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Sample records for africanus ferredoxin iii

  1. Slow formation of [3Fe-4S](1+) clusters in mutant forms of Desulfovibrio africanus ferredoxin III.

    PubMed

    Hannan, J P; Busch, J L; James, R; Thomson, A J; Moore, G R; Davy, S L

    2000-02-25

    Desulfovibrio africanus ferredoxin III (Da FdIII) readily interconverts between a 7Fe and an 8Fe form with Asp-14 believed to provide a cluster ligand in the latter form. To investigate the factors important for cluster interconversion in Fe/S cluster-containing proteins we have studied two variants of Da FdIII produced by site-directed mutagenesis, Asp14Glu and Asp14His, with cluster incorporation performed in vitro. Characterisation of these proteins by UV/visible, EPR and (1)H NMR spectroscopies revealed that the formation of the stable 7Fe form of these proteins takes some time to occur. Evidence is presented which indicates the [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster is incorporated prior to the [3Fe-4S](1+) cluster. PMID:10692579

  2. Ferredoxin and ferredoxin-NADP reductase from photosynthetic and nonphotosynthetic tissues of tomato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, L. S.; Yee, B. C.; Buchanan, B. B.; Kamide, K.; Sanada, Y.; Wada, K.

    1991-01-01

    Ferredoxin and ferredoxin-NADP+ oxidoreductase (FNR) were purified from leaves, roots, and red and green pericarp of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum, cv VFNT and cv Momotaro). Four different ferredoxins were identified on the basis of N-terminal amino acid sequence and charge. Ferredoxins I and II were the most prevalent forms in leaves and green pericarp, and ferredoxin III was the most prevalent in roots. Red pericarp of the VFNT cv yielded variable amounts of ferredoxins II and III plus a unique form, ferredoxin IV. Red pericarp of the Momotaro cv contained ferredoxins I, II, and IV. This represents the first demonstration of ferredoxin in a chromoplast-containing tissue. There were no major differences among the tomato ferredoxins in absorption spectrum or cytochrome c reduction activity. Two forms of FNR were present in tomato as judged by anion exchange chromatography and by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. FNR II had a lower apparent relative molecular weight, a slightly altered absorption spectrum, and a lower specific activity for cytochrome c reduction than FNR I. FNR II could be a partially degraded form of FNR I. The FNRs from the different tissues of tomato plants all showed diaphorase activity, with FNR II being more active than FNR I. The presence of ferredoxin and FNR in heterotrophic tissues of tomato is consistent with the existence of a nonphotosynthetic ferredoxin/FNR redox pathway to support the function of ferredoxin-dependent enzymes.

  3. Metacarpal proportions in Australopithecus africanus.

    PubMed

    Green, David J; Gordon, Adam D

    2008-05-01

    Recent work has shown that, despite being craniodentally more derived, Australopithecus africanus had more apelike limb-size proportions than A. afarensis. Here, we test whether the A. africanus hand, as judged by metacarpal shaft and articular proportions, was similarly apelike. More specifically, did A. africanus have a short and narrow first metacarpal (MC1) relative to the other metacarpals? Proportions of both MC breadth and length were considered: the geometric mean (GM) of articular and midshaft measurements of MC1 breadth was compared to those of MC2-4, and MC1 length was compared to MC3 length individually and also to the GM of MC2 and 3 lengths. To compare the extant hominoid sample with an incomplete A. africanus fossil record (11 attributed metacarpals), a resampling procedure imposed sampling constraints on the comparative groups that produced composite intrahand ratios. Resampled ratios in the extant sample are not significantly different from actual ratios based on associated elements, demonstrating the methodological appropriateness of this technique. Australopithecus africanus metacarpals do not differ significantly from the great apes in the comparison of breadth ratios but are significantly greater than chimpanzees and orangutans in both measures of relative length. Conversely, A. africanus has a significantly smaller breadth ratio than modern humans, but does not significantly differ from this group in either measure of relative length. We conclude that the first metacarpals of A. africanus are more apelike in relative breadth while also being more humanlike in relative length, a finding consistent with previous work on A. afarensis hand proportions. This configuration would have likely promoted a high degree of manipulative dexterity, but the relatively slender, apelike first metacarpal suggests that A. africanus did not place the same mechanical demands on the thumb as more recent, stone-tool-producing hominins. PMID:18191176

  4. Visualisation of plastids in endosperm, pollen and roots of transgenic wheat expressing modified GFP fused to transit peptides from wheat SSU RubisCO, rice FtsZ and maize ferredoxin III proteins.

    PubMed

    Primavesi, Lucia F; Wu, Huixia; Mudd, Elisabeth A; Day, Anil; Jones, Huw D

    2008-08-01

    The ability to target marker proteins to specific subcellular compartments is a powerful research tool to study the structure and development of organelles. Here transit sequences from nuclear-encoded, plastid proteins, namely rice FtsZ, maize non-photosynthetic ferredoxin III (FdIII) and the small subunit of RubisCO were used to target a modified synthetic GFP (S65G, S72A) to plastids. The localisations of the fusion proteins expressed in transgenic wheat plants and under the control of the rice actin promoter were compared to an untargeted GFP control. GFP fluorescence was localised to non-green plastids in pollen, roots and seed endosperm and detected in isolated leaf chloroplasts using a GFP-specific antibody. Transit peptides appeared to influence the relative fluorescence intensities of plastids in different tissues. This is consistent with differential targeting and/or turnover of GFP fusion proteins in different plastid types. Replacement of GFP sequences with alternative coding regions enables immediate applications of our vectors for academic research and commercial applications. PMID:17710559

  5. New perspectives on bacterial ferredoxin evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, D. G.; Hunt, L. T.; Yeh, L.-S. L.; Barker, W. C.

    1985-01-01

    Ferredoxins are low-molecular-weight, nonheme, iron proteins which function as electron carriers in a wide variety of electron transport chains. Howard et al. (1983) have suggested that the amino end of Azotobacter vinelandii ferredoxin shows a greater similarity to the carboxyl end of ferredoxin from Chromatium vinosum and that their half-chain sequences are homologous when the half-chains of either species are considered in inverse order. Examination of this proposition has made it necessary to reevaluate previous conclusions concerning the evolution of bacterial ferredoxin. Attention is given to the properties of the bacterial ferredoxin sequences, and the evolution of the bacterial ferredoxins.

  6. Ferredoxin/ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase complex: Complete NMR mapping of the interaction site on ferredoxin by gallium substitution.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xingfu; Kim, Sung-Kun; Schürmann, Peter; Hirasawa, Masakazu; Tripathy, Jatindra N; Smith, Jody; Knaff, David B; Ubbink, Marcellus

    2006-12-11

    The reduction of ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR) by plant-type ferredoxin plays an important role in redox regulation in plants and cyanobacteria. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used to map the binding sites on Synechocystis ferredoxin for FTR. A gallium-substituted structural analog of this [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin was obtained by reconstituting the apoprotein in a refolding buffer containing gallium. For the first time, the complete interaction interface of a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin with a target enzyme has been mapped by NMR chemical shift perturbation with this diamagnetic structural analog. PMID:17134703

  7. Ferredoxin-linked chloroplast enzymes. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    This report summarizes research on ferredoxin:NADP{sup +} oxidoreductase and ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase. One of the primary goals of the original proposal was to map the ferredoxin-binding sites on three soluble enzymes that are located in spinach chloroplasts and utilize ferredoxin as an electron donor:Ferredoxin:NADP{sup +} oxidoreductase (FNR); ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase (FTR) and glutamate synthase. As the availability of amino acid sequences for the enzymes are important in such studies, it was proposed that the amino acid sequence of glutamate synthase be determined. The amino acid sequences of FNR, FTR and ferredoxin are already known. An aim related to elucidating the binding sites on these enzymes for ferredoxin was to determine whether there is a common site on ferredoxin involved in binding to all of these ferredoxin-dependent chloroplast enzymes and, if so, to map it. One additional aim was to characterize thioredoxin binding by FTR and determine whether the same site on FTR is involved in binding both ferredoxin and thioredoxin. Considerable progress has been made on most of these original projects, although work conducted on FTR is still in its preliminary stages.

  8. Crystal structures of archaeal 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases from Sulfolobus tokodaii.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhen; Maruyama, Akane; Arakawa, Takatoshi; Fushinobu, Shinya; Wakagi, Takayoshi

    2016-01-01

    As the first three-dimensional structure of the two-subunit type 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases (OFOR) from archaea, we solved the crystal structures of STK_23000/STK_22980 (StOFOR1) and STK_24350/STK_24330 (StOFOR2) from Sulfolobus tokodaii. They showed similar overall structures, consisting of two a- and b-subunit heterodimers containing thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) cofactor and [4Fe-4S] cluster, but lack an intramolecular ferredoxin domain. Unlike other OFORs, StOFORs can utilize both pyruvate and 2-oxoglutarate, playing a key role in the central metabolism. In the structure of StOFOR2 in unreacted pyruvate complex form, carboxylate group of pyruvate is recognized by Arg344 and Thr257 from the a-subunit, which are conserved in pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase from Desulfovbrio africanus (DaPFOR). In the structure of StOFOR1 co-crystallized with 2-oxobutyrate, electron density corresponding to a 1-hydroxypropyl group (post-decarboxylation state) was observed at the thiazole ring of TPP. The binding pockets of the StOFORs surrounding the methyl or propyl group of the ligands are wider than that of DaPFOR. Mutational analyses indicated that several residues were responsible for the broad 2-oxoacid specificity of StOFORs. We also constructed a possible complex structural model by placing a Zn(2+)-containing dicluster ferredoxin of S. tokodaii into the large pocket of StOFOR2, providing insight into the electron transfer between the two redox proteins. PMID:27619895

  9. Photoreduction of the ferredoxin/ferredoxin-NADP(+)-reductase complex by a linked ruthenium polypyridyl chromophore.

    PubMed

    Quaranta, Annamaria; Lagoutte, Bernard; Frey, Julien; Sétif, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    Photosynthetic ferredoxin and its main partner ferredoxin-NADP(+)-reductase (FNR) are key proteins during the photoproduction of reductive power involved in photosynthetic growth. In this work, we used covalent attachment of ruthenium derivatives to different cysteine mutants of ferredoxin to trigger by laser-flash excitation both ferredoxin reduction and subsequent electron transfer from reduced ferredoxin to FNR. Rates and yields of reduction of the ferredoxin [2Fe-2S] cluster by reductively quenched Ru* could be measured for the first time for such a low redox potential protein whereas ferredoxin-FNR electron transfer was characterized in detail for one particular Ru-ferredoxin covalent adduct. For this adduct, the efficiency of FNR single reduction by reduced ferredoxin was close to 100% under both first-order and diffusion-limited second-order conditions. Interprotein intracomplex electron transfer was measured unambiguously for the first time with a fast rate of c. 6500s(-1). Our measurements point out that Ru photosensitizing is a powerful approach to study the functional interactions of ferredoxin with its numerous partners besides FNR. PMID:27180037

  10. (The interaction of ferredoxin:NADP sup + oxidoreductase and ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase with substrates)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    We seek to map the ferredoxin-binding sites on three soluble enzymes located in spinach chloroplasts which utilize ferredoxin as an electron donor:Ferredoxin:NADP{sup +}oxidoreductase (FNR); ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase (FTR) and glutamate synthase. As the availability of amino acid sequences for the enzymes are important in such studies, that the amino acid sequence of glutamate synthase needs be determined, the amino acid sequences of FNR, FTR and ferredoxin are already known. Related to an aim elucidate the binding sites for ferredoxin to determine whether there is a common binding site on all of these ferredoxin-dependent chloroplast enzymes and, if so, to map it. Additionally thioredoxin binding by FTR needs be determine to resolve whether the same site on FTR is involved in binding both ferredoxin and thioredoxin. Considerable progress is reported on the prosthetic groups of glutamate synthase, in establishing the role of arginine and lysine residues in ferredoxin binding by, ferredoxin:nitrite oxidoreductase nitrite reductase, labelling carboxyl groups on ferredoxin with taurine and labelling lysine residues biotinylation, and low potential heme proteins have been isolated and characterized from a non-photosynthetic plant tissue. Although the monoclonal antibodies raised against FNR turned out not to be useful for mapping the FNR/ferredoxin or FNR/NADPinteraction domains, good progress has been made on mapping the FNR/ferredoxin interaction domains by an alternative technique. The techniques developed for differential chemical modification of these two proteins - taurine modification of aspartate and glutamate residues and biotin modification of lysine residues - should be useful for mapping the interaction domains of many proteins that associate through electrostatic interactions.

  11. Sexual dimorphism in the face of Australopithecus africanus.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, C A

    1999-01-01

    Recently discovered crania of Australopithecus africanus from Sterkfontein Member 4 and Makapansgat enlarge the size range of the species and encourage a reappraisal of both the degree and pattern of sexual dimorphism. Resampling methodology (bootstrapping) is used here to establish that A. africanus has a greater craniofacial size range than chimpanzees or modern humans, a range which is best attributed to a moderately high degree of sexual dimorphism. Compared to other fossil hominins, this variation is similar to that of Homo habilis (sensu lato) but less than that of A. boisei. The finding of moderately high dimorphism is corroborated by a CV-based estimate and ratios between those specimens considered to be male and those considered to be female. Inferences about the pattern of craniofacial dimorphism in the A. africanus face currently rely on the relationship of morphology and size. Larger specimens, particularly Stw 505, show prominent superciliary eminences and glabellar regions, but in features related in part to canine size, such as the curvature of the infraorbital surface, large and small specimens of A. africanus are similar. In this respect, the pattern resembles that of modern humans more so than chimpanzees or lowland gorillas. A. africanus may also show novel patterns of sexual dimorphism when compared to extant hominines, such as in the form of the anterior pillar. However, males of the species do not exhibit characteristics of more derived hominins, such as A. robustus. PMID:9915304

  12. Resistance to Ditylenchus africanus present in peanut breeding lines

    PubMed Central

    Mc Donald, Alexander H.; de Waele, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Peanut is an important cash crop both for commercial and small-scale farmers in South Africa. The effect of Ditylenchus africanus on peanut is mainly qualitative, leading to downgrading of consignments. This nematode is difficult to control because of its high reproductive and damage potential. The objective of this study was to identify peanut genotypes with resistance to D. africanus that would also be sustainable under field conditions. Selected peanut genotypes were evaluated against D. africanus in microplot and field trials. The inbred lines PC254K1 and CG7 were confirmed to be resistant to D. africanus. The resistance expressed by these two genotypes was sustainable under field conditions. The breeding line PC287K5 maintained low nematode numbers in some trials, but its level of resistance was not as strong or as sustainable as that of PC254K1 or CG7. However, PC287K5 could still play an important role in the peanut industry where lower D. africanus populations occur. PMID:22736852

  13. Role of Morphological Growth State and Gene Expression in Desulfovibrio africanus strain Walvis Bay Mercury Methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Moberly, James G; Miller, Carrie L; Brown, Steven D; Biswas, Abir; Brandt, Craig C; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Elias, Dwayne A

    2012-01-01

    The biogeochemical transformations of mercury are a complex process, with the production of methylmercury, a potent human neurotoxin, repeatedly demonstrated in sulfate- and Fe(III)- reducing as well as methanogenic bacteria. However, little is known regarding the morphology, genes or proteins involved in methylmercury generation. Desulfovibrio africanus strain Walvis Bay is a Hg-methylating -proteobacterium with a sequenced genome and has unusual pleomorphic forms. In this study, a relationship between the pleomorphism and Hg methylation was investigated. Proportional increases in the sigmoidal (regular) cell form corresponded with increased net MeHg production, but decreased when the pinched cocci (persister) form became the major morphotype. D. africanus microarrays indicated that the ferrous iron transport genes (feoAB), as well as ribosomal genes and several genes whose products are predicted to have metal binding domains (CxxC), were up-regulated during exposure to Hg in the exponential phase. While no specific methylation pathways were identified, the finding that Hg may interfere with iron transport and the correlation of growth-phase dependent morphology with MeHg production are notable. The identification of these relationships between differential gene expression, morphology, and the growth phase dependence of Hg transformations suggests that actively growing cells are primarily responsible for methylation, and so areas with ample carbon and electron-acceptor concentrations may also generate a higher proportion of methylmercury than more oligotrophic environments. The observation of increased iron transporter expression also suggests that Hg methylation may interfere with iron biogeochemical cycles.

  14. [The interaction of ferredoxin:NADP{sup +} oxidoreductase and ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase with substrates]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    We seek to map the ferredoxin-binding sites on three soluble enzymes located in spinach chloroplasts which utilize ferredoxin as an electron donor:Ferredoxin:NADP{sup +}oxidoreductase (FNR); ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase (FTR) and glutamate synthase. As the availability of amino acid sequences for the enzymes are important in such studies, that the amino acid sequence of glutamate synthase needs be determined, the amino acid sequences of FNR, FTR and ferredoxin are already known. Related to an aim elucidate the binding sites for ferredoxin to determine whether there is a common binding site on all of these ferredoxin-dependent chloroplast enzymes and, if so, to map it. Additionally thioredoxin binding by FTR needs be determine to resolve whether the same site on FTR is involved in binding both ferredoxin and thioredoxin. Considerable progress is reported on the prosthetic groups of glutamate synthase, in establishing the role of arginine and lysine residues in ferredoxin binding by, ferredoxin:nitrite oxidoreductase nitrite reductase, labelling carboxyl groups on ferredoxin with taurine and labelling lysine residues biotinylation, and low potential heme proteins have been isolated and characterized from a non-photosynthetic plant tissue. Although the monoclonal antibodies raised against FNR turned out not to be useful for mapping the FNR/ferredoxin or FNR/NADPinteraction domains, good progress has been made on mapping the FNR/ferredoxin interaction domains by an alternative technique. The techniques developed for differential chemical modification of these two proteins - taurine modification of aspartate and glutamate residues and biotin modification of lysine residues - should be useful for mapping the interaction domains of many proteins that associate through electrostatic interactions.

  15. Reproduction and Damage Potential of Five Geographical Ditylenchus africanus Populations on Peanut

    PubMed Central

    Steenkamp, Sonia; De Waele, Dirk; McDonald, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Ditylenchus africanus affects peanut quality, which leads to downgrading of consignments and economic losses for producers. This nematode is difficult to control and host-plant resistance may be the most effective way to control it. Recently, the peanut breeding line PC254K1 has been identified as resistant to a D. africanus population from Vaalharts and will be included into the peanut breeding program. The objectives of our study were to compare the reproduction potential of D. africanus geographic populations from five different areas in the peanut production area of South Africa and to assess whether PC254K1 is resistant to all five D. africanus populations. Reproduction of the D. africanus populations was evaluated on peanut callus in growth cabinets at 21°C, 28°C, and 35°C. The peanut cv. Sellie was included in the study as the D. africanus-susceptible reference genotype in the greenhouse and microplots. Reproduction potential of all five of the D. africanus populations was similar. Resistance of PC254K1 was confirmed to all five D. africanus populations. The resistance trait of a D. africanus-resistant cultivar developed from PC254K1 should, therefore, be sustainable over the five localities tested during this study. PMID:27418699

  16. Reproduction and Damage Potential of Five Geographical Ditylenchus africanus Populations on Peanut.

    PubMed

    Steenkamp, Sonia; De Waele, Dirk; McDonald, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    Ditylenchus africanus affects peanut quality, which leads to downgrading of consignments and economic losses for producers. This nematode is difficult to control and host-plant resistance may be the most effective way to control it. Recently, the peanut breeding line PC254K1 has been identified as resistant to a D. africanus population from Vaalharts and will be included into the peanut breeding program. The objectives of our study were to compare the reproduction potential of D. africanus geographic populations from five different areas in the peanut production area of South Africa and to assess whether PC254K1 is resistant to all five D. africanus populations. Reproduction of the D. africanus populations was evaluated on peanut callus in growth cabinets at 21°C, 28°C, and 35°C. The peanut cv. Sellie was included in the study as the D. africanus-susceptible reference genotype in the greenhouse and microplots. Reproduction potential of all five of the D. africanus populations was similar. Resistance of PC254K1 was confirmed to all five D. africanus populations. The resistance trait of a D. africanus-resistant cultivar developed from PC254K1 should, therefore, be sustainable over the five localities tested during this study. PMID:27418699

  17. Microwear, mechanics and the feeding adaptations of Australopithecus africanus.

    PubMed

    Strait, David S; Weber, Gerhard W; Constantino, Paul; Lucas, Peter W; Richmond, Brian G; Spencer, Mark A; Dechow, Paul C; Ross, Callum F; Grosse, Ian R; Wright, Barth W; Wood, Bernard A; Wang, Qian; Byron, Craig; Slice, Dennis E

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies of dental microwear and craniofacial mechanics have yielded contradictory interpretations regarding the feeding ecology and adaptations of Australopithecus africanus. As part of this debate, the methods used in the mechanical studies have been criticized. In particular, it has been claimed that finite element analysis has been poorly applied to this research question. This paper responds to some of these mechanical criticisms, highlights limitations of dental microwear analysis, and identifies avenues of future research. PMID:22130183

  18. Ferredoxin Gene Mutation in Iranian Trichomonas vaginalis Isolates

    PubMed Central

    HEIDARI, Soudabeh; BANDEHPOUR, Mojgan; SEYYED-TABAEI, Seyyed-Javad; VALADKHANI, Zarintaj; HAGHIGHI, Ali; ABADI, AliReza; KAZEMI, Bahram

    2013-01-01

    Background Trichomonas vaginalis causes trichomoniasis and metronidazole is its chosen drug for treatment. Ferredoxin has role in electron transport and carbohydrate metabolism and the conversion of an inactive form of metronidazole (CO) to its active form (CPR). Ferredoxin gene mutations reduce gene expression and increase its resistance to metronidazole. In this study, the frequency of ferredoxin gene mutations in clinical isolates of T.vaginalis in Tehran has been studied. Methods Forty six clinical T. vaginalis isolates of vaginal secretions and urine sediment were collected from Tehran Province since 2011 till 2012. DNA was extracted and ferredoxin gene was amplified by PCR technique. The ferredoxin gene PCR products were sequenced to determine gene mutations. Results In four isolates (8.69%) point mutation at nucleotide position -239 (the translation start codon) of the ferredoxin gene were detected in which adenosine were converted to thymine. Conclusion Mutation at nucleotide -239 ferredoxin gene reduces translational regulatory protein's binding affinity which concludes reduction of ferredoxin expression. For this reduction, decrease in activity and decrease in metronidazole drug delivery into the cells occur. Mutations in these four isolates may lead to resistance of them to metronidazole. PMID:24454433

  19. Sequence and expression of ferredoxin mRNA in barley

    SciTech Connect

    Zielinski, R.; Funder, P.M.; Ling, V. )

    1990-05-01

    We have isolated and structurally characterized a full-length cDNA clone encoding ferredoxin from a {lambda}gt10 cDNA library prepared from barley leaf mRNA. The ferredoxin clone (pBFD-1) was fused head-to-head with a partial-length cDNA clone encoding calmodulin, and was fortuitously isolated by screening the library with a calmodulin-specific oligonucleotide probe. The mRNA sequence from which pBFD-1 was derived is expressed exclusively in the leaf tissues of 7-d old barley seedlings. Barley pre-ferredoxin has a predicted size of 15.3 kDal, of which 4.6 kDal are accounted for by the transit peptide. The polypeptide encoded by pBFD-1 is identical to wheat ferredoxin, and shares slightly more amino acid sequence similarity with spinach ferredoxin I than with ferredoxin II. Ferredoxin mRNA levels are rapidly increased 10-fold by white light in etiolated barley leaves.

  20. A nitrate-inducible ferredoxin in maize roots. Genomic organization and differential expression of two nonphotosynthetic ferredoxin isoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, T; Sakakibara, H; Nakano, R; Kimata, Y; Sugiyama, T; Hase, T

    1997-01-01

    We have identified and characterized a nitrate-inducible ferredoxin (Fd) in maize (Zea mays L.) roots by structural analysis of the purified protein and by cloning of its cDNA and gene. In maize Fd isoproteins are encoded by a small multigene family, and the nitrate-inducible Fd was identified as a novel isoprotein, designated Fd VI, which differed from an Fd I to Fd V identified to date. In the roots of seedlings cultured without nitrate, Fd VI was undetectable. However, during the induction of the capacity for nitrate assimilation, the amount of Fd VI increased markedly within 24 h. Concurrently, the level of transcript for Fd VI increased, but more quickly, reaching a maximal level within 2 h with kinetics similar to those of nitrite reductase and Fd-NADP+ reductase. Fd III was constitutively expressed in roots, and no such changes at the protein and mRNA levels were observed during the nitrate induction. In the 5' flanking region of the gene for Fd VI only, we identified NIT-2 motifs, which are widely found in genes for enzymes related to nitrogen metabolism. These data indicate that Fd VI is co-induced with the previously characterized enzymes involved in nitrate assimilation, and they suggest that the novel Fd isoprotein, distinct from the constitutively expressed Fd, might play an important role as an electron carrier from NADPH to nitrite reductase and other Fd-dependent enzymes in root plastids. PMID:9193097

  1. Human evolution. Human-like hand use in Australopithecus africanus.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Matthew M; Stephens, Nicholas B; Tsegai, Zewdi J; Foote, Alexandra C; Nguyen, N Huynh; Gross, Thomas; Pahr, Dieter H; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Kivell, Tracy L

    2015-01-23

    The distinctly human ability for forceful precision and power "squeeze" gripping is linked to two key evolutionary transitions in hand use: a reduction in arboreal climbing and the manufacture and use of tools. However, it is unclear when these locomotory and manipulative transitions occurred. Here we show that Australopithecus africanus (~3 to 2 million years ago) and several Pleistocene hominins, traditionally considered not to have engaged in habitual tool manufacture, have a human-like trabecular bone pattern in the metacarpals consistent with forceful opposition of the thumb and fingers typically adopted during tool use. These results support archaeological evidence for stone tool use in australopiths and provide morphological evidence that Pliocene hominins achieved human-like hand postures much earlier and more frequently than previously considered. PMID:25613885

  2. Underestimating intraspecific variation: the problem with excluding Sts 19 from Australopithecus africanus.

    PubMed

    Ahern, J C

    1998-04-01

    Two analyses conclude that Sts 19 cannot be accommodated within the Australopithecus africanus hypodigm (Kimbel and Rak [1993] In Kimbel and Martin [eds.]: Species, Species Concepts, and Primate Evolution. New York: Plenum, pp. 461-484; Sarmiento [1993] Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. [Suppl.] 16:173). Both studies exclude Sts 19 because it possesses synapomorphies with Homo. Furthermore, according to Kimbel and Rak (1993), including Sts 19 in A. africanus results in an unacceptably high degree of polymorphism. This study aims to refute the null hypothesis that Sts 19 belongs to A. africanus. Twelve basicranial characters, as defined and implemented in Kimbel and Rak's study, were scored for casts of seven A. africanus and seven Homo habilis basicranial specimens. These characters were also examined on specimens from a large (N = 87) sample of African pongids. Contrary to Kimbel and Rak's (1993) findings, the null hypothesis is not refuted. The degree of polymorphism among A. africanus with Sts 19 included is less than that seen in Pan troglodytes. In addition, Sts 19 shares only one apomorphy with Homo. However, when treated metrically, Sts 19's morphology for this character is not significantly divergent from other A. africanus specimens. PMID:9584889

  3. Ferredoxin:NADP+ Oxidoreductase Association with Phycocyanin Modulates Its Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Korn, Anja; Ajlani, Ghada; Lagoutte, Bernard; Gall, Andrew; Sétif, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    In photosynthetic organisms, ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase (FNR) is known to provide NADPH for CO2 assimilation, but it also utilizes NADPH to provide reduced ferredoxin. The cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 produces two FNR isoforms, a small one (FNRS) similar to the one found in plant plastids and a large one (FNRL) that is associated with the phycobilisome, a light-harvesting complex. Here we show that a mutant lacking FNRL exhibits a higher NADP+/NADPH ratio. We also purified to homogeneity a phycobilisome subcomplex comprising FNRL, named FNRL-PC. The enzymatic activities of FNRL-PC were compared with those of FNRS. During NADPH oxidation, FNRL-PC exhibits a 30% decrease in the Michaelis constant Km(NADPH), and a 70% increase in Km(ferredoxin), which is in agreement with its predicted lower activity of ferredoxin reduction. During NADP+ reduction, the FNRL-PC shows a 29/43% decrease in the rate of single electron transfer from reduced ferredoxin in the presence/absence of NADP+. The increase in Km(ferredoxin) and the rate decrease of single reduction are attributed to steric hindrance by the phycocyanin moiety of FNRL-PC. Both isoforms are capable of catalyzing the NADP+ reduction under multiple turnover conditions. Furthermore, we obtained evidence that, under high ionic strength conditions, electron transfer from reduced ferredoxin is rate limiting during this process. The differences that we observe might not fully explain the in vivo properties of the Synechocystis mutants expressing only one of the isoforms. Therefore, we advocate that FNR localization and/or substrates availability are essential in vivo. PMID:19759024

  4. Molecular interaction of ferredoxin and ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase from human malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Kimata-Ariga, Yoko; Saitoh, Takashi; Ikegami, Takahisa; Horii, Toshihiro; Hase, Toshiharu

    2007-12-01

    The malaria parasite possesses plant-type ferredoxin (Fd) and ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (FNR) in a plastid-derived organelle called the apicoplast. This Fd/FNR redox system, which potentially provides reducing power for essential biosynthetic pathways in the apicoplast, has been proposed as a target for the development of specific new anti-malarial agents. We studied the molecular interaction of Fd and FNR of human malaria parasite (Plasmodium falciparum), which were produced as recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. NMR chemical shift perturbation analysis mapped the location of the possible FNR interaction sites on the surface of P. falciparum Fd. Site-specific mutation of acidic Fd residues in these regions and the resulting analyses of electron transfer activity and affinity chromatography of those mutants revealed that two acidic regions (a region including Asp26, Glu29 and Glu34, and the other including Asp65 and Glu66) dominantly contribute to the electrostatic interaction with P. falciparum FNR. The combination of Asp26/Glu29/Glu34 conferred a larger contribution than that of Asp65/Glu66, and among Asp26, Glu29 and Glu34, Glu29 was shown to be the most important residue for the interaction with P. falciparum FNR. These findings provide the basis for understanding molecular recognition between Fd and FNR of the malaria parasite. PMID:17938142

  5. Two distinct ferredoxins from Rhodobacter capsulatus: complete amino acid sequences and molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    Saeki, K; Suetsugu, Y; Yao, Y; Horio, T; Marrs, B L; Matsubara, H

    1990-09-01

    Two distinct ferredoxins were purified from Rhodobacter capsulatus SB1003. Their complete amino acid sequences were determined by a combination of protease digestion, BrCN cleavage and Edman degradation. Ferredoxins I and II were composed of 64 and 111 amino acids, respectively, with molecular weights of 6,728 and 12,549 excluding iron and sulfur atoms. Both contained two Cys clusters in their amino acid sequences. The first cluster of ferredoxin I and the second cluster of ferredoxin II had a sequence, CxxCxxCxxxCP, in common with the ferredoxins found in Clostridia. The second cluster of ferredoxin I had a sequence, CxxCxxxxxxxxCxxxCM, with extra amino acids between the second and third Cys, which has been reported for other photosynthetic bacterial ferredoxins and putative ferredoxins (nif-gene products) from nitrogen-fixing bacteria, and with a unique occurrence of Met. The first cluster of ferredoxin II had a CxxCxxxxCxxxCP sequence, with two additional amino acids between the second and third Cys, a characteristics feature of Azotobacter-[3Fe-4S] [4Fe-4S]-ferredoxin. Ferredoxin II was also similar to Azotobacter-type ferredoxins with an extended carboxyl (C-) terminal sequence compared to the common Clostridium-type. The evolutionary relationship of the two together with a putative one recently found to be encoded in nifENXQ region in this bacterium [Moreno-Vivian et al. (1989) J. Bacteriol. 171, 2591-2598] is discussed. PMID:2277040

  6. Heterologous overproduction of 2[4Fe4S]- and [2Fe2S]-type clostridial ferredoxins and [2Fe2S]-type agrobacterial ferredoxin.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haiyan; Hu, Liejie; Yu, Wenjun; Li, Huili; Tao, Fei; Xie, Huijun; Wang, Shuning

    2016-05-01

    Ferredoxins are small, acidic proteins containing iron-sulfur clusters that are widespread in living organisms. They play key roles as electron carriers in various metabolic processes, including respiration, photosynthesis, fermentation, nitrogen fixation, carbon dioxide fixation, and hydrogen production. However, only several kinds of ferredoxins are commercially available now, greatly limiting the investigation of ferredoxin-related enzymes and metabolic processes. Here we describe the heterologous overproduction of 2[4Fe4S]- and [2Fe2S]-type clostridial ferredoxins and [2Fe2S]-type agrobacterial ferredoxin. Adding extra iron and sulfur sources to the medium in combination with using Escherichia coli C41(DE3) harboring pCodonplus and pRKISC plasmids as host greatly enhanced iron-sulfur cluster synthesis in the three ferredoxins. After induction for 12 h in terrific broth and purification by affinity chromatography and anion exchange chromatography, approximately 3.4 mg of streptavidin (Strep)-tagged and 3.7 mg of polyhistidine (His)-tagged clostridial 2[4Fe4S] ferredoxins were obtained from 1 l of culture. Excitingly, after induction for 24 h in terrific broth, around 40 mg of His-tagged clostridial [2Fe2S] and 23 mg of His-tagged agrobacterial [2Fe2S] ferredoxins were purified from 1 l of culture. The recombinant ferredoxins apparently exhibited identical properties and physiological function to native ferredoxins. No negative impact of two different affinity tags on ferredoxin activity was found. In conclusion, we successfully developed a convenient method for heterologous overproduction of the three kinds of ferredoxins with satisfactory yields and activities, which would be very helpful for the ferredoxin-related researches. PMID:26748213

  7. Size and shape variation in the proximal femur of Australopithecus africanus.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Elizabeth

    2009-06-01

    Aside from use as estimates of body mass dimorphism and fore to hind limb joint size comparisons, postcranial elements have not often contributed to assessments of variation in Australopithecus africanus. Meanwhile, cranial, facial, and dental size variation is interpreted to be high or moderately high. Further, the cranial base and face express patterns of structural (shape) variation, which are interpreted by some as evidence for the presence of multiple species. Here, the proximal femur is used to consider postcranial size and shape variation in A. africanus. Original fossils from Makapansgat and Sterkfontein, and samples from Homo, Pan, Gorilla, and Pongo were measured. Size variation was assessed by comparing the A. africanus coefficient of variation to bootstrapped distributions of coefficient of variation samples for each taxon. Shape variation was assessed from isometrically adjusted shape variables. First, the A. africanus standard deviation of log transformed shape variables was compared to bootstrapped distributions of logged standard deviations in each taxon. Second, shape variable based Euclidean distances between fossil pairs were compared to pairwise Euclidean distance distributions in each reference taxon. The degree of size variation in the A. africanus proximal femur is consistent with that of a single species, and is most comparable to Homo and Pan, lower than A. afarensis, and lower than some estimates of cranial and dental variation. Some, but not all, shape variables show more variation in A. africanus than in extant taxa. The degree of shape difference between some fossils exceeds the majority of pairwise differences in the reference taxa. Proximal femoral shape, but not size, variation is consistent with high estimates of A. africanus cranial variation. PMID:19446306

  8. The feeding biomechanics and dietary ecology of Australopithecus africanus.

    PubMed

    Strait, David S; Weber, Gerhard W; Neubauer, Simon; Chalk, Janine; Richmond, Brian G; Lucas, Peter W; Spencer, Mark A; Schrein, Caitlin; Dechow, Paul C; Ross, Callum F; Grosse, Ian R; Wright, Barth W; Constantino, Paul; Wood, Bernard A; Lawn, Brian; Hylander, William L; Wang, Qian; Byron, Craig; Slice, Dennis E; Smith, Amanda L

    2009-02-17

    The African Plio-Pleistocene hominins known as australopiths evolved a distinctive craniofacial morphology that traditionally has been viewed as a dietary adaptation for feeding on either small, hard objects or on large volumes of food. A historically influential interpretation of this morphology hypothesizes that loads applied to the premolars during feeding had a profound influence on the evolution of australopith craniofacial form. Here, we test this hypothesis using finite element analysis in conjunction with comparative, imaging, and experimental methods. We find that the facial skeleton of the Australopithecus type species, A. africanus, is well suited to withstand premolar loads. However, we suggest that the mastication of either small objects or large volumes of food is unlikely to fully explain the evolution of facial form in this species. Rather, key aspects of australopith craniofacial morphology are more likely to be related to the ingestion and initial preparation of large, mechanically protected food objects like large nuts and seeds. These foods may have broadened the diet of these hominins, possibly by being critical resources that australopiths relied on during periods when their preferred dietary items were in short supply. Our analysis reconciles apparent discrepancies between dietary reconstructions based on biomechanics, tooth morphology, and dental microwear. PMID:19188607

  9. The feeding biomechanics and dietary ecology of Australopithecus africanus

    PubMed Central

    Strait, David S.; Weber, Gerhard W.; Neubauer, Simon; Chalk, Janine; Richmond, Brian G.; Lucas, Peter W.; Spencer, Mark A.; Schrein, Caitlin; Dechow, Paul C.; Ross, Callum F.; Grosse, Ian R.; Wright, Barth W.; Constantino, Paul; Wood, Bernard A.; Lawn, Brian; Hylander, William L.; Wang, Qian; Byron, Craig; Slice, Dennis E.; Smith, Amanda L.

    2009-01-01

    The African Plio-Pleistocene hominins known as australopiths evolved a distinctive craniofacial morphology that traditionally has been viewed as a dietary adaptation for feeding on either small, hard objects or on large volumes of food. A historically influential interpretation of this morphology hypothesizes that loads applied to the premolars during feeding had a profound influence on the evolution of australopith craniofacial form. Here, we test this hypothesis using finite element analysis in conjunction with comparative, imaging, and experimental methods. We find that the facial skeleton of the Australopithecus type species, A. africanus, is well suited to withstand premolar loads. However, we suggest that the mastication of either small objects or large volumes of food is unlikely to fully explain the evolution of facial form in this species. Rather, key aspects of australopith craniofacial morphology are more likely to be related to the ingestion and initial preparation of large, mechanically protected food objects like large nuts and seeds. These foods may have broadened the diet of these hominins, possibly by being critical resources that australopiths relied on during periods when their preferred dietary items were in short supply. Our analysis reconciles apparent discrepancies between dietary reconstructions based on biomechanics, tooth morphology, and dental microwear. PMID:19188607

  10. Physicochemical nature of interfaces controlling ferredoxin NADP(+) reductase activity through its interprotein interactions with ferredoxin.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Misaki; Kim, Ju Yaen; Kume, Satoshi; Sakakibara, Yukiko; Sugiki, Toshihiko; Kojima, Chojiro; Kurisu, Genji; Ikegami, Takahisa; Hase, Toshiharu; Kimata-Ariga, Yoko; Lee, Young-Ho

    2015-10-01

    Although acidic residues of ferredoxin (Fd) are known to be essential for activities of various Fd-dependent enzymes, including ferredoxin NADP(+) reductase (FNR) and sulfite reductase (SiR), through electrostatic interactions with basic residues of partner enzymes, non-electrostatic contributions such as hydrophobic forces remain largely unknown. We herein demonstrated that intermolecular hydrophobic and charge-charge interactions between Fd and enzymes were both critical for enzymatic activity. Systematic site-directed mutagenesis, which altered physicochemical properties of residues on the interfaces of Fd for FNR /SiR, revealed various changes in activities of both enzymes. The replacement of serine 43 of Fd to a hydrophobic residue (S43W) and charged residue (S43D) increased and decreased FNR activity, respectively, while S43W showed significantly lower SiR activity without affecting SiR activity by S43D, suggesting that hydrophobic and electrostatic interprotein forces affected FNR activity. Enzyme kinetics revealed that changes in FNR activity by mutating Fd correlated with Km, but not with kcat or activation energy, indicating that interprotein interactions determined FNR activity. Calorimetry-based binding thermodynamics between Fd and FNR showed different binding modes of FNR to wild-type, S43W, or S43D, which were controlled by enthalpy and entropy, as shown by the driving force plot. Residue-based NMR spectroscopy of (15)N FNR with Fds also revealed distinct binding modes of each complex based on different directions of NMR peak shifts with similar overall chemical shift differences. We proposed that subtle adjustments in both hydrophobic and electrostatic forces were critical for enzymatic activity, and these results may be applicable to protein-based electron transfer systems. PMID:26087388

  11. Metopic suture of Taung (Australopithecus africanus) and its implications for hominin brain evolution

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Dean; Zollikofer, Christoph P. E.; Morimoto, Naoki; Ponce de León, Marcia S.

    2012-01-01

    The type specimen for Australopithecus africanus (Taung) includes a natural endocast that reproduces most of the external morphology of the right cerebral hemisphere and a fragment of fossilized face that articulates with the endocast. Despite the fact that Taung died between 3 and 4 y of age, the endocast reproduces a small triangular-shaped remnant of the anterior fontanelle, from which a clear metopic suture (MS) courses rostrally along the midline [Hrdlička A (1925) Am J Phys Anthropol 8:379–392]. Here we describe and interpret this feature of Taung in light of comparative fossil and actualistic data on the timing of MS closure. In great apes, the MS normally fuses shortly after birth, such that unfused MS similar to Taung’s are rare. In humans, however, MS fuses well after birth, and partially or unfused MS are frequent. In gracile fossil adult hominins that lived between ∼3.0 and 1.5 million y ago, MS are also relatively frequent, indicating that the modern human-like pattern of late MS fusion may have become adaptive during early hominin evolution. Selective pressures favoring delayed fusion might have resulted from three aspects of perinatal ontogeny: (i) the difficulty of giving birth to large-headed neonates through birth canals that were reconfigured for bipedalism (the “obstetric dilemma”), (ii) high early postnatal brain growth rates, and (iii) reorganization and expansion of the frontal neocortex. Overall, our data indicate that hominin brain evolution occurred within a complex network of fetopelvic constraints, which required modification of frontal neurocranial ossification patterns. PMID:22566620

  12. Metopic suture of Taung (Australopithecus africanus) and its implications for hominin brain evolution.

    PubMed

    Falk, Dean; Zollikofer, Christoph P E; Morimoto, Naoki; Ponce de León, Marcia S

    2012-05-29

    The type specimen for Australopithecus africanus (Taung) includes a natural endocast that reproduces most of the external morphology of the right cerebral hemisphere and a fragment of fossilized face that articulates with the endocast. Despite the fact that Taung died between 3 and 4 y of age, the endocast reproduces a small triangular-shaped remnant of the anterior fontanelle, from which a clear metopic suture (MS) courses rostrally along the midline [Hrdlička A (1925) Am J Phys Anthropol 8:379-392]. Here we describe and interpret this feature of Taung in light of comparative fossil and actualistic data on the timing of MS closure. In great apes, the MS normally fuses shortly after birth, such that unfused MS similar to Taung's are rare. In humans, however, MS fuses well after birth, and partially or unfused MS are frequent. In gracile fossil adult hominins that lived between ∼3.0 and 1.5 million y ago, MS are also relatively frequent, indicating that the modern human-like pattern of late MS fusion may have become adaptive during early hominin evolution. Selective pressures favoring delayed fusion might have resulted from three aspects of perinatal ontogeny: (i) the difficulty of giving birth to large-headed neonates through birth canals that were reconfigured for bipedalism (the "obstetric dilemma"), (ii) high early postnatal brain growth rates, and (iii) reorganization and expansion of the frontal neocortex. Overall, our data indicate that hominin brain evolution occurred within a complex network of fetopelvic constraints, which required modification of frontal neurocranial ossification patterns. PMID:22566620

  13. Dental metric assessment of the omo fossils: implications for the phylogenetic position of Australopithecus africanus.

    PubMed

    Hunt, K; Vitzthum, V J

    1986-10-01

    The discovery of Australopithecus afarensis has led to new interpretations of hominid phylogeny, some of which reject A. africanus as an ancestor of Homo. Analysis of buccolingual tooth crown dimensions in australopithecines and Homo species by Johanson and White (Science 202:321-330, 1979) revealed that the South African gracile australopithecines are intermediate in size between Laetoli/hadar hominids and South African robust hominids. Homo, on the other hand, displays dimensions similar to those of A. afarensis and smaller than those of other australopithecines. These authors conclude, therefore, that A. africanus is derived in the direction of A. robustus and is not an ancestor of the Homo clade. However, there is a considerable time gap (ca. 800,000 years) between the Laetoli/Hadar specimens and the earliest Homo specimens; "gracile" hominids from Omo fit into this chronological gap and are from the same geographic area. Because the early specimens at Omo have been designated A. afarensis and the later specimens classified as Homo habilis, Omo offers a unique opportunity to test hypotheses concerning hominid evolution, especially regarding the phylogenetic status of A. africanus. Comparisons of mean cheek teeth breadths disclosed the significant (P less than or equal to 0.05) differences between the Omo sample and the Laetoli/Hadar fossils (P4, M2, and M3), the Homo fossils (P3, P4, M1, M2, and M1), and A. africanus (M3). Of the several possible interpretations of these data, it appears that the high degree of similarity between the Omo sample and the South African gracile australopithecine material warrants considering the two as geographical variants of A. africanus. The geographic, chronologic, and metric attributes of the Omo sample argue for its lineal affinity with A. afarensis and Homo. In conclusion, a consideration of hominid postcanine dental metrics provides no basis for removing A. africanus from the ancestry of the Homo lineage. PMID:3099582

  14. Revised Host Range and Studies on the Life Cycle of Longidorus africanus

    PubMed Central

    Kolodge, Craig; Radewald, John D.; Shibuya, Fujio

    1987-01-01

    The host range of Longidorus africanus was demonstrated to be much wider than previously reported. All commercial crop plants tested, except two of four crucifers, were hosts of L. africanus. The nematode was widespread in fields, and soil type did not appear to be related to its distribution. The minimum time to complete a life cycle was 9 weeks at 28 C in a plant growth chamber. Field observations of population densities indicated, however, that in undisturbed field soils the life cycle required considerably less time than was indicated by growth chamber studies. PMID:19290109

  15. Ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase: a catalytically active dithiol group links photoreduced ferredoxin to thioredoxin functional in photosynthetic enzyme regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Droux, M.; Miginiac-Maslow, M.; Jacquot, J.P.; Gadal, P.; Crawford, N.A.; Kosower, N.S.; Buchanan, B.B.

    1987-07-01

    The mechanism by which the ferredoxin-thioredoxin system activates the target enzyme, NADP-malate dehydrogenase, was investigated by analyzing the sulfhydryl status of individual protein components with (/sup 14/C)iodoacetate and monobromobimane. The data indicate that ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR)--an iron-sulfur enzyme present in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms--is the first member of a thiol chain that links light to enzyme regulation. FTR possesses a catalytically active dithiol group localized on the 13 kDa (similar) subunit, that occurs in all species investigated and accepts reducing equivalents from photoreduced ferredoxin and transfers them stoichiometrically to the disulfide form of thioredoxin m. The reduced thioredoxin m, in turn, reduces NADP-malate dehydrogenase, thereby converting it from an inactive (S-S) to an active (SH) form. The means by which FTR is able to combine electrons (from photoreduced ferredoxin) with protons (from the medium) to reduce its active disulfide group remains to be determined.

  16. Genome Sequence of Mercury-Methylating and Pleomorphic Desulfovibrio africanus strain Walvis Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D; Wall, Judy D.; Kucken, A M; Gilmour, C C; Podar, Mircea; Brandt, Craig C; Teshima, Hazuki; Detter, J C; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam L; Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Pennacchio, Len; Nolan, Matt; Pitluck, Samual; Woyke, Tanja; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Elias, Dwayne A

    2011-01-01

    Desulfovibrio africanus strain Walvis Bay is an anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacterium capable of producing methylmercury (MeHg), a potent human neurotoxin. The mechanism of methylation by this and other organisms is unknown. We present the 4.2-Mb genome sequence to provide further insight into microbial mercury methylation and sulfate-reducing bacteria.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Liberibacter africanus," a Bacterium Associated with Citrus Huanglongbing.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong; Pietersen, Gerhard; Han, Cliff; Read, David Alan; Lou, Binghai; Gupta, Goutam; Civerolo, Edwin L

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of "Candidatus Liberibacter africanus" strain PTSAPSY. The 1,192,232-bp genome with 34.5% G+C content comprises 1,017 open reading frames, 44 tRNAs, and three complete rRNAs in a circular chromosome. PMID:26184931

  18. Purification and biochemical characterization of reno-ferredoxin from bovine kidney mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, M

    1990-08-01

    Bovine reno-ferredoxin was purified from kidney mitochondria by an improved method that included hydrophobic and ion-exchange chromatography on Toyopearl gels. The optical absorption spectrum of the oxidized reno-ferredoxin revealed two peaks, at 414 and 455 nm in the visible region. The minimum molecular weight of the ferredoxin was 12,900 Da by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The amino acid residues of the NH2-terminal sequence of the ferredoxin were investigated using by a gas-phase sequencer. Bovine reno-ferredoxin and adreno-ferredoxin showed almost identical NH2-terminal amino acid sequences. Reconstitution of the 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-1 alpha -hydroxylase system was performed with the following three components: NADPH-ferredoxin reductase from bovine kidney mitochondria, reno-ferredoxin, and cytochrome P-450(D1 alpha) from bovine kidney mitochondria. The results demonstrated that the reno-ferredoxin was essential for the 1 alpha-hydroxylase activity of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3. PMID:2250408

  19. Azotobacter vinelandii NADPH:ferredoxin reductase cloning, sequencing, and overexpression.

    PubMed

    Isas, J M; Yannone, S M; Burgess, B K

    1995-09-01

    Azotobacter vinelandii ferredoxin I (AvFdI) controls the expression of another protein that was originally designated Protein X. Recently we reported that Protein X is a NADPH-specific flavoprotein that binds specifically to FdI (Isas, J.M., and Burgess, B.K. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 19404-19409). The gene encoding this protein has now been cloned and sequenced. Protein X is 33% identical and has an overall 53% similarity with the fpr gene product from Escherichia coli that encodes NADPH:ferredoxin reductase. On the basis of this similarity and the similarity of the physical properties of the two proteins, we now designate Protein X as A. vinelandii NADPH:ferredoxin reductase and its gene as the fpr gene. The protein has been overexpressed in its native background in A. vinelandii by using the broad host range multicopy plasmid, pKT230. In addition to being regulated by FdI, the fpr gene product is overexpressed when A. vinelandii is grown under N2-fixing conditions even though the fpr gene is not preceded by a nif specific promoter. By analogy to what is known about fpr expression in E. coli, we propose that FdI may exert its regulatory effect on fpr by interacting with the SoxRS regulon. PMID:7673160

  20. Bacterial Na+-translocating ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Biegel, Eva; Müller, Volker

    2010-10-19

    The anaerobic acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii carries out a unique type of Na(+)-motive, anaerobic respiration with caffeate as electron acceptor, termed "caffeate respiration." Central, and so far the only identified membrane-bound reaction in this respiration pathway, is a ferredoxin:NAD(+) oxidoreductase (Fno) activity. Here we show that inverted membrane vesicles of A. woodii couple electron transfer from reduced ferredoxin to NAD(+) with the transport of Na(+) from the outside into the lumen of the vesicles. Na(+) transport was electrogenic, and accumulation was inhibited by sodium ionophores but not protonophores, demonstrating a direct coupling of Fno activity to Na(+) transport. Results from inhibitor studies are consistent with the hypothesis that Fno activity coupled to Na(+) translocation is catalyzed by the Rnf complex, a membrane-bound, iron-sulfur and flavin-containing electron transport complex encoded by many bacterial and some archaeal genomes. Fno is a unique type of primary Na(+) pump and represents an early evolutionary mechanism of energy conservation that expands the redox range known to support life. In addition, it explains the lifestyle of many anaerobic bacteria and gives a mechanistic explanation for the enigma of the energetic driving force for the endergonic reduction of ferredoxin with NADH plus H(+) as reductant in a number of aerobic bacteria. PMID:20921383

  1. Isolation, characterization, and biological activity of ferredoxin-NAD+ reductase from the methane oxidizer Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y P; Yoch, D C

    1989-01-01

    A ferredoxin-NAD+ oxidoreductase (EC 1.18.1.3) has been isolated from extracts of the obligate methanotroph Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. This enzyme was shown to couple electron flow from formate dehydrogenase (NAD+ requiring) to ferredoxin. Ferredoxin-NAD+ reductase was purified to homogeneity by conventional chromatography techniques and was shown to be a flavoprotein with a molecular weight of 36,000 +/- 1,000. This ferredoxin reductase was specific for NADH (Km, 125 microM) and coupled electron flow to the native ferredoxin and to ferredoxins from spinach, Clostridium pasteurianum, and Rhodospirillum rubrum (ferredoxin II). M. trichosporium ferredoxin saturated the ferredoxin-NAD+ reductase at a concentration 2 orders of magnitude lower (3 nM) than did spinach ferredoxin (0.4 microM). Ferredoxin-NAD+ reductase also had transhydrogenase activity which transferred electrons and protons from NADH to thionicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (Km, 9 microM) and from NADPH to 3-acetylpyridine adenine dinucleotide (Km, 16 microM). Reconstitution of a soluble electron transport pathway that coupled formate oxidation to ferredoxin reduction required formate dehydrogenase, NAD+, and ferredoxin-NAD+ reductase. Images PMID:2768195

  2. X-ray structure of a soluble Rieske-type ferredoxin from Mus musculus

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Elena J.; Elsen, Nathaniel L.; Seder, Kory D.; McCoy, Jason G.; Fox, Brian G; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2009-03-11

    The 2.07 {angstrom} resolution X-ray crystal structure of a soluble Rieske-type ferredoxin from Mus musculus encoded by the gene Mm.266515 is reported. Although they are present as covalent domains in eukaryotic membrane oxidase complexes, soluble Rieske-type ferredoxins have not previously been observed in eukaryotes. The overall structure of the mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin is typical of this class of iron-sulfur proteins and consists of a larger partial {beta}-barrel domain and a smaller domain containing Cys57, His59, Cys80 and His83 that binds the [2Fe-2S] cluster. The S atoms of the cluster are hydrogen-bonded by six backbone amide N atoms in a pattern typical of membrane-bound high-potential eukaryotic respiratory Rieske ferredoxins. However, phylogenetic analysis suggested that the mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin was more closely related to bacterial Rieske-type ferredoxins. Correspondingly, the structure revealed an extended loop most similar to that seen in Rieske-type ferredoxin subunits of bacterial aromatic dioxygenases, including the positioning of an aromatic side chain (Tyr85) between this loop and the [2Fe-2S] cluster. The mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin was shown to be capable of accepting electrons from both eukaryotic and prokaryotic oxidoreductases, although it was unable to serve as an electron donor for a bacterial monooxygenase complex. The human homolog of mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin was also cloned and purified. It behaved identically to mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin in all biochemical characterizations but did not crystallize. Based on its high sequence identity, the structure of the human homolog is likely to be modeled well by the mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin structure.

  3. Brownian dynamics and molecular dynamics study of the association between hydrogenase and ferredoxin from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Long, Hai; Chang, Christopher H; King, Paul W; Ghirardi, Maria L; Kim, Kwiseon

    2008-10-01

    The [FeFe] hydrogenase from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii can catalyze the reduction of protons to hydrogen gas using electrons supplied from photosystem I and transferred via ferredoxin. To better understand the association of the hydrogenase and the ferredoxin, we have simulated the process over multiple timescales. A Brownian dynamics simulation method gave an initial thorough sampling of the rigid-body translational and rotational phase spaces, and the resulting trajectories were used to compute the occupancy and free-energy landscapes. Several important hydrogenase-ferredoxin encounter complexes were identified from this analysis, which were then individually simulated using atomistic molecular dynamics to provide more details of the hydrogenase and ferredoxin interaction. The ferredoxin appeared to form reasonable complexes with the hydrogenase in multiple orientations, some of which were good candidates for inclusion in a transition state ensemble of configurations for electron transfer. PMID:18621810

  4. Laser flash absorption spectroscopy study of ferredoxin reduction by photosystem I: Spectral and kinetic evidence for the existence of several photosystem I-ferredoxin complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Setif, P.Q.Y.; Bottin, H.

    1995-07-18

    The existence of three first-order phases has been previously reported for the reduction of soluble ferredoxin by photosystem I (PSI), both from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (at pH 8 and in the presence of salts). The spectra of these three phases (t{sub 1/2} < {mu}s, = 13-20 and 103-123 {mu}s) have been measured between 460 and 600 nm. All of them are fully consistent with electron transfer from (F{sub A},F{sub B}){sup -}, the terminal 4Fe-4S acceptors of PSI, to ferredoxin. Though the three spectra deviate significantly from the spectrum that can be calculated independently for this process, their sum closely matches the calculated spectrum. A detailed examination of these deviations indicates that the intermediate (13-20 ps) and slow (103- 123 ys) first-order phases are associated with two distinct ferredoxin-binding sites on PSI. Under the same conditions, a fourth phase of negative amplitude is also observed in the 460-600 nm region. The kinetic properties of this process show that it is triggered by collision of free ferredoxin with a preformed PSI-ferredoxin complex. Taking this reaction into account, it is shown that the relative proportions of the three first-order phases of ferredoxin reduction do not depend upon the ferredoxin concentration, indicating that the different sites of ferredoxin binding are mutually exclusive. The kinetics of ferredoxin reduction were also studied at pH 5.8, in the absence of salts. Two similar first-order components are found for the reduction of spinach ferredoxin by PSI from Synechocystis at pH 8, though the apparent dissociation constant for the latter system is larger ({approx}5 {mu}M). Despite the different affinities of spinach and Synechocystis ferredoxins for the cyanobacterial PSI, similar second-order rate constants are found in both cases at pH 8 [(2-6) x 10{sup 8} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}]. 29 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Delineating a New Heterothallic Species of Volvox (Volvocaceae, Chlorophyceae) Using New Strains of "Volvox africanus".

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Hisayoshi; Matsuzaki, Ryo; Yamamoto, Kayoko; Kawachi, Masanobu; Takahashi, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    The volvocine algae represent an excellent model lineage in which to study evolution of female and male genders based on comparative analyses of related species. Among these species, Volvox carteri has been extensively studied as a model of an oogamous and complex organism. However, it may have unique derived features that are not present in other species of Volvox. Therefore, information regarding the characteristics of sexual reproduction of other species of Volvox is also important. In 1971, Starr studied four types of sexuality in several global strains identified as Volvox africanus; however, further taxonomic studies of these strains have been lacking, and strains of three of the four sexual types are not available. Here, we studied the morphology, sexual reproduction, and taxonomy of two V. africanus-like species isolated recently from Lake Biwa, Japan. These two species were very similar to two sexual types described by Starr in 1971: one producing dioecious sexual spheroids in heterothallic strains and the other forming both male spheroids and monoecious spheroids in a single strain. The former species produced zygotes with a reticulate cell wall, whereas a smooth zygote wall was observed in the latter species as in V. africanus previously reported from various localities around the world. Our multigene phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that these are sister species to each other. However, the presence of a compensatory base change in the most conserved region of the secondary structure of nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer-2, hybrid inviability demonstrated by intercrossing experiments, and morphological differences in the density of abutment between the gelatinous material of adjacent cells (individual sheaths) in the spheroid supported the recognition of the two species, V. africanus having a smooth zygote wall and V. reticuliferus Nozaki sp. nov. having a reticulate zygote wall. PMID:26562165

  6. Human evolution. Comment on "Human-like hand use in Australopithecus africanus".

    PubMed

    Almécija, Sergio; Wallace, Ian J; Judex, Stefan; Alba, David M; Moyà-Solà, Salvador

    2015-06-01

    Skinner and colleagues (Research Article, 23 January 2015, p. 395), based on metacarpal trabecular bone structure, argue that Australopithecus africanus employed human-like dexterity for stone tool making and use 3 million years ago. However, their evolutionary and biological assumptions are misinformed, failing to refute the previously existing hypothesis that human-like manipulation preceded systematized stone tool manufacture, as indicated by the fossil record. PMID:26045428

  7. Human evolution. Response to Comment on "Human-like hand use in Australopithecus africanus".

    PubMed

    Skinner, Matthew M; Stephens, Nicholas B; Tsegai, Zewdi J; Foote, Alexandra C; Nguyen, N Huynh; Gross, Thomas; Pahr, Dieter H; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Kivell, Tracy L

    2015-06-01

    Almécija and colleagues claim that we apply a simplified understanding of bone functional adaptation and that our results of human-like hand use in Australopithecus africanus are not novel. We argue that our results speak to actual behavior, rather than potential behaviors, and our functional interpretation is well supported by our methodological approach, comparative sample, and previous experimental data. PMID:26045429

  8. The ferredoxin-binding site of ferredoxin: Nitrite oxidoreductase. Differential chemical modification of the free enzyme and its complex with ferredoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Dose, M M; Hirasawa, M; Kleis-SanFrancisco, S; Lew, E L; Knaff, D B

    1997-01-01

    Spinach (Spinacea oleracea) leaf ferredoxin (Fd)-dependent nitrite reductase was treated with either the arginine-modifying reagent phenyl-glyoxal or the lysine-modifying reagent pyridoxal-5'-phosphate under conditions where only the Fd-binding affinity of the enzyme was affected and where complex formation between Fd and the enzyme prevented the inhibition by either reagent. Modification with [14C]phenylglyoxal allowed the identification of two nitrite reductase arginines, R375 and R556, that are protected by Fd against labeling. Modification of nitrite reductase with pyridoxal-5'-phosphate, followed by reduction with NaBH4, allowed the identification of a lysine, K436, that is protected by Fd against labeling. Positive charges are present at these positions in all of the Fd-dependent nitrite reductase for which sequences are available, suggesting that these amino acids are directly involved in electrostatic binding of Fd to the enzyme. PMID:9232882

  9. Trabecular Evidence for a Human-Like Gait in Australopithecus africanus

    PubMed Central

    Raichlen, David; Pontzer, Herman; Warrener, Anna G.; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Although the earliest known hominins were apparently upright bipeds, there has been mixed evidence whether particular species of hominins including those in the genus Australopithecus walked with relatively extended hips, knees and ankles like modern humans, or with more flexed lower limb joints like apes when bipedal. Here we demonstrate in chimpanzees and humans a highly predictable and sensitive relationship between the orientation of the ankle joint during loading and the principal orientation of trabecular bone struts in the distal tibia that function to withstand compressive forces within the joint. Analyses of the orientation of these struts using microCT scans in a sample of fossil tibiae from the site of Sterkfontein, of which two are assigned to Australopithecus africanus, indicate that these hominins primarily loaded their ankles in a relatively extended posture like modern humans and unlike chimpanzees. In other respects, however, trabecular properties in Au africanus are distinctive, with values that mostly fall between those of chimpanzees and humans. These results indicate that Au. africanus, like Homo, walked with an efficient, extended lower limb. PMID:24223719

  10. Complete mitogenomes of Guinean angelfish (Holacanthus africanus) and Rock beauty (Holacanthus tricolor) (Teleostei: Pomacanthidae).

    PubMed

    Shen, Kang-Ning; Chen, Ching-Hung; Hsiao, Chung-Der

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we used the next-generation sequencing method to deduce two complete mitogenomes of Guinean angelfish (Holacanthus africanus) and Rock beauty (Holacanthus tricolor) for the first time. The assembled mitogenome, consisting of 16,819 bp and 16,625 bp in length, shows 87% similarity with each other. Both mitogenomes follow the typical vertebrate arrangement, including 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNAs, 2 ribosomal RNAs genes, and a non-coding control region of D-loop. The D-loop contains 1107 bp in H. africanus and 905 bp in H. tricolor and is located between tRNA-Pro and tRNA-Phe. The overall GC content is 46.2% for H. africanus and 45.6% for H. tricolor. The complete mitogenome of Guinean angelfish and Rock beauty deduced in this study provides essential and important DNA molecular data for further phylogenetic and evolutionary analysis for marine angelfish. PMID:26114323

  11. Trabecular evidence for a human-like gait in Australopithecus africanus.

    PubMed

    Barak, Meir M; Lieberman, Daniel E; Raichlen, David; Pontzer, Herman; Warrener, Anna G; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Although the earliest known hominins were apparently upright bipeds, there has been mixed evidence whether particular species of hominins including those in the genus Australopithecus walked with relatively extended hips, knees and ankles like modern humans, or with more flexed lower limb joints like apes when bipedal. Here we demonstrate in chimpanzees and humans a highly predictable and sensitive relationship between the orientation of the ankle joint during loading and the principal orientation of trabecular bone struts in the distal tibia that function to withstand compressive forces within the joint. Analyses of the orientation of these struts using microCT scans in a sample of fossil tibiae from the site of Sterkfontein, of which two are assigned to Australopithecus africanus, indicate that these hominins primarily loaded their ankles in a relatively extended posture like modern humans and unlike chimpanzees. In other respects, however, trabecular properties in Au africanus are distinctive, with values that mostly fall between those of chimpanzees and humans. These results indicate that Au. africanus, like Homo, walked with an efficient, extended lower limb. PMID:24223719

  12. A theoretical multiscale treatment of protein-protein electron transfer: The ferredoxin/ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase and flavodoxin/ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase systems.

    PubMed

    Saen-Oon, Suwipa; Cabeza de Vaca, Israel; Masone, Diego; Medina, Milagros; Guallar, Victor

    2015-12-01

    In the photosynthetic electron transfer (ET) chain, two electrons transfer from photosystem I to the flavin-dependent ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (FNR) via two sequential independent ferredoxin (Fd) electron carriers. In some algae and cyanobacteria (as Anabaena), under low iron conditions, flavodoxin (Fld) replaces Fd as single electron carrier. Extensive mutational studies have characterized the protein-protein interaction in FNR/Fd and FNR/Fld complexes. Interestingly, even though Fd and Fld share the interaction site on FNR, individual residues on FNR do not participate to the same extent in the interaction with each of the protein partners, pointing to different electron transfer mechanisms. Despite of extensive mutational studies, only FNR/Fd X-ray structures from Anabaena and maize have been solved; structural data for FNR/Fld remains elusive. Here, we present a multiscale modelling approach including coarse-grained and all-atom protein-protein docking, the QM/MM e-Pathway analysis and electronic coupling calculations, allowing for a molecular and electronic comprehensive analysis of the ET process in both complexes. Our results, consistent with experimental mutational data, reveal the ET in FNR/Fd proceeding through a bridge-mediated mechanism in a dominant protein-protein complex, where transfer of the electron is facilitated by Fd loop-residues 40-49. In FNR/Fld, however, we observe a direct transfer between redox cofactors and less complex specificity than in Fd; more than one orientation in the encounter complex can be efficient in ET. PMID:26385068

  13. Evaluation of Wood and Cellulosic Materials as Fillers in Artificial Diets for Lyctus africanus Lesne (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae)

    PubMed Central

    Kartika, Titik; Yoshimura, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    We studied the usefulness of wood- and cellulose-based diets for L. africanus Lesne. Three diets were prepared which differed on the base ingredients; wood particles (Diet 1), cellulose powder (Diet 2), and alpha-cellulose (Diet 3). The diets were provided to adult L. africanus and the number of larvae, as well as the number of adults that emerged sex ratio, and body weight of the progeny was determined. Findings indicated similar results for the number of larvae, sex ratio and body weight of the emerged L. africanus fed on each diet. However, the number of adult produced by L. africanus on Diet 3 was significantly lower. The results indicate that the amount of vital nutrients is not the only important factor in selecting a suitable diet for L. africanus because the filler used in artificial diets influences the beetles overall population growth. For the population upon which the diets were tested, Diet 1 and Diet 2 could be utilized to rear beetles in the laboratory. PMID:26463410

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of ferredoxin reductase from Leptospira interrogans

    SciTech Connect

    Nascimento, Alessandro S.; Ferrarezi, Thiago; Catalano-Dupuy, Daniela L.; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A.; Polikarpov, Igor

    2006-07-01

    Crystals adequate for X-ray diffraction analysis have been prepared from L. interrogans ferredoxin-NADP{sup +} reductase. Ferredoxin-NADP{sup +} reductase (FNR) is an FAD-containing enzyme that catalyzes electron transfer between NADP(H) and ferredoxin. Here, results are reported of the recombinant expression, purification and crystallization of FNR from Leptospira interrogans, a parasitic bacterium of animals and humans. The L. interrogans FNR crystals belong to a primitive monoclinic space group and diffract to 2.4 Å resolution at a synchrotron source.

  15. Study of the Thiol/Disulfide Redox Systems of the Anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris Points Out Pyruvate:Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase as a New Target for Thioredoxin 1

    PubMed Central

    Pieulle, Laetitia; Stocker, Pierre; Vinay, Manon; Nouailler, Matthieu; Vita, Nicolas; Brasseur, Gaël; Garcin, Edwige; Sebban-Kreuzer, Corinne; Dolla, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Sulfate reducers have developed a multifaceted adaptative strategy to survive against oxidative stresses. Along with this oxidative stress response, we recently characterized an elegant reversible disulfide bond-dependent protective mechanism in the pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) of various Desulfovibrio species. Here, we searched for thiol redox systems involved in this mechanism. Using thiol fluorescent labeling, we show that glutathione is not the major thiol/disulfide balance-controlling compound in four different Desulfovibrio species and that no other plentiful low molecular weight thiol can be detected. Enzymatic analyses of two thioredoxins (Trxs) and three thioredoxin reductases allow us to propose the existence of two independent Trx systems in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH). The TR1/Trx1 system corresponds to the typical bacterial Trx system. We measured a TR1 apparent Km value for Trx1 of 8.9 μm. Moreover, our results showed that activity of TR1 was NADPH-dependent. The second system named TR3/Trx3 corresponds to an unconventional Trx system as TR3 used preferentially NADH (Km for NADPH, 743 μm; Km for NADH, 5.6 μm), and Trx3 was unable to reduce insulin. The Km value of TR3 for Trx3 was 1.12 μm. In vitro experiments demonstrated that the TR1/Trx1 system was the only one able to reactivate the oxygen-protected form of Desulfovibrio africanus PFOR. Moreover, ex vivo pulldown assays using the mutant Trx1C33S as bait allowed us to capture PFOR from the DvH extract. Altogether, these data demonstrate that PFOR is a new target for Trx1, which is probably involved in the protective switch mechanism of the enzyme. PMID:21199874

  16. The structural rigidity of the cranium of Australopithecus africanus: implications for diet, dietary adaptations, and the allometry of feeding biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Strait, David S; Grosse, Ian R; Dechow, Paul C; Smith, Amanda L; Wang, Qian; Weber, Gerhard W; Neubauer, Simon; Slice, Dennis E; Chalk, Janine; Richmond, Brian G; Lucas, Peter W; Spencer, Mark A; Schrein, Caitlin; Wright, Barth W; Byron, Craig; Ross, Callum F

    2010-04-01

    Australopithecus africanus is an early hominin (i.e., human relative) believed to exhibit stress-reducing adaptations in its craniofacial skeleton that may be related to the consumption of resistant food items using its premolar teeth. Finite element analyses simulating molar and premolar biting were used to test the hypothesis that the cranium of A. africanus is structurally more rigid than that of Macaca fascicularis, an Old World monkey that lacks derived australopith facial features. Previously generated finite element models of crania of these species were subjected to isometrically scaled loads, permitting a direct comparison of strain magnitudes. Moreover, strain energy (SE) in the models was compared after results were scaled to account for differences in bone volume and muscle forces. Results indicate that strains in certain skeletal regions below the orbits are higher in M. fascicularis than in A. africanus. Moreover, although premolar bites produce von Mises strains in the rostrum that are elevated relative to those produced by molar biting in both species, rostral strains are much higher in the macaque than in the australopith. These data suggest that at least the midface of A. africanus is more rigid than that of M. fascicularis. Comparisons of SE reveal that the A. africanus cranium is, overall, more rigid than that of M. fascicularis during premolar biting. This is consistent with the hypothesis that this hominin may have periodically consumed large, hard food items. However, the SE data suggest that the A. africanus cranium is marginally less rigid than that of the macaque during molar biting. It is hypothesized that the SE results are being influenced by the allometric scaling of cranial cortical bone thickness. PMID:20235314

  17. Body proportions of Australopithecus afarensis and A. africanus and the origin of the genus Homo.

    PubMed

    McHenry, H M; Berger, L R

    1998-07-01

    New discoveries of A. africanus fossils from Member 4 Sterkfontein reveal a body form quite unlike earlier Australopithecus species. The new adult material consists of over 48 fore- and hindlimb specimens and includes an associated partial skeleton, Stw 431. The forelimbs and relatively large: the average size of their joints corresponds to a modern human with body mass of 53 kg. The hindlimbs are much smaller with an average size matching a modern human of only 33 kg. Analyses of the Stw 431 partial skeleton confirm these results. In contrast, A. afarensis and anamensis more closely approximate a human pattern of forelimb joint size. This is an unanticipated complication in our understanding of early human evolution. In general, craniodental morphology tracks time in species of Australopithecus: A. anamensis (3.5-4.1 Ma) is the the most primitive with a strongly sloping symphysis, large canine roots, etc., A. afarensis (3.0-3.6 Ma) is less primitive, and A. africanus (2.6-3.0 Ma) shares many derived characteristics with early Homo (e.g., expanded brain, reduced canine, bicuspid lower third premolar, reduced prognathism, greater flexion of the cranial base, deeper TMJ). the new postcranial material, however, reveals an apparently primitive morphology of relatively large forelimb and small hindlimb joints resembling more the pongid than the human pattern. More pongid-like proportions are also present in the two known associated partial skeletons of H. habilis (OH 62 KNM-ER 3735). This may imply either (1) that A. africanus and H. habilis evolved craniodental characters in parallel with the lineage leading to later Homo, or (2) that fore- to hindlimb proportions of A. afarensis (and perhaps A. anamensis) evolved independent of the lineage leading to Homo and does not imply a close phylogenetic link with Homo. Both of these explanations or any other phylogeny imply homoplasy. PMID:9680464

  18. Proximal femur of Australopithecus africanus from Member 4, Makapansgat, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Reed, K E; Kitching, J W; Grine, F E; Jungers, W L; Sokoloff, L

    1993-09-01

    A left proximal femur (MLD 46) from Member 4, Makapansgat, South Africa is described and analyzed. It consists of the head, neck, and a small segment of the shaft that extends to just below the lesser trochanter. The femur exhibits degenerative joint disease in the form of marginal osteophyte formation and thus its taxonomic identity has been somewhat obscured. Consideration of all like-sized mammalian femora from Makapansgat suggests that the femur is that of either a felid or hominid. Comparison of MLD 46 to femora of extent and extinct felids reveals that MLD 46 does not possess two morphological features that are characteristic of felids, namely a deep, prolonged trochanteric fossa and a high neck-shaft angle. Simple shape variables (ratios) and multivariate analyses consistently place MLD 46 with modern and fossil hominids, and most closely align it with the australopithecines. We conclude that the femur is most reasonably attributable to Australopithecus africanus, which is the only hominid yet identified from Makapansgat. Despite its pathological condition, MLD 46 is the most complete proximal femur known for A. africanus, thereby permitting further morphological comparisons with homologues of A. afarensis and Paranthropus. Marginal osteophytes of mammalian femoral heads characteristically occur in individuals of advanced age, suggesting that MLD 46 may have lived some time with the disease. Finally, MLD 46 is considerably larger than the previously described specimen, Sts 14, from Sterkfontein Member 4. There may be as great a contrast in body size in A. africanus as there is between the large and small specimens of A. afarensis. PMID:8238286

  19. Ferredoxin-linked chloreplast enzymes. Progress report, August 15, 1990--August 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    Progress has clearly been made on all of the goals set forth in the original proposal. Although the monoclonal antibodies raised against FNR turned out no to be useful for mapping the FNR/ferredoxin or FNR/NADP+ interaction domains, good progress has been made on mapping the FNR/ferredoxin interaction domains by an alternative technique, differential chemical modification. Furthermore, the techniques developed for differential chemical modifications of these two proteins - taurine modification of aspartate and glutamate residues and biotin modification of lysine residues - should be useful for mapping the interaction domains of many proteins that associate through electrostatic interactions. Finally, progress has also been made with respect to another ferredoxin-dependent enzyme involved in the earliest steps of plant nitrogen metabolism - nitrite reductase. Questions concerning the subunit composition and heme content of the enzyme have been resolved and evidence demonstrating the involvement of lysine and arginine residues in binding ferredoxin has been obtained for the first time.

  20. Classification of iron-sulfur cores in ferredoxins by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, K; Ozaki, Y; Kyogoku, Y; Hase, T; Matsubara, H

    1983-09-01

    A 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study was carried out on various ferredoxins which possess one of three types of iron-sulfur clusters, (2Fe-2S), (3Fe-3S), or (4Fe-4S). In the isolated form, (2Fe-2S) ferredoxins from spinach (Spinacea oleracia), pokeweed (Phytolacca americana), a blue-green alga (Spirulina platensis), and a halobacterium (Halobacterium halobium) exhibited two broad resonances common in chemical shift at the region downfield of 10 ppm. In their reduced forms, seven contact-shifted resonances appeared spread over 30 ppm. Although the positions of the contact-shifted resonances in the reduced state differed among the four, a common trend in the temperature dependence of their resonance positions was recognized. Two (4Fe-4S) ferredoxins from Bacillus stearothermophilus and Bacillus thermoproteolyticus exhibited almost indistinguishable spectral patterns in both the oxidized and reduced forms. The ferricyanide-treated ferredoxins of B. stearothermophilus and B. thermoproteolyticus showed characteristic contact-shifted resonances distinct from the spectra of the original (4Fe-4S) ferredoxins. This corresponds to the recent finding of the interconversion of (4Fe-4S) and (3Fe-3S) clusters with ferricyanide in the ferredoxin. Based on our data together with reported NMR data on other ferredoxins, contact-shift resonances of three types of clusters were tabulated. The reliability of NMR classification increases when we compare the NMR spectra of a ferredoxin with the classification standards at the two redox states. Moreover, not only the absolute values of the chemical shifts of contact-shifted resonances but also their temperature dependence give distinctive information applicable to iron core identification. PMID:6417123

  1. Fusion of Ferredoxin and Cytochrome P450 Enables Direct Light-Driven Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450s (P450s) are key enzymes in the synthesis of bioactive natural products in plants. Efforts to harness these enzymes for in vitro and whole-cell production of natural products have been hampered by difficulties in expressing them heterologously in their active form, and their requirement for NADPH as a source of reducing power. We recently demonstrated targeting and insertion of plant P450s into the photosynthetic membrane and photosynthesis-driven, NADPH-independent P450 catalytic activity mediated by the electron carrier protein ferredoxin. Here, we report the fusion of ferredoxin with P450 CYP79A1 from the model plant Sorghum bicolor, which catalyzes the initial step in the pathway leading to biosynthesis of the cyanogenic glucoside dhurrin. Fusion with ferredoxin allows CYP79A1 to obtain electrons for catalysis by interacting directly with photosystem I. Furthermore, electrons captured by the fused ferredoxin moiety are directed more effectively toward P450 catalytic activity, making the fusion better able to compete with endogenous electron sinks coupled to metabolic pathways. The P450-ferredoxin fusion enzyme obtains reducing power solely from its fused ferredoxin and outperforms unfused CYP79A1 in vivo. This demonstrates greatly enhanced electron transfer from photosystem I to CYP79A1 as a consequence of the fusion. The fusion strategy reported here therefore forms the basis for enhanced partitioning of photosynthetic reducing power toward P450-dependent biosynthesis of important natural products. PMID:27119279

  2. Fusion of Ferredoxin and Cytochrome P450 Enables Direct Light-Driven Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Silas Busck; Nielsen, Agnieszka Zygadlo; Burow, Meike; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Jakubauskas, Dainius; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Jensen, Poul Erik

    2016-07-15

    Cytochrome P450s (P450s) are key enzymes in the synthesis of bioactive natural products in plants. Efforts to harness these enzymes for in vitro and whole-cell production of natural products have been hampered by difficulties in expressing them heterologously in their active form, and their requirement for NADPH as a source of reducing power. We recently demonstrated targeting and insertion of plant P450s into the photosynthetic membrane and photosynthesis-driven, NADPH-independent P450 catalytic activity mediated by the electron carrier protein ferredoxin. Here, we report the fusion of ferredoxin with P450 CYP79A1 from the model plant Sorghum bicolor, which catalyzes the initial step in the pathway leading to biosynthesis of the cyanogenic glucoside dhurrin. Fusion with ferredoxin allows CYP79A1 to obtain electrons for catalysis by interacting directly with photosystem I. Furthermore, electrons captured by the fused ferredoxin moiety are directed more effectively toward P450 catalytic activity, making the fusion better able to compete with endogenous electron sinks coupled to metabolic pathways. The P450-ferredoxin fusion enzyme obtains reducing power solely from its fused ferredoxin and outperforms unfused CYP79A1 in vivo. This demonstrates greatly enhanced electron transfer from photosystem I to CYP79A1 as a consequence of the fusion. The fusion strategy reported here therefore forms the basis for enhanced partitioning of photosynthetic reducing power toward P450-dependent biosynthesis of important natural products. PMID:27119279

  3. Lung fluke (Paragonimus africanus) infects Nigerian red-capped mangabeys and causes respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Friant, Sagan; Brown, Kelsey; Saari, Mason T.; Segel, Nicholas H.; Slezak, Julia; Goldberg, Tony L.

    2015-01-01

    Eggs of the lung fluke genus Paragonimus were detected in red-capped mangabeys (Cercocebus torquatus) in Nigeria. We assess the role of these primates as potential sylvatic hosts and the clinical effects of the parasite on monkeys. DNA sequenced from eggs in feces were 100% identical in the ITS2 region to Paragonimus africanus sequences from humans in Cameroon. Paragonimus-positive monkeys coughed more than uninfected monkeys. Experimental de-worming led to reduction in parasite intensity and a corresponding reduction of coughing to baseline levels in infected monkeys. This report provides the first evidence of Paragonimus sp. in C. torquatus, of P. africanus in Nigerian wildlife, and the first molecular evidence of the parasite in African wildlife. Coughing, sometimes interpreted as a communication behavior in primates, can actually indicate infection with lung parasites. Observations of coughing in primates may, in turn, provide a useful mechanism for surveillance of Paragonimus spp, which are re-emerging human pathogens, in wildlife reservoirs. PMID:26543803

  4. Individual tooth macrowear pattern guides the reconstruction of Sts 52 (Australopithecus africanus) dental arches.

    PubMed

    Benazzi, Stefano; Kullmer, Ottmar; Schulz, Dieter; Gruppioni, Giorgio; Weber, Gerhard W

    2013-02-01

    The functional restoration of the occlusal relationship between maxillary and mandibular tooth rows is a major challenge in modern dentistry and maxillofacial surgery. Similar technical challenges are present in paleoanthropology when considering fragmented and deformed mandibular and maxillary fossils. Sts 52, an Australopithecus africanus specimen from Sterkfontein Member 4, represents a typical case where the original shape of the dental arches is no longer preserved. It includes a partial lower face (Sts 52a) and a fragmented mandible (Sts 52b), both incomplete and damaged to such an extent to thwart attempts at matching upper and lower dentitions. We show how the preserved macro wear pattern of the tooth crowns can be used to functionally reconstruct Sts 52's dental arches. High-resolution dental stone casts of Sts 52 maxillary and mandibular dentition were mounted and repositioned in a dental articulator. The occlusal relationship between antagonists was restored based on the analysis of the occlusal wear pattern of each preserved tooth, considering all dental contact movements represented in the occlusal compass. The reconstructed dental arches were three-dimensional surface scanned and their occlusal kinematics tested in a simulation. The outcome of this contribution is the first functional restoration of A. africanus dental arches providing new morphometric data for specimen Sts 52. It is noteworthy that the method described in this case study might be applied to several other fossil specimens. PMID:23296796

  5. Biochemical and structural characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bfd and FPR: ferredoxin NADP+ reductase and not ferredoxin is the redox partner of heme oxygenase under iron-starvation conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, An; Zeng, Yuhong; Han, Huijong; Weeratunga, Saroja; Morgan, Bailey N; Moënne-Loccoz, Pierre; Schönbrunn, Ernst; Rivera, Mario

    2007-10-30

    Among the 118 genes upregulated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in response to iron starvation [Ochsner, U. A., Wilderman, P. J., Vasil, A. I., and Vasil, M. L. (2002) Mol. Microbiol. 45, 1277-1287], we focused on the products of the two genes encoding electron transfer proteins, as a means of identifying the redox partners of the heme oxygenase (pa-HO) expressed under low-iron stress conditions. Biochemical and spectroscopic investigations demonstrated that the bfd gene encodes a 73-amino acid protein (pa-Bfd) that incorporates a [2Fe-2S]2+/+ center, whereas the fpr gene encodes a 258-residue NADPH-dependent ferredoxin reductase (pa-FPR) that utilizes FAD as a cofactor. In vitro reconstitution of pa-HO catalytic activity with the newly characterized proteins led to the surprising observation that pa-FPR efficiently supports the catalytic cycle of pa-HO, without the need of a ferredoxin. In comparison, electron transfer from pa-Bfd to pa-HO is sluggish, which strongly argues against the possibility that the seven electrons needed by pa-HO to degrade biliverdin are transferred from NADPH to pa-HO in a ferredoxin (Bfd)-dependent manner. Given that pa-HO functions to release iron from exogenous heme acquired under iron-starvation conditions, the use of a flavoenzyme rather than an iron-sulfur center-containing protein to support heme degradation is an efficient use of resources in the cell. The crystal structure of pa-FPR (1.6 A resolution) showed that its fold is comparable that of the superfamily of ferredoxin reductases and most similar to the structure of Azotobacter vinelandii FPR and Escherichia coli flavodoxin reductase. The latter two enzymes interact with distinct redox partners, a ferredoxin and a flavodoxin, respectively. Hence, findings reported herein extend the range of redox partners recognized by the fold of pa-FPR to include a heme oxygenase (pa-HO). PMID:17915950

  6. Dual targeted poplar ferredoxin NADP(+) oxidoreductase interacts with hemoglobin 1.

    PubMed

    Jokipii-Lukkari, Soile; Kastaniotis, Alexander J; Parkash, Vimal; Sundström, Robin; Leiva-Eriksson, Nélida; Nymalm, Yvonne; Blokhina, Olga; Kukkola, Eija; Fagerstedt, Kurt V; Salminen, Tiina A; Läärä, Esa; Bülow, Leif; Ohlmeier, Steffen; Hiltunen, J Kalervo; Kallio, Pauli T; Häggman, Hely

    2016-06-01

    Previous reports have connected non-symbiotic and truncated hemoglobins (Hbs) to metabolism of nitric oxide (NO), an important signalling molecule involved in wood formation. We have studied the capability of poplar (Populus tremula×tremuloides) Hbs PttHb1 and PttTrHb proteins alone or with a flavin-protein reductase to relieve NO cytotoxicity in living cells. Complementation tests in a Hb-deficient, NO-sensitive yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Δyhb1 mutant showed that neither PttHb1 nor PttTrHb alone protected cells against NO. To study the ability of Hbs to interact with a reductase, ferredoxin NADP(+) oxidoreductase PtthFNR was characterized by sequencing and proteomics. To date, by far the greatest number of the known dual-targeted plant proteins are directed to chloroplasts and mitochondria. We discovered a novel variant of hFNR that lacks the plastid presequence and resides in cytosol. The coexpression of PttHb1 and PtthFNR partially restored NO resistance of the yeast Δyhb1 mutant, whereas PttTrHb coexpressed with PtthFNR failed to rescue growth. YFP fusion proteins confirmed the interaction between PttHb1 and PtthFNR in plant cells. The structural modelling results indicate that PttHb1 and PtthFNR are able to interact as NO dioxygenase. This is the first report on dual targeting of central plant enzyme FNR to plastids and cytosol. PMID:27095407

  7. Identification of Global Ferredoxin Interaction Networks in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii*

    PubMed Central

    Peden, Erin A.; Boehm, Marko; Mulder, David W.; Davis, ReAnna; Old, William M.; King, Paul W.; Ghirardi, Maria L.; Dubini, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Ferredoxins (FDXs) can distribute electrons originating from photosynthetic water oxidation, fermentation, and other reductant-generating pathways to specific redox enzymes in different organisms. The six FDXs identified in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii are not fully characterized in terms of their biological function. In this report, we present data from the following: (a) yeast two-hybrid screens, identifying interaction partners for each Chlamydomonas FDX; (b) pairwise yeast two-hybrid assays measuring FDX interactions with proteins from selected biochemical pathways; (c) affinity pulldown assays that, in some cases, confirm and even expand the interaction network for FDX1 and FDX2; and (d) in vitro NADP+ reduction and H2 photo-production assays mediated by each FDX that verify their role in these two pathways. Our results demonstrate new potential roles for FDX1 in redox metabolism and carbohydrate and fatty acid biosynthesis, for FDX2 in anaerobic metabolism, and possibly in state transition. Our data also suggest that FDX3 is involved in nitrogen assimilation, FDX4 in glycolysis and response to reactive oxygen species, and FDX5 in hydrogenase maturation. Finally, we provide experimental evidence that FDX1 serves as the primary electron donor to two important biological pathways, NADPH and H2 photo-production, whereas FDX2 is capable of driving these reactions at less than half the rate observed for FDX1. PMID:24100040

  8. Temporal and spatial distribution of ferredoxin isoproteins in tomato fruit.

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, K; Wada, K

    1996-01-01

    Five ferredoxin (Fd) isoproteins (FdA, FdB, FdC, FdD, and FdE) were isolated from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum cv Momotaro) fruit. These isoproteins showed differential temporal and spatial accumulation patterns. FdA and FdC were present in leaves. FdE was present in roots, and FdB and FdD were fruit-specific. During fruit growth, the relative abundance of FdA decreased and that of FdE increased. The FdE/FdA ratio was higher in the inner tissues of the fruit than in the outer tissue, and it was correlated with starch accumulation. In darkgrown fruit the contents of FdA, FdB, and FdC, as well as chlorophyll, decreased remarkably relative to their light-grown counterparts; however, the contents of FdE and starch did not change significantly. Under in vitro conditions FdE showed higher cytochrome c reduction activity than FdA and FdB. These results, together with their N-terminal sequences, indicate that both photosynthetic- and heterotrophic-type Fd isoproteins are present in tomato fruit. PMID:8883378

  9. Posttranslational modifications of FERREDOXIN-NADP+ OXIDOREDUCTASE in Arabidopsis chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Lehtimäki, Nina; Koskela, Minna M; Dahlström, Käthe M; Pakula, Eveliina; Lintala, Minna; Scholz, Martin; Hippler, Michael; Hanke, Guy T; Rokka, Anne; Battchikova, Natalia; Salminen, Tiina A; Mulo, Paula

    2014-12-01

    Rapid responses of chloroplast metabolism and adjustments to photosynthetic machinery are of utmost importance for plants' survival in a fluctuating environment. These changes may be achieved through posttranslational modifications of proteins, which are known to affect the activity, interactions, and localization of proteins. Recent studies have accumulated evidence about the crucial role of a multitude of modifications, including acetylation, methylation, and glycosylation, in the regulation of chloroplast proteins. Both of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf-type FERREDOXIN-NADP(+) OXIDOREDUCTASE (FNR) isoforms, the key enzymes linking the light reactions of photosynthesis to carbon assimilation, exist as two distinct forms with different isoelectric points. We show that both AtFNR isoforms contain multiple alternative amino termini and undergo light-responsive addition of an acetyl group to the α-amino group of the amino-terminal amino acid of proteins, which causes the change in isoelectric point. Both isoforms were also found to contain acetylation of a conserved lysine residue near the active site, while no evidence for in vivo phosphorylation or glycosylation was detected. The dynamic, multilayer regulation of AtFNR exemplifies the complex regulatory network systems controlling chloroplast proteins by a range of posttranslational modifications, which continues to emerge as a novel area within photosynthesis research. PMID:25301888

  10. Expression of plant ferredoxin-like protein (PFLP) enhances tolerance to heat stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Hsien; Huang, Li-Fen; Hase, Tashiharu; Huang, Hsiang-En; Feng, Teng-Yung

    2015-03-25

    Under adverse environments, plants produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can trigger cell death when their accumulation surpasses the antioxidant capacity of ROS scavenging systems. These systems function in chloroplasts mainly through the ascorbate-mediated water-water cycle, in which ascorbate is photoreduced by ferredoxin in the photosynthetic system. Our previous study showed that the fraction of the reduced form of ascorbate was increased in ferredoxin-transgenic Arabidopsis (CPF) plants which overexpressed plant ferredoxin-like protein (PFLP) in their chloroplasts. Thus, we hypothesized that expression of PFLP could alter the tolerance of plants to abiotic stresses through increasing reduced form of ascorbate. In this study, we found that two CPF lines exhibited lower mortality rates at five days, following two days of heat treatment. Compared to non-transgenic wild type (Col-0) plants, CPF plants exhibited decreased H2O2 content, MDA accumulation, and ion leakage after heat treatment. To confirm the efficacy of ferredoxin against heat stress in chloroplasts, we evaluated two RNA interference (RNAi) lines on two endogenous ferredoxin isoforms, Atfd1 or Atfd2, of Arabidopsis plants. Both lines not only decreased their amounts of ascorbate, but also exhibited adverse reactions following heat treatment. Based on these results, we conclude that expression of PFLP in chloroplasts can confer tolerance to heat stress. This tolerance might be associated with the increasing of ascorbate in plants. PMID:25527360

  11. The crystal structure of FdxA, a 7Fe ferredoxin from Mycobacterium smegmatis

    SciTech Connect

    Ricagno, Stefano; De Rosa, Matteo; Aliverti, Alessandro; Zanetti, Giuliana; Bolognesi, Martino . E-mail: martino.bolognesi@unimi.it

    2007-08-17

    Mycobacterium smegmatis ferredoxin FdxA, which has an orthologue ferredoxin in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, FdxC, contains both one [3Fe-4S] and one [4Fe-4S] cluster. M. smegmatis FdxA has been shown to be a preferred ferredoxin substrate of FprA [F. Fischer, D. Raimondi, A. Aliverti, G. Zanetti, Mycobacterium tuberculosis FprA, a novel bacterial NADPH-ferredoxin reductase, Eur. J. Biochem. 269 (2002) 3005-3013], an adrenodoxin reductase-like flavoprotein of M. tuberculosis, suggesting that M. tuberculosis FdxC could be the physiological partner of the enzyme in providing reducing power to the cytochromes P450. We report here the crystal structure of FdxA at 1.6 A resolution (R {sub factor} 16.5%, R {sub free} 20.2%). Besides providing an insight on protein architecture for this 106-residue ferredoxin, our crystallographic investigation highlights lability of the [4Fe-4S] center, which is shown to loose a Fe atom during crystal growth. Due to their high similarity (87% sequence identity), the structure here reported can be considered a valuable model for M. tuberculosis FdxC, thus representing a step forward in the study of the complex mycobacterial redox pathways.

  12. EPR and (57)Fe ENDOR investigation of 2Fe ferredoxins from Aquifex aeolicus.

    PubMed

    Cutsail, George E; Doan, Peter E; Hoffman, Brian M; Meyer, Jacques; Telser, Joshua

    2012-12-01

    We have employed EPR and a set of recently developed electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopies to characterize a suite of [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin clusters from Aquifex aeolicus (Aae Fd1, Fd4, and Fd5). Antiferromagnetic coupling between the Fe(II), S = 2, and Fe(III), S = 5/2, sites of the [2Fe-2S](+) cluster in these proteins creates an S = 1/2 ground state. A complete discussion of the spin-Hamiltonian contributions to g includes new symmetry arguments along with references to related FeS model compounds and their symmetry and EPR properties. Complete (57)Fe hyperfine coupling (hfc) tensors for each iron, with respective orientations relative to g, have been determined by the use of "stochastic" continuous wave and/or "random hopped" pulsed ENDOR, with the relative utility of the two approaches being emphasized. The reported hyperfine tensors include absolute signs determined by a modified pulsed ENDOR saturation and recovery (PESTRE) technique, RD-PESTRE-a post-processing protocol of the "raw data" that comprises an ENDOR spectrum. The (57)Fe hyperfine tensor components found by ENDOR are nicely consistent with those previously found by Mössbauer spectroscopy, while accurate tensor orientations are unique to the ENDOR approach. These measurements demonstrate the capabilities of the newly developed methods. The high-precision hfc tensors serve as a benchmark for this class of FeS proteins, while the variation in the (57)Fe hfc tensors as a function of symmetry in these small FeS clusters provides a reference for higher-nuclearity FeS clusters, such as those found in nitrogenase. PMID:22872138

  13. ANTEMORTEM DIAGNOSIS OF CYSTIC ENDOMETRIAL HYPERPLASIA AND SUCCESSFUL OVARIOHYSTERECTOMY IN AN AFRICAN WARTHOG (PHACOCHOERUS AFRICANUS).

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kimberly A; Niehaus, Andrew; Shellabarger, Wynona; Depenbrock, Sarah; Agnew, Dalen

    2015-12-01

    During a routine geriatric examination on a 9-yr-old, nulliparous female African warthog (Phacochoerus africanus), a severely enlarged, mixed echogenicity uterus was discovered during transabdominal ultrasound. Ovariohysterectomy (OVH) was elected and performed due to concern for a potential neoplastic condition. Postoperatively, the warthog was treated prophylactically with metoclopramide and ranitidine to promote gastrointestinal motility and prevent postoperative ileus. The gross appearance and histopathology confirmed the presence of extensive widely disseminated cystic changes consistent with cystic endometrial hyperplasia (CEH) and multiple para-ovarian cysts. Uterine pathology, including CEH, is a common condition in domestic potbellied pigs (Sus scrofa), and as a result, it is recommended to perform an OVH at an early age. The advanced uterine changes may have accounted for this animal's history of infertility. This case provides evidence that nulliparity may be associated with the development of uterine pathology in warthogs. Increased knowledge of reproductive pathology will aid in improved management strategies for breeding nondomestic suids. PMID:26667548

  14. Suspected cervical spinal cord vascular anomaly in an African warthog (Phacochoerus africanus).

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Douglas P; Shury, Todd K; Black, Sandra R; Raverty, Stephen

    2006-09-01

    Vascular myelopathies of the spinal cord have not been described in Suidae, and are a rare finding in companion animals. An 8.5-yr female African warthog (Phacochoerus africanus) presented with an acute onset of tetraparesis. Based on neurologic findings, a cervical spinal cord lesion between C7-T2 was suspected. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed severe intramedullary hemorrhage with suspected abnormal vessels in the spinal cord at the level of the seventh cervical vertebrae. The acute onset of clinical signs and rapid deterioration of neurological status precluded surgical managements. A vascular anomaly was suspected on gross pathology and histology. Immunohistochemistry identified the lesion as a spontaneous intramedullary hematoma. Spontaneous intramedullary hematomyelia should be considered as a differential for acute onset of paresis in suid species. PMID:17319141

  15. Tethering of ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase to thylakoid membranes is mediated by novel chloroplast protein TROL.

    PubMed

    Jurić, Snjezana; Hazler-Pilepić, Kroata; Tomasić, Ana; Lepedus, Hrvoje; Jelicić, Branka; Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Bionda, Tihana; Vojta, Lea; Allen, John F; Schleiff, Enrico; Fulgosi, Hrvoje

    2009-12-01

    Working in tandem, two photosystems in the chloroplast thylakoid membranes produce a linear electron flow from H(2)O to NADP(+). Final electron transfer from ferredoxin to NADP(+) is accomplished by a flavoenzyme ferredoxin:NADP(+) oxidoreductase (FNR). Here we describe TROL (thylakoid rhodanese-like protein), a nuclear-encoded component of thylakoid membranes that is required for tethering of FNR and sustaining efficient linear electron flow (LEF) in vascular plants. TROL consists of two distinct modules; a centrally positioned rhodanese-like domain and a C-terminal hydrophobic FNR binding region. Analysis of Arabidopsis mutant lines indicates that, in the absence of TROL, relative electron transport rates at high-light intensities are severely lowered accompanied with significant increase in non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). Thus, TROL might represent a missing thylakoid membrane docking site for a complex between FNR, ferredoxin and NADP(+). Such association might be necessary for maintaining photosynthetic redox poise and enhancement of the NPQ. PMID:19682289

  16. Protein chemotaxonomy. XIII. Amino acid sequence of ferredoxin from Panax ginseng.

    PubMed

    Mino, Yoshiki

    2006-08-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin from Panax ginseng (Araliaceae) has been determined by automated Edman degradation of the entire S-carboxymethylcysteinyl protein and of the peptides obtained by enzymatic digestion. This ferredoxin has a unique amino acid sequence, which includes an insertion of Tyr at the 3rd position from the amino-terminus and a deletion of two amino acid residues at the carboxyl terminus. This ferredoxin had 18 differences in its amino acid sequence compared to that of Petroselinum sativum (Umbelliferae). In contrast, 23-33 differences were observed compared to other dicotyledonous plants. This suggests that Panax ginseng is related taxonomically to umbelliferous plants. PMID:16880642

  17. Purification and properties of two 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases from Halobacterium halobium.

    PubMed

    Kerscher, L; Oesterhelt, D

    1981-06-01

    Pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and 2-oxoglutarate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase were obtained from cell-free extracts of Halobacterium halobium as homogeneous proteins after ammonium sulfate precipitation, salting-out chromatography with ammonium sulfate on unsubstituted agarose, gel filtration and chromatography on hydroxyapatite. The respective molecular weights are 256000 and 248000. Both enzymes consist of two sets of non-identical subunits of Mr 86000 and 42000 in the case of the pyruvate-degrading enzyme and of 88000 and 36000 in the case of the 20 -oxogluatarate-degrading enzyme. Analyses indicate that an intact enzyme molecule contains two [4 Fe-4S]2 + (2 + , 1+) clusters and two molecules of thiamin diphosphate. Flavin nucleotides, lipoic acid and pantetheine are absent. Thus the enzymes are very similar to the 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases from fermentative and photosynthetic anaerobes described previously, but are clearly different from the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes which commonly occur in anaerobic organisms. PMID:6266826

  18. Pyruvate:Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase Is Coupled to Light-independent Hydrogen Production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii*

    PubMed Central

    Noth, Jens; Krawietz, Danuta; Hemschemeier, Anja; Happe, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    In anaerobiosis, the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii evolves molecular hydrogen (H2) as one of several fermentation products. H2 is generated mostly by the [Fe-Fe]-hydrogenase HYDA1, which uses plant type ferredoxin PETF/FDX1 (PETF) as an electron donor. Dark fermentation of the alga is mainly of the mixed acid type, because formate, ethanol, and acetate are generated by a pyruvate:formate lyase pathway similar to Escherichia coli. However, C. reinhardtii also possesses the pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase PFR1, which, like pyruvate:formate lyase and HYDA1, is localized in the chloroplast. PFR1 has long been suggested to be responsible for the low but significant H2 accumulation in the dark because the catalytic mechanism of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase involves the reduction of ferredoxin. With the aim of proving the biochemical feasibility of the postulated reaction, we have heterologously expressed the PFR1 gene in E. coli. Purified recombinant PFR1 is able to transfer electrons from pyruvate to HYDA1, using the ferredoxins PETF and FDX2 as electron carriers. The high reactivity of PFR1 toward oxaloacetate indicates that in vivo, fermentation might also be coupled to an anaerobically active glyoxylate cycle. Our results suggest that C. reinhardtii employs a clostridial type H2 production pathway in the dark, especially because C. reinhardtii PFR1 was also able to allow H2 evolution in reaction mixtures containing Clostridium acetobutylicum 2[4Fe-4S]-ferredoxin and [Fe-Fe]-hydrogenase HYDA. PMID:23258532

  19. Metal-ion-center assembly of ferredoxin and plastocyanin in isolated chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hsoumin; Theg, S.M.; Bauerle, C.M.; Keegstra, K. )

    1990-09-01

    Most chloroplastic proteins are cytosolically synthesized andposttranslationally transported to their proper locations. Two examples of this group of proteins are ferredoxin and plastocyanin, both of which are metal-containing components of the photosynthetic electron-transport chain. The import process for these two proteins includes the insertion of the metal ions to produce the holo forms of the proteins. The authors show here that in vitro translated precursor proteins of ferredoxin and plastocyanin are synthesized as apo forms and are assembled into their respective holo forms after being imported into isolated chloroplasts. They also provide evidence that only mature-sized proteins are competent to be assembled into holo forms.

  20. Detection of the Messenger RNA Encoding for the Ferredoxin-Dependent Glutamate Synthase in Maize Leaf

    PubMed Central

    Commere, Bernard; Vidal, Jean; Suzuki, Akira; Gadal, Pierre; Caboche, Michel

    1986-01-01

    Ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase (EC 1.4.7.1), glutamate oxoglutarate aminotransferase (glutamate synthase) (GOGAT) messenger RNA was extracted from maize (Zea mays L.) leaves and partially purified through oligo(dT)-cellulose chromatography and ultracentrifugation in a sucrose gradient. mRNA were translated in vitro using a reticulocyte system. The glutamate synthase subunit was characterized by immunoprecipitation with antibodies raised against the rice (Oryza sativa L.) ferredoxin-glutamate synthase. The in vitro synthesized protein and the 145 kilodaltons genuine maize leaf subunit of GOGAT were found to comigrate in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis experiments. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:16664732

  1. Ferredoxin, in conjunction with NADPH and ferredoxin-NADP reductase, transfers electrons to the IscS/IscU complex to promote iron-sulfur cluster assembly.

    PubMed

    Yan, Robert; Adinolfi, Salvatore; Pastore, Annalisa

    2015-09-01

    Fe-S cluster biogenesis is an essential pathway coordinated by a network of protein-protein interactions whose functions include desulfurase activity, substrate delivery, electron transfer and product transfer. In an effort to understand the intricacies of the pathway, we have developed an in vitro assay to follow the ferredoxin role in electron transfer during Fe-S cluster assembly. Previously, assays have relied upon the non-physiological reducing agents dithionite and dithiothreitol to assess function. We have addressed this shortcoming by using electron transfer between NADPH and ferredoxin-NADP-reductase to reduce ferredoxin. Our results show that this trio of electron transfer partners are sufficient to sustain the reaction in in vitro studies, albeit with a rate slower compared with DTT-mediated cluster assembly. We also show that, despite overlapping with the CyaY protein in binding to IscS, Fdx does not interfere with the inhibitory activity of this protein. We suggest explanations for these observations which have important consequences for understanding the mechanism of cluster formation. Cofactor-dependent proteins: evolution, chemical diversity and bio-applications. PMID:25688831

  2. Endocranial volume of Australopithecus africanus: new CT-based estimates and the effects of missing data and small sample size.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Simon; Gunz, Philipp; Weber, Gerhard W; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2012-04-01

    Estimation of endocranial volume in Australopithecus africanus is important in interpreting early hominin brain evolution. However, the number of individuals available for investigation is limited and most of these fossils are, to some degree, incomplete and/or distorted. Uncertainties of the required reconstruction ('missing data uncertainty') and the small sample size ('small sample uncertainty') both potentially bias estimates of the average and within-group variation of endocranial volume in A. africanus. We used CT scans, electronic preparation (segmentation), mirror-imaging and semilandmark-based geometric morphometrics to generate and reconstruct complete endocasts for Sts 5, Sts 60, Sts 71, StW 505, MLD 37/38, and Taung, and measured their endocranial volumes (EV). To get a sense of the reliability of these new EV estimates, we then used simulations based on samples of chimpanzees and humans to: (a) test the accuracy of our approach, (b) assess missing data uncertainty, and (c) appraise small sample uncertainty. Incorporating missing data uncertainty of the five adult individuals, A. africanus was found to have an average adult endocranial volume of 454-461 ml with a standard deviation of 66-75 ml. EV estimates for the juvenile Taung individual range from 402 to 407 ml. Our simulations show that missing data uncertainty is small given the missing portions of the investigated fossils, but that small sample sizes are problematic for estimating species average EV. It is important to take these uncertainties into account when different fossil groups are being compared. PMID:22365336

  3. Metabolic Interactions between Spinach Leaf Nitrite Reductase and Ferredoxin-NADP Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Baysdorfer, Chris; Robinson, J. Michael

    1985-01-01

    Steady state rates of NADP reduction decline upon commencement of nitrite reduction in reconstituted chloroplast preparations. Similarly, steady state rates of nitrite reduction are lower, but not zero, during concurrent NADP reduction. These results imply that competition for substrate occurs and suggest that nitrite reduction can successfully compete for reduced ferredoxin, even at high rates of NADP reduction. PMID:16664050

  4. Evidence for oxidation-state-dependent conformational changes in human ferredoxin from multinuclear, multidimensional NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xia, B; Volkman, B F; Markley, J L

    1998-03-17

    Human ferredoxin belongs to the vertebrate ferredoxin family which includes bovine adrenodoxin. It is a small (13.8 kDa) acidic protein with a [2Fe-2S] cluster. It functions as an electron shuttle in the cholesterol side-chain cleavage reaction which is the first step of steroid hormone biosynthesis. The protein studied here was produced in Escherichia coli and doubly labeled with 13C and 15N. The diamagnetic 15N, 13C', 13C alpha, 13C beta, 1H alpha, and 1HN resonances from about 70% of the 124 amino acid residues for oxidized human ferredoxin and 80% of those for the reduced protein have been assigned primarily on the basis of results from three-dimensional, triple-resonance experiments. Secondary structure features for human ferredoxin in its oxidized and reduced states have been identified from a combination of chemical shift index and NOE data. Comparison of NMR results from the protein in its oxidized and reduced states indicates that structural changes accompany the change in the oxidation state of the [2Fe-2S] cluster. Major differences are localized at two regions: residues 29-31 and residues 109-124; the latter stretch forms the C-terminal region of the protein. The possible functional significance of these oxidation-state-dependent structural changes is discussed. PMID:9521718

  5. Three novel lineages of 'Candidatus Liberibacter africanus' associated with native rutaceous hosts of Trioza erytreae in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Ronel; Steenkamp, Emma T; Pietersen, Gerhard

    2015-02-01

    Greening disease of citrus in South Africa is associated with 'Candidatus Liberibacter africanus' (Laf), a phloem-limited bacterium vectored by the sap-sucking insect Trioza erytreae (Triozidae). Despite the implementation of control strategies, this disease remains problematic, suggesting the existence of reservoir hosts to Laf. The current study aimed to identify such hosts. Samples from 234 trees of Clausena anisata, 289 trees of Vepris lanceolata and 231 trees of Zanthoxylum capense were collected throughout the natural distribution of these trees in South Africa. Total DNA was extracted from samples and tested for the presence of liberibacters by a generic Liberibacter TaqMan real-time PCR assay. Liberibacters present in positive samples were characterized by amplifying and sequencing rplJ, omp and 16S rRNA gene regions. The identity of tree host species from which liberibacter sequences were obtained was verified by sequencing host rbcL genes. Of the trees tested, 33 specimens of Clausena, 17 specimens of Vepris and 10 specimens of Zanthoxylum tested positive for liberibacter. None of the samples contained typical citrus-infecting Laf sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the liberibacters obtained from Vepris and Clausena had 16S rRNA gene sequences identical to that of 'Candidatus Liberibacter africanus subsp. capensis' (LafC), whereas those from Zanthoxylum species grouped separately. Phylogenetic analysis of the rplJ and omp gene regions revealed unique clusters for liberibacters associated with each tree species. We propose the following names for these novel liberibacters: 'Candidatus Liberibacter africanus subsp. clausenae' (LafCl), 'Candidatus Liberibacter africanus subsp. vepridis' (LafV) and 'Candidatus Liberibacter africanus subsp. zanthoxyli' (LafZ). This study did not find any natural hosts of Laf associated with greening of citrus. While native citrus relatives were shown to be infected with Laf

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the electron-transfer complex of Rieske-type [2Fe–2S] ferredoxin and NADH-dependent ferredoxin reductase derived from Acidovorax sp. strain KKS102

    SciTech Connect

    Senda, Miki; Kishigami, Shinya; Kimura, Shigenobu; Senda, Toshiya

    2007-06-01

    The electron-transfer complex of BphA3, a Rieske-type [2Fe–2S] ferredoxin, and BphA4, a NADH-dependent ferredoxin reductase, was crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method under anaerobic conditions. The electron-transfer complex of BphA3, a Rieske-type [2Fe–2S] ferredoxin, and BphA4, a NADH-dependent ferredoxin reductase, was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method under anaerobic conditions. The obtained crystals were analyzed by SDS–PAGE, which showed that they contained both BphA3 and BphA4. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.60, b = 173.72, c = 60.98 Å, β = 115.8°, and diffracted to a resolution of 1.9 Å.

  7. Identification of Esters as Novel Aggregation Pheromone Components Produced by the Male Powder-Post Beetle, Lyctus africanus Lesne (Coleoptera: Lyctinae)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Lyctus africanus is a cosmopolitan powder-post beetle that is considered one of the major pests threatening timber and timber products. Because infestations of this beetle are inconspicuous, damage is difficult to detect and identification is often delayed. We identified the chemical compounds involved in the aggregation behavior of L. africanus using preparations of crude hexanic extracts from male and female beetles (ME and FE, respectively). Both male and female beetles showed significant preferences for ME, which was found to contain three esters. FE was ignored by both the sexes. Further bioassay confirmed the role of esters in the aggregation behavior of L. africanus. Three esters were identified as 2-propyl dodecanoate, 3-pentyl dodecanoate, and 3-pentyl tetradecanoate. Further behavioral bioassays revealed 3-pentyl dodecanoate to play the main role in the aggregation behavior of female L. africanus beetles. However, significantly more beetles aggregated on a paper disk treated with a blend of the three esters than on a paper disk treated with a single ester. This is the first report on pheromone identification in L. africanus; in addition, the study for the first time presents 3-pentyl dodecanoate as an insect pheromone. PMID:26544984

  8. Anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic cyathane diterpenoids from the medicinal fungus Cyathus africanus.

    PubMed

    Han, Junjie; Chen, Yuhui; Bao, Li; Yang, Xiaoli; Liu, Dailin; Li, Shaojie; Zhao, Feng; Liu, Hongwei

    2013-01-01

    Five novel cyathane diterpenes, cyathins D-H (1-5), as well as three known diterpenes, neosarcodonin O (6), cyathatriol (7),and 11-O-acetylcyathatriol (8), were isolated from the solid culture of Cyathus africanus. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic methods. The absolute configurations of compounds 2 and 8 were determined by single-crystal X-ray crystallographic analysis, whereas the absolute configuration of C-14 in 1 was determined via the circular dichroism data of the [Rh(2)(OCOCF(3))(4)] complex. Compounds 3, 5, 6, 8, and 9 showed potent inhibition against nitric oxide production in lipopolysaccaride-activated macrophages with an IC(50) value of 2.57, 1.45, 12.0, 10.73, and 9.45μM, respectively. Compounds 6 and 8 showed strong cytotoxicity against Hela and K562 cell lines with the IC(50) value less than 10μM. PMID:23075884

  9. Antimicrobial Agents Produced by Marine Aspergillus terreus var. africanus Against Some Virulent Fish Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Khouloud M; Gohar, Yousry M

    2012-09-01

    Screening of fungal isolates collected from different locations of Alexandria coast, Egypt, was carried out to obtain new biologically active metabolites against some virulent fish pathogens (Edwardsiella tarda, Aeromonas hydrophila, Vibrio ordalli and Vibrio angularuim). Among 26 fungal isolates, Aspergillus terreus var. africanus was identified as the most potent isolate. Production of the bioactive material was optimized using response surface methodology including fermentation media, incubation period, temperature, pH, and thermo-stability. Spectral properties of the gas chromatography/mass spectrum of the ethyl acetate crude extract were determined. Partially purified components of the crude extract were chromatographically separated and bioassayed. Out of ten separated compounds, five were with considerable antibacterial agent. The bio-toxicity of crude showed a slight toxicity against the brine shrimp Artemia salina (LC50 = 1,500 μg/l). Antibacterial activity of the crude was compared with some known standard antibiotics and found to be superior over many where its MIC against some pathogen reached 1 μg/ml. PMID:23997326

  10. Effects of Decompression Treatment for Controlling the Powderpost Beetle, Lyctus africanus Lesne, (Coleoptera: Lyctinae).

    PubMed

    Nakai, Kazushi; Hiraku, Tatsuya; Fujimoto, Izumi; Yoshimura, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of decompression treatment as a non-destructive method to control larvae of the powderpost beetle, Lyctus africanus Lesne, was evaluated in the laboratory using various combinations of two pressure levels, 1.1 kPa and 40 kPa, and three temperature levels, 20, 25, and 40 °C. Larval mortality generally depended on weight reduction while decreases in the oxygen level had relatively little effect. The lower pressure, 1.1 kPa, significantly affected mortality, and no larvae survived after 12 h of this pressure treatment, at 25 °C. The average body weight was reduced with treatment time and temperature, and the reduction rate at 25 °C was higher than that at the lower temperature, 20 °C. Effects on larvae of the higher pressure treatment, 40 kPa, with a CO₂ gas purge, were tested to determine the feasibility of decompression treatment in the manufacturing process. Although higher pressure resulted in low mortality, the body weight was dramatically decreased using the CO₂ purge. These results present important information on the possibility of using decompression treatment for wood products. PMID:27429007

  11. Molecular dynamics study of Desulfovibrio africanus cytochrome c3 in oxidized and reduced forms.

    PubMed Central

    Bret, Céline; Roth, Michel; Nørager, Sofie; Hatchikian, E Claude; Field, Martin J

    2002-01-01

    A 5-ns molecular dynamics study of a tetraheme cytochrome in fully oxidized and reduced forms was performed using the CHARMM molecular modeling program, with explicit water molecules, Langevin dynamics thermalization, Particle Mesh Ewald long-range electrostatics, and quantum mechanical determination of heme partial charges. The simulations used, as starting points, crystallographic structures of the oxidized and reduced forms of the acidic cytochrome c(3) from Desulfovibrio africanus obtained at pH 5.6. In this paper we also report structures for the two forms obtained at pH 8. In contrast to previous cytochrome c(3) dynamics simulations, our model is stable. The simulation structures agree reasonably well with the crystallographic ones, but our models show higher flexibility and the water molecules are more labile. We have compared in detail the differences between the simulated and experimental structures of the two redox states and observe that the hydration structure is highly dependent on the redox state. We have also analyzed the interaction energy terms between the hemes, the protein residues, and water. The direct electrostatic interaction between hemes is weak and nearly insensitive to the redox state, but the remaining terms are large and contribute in a complex way to the overall potential energy differences that we see between the redox states. PMID:12496077

  12. Phenetic and functional analyses of the distal ulna of Australopithecus afarensis and Australopithecus africanus.

    PubMed

    Tallman, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    The morphology of the distal portion of the hominoid ulna is poorly studied despite its important functional role at the wrist joint. There are five qualitatively well-described fossil hominin distal ulnae belonging to Australopithecus afarensis and Australopithecus africanus, but there have been few efforts to quantify their morphology or relate it to their functional abilities. This article presents an effort to do so, using three-dimensional geometric morphometrics to analyze the shape of the distal ulna of the Plio-Pleistocene hominins and an extant comparative sample of great apes and humans. For the extant taxa, results show that the morphology of Pan and Pongo is distinct from that of Homo, and that these differences are likely related to climbing, clambering and below-branch suspension in the former, and the release of the limbs from locomotion and (potentially) tool manufacture in the latter. For the australopiths, results indicate that the A. afarensis sample is relatively heterogeneous. These results are driven by the morphology of A.L. 333-12, which is the largest ulna in the sample and has a unique combination of traits when compared with the other two A. afarensis specimens. Overall, the morphology of all the hominins was most consistent with the pattern displayed by extant great apes, and specifically Pan and Pongo; however, large overlap in shape in the distal ulna in the extant sample indicates that other areas of the skeleton may be more informative for functional analyses. PMID:25529241

  13. Endocranial features of Australopithecus africanus revealed by 2- and 3-D computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Conroy, G C; Vannier, M W; Tobias, P V

    1990-02-16

    The earliest hominid from South Africa, Australopithecus africanus, is known from only six specimens in which accurate assessment of endocranial capacity and cranial venous outflow pattern can be obtained. This places a severe limit on a number of hypotheses concerning early hominid evolution, particularly those involving brain-body size relationships and adaptations of the circulatory system to evolving upright posture. Advances in high-resolution two- and three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) now allow the inclusion of another important specimen to this list, MLD 37/38 from Makapansgat. A new computer imaging technique is described that "reconstructs" the missing portions of the endocranial cavity in order to determine endocranial capacity. In addition, CT evaluation allows assessment of cranial venous outflow pattern even in cases where the endocranial cavity is completely filled with stone matrix. Results show that endocranial capacity in this specimen is less than originally proposed and also support the view that gracile and robust australopithecines evolved different cranial venous outflow patterns in response to upright postures. PMID:2305255

  14. The ferredoxin-thioredoxin system of a green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: identification and characterization of thioredoxins and ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huppe, H. C.; de Lamotte-Guery, F.; Buchanan, B. B.

    1990-01-01

    The components of the ferredoxin-thioredoxin (FT) system of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii have been purified and characterized. The system resembled that of higher plants in consisting of a ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR) and two types of thioredoxin, a single f and two m species, m1 and m2. The Chlamydomonas m and f thioredoxins were antigenically similar to their higher-plant counterparts, but not to one another. The m thioredoxins were recognized by antibodies to both higher plant m and bacterial thioredoxins, whereas the thioredoxin f was not. Chlamydomonas thioredoxin f reacted, although weakly, with the antibody to spinach thioredoxin f. The algal thioredoxin f differed from thioredoxins studied previously in behaving as a basic protein on ion-exchange columns. Purification revealed that the algal thioredoxins had molecular masses (Mrs) typical of thioredoxins from other sources, m1 and m2 being 10700 and f 11500. Chlamydomonas FTR had two dissimilar subunits, a feature common to all FTRs studied thus far. One, the 13-kDa ("similar") subunit, resembled its counterpart from other sources in both size and antigenicity. The other, 10-kDa ("variable") subunit was not recognized by antibodies to any FTR tested. When combined with spinach, (Spinacia oleracea L.) thylakoid membranes, the components of the FT system functioned in the light activation of the standard target enzymes from chloroplasts, corn (Zea mays L.) NADP-malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.82) and spinach fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11) as well as the chloroplast-type fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase from Chlamydomonas. Activity was greatest if ferredoxin and other components of the FT system were from Chlamydomonas. The capacity of the Chlamydomonas FT system to activate autologous FBPase indicates that light regulates the photosynthetic carbon metabolism of green algae as in other oxygenic photosynthetic organisms.

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of an electron-transfer complex of ferredoxin and ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase from the cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya boryana

    PubMed Central

    Shinmura, Kanako; Muraki, Norifumi; Yoshida, Ayako; Hase, Toshiharu; Kurisu, Genji

    2012-01-01

    Ferredoxin (Fd) dependent glutamate synthase (Fd-GOGAT) is a key enzyme involved in nitrogen assimilation that catalyzes the two-electron reductive conversion of Gln and 2-oxoglutarate to two molecules of Glu. Fd serves as an electron donor for Fd-GOGAT and the two proteins form a transient electron-transfer complex. In this study, these two proteins were cocrystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Diffraction data were collected and processed at 2.65 Å resolution. The crystals belonged to space group P43, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 84.95, c = 476.31 Å. PMID:22442234

  16. Critical role of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii ferredoxin-5 in maintaining membrane structure and dark metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wittkopp, Tyler M.; Warakanont, Jaruswan; Dubini, Alexandra; Catalanotti, Claudia; Kim, Rick G.; Nowack, Eva C. M.; Mackinder, Luke C. M.; Aksoy, Munevver; Page, Mark Dudley; D’Adamo, Sarah; Saroussi, Shai; Heinnickel, Mark; Johnson, Xenie; Richaud, Pierre; Alric, Jean; Boehm, Marko; Jonikas, Martin C.; Benning, Christoph; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Posewitz, Matthew C.; Grossman, Arthur R.

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic microorganisms typically have multiple isoforms of the electron transfer protein ferredoxin, although we know little about their exact functions. Surprisingly, a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant null for the ferredoxin-5 gene (FDX5) completely ceased growth in the dark, with both photosynthetic and respiratory functions severely compromised; growth in the light was unaffected. Thylakoid membranes in dark-maintained fdx5 mutant cells became severely disorganized concomitant with a marked decrease in the ratio of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol to digalactosyldiacylglycerol, major lipids in photosynthetic membranes, and the accumulation of triacylglycerol. Furthermore, FDX5 was shown to physically interact with the fatty acid desaturases CrΔ4FAD and CrFAD6, likely donating electrons for the desaturation of fatty acids that stabilize monogalactosyldiacylglycerol. Our results suggest that in photosynthetic organisms, specific redox reactions sustain dark metabolism, with little impact on daytime growth, likely reflecting the tailoring of electron carriers to unique intracellular metabolic circuits under these two very distinct redox conditions. PMID:26627249

  17. Direct computer simulation of ferredoxin and FNR complex formation in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, I. B.; Diakonova, A. N.; Abaturova, A. M.; Riznichenko, G. Yu; Rubin, A. B.

    2010-06-01

    Ferredoxin reduced by Photosystem I in light serves as an electron donor for the reduction of NADP+ to NADPH, and this reaction is catalyzed by enzyme ferredoxin:NADP+-reductase (FNR). Kinetics and mechanisms of this reaction have been extensively studied experimentally by site-specific mutagenesis, laser flash photolysis and stopped-flow methods. We have applied a method of multiparticle computer simulation to study the effects of electrostatic interactions upon the reaction rate of Fd-FNR complex formation. Using the model we calculated rate constants of Fd-FNR complex formation for the wild-type proteins and some mutant forms of FNR at different values of ionic strength. Simulation revealed that electrostatic interactions play an important role in Fd-FNR complex formation and define its specificity.

  18. Computer simulation of interaction of photosystem 1 with plastocyanin and ferredoxin.

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, Ilya B; Abaturova, Anna M; Riznichenko, Galina Yu; Rubin, Andrei B

    2011-02-01

    We designed 3D multiparticle computer models to simulate diffusion and interactions of spinach plastocyanin and ferredoxin with plant photosystem 1 in a solution. Using these models we studied kinetic characteristics of plastocyanin-photosystem 1 and ferredoxin-photosystem 1 complex formation at a variety of ionic strength values. The computer multiparticle models demonstrate non-monotonic dependences of complex formation rates on the ionic strength as the result of long-range electrostatic interactions. Our calculations show that the decrease in the association second-order rate constant at low values of the ionic strength is caused by the protein pairs spending more time in "wrong" orientations which do not satisfy the docking conditions and so do not form the final complex capable of the electron transfer. PMID:20934483

  19. Direct computer simulation of ferredoxin and FNR complex formation in solution.

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, I B; Diakonova, A N; Abaturova, A M; Riznichenko, G Yu; Rubin, A B

    2010-01-01

    Ferredoxin reduced by Photosystem I in light serves as an electron donor for the reduction of NADP(+) to NADPH, and this reaction is catalyzed by enzyme ferredoxin:NADP(+)-reductase (FNR). Kinetics and mechanisms of this reaction have been extensively studied experimentally by site-specific mutagenesis, laser flash photolysis and stopped-flow methods. We have applied a method of multiparticle computer simulation to study the effects of electrostatic interactions upon the reaction rate of Fd-FNR complex formation. Using the model we calculated rate constants of Fd-FNR complex formation for the wild-type proteins and some mutant forms of FNR at different values of ionic strength. Simulation revealed that electrostatic interactions play an important role in Fd-FNR complex formation and define its specificity. PMID:20453296

  20. Critical role of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii ferredoxin-5 in maintaining membrane structure and dark metabolism.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenqiang; Wittkopp, Tyler M; Li, Xiaobo; Warakanont, Jaruswan; Dubini, Alexandra; Catalanotti, Claudia; Kim, Rick G; Nowack, Eva C M; Mackinder, Luke C M; Aksoy, Munevver; Page, Mark Dudley; D'Adamo, Sarah; Saroussi, Shai; Heinnickel, Mark; Johnson, Xenie; Richaud, Pierre; Alric, Jean; Boehm, Marko; Jonikas, Martin C; Benning, Christoph; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Posewitz, Matthew C; Grossman, Arthur R

    2015-12-01

    Photosynthetic microorganisms typically have multiple isoforms of the electron transfer protein ferredoxin, although we know little about their exact functions. Surprisingly, a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant null for the ferredoxin-5 gene (FDX5) completely ceased growth in the dark, with both photosynthetic and respiratory functions severely compromised; growth in the light was unaffected. Thylakoid membranes in dark-maintained fdx5 mutant cells became severely disorganized concomitant with a marked decrease in the ratio of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol to digalactosyldiacylglycerol, major lipids in photosynthetic membranes, and the accumulation of triacylglycerol. Furthermore, FDX5 was shown to physically interact with the fatty acid desaturases CrΔ4FAD and CrFAD6, likely donating electrons for the desaturation of fatty acids that stabilize monogalactosyldiacylglycerol. Our results suggest that in photosynthetic organisms, specific redox reactions sustain dark metabolism, with little impact on daytime growth, likely reflecting the tailoring of electron carriers to unique intracellular metabolic circuits under these two very distinct redox conditions. PMID:26627249

  1. Enamel-dentine junction (EDJ) morphology distinguishes the lower molars of Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus robustus.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Matthew M; Gunz, Philipp; Wood, Bernard A; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2008-12-01

    Tooth crown morphology plays a central role in hominin systematics, but the removal of the original outer enamel surface by dental attrition often eliminates from consideration the type of detailed crown morphology that has been shown to discriminate among hominin taxa. This reduces the size of samples available for study. The enamel-dentine junction (EDJ) is the developmental precursor and primary contributor to the morphology of the unworn outer enamel surface, and its morphology is only affected after considerable attrition. In this paper, we explore whether the form of the EDJ can be used to distinguish between the mandibular molars of two southern African fossil hominins: Paranthropus (or Australopithecus) robustus and Australopithecus africanus. After micro-computed tomographic scanning the molar sample, we made high-resolution images of the EDJ and used geometric morphometrics to compare EDJ shape differences between species, in addition to documenting metameric variation along the molar row within each species. Landmarks were collected along the marginal ridge that runs between adjacent dentine horns and around the circumference of the cervix. Our results suggest that the morphology of the EDJ can distinguish lower molars of these southern African hominins, and it can discriminate first, second, and third molars within each taxon. These results confirm previous findings that the EDJ preserves taxonomically valuable shape information in worn teeth. Mean differences in EDJ shape, in particular dentine horn height, crown height, and cervix shape, are more marked between adjacent molars within each taxon than for the same molar between the two taxa. PMID:18824253

  2. The Afya Bora Consortium: an African-U.S. partnership to Train Leaders in Global Health

    PubMed Central

    Farquhar, Carey; Nathanson, Neal

    2011-01-01

    Synopsis The Afya Bora Consortium is a partnership of eight academic health institutions, four in Africa and four in the United States. The Consortium members have a history of collaboration in four African-U.S. pairs: Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda, and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, and the University of California in San Francisco, California, USA; the University of Botswana, Gaborone, Botswana, and the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; the University of Nairobi, Nairobi, Kenya, and the University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. The Consortium is developing a Global Health Leadership Fellowship for medical, nursing, and public health professionals, largely drawn from the four African partner countries. The primary purpose of the fellowship is to provide trainees with practical skills that will prepare them for future positions leading the design, implementation and evaluation of large, high impact programs in governmental agencies, non-governmental organizations, and academic health institutions in their own countries. In this overview, we describe a Pilot of the proposed program, which includes three components: a six-week Core Curriculum taught in modules that focus on foundational skills in leadership, management, evaluation and other relevant topics; a six-month assignment to two Attachment Sites, that provides hands-on experience in a programmatic, clinical, or research area; and a post-training support and mentoring phase. We believe that the Afya Bora Fellowship is an innovative model, which, when fully implemented, could contribute significantly to training future leaders in global health and reducing “brain drain” of health professionals. PMID:21628054

  3. The natural endocast of Taung (Australopithecus africanus): insights from the unpublished papers of Raymond Arthur Dart.

    PubMed

    Falk, Dean

    2009-01-01

    Dart's 1925 announcement of Australopithecus africanus (Dart: Nature 115 [1925] 195-199) was highly controversial, partly because of an interpretation of the Taung natural endocast that rested on an erroneous identification of the lambdoid suture as the lunate sulcus. Unpublished materials from the University of Witwatersrand Archives (Dart, unpublished material) reveal that Dart reacted to the controversy by: 1) describing and illustrating the entire sulcal pattern on the Taung endocast, in contrast to just two sulcal identifications in 1925, 2) identifying a hypothetical part of the lambdoid suture and revising his description of the lunate sulcus, and 3) bolstering his argument that Taung's brain was advanced by detailing expansions in three significant cortical association areas. Four unpublished illustrations of Dart's identifications for sulci and sutures on the Taung endocast are compared here with those published by Keith (Keith: New discoveries relating to the antiquity of man (1931)), Schepers (Schepers: The endocranial casts of the South African ape-men. In: Broom R, Schepers GWH, editors. The South African fossil ape-men; the Australopithecinae [1946] p 155-272), and Falk (Falk: Am J Phys Anthropol 53 [1980] 525-539), and the thorny issue of the location of the lunate sulcus is revisited in light of new information. Archival materials reveal that Dart believed that Taung's brain was reorganized globally rather than in a mosaic manner, and that the shapes of certain cortical association areas showed that Australopithecus was closer to Pithecanthropus than to the living apes. Although a few of Dart's hitherto-unpublished sulcal identifications, including his revision for the lunate sulcus, were questionable, his claim that the Taung endocast reproduced a shape that was advanced toward a human condition in its prefrontal cortex and caudally protruded occipital lobe was correct. PMID:19890860

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF IMMUNOASSAYS FOR THE IRON-REGULATED PROTEINS FERREDOXIN AND FLAVODOXIN IN POLAR MICROALGAE(1).

    PubMed

    Pankowski, Andrew; McMinn, Andrew

    2009-06-01

    While the growth of Southern Ocean phytoplankton is often limited by iron availability, there are no comparable experiments on sea-ice algae. Here we assess the use of ferredoxin and flavodoxin to investigate the iron nutritional status of sea-ice algae and describe the development of a quantitative immunoassay for both proteins in marine diatoms. High-affinity monoclonal antibodies toward both proteins were produced from Cylindrotheca closterium (Ehrenb.) J. M. Lewin et Reimann, and these were used to develop Western blots. Western blots run on whole protein extracts detected both proteins with little cross-reactivity toward other proteins. The two proteins could be successfully quantitated when applied to gels at between 5 and 50 ng in a volume of 25 μL (0.2-2 μg · mL(-1) ). Flavodoxin and ferrodoxin expression was examined in the Antarctic diatoms Entomoneis kjellmannii (Cleve) Poulin et Cardinal, Navicula directa (W. Sm.) Ralfs, Fragilariopsis curta (Van Heurck) Hust., Pseudo-nitzschia sp., Porosira glacialis (Grunow) E. G. Jørg., Fragilariopsis cylindrus (Grunow) Willi Krieg., Fragilariopsis sublinearis (Van Heurck) Heiden et Kolbe, C. closterium, Nitzschia lecointei Van Heurck, and the dinoflagellate Polarella glacialis Montresor, Procaccini et Stoecker. Two Arctic isolates were also examined, Nitzschia frigida (Grunow) and Fragilariopsis oceanica (Cleve) Hasle. Significant heterogeneity of protein expression was observed despite all cultures being grown in iron-replete f/2 medium. Only one species, F. cylindrus, displayed the expected expression of ferredoxin only in iron-replete medium. Four were observed to produce both proteins under iron-replete conditions. Ferredoxin was not detected at all in F. curta and Pseudo-nitzschia sp., but distinct flavodoxin bands were observed in both of these organisms. All species examined were observed to express either flavodoxin or ferredoxin or both of the proteins as determined by Western immunoblotting

  5. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplasts contain a homodimeric pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase that functions with FDX1.

    PubMed

    van Lis, Robert; Baffert, Carole; Couté, Yohann; Nitschke, Wolfgang; Atteia, Ariane

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic algae have long been known to live in anoxic environments, but interest in their anaerobic energy metabolism has only recently gained momentum, largely due to their utility in biofuel production. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii figures remarkably in this respect, because it efficiently produces hydrogen and its genome harbors many genes for anaerobic metabolic routes. Central to anaerobic energy metabolism in many unicellular eukaryotes (protists) is pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO), which decarboxylates pyruvate and forms acetyl-coenzyme A with concomitant reduction of low-potential ferredoxins or flavodoxins. Here, we report the biochemical properties of the homodimeric PFO of C. reinhardtii expressed in Escherichia coli. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of the recombinant enzyme (Cr-rPFO) showed three distinct [4Fe-4S] iron-sulfur clusters and a thiamine pyrophosphate radical upon reduction by pyruvate. Purified Cr-rPFO exhibits a specific decarboxylase activity of 12 µmol pyruvate min⁻¹ mg⁻¹ protein using benzyl viologen as electron acceptor. Despite the fact that the enzyme is very oxygen sensitive, it localizes to the chloroplast. Among the six known chloroplast ferredoxins (FDX1-FDX6) in C. reinhardtii, FDX1 and FDX2 were the most efficient electron acceptors from Cr-rPFO, with comparable apparent K(m) values of approximately 4 µm. As revealed by immunoblotting, anaerobic conditions that lead to the induction of CrPFO did not increase levels of either FDX1 or FDX2. FDX1, being by far the most abundant ferredoxin, is thus likely the partner of PFO in C. reinhardtii. This finding postulates a direct link between CrPFO and hydrogenase and provides new opportunities to better study and engineer hydrogen production in this protist. PMID:23154536

  6. Involvement of ferredoxin in desaturation of lipid-bound oleate in chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, H.; Heinz, E. )

    1990-09-01

    Intact spinach (Spinacia oleracea) chloroplasts, pulse-labeled with ({sup 14}C)acetate, desaturate newly formed fatty acids as ester groups of monogalactosyl diacylglycerol in a subsequent chase in the dark. Rupture of pulse-labeled chloroplasts by addition of a detergent solution 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propane sulfonate preserves part of this desaturation activity. Direct addition of different free fatty acids together with appropriate cofactors to detergent-ruptured chloroplasts results in fatty acid labeling of monogalactosyl diacylglycerol. During subsequent incubation these lipid-linked fatty acids are desaturated, i.e. 18:1 to 18:2 and 18:3 and to a small extent also 16:0 to 16:3. The formation of 18:2 was also observed after incorporation of 18:1 into sulfolipid and phosphatidyl choline. Density gradient centrifugation separated a membrane fraction from detergent-ruptured chloroplasts which in the presence of appropriate cofactors incorporated 18:1 and 18:2 into the above-mentioned lipids. In the light, desaturation was dependent on added ferredoxin, whereas in the dark, in addition to ferredoxin NAD(P)H was also required. Preliminary evidence for the involvement of membrane-bound ferredoxin:NADP oxidoreductase (FNR) as a third component of desaturation in the dark was obtained by inhibitor studies including antibodies against FNR. Desaturation of lipid-bound 18:1 and 18:2 resembles stearoyl-ACP desaturation with respect to its requirement of reduced ferredoxin and oxygen.

  7. Structure of T4moF, the Toluene 4-Monooxygenase Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Acheson, Justin F; Moseson, Hannah; Fox, Brian G

    2015-09-29

    The 1.6 Å crystal structure of toluene 4-monooxygenase reductase T4moF is reported. The structure includes ferredoxin, flavin, and NADH binding domains. The position of the ferredoxin domain relative to the other two domains represents a new configuration for the iron-sulfur flavoprotein family. Close contacts between the C8 methyl group of FAD and [2Fe-2S] ligand Cys36-O represent a plausible pathway for electron transfer between the redox cofactors. Energy-minimized docking of NADH and calculation of hingelike motions between domains suggest how simple coordinated shifts of residues at the C-terminus of the enzyme could expose the N5 position of FAD for productive interaction with the nicotinamide ring. The domain configuration revealed by the T4moF structure provides an excellent steric and electrostatic match to the obligate electron acceptor, Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin T4moC. Protein-protein docking and energy minimization of the T4moFC complex indicate that T4moF [2Fe-2S] ligand Cys41 and T4moC [2Fe-2S] ligand His67, along with other electrostatic interactions between the protein partners, form the functional electron transfer interface. PMID:26309236

  8. The fdx gene encoding the [2Fe--2S] ferredoxin of Halobacterium salinarium (H. halobium).

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, F; Griffig, J; Oesterhelt, D

    1993-05-01

    The gene encoding the [2Fe--2S] ferredoxin (fdx gene) was isolated from Halobacterium salinarium using two oligonucleotides deduced from the ferredoxin sequence as probes. Cosmid DNAs exhibiting hybridization were isolated, the fdx gene was localized to smaller subfragments and the nucleotide sequence determined. The 390 bp coding sequence is located in the halobacterial FI-DNA and transcribed as a 440 nucleotide mRNA. S1 mapping indicated that the 5' terminus of the mRNA maps immediately upstream of the ATG start codon. The promoter box A, centred around position -25 (5' AC-TATG 3'), and box B (TG) elements at the start of the transcript resemble the sequences of a typical archaeal promoter. The restriction pattern of an approximately 50 kb region surrounding the fdx gene is conserved in various Halobacterium species. The halobacterial ferredoxin and the major gas vesicle protein GvpA exhibit up to 70% similarity to their respective counterparts in cyanobacteria suggesting lateral gene transfer between the organisms. These similarities prompted a more detailed investigation of the relative positions of the genes in the halobacterial genome. PMID:8510664

  9. The Roles of Four Conserved Basic Amino Acids in a Ferredoxin-Dependent Cyanobacterial Nitrate Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Anurag P.; Hirasawa, Masakazu; Bhalla, Megha; Chung, Jung-Sung; Allen, James P.; Johnson, Michael K.; Tripathy, Jatindra N.; Rubio, Luis M.; Vaccaro, Brian; Subramanian, Sowmya; Flores, Enrique; Zabet-Moghaddam, Masoud; Stitle, Kyle; Knaff, David B.

    2013-01-01

    The roles of four conserved basic amino acids in the reaction catalyzed by the ferredoxin-dependent nitrate reductase from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942 have been investigated using site-directed mutagenesis in combination with measurements of steady-state kinetics, substrate-binding affinities and spectroscopic properties of the enzyme’s two prosthetic groups. Replacement of either Lys58 or Arg70 by glutamine leads to a complete loss of activity, with both the physiological electron donor, reduced ferredoxin and with a non-physiological electron donor, reduced methyl viologen. More conservative, charge-maintaining K58R and R70K variants were also completely inactive. Replacement of Lys130 by glutamine produced a variant that retained 26% of the wild-type activity with methyl viologen as the electron donor and 22% of the wild-type activity with ferredoxin as the electron donor, while replacement by arginine produces a variant that retains a significantly higher percentage of the wild-type activity with both electron donors. In contrast, replacement of Arg146 by glutamine had minimal effect on the activity of the enzyme. These results, along with substrate-binding and spectroscopic measurements, are discussed in terms of an in silico structural model for the enzyme. PMID:23692082

  10. Atomic Resolution Modeling of the Ferredoxin:[FeFe] Hydrogenase Complex from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Christopher H.; King, Paul W.; Ghirardi, Maria L.; Kim, Kwiseon

    2007-01-01

    The [FeFe] hydrogenases HydA1 and HydA2 in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii catalyze the final reaction in a remarkable metabolic pathway allowing this photosynthetic organism to produce H2 from water in the chloroplast. A [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin is a critical branch point in electron flow from Photosystem I toward a variety of metabolic fates, including proton reduction by hydrogenases. To better understand the binding determinants involved in ferredoxin:hydrogenase interactions, we have modeled Chlamydomonas PetF1 and HydA2 based on amino-acid sequence homology, and produced two promising electron-transfer model complexes by computational docking. To characterize these models, quantitative free energy calculations at atomic resolution were carried out, and detailed analysis of the interprotein interactions undertaken. The protein complex model we propose for ferredoxin:HydA2 interaction is energetically favored over the alternative candidate by 20 kcal/mol. This proposed model of the electron-transfer complex between PetF1 and HydA2 permits a more detailed view of the molecular events leading up to H2 evolution, and suggests potential mutagenic strategies to modulate electron flow to HydA2. PMID:17660315

  11. Premolar root and canal variation in South African Plio-Pleistocene specimens attributed to Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus robustus.

    PubMed

    Moore, N Collin; Thackeray, J Francis; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Skinner, Matthew M

    2016-04-01

    South African hominin fossils attributed to Australopithecus africanus derive from the cave sites of Makapansgat, Sterkfontein, and Taung, from deposits dated between about 2 and 3 million years ago (Ma), while Paranthropus robustus is known from Drimolen, Kromdraai, and Swartkrans, from deposits dated between about 1 and 2 Ma. Although variation in the premolar root complex has informed taxonomic and phylogenetic hypotheses for these fossil hominin species, traditionally there has been a focus on external root form, number, and position. In this study, we use microtomography to undertake the first comprehensive study of maxillary and mandibular premolar root and canal variation in Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus robustus (n = 166 teeth) within and between the species. We also test for correlations between premolar size and root morphology as predicted under the 'size/number continuum' (SNC) model, which correlates increasing root number with tooth size. Our results demonstrate previously undocumented variation in these two fossil hominin species and highlight taxonomic differences in the presence and frequency of particular root types, qualitative root traits, and tooth size (measured as cervix cross-sectional area). Patterns of tooth size and canal/root number are broadly consistent with the SNC model, however statistically significant support is limited. The implications for hominin taxonomy in light of the increased variation in root morphology documented in this study are discussed. PMID:27086055

  12. Superoxide generated from the glutathione-mediated reduction of selenite damages the iron-sulfur cluster of chloroplastic ferredoxin.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Brian; Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Abdel-Ghany, Salah; Pilon, Marinus; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A; Sagi, Moshe; Van Hoewyk, Doug

    2016-09-01

    Selenium assimilation in plants is facilitated by several enzymes that participate in the transport and assimilation of sulfate. Manipulation of genes that function in sulfur metabolism dramatically affects selenium toxicity and accumulation. However, it has been proposed that selenite is not reduced by sulfite reductase. Instead, selenite can be non-enzymatically reduced by glutathione, generating selenodiglutathione and superoxide. The damaging effects of superoxide on iron-sulfur clusters in cytosolic and mitochondrial proteins are well known. However, it is unknown if superoxide damages chloroplastic iron-sulfur proteins. The goals of this study were twofold: to determine whether decreased activity of sulfite reductase impacts selenium tolerance in Arabidopsis, and to determine if superoxide generated from the glutathione-mediated reduction of selenite damages the iron-sulfur cluster of ferredoxin. Our data demonstrate that knockdown of sulfite reductase in Arabidopsis does not affect selenite tolerance or selenium accumulation. Additionally, we provide in vitro evidence that the non-enzymatic reduction of selenite damages the iron-sulfur cluster of ferredoxin, a plastidial protein that is an essential component of the photosynthetic light reactions. Damage to ferredoxin's iron-sulfur cluster was associated with formation of apo-ferredoxin and impaired activity. We conclude that if superoxide damages iron-sulfur clusters of ferredoxin in planta, then it might contribute to photosynthetic impairment often associated with abiotic stress, including toxic levels of selenium. PMID:27182957

  13. Allozyme variation in four populations of African whitebacked vultures (Gyps africanus) and phylogenetic relationships between four vulture species from southern Africa.

    PubMed

    van Wyk, E; van der Bank, H; Verdoorn, G H.

    2001-05-01

    Genetic variation detected by protein electrophoresis at 41 presumptive gene loci was assayed in four populations of Gyps africanus and compared to values previously obtained for Gyps coprotheres. Values calculated for percentage of polymorphic loci (P=34.15%, 0.99 criterion) and average heterozygosity (&Hmacr;=0.108, +/-0.032) in G. africanus, confirm low levels of genetic variation as reported for G. coprotheres. Allele frequency data, assessed at 19 loci, were obtained to evaluate genetic differentiation among four vulture species. Six (31.58%) of the 19 shared loci were polymorphic. Values of 1.26 (+/-0.1), 26.32% and 0.076 (+/-0.047) for G. africanus, 1.21 (+/-0.1), 21.05% and 0.097 (+/-0.045) for Torgos tracheliotus, 1.11 (+/-0.7), 21.05% and 0.053 (+/-0.053) for Neophron percnopterus and 1.05 (+/-0.5), 5.26% and 0.044 (+/-0.047) for G. coprotheres were obtained for the mean number of alleles per locus, P and &Hmacr;, respectively. An average between-population fixation index (F(ST)) value of 0.322 was obtained, which is indicative of significant (P<0.01) differentiation between the four accipitrid species studied. Considerable concordance was obtained between dendograms produced from different analyses, pointing to the distinctiveness of N. percnopterus, which has evolved along a separate lineage as G. africanus, G. coprotheres and T. tracheliotus. Along the latter lineage G. africanus is clustered together with G. coprotheres which is consistent with the morphological similarities of these species. PMID:11274771

  14. Electrostatic forces involved in orienting Anabaena ferredoxin during binding to Anabaena ferredoxin:NADP+ reductase: site-specific mutagenesis, transient kinetic measurements, and electrostatic surface potentials.

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, J. K.; Hazzard, J. T.; Martínez-Júlvez, M.; Medina, M.; Gómez-Moreno, C.; Tollin, G.

    1999-01-01

    Transient absorbance measurements following laser flash photolysis have been used to measure the rate constants for electron transfer (et) from reduced Anabaena ferredoxin (Fd) to wild-type and seven site-specific charge-reversal mutants of Anabaena ferredoxin:NADP+ reductase (FNR). These mutations have been designed to probe the importance of specific positively charged amino acid residues on the surface of the FNR molecule near the exposed edge of the FAD cofactor in the protein-protein interaction during et with Fd. The mutant proteins fall into two groups: overall, the K75E, R16E, and K72E mutants are most severely impaired in et, and the K138E, R264E, K290E, and K294E mutants are impaired to a lesser extent, although the degree of impairment varies with ionic strength. Binding constants for complex formation between the oxidized proteins and for the transient et complexes show that the severity of the alterations in et kinetics for the mutants correlate with decreased stabilities of the protein-protein complexes. Those mutated residues, which show the largest effects, are located in a region of the protein in which positive charge predominates, and charge reversals have large effects on the calculated local surface electrostatic potential. In contrast, K138, R264, K290, and K294 are located within or close to regions of intense negative potential, and therefore the introduction of additional negative charges have considerably smaller effects on the calculated surface potential. We attribute the relative changes in et kinetics and complex binding constants for these mutants to these characteristics of the surface charge distribution in FNR and conclude that the positively charged region of the FNR surface located in the vicinity of K75, R16, and K72 is especially important in the binding and orientation of Fd during electron transfer. PMID:10452605

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of a ferredoxin reductase from Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA009

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Ying; Xu, Feng; Bell, Stephen G.; Wong, Luet-Lok; Rao, Zihe

    2007-05-01

    Palustrisredoxin reductase (RPA3782, PuR), a flavin-dependent ferredoxin reductase, is an essential component of the Class I cytochrome P450 systems in Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA009. Crystals of PuR that diffract to 2.2 Å resolution have been obtained. Palustrisredoxin reductase from Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA009, a member of the oxygenase-coupled NADH-dependent ferredoxin reductase (ONFR) family, catalyzes electron transfer from NADH to ferredoxins. It is an essential component of the cytochrome P450 systems in R. palustris CGA009, a model organism with diverse metabolic pathways. Here, the crystallization of palustrisredoxin reductase is reported. The crystals belong to the trigonal space group P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = 107.5, b = 107.5, c = 69.9 Å, and diffract to 2.2 Å resolution on a synchrotron source.

  16. Photosynthetic electron partitioning between [FeFe]-hydrogenase and ferredoxin:NADP+-oxidoreductase (FNR) enzymes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yacoby, Iftach; Pochekailov, Sergii; Toporik, Hila; Ghirardi, Maria L.; King, Paul W.; Zhang, Shuguang

    2011-01-01

    Photosynthetic water splitting, coupled to hydrogenase-catalyzed hydrogen production, is considered a promising clean, renewable source of energy. It is widely accepted that the oxygen sensitivity of hydrogen production, combined with competition between hydrogenases and NADPH-dependent carbon dioxide fixation are the main limitations for its commercialization. Here we provide evidence that, under the anaerobic conditions that support hydrogen production, there is a significant loss of photosynthetic electrons toward NADPH production in vitro. To elucidate the basis for competition, we bioengineered a ferredoxin-hydrogenase fusion and characterized hydrogen production kinetics in the presence of Fd, ferredoxin:NADP+-oxidoreductase (FNR), and NADP+. Replacing the hydrogenase with a ferredoxin-hydrogenase fusion switched the bias of electron transfer from FNR to hydrogenase and resulted in an increased rate of hydrogen photoproduction. These results suggest a new direction for improvement of biohydrogen production and a means to further resolve the mechanisms that control partitioning of photosynthetic electron transport. PMID:21606330

  17. Photosynthetic electron partitioning between [FeFe]-hydrogenase and ferredoxin:NADP+-oxidoreductase (FNR) enzymes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yacoby, Iftach; Pochekailov, Sergii; Toporik, Hila; Ghirardi, Maria L; King, Paul W; Zhang, Shuguang

    2011-06-01

    Photosynthetic water splitting, coupled to hydrogenase-catalyzed hydrogen production, is considered a promising clean, renewable source of energy. It is widely accepted that the oxygen sensitivity of hydrogen production, combined with competition between hydrogenases and NADPH-dependent carbon dioxide fixation are the main limitations for its commercialization. Here we provide evidence that, under the anaerobic conditions that support hydrogen production, there is a significant loss of photosynthetic electrons toward NADPH production in vitro. To elucidate the basis for competition, we bioengineered a ferredoxin-hydrogenase fusion and characterized hydrogen production kinetics in the presence of Fd, ferredoxin:NADP(+)-oxidoreductase (FNR), and NADP(+). Replacing the hydrogenase with a ferredoxin-hydrogenase fusion switched the bias of electron transfer from FNR to hydrogenase and resulted in an increased rate of hydrogen photoproduction. These results suggest a new direction for improvement of biohydrogen production and a means to further resolve the mechanisms that control partitioning of photosynthetic electron transport. PMID:21606330

  18. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of a Ferredoxin:Thioredoxin Reductase-like Enzyme from Methanosarcina acetivorans.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Adepu K; Kumar, R Siva Sai; Yennawar, Neela H; Yennawar, Hemant P; Ferry, James G

    2015-05-19

    Bioinformatics analyses predict the distribution in nature of several classes of diverse disulfide reductases that evolved from an ancestral plant-type ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase (FTR) catalytic subunit to meet a variety of ecological needs. Methanosarcina acetivorans is a methane-producing species from the domain Archaea predicted to encode an FTR-like enzyme with two domains, one resembling the FTR catalytic subunit and the other containing a rubredoxin-like domain replacing the variable subunit of present-day FTR enzymes. M. acetivorans is of special interest as it was recently proposed to have evolved at the time of the end-Permian extinction and to be largely responsible for the most severe biotic crisis in the fossil record by converting acetate to methane. The crystal structure and biochemical characteristics were determined for the FTR-like enzyme from M. acetivorans, here named FDR (ferredoxin disulfide reductase). The results support a role for the rubredoxin-like center of FDR in transfer of electrons from ferredoxin to the active-site [Fe₄S₄] cluster adjacent to a pair of redox-active cysteines participating in reduction of disulfide substrates. A mechanism is proposed for disulfide reduction similar to one of two mechanisms previously proposed for the plant-type FTR. Overall, the results advance the biochemical and evolutionary understanding of the FTR-like family of enzymes and the conversion of acetate to methane that is an essential link in the global carbon cycle and presently accounts for most of this greenhouse gas that is biologically generated. PMID:25915695

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of ferredoxin-NAD(P)+ reductase from Chlorobium tepidum

    PubMed Central

    Muraki, Norifumi; Seo, Daisuke; Shiba, Tomoo; Sakurai, Takeshi; Kurisu, Genji

    2008-01-01

    Ferredoxin-NAD(P)+ reductase (FNR) is a key enzyme that catalyzes the photoreduction of NAD(P)+ to generate NAD(P)H during the final step of the photosynthetic electron-transport chain. FNR from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum is a homodimeric enzyme with a molecular weight of 90 kDa; it shares a high level of amino-acid sequence identity to thioredoxin reductase rather than to conventional plant-type FNRs. In order to understand the structural basis of the ferredoxin-dependency of this unique photosynthetic FNR, C. tepidum FNR has been heterologously expressed, purified and crystallized in two forms. Form I crystals belong to space group C2221 and contain one dimer in the asymmetric unit, while form II crystals belong to space group P4122 or P4322. Diffraction data were collected from a form I crystal to 2.4 Å resolution on the synchrotron-radiation beamline NW12 at the Photon Factory. PMID:18323604

  20. Cluster and Fold Stability of E. coli ISC-Type Ferredoxin

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Robert; Adinolfi, Salvatore; Iannuzzi, Clara; Kelly, Geoff; Oregioni, Alain; Martin, Stephen; Pastore, Annalisa

    2013-01-01

    Iron-sulfur clusters are essential protein prosthetic groups that provide their redox potential to several different metabolic pathways. Formation of iron-sulfur clusters is assisted by a specialised machine that comprises, among other proteins, a ferredoxin. As a first step to elucidate the precise role of this protein in cluster assembly, we have studied the factors governing the stability and the dynamic properties of E. coli ferredoxin using different spectroscopic techniques. The cluster-loaded protein is monomeric and well structured with a flexible C-terminus but is highly oxygen sensitive so that it readily loses the cluster leading to an irreversible unfolding under aerobic conditions. This process is slowed down by reducing conditions and high ionic strengths. NMR relaxation experiments on the cluster-loaded protein also show that, once the cluster is in place, the protein forms a globular and relatively rigid domain. These data indicate that the presence of the iron-sulfur cluster is the switch between a functional and a non-functional state. PMID:24265733

  1. Sulfolobus tokodaii ST2133 is characterized as a thioredoxin reductase-like ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhen; Nam, Young-Woo; Fushinobu, Shinya; Wakagi, Takayoshi

    2014-01-01

    The putative gene (st2133) for ferredoxin:NADP(+) oxidoreductase (FNR) from Sulfolobus tokodaii, a thermoacidophilic crenarchaeon, was heterologously expressed. About 90% of the purified product was a homodimer containing 0.46 mol FAD/mol subunit, and showing NADPH:DCPIP oxidoreductase activity, V max being 1.38 and 21.8 U/mg (70 °C) in the absence and presence of 1 mM FMN. NADPH was a much better electron donor than NADH with various electron acceptors, such as oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, DCPIP, cytochrome c, and dithiobisnitrobenzoate. Most of the reactions were activated by 15- to 140-fold on addition of FMN, while FAD was 5-10 times less effective. Ferredoxin (Fd) from S. tokodaii served as an electron carrier in both Fd-dependent NADPH formation and NADPH-dependent Fd reduction. ST2133 belongs to the thioredoxin reductase-like protein family, which is slightly distantly related to FNR family proteins from bacteria, plants and man. This is the first report on FNR from a crenarchaeon, providing a clue to the recycling of Fd during archaeal metabolism. PMID:24292509

  2. Hydrogenase/ferredoxin charge-transfer complexes: effect of hydrogenase mutations on the complex association.

    PubMed

    Long, Hai; King, Paul W; Ghirardi, Maria L; Kim, Kwiseon

    2009-04-23

    The [FeFe]-hydrogenases in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii utilize photogenerated electrons to reduce protons into hydrogen gas. The electrons are supplied from photosystem I and transferred to the [FeFe]-hydrogenase through specific hydrogenase-ferredoxin association. To understand how structural and kinetic factors control the association better, we used Brownian dynamics simulation methods to simulate the charge-transfer complex formation between both native and in silico mutants of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase HYDA2 and the [2Fe2S]-ferredoxin FDX1 from C. reinhardtii . The changes in binding free energy between different HYDA2 mutants and the native FDX1 were calculated by the free-energy perturbation method. Within the limits of our current models, we found that two HYDA2 mutations, T99K(H) and D102K(H), led to lower binding free energies and higher association rate with FDX1 and are thus promising targets for improving hydrogen production rates in engineered organisms. PMID:19317477

  3. Purification and characterization of 2-oxoglutarate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase from a thermophilic, obligately chemolithoautotrophic bacterium, Hydrogenobacter thermophilus TK-6.

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, K S; Ishii, M; Igarashi, Y; Kodama, T

    1996-01-01

    2-Oxoglutarate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase from a thermophilic, obligately autotrophic, hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium, Hydrogenobacter thermophilus TK-6, was purified to homogeneity by precipitation with ammonium sulfate and by fractionation by DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B, polyacrylate-quaternary amine, hydroxyapatite, and Superdex-200 chromatography. The purified enzyme had a molecular mass of about 105 kDa and comprised two subunits (70 kDa and 35 kDa). The activity of the 2-oxoglutarate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase was detected by the use of 2-oxoglutarate, coenzyme A, and one of several electron acceptors in substrate amounts (ferredoxin isolated from H. thermophilus, flavin adenine dinucleotide, flavin mononucleotide, or methyl viologen). NAD, NADP, and ferredoxins from Chlorella spp. and Clostridium pasteurianum were ineffective. The enzyme was extremely thermostable; the temperature optimum for 2-oxoglutarate oxidation was above 80 degrees C, and the time for a 50% loss of activity at 70 degrees C under anaerobic conditions was 22 h. The optimum pH for a 2-oxoglutarate oxidation reaction was 7.6 to 7.8. The apparent Km values for 2-oxoglutarate and coenzyme A at 70 degrees C were 1.42 mM and 80 microM, respectively. PMID:8655524

  4. Insights into Flavin-based Electron Bifurcation via the NADH-dependent Reduced Ferredoxin:NADP Oxidoreductase Structure*

    PubMed Central

    Demmer, Julius K.; Huang, Haiyan; Wang, Shuning; Demmer, Ulrike; Thauer, Rudolf K.; Ermler, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    NADH-dependent reduced ferredoxin:NADP oxidoreductase (NfnAB) is found in the cytoplasm of various anaerobic bacteria and archaea. The enzyme reversibly catalyzes the endergonic reduction of ferredoxin with NADPH driven by the exergonic transhydrogenation from NADPH onto NAD+. Coupling is most probably accomplished via the mechanism of flavin-based electron bifurcation. To understand this process on a structural basis, we heterologously produced the NfnAB complex of Thermotoga maritima in Escherichia coli, provided kinetic evidence for its bifurcating behavior, and determined its x-ray structure in the absence and presence of NADH. The structure of NfnAB reveals an electron transfer route including the FAD (a-FAD), the [2Fe-2S] cluster of NfnA and the FAD (b-FAD), and the two [4Fe-4S] clusters of NfnB. Ferredoxin is presumably docked onto NfnB close to the [4Fe-4S] cluster distal to b-FAD. NAD(H) binds to a-FAD and NADP(H) consequently to b-FAD, which is positioned in the center of the NfnAB complex and the site of electron bifurcation. Arg187 is hydrogen-bonded to N5 and O4 of the bifurcating b-FAD and might play a key role in adjusting a low redox potential of the FADH•/FAD pair required for ferredoxin reduction. A mechanism of FAD-coupled electron bifurcation by NfnAB is proposed. PMID:26139605

  5. Identification and cloning of two immunogenic Clostridium perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase of C. perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium-related poultry diseases such as necrotic enteritis (NE) and gangrenous dermatitis (GD) cause substantial economic losses on a global scale. Two antigenic Clostridium perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO), were identified by react...

  6. Pre-steady-state kinetic studies of redox reactions catalysed by Bacillus subtilis ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase with NADP(+)/NADPH and ferredoxin.

    PubMed

    Seo, Daisuke; Soeta, Takahiro; Sakurai, Hidehiro; Sétif, Pierre; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase ([EC1.18.1.2], FNR) from Bacillus subtilis (BsFNR) is a homodimeric flavoprotein sharing structural homology with bacterial NADPH-thioredoxin reductase. Pre-steady-state kinetics of the reactions of BsFNR with NADP(+), NADPH, NADPD (deuterated form) and B. subtilis ferredoxin (BsFd) using stopped-flow spectrophotometry were studied. Mixing BsFNR with NADP(+) and NADPH yielded two types of charge-transfer (CT) complexes, oxidized FNR (FNR(ox))-NADPH and reduced FNR (FNR(red))-NADP(+), both having CT absorption bands centered at approximately 600n m. After mixing BsFNR(ox) with about a 10-fold molar excess of NADPH (forward reaction), BsFNR was almost completely reduced at equilibrium. When BsFNR(red) was mixed with NADP(+), the amount of BsFNR(ox) increased with increasing NADP(+) concentration, but BsFNR(red) remained as the major species at equilibrium even with about 50-fold molar excess NADP(+). In both directions, the hydride-transfer was the rate-determining step, where the forward direction rate constant (~500 s(-1)) was much higher than the reverse one (<10 s(-1)). Mixing BsFd(red) with BsFNR(ox) induced rapid formation of a neutral semiquinone form. This process was almost completed within 1 ms. Subsequently the neutral semiquinone form was reduced to the hydroquinone form with an apparent rate constant of 50 to 70 s(-1) at 10°C, which increased as BsFd(red) increased from 40 to 120 μM. The reduction rate of BsFNR(ox) by BsFd(red) was markedly decreased by premixing BsFNR(ox) with BsFd(ox), indicating that the dissociation of BsFd(ox) from BsFNR(sq) is rate-limiting in the reaction. The characteristics of the BsFNR reactions with NADP(+)/NADPH were compared with those of other types of FNRs. PMID:26965753

  7. The Ferredoxin:NAD+ Oxidoreductase (Rnf) from the Acetogen Acetobacterium woodii Requires Na+ and Is Reversibly Coupled to the Membrane Potential*

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Verena; Schuchmann, Kai; Müller, Volker

    2013-01-01

    The anaerobic acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii has a novel Na+-translocating electron transport chain that couples electron transfer from reduced ferredoxin to NAD+ with the generation of a primary electrochemical Na+ potential across its cytoplasmic membrane. In previous assays in which Ti3+ was used to reduce ferredoxin, Na+ transport was observed, but not a Na+ dependence of the electron transfer reaction. Here, we describe a new biological reduction system for ferredoxin in which ferredoxin is reduced with CO, catalyzed by the purified acetyl-CoA synthase/CO dehydrogenase from A. woodii. Using CO-reduced ferredoxin, NAD+ reduction was highly specific and strictly dependent on ferredoxin and occurred at a rate of 50 milliunits/mg of protein. Most important, this assay revealed for the first time a strict Na+ dependence of this electron transfer reaction. The Km was 0.2 mm. Na+ could be partly substituted by Li+. Na+ dependence was observed at neutral and acidic pH values, indicating the exclusive use of Na+ as a coupling ion. Electron transport from reduced ferredoxin to NAD+ was coupled to electrogenic Na+ transport, indicating the generation of Δμ̃Na+. Vice versa, endergonic ferredoxin reduction with NADH as reductant was possible, but only in the presence of Δμ̃Na+, and was accompanied by Na+ efflux out of the vesicles. This is consistent with the hypothesis that Rnf also catalyzes ferredoxin reduction at the expense of an electrochemical Na+ gradient. The physiological significance of this finding is discussed. PMID:24045950

  8. The ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase (Rnf) from the acetogen Acetobacterium woodii requires Na+ and is reversibly coupled to the membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Hess, Verena; Schuchmann, Kai; Müller, Volker

    2013-11-01

    The anaerobic acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii has a novel Na(+)-translocating electron transport chain that couples electron transfer from reduced ferredoxin to NAD(+) with the generation of a primary electrochemical Na(+) potential across its cytoplasmic membrane. In previous assays in which Ti(3+) was used to reduce ferredoxin, Na(+) transport was observed, but not a Na(+) dependence of the electron transfer reaction. Here, we describe a new biological reduction system for ferredoxin in which ferredoxin is reduced with CO, catalyzed by the purified acetyl-CoA synthase/CO dehydrogenase from A. woodii. Using CO-reduced ferredoxin, NAD(+) reduction was highly specific and strictly dependent on ferredoxin and occurred at a rate of 50 milliunits/mg of protein. Most important, this assay revealed for the first time a strict Na(+) dependence of this electron transfer reaction. The Km was 0.2 mm. Na(+) could be partly substituted by Li(+). Na(+) dependence was observed at neutral and acidic pH values, indicating the exclusive use of Na(+) as a coupling ion. Electron transport from reduced ferredoxin to NAD(+) was coupled to electrogenic Na(+) transport, indicating the generation of ΔμNa(+). Vice versa, endergonic ferredoxin reduction with NADH as reductant was possible, but only in the presence of ΔμNa(+), and was accompanied by Na(+) efflux out of the vesicles. This is consistent with the hypothesis that Rnf also catalyzes ferredoxin reduction at the expense of an electrochemical Na(+) gradient. The physiological significance of this finding is discussed. PMID:24045950

  9. Ferredoxin 1b (Fdx1b) Is the Essential Mitochondrial Redox Partner for Cortisol Biosynthesis in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Aliesha; Parajes, Silvia; Weger, Meltem; Zaucker, Andreas; Taylor, Angela E; O'Neil, Donna M; Müller, Ferenc; Krone, Nils

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes rely on electron transfer from the redox partner ferredoxin 1 (FDX1) for catalytic activity. Key steps in steroidogenesis require mitochondrial CYP enzymes and FDX1. Over 30 ferredoxin mutations have been explored in vitro; however, no spontaneously occurring mutations have been identified in humans leaving the impact of FDX1 on steroidogenesis in the whole organism largely unknown. Zebrafish are an important model to study human steroidogenesis, because they have similar steroid products and endocrine tissues. This study aimed to characterize the influence of ferredoxin on steroidogenic capacity in vivo by using zebrafish. Zebrafish have duplicate ferredoxin paralogs: fdx1 and fdx1b. Although fdx1 was observed throughout development and in most tissues, fdx1b was expressed after development of the zebrafish interrenal gland (counterpart to the mammalian adrenal gland). Additionally, fdx1b was restricted to adult steroidogenic tissues, such as the interrenal, gonads, and brain, suggesting that fdx1b was interacting with steroidogenic CYP enzymes. By using transcription activator-like effector nucleases, we generated fdx1b mutant zebrafish lines. Larvae with genetic disruption of fdx1b were morphologically inconspicuous. However, steroid hormone analysis by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry revealed fdx1b mutants failed to synthesize glucocorticoids. Additionally, these mutants had an up-regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-interrenal axis and showed altered dark-light adaptation, suggesting impaired cortisol signaling. Antisense morpholino knockdown confirmed Fdx1b is required for de novo cortisol biosynthesis. In summary, by using zebrafish, we generated a ferredoxin knockout model system, which demonstrates for the first time the impact of mitochondrial redox regulation on glucocorticoid biosynthesis in vivo. PMID:26650568

  10. Characterization of ferredoxin, flavodoxin, and rubredoxin from Clostridium formicoaceticum grown in media with high and low iron contents.

    PubMed Central

    Ragsdale, S W; Ljungdahl, L G

    1984-01-01

    Ferredoxin, flavodoxin, and rubredoxin were purified to homogeneity from Clostridium formicoaceticum and characterized. Variation of the iron concentration of the growth medium caused substantial changes in the concentrations of ferredoxin and flavodoxin but not of rubredoxin. The ferredoxin has a molecular weight of 6,000 and is a four iron-four sulfur protein with eight cysteine residues. The spectrum is similar to that of other ferredoxins. The molar extinction coefficients are 22.6 X 10(3) and 17.6 X 10(3) at 280 and 390 nm, respectively. From 100 g wet weight of cells grown with 3.6 microM iron and with 40 microM iron, 5 and 20 mg offerredoxin were isolated, respectively. The molecular weight of rubredoxin is 5,800 and it contains one iron and four cysteines. The UV-visible absorption spectrum is dissimilar to those of other rubredoxins in that the 373 nm absorption peak is quite symmetric, lacking the characteristic 350-nm shoulder found in other rubredoxins. The flavodoxin is a 14,500-molecular-weight protein which contains 1 mol of flavin mononucleotide per mol of protein. It forms a stable, blue semiquinone upon light irradiation in the presence of EDTA or during enzymatic reduction. When cells were grown in low-iron medium, flavodoxin constituted at least 2% of the soluble cell protein; however, it was not detected in extracts of cells grown in high-iron medium. The rubredoxin and ferredoxin expressed during growth in low-iron and high-iron media are identical as judged by iron, inorganic sulfide, and amino acid analysis, as well as light absorption spectroscopy. PMID:6690418

  11. The Ferredoxin ThnA3 Negatively Regulates Tetralin Biodegradation Gene Expression via ThnY, a Ferredoxin Reductase That Functions as a Regulator of the Catabolic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ledesma-García, Laura; Reyes-Ramírez, Francisca; Santero, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The genes for tetralin (thn) utilization in Sphingomonasmacrogolitabida strain TFA are regulated at the transcriptional level by ThnR, ThnY and ThnA3. ThnR, a LysR-type transcriptional activator activates transcription specifically in response to tetralin, and ThnY is an iron-sulfur flavoprotein that may activate ThnR by protein-protein interaction. ThnA3, a Rieske-type ferredoxin that transfers electrons to the tetralin dioxygenase, prevents transcription of thn genes when the inducer molecule of the pathway is a poor substrate for the dioxygenase. The mechanism by which ThnA3 transduces this signal to the regulatory system is a major question concerning thn gene regulation. Here, we have confirmed the discriminatory function of ThnA3 and the negative role of its reduced form. We have generated ThnY variants with amino acid exchanges in the [2Fe-2S], FAD and NAD(P) H binding domains and their regulatory properties have been analyzed. Two variants, ThnY-C40S and ThnY-N201G,S206P have completely lost the discriminatory function of the regulatory system because they induced thn gene expression with different molecules such us cis-decalin, cyclohexane, trans-decalin, or benzene, which are not real inducers of the pathway. These results support a model in which ThnA3 exerts its negative modulation via the regulator ThnY. PMID:24069247

  12. A convenient ligand exchange pathway to [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin analogues.

    PubMed

    Ballmann, Joachim; Sun, Xianru; Dechert, Sebastian; Schneider, Benjamin; Meyer, Franc

    2009-07-01

    The benzanellated analogues (NEt(4))(2)[Fe(2)S(2)(indolate)(4)] (2) and (NEt(4))(2)[Fe(2)S(2)(carbazolate)(4)] (3) of the previously reported parent (NEt(4))(2)[Fe(2)S(2)(pyrrolate)(4)] cluster (1) were synthesized and characterized spectroscopically. In contrast to 1 and 3, compound 2 can be applied as a versatile precursor in ligand exchange reactions with various thiophenols affording the thiophenolate-coordinate [2Fe-2S] clusters. Heteroaromatic thiols and chelating biphenols are suitable substrates in this conversion as well, providing a convenient access to a variety of new [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin analogues and related complexes. Several new S- and O-coordinate [2Fe-2S] clusters have been prepared and fully characterized, including five X-ray crystal structures. PMID:19662283

  13. Cloning and nucleotide sequence determination of the Clostridium pasteurianum ferredoxin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Graves, M C; Mullenbach, G T; Rabinowitz, J C

    1985-01-01

    We have constructed a library of Clostridium pasteurianum DNA cloned in the plasmid pBR322. Based on the known amino acid sequence for C. pasteurianum ferredoxin, a 64-fold degenerate heptadecanucleotide pool was synthesized. This mixed probe hybridized to two clones which were shown to contain greater than 6 kilobase pairs of the same genomic DNA. Sequence analysis of a common Sau3A1 0.6-kilobase-pair fragment revealed that it contains the information for the apoferredoxin structural gene. According to the DNA sequence, the only post-translational processing of this small apoprotein is the hydrolysis of the initiator methionine. Putative transcription and translation start and stop signals are present within the sequence. Images PMID:3856844

  14. NtcA is responsible for accumulation of the small isoform of ferredoxin:NADP oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Omairi-Nasser, Amin; Galmozzi, Carla V; Latifi, Amel; Muro-Pastor, M Isabel; Ajlani, Ghada

    2014-04-01

    In several cyanobacteria, petH, the gene encoding ferredoxin:NADP oxidoreductase (FNR), is transcribed from at least two promoters depending on growth conditions. Two transcripts (short and long) are translated from two different translation initiation sites, resulting in two isoforms (large and small, respectively). Here, we show that in Synechocystis PCC6803 the global transcriptional regulator NtcA activates transcription from the distal petH promoter. Modification of the NtcA-binding site prevents NtcA binding to the promoter in vitro and abolishes accumulation of the small isoform of FNR in vivo. We also demonstrate that a similar petH transcription and translation regime occurs in other cyanobacteria. The conditions under which this system operates provide hints for the function of each FNR isoform. PMID:24464800

  15. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Trichomonas vaginalis Ferredoxin Show a Loop-Cap Transition.

    SciTech Connect

    Weksberg, Tiffany E; Lynch, Gillian C; Krause, Kurt; Pettitt, Bernard M

    2007-05-01

    The crystal structure of the oxidized Trichomonas vaginalis ferredoxin (Tvfd) showed a unique crevice that exposed the redox center. Here we have examined the dynamics and solvation of the active site of Tvfd using molecular dynamics simulations of both the reduced and oxidized states. The oxidized simulation stays true to the crystal form with a heavy atom root mean-squared deviation of 2Å. However, within the reduced simulation of Tvfd a profound loop-cap transition into the redox center occurred within 6-ns of the start of the simulation and remained open throughout the rest of the 20-ns simulation. This large opening seen in the simulations supports the hypothesis that the exceptionally fast electron transfer rate between Tvfd and the drug metronidazole is due to the increased access of the antibiotic to the redox center of the protein and not due to the reduction potential.

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Trichomonas vaginalis Ferredoxin Show a Loop-Cap Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Weksberg, Tiffany E; Lynch, Gillian C; Krause, Kurt; Pettitt, Bernard M

    2007-05-01

    The crystal structure of the oxidized Trichomonas vaginalis ferredoxin (Tvfd) showed a unique crevice that exposed the redox center. Here we have examined the dynamics and solvation of the active site of Tvfd using molecular dynamics simulations of both the reduced and oxidized states. The oxidized simulation stays true to the crystal form with a heavy atom root mean-squared deviation of 2Å . However, within the reduced simulation of Tvfd a profound loop-cap transition into the redox center occurred within 6-ns of the start of the simulation and remained open throughout the rest of the 20-ns simulation. This large opening seen in the simulations supports the hypothesis that the exceptionally fast electron transfer rate between Tvfd and the drug metronidazole is due to the increased access of the antibiotic to the redox center of the protein and not due to the reduction potential.

  17. Structural Insight into the Complex of Ferredoxin and [FeFe] Hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Rumpel, Sigrun; Siebel, Judith F; Diallo, Mamou; Farès, Christophe; Reijerse, Edward J; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2015-07-27

    The transfer of photosynthetic electrons by the ferredoxin PetF to the [FeFe] hydrogenase HydA1 in the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a key step in hydrogen production. Electron delivery requires a specific interaction between PetF and HydA1. However, because of the transient nature of the electron-transfer complex, a crystal structure remains elusive. Therefore, we performed protein-protein docking based on new experimental data from a solution NMR spectroscopy investigation of native and gallium-substituted PetF. This provides valuable information about residues crucial for complex formation and electron transfer. The derived complex model might help to pinpoint residue substitution targets for improved hydrogen production. PMID:26010059

  18. Constrained spin-density dynamics of an iron-sulfur complex: Ferredoxin cofactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Md. Ehesan; Nair, Nisanth N.; Staemmler, Volker; Marx, Dominik

    2012-06-01

    The computation of antiferromagnetic exchange coupling constants J by means of efficient density-based approaches requires in practice to take care of both spin projection to approximate the low spin ground state and proper localization of the magnetic orbitals at the transition metal centers. This is demonstrated here by a combined approach where the extended broken-symmetry (EBS) technique is employed to include the former aspect, while spin density constraints are applied to ensure the latter. This constrained EBS (CEBS) approach allows us to carry out ab initio molecular dynamics on a spin-projected low spin potential energy surface that is generated on-the-fly by propagating two coupled determinants and thereby accessing the antiferromagnetic coupling along the trajectory. When applied to the prototypical model of the oxidized [2Fe-2S] cofactor in Ferredoxins, [Fe2S2(SH)4]2-, at room temperature, CEBS leads to remarkably good results for geometrical structures and coupling constants J.

  19. Identification of weak points prone for mutation in ferredoxin of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Wiwanitkit, V

    2008-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis, the causative agent for human trichomoniasis, is a problematic sexually transmitted disease mainly in women. At present, metronidazole-resistant trichomoniasis is an infrequent but challenging problem with no universally successful treatment. Genetic mutation is believed to be an important factor leading to increasing drug resistance. Understanding the mutation status will help to design accurate strategies of therapy against mutant strains of T. vaginalis. The author performed a bioinformatic analysis to determine positions that tend to comply peptide motifs in the amino acid sequence of ferredoxin of T. vaginalis. Based on this study, the weak linkages in the studied protein can be identified and can be useful information for prediction of possible new mutations that can lead to drug resistance. In addition, the results from this study can be good information for further research on the diagnosis for mutants and new effective drug development. PMID:18445954

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Trichomonas vaginalis Ferredoxin Show a Loop-Cap Transition

    PubMed Central

    Weksberg, Tiffany E.; Lynch, Gillian C.; Krause, Kurt L.; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structure of the oxidized Trichomonas vaginalis ferredoxin (Tvfd) showed a unique crevice that exposed the redox center. Here we have examined the dynamics and solvation of the active site of Tvfd using molecular dynamics simulations of both the reduced and oxidized states. The oxidized simulation stays true to the crystal form with a heavy atom root mean-squared deviation of 2 Å. However, within the reduced simulation of Tvfd a profound loop-cap transition into the redox center occurred within 6-ns of the start of the simulation and remained open throughout the rest of the 20-ns simulation. This large opening seen in the simulations supports the hypothesis that the exceptionally fast electron transfer rate between Tvfd and the drug metronidazole is due to the increased access of the antibiotic to the redox center of the protein and not due to the reduction potential. PMID:17325017

  1. Occurrence of ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity and its ion specificity in several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Verena; Gallegos, Rene; Jones, J Andrew; Barquera, Blanca; Malamy, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    A ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase was recently discovered as a redox-driven ion pump in the anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii. The enzyme is assumed to be encoded by the rnf genes. Since these genes are present in the genomes of many bacteria, we tested for ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity in cytoplasmic membranes from several different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that have annotated rnf genes. We found this activity in Clostridium tetanomorphum, Clostridium ljungdahlii, Bacteroides fragilis, and Vibrio cholerae but not in Escherichia coli and Rhodobacter capsulatus. As in A. woodii, the activity was Na+-dependent in C. tetanomorphum and B. fragilis but Na+-independent in C. ljungdahlii and V. cholerae. We deleted the rnf genes from B. fragilis and demonstrated that the mutant has greatly reduced ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity. This is the first genetic proof that the rnf genes indeed encode the reduced ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity. PMID:26793417

  2. Crystallographic analysis of the intact metal centres [3Fe-4S](1+/0) and [4Fe-4S](2+/1+) in a Zn(2+) -containing ferredoxin.

    PubMed

    Frazão, Carlos; Aragão, David; Coelho, Ricardo; Leal, Sónia S; Gomes, Cláudio M; Teixeira, Miguel; Carrondo, Maria Arménia

    2008-03-01

    Detailed structural models of di-cluster seven-iron ferredoxins constitute a valuable resource for folding and stability studies relating the metal cofactors' role in protein stability. The here reported, hemihedric twinned crystal structure at 2.0 A resolution from Acidianus ambivalens ferredoxin, shows an integral 103 residues, physiologically relevant native form composed by a N-terminal extension comprising a His/Asp Zn(2+) site and the ferredoxin (betaalphabeta)(2) core, which harbours intact clusters I and II, a [3Fe-4S](1+/0) and a [4Fe-4S](2+/1+) centres. This is in contrast with the previously available ferredoxin structure from Sulfolofus tokodai, which was obtained from an artificial oxidative conversion with two [3Fe-4S](1+/0) centres and poor definition around cluster II. PMID:18258200

  3. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the ferredoxin component of carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase from Nocardioides aromaticivorans IC177

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Kengo; Ashikawa, Yuji; Usami, Yusuke; Noguchi, Haruko; Fujimoto, Zui; Yamane, Hisakazu; Nojiri, Hideaki

    2007-10-01

    The ferredoxin component of carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase from N. aromaticivorans IC177 was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to 2.0 Å resolution. Carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase (CARDO) catalyzes the dihydroxylation of carbazole by angular position (C9a) carbon bonding to the imino nitrogen and its adjacent C1 carbon. CARDO consists of a terminal oxygenase component and two electron-transfer components: ferredoxin and ferredoxin reductase. The ferredoxin component of carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase from Nocardioides aromaticivorans IC177 was crystallized at 293 K using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with ammonium sulfate as the precipitant. The crystals, which were improved by macroseeding, diffract to 2.0 Å resolution and belong to space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2.

  4. Occurrence of ferredoxin:NAD(+) oxidoreductase activity and its ion specificity in several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hess, Verena; Gallegos, Rene; Jones, J Andrew; Barquera, Blanca; Malamy, Michael H; Müller, Volker

    2016-01-01

    A ferredoxin:NAD(+) oxidoreductase was recently discovered as a redox-driven ion pump in the anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii. The enzyme is assumed to be encoded by the rnf genes. Since these genes are present in the genomes of many bacteria, we tested for ferredoxin:NAD(+) oxidoreductase activity in cytoplasmic membranes from several different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that have annotated rnf genes. We found this activity in Clostridium tetanomorphum, Clostridium ljungdahlii, Bacteroides fragilis, and Vibrio cholerae but not in Escherichia coli and Rhodobacter capsulatus. As in A. woodii, the activity was Na(+)-dependent in C. tetanomorphum and B. fragilis but Na(+)-independent in C. ljungdahlii and V. cholerae. We deleted the rnf genes from B. fragilis and demonstrated that the mutant has greatly reduced ferredoxin:NAD(+) oxidoreductase activity. This is the first genetic proof that the rnf genes indeed encode the reduced ferredoxin:NAD(+) oxidoreductase activity. PMID:26793417

  5. Transcriptional regulation of human ferredoxin reductase through an intronic enhancer in steroidogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Imamichi, Yoshitaka; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Ju, Yunfeng; Matsumura, Takehiro; Kawabe, Shinya; Kanno, Masafumi; Yazawa, Takashi; Miyamoto, Kaoru

    2014-01-01

    Ferredoxin reductase (FDXR, also known as adrenodoxin reductase) is a mitochondrial flavoprotein that transfers electrons from NADPH to mitochondrial cytochrome P450 enzymes, mediating the function of an iron-sulfur cluster protein, ferredoxin. FDXR functions in various metabolic processes including steroidogenesis. It is well known that multiple steroidogenic enzymes are regulated by a transcription factor steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1, also known as Ad4BP). Previously, we have shown that SF-1 transduction causes human mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into steroidogenic cells. Genome-wide analysis of differentiated cells, using a combination of DNA microarray and promoter tiling array analyses, showed that FDXR is a novel SF-1 target gene. In this study, the transcriptional regulatory mechanism of FDXR was examined in steroidogenic cells. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that a novel SF-1 binding region was located within intron 2 of the human FDXR gene. Luciferase reporter assays showed that FDXR transcription was activated through the novel SF-1 binding site within intron 2. Endogenous SF-1 knockdown in human adrenocortical H295R and KGN cells decreased FDXR expression. In H295R cells, strong binding of two histone markers of active enhancers, histones H3K27ac and H3K4me2, were detected near the SF-1 binding site within intron 2. Furthermore, the binding of these histone markers was decreased concurrent with SF-1 knockdown in H295R cells. These results indicated that abundant FDXR expression in these steroidogenic cells was maintained through SF-1 binding to the intronic enhancer of the FDXR gene. PMID:24321386

  6. Cloning, expression, and molecular characterization of the gene encoding an extremely thermostable [4Fe-4S] ferredoxin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed Central

    Heltzel, A; Smith, E T; Zhou, Z H; Blamey, J M; Adams, M W

    1994-01-01

    The gene for ferredoxin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The coding region confirmed the determined amino acid sequence. Putative archaeon-type transcriptional regulatory elements were identified. The fdxA gene appears to be an independent transcriptional unit. Recombinant ferredoxin was indistinguishable from the protein purified from P. furiosus in its thermal stability and in the potentiometric and spectroscopic properties of its [4Fe-4S] cluster. PMID:8045914

  7. Putative thioredoxin Trx1 from Thermosipho africanus strain TCF52B: expression, purification and structural determination using S-SAD.

    PubMed

    Sahtout, Naheda; Kuttiyatveetil, Jijin R A; Fodje, Michel; Sanders, David A R

    2016-06-01

    Thioredoxin is a small ubiquitous protein that plays a role in many biological processes. A putative thioredoxin, Trx1, from Thermosipho africanus strain TCF52B, which has low sequence identity to its closest homologues, was successfully cloned, overexpressed and purified. The protein was crystallized using the microbatch-under-oil technique at 289 K in a variety of conditions; crystals grown in 0.2 M MgCl2, 0.1 M bis-tris pH 6.5, 25%(w/v) PEG 3350, which grew as irregular trapezoids to maximum dimensions of 1.2 × 1.5 × 0.80 mm, were used for sulfur single-wavelength anomalous dispersion analysis. The anomalous sulfur signal could be detected to 2.83 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation on the 08B1-1 beamline at the Canadian Light Source. The crystals belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 40.6, b = 41.5, c = 56.4 Å, α = β = γ = 90.0°. PMID:27303896

  8. Protostylid expression at the enamel-dentine junction and enamel surface of mandibular molars of Paranthropus robustus and Australopithecus africanus.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Matthew M; Wood, Bernard A; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Distinctive expressions and incidences of discrete dental traits at the outer enamel surface (OES) contribute to the diagnoses of many early hominin taxa. Examination of the enamel-dentine junction (EDJ), imaged non-destructively using micro-computed tomography, has elucidated the morphological development of dental traits and improved interpretations of their variability within and among taxa. The OES expressions of one of these dental traits, the protostylid, have been found to differ among African Plio-Pleistocene fossil hominin taxa. In this study protostylid expression is examined at the OES and at the EDJ of Paranthropus robustus (n=23) and Australopithecus africanus (n=28) mandibular molars, with the goals of incorporating EDJ morphology into the definition of the protostylid and assessing the relative contribution of the EDJ and enamel cap to its expression in these taxa. The results provide evidence (a) of statistically significant taxon-specific patterns of protostylid morphology at the EDJ that are not evident at the OES; (b) that in P. robustus, thick enamel reduces the morphological correspondence between the form of the protostylid seen at the EDJ and the OES, and (c) that if EDJ images can be obtained, then the protostylid retains its taxonomic value even in worn teeth. PMID:18986683

  9. The enamel–dentine junction in the postcanine dentition of Australopithecus africanus: intra-individual metameric and antimeric variation

    PubMed Central

    Braga, J; Thackeray, J F; Subsol, G; Kahn, J L; Maret, D; Treil, J; Beck, A

    2010-01-01

    We used micro-computed tomography and virtual tools to study metric and morphological features at the enamel–dentine junction and on the outer enamel surface in the postcanine dentition of an exceptionally well-preserved maxilla and mandible of an early hominin. The fossil, Sts 52 from Sterkfontein, South Africa, is attributed to Australopithecus africanus and is about 2.5 million years old. For comparative purposes in this exploratory study, we also used micro-computed tomography to analyse the dentition of a common chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), a pygmy chimpanzee (Pan paniscus) and three extant humans. Metameric variation of the 3D enamel–dentine junction in the two chimpanzee mandibles was much smaller than in extant humans. Variation in metameric shape was high and complex. Notably, the mandibular metameric variation in extant humans can be greater within individuals, as compared with variation between individuals, with differences in shape appearing greater for M2 compared with M1. We recommend the use of a new approach in which individual metameric variation is systematically assessed before making inferences about differences between fossil hominin species. The fossil hominin examined in this study showed a metameric pattern of mandibular variation in shape that was comparable to the pattern seen in two chimpanzees. This degree of metameric variation appeared relatively small compared with the much larger patterns of variation observed within and between extant humans. PMID:19900182

  10. Reproductive functional anatomy and oestrous cycle pattern of the female brush-tailed porcupine (Atherurus africanus, Gray 1842) from Gabon.

    PubMed

    Mayor, P; López-Béjar, M; Jori, F; Fenech, M; López-Gatius, F

    2003-07-15

    In the present study, we examined certain features of the functional anatomy of the female genital tract of the wild brush-tailed porcupine (Atherurus africanus) to obtain data on the reproductive biology of this African forest rodent. Two consecutive experiments were performed. The aim of the first was to establish macroscopic and microscopic features of the genital organs, and to explore correlations between predominant ovarian structures and vaginal contents in 20 wild, mature females. In the second experiment, we inspected the external genitalia and vaginal smears of a further 10 females in captivity on a daily basis for 90 days. The uterus of the brush-tailed porcupine is bicornuate and composed of two separated uterine horns, a uterine body and cervix. The genital tract does not present a vaginal vestibule. Thus, there is no portion common to genital and urinary tracts. Females in the follicular phase of the oestrous cycle showed increased cornification of the vaginal epithelium and a high density of eosinophilic cells in vaginal smears. The vulva and vaginal opening were open, reddish and tumefacted. In luteal phase or in pregnancy, epithelial cornification and eosinophilic features were notably reduced and the vagina presented a pale, non-tumefacted vulva and a vaginal closure membrane. Females in captivity showed spontaneous cycles, a polyoestrous reproduction pattern and, based on features of the external genitalia and vaginal smears, their oestrous cycle length was 27.1+/-6.4 days (n=12). PMID:12695058

  11. Tiarajudens eccentricus and Anomocephalus africanus, two bizarre anomodonts (Synapsida, Therapsida) with dental occlusion from the Permian of Gondwana

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros, Juan Carlos; Abdala, Fernando; Jashashvili, Tea; de Oliveira Bueno, Ana; Dentzien-Dias, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Anomodontia was a highly successful tetrapod clade during the Permian and the Triassic. New morphological information regarding two bizarre basal anomodonts is provided and their palaeoecological significance is explored. The osteology of the recently discovered Tiarajudens eccentricus Cisneros et al. 2011, from the Brazilian Permian, is described in detail. The taxon exhibits unusual postcranial features, including the presence of gastralia. Additional preparation and computed tomography scans of the holotype of Anomocephalus africanus Modesto et al. 1999 discovered in the Karoo Basin of South Africa allow a reappraisal of this genus. Anomocephalus is similar to Tiarajudens with regard to several traits, including a battery of large, transversally expanded, palatal teeth. Molariform teeth are present in the mandible of the African taxon, providing additional insight into the function of the earliest tooth-occlusion mechanism known in therapsids. At least two waves of tooth replacement can be recognized in the palate of Anomocephalus. The outsized, blade-like caniniforms of the herbivorous Tiarajudens allow several non-exclusive ecological interpretations, among which we favour intraspecific display or combat. This behaviour was an alternative to the head-butting practised by the contemporary dinocephalians. Combat specializations that are considered typical of Cenozoic herbivores likely evolved during the Middle Permian, at the time the first communities with diverse, abundant tetrapod herbivores were being assembled. PMID:26587266

  12. Tiarajudens eccentricus and Anomocephalus africanus, two bizarre anomodonts (Synapsida, Therapsida) with dental occlusion from the Permian of Gondwana.

    PubMed

    Cisneros, Juan Carlos; Abdala, Fernando; Jashashvili, Tea; de Oliveira Bueno, Ana; Dentzien-Dias, Paula

    2015-07-01

    Anomodontia was a highly successful tetrapod clade during the Permian and the Triassic. New morphological information regarding two bizarre basal anomodonts is provided and their palaeoecological significance is explored. The osteology of the recently discovered Tiarajudens eccentricus Cisneros et al. 2011, from the Brazilian Permian, is described in detail. The taxon exhibits unusual postcranial features, including the presence of gastralia. Additional preparation and computed tomography scans of the holotype of Anomocephalus africanus Modesto et al. 1999 discovered in the Karoo Basin of South Africa allow a reappraisal of this genus. Anomocephalus is similar to Tiarajudens with regard to several traits, including a battery of large, transversally expanded, palatal teeth. Molariform teeth are present in the mandible of the African taxon, providing additional insight into the function of the earliest tooth-occlusion mechanism known in therapsids. At least two waves of tooth replacement can be recognized in the palate of Anomocephalus. The outsized, blade-like caniniforms of the herbivorous Tiarajudens allow several non-exclusive ecological interpretations, among which we favour intraspecific display or combat. This behaviour was an alternative to the head-butting practised by the contemporary dinocephalians. Combat specializations that are considered typical of Cenozoic herbivores likely evolved during the Middle Permian, at the time the first communities with diverse, abundant tetrapod herbivores were being assembled. PMID:26587266

  13. Expressed sequence tags of the peanut pod nematode Ditylenchus africanus: the first transcriptome analysis of an Anguinid nematode

    PubMed Central

    Haegeman, Annelies; Jacob, Joachim; Vanholme, Bartel; Kyndt, Tina; Mitreva, Makedonka; Gheysen, Godelieve

    2009-01-01

    In this study, 4847 expressed sequenced tags (ESTs) from mixed stages of the migratory plant-parasitic nematode Ditylenchus africanus (peanut pod nematode) were investigated. It is the first molecular survey of a nematode which belongs to the family of the Anguinidae (order Rhabditida, superfamily Sphaerularioidea). The sequences were clustered into 2596 unigenes, of which 43% did not show any homology to known protein, nucleotide, nematode EST or plant-parasitic nematode genome sequences. Gene ontology mapping revealed that most putative proteins are involved in developmental and reproductive processes. In addition unigenes involved in oxidative stress as well as in anhydrobiosis, such as LEA (late embryogenesis abundant protein) and trehalose-6-phosphate synthase were identified. Other tags showed homology to genes previously described as being involved in parasitism (expansin, SEC-2, calreticulin, 14-3-3b and various allergen proteins). In situ hybridization revealed that the expression of a putative expansin and a venom allergen protein was restricted to the gland cell area of the nematode, being in agreement with their presumed role in parasitism. Furthermore, 7 putative novel candidate parasitism genes were identified based on the prediction of a signal peptide in the corresponding protein sequence and homologous ESTs exclusively in parasitic nematodes. These genes are interesting for further research and functional characterization. Finally, 34 unigenes were retained as good target candidates for future RNAi experiments, because of their nematode specific nature and observed lethal phenotypes of Caenorhabditis elegans homologs. PMID:19383517

  14. The enamel-dentine junction in the postcanine dentition of Australopithecus africanus: intra-individual metameric and antimeric variation.

    PubMed

    Braga, J; Thackeray, J F; Subsol, G; Kahn, J L; Maret, D; Treil, J; Beck, A

    2010-01-01

    We used micro-computed tomography and virtual tools to study metric and morphological features at the enamel-dentine junction and on the outer enamel surface in the postcanine dentition of an exceptionally well-preserved maxilla and mandible of an early hominin. The fossil, Sts 52 from Sterkfontein, South Africa, is attributed to Australopithecus africanus and is about 2.5 million years old. For comparative purposes in this exploratory study, we also used micro-computed tomography to analyse the dentition of a common chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), a pygmy chimpanzee (Pan paniscus) and three extant humans. Metameric variation of the 3D enamel-dentine junction in the two chimpanzee mandibles was much smaller than in extant humans. Variation in metameric shape was high and complex. Notably, the mandibular metameric variation in extant humans can be greater within individuals, as compared with variation between individuals, with differences in shape appearing greater for M2 compared with M1. We recommend the use of a new approach in which individual metameric variation is systematically assessed before making inferences about differences between fossil hominin species. The fossil hominin examined in this study showed a metameric pattern of mandibular variation in shape that was comparable to the pattern seen in two chimpanzees. This degree of metameric variation appeared relatively small compared with the much larger patterns of variation observed within and between extant humans. PMID:19900182

  15. Continuous dental eruption identifies Sts 5 as the developmentally oldest fossil hominin and informs the taxonomy of Australopithecus africanus.

    PubMed

    Villmoare, B; Kuykendall, K; Rae, T C; Brimacombe, C S

    2013-12-01

    The relatively small Australopithecus africanus specimen Sts 5 has figured prominently in taxonomic debates, and the determination of this specimen as a young male or an elderly female has the potential to offer a great deal of resolution on this question. Sts 5 has been argued to be either a small, immature male or a mature female based on a variety of characters. A proposed model of continuous root remodeling and angular change for heavily worn dentition may account for the extremely short tooth roots, particularly for the anterior dentition, that Sts 5 demonstrates. The anterior tooth roots of Sts 5 are oriented vertically (relative to the alveolar plane), unlike those found in most other apes, humans, and fossil specimens, in which the tooth roots are roughly parallel with the plane of the nasoalveolar clivus. Computed tomography (CT) data of adult apes were examined and a relationship between the angle of the anterior tooth roots and their length was discovered, caused by heavily worn anterior dentition continuing to erupt to maintain occlusion. The extremely short and vertically oriented anterior roots observed in Sts 5 thus suggest that the specimen represents an aged female specimen with extremely worn dentition. Interestingly, this reorientation of anterior tooth roots helps account for the unusual nasoalveolar contour of Sts 5. The remodeling associated with the heavily worn teeth and reoriented roots thus resolves the taxonomic question raised by analyses identifying unusual prognathism of this small specimen. PMID:24210658

  16. Uncouplers Stimulate Photosynthesis in Intact Chloroplasts by Enhancing Light-Activation of Enzymes Regulated by the Ferredoxin-Thioredoxin System

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Luciana; Whatley, F. Robert

    1981-01-01

    Some uncouplers stimulate CO2-dependent O2 evolution by intact spinach chloroplasts at pH 8.6. This effect is not due to alkalinization of the stroma. The stimulation is observed only when photosynthesis has been partly inhibited by the presence of H2O2, generated in a Mehler-type reaction by the broken chloroplasts which always contaminate the intact chloroplast preparations. The addition of methyl viologen increases the Mehler-type reaction and results in greater inhibition of photosynthesis. The addition of excess catalase stimulates photosynthesis by preventing accumulation of H2O2. The uncouplers stimulate photosynthesis primarily by enhancing the light-activation of enzymes that are regulated by the ferredoxin-thioredoxin system, and this effect results from the influence of the uncouplers on the redox poising of the ferredoxin in the intact chloroplasts. PMID:16661918

  17. Ferredoxin:NADP oxidoreductase of Cyanophora paradoxa: purification, partial characterization, and N-terminal amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Gebhart, U B; Maier, T L; Stevanović, S; Bayer, M G; Schenk, H E

    1992-06-01

    The ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase of the protist Cyanophora paradoxa, as a descendant of a former symbiotic consortium, an important model organism in view of the Endosymbiosis Theory, is the first enzyme purified from a formerly original endocytobiont (cyanelle) that is found to be encoded in the nucleus of the host. This cyanoplast enzyme was isolated by FPLC (19% yield) and characterized with respect to the uv-vis spectrum, pH optimum (pH 9), molecular mass of 34 kDa, and an N-terminal amino acid sequence (24 residues). The enzyme shows, as known from other organisms, molecular heterogeneity. The N-terminus of a further ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase polypeptide represents a shorter sequence missing the first four amino acids of the mature enzyme. PMID:1392619

  18. Immunodetection of the Ferredoxin-NADP+ Oxidoreductase-Binding Protein Complex in Thylakoids of Different Higher Plant Species 1

    PubMed Central

    Soncini, Fernando C.; Vallejos, Rubén H.

    1989-01-01

    Monospecific polyclonal antibodies against thylakoid ferredoxin-NADP+ oxidoreductase and its binding protein from Spinacia oleracea were used to detect the presence of these proteins in different higher plants, including C3, C4, and Crassulacean acid metabolism species. A remarkable conservation of antigenic determinants in all the species analyzed was demonstrated for both the reductase and its binding protein. The association of these polypeptides in a complex was detected by immunoprecipitation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:16666777

  19. Characterization of a 7Fe ferredoxin isolated from the marine denitrifier Pseudomonas nautica strain 617: spectroscopic and electrochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Macedo, A L; Besson, S; Moreno, C; Fauque, G; Moura, J J; Moura, I

    1996-12-13

    A 7Fe ferredoxin, isolated from the marine denitrifier Pseudomonas nautica strain 617, was characterized. The NH2-terminal sequence analysis, performed until residue number 56, shows a high similarity with the 7Fe ferredoxins isolated from Azotobacter vinelandii, Pseudomonas putida, and Pseudomonas stutzeri. EPR and NMR spectroscopies identify the presence of both [3Fe-4S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters, with cysteinyl coordination. The electrochemical studies on [Fe-S] clusters show that a fast diffusion-dominated electron transfer, promoted by Mg(II), takes place between the ferredoxin and the glassy carbon electrode. Square wave voltammetry studies gave access to the electrosynthesis of a 4Fe center formed within the [3Fe-4S] core. The [3Fe-4S] cluster exhibited two reduction potentials at -175 and -680 +/- 10 mV and the [4Fe-4S] cluster was characterized by an unusually low reduction potential of -715 +/- 10 mV, at pH 7.6 PMID:8954931

  20. Identification and Expression Analysis of a Novel HbCIPK2-Interacting Ferredoxin from Halophyte H. brevisubulatum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Ge, Rongchao; Zhang, Junwen; Chen, Yajuan; Wang, Hongzhi; Wei, Jianhua; Li, Ruifen

    2015-01-01

    Ferredoxin is a small iron-sulfer protein involved in various one-eletron transfer pathways. Little is known about how ferredoxin is regulated to distribute electron under abiotic stress. Our previous study has showed that HbCIPK2 conferred salinity and drought tolerance. Thus, we hypothesized that HbCIPK2 could mediate the activities of interacting partners as a signal transducer. In this report, we identified a novel HbCIPK2-interacting ferredoxin (HbFd1) from halophyte Hordeum brevisubulatum by yeast two-hybrid screens, confirmed this interaction by BiFC in vivo and CoIP in vitro, and presented the expression pattern of HbFd1. HbFd1 was down-regulated under salinity and cold stress but up-regulated under PEG stress, its expression showed tissue-specific, mainly in shoot chloroplast, belonging to leaf-type subgroup. Moreover, HbCIPK2 could recruit HbFd1 to the nucleus for their interaction. The C-terminal segment in HbFd1 protein was involved in the interaction with HbCIPK2. These results provided insight into the connection between CBL-CIPK signaling network and Fd-dependent metabolic pathways. PMID:26636581

  1. 1H nuclear-magnetic-resonance investigation of oxidized Fe4S4 ferredoxin from Thermotoga maritima. Hyperfine-shifted resonances, sequence-specific assignments and secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Wildegger, G; Bentrop, D; Ejchart, A; Alber, M; Hage, A; Sterner, R; Rösch, P

    1995-05-01

    The oxidized Fe4S4 ferredoxin from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima has been investigated by one- and two-dimensional NMR in order to characterize its hyperfine-shifted resonances originating from the cysteinyl cluster ligands and to assign its resonances in the diamagnetic shift range. The chemical shift and relaxation time pattern of the hyperfine-shifted signals is very similar to other oxidized Fe4S4 ferredoxins. A tentative sequence-specific assignment of these resonances according to a general pattern of chemical shift of cysteine protons versus sequence position of cluster ligand is presented. Furthermore, sequence-specific assignments for 85% of the amino acid residues that were obtained without any guidance by known X-ray structures of ferredoxins are given. They reveal the formation of at least two elements of secondary structure by the polypeptide chain of T. maritima ferredoxin: an alpha-helix comprising residues C43-D49 and a double-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet consisting of the N- and C-terminal parts of the protein. This folding pattern is very similar to that of the crystallographically characterized ferredoxin from the mesophile Desulfovibrio gigas [Kissinger, C.R., Sieker, L.C., Adman E.T. & Jensen, L.H. (1991) J. Mol. Biol. 219, 693-715] and therefore suggesting different mechanisms of stabilization for T. maritima ferredoxin and the ferredoxin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus that was recently investigated by NMR [Teng, Q., Zhou, Z.H., Smith, E.T., Busse, S. C., Howard, J.B., Adams M.W.W. & La Mar, G.N. (1994) Biochemistry 33, 6316-6326]. PMID:7758460

  2. Structural-functional characterization and physiological significance of ferredoxin-NADP reductase from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Tondo, María Laura; Musumeci, Matías A; Delprato, María Laura; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A; Orellano, Elena G

    2011-01-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri is a phytopathogen bacterium that causes severe citrus canker disease. Similar to other phytopathogens, after infection by this bacterium, plants trigger a defense mechanism that produces reactive oxygen species. Ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductases (FNRs) are redox flavoenzymes that participate in several metabolic functions, including the response to reactive oxygen species. Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri has a gene (fpr) that encodes for a FNR (Xac-FNR) that belongs to the subclass I bacterial FNRs. The aim of this work was to search for the physiological role of this enzyme and to characterize its structural and functional properties. The functionality of Xac-FNR was tested by cross-complementation of a FNR knockout Escherichia coli strain, which exhibit high susceptibility to agents that produce an abnormal accumulation of (•)O(2)(-). Xac-FNR was able to substitute for the FNR in E. coli in its antioxidant role. The expression of fpr in X. axonopodis pv. citri was assessed using semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. A 2.2-fold induction was observed in the presence of the superoxide-generating agents methyl viologen and 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone. Structural and functional studies showed that Xac-FNR displayed different functional features from other subclass I bacterial FNRs. Our analyses suggest that these differences may be due to the unusual carboxy-terminal region. We propose a further classification of subclass I bacterial FNRs, which is useful to determine the nature of their ferredoxin redox partners. Using sequence analysis, we identified a ferredoxin (XAC1762) as a potential substrate of Xac-FNR. The purified ferredoxin protein displayed the typical broad UV-visible spectrum of [4Fe-4S] clusters and was able to function as substrate of Xac-FNR in the cytochrome c reductase activity. Our results suggest that Xac-FNR is involved in the oxidative stress response of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri and

  3. Brief communication: beyond the South African cave paradigm--Australopithecus africanus from Plio-Pleistocene paleosol deposits at Taung.

    PubMed

    Hopley, Philip J; Herries, Andy I R; Baker, Stephanie Edwards; Kuhn, Brian F; Menter, Colin G

    2013-06-01

    Following the discovery of the "Taung Child" (Australopithecus africanus) in 1924 in the Buxton-Norlim Limeworks near Taung, the fossil-bearing deposits associated with the Dart and Hrdlička pinnacles have been interpreted as the mined remnants of cave sediments that formed within the Plio-Pleistocene Thabaseek Tufa: either as a younger cave-fill or as contemporaneous carapace caves. When combined with the Plio-Pleistocene dolomitic cave deposits from the "Cradle of Humankind," a rather restricted view emerges that South African early hominins derived from cave deposits, whereas those of east and central Africa are derived from fluvio-lacustrine and paleosol deposits. We undertook a sedimentological and paleomagnetic analysis of the pink-colored deposit (PCS) from which the "Taung Child" is purported to have derived and demonstrate that it is a calcrete, a carbonate-rich pedogenic sediment, which formed on the paleo-land surface. The deposit extends 100 s of meters laterally beyond the Dart and Hrdlička Pinnacles where it is interbedded with the Thabaseek Tufa, indicating multiple episodes of calcrete development and tufa growth. The presence of in situ rhizoconcretions and insect trace fossils (Celliforma sp. and Coprinisphaera sp.) and the distinctive carbonate microfabric confirm that the pink deposit is a pedogenic calcrete, not a calcified cave sediment. Paleomagnetic and stratigraphic evidence indicates that a second, reversed polarity, fossil-bearing deposit (YRSS) is a younger fissure-fill formed within a solutional cavity of the normal polarity tufa and pink calcrete (PCS). These observations have implications for the dating, environment, and taphonomy of the site, and increase the likelihood of future fossil discoveries within the Buxton-Norlim Limeworks. PMID:23633001

  4. Foraging ranges of immature African white-backed vultures (Gyps africanus) and their use of protected areas in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Phipps, W Louis; Willis, Stephen G; Wolter, Kerri; Naidoo, Vinny

    2013-01-01

    Vultures in the Gyps genus are declining globally. Multiple threats related to human activity have caused widespread declines of vulture populations in Africa, especially outside protected areas. Addressing such threats requires the estimation of foraging ranges yet such estimates are lacking, even for widespread (but declining) species such as the African white-backed vulture (Gyps africanus). We tracked six immature African white-backed vultures in South Africa using GPS-GSM units to study their movement patterns, their use of protected areas and the time they spent in the vicinity of supplementary feeding sites. All individuals foraged widely; their combined foraging ranges extended into six countries in southern Africa (mean (± SE) minimum convex polygon area =269,103±197,187 km(2)) and three of the vultures travelled more than 900 km from the capture site. All six vultures spent the majority of their tracking periods outside protected areas. South African protected areas were very rarely visited whereas protected areas in northern Botswana and Zimbabwe were used more frequently. Two of the vultures visited supplementary feeding sites regularly, with consequent reduced ranging behaviour, suggesting that individuals could alter their foraging behaviour in response to such sites. We show that immature African white-backed vultures are capable of travelling throughout southern Africa, yet use protected areas to only a limited extent, making them susceptible to the full range of threats in the region. The standard approach of designating protected areas to conserve species is unlikely to ensure the protection of such wide-ranging species against threats in the wider landscape. PMID:23382824

  5. Foraging Ranges of Immature African White-Backed Vultures (Gyps africanus) and Their Use of Protected Areas in Southern Africa

    PubMed Central

    Phipps, W. Louis; Willis, Stephen G.; Wolter, Kerri; Naidoo, Vinny

    2013-01-01

    Vultures in the Gyps genus are declining globally. Multiple threats related to human activity have caused widespread declines of vulture populations in Africa, especially outside protected areas. Addressing such threats requires the estimation of foraging ranges yet such estimates are lacking, even for widespread (but declining) species such as the African white-backed vulture (Gyps africanus). We tracked six immature African white-backed vultures in South Africa using GPS-GSM units to study their movement patterns, their use of protected areas and the time they spent in the vicinity of supplementary feeding sites. All individuals foraged widely; their combined foraging ranges extended into six countries in southern Africa (mean (± SE) minimum convex polygon area  = 269,103±197,187 km2) and three of the vultures travelled more than 900 km from the capture site. All six vultures spent the majority of their tracking periods outside protected areas. South African protected areas were very rarely visited whereas protected areas in northern Botswana and Zimbabwe were used more frequently. Two of the vultures visited supplementary feeding sites regularly, with consequent reduced ranging behaviour, suggesting that individuals could alter their foraging behaviour in response to such sites. We show that immature African white-backed vultures are capable of travelling throughout southern Africa, yet use protected areas to only a limited extent, making them susceptible to the full range of threats in the region. The standard approach of designating protected areas to conserve species is unlikely to ensure the protection of such wide-ranging species against threats in the wider landscape. PMID:23382824

  6. NDH-1L interacts with ferredoxin via the subunit NdhS in Thermosynechococcus elongatus.

    PubMed

    He, Zhihui; Zheng, Fangfang; Wu, Yaozong; Li, Qinghua; Lv, Jing; Fu, Pengcheng; Mi, Hualing

    2015-12-01

    The large size complex of cyanobacterial NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDH-1) complex (NDH-1L) plays crucial role in a variety of bioenergetic reactions such as respiration and cyclic electron flow around photosystem I. Although the complex has been isolated and identified, its biochemical function still remains to be clarified. Here, we highly purified the NDH-1L complex from the cells of Thermosynechococcus elongatus by Ni(2+) affinity chromatography and size-exclusion chromatography. The purified NDH-1L complex has an apparent total molecular mass of approximately 500 kDa. 14 known subunits were identified by mass spectrometry and immunoblotting, including the NdhS subunit containing ferredoxin (Fd)-docking site domain. Surface plasmon resonance measurement demonstrates that the NDH-1L complex could bind to Fd with the binding constant (K D) of 59 µM. Yeast two-hybrid system assay further confirmed the interaction of Fd with NdhS and indicated that NdhH is involved in the interaction. Our results provide direct biochemical evidence that the cyanobacterial NDH-1 complex catalyzes the electron transport from reduced Fd to plastoquinone via NdhS and NdhH. PMID:25630976

  7. Overexpression of Ferredoxin, PETF, Enhances Tolerance to Heat Stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Hsien; Pan, Kui-You; Hung, Ching-Hui; Huang, Hsiang-En; Chen, Ching-Lian; Feng, Teng-Yung; Huang, Li-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by plants in adverse environments can cause damage to organelles and trigger cell death. Removal of excess ROS can be achieved through the ascorbate scavenger pathway to prevent plant cell death. The amount of this scavenger can be regulated by ferredoxin (FDX). Chloroplastic FDXs are electron transfer proteins that perform in distributing photosynthetic reducing power. In this study, we demonstrate that overexpression of the endogenous photosynthetic FDX gene, PETF, in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii could raise the level of reduced ascorbate and diminish H2O2 levels under normal growth conditions. Furthermore, the overexpressing PETF transgenic Chlamydomonas lines produced low levels of H2O2 and exhibited protective effects that were observed through decreased chlorophyll degradation and increased cell survival under heat-stress conditions. The findings of this study suggest that overexpression of PETF can increase the efficiency of ROS scavenging in chloroplasts to confer heat tolerance. The roles of PETF in the downregulation of the ROS level offer a method for potentially improving the tolerance of crops against heat stress. PMID:24141188

  8. Influence of 120 kDa Pyruvate:Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase on Pathogenicity of Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun-Ouk

    2016-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a flagellate protozoan parasite and commonly infected the lower genital tract in women and men. Iron is a known nutrient for growth of various pathogens, and also reported to be involved in establishment of trichomoniasis. However, the exact mechanism was not clarified. In this study, the author investigated whether the 120 kDa protein of T. vaginalis may be involved in pathogenicity of trichomonads. Antibodies against 120 kDa protein of T. vaginalis, which was identified as pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) by peptide analysis of MALDI-TOF-MS, were prepared in rabbits. Pretreatment of T. vaginalis with anti-120 kDa Ab decreased the proliferation and adherence to vaginal epithelial cells (MS74) of T. vaginalis. Subcutaneous tissue abscess in anti-120 kDa Ab-treated T. vaginalis-injected mice was smaller in size than that of untreated T. vaginalis-infected mice. Collectively, the 120 kDa protein expressed by iron may be involved in proliferation, adhesion to host cells, and abscess formation, thereby may influence on the pathogenicity of T. vaginalis. PMID:26951982

  9. Decreased Content of Leaf Ferredoxin Changes Electron Distribution and Limits Photosynthesis in Transgenic Potato Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Holtgrefe, Simone; Bader, Klaus P.; Horton, Peter; Scheibe, Renate; von Schaewen, Antje; Backhausen, Jan E.

    2003-01-01

    A complete ferredoxin (Fd) cDNA clone was isolated from potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv Desiree) leaves. By molecular and immunoblot analysis, the gene was identified as the leaf-specific Fd isoform I. Transgenic potato plants were constructed by introducing the homologous potato fed 1 cDNA clone as an antisense construct under the control of the constitutive cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Stable antisense lines with Fd contents between 40% and 80% of the wild-type level were selected by northern- and western-blot analysis. In short-term experiments, the distribution of electrons toward their stromal acceptors was altered in the mutant plants. Cyclic electron transport, as determined by the quantum yields of photosystems I and II, was enhanced. The CO2 assimilation rate was decreased, but depending on the remaining Fd content, some lines showed photoinhibition. The leaf protein content remained largely constant, but the antisense plants had a lower total chlorophyll content per unit leaf area and an increased chlorophyll a/b ratio. In the antisense plants, the redox state of the quinone acceptor A in photosystem II (QA) was more reduced than that of the wild-type plants under all experimental conditions. Because the plants with lower Fd amounts reacted as if they were grown under a higher light intensity, the possibility that the altered chloroplast redox state affects light acclimation is discussed. PMID:14645726

  10. Posttranslational Modifications of FERREDOXIN-NADP+ OXIDOREDUCTASE in Arabidopsis Chloroplasts1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lehtimäki, Nina; Koskela, Minna M.; Dahlström, Käthe M.; Pakula, Eveliina; Lintala, Minna; Scholz, Martin; Hippler, Michael; Hanke, Guy T.; Rokka, Anne; Battchikova, Natalia; Salminen, Tiina A.; Mulo, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Rapid responses of chloroplast metabolism and adjustments to photosynthetic machinery are of utmost importance for plants’ survival in a fluctuating environment. These changes may be achieved through posttranslational modifications of proteins, which are known to affect the activity, interactions, and localization of proteins. Recent studies have accumulated evidence about the crucial role of a multitude of modifications, including acetylation, methylation, and glycosylation, in the regulation of chloroplast proteins. Both of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf-type FERREDOXIN-NADP+ OXIDOREDUCTASE (FNR) isoforms, the key enzymes linking the light reactions of photosynthesis to carbon assimilation, exist as two distinct forms with different isoelectric points. We show that both AtFNR isoforms contain multiple alternative amino termini and undergo light-responsive addition of an acetyl group to the α-amino group of the amino-terminal amino acid of proteins, which causes the change in isoelectric point. Both isoforms were also found to contain acetylation of a conserved lysine residue near the active site, while no evidence for in vivo phosphorylation or glycosylation was detected. The dynamic, multilayer regulation of AtFNR exemplifies the complex regulatory network systems controlling chloroplast proteins by a range of posttranslational modifications, which continues to emerge as a novel area within photosynthesis research. PMID:25301888

  11. Overexpression of ferredoxin, PETF, enhances tolerance to heat stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Hsien; Pan, Kui-You; Hung, Ching-Hui; Huang, Hsiang-En; Chen, Ching-Lian; Feng, Teng-Yung; Huang, Li-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by plants in adverse environments can cause damage to organelles and trigger cell death. Removal of excess ROS can be achieved through the ascorbate scavenger pathway to prevent plant cell death. The amount of this scavenger can be regulated by ferredoxin (FDX). Chloroplastic FDXs are electron transfer proteins that perform in distributing photosynthetic reducing power. In this study, we demonstrate that overexpression of the endogenous photosynthetic FDX gene, PETF, in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii could raise the level of reduced ascorbate and diminish H2O2 levels under normal growth conditions. Furthermore, the overexpressing PETF transgenic Chlamydomonas lines produced low levels of H2O2 and exhibited protective effects that were observed through decreased chlorophyll degradation and increased cell survival under heat-stress conditions. The findings of this study suggest that overexpression of PETF can increase the efficiency of ROS scavenging in chloroplasts to confer heat tolerance. The roles of PETF in the downregulation of the ROS level offer a method for potentially improving the tolerance of crops against heat stress. PMID:24141188

  12. Nicotiana tabacum Tsip1-Interacting Ferredoxin 1 Affects Biotic and Abiotic Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Sung Un; Lee, In-Ju; Ham, Byung-Kook; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2012-01-01

    Tsip1, a Zn finger protein that was isolated as a direct interactor with tobacco stress-induced 1 (Tsi1), plays an important role in both biotic and abiotic stress signaling. To further understand Tsip1 function, we searched for more Tsip1-interacting proteins by yeast two-hybrid screening using a tobacco cDNA library. Screening identified a new Tsip1-interacting protein, Nicotiana tabacum Tsip1-interacting ferredoxin 1 (NtTfd1), and binding specificity was confirmed both in vitro and in vivo. The four repeats of a cysteine-rich motif (CXXCXGXG) of Tsip1 proved important for binding to NtTfd1. Virus-induced gene silencing of NtTfd1, Tsip1, and NtTfd1/Tsip1 rendered plants more susceptible to salinity stress compared with TRV2 control plants. NtTfd1- and Tsip1-silenced tobacco plants were more susceptible to infection by Cucumber mosaic virus compared with control plants. These results suggest that NtTfd1 might be involved in the regulation of biotic and abiotic stresses in chloroplasts by interaction with Tsip1. PMID:22699755

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of a novel ferredoxin involved in the dioxygenation of carbazole by Novosphingobium sp. KA1

    SciTech Connect

    Umeda, Takashi; Katsuki, Junichi; Usami, Yusuke; Inoue, Kengo; Noguchi, Haruko; Fujimoto, Zui; Ashikawa, Yuji; Yamane, Hisakazu; Nojiri, Hideaki

    2008-07-01

    The ferredoxin component of carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase (CARDO-F) is involved in an electron-transfer reaction. The CARDO-F from Novosphingobium sp. KA1 was crystallized under anaerobic conditions and diffracted to a resolution of 1.9 Å. Novosphingobium sp. KA1 uses carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase (CARDO) as the first dioxygenase in its carbazole-degradation pathway. The CARDO of KA1 contains a terminal oxygenase component and two electron-transfer components: ferredoxin and ferredoxin reductase. In contrast to the CARDO systems of other species, the ferredoxin component of KA1 is a putidaredoxin-type protein. This novel ferredoxin was crystallized at 293 K by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG MME 550 as the precipitant under anaerobic conditions. The crystals belong to space group C222{sub 1} and diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 1.9 Å (the diffraction limit was 1.6 Å)

  14. In planta mutagenesis of Src homology 3 domain-like fold of NdhS, a ferredoxin-binding subunit of the chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase-like complex in Arabidopsis: a conserved Arg-193 plays a critical role in ferredoxin binding.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Shikanai, Toshiharu

    2013-12-20

    Chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase-like (NDH) complex mediates cyclic electron transport around photosystem I and chlororespiration in angiosperms. The Src homology 3 domain (SH3)-like fold protein NdhS/CRR31 is an NDH subunit that is necessary for high affinity binding of ferredoxin, indicating that chloroplast NDH functions as a ferredoxin:plastoquinone oxidoreductase. However, the mechanism of the interaction between NdhS and ferredoxin is unclear. In this study, we analyzed their interaction in planta by using site-directed mutagenesis of NdhS. In general, binding of ferredoxin to its target proteins depends on electrostatic interaction. In silico analysis predicted the presence of a positively charged pocket in the SH3-like domain of NdhS, where nine charged residues are highly conserved among plants. Systematic alteration of these sites with neutral glutamine revealed that only arginine 193 was required for high NDH activity in vivo. Further replacement of arginine 193 with negatively charged aspartate or glutamate or hydrophobic alanine significantly decreased the efficiency of ferredoxin-dependent plastoquinone reduction by NDH in ruptured chloroplasts. Similar results were obtained in in vivo analyses of NDH activity and electron transport. From these results, we propose that the positive charge of arginine 193 in the SH3-like domain of NdhS is critical for electrostatic interaction with ferredoxin in vivo. PMID:24225949

  15. Establishment of selected baseline blood chemistry and hematologic parameters in captive and wild-caught African white-backed vultures (Gyps africanus).

    PubMed

    Naidoo, V; Diekmann, M; Wolters, K; Swan, G E

    2008-07-01

    Despite the devastating collapse of three vulture populations on the Asian subcontinent as a result of their exposure to diclofenac, there is little available information on the normal physiology of many vulture species, including the African White-backed Vulture (Gyps africanus). Such information is needed to fully understand mechanisms for toxicity and to identify and prevent future health problems. The aim of this study was to establish baseline parameters for hematologic and selected serum chemistry parameters for this model species for further studies into the toxicity of diclofenac. Captive nonreleasable and wild African White-backed Vultures were used to determine reference values. For hematology, erythrocyte counts, hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, packed cell volume, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, and total and differential leukocyte counts were measured. Chemical analytes measured included sodium, potassium, calcium, albumin, and globulin concentrations, aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, and alanine aminotransferase activities. Uric acid and urea concentrations and the urea:uric acid ratio also were evaluated. Values are presented as means, standard deviations, and reference intervals. The serum chemistry parameters selected may provide a starting point for the evaluation of changes in renal and hepatic function; these organ systems are most severely affected by diclofenac. Results were also compared with values reported for G. africanus nestlings, and from these results it is evident that the clinical pathologic parameters are age related. This indicates that the use of nestling values for the evaluation of clinical pathologic findings in adults may be unreliable and could lead to incorrect assumptions. PMID:18689650

  16. The bidirectional NiFe-hydrogenase in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is reduced by flavodoxin and ferredoxin and is essential under mixotrophic, nitrate-limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Gutekunst, Kirstin; Chen, Xi; Schreiber, Karoline; Kaspar, Ursula; Makam, Srinivas; Appel, Jens

    2014-01-24

    Cyanobacteria are able to use solar energy for the production of hydrogen. It is generally accepted that cyanobacterial NiFe-hydrogenases are reduced by NAD(P)H. This is in conflict with thermodynamic considerations, as the midpoint potentials of NAD(P)H do not suffice to support the measured hydrogen production under physiological conditions. We show that flavodoxin and ferredoxin directly reduce the bidirectional NiFe-hydrogenase of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 in vitro. A merodiploid ferredoxin-NADP reductase mutant produced correspondingly more photohydrogen. We furthermore found that the hydrogenase receives its electrons via pyruvate:flavodoxin/ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR)-flavodoxin/ferredoxin under fermentative conditions, enabling the cells to gain ATP. These results strongly support that the bidirectional NiFe-hydrogenases in cyanobacteria function as electron sinks for low potential electrons from photosystem I and as a redox balancing device under fermentative conditions. However, the selective advantage of this enzyme is not known. No strong phenotype of mutants lacking the hydrogenase has been found. Because bidirectional hydrogenases are widespread in aquatic nutrient-rich environments that are capable of triggering phytoplankton blooms, we mimicked those conditions by growing cells in the presence of increased amounts of dissolved organic carbon and dissolved organic nitrogen. Under these conditions the hydrogenase was found to be essential. As these conditions close the two most important sinks for reduced flavodoxin/ferredoxin (CO2-fixation and nitrate reduction), this discovery further substantiates the connection between flavodoxin/ferredoxin and the NiFe-hydrogenase. PMID:24311779

  17. Expression analysis of the fpr (ferredoxin-NADP{sup +} reductase) gene in Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yunho; Pena-Llopis, Samuel; Kang, Yoon-Suk; Shin, Hyeon-Dong; Demple, Bruce; Madsen, Eugene L.; Jeon, Che Ok; Park, Woojun . E-mail: wpark@korea.ac.kr

    2006-01-27

    The ferredoxin-NADP{sup +} reductase (fpr) participates in cellular defense against oxidative damage. The fpr expression in Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is induced by oxidative and osmotic stresses. FinR, a LysR-type transcriptional factor near the fpr gene in the P. putida KT2440 genome, is required for induction of the fpr under both conditions. We have shown that the fpr and finR gene products can counteract the effects of oxidative and osmotic stresses. Interestingly, FinR-independent expression occurs either during a long period of incubation with paraquat or with high concentrations of oxidative stress agent. This result indicates that there may be additional regulators present in the P. putida KT2440 genome. In contrast to in vivo expression kinetics of fpr from the plant pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae, the fpr gene from P. putida KT2440 exhibited unusually prolonged expression after oxidative stress. Transcriptional fusion and Northern blot analysis studies indicated that the FinR is negatively autoregulated. Expression of the fpr promoter was higher in minimal media than in rich media during exponential phase growth. Consistent with this result, the fpr and finR mutants had a long lag phase in minimal media in contrast to wild-type growth characteristics. Antioxidants such as ascorbate could increase the growth rate of all tested strains in minimal media. This result confirmed that P. putida KT2440 experienced more oxidative stress during exponential growth in minimal media than in rich media. Endogenous promoter activity of the fpr gene is much higher during exponential growth than during stationary growth. These findings demonstrate new relationships between fpr, finR, and the physiology of oxidative stress in P. putida KT2440.

  18. Formation of the Fe-S cluster of ferredoxin in lysed spinach chloroplasts. [Spinacia oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Mitsui, Akira; Matsubara, Hiroshi )

    1991-01-01

    In vitro formation of the {sup 35}S-labeled Fe-S cluster of ferredoxin (Fd) has been achieved by incubating apo-Fd and ({sup 35}S)cysteine with osmotically lysed chloroplasts of spinach (Spinacia oleracea). Correct integration of the {sup 35}S-labeled Fe-S cluster into Fd was verified on the basis of the following: (a) Under nondenaturing conditions, {sup 35}S-labeled holo-Fd showed the same electrophoretic mobility as authentic holo-Fd; (b) {sup 35}S-labeled holo-Fd showed an ability to bind Fd-NADP{sup +} reductase; (c) the {sup 35}S-labeled moiety was removed from the Fd polypeptide by TCA treatment but not by 2-mercaptoethanol treatment; (d) externally added pea II apo-Fd was converted to {sup 35}S-labeled holo-Fd. This reconstitution was dependent on both ATP and light, and formation of the {sup 35}S-labeled Fe-S cluster was observed upon addition of ATP or when an ATP generation-system was constructed in the light. In contrast, ATP-consuming systems abolished the Fe-S cluster formation. A non-hydrolyzable ATP analog was unable to serve as an ATP substitute, indicating the requirement of ATP hydrolysis for cluster formation. GTP was able to substitute for ATP, but CTP and UTP were less effective. Fe-S cluster formation in lysed chloroplasts was stimulated by light even in the presence of added ATP. Light stimulation was inhibited by DCMU or methyl viologen but not by NH{sub 4}{sup +}. NADPH was able to substitute for light, indicating that light energy is required for the production of reducing compounds such as NADPH in addition to the generation of ATP.

  19. The function and properties of the iron-sulfur center in spinach ferredoxin: Thioredoxin reductase: A new biological role for iron-sulfur clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Staples, C.R.; Ameyibor, E.; Fu, Weiguang; Johnson, M.K.

    1996-09-03

    Thioredoxin reduction in chloroplasts in catalyzed by a unique class of disulfide reductases which use a [2Fe-2S]{sup 2+/+} ferredoxin as the electron donor and contain an Fe-S cluster as the sole prosthetic group in addition to the active-site disulfide. The nature, properties, and function of the Fe-S cluster in spinach ferredoxin: thioredoxin reductase (FTR) have been investigated by the combination of UV/visible absorption, variable-temperature magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), EPR, and resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopies. 66 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Position des lignes temporales sur le cranium de «Mrs » Ples (A.africanus) : une attribution sexuelle est-elle possible ?Possible position of the temporal lines on the cranium of 'Mrs' Ples (A. africanus): is sexual determination possible?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prat, Sandrine; Thackeray, John Francis

    2001-03-01

    The cranium and associated matrix of Sts 5, a cranium of Australopithecus africanus is re-examined in the context of an unfused sagittal suture and the position of the temporal lines. These lines are not developed as a sagittal crest although they are close to the mid-sagittal line. A comparative study of the presence of sagittal crests in male, female, juvenile and adult specimens of extant great apes ( Gorilla, Pan, Pongo) suggests that the existence of a sagittal crest is influenced to a greater extent by anatomical age rather than by the sex of the individuals.

  1. Flavodoxin: a compromise between efficiency and versatility in the electron transfer from Photosystem I to Ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase.

    PubMed

    Goñi, Guillermina; Herguedas, Beatriz; Hervás, Manuel; Peregrina, José R; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Gómez-Moreno, Carlos; Navarro, José A; Hermoso, Juan A; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Medina, Milagros

    2009-03-01

    Under iron-deficient conditions Flavodoxin (Fld) replaces Ferredoxin in Anabaena as electron carrier from Photosystem I (PSI) to Ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (FNR). Several residues modulate the Fld interaction with FNR and PSI, but no one appears as specifically critical for efficient electron transfer (ET). Fld shows a strong dipole moment, with its negative end directed towards the flavin ring. The role of this dipole moment in the processes of interaction and ET with positively charged surfaces exhibited by PSI and FNR has been analysed by introducing single and multiple charge reversal mutations on the Fld surface. Our data confirm that in this system interactions do not rely on a precise complementary surface of the reacting molecules. In fact, they indicate that the initial orientation driven by the alignment of dipole moment of the Fld molecule with that of the partner contributes to the formation of a bunch of alternative binding modes competent for the efficient ET reaction. Additionally, the fact that Fld uses different interaction surfaces to dock to PSI and to FNR is confirmed. PMID:19150326

  2. Insight Into the Radical Mechanism of Phycocyanobilin-Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase (Pcya) Revealed By X-Ray Crystallography And Biochemical Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, S.-L.; Rockwell, N.; Lagarias, J.C.; Fisher, A.J.; /Inst. Plant Microb. Biol., Taipei /UC, Davis

    2007-07-13

    The X-ray crystal structure of the substrate-free form of phycocyanobilin (PCB)-ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PcyA; EC 1.3.7.5) from the cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC7120 has been solved at 2.5 angstrom resolution. A comparative analysis of this structure with those recently reported for substrate-bound and substrate-free forms of PcyA from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 (Hagiwara et al. (2006) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103, 27-32; Hagiwara et al. (2006) FEBS Lett. 580, 3823-3828) provides a compelling picture of substrate-induced changes in the PcyA enzyme and the chemical basis of PcyA's catalytic activity. On the basis of these structures and the biochemical analysis of site-directed mutants of Nostoc PcyA, including mutants reported in recent studies (Tu et al. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 3127-3136) as well as mutants described in this study, a revised mechanism for the PcyA-mediated four-electron reduction of biliverdin IX{alpha} to 3E/3Z-phycocyanobilin via enzyme-bound bilin radical intermediates is proposed. The mechanistic insight of these studies, along with homology modeling, have provided new insight into the catalytic mechanisms of other members of the ferredoxin-dependent bilin reductase family that are widespread in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms.

  3. Roles of ATP and NADPH in formation of the fe-s cluster of spinach ferredoxin.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Y; Mitsui, A; Fujita, Y; Matsubara, H

    1991-01-01

    Ferredoxin (Fd) in higher plants is encoded by a nuclear gene, synthesized in the cytoplasm as a larger precursor, and imported into the chloroplast, where it is proteolytically processed, and assembled with the [2Fe-2S] cluster. The final step in the biosynthetic pathway of Fd can be analyzed by a reconstitution system composed of isolated chloroplasts and [(35)S]cysteine, in which [(35)S]sulfide and iron are incorporated into Fd to build up the (35)S-labeled Fe-S cluster. Although a lysed chloroplast system shows obligate requirements for ATP and NADPH, in vitro chemical reconstitution of the Fe-S cluster is generally thought to be energy-independent. The present study investigated whether ATP and NADPH in the chloroplast system of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) are involved in the supply of [(35)S]sulfide or iron, or in Fe-S cluster formation itself. [(35)S]Sulfide was liberated from [(35)S] cysteine in an NADPH-dependent manner, whereas ATP was not necessary for this process. This desulfhydration of [(35)S]cysteine occurred before the formation of the (35)S-labeled Fe-S cluster, and the amount of radioactivity in [(35)S]sulfide was greater than that in (35)S-labeled holo-Fd by a factor of more than 20. Addition of nonradioactive sulfide (Na(2)S) inhibited competitively formation of the (35)S-labeled Fe-S cluster along with the addition of nonradioactive cysteine, indicating that some of the inorganic sulfide released from cysteine is incorporated into the Fe-S cluster of Fd. ATP hydrolysis was not involved in the production of inorganic sulfide or in the supply of iron for assembly into the Fe-S cluster. However, ATP-dependent Fe-S cluster formation was observed even in the presence of sufficient amounts of [(35)S]sulfide and iron. These results suggest a novel type of ATP-dependent in vivo Fe-S cluster formation that is distinct from in vitro chemical reconstitution. The implications of these results for the possible mechanisms of ATP-dependent Fe-S cluster

  4. Identification and cloning of two immunogenic C. perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO) of Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium related poultry diseases such as necrotic enteritis (NE) and gangrenous dermatitis (GD) cause substantial economic losses on a global scale. Two antigenic C. perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO), were identified by reaction with...

  5. Spectopotentiometric properties and salt-dependent thermotolerance of a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin-involved nitrate assimilation in Haloferax mediterranei.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Espinosa, Rosa María; Richardson, David J; Butt, Julea N; Bonete, María José

    2007-12-01

    Haloferax mediterranei is a halophilic archaeon that can grow using nitrate as the sole nitrogen source. A ferredoxin that serves as the physiological electron donor to the nitrate and nitrite reductases in this assimilatory process has been characterized. The ferredoxin was found to contain approximately two atoms of iron and two atoms of sulphur, indicative of the binding of a [2Fe-2S] cluster. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of the reduced form of the protein displayed a rhombic signal, with g(x)=1.91, g(y)=1.98, g(z)=2.07, that shows considerable similarity to plant and algal [2Fe-2S] ferredoxins. UV-visible spectropotentiometric analysis determined a midpoint redox potential for the [2Fe-2S](2+/1+) transition of around -285 mV vs. SHE that was independent of salt concentration. UV-visible spectroscopy was also used to establish that the [2Fe-2S] cluster integrity of this protein was maintained over the pH range 5-11. Significantly, the Haloferax mediterranei ferredoxin was shown to be a highly thermostable protein. It was stable up to 60 degrees C in a low-salt (0.2 M) medium and this increased to 80 degrees C in a high-salt (4 M) medium. This thermostability at high salt concentration is an essential physiological characteristic because haloarchaea are mainly found in environments where high temperatures and concentrated salt water occur. PMID:17986084

  6. Spectroscopic and Redox Studies of Valence-Delocalized [Fe2S2]+ Centers in Thioredoxin-Like Ferredoxins

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Sowmya; Duin, Evert C.; Fawcett, Sarah E. J.; Armstrong, Fraser A.; Meyer, Jacques; Johnson, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Reduced forms of the C56S and C60S variants of the thioredoxin-like Clostridium pasteurianum [Fe2S2] ferredoxin (CpFd) provide the only known examples of valence-delocalized [Fe2S2]+ clusters, which constitute a fundamental building block of all higher nuclearity Fe-S clusters. In this work, we have revisited earlier work on the CpFd variants and carried out redox and spectroscopic studies on the [Fe2S2]2+,+ centers in wild-type and equivalent variants of the highly homologous and structurally characterized Aquifex aeolicus ferredoxin 4 (AaeFd4) using EPR, UV-visible-NIR absorption, CD and variable-temperature MCD, and protein-film electrochemistry. The results indicate that the [Fe2S2]+ centers in the equivalent AaeFd4 and CpFd variants reversibly interconvert between similar valence-localized S = 1/2 and valence-delocalized S = 9/2 forms as a function of pH, with pKa values in the range 8.3-9.0, due to protonation of the coordinated serinate residue. However, freezing high-pH samples results in partial or full conversion from valence-delocalized S = 9/2 to valence-localized S = 1/2 [Fe2S2]+ clusters. MCD saturation magnetization data for valence-delocalized S = 9/2 [Fe2S2]+ centers facilitated determination of transition polarizations and thereby assignments of low-energy MCD bands associated with the Fe−Fe interaction. The assignments provide experimental assessment of the double exchange parameter, B, for valence-delocalized [Fe2S2]+ centers and demonstrate that variable-temperature MCD spectroscopy provides a means of detecting and investigating the properties of valence-delocalized S = 9/2 [Fe2S2]+ fragments in higher nuclearity Fe-S clusters. The origin of valence delocalization in thioredoxin-like ferredoxin Cys-to-Ser variants and Fe-S clusters in general is discussed in light of these results. PMID:25790339

  7. Spectroscopic and redox studies of valence-delocalized [Fe2S2](+) centers in thioredoxin-like ferredoxins.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Sowmya; Duin, Evert C; Fawcett, Sarah E J; Armstrong, Fraser A; Meyer, Jacques; Johnson, Michael K

    2015-04-01

    Reduced forms of the C56S and C60S variants of the thioredoxin-like Clostridium pasteurianum [Fe2S2] ferredoxin (CpFd) provide the only known examples of valence-delocalized [Fe2S2](+) clusters, which constitute a fundamental building block of all higher nuclearity Fe-S clusters. In this work, we have revisited earlier work on the CpFd variants and carried out redox and spectroscopic studies on the [Fe2S2](2+,+) centers in wild-type and equivalent variants of the highly homologous and structurally characterized Aquifex aeolicus ferredoxin 4 (AaeFd4) using EPR, UV-visible-NIR absorption, CD and variable-temperature MCD, and protein-film electrochemistry. The results indicate that the [Fe2S2](+) centers in the equivalent AaeFd4 and CpFd variants reversibly interconvert between similar valence-localized S = 1/2 and valence-delocalized S = 9/2 forms as a function of pH, with pKa values in the range 8.3-9.0, because of protonation of the coordinated serinate residue. However, freezing high-pH samples results in partial or full conversion from valence-delocalized S = 9/2 to valence-localized S = 1/2 [Fe2S2](+) clusters. MCD saturation magnetization data for valence-delocalized S = 9/2 [Fe2S2](+) centers facilitated determination of transition polarizations and thereby assignments of low-energy MCD bands associated with the Fe-Fe interaction. The assignments provide experimental assessment of the double exchange parameter, B, for valence-delocalized [Fe2S2](+) centers and demonstrate that variable-temperature MCD spectroscopy provides a means of detecting and investigating the properties of valence-delocalized S = 9/2 [Fe2S2](+) fragments in higher nuclearity Fe-S clusters. The origin of valence delocalization in thioredoxin-like ferredoxin Cys-to-Ser variants and Fe-S clusters in general is discussed in light of these results. PMID:25790339

  8. ACRIM III

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-12-30

    ACRIM III Data and Information Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance ... the ACRIMSAT spacecraft on December 20, 1999. ACRIM III data are reprocessed every 90 days to utilize instrument recalibration.   ... ACRIM III Instrument Team Page ACRIM II Data Sets SCAR-B Block:  SCAR-B Products ...

  9. Ab initio single and multideterminant methods used in the determination of reduction potentials and magnetic properties of Rieske ferredoxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Nathan Lee

    2008-10-01

    The [Fe2S2]2+/[Fe2S 2]+ electronic structure of seven Rieske protein active sites (bovine mitochondrial cytochrome bc1 complex, spinach chloroplast cytochrome b6f complex, Rieske-type ferredoxin associated with biphenyl dioxygenase from Burkholderia cepacia, yeast cytochrome bcl complex from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rieske subunit of arsenite oxidase from Alcaligenes faecalis, respiratory-type Rieske protein from Thermus thermophilus, and Rieske protein II (soxF) from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius), which lie in a reduction potential range from -150 mV to 375 mV, have been studied by both single and multi-determinant quantum mechanical methods. Calculated reduction potentials and magnetic properties are found comparable to experimental values.

  10. Crystal structure of the FAD-containing ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Tondo, María Laura; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A; Medina, Milagros; Orellano, Elena G; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta

    2013-01-01

    We have solved the structure of ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductase, FPR, from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri, responsible for citrus canker, at a resolution of 1.5 Å. This structure reveals differences in the mobility of specific loops when compared to other FPRs, probably unrelated to the hydride transfer process, which contributes to explaining the structural and functional divergence between the subclass I FPRs. Interactions of the C-terminus of the enzyme with the phosphoadenosine of the cofactor FAD limit its mobility, thus affecting the entrance of nicotinamide into the active site. This structure opens the possibility of rationally designing drugs against the X. axonopodis pv. citri phytopathogen. PMID:23984418

  11. Discovery of a ferredoxin:NAD+-oxidoreductase (Rnf) in Acetobacterium woodii: a novel potential coupling site in acetogens.

    PubMed

    Müller, Volker; Imkamp, Frank; Biegel, Eva; Schmidt, Silke; Dilling, Sabrina

    2008-03-01

    Acetogens use the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for reduction of carbon dioxide to acetate. This pathway not only allows reoxidation of reducing equivalents during heterotrophic growth but also supports chemolithoautotrophic growth on H(2) + CO(2). The latter argues for this pathway being a source for net energy conservation, but the mechanism involved remains unknown. In addition to CO(2), acetogens can use alternative electron acceptors, such as nitrate or caffeate. Caffeate respiration in the model acetogen Acetobacterium woodii is coupled to energy conservation via a chemiosmotic mechanism, with Na(+) as coupling ion. The pathway and its bioenergetics were solved in some detail very recently. This review focuses on the regulation of caffeate respiration, describes the enyzmes involved, summarizes the evidence for a potential Na(+)-translocating ferredoxin:NAD(+)-oxidoreductase (Rnf complex) as a new coupling site, and hypothesizes on the role of this Rnf complex in the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. PMID:18378592

  12. Electron spin-lattice relaxation of the (4Fe-4S) ferredoxin from B. stearothermophilus. Comparison with other iron proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Patrick; Gayda, Jean-Pierre; Rao, K. Krishna

    1982-05-01

    The temperature dependence of the electron spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of the (4Fe-4S) ferredoxin from Bacillus stearothermophilus is studied in the range 1.2 to 40 K. This dependence is similar to that observed for the (2Fe-2S) ferredoxin from Spirulina maxima and can be interpreted with the same relaxation processes [J.P. Gayda, P. Bertrand, A. Deville, C. More, G. Roger, J.F. Gibson, and R. Cammack, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 581, 15 (1979)]. In particular, between 4 and 15 K, the data are well fitted by a second-order Raman process involving three-dimensional phonons, with a Debye temperature of about 60 K (45 cm-1). This would give an estimation of the highest frequency of the vibrations which can propagate through the three-dimensional proteinic medium. In the highest temperature range (T≳30 K) the results are interpreted with an Orbach process involving an excited level of energy 120 cm-1. This process could be induced by the localized vibrations of the active site. Finally, these results are compared to those recently reported for some hemoproteins [H.J. Stapleton, J.P. Allen, C.P. Flynn, D.G. Stinson, and S.R. Kurtz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 45, 1456 (1980)]. Below 15 K, the temperature dependence of T1 for these samples is similar to that observed for the iron-sulfur proteins and may be interpreted in the same way. Our interpretation is compared to the fractal model proposed by Stapleton et al.

  13. Concentration-dependent oligomerization of cross-linked complexes between ferredoxin and ferredoxin–NADP{sup +} reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Kimata-Ariga, Yoko Kubota-Kawai, Hisako; Lee, Young-Ho; Muraki, Norifumi; Ikegami, Takahisa; Kurisu, Genji; Hase, Toshiharu

    2013-05-17

    Highlights: •Cross-linked complexes of ferredoxin (Fd) and Fd–NADP{sup +} reductase form oligomers. •In the crystal structures, Fd- and FNR moieties swap across the molecules. •The complexes exhibit concentration-dependent oligomerization at sub-milimolar order. -- Abstract: Ferredoxin–NADP{sup +} reductase (FNR) forms a 1:1 complex with ferredoxin (Fd), and catalyzes the electron transfer between Fd and NADP{sup +}. In our previous study, we prepared a series of site-specifically cross-linked complexes of Fd and FNR, which showed diverse electron transfer properties. Here, we show that X-ray crystal structures of the two different Fd–FNR cross-linked complexes form oligomers by swapping Fd and FNR moieties across the molecules; one complex is a dimer from, and the other is a successive multimeric form. In order to verify whether these oligomeric structures are formed only in crystal, we investigated the possibility of the oligomerization of these complexes in solution. The mean values of the particle size of these cross-linked complexes were shown to increase with the rise of protein concentration at sub-milimolar order, whereas the size of dissociable wild-type Fd:FNR complex was unchanged as analyzed by dynamic light scattering measurement. The oligomerization products were detected by SDS–PAGE after chemical cross-linking of these complexes at the sub-milimolar concentrations. The extent and concentration-dependent profile of the oligomerizaion were differentiated between the two cross-linked complexes. These results show that these Fd–FNR cross-linked complexes exhibit concentration-dependent oligomerization, possibly through swapping of Fd and FNR moieties also in solution. These findings lead to the possibility that some native multi-domain proteins may present similar phenomenon in vivo.

  14. Structural Investigations of the Ferredoxin and Terminal Oxygenase Components of the biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenase from Sphingobium yanoikuyae B1

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraro,D.; Brown, E.; Yu, C.; Parales, R.; Gibson, D.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2007-01-01

    The initial step involved in oxidative hydroxylation of monoaromatic and polyaromatic compounds by the microorganism Sphingobium yanoikuyae strain B1 (B1), previously known as Sphingomonas yanoikuyae strain B1 and Beijerinckia sp. strain B1, is performed by a set of multiple terminal Rieske non-heme iron oxygenases. These enzymes share a single electron donor system consisting of a reductase and a ferredoxin (BPDO-F{sub B1}). One of the terminal Rieske oxygenases, biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenase (BPDO-O{sub B1}), is responsible for B1's ability to dihydroxylate large aromatic compounds, such as chrysene and benzo(a)pyrene. Results: In this study, crystal structures of BPDO-O{sub B1} in both native and biphenyl bound forms are described. Sequence and structural comparisons to other Rieske oxygenases show this enzyme to be most similar, with 43.5 % sequence identity, to naphthalene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4. While structurally similar to naphthalene 1,2-dioxygenase, the active site entrance is significantly larger than the entrance for naphthalene 1,2-dioxygenase. Differences in active site residues also allow the binding of large aromatic substrates. There are no major structural changes observed upon binding of the substrate. BPDO-F{sub B1} has large sequence identity to other bacterial Rieske ferredoxins whose structures are known and demonstrates a high structural homology; however, differences in side chain composition and conformation around the Rieske cluster binding site are noted. Conclusion: This is the first structure of a Rieske oxygenase that oxidizes substrates with five aromatic rings to be reported. This ability to catalyze the oxidation of larger substrates is a result of both a larger entrance to the active site as well as the ability of the active site to accommodate larger substrates. While the biphenyl ferredoxin is structurally similar to other Rieske ferredoxins, there are distinct changes in the amino acids near the iron

  15. In Planta Mutagenesis of Src Homology 3 Domain-like Fold of NdhS, a Ferredoxin-binding Subunit of the Chloroplast NADH Dehydrogenase-like Complex in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Shikanai, Toshiharu

    2013-01-01

    Chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase-like (NDH) complex mediates cyclic electron transport around photosystem I and chlororespiration in angiosperms. The Src homology 3 domain (SH3)-like fold protein NdhS/CRR31 is an NDH subunit that is necessary for high affinity binding of ferredoxin, indicating that chloroplast NDH functions as a ferredoxin:plastoquinone oxidoreductase. However, the mechanism of the interaction between NdhS and ferredoxin is unclear. In this study, we analyzed their interaction in planta by using site-directed mutagenesis of NdhS. In general, binding of ferredoxin to its target proteins depends on electrostatic interaction. In silico analysis predicted the presence of a positively charged pocket in the SH3-like domain of NdhS, where nine charged residues are highly conserved among plants. Systematic alteration of these sites with neutral glutamine revealed that only arginine 193 was required for high NDH activity in vivo. Further replacement of arginine 193 with negatively charged aspartate or glutamate or hydrophobic alanine significantly decreased the efficiency of ferredoxin-dependent plastoquinone reduction by NDH in ruptured chloroplasts. Similar results were obtained in in vivo analyses of NDH activity and electron transport. From these results, we propose that the positive charge of arginine 193 in the SH3-like domain of NdhS is critical for electrostatic interaction with ferredoxin in vivo. PMID:24225949

  16. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a ferredoxin/flavodoxin-NADP(H) oxidoreductase (Bc0385) from Bacillus cereus

    PubMed Central

    Skråmo, Silje; Hersleth, Hans-Petter; Hammerstad, Marta; Andersson, K. Kristoffer; Røhr, Åsmund K.

    2014-01-01

    Ferredoxin/flavodoxin-NADP(H) oxidoreductases (FNRs) are key enzymes involved in catalysing electron transfer between ferredoxins/flavodoxins and NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+. In Bacillus cereus there are three genes that may encode FNRs, and the Bc0385 FNR has been cloned, overexpressed, purified and successfully crystallized in its NADPH/NADP+-free form. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.5 Å resolution from crystals belonging to the orthorhombic space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 57.2, b = 164.3, c = 95.0 Å, containing two FNR molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure of the Bc0385 FNR has been solved by molecular replacement, and is a member of the homodimeric thioredoxin reductase-like class of FNRs. PMID:24915092

  17. A Second [2Fe-2S] Ferredoxin from Sphingomonas sp. Strain RW1 Can Function as an Electron Donor for the Dioxin Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Armengaud, Jean; Gaillard, Jacques; Timmis, Kenneth N.

    2000-01-01

    The first step in the degradation of dibenzofuran and dibenzo-p-dioxin by Sphingomonas sp. strain RW1 is carried out by dioxin dioxygenase (DxnA1A2), a ring-dihydroxylating enzyme. An open reading frame (fdx3) that could potentially specify a new ferredoxin has been identified downstream of dxnA1A2, a two-cistron gene (J. Armengaud, B. Happe, and K. N. Timmis, J. Bacteriol. 180:3954–3966, 1998). In the present study, we report a biochemical analysis of Fdx3 produced in Escherichia coli. This third ferredoxin thus far identified in Sphingomonas sp. strain RW1 contained a putidaredoxin-type [2Fe-2S] cluster which was characterized by UV-visible absorption spectrophotometry and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The midpoint redox potential of this ferredoxin (E′0 = −247 ± 10 mV versus normal hydrogen electrode at pH 8.0) is similar to that exhibited by Fdx1 (−245 mV), a homologous ferredoxin previously characterized in Sphingomonas sp. strain RW1. In in vitro assays, Fdx3 can be reduced by RedA2 (a reductase similar to class I cytochrome P-450 reductases), previously isolated from Sphingomonas sp. strain RW1. RedA2 exhibits a Km value of 3.2 ± 0.3 μM for Fdx3. In vivo coexpression of fdx3 and redA2 with dxnA1A2 confirmed that Fdx3 can serve as an electron donor for the dioxin dioxygenase. PMID:10735867

  18. Kinetic Properties of Pyruvate Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase of Intestinal Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria Desulfovibrio piger Vib-7 and Desulfomicrobium sp. Rod-9.

    PubMed

    Kushkevych, Ivan V

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal sulfate-reducing bacteria reduce sulfate ions to hydrogen sulfide causing inflammatory bowel diseases of humans and animals. The bacteria consume lactate as electron donor which is oxidized to acetate via pyruvate in process of the dissimilatory sulfate reduction. Pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase activity and the kinetic properties of the enzyme from intestinal sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio piger and Desulfomicrobium sp. have never been well-characterized and have not been yet studied. In this paper we present for the first time the specific activity of pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase and the kinetic properties of the enzyme in cell-free extracts of both D. piger Vib-7 and Desulfomicrobium sp. Rod-9 intestinal bacterial strains. Microbiological, biochemical, biophysical and statistical methods were used in this work. The optimal temperature (+35°C) and pH 8.5 for enzyme reaction were determined. The spectral analysis of the puri- fied pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase from the cell-free extracts was demonstrated. Analysis of the kinetic properties of the studied enzyme was carried out. Initial (instantaneous) reaction velocity (V0), maximum amount of the product of reaction (Pmax), the reaction time (half saturation period) and maximum velocity of the pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase reaction (V ) were defined. Michaelis constants (Km) of the enzyme reaction were calculated for both intestinal bacterial strains. The studies of the kinetic enzyme properties in the intestinal sulfate-reducing bacteria strains in detail can be prospects for clarifying the etiological role of these bacteria in the development of inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:26373169

  19. Functional analysis of the cysteine motifs in the ferredoxin-like protein FdxN of Rhizobium meliloti involved in symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Masepohl, B; Kutsche, M; Riedel, K U; Schmehl, M; Klipp, W; Pühler, A

    1992-05-01

    The Rhizobium meliloti fdxN gene, which is part of the nifA-nifB-fdxN operon, is absolutely required for symbiotic nitrogen fixation. The deduced sequence of the FdxN protein is characterized by two cysteine motifs typical of bacterial-type ferredoxins. The Fix-phenotype of an R. meliloti fdxN::[Tc] mutant could be rescued by the R. leguminosarum fdxN gene, whereas no complementation was observed with nif-associated genes encoding ferredoxins from Bradyrhizobium japonicum, Azotobacter vinelandii, A. chroococcum and Rhodobacter capsulatus. In addition to these heterologous genes, several R. meliloti fdxN mutant genes constructed by site-directed mutagenesis were analyzed. Not only a cysteine residue within the second cysteine motif (position 42), which is known to coordinate the Fe-S cluster in homologous proteins, but also a cysteine located down-stream of this motif (position 61), was found to be essential for the activity of the R. meliloti FdxN protein. Changing the amino acid residue proline in position 56 into methionine resulted in a FdxN mutant protein with decreased activity, whereas changes in positions 35 (Asp35Glu) and 45 (Gly45Glu) had no significant effect on the function of the FdxN mutant proteins. In contrast to bacterial-type ferredoxins, which contain two identical cysteine motifs of the form C-X2-C-X2-C-X3-C, nif-associated ferredoxins, including R. meliloti FdxN, are characterized by two different cysteine motifs. Six "additional" amino acids separate the second (Cys42) and the third cysteine (Cys51) in the C-terminal motif (C-X2-C-X8-C-X3-C).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1603075

  20. SAGE III

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-15

    SAGE III Data and Information The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas ... on the spacecraft. SAGE III produced L1 and L2 scientific data from 5/07/2002 until 12/31/2005. The flight of the second instrument is as ... Guide Documents:  Project Guide Data Products User's Guide  (PDF) Relevant Documents:  ...

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the ferredoxin reductase component in the Rieske nonhaem iron oxygenase system carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Ashikawa, Yuji; Uchimura, Hiromasa; Fujimoto, Zui; Inoue, Kengo; Noguchi, Haruko; Yamane, Hisakazu; Nojiri, Hideaki

    2007-06-01

    The NAD(P)H:ferredoxin oxidoreductase in carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase from Janthinobacterium sp. J3 was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to 2.60 Å resolution. Carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase (CARDO), which consists of an oxygenase component (CARDO-O) and the electron-transport components ferredoxin (CARDO-F) and ferredoxin reductase (CARDO-R), catalyzes dihydroxylation at the C1 and C9a positions of carbazole. CARDO-R was crystallized at 277 K using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with the precipitant PEG 8000. Two crystal types (types I and II) were obtained. The type I crystal diffracted to a maximum resolution of 2.80 Å and belonged to space group P4{sub 2}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 158.7, c = 81.4 Å. The type II crystal was obtained in drops from which type I crystals had been removed; it diffracted to 2.60 Å resolution and belonged to the same space group, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 161.8, c = 79.5 Å.

  2. The prevalence and transmission to exotic equids (Equus quagga antiquorum, Equus przewalskii, Equus africanus) of intestinal nematodes in contaminated pasture in two wild animal parks.

    PubMed

    Epe, C; Kings, M; Stoye, M; Böer, M

    2001-06-01

    Wild equids maintained in large enclosures may suffer from helminth diseases because common hygiene practices have only limited effects on parasite populations. Weekly monitoring of helminth prevalences and pasture infestation was performed for 1 yr in several extensive maintenance systems of two wildlife parks with similar climates to determine when veterinary intervention to control parasites would be useful. We also sought evidence of natural immunogenic reactions among herds of Chapman zebras (Equus quagga antiquorum), Przewalski's horses (Equus przewalskii) and dwarf donkeys (Equus asinus africanus). Fecal and vegetation samples and cultures for third-stage larvae revealed permanent egg shedding in the three species and pasture infestation during the warm, moist periods (July-September) in all enclosures. Stable social structure and low equid population density may be sufficient to make prophylaxis unnecessary in adults, whereas biotic and abiotic environmental factors such as crowding, animal transfers, social integration of subadults, and weaning stress may facilitate temporary severe infections of individuals. Biweekly helminth monitoring is a useful diagnostic tool for extensive management of exotic equids. PMID:12790423

  3. The Rnf Complex of Clostridium ljungdahlii Is a Proton-Translocating Ferredoxin:NAD(+) Oxidoreductase Essential for Autotrophic Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, PL; Zhang, T; Dar, SA; Leang, C; Lovley, DR

    2012-12-26

    It has been predicted that the Rnf complex of Clostridium ljungdahlii is a proton-translocating ferredoxin: NAD(+) oxidoreductase which contributes to ATP synthesis by an H+-translocating ATPase under both autotrophic and heterotrophic growth conditions. The recent development of methods for genetic manipulation of C. ljungdahlii made it possible to evaluate the possible role of the Rnf complex in energy conservation. Disruption of the C. ljungdahlii rnf operon inhibited autotrophic growth. ATP synthesis, proton gradient, membrane potential, and proton motive force collapsed in the Rnf-deficient mutant with H-2 as the electron source and CO2 as the electron acceptor. Heterotrophic growth was hindered in the absence of a functional Rnf complex, as ATP synthesis, proton gradient, and proton motive force were significantly reduced with fructose as the electron donor. Growth of the Rnf-deficient mutant was also inhibited when no source of fixed nitrogen was provided. These results demonstrate that the Rnf complex of C. ljungdahlii is responsible for translocation of protons across the membrane to elicit energy conservation during acetogenesis and is a multifunctional device also implicated in nitrogen fixation. IMPORTANCE Mechanisms for energy conservation in the acetogen Clostridium ljungdahlii are of interest because of its potential value as a chassis for the production of biocommodities with novel electron donors such as carbon monoxide, syngas, and electrons derived from electrodes. Characterizing the components implicated in the chemiosmotic ATP synthesis during acetogenesis by C. ljungdahlii is a prerequisite for the development of highly productive strains. The Rnf complex has been considered the prime candidate to be the pump responsible for the formation of an ion gradient coupled with ATP synthesis in multiple acetogens. However, experimental evidence for a proton-pumping Rnf complex has been lacking. This study establishes the C. ljungdahlii Rnf complex as

  4. Synthesis and Antimicrobial Evaluation of Amixicile-Based Inhibitors of the Pyruvate-Ferredoxin Oxidoreductases of Anaerobic Bacteria and Epsilonproteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Andrew J; Bruce, Alexandra M; Gineste, Catherine; Ballard, T Eric; Olekhnovich, Igor N; Macdonald, Timothy L; Hoffman, Paul S

    2016-07-01

    Amixicile is a promising derivative of nitazoxanide (an antiparasitic therapeutic) developed to treat systemic infections caused by anaerobic bacteria, anaerobic parasites, and members of the Epsilonproteobacteria (Campylobacter and Helicobacter). Amixicile selectively inhibits pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) and related enzymes by inhibiting the function of the vitamin B1 cofactor (thiamine pyrophosphate) by a novel mechanism. Here, we interrogate the amixicile scaffold, guided by docking simulations, direct PFOR inhibition assays, and MIC tests against Clostridium difficile, Campylobacter jejuni, and Helicobacter pylori Docking simulations revealed that the nitro group present in nitazoxanide interacts with the protonated N4'-aminopyrimidine of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP). The ortho-propylamine on the benzene ring formed an electrostatic interaction with an aspartic acid moiety (B456) of PFOR that correlated with improved PFOR-inhibitory activity and potency by MIC tests. Aryl substitution with electron-withdrawing groups and substitutions of the propylamine with other alkyl amines or nitrogen-containing heterocycles both improved PFOR inhibition and, in many cases, biological activity against C. difficile Docking simulation results correlate well with mechanistic enzymology and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies that show members of this class of antimicrobials to be specific inhibitors of vitamin B1 function by proton abstraction, which is both novel and likely to limit mutation-based drug resistance. PMID:27090174

  5. Arabidopsis tic62 trol mutant lacking thylakoid-bound ferredoxin-NADP+ oxidoreductase shows distinct metabolic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Lintala, Minna; Schuck, Natalie; Thormählen, Ina; Jungfer, Andreas; Weber, Katrin L; Weber, Andreas P M; Geigenberger, Peter; Soll, Jürgen; Bölter, Bettina; Mulo, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP+ oxidoreductase (FNR), functioning in the last step of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain, exists both as a soluble protein in the chloroplast stroma and tightly attached to chloroplast membranes. Surface plasmon resonance assays showed that the two FNR isoforms, LFNR1 and LFNR2, are bound to the thylakoid membrane via the C-terminal domains of Tic62 and TROL proteins in a pH-dependent manner. The tic62 trol double mutants contained a reduced level of FNR, exclusively found in the soluble stroma. Although the mutant plants showed no visual phenotype or defects in the function of photosystems under any conditions studied, a low ratio of NADPH/NADP+ was detected. Since the CO₂ fixation capacity did not differ between the tic62 trol plants and wild-type, it seems that the plants are able to funnel reducing power to most crucial reactions to ensure survival and fitness of the plants. However, the activity of malate dehydrogenase was down-regulated in the mutant plants. Apparently, the plastid metabolism is able to cope with substantial changes in directing the electrons from the light reactions to stromal metabolism and thus only few differences are visible in steady-state metabolite pool sizes of the tic62 trol plants. PMID:24043709

  6. A second isoform of the ferredoxin:NADP oxidoreductase generated by an in-frame initiation of translation

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jean-Claude; Ughy, Bettina; Lagoutte, Bernard; Ajlani, Ghada

    2006-01-01

    Ferredoxin:NADP oxidoreductases (FNRs) constitute a family of flavoenzymes that catalyze the exchange of reducing equivalents between one-electron carriers and the two-electron-carrying NADP(H). The main role of FNRs in cyanobacteria and leaf plastids is to provide the NADPH for photoautotrophic metabolism. In root plastids, a distinct FNR isoform is found that has been postulated to function in the opposite direction, providing electrons for nitrogen assimilation at the expense of NADPH generated by heterotrophic metabolism. A multiple gene family encodes FNR isoenzymes in plants, whereas there is only one FNR gene (petH) in cyanobacteria. Nevertheless, we detected two FNR isoforms in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803. One of them (FNRS ≈34 kDa) is similar in size to the plastid FNR and specifically accumulates under heterotrophic conditions, whereas the other one (FNRL ≈46 kDa) contains an extra N-terminal domain that allows its association with the phycobilisome. Site-directed mutants allowed us to conclude that the smaller isoform, FNRS, is produced from an internal ribosome entry site within the petH ORF. Thus we have uncovered a mechanism by which two isoforms are produced from a single gene, which is, to our knowledge, novel in photosynthetic bacteria. Our results strongly suggest that FNRL is an NADP+ reductase, whereas FNRS is an NADPH oxidase. PMID:17116880

  7. The Rnf Complex of Clostridium ljungdahlii Is a Proton-Translocating Ferredoxin:NAD+ Oxidoreductase Essential for Autotrophic Growth

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Zhang, Tian; Dar, Shabir A.; Leang, Ching; Lovley, Derek R.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT It has been predicted that the Rnf complex of Clostridium ljungdahlii is a proton-translocating ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase which contributes to ATP synthesis by an H+-translocating ATPase under both autotrophic and heterotrophic growth conditions. The recent development of methods for genetic manipulation of C. ljungdahlii made it possible to evaluate the possible role of the Rnf complex in energy conservation. Disruption of the C. ljungdahlii rnf operon inhibited autotrophic growth. ATP synthesis, proton gradient, membrane potential, and proton motive force collapsed in the Rnf-deficient mutant with H2 as the electron source and CO2 as the electron acceptor. Heterotrophic growth was hindered in the absence of a functional Rnf complex, as ATP synthesis, proton gradient, and proton motive force were significantly reduced with fructose as the electron donor. Growth of the Rnf-deficient mutant was also inhibited when no source of fixed nitrogen was provided. These results demonstrate that the Rnf complex of C. ljungdahlii is responsible for translocation of protons across the membrane to elicit energy conservation during acetogenesis and is a multifunctional device also implicated in nitrogen fixation. PMID:23269825

  8. (4Fe-4S)-cluster-depleted Azotobacter vinelandii ferredoxin I: a new 3Fe iron-sulfur protein

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, P.J.; Morgan, T.V.; Devlin, F.; Penner-Hahn, J.E.; Hodgson, K.O.; Scott, R.A.; Stout, C.D.; Burgess, B.K.

    1985-09-01

    Fe(CN)6T oxidation of the aerobically isolated 7Fe Azotobacter vinelandii ferredoxin I, (7Fe)FdI, is a degradative reaction. Destruction of the (4Fe-4S) cluster occurs first, followed by destruction of the (3Fe-3S) cluster. At a Fe(CN)6T /(7Fe)FdI concentration ratio of 20, the product is a mixture of apoprotein and protein containing only a (3Fe-3S) cluster, (3Fe)FdI. This protein mixture, after partial purification, has been characterized by absorption, CD, magnetic CD, and EPR and Fe x-ray absorption spectroscopies. EPR and magnetic CD spectra provide strong evidence that the (3Fe-3S) cluster in (3Fe)FdI is essentially identical in structure to that in (7Fe)FdI. Analysis of the extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of (3Fe)FdI finds Fe scattering at an average Fe...Fe distance of approx. =2.7 A. The structure of the oxidized (3Fe-3S) cluster in solutions of oxidized (3Fe)FdI, and, by extension, of oxidized (7Fe)FdI, is thus different from that obtained by x-ray crystallography on oxidized (7Fe)FdI. Possible interpretations of this result are discussed.

  9. Ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase in junction with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots: characteristics of an enzymatically active nanohybrid.

    PubMed

    Szczepaniak, Krzysztof; Worch, Remigiusz; Grzyb, Joanna

    2013-05-15

    Ferredoxin:NADP(+) oxidoreductase (FNR) is a plant and cyanobacterial photosynthetic enzyme, also found in non-photosynthetic tissues, where it is involved in redox reactions of biosynthetic pathways. In vivo it transfers electrons to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP(+)), forming its reduced version, NADPH, while in vitro it can also use NADPH to reduce several substrates, such as ferricyanide, various quinones and nitriles. As an oxidoreductase catalyzing reaction of a broad range of substrates, FNR may be used in biotechnological processes. Quantum dots are semiconductor nanocrystals of a few to several nanometers diameter, having very useful luminescent properties. We present the spectroscopic and functional characteristics of a covalent conjugation of FNR and CdSe/ZnS quantum dots. Two types of quantum dots, of different diameter and emission maximum (550 and 650 nm), were used for comparison. Steady-state fluorescence and gel electrophoresis confirmed efficient conjugation, while fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) allowed for determination of the conjugates' radii. The nanohybrids sustained enzymatic activity; however, changes in maximal reaction rates and Michaelis constant were found. Detailed analysis of the kinetic parameters showed that the changes in the enzyme activity depend on the substrate used for activity measurement but also on the size of the quantum dots. The presented nanohybrids, as the first example using plant and photosynthetic enzyme as a protein partner, may became a tool to study photosynthesis as well as other biosynthetic and biotechnological processes, involving enzymatically catalyzed electron transfer. PMID:23611948

  10. Molecular and biochemical characterization of bifunctional pyruvate decarboxylases and pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductases from Thermotoga maritima and Thermotoga hypogea.

    PubMed

    Eram, Mohammad S; Wong, Alton; Oduaran, Erica; Ma, Kesen

    2015-12-01

    Hyperthermophilic bacteria Thermotoga maritima and Thermotoga hypogea produce ethanol as a metabolic end product, which is resulted from acetaldehyde reduction catalysed by an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). However, the enzyme that is involved in the production of acetaldehyde from pyruvate is not well characterized. An oxygen sensitive and coenzyme A-dependent pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) activity was found to be present in cell free extracts of T. maritima and T. hypogea. Both enzymes were purified and found to have pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR) activity, indicating their bifunctionality. Both PDC and POR activities from each of the purified enzymes were characterized in regards to their optimal assay conditions including pH dependency, oxygen sensitivity, thermal stability, temperature dependency and kinetic parameters. The close relatedness of the PORs that was shown by sequence analysis could be an indication of the presence of such bifunctionality in other hyperthermophilic bacteria. This is the first report of a bifunctional PDC/POR enzyme in hyperthermophilic bacteria. The PDC and the previously reported ADHs are most likely the key enzymes catalysing the production of ethanol from pyruvate in bacterial hyperthermophiles. PMID:26032540

  11. Physiological roles of pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase and pyruvate formate-lyase in Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum JW/SL-YS485

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jilai; Olson, Daniel G.; Lanahan, Anthony A.; Tian, Liang; Murphy, Sean Jean-Loup; Lo, Jonathan; Lynd, Lee R.

    2015-09-15

    We report that Thermoanaerobacter saccharolyticum is a thermophilic microorganism that has been engineered to produce ethanol at high titer (30–70 g/L) and greater than 90 % theoretical yield. However, few genes involved in pyruvate to ethanol production pathway have been unambiguously identified. In T. saccharolyticum, the products of six putative pfor gene clusters and one pfl gene may be responsible for the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. To gain insights into the physiological roles of PFOR and PFL, we studied the effect of deletions of several genes thought to encode these activities. We found that that pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase enzyme (PFOR) is encoded by the pforA gene and plays a key role in pyruvate dissimilation. We further demonstrated that pyruvate formate-lyase activity (PFL) is encoded by the pfl gene. Although the pfl gene is normally expressed at low levels, it is crucial for biosynthesis in T. saccharolyticum. In pforA deletion strains, pfl expression increased and was able to partially compensate for the loss of PFOR activity. Deletion of both pforA and pfl resulted in a strain that required acetate and formate for growth and produced lactate as the primary fermentation product, achieving 88 % theoretical lactate yield. PFOR encoded by Tsac_0046 and PFL encoded by Tsac_0628 are only two routes for converting pyruvate to acetyl-CoA in T. saccharolyticum. The physiological role of PFOR is pyruvate dissimilation, whereas that of PFL is supplying C1 units for biosynthesis.

  12. Functional Replacement of Ferredoxin by a Cyanobacterial Flavodoxin in Tobacco Confers Broad-Range Stress Tolerance[W

    PubMed Central

    Tognetti, Vanesa B.; Palatnik, Javier F.; Fillat, María F.; Melzer, Michael; Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza; Valle, Estela M.; Carrillo, Néstor

    2006-01-01

    Chloroplast ferredoxin (Fd) plays a pivotal role in plant cell metabolism by delivering reducing equivalents to various essential oxidoreductive pathways. Fd levels decrease under adverse environmental conditions in many microorganisms, including cyanobacteria, which share a common ancestor with chloroplasts. Conversely, stress situations induce the synthesis of flavodoxin (Fld), an electron carrier flavoprotein not found in plants, which can efficiently replace Fd in most electron transfer processes. We report here that chloroplast Fd also declined in plants exposed to oxidants or stress conditions. A purified cyanobacterial Fld was able to mediate plant Fd-dependent reactions in vitro, including NADP+ and thioredoxin reduction. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants expressing Fld in chloroplasts displayed increased tolerance to multiple sources of stress, including redox-cycling herbicides, extreme temperatures, high irradiation, water deficit, and UV radiation. Oxidant buildup and oxidative inactivation of thioredoxin-dependent plastidic enzymes were decreased in stressed plants expressing plastid-targeted Fld, suggesting that development of the tolerant phenotype relied on productive interaction of this flavoprotein with Fd-dependent oxidoreductive pathways of the host, most remarkably, thioredoxin reduction. The use of Fld provides new tools to investigate the requirements of photosynthesis in planta and to increase plant stress tolerance based on the introduction of a cyanobacterial product that is free from endogenous regulation in higher plants. PMID:16829589

  13. Phosphorylation of ferredoxin and regulation of renal mitochondrial 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1 alpha-hydroxylase activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nemani, R; Ghazarian, J G; Moorthy, B; Wongsurawat, N; Strong, R; Armbrecht, H J

    1989-09-15

    The kidney is the principal physiologic site of production of biologically active 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. The 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1 alpha-hydroxylase (1-OHase) activity found in renal mitochondria is under tight hormonal control. Parathyroid hormone stimulates the renal conversion of 25-hydroxyvitamin D to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D in young animals, which is accompanied by dephosphorylation of ferredoxin (Fx), a component of the mitochondrial 1-OHase enzyme complex (Siegel, N., Wongsurawat, N., and Armbrecht, H. J. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 16998-17003). The present study investigates the capacity of Fx to be phosphorylated in vitro and to modulate the 1-OHase activity of a reconstituted system. Fx was phosphorylated by renal mitochondrial type II protein kinase. Phosphorylation did not alter Fx mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels but did decrease the pI as measured by isoelectric focusing. Amino acid analysis demonstrated that 1 mol of serine and 1 mol of threonine were phosphorylated per mol of Fx. Peptide mapping of phosphorylated Fx was consistent with phosphorylation of serine 88 and threonine 85 or 97. Fx was selectively dephosphorylated by rabbit skeletal muscle protein phosphatase C2 but not C1. Phosphorylation of Fx significantly inhibited the 1-OHase activity of a reconstituted system consisting of Fx reductase, Fx, and renal mitochondrial cytochrome P-450. These findings suggest that phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of Fx may play a role in modulating renal 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D production. PMID:2768268

  14. Detection and characterization of hyperfine-shifted resonances in the proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of Anabaena 7120 ferredoxin at high magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Skjeldal, L; Westler, W M; Markley, J L

    1990-05-01

    This paper presents previously unobserved signals in the 1H NMR spectra of oxidized and reduced [2Fe-2S]-ferredoxin from Anabaena 7120 detected at 400, 500, and 600 MHz. The signals shifted to low field exhibited longitudinal relaxation (T1) values in the range of 100-400 microseconds and line widths in the range of 1-10 kHz (at 400 MHz), and the chemical shifts of all signals showed strong temperature dependence. Although the line widths were smaller at lower magnetic fields, the resolution was better at higher magnetic fields. In the oxidized state, a broad signal was detected at 37 ppm, which corresponds to at least 6 protons, and whose chemical shift exhibits positive temperature dependence. This signal also was found in oxidized ferredoxin reconstituted in 2H2O, which excludes the signal as arising from solvent-exchangeable amide protons. In the reduced state, four signals detected between 90 and 140 ppm exhibited negative temperature dependence. These consisted of two pairs of signals, each pair having one component with half the linewidth of the other. On the basis of their chemical shifts, linewidths, longitudinal relaxation properties, and temperature dependence we assigned these resonances to four of the beta hydrogens of the ligated cysteines. Two solvent-exchangeable hyperfine-shifted signals were found in the reduced state; these are located upfield of the diamagnetic region. The low-field hyperfine resonances of half-reduced ferredoxin in the presence of sodium dithionite showed a self electron transfer exchange rate that was slow on the NMR scale as observed earlier (Chan, T., and Markley, J. L. (1983) Biochemistry 22, 5982-5987), but the exchange rate was accelerated in the presence of methyl viologen. PMID:2327800

  15. Welding III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding III, an advanced course in arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with the proficiency necessary for industrial certification. The course objectives, which are outlined first, specify that students will…

  16. LANDVIEW III

    EPA Science Inventory

    LandView III is a desktop mapping system that includes database extracts from the Environmental Protection Agency, the Bureau of the Census, The U.S. Geological Survey, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Department of Transportation, and the Federal Emergency Management Agenc...

  17. Light-regulated changes in abundance and polyribosome association of ferredoxin mRNA are dependent on photosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Petracek, M E; Dickey, L F; Huber, S C; Thompson, W F

    1997-01-01

    In transgenic tobacco plants containing a pea ferredoxin transcribed region (Fed-1) driven by the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (P35S), light acts at a post-transcriptional level to control the abundance of Fed-1 mRNA in green leaves. To determine whether the light signal for this response involves photosynthesis, we treated transgenic seedlings with or without 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), an inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport. DCMU prevented the normal light response by blocking reaccumulation of Fed-1 transcripts when dark-adapted green plants were returned to the light. In contrast, reaccumulation of light-harvesting complex B (Lhcb) transcripts was unaffected by DCMU treatment. Because Fed-1 light regulation requires translation, we also examined polyribosome profiles. We found that Fed-1 transcripts accumulated on polyribosomes in the light but were found primarily in non-polyribosomal fractions in dark-adapted plants or in illuminated plants exposed to lower than normal light intensity or treated with DCMU. Surprisingly, although Lhcb mRNA abundance was not affected by DCMU, its polyribosomal loading pattern was altered in much the same way as was that of Fed-1 mRNA. In contrast, DCMU had no effect on either the abundance or the polyribosome profiles of endogenous histone H1 or transgenic P35S::CAT transcripts. Thus, our results are consistent with the hypothesis that a process coupled to photosynthesis affects the polyribosome loading of a subset of cytoplasmic mRNAs. PMID:9437868

  18. Role for Ferredoxin:NAD(P)H Oxidoreductase (FprA) in Sulfate Assimilation and Siderophore Biosynthesis in Pseudomonads

    PubMed Central

    Glassing, Angela; Harper, Justin; Franklin, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Pyridine-2,6-bis(thiocarboxylate) (PDTC), produced by certain pseudomonads, is a sulfur-containing siderophore that binds iron, as well as a wide range of transition metals, and it affects the net hydrolysis of the environmental contaminant carbon tetrachloride. The pathway of PDTC biosynthesis has not been defined. Here, we performed a transposon screen of Pseudomonas putida DSM 3601 to identify genes necessary for PDTC production (Pdt phenotype). Transposon insertions within genes for sulfate assimilation (cysD, cysNC, and cysG [cobA2]) dominated the collection of Pdt mutations. In addition, two insertions were within the gene for the LysR-type transcriptional activator FinR (PP1637). Phenotypic characterization indicated that finR mutants were cysteine bradytrophs. The Pdt phenotype of finR mutants could be complemented by the known target of FinR regulation, fprA (encoding ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase), or by Escherichia coli cysJI (encoding sulfite reductase). These data indicate that fprA is necessary for effective sulfate assimilation by P. putida and that the effect of finR mutation on PDTC production was due to deficient expression of fprA and sulfite reduction. fprA expression in both P. putida and P. aeruginosa was found to be regulated by FinR, but in a manner dependent upon reduced sulfur sources, implicating FinR in sulfur regulatory physiology. The genes and phenotypes identified in this study indicated a strong dependence upon intracellular reduced sulfur/cysteine for PDTC biosynthesis and that pseudomonads utilize sulfite reduction enzymology distinct from that of E. coli and possibly similar to that of chloroplasts and other proteobacteria. PMID:23794620

  19. Physiological roles of pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase and pyruvate formate-lyase in Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum JW/SL-YS485

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhou, Jilai; Olson, Daniel G.; Lanahan, Anthony A.; Tian, Liang; Murphy, Sean Jean-Loup; Lo, Jonathan; Lynd, Lee R.

    2015-09-15

    We report that Thermoanaerobacter saccharolyticum is a thermophilic microorganism that has been engineered to produce ethanol at high titer (30–70 g/L) and greater than 90 % theoretical yield. However, few genes involved in pyruvate to ethanol production pathway have been unambiguously identified. In T. saccharolyticum, the products of six putative pfor gene clusters and one pfl gene may be responsible for the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. To gain insights into the physiological roles of PFOR and PFL, we studied the effect of deletions of several genes thought to encode these activities. We found that that pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase enzymemore » (PFOR) is encoded by the pforA gene and plays a key role in pyruvate dissimilation. We further demonstrated that pyruvate formate-lyase activity (PFL) is encoded by the pfl gene. Although the pfl gene is normally expressed at low levels, it is crucial for biosynthesis in T. saccharolyticum. In pforA deletion strains, pfl expression increased and was able to partially compensate for the loss of PFOR activity. Deletion of both pforA and pfl resulted in a strain that required acetate and formate for growth and produced lactate as the primary fermentation product, achieving 88 % theoretical lactate yield. PFOR encoded by Tsac_0046 and PFL encoded by Tsac_0628 are only two routes for converting pyruvate to acetyl-CoA in T. saccharolyticum. The physiological role of PFOR is pyruvate dissimilation, whereas that of PFL is supplying C1 units for biosynthesis.« less

  20. Simultaneous Involvement of a Tungsten-Containing Aldehyde:Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase and a Phenylacetaldehyde Dehydrogenase in Anaerobic Phenylalanine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Debnar-Daumler, Carlotta; Seubert, Andreas; Schmitt, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic phenylalanine metabolism in the denitrifying betaproteobacterium Aromatoleum aromaticum is initiated by conversion of phenylalanine to phenylacetate, which is further metabolized via benzoyl-coenzyme A (CoA). The formation of phenylacetate is catalyzed by phenylalanine transaminase, phenylpyruvate decarboxylase, and a phenylacetaldehyde-oxidizing enzyme. The presence of these enzymes was detected in extracts of cells grown with phenylalanine and nitrate. We found that two distinct enzymes are involved in the oxidation of phenylacetaldehyde to phenylacetate, an aldehyde:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (AOR) and a phenylacetaldehyde dehydrogenase (PDH). Based on sequence comparison, growth studies with various tungstate concentrations, and metal analysis of the enriched enzyme, AOR was shown to be a tungsten-containing enzyme, necessitating specific cofactor biosynthetic pathways for molybdenum- and tungsten-dependent enzymes simultaneously. We predict from the genome sequence that most enzymes of molybdopterin biosynthesis are shared, while the molybdate/tungstate uptake systems are duplicated and specialized paralogs of the sulfur-inserting MoaD and the metal-inserting MoeA proteins seem to be involved in dedicating biosynthesis toward molybdenum or tungsten cofactors. We also characterized PDH biochemically and identified both NAD+ and NADP+ as electron acceptors. We identified the gene coding for the enzyme and purified a recombinant Strep-tagged PDH variant. The homotetrameric enzyme is highly specific for phenylacetaldehyde, has cooperative kinetics toward the substrate, and shows considerable substrate inhibition. Our data suggest that A. aromaticum utilizes PDH as the primary enzyme during anaerobic phenylalanine degradation, whereas AOR is not essential for the metabolic pathway. We hypothesize a function as a detoxifying enzyme if high aldehyde concentrations accumulate in the cytoplasm, which would lead to substrate inhibition of PDH. PMID:24214948

  1. Expression of the minor isoform pea ferredoxin in tobacco alters photosynthetic electron partitioning and enhances cyclic electron flow.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Nicolás E; Ceccoli, Romina D; Vía, María V Dalla; Voss, Ingo; Segretin, María E; Bravo-Almonacid, Fernando F; Melzer, Michael; Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza; Scheibe, Renate; Hanke, Guy T

    2013-02-01

    Ferredoxins (Fds) are ferrosulfoproteins that function as low-potential electron carriers in plants. The Fd family is composed of several isoforms that share high sequence homology but differ in functional characteristics. In leaves, at least two isoforms conduct linear and cyclic photosynthetic electron transport around photosystem I, and mounting evidence suggests the existence of at least partial division of duties between these isoforms. To evaluate the contribution of different kinds of Fds to the control of electron fluxes along the photosynthetic electron transport chain, we overexpressed a minor pea (Pisum sativum) Fd isoform (PsFd1) in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. The transplastomic OeFd1 plants exhibited variegated leaves and retarded growth and developmental rates. Photosynthetic studies of these plants indicated a reduction in carbon dioxide assimilation rates, photosystem II photochemistry, and linear electron flow. However, the plants showed an increase in nonphotochemical quenching, better control of excitation pressure at photosystem II, and no evidence of photoinhibition, implying a better dynamic regulation to remove excess energy from the photosynthetic electron transport chain. Finally, analysis of P700 redox status during illumination confirmed that the minor pea Fd isoform promotes enhanced cyclic flow around photosystem I. The two novel features of this work are: (1) that Fd levels achieved in transplastomic plants promote an alternative electron partitioning even under greenhouse light growth conditions, a situation that is exacerbated at higher light intensity measurements; and (2) that an alternative, minor Fd isoform has been overexpressed in plants, giving new evidence of labor division among Fd isoforms. PMID:23370717

  2. Flavodoxin-mediated electron transfer from photosystem I to ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase in Anabaena: role of flavodoxin hydrophobic residues in protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Goñi, Guillermina; Serrano, Ana; Frago, Susana; Hervás, Manuel; Peregrina, José Ramón; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Gómez-Moreno, Carlos; Navarro, José A; Medina, Milagros

    2008-01-29

    Three surface hydrophobic residues located at the Anabaena flavodoxin (Fld) putative complex interface with its redox partners were replaced by site-directed mutagenesis. The effects of these replacements on Fld interaction with both its physiological electron donor, photosystem I (PSI), and its electron acceptor, ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase (FNR), were analyzed. Trp57, Ile59, and Ile92 contributed to the optimal orientation and tightening of the FNR:Fld and PSI:Fld complexes. However, these side chains did not appear to be involved in crucial specific interactions, but rather contributed to the obtainment of the optimal orientation and distance of the redox centers required for efficient electron transfer. This supports the idea that the interaction of Fld with its partners is less specific than that of ferredoxin and that more than one orientation is efficient for electron transfer in these transient complexes. Additionally, for some of the analyzed processes, WT Fld seems not to be the most optimized molecular species. Therefore, subtle changes at the isoalloxazine environment not only influence the Fld binding abilities, but also modulate the electron exchange processes by producing different orientations and distances between the redox centers. Finally, the weaker apoflavodoxin interaction with FNR suggests that the solvent-accessible region of FMN plays a role either in complex formation with FNR or in providing the adequate conformation of the FNR binding region in Fld. PMID:18177021

  3. Overexpressing Ferredoxins in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Increase Starch and Oil Yields and Enhance Electric Power Production in a Photo Microbial Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-Fen; Lin, Ji-Yu; Pan, Kui-You; Huang, Chun-Kai; Chu, Ying-Kai

    2015-01-01

    Ferredoxins (FDX) are final electron carrier proteins in the plant photosynthetic pathway, and function as major electron donors in diverse redox-driven metabolic pathways. We previously showed that overexpression of a major constitutively expressed ferredoxin gene PETF in Chlamydomonas decreased the reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and enhanced tolerance to heat stress. In addition to PETF, an endogenous anaerobic induced FDX5 was overexpressed in transgenic Chlamydomonas lines here to address the possible functions of FDX5. All the independent FDX transgenic lines showed decreased cellular ROS levels and enhanced tolerance to heat and salt stresses. The transgenic Chlamydomonas lines accumulated more starch than the wild-type line and this effect increased almost three-fold in conditions of nitrogen depletion. Furthermore, the lipid content was higher in the transgenic lines than in the wild-type line, both with and without nitrogen depletion. Two FDX-overexpressing Chlamydomonas lines were assessed in a photo microbial fuel cell (PMFC); power density production by the transgenic lines was higher than that of the wild-type cells. These findings suggest that overexpression of either PETF or FDX5 can confer tolerance against heat and salt stresses, increase starch and oil production, and raise electric power density in a PMFC. PMID:26287179

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the ISC-like [2Fe–2S] ferredoxin (FdxB) from Pseudomonas putida JCM 20004

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasaki, Toshio; Ohmori, Daijiro; Shimizu, Nobutaka; Kumasaka, Takashi

    2007-12-01

    A vertebrate-type [2Fe–2S] ferredoxin (FdxB), which is probably involved in the iron–sulfur cluster-biosynthesis system of the γ-proteobacterium P. putida JCM 20004, has been crystallized in space group P6{sub 1}22. The needle-shaped crystals of recombinant FdxB diffract to 1.90 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The iron–sulfur (Fe–S) cluster-biosynthesis (ISC) system of the γ-proteobacterium Pseudomonas putida JCM 20004 contains a constitutively expressed vertebrate-type [2Fe–2S] ferredoxin, FdxB, which lacks the conserved free cysteine residue near the Fe–S cluster site that has been proposed to function in the catalysis of biological Fe–S cluster assembly in other bacterial homologues. Recombinant FdxB was heterologously overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized in its oxidized form by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion and streak-seeding methods using 1.6 M trisodium citrate dihydrate pH 6.5. The thin needle-shaped crystals diffract to 1.90 Å resolution and belong to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 1}22, with unit-cell parameters a = 87.58, c = 73.14 Å. The asymmetric unit contains one protein molecule.

  5. A novel sterol 14alpha-demethylase/ferredoxin fusion protein (MCCYP51FX) from Methylococcus capsulatus represents a new class of the cytochrome P450 superfamily.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Colin J; Lamb, David C; Marczylo, Timothy H; Warrilow, Andrew G S; Manning, Nigel J; Lowe, David J; Kelly, Diane E; Kelly, Steven L

    2002-12-01

    Sterol 14alpha-demethylase encoded by CYP51 is a member of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily of enzymes and has been shown to have an essential role in sterol biosynthesis in eukaryotes, with orthologues recently being described in some bacteria. Examination of the genome sequence data for the proteobacterium Methylococcus capsulatus, a bacterial species known to produce sterol, revealed the presence of a single CYP with strong homology to CYP51, particularly to a form in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This M. capsulatus CYP51 protein represents a new class of CYP consisting of the CYP domain naturally fused to a ferredoxin domain at the C terminus via an alanine-rich linker. Expression of the M. capsulatus MCCYP51FX fusion in Escherichia coli yielded a P450, which, when purified to homogeneity, had the predicted molecular mass approximately 62 kDa on SDS/PAGE and bound lanosterol as a putative substrate. Sterol 14alpha-demethylase activity was shown (0.24 nmol of lanosterol metabolized per minute per nanomole of MCCYP51FX fusion) by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with the activity dependent upon the presence of ferredoxin reductase and NADPH. Our unique findings describe a new class of naturally existing cytochrome P450, which will provide pivotal information for CYP structure/function in general. PMID:12235134

  6. Overexpressing Ferredoxins in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Increase Starch and Oil Yields and Enhance Electric Power Production in a Photo Microbial Fuel Cell

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li-Fen; Lin, Ji-Yu; Pan, Kui-You; Huang, Chun-Kai; Chu, Ying-Kai

    2015-01-01

    Ferredoxins (FDX) are final electron carrier proteins in the plant photosynthetic pathway, and function as major electron donors in diverse redox-driven metabolic pathways. We previously showed that overexpression of a major constitutively expressed ferredoxin gene PETF in Chlamydomonas decreased the reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and enhanced tolerance to heat stress. In addition to PETF, an endogenous anaerobic induced FDX5 was overexpressed in transgenic Chlamydomonas lines here to address the possible functions of FDX5. All the independent FDX transgenic lines showed decreased cellular ROS levels and enhanced tolerance to heat and salt stresses. The transgenic Chlamydomonas lines accumulated more starch than the wild-type line and this effect increased almost three-fold in conditions of nitrogen depletion. Furthermore, the lipid content was higher in the transgenic lines than in the wild-type line, both with and without nitrogen depletion. Two FDX-overexpressing Chlamydomonas lines were assessed in a photo microbial fuel cell (PMFC); power density production by the transgenic lines was higher than that of the wild-type cells. These findings suggest that overexpression of either PETF or FDX5 can confer tolerance against heat and salt stresses, increase starch and oil production, and raise electric power density in a PMFC. PMID:26287179

  7. Identification of the Binding Region of the [2Fe-2S] Ferredoxin in Stearoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Desaturase

    PubMed Central

    Sobrado, Pablo; Lyle, Karen S.; Kaul, Steven P.; Turco, Michelle M.; Arabshahi, Ida; Marwah, Ashok; Fox, Brian G.

    2008-01-01

    Stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase (Δ9D) catalyzes the O2 and 2e- dependent desaturation of stearoyl-acyl carrier protein (18:0-ACP) to yield oleoyl-ACP (18:1-ACP). The 2e- are provided by essential interactions with reduced plant-type [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin (Fd). We have investigated the protein-protein interface involved in the Fd-Δ9D complex by use of chemical cross-linking, site-directed mutagenesis, steady-state kinetic approaches and molecular docking studies. Treatment of the different proteins with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide revealed that carboxylate residues from Fd and lysine residues from Δ9D contribute to the cross-linking. The single substitutions of K60A, K56A, and K230A on Δ9D decreased the kcat/KM for Fd by 4-, 22- and 2,400-fold, respectively, as compared to wt Δ9D and a K41A substitution. The double substitution K56A/K60A decreased the kcat/KM for Fd by 250-fold, while the triple mutation K56A/K60A/K230A decreased the kcat/KM for Fd by at least 700,000-fold. These results strongly implicate the triad of K56, K60 and K230 of Δ9D in the formation of a catalytic complex with Fd. Molecular docking studies indicate that electrostatic interactions between K56 and K60 and carboxylate groups on Fd may situate the [2Fe-2S] cluster of Fd near to W62, a surface residue that is structurally conserved in both ribonucleotide reductase and mycobacterial putative acyl-ACP desaturase DesA2. Owing to the considerably larger effects on catalysis, K230 appears to have other contributions to catalysis arising from its positioning in helix-7 and its close spatial location to the diiron center ligands E229 and H232. These results are considered in the light of the presently available models for Fd-mediated electron transfer in Δ9D and other protein-protein complexes. PMID:16605252

  8. Le sacrum de Sterkfontein Sts 14 Q ( Australopithecus africanus): nouvelles données sur la croissance et sur l'âge osseux du spécimen (hommage à R. Broom et J.T. Robinson) . The sacrum of Sterkfontein Sts 14 Q (Australopithecus africanus): new data on the growth and on the osseus age of the specimen (homage to R. Broom and J.T. Robinson)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berge, Christine; Gommery, Dominique

    1999-08-01

    The fossil sacrum of Sterkfontein Sts 14Q ( Australopithecus africanus) was compared with 96 human sacrums of known age so as to reveal its growth stage. Robinson (1972) noticed the presence of an immature trait (unfused intervertebral disc between S1 and S2) in this individual which in other respects is supposed to be a fully matured adult. Our study brings us to define a "sub-adult" category corresponding to a class between the ages of 16 to 25 years in modern humans. Sts 14Q had the same state of maturation, which corresponds to a post-pubertal individual which had not finished its growth concerning the sacral breadth, and probably the pelvic breadth.

  9. Rapid Reduction of the Diferric-Peroxyhemiacetal Intermediate in Aldehyde-Deformylating Oxygenase by a Cyanobacterial Ferredoxin: Evidence for a Free-Radical Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rajakovich, Lauren J; Nørgaard, Hanne; Warui, Douglas M; Chang, Wei-chen; Li, Ning; Booker, Squire J; Krebs, Carsten; Bollinger, J Martin; Pandelia, Maria-Eirini

    2015-09-16

    Aldehyde-deformylating oxygenase (ADO) is a ferritin-like nonheme-diiron enzyme that catalyzes the last step in a pathway through which fatty acids are converted into hydrocarbons in cyanobacteria. ADO catalyzes conversion of a fatty aldehyde to the corresponding alk(a/e)ne and formate, consuming four electrons and one molecule of O2 per turnover and incorporating one atom from O2 into the formate coproduct. The source of the reducing equivalents in vivo has not been definitively established, but a cyanobacterial [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin (PetF), reduced by ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (FNR) using NADPH, has been implicated. We show that both the diferric form of Nostoc punctiforme ADO and its (putative) diferric-peroxyhemiacetal intermediate are reduced much more rapidly by Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 PetF than by the previously employed chemical reductant, 1-methoxy-5-methylphenazinium methyl sulfate. The yield of formate and alkane per reduced PetF approaches its theoretical upper limit when reduction of the intermediate is carried out in the presence of FNR. Reduction of the intermediate by either system leads to accumulation of a substrate-derived peroxyl radical as a result of off-pathway trapping of the C2-alkyl radical intermediate by excess O2, which consequently diminishes the yield of the hydrocarbon product. A sulfinyl radical located on residue Cys71 also accumulates with short-chain aldehydes. The detection of these radicals under turnover conditions provides the most direct evidence to date for a free-radical mechanism. Additionally, our results expose an inefficiency of the enzyme in processing its radical intermediate, presenting a target for optimization of bioprocesses exploiting this hydrocarbon-production pathway. PMID:26284355

  10. Theoretical study of the mechanism of the hydride transfer between ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase and NADP+: the role of Tyr303.

    PubMed

    Lans, Isaias; Medina, Milagros; Rosta, Edina; Hummer, Gerhard; Garcia-Viloca, Mireia; Lluch, José M; González-Lafont, Àngels

    2012-12-19

    During photosynthesis, ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (FNR) catalyzes the electron transfer from ferredoxin to NADP(+) via its FAD cofactor. The final hydride transfer event between FNR and the nucleotide is a reversible process. Two different transient charge-transfer complexes form prior to and upon hydride transfer, FNR(rd)-NADP(+) and FNR(ox)-NADPH, regardless of the hydride transfer direction. Experimental structures of the FNR(ox):NADP(+) interaction have suggested a series of conformational rearrangements that might contribute to attaining the catalytically competent complex, but to date, no direct experimental information about the structure of this complex is available. Recently, a molecular dynamics (MD) theoretical approach was used to provide a putative organization of the active site that might represent a structure close to the transient catalytically competent interaction of Anabaena FNR with its coenzyme, NADP(+). Using this structure, we performed fully microscopic simulations of the hydride transfer processes between Anabaena FNR(rd)/FNR(ox) and NADP(+)/H, accounting also for the solvation. A dual-level QM/MM hybrid approach was used to describe the potential energy surface of the whole system. MD calculations using the finite-temperature string method combined with the WHAM method provided the potential of mean force for the hydride transfer processes. The results confirmed that the structural model of the reactants evolves to a catalytically competent transition state through very similar free energy barriers for both the forward and reverse reactions, in good agreement with the experimental hydride transfer rate constants reported for this system. This theoretical approach additionally provides subtle structural details of the mechanism in wild-type FNR and provides an explanation why Tyr303 makes possible the photosynthetic reaction, a process that cannot occur when this Tyr is replaced by a Ser. PMID:23181670

  11. Pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and thioredoxin reductase are involved in 5-nitroimidazole activation while flavin metabolism is linked to 5-nitroimidazole resistance in Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Leitsch, David; Burgess, Anita G.; Dunn, Linda A.; Krauer, Kenia G.; Tan, Kevin; Duchêne, Michael; Upcroft, Peter; Eckmann, Lars; Upcroft, Jacqueline A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The mechanism of action of, and resistance to, metronidazole in the anaerobic (or micro-aerotolerant) protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia has long been associated with the reduction of ferredoxin (Fd) by the enzyme pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) and the subsequent activation of metronidazole by Fd to toxic radical species. Resistance to metronidazole has been associated with down-regulation of PFOR and Fd. The aim of this study was to determine whether the PFOR/Fd couple is the only pathway involved in metronidazole activation in Giardia. Methods PFOR and Fd activities were measured in extracts of highly metronidazole-resistant (MTRr) lines and activities of recombinant G. lamblia thioredoxin reductase (GlTrxR) and NADPH oxidase were assessed for their involvement in metronidazole activation and resistance. Results We demonstrated that several lines of highly MTRr G. lamblia have fully functional PFOR and Fd indicating that PFOR/Fd-independent mechanisms are involved in metronidazole activation and resistance in these cells. Flavin-dependent GlTrxR, like TrxR of other anaerobic protozoa, reduces 5-nitroimidazole compounds including metronidazole, although expression of TrxR is not decreased in MTRr Giardia. However, reduction of flavins is suppressed in highly MTRr cells, as evidenced by as much as an 80% decrease in NADPH oxidase flavin mononucleotide reduction activity. This suppression is consistent with generalized impaired flavin metabolism in highly MTRr Trichomonas vaginalis. Conclusions These data add to the mounting evidence against the dogma that PFOR/Fd is the only couple with a low enough redox potential to reduce metronidazole in anaerobes and point to the multi-factorial nature of metronidazole resistance. PMID:21602576

  12. Functional Analysis of Two Isoforms of Leaf-Type Ferredoxin-NADP+-Oxidoreductase in Rice Using the Heterologous Expression System of Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi-Takeuchi, Mieko; Ichikawa, Takanari; Kondou, Youichi; Matsui, Keiko; Hasegawa, Yukako; Kawashima, Mika; Sonoike, Kintake; Mori, Masaki; Hirochika, Hirohiko; Matsui, Minami

    2011-01-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP+-oxidoreductase (FNR) mediates electron transfer between ferredoxin (Fd) and NADP+; therefore, it is a key enzyme that provides the reducing power used in the Calvin cycle. Other than FNR, nitrite reductase, sulfite reductase, glutamate synthase, and Fd-thioredoxin reductase also accept electrons from Fd, an electron carrier protein in the stroma. Therefore, the regulation of electron partitioning in the chloroplast is important for photosynthesis and other metabolic pathways. The regulatory mechanism of electron partitioning, however, remains to be elucidated. We found, by taking advantage of a gain-of-function approach, that expression of two rice (Oryza sativa) full-length cDNAs of leaf-type FNRs (OsLFNR1 and OsLFNR2) led to altered chlorophyll fluorescence and growth in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice. We revealed that overexpression of the OsLFNR1 and OsLFNR2 full-length cDNAs resulted in distinct phenotypes despite the high sequence similarity between them. Expression of OsLFNR1 affected the nitrogen assimilation pathway without inhibition of photosynthesis under normal conditions. On the other hand, OsLFNR2 expression led to the impairment of photosynthetic linear electron transport as well as Fd-dependent cyclic electron flow around photosystem I. The endogenous protein level of OsLFNR was found to be suppressed in both OsLFNR1- and OsLFNR2-overexpressing rice plants, leading to changes in the stoichiometry of the two LFNR isoforms within the thylakoid and soluble fractions. Thus, we propose that the stoichiometry of two LFNR isoforms plays an important role in electron partitioning between carbon fixation and nitrogen assimilation. PMID:21734114

  13. The [2Fe-2S] protein I (Shetna protein I) from Azotobacter vinelandii is homologous to the [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin from Clostridium pasteurianum.

    PubMed

    Chatelet, C; Meyer, J

    1999-06-01

    The [2Fe-2S] protein from Azotobacter vinelandii that was previously known as iron-sulfur protein I, or Shethna protein I, has been shown to be encoded by a gene belonging to the major nif gene cluster. Overexpression of this gene in Escherichia coli yielded a dimeric protein of which each subunit comprises 106 residues and contains one [2Fe-2S] cluster. The sequence of this protein is very similar to that of the [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin from Clostridium pasteurianum (2FeCpFd), and the four cysteine ligands of the [2Fe-2S] cluster occur in the same positions. The A. vinelandii protein differs from the C. pasteurianum one by the absence of the N-terminal methionine, the presence of a five-residue C-terminal extension, and a lesser number of acidic and polar residues. The UV-visible absorption and EPR spectra, as well as the redox potentials of the two proteins, are nearly identical. These data show that the A. vinelandii FeS protein I, which is therefore proposed to be designated 2FeAvFdI, is the counterpart of the [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin from C. pasteurianum. The occurrence of the 2FeAvFdI-encoding gene in the nif gene cluster, together with the previous demonstration of a specific interaction between the 2FeCpFd and the nitrogenase MoFe protein, suggest that both proteins might be involved in nitrogen fixation, with possibly similar roles. PMID:10439076

  14. Transgenic Tobacco Plants Overexpressing Chloroplastic Ferredoxin-NADP(H) Reductase Display Normal Rates of Photosynthesis and Increased Tolerance to Oxidative Stress1

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Ramiro E.; Lodeyro, Anabella; Poli, Hugo O.; Zurbriggen, Matias; Peisker, Martin; Palatnik, Javier F.; Tognetti, Vanesa B.; Tschiersch, Henning; Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza; Valle, Estela M.; Carrillo, Néstor

    2007-01-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductase (FNR) catalyzes the last step of photosynthetic electron transport in chloroplasts, driving electrons from reduced ferredoxin to NADP+. This reaction is rate limiting for photosynthesis under a wide range of illumination conditions, as revealed by analysis of plants transformed with an antisense version of the FNR gene. To investigate whether accumulation of this flavoprotein over wild-type levels could improve photosynthetic efficiency and growth, we generated transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants expressing a pea (Pisum sativum) FNR targeted to chloroplasts. The alien product distributed between the thylakoid membranes and the chloroplast stroma. Transformants grown at 150 or 700 μmol quanta m−2 s−1 displayed wild-type phenotypes regardless of FNR content. Thylakoids isolated from plants with a 5-fold FNR increase over the wild type displayed only moderate stimulation (approximately 20%) in the rates of electron transport from water to NADP+. In contrast, when donors of photosystem I were used to drive NADP+ photoreduction, the activity was 3- to 4-fold higher than the wild-type controls. Plants expressing various levels of FNR (from 1- to 3.6-fold over the wild type) failed to show significant differences in CO2 assimilation rates when assayed over a range of light intensities and CO2 concentrations. Transgenic lines exhibited enhanced tolerance to photooxidative damage and redox-cycling herbicides that propagate reactive oxygen species. The results suggest that photosynthetic electron transport has several rate-limiting steps, with FNR catalyzing just one of them. PMID:17189326

  15. Increasing the electron-transfer ability of Cyanidioschyzon merolae ferredoxin by a one-point mutation – A high resolution and Fe-SAD phasing crystal structure analysis of the Asp58Asn mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, Yuko; Matsumoto, Takashi; Yamano, Akihito; Imai, Takeo; Morimoto, Yukio

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •A single amino acid change on the ferredoxin surface affects electron transfer. •Precise positions of amide atoms were located utilizing no prior structural data. •Ultra high resolution and SAD phasing may be used for bias-free model building. -- Abstract: Cyanidioschyzon merolae (Cm) is a single cell red algae that grows in rather thermophilic (40–50 °C) and acidic (pH 1–3) conditions. Ferredoxin (Fd) was purified from this algae and characterized as a plant-type [2Fe–2S] Fd by physicochemical techniques. A high resolution (0.97 Å) three-dimensional structure of the CmFd D58N mutant molecule has been determined using the Fe-SAD phasing method to clarify the precise position of the Asn58 amide, as this substitution increases the electron-transfer ability relative to wild-type CmFd by a factor of 1.5. The crystal structure reveals an electro-positive surface surrounding Asn58 that may interact with ferredoxin NADP{sup +} reductase or cytochrome c.

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analyses of the redox-controlled complex of terminal oxygenase and ferredoxin components in the Rieske nonhaem iron oxygenase carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuzawa, Jun; Aikawa, Hiroki; Umeda, Takashi; Ashikawa, Yuji; Suzuki-Minakuchi, Chiho; Kawano, Yoshiaki; Fujimoto, Zui; Okada, Kazunori; Yamane, Hisakazu; Nojiri, Hideaki

    2014-09-25

    A crystal was obtained of the complex between reduced terminal oxygenase and oxidized ferredoxin components of carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase. The crystal belonged to space group P2{sub 1} and diffracted to 2.25 Å resolution. The initial reaction in bacterial carbazole degradation is catalyzed by carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase, which consists of terminal oxygenase (Oxy), ferredoxin (Fd) and ferredoxin reductase components. The electron-transfer complex between reduced Oxy and oxidized Fd was crystallized at 293 K using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with PEG 3350 as the precipitant under anaerobic conditions. The crystal diffracted to a maximum resolution of 2.25 Å and belonged to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 97.3, b = 81.6, c = 116.2 Å, α = γ = 90, β = 100.1°. The V{sub M} value is 2.85 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}, indicating a solvent content of 56.8%.

  17. Binding of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Apo-Bacterioferritin Associated Ferredoxin to Bacterioferritin B Promotes Heme Mediation of Electron Delivery and Mobilization of Core Mineral Iron†

    PubMed Central

    Weeratunga, Saroja K.; Gee, Casey E.; Lovell, Scott; Zeng, Yuhong; Woodin, Carrie L.; Rivera, Mario

    2009-01-01

    The bfrB gene from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was cloned and expressed in E. coli. The resultant protein (BfrB), which assembles into a 445.3 kDa complex0020from 24 identical subunits, binds 12 molecules of heme axially coordinated by two Met residues. BfrB, isolated with 5–10 iron atoms per protein molecule, was reconstituted with ferrous ions to prepare samples with a core mineral containing 600 ± 40 ferric ions per BfrB molecule and approximately one phosphate molecule per iron atom. In the presence of sodium dithionite or in the presence of P. aeruginosa ferredoxin NADP reductase (FPR) and NADPH the heme in BfrB remains oxidized and the core iron mineral is mobilized sluggishly. In stark contrast, addition of NADPH to a solution containing BfrB, FPR and the apo-form of P. aeruginosa bacterioferritin associated ferredoxin (apo-Bfd) results in rapid reduction of the heme in BfrB and in the efficient mobilization of the core iron mineral. Results from additional experimentation indicate that Bfd must bind to BfrB to promote heme mediation of electrons from the surface to the core to support the efficient mobilization of ferrous ions from BfrB. In this context, the thus far mysterious role of heme in bacterioferritins has been brought to the front by reconstituting BfrB with its physiological partner, apo-Bfd. These findings are discussed in the context of a model for the utilization of stored iron in which the significant upregulation of the bfd gene under low-iron conditions [Ochsner, U.A., Wilderman, P.J., Vasil, A.I., and Vasil, M.L. (2002) Mol. Microbiol. 45, 1277–1287] ensures sufficient concentrations of apo-Bfd to bind BfrB and unlock the iron stored in its core. Although these findings are in contrast to previous speculations suggesting redox mediation of electron transfer by holo-Bfd, the ability of apo-Bfd to promote iron mobilization is an economical strategy used by the cell because it obviates the need to further deplete cellular iron levels to

  18. Binding of Pseudomonas aeruginosa apobacterioferritin-associated ferredoxin to bacterioferritin B promotes heme mediation of electron delivery and mobilization of core mineral iron.

    PubMed

    Weeratunga, Saroja K; Gee, Casey E; Lovell, Scott; Zeng, Yuhong; Woodin, Carrie L; Rivera, Mario

    2009-08-11

    The bfrB gene from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The resultant protein (BfrB), which assembles into a 445.3 kDa complex from 24 identical subunits, binds 12 molecules of heme axially coordinated by two Met residues. BfrB, isolated with 5-10 iron atoms per protein molecule, was reconstituted with ferrous ions to prepare samples with a core mineral containing 600 +/- 40 ferric ions per BfrB molecule and approximately one phosphate molecule per iron atom. In the presence of sodium dithionite or in the presence of P. aeruginosa ferredoxin NADP reductase (FPR) and NADPH, the heme in BfrB remains oxidized, and the core iron mineral is mobilized sluggishly. In stark contrast, addition of NADPH to a solution containing BfrB, FPR, and the apo form of P. aeruginosa bacterioferritin-associated ferredoxin (apo-Bfd) results in rapid reduction of the heme in BfrB and in the efficient mobilization of the core iron mineral. Results from additional experimentation indicate that Bfd must bind to BfrB to promote heme mediation of electrons from the surface to the core to support the efficient mobilization of ferrous ions from BfrB. In this context, the thus far mysterious role of heme in bacterioferritins has been brought to the front by reconstituting BfrB with its physiological partner, apo-Bfd. These findings are discussed in the context of a model for the utilization of stored iron in which the significant upregulation of the bfd gene under low-iron conditions [Ochsner, U. A., Wilderman, P. J., Vasil, A. I., and Vasil, M. L. (2002) Mol. Microbiol. 45, 1277-1287] ensures sufficient concentrations of apo-Bfd to bind BfrB and unlock the iron stored in its core. Although these findings are in contrast to previous speculations suggesting redox mediation of electron transfer by holo-Bfd, the ability of apo-Bfd to promote iron mobilization is an economical strategy used by the cell because it obviates the need to further deplete cellular iron

  19. Role of a ferredoxin gene cotranscribed with the nifHDK operon in N(2) fixation and nitrogenase "switch-off" of Azoarcus sp. strain BH72.

    PubMed

    Egener, T; Martin, D E; Sarkar, A; Reinhold-Hurek, B

    2001-06-01

    The endophytic diazotroph Azoarcus sp. strain BH72 is capable of infecting rice roots and of expressing the nitrogenase (nif) genes there. In order to study the genetic background for nitrogen fixation in strain BH72, the structural genes of nitrogenase (nifHDK) were cloned and sequenced. The sequence analysis revealed an unusual gene organization: downstream of nifHDK, a ferredoxin gene (fdxN; 59% amino acid sequence identity to R. capsulatus FdxN) and open reading frames showing 52 and 36% amino acid sequence identity to nifY of Pseudomonas stutzeri A15 and ORF1 of Azotobacter vinelandii were located. Northern blot analysis, reverse transcriptase PCR and primer extension analysis revealed that these six genes are located on one transcript transcribed from a sigma(54)-type promoter. Shorter transcripts sequentially missing genes of the 3' part of the full-length mRNA were more abundantly detected. Mutational analyses suggested that FdxN is an important but not the essential electron donor for dinitrogenase reductase. An in-frame deletion of fdxN resulted in reduced growth rates (59% +/- 9%) and nitrogenase activities (81%) in nitrogen-fixing pure cultures in comparison to the wild type. Nitrogenase activity was fully complemented in an fdxN mutant which carried a nifH promoter-driven fdxN gene in trans. Also, in coculture with the ascomycete Acremonium alternatum, where strain BH72 develops intracytoplasmic membrane stacks, the nitrogenase activity in the fdxN deletion mutant was decreased to 56% of the wild-type level. Surprisingly, the fdxN deletion also had an effect on the rapid "switch-off" of nitrogenase activity in response to ammonium. Wild-type strain BH72 and the deletion mutant complemented with fdxN in trans showed a rapid reversible inactivation of acetylene reduction, while the deletion mutant did not cease to reduce acetylene. In concordance with the hypothesis that changes in the redox state of NifH or electron flux towards nitrogenase may be

  20. Identification of a Novel Nonstructural Protein, VP9, from White Spot Syndrome Virus: Its Structure Reveals a Ferredoxin Fold with Specific Metal Binding Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Liu,Y.; Wu, J.; Song, J.; Sivaraman, J.; Hew, C.

    2006-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major pathogen in shrimp aquaculture. VP9, a full-length protein of WSSV, encoded by open reading frame wsv230, was identified for the first time in the infected Penaeus monodon shrimp tissues, gill, and stomach as a novel, nonstructural protein by Western blotting, mass spectrometry, and immunoelectron microscopy. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR demonstrated that the transcription of VP9 started from the early to the late stage of WSSV infection as a major mRNA species. The structure of full-length VP9 was determined by both X-ray and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. It is the first structure to be reported for WSSV proteins. The crystal structure of VP9 revealed a ferredoxin fold with divalent metal ion binding sites. Cadmium sulfate was found to be essential for crystallization. The Cd2+ ions were bound between the monomer interfaces of the homodimer. Various divalent metal ions have been titrated against VP9, and their interactions were analyzed using NMR spectroscopy. The titration data indicated that VP9 binds with both Zn2+ and Cd2+. VP9 adopts a similar fold as the DNA binding domain of the papillomavirus E2 protein. Based on our present investigations, we hypothesize that VP9 might be involved in the transcriptional regulation of WSSV, a function similar to that of the E2 protein during papillomavirus infection of the host cells.

  1. Mutation of FdC2 gene encoding a ferredoxin-like protein with C-terminal extension causes yellow-green leaf phenotype in rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunmei; Hu, Yan; Huang, Rui; Ma, Xiaozhi; Wang, Yang; Liao, Tingting; Zhong, Ping; Xiao, Fuliang; Sun, Changhui; Xu, Zhengjun; Deng, Xiaojian; Wang, Pingrong

    2015-09-01

    Ferredoxins (Fds) are small iron-sulfur proteins that mediate electron transfer in a wide range of metabolic reactions. Besides Fds, there is a type of Fd-like proteins designated as FdC, which have conserved elements of Fds, but contain a significant C-terminal extension. So far, only two FdC genes of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) have been identified in higher plants and thus the functions of FdC proteins remain largely unknown. In this study, we isolated a yellow-green leaf mutant, 501ys, in rice (Oryza sativa). The mutant exhibited yellow-green leaf phenotype and reduced chlorophyll level. The phenotype of 501ys was caused by mutation of a gene on rice chromosome 3. Map-based cloning of this mutant resulted in identification of OsFdC2 gene (LOC_Os03g48040) showing high identity with Arabidopsis FdC2 gene (AT1G32550). OsFdC2 was expressed most abundantly in leaves and its encoded protein was targeted to the chloroplast. In 501ys mutant, a missense mutation was detected in DNA sequence of the gene, resulting in an amino acid change in the encoded protein. The mutant phenotype was rescued by introduction of the wild-type gene. Therefore, we successfully identified FdC2 gene via map-based cloning approach, and demonstrated that mutation of this gene caused yellow-green leaf phenotype in rice. PMID:26259181

  2. Direct interaction with ACR11 is necessary for post-transcriptional control of GLU1-encoded ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase in leaves.

    PubMed

    Takabayashi, Atsushi; Niwata, Akihiro; Tanaka, Ayumi

    2016-01-01

    Because it plays an essential role in nitrogen (N) assimilation and photorespiration, the glutamine synthetase (GS)/glutamate synthase (GOGAT) system is widely accepted as occupying a central position in leaf N metabolism. However, the regulation of GOGAT at the post-transcriptional level is poorly understood. Here, we show that ACR11, an ACT (acronym for aspartate kinase, chorismate mutase, and TyrA) domain-containing family protein, interacts with Glu1-encoded ferredoxin (Fd)-GOGAT in Arabidopsis chloroplasts. In addition, Arabidopsis acr11 mutants have lost the capability to control Fd-GOGAT levels in response to light/dark diurnal cycles, nitrogen inputs, and changes in photorespiratory activity. Considering that ACR11 has putative glutamine-binding domains, our results indicate that ACR11 is necessary for post-transcriptional control of leaf Glu1-encoded Fd-GOGAT. This regulation takes place through direct interaction of ACR11 and Fd-GOGAT, possibly in an allosteric manner. PMID:27411448

  3. Direct interaction with ACR11 is necessary for post-transcriptional control of GLU1-encoded ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase in leaves

    PubMed Central

    Takabayashi, Atsushi; Niwata, Akihiro; Tanaka, Ayumi

    2016-01-01

    Because it plays an essential role in nitrogen (N) assimilation and photorespiration, the glutamine synthetase (GS)/glutamate synthase (GOGAT) system is widely accepted as occupying a central position in leaf N metabolism. However, the regulation of GOGAT at the post-transcriptional level is poorly understood. Here, we show that ACR11, an ACT (acronym for aspartate kinase, chorismate mutase, and TyrA) domain-containing family protein, interacts with Glu1-encoded ferredoxin (Fd)-GOGAT in Arabidopsis chloroplasts. In addition, Arabidopsis acr11 mutants have lost the capability to control Fd-GOGAT levels in response to light/dark diurnal cycles, nitrogen inputs, and changes in photorespiratory activity. Considering that ACR11 has putative glutamine-binding domains, our results indicate that ACR11 is necessary for post-transcriptional control of leaf Glu1-encoded Fd-GOGAT. This regulation takes place through direct interaction of ACR11 and Fd-GOGAT, possibly in an allosteric manner. PMID:27411448

  4. Deconvolution of ferredoxin, plastocyanin, and P700 transmittance changes in intact leaves with a new type of kinetic LED array spectrophotometer.

    PubMed

    Klughammer, Christof; Schreiber, Ulrich

    2016-05-01

    A newly developed compact measuring system for assessment of transmittance changes in the near-infrared spectral region is described; it allows deconvolution of redox changes due to ferredoxin (Fd), P700, and plastocyanin (PC) in intact leaves. In addition, it can also simultaneously measure chlorophyll fluorescence. The major opto-electronic components as well as the principles of data acquisition and signal deconvolution are outlined. Four original pulse-modulated dual-wavelength difference signals are measured (785-840 nm, 810-870 nm, 870-970 nm, and 795-970 nm). Deconvolution is based on specific spectral information presented graphically in the form of 'Differential Model Plots' (DMP) of Fd, P700, and PC that are derived empirically from selective changes of these three components under appropriately chosen physiological conditions. Whereas information on maximal changes of Fd is obtained upon illumination after dark-acclimation, maximal changes of P700 and PC can be readily induced by saturating light pulses in the presence of far-red light. Using the information of DMP and maximal changes, the new measuring system enables on-line deconvolution of Fd, P700, and PC. The performance of the new device is demonstrated by some examples of practical applications, including fast measurements of flash relaxation kinetics and of the Fd, P700, and PC changes paralleling the polyphasic fluorescence rise upon application of a 300-ms pulse of saturating light. PMID:26837213

  5. LIGHT-INDUCED RICE1 Regulates Light-Dependent Attachment of LEAF-TYPE FERREDOXIN-NADP+ OXIDOREDUCTASE to the Thylakoid Membrane in Rice and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Hu, Hongtao; Ren, Hongyan; Kong, Yuzhu; Lin, Hongwei; Guo, Jiangfan; Wang, Lingling; He, Yi; Ding, Xiaomeng; Grabsztunowicz, Magda; Mulo, Paula; Chen, Tao; Liu, Yu; Wu, Zhongchang; Wu, Yunrong; Mao, Chuanzao; Wu, Ping; Mo, Xiaorong

    2016-03-01

    LIR1 (LIGHT-INDUCED RICE1) encodes a 13-kD, chloroplast-targeted protein containing two nearly identical motifs of unknown function. LIR1 is present in the genomes of vascular plants, mosses, liverworts, and algae, but not in cyanobacteria. Using coimmunoprecipitation assays, pull-down assays, and yeast two-hybrid analyses, we showed that LIR1 interacts with LEAF-TYPE FERREDOXIN-NADP(+) OXIDOREDUCTASE (LFNR), an essential chloroplast enzyme functioning in the last step of photosynthetic linear electron transfer. LIR1 and LFNR formed high molecular weight thylakoid protein complexes with the TIC62 and TROL proteins, previously shown to anchor LFNR to the membrane. We further showed that LIR1 increases the affinity of LFNRs for TIC62 and that the rapid light-triggered degradation of the LIR1 coincides with the release of the LFNR from the thylakoid membrane. Loss of LIR1 resulted in a marked decrease in the accumulation of LFNR-containing thylakoid protein complexes without a concomitant decrease in total LFNR content. In rice (Oryza sativa), photosynthetic capacity of lir1 plants was slightly impaired, whereas no such effect was observed in Arabidopsis thaliana knockout mutants. The consequences of LIR1 deficiency in different species are discussed. PMID:26941088

  6. Dynamics of the [4Fe-4S] Cluster in Pyrococcus furiosus D14C Ferredoxin via Nuclear Resonance Vibrational and Resonance Raman Spectroscopies, Force Field Simulations, and Density Functional Theory Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Devrani; Pelmenschikov, Vladimir; Guo, Yisong; Case, David A.; Wang, Hongxin; Dong, Weibing; Tan, Ming-Liang; Ichiye, Toshiko; Jenney, Francis E.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Zhao, Jiyong; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2011-01-01

    We have used 57Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) to study oxidized and reduced forms of the [4Fe-4S] cluster in the D14C variant ferredoxin from Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf D14C Fd). To assist the normal mode assignments, we recorded the NRVS of D14C ferredoxin samples with 36S substituted into the [4Fe-4S] cluster bridging sulfide positions, and a model compound without ligand side chains: (Ph4P)2[Fe4S4Cl4]. Several distinct regions of NRVS intensity are identified, ranging from `protein' and torsional modes below 100 cm−1, through bending and breathing modes near 150 cm−1, to strong bands from Fe-S stretching modes between 250 cm−1 and ~400 cm−1. The oxidized ferredoxin samples were also investigated by resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy. We found good agreement between NRVS and RR frequencies, but because of different selection rules, the intensities vary dramatically between the two types of spectra. The 57Fe partial vibrational densities of states (PVDOS) for the oxidized samples were interpreted by normal mode analysis with optimization of Urey-Bradley force fields for local models of the [4Fe-4S] clusters. Full protein model calculations were also conducted using a supplemented CHARMM force field, and these calculations revealed low frequency modes that may be relevant to electron transfer with Pf Fd partners. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations complemented these empirical analyses, and DFT was used to estimate the reorganization energy associated with the [Fe4S4]2+/1+ redox cycle. Overall, the NRVS technique demonstrates great promise for the observation and quantitative interpretation of the dynamical properties of Fe-S proteins. PMID:21500788

  7. Functional Inactivation of Putative Photosynthetic Electron Acceptor Ferredoxin C2 (FdC2) Induces Delayed Heading Date and Decreased Photosynthetic Rate in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Banpu; Kang, Shujing; He, Lei; Zhang, Sen; Dong, Guojun; Hu, Jiang; Zeng, Dali; Zhang, Guangheng; Gao, Zhenyu; Ren, Deyong; Hu, Xingming; Chen, Guang; Guo, Longbiao; Qian, Qian; Zhu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Ferredoxin (Fd) protein as unique electron acceptor, involved in a variety of fundamental metabolic and signaling processes, which is indispensable for plant growth. The molecular mechanisms of Fd such as regulation of electron partitioning, impact of photosynthetic rate and involvement in the carbon fixing remain elusive in rice. Here we reported a heading date delay and yellowish leaf 1 (hdy1) mutant derived from Japonica rice cultivar “Nipponbare” subjected to EMS treatment. In the paddy field, the hdy1 mutant appeared at a significantly late heading date and had yellow-green leaves during the whole growth stage. Further investigation indicated that the abnormal phenotype of hdy1 was connected with depressed pigment content and photosynthetic rate. Genetic analysis results showed that the hdy1 mutant phenotype was caused by a single recessive nuclear gene mutation. Map-based cloning revealed that OsHDY1 is located on chromosome 3 and encodes an ortholog of the AtFdC2 gene. Complementation and overexpression, transgenic plants exhibited the mutant phenotype including head date, leaf color and the transcription levels of the FdC2 were completely rescued by transformation with OsHDY1. Real-time PCR revealed that the expression product of OsHDY1 was detected in almost all of the organs except root, whereas highest expression levels were observed in seeding new leaves. The lower expression levels of HDY1 and content of iron were detected in hdy1 than WT’s. The FdC2::GFP was detected in the chloroplasts of rice. Real-time PCR results showed that the expression of many photosynthetic electron transfer related genes in hdy1 were higher than WT. Our results suggest that OsFdC2 plays an important role in photosynthetic rate and development of heading date by regulating electron transfer and chlorophyll content in rice. PMID:26598971

  8. Functional Inactivation of Putative Photosynthetic Electron Acceptor Ferredoxin C2 (FdC2) Induces Delayed Heading Date and Decreased Photosynthetic Rate in Rice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan; Qiu, Zhennan; Ruan, Banpu; Kang, Shujing; He, Lei; Zhang, Sen; Dong, Guojun; Hu, Jiang; Zeng, Dali; Zhang, Guangheng; Gao, Zhenyu; Ren, Deyong; Hu, Xingming; Chen, Guang; Guo, Longbiao; Qian, Qian; Zhu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Ferredoxin (Fd) protein as unique electron acceptor, involved in a variety of fundamental metabolic and signaling processes, which is indispensable for plant growth. The molecular mechanisms of Fd such as regulation of electron partitioning, impact of photosynthetic rate and involvement in the carbon fixing remain elusive in rice. Here we reported a heading date delay and yellowish leaf 1 (hdy1) mutant derived from Japonica rice cultivar "Nipponbare" subjected to EMS treatment. In the paddy field, the hdy1 mutant appeared at a significantly late heading date and had yellow-green leaves during the whole growth stage. Further investigation indicated that the abnormal phenotype of hdy1 was connected with depressed pigment content and photosynthetic rate. Genetic analysis results showed that the hdy1 mutant phenotype was caused by a single recessive nuclear gene mutation. Map-based cloning revealed that OsHDY1 is located on chromosome 3 and encodes an ortholog of the AtFdC2 gene. Complementation and overexpression, transgenic plants exhibited the mutant phenotype including head date, leaf color and the transcription levels of the FdC2 were completely rescued by transformation with OsHDY1. Real-time PCR revealed that the expression product of OsHDY1 was detected in almost all of the organs except root, whereas highest expression levels were observed in seeding new leaves. The lower expression levels of HDY1 and content of iron were detected in hdy1 than WT's. The FdC2::GFP was detected in the chloroplasts of rice. Real-time PCR results showed that the expression of many photosynthetic electron transfer related genes in hdy1 were higher than WT. Our results suggest that OsFdC2 plays an important role in photosynthetic rate and development of heading date by regulating electron transfer and chlorophyll content in rice. PMID:26598971

  9. Arabidopsis Tic62 and Ferredoxin-NADP(H) Oxidoreductase Form Light-Regulated Complexes That Are Integrated into the Chloroplast Redox Poise[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Benz, J.P.; Stengel, A.; Lintala, M.; Lee, Y.-H.; Weber, A.; Philippar, K.; Gügel, I.L.; Kaieda, S.; Ikegami, T.; Mulo, P.; Soll, J.; Bölter, B.

    2009-01-01

    Translocation of nuclear-encoded preproteins across the inner envelope of chloroplasts is catalyzed by the Tic translocon, consisting of Tic110, Tic40, Tic62, Tic55, Tic32, Tic20, and Tic22. Tic62 was proposed to act as a redox sensor of the complex because of its redox-dependent shuttling between envelope and stroma and its specific interaction with the photosynthetic protein ferredoxin-NADP(H) oxidoreductase (FNR). However, the nature of this close relationship so far remained enigmatic. A putative additional localization of Tic62 at the thylakoids mandated further studies examining how this feature might be involved in the respective redox sensing pathway and the interaction with its partner protein. Therefore, both the association with FNR and the physiological role of the third, thylakoid-bound pool of Tic62 were investigated in detail. Coexpression analysis indicates that Tic62 has similar expression patterns as genes involved in photosynthetic functions and protein turnover. At the thylakoids, Tic62 and FNR form high molecular weight complexes that are not involved in photosynthetic electron transfer but are dynamically regulated by light signals and the stromal pH. Structural analyses reveal that Tic62 binds to FNR in a novel binding mode for flavoproteins, with a major contribution from hydrophobic interactions. Moreover, in absence of Tic62, membrane binding and stability of FNR are drastically reduced. We conclude that Tic62 represents a major FNR interaction partner not only at the envelope and in the stroma, but also at the thylakoids of Arabidopsis thaliana and perhaps all flowering plants. Association with Tic62 stabilizes FNR and is involved in its dynamic and light-dependent membrane tethering. PMID:20040542

  10. Identification of the iron-sulfur clusters in a ferredoxin from the archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. Evidence for a reduced [3Fe-4S] cluster with pH-dependent electronic properties.

    PubMed

    Breton, J L; Duff, J L; Butt, J N; Armstrong, F A; George, S J; Pétillot, Y; Forest, E; Schäfer, G; Thomson, A J

    1995-11-01

    A ferredoxin isolated from the archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius strain DSM 639 has been shown to contain one [3Fe-4S]1 + 10 cluster with a reduction potential of -275 mV and one [4Fe-4S]2+/1+ cluster with a reduction potential of -529 mV at pH 6.4, in the temperature range 0-50 degrees C. The monomer molecular mass was confirmed to be 10907.5 +/- 1.0 Da by electrospray mass spectrometry, as calculated from the published amino acid sequence [Minami, Y. Wakabayashi. S., Wada, K., Matsubara, H., Kerscher, L. & Oesterhelt, D. (1985) J. Biochem. (Tokyo) 97, 745-751], while the holoprotein molecular mass was found to be 11,550 +/- 1.0 Da. The reduced [3Fe-4S]0 cluster was also shown by direct electrochemistry and magnetic circular dichroic spectroscopy to undergo a one-proton uptake reaction as first observed for Azotobacter chroococcum ferredoxin I [George, S. J., Richards, A. J. M., Thomson, A. J. & Yates, M. G. (1984) Biochem. J. 224, 247-251]. The pKa of the protonation step has been determined by a novel thin film electrochemical method to be 5.8. This is significantly different from the pKa of 7.7 determined for A. vinelandii ferredoxin I [Shen, B., Martin, L. L., Butt, J. N., Armstrong, F. A., Stout, C. D., Jensen, J. M., Stephens, P. J., LaMar, G. N., Gorst, C. M. & Burgess, B. K. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 25928-25939] and indicates that the polypeptide chain around the [3Fe-4S] cluster controls this reaction. Although this appears to be only the second reported case of protonation at or near the reduced [3Fe-4S]0 cluster, its observation in S. acidocaldarius ferredoxin raises the question of the generality of this chemistry for 3Fe clusters. The similarity of the pKa to the estimated intracellular pH of S. acidocaldarius strongly suggests a physiological role for this process. PMID:8521862

  11. Prevalence of Theileria equi and Babesia caballi as well as the identification of associated ticks in sympatric Grevy's zebras (Equus grevyi) and donkeys (Equus africanus asinus) in northern Kenya.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Elaine; Kock, Richard; McKeever, Declan; Gakuya, Francis; Musyoki, Charles; Chege, Stephen M; Mutinda, Mathew; Kariuki, Edward; Davidson, Zeke; Low, Belinda; Skilton, Robert A; Njahira, Moses N; Wamalwa, Mark; Maina, Elsie

    2015-01-01

    The role of equine piroplasmosis as a factor in the population decline of the Grevy's zebra is not known. We determined the prevalence of Babesia caballi and Theileria equi in cograzing Grevy's zebras (Equus grevyi) and donkeys (Equus africanus asinus) in northern Kenya and identified the associated tick vectors. Blood samples were taken from 71 donkeys and 16 Grevy's zebras from March to May 2011. A nested PCR reaction using 18s ribosomal (r)RNA primers on 87 blood spots showed 72% (51/71; 95% confidence interval [CI] 60.4-81.0%) of donkeys and 100% (16/16; 95% CI, 77.3-100%) of Grevy's zebras were T. equi positive. No samples were positive for B. caballi. Sequence comparison using the National Center for Biotechnology Information's basic local alignment search tool identified homologous 18s rRNA sequences with a global geographic spread. The T. equi-derived sequences were evaluated using Bayesian approaches with independent Metropolis-coupled Markov chain Monte Carlo runs. The sequences clustered with those found in Sudan, Croatia, Mongolia, and the US, with statistical support greater than 80% for the two main clades. Hyalomma tick species were found on both donkeys and Grevy's zebras, whereas Rhipicephalus pulchellus was found exclusively on Grevy's zebras and Hyalomma marginatum rupfipes on donkeys. The prevalence of T. equi was 100% in Grevy's zebras and 72% in donkeys with common tick vectors identified. Our results suggest that donkeys and Grevy's zebras can be asymptomatic carriers and that piroplasmosis is endemic in the study area. PMID:25380362

  12. SUPERSTARS III: K-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Education, Raleigh.

    SUPERSTARS III is a K-8 program designed as an enrichment opportunity for self-directed learners in mathematics. The basic purpose of SUPERSTARS III is to provide the extra challenge that self-motivated students need in mathematics and to do so in a structured, long-term program that does not impinge on the normal classroom routine or the…

  13. CITY III Player's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Envirometrics, Inc., Washington, DC.

    CITY III is a computer-assisted simulation game in which participants make decisions affecting the economic, governmental, and social conditions of a simulated urban area. In CITY III, the computer stores all the relevant statistics for the area, updates data when changes are made, and prints out yearly reports. The computer also simulates…

  14. CITY III Operator's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Envirometrics, Inc., Washington, DC.

    CITY III is a computer-assisted simulation game of an urban system involving player operation of and interaction with economic, social, and government components. The role of operator in the game is to take the handwritten inputs (decisions) from the CITY III participants, process them, and return output which initiates the next round of…

  15. Multinuclear magnetic resonance studies of the 2Feter dot 2S sup * ferredoxin from Anabaena species strain PCC 7120. 1. Sequence-specific hydrogen-1 resonance assignments and secondary structure in solution of the oxidized form

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Byung-Ha; Markley, J.L. )

    1990-04-24

    Complete sequence-specific assignments were determined for the diamagnetic {sup 1}H resonances from Anabaena 7120 ferredoxin. A novel assignment procedure was followed whose first step was the identification of the {sup 13}C spin systems of the amino acids by a {sup 13}C({sup 13}C) double quantum correlation experiment. Then, the {sup 1}H spin systems of the amino acids were identified from the {sup 13}C spin systems by means of direct and relayed {sup 1}H({sup 13}C) single-bond correlations. The sequential resonance assignments were based mainly on conventional interresidue {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}}{sub i}-{sup 1}H{sup N}{sub i+1} NOE connectivities. Resonances from 18 residues were not resolved in two-dimensional {sup 1}H NMR spectra. When these residues were mapped onto the X-ray crystal structure of the homologous ferredoxin from Spirulina platensis, it was found that they correspond to amino acids close to the paramagnetic 2Fe{center dot}2S cluster. Cross peaks in two-dimensional homonuclear {sup 1}H NMR spectra were not observed for any protons closer than about 7.8 {angstrom} to both iron atoms. Secondary structural features identified in solution include two antiparallel {beta}-sheets, one parallel {beta}-sheet, and one {alpha}-helix.

  16. Expression of spinach ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase using tandem T7 promoters and application of the purified protein for in vitro light-dependent thioredoxin-reduction system.

    PubMed

    Okegawa, Yuki; Motohashi, Ken

    2016-05-01

    Thioredoxins (Trxs) regulate the activity of target proteins in the chloroplast redox regulatory system. In vivo, a disulfide bond within Trxs is reduced by photochemically generated electrons via ferredoxin (Fd) and ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR: EC 1.8.7.2). FTR is an αβ-heterodimer, and the β-subunit has a 4Fe-4S cluster that is indispensable for the electron transfer from Fd to Trxs. Reconstitution of the light-dependent Fd/Trx system, including FTR, is required for the biochemical characterization of the Trx-dependent reduction pathway in the chloroplasts. In this study, we generated functional FTR by simultaneously expressing FTR-α and -β subunits under the control of tandem T7 promoters in Escherichia coli, and purifying the resulting FTR complex protein. The purified FTR complex exhibited spectroscopic absorption at 410 nm, indicating that it contained the Fe-S cluster. Modification of the expression system and simplification of the purification steps resulted in improved FTR complex yields compared to those obtained in previous studies. Furthermore, the light-dependent Trx-reduction system was reconstituted by using Fd, the purified FTR, and intact thylakoids. PMID:26773743

  17. Expression and characterization of ferredoxin and flavin adenine dinucleotide binding domains of the reductase component of soluble methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Blazyk, Jessica L; Lippard, Stephen J

    2002-12-31

    Soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) catalyzes the selective oxidation of methane to methanol, the first step in the primary catabolic pathway of methanotrophic bacteria. A reductase (MMOR) mediates electron transfer from NADH through its FAD and [2Fe-2S] cofactors to the dinuclear non-heme iron sites housed in a hydroxylase (MMOH). The structurally distinct [2Fe-2S], FAD, and NADH binding domains of MMOR facilitated division of the protein into its functional ferredoxin (MMOR-Fd) and FAD/NADH (MMOR-FAD) component domains. The 10.9 kDa MMOR-Fd (MMOR residues 1-98) and 27.6 kDa MMOR-FAD (MMOR residues 99-348) were expressed and purified from recombinant Escherichia coli systems. The Fd and FAD domains have absorbance spectral features identical to those of the [2Fe-2S] and flavin components, respectively, of MMOR. Redox potentials, determined by reductive titrations that included indicator dyes, for the [2Fe-2S] and FAD cofactors in the domains are as follows: -205.2 +/- 1.3 mV for [2Fe-2S](ox/red), -172.4 +/- 2.0 mV for FAD(ox/sq), and -266.4 +/- 3.5 mV for FAD(sq/hq). Kinetic and spectral properties of intermediates observed in the reaction of oxidized MMOR-FAD (FAD(ox)) with NADH at 4 degrees C were established with stopped-flow UV-visible spectroscopy. Analysis of the influence of pH on MMOR-FAD optical spectra, redox potentials, and NADH reaction kinetics afforded pK(a) values for the semiquinone (FAD(sq)) and hydroquinone (FAD(hq)) MMOR-FAD species and two protonatable groups near the flavin cofactor. Electron transfer from MMOR-FAD(hq) to oxidized MMOR-Fd is extremely slow (k = 1500 M(-1) s(-1) at 25 degrees C, compared to 90 s(-1) at 4 degrees C for internal electron transfer between cofactors in MMOR), indicating that cofactor proximity is essential for efficient interdomain electron transfer. PMID:12501207

  18. Antithrombin III blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... AT III) is a protein that helps control blood clotting. A blood test can determine the amount of ... may mean you have an increased risk of blood clotting. This can occur when there is not enough ...

  19. Antithrombin III blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... be due to: Bone marrow transplant Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) AT III deficiency, an inherited condition Liver ... Schmaier AH, Miller JL. Coagulation and fibrinolysis. In: McPherson ... Management by Laboratory Methods . 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  20. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.D.

    1985-07-01

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report.

  1. Replacement of Tyr50 stacked on the si-face of the isoalloxazine ring of the flavin adenine dinucleotide prosthetic group modulates Bacillus subtilis ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase activity toward NADPH.

    PubMed

    Seo, Daisuke; Naito, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Erika; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2015-08-01

    Ferredoxin-NAD(P)(+) oxidoreductases ([EC 1.18.1.2], [EC 1.18.1.3], FNRs) from green sulfur bacteria, purple non-sulfur bacteria and most of Firmicutes, such as Bacillus subtilis (BsFNR) are homo-dimeric flavoproteins homologous to bacterial NADPH-thioredoxin reductase. These FNRs contain two unique aromatic residues stacked on the si- and re-face of the isoalloxazine ring moiety of the FAD prosthetic group whose configurations are often found among other types of flavoproteins including plant-type FNR and flavodoxin, but not in bacterial NADPH-thioredoxin reductase. To investigate the role of the si-face Tyr50 residue in BsFNR, we replaced Tyr50 with Gly, Ser, and Trp and examined its spectroscopic properties and enzymatic activities in the presence of NADPH and ferredoxin (Fd) from B. subtilis (BsFd). The replacement of Tyr50 to Gly (Y50G), Ser (Y50S), and Trp (Y50W) in BsFNR resulted in a blue shift of the FAD transition bands. The Y50G and Y50S mutations enhanced the FAD fluorescence emission, whereas those of the wild type and Y50W mutant were quenched. All three mutants decreased thermal stabilities compared to wild type. Using a diaphorase assay, the k cat values for the Y50G and Y50S mutants in the presence of NADPH and ferricyanide were decreased to less than 5 % of the wild type activity. The Y50W mutant retained approximately 20 % reactivity in the diaphorase assay and BsFd-dependent cytochrome c reduction assay relative to wild type. The present results suggest that Tyr50 modulates the electronic properties and positioning of the prosthetic group. PMID:25698107

  2. Multinuclear magnetic resonance studies of the 2Fe-2S sup * ferredoxin from Anabaena species strain PCC 7120. 3. Detection and characterization of hyperfine-shifted nitrogen-15 and hydrogen-1 resonances of the oxidized form

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Byung-Ha; Markley, J.L. )

    1990-04-24

    All the nitrogen signals from the amino acid side chains and 80 of the total of 98 backbone nitrogen signals of the oxidized form of the 2Fe{center dot}2S* ferredoxin from Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 were assigned by means of a series of heteronuclear two-dimensional experiments. Two additional nitrogen signals were observed in the one-dimensional {sup 15}N NMR spectrum and classified as backbone amide resonances from residues whose proton resonances experience paramagnetic broadening. The one-dimensional {sup 15}N NMR spectrum shows nine resonances that are hyperfine shifted and broadened. From this inventory of diamagnetic nitrogen signals and the available X-ray coordinates of the related ferredoxin, the resolved hyperfine-shifted {sup 15}N peaks were attributed to backbone amide nitrogens of two other amino acids that share electrons with the 2Fe{center dot}2S* center to backbone amide nitrogens of two other amino acids that are close to the 2Fe{center dot}2S* center. The seven {sup 15}N signals that are missing and unaccounted for probably are buried under the envelope of amide signals. {sup 1}H NMR signals from all the amide protons directly bonded to the seven missing and nine hyperfine-shifted nitrogens were too broad to be resolved in conventional 2D NMR spectra. From their dependence on the magnetogyric ratio, a {sup 1}H resonance should be up to 100 times broader than a {sup 15}N resonance that experiences a similar hyperfine interaction. This appears to be the reason why more well-resolved hyperfine-shifted {sup 15}N resonances were observed than corresponding {sup 1}H resonances. The result suggest that hyperfine-shifted {sup 15}N peaks can provide a unique window on the electronic structure and environment of this and other paramagnetic centers.

  3. Pioneer III Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Looking more like surgeons, these technicians wearing 'cleanroom' attire inspect the Pioneer III probe before shipping it to Cape Canaveral, Florida. Pioneer III was launched on December 6, 1958 aboard a Juno II rocket at the Atlantic Missile Range, Cape Canaveral, Florida. The mission objectives were to measure the radiation intensity of the Van Allen radiation belt, test long range communication systems, the launch vehicle and other subsystems. The Juno II failed to reach proper orbital escape velocity. The probe re-entered the Earth's atmosphere on December 7th ending its brief mission.

  4. Summary of Session III

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    2002-06-19

    This is a summary of the talks presented in Session III ''Simulations of Electron-Cloud Build Up'' of the Mini-Workshop on Electron-Cloud Simulations for Proton and Positron Beams ECLOUD-02, held at CERN, 15-18 April 2002.

  5. The Apple III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditlea, Steve

    1982-01-01

    Describes and evaluates the features, performance, peripheral devices, available software, and capabilities of the Apple III microcomputer. The computer's operating system, its hardware, and the commercially produced software it accepts are discussed. Specific applications programs for financial planning, accounting, and word processing are…

  6. CITY III Director's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Envirometrics, Inc., Washington, DC.

    CITY III is a computer-assisted simulation game which allows the participants to make decisions affecting various aspects of the economic, governmental, and social sectors of a simulated urban area. The game director selects one of five possible starting city configurations, may set a number of conditions in the city before the start of play, and…

  7. Hyper III on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Hyper III was a full-scale lifting-body remotely piloted research vehicle (RPRV) built at what was then the NASA Flight Research Center located at Edwards Air Force Base in Southern California. The Flight Research Center (FRC--as Dryden was named from 1959 until 1976) already had experience with testing small-scale aircraft using model-airplane techniques, but the first true remotely piloted research vehicle was the Hyper III, which flew only once in December 1969. At that time, the Center was engaged in flight research with a variety of reentry shapes called lifting bodies, and there was a desire both to expand the flight research experience with maneuverable reentry vehicles, including a high-performance, variable-geometry craft, and to investigate a remotely piloted flight research technique that made maximum use of a research pilot's skill and experience by placing him 'in the loop' as if he were in the cockpit. (There have been, as yet, no female research pilots assigned to Dryden.) The Hyper III as originally conceived was a stiletto-shaped lifting body that had resulted from a study at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. It was one of a number of hypersonic, cross-range reentry vehicles studied at Langley. (Hypersonic means Mach 5--five times the speed of sound--or faster; cross-range means able to fly a considerable distance to the left or right of the initial reentry path.) The FRC added a small, deployable, skewed wing to compensate for the shape's extremely low glide ratio. Shop personnel built the 32-foot-long Hyper III and covered its tubular frame with dacron, aluminum, and fiberglass, for about $6,500. Hyper III employed the same '8-ball' attitude indicator developed for control-room use when flying the X-15, two model-airplane receivers to command the vehicle's hydraulic controls, and a telemetry system (surplus from the X-15 program) to transmit 12 channels of data to the ground not only for display and control but for data

  8. Fueling type III secretion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Pei-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Type III secretion systems are complex nanomachines that export proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm across the cell envelope in a single step. They are at the core of the machinery used to assemble the bacterial flagellum, and the needle complex many Gram-negative pathogens use to inject effector proteins into host cells and cause disease. Several models have been put forward to explain how this export is energized, and the mechanism has been the subject of considerable debate. Here we present an overview of these models and discuss their relative merits. Recent evidence suggests that the proton motive force is the primary energy source for type III secretion, although contribution from refolding of secreted proteins has not been ruled out. The mechanism, by which the proton motive force is converted to protein export, remains enigmatic. PMID:25701111

  9. Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/000692.htm Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cranial mononeuropathy III -- diabetic type -- is usually a complication of diabetes that causes ...

  10. Migration Type III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artymowicz, Pawel

    2004-03-01

    Migration type IIIMigration of objects embedded in disks (and the accompanying eccentricity evolution) is becoming a major theme in planetary system formation.The underlying physics can be distilled into the notion of disk-planet coupling via Lindblad resonances, which launch waves, sometimes spectacular spiral shock waves in gas disks. The wave pattern exchanges angular momentum with the planet. That causes (i) migration, (ii) eccentricity evolution, and (iii) gap opening by sufficiently massive planets.A competing source of disk-planet interaction, the corotationaltorques, are much less conspicuous (corotation does not produce easilydetectable waves, as galaxy observers can attest) and have often been missed in the analysis of planet migration. If spiral waves are like waves at Goleta beach, then the corotation acts more like a stealthy riptide. Corotationalflows lie at the basis of a new, surprisingly rapid, mode of migration (type III),superseding the standard type II migration (with a gap), and revising the speed of type I migration (without a gap). The talk will contain results obtained at KITP, e.g., an analytical derivation of da/dt in type III motion. It will be illustrated by videos of high-resolution numerical simulations obtained with different implementations of the Piecewise Parabolic Method hydrodynamics.

  11. POPULATION III HYPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Smidt, Joseph; Whalen, Daniel J.; Wiggins, Brandon K.; Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L.; Johnson, Jarrett L.

    2014-12-20

    Population III supernovae have been of growing interest of late for their potential to directly probe the properties of the first stars, particularly the most energetic events that are visible near the edge of the observable universe. Until now, hypernovae, the unusually energetic Type Ib/c supernovae that are sometimes associated with gamma-ray bursts, have been overlooked as cosmic beacons at the highest redshifts. In this, the latest of a series of studies on Population III supernovae, we present numerical simulations of 25-50 M {sub ☉} hypernovae and their light curves done with the Los Alamos RAGE and SPECTRUM codes. We find that they will be visible at z = 10-15 to the James Webb Space Telescope and z = 4-5 to the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope, tracing star formation rates in the first galaxies and at the end of cosmological reionization. If, however, the hypernova crashes into a dense shell ejected by its progenitor, it is expected that a superluminous event will occur that may be seen at z ∼ 20 in the first generation of stars.

  12. Ammonium diphosphitoindate(III)

    PubMed Central

    Hamchaoui, Farida; Rebbah, Houria; Le Fur, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The crystal structure of the title compound, NH4[In(HPO3)2], is built up from InIII cations (site symmetry 3m.) adopting an octa­hedral environment and two different phosphite anions (each with site symmetry 3m.) exhibiting a triangular–pyramidal geometry. Each InO6 octa­hedron shares its six apices with hydrogen phosphite groups. Reciprocally, each HPO3 group shares all its O atoms with three different metal cations, leading to [In(HPO3)2]− layers which propagate in the ab plane. The ammonium cation likewise has site symmetry 3m.. In the structure, the cations are located between the [In(HPO3)2]− layers of the host framework. The sheets are held together by hydrogen bonds formed between the NH4 + cations and the O atoms of the framework. PMID:23633983

  13. Ammonium diphosphitoindate(III).

    PubMed

    Hamchaoui, Farida; Rebbah, Houria; Le Fur, Eric

    2013-04-01

    The crystal structure of the title compound, NH4[In(HPO3)2], is built up from In(III) cations (site symmetry 3m.) adopting an octa-hedral environment and two different phosphite anions (each with site symmetry 3m.) exhibiting a triangular-pyramidal geometry. Each InO6 octa-hedron shares its six apices with hydrogen phosphite groups. Reciprocally, each HPO3 group shares all its O atoms with three different metal cations, leading to [In(HPO3)2](-) layers which propagate in the ab plane. The ammonium cation likewise has site symmetry 3m.. In the structure, the cations are located between the [In(HPO3)2](-) layers of the host framework. The sheets are held together by hydrogen bonds formed between the NH4 (+) cations and the O atoms of the framework. PMID:23633983

  14. Pseudo Class III malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hummayani, Fadia M.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of deep anterior crossbite is technically challenging due to the difficulty of placing traditional brackets with fixed appliances. This case report represents a none traditional treatment modality to treat deep anterior crossbite in an adult pseudo class III malocclusion complicated by severely retruded, supraerupted upper and lower incisors. Treatment was carried out in 2 phases. Phase I treatment was performed by removable appliance “modified Hawley appliance with inverted labial bow,” some modifications were carried out to it to suit the presented case. Positive overbite and overjet was accomplished in one month, in this phase with minimal forces exerted on the lower incisors. Whereas, phase II treatment was performed with fixed appliances (braces) to align teeth and have proper over bite and overjet and to close posterior open bite, this phase was accomplished within 11 month. PMID:27052290

  15. Force constants of phosphorus (III) cyanide and arsenic (III) cyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, H. G. M.; Fawcett, V.

    The force constants of phosphorus (III) cyanide and arsenic (III) cyanide have been calculated using a simple valence force-field approximation with interaction constants. Several revisions are proposed to the existing vibrational assignments for the As(CN) 3 species and the vibrational assignments for P(CN) 3 are confirmed.

  16. Title III in Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The Title III Quarterly, 1972

    1972-01-01

    The journal on special education programs funded under Title III of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act contains articles on three projects, abstracts of other projects, a picture story on San Diego Schools' outdoor classroom for special education, and a state by state listing of all Title III special education projects. The programs…

  17. SUPERSTARS III: 3-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Education, Raleigh.

    SUPERSTARS III is a K-8 program designed as an enrichment opportunity for self-directed learners in mathematics. The basic purpose of SUPERSTARS III is to provide the extra challenge that self-motivated students need in mathematics and to do so in a structured, long-term program that does not impinge on the normal classroom routine or the…

  18. SUPERSTARS III: 6-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Education, Raleigh.

    SUPERSTARS III is a K-8 program designed as an enrichment opportunity for self-directed learners in mathematics. The basic purpose of SUPERSTARS III is to provide the extra challenge that self-motivated students need in mathematics and to do so in a structured, long-term program that does not impinge on the normal classroom routine or the…

  19. PREFACE: Quantum Optics III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orszag, M.; Retamal, J. C.; Saavedra, C.; Wallentowitz, S.

    2007-06-01

    All the 50 years of conscious pondering did not bring me nearer to an answer to the question `what is light quanta?'. Nowadays, every rascal believes, he knows it, however, he is mistaken. (A Einstein, 1951 in a letter to M Besso) Quantum optics has played a key role in physics in the last several decades. On the other hand, in these early decades of the information age, the flow of information is becoming more and more central to our daily life. Thus, the related fields of quantum information theory as well as Bose-Einstein condensation have acquired tremendous importance in the last couple of decades. In Quantum Optics III, a fusion of these fields appears in a natural way. Quantum Optics III was held in Pucón, Chile, in 27-30 of November, 2006. This beautiful location in the south of Chile is near the lake Villarrica and below the snow covered volcano of the same name. This fantastic environment contributed to a relaxed atmosphere, suitable for informal discussion and for the students to have a chance to meet the key figures in the field. The previous Quantum Optics conferences took place in Santiago, Chile (Quantum Optics I, 2000) and Cozumel, Mexico (Quantum Optics II, 2004). About 115 participants from 19 countries attended and participated in the meeting to discuss a wide variety of topics such as quantum-information processing, experiments related to non-linear optics and squeezing, various aspects of entanglement including its sudden death, correlated twin-photon experiments, light storage, decoherence-free subspaces, Bose-Einstein condensation, discrete Wigner functions and many more. There was a strong Latin-American participation from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela and Mexico, as well as from Europe, USA, China, and Australia. New experimental and theoretical results were presented at the conference. In Latin-America a quiet revolution has taken place in the last twenty years. Several groups working in quantum optics and

  20. Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetic third nerve palsy; Pupil-sparing third cranial nerve palsy ... Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type -- is a mononeuropathy . This means that only one nerve is damaged. The condition affects the third cranial (oculomotor) ...

  1. The MAX III storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöström, M.; Wallén, E.; Eriksson, M.; Lindgren, L.-J.

    2009-04-01

    One of the primary goals of the 700 MeV MAX III synchrotron radiation source is to test and gain experience with new magnet and accelerator technology. Each magnet cell is machined out of two solid iron blocks that are then sandwiched together after coil and quadrupole installation. The MAX III ring makes extensive use of combined function magnets to obtain a compact lattice. In order to obtain flexibility in machine tuning pole face current strips are used in the main dipoles, which also contain the horizontally defocusing gradients. Commissioning finished in 2007 and MAX III is now going into user operation. Over the last year, MAX III has been characterized in order to both obtain calibrated models for operation purposes as well as evaluating the magnet technology. The characterization results will be described in this paper.

  2. Exchange variation of zero-field splittings in [Fe 4S 4] + clusters of ferredoxins with high-spin S=3/2 ground state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belinsky, Moisey I.

    2000-04-01

    The spin-coupling model of zero-field splitting (ZFS) of tetrameric mixed-valent and monovalent clusters is developed. The <| ŝi0(2)|> matrix elements of the individual ZFS tensor operator of the second rank were calculated for tetramers of the general type in the representation of the total and intermediate spins. The spin-dependent correlations between ZFS parameters D S of the cluster states S and D i of individual ions s i were obtained for [4Fe-4S] + centers of native systems and synthetic model compounds with the high-spin Sgr=3/2 ground state. It was shown that the single-particle spin parameters f i=<| ŝiz2-s i(s i+1)/3|>/<| Ŝz2-S(S+1)/3|> of the [Fe 3(II)Fe(III)] center essentially depend on the total, intermediate and local spins and on the exchange parameters. In the spin schemes with fixed intermediate spins, the correlation between the cluster total spin ZFS parameters, D S, and the individual ZFS parameters, D i, are determined by the total, intermediate and individual spins. Anisotropic cluster ZFS parameters D S strongly depend on isotropic Heisenberg exchange and double exchange inter-ion interactions due to exchange mixing of the states with different intermediate spins. It was shown that the cluster ZFS parameters D S, for the states with S=3/2, change their values and sign under the variation of the Heisenberg exchange and double exchange parameters during the cluster deformation. The single-particle ZFS parameters D i and the exchange effects determine the observed strong positive ( DS=1.5-6 cm -1) and negative ( DS=-1.7 to -5 cm -1) cluster ZFS splittings of the ground Sgr=3/2 states of the [4Fe-4S] + clusters. Positive (negative) cluster ZFS parameters D S correspond to negative (positive) individual ZFS parameters D1-3 [Fe(II)]. The theory explains the observation of small negative effective hyperfine constants A i for the Sgr=3/2 clusters with positive and negative cluster ZFS parameters D S. The correlations between the individual and

  3. The START III bargaining space

    SciTech Connect

    Karas, T.H.

    1998-08-01

    The declining state of the Russian military and precarious Russian economic condition will give the US considerable advantages at the START III bargaining table. Taking the US-RF asymmetries into account, this paper discusses a menu of START III measures the US could ask for, and measures it could offer in return, in attempting to negotiate an equitable treaty. Measures the US might seek in a START III treaty include: further reductions in deployed strategic nuclear warheads, irreversibility of reductions through warhead dismantlement; beginning to bring theater nuclear weapons under mutual control, and increased transparency into the Russian nuclear weapons complex. The US may, however, wish to apply its bargaining advantages to attempting to achieve the first steps toward two long-range goals that would enhance US security: bringing theater nuclear weapons into the US-RF arms control arena, and increasing transparency into the Russian nuclear weapons complex. In exchange for measures relating to these objectives, the US might consider offering to Russia: Further strategic weapons reductions approaching levels at which the Russians believe they could maintain a degree of parity with the US; Measures to decrease the large disparities in potential deliver-system uploading capabilities that appear likely under current START II/START III scenarios; and Financial assistance in achieving START II/START III reductions as rapidly as is technically possible.

  4. Thermal and optical properties of Tb(III), Eu(III) and Tb(III)/Eu(III) co-complexed silicone fluorinated acrylate copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Yinfeng; Xie, Hongde; Cai, Haijun; Cai, Peiqing; Seo, Hyo Jin

    2015-07-01

    Tb(III), Eu(III) and Tb(III)/Eu(III) activated silicone fluorinated acrylate (SFA) have been successfully synthesized using the method of semi-continuous emulsion polymerization. The copolymers are characterized by flourier transform infrared (FT-IR), thermal gravity analysis (TGA), photoluminescence excitation (PLE) and emission (PL) spectroscopy. The copolymer containing Tb(III) and Eu(III) ions display green and red luminescent colors under UV light excitation, respectively. The TGA curves show the thermal decomposition temperatures of the copolymers are up to about 300 °C. The PL spectra show a strong green emission at 546 nm (5D4 → 7F5) of Tb(III) complexed copolymers, and show a prominent red emission at 615 nm (5D0 → 7F2) of Eu(III) complexed copolymers. Different concentrations of Eu(III) and Tb(III) ions are introduced into the copolymer and the energy transfer from Tb(III) to Eu(III) ions in the copolymer was found. Thus, based on the results it can be suggested that SFA:Eu(III), SFA:Tb(III) and SFA:Tb(III)/Eu(III) can be used potentially as luminescent materials.

  5. III-Nitride nanowire optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Songrui; Nguyen, Hieu P. T.; Kibria, Md. G.; Mi, Zetian

    2015-11-01

    Group-III nitride nanowire structures, including GaN, InN, AlN and their alloys, have been intensively studied in the past decade. Unique to this material system is that its energy bandgap can be tuned from the deep ultraviolet (~6.2 eV for AlN) to the near infrared (~0.65 eV for InN). In this article, we provide an overview on the recent progress made in III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices, including light emitting diodes, lasers, photodetectors, single photon sources, intraband devices, solar cells, and artificial photosynthesis. The present challenges and future prospects of III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices are also discussed.

  6. Like Father, Like Son: Assessment of the Morphological Affinities of A.L. 288–1 (A. afarensis), Sts 7 (A. africanus) and Omo 119–73–2718 (Australopithecus sp.) through a Three-Dimensional Shape Analysis of the Shoulder Joint

    PubMed Central

    Arias-Martorell, Julia; Potau, Josep Maria; Bello-Hellegouarch, Gaëlle; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    The postcranial evidence for the Australopithecus genus indicates that australopiths were able bipeds; however, the morphology of the forelimbs and particularly that of the shoulder girdle suggests that they were partially adapted to an arboreal lifestyle. The nature of such arboreal adaptations is still unclear, as are the kind of arboreal behaviors in which australopiths might have engaged. In this study we analyzed the shape of the shoulder joint (proximal humerus and glenoid cavity of the scapula) of three australopith specimens: A.L. 288–1 (A. afarensis), Sts 7 (A. africanus) and Omo 119–73–2718 (Australopithecus sp.) with three-dimensional geometric morphometrics. The morphology of the specimens was compared with that of a wide array of living anthropoid taxa and some additional fossil hominins (the Homo erectus specimen KNM-WT 15000 and the H. neanderthalensis specimen Tabun 1). Our results indicate that A.L. 288–1 shows mosaic traits resembling H. sapiens and Pongo, whereas the Sts 7 shoulder is most similar to the arboreal apes and does not present affinities with H. sapiens. Omo 119–73–2718 exhibits morphological affinities with the more arboreal and partially suspensory New World monkey Lagothrix. The shoulder of the australopith specimens thus shows a combination of primitive and derived traits (humeral globularity, enhancement of internal and external rotation of the joint), related to use of the arm in overhead positions. The genus Homo specimens show overall affinities with H. sapiens at the shoulder, indicating full correspondence of these hominin shoulders with the modern human morphotype. PMID:25651542

  7. Like father, like son: assessment of the morphological affinities of A.L. 288-1 (A. afarensis), Sts 7 (A. africanus) and Omo 119-73-2718 (Australopithecus sp.) through a three-dimensional shape analysis of the shoulder joint.

    PubMed

    Arias-Martorell, Julia; Potau, Josep Maria; Bello-Hellegouarch, Gaëlle; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    The postcranial evidence for the Australopithecus genus indicates that australopiths were able bipeds; however, the morphology of the forelimbs and particularly that of the shoulder girdle suggests that they were partially adapted to an arboreal lifestyle. The nature of such arboreal adaptations is still unclear, as are the kind of arboreal behaviors in which australopiths might have engaged. In this study we analyzed the shape of the shoulder joint (proximal humerus and glenoid cavity of the scapula) of three australopith specimens: A.L. 288-1 (A. afarensis), Sts 7 (A. africanus) and Omo 119-73-2718 (Australopithecus sp.) with three-dimensional geometric morphometrics. The morphology of the specimens was compared with that of a wide array of living anthropoid taxa and some additional fossil hominins (the Homo erectus specimen KNM-WT 15000 and the H. neanderthalensis specimen Tabun 1). Our results indicate that A.L. 288-1 shows mosaic traits resembling H. sapiens and Pongo, whereas the Sts 7 shoulder is most similar to the arboreal apes and does not present affinities with H. sapiens. Omo 119-73-2718 exhibits morphological affinities with the more arboreal and partially suspensory New World monkey Lagothrix. The shoulder of the australopith specimens thus shows a combination of primitive and derived traits (humeral globularity, enhancement of internal and external rotation of the joint), related to use of the arm in overhead positions. The genus Homo specimens show overall affinities with H. sapiens at the shoulder, indicating full correspondence of these hominin shoulders with the modern human morphotype. PMID:25651542

  8. Response of Chloroplast NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase-Mediated Cyclic Electron Flow to a Shortage or Lack in Ferredoxin-Quinone Oxidoreductase-Dependent Pathway in Rice Following Short-Term Heat Stress.

    PubMed

    Essemine, Jemaa; Qu, Mingnan; Mi, Hualing; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic electron flow (CEF) around photosystem I (PSI) can protect photosynthetic electron carriers under conditions of stromal over-reduction. The goal of the research reported in this paper was to investigate the responses of both PSI and photosystem II (PSII) to a short-term heat stress in two rice lines with different capacities of cyclic electron transfer, i.e., Q4149 with a high capacity (hcef) and C4023 with a low capacity (lcef). The absorbance change at 820 nm (ΔA820) was used here to assess the charge separation in the PSI reaction center (P700). The results obtained show that short-term heat stress abolishes the ferredoxin-quinone oxidoreductase (FQR)-dependent CEF in rice and accelerates the initial rate of P700 (+) re-reduction. The P700 (+) amplitude was slightly increased at a moderate heat-stress (35°C) because of a partial restriction of FQR but it was decreased following high heat-stress (42°C). Assessment of PSI and PSII activities shows that PSI is more susceptible to heat stress than PSII. Under high temperature, FQR-dependent CEF was completely removed and NDH-dependent CEF was up-regulated and strengthened to a higher extent in C4023 than in Q4149. Specifically, under normal growth temperature, hcef (Q4149) was characterized by higher FQR- and chloroplast NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDH)-dependent CEF rates than lcef (C4023). Following thermal stress, the activation of NDH-pathway was 130 and 10% for C4023 and Q4149, respectively. Thus, the NDH-dependent CEF may constitute the second layer of plant protection and defense against heat stress after the main route, i.e., FQR-dependent CEF, reaches its capacity. We discuss the possibility that under high heat stress, the NDH pathway serves as a safety valve to dissipate excess energy by cyclic photophosphorylation and overcome the stroma over-reduction following inhibition of CO2 assimilation and any shortage or lack in the FQR pathway. The potential role of the NDH-dependent pathway during the

  9. Response of Chloroplast NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase-Mediated Cyclic Electron Flow to a Shortage or Lack in Ferredoxin-Quinone Oxidoreductase-Dependent Pathway in Rice Following Short-Term Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Essemine, Jemaa; Qu, Mingnan; Mi, Hualing; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic electron flow (CEF) around photosystem I (PSI) can protect photosynthetic electron carriers under conditions of stromal over-reduction. The goal of the research reported in this paper was to investigate the responses of both PSI and photosystem II (PSII) to a short-term heat stress in two rice lines with different capacities of cyclic electron transfer, i.e., Q4149 with a high capacity (hcef) and C4023 with a low capacity (lcef). The absorbance change at 820 nm (ΔA820) was used here to assess the charge separation in the PSI reaction center (P700). The results obtained show that short-term heat stress abolishes the ferredoxin-quinone oxidoreductase (FQR)-dependent CEF in rice and accelerates the initial rate of P700+ re-reduction. The P700+ amplitude was slightly increased at a moderate heat-stress (35°C) because of a partial restriction of FQR but it was decreased following high heat-stress (42°C). Assessment of PSI and PSII activities shows that PSI is more susceptible to heat stress than PSII. Under high temperature, FQR-dependent CEF was completely removed and NDH-dependent CEF was up-regulated and strengthened to a higher extent in C4023 than in Q4149. Specifically, under normal growth temperature, hcef (Q4149) was characterized by higher FQR- and chloroplast NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDH)-dependent CEF rates than lcef (C4023). Following thermal stress, the activation of NDH-pathway was 130 and 10% for C4023 and Q4149, respectively. Thus, the NDH-dependent CEF may constitute the second layer of plant protection and defense against heat stress after the main route, i.e., FQR-dependent CEF, reaches its capacity. We discuss the possibility that under high heat stress, the NDH pathway serves as a safety valve to dissipate excess energy by cyclic photophosphorylation and overcome the stroma over-reduction following inhibition of CO2 assimilation and any shortage or lack in the FQR pathway. The potential role of the NDH-dependent pathway during the evolution

  10. Analysis of rdxA and Involvement of Additional Genes Encoding NAD(P)H Flavin Oxidoreductase (FrxA) and Ferredoxin-Like Protein (FdxB) in Metronidazole Resistance of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Dong-Hyeon; El-Zaatari, Fouad A. K.; Kato, Mototsugu; Osato, Michael S.; Reddy, Rita; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Graham, David Y.

    2000-01-01

    Metronidazole (Mtz) is a critical ingredient of modern multidrug therapies for Helicobacter pylori infection. Mtz resistance reduces the effectiveness of these combinations. Although null mutations in a rdxA gene that encodes oxygen-insensitive NAD(P)H nitroreductase was reported in Mtz-resistant H. pylori, an intact rdxA gene has also been reported in Mtz-resistant H. pylori, suggesting that additional Mtz resistance mechanisms exist in H. pylori. We explored the nature of Mtz resistance among 544 clinical H. pylori isolates to clarify the role of rdxA inactivation in Mtz resistance and to identify another gene(s) responsible for Mtz resistance in H. pylori. Mtz resistance was present in 33% (181 of 544) of the clinical isolates. There was marked heterogeneity of resistance, with Mtz MICs ranging from 8 to ≥256 μg/ml. rdxA inactivation resulted in Mtz MICs of up to 32 μg/ml for 6 Mtz-sensitive H. pylori strains and 128 μg/ml for one Mtz-sensitive strain. Single or dual (with rdxA) inactivation of genes that encode ferredoxin-like protein (designated fdxB) and NAD(P)H flavin oxidoreductase (frxA) also increased the MICs of Mtz for sensitive and resistant strains with low to moderate levels of Mtz resistance. fdxB inactivation resulted in a lower level of resistance than that from rdxA inactivation, whereas frxA inactivation resulted in MICs similar to those seen with rdxA inactivation. Further evidence for involvement of the frxA gene in Mtz resistance included the finding of a naturally inactivated frxA but an intact rdxA in an Mtz-resistant strain, complementation of Mtz sensitivity from an Mtz-sensitive strain to an Mtz-resistant strain or vice versa by use of naturally inactivated or functional frxA genes, respectively, and transformation of an Mtz-resistant Escherichia coli strain to an Mtz sensitive strain by a naturally functional frxA gene but not an inactivated frxA gene. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that null mutations in fdx

  11. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S; Farnaby, Joy H; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G; Love, Jason B; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal-ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on U(III) and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to Np(IV). Here we report the synthesis of three new Np(III) organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that Np(III) complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of Np(II) is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key Np(III) orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements. PMID:27442286

  12. Terrain Perception for DEMO III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manduchi, R.; Bellutta, P.; Matthies, L.; Owens, K.; Rankin, A.

    2000-01-01

    The Demo III program has as its primary focus the development of autonomous mobility for a small rugged cross country vehicle. In this paper we report recent progress on both stereo-based obstacle detection and terrain cover color-based classification.

  13. Title III hazardous air pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, R.

    1995-12-31

    The author presents an overview of the key provisions of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The key provisions include the following: 112(b) -- 189 Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP); 112(a) -- Major Source: 10 TPY/25 TPY; 112(d) -- Application of MACT; 112(g) -- Modifications; 112(I) -- State Program; 112(j) -- The Hammer; and 112(r) -- Accidental Release Provisions.

  14. Chromium(III), insoluble salts

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chromium ( III ) , insoluble salts ; CASRN 16065 - 83 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments

  15. Precipitates of Al(III), Sc(III), and La(III) at the muscovite-water interface.

    PubMed

    Saslow Gomez, Sarah A; Geiger, Franz M

    2014-11-20

    The interaction of Al(III), Sc(III), and La(III) with muscovite-water interfaces was studied at pH 4 and 10 mM NaCl using second harmonic generation (SHG) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). SHG data for Sc(III) and La(III) suggest complete and/or partial irreversible adsorption that is attributed by XPS to the growth of Sc(III) and La(III) hydroxides/oxides on the muscovite surface. Al(III) adsorption appears to coincide with the growth of gibbsite (Al(OH)3) deposits on the muscovite surface, as indicated by the magnitude of the interfacial potential computed from the SHG data. This interpretation of the data is consistent with previous studies reporting the epitaxial growth of gibbsite on the muscovite surface under similar conditions. The implication of our findings is that the surface charge density of mica may change (and in the case of Al(III), even flip sign from negative (mica) to positive (gibbsite)) when Al(III), Sc(III), or La(III) is present in aqueous phases in contact with heterogeneous geochemical media rich in mica-class minerals, even at subsaturation conditions. PMID:25380548

  16. NIF Title III engineering plan

    SciTech Connect

    Deis, G

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to define the work that must be accomplished by the NIF Project during Title III Engineering. This definition is intended to be sufficiently detailed to provide a framework for yearly planning, to clearly identify the specific deliverables so that the Project teams can focus on them, and to provide a common set of objectives and processes across the Project. This plan has been preceded by similar documents for Title I and Title II design and complements the Site Management Plan, the Project Control Manual, the Quality Assurance Program Plan, the RM Parsons NIF Title III Configuration Control Plan, the Integrated Project Schedule, the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report, the Configuration Management Plan, and the Transition Plan.

  17. DSN tracking system: Mark III-77

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaney, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    The Deep Space Network tracking system is described. Revisions of subsystem Mark III-75 are briefly outlined, and the currently used multimission support subsystem Mark III-77 is described. Tracking functions performed are given as well.

  18. Silver europium(III) polyphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Ayadi, Mounir; Férid, Mokhtar; Moine, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Europium(III) silver polyphosphate, AgEu(PO3)4, was prepared by the flux method. The atomic arrangement is built up by infinite (PO3)n chains (periodicity of 4) extending along the c axis. These chains are joined to each other by EuO8 dodeca­hedra. The Ag+ cations are located in the voids of this arrangement and are surrounded by five oxygen atoms in a distorted [4+1] coordination. PMID:21582031

  19. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S.; Farnaby, Joy H.; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G.; Love, Jason B.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L.

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal–ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on UIII and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to NpIV. Here we report the synthesis of three new NpIII organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that NpIII complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of NpII is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key NpIII orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements.

  20. Glycosaminoglycans and mucopolysaccharidosis type III.

    PubMed

    Jakobkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Gabig-Ciminska, Magdalena; Kloska, Anna; Malinowska, Marcelina; Piotrowska, Ewa; Banecka-Majkutewicz, Zyta; Banecki, Bogdan; Wegrzyn, Alicja; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (MPS III), or Sanfilippo syndrome, is a lysosomal storage disease in which heparan sulfate is accumulated in lysosomes, as well as outside of cells, as the primary storage material. This disease is a complex of four conditions caused by dysfunctions of one of genes coding for lysosomal enzymes involved in degradation of heparan sulfate: SGSH (coding for heparan N-sulfatase) - causing MPS IIIA, NAGLU (coding for alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase) - causing MPS IIIB, HGSNAT (coding for acetyl CoA alpha-glucosaminide acetyltransferase) - causing MPS IIIC), and GNS (coding for N-acetylglucosamine-6-sulfatase) - causing MPS IIID. The primary storage is responsible for some disease symptoms, but other arise as a result of secondary storage, including glycosphingolipids, and subsequent processes, like oxidative stress and neuroinflammation. Central nervous system is predominantly affected in all subtypes of MPS III. Heparan sulfate and its derivatives are the most commonly used biomarkers for diagnosis and prediction procedures. Currently, there is no therapy for Sanfilippo syndrome, however, clinical trials are ongoing for enzyme replacement therapy, gene therapy and substrate reduction therapy (particularly gene expression-targeted isoflavone therapy). PMID:27100513

  1. The gelation mechanism of chromium(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, P.

    1988-05-01

    Chromium(III) is commonly used crosslinker for preparing profile control gels with polymers having carboxylate and amide functionalities. Cr(III) is applied in many forms. For example, it can be used in the form of simple chromic salts of chloride and sulfate, or as complexed Cr(III) used in leather tanning, or as in-situ generated Cr(III) from the redox reaction of dichromate and bisulfite or thiourea. The gelation rate, and gel quality, doped on which form of Cr(III) is used. The author has found that the Cr olates, produced by hydrolysis of Cr(III) ions, are the reactive crosslinking species. The different gelation rates are due to the different degrees of olation. Furthermore, by controlling the degree of hydrolysis Cr(III) derived from various sources mentioned above can exhibit the same gelation rate.

  2. Titan III-C Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    This photograph shows a Titan III-C launch vehicle. Titan vehicles are designed to carry payloads equal to the size and weight of those on the space shuttle. The Titan IV Centaur can put 10,000 pound payloads into geosynchronous orbit, 22,300 miles above Earth. For more information about Titan and Centaur, please see chapters 4 and 8, respectively, in Roger Launius and Dennis Jenkins' book To Reach the High Frontier published by The University Press of Kentucky in 2002.

  3. The Mark III vertex chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, J.; Bolton, T.; Bunnell, K.; Cassell, R.; Cheu, E.; Freese, T.; Grab, C.; Mazaheri, G.; Mir, R.; Odian, A.

    1987-07-01

    The design and construction of the new Mark III vertex chamber is described. Initial tests with cosmic rays prove the ability of track reconstruction and yield triplet resolutions below 50 ..mu..m at 3 atm using argon/ethane (50:50). Also performed are studies using a prototype of a pressurized wire vertex chamber with 8 mm diameter straw geometry. Spatial resolution of 35mm was obtained using dimethyl ether (DME) at 1 atm and 30 ..mu..m using argon/ethane (50/50 mixture) at 4 atm. Preliminary studies indicate the DME to adversely affect such materials as aluminized Mylar and Delrin.

  4. Implementing Title III -- Air toxics

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, B.W.

    1995-12-31

    The South Coast Air Quality Management District (AQMD) is taking three basic approaches to implementing the new National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) from the Title III program: accept and implement, as written, the NESHAPs where few sources are located in the South Coast Air Basin; incorporate with simplification of the NESHAP requirements into AQMD rules when many sources are involved; then seek equivalency by the US EPA; and incorporate with a market-based rule (VOC RECLAIM), part of many NESHAPs which control volatile organic compound as HAPs. Whatever the approach, emphasis will be placed on: streamlining and simplification; helping sources understand requirements and comply; and common sense.

  5. Zinc in +III oxidation state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Devleena; Jena, Puru

    2012-02-01

    The possibility of Group 12 elements, such as Zn, Cd, and Hg existing in an oxidation state of +III or higher has fascinated chemists for decades. Significant efforts have been made in the past to achieve higher oxidation states for the heavier congener mercury (since the 3^rd ionization potential of the elements decrease as we go down the periodic table). It took nearly 20 years before experiment could confirm the theoretical prediction that Hg indeed can exist in an oxidation state of +IV. While this unusual property of Hg is attributed to the relativistic effects, Zn being much lighter than Hg has not been expected to have an oxidation state higher than +II. Using density functional theory we show that an oxidation state of +III for Zn can be realized by choosing specific ligands with large electron affinities i.e. superhalogens. We demonstrate this by a systematic study of the interaction of Zn with F, BO2, and AuF6 ligands whose electron affinities are progressively higher, namely, 3.4 eV, 4.4 eV, and 8.4 eV, respectively. Discovery of higher oxidation states of elements can help in the formulation of new reactions and hence in the development of new chemistry.

  6. DOE/NNSA perspective safeguard by design: GEN III/III+ light water reactors and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Paul Y

    2010-12-10

    An overview of key issues relevant to safeguards by design (SBD) for GEN III/IV nuclear reactors is provided. Lessons learned from construction of typical GEN III+ water reactors with respect to SBD are highlighted. Details of SBD for safeguards guidance development for GEN III/III+ light water reactors are developed and reported. This paper also identifies technical challenges to extend SBD including proliferation resistance methodologies to other GEN III/III+ reactors (except HWRs) and GEN IV reactors because of their immaturity in designs.

  7. Dens invaginatus (Type III B)

    PubMed Central

    Kallianpur, Shreenivas; Sudheendra, US; Kasetty, Sowmya; Joshi, Prathamesh

    2012-01-01

    Dens invaginatus or ‘dens in dente’ is a developmental malformation of the tooth resulting from infolding of the dental papilla before calcification. This article presents a case of dens invaginatus occurring in maxillary right lateral incisor of a 45-year-old male patient. The patient presented with pain and clinically missing maxillary right canine. The tooth was found to be non-vital. Radiographic examination revealed the tooth-in-tooth appearance of lateral incisor with a dilated pulp chamber. The crown of impacted canine was found within the pulp chamber of lateral incisor. Owing to this unique clinical presentation, both the lateral incisor and the impacted canine were extracted. Histopathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of Dens invaginatus Type III B. A brief review on etiopathogenesis, radiographic features and treatment of dens invaginatus has also been included. PMID:22923901

  8. Genotypic variation in sulfur assimilation and metabolism of onion (Allium cepa L.) III. Characterization of sulfite reductase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic and cDNA sequences corresponding to a ferredoxin-sulfite reductase (SiR) have been cloned from bulb onion (Allium cepa L.) and the expression of the gene and activity of the enzyme characterised with respect to sulfur (S) supply. Cloning, mapping and expression studies revealed that onion ha...

  9. Comparative adsorption of Eu(III) and Am(III) on TPD.

    PubMed

    Fan, Q H; Zhao, X L; Ma, X X; Yang, Y B; Wu, W S; Zheng, G D; Wang, D L

    2015-09-01

    Comparative adsorption behaviors of Eu(III) and Am(III) on thorium phosphate diphosphate (TPD), i.e., Th4(PO4)4P2O7, have been studied using a batch approach and surface complexation model (SCM) in this study. The results showed that Eu(III) and Am(III) adsorption increased to a large extent with the increase in TPD dose. Strong pH-dependence was observed in both Eu(III) and Am(III) adsorption processes, suggesting that inner-sphere complexes (ISCs) were possibly responsible for the adsorption of Eu(III) and Am(III). Meanwhile, the adsorption of Eu(III) and Am(III) decreased to a different extent with the increase in ion strength, which was possibly related to outer-sphere complexes and/or ion exchange. In the presence of fulvic acid (FA), the adsorption of Eu(III) and Am(III) showed high enhancement mainly due to the ternary surface complexes of TPD-FA-Eu(3+) and TPD-FA-Am(3+). The SCM showed that one ion exchange (≡S3Am/Eu) and two ISCs (≡(XO)2Am/EuNO3 and ≡(YO)2Am/EuNO3) seemed more reasonable to quantitatively describe the adsorption edges of both Eu(III) and Am(III). Our findings obviously showed that Eu(III) could be a good analogue to study actinide behaviors in practical terms. However, it should be kept in mind that there are still obvious differences between the characteristics of Eu(III) and Am(III) in some special cases, for instance, the complex ability with organic matter and adsorption affinity to a solid surface. PMID:26198355

  10. Characterization of ribonuclease III from Brucella.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chang-Xian; Xu, Xian-Jin; Zheng, Ke; Liu, Fang; Yang, Xu-Dong; Chen, Chuang-Fu; Chen, Huan-Chun; Liu, Zheng-Fei

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial ribonuclease III (RNase III) is a highly conserved endonuclease, which plays pivotal roles in RNA maturation and decay pathways by cleaving double-stranded structure of RNAs. Here we cloned rncS gene from the genomic DNA of Brucella melitensis, and analyzed the cleavage properties of RNase III from Brucella. We identified Brucella-encoding small RNA (sRNA) by high-throughput sequencing and northern blot, and found that sRNA of Brucella and Homo miRNA precursor (pre-miRNA) can be bound and cleaved by B.melitensis ribonuclease III (Bm-RNase III). Cleavage activity of Bm-RNase III is bivalent metal cations- and alkaline buffer-dependent. We constructed several point mutations in Bm-RNase III, whose cleavage activity indicated that the 133th Glutamic acid residue was required for catalytic activity. Western blot revealed that Bm-RNase III was differently expressed in Brucella virulence strain 027 and vaccine strain M5-90. Collectively, our data suggest that Brucella RNase III can efficiently bind and cleave stem-loop structure of small RNA, and might participate in regulation of virulence in Brucella. PMID:26778206

  11. Mechanisms of Sb(III) Photooxidation by the Excitation of Organic Fe(III) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Kong, Linghao; He, Mengchang

    2016-07-01

    Organic Fe(III) complexes are widely distributed in the aqueous environment, which can efficiently generate free radicals under light illumination, playing a significant role in heavy metal speciation. However, the potential importance of the photooxidation of Sb(III) by organic Fe(III) complexes remains unclear. Therefore, the photooxidation mechanisms of Sb(III) were comprehensively investigated in Fe(III)-oxalate, Fe(III)-citrate and Fe(III)-fulvic acid (FA) solutions by kinetic measurements and modeling. Rapid photooxidation of Sb(III) was observed in an Fe(III)-oxalate solution over the pH range of 3 to 7. The addition of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) as an ·OH scavenger quenched the Sb(III) oxidation, suggesting that ·OH is an important oxidant for Sb(III). However, the incomplete quenching of Sb(III) oxidation indicated the existence of other oxidants, presumably an Fe(IV) species in irradiated Fe(III)-oxalate solution. In acidic solutions, ·OH may be formed by the reaction of Fe(II)(C2O4) with H2O2, but a hypothetical Fe(IV) species may be generated by the reaction of Fe(II)(C2O4)2(2-) with H2O2 at higher pH. Kinetic modeling provides a quantitative explanation of the results. Evidence for the existence of ·OH and hypothetical Fe(IV) was also observed in an irradiated Fe(III)-citrate and Fe(III)-FA system. This study demonstrated an important pathway of Sb(III) oxidation in surface waters. PMID:27267512

  12. Organoantimony(III)-Containing Tungstoarsenates(III): From Controlled Assembly to Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Bassil, Bassem S; Lin, Zhengguo; Haider, Ali; Alfaro-Espinoza, Gabriela; Ullrich, Matthias S; Silvestru, Cristian; Kortz, Ulrich

    2015-10-26

    A family of three sandwich-type, phenylantimony(III)-containing tungstoarsenates(III), [(PhSb(III) ){Na(H2 O)}As(III) 2 W19 O67 (H2 O)](11-) (1), [(PhSb(III) )2 As(III) 2 W19 O67 (H2 O)](10-) (2), and [(PhSb(III) )3 (B-α-As(III) W9 O33 )2 ](12-) (3), have been synthesized by one-pot procedures and isolated as hydrated alkali metal salts, Cs3 K3.5 Na4.5 [(PhSb(III) ){Na(H2 O)}As(III) 2 W19 O67 (H2 O)]⋅41H2 O (CsKNa-1), Cs4.5 K5.5 [(PhSb(III) )2 As(III) 2 W19 O67 (H2 O)]⋅35H2 O (CsK-2), and Cs4.5 Na7.5 [(PhSb(III) )3 (B-α-As(III) W9 O33 )2 ]⋅42H2 O (CsNa-3). The number of incorporated {PhSb(III) } units could be selectively tuned from one to three by careful control of the reaction parameters. The three compounds were characterized in the solid state by single-crystal XRD, IR spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The aqueous solution stability of sandwich polyanions 1-3 was also studied by multinuclear ((1) H, (13) C, (183) W) NMR spectroscopy. Effective inhibitory activity against six different kinds of bacteria was identified for all three polyanions, for which the activity increased with the number of incorporated {PhSb(III) } groups. PMID:26368119

  13. Grant Administration Manual for Title III Coordinators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathis, Emily Duncan; Ashmore, Frances W.

    Guidelines for coordinators of programs under Title III of the Higher Education Act of 1965 are presented, based on a national survey of Title III program coordinators. The responsibilities of the coordinator and information on administering the Strengthening Developing Institutions Program (SDIP) grant are covered. The program can either be a…

  14. Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A.P.; Olshavsky, M.A.

    1996-04-09

    Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed. They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline. 4 figs.

  15. Synthesis, spectroscopic and antimicrobial studies of La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) Metformin HCl chelates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Al-Azab, Fathi M.; Al-Maydama, Hussein M. A.; Amin, Ragab R.; Jamil, Yasmin M. S.; Kobeasy, Mohamed I.

    2015-05-01

    Metal complexes of Metformin hydrochloride were prepared using La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III). The resulting complexes were discussed and synthesized to serve as potential insulin-mimetic. Some physical properties and analytical data of the four complexes were checked. The elemental analysis shows that La(III), Ce(III) Sm(III) and Y(III) formed complexes with Metformin in 1:3 (metal:MF) molar ratio. All the synthesized complexes are white and possess high melting points. These complexes are soluble in dimethylsulfoxide and dimethylformamide, partially soluble in hot methanol and insoluble in water and some other organic solvents. From the spectroscopic (infrared, UV-vis and florescence), effective magnetic moment and elemental analyses data, the formula structures are suggested. The results obtained suggested that Metformin reacted with metal ions as a bidentate ligand through its two imino groups. The molar conductance measurements proved that the Metformin complexes are slightly electrolytic in nature. The kinetic thermodynamic parameters such as: E∗, ΔH∗, ΔS∗ and ΔG∗ were estimated from the DTG curves. The antibacterial evaluations of the Metformin and their complexes were also performed against some gram positive, negative bacteria as well as fungi.

  16. The case of King Richard III.

    PubMed

    Skrziepietz, A

    2011-11-01

    In this short essay we will discuss the possible diseases of King Richard III according to the descriptions in Shakespeare's plays King Richard III and Henry VI. Furthermore, it is shown that the description of the defeated enemy as physically and mentally deformed is part of a long tradition which has its roots in Ancient Greece. PMID:22089046

  17. Genes, genetics, and Class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Xue, F; Wong, R W K; Rabie, A B M

    2010-05-01

    To present current views that are pertinent to the investigation of the genetic etiology of Class III malocclusion. Class III malocclusion is thought to be a polygenic disorder that results from an interaction between susceptibility genes and environmental factors. However, research on family pedigrees has indicated that Class III malocclusion might also be a monogenic dominant phenotype. Recent studies have reported that genes that encode specific growth factors or other signaling molecules are involved in condylar growth under mechanical strain. These genes, which include Indian hedgehog homolog (IHH), parathyroid-hormone like hormone (PTHLH), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and variations in their levels of expression play an important role in the etiology of Class III malocclusion. In addition, genome-wide scans have revealed chromosomal loci that are associated with Class III malocclusion. It is likely that chromosomal loci 1p36, 12q23, and 12q13 harbor genes that confer susceptibility to Class III malocclusion. In a case-control association study, we identified erythrocyte membrane protein band 4.1 (EPB41) to be a new positional candidate gene that might be involved in susceptibility to mandibular prognathism. Most of the earlier studies on the genetic etiology of Class III malocclusion have focused on the patterns of inheritance of this phenotype. Recent investigations have focused on understanding the genetic variables that affect Class III malocclusion and might provide new approaches to uncovering the genetic etiology of this phenotype. PMID:20477965

  18. Synthesis and in vitro microbial evaluation of La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) metal complexes of vitamin B6 drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Al-Azab, Fathi M.; Al-Maydama, Hussein M. A.; Amin, Ragab R.; Jamil, Yasmin M. S.

    2014-06-01

    Metal complexes of pyridoxine mono hydrochloride (vitamin B6) are prepared using La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III). The resulting complexes are investigated. Some physical properties, conductivity, analytical data and the composition of the four pyridoxine complexes are discussed. The elemental analysis shows that the formed complexes of La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) with pyridoxine are of 1:2 (metal:PN) molar ratio. All the synthesized complexes are brown in color and possess high melting points. These complexes are partially soluble in hot methanol, dimethylsulfoxide and dimethylformamide and insoluble in water and some other organic solvents. Elemental analysis data, spectroscopic (IR, UV-vis. and florescence), effective magnetic moment in Bohr magnetons and the proton NMR suggest the structures. However, definite particle size is determined by invoking the X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy data. The results obtained suggested that pyridoxine reacted with metal ions as a bidentate ligand through its phenolate oxygen and the oxygen of the adjacent group at the 4‧-position. The molar conductance measurements proved that the pyridoxine complexes are electrolytic in nature. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters such as: Ea, ΔH*, ΔS* and ΔG* were estimated from the DTG curves. The antibacterial evaluation of the pyridoxine and their complexes were also performed against some gram positive, negative bacteria as well as fungi.

  19. Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Olshavsky, Michael A.

    1996-01-01

    Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed, They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline.

  20. FATE OF CHROMIUM (III) IN CHLORINATED WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The oxidation of trivalent chromium, Cr(III), to the more toxic Cr(VI) in chlorinated water is thermodynamically feasible and was the subject of the study. The study found that free available chlorine (FAC) readily converts Cr(III) to Cr(VI) at a rate that is highly dependent upo...

  1. III-V arsenide-nitride semiconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, Jo S. (Inventor); Welch, David F. (Inventor); Scifres, Donald R. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    III-V arsenide-nitride semiconductor are disclosed. Group III elements are combined with group V elements, including at least nitrogen and arsenic, in concentrations chosen to lattice match commercially available crystalline substrates. Epitaxial growth of these III-V crystals results in direct bandgap materials, which can be used in applications such as light emitting diodes and lasers. Varying the concentrations of the elements in the III-V materials varies the bandgaps, such that materials emitting light spanning the visible spectra, as well as mid-IR and near-UV emitters, can be created. Conversely, such material can be used to create devices that acquire light and convert the light to electricity, for applications such as full color photodetectors and solar energy collectors. The growth of the III-V material can be accomplished by growing thin layers of elements or compounds in sequences that result in the overall lattice match and bandgap desired.

  2. Title III and toxic torts

    SciTech Connect

    Rodnehausen, G.A.

    1989-07-01

    In July the second annual Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) report under Section 313 of Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), and the computerized, national TRI data-base will be issued. Although the Environmental Protection Agency will not be able to aggregate the July, 1989 reports and issue its own annual report until early next year, we can expect political attention to focus quickly on whether total releases to air, land and water, and in particular total emissions to the air, have increased or decreased from 1987 to 1988. Because the reporting threshold for chemical manufacturing and processing facilities will drop from 75,000 to 50,000 pounds per year, the number of facilities reporting and number of chemicals reported should increase significantly, forcing up total releases. Bringing the totals down will be waste and release reduction efforts already underway in the chemical industry and elsewhere, and perhaps improved accuracy in measurement and estimation of releases. Additions to and deletions from the list of reportable chemicals will also have an effect. Nevertheless, any significant increase in aggregate totals, no matter what the explanation, will be bound to have a political impact on air toxics legislation, and spur public concern with the health risks of air pollution.

  3. Standards in neurosonology. Part III

    PubMed Central

    Tomczyk, Tomasz; Luchowski, Piotr; Kozera, Grzegorz; Kaźmierski, Radosław; Stelmasiak, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents standards related to ultrasound imaging of the cerebral vasculature and structures. The aim of this paper is to standardize both the performance and description of ultrasound imaging of the extracranial and intracranial cerebral arteries as well as a study of a specific brain structure, i.e. substantia nigra hyperechogenicity. The following aspects are included in the description of standards for each ultrasonographic method: equipment requirements, patient preparation, study technique and documentation as well as the required elements of ultrasound description. Practical criteria for the diagnosis of certain pathologies in accordance with the latest literature were also presented. Furthermore, additional comments were included in some of the sections. Part I discusses standards for the performance, documentation and description of different ultrasound methods (Duplex, Doppler). Part II and III are devoted to standards for specific clinical situations (vasospasm, monitoring after the acute stage of stroke, detection of a right-to-left shunts, confirmation of the arrest of the cerebral circulation, an assessment of the functional efficiency of circle of Willis, an assessment of the cerebrovascular vasomotor reserve as well as the measurement of substantia nigra hyperechogenicity). PMID:27446600

  4. Doublet III Big Dee Project

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, L.G.; Luxon, J.L.

    1985-05-01

    The Doublet III tokamak is presently being reconfigured into a new larger dee-shaped plasma configuration. Experiments will begin in 1986 with a goal of high current, high beta plasma operation at moderate magnetic field. The existing toroidal field coil, Ohmic heating coil, and innermost plasma shaping coils will be retained. A new water-cooled vacuum vessel is being fabricated using a corrugated Inconel sandwich wall construction. Six new water-cooled copper poloidal field coils are also being fabricated. The resultant device along with additional power supplies will provide a capability for plasma currents of 3.5 MA for 1.5 s during the first phase of operations; the tokamak systems are designed for 5 MA operation with additional power systems. The four existing 80 keV, 3 MW neutral beam lines are being modified for optimum torus access and 0.7 s operation. These injectors will be upgraded to allow 5 s operation with new sources in 1987. The device has been designed to accommodate an additional 20 MW of ICRH and ECH power in the future. Limiters and vessel wall protection will be provided for initial operation with up to 40 MJ of input energy. Future installation of additional thermal armor will allow operation with up to 200 MJ of input energy over a 10 s period. Most of the existing diagnostics will be modified as required and reinstalled on the new vessel.

  5. Standards in neurosonology. Part III.

    PubMed

    Wojczal, Joanna; Tomczyk, Tomasz; Luchowski, Piotr; Kozera, Grzegorz; Kaźmierski, Radosław; Stelmasiak, Zbigniew

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents standards related to ultrasound imaging of the cerebral vasculature and structures. The aim of this paper is to standardize both the performance and description of ultrasound imaging of the extracranial and intracranial cerebral arteries as well as a study of a specific brain structure, i.e. substantia nigra hyperechogenicity. The following aspects are included in the description of standards for each ultrasonographic method: equipment requirements, patient preparation, study technique and documentation as well as the required elements of ultrasound description. Practical criteria for the diagnosis of certain pathologies in accordance with the latest literature were also presented. Furthermore, additional comments were included in some of the sections. Part I discusses standards for the performance, documentation and description of different ultrasound methods (Duplex, Doppler). Part II and III are devoted to standards for specific clinical situations (vasospasm, monitoring after the acute stage of stroke, detection of a right-to-left shunts, confirmation of the arrest of the cerebral circulation, an assessment of the functional efficiency of circle of Willis, an assessment of the cerebrovascular vasomotor reserve as well as the measurement of substantia nigra hyperechogenicity). PMID:27446600

  6. Large Hexadecametallic {Mn(III) -Ln(III) } Wheels: Synthesis, Structural, Magnetic, and Theoretical Characterization.

    PubMed

    Vignesh, Kuduva R; Langley, Stuart K; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Murray, Keith S; Rajaraman, Gopalan

    2015-11-01

    The synthesis, gas sorption studies, magnetic properties, and theoretical studies of new molecular wheels of core type {Mn(III) 8 Ln(III) 8 } (Ln=Dy, Ho, Er, Y and Yb), using the ligand mdeaH2 , in the presence of ortho-toluic or benzoic acid are reported. From the seven wheels studied the {Mn8 Dy8 } and {Mn8 Y8 } analogues exhibit SMM behavior as determined from ac susceptibility experiments in a zero static magnetic field. From DFT calculations a S=16 ground state was determined for the {Mn8 Y8 } complex due to weak ferromagnetic Mn(III) -Mn(III) interactions. Ab initio CASSCF+RASSI-SO calculations on the {Mn8 Dy8 } wheel estimated the Mn(III) -Dy(III) exchange interaction as -0.1 cm(-1) . This weak exchange along with unfavorable single-ion anisotropy of Dy(III) /Mn(III) ions, however, led to the observation of SMM behavior with fast magnetic relaxation. The orientation of the g-anisotropy of the Dy(III) ions is found to be perpendicular to the plane of the wheel and this suggests the possibility of toroidal magnetic moments in the cluster. The {Mn8 Ln8 } clusters reported here are the largest heterometallic Mn(III) Ln(III) wheels and the largest {3d-4f} wheels to exhibit SMM behavior reported to date. PMID:26403264

  7. Mechanisms of Eu(III) and Cm(III) Association With Chlorella Vulgaris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, T.; Kimura, T.; Ohnuki, T.; Francis, A. J.

    2002-12-01

    Association of Eu(III) and Cm(III) with Chlorella vulgaris and cellulose was studied by a batch method, time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). The kinetics study performed by a batch method showed that the maximum adsorption of Eu(III) and Cm(III) on C. vulgaris was attained within three minutes of contact time, and afterwards the percentage adsorption decreased with time due to exudates released from C. vulgaris with affinity for Eu(III) and Cm(III). TRLFS showed that the short-term adsorption of Eu(III) on C. vulgaris was attributed to their coordination with the cell wall components comprised of cellulose. TRLFS also demonstrated that Eu(III) coordinated with the functional groups of cellulose very weakly in spite of the large distribution coefficients observed. EXAFS analysis showed the local structure around the Eu(III) adsorbed on cellulose and with C. vulgaris was similar. These results indicate that the reactions both at cell surfaces through the adsorption as well as in solution phases through chelation with the exudates are important in estimating the environmental behavior of Eu(III) and Cm(III) in aqueous environments.

  8. Separation studies of As(III), Sb(III) and Bi(III) by reversed-phase paper chromatographic technique

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, B.; Shinde, V.M.

    1987-07-01

    Reversed-phase paper chromatographic separations of As(III), Sb(III) and Bi(III) have been carried out on Whatman No 1 filter paper impregnated with triphenylphosphine oxide as stationary phase and using organic complexing agents such as sodium acetate, sodium succinate and sodium malonate solutions as active mobile phases. Results for the separation of binary and ternary mixtures are reported and the method has been successfully applied to the separation and detection of these elements present in real samples and at ppm level concentration.

  9. Rapid photooxidation of Sb(III) in the presence of different Fe(III) species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Linghao; He, Mengchang; Hu, Xingyun

    2016-05-01

    The toxicity and mobility of antimony (Sb) are strongly influenced by the redox processes associated with Sb. Dissolved iron (Fe) is widely distributed in the environment as different species and plays a significant role in Sb speciation. However, the mechanisms of Sb(III) oxidation in the presence of Fe have remained unclear because of the complexity of Fe and Sb speciation. In this study, the mechanisms of Sb(III) photooxidation in the presence of different Fe species were investigated systematically. The photooxidation of Sb(III) occurred over a wide pH range, from 1 to 10. Oxygen was not a predominant or crucial factor in the Sb(III) oxidation process. The mechanism of Sb(III) photooxidation varied depending on the Fe(III) species. In acidic solution (pH 1-3), dichloro radicals (radCl2-) and hydroxyl radicals (radOH) generated by the photocatalysis of FeCl2+ and FeOH2+ were the main oxidants for Sb(III) oxidation. Fe(III) gradually transformed into the colloid ferric hydroxide (CFH) and ferrihydrite in circumneutral and alkaline solutions (pH 4-10). Photooxidation of Sb(III) occurred through electron transfer from Sb(III) to Fe(III) along with the reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II) through a ligand-to-metal charge-transfer (LMCT) process. The photocatalysis of different Fe(III) species may play an important role in the geochemical cycle of Sb(III) in surface soil and aquatic environments.

  10. Neptunium(III) application in extraction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Guérin, Nicolas; Nadeau, Kenny; Larivière, Dominic

    2011-12-15

    This paper describes a novel strategy for actinide separation by extraction chromatography with Np(III) valence adjustment. Neptunium(IV) was reduced to Np(III) using Cr(II) and then selectively separated from uranium (IV) on a TEVA resin. After elution, Np(III) was retained on a DGA resin in order to remove any detrimental chromium impurities. Neptunium(III) formation was demonstrated by the complete and selective elution of Np from TEVA resin (99 ± 7%) in less than 12 mL of 9M HCl from U(IV) (0.7 ± 0.7%). It was determined by UV-visible and kinetic studies that Cr(II) was the only species responsible for the elution of Np(IV) as Np(III) and that the Cr(II) solution could be prepared from 2 to 30 min before its use without the need of complex degassing systems to prevent the oxidation of Np(III) by oxygen. The methodology proposed here with TEVA/DGA resins provides removal of Cr(III) impurities produced at high decontamination factors (2.8 × 10(3) and 7.3 × 10(4) respectively). PMID:22099641

  11. Timely management of developing class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Yelampalli, M R; Rachala, M R

    2012-01-01

    Timing of orthodontic treatment, especially for children with developing class III malocclusions, has always been somewhat controversial, and definitive treatment tends to be delayed for severe class III cases. Developing class III patients with moderate to severe anterior crossbite and deep bite may need early intervention in some selected cases. Class III malocclusion may develop in children as a result of an inherent growth abnormality, i.e. true class III malocclusion, or as a result of premature occlusal contacts causing forward functional shift of the mandible, which is known as pseudo class III malocclusion. These cases, if not treated at the initial stage of development, interfere with normal growth of the jaw bases and may result in severe facial deformities. The treatment should be carried out as early as possible for permitting normal growth of the skeletal bases. This paper deals with the selection of an appropriate appliance from the various current options available for early intervention in developing class III malocclusion through two case reports. PMID:22565523

  12. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D.; Misra, Mira

    1997-01-01

    A photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The photodetector includes a substrate with interdigitated electrodes formed on its surface. The substrate has a sapphire base layer, a buffer layer formed from a III-V nitride and a single crystal III-V nitride film. The three layers are formed by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (ECR-assisted MBE). Use of the ECR-assisted MBE process allows control and predetermination of the electrical properties of the photodetector.

  13. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, T.D.; Misra, M.

    1997-10-14

    A photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The photodetector includes a substrate with interdigitated electrodes formed on its surface. The substrate has a sapphire base layer, a buffer layer formed from a III-V nitride and a single crystal III-V nitride film. The three layers are formed by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (ECR-assisted MBE). Use of the ECR-assisted MBE process allows control and predetermination of the electrical properties of the photodetector. 24 figs.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: mucolipidosis III alpha/beta

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions mucolipidosis III alpha/beta mucolipidosis III alpha/beta Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Mucolipidosis III alpha/beta is a slowly progressive disorder that affects ...

  15. Complexation of N4-Tetradentate Ligands with Nd(III) and Am(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, Mark D.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Meier, G. Patrick; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Nash, Kenneth L.

    2012-12-06

    To improve understanding of aza-complexants in trivalent actinide–lanthanide separations, a series of tetradentate N-donor ligands have been synthesized and their complexation of americium(III) and neodymium(III) investigated by UV–visible spectrophotometry in methanolic solutions. The six pyridine/alkyl amine/imine ligands are N,N0-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,2-diaminoethane, N,N0-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,3-diaminopropane, trans-N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,2-diaminocyclohexane (BPMDAC), N,N’-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)piperazine, N,N’-bis-[pyridin-2-ylmethylene]ethane-1,2-diamine, and trans-N,Nbis-([pyridin-2-ylmethylene]-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine. Each ligand has two pyridine groups and two aliphatic amine/imine N-donor atoms arranged with different degrees of preorganization and structural backbone rigidity. Conditional stability constants for the complexes of Am(III) and Nd(III) by these ligands establish the selectivity patterns. The overall selectivity of Am(III) over Nd(III) is similar to that reported for the terdentate bis(dialkyltriazinyl)pyridine molecules. The cyclohexane amine derivative (BPMDAC) is the strongest complexant and shows the highest selectivity for Am(III) over Nd(III) while the imines appear to prefer a bridging arrangement between two cations. These results suggest that this series of ligands could be employed to develop an enhanced actinide(III)– lanthanide(III) separation system.

  16. Extraction chromatographic separation of Am(III) and Eu(III) by TPEN-immobilized gel

    SciTech Connect

    Takeshita, K.; Ogata, T.; Oaki, H.; Inaba, Y.; Mori, A.; Yaita, T.; Koyama, S.I.

    2013-07-01

    A TPEN derivative with 4 vinyl groups, N,N,N',N' -tetrakis-(4-propenyloxy-2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPPEN) was synthesized for the separation of trivalent minor actinides (Am(III)) and lanthanides (Eu(III)). A co-polymer gel with TPPEN and N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) showed a high separation factor of Am(III) over Eu(III) (SF[Am/Eu]), which was evaluated to be 26 at pH=5. Thin film of NIPA-TPPEN gel (average thickness: 2-40 nm) was immobilized on the pore surface in porous silica particles (particle diameter : 50 μm, average pore diameter : 50 and 300 nm) and a chromatographic column (diameter: 6 mm, height: 11 mm) packed with the gel-coated particles was prepared. A small amount of weakly acidic solution (pH=4) containing Am(III) and Eu(III) was supplied in the column and the elution tests of Am(III) and Eu(III) were carried out. Eu(III) was recovered separately by a weakly acidic eluent (pH=4) at 313 K and Am(III) by a highly acidic eluent (pH=2) at 298 K. These results suggest that the contentious separation of minor actinides and lanthanides is attainable by a new extraction chromatographic process with two columns adjusted to 298 K and 313 K. (authors)

  17. Potentiometry: A Chromium (III) -- EDTA Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoppe, J. I.; Howell, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment that involves the preparation of a chromium (III)-EDTA compound, a study of its infrared spectrum, and the potentiometric determination of two successive acid dissociation constants. (Author/GS)

  18. Synthesis, thermal and spectroscopic behaviors of metal-drug complexes: La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) amoxicillin trihydrate antibiotic drug complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Al-Maydama, Hussein M. A.; Al-Azab, Fathi M.; Amin, Ragab R.; Jamil, Yasmin M. S.

    2014-07-01

    The metal complexes of Amoxicillin trihydrate with La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) are synthesized with 1:1 (metal:Amox) molar ratio. The suggested formula structures of the complexes are based on the results of the elemental analyses, molar conductivity, (infrared, UV-visible and fluorescence) spectra, effective magnetic moment in Bohr magnetons, as well as the thermal analysis (TG), and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results obtained suggested that Amoxicillin reacted with metal ions as tridentate ligands, coordinating the metal ion through its amino, imino, and β-lactamic carbonyl. The kinetic thermodynamic parameters such as: Ea, ΔH*, ΔS* and ΔG* were estimated from the DTG curves.

  19. SAGE III/Meteor - 3M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Full view of the SAGE III Bench Checkout Unit, Collimated Source Bench (CSB), Portable Image Generator (PIG) on tripod, and Stratospheric Aerosol Gastropheric Experiment (SAGE)/Meteor - 3M flight instrument. Photographed in building 1250, 40 foot clean room.

  20. SAGE III/Meteor - 3M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Back view of the SAGE III Bench Checkout Unit, Portable Image Generator (PIG) on tripod, and the Stratospheric Aerosol Gastropheric Experiment (SAGE)/Meteor - 3M flight instrument. Photographed in building 1250, 40 foot clean room.

  1. Sorption of indium (III) onto carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Alguacil, F J; Lopez, F A; Rodriguez, O; Martinez-Ramirez, S; Garcia-Diaz, I

    2016-08-01

    Indium has numerous applications in different industrial sectors and is not an abundant element. Therefore appropriate technology to recover this element from various process wastes is needed. This research reports high adsorption capacity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) for In(III). The effects of pH, kinetics, isotherms and adsorption mechanism of MWCNT on In(III) adsorption were investigated and discussed in detail. The pH increases improves the adsorption capacity for In(III). The Langmuir adsorption model is the best fit with the experimental data. For the kinetic study, the adsorption onto MWCNT could be fitted to pseudo second-order. The adsorption of indium(III) can be described to a mechanism which consists of a film diffusion controlled process. Metal desorption can be achieved with acidic solutions. PMID:27085001

  2. SAGE III capabilities and global change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. Patrick

    1991-01-01

    The science objectives of the satellite-borne SAGE III are presented as they pertain to detecting global change. SAGE III is the proposed follow on and improved version of SAM II, SAGE I and SAGE II which have measured stratospheric and, in some cases, tropospheric species since late 1978. Specifically, SAGE III will measure profiles of aerosols, ozone, water vapor, nitrogen dioxide and trioxide, neutral density, temperature, clouds, and chlorine dioxide using the solar and lunar occultation techniques. These techniques are inherently self-calibrating, provide high vertical resolution, and use well-behaved data retrievals making them ideal for trend detection and global change studies. The potential capabilities of SAGE III are illustrated by using data and results from SAM II, SAGE I and SAGE II.

  3. SAGE III solar ozone measurements: Initial results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hsiang-Jui; Cunnold, Derek M.; Trepte, Chip; Thomason, Larry W.; Zawodny, Joseph M.

    2006-01-01

    Results from two retrieval algorithms, o3-aer and o3-mlr , used for SAGE III solar occultation ozone measurements in the stratosphere and upper troposphere are compared. The main differences between these two retrieved (version 3.0) ozone are found at altitudes above 40 km and below 15 km. Compared to correlative measurements, the SAGE II type ozone retrievals (o3-aer) provide better precisions above 40 km and do not induce artificial hemispheric differences in upper stratospheric ozone. The multiple linear regression technique (o3_mlr), however, can yield slightly more accurate ozone (by a few percent) in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere. By using SAGE III (version 3.0) ozone from both algorithms and in their preferred regions, the agreement between SAGE III and correlative measurements is shown to be approx.5% down to 17 km. Below 17 km SAGE III ozone values are systematically higher, by 10% at 13 km, and a small hemispheric difference (a few percent) appears. Compared to SAGE III and HALOE, SAGE II ozone has the best accuracy in the lowest few kilometers of the stratosphere. Estimated precision in SAGE III ozone is about 5% or better between 20 and 40 km and approx.10% at 50 km. The precision below 20 km is difficult to evaluate because of limited coincidences between SAGE III and sondes. SAGE III ozone values are systematically slightly larger (2-3%) than those from SAGE II but the profile shapes are remarkably similar for altitudes above 15 km. There is no evidence of any relative drift or time dependent differences between these two instruments for altitudes above 15-20 km.

  4. The Mark III Hypercube-Ensemble Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, John C.; Tuazon, Jesus O.; Lieberman, Don; Pniel, Moshe

    1988-01-01

    Mark III Hypercube concept applied in development of series of increasingly powerful computers. Processor of each node of Mark III Hypercube ensemble is specialized computer containing three subprocessors and shared main memory. Solves problem quickly by simultaneously processing part of problem at each such node and passing combined results to host computer. Disciplines benefitting from speed and memory capacity include astrophysics, geophysics, chemistry, weather, high-energy physics, applied mechanics, image processing, oil exploration, aircraft design, and microcircuit design.

  5. Population III Stars Around the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komiya, Yutaka; Suda, Takuma; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.

    2016-03-01

    We explore the possibility of observing Population III (Pop III) stars, born of primordial gas. Pop III stars with masses below 0.8 M⊙ should survive to date though are not yet observed, but the existence of stars with low metallicity as [{{Fe}}/{{H}}]\\lt -5 in the Milky Way halo suggests the surface pollution of Pop III stars with accreted metals from the interstellar gas after birth. In this paper, we investigate the runaway of Pop III stars from their host mini-halos, considering the ejection of secondary members from binary systems when their massive primaries explode as supernovae. These stars save them from surface pollution. By computing the star formation and chemical evolution along with the hierarchical structure formation based on the extended Press-Schechter merger trees, we demonstrate that several hundreds to tens of thousands of low-mass Pop III stars escape from the building blocks of the Milky Way. The second and later generations of extremely metal-poor stars also escaped from the mini-halos. We discuss the spatial distributions of these escaped stars by evaluating the distances between the mini-halos in the branches of merger trees under the spherical collapse model of dark matter halos. It is demonstrated that the escaped stars distribute beyond the stellar halo with a density profile close to the dark matter halo, while Pop III stars are slightly more centrally concentrated. 6%-30% of the escaped stars leave the Milky Way and go out into the intergalactic space. Based on the results, we discuss the feasibility of observing the Pop III stars with the pristine surface abundance.

  6. Lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) derivatives with dithiocarbamates derived from α-amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Anita; Sengupta, Soumitra K.; Pandey, Om P.

    2006-06-01

    Lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) complexes with dithiocarbamates have been synthesized by the reactions of lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) chloride with barium dithiocarbamate and complexes of type [LnCl(L)H 2O] n have been obtained (where Ln = La(III) or Pr(III); L = barium salt of dithiocarbamate derived from glycine, L-leucine, L-valine, DL-alanine). The complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, electronic absorption and fluorescence, infrared, far infrared, 1H NMR spectral studies. The presence of coordinated water molecule is inferred from thermogravimetric analysis which indicates the loss of one water molecule at 150-170 °C. The oscillator strength, Judd-Ofelt intensity parameter, stimulated emission cross-section, etc. have been obtained for different transitions of Pr 3+.

  7. Gallium(iii) and iron(iii) complexes of quinolone antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Mjos, Katja Dralle; Cawthray, Jacqueline F; Polishchuk, Elena; Abrams, Michael J; Orvig, Chris

    2016-08-16

    Iron is an essential nutrient for many microbes. According to the "Trojan Horse Hypothesis", biological systems have difficulties distinguishing between Fe(3+) and Ga(3+), which constitutes the antimicrobial efficacy of the gallium(iii) ion. Nine novel tris(quinolono)gallium(iii) complexes and their corresponding iron(iii) analogs have been synthesized and fully characterized. Quinolone antimicrobial agents from three drug generations were used in this study: ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, fleroxacin, levofloxacin, lomefloxacin, nalidixic acid, norfloxacin, oxolinic acid, and pipemidic acid. The antimicrobial efficacy of the tris(quinolono)gallium(iii) complexes was studied against E. faecalis and S. aureus (both Gram-positive), as well as E. coli, K. pneumonia, and P. aeruginosa (all Gram-negative) in direct comparison to the tris(quinolono)iron(iii) complexes and the corresponding free quinolone ligands at various concentrations. For the tris(quinolono)gallium(iii) complexes, no combinational antimicrobial effects between Ga(3+) and the quinolone antimicrobial agents were observed. PMID:27315225

  8. Design of Integrated III-Nitride/Non-III-Nitride Tandem Photovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Toledo, N. G.; Friedman, D.J.; Farrell, R. M.; Perl, E. E.; Lin, C. T.; Bowers, J. E.; Speck, J. S.; Mishra, U. K.

    2012-03-01

    The integration of III-nitride and non-III-nitride materials for tandem solar cell applications can improve the efficiency of the photovoltaic device due to the added power contributed by the III-nitride top cell to that of high-efficiency multi-junction non-III-nitride solar cells if the device components are properly designed and optimized. The proposed tandem solar cell is comprised of a III-nitride top cell bonded to a non-III-nitride, series-constrained, multi-junction subcell. The top cell is electrically isolated, but optically coupled to the underlying subcell. The use of a III-nitride top cell is potentially beneficial when the top junction of a stand-alone non-III-nitride subcell generates more photocurrent than the limiting current of the non-III-nitride subcell. Light producing this excess current can either be redirected to the III-nitride top cell through high energy photon absorption, redirected to the lower junctions through layer thickness optimization, or a combination of both, resulting in improved total efficiency. When the non-III-nitride cell's top junction is the limiting junction, the minimum power conversion efficiency that the III-nitride top cell must contribute should compensate for the spectrum filtered from the multi-junction subcell for this design to be useful. As the III-nitride absorption edge wavelength, {lambda}{sub N}, increases, the performance of the multi-junction subcell decreases due to spectral filtering. In the most common spectra of interest (AM1.5G, AM1.5 D, and AM0), the technology to grow InGaN cells with {lambda}{sub N}<520 nm is found to be sufficient for III-nitride top cell applications. The external quantum efficiency performance, however, of state-of-the-art InGaN solar cells still needs to be improved. The effects of surface/interface reflections are also presented. The management of these reflection issues determines the feasibility of the integrated III-nitride/non-III-nitride design to improve overall cell

  9. Association of Eu(III) and Cm(III) With Halophiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, T.; Takenaka, Y.; Ohnuki, T.; Gillow, J. B.; Francis, A. J.

    2003-12-01

    Halophiles live in high ionic strength brine. The mechanisms of metal association with these microorganisms are poorly understood. In this study, we determined the distribution of Eu(III) and Cm(III) on halophiles, Halomonas sp. (WIPP1A) which was isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository in Carlsbad, US., Halomonas elongata (ATCC33173), Halobacterium salinarum (ATCC19700), and Halobacterium halobium (ATCC43214) and examined the coordination environment of Eu(III) adsorbed on the cells by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The cells of Halomonas sp. and H. elongata were grown in media containing 10 - 15 w/v% and 3.5 - 30 w/v% NaCl, respectively. Halobacterium salinarum and H. halobium were grown in media containing 25 w/v% NaCl. The logarithmic distribution coefficient (log Kd) was measured by using the cells at the late exponential phase. After washing the cells with the same concentrations of NaCl, the cells were mixed with 1x10-6 mol dm-3 Eu(III) and 1x10-8 mol dm-3 Cm(III) at pH 5 in the same concentrations of NaCl and log Kd of Eu(III) and Cm(III) was determined. For Halomonas sp. and H. elongata, log Kd was determined as a function of NaCl concentrations. The coordination environment of Eu(III) adsorbed on the cells was estimated by TRLFS. For TRLFS measurements, samples were prepared by adding cells to a solution of 1x10-3 mol dm-3 Eu(III) with the same concentrations of NaCl as the culture media. For Halomonas sp. and H. elongata, log Kd of Cm(III) was apparently larger than that of Eu(III) at all the NaCl concentrations examined. On the other hand, log Kd of Eu(III) and Cm(III) for H. salinarum and H. halobium was almost identical. Our previous study demonstrated that non-halophiles, Chlorella vulgaris, Bacillus subtilis, and Pseudomonas fluorescens show no preferences between these elements. Chemical properties of Eu(III) and Cm(III) are almost identical. Our findings suggest that the difference in log Kd

  10. Sparkle/PM3 Parameters for the Modeling of Neodymium(III), Promethium(III), and Samarium(III) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Freire, Ricardo O; da Costa, Nivan B; Rocha, Gerd B; Simas, Alfredo M

    2007-07-01

    The Sparkle/PM3 model is extended to neodymium(III), promethium(III), and samarium(III) complexes. The unsigned mean error, for all Sparkle/PM3 interatomic distances between the trivalent lanthanide ion and the ligand atoms of the first sphere of coordination, is 0.074 Å for Nd(III); 0.057 Å for Pm(III); and 0.075 Å for Sm(III). These figures are similar to the Sparkle/AM1 ones of 0.076 Å, 0.059 Å, and 0.075 Å, respectively, indicating they are all comparable models. Moreover, their accuracy is similar to what can be obtained by present-day ab initio effective potential calculations on such lanthanide complexes. Hence, the choice of which model to utilize will depend on the assessment of the effect of either AM1 or PM3 on the quantum chemical description of the organic ligands. Finally, we present a preliminary attempt to verify the geometry prediction consistency of Sparkle/PM3. Since lanthanide complexes are usually flexible, we randomly generated 200 different input geometries for the samarium complex QIPQOV which were then fully optimized by Sparkle/PM3. A trend appeared in that, on average, the lower the total energy of the local minima found, the lower the unsigned mean errors, and the higher the accuracy of the model. These preliminary results do indicate that attempting to find, with Sparkle/PM3, a global minimum for the geometry of a given complex, with the understanding that it will tend to be closer to the experimental geometry, appears to be warranted. Therefore, the sparkle model is seemingly a trustworthy semiempirical quantum chemical model for the prediction of lanthanide complexes geometries. PMID:26633229

  11. The Berkeley SETI Program: SERENDIP III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, C.; Bowyer, S.; Werthimer, D.; Ng, D.; Cobb, J.

    1993-05-01

    The Berkeley SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) program, named SERENDIP, was begun in the late 1970's. It is aimed at detecting narrow band radio signals from extraterrestrial civilizations. The SERENDIP I, II and III systems have operated autonomously in a piggyback search mode, conducting unobtrusive, long-term observations on the world's largest radio telescopes. The latest generation SERENDIP instrument, SERENDIP III, is a four million channel FFT-based spectrum analyzer operating at 0.6 Hz resolution with a 1.7 second integration time. SERENDIP III has been operating at the NAIC Arecibo Observatory since April, 1992. Several independent criteria suggest that this search is the most sensitive SETI search in operation. To date SERENDIP III has accumulated over 3600 hours of high quality telescope time, observing 75% of the sky visible by the Arecibo telescope. Over this period SERENDIP III has analyzed over 30 trillion spectral bins, and recorded information on 110 million strong narrow band signals in the 424--435 MHz band. A handful of these signals have survived our RFI rejection and signal detection algorithms, and have thus been added to our list of ETI candidate signals. A follow-up observation program will be conducted next year in an attempt to verify each of these candidate signals. This work has been supported by NASA grant NAGW-2722.

  12. Stoichiometries of arsenazo III-Ca complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Palade, P; Vergara, J

    1983-01-01

    The equilibrium interactions of the metallochromic indicator arsenazo III with calcium at physiological ionic strength and pH were investigated spectrophotometrically and with the aid of a calcium electrode. Evidence suggests the formation of more than one dye-calcium complex. The analysis of data obtained over a 10,000-fold range of dye concentrations concludes that at the concentrations used for in vitro biochemical studies (10--100 microM), arsenazo III absorbance changes in response to calcium binding primarily involve the formation of a complex involving two dye molecules and two calcium ions. At millimolar dye concentrations, typical of physiological calcium transient determinations in situ, a second complex involving two arsenazo III molecules and one calcium ion is additionally formed. A third complex, involving one arsenazo III molecule and one calcium ion, is formed at very low dye concentrations. The results reported here suggest that equilibrium calibration of the dye with calcium cannot be used directly to satisfactorily relate transient absorbance changes in physiological preparations to calcium concentration changes since several stoichiometrically distinct complexes with different absorbances could be formed at different rates. The results of this study do not permit the elucidation of a unique kinetic scheme of arsenazo III complexation with calcium; for this, in vitro kinetic analysis is required. Results of similar analysis of the dye interaction with magnesium are also reported, and these appear compatible with a much simpler model of complexation. PMID:6626673

  13. A semisimultaneous inversion algorithm for SAGE III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Dale M.

    2002-12-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III instrument was successfully launched into orbit on 10 December 2001. The planned operational species separation inversion algorithm will utilize a stepwise retrieval strategy. This paper presents an alternative, semisimultaneous species separation inversion that simultaneously retrieves all species over user-specified vertical intervals or blocks. By overlapping these vertical blocks, retrieved species profiles over the entire vertical range of the measurements are obtained. The semisimultaneous retrieval approach provides a more straightforward method for evaluating the error coupling that occurs among the retrieved profiles due to various types of input uncertainty. Simulation results are presented to show how the semisimultaneous inversion can enhance understanding of the SAGE III retrieval process. In the future, the semisimultaneous inversion algorithm will be used to help evaluate the results and performance of the operational inversion. Compared to SAGE II, SAGE III will provide expanded and more precise spectral measurements. This alone is shown to significantly reduce the uncertainties in the retrieved ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and aerosol extinction profiles for SAGE III. Additionally, the well-documented concern that SAGE II retrievals are biased by the level of volcanic aerosol is greatly alleviated for SAGE III.

  14. Hybrid III-V/silicon lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspar, P.; Jany, C.; Le Liepvre, A.; Accard, A.; Lamponi, M.; Make, D.; Levaufre, G.; Girard, N.; Lelarge, F.; Shen, A.; Charbonnier, P.; Mallecot, F.; Duan, G.-H.; Gentner, J.-.; Fedeli, J.-M.; Olivier, S.; Descos, A.; Ben Bakir, B.; Messaoudene, S.; Bordel, D.; Malhouitre, S.; Kopp, C.; Menezo, S.

    2014-05-01

    The lack of potent integrated light emitters is one of the bottlenecks that have so far hindered the silicon photonics platform from revolutionizing the communication market. Photonic circuits with integrated light sources have the potential to address a wide range of applications from short-distance data communication to long-haul optical transmission. Notably, the integration of lasers would allow saving large assembly costs and reduce the footprint of optoelectronic products by combining photonic and microelectronic functionalities on a single chip. Since silicon and germanium-based sources are still in their infancy, hybrid approaches using III-V semiconductor materials are currently pursued by several research laboratories in academia as well as in industry. In this paper we review recent developments of hybrid III-V/silicon lasers and discuss the advantages and drawbacks of several integration schemes. The integration approach followed in our laboratory makes use of wafer-bonded III-V material on structured silicon-on-insulator substrates and is based on adiabatic mode transfers between silicon and III-V waveguides. We will highlight some of the most interesting results from devices such as wavelength-tunable lasers and AWG lasers. The good performance demonstrates that an efficient mode transfer can be achieved between III-V and silicon waveguides and encourages further research efforts in this direction.

  15. Failures in Phase III: Causes and Consequences.

    PubMed

    Seruga, Bostjan; Ocana, Alberto; Amir, Eitan; Tannock, Ian F

    2015-10-15

    Phase III randomized controlled trials (RCT) in oncology fail to lead to registration of new therapies more often than RCTs in other medical disciplines. Most RCTs are sponsored by the pharmaceutical industry, which reflects industry's increasing responsibility in cancer drug development. Many preclinical models are unreliable for evaluation of new anticancer agents, and stronger evidence of biologic effect should be required before a new agent enters the clinical development pathway. Whenever possible, early-phase clinical trials should include pharmacodynamic studies to demonstrate that new agents inhibit their molecular targets and demonstrate substantial antitumor activity at tolerated doses in an enriched population of patients. Here, we review recent RCTs and found that these conditions were not met for most of the targeted anticancer agents, which failed in recent RCTs. Many recent phase III RCTs were initiated without sufficient evidence of activity from early-phase clinical trials. Because patients treated within such trials can be harmed, they should not be undertaken. The bar should also be raised when making decisions to proceed from phase II to III and from phase III to marketing approval. Many approved agents showed only better progression-free survival than standard treatment in phase III trials and were not shown to improve survival or its quality. Introduction of value-based pricing of new anticancer agents would dissuade the continued development of agents with borderline activity in early-phase clinical trials. When collaborating with industry, oncologists should be more critical and better advocates for cancer patients. PMID:26473191

  16. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  17. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  18. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  19. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  20. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  1. Psychometric Testing of the FACES III with Rural Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ide, Bette; Dingmann, Colleen; Cuevas, Elizabeth; Meehan, Maurita

    2010-01-01

    This study tests the validity and reliability of the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Scale III (FACES III) in two samples of rural adolescents. The underlying theory is the linear 3-D circumplex model. The FACES III was administered to 1,632 adolescents in Grades 7 through 12 in two counties in a rural western state. The FACES III Scale and the…

  2. Molten-Salt-Based Growth of Group III Nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Waldrip, Karen E.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Kerley, Thomas M.

    2008-10-14

    A method for growing Group III nitride materials using a molten halide salt as a solvent to solubilize the Group-III ions and nitride ions that react to form the Group III nitride material. The concentration of at least one of the nitride ion or Group III cation is determined by electrochemical generation of the ions.

  3. Teachers' Guide to Music Appreciation III A and III B in the Senior High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, J. Mark; Dawkins, Barbara R.

    This guide to music appreciation courses was developed for use in senior high schools in Duval County, Jacksonville, Florida. Music Appreciation III A examines the development of music, from the Gothic period through the Classical period. Music Appreciation III B examines the development of music from the Romantic period through the 1970s.…

  4. Hexaammine Complexes of Cr(III) and Co(III): A Spectral Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, D. R.; Pavlis, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    Procedures are provided for experiments containing complex ions with octahedral symmetry, hexaamminecobalt(III) chloride and hexaamminechromium(III) nitrate, so students can interpret fully the ultra violet/visible spectra of the complex cations in terms of the ligand field parameters, 10 "Dq," the Racah interelectron repulsion parameters, "B,"…

  5. Effects of difructose anhydride III (DFA III) administration on bile acids and growth of DFA III-assimilating bacterium Ruminococcus productus on rat intestine.

    PubMed

    Minamida, Kimiko; Kaneko, Maki; Ohashi, Midori; Sujaya, I Nengah; Sone, Teruo; Wada, Masaru; Yokota, Atsushi; Hara, Hiroshi; Asano, Kozo; Tomita, Fusao

    2005-06-01

    The growth of DFA III-assimilating bacteria in the intestines of rats fed 3% DFA III for 2 weeks was examined. Sixty-four percent of the DFA III intake had been assimilated on day 3 of ingestion, and almost all of the DFA III was assimilated at the end of the experiment. The DFA III-assimilating bacterium, Ruminococcus productus, in DFA III-fed rats was in the stationary state of 10(8)-10(9) cells/g dry feces within a week from 10(6) cells/g dry feces on day 1 of DFA III ingestion. The number of R. productus cells was associated with the amount of DFA III excreted in the feces. The acetic acid produced from DFA III by R. productus lowered the cecal pH to 5.8. In control-fed rats and DFA III-fed rats, 94% of secondary bile acids and 94% of primary bile acids, respectively, were accounted for in the total bile acids analyzed. DFA III ingestion increased the ratio of primary bile acids and changed the composition of fecal bile acids. In conclusion, R. productus assimilated DFA III, produced short chain fatty acids, and the cecal pH was lowered. The acidification of rat intestine perhaps inhibited secondary bile acid formation and decreased the ratio of secondary bile acids. Therefore, it is expected that DFA III may prevent colorectal cancer and be a new prebiotic candidate. PMID:16233830

  6. Class III viral membrane fusion proteins

    PubMed Central

    Backovic, Marija

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Accumulating structural studies of viral fusion glycoproteins have revealed unanticipated structural relationships between unrelated virus families and allowed the grouping of these membrane fusogens into three distinct classes. Here we review the newly identified group of class III viral fusion proteins, whose members include fusion proteins from rhabdoviruses, herpesviruses and baculoviruses. While clearly related in structure, the class III viral fusion proteins exhibit distinct structural features in their architectures as well as in their membrane-interacting fusion loops, which are likely related to their virus-specific differences in cellular entry. Further study of the similarities and differences in the class III viral fusion glycoproteins may provide greater insights into protein:membrane interactions that are key to promoting efficient bilayer fusion during virus entry. PMID:19356922

  7. The Spatial Infrared Imaging Telescope III.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartschi, B. Y.; Morse, D. E.; Woolston, T. L.

    1996-06-01

    The Spatial Infrared Imaging Telescope III (SPIRIT III) is a mid- through long-wave infrared instrumentation package built and managed by the Space Dynamics Laboratory at Utah State University for the Midcourse Space Experiment. SPIRIT III contains a radiometer and an auto-aligning interferometer-spectrometer that share a telescope designed for high off-axis rejection. A solid-hydrogen cryostat, the first of its kind to be used in a space/satellite application, cools the entire sensor system to cryogenic operating temperatures. This hardware will measure the spectral, spatial, temporal, and intensity characteristics of Earth-limb backgrounds, celestial objects, and other upper atmospheric phenomena. Collected data will provide answers to fundamental questions about Department of Defense surveillance systems and supply invaluable information for system planners and designers of future threat detection systems.

  8. Radiation shielding design considerations for Doublet III

    SciTech Connect

    Engholm, B.A.

    1980-06-01

    Calculations and measurements were made of the bremsstrahlung (x-ray) doses resulting from runaway electron shots at Doublet III. The analysis considered direct, wall-scattered, and skyshine contributions. Reasonably good agreement was obtained between calculations and measurements. The x-ray dose in the control room was about 1 mR per runaway shot, while that at the north boundary was undetectable, with a calculated value of 0.05 mR per shot. These low doses attest to the adequacy of the 2 ft concrete shadow shield surrounding the Doublet III room. Exploratory shielding analyses were performed for possible neutron generation if Doublet III were operated with neutral beam injection in an aggressive D-D mode.

  9. SAGE III Aerosol Extinction Validation in the Arctic Winter: Comparisons with SAGE II and POAM III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, L. W.; Poole, L. R.; Randall, C. E.

    2007-01-01

    The use of SAGE III multiwavelength aerosol extinction coefficient measurements to infer PSC type is contingent on the robustness of both the extinction magnitude and its spectral variation. Past validation with SAGE II and other similar measurements has shown that the SAGE III extinction coefficient measurements are reliable though the comparisons have been greatly weighted toward measurements made at mid-latitudes. Some aerosol comparisons made in the Arctic winter as a part of SOLVE II suggested that SAGE III values, particularly at longer wavelengths, are too small with the implication that both the magnitude and the wavelength dependence are not reliable. Comparisons with POAM III have also suggested a similar discrepancy. Herein, we use SAGE II data as a common standard for comparison of SAGE III and POAM III measurements in the Arctic winters of 2002/2003 through 2004/2005. During the winter, SAGE II measurements are made infrequently at the same latitudes as these instruments. We have mitigated this problem through the use potential vorticity as a spatial coordinate and thus greatly increased the number of coincident events. We find that SAGE II and III extinction coefficient measurements show a high degree of compatibility at both 1020 nm and 450 nm except a 10-20% bias at both wavelengths. In addition, the 452 to 1020-nm extinction ratio shows a consistent bias of approx. 30% throughout the lower stratosphere. We also find that SAGE II and POAM III are on average consistent though the comparisons show a much higher variability and larger bias than SAGE II/III comparisons. In addition, we find that the two data sets are not well correlated below 18 km. Overall, we find both the extinction values and the spectral dependence from SAGE III are robust and we find no evidence of a significant defect within the Arctic vortex.

  10. Complexation of Cm(III)/Eu(III) with Silicate in Basic Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zheming; Felmy, Andrew R; Xia, Yuanxian; Qafoku, Odeta; Yantasee, Wassana; Cho, Herman M

    2005-12-01

    The complexation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) with dissolved silica was studied by time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) in basic solutions over a range of total silica concentrations and ionic strengths (NaNO3). In highly basic solutions, both the fluorescence spectra and lifetime data indicate the formation of Eu(III)/Cm(III) complexes with oligomeric silicates as well as hydroxide groups and/or nitrate in the presence of concentrated NaNO3. At high silica concentration the inner-sphere complexation caused the shift of the fluorescence spectral maximum for Cm(III)(aq) from 594 nm to up to 607 nm and a significant increase of the hypersensitive 5D0 → 7F2 band around 615 nm relative to the non-hypersensitive 5D0 → 7F1 band at 592 nm for Eu(III). At the same time, the fluorescence lifetime increased from 68 s to up to 202 s for Cm(III) in 0.1 M NaNO3 and from 115 s to 1.8 ms for Eu(III) in 3.0 M and 5.0 M NaNO3, consistent with the removal of 6 or more water molecules upon silicate complexation. Linear correlations between the spectral intensity of Cm(III) complexes and the concentrations of the dissolved silicates suggest that Cm(III) complexation with the silicate dimer, Si2O2(OH)22-, may play a role.

  11. Transcribing RNA polymerase III observed by electron cryomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Niklas A; Jakobi, Arjen J; Vorländer, Matthias K; Sachse, Carsten; Müller, Christoph W

    2016-08-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy reconstructions of elongating RNA polymerase (Pol) III at 3.9 Å resolution and of unbound Pol III (apo Pol III) in two distinct conformations at 4.6 Å and 4.7 Å resolution allow the construction of complete atomic models of Pol III and provide new functional insights into the adaption of Pol III to fulfill its specific transcription tasks. PMID:27059519

  12. Factor structure of the MCMI-III.

    PubMed

    Craig, R J; Bivens, A

    1998-02-01

    The factor structure of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (Millon, 1994; MCMI-III) was assessed among 444 African American inpatient substance abusers and constitutes the first factor analysis of the MCMI-III. We found 3 main factors: General Maladjustment, Paranoid Behavior/Thinking With Detached Emotionality, and Antisocial Acting Out. These factors were essentially similar to previous findings of factor studies with the MCMI and MCMI-II across diverse populations. This factor invariance should lend credibility to the revised test and spur additional research into its psychometric properties. PMID:9615431

  13. Supported liquid membrane system for Cr(III) separation from Cr(III)/Cr(VI) mixtures.

    PubMed

    Religa, P; Rajewski, J; Gierycz, P; Swietlik, R

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of analyses of the chromium(III) transport process from mixtures of Cr(III)/Cr(VI) ions using supported liquid membranes (SLM), in which dinonylnaphthalene sulfonic acid (DNNSA) and di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) were used as carriers. In both cases the membrane worked as a selective barrier for Cr(VI) ions. The increase in both the time of Cr(VI) ions-carrier interaction and the Cr(VI) concentration in the feed phase negatively influenced the Cr(III) separation. The polarizing layer consisting of Cr(VI) ions prevents the access of Cr(III) ions to the inter phase surface and leads to the deactivation of the carrier, which is the result of the strong oxidation properties of Cr(VI) ions. These factors meant that, in the case of the membrane with DNNSA, the membrane could not be used for the effective separation of Cr(III) from the Cr(III)/Cr(VI) mixture. On the other hand, the membrane with D2EHPA can be used for fast and efficient transport of Cr(III) ions, but only for strictly defined process parameters, i.e. where the level of chromium(VI) concentration is below 10(-3)M and with intensive feed phase mixing. PMID:24960010

  14. Academic Achievement of NCAA Division III Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, Kathy A.; Hickey, Ann

    2014-01-01

    A study of 215 athletes at a small private liberal arts Division III college revealed that athletes (a) begin their college experience with SATs no different from non-athletes; (b) attain GPAs that do not significantly differ from those of nonathletes; (c) achieve GPAs that do not significantly differ between their "in-season" semester…

  15. Perspectives of precipitation science: Part III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelides, Silas

    2016-03-01

    This Special Issue of Atmospheric Research entitled "Perspectives of Precipitation Science: Part III" encompasses selected papers that were presented at the General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union, held in Vienna, Austria, from 27 April to 2 May 2014, within the framework of the (General) Session "Precipitation: Measurement, Climatology, Remote Sensing, and Modeling".

  16. Constraining the Statistics of Population III Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacy, Athena; Bromm, Volker

    2012-01-01

    We perform a cosmological simulation in order to model the growth and evolution of Population III (Pop III) stellar systems in a range of host minihalo environments. A Pop III multiple system forms in each of the ten minihaloes, and the overall mass function is top-heavy compared to the currently observed initial mass function in the Milky Way. Using a sink particle to represent each growing protostar, we examine the binary characteristics of the multiple systems, resolving orbits on scales as small as 20 AU. We find a binary fraction of approx. 36, with semi-major axes as large as 3000 AU. The distribution of orbital periods is slightly peaked at approx. < 900 yr, while the distribution of mass ratios is relatively flat. Of all sink particles formed within the ten minihaloes, approx. 50 are lost to mergers with larger sinks, and 50 of the remaining sinks are ejected from their star-forming disks. The large binary fraction may have important implications for Pop III evolution and nucleosynthesis, as well as the final fate of the first stars.

  17. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, T.D.

    1998-12-08

    A bandpass photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The bandpass photodetector detects electromagnetic radiation between a lower transition wavelength and an upper transition wavelength. That detector comprises two low pass photodetectors. The response of the two low pass photodetectors is subtracted to yield a response signal. 24 figs.

  18. International Space Programs. Aerospace Education III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulmer, S. B.

    This book, one in the series on Aerospace Education III, is a collection of the diverse information available regarding the international space programs. The five goals listed for the book are: to examine the Soviet space program, to understand the future of Soviet space activity, to examine other national and international space programs, to…

  19. Leveraging Information Technology. Track III: Organizational Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Seven papers from the 1987 CAUSE conference's Track III, Organizational Issues, are presented. They include: "Learning Resources and Technologies: A Unified Organizational Reorientation to Administering Educational Support Services" (Morrell D. Boone); "IRM: A Short-Lived Concept?" (James I. Penrod and Michael G. Dolence); "Organizing to Manage…

  20. ESEA Title III 1972 - PACE in Pennsylvania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research and Information Services for Education, King of Prussia, PA.

    This document is a collection of abstracts of all ESEA Title III educational innovation projects funded or operating in Pennsylvania during 1972. Each abstract contains the name of the local supporting agency, the project number, financial information, target population, major objectives, activities, evaluation design, findings to date,…

  1. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D.

    1998-01-01

    A bandpass photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties. The bandpass photodetector detects electromagnetic radiation between a lower transition wavelength and an upper transition wavelength. That detector comprises two low pass photodetectors. The response of the two low pass photodetectors is subtracted to yield a response signal.

  2. Type III functional response in Daphnia.

    PubMed

    Sarnelle, Orlando; Wilson, Alan E

    2008-06-01

    The functional response of Daphnia, a common pelagic herbivore in lakes, was assessed with a combination of secondary and meta-analyses of published data and new data from an experiment conducted using very low food levels. Secondary analyses of literature data (28 studies, n = 239-393) revealed a significant positive influence of food concentration on Daphnia clearance rate at low food levels, i.e., evidence of an overall Type III functional response. This result was not an artifact of including data from Daphnia that were exhausted from prolonged food deprivation (more than three hours at very low food). Meta-analysis of Daphnia clearance rate vs. food concentration across a range of low food concentrations (eight studies) showed a significantly positive slope across studies, which also supports the presence of a Type III response. Congruent with these analyses of published data, the feeding experiment showed clear evidence of a Type III functional response for D. pulicaria feeding on Ankistrodesmus falcatus. Food levels at which Daphnia clearance rate declined with decreasing food were near the minimum resource requirement for Daphnia population maintenance at steady state (R*). We suggest that Type III responses are more common than previously believed, perhaps because of the relative paucity of observations at low food levels, and that reduced prey mortality at low phytoplankton densities could be a stabilizing mechanism for Daphnia-phytoplankton systems under resource scarcity. PMID:18589536

  3. The Changing Nature of Division III Athletics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, William

    2014-01-01

    Non-selective Division III institutions often face challenges in meeting their enrollment goals. To ensure their continued viability, these schools recruit large numbers of student athletes. As a result, when compared to FBS (Football Bowl Division) institutions these schools have a much higher percentage of student athletes on campus and a…

  4. Constraining the statistics of Population III binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacy, Athena; Bromm, Volker

    2013-08-01

    We perform a cosmological simulation in order to model the growth and evolution of Population III (Pop III) stellar systems in a range of host minihalo environments. A Pop III multiple system forms in each of the 10 minihaloes, and the overall mass function is top-heavy compared to the currently observed initial mass function in the Milky Way. Using a sink particle to represent each growing protostar, we examine the binary characteristics of the multiple systems, resolving orbits on scales as small as 20 au. We find a binary fraction of ˜35 per cent, with semi-major axes as large as 3000 au. The distribution of orbital periods is slightly peaked at ≲ 900 yr, while the distribution of mass ratios is relatively flat. Of all sink particles formed within the 10 minihaloes, ˜50 per cent are lost to mergers with larger sinks, and ˜50 per cent of the remaining sinks are ejected from their star-forming discs. The large binary fraction may have important implications for Pop III evolution and nucleosynthesis, as well as the final fate of the first stars.

  5. Estimation of the standard entropies of some Am(III) and Cm(III) compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konings, R. J. M.

    2001-05-01

    The standard entropies S°(298.15 K) of some actinide(III) compounds have been estimated using a semi-empirical method describing the total entropy as the sum of the lattice entropy Slat and the excess entropy Sexs. The validity of the applied approach has been verified for the iso-electronic lanthanide(III) compounds for which a good agreement with experimental values has been obtained. The present results for the actinide(III) compounds are compared to previous estimates. Significant differences have been found, in particular for the americium compounds.

  6. The capillary pumped loop III (CAPL III) flight demonstration description and status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong (Jake) H.; Cheung, Kwok-Hung; Butler, Dan; Ku, Jentung; Haught, Eric; Kroliczeck, Edward J.; Cullimore, Brent; Baumann, Jane

    1997-01-01

    To realize the full benefits of capillary pump loop (CPL) devices, for use in spacecraft thermal control subsystems, a reliable, load sharing, multiple evaporator system must be developed and successfully demonstrated in space. The Capillary Pumped Loop Flight Experiment 3 (CAPL III) will be the second attempt to flight demonstrate a multiple evaporator CPL in space environment. Using the lessons learned from CAPL I, which was flown aboard STS-60 in February 1994, new hardware and concepts are being developed for CAPL III to enable load sharing between evaporators, reliable system start-up/re-start, and reliable continuous operation. Started in May 1996, CAPL III is primarily a joint venture between the Naval Research Laboratory and the NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center, with Swales and Associates, Inc. as an industry partner. The program is scheduled to meet an STS flight opportunity in mid-1998. This paper will present the requirements and the preliminary design description of the CAPL III CPL system.

  7. Kinetics of the reaction between Pu(III) and Fe(III) in nitric acid solution

    SciTech Connect

    Koltunov, V.S.; Zhuravleva, G.I.

    1988-01-01

    The kinetics of the reaction between Pu/sup (III)/ and Fe/sup (III)/ in an aqueous nitric acid solution in the presence of persulfate ions at a constant ionic strength of the solution was studied spectrophotometrically. It was shown that the reaction is first order with respect to the reagents; its rate is practically independent of the concentration of the H/sup +/ and S/sub 2/O/sub 8//sup 2 -/ ions and with increase in the analytical HNO/sub 3/ concentration at variable ionic strength, it first increases, and then decreases. The temperature dependence of the reaction was determined, and its thermodynamic activation parameters were calculated. A possible mechanism for the reaction between Pu/sup (III)/ and Fe/sup (III)/ was proposed.

  8. Theoretical insights into the separation of Am(III) over Eu(III) with PhenBHPPA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Han; Wu, Qun-Yan; Wang, Cong-Zhi; Lan, Jian-Hui; Liu, Zhi-Rong; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2015-10-14

    Due to the similar chemical properties of actinides An(iii) and lanthanides Ln(iii), their separation in spent nuclear fuel reprocessing is extremely challenging. A 1,10-phenanthroline dipicolinamide-based ligand (PhenBHPPA) has been identified to possess a selectivity for Am(iii) over Eu(iii) and could potentially be used for group actinide extraction. In this study, quasi-relativistic density functional theoretical calculations have been used to disclose the interaction mechanisms of Am(iii) and Eu(iii) complexes with PhenBHPPA. The electronic structures, bonding nature, QTAIM (Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules) analyses and thermodynamic behaviors of the Am(iii) and Eu(iii) complexes with PhenBHPPA have been explored in detail. According to the Wiberg bond indices (WBIs) and QTAIM analyses, interactions between the ligand and metal cations (Am(iii) and Eu(iii)) exhibit a weakly covalent character. Thermodynamic analyses show that the charged complexes [ML(NO3)2](+) appear to be the most stable species in the complexation processes. Moreover, it is more energetically favorable for PhenBHPPA to bind to Am(iii) compared to Eu(iii). Our study could render new insights into understanding the selectivity of the ligand towards minor actinides and the separation of An(iii) from Ln(iii) via liquid-liquid extraction. PMID:26332357

  9. Functional conservation of RNase III-like enzymes: studies on a Vibrio vulnificus ortholog of Escherichia coli RNase III.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minho; Ahn, Sangmi; Lim, Boram; Lee, Dong-Ho; Lee, Kangseok

    2014-04-01

    Bacterial ribonuclease III (RNase III) belongs to the RNase III enzyme family, which plays a pivotal role in controlling mRNA stability and RNA processing in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In the Vibrio vulnificus genome, one open reading frame encodes a protein homologous to E. coli RNase III, designated Vv-RNase III, which has 77.9 % amino acid identity to E. coli RNase III. Here, we report that Vv-RNase III has the same cleavage specificity as E. coli RNase III in vivo and in vitro. Expressing Vv-RNase III in E. coli cells deleted for the RNase III gene (rnc) restored normal rRNA processing and, consequently, growth rates of these cells comparable to wild-type cells. In vitro cleavage assays further showed that Vv-RNase III has the same cleavage activity and specificity as E. coli RNase III on RNase III-targeted sequences of corA and mltD mRNA. Our findings suggest that RNase III-like proteins have conserved cleavage specificity across bacterial species. PMID:24241331

  10. Rhodium(i), rhodium(iii) and iridium(iii) carbaporphyrins.

    PubMed

    Adiraju, Venkata A K; Ferrence, Gregory M; Lash, Timothy D

    2016-09-21

    Treatment of a benzocarbaporphyrin with [Rh(CO)2Cl]2 in refluxing dichloromethane gave a rhodium(i) dicarbonyl complex, and further reaction in refluxing pyridine afforded an organometallic rhodium(iii) derivative. The carbaporphyrin also reacted with [Ir(COD)Cl]2 and pyridine in refluxing p-xylene to generate a related iridium(iii) compound. These novel metalated porphyrinoids retained strongly diatropic characteristics and were fully characterized by XRD. PMID:27529466

  11. A XAFS study of plain and composite iron(III) and chromium(III) hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Papassiopi, N; Pinakidou, F; Katsikini, M; Antipas, G S E; Christou, C; Xenidis, A; Paloura, E C

    2014-09-01

    Reduction of hexavalent Cr(VI) to the trivalent state is the common strategy for remediation of Cr(VI) contaminated waters and soils. In the presence of Fe the resulting compounds are usually mixed Fe(III)-Cr(III) phases, while, under iron-free conditions, reduction leads to formation of plain Cr(III) hydroxides. Environmental stability of these compounds depends on their structure and is important to understand how different precipitation conditions affect the local atomic order of resulting compounds and thus their long term stability. In current study, typical Cr(VI) environmental remediation products, i.e. plain and mixed Fe(III)-Cr(III) hydroxides, were synthesized by hydrolysis and redox reactions and their structure was studied by X ray diffraction and X ray absorption fine structure techniques. Plain Cr(III) hydroxide was found to correspond to the molecular formula Cr(OH)3·3H2O and was identified as crystalline in XRD. However, the same compound when examined by EXAFS did not exhibit any clear local order in the range of EXAFS detectable distances, i.e. between 0 and 5Å. Namely, EXAFS spectroscopy detected only contribution from the first nearest neighboring (Cr-O) shell, suggesting that CrO6 octahedra interconnection is loose, in accordance with the suggested anti-bayerite structure of this compound. Mixed Fe(III)-Cr(III) systems resembled 2-line ferrihydrite irrespective of the synthesis route. Analysis of Fe-K-EXAFS and Cr-K-EXAFS spectra indicated that FeO6 octahedra are bonded by sharing both edges and corners, while CrO6 octahedra seem to prefer edge sharing linkage. EXAFS data also suggest that Fe-Cr hydroxide produced by hydrolysis presents a better arrangement of CrO6 octahedra compared to the redox product. PMID:24997915

  12. Characterization of Human RNA Polymerase III Identifies Orthologues for Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA Polymerase III Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ping; Wu, Si; Sun, Yuling; Yuan, Chih-Chi; Kobayashi, Ryuji; Myers, Michael P.; Hernandez, Nouria

    2002-01-01

    Unlike Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase III, human RNA polymerase III has not been entirely characterized. Orthologues of the yeast RNA polymerase III subunits C128 and C37 remain unidentified, and for many of the other subunits, the available information is limited to database sequences with various degrees of similarity to the yeast subunits. We have purified an RNA polymerase III complex and identified its components. We found that two RNA polymerase III subunits, referred to as RPC8 and RPC9, displayed sequence similarity to the RNA polymerase II RPB7 and RPB4 subunits, respectively. RPC8 and RPC9 associated with each other, paralleling the association of the RNA polymerase II subunits, and were thus paralogues of RPB7 and RPB4. Furthermore, the complex contained a prominent 80-kDa polypeptide, which we called RPC5 and which corresponded to the human orthologue of the yeast C37 subunit despite limited sequence similarity. RPC5 associated with RPC53, the human orthologue of S. cerevisiae C53, paralleling the association of the S. cerevisiae C37 and C53 subunits, and was required for transcription from the type 2 VAI and type 3 human U6 promoters. Our results provide a characterization of human RNA polymerase III and show that the RPC5 subunit is essential for transcription. PMID:12391170

  13. III-V nanowire growth mechanism: V/III ratio and temperature effects.

    PubMed

    Dayeh, Shadi A; Yu, Edward T; Wang, Deli

    2007-08-01

    We have studied the dependence of Au-assisted InAs nanowire (NW) growth on InAs(111)B substrates as a function of substrate temperature and input V/III precursor ratio using organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy. Temperature-dependent growth was observed within certain temperature windows that are highly dependent on input V/III ratios. This dependence was found to be a direct consequence of the drop in NW nucleation and growth rate with increasing V/III ratio at a constant growth temperature due to depletion of indium at the NW growth sites. The growth rate was found to be determined by the local V/III ratio, which is dependent on the input precursor flow rates, growth temperature, and substrate decomposition. These studies advance understanding of the key processes involved in III-V NW growth, support the general validity of the vapor-liquid-solid growth mechanism for III-V NWs, and improve rational control over their growth morphology. PMID:17608541

  14. Adsorption behavior of Eu(III) on partially Fe(III)- or Ti(IV)-coated silica

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of Eu(III) onto silica surface, which was partially coated with Fe(III) or Ti(IV), was investigated to determine Fe(III) or Ti(IV) effects on the surface reaction of lanthanides on mineral surfaces in groundwater. Compared with a parallel uncoated silica, the Fe(III)-coated silica did not enhance the adsorption of Eu(III). However, enhanced adsorption of Eu(III) on the Ti(IV)-coated silica was observed by increasing the amount of Ti(IV) on the silica surface. PMID:22221407

  15. Hyper III on ramp, front view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Hyper III was a low-cost test vehicle for an advanced lifting-body shape. Like the earlier M2-F1, it was a 'homebuilt' research aircraft, i.e., built at the Flight Research Center (FRC), later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center. It had a steel-tube frame covered with Dacron, a fiberglass nose, sheet aluminum fins, and a wing from an HP-11 sailplane. Construction was by volunteers at the FRC. Although the Hyper III was to be flown remotely in its initial tests, it was fitted with a cockpit for a pilot. On the Hyper III's only flight, it was towed aloft attached to a Navy SH-3 helicopter by a 400-foot cable. NASA research pilot Bruce Peterson flew the SH-3. After he released the Hyper III from the cable, NASA research pilot Milt Thompson flew the vehicle by radio control until the final approach when Dick Fischer took over control using a model-airplane radio-control box. The Hyper III flared, then landed and slid to a stop on Rogers Dry Lakebed. The Flight Research Center (FRC--as Dryden was named from 1959 until 1976) already had experience with testing small-scale aircraft using model-airplane techniques, but the first true remotely piloted research vehicle was the Hyper III, which flew only once in December 1969. At that time, the Center was engaged in flight research with a variety of reentry shapes called lifting bodies, and there was a desire both to expand the flight research experience with maneuverable reentry vehicles, including a high-performance, variable-geometry craft, and to investigate a remotely piloted flight research technique that made maximum use of a research pilot's skill and experience by placing him 'in the loop' as if he were in the cockpit. (There have been, as yet, no female research pilots assigned to Dryden.) The Hyper III as originally conceived was a stiletto-shaped lifting body that had resulted from a study at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. It was one of a number of hypersonic, cross

  16. Background investigation in EDELWEISS-III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scorza, Silvia

    2015-08-01

    Protection from and rejection of backgrounds is a key issue for the EDELWEISS-III direct dark matter detection experiment which aims at exploring the 10-9 pb cross-section region for spin-independent WIMP-nucleon interaction. The detector is located in the low radioactivity environment of the Modane Underground Laboratory and consists of 36 advanced FID germanium detectors operating at 18 mK in a dilution refrigerator in order to identify eventual rare nuclear recoils induced by elastic scattering of WIMPs from our Galactic halo. I will discuss the background and the methods of rejecting it with the FID detectors. Detector performances and the first analysis of data acquired in a long-term campaign will be presented as well. The FID detector technology is not limited to EDELWEISS-III but can further be employed in the next generation of cryogenic detector experiments.

  17. Doublet III beamline: as-built

    SciTech Connect

    Harder, C.R.; Holland, M.M.; Parker, J.W.; Gunn, J.; Resnick, L.

    1980-03-01

    In order to fully exploit Doublet III capabilities and to study new plasma physics regimes, a Neutral Beam Injector System has been constructed. Initially, a two beamline system will supply 7 MW of heat to the plasma. The system is currently being expanded to inject approx. 20 MW of power (6 beamlines). Each beamline is equipped with two Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory type rectangular ion sources with 10 cm x 40 cm extraction grids. These sources will accelerate hydrogen ions to 80 keV, with extracted beam currents in excess of 80 A per source expected. The first completed source is currently being tested and conditioned on the High Voltage Test Stand at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. This paper pictorially reviews the as-built Doublet III neutral beamline with emphasis on component relation and configuration relative to spatial and source imposed design constraints.

  18. Mucolipidosis Type III α/β

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Darcy A.; Memoli, Vincent A.; Cathey, Sara S.; Harris, Brent T.

    2014-01-01

    We report findings from an autopsy of a 45-year-old woman with the rare lysosomal storage disease mucolipidosis type III α/β. Her disease manifested most notably as multiple bone and cartilage problems with tracheal and bronchial malacia. Principal autopsy findings included gross abnormalities in bone and cartilage with corresponding microscopic cytoplasmic lysosomal granules. These cytoplasmic granules were also seen in histologic preparations of the brain, myocardium, heart valves, and fibroblasts of the liver and skin by light and electron microscopy. By electron microscopy there were scattered, diffuse vesicular cytoplasmic granules in neurons and glia and an increase in lysosomal structures with fine electron lucent granularity in the above tissue types. Our findings help elaborate current understanding of this disease and differentiate it from the mucopolysaccharidoses and related disorders. To our knowledge, this is the first report to document pathologic findings in a patient with mucolipidosis type III α/β by autopsy. PMID:21466370

  19. Flexor tendon repair in zone III.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, Mohammad M

    2011-01-01

    There is a paucity of the literature on the outcome of zone III flexor tendon injuries. In this paper, we report on the results of zone III flexor tendon repair in 35 consecutive adult patients with clean cut lacerations of both flexor tendons in 42 fingers. There were 25 men and 10 women with an average age of 32 years. Repair of both flexor tendons was performed using 'figure of eight' core sutures and a continuous epitendinous suture. Postoperatively, an immediate active range of motion protocol was applied to ensure full active extension of the interphalangeal joints. The results were assessed using the Strickland-Glogovac grading system. There were no ruptures. One patient with two injured fingers developed complex regional pain syndrome and the final outcome was fair in both fingers. In the remaining 34 patients (40 fingers), 33 patients (38 fingers) had an excellent outcome and the remaining patient (two fingers) had a good outcome. PMID:20807720

  20. Luminescence of europium (III) complexes for visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolontaeva, Olga A.; Pozharov, Mikhail V.; Korolovich, Vladimir F.; Khokhlova, Anastasia R.; Kirdyanova, Anna N.; Burmistrova, Natalia A.; Zakharova, Tamara V.; Goryacheva, Irina Y.

    2016-04-01

    With the purpose to develop bright non-toxic luminescent label for theranostic application we have studied complexation of lanthanide dipicolinates (2,6-pyridinedicarboxylates) by sodium alginate and effect of thermal exposure of synthesized micro-capsules on their luminescent properties. Synthesized micro-capsules are stable in acidic medium but dissolve at pH ~ 4 due to transformation of cationic europium dipicolinate complex to anionic. Luminescence studies have shown that emission spectra of europium(III)-alginate complexes (both chloride and dipicolinate) contain two intensive bands characteristic to Eu3+ ion (5D0 --> 7F1 (590 nm) and 5D0 --> 7F1 (612 nm)). We have also found that at 160ºC europium(III)- alginate micro-capsules decompose to black, soot-like substance, therefore, their thermal treatment must be performed in closed environment (i.e., sealed ampoules).

  1. LSPRAY-III: A Lagrangian Spray Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.

    2008-01-01

    LSPRAY-III is a Lagrangian spray solver developed for application with parallel computing and unstructured grids. It is designed to be massively parallel and could easily be coupled with any existing gas-phase flow and/or Monte Carlo Probability Density Function (PDF) solvers. The solver accommodates the use of an unstructured mesh with mixed elements of either triangular, quadrilateral, and/or tetrahedral type for the gas flow grid representation. It is mainly designed to predict the flow, thermal and transport properties of a rapidly vaporizing spray because of its importance in aerospace application. The manual provides the user with an understanding of various models involved in the spray formulation, its code structure and solution algorithm, and various other issues related to parallelization and its coupling with other solvers. With the development of LSPRAY-III, we have advanced the state-of-the-art in spray computations in several important ways.

  2. Background investigation in EDELWEISS-III

    SciTech Connect

    Scorza, Silvia

    2015-08-17

    Protection from and rejection of backgrounds is a key issue for the EDELWEISS-III direct dark matter detection experiment which aims at exploring the 10{sup −9} pb cross-section region for spin-independent WIMP-nucleon interaction. The detector is located in the low radioactivity environment of the Modane Underground Laboratory and consists of 36 advanced FID germanium detectors operating at 18 mK in a dilution refrigerator in order to identify eventual rare nuclear recoils induced by elastic scattering of WIMPs from our Galactic halo. I will discuss the background and the methods of rejecting it with the FID detectors. Detector performances and the first analysis of data acquired in a long-term campaign will be presented as well. The FID detector technology is not limited to EDELWEISS-III but can further be employed in the next generation of cryogenic detector experiments.

  3. Chukar III-R Reconnaissance System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toops, Laurence C.

    1990-02-01

    This paper describes Northrop's developmental Chukar 111-R reconnaissance system, which is based on the Chukar III target drone. Some military needs for reconnaissance and the advantages of employing an unmanned air vehicle to satisfy these needs are noted. Next, features incorporated into the new Chukar III-R reconnaissance system are described. These features include a high performance unmanned air vehicle (UAV), an infrared line scanner for imaOng targets, radio position-fix enhanced navigation, and a new mission planning and control station. Sensor slight test results, a pay-load mockup, and mission planning and image exploitation capabilities are discussed. The advantages of high speed and low observability are cited. Launch and retrieval techniques are described.

  4. MAVIS III -- A Windows 95/NT Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Hardwick, M.F.

    1997-12-01

    MAVIS (Modeling and Analysis of Explosive Valve Interactions) is a computer program that simulates operation of explosively actuated valve. MAVIS was originally written in Fortran in the mid 1970`s and was primarily run on the Sandia Vax computers in use through the early 1990`s. During the mid to late 1980`s MAVIS was upgraded to include the effects of plastic deformation and it became MAVIS II. When the Vax computers were retired, the Gas Transfer System (GTS) Development Department ported the code to the Macintosh and PC platforms, where it ran as a simple console application. All graphical output was lost during these ports. GTS code developers recently completed an upgrade that provides a Windows 95/NT MAVIS application and restores all of the original graphical output. This upgrade is called MAVIS III version 1.0. This report serves both as a user`s manual for MAVIS III v 1.0 and as a general software development reference.

  5. Antisites in III-V semiconductors: Density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chroneos, A.; Tahini, H. A.; Schwingenschlögl, U.; Grimes, R. W.

    2014-07-01

    Density functional based simulation, corrected for finite size effects, is used to investigate systematically the formation of antisite defects in III-V semiconductors (III = Al, Ga, and In and V = P, As, and Sb). Different charge states are modelled as a function of the Fermi level and under different growth conditions. The formation energies of group III antisites ( III V q) decrease with increasing covalent radius of the group V atom though not group III radius, whereas group V antisites ( V I I I q) show a consistent decrease in formation energies with increase in group III and group V covalent radii. In general, III V q defects dominate under III-rich conditions and V I I I q under V-rich conditions. Comparison with equivalent vacancy formation energy simulations shows that while antisite concentrations are always dominant under stoichiometric conditions, modest variation in growth or doping conditions can lead to a significantly higher concentration of vacancies.

  6. [Role of antithrombin iii in cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Muedra, V; Barettino, D; D'Ocón, P

    2013-11-01

    Coagulation of blood is of multidisciplinary interest. Cardiac surgery produces major changes in the delicate balance between pro-and anti-coagulant serum factors. The role of antithrombin iii has been analysed after finding evidence that associated decreased levels of protein activity to postoperative morbidity and mortality. Supplementing exogenous antithrombin is considered with the aim of optimising outcomes. Its intrinsic anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties have stimulated a growing interest, and suggests new lines of research. PMID:23228672

  7. Engineering design of ARIES-III

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, D.K.; Wong, C.; Cheng, E.

    1993-07-01

    An efficient organic cooled low activation ferritic steel first wall and shield has been designed for the D-{sup 3}He power reactor ARIES-III. The design allows removal of the large surface heat load without exceeding temperature and stress design limits. The structure is expected to last for the whole reactor life. The major concerns regarding using the organic coolant in fusion reactors have been greatly alleviated.

  8. Organic coolant for ARIES-III

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, D.K. ); Sviatoslavsky, I.; Sawan, M. ); Gierszewski, P. ); Hollies, R. ); Sharafat, S. ); Herring, S. )

    1991-04-01

    ARIES-III is a D-He{sub 3} reactor design study. It is found that the organic coolant is well suited for the D-He{sub 3} reactor. This paper discusses the unique features of the D-He{sub 3} reactor, and the reason that the organic coolant is compatible with those features. The problems associated with the organic coolant are also discussed. 8 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Biosorption of Cr(III) and Fe(III) in single and binary systems onto pretreated orange peel.

    PubMed

    Lugo-Lugo, V; Barrera-Díaz, C; Ureña-Núñez, F; Bilyeu, B; Linares-Hernández, I

    2012-12-15

    Trivalent chromium and iron are the products of the traditional reduction of hexavalent chromium by ferrous salts in industrial wastewater. Although there have been a few studies of Cr(III) adsorption, none have considered the effect of Fe(III) on Cr(III) adsorption in a binary system representing expected products of hexavalent chromium in industrial wastewater. The biosorption of Cr(III) and Fe(III) ions onto pretreated ground orange peel in single and binary systems was studied in batch experiments using a variety of techniques. The kinetic results showed a rapid rate of biosorption of Cr(III) and Fe(III) in single and binary systems and mutual interference effects in the competitive binary Cr(III)-Fe(III) system. Second order kinetic models showed the best fit for all systems. The behavior of competitive Cr(III)-Fe(III) biosorption were successfully described by the multicomponent Langmuir model, obtaining maximum capacities for Cr(III) and Fe(III) of 9.43 and 18.19 mg/g respectively. SEM/EDS results confirmed that the metals adsorb on the surface and FTIR identified the hydroxyl groups on the carboxylic acids as the active binding sites. PMID:22892173

  10. First heterometallic Ga(III)-Dy(III) single-molecule magnets: implication of Ga(III) in extracting Fe-Dy interaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sihuai; Mereacre, Valeriu; Anson, Christopher E; Powell, Annie K

    2016-05-31

    The compounds of the system [M4M'2(μ3-OH)2(nbdea)4(C6H5CO2)8]·MeCN, where M = Ga(III), M' = Dy(III) (), M = Fe(III), M' = Y(III) () are isostructural to the known [Fe4Dy2] compound (). Those of the system [M4M'4(μ3-OH)4(nbdea)4(m-CH3C6H4CO2)12]·nMeCN, where M = Ga(III), M' = Dy(III), n = 4 (), M = Fe(III), M' = Y(III), n = 1 () are isostructural to the [Fe4Dy4] compound (). This allows for comparisons between single ion effects of the paramagnetic ions. The structures were determined using single crystal analysis. Magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal that the Ga(III)-Dy(III) compounds and are SMMs. The energy barrier for is close to that for the known isostructural Fe4Dy2 compound (), but with a significantly increased relaxation time. PMID:27184869

  11. Dry etching of III-V nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Pearton, S.J.; Shul, R.J.; McLane, G.F.; Constantine, C.

    1995-12-01

    The chemical inertness and high bond strengths of the III-V nitrides lead to slower plasma etching rates than for more conventional III-V semiconductors under the same conditions. High ion density conditions (>3{times}l0{sup 9}cm{sup {minus}3}) such as those obtained in ECR or magnetron reactors produce etch rates up to an order of magnitude higher than for RIE, where the ion densities are in the 10{sup 9}cm{sup {minus}3} range. We have developed smooth anisotropic dry etches for GaN, InN, AlN and their alloys based on Cl{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar, BCl{sub 3}/Ar, Cl{sub 2}/H{sub 2}, Cl{sub 2}/SF{sub 6}, HBr/H{sub 2} and HI/H{sub 2} plasma chemistries achieving etch rates up to {approximately}4,000{angstrom}/min at moderate dc bias voltages ({le}-150V). Ion-induced damage in the nitrides appears to be less apparent than in other III-V`s. One of the key remaining issues is the achievement of high selectivities for removal of one layer from another.

  12. Energy source of flagellar type III secretion.

    PubMed

    Paul, Koushik; Erhardt, Marc; Hirano, Takanori; Blair, David F; Hughes, Kelly T

    2008-01-24

    Bacterial flagella contain a specialized secretion apparatus that functions to deliver the protein subunits that form the filament and other structures to outside the membrane. This apparatus is related to the injectisome used by many gram-negative pathogens and symbionts to transfer effector proteins into host cells; in both systems this export mechanism is termed 'type III' secretion. The flagellar secretion apparatus comprises a membrane-embedded complex of about five proteins, and soluble factors, which include export-dedicated chaperones and an ATPase, FliI, that was thought to provide the energy for export. Here we show that flagellar secretion in Salmonella enterica requires the proton motive force (PMF) and does not require ATP hydrolysis by FliI. The export of several flagellar export substrates was prevented by treatment with the protonophore CCCP, with no accompanying decrease in cellular ATP levels. Weak swarming motility and rare flagella were observed in a mutant deleted for FliI and for the non-flagellar type-III secretion ATPases InvJ and SsaN. These findings show that the flagellar secretion apparatus functions as a proton-driven protein exporter and that ATP hydrolysis is not essential for type III secretion. PMID:18216859

  13. 1,2,4-Diazaphospholide complexes of yttrium(iii), dysprosium(iii), erbium(iii), and europium(ii,iii): synthesis, X-ray structural characterization, and EPR analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongli; Guo, Wenzhen; Liu, Dongling; Yang, Ying; Zheng, Wenjun

    2016-01-21

    Several structurally characterized heteroleptic, charge-separated heterobimetallic, and polymeric alkali metal ate complexes of 1,2,4-diazaphospholide Y(iii), Dy(iii), Er(iii), Eu(iii), and Eu(ii) were prepared via the reaction of MCl3 and K[3,5-R2dp] in varied ratios at 200-220 °C (M = Y, Dy, Er, Eu; R = tBu, Ph). PMID:26666366

  14. 1,2,4-Diazaphospholide complexes of lanthanum(iii), cerium(iii), neodymium(iii), praseodymium(iii), and samarium(iii): synthesis, X-ray structural characterization, and magnetic susceptibility studies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Minggang; Wang, Lixia; Li, Pangpang; Ma, Jianping; Zheng, Wenjun

    2016-07-01

    A few heteroleptic, charge-separated heterobimetallic, and polymeric alkali metalate complexes of 1,2,4-diazaphospholide lanthanum(iii), cerium(iii), neodymium(iii), praseodymium(iii), and samarium(iii) were simply prepared via the metathesis reaction of MCl3 (THF)m (m = 1-2) and K[3,5-R2dp] ([3,5-R2dp](-) = 3,5-di-substituent-1,2,4-diazaphospholide; R = tBu, Ph) in a varied ratio (1 : 3, 1 : 4, and 1 : 5, respectively) at room temperature in tetrahydrofuran. All the complexes were fully characterized by (1)H, (13)C{(1)H}, (31)P{(1)H}, IR, and X-ray single crystal diffraction analysis despite their paramagnetism (excluding La(iii) complexes). The structures of the complexes were found to feature varied coordination modes. The magnetic properties of several compounds were studied by magnetic susceptibility, and the complexes presented the magnetic moments close to or lower than the theoretical values for the free ions in the trivalent oxidation states (Pr(3+), Nd(3+)). PMID:27326667

  15. 49 CFR 172.440 - RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. 172.440 Section 172... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.440 RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label must be as follows: EC02MR91.034 (b) In addition to complying...

  16. 49 CFR 172.440 - RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. 172.440 Section 172... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.440 RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label must be as follows: EC02MR91.034 (b) In addition to complying...

  17. 49 CFR 172.440 - RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. 172.440 Section 172... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.440 RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label must be as follows: EC02MR91.034 (b) In addition to complying...

  18. 49 CFR 172.440 - RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. 172.440 Section 172... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.440 RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label must be as follows: EC02MR91.034 (b) In addition to complying...

  19. 49 CFR 172.440 - RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. 172.440 Section 172... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.440 RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label must be as follows: EC02MR91.034 (b) In addition to complying...

  20. Korean Cultural Influences on the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunsalus, Ae-Jung Chang; Kelly, Kevin R.

    2001-01-01

    Investigates the effect of Korean culture on the results of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III) by comparing profiles of 147 Korean and 132 American college students. Results indicate that MCMI-III personality profile differences exist between Korean and American college students. Discusses implications for mental health…

  1. Brazilian Adaptation of the Woodcock-Johnson III Cognitive Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wechsler, Solange Muglia; Nunes, Carlos Sancineto; Schelini, Patricia Waltz; Pasian, Sonia Regina; Homsi, Silvia Vertoni; Moretti, Lucia; Anache, Alexandra Ayach

    2010-01-01

    An adaptation of the standard battery of Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities (WJ-III) for Brazilian children and youth was investigated. The sample was composed of 1094 students (54 percent girls), ages 7-17, living in Sao Paulo state (91 percent). Items from Brazilian school books as well as from the WJ-III Spanish version…

  2. Current Use of DSM-III-R in Counselor Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritchie, Martin H.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Surveyed 146 counselor education programs to investigate proportion of programs that teach use of "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-3rd Edition," revised (DSM-III-R), program tracks requiring DSM-III-R training, and differences between accredited and nonaccredited programs in DSM-III-R coverage. Found that most programs taught…

  3. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 261 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false III Appendix III to Part 261 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Appendix III to Part 261...

  4. Microbial As(III) Oxidation in Water Treatment Plant Filters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic exists in two oxidation states in water - arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)]. As(III) is relatively mobile in water and difficult to remove by arsenic-removal treatment processes. Source waters that contain As(III) must add a strong oxidant such as free chlorine or p...

  5. 76 FR 60511 - Amendment of Marine Safety Manual, Volume III

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Background and Purpose Chapter 16 of Volume III of the Marine Safety Manual... SECURITY Coast Guard Amendment of Marine Safety Manual, Volume III AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice... Offshore Units. The policy is currently found in Chapter 16 of the Marine Safety Manual, Volume III....

  6. 76 FR 33589 - Standards Improvement Project-Phase III

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ...Phase III of the Standards Improvement Project (SIP-III) is the third in a series of rulemaking actions to improve and streamline OSHA standards. The Standards Improvement Project removes or revises individual requirements within rules that are confusing, outdated, duplicative, or inconsistent. OSHA identified several requirements for SIP-III (e.g., rigging, NIOSH records, and training......

  7. Luminescent properties of europium(III) and terbium(III) complexes with para- and ortho-ethoxybenzoic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panyushkin, V. T.; Mutuzova, M. Kh.; Shamsutdinova, M. Kh.

    2016-02-01

    The luminescent properties of europium(III) and terbium(III) complexes with para- and ortho-ethoxybenzoic acids are studied. The excitation energies of the triplet states of ligands are determined, a hypothesis is made about the efficient luminescence of europium(III) and terbium(III) complexes, the geometry of the coordination polyhedron of a europium complex is established, and the luminescence quantum yields of the complexes in solution are determined.

  8. [Ln(III)-Mn(II)-Ln(III)] heterometallic compounds: rare linear SMMs with divalent manganese ions.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Lei; Min, Fan-Yong; Wang, Chao; Lin, Shuang-Yan; Liu, Zhiliang; Tang, Jinkui

    2015-02-21

    The reaction of Mn(OAc)2·4H2O and Ln(NO3)3·6H2O with N-(2-aminopropyl)-2-hydroxybenzamide and salicylic aldehyde in methanol/methylene dichloride produces yellow crystals of Ln2Mn(C7H5O2)8 (Ln = Gd (), Tb (), Dy (), Ho () and Er ()), in the presence of triethylamine. Three metal ions are connected by six μ2-phenolate oxygen atoms of six salicylic aldehyde ligands, resulting in perfect linear [Ln(III)-Mn(II)-Ln(III)] structures. Magnetic studies of these complexes have been performed and AC susceptibility measurements show the presence of a temperature-dependent out-of-phase ac signal for complexes and indicating single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior. The Dy(III)2Mn(II) compound shows double relaxation pathways which may originate from the single ion behavior of individual Dy(III) ions and the weak coupling between Dy(III) and Mn(II) ions, respectively. The Ueff of 92.4(2) K is a relatively high value among 3d-4f SMMs. Moreover, complexes and represent the first linear Mn-Ln SMMs containing only divalent manganese ions as far as we know. The result suggests the positive effects of magnetic coupling to enhance their SMM behavior, presenting a promising strategy for constructing efficient heterometallic SMMs. PMID:25601415

  9. Does As(III) interact with Fe(II), Fe(III) and organic matter through ternary complexes?

    PubMed

    Catrouillet, Charlotte; Davranche, Mélanie; Dia, Aline; Bouhnik-Le Coz, Martine; Demangeat, Edwige; Gruau, Gérard

    2016-05-15

    Up until now, only a small number of studies have been dedicated to the binding processes of As(III) with organic matter (OM) via ionic Fe(III) bridges; none was interested in Fe (II). Complexation isotherms were carried out with As(III), Fe(II) or Fe(III) and Leonardite humic acid (HA). Although PHREEQC/Model VI, implemented with OM thiol groups, reproduced the experimental datasets with Fe(III), the poor fit between the experimental and modeled Fe(II) data suggested another binding mechanism for As(III) to OM. PHREEQC/Model VI was modified to take various possible As(III)-Fe(II)-OM ternary complex conformations into account. The complexation of As(III) as a mononuclear bidentate complex to a bidentate Fe(II)-HA complex was evidenced. However, the model needed to be improved since the distribution of the bidentate sites appeared to be unrealistic with regards to the published XAS data. In the presence of Fe(III), As(III) was bound to thiol groups which are more competitive with regards to the low density of formed Fe(III)-HA complexes. Based on the new data and previously published results, we propose a general scheme describing the various As(III)-Fe-MO complexes that are able to form in Fe and OM-rich waters. PMID:26939079

  10. The role of Ce(III) in BZ oscillating reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, Paulo A.; Varela, Hamilton; Faria, Roberto B.

    2012-03-01

    Herein we present results on the oscillatory dynamics in the bromate-oxalic acid-acetone-Ce(III)/Ce(IV) system in batch and also in a CSTR. We show that Ce(III) is the necessary reactant to allow the emergence of oscillations. In batch, oscillations occur with Ce(III) and also with Ce(IV), but no induction period is observed with Ce(III). In a CSTR, no oscillations were found using a freshly prepared Ce(IV), but only when the cerium-containing solution was aged, allowing partial conversion of Ce(IV) to Ce(III) by reaction with acetone.

  11. Antioxidant property of quercetin-Cr(III) complex: The role of Cr(III) ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weijun; Sun, Shaofang; cao, Wei; Liang, Yan; Song, Jirong

    2009-01-01

    Flavonoid-metal complex is reported to exhibit a higher antioxidant activity than parent flavonoid. In this paper, experimental and theoretical methods are applied to study the antioxidant properties of quercetin and quercetin-Cr(III) complex, to find out the antioxidant activity variation and the role of Cr(III) ion on the antioxidant activity of the complex. Bond dissociation energy (BDE) and ionization potential (IP) of quercetin and the complex are calculated at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p)//B3LYP/LANL2DZ level. The experimental results show that the complex has a higher DPPH radical scavenging activity than quercetin. The calculated results show that the complex displays lower BDE and IP than quercetin. The IP of the complex declines obviously, indicating that the Cr (III) ion has more impact on the electron donating ability than on the hydrogen atom transferring ability of the complex.

  12. Redox stability of As(III) on schwertmannite surfaces.

    PubMed

    Paikaray, Susanta; Essilfie-Dughan, Joseph; Göttlicher, Jörg; Pollok, Kilian; Peiffer, Stefan

    2014-01-30

    As(III)-enriched mine discharge often drains through Fe(III)-mineral abundant land covers which makes the understanding of its fate and redox behaviour extremely important. We therefore conducted batch kinetic and equilibrium studies at pH 3.0±0.05 in anoxic media coupled with spectroscopic and microscopic examinations at variable conditions to understand possible As(III) binding mechanisms and the redox stability of As(III) on schwertmannite, a prominent ferric mineral in acid mine drainage environments. Schwertmannite acted as an efficient scavenger for As(III) compared to goethite at identical sorbent:solute ratios. As K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) demonstrated partial oxidation of sorbed As(III) to As(V) on both the minerals depending on the Fe(III)/As(III) ratios (goethite acted as a better oxidant than schwertmannite). Sorbed As(III) and As(V) coordinated in a bidentate binuclear binding mechanism with As(III)/As(V)-O and As(III)/As(V)-Fe interatomic distances as 1.78/1.69 and 3.37/3.31Å, respectively. Scanning (SEM-EDX) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopic, and IR spectroscopic measurements revealed the formation of As-containing surface coatings by sorbed As on schwertmannite. PMID:24361800

  13. Spectroscopic characterization of bioactive carboxyamide with trinuclear lanthanide (III) ions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bibhesh K; Prakash, Anant; Adhikari, Devjani

    2009-10-15

    Complexes of La(III), Sm(III), Eu(III) and Tb(III) with bioactive carboxyamide ligands N',N''-bis(3-caboxy-1-oxophenelenyl)2-amino-N-arylbenzamidine have been synthesized and characterized by various physico-chemical techniques. Mass spectrum explains the successive degradation of the molecular species in solution and justifies ML complexes. Vibrational spectra indicate coordination of Ln(III) with amide and carboxylate oxygen of the ligand along with nitrate ions. The magnetic moment of Sm(III) and Eu(III) complexes showed slightly higher-values which originated due to low J-J separation leading to thermal population of next higher energy J levels and susceptibility due to first order Zeeman effect. The strong luminescence emitting peaks at 587 nm for Eu(III) and 543 nm for Tb(III) can be observed, which could be attributed to the ligand have an enhanced effect to the luminescence intensity of the Eu(III) and Tb(III). The thermal behaviour of complexes shows that water molecules and nitrate ion are removed in first step followed by the removal of two molecules of nitrate ions and then decomposition of the ligand molecule in subsequent step. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were computed from the thermal data using Coats and Redferm method, which confirm first order kinetics. PMID:19716336

  14. A deficiency of O III in the Io plasma torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. A.; Shemansky, D. E.; Johnson, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Evidence for a deficiency of O III ions in the Io plasma torus is reported and implications of this deficiency for the physical processes controlling the plasma are considered. Observations of the O III 5007-A as well as Cl III and S III emissions from the Io plasma torus were made by a ground-based echelle spectrograph and intensified Reticon detector in February and May, 1981. The O III observations allow an upper limit of 4/cu cm to be placed on torus O III abundance, which is inconsistent with expectations for a low density plasma controlled by electron collisions. The inclusion of ion-ion and ion-atom charge exchange reactions and a depleted high energy electron component in the model is found to suppress O III levels, however observed limiting values are only achieved if it is assumed that the O III is kinetically hot. In addition, the charge-exchange model developed is inconsistent with previous observations of the kinetics of the S II-S III system. The present observations also establish upper limits of 2 R on 5518-A and 5538-A Cl III emission, and an emission rate of 58 + or - 40 R for the S III 6312-A line in the hot torus.

  15. Selectivity of azine ligands toward lanthanide(III)/actinide(III) differentiation: a relativistic DFT based rationalization.

    PubMed

    Zaiter, Abdellah; Amine, Boudersa; Bouzidi, Yamina; Belkhiri, Lotfi; Boucekkine, Abdou; Ephritikhine, Michel

    2014-05-01

    Polyazines emerge as highly selective ligands toward actinide versus lanthanide separation. Electronic structures of several mono- and polyazine f-complexes of general formula MX3L (M(+3) = Ce, Nd, Eu, U, Am, and Cm; X = RCp(-) or NO3(-); L = N-donor ligand) related to Ln(III)/An(III) differentiation have been investigated using scalar relativistic ZORA/DFT calculations. In all cases, DFT calculations predict shorter An-N bonds than Ln-N ones whatever the azine used, in good agreement with available experimental data. The An-N bonds are also characterized by higher stretching frequencies than Ln-N bonds. The electronic structures of all species have been studied using different population analyses, among them natural population (NPA) and the quantum theory of atoms in molecule approach (QTAIM), as well as using different bond indices. The ability for Ln(III)/An(III) differentiation of the terdentate bipyrazolate BPPR ligand in the M(BPPR)(NO3)3 complexes (M(3+) = Ce, Eu, U and Am ; R = H, 2,2-dimethylpropyl) where BPP = 2,6-bis(dialkyl-1H-pyrazol-3-yl)pyridine has been studied, with a special emphasis on the total metal-ligand bonding energy (TBE). The ZORA/DFT approach was found to properly reproduce the higher selectivity of the polyazine BPP ligand compared to monoazines, especially for the Eu(III)/Am(III) pair operating in spent nuclear fuel, using computed TBEs as criterion. Moreover, the orbital part of the total bonding energy appears also to rationalize well the observed selectivity. PMID:24749559

  16. 9,10-phenanthrenesemiquinone radical complexes of ruthenium(III), osmium(III) and rhodium(III) and redox series.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Manas Kumar; Patra, Sarat Chandra; Maity, Amarendra Nath; Ke, Shyue-Chu; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Ghosh, Prasanta

    2013-05-14

    Reactions of 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (PQ) in toluene with [M(II)(PPh3)3X2] at 298 K afford green complexes, trans-[M(PQ)(PPh3)2X2] (M = Ru, X = Cl, 1; M = Os, X = Br, 2) in moderate yields. Reaction of anhydrous RhCl3 with PQ and PPh3 in boiling ethanol affords the dark brown paramagnetic complex, cis-[Rh(PQ)(PPh3)2Cl2] (3) in good yields. Diffusion of iodine solution in n-hexane to the trans-[Os(PQ) (PPh3)2(CO)(Br)] solution in CH2Cl2 generates the crystals of trans-[Os(PQ)(PPh3)2(CO)(Br)](+)I3(-), (4(+))I3(-)), in lower yields. Single crystal X-ray structure determinations of 1·2toluene, 2·CH2Cl2 and 4(+)I3(-), UV-vis/NIR absorption spectra, EPR spectra of 3, electrochemical activities and DFT calculations on 1, 2, trans-[Ru(PQ)(PMe3)2Cl2] (1Me), trans-[Os(PQ)(PMe3)2Br2] (2Me), cis-[Rh(PQ)(PMe3)2Cl2] (3Me) and their oxidized and reduced analogues including trans-[Os(PQ)(PMe3)2(CO)(Br)](+) (4Me(+)) substantiated that 1-3 are the 9,10-phenanthrenesemiquinone radical (PQ(˙-)) complexes of ruthenium(III), osmium(III) and rhodium(III) and are defined as trans/cis-[M(III)(PQ(˙-))(PPh3)2X2] with a minor contribution of the resonance form trans/cis-[M(II)(PQ)(PPh3)2X2]. Two comparatively longer C-O (1.286(4) Å) and the shorter C-C lengths (1.415(7) Å) of the OO-chelate of 1·2toluene and 2·CH2Cl2 and the isotropic fluid solution EPR signal at g = 1.999 of 3 are consistent with the existence of the reduced PQ(˙-) ligand in 1-3 complexes. Anisotropic EPR spectra of the frozen glasses (g11 = g22 = 2.0046 and g33 = 1.9874) and solids (g11 = g22 = 2.005 and g33 = 1.987) instigate the contribution of the resonance form, cis-[Rh(II)(PQ)(PPh3)2Cl2] in 3. DFT calculations established that the closed shell singlet (CSS) solutions of 1Me and 2Me are unstable due to open shell singlet (OSS) perturbation. However, the broken symmetry (BS) (1,1) Ms = 0 solutions of 1Me and 2Me are respectively 22.6 and 24.2 kJ mole(-1) lower in energy and reproduced the experimental bond

  17. Unequivocal synthetic pathway to heterodinuclear (4f,4f') complexes: magnetic study of relevant (Ln(III), Gd(III)) and (Gd(III), Ln(III)) complexes.

    PubMed

    Costes, Jean-Pierre; Nicodème, Franck

    2002-08-01

    The tripodal ligand tris[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-aza-3-buten]amine (LH(3)) is capable of coordinating to two different lanthanide ions to give complexes formulated as [LLnLn'(NO(3))(3)].x H(2)O. The stepwise synthetic procedure consists of introducing first a Ln(III) ion in the inner N(4)O(3) coordination site. The isolated neutral complex LLn is then allowed to react with a second and different Ln' ion that occupies the outer O(6) site, thus yielding a [LLnLn'(NO(3))(3)].x H(2)O complex. A FAB(+) study has confirmed the existence of (Ln, Ln') entities as genuine, when the Ln' ion in the outer site has a larger ionic radius than the Ln ion in the inner site. The qualitative magnetic study of the (Gd, Ln) and (Ln, Gd) complexes, based on the comparison of the magnetic properties of (Gd, Ln) (or (Ln, Gd)) pairs and (Y, Ln) (or (Ln, La)) pairs, is very informative. Indeed, these former complexes are governed by the thermal population of the Ln(III) Stark levels and the Ln-Gd interaction, while the latter are influenced by the thermal population of the Ln(III) Stark levels. We have been able to show that a ferromagnetic interaction exists at low temperature in the (Gd, Nd), (Gd, Ce), and (Yb, Gd) complexes. In contrast, an antiferromagnetic interaction occurs in the (Dy, Gd) and (Er, Gd) complexes. Although we cannot give a quantitative value to these interactions, we can affirm that their magnitudes are weak since they are only perceptible at very low temperature. PMID:12203324

  18. Space Processing Applications Rocket project SPAR III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, F.

    1978-01-01

    This document presented the engineering report and science payload III test report and summarized the experiment objectives, design/operational concepts, and final results of each of five scientific experiments conducted during the third Space Processing Applications Rocket (SPAR) flight flown by NASA in December 1976. The five individual SPAR experiments, covering a wide and varied range of scientific materials processing objectives, were entitled: Liquid Mixing, Interaction of Bubbles with Solidification Interfaces, Epitaxial Growth of Single Crystal Film, Containerless Processing of Beryllium, and Contact and Coalescence of Viscous Bodies.

  19. Have We Finally Found Pop III Stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    Elusive Population: Population III stars — the theoretical generation of extremely metal-poor stars that should have been formed in the early universe before metals existed — have been conspicuously absent in observations. But a team led by David Sobral (Institute of Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of Lisbon, and Leiden Observatory) may have changed this paradigm with their recent detection of an extremely bright galaxy in the early universe. The team's broad survey of distant galaxies using ESO's Very Large Telescope provides a glimpse of the universe as it was only 800 million years after the Big Bang. The survey uncovered several unusually bright galaxies — including the brightest galaxy ever seen at this distance, an important discovery by itself. But further scrutiny of this galaxy, named CR7, produced an even more exciting find: a bright pocket of the galaxy contained no sign of any metals. Follow-up with other telescopes confirmed this initial detection. Formation Waves: Sobral and his team postulate that we are observing this galaxy at just the right time to have caught a cluster of Population III stars — the bright, metal-free region of the galaxy — at the end of a wave of early star formation. The observations of CR7 also suggest the presence of regular stars in clumps around the metal-free pocket. These older, surrounding clusters may have formed stars first, helping to ionize a local bubble in the galaxy and allowing us to now observe the light from CR7. It was previously thought that Population III stars might only be found in small, dim galaxies, making them impossible for us to detect. But CR7 provides an interesting alternative: this galaxy is bright, and the candidate Population III stars are surrounded by clusters of normal stars. This suggests that these first-generation stars might in fact be easier to detect than was originally thought. Additional follow-up observations with other telescopes will help to confirm the

  20. Diluted magnetic III-V semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munekata, H.; Ohno, H.; von Molnar, S.; Segmüller, Armin; Chang, L. L.; Esaki, L.

    1989-10-01

    A new diluted magnetic III-V semiconductor of In1-xMnxAs (x<=0.18) has been produced by molecular-beam epitaxy. Films grown at 300 °C are predominantly ferromagnetic and their properties suggest the presence of MnAs clusters. Films grown 200 °C, however, are predominantly paramagnetic, and the lattice constant decreases with increasing Mn composition; both are indicative of the formation of a homogeneous alloy. These films have n-type conductivity and reduced band gaps.

  1. The III-Bi binary compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keen, Benjamin

    Bismuth containing III-V alloys such as GaAsBi, GaSbBi, InSbBi and InAsBi have recently become of great interest in the development of optical devices in the infrared spectrum. Difficulties in fabricating these materials stems, in part, from the lack of experimental data on the characteristics of the III-Bi family of compounds: AlBi, GaBi, and InBi. This thesis outlines the growth conditions and characteristics of the MBE deposition of InBi. To date, InBi remains the only one of the three compounds that has been experimentally reported, and the difficulties associated with the growth of AlBi and GaBi are also described herein. InBi thin films were grown on GaAs substrates at temperatures ranging from 50 °C to 100 °C. Unlike other III-V materials, which require a group V overpressure during deposition, to achieve stoichiometric quantities of indium and bismuth an In:Bi BEP ratio of 4:3 was found to be necessary. InBi samples were studied by a variety of measurement techniques, including SEM, EDX, XRD, HAXPES, and HRTEM. Films were found to grow in a 3-D Volmer-Weber mode, forming hemispherical droplets on the substrate surface. These droplets indicated clear signs of Ostwald ripening during growth, but maintained their distribution after deposition. InBi samples are believed to be semi-metallic, confirming some of the properties predicted by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. However, analysis of the crystal structure at the substrate/droplet interface indicates the epitaxial growth of InBi is in the zinc-blende configuration, instead of the PbO configuration, in direct opposition to predictions by DFT and experimental data reported from bulk crystal studies. Attempts to grow the other III-Bi materials, GaBi and AlBi, by MBE also resulted in 3-D droplet formation, but both gallium and aluminum failed to incorporate with bismuth to form a compound. Instead, the materials formed segregated regions in the droplets, clearly visible to SEM and EDX

  2. Prototype studies for the CLEO III RICH

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, S.; Artuso, M.; Efimov, A.; Gao, M.; Playfer, S.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Stone, S.

    1996-06-01

    The authors describe a prototype RICH detector that has been built as part of design work for the CLEO III RICH. Cherenkov photons are produced in a LiF radiator, and are detected in a multiwire chamber with a CaF{sub 2} entrance window containing a gas mixture of methane and TEA. Signals are read out from 2016 cathode pads using low noise Viking chips. First results from this prototype show a yield of 13 photoelectrons per image in agreement with the design studies.

  3. III Astronomy School: the world of stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivielso, L.

    2015-05-01

    The Astronomy School is an activity organized by the Centro de Estudios de Física del Cosmos de Aragón. It is celebrated every year at the end of the summer or the beginning of autumn with the purpose of bringing Astronomy and Astrophysics to the population from an educational and a training point of view. Its III Edition, held in October 2013, has been financed by the Spanish Astronomical Society and was focused on stellar physics. This contribution describes the School and the results.

  4. Arthroscopic fixation of type III acromioclavicular dislocations.

    PubMed

    Somers, Jan F A; Van der Linden, Dietert

    2007-10-01

    Type III Acromio-Clavicular Joint dislocations can be treated successfully by surgical stabilisation in situ, with or without reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments. The authors describe a simple and reliable mode of fixation, performed arthroscopically. The technique can be used for in situ fixation, or as part of an arthroscopically assisted Weaver and Dunn procedure. Using a metallic anchor loaded with a braided polyfilament suture, a strong and reliable fixation of the clavicle to the coracoid process is obtained. No hardware removal is necessary. Concomitant glenohumeral pathology can be treated simultaneously. PMID:18019910

  5. Proteome of Geobacter sulfurreducens grown with Fe(III) oxide or Fe(III) citrate as the electron acceptor.

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y-H R.; Hixson, Kim K.; Aklujkar, Ma; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Lovley, Derek R.; Mester, Tunde

    2008-12-01

    e(III) oxides are the most abundant source of reducible Fe(III) by microorganisms in most soils and sediments, yet few studies on the physiology of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms during growth on Fe(III) oxide have been conducted because of the technical difficulties in working with cell growth and harvest in the presence of Fe(III) oxides. Geobacter sulfurreducens is a representative of the Geobacter species that predominate in a variety of subsurface environments in which Fe(III) oxide is important. In order to better understand the physiology of Geobacter species during growth on Fe(III) oxide, the proteome of G. sulfurreducens grown on Fe(III) oxide was compared with the proteome of cells grown with soluble Fe(III) citrate. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) revealed 19 proteins that were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). These included proteins related to protein synthesis, electron transfer and energy production, oxidative stress, protein folding, outer membrane proteins, nitrogen metabolism and hypothetical proteins. Further analysis of the proteome with the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag method revealed additional proteins associated with growth on Fe(III) oxide. These included the outer-membrane c-type cytochrome, OmcS and OmcG, which genetic studies have suggested are required for Fe(III) oxide reduction. Furthermore, several other cytochromes, as yet unstudied, were detected to be significantly up regulated during growth on Fe(III) oxide and other proteins of unknown function were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). PilA, the structural protein for pili, which is required for Fe(III) oxide reduction, and other pilin-associated proteins were also more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide. Confirmation of the differential expression of proteins known to be important in Fe(III) oxide reduction was observed, and an additional number of previously

  6. Defining the RNA polymerase III transcriptome: Genome-wide localization of the RNA polymerase III transcription machinery in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Canella, Donatella; Praz, Viviane; Reina, Jaime H.; Cousin, Pascal; Hernandez, Nouria

    2010-01-01

    Our view of the RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcription machinery in mammalian cells arises mostly from studies of the RN5S (5S) gene, the Ad2 VAI gene, and the RNU6 (U6) gene, as paradigms for genes with type 1, 2, and 3 promoters. Recruitment of Pol III onto these genes requires prior binding of well-characterized transcription factors. Technical limitations in dealing with repeated genomic units, typically found at mammalian Pol III genes, have so far hampered genome-wide studies of the Pol III transcription machinery and transcriptome. We have localized, genome-wide, Pol III and some of its transcription factors. Our results reveal broad usage of the known Pol III transcription machinery and define a minimal Pol III transcriptome in dividing IMR90hTert fibroblasts. This transcriptome consists of some 500 actively transcribed genes including a few dozen candidate novel genes, of which we confirmed nine as Pol III transcription units by additional methods. It does not contain any of the microRNA genes previously described as transcribed by Pol III, but reveals two other microRNA genes, MIR886 (hsa-mir-886) and MIR1975 (RNY5, hY5, hsa-mir-1975), which are genuine Pol III transcription units. PMID:20413673

  7. White Light Emissive Dy(III) Single-Molecule Magnets Sensitized by Diamagnetic [Co(III) (CN)6 ](3-) Linkers.

    PubMed

    Chorazy, Szymon; Rams, Michał; Nakabayashi, Koji; Sieklucka, Barbara; Ohkoshi, Shin-Ichi

    2016-05-23

    The self-assembly of Dy(III) -3-hydroxypyridine (3-OHpy) complexes with hexacyanidocobaltate(III) anions in water produces cyanido-bridged {[Dy(III) (3-OHpy)2 (H2 O)4 ] [Co(III) (CN)6 ]}⋅H2 O (1) chains. They reveal a single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior with a large zero direct current (dc) field energy barrier, ΔE=266(12) cm(-1) (≈385 K), originating from the single-ion property of eight-coordinated Dy(III) of an elongated dodecahedral geometry, which are embedded with diamagnetic [Co(III) (CN)6 ](3-) ions into zig-zag coordination chains. The SMM character is enhanced by the external dc magnetic field, which results in the ΔE of 320(23) cm(-1) (≈460 K) at Hdc =1 kOe, and the opening of a butterfly hysteresis loop below 6 K. Complex 1 exhibits white Dy(III) -based emission realized by energy transfer from Co(III) and 3-OHpy to Dy(III) . Low temperature emission spectra were correlated with SMM property giving the estimation of the zero field ΔE. 1 is a unique example of bifunctional magneto-luminescent material combining white emission and slow magnetic relaxation with a large energy barrier, both controlled by rich structural and electronic interplay between Dy(III) , 3-OHpy, and [Co(III) (CN)6 ](3-) . PMID:26990787

  8. The influence of triplet energy levels of bridging ligands on energy transfer processes in Ir(III)/Eu(III) dyads.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weili; Lou, Bin; Wang, Jianqiang; Lv, Hongbin; Bian, Zuqiang; Huang, Chunhui

    2011-11-21

    A series of N^N,O^O-bridging ligands based on substituted 1-(pyridin-2-yl)-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone and their corresponding heteroleptic iridium(III) complexes as well as Ir-Eu bimetallic complexes were synthesized and fully characterized. The influence of the triplet energy levels of the bridging ligands on the energy transfer (ET) process from the Ir(III) complexes to Eu(III) ions in solution was investigated at 77 K in Ir(III)/Eu(III) dyads. Photophysical experiment results show the bridging ligands play an important role in the ET process. Only when the triplet energy level of the bridging ligand was lower than the triplet metal-to-ligand charge transfer ((3)MLCT) energy level of the Ir moiety, was pure emission from the Eu(III) ion observed, implying complete ET took place from the Ir moiety to the Eu(III) ion. PMID:21931913

  9. Extraction Based on in situ Formation of Dithiocarbamate for Separation of Am(III) from Ln(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Miyashita, Sunao; Yanaga, Makoto; Okuno, Kenji; Suganuma, Hideo; Satoh, Isamu

    2007-07-01

    A new solvent extraction technique based on in situ extractant formation of dithiocarbamate derivatives was constructed for the purpose of separation of Am(III) from Ln(III). Ammonium salts of dithiocarbamate in this technique are formed during the extraction course by the reaction between secondary amines and carbon disulfide in organic phase. The effects of substituent of secondary amines against the behavior of in situ formation of dithiocarbamate and the distribution behaviors of Am(III) and Ln(III)(especially Eu(III)) into nitrobenzene phase using in situ formation of dithiocarbamate were investigated. It was revealed that amines containing substituent in {alpha} position of amine were not suited that for in situ extractant formation method. The values of separation factor of Am(III)/Eu(III) >10{sup 4} were obtained by the new method using five di-substituted amines/CS{sub 2}/nitrobenzene system. (authors)

  10. Sources of type III solar microwave bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Dmitriy; Lesovoi, Sergey; Tokhchukova, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Microwave fine structures allow us to study plasma evolution in an energy release region. The Siberian Solar Radio Telescope (SSRT) is a unique instrument designed to examine fine structures at 5.7 GHz. A complex analysis of data from RATAN-600, 4-8 GHz spectropolarimeter, and SSRT, simultaneously with extreme UV data, made it possible to localize sources of III type microwave drift bursts in August 10, 2011 event within the entire frequency band of burst occurrences, as well as to determine the most probable region of primary energy release. To localize sources of III type bursts from RATAN-600 data, an original method for data processing has been worked out. At 5.7 GHz, the source of bursts was determined along two coordinates whereas at 4.5, 4.7, 4.9, 5.1, 5.3, 5.5 and 6.0 GHz, their locations were identified along one coordinate. The size of the burst source at 5.1 GHz was found to be maximum as compared to source sizes at other frequencies.

  11. Radioactivity backgrounds in ZEPLIN-III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, H. M.; Akimov, D. Yu.; Barnes, E. J.; Belov, V. A.; Bewick, A.; Burenkov, A. A.; Chepel, V.; Currie, A.; Deviveiros, L.; Edwards, B.; Ghag, C.; Hollingsworth, A.; Horn, M.; Kalmus, G. E.; Kobyakin, A. S.; Kovalenko, A. G.; Lebedenko, V. N.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, M. I.; Lüscher, R.; Majewski, P.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Neves, F.; Paling, S. M.; Pinto da Cunha, J.; Preece, R.; Quenby, J. J.; Reichhart, L.; Scovell, P. R.; Silva, C.; Solovov, V. N.; Smith, N. J. T.; Smith, P. F.; Stekhanov, V. N.; Sumner, T. J.; Thorne, C.; Walker, R. J.

    2012-03-01

    We examine electron and nuclear recoil backgrounds from radioactivity in the ZEPLIN-III dark matter experiment at Boulby. The rate of low-energy electron recoils in the liquid xenon WIMP target is 0.75 ± 0.05 events/kg/day/keV, which represents a 20-fold improvement over the rate observed during the first science run. Energy and spatial distributions agree with those predicted by component-level Monte Carlo simulations propagating the effects of the radiological contamination measured for materials employed in the experiment. Neutron elastic scattering is predicted to yield 3.05 ± 0.5 nuclear recoils with energy 5-50 keV per year, which translates to an expectation of 0.4 events in a 1 yr dataset in anti-coincidence with the veto detector for realistic signal acceptance. Less obvious background sources are discussed, especially in the context of future experiments. These include contamination of scintillation pulses with Cherenkov light from Compton electrons and from β activity internal to photomultipliers, which can increase the size and lower the apparent time constant of the scintillation response. Another challenge is posed by multiple-scatter γ-rays with one or more vertices in regions that yield no ionisation. If the discrimination power achieved in the first run can be replicated, ZEPLIN-III should reach a sensitivity of ˜1 × 10-8pb · yr to the scalar WIMP-nucleon elastic cross-section, as originally conceived.

  12. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), Data Release 8

    DOE Data Explorer

    Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and SDSS-II, the SDSS-III Collaboration is working to map the Milky Way, search for extrasolar planets, and solve the mystery of dark energy. SDSS-III's first release, Data Release 8 (DR8), became available in the first half of 2012. DR8 contains all the images ever taken by the SDSS telescope. Together, these images make up the largest color image of the sky ever made. A version of the DR8 image is shown to the right. DR8 also includes measurements for nearly 500 million stars, galaxies, and quasars, and spectra for nearly two million. All of DR8's images, spectra, and measurements are available to anyone online. You can browse through sky images, look up data for individual objects, or search for objects anywhere using any criteria. SDSS-III will collect data from 2008 to 2014, using the 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. SDSS-III consists of four surveys, each focused on a different scientific theme. These four surveys are: 1) Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS); 2) SEGUE-2 (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration); 3) The APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE); and 4) The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). [Copied with edits from http://www.sdss3.org/index.php

  13. Lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) complexes with isatin thiosemicarbazones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Anita; Sengupta, Soumitra K.; Pandey, Om P.

    2005-09-01

    Ten new lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) complexes of the general formula Na[La(L) 2H 2O] (Ln = La(III) or Pr(III); LH 2 = thiosemicarbazones) derived from the condensation of isatin with 4-phenyl thiosemicarbazide, 4-(4-chlorophenyl) thiosemicarbazide, 4-(2-nitrophenyl) thiosemicarbazide, 4-(2-bromophenyl) thiosemicarbazide and 4-(2-methylphenyl) thiosemicarbazide, have been synthesized in methanol in presence of sodium hydroxide. The XRD spectra of the complexes were monitored to verify complex formation. The complexes have also been characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, electronic absorption and fluorescence, infrared, far infrared, 1H and 13C NMR spectral studies. Thermal studies of these complexes have been carried out in the temperature range 25-800 °C using TG, DTG and DTA techniques. All these complexes decompose gradually with the formation of Ln 2O 3 as the end product. The Judd-ofelt intensity parameter, oscillator strength, transition probability, stimulated emission cross section for different transitions of Pr 3+ for 4-phenyl thiosemicarbazones have been calculated.

  14. Electrochemistry and spectroscopy of ortho-metalated complexes of Ir(III) and Rh(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsawa, Y.; Sprouse, S.; King, K.A.; DeArmond, M.K.; Hanck, K.W.; Watts, R.J.

    1987-02-26

    The electrochemical and UV-visible spectroscopic properties of Rh(III) and Ir(III) complexes of the ortho-metalating (NC) ligands, 2-phenylpyridine (ppy) and benzo(h)quinone (bzq), have been studied. Cyclic voltammetric studies of several of the dimeric species, (M(NC)/sub 2/Cl)/sub 2/, indicate metal-centered oxidation occurs at moderate potentials. Cationic monomers of the type M(NC)/sub 2/(NN)/sup +/ where (NN) = 2,2'-bipyridine or 1,10-phenanthroline have been prepared by reaction of the chelating ligands with the parent dimers. Cyclic voltammetric studies of these monomers indicate that several reversible ligand-centered reductions are generally observed and that the chelating ligand is more easily reduced than is the ortho-metalating ligand. Spectroscopic studies of the mixed ligand monomers indicate that dual emissions from MLCT states associated with the ortho-metalating and chelating ligands occur in the Ir(III) complexes whereas a single emission from a ligand-localized excited state is observed in the Rh(III) complexes. These results are discussed in terms of electronic and nuclear coupling factors analogous to those encountered in descriptions of bimolecular energy and electron-transfer processes.

  15. Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station (SAGE III/ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasbarre, Joseph; Walker, Richard; Cisewski, Michael; Zawodny, Joseph; Cheek, Dianne; Thornton, Brooke

    2015-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station (SAGE III/ISS) mission will extend the SAGE data record from the ideal vantage point of the International Space Station (ISS). The ISS orbital inclination is ideal for SAGE measurements providing coverage between 70 deg north and 70 deg south latitude. The SAGE data record includes an extensively validated data set including aerosol optical depth data dating to the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) experiments in 1975 and 1978 and stratospheric ozone profile data dating to the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) in 1979. These and subsequent data records, notably from the SAGE II experiment launched on the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite in 1984 and the SAGE III experiment launched on the Russian Meteor-3M satellite in 2001, have supported a robust, long-term assessment of key atmospheric constituents. These scientific measurements provide the basis for the analysis of five of the nine critical constituents (aerosols, ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), water vapor (H2O), and air density using O2) identified in the U.S. National Plan for Stratospheric Monitoring. SAGE III on ISS was originally scheduled to fly on the ISS in the same timeframe as the Meteor-3M mission, but was postponed due to delays in ISS construction. The project was re-established in 2009.

  16. Apoprotein C-III: A review of its clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jing-Lu; Guo, Yuan-Lin; Li, Jian-Jun

    2016-09-01

    Apoprotein C-III (apoC-III), originating from the apoA-I/C-III/A-IV gene cluster affected by multiple regulating factors, has been demonstrated to have a validated link with hypertriglyceridemia in humans. Following genome studies establishing the impact of apoC-III on both plasma triglyceride (TG) level and cardiovascular disease (CVD), apoC-III offers us a novel explanation attempting to resolve the long-existing confusion with regard to the atherogenic effect of TG. Notably, apoC-III exerts its atherogenic effect by means of not only intervening in the function and metabolism of various lipid molecules, but also accelerating pro-inflammatory effects between monocytes and endothelial cells. Data have suggested that diabetes, a common endocrine disease, also correlates closely with apoC-III in its apoptosis process of islet βcells. In fact, apoC-III genes, with various mutations among individuals, are also found to have relevance to other diseases, including fatty liver disease. Fortunately, besides present day therapeutic strategies, such as lifestyle changes and lipid-lowering drug treatments, a promising new antisense drug specifically targeting on apoC-III gene expression opens up new avenues. This article mainly summarizes the clinical implication of apoC-III and its future directions of treatment. PMID:27318213

  17. Molecular magnets based on homometallic hexanuclear lanthanide(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Das, Sourav; Hossain, Sakiat; Dey, Atanu; Biswas, Sourav; Sutter, Jean-Pascal; Chandrasekhar, Vadapalli

    2014-05-19

    The reaction of lanthanide(III) chloride salts (Gd(III), Dy(III), Tb(III), and Ho(III)) with the hetero donor chelating ligand N'-(2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)-6-(hydroxymethyl)picolinohydrazide (LH3) in the presence of triethylamine afforded the hexanuclear Ln(III) complexes [{Ln6(L)2(LH)2}(μ3-OH)4][MeOH]p[H2O]q[Cl]4·xH2O·yCH3OH (1, Ln = Gd(III), p = 4, q = 4, x = 8, y = 2; 2, Ln = Dy(III), p = 2, q = 6, x = 8, y = 4; 3, Ln = Tb(III), p = 2, q = 6, x = 10, y = 4; 4, Ln = Ho(III), p = 2, q = 6, x = 10, y = 2). X-ray diffraction studies revealed that these compounds possess a hexanuclear [Ln6(OH)4](14+) core consisting of four fused [Ln3(OH)](8+) subunits. Both static (dc) and dynamic (ac) magnetic properties of 1-4 have been studied. Single-molecule magnetic behavior has been observed in compound 2 with an effective energy barrier and relaxation time pre-exponential parameters of Δ/kB = 46.2 K and τ0 = 2.85 × 10(-7) s, respectively. PMID:24766539

  18. Overview of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flittner, David; Pitts, Michael; Zawodny, Joe; Hill, Charles; Damadeo, Robert; Moore, Randy; Cisewski, Michael

    2012-07-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III is the fourth generation of solar occultation instruments operated by NASA, the first coming under a different acronym, to investigate the Earth's upper atmosphere. Three flight-ready SAGE III instruments were built by Ball Aerospace in the late 1990s, with one launched aboard the former Russian Avaiation and Space Agency (now known as Roskosmos) Meteor-3M (M3M) platform on 10 December 2001 (continuing until the platform lost power in 2006). Another of the original instruments was manifested for the International Space Station (ISS) in the 2004 time frame, but was delayed because of budgetary considerations. Fortunately, that SAGE III/ISS mission was restarted in 2009 with a major focus upon filling an anticipated gap in ozone and aerosol observations in the second half of this decade. This exciting mission utilizes contributions from both the Science Mission Directorate and the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the European Space Agency to enable scientific measurements that will provide the basis for the analysis of five of the nine critical constituents identified in the U.S. National Plan for Stratospheric Monitoring. A related paper by Anderson et al. discusses the. Presented here is an overview of the mission architecture, its implementation and the data that will be produced by SAGE III/ISS, including their expected accuracy and coverage. The 52-degree inclined orbit of the ISS is well-suited for solar occultation and provides near-global observations on a monthly basis with excellent coverage of low and mid-latitudes. This is similar to that of the SAGE II mission (1985-2005), whose data set has served the international atmospheric science community as a standard for stratospheric ozone and aerosol measurements. The nominal science products include vertical profiles of trace gases, such as ozone, nitrogen dioxide and water

  19. Synthesis, characterization and stability of Cr(III) and Fe(III) hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Papassiopi, N; Vaxevanidou, K; Christou, C; Karagianni, E; Antipas, G S E

    2014-01-15

    Chromium is a common contaminant of soils and aquifers and constitutes a major environmental problem. In nature, chromium usually exists in the form of two oxidation states, trivalent, Cr(III), which is relatively innocuous for biota and for the aquatic environment, and hexavalent, Cr(VI) which is toxic, carcinogenic and very soluble. Accordingly, the majority of wastewater and groundwater treatment technologies, include a stage where Cr(VI) is reduced to Cr(III), in order to remove chromium from the aqueous phase and bind the element in the form of environmentally stable solid compounds. In the absence of iron the final product is typically of the form Cr(OH)3·xH2O whereas in the presence of iron the precipitate is a mixed Fe(1-x)Crx(OH)3 phase. In this study, we report on the synthesis, characterisation and stability of mixed (Fex,Cr1-x)(OH)3 hydroxides as compared to the stability of Cr(OH)3. We established that the plain Cr(III) hydroxide, abiding to the approximate molecular formula Cr(OH)3·3H2O, was crystalline, highly soluble, i.e. unstable, with a tendency to transform into the stable amorphous hydroxide Cr(OH)3(am) phase. Mixed Fe0.75Cr0.25(OH)3 hydroxides were found to be of the ferrihydrite structure, Fe(OH)3, and we correlated their solubility to that of a solid solution formed by plain ferrihydrite and the amorphous Cr(III) hydroxide. Both our experimental results and thermodynamic calculations indicated that mixed Fe(III)-Cr(III) hydroxides are more effective enhancers of groundwater quality, in comparison to the plain amorphous or crystalline Cr(III) hydroxides, the latter found to have a solubility typically higher than 50μg/l (maximum EU permitted Cr level in drinking water), while the amorphous Cr(OH)3(am) phase was within the drinking water threshold in the range 5.7

  20. Synthesis of Imine-Naphthol Tripodal Ligand and Study of Its Coordination Behaviour towards Fe(III), Al(III), and Cr(III) Metal Ions

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Kirandeep

    2014-01-01

    A hexadentate Schiff base tripodal ligand is synthesized by the condensation of tris (2-aminoethyl) amine with 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde and characterized by various spectroscopic techniques like UV-VIS, IR, NMR, MASS, and elemental analysis. The solution studies by potentiometric and spectrophotometric methods are done at 25 ± 1°C, µ = 0.1 M KCl, to calculate the protonation constants of the ligand and formation constants of metal complexes formed by the ligand with Fe(III), Al(III), and Cr(III) metal ions. The affinity of the ligand towards Fe(III) is compared with deferiprone (a drug applied for iron intoxication) and transferrin (the main Fe(III) binding protein in plasma). Structural analysis of the ligand and the metal complexes was done using semiempirical PM6 method. Electronic and IR spectra are calculated by semiempirical methods and compared with experimental one. PMID:25294978

  1. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart III of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III 2 Table 2 to Subpart III of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production Pt. 63, Subpt. III, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart III of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III Subpart...

  2. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart III of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III 2 Table 2 to Subpart III of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production Pt. 63, Subpt. III, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart III of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III Subpart A reference...

  3. Variation in plasmonic (electronic) spectral parameters of Pr (III) and Nd (III) with varied concentration of moderators

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Shubha; Limaye, S. N.

    2015-07-31

    It is said that the -4f shells behave as core and are least perturbed by changes around metal ion surrounding. However, there are evidences that-4f shells partially involved in direct moderator interaction. A systematic investigation on the plasmonic (electronic) spectral studies of some Rare Earths[RE(III).Mod] where, RE(III) = Pr(III),Nd(III) and Mod(moderator) = Y(III),La(III),Gd(III) and Lu(III), increased moderator concentration from 0.01 mol dm{sup −3} to 0.025 mol dm{sup −3} keeping the metal ion concentration at 0.01mol dm{sup −3} have been carried out. Variations in oscillator strengths (f), Judd-Ofelt parameters (T{sub λ}),inter-electronic repulsion Racah parameters (δE{sup k}),nephelauxetic ratio (β), radiative parameters (S{sub ED},A{sub T},β{sub R},T{sub R}). The values of oscillator strengths and Judd-Ofelt parameters have been discussed in the light of coordination number of RE(III) metal ions, denticity and basicity of the moderators. The [RE(III).Mod] bonding pattern has been studies in the light of the change in Racah parameters and nephelauxetic ratio.

  4. III-V nanowires and nanowire optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunyan; Wu, Jiang; Aagesen, Martin; Liu, Huiyun

    2015-11-01

    III-V nanowires (NWs) have been envisioned as nanoscale materials for next-generation technology with good functionality, superior performance, high integration ability and low cost, because of their special growth modes and unique 1D structure. In this review, we summarize the main challenges and important progress of the fabrication and applications of III-V NWs. We start with the III-V NW growth, that significantly influences the NW morphology and crystal quality. Attention is then given to the fabrication of some advanced III-V structures composed of axial and radial junctions. After that, we review the advantages, challenges, and major breakthroughs of using III-V NWs as solar energy harvesters and light emitters. Finally, we attempt to give a perspective look on the future development trends and the remaining challenges in the research field of III-V NWs.

  5. Acquired antithrombin III deficiency in patients with glomerular proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Thaler, E; Balzar, E; Kopsa, H; Pinggera, W F

    1978-01-01

    Antithrombin III (AT II/III) was determined immunologically and by means of a heparin cofactor assay in plasma samples and 24-hour urine of 15 patients with various degrees of proteinuria, being predominantly of glomerular origin. In urine the AT II/III concentrations were significantly correlated to the concentrations of albumin, plasminogen and IgG. One third of the patients had AT II/III plasma levels below the normal range. The plasma levels showed a significant inverse correlation to the AT II/III and albumin clearance rates. Similarily, the plasminogen concentrations in plasma were decreased in two thirds of the patients, being inversely correlated to the renal plasminogen clearance values. It is proposed that AT II/III deficiency in the nephrotic syndrome is an important pathogenetic factor in venous thrombosis. PMID:689489

  6. Apolipophorin III: a lipid-triggered molecular switch.

    PubMed

    Weers, Paul M M; Ryan, Robert O

    2003-12-01

    Apolipophorin III (apoLp-III) is a low molecular weight exchangeable apolipoprotein that plays an important role in the enhanced neutral lipid transport during insect flight. The protein exists in lipid-free and lipid-bound states. The lipid-bound state is the active form of the protein and occurs when apoLp-III associates with lipid-enriched lipophorins. ApoLp-III is well characterized in two evolutionally divergent species: Locusta migratoria and Manduca sexta. The two apolipoproteins interact in a similar manner with model phospholipid vesicles, and transform them into discoidal particles. Their low intrinsic stability in the lipid-free state likely facilitates interaction with lipid surfaces. Low solution pH also favors lipid binding interaction through increased exposure of hydrophobic surfaces on apoLp-III. While secondary structure is maintained under acidic conditions, apoLp-III tertiary structure is altered, adopting molten globule-like characteristics. In studies of apoLp-III interaction with natural lipoproteins, we found that apoLp-III is readily displaced from the surface of L. migratoria low-density lipophorin by recombinant apoLp-III proteins from either L. migratoria or M. sexta. Thus, despite important differences between these two apoLp-IIIs (amino acid sequence, presence of carbohydrate), their functional similarity is striking. This similarity is also illustrated by the recently published NMR solution structure of M. sexta apoLp-III wherein its molecular architecture closely parallels that of L. migratoria apoLp-III. PMID:14599497

  7. ORTHODONTIC TREATMENT ALTERNATIVE TO A CLASS III SUBDIVISION MALOCCLUSION

    PubMed Central

    Janson, Guilherme; de Souza, José Eduardo Prado; Barros, Sérgio Estelita Cavalcante; Andrade, Pedro; Nakamura, Alexandre Yudi

    2009-01-01

    Class III malocclusions are considered one of the most complex and difficult orthodontic problems to diagnose and treat. Skeletal and/or dental asymmetries in patients presenting with Class III malocclusions can worsen the prognosis. Recognizing the dentoalveolar and skeletal characteristics of subdivision malocclusions and their treatment possibilities is essential for a favorable nonsurgical correction. Therefore, this article presents a nonsurgical asymmetric extraction approach to Class III subdivision malocclusion treatment which can significantly improve the occlusal and facial discrepancies. PMID:19668997

  8. AUTOCLASS III - AUTOMATIC CLASS DISCOVERY FROM DATA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheeseman, P. C.

    1994-01-01

    The program AUTOCLASS III, Automatic Class Discovery from Data, uses Bayesian probability theory to provide a simple and extensible approach to problems such as classification and general mixture separation. Its theoretical basis is free from ad hoc quantities, and in particular free of any measures which alter the data to suit the needs of the program. As a result, the elementary classification model used lends itself easily to extensions. The standard approach to classification in much of artificial intelligence and statistical pattern recognition research involves partitioning of the data into separate subsets, known as classes. AUTOCLASS III uses the Bayesian approach in which classes are described by probability distributions over the attributes of the objects, specified by a model function and its parameters. The calculation of the probability of each object's membership in each class provides a more intuitive classification than absolute partitioning techniques. AUTOCLASS III is applicable to most data sets consisting of independent instances, each described by a fixed length vector of attribute values. An attribute value may be a number, one of a set of attribute specific symbols, or omitted. The user specifies a class probability distribution function by associating attribute sets with supplied likelihood function terms. AUTOCLASS then searches in the space of class numbers and parameters for the maximally probable combination. It returns the set of class probability function parameters, and the class membership probabilities for each data instance. AUTOCLASS III is written in Common Lisp, and is designed to be platform independent. This program has been successfully run on Symbolics and Explorer Lisp machines. It has been successfully used with the following implementations of Common LISP on the Sun: Franz Allegro CL, Lucid Common Lisp, and Austin Kyoto Common Lisp and similar UNIX platforms; under the Lucid Common Lisp implementations on VAX/VMS v5

  9. J/psi spectroscopy from Mark III

    SciTech Connect

    Mallik, U.

    1987-02-01

    The Mark III detector at the SPEAR e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring at SLAC has accumulated a data sample of 5.8 x 10/sup 6/ J/psi produced. The status of the xi(2230) observed in the radiative J/psi decay is described. The status of the glueball candidates eta(1440) (iota(1440)) and f/sub 2/(1720) (theta(1720)) are probed with a systematic comparison between the radiative and the hadronic decays of J/psi. Finally, an understanding of quark correlations is attempted from a systematic study of the J/psi decaying into Vector-Pseudoscalar, Vector-Tensor and Vector-Scalar nonets.

  10. The NATO III 5 MHz Distribution System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vulcan, A.; Bloch, M.

    1981-01-01

    A high performance 5 MHz distribution system is described which has extremely low phase noise and jitter characteristics and provides multiple buffered outputs. The system is completely redundant with automatic switchover and is self-testing. Since the 5 MHz reference signals distributed by the NATO III distribution system are used for up-conversion and multiplicative functions, a high degree of phase stability and isolation between outputs is necessary. Unique circuit design and packaging concepts insure that the isolation between outputs is sufficient to quarantee a phase perturbation of less than 0.0016 deg when other outputs are open circuited, short circuited or terminated in 50 ohms. Circuit design techniques include high isolation cascode amplifiers. Negative feedback stabilizes system gain and minimizes circuit phase noise contributions. Balanced lines, in lieu of single ended coaxial transmission media, minimize pickup.

  11. POPULATION III GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Meszaros, P.; Rees, M. J.

    2010-06-01

    We discuss a model of Poynting-dominated gamma-ray bursts from the collapse of very massive first generation (Pop. III) stars. From redshifts of order 20, the resulting relativistic jets would radiate in the hard X-ray range around 50 keV and above, followed after roughly a day by an external shock component peaking around a few keV. On the same timescales an inverse Compton component around 75 GeV may be expected, as well as a possible infrared flash. The fluences of these components would be above the threshold for detectors such as Swift and Fermi, providing potentially valuable information on the formation and properties of what may be the first luminous objects and their black holes in the high redshift universe.

  12. Propellant management operations on GSTAR-III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberg, D. J.; Misra, P.

    1993-06-01

    The GSTAR III satellite has depleted most of its hydrazine fuel supply, and will continue to operate with nearly empty fuel tanks for several years by allowing the inclination to grow. Temperature differentials on pairs of tanks within a half system cause the fuel to be pumped back and forth between the tanks on a daily basis. The depletion of any one tank expels helium into the lines, creating maneuver difficulties and an uncertainty in estimation of available fuel. A model of fuel flow, based on the Ideal Gas Law, has been developed to estimate the level of fuel in each tank at all times, and a thermal model of the propulsion system has been developed which uses measured temperatures to estimate convection from flowing hydrazine and verify the fuel flow model. Tank heaters have been used to control fuel distribution with apparent success.

  13. Benchmark On Sensitivity Calculation (Phase III)

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, Tatiana; Laville, Cedric; Dyrda, James; Mennerdahl, Dennis; Golovko, Yury; Raskach, Kirill; Tsiboulia, Anatoly; Lee, Gil Soo; Woo, Sweng-Woong; Bidaud, Adrien; Patel, Amrit; Bledsoe, Keith C; Rearden, Bradley T; Gulliford, J.

    2012-01-01

    The sensitivities of the keff eigenvalue to neutron cross sections have become commonly used in similarity studies and as part of the validation algorithm for criticality safety assessments. To test calculations of the sensitivity coefficients, a benchmark study (Phase III) has been established by the OECD-NEA/WPNCS/EG UACSA (Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment). This paper presents some sensitivity results generated by the benchmark participants using various computational tools based upon different computational methods: SCALE/TSUNAMI-3D and -1D, MONK, APOLLO2-MORET 5, DRAGON-SUSD3D and MMKKENO. The study demonstrates the performance of the tools. It also illustrates how model simplifications impact the sensitivity results and demonstrates the importance of 'implicit' (self-shielding) sensitivities. This work has been a useful step towards verification of the existing and developed sensitivity analysis methods.

  14. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program: Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    G.T. Amrhein; R.T. Bailey; W. Downs; M.J. Holmes; G.A. Kudlac; D.A. Madden

    1999-07-01

    The primary objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. The project goal is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas clean-up equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), fabric filters (baghouses - BH), and wet flue gas desulfurization systems (WFGD). Development work concentrated on the capture of trace metals, fine particulate, hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride, with an emphasis on the control of mercury. The AECDP project is jointly funded by the US Department of Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development (OCDO), and Babcock and Wilcox, a McDermott company (B and W). This report discusses results of all three phases of the AECDP project with an emphasis on Phase III activities. Following the construction and evaluation of a representative air toxics test facility in Phase I, Phase II focused on characterization of the emissions of mercury and other air toxics and the control of these emissions for typical operating conditions of conventional flue gas clean-up equipment. Some general comments that can be made about the control of air toxics while burning a high-sulfur bituminous coal are as follows: (1) particulate control devices such as ESP's and baghouses do a good job of removing non-volatile trace metals, (2) particulate control devices (ESPs and baghouses) effectively remove the particulate-phase mercury, but the particulate-phase mercury was only a small fraction of the total for the coals tested, (3) wet scrubbing can effectively remove hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride, and (4) wet scrubbers show good potential for the removal of mercury when operated under certain conditions, however, for certain applications, system enhancements can be required to achieve high

  15. Neptunium(III) copper(I) diselenide

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Daniel M.; Skanthakumar, S.; Soderholm, L.; Ibers, James A.

    2009-01-01

    The title compound, NpCuSe2, is the first ternary neptunium transition-metal chalcogenide. It was synthesized from the elements at 873 K in an evacuated fused-silica tube. Single crystals were grown by vapor transport with I2. NpCuSe2 crystallizes in the LaCuS2 structure type and can be viewed as a stacking of layers of CuSe4 tetra­hedra and of double layers of NpSe7 monocapped trigonal prisms along [100]. Because there are no Se—Se bonds in the structure, the formal oxidation states of Np/Cu/Se may be assigned as +III/+I/−II, respectively. PMID:21582032

  16. Aqua-bromidobis(dimethyl-glyoximato)cobalt(III).

    PubMed

    Meera, Parthasarathy; Amutha Selvi, Madhavan; Jothi, Pachaimuthu; Dayalan, Arunachalam

    2011-04-01

    In the title complex, [CoBr(C(4)H(7)N(2)O(2))(2)(H(2)O)], a crystallo-graphic mirror plane bis-ects the mol-ecule, perpendicular to the glyoximate ligands. The geometry around the cobalt(III) atom is approximately octa-hedral with the four glyoximate N atoms forming the square base. A bromide ion and the O atom of a water mol-ecule occupy the remaining coordination sites. The N-Co-N bite angles are 82.18 (4) and 80.03 (16)°. The glyoximate moieties form strong intra-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The coordinated water mol-ecule forms an inter-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bond with a glyoximate O atom, thereby generating supra-molecular chains parallel to [010]. PMID:21753964

  17. Titan III - Commercial access to space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gizinski, Stephen J., III; Herrington, Douglas B.

    1988-06-01

    The commercial Titan III launch vehicle is discussed, reviewing the history of the Titan program, the technical aspects of the launcher, and the market outlook. The solid rocket motors of the boost vehicle, core, attitude control system, and payload carrier are described. The vehicle can carry one or two payloads taking up a space of up to 3.65 m in diameter and 10.7 m in length. The avionics, communications, and electrical power systems of the vehicle are examined and the range of perigree stages with which the vehicle is compatible is given. An overview of the mission and the launch facilities is presented and future markets for commercial satellites are considered.

  18. DECIMETRIC TYPE III BURSTS: GENERATION AND PROPAGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Li, B.; Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.; Yan, Y. H.

    2011-09-01

    Simulations are presented for decimetric type III radio bursts at 2f{sub p} , where f{sub p} is the local electron plasma frequency. The simulations show that 2f{sub p} radiation can be observed at Earth in two scenarios for the radiation's generation and propagation. In Scenario A, radiation is produced and propagates in warm plasmas in the lower corona that are caused by previous magnetic reconnection outflows and/or chromospheric evaporation. In Scenario B radiation is generated in normal plasmas, then due to its natural directivity pattern and refraction, radiation partly propagates into nearby regions, which are hot because of previous reconnection/evaporation. The profiles of plasma density n{sub e} (r) and electron temperature T{sub e} (r) in the lower corona (r - R{sub sun} {approx}< 100 Mm) are found to be crucial to whether radiation can be produced and escape at observable levels against the effects of free-free absorption, where r is the heliocentric distance. Significantly, the observed wide ranges of radiation properties (e.g., drift rates) require n{sub e} (r) with a large range of scale heights h{sub s} , consistent nonetheless for Scenario B with short observed EUV loops. This is relevant to problems with large h{sub s} inferred from tall EUV loops. The simulations suggest: (1) n{sub e} (r) with small h{sub s} , such as n{sub e} (r){proportional_to}(r - R{sub sun}){sup -2.38} for flaring regions, are unexpectedly common deep in the corona. This result is consistent with recent work on n{sub e} (r) for r {approx} (1.05-2)R{sub sun} extracted from observed metric type IIIs. (2) The dominance of reverse-slope bursts over normal bursts sometimes observed may originate from asymmetric reconnection/acceleration, which favors downgoing beams.

  19. A possible role for chromium(III) in genotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Snow, E T

    1991-01-01

    Chromium is found in the environment in two major forms: reduced CrIII and CrVI, or chromate. Chromate, the most biologically active species, is readily taken up by living cells and reduced intracellularly, via reactive intermediates, to stable CrIII species. CrIII, the most abundant form of chromium in the environment, does not readily cross cell membranes and is relatively inactive in vivo. However, intracellular CrIII can react slowly with both nucleic acids and proteins and can be genotoxic. We have investigated the genotoxicity of CrIII in vitro using a DNA replication assay and in vivo by CaCl2-mediated transfection of chromium-treated DNA into Escherichia coli. When DNA replication was measured on a CrIII-treated template using purified DNA polymerases (either bacterial or mammalian), both the rate of DNA replication and the amount of incorporation per polymerase binding event (processivity) were greatly increased relative to controls. When transfected into E. coli, CrIII-treated M13mp2 bacteriophage DNA showed a dose-dependent increase in mutation frequency. These results suggest that CrIII alters the interaction between the DNA template and the polymerase such that the binding strength of the DNA polymerase is increased and the fidelity of DNA replication is decreased. These interactions may contribute to the mutagenicity of chromium ions in vivo and suggest that CrIII can contribute to chromium-mediated carcinogenesis. Images FIGURE 3. PMID:1935855

  20. Expression of Secretogranin III in Chicken Endocrine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Morikawa, Satomi; Shinmura, Naoki; Moki, Hiroaki; Yasui, Tadashi; Tsukise, Azuma; Torii, Seiji; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Maeda, Yoshinori; Hosaka, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    The expression of secretogranin III (SgIII) in chicken endocrine cells has not been investigated. There is limited data available for the immunohistochemical localization of SgIII in the brain, pituitary, and pancreatic islets of humans and rodents. In the present study, we used immunoblotting to reveal the similarities between the expression patterns of SgIII in the common endocrine glands of chickens and rats. The protein–protein interactions between SgIII and chromogranin A (CgA) mediate the sorting of CgA/prohormone core aggregates to the secretory granule membrane. We examined these interactions using co-immunoprecipitation in chicken endocrine tissues. Using immunohistochemistry, we also examined the expression of SgIII in a wide range of chicken endocrine glands and gastrointestinal endocrine cells (GECs). SgIII was expressed in the pituitary, pineal, adrenal (medullary parts), parathyroid, and ultimobranchial glands, but not in the thyroid gland. It was also expressed in GECs of the stomach (proventriculus and gizzard), small and large intestines, and pancreatic islet cells. These SgIII-expressing cells co-expressed serotonin, somatostatin, gastric inhibitory polypeptide, glucagon-like peptide-1, glucagon, or insulin. These results suggest that SgIII is expressed in the endocrine cells that secrete peptide hormones, which mature via the intragranular enzymatic processing of prohormones and physiologically active amines in chickens. PMID:25673289

  1. Antisites in III-V semiconductors: Density functional theory calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Chroneos, A.; Tahini, H. A.; Schwingenschlögl, U.; Grimes, R. W.

    2014-07-14

    Density functional based simulation, corrected for finite size effects, is used to investigate systematically the formation of antisite defects in III-V semiconductors (III = Al, Ga, and In and V = P, As, and Sb). Different charge states are modelled as a function of the Fermi level and under different growth conditions. The formation energies of group III antisites (III{sub V}{sup q}) decrease with increasing covalent radius of the group V atom though not group III radius, whereas group V antisites (V{sub III}{sup q}) show a consistent decrease in formation energies with increase in group III and group V covalent radii. In general, III{sub V}{sup q} defects dominate under III-rich conditions and V{sub III}{sup q} under V-rich conditions. Comparison with equivalent vacancy formation energy simulations shows that while antisite concentrations are always dominant under stoichiometric conditions, modest variation in growth or doping conditions can lead to a significantly higher concentration of vacancies.

  2. Synthesis, characterization, molecular docking and DNA binding studies of Al(III), Ga(III) and In(III) water-soluble complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorkaei, Mohammad Ranjkesh; Asadi, Zahra; Asadi, Mozaffar

    2016-04-01

    In this work three new water-soluble aluminum(III), gallium(III) and indium(III) Schiff base complexes; Na2[M(L)NO3]; where L denotes; N,N'-bis(5-sulfosalicyliden)-1,2-phenylendiamin (salsophen) were synthesized and characterized by UV-vis, 1HNMR, FT-IR spectroscopy, thermal gravimetry (TG) and elemental analysis. To study the biological preference with the molecular target DNA, interaction of these complexes with DNA have been explored by employing various biophysical methods including absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra, cyclic voltammetry and viscosity measurement. The Kb values at 298 K were found to be 1.17 × 104 for Al(III), 1.35 × 104 for Ga(III) and 1.64 × 104 M-1 for In(III) complexes, respectively. These results suggesting the greater binding propensity of In(III) complexes. Additionally molecular docking was carried out to ascertain the mode of action towards the molecular target DNA.

  3. Selective Extraction of Americium(III) over Europium(III) with the Pyridylpyrazole Based Tetradentate Ligands: Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jieru; Su, Dongping; Wang, Dongqi; Ding, Songdong; Huang, Chao; Huang, Huang; Hu, Xiaoyang; Wang, Zhipeng; Li, Shimeng

    2015-11-16

    1,3-Bis[3-(2-pyridyl)pyrazol-1-yl]propane (Bippp) and 1,2-bis[3-(2-pyridyl)pyrazyl-1-methyl]benzene (Dbnpp), the pyridylpyrazole based tetradentate ligands, were synthesized and characterized by MS, NMR, and FT-IR. The solvent extraction and complexation behaviors of Am(III) and Eu(III) with the ligands were investigated experimentally and theoretically. In the presence of 2-bromohexanoic acid, the two ligands can effectively extract Am(III) over Eu(III) and other rare earth(III) metals (RE(III)) in HNO3 solution with the separation factors (SFAm/RE) ranging from 15 to 60. Slope analyses showed that both Am(III) and Eu(III) were extracted as monosolvated species, which agrees well with the results observed from X-ray crystallography and MS analyses. The stability constants (log K) obtained from UV-vis titration for Eu(III) complexes with Bippp and Dbnpp are 4.75 ± 0.03 and 4.45 ± 0.04, respectively. Both UV-vis titration and solvent extraction studies indicated that Bippp had stronger affinity for Eu(III) than Dbnpp, which is confirmed by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. DFT calculations revealed that the AmL(NO3)3 (L = Bippp and Dbnpp) complexes are thermodynamically more stable in water than their Eu(III) analogues, which is caused by greater covalency of the Am-N than Eu-N bonds. Theoretical studies gave an insight into the nature of the M(III)-ligand bonding interactions. PMID:26517736

  4. Oxalate complexation with aluminum(III) and iron(III) at moderately elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Tait, C.D.; Janecky, D.R.; Clark, D.L.; Bennett, P.C.

    1992-05-01

    To add to our understanding of the weathering of rocks in organic rich environments such as sedimentary brines and oil field waters, we have examined the temperature dependent complexation of aluminum with oxalate. Raman vibrational studies show that even the association constant for the highly charged Al(ox){sub 3}{sup 3{minus}} unexpectedly increases with moderate temperature increases to 80{degrees}C. To evaluate the potential importance of these Al-oxalate species in complex natural systems, temperature dependent competition experiments Fe(III) and Al(III) for oxalate have been initiated. Similar to aluminum, ferric oxalates show increases in association constants at higher temperatures. In competition experiments, the first association constant for Fe(ox){sup +} increases faster than that for Al(ox){sup +} to 90{degrees}C.

  5. Preparation and spectroscopic studies of antimony(III) and bismuth(III) halodithiocarbamate derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusti, Aleardo; Preti, Carlo; Tosi, Giuseppe; Zannini, Paolo

    1983-04-01

    The complexes of antimony(III) and bismuth(III) with piperidine (Pipdtc), morpholine (Morphdtc) and thiomorpholinedithiocarbamate (Timdtc) of general formula Sb 2-(Rdtc) 3X 3 and M(Rdtc)X 2 (M is antimony or bismuth, X a halogen and Rdtc the dithiocarbamates) have been prepared and characterized by spectroscopic methods. The IR spectra suggest that the dithiocarbamate group coordinates as a bidentate ligand; the metal-sulphur and metal-halide stretching modes have also been assigned. The spectral data are discussed and compared with those of the corresponding trisdithiocarbamate and monohalobisdithiocarbamate derivatives. The molecular weight determinations indicate that all these dithiocarbamate complexes are dimeric. Tentative stereochemistries are proposed and discussed on the basis of the results obtained.

  6. Oxalate complexation with aluminum(III) and iron(III) at moderately elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Tait, C.D.; Janecky, D.R.; Clark, D.L. ); Bennett, P.C. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    To add to our understanding of the weathering of rocks in organic rich environments such as sedimentary brines and oil field waters, we have examined the temperature dependent complexation of aluminum with oxalate. Raman vibrational studies show that even the association constant for the highly charged Al(ox){sub 3}{sup 3{minus}} unexpectedly increases with moderate temperature increases to 80{degrees}C. To evaluate the potential importance of these Al-oxalate species in complex natural systems, temperature dependent competition experiments Fe(III) and Al(III) for oxalate have been initiated. Similar to aluminum, ferric oxalates show increases in association constants at higher temperatures. In competition experiments, the first association constant for Fe(ox){sup +} increases faster than that for Al(ox){sup +} to 90{degrees}C.

  7. A Qualitative Study of Recovery from Type III-B and III-C Tibial Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Shauver, Melissa S.; Aravind, Maya S.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2011-01-01

    The literature has shown that long-term outcomes for both below-knee amputation and reconstruction following type III-B and III-C tibial fracture are poor. Yet, patients often report satisfaction with their treatment and/or outcomes. The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between patient outcomes and satisfaction after open tibial fractures via qualitative methodology. Twenty patients who were treated for open tibial fractures at one institution were selected using purposeful sampling and interviewed in-person in a semi-structured manner. Data were analyzed using grounded theory methodology. Despite reporting marked physical and psychosocial deficits, participants relayed high satisfaction. We hypothesize that the use adaptive coping techniques successfully reduces stress, which leads to an increase in coping self-efficacy that results in the further use of adaptive coping strategies, culminating in personal growth. This stress reduction and personal growth leads to satisfaction despite poor functional and emotional outcomes. PMID:20948418

  8. Exceptional Oxygen Sensing Properties of New Blue Light-Excitable Highly Luminescent Europium(III) and Gadolinium(III) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Borisov, Sergey M.; Fischer, Roland; Saf, Robert; Klimant, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    New europium(III) and gadolinium(III) complexes bearing 8-hydroxyphenalenone antenna combine efficient absorption in the blue part of the spectrum and strong emission in polymers at room temperature. The Eu(III) complexes show characteristic red luminescence whereas the Gd(III) dyes are strongly phosphorescent. The luminescence quantum yields are about 20% for the Eu(III) complexes and 50% for the Gd(III) dyes. In contrast to most state-of-the-art Eu(III) complexes the new dyes are quenched very efficiently by molecular oxygen. The luminescence decay times of the Gd(III) complexes exceed 1 ms which ensures exceptional sensitivity even in polymers of moderate oxygen permeability. These sensors are particularly suitable for trace oxygen sensing and may be good substitutes for Pd(II) porphyrins. The photophysical and sensing properties can be tuned by varying the nature of the fourth ligand. The narrow-band emission of the Eu(III) allows efficient elimination of the background light and autofluorescence and is also very attractive for use e.g. in multi-analyte sensors. The highly photostable indicators incorporated in nanoparticles are promising for imaging applications. Due to the straightforward preparation and low cost of starting materials the new dyes represent a promising alternative to the state-of-the-art oxygen indicators particularly for such applications as e.g. food packaging. PMID:27158252

  9. Synthesis and Structure of Hexatungstochromate(III), [H3Cr(III)W6O24]6-.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjing; Lin, Zhengguo; Bassil, Bassem S; Al-Oweini, Rami; Kortz, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    The hexatungstochromate(III) [H(3)Cr(III)W(6)O(24)](6-) (1) was synthesized in aqueous, basic medium by simple reaction of chromium(III) nitrate nonahydrate and sodium tungstate dihydrate in a 1:6 ratio. Polyanion 1 represents the first Anderson-Evans type heteropolytungstate with a trivalent hetero element. The sodium salt of 1 with the formula Na(6)[H(3)Cr(III)W(6)O(24)]·22H(2)O (1a) was fully characterized in the solid state by single crystal XRD, FT-IR spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. PMID:26507761

  10. Soluble Manganese(III) in the Marine Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luther, G. W., III; Oldham, V.; Madison, A.; Tebo, B.; Jones, M.; Jensen, L.; Owings, S.; Mucci, A.; Sundby, B.

    2014-12-01

    Recent field studies have confirmed the presence of soluble manganese(III), which along with Mn(II) passes through a 0.2 μm filter, in suboxic marine waters. Here we applied a spectrophotometric method using a soluble porphyrin as a competitive ligand to calculate the concentrations and kinetics of Mn(II) and Mn(III) recovery. Data will be presented from the suboxic porewaters of the Saint Lawrence estuary, the suboxic and anoxic waters of the Chesapeake Bay and the oxygenated surface waters of a coastal waterway bordered by wetlands and salt marshes in Delaware. Soluble Mn(III) accounts for up to 100% of the dissolved Mn pool with concentrations ranging from the detection limit of 50 nM to 80 μM at the oxic/anoxic interface of the non-sulfidic porewaters from the hemipelagic sediments of the St. Lawrence Estuary. Data indicate weak-ligand complexation of Mn(III) formed from Mn(II) oxidation as well as reduction of MnO2. Complexation of Mn(III) in the anoxic waters of Chesapeake Bay appears stronger as the porphyrin could not outcompete the natural ligands binding Mn(III). Mn(III) complexes were reduced in the presence of hydroxylamine or hydrogen sulfide and detected as Mn(II). Soluble Mn(III) comprised up to 52 % of total dissolved Mn. Profiles over the course of a five day cruise showed that high Mn(III) concentrations (7.3 μM) were observed at low H2S (4.9 μM) whereas low Mn(III) (1.1 μM) was detected at high H2S (40 μM). The presence of Mn(III) in sulfidic waters indicated that it is kinetically stabilized in situ by strong ligands so reduction to Mn(II) was incomplete. One electron reductive dissolution of solid MnO2 particles formed at the oxic-anoxic interface appear to be the source of Mn(III). Lastly, soluble Mn(III) was detected in the oxygenated surface waters of a coastal waterway (salinity ranging from freshwater to 31) bordered by wetlands and salt marshes in Delaware. Soluble Mn(III) made up 0-49 % of the total dissolved Mn (maximum of 1.92

  11. Biochemical and Structural Properties of Mouse Kynurenine Aminotransferase III

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Q.; Robinson, H; Cai, T; Tagle, D; Li, J

    2009-01-01

    Kynurenine aminotransferase III (KAT III) has been considered to be involved in the production of mammalian brain kynurenic acid (KYNA), which plays an important role in protecting neurons from overstimulation by excitatory neurotransmitters. The enzyme was identified based on its high sequence identity with mammalian KAT I, but its activity toward kynurenine and its structural characteristics have not been established. In this study, the biochemical and structural properties of mouse KAT III (mKAT III) were determined. Specifically, mKAT III cDNA was amplified from a mouse brain cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was expressed in an insect cell protein expression system. We established that mKAT III is able to efficiently catalyze the transamination of kynurenine to KYNA and has optimum activity at relatively basic conditions of around pH 9.0 and at relatively high temperatures of 50 to 60C. In addition, mKAT III is active toward a number of other amino acids. Its activity toward kynurenine is significantly decreased in the presence of methionine, histidine, glutamine, leucine, cysteine, and 3-hydroxykynurenine. Through macromolecular crystallography, we determined the mKAT III crystal structure and its structures in complex with kynurenine and glutamine. Structural analysis revealed the overall architecture of mKAT III and its cofactor binding site and active center residues. This is the first report concerning the biochemical characteristics and crystal structures of KAT III enzymes and provides a basis toward understanding the overall physiological role of mammalian KAT III in vivo and insight into regulating the levels of endogenous KYNA through modulation of the enzyme in the mouse brain.

  12. Synthesis and structural characterization of new dithiocarbamate complexes from Sb(III) and Bi(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Jamaluddin, Nur Amirah; Baba, Ibrahim

    2013-11-27

    Twenty new antimony and bismuth dithiocarbamate complexes which employed ten different type of amines have been successfully synthesized. The synthesized complexes with metal to dithiocarbamate ratio at 1:3. Elemental analysis of the complexes gave the general formula of MCl[S{sub 2}CNR’R”]{sub 2} where M = Sb(III), Bi(III); R’ = methyl, ethyl, propyl, isopropyl, butyl, sec-butyl, benzyl; R” = ethanol, methyl, ethyl, propyl, isopropyl, cyclohexyl, benzyl. The complexes were analysed by IR and NMR spectroscopy. The crystal structure of five-coordinated antimony (III) complex have been determined by X-ray single crystal diffraction. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies on SbCl[S{sub 2}CN(C{sub 4}H{sub 9})(C{sub 2}H{sub 5})]{sub 2} adopted a triclinic system with a space group P1 with a = 10.0141(8) Å, b = 10.1394(7) Å, c = 11.8665(9) Å, α = 67.960°, β =87.616°, γ = 80.172°.

  13. Synthesis and structural characterization of new dithiocarbamate complexes from Sb(III) and Bi(III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamaluddin, Nur Amirah; Baba, Ibrahim

    2013-11-01

    Twenty new antimony and bismuth dithiocarbamate complexes which employed ten different type of amines have been successfully synthesized. The synthesized complexes with metal to dithiocarbamate ratio at 1:3. Elemental analysis of the complexes gave the general formula of MCl[S2CNR'R"]2 where M = Sb(III), Bi(III); R' = methyl, ethyl, propyl, isopropyl, butyl, sec-butyl, benzyl; R" = ethanol, methyl, ethyl, propyl, isopropyl, cyclohexyl, benzyl. The complexes were analysed by IR and NMR spectroscopy. The crystal structure of five-coordinated antimony (III) complex have been determined by X-ray single crystal diffraction. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies on SbCl[S2CN(C4H9)(C2H5)]2 adopted a triclinic system with a space group P1 with a = 10.0141(8) Å, b = 10.1394(7) Å, c = 11.8665(9) Å, α = 67.960°, β =87.616°, γ = 80.172°.

  14. Gd(III)-Gd(III) distance measurements with chirp pump pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doll, Andrin; Qi, Mian; Wili, Nino; Pribitzer, Stephan; Godt, Adelheid; Jeschke, Gunnar

    2015-10-01

    The broad EPR spectrum of Gd(III) spin labels restricts the dipolar modulation depth in distance measurements between Gd(III) pairs to a few percent. To overcome this limitation, frequency-swept chirp pulses are utilized as pump pulses in the DEER experiment. Using a model system with 3.4 nm Gd-Gd distance, application of one single chirp pump pulse at Q-band frequencies leads to modulation depths beyond 10%. However, the larger modulation depth is counteracted by a reduction of the absolute echo intensity due to the pump pulse. As supported by spin dynamics simulations, this effect is primarily driven by signal loss to double-quantum coherence and specific to the Gd(III) high spin state of S = 7/2. In order to balance modulation depth and echo intensity for optimum sensitivity, a simple experimental procedure is proposed. An additional improvement by 25% in DEER sensitivity is achieved with two consecutive chirp pump pulses. These pulses pump the Gd(III) spectrum symmetrically around the observation position, therefore mutually compensating for dynamical Bloch-Siegert phase shifts at the observer spins. The improved sensitivity of the DEER data with modulation depths on the order of 20% is due to mitigation of the echo reduction effects by the consecutive pump pulses. In particular, the second pump pulse does not lead to additional signal loss if perfect inversion is assumed. Moreover, the compensation of the dynamical Bloch-Siegert phase prevents signal loss due to spatial dependence of the dynamical phase, which is caused by inhomogeneities in the driving field. The new methodology is combined with pre-polarization techniques to measure long distances up to 8.6 nm, where signal intensity and modulation depth become attenuated by long dipolar evolution windows. In addition, the influence of the zero-field splitting parameters on the echo intensity is studied with simulations. Herein, larger sensitivity is anticipated for Gd(III) complexes with zero

  15. CONVERSION EXTRACTION DESULFURIZATION (CED) PHASE III

    SciTech Connect

    James Boltz

    2005-03-01

    This project was undertaken to refine the Conversion Extraction Desulfurization (CED) technology to efficiently and economically remove sulfur from diesel fuel to levels below 15-ppm. CED is considered a generic term covering all desulfurization processes that involve oxidation and extraction. The CED process first extracts a fraction of the sulfur from the diesel, then selectively oxidizes the remaining sulfur compounds, and finally extracts these oxidized materials. The Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Petro Star Inc. a contract to fund Phase III of the CED process development. Phase III consisted of testing a continuous-flow process, optimization of the process steps, design of a pilot plant, and completion of a market study for licensing the process. Petro Star and the Degussa Corporation in coordination with Koch Modular Process Systems (KMPS) tested six key process steps in a 7.6-centimeter (cm) (3.0-inch) inside diameter (ID) column at gas oil feed rates of 7.8 to 93.3 liters per hour (l/h) (2.1 to 24.6 gallons per hour). The team verified the technical feasibility with respect to hydraulics for each unit operation tested and successfully demonstrated pre-extraction and solvent recovery distillation. Test operations conducted at KMPS demonstrated that the oxidation reaction converted a maximum of 97% of the thiophenes. The CED Process Development Team demonstrated that CED technology is capable of reducing the sulfur content of light atmospheric gas oil from 5,000-ppm to less than 15-ppm within the laboratory scale. In continuous flow trials, the CED process consistently produced fuel with approximately 20-ppm of sulfur. The process economics study calculated an estimated process cost of $5.70 per product barrel. The Kline Company performed a marketing study to evaluate the possibility of licensing the CED technology. Kline concluded that only 13 refineries harbored opportunity for the CED process. The Kline study and the research team's discussions with

  16. 40 CFR Appendixes II-Iii to Part 264 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false II Appendixes II-III to Part 264 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Appendixes II-III...

  17. Avatar Gender and Ethical Choices in "Fable III"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrier, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates how players make ethical decisions in "Fable III," a video game, with consideration to avatar gender. Thirty males, 18 to 34 years old, were recruited; 20 were assigned to play "Fable III," with half assigned to play as a male avatar (Condition 1), and half assigned as a female avatar (Condition 2). Any ethical thinking…

  18. VAC protocol for treatment of dogs with stage III hemangiosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Francisco J; Hosoya, Kenji; Lara-Garcia, Ana; Kisseberth, William; Couto, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    Hemangiosarcomas (HSAs) are aggressive tumors with a high rate of metastasis. Clinical stage has been considered a negative prognostic factor for survival. The study authors hypothesized that the median survival time (MST) of dogs with metastatic (stage III) HSA treated with a vincristine, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide (VAC) chemotherapy protocol would not be different than those with stage I/II HSA. Sixty-seven dogs with HSA in different anatomic locations were evaluated retrospectively. All dogs received the VAC protocol as an adjuvant to surgery (n = 50), neoadjuvant (n = 3), or as the sole treatment modality (n = 14). There was no significant difference (P = 0.97) between the MST of dogs with stage III and stage I/II HSA. For dogs presenting with splenic HSA alone, there was no significant difference between the MST of dogs with stage III and stage I/II disease (P = 0.12). The overall response rate (complete response [CR] and partial response [PR]) was 86%). No unacceptable toxicities were observed. Dogs with stage III HSA treated with the VAC protocol have a similar prognosis to dogs with stage I/II HSA. Dogs with HSA and evidence of metastases at the time of diagnosis should not be denied treatment. PMID:24051260

  19. Age Dedifferentiation Hypothesis: Evidence form the WAIS III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juan-Espinosa, Manuel; Garcia, Luis F.; Escorial, Sergio; Rebollo, Irene; Colom, Roberto; Abad, Francisco J.

    2002-01-01

    Used the Spanish standardization of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale III (WAIS III) (n=1,369) to test the age dedifferentiation hypothesis. Results show no changes in the percentage of variance accounted for by "g" and four group factors when restriction of range is controlled. Discusses an age indifferentation hypothesis. (SLD)

  20. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart III of... - Emission Limitations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission Limitations 1 Table 1 to... Before November 30, 1999 Pt. 62, Subpt. III, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart III of Part 62—Emission Limitations For the air pollutant You must meet this emission limitation a Using this averaging time...