared to the δ18O ice record. This “resistance” of the tropics to the interstadial-stadial transitions suggests a threshold response of the tropics to North Atlantic cooling.

  2. Correcting the Science Record: Direct Stratospheric Injection vs. Asian Monsoon and the Solar Escalator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromm, M. D.; Nedoluha, G. E.; Kablick, G. P.

    2012-12-01

    Two entries in the literature in 2012 make provocative but unsupportable claims regarding pollutant pathways from the Earth to the stratosphere. One claims the 13 June 2011 Nabro volcano (Eritrea) emitted gases and particles into the troposphere, and these constituents reached the stratosphere in great abundance via the Asian Monsoon circulation [Bourassa et al., 2012]. The other claims that smoke from the Black Saturday fire storms (Australia) was emitted into the troposphere, and was lofted ~15 km into the stratosphere by solar-induced diabatic heating [de Laat et al., 2012]. In both cases the stratospheric plumes attributed to these events spread around the globe and lasted for months. We will show that in both cases the postulated pathways are incorrect; the correct pathway is a direct convective injection by volcanic eruption and pyrocumulonimbus (pyroCb), respectively. We will present satellite data that will unambiguously reveal multiple, distinct stratospheric volcano-convection columns from Nabro connected to height-resolved volcanic SO2 and sulfate particles. In the case of Black Saturday we will characterize the pyroCb columns with ground-based radar and satellite imagery. The young pyroCb plume in the stratosphere will be characterized with a synergistic analysis of several NASA A-Train passive and active remote sensors. We will discuss the implications of our findings with respect to how satellite-based data are best used for tracking and characterizing point source injection plumes in the stratosphere. Bourassa et al. (2012), Large Volcanic Aerosol Load in the Stratosphere Linked to Asian Monsoon Transport, Science, 337, 78, DOI: 10:1126/Science.1219371 de Laat, et al. (2012), A solar escalator: Observational evidence of the self-lifting of smoke and aerosols by absorption of solar radiation in the February 2009 Australian Black Saturday plume, J. Geophys. Res., 117, D04204, doi:10.1029/2011JD017016.

  3. Distinguished ENSO response and moisture supply of dominant intraseasonal modes in the East Asian summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Hyoeun; Ha, Kyung-Ja; Chu, Jung-Eun; Yun, Kyung-Sook

    2013-04-01

    On the basis of various self-organizing map (SOM) analysis, a kind of artificial neural network, the dominant modes of the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) are identified as the Meiyu-Baiu, Changma, post-Changma, and the dry-spell modes. The SOM approach supposes that sudden phase change during summer monsoon period results from the presence of non-linear coupled features of intraseasonal phases. Thus, the origin and nature of the moisture supply in the dominant intraseasonal modes of the EASM rainfall can be identified in terms of each mode. To discuss the uniqueness of EASM major modes, the horizontal and vertical moisture supply are examined using moisture budget equation consisting of convergence, advection and transient eddy terms. Strong moisture convergence region can be found over the southern part of Meiyu-Baiu rainband. The Changma mode has zonal-oriented moisture source which confined to low-level from surface to 925-hPa over the Korean peninsula. Furthermore, convective instability deeply developed in the Changma mode. It means advection of moist, warm air by low-level wind from the south and cold, dry air from the north are fundamental for generating convective instability and sustaining convective activity. On the contrary to Changma mode, post-Changma mode has meridional-oriented moisture source with its deep vertical profile. Moisture divergence regions cover the northern China, Korea, and Japan for dry-spell mode. Besides the moisture convergence and advection, the transient eddies play a role in supplying moisture over the boundary region of mean flow. Detailed analyses for the relationship between external components such as El Niño Southern Oscillation which can be affected slowly on the inter-annual time scale have been discussed.

  4. Rainfall Trends over the Indo-Pak Summer Monsoon and Related Large-Scale Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latif, Muhammad; Syed, Faisal; Hannachi, Abdel

    2016-04-01

    The study of regional rainfall trends over South Asia is critically important for food security and infrastructure. This study investigates the presence of trends in seasonal and sub-seasonal (June through September-JJAS) rainfall obtained from multiple observed datasets. The obtained results identified a dipole-type structure in rainfall trends over the region north of the Indo-Pak subcontinent, where significant increasing trends are seen over the core monsoon region of Pakistan and significant decreasing trends are observed over the central-north India and adjacent areas. The study strongly suggests that strengthening of Vertically Integrated Meridional Moisture Transport (VIMMT) over the Arabian Sea is likely reason for the trend of rainfall in the core monsoon region of Pakistan. In contrast, over the central-north India region, the rainfall trends are significantly decreasing due to the weakening of IMT over the Bay of Bengal. The leading EOF clearly shows the strengthening (weakening) patterns of VIMMT over the Arabian Sea (Bay of Bengal) in seasonal and sub-seasonal interannual time-scales. The regression analysis between the principal components and rainfall confirms the dipole pattern over the region. Our results also suggest that the Circumglobal Teleconnection in upper troposphere influence in maintaining the mean rainfall over Pakistan via cross-equatorial flow of moisture into the Arabian Sea. We also investigate seasonal JJAS rainfall trends using historical and climate change (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5) simulations from a set of regional climate models from Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). Trends and asymmetry of seasonal rainfall show great variability across models. Meridional moisture transport and associated large-scale dynamics will also be discussed.

  5. KZai 02 pollen record, an insight into West African monsoon fluctuations during the Last Climatic Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalibard, M.; Popescu, S.; Maley, J.; Suc, J.

    2012-12-01

    Climate of the circum-Atlantic intertropical zone is driven by the ocean/atmosphere dynamics in response to variations of yearly insolation. These latitudes correspond to the convergence of the Hadley cells expressed on earth surface by intense trade winds and in lower troposphere by the African easterly jet making the edges of the intertropical zone relatively dry, while humidity is concentrated near the Equator. This phenomenon generates a precipitation front, known as the InterTropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), the oscillations of which regulate the latitudinal vegetation distribution. Pollen record of core KZai 02 (Guinea Gulf) allows high resolution reconstruction of variations of past ecosystems over Central Africa during the Last Climatic Cycle. Plant taxa recorded in pollen analyses have been clustered according to their ecological requirements and African phytogeography. Fluctuations of these groups inform on precipitation intensity and their distribution during the last 130 ka. During Glacials, an open vegetation made of Cyperaceae marshes developed in the central Zaire/Congo Basin, surrounded by savannah on borders and afromontane forests on reliefs. Composition and distribution of vegetation indicate a decrease in monsoon activity and the strengthening of the precipitation front in the center of the basin. Interglacial phases are characterized by rain forest expansion over Central Africa in response to a precipitation enhancement associated with a northward shift of the rainfall front. Replacement of afromontane forest and marsh ecosystems by savannah then lowland pioneering, warm-temperate and rain forests characterized glacial/interglacial transitions. This succession suggests the increasing influence of at least two climatic parameters: the water availability and temperature and/or CO2 fluctuation. Spectral analysis applied to vegetation groups evidences the forcing of insolation, mainly driven by precession, on the West African monsoon system. Sub

  6. The 20th century transitions in basic and extreme monsoon rainfall indices in India: Comparison of the ETCCDI indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Dileep K.; Panigrahi, P.; Mohanty, S.; Mohanty, R. K.; Sethi, R. R.

    2016-11-01

    The mean and extreme matrices of the monsoon rainfall in India not only play an important role in depicting the global monsoon climate, but also their spatiotemporal patterns influence the socio-economic profile of a major proportion of the country's huge population. Given the reported conflicting trends at the global and national scales, the present study investigates the 20th century (1901-2004) changes in monsoon rainfall of India, particularly focusing the indices developed by the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection and Indices (ETCCDI) to facilitate a global comparison. Result of this comprehensive analysis, which includes the response of fifteen indices over two study periods (i.e., 1901-1940 and 1961-2004), indicates clear signals of change with respect to the period and region of study and the choice of the ETCCDI indices. While wet day frequency, low-to-moderate events and consecutive wet days (CWD) exhibit a prominent transition from a pre-1940 wetting to a post-1960 drying tendency over a large part of the central-north India (CNI), both the wet and dry extremes have occurred in a spatially less consistent manner during the recent decades. For consecutive dry days (CDD), the reported less clear global signals could be related to the timescale of analysis, as our sub-seasonal scale results display consistent changes compared to that of the seasonal and annual scales. The Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) provides clear indications of a post-1960 non-stationarity, showing changes in the mean as well as variance. Based on the partial Mann-Kendall test (PMK), some of the identified rainfall trends during 1961-2004 are found to be influenced more by the tropical Indian Ocean sea surface temperatures than the El Niño-Southern Oscillation index. These results have important implications for formulating the water resource management strategy, particularly over the drying central and northern parts of the country.

  7. Role of Atmospheric Circulation and Westerly Jet Changes in the mid-Holocene East Asian Summer Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, W.; Chiang, J. C. H.

    2014-12-01

    The East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM) varies on inter-decadal to interglacial-glacial timescales. The EASM is stronger in the mid-Holocene than today, and these changes can be readily explained by orbitally-driven insolation increase during the boreal summer. However, a detailed understanding of the altered seasonal evolution of the EASM during this time is still lacking. In particular, previous work has suggested a close link between seasonal migration of the EASM and that of the mid-latitude westerlies impinging on the Tibetan Plateau. In this study, we explore, this problem in PMIP3 climate model simulations of the mid-Holocene, focusing on the role of atmospheric circulation and in particular how the westerly jet modulates the East Asia summer climate on paleoclimate timescales. Analysis of the model simulations suggests that, compared to the preindustrial simulations, the transition from Mei-Yu to deep summer rainfall occurs earlier in the mid-Holocene. This is accompanied by an earlier weakening and northward shift of westerly jet away from the Tibetan Plateau. The variation in the strength and the 3-D structure of the westerly jet in the mid-Holocene is summarized. We find that changes to the monsoonal rainfall, westerly jet and meridional circulation covary on paleoclimate timescales. Meridional wind changes in particular are tied to an altered stationary wave pattern, resembling today's the so-called 'Silk Road' teleconnection pattern, riding along the westerly jet. Diagnostic analysis also reveals changes in moist static energy and eddy energy fluxes associated with the earlier seasonal transition of the EASM. Our analyses suggest that the westerly jet is critical to the altered dynamics of the East Asian summer monsoon during the mid-Holocene.

  8. Fine-scale responses of phytoplankton to freshwater influx in a tropical monsoonal estuary following the onset of southwest monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pednekar, Suraksha M.; Matondkar, S. G. Prabhu; Gomes, Helga Do R.; Goes, Joaquim I.; Parab, Sushma; Kerkar, Vijaya

    2011-06-01

    In May of 2007, a study was initiated by the National Institute of Oceanography (NIO), Goa, India, to investigate the influence of monsoonal rainfall on hydrographic conditions in the Mandovi River of India. The study was undertaken at a location ˜2 km upstream of the mouth of this estuary. During the premonsoon (PreM) in May, when circulation in the estuary was dominated by tidal activity, phytoplankton communities in the high saline (35-37 psu) waters at the study site were largely made up of the coastal neritic species Fragilaria oceanica, Ditylum brightwellii and Trichodesmium erythraeum. During the later part of the intermonsoon (InterM) phase, an abrupt decline in salinity led to a surge in phytoplankton biomass (Chlorophyll a ˜14 mg m - 3), of a population that was dominated by Thalassiosira eccentricus. As the southwest monsoon (SWM) progressed and the estuary freshened salinity and Chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations decreased during the MoN, Skeletonema costatum established itself as the dominant form. Despite the low biomass (Chl a <2 mg m - 3), the phytoplankton community of the MoN was the most diverse of the entire study. During the postmonsoon (PostM), the increase in salinity was marked by a surge in dinoflagellate populations comprising of Ceratium furca, Akashiwo sanguinea, and Pyrophacus horologium.

  9. Holocene Monsoon variability in East Africa: a marine perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romahn, S.; Mackensen, A.; Groeneveld, J.; Pätzold, J.

    2012-12-01

    The processes that control past monsoon variability in the East African Tropics during the Holocene are poorly understood. Especially the role of Sea Surface Temperatures (SST) controlling East African Rainfall on millennial timescales, as it is observed on decadal timescales, is currently intensely debated. In addition, it has been suggested recently that the longitudinal migration of the Congo Air Boundary (CAB) modulates East African precipitation on a regional scale as well [Tierney et al., 2011]. Here, we present a high-resolution marine sediment record for the past 12 kyrs from offshore Tanzania, close to the Rufiji River delta, to contribute to the current debate from a marine point of view. We reconstructed past SST and δ18Oseawater, derived from planktic foraminiferal Mg/Ca and δ18O, and past Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) variations, derived from planktic foraminiferal Ba/Ca-ratios. In the vicinity of river deltas, Ba/Ca-ratios have potential to record precipitation changes in the rivers' catchment area. Our records show that East African precipitation, derived from Ba/Ca-ratios, roughly varies in concert with Indian Ocean SST, suggesting higher Indian Ocean SST to be an important prerequisite for stronger precipitation, and hence an intense monsoon episode in East Africa. We calculated the difference (ΔSST) between our record of Indian Ocean SST and SST of the tropical Atlantic [Weldeab et al., 2005], showing that ΔSST variability resembles the isotopic pattern of the Kilimanjaro ice core record [Thompson et al., 2002]. We suggest this to be the consequence of a longitudinal movement of the CAB over the African Continent, changing the trajectory of Indian Ocean moisture into the continent and therefore affecting the δ18O of the East African rainout. Thompson, L. G., et al. (2002), Kilimanjaro Ice Core Records: Evidence of Holocene Climate Change in Tropical Africa, Science, 298, 589-593. Tierney, J. E., et al. (2011), Late Quaternary behavior of the

  10. Precipitation and Moisture Sources in North American Monsoon Surges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffer, N. J.; Nesbitt, S. W.

    2009-12-01

    Prediction of North American Monsoon (NAM) precipitation plays an important role in decision-mak