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Sample records for africanus ferredoxin iii

  1. Low Temperature Electronic Absorption Spectra of Oxidized and Reduced Spinach Ferredoxins. Evidence for Nonequivalent Iron(III) Sites.

    PubMed

    Rawlings, J; Siiman, O; Gray, H B

    1974-01-01

    The electronic absorption spectra of oxidized and reduced spinach ferredoxins have been measured between 1200 and 600 nm at low temperature in D(2)O/ethylene glycol glasses. Relatively weak absorption bands are observed at 720, 820, and 920 nm in oxidized ferredoxin, and at 652, 820, and 920 nm in reduced ferredoxin. The spectral results show that the two Fe(III) centers in oxidized ferredoxin are not equivalent, and that the 820- and 920-nm bands are associated with the nonreducible site. Assignment of the reducible site as tetrahedral Fe(III) is indicated. The 720-nm (13.9 kcm(-1)) band in oxidized ferredoxin is attributed to an intensity-enhanced (6)A(1) --> (4)T(1)d-d transition, whereas the 652-nm (15.3 kcm(-1)) feature of reduced ferredoxin could be due either to (5)E --> (3)T(1) in tetrahedral Fe(II)S(4) or an Fe(II) --> Fe(III) intervalence excitation.

  2. A Ferredoxin Disulfide Reductase Delivers Electrons to the Methanosarcina barkeri Class III Ribonucleotide Reductase.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yifeng; Li, Bin; Prakash, Divya; Ferry, James G; Elliott, Sean J; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2015-12-01

    Two subtypes of class III anaerobic ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) studied so far couple the reduction of ribonucleotides to the oxidation of formate, or the oxidation of NADPH via thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase. Certain methanogenic archaea contain a phylogenetically distinct third subtype of class III RNR, with distinct active-site residues. Here we report the cloning and recombinant expression of the Methanosarcina barkeri class III RNR and show that the electrons required for ribonucleotide reduction can be delivered by a [4Fe-4S] protein ferredoxin disulfide reductase, and a conserved thioredoxin-like protein NrdH present in the RNR operon. The diversity of class III RNRs reflects the diversity of electron carriers used in anaerobic metabolism.

  3. Ferredoxin and ferredoxin-NADP reductase from photosynthetic and nonphotosynthetic tissues of tomato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, L. S.; Yee, B. C.; Buchanan, B. B.; Kamide, K.; Sanada, Y.; Wada, K.

    1991-01-01

    Ferredoxin and ferredoxin-NADP+ oxidoreductase (FNR) were purified from leaves, roots, and red and green pericarp of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum, cv VFNT and cv Momotaro). Four different ferredoxins were identified on the basis of N-terminal amino acid sequence and charge. Ferredoxins I and II were the most prevalent forms in leaves and green pericarp, and ferredoxin III was the most prevalent in roots. Red pericarp of the VFNT cv yielded variable amounts of ferredoxins II and III plus a unique form, ferredoxin IV. Red pericarp of the Momotaro cv contained ferredoxins I, II, and IV. This represents the first demonstration of ferredoxin in a chromoplast-containing tissue. There were no major differences among the tomato ferredoxins in absorption spectrum or cytochrome c reduction activity. Two forms of FNR were present in tomato as judged by anion exchange chromatography and by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. FNR II had a lower apparent relative molecular weight, a slightly altered absorption spectrum, and a lower specific activity for cytochrome c reduction than FNR I. FNR II could be a partially degraded form of FNR I. The FNRs from the different tissues of tomato plants all showed diaphorase activity, with FNR II being more active than FNR I. The presence of ferredoxin and FNR in heterotrophic tissues of tomato is consistent with the existence of a nonphotosynthetic ferredoxin/FNR redox pathway to support the function of ferredoxin-dependent enzymes.

  4. Structural redox control in a 7Fe ferredoxin isolated from Desulfovibrio alaskensis.

    PubMed

    Grazina, Raquel; de Sousa, Patrícia M Paes; Brondino, Carlos D; Carepo, Marta S P; Moura, Isabel; Moura, José J G

    2011-08-01

    The redox behaviour of a ferredoxin (Fd) from Desulfovibrio alaskensis was characterized by electrochemistry. The protein was isolated and purified, and showed to be a tetramer containing one [3Fe-4S] and one [4Fe-4S] centre. This ferredoxin has high homology with FdI from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki and Hildenborough and FdIII from Desulfovibrio africanus. From differential pulse voltammetry the following signals were identified: [3Fe-4S](+1/0) (E(0')=-158±5mV); [4Fe-4S](+2/+1) (E(0')=-474±5mV) and [3Fe-4S](0/-2) (E(0')=-660±5mV). The effect of pH on these signals showed that the reduced [3Fe-4S](0) cluster has a pK'(red)(')=5.1±0.1, the [4Fe-4S](+2/+1) centre is pH independent, and the [3Fe-4S](0/-2) reduction is accompanied by the binding of two protons. The ability of the [3Fe-4S](0) cluster to be converted into a new [4Fe-4S] cluster was proven. The redox potential of the original [4Fe-4S] centre showed to be dependent on the formation of the new [4Fe-4S] centre, which results in a positive shift (ca. 70mV) of the redox potential of the original centre. Being most [Fe-S] proteins involved in electron transport processes, the electrochemical characterization of their clusters is essential to understand their biological function. Complementary EPR studies were performed.

  5. [Ferredoxin from Bumilleriopsis filiformis Vischer].

    PubMed

    Böger, P

    1970-06-01

    Ferredoxin from the alga Bumilleriopsis filiformis Vischer (Xanthophyceae) is characterized by comparing some of its properties with spinach ferredoxin.It is similar to the known plant ferredoxins in the following points: a) Absorption spectrum. b) Molecular weight. c) Amino acid composition (approx. 100 amino acid residues). d) Uptake of 1 electron upon complete reduction and a 50 per cent decrease of the optical density at 420 nm. e) 2 non-heme iron atoms per molecule, which do not exchange with an iron isotope. f) SH-groups of the native protein do not react with DTNB. Bumilleriopsis ferredoxin differs from known plant ferredoxins in the following points: a) Greater stability towards atmospheric oxygen when gently heated. b) Only 1 detectable acid-labile sulfur atom per molecule. c) Dialysis against EDTA: by this procedure a part of the iron but none of the acid-labile sulfur is removed. With spinach ferredoxin a part of both elements is removed simultaneously. d) Greater reactivity with ferredoxin-NADP reductase from Bumilleriopsis than with that from spinach. With spinach ferredoxin no substantial difference between the reaction rates of the two reductases is observed (see Böger, 1969 b). The results may indicate an active center in Bumilleriopsis ferredoxin consisting of 1 atom iron and 1 atom acid-labile sulfur.

  6. Multiple orientations in a physiological complex: the pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase-ferredoxin system.

    PubMed

    Pieulle, Laetitia; Nouailler, Matthieu; Morelli, Xavier; Cavazza, Christine; Gallice, Philippe; Blanchet, Stéphane; Bianco, Pierre; Guerlesquin, Françoise; Hatchikian, E Claude

    2004-12-14

    Ferredoxin I from Desulfovibrio africanus (Da FdI) is a small acidic [4Fe-4S] cluster protein that exchanges electrons with pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR), a key enzyme in the energy metabolism of anaerobes. The thermodynamic properties and the electron transfer between PFOR and either native or mutated FdI have been investigated by microcalorimetry and steady-state kinetics, respectively. The association constant of the PFOR-FdI complex is 3.85 x 10(5) M(-1), and the binding affinity has been found to be highly sensitive to ionic strength, suggesting the involvement of electrostatic forces in formation of the complex. Surprisingly, the punctual or combined neutralizations of carboxylate residues surrounding the [4Fe-4S] cluster slightly affect the PFOR-FdI interaction. Furthermore, hydrophobic residues around the cluster do not seem to be crucial for the PFOR-FdI system activity; however, some of them play an important role in the stability of the FeS cluster. NMR restrained docking associated with site-directed mutagenesis studies suggested the presence of various interacting sites on Da FdI. The modification of additional acidic residues at the interacting interface, generating a FdI pentamutant, evidenced at least two distinct FdI binding sites facing the distal [4Fe-4S] cluster of the PFOR. We also used a set of various small acidic partners to investigate the specificity of PFOR toward redox partners. The remarkable flexibility of the PFOR-FdI system supports the idea that the specificity of the physiological complex has probably been "sacrificed" to improve the turnover rate and thus the efficiency of bacterial electron transfer. PMID:15581360

  7. New perspectives on bacterial ferredoxin evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, D. G.; Hunt, L. T.; Yeh, L.-S. L.; Barker, W. C.

    1985-01-01

    Ferredoxins are low-molecular-weight, nonheme, iron proteins which function as electron carriers in a wide variety of electron transport chains. Howard et al. (1983) have suggested that the amino end of Azotobacter vinelandii ferredoxin shows a greater similarity to the carboxyl end of ferredoxin from Chromatium vinosum and that their half-chain sequences are homologous when the half-chains of either species are considered in inverse order. Examination of this proposition has made it necessary to reevaluate previous conclusions concerning the evolution of bacterial ferredoxin. Attention is given to the properties of the bacterial ferredoxin sequences, and the evolution of the bacterial ferredoxins.

  8. Ferredoxin-linked chloroplast enzymes. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    This report summarizes research on ferredoxin:NADP{sup +} oxidoreductase and ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase. One of the primary goals of the original proposal was to map the ferredoxin-binding sites on three soluble enzymes that are located in spinach chloroplasts and utilize ferredoxin as an electron donor:Ferredoxin:NADP{sup +} oxidoreductase (FNR); ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase (FTR) and glutamate synthase. As the availability of amino acid sequences for the enzymes are important in such studies, it was proposed that the amino acid sequence of glutamate synthase be determined. The amino acid sequences of FNR, FTR and ferredoxin are already known. An aim related to elucidating the binding sites on these enzymes for ferredoxin was to determine whether there is a common site on ferredoxin involved in binding to all of these ferredoxin-dependent chloroplast enzymes and, if so, to map it. One additional aim was to characterize thioredoxin binding by FTR and determine whether the same site on FTR is involved in binding both ferredoxin and thioredoxin. Considerable progress has been made on most of these original projects, although work conducted on FTR is still in its preliminary stages.

  9. Octomeric pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Garczarek, Florian; Dong, Ming; Typke, Dieter; Witkowska, H Ewa; Hazen, Terry C; Nogales, Eva; Biggin, Mark D; Glaeser, Robert M

    2007-07-01

    Pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductatse (PFOR) carries out the central step in oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. We have purified this enzyme from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH) as part of a systematic characterization of as many multiprotein complexes as possible for this organism, and the three-dimensional structure of this enzyme has been determined by a combination of electron microscopy (EM), single particle image analysis, homology modeling and computational molecular docking. Our results show that the 1MDa DvH PFOR complex is a homo-octomer, or more precisely, a tetramer of the dimeric form of the related enzyme found in Desulfovibrio africanus (Da), with which it shares a sequence identity of 69%. Our homology model of the DvH PFOR dimer is based on the Da PFOR X-ray structure. Docking of this model into our 17A resolution EM-reconstruction of negatively stained DvH PFOR octomers strongly suggests that the difference in oligomerization state for the two species is due to the insertion of a single valine residue (Val383) within a surface loop of the DvH enzyme. This study demonstrates that the strategy of intermediate resolution EM reconstruction coupled to homology modeling and docking can be powerful enough to infer the functionality of single amino acid residues. PMID:17400475

  10. Crystal structures of archaeal 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases from Sulfolobus tokodaii.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhen; Maruyama, Akane; Arakawa, Takatoshi; Fushinobu, Shinya; Wakagi, Takayoshi

    2016-01-01

    As the first three-dimensional structure of the two-subunit type 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases (OFOR) from archaea, we solved the crystal structures of STK_23000/STK_22980 (StOFOR1) and STK_24350/STK_24330 (StOFOR2) from Sulfolobus tokodaii. They showed similar overall structures, consisting of two a- and b-subunit heterodimers containing thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) cofactor and [4Fe-4S] cluster, but lack an intramolecular ferredoxin domain. Unlike other OFORs, StOFORs can utilize both pyruvate and 2-oxoglutarate, playing a key role in the central metabolism. In the structure of StOFOR2 in unreacted pyruvate complex form, carboxylate group of pyruvate is recognized by Arg344 and Thr257 from the a-subunit, which are conserved in pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase from Desulfovbrio africanus (DaPFOR). In the structure of StOFOR1 co-crystallized with 2-oxobutyrate, electron density corresponding to a 1-hydroxypropyl group (post-decarboxylation state) was observed at the thiazole ring of TPP. The binding pockets of the StOFORs surrounding the methyl or propyl group of the ligands are wider than that of DaPFOR. Mutational analyses indicated that several residues were responsible for the broad 2-oxoacid specificity of StOFORs. We also constructed a possible complex structural model by placing a Zn(2+)-containing dicluster ferredoxin of S. tokodaii into the large pocket of StOFOR2, providing insight into the electron transfer between the two redox proteins. PMID:27619895

  11. Crystal structures of archaeal 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases from Sulfolobus tokodaii

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhen; Maruyama, Akane; Arakawa, Takatoshi; Fushinobu, Shinya; Wakagi, Takayoshi

    2016-01-01

    As the first three-dimensional structure of the two-subunit type 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases (OFOR) from archaea, we solved the crystal structures of STK_23000/STK_22980 (StOFOR1) and STK_24350/STK_24330 (StOFOR2) from Sulfolobus tokodaii. They showed similar overall structures, consisting of two a- and b-subunit heterodimers containing thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) cofactor and [4Fe-4S] cluster, but lack an intramolecular ferredoxin domain. Unlike other OFORs, StOFORs can utilize both pyruvate and 2-oxoglutarate, playing a key role in the central metabolism. In the structure of StOFOR2 in unreacted pyruvate complex form, carboxylate group of pyruvate is recognized by Arg344 and Thr257 from the a-subunit, which are conserved in pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase from Desulfovbrio africanus (DaPFOR). In the structure of StOFOR1 co-crystallized with 2-oxobutyrate, electron density corresponding to a 1-hydroxypropyl group (post-decarboxylation state) was observed at the thiazole ring of TPP. The binding pockets of the StOFORs surrounding the methyl or propyl group of the ligands are wider than that of DaPFOR. Mutational analyses indicated that several residues were responsible for the broad 2-oxoacid specificity of StOFORs. We also constructed a possible complex structural model by placing a Zn2+-containing dicluster ferredoxin of S. tokodaii into the large pocket of StOFOR2, providing insight into the electron transfer between the two redox proteins. PMID:27619895

  12. Role of Morphological Growth State and Gene Expression in Desulfovibrio africanus strain Walvis Bay Mercury Methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Moberly, James G; Miller, Carrie L; Brown, Steven D; Biswas, Abir; Brandt, Craig C; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Elias, Dwayne A

    2012-01-01

    The biogeochemical transformations of mercury are a complex process, with the production of methylmercury, a potent human neurotoxin, repeatedly demonstrated in sulfate- and Fe(III)- reducing as well as methanogenic bacteria. However, little is known regarding the morphology, genes or proteins involved in methylmercury generation. Desulfovibrio africanus strain Walvis Bay is a Hg-methylating -proteobacterium with a sequenced genome and has unusual pleomorphic forms. In this study, a relationship between the pleomorphism and Hg methylation was investigated. Proportional increases in the sigmoidal (regular) cell form corresponded with increased net MeHg production, but decreased when the pinched cocci (persister) form became the major morphotype. D. africanus microarrays indicated that the ferrous iron transport genes (feoAB), as well as ribosomal genes and several genes whose products are predicted to have metal binding domains (CxxC), were up-regulated during exposure to Hg in the exponential phase. While no specific methylation pathways were identified, the finding that Hg may interfere with iron transport and the correlation of growth-phase dependent morphology with MeHg production are notable. The identification of these relationships between differential gene expression, morphology, and the growth phase dependence of Hg transformations suggests that actively growing cells are primarily responsible for methylation, and so areas with ample carbon and electron-acceptor concentrations may also generate a higher proportion of methylmercury than more oligotrophic environments. The observation of increased iron transporter expression also suggests that Hg methylation may interfere with iron biogeochemical cycles.

  13. (The interaction of ferredoxin:NADP sup + oxidoreductase and ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase with substrates)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    We seek to map the ferredoxin-binding sites on three soluble enzymes located in spinach chloroplasts which utilize ferredoxin as an electron donor:Ferredoxin:NADP{sup +}oxidoreductase (FNR); ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase (FTR) and glutamate synthase. As the availability of amino acid sequences for the enzymes are important in such studies, that the amino acid sequence of glutamate synthase needs be determined, the amino acid sequences of FNR, FTR and ferredoxin are already known. Related to an aim elucidate the binding sites for ferredoxin to determine whether there is a common binding site on all of these ferredoxin-dependent chloroplast enzymes and, if so, to map it. Additionally thioredoxin binding by FTR needs be determine to resolve whether the same site on FTR is involved in binding both ferredoxin and thioredoxin. Considerable progress is reported on the prosthetic groups of glutamate synthase, in establishing the role of arginine and lysine residues in ferredoxin binding by, ferredoxin:nitrite oxidoreductase nitrite reductase, labelling carboxyl groups on ferredoxin with taurine and labelling lysine residues biotinylation, and low potential heme proteins have been isolated and characterized from a non-photosynthetic plant tissue. Although the monoclonal antibodies raised against FNR turned out not to be useful for mapping the FNR/ferredoxin or FNR/NADPinteraction domains, good progress has been made on mapping the FNR/ferredoxin interaction domains by an alternative technique. The techniques developed for differential chemical modification of these two proteins - taurine modification of aspartate and glutamate residues and biotin modification of lysine residues - should be useful for mapping the interaction domains of many proteins that associate through electrostatic interactions.

  14. Reproduction and Damage Potential of Five Geographical Ditylenchus africanus Populations on Peanut.

    PubMed

    Steenkamp, Sonia; De Waele, Dirk; McDonald, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    Ditylenchus africanus affects peanut quality, which leads to downgrading of consignments and economic losses for producers. This nematode is difficult to control and host-plant resistance may be the most effective way to control it. Recently, the peanut breeding line PC254K1 has been identified as resistant to a D. africanus population from Vaalharts and will be included into the peanut breeding program. The objectives of our study were to compare the reproduction potential of D. africanus geographic populations from five different areas in the peanut production area of South Africa and to assess whether PC254K1 is resistant to all five D. africanus populations. Reproduction of the D. africanus populations was evaluated on peanut callus in growth cabinets at 21°C, 28°C, and 35°C. The peanut cv. Sellie was included in the study as the D. africanus-susceptible reference genotype in the greenhouse and microplots. Reproduction potential of all five of the D. africanus populations was similar. Resistance of PC254K1 was confirmed to all five D. africanus populations. The resistance trait of a D. africanus-resistant cultivar developed from PC254K1 should, therefore, be sustainable over the five localities tested during this study. PMID:27418699

  15. Reproduction and Damage Potential of Five Geographical Ditylenchus africanus Populations on Peanut

    PubMed Central

    Steenkamp, Sonia; De Waele, Dirk; McDonald, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Ditylenchus africanus affects peanut quality, which leads to downgrading of consignments and economic losses for producers. This nematode is difficult to control and host-plant resistance may be the most effective way to control it. Recently, the peanut breeding line PC254K1 has been identified as resistant to a D. africanus population from Vaalharts and will be included into the peanut breeding program. The objectives of our study were to compare the reproduction potential of D. africanus geographic populations from five different areas in the peanut production area of South Africa and to assess whether PC254K1 is resistant to all five D. africanus populations. Reproduction of the D. africanus populations was evaluated on peanut callus in growth cabinets at 21°C, 28°C, and 35°C. The peanut cv. Sellie was included in the study as the D. africanus-susceptible reference genotype in the greenhouse and microplots. Reproduction potential of all five of the D. africanus populations was similar. Resistance of PC254K1 was confirmed to all five D. africanus populations. The resistance trait of a D. africanus-resistant cultivar developed from PC254K1 should, therefore, be sustainable over the five localities tested during this study. PMID:27418699

  16. Identification and molecular characterization of mitochondrial ferredoxins and ferredoxin reductase from Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Takubo, Keiko; Morikawa, Tomomi; Nonaka, Yasuki; Mizutani, Masaharu; Takenaka, Shigeo; Takabe, Keiji; Takahashi, Masa-aki; Ohta, Daisaku

    2003-07-01

    We have identified and characterized novel types of ferredoxin and ferredoxin reductase from Arabidopsis. Among a number of potential ferredoxin reductase genes in the Arabidopsis genome, AtMFDR was identified to encode a homologue of mitochondrial ferredoxin reductase, and AtMFDX1 and AtMFDX2 were predicted to code for proteins similar to mitochondrial ferredoxin. First, we isolated cDNAs for these proteins and expressed them in heterologous systems of insect cells and Escherichia coli, respectively. The recombinant AtMFDX1 and AtMFDR proteins exhibited spectral properties characteristic of ferredoxin and ferredoxin reductase, respectively, and a pair of recombinant AtMFDX1 and AtMFDR proteins was sufficient to transfer electrons from NAD(P)H to cytochrome c in vitro. Subcellular fractionation analyses suggested membrane association of AtMFDR protein, and protein-gel blot analyses and transient expression studies of green fluorescence protein fusions indicated mitochondrial localization of AtMFDX1 and AtMFDR. RNA-gel blot analyses revealed that the accumulation levels of AtMFDXs and AtMFDR gene transcripts were specifically high in flowers, while protein-gel blot analysis demonstrated substantial accumulation of AtMFDR protein in leaf, stem, and flower. Possible physiological roles of these mitochondrial electron transfer components are discussed in relation to redox dependent metabolic pathways in plants.

  17. Crystal structure of the free radical intermediate of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Chabrière, E; Vernède, X; Guigliarelli, B; Charon, M H; Hatchikian, E C; Fontecilla-Camps, J C

    2001-12-21

    In anaerobic organisms, the decarboxylation of pyruvate, a crucial component of intermediary metabolism, is catalyzed by the metalloenzyme pyruvate: ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) resulting in the generation of low potential electrons and the subsequent acetylation of coenzyme A (CoA). PFOR is the only enzyme for which a stable acetyl thiamine diphosphate (ThDP)-based free radical reaction intermediate has been identified. The 1.87 A-resolution structure of the radical form of PFOR from Desulfovibrio africanus shows that, despite currently accepted ideas, the thiazole ring of the ThDP cofactor is markedly bent, indicating a drastic reduction of its aromaticity. In addition, the bond connecting the acetyl group to ThDP is unusually long, probably of the one-electron type already described for several cation radicals but not yet found in a biological system. Taken together, our data, along with evidence from the literature, suggest that acetyl-CoA synthesis by PFOR proceeds via a condensation mechanism involving acetyl (PFOR-based) and thiyl (CoA-based) radicals. PMID:11752578

  18. [The interaction of ferredoxin:NADP{sup +} oxidoreductase and ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase with substrates]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    We seek to map the ferredoxin-binding sites on three soluble enzymes located in spinach chloroplasts which utilize ferredoxin as an electron donor:Ferredoxin:NADP{sup +}oxidoreductase (FNR); ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase (FTR) and glutamate synthase. As the availability of amino acid sequences for the enzymes are important in such studies, that the amino acid sequence of glutamate synthase needs be determined, the amino acid sequences of FNR, FTR and ferredoxin are already known. Related to an aim elucidate the binding sites for ferredoxin to determine whether there is a common binding site on all of these ferredoxin-dependent chloroplast enzymes and, if so, to map it. Additionally thioredoxin binding by FTR needs be determine to resolve whether the same site on FTR is involved in binding both ferredoxin and thioredoxin. Considerable progress is reported on the prosthetic groups of glutamate synthase, in establishing the role of arginine and lysine residues in ferredoxin binding by, ferredoxin:nitrite oxidoreductase nitrite reductase, labelling carboxyl groups on ferredoxin with taurine and labelling lysine residues biotinylation, and low potential heme proteins have been isolated and characterized from a non-photosynthetic plant tissue. Although the monoclonal antibodies raised against FNR turned out not to be useful for mapping the FNR/ferredoxin or FNR/NADPinteraction domains, good progress has been made on mapping the FNR/ferredoxin interaction domains by an alternative technique. The techniques developed for differential chemical modification of these two proteins - taurine modification of aspartate and glutamate residues and biotin modification of lysine residues - should be useful for mapping the interaction domains of many proteins that associate through electrostatic interactions.

  19. The feeding biomechanics and dietary ecology of Australopithecus africanus.

    PubMed

    Strait, David S; Weber, Gerhard W; Neubauer, Simon; Chalk, Janine; Richmond, Brian G; Lucas, Peter W; Spencer, Mark A; Schrein, Caitlin; Dechow, Paul C; Ross, Callum F; Grosse, Ian R; Wright, Barth W; Constantino, Paul; Wood, Bernard A; Lawn, Brian; Hylander, William L; Wang, Qian; Byron, Craig; Slice, Dennis E; Smith, Amanda L

    2009-02-17

    The African Plio-Pleistocene hominins known as australopiths evolved a distinctive craniofacial morphology that traditionally has been viewed as a dietary adaptation for feeding on either small, hard objects or on large volumes of food. A historically influential interpretation of this morphology hypothesizes that loads applied to the premolars during feeding had a profound influence on the evolution of australopith craniofacial form. Here, we test this hypothesis using finite element analysis in conjunction with comparative, imaging, and experimental methods. We find that the facial skeleton of the Australopithecus type species, A. africanus, is well suited to withstand premolar loads. However, we suggest that the mastication of either small objects or large volumes of food is unlikely to fully explain the evolution of facial form in this species. Rather, key aspects of australopith craniofacial morphology are more likely to be related to the ingestion and initial preparation of large, mechanically protected food objects like large nuts and seeds. These foods may have broadened the diet of these hominins, possibly by being critical resources that australopiths relied on during periods when their preferred dietary items were in short supply. Our analysis reconciles apparent discrepancies between dietary reconstructions based on biomechanics, tooth morphology, and dental microwear.

  20. The potential of Cyathus africanus for transformation of terpene substrates.

    PubMed

    McCook, Kayanne P; Chen, Avril R M; Reynolds, William F; Reese, Paul B

    2012-10-01

    The insecticidal sesquiterpenes cadina-4,10(15)-dien-3-one and aromadendr-1(10)-en-9-one were administered to the fungus Cyathus africanus ATCC 35853. Biotransformation of the former produced (4R)-9α-hydroxycadin-10(15)-en-3-one, while the latter gave 2β-hydroxyaromadendr-1(10)-en-9-one, 2α-hydroxyaromadendr-1(10)-en-9-one and 10α-hydroxy-1β,2β-epoxyaromadendran-9-one. The bioconversion of santonin led to the production of two analogues, 11,13-dihydroxysantonin and the hitherto unreported 8α,13-dihydroxysantonin, while cedrol yielded 3β,8β-dihydroxycedrane and 3α,8β-dihydroxycedrane. Stemod-12-ene, a diterpene, was transformed to 2-oxostemar-13-ene, a hitherto unknown analogue with a rearranged carbon framework. When methyl betulonate, a triterpenoid belonging to the lupane family, was supplied to the fungus 18α-ursane and 18α-oleanane derivatives, namely 19β-hydroxy-3-oxo-18α-oleanan-28-oic acid and 19α-hydroxy-3-oxo-18α-ursan-28-oic acids, were generated. There are no previous reports of fungal transformation of a triterpene in which a skeletal rearrangement occurred. All substrate administration experiments were done in the presence of the terpene cyclase inhibitor chlorocholine chloride (CCC), using the single phase - pulse feed method.

  1. Sequence and expression of ferredoxin mRNA in barley

    SciTech Connect

    Zielinski, R.; Funder, P.M.; Ling, V. )

    1990-05-01

    We have isolated and structurally characterized a full-length cDNA clone encoding ferredoxin from a {lambda}gt10 cDNA library prepared from barley leaf mRNA. The ferredoxin clone (pBFD-1) was fused head-to-head with a partial-length cDNA clone encoding calmodulin, and was fortuitously isolated by screening the library with a calmodulin-specific oligonucleotide probe. The mRNA sequence from which pBFD-1 was derived is expressed exclusively in the leaf tissues of 7-d old barley seedlings. Barley pre-ferredoxin has a predicted size of 15.3 kDal, of which 4.6 kDal are accounted for by the transit peptide. The polypeptide encoded by pBFD-1 is identical to wheat ferredoxin, and shares slightly more amino acid sequence similarity with spinach ferredoxin I than with ferredoxin II. Ferredoxin mRNA levels are rapidly increased 10-fold by white light in etiolated barley leaves.

  2. Metopic suture of Taung (Australopithecus africanus) and its implications for hominin brain evolution

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Dean; Zollikofer, Christoph P. E.; Morimoto, Naoki; Ponce de León, Marcia S.

    2012-01-01

    The type specimen for Australopithecus africanus (Taung) includes a natural endocast that reproduces most of the external morphology of the right cerebral hemisphere and a fragment of fossilized face that articulates with the endocast. Despite the fact that Taung died between 3 and 4 y of age, the endocast reproduces a small triangular-shaped remnant of the anterior fontanelle, from which a clear metopic suture (MS) courses rostrally along the midline [Hrdlička A (1925) Am J Phys Anthropol 8:379–392]. Here we describe and interpret this feature of Taung in light of comparative fossil and actualistic data on the timing of MS closure. In great apes, the MS normally fuses shortly after birth, such that unfused MS similar to Taung’s are rare. In humans, however, MS fuses well after birth, and partially or unfused MS are frequent. In gracile fossil adult hominins that lived between ∼3.0 and 1.5 million y ago, MS are also relatively frequent, indicating that the modern human-like pattern of late MS fusion may have become adaptive during early hominin evolution. Selective pressures favoring delayed fusion might have resulted from three aspects of perinatal ontogeny: (i) the difficulty of giving birth to large-headed neonates through birth canals that were reconfigured for bipedalism (the “obstetric dilemma”), (ii) high early postnatal brain growth rates, and (iii) reorganization and expansion of the frontal neocortex. Overall, our data indicate that hominin brain evolution occurred within a complex network of fetopelvic constraints, which required modification of frontal neurocranial ossification patterns. PMID:22566620

  3. Dental metric assessment of the omo fossils: implications for the phylogenetic position of Australopithecus africanus.

    PubMed

    Hunt, K; Vitzthum, V J

    1986-10-01

    The discovery of Australopithecus afarensis has led to new interpretations of hominid phylogeny, some of which reject A. africanus as an ancestor of Homo. Analysis of buccolingual tooth crown dimensions in australopithecines and Homo species by Johanson and White (Science 202:321-330, 1979) revealed that the South African gracile australopithecines are intermediate in size between Laetoli/hadar hominids and South African robust hominids. Homo, on the other hand, displays dimensions similar to those of A. afarensis and smaller than those of other australopithecines. These authors conclude, therefore, that A. africanus is derived in the direction of A. robustus and is not an ancestor of the Homo clade. However, there is a considerable time gap (ca. 800,000 years) between the Laetoli/Hadar specimens and the earliest Homo specimens; "gracile" hominids from Omo fit into this chronological gap and are from the same geographic area. Because the early specimens at Omo have been designated A. afarensis and the later specimens classified as Homo habilis, Omo offers a unique opportunity to test hypotheses concerning hominid evolution, especially regarding the phylogenetic status of A. africanus. Comparisons of mean cheek teeth breadths disclosed the significant (P less than or equal to 0.05) differences between the Omo sample and the Laetoli/Hadar fossils (P4, M2, and M3), the Homo fossils (P3, P4, M1, M2, and M1), and A. africanus (M3). Of the several possible interpretations of these data, it appears that the high degree of similarity between the Omo sample and the South African gracile australopithecine material warrants considering the two as geographical variants of A. africanus. The geographic, chronologic, and metric attributes of the Omo sample argue for its lineal affinity with A. afarensis and Homo. In conclusion, a consideration of hominid postcanine dental metrics provides no basis for removing A. africanus from the ancestry of the Homo lineage.

  4. Dental metric assessment of the omo fossils: implications for the phylogenetic position of Australopithecus africanus.

    PubMed

    Hunt, K; Vitzthum, V J

    1986-10-01

    The discovery of Australopithecus afarensis has led to new interpretations of hominid phylogeny, some of which reject A. africanus as an ancestor of Homo. Analysis of buccolingual tooth crown dimensions in australopithecines and Homo species by Johanson and White (Science 202:321-330, 1979) revealed that the South African gracile australopithecines are intermediate in size between Laetoli/hadar hominids and South African robust hominids. Homo, on the other hand, displays dimensions similar to those of A. afarensis and smaller than those of other australopithecines. These authors conclude, therefore, that A. africanus is derived in the direction of A. robustus and is not an ancestor of the Homo clade. However, there is a considerable time gap (ca. 800,000 years) between the Laetoli/Hadar specimens and the earliest Homo specimens; "gracile" hominids from Omo fit into this chronological gap and are from the same geographic area. Because the early specimens at Omo have been designated A. afarensis and the later specimens classified as Homo habilis, Omo offers a unique opportunity to test hypotheses concerning hominid evolution, especially regarding the phylogenetic status of A. africanus. Comparisons of mean cheek teeth breadths disclosed the significant (P less than or equal to 0.05) differences between the Omo sample and the Laetoli/Hadar fossils (P4, M2, and M3), the Homo fossils (P3, P4, M1, M2, and M1), and A. africanus (M3). Of the several possible interpretations of these data, it appears that the high degree of similarity between the Omo sample and the South African gracile australopithecine material warrants considering the two as geographical variants of A. africanus. The geographic, chronologic, and metric attributes of the Omo sample argue for its lineal affinity with A. afarensis and Homo. In conclusion, a consideration of hominid postcanine dental metrics provides no basis for removing A. africanus from the ancestry of the Homo lineage. PMID:3099582

  5. A four-iron ferredoxin from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (Short Communication)

    PubMed Central

    Zubieta, J. A.; Mason, R.; Postgate, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Ferredoxin from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was isolated, purified and crystallized. It contains four iron atoms and four sulphido or `acid-labile' sulphur atoms for a molecule of 6000 daltons. The absorption spectrum in the u.v.–visible region and the electron-paramagnetic-resonance signals of the reduced protein are similar to those observed for other four-iron ferredoxins. The amino acid composition is different from that of Desulfovibrio gigas ferredoxin. The redox potential of −0.33V at pH7.0 was determined by dye techniques. PMID:4748838

  6. Disulfide bond-dependent mechanism of protection against oxidative stress in pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase of anaerobic Desulfovibrio bacteria.

    PubMed

    Vita, Nicolas; Hatchikian, E Claude; Nouailler, Matthieu; Dolla, Alain; Pieulle, Laetitia

    2008-01-22

    Oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate forming acetyl-coenzyme A is a crucial step in many metabolic pathways. In most anaerobes, this reaction is carried out by pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR), an enzyme normally oxygen sensitive except in Desulfovibrio africanus (Da), where it shows an abnormally high oxygen stability. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we have specified a disulfide bond-dependent protective mechanism against oxidative conditions in Da PFOR. Our data demonstrated that the two cysteine residues forming the only disulfide bond in the as-isolated PFOR are crucial for the stability of the enzyme in oxidative conditions. A methionine residue located in the environment of the proximal [4Fe-4S] cluster was also found to be essential for this protective mechanism. In vivo analysis demonstrated unambiguously that PFOR in Da cells as well as two other Desulfovibrio species was efficiently protected against oxidative stress. Importantly, a less active but stable Da PFOR in oxidized cells rapidly reactivated when returned to anaerobic medium. Our work demonstrates the existence of an elegant disulfide bond-dependent reversible mechanism, found in the Desulfovibrio species to protect one of the key enzymes implicated in the central metabolism of these strict anaerobes. This new mechanism could be considered as an adaptation strategy used by sulfate-reducing bacteria to cope with temporary oxidative conditions and to maintain an active dormancy. PMID:18161989

  7. Magnetostructural dynamics of Rieske versus ferredoxin iron-sulfur cofactors.

    PubMed

    Ali, Md Ehesan; Staemmler, Volker; Marx, Dominik

    2015-03-01

    The local chemical environment of the [2Fe-2S] cofactor hosted by ferredoxin and Rieske-type proteins is fundamentally different due to the presence of distinct ligands at the two iron centers in the case of Rieske proteins, whereas they are identical in ferredoxins. This renders Rieske [2Fe-2S] cores chemically asymmetric and results in more complex vibrational spectra as compared to ferredoxin. Likewise, one would expect other properties, for instance the dynamics of the magnetic exchange coupling constant J, to be also more complex. Applying ab initio molecular dynamics using our recently introduced spin-constrained two-determinant extended broken symmetry (CEBS) approach to Rieske and ferredoxin model complexes at 300 K, we extract the molecular fluctuations and the resulting magnetostructural cross-correlations involving the antiferromagnetic exchange interaction J(t). This analysis demonstrates that the details of the magnetostructural dynamics are indeed distinctly different for Rieske and ferredoxin cofactors, while the time averages of 〈J〉 are shown to be essentially identical. In particular, the frequency window between about 200 and 350 cm(-1), is a "fingerprint region" that allows one to distinguish chemically asymmetric from symmetric cofactors and thus Rieske proteins from ferredoxins.

  8. Genome Sequence of Mercury-Methylating and Pleomorphic Desulfovibrio africanus strain Walvis Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D; Wall, Judy D.; Kucken, A M; Gilmour, C C; Podar, Mircea; Brandt, Craig C; Teshima, Hazuki; Detter, J C; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam L; Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Pennacchio, Len; Nolan, Matt; Pitluck, Samual; Woyke, Tanja; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Elias, Dwayne A

    2011-01-01

    Desulfovibrio africanus strain Walvis Bay is an anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacterium capable of producing methylmercury (MeHg), a potent human neurotoxin. The mechanism of methylation by this and other organisms is unknown. We present the 4.2-Mb genome sequence to provide further insight into microbial mercury methylation and sulfate-reducing bacteria.

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Liberibacter africanus," a Bacterium Associated with Citrus Huanglongbing.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong; Pietersen, Gerhard; Han, Cliff; Read, David Alan; Lou, Binghai; Gupta, Goutam; Civerolo, Edwin L

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of "Candidatus Liberibacter africanus" strain PTSAPSY. The 1,192,232-bp genome with 34.5% G+C content comprises 1,017 open reading frames, 44 tRNAs, and three complete rRNAs in a circular chromosome. PMID:26184931

  10. Ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase association with phycocyanin modulates its properties.

    PubMed

    Korn, Anja; Ajlani, Ghada; Lagoutte, Bernard; Gall, Andrew; Sétif, Pierre

    2009-11-13

    In photosynthetic organisms, ferredoxin:NADP(+) oxidoreductase (FNR) is known to provide NADPH for CO(2) assimilation, but it also utilizes NADPH to provide reduced ferredoxin. The cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 produces two FNR isoforms, a small one (FNR(S)) similar to the one found in plant plastids and a large one (FNR(L)) that is associated with the phycobilisome, a light-harvesting complex. Here we show that a mutant lacking FNR(L) exhibits a higher NADP(+)/NADPH ratio. We also purified to homogeneity a phycobilisome subcomplex comprising FNR(L,) named FNR(L)-PC. The enzymatic activities of FNR(L)-PC were compared with those of FNR(S). During NADPH oxidation, FNR(L)-PC exhibits a 30% decrease in the Michaelis constant K(m)((NADPH)), and a 70% increase in K(m)((ferredoxin)), which is in agreement with its predicted lower activity of ferredoxin reduction. During NADP(+) reduction, the FNR(L)-PC shows a 29/43% decrease in the rate of single electron transfer from reduced ferredoxin in the presence/absence of NADP(+). The increase in K(m)((ferredoxin)) and the rate decrease of single reduction are attributed to steric hindrance by the phycocyanin moiety of FNR(L)-PC. Both isoforms are capable of catalyzing the NADP(+) reduction under multiple turnover conditions. Furthermore, we obtained evidence that, under high ionic strength conditions, electron transfer from reduced ferredoxin is rate limiting during this process. The differences that we observe might not fully explain the in vivo properties of the Synechocystis mutants expressing only one of the isoforms. Therefore, we advocate that FNR localization and/or substrates availability are essential in vivo.

  11. Ferredoxin:NADP+ Oxidoreductase Association with Phycocyanin Modulates Its Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Korn, Anja; Ajlani, Ghada; Lagoutte, Bernard; Gall, Andrew; Sétif, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    In photosynthetic organisms, ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase (FNR) is known to provide NADPH for CO2 assimilation, but it also utilizes NADPH to provide reduced ferredoxin. The cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 produces two FNR isoforms, a small one (FNRS) similar to the one found in plant plastids and a large one (FNRL) that is associated with the phycobilisome, a light-harvesting complex. Here we show that a mutant lacking FNRL exhibits a higher NADP+/NADPH ratio. We also purified to homogeneity a phycobilisome subcomplex comprising FNRL, named FNRL-PC. The enzymatic activities of FNRL-PC were compared with those of FNRS. During NADPH oxidation, FNRL-PC exhibits a 30% decrease in the Michaelis constant Km(NADPH), and a 70% increase in Km(ferredoxin), which is in agreement with its predicted lower activity of ferredoxin reduction. During NADP+ reduction, the FNRL-PC shows a 29/43% decrease in the rate of single electron transfer from reduced ferredoxin in the presence/absence of NADP+. The increase in Km(ferredoxin) and the rate decrease of single reduction are attributed to steric hindrance by the phycocyanin moiety of FNRL-PC. Both isoforms are capable of catalyzing the NADP+ reduction under multiple turnover conditions. Furthermore, we obtained evidence that, under high ionic strength conditions, electron transfer from reduced ferredoxin is rate limiting during this process. The differences that we observe might not fully explain the in vivo properties of the Synechocystis mutants expressing only one of the isoforms. Therefore, we advocate that FNR localization and/or substrates availability are essential in vivo. PMID:19759024

  12. Heterologous overproduction of 2[4Fe4S]- and [2Fe2S]-type clostridial ferredoxins and [2Fe2S]-type agrobacterial ferredoxin.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haiyan; Hu, Liejie; Yu, Wenjun; Li, Huili; Tao, Fei; Xie, Huijun; Wang, Shuning

    2016-05-01

    Ferredoxins are small, acidic proteins containing iron-sulfur clusters that are widespread in living organisms. They play key roles as electron carriers in various metabolic processes, including respiration, photosynthesis, fermentation, nitrogen fixation, carbon dioxide fixation, and hydrogen production. However, only several kinds of ferredoxins are commercially available now, greatly limiting the investigation of ferredoxin-related enzymes and metabolic processes. Here we describe the heterologous overproduction of 2[4Fe4S]- and [2Fe2S]-type clostridial ferredoxins and [2Fe2S]-type agrobacterial ferredoxin. Adding extra iron and sulfur sources to the medium in combination with using Escherichia coli C41(DE3) harboring pCodonplus and pRKISC plasmids as host greatly enhanced iron-sulfur cluster synthesis in the three ferredoxins. After induction for 12 h in terrific broth and purification by affinity chromatography and anion exchange chromatography, approximately 3.4 mg of streptavidin (Strep)-tagged and 3.7 mg of polyhistidine (His)-tagged clostridial 2[4Fe4S] ferredoxins were obtained from 1 l of culture. Excitingly, after induction for 24 h in terrific broth, around 40 mg of His-tagged clostridial [2Fe2S] and 23 mg of His-tagged agrobacterial [2Fe2S] ferredoxins were purified from 1 l of culture. The recombinant ferredoxins apparently exhibited identical properties and physiological function to native ferredoxins. No negative impact of two different affinity tags on ferredoxin activity was found. In conclusion, we successfully developed a convenient method for heterologous overproduction of the three kinds of ferredoxins with satisfactory yields and activities, which would be very helpful for the ferredoxin-related researches. PMID:26748213

  13. Delineating a New Heterothallic Species of Volvox (Volvocaceae, Chlorophyceae) Using New Strains of "Volvox africanus".

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Hisayoshi; Matsuzaki, Ryo; Yamamoto, Kayoko; Kawachi, Masanobu; Takahashi, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    The volvocine algae represent an excellent model lineage in which to study evolution of female and male genders based on comparative analyses of related species. Among these species, Volvox carteri has been extensively studied as a model of an oogamous and complex organism. However, it may have unique derived features that are not present in other species of Volvox. Therefore, information regarding the characteristics of sexual reproduction of other species of Volvox is also important. In 1971, Starr studied four types of sexuality in several global strains identified as Volvox africanus; however, further taxonomic studies of these strains have been lacking, and strains of three of the four sexual types are not available. Here, we studied the morphology, sexual reproduction, and taxonomy of two V. africanus-like species isolated recently from Lake Biwa, Japan. These two species were very similar to two sexual types described by Starr in 1971: one producing dioecious sexual spheroids in heterothallic strains and the other forming both male spheroids and monoecious spheroids in a single strain. The former species produced zygotes with a reticulate cell wall, whereas a smooth zygote wall was observed in the latter species as in V. africanus previously reported from various localities around the world. Our multigene phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that these are sister species to each other. However, the presence of a compensatory base change in the most conserved region of the secondary structure of nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer-2, hybrid inviability demonstrated by intercrossing experiments, and morphological differences in the density of abutment between the gelatinous material of adjacent cells (individual sheaths) in the spheroid supported the recognition of the two species, V. africanus having a smooth zygote wall and V. reticuliferus Nozaki sp. nov. having a reticulate zygote wall. PMID:26562165

  14. The description of Mediorhynchus africanus n. sp. (Acanthocephala: Gigantorhynchidae) from galliform birds in Africa.

    PubMed

    Amin, Omar M; Evans, Paul; Heckmann, Richard A; El-Naggar, Atif M

    2013-08-01

    Mediorhynchus africanus n. sp. is described from specimens collected from the helmeted guinea fowls, Numida meliagris Linn. 1758 in Kruger National Park and elsewhere in subSaharan Africa from the same and other galliform birds. These specimens were previously assigned to Mediorhynchus gallinarum Bhaleroa (Proc Zool Soc Lond Ser B Syst Morph 107:199-203, 1937) described from chickens, Gallus gallus L. in India and subsequently reported from other Asian countries. The identification of the African forms as M. gallinarum was based on similarities in the structure and measurements of the proboscis, proboscis armature and receptacle, lemnisci, and reproductive organs. A detailed study of specimens from South Africa and descriptions reported from elsewhere in Africa revealed marked differences that clearly distinguish the African material as new species. The African specimens are pseudo-segmented and flattened, the proboscis has two prominent apical pores, sensory pits are prevalent throughout the trunk, the posterior end of the female is broad with dorso-terminal dome-like extension opposite the subterminal gonopore, and the eggs are large. The Asian specimens from Indonesia and elsewhere are cylindrical and non-segmented, the proboscis lacks prominent apical pores, sensory pits are rare on the trunk, the posterior end of the female is pointed with a terminal gonopore, and the eggs are markedly smaller. We used DNA sequence from one mitochondrial gene (cytochrome oxidase subunit I) and one nuclear gene (18S ribosomal RNA) to infer the phylogenetic relationships of M. africanus and M. gallinarum and selected Acanthocephala. Medioryhnchus is monophyletic and M. africanus and M. gallinarum are allopatric sister species (9.7% sequence divergence). All findings indicate that M. africanus should be ranked as a separate species.

  15. Trabecular Evidence for a Human-Like Gait in Australopithecus africanus

    PubMed Central

    Raichlen, David; Pontzer, Herman; Warrener, Anna G.; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Although the earliest known hominins were apparently upright bipeds, there has been mixed evidence whether particular species of hominins including those in the genus Australopithecus walked with relatively extended hips, knees and ankles like modern humans, or with more flexed lower limb joints like apes when bipedal. Here we demonstrate in chimpanzees and humans a highly predictable and sensitive relationship between the orientation of the ankle joint during loading and the principal orientation of trabecular bone struts in the distal tibia that function to withstand compressive forces within the joint. Analyses of the orientation of these struts using microCT scans in a sample of fossil tibiae from the site of Sterkfontein, of which two are assigned to Australopithecus africanus, indicate that these hominins primarily loaded their ankles in a relatively extended posture like modern humans and unlike chimpanzees. In other respects, however, trabecular properties in Au africanus are distinctive, with values that mostly fall between those of chimpanzees and humans. These results indicate that Au. africanus, like Homo, walked with an efficient, extended lower limb. PMID:24223719

  16. Complete mitogenomes of Guinean angelfish (Holacanthus africanus) and Rock beauty (Holacanthus tricolor) (Teleostei: Pomacanthidae).

    PubMed

    Shen, Kang-Ning; Chen, Ching-Hung; Hsiao, Chung-Der

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we used the next-generation sequencing method to deduce two complete mitogenomes of Guinean angelfish (Holacanthus africanus) and Rock beauty (Holacanthus tricolor) for the first time. The assembled mitogenome, consisting of 16,819 bp and 16,625 bp in length, shows 87% similarity with each other. Both mitogenomes follow the typical vertebrate arrangement, including 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNAs, 2 ribosomal RNAs genes, and a non-coding control region of D-loop. The D-loop contains 1107 bp in H. africanus and 905 bp in H. tricolor and is located between tRNA-Pro and tRNA-Phe. The overall GC content is 46.2% for H. africanus and 45.6% for H. tricolor. The complete mitogenome of Guinean angelfish and Rock beauty deduced in this study provides essential and important DNA molecular data for further phylogenetic and evolutionary analysis for marine angelfish.

  17. Spectrophotometric studies on alkaline isomerization of spinach ferredoxin.

    PubMed

    Hasumi, H; Nagata, E; Nakamura, S

    1985-10-01

    The gross protein structure, the microenvironment of the iron-sulfur cluster, and the effect of neutral salts on the molecular structure of spinach ferredoxin were studied by CD and absorption spectroscopy in the alkaline pH range. In the pH range of 7-11, the existence of reversible isomerization which consisted of at least two proton dissociation processes was indicated by the statical CD and absorption spectra. The CD changes in the visible and far-UV regions were dramatic upon elevation of the pH from neutral to alkaline, indicating a significant alteration of the microenvironment of the cluster and a decrease in the ordered secondary structures. The absorption change in the visible region due to pH elevation was small but clearly observed with a high signal-to-noise ratio. The numbers of protons involved in the respective processes and the apparent pK values obtained from the pH-dependence of the CD changes were in good agreement with those obtained from the pH-dependence of the absorption changes in the visible region. In addition, the rate constants obtained from the time courses of the CD and absorption changes agreed with one another. By the addition of 1 M NaCl, the CD and absorption spectra at alkaline pH were reversed almost to those at neutral pH without significant pH change. On the other hand, above pH 11, ferredoxin was found to be irreversibly denatured. Based on analyses of the statical CD and absorption spectra and of the time courses of the CD changes, the probable mechanism of the isomerization was considered to be as follows: (Formula: see text) where H stands for a proton, N-form for native ferredoxin at neutral pH, N*-form for alkaline ferredoxin below pH 11 which still has the iron-sulfur cluster but with disordered secondary structures of the polypeptide chain, and D-form for completely denatured ferredoxin above pH 11. These results lead to the conclusions that (1) the interaction between the protein moiety and the iron-sulfur cluster is

  18. Ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase: a catalytically active dithiol group links photoreduced ferredoxin to thioredoxin functional in photosynthetic enzyme regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Droux, M.; Miginiac-Maslow, M.; Jacquot, J.P.; Gadal, P.; Crawford, N.A.; Kosower, N.S.; Buchanan, B.B.

    1987-07-01

    The mechanism by which the ferredoxin-thioredoxin system activates the target enzyme, NADP-malate dehydrogenase, was investigated by analyzing the sulfhydryl status of individual protein components with (/sup 14/C)iodoacetate and monobromobimane. The data indicate that ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR)--an iron-sulfur enzyme present in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms--is the first member of a thiol chain that links light to enzyme regulation. FTR possesses a catalytically active dithiol group localized on the 13 kDa (similar) subunit, that occurs in all species investigated and accepts reducing equivalents from photoreduced ferredoxin and transfers them stoichiometrically to the disulfide form of thioredoxin m. The reduced thioredoxin m, in turn, reduces NADP-malate dehydrogenase, thereby converting it from an inactive (S-S) to an active (SH) form. The means by which FTR is able to combine electrons (from photoreduced ferredoxin) with protons (from the medium) to reduce its active disulfide group remains to be determined.

  19. Evaluation of Wood and Cellulosic Materials as Fillers in Artificial Diets for Lyctus africanus Lesne (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae)

    PubMed Central

    Kartika, Titik; Yoshimura, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    We studied the usefulness of wood- and cellulose-based diets for L. africanus Lesne. Three diets were prepared which differed on the base ingredients; wood particles (Diet 1), cellulose powder (Diet 2), and alpha-cellulose (Diet 3). The diets were provided to adult L. africanus and the number of larvae, as well as the number of adults that emerged sex ratio, and body weight of the progeny was determined. Findings indicated similar results for the number of larvae, sex ratio and body weight of the emerged L. africanus fed on each diet. However, the number of adult produced by L. africanus on Diet 3 was significantly lower. The results indicate that the amount of vital nutrients is not the only important factor in selecting a suitable diet for L. africanus because the filler used in artificial diets influences the beetles overall population growth. For the population upon which the diets were tested, Diet 1 and Diet 2 could be utilized to rear beetles in the laboratory. PMID:26463410

  20. Structural prototypes for an extended family of flavoprotein reductases: comparison of phthalate dioxygenase reductase with ferredoxin reductase and ferredoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Correll, C. C.; Ludwig, M. L.; Bruns, C. M.; Karplus, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    The structure of phthalate dioxygenase reductase (PDR), a monomeric iron-sulfur flavoprotein that delivers electrons from NADH to phthalate dioxygenase, is compared to ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase (FNR) and ferredoxin, the proteins that reduce NADP+ in the final reaction of photosystem I. The folding patterns of the domains that bind flavin, NAD(P), and [2Fe-2S] are very similar in the two systems. Alignment of the X-ray structures of PDR and FNR substantiates the assignment of features that characterize a family of flavoprotein reductases whose members include cytochrome P-450 reductase, sulfite and nitrate reductases, and nitric oxide synthase. Hallmarks of this subfamily of flavoproteins, here termed the FNR family, are an antiparallel beta-barrel that binds the flavin prosthetic group, and a characteristic variant of the classic pyridine nucleotide-binding fold. Despite the similarities between FNR and PDR, attempts to model the structure of a dissociable FNR:ferredoxin complex by analogy with PDR reveal features that are at odds with chemical crosslinking studies (Zanetti, G., Morelli, D., Ronchi, S., Negri, A., Aliverti, A., & Curti, B., 1988, Biochemistry 27, 3753-3759). Differences in the binding sites for flavin and pyridine nucleotides determine the nucleotide specificities of FNR and PDR. The specificity of FNR for NADP+ arises primarily from substitutions in FNR that favor interactions with the 2' phosphate of NADP+. Variations in the conformation and sequences of the loop adjoining the flavin phosphate affect the selectivity for FAD versus FMN. The midpoint potentials for reduction of the flavin and [2Fe-2S] groups in PDR are higher than their counterparts in FNR and spinach ferredoxin, by about 120 mV and 260 mV, respectively. Comparisons of the structure of PDR with spinach FNR and with ferredoxin from Anabaena 7120, along with calculations of electrostatic potentials, suggest that local interactions, including hydrogen bonds, are the dominant

  1. Proximal femur of Australopithecus africanus from Member 4, Makapansgat, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Reed, K E; Kitching, J W; Grine, F E; Jungers, W L; Sokoloff, L

    1993-09-01

    A left proximal femur (MLD 46) from Member 4, Makapansgat, South Africa is described and analyzed. It consists of the head, neck, and a small segment of the shaft that extends to just below the lesser trochanter. The femur exhibits degenerative joint disease in the form of marginal osteophyte formation and thus its taxonomic identity has been somewhat obscured. Consideration of all like-sized mammalian femora from Makapansgat suggests that the femur is that of either a felid or hominid. Comparison of MLD 46 to femora of extent and extinct felids reveals that MLD 46 does not possess two morphological features that are characteristic of felids, namely a deep, prolonged trochanteric fossa and a high neck-shaft angle. Simple shape variables (ratios) and multivariate analyses consistently place MLD 46 with modern and fossil hominids, and most closely align it with the australopithecines. We conclude that the femur is most reasonably attributable to Australopithecus africanus, which is the only hominid yet identified from Makapansgat. Despite its pathological condition, MLD 46 is the most complete proximal femur known for A. africanus, thereby permitting further morphological comparisons with homologues of A. afarensis and Paranthropus. Marginal osteophytes of mammalian femoral heads characteristically occur in individuals of advanced age, suggesting that MLD 46 may have lived some time with the disease. Finally, MLD 46 is considerably larger than the previously described specimen, Sts 14, from Sterkfontein Member 4. There may be as great a contrast in body size in A. africanus as there is between the large and small specimens of A. afarensis. PMID:8238286

  2. Body proportions of Australopithecus afarensis and A. africanus and the origin of the genus Homo.

    PubMed

    McHenry, H M; Berger, L R

    1998-07-01

    New discoveries of A. africanus fossils from Member 4 Sterkfontein reveal a body form quite unlike earlier Australopithecus species. The new adult material consists of over 48 fore- and hindlimb specimens and includes an associated partial skeleton, Stw 431. The forelimbs and relatively large: the average size of their joints corresponds to a modern human with body mass of 53 kg. The hindlimbs are much smaller with an average size matching a modern human of only 33 kg. Analyses of the Stw 431 partial skeleton confirm these results. In contrast, A. afarensis and anamensis more closely approximate a human pattern of forelimb joint size. This is an unanticipated complication in our understanding of early human evolution. In general, craniodental morphology tracks time in species of Australopithecus: A. anamensis (3.5-4.1 Ma) is the the most primitive with a strongly sloping symphysis, large canine roots, etc., A. afarensis (3.0-3.6 Ma) is less primitive, and A. africanus (2.6-3.0 Ma) shares many derived characteristics with early Homo (e.g., expanded brain, reduced canine, bicuspid lower third premolar, reduced prognathism, greater flexion of the cranial base, deeper TMJ). the new postcranial material, however, reveals an apparently primitive morphology of relatively large forelimb and small hindlimb joints resembling more the pongid than the human pattern. More pongid-like proportions are also present in the two known associated partial skeletons of H. habilis (OH 62 KNM-ER 3735). This may imply either (1) that A. africanus and H. habilis evolved craniodental characters in parallel with the lineage leading to later Homo, or (2) that fore- to hindlimb proportions of A. afarensis (and perhaps A. anamensis) evolved independent of the lineage leading to Homo and does not imply a close phylogenetic link with Homo. Both of these explanations or any other phylogeny imply homoplasy.

  3. Effect of the ferredoxin electron donor on sunflower (Helianthus annuus) desaturases.

    PubMed

    Venegas-Calerón, M; Youssar, L; Salas, J J; Garcés, R; Martínez-Force, E

    2009-08-01

    Ferredoxins are proteins that participate in photosynthesis and in other processes that require reducing equivalents, such as the reduction of nitrogen or fatty acid desaturation. Two classes of ferredoxins have been described in plants: light-regulated photosynthetic ferredoxins and heterotrophic ferredoxins whose activity is not influenced by light. Genes encoding the two forms of ferredoxin have been cloned and characterized in developing sunflower cotyledons. Here, these genes were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and they were purified by ion exchange and size exclusion chromatography to study their capacity to supply electrons to two different sunflower desaturases: soluble stearoyl-ACP desaturase from sunflower cotyledons, and membrane bound desaturase FAD7 expressed in yeast. In both cases photosynthetic ferredoxin was the form that promoted the strongest desaturase activity.

  4. Purification, properties and complete amino acid sequence of the ferredoxin from a green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Schmitter, J M; Jacquot, J P; de Lamotte-Guéry, F; Beauvallet, C; Dutka, S; Gadal, P; Decottignies, P

    1988-03-01

    The ferredoxin was purified from the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The protein showed typical absorption and circular dichroism spectra of a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin. When compared with spinach ferredoxin, the C. reinhardtii protein was less effective in the catalysis of NADP+ photoreduction, but its activity was higher in the light activation of C. reinhardtii malate dehydrogenase (NADP). The complete amino acid sequence was determined by automated Edman degradation of the whole protein and of peptides obtained by trypsin and chymotrypsin digestions and by CNBr cleavage. The protein consists of 94 residues, with Tyr at both NH2 and COOH termini. The positions of the four cysteines binding the two iron atoms are similar to those found in other [2Fe-2S] ferredoxins. The primary structure of C. reinhardtii ferredoxin showed a great homology (about 80%) with ferredoxins from two other green algae.

  5. Lung fluke (Paragonimus africanus) infects Nigerian red-capped mangabeys and causes respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Friant, Sagan; Brown, Kelsey; Saari, Mason T.; Segel, Nicholas H.; Slezak, Julia; Goldberg, Tony L.

    2015-01-01

    Eggs of the lung fluke genus Paragonimus were detected in red-capped mangabeys (Cercocebus torquatus) in Nigeria. We assess the role of these primates as potential sylvatic hosts and the clinical effects of the parasite on monkeys. DNA sequenced from eggs in feces were 100% identical in the ITS2 region to Paragonimus africanus sequences from humans in Cameroon. Paragonimus-positive monkeys coughed more than uninfected monkeys. Experimental de-worming led to reduction in parasite intensity and a corresponding reduction of coughing to baseline levels in infected monkeys. This report provides the first evidence of Paragonimus sp. in C. torquatus, of P. africanus in Nigerian wildlife, and the first molecular evidence of the parasite in African wildlife. Coughing, sometimes interpreted as a communication behavior in primates, can actually indicate infection with lung parasites. Observations of coughing in primates may, in turn, provide a useful mechanism for surveillance of Paragonimus spp, which are re-emerging human pathogens, in wildlife reservoirs. PMID:26543803

  6. Individual tooth macrowear pattern guides the reconstruction of Sts 52 (Australopithecus africanus) dental arches.

    PubMed

    Benazzi, Stefano; Kullmer, Ottmar; Schulz, Dieter; Gruppioni, Giorgio; Weber, Gerhard W

    2013-02-01

    The functional restoration of the occlusal relationship between maxillary and mandibular tooth rows is a major challenge in modern dentistry and maxillofacial surgery. Similar technical challenges are present in paleoanthropology when considering fragmented and deformed mandibular and maxillary fossils. Sts 52, an Australopithecus africanus specimen from Sterkfontein Member 4, represents a typical case where the original shape of the dental arches is no longer preserved. It includes a partial lower face (Sts 52a) and a fragmented mandible (Sts 52b), both incomplete and damaged to such an extent to thwart attempts at matching upper and lower dentitions. We show how the preserved macro wear pattern of the tooth crowns can be used to functionally reconstruct Sts 52's dental arches. High-resolution dental stone casts of Sts 52 maxillary and mandibular dentition were mounted and repositioned in a dental articulator. The occlusal relationship between antagonists was restored based on the analysis of the occlusal wear pattern of each preserved tooth, considering all dental contact movements represented in the occlusal compass. The reconstructed dental arches were three-dimensional surface scanned and their occlusal kinematics tested in a simulation. The outcome of this contribution is the first functional restoration of A. africanus dental arches providing new morphometric data for specimen Sts 52. It is noteworthy that the method described in this case study might be applied to several other fossil specimens.

  7. X-ray structure of a soluble Rieske-type ferredoxin from Mus musculus

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Elena J.; Elsen, Nathaniel L.; Seder, Kory D.; McCoy, Jason G.; Fox, Brian G; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2009-03-11

    The 2.07 {angstrom} resolution X-ray crystal structure of a soluble Rieske-type ferredoxin from Mus musculus encoded by the gene Mm.266515 is reported. Although they are present as covalent domains in eukaryotic membrane oxidase complexes, soluble Rieske-type ferredoxins have not previously been observed in eukaryotes. The overall structure of the mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin is typical of this class of iron-sulfur proteins and consists of a larger partial {beta}-barrel domain and a smaller domain containing Cys57, His59, Cys80 and His83 that binds the [2Fe-2S] cluster. The S atoms of the cluster are hydrogen-bonded by six backbone amide N atoms in a pattern typical of membrane-bound high-potential eukaryotic respiratory Rieske ferredoxins. However, phylogenetic analysis suggested that the mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin was more closely related to bacterial Rieske-type ferredoxins. Correspondingly, the structure revealed an extended loop most similar to that seen in Rieske-type ferredoxin subunits of bacterial aromatic dioxygenases, including the positioning of an aromatic side chain (Tyr85) between this loop and the [2Fe-2S] cluster. The mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin was shown to be capable of accepting electrons from both eukaryotic and prokaryotic oxidoreductases, although it was unable to serve as an electron donor for a bacterial monooxygenase complex. The human homolog of mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin was also cloned and purified. It behaved identically to mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin in all biochemical characterizations but did not crystallize. Based on its high sequence identity, the structure of the human homolog is likely to be modeled well by the mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin structure.

  8. Brownian dynamics and molecular dynamics study of the association between hydrogenase and ferredoxin from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Long, Hai; Chang, Christopher H; King, Paul W; Ghirardi, Maria L; Kim, Kwiseon

    2008-10-01

    The [FeFe] hydrogenase from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii can catalyze the reduction of protons to hydrogen gas using electrons supplied from photosystem I and transferred via ferredoxin. To better understand the association of the hydrogenase and the ferredoxin, we have simulated the process over multiple timescales. A Brownian dynamics simulation method gave an initial thorough sampling of the rigid-body translational and rotational phase spaces, and the resulting trajectories were used to compute the occupancy and free-energy landscapes. Several important hydrogenase-ferredoxin encounter complexes were identified from this analysis, which were then individually simulated using atomistic molecular dynamics to provide more details of the hydrogenase and ferredoxin interaction. The ferredoxin appeared to form reasonable complexes with the hydrogenase in multiple orientations, some of which were good candidates for inclusion in a transition state ensemble of configurations for electron transfer. PMID:18621810

  9. Laser flash absorption spectroscopy study of ferredoxin reduction by photosystem I: Spectral and kinetic evidence for the existence of several photosystem I-ferredoxin complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Setif, P.Q.Y.; Bottin, H.

    1995-07-18

    The existence of three first-order phases has been previously reported for the reduction of soluble ferredoxin by photosystem I (PSI), both from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (at pH 8 and in the presence of salts). The spectra of these three phases (t{sub 1/2} < {mu}s, = 13-20 and 103-123 {mu}s) have been measured between 460 and 600 nm. All of them are fully consistent with electron transfer from (F{sub A},F{sub B}){sup -}, the terminal 4Fe-4S acceptors of PSI, to ferredoxin. Though the three spectra deviate significantly from the spectrum that can be calculated independently for this process, their sum closely matches the calculated spectrum. A detailed examination of these deviations indicates that the intermediate (13-20 ps) and slow (103- 123 ys) first-order phases are associated with two distinct ferredoxin-binding sites on PSI. Under the same conditions, a fourth phase of negative amplitude is also observed in the 460-600 nm region. The kinetic properties of this process show that it is triggered by collision of free ferredoxin with a preformed PSI-ferredoxin complex. Taking this reaction into account, it is shown that the relative proportions of the three first-order phases of ferredoxin reduction do not depend upon the ferredoxin concentration, indicating that the different sites of ferredoxin binding are mutually exclusive. The kinetics of ferredoxin reduction were also studied at pH 5.8, in the absence of salts. Two similar first-order components are found for the reduction of spinach ferredoxin by PSI from Synechocystis at pH 8, though the apparent dissociation constant for the latter system is larger ({approx}5 {mu}M). Despite the different affinities of spinach and Synechocystis ferredoxins for the cyanobacterial PSI, similar second-order rate constants are found in both cases at pH 8 [(2-6) x 10{sup 8} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}]. 29 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  10. A theoretical multiscale treatment of protein-protein electron transfer: The ferredoxin/ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase and flavodoxin/ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase systems.

    PubMed

    Saen-Oon, Suwipa; Cabeza de Vaca, Israel; Masone, Diego; Medina, Milagros; Guallar, Victor

    2015-12-01

    In the photosynthetic electron transfer (ET) chain, two electrons transfer from photosystem I to the flavin-dependent ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (FNR) via two sequential independent ferredoxin (Fd) electron carriers. In some algae and cyanobacteria (as Anabaena), under low iron conditions, flavodoxin (Fld) replaces Fd as single electron carrier. Extensive mutational studies have characterized the protein-protein interaction in FNR/Fd and FNR/Fld complexes. Interestingly, even though Fd and Fld share the interaction site on FNR, individual residues on FNR do not participate to the same extent in the interaction with each of the protein partners, pointing to different electron transfer mechanisms. Despite of extensive mutational studies, only FNR/Fd X-ray structures from Anabaena and maize have been solved; structural data for FNR/Fld remains elusive. Here, we present a multiscale modelling approach including coarse-grained and all-atom protein-protein docking, the QM/MM e-Pathway analysis and electronic coupling calculations, allowing for a molecular and electronic comprehensive analysis of the ET process in both complexes. Our results, consistent with experimental mutational data, reveal the ET in FNR/Fd proceeding through a bridge-mediated mechanism in a dominant protein-protein complex, where transfer of the electron is facilitated by Fd loop-residues 40-49. In FNR/Fld, however, we observe a direct transfer between redox cofactors and less complex specificity than in Fd; more than one orientation in the encounter complex can be efficient in ET. PMID:26385068

  11. X-ray structure of a soluble Rieske-type ferredoxin from Mus musculus

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Elena J.; Elsen, Nathaniel L.; Seder, Kory D.; McCoy, Jason G.; Fox, Brian G.; Phillips Jr, George N.

    2008-09-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of a soluble Rieske ferredoxin from M. musculus was solved at 2.07 Å resolution, revealing an iron–sulfur cluster-binding domain with similar architecture to the Rieske-type domains of bacterial aromatic dioxygenases. The ferredoxin was also shown to be capable of accepting electrons from both eukaryotic and prokaryotic oxidoreductases. The 2.07 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of a soluble Rieske-type ferredoxin from Mus musculus encoded by the gene Mm.266515 is reported. Although they are present as covalent domains in eukaryotic membrane oxidase complexes, soluble Rieske-type ferredoxins have not previously been observed in eukaryotes. The overall structure of the mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin is typical of this class of iron–sulfur proteins and consists of a larger partial β-barrel domain and a smaller domain containing Cys57, His59, Cys80 and His83 that binds the [2Fe–2S] cluster. The S atoms of the cluster are hydrogen-bonded by six backbone amide N atoms in a pattern typical of membrane-bound high-potential eukaryotic respiratory Rieske ferredoxins. However, phylogenetic analysis suggested that the mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin was more closely related to bacterial Rieske-type ferredoxins. Correspondingly, the structure revealed an extended loop most similar to that seen in Rieske-type ferredoxin subunits of bacterial aromatic dioxygenases, including the positioning of an aromatic side chain (Tyr85) between this loop and the [2Fe–2S] cluster. The mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin was shown to be capable of accepting electrons from both eukaryotic and prokaryotic oxidoreductases, although it was unable to serve as an electron donor for a bacterial monooxygenase complex. The human homolog of mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin was also cloned and purified. It behaved identically to mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin in all biochemical characterizations but did not crystallize. Based on its high sequence identity, the structure of the

  12. Structural and functional diversity of ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductases.

    PubMed

    Aliverti, Alessandro; Pandini, Vittorio; Pennati, Andrea; de Rosa, Matteo; Zanetti, Giuliana

    2008-06-15

    Although all ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductases (FNRs) catalyze the same reaction, i.e. the transfer of reducing equivalents between NADP(H) and ferredoxin, they belong to two unrelated families of proteins: the plant-type and the glutathione reductase-type of FNRs. Aim of this review is to provide a general classification scheme for these enzymes, to be used as a framework for the comparison of their properties. Furthermore, we report on some recent findings, which significantly increased the understanding of the structure-function relationships of FNRs, i.e. the ability of adrenodoxin reductase and its homologs to catalyze the oxidation of NADP(+) to its 4-oxo derivative, and the properties of plant-type FNRs from non-photosynthetic organisms. Plant-type FNRs from bacteria and Apicomplexan parasites provide examples of novel ways of FAD- and NADP(H)-binding. The recent characterization of an FNR from Plasmodium falciparum brings these enzymes into the field of drug design.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of ferredoxin reductase from Leptospira interrogans

    SciTech Connect

    Nascimento, Alessandro S.; Ferrarezi, Thiago; Catalano-Dupuy, Daniela L.; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A.; Polikarpov, Igor

    2006-07-01

    Crystals adequate for X-ray diffraction analysis have been prepared from L. interrogans ferredoxin-NADP{sup +} reductase. Ferredoxin-NADP{sup +} reductase (FNR) is an FAD-containing enzyme that catalyzes electron transfer between NADP(H) and ferredoxin. Here, results are reported of the recombinant expression, purification and crystallization of FNR from Leptospira interrogans, a parasitic bacterium of animals and humans. The L. interrogans FNR crystals belong to a primitive monoclinic space group and diffract to 2.4 Å resolution at a synchrotron source.

  14. The roles of coenzyme A in the pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase reaction mechanism: rate enhancement of electron transfer from a radical intermediate to an iron-sulfur cluster.

    PubMed

    Furdui, Cristina; Ragsdale, Stephen W

    2002-08-01

    Pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) catalyzes the coenzyme A (CoA)-dependent oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate. In many autotrophic anaerobes, PFOR links the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway to glycolysis and to cell carbon synthesis. Herein, we cloned and sequenced the M. thermoacetica PFOR, demonstrating strong structural homology with the structurally characterized D. africanus PFOR, including the presence of three [4Fe-4S] clusters per monomeric unit. The PFOR reaction includes a hydroxyethyl-thiamin pyrophosphate (HE-TPP) radical intermediate, which forms rapidly after PFOR reacts with pyruvate. This step precedes electron transfer from the HE-TPP radical intermediate to an intramolecular [4Fe-4S] cluster. We show that CoA increases the rate of this redox reaction by 10(5)-fold. Analysis by Marcus theory indicates that, in the absence of CoA, this is a true electron-transfer reaction; however, in its presence, electron transfer is gated by an adiabatic event. Analysis by the Eyring equation indicates that entropic effects dominate this rate enhancement. Our results indicate that the energy of binding CoA contributes minimally to the rate increase since the thiol group of CoA lends over 40 kJ/mol to the reaction, whereas components of CoA that afford most of the cofactor's binding energy contribute minimally. Major conformational changes also do not appear to explain the rate enhancement. We propose several ways that CoA can accomplish this rate increase, including formation of a highly reducing adduct with the HE-TPP radical to increase the driving force for electron transfer. We also consider the possibility that CoA itself forms part of the electron-transfer pathway. PMID:12146957

  15. Study of the thiol/disulfide redox systems of the anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris points out pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase as a new target for thioredoxin 1.

    PubMed

    Pieulle, Laetitia; Stocker, Pierre; Vinay, Manon; Nouailler, Matthieu; Vita, Nicolas; Brasseur, Gaël; Garcin, Edwige; Sebban-Kreuzer, Corinne; Dolla, Alain

    2011-03-11

    Sulfate reducers have developed a multifaceted adaptative strategy to survive against oxidative stresses. Along with this oxidative stress response, we recently characterized an elegant reversible disulfide bond-dependent protective mechanism in the pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) of various Desulfovibrio species. Here, we searched for thiol redox systems involved in this mechanism. Using thiol fluorescent labeling, we show that glutathione is not the major thiol/disulfide balance-controlling compound in four different Desulfovibrio species and that no other plentiful low molecular weight thiol can be detected. Enzymatic analyses of two thioredoxins (Trxs) and three thioredoxin reductases allow us to propose the existence of two independent Trx systems in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH). The TR1/Trx1 system corresponds to the typical bacterial Trx system. We measured a TR1 apparent K(m) value for Trx1 of 8.9 μM. Moreover, our results showed that activity of TR1 was NADPH-dependent. The second system named TR3/Trx3 corresponds to an unconventional Trx system as TR3 used preferentially NADH (K(m) for NADPH, 743 μM; K(m) for NADH, 5.6 μM), and Trx3 was unable to reduce insulin. The K(m) value of TR3 for Trx3 was 1.12 μM. In vitro experiments demonstrated that the TR1/Trx1 system was the only one able to reactivate the oxygen-protected form of Desulfovibrio africanus PFOR. Moreover, ex vivo pulldown assays using the mutant Trx1(C33S) as bait allowed us to capture PFOR from the DvH extract. Altogether, these data demonstrate that PFOR is a new target for Trx1, which is probably involved in the protective switch mechanism of the enzyme. PMID:21199874

  16. Two-dimensional magnetization exchange spectroscopy of Anabaena 7120 ferredoxin. Nuclear Overhauser effect and electron self-exchange cross peaks from amino acid residues surrounding the Fe-2S* cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Skjeldal, L.; Westler, W.M.; Oh, Byungha; Krezel, A.M.; Markley, J.L.; Holden, H.M.; Jacobson, B.L.; Rayment, I. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison )

    1991-07-30

    Hyperfine {sup 1}H NMR signals of the 2 Fe-2S* vegetative ferredoxin from Anabaena 7,120 have been studied by two-dimensional (2D) magnetization exchange spectroscopy. The rapid longitudinal relaxation rates of these signals required the use of very short nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) mixing times (0.5-20 ms). The resulting pattern of NOE cross-relaxation peaks when combined with previous 1D NOE results led to elucidation of the carbon-bound proton spin systems from each of the four cysteines ligated to the 2Fe-2S* cluster in the reduced ferredoxin. Additional NOE cross peaks were observed that provide information about other amino acid residues that interact with the iron-sulfur cluster. NOE cross peaks were assigned tentatively to Leu{sup 27}, Arg{sup 42}, and Ala{sup 43} on the basis of the X-ray coordinates of oxidized Anabaena 7,120 ferredoxin. Three chemical exchange cross peaks were detected in magnetization exchange spectra of half-reduced ferredoxin and assigned to the {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}} protons of Cys{sup 49} and Cys{sup 79} (both of whose sulfur atoms are ligated to Fe(III)) and Arg{sup 42} (whose amide nitrogen is hydrogen-bonded to one of the inorganic sulfurs of the 2Fe-2S* cluster). The chemical exchange cross peaks provide a means of extending assignments in the spectrum of reduced ferredoxin to assignments in the spectrum of the oxidized protein. The results suggest that 2D magnetization exchange spectroscopy employing short mixing times will be useful for the assignment and characterization of hyperfine {sup 1}H peaks in a variety of paramagnetic proteins.

  17. Three novel lineages of 'Candidatus Liberibacter africanus' associated with native rutaceous hosts of Trioza erytreae in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Ronel; Steenkamp, Emma T; Pietersen, Gerhard

    2015-02-01

    Greening disease of citrus in South Africa is associated with 'Candidatus Liberibacter africanus' (Laf), a phloem-limited bacterium vectored by the sap-sucking insect Trioza erytreae (Triozidae). Despite the implementation of control strategies, this disease remains problematic, suggesting the existence of reservoir hosts to Laf. The current study aimed to identify such hosts. Samples from 234 trees of Clausena anisata, 289 trees of Vepris lanceolata and 231 trees of Zanthoxylum capense were collected throughout the natural distribution of these trees in South Africa. Total DNA was extracted from samples and tested for the presence of liberibacters by a generic Liberibacter TaqMan real-time PCR assay. Liberibacters present in positive samples were characterized by amplifying and sequencing rplJ, omp and 16S rRNA gene regions. The identity of tree host species from which liberibacter sequences were obtained was verified by sequencing host rbcL genes. Of the trees tested, 33 specimens of Clausena, 17 specimens of Vepris and 10 specimens of Zanthoxylum tested positive for liberibacter. None of the samples contained typical citrus-infecting Laf sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the liberibacters obtained from Vepris and Clausena had 16S rRNA gene sequences identical to that of 'Candidatus Liberibacter africanus subsp. capensis' (LafC), whereas those from Zanthoxylum species grouped separately. Phylogenetic analysis of the rplJ and omp gene regions revealed unique clusters for liberibacters associated with each tree species. We propose the following names for these novel liberibacters: 'Candidatus Liberibacter africanus subsp. clausenae' (LafCl), 'Candidatus Liberibacter africanus subsp. vepridis' (LafV) and 'Candidatus Liberibacter africanus subsp. zanthoxyli' (LafZ). This study did not find any natural hosts of Laf associated with greening of citrus. While native citrus relatives were shown to be infected with Laf

  18. Endocranial features of Australopithecus africanus revealed by 2- and 3-D computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Conroy, G C; Vannier, M W; Tobias, P V

    1990-02-16

    The earliest hominid from South Africa, Australopithecus africanus, is known from only six specimens in which accurate assessment of endocranial capacity and cranial venous outflow pattern can be obtained. This places a severe limit on a number of hypotheses concerning early hominid evolution, particularly those involving brain-body size relationships and adaptations of the circulatory system to evolving upright posture. Advances in high-resolution two- and three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) now allow the inclusion of another important specimen to this list, MLD 37/38 from Makapansgat. A new computer imaging technique is described that "reconstructs" the missing portions of the endocranial cavity in order to determine endocranial capacity. In addition, CT evaluation allows assessment of cranial venous outflow pattern even in cases where the endocranial cavity is completely filled with stone matrix. Results show that endocranial capacity in this specimen is less than originally proposed and also support the view that gracile and robust australopithecines evolved different cranial venous outflow patterns in response to upright postures. PMID:2305255

  19. Antimicrobial Agents Produced by Marine Aspergillus terreus var. africanus Against Some Virulent Fish Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Khouloud M; Gohar, Yousry M

    2012-09-01

    Screening of fungal isolates collected from different locations of Alexandria coast, Egypt, was carried out to obtain new biologically active metabolites against some virulent fish pathogens (Edwardsiella tarda, Aeromonas hydrophila, Vibrio ordalli and Vibrio angularuim). Among 26 fungal isolates, Aspergillus terreus var. africanus was identified as the most potent isolate. Production of the bioactive material was optimized using response surface methodology including fermentation media, incubation period, temperature, pH, and thermo-stability. Spectral properties of the gas chromatography/mass spectrum of the ethyl acetate crude extract were determined. Partially purified components of the crude extract were chromatographically separated and bioassayed. Out of ten separated compounds, five were with considerable antibacterial agent. The bio-toxicity of crude showed a slight toxicity against the brine shrimp Artemia salina (LC50 = 1,500 μg/l). Antibacterial activity of the crude was compared with some known standard antibiotics and found to be superior over many where its MIC against some pathogen reached 1 μg/ml. PMID:23997326

  20. Effects of Decompression Treatment for Controlling the Powderpost Beetle, Lyctus africanus Lesne, (Coleoptera: Lyctinae)

    PubMed Central

    Nakai, Kazushi; Hiraku, Tatsuya; Fujimoto, Izumi; Yoshimura, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of decompression treatment as a non-destructive method to control larvae of the powderpost beetle, Lyctus africanus Lesne, was evaluated in the laboratory using various combinations of two pressure levels, 1.1 kPa and 40 kPa, and three temperature levels, 20, 25, and 40 °C. Larval mortality generally depended on weight reduction while decreases in the oxygen level had relatively little effect. The lower pressure, 1.1 kPa, significantly affected mortality, and no larvae survived after 12 h of this pressure treatment, at 25 °C. The average body weight was reduced with treatment time and temperature, and the reduction rate at 25 °C was higher than that at the lower temperature, 20 °C. Effects on larvae of the higher pressure treatment, 40 kPa, with a CO2 gas purge, were tested to determine the feasibility of decompression treatment in the manufacturing process. Although higher pressure resulted in low mortality, the body weight was dramatically decreased using the CO2 purge. These results present important information on the possibility of using decompression treatment for wood products. PMID:27429007

  1. Effects of Decompression Treatment for Controlling the Powderpost Beetle, Lyctus africanus Lesne, (Coleoptera: Lyctinae).

    PubMed

    Nakai, Kazushi; Hiraku, Tatsuya; Fujimoto, Izumi; Yoshimura, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of decompression treatment as a non-destructive method to control larvae of the powderpost beetle, Lyctus africanus Lesne, was evaluated in the laboratory using various combinations of two pressure levels, 1.1 kPa and 40 kPa, and three temperature levels, 20, 25, and 40 °C. Larval mortality generally depended on weight reduction while decreases in the oxygen level had relatively little effect. The lower pressure, 1.1 kPa, significantly affected mortality, and no larvae survived after 12 h of this pressure treatment, at 25 °C. The average body weight was reduced with treatment time and temperature, and the reduction rate at 25 °C was higher than that at the lower temperature, 20 °C. Effects on larvae of the higher pressure treatment, 40 kPa, with a CO₂ gas purge, were tested to determine the feasibility of decompression treatment in the manufacturing process. Although higher pressure resulted in low mortality, the body weight was dramatically decreased using the CO₂ purge. These results present important information on the possibility of using decompression treatment for wood products. PMID:27429007

  2. Ferredoxin-linked chloreplast enzymes. Progress report, August 15, 1990--August 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    Progress has clearly been made on all of the goals set forth in the original proposal. Although the monoclonal antibodies raised against FNR turned out no to be useful for mapping the FNR/ferredoxin or FNR/NADP+ interaction domains, good progress has been made on mapping the FNR/ferredoxin interaction domains by an alternative technique, differential chemical modification. Furthermore, the techniques developed for differential chemical modifications of these two proteins - taurine modification of aspartate and glutamate residues and biotin modification of lysine residues - should be useful for mapping the interaction domains of many proteins that associate through electrostatic interactions. Finally, progress has also been made with respect to another ferredoxin-dependent enzyme involved in the earliest steps of plant nitrogen metabolism - nitrite reductase. Questions concerning the subunit composition and heme content of the enzyme have been resolved and evidence demonstrating the involvement of lysine and arginine residues in binding ferredoxin has been obtained for the first time.

  3. Classification of iron-sulfur cores in ferredoxins by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, K; Ozaki, Y; Kyogoku, Y; Hase, T; Matsubara, H

    1983-09-01

    A 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study was carried out on various ferredoxins which possess one of three types of iron-sulfur clusters, (2Fe-2S), (3Fe-3S), or (4Fe-4S). In the isolated form, (2Fe-2S) ferredoxins from spinach (Spinacea oleracia), pokeweed (Phytolacca americana), a blue-green alga (Spirulina platensis), and a halobacterium (Halobacterium halobium) exhibited two broad resonances common in chemical shift at the region downfield of 10 ppm. In their reduced forms, seven contact-shifted resonances appeared spread over 30 ppm. Although the positions of the contact-shifted resonances in the reduced state differed among the four, a common trend in the temperature dependence of their resonance positions was recognized. Two (4Fe-4S) ferredoxins from Bacillus stearothermophilus and Bacillus thermoproteolyticus exhibited almost indistinguishable spectral patterns in both the oxidized and reduced forms. The ferricyanide-treated ferredoxins of B. stearothermophilus and B. thermoproteolyticus showed characteristic contact-shifted resonances distinct from the spectra of the original (4Fe-4S) ferredoxins. This corresponds to the recent finding of the interconversion of (4Fe-4S) and (3Fe-3S) clusters with ferricyanide in the ferredoxin. Based on our data together with reported NMR data on other ferredoxins, contact-shift resonances of three types of clusters were tabulated. The reliability of NMR classification increases when we compare the NMR spectra of a ferredoxin with the classification standards at the two redox states. Moreover, not only the absolute values of the chemical shifts of contact-shifted resonances but also their temperature dependence give distinctive information applicable to iron core identification.

  4. Fusion of Ferredoxin and Cytochrome P450 Enables Direct Light-Driven Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450s (P450s) are key enzymes in the synthesis of bioactive natural products in plants. Efforts to harness these enzymes for in vitro and whole-cell production of natural products have been hampered by difficulties in expressing them heterologously in their active form, and their requirement for NADPH as a source of reducing power. We recently demonstrated targeting and insertion of plant P450s into the photosynthetic membrane and photosynthesis-driven, NADPH-independent P450 catalytic activity mediated by the electron carrier protein ferredoxin. Here, we report the fusion of ferredoxin with P450 CYP79A1 from the model plant Sorghum bicolor, which catalyzes the initial step in the pathway leading to biosynthesis of the cyanogenic glucoside dhurrin. Fusion with ferredoxin allows CYP79A1 to obtain electrons for catalysis by interacting directly with photosystem I. Furthermore, electrons captured by the fused ferredoxin moiety are directed more effectively toward P450 catalytic activity, making the fusion better able to compete with endogenous electron sinks coupled to metabolic pathways. The P450-ferredoxin fusion enzyme obtains reducing power solely from its fused ferredoxin and outperforms unfused CYP79A1 in vivo. This demonstrates greatly enhanced electron transfer from photosystem I to CYP79A1 as a consequence of the fusion. The fusion strategy reported here therefore forms the basis for enhanced partitioning of photosynthetic reducing power toward P450-dependent biosynthesis of important natural products. PMID:27119279

  5. Purification and characterization of a soybean flour-inducible ferredoxin reductase of Streptomyces griseus.

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandra, M; Seetharam, R; Emptage, M H; Sariaslani, F S

    1991-01-01

    We have purified an NADH-dependent ferredoxin reductase from crude extracts of Streptomyces griseus cells grown in soybean flour-enriched medium. The purified protein has a molecular weight of 60,000 as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. The enzyme requires Mg2+ ion for catalytic activity in reconstituted assays, and its spectral properties resemble those of many other flavin adenine dinucleotide-containing flavoproteins. A relatively large number of hydrophobic amino acid residues are found by amino acid analysis, and beginning with residue 7, a consensus flavin adenine dinucleotide binding sequence, GXGXXGXXXA, is revealed in this protein. In the presence of NADH, the ferredoxin reductase reduces various electron acceptors such as cytochrome c, potassium ferricyanide, dichlorophenolindophenol, and nitroblue tetrazolium. However, only cytochrome c reduction by the ferredoxin reductase is enhanced by the addition of ferredoxin. In the presence of NADH, S. griseus ferredoxin and cytochrome P-450soy, the ferredoxin reductase mediates O dealkylation of 7-ethoxycoumarin. Images FIG. 2 PMID:1938912

  6. Novel and remarkably thermostable ferredoxin from the hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Pyrococcus furiosus

    SciTech Connect

    Aono, S.; Bryant, F.O.; Adams, M.W.W. )

    1989-06-01

    The archaebacterium Pyrococcus furiosus is a strict anaerobe that grows optimally at 100{degree}C by a fermentative-type metabolism in which H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} are the only detectable products. A ferredoxin, which functions as the electron donor to the hydrogenase of this organism was purified under anaerobic reducing conditions. The study shows that P. furiosus ferredoxin is therefore distinct from other ferredoxins in that the bulk of its iron is not present as iron-sulfur clusters with an S = 1/2 ground state. The apoferredoxin was reconstituted with iron and sulfide to give a protein that was indistinguishable from the native ferredoxin by its iron content and electron paramagnetic resonance properties, which showed that the novel iron-sulfur clusters were not artifacts of purification. The reduced ferredoxin also functioned as an electron donor for H{sub 2} evolution catalyzed by the hydrogenase of the mesophilic eubacterium Clostridium pasteurianum. P. furiosus ferredoxin was resistant to denaturation by sodium dodecyl sulfate (20%, wt/vol) and was remarkably thermostable. Its UV-visible absorption spectrum and electron carrier activity to P. furiosus hydrogenase were unaffected by a 12-h incubation at 95{degree}C.

  7. Identification of Esters as Novel Aggregation Pheromone Components Produced by the Male Powder-Post Beetle, Lyctus africanus Lesne (Coleoptera: Lyctinae).

    PubMed

    Kartika, Titik; Shimizu, Nobuhiro; Yoshimura, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Lyctus africanus is a cosmopolitan powder-post beetle that is considered one of the major pests threatening timber and timber products. Because infestations of this beetle are inconspicuous, damage is difficult to detect and identification is often delayed. We identified the chemical compounds involved in the aggregation behavior of L. africanus using preparations of crude hexanic extracts from male and female beetles (ME and FE, respectively). Both male and female beetles showed significant preferences for ME, which was found to contain three esters. FE was ignored by both the sexes. Further bioassay confirmed the role of esters in the aggregation behavior of L. africanus. Three esters were identified as 2-propyl dodecanoate, 3-pentyl dodecanoate, and 3-pentyl tetradecanoate. Further behavioral bioassays revealed 3-pentyl dodecanoate to play the main role in the aggregation behavior of female L. africanus beetles. However, significantly more beetles aggregated on a paper disk treated with a blend of the three esters than on a paper disk treated with a single ester. This is the first report on pheromone identification in L. africanus; in addition, the study for the first time presents 3-pentyl dodecanoate as an insect pheromone.

  8. Identification of Esters as Novel Aggregation Pheromone Components Produced by the Male Powder-Post Beetle, Lyctus africanus Lesne (Coleoptera: Lyctinae)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Lyctus africanus is a cosmopolitan powder-post beetle that is considered one of the major pests threatening timber and timber products. Because infestations of this beetle are inconspicuous, damage is difficult to detect and identification is often delayed. We identified the chemical compounds involved in the aggregation behavior of L. africanus using preparations of crude hexanic extracts from male and female beetles (ME and FE, respectively). Both male and female beetles showed significant preferences for ME, which was found to contain three esters. FE was ignored by both the sexes. Further bioassay confirmed the role of esters in the aggregation behavior of L. africanus. Three esters were identified as 2-propyl dodecanoate, 3-pentyl dodecanoate, and 3-pentyl tetradecanoate. Further behavioral bioassays revealed 3-pentyl dodecanoate to play the main role in the aggregation behavior of female L. africanus beetles. However, significantly more beetles aggregated on a paper disk treated with a blend of the three esters than on a paper disk treated with a single ester. This is the first report on pheromone identification in L. africanus; in addition, the study for the first time presents 3-pentyl dodecanoate as an insect pheromone. PMID:26544984

  9. Enamel-dentine junction (EDJ) morphology distinguishes the lower molars of Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus robustus.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Matthew M; Gunz, Philipp; Wood, Bernard A; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2008-12-01

    Tooth crown morphology plays a central role in hominin systematics, but the removal of the original outer enamel surface by dental attrition often eliminates from consideration the type of detailed crown morphology that has been shown to discriminate among hominin taxa. This reduces the size of samples available for study. The enamel-dentine junction (EDJ) is the developmental precursor and primary contributor to the morphology of the unworn outer enamel surface, and its morphology is only affected after considerable attrition. In this paper, we explore whether the form of the EDJ can be used to distinguish between the mandibular molars of two southern African fossil hominins: Paranthropus (or Australopithecus) robustus and Australopithecus africanus. After micro-computed tomographic scanning the molar sample, we made high-resolution images of the EDJ and used geometric morphometrics to compare EDJ shape differences between species, in addition to documenting metameric variation along the molar row within each species. Landmarks were collected along the marginal ridge that runs between adjacent dentine horns and around the circumference of the cervix. Our results suggest that the morphology of the EDJ can distinguish lower molars of these southern African hominins, and it can discriminate first, second, and third molars within each taxon. These results confirm previous findings that the EDJ preserves taxonomically valuable shape information in worn teeth. Mean differences in EDJ shape, in particular dentine horn height, crown height, and cervix shape, are more marked between adjacent molars within each taxon than for the same molar between the two taxa. PMID:18824253

  10. Inactivation of Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase by xanthine oxidase, nicotinate hydroxylase, horseradish peroxidase, or glucose oxidase: effects of ferredoxin, putidaredoxin, and menadione.

    PubMed

    Stadtman, E R; Wittenberger, M E

    1985-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that several mixed-function oxidation (MFO) systems are capable of catalyzing the inactivation of glutamine synthetase (GS) [R.L. Levine, C. N. Oliver, R. M. Fulks, and E. R. Stadtman (1978) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 78, 2120-2124] and a number of the other enzymes [L. Fucci, C. N. Oliver, M. J. Coon, and E. R. Stadtman (1983) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 80, 1521-1525]. It has now been found that in the presence of Fe(III), O2, and an appropriate electron donor (hypoxanthine or NADPH, respectively) glutamine synthetase is also inactivated by either milk xanthine oxidase or Clostridial nicotinate hydroxylase. Inactivation of glutamine synthetase by either of these flavoproteins is greatly stimulated by the presence of electron carrier proteins possessing nonheme-iron-sulfur (NHIS) clusters (i.e., ferredoxin or putidaredoxin) or by the presence of menadione. The inactivation reactions are partially inhibited by free radical scavengers, superoxide dismutase, (SOD), histidine, mannitol, dimethyl sulfoxide, and dimethylthiourea, and are inhibited completely by either Mn(II), EDTA, or catalase. The sensitivity to SOD inhibition is greatly suppressed when the xanthine oxidase system is supplemented with either ferredoxin or redoxin. In the presence of the latter NHIS-proteins (and only when they are present), MFO systems, comprised of either horseradish peroxidase and H2O2 or glucose oxidase, O2, and glucose, can also catalyze the inactivation of GS. The ability of ferredoxin and putidaredoxin to promote oxidation modification of GS by any one of these MFO systems suggests that proteins with NHIS centers may mediate the generation (or stabilization) of highly reactive radical intermediates.

  11. Posttranslational modifications of FERREDOXIN-NADP+ OXIDOREDUCTASE in Arabidopsis chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Lehtimäki, Nina; Koskela, Minna M; Dahlström, Käthe M; Pakula, Eveliina; Lintala, Minna; Scholz, Martin; Hippler, Michael; Hanke, Guy T; Rokka, Anne; Battchikova, Natalia; Salminen, Tiina A; Mulo, Paula

    2014-12-01

    Rapid responses of chloroplast metabolism and adjustments to photosynthetic machinery are of utmost importance for plants' survival in a fluctuating environment. These changes may be achieved through posttranslational modifications of proteins, which are known to affect the activity, interactions, and localization of proteins. Recent studies have accumulated evidence about the crucial role of a multitude of modifications, including acetylation, methylation, and glycosylation, in the regulation of chloroplast proteins. Both of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf-type FERREDOXIN-NADP(+) OXIDOREDUCTASE (FNR) isoforms, the key enzymes linking the light reactions of photosynthesis to carbon assimilation, exist as two distinct forms with different isoelectric points. We show that both AtFNR isoforms contain multiple alternative amino termini and undergo light-responsive addition of an acetyl group to the α-amino group of the amino-terminal amino acid of proteins, which causes the change in isoelectric point. Both isoforms were also found to contain acetylation of a conserved lysine residue near the active site, while no evidence for in vivo phosphorylation or glycosylation was detected. The dynamic, multilayer regulation of AtFNR exemplifies the complex regulatory network systems controlling chloroplast proteins by a range of posttranslational modifications, which continues to emerge as a novel area within photosynthesis research.

  12. Dual targeted poplar ferredoxin NADP(+) oxidoreductase interacts with hemoglobin 1.

    PubMed

    Jokipii-Lukkari, Soile; Kastaniotis, Alexander J; Parkash, Vimal; Sundström, Robin; Leiva-Eriksson, Nélida; Nymalm, Yvonne; Blokhina, Olga; Kukkola, Eija; Fagerstedt, Kurt V; Salminen, Tiina A; Läärä, Esa; Bülow, Leif; Ohlmeier, Steffen; Hiltunen, J Kalervo; Kallio, Pauli T; Häggman, Hely

    2016-06-01

    Previous reports have connected non-symbiotic and truncated hemoglobins (Hbs) to metabolism of nitric oxide (NO), an important signalling molecule involved in wood formation. We have studied the capability of poplar (Populus tremula × tremuloides) Hbs PttHb1 and PttTrHb proteins alone or with a flavin-protein reductase to relieve NO cytotoxicity in living cells. Complementation tests in a Hb-deficient, NO-sensitive yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Δyhb1 mutant showed that neither PttHb1 nor PttTrHb alone protected cells against NO. To study the ability of Hbs to interact with a reductase, ferredoxin NADP(+) oxidoreductase PtthFNR was characterized by sequencing and proteomics. To date, by far the greatest number of the known dual-targeted plant proteins are directed to chloroplasts and mitochondria. We discovered a novel variant of hFNR that lacks the plastid presequence and resides in cytosol. The coexpression of PttHb1 and PtthFNR partially restored NO resistance of the yeast Δyhb1 mutant, whereas PttTrHb coexpressed with PtthFNR failed to rescue growth. YFP fusion proteins confirmed the interaction between PttHb1 and PtthFNR in plant cells. The structural modelling results indicate that PttHb1 and PtthFNR are able to interact as NO dioxygenase. This is the first report on dual targeting of central plant enzyme FNR to plastids and cytosol. PMID:27095407

  13. The crystal structure of FdxA, a 7Fe ferredoxin from Mycobacterium smegmatis

    SciTech Connect

    Ricagno, Stefano; De Rosa, Matteo; Aliverti, Alessandro; Zanetti, Giuliana; Bolognesi, Martino . E-mail: martino.bolognesi@unimi.it

    2007-08-17

    Mycobacterium smegmatis ferredoxin FdxA, which has an orthologue ferredoxin in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, FdxC, contains both one [3Fe-4S] and one [4Fe-4S] cluster. M. smegmatis FdxA has been shown to be a preferred ferredoxin substrate of FprA [F. Fischer, D. Raimondi, A. Aliverti, G. Zanetti, Mycobacterium tuberculosis FprA, a novel bacterial NADPH-ferredoxin reductase, Eur. J. Biochem. 269 (2002) 3005-3013], an adrenodoxin reductase-like flavoprotein of M. tuberculosis, suggesting that M. tuberculosis FdxC could be the physiological partner of the enzyme in providing reducing power to the cytochromes P450. We report here the crystal structure of FdxA at 1.6 A resolution (R {sub factor} 16.5%, R {sub free} 20.2%). Besides providing an insight on protein architecture for this 106-residue ferredoxin, our crystallographic investigation highlights lability of the [4Fe-4S] center, which is shown to loose a Fe atom during crystal growth. Due to their high similarity (87% sequence identity), the structure here reported can be considered a valuable model for M. tuberculosis FdxC, thus representing a step forward in the study of the complex mycobacterial redox pathways.

  14. Expression of plant ferredoxin-like protein (PFLP) enhances tolerance to heat stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Hsien; Huang, Li-Fen; Hase, Tashiharu; Huang, Hsiang-En; Feng, Teng-Yung

    2015-03-25

    Under adverse environments, plants produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can trigger cell death when their accumulation surpasses the antioxidant capacity of ROS scavenging systems. These systems function in chloroplasts mainly through the ascorbate-mediated water-water cycle, in which ascorbate is photoreduced by ferredoxin in the photosynthetic system. Our previous study showed that the fraction of the reduced form of ascorbate was increased in ferredoxin-transgenic Arabidopsis (CPF) plants which overexpressed plant ferredoxin-like protein (PFLP) in their chloroplasts. Thus, we hypothesized that expression of PFLP could alter the tolerance of plants to abiotic stresses through increasing reduced form of ascorbate. In this study, we found that two CPF lines exhibited lower mortality rates at five days, following two days of heat treatment. Compared to non-transgenic wild type (Col-0) plants, CPF plants exhibited decreased H2O2 content, MDA accumulation, and ion leakage after heat treatment. To confirm the efficacy of ferredoxin against heat stress in chloroplasts, we evaluated two RNA interference (RNAi) lines on two endogenous ferredoxin isoforms, Atfd1 or Atfd2, of Arabidopsis plants. Both lines not only decreased their amounts of ascorbate, but also exhibited adverse reactions following heat treatment. Based on these results, we conclude that expression of PFLP in chloroplasts can confer tolerance to heat stress. This tolerance might be associated with the increasing of ascorbate in plants.

  15. EPR and (57)Fe ENDOR investigation of 2Fe ferredoxins from Aquifex aeolicus.

    PubMed

    Cutsail, George E; Doan, Peter E; Hoffman, Brian M; Meyer, Jacques; Telser, Joshua

    2012-12-01

    We have employed EPR and a set of recently developed electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopies to characterize a suite of [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin clusters from Aquifex aeolicus (Aae Fd1, Fd4, and Fd5). Antiferromagnetic coupling between the Fe(II), S = 2, and Fe(III), S = 5/2, sites of the [2Fe-2S](+) cluster in these proteins creates an S = 1/2 ground state. A complete discussion of the spin-Hamiltonian contributions to g includes new symmetry arguments along with references to related FeS model compounds and their symmetry and EPR properties. Complete (57)Fe hyperfine coupling (hfc) tensors for each iron, with respective orientations relative to g, have been determined by the use of "stochastic" continuous wave and/or "random hopped" pulsed ENDOR, with the relative utility of the two approaches being emphasized. The reported hyperfine tensors include absolute signs determined by a modified pulsed ENDOR saturation and recovery (PESTRE) technique, RD-PESTRE-a post-processing protocol of the "raw data" that comprises an ENDOR spectrum. The (57)Fe hyperfine tensor components found by ENDOR are nicely consistent with those previously found by Mössbauer spectroscopy, while accurate tensor orientations are unique to the ENDOR approach. These measurements demonstrate the capabilities of the newly developed methods. The high-precision hfc tensors serve as a benchmark for this class of FeS proteins, while the variation in the (57)Fe hfc tensors as a function of symmetry in these small FeS clusters provides a reference for higher-nuclearity FeS clusters, such as those found in nitrogenase. PMID:22872138

  16. TWELVE ISOLATIONS OF ZIKA VIRUS FROM AEDES (STEGOMYIA) AFRICANUS (THEOBALD) TAKEN IN AND ABOVE A UGANDA FOREST.

    PubMed

    HADDOW, A J; WILLIAMS, M C; WOODALL, J P; SIMPSON, D I; GOMA, L K

    1964-01-01

    In continuation of a series of studies of arboreal mosquitos as virus vectors in Uganda, 12 strains of Zika virus and one strain of another Group B arbovirus were isolated between November 1961 and June 1963 from pools of Aedes (Stegomyia) africanus caught on a 120-foot (36.5-m) tower in Zika forest. For five strains it is known at what height the mosquitos were caught: one was from mosquitos taken at ground level, and the other four were from mosquitos taken in or above the upper canopy after sunset. No small mammal trapped in the forest either on the ground or in the trees showed serum antibody for Zika virus.These findings suggest that in Zika forest, A. (S.) africanus becomes infected from a virus reservoir that is probably not among the small animals tested and that infected mosquitos are liable to be spread widely beyond the forest by convection currents above the tree-tops in the first two or three hours after sunset.

  17. Premolar root and canal variation in South African Plio-Pleistocene specimens attributed to Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus robustus.

    PubMed

    Moore, N Collin; Thackeray, J Francis; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Skinner, Matthew M

    2016-04-01

    South African hominin fossils attributed to Australopithecus africanus derive from the cave sites of Makapansgat, Sterkfontein, and Taung, from deposits dated between about 2 and 3 million years ago (Ma), while Paranthropus robustus is known from Drimolen, Kromdraai, and Swartkrans, from deposits dated between about 1 and 2 Ma. Although variation in the premolar root complex has informed taxonomic and phylogenetic hypotheses for these fossil hominin species, traditionally there has been a focus on external root form, number, and position. In this study, we use microtomography to undertake the first comprehensive study of maxillary and mandibular premolar root and canal variation in Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus robustus (n = 166 teeth) within and between the species. We also test for correlations between premolar size and root morphology as predicted under the 'size/number continuum' (SNC) model, which correlates increasing root number with tooth size. Our results demonstrate previously undocumented variation in these two fossil hominin species and highlight taxonomic differences in the presence and frequency of particular root types, qualitative root traits, and tooth size (measured as cervix cross-sectional area). Patterns of tooth size and canal/root number are broadly consistent with the SNC model, however statistically significant support is limited. The implications for hominin taxonomy in light of the increased variation in root morphology documented in this study are discussed. PMID:27086055

  18. Stearoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein and Unusual Acyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Desaturase Activities Are Differentially Influenced by Ferredoxin1

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, David J.; Suh, Mi Chung; Ohlrogge, John B.

    2000-01-01

    Acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturases function to position a single double bond into an acyl-ACP substrate and are best represented by the ubiquitous Δ9 18:0-ACP desaturase. Several variant acyl-ACP desaturases have also been identified from species that produce unusual monoenoic fatty acids. All known acyl-ACP desaturase enzymes use ferredoxin as the electron-donating cofactor, and in almost all previous studies the photosynthetic form of ferredoxin rather than the non-photosynthetic form has been used to assess activity. We have examined the influence of different forms of ferredoxin on acyl-ACP desaturases. Using combinations of in vitro acyl-ACP desaturase assays and [14C]malonyl-coenzyme A labeling studies, we have determined that heterotrophic ferredoxin isoforms support up to 20-fold higher unusual acyl-ACP desaturase activity in coriander (Coriandrum sativum), Thunbergia alata, and garden geranium (Pelargonium × hortorum) when compared with photosynthetic ferredoxin isoforms. Heterotrophic ferredoxin also increases activity of the ubiquitous Δ9 18:0-ACP desaturase 1.5- to 3.0-fold in both seed and leaf extracts. These results suggest that ferredoxin isoforms may specifically interact with acyl-ACP desaturases to achieve optimal enzyme activity and that heterotrophic isoforms of ferredoxin may be the in vivo electron donor for this reaction. PMID:11027717

  19. Brownian Dynamics and Molecular Dynamics Study of the Association Between Hydrogenase and Ferredoxin from the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Long, H.; Chang, C. H.; King, P. W.; Ghirardi, M. L.; Kim, K.

    2008-10-01

    The [FeFe] hydrogenase from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii can catalyze the reduction of protons to hydrogen gas using electrons supplied from photosystem I and transferred via ferredoxin. To better understand the association of the hydrogenase and the ferredoxin, we have simulated the process over multiple timescales. A Brownian dynamics simulation method gave an initial thorough sampling of the rigid-body translational and rotational phase spaces, and the resulting trajectories were used to compute the occupancy and free-energy landscapes. Several important hydrogenase-ferredoxin encounter complexes were identified from this analysis, which were then individually simulated using atomistic molecular dynamics to provide more details of the hydrogenase and ferredoxin interaction. The ferredoxin appeared to form reasonable complexes with the hydrogenase in multiple orientations, some of which were good candidates for inclusion in a transition state ensemble of configurations for electron transfer.

  20. Water-assisted proton transfer in ferredoxin I.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Stephan; Tubert-Brohman, Ivan; Yang, Yonggang; Meuwly, Markus

    2011-07-01

    The role of water molecules in assisting proton transfer (PT) is investigated for the proton-pumping protein ferredoxin I (FdI) from Azotobacter vinelandii. It was shown previously that individual water molecules can stabilize between Asp(15) and the buried [3Fe-4S](0) cluster and thus can potentially act as a proton relay in transferring H(+) from the protein to the μ(2) sulfur atom. Here, we generalize molecular mechanics with proton transfer to studying proton transfer reactions in the condensed phase. Both umbrella sampling simulations and electronic structure calculations suggest that the PT Asp(15)-COOH + H(2)O + [3Fe-4S](0) → Asp(15)-COO(-) + H(2)O + [3Fe-4S](0) H(+) is concerted, and no stable intermediate hydronium ion (H(3)O(+)) is expected. The free energy difference of 11.7 kcal/mol for the forward reaction is in good agreement with the experimental value (13.3 kcal/mol). For the reverse reaction (Asp(15)-COO(-) + H(2)O + [3Fe-4S](0)H(+) → Asp(15)-COOH + H(2)O + [3Fe-4S](0)), a larger barrier than for the forward reaction is correctly predicted, but it is quantitatively overestimated (23.1 kcal/mol from simulations versus 14.1 from experiment). Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. Compared with the water-assisted process (ΔE ≈ 10 kcal/mol), water-unassisted proton transfer yields a considerably higher barrier of ΔE ≈ 35 kcal/mol.

  1. Metal-ion-center assembly of ferredoxin and plastocyanin in isolated chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hsoumin; Theg, S.M.; Bauerle, C.M.; Keegstra, K. )

    1990-09-01

    Most chloroplastic proteins are cytosolically synthesized andposttranslationally transported to their proper locations. Two examples of this group of proteins are ferredoxin and plastocyanin, both of which are metal-containing components of the photosynthetic electron-transport chain. The import process for these two proteins includes the insertion of the metal ions to produce the holo forms of the proteins. The authors show here that in vitro translated precursor proteins of ferredoxin and plastocyanin are synthesized as apo forms and are assembled into their respective holo forms after being imported into isolated chloroplasts. They also provide evidence that only mature-sized proteins are competent to be assembled into holo forms.

  2. Application of Rapid Serologic Tests for Detection of Mycobacterium bovis Infection in Free-Ranging Warthogs (Phacochoerus africanus)--Implications for Antemortem Disease Screening.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michele; Buss, Peter; de Klerk-Lorist, Lin-Mari; Hofmeyr, Jennifer; Hausler, Guy; Lyashchenko, Konstantin; Lane, Emily P; Botha, Louise; Parsons, Sven; van Helden, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Warthogs (Phacochoerus africanus) have been implicated as potential maintenance hosts of Mycobacterium bovis. Our preliminary investigation of bovine tuberculosis in three warthogs describes pathologic findings and associated positive serologic results in two infected animals. This demonstrates the potential use of serodiagnostic tests for M. bovis infection in this species.

  3. Design and synthesis of chalcone derivatives as inhibitors of the ferredoxin - ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase interaction of Plasmodium falciparum: pursuing new antimalarial agents.

    PubMed

    Suwito, Hery; Jumina; Mustofa; Pudjiastuti, Pratiwi; Fanani, Much Zaenal; Kimata-Ariga, Yoko; Katahira, Ritsuko; Kawakami, Toru; Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Hase, Toshiharu; Sirat, Hasnah Mohd; Puspaningsih, Ni Nyoman Tri

    2014-01-01

    Some chalcones have been designed and synthesized using Claisen-Schmidt reactions as inhibitors of the ferredoxin and ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase interaction to pursue a new selective antimalaria agent. The synthesized compounds exhibited inhibition interactions between PfFd-PfFNR in the range of 10.94%-50%. The three strongest inhibition activities were shown by (E)-1-(4-aminophenyl)-3-(4-methoxyphenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (50%), (E)-1-(4-aminophenyl)-3-(2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (38.16%), and (E)-1-(4-aminophenyl)-3-(2,3-dimethoxyphenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (31.58%). From the docking experiments we established that the amino group of the methoxyamino chlacone derivatives plays an important role in the inhibition activity by electrostatic interaction through salt bridges and that it forms more stable and better affinity complexes with FNR than with Fd.

  4. Allozyme variation in four populations of African whitebacked vultures (Gyps africanus) and phylogenetic relationships between four vulture species from southern Africa.

    PubMed

    van Wyk, E; van der Bank, H; Verdoorn, G H.

    2001-05-01

    Genetic variation detected by protein electrophoresis at 41 presumptive gene loci was assayed in four populations of Gyps africanus and compared to values previously obtained for Gyps coprotheres. Values calculated for percentage of polymorphic loci (P=34.15%, 0.99 criterion) and average heterozygosity (&Hmacr;=0.108, +/-0.032) in G. africanus, confirm low levels of genetic variation as reported for G. coprotheres. Allele frequency data, assessed at 19 loci, were obtained to evaluate genetic differentiation among four vulture species. Six (31.58%) of the 19 shared loci were polymorphic. Values of 1.26 (+/-0.1), 26.32% and 0.076 (+/-0.047) for G. africanus, 1.21 (+/-0.1), 21.05% and 0.097 (+/-0.045) for Torgos tracheliotus, 1.11 (+/-0.7), 21.05% and 0.053 (+/-0.053) for Neophron percnopterus and 1.05 (+/-0.5), 5.26% and 0.044 (+/-0.047) for G. coprotheres were obtained for the mean number of alleles per locus, P and &Hmacr;, respectively. An average between-population fixation index (F(ST)) value of 0.322 was obtained, which is indicative of significant (P<0.01) differentiation between the four accipitrid species studied. Considerable concordance was obtained between dendograms produced from different analyses, pointing to the distinctiveness of N. percnopterus, which has evolved along a separate lineage as G. africanus, G. coprotheres and T. tracheliotus. Along the latter lineage G. africanus is clustered together with G. coprotheres which is consistent with the morphological similarities of these species. PMID:11274771

  5. The end of the line: can ferredoxin and ferredoxin NADP(H) oxidoreductase determine the fate of photosynthetic electrons?

    PubMed

    Goss, Tatjana; Hanke, Guy

    2014-01-01

    At the end of the linear photosynthetic electron transfer (PET) chain, the small soluble protein ferredoxin (Fd) transfers electrons to Fd:NADP(H) oxidoreductase (FNR), which can then reduce NADP+ to support C assimilation. In addition to this linear electron flow (LEF), Fd is also thought to mediate electron flow back to the membrane complexes by different cyclic electron flow (CEF) pathways: either antimycin A sensitive, NAD(P)H complex dependent, or through FNR located at the cytochrome b6f complex. Both Fd and FNR are present in higher plant genomes as multiple gene copies, and it is now known that specific Fd iso-proteins can promote CEF. In addition, FNR iso-proteins vary in their ability to dynamically interact with thylakoid membrane complexes, and it has been suggested that this may also play a role in CEF. We will highlight work on the different Fd-isoproteins and FNR-membrane association found in the bundle sheath (BSC) and mesophyll (MC) cell chloroplasts of the C4 plant maize. These two cell types perform predominantly CEF and LEF, and the properties and activities of Fd and FNR in the BSC and MC are therefore specialized for CEF and LEF respectively. A diversity of Fd isoproteins and dynamic FNR location has also been recorded in C3 plants, algae and cyanobacteria. This indicates that the principles learned from the extreme electron transport situations in the BSC and MC of maize might be usefully applied to understanding the dynamic transition between these states in other systems.

  6. Purification and characterization of ferredoxin-sulfite reductase from turnip (Brassica rapa) leaves and comparison of properties with ferredoxin-sulfite reductase from turnip roots.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, S; Yip, W C; Tamura, G

    1997-09-01

    Ferredoxin-sulfite reductase (Fd-SiR) [hydrogen-sulfide: ferredoxin oxidoreductase, EC 1.8.7.1] from turnip leaves (SiR-L) has been purified to homogeneity and its enzymatic properties compared with that from turnip roots (SiR-R). Each enzyme had a molecular mass of 64.5 +/- 0.5 kDa by SDS-PAGE and an isoelectric point of 5.15 +/- 0.05. Although each had a pH optimum around 7.8 with the same effects of inhibitors, SiR-L had higher heat stability at 60 degrees C than SiR-R. Moreover, SiR-R had a lower K(m) and a higher specificity constant (kcat/K(m)) for turnip leaf ferredoxin than SiR-L. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of SiR-L was different from that of SiR-R. The results of amino acid analysis and peptide mapping suggested that SiR-L and SiR-R have different primary structures.

  7. Ferredoxin, in conjunction with NADPH and ferredoxin-NADP reductase, transfers electrons to the IscS/IscU complex to promote iron-sulfur cluster assembly.

    PubMed

    Yan, Robert; Adinolfi, Salvatore; Pastore, Annalisa

    2015-09-01

    Fe-S cluster biogenesis is an essential pathway coordinated by a network of protein-protein interactions whose functions include desulfurase activity, substrate delivery, electron transfer and product transfer. In an effort to understand the intricacies of the pathway, we have developed an in vitro assay to follow the ferredoxin role in electron transfer during Fe-S cluster assembly. Previously, assays have relied upon the non-physiological reducing agents dithionite and dithiothreitol to assess function. We have addressed this shortcoming by using electron transfer between NADPH and ferredoxin-NADP-reductase to reduce ferredoxin. Our results show that this trio of electron transfer partners are sufficient to sustain the reaction in in vitro studies, albeit with a rate slower compared with DTT-mediated cluster assembly. We also show that, despite overlapping with the CyaY protein in binding to IscS, Fdx does not interfere with the inhibitory activity of this protein. We suggest explanations for these observations which have important consequences for understanding the mechanism of cluster formation. Cofactor-dependent proteins: evolution, chemical diversity and bio-applications.

  8. Differential electron flow around photosystem I by two C4-photosynthetic-cell-specific ferredoxins

    PubMed Central

    Kimata-Ariga, Yoko; Matsumura, Tomohiro; Kada, Shigeki; Fujimoto, Hiroki; Fujita, Yuichi; Endo, Tsuyoshi; Mano, Jun’ichi; Sato, Fumihiko; Hase, Toshiharu

    2000-01-01

    In the C4 plant maize (Zea mays L.), two ferredoxin isoproteins, Fd I and Fd II, are expressed specifically in mesophyll and bundle-sheath cells, respectively. cDNAs for these ferredoxins were introduced separately into the cyanobacterium Plectonema boryanum with a disrupted endogenous ferredoxin gene, yielding TM202 and KM2-9 strains expressing Fd I and Fd II. The growth of TM202 was retarded under high light (130 µmol/m2/s), whereas KM2-9 grew at a normal rate but exhibited a nitrogen-deficient phenotype. Measurement of photosynthetic O2 evolution revealed that the reducing power was not efficiently partitioned into nitrogen assimilation in KM2-9. After starvation of the cells in darkness, the P700 oxidation level under far-red illumination increased significantly in TM202. However, it remained low in KM2-9, indicating an active cyclic electron flow. In accordance with this, the cellular ratio of ATP/ADP increased and that of NADPH/NADP+ decreased in KM2-9 as compared with TM202. These results demonstrated that the two cell type-specific ferredoxins differentially modulate electron flow around photosystem I. PMID:11013207

  9. Discovery of native metal ion sites located on the ferredoxin docking side of photosystem I.

    SciTech Connect

    Utschig, L. M.; Chen, L. X.; Poluektov, O. G.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2008-03-25

    Photosystem I (PSI) is a large membrane protein that catalyzes light-driven electron transfer across the thylakoid membrane from plastocyanin located in the lumen to ferredoxin in the stroma. Metal analysis reveals that PSI isolated from the cyanobacterial membranes of Synechococcus leopoliensis has a near-stoichiometric 1 molar equiv of Zn2+ per PSI monomer and two additional surface metal ion sites that favor Cu2+ binding. Two-dimensional hyperfine sublevel correlation (HYSCORE) spectroscopy reveals coupling to the so-called remote nitrogen of a single histidine coordinated to one of the Cu2+ centers. EPR and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) studies of 2Cu?PSI complexes reveal the direct interaction of ferredoxin with the Cu2+ centers on PSI, establishing the location of native metal sites on the ferredoxin docking side of PSI. On the basis of these spectroscopic results and previously reported site-directed mutagenesis studies, inspection of the PSI crystal structure reveals a cluster of three highly conserved residues, His(D95), Glu(D103), and Asp(C23), as a likely Cu2+ binding site. The discovery of surface metal sites on the acceptor side of PSI provides a unique opportunity to probe the stromal region of PSI and the interactions of PSI with its reaction partner, the soluble electron carrier protein ferredoxin.

  10. Flavin and iron-sulfur containing ferredoxin-linked glutamate synthase from spinach leaves.

    PubMed

    Hirasawa, M; Tamura, G

    1984-04-01

    Ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase (native enzyme) [EC 1.4.7.1] of spinach has been purified to homogeneity in the presence of 2-oxoglutarate and sodium chloride and the properties of the enzyme have been studied. The molecular weight of the enzyme was estimated to be 140,000 by gel filtration. Subunit analysis by SDS-gel electrophoresis yielded a single protein band whose molecular weight was about 170,000. This purified enzyme showed a flavo-protein-like absorption spectrum having maxima at 279 and 438 nm with shoulders at 415 and 460 nm and a broad band around 360 nm. Fluorometric data indicated the presence of 2 mol of flavin per mol of the enzyme. Preliminary paper chromatography results indicated the presence of FAD and FMN in the purified enzyme. The enzyme also contained 4 mol of acid-labile sulfide and 4 g-atoms iron per mol of enzyme. In the absence of 2-oxoglutarate and/or sodium chloride, the purified enzyme was separated by either DE-52 cellulose chromatography or gel filtration with Ultrogel AcA 34 into two molecular forms (modified enzymes) with considerable inactivation. When reduced methyl viologen plus ferredoxin was used as the electron donor, the purified (native) enzyme showed high ferredoxin-dependent activity with a specific activity of 100 units/mg protein. Methyl viologen-dependent activity was negligible in the absence of ferredoxin. Kinetic properties and results of ESR studies were described. The results indicate that ferredoxin-linked glutamate synthase of spinach leaves is an iron-sulfur flavoprotein.

  11. Crystallization and electron paramagnetic resonance characterization of the complex of photosystem I with its natural electron acceptor ferredoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Fromme, Petra; Bottin, Hervé; Krauss, Norbert; Sétif, Pierre

    2002-01-01

    The formation of a transient complex between photosystem I and ferredoxin is involved in the process of ferredoxin photoreduction in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. Reduced ferredoxin is an essential redox intermediate involved in many assimilatory processes and is necessary for the reduction of NADP(+) to NADPH. Single crystals from a complex of photosystem I with ferredoxin were grown using PEG 400 and CaCl(2) as precipitation agents. The crystals diffract x-rays to a resolution of 7-8 A. The space group was determined to be orthorhombic with the unit cell dimensions a = 194 A, b = 208 A, and c = 354 A. The crystals contain photosystem I and ferredoxin in a 1:1 ratio. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements on these crystals are reported, where EPR signals of the three [4Fe-4S] clusters F(A), F(B), F(X), and the [2Fe-2S] cluster of ferredoxin were detected. From the EPR spectra observed at three particular orientations of the crystal in the magnetic field, the full orientation pattern of the F g-tensor was simulated. This simulation is consistent with the presence of 12 magnetically inequivalent F clusters per unit cell with the C(3) axis of the PSI trimers oriented at (23 degrees, 72 degrees, 77 degrees ) to the unit cell axes. PMID:12324399

  12. The ferredoxin-thioredoxin system of a green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: identification and characterization of thioredoxins and ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huppe, H. C.; de Lamotte-Guery, F.; Buchanan, B. B.

    1990-01-01

    The components of the ferredoxin-thioredoxin (FT) system of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii have been purified and characterized. The system resembled that of higher plants in consisting of a ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR) and two types of thioredoxin, a single f and two m species, m1 and m2. The Chlamydomonas m and f thioredoxins were antigenically similar to their higher-plant counterparts, but not to one another. The m thioredoxins were recognized by antibodies to both higher plant m and bacterial thioredoxins, whereas the thioredoxin f was not. Chlamydomonas thioredoxin f reacted, although weakly, with the antibody to spinach thioredoxin f. The algal thioredoxin f differed from thioredoxins studied previously in behaving as a basic protein on ion-exchange columns. Purification revealed that the algal thioredoxins had molecular masses (Mrs) typical of thioredoxins from other sources, m1 and m2 being 10700 and f 11500. Chlamydomonas FTR had two dissimilar subunits, a feature common to all FTRs studied thus far. One, the 13-kDa ("similar") subunit, resembled its counterpart from other sources in both size and antigenicity. The other, 10-kDa ("variable") subunit was not recognized by antibodies to any FTR tested. When combined with spinach, (Spinacia oleracea L.) thylakoid membranes, the components of the FT system functioned in the light activation of the standard target enzymes from chloroplasts, corn (Zea mays L.) NADP-malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.82) and spinach fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11) as well as the chloroplast-type fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase from Chlamydomonas. Activity was greatest if ferredoxin and other components of the FT system were from Chlamydomonas. The capacity of the Chlamydomonas FT system to activate autologous FBPase indicates that light regulates the photosynthetic carbon metabolism of green algae as in other oxygenic photosynthetic organisms.

  13. Direct computer simulation of ferredoxin and FNR complex formation in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, I. B.; Diakonova, A. N.; Abaturova, A. M.; Riznichenko, G. Yu; Rubin, A. B.

    2010-06-01

    Ferredoxin reduced by Photosystem I in light serves as an electron donor for the reduction of NADP+ to NADPH, and this reaction is catalyzed by enzyme ferredoxin:NADP+-reductase (FNR). Kinetics and mechanisms of this reaction have been extensively studied experimentally by site-specific mutagenesis, laser flash photolysis and stopped-flow methods. We have applied a method of multiparticle computer simulation to study the effects of electrostatic interactions upon the reaction rate of Fd-FNR complex formation. Using the model we calculated rate constants of Fd-FNR complex formation for the wild-type proteins and some mutant forms of FNR at different values of ionic strength. Simulation revealed that electrostatic interactions play an important role in Fd-FNR complex formation and define its specificity.

  14. Critical role of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii ferredoxin-5 in maintaining membrane structure and dark metabolism.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenqiang; Wittkopp, Tyler M; Li, Xiaobo; Warakanont, Jaruswan; Dubini, Alexandra; Catalanotti, Claudia; Kim, Rick G; Nowack, Eva C M; Mackinder, Luke C M; Aksoy, Munevver; Page, Mark Dudley; D'Adamo, Sarah; Saroussi, Shai; Heinnickel, Mark; Johnson, Xenie; Richaud, Pierre; Alric, Jean; Boehm, Marko; Jonikas, Martin C; Benning, Christoph; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Posewitz, Matthew C; Grossman, Arthur R

    2015-12-01

    Photosynthetic microorganisms typically have multiple isoforms of the electron transfer protein ferredoxin, although we know little about their exact functions. Surprisingly, a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant null for the ferredoxin-5 gene (FDX5) completely ceased growth in the dark, with both photosynthetic and respiratory functions severely compromised; growth in the light was unaffected. Thylakoid membranes in dark-maintained fdx5 mutant cells became severely disorganized concomitant with a marked decrease in the ratio of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol to digalactosyldiacylglycerol, major lipids in photosynthetic membranes, and the accumulation of triacylglycerol. Furthermore, FDX5 was shown to physically interact with the fatty acid desaturases CrΔ4FAD and CrFAD6, likely donating electrons for the desaturation of fatty acids that stabilize monogalactosyldiacylglycerol. Our results suggest that in photosynthetic organisms, specific redox reactions sustain dark metabolism, with little impact on daytime growth, likely reflecting the tailoring of electron carriers to unique intracellular metabolic circuits under these two very distinct redox conditions. PMID:26627249

  15. [Effects of the symbiosis of Trichomonas vaginalis with Mycoplasma hominis on ferredoxin gene].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaodong; Wen, Wenjing; Xue, Changgui

    2011-08-01

    We isolated 30 Trichomonas vaginalis for the PCR detection from the gynecological outpatients in the Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University using the specific 16s rDNA primers of Mycoplasma hominis. The results showed that there were 25 cases of Mycoplasma hominis infection, with the infection rate of 83.33%. This gave a clew that the symbiosis of Trichomonas vaginalis with Mycoplasma hominis may be of certain generality in China. We sequenced the ferredoxin gene of 10 Trichomonas vaginalis where 5 Mycoplasma hominis were positive and five negative, and found that the ferredoxin (Fd) gene of the 10 Trichomonas vaginalis were exactly the same. But compared to the genes in the GenBank, a comparative analysis of the gene revealed that there were 3 more ctg bases at the 200th position of encoding leucine, but this did not lead to changes in reading frame. The gene homology was 99%.

  16. Critical role of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii ferredoxin-5 in maintaining membrane structure and dark metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wittkopp, Tyler M.; Warakanont, Jaruswan; Dubini, Alexandra; Catalanotti, Claudia; Kim, Rick G.; Nowack, Eva C. M.; Mackinder, Luke C. M.; Aksoy, Munevver; Page, Mark Dudley; D’Adamo, Sarah; Saroussi, Shai; Heinnickel, Mark; Johnson, Xenie; Richaud, Pierre; Alric, Jean; Boehm, Marko; Jonikas, Martin C.; Benning, Christoph; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Posewitz, Matthew C.; Grossman, Arthur R.

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic microorganisms typically have multiple isoforms of the electron transfer protein ferredoxin, although we know little about their exact functions. Surprisingly, a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant null for the ferredoxin-5 gene (FDX5) completely ceased growth in the dark, with both photosynthetic and respiratory functions severely compromised; growth in the light was unaffected. Thylakoid membranes in dark-maintained fdx5 mutant cells became severely disorganized concomitant with a marked decrease in the ratio of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol to digalactosyldiacylglycerol, major lipids in photosynthetic membranes, and the accumulation of triacylglycerol. Furthermore, FDX5 was shown to physically interact with the fatty acid desaturases CrΔ4FAD and CrFAD6, likely donating electrons for the desaturation of fatty acids that stabilize monogalactosyldiacylglycerol. Our results suggest that in photosynthetic organisms, specific redox reactions sustain dark metabolism, with little impact on daytime growth, likely reflecting the tailoring of electron carriers to unique intracellular metabolic circuits under these two very distinct redox conditions. PMID:26627249

  17. Cloning, nucleotide sequence, and transcriptional analyses of the gene encoding a ferredoxin from Methanosarcina thermophila.

    PubMed Central

    Clements, A P; Ferry, J G

    1992-01-01

    A mixed 17-mer oligonucleotide deduced from the N terminus of a ferredoxin isolated from Methanosarcina thermophila was used to probe a lambda gt11 library prepared from M. thermophila genomic DNA; positive clones contained either a 5.7- or 2.1-kbp EcoRI insert. An open reading frame (fdxA) located within the 5.7-kbp insert had a deduced amino acid sequence that was identical to the first 26 N-terminal residues reported for the ferredoxin isolated from M. thermophila, with the exception of the initiator methionine. fdxA had the coding capacity for a 6,230-Da protein which contained eight cysteines with spacings typical of 2[4Fe-4S] ferredoxins. An open reading frame (ORF1) located within the 2.1-kbp EcoRI fragment also had the potential to encode a 2[4Fe-4S] bacterial-type ferredoxin (5,850 Da). fdxA and ORF1 were present as single copies in the genome, and each was transcribed on a monocistronic mRNA. While the fdxA- and ORF1-specific mRNAs were detected in cells grown on methanol and trimethylamine, only the fdxA-specific transcript was present in acetate-grown cells. The apparent transcriptional start sites of fdxA and ORF1, as determined by primer extension analyses, lay 21 to 28 bases downstream of sequences with high identity to the consensus methanogen promoter. Images PMID:1379583

  18. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplasts contain a homodimeric pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase that functions with FDX1.

    PubMed

    van Lis, Robert; Baffert, Carole; Couté, Yohann; Nitschke, Wolfgang; Atteia, Ariane

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic algae have long been known to live in anoxic environments, but interest in their anaerobic energy metabolism has only recently gained momentum, largely due to their utility in biofuel production. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii figures remarkably in this respect, because it efficiently produces hydrogen and its genome harbors many genes for anaerobic metabolic routes. Central to anaerobic energy metabolism in many unicellular eukaryotes (protists) is pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO), which decarboxylates pyruvate and forms acetyl-coenzyme A with concomitant reduction of low-potential ferredoxins or flavodoxins. Here, we report the biochemical properties of the homodimeric PFO of C. reinhardtii expressed in Escherichia coli. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of the recombinant enzyme (Cr-rPFO) showed three distinct [4Fe-4S] iron-sulfur clusters and a thiamine pyrophosphate radical upon reduction by pyruvate. Purified Cr-rPFO exhibits a specific decarboxylase activity of 12 µmol pyruvate min⁻¹ mg⁻¹ protein using benzyl viologen as electron acceptor. Despite the fact that the enzyme is very oxygen sensitive, it localizes to the chloroplast. Among the six known chloroplast ferredoxins (FDX1-FDX6) in C. reinhardtii, FDX1 and FDX2 were the most efficient electron acceptors from Cr-rPFO, with comparable apparent K(m) values of approximately 4 µm. As revealed by immunoblotting, anaerobic conditions that lead to the induction of CrPFO did not increase levels of either FDX1 or FDX2. FDX1, being by far the most abundant ferredoxin, is thus likely the partner of PFO in C. reinhardtii. This finding postulates a direct link between CrPFO and hydrogenase and provides new opportunities to better study and engineer hydrogen production in this protist.

  19. Crystal structure of paprika ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase. Implications for the electron transfer pathway.

    PubMed

    Dorowski, A; Hofmann, A; Steegborn, C; Boicu, M; Huber, R

    2001-03-23

    cDNA of Capsicum annuum Yolo Wonder (paprika) has been prepared from total cellular RNA, and the complete gene encoding paprika ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (pFNR) precursor was sequenced and cloned from this cDNA. Fusion to a T7 promoter allowed expression in Escherichia coli. Both native and recombinant pFNR were purified to homogeneity and crystallized. The crystal structure of pFNR has been solved by Patterson search techniques using the structure of spinach ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase as search model. The structure was refined at 2.5-A resolution to a crystallographic R-factor of 19.8% (R(free) = 26.5%). The overall structure of pFNR is similar to other members of the ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase family, the major differences concern a long loop (residues 167-177) that forms part of the FAD binding site and some of the variable loops in surface regions. The different orientation of the FAD binding loop leads to a tighter interaction between pFNR and the adenine moiety of FAD. The physiological redox partners [2Fe-2S]-ferredoxin I and NADP(+) were modeled into the native structure of pFNR. The complexes reveal a protein-protein interaction site that is consistent with existing biochemical data and imply possible orientations for the side chain of tyrosine 362, which has to be displaced by the nicotinamide moiety of NADP(+) upon binding. A reasonable electron transfer pathway could be deduced from the modeled structures of the complexes. PMID:11053431

  20. Involvement of ferredoxin in desaturation of lipid-bound oleate in chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, H.; Heinz, E. )

    1990-09-01

    Intact spinach (Spinacia oleracea) chloroplasts, pulse-labeled with ({sup 14}C)acetate, desaturate newly formed fatty acids as ester groups of monogalactosyl diacylglycerol in a subsequent chase in the dark. Rupture of pulse-labeled chloroplasts by addition of a detergent solution 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propane sulfonate preserves part of this desaturation activity. Direct addition of different free fatty acids together with appropriate cofactors to detergent-ruptured chloroplasts results in fatty acid labeling of monogalactosyl diacylglycerol. During subsequent incubation these lipid-linked fatty acids are desaturated, i.e. 18:1 to 18:2 and 18:3 and to a small extent also 16:0 to 16:3. The formation of 18:2 was also observed after incorporation of 18:1 into sulfolipid and phosphatidyl choline. Density gradient centrifugation separated a membrane fraction from detergent-ruptured chloroplasts which in the presence of appropriate cofactors incorporated 18:1 and 18:2 into the above-mentioned lipids. In the light, desaturation was dependent on added ferredoxin, whereas in the dark, in addition to ferredoxin NAD(P)H was also required. Preliminary evidence for the involvement of membrane-bound ferredoxin:NADP oxidoreductase (FNR) as a third component of desaturation in the dark was obtained by inhibitor studies including antibodies against FNR. Desaturation of lipid-bound 18:1 and 18:2 resembles stearoyl-ACP desaturation with respect to its requirement of reduced ferredoxin and oxygen.

  1. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplasts contain a homodimeric pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase that functions with FDX1.

    PubMed

    van Lis, Robert; Baffert, Carole; Couté, Yohann; Nitschke, Wolfgang; Atteia, Ariane

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic algae have long been known to live in anoxic environments, but interest in their anaerobic energy metabolism has only recently gained momentum, largely due to their utility in biofuel production. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii figures remarkably in this respect, because it efficiently produces hydrogen and its genome harbors many genes for anaerobic metabolic routes. Central to anaerobic energy metabolism in many unicellular eukaryotes (protists) is pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO), which decarboxylates pyruvate and forms acetyl-coenzyme A with concomitant reduction of low-potential ferredoxins or flavodoxins. Here, we report the biochemical properties of the homodimeric PFO of C. reinhardtii expressed in Escherichia coli. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of the recombinant enzyme (Cr-rPFO) showed three distinct [4Fe-4S] iron-sulfur clusters and a thiamine pyrophosphate radical upon reduction by pyruvate. Purified Cr-rPFO exhibits a specific decarboxylase activity of 12 µmol pyruvate min⁻¹ mg⁻¹ protein using benzyl viologen as electron acceptor. Despite the fact that the enzyme is very oxygen sensitive, it localizes to the chloroplast. Among the six known chloroplast ferredoxins (FDX1-FDX6) in C. reinhardtii, FDX1 and FDX2 were the most efficient electron acceptors from Cr-rPFO, with comparable apparent K(m) values of approximately 4 µm. As revealed by immunoblotting, anaerobic conditions that lead to the induction of CrPFO did not increase levels of either FDX1 or FDX2. FDX1, being by far the most abundant ferredoxin, is thus likely the partner of PFO in C. reinhardtii. This finding postulates a direct link between CrPFO and hydrogenase and provides new opportunities to better study and engineer hydrogen production in this protist. PMID:23154536

  2. Atomic Resolution Modeling of the Ferredoxin:[FeFe] Hydrogenase Complex from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C. H.; King, P. W.; Ghirardi, M. L.; Kim, K.

    2007-11-01

    The [FeFe] hydrogenases HydA1 and HydA2 in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii catalyze the final reaction in a remarkable metabolic pathway allowing this photosynthetic organism to produce H2 from water in the chloroplast. A [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin is a critical branch point in electron flow from Photosystem I toward a variety of metabolic fates, including proton reduction by hydrogenases. To better understand the binding determinants involved in ferredoxin:hydrogenase interactions, we have modeled Chlamydomonas PetF1 and HydA2 based on amino-acid sequence homology, and produced two promising electron-transfer model complexes by computational docking. To characterize these models, quantitative free energy calculations at atomic resolution were carried out, and detailed analysis of the interprotein interactions undertaken. The protein complex model we propose for ferredoxin:HydA2 interaction is energetically favored over the alternative candidate by 20kcal/mol. This proposed model of the electron-transfer complex between PetF1 and HydA2 permits a more detailed view of the molecular events leading up to H2 evolution, and suggests potential mutagenic strategies to modulate electron flow to HydA2.

  3. Characterization of the iron-sulfur clusters in ferredoxin from acetate-grown Methanosarcina thermophila.

    PubMed Central

    Clements, A P; Kilpatrick, L; Lu, W P; Ragsdale, S W; Ferry, J G

    1994-01-01

    Ferredoxin from Methanosarcina thermophila is an electron acceptor for the CO dehydrogenase complex which decarbonylates acetyl-coenzyme A and oxidizes the carbonyl group to carbon dioxide in the pathway for conversion of the methyl group of acetate to methane (K. C. Terlesky and J. G. Ferry, J. Biol. Chem. 263:4080-4082, 1988). Resonance Raman spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroelectrochemistry indicated that the ferredoxin contained two [4Fe-4S] clusters per monomer of 6,790 Da, each with a midpoint potential of -407 mV. A [3Fe-4S] species, with a midpoint potential of +103 mV, was also detected in the protein at high redox potentials. Quantitation of the [3Fe-4S] and [4Fe-4S] centers revealed 0.4 and 2.1 spins per monomer, respectively. The iron-sulfur clusters were unstable in the presence of air, and the rate of cluster loss increased with increasing temperature. A ferredoxin preparation, with a low spin quantitation of [4Fe-4S] centers, was treated with Fe2+ and S2-, which resulted in an increase in [4Fe-4S] and a decrease in [3Fe-4S] clusters. The results of these studies suggest the [3Fe-4S] species may be an artifact formed from degradation of [4Fe-4S] clusters. PMID:8169218

  4. The Roles of Four Conserved Basic Amino Acids in a Ferredoxin-Dependent Cyanobacterial Nitrate Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Anurag P.; Hirasawa, Masakazu; Bhalla, Megha; Chung, Jung-Sung; Allen, James P.; Johnson, Michael K.; Tripathy, Jatindra N.; Rubio, Luis M.; Vaccaro, Brian; Subramanian, Sowmya; Flores, Enrique; Zabet-Moghaddam, Masoud; Stitle, Kyle; Knaff, David B.

    2013-01-01

    The roles of four conserved basic amino acids in the reaction catalyzed by the ferredoxin-dependent nitrate reductase from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942 have been investigated using site-directed mutagenesis in combination with measurements of steady-state kinetics, substrate-binding affinities and spectroscopic properties of the enzyme’s two prosthetic groups. Replacement of either Lys58 or Arg70 by glutamine leads to a complete loss of activity, with both the physiological electron donor, reduced ferredoxin and with a non-physiological electron donor, reduced methyl viologen. More conservative, charge-maintaining K58R and R70K variants were also completely inactive. Replacement of Lys130 by glutamine produced a variant that retained 26% of the wild-type activity with methyl viologen as the electron donor and 22% of the wild-type activity with ferredoxin as the electron donor, while replacement by arginine produces a variant that retains a significantly higher percentage of the wild-type activity with both electron donors. In contrast, replacement of Arg146 by glutamine had minimal effect on the activity of the enzyme. These results, along with substrate-binding and spectroscopic measurements, are discussed in terms of an in silico structural model for the enzyme. PMID:23692082

  5. Exceptional stability of a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin from hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Catherine L; Meyer, Jacques; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2002-09-23

    Aquifex aeolicus is the only hyperthermophile that is known to contain a plant- and mammalian-type [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin (Aae Fd1). This unique protein contains two cysteines, in addition to the four that act as ligands of the [2Fe-2S] cluster, which form a disulfide bridge. We have investigated the stability of Aae Fd1 with (wild-type) and without (C87A variant) the disulfide bond, with respect to pH, thermal and chemical perturbation, and compared the results to those for the mesophilic [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin from spinach. Unfolding reactions of all three proteins are irreversible due to cluster decomposition in the unfolded state. Wild-type and C87A Aae Fd1 proteins are extremely stable: unfolding at 20 degrees C requires high concentrations of the chemical denaturant and long incubation times. Moreover, their thermal-unfolding midpoints are 40-50 degrees higher than that for spinach ferredoxin (pH 7). The stability of the Aae Fd1 protein is significantly lower at pH 2.5 than pH 7 and 10, suggesting that ionic interactions play a role in structural integrity. Interestingly, the iron-sulfur cluster in C87A Aae Fd1 rearranges into a transient species with absorption bands at 520 and 610 nm, presumably a linear three-iron cluster, in the high-pH unfolded state.

  6. Electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions during complex formation and electron transfer in the ferredoxin/ferredoxin: NADP{sup +} reductase system from Anabaena

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, J.K.; Tollin, G.; Fillat, M.F.; Gomez-Moreno, C.

    1996-06-19

    Transient kinetics and protein-protein binding measurements over a wide range of ionic strength (I) have been used to characterize the interactions occurring during complex formation and electron transfer (et) between recombinant ferredoxin (Fd) and both native and recombinant ferredoxin: NADP{sup +} reductase (FNR) from the cyanobacterium Anabaena. Between I = 12 mM and I = 100 mM, the dissociation constant (K{sub d}) for the complex formed between oxidized Fd and oxidized native FNR increases from 4.5 to 8.1 {mu}M, whereas K{sub d} for the Fd complex with recombinant FNR increases from 0.3 to 3.3 {mu}M. For both pairs of proteins, the ionic strength dependence of k{sub obs} for the et reaction is biphasic. Electrostatic analysis of the kinetic data above I = 100 mM allows a prediction of the ionic strength dependence of the K{sub d} values, if electrostatic interactions are the only determinant of complex stability. The predicted dependence is dramatically larger than the observed one, indicating that hydrophobic interactions make an important contribution to complex stability. The differences in binding between native and recombinant FNR are ascribed to proteolytic cleavage at the N-terminus, which occurs during preparation of the native enzyme and which removes two positively charged residues, thereby decreasing the electrostatic interactions with Fd. 39 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Reproductive functional anatomy and oestrous cycle pattern of the female brush-tailed porcupine (Atherurus africanus, Gray 1842) from Gabon.

    PubMed

    Mayor, P; López-Béjar, M; Jori, F; Fenech, M; López-Gatius, F

    2003-07-15

    In the present study, we examined certain features of the functional anatomy of the female genital tract of the wild brush-tailed porcupine (Atherurus africanus) to obtain data on the reproductive biology of this African forest rodent. Two consecutive experiments were performed. The aim of the first was to establish macroscopic and microscopic features of the genital organs, and to explore correlations between predominant ovarian structures and vaginal contents in 20 wild, mature females. In the second experiment, we inspected the external genitalia and vaginal smears of a further 10 females in captivity on a daily basis for 90 days. The uterus of the brush-tailed porcupine is bicornuate and composed of two separated uterine horns, a uterine body and cervix. The genital tract does not present a vaginal vestibule. Thus, there is no portion common to genital and urinary tracts. Females in the follicular phase of the oestrous cycle showed increased cornification of the vaginal epithelium and a high density of eosinophilic cells in vaginal smears. The vulva and vaginal opening were open, reddish and tumefacted. In luteal phase or in pregnancy, epithelial cornification and eosinophilic features were notably reduced and the vagina presented a pale, non-tumefacted vulva and a vaginal closure membrane. Females in captivity showed spontaneous cycles, a polyoestrous reproduction pattern and, based on features of the external genitalia and vaginal smears, their oestrous cycle length was 27.1+/-6.4 days (n=12).

  8. The enamel–dentine junction in the postcanine dentition of Australopithecus africanus: intra-individual metameric and antimeric variation

    PubMed Central

    Braga, J; Thackeray, J F; Subsol, G; Kahn, J L; Maret, D; Treil, J; Beck, A

    2010-01-01

    We used micro-computed tomography and virtual tools to study metric and morphological features at the enamel–dentine junction and on the outer enamel surface in the postcanine dentition of an exceptionally well-preserved maxilla and mandible of an early hominin. The fossil, Sts 52 from Sterkfontein, South Africa, is attributed to Australopithecus africanus and is about 2.5 million years old. For comparative purposes in this exploratory study, we also used micro-computed tomography to analyse the dentition of a common chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), a pygmy chimpanzee (Pan paniscus) and three extant humans. Metameric variation of the 3D enamel–dentine junction in the two chimpanzee mandibles was much smaller than in extant humans. Variation in metameric shape was high and complex. Notably, the mandibular metameric variation in extant humans can be greater within individuals, as compared with variation between individuals, with differences in shape appearing greater for M2 compared with M1. We recommend the use of a new approach in which individual metameric variation is systematically assessed before making inferences about differences between fossil hominin species. The fossil hominin examined in this study showed a metameric pattern of mandibular variation in shape that was comparable to the pattern seen in two chimpanzees. This degree of metameric variation appeared relatively small compared with the much larger patterns of variation observed within and between extant humans. PMID:19900182

  9. Tiarajudens eccentricus and Anomocephalus africanus, two bizarre anomodonts (Synapsida, Therapsida) with dental occlusion from the Permian of Gondwana

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros, Juan Carlos; Abdala, Fernando; Jashashvili, Tea; de Oliveira Bueno, Ana; Dentzien-Dias, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Anomodontia was a highly successful tetrapod clade during the Permian and the Triassic. New morphological information regarding two bizarre basal anomodonts is provided and their palaeoecological significance is explored. The osteology of the recently discovered Tiarajudens eccentricus Cisneros et al. 2011, from the Brazilian Permian, is described in detail. The taxon exhibits unusual postcranial features, including the presence of gastralia. Additional preparation and computed tomography scans of the holotype of Anomocephalus africanus Modesto et al. 1999 discovered in the Karoo Basin of South Africa allow a reappraisal of this genus. Anomocephalus is similar to Tiarajudens with regard to several traits, including a battery of large, transversally expanded, palatal teeth. Molariform teeth are present in the mandible of the African taxon, providing additional insight into the function of the earliest tooth-occlusion mechanism known in therapsids. At least two waves of tooth replacement can be recognized in the palate of Anomocephalus. The outsized, blade-like caniniforms of the herbivorous Tiarajudens allow several non-exclusive ecological interpretations, among which we favour intraspecific display or combat. This behaviour was an alternative to the head-butting practised by the contemporary dinocephalians. Combat specializations that are considered typical of Cenozoic herbivores likely evolved during the Middle Permian, at the time the first communities with diverse, abundant tetrapod herbivores were being assembled. PMID:26587266

  10. Tiarajudens eccentricus and Anomocephalus africanus, two bizarre anomodonts (Synapsida, Therapsida) with dental occlusion from the Permian of Gondwana.

    PubMed

    Cisneros, Juan Carlos; Abdala, Fernando; Jashashvili, Tea; de Oliveira Bueno, Ana; Dentzien-Dias, Paula

    2015-07-01

    Anomodontia was a highly successful tetrapod clade during the Permian and the Triassic. New morphological information regarding two bizarre basal anomodonts is provided and their palaeoecological significance is explored. The osteology of the recently discovered Tiarajudens eccentricus Cisneros et al. 2011, from the Brazilian Permian, is described in detail. The taxon exhibits unusual postcranial features, including the presence of gastralia. Additional preparation and computed tomography scans of the holotype of Anomocephalus africanus Modesto et al. 1999 discovered in the Karoo Basin of South Africa allow a reappraisal of this genus. Anomocephalus is similar to Tiarajudens with regard to several traits, including a battery of large, transversally expanded, palatal teeth. Molariform teeth are present in the mandible of the African taxon, providing additional insight into the function of the earliest tooth-occlusion mechanism known in therapsids. At least two waves of tooth replacement can be recognized in the palate of Anomocephalus. The outsized, blade-like caniniforms of the herbivorous Tiarajudens allow several non-exclusive ecological interpretations, among which we favour intraspecific display or combat. This behaviour was an alternative to the head-butting practised by the contemporary dinocephalians. Combat specializations that are considered typical of Cenozoic herbivores likely evolved during the Middle Permian, at the time the first communities with diverse, abundant tetrapod herbivores were being assembled. PMID:26587266

  11. Carbofuran and its toxic metabolites provide forensic evidence for furadan exposure in vultures (Gyps africanus) in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Otieno, Peter O; Lalah, Joseph O; Virani, Munir; Jondiko, Isaac O; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2010-05-01

    Forensic analysis of carbofuran residues in weathered tissue samples for evidence of Furadan exposure in vultures (Gps africanus) by HPLC gave concentration (mg/Kg dry tissue weight) ranges of bdl - 0.07 (carbofuran), bdl - 0.499 (3-ketocarbofuran) and 0.013-0.147 (3-hydroxycarbofuran) in beaks, bdl-0.65 (carbofuran), 0.024-0.190 (3-ketocarbofuran) and 0.017-0.098 (3-hydroxycarbofuran) in feet, 0.179-0.219 (3-ketocarbofuran) and 0.081-0.093 (3-hydroxycarbofuran) in crop content, 0.078-0.082 (3-ketocarbofuran) and 0.091-0.101 (3-hydroxycarbofuran) in muscle of a laced carcass and 0.006-0.014 (carbofuran), 0.590-1.010 (3-ketocarbofuran) and 0.095-0.135 (3-hydroxycarbofuran) in soil sampled from a poisoning site. These compounds were confirmed by GC-MS. The results showed that HPLC combined with GC-MS is suitable for forensic analysis of carbofuran residues in bird tissue samples and that forensic investigation should include its two toxic metabolites, 3-hydroxycarbofuran and 3-ketocarbofuran.

  12. Protostylid expression at the enamel-dentine junction and enamel surface of mandibular molars of Paranthropus robustus and Australopithecus africanus.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Matthew M; Wood, Bernard A; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Distinctive expressions and incidences of discrete dental traits at the outer enamel surface (OES) contribute to the diagnoses of many early hominin taxa. Examination of the enamel-dentine junction (EDJ), imaged non-destructively using micro-computed tomography, has elucidated the morphological development of dental traits and improved interpretations of their variability within and among taxa. The OES expressions of one of these dental traits, the protostylid, have been found to differ among African Plio-Pleistocene fossil hominin taxa. In this study protostylid expression is examined at the OES and at the EDJ of Paranthropus robustus (n=23) and Australopithecus africanus (n=28) mandibular molars, with the goals of incorporating EDJ morphology into the definition of the protostylid and assessing the relative contribution of the EDJ and enamel cap to its expression in these taxa. The results provide evidence (a) of statistically significant taxon-specific patterns of protostylid morphology at the EDJ that are not evident at the OES; (b) that in P. robustus, thick enamel reduces the morphological correspondence between the form of the protostylid seen at the EDJ and the OES, and (c) that if EDJ images can be obtained, then the protostylid retains its taxonomic value even in worn teeth. PMID:18986683

  13. Superoxide generated from the glutathione-mediated reduction of selenite damages the iron-sulfur cluster of chloroplastic ferredoxin.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Brian; Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Abdel-Ghany, Salah; Pilon, Marinus; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A; Sagi, Moshe; Van Hoewyk, Doug

    2016-09-01

    Selenium assimilation in plants is facilitated by several enzymes that participate in the transport and assimilation of sulfate. Manipulation of genes that function in sulfur metabolism dramatically affects selenium toxicity and accumulation. However, it has been proposed that selenite is not reduced by sulfite reductase. Instead, selenite can be non-enzymatically reduced by glutathione, generating selenodiglutathione and superoxide. The damaging effects of superoxide on iron-sulfur clusters in cytosolic and mitochondrial proteins are well known. However, it is unknown if superoxide damages chloroplastic iron-sulfur proteins. The goals of this study were twofold: to determine whether decreased activity of sulfite reductase impacts selenium tolerance in Arabidopsis, and to determine if superoxide generated from the glutathione-mediated reduction of selenite damages the iron-sulfur cluster of ferredoxin. Our data demonstrate that knockdown of sulfite reductase in Arabidopsis does not affect selenite tolerance or selenium accumulation. Additionally, we provide in vitro evidence that the non-enzymatic reduction of selenite damages the iron-sulfur cluster of ferredoxin, a plastidial protein that is an essential component of the photosynthetic light reactions. Damage to ferredoxin's iron-sulfur cluster was associated with formation of apo-ferredoxin and impaired activity. We conclude that if superoxide damages iron-sulfur clusters of ferredoxin in planta, then it might contribute to photosynthetic impairment often associated with abiotic stress, including toxic levels of selenium. PMID:27182957

  14. Superoxide generated from the glutathione-mediated reduction of selenite damages the iron-sulfur cluster of chloroplastic ferredoxin.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Brian; Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Abdel-Ghany, Salah; Pilon, Marinus; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A; Sagi, Moshe; Van Hoewyk, Doug

    2016-09-01

    Selenium assimilation in plants is facilitated by several enzymes that participate in the transport and assimilation of sulfate. Manipulation of genes that function in sulfur metabolism dramatically affects selenium toxicity and accumulation. However, it has been proposed that selenite is not reduced by sulfite reductase. Instead, selenite can be non-enzymatically reduced by glutathione, generating selenodiglutathione and superoxide. The damaging effects of superoxide on iron-sulfur clusters in cytosolic and mitochondrial proteins are well known. However, it is unknown if superoxide damages chloroplastic iron-sulfur proteins. The goals of this study were twofold: to determine whether decreased activity of sulfite reductase impacts selenium tolerance in Arabidopsis, and to determine if superoxide generated from the glutathione-mediated reduction of selenite damages the iron-sulfur cluster of ferredoxin. Our data demonstrate that knockdown of sulfite reductase in Arabidopsis does not affect selenite tolerance or selenium accumulation. Additionally, we provide in vitro evidence that the non-enzymatic reduction of selenite damages the iron-sulfur cluster of ferredoxin, a plastidial protein that is an essential component of the photosynthetic light reactions. Damage to ferredoxin's iron-sulfur cluster was associated with formation of apo-ferredoxin and impaired activity. We conclude that if superoxide damages iron-sulfur clusters of ferredoxin in planta, then it might contribute to photosynthetic impairment often associated with abiotic stress, including toxic levels of selenium.

  15. Foraging ranges of immature African white-backed vultures (Gyps africanus) and their use of protected areas in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Phipps, W Louis; Willis, Stephen G; Wolter, Kerri; Naidoo, Vinny

    2013-01-01

    Vultures in the Gyps genus are declining globally. Multiple threats related to human activity have caused widespread declines of vulture populations in Africa, especially outside protected areas. Addressing such threats requires the estimation of foraging ranges yet such estimates are lacking, even for widespread (but declining) species such as the African white-backed vulture (Gyps africanus). We tracked six immature African white-backed vultures in South Africa using GPS-GSM units to study their movement patterns, their use of protected areas and the time they spent in the vicinity of supplementary feeding sites. All individuals foraged widely; their combined foraging ranges extended into six countries in southern Africa (mean (± SE) minimum convex polygon area =269,103±197,187 km(2)) and three of the vultures travelled more than 900 km from the capture site. All six vultures spent the majority of their tracking periods outside protected areas. South African protected areas were very rarely visited whereas protected areas in northern Botswana and Zimbabwe were used more frequently. Two of the vultures visited supplementary feeding sites regularly, with consequent reduced ranging behaviour, suggesting that individuals could alter their foraging behaviour in response to such sites. We show that immature African white-backed vultures are capable of travelling throughout southern Africa, yet use protected areas to only a limited extent, making them susceptible to the full range of threats in the region. The standard approach of designating protected areas to conserve species is unlikely to ensure the protection of such wide-ranging species against threats in the wider landscape.

  16. Foraging Ranges of Immature African White-Backed Vultures (Gyps africanus) and Their Use of Protected Areas in Southern Africa

    PubMed Central

    Phipps, W. Louis; Willis, Stephen G.; Wolter, Kerri; Naidoo, Vinny

    2013-01-01

    Vultures in the Gyps genus are declining globally. Multiple threats related to human activity have caused widespread declines of vulture populations in Africa, especially outside protected areas. Addressing such threats requires the estimation of foraging ranges yet such estimates are lacking, even for widespread (but declining) species such as the African white-backed vulture (Gyps africanus). We tracked six immature African white-backed vultures in South Africa using GPS-GSM units to study their movement patterns, their use of protected areas and the time they spent in the vicinity of supplementary feeding sites. All individuals foraged widely; their combined foraging ranges extended into six countries in southern Africa (mean (± SE) minimum convex polygon area  = 269,103±197,187 km2) and three of the vultures travelled more than 900 km from the capture site. All six vultures spent the majority of their tracking periods outside protected areas. South African protected areas were very rarely visited whereas protected areas in northern Botswana and Zimbabwe were used more frequently. Two of the vultures visited supplementary feeding sites regularly, with consequent reduced ranging behaviour, suggesting that individuals could alter their foraging behaviour in response to such sites. We show that immature African white-backed vultures are capable of travelling throughout southern Africa, yet use protected areas to only a limited extent, making them susceptible to the full range of threats in the region. The standard approach of designating protected areas to conserve species is unlikely to ensure the protection of such wide-ranging species against threats in the wider landscape. PMID:23382824

  17. Foraging ranges of immature African white-backed vultures (Gyps africanus) and their use of protected areas in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Phipps, W Louis; Willis, Stephen G; Wolter, Kerri; Naidoo, Vinny

    2013-01-01

    Vultures in the Gyps genus are declining globally. Multiple threats related to human activity have caused widespread declines of vulture populations in Africa, especially outside protected areas. Addressing such threats requires the estimation of foraging ranges yet such estimates are lacking, even for widespread (but declining) species such as the African white-backed vulture (Gyps africanus). We tracked six immature African white-backed vultures in South Africa using GPS-GSM units to study their movement patterns, their use of protected areas and the time they spent in the vicinity of supplementary feeding sites. All individuals foraged widely; their combined foraging ranges extended into six countries in southern Africa (mean (± SE) minimum convex polygon area =269,103±197,187 km(2)) and three of the vultures travelled more than 900 km from the capture site. All six vultures spent the majority of their tracking periods outside protected areas. South African protected areas were very rarely visited whereas protected areas in northern Botswana and Zimbabwe were used more frequently. Two of the vultures visited supplementary feeding sites regularly, with consequent reduced ranging behaviour, suggesting that individuals could alter their foraging behaviour in response to such sites. We show that immature African white-backed vultures are capable of travelling throughout southern Africa, yet use protected areas to only a limited extent, making them susceptible to the full range of threats in the region. The standard approach of designating protected areas to conserve species is unlikely to ensure the protection of such wide-ranging species against threats in the wider landscape. PMID:23382824

  18. Roles of the species-specific subdomain and the N-terminal peptide of Toxoplasma gondii ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase in ferredoxin binding.

    PubMed

    Pandini, Vittorio; Caprini, Gianluca; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Seeber, Frank; Zanetti, Giuliana; Aliverti, Alessandro

    2006-03-21

    The plant-type ferredoxin/ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (Fd/FNR) redox system found in parasites of the phylum Apicomplexa has been proposed as a target for novel drugs used against life-threatening diseases such as malaria and toxoplasmosis. Like many proteins from these protists, apicomplexan FNRs are characterized by the presence of unique peptide insertions of variable length and yet unknown function. Since three-dimensional data are not available for any of the parasite FNRs, we used limited proteolysis to carry out an extensive study of the conformation of Toxoplasma gondii FNR. This led to identification of 11 peptide bonds susceptible to the action of four different proteases. Cleavage sites are clustered in four regions of the enzyme, which include two of its three species-specific insertions. Such regions are thus predicted to form flexible surface loops. The protein substrate Fd protected FNR against cleavage both at its N-terminal peptide and at its largest sequence insertion (28 residues). Deletion by protein engineering of the species-specific subdomain containing the latter insertion resulted in an enzyme form that, although catalytically active, displayed a 10-fold decreased affinity for Fd. In contrast, removal of the first 15 residues of the enzyme unexpectedly enhanced its interaction with Fd. Thus, two flexible polypeptide regions of T. gondii FNR are involved in Fd interaction but have opposite roles in modulating the binding affinity for the protein ligand. In this respect, T. gondii FNR differs from plant FNRs, where the N-terminal peptide contributes to the stabilization of their complex with Fd.

  19. Photosynthetic electron partitioning between [FeFe]-hydrogenase and ferredoxin:NADP+-oxidoreductase (FNR) enzymes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yacoby, Iftach; Pochekailov, Sergii; Toporik, Hila; Ghirardi, Maria L; King, Paul W; Zhang, Shuguang

    2011-06-01

    Photosynthetic water splitting, coupled to hydrogenase-catalyzed hydrogen production, is considered a promising clean, renewable source of energy. It is widely accepted that the oxygen sensitivity of hydrogen production, combined with competition between hydrogenases and NADPH-dependent carbon dioxide fixation are the main limitations for its commercialization. Here we provide evidence that, under the anaerobic conditions that support hydrogen production, there is a significant loss of photosynthetic electrons toward NADPH production in vitro. To elucidate the basis for competition, we bioengineered a ferredoxin-hydrogenase fusion and characterized hydrogen production kinetics in the presence of Fd, ferredoxin:NADP(+)-oxidoreductase (FNR), and NADP(+). Replacing the hydrogenase with a ferredoxin-hydrogenase fusion switched the bias of electron transfer from FNR to hydrogenase and resulted in an increased rate of hydrogen photoproduction. These results suggest a new direction for improvement of biohydrogen production and a means to further resolve the mechanisms that control partitioning of photosynthetic electron transport.

  20. Photosynthetic electron partitioning between [FeFe]-hydrogenase and ferredoxin:NADP+-oxidoreductase (FNR) enzymes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yacoby, Iftach; Pochekailov, Sergii; Toporik, Hila; Ghirardi, Maria L; King, Paul W; Zhang, Shuguang

    2011-06-01

    Photosynthetic water splitting, coupled to hydrogenase-catalyzed hydrogen production, is considered a promising clean, renewable source of energy. It is widely accepted that the oxygen sensitivity of hydrogen production, combined with competition between hydrogenases and NADPH-dependent carbon dioxide fixation are the main limitations for its commercialization. Here we provide evidence that, under the anaerobic conditions that support hydrogen production, there is a significant loss of photosynthetic electrons toward NADPH production in vitro. To elucidate the basis for competition, we bioengineered a ferredoxin-hydrogenase fusion and characterized hydrogen production kinetics in the presence of Fd, ferredoxin:NADP(+)-oxidoreductase (FNR), and NADP(+). Replacing the hydrogenase with a ferredoxin-hydrogenase fusion switched the bias of electron transfer from FNR to hydrogenase and resulted in an increased rate of hydrogen photoproduction. These results suggest a new direction for improvement of biohydrogen production and a means to further resolve the mechanisms that control partitioning of photosynthetic electron transport. PMID:21606330

  1. Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 nifJ mutant lacking pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    McNeely, Kelsey; Xu, Yu; Ananyev, Gennady; Bennette, Nicholas; Bryant, Donald A; Dismukes, G Charles

    2011-04-01

    The nifJ gene codes for pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR), which reduces ferredoxin during fermentative catabolism of pyruvate to acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA). A nifJ knockout mutant was constructed that lacks one of two pathways for the oxidation of pyruvate in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. Remarkably, the photoautotrophic growth rate of this mutant increased by 20% relative to the wild-type (WT) rate under conditions of light-dark cycling. This result is attributed to an increase in the quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) charge separation as measured by photosynthetic electron turnover efficiency determined using fast-repetition-rate fluorometry (F(v)/F(m)). During autofermentation, the excretion of acetate and lactate products by nifJ mutant cells decreased 2-fold and 1.2-fold, respectively. Although nifJ cells displayed higher in vitro hydrogenase activity than WT cells, H(2) production in vivo was 1.3-fold lower than the WT level. Inhibition of acetate-CoA ligase and pyruvate dehydrogenase complex by glycerol eliminated acetate production, with a resulting loss of reductant and a 3-fold decrease in H(2) production by nifJ cells compared to WT cells. Continuous electrochemical detection of dissolved H(2) revealed two temporally resolved phases of H(2) production during autofermentation, a minor first phase and a major second phase. The first phase was attributed to reduction of ferredoxin, because its level decreased 2-fold in nifJ cells. The second phase was attributed to glycolytic NADH production and decreased 20% in nifJ cells. Measurement of the intracellular NADH/NAD(+) ratio revealed that the reductant generated by PFOR contributing to the first phase of H(2) production was not in equilibrium with bulk NADH/NAD(+) and that the second phase corresponded to the equilibrium NADH-mediated process. PMID:21317262

  2. Analyses of optical absorption and circular dichroism spectra of spinach ferredoxin at alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Hasumi, H

    1982-10-01

    The whole protein structure and the microenvironments of the iron-sulfur cluster and of the side chains of amino acid residues of spinach ferredoxin were studied by optical absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy in the alkaline pH range. From the pH-dependence of the optical absorption changes at 245 nm, the four tyrosyl residues of ferredoxin were classified into three groups: one exposed residue with a normal apparent pK value of 10.1, two exposed residues with abnormal apparent pK values of 12.0, and one buried residue showing time-dependent ionization. The absorption in the visible region disappeared gradually with the ionization of the buried residue rather than that of the three exposed residues. The apparent pK value of 10.0 was obtained from the rapid CD changes at 258 nm caused by pH elevation from neutral to alkaline pH. The structural alteration associated with the CD change had no effect on the secondary structure of the protein moiety other than the iron-sulfur cluster and the microenvironment of the cluster. The rate constants obtained from the time courses of the CD changes in the near-ultraviolet and visible regions were in good agreement with those obtained from the time courses of the optical absorption changes. These results lead to the conclusions that (1) the native ferredoxin structure is maintained through the interaction with the iron-sulfur cluster and (2) the protein structure in the neighborhood of the cluster, important for the physiological activity, is not perturbed even though the exposed tyrosyl residues are ionized.

  3. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of a Ferredoxin:Thioredoxin Reductase-like Enzyme from Methanosarcina acetivorans.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Adepu K; Kumar, R Siva Sai; Yennawar, Neela H; Yennawar, Hemant P; Ferry, James G

    2015-05-19

    Bioinformatics analyses predict the distribution in nature of several classes of diverse disulfide reductases that evolved from an ancestral plant-type ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase (FTR) catalytic subunit to meet a variety of ecological needs. Methanosarcina acetivorans is a methane-producing species from the domain Archaea predicted to encode an FTR-like enzyme with two domains, one resembling the FTR catalytic subunit and the other containing a rubredoxin-like domain replacing the variable subunit of present-day FTR enzymes. M. acetivorans is of special interest as it was recently proposed to have evolved at the time of the end-Permian extinction and to be largely responsible for the most severe biotic crisis in the fossil record by converting acetate to methane. The crystal structure and biochemical characteristics were determined for the FTR-like enzyme from M. acetivorans, here named FDR (ferredoxin disulfide reductase). The results support a role for the rubredoxin-like center of FDR in transfer of electrons from ferredoxin to the active-site [Fe₄S₄] cluster adjacent to a pair of redox-active cysteines participating in reduction of disulfide substrates. A mechanism is proposed for disulfide reduction similar to one of two mechanisms previously proposed for the plant-type FTR. Overall, the results advance the biochemical and evolutionary understanding of the FTR-like family of enzymes and the conversion of acetate to methane that is an essential link in the global carbon cycle and presently accounts for most of this greenhouse gas that is biologically generated. PMID:25915695

  4. Crystal structure of red chlorophyll catabolite reductase: enlargement of the ferredoxin-dependent bilin reductase family.

    PubMed

    Sugishima, Masakazu; Kitamori, Yuka; Noguchi, Masato; Kohchi, Takayuki; Fukuyama, Keiichi

    2009-06-01

    The key steps in the degradation pathway of chlorophylls are the ring-opening reaction catalyzed by pheophorbide a oxygenase and sequential reduction by red chlorophyll catabolite reductase (RCCR). During these steps, chlorophyll catabolites lose their color and phototoxicity. RCCR catalyzes the ferredoxin-dependent reduction of the C20/C1 double bond of red chlorophyll catabolite. RCCR appears to be evolutionarily related to the ferredoxin-dependent bilin reductase (FDBR) family, which synthesizes a variety of phytobilin pigments, on the basis of sequence similarity, ferredoxin dependency, and the common tetrapyrrole skeleton of their substrates. The evidence, however, is not robust; the identity between RCCR and FDBR HY2 from Arabidopsis thaliana is only 15%, and the oligomeric states of these enzymes are different. Here, we report the crystal structure of A. thaliana RCCR at 2.4 A resolution. RCCR forms a homodimer, in which each subunit folds in an alpha/beta/alpha sandwich. The tertiary structure of RCCR is similar to those of FDBRs, strongly supporting that these enzymes evolved from a common ancestor. The two subunits are related by noncrystallographic 2-fold symmetry in which the alpha-helices near the edge of the beta-sheet unique in RCCR participate in intersubunit interaction. The putative RCC-binding site, which was derived by superimposing RCCR onto biliverdin-bound forms of FDBRs, forms an open pocket surrounded by conserved residues among RCCRs. Glu154 and Asp291 of A. thaliana RCCR, which stand opposite each other in the pocket, likely are involved in substrate binding and/or catalysis.

  5. Cloning and sequencing of the ferredoxin gene of blue-green alga Anabaena siamensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shou-Dong; Song, Li-Rong; Liu, Yong-Ding; Zhao, Jin-Dong

    1998-03-01

    The structure gene for ferredoxin, petFI, from Anabaena siamensis has been amplified by polymerase chain reaction(PCR) and cloned into cloning vector pGEM-3zf(+). The nucleotide sequence of petFI has been determined with silver staining sequencing method. There is 96.8% homology between coding region of petFI from A. siamensis and that of petFI from A. sp. 7120. Amino acid sequences of seven strains of blue-green algae are compared.

  6. A STD-NMR study of the interaction of the Anabaena ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase with the coenzyme.

    PubMed

    Antonini, Lara V; Peregrina, José R; Angulo, Jesús; Medina, Milagros; Nieto, Pedro M

    2014-01-07

    Ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase (FNR) catalyzes the electron transfer from ferredoxin to NADP+ via its flavin FAD cofactor. To get further insights in the architecture of the transient complexes produced during the hydride transfer event between the enzyme and the NADP+ coenzyme we have applied NMR spectroscopy using Saturation Transfer Difference (STD) techniques to analyze the interaction between FNRox and the oxidized state of its NADP+ coenzyme. We have found that STD NMR, together with the use of selected mutations on FNR and of the non-FNR reacting coenzyme analogue NAD+, are appropriate tools to provide further information about the the interaction epitope.

  7. Establishment of selected baseline blood chemistry and hematologic parameters in captive and wild-caught African white-backed vultures (Gyps africanus).

    PubMed

    Naidoo, V; Diekmann, M; Wolters, K; Swan, G E

    2008-07-01

    Despite the devastating collapse of three vulture populations on the Asian subcontinent as a result of their exposure to diclofenac, there is little available information on the normal physiology of many vulture species, including the African White-backed Vulture (Gyps africanus). Such information is needed to fully understand mechanisms for toxicity and to identify and prevent future health problems. The aim of this study was to establish baseline parameters for hematologic and selected serum chemistry parameters for this model species for further studies into the toxicity of diclofenac. Captive nonreleasable and wild African White-backed Vultures were used to determine reference values. For hematology, erythrocyte counts, hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, packed cell volume, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, and total and differential leukocyte counts were measured. Chemical analytes measured included sodium, potassium, calcium, albumin, and globulin concentrations, aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, and alanine aminotransferase activities. Uric acid and urea concentrations and the urea:uric acid ratio also were evaluated. Values are presented as means, standard deviations, and reference intervals. The serum chemistry parameters selected may provide a starting point for the evaluation of changes in renal and hepatic function; these organ systems are most severely affected by diclofenac. Results were also compared with values reported for G. africanus nestlings, and from these results it is evident that the clinical pathologic parameters are age related. This indicates that the use of nestling values for the evaluation of clinical pathologic findings in adults may be unreliable and could lead to incorrect assumptions. PMID:18689650

  8. Adrenodoxin: the archetype of vertebrate-type [2Fe-2S] cluster ferredoxins.

    PubMed

    Ewen, Kerstin Maria; Kleser, Michael; Bernhardt, Rita

    2011-01-01

    Adrenodoxin is probably the best characterized member of the vertebrate-type [2Fe-2S]-cluster ferredoxins. It has been in the spotlight of scientific interest for many years due to its essential role in mammalian steroid hormone biosynthesis, where it acts as electron mediator between the NADPH-dependent adrenodoxin reductase and several mitochondrial cytochromes P450. In this review we will focus on the present knowledge about protein-protein recognition in the mitochondrial cytochrome P450 system and the modulation of the electron transfer between Adx and its redox partners, AdR and CYP(s). We also intend to point out the potential biotechnological applications of Adx as a versatile electron donor to different cytochromes P450, both in vitro and in vivo. Finally we will address the comparison between the mammalian cytochrome P450-associated adrenodoxin and ferredoxins involved in iron-sulfur-cluster biosynthesis. Despite their different functions, these proteins display an amazing similarity regarding their primary sequence, tertiary structure and biophysical features.

  9. Mechanostability of the Single-Electron-Transfer Complexes of Anabaena Ferredoxin-NADP(+) Reductase.

    PubMed

    Marcuello, Carlos; de Miguel, Rocío; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Gómez-Moreno, Carlos; Lostao, Anabel

    2015-10-26

    The complexes formed between the flavoenzyme ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (FNR; NADP(+) =nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) and its redox protein partners, ferredoxin (Fd) and flavodoxin (Fld), have been analysed by using dynamic force spectroscopy through AFM. A strategy is developed to immobilise proteins on a substrate and AFM tip to optimise the recognition ability. The differences in the recognition efficiency regarding a random attachment procedure, together with nanomechanical results, show two binding models for these systems. The interaction of the reductase with the natural electron donor, Fd, is threefold stronger and its lifetime is longer and more specific than that with the substitute under iron-deficient conditions, Fld. The higher bond probability and two possible dissociation pathways in Fld binding to FNR are probably due to the nature of this complex, which is closer to a dynamic ensemble model. This is in contrast with the one-step dissociation kinetics that has been observed and a specific interaction described for the FNR:Fd complex.

  10. Coenzyme binding and hydride transfer in Rhodobacter capsulatus ferredoxin/flavodoxin NADP(H) oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Bortolotti, Ana; Pérez-Dorado, Inmaculada; Goñi, Guillermina; Medina, Milagros; Hermoso, Juan A; Carrillo, Néstor; Cortez, Néstor

    2009-02-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductases catalyse the reversible hydride/electron exchange between NADP(H) and ferredoxin/flavodoxin, comprising a structurally defined family of flavoenzymes with two distinct subclasses. Those present in Gram-negative bacteria (FPRs) display turnover numbers of 1-5 s(-1) while the homologues of cyanobacteria and plants (FNRs) developed a 100-fold activity increase. We investigated nucleotide interactions and hydride transfer in Rhodobacter capsulatus FPR comparing them to those reported for FNRs. NADP(H) binding proceeds as in FNRs with stacking of the nicotinamide on the flavin, which resulted in formation of charge-transfer complexes prior to hydride exchange. The affinity of FPR for both NADP(H) and 2'-P-AMP was 100-fold lower than that of FNRs. The crystal structure of FPR in complex with 2'-P-AMP and NADP(+) allowed modelling of the adenosine ring system bound to the protein, whereas the nicotinamide portion was either not visible or protruding toward solvent in different obtained crystals. Stabilising contacts with the active site residues are different in the two reductase classes. We conclude that evolution to higher activities in FNRs was partially favoured by modification of NADP(H) binding in the initial complexes through changes in the active site residues involved in stabilisation of the adenosine portion of the nucleotide and in the mobile C-terminus of FPR.

  11. The transient catalytically competent coenzyme allocation into the active site of Anabaena ferredoxin NADP+ -reductase.

    PubMed

    Peregrina, José Ramón; Lans, Isaías; Medina, Milagros

    2012-01-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (FNR) catalyses the electron transfer from ferredoxin to NADP(+) via its flavin FAD cofactor. A molecular dynamics theoretical approach is applied here to visualise the transient catalytically competent interaction of Anabaena FNR with its coenzyme, NADP(+). The particular role of some of the residues identified as key in binding and accommodating the 2'P-AMP moiety of the coenzyme is confirmed in molecular terms. Simulations also indicate that the architecture of the active site precisely contributes to the orientation of the N5 of the FAD isoalloxazine ring and the C4 of the coenzyme nicotinamide ring in the conformation of the catalytically competent hydride transfer complex and, therefore, contributes to the efficiency of the process. In particular, the side chain of the C-terminal Y303 in Anabaena FNR appears key to providing the optimum geometry by reducing the stacking probability between the isoalloxazine and nicotinamide rings, thus providing the required co-linearity and distance among the N5 of the flavin cofactor, the C4 of the coenzyme nicotinamide and the hydride that has to be transferred between them. All these factors are highly related to the reaction efficiency, mechanism and reversibility of the process.

  12. Pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance experiments identify the paramagnetic intermediates in the pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase catalytic cycle.

    PubMed

    Astashkin, Andrei V; Seravalli, Javier; Mansoorabadi, Steven O; Reed, George H; Ragsdale, Stephen W

    2006-03-29

    Pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) is central to the anaerobic metabolism of many bacteria and amitochondriate eukaryotes. PFOR contains thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) and three [4Fe-4S] clusters, which link pyruvate oxidation to reduction of ferredoxin. In the PFOR reaction, TPP reacts with pyruvate to form lactyl-TPP, which undergoes decarboxylation to form a hydroxyethyl-TPP (HE-TPP) intermediate. One electron is then transferred from HE-TPP to one of the three [4Fe-4S] clusters to form an HE-TPP radical and a [4Fe-4S]1+ intermediate. Pulsed EPR methods have been used to measure the distance between the HE-TPP radical and the [4Fe-4S]1+ cluster to which it is coupled. Computational analysis including the PFOR crystal structure and the spin distribution in the HE-TPP radical and in the reduced [4Fe-4S] cluster demonstrates that the distance between the HE-TPP radical and the medial cluster B matches the experimentally determined dipolar interaction, while one of the other two clusters is too close and the other is too far away. These results clearly demonstrate that it is the medial cluster (cluster B) that is reduced. Thus, rapid electron transfer occurs through the electron-transfer chain, which leaves an oxidized proximal cluster poised to accept an electron from the HE-TPP radical in the subsequent reaction step. PMID:16551078

  13. Homology modeling and in silico site directed mutagenesis of pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase from Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Saranyah, Kannuchamy; Kalva, Sukesh; Mukund, Nisha; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar; Saleena, Lilly M

    2015-01-01

    Pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase is the crucial enzyme that involves in bioethanol synthesis pathway of Clostridium thermocellum. It is an ethanologenic organism but has been investigated less on its enzyme structure. The amino acid sequence of Pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase was derived from UNIPROT and the screened crystal structure was taken as the template for homology modeling using MODELLER 9V11. The model was loop refined and was validated using RMSD, ProSA and PROCHECK. The docking and per residue interaction studies were carried out to elucidate the interaction energies of amino acid residues with pyruvate. To enhance the binding of pyruvate with the enzyme, mutation studies were carried out by replacing Thr31 as it had a less interaction energy. Out of 10 mutants, T31N, T31Q and T31G were selected using potential energy and the residual energy calculations. Five nanoseconds explicit MD simulations were run for apo, wild type and mutants T31N, T31Q and T31G using Desmond. RMSD, RMSF, distance plots and H-bonds analysis proved T31G to be a favorable mutant for binding of pyruvate. Thus, modeling PFOR would help in profound understanding of its structural clefts and mutation studies would aid in improving the enzyme efficiency. PMID:26369404

  14. Ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase (FTR) links the regulation of oxygenic photosynthesis to deeply rooted bacteria.

    PubMed

    Balsera, Monica; Uberegui, Estefania; Susanti, Dwi; Schmitz, Ruth A; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Schürmann, Peter; Buchanan, Bob B

    2013-02-01

    Uncovered in studies on photosynthesis 35 years ago, redox regulation has been extended to all types of living cells. We understand a great deal about the occurrence, function, and mechanism of action of this mode of regulation, but we know little about its origin and its evolution. To help fill this gap, we have taken advantage of available genome sequences that make it possible to trace the phylogenetic roots of members of the system that was originally described for chloroplasts-ferredoxin, ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase (FTR), and thioredoxin as well as target enzymes. The results suggest that: (1) the catalytic subunit, FTRc, originated in deeply rooted microaerophilic, chemoautotrophic bacteria where it appears to function in regulating CO(2) fixation by the reverse citric acid cycle; (2) FTRc was incorporated into oxygenic photosynthetic organisms without significant structural change except for addition of a variable subunit (FTRv) seemingly to protect the Fe-S cluster against oxygen; (3) new Trxs and target enzymes were systematically added as evolution proceeded from bacteria through the different types of oxygenic photosynthetic organisms; (4) an oxygenic type of regulation preceded classical light-dark regulation in the regulation of enzymes of CO(2) fixation by the Calvin-Benson cycle; (5) FTR is not universally present in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms, and in certain early representatives is seemingly functionally replaced by NADP-thioredoxin reductase; and (6) FTRc underwent structural diversification to meet the ecological needs of a variety of bacteria and archaea.

  15. Hydrogenase/ferredoxin charge-transfer complexes: effect of hydrogenase mutations on the complex association.

    PubMed

    Long, Hai; King, Paul W; Ghirardi, Maria L; Kim, Kwiseon

    2009-04-23

    The [FeFe]-hydrogenases in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii utilize photogenerated electrons to reduce protons into hydrogen gas. The electrons are supplied from photosystem I and transferred to the [FeFe]-hydrogenase through specific hydrogenase-ferredoxin association. To understand how structural and kinetic factors control the association better, we used Brownian dynamics simulation methods to simulate the charge-transfer complex formation between both native and in silico mutants of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase HYDA2 and the [2Fe2S]-ferredoxin FDX1 from C. reinhardtii . The changes in binding free energy between different HYDA2 mutants and the native FDX1 were calculated by the free-energy perturbation method. Within the limits of our current models, we found that two HYDA2 mutations, T99K(H) and D102K(H), led to lower binding free energies and higher association rate with FDX1 and are thus promising targets for improving hydrogen production rates in engineered organisms. PMID:19317477

  16. Indications of radiation damage in ferredoxin microcrystals using high-intensity X-FEL beams.

    PubMed

    Nass, Karol; Foucar, Lutz; Barends, Thomas R M; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Botha, Sabine; Shoeman, Robert L; Doak, R Bruce; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Aquila, Andrew; Bajt, Saša; Barty, Anton; Bean, Richard; Beyerlein, Kenneth R; Bublitz, Maike; Drachmann, Nikolaj; Gregersen, Jonas; Jönsson, H Olof; Kabsch, Wolfgang; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Koglin, Jason E; Krumrey, Michael; Mattle, Daniel; Messerschmidt, Marc; Nissen, Poul; Reinhard, Linda; Sitsel, Oleg; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Williams, Garth J; Hau-Riege, Stefan; Timneanu, Nicusor; Caleman, Carl; Chapman, Henry N; Boutet, Sébastien; Schlichting, Ilme

    2015-03-01

    Proteins that contain metal cofactors are expected to be highly radiation sensitive since the degree of X-ray absorption correlates with the presence of high-atomic-number elements and X-ray energy. To explore the effects of local damage in serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX), Clostridium ferredoxin was used as a model system. The protein contains two [4Fe-4S] clusters that serve as sensitive probes for radiation-induced electronic and structural changes. High-dose room-temperature SFX datasets were collected at the Linac Coherent Light Source of ferredoxin microcrystals. Difference electron density maps calculated from high-dose SFX and synchrotron data show peaks at the iron positions of the clusters, indicative of decrease of atomic scattering factors due to ionization. The electron density of the two [4Fe-4S] clusters differs in the FEL data, but not in the synchrotron data. Since the clusters differ in their detailed architecture, this observation is suggestive of an influence of the molecular bonding and geometry on the atomic displacement dynamics following initial photoionization. The experiments are complemented by plasma code calculations.

  17. Indications of radiation damage in ferredoxin microcrystals using high-intensity X-FEL beams.

    PubMed

    Nass, Karol; Foucar, Lutz; Barends, Thomas R M; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Botha, Sabine; Shoeman, Robert L; Doak, R Bruce; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Aquila, Andrew; Bajt, Saša; Barty, Anton; Bean, Richard; Beyerlein, Kenneth R; Bublitz, Maike; Drachmann, Nikolaj; Gregersen, Jonas; Jönsson, H Olof; Kabsch, Wolfgang; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Koglin, Jason E; Krumrey, Michael; Mattle, Daniel; Messerschmidt, Marc; Nissen, Poul; Reinhard, Linda; Sitsel, Oleg; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Williams, Garth J; Hau-Riege, Stefan; Timneanu, Nicusor; Caleman, Carl; Chapman, Henry N; Boutet, Sébastien; Schlichting, Ilme

    2015-03-01

    Proteins that contain metal cofactors are expected to be highly radiation sensitive since the degree of X-ray absorption correlates with the presence of high-atomic-number elements and X-ray energy. To explore the effects of local damage in serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX), Clostridium ferredoxin was used as a model system. The protein contains two [4Fe-4S] clusters that serve as sensitive probes for radiation-induced electronic and structural changes. High-dose room-temperature SFX datasets were collected at the Linac Coherent Light Source of ferredoxin microcrystals. Difference electron density maps calculated from high-dose SFX and synchrotron data show peaks at the iron positions of the clusters, indicative of decrease of atomic scattering factors due to ionization. The electron density of the two [4Fe-4S] clusters differs in the FEL data, but not in the synchrotron data. Since the clusters differ in their detailed architecture, this observation is suggestive of an influence of the molecular bonding and geometry on the atomic displacement dynamics following initial photoionization. The experiments are complemented by plasma code calculations. PMID:25723924

  18. The Bifunctional Pyruvate Decarboxylase/Pyruvate Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase from Thermococcus guaymasensis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus guaymasensis produces ethanol as a metabolic end product, and an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) catalyzing the reduction of acetaldehyde to ethanol has been purified and characterized. However, the enzyme catalyzing the formation of acetaldehyde has not been identified. In this study an enzyme catalyzing the production of acetaldehyde from pyruvate was purified and characterized from T. guaymasensis under strictly anaerobic conditions. The enzyme had both pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) and pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR) activities. It was oxygen sensitive, and the optimal temperatures were 85°C and >95°C for the PDC and POR activities, respectively. The purified enzyme had activities of 3.8 ± 0.22 U mg−1 and 20.2 ± 1.8 U mg−1, with optimal pH-values of 9.5 and 8.4 for each activity, respectively. Coenzyme A was essential for both activities, although it did not serve as a substrate for the former. Enzyme kinetic parameters were determined separately for each activity. The purified enzyme was a heterotetramer. The sequences of the genes encoding the subunits of the bifunctional PDC/POR were determined. It is predicted that all hyperthermophilic β-keto acids ferredoxin oxidoreductases are bifunctional, catalyzing the activities of nonoxidative and oxidative decarboxylation of the corresponding β-keto acids. PMID:24982594

  19. Spectroscopic investigation of selective cluster conversion of archaeal zinc-containing ferredoxin from Sulfolobus sp. strain 7.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, T; Watanabe, E; Ohmori, D; Imai, T; Urushiyama, A; Akiyama, M; Hayashi-Iwasaki, Y; Cosper, N J; Scott, R A

    2000-08-18

    Archaeal zinc-containing ferredoxin from Sulfolobus sp. strain 7 contains one [3Fe-4S] cluster (cluster I), one [4Fe-4S] cluster (cluster II), and one isolated zinc center. Oxidative degradation of this ferredoxin led to the formation of a stable intermediate with 1 zinc and approximately 6 iron atoms. The metal centers of this intermediate were analyzed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), low temperature resonance Raman, x-ray absorption, and (1)H NMR spectroscopies. The spectroscopic data suggest that (i) cluster II was selectively converted to a cubane [3Fe-4S](1+) cluster in the intermediate, without forming a stable radical species, and that (ii) the local metric environments of cluster I and the isolated zinc site did not change significantly in the intermediate. It is concluded that the initial step of oxidative degradation of the archaeal zinc-containing ferredoxin is selective conversion of cluster II, generating a novel intermediate containing two [3Fe-4S] clusters and an isolated zinc center. At this stage, significant structural rearrangement of the protein does not occur. We propose a new scheme for oxidative degradation of dicluster ferredoxins in which each cluster converts in a stepwise manner, prior to apoprotein formation, and discuss its structural and evolutionary implications.

  20. Identification and cloning of two immunogenic Clostridium perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase of C. perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium-related poultry diseases such as necrotic enteritis (NE) and gangrenous dermatitis (GD) cause substantial economic losses on a global scale. Two antigenic Clostridium perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO), were identified by react...

  1. Insights into Flavin-based Electron Bifurcation via the NADH-dependent Reduced Ferredoxin:NADP Oxidoreductase Structure*

    PubMed Central

    Demmer, Julius K.; Huang, Haiyan; Wang, Shuning; Demmer, Ulrike; Thauer, Rudolf K.; Ermler, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    NADH-dependent reduced ferredoxin:NADP oxidoreductase (NfnAB) is found in the cytoplasm of various anaerobic bacteria and archaea. The enzyme reversibly catalyzes the endergonic reduction of ferredoxin with NADPH driven by the exergonic transhydrogenation from NADPH onto NAD+. Coupling is most probably accomplished via the mechanism of flavin-based electron bifurcation. To understand this process on a structural basis, we heterologously produced the NfnAB complex of Thermotoga maritima in Escherichia coli, provided kinetic evidence for its bifurcating behavior, and determined its x-ray structure in the absence and presence of NADH. The structure of NfnAB reveals an electron transfer route including the FAD (a-FAD), the [2Fe-2S] cluster of NfnA and the FAD (b-FAD), and the two [4Fe-4S] clusters of NfnB. Ferredoxin is presumably docked onto NfnB close to the [4Fe-4S] cluster distal to b-FAD. NAD(H) binds to a-FAD and NADP(H) consequently to b-FAD, which is positioned in the center of the NfnAB complex and the site of electron bifurcation. Arg187 is hydrogen-bonded to N5 and O4 of the bifurcating b-FAD and might play a key role in adjusting a low redox potential of the FADH•/FAD pair required for ferredoxin reduction. A mechanism of FAD-coupled electron bifurcation by NfnAB is proposed. PMID:26139605

  2. Pre-steady-state kinetic studies of redox reactions catalysed by Bacillus subtilis ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase with NADP(+)/NADPH and ferredoxin.

    PubMed

    Seo, Daisuke; Soeta, Takahiro; Sakurai, Hidehiro; Sétif, Pierre; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase ([EC1.18.1.2], FNR) from Bacillus subtilis (BsFNR) is a homodimeric flavoprotein sharing structural homology with bacterial NADPH-thioredoxin reductase. Pre-steady-state kinetics of the reactions of BsFNR with NADP(+), NADPH, NADPD (deuterated form) and B. subtilis ferredoxin (BsFd) using stopped-flow spectrophotometry were studied. Mixing BsFNR with NADP(+) and NADPH yielded two types of charge-transfer (CT) complexes, oxidized FNR (FNR(ox))-NADPH and reduced FNR (FNR(red))-NADP(+), both having CT absorption bands centered at approximately 600n m. After mixing BsFNR(ox) with about a 10-fold molar excess of NADPH (forward reaction), BsFNR was almost completely reduced at equilibrium. When BsFNR(red) was mixed with NADP(+), the amount of BsFNR(ox) increased with increasing NADP(+) concentration, but BsFNR(red) remained as the major species at equilibrium even with about 50-fold molar excess NADP(+). In both directions, the hydride-transfer was the rate-determining step, where the forward direction rate constant (~500 s(-1)) was much higher than the reverse one (<10 s(-1)). Mixing BsFd(red) with BsFNR(ox) induced rapid formation of a neutral semiquinone form. This process was almost completed within 1 ms. Subsequently the neutral semiquinone form was reduced to the hydroquinone form with an apparent rate constant of 50 to 70 s(-1) at 10°C, which increased as BsFd(red) increased from 40 to 120 μM. The reduction rate of BsFNR(ox) by BsFd(red) was markedly decreased by premixing BsFNR(ox) with BsFd(ox), indicating that the dissociation of BsFd(ox) from BsFNR(sq) is rate-limiting in the reaction. The characteristics of the BsFNR reactions with NADP(+)/NADPH were compared with those of other types of FNRs.

  3. Ferredoxin 1b (Fdx1b) Is the Essential Mitochondrial Redox Partner for Cortisol Biosynthesis in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Aliesha; Parajes, Silvia; Weger, Meltem; Zaucker, Andreas; Taylor, Angela E; O'Neil, Donna M; Müller, Ferenc; Krone, Nils

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes rely on electron transfer from the redox partner ferredoxin 1 (FDX1) for catalytic activity. Key steps in steroidogenesis require mitochondrial CYP enzymes and FDX1. Over 30 ferredoxin mutations have been explored in vitro; however, no spontaneously occurring mutations have been identified in humans leaving the impact of FDX1 on steroidogenesis in the whole organism largely unknown. Zebrafish are an important model to study human steroidogenesis, because they have similar steroid products and endocrine tissues. This study aimed to characterize the influence of ferredoxin on steroidogenic capacity in vivo by using zebrafish. Zebrafish have duplicate ferredoxin paralogs: fdx1 and fdx1b. Although fdx1 was observed throughout development and in most tissues, fdx1b was expressed after development of the zebrafish interrenal gland (counterpart to the mammalian adrenal gland). Additionally, fdx1b was restricted to adult steroidogenic tissues, such as the interrenal, gonads, and brain, suggesting that fdx1b was interacting with steroidogenic CYP enzymes. By using transcription activator-like effector nucleases, we generated fdx1b mutant zebrafish lines. Larvae with genetic disruption of fdx1b were morphologically inconspicuous. However, steroid hormone analysis by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry revealed fdx1b mutants failed to synthesize glucocorticoids. Additionally, these mutants had an up-regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-interrenal axis and showed altered dark-light adaptation, suggesting impaired cortisol signaling. Antisense morpholino knockdown confirmed Fdx1b is required for de novo cortisol biosynthesis. In summary, by using zebrafish, we generated a ferredoxin knockout model system, which demonstrates for the first time the impact of mitochondrial redox regulation on glucocorticoid biosynthesis in vivo.

  4. The Ferredoxin ThnA3 Negatively Regulates Tetralin Biodegradation Gene Expression via ThnY, a Ferredoxin Reductase That Functions as a Regulator of the Catabolic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ledesma-García, Laura; Reyes-Ramírez, Francisca; Santero, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The genes for tetralin (thn) utilization in Sphingomonasmacrogolitabida strain TFA are regulated at the transcriptional level by ThnR, ThnY and ThnA3. ThnR, a LysR-type transcriptional activator activates transcription specifically in response to tetralin, and ThnY is an iron-sulfur flavoprotein that may activate ThnR by protein-protein interaction. ThnA3, a Rieske-type ferredoxin that transfers electrons to the tetralin dioxygenase, prevents transcription of thn genes when the inducer molecule of the pathway is a poor substrate for the dioxygenase. The mechanism by which ThnA3 transduces this signal to the regulatory system is a major question concerning thn gene regulation. Here, we have confirmed the discriminatory function of ThnA3 and the negative role of its reduced form. We have generated ThnY variants with amino acid exchanges in the [2Fe-2S], FAD and NAD(P) H binding domains and their regulatory properties have been analyzed. Two variants, ThnY-C40S and ThnY-N201G,S206P have completely lost the discriminatory function of the regulatory system because they induced thn gene expression with different molecules such us cis-decalin, cyclohexane, trans-decalin, or benzene, which are not real inducers of the pathway. These results support a model in which ThnA3 exerts its negative modulation via the regulator ThnY. PMID:24069247

  5. Occurrence of ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity and its ion specificity in several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Verena; Gallegos, Rene; Jones, J Andrew; Barquera, Blanca; Malamy, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    A ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase was recently discovered as a redox-driven ion pump in the anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii. The enzyme is assumed to be encoded by the rnf genes. Since these genes are present in the genomes of many bacteria, we tested for ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity in cytoplasmic membranes from several different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that have annotated rnf genes. We found this activity in Clostridium tetanomorphum, Clostridium ljungdahlii, Bacteroides fragilis, and Vibrio cholerae but not in Escherichia coli and Rhodobacter capsulatus. As in A. woodii, the activity was Na+-dependent in C. tetanomorphum and B. fragilis but Na+-independent in C. ljungdahlii and V. cholerae. We deleted the rnf genes from B. fragilis and demonstrated that the mutant has greatly reduced ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity. This is the first genetic proof that the rnf genes indeed encode the reduced ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity. PMID:26793417

  6. A convenient ligand exchange pathway to [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin analogues.

    PubMed

    Ballmann, Joachim; Sun, Xianru; Dechert, Sebastian; Schneider, Benjamin; Meyer, Franc

    2009-07-01

    The benzanellated analogues (NEt(4))(2)[Fe(2)S(2)(indolate)(4)] (2) and (NEt(4))(2)[Fe(2)S(2)(carbazolate)(4)] (3) of the previously reported parent (NEt(4))(2)[Fe(2)S(2)(pyrrolate)(4)] cluster (1) were synthesized and characterized spectroscopically. In contrast to 1 and 3, compound 2 can be applied as a versatile precursor in ligand exchange reactions with various thiophenols affording the thiophenolate-coordinate [2Fe-2S] clusters. Heteroaromatic thiols and chelating biphenols are suitable substrates in this conversion as well, providing a convenient access to a variety of new [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin analogues and related complexes. Several new S- and O-coordinate [2Fe-2S] clusters have been prepared and fully characterized, including five X-ray crystal structures. PMID:19662283

  7. Tetrahedral iron in the active center of plant ferredoxins and beef adrenodoxin.

    PubMed

    Eaton, W A; Palmer, G; Fee, J A; Kimura, T; Lovenberg, W

    1971-12-01

    The coordination structure of the iron-sulfur complex in spinach ferredoxin and adrenodoxin is investigated by optical spectroscopy. The circular-dichroism and absorption spectra of these two-iron iron-sulfur proteins reveal weak electronic transitions in the near-infrared wavelength range, 0.8-2.5 mum (12,500-4000 cm(-1)). On the basis of the low absorption intensities and large anisotropy factors, d --> d transitions of the iron can be identified in the reduced proteins at about 4000 cm(-1) and 6000 cm(-1). The low energy of these one-center ligand-field transitions, together with the similarity to the ligand-field spectrum of the one-iron protein rubredoxin, leads to the conclusion that the reduced two-iron iron-sulfur proteins also contain a high-spin ferrous ion in a distorted tetrahedral site.

  8. Identification of aldolase and ferredoxin reductase within the dbt operon of Burkholderia fungorum DBT1.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Stefano; Andreolli, Marco; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Zordan, Fabio; Lampis, Silvia; Vallini, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    Burkholderia fungorum DBT1, first isolated from settling particulate matter of an oil refinery wastewater, is a bacterial strain which has been shown capable of utilizing several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) including dibenzothiophene (DBT). In particular, this microbe is able to efficiently degrade DBT through the Kodama pathway. Previous investigations have lead to the identification of six genes, on a total of eight, required for DBT degradation. In the present study, a combined experimental/computational approach was adopted to identify and in silico characterize the two missing genes, namely a ferredoxin reductase and a hydratase-aldolase. Thus, the finding of all enzymatic components of the Kodama pathway in B. fungorum DBT1 makes this bacterial strain amenable for possible exploitation in soil bioremediation protocols.

  9. Identification of weak points prone for mutation in ferredoxin of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Wiwanitkit, V

    2008-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis, the causative agent for human trichomoniasis, is a problematic sexually transmitted disease mainly in women. At present, metronidazole-resistant trichomoniasis is an infrequent but challenging problem with no universally successful treatment. Genetic mutation is believed to be an important factor leading to increasing drug resistance. Understanding the mutation status will help to design accurate strategies of therapy against mutant strains of T. vaginalis. The author performed a bioinformatic analysis to determine positions that tend to comply peptide motifs in the amino acid sequence of ferredoxin of T. vaginalis. Based on this study, the weak linkages in the studied protein can be identified and can be useful information for prediction of possible new mutations that can lead to drug resistance. In addition, the results from this study can be good information for further research on the diagnosis for mutants and new effective drug development. PMID:18445954

  10. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Trichomonas vaginalis Ferredoxin Show a Loop-Cap Transition

    PubMed Central

    Weksberg, Tiffany E.; Lynch, Gillian C.; Krause, Kurt L.; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structure of the oxidized Trichomonas vaginalis ferredoxin (Tvfd) showed a unique crevice that exposed the redox center. Here we have examined the dynamics and solvation of the active site of Tvfd using molecular dynamics simulations of both the reduced and oxidized states. The oxidized simulation stays true to the crystal form with a heavy atom root mean-squared deviation of 2 Å. However, within the reduced simulation of Tvfd a profound loop-cap transition into the redox center occurred within 6-ns of the start of the simulation and remained open throughout the rest of the 20-ns simulation. This large opening seen in the simulations supports the hypothesis that the exceptionally fast electron transfer rate between Tvfd and the drug metronidazole is due to the increased access of the antibiotic to the redox center of the protein and not due to the reduction potential. PMID:17325017

  11. Structural Insight into the Complex of Ferredoxin and [FeFe] Hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Rumpel, Sigrun; Siebel, Judith F; Diallo, Mamou; Farès, Christophe; Reijerse, Edward J; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2015-07-27

    The transfer of photosynthetic electrons by the ferredoxin PetF to the [FeFe] hydrogenase HydA1 in the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a key step in hydrogen production. Electron delivery requires a specific interaction between PetF and HydA1. However, because of the transient nature of the electron-transfer complex, a crystal structure remains elusive. Therefore, we performed protein-protein docking based on new experimental data from a solution NMR spectroscopy investigation of native and gallium-substituted PetF. This provides valuable information about residues crucial for complex formation and electron transfer. The derived complex model might help to pinpoint residue substitution targets for improved hydrogen production. PMID:26010059

  12. Solvent Tuning of Electrochemical Potentials in the Active Sites of HiPIP Versus Ferredoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, A.; Francis, E.J.; Adams, M.W.W.; Babini, E.; Takahashi, Y.; Fukuyama, K.; Hodgson, K.O.; Hedman, B.; Solomon, E.I.; /Stanford U., Chem. Dept. /Georgia U. /Bologna U. /Osaka U. /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-04-29

    A persistent puzzle in the field of biological electron transfer is the conserved iron-sulfur cluster motif in both high potential iron-sulfur protein (HiPIP) and ferredoxin (Fd) active sites. Despite this structural similarity, HiPIPs react oxidatively at physiological potentials, whereas Fds are reduced. Sulfur K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy uncovers the substantial influence of hydration on this variation in reactivity. Fe-S covalency is much lower in natively hydrated Fd active sites than in HiPIPs but increases upon water removal; similarly, HiPIP covalency decreases when unfolding exposes an otherwise hydrophobically shielded active site to water. Studies on model compounds and accompanying density functional theory calculations support a correlation of Fe-S covalency with ease of oxidation and therefore suggest that hydration accounts for most of the difference between Fd and HiPIP reduction potentials.

  13. Immobilized chloroplast-ferredoxin-hydrogenase system for the simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Greenbaum, E.

    1983-01-01

    The chloroplast-ferredoxin-hydrogenase (CFH) system is capable of the simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen using water as the source of electrons. The immobilization of chloroplasts and hydrogenase, which has been the subject of several reports, has been attempted in order to increase their storage and functional stability. However, immobilized chloroplasts and hydrogenase have never been shown to produce hydrogen and oxygen simultaneously. The simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen is a valuable guide in assessing the role of water as the primary substrate in biophotolysis. As has been shown previously, the stoichiometric ratio of hydrogen to oxygen is, in general, not equal to two. By measuring the oxygen that is produced along with the hydrogen, it is possible to set an upper limit on the photoproduced hydrogen that is derived from water. The study reported here describes for the first time the simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen by the CFH system immobilized in calcium alginate gel spheres.

  14. Position des lignes temporales sur le cranium de «Mrs » Ples (A.africanus) : une attribution sexuelle est-elle possible ?Possible position of the temporal lines on the cranium of 'Mrs' Ples (A. africanus): is sexual determination possible?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prat, Sandrine; Thackeray, John Francis

    2001-03-01

    The cranium and associated matrix of Sts 5, a cranium of Australopithecus africanus is re-examined in the context of an unfused sagittal suture and the position of the temporal lines. These lines are not developed as a sagittal crest although they are close to the mid-sagittal line. A comparative study of the presence of sagittal crests in male, female, juvenile and adult specimens of extant great apes ( Gorilla, Pan, Pongo) suggests that the existence of a sagittal crest is influenced to a greater extent by anatomical age rather than by the sex of the individuals.

  15. Cloning, expression, and molecular characterization of the gene encoding an extremely thermostable [4Fe-4S] ferredoxin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed Central

    Heltzel, A; Smith, E T; Zhou, Z H; Blamey, J M; Adams, M W

    1994-01-01

    The gene for ferredoxin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The coding region confirmed the determined amino acid sequence. Putative archaeon-type transcriptional regulatory elements were identified. The fdxA gene appears to be an independent transcriptional unit. Recombinant ferredoxin was indistinguishable from the protein purified from P. furiosus in its thermal stability and in the potentiometric and spectroscopic properties of its [4Fe-4S] cluster. PMID:8045914

  16. Regulation of cyclic photophosphorylation during ferredoxin-mediated electron transport. Effect of DCMU and the NADPH/NADP/sup +/ ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Hosler, J.P.; Yocum, C.F.

    1987-04-01

    Addition of ferredoxin to isolated thylakoid membranes reconstitutes electron transport from water to NADP and to O/sub 2/ (the Mehler reaction). This electron flow is coupled to ATP synthesis, and both cyclic and noncyclic electron transport drive photophosphorylation. Under conditions where the NADPH/NADP/sup +/ ratio is varied, as is the amount of ATP synthesis due to cyclic activity is also varied, as is the amount of cyclic activity which is sensitive to antimycin A. Partial inhibition of photosystem II activity with DCMU (which affects reduction of electron carriers of the interphotosystem chain) also affects the level of cyclic activity. The results of these experiments indicate that two modes of cyclic electron transfer activity, which differ in their antimycin A sensitivity, can operate in the thylakoid membrane. Regulation of these activities can occur at the level of ferredoxin and is governed by the NADPH/NADP ratio.

  17. Uncouplers stimulate photosynthesis in intact chloroplasts by enhancing light-activation of enzymes regulated by the ferredoxin-thioredoxin system.

    PubMed

    Rosa, L; Whatley, F R

    1981-08-01

    Some uncouplers stimulate CO(2)-dependent O(2) evolution by intact spinach chloroplasts at pH 8.6. This effect is not due to alkalinization of the stroma. The stimulation is observed only when photosynthesis has been partly inhibited by the presence of H(2)O(2), generated in a Mehler-type reaction by the broken chloroplasts which always contaminate the intact chloroplast preparations. The addition of methyl viologen increases the Mehler-type reaction and results in greater inhibition of photosynthesis. The addition of excess catalase stimulates photosynthesis by preventing accumulation of H(2)O(2). The uncouplers stimulate photosynthesis primarily by enhancing the light-activation of enzymes that are regulated by the ferredoxin-thioredoxin system, and this effect results from the influence of the uncouplers on the redox poising of the ferredoxin in the intact chloroplasts.

  18. Eukaryotic genomes contain a [2Fez.sbnd;2S] ferredoxin isoform with a conserved C-terminal sequence motif.

    PubMed

    Seeber, Frank

    2002-11-01

    Apicomplexan protists contain a single mitochondrial [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin sequence (mtFd) with a highly conserved C-terminal motif, VDGxxpxPH, that distinguishes it from other mtFd, which have heterogeneous C-termini. This isoform of mtFd, called 'type II ferredoxin', is widespread in eukaryotes, some species having two isoforms and others possessing only one. Because of the known modulating role of the C-terminus of type I mtFd during association with itself and other interacting proteins, the presence of a conserved C-terminus in type II mtFd suggests it evolved either as a means for optimized homodimerization or to allow interaction with a highly conserved partner(s) that is yet to be defined.

  19. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Chloroplasts Contain a Homodimeric Pyruvate:Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase That Functions with FDX11[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    van Lis, Robert; Baffert, Carole; Couté, Yohann; Nitschke, Wolfgang; Atteia, Ariane

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic algae have long been known to live in anoxic environments, but interest in their anaerobic energy metabolism has only recently gained momentum, largely due to their utility in biofuel production. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii figures remarkably in this respect, because it efficiently produces hydrogen and its genome harbors many genes for anaerobic metabolic routes. Central to anaerobic energy metabolism in many unicellular eukaryotes (protists) is pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO), which decarboxylates pyruvate and forms acetyl-coenzyme A with concomitant reduction of low-potential ferredoxins or flavodoxins. Here, we report the biochemical properties of the homodimeric PFO of C. reinhardtii expressed in Escherichia coli. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of the recombinant enzyme (Cr-rPFO) showed three distinct [4Fe-4S] iron-sulfur clusters and a thiamine pyrophosphate radical upon reduction by pyruvate. Purified Cr-rPFO exhibits a specific decarboxylase activity of 12 µmol pyruvate min−1 mg−1 protein using benzyl viologen as electron acceptor. Despite the fact that the enzyme is very oxygen sensitive, it localizes to the chloroplast. Among the six known chloroplast ferredoxins (FDX1–FDX6) in C. reinhardtii, FDX1 and FDX2 were the most efficient electron acceptors from Cr-rPFO, with comparable apparent Km values of approximately 4 µm. As revealed by immunoblotting, anaerobic conditions that lead to the induction of CrPFO did not increase levels of either FDX1 or FDX2. FDX1, being by far the most abundant ferredoxin, is thus likely the partner of PFO in C. reinhardtii. This finding postulates a direct link between CrPFO and hydrogenase and provides new opportunities to better study and engineer hydrogen production in this protist. PMID:23154536

  20. A larger transcript is required for the synthesis of the smaller isoform of ferredoxin:NADP oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Omairi-Nasser, Amin; de Gracia, Adrienne Gomez; Ajlani, Ghada

    2011-09-01

    Ferredoxin:NADP oxidoreductases (FNRs) constitute a family of flavoenzymes that catalyse the exchange of electrons between ferredoxin and NADP(H). In cyanobacteria FNR provides NADPH for photoautotrophic metabolism, but the enzyme is also capable of oxidizing NADPH providing reduced ferredoxin. In the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803, the unique petH gene has two translation products depending on growth conditions. As a consequence two isoforms of the FNR accumulate - FNR(L) and FNR(S) . In the present work, analysis of petH expression reveals that different transcriptional start points (tsp) are responsible for this differential translation initiation. Under standard conditions (where FNR(L) accumulates), two tsps were found at -52 and -34 relative to the first translation start site. Under nitrogen-starvation conditions (where FNR(S) accumulates) a tsp was mapped at -126 relative to the first translation start site. Therefore, the transcript responsible for FNR(S) translation is longer than that producing FNR(L) . In addition, expression of the short or long transcript in E. coli resulted in the accumulation of FNR(L) or FNR(S) respectively. This result demonstrates that translation can initiate at two different sites, 336-bases apart (ATG-1 to ATG-113), depending only on the 5'UTR structure.

  1. Identification and Expression Analysis of a Novel HbCIPK2-Interacting Ferredoxin from Halophyte H. brevisubulatum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Ge, Rongchao; Zhang, Junwen; Chen, Yajuan; Wang, Hongzhi; Wei, Jianhua; Li, Ruifen

    2015-01-01

    Ferredoxin is a small iron-sulfer protein involved in various one-eletron transfer pathways. Little is known about how ferredoxin is regulated to distribute electron under abiotic stress. Our previous study has showed that HbCIPK2 conferred salinity and drought tolerance. Thus, we hypothesized that HbCIPK2 could mediate the activities of interacting partners as a signal transducer. In this report, we identified a novel HbCIPK2-interacting ferredoxin (HbFd1) from halophyte Hordeum brevisubulatum by yeast two-hybrid screens, confirmed this interaction by BiFC in vivo and CoIP in vitro, and presented the expression pattern of HbFd1. HbFd1 was down-regulated under salinity and cold stress but up-regulated under PEG stress, its expression showed tissue-specific, mainly in shoot chloroplast, belonging to leaf-type subgroup. Moreover, HbCIPK2 could recruit HbFd1 to the nucleus for their interaction. The C-terminal segment in HbFd1 protein was involved in the interaction with HbCIPK2. These results provided insight into the connection between CBL-CIPK signaling network and Fd-dependent metabolic pathways.

  2. Identification and Expression Analysis of a Novel HbCIPK2-Interacting Ferredoxin from Halophyte H. brevisubulatum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Ge, Rongchao; Zhang, Junwen; Chen, Yajuan; Wang, Hongzhi; Wei, Jianhua; Li, Ruifen

    2015-01-01

    Ferredoxin is a small iron-sulfer protein involved in various one-eletron transfer pathways. Little is known about how ferredoxin is regulated to distribute electron under abiotic stress. Our previous study has showed that HbCIPK2 conferred salinity and drought tolerance. Thus, we hypothesized that HbCIPK2 could mediate the activities of interacting partners as a signal transducer. In this report, we identified a novel HbCIPK2-interacting ferredoxin (HbFd1) from halophyte Hordeum brevisubulatum by yeast two-hybrid screens, confirmed this interaction by BiFC in vivo and CoIP in vitro, and presented the expression pattern of HbFd1. HbFd1 was down-regulated under salinity and cold stress but up-regulated under PEG stress, its expression showed tissue-specific, mainly in shoot chloroplast, belonging to leaf-type subgroup. Moreover, HbCIPK2 could recruit HbFd1 to the nucleus for their interaction. The C-terminal segment in HbFd1 protein was involved in the interaction with HbCIPK2. These results provided insight into the connection between CBL-CIPK signaling network and Fd-dependent metabolic pathways. PMID:26636581

  3. Ferredoxin Is Involved in Secretion of Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1 across the Cytoplasmic Membrane in Escherichia coli K1▿

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hao; Kim, Kwang Sik

    2010-01-01

    We previously showed that cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 (CNF1) contributes to Escherichia coli K1 invasion of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) and interacts with the receptor on the surface of HBMEC. CNF1 is the cytoplasmic protein, and it remains incompletely understood how CNF1 is secreted across the inner and outer membranes in E. coli K1. In order to investigate the genetic determinants for secretion of CNF1 in E. coli K1, we performed Tn5 mutagenesis screening by applying β-lactamase as a reporter to monitor secretion of CNF1. We identified a Tn5 mutant that exhibited no β-lactamase activity in the culture supernatant and in which the mutated gene encodes a ferredoxin gene (fdx). In the fdx deletion mutant, there was no evidence of translocation of CNF1 into HBMEC. Western blot analysis of the fdx deletion mutant revealed that ferredoxin is involved in translocation of CNF1 across the cytoplasmic membrane. The fdx mutant exhibited significantly decreased invasion of HBMEC, similar to the decreased HBMEC invasion observed with the CNF1 mutant. The failures to secrete CNF1 and invade HBMEC of the fdx mutant were restored to the levels of the parent strain by complementation with fdx. These findings demonstrate for the first time that ferredoxin is involved in secretion of CNF1 across the inner membrane in meningitis-causing E. coli K1. PMID:19917710

  4. Sequence determination of reduction potentials by cysteinyl hydrogen bonds and peptide pipoles in [4Fe-4S] ferredoxins.

    PubMed Central

    Beck, B W; Xie, Q; Ichiye, T

    2001-01-01

    A sequence determinant of reduction potentials is reported for bacterial [4Fe-4S]-type ferredoxins. The residue that is four residues C-terminal to the fourth ligand of either cluster is generally an alanine or a cysteine. In five experimental ferredoxin structures, the cysteine has the same structural orientation relative to the nearest cluster, which is stabilized by the SH...S bond. Although such bonds are generally considered weak, indications that Fe-S redox site sulfurs are better hydrogen-bond acceptors than most sulfurs include the numerous amide NH...S bonds noted by Adman and our quantum mechanical calculations. Furthermore, electrostatic potential calculations of 11 experimental ferredoxin structures indicate that the extra cysteine decreases the reduction potential relative to an alanine by approximately 60 mV, in agreement with experimental mutational studies. Moreover, the decrease in potential is due to a shift in the polar backbone stabilized by the SH...S bond rather than to the slightly polar cysteinyl side chain. Thus, these cysteines can "tune" the reduction potential, which could optimize electron flow in an electron transport chain. More generally, hydrogen bonds involving sulfur can be important in protein structure/function, and mutations causing polar backbone shifts can alter electrostatics and thus affect redox properties or even enzymatic activity of a protein. PMID:11463610

  5. Evidence for lateral transfer of genes encoding ferredoxins, nitroreductases, NADH oxidase, and alcohol dehydrogenase 3 from anaerobic prokaryotes to Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Julie E J; Wang, Amy; Field, Jessica; Morrison, Hilary G; McArthur, Andrew G; Sogin, Mitchell L; Loftus, Brendan J; Samuelson, John

    2002-04-01

    Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba histolytica are amitochondriate, microaerophilic protists which use fermentation enzymes like those of bacteria to survive anaerobic conditions within the intestinal lumen. Genes encoding fermentation enzymes and related electron transport peptides (e.g., ferredoxins) in giardia organisms and amebae are hypothesized to be derived from either an ancient anaerobic eukaryote (amitochondriate fossil hypothesis), a mitochondrial endosymbiont (hydrogen hypothesis), or anaerobic bacteria (lateral transfer hypothesis). The goals here were to complete the molecular characterization of giardial and amebic fermentation enzymes and to determine the origins of the genes encoding them, when possible. A putative giardia [2Fe-2S]ferredoxin which had a hypothetical organelle-targeting sequence at its N terminus showed similarity to mitochondrial ferredoxins and the hydrogenosomal ferredoxin of Trichomonas vaginalis (another luminal protist). However, phylogenetic trees were star shaped, with weak bootstrap support, so we were unable to confirm or rule out the endosymbiotic origin of the giardia [2Fe-2S]ferredoxin gene. Putative giardial and amebic 6-kDa ferredoxins, ferredoxin-nitroreductase fusion proteins, and oxygen-insensitive nitroreductases each tentatively supported the lateral transfer hypothesis. Although there were not enough sequences to perform meaningful phylogenetic analyses, the unique common occurrence of these peptides and enzymes in giardia organisms, amebae, and the few anaerobic prokaryotes suggests the possibility of lateral transfer. In contrast, there was more robust phylogenetic evidence for the lateral transfer of G. lamblia genes encoding an NADH oxidase from a gram-positive coccus and a microbial group 3 alcohol dehydrogenase from thermoanaerobic prokaryotes. In further support of lateral transfer, the G. lamblia NADH oxidase and adh3 genes appeared to have an evolutionary history distinct from those of E. histolytica.

  6. Structural-functional characterization and physiological significance of ferredoxin-NADP reductase from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Tondo, María Laura; Musumeci, Matías A; Delprato, María Laura; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A; Orellano, Elena G

    2011-01-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri is a phytopathogen bacterium that causes severe citrus canker disease. Similar to other phytopathogens, after infection by this bacterium, plants trigger a defense mechanism that produces reactive oxygen species. Ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductases (FNRs) are redox flavoenzymes that participate in several metabolic functions, including the response to reactive oxygen species. Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri has a gene (fpr) that encodes for a FNR (Xac-FNR) that belongs to the subclass I bacterial FNRs. The aim of this work was to search for the physiological role of this enzyme and to characterize its structural and functional properties. The functionality of Xac-FNR was tested by cross-complementation of a FNR knockout Escherichia coli strain, which exhibit high susceptibility to agents that produce an abnormal accumulation of (•)O(2)(-). Xac-FNR was able to substitute for the FNR in E. coli in its antioxidant role. The expression of fpr in X. axonopodis pv. citri was assessed using semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. A 2.2-fold induction was observed in the presence of the superoxide-generating agents methyl viologen and 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone. Structural and functional studies showed that Xac-FNR displayed different functional features from other subclass I bacterial FNRs. Our analyses suggest that these differences may be due to the unusual carboxy-terminal region. We propose a further classification of subclass I bacterial FNRs, which is useful to determine the nature of their ferredoxin redox partners. Using sequence analysis, we identified a ferredoxin (XAC1762) as a potential substrate of Xac-FNR. The purified ferredoxin protein displayed the typical broad UV-visible spectrum of [4Fe-4S] clusters and was able to function as substrate of Xac-FNR in the cytochrome c reductase activity. Our results suggest that Xac-FNR is involved in the oxidative stress response of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri and

  7. Influence of 120 kDa Pyruvate:Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase on Pathogenicity of Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun-Ouk

    2016-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a flagellate protozoan parasite and commonly infected the lower genital tract in women and men. Iron is a known nutrient for growth of various pathogens, and also reported to be involved in establishment of trichomoniasis. However, the exact mechanism was not clarified. In this study, the author investigated whether the 120 kDa protein of T. vaginalis may be involved in pathogenicity of trichomonads. Antibodies against 120 kDa protein of T. vaginalis, which was identified as pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) by peptide analysis of MALDI-TOF-MS, were prepared in rabbits. Pretreatment of T. vaginalis with anti-120 kDa Ab decreased the proliferation and adherence to vaginal epithelial cells (MS74) of T. vaginalis. Subcutaneous tissue abscess in anti-120 kDa Ab-treated T. vaginalis-injected mice was smaller in size than that of untreated T. vaginalis-infected mice. Collectively, the 120 kDa protein expressed by iron may be involved in proliferation, adhesion to host cells, and abscess formation, thereby may influence on the pathogenicity of T. vaginalis. PMID:26951982

  8. Influence of 120 kDa Pyruvate:Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase on Pathogenicity of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun-Ouk

    2016-02-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a flagellate protozoan parasite and commonly infected the lower genital tract in women and men. Iron is a known nutrient for growth of various pathogens, and also reported to be involved in establishment of trichomoniasis. However, the exact mechanism was not clarified. In this study, the author investigated whether the 120 kDa protein of T. vaginalis may be involved in pathogenicity of trichomonads. Antibodies against 120 kDa protein of T. vaginalis, which was identified as pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) by peptide analysis of MALDI-TOF-MS, were prepared in rabbits. Pretreatment of T. vaginalis with anti-120 kDa Ab decreased the proliferation and adherence to vaginal epithelial cells (MS74) of T. vaginalis. Subcutaneous tissue abscess in anti-120 kDa Ab-treated T. vaginalis-injected mice was smaller in size than that of untreated T. vaginalis-infected mice. Collectively, the 120 kDa protein expressed by iron may be involved in proliferation, adhesion to host cells, and abscess formation, thereby may influence on the pathogenicity of T. vaginalis. PMID:26951982

  9. NDH-1L interacts with ferredoxin via the subunit NdhS in Thermosynechococcus elongatus.

    PubMed

    He, Zhihui; Zheng, Fangfang; Wu, Yaozong; Li, Qinghua; Lv, Jing; Fu, Pengcheng; Mi, Hualing

    2015-12-01

    The large size complex of cyanobacterial NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDH-1) complex (NDH-1L) plays crucial role in a variety of bioenergetic reactions such as respiration and cyclic electron flow around photosystem I. Although the complex has been isolated and identified, its biochemical function still remains to be clarified. Here, we highly purified the NDH-1L complex from the cells of Thermosynechococcus elongatus by Ni(2+) affinity chromatography and size-exclusion chromatography. The purified NDH-1L complex has an apparent total molecular mass of approximately 500 kDa. 14 known subunits were identified by mass spectrometry and immunoblotting, including the NdhS subunit containing ferredoxin (Fd)-docking site domain. Surface plasmon resonance measurement demonstrates that the NDH-1L complex could bind to Fd with the binding constant (K D) of 59 µM. Yeast two-hybrid system assay further confirmed the interaction of Fd with NdhS and indicated that NdhH is involved in the interaction. Our results provide direct biochemical evidence that the cyanobacterial NDH-1 complex catalyzes the electron transport from reduced Fd to plastoquinone via NdhS and NdhH. PMID:25630976

  10. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase is regulated by ferredoxin-NADP reductase in the diatom Asterionella formosa.

    PubMed

    Mekhalfi, Malika; Puppo, Carine; Avilan, Luisana; Lebrun, Régine; Mansuelle, Pascal; Maberly, Stephen C; Gontero, Brigitte

    2014-07-01

    Diatoms are a widespread and ecologically important group of heterokont algae that contribute c. 20% to global productivity. Previous work has shown that regulation of their key Calvin cycle enzymes differs from that of the Plantae, and that in crude extracts, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) can be inhibited by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced (NADPH) under oxidizing conditions. The freshwater diatom, Asterionella formosa, was studied using enzyme kinetics, chromatography, surface plasmon resonance, mass spectrometry and sequence analysis to determine the mechanism behind this GAPDH inhibition. GAPDH interacted with ferredoxin-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) reductase (FNR) from the primary phase of photosynthesis, and the small chloroplast protein, CP12. Sequences of copurified GAPDH and FNR were highly homologous with published sequences. However, the widespread ternary complex among GAPDH, phosphoribulokinase and CP12 was absent. Activity measurements under oxidizing conditions showed that NADPH can inhibit GAPDH-CP12 in the presence of FNR, explaining the earlier observed inhibition within crude extracts. Diatom plastids have a distinctive metabolism, including the lack of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and so cannot produce NADPH in the dark. The observed down-regulation of GAPDH in the dark may allow NADPH to be rerouted towards other reductive processes contributing to their ecological success.

  11. Overexpression of Ferredoxin, PETF, Enhances Tolerance to Heat Stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Hsien; Pan, Kui-You; Hung, Ching-Hui; Huang, Hsiang-En; Chen, Ching-Lian; Feng, Teng-Yung; Huang, Li-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by plants in adverse environments can cause damage to organelles and trigger cell death. Removal of excess ROS can be achieved through the ascorbate scavenger pathway to prevent plant cell death. The amount of this scavenger can be regulated by ferredoxin (FDX). Chloroplastic FDXs are electron transfer proteins that perform in distributing photosynthetic reducing power. In this study, we demonstrate that overexpression of the endogenous photosynthetic FDX gene, PETF, in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii could raise the level of reduced ascorbate and diminish H2O2 levels under normal growth conditions. Furthermore, the overexpressing PETF transgenic Chlamydomonas lines produced low levels of H2O2 and exhibited protective effects that were observed through decreased chlorophyll degradation and increased cell survival under heat-stress conditions. The findings of this study suggest that overexpression of PETF can increase the efficiency of ROS scavenging in chloroplasts to confer heat tolerance. The roles of PETF in the downregulation of the ROS level offer a method for potentially improving the tolerance of crops against heat stress. PMID:24141188

  12. Posttranslational Modifications of FERREDOXIN-NADP+ OXIDOREDUCTASE in Arabidopsis Chloroplasts1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lehtimäki, Nina; Koskela, Minna M.; Dahlström, Käthe M.; Pakula, Eveliina; Lintala, Minna; Scholz, Martin; Hippler, Michael; Hanke, Guy T.; Rokka, Anne; Battchikova, Natalia; Salminen, Tiina A.; Mulo, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Rapid responses of chloroplast metabolism and adjustments to photosynthetic machinery are of utmost importance for plants’ survival in a fluctuating environment. These changes may be achieved through posttranslational modifications of proteins, which are known to affect the activity, interactions, and localization of proteins. Recent studies have accumulated evidence about the crucial role of a multitude of modifications, including acetylation, methylation, and glycosylation, in the regulation of chloroplast proteins. Both of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf-type FERREDOXIN-NADP+ OXIDOREDUCTASE (FNR) isoforms, the key enzymes linking the light reactions of photosynthesis to carbon assimilation, exist as two distinct forms with different isoelectric points. We show that both AtFNR isoforms contain multiple alternative amino termini and undergo light-responsive addition of an acetyl group to the α-amino group of the amino-terminal amino acid of proteins, which causes the change in isoelectric point. Both isoforms were also found to contain acetylation of a conserved lysine residue near the active site, while no evidence for in vivo phosphorylation or glycosylation was detected. The dynamic, multilayer regulation of AtFNR exemplifies the complex regulatory network systems controlling chloroplast proteins by a range of posttranslational modifications, which continues to emerge as a novel area within photosynthesis research. PMID:25301888

  13. Protein motifs involved in coenzyme interaction and enzymatic efficiency in anabaena ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase.

    PubMed

    Peregrina, José R; Herguedas, Beatriz; Hermoso, Juan A; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Medina, Milagros

    2009-04-14

    Ferredoxin-NADP+ reductases (FNRs) must determine the coenzyme specificity and allow the transient encounter between N5 of its flavin cofactor and C4 of the coenzyme nicotinamide for efficient hydride transfer. Combined site-directed replacements in different putative determinants of the FNR coenzyme specificity were simultaneously produced. The resulting variants were structurally and functionally analyzed for their binding and hydride transfer abilities to the FNR physiological coenzyme NADP+/H, as well as to NAD+/H. The previously studied Y303S mutation is the only one that significantly enhances specificity for NAD+. Combination of mutations from the pyrophosphate or 2'-phosphate regions, even including Y303S, does not improve activity with NAD+, despite structures of these FNRs show how particular coenzyme-binding regions resembled motifs found in NAD+/H-dependent enzymes of the FNR family. Therefore, the "rational approach" did not succeed well, and coenzyme specificity redesign in the FNR family will be more complex than that anticipated in other NADP+/NAD+ families.

  14. Nicotiana tabacum Tsip1-Interacting Ferredoxin 1 Affects Biotic and Abiotic Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Sung Un; Lee, In-Ju; Ham, Byung-Kook; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2012-01-01

    Tsip1, a Zn finger protein that was isolated as a direct interactor with tobacco stress-induced 1 (Tsi1), plays an important role in both biotic and abiotic stress signaling. To further understand Tsip1 function, we searched for more Tsip1-interacting proteins by yeast two-hybrid screening using a tobacco cDNA library. Screening identified a new Tsip1-interacting protein, Nicotiana tabacum Tsip1-interacting ferredoxin 1 (NtTfd1), and binding specificity was confirmed both in vitro and in vivo. The four repeats of a cysteine-rich motif (CXXCXGXG) of Tsip1 proved important for binding to NtTfd1. Virus-induced gene silencing of NtTfd1, Tsip1, and NtTfd1/Tsip1 rendered plants more susceptible to salinity stress compared with TRV2 control plants. NtTfd1- and Tsip1-silenced tobacco plants were more susceptible to infection by Cucumber mosaic virus compared with control plants. These results suggest that NtTfd1 might be involved in the regulation of biotic and abiotic stresses in chloroplasts by interaction with Tsip1. PMID:22699755

  15. Structural and mutational studies of an electron transfer complex of maize sulfite reductase and ferredoxin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju Yaen; Nakayama, Masato; Toyota, Hiroshi; Kurisu, Genji; Hase, Toshiharu

    2016-08-01

    The structure of the complex of maize sulfite reductase (SiR) and ferredoxin (Fd) has been determined by X-ray crystallography. Co-crystals of the two proteins prepared under different conditions were subjected to the diffraction analysis and three possible structures of the complex were solved. Although topological relationship of SiR and Fd varied in each of the structures, two characteristics common to all structures were found in the pattern of protein-protein interactions and positional arrangements of redox centres; (i) a few negative residues of Fd contact with a narrow area of SiR with positive electrostatic surface potential and (ii) [2Fe-2S] cluster of Fd and [4Fe-4S] cluster of SiR are in a close proximity with the shortest distance around 12 Å. Mutational analysis of a total of seven basic residues of SiR distributed widely at the interface of the complex showed their importance for supporting an efficient Fd-dependent activity and a strong physical binding to Fd. These combined results suggest that the productive electron transfer complex of SiR and Fd could be formed through multiple processes of the electrostatic intermolecular interaction and this implication is discussed in terms of the multi-functionality of Fd in various redox metabolisms. PMID:26920048

  16. Ferredoxin reductase affects p53-dependent, 5-fluorouracil–induced apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Paul M.; Bunz, Fred; Yu, Jian; Rago, Carlo; Chan, Timothy A.; Murphy, Michael P.; Kelso, Geoffry F.; Smith, Robin A. J.; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert

    2013-01-01

    Loss of p53 gene function, which occurs in most colon cancer cells, has been shown to abolish the apoptotic response to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). To identify genes downstream of p53 that might mediate these effects, we assessed global patterns of gene expression following 5-FU treatment of isogenic cells differing only in their p53 status. The gene encoding mitochondrial ferredoxin reductase (protein, FR; gene, FDXR) was one of the few genes significantly induced by p53 after 5-FU treatment. The FR protein was localized to mitochondria and suppressed the growth of colon cancer cells when over-expressed. Targeted disruption of the FDXR gene in human colon cancer cells showed that it was essential for viability, and partial disruption of the gene resulted in decreased sensitivity to 5-FU-induced apoptosis. These data, coupled with the effects of pharmacologic inhibitors of reactive oxygen species, indicate that FR contributes to p53-mediated apoptosis through the generation of oxidative stress in mitochondria. PMID:11590433

  17. Overexpression of ferredoxin, PETF, enhances tolerance to heat stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Hsien; Pan, Kui-You; Hung, Ching-Hui; Huang, Hsiang-En; Chen, Ching-Lian; Feng, Teng-Yung; Huang, Li-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by plants in adverse environments can cause damage to organelles and trigger cell death. Removal of excess ROS can be achieved through the ascorbate scavenger pathway to prevent plant cell death. The amount of this scavenger can be regulated by ferredoxin (FDX). Chloroplastic FDXs are electron transfer proteins that perform in distributing photosynthetic reducing power. In this study, we demonstrate that overexpression of the endogenous photosynthetic FDX gene, PETF, in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii could raise the level of reduced ascorbate and diminish H2O2 levels under normal growth conditions. Furthermore, the overexpressing PETF transgenic Chlamydomonas lines produced low levels of H2O2 and exhibited protective effects that were observed through decreased chlorophyll degradation and increased cell survival under heat-stress conditions. The findings of this study suggest that overexpression of PETF can increase the efficiency of ROS scavenging in chloroplasts to confer heat tolerance. The roles of PETF in the downregulation of the ROS level offer a method for potentially improving the tolerance of crops against heat stress. PMID:24141188

  18. Immobilized chloroplast-ferredoxin-hydrogenase system for the simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Greenbaum, E.

    1983-01-01

    The chloroplast-ferredoxin-hydrogenase (CFH) system is capable of the simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen using water as the source of electrons. The immobilization of chloroplasts and hydrogenase, which has been the subject of several reports has been attempted in order to increase their storage and functional stability. However, immobilized chloroplasts and hydrogenase have never been shown to produce hydrogen and oxygen simultaneously. The simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen is a valuable guide in assessing the role of water as the primary substrate in biophotolysis. As has been shown previously, the stoichiometric ratio of hydrogen to oxygen is, in general, not equal to 2. By measuring the oxygen that is produced along with the hydrogen, it is possible to set an upper limit on the photoproduced hydrogen that is derive d from water. The study reported here describes for the first time the simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen by the CFH system immobilized in calcium alginate gel spheres. 15 references, 4 figures.

  19. cDNA cloning, expression levels and gene mapping of photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic ferredoxin genes in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    PubMed

    Venegas-Calerón, M; Zambelli, A; Ruiz-López, N; Youssar, L; León, A; Garcés, R; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2009-03-01

    Fatty acid desaturation in plastids and chloroplasts depends on the electron-donor activity of ferredoxins. Using degenerate oligonucleotides designed from known photosynthetic and heterotrophic plant ferredoxin sequences, two full-length ferredoxin cDNAs were cloned from sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) leaves and developing seeds, HaFd1 and HaFd2, homologous to photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic ferredoxins, respectively. Based on these cDNAs, the respective genomic sequences were obtained and the presence of DNA polymorphisms was investigated. Complete sequencing of the HaFd1 and HaFd2 genes in different lines indicated the presence of two haplotypes for HaFd2 and their alignment showed that sequence polymorphisms are restricted to the 5'-NTR intron. In addition, specific DNA markers for the HaFd1 and HaFd2 genes were developed that enabled the genes to be mapped. Accordingly, the HaFd1 locus maps to linkage group 10 of the public sunflower map, while the HaFd2 locus maps to linkage group 11. Both ferredoxins display different spatial-temporal patterns of expression. While HaFd2 is expressed at similar levels in all tissues tested (leaves, stem, roots, cotyledons and developing seeds), HaFd1 is more strongly expressed in green tissues than in all the other tissues tested. Both photosynthetic- and heterotrophic-ferredoxins are present in sunflower seeds and may contribute to fatty acid desaturation during oil accumulation. Nevertheless, the levels of HaFd2 expression during seed formation are distinct in lines that only varied in the HaFd2 haplotypes they expressed.

  20. The bidirectional NiFe-hydrogenase in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is reduced by flavodoxin and ferredoxin and is essential under mixotrophic, nitrate-limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Gutekunst, Kirstin; Chen, Xi; Schreiber, Karoline; Kaspar, Ursula; Makam, Srinivas; Appel, Jens

    2014-01-24

    Cyanobacteria are able to use solar energy for the production of hydrogen. It is generally accepted that cyanobacterial NiFe-hydrogenases are reduced by NAD(P)H. This is in conflict with thermodynamic considerations, as the midpoint potentials of NAD(P)H do not suffice to support the measured hydrogen production under physiological conditions. We show that flavodoxin and ferredoxin directly reduce the bidirectional NiFe-hydrogenase of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 in vitro. A merodiploid ferredoxin-NADP reductase mutant produced correspondingly more photohydrogen. We furthermore found that the hydrogenase receives its electrons via pyruvate:flavodoxin/ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR)-flavodoxin/ferredoxin under fermentative conditions, enabling the cells to gain ATP. These results strongly support that the bidirectional NiFe-hydrogenases in cyanobacteria function as electron sinks for low potential electrons from photosystem I and as a redox balancing device under fermentative conditions. However, the selective advantage of this enzyme is not known. No strong phenotype of mutants lacking the hydrogenase has been found. Because bidirectional hydrogenases are widespread in aquatic nutrient-rich environments that are capable of triggering phytoplankton blooms, we mimicked those conditions by growing cells in the presence of increased amounts of dissolved organic carbon and dissolved organic nitrogen. Under these conditions the hydrogenase was found to be essential. As these conditions close the two most important sinks for reduced flavodoxin/ferredoxin (CO2-fixation and nitrate reduction), this discovery further substantiates the connection between flavodoxin/ferredoxin and the NiFe-hydrogenase. PMID:24311779

  1. Expression analysis of the fpr (ferredoxin-NADP{sup +} reductase) gene in Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yunho; Pena-Llopis, Samuel; Kang, Yoon-Suk; Shin, Hyeon-Dong; Demple, Bruce; Madsen, Eugene L.; Jeon, Che Ok; Park, Woojun . E-mail: wpark@korea.ac.kr

    2006-01-27

    The ferredoxin-NADP{sup +} reductase (fpr) participates in cellular defense against oxidative damage. The fpr expression in Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is induced by oxidative and osmotic stresses. FinR, a LysR-type transcriptional factor near the fpr gene in the P. putida KT2440 genome, is required for induction of the fpr under both conditions. We have shown that the fpr and finR gene products can counteract the effects of oxidative and osmotic stresses. Interestingly, FinR-independent expression occurs either during a long period of incubation with paraquat or with high concentrations of oxidative stress agent. This result indicates that there may be additional regulators present in the P. putida KT2440 genome. In contrast to in vivo expression kinetics of fpr from the plant pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae, the fpr gene from P. putida KT2440 exhibited unusually prolonged expression after oxidative stress. Transcriptional fusion and Northern blot analysis studies indicated that the FinR is negatively autoregulated. Expression of the fpr promoter was higher in minimal media than in rich media during exponential phase growth. Consistent with this result, the fpr and finR mutants had a long lag phase in minimal media in contrast to wild-type growth characteristics. Antioxidants such as ascorbate could increase the growth rate of all tested strains in minimal media. This result confirmed that P. putida KT2440 experienced more oxidative stress during exponential growth in minimal media than in rich media. Endogenous promoter activity of the fpr gene is much higher during exponential growth than during stationary growth. These findings demonstrate new relationships between fpr, finR, and the physiology of oxidative stress in P. putida KT2440.

  2. Dynamics of the active site architecture in plant-type ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductases catalytic complexes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Azqueta, Ana; Catalano-Dupuy, Daniela L; López-Rivero, Arleth; Tondo, María Laura; Orellano, Elena G; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A; Medina, Milagros

    2014-10-01

    Kinetic isotope effects in reactions involving hydride transfer and their temperature dependence are powerful tools to explore dynamics of enzyme catalytic sites. In plant-type ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductases the FAD cofactor exchanges a hydride with the NADP(H) coenzyme. Rates for these processes are considerably faster for the plastidic members (FNR) of the family than for those belonging to the bacterial class (FPR). Hydride transfer (HT) and deuteride transfer (DT) rates for the NADP(+) coenzyme reduction of four plant-type FNRs (two representatives of the plastidic type FNRs and the other two from the bacterial class), and their temperature dependences are here examined applying a full tunnelling model with coupled environmental fluctuations. Parameters for the two plastidic FNRs confirm a tunnelling reaction with active dynamics contributions, but isotope effects on Arrhenius factors indicate a larger contribution for donor-acceptor distance (DAD) dynamics in the Pisum sativum FNR reaction than in the Anabaena FNR reaction. On the other hand, parameters for bacterial FPRs are consistent with passive environmental reorganisation movements dominating the HT coordinate and no contribution of DAD sampling or gating fluctuations. This indicates that active sites of FPRs are more organised and rigid than those of FNRs. These differences must be due to adaptation of the active sites and catalytic mechanisms to fulfil their particular metabolic roles, establishing a compromise between protein flexibility and functional optimisation. Analysis of site-directed mutants in plastidic enzymes additionally indicates the requirement of a minimal optimal architecture in the catalytic complex to provide a favourable gating contribution. PMID:24953402

  3. Formation of the Fe-S cluster of ferredoxin in lysed spinach chloroplasts. [Spinacia oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Mitsui, Akira; Matsubara, Hiroshi )

    1991-01-01

    In vitro formation of the {sup 35}S-labeled Fe-S cluster of ferredoxin (Fd) has been achieved by incubating apo-Fd and ({sup 35}S)cysteine with osmotically lysed chloroplasts of spinach (Spinacia oleracea). Correct integration of the {sup 35}S-labeled Fe-S cluster into Fd was verified on the basis of the following: (a) Under nondenaturing conditions, {sup 35}S-labeled holo-Fd showed the same electrophoretic mobility as authentic holo-Fd; (b) {sup 35}S-labeled holo-Fd showed an ability to bind Fd-NADP{sup +} reductase; (c) the {sup 35}S-labeled moiety was removed from the Fd polypeptide by TCA treatment but not by 2-mercaptoethanol treatment; (d) externally added pea II apo-Fd was converted to {sup 35}S-labeled holo-Fd. This reconstitution was dependent on both ATP and light, and formation of the {sup 35}S-labeled Fe-S cluster was observed upon addition of ATP or when an ATP generation-system was constructed in the light. In contrast, ATP-consuming systems abolished the Fe-S cluster formation. A non-hydrolyzable ATP analog was unable to serve as an ATP substitute, indicating the requirement of ATP hydrolysis for cluster formation. GTP was able to substitute for ATP, but CTP and UTP were less effective. Fe-S cluster formation in lysed chloroplasts was stimulated by light even in the presence of added ATP. Light stimulation was inhibited by DCMU or methyl viologen but not by NH{sub 4}{sup +}. NADPH was able to substitute for light, indicating that light energy is required for the production of reducing compounds such as NADPH in addition to the generation of ATP.

  4. The function and properties of the iron-sulfur center in spinach ferredoxin: Thioredoxin reductase: A new biological role for iron-sulfur clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Staples, C.R.; Ameyibor, E.; Fu, Weiguang; Johnson, M.K.

    1996-09-03

    Thioredoxin reduction in chloroplasts in catalyzed by a unique class of disulfide reductases which use a [2Fe-2S]{sup 2+/+} ferredoxin as the electron donor and contain an Fe-S cluster as the sole prosthetic group in addition to the active-site disulfide. The nature, properties, and function of the Fe-S cluster in spinach ferredoxin: thioredoxin reductase (FTR) have been investigated by the combination of UV/visible absorption, variable-temperature magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), EPR, and resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopies. 66 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy of 2Fe-2S ferredoxin: covalency of the oxidized and reduced 2Fe forms and comparison to model complexes.

    PubMed

    Anxolabéhère-Mallart, E; Glaser, T; Frank, P; Aliverti, A; Zanetti, G; Hedman, B; Hodgson, K O; Solomon, E I

    2001-06-13

    Ligand K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) provides a direct experimental probe of ligand-metal bonding. In previous studies, this method has been applied to mononuclear Fe-S and binuclear 2Fe-2S model compounds as well as to rubredoxins and the Rieske protein. These studies are now extended to the oxidized and reduced forms of ferredoxin I from spinach. Because of its high instability, the mixed-valence state was generated electrochemically in the protein matrix, and ligand K-edge absorption spectra were recorded using an XAS spectroelectrochemical cell. The experimental setup is described. The XAS edge data are analyzed to independently determine the covalencies of the iron-sulfide and -thiolate bonds. The results are compared with those obtained previously for the Rieske protein and for 2Fe-2S model compounds. It is found that the sulfide covalency is significantly lower in oxidized FdI compared to that of the oxidized model complex. This decrease is interpreted in terms of H bonding present in the protein, and its contribution to the reduction potential E degrees is estimated. Further, a significant increase in covalency for the Fe(III)-sulfide bond and a decrease of the Fe(II)-sulfide bond are observed in the reduced Fe(III)Fe(II) mixed-valence species compared to those of the Fe(III)Fe(III) homovalent site. This demonstrates that, upon reduction, the sulfide interactions with the ferrous site decrease, allowing greater charge donation to the remaining ferric center. That is the dominant change in electronic structure of the Fe(2)S(2)RS(4) center upon reduction and can contribute to the redox properties of this active site.

  6. HC-Pro protein of sugar cane mosaic virus interacts specifically with maize ferredoxin-5 in vitro and in planta.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Qin; Liu, Zhong-Mei; Xu, Jian; Zhou, Tao; Wang, Meng; Chen, Yu-Ting; Li, Huai-Fang; Fan, Zai-Feng

    2008-08-01

    Symptom development of a plant viral disease is a result of molecular interactions between the virus and its host plant; thus, the elucidation of specific interactions is a prerequisite to reveal the mechanism of viral pathogenesis. Here, we show that the chloroplast precursor of ferredoxin-5 (Fd V) from maize (Zea mays) interacts with the multifunctional HC-Pro protein of sugar cane mosaic virus (SCMV) in yeast, Nicotiana benthamiana cells and maize protoplasts. Our results demonstrate that the transit peptide rather than the mature protein of Fd V precursor could interact with both N-terminal (residues 1-100) and C-terminal (residues 301-460) fragments, but not the middle part (residues 101-300), of HC-Pro. In addition, SCMV HC-Pro interacted only with Fd V, and not with the other two photosynthetic ferredoxin isoproteins (Fd I and Fd II) from maize plants. SCMV infection significantly downregulated the level of Fd V mRNA in maize plants; however, no obvious changes were observed in levels of Fd I and Fd II mRNA. These results suggest that SCMV HC-Pro interacts specifically with maize Fd V and that this interaction may disturb the post-translational import of Fd V into maize bundle-sheath cell chloroplasts, which could lead to the perturbation of chloroplast structure and function.

  7. Mechanistic insights into ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductase catalysis involving the conserved glutamate in the active site.

    PubMed

    Dumit, Verónica I; Essigke, Timm; Cortez, Néstor; Ullmann, G Matthias

    2010-04-01

    Plant-type ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductases (FNRs) are flavoenzymes harboring one molecule of noncovalently bound flavin adenine dinucleotide that catalyze reversible reactions between obligatory one-electron carriers and obligatory two-electron carriers. A glutamate next to the C-terminus is strictly conserved in FNR and has been proposed to function as proton donor/acceptor during catalysis. However, experimental studies of this proposed function led to contradicting conclusions about the role of this glutamate in the catalytic mechanism. In the present work, we study the titration behavior of the glutamate in the active site of FNR using theoretical methods. Protonation probabilities for maize FNR were computed for the reaction intermediates of the catalytic cycle by Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatic calculations and Metropolis Monte Carlo titration. The titration behavior of the highly conserved glutamate was found to vary depending on the bound substrates NADP(H) and ferredoxin and also on the redox states of these substrates and the flavin adenine dinucleotide. Our results support the involvement of the glutamate in the FNR catalytic mechanism not only as a proton donor but also as a key residue for stabilizing and destabilizing reaction intermediates. On the basis of our findings, we propose a model rationalizing the function of the glutamate in the reaction cycle, which allows reinterpretation of previous experimental results.

  8. Insight Into the Radical Mechanism of Phycocyanobilin-Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase (Pcya) Revealed By X-Ray Crystallography And Biochemical Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, S.-L.; Rockwell, N.; Lagarias, J.C.; Fisher, A.J.; /Inst. Plant Microb. Biol., Taipei /UC, Davis

    2007-07-13

    The X-ray crystal structure of the substrate-free form of phycocyanobilin (PCB)-ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PcyA; EC 1.3.7.5) from the cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC7120 has been solved at 2.5 angstrom resolution. A comparative analysis of this structure with those recently reported for substrate-bound and substrate-free forms of PcyA from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 (Hagiwara et al. (2006) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103, 27-32; Hagiwara et al. (2006) FEBS Lett. 580, 3823-3828) provides a compelling picture of substrate-induced changes in the PcyA enzyme and the chemical basis of PcyA's catalytic activity. On the basis of these structures and the biochemical analysis of site-directed mutants of Nostoc PcyA, including mutants reported in recent studies (Tu et al. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 3127-3136) as well as mutants described in this study, a revised mechanism for the PcyA-mediated four-electron reduction of biliverdin IX{alpha} to 3E/3Z-phycocyanobilin via enzyme-bound bilin radical intermediates is proposed. The mechanistic insight of these studies, along with homology modeling, have provided new insight into the catalytic mechanisms of other members of the ferredoxin-dependent bilin reductase family that are widespread in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms.

  9. The role of pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase in pyruvate synthesis during autotrophic growth by the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway.

    PubMed

    Furdui, C; Ragsdale, S W

    2000-09-15

    Pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA and CO(2). The catalytic proficiency of this enzyme for the reverse reaction, pyruvate synthase, is poorly understood. Conversion of acetyl-CoA to pyruvate links the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway of autotrophic CO(2) fixation to the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle, which in these autotrophic anaerobes is the stage for biosynthesis of all cellular macromolecules. The results described here demonstrate that the Clostridium thermoaceticum PFOR is a highly efficient pyruvate synthase. The Michaelis-Menten parameters for pyruvate synthesis by PFOR are: V(max) = 1.6 unit/mg (k(cat) = 3.2 s(-1)), K(m)(Acetyl-CoA) = 9 micrometer, and K(m)(CO(2)) = 2 mm. The intracellular concentrations of acetyl-CoA, CoASH, and pyruvate have been measured. The predicted rate of pyruvate synthesis at physiological concentrations of substrates clearly is sufficient to support the role of PFOR as a pyruvate synthase in vivo. Measurements of its k(cat)/K(m) values demonstrate that ferredoxin is a highly efficient electron carrier in both the oxidative and reductive reactions. On the other hand, rubredoxin is a poor substitute in the oxidative direction and is inept in donating electrons for pyruvate synthesis. PMID:10878009

  10. SAGE III

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-15

    SAGE III Data and Information The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas ... on the spacecraft. SAGE III produced L1 and L2 scientific data from 5/07/2002 until 12/31/2005. The flight of the second instrument is as ... Guide Documents:  Project Guide Data Products User's Guide  (PDF) Relevant Documents:  ...

  11. Identification and cloning of two immunogenic C. perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO) of Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium related poultry diseases such as necrotic enteritis (NE) and gangrenous dermatitis (GD) cause substantial economic losses on a global scale. Two antigenic C. perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO), were identified by reaction with...

  12. Influence of pH and ionic strength on electrostatic properties of ferredoxin, FNR, and hydrogenase and the rate constants of their interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diakonova, A. N.; Khrushchev, S. S.; Kovalenko, I. B.; Riznichenko, G. Yu; Rubin, A. B.

    2016-10-01

    Ferredoxin (Fd) protein transfers electrons from photosystem I (PSI) to ferredoxin:NADP+-reductase (FNR) in the photosynthetic electron transport chain, as well as other metabolic pathways. In some photosynthetic organisms including cyanobacteria and green unicellular algae under anaerobic conditions Fd transfers electrons not only to FNR but also to hydrogenase—an enzyme which catalyzes reduction of atomic hydrogen to H2. One of the questions posed by this competitive relationship between proteins is which characteristics of thylakoid stroma media allow switching of the electron flow between the linear path PSI-Fd-FNR-NADP+ and the path PSI-Fd-hydrogenase-H2. The study was conducted using direct multiparticle simulation approach. In this method protein molecules are considered as individual objects that experience Brownian motion and electrostatic interaction with the surrounding media and each other. Using the model we studied the effects of pH and ionic strength (I) upon complex formation between ferredoxin and FNR and ferredoxin and hydrogenase. We showed that the rate constant of Fd-FNR complex formation is constant in a wide range of physiologically significant pH values. Therefore it can be argued that regulation of FNR activity doesn’t involve pH changes in stroma. On the other hand, in the model rate constant of Fd-hydrogenase interaction dramatically depends upon pH: in the range 7–9 it increases threefold. It may seem that because hydrogenase reduces protons it should be more active when pH is acidic. Apparently, regulation of hydrogenase’s affinity to both her reaction partners (H+ and Fd) is carried out by changes in its electrostatic properties. In the dark, the protein is inactive and in the light it is activated and starts to interact with both Fd and H+. Therefore, we can conclude that in chloroplasts the rate of hydrogen production is regulated by pH through the changes in the affinity between hydrogenase and ferredoxin.

  13. Ab initio single and multideterminant methods used in the determination of reduction potentials and magnetic properties of Rieske ferredoxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Nathan Lee

    2008-10-01

    The [Fe2S2]2+/[Fe2S 2]+ electronic structure of seven Rieske protein active sites (bovine mitochondrial cytochrome bc1 complex, spinach chloroplast cytochrome b6f complex, Rieske-type ferredoxin associated with biphenyl dioxygenase from Burkholderia cepacia, yeast cytochrome bcl complex from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rieske subunit of arsenite oxidase from Alcaligenes faecalis, respiratory-type Rieske protein from Thermus thermophilus, and Rieske protein II (soxF) from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius), which lie in a reduction potential range from -150 mV to 375 mV, have been studied by both single and multi-determinant quantum mechanical methods. Calculated reduction potentials and magnetic properties are found comparable to experimental values.

  14. Crystal structure of the FAD-containing ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Tondo, María Laura; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A; Medina, Milagros; Orellano, Elena G; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta

    2013-01-01

    We have solved the structure of ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductase, FPR, from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri, responsible for citrus canker, at a resolution of 1.5 Å. This structure reveals differences in the mobility of specific loops when compared to other FPRs, probably unrelated to the hydride transfer process, which contributes to explaining the structural and functional divergence between the subclass I FPRs. Interactions of the C-terminus of the enzyme with the phosphoadenosine of the cofactor FAD limit its mobility, thus affecting the entrance of nicotinamide into the active site. This structure opens the possibility of rationally designing drugs against the X. axonopodis pv. citri phytopathogen. PMID:23984418

  15. Concentration-dependent oligomerization of cross-linked complexes between ferredoxin and ferredoxin–NADP{sup +} reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Kimata-Ariga, Yoko Kubota-Kawai, Hisako; Lee, Young-Ho; Muraki, Norifumi; Ikegami, Takahisa; Kurisu, Genji; Hase, Toshiharu

    2013-05-17

    Highlights: •Cross-linked complexes of ferredoxin (Fd) and Fd–NADP{sup +} reductase form oligomers. •In the crystal structures, Fd- and FNR moieties swap across the molecules. •The complexes exhibit concentration-dependent oligomerization at sub-milimolar order. -- Abstract: Ferredoxin–NADP{sup +} reductase (FNR) forms a 1:1 complex with ferredoxin (Fd), and catalyzes the electron transfer between Fd and NADP{sup +}. In our previous study, we prepared a series of site-specifically cross-linked complexes of Fd and FNR, which showed diverse electron transfer properties. Here, we show that X-ray crystal structures of the two different Fd–FNR cross-linked complexes form oligomers by swapping Fd and FNR moieties across the molecules; one complex is a dimer from, and the other is a successive multimeric form. In order to verify whether these oligomeric structures are formed only in crystal, we investigated the possibility of the oligomerization of these complexes in solution. The mean values of the particle size of these cross-linked complexes were shown to increase with the rise of protein concentration at sub-milimolar order, whereas the size of dissociable wild-type Fd:FNR complex was unchanged as analyzed by dynamic light scattering measurement. The oligomerization products were detected by SDS–PAGE after chemical cross-linking of these complexes at the sub-milimolar concentrations. The extent and concentration-dependent profile of the oligomerizaion were differentiated between the two cross-linked complexes. These results show that these Fd–FNR cross-linked complexes exhibit concentration-dependent oligomerization, possibly through swapping of Fd and FNR moieties also in solution. These findings lead to the possibility that some native multi-domain proteins may present similar phenomenon in vivo.

  16. Electronic, Magnetic, and Redox Properties of [MFe(3)S(4)] Clusters (M = Cd, Cu, Cr) in Pyrococcus furiosus Ferredoxin.

    PubMed

    Staples, Christopher R.; Dhawan, Ish K.; Finnegan, Michael G.; Dwinell, Derek A.; Zhou, Zhi Hao; Huang, Heshu; Verhagen, Marc F. J. M.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Johnson, Michael K.

    1997-12-01

    The ground- and excited-state properties of heterometallic [CuFe(3)S(4)](2+,+), [CdFe(3)S(4)](2+,+), and [CrFe(3)S(4)](2+,+) cubane clusters assembled in Pyrococcus furiosus ferredoxin have been investigated by the combination of EPR and variable-temperature/variable-field magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) studies. The results indicate Cd(2+) incorporation into [Fe(3)S(4)](0,-) cluster fragments to yield S = 2 [CdFe(3)S(4)](2+) and S = (5)/(2) [CdFe(3)S(4)](+) clusters and Cu(+) incorporation into [Fe(3)S(4)](+,0) cluster fragments to yield S = (1)/(2) [CuFe(3)S(4)](2+) and S = 2 [CuFe(3)S(4)](+) clusters. This is the first report of the preparation of cubane type [CrFe(3)S(4)](2+,+) clusters, and the combination of EPR and MCD results indicates S = 0 and S = (3)/(2) ground states for the oxidized and reduced forms, respectively. Midpoint potentials for the [CdFe(3)S(4)](2+,+), [CrFe(3)S(4)](2+,+), and [CuFe(3)S(4)](2+,+) couples, E(m) = -470 +/- 15, -440 +/- 10, and +190 +/- 10 mV (vs NHE), respectively, were determined by EPR-monitored redox titrations or direct electrochemistry at a glassy carbon electrode. The trends in redox potential, ground-state spin, and electron delocalization of [MFe(3)S(4)](2+,+) clusters in P. furiosus ferredoxin are discussed as a function of heterometal (M = Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Tl).

  17. Structural Investigations of the Ferredoxin and Terminal Oxygenase Components of the biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenase from Sphingobium yanoikuyae B1

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraro,D.; Brown, E.; Yu, C.; Parales, R.; Gibson, D.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2007-01-01

    The initial step involved in oxidative hydroxylation of monoaromatic and polyaromatic compounds by the microorganism Sphingobium yanoikuyae strain B1 (B1), previously known as Sphingomonas yanoikuyae strain B1 and Beijerinckia sp. strain B1, is performed by a set of multiple terminal Rieske non-heme iron oxygenases. These enzymes share a single electron donor system consisting of a reductase and a ferredoxin (BPDO-F{sub B1}). One of the terminal Rieske oxygenases, biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenase (BPDO-O{sub B1}), is responsible for B1's ability to dihydroxylate large aromatic compounds, such as chrysene and benzo(a)pyrene. Results: In this study, crystal structures of BPDO-O{sub B1} in both native and biphenyl bound forms are described. Sequence and structural comparisons to other Rieske oxygenases show this enzyme to be most similar, with 43.5 % sequence identity, to naphthalene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4. While structurally similar to naphthalene 1,2-dioxygenase, the active site entrance is significantly larger than the entrance for naphthalene 1,2-dioxygenase. Differences in active site residues also allow the binding of large aromatic substrates. There are no major structural changes observed upon binding of the substrate. BPDO-F{sub B1} has large sequence identity to other bacterial Rieske ferredoxins whose structures are known and demonstrates a high structural homology; however, differences in side chain composition and conformation around the Rieske cluster binding site are noted. Conclusion: This is the first structure of a Rieske oxygenase that oxidizes substrates with five aromatic rings to be reported. This ability to catalyze the oxidation of larger substrates is a result of both a larger entrance to the active site as well as the ability of the active site to accommodate larger substrates. While the biphenyl ferredoxin is structurally similar to other Rieske ferredoxins, there are distinct changes in the amino acids near the iron

  18. Welding III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding III, an advanced course in arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with the proficiency necessary for industrial certification. The course objectives, which are outlined first, specify that students will…

  19. NADP+ reduction with reduced ferredoxin and NADP+ reduction with NADH are coupled via an electron-bifurcating enzyme complex in Clostridium kluyveri.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuning; Huang, Haiyan; Moll, Johanna; Thauer, Rudolf K

    2010-10-01

    It was recently found that the cytoplasmic butyryl-coenzyme A (butyryl-CoA) dehydrogenase-EtfAB complex from Clostridium kluyveri couples the exergonic reduction of crotonyl-CoA to butyryl-CoA with NADH and the endergonic reduction of ferredoxin with NADH via flavin-based electron bifurcation. We report here on a second cytoplasmic enzyme complex in C. kluyveri capable of energetic coupling via this novel mechanism. It was found that the purified iron-sulfur flavoprotein complex NfnAB couples the exergonic reduction of NADP+ with reduced ferredoxin (Fdred) and the endergonic reduction of NADP+ with NADH in a reversible reaction: Fdred2-+NADH+2 NADP++H+=Fdox+NAD++2 NADPH. The role of this energy-converting enzyme complex in the ethanol-acetate fermentation of C. kluyveri is discussed.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the reduced Rieske-type [2Fe–2S] ferredoxin derived from Pseudomonas sp. strain KKS102

    SciTech Connect

    Senda, Miki; Kishigami, Shinya; Kimura, Shigenobu; Senda, Toshiya

    2007-04-01

    The reduced form of BphA3, a Rieske-type [2Fe–2S] ferredoxin, was crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method under anaerobic conditions. A molecular-replacement calculation yielded a satisfactory solution. The reduced form of BphA3, a Rieske-type [2Fe–2S] ferredoxin component of the biphenyl dioxygenase BphA from Pseudomonas sp. strain KKS102, was crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method under anaerobic conditions. The crystal belongs to space group P3{sub 1}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 49.6, c = 171.9 Å, and diffracts to a resolution of 1.95 Å. A molecular-replacement calculation using oxidized BphA3 as a search model yielded a satisfactory solution.

  1. Kinetic Properties of Pyruvate Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase of Intestinal Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria Desulfovibrio piger Vib-7 and Desulfomicrobium sp. Rod-9.

    PubMed

    Kushkevych, Ivan V

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal sulfate-reducing bacteria reduce sulfate ions to hydrogen sulfide causing inflammatory bowel diseases of humans and animals. The bacteria consume lactate as electron donor which is oxidized to acetate via pyruvate in process of the dissimilatory sulfate reduction. Pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase activity and the kinetic properties of the enzyme from intestinal sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio piger and Desulfomicrobium sp. have never been well-characterized and have not been yet studied. In this paper we present for the first time the specific activity of pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase and the kinetic properties of the enzyme in cell-free extracts of both D. piger Vib-7 and Desulfomicrobium sp. Rod-9 intestinal bacterial strains. Microbiological, biochemical, biophysical and statistical methods were used in this work. The optimal temperature (+35°C) and pH 8.5 for enzyme reaction were determined. The spectral analysis of the puri- fied pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase from the cell-free extracts was demonstrated. Analysis of the kinetic properties of the studied enzyme was carried out. Initial (instantaneous) reaction velocity (V0), maximum amount of the product of reaction (Pmax), the reaction time (half saturation period) and maximum velocity of the pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase reaction (V ) were defined. Michaelis constants (Km) of the enzyme reaction were calculated for both intestinal bacterial strains. The studies of the kinetic enzyme properties in the intestinal sulfate-reducing bacteria strains in detail can be prospects for clarifying the etiological role of these bacteria in the development of inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:26373169

  2. Kinetic Properties of Pyruvate Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase of Intestinal Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria Desulfovibrio piger Vib-7 and Desulfomicrobium sp. Rod-9.

    PubMed

    Kushkevych, Ivan V

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal sulfate-reducing bacteria reduce sulfate ions to hydrogen sulfide causing inflammatory bowel diseases of humans and animals. The bacteria consume lactate as electron donor which is oxidized to acetate via pyruvate in process of the dissimilatory sulfate reduction. Pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase activity and the kinetic properties of the enzyme from intestinal sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio piger and Desulfomicrobium sp. have never been well-characterized and have not been yet studied. In this paper we present for the first time the specific activity of pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase and the kinetic properties of the enzyme in cell-free extracts of both D. piger Vib-7 and Desulfomicrobium sp. Rod-9 intestinal bacterial strains. Microbiological, biochemical, biophysical and statistical methods were used in this work. The optimal temperature (+35°C) and pH 8.5 for enzyme reaction were determined. The spectral analysis of the puri- fied pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase from the cell-free extracts was demonstrated. Analysis of the kinetic properties of the studied enzyme was carried out. Initial (instantaneous) reaction velocity (V0), maximum amount of the product of reaction (Pmax), the reaction time (half saturation period) and maximum velocity of the pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase reaction (V ) were defined. Michaelis constants (Km) of the enzyme reaction were calculated for both intestinal bacterial strains. The studies of the kinetic enzyme properties in the intestinal sulfate-reducing bacteria strains in detail can be prospects for clarifying the etiological role of these bacteria in the development of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  3. Overexpression in E. coli of the complete petH gene product from Anabaena: purification and properties of a 49 kDa ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Júlvez, M; Hurley, J K; Tollin, G; Gómez-Moreno, C; Fillat, M F

    1996-10-17

    The complete petH gene product from Anabaena PCC 7119 has been overexpressed in E. coli and purified in order to determine the influence of the N-terminal extension on the interaction of ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase with its substrates. The intact 49 kDa FNR can be easily purified in a two-step procedure using batch extraction with DEAE-cellulose followed by Cibacron blue-Sepharose chromatography of the proteins unbound to DEAE. Isoelectric focusing of FNR shows several forms, with the major band at pH 6.26. The presence of the N-terminal extension increases the K(m) of FNR for NADPH by 4-fold and by 16.4-fold in the reduction reactions of DCPIP and cytochrome c. However, the K(m) for ferredoxin is 12-fold lower in the reaction catalyzed by the 49 kDa FNR than with the 36 kDa protein. This indicates that the presence of the third domain favours the interaction of FNR with ferredoxin, possibly due to the more positive net charge of the N-terminal extension. Comparable rate constants for both enzymes, were obtained for the photoreduction of NADP+ using photosynthetic membranes and also using rapid kinetic techniques. Slightly different ionic strength dependences of the rate constants were obtained, nevertheless, for both forms of the enzyme. These are a consequence of the structural differences that the proteins show at the N-terminal and of their effect on the interaction with ferredoxin.

  4. Isoprenoid biosynthesis in plant chloroplasts via the MEP pathway: direct thylakoid/ferredoxin-dependent photoreduction of GcpE/IspG.

    PubMed

    Seemann, Myriam; Tse Sum Bui, Bernadette; Wolff, Murielle; Miginiac-Maslow, Myroslawa; Rohmer, Michel

    2006-03-01

    In the methylerythritol phosphate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis, the GcpE/IspG enzyme catalyzes the conversion of 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate into (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methylbut-2-enyl diphosphate. This reaction requires a double one-electron transfer involving a [4Fe-4S] cluster. A thylakoid preparation from spinach chloroplasts was capable in the presence of light to act as sole electron donor for the plant GcpE Arabidopsis thaliana in the absence of any pyridine nucleotide. This is in sharp contrast with the bacterial Escherichia coli GcpE, which requires flavodoxin/flavodoxin reductase and NADPH as reducing system and represents the first proof that the electron flow from photosynthesis can directly act in phototrophic organisms as reducer in the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway, most probably via ferredoxin, in the absence of any reducing cofactor. In the dark, the plant GcpE catalysis requires in addition of ferredoxin NADP(+)/ferredoxin oxido-reductase and NADPH as electron shuttle.

  5. The Rnf Complex of Clostridium ljungdahlii Is a Proton-Translocating Ferredoxin:NAD(+) Oxidoreductase Essential for Autotrophic Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, PL; Zhang, T; Dar, SA; Leang, C; Lovley, DR

    2012-12-26

    It has been predicted that the Rnf complex of Clostridium ljungdahlii is a proton-translocating ferredoxin: NAD(+) oxidoreductase which contributes to ATP synthesis by an H+-translocating ATPase under both autotrophic and heterotrophic growth conditions. The recent development of methods for genetic manipulation of C. ljungdahlii made it possible to evaluate the possible role of the Rnf complex in energy conservation. Disruption of the C. ljungdahlii rnf operon inhibited autotrophic growth. ATP synthesis, proton gradient, membrane potential, and proton motive force collapsed in the Rnf-deficient mutant with H-2 as the electron source and CO2 as the electron acceptor. Heterotrophic growth was hindered in the absence of a functional Rnf complex, as ATP synthesis, proton gradient, and proton motive force were significantly reduced with fructose as the electron donor. Growth of the Rnf-deficient mutant was also inhibited when no source of fixed nitrogen was provided. These results demonstrate that the Rnf complex of C. ljungdahlii is responsible for translocation of protons across the membrane to elicit energy conservation during acetogenesis and is a multifunctional device also implicated in nitrogen fixation. IMPORTANCE Mechanisms for energy conservation in the acetogen Clostridium ljungdahlii are of interest because of its potential value as a chassis for the production of biocommodities with novel electron donors such as carbon monoxide, syngas, and electrons derived from electrodes. Characterizing the components implicated in the chemiosmotic ATP synthesis during acetogenesis by C. ljungdahlii is a prerequisite for the development of highly productive strains. The Rnf complex has been considered the prime candidate to be the pump responsible for the formation of an ion gradient coupled with ATP synthesis in multiple acetogens. However, experimental evidence for a proton-pumping Rnf complex has been lacking. This study establishes the C. ljungdahlii Rnf complex as

  6. Role of the [Fe4S4] cluster in mediating disulfide reduction in spinach ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase.

    PubMed

    Staples, C R; Gaymard, E; Stritt-Etter, A L; Telser, J; Hoffman, B M; Schürmann, P; Knaff, D B; Johnson, M K

    1998-03-31

    Thioredoxin reduction in plant chloroplasts is catalyzed by a unique class of disulfide reductases which use a one-electron donor, [Fe2S2]2+,+ ferredoxin, and has an active site involving a disulfide in close proximity to a [Fe4S4]2+ cluster. In this study, spinach ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase (FTR) reduced with stoichiometric amounts of reduced benzyl viologen or frozen under turnover conditions in the presence of thioredoxin is shown to exhibit a slowly relaxing S = 1/2 resonance (g = 2.11, 2.00, 1.98) identical to that of a modified form of the enzyme in which one of the cysteines of the active-site disulfide is alkylated with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM-FTR). Hence, in accord with the previous proposal [Staples, C.R., Ameyibor, E., Fu, W., Gardet-Salvi, L., Stritt-Etter, A.-L., Schürmann, P., Knaff, D.B., and Johnson, M.K. (1996) Biochemistry 35, 11425-11434], NEM-FTR is shown to be a stable analogue of a one-electron-reduced enzymatic intermediate. The properties of the Fe-S cluster in NEM-FTR have been further investigated by resonance Raman and electron nuclear double resonance spectroscopies; the results, taken together with the previous UV-visible absorption, variable temperature magnetic circular dichroism, and resonance Raman data, indicate the presence of a novel type of [Fe4S4]3+ cluster that is coordinated by five cysteinates with little unpaired spin density delocalized onto the cluster-associated cysteine of the active-site disulfide. While the ligation site of the fifth cysteine remains undefined, the best candidate is a cluster bridging sulfide. On the basis of the spectroscopic and redox results, mechanistic schemes are proposed for the benzyl viologen-mediated two-electron-reduction of FTR and the catalytic mechanism of FTR. The catalytic mechanism involves novel S-based cluster chemistry to facilitate electron transfer to the active-site disulfide resulting in covalent attachment of the electron-transfer cysteine and generation of the free

  7. Molecular and biochemical characterization of bifunctional pyruvate decarboxylases and pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductases from Thermotoga maritima and Thermotoga hypogea.

    PubMed

    Eram, Mohammad S; Wong, Alton; Oduaran, Erica; Ma, Kesen

    2015-12-01

    Hyperthermophilic bacteria Thermotoga maritima and Thermotoga hypogea produce ethanol as a metabolic end product, which is resulted from acetaldehyde reduction catalysed by an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). However, the enzyme that is involved in the production of acetaldehyde from pyruvate is not well characterized. An oxygen sensitive and coenzyme A-dependent pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) activity was found to be present in cell free extracts of T. maritima and T. hypogea. Both enzymes were purified and found to have pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR) activity, indicating their bifunctionality. Both PDC and POR activities from each of the purified enzymes were characterized in regards to their optimal assay conditions including pH dependency, oxygen sensitivity, thermal stability, temperature dependency and kinetic parameters. The close relatedness of the PORs that was shown by sequence analysis could be an indication of the presence of such bifunctionality in other hyperthermophilic bacteria. This is the first report of a bifunctional PDC/POR enzyme in hyperthermophilic bacteria. The PDC and the previously reported ADHs are most likely the key enzymes catalysing the production of ethanol from pyruvate in bacterial hyperthermophiles.

  8. Arabidopsis tic62 trol mutant lacking thylakoid-bound ferredoxin-NADP+ oxidoreductase shows distinct metabolic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Lintala, Minna; Schuck, Natalie; Thormählen, Ina; Jungfer, Andreas; Weber, Katrin L; Weber, Andreas P M; Geigenberger, Peter; Soll, Jürgen; Bölter, Bettina; Mulo, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP+ oxidoreductase (FNR), functioning in the last step of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain, exists both as a soluble protein in the chloroplast stroma and tightly attached to chloroplast membranes. Surface plasmon resonance assays showed that the two FNR isoforms, LFNR1 and LFNR2, are bound to the thylakoid membrane via the C-terminal domains of Tic62 and TROL proteins in a pH-dependent manner. The tic62 trol double mutants contained a reduced level of FNR, exclusively found in the soluble stroma. Although the mutant plants showed no visual phenotype or defects in the function of photosystems under any conditions studied, a low ratio of NADPH/NADP+ was detected. Since the CO₂ fixation capacity did not differ between the tic62 trol plants and wild-type, it seems that the plants are able to funnel reducing power to most crucial reactions to ensure survival and fitness of the plants. However, the activity of malate dehydrogenase was down-regulated in the mutant plants. Apparently, the plastid metabolism is able to cope with substantial changes in directing the electrons from the light reactions to stromal metabolism and thus only few differences are visible in steady-state metabolite pool sizes of the tic62 trol plants. PMID:24043709

  9. Physiological roles of pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase and pyruvate formate-lyase in Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum JW/SL-YS485

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jilai; Olson, Daniel G.; Lanahan, Anthony A.; Tian, Liang; Murphy, Sean Jean-Loup; Lo, Jonathan; Lynd, Lee R.

    2015-09-15

    We report that Thermoanaerobacter saccharolyticum is a thermophilic microorganism that has been engineered to produce ethanol at high titer (30–70 g/L) and greater than 90 % theoretical yield. However, few genes involved in pyruvate to ethanol production pathway have been unambiguously identified. In T. saccharolyticum, the products of six putative pfor gene clusters and one pfl gene may be responsible for the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. To gain insights into the physiological roles of PFOR and PFL, we studied the effect of deletions of several genes thought to encode these activities. We found that that pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase enzyme (PFOR) is encoded by the pforA gene and plays a key role in pyruvate dissimilation. We further demonstrated that pyruvate formate-lyase activity (PFL) is encoded by the pfl gene. Although the pfl gene is normally expressed at low levels, it is crucial for biosynthesis in T. saccharolyticum. In pforA deletion strains, pfl expression increased and was able to partially compensate for the loss of PFOR activity. Deletion of both pforA and pfl resulted in a strain that required acetate and formate for growth and produced lactate as the primary fermentation product, achieving 88 % theoretical lactate yield. PFOR encoded by Tsac_0046 and PFL encoded by Tsac_0628 are only two routes for converting pyruvate to acetyl-CoA in T. saccharolyticum. The physiological role of PFOR is pyruvate dissimilation, whereas that of PFL is supplying C1 units for biosynthesis.

  10. Arabidopsis tic62 trol mutant lacking thylakoid-bound ferredoxin-NADP+ oxidoreductase shows distinct metabolic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Lintala, Minna; Schuck, Natalie; Thormählen, Ina; Jungfer, Andreas; Weber, Katrin L; Weber, Andreas P M; Geigenberger, Peter; Soll, Jürgen; Bölter, Bettina; Mulo, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP+ oxidoreductase (FNR), functioning in the last step of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain, exists both as a soluble protein in the chloroplast stroma and tightly attached to chloroplast membranes. Surface plasmon resonance assays showed that the two FNR isoforms, LFNR1 and LFNR2, are bound to the thylakoid membrane via the C-terminal domains of Tic62 and TROL proteins in a pH-dependent manner. The tic62 trol double mutants contained a reduced level of FNR, exclusively found in the soluble stroma. Although the mutant plants showed no visual phenotype or defects in the function of photosystems under any conditions studied, a low ratio of NADPH/NADP+ was detected. Since the CO₂ fixation capacity did not differ between the tic62 trol plants and wild-type, it seems that the plants are able to funnel reducing power to most crucial reactions to ensure survival and fitness of the plants. However, the activity of malate dehydrogenase was down-regulated in the mutant plants. Apparently, the plastid metabolism is able to cope with substantial changes in directing the electrons from the light reactions to stromal metabolism and thus only few differences are visible in steady-state metabolite pool sizes of the tic62 trol plants.

  11. Role of specific residues in coenzyme binding, charge-transfer complex formation, and catalysis in Anabaena ferredoxin NADP+-reductase.

    PubMed

    Peregrina, José Ramón; Sánchez-Azqueta, Ana; Herguedas, Beatriz; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Medina, Milagros

    2010-09-01

    Two transient charge-transfer complexes (CTC) form prior and upon hydride transfer (HT) in the reversible reaction of the FAD-dependent ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase (FNR) with NADP+/H, FNR(ox)-NADPH (CTC-1), and FNR(rd)-NADP+ (CTC-2). Spectral properties of both CTCs, as well as the corresponding interconversion HT rates, are here reported for several Anabaena FNR site-directed mutants. The need for an adequate initial interaction between the 2'P-AMP portion of NADP+/H and FNR that provides subsequent conformational changes leading to CTC formation is further confirmed. Stronger interactions between the isoalloxazine and nicotinamide rings might relate with faster HT processes, but exceptions are found upon distortion of the active centre. Thus, within the analyzed FNR variants, there is no strict correlation between the stability of the transient CTCs formation and the rate of the subsequent HT. Kinetic isotope effects suggest that, while in the WT, vibrational enhanced modulation of the active site contributes to the tunnel probability of HT; complexes of some of the active site mutants with the coenzyme hardly allow the relative movement of isoalloxazine and nicotinamide rings along the HT reaction. The architecture of the WT FNR active site precisely contributes to reduce the stacking probability between the isoalloxazine and nicotinamide rings in the catalytically competent complex, modulating the angle and distance between the N5 of the FAD isoalloxazine and the C4 of the coenzyme nicotinamide to values that ensure efficient HT processes.

  12. Ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase in junction with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots: characteristics of an enzymatically active nanohybrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczepaniak, Krzysztof; Worch, Remigiusz; Grzyb, Joanna

    2013-05-01

    Ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase (FNR) is a plant and cyanobacterial photosynthetic enzyme, also found in non-photosynthetic tissues, where it is involved in redox reactions of biosynthetic pathways. In vivo it transfers electrons to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP+), forming its reduced version, NADPH, while in vitro it can also use NADPH to reduce several substrates, such as ferricyanide, various quinones and nitriles. As an oxidoreductase catalyzing reaction of a broad range of substrates, FNR may be used in biotechnological processes. Quantum dots are semiconductor nanocrystals of a few to several nanometers diameter, having very useful luminescent properties. We present the spectroscopic and functional characteristics of a covalent conjugation of FNR and CdSe/ZnS quantum dots. Two types of quantum dots, of different diameter and emission maximum (550 and 650 nm), were used for comparison. Steady-state fluorescence and gel electrophoresis confirmed efficient conjugation, while fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) allowed for determination of the conjugates’ radii. The nanohybrids sustained enzymatic activity; however, changes in maximal reaction rates and Michaelis constant were found. Detailed analysis of the kinetic parameters showed that the changes in the enzyme activity depend on the substrate used for activity measurement but also on the size of the quantum dots. The presented nanohybrids, as the first example using plant and photosynthetic enzyme as a protein partner, may became a tool to study photosynthesis as well as other biosynthetic and biotechnological processes, involving enzymatically catalyzed electron transfer.

  13. The Rnf Complex of Clostridium ljungdahlii Is a Proton-Translocating Ferredoxin:NAD+ Oxidoreductase Essential for Autotrophic Growth

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Zhang, Tian; Dar, Shabir A.; Leang, Ching; Lovley, Derek R.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT It has been predicted that the Rnf complex of Clostridium ljungdahlii is a proton-translocating ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase which contributes to ATP synthesis by an H+-translocating ATPase under both autotrophic and heterotrophic growth conditions. The recent development of methods for genetic manipulation of C. ljungdahlii made it possible to evaluate the possible role of the Rnf complex in energy conservation. Disruption of the C. ljungdahlii rnf operon inhibited autotrophic growth. ATP synthesis, proton gradient, membrane potential, and proton motive force collapsed in the Rnf-deficient mutant with H2 as the electron source and CO2 as the electron acceptor. Heterotrophic growth was hindered in the absence of a functional Rnf complex, as ATP synthesis, proton gradient, and proton motive force were significantly reduced with fructose as the electron donor. Growth of the Rnf-deficient mutant was also inhibited when no source of fixed nitrogen was provided. These results demonstrate that the Rnf complex of C. ljungdahlii is responsible for translocation of protons across the membrane to elicit energy conservation during acetogenesis and is a multifunctional device also implicated in nitrogen fixation. PMID:23269825

  14. A second isoform of the ferredoxin:NADP oxidoreductase generated by an in-frame initiation of translation

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jean-Claude; Ughy, Bettina; Lagoutte, Bernard; Ajlani, Ghada

    2006-01-01

    Ferredoxin:NADP oxidoreductases (FNRs) constitute a family of flavoenzymes that catalyze the exchange of reducing equivalents between one-electron carriers and the two-electron-carrying NADP(H). The main role of FNRs in cyanobacteria and leaf plastids is to provide the NADPH for photoautotrophic metabolism. In root plastids, a distinct FNR isoform is found that has been postulated to function in the opposite direction, providing electrons for nitrogen assimilation at the expense of NADPH generated by heterotrophic metabolism. A multiple gene family encodes FNR isoenzymes in plants, whereas there is only one FNR gene (petH) in cyanobacteria. Nevertheless, we detected two FNR isoforms in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803. One of them (FNRS ≈34 kDa) is similar in size to the plastid FNR and specifically accumulates under heterotrophic conditions, whereas the other one (FNRL ≈46 kDa) contains an extra N-terminal domain that allows its association with the phycobilisome. Site-directed mutants allowed us to conclude that the smaller isoform, FNRS, is produced from an internal ribosome entry site within the petH ORF. Thus we have uncovered a mechanism by which two isoforms are produced from a single gene, which is, to our knowledge, novel in photosynthetic bacteria. Our results strongly suggest that FNRL is an NADP+ reductase, whereas FNRS is an NADPH oxidase. PMID:17116880

  15. EPR spectroscopic and computational characterization of the hydroxyethylidene-thiamine pyrophosphate radical intermediate of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Mansoorabadi, Steven O; Seravalli, Javier; Furdui, Cristina; Krymov, Vladimir; Gerfen, Gary J; Begley, Tadhg P; Melnick, Jonathan; Ragsdale, Stephen W; Reed, George H

    2006-06-13

    The radical intermediate of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) from Moorella thermoacetica was characterized using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at X-band and D-band microwave frequencies. EPR spectra, obtained with various combinations of isotopically labeled substrate (pyruvate) and coenzyme (thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP)), were analyzed by spectral simulations. Parameters obtained from the simulations were compared with those predicted from electronic structure calculations on various radical structures. The g-values and 14N/15N-hyperfine splittings obtained from the spectra are consistent with a planar, hydroxyethylidene-thiamine pyrophosphate (HE-TPP) pi-radical, in which spin is delocalized onto the thiazolium sulfur and nitrogen atoms. The 1H-hyperfine splittings from the methyl group of pyruvate and the 13C-hyperfine splittings from C2 of both pyruvate and TPP are consistent with a model in which the pyruvate-derived oxygen atom of the HE-TPP radical forms a hydrogen bond. The hyperfine splitting constants and g-values are not compatible with those predicted for a nonplanar, sigma/n-type cation radical. PMID:16752902

  16. Flexibility of thiamine diphosphate revealed by kinetic crystallographic studies of the reaction of pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase with pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Cavazza, Christine; Contreras-Martel, Carlos; Pieulle, Laetitia; Chabrière, Eric; Hatchikian, E Claude; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C

    2006-02-01

    Pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductases (PFOR) are unique among thiamine pyrophosphate (ThDP)-containing enzymes in giving rise to a rather stable cofactor-based free-radical species upon the decarboxylation of their first substrate, pyruvate. We have obtained snapshots of unreacted and partially reacted (probably as a tetrahedral intermediate) pyruvate-PFOR complexes at different time intervals. We conclude that pyruvate decarboxylation involves very limited substrate-to-product movements but a significant displacement of the thiazolium moiety of ThDP. In this respect, PFOR seems to differ substantially from other ThDP-containing enzymes, such as transketolase and pyruvate decarboxylase. In addition, exposure of PFOR to oxygen in the presence of pyruvate results in significant inhibition of catalytic activity, both in solution and in the crystals. Examination of the crystal structure of inhibited PFOR suggests that the loss of activity results from oxime formation at the 4' amino substituent of the pyrimidine moiety of ThDP. PMID:16472741

  17. Regulation of enzyme activity of alcohol dehydrogenase through its interactions with pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase in Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Wang, Quanhui; Tong, Wei; Bai, Xue; Chen, Zhen; Zhao, Jingjing; Zhang, Jiyuan; Liu, Siqi

    2012-01-20

    Alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) from thermophilic microorganisms are interesting enzymes that have their potential applications in biotechnology and potentially provide insight into the mechanisms of action of thermo-tolerant proteins. The molecular mechanisms of ADHs under thermal stress in vivo have yet to be explored. Herein, we employed a proteomic strategy to survey the possible interactions of secondary-ADH (2-ADH) with other proteins in Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis (T. tengcongensis) cultured at 75°C and found that 2-ADH, pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) and several glycolytic enzymes coexisted in a protein complex. Using anion exchange chromatography, the elution profile indicated that the native 2-ADH was present in two forms, PFOR-bound and PFOR-free. Immuno-precipitation and pull down analysis further validated the interactions between 2-ADH and PFOR. The kinetic behaviours of 2-ADH either in the recombinant or native form were evaluated with different substrates. The enzyme activity of 2-ADH was inhibited in a non-competitive mode by PFOR, implying the interaction of 2-ADH and PFOR negatively regulated alcohol formation. In T. tengcongensis, PFOR is an enzyme complex located at the upstream of 2-ADH in the alcohol generation pathway. These findings, therefore, offered a plausible mechanism for how alcohol metabolism is regulated by hetero-interactions between 2-ADH and PFOR, especially in anaerobic thermophiles. PMID:22222371

  18. Synthesis and Antimicrobial Evaluation of Amixicile-Based Inhibitors of the Pyruvate-Ferredoxin Oxidoreductases of Anaerobic Bacteria and Epsilonproteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Andrew J; Bruce, Alexandra M; Gineste, Catherine; Ballard, T Eric; Olekhnovich, Igor N; Macdonald, Timothy L; Hoffman, Paul S

    2016-07-01

    Amixicile is a promising derivative of nitazoxanide (an antiparasitic therapeutic) developed to treat systemic infections caused by anaerobic bacteria, anaerobic parasites, and members of the Epsilonproteobacteria (Campylobacter and Helicobacter). Amixicile selectively inhibits pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) and related enzymes by inhibiting the function of the vitamin B1 cofactor (thiamine pyrophosphate) by a novel mechanism. Here, we interrogate the amixicile scaffold, guided by docking simulations, direct PFOR inhibition assays, and MIC tests against Clostridium difficile, Campylobacter jejuni, and Helicobacter pylori Docking simulations revealed that the nitro group present in nitazoxanide interacts with the protonated N4'-aminopyrimidine of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP). The ortho-propylamine on the benzene ring formed an electrostatic interaction with an aspartic acid moiety (B456) of PFOR that correlated with improved PFOR-inhibitory activity and potency by MIC tests. Aryl substitution with electron-withdrawing groups and substitutions of the propylamine with other alkyl amines or nitrogen-containing heterocycles both improved PFOR inhibition and, in many cases, biological activity against C. difficile Docking simulation results correlate well with mechanistic enzymology and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies that show members of this class of antimicrobials to be specific inhibitors of vitamin B1 function by proton abstraction, which is both novel and likely to limit mutation-based drug resistance. PMID:27090174

  19. Overproduction of stromal ferredoxin:NADPH oxidoreductase in H2O 2-accumulating Brassica napus leaf protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Rajesh Kumar; Satoh, Mamoru; Kado, Sayaka; Mishina, Kohei; Anma, Misato; Enami, Kazuhiko; Hanaoka, Mitsumasa; Watanabe, Masami

    2014-12-01

    The isolation of Brassica napus leaf protoplasts induces reactive oxygen species generation and accumulation in the chloroplasts. An activated isoform of NADPH oxidase-like protein was detected in the protoplasts and the protoplast chloroplasts. The purpose of this study is to define the NADH oxidase-like activities in the H2O2-accumulating protoplast chloroplasts. Proteomic analysis of this protein revealed an isoform of ferredoxin:NADPH oxidoreductase (FNR1). While leaves highly expressed the LFNR1 transcript, protoplasts decreased the expression significantly. The protoplast chloroplasts predominantly expressed soluble FNR1 proteins. While the albino leaves of white kale (Brassica oleracea var. acephala f. tricolor cv. white pigeon) expressed FNR1 protein at the same level as B. napus leaves, the protoplasts of albino leaves displayed reduced FNR1 expression. The albino leaf protoplasts of white kale generated and accumulated H2O2 in the cytoplasm and on the plasma membrane. Intracellular pH showed that the chloroplasts were acidic, which suggest that excess H(+) was generated in chloroplast stroma. NADPH content of the protoplast chloroplasts increased by over sixfold during the isolation of protoplasts. This study reports a possibility of mediating electrons to oxygen by an overproduced soluble FNR, and suggests that the FNR has a function in utilizing any excess reducing power of NADPH.

  20. Incorporation of iron into Tritrichomonas foetus cell compartments reveals ferredoxin as a major iron-binding protein in hydrogenosomes.

    PubMed

    Suchan, Pavel; Vyoral, Daniel; Petrák, Jirí; Sut'ák, Robert; Rasoloson, Dominique; Nohýnková, Eva; Dolezal, Pavel; Tachezy, Jan

    2003-07-01

    The intracellular transport of iron and its incorporation into organelles are poorly understood processes in eukaryotes and virtually unknown in parasitic protists. The transport of iron is of particular interest in trichomonads, which possess hydrogenosomes instead of mitochondria. The metabolic functions of hydrogenosomes, which contain a specific set of FeS proteins, entirely depend on iron acquisition. In this work the incorporation of iron into the cattle parasite Tritrichomonas foetus was monitored. Iron was efficiently taken up from (59)Fe-nitrilotriacetic acid and accumulated in the cytosol (88.9 %) and hydrogenosomes (4.7 % of the total radioactivity). Using atomic absorption spectrophotometry, an unusually high steady-state iron concentration in hydrogenosomes was determined [54.4+/-1.1 nmol Fe (mg protein)(-1)]. The concentration of iron in the cytosol was 13.4+/-0.5 nmol Fe (mg protein)(-1). Qualitative analysis of incorporated iron was performed using native gradient PAGE. The majority of the (59)Fe in the cytosol appeared as the labile-iron pool, which represents weakly bound iron associated with compounds of molecular mass ranging from 5000 to 30000 Da. Ferritin was not observed in Tt. foetus, nor in two other anaerobic protists, Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia intestinalis. Analysis of Tt. foetus hydrogenosomes showed at least nine iron-binding compounds, which were absent in metronidazole-resistant mutants. The major iron-binding compound was identified as [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin of the adrenodoxin type.

  1. An analysis of g strain in the EPR of two [2Fe2S] ferredoxins. Evidence for a protein rigidity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearshen, D. O.; Hagen, W. R.; Sands, R. H.; Grande, H. J.; Crespi, H. L.; Gunsalus, I. C.; Dunham, W. R.

    Replacing current notions of a paramagnetic center in a metalloprotein as a single entity in vivo with the more realistic concept of an ensemble of spin systems, each uniquely disturbed by its own surrounding protein, leads to a rigorous description of the spectroscopic factor, g, as a random variable whose statistical properties contain information on the rigidity of the protein. Generation of a consistent set of accurate simulations of very low-noise, multifrvquency (3, 9, 15 GHz) EPR data from selected S = {1}/{2} proteins has now been achieved. This consistency lends support to the physical and biological inferences drawn from such simulations. The spectral contribution of magnetic hyperfine line-broadening is minimized by studying the 56Fe reconstituted [2Fe2S] cluster in fully deuterated ferredoxin from Synechococcus lividus and the 2H 2O exchanged [2Fe2S] ferredoxin from Pseudomonas putida. High-resolution Mössbauer data on oxidized and reduced 57Fe reconstituted S. lividus ferredoxin are also presented. The oxidized spectrum shows that the inequivalence of the two ferric ions in a [2Fe2S] cluster can be resolved as two Mössbauer lines. The complete absence of this splitting in the ferric fines of the reduced spectrum is definitive proof that the reducing electron always resides at the same 56Fe atom in frozen aqueous solutions. To explain the distributed nature of the paramagnetic site in the ferredoxins, three models are considered: (1) a multiplicity of EPR states; (2) external perturbations to the molecular Hamiltonian; (3) a distribution in the crystal field Hamiltonian parameters. The first model is discarded, the second is possible but difficult to verify, and the third model is shown to fit the data well. The latter comparison requires a correction to literature expressions for the g and A tensors in [2Fe2S] clusters. Statistical analysis strongly suggests that the EPR of metalloproteins in its details is a reflection of protein

  2. Light-regulated changes in abundance and polyribosome association of ferredoxin mRNA are dependent on photosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Petracek, M E; Dickey, L F; Huber, S C; Thompson, W F

    1997-01-01

    In transgenic tobacco plants containing a pea ferredoxin transcribed region (Fed-1) driven by the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (P35S), light acts at a post-transcriptional level to control the abundance of Fed-1 mRNA in green leaves. To determine whether the light signal for this response involves photosynthesis, we treated transgenic seedlings with or without 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), an inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport. DCMU prevented the normal light response by blocking reaccumulation of Fed-1 transcripts when dark-adapted green plants were returned to the light. In contrast, reaccumulation of light-harvesting complex B (Lhcb) transcripts was unaffected by DCMU treatment. Because Fed-1 light regulation requires translation, we also examined polyribosome profiles. We found that Fed-1 transcripts accumulated on polyribosomes in the light but were found primarily in non-polyribosomal fractions in dark-adapted plants or in illuminated plants exposed to lower than normal light intensity or treated with DCMU. Surprisingly, although Lhcb mRNA abundance was not affected by DCMU, its polyribosomal loading pattern was altered in much the same way as was that of Fed-1 mRNA. In contrast, DCMU had no effect on either the abundance or the polyribosome profiles of endogenous histone H1 or transgenic P35S::CAT transcripts. Thus, our results are consistent with the hypothesis that a process coupled to photosynthesis affects the polyribosome loading of a subset of cytoplasmic mRNAs. PMID:9437868

  3. Physiological roles of pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase and pyruvate formate-lyase in Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum JW/SL-YS485

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Jilai; Olson, Daniel G.; Lanahan, Anthony A.; Tian, Liang; Murphy, Sean Jean-Loup; Lo, Jonathan; Lynd, Lee R.

    2015-09-15

    We report that Thermoanaerobacter saccharolyticum is a thermophilic microorganism that has been engineered to produce ethanol at high titer (30–70 g/L) and greater than 90 % theoretical yield. However, few genes involved in pyruvate to ethanol production pathway have been unambiguously identified. In T. saccharolyticum, the products of six putative pfor gene clusters and one pfl gene may be responsible for the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. To gain insights into the physiological roles of PFOR and PFL, we studied the effect of deletions of several genes thought to encode these activities. We found that that pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase enzymemore » (PFOR) is encoded by the pforA gene and plays a key role in pyruvate dissimilation. We further demonstrated that pyruvate formate-lyase activity (PFL) is encoded by the pfl gene. Although the pfl gene is normally expressed at low levels, it is crucial for biosynthesis in T. saccharolyticum. In pforA deletion strains, pfl expression increased and was able to partially compensate for the loss of PFOR activity. Deletion of both pforA and pfl resulted in a strain that required acetate and formate for growth and produced lactate as the primary fermentation product, achieving 88 % theoretical lactate yield. PFOR encoded by Tsac_0046 and PFL encoded by Tsac_0628 are only two routes for converting pyruvate to acetyl-CoA in T. saccharolyticum. The physiological role of PFOR is pyruvate dissimilation, whereas that of PFL is supplying C1 units for biosynthesis.« less

  4. Plasmodium falciparum ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase His286 plays a dual role in NADP(H) binding and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Crobu, Danila; Canevari, Giulia; Milani, Mario; Pandini, Vittorio; Vanoni, Maria Antonietta; Bolognesi, Martino; Zanetti, Giuliana; Aliverti, Alessandro

    2009-10-13

    The NADP-binding site of Plasmodium falciparum ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase contains two basic residues, His286 and Lys249, conserved within the Plasmodium genus, but not in other plant-type homologues. Previous crystal studies indicated that His286 interacts with the adenine ring and with the 5'-phosphate of 2'-P-AMP, a ligand that mimics the adenylate moiety of NADP(H). Here we show that replacement of His286 with aliphatic residues results both in a decrease in the affinity of the enzyme for NADPH and in a decrease in k(cat), due to a lowered hydride-transfer rate. Unexpectedly, the mutation to Gln produces an enzyme more active than the wild-type one, whereas the change to Lys destabilizes the nicotinamide-isoalloxazine interaction, decreasing k(cat). On the basis of the crystal structure of selected mutants complexed with 2'-P-AMP, we conclude that the His286 side chain plays a dual role in catalysis both by providing binding energy for NADPH and by favoring the catalytically competent orientation of its nicotinamide ring. For the latter function, the H-bonding potential rather than the positively charged state of the His286 imidazole seems sufficient. Furthermore, we show that the Lys249Ala mutation decreases K(m)(NADPH) and K(d) for NADP(+) or 2'-P-AMP by a factor of 10. We propose that the Lys249 side chain participates in substrate recognition by interacting with the 2'-phosphate of NADP(H) and that this interaction was not observed in the crystal form of the enzyme-2'-P-AMP complex due to a conformational perturbation of the substrate-binding loop induced by dimerization.

  5. A single tyrosine hydroxyl group almost entirely controls the NADPH specificity of Plasmodium falciparum ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase.

    PubMed

    Baroni, Sara; Pandini, Vittorio; Vanoni, Maria Antonietta; Aliverti, Alessandro

    2012-05-01

    Plasmodium falciparum ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (FNR) is a FAD-containing enzyme that, in addition to be a promising target of novel antimalarial drugs, represents an excellent model of plant-type FNRs. The cofactor specificity of FNRs depends on differences in both k(cat) and K(m) values for NADPH and NADH. Here, we report that deletion of the hydroxyl group of the conserved Y258 of P. falciparum FNR, which interacts with the 2'-phosphate group of NADPH, selectively decreased the k(cat) of the NADPH-dependent reaction by a factor of 2 to match that of the NADH-dependent one. Rapid-reaction kinetics, active-site titrations with NADP(+), and anaerobic photoreduction experiments indicated that this effect may be the consequence of destabilization of the catalytically competent conformation of bound NADPH. Moreover, because the Y258F replacement increased the K(m) for NADPH 4-fold and decreased that for NADH 3-fold, it led to a drop in the ability of the enzyme to discriminate between the coenzymes from 70- to just 1.5-fold. The impact of the Y258F change was not affected by the presence of the H286Q mutation, which is known to enhance the catalytic activity of the enzyme. Our data highlight the major role played by the Y258 hydroxyl group in determining the coenzyme specificity of P. falciparum FNR. From the general standpoint of engineering the kinetic properties of plant-type FNRs, although P. falciparum FNR is less strictly NADPH-dependent than its homologues, the almost complete abolishment of coenzyme selectivity reported here has never been accomplished before through a single mutation.

  6. Involvement of the pyrophosphate and the 2'-phosphate binding regions of ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase in coenzyme specificity.

    PubMed

    Tejero, Jesús; Martínez-Julvez, Marta; Mayoral, Tomas; Luquita, Alejandra; Sanz-Aparicio, Julia; Hermoso, Juan A; Hurley, John K; Tollin, Gordon; Gómez-Moreno, Carlos; Medina, Milagros

    2003-12-01

    Previous studies indicated that the determinants of coenzyme specificity in ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase (FNR) from Anabaena are situated in the 2'-phosphate (2'-P) NADP+ binding region, and also suggested that other regions must undergo structural rearrangements of the protein backbone during coenzyme binding. Among the residues involved in such specificity could be those located in regions where interaction with the pyrophosphate group of the coenzyme takes place, namely loops 155-160 and 261-268 in Anabaena FNR. In order to learn more about the coenzyme specificity determinants, and to better define the structural basis of coenzyme binding, mutations in the pyrophosphate and 2'-P binding regions of FNR have been introduced. Modification of the pyrophosphate binding region, involving residues Thr-155, Ala-160, and Leu-263, indicates that this region is involved in determining coenzyme specificity and that selected alterations of these positions produce FNR enzymes that are able to bind NAD+. Thus, our results suggest that slightly different structural rearrangements of the backbone chain in the pyrophosphate binding region might determine FNR specificity for the coenzyme. Combined mutations at the 2'-P binding region, involving residues Ser-223, Arg-224, Arg-233, and Tyr-235, in combination with the residues mentioned above in the pyrophosphate binding region have also been carried out in an attempt to increase the FNR affinity for NAD+/H. However, in most cases the analyzed mutants lost the ability for NADP+/H binding and electron transfer, and no major improvements were observed with regard to the efficiency of the reactions with NAD+/H. Therefore, our results confirm that determinants for coenzyme specificity in FNR are also situated in the pyrophosphate binding region and not only in the 2'-P binding region. Such observations also suggest that other regions of the protein, yet to be identified, might also be involved in this process.

  7. Expression of the minor isoform pea ferredoxin in tobacco alters photosynthetic electron partitioning and enhances cyclic electron flow.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Nicolás E; Ceccoli, Romina D; Vía, María V Dalla; Voss, Ingo; Segretin, María E; Bravo-Almonacid, Fernando F; Melzer, Michael; Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza; Scheibe, Renate; Hanke, Guy T

    2013-02-01

    Ferredoxins (Fds) are ferrosulfoproteins that function as low-potential electron carriers in plants. The Fd family is composed of several isoforms that share high sequence homology but differ in functional characteristics. In leaves, at least two isoforms conduct linear and cyclic photosynthetic electron transport around photosystem I, and mounting evidence suggests the existence of at least partial division of duties between these isoforms. To evaluate the contribution of different kinds of Fds to the control of electron fluxes along the photosynthetic electron transport chain, we overexpressed a minor pea (Pisum sativum) Fd isoform (PsFd1) in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. The transplastomic OeFd1 plants exhibited variegated leaves and retarded growth and developmental rates. Photosynthetic studies of these plants indicated a reduction in carbon dioxide assimilation rates, photosystem II photochemistry, and linear electron flow. However, the plants showed an increase in nonphotochemical quenching, better control of excitation pressure at photosystem II, and no evidence of photoinhibition, implying a better dynamic regulation to remove excess energy from the photosynthetic electron transport chain. Finally, analysis of P700 redox status during illumination confirmed that the minor pea Fd isoform promotes enhanced cyclic flow around photosystem I. The two novel features of this work are: (1) that Fd levels achieved in transplastomic plants promote an alternative electron partitioning even under greenhouse light growth conditions, a situation that is exacerbated at higher light intensity measurements; and (2) that an alternative, minor Fd isoform has been overexpressed in plants, giving new evidence of labor division among Fd isoforms. PMID:23370717

  8. Expression of the minor isoform pea ferredoxin in tobacco alters photosynthetic electron partitioning and enhances cyclic electron flow.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Nicolás E; Ceccoli, Romina D; Vía, María V Dalla; Voss, Ingo; Segretin, María E; Bravo-Almonacid, Fernando F; Melzer, Michael; Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza; Scheibe, Renate; Hanke, Guy T

    2013-02-01

    Ferredoxins (Fds) are ferrosulfoproteins that function as low-potential electron carriers in plants. The Fd family is composed of several isoforms that share high sequence homology but differ in functional characteristics. In leaves, at least two isoforms conduct linear and cyclic photosynthetic electron transport around photosystem I, and mounting evidence suggests the existence of at least partial division of duties between these isoforms. To evaluate the contribution of different kinds of Fds to the control of electron fluxes along the photosynthetic electron transport chain, we overexpressed a minor pea (Pisum sativum) Fd isoform (PsFd1) in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. The transplastomic OeFd1 plants exhibited variegated leaves and retarded growth and developmental rates. Photosynthetic studies of these plants indicated a reduction in carbon dioxide assimilation rates, photosystem II photochemistry, and linear electron flow. However, the plants showed an increase in nonphotochemical quenching, better control of excitation pressure at photosystem II, and no evidence of photoinhibition, implying a better dynamic regulation to remove excess energy from the photosynthetic electron transport chain. Finally, analysis of P700 redox status during illumination confirmed that the minor pea Fd isoform promotes enhanced cyclic flow around photosystem I. The two novel features of this work are: (1) that Fd levels achieved in transplastomic plants promote an alternative electron partitioning even under greenhouse light growth conditions, a situation that is exacerbated at higher light intensity measurements; and (2) that an alternative, minor Fd isoform has been overexpressed in plants, giving new evidence of labor division among Fd isoforms.

  9. Amixicile, a novel inhibitor of pyruvate: ferredoxin oxidoreductase, shows efficacy against Clostridium difficile in a mouse infection model.

    PubMed

    Warren, Cirle A; van Opstal, Edward; Ballard, T Eric; Kennedy, Andrew; Wang, Xia; Riggins, Mary; Olekhnovich, Igor; Warthan, Michelle; Kolling, Glynis L; Guerrant, Richard L; Macdonald, Timothy L; Hoffman, Paul S

    2012-08-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a serious diarrheal disease that often develops following prior antibiotic usage. One of the major problems with current therapies (oral vancomycin and metronidazole) is the high rate of recurrence. Nitazoxanide (NTZ), an inhibitor of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) in anaerobic bacteria, parasites, Helicobacter pylori, and Campylobacter jejuni, also shows clinical efficacy against CDI. From a library of ∼250 analogues of NTZ, we identified leads with increased potency for PFOR. MIC screens indicated in vitro activity in the 0.05- to 2-μg/ml range against C. difficile. To improve solubility, we replaced the 2-acetoxy group with propylamine, producing amixicile, a soluble (10 mg/ml), nontoxic (cell-based assay) lead that produced no adverse effects in mice by oral or intraperitoneal (i.p.) routes at 200 mg/kg of body weight/day. In initial efficacy testing in mice treated (20 mg/kg/day, 5 days each) 1 day after receiving a lethal inoculum of C. difficile, amixicile showed slightly less protection than did vancomycin by day 5. However, in an optimized CDI model, amixicile showed equivalence to vancomycin and fidaxomicin at day 5 and there was significantly greater survival produced by amixicile than by the other drugs on day 12. All three drugs were comparable by measures of weight loss/gain and severity of disease. Recurrence of CDI was common for mice treated with vancomycin or fidaxomicin but not for mice receiving amixicile or NTZ. These results suggest that gut repopulation with beneficial (non-PFOR) bacteria, considered essential for protection against CDI, rebounds much sooner with amixicile therapy than with vancomycin or fidaxomicin. If the mouse model is indeed predictive of human CDI disease, then amixicile, a novel PFOR inhibitor, appears to be a very promising new candidate for treatment of CDI. PMID:22585229

  10. Light-regulated changes in abundance and polyribosome association of ferredoxin mRNA are dependent on photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Petracek, M E; Dickey, L F; Huber, S C; Thompson, W F

    1997-12-01

    In transgenic tobacco plants containing a pea ferredoxin transcribed region (Fed-1) driven by the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (P35S), light acts at a post-transcriptional level to control the abundance of Fed-1 mRNA in green leaves. To determine whether the light signal for this response involves photosynthesis, we treated transgenic seedlings with or without 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), an inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport. DCMU prevented the normal light response by blocking reaccumulation of Fed-1 transcripts when dark-adapted green plants were returned to the light. In contrast, reaccumulation of light-harvesting complex B (Lhcb) transcripts was unaffected by DCMU treatment. Because Fed-1 light regulation requires translation, we also examined polyribosome profiles. We found that Fed-1 transcripts accumulated on polyribosomes in the light but were found primarily in non-polyribosomal fractions in dark-adapted plants or in illuminated plants exposed to lower than normal light intensity or treated with DCMU. Surprisingly, although Lhcb mRNA abundance was not affected by DCMU, its polyribosomal loading pattern was altered in much the same way as was that of Fed-1 mRNA. In contrast, DCMU had no effect on either the abundance or the polyribosome profiles of endogenous histone H1 or transgenic P35S::CAT transcripts. Thus, our results are consistent with the hypothesis that a process coupled to photosynthesis affects the polyribosome loading of a subset of cytoplasmic mRNAs.

  11. Expression of the Minor Isoform Pea Ferredoxin in Tobacco Alters Photosynthetic Electron Partitioning and Enhances Cyclic Electron Flow1[W

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Nicolás E.; Ceccoli, Romina D.; Vía, María V. Dalla; Voss, Ingo; Segretin, María E.; Bravo-Almonacid, Fernando F.; Melzer, Michael; Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza; Scheibe, Renate; Hanke, Guy T.

    2013-01-01

    Ferredoxins (Fds) are ferrosulfoproteins that function as low-potential electron carriers in plants. The Fd family is composed of several isoforms that share high sequence homology but differ in functional characteristics. In leaves, at least two isoforms conduct linear and cyclic photosynthetic electron transport around photosystem I, and mounting evidence suggests the existence of at least partial division of duties between these isoforms. To evaluate the contribution of different kinds of Fds to the control of electron fluxes along the photosynthetic electron transport chain, we overexpressed a minor pea (Pisum sativum) Fd isoform (PsFd1) in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. The transplastomic OeFd1 plants exhibited variegated leaves and retarded growth and developmental rates. Photosynthetic studies of these plants indicated a reduction in carbon dioxide assimilation rates, photosystem II photochemistry, and linear electron flow. However, the plants showed an increase in nonphotochemical quenching, better control of excitation pressure at photosystem II, and no evidence of photoinhibition, implying a better dynamic regulation to remove excess energy from the photosynthetic electron transport chain. Finally, analysis of P700 redox status during illumination confirmed that the minor pea Fd isoform promotes enhanced cyclic flow around photosystem I. The two novel features of this work are: (1) that Fd levels achieved in transplastomic plants promote an alternative electron partitioning even under greenhouse light growth conditions, a situation that is exacerbated at higher light intensity measurements; and (2) that an alternative, minor Fd isoform has been overexpressed in plants, giving new evidence of labor division among Fd isoforms. PMID:23370717

  12. Role for Ferredoxin:NAD(P)H Oxidoreductase (FprA) in Sulfate Assimilation and Siderophore Biosynthesis in Pseudomonads

    PubMed Central

    Glassing, Angela; Harper, Justin; Franklin, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Pyridine-2,6-bis(thiocarboxylate) (PDTC), produced by certain pseudomonads, is a sulfur-containing siderophore that binds iron, as well as a wide range of transition metals, and it affects the net hydrolysis of the environmental contaminant carbon tetrachloride. The pathway of PDTC biosynthesis has not been defined. Here, we performed a transposon screen of Pseudomonas putida DSM 3601 to identify genes necessary for PDTC production (Pdt phenotype). Transposon insertions within genes for sulfate assimilation (cysD, cysNC, and cysG [cobA2]) dominated the collection of Pdt mutations. In addition, two insertions were within the gene for the LysR-type transcriptional activator FinR (PP1637). Phenotypic characterization indicated that finR mutants were cysteine bradytrophs. The Pdt phenotype of finR mutants could be complemented by the known target of FinR regulation, fprA (encoding ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase), or by Escherichia coli cysJI (encoding sulfite reductase). These data indicate that fprA is necessary for effective sulfate assimilation by P. putida and that the effect of finR mutation on PDTC production was due to deficient expression of fprA and sulfite reduction. fprA expression in both P. putida and P. aeruginosa was found to be regulated by FinR, but in a manner dependent upon reduced sulfur sources, implicating FinR in sulfur regulatory physiology. The genes and phenotypes identified in this study indicated a strong dependence upon intracellular reduced sulfur/cysteine for PDTC biosynthesis and that pseudomonads utilize sulfite reduction enzymology distinct from that of E. coli and possibly similar to that of chloroplasts and other proteobacteria. PMID:23794620

  13. A single eubacterial origin of eukaryotic pyruvate: ferredoxin oxidoreductase genes: implications for the evolution of anaerobic eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Horner, D S; Hirt, R P; Embley, T M

    1999-09-01

    The iron sulfur protein pyruvate: ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO) is central to energy metabolism in amitochondriate eukaryotes, including those with hydrogenosomes. Thus, revealing the evolutionary history of PFO is critical to understanding the origin(s) of eukaryote anaerobic energy metabolism. We determined a complete PFO sequence for Spironucleus barkhanus, a large fragment of a PFO sequence from Clostridium pasteurianum, and a fragment of a new PFO from Giardia lamblia. Phylogenetic analyses of eubacterial and eukaryotic PFO genes suggest a complex history for PFO, including possible gene duplications and horizontal transfers among eubacteria. Our analyses favor a common origin for eukaryotic cytosolic and hydrogenosomal PFOs from a single eubacterial source, rather than from separate horizontal transfers as previously suggested. However, with the present sampling of genes and species, we were unable to infer a specific eubacterial sister group for eukaryotic PFO. Thus, we find no direct support for the published hypothesis that the donor of eukaryote PFO was the common alpha-proteobacterial ancestor of mitochondria and hydrogenosomes. We also report that several fungi and protists encode proteins with PFO domains that are likely monophyletic with PFOs from anaerobic protists. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, PFO domains combine with fragments of other redox proteins to form fusion proteins which participate in methionine biosynthesis. Our results are consistent with the view that PFO, an enzyme previously considered to be specific to energy metabolism in amitochondriate protists, was present in the common ancestor of contemporary eukaryotes and was retained, wholly or in part, during the evolution of oxygen-dependent and mitochondrion-bearing lineages.

  14. Simultaneous involvement of a tungsten-containing aldehyde:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and a phenylacetaldehyde dehydrogenase in anaerobic phenylalanine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Debnar-Daumler, Carlotta; Seubert, Andreas; Schmitt, Georg; Heider, Johann

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic phenylalanine metabolism in the denitrifying betaproteobacterium Aromatoleum aromaticum is initiated by conversion of phenylalanine to phenylacetate, which is further metabolized via benzoyl-coenzyme A (CoA). The formation of phenylacetate is catalyzed by phenylalanine transaminase, phenylpyruvate decarboxylase, and a phenylacetaldehyde-oxidizing enzyme. The presence of these enzymes was detected in extracts of cells grown with phenylalanine and nitrate. We found that two distinct enzymes are involved in the oxidation of phenylacetaldehyde to phenylacetate, an aldehyde:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (AOR) and a phenylacetaldehyde dehydrogenase (PDH). Based on sequence comparison, growth studies with various tungstate concentrations, and metal analysis of the enriched enzyme, AOR was shown to be a tungsten-containing enzyme, necessitating specific cofactor biosynthetic pathways for molybdenum- and tungsten-dependent enzymes simultaneously. We predict from the genome sequence that most enzymes of molybdopterin biosynthesis are shared, while the molybdate/tungstate uptake systems are duplicated and specialized paralogs of the sulfur-inserting MoaD and the metal-inserting MoeA proteins seem to be involved in dedicating biosynthesis toward molybdenum or tungsten cofactors. We also characterized PDH biochemically and identified both NAD(+) and NADP(+) as electron acceptors. We identified the gene coding for the enzyme and purified a recombinant Strep-tagged PDH variant. The homotetrameric enzyme is highly specific for phenylacetaldehyde, has cooperative kinetics toward the substrate, and shows considerable substrate inhibition. Our data suggest that A. aromaticum utilizes PDH as the primary enzyme during anaerobic phenylalanine degradation, whereas AOR is not essential for the metabolic pathway. We hypothesize a function as a detoxifying enzyme if high aldehyde concentrations accumulate in the cytoplasm, which would lead to substrate inhibition of PDH.

  15. Overexpressing Ferredoxins in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Increase Starch and Oil Yields and Enhance Electric Power Production in a Photo Microbial Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-Fen; Lin, Ji-Yu; Pan, Kui-You; Huang, Chun-Kai; Chu, Ying-Kai

    2015-08-14

    Ferredoxins (FDX) are final electron carrier proteins in the plant photosynthetic pathway, and function as major electron donors in diverse redox-driven metabolic pathways. We previously showed that overexpression of a major constitutively expressed ferredoxin gene PETF in Chlamydomonas decreased the reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and enhanced tolerance to heat stress. In addition to PETF, an endogenous anaerobic induced FDX5 was overexpressed in transgenic Chlamydomonas lines here to address the possible functions of FDX5. All the independent FDX transgenic lines showed decreased cellular ROS levels and enhanced tolerance to heat and salt stresses. The transgenic Chlamydomonas lines accumulated more starch than the wild-type line and this effect increased almost three-fold in conditions of nitrogen depletion. Furthermore, the lipid content was higher in the transgenic lines than in the wild-type line, both with and without nitrogen depletion. Two FDX-overexpressing Chlamydomonas lines were assessed in a photo microbial fuel cell (PMFC); power density production by the transgenic lines was higher than that of the wild-type cells. These findings suggest that overexpression of either PETF or FDX5 can confer tolerance against heat and salt stresses, increase starch and oil production, and raise electric power density in a PMFC.

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the Rieske-type [2Fe–2S] ferredoxin component of biphenyl dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain KKS102

    SciTech Connect

    Senda, Miki; Kimura, Shigenobu; Kishigami, Shinya; Senda, Toshiya

    2006-06-01

    BphA3, a Rieske-type [2Fe–2S] ferredoxin, was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. A molecular-replacement calculation yielded a satisfactory solution. BphA3, a Rieske-type [2Fe–2S] ferredoxin component of a biphenyl dioxygenase (BphA) from Pseudomonas sp. strain KKS102, was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Two crystal forms were obtained from the same conditions. The form I crystal belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 26.3, b = 144.3, c = 61.5 Å, and diffracted to 2.45 Å resolution. The form II crystal belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 26.2, b = 121.3, c = 142.7 Å, and diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution. A molecular-replacement calculation using BphF as a search model yielded a satisfactory solution for both forms.

  17. Overexpressing Ferredoxins in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Increase Starch and Oil Yields and Enhance Electric Power Production in a Photo Microbial Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-Fen; Lin, Ji-Yu; Pan, Kui-You; Huang, Chun-Kai; Chu, Ying-Kai

    2015-01-01

    Ferredoxins (FDX) are final electron carrier proteins in the plant photosynthetic pathway, and function as major electron donors in diverse redox-driven metabolic pathways. We previously showed that overexpression of a major constitutively expressed ferredoxin gene PETF in Chlamydomonas decreased the reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and enhanced tolerance to heat stress. In addition to PETF, an endogenous anaerobic induced FDX5 was overexpressed in transgenic Chlamydomonas lines here to address the possible functions of FDX5. All the independent FDX transgenic lines showed decreased cellular ROS levels and enhanced tolerance to heat and salt stresses. The transgenic Chlamydomonas lines accumulated more starch than the wild-type line and this effect increased almost three-fold in conditions of nitrogen depletion. Furthermore, the lipid content was higher in the transgenic lines than in the wild-type line, both with and without nitrogen depletion. Two FDX-overexpressing Chlamydomonas lines were assessed in a photo microbial fuel cell (PMFC); power density production by the transgenic lines was higher than that of the wild-type cells. These findings suggest that overexpression of either PETF or FDX5 can confer tolerance against heat and salt stresses, increase starch and oil production, and raise electric power density in a PMFC. PMID:26287179

  18. Overexpressing Ferredoxins in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Increase Starch and Oil Yields and Enhance Electric Power Production in a Photo Microbial Fuel Cell

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li-Fen; Lin, Ji-Yu; Pan, Kui-You; Huang, Chun-Kai; Chu, Ying-Kai

    2015-01-01

    Ferredoxins (FDX) are final electron carrier proteins in the plant photosynthetic pathway, and function as major electron donors in diverse redox-driven metabolic pathways. We previously showed that overexpression of a major constitutively expressed ferredoxin gene PETF in Chlamydomonas decreased the reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and enhanced tolerance to heat stress. In addition to PETF, an endogenous anaerobic induced FDX5 was overexpressed in transgenic Chlamydomonas lines here to address the possible functions of FDX5. All the independent FDX transgenic lines showed decreased cellular ROS levels and enhanced tolerance to heat and salt stresses. The transgenic Chlamydomonas lines accumulated more starch than the wild-type line and this effect increased almost three-fold in conditions of nitrogen depletion. Furthermore, the lipid content was higher in the transgenic lines than in the wild-type line, both with and without nitrogen depletion. Two FDX-overexpressing Chlamydomonas lines were assessed in a photo microbial fuel cell (PMFC); power density production by the transgenic lines was higher than that of the wild-type cells. These findings suggest that overexpression of either PETF or FDX5 can confer tolerance against heat and salt stresses, increase starch and oil production, and raise electric power density in a PMFC. PMID:26287179

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the ISC-like [2Fe–2S] ferredoxin (FdxB) from Pseudomonas putida JCM 20004

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasaki, Toshio; Ohmori, Daijiro; Shimizu, Nobutaka; Kumasaka, Takashi

    2007-12-01

    A vertebrate-type [2Fe–2S] ferredoxin (FdxB), which is probably involved in the iron–sulfur cluster-biosynthesis system of the γ-proteobacterium P. putida JCM 20004, has been crystallized in space group P6{sub 1}22. The needle-shaped crystals of recombinant FdxB diffract to 1.90 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The iron–sulfur (Fe–S) cluster-biosynthesis (ISC) system of the γ-proteobacterium Pseudomonas putida JCM 20004 contains a constitutively expressed vertebrate-type [2Fe–2S] ferredoxin, FdxB, which lacks the conserved free cysteine residue near the Fe–S cluster site that has been proposed to function in the catalysis of biological Fe–S cluster assembly in other bacterial homologues. Recombinant FdxB was heterologously overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized in its oxidized form by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion and streak-seeding methods using 1.6 M trisodium citrate dihydrate pH 6.5. The thin needle-shaped crystals diffract to 1.90 Å resolution and belong to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 1}22, with unit-cell parameters a = 87.58, c = 73.14 Å. The asymmetric unit contains one protein molecule.

  20. The ferredoxin-dependent conversion of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus represents a novel site of glycolytic regulation.

    PubMed

    van der Oost, J; Schut, G; Kengen, S W; Hagen, W R; Thomm, M; de Vos, W M

    1998-10-23

    The fermentative conversion of glucose in anaerobic hyperthermophilic Archaea is a variant of the classical Embden-Meyerhof pathway found in Bacteria and Eukarya. A major difference of the archaeal glycolytic pathway concerns the conversion of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, this reaction is catalyzed by an unique enzyme, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (GAPOR). Here, we report the isolation, characterization, and transcriptional analysis of the GAPOR-encoding gene. GAPOR is related to a family of ferredoxin-dependent tungsten enzymes in (hyper)thermophilic Archaea and, in addition, to a hypothetical protein in Escherichia coli. Electron paramagnetic resonance analysis of the purified P. furiosus GAPOR protein confirms the anticipated involvement of tungsten in catalysis. During glycolysis in P. furiosus, GAPOR gene expression is induced, whereas the activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase is repressed. It is discussed that this unprecedented unidirectional reaction couple in the pyrococcal glycolysis and gluconeogenesis gives rise to a novel site of glycolytic regulation that might be widespread among Archaea.

  1. Role of the C-terminal extension stacked on the re-face of the isoalloxazine ring moiety of the flavin adenine dinucleotide prosthetic group in ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase from Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Seo, Daisuke; Asano, Tomoya; Komori, Hirofumi; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2014-08-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase [EC 1.18.1.2] from Bacillus subtilis (BsFNR) is homologous to the bacterial NADPH-thioredoxin reductase, but possesses a unique C-terminal extension that covers the re-face of the isoalloxazine ring moiety of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) prosthetic group. In this report, we utilize BsFNR mutants depleted of their C-terminal residues to examine the importance of the C-terminal extension in reactions with NADPH and ferredoxin (Fd) from B. subtilis by spectroscopic and steady-state reaction analyses. The depletions of residues Y313 to K332 (whole C-terminal extension region) and S325 to K332 (His324 intact) resulted in significant increases in the catalytic efficiency with NADPH in diaphorase assay with ferricyanide, whereas Km values for ferricyanide were increased. In the cytochrome c reduction assay in the presence of B. subtilis ferredoxin, the S325-K332 depleted mutant displayed a significant decrease in the turnover rate with an Fd concentration range of 1-10 μM. The Y313-K332 depleted mutant demonstrated an increase in the rate of the direct reduction of horse heart cytochrome c in the absence of Fd. These data indicated that depletion of the C-terminal extension plays an important role in the reaction of BsFNR with ferredoxin.

  2. Identification of the Binding Region of the [2Fe-2S] Ferredoxin in Stearoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Desaturase

    PubMed Central

    Sobrado, Pablo; Lyle, Karen S.; Kaul, Steven P.; Turco, Michelle M.; Arabshahi, Ida; Marwah, Ashok; Fox, Brian G.

    2008-01-01

    Stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase (Δ9D) catalyzes the O2 and 2e- dependent desaturation of stearoyl-acyl carrier protein (18:0-ACP) to yield oleoyl-ACP (18:1-ACP). The 2e- are provided by essential interactions with reduced plant-type [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin (Fd). We have investigated the protein-protein interface involved in the Fd-Δ9D complex by use of chemical cross-linking, site-directed mutagenesis, steady-state kinetic approaches and molecular docking studies. Treatment of the different proteins with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide revealed that carboxylate residues from Fd and lysine residues from Δ9D contribute to the cross-linking. The single substitutions of K60A, K56A, and K230A on Δ9D decreased the kcat/KM for Fd by 4-, 22- and 2,400-fold, respectively, as compared to wt Δ9D and a K41A substitution. The double substitution K56A/K60A decreased the kcat/KM for Fd by 250-fold, while the triple mutation K56A/K60A/K230A decreased the kcat/KM for Fd by at least 700,000-fold. These results strongly implicate the triad of K56, K60 and K230 of Δ9D in the formation of a catalytic complex with Fd. Molecular docking studies indicate that electrostatic interactions between K56 and K60 and carboxylate groups on Fd may situate the [2Fe-2S] cluster of Fd near to W62, a surface residue that is structurally conserved in both ribonucleotide reductase and mycobacterial putative acyl-ACP desaturase DesA2. Owing to the considerably larger effects on catalysis, K230 appears to have other contributions to catalysis arising from its positioning in helix-7 and its close spatial location to the diiron center ligands E229 and H232. These results are considered in the light of the presently available models for Fd-mediated electron transfer in Δ9D and other protein-protein complexes. PMID:16605252

  3. Characterization of a nif-regulated flavoprotein (FprA) from Rhodobacter capsulatus. Redox properties and molecular interaction with a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin.

    PubMed

    Jouanneau, Y; Meyer, C; Asso, M; Guigliarelli, B; Willison, J C

    2000-02-01

    A flavoprotein from Rhodobacter capsulatus was purified as a recombinant (His)6-tag fusion from an Escherichia coli clone over-expressing the fprA structural gene. The FprA protein is a homodimer containing one molecule of FMN per 48-kDa monomer. Reduction of the flavoprotein by dithionite showed biphasic kinetics, starting with a fast step of semiquinone (SQ) formation, and followed by a slow reduction of the SQ. This SQ was in the anionic form as shown by EPR and optical spectroscopies. Spectrophotometric titration gave a midpoint redox potential for the oxidized/SQ couple of Em1 = +20 mV (pH 8.0), whereas the SQ/hydroquinone couple could not be titrated due to the thermodynamic instability of SQ associated with its slow reduction process. The inability to detect the intermediate form, SQ, upon oxidative titration confirmed this instability and led to an estimate of Em2 - Em1 of > 80 mV. The reduction of SQ by dithionite was significantly accelerated when the [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin FdIV was used as redox mediator. The midpoint redox potential of this ferredoxin was determined to be -275 +/- 2 mV at pH 7.5, consistent with FdIV serving as electron donor to FprA in vivo. FdIV and FprA were found to cross-react when incubated together with the 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide, giving a covalent complex with an Mr of approximately 60 000. Formation of this complex was unaffected by the redox states of the two proteins. Other [2Fe-2S] ferredoxins, including FdV and FdVI from R. capsulatus, were ineffective as electron carriers to FprA, and cross-reacted poorly with the flavoprotein. The possible function of FprA with regard to nitrogen fixation was investigated using an fprA-deleted mutant. Although nitrogenase activity was significantly reduced in the mutant compared with the wild-type strain, nitrogen fixation was apparently unaffected by the fprA deletion even under iron limitation or microaerobic conditions.

  4. The function and properties of the iron-sulfur center in spinach ferredoxin: thioredoxin reductase: a new biological role for iron-sulfur clusters.

    PubMed

    Staples, C R; Ameyibor, E; Fu, W; Gardet-Salvi, L; Stritt-Etter, A L; Schürmann, P; Knaff, D B; Johnson, M K

    1996-09-01

    Thioredoxin reduction in chloroplasts is catalyzed by a unique class of disulfide reductases which use a [2Fe-2S]2+/+ ferredoxin as the electron donor and contain an Fe-S cluster as the sole prosthetic group in addition to the active-site disulfide. The nature, properties, and function of the Fe-S cluster in spinach ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase (FTR) have been investigated by the combination of UV/visible absorption, variable-temperature magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), EPR, and resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopies. The results indicate the presence of an S = 0 [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster with complete cysteinyl-S coordination that cannot be reduced at potentials down to -650 mV, but can be oxidized by ferricyanide to an S = 1/2 [4Fe-4S]3+ state (g = 2.09, 2.04, 2.02). The midpoint potential for the [4Fe-4S]3+/2+ couple is estimated to be +420 mV (versus NHE). These results argue against a role for the cluster in mediating electron transport from ferredoxin (Em = -420 mV) to the active-site disulfide (Em = -230 mV, n = 2). An alternative role for the cluster in stabilizing the one-electron-reduced intermediate is suggested by parallel spectroscopic studies of a modified form of the enzyme in which one of the cysteines of the active-site dithiol has been alkylated with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM). NEM-modified FTR is paramagnetic as prepared and exhibits a slow relaxing, S = 1/2 EPR signal, g = 2.11, 2.00, 1.98, that is observable without significant broadening up to 150 K. While the relaxation properties are characteristic of a radical species, MCD, RR, and absorption studies indicate at least partial cluster oxidation to the [4Fe-4S]3+ state. Dye-mediated EPR redox titrations indicate a midpoint potential of -210 mV for the one-electron reduction to a diamagnetic state. By analogy with the properties of the ferricyanide-oxidized [4Fe-4S] cluster in Azotobacter vinelandii 7Fe ferredoxin [Hu, Z., Jollie, D., Burgess, B. K., Stephens, P. J., & Münck, E. (1994) Biochemistry

  5. Prevalence of Theileria equi and Babesia caballi as well as the identification of associated ticks in sympatric Grevy's zebras (Equus grevyi) and donkeys (Equus africanus asinus) in northern Kenya.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Elaine; Kock, Richard; McKeever, Declan; Gakuya, Francis; Musyoki, Charles; Chege, Stephen M; Mutinda, Mathew; Kariuki, Edward; Davidson, Zeke; Low, Belinda; Skilton, Robert A; Njahira, Moses N; Wamalwa, Mark; Maina, Elsie

    2015-01-01

    The role of equine piroplasmosis as a factor in the population decline of the Grevy's zebra is not known. We determined the prevalence of Babesia caballi and Theileria equi in cograzing Grevy's zebras (Equus grevyi) and donkeys (Equus africanus asinus) in northern Kenya and identified the associated tick vectors. Blood samples were taken from 71 donkeys and 16 Grevy's zebras from March to May 2011. A nested PCR reaction using 18s ribosomal (r)RNA primers on 87 blood spots showed 72% (51/71; 95% confidence interval [CI] 60.4-81.0%) of donkeys and 100% (16/16; 95% CI, 77.3-100%) of Grevy's zebras were T. equi positive. No samples were positive for B. caballi. Sequence comparison using the National Center for Biotechnology Information's basic local alignment search tool identified homologous 18s rRNA sequences with a global geographic spread. The T. equi-derived sequences were evaluated using Bayesian approaches with independent Metropolis-coupled Markov chain Monte Carlo runs. The sequences clustered with those found in Sudan, Croatia, Mongolia, and the US, with statistical support greater than 80% for the two main clades. Hyalomma tick species were found on both donkeys and Grevy's zebras, whereas Rhipicephalus pulchellus was found exclusively on Grevy's zebras and Hyalomma marginatum rupfipes on donkeys. The prevalence of T. equi was 100% in Grevy's zebras and 72% in donkeys with common tick vectors identified. Our results suggest that donkeys and Grevy's zebras can be asymptomatic carriers and that piroplasmosis is endemic in the study area. PMID:25380362

  6. Prevalence of Theileria equi and Babesia caballi as well as the identification of associated ticks in sympatric Grevy's zebras (Equus grevyi) and donkeys (Equus africanus asinus) in northern Kenya.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Elaine; Kock, Richard; McKeever, Declan; Gakuya, Francis; Musyoki, Charles; Chege, Stephen M; Mutinda, Mathew; Kariuki, Edward; Davidson, Zeke; Low, Belinda; Skilton, Robert A; Njahira, Moses N; Wamalwa, Mark; Maina, Elsie

    2015-01-01

    The role of equine piroplasmosis as a factor in the population decline of the Grevy's zebra is not known. We determined the prevalence of Babesia caballi and Theileria equi in cograzing Grevy's zebras (Equus grevyi) and donkeys (Equus africanus asinus) in northern Kenya and identified the associated tick vectors. Blood samples were taken from 71 donkeys and 16 Grevy's zebras from March to May 2011. A nested PCR reaction using 18s ribosomal (r)RNA primers on 87 blood spots showed 72% (51/71; 95% confidence interval [CI] 60.4-81.0%) of donkeys and 100% (16/16; 95% CI, 77.3-100%) of Grevy's zebras were T. equi positive. No samples were positive for B. caballi. Sequence comparison using the National Center for Biotechnology Information's basic local alignment search tool identified homologous 18s rRNA sequences with a global geographic spread. The T. equi-derived sequences were evaluated using Bayesian approaches with independent Metropolis-coupled Markov chain Monte Carlo runs. The sequences clustered with those found in Sudan, Croatia, Mongolia, and the US, with statistical support greater than 80% for the two main clades. Hyalomma tick species were found on both donkeys and Grevy's zebras, whereas Rhipicephalus pulchellus was found exclusively on Grevy's zebras and Hyalomma marginatum rupfipes on donkeys. The prevalence of T. equi was 100% in Grevy's zebras and 72% in donkeys with common tick vectors identified. Our results suggest that donkeys and Grevy's zebras can be asymptomatic carriers and that piroplasmosis is endemic in the study area.

  7. Theoretical study of the mechanism of the hydride transfer between ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase and NADP+: the role of Tyr303.

    PubMed

    Lans, Isaias; Medina, Milagros; Rosta, Edina; Hummer, Gerhard; Garcia-Viloca, Mireia; Lluch, José M; González-Lafont, Àngels

    2012-12-19

    During photosynthesis, ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (FNR) catalyzes the electron transfer from ferredoxin to NADP(+) via its FAD cofactor. The final hydride transfer event between FNR and the nucleotide is a reversible process. Two different transient charge-transfer complexes form prior to and upon hydride transfer, FNR(rd)-NADP(+) and FNR(ox)-NADPH, regardless of the hydride transfer direction. Experimental structures of the FNR(ox):NADP(+) interaction have suggested a series of conformational rearrangements that might contribute to attaining the catalytically competent complex, but to date, no direct experimental information about the structure of this complex is available. Recently, a molecular dynamics (MD) theoretical approach was used to provide a putative organization of the active site that might represent a structure close to the transient catalytically competent interaction of Anabaena FNR with its coenzyme, NADP(+). Using this structure, we performed fully microscopic simulations of the hydride transfer processes between Anabaena FNR(rd)/FNR(ox) and NADP(+)/H, accounting also for the solvation. A dual-level QM/MM hybrid approach was used to describe the potential energy surface of the whole system. MD calculations using the finite-temperature string method combined with the WHAM method provided the potential of mean force for the hydride transfer processes. The results confirmed that the structural model of the reactants evolves to a catalytically competent transition state through very similar free energy barriers for both the forward and reverse reactions, in good agreement with the experimental hydride transfer rate constants reported for this system. This theoretical approach additionally provides subtle structural details of the mechanism in wild-type FNR and provides an explanation why Tyr303 makes possible the photosynthetic reaction, a process that cannot occur when this Tyr is replaced by a Ser.

  8. Ectopically expressed sweet pepper ferredoxin PFLP enhances disease resistance to Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum affected by harpin and protease-mediated hypersensitive response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ger, Mang-Jye; Louh, Guan-Yu; Lin, Yi-Hsien; Feng, Teng-Yung; Huang, Hsiang-En

    2014-12-01

    Plant ferredoxin-like protein (PFLP) is a photosynthesis-type ferredoxin (Fd) found in sweet pepper. It contains an iron-sulphur cluster that receives and delivers electrons between enzymes involved in many fundamental metabolic processes. It has been demonstrated that transgenic plants overexpressing PFLP show a high resistance to many bacterial pathogens, although the mechanism remains unclear. In this investigation, the PFLP gene was transferred into Arabidopsis and its defective derivatives, such as npr1 (nonexpresser of pathogenesis-related gene 1) and eds1 (enhanced disease susceptibility 1) mutants and NAHG-transgenic plants. These transgenic plants were then infected with the soft-rot bacterial pathogen Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (Erwinia carotovora ssp. carotovora, ECC) to investigate the mechanism behind PFLP-mediated resistance. The results revealed that, instead of showing soft-rot symptoms, ECC activated hypersensitive response (HR)-associated events, such as the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ), electrical conductivity leakage and expression of the HR marker genes (ATHSR2 and ATHSR3) in PFLP-transgenic Arabidopsis. This PFLP-mediated resistance could be abolished by inhibitors, such as diphenylene iodonium (DPI), 1-l-trans-epoxysuccinyl-leucylamido-(4-guanidino)-butane (E64) and benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone (z-VAD-fmk), but not by myriocin and fumonisin. The PFLP-transgenic plants were resistant to ECC, but not to its harpin mutant strain ECCAC5082. In the npr1 mutant and NAHG-transgenic Arabidopsis, but not in the eds1 mutant, overexpression of the PFLP gene increased resistance to ECC. Based on these results, we suggest that transgenic Arabidopsis contains high levels of ectopic PFLP; this may lead to the recognition of the harpin and to the activation of the HR and other resistance mechanisms, and is dependent on the protease-mediated pathway.

  9. Characterization of 2-ketoisovalerate ferredoxin oxidoreductase, a new and reversible coenzyme A-dependent enzyme involved in peptide fermentation by hyperthermophilic archaea.

    PubMed Central

    Heider, J; Mai, X; Adams, M W

    1996-01-01

    Cell extracts of the proteolytic and hyperthermophilic archaea Thermococcus litoralis, Thermococcus sp. strain ES-1, Pyrococcus furiosus, and Pyrococcus sp. strain ES-4 contain an enzyme which catalyzes the coenzyme A-dependent oxidation of branched-chain 2-ketoacids coupled to the reduction of viologen dyes or ferredoxin. This enzyme, termed VOR (for keto-valine-ferredoxin oxidoreductase), has been purified from all four organisms. All four VORs comprise four different subunits and show amino-terminal sequence homology. T. litoralis VOR has an M(r) of ca. 230,000, with subunit M(r) values of 47,000 (alpha), 34,000 (beta), 23,000 (gamma), and 13,000 (delta). It contains about 11 iron and 12 acid-labile sulfide atoms and 13 cysteine residues per heterotetramer (alpha beta gamma delta), but thiamine pyrophosphate, which is required for catalytic activity, was lost during purification. The most efficient substrates (kcat/Km > 1.0 microM-1 s-1; Km < 100 microM) for the enzyme were the 2-ketoacid derivatives of valine, leucine, isoleucine, and methionine, while pyruvate and aryl pyruvates were very poor substrates (kcat/Km < 0.2 microM-1 s-1) and 2-ketoglutarate was not utilized. T. litoralis VOR also functioned as a 2-ketoisovalerate synthase at 85 degrees C, producing 2-ketoisovalerate and coenzyme A from isobutyryl-coenzyme A (apparent Km, 250 microM) and CO2 (apparent Km, 48 mM) with reduced viologen as the electron donor. The rate of 2-ketoisovalerate synthesis was about 5% of the rate of 2-ketoisovalerate oxidation. The optimum pH for both reactions was 7.0. A mechanism for 2-ketoisovalerate oxidation based on data from substrate-induced electron paramagnetic resonance spectra is proposed, and the physiological role of VOR is discussed. PMID:8550513

  10. Pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and thioredoxin reductase are involved in 5-nitroimidazole activation while flavin metabolism is linked to 5-nitroimidazole resistance in Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Leitsch, David; Burgess, Anita G.; Dunn, Linda A.; Krauer, Kenia G.; Tan, Kevin; Duchêne, Michael; Upcroft, Peter; Eckmann, Lars; Upcroft, Jacqueline A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The mechanism of action of, and resistance to, metronidazole in the anaerobic (or micro-aerotolerant) protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia has long been associated with the reduction of ferredoxin (Fd) by the enzyme pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) and the subsequent activation of metronidazole by Fd to toxic radical species. Resistance to metronidazole has been associated with down-regulation of PFOR and Fd. The aim of this study was to determine whether the PFOR/Fd couple is the only pathway involved in metronidazole activation in Giardia. Methods PFOR and Fd activities were measured in extracts of highly metronidazole-resistant (MTRr) lines and activities of recombinant G. lamblia thioredoxin reductase (GlTrxR) and NADPH oxidase were assessed for their involvement in metronidazole activation and resistance. Results We demonstrated that several lines of highly MTRr G. lamblia have fully functional PFOR and Fd indicating that PFOR/Fd-independent mechanisms are involved in metronidazole activation and resistance in these cells. Flavin-dependent GlTrxR, like TrxR of other anaerobic protozoa, reduces 5-nitroimidazole compounds including metronidazole, although expression of TrxR is not decreased in MTRr Giardia. However, reduction of flavins is suppressed in highly MTRr cells, as evidenced by as much as an 80% decrease in NADPH oxidase flavin mononucleotide reduction activity. This suppression is consistent with generalized impaired flavin metabolism in highly MTRr Trichomonas vaginalis. Conclusions These data add to the mounting evidence against the dogma that PFOR/Fd is the only couple with a low enough redox potential to reduce metronidazole in anaerobes and point to the multi-factorial nature of metronidazole resistance. PMID:21602576

  11. Increasing the electron-transfer ability of Cyanidioschyzon merolae ferredoxin by a one-point mutation – A high resolution and Fe-SAD phasing crystal structure analysis of the Asp58Asn mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, Yuko; Matsumoto, Takashi; Yamano, Akihito; Imai, Takeo; Morimoto, Yukio

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •A single amino acid change on the ferredoxin surface affects electron transfer. •Precise positions of amide atoms were located utilizing no prior structural data. •Ultra high resolution and SAD phasing may be used for bias-free model building. -- Abstract: Cyanidioschyzon merolae (Cm) is a single cell red algae that grows in rather thermophilic (40–50 °C) and acidic (pH 1–3) conditions. Ferredoxin (Fd) was purified from this algae and characterized as a plant-type [2Fe–2S] Fd by physicochemical techniques. A high resolution (0.97 Å) three-dimensional structure of the CmFd D58N mutant molecule has been determined using the Fe-SAD phasing method to clarify the precise position of the Asn58 amide, as this substitution increases the electron-transfer ability relative to wild-type CmFd by a factor of 1.5. The crystal structure reveals an electro-positive surface surrounding Asn58 that may interact with ferredoxin NADP{sup +} reductase or cytochrome c.

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analyses of the redox-controlled complex of terminal oxygenase and ferredoxin components in the Rieske nonhaem iron oxygenase carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuzawa, Jun; Aikawa, Hiroki; Umeda, Takashi; Ashikawa, Yuji; Suzuki-Minakuchi, Chiho; Kawano, Yoshiaki; Fujimoto, Zui; Okada, Kazunori; Yamane, Hisakazu; Nojiri, Hideaki

    2014-09-25

    A crystal was obtained of the complex between reduced terminal oxygenase and oxidized ferredoxin components of carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase. The crystal belonged to space group P2{sub 1} and diffracted to 2.25 Å resolution. The initial reaction in bacterial carbazole degradation is catalyzed by carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase, which consists of terminal oxygenase (Oxy), ferredoxin (Fd) and ferredoxin reductase components. The electron-transfer complex between reduced Oxy and oxidized Fd was crystallized at 293 K using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with PEG 3350 as the precipitant under anaerobic conditions. The crystal diffracted to a maximum resolution of 2.25 Å and belonged to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 97.3, b = 81.6, c = 116.2 Å, α = γ = 90, β = 100.1°. The V{sub M} value is 2.85 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}, indicating a solvent content of 56.8%.

  13. X-ray crystallographic and solution state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic investigations of NADP+ binding to ferredoxin NADP reductase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wang, An; Rodríguez, Juan Carlos; Han, Huijong; Schönbrunn, Ernst; Rivera, Mario

    2008-08-01

    The ferredoxin nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reductase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa ( pa-FPR) in complex with NADP (+) has been characterized by X-ray crystallography and in solution by NMR spectroscopy. The structure of the complex revealed that pa-FPR harbors a preformed NADP (+) binding pocket where the cofactor binds with minimal structural perturbation of the enzyme. These findings were complemented by obtaining sequential backbone resonance assignments of this 29518 kDa enzyme, which enabled the study of the pa-FPR-NADP complex by monitoring chemical shift perturbations induced by addition of NADP (+) or the inhibitor adenine dinucleotide phosphate (ADP) to pa-FPR. The results are consistent with a preformed NADP (+) binding site and also demonstrate that the pa-FPR-NADP complex is largely stabilized by interactions between the protein and the 2'-P AMP portion of the cofactor. Analysis of the crystal structure also shows a vast network of interactions between the two cofactors, FAD and NADP (+), and the characteristic AFVEK (258) C'-terminal extension that is typical of bacterial FPRs but is absent in their plastidic ferredoxin NADP (+) reductase (FNR) counterparts. The conformations of NADP (+) and FAD in pa-FPR place their respective nicotinamide and isoalloxazine rings 15 A apart and separated by residues in the C'-terminal extension. The network of interactions among NADP (+), FAD, and residues in the C'-terminal extension indicate that the gross conformational rearrangement that would be necessary to place the nicotinamide and isoalloxazine rings parallel and adjacent to one another for direct hydride transfer between NADPH and FAD in pa-FPR is highly unlikely. This conclusion is supported by observations made in the NMR spectra of pa-FPR and the pa-FPR-NADP complex, which strongly suggest that residues in the C'-terminal sequence do not undergo conformational exchange in the presence or absence of NADP (+). These findings are discussed in

  14. Role of a Ferredoxin Gene Cotranscribed with the nifHDK Operon in N2 Fixation and Nitrogenase “Switch-Off” of Azoarcus sp. Strain BH72

    PubMed Central

    Egener, Tanja; Martin, Dietmar E.; Sarkar, Abhijit; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    The endophytic diazotroph Azoarcus sp. strain BH72 is capable of infecting rice roots and of expressing the nitrogenase (nif) genes there. In order to study the genetic background for nitrogen fixation in strain BH72, the structural genes of nitrogenase (nifHDK) were cloned and sequenced. The sequence analysis revealed an unusual gene organization: downstream of nifHDK, a ferredoxin gene (fdxN; 59% amino acid sequence identity to R. capsulatus FdxN) and open reading frames showing 52 and 36% amino acid sequence identity to nifY of Pseudomonas stutzeri A15 and ORF1 of Azotobacter vinelandii were located. Northern blot analysis, reverse transcriptase PCR and primer extension analysis revealed that these six genes are located on one transcript transcribed from a ς54-type promoter. Shorter transcripts sequentially missing genes of the 3′ part of the full-length mRNA were more abundantly detected. Mutational analyses suggested that FdxN is an important but not the essential electron donor for dinitrogenase reductase. An in-frame deletion of fdxN resulted in reduced growth rates (59% ± 9%) and nitrogenase activities (81%) in nitrogen-fixing pure cultures in comparison to the wild type. Nitrogenase activity was fully complemented in an fdxN mutant which carried a nifH promoter-driven fdxN gene in trans. Also, in coculture with the ascomycete Acremonium alternatum, where strain BH72 develops intracytoplasmic membrane stacks, the nitrogenase activity in the fdxN deletion mutant was decreased to 56% of the wild-type level. Surprisingly, the fdxN deletion also had an effect on the rapid “switch-off” of nitrogenase activity in response to ammonium. Wild-type strain BH72 and the deletion mutant complemented with fdxN in trans showed a rapid reversible inactivation of acetylene reduction, while the deletion mutant did not cease to reduce acetylene. In concordance with the hypothesis that changes in the redox state of NifH or electron flux towards nitrogenase may be

  15. Binding of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Apo-Bacterioferritin Associated Ferredoxin to Bacterioferritin B Promotes Heme Mediation of Electron Delivery and Mobilization of Core Mineral Iron†

    PubMed Central

    Weeratunga, Saroja K.; Gee, Casey E.; Lovell, Scott; Zeng, Yuhong; Woodin, Carrie L.; Rivera, Mario

    2009-01-01

    The bfrB gene from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was cloned and expressed in E. coli. The resultant protein (BfrB), which assembles into a 445.3 kDa complex0020from 24 identical subunits, binds 12 molecules of heme axially coordinated by two Met residues. BfrB, isolated with 5–10 iron atoms per protein molecule, was reconstituted with ferrous ions to prepare samples with a core mineral containing 600 ± 40 ferric ions per BfrB molecule and approximately one phosphate molecule per iron atom. In the presence of sodium dithionite or in the presence of P. aeruginosa ferredoxin NADP reductase (FPR) and NADPH the heme in BfrB remains oxidized and the core iron mineral is mobilized sluggishly. In stark contrast, addition of NADPH to a solution containing BfrB, FPR and the apo-form of P. aeruginosa bacterioferritin associated ferredoxin (apo-Bfd) results in rapid reduction of the heme in BfrB and in the efficient mobilization of the core iron mineral. Results from additional experimentation indicate that Bfd must bind to BfrB to promote heme mediation of electrons from the surface to the core to support the efficient mobilization of ferrous ions from BfrB. In this context, the thus far mysterious role of heme in bacterioferritins has been brought to the front by reconstituting BfrB with its physiological partner, apo-Bfd. These findings are discussed in the context of a model for the utilization of stored iron in which the significant upregulation of the bfd gene under low-iron conditions [Ochsner, U.A., Wilderman, P.J., Vasil, A.I., and Vasil, M.L. (2002) Mol. Microbiol. 45, 1277–1287] ensures sufficient concentrations of apo-Bfd to bind BfrB and unlock the iron stored in its core. Although these findings are in contrast to previous speculations suggesting redox mediation of electron transfer by holo-Bfd, the ability of apo-Bfd to promote iron mobilization is an economical strategy used by the cell because it obviates the need to further deplete cellular iron levels to

  16. Strategy for the study of paramagnetic proteins with slow electronic relaxation rates by nmr spectroscopy: application to oxidized human [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin.

    PubMed

    Machonkin, Timothy E; Westler, William M; Markley, John L

    2004-05-01

    NMR studies of paramagnetic proteins are hampered by the rapid relaxation of nuclei near the paramagnetic center, which prevents the application of conventional methods to investigations of the most interesting regions of such molecules. This problem is particularly acute in systems with slow electronic relaxation rates. We present a strategy that can be used with a protein with slow electronic relaxation to identify and assign resonances from nuclei near the paramagnetic center. Oxidized human [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin (adrenodoxin) was used to test the approach. The strategy involves six steps: (1) NMR signals from (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N nuclei unaffected or minimally affected by paramagnetic effects are assigned by standard multinuclear two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) spectroscopic methods with protein samples labeled uniformly with (13)C and (15)N. (2) The very broad, hyperfine-shifted signals from carbons in the residues that ligate the metal center are classified by amino acid and atom type by selective (13)C labeling and one-dimensional (1D) (13)C NMR spectroscopy. (3) Spin systems involving carbons near the paramagnetic center that are broadened but not hyperfine-shifted are elucidated by (13)C[(13)C] constant time correlation spectroscopy (CT-COSY). (4) Signals from amide nitrogens affected by the paramagnetic center are assigned to amino acid type by selective (15)N labeling and 1D (15)N NMR spectroscopy. (5) Sequence-specific assignments of these carbon and nitrogen signals are determined by 1D (13)C[(15)N] difference decoupling experiments. (6) Signals from (1)H nuclei in these spin systems are assigned by paramagnetic-optimized 2D and 3D (1)H[(13)C] experiments. For oxidized human ferredoxin, this strategy led to assignments (to amino acid and atom type) for 88% of the carbons in the [2Fe-2S] cluster-binding loops (residues 43-58 and 89-94). These included complete carbon spin-system assignments for eight of the 22 residues and partial assignments for

  17. CITY III Operator's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Envirometrics, Inc., Washington, DC.

    CITY III is a computer-assisted simulation game of an urban system involving player operation of and interaction with economic, social, and government components. The role of operator in the game is to take the handwritten inputs (decisions) from the CITY III participants, process them, and return output which initiates the next round of…

  18. SUPERSTARS III: K-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Education, Raleigh.

    SUPERSTARS III is a K-8 program designed as an enrichment opportunity for self-directed learners in mathematics. The basic purpose of SUPERSTARS III is to provide the extra challenge that self-motivated students need in mathematics and to do so in a structured, long-term program that does not impinge on the normal classroom routine or the…

  19. Direct interaction with ACR11 is necessary for post-transcriptional control of GLU1-encoded ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase in leaves.

    PubMed

    Takabayashi, Atsushi; Niwata, Akihiro; Tanaka, Ayumi

    2016-01-01

    Because it plays an essential role in nitrogen (N) assimilation and photorespiration, the glutamine synthetase (GS)/glutamate synthase (GOGAT) system is widely accepted as occupying a central position in leaf N metabolism. However, the regulation of GOGAT at the post-transcriptional level is poorly understood. Here, we show that ACR11, an ACT (acronym for aspartate kinase, chorismate mutase, and TyrA) domain-containing family protein, interacts with Glu1-encoded ferredoxin (Fd)-GOGAT in Arabidopsis chloroplasts. In addition, Arabidopsis acr11 mutants have lost the capability to control Fd-GOGAT levels in response to light/dark diurnal cycles, nitrogen inputs, and changes in photorespiratory activity. Considering that ACR11 has putative glutamine-binding domains, our results indicate that ACR11 is necessary for post-transcriptional control of leaf Glu1-encoded Fd-GOGAT. This regulation takes place through direct interaction of ACR11 and Fd-GOGAT, possibly in an allosteric manner. PMID:27411448

  20. Identification of a Novel Nonstructural Protein, VP9, from White Spot Syndrome Virus: Its Structure Reveals a Ferredoxin Fold with Specific Metal Binding Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Liu,Y.; Wu, J.; Song, J.; Sivaraman, J.; Hew, C.

    2006-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major pathogen in shrimp aquaculture. VP9, a full-length protein of WSSV, encoded by open reading frame wsv230, was identified for the first time in the infected Penaeus monodon shrimp tissues, gill, and stomach as a novel, nonstructural protein by Western blotting, mass spectrometry, and immunoelectron microscopy. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR demonstrated that the transcription of VP9 started from the early to the late stage of WSSV infection as a major mRNA species. The structure of full-length VP9 was determined by both X-ray and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. It is the first structure to be reported for WSSV proteins. The crystal structure of VP9 revealed a ferredoxin fold with divalent metal ion binding sites. Cadmium sulfate was found to be essential for crystallization. The Cd2+ ions were bound between the monomer interfaces of the homodimer. Various divalent metal ions have been titrated against VP9, and their interactions were analyzed using NMR spectroscopy. The titration data indicated that VP9 binds with both Zn2+ and Cd2+. VP9 adopts a similar fold as the DNA binding domain of the papillomavirus E2 protein. Based on our present investigations, we hypothesize that VP9 might be involved in the transcriptional regulation of WSSV, a function similar to that of the E2 protein during papillomavirus infection of the host cells.

  1. Mutation of FdC2 gene encoding a ferredoxin-like protein with C-terminal extension causes yellow-green leaf phenotype in rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunmei; Hu, Yan; Huang, Rui; Ma, Xiaozhi; Wang, Yang; Liao, Tingting; Zhong, Ping; Xiao, Fuliang; Sun, Changhui; Xu, Zhengjun; Deng, Xiaojian; Wang, Pingrong

    2015-09-01

    Ferredoxins (Fds) are small iron-sulfur proteins that mediate electron transfer in a wide range of metabolic reactions. Besides Fds, there is a type of Fd-like proteins designated as FdC, which have conserved elements of Fds, but contain a significant C-terminal extension. So far, only two FdC genes of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) have been identified in higher plants and thus the functions of FdC proteins remain largely unknown. In this study, we isolated a yellow-green leaf mutant, 501ys, in rice (Oryza sativa). The mutant exhibited yellow-green leaf phenotype and reduced chlorophyll level. The phenotype of 501ys was caused by mutation of a gene on rice chromosome 3. Map-based cloning of this mutant resulted in identification of OsFdC2 gene (LOC_Os03g48040) showing high identity with Arabidopsis FdC2 gene (AT1G32550). OsFdC2 was expressed most abundantly in leaves and its encoded protein was targeted to the chloroplast. In 501ys mutant, a missense mutation was detected in DNA sequence of the gene, resulting in an amino acid change in the encoded protein. The mutant phenotype was rescued by introduction of the wild-type gene. Therefore, we successfully identified FdC2 gene via map-based cloning approach, and demonstrated that mutation of this gene caused yellow-green leaf phenotype in rice.

  2. Identification of a novel nonstructural protein, VP9, from white spot syndrome virus: its structure reveals a ferredoxin fold with specific metal binding sites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Wu, Jinlu; Song, Jianxing; Sivaraman, J; Hew, Choy L

    2006-11-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major pathogen in shrimp aquaculture. VP9, a full-length protein of WSSV, encoded by open reading frame wsv230, was identified for the first time in the infected Penaeus monodon shrimp tissues, gill, and stomach as a novel, nonstructural protein by Western blotting, mass spectrometry, and immunoelectron microscopy. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR demonstrated that the transcription of VP9 started from the early to the late stage of WSSV infection as a major mRNA species. The structure of full-length VP9 was determined by both X-ray and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. It is the first structure to be reported for WSSV proteins. The crystal structure of VP9 revealed a ferredoxin fold with divalent metal ion binding sites. Cadmium sulfate was found to be essential for crystallization. The Cd2+ ions were bound between the monomer interfaces of the homodimer. Various divalent metal ions have been titrated against VP9, and their interactions were analyzed using NMR spectroscopy. The titration data indicated that VP9 binds with both Zn2+ and Cd2+. VP9 adopts a similar fold as the DNA binding domain of the papillomavirus E2 protein. Based on our present investigations, we hypothesize that VP9 might be involved in the transcriptional regulation of WSSV, a function similar to that of the E2 protein during papillomavirus infection of the host cells.

  3. The involvement of the nif-associated ferredoxin-like genes fdxA and fdxN of Herbaspirillum seropedicae in nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Souza, André L F; Invitti, Adriana L; Rego, Fabiane G M; Monteiro, Rose A; Klassen, Giseli; Souza, Emanuel M; Chubatsu, Leda S; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Rigo, Liu U

    2010-02-01

    The pathway of electron transport to nitrogenase in the endophytic beta-Proteobacterium Herbaspirillum seropedicae has not been characterized. We have generated mutants in two nif-associated genes encoding putative ferredoxins, fdxA and fdxN. The fdxA gene is part of the operon nifHDKENXorf1orf2fdxAnifQmodABC and is transcribed from the nifH promoter, as revealed by lacZ gene fusion. The fdxN gene is probably cotranscribed with the nifB gene. Mutational analysis suggests that the FdxA protein is essential for maximum nitrogenase activity, since the nitrogenase activity of the fdxA mutant strain was reduced to about 30% of that of the wild-type strain. In addition, the fdxA mutation had no effect on the nitrogenase switch-off in response to ammonium. Nitrogenase activity of a mutant strain lacking the fdxN gene was completely abolished. This phenotype was reverted by complementation with fdxN expressed under lacZ promoter control. The results suggest that the products of both the fdxA and fdxN genes are probably involved in electron transfer during nitrogen fixation.

  4. LIGHT-INDUCED RICE1 Regulates Light-Dependent Attachment of LEAF-TYPE FERREDOXIN-NADP+ OXIDOREDUCTASE to the Thylakoid Membrane in Rice and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Hu, Hongtao; Ren, Hongyan; Kong, Yuzhu; Lin, Hongwei; Guo, Jiangfan; Wang, Lingling; He, Yi; Ding, Xiaomeng; Grabsztunowicz, Magda; Mulo, Paula; Chen, Tao; Liu, Yu; Wu, Zhongchang; Wu, Yunrong; Mao, Chuanzao; Wu, Ping; Mo, Xiaorong

    2016-03-01

    LIR1 (LIGHT-INDUCED RICE1) encodes a 13-kD, chloroplast-targeted protein containing two nearly identical motifs of unknown function. LIR1 is present in the genomes of vascular plants, mosses, liverworts, and algae, but not in cyanobacteria. Using coimmunoprecipitation assays, pull-down assays, and yeast two-hybrid analyses, we showed that LIR1 interacts with LEAF-TYPE FERREDOXIN-NADP(+) OXIDOREDUCTASE (LFNR), an essential chloroplast enzyme functioning in the last step of photosynthetic linear electron transfer. LIR1 and LFNR formed high molecular weight thylakoid protein complexes with the TIC62 and TROL proteins, previously shown to anchor LFNR to the membrane. We further showed that LIR1 increases the affinity of LFNRs for TIC62 and that the rapid light-triggered degradation of the LIR1 coincides with the release of the LFNR from the thylakoid membrane. Loss of LIR1 resulted in a marked decrease in the accumulation of LFNR-containing thylakoid protein complexes without a concomitant decrease in total LFNR content. In rice (Oryza sativa), photosynthetic capacity of lir1 plants was slightly impaired, whereas no such effect was observed in Arabidopsis thaliana knockout mutants. The consequences of LIR1 deficiency in different species are discussed. PMID:26941088

  5. The reduced [2Fe-2S] clusters in adrenodoxin and Arthrospira platensis ferredoxin share spin density with protein nitrogens, probed using 2D ESEEM†

    PubMed Central

    Dikanov, Sergei A.; Samoilova, Rimma I.; Kappl, Reinhard; Crofts, Antony R.; Hüttermann, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Summary We have used X-band ESEEM to study the reduced [2Fe-2S] cluster in adrenodoxin and Arthrospira platensis ferredoxin. By use of a 2D approach (HYSCORE), we have shown that the cluster is involved in weak magnetic interactions with several nitrogens in each protein. Despite substantial difference in the shape and orientational dependence of individual crosspeaks, the major spectral features in both proteins are attributable to two peptide nitrogens (N1 and N2) with similar hyperfine couplings ∼1.1 and ∼0.70 MHz. The couplings determined represent to a small fraction (0.0003–0.0005) of the unpaired spin density of the reduced cluster transferred to these nitrogens over H-bond bridges or the covalent bonds of cysteine ligands. Simulation of the HYSCORE spectra has allowed us to estimate the orientation of the nuclear quadrupole tensors of N1 and N2 in the g-tensor coordinate system. The most likely candidates for the role of N1 and N2 have been identified in the protein environment by comparing magnetic-resonance data with crystallographic structures of the oxidized proteins. A possible influence of redox-linked structural changes on ESEEM data is analyzed using available structures for related proteins in two redox states. PMID:19639155

  6. A Trichomonas vaginalis 120 kDa protein with identity to hydrogenosome pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase is a surface adhesin induced by iron.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Brito, Verónica; Yáñez-Gómez, Carmina; Meza-Cervantez, Patricia; Avila-González, Leticia; Rodríguez, Mario Alberto; Ortega-López, Jaime; González-Robles, Arturo; Arroyo, Rossana

    2005-02-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis, a human sexually transmitted protozoan, relies on adherence to the vaginal epithelium for colonization and maintenance of infection in the host. Thus, adherence molecules play a fundamental role in the trichomonal infection. Here, we show the identification and characterization of a 120 kDa surface glycoprotein (AP120) induced by iron, which participates in cytoadherence. AP120 is synthesized by the parasite when grown in 250 microM iron medium. Antibodies to AP120 and the electro-eluted AP120 inhibited parasite adherence in a concentration-dependent manner, demonstrating its participation in cytoadherence. In addition, a protein of 130 kDa was detected on the surface of HeLa cells as the putative receptor for AP120. By peptide matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), the AP120 adhesin showed homology with a hydrogenosomal enzyme, the pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO) encoded by the pfoa gene. This homology was confirmed by immunoblot and indirect immunofluorescence assays with an antibody to the carboxy-terminus region of the Entamoeba histolytica PFO. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays showed that a pfoa-like gene was better transcribed in trichomonads grown in iron-rich medium. In conclusion, the homology of AP120 to PFO suggests that this novel adhesin induced by iron could be an example of moonlighting protein in T. vaginalis.

  7. Direct interaction with ACR11 is necessary for post-transcriptional control of GLU1-encoded ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase in leaves

    PubMed Central

    Takabayashi, Atsushi; Niwata, Akihiro; Tanaka, Ayumi

    2016-01-01

    Because it plays an essential role in nitrogen (N) assimilation and photorespiration, the glutamine synthetase (GS)/glutamate synthase (GOGAT) system is widely accepted as occupying a central position in leaf N metabolism. However, the regulation of GOGAT at the post-transcriptional level is poorly understood. Here, we show that ACR11, an ACT (acronym for aspartate kinase, chorismate mutase, and TyrA) domain-containing family protein, interacts with Glu1-encoded ferredoxin (Fd)-GOGAT in Arabidopsis chloroplasts. In addition, Arabidopsis acr11 mutants have lost the capability to control Fd-GOGAT levels in response to light/dark diurnal cycles, nitrogen inputs, and changes in photorespiratory activity. Considering that ACR11 has putative glutamine-binding domains, our results indicate that ACR11 is necessary for post-transcriptional control of leaf Glu1-encoded Fd-GOGAT. This regulation takes place through direct interaction of ACR11 and Fd-GOGAT, possibly in an allosteric manner. PMID:27411448

  8. Mutation of FdC2 gene encoding a ferredoxin-like protein with C-terminal extension causes yellow-green leaf phenotype in rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunmei; Hu, Yan; Huang, Rui; Ma, Xiaozhi; Wang, Yang; Liao, Tingting; Zhong, Ping; Xiao, Fuliang; Sun, Changhui; Xu, Zhengjun; Deng, Xiaojian; Wang, Pingrong

    2015-09-01

    Ferredoxins (Fds) are small iron-sulfur proteins that mediate electron transfer in a wide range of metabolic reactions. Besides Fds, there is a type of Fd-like proteins designated as FdC, which have conserved elements of Fds, but contain a significant C-terminal extension. So far, only two FdC genes of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) have been identified in higher plants and thus the functions of FdC proteins remain largely unknown. In this study, we isolated a yellow-green leaf mutant, 501ys, in rice (Oryza sativa). The mutant exhibited yellow-green leaf phenotype and reduced chlorophyll level. The phenotype of 501ys was caused by mutation of a gene on rice chromosome 3. Map-based cloning of this mutant resulted in identification of OsFdC2 gene (LOC_Os03g48040) showing high identity with Arabidopsis FdC2 gene (AT1G32550). OsFdC2 was expressed most abundantly in leaves and its encoded protein was targeted to the chloroplast. In 501ys mutant, a missense mutation was detected in DNA sequence of the gene, resulting in an amino acid change in the encoded protein. The mutant phenotype was rescued by introduction of the wild-type gene. Therefore, we successfully identified FdC2 gene via map-based cloning approach, and demonstrated that mutation of this gene caused yellow-green leaf phenotype in rice. PMID:26259181

  9. Antithrombin III blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... be due to: Bone marrow transplant Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) AT III deficiency, an inherited condition Liver ... Schmaier AH, Miller JL. Coagulation and fibrinolysis. In: McPherson ... Management by Laboratory Methods . 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  10. Dynamics of the [4Fe-4S] Cluster in Pyrococcus furiosus D14C Ferredoxin via Nuclear Resonance Vibrational and Resonance Raman Spectroscopies, Force Field Simulations, and Density Functional Theory Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Devrani; Pelmenschikov, Vladimir; Guo, Yisong; Case, David A.; Wang, Hongxin; Dong, Weibing; Tan, Ming-Liang; Ichiye, Toshiko; Jenney, Francis E.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Zhao, Jiyong; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2011-01-01

    We have used 57Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) to study oxidized and reduced forms of the [4Fe-4S] cluster in the D14C variant ferredoxin from Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf D14C Fd). To assist the normal mode assignments, we recorded the NRVS of D14C ferredoxin samples with 36S substituted into the [4Fe-4S] cluster bridging sulfide positions, and a model compound without ligand side chains: (Ph4P)2[Fe4S4Cl4]. Several distinct regions of NRVS intensity are identified, ranging from `protein' and torsional modes below 100 cm−1, through bending and breathing modes near 150 cm−1, to strong bands from Fe-S stretching modes between 250 cm−1 and ~400 cm−1. The oxidized ferredoxin samples were also investigated by resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy. We found good agreement between NRVS and RR frequencies, but because of different selection rules, the intensities vary dramatically between the two types of spectra. The 57Fe partial vibrational densities of states (PVDOS) for the oxidized samples were interpreted by normal mode analysis with optimization of Urey-Bradley force fields for local models of the [4Fe-4S] clusters. Full protein model calculations were also conducted using a supplemented CHARMM force field, and these calculations revealed low frequency modes that may be relevant to electron transfer with Pf Fd partners. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations complemented these empirical analyses, and DFT was used to estimate the reorganization energy associated with the [Fe4S4]2+/1+ redox cycle. Overall, the NRVS technique demonstrates great promise for the observation and quantitative interpretation of the dynamical properties of Fe-S proteins. PMID:21500788

  11. Comparison of the kinetics of reduction and intramolecular electron transfer in electrostatic and covalent complexes of ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase and flavodoxin from Anabaena PCC 7119.

    PubMed

    Walker, M C; Pueyo, J J; Gómez-Moreno, C; Tollin, G

    1990-08-15

    The kinetics of reduction and intracomplex electron transfer in electrostatically stabilized and covalently crosslinked complexes between ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase (FNR) and flavodoxin (Fld) from the cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC 7119 were compared using laser flash photolysis. The second-order rate constant for reduction by 5-deazariboflavin semiquinone (dRfH) of FNR within the electrostatically stabilized complex at 10 mM ionic strength (4.0 X 10(8) M-1 s-1) was identical to that for free FNR. This suggests that the FAD cofactor of FNR is not sterically hindered upon complex formation. A lower limit of approximately 7000 s-1 was estimated for the first-order rate constant for intracomplex electron transfer from FNRred to Fldox under these conditions. In contrast, for the covalently crosslinked complex, a smaller second-order rate constant (2.1 X 10(8) M-1 s-1) was obtained for the reduction of FNR by dRfH within the complex, suggesting that some steric hindrance of the FAD cofactor of FNR occurs due to crosslinking. A limiting rate constant of 1000 s-1 for the intracomplex electron transfer reaction was obtained for the covalent complex, which was unaffected by changes in ionic strength. The substantially diminished limiting rate constant, relative to that of the electrostatic complex, may reflect either a suboptimal orientation of the redox cofactors within the covalent complex or a required structural reorganization preceding electron transfer which is not allowed once the proteins have been covalently linked. Thus, although the covalent complex is biochemically competent, it is not a quantitatively precise model for the catalytically relevant intermediate along the reaction pathway.

  12. Structural backgrounds for the formation of a catalytically competent complex with NADP(H) during hydride transfer in ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductases.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Azqueta, Ana; Musumeci, Matías A; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A; Medina, Milagros

    2012-07-01

    The role of the highly conserved C266 and L268 of pea ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (FNR) in formation of the catalytically competent complex of the enzyme with NADP(H) was investigated. Previous studies suggest that the volume of these side-chains, situated facing the side of the C-terminal Y308 catalytic residue not stacking the flavin isoalloxazine ring, may be directly involved in the fine-tuning of the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme. Wild-type pea FNR as well as single and double mutants of C266 and L268 residues were analysed by fast transient-kinetic techniques and their midpoint reduction potentials were determined. For the C266A, C266M and C266A/L268A mutants a significant reduction in the overall hydride transfer (HT) rates was observed along with the absence of charge-transfer complex formation. The HT rate constants for NADPH oxidation were lower than those for NADP(+) reduction, reaching a 30-fold decrease in the double mutant. In agreement, these variants exhibited more negative midpoint potentials with respect to the wild-type enzyme. The three-dimensional structures of C266M and L268V variants were solved. The C266M mutant shows a displacement of E306 away from the relevant residue S90 to accommodate the bulky methionine introduced. The overall findings indicate that in FNR the volume of the residue at position 266 is essential to attain the catalytic architecture between the nicotinamide and isoalloxazine rings at the active site and, therefore, for an efficient HT process. In addition, flexibility of the 268-270 loop appears to be critical for FNR to achieve catalytically competent complexes with NADP(H).

  13. Pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and bifunctional aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase are essential for energy metabolism under oxidative stress in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Pineda, Erika; Encalada, Rusely; Rodríguez-Zavala, José S; Olivos-García, Alfonso; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Saavedra, Emma

    2010-08-01

    The in vitro Entamoeba histolytica pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (EhPFOR) kinetic properties and the effect of oxidative stress on glycolytic pathway enzymes and fluxes in live trophozoites were evaluated. EhPFOR showed a strong preference for pyruvate as substrate over other oxoacids. The enzyme was irreversibly inactivated by a long period of saturating O(2) exposure (IC(50) 0.034 mm), whereas short-term exposure (< 30 min) leading to > 90% inhibition allowed for partial restoration by addition of Fe(2+). CoA and acetyl-CoA prevented, whereas pyruvate exacerbated, inactivation induced by short-term saturating O(2) exposure. Superoxide dismutase was more effective than catalase in preventing the inactivation, indicating that reactive oxygen species (ROS) were involved. Hydrogen peroxide caused inactivation in an Fe(2+)-reversible fashion that was not prevented by the coenzymes, suggesting different mechanisms of enzyme inactivation by ROS. Structural analysis on an EhPFOR 3D model suggested that the protection against ROS provided by coenzymes could be attributable to their proximity to the Fe-S clusters. After O(2) exposure, live parasites displayed decreased enzyme activities only for PFOR (90%) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH; 68%) of the bifunctional aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase (EhADH2), whereas acetyl-CoA synthetase remained unchanged, explaining the increased acetate and lowered ethanol fluxes. Remarkably, PFOR and ALDH activities were restored after return of the parasites to normoxic conditions, which correlated with higher ethanol and lower acetate fluxes. These results identified amebal PFOR and ALDH of EhADH2 activities as markers of oxidative stress, and outlined their relevance as significant controlling steps of energy metabolism in parasites subjected to oxidative stress. PMID:20629749

  14. Pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO) is a surface-associated cell-binding protein in Trichomonas vaginalis and is involved in trichomonal adherence to host cells.

    PubMed

    Meza-Cervantez, Patricia; González-Robles, Arturo; Cárdenas-Guerra, Rosa Elena; Ortega-López, Jaime; Saavedra, Emma; Pineda, Erika; Arroyo, Rossana

    2011-12-01

    The Trichomonas vaginalis 120 kDa protein adhesin (AP120) is induced under iron-rich conditions and has sequence homology with pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase A (PFO A), a hydrogenosomal enzyme that is absent in humans. This homology raises the possibility that, like AP120, PFO might be localized to the parasite surface and participate in cytoadherence. Here, the cellular localization and function of PFO that was expressed under various iron concentrations was investigated using a polyclonal antibody generated against the 50 kDa recombinant C-terminal region of PFO A (anti-PFO50). In Western blot assays, this antibody recognized a 120 kDa protein band in total protein extracts, and proteins with affinity to the surface of HeLa cells from parasites grown under iron-rich conditions. In addition to localization that is typical of hydrogenosomal proteins, PFOs that were expressed under iron-rich conditions were found to localize at the surface. This localization was demonstrated using immunofluorescence and co-localization assays, as well as immunogold transmission electron microscopy. In addition to describing its enzyme activity, we describe a novel function in trichomonal host interaction for the PFO localized on the parasite surface. The anti-PFO50 antibody reduced the levels of T. vaginalis adherence to HeLa cell monolayers in a concentration-dependent manner. Thus, T. vaginalis PFO is an example of a surface-associated cell-binding protein that lacks enzyme activity and that is involved in cytoadherence. Additionally, PFO behaves like AP120 in parasites grown under iron-rich conditions. Therefore, these data suggest that AP120 and PFO A are encoded by the same gene, namely pfo a.

  15. Dissection of the Bradyrhizobium japonicum NifA+sigma54 regulon, and identification of a ferredoxin gene (fdxN) for symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Felix; Pessi, Gabriella; Friberg, Markus; Weber, Christoph; Rusca, Nicola; Lindemann, Andrea; Fischer, Hans-Martin; Hennecke, Hauke

    2007-09-01

    Hierarchically organized regulatory proteins form a complex network for expression control of symbiotic and accessory genes in the nitrogen-fixing soybean symbiont Bradyrhizobium japonicum. A genome-wide survey of regulatory interactions was made possible with the design of a custom-made gene chip. Here, we report the first use of the microarray in a comprehensive and complete characterization of the B. japonicum NifA+sigma(54) regulon which forms an important node in the entire network. Comparative transcript profiles of anaerobically grown wild-type, nifA, and rpoN (1/2) mutant cells were complemented with a position-specific frequency matrix-based search for NifA- and sigma(54)-binding sites plus a simple operon definition. One of the newly identified NifA+sigma(54)-dependent genes, fdxN, encodes a ferredoxin required for efficient symbiotic nitrogen fixation, which makes it a candidate for being a direct electron donor to nitrogenase. The fdxN gene has an unconventional, albeit functional sigma(54 )promoter with the dinucleotide GA instead of the consensus GC motif at position -12. A GC-containing mutant promoter and the atypical GA-containing promoter of the wild type were disparately activated. Expression analyses were also carried out with two other NifA+sigma(54) targets (ectC; ahpC). Incidentally, the tiling-like design of the microarray has helped to arrive at completely revised annotations of the ectC- and ahpC-upstream DNA regions, which are now compatible with promoter locations. Taken together, the approaches used here led to a substantial expansion of the NifA+sigma(54 )regulon size, culminating in a total of 65 genes for nitrogen fixation and diverse other processes.

  16. 15N Tracing Studies on In Vitro Reactions of Ferredoxin-Dependent Nitrite Reductase and Glutamate Synthase Using Reconstituted Electron Donation Systems.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Tadakatsu; Fujimori, Tamaki; Yanagisawa, Shuichi; Hase, Toshiharu; Suzuki, Akira

    2015-06-01

    It is known that plants contain ferredoxin (Fd)-dependent nitrite reductase (NiR) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT). The Fd-NiR reaction produces ammonia from nitrite, and the activity is usually measured by nitrite disappearance. The Fd-GOGAT reaction forms two glutamates of different origin, from glutamine and 2-oxoglutarate, and the activity is measured by the oxidation of reductant (NADPH) or by formation of total glutamate. Here, a quantitative probe of the products and efficiency of the process was conducted using (15)N tracing techniques on these reactions in vitro. We quantified the reduction of (15)N-labeled [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] and the formation of [(15)N]glutamate and [(14)N]glutamate from [5-(15)N-amide]glutamine plus 2-oxoglutarate by NiR and GOGAT, respectively, with the reductant-Fd-NADP(+) oxidoreductase (FNR)-Fd system as the sequential electron donors. The supply of dithionite or NADPH to recombinant cyanobacterial NiR led to electron donation system-dependent formation of [(15)N]ammonium from [(15)N]nitrite. Addition of 20 mM NaCl and 20 mM Na-ascorbate accelerated nitrite reduction under high concentrations of NADPH. A sufficient supply of NADPH to recombinant Zea mays Fd-GOGAT generated complete GOGAT activity (transferring the [5-(15)N]amide of glutamine to 2-oxoglutarate to form [(15)N]glutamate), whereas a shortage of NADPH resulted in glutaminase activity only, which removed the amide from glutamine and released ammonia and [(14)N]glutamate. We conclude that although the recombinant Fd-GOGAT enzyme has two forms of glutamate synthesis, the first by glutaminase (ammonia release by glutamine amidotransferase) and the second by glutamate synthase (coupling of the ammonia and exogenously applied 2-oxoglutarate), the first works without NADPH, while the second is strictly dependent on NADPH availability.

  17. Functional Inactivation of Putative Photosynthetic Electron Acceptor Ferredoxin C2 (FdC2) Induces Delayed Heading Date and Decreased Photosynthetic Rate in Rice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan; Qiu, Zhennan; Ruan, Banpu; Kang, Shujing; He, Lei; Zhang, Sen; Dong, Guojun; Hu, Jiang; Zeng, Dali; Zhang, Guangheng; Gao, Zhenyu; Ren, Deyong; Hu, Xingming; Chen, Guang; Guo, Longbiao; Qian, Qian; Zhu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Ferredoxin (Fd) protein as unique electron acceptor, involved in a variety of fundamental metabolic and signaling processes, which is indispensable for plant growth. The molecular mechanisms of Fd such as regulation of electron partitioning, impact of photosynthetic rate and involvement in the carbon fixing remain elusive in rice. Here we reported a heading date delay and yellowish leaf 1 (hdy1) mutant derived from Japonica rice cultivar "Nipponbare" subjected to EMS treatment. In the paddy field, the hdy1 mutant appeared at a significantly late heading date and had yellow-green leaves during the whole growth stage. Further investigation indicated that the abnormal phenotype of hdy1 was connected with depressed pigment content and photosynthetic rate. Genetic analysis results showed that the hdy1 mutant phenotype was caused by a single recessive nuclear gene mutation. Map-based cloning revealed that OsHDY1 is located on chromosome 3 and encodes an ortholog of the AtFdC2 gene. Complementation and overexpression, transgenic plants exhibited the mutant phenotype including head date, leaf color and the transcription levels of the FdC2 were completely rescued by transformation with OsHDY1. Real-time PCR revealed that the expression product of OsHDY1 was detected in almost all of the organs except root, whereas highest expression levels were observed in seeding new leaves. The lower expression levels of HDY1 and content of iron were detected in hdy1 than WT's. The FdC2::GFP was detected in the chloroplasts of rice. Real-time PCR results showed that the expression of many photosynthetic electron transfer related genes in hdy1 were higher than WT. Our results suggest that OsFdC2 plays an important role in photosynthetic rate and development of heading date by regulating electron transfer and chlorophyll content in rice.

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa IscR-Regulated Ferredoxin NADP(+) Reductase Gene (fprB) Functions in Iron-Sulfur Cluster Biogenesis and Multiple Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Romsang, Adisak; Duang-Nkern, Jintana; Wirathorn, Wilaiwan; Vattanaviboon, Paiboon; Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2015-01-01

    P. aeruginosa (PAO1) has two putative genes encoding ferredoxin NADP(+) reductases, denoted fprA and fprB. Here, the regulation of fprB expression and the protein's physiological roles in [4Fe-4S] cluster biogenesis and stress protection are characterized. The fprB mutant has defects in [4Fe-4S] cluster biogenesis, as shown by reduced activities of [4Fe-4S] cluster-containing enzymes. Inactivation of the gene resulted in increased sensitivity to oxidative, thiol, osmotic and metal stresses compared with the PAO1 wild type. The increased sensitivity could be partially or completely suppressed by high expression of genes from the isc operon, which are involved in [Fe-S] cluster biogenesis, indicating that stress sensitivity in the fprB mutant is partially caused by a reduction in levels of [4Fe-4S] clusters. The pattern and regulation of fprB expression are in agreement with the gene physiological roles; fprB expression was highly induced by redox cycling drugs and diamide and was moderately induced by peroxides, an iron chelator and salt stress. The stress-induced expression of fprB was abolished by a deletion of the iscR gene. An IscR DNA-binding site close to fprB promoter elements was identified and confirmed by specific binding of purified IscR. Analysis of the regulation of fprB expression supports the role of IscR in directly regulating fprB transcription as a transcription activator. The combination of IscR-regulated expression of fprB and the fprB roles in response to multiple stressors emphasizes the importance of [Fe-S] cluster homeostasis in both gene regulation and stress protection.

  19. Functional Inactivation of Putative Photosynthetic Electron Acceptor Ferredoxin C2 (FdC2) Induces Delayed Heading Date and Decreased Photosynthetic Rate in Rice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan; Qiu, Zhennan; Ruan, Banpu; Kang, Shujing; He, Lei; Zhang, Sen; Dong, Guojun; Hu, Jiang; Zeng, Dali; Zhang, Guangheng; Gao, Zhenyu; Ren, Deyong; Hu, Xingming; Chen, Guang; Guo, Longbiao; Qian, Qian; Zhu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Ferredoxin (Fd) protein as unique electron acceptor, involved in a variety of fundamental metabolic and signaling processes, which is indispensable for plant growth. The molecular mechanisms of Fd such as regulation of electron partitioning, impact of photosynthetic rate and involvement in the carbon fixing remain elusive in rice. Here we reported a heading date delay and yellowish leaf 1 (hdy1) mutant derived from Japonica rice cultivar "Nipponbare" subjected to EMS treatment. In the paddy field, the hdy1 mutant appeared at a significantly late heading date and had yellow-green leaves during the whole growth stage. Further investigation indicated that the abnormal phenotype of hdy1 was connected with depressed pigment content and photosynthetic rate. Genetic analysis results showed that the hdy1 mutant phenotype was caused by a single recessive nuclear gene mutation. Map-based cloning revealed that OsHDY1 is located on chromosome 3 and encodes an ortholog of the AtFdC2 gene. Complementation and overexpression, transgenic plants exhibited the mutant phenotype including head date, leaf color and the transcription levels of the FdC2 were completely rescued by transformation with OsHDY1. Real-time PCR revealed that the expression product of OsHDY1 was detected in almost all of the organs except root, whereas highest expression levels were observed in seeding new leaves. The lower expression levels of HDY1 and content of iron were detected in hdy1 than WT's. The FdC2::GFP was detected in the chloroplasts of rice. Real-time PCR results showed that the expression of many photosynthetic electron transfer related genes in hdy1 were higher than WT. Our results suggest that OsFdC2 plays an important role in photosynthetic rate and development of heading date by regulating electron transfer and chlorophyll content in rice. PMID:26598971

  20. Arabidopsis Tic62 and Ferredoxin-NADP(H) Oxidoreductase Form Light-Regulated Complexes That Are Integrated into the Chloroplast Redox Poise[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Benz, J.P.; Stengel, A.; Lintala, M.; Lee, Y.-H.; Weber, A.; Philippar, K.; Gügel, I.L.; Kaieda, S.; Ikegami, T.; Mulo, P.; Soll, J.; Bölter, B.

    2009-01-01

    Translocation of nuclear-encoded preproteins across the inner envelope of chloroplasts is catalyzed by the Tic translocon, consisting of Tic110, Tic40, Tic62, Tic55, Tic32, Tic20, and Tic22. Tic62 was proposed to act as a redox sensor of the complex because of its redox-dependent shuttling between envelope and stroma and its specific interaction with the photosynthetic protein ferredoxin-NADP(H) oxidoreductase (FNR). However, the nature of this close relationship so far remained enigmatic. A putative additional localization of Tic62 at the thylakoids mandated further studies examining how this feature might be involved in the respective redox sensing pathway and the interaction with its partner protein. Therefore, both the association with FNR and the physiological role of the third, thylakoid-bound pool of Tic62 were investigated in detail. Coexpression analysis indicates that Tic62 has similar expression patterns as genes involved in photosynthetic functions and protein turnover. At the thylakoids, Tic62 and FNR form high molecular weight complexes that are not involved in photosynthetic electron transfer but are dynamically regulated by light signals and the stromal pH. Structural analyses reveal that Tic62 binds to FNR in a novel binding mode for flavoproteins, with a major contribution from hydrophobic interactions. Moreover, in absence of Tic62, membrane binding and stability of FNR are drastically reduced. We conclude that Tic62 represents a major FNR interaction partner not only at the envelope and in the stroma, but also at the thylakoids of Arabidopsis thaliana and perhaps all flowering plants. Association with Tic62 stabilizes FNR and is involved in its dynamic and light-dependent membrane tethering. PMID:20040542

  1. In Situ Association of Calvin Cycle Enzymes, Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase Activase, Ferredoxin-NADP+ Reductase, and Nitrite Reductase with Thylakoid and Pyrenoid Membranes of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Chloroplasts as Revealed by Immunoelectron Microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Suss, K. H.; Prokhorenko, I.; Adler, K.

    1995-01-01

    The in situ localization of the chloroplast enzymes ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco), Rubisco activase, ribose-5-phosphate isomerase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, aldolase, nitrite reductase, ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase, and H+-ATP synthase was studied by immunoelectron microscopy in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Immunogold labeling revealed that, despite Rubisco in the pyrenoid matrix, Calvin cycle enzymes, Rubisco activase, nitrite reductase, ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase, and H+-ATP synthase are associated predominantly with chloroplast thylakoid membranes and the inner surface of the pyrenoid membrane. This is in accord with previous enzyme localization studies in higher plants (K.H. Suss, C. Arkona, R. Manteuffel, K. Adler [1993] Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 90: 5514-5518). Pyrenoid tubules do not contain these enzymes. The pyrenoid matrix consists of Rubisco but is devoid of the other photosynthetic enzymes investigated. Evidence for the occurrence of two Rubisco forms differing in their spatial localization has also been obtained: Rubisco form I appears to be membrane associated like other Calvin cycle components, whereas Rubisco form II is confined to the pyrenoid matrix. It is proposed that enzyme form I represents an active Rubisco when assembled into Calvin cycle enzyme complexes, whereas Rubisco form II may be part of a CO2-concentrating mechanism. Pyrenoidal Calvin cycle complexes are thought to be highly active in CO2 fixation and important for the synthesis of starch around the pyrenoid. PMID:12228443

  2. Multinuclear magnetic resonance studies of the 2Feter dot 2S sup * ferredoxin from Anabaena species strain PCC 7120. 1. Sequence-specific hydrogen-1 resonance assignments and secondary structure in solution of the oxidized form

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Byung-Ha; Markley, J.L. )

    1990-04-24

    Complete sequence-specific assignments were determined for the diamagnetic {sup 1}H resonances from Anabaena 7120 ferredoxin. A novel assignment procedure was followed whose first step was the identification of the {sup 13}C spin systems of the amino acids by a {sup 13}C({sup 13}C) double quantum correlation experiment. Then, the {sup 1}H spin systems of the amino acids were identified from the {sup 13}C spin systems by means of direct and relayed {sup 1}H({sup 13}C) single-bond correlations. The sequential resonance assignments were based mainly on conventional interresidue {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}}{sub i}-{sup 1}H{sup N}{sub i+1} NOE connectivities. Resonances from 18 residues were not resolved in two-dimensional {sup 1}H NMR spectra. When these residues were mapped onto the X-ray crystal structure of the homologous ferredoxin from Spirulina platensis, it was found that they correspond to amino acids close to the paramagnetic 2Fe{center dot}2S cluster. Cross peaks in two-dimensional homonuclear {sup 1}H NMR spectra were not observed for any protons closer than about 7.8 {angstrom} to both iron atoms. Secondary structural features identified in solution include two antiparallel {beta}-sheets, one parallel {beta}-sheet, and one {alpha}-helix.

  3. Expression of spinach ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase using tandem T7 promoters and application of the purified protein for in vitro light-dependent thioredoxin-reduction system.

    PubMed

    Okegawa, Yuki; Motohashi, Ken

    2016-05-01

    Thioredoxins (Trxs) regulate the activity of target proteins in the chloroplast redox regulatory system. In vivo, a disulfide bond within Trxs is reduced by photochemically generated electrons via ferredoxin (Fd) and ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR: EC 1.8.7.2). FTR is an αβ-heterodimer, and the β-subunit has a 4Fe-4S cluster that is indispensable for the electron transfer from Fd to Trxs. Reconstitution of the light-dependent Fd/Trx system, including FTR, is required for the biochemical characterization of the Trx-dependent reduction pathway in the chloroplasts. In this study, we generated functional FTR by simultaneously expressing FTR-α and -β subunits under the control of tandem T7 promoters in Escherichia coli, and purifying the resulting FTR complex protein. The purified FTR complex exhibited spectroscopic absorption at 410 nm, indicating that it contained the Fe-S cluster. Modification of the expression system and simplification of the purification steps resulted in improved FTR complex yields compared to those obtained in previous studies. Furthermore, the light-dependent Trx-reduction system was reconstituted by using Fd, the purified FTR, and intact thylakoids. PMID:26773743

  4. In Situ Association of Calvin Cycle Enzymes, Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase Activase, Ferredoxin-NADP+ Reductase, and Nitrite Reductase with Thylakoid and Pyrenoid Membranes of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Chloroplasts as Revealed by Immunoelectron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Suss, K. H.; Prokhorenko, I.; Adler, K.

    1995-04-01

    The in situ localization of the chloroplast enzymes ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco), Rubisco activase, ribose-5-phosphate isomerase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, aldolase, nitrite reductase, ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase, and H+-ATP synthase was studied by immunoelectron microscopy in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Immunogold labeling revealed that, despite Rubisco in the pyrenoid matrix, Calvin cycle enzymes, Rubisco activase, nitrite reductase, ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase, and H+-ATP synthase are associated predominantly with chloroplast thylakoid membranes and the inner surface of the pyrenoid membrane. This is in accord with previous enzyme localization studies in higher plants (K.H. Suss, C. Arkona, R. Manteuffel, K. Adler [1993] Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 90: 5514-5518). Pyrenoid tubules do not contain these enzymes. The pyrenoid matrix consists of Rubisco but is devoid of the other photosynthetic enzymes investigated. Evidence for the occurrence of two Rubisco forms differing in their spatial localization has also been obtained: Rubisco form I appears to be membrane associated like other Calvin cycle components, whereas Rubisco form II is confined to the pyrenoid matrix. It is proposed that enzyme form I represents an active Rubisco when assembled into Calvin cycle enzyme complexes, whereas Rubisco form II may be part of a CO2-concentrating mechanism. Pyrenoidal Calvin cycle complexes are thought to be highly active in CO2 fixation and important for the synthesis of starch around the pyrenoid.

  5. Expression of a ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase gene in mesophyll and vascular cells and functions of the enzyme in ammonium assimilation in Nicotiana tabacum (L.).

    PubMed

    Feraud, Magali; Masclaux-Daubresse, Céline; Ferrario-Méry, Sylvie; Pageau, Karine; Lelandais, Maud; Ziegler, Christine; Leboeuf, Edouard; Jouglet, Tiphaine; Viret, Lauriane; Spampinato, Axelle; Paganelli, Vanina; Hammouda, Mounir Ben; Suzuki, Akira

    2005-11-01

    GLU1 encodes the major ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase (Fd-GOGAT, EC 1.4.7.1) in Arabidopsis thaliana (ecotype Columbia). With the aim of providing clues on the role of Fd-GOGAT, we analyzed the expression of Fd-GOGAT in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi). The 5' flanking element of GLU1 directed the expression of the uidA reporter gene in the palisade and spongy parenchyma of mesophyll, in the phloem cells of vascular tissue and in the roots of tobacco. White light, red light or sucrose induced GUS expression in the dark-grown seedlings in a pattern similar to the GLU1 mRNA accumulation in Arabidopsis. The levels of GLU2 mRNA encoding the second Fd-GOGAT and NADH-glutamate synthase (NADH-GOGAT, EC 1.4.1.14) were not affected by light. Both in the light and in darkness, (15)NH4(+) was incorporated into [5-(15)N]glutamine and [2-(15)N]glutamate by glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2) and Fd-GOGAT in leaf disks of transgenic tobacco expressing antisense Fd-GOGAT mRNA and in wild-type tobacco. In the light, low level of Fd-glutamate synthase limited the [2-(15)N]glutamate synthesis in transgenic leaf disks. The efficient dark labeling of [2-(15)N]glutamate in the antisense transgenic tobacco leaves indicates that the remaining Fd-GOGAT (15-20% of the wild-type activity) was not the main limiting factor in the dark ammonium assimilation. The antisense tobacco under high CO2 contained glutamine, glutamate, asparagine and aspartate as the bulk of the nitrogen carriers in leaves (62.5%), roots (69.9%) and phloem exudates (53.2%). The levels of glutamate, asparagine and aspartate in the transgenic phloem exudates were similar to the wild-type levels while the glutamine level increased. The proportion of these amino acids remained unchanged in the roots of the transgenic plants. Expression of GLU1 in mesophyll cells implies that Fd-GOGAT assimilates photorespiratory and primary ammonium. GLU1 expression in vascular cells indicates that Fd-GOGAT provides

  6. Electron Transport in a Dioxygenase-Ferredoxin Complex: Long Range Charge Coupling between the Rieske and Non-Heme Iron Center

    PubMed Central

    Jono, Ryota; Shimizu, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Dioxygenase (dOx) utilizes stereospecific oxidation on aromatic molecules; consequently, dOx has potential applications in bioremediation and stereospecific oxidation synthesis. The reactive components of dOx comprise a Rieske structure Cys2[2Fe-2S]His2 and a non-heme reactive oxygen center (ROC). Between the Rieske structure and the ROC, a universally conserved Asp residue appears to bridge the two structures forming a Rieske-Asp-ROC triad, where the Asp is known to be essential for electron transfer processes. The Rieske and ROC share hydrogen bonds with Asp through their His ligands; suggesting an ideal network for electron transfer via the carboxyl side chain of Asp. Associated with the dOx is an itinerant charge carrying protein Ferredoxin (Fdx). Depending on the specific cognate, Fdx may also possess either the Rieske structure or a related structure known as 4-Cys-[2Fe-2S] (4-Cys). In this study, we extensively explore, at different levels of theory, the behavior of the individual components (Rieske and ROC) and their interaction together via the Asp using a variety of density function methods, basis sets, and a method known as Generalized Ionic Fragment Approach (GIFA) that permits setting up spin configurations manually. We also report results on the 4-Cys structure for comparison. The individual optimized structures are compared with observed spectroscopic data from the Rieske, 4-Cys and ROC structures (where information is available). The separate pieces are then combined together into a large Rieske-Asp-ROC (donor/bridge/acceptor) complex to estimate the overall coupling between individual components, based on changes to the partial charges. The results suggest that the partial charges are significantly altered when Asp bridges the Rieske and the ROC; hence, long range coupling through hydrogen bonding effects via the intercalated Asp bridge can drastically affect the partial charge distributions compared to the individual isolated structures. The

  7. Plutonium (III) and uranium (III) nitrile complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Enriquez, A. E.; Matonic, J. H.; Scott, B. L.; Neu, M. P.

    2002-01-01

    Iodine oxidation of uranium and plutonium metals in tetrahydrofuran and pyridine form AnI{sub 3}(THF){sub 4} and AnI{sub 3}(py){sub 4} (An = Pu, U). These compounds represent convenient entries Into solution An(III) chemistry in organic solvents. Extensions of the actinide metal oxidation methodology in nitrile solvents by I{sub 2}, AgPF{sub 6}, and TIPF{sub 6} are presented here. Treatment of Pu{sup 0} in acetonitrile with iodine yields a putative PuI{sub 3}(NCMe){sub x} intermediate which can be trapped with the tripodal nitrogen donor ligand tpza (tpza = (tris[(2-pyrazinyl)methyl]amine)) and forms the eight-coordinate complex (tpza)PuI{sub 3}(NCMe). Treatment of excess U{sup 0} metal by iodine in acetonitrile afforded a brown crystalline mixed valence complex, [U(NCMe){sub 9}][UI{sub 6}][I], instead of UI{sub 3}(NCMe){sub 4}. The analogous reaction in bezonitrile forms red crystalline UI{sub 4}(NCPh){sub 4}. In contrast, treatment of UI{sub 3}(THF){sub 4} with excess acetonitrile cleanly generates [U(NCMe){sub 9}][I]{sub 3}. Oxidation of Pu{sup 0} by either TI(I) or Ag(I) hexafluorophosphate salts generates a nine-coordinate homoleptic acetonitrile adduct [Pu(NCMe){sub 9}][PF{sub 6}]{sub 3}. Attempts to oxidize U{sub 0} with these salts were unsuccessful.

  8. Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/000692.htm Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cranial mononeuropathy III -- diabetic type -- is usually a complication of diabetes that causes ...

  9. Type III Hyperlipoproteinaemia

    PubMed Central

    Borrie, Peter

    1969-01-01

    Eighteen patients with type III hyperlipoproteinaemia, diagnosed on the basis of skin lesions, serum lipids, and lipoprotein electrophoresis, have been fully investigated over a period of 15 years. The incidence of coronary artery disease was only slightly increased, and was not increased at all among first-degree relatives. Peripheral occlusive arterial disease was probably more common. An increased incidence of carbohydrate intolerance was found in neither the patients nor their relatives. The effects of treatment on the skin were uniformly good. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:5783124

  10. POPULATION III HYPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Smidt, Joseph; Whalen, Daniel J.; Wiggins, Brandon K.; Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L.; Johnson, Jarrett L.

    2014-12-20

    Population III supernovae have been of growing interest of late for their potential to directly probe the properties of the first stars, particularly the most energetic events that are visible near the edge of the observable universe. Until now, hypernovae, the unusually energetic Type Ib/c supernovae that are sometimes associated with gamma-ray bursts, have been overlooked as cosmic beacons at the highest redshifts. In this, the latest of a series of studies on Population III supernovae, we present numerical simulations of 25-50 M {sub ☉} hypernovae and their light curves done with the Los Alamos RAGE and SPECTRUM codes. We find that they will be visible at z = 10-15 to the James Webb Space Telescope and z = 4-5 to the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope, tracing star formation rates in the first galaxies and at the end of cosmological reionization. If, however, the hypernova crashes into a dense shell ejected by its progenitor, it is expected that a superluminous event will occur that may be seen at z ∼ 20 in the first generation of stars.

  11. Replacement of Tyr50 stacked on the si-face of the isoalloxazine ring of the flavin adenine dinucleotide prosthetic group modulates Bacillus subtilis ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase activity toward NADPH.

    PubMed

    Seo, Daisuke; Naito, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Erika; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2015-08-01

    Ferredoxin-NAD(P)(+) oxidoreductases ([EC 1.18.1.2], [EC 1.18.1.3], FNRs) from green sulfur bacteria, purple non-sulfur bacteria and most of Firmicutes, such as Bacillus subtilis (BsFNR) are homo-dimeric flavoproteins homologous to bacterial NADPH-thioredoxin reductase. These FNRs contain two unique aromatic residues stacked on the si- and re-face of the isoalloxazine ring moiety of the FAD prosthetic group whose configurations are often found among other types of flavoproteins including plant-type FNR and flavodoxin, but not in bacterial NADPH-thioredoxin reductase. To investigate the role of the si-face Tyr50 residue in BsFNR, we replaced Tyr50 with Gly, Ser, and Trp and examined its spectroscopic properties and enzymatic activities in the presence of NADPH and ferredoxin (Fd) from B. subtilis (BsFd). The replacement of Tyr50 to Gly (Y50G), Ser (Y50S), and Trp (Y50W) in BsFNR resulted in a blue shift of the FAD transition bands. The Y50G and Y50S mutations enhanced the FAD fluorescence emission, whereas those of the wild type and Y50W mutant were quenched. All three mutants decreased thermal stabilities compared to wild type. Using a diaphorase assay, the k cat values for the Y50G and Y50S mutants in the presence of NADPH and ferricyanide were decreased to less than 5 % of the wild type activity. The Y50W mutant retained approximately 20 % reactivity in the diaphorase assay and BsFd-dependent cytochrome c reduction assay relative to wild type. The present results suggest that Tyr50 modulates the electronic properties and positioning of the prosthetic group.

  12. Multinuclear magnetic resonance studies of the 2Fe-2S sup * ferredoxin from Anabaena species strain PCC 7120. 3. Detection and characterization of hyperfine-shifted nitrogen-15 and hydrogen-1 resonances of the oxidized form

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Byung-Ha; Markley, J.L. )

    1990-04-24

    All the nitrogen signals from the amino acid side chains and 80 of the total of 98 backbone nitrogen signals of the oxidized form of the 2Fe{center dot}2S* ferredoxin from Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 were assigned by means of a series of heteronuclear two-dimensional experiments. Two additional nitrogen signals were observed in the one-dimensional {sup 15}N NMR spectrum and classified as backbone amide resonances from residues whose proton resonances experience paramagnetic broadening. The one-dimensional {sup 15}N NMR spectrum shows nine resonances that are hyperfine shifted and broadened. From this inventory of diamagnetic nitrogen signals and the available X-ray coordinates of the related ferredoxin, the resolved hyperfine-shifted {sup 15}N peaks were attributed to backbone amide nitrogens of two other amino acids that share electrons with the 2Fe{center dot}2S* center to backbone amide nitrogens of two other amino acids that are close to the 2Fe{center dot}2S* center. The seven {sup 15}N signals that are missing and unaccounted for probably are buried under the envelope of amide signals. {sup 1}H NMR signals from all the amide protons directly bonded to the seven missing and nine hyperfine-shifted nitrogens were too broad to be resolved in conventional 2D NMR spectra. From their dependence on the magnetogyric ratio, a {sup 1}H resonance should be up to 100 times broader than a {sup 15}N resonance that experiences a similar hyperfine interaction. This appears to be the reason why more well-resolved hyperfine-shifted {sup 15}N resonances were observed than corresponding {sup 1}H resonances. The result suggest that hyperfine-shifted {sup 15}N peaks can provide a unique window on the electronic structure and environment of this and other paramagnetic centers.

  13. Pseudo Class III malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hummayani, Fadia M.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of deep anterior crossbite is technically challenging due to the difficulty of placing traditional brackets with fixed appliances. This case report represents a none traditional treatment modality to treat deep anterior crossbite in an adult pseudo class III malocclusion complicated by severely retruded, supraerupted upper and lower incisors. Treatment was carried out in 2 phases. Phase I treatment was performed by removable appliance “modified Hawley appliance with inverted labial bow,” some modifications were carried out to it to suit the presented case. Positive overbite and overjet was accomplished in one month, in this phase with minimal forces exerted on the lower incisors. Whereas, phase II treatment was performed with fixed appliances (braces) to align teeth and have proper over bite and overjet and to close posterior open bite, this phase was accomplished within 11 month. PMID:27052290

  14. SUPERSTARS III: 3-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Education, Raleigh.

    SUPERSTARS III is a K-8 program designed as an enrichment opportunity for self-directed learners in mathematics. The basic purpose of SUPERSTARS III is to provide the extra challenge that self-motivated students need in mathematics and to do so in a structured, long-term program that does not impinge on the normal classroom routine or the…

  15. SUPERSTARS III: 6-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Education, Raleigh.

    SUPERSTARS III is a K-8 program designed as an enrichment opportunity for self-directed learners in mathematics. The basic purpose of SUPERSTARS III is to provide the extra challenge that self-motivated students need in mathematics and to do so in a structured, long-term program that does not impinge on the normal classroom routine or the…

  16. Using dBase III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Janet; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Four articles on dBASE III include three on library applications: a photocopy invoicing system for interlibrary loan, a vertical file subject headings list program, and a subject index to statistical resources. Another article explains the differences between interpreters and compilers and the advantages of the Clipper compiler for dBASE III. (EM)

  17. PREFACE: Quantum Optics III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orszag, M.; Retamal, J. C.; Saavedra, C.; Wallentowitz, S.

    2007-06-01

    All the 50 years of conscious pondering did not bring me nearer to an answer to the question `what is light quanta?'. Nowadays, every rascal believes, he knows it, however, he is mistaken. (A Einstein, 1951 in a letter to M Besso) Quantum optics has played a key role in physics in the last several decades. On the other hand, in these early decades of the information age, the flow of information is becoming more and more central to our daily life. Thus, the related fields of quantum information theory as well as Bose-Einstein condensation have acquired tremendous importance in the last couple of decades. In Quantum Optics III, a fusion of these fields appears in a natural way. Quantum Optics III was held in Pucón, Chile, in 27-30 of November, 2006. This beautiful location in the south of Chile is near the lake Villarrica and below the snow covered volcano of the same name. This fantastic environment contributed to a relaxed atmosphere, suitable for informal discussion and for the students to have a chance to meet the key figures in the field. The previous Quantum Optics conferences took place in Santiago, Chile (Quantum Optics I, 2000) and Cozumel, Mexico (Quantum Optics II, 2004). About 115 participants from 19 countries attended and participated in the meeting to discuss a wide variety of topics such as quantum-information processing, experiments related to non-linear optics and squeezing, various aspects of entanglement including its sudden death, correlated twin-photon experiments, light storage, decoherence-free subspaces, Bose-Einstein condensation, discrete Wigner functions and many more. There was a strong Latin-American participation from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela and Mexico, as well as from Europe, USA, China, and Australia. New experimental and theoretical results were presented at the conference. In Latin-America a quiet revolution has taken place in the last twenty years. Several groups working in quantum optics and

  18. Outcome of tyrosinaemia type III.

    PubMed

    Ellaway, C J; Holme, E; Standing, S; Preece, M A; Green, A; Ploechl, E; Ugarte, M; Trefz, F K; Leonard, J V

    2001-12-01

    Tyrosinaemia type III is a rare disorder caused by a deficiency of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase, the second enzyme in the catabolic pathway of tyrosine. The majority of the nine previously reported patients have presented with neurological symptoms after the neonatal period, while others detected by neonatal screening have been asymptomatic. All have had normal liver and renal function and none has skin or eye abnormalities. A further four patients with tyrosinaemia type III are described. It is not clear whether a strict low tyrosine diet alters the natural history of tyrosinaemia type III, although there remains a suspicion that treatment may be important, at least in infancy.

  19. Like father, like son: assessment of the morphological affinities of A.L. 288-1 (A. afarensis), Sts 7 (A. africanus) and Omo 119-73-2718 (Australopithecus sp.) through a three-dimensional shape analysis of the shoulder joint.

    PubMed

    Arias-Martorell, Julia; Potau, Josep Maria; Bello-Hellegouarch, Gaëlle; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    The postcranial evidence for the Australopithecus genus indicates that australopiths were able bipeds; however, the morphology of the forelimbs and particularly that of the shoulder girdle suggests that they were partially adapted to an arboreal lifestyle. The nature of such arboreal adaptations is still unclear, as are the kind of arboreal behaviors in which australopiths might have engaged. In this study we analyzed the shape of the shoulder joint (proximal humerus and glenoid cavity of the scapula) of three australopith specimens: A.L. 288-1 (A. afarensis), Sts 7 (A. africanus) and Omo 119-73-2718 (Australopithecus sp.) with three-dimensional geometric morphometrics. The morphology of the specimens was compared with that of a wide array of living anthropoid taxa and some additional fossil hominins (the Homo erectus specimen KNM-WT 15000 and the H. neanderthalensis specimen Tabun 1). Our results indicate that A.L. 288-1 shows mosaic traits resembling H. sapiens and Pongo, whereas the Sts 7 shoulder is most similar to the arboreal apes and does not present affinities with H. sapiens. Omo 119-73-2718 exhibits morphological affinities with the more arboreal and partially suspensory New World monkey Lagothrix. The shoulder of the australopith specimens thus shows a combination of primitive and derived traits (humeral globularity, enhancement of internal and external rotation of the joint), related to use of the arm in overhead positions. The genus Homo specimens show overall affinities with H. sapiens at the shoulder, indicating full correspondence of these hominin shoulders with the modern human morphotype. PMID:25651542

  20. Like Father, Like Son: Assessment of the Morphological Affinities of A.L. 288–1 (A. afarensis), Sts 7 (A. africanus) and Omo 119–73–2718 (Australopithecus sp.) through a Three-Dimensional Shape Analysis of the Shoulder Joint

    PubMed Central

    Arias-Martorell, Julia; Potau, Josep Maria; Bello-Hellegouarch, Gaëlle; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    The postcranial evidence for the Australopithecus genus indicates that australopiths were able bipeds; however, the morphology of the forelimbs and particularly that of the shoulder girdle suggests that they were partially adapted to an arboreal lifestyle. The nature of such arboreal adaptations is still unclear, as are the kind of arboreal behaviors in which australopiths might have engaged. In this study we analyzed the shape of the shoulder joint (proximal humerus and glenoid cavity of the scapula) of three australopith specimens: A.L. 288–1 (A. afarensis), Sts 7 (A. africanus) and Omo 119–73–2718 (Australopithecus sp.) with three-dimensional geometric morphometrics. The morphology of the specimens was compared with that of a wide array of living anthropoid taxa and some additional fossil hominins (the Homo erectus specimen KNM-WT 15000 and the H. neanderthalensis specimen Tabun 1). Our results indicate that A.L. 288–1 shows mosaic traits resembling H. sapiens and Pongo, whereas the Sts 7 shoulder is most similar to the arboreal apes and does not present affinities with H. sapiens. Omo 119–73–2718 exhibits morphological affinities with the more arboreal and partially suspensory New World monkey Lagothrix. The shoulder of the australopith specimens thus shows a combination of primitive and derived traits (humeral globularity, enhancement of internal and external rotation of the joint), related to use of the arm in overhead positions. The genus Homo specimens show overall affinities with H. sapiens at the shoulder, indicating full correspondence of these hominin shoulders with the modern human morphotype. PMID:25651542

  1. Insertion devices for Doris III

    SciTech Connect

    Pfluger, J.; Heintze, G. ); Baran, W.; Fernow, D.; Kuntze, K. )

    1992-01-01

    In this paper the mechanical and magnetic layout of the first three insertion devices for DORIS III, an upgraded reconstruction of DORIS II, is described and results of the magnetic characterization are given as well.

  2. Impact analysis of Minuteman III Payload Transporter Type III

    SciTech Connect

    Stirbis, P.P.

    1993-12-01

    An analysis of the impact of the Minuteman III Payload Transporter Type III into a nonyielding target at 46 m.p.h. and 30 m.p.h., and into a yielding target at 46 m.p.h. is presented. The analysis considers the structural response of the tiedown system which secures the Minuteman III re-entry system to the floor of the payload transporter. A finite element model of the re-entry system, its tiedown system, which includes tie-rods and shear pins, and the pallet plate which is attached to the transporter floating plate, was constructed. Because accelerations of the payload transporter are not known, acceleration data from one-quarter scale testing of the Safe Secure Trailer was used to investigate the response of the tiedown system. These accelerations were applied to the pallet plate. The ABAQUS computer code was used to predict the forces in the members of the tiedown system.

  3. Multinuclear magnetic resonance studies of the 2Fe-2S sup * ferredoxin from Anabaena species strain PCC 7120. 2. Sequence-specific carbon-13 and nitrogen-15 resonance assignments of the oxidized form

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Byung-Ha; Mooberry, E.S.; Markley, J.L. )

    1990-04-24

    Multinuclear two-dimensional NMR techniques were used to assign nearly all diamagnetic {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N resonances of the plant-type 2Fe{center dot}2S* ferredoxin from Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. Since a {sup 13}C spin system directed strategy had been used to identify the {sup 1}H spin systems, the sequence-specific {sup 1}H assignments also provided sequence-specific {sup 13}C assignments. Several resonances from {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C groups were assigned independently of the {sup 1}H assignments by considering the distances between these nuclei and the paramagnetic 2Fe{center dot}2S center. A {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N correlation data set was used to assign additional carbonyl carbons and to analyze overlapping regions of the {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C correlation spectrum. Sequence-specific assignments of backbone and side-chain nitrogens were based on {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N and {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N correlations obtained from various two-dimensional NMR experiments.

  4. High temperature triggers the metabolism of S-nitrosothiols in sunflower mediating a process of nitrosative stress which provokes the inhibition of ferredoxin-NADP reductase by tyrosine nitration.

    PubMed

    Chaki, Mounira; Valderrama, Raquel; Fernández-Ocaña, Ana M; Carreras, Alfonso; Gómez-Rodríguez, Maria V; López-Jaramillo, Javier; Begara-Morales, Juan C; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Luque, Francisco; Leterrier, Marina; Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B

    2011-11-01

    High temperature (HT) is considered a major abiotic stress that negatively affects both vegetative and reproductive growth. Whereas the metabolism of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is well established under HT, less is known about the metabolism of reactive nitrogen species (RNS). In sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seedlings exposed to HT, NO content as well as S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) activity and expression were down-regulated with the simultaneous accumulation of total S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) including S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). However, the content of tyrosine nitration (NO(2) -Tyr) studied by high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and by confocal laser scanning microscope was induced. Nitroproteome analysis under HT showed that this stress induced the protein expression of 13 tyrosine-nitrated proteins. Among the induced proteins, ferredoxin-NADP reductase (FNR) was selected to evaluate the effect of nitration on its activity after heat stress and in vitro conditions using 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) (peroxynitrite donor) as the nitrating agent, the FNR activity being inhibited. Taken together, these results suggest that HT augments SNOs, which appear to mediate protein tyrosine nitration, inhibiting FNR, which is involved in the photosynthesis process.

  5. The START III bargaining space

    SciTech Connect

    Karas, T.H.

    1998-08-01

    The declining state of the Russian military and precarious Russian economic condition will give the US considerable advantages at the START III bargaining table. Taking the US-RF asymmetries into account, this paper discusses a menu of START III measures the US could ask for, and measures it could offer in return, in attempting to negotiate an equitable treaty. Measures the US might seek in a START III treaty include: further reductions in deployed strategic nuclear warheads, irreversibility of reductions through warhead dismantlement; beginning to bring theater nuclear weapons under mutual control, and increased transparency into the Russian nuclear weapons complex. The US may, however, wish to apply its bargaining advantages to attempting to achieve the first steps toward two long-range goals that would enhance US security: bringing theater nuclear weapons into the US-RF arms control arena, and increasing transparency into the Russian nuclear weapons complex. In exchange for measures relating to these objectives, the US might consider offering to Russia: Further strategic weapons reductions approaching levels at which the Russians believe they could maintain a degree of parity with the US; Measures to decrease the large disparities in potential deliver-system uploading capabilities that appear likely under current START II/START III scenarios; and Financial assistance in achieving START II/START III reductions as rapidly as is technically possible.

  6. III-Nitride nanowire optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Songrui; Nguyen, Hieu P. T.; Kibria, Md. G.; Mi, Zetian

    2015-11-01

    Group-III nitride nanowire structures, including GaN, InN, AlN and their alloys, have been intensively studied in the past decade. Unique to this material system is that its energy bandgap can be tuned from the deep ultraviolet (~6.2 eV for AlN) to the near infrared (~0.65 eV for InN). In this article, we provide an overview on the recent progress made in III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices, including light emitting diodes, lasers, photodetectors, single photon sources, intraband devices, solar cells, and artificial photosynthesis. The present challenges and future prospects of III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices are also discussed.

  7. Chromium(III), insoluble salts

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chromium ( III ) , insoluble salts ; CASRN 16065 - 83 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments

  8. Title III hazardous air pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, R.

    1995-12-31

    The author presents an overview of the key provisions of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The key provisions include the following: 112(b) -- 189 Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP); 112(a) -- Major Source: 10 TPY/25 TPY; 112(d) -- Application of MACT; 112(g) -- Modifications; 112(I) -- State Program; 112(j) -- The Hammer; and 112(r) -- Accidental Release Provisions.

  9. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S; Farnaby, Joy H; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G; Love, Jason B; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal-ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on U(III) and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to Np(IV). Here we report the synthesis of three new Np(III) organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that Np(III) complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of Np(II) is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key Np(III) orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements.

  10. Terrain Perception for DEMO III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manduchi, R.; Bellutta, P.; Matthies, L.; Owens, K.; Rankin, A.

    2000-01-01

    The Demo III program has as its primary focus the development of autonomous mobility for a small rugged cross country vehicle. In this paper we report recent progress on both stereo-based obstacle detection and terrain cover color-based classification.

  11. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S; Farnaby, Joy H; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G; Love, Jason B; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal-ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on U(III) and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to Np(IV). Here we report the synthesis of three new Np(III) organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that Np(III) complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of Np(II) is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key Np(III) orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements. PMID:27442286

  12. A T14C variant of Azotobacter vinelandii ferredoxin I undergoes facile [3Fe-4S]0 to [4Fe-4S]2+ conversion in vitro but not in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gao-Sheridan, H S; Kemper, M A; Khayat, R; Tilley, G J; Armstrong, F A; Sridhar, V; Prasad, G S; Stout, C D; Burgess, B K

    1998-12-11

    [4Fe-4S]2+/+ clusters that are ligated by Cys-X-X-Cys-X-X-Cys sequence motifs share the general feature of being hard to convert to [3Fe-4S]+/0 clusters, whereas those that contain a Cys-X-X-Asp-X-X-Cys motif undergo facile and reversible cluster interconversion. Little is known about the factors that control the in vivo assembly and conversion of these clusters. In this study we have designed and constructed a 3Fe to 4Fe cluster conversion variant of Azotobacter vinelandii ferredoxin I (FdI) in which the sequence that ligates the [3Fe-4S] cluster in native FdI was altered by converting a nearby residue, Thr-14, to Cys. Spectroscopic and electrochemical characterization shows that when purified in the presence of dithionite, T14C FdI is an O2-sensitive 8Fe protein. Both the new and the indigenous clusters have reduction potentials that are significantly shifted compared with those in native FdI, strongly suggesting a significantly altered environment around the clusters. Interestingly, whole cell EPR have revealed that T14C FdI exists as a 7Fe protein in vivo. This 7Fe form of T14C FdI is extremely similar to native FdI in its spectroscopic, electrochemical, and structural features. However, unlike native FdI which does not undergo facile cluster conversion, the 7Fe form T14C FdI quickly converts to the 8Fe form with a high efficiency under reducing conditions.

  13. Flavodoxin:quinone reductase (FqrB): a redox partner of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase that reversibly couples pyruvate oxidation to NADPH production in Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    St Maurice, Martin; Cremades, Nunilo; Croxen, Matthew A; Sisson, Gary; Sancho, Javier; Hoffman, Paul S

    2007-07-01

    Pyruvate-dependent reduction of NADP has been demonstrated in cell extracts of the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori. However, NADP is not a substrate of purified pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR), suggesting that other redox active enzymes mediate this reaction. Here we show that fqrB (HP1164), which is essential and highly conserved among the epsilonproteobacteria, exhibits NADPH oxidoreductase activity. FqrB was purified by nickel interaction chromatography following overexpression in Escherichia coli. The protein contained flavin adenine dinucleotide and exhibited NADPH quinone reductase activity with menadione or benzoquinone and weak activity with cytochrome c, molecular oxygen, and 5,5'-dithio-bis-2-nitrobenzoic acid (DTNB). FqrB exhibited a ping-pong catalytic mechanism, a k(cat) of 122 s(-1), and an apparent K(m) of 14 muM for menadione and 26 muM for NADPH. FqrB also reduced flavodoxin (FldA), the electron carrier of PFOR. In coupled enzyme assays with purified PFOR and FldA, FqrB reduced NADP in a pyruvate- and reduced coenzyme A (CoA)-dependent manner. Moreover, in the presence of NADPH, CO(2), and acetyl-CoA, the PFOR:FldA:FqrB complex generated pyruvate via CO(2) fixation. PFOR was the rate-limiting enzyme in the complex, and nitazoxanide, a specific inhibitor of PFOR of H. pylori and Campylobacter jejuni, also inhibited NADP reduction in cell-free lysates. These capnophilic (CO(2)-requiring) organisms contain gaps in pathways of central metabolism that would benefit substantially from pyruvate formation via CO(2) fixation. Thus, FqrB provides a novel function in pyruvate metabolism and, together with production of superoxide anions via quinone reduction under high oxygen tensions, contributes to the unique microaerobic lifestyle that defines the epsilonproteobacterial group. PMID:17468253

  14. NIF Title III engineering plan

    SciTech Connect

    Deis, G

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to define the work that must be accomplished by the NIF Project during Title III Engineering. This definition is intended to be sufficiently detailed to provide a framework for yearly planning, to clearly identify the specific deliverables so that the Project teams can focus on them, and to provide a common set of objectives and processes across the Project. This plan has been preceded by similar documents for Title I and Title II design and complements the Site Management Plan, the Project Control Manual, the Quality Assurance Program Plan, the RM Parsons NIF Title III Configuration Control Plan, the Integrated Project Schedule, the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report, the Configuration Management Plan, and the Transition Plan.

  15. Silver europium(III) polyphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Ayadi, Mounir; Férid, Mokhtar; Moine, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Europium(III) silver polyphosphate, AgEu(PO3)4, was prepared by the flux method. The atomic arrangement is built up by infinite (PO3)n chains (periodicity of 4) extending along the c axis. These chains are joined to each other by EuO8 dodeca­hedra. The Ag+ cations are located in the voids of this arrangement and are surrounded by five oxygen atoms in a distorted [4+1] coordination. PMID:21582031

  16. Antithrombin III and the nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, K A; Stoffersen, E

    1979-05-01

    Plasma and urinary antithrombin III (AT-III) was measured in 15 cases of nephrotic syndrome. Plasma AT-III correlated well with serum albumin, but poorly with proteinuria, whereas urinary AT-III correlated well to proteinuria. The plasma AT-III level had a mean similar to 25 healthy controls, but the range was significantly wider. A case with nephrotic syndrome and left renal vein thrombosis is reported. The urinary output of AT-III rose and the plasma level fell with the activity of the disease. Although AT-III and albumin have similar molecule weight, their renal clearance was found to be different. It is suggested that urinary loss of AT-III plays a role in the hypercoagulable state sometimes found in the nephrotic syndrome.

  17. Bursts of Type III and Type V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, S.; Dulk, G. A.

    The observational database on Types III and V solar radio bursts is summarized and used as a basis for developing analytical models of the observed phenomena. Type III events are characterized by a rapid drift from high to low frequencies, a harmonic structure consisting of F-H pairs, and circular polarization. Type V events last longer than Type III bursts and have a broader bandwidth. Both bursts are thought to arise from the same mechanism. Probable sources of the F-H pairs are characterized, along with the brightness temperature, time profiles, and polarization features typical of Type III and IIIb, structureless Type III and storm Type III bursts. Attention is also given to the interaction between Type III bursts and the coronal magnetic field and to similarities between Type III events and inverted-U and J bursts.

  18. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S.; Farnaby, Joy H.; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G.; Love, Jason B.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L.

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal-ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on UIII and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to NpIV. Here we report the synthesis of three new NpIII organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that NpIII complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of NpII is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key NpIII orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements.

  19. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S.; Farnaby, Joy H.; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G.; Love, Jason B.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L.

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal–ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on UIII and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to NpIV. Here we report the synthesis of three new NpIII organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that NpIII complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of NpII is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key NpIII orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements.

  20. [Clinical aspects of acquired antithrombin III deficiency].

    PubMed

    von Blohn, G; Hellstern, P; Köhler, M; Scheffler, P; Wenzel, E

    1986-02-01

    The significance of acquired antithrombin III (AT III) deficiency must be interpreted in close relation to the underlying disease process. In patients with acute or chronic liver impairment, the AT III activity is related to a decrease of procoagulatory factors, whereas, in protein loss syndromes such as nephrotic syndrome, the AT III indicates an increased risk of thromboembolic events. The effect of oral contraceptives (OC) on AT III levels in young healthy females (n = 30) was determined prospectively. AT III decreases during OC usage could not be related to the estrogen content of the examined oral contraceptives, and there was no parallel decrease of AT III activity and concentration in each type of OC. In a prospective study, the extent of AT III decrease was determined in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass operations (CPB) receiving different anticoagulant schedules during extracorporeal circulation (n = 49). There was no significant influence on the effectiveness of anticoagulation by the observed AT III decreases. AT III deficiency during CPB was primarily the result of hemodilution. However, the AT III kinetics were significantly influenced by the different protamin dosages and were not affected by the different heparin dosages. Correction of diminished AT III levels by substitution of AT III concentrates is beneficial in cases, in which an interruption of an enhanced coagulatory process such as disseminated intravascular coagulation is necessary or in patients requiring high dosage heparinization as in deep vein thrombosis. In those cases the quality of AT III correction correlates to the course of the disease. However, the potency of concentrates as well as the individual AT III recovery and half-life must be considered for an appropriate treatment with AT III substitution. PMID:3718407

  1. Horner's syndrome in an African spotted eagle owl (Bubo africanus).

    PubMed

    Williams, D L; Cooper, J E

    1994-01-15

    An unilateral ptosis in an African spotted eagle own was ameliorated by topical treatment with phenylephrine, strongly suggesting a diagnosis of Horner's syndrome, the first recorded case of this syndrome in a bird. PMID:8135016

  2. Optical properties of the Eu(III)-La(III)-complex-doped polyolefine film and rod samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogreb, Roman; Popov, Oleg; Lirtsman, Vlad; Pyshkin, Oleg; Kazachkov, Alexander; Musin, Albina; Finkelshtein, Binyamin; Shmukler, Yuri; Davidov, Dan; Bormashenko, Edward

    2005-04-01

    The work is devoted to luminescent properties of trivalent lanthanide complexes dispersed in thermoplastic host matrices. Polyethylene-based film and polypropylene-based rod both doped with these complexes were manufactured using an extrusion technique. Two kinds of dopants were used: Eu(III)-thenoyltrifluoroacetone-1,10-phenanthroline complex (Eu(III)) and Eu(III)-La(III)-1,10-phenanthroline complex (Eu(III)-La(III)). Comparison was made between these samples regarding absorption, excitation, emission and a lifetime of luminescence. Dependence of emission intensity on the excitation energy was determined. Emission spectra of the films were studied at room and helium temperatures. Optical properties of Eu(III) samples are different from Eu(III)-La(III) samples. Significant difference in spectra of these two types of samples may be attributed to the La(III) action.

  3. Development of demographic norms for four new WAIS-III/WMS-III indexes.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Chelune, Gordon J; Taylor, Michael J; Woodward, Todd S; Heaton, Robert K

    2006-06-01

    Following the publication of the third edition Wechsler scales (i.e., WAIS-III and WMS-III), demographically corrected norms were made available in the form of a computerized scoring program (i.e., WAIS-III/WMS-III/WIAT-II Scoring Assistant). These norms correct for age, gender, ethnicity, and education. Since then, four new indexes have been developed: the WAIS-III General Ability Index, the WMS-III Delayed Memory Index, and the two alternate Immediate and Delayed Memory Indexes. The purpose of this study was to develop demographically corrected norms for the four new indexes using the standardization sample and education oversample from the WAIS-III and WMS-III. These norms were developed using the same methodology as the demographically corrected norms made available in the WAIS-III/WMS-III/WIAT-II Scoring Assistant.

  4. Development of demographic norms for four new WAIS-III/WMS-III indexes.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Chelune, Gordon J; Taylor, Michael J; Woodward, Todd S; Heaton, Robert K

    2006-06-01

    Following the publication of the third edition Wechsler scales (i.e., WAIS-III and WMS-III), demographically corrected norms were made available in the form of a computerized scoring program (i.e., WAIS-III/WMS-III/WIAT-II Scoring Assistant). These norms correct for age, gender, ethnicity, and education. Since then, four new indexes have been developed: the WAIS-III General Ability Index, the WMS-III Delayed Memory Index, and the two alternate Immediate and Delayed Memory Indexes. The purpose of this study was to develop demographically corrected norms for the four new indexes using the standardization sample and education oversample from the WAIS-III and WMS-III. These norms were developed using the same methodology as the demographically corrected norms made available in the WAIS-III/WMS-III/WIAT-II Scoring Assistant. PMID:16768593

  5. Structural and photophysical studies on ternary Sm(III), Nd(III), Yb(III), Er(III) complexes containing pyridyltriazole ligands

    PubMed Central

    Gusev, Alexey N.; Shul’gin, Victor F.; Meshkova, Svetlana B.; Hasegawa, Miki; Alexandrov, Grigory G.; Eremenko, Igor L.; Linert, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Two bidentate pyridine-triazole ligands (3-(pyridine-2-yl)-5-phenyl-1,2,4-triazole (L1) and 5-phenyl-2-(2′-pyridyl)-7,8-benzo-6,5-dihydro-1,3,6-triazaindolizine (L2)), have been synthesized and used for Ln(Dbm)3 (Ln = Sm(III), Nd(III), Yb(III) and Er(III)) coordination. The structures of the ligands and resulting Sm(III) complex were determined in the solid state by X-ray diffraction. The title complexes were characterized by UV, fluorescent, IR-spectroscopy and thermogravimetric and elemental analyses. Photophysical studies on the Ln(III) complexes were carried out showing luminescence in the region typical for Ln(III). The effect of various factors on the enhancement luminescence of complexes is discussed. PMID:23470984

  6. Implementing Title III -- Air toxics

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, B.W.

    1995-12-31

    The South Coast Air Quality Management District (AQMD) is taking three basic approaches to implementing the new National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) from the Title III program: accept and implement, as written, the NESHAPs where few sources are located in the South Coast Air Basin; incorporate with simplification of the NESHAP requirements into AQMD rules when many sources are involved; then seek equivalency by the US EPA; and incorporate with a market-based rule (VOC RECLAIM), part of many NESHAPs which control volatile organic compound as HAPs. Whatever the approach, emphasis will be placed on: streamlining and simplification; helping sources understand requirements and comply; and common sense.

  7. The Mark III vertex chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, J.; Bolton, T.; Bunnell, K.; Cassell, R.; Cheu, E.; Freese, T.; Grab, C.; Mazaheri, G.; Mir, R.; Odian, A.

    1987-07-01

    The design and construction of the new Mark III vertex chamber is described. Initial tests with cosmic rays prove the ability of track reconstruction and yield triplet resolutions below 50 ..mu..m at 3 atm using argon/ethane (50:50). Also performed are studies using a prototype of a pressurized wire vertex chamber with 8 mm diameter straw geometry. Spatial resolution of 35mm was obtained using dimethyl ether (DME) at 1 atm and 30 ..mu..m using argon/ethane (50/50 mixture) at 4 atm. Preliminary studies indicate the DME to adversely affect such materials as aluminized Mylar and Delrin.

  8. Zinc in +III oxidation state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Devleena; Jena, Puru

    2012-02-01

    The possibility of Group 12 elements, such as Zn, Cd, and Hg existing in an oxidation state of +III or higher has fascinated chemists for decades. Significant efforts have been made in the past to achieve higher oxidation states for the heavier congener mercury (since the 3^rd ionization potential of the elements decrease as we go down the periodic table). It took nearly 20 years before experiment could confirm the theoretical prediction that Hg indeed can exist in an oxidation state of +IV. While this unusual property of Hg is attributed to the relativistic effects, Zn being much lighter than Hg has not been expected to have an oxidation state higher than +II. Using density functional theory we show that an oxidation state of +III for Zn can be realized by choosing specific ligands with large electron affinities i.e. superhalogens. We demonstrate this by a systematic study of the interaction of Zn with F, BO2, and AuF6 ligands whose electron affinities are progressively higher, namely, 3.4 eV, 4.4 eV, and 8.4 eV, respectively. Discovery of higher oxidation states of elements can help in the formulation of new reactions and hence in the development of new chemistry.

  9. Response of Chloroplast NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase-Mediated Cyclic Electron Flow to a Shortage or Lack in Ferredoxin-Quinone Oxidoreductase-Dependent Pathway in Rice Following Short-Term Heat Stress.

    PubMed

    Essemine, Jemaa; Qu, Mingnan; Mi, Hualing; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic electron flow (CEF) around photosystem I (PSI) can protect photosynthetic electron carriers under conditions of stromal over-reduction. The goal of the research reported in this paper was to investigate the responses of both PSI and photosystem II (PSII) to a short-term heat stress in two rice lines with different capacities of cyclic electron transfer, i.e., Q4149 with a high capacity (hcef) and C4023 with a low capacity (lcef). The absorbance change at 820 nm (ΔA820) was used here to assess the charge separation in the PSI reaction center (P700). The results obtained show that short-term heat stress abolishes the ferredoxin-quinone oxidoreductase (FQR)-dependent CEF in rice and accelerates the initial rate of P700 (+) re-reduction. The P700 (+) amplitude was slightly increased at a moderate heat-stress (35°C) because of a partial restriction of FQR but it was decreased following high heat-stress (42°C). Assessment of PSI and PSII activities shows that PSI is more susceptible to heat stress than PSII. Under high temperature, FQR-dependent CEF was completely removed and NDH-dependent CEF was up-regulated and strengthened to a higher extent in C4023 than in Q4149. Specifically, under normal growth temperature, hcef (Q4149) was characterized by higher FQR- and chloroplast NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDH)-dependent CEF rates than lcef (C4023). Following thermal stress, the activation of NDH-pathway was 130 and 10% for C4023 and Q4149, respectively. Thus, the NDH-dependent CEF may constitute the second layer of plant protection and defense against heat stress after the main route, i.e., FQR-dependent CEF, reaches its capacity. We discuss the possibility that under high heat stress, the NDH pathway serves as a safety valve to dissipate excess energy by cyclic photophosphorylation and overcome the stroma over-reduction following inhibition of CO2 assimilation and any shortage or lack in the FQR pathway. The potential role of the NDH-dependent pathway during the

  10. Response of Chloroplast NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase-Mediated Cyclic Electron Flow to a Shortage or Lack in Ferredoxin-Quinone Oxidoreductase-Dependent Pathway in Rice Following Short-Term Heat Stress.

    PubMed

    Essemine, Jemaa; Qu, Mingnan; Mi, Hualing; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic electron flow (CEF) around photosystem I (PSI) can protect photosynthetic electron carriers under conditions of stromal over-reduction. The goal of the research reported in this paper was to investigate the responses of both PSI and photosystem II (PSII) to a short-term heat stress in two rice lines with different capacities of cyclic electron transfer, i.e., Q4149 with a high capacity (hcef) and C4023 with a low capacity (lcef). The absorbance change at 820 nm (ΔA820) was used here to assess the charge separation in the PSI reaction center (P700). The results obtained show that short-term heat stress abolishes the ferredoxin-quinone oxidoreductase (FQR)-dependent CEF in rice and accelerates the initial rate of P700 (+) re-reduction. The P700 (+) amplitude was slightly increased at a moderate heat-stress (35°C) because of a partial restriction of FQR but it was decreased following high heat-stress (42°C). Assessment of PSI and PSII activities shows that PSI is more susceptible to heat stress than PSII. Under high temperature, FQR-dependent CEF was completely removed and NDH-dependent CEF was up-regulated and strengthened to a higher extent in C4023 than in Q4149. Specifically, under normal growth temperature, hcef (Q4149) was characterized by higher FQR- and chloroplast NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDH)-dependent CEF rates than lcef (C4023). Following thermal stress, the activation of NDH-pathway was 130 and 10% for C4023 and Q4149, respectively. Thus, the NDH-dependent CEF may constitute the second layer of plant protection and defense against heat stress after the main route, i.e., FQR-dependent CEF, reaches its capacity. We discuss the possibility that under high heat stress, the NDH pathway serves as a safety valve to dissipate excess energy by cyclic photophosphorylation and overcome the stroma over-reduction following inhibition of CO2 assimilation and any shortage or lack in the FQR pathway. The potential role of the NDH-dependent pathway during the

  11. Response of Chloroplast NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase-Mediated Cyclic Electron Flow to a Shortage or Lack in Ferredoxin-Quinone Oxidoreductase-Dependent Pathway in Rice Following Short-Term Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Essemine, Jemaa; Qu, Mingnan; Mi, Hualing; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic electron flow (CEF) around photosystem I (PSI) can protect photosynthetic electron carriers under conditions of stromal over-reduction. The goal of the research reported in this paper was to investigate the responses of both PSI and photosystem II (PSII) to a short-term heat stress in two rice lines with different capacities of cyclic electron transfer, i.e., Q4149 with a high capacity (hcef) and C4023 with a low capacity (lcef). The absorbance change at 820 nm (ΔA820) was used here to assess the charge separation in the PSI reaction center (P700). The results obtained show that short-term heat stress abolishes the ferredoxin-quinone oxidoreductase (FQR)-dependent CEF in rice and accelerates the initial rate of P700+ re-reduction. The P700+ amplitude was slightly increased at a moderate heat-stress (35°C) because of a partial restriction of FQR but it was decreased following high heat-stress (42°C). Assessment of PSI and PSII activities shows that PSI is more susceptible to heat stress than PSII. Under high temperature, FQR-dependent CEF was completely removed and NDH-dependent CEF was up-regulated and strengthened to a higher extent in C4023 than in Q4149. Specifically, under normal growth temperature, hcef (Q4149) was characterized by higher FQR- and chloroplast NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDH)-dependent CEF rates than lcef (C4023). Following thermal stress, the activation of NDH-pathway was 130 and 10% for C4023 and Q4149, respectively. Thus, the NDH-dependent CEF may constitute the second layer of plant protection and defense against heat stress after the main route, i.e., FQR-dependent CEF, reaches its capacity. We discuss the possibility that under high heat stress, the NDH pathway serves as a safety valve to dissipate excess energy by cyclic photophosphorylation and overcome the stroma over-reduction following inhibition of CO2 assimilation and any shortage or lack in the FQR pathway. The potential role of the NDH-dependent pathway during the evolution

  12. III-Nitride Nanowire Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jeremy Benjamin

    2014-07-01

    In recent years there has been a tremendous interest in nanoscale optoelectronic devices. Among these devices are semiconductor nanowires whose diameters range from 10-100 nm. To date, nanowires have been grown using many semiconducting material systems and have been utilized as light emitting diodes, photodetectors, and solar cells. Nanowires possess a relatively large index contrast relative to their dielectric environment and can be used as lasers. A key gure of merit that allows for nanowire lasing is the relatively high optical con nement factor. In this work, I discuss the optical characterization of 3 types of III-nitride nanowire laser devices. Two devices were designed to reduce the number of lasing modes to achieve singlemode operation. The third device implements low-group velocity mode lasing with a photonic crystal constructed of an array of nanowires. Single-mode operation is necessary in any application where high beam quality and single frequency operation is required. III-Nitride nanowire lasers typically operate in a combined multi-longitudinal and multi-transverse mode state. Two schemes are introduced here for controlling the optical modes and achieving single-mode op eration. The rst method involves reducing the diameter of individual nanowires to the cut-o condition, where only one optical mode propagates in the wire. The second method employs distributed feedback (DFB) to achieve single-mode lasing by placing individual GaN nanowires onto substrates with etched gratings. The nanowire-grating substrate acted as a distributed feedback mirror producing single mode operation at 370 nm with a mode suppression ratio (MSR) of 17 dB. The usage of lasers for solid state lighting has the potential to further reduce U.S. lighting energy usage through an increase in emitter e ciency. Advances in nanowire fabrication, speci cally a two-step top-down approach, have allowed for the demonstration of a multi-color array of lasers on a single chip that emit

  13. III-nitride nanowire lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Jeremy Benjamin

    In recent years there has been a tremendous interest in nanoscale optoelectronic devices. Among these devices are semiconductor nanowires whose diameters range from 10-100 nm. To date, nanowires have been grown using many semiconducting material systems and have been utilized as light emitting diodes, photodetectors, and solar cells. Nanowires possess a relatively large index contrast relative to their dielectric environment and can be used as lasers. A key figure of merit that allows for nanowire lasing is the relatively high optical confinement factor. In this work, I discuss the optical characterization of 3 types of III-nitride nanowire laser devices. Two devices were designed to reduce the number of lasing modes to achieve single-mode operation. The third device implements low-group velocity mode lasing with a photonic crystal constructed of an array of nanowires. Single-mode operation is necessary in any application where high beam quality and single frequency operation is required. III-Nitride nanowire lasers typically operate in a combined multi-longitudinal and multi-transverse mode state. Two schemes are introduced here for controlling the optical modes and achieving single-mode operation. The first method involves reducing the diameter of individual nanowires to the cut-off condition, where only one optical mode propagates in the wire. The second method employs distributed feedback (DFB) to achieve single-mode lasing by placing individual GaN nanowires onto substrates with etched gratings. The nanowire-grating substrate acted as a distributed feedback mirror producing single mode operation at 370 nm with a mode suppression ratio (MSR) of 17 dB. The usage of lasers for solid state lighting has the potential to further reduce U.S. lighting energy usage through an increase in emitter efficiency. Advances in nanowire fabrication, specifically a two-step top-down approach, have allowed for the demonstration of a multi-color array of lasers on a single chip

  14. DOE/NNSA perspective safeguard by design: GEN III/III+ light water reactors and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Paul Y

    2010-12-10

    An overview of key issues relevant to safeguards by design (SBD) for GEN III/IV nuclear reactors is provided. Lessons learned from construction of typical GEN III+ water reactors with respect to SBD are highlighted. Details of SBD for safeguards guidance development for GEN III/III+ light water reactors are developed and reported. This paper also identifies technical challenges to extend SBD including proliferation resistance methodologies to other GEN III/III+ reactors (except HWRs) and GEN IV reactors because of their immaturity in designs.

  15. The type III secretion injectisome.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Guy R

    2006-11-01

    The type III secretion injectisome is a complex nanomachine that allows bacteria to deliver protein effectors across eukaryotic cellular membranes. In recent years, significant progress has been made in our understanding of its structure, assembly and mode of operation. The principal structural components of the injectisome, from the base located in the bacterial cytosol to the tip of the needle protruding from the cell surface, have been investigated in detail. The structures of several constituent proteins were solved at the atomic level and important insights into the assembly process have been gained. However, despite the ongoing concerted efforts of molecular and structural biologists, the role of many of the constituent components of this nanomachine remain unknown. PMID:17041629

  16. III-Nitride UV Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asif Khan, M.; Shatalov, M.; Maruska, H. P.; Wang, H. M.; Kuokstis, E.

    2005-10-01

    The need for efficient, compact and robust solid-state UV optical sources and sensors had stimulated the development of optical devices based on III-nitride material system. Rapid progress in material growth, device fabrication and packaging enabled demonstration of high efficiency visible-blind and solar-blind photodetectors, deep-UV light-emitting diodes with emission from 400 to 250 nm, and UV laser diodes with operation wavelengths ranging from 340 to 350 nm. Applications of these UV optical devices include flame sensing; fluorescence-based biochemical sensing; covert communications; air, water and food purification and disinfection; and biomedical instrumentation. This paper provides a review of recent advances in the development of UV optical devices. Performance of state-of-the-art devices as well as future prospects and challenges are discussed.

  17. DSM-III-R and religion.

    PubMed

    Post, S G

    1992-07-01

    The interpretation of religion in DSM-III-R contains considerable negative bias and contributes to unfair stereotypes of religious persons. Particularly new religious movements and religious conversion are unfairly interpreted under the DSM-III-R heading, 'Dissociative Disorder Not Otherwise Specified'. It is suggested that a more balanced and respectful interpretation of religion is needed in DSM-III-R, since psychiatry through its official nomenclature should not contribute to social intolerance of religious nonconformity.

  18. On Type III plessite in chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, R., Jr.

    1980-03-01

    Questions are raised concerning the possible sources of heat necessary for converting martensite to coarse Type III plessite in ordinary chondrites. It is suggested that the unusual Type III plesite in the Kingfisher, Oklahoma black chondrite was formed by partial homogenization of preexisting Type III plessite as a result of shock reheating of the metal into the gamma field of the Fe-Ni phase diagram, rather than by decomposition of shock reheated prior martensite in the alpha + gamma field, as originally proposed by Taylor and Heymann. Because martensite is sporadically distributed within Kingfisher plessite it is suggested that microstructures of this kind be called Type II-III plessite.

  19. Spectrofluorimetric determination of Er (III) with diantipyrylmethane.

    PubMed

    Sungur, S

    2001-02-01

    The optimum fluorescence conditions for erbium (III) are obtained by irradiating this lanthanide at 435 nm in 0.04 microg ml(-1) diantipyrylmethane solution at pH = 8 (lambdaem = 510 nm). The method proposed is satisfactory for the determination of erbium (III) in the range of 0.001 to 1 microg ml(-1). The relative standard deviation 0.02 microg ml(-1) Er (III) in 0.04 microg ml(-1) diantipyrylmethane solution is 1.1%. The effect of other rare earths upon the intensity of the fluorescence emitted by erbium (III) is discussed. PMID:11206569

  20. M(III)Dy(III)3 (M = Fe(III), Co(III)) complexes: three-blade propellers exhibiting slow relaxation of magnetization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gong-Feng; Gamez, Patrick; Tang, Jinkui; Clérac, Rodolphe; Guo, Yun-Nan; Guo, Yang

    2012-05-21

    [Dy(III)(HBpz(3))(2)](2+) moieties (HBpz(3)(-) = hydrotris(pyrazolyl)borate) and a 3d transition-metal ion (Fe(III) or Co(III)) have been rationally assembled using an dithiooxalato dianion ligand into 3d-4f [MDy(3)(HBpz(3))(6)(dto)(3)]·4CH(3)CN·2CH(2)Cl(2) (M = Fe (1), Co (2) complexes. Single-crystal X-ray studies reveal that three eight-coordinated Dy(III) centers in a square antiprismatic coordination environment are connecting to a central octahedral trivalent Fe or Co ion forming a propeller-type complex. The dynamics of the magnetization in the two isostructural compounds, modulated by the nature of the central M(III) metal ion, are remarkably different despite their analogous direct current (dc) magnetic properties. The slow relaxation of the magnetization observed for 2 mainly originates from isolated Dy ions, since a diamagnetic Co(III) metal ion links the magnetic Dy(III) ions. In the case of 1, the magnetic interaction between S = 1/2 Fe(III) ion and the three Dy(III) magnetic centers, although weak, generates a complex energy spectrum of magnetic states with low-lying excited states that induce a smaller energy gap than for 2 and thus a faster relaxation of the magnetization.

  1. Comparative adsorption of Eu(III) and Am(III) on TPD.

    PubMed

    Fan, Q H; Zhao, X L; Ma, X X; Yang, Y B; Wu, W S; Zheng, G D; Wang, D L

    2015-09-01

    Comparative adsorption behaviors of Eu(III) and Am(III) on thorium phosphate diphosphate (TPD), i.e., Th4(PO4)4P2O7, have been studied using a batch approach and surface complexation model (SCM) in this study. The results showed that Eu(III) and Am(III) adsorption increased to a large extent with the increase in TPD dose. Strong pH-dependence was observed in both Eu(III) and Am(III) adsorption processes, suggesting that inner-sphere complexes (ISCs) were possibly responsible for the adsorption of Eu(III) and Am(III). Meanwhile, the adsorption of Eu(III) and Am(III) decreased to a different extent with the increase in ion strength, which was possibly related to outer-sphere complexes and/or ion exchange. In the presence of fulvic acid (FA), the adsorption of Eu(III) and Am(III) showed high enhancement mainly due to the ternary surface complexes of TPD-FA-Eu(3+) and TPD-FA-Am(3+). The SCM showed that one ion exchange (≡S3Am/Eu) and two ISCs (≡(XO)2Am/EuNO3 and ≡(YO)2Am/EuNO3) seemed more reasonable to quantitatively describe the adsorption edges of both Eu(III) and Am(III). Our findings obviously showed that Eu(III) could be a good analogue to study actinide behaviors in practical terms. However, it should be kept in mind that there are still obvious differences between the characteristics of Eu(III) and Am(III) in some special cases, for instance, the complex ability with organic matter and adsorption affinity to a solid surface. PMID:26198355

  2. Near-Infrared Photoluminescence and Electroluminescence of Neodymium(III), Erbium(III), and Ytterbium(III) Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Yuichiro; Wada, Yuji; Yanagida, Shozo

    2001-01-01

    Tris(dibenzoylmethanato)(monobathophenanthroline)lanthanide(III) complex [Ln(DBM)3 bath (Ln: Nd, Er and Yb)] both in solutions and thin films at room temperature showed narrow band photoluminescence (PL) due to the f-f transitions in the near-IR region: 890, 1070 and 1350 nm for Nd(III), 980 and 1540 nm for Er(III), and 985 nm for Yb(III). The PL efficiencies in solution were determined [φPL=3.3× 10-3 for Nd(III), 7.0× 10-5 for Er(III), and 1.4× 10-2 for Yb(III)]. Organic electroluminescent (EL) devices having the structure of glass substrate/indium-tin oxide/N,N\\prime-diphenyl-N,N\\prime-di(m-tolyl)benzidine{\\slash}Ln(DBM)3bath(Ln: Nd, Er and Yb)/bathocuproine/Mg:Ag/Ag were fabricated, giving the EL bands around 900-1600 nm at room temperature. The external near-IR EL efficiencies at low current density were estimated by comparing with that of the Eu(III) device having the same structure. The saturation of near-IR EL intensity observed at the high current density suggested that the near-IR EL should suffer the T-T annihilation.

  3. Heterotrimetallic coordination polymers: {Cu(II)Ln(III)Fe(III)} chains and {Ni(II)Ln(III)Fe(III)} layers: synthesis, crystal structures, and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Alexandru, Maria-Gabriela; Visinescu, Diana; Andruh, Marius; Marino, Nadia; Armentano, Donatella; Cano, Joan; Lloret, Francesc; Julve, Miguel

    2015-03-27

    The use of the [Fe(III) (AA)(CN)4](-) complex anion as metalloligand towards the preformed [Cu(II) (valpn)Ln(III)](3+) or [Ni(II) (valpn)Ln(III) ](3+) heterometallic complex cations (AA=2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) and 1,10-phenathroline (phen); H2 valpn=1,3-propanediyl-bis(2-iminomethylene-6-methoxyphenol)) allowed the preparation of two families of heterotrimetallic complexes: three isostructural 1D coordination polymers of general formula {[Cu(II) (valpn)Ln(III) (H2O)3 (μ-NC)2 Fe(III) (phen)(CN)2 {(μ-NC)Fe(III) (phen)(CN)3}]NO3 ⋅7 H2O}n (Ln=Gd (1), Tb (2), and Dy (3)) and the trinuclear complex [Cu(II) (valpn)La(III) (OH2 )3 (O2 NO)(μ-NC)Fe(III) (phen)(CN)3 ]⋅NO3 ⋅H2O⋅CH3 CN (4) were obtained with the [Cu(II) (valpn)Ln(III)](3+) assembling unit, whereas three isostructural heterotrimetallic 2D networks, {[Ni(II) (valpn)Ln(III) (ONO2 )2 (H2 O)(μ-NC)3 Fe(III) (bipy)(CN)]⋅2 H2 O⋅2 CH3 CN}n (Ln=Gd (5), Tb (6), and Dy (7)) resulted with the related [Ni(II) (valpn)Ln(III) ](3+) precursor. The crystal structure of compound 4 consists of discrete heterotrimetallic complex cations, [Cu(II) (valpn)La(III) (OH2)3 (O2 NO)(μ-NC)Fe(III) (phen)(CN)3 ](+), nitrate counterions, and non-coordinate water and acetonitrile molecules. The heteroleptic {Fe(III) (bipy)(CN)4} moiety in 5-7 acts as a tris-monodentate ligand towards three {Ni(II) (valpn)Ln(III)} binuclear nodes leading to heterotrimetallic 2D networks. The ferromagnetic interaction through the diphenoxo bridge in the Cu(II)-Ln(III) (1-3) and Ni(II)-Ln(III) (5-7) units, as well as through the single cyanide bridge between the Fe(III) and either Ni(II) (5-7) or Cu(II) (4) account for the overall ferromagnetic behavior observed in 1-7. DFT-type calculations were performed to substantiate the magnetic interactions in 1, 4, and 5. Interestingly, compound 6 exhibits slow relaxation of the magnetization with maxima of the out-of-phase ac signals below 4.0 K in the lack of a dc field, the values of the pre

  4. Mechanisms of Sb(III) Photooxidation by the Excitation of Organic Fe(III) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Kong, Linghao; He, Mengchang

    2016-07-01

    Organic Fe(III) complexes are widely distributed in the aqueous environment, which can efficiently generate free radicals under light illumination, playing a significant role in heavy metal speciation. However, the potential importance of the photooxidation of Sb(III) by organic Fe(III) complexes remains unclear. Therefore, the photooxidation mechanisms of Sb(III) were comprehensively investigated in Fe(III)-oxalate, Fe(III)-citrate and Fe(III)-fulvic acid (FA) solutions by kinetic measurements and modeling. Rapid photooxidation of Sb(III) was observed in an Fe(III)-oxalate solution over the pH range of 3 to 7. The addition of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) as an ·OH scavenger quenched the Sb(III) oxidation, suggesting that ·OH is an important oxidant for Sb(III). However, the incomplete quenching of Sb(III) oxidation indicated the existence of other oxidants, presumably an Fe(IV) species in irradiated Fe(III)-oxalate solution. In acidic solutions, ·OH may be formed by the reaction of Fe(II)(C2O4) with H2O2, but a hypothetical Fe(IV) species may be generated by the reaction of Fe(II)(C2O4)2(2-) with H2O2 at higher pH. Kinetic modeling provides a quantitative explanation of the results. Evidence for the existence of ·OH and hypothetical Fe(IV) was also observed in an irradiated Fe(III)-citrate and Fe(III)-FA system. This study demonstrated an important pathway of Sb(III) oxidation in surface waters. PMID:27267512

  5. Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Olshavsky, Michael A.

    1996-01-01

    Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed, They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline.

  6. Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Alivisatos, A.P.; Olshavsky, M.A.

    1996-04-09

    Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed. They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline. 4 figs.

  7. Synthesis, spectroscopic and antimicrobial studies of La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) Metformin HCl chelates.

    PubMed

    Refat, Moamen S; Al-Azab, Fathi M; Al-Maydama, Hussein M A; Amin, Ragab R; Jamil, Yasmin M S; Kobeasy, Mohamed I

    2015-05-01

    Metal complexes of Metformin hydrochloride were prepared using La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III). The resulting complexes were discussed and synthesized to serve as potential insulin-mimetic. Some physical properties and analytical data of the four complexes were checked. The elemental analysis shows that La(III), Ce(III) Sm(III) and Y(III) formed complexes with Metformin in 1:3 (metal:MF) molar ratio. All the synthesized complexes are white and possess high melting points. These complexes are soluble in dimethylsulfoxide and dimethylformamide, partially soluble in hot methanol and insoluble in water and some other organic solvents. From the spectroscopic (infrared, UV-vis and florescence), effective magnetic moment and elemental analyses data, the formula structures are suggested. The results obtained suggested that Metformin reacted with metal ions as a bidentate ligand through its two imino groups. The molar conductance measurements proved that the Metformin complexes are slightly electrolytic in nature. The kinetic thermodynamic parameters such as: E(∗), ΔH(∗), ΔS(∗) and ΔG(∗) were estimated from the DTG curves. The antibacterial evaluations of the Metformin and their complexes were also performed against some gram positive, negative bacteria as well as fungi.

  8. Synthesis and in vitro microbial evaluation of La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) metal complexes of vitamin B6 drug.

    PubMed

    Refat, Moamen S; Al-Azab, Fathi M; Al-Maydama, Hussein M A; Amin, Ragab R; Jamil, Yasmin M S

    2014-06-01

    Metal complexes of pyridoxine mono hydrochloride (vitamin B6) are prepared using La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III). The resulting complexes are investigated. Some physical properties, conductivity, analytical data and the composition of the four pyridoxine complexes are discussed. The elemental analysis shows that the formed complexes of La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) with pyridoxine are of 1:2 (metal:PN) molar ratio. All the synthesized complexes are brown in color and possess high melting points. These complexes are partially soluble in hot methanol, dimethylsulfoxide and dimethylformamide and insoluble in water and some other organic solvents. Elemental analysis data, spectroscopic (IR, UV-vis. and florescence), effective magnetic moment in Bohr magnetons and the proton NMR suggest the structures. However, definite particle size is determined by invoking the X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy data. The results obtained suggested that pyridoxine reacted with metal ions as a bidentate ligand through its phenolate oxygen and the oxygen of the adjacent group at the 4'-position. The molar conductance measurements proved that the pyridoxine complexes are electrolytic in nature. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters such as: Ea, ΔH(*), ΔS(*) and ΔG(*) were estimated from the DTG curves. The antibacterial evaluation of the pyridoxine and their complexes were also performed against some gram positive, negative bacteria as well as fungi.

  9. Modal Profiles for the WISC-III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, David A.; Livingston, Ronald B.; Reynolds, Cecil R.; Moses, James A., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Presents a normative typology for classifying the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition (WISC-III) factor index profiles according to profile shape. Current analyses indicate that overall profile level accounted for a majority of the variance in WISC-III index scores, but a considerable proportion of the variance was because of…

  10. Synthesis, spectroscopic and antimicrobial studies of La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) Metformin HCl chelates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Al-Azab, Fathi M.; Al-Maydama, Hussein M. A.; Amin, Ragab R.; Jamil, Yasmin M. S.; Kobeasy, Mohamed I.

    2015-05-01

    Metal complexes of Metformin hydrochloride were prepared using La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III). The resulting complexes were discussed and synthesized to serve as potential insulin-mimetic. Some physical properties and analytical data of the four complexes were checked. The elemental analysis shows that La(III), Ce(III) Sm(III) and Y(III) formed complexes with Metformin in 1:3 (metal:MF) molar ratio. All the synthesized complexes are white and possess high melting points. These complexes are soluble in dimethylsulfoxide and dimethylformamide, partially soluble in hot methanol and insoluble in water and some other organic solvents. From the spectroscopic (infrared, UV-vis and florescence), effective magnetic moment and elemental analyses data, the formula structures are suggested. The results obtained suggested that Metformin reacted with metal ions as a bidentate ligand through its two imino groups. The molar conductance measurements proved that the Metformin complexes are slightly electrolytic in nature. The kinetic thermodynamic parameters such as: E∗, ΔH∗, ΔS∗ and ΔG∗ were estimated from the DTG curves. The antibacterial evaluations of the Metformin and their complexes were also performed against some gram positive, negative bacteria as well as fungi.

  11. Synthesis and in vitro microbial evaluation of La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) metal complexes of vitamin B6 drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Al-Azab, Fathi M.; Al-Maydama, Hussein M. A.; Amin, Ragab R.; Jamil, Yasmin M. S.

    2014-06-01

    Metal complexes of pyridoxine mono hydrochloride (vitamin B6) are prepared using La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III). The resulting complexes are investigated. Some physical properties, conductivity, analytical data and the composition of the four pyridoxine complexes are discussed. The elemental analysis shows that the formed complexes of La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) with pyridoxine are of 1:2 (metal:PN) molar ratio. All the synthesized complexes are brown in color and possess high melting points. These complexes are partially soluble in hot methanol, dimethylsulfoxide and dimethylformamide and insoluble in water and some other organic solvents. Elemental analysis data, spectroscopic (IR, UV-vis. and florescence), effective magnetic moment in Bohr magnetons and the proton NMR suggest the structures. However, definite particle size is determined by invoking the X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy data. The results obtained suggested that pyridoxine reacted with metal ions as a bidentate ligand through its phenolate oxygen and the oxygen of the adjacent group at the 4‧-position. The molar conductance measurements proved that the pyridoxine complexes are electrolytic in nature. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters such as: Ea, ΔH*, ΔS* and ΔG* were estimated from the DTG curves. The antibacterial evaluation of the pyridoxine and their complexes were also performed against some gram positive, negative bacteria as well as fungi.

  12. Title III and toxic torts

    SciTech Connect

    Rodnehausen, G.A.

    1989-07-01

    In July the second annual Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) report under Section 313 of Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), and the computerized, national TRI data-base will be issued. Although the Environmental Protection Agency will not be able to aggregate the July, 1989 reports and issue its own annual report until early next year, we can expect political attention to focus quickly on whether total releases to air, land and water, and in particular total emissions to the air, have increased or decreased from 1987 to 1988. Because the reporting threshold for chemical manufacturing and processing facilities will drop from 75,000 to 50,000 pounds per year, the number of facilities reporting and number of chemicals reported should increase significantly, forcing up total releases. Bringing the totals down will be waste and release reduction efforts already underway in the chemical industry and elsewhere, and perhaps improved accuracy in measurement and estimation of releases. Additions to and deletions from the list of reportable chemicals will also have an effect. Nevertheless, any significant increase in aggregate totals, no matter what the explanation, will be bound to have a political impact on air toxics legislation, and spur public concern with the health risks of air pollution.

  13. DHS Phase III activities underway.

    PubMed

    1993-01-01

    Activities and improvements in the third round of the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) are described for the first year of the five year DHS-III project during 1992-97. Underway are data quality assessments, identification of data needs, development of a new core questionnaire and modules, and fieldwork survey implementation. Data quality studies are conducted on respondent age, age at first marriage, birth history, knowledge and use of contraception, and health of children aged under 5 years. An analysis of reinterview subsamples for Pakistan and Nigeria will test reliability of data. Emerging data needs for the decade are identified through consultations with data users in the population and health fields. A variety of organizational representatives and recognized experts provide valuable inputs on questionnaire content and module topics. This article also reveals that a shorter questionnaire length will be considered. There will be new questionnaire topics on reliance on breast feeding for contraception, induced abortion and complications, and quality of care. Reductions are made in little used data and retrospective data longer than 3-5 years preceding the survey date. Revisions are made in the Interviewer's and Supervisor's Manuals, the Service Availability Questionnaire, the Male/Husbands Questionnaire, and fifteen modules. Fieldwork is either in progress of completion in Ghana, Kenya, the Philippines, and Turkey. Bangladesh and Bolivia are scheduled for 1993. In 1994 surveys will be administered in Burundi, Central African Republic, Cote d'Ivoire, Guatemala, Haiti, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Mali, Nigeria, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zimbabwe. PMID:12287320

  14. Standards in neurosonology. Part III.

    PubMed

    Wojczal, Joanna; Tomczyk, Tomasz; Luchowski, Piotr; Kozera, Grzegorz; Kaźmierski, Radosław; Stelmasiak, Zbigniew

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents standards related to ultrasound imaging of the cerebral vasculature and structures. The aim of this paper is to standardize both the performance and description of ultrasound imaging of the extracranial and intracranial cerebral arteries as well as a study of a specific brain structure, i.e. substantia nigra hyperechogenicity. The following aspects are included in the description of standards for each ultrasonographic method: equipment requirements, patient preparation, study technique and documentation as well as the required elements of ultrasound description. Practical criteria for the diagnosis of certain pathologies in accordance with the latest literature were also presented. Furthermore, additional comments were included in some of the sections. Part I discusses standards for the performance, documentation and description of different ultrasound methods (Duplex, Doppler). Part II and III are devoted to standards for specific clinical situations (vasospasm, monitoring after the acute stage of stroke, detection of a right-to-left shunts, confirmation of the arrest of the cerebral circulation, an assessment of the functional efficiency of circle of Willis, an assessment of the cerebrovascular vasomotor reserve as well as the measurement of substantia nigra hyperechogenicity). PMID:27446600

  15. Standards in neurosonology. Part III

    PubMed Central

    Tomczyk, Tomasz; Luchowski, Piotr; Kozera, Grzegorz; Kaźmierski, Radosław; Stelmasiak, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents standards related to ultrasound imaging of the cerebral vasculature and structures. The aim of this paper is to standardize both the performance and description of ultrasound imaging of the extracranial and intracranial cerebral arteries as well as a study of a specific brain structure, i.e. substantia nigra hyperechogenicity. The following aspects are included in the description of standards for each ultrasonographic method: equipment requirements, patient preparation, study technique and documentation as well as the required elements of ultrasound description. Practical criteria for the diagnosis of certain pathologies in accordance with the latest literature were also presented. Furthermore, additional comments were included in some of the sections. Part I discusses standards for the performance, documentation and description of different ultrasound methods (Duplex, Doppler). Part II and III are devoted to standards for specific clinical situations (vasospasm, monitoring after the acute stage of stroke, detection of a right-to-left shunts, confirmation of the arrest of the cerebral circulation, an assessment of the functional efficiency of circle of Willis, an assessment of the cerebrovascular vasomotor reserve as well as the measurement of substantia nigra hyperechogenicity). PMID:27446600

  16. Standards in neurosonology. Part III.

    PubMed

    Wojczal, Joanna; Tomczyk, Tomasz; Luchowski, Piotr; Kozera, Grzegorz; Kaźmierski, Radosław; Stelmasiak, Zbigniew

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents standards related to ultrasound imaging of the cerebral vasculature and structures. The aim of this paper is to standardize both the performance and description of ultrasound imaging of the extracranial and intracranial cerebral arteries as well as a study of a specific brain structure, i.e. substantia nigra hyperechogenicity. The following aspects are included in the description of standards for each ultrasonographic method: equipment requirements, patient preparation, study technique and documentation as well as the required elements of ultrasound description. Practical criteria for the diagnosis of certain pathologies in accordance with the latest literature were also presented. Furthermore, additional comments were included in some of the sections. Part I discusses standards for the performance, documentation and description of different ultrasound methods (Duplex, Doppler). Part II and III are devoted to standards for specific clinical situations (vasospasm, monitoring after the acute stage of stroke, detection of a right-to-left shunts, confirmation of the arrest of the cerebral circulation, an assessment of the functional efficiency of circle of Willis, an assessment of the cerebrovascular vasomotor reserve as well as the measurement of substantia nigra hyperechogenicity).

  17. III-V arsenide-nitride semiconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, Jo S. (Inventor); Welch, David F. (Inventor); Scifres, Donald R. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    III-V arsenide-nitride semiconductor are disclosed. Group III elements are combined with group V elements, including at least nitrogen and arsenic, in concentrations chosen to lattice match commercially available crystalline substrates. Epitaxial growth of these III-V crystals results in direct bandgap materials, which can be used in applications such as light emitting diodes and lasers. Varying the concentrations of the elements in the III-V materials varies the bandgaps, such that materials emitting light spanning the visible spectra, as well as mid-IR and near-UV emitters, can be created. Conversely, such material can be used to create devices that acquire light and convert the light to electricity, for applications such as full color photodetectors and solar energy collectors. The growth of the III-V material can be accomplished by growing thin layers of elements or compounds in sequences that result in the overall lattice match and bandgap desired.

  18. Subcellular location of horseradish peroxidase in horseradish leaves treated with La(III), Ce(III) and Tb(III).

    PubMed

    Ye, Yaxin; Wang, Lihong; Huang, Xiaohua; Lu, Tianhong; Ding, Xiaolan; Zhou, Qing; Guo, Shaofen

    2008-11-01

    The agricultural application of rare-earth elements (REEs) would promote REEs inevitably to enter in the environment and then to threaten the environmental safety and human health. Therefore, the distribution of the REEs ion, (141)Ce(III) and effects of La(III), Ce(III) and Tb(III) on the distribution of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in horseradish mesophyll cells were investigated with electron microscopic radioautography and transmission electron microscopic cytochemistry. It was found for the first time that REEs ions can enter into the mesophyll cells, deposit in both extra and intra-cellular. Compared to the normal condition, after the horseradish leaves treated with La(III) or Tb(III), HRP located on the tonoplast is decreased and HRP is mainly located on the cell wall, while HRP is mainly located on the plasma membrane after the horseradish leaves were treated with Ce(III). This also indicated that REEs ions may regulate the plant growth through changing the distribution of enzymes.

  19. Genotypic variation in sulfur assimilation and metabolism of onion (Allium cepa L.) III. Characterization of sulfite reductase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic and cDNA sequences corresponding to a ferredoxin-sulfite reductase (SiR) have been cloned from bulb onion (Allium cepa L.) and the expression of the gene and activity of the enzyme characterised with respect to sulfur (S) supply. Cloning, mapping and expression studies revealed that onion ha...

  20. Large Hexadecametallic {Mn(III) -Ln(III) } Wheels: Synthesis, Structural, Magnetic, and Theoretical Characterization.

    PubMed

    Vignesh, Kuduva R; Langley, Stuart K; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Murray, Keith S; Rajaraman, Gopalan

    2015-11-01

    The synthesis, gas sorption studies, magnetic properties, and theoretical studies of new molecular wheels of core type {Mn(III) 8 Ln(III) 8 } (Ln=Dy, Ho, Er, Y and Yb), using the ligand mdeaH2 , in the presence of ortho-toluic or benzoic acid are reported. From the seven wheels studied the {Mn8 Dy8 } and {Mn8 Y8 } analogues exhibit SMM behavior as determined from ac susceptibility experiments in a zero static magnetic field. From DFT calculations a S=16 ground state was determined for the {Mn8 Y8 } complex due to weak ferromagnetic Mn(III) -Mn(III) interactions. Ab initio CASSCF+RASSI-SO calculations on the {Mn8 Dy8 } wheel estimated the Mn(III) -Dy(III) exchange interaction as -0.1 cm(-1) . This weak exchange along with unfavorable single-ion anisotropy of Dy(III) /Mn(III) ions, however, led to the observation of SMM behavior with fast magnetic relaxation. The orientation of the g-anisotropy of the Dy(III) ions is found to be perpendicular to the plane of the wheel and this suggests the possibility of toroidal magnetic moments in the cluster. The {Mn8 Ln8 } clusters reported here are the largest heterometallic Mn(III) Ln(III) wheels and the largest {3d-4f} wheels to exhibit SMM behavior reported to date.

  1. Rapid photooxidation of Sb(III) in the presence of different Fe(III) species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Linghao; He, Mengchang; Hu, Xingyun

    2016-05-01

    The toxicity and mobility of antimony (Sb) are strongly influenced by the redox processes associated with Sb. Dissolved iron (Fe) is widely distributed in the environment as different species and plays a significant role in Sb speciation. However, the mechanisms of Sb(III) oxidation in the presence of Fe have remained unclear because of the complexity of Fe and Sb speciation. In this study, the mechanisms of Sb(III) photooxidation in the presence of different Fe species were investigated systematically. The photooxidation of Sb(III) occurred over a wide pH range, from 1 to 10. Oxygen was not a predominant or crucial factor in the Sb(III) oxidation process. The mechanism of Sb(III) photooxidation varied depending on the Fe(III) species. In acidic solution (pH 1-3), dichloro radicals (radCl2-) and hydroxyl radicals (radOH) generated by the photocatalysis of FeCl2+ and FeOH2+ were the main oxidants for Sb(III) oxidation. Fe(III) gradually transformed into the colloid ferric hydroxide (CFH) and ferrihydrite in circumneutral and alkaline solutions (pH 4-10). Photooxidation of Sb(III) occurred through electron transfer from Sb(III) to Fe(III) along with the reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II) through a ligand-to-metal charge-transfer (LMCT) process. The photocatalysis of different Fe(III) species may play an important role in the geochemical cycle of Sb(III) in surface soil and aquatic environments.

  2. Timely management of developing class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Yelampalli, M R; Rachala, M R

    2012-01-01

    Timing of orthodontic treatment, especially for children with developing class III malocclusions, has always been somewhat controversial, and definitive treatment tends to be delayed for severe class III cases. Developing class III patients with moderate to severe anterior crossbite and deep bite may need early intervention in some selected cases. Class III malocclusion may develop in children as a result of an inherent growth abnormality, i.e. true class III malocclusion, or as a result of premature occlusal contacts causing forward functional shift of the mandible, which is known as pseudo class III malocclusion. These cases, if not treated at the initial stage of development, interfere with normal growth of the jaw bases and may result in severe facial deformities. The treatment should be carried out as early as possible for permitting normal growth of the skeletal bases. This paper deals with the selection of an appropriate appliance from the various current options available for early intervention in developing class III malocclusion through two case reports.

  3. Neptunium(III) application in extraction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Guérin, Nicolas; Nadeau, Kenny; Larivière, Dominic

    2011-12-15

    This paper describes a novel strategy for actinide separation by extraction chromatography with Np(III) valence adjustment. Neptunium(IV) was reduced to Np(III) using Cr(II) and then selectively separated from uranium (IV) on a TEVA resin. After elution, Np(III) was retained on a DGA resin in order to remove any detrimental chromium impurities. Neptunium(III) formation was demonstrated by the complete and selective elution of Np from TEVA resin (99 ± 7%) in less than 12 mL of 9M HCl from U(IV) (0.7 ± 0.7%). It was determined by UV-visible and kinetic studies that Cr(II) was the only species responsible for the elution of Np(IV) as Np(III) and that the Cr(II) solution could be prepared from 2 to 30 min before its use without the need of complex degassing systems to prevent the oxidation of Np(III) by oxygen. The methodology proposed here with TEVA/DGA resins provides removal of Cr(III) impurities produced at high decontamination factors (2.8 × 10(3) and 7.3 × 10(4) respectively).

  4. Recruitment of RNA polymerase III in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kenneth, Niall S; Marshall, Lynne; White, Robert J

    2008-06-01

    RNA polymerase (pol) III contains a dissociable subcomplex that is required for initiation, but not for elongation or termination of transcription. This subcomplex is composed of subunits RPC3, RPC6 and RPC7, and interacts with TFIIIB, a factor that is necessary and sufficient to support accurate pol III transcription in vitro. Direct binding of TFIIIB to RPC6 is believed to recruit pol III to its genetic templates. However, this has never been tested in vivo. Here we combine chromatin immunoprecipitation with RNA interference to demonstrate that the RPC3/6/7 subcomplex is required for pol III recruitment in mammalian cells. Specific knockdown of RPC6 by RNAi results in post-transcriptional depletion of the other components of the subcomplex, RPC3 and RPC7, without destabilizing core pol III subunits or TFIIIB. The resultant core enzyme is defective in associating with TFIIIB and target genes in vivo. Promoter occupancy by pol II is unaffected, despite sharing five subunits with the pol III core. These observations provide evidence for the validity in vivo of the model for pol III recruitment that was built on biochemical data.

  5. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, T.D.; Misra, M.

    1997-10-14

    A photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The photodetector includes a substrate with interdigitated electrodes formed on its surface. The substrate has a sapphire base layer, a buffer layer formed from a III-V nitride and a single crystal III-V nitride film. The three layers are formed by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (ECR-assisted MBE). Use of the ECR-assisted MBE process allows control and predetermination of the electrical properties of the photodetector. 24 figs.

  6. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D.; Misra, Mira

    1997-01-01

    A photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The photodetector includes a substrate with interdigitated electrodes formed on its surface. The substrate has a sapphire base layer, a buffer layer formed from a III-V nitride and a single crystal III-V nitride film. The three layers are formed by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (ECR-assisted MBE). Use of the ECR-assisted MBE process allows control and predetermination of the electrical properties of the photodetector.

  7. Complexation of N4-Tetradentate Ligands with Nd(III) and Am(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, Mark D.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Meier, G. Patrick; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Nash, Kenneth L.

    2012-12-06

    To improve understanding of aza-complexants in trivalent actinide–lanthanide separations, a series of tetradentate N-donor ligands have been synthesized and their complexation of americium(III) and neodymium(III) investigated by UV–visible spectrophotometry in methanolic solutions. The six pyridine/alkyl amine/imine ligands are N,N0-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,2-diaminoethane, N,N0-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,3-diaminopropane, trans-N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,2-diaminocyclohexane (BPMDAC), N,N’-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)piperazine, N,N’-bis-[pyridin-2-ylmethylene]ethane-1,2-diamine, and trans-N,Nbis-([pyridin-2-ylmethylene]-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine. Each ligand has two pyridine groups and two aliphatic amine/imine N-donor atoms arranged with different degrees of preorganization and structural backbone rigidity. Conditional stability constants for the complexes of Am(III) and Nd(III) by these ligands establish the selectivity patterns. The overall selectivity of Am(III) over Nd(III) is similar to that reported for the terdentate bis(dialkyltriazinyl)pyridine molecules. The cyclohexane amine derivative (BPMDAC) is the strongest complexant and shows the highest selectivity for Am(III) over Nd(III) while the imines appear to prefer a bridging arrangement between two cations. These results suggest that this series of ligands could be employed to develop an enhanced actinide(III)– lanthanide(III) separation system.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: mucolipidosis III alpha/beta

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions mucolipidosis III alpha/beta mucolipidosis III alpha/beta Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Mucolipidosis III alpha/beta is a slowly progressive disorder that affects ...

  9. Potentiometry: A Chromium (III) -- EDTA Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoppe, J. I.; Howell, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment that involves the preparation of a chromium (III)-EDTA compound, a study of its infrared spectrum, and the potentiometric determination of two successive acid dissociation constants. (Author/GS)

  10. Synthesis, thermal and spectroscopic behaviors of metal-drug complexes: La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) amoxicillin trihydrate antibiotic drug complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Al-Maydama, Hussein M. A.; Al-Azab, Fathi M.; Amin, Ragab R.; Jamil, Yasmin M. S.

    2014-07-01

    The metal complexes of Amoxicillin trihydrate with La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) are synthesized with 1:1 (metal:Amox) molar ratio. The suggested formula structures of the complexes are based on the results of the elemental analyses, molar conductivity, (infrared, UV-visible and fluorescence) spectra, effective magnetic moment in Bohr magnetons, as well as the thermal analysis (TG), and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results obtained suggested that Amoxicillin reacted with metal ions as tridentate ligands, coordinating the metal ion through its amino, imino, and β-lactamic carbonyl. The kinetic thermodynamic parameters such as: Ea, ΔH*, ΔS* and ΔG* were estimated from the DTG curves.

  11. Synthesis, thermal and spectroscopic behaviors of metal-drug complexes: La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) amoxicillin trihydrate antibiotic drug complexes.

    PubMed

    Refat, Moamen S; Al-Maydama, Hussein M A; Al-Azab, Fathi M; Amin, Ragab R; Jamil, Yasmin M S

    2014-07-15

    The metal complexes of Amoxicillin trihydrate with La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) are synthesized with 1:1 (metal:Amox) molar ratio. The suggested formula structures of the complexes are based on the results of the elemental analyses, molar conductivity, (infrared, UV-visible and fluorescence) spectra, effective magnetic moment in Bohr magnetons, as well as the thermal analysis (TG), and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results obtained suggested that Amoxicillin reacted with metal ions as tridentate ligands, coordinating the metal ion through its amino, imino, and β-lactamic carbonyl. The kinetic thermodynamic parameters such as: Ea, ΔH(*), ΔS(*) and ΔG(*) were estimated from the DTG curves.

  12. SAGE III/Meteor - 3M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Full view of the SAGE III Bench Checkout Unit, Collimated Source Bench (CSB), Portable Image Generator (PIG) on tripod, and Stratospheric Aerosol Gastropheric Experiment (SAGE)/Meteor - 3M flight instrument. Photographed in building 1250, 40 foot clean room.

  13. SAGE III/Meteor - 3M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Back view of the SAGE III Bench Checkout Unit, Portable Image Generator (PIG) on tripod, and the Stratospheric Aerosol Gastropheric Experiment (SAGE)/Meteor - 3M flight instrument. Photographed in building 1250, 40 foot clean room.

  14. The Mark III Hypercube-Ensemble Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, John C.; Tuazon, Jesus O.; Lieberman, Don; Pniel, Moshe

    1988-01-01

    Mark III Hypercube concept applied in development of series of increasingly powerful computers. Processor of each node of Mark III Hypercube ensemble is specialized computer containing three subprocessors and shared main memory. Solves problem quickly by simultaneously processing part of problem at each such node and passing combined results to host computer. Disciplines benefitting from speed and memory capacity include astrophysics, geophysics, chemistry, weather, high-energy physics, applied mechanics, image processing, oil exploration, aircraft design, and microcircuit design.

  15. Solar type III radio burst emission process

    SciTech Connect

    Wentzel, D.G.

    1982-05-01

    The interplanetary type III radio emission has been explained by two qualitatively different nonlinear plasma processes, invoking respectively one- and two-dimensional evolution of plasma wave packets. This paper asks: Is solar coronal type III emission consistent with plasma solitons evolving in one dimension. Although the answer is at best a qualified yes, the theory suggests observational questions that have attracted little attention so far.

  16. Population III Stars Around the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komiya, Yutaka; Suda, Takuma; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.

    2016-03-01

    We explore the possibility of observing Population III (Pop III) stars, born of primordial gas. Pop III stars with masses below 0.8 M⊙ should survive to date though are not yet observed, but the existence of stars with low metallicity as [{{Fe}}/{{H}}]\\lt -5 in the Milky Way halo suggests the surface pollution of Pop III stars with accreted metals from the interstellar gas after birth. In this paper, we investigate the runaway of Pop III stars from their host mini-halos, considering the ejection of secondary members from binary systems when their massive primaries explode as supernovae. These stars save them from surface pollution. By computing the star formation and chemical evolution along with the hierarchical structure formation based on the extended Press-Schechter merger trees, we demonstrate that several hundreds to tens of thousands of low-mass Pop III stars escape from the building blocks of the Milky Way. The second and later generations of extremely metal-poor stars also escaped from the mini-halos. We discuss the spatial distributions of these escaped stars by evaluating the distances between the mini-halos in the branches of merger trees under the spherical collapse model of dark matter halos. It is demonstrated that the escaped stars distribute beyond the stellar halo with a density profile close to the dark matter halo, while Pop III stars are slightly more centrally concentrated. 6%-30% of the escaped stars leave the Milky Way and go out into the intergalactic space. Based on the results, we discuss the feasibility of observing the Pop III stars with the pristine surface abundance.

  17. SAGE III solar ozone measurements: Initial results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hsiang-Jui; Cunnold, Derek M.; Trepte, Chip; Thomason, Larry W.; Zawodny, Joseph M.

    2006-01-01

    Results from two retrieval algorithms, o3-aer and o3-mlr , used for SAGE III solar occultation ozone measurements in the stratosphere and upper troposphere are compared. The main differences between these two retrieved (version 3.0) ozone are found at altitudes above 40 km and below 15 km. Compared to correlative measurements, the SAGE II type ozone retrievals (o3-aer) provide better precisions above 40 km and do not induce artificial hemispheric differences in upper stratospheric ozone. The multiple linear regression technique (o3_mlr), however, can yield slightly more accurate ozone (by a few percent) in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere. By using SAGE III (version 3.0) ozone from both algorithms and in their preferred regions, the agreement between SAGE III and correlative measurements is shown to be approx.5% down to 17 km. Below 17 km SAGE III ozone values are systematically higher, by 10% at 13 km, and a small hemispheric difference (a few percent) appears. Compared to SAGE III and HALOE, SAGE II ozone has the best accuracy in the lowest few kilometers of the stratosphere. Estimated precision in SAGE III ozone is about 5% or better between 20 and 40 km and approx.10% at 50 km. The precision below 20 km is difficult to evaluate because of limited coincidences between SAGE III and sondes. SAGE III ozone values are systematically slightly larger (2-3%) than those from SAGE II but the profile shapes are remarkably similar for altitudes above 15 km. There is no evidence of any relative drift or time dependent differences between these two instruments for altitudes above 15-20 km.

  18. Terbium(III), europium(III), and mixed terbium(III)-europium(III) mucicate frameworks: hydrophilicity and stoichiometry-dependent color tunability.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Sudip; Adhikari, Sangita; Riju, Hiranya; Maji, Tapas Kumar

    2012-05-01

    Two 3D porous terbium(III) mucicate frameworks, {[Tb(2)(Mu(2-))(3)(H(2)O)(2)]·4H(2)O}(n) (1) and {[Tb(Mu(2-))(Ox(2-))(0.5)(H(2)O)]·H(2)O}(n) (2), have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions by changing the pH of the reaction medium. Isostructural europium(III) and seven mixed terbium(III)-europium(III) mucicates were synthesized by doping different percentages of Eu(III) under similar reaction conditions and unveiling different emission colors ranging from green to red under the same wavelength. Both dehydrated Tb(III) metal-organic frameworks exhibit selective H(2)O vapor sorption over other solvent molecules (MeOH, MeCN, and EtOH) of less polarity and bigger size and have been correlated to the highly hydrophilic pore surfaces decorated with -OH groups and O atoms from the carboxyl groups of mucicate.

  19. Subunit arrangement in beef heart complex III

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Halphen, D.; Lindorfer, M.A.; Capaldi, R.A.

    1988-09-06

    Beef heart mitochondrial complex III was separated into 12 polypeptide bands representing 11 different subunits by using the electrophoresis conditions described previously. Eight of the 12 polypeptide bands were identified from their NH/sub 2/-terminal sequences as obtained by electroblotting directly from the NaDodSO/sub 4/-polyacrylamide gel onto a solid support. The topology of the subunits in complex III was explored by three different approaches. (1) Protease digestion experiments of submitochrondial particles in the presence and absence of detergent showed that subunits II and VI are on the M side of the inner membrane and subunits V and XI on the C side. (2) Labeling experiments with the membrane-intercalated probes (/sup 125/I)TID and arylazidoPE indicated that cytochrome b is the predominant bilayer embedded subunit of complex III, while the non-heme iron protein appears to be peripherally located. (3) Cross-linking studies with carbodiimides and homobifunctional cleavable reagents demonstrated that near-neighbor pairs include subunits I+II, II+VI, III+VI, IV+V, V+X, and V+VII. The cytochrome c binding site was found to include subunits IV, VII, and X. The combined data are used to provide an updated model of the topology of beef heart complex III.

  20. Lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) derivatives with dithiocarbamates derived from α-amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Anita; Sengupta, Soumitra K.; Pandey, Om P.

    2006-06-01

    Lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) complexes with dithiocarbamates have been synthesized by the reactions of lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) chloride with barium dithiocarbamate and complexes of type [LnCl(L)H 2O] n have been obtained (where Ln = La(III) or Pr(III); L = barium salt of dithiocarbamate derived from glycine, L-leucine, L-valine, DL-alanine). The complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, electronic absorption and fluorescence, infrared, far infrared, 1H NMR spectral studies. The presence of coordinated water molecule is inferred from thermogravimetric analysis which indicates the loss of one water molecule at 150-170 °C. The oscillator strength, Judd-Ofelt intensity parameter, stimulated emission cross-section, etc. have been obtained for different transitions of Pr 3+.

  1. Gallium(iii) and iron(iii) complexes of quinolone antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Mjos, Katja Dralle; Cawthray, Jacqueline F; Polishchuk, Elena; Abrams, Michael J; Orvig, Chris

    2016-08-16

    Iron is an essential nutrient for many microbes. According to the "Trojan Horse Hypothesis", biological systems have difficulties distinguishing between Fe(3+) and Ga(3+), which constitutes the antimicrobial efficacy of the gallium(iii) ion. Nine novel tris(quinolono)gallium(iii) complexes and their corresponding iron(iii) analogs have been synthesized and fully characterized. Quinolone antimicrobial agents from three drug generations were used in this study: ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, fleroxacin, levofloxacin, lomefloxacin, nalidixic acid, norfloxacin, oxolinic acid, and pipemidic acid. The antimicrobial efficacy of the tris(quinolono)gallium(iii) complexes was studied against E. faecalis and S. aureus (both Gram-positive), as well as E. coli, K. pneumonia, and P. aeruginosa (all Gram-negative) in direct comparison to the tris(quinolono)iron(iii) complexes and the corresponding free quinolone ligands at various concentrations. For the tris(quinolono)gallium(iii) complexes, no combinational antimicrobial effects between Ga(3+) and the quinolone antimicrobial agents were observed. PMID:27315225

  2. Lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) derivatives with dithiocarbamates derived from alpha-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Rai, Anita; Sengupta, Soumitra K; Pandey, Om P

    2006-06-01

    Lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) complexes with dithiocarbamates have been synthesized by the reactions of lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) chloride with barium dithiocarbamate and complexes of type [LnCl(L)H2O]n have been obtained (where Ln=La(III) or Pr(III); L=barium salt of dithiocarbamate derived from glycine, L-leucine, L-valine, DL-alanine). The complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, electronic absorption and fluorescence, infrared, far infrared, 1H NMR spectral studies. The presence of coordinated water molecule is inferred from thermogravimetric analysis which indicates the loss of one water molecule at 150-170 degrees C. The oscillator strength, Judd-Ofelt intensity parameter, stimulated emission cross-section, etc. have been obtained for different transitions of Pr3+.

  3. Development of WAIS-III General Ability Index Minus WMS-III memory discrepancy scores.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Chelune, Gordon J; Tulsky, David S

    2006-09-01

    Analysis of the discrepancy between intellectual functioning and memory ability has received some support as a useful means for evaluating memory impairment. In recent additions to Wechlser scale interpretation, the WAIS-III General Ability Index (GAI) and the WMS-III Delayed Memory Index (DMI) were developed. The purpose of this investigation is to develop base rate data for GAI-IMI, GAI-GMI, and GAI-DMI discrepancy scores using data from the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample (weighted N = 1250). Base rate tables were developed using the predicted-difference method and two simple-difference methods (i.e., stratified and non-stratified). These tables provide valuable data for clinical reference purposes to determine the frequency of GAI-IMI, GAI-GMI, and GAI-DMI discrepancy scores in the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample.

  4. Development of WAIS-III General Ability Index Minus WMS-III memory discrepancy scores.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Chelune, Gordon J; Tulsky, David S

    2006-09-01

    Analysis of the discrepancy between intellectual functioning and memory ability has received some support as a useful means for evaluating memory impairment. In recent additions to Wechlser scale interpretation, the WAIS-III General Ability Index (GAI) and the WMS-III Delayed Memory Index (DMI) were developed. The purpose of this investigation is to develop base rate data for GAI-IMI, GAI-GMI, and GAI-DMI discrepancy scores using data from the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample (weighted N = 1250). Base rate tables were developed using the predicted-difference method and two simple-difference methods (i.e., stratified and non-stratified). These tables provide valuable data for clinical reference purposes to determine the frequency of GAI-IMI, GAI-GMI, and GAI-DMI discrepancy scores in the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample. PMID:16895854

  5. WAIS-III and WMS-III profiles of mildly to severely brain-injured patients.

    PubMed

    Fisher, D C; Ledbetter, M F; Cohen, N J; Marmor, D; Tulsky, D S

    2000-01-01

    Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (WAIS-III) and Wechsler Memory Scale-III (WMS-III; The Psychological Corporation, 1997) scores of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI, n = 23) to moderate-severe traumatic brain injury (M-S TBI, n = 22) were compared to those of 45 matched normal control patients. WAIS-III results revealed that IQ and index scores of MTBI patients did not significantly differ from those of controls, whereas M-S TBI patients received significantly lower mean scores on all measures. All M-S TBI patients' WMS-III index scores also revealed significantly lower scores in comparison to those of control participants, with the exception of Delayed Auditory Recognition. MTBI patients showed significantly lower mean index scores compared to normal controls on measures of immediate and delayed auditory memory, immediate memory, visual delayed memory, and general memory. Eta-squared analyses revealed that WMS-III visual indexes and WAIS-III processing speed showed particularly large effect sizes. These results suggest that symptomatic MTBI patients obtain some low WMS-III test scores comparable to those of more severely injured patients.

  6. An EGFR wild type-EGFRvIII-HB-EGF feed forward loop regulates the activation of EGFRvIII

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Chakraborty, Sharmistha; Yang, Chin-Rang; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Cipher, Daisha J.; Puliyappadamba, Vineshkumar Thidil; Rehman, Alizeh; Jiwani, Ameena J.; Mickey, Bruce; Madden, Christopher; Raisanen, Jack; Burma, Sandeep; Saha, Debabrata; Wang, Zhixiang; Pingle, Sandeep C.; Kesari, Santosh; Boothman, David A.; Habib, Amyn A.

    2014-01-01

    EGFRvIII is a key oncogene in glioblastoma (GBM). EGFRvIII results from an in frame deletion in the extracellular domain of EGFR, does not bind ligand, and is thought to be constitutively active. While EGFRvIII dimerization is known to activate EGFRvIII, the factors that drive EGFRvIII dimerization and activation are not well understood. Here we present a new model of EGFRvIII activation and propose that oncogenic activation of EGFRvIII in glioma cells is driven by co-expressed activated EGFR wild type (EGFRwt). Increasing EGFRwt leads to a striking increase in EGFRvIII tyrosine phosphorylation and activation while silencing EGFRwt inhibits EGFRvIII activation. Both the dimerization arm and the kinase activity of EGFRwt are required for EGFRvIII activation. EGFRwt activates EGFRvIII by facilitating EGFRvIII dimerization. We have previously identified HB-EGF, a ligand for EGFRwt, as a gene induced specifically by EGFRvIII. In this study we show that HB-EGF, is induced by EGFRvIII only when EGFRwt is present. Remarkably, altering HB-EGF recapitulates the effect of EGFRwt on EGFRvIII activation. Thus, increasing HB-EGF leads to a striking increase in EGFRvIII tyrosine phosphorylation while silencing HB-EGF attenuates EGFRvIII phosphorylation, suggesting that an EGFRvIII-HB-EGF-EGFRwt feed forward loop regulates EGFRvIII activation. Silencing EGFRwt or HB-EGF leads to a striking inhibition of EGFRvIII induced tumorigenicity, while increasing EGFRwt or HB-EGF levels resulted in accelerated EGFRvIII mediated oncogenicity in an orthotopic mouse model. Furthermore, we demonstrate the existence of this loop in human GBM. Thus, our data demonstrate that oncogenic activation of EGFRvIII in GBM is likely maintained by a continuous EGFRwt-EGFRvIII-HBEGF loop, potentially an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24077285

  7. Sparkle/PM3 Parameters for the Modeling of Neodymium(III), Promethium(III), and Samarium(III) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Freire, Ricardo O; da Costa, Nivan B; Rocha, Gerd B; Simas, Alfredo M

    2007-07-01

    The Sparkle/PM3 model is extended to neodymium(III), promethium(III), and samarium(III) complexes. The unsigned mean error, for all Sparkle/PM3 interatomic distances between the trivalent lanthanide ion and the ligand atoms of the first sphere of coordination, is 0.074 Å for Nd(III); 0.057 Å for Pm(III); and 0.075 Å for Sm(III). These figures are similar to the Sparkle/AM1 ones of 0.076 Å, 0.059 Å, and 0.075 Å, respectively, indicating they are all comparable models. Moreover, their accuracy is similar to what can be obtained by present-day ab initio effective potential calculations on such lanthanide complexes. Hence, the choice of which model to utilize will depend on the assessment of the effect of either AM1 or PM3 on the quantum chemical description of the organic ligands. Finally, we present a preliminary attempt to verify the geometry prediction consistency of Sparkle/PM3. Since lanthanide complexes are usually flexible, we randomly generated 200 different input geometries for the samarium complex QIPQOV which were then fully optimized by Sparkle/PM3. A trend appeared in that, on average, the lower the total energy of the local minima found, the lower the unsigned mean errors, and the higher the accuracy of the model. These preliminary results do indicate that attempting to find, with Sparkle/PM3, a global minimum for the geometry of a given complex, with the understanding that it will tend to be closer to the experimental geometry, appears to be warranted. Therefore, the sparkle model is seemingly a trustworthy semiempirical quantum chemical model for the prediction of lanthanide complexes geometries.

  8. Association of Eu(III) and Cm(III) With Halophiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, T.; Takenaka, Y.; Ohnuki, T.; Gillow, J. B.; Francis, A. J.

    2003-12-01

    Halophiles live in high ionic strength brine. The mechanisms of metal association with these microorganisms are poorly understood. In this study, we determined the distribution of Eu(III) and Cm(III) on halophiles, Halomonas sp. (WIPP1A) which was isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository in Carlsbad, US., Halomonas elongata (ATCC33173), Halobacterium salinarum (ATCC19700), and Halobacterium halobium (ATCC43214) and examined the coordination environment of Eu(III) adsorbed on the cells by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The cells of Halomonas sp. and H. elongata were grown in media containing 10 - 15 w/v% and 3.5 - 30 w/v% NaCl, respectively. Halobacterium salinarum and H. halobium were grown in media containing 25 w/v% NaCl. The logarithmic distribution coefficient (log Kd) was measured by using the cells at the late exponential phase. After washing the cells with the same concentrations of NaCl, the cells were mixed with 1x10-6 mol dm-3 Eu(III) and 1x10-8 mol dm-3 Cm(III) at pH 5 in the same concentrations of NaCl and log Kd of Eu(III) and Cm(III) was determined. For Halomonas sp. and H. elongata, log Kd was determined as a function of NaCl concentrations. The coordination environment of Eu(III) adsorbed on the cells was estimated by TRLFS. For TRLFS measurements, samples were prepared by adding cells to a solution of 1x10-3 mol dm-3 Eu(III) with the same concentrations of NaCl as the culture media. For Halomonas sp. and H. elongata, log Kd of Cm(III) was apparently larger than that of Eu(III) at all the NaCl concentrations examined. On the other hand, log Kd of Eu(III) and Cm(III) for H. salinarum and H. halobium was almost identical. Our previous study demonstrated that non-halophiles, Chlorella vulgaris, Bacillus subtilis, and Pseudomonas fluorescens show no preferences between these elements. Chemical properties of Eu(III) and Cm(III) are almost identical. Our findings suggest that the difference in log Kd

  9. SAGE III on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitts, M. C.; Thomason, L. W.; Zawodny, J.; Hill, C.

    2012-04-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE III) has recently been selected for a flight on the International Space Station (ISS) beginning in 2014. Since the instrument was constructed in the early 2000s, the instrument will require extensive testing and refurbishment prior to deliver to ISS. The project will also include the refurbishment of the ESA Hexapod which is a high-accuracy pointing system developed to support ISS external payloads particularly SAGE III. SAGE III refurbishment may also include the replacement of the neutral density filter that has been associated with some instrument response issues during the METEOR/3M mission. We are also exploring options for expanding the science targets to include additional gas species including IO, BrO, and other solar, lunar, and limb-scatter species. In this presentation, we will discuss our plans for SAGE III - ISS refurbishment including results from Sun-look testing, revisions to the science measurements, and discuss expected measurement accuracies in part by examining SAGE III - METEOR/3M measurement data quality. We will also discuss potential mission science goals enabled by the mid-inclination ISS orbit.

  10. Hybrid III-V/silicon lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspar, P.; Jany, C.; Le Liepvre, A.; Accard, A.; Lamponi, M.; Make, D.; Levaufre, G.; Girard, N.; Lelarge, F.; Shen, A.; Charbonnier, P.; Mallecot, F.; Duan, G.-H.; Gentner, J.-.; Fedeli, J.-M.; Olivier, S.; Descos, A.; Ben Bakir, B.; Messaoudene, S.; Bordel, D.; Malhouitre, S.; Kopp, C.; Menezo, S.

    2014-05-01

    The lack of potent integrated light emitters is one of the bottlenecks that have so far hindered the silicon photonics platform from revolutionizing the communication market. Photonic circuits with integrated light sources have the potential to address a wide range of applications from short-distance data communication to long-haul optical transmission. Notably, the integration of lasers would allow saving large assembly costs and reduce the footprint of optoelectronic products by combining photonic and microelectronic functionalities on a single chip. Since silicon and germanium-based sources are still in their infancy, hybrid approaches using III-V semiconductor materials are currently pursued by several research laboratories in academia as well as in industry. In this paper we review recent developments of hybrid III-V/silicon lasers and discuss the advantages and drawbacks of several integration schemes. The integration approach followed in our laboratory makes use of wafer-bonded III-V material on structured silicon-on-insulator substrates and is based on adiabatic mode transfers between silicon and III-V waveguides. We will highlight some of the most interesting results from devices such as wavelength-tunable lasers and AWG lasers. The good performance demonstrates that an efficient mode transfer can be achieved between III-V and silicon waveguides and encourages further research efforts in this direction.

  11. The Berkeley SETI Program: SERENDIP III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, C.; Bowyer, S.; Werthimer, D.; Ng, D.; Cobb, J.

    1993-05-01

    The Berkeley SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) program, named SERENDIP, was begun in the late 1970's. It is aimed at detecting narrow band radio signals from extraterrestrial civilizations. The SERENDIP I, II and III systems have operated autonomously in a piggyback search mode, conducting unobtrusive, long-term observations on the world's largest radio telescopes. The latest generation SERENDIP instrument, SERENDIP III, is a four million channel FFT-based spectrum analyzer operating at 0.6 Hz resolution with a 1.7 second integration time. SERENDIP III has been operating at the NAIC Arecibo Observatory since April, 1992. Several independent criteria suggest that this search is the most sensitive SETI search in operation. To date SERENDIP III has accumulated over 3600 hours of high quality telescope time, observing 75% of the sky visible by the Arecibo telescope. Over this period SERENDIP III has analyzed over 30 trillion spectral bins, and recorded information on 110 million strong narrow band signals in the 424--435 MHz band. A handful of these signals have survived our RFI rejection and signal detection algorithms, and have thus been added to our list of ETI candidate signals. A follow-up observation program will be conducted next year in an attempt to verify each of these candidate signals. This work has been supported by NASA grant NAGW-2722.

  12. Far-infrared absorption spectra of cobalt(III), rhodium(III), and iridium(III). beta. -diketonates

    SciTech Connect

    Oglezneva, I.M.; Isakova, V.G.; Igumenov, I.K.

    1987-03-01

    The IR absorption spectra of the complexes of Co(II), Rh(III), and Ir(III) with acetylacetone, trifluoroacetylacetone, hexafluoroactylacetone, dipivaloylmethane, and pivaloyltrifluoroacetylacetone in the region from 30 to 700 cm/sup -1/ have been examined for the first time. The frequencies of the intramolecular vibrations associated with in-plane and out-of-plane deformations of the chelate rings and deformations of the radicals in the ligands have been assigned. The frequencies of the predominantly stretching nu(MO) vibrations of the metal-oxygen bonds have been identified. Their variation has been compared with NMR data on the redistribution of the electron density in the chelate rings.

  13. Hexaammine Complexes of Cr(III) and Co(III): A Spectral Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, D. R.; Pavlis, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    Procedures are provided for experiments containing complex ions with octahedral symmetry, hexaamminecobalt(III) chloride and hexaamminechromium(III) nitrate, so students can interpret fully the ultra violet/visible spectra of the complex cations in terms of the ligand field parameters, 10 "Dq," the Racah interelectron repulsion parameters, "B,"…

  14. Luminescent xerogels obtained through embedding Tb(III) and Eu(III) complexes in silica matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, Corneliu S.; Marcotte, Nathalie; Secula, Marius S.; Popa, Marcel

    2013-07-01

    The paper reports the preparation of two luminescent xerogels through embedding in a silica matrix of Tb(III) and Eu(III) complexes using succinimide (SI) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHSI) as ligands. In the first stage, Tb(III) and Eu(III) complexes with N-hydroxysuccinimide and succinimide were prepared at 1:3 metal to ligand ratio. Strong luminescent emission was observed only in case of Eu(III)-SI and Tb(III)-NHSI complexes while the Eu(III)-NHSI and Tb(III)-SI complexes exhibited none or weak photoluminescent properties. In the second stage, the selected highly luminescent complexes were embedded in silica matrices via a sol-gel procedure leading to the formation of xerogels with transparent-glassy aspect which keep the remarkable photoluminescence properties of the free complexes. The selected, highly luminescent free complexes and their correspondent silica xerogels were investigated through thermal analysis, powder XRD, SEM, FT-IR and fluorescence spectroscopy. Their excellent photoluminescent properties and excitation spectra, conveniently located in UV-A region, might recommend these materials for applications in optoelectronic devices where photonic conversion layers are required.

  15. Sensitivity and specificity of WAIS-III/WMS-III demographically corrected factor scores in neuropsychological assessment.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M J; Heaton, R K

    2001-11-01

    This study explored the neurodiagnostic utility of 6 factor scores identified by recent exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of the WAIS-III and WMS-III: Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Organization, Processing Speed, Working Memory, Auditory Memory and Visual Memory. Factor scores were corrected for age. education, sex and ethnicity to minimize their influences on diagnostic accuracy. Cut-offs at 1, 1.5 and 2 standard deviations (SDs) below the standardization sample mean were applied to data from the overlapping test normative samples (N = 1073) and 6 clinical samples described in the WAIS-III/WMS-III Technical Manual (N = 126). The analyses suggest that a I SD cut-off yields the most balanced levels of sensitivity and specificity; more strict (1.5 or 2 SD) cut-offs generally result in trading modest gains in specificity for larger losses in sensitivity. Finally, using combinations of WAIS-III/WMS-III factors together as test batteries, we explored the sensitivity and specificity implications of varying diagnostic decision rules (e.g.,1 vs. 2 impaired factors = "impairment"). For most of the disorders considered here, even a small (e.g., 3 factor) WAIS-III/WMS-III battery provides quite good overall diagnostic accuracy.

  16. Synthesis, crystal structure and magnetism of iron(III) and manganese(III) dipicolinates with pyridinemethanols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhrecký, Róbert; Pavlik, Ján; Růžičková, Zdeňka; Dlháň, Ľubor; Koman, Marian; Boča, Roman; Moncoľ, Ján

    2014-11-01

    Four ionic iron(III) and manganese(III) dipicolinato complexes of the formula (2-pymeH) [FeIII(dipic)2]ṡ[FeIII(H2O)2Cl(dipic)]ṡ2H2O, (3-pymeH)[MnIII(dipic)2]ṡ1.5H2O, (4-pymeH)[FeIII(dipic)2]ṡ2H2O and (4-pymeH)[MnIII(dipic)2]ṡ2H2O, where H2dipic = pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid, 2-pyme = 2-pyridinemethanol, 3-pyme = 3-pyridinemethanol, 4-pyme = 4-pyridinemethanol, have been prepared and characterized by the single-crystal X-ray structure analysis, infrared spectroscopy and magnetic measurements. The magnetic data were fitted to a zero-field splitting model revealing a slight magnetic anisotropy for Mn(III) systems. The molecular field correction was consistently formulated and included in the analysis for both, magnetic susceptibility and magnetization data.

  17. Psychometric Testing of the FACES III with Rural Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ide, Bette; Dingmann, Colleen; Cuevas, Elizabeth; Meehan, Maurita

    2010-01-01

    This study tests the validity and reliability of the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Scale III (FACES III) in two samples of rural adolescents. The underlying theory is the linear 3-D circumplex model. The FACES III was administered to 1,632 adolescents in Grades 7 through 12 in two counties in a rural western state. The FACES III Scale and the…

  18. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  19. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  20. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  1. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  2. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  3. Molten-Salt-Based Growth of Group III Nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Waldrip, Karen E.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Kerley, Thomas M.

    2008-10-14

    A method for growing Group III nitride materials using a molten halide salt as a solvent to solubilize the Group-III ions and nitride ions that react to form the Group III nitride material. The concentration of at least one of the nitride ion or Group III cation is determined by electrochemical generation of the ions.

  4. Evolution of Class III treatment in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Ngan, Peter; Moon, Won

    2015-07-01

    Angle, Tweed, and Moyers classified Class III malocclusions into 3 types: pseudo, dentoalveolar, and skeletal. Clinicians have been trying to identify the best timing to intercept a Class III malocclusion that develops as early as the deciduous dentition. With microimplants as skeletal anchorage, orthopedic growth modification became more effective, and it also increased the scope of camouflage orthodontic treatment for patients who were not eligible for orthognathic surgery. However, orthodontic treatment combined with orthognathic surgery remains the only option for patients with a severe skeletal Class III malocclusion or a craniofacial anomaly. Distraction osteogenesis can now be performed intraorally at an earlier age. The surgery-first approach can minimize the length of time that the malocclusion needs to worsen before orthognathic surgery. Finally, the use of computed tomography scans for 3-dimensional diagnosis and treatment planning together with advances in imaging technology can improve the accuracy of surgical movements and the esthetic outcomes for these patients.

  5. Practical management of grade III acromioclavicular separations.

    PubMed

    Trainer, Gabriel; Arciero, Robert A; Mazzocca, Augustus D

    2008-03-01

    Acromioclavicular joint (AC) injuries are common in the young athletic population. There is general agreement that grade I and grade II separations are best managed nonoperatively, whereas grades IV to VI warrant surgical stabilization. In contrast, considerable controversy exists surrounding the best method of treatment for grade III AC separations. The trend in recent literature is toward the initial nonoperative management of these injuries. However, consideration of other factors such as type of sport, timing of injury relative to athletic season, or the throwing demands in an injured dominant arm may play a role in the decision to treat grade III injuries operatively or nonoperatively. We offer a protocol algorithm for treating grade III AC separations for managing this controversial injury.

  6. SAGE III Aerosol Extinction Validation in the Arctic Winter: Comparisons with SAGE II and POAM III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, L. W.; Poole, L. R.; Randall, C. E.

    2007-01-01

    The use of SAGE III multiwavelength aerosol extinction coefficient measurements to infer PSC type is contingent on the robustness of both the extinction magnitude and its spectral variation. Past validation with SAGE II and other similar measurements has shown that the SAGE III extinction coefficient measurements are reliable though the comparisons have been greatly weighted toward measurements made at mid-latitudes. Some aerosol comparisons made in the Arctic winter as a part of SOLVE II suggested that SAGE III values, particularly at longer wavelengths, are too small with the implication that both the magnitude and the wavelength dependence are not reliable. Comparisons with POAM III have also suggested a similar discrepancy. Herein, we use SAGE II data as a common standard for comparison of SAGE III and POAM III measurements in the Arctic winters of 2002/2003 through 2004/2005. During the winter, SAGE II measurements are made infrequently at the same latitudes as these instruments. We have mitigated this problem through the use potential vorticity as a spatial coordinate and thus greatly increased the number of coincident events. We find that SAGE II and III extinction coefficient measurements show a high degree of compatibility at both 1020 nm and 450 nm except a 10-20% bias at both wavelengths. In addition, the 452 to 1020-nm extinction ratio shows a consistent bias of approx. 30% throughout the lower stratosphere. We also find that SAGE II and POAM III are on average consistent though the comparisons show a much higher variability and larger bias than SAGE II/III comparisons. In addition, we find that the two data sets are not well correlated below 18 km. Overall, we find both the extinction values and the spectral dependence from SAGE III are robust and we find no evidence of a significant defect within the Arctic vortex.

  7. A mixed iron(III)/lithium alkoxide.

    PubMed

    Barley, Helen R L; Kennedy, Alan R; Mulvey, Robert E

    2005-07-01

    The heterometallic alkoxide catena-poly[[tetra-mu2-tert-butoxo-1:2kappa4O:O;1:3kappa4O:O-bis(tetrahydrofuran)-2kappaO,3kappaO-iron(III)dilithium(I)]-mu-bromo], [FeLi2Br(C4H9O)4(C4H8O)2]n, forms a one-dimensional chain through an a-glide. This conformation is achieved through the formation of Fe(III)/O/Li/O rings and Li-Br-Li bridges. PMID:15997061

  8. Extraoral traction and class III treatment.

    PubMed

    Cozzani, G

    1981-12-01

    True Class III malocclusions are difficult to treat because they reflect basal bone discrepancies and there are many limitations to conventional treatment mechanisms. For example, Class III elastics may adversely affect the inclination of the occlusal plane and bite depth. On the other hand, extraoral appliances can be used advantageously. One important application is to move a retrognathically positioned maxilla forward orthopedically by means of the facial mask of Delaire. In addition, extraoral appliances placed against the lower incisor segment can also be used to retract the mandibular incisors and control bite depth during the retraction procedure.

  9. Siderophores are not involved in Fe(III) solubilization during anaerobic Fe(III) respiration by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Fennessey, Christine M; Jones, Morris E; Taillefert, Martial; DiChristina, Thomas J

    2010-04-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 respires a wide range of anaerobic electron acceptors, including sparingly soluble Fe(III) oxides. In the present study, S. oneidensis was found to produce Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration, a respiratory strategy postulated to destabilize Fe(III) and produce more readily reducible soluble organic Fe(III). In-frame gene deletion mutagenesis, siderophore detection assays, and voltammetric techniques were combined to determine (i) if the Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands produced by S. oneidensis during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration were synthesized via siderophore biosynthesis systems and (ii) if the Fe(III)-siderophore reductase was required for respiration of soluble organic Fe(III) as an anaerobic electron acceptor. Genes predicted to encode the siderophore (hydroxamate) biosynthesis system (SO3030 to SO3032), the Fe(III)-hydroxamate receptor (SO3033), and the Fe(III)-hydroxamate reductase (SO3034) were identified in the S. oneidensis genome, and corresponding in-frame gene deletion mutants were constructed. DeltaSO3031 was unable to synthesize siderophores or produce soluble organic Fe(III) during aerobic respiration yet retained the ability to solubilize and respire Fe(III) at wild-type rates during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration. DeltaSO3034 retained the ability to synthesize siderophores during aerobic respiration and to solubilize and respire Fe(III) at wild-type rates during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration. These findings indicate that the Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands produced by S. oneidensis during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration are not synthesized via the hydroxamate biosynthesis system and that the Fe(III)-hydroxamate reductase is not essential for respiration of Fe(III)-citrate or Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) as an anaerobic electron acceptor.

  10. Shewanella putrefaciens produces an Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligand during anaerobic respiration on insoluble Fe(III) oxides.

    PubMed

    Taillefert, Martial; Beckler, Jordon S; Carey, Elizabeth; Burns, Justin L; Fennessey, Christine M; DiChristina, Thomas J

    2007-11-01

    The mechanism of Fe(III) reduction was investigated using voltammetric techniques in anaerobic incubations of Shewanella putrefaciens strain 200 supplemented with Fe(III) citrate or a suite of Fe(III) oxides as terminal electron acceptor. Results indicate that organic complexes of Fe(III) are produced during the reduction of Fe(III) at rates that correlate with the reactivity of the Fe(III) phase and bacterial cell density. Anaerobic Fe(III) solubilization activity is detected with either Fe(III) oxides or Fe(III) citrate, suggesting that the organic ligand produced is strong enough to destabilize Fe(III) from soluble or solid Fe(III) substrates. Results also demonstrate that Fe(III) oxide dissolution is not controlled by the intrinsic chemical reactivity of the Fe(III) oxides. Instead, the chemical reaction between the endogenous organic ligand is only affected by the number of reactive surface sites available to S. putrefaciens. This report describes the first application of voltammetric techniques to demonstrate production of soluble organic-Fe(III) complexes by any Fe(III)-reducing microorganism and is the first report of a Fe(III)-solubilizing ligand generated by a metal-reducing member of the genus Shewanella.

  11. Quantum chemical study of arsenic (III, V) adsorption on Mn-oxides: implications for arsenic(III) oxidation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mengqiang; Paul, Kristian W; Kubicki, James D; Sparks, Donald L

    2009-09-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to investigate As(V) and As(III) surface complex structures and reaction energies on both Mn(III) and Mn(IV) sites in an attempt to better understand As(III) oxidation bybirnessite, a layered Mn-dioxide mineral. Edge-sharing dioctahedral Mn(III) and Mn(IV) clusters with different combinations of surface functional groups (>MnOH and >MnOH2) were employed to mimic pH variability. Results show that As(V) adsorption was more thermodynamically favorable than As(III) adsorption on both Mn(III) and Mn(IV) surface sites under simulated acidic pH conditions. Therefore, we propose that As(V) adsorption inhibits As(III) oxidation by blocking adsorption sites. Under simulated acidic pH conditions, Mn(IV) sites exhibited stronger adsorption affinity than Mn(III) sites for both As(III) and As(V). Overall, we hypothesize that Mn(III) sites are less reactive in terms of As(III) oxidation due to their lower affinity for As(III) adsorption, higher potential to be blocked by As(V) complexes, and slower electron transfer rates with adsorbed As(III). Results from this study offer an explanation regarding the experimental observations of Mn(III) accumulation on birnessite and the long residence time of As(III) adsorption complexes on manganite (r-MnOOH) during As(III) oxidation. PMID:19764231

  12. Anisotropy barrier enhancement via ligand substitution in tetranuclear {Co(III)2Ln(III)2} single molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Langley, Stuart K; Chilton, Nicholas F; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Murray, Keith S

    2013-08-11

    The replacement of coordinated acetylacetonate for nitrate around a Dy(III) ion results in the enhancement of the single molecule magnet properties of a {Co(III)2Dy(III)2} complex, resulting in a large thermal energy barrier and reduced quantum tunnelling at low temperatures. The analogous Tb(III) complex displays field induced SMM behaviour.

  13. Arsenic (III, V), indium (III), and gallium (III) toxicity to zebrafish embryos using a high-throughput multi-endpoint in vivo developmental and behavioral assay.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Christopher I; Field, Jim A; Simonich, Michael; Tanguay, Robert L; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2016-04-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) and other III/V materials are finding increasing application in microelectronic components. The rising demand for III/V-based products is leading to increasing generation of effluents containing ionic species of gallium, indium, and arsenic. The ecotoxicological hazard potential of these streams is unknown. While the toxicology of arsenic is comprehensive, much less is known about the effects of In(III) and Ga(III). The embryonic zebrafish was evaluated for mortality, developmental abnormalities, and photomotor response (PMR) behavior changes associated with exposure to As(III), As(V), Ga(III), and In(III). The As(III) lowest observable effect level (LOEL) for mortality was 500 μM at 24 and 120 h post fertilization (hpf). As(V) exposure was associated with significant mortality at 63 μM. The Ga(III)-citrate LOEL was 113 μM at 24 and 120 hpf. There was no association of significant mortality over the tested range of In(III)-citrate (56-900 μM) or sodium citrate (213-3400 μM) exposures. Only As(V) resulted in significant developmental abnormalities with LOEL of 500 μM. Removal of the chorion prior to As(III) and As(V) exposure was associated with increased incidence of mortality and developmental abnormality suggesting that the chorion may normally attenuate mass uptake of these metals by the embryo. Finally, As(III), As(V), and In(III) caused PMR hypoactivity (49-69% of control PMR) at 900-1000 μM. Overall, our results represent the first characterization of multidimensional toxicity effects of III/V ions in zebrafish embryos helping to fill a significant knowledge gap, particularly in Ga(III) and In(III) toxicology.

  14. Arsenic (III, V), indium (III), and gallium (III) toxicity to zebrafish embryos using a high-throughput multi-endpoint in vivo developmental and behavioral assay.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Christopher I; Field, Jim A; Simonich, Michael; Tanguay, Robert L; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2016-04-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) and other III/V materials are finding increasing application in microelectronic components. The rising demand for III/V-based products is leading to increasing generation of effluents containing ionic species of gallium, indium, and arsenic. The ecotoxicological hazard potential of these streams is unknown. While the toxicology of arsenic is comprehensive, much less is known about the effects of In(III) and Ga(III). The embryonic zebrafish was evaluated for mortality, developmental abnormalities, and photomotor response (PMR) behavior changes associated with exposure to As(III), As(V), Ga(III), and In(III). The As(III) lowest observable effect level (LOEL) for mortality was 500 μM at 24 and 120 h post fertilization (hpf). As(V) exposure was associated with significant mortality at 63 μM. The Ga(III)-citrate LOEL was 113 μM at 24 and 120 hpf. There was no association of significant mortality over the tested range of In(III)-citrate (56-900 μM) or sodium citrate (213-3400 μM) exposures. Only As(V) resulted in significant developmental abnormalities with LOEL of 500 μM. Removal of the chorion prior to As(III) and As(V) exposure was associated with increased incidence of mortality and developmental abnormality suggesting that the chorion may normally attenuate mass uptake of these metals by the embryo. Finally, As(III), As(V), and In(III) caused PMR hypoactivity (49-69% of control PMR) at 900-1000 μM. Overall, our results represent the first characterization of multidimensional toxicity effects of III/V ions in zebrafish embryos helping to fill a significant knowledge gap, particularly in Ga(III) and In(III) toxicology. PMID:26824274

  15. 19-Tungstodiarsenate(III) Functionalized by Organoantimony(III) Groups: Tuning the Structure-Bioactivity Relationship.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Lin, Zhengguo; Alfaro-Espinoza, Gabriela; Ullrich, Matthias S; Raţ, Ciprian I; Silvestru, Cristian; Kortz, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    A family of three discrete organoantimony(III)-functionalized heteropolyanions-[Na{2-(Me2HN(+)CH2)C6H4Sb(III)}As(III)2W19O67(H2O)](10-) (1), [{2-(Me2HN(+)CH2)C6H4Sb(III)}2As(III)2W19O67(H2O)](8-) (2), and [{2-(Me2HN(+)CH2)C6H4Sb(III)}{WO2(H2O)}{WO(H2O)}2(B-β-As(III)W8O30)(B-α-As(III)W9O33)2](14-) (3)-have been prepared by one-pot reactions of the 19-tungstodiarsenate(III) precursor [As(III)2W19O67(H2O)](14-) with 2-(Me2NCH2)C6H4SbCl2. The three novel polyanions crystallized as the hydrated mixed-alkali salts Cs3KNa6[Na{2-(Me2HN(+)CH2)C6H4Sb(III)}As(III)2W19O67(H2O)]·43H2O (CsKNa-1), Rb2.5K5.5[{2-(Me2HN(+)CH2)C6H4Sb(III)}2As(III)2W19O67(H2O)]·18H2O·Me2NCH2C6H5 (RbK-2), and Rb2.5K11.5[{2-(Me2HN(+)CH2)C6H4Sb(III)}{WO2(H2O)}{WO(H2O)}2(B-β-As(III)W8O30)(B-α-As(III)W9O33)2]·52H2O (RbK-3), respectively. The number of incorporated {2-(Me2HN(+)CH2)C6H4Sb(III)} units could be tuned by careful control of the experimental parameters. Polyanions 1 and 2 possess a dimeric sandwich-type topology, whereas 3 features a trimeric, wheel-shaped structure, representing the largest organoantimony-containing polyanion. All three compounds were fully characterized in the solid state via single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis, and their aqueous solution stability was validated by ultraviolet-visible light (UV-vis) and multinuclear ((1)H, (13)C, and (183)W) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Effective inhibition against six different types of bacteria was observed for 1 and 2, and we could extract a structure-bioactivity relationship for these polyanions.

  16. Hydration of lanthanoids(III) and actinoids(III): an experimental/theoretical saga.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Paola; Spezia, Riccardo

    2012-09-01

    The latest experimental and theoretical studies on structural and dynamical properties of lanthanoid(III) and actinoid(III) ions in water have been reviewed. In the last years, most of the issues about lanthanoid(III) hydration have been resolved combining X-ray absorption experiments and different theoretical methods. Since 2008 an effort has been made to treat the entire series thus obtaining coherent sets of experimental and theoretical results that were lately put together in such a way that it was possible to derive new basic properties, such as effective ionic radii, across the series. While for the hydration of lanthanoids(III) many experiments and simulations have been reported, the hydration of actinoids(III) was less investigated. There are some experiments performed by different research groups and few simulations that we discuss in this review. Currently, there are enough results that it is possible to gain some understanding of the hydration behavior of lanthanoids(III) and actinoids(III). The ultimate goal of this review is to provide clues on the analogies and differences between the two series. These aspects are connected to several issues: 1) technological: the separation of these elements that is necessary for recycling and stocking of nuclear waste, 2) practical: because experiments on actinoids need particular care, the definition of possible analogies will give the possibility to use the correct lanthanoid when the information on a specific actinoid is needed, 3) fundamental: related to chemical similarities between the two series.

  17. Interpreting change on the WAIS-III/WMS-III in clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Iverson, G L

    2001-02-01

    Clinicians should note that there is considerable variability in the reliabilities of the index and subtest scores derived from the third editions of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III) and the Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS-III). The purpose of this article is to review these reliabilities and to illustrate how they can be used to interpret change in patients' performances from test to retest. The WAIS-III IQ and Index scores are consistently the most reliable scores, in terms of both internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The most internally consistent WAIS-III subtests are Vocabulary, Information, Digit Span, Matrix Reasoning, and Arithmetic. Information and Vocabulary have the highest test-retest reliability. On the WMS-III, the Auditory Immediate Index, Immediate Memory Index, Auditory Delayed Index, and General Memory Index are the most reliable, in terms of both internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The Logical Memory I and Verbal Paired Associates I subtests are the most reliable. Data from three clinical groups (i.e., Alzheimer's disease, chronic alcohol abuse, and schizophrenia) were extracted from the Technical Manual [Psychological Corporation (1997). WAIS-III/WMS-III Technical Manual. San Antonio: Harcourt Brace] for the purpose of calculating reliable change estimates. A table of confidence intervals for test-retest measurement error is provided to help the clinician determine if patients have reliably improved or deteriorated on follow-up testing.

  18. Academic Achievement of NCAA Division III Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, Kathy A.; Hickey, Ann

    2014-01-01

    A study of 215 athletes at a small private liberal arts Division III college revealed that athletes (a) begin their college experience with SATs no different from non-athletes; (b) attain GPAs that do not significantly differ from those of nonathletes; (c) achieve GPAs that do not significantly differ between their "in-season" semester…

  19. Constraining the Statistics of Population III Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacy, Athena

    2013-01-01

    We perform a cosmological simulation in order to model the growth and evolution of Population III (Pop III) stellar systems in a range of host minihalo environments. A Pop III multiple system forms in each of the ten minihaloes, and the overall mass function is top-heavy compared to the currently observed initial mass function in the Milky Way. Using a sink particle to represent each growing protostar, we examine the binary characteristics of the multiple systems, resolving orbits on scales as small as 20 AU. We find a binary fraction of ~36%, with semi-major axes as large as 3000 AU. The distribution of orbital periods is slightly peaked at ~900 yr, while the distribution of mass ratios is relatively flat. Of all sink particles formed within the ten minihaloes, ~50% are lost to mergers with larger sinks, and ~50% of the remaining sinks are ejected from their star-forming disks. The large binary fraction may have important implications for Pop III evolution and nucleosynthesis, as well as the final fate of the first stars.

  20. Constraining the statistics of Population III binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacy, Athena; Bromm, Volker

    2013-08-01

    We perform a cosmological simulation in order to model the growth and evolution of Population III (Pop III) stellar systems in a range of host minihalo environments. A Pop III multiple system forms in each of the 10 minihaloes, and the overall mass function is top-heavy compared to the currently observed initial mass function in the Milky Way. Using a sink particle to represent each growing protostar, we examine the binary characteristics of the multiple systems, resolving orbits on scales as small as 20 au. We find a binary fraction of ˜35 per cent, with semi-major axes as large as 3000 au. The distribution of orbital periods is slightly peaked at ≲ 900 yr, while the distribution of mass ratios is relatively flat. Of all sink particles formed within the 10 minihaloes, ˜50 per cent are lost to mergers with larger sinks, and ˜50 per cent of the remaining sinks are ejected from their star-forming discs. The large binary fraction may have important implications for Pop III evolution and nucleosynthesis, as well as the final fate of the first stars.

  1. Constraining the Statistics of Population III Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacy, Athena; Bromm, Volker

    2012-01-01

    We perform a cosmological simulation in order to model the growth and evolution of Population III (Pop III) stellar systems in a range of host minihalo environments. A Pop III multiple system forms in each of the ten minihaloes, and the overall mass function is top-heavy compared to the currently observed initial mass function in the Milky Way. Using a sink particle to represent each growing protostar, we examine the binary characteristics of the multiple systems, resolving orbits on scales as small as 20 AU. We find a binary fraction of approx. 36, with semi-major axes as large as 3000 AU. The distribution of orbital periods is slightly peaked at approx. < 900 yr, while the distribution of mass ratios is relatively flat. Of all sink particles formed within the ten minihaloes, approx. 50 are lost to mergers with larger sinks, and 50 of the remaining sinks are ejected from their star-forming disks. The large binary fraction may have important implications for Pop III evolution and nucleosynthesis, as well as the final fate of the first stars.

  2. FutureTox III: Bridges for Translation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present document describes key discussion points and outcomes of a Society of Toxicology (SOT) Contemporary Concepts in Toxicology (CCT) Workshop, entitled FutureTox III1,2 that was held in Crystal City, Virginia, November 19-20, 2015. The workshop built on the many lessons l...

  3. ESEA Title III 1972 - PACE in Pennsylvania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research and Information Services for Education, King of Prussia, PA.

    This document is a collection of abstracts of all ESEA Title III educational innovation projects funded or operating in Pennsylvania during 1972. Each abstract contains the name of the local supporting agency, the project number, financial information, target population, major objectives, activities, evaluation design, findings to date,…

  4. Gold(III)-Catalyzed Hydration of Phenylacetylene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, J. Michelle; Tzeel, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    A guided inquiry-based experiment exploring the regioselectivity of the hydration of phenylacetylene is described. The experiment uses an acidic gold(III) catalyst in a benign methanol/water solvent system to introduce students to alkyne chemistry and key principles of green chemistry. The experiment can be easily completed in approximately 2 h,…

  5. District Practices Study. Phase III Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Advanced Technology, Inc., Reston, VA.

    Following up on the first two phases (1976-82) of the "District Practices Study" of Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) as presented in a resource book and seven special reports, this report is devoted to the study's third and final phase. During phase III (1982-83), researchers visited 14 sites to describe their solutions…

  6. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D.

    1998-01-01

    A bandpass photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties. The bandpass photodetector detects electromagnetic radiation between a lower transition wavelength and an upper transition wavelength. That detector comprises two low pass photodetectors. The response of the two low pass photodetectors is subtracted to yield a response signal.

  7. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, T.D.

    1998-12-08

    A bandpass photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The bandpass photodetector detects electromagnetic radiation between a lower transition wavelength and an upper transition wavelength. That detector comprises two low pass photodetectors. The response of the two low pass photodetectors is subtracted to yield a response signal. 24 figs.

  8. The Changing Nature of Division III Athletics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, William

    2014-01-01

    Non-selective Division III institutions often face challenges in meeting their enrollment goals. To ensure their continued viability, these schools recruit large numbers of student athletes. As a result, when compared to FBS (Football Bowl Division) institutions these schools have a much higher percentage of student athletes on campus and a…

  9. Management of anti-thrombin III deficiency during pregnancy without administration of anti-thrombin III.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, J R; Geerts, W; Panju, A; Nguyen, P; Hirsh, J

    1986-02-15

    We report a patient with hereditary antithrombin III deficiency who was successfully treated with heparin throughout pregnancy. Functional antithrombin III levels fell to 0.32 U/ml during heparin treatment, but it was possible to achieve a heparin effect, measured by the activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin clotting time and heparin assay with subcutaneous heparin in doses of 30,000 U to 35,000 U/24 hours. This achieve an long term heparin effect was obtained without the need for antithrombin III infusions.

  10. Cosmological Impact of Population III Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Bromm, Volker; Heger, Alexander; Jeon, Myoungwon; Woosley, Stan

    2015-03-01

    We present the results of the stellar feedback from Population III (Pop III) binaries by employing improved, more realistic Pop III evolutionary stellar models. To facilitate a meaningful comparison, we consider a fixed mass of 60 {{M}⊙ } incorporated in Pop III stars, either contained in a single star, or split up in binary stars of 30 {{M}⊙ } each or an asymmetric case of one 45 and one 15 {{M}⊙ } star. Whereas the sizes of the resulting H ii regions are comparable across all cases, the He iii regions around binary stars are significantly smaller than that of the single star. Consequently, the He+ 1640 \\overset{\\circ}A recombination line is expected to become much weaker. Supernova (SN) feedback exhibits great variety due to the uncertainty in possible explosion pathways. If at least one of the component stars dies as a hypernova about 10 times more energetic than conventional core-collapse SNe, the gas inside the host minihalo is effectively blown out, chemically enriching the intergalactic medium (IGM) to an average metallicity of {{10}-4}-{{10}-3} {{Z}⊙ }, out to ˜ 2 kpc. The single star, however, is more likely to collapse into a black hole, accompanied by at most very weak explosions. The effectiveness of early chemical enrichment would thus be significantly reduced, in contrast to the lower mass binary stars, where at least one component is likely to contribute to heavy element production and dispersal. Important new feedback physics is also introduced if close binaries can form high-mass X-ray binaries, leading to the pre-heating and -ionization of the IGM beyond the extent of the stellar H ii regions.

  11. Rhodium(i), rhodium(iii) and iridium(iii) carbaporphyrins.

    PubMed

    Adiraju, Venkata A K; Ferrence, Gregory M; Lash, Timothy D

    2016-09-21

    Treatment of a benzocarbaporphyrin with [Rh(CO)2Cl]2 in refluxing dichloromethane gave a rhodium(i) dicarbonyl complex, and further reaction in refluxing pyridine afforded an organometallic rhodium(iii) derivative. The carbaporphyrin also reacted with [Ir(COD)Cl]2 and pyridine in refluxing p-xylene to generate a related iridium(iii) compound. These novel metalated porphyrinoids retained strongly diatropic characteristics and were fully characterized by XRD. PMID:27529466

  12. A XAFS study of plain and composite iron(III) and chromium(III) hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Papassiopi, N; Pinakidou, F; Katsikini, M; Antipas, G S E; Christou, C; Xenidis, A; Paloura, E C

    2014-09-01

    Reduction of hexavalent Cr(VI) to the trivalent state is the common strategy for remediation of Cr(VI) contaminated waters and soils. In the presence of Fe the resulting compounds are usually mixed Fe(III)-Cr(III) phases, while, under iron-free conditions, reduction leads to formation of plain Cr(III) hydroxides. Environmental stability of these compounds depends on their structure and is important to understand how different precipitation conditions affect the local atomic order of resulting compounds and thus their long term stability. In current study, typical Cr(VI) environmental remediation products, i.e. plain and mixed Fe(III)-Cr(III) hydroxides, were synthesized by hydrolysis and redox reactions and their structure was studied by X ray diffraction and X ray absorption fine structure techniques. Plain Cr(III) hydroxide was found to correspond to the molecular formula Cr(OH)3·3H2O and was identified as crystalline in XRD. However, the same compound when examined by EXAFS did not exhibit any clear local order in the range of EXAFS detectable distances, i.e. between 0 and 5Å. Namely, EXAFS spectroscopy detected only contribution from the first nearest neighboring (Cr-O) shell, suggesting that CrO6 octahedra interconnection is loose, in accordance with the suggested anti-bayerite structure of this compound. Mixed Fe(III)-Cr(III) systems resembled 2-line ferrihydrite irrespective of the synthesis route. Analysis of Fe-K-EXAFS and Cr-K-EXAFS spectra indicated that FeO6 octahedra are bonded by sharing both edges and corners, while CrO6 octahedra seem to prefer edge sharing linkage. EXAFS data also suggest that Fe-Cr hydroxide produced by hydrolysis presents a better arrangement of CrO6 octahedra compared to the redox product.

  13. Theoretical insights into the separation of Am(III) over Eu(III) with PhenBHPPA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Han; Wu, Qun-Yan; Wang, Cong-Zhi; Lan, Jian-Hui; Liu, Zhi-Rong; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2015-10-14

    Due to the similar chemical properties of actinides An(iii) and lanthanides Ln(iii), their separation in spent nuclear fuel reprocessing is extremely challenging. A 1,10-phenanthroline dipicolinamide-based ligand (PhenBHPPA) has been identified to possess a selectivity for Am(iii) over Eu(iii) and could potentially be used for group actinide extraction. In this study, quasi-relativistic density functional theoretical calculations have been used to disclose the interaction mechanisms of Am(iii) and Eu(iii) complexes with PhenBHPPA. The electronic structures, bonding nature, QTAIM (Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules) analyses and thermodynamic behaviors of the Am(iii) and Eu(iii) complexes with PhenBHPPA have been explored in detail. According to the Wiberg bond indices (WBIs) and QTAIM analyses, interactions between the ligand and metal cations (Am(iii) and Eu(iii)) exhibit a weakly covalent character. Thermodynamic analyses show that the charged complexes [ML(NO3)2](+) appear to be the most stable species in the complexation processes. Moreover, it is more energetically favorable for PhenBHPPA to bind to Am(iii) compared to Eu(iii). Our study could render new insights into understanding the selectivity of the ligand towards minor actinides and the separation of An(iii) from Ln(iii) via liquid-liquid extraction. PMID:26332357

  14. Theoretical insights into the separation of Am(III) over Eu(III) with PhenBHPPA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Han; Wu, Qun-Yan; Wang, Cong-Zhi; Lan, Jian-Hui; Liu, Zhi-Rong; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2015-10-14

    Due to the similar chemical properties of actinides An(iii) and lanthanides Ln(iii), their separation in spent nuclear fuel reprocessing is extremely challenging. A 1,10-phenanthroline dipicolinamide-based ligand (PhenBHPPA) has been identified to possess a selectivity for Am(iii) over Eu(iii) and could potentially be used for group actinide extraction. In this study, quasi-relativistic density functional theoretical calculations have been used to disclose the interaction mechanisms of Am(iii) and Eu(iii) complexes with PhenBHPPA. The electronic structures, bonding nature, QTAIM (Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules) analyses and thermodynamic behaviors of the Am(iii) and Eu(iii) complexes with PhenBHPPA have been explored in detail. According to the Wiberg bond indices (WBIs) and QTAIM analyses, interactions between the ligand and metal cations (Am(iii) and Eu(iii)) exhibit a weakly covalent character. Thermodynamic analyses show that the charged complexes [ML(NO3)2](+) appear to be the most stable species in the complexation processes. Moreover, it is more energetically favorable for PhenBHPPA to bind to Am(iii) compared to Eu(iii). Our study could render new insights into understanding the selectivity of the ligand towards minor actinides and the separation of An(iii) from Ln(iii) via liquid-liquid extraction.

  15. III-V nanowire growth mechanism: V/III ratio and temperature effects.

    PubMed

    Dayeh, Shadi A; Yu, Edward T; Wang, Deli

    2007-08-01

    We have studied the dependence of Au-assisted InAs nanowire (NW) growth on InAs(111)B substrates as a function of substrate temperature and input V/III precursor ratio using organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy. Temperature-dependent growth was observed within certain temperature windows that are highly dependent on input V/III ratios. This dependence was found to be a direct consequence of the drop in NW nucleation and growth rate with increasing V/III ratio at a constant growth temperature due to depletion of indium at the NW growth sites. The growth rate was found to be determined by the local V/III ratio, which is dependent on the input precursor flow rates, growth temperature, and substrate decomposition. These studies advance understanding of the key processes involved in III-V NW growth, support the general validity of the vapor-liquid-solid growth mechanism for III-V NWs, and improve rational control over their growth morphology. PMID:17608541

  16. The Behavior of Thallium(III) During Jarosite Precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Dutrizac,J.; Chen, T.; Beauchemin, S.

    2005-01-01

    The behavior of thallium(III) under the general conditions employed for jarosite precipitation in the zinc industry was investigated in a series of laboratory experiments. Thallium(III) does not appear to form end-member jarosite-type compounds, MTl{sub 3}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){sub 6}, where M is Na, K, NH{sub 4}, etc. In acid solutions at pH > 0.7, the thallium(III) hydrolyzes to Tl{sub 2}O{sub 3}; in more strongly acid media, two K-Tl(III) sulphate phases crystallize at temperatures < 90 C. The K-Tl(III) sulphate phases were investigated by chemical and X-ray diffraction analyses and by thermogravimetry. Although end-member Tl(III) analogues of jarosite-type compounds could not be synthesized, it is possible to incorporate significant amounts of Tl(III) in potassium jarosite (KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6), and over 20 at.% substitution of Tl(III) for Fe(III) was achieved. The presence of Tl(III) in the potassium jarosite structure was confirmed by microscopic methods, electron microprobe analyses and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The Tl(III)-bearing species forms rapidly, and excess Fe(III) precipitates as nearly Tl-free potassium jarosite which envelops the initially formed Tl(III)-bearing potassium jarosite phase.

  17. MAVIS III -- A Windows 95/NT Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Hardwick, M.F.

    1997-12-01

    MAVIS (Modeling and Analysis of Explosive Valve Interactions) is a computer program that simulates operation of explosively actuated valve. MAVIS was originally written in Fortran in the mid 1970`s and was primarily run on the Sandia Vax computers in use through the early 1990`s. During the mid to late 1980`s MAVIS was upgraded to include the effects of plastic deformation and it became MAVIS II. When the Vax computers were retired, the Gas Transfer System (GTS) Development Department ported the code to the Macintosh and PC platforms, where it ran as a simple console application. All graphical output was lost during these ports. GTS code developers recently completed an upgrade that provides a Windows 95/NT MAVIS application and restores all of the original graphical output. This upgrade is called MAVIS III version 1.0. This report serves both as a user`s manual for MAVIS III v 1.0 and as a general software development reference.

  18. BES-III distributed computing status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, S. D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Korenkov, V. V.; Li, W. D.; Lin, T.; Ma, Z. T.; Nicholson, C.; Pelevanyuk, I. S.; Suo, B.; Trofimov, V. V.; Tsaregorodtsev, A. U.; Uzhinskiy, A. V.; Yan, T.; Yan, X. F.; Zhang, X. M.; Zhemchugov, A. S.

    2016-09-01

    The BES-III experiment at the Institute of High Energy Physics (Beijing, China) is aimed at the precision measurements in e+e- annihilation in the energy range from 2.0 till 4.6 GeV. The world's largest samples of J/psi and psi' events and unique samples of XYZ data have been already collected. The expected increase of the data volume in the coming years required a significant evolution of the computing model, namely shift from a centralized data processing to a distributed one. This report summarizes a current design of the BES-III distributed computing system, some of key decisions and experience gained during 2 years of operations.

  19. LSPRAY-III: A Lagrangian Spray Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.

    2008-01-01

    LSPRAY-III is a Lagrangian spray solver developed for application with parallel computing and unstructured grids. It is designed to be massively parallel and could easily be coupled with any existing gas-phase flow and/or Monte Carlo Probability Density Function (PDF) solvers. The solver accommodates the use of an unstructured mesh with mixed elements of either triangular, quadrilateral, and/or tetrahedral type for the gas flow grid representation. It is mainly designed to predict the flow, thermal and transport properties of a rapidly vaporizing spray because of its importance in aerospace application. The manual provides the user with an understanding of various models involved in the spray formulation, its code structure and solution algorithm, and various other issues related to parallelization and its coupling with other solvers. With the development of LSPRAY-III, we have advanced the state-of-the-art in spray computations in several important ways.

  20. Background investigation in EDELWEISS-III

    SciTech Connect

    Scorza, Silvia

    2015-08-17

    Protection from and rejection of backgrounds is a key issue for the EDELWEISS-III direct dark matter detection experiment which aims at exploring the 10{sup −9} pb cross-section region for spin-independent WIMP-nucleon interaction. The detector is located in the low radioactivity environment of the Modane Underground Laboratory and consists of 36 advanced FID germanium detectors operating at 18 mK in a dilution refrigerator in order to identify eventual rare nuclear recoils induced by elastic scattering of WIMPs from our Galactic halo. I will discuss the background and the methods of rejecting it with the FID detectors. Detector performances and the first analysis of data acquired in a long-term campaign will be presented as well. The FID detector technology is not limited to EDELWEISS-III but can further be employed in the next generation of cryogenic detector experiments.

  1. [Early treatment of Class III malocclusion].

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Michel; Philip, Camille; Salvadori, André

    2011-09-01

    Optimum treatment timing for orthodontic problems continues to be one of the more controversial topics in orthodontics. Especially regarding the correction of Class III malocclusion, there is little consensus as to proper timing or methods for correcting these problems. The orthopedic approach for growth modification is usually limited to children with growth remaining subjected to non hereditary pattern. If the skeletal malocclusion is within the range of an orthodontic treatment, fixed orthodontic appliances with dentoalveolar compensation mechanism can achieve a normal occlusion. Otherwise in patients with a severe skeletal discrepancy, it will be necessary to consider a combined surgical and orthodontic approach. The purpose of this study was to describe treatment planning according to the age and to the initial diagnosis. The management of skeletal Class III malocclusion is still a challenge to orthodontists especially because of relapse due to the late growth of the mandible.

  2. Luminescence of europium (III) complexes for visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolontaeva, Olga A.; Pozharov, Mikhail V.; Korolovich, Vladimir F.; Khokhlova, Anastasia R.; Kirdyanova, Anna N.; Burmistrova, Natalia A.; Zakharova, Tamara V.; Goryacheva, Irina Y.

    2016-04-01

    With the purpose to develop bright non-toxic luminescent label for theranostic application we have studied complexation of lanthanide dipicolinates (2,6-pyridinedicarboxylates) by sodium alginate and effect of thermal exposure of synthesized micro-capsules on their luminescent properties. Synthesized micro-capsules are stable in acidic medium but dissolve at pH ~ 4 due to transformation of cationic europium dipicolinate complex to anionic. Luminescence studies have shown that emission spectra of europium(III)-alginate complexes (both chloride and dipicolinate) contain two intensive bands characteristic to Eu3+ ion (5D0 --> 7F1 (590 nm) and 5D0 --> 7F1 (612 nm)). We have also found that at 160ºC europium(III)- alginate micro-capsules decompose to black, soot-like substance, therefore, their thermal treatment must be performed in closed environment (i.e., sealed ampoules).

  3. [Role of antithrombin iii in cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Muedra, V; Barettino, D; D'Ocón, P

    2013-11-01

    Coagulation of blood is of multidisciplinary interest. Cardiac surgery produces major changes in the delicate balance between pro-and anti-coagulant serum factors. The role of antithrombin iii has been analysed after finding evidence that associated decreased levels of protein activity to postoperative morbidity and mortality. Supplementing exogenous antithrombin is considered with the aim of optimising outcomes. Its intrinsic anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties have stimulated a growing interest, and suggests new lines of research. PMID:23228672

  4. [Role of antithrombin iii in cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Muedra, V; Barettino, D; D'Ocón, P

    2013-11-01

    Coagulation of blood is of multidisciplinary interest. Cardiac surgery produces major changes in the delicate balance between pro-and anti-coagulant serum factors. The role of antithrombin iii has been analysed after finding evidence that associated decreased levels of protein activity to postoperative morbidity and mortality. Supplementing exogenous antithrombin is considered with the aim of optimising outcomes. Its intrinsic anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties have stimulated a growing interest, and suggests new lines of research.

  5. Engineering design of ARIES-III

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, D.K.; Wong, C.; Cheng, E.

    1993-07-01

    An efficient organic cooled low activation ferritic steel first wall and shield has been designed for the D-{sup 3}He power reactor ARIES-III. The design allows removal of the large surface heat load without exceeding temperature and stress design limits. The structure is expected to last for the whole reactor life. The major concerns regarding using the organic coolant in fusion reactors have been greatly alleviated.

  6. Antisites in III-V semiconductors: Density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chroneos, A.; Tahini, H. A.; Schwingenschlögl, U.; Grimes, R. W.

    2014-07-01

    Density functional based simulation, corrected for finite size effects, is used to investigate systematically the formation of antisite defects in III-V semiconductors (III = Al, Ga, and In and V = P, As, and Sb). Different charge states are modelled as a function of the Fermi level and under different growth conditions. The formation energies of group III antisites ( III V q) decrease with increasing covalent radius of the group V atom though not group III radius, whereas group V antisites ( V I I I q) show a consistent decrease in formation energies with increase in group III and group V covalent radii. In general, III V q defects dominate under III-rich conditions and V I I I q under V-rich conditions. Comparison with equivalent vacancy formation energy simulations shows that while antisite concentrations are always dominant under stoichiometric conditions, modest variation in growth or doping conditions can lead to a significantly higher concentration of vacancies.

  7. Mechanistic insights into type III restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra, Nidhanapati K; Bheemanaik, Shivakumara; Rao, Desirazu N

    2012-01-01

    Type III restriction-modification (R-M) enzymes need to interact with two separate unmethylated DNA sequences in indirectly repeated, head-to-head orientations for efficient cleavage to occur at a defined location next to only one of the two sites. However, cleavage of sites that are not in head-to-head orientation have been observed to occur under certain reaction conditions in vitro. ATP hydrolysis is required for the long-distance communication between the sites prior to cleavage. Type III R-M enzymes comprise two subunits, Res and Mod that form a homodimeric Mod2 and a heterotetrameric Res2Mod2 complex. The Mod subunit in M2 or R2M2 complex recognizes and methylates DNA while the Res subunit in R2M2 complex is responsible for ATP hydrolysis, DNA translocation and cleavage. A vast majority of biochemical studies on Type III R-M enzymes have been undertaken using two closely related enzymes, EcoP1I and EcoP15I. Divergent opinions about how the long-distance interaction between the recognition sites exist and at least three mechanistic models based on 1D- diffusion and/or 3D- DNA looping have been proposed.

  8. First heterometallic Ga(III)-Dy(III) single-molecule magnets: implication of Ga(III) in extracting Fe-Dy interaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sihuai; Mereacre, Valeriu; Anson, Christopher E; Powell, Annie K

    2016-05-31

    The compounds of the system [M4M'2(μ3-OH)2(nbdea)4(C6H5CO2)8]·MeCN, where M = Ga(III), M' = Dy(III) (), M = Fe(III), M' = Y(III) () are isostructural to the known [Fe4Dy2] compound (). Those of the system [M4M'4(μ3-OH)4(nbdea)4(m-CH3C6H4CO2)12]·nMeCN, where M = Ga(III), M' = Dy(III), n = 4 (), M = Fe(III), M' = Y(III), n = 1 () are isostructural to the [Fe4Dy4] compound (). This allows for comparisons between single ion effects of the paramagnetic ions. The structures were determined using single crystal analysis. Magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal that the Ga(III)-Dy(III) compounds and are SMMs. The energy barrier for is close to that for the known isostructural Fe4Dy2 compound (), but with a significantly increased relaxation time. PMID:27184869

  9. 1,2,4-Diazaphospholide complexes of lanthanum(iii), cerium(iii), neodymium(iii), praseodymium(iii), and samarium(iii): synthesis, X-ray structural characterization, and magnetic susceptibility studies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Minggang; Wang, Lixia; Li, Pangpang; Ma, Jianping; Zheng, Wenjun

    2016-07-01

    A few heteroleptic, charge-separated heterobimetallic, and polymeric alkali metalate complexes of 1,2,4-diazaphospholide lanthanum(iii), cerium(iii), neodymium(iii), praseodymium(iii), and samarium(iii) were simply prepared via the metathesis reaction of MCl3 (THF)m (m = 1-2) and K[3,5-R2dp] ([3,5-R2dp](-) = 3,5-di-substituent-1,2,4-diazaphospholide; R = tBu, Ph) in a varied ratio (1 : 3, 1 : 4, and 1 : 5, respectively) at room temperature in tetrahydrofuran. All the complexes were fully characterized by (1)H, (13)C{(1)H}, (31)P{(1)H}, IR, and X-ray single crystal diffraction analysis despite their paramagnetism (excluding La(iii) complexes). The structures of the complexes were found to feature varied coordination modes. The magnetic properties of several compounds were studied by magnetic susceptibility, and the complexes presented the magnetic moments close to or lower than the theoretical values for the free ions in the trivalent oxidation states (Pr(3+), Nd(3+)). PMID:27326667

  10. 1,2,4-Diazaphospholide complexes of lanthanum(iii), cerium(iii), neodymium(iii), praseodymium(iii), and samarium(iii): synthesis, X-ray structural characterization, and magnetic susceptibility studies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Minggang; Wang, Lixia; Li, Pangpang; Ma, Jianping; Zheng, Wenjun

    2016-07-01

    A few heteroleptic, charge-separated heterobimetallic, and polymeric alkali metalate complexes of 1,2,4-diazaphospholide lanthanum(iii), cerium(iii), neodymium(iii), praseodymium(iii), and samarium(iii) were simply prepared via the metathesis reaction of MCl3 (THF)m (m = 1-2) and K[3,5-R2dp] ([3,5-R2dp](-) = 3,5-di-substituent-1,2,4-diazaphospholide; R = tBu, Ph) in a varied ratio (1 : 3, 1 : 4, and 1 : 5, respectively) at room temperature in tetrahydrofuran. All the complexes were fully characterized by (1)H, (13)C{(1)H}, (31)P{(1)H}, IR, and X-ray single crystal diffraction analysis despite their paramagnetism (excluding La(iii) complexes). The structures of the complexes were found to feature varied coordination modes. The magnetic properties of several compounds were studied by magnetic susceptibility, and the complexes presented the magnetic moments close to or lower than the theoretical values for the free ions in the trivalent oxidation states (Pr(3+), Nd(3+)).

  11. 1,2,4-Diazaphospholide complexes of yttrium(iii), dysprosium(iii), erbium(iii), and europium(ii,iii): synthesis, X-ray structural characterization, and EPR analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongli; Guo, Wenzhen; Liu, Dongling; Yang, Ying; Zheng, Wenjun

    2016-01-21

    Several structurally characterized heteroleptic, charge-separated heterobimetallic, and polymeric alkali metal ate complexes of 1,2,4-diazaphospholide Y(iii), Dy(iii), Er(iii), Eu(iii), and Eu(ii) were prepared via the reaction of MCl3 and K[3,5-R2dp] in varied ratios at 200-220 °C (M = Y, Dy, Er, Eu; R = tBu, Ph). PMID:26666366

  12. Korean Cultural Influences on the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunsalus, Ae-Jung Chang; Kelly, Kevin R.

    2001-01-01

    Investigates the effect of Korean culture on the results of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III) by comparing profiles of 147 Korean and 132 American college students. Results indicate that MCMI-III personality profile differences exist between Korean and American college students. Discusses implications for mental health…

  13. 75 FR 14575 - Voting Equipment Evaluations Phase III

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-26

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Voting Equipment Evaluations Phase III AGENCY: National... Phase III of the benchmark research for voting equipment used in an election in 2008 or later and/ or... Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) will be conducting Phase III research on voting equipment...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 261 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false III Appendix III to Part 261 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Appendix III to Part 261...

  15. Experimental and Theoretical Studies on Biologically Active Lanthanide (III) Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostova, I.; Trendafilova, N.; Georgieva, I.; Rastogi, V. K.; Kiefer, W.

    2008-11-01

    The complexation ability and the binding mode of the ligand coumarin-3-carboxylic acid (HCCA) to La(III), Ce(III), Nd(III), Sm(III), Gd(III) and Dy(III) lanthanide ions (Ln(III)) are elucidated at experimental and theoretical level. The complexes were characterized using elemental analysis, DTA and TGA data as well as 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra. FTIR and Raman spectroscopic techniques as well as DFT quantum chemical calculations were used for characterization of the binding mode and the structures of lanthanide(III) complexes of HCCA. The metal—ligand binding mode is predicted through molecular modeling and energy estimation of different Ln—CCA structures using B3LYP/6-31G(d) method combined with a large quasi-relativistic effective core potential for lanthanide ion. The energies obtained predict bidentate coordination of CCA- to Ln(III) ions through the carbonylic oxygen and the carboxylic oxygen. Detailed vibrational analysis of HCCA, CCA- and Ln(III) complexes based on both calculated and experimental frequencies confirms the suggested metal—ligand binding mode. The natural bonding analysis predicts strongly ionic character of the Ln(III)-CCA bonding in the- complexes studied. With the relatively resistant tumor cell line K-562 we obtained very interesting in-vitro results which are in accordance with our previously published data concerning the activity of lanthanide(III) complexes with other coumarin derivatives.

  16. Microbial As(III) Oxidation in Water Treatment Plant Filters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic exists in two oxidation states in water - arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)]. As(III) is relatively mobile in water and difficult to remove by arsenic-removal treatment processes. Source waters that contain As(III) must add a strong oxidant such as free chlorine or p...

  17. 29 CFR 452.8 - Trusteeship provisions, title III.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trusteeship provisions, title III. 452.8 Section 452.8... AND DISCLOSURE ACT OF 1959 Other Provisions of the Act Affecting Title IV § 452.8 Trusteeship provisions, title III. Placing a labor organization under trusteeship consistent with title III, may have...

  18. 40 CFR 300.220 - Related Title III issues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PLAN Planning and Preparedness § 300.220 Related Title III issues. Other related Title III requirements are found in 40 CFR part 355. ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Related Title III issues....

  19. 49 CFR 172.440 - RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. 172.440 Section 172... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.440 RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label must be as follows: EC02MR91.034 (b) In addition to complying...

  20. 49 CFR 172.440 - RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. 172.440 Section 172... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.440 RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label must be as follows: EC02MR91.034 (b) In addition to complying...

  1. 49 CFR 172.440 - RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. 172.440 Section 172... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.440 RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label must be as follows: EC02MR91.034 (b) In addition to complying...

  2. 49 CFR 172.440 - RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. 172.440 Section 172... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.440 RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label must be as follows: EC02MR91.034 (b) In addition to complying...

  3. 49 CFR 172.440 - RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. 172.440 Section 172... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.440 RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label must be as follows: EC02MR91.034 (b) In addition to complying...

  4. WAIS-III and WMS-III performance in chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Keilp, John G; Corbera, Kathy; Slavov, Iordan; Taylor, Michael J; Sackeim, Harold A; Fallon, Brian A

    2006-01-01

    There is controversy regarding the nature and degree of intellectual and memory deficits in chronic Lyme disease. In this study, 81 participants with rigorously diagnosed chronic Lyme disease were administered the newest revisions of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III) and Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS-III), and compared to 39 nonpatients. On the WAIS-III, Lyme disease participants had poorer Full Scale and Performance IQ's. At the subtest level, differences were restricted to Information and the Processing Speed subtests. On the WMS-III, Lyme disease participants performed more poorly on Auditory Immediate, Immediate, Auditory Delayed, Auditory Recognition Delayed, and General Memory indices. Among WMS-III subtests, however, differences were restricted to Logical Memory (immediate and delayed) and Family Pictures (delayed only), a Visual Memory subtest. Discriminant analyses suggest deficits in chronic Lyme are best characterized as a combination of memory difficulty and diminished processing speed. Deficits were modest, between one-third and two-thirds of a standard deviation, consistent with earlier studies. Depression severity had a weak relationship to processing speed, but little other association to test performance. Deficits in chronic Lyme disease are consistent with a subtle neuropathological process affecting multiple performance tasks, although further work is needed to definitively rule out nonspecific illness effects.

  5. Luminescent properties of europium(III) and terbium(III) complexes with para- and ortho-ethoxybenzoic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panyushkin, V. T.; Mutuzova, M. Kh.; Shamsutdinova, M. Kh.

    2016-02-01

    The luminescent properties of europium(III) and terbium(III) complexes with para- and ortho-ethoxybenzoic acids are studied. The excitation energies of the triplet states of ligands are determined, a hypothesis is made about the efficient luminescence of europium(III) and terbium(III) complexes, the geometry of the coordination polyhedron of a europium complex is established, and the luminescence quantum yields of the complexes in solution are determined.

  6. Does As(III) interact with Fe(II), Fe(III) and organic matter through ternary complexes?

    PubMed

    Catrouillet, Charlotte; Davranche, Mélanie; Dia, Aline; Bouhnik-Le Coz, Martine; Demangeat, Edwige; Gruau, Gérard

    2016-05-15

    Up until now, only a small number of studies have been dedicated to the binding processes of As(III) with organic matter (OM) via ionic Fe(III) bridges; none was interested in Fe (II). Complexation isotherms were carried out with As(III), Fe(II) or Fe(III) and Leonardite humic acid (HA). Although PHREEQC/Model VI, implemented with OM thiol groups, reproduced the experimental datasets with Fe(III), the poor fit between the experimental and modeled Fe(II) data suggested another binding mechanism for As(III) to OM. PHREEQC/Model VI was modified to take various possible As(III)-Fe(II)-OM ternary complex conformations into account. The complexation of As(III) as a mononuclear bidentate complex to a bidentate Fe(II)-HA complex was evidenced. However, the model needed to be improved since the distribution of the bidentate sites appeared to be unrealistic with regards to the published XAS data. In the presence of Fe(III), As(III) was bound to thiol groups which are more competitive with regards to the low density of formed Fe(III)-HA complexes. Based on the new data and previously published results, we propose a general scheme describing the various As(III)-Fe-MO complexes that are able to form in Fe and OM-rich waters. PMID:26939079

  7. The role of Ce(III) in BZ oscillating reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, Paulo A.; Varela, Hamilton; Faria, Roberto B.

    2012-03-01

    Herein we present results on the oscillatory dynamics in the bromate-oxalic acid-acetone-Ce(III)/Ce(IV) system in batch and also in a CSTR. We show that Ce(III) is the necessary reactant to allow the emergence of oscillations. In batch, oscillations occur with Ce(III) and also with Ce(IV), but no induction period is observed with Ce(III). In a CSTR, no oscillations were found using a freshly prepared Ce(IV), but only when the cerium-containing solution was aged, allowing partial conversion of Ce(IV) to Ce(III) by reaction with acetone.

  8. Spectroscopic characterization of bioactive carboxyamide with trinuclear lanthanide (III) ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bibhesh K.; Prakash, Anant; Adhikari, Devjani

    2009-10-01

    Complexes of La(III), Sm(III), Eu(III) and Tb(III) with bioactive carboxyamide ligands N',N″-bis(3-caboxy-1-oxophenelenyl)2-amino-N-arylbenzamidine have been synthesized and characterized by various physico-chemical techniques. Mass spectrum explains the successive degradation of the molecular species in solution and justifies ML complexes. Vibrational spectra indicate coordination of Ln(III) with amide and carboxylate oxygen of the ligand along with nitrate ions. The magnetic moment of Sm(III) and Eu(III) complexes showed slightly higher-values which originated due to low J- J separation leading to thermal population of next higher energy J levels and susceptibility due to first order Zeeman effect. The strong luminescence emitting peaks at 587 nm for Eu(III) and 543 nm for Tb(III) can be observed, which could be attributed to the ligand have an enhanced effect to the luminescence intensity of the Eu(III) and Tb(III). The thermal behaviour of complexes shows that water molecules and nitrate ion are removed in first step followed by the removal of two molecules of nitrate ions and then decomposition of the ligand molecule in subsequent step. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were computed from the thermal data using Coats and Redferm method, which confirm first order kinetics.

  9. Approaching actinide(+III) hydration from first principles.

    PubMed

    Wiebke, J; Moritz, A; Cao, X; Dolg, M

    2007-01-28

    A systematic computational approach to An(III) hydration on a density-functional level of theory, using quasi-relativistic 5f-in-core pseudopotentials and valence-only basis sets for the An(III) subsystems, is presented. Molecular structures, binding energies, hydration energies, and Gibbs free energies of hydration have been calculated for [An(III)(OH(2))(h)](3+) (h = 7, 8, 9) and [An(III)(OH(2))(h-1) * OH(2)](3+) (h = 8, 9), using large (7s6p5d2f1g)/[6s5p4d2f1g] An(III) and cc-pVQZ O and H basis sets within the COSMO implicit solvation model. An(III) preferred primary hydration numbers are found to be 8 for all An(III) at the gradient-corrected density-functional level of theory. Second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory predicts preferred primary hydration numbers of 9 and 8 for Ac(III)-Md(III) and No(III)-Lr(III), respectively.

  10. Expression of CA III in rodent models of obesity.

    PubMed

    Stanton, L W; Ponte, P A; Coleman, R T; Snyder, M A

    1991-06-01

    To achieve a better understanding of the biochemical basis of obesity, we have undertaken comparative analyses of adipose tissue of lean and obese mice. By two-dimensional gel analysis, carbonic anhydrase-III (CA III) has been identified as a major constituent of murine adipose tissue. Quantitative comparisons of CA III protein and mRNA levels indicate that this enzyme is expressed at lower levels in adipose tissue from animals that were either genetically obese or had experimentally induced obesity compared to levels in the corresponding lean controls. This decrease in CA III expression was unique to adipose tissue, since other CA III-containing organs and tissues did not show a change when lean and obese animals were compared. Additionally, levels of CA III in adipose tissue from obese animals responded to acute changes in energy balance of the animal. These results are discussed in light of possible metabolic roles for CA III.

  11. Synthesis and Structural Studies of Gallium(III) and Iron(III) Hemicryptophane Complexes.

    PubMed

    Gosse, Isabelle; Robeyns, Koen; Bougault, Catherine; Martinez, Alexandre; Tinant, Bernard; Dutasta, Jean-Pierre

    2016-02-01

    New gallium(III) and iron(III) endohedral complexes were obtained from a hemicryptophane ligand bearing suitable binding sites for octahedral metal coordination. The solid-state structures of the free host and of the complexes were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The metal ion is linked to the hydrazone nitrogen and the phenolate oxygen atoms, yielding a distorted octahedral geometry around the encapsulated metal. The two isomorphous structures of the metal complexes reveal the exclusive formation of PΔ/MΛ enantiomeric pairs.

  12. Spectroscopic studies on unexpected complex azides of lanthanum(III) and neodymium(III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popitsch, A.; Mautner, A.; Fritzer, H. P.

    Solid azides of the types Cs 3La(N 3) 6, Cs 2Nd(N 3) 5, and Cs 4Nd(N 3) 7 can be prepared by metathetical reactions under special precautions. Electronic spectra in diffuse reflectance, infrared and Raman spectra, and magnetic susceptibilities versus temperature and field strength were measured on microcrystalline samples. The data of these new compounds are primarily discussed in view of vibrational properties of the azide ion N 3-, as ligand and in relation to first insights into the nature of the metal-nitrogen bonds within the coordination polyhedra of La(III) and Nd(III).

  13. III Astronomy School: the world of stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivielso, L.

    2015-05-01

    The Astronomy School is an activity organized by the Centro de Estudios de Física del Cosmos de Aragón. It is celebrated every year at the end of the summer or the beginning of autumn with the purpose of bringing Astronomy and Astrophysics to the population from an educational and a training point of view. Its III Edition, held in October 2013, has been financed by the Spanish Astronomical Society and was focused on stellar physics. This contribution describes the School and the results.

  14. Doubly Excited States in Be III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, T.; Bentzen, S. M.; Poulsen, O.

    1980-01-01

    The triplet spectrum of doubly excited Be III has been studied in the wavelength region of 75-5000 Å in order to test the validity of the theoretical term values reported by Lipsky et al. The beam-foil excitation technique was applied to effectively populate the doubly excited states. The identified lower-lying, doubly excited states 2p2 3P, 2pnp 3P, or 3D, and 2pnd 3P, or 3D (n = 3, 4) show that the theoretical term values should be slightly modified.

  15. The crystal structure of methane phase III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Marcus A.; Press, Werner; Nöldeke, Christian; Asmussen, Bernd; Prager, Michael; Ibberson, Richard M.

    2003-07-01

    Methane is the simplest organic molecule, and like many supposedly simple molecular materials it has a rich phase diagram. While crystal structures could be determined for two of the solid phases, that of the low temperature phase III remained unsolved. Using high-resolution neutron powder diffraction and a direct-space Monte Carlo simulated annealing approach, this fundamental structure has now finally been solved. It is orthorhombic with space group Cmca, and 16 molecules in the unit cell. The structure is closely related to that of phase II, yet is no subgroup of it.

  16. Space Processing Applications Rocket project SPAR III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, F.

    1978-01-01

    This document presented the engineering report and science payload III test report and summarized the experiment objectives, design/operational concepts, and final results of each of five scientific experiments conducted during the third Space Processing Applications Rocket (SPAR) flight flown by NASA in December 1976. The five individual SPAR experiments, covering a wide and varied range of scientific materials processing objectives, were entitled: Liquid Mixing, Interaction of Bubbles with Solidification Interfaces, Epitaxial Growth of Single Crystal Film, Containerless Processing of Beryllium, and Contact and Coalescence of Viscous Bodies.

  17. Treatment of Class III with Facemask Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pattanaik, Snigdha; Mishra, Sumita

    2016-01-01

    Class III malocclusion is one of the most difficult problems to treat in the mixed dentition. It has a multifactorial etiology involving both genetic and environmental causes. The dental and skeletal effects of maxillary protraction with a facemask are well documented in several studies. Although treatment in the late mixed or early permanent dentition can be successful, results are generally better in the deciduous or early mixed dentition. The following case shows early treatment of a young patient with severe sagittal and transverse discrepancy of the maxilla and mandible, using a facemask. PMID:26925273

  18. Recombinant human antithrombin III: rhATIII.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    GTC Biotherapeutics (formerly Genzyme Transgenics Corporation) is developing a transgenic form of antithrombin III known as recombinant human antithrombin III [rhATIII]. It is produced by inserting human DNA into the cells of goats so that the targeted protein is excreted in the milk of the female offspring. The transgenic goats have been cloned in collaboration with the Louisiana State University Agriculture Center. GTC Biotherapeutics is conducting clinical trials of rhATIII in coagulation disorders. rhATIII is believed to be both safer and more cost-effective than the currently available plasma-derived product. rhATIII is also being investigated in cancer and acute lung injury. Genzyme Transgenics Corporation, originally a subsidiary of Genzyme Corporation, changed its name to GTC Biotherapeutics in June 2002; it is no longer a subsidiary of Genzyme Corporation. GTC Biotherapeutics is seeking partners for the commercialisation of rhATIII. Restructuring of GTC Biotherapeutics to support its commercialisation programmes was announced in February 2004. Genzyme Transgenics Corporation was developing rhATIII in association with Genzyme General (Genzyme Corporation) in the ATIII LLC joint venture, but in November 2000 a letter of intent was signed for the reacquisition of the rights by Genzyme Transgenics Corporation. It was announced in February 2001 that this reacquisition was not going to be completed and that the development of rhATIII was to continue with ATIII LLC. However, in July 2001, Genzyme Transgenics Corporation reacquired all the rights in the transgenic antithrombin III programme. SMI Genzyme Ltd, a joint venture between Sumitomo Metal Industries, Japan, and Genzyme Transgenics Corporation, USA, was set up to fund development of transgenic antithrombin III in Asia. However, in October 2000, Genzyme Transgenics Corporation reacquired, from Sumitomo Metal Industries, the rights to its technology for production of medicines from milk in 18 Asian countries

  19. Have We Finally Found Pop III Stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    Elusive Population: Population III stars — the theoretical generation of extremely metal-poor stars that should have been formed in the early universe before metals existed — have been conspicuously absent in observations. But a team led by David Sobral (Institute of Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of Lisbon, and Leiden Observatory) may have changed this paradigm with their recent detection of an extremely bright galaxy in the early universe. The team's broad survey of distant galaxies using ESO's Very Large Telescope provides a glimpse of the universe as it was only 800 million years after the Big Bang. The survey uncovered several unusually bright galaxies — including the brightest galaxy ever seen at this distance, an important discovery by itself. But further scrutiny of this galaxy, named CR7, produced an even more exciting find: a bright pocket of the galaxy contained no sign of any metals. Follow-up with other telescopes confirmed this initial detection. Formation Waves: Sobral and his team postulate that we are observing this galaxy at just the right time to have caught a cluster of Population III stars — the bright, metal-free region of the galaxy — at the end of a wave of early star formation. The observations of CR7 also suggest the presence of regular stars in clumps around the metal-free pocket. These older, surrounding clusters may have formed stars first, helping to ionize a local bubble in the galaxy and allowing us to now observe the light from CR7. It was previously thought that Population III stars might only be found in small, dim galaxies, making them impossible for us to detect. But CR7 provides an interesting alternative: this galaxy is bright, and the candidate Population III stars are surrounded by clusters of normal stars. This suggests that these first-generation stars might in fact be easier to detect than was originally thought. Additional follow-up observations with other telescopes will help to confirm the

  20. Proteome of Geobacter sulfurreducens grown with Fe(III) oxide or Fe(III) citrate as the electron acceptor.

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y-H R.; Hixson, Kim K.; Aklujkar, Ma; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Lovley, Derek R.; Mester, Tunde

    2008-12-01

    e(III) oxides are the most abundant source of reducible Fe(III) by microorganisms in most soils and sediments, yet few studies on the physiology of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms during growth on Fe(III) oxide have been conducted because of the technical difficulties in working with cell growth and harvest in the presence of Fe(III) oxides. Geobacter sulfurreducens is a representative of the Geobacter species that predominate in a variety of subsurface environments in which Fe(III) oxide is important. In order to better understand the physiology of Geobacter species during growth on Fe(III) oxide, the proteome of G. sulfurreducens grown on Fe(III) oxide was compared with the proteome of cells grown with soluble Fe(III) citrate. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) revealed 19 proteins that were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). These included proteins related to protein synthesis, electron transfer and energy production, oxidative stress, protein folding, outer membrane proteins, nitrogen metabolism and hypothetical proteins. Further analysis of the proteome with the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag method revealed additional proteins associated with growth on Fe(III) oxide. These included the outer-membrane c-type cytochrome, OmcS and OmcG, which genetic studies have suggested are required for Fe(III) oxide reduction. Furthermore, several other cytochromes, as yet unstudied, were detected to be significantly up regulated during growth on Fe(III) oxide and other proteins of unknown function were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). PilA, the structural protein for pili, which is required for Fe(III) oxide reduction, and other pilin-associated proteins were also more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide. Confirmation of the differential expression of proteins known to be important in Fe(III) oxide reduction was observed, and an additional number of previously

  1. White Light Emissive Dy(III) Single-Molecule Magnets Sensitized by Diamagnetic [Co(III) (CN)6 ](3-) Linkers.

    PubMed

    Chorazy, Szymon; Rams, Michał; Nakabayashi, Koji; Sieklucka, Barbara; Ohkoshi, Shin-Ichi

    2016-05-23

    The self-assembly of Dy(III) -3-hydroxypyridine (3-OHpy) complexes with hexacyanidocobaltate(III) anions in water produces cyanido-bridged {[Dy(III) (3-OHpy)2 (H2 O)4 ] [Co(III) (CN)6 ]}⋅H2 O (1) chains. They reveal a single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior with a large zero direct current (dc) field energy barrier, ΔE=266(12) cm(-1) (≈385 K), originating from the single-ion property of eight-coordinated Dy(III) of an elongated dodecahedral geometry, which are embedded with diamagnetic [Co(III) (CN)6 ](3-) ions into zig-zag coordination chains. The SMM character is enhanced by the external dc magnetic field, which results in the ΔE of 320(23) cm(-1) (≈460 K) at Hdc =1 kOe, and the opening of a butterfly hysteresis loop below 6 K. Complex 1 exhibits white Dy(III) -based emission realized by energy transfer from Co(III) and 3-OHpy to Dy(III) . Low temperature emission spectra were correlated with SMM property giving the estimation of the zero field ΔE. 1 is a unique example of bifunctional magneto-luminescent material combining white emission and slow magnetic relaxation with a large energy barrier, both controlled by rich structural and electronic interplay between Dy(III) , 3-OHpy, and [Co(III) (CN)6 ](3-) . PMID:26990787

  2. Defining the RNA polymerase III transcriptome: Genome-wide localization of the RNA polymerase III transcription machinery in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Canella, Donatella; Praz, Viviane; Reina, Jaime H.; Cousin, Pascal; Hernandez, Nouria

    2010-01-01

    Our view of the RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcription machinery in mammalian cells arises mostly from studies of the RN5S (5S) gene, the Ad2 VAI gene, and the RNU6 (U6) gene, as paradigms for genes with type 1, 2, and 3 promoters. Recruitment of Pol III onto these genes requires prior binding of well-characterized transcription factors. Technical limitations in dealing with repeated genomic units, typically found at mammalian Pol III genes, have so far hampered genome-wide studies of the Pol III transcription machinery and transcriptome. We have localized, genome-wide, Pol III and some of its transcription factors. Our results reveal broad usage of the known Pol III transcription machinery and define a minimal Pol III transcriptome in dividing IMR90hTert fibroblasts. This transcriptome consists of some 500 actively transcribed genes including a few dozen candidate novel genes, of which we confirmed nine as Pol III transcription units by additional methods. It does not contain any of the microRNA genes previously described as transcribed by Pol III, but reveals two other microRNA genes, MIR886 (hsa-mir-886) and MIR1975 (RNY5, hY5, hsa-mir-1975), which are genuine Pol III transcription units. PMID:20413673

  3. White Light Emissive Dy(III) Single-Molecule Magnets Sensitized by Diamagnetic [Co(III) (CN)6 ](3-) Linkers.

    PubMed

    Chorazy, Szymon; Rams, Michał; Nakabayashi, Koji; Sieklucka, Barbara; Ohkoshi, Shin-Ichi

    2016-05-23

    The self-assembly of Dy(III) -3-hydroxypyridine (3-OHpy) complexes with hexacyanidocobaltate(III) anions in water produces cyanido-bridged {[Dy(III) (3-OHpy)2 (H2 O)4 ] [Co(III) (CN)6 ]}⋅H2 O (1) chains. They reveal a single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior with a large zero direct current (dc) field energy barrier, ΔE=266(12) cm(-1) (≈385 K), originating from the single-ion property of eight-coordinated Dy(III) of an elongated dodecahedral geometry, which are embedded with diamagnetic [Co(III) (CN)6 ](3-) ions into zig-zag coordination chains. The SMM character is enhanced by the external dc magnetic field, which results in the ΔE of 320(23) cm(-1) (≈460 K) at Hdc =1 kOe, and the opening of a butterfly hysteresis loop below 6 K. Complex 1 exhibits white Dy(III) -based emission realized by energy transfer from Co(III) and 3-OHpy to Dy(III) . Low temperature emission spectra were correlated with SMM property giving the estimation of the zero field ΔE. 1 is a unique example of bifunctional magneto-luminescent material combining white emission and slow magnetic relaxation with a large energy barrier, both controlled by rich structural and electronic interplay between Dy(III) , 3-OHpy, and [Co(III) (CN)6 ](3-) .

  4. Performance characteristics of postacute traumatic brain injury patients on the WAIS-III and WMS-III.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, B N; Fichtenberg, N L; Liethen, P C; Czarnota, M A; Stucky, K

    2001-12-01

    Publication of the third editions of the Wechsler intelligence and memory batteries in 1997 created a need for research identifying Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition/Wechsler Memory Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III/WMS-III) profile patterns associated with neuropathology. The WAIS-III/WMS-III Technical Manual offers data on various diagnostic groups, including traumatic brain injury (TBI). Hawkins (1998) employed Technical Manual data to propose certain diagnostic guidelines. In order to validate the conclusions put forth by Hawkins as they apply to brain injury, we examined WAIS-III and WMS-III profiles in an independent sample of 46 TBI cases. As expected, the WAIS-III Processing Speed Index (PSI) was more sensitive to brain injury than other WAIS-III composites; and specific WAIS-III scores were stronger than certain WMS-III scores. On the other hand, the predicted relationship for WMS-III auditory and visual indexes was not found. The lack of specificity for TBI of the proposed index comparisons confirms the need to validate such hypotheses in independent samples.

  5. Sources of type III solar microwave bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Dmitriy; Lesovoi, Sergey; Tokhchukova, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Microwave fine structures allow us to study plasma evolution in an energy release region. The Siberian Solar Radio Telescope (SSRT) is a unique instrument designed to examine fine structures at 5.7 GHz. A complex analysis of data from RATAN-600, 4-8 GHz spectropolarimeter, and SSRT, simultaneously with extreme UV data, made it possible to localize sources of III type microwave drift bursts in August 10, 2011 event within the entire frequency band of burst occurrences, as well as to determine the most probable region of primary energy release. To localize sources of III type bursts from RATAN-600 data, an original method for data processing has been worked out. At 5.7 GHz, the source of bursts was determined along two coordinates whereas at 4.5, 4.7, 4.9, 5.1, 5.3, 5.5 and 6.0 GHz, their locations were identified along one coordinate. The size of the burst source at 5.1 GHz was found to be maximum as compared to source sizes at other frequencies.

  6. Lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) complexes with isatin thiosemicarbazones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Anita; Sengupta, Soumitra K.; Pandey, Om P.

    2005-09-01

    Ten new lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) complexes of the general formula Na[La(L) 2H 2O] (Ln = La(III) or Pr(III); LH 2 = thiosemicarbazones) derived from the condensation of isatin with 4-phenyl thiosemicarbazide, 4-(4-chlorophenyl) thiosemicarbazide, 4-(2-nitrophenyl) thiosemicarbazide, 4-(2-bromophenyl) thiosemicarbazide and 4-(2-methylphenyl) thiosemicarbazide, have been synthesized in methanol in presence of sodium hydroxide. The XRD spectra of the complexes were monitored to verify complex formation. The complexes have also been characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, electronic absorption and fluorescence, infrared, far infrared, 1H and 13C NMR spectral studies. Thermal studies of these complexes have been carried out in the temperature range 25-800 °C using TG, DTG and DTA techniques. All these complexes decompose gradually with the formation of Ln 2O 3 as the end product. The Judd-ofelt intensity parameter, oscillator strength, transition probability, stimulated emission cross section for different transitions of Pr 3+ for 4-phenyl thiosemicarbazones have been calculated.

  7. Lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) complexes with isatin thiosemicarbazones.

    PubMed

    Rai, Anita; Sengupta, Soumitra K; Pandey, Om P

    2005-09-01

    Ten new lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) complexes of the general formula Na[La(L)2H2O] (Ln=La(III) or Pr(III); LH2=thiosemicarbazones) derived from the condensation of isatin with 4-phenyl thiosemicarbazide, 4-(4-chlorophenyl) thiosemicarbazide, 4-(2-nitrophenyl) thiosemicarbazide, 4-(2-bromophenyl) thiosemicarbazide and 4-(2-methylphenyl) thiosemicarbazide, have been synthesized in methanol in presence of sodium hydroxide. The XRD spectra of the complexes were monitored to verify complex formation. The complexes have also been characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, electronic absorption and fluorescence, infrared, far infrared, 1H and 13C NMR spectral studies. Thermal studies of these complexes have been carried out in the temperature range 25-800 degrees C using TG, DTG and DTA techniques. All these complexes decompose gradually with the formation of Ln2O3 as the end product. The Judd-ofelt intensity parameter, oscillator strength, transition probability, stimulated emission cross section for different transitions of Pr3+ for 4-phenyl thiosemicarbazones have been calculated.

  8. Electrochemistry and spectroscopy of ortho-metalated complexes of Ir(III) and Rh(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsawa, Y.; Sprouse, S.; King, K.A.; DeArmond, M.K.; Hanck, K.W.; Watts, R.J.

    1987-02-26

    The electrochemical and UV-visible spectroscopic properties of Rh(III) and Ir(III) complexes of the ortho-metalating (NC) ligands, 2-phenylpyridine (ppy) and benzo(h)quinone (bzq), have been studied. Cyclic voltammetric studies of several of the dimeric species, (M(NC)/sub 2/Cl)/sub 2/, indicate metal-centered oxidation occurs at moderate potentials. Cationic monomers of the type M(NC)/sub 2/(NN)/sup +/ where (NN) = 2,2'-bipyridine or 1,10-phenanthroline have been prepared by reaction of the chelating ligands with the parent dimers. Cyclic voltammetric studies of these monomers indicate that several reversible ligand-centered reductions are generally observed and that the chelating ligand is more easily reduced than is the ortho-metalating ligand. Spectroscopic studies of the mixed ligand monomers indicate that dual emissions from MLCT states associated with the ortho-metalating and chelating ligands occur in the Ir(III) complexes whereas a single emission from a ligand-localized excited state is observed in the Rh(III) complexes. These results are discussed in terms of electronic and nuclear coupling factors analogous to those encountered in descriptions of bimolecular energy and electron-transfer processes.

  9. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), Data Release 8

    DOE Data Explorer

    Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and SDSS-II, the SDSS-III Collaboration is working to map the Milky Way, search for extrasolar planets, and solve the mystery of dark energy. SDSS-III's first release, Data Release 8 (DR8), became available in the first half of 2012. DR8 contains all the images ever taken by the SDSS telescope. Together, these images make up the largest color image of the sky ever made. A version of the DR8 image is shown to the right. DR8 also includes measurements for nearly 500 million stars, galaxies, and quasars, and spectra for nearly two million. All of DR8's images, spectra, and measurements are available to anyone online. You can browse through sky images, look up data for individual objects, or search for objects anywhere using any criteria. SDSS-III will collect data from 2008 to 2014, using the 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. SDSS-III consists of four surveys, each focused on a different scientific theme. These four surveys are: 1) Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS); 2) SEGUE-2 (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration); 3) The APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE); and 4) The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). [Copied with edits from http://www.sdss3.org/index.php

  10. Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station (SAGE III/ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasbarre, Joseph; Walker, Richard; Cisewski, Michael; Zawodny, Joseph; Cheek, Dianne; Thornton, Brooke

    2015-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station (SAGE III/ISS) mission will extend the SAGE data record from the ideal vantage point of the International Space Station (ISS). The ISS orbital inclination is ideal for SAGE measurements providing coverage between 70 deg north and 70 deg south latitude. The SAGE data record includes an extensively validated data set including aerosol optical depth data dating to the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) experiments in 1975 and 1978 and stratospheric ozone profile data dating to the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) in 1979. These and subsequent data records, notably from the SAGE II experiment launched on the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite in 1984 and the SAGE III experiment launched on the Russian Meteor-3M satellite in 2001, have supported a robust, long-term assessment of key atmospheric constituents. These scientific measurements provide the basis for the analysis of five of the nine critical constituents (aerosols, ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), water vapor (H2O), and air density using O2) identified in the U.S. National Plan for Stratospheric Monitoring. SAGE III on ISS was originally scheduled to fly on the ISS in the same timeframe as the Meteor-3M mission, but was postponed due to delays in ISS construction. The project was re-established in 2009.

  11. Overview of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flittner, David; Pitts, Michael; Zawodny, Joe; Hill, Charles; Damadeo, Robert; Moore, Randy; Cisewski, Michael

    2012-07-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III is the fourth generation of solar occultation instruments operated by NASA, the first coming under a different acronym, to investigate the Earth's upper atmosphere. Three flight-ready SAGE III instruments were built by Ball Aerospace in the late 1990s, with one launched aboard the former Russian Avaiation and Space Agency (now known as Roskosmos) Meteor-3M (M3M) platform on 10 December 2001 (continuing until the platform lost power in 2006). Another of the original instruments was manifested for the International Space Station (ISS) in the 2004 time frame, but was delayed because of budgetary considerations. Fortunately, that SAGE III/ISS mission was restarted in 2009 with a major focus upon filling an anticipated gap in ozone and aerosol observations in the second half of this decade. This exciting mission utilizes contributions from both the Science Mission Directorate and the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the European Space Agency to enable scientific measurements that will provide the basis for the analysis of five of the nine critical constituents identified in the U.S. National Plan for Stratospheric Monitoring. A related paper by Anderson et al. discusses the. Presented here is an overview of the mission architecture, its implementation and the data that will be produced by SAGE III/ISS, including their expected accuracy and coverage. The 52-degree inclined orbit of the ISS is well-suited for solar occultation and provides near-global observations on a monthly basis with excellent coverage of low and mid-latitudes. This is similar to that of the SAGE II mission (1985-2005), whose data set has served the international atmospheric science community as a standard for stratospheric ozone and aerosol measurements. The nominal science products include vertical profiles of trace gases, such as ozone, nitrogen dioxide and water

  12. Synthesis, characterization and stability of Cr(III) and Fe(III) hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Papassiopi, N; Vaxevanidou, K; Christou, C; Karagianni, E; Antipas, G S E

    2014-01-15

    Chromium is a common contaminant of soils and aquifers and constitutes a major environmental problem. In nature, chromium usually exists in the form of two oxidation states, trivalent, Cr(III), which is relatively innocuous for biota and for the aquatic environment, and hexavalent, Cr(VI) which is toxic, carcinogenic and very soluble. Accordingly, the majority of wastewater and groundwater treatment technologies, include a stage where Cr(VI) is reduced to Cr(III), in order to remove chromium from the aqueous phase and bind the element in the form of environmentally stable solid compounds. In the absence of iron the final product is typically of the form Cr(OH)3·xH2O whereas in the presence of iron the precipitate is a mixed Fe(1-x)Crx(OH)3 phase. In this study, we report on the synthesis, characterisation and stability of mixed (Fex,Cr1-x)(OH)3 hydroxides as compared to the stability of Cr(OH)3. We established that the plain Cr(III) hydroxide, abiding to the approximate molecular formula Cr(OH)3·3H2O, was crystalline, highly soluble, i.e. unstable, with a tendency to transform into the stable amorphous hydroxide Cr(OH)3(am) phase. Mixed Fe0.75Cr0.25(OH)3 hydroxides were found to be of the ferrihydrite structure, Fe(OH)3, and we correlated their solubility to that of a solid solution formed by plain ferrihydrite and the amorphous Cr(III) hydroxide. Both our experimental results and thermodynamic calculations indicated that mixed Fe(III)-Cr(III) hydroxides are more effective enhancers of groundwater quality, in comparison to the plain amorphous or crystalline Cr(III) hydroxides, the latter found to have a solubility typically higher than 50μg/l (maximum EU permitted Cr level in drinking water), while the amorphous Cr(OH)3(am) phase was within the drinking water threshold in the range 5.7

  13. Apolipophorin III from honeybees (Apis cerana) exhibits antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo Yeon; Jin, Byung Rae

    2015-04-01

    Apolipophorin III (apoLp-III) is involved in lipid transport and innate immunity in insects. In this study, an apoLp-III protein that exhibits antibacterial activity was identified in honeybees (Apis cerana). A. cerana apoLp-III cDNA encodes a 193 amino acid sequence that shares high identity with other members of the hymenopteran insect apoLp-III family. A. cerana apoLp-III is expressed constitutively in the fat body, epidermis, and venom gland and is detected as a 23-kDa protein. A. cerana apoLp-III expression is induced in the fat body after injection with Escherichia coli, Bacillus thuringiensis, or Beauveria bassiana. However, recombinant A. cerana apoLp-III (expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells) binds directly to E. coli and B. thuringiensis but not to B. bassiana. Consistent with these findings, A. cerana apoLp-III exhibited antibacterial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. These results provide insight into the role of A. cerana apoLp-III during the innate immune response following bacterial infection.

  14. Molecular magnets based on homometallic hexanuclear lanthanide(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Das, Sourav; Hossain, Sakiat; Dey, Atanu; Biswas, Sourav; Sutter, Jean-Pascal; Chandrasekhar, Vadapalli

    2014-05-19

    The reaction of lanthanide(III) chloride salts (Gd(III), Dy(III), Tb(III), and Ho(III)) with the hetero donor chelating ligand N'-(2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)-6-(hydroxymethyl)picolinohydrazide (LH3) in the presence of triethylamine afforded the hexanuclear Ln(III) complexes [{Ln6(L)2(LH)2}(μ3-OH)4][MeOH]p[H2O]q[Cl]4·xH2O·yCH3OH (1, Ln = Gd(III), p = 4, q = 4, x = 8, y = 2; 2, Ln = Dy(III), p = 2, q = 6, x = 8, y = 4; 3, Ln = Tb(III), p = 2, q = 6, x = 10, y = 4; 4, Ln = Ho(III), p = 2, q = 6, x = 10, y = 2). X-ray diffraction studies revealed that these compounds possess a hexanuclear [Ln6(OH)4](14+) core consisting of four fused [Ln3(OH)](8+) subunits. Both static (dc) and dynamic (ac) magnetic properties of 1-4 have been studied. Single-molecule magnetic behavior has been observed in compound 2 with an effective energy barrier and relaxation time pre-exponential parameters of Δ/kB = 46.2 K and τ0 = 2.85 × 10(-7) s, respectively. PMID:24766539

  15. Synthesis of Imine-Naphthol Tripodal Ligand and Study of Its Coordination Behaviour towards Fe(III), Al(III), and Cr(III) Metal Ions

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Kirandeep

    2014-01-01

    A hexadentate Schiff base tripodal ligand is synthesized by the condensation of tris (2-aminoethyl) amine with 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde and characterized by various spectroscopic techniques like UV-VIS, IR, NMR, MASS, and elemental analysis. The solution studies by potentiometric and spectrophotometric methods are done at 25 ± 1°C, µ = 0.1 M KCl, to calculate the protonation constants of the ligand and formation constants of metal complexes formed by the ligand with Fe(III), Al(III), and Cr(III) metal ions. The affinity of the ligand towards Fe(III) is compared with deferiprone (a drug applied for iron intoxication) and transferrin (the main Fe(III) binding protein in plasma). Structural analysis of the ligand and the metal complexes was done using semiempirical PM6 method. Electronic and IR spectra are calculated by semiempirical methods and compared with experimental one. PMID:25294978

  16. Synthesis of Imine-Naphthol Tripodal Ligand and Study of Its Coordination Behaviour towards Fe(III), Al(III), and Cr(III) Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Kirandeep; Baral, Minati

    2014-01-01

    A hexadentate Schiff base tripodal ligand is synthesized by the condensation of tris (2-aminoethyl) amine with 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde and characterized by various spectroscopic techniques like UV-VIS, IR, NMR, MASS, and elemental analysis. The solution studies by potentiometric and spectrophotometric methods are done at 25 ± 1°C, µ = 0.1 M KCl, to calculate the protonation constants of the ligand and formation constants of metal complexes formed by the ligand with Fe(III), Al(III), and Cr(III) metal ions. The affinity of the ligand towards Fe(III) is compared with deferiprone (a drug applied for iron intoxication) and transferrin (the main Fe(III) binding protein in plasma). Structural analysis of the ligand and the metal complexes was done using semiempirical PM6 method. Electronic and IR spectra are calculated by semiempirical methods and compared with experimental one. PMID:25294978

  17. Synthesis of Imine-Naphthol Tripodal Ligand and Study of Its Coordination Behaviour towards Fe(III), Al(III), and Cr(III) Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Kirandeep; Baral, Minati

    2014-01-01

    A hexadentate Schiff base tripodal ligand is synthesized by the condensation of tris (2-aminoethyl) amine with 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde and characterized by various spectroscopic techniques like UV-VIS, IR, NMR, MASS, and elemental analysis. The solution studies by potentiometric and spectrophotometric methods are done at 25 ± 1°C, µ = 0.1 M KCl, to calculate the protonation constants of the ligand and formation constants of metal complexes formed by the ligand with Fe(III), Al(III), and Cr(III) metal ions. The affinity of the ligand towards Fe(III) is compared with deferiprone (a drug applied for iron intoxication) and transferrin (the main Fe(III) binding protein in plasma). Structural analysis of the ligand and the metal complexes was done using semiempirical PM6 method. Electronic and IR spectra are calculated by semiempirical methods and compared with experimental one.

  18. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart III of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III 2 Table 2 to Subpart III of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production Pt. 63, Subpt. III, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart III of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III Subpart A reference...

  19. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart III of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III 2 Table 2 to Subpart III of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production Pt. 63, Subpt. III, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart III of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III Subpart...

  20. Variation in plasmonic (electronic) spectral parameters of Pr (III) and Nd (III) with varied concentration of moderators

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Shubha; Limaye, S. N.

    2015-07-31

    It is said that the -4f shells behave as core and are least perturbed by changes around metal ion surrounding. However, there are evidences that-4f shells partially involved in direct moderator interaction. A systematic investigation on the plasmonic (electronic) spectral studies of some Rare Earths[RE(III).Mod] where, RE(III) = Pr(III),Nd(III) and Mod(moderator) = Y(III),La(III),Gd(III) and Lu(III), increased moderator concentration from 0.01 mol dm{sup −3} to 0.025 mol dm{sup −3} keeping the metal ion concentration at 0.01mol dm{sup −3} have been carried out. Variations in oscillator strengths (f), Judd-Ofelt parameters (T{sub λ}),inter-electronic repulsion Racah parameters (δE{sup k}),nephelauxetic ratio (β), radiative parameters (S{sub ED},A{sub T},β{sub R},T{sub R}). The values of oscillator strengths and Judd-Ofelt parameters have been discussed in the light of coordination number of RE(III) metal ions, denticity and basicity of the moderators. The [RE(III).Mod] bonding pattern has been studies in the light of the change in Racah parameters and nephelauxetic ratio.