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Sample records for afterglow emission properties

  1. Prompt and Afterglow Emission Properties of Gamma-Ray Bursts with Spectroscopically Identified Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaneko, Yuki; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Patel, Sandeep K.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Granot, Jonathan; Rol, Evert; Woosley, Stan; in'tZand, Jean J. M.; vanderHorst, Alexander; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Strom, Richard

    2006-01-01

    We present a detailed spectral analysis of the prompt and afterglow emission of four nearby GRBs (GRBs 980425, 030329, 031203, and 060218) that were spectroscopically found to be associated with type Ib/c supernovae. For each event, we investigated its spectral and luminosity evolution and estimated the total energy budget based on the broadband observations. We discuss the properties of the four events in comparison to general burst population, and infer the physical parameters involved in creation of these nearby GRB-SN events

  2. Emission and afterglow properties of an expanding RF plasma with nonuniform neutral gas density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplin, Vernon H.; Bellan, Paul M.

    2016-08-01

    We describe some notable aspects of the light emission and afterglow properties in pulsed, high-density ( 1018-1020 m-3 ) argon inductively coupled discharges initiated following fast gas injection. The plasma was created in a long, narrow discharge tube and then expanded downstream of the radiofrequency (RF) antenna into a large chamber. Fast camera images of the expanding plasma revealed a multi-phase time-dependent emission pattern that did not follow the ion density distribution. Dramatic differences in visible brightness were observed between discharges with and without an externally applied magnetic field. These phenomena were studied by tracking excited state populations using passive emission spectroscopy and are discussed in terms of the distinction between ionizing and recombining phase plasmas. Additionally, a method is presented for inferring the unknown neutral gas pressure in the discharge tube from the time-dependent visible and infrared emission measured by a simple photodiode placed near the antenna. In magnetized discharges created with fast gas injection, the downstream ion density rose by Δni˜1018 m-3 in the first ˜100 μs after the RF power was turned off. The conditions conducive to this afterglow density rise are investigated in detail, and the effect is tentatively attributed to pooling ionization.

  3. Prompt and Afterglow Emission Properties of Gamma-Ray Bursts with Spectroscopically Identified Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaneko, Yuki; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Granot, Jonathan; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Woosley, Stan E.; Patel, Sandeep K.; Rol, Evert; In'TZand, Jean J. M.; VanDerHorst, Alexander J.; Wuers, Ralph A. M. J.; Strom, Richard

    2007-01-01

    We present a detailed spectral analysis of the prompt and afterglow emission of four nearby long-soft gamma-ray bursts (GRBs 980425,030329,031203, and 060218) that were spectroscopically found to be associated with Type Ic supernovae and compare them to the general GRB population. For each event, we investigate the spectral and luminosity evolution and estimate the total energy budget based on broadband observations. The observational inventory for these events has become rich enough to allow estimates of their energy content in relativistic and subrelativistic form. The result is a global portrait of the effects of the physical processes responsible for producing long-soft GRBs. In particular, we find that the values of the energy released in mildly relativistic outflows appears to have a significantly smaller scatter than those found in highly relativistic ejecta. This is consistent with a picture in which the energy released inside the progenitor star is roughly standard, while the fraction of that energy that ends up in highly relativistic ejecta outside the star can vary dramatically between different events.

  4. Prompt and Afterglow Emission Properties of Gamma-Ray Bursts with Spectroscopically Identified Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Yuki; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Granot, J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Woosley, S.E.; Patel, S.K.; Rol, E.; Zand, J.J.M.in't; a; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Strom, R.; /USRA, Huntsville /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study /UC, Santa Cruz /KIPAC, Menlo Park /NASA, Marshall /Leicester U. /SRON, Utrecht /Utrecht, Astron. Inst. /Amsterdam U., Astron. Inst. /NFRA, Dwingeloo

    2006-07-12

    We present a detailed spectral analysis of the prompt and afterglow emission of four nearby long-soft gamma-ray bursts (GRBs 980425, 030329, 031203, and 060218) that were spectroscopically found to be associated with type Ic supernovae, and compare them to the general GRB population. For each event, we investigate the spectral and luminosity evolution, and estimate the total energy budget based upon broadband observations. The observational inventory for these events has become rich enough to allow estimates of their energy content in relativistic and sub-relativistic form. The result is a global portrait of the effects of the physical processes responsible for producing long-soft GRBs. In particular, we find that the values of the energy released in mildly relativistic outflows appears to have a significantly smaller scatter than those found in highly relativistic ejecta. This is consistent with a picture in which the energy released inside the progenitor star is roughly standard, while the fraction of that energy that ends up in highly relativistic ejecta outside the star can vary dramatically between different events.

  5. The ultra-long GRB 111209A. II. Prompt to afterglow and afterglow properties

    SciTech Connect

    Stratta, G.; Gendre, B.; Boër, M.; Atteia, J. L.; Coward, D. M.; Howell, E.; De Pasquale, M.; Oates, S.; Klotz, A.; Piro, L.

    2013-12-10

    The 'ultra-long' gamma-ray burst GRB 111209A at redshift z = 0.677 is the longest GRB ever observed thus far, with a rest frame prompt emission duration of ∼4 hr. In order to explain the burst exceptional longevity, a low-metallicity blue supergiant progenitor was invoked. In this article we further constrain the phenomenology and progenitor properties of this peculiar GRB by performing a multiband temporal and spectral analysis of both the prompt and the afterglow emission. We use proprietary and publicly available data from Swift, Konus WIND, XMM-Newton, and TAROT, as well as from other ground-based optical and radio telescopes. We find some peculiar properties that are possibly connected to the exceptional nature of this burst, namely: (1) an unprecedented large optical delay of 410 ± 50 s between the peak time in gamma-rays and the peak time in the optical of a marked multiwavelength flare; (2) multiwavelength prompt emission spectral modeling requires a certain amount of dust in the circumburst environment. The dust produces a rest frame visual extinction of A{sub V} = 0.3-1.5 mag, and may undergo destruction at late times; and (3) we detect the presence of a hard spectral extra power-law component at the end of the X-ray steep steep decay phase and before the start of the X-ray afterglow, which has never been revealed thus far in past GRBs. The optical afterglow shows more usual properties; it has a flux power-law decay with an index of 1.6 ± 0.1 and a late rebrightening feature observed at ∼1.1 the day after the first Burst Alert Telescope trigger. We discuss our findings in the context of several possible interpretations that have been given thus far of the complex multiband GRB phenomenology and propose a binary channel formation for the blue supergiant progenitor.

  6. Emission spectrum of a sporadic fireball afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madiedo, J.; Trigo-Rodríguez, J.

    2014-07-01

    A mag. -11 fireball was imaged over southern Spain on April 14, 2013 at 22:35:49.8 ± 0.1s UTC. Its emission spectrum was also obtained. This event was assigned the SPMN code 140413 after the recording date. By the end of its atmospheric path, it exhibited a very bright flare which resulted in a persistent train whose spectrum was recorded. Here we present a preliminary analysis of this event and focus special attention on the evolution of the main emission lines in the spectrum of the afterglow. An array of low-lux CCD video devices (models 902H and 902H Ultimate from Watec Co.) operating from our stations at Sevilla and El Arenosillo was employed to record the SPMN140413 fireball. The operation of these systems is explained in [1,2]. Some of these are configured as spectrographs by attaching holographic diffraction gratings (1000 lines/mm) to the objective lens [3]. To calculate the atmospheric trajectory, radiant, and orbit we have employed our AMALTHEA software, which follows the planes intersection method [4]. The spectrum was analyzed with our CHIMET application [5]. The parent meteoroid impacted the atmosphere with an initial velocity of 28.9 ± 0.3 km/s and the fireball began at a height of 104.4 ± 0.5 km. The event ended at 80.7 ± 0.5 km above the ground level, with the main flare taking place at 83 ± 0.5 km. The calculated radiant and orbital parameters confirm the sporadic nature of the bolide. The calibrated emission spectrum shows that the most important contributions correspond to the Na I-1 (588.9 nm) and Mg I-2 (517.2 nm) multiplets. In the ultraviolet, the contribution from the H and K lines from Ca was also identified. As usual in meteor spectra, most of the lines correspond to Fe I. The train spectrum was recorded during about 0.12 seconds. This provided the evolution with time of the intensity of the emission lines in this signal. The contributions from Mg I, Na I, Ca I, Fe I, Ca II, and O I were identified in the afterglow, with the Na I-1

  7. Phenomenology of reverse-shock emission in the optical afterglows of gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Japelj, J.; Kopač, D.; Gomboc, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Harrison, R.; Virgili, F. J.; Mundell, C. G.; Guidorzi, C.; Melandri, A. E-mail: andreja.gomboc@fmf.uni-lj.si

    2014-04-20

    We use a parent sample of 118 gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows, with known redshift and host galaxy extinction, to separate afterglows with and without signatures of dominant reverse-shock (RS) emission and to determine which physical conditions lead to a prominent reverse-shock emission. We identify 10 GRBs with reverse-shock signatures: 990123, 021004, 021211, 060908, 061126, 080319B, 081007, 090102, 090424, and 130427A. By modeling their optical afterglows with reverse- and forward-shock analytic light curves and using Monte Carlo simulations, we estimate the parameter space of the physical quantities describing the ejecta and circumburst medium. We find that physical properties cover a wide parameter space and do not seem to cluster around any preferential values. Comparing the rest-frame optical, X-ray, and high-energy properties of the larger sample of non-RS-dominated GRBs, we show that the early-time (<1 ks) optical spectral luminosity, X-ray afterglow luminosity, and γ-ray energy output of our reverse-shock dominated sample do not differ significantly from the general population at early times. However, the GRBs with dominant reverse-shock emission have fainter than average optical forward-shock emission at late times (>10 ks). We find that GRBs with an identifiable reverse-shock component show a high magnetization parameter R {sub B} = ε{sub B,r}/ε{sub B,f} ∼ 2-10{sup 4}. Our results are in agreement with the mildly magnetized baryonic jet model of GRBs.

  8. The properties of a novel green long afterglow phosphor Zn2GeO4:Mn2+, Pr3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Minhua; Wang, Yinhai; Wang, Xiansheng; Zhao, Hui; Hu, Zhengfa

    2014-01-01

    Novel Zn2GeO4:Mn2+, Pr3+ long afterglow phosphor was successfully synthesized by the high temperature solid state reaction. Long afterglow properties of the sample has been investigated in detail by measuring the X-ray diffraction (XRD), excitation spectrum, emission spectrum, afterglow spectrum, decay curve and thermoluminescence curve. The X-ray diffraction phases indicate that the co-doped Mn2+, Pr3+ have little influence on the crystal structure of Zn2GeO4. According to the emission spectra, we found that the Zn2GeO4:Mn2+, Pr3+ exhibit a narrow band emission with the peak at 532 nm, which could be ascribed to Mn2+ transition between 4T1 and 6A1 electron configurations. The green long afterglow of Zn2GeO4:Mn2+, Pr3+ could be observed for three hours by naked eyes at room temperature under 254 nm UV excitation. The thermoluminescence (TL) curve is employed for the discussion of the origin of the traps and the mechanism of the persistent luminescence. The results suggest that Zn2GeO4 may be an excellent host material for Mn2+-based long afterglow. Furthermore, the function of co-doped Pr3+ ions is confirmed as trap center, which can greatly postpone the afterglow emission properties of Mn2+.

  9. Effect of secondary emission on the argon plasma afterglow with large dust density

    SciTech Connect

    Denysenko, I. B.; Azarenkov, N. A.; Burmaka, G. P.; Stefanović, I.

    2015-02-15

    A zero-dimensional, space-averaged model for argon plasma afterglow with large dust density is developed. In the model, three groups of electrons in the plasma afterglow are assumed: (i) thermal electrons with Maxwellian distribution, (ii) energetic electrons generated by metastable-metastable collisions (metastable pooling), and (iii) secondary electrons generated at collisions of ions with the electrodes, which have sufficiently large negative voltages in the afterglow. The model calculates the time-dependencies for electron densities in plasma afterglow based on experimental decay times for metastable density and electrode bias. The effect of secondary emission on electron density in the afterglow is estimated by varying secondary emission yields. It is found that this effect is less important than metastable pooling. The case of dust-free plasma afterglow is considered also, and it is found that in the afterglow the effect of secondary emission may be more important than metastable pooling. The secondary emission may increase thermal electron density n{sub e} in dust-free and dusty plasma afterglows on a few ten percentages. The calculated time dependencies for n{sub e} in dust-free and dusty plasma afterglows describe well the experimental results.

  10. Analysis of two scenarios for the early optical emission of the gamma-ray burst afterglows 990123 and 021211

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panaitescu, A.; Kumar, P.

    2004-09-01

    The optical light curves of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows 990123 and 021211 exhibit a steep decay at 100-600 s after the burst, the decay becoming slower after about 10 min. We investigate two scenarios for the fast decaying early optical emission of these GRB afterglows. In the reverse-forward shock scenario, this emission arises in the reverse shock crossing the GRB ejecta, the mitigation of the light-curve decay occurring when the forward shock emission overtakes that from the reverse shock. Both a homogeneous and wind-like circumburst medium are considered. In the wind-bubble scenario, the steeply decaying, early optical emission arises from the forward shock interacting with a r-2 bubble, with a negligible contribution from the reverse shock, the slower decay starting when the blast wave reaches the bubble termination shock and enters a homogeneous region of the circumburst medium. We determine the shock microphysical parameters, ejecta kinetic energy and circumburst density, which accommodate the radio and optical measurements of the GRB afterglows 990123 and 021211. We find that, for a homogeneous medium, the radio and optical emissions of the afterglow 990123 can be accommodated by the reverse-forward shock scenario if the microphysical parameters behind the two shocks differ substantially. A wind-like circumburst medium also allows the reverse-forward shock scenario to account for the radio and optical properties of the afterglows 990123 and 021211, but the required wind densities are at least 10 times smaller than those of Galactic Wolf-Rayet stars. The wind-bubble scenario requires a variation of the microphysical parameters when the afterglow fireball reaches the wind termination shock, which seems a contrived feature.

  11. Synchrotron and inverse-Compton emissions from pairs formed in GRB afterglows (analytical treatment)

    SciTech Connect

    Panaitescu, A.; Vestrand, W. T.

    2014-10-01

    We calculate the synchrotron and inverse-Compton emissions from pairs formed in gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows from high-energy photons (above 100 MeV), assuming a power-law photon spectrum C {sub ν}∝ν{sup –2} and considering only the pairs generated from primary high-energy photons. The essential properties of these pairs (number, minimal energy, cooling energy, distribution with energy) and of their emission (peak flux, spectral breaks, spectral slope) are set by the observables GeV fluence Φ(t) = Ft and spectrum, and by the Lorentz factor, Γ, and magnetic field, B, of the source of high-energy photons, at observer time, t. Optical and X-ray pseudo light curves, F {sub ν}(Γ), are calculated for the given B; proper synchrotron self-Compton light curves are calculated by setting the dynamics Γ(t) of the high-energy photon source to be that of a decelerating, relativistic shock. It is found that the emission from pairs can accommodate the flux and decays of the optical flashes measured during the prompt (GRB) phase, but it decays faster than the X-ray plateaus observed during the delayed (afterglow) phase. The brightest pair optical emission is obtained for 100 < Γ < 500, and depends mostly on the GeV fluence, being independent of the source redshift. Emission from pairs formed during the GRB phase offers an alternate explanation to reverse-shock optical flashes. These two models may be distinguished based on their corresponding flux decay index-spectral slope relations, different correlations with the Large Area Telescope fluence, or through modeling of the afterglow multiwavelength data.

  12. Long afterglow properties of Zn2GeO4:Mn2+, Cr3+ phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Yan; He, Yangyang; Dong, Bin; Xiao, Yu; Wang, Limei

    2015-04-01

    Zn2GeO4:Mn2+, Cr3+ phosphors were prepared by conventional solid state reaction and the photoluminescence properties were investigated. The Mn2+ activated Zn2GeO4 phosphors exhibited green emission at 533 nm due to the 4T1(4G) → 6A1(6S) transition of Mn2+ ions. With Cr3+ co-doping in Zn2GeO4 host, long afterglow characteristics were found from the same transition of Mn2+. The TL results revealed the presence of same traps in the phosphor, and the doping of Cr3+ ions deepened the VGe traps. The native defect VGe as a hole traps is responsible for the long afterglow emission in Zn2GeO4:Mn2+, Cr3+ phosphor. The possible mechanism of this phosphor has also been discussed.

  13. GRB off-axis afterglows and the emission from the accompanying supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kathirgamaraju, Adithan; Barniol Duran, Rodolfo; Giannios, Dimitrios

    2016-09-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows are likely produced in the shock that is driven as the GRB jet interacts with the external medium. Long-duration GRBs are also associated with powerful supernovae (SNe). We consider the optical and radio afterglows of long GRBs for both blasts viewed along the jet axis (`on-axis' afterglows) and misaligned observes (`off-axis' afterglows). Comparing the optical emission from the afterglow with that of the accompanying SN, using SN 1998bw as an archetype, we find that only a few per cent of afterglows viewed off-axis are brighter than the SN. For observable optical off-axis afterglows, the viewing angle is at most twice the half-opening angle of the GRB jet. Radio off-axis afterglows should be detected with upcoming radio surveys within a few hundred Mpc. We propose that these surveys will act as `radio triggers', and that dedicated radio facilities should follow-up these sources. Follow-ups can unveil the presence of the radio SN remnant, if present. In addition, they can probe the presence of a mildly relativistic component, either associated with the GRB jet or the SN ejecta, expected in these sources.

  14. Experimental and numerical studies on Xe2* VUV emission in fast electric discharge afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Dennis; Shangguan, Cheng; Kochetov, Igor; Napartovich, Anatoly

    2002-10-01

    Optical and electrical properties of a fast ( 50 ns) high-pressure discharge in pure Xe and Xe-Ne mixtures were studied experimentally and simulated numerically. Afterglow VUV emission was revealed lasting for a few microseconds. Its duration depended on gas pressure and Xe content. Observations of VUV emission intensity across the discharge aperture demonstrated a good uniformity with sizes 4.5x 2 mm2. The length of the discharge was 42 cm. Operation of the discharge was limited in gas pressure by development of instability. The highest pressure for stable discharge run was 0.55 bar for pure Xe and 5 bar for xenon-lean mixture. A detailed kinetic model of discharge plasma was developed, which calculated self-consistently electron energy distribution function and excited states including excimer population dynamics. VUV emission dynamics observed experimentally can be explained theoretically only in a model with an essentially increased number of electronic states taken into account. Calculated discharge voltage history and VUV emission dynamics agree satisfactory with measurements.

  15. Shock-wave-induced enhancement of optical emission in nitrogen afterglow plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Siefert, N.; Ganguly, B.N.; Bletzinger, P.

    2005-12-15

    This paper reports measurements of optical emission enhancement at the shock front of Mach 1.5 to Mach 3.5 shockwaves propagating in the afterglow of a 0.75 Torr nitrogen glow discharge. Electrically-generated shocks pass through the afterglow and create noticeable enhancements of the B {sup 3}{pi}{sub g}-A {sup 3}{sigma}{sub u}{sup +} and C {sup 3}{pi}{sub u}-B {sup 3}{pi}{sub g} transitions of nitrogen. Under our discharge conditions, the electron Debye length was approximately the same magnitude as the shock thickness; this allows the possibility of a space-charge region extending beyond the neutral shockwave discontinuity. Previous researchers have measured enhancement in the B {sup 3}{pi}{sub g}-A {sup 3}{sigma}{sub u}{sup +} optical emission at the shock front, but only in the active discharge. Fibers connected to photomultipler tubes measure the optical emission from the discharge. Laser deflection measures the shock velocity. The data reveals that the emission enhancement increases with Mach number, and also indicates that the emission enhancement decreases exponentially with time in the afterglow. Since the discharge voltage has already been shut off, the energy needed to create the emission enhancement cannot come from the power supply. We conclude that under our discharge conditions there is an increase in the already non-equilibrium energy of the electrons at the shock front via a shockwave-induced strong double layer.

  16. Shock-wave-induced enhancement of optical emission in nitrogen afterglow plasma.

    PubMed

    Siefert, N; Ganguly, B N; Bletzinger, P

    2005-12-01

    This paper reports measurements of optical emission enhancement at the shock front of Mach 1.5 to Mach 3.5 shockwaves propagating in the afterglow of a 0.75 Torr nitrogen glow discharge. Electrically-generated shocks pass through the afterglow and create noticeable enhancements of the B 3Pig-A 3Sigma+u and C 3Piu-B 3Pig transitions of nitrogen. Under our discharge conditions, the electron Debye length was approximately the same magnitude as the shock thickness; this allows the possibility of a space-charge region extending beyond the neutral shockwave discontinuity. Previous researchers have measured enhancement in the B 3Pig-A 3Sigma+u optical emission at the shock front, but only in the active discharge. Fibers connected to photomultipler tubes measure the optical emission from the discharge. Laser deflection measures the shock velocity. The data reveals that the emission enhancement increases with Mach number, and also indicates that the emission enhancement decreases exponentially with time in the afterglow. Since the discharge voltage has already been shut off, the energy needed to create the emission enhancement cannot come from the power supply. We conclude that under our discharge conditions there is an increase in the already non-equilibrium energy of the electrons at the shock front via a shockwave-induced strong double layer.

  17. Prior Emission Model for X-ray Plateau Phase of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Ryo

    2009-01-01

    The two-component emission model to explain the plateau phase of the X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is proposed. One component, which is responsible for the plateau and subsequent normal decay phase of the X-ray afterglow, is the prior emission via outflow ejected from the central engine before the main burst. The other is the main outflow, which causes the prompt GRB emission and the initial steep decay phase of the X-ray afterglow. In this model, the transition from the plateau to the subsequent normal decay phase is an artifact of the choice of the zero of time. For events with distinct plateau phase, the central engine is active 103-104 s before the launch of the main outflow. According to this model, a prior emission in the X-ray and/or optical bands 103-104 s before the prompt GRB emission is possibly seen, which will be tested by near-future instruments such as Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI), WIDe-field telescope for GRB Early Timing (WIDGET), and so on.

  18. Direct and bulk-scattered forward-shock emissions: sources of X-ray afterglow diversity

    SciTech Connect

    Panaitescu, A.

    2008-05-22

    I describe the modifications to the standard forward-shock model required to account for the X-ray light-curve features discovered by Swift in the early afterglow emission and propose that a delayed, pair-enriched, and highly relativistic outflow, which bulk-scatters the forward-shock synchrotron emission, yields sometimes a brighter X-ray emission, producing short-lived X-ray flares, X-ray light-curve plateaus ending with chromatic breaks, and fast post-plateau decays.

  19. Emissive sheath measurements in the afterglow of a radio frequency plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehan, J. P. Hershkowitz, N.; Barnat, E. V.; Weatherford, B. R.; Kaganovich, I. D.

    2014-01-15

    The difference between the plasma potential and the floating potential of a highly emissive planar surface was measured in the afterglow of a radio frequency discharge. A Langmuir probe was used to measure the electron temperature and an emissive probe was used to measure the spatial distribution of the potential using the inflection point in the limit of zero emission technique. Time-resolved measurements were made using the slow-sweep method, a technique for measuring time-resolved current-voltage traces. This was the first time the inflection point in the limit of zero emission was used to make time-resolved measurements. Measurements of the potential profile of the presheath indicate that the potential penetrated approximately 50% farther into the plasma when a surface was emitting electrons. The experiments confirmed a recent kinetic theory of emissive sheaths, demonstrating that late in the afterglow as the plasma electron temperature approached the emitted electron temperature, the emissive sheath potential shrank to zero. However, the difference between the plasma potential and the floating potential of a highly emissive planar surface data appeared to be much less sensitive to the electron temperature ratio than the theory predicts.

  20. Emissive sheath measurements in the afterglow of a radio frequency plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, J. P.; Barnat, E. V.; Weatherford, B. R.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Hershkowitz, N.

    2014-01-01

    The difference between the plasma potential and the floating potential of a highly emissive planar surface was measured in the afterglow of a radio frequency discharge. A Langmuir probe was used to measure the electron temperature and an emissive probe was used to measure the spatial distribution of the potential using the inflection point in the limit of zero emission technique. Time-resolved measurements were made using the slow-sweep method, a technique for measuring time-resolved current-voltage traces. This was the first time the inflection point in the limit of zero emission was used to make time-resolved measurements. Measurements of the potential profile of the presheath indicate that the potential penetrated approximately 50% farther into the plasma when a surface was emitting electrons. The experiments confirmed a recent kinetic theory of emissive sheaths, demonstrating that late in the afterglow as the plasma electron temperature approached the emitted electron temperature, the emissive sheath potential shrank to zero. However, the difference between the plasma potential and the floating potential of a highly emissive planar surface data appeared to be much less sensitive to the electron temperature ratio than the theory predicts.

  1. Afterglows, Redshifts, and Properties of Swift Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, E.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Fox, D. B.; Soderberg, A. M.; Harrison, F. A.; Nakar, E.; Kelson, D. D.; Gladders, M. D.; Mulchaey, J. S.; Oemler, A.; Dressler, A.; Cenko, S. B.; Price, P. A.; Schmidt, B. P.; Frail, D. A.; Morrell, N.; Gonzalez, S.; Krzeminski, W.; Sari, R.; Gal-Yam, A.; Moon, D.-S.; Penprase, B. E.; Jayawardhana, R.; Scholz, A.; Rich, J.; Peterson, B. A.; Anderson, G.; McNaught, R.; Minezaki, T.; Yoshii, Y.; Cowie, L. L.; Pimbblet, K.

    2005-11-01

    We present optical, near-IR, and radio follow-up of 16 Swift bursts, including our discovery of nine afterglows and a redshift determination for three. These observations, supplemented by data from the literature, provide an afterglow recovery rate of 52% in the optical/near-IR, much higher than in previous missions (BeppoSAX, HETE-2, INTEGRAL, and IPN). The optical/near-IR afterglows of Swift events are on average 1.8 mag fainter at t=12 hr than those of previous missions. The X-ray afterglows are similarly fainter than those of pre-Swift bursts. In the radio the limiting factor is the VLA threshold, and the detection rate for Swift bursts is similar to that for past missions. The redshift distribution of pre-Swift bursts peaked at z~1, whereas the six Swift bursts with measured redshifts are distributed evenly between 0.7 and 3.2. From these results we conclude that (1) the pre-Swift distributions were biased in favor of bright events and low-redshift events, (2) the higher sensitivity and accurate positions of Swift result in a better representation of the true burst redshift and brightness distributions (which are higher and dimmer, respectively), and (3) ~10% of the bursts are optically dark, as a result of a high redshift and/or dust extinction. We remark that the apparent lack of low-redshift, low-luminosity Swift bursts and the lower event rate than prelaunch estimates (90 vs. 150 per year) are the result of a threshold that is similar to that of BATSE. In view of these inferences, afterglow observers may find it advisable to make significant changes in follow-up strategies of Swift events. The faintness of the afterglows means that large telescopes should be employed as soon as the burst is localized. Sensitive observations in RIz and near-IR bands will be needed to discriminate between a typical z~2 burst with modest extinction and a high-redshift event. Radio observations will be profitable for a small fraction (~10%) of events. Finally, we suggest that

  2. Multiwavelength Observations of GRB 110731A: GeV Emission from Onset to Afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Granot, J.; Greiner, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hughes, R. E.; Jackson, M. S.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Mészáros, P.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Nymark, T.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Romoli, C.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sanchez, D. A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Sonbas, E.; Spinelli, P.; Stamatikos, M.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Gruber, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Briggs, M. S.; Burgess, J. M.; Connaughton, V.; Foley, S.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; McBreen, S.; McGlynn, S.; Paciesas, W. S.; Pelassa, V.; Preece, R.; Rau, A.; van der Horst, A. J.; von Kienlin, A.; Kann, D. A.; Filgas, R.; Klose, S.; Krühler, T.; Fukui, A.; Sako, T.; Tristram, P. J.; Oates, S. R.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Littlejohns, O.

    2013-02-01

    We report on the multiwavelength observations of the bright, long gamma-ray burst GRB 110731A, by the Fermi and Swift observatories, and by the MOA and GROND optical telescopes. The analysis of the prompt phase reveals that GRB 110731A shares many features with bright Large Area Telescope bursts observed by Fermi during the first three years on-orbit: a light curve with short time variability across the whole energy range during the prompt phase, delayed onset of the emission above 100 MeV, extra power-law component and temporally extended high-energy emission. In addition, this is the first GRB for which simultaneous GeV, X-ray, and optical data are available over multiple epochs beginning just after the trigger time and extending for more than 800 s, allowing temporal and spectral analysis in different epochs that favor emission from the forward shock in a wind-type medium. The observed temporally extended GeV emission is most likely part of the high-energy end of the afterglow emission. Both the single-zone pair transparency constraint for the prompt signal and the spectral and temporal analysis of the forward-shock afterglow emission independently lead to an estimate of the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet Γ ~ 500-550.

  3. Gamma-ray Burst Reverse Shock Emission in Early Radio Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resmi, Lekshmi; Zhang, Bing

    2016-07-01

    Reverse shock (RS) emission from gamma-ray bursts is an important tool in investigating the nature of the ejecta from the central engine. If the magnetization of the ejecta is not high enough to suppress the RS, a strong RS emission component, usually peaking in the optical/IR band early on, would provide an important contribution to early afterglow light curve. In the radio band, synchrotron self-absorption may suppress early RS emission and also delay the RS peak time. In this paper, we calculate the self-absorbed RS emission in the radio band under different dynamical conditions. In particular, we stress that the RS radio emission is subject to self-absorption in both RSs and forward shocks (FSs). We calculate the ratio between the RS to FS flux at the RS peak time for different frequencies, which is a measure of the detectability of the RS emission component. We then constrain the range of physical parameters for a detectable RS, in particular the role of magnetization. We notice that unlike optical RS emission which is enhanced by moderate magnetization, moderately magnetized ejecta do not necessarily produce a brighter radio RS due to the self-absorption effect. For typical parameters, the RS emission component would not be detectable below 1 GHz unless the medium density is very low (e.g., n < 10-3 cm-3 for the interstellar medium and A * < 5 × 10-4 for wind). These predictions can be tested using the afterglow observations from current and upcoming radio facilities such as the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, the Low-Frequency Array, the Five Hundred Meter Aperture Spherical Telescope, and the Square Kilometer Array.

  4. PANCHROMATIC OBSERVATIONS OF THE TEXTBOOK GRB 110205A: CONSTRAINING PHYSICAL MECHANISMS OF PROMPT EMISSION AND AFTERGLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, W.; Shen, R. F.; Sakamoto, T.; Beardmore, A. P.; De Pasquale, M.; Wu, X. F.; Zhang, B.; Gorosabel, J.; Urata, Y.; Sugita, S.; Pozanenko, A.; Sahu, D. K.; Im, M.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Andreev, M.; Klunko, E. E-mail: rfshen@astro.utoronto.ca; and others

    2012-06-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of a bright, long-duration (T{sub 90} {approx} 257 s) GRB 110205A at redshift z = 2.22. The optical prompt emission was detected by Swift/UVOT, ROTSE-IIIb, and BOOTES telescopes when the gamma-ray burst (GRB) was still radiating in the {gamma}-ray band, with optical light curve showing correlation with {gamma}-ray data. Nearly 200 s of observations were obtained simultaneously from optical, X-ray, to {gamma}-ray (1 eV to 5 MeV), which makes it one of the exceptional cases to study the broadband spectral energy distribution during the prompt emission phase. In particular, we clearly identify, for the first time, an interesting two-break energy spectrum, roughly consistent with the standard synchrotron emission model in the fast cooling regime. Shortly after prompt emission ({approx}1100 s), a bright (R = 14.0) optical emission hump with very steep rise ({alpha} {approx} 5.5) was observed, which we interpret as the reverse shock (RS) emission. It is the first time that the rising phase of an RS component has been closely observed. The full optical and X-ray afterglow light curves can be interpreted within the standard reverse shock (RS) + forward shock (FS) model. In general, the high-quality prompt and afterglow data allow us to apply the standard fireball model to extract valuable information, including the radiation mechanism (synchrotron), radius of prompt emission (R{sub GRB} {approx} 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} cm), initial Lorentz factor of the outflow ({Gamma}{sub 0} {approx} 250), the composition of the ejecta (mildly magnetized), the collimation angle, and the total energy budget.

  5. Electromagnetic afterglows associated with gamma-ray emission coincident with binary black hole merger event GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Ryo; Asano, Katsuaki; Ohira, Yutaka

    2016-05-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor reported the possible detection of the gamma-ray counterpart of a binary black hole merger event, GW150914. We show that the gamma-ray emission is caused by a relativistic outflow with Lorentz factor larger than 10. Subsequently, debris outflow pushes the ambient gas to form a shock, which is responsible for the afterglow synchrotron emission. We find that the 1.4 GHz radio flux peaks at {˜ }10^5 s after the burst trigger. If the ambient matter is dense enough, with density larger than {˜ }10^{-2} cm^{-3}, then the peak radio flux is {˜ }0.1 mJy, which is detectable with radio telescopes such as the Very Large Array. The optical afterglow peaks earlier than the radio, and if the ambient matter density is larger than {˜ }0.1 cm^{-3}, the optical flux is detectable with large telescopes such as the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam. To reveal the currently unknown mechanisms of the outflow and its gamma-ray emission associated with the binary black hole merger event, follow-up electromagnetic observations of afterglows are important. Detection of the afterglow will localize the sky position of the gravitational wave and gamma-ray emissions, and it will support the physical association between them.

  6. Luminescence properties of a new green afterglow phosphor NaBaScSi2O7:Eu(2+).

    PubMed

    Li, Gen; Wang, Yuhua; Zeng, Wei; Chen, Wenbo; Han, Shaochun; Guo, Haijie; Wang, Xicheng

    2015-10-28

    A novel green afterglow phosphor NaBaScSi2O7:Eu(2+) was prepared by a solid state reaction under a reductive atmosphere. The NaBaScSi2O7:Eu(2+) phosphor shows two emission bands centered at about 424 (weak) and 502 nm (strong) due to the substitution of Eu(2+) in both Ba(+) and Na(2+) sites, and energy transfer from EuBa (424 nm) to EuNa (502 nm) was found. Both EuBa and EuNa contribute to the afterglow process while EuNa dominates. Na0.99BaScSi2O7:0.01Eu(2+) exhibits green long lasting phosphorescence, whose duration is more than 1 h. The thermoluminescence properties of NaBaScSi2O7:Eu(2+) and the relationship between thermoluminescence and thermal quenching properties were discussed in detail. This work provides a new and efficient candidate for long lasting phosphorescence materials. PMID:26391314

  7. Plastic Damping of Alfvén Waves in Magnetar Flares and Delayed Afterglow Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinyu; Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetar flares generate Alfvén waves bouncing in the closed magnetosphere with energy up to ∼ {10}46 erg. We show that on a timescale of 10 ms the waves are transmitted into the star and form a compressed packet of high energy density. This packet strongly shears the stellar crust and initiates a plastic flow, heating the crust and melting it hundreds of meters below the surface. A fraction of the deposited plastic heat is eventually conducted to the stellar surface, contributing to the surface afterglow months to years after the flare. A large fraction of heat is lost to neutrino emission or conducted into the core of the neutron star.

  8. THE PROPERTIES OF THE 2175 A EXTINCTION FEATURE DISCOVERED IN GRB AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Zafar, Tayyaba; Watson, Darach; Eliasdottir, Ardis; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Kruehler, Thomas; Leloudas, Giorgos; Schady, Patricia; Greiner, Jochen; Jakobsson, Pall; Thoene, Christina C.; Perley, Daniel A.; Morgan, Adam N.; Bloom, Joshua E-mail: darach@dark-cosmology.dk

    2012-07-01

    The unequivocal, spectroscopic detection of the 2175 A bump in extinction curves outside the Local Group is rare. To date, the properties of the bump have been examined in only two gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows (GRB 070802 and GRB 080607). In this work, we analyze in detail the detections of the 2175 Angstrom-Sign extinction bump in the optical spectra of two further GRB afterglows: GRB 080605 and 080805. We gather all available optical/near-infrared photometric, spectroscopic, and X-ray data to construct multi-epoch spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for both GRB afterglows. We fit the SEDs with the Fitzpatrick and Massa model with a single or broken power law. We also fit a sample of 38 GRB afterglows, known to prefer a Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC)-type extinction curve, with the same model. We find that the SEDs of GRB 080605 and GRB 080805 at two epochs are fit well with a single power law with a derived extinction of A{sub V} = 0.52{sup +0.13}{sub -0.16} and 0.50{sup +0.13}{sub -0.10}, and 2.1{sup +0.7}{sub -0.6} and 1.5 {+-} 0.2, respectively. While the slope of the extinction curve of GRB 080805 is not well constrained, the extinction curve of GRB 080605 has an unusual very steep far-UV rise together with the 2175 A bump. Such an extinction curve has previously been found in only a small handful of sightlines in the Milky Way. One possible explanation of such an extinction curve may be dust arising from two different regions with two separate grain populations, however we cannot distinguish the origin of the curve. We finally compare the four 2175 A bump sightlines to the larger GRB afterglow sample and to Local Group sightlines. We find that while the width and central positions of the bumps are consistent with what is observed in the Local Group, the relative strength of the detected bump (A{sub bump}) for GRB afterglows is weaker for a given A{sub V} than for almost any Local Group sightline. Such dilution of the bump strength may offer tentative

  9. Probing the Environment of Gravitational-wave Transient Sources with TeV Afterglow Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qin-Yu; Wang, Xiang-Yu

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory detected gravitational-wave (GW) transients from mergers of binary black holes (BHs). The system may also produce a wide-angle, relativistic outflow if the claimed short gamma-ray burst detected by GBM is in real association with GW150914. It was suggested that mergers of double neutron stars (or neutron star-black hole binaries), another promising source of GW transients, also produce fast, wide-angle outflows. In this paper, we calculate the high-energy gamma-ray emission arising from the blast waves driven by these wide-angle outflows. We find that TeV emission arising from the inverse-Compton process in the relativistic outflow, originating from mergers of binary BHs that are similar to those in GW150914, could be detectable by ground-based Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes such as the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) if the sources occur in a dense medium with a density of n≳ 0.3 {{cm}}-3. For neutron star–neutron star (NS–NS) and NS–BH mergers, TeV emission from the wide-angle, mildly relativistic outflow could be detected as well, if it occurs in a dense medium with n≳ 10{--}100 {{cm}}-3. Thus, TeV afterglow emission could be a useful probe of the environment of the GW transients, which could shed light on the evolution channels of the progenitors of GW transients.

  10. Probing the Environment of Gravitational-wave Transient Sources with TeV Afterglow Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qin-Yu; Wang, Xiang-Yu

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory detected gravitational-wave (GW) transients from mergers of binary black holes (BHs). The system may also produce a wide-angle, relativistic outflow if the claimed short gamma-ray burst detected by GBM is in real association with GW150914. It was suggested that mergers of double neutron stars (or neutron star-black hole binaries), another promising source of GW transients, also produce fast, wide-angle outflows. In this paper, we calculate the high-energy gamma-ray emission arising from the blast waves driven by these wide-angle outflows. We find that TeV emission arising from the inverse-Compton process in the relativistic outflow, originating from mergers of binary BHs that are similar to those in GW150914, could be detectable by ground-based Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes such as the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) if the sources occur in a dense medium with a density of n≳ 0.3 {{cm}}-3. For neutron star-neutron star (NS-NS) and NS-BH mergers, TeV emission from the wide-angle, mildly relativistic outflow could be detected as well, if it occurs in a dense medium with n≳ 10{--}100 {{cm}}-3. Thus, TeV afterglow emission could be a useful probe of the environment of the GW transients, which could shed light on the evolution channels of the progenitors of GW transients.

  11. THERMAL EMISSIONS SPANNING THE PROMPT AND THE AFTERGLOW PHASES OF THE ULTRA-LONG GRB 130925A

    SciTech Connect

    Basak, Rupal; Rao, A. R. E-mail: arrao@tifr.res.in

    2015-07-01

    GRB 130925A is an ultra-long gamma-ray burst (GRB), and it shows clear evidence for thermal emission in the soft X-ray data of the Swift/X-ray Telescope (XRT; ∼0.5 keV), lasting until the X-ray afterglow phase. Due to the long duration of the GRB, the burst could be studied in hard X-rays with high-resolution focusing detectors (NuSTAR). The blackbody temperature, as measured by the Swift/XRT, shows a decreasing trend until the late phase (Piro et al.) whereas the high-energy data reveal a significant blackbody component during the late epochs at an order of magnitude higher temperature (∼5 keV) compared to contemporaneous low energy data (Bellm et al.). We resolve this apparent contradiction by demonstrating that a model with two black bodies and a power law (2BBPL) is consistent with the data right from the late prompt emission to the afterglow phase. Both blackbodies show a similar cooling behavior up to late times. We invoke a structured jet, having a fast spine and a slower sheath layer, to identify the location of these blackbodies. Independent of the physical interpretation, we propose that the 2BBPL model is a generic feature of the prompt emission of all long GRBs, and the thermal emission found in the afterglow phase of different GRBs reflects the lingering thermal component of the prompt emission with different timescales. We strengthen this proposal by pointing out a close similarity between the spectral evolutions of this GRB and GRB 090618, a source with significant wide band data during the early afterglow phase.

  12. Luminosity Correlations for Gamma-Ray Bursts and Implications for Their Prompt and Afterglow Emission Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, J.; Kazanas, D.; Fukumura, K.

    2012-10-01

    We present the relation between the (z- and k-corrected) spectral lags, τ, for the standard Swift energy bands 50-100 keV and 100-200 keV and the peak isotropic luminosity, L iso (a relation reported first by Norris et al.), for a subset of 12 long Swift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) taken from a recent study of this relation by Ukwatta et al. The chosen GRBs are also a subset of the Dainotti et al. sample, a set of Swift GRBs of known redshift, employed in establishing a relation between the (GRB frame) luminosity, LX , of the shallow (or constant) flux portion of the typical X-Ray Telescope GRB-afterglow light curve and the (GRB frame) time of transition to the normal decay rate, T brk. We also present the LX -T brk relation using only the bursts common in the two samples. The two relations exhibit a significant degree of correlation (ρ = -0.65 for the L iso-τ and ρ = -0.88 for the LX -T brk relation) and have surprisingly similar best-fit power-law indices (-1.19 ± 0.17 for L iso-τ and -1.10 ± 0.03 for LX -T brk). Even more surprisingly, we noted that although τ and T brk represent different GRB time variables, it appears that the first relation (L iso-τ) extrapolates into the second one for timescales τ ~= T brk. This fact suggests that these two relations have a common origin, which we conjecture to be kinematic. This relation adds to the recently discovered relations between properties of the prompt and afterglow GRB phases, indicating a much more intimate relation between these two phases than hitherto considered.

  13. LUMINOSITY CORRELATIONS FOR GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THEIR PROMPT AND AFTERGLOW EMISSION MECHANISMS

    SciTech Connect

    Sultana, J.; Kazanas, D.; Fukumura, K.

    2012-10-10

    We present the relation between the (z- and k-corrected) spectral lags, {tau}, for the standard Swift energy bands 50-100 keV and 100-200 keV and the peak isotropic luminosity, L{sub iso} (a relation reported first by Norris et al.), for a subset of 12 long Swift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) taken from a recent study of this relation by Ukwatta et al. The chosen GRBs are also a subset of the Dainotti et al. sample, a set of Swift GRBs of known redshift, employed in establishing a relation between the (GRB frame) luminosity, L{sub X} , of the shallow (or constant) flux portion of the typical X-Ray Telescope GRB-afterglow light curve and the (GRB frame) time of transition to the normal decay rate, T{sub brk}. We also present the L{sub X} -T{sub brk} relation using only the bursts common in the two samples. The two relations exhibit a significant degree of correlation ({rho} = -0.65 for the L{sub iso}-{tau} and {rho} = -0.88 for the L{sub X} -T{sub brk} relation) and have surprisingly similar best-fit power-law indices (-1.19 {+-} 0.17 for L{sub iso}-{tau} and -1.10 {+-} 0.03 for L{sub X} -T{sub brk}). Even more surprisingly, we noted that although {tau} and T{sub brk} represent different GRB time variables, it appears that the first relation (L{sub iso}-{tau}) extrapolates into the second one for timescales {tau} {approx_equal} T{sub brk}. This fact suggests that these two relations have a common origin, which we conjecture to be kinematic. This relation adds to the recently discovered relations between properties of the prompt and afterglow GRB phases, indicating a much more intimate relation between these two phases than hitherto considered.

  14. A Crystalline Mesolamellar Gallium Phosphate with Zwitterionic-type Templates Exhibiting Green Afterglow Property.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui-Lin; Huang, Yu-Ting; Wang, Sue-Lein

    2016-07-18

    We synthesized a unique layer structure of gallium phosphates containing zwitterionic-type templates under mild hydrothermal reactions. The zwitterionic-type templates, formed of long-alkyl-chain diamine cations and biphenyldicarboxylate anions, resided upright between adjacent layers, propping the interlayer distance up to 2.2 nm. For the first time, the mesoscale interlayer templates were sufficiently well-ordered to afford elucidation to the atomic-level. The mesolamellar (HDADD)2(BPDC)0.5[Ga3(OH)2(HPO4)4] (1; DADD = 1,12-diaminododecane, BPDC = 4,4'-biphenyldicarboxylate) was composed of inorganic layers built up exclusively with a unique type of heptameric unit which featured an unprecedented trimeric cluster of [Ga3(OH)2O12]. Unexpectedly, compound 1 possessed an unusual green afterglow. To interpret the interesting photoluminescence (PL) property, three other low-dimensional structures related to 1 were prepared as well. The data from PL and electron paramagnetic resonance indicated that the afterglow was mainly attributed to lattice defects and the orientations of BPDC. PMID:27367262

  15. Prompt and Afterglow Emmision Properties of Gamma-ray Bursts with Spectroscopically Identified Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaneko, Yuki; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Granot, Jonathan; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Woosley, Stan E.; Patel, Sandeep K.; Rol, Evert; In'TZant, Jean J. M.; VanDerHorst, Alexander J.; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Strom, Richard

    2007-01-01

    We present a detailed spectral analysis of the prompt and afterglow emission of four nearby long-soft gamma-ray bursts (GRBs 980425,030329,031203, and 060218) that were spectroscopically found to be associated with Type IC supernovae and compare them to the general GRB population. For each event, we investigate the spectral and luminosity evolution and estimate the total energy budget based on broadband observations. The observational inventory for these events has become rich enough to allow estimates of their energy content in relativistic and subrelativistic form. The result is a global portrait of the effects of the physical processes responsible for producing long-soft GRBs. In particular, we find that the values of the energy released in mildly relativistic out8ows appears to have a sigruficantly smaller scatter than those found in highly relativistic ejecta. This is consistent with a picture in which the energy released inside the progenitor star is roughly standard, while the fracti

  16. A COMPREHENSIVE STUDY OF GAMMA-RAY BURST OPTICAL EMISSION. II. AFTERGLOW ONSET AND LATE RE-BRIGHTENING COMPONENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Enwei; Li Liang; Liang Yunfeng; Tang Qingwen; Chen Jiemin; Lu Ruijing; Lue Lianzhong; Gao He; Zhang, Bing; Lue Houjun; Wu Xuefeng; Yi Shuangxi; Dai Zigao; Zhang Jin; Wei Jianyan E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2013-09-01

    We continue our systematic statistical study of various components of gamma-ray burst (GRB) optical light curves. We decompose the early onset bump and the late re-brightening bump with empirical fits and analyze their statistical properties. Among the 146 GRBs that have well-sampled optical light curves, the onset and re-brightening bumps are observed in 38 and 26 GRBs, respectively. It is found that the typical rising and decaying slopes for both the onset and re-brightening bumps are {approx}1.5 and {approx} - 1.15, respectively. No early onset bumps in the X-ray band are detected to be associated with the optical onset bumps, while an X-ray re-brightening bump is detected for half of the re-brightening optical bumps. The peak luminosity is anti-correlated with the peak time L{sub p}{proportional_to}t{sub p}{sup -1.81{+-}0.32} for the onset bumps and L{sub p}{proportional_to}t{sub p}{sup -0.83{+-}0.17} for the re-brightening bumps. Both L{sub p} and the isotropic energy release of the onset bumps are correlated with E{sub {gamma},iso}, whereas no similar correlation is found for the re-brightening bumps. These results suggest that the afterglow onset bumps are likely due to the deceleration of the GRB fireballs. Taking the onset bumps as probes for the properties of the fireballs and their ambient medium, we find that the typical power-law index of the relativistic electrons is 2.5 and the medium density profile behaves as n{proportional_to}r {sup -1} within the framework of the synchrotron external shock models. With the medium density profile obtained from our analysis, we also confirm the correlation between the initial Lorentz factor ({Gamma}{sub 0}) and E{sub iso,{gamma}} in our previous work. The jet component that produces the re-brightening bump seems to be on-axis and independent of the prompt emission jet component. Its typical kinetic energy budget would be about one order of magnitude larger than the prompt emission component, but with a lower {Gamma

  17. NuSTAR OBSERVATIONS OF GRB 130427A ESTABLISH A SINGLE COMPONENT SYNCHROTRON AFTERGLOW ORIGIN FOR THE LATE OPTICAL TO MULTI-GEV EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Kouveliotou, C.; Racusin, J. L.; Gehrels, N.; McEnery, J. E.; Zhang, W. W.; Bellm, E.; Harrison, F. A.; Vianello, G.; Oates, S.; Fryer, C. L.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W.; Christensen, F. E.; Dermer, C. D.; Hailey, C. J.; Melandri, A.; Tagliaferri, G.; Mundell, C. G.; Stern, D. K. E-mail: granot@openu.ac.il

    2013-12-10

    GRB 130427A occurred in a relatively nearby galaxy; its prompt emission had the largest GRB fluence ever recorded. The afterglow of GRB 130427A was bright enough for the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR) to observe it in the 3-79 keV energy range long after its prompt emission (∼1.5 and 5 days). This range, where afterglow observations were previously not possible, bridges an important spectral gap. Combined with Swift, Fermi, and ground-based optical data, NuSTAR observations unambiguously establish a single afterglow spectral component from optical to multi-GeV energies a day after the event, which is almost certainly synchrotron radiation. Such an origin of the late-time Fermi/Large Area Telescope >10 GeV photons requires revisions in our understanding of collisionless relativistic shock physics.

  18. SYNCHROTRON SELF-COMPTON EMISSION AS THE ORIGIN OF THE GAMMA-RAY AFTERGLOW OBSERVED IN GRB 980923

    SciTech Connect

    Fraija, N.; Gonzalez, M. M.; Lee, W. H. E-mail: magda@astro.unam.mx

    2012-05-20

    GRB 980923 was one of the brightest bursts observed by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment. Previous studies have detected two distinct components in addition to the main prompt episode, which is well described by a Band function. The first of these is a tail with a duration of {approx_equal} 400 s, while the second is a high-energy component lasting {approx_equal} 2 s. We summarize the observations and argue for a unified model in which the tail can be understood as the early {gamma}-ray afterglow from forward shock synchrotron emission, while the high-energy component arises from synchrotron self-Compton from the reverse shock. Consistency between the main assumption of thick shell emission and agreement between the observed and computed values for fluxes, break energies, starting times, and spectral indices leads to a requirement that the ejecta must be highly magnetized.

  19. ON THE FORMATION OF Lyalpha EMISSION FROM RESONANTLY SCATTERED CONTINUUM PHOTONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURST's AFTERGLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Wen; Wu Xiangping

    2010-02-20

    The continuum spectrum of gamma-ray burst's (GRB) afterglow at Lyalpha wavelength is known to be otherwise featureless except for the existence of a pair of smooth damping wings. Resonant scattering of photons with the ambient neutral hydrogen around the GRB may alter this picture. We study the formation and evolution of the spectral imprint of these resonantly scattered photons in the context of GRB's afterglow. Based on an analytic model that includes photons that are scattered only once, as well as a complete treatment of all the scatterings using Monte Carlo simulations, we are able to calculate the spectrum and luminosity of this Lyalpha emission from a very early moment up to a late epoch. We find that the amount, the motion, and the geometry of the neutral hydrogen around the GRB, together with the time behavior of the source are the crucial factors that affect the predicted luminosity and spectral profile. The flux of the Lyalpha emission is found to be mainly contributed by photons that are scattered only once. The flux is of the order 10{sup -4}-10{sup -9} relative to the undecayed maximum flux of the transmitted continuum, making the feature negligible but potentially observable. If not obscured by the host galaxy's damped Lyalpha absorption systems or intergalactic neutral hydrogen, the feature may appear sometime from 1 hr to several years when the directly transmitted light has faded away. This scattered emission feature can be distinguished from Lyalpha photons of other origins by its luminosity evolution and by its gradual narrowing of profile with time. The typical timescale for spectral variance is that of the light crossing time of a hydrogen clump close to the GRB. If observed, the resonant peaks' time-dependent behavior is a scanning probe on the distribution of neutral hydrogen in GRB's immediate neighborhood.

  20. THERMAL EMISSION IN THE EARLY X-RAY AFTERGLOWS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS: FOLLOWING THE PROMPT PHASE TO LATE TIMES

    SciTech Connect

    Friis, Mette; Watson, Darach E-mail: darach@dark-cosmology.dk

    2013-07-01

    Thermal radiation, peaking in soft X-rays, has now been detected in a handful of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows and has to date been interpreted as shock break-out of the GRB's progenitor star. We present a search for thermal emission in the early X-ray afterglows of a sample of Swift bursts selected by their brightness in X-rays at early times. We identify a clear thermal component in eight GRBs and track the evolution. We show that at least some of the emission must come from highly relativistic material since two show an apparent super-luminal expansion of the thermal component. Furthermore, we determine very large luminosities and high temperatures for many of the components-too high to originate in a supernova shock break-out. Instead, we suggest that the component may be modeled as late photospheric emission from the jet, linking it to the apparently thermal component observed in the prompt emission of some GRBs at gamma-ray and hard X-ray energies. By comparing the parameters from the prompt emission and the early afterglow emission, we find that the results are compatible with the interpretation that we are observing the prompt quasi-thermal emission component in soft X-rays at a later point in its evolution.

  1. Panchromatic Observations of the Textbook GRB 110205A: Constraining Physical Mechanisms of Prompt Emission and Afterglow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, W.; Shen, R. F.; Sakamoto, T.; Beardmore, A. P.; De Pasquale, M.; Wu, X. F.; Gorosabel, J.; Urata, Y.; Sugita, S.; Zhang, B.; Pozanenko, A.; Nissinen, M.; Sahu, D. K.; Im, M.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Andreev, M.; Klunko, E.; Volnova, A.; Akerlof, C. W.; Anto, P.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Breeveld, A.; Carsenty, U.; Gehrels, N.; Sonbas, E.

    2011-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of a bright, long duration (T(sub 90) approx. 257 s) GRB 110205A at redshift z = 2.22. The optical prompt emission was detected by Swift/UVOT, ROTSE-IIIb and BOOTES telescopes when the GRB was still radiating in the gamma-ray band. Thanks to its long duration, nearly 200 s of observations were obtained simultaneously from optical, X-ray to gamma-ray (1 eV - 5 MeV), which makes it one of the exceptional cases to study the broadband spectral energy distribution across 6 orders of magnitude in energy during the prompt emission phase. In particular, by fitting the time resolved prompt spectra, we clearly identify, for the first time, an interesting two-break energy spectrum, roughly consistent with the standard GRB synchrotron emission model in the fast cooling regime. Although the prompt optical emission is brighter than the extrapolation of the best fit X/ -ray spectra, it traces the -ray light curve shape, suggesting a relation to the prompt high energy emission. The synchrotron + synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) scenario is disfavored by the data, but the models invoking a pair of internal shocks or having two emission regions can interpret the data well. Shortly after prompt emission (approx. 1100 s), a bright (R = 14.0) optical emission hump with very steep rise ( alpha approx. 5.5) was observed which we interpret as the emission from the reverse shock. It is the first time that the rising phase of a reverse shock component has been closely observed.

  2. Short GRB Prompt and Afterglow Correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2007-01-01

    The Swift data set on short GRBs has now grown large enough to study correlations of key parameters. The goal is to compare long and short bursts to better understand similarities and differences in the burst origins. In this study we consider the both prompt and afterglow fluxes. It is found that the optical, X-ray and gamma-ray emissions are linearly correlated - stronger bursts tend to have brighter afterglows, and bursts with brighter X-ray afterglow tend to have brighter optical afterglow. Both the prompt and afterglow fluxes are, on average, lower for short bursts than for long. Although there are short GRBs with undetected optical emission, there is no evidence for "dark" short bursts with anomalously low opt/X ratios. The weakest short bursts have a low X-ray/gamma-ray ratio.

  3. Detailed afterglow modelling and host galaxy properties of the dark GRB 111215A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Horst, A. J.; Levan, A. J.; Pooley, G. G.; Wiersema, K.; Krühler, T.; Perley, D. A.; Starling, R. L. C.; Curran, P. A.; Tanvir, N. R.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Strom, R. G.; Kouveliotou, C.; Hartoog, O. E.; Xu, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Jakobsson, P.

    2015-02-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) 111215A was bright at X-ray and radio frequencies, but not detected in the optical or near-infrared (nIR) down to deep limits. We have observed the GRB afterglow with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and Arcminute Microkelvin Imager at radio frequencies, with the William Herschel Telescope and Nordic Optical Telescope in the nIR/optical, and with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We have combined our data with the Swift X-Ray Telescope monitoring, and radio and millimetre observations from the literature to perform broad-band modelling, and determined the macro- and microphysical parameters of the GRB blast wave. By combining the broad-band modelling results with our nIR upper limits we have put constraints on the extinction in the host galaxy. This is consistent with the optical extinction we have derived from the excess X-ray absorption, and higher than in other dark bursts for which similar modelling work has been performed. We also present deep imaging of the host galaxy with the Keck I telescope, Spitzer Space Telescope, and Hubble Space Telescope (HST), which resulted in a well-constrained photometric redshift, giving credence to the tentative spectroscopic redshift we obtained with the Keck II telescope, and estimates for the stellar mass and star formation rate of the host. Finally, our high-resolution HST images of the host galaxy show that the GRB afterglow position is offset from the brightest regions of the host galaxy, in contrast to studies of optically bright GRBs.

  4. GRB050525A : Multiband modelling of the afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resmi, Lekshmi; Misra, Kuntal; Castro-Tirado, Alberto

    2011-08-01

    The Swift era has posed a challenge to the standard blast-wave model of Gamma Ray Burst afterglows. The achromatic steepening of the afterglow lightcurves (`jet break') considered in the model as the signature of outflow collimation, has become almost rare. Several afterglows exhibited complex lightcurves that did not confirm by the predicted spectral--temporal `closure relations' of the blastwave model. Here we present optical observations and broadband modelling of the afterglow of GRB0505025A, a bright burst detected and followed up by Swift. We find that the overall evolution of the afterglow can not be explained by a single forward shock emission, though the late time evolution is compatible with the predictions of the standard afterglow model, including a jet break. We explain the afterglow evolution based on a two-component jet model and estimate the physical parameters.

  5. GLAST Prospects for Swift-Era Afterglows

    SciTech Connect

    Gou, L.J.; Meszaros, P.; /Penn State U.

    2011-11-23

    We calculate the GeV spectra of gamma-ray burst afterglows produced by inverse Compton scattering of these objects sub-MeV emission. We improve on earlier treatments by using refined afterglow parameters and new model developments motivated by recent Swift observations. We present time-dependent GeV spectra for standard, constant-parameter models, as well as for models with energy injection and with time-varying parameters, for a range of burst parameters. We evaluate the limiting redshift to which such afterglows can be detected by the GLAST Large Area Telescope, as well as by AGILE.

  6. Observational Signatures of High-Energy Emission during the Shallow Decay Phase of Gamma-Ray Burst X-Ray Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y. W.; Liu, X. W.; Dai, Z. G.

    2007-12-01

    The widely existing shallow decay phase of the X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is generally accepted to be due to long-lasting energy injection. The outflows carrying the injecting energy, based on the component that is dominant in energy, fall into two possible types: baryon-dominated and lepton-dominated ones. The former type of outflow could be ejecta that is ejected during the prompt phase of a GRB and consists of a series of baryonic shells with a distribution of Lorentz factors, and the latter type could be an electron-positron pair wind that is driven by the postburst central engine. We here provide a unified description for the dynamics of fireballs based on these two types of energy injection and calculate the corresponding high-energy photon emission by considering synchrotron radiation and inverse Compton scattering (including synchrotron self-Compton and combined inverse Compton) of electrons. We find that, in the two energy-injection models, there is a plateau (even a hump) in high-energy light curves during the X-ray shallow decay phase. In particular, a considerable fraction of the injecting energy in the lepton-dominated model can be shared by the long-lasting reverse shock since it is relativistic. Furthermore, almost all of the energy of the reverse shock is carried by leptons, and thus, the inverse Compton emission is enhanced dramatically. Therefore, this model predicts more significant high-energy afterglow emission than the baryon-dominated model. We argue that these observational signatures would be used to discriminate between different energy-injection models in the upcoming Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) era.

  7. The late X-ray afterglow of gamma-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Willingale, Richard; O'Brien, Paul T

    2007-05-15

    We have developed a functional fit which can be used to represent the entire temporal decay of the X-ray afterglow of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The fit delineates and parameterizes well-defined phases for the decay: the prompt emission; an initial steep decay; a shallow plateau phase; and finally, a powerlaw afterglow. For 20% of GRBs, the plateau phase is weak, or not seen, and the initial powerlaw decay becomes the final afterglow.We compare the temporal decay parameters and X-ray spectral indices for 107 GRBs discovered by Swift with the expectations of the standard fireball model including a search for possible jet breaks. For approximately 50% of GRBs, the observed afterglow is in accord with the model, but for the rest the temporal and spectral properties are not as expected. We identify a few possible jet breaks, but there are many examples where such breaks are predicted but are absent. We also find that the start time of the final afterglow decay, Ta, is associated with the peak of the prompt gamma-ray emission spectrum, Epeak, just as optical jet-break times, tj, are associated with Epeak in the Ghirlanda relation.

  8. Physical Processes Shaping Gamma-Ray Burst X-Ray Afterglow Light Curves: Theoretical Implications from the Swift X-Ray Telescope Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bing; Fan, Y. Z.; Dyks, Jaroslaw; Kobayashi, Shiho; Mészáros, Peter; Burrows, David N.; Nousek, John A.; Gehrels, Neil

    2006-05-01

    With the successful launch of the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer, a rich trove of early X-ray afterglow data has been collected by its onboard X-Ray Telescope (XRT). Some interesting features are emerging, including a distinct rapidly decaying component preceding the conventional afterglow component in many sources, a shallow decay component before the more ``normal'' decay component observed in a good fraction of GRBs, and X-ray flares in nearly half of the afterglows. In this paper we systematically analyze the possible physical processes that shape the properties of the early X-ray afterglow light curves and use the data to constrain various models. We suggest that the steep decay component is consistent with the tail emission of the prompt gamma-ray bursts and/or the X-ray flares. This provides strong evidence that the prompt emission and afterglow emission are likely two distinct components, supporting the internal origin of the GRB prompt emission. The shallow decay segment observed in a group of GRBs suggests that very likely the forward shock keeps being refreshed for some time. This might be caused by either a long-lived central engine, or a wide distribution of the shell Lorentz factors, or else possibly the deceleration of a Poynting flux-dominated flow. X-ray flares suggest that the GRB central engine is very likely still active after the prompt gamma-ray emission is over, but with a reduced activity at later times. In some cases, the central engine activity even extends to days after the burst triggers. Analyses of early X-ray afterglow data reveal that GRBs are indeed highly relativistic events and that early afterglow data of many bursts, starting from the beginning of the XRT observations, are consistent with the afterglow emission from an ISM environment.

  9. Observation on long afterglow of Tb{sup 3+} in CaWO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Haoyi; Hu, Yihua; Kang, Fengwen; Chen, Li; Wang, Xiaojuan; Ju, Guifang; Mu, Zhongfei

    2011-12-15

    Graphical abstract: The afterglow of Tb{sup 3+} is observed in CaWO{sub 4} matrix. The main emission of the afterglow is ascribed to the {sup 5}D{sub 4} {yields} {sup 7}F{sub 5} and {sup 5}D{sub 4} {yields} {sup 7}F{sub 6}. Emission due to {sup 5}D{sub 3} {yields} {sup 7}F{sub 4} and {sup 5}D{sub 3} {yields} {sup 7}F{sub 5} is weak. The cross-relaxation dominate the afterglow emission and it enhances the transition from {sup 5}D{sub 4} whereas from {sup 5}D{sub 3}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A green long afterglow is observed from Tb{sup 3+} in CaWO{sub 4} matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two traps which may have a strong influence on the afterglow properties are revealed by TL. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A mechanism model based on energy transfer from WO{sub 4}{sup 2-} group to Tb{sup 3+} followed by cross-relaxation is proposed. -- Abstract: The Tb{sup 3+} doped CaWO{sub 4} phosphors are synthesized via high temperature solid state reaction. The X-ray diffraction shows that small amount of Tb{sup 3+} does not have a significant influence on the structure of CaWO{sub 4}. A broad absorption band of the WO{sub 4}{sup 2-} group is observed from photoluminescence and the energy transfer from WO{sub 4}{sup 2-} group to Tb{sup 3+} ions induces the f-f transition. The cross-relaxation between two adjacent Tb{sup 3+} ions weakens {sup 5}D{sub 3}-{sup 7}F{sub j} transitions and enhances the {sup 5}D{sub 4}-{sup 7}F{sub j} transitions, leading to a green long afterglow of the phosphors. The thermoluminescence curves centered around 75 Degree-Sign C reveal the trap depth for afterglow generation is about 0.74-0.77 eV. The optimum Tb{sup 3+} concentration for afterglow properties is about 1%. A deep hole trap is induced when Tb{sup 3+} concentration exceeds 1% and it suppresses the thermoluminescence and the decay properties.

  10. Afterglow Complex Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Samarian, A. A.; Boufendi, L.; Mikikian, M.

    2008-09-07

    The review of the first detailed experimental and theoretical studies of complex plasma in RF discharge afterglow is presented. The studies have been done in a frame of FAST collaborative research project between Complex Plasma Laboratory of the University of Sydney and the GREMI laboratory of Universite d'Orleans. We examined the existing models of plasma decay, presents experimental observations of dust dynamics under different afterglow complex plasma conditions, presents the experimental data obtained (in particular the presence of positively charged particles in discharge afterglow), discusses the use of dust particles as a probe to study the diffusion losses in afterglow plasmas.

  11. IN SEARCH OF PROGENITORS FOR SUPERNOVALESS GAMMA-RAY BURSTS 060505 AND 060614: RE-EXAMINATION OF THEIR AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Sollerman, J.; Watson, D.; Hjorth, J.; Starling, R. L. C.; O'Brien, P. T.; Yost, S.; Foley, S.

    2009-05-01

    GRB 060505 and GRB 060614 are nearby long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) without accompanying supernovae (SNe) down to very strict limits. They thereby challenge the conventional LGRB-SN connection and naturally give rise to the question: are there other peculiar features in their afterglows which would help shed light on their progenitors? To answer this question, we combine new observational data with published data and investigate the multiband temporal and spectral properties of the two afterglows. We find that both afterglows can be well interpreted within the framework of the jetted standard external shock wave model, and that the afterglow parameters for both bursts fall well within the range observed for other LGRBs. Hence, from the properties of the afterglows there is nothing to suggest that these bursts should have another progenitor than other LGRBs. Recently, Swift-discovered GRB 080503 also has the spike + tail structure during its prompt {gamma}-ray emission seemingly similar to GRB 060614. We analyze the prompt emission of this burst and find that this GRB is actually a hard-spike + hard-tail burst with a spectral lag of 0.8 {+-} 0.4 s during its tail emission. Thus, the properties of the prompt emission of GRB 060614 and GRB 080503 are clearly different, motivating further thinking of GRB classification (and even identification of faint core-collapse SNe). Finally, we note that, whereas the progenitor of the two SN-less bursts remains uncertain, the core-collapse origin for the SN-less bursts would be quite certain if a windlike environment can be observationally established, e.g., from an optical decay faster than the X-ray decay in the afterglow's slow cooling phase.

  12. Simulation and physical model based gamma-ray burst afterglow analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eerten, H. J.

    2015-09-01

    Advances in our numerical and theoretical understanding of gamma-ray burst afterglow processes allow us to construct models capable of dealing with complex relativistic jet dynamics and non-thermal emission, that can be compared directly to data from instruments such as Swift. Because afterglow blast waves and power law spectra are intrinsically scale-invariant under changes of explosion energy and medium density, templates can be generated from large-scale hydrodynamics simulations. This allows for iterative template-based model fitting using the physical model parameters (quantifying the properties of the burster, emission and observer) directly as fit variables. Here I review how such an approach to afterglow analysis works in practice, paying special attention to the underlying model assumptions, possibilities, caveats and limitations of this type of analysis. Because some model parameters can be degenerate in certain regions of parameter space, or unconstrained if data in a limited number of a bands is available, a Bayesian approach is a natural fit. The main features of the standard afterglow model are reviewed in detail.

  13. Hydrothermal synthesis and afterglow luminescence properties of hollow SnO{sub 2}:Sm{sup 3+},Zr{sup 4+} spheres for potential application in drug delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Pengfei; Zhang, Jiachi Qin, Qingsong; Hu, Rui; Wang, Yuhua

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • We designed a novel afterglow labeling material SnO{sub 2}:Sm{sup 3+},Zr{sup 4+} for the first time. • Hollow SnO{sub 2}:Sm{sup 3+},Zr{sup 4+} spheres with afterglow were prepared by hydrothermal method. • Hollow SnO{sub 2}:Sm{sup 3+},Zr{sup 4+} is a potential afterglow labeling medium for drug delivery. - Abstract: A novel afterglow labeling material SnO{sub 2}:Sm{sup 3+},Zr{sup 4+} with hollow sphere shape and intense afterglow luminescence is prepared by hydrothermal method at 180 °C for the first time. The morphology and the sphere growth process of this material are investigated by scanning electron microscopy in detail. The afterglow measurement shows that this hydrothermal obtained material exhibits obvious red afterglow luminescence (550–700 nm) of Sm{sup 3+} which can last for 542 s (0.32 mcd/m{sup 2}). The depth of traps in this hydrothermal obtained material is calculated to be as shallow as 0.58 eV. The results demonstrate that although it is necessary to further improve the afterglow performance of the hydrothermal derived hollow SnO{sub 2}:Sm{sup 3+},Zr{sup 4+} spheres, it still can be regarded as a potential afterglow labeling medium for drug delivery.

  14. Afterglow Population Studies from Swift Follow-Up Observations of Fermi LAT GRBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racusin, Judith L.; Oates, S. R.; McEnery, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Troja, E.; Gehrels, N.

    2010-01-01

    The small population of Fermi LAT detected GRBs discovered over the last year has been providing interesting and unexpected clues into GRB prompt and afterglow emission mechanisms. Over the last 5 years, it has been Swift that has provided the robust data set of UV/optical and X-ray afterglow observations that opened many windows into other components of GRB emission structure. We explore the new ability to utilize both of these observatories to study the same GRBs over 10 orders of magnitude in energy, although not always concurrently. Almost all LAT GRBs that have been followed-up by Swift within 1-day have been clearly detected and carefully observed. We will present the context of the lower-energy afterglows of this special subset of GRBs that has > 100 MeV emission compared to the hundreds in the Swift database that may or may not have been observed by LAT, and theorize upon the relationship between these properties and the origin of the high energy gamma-ray emission.

  15. MULTI-WAVELENGTH AFTERGLOWS OF FAST RADIO BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Shuang-Xi; Gao, He; Zhang, Bing

    2014-09-01

    The physical origin of fast radio bursts (FRBs) is unknown. Detecting electromagnetic counterparts to FRBs in other wavelengths is essential to measure their distances and to determine their physical origin. Assuming that at least some of them are of cosmological origin, we calculate their afterglow light curves in multiple wavelengths (X-rays, optical, and radio) by assuming a range of total kinetic energies and redshifts. We focus on forward shock emission, but also consider the possibility that some of the FRBs might have bright reverse shock emission. In general, FRB afterglows are too faint to be detected by current detectors. Only if an FRB has a very low radiative efficiency in radio (hence, a very large kinetic energy), and when it is close enough to observe can its afterglow be detected in the optical and radio bands. We discuss observational strategies for detecting these faint afterglows using future telescopes such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and Expanded Very Large Array.

  16. Comparison of Three Afterglow Morphologies

    SciTech Connect

    Salmonson, J D; Rossi, E; Lazzati, D

    2003-12-23

    Herein we compare three functional families for afterglow morphologies: the homogeneous afterglow with constant shock surface energy density, the structured afterglow for which the energy density decays as a power-law as a function of viewer angle, and the gaussian afterglow which has an exponential decay of energy density with viewer angle. We simulate observed lightcurves and polarization curves for each as seen from a variety of observer vantage points. We find that the homogeneous jet is likely inconsistent with observations and suggest that the future debate on the structure of afterglow jets will be between the other two candidates.

  17. Fermi and Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Population Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racusin, J. L.; Oates, S. R.; Schady, P.; Burrows, D. N.; de Pasquale, M.; Donato, D.; Gehrels, N.; Koch, S.; McEnery, J.; Piran, T.; Roming, P.; Sakamoto, T.; Swenson, C.; Virgili, F.; Wanderman, D.; Zhang, B.

    2011-01-01

    The new and extreme population of GRBs detected by Fermi-LAT shows several new features in high energy gamma-rays that are providing interesting and unexpected clues into GRB prompt and afterglow emission mechanisms. Over the last 6 years, it has been Swift that has provided the robust data set of UV/optical and X-ray afterglow observations that opened many windows into components of GRB emission structure. The relationship between the LAT GRBs and the well studied, fainter, less energetic GRBs detected by Swift-BAT is only beginning to be explored by multiwavelength studies. We explore the large sample of GRBs detected by BAT only, BAT and Fermi-GBM, and GBM and LAT, focusing on these samples separately in order to search for statistically significant differences between the populations, using only those GRBs with measured redshifts in order to physically characterize these objects. We disentangle which differences are instrumental selection effects versus intrinsic properties, in order to better understand the nature of the special characteristics of the LAT bursts.

  18. Fermi and Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Population Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racusin, Judith I.

    2011-01-01

    The new and extreme population of GRBs detected by Fermi-LAT shows several new features in high energy gamma-rays that are providing interesting and unexpected clues into GRB prompt and afterglow emission mechanisms. Over the last 6 years, it has been Swift that has provided the robust data set of UV/optical and X-ray afterglow observations that opened many windows into components of GRB emission structure. The relationship between the LAT GRBs and the well studied, fainter, less energetic GRBs detected by Swift-BAT is only beginning to be explored by multi-wavelength studies. We explore the large sample of GRBs detected by BAT only, BAT and Fermi-GBM, and GBM and LAT, focusing on these samples separately in order to search for statistically significant differences between the populations, using only those GRBs with measured redshifts in order to physically characterize these objects. We disentangle which differences are instrumental selection effects versus intrinsic properties, in order to better understand the nature of the special characteristics of the LAT bursts.

  19. Fermi and Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Population Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racusin, Judith L.; Oates, S. R.; Schady, P.; Burrows, D. N.; dePasquale, M.; Donato, D.; Gehrels, N.; Koch, S.; McEnery, J.; Piran, T.; Roming, P.; Sakamoto, T.; Swenson, C.; Troja, E.; Vasileiou, V.; Virgili, F.; Wanderman, D.; Zhang, B.

    2011-01-01

    The new and extreme population of GRBs detected by Fermi -LAT shows several new features in high energy gamma-rays that are providing interesting and unexpected clues into GRB prompt and afterglow emission mechanisms. Over the last 6 years, it has been Swift that has provided the robust dataset of UV/optical and X-ray afterglow observations that opened many windows into components of GRB emission structure. The relationship between the LAT detected GRBs and the well studied, fainter, less energetic GRBs detected by Swift -BAT is only beginning to be explored by multi-wavelength studies. We explore the large sample of GRBs detected by BAT only, BAT and Fermi -GBM, and GBM and LAT, focusing on these samples separately in order to search for statistically significant differences between the populations, using only those GRBs with measured redshifts in order to physically characterize these objects. We disentangle which differences are instrumental selection effects versus intrinsic properties, in order to better understand the nature of the special characteristics of the LAT bursts.

  20. The air afterglow revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, F.

    1972-01-01

    The air afterglow, 0 + NO2 chemiluminescence, is discussed in terms of fluorescence, photodissociation, and quantum theoretical calculations of NO2. The experimental results presented include pressure dependence, M-dependence, spectral dependence of P and M, temperature dependence, and infrared measurements. The NO2 energy transfer model is also discussed.

  1. Investigation on luminescence enhancement and decay characteristics of long afterglow nanophosphors for dark-vision display applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swati, G.; Chawla, S.; Mishra, S.; Rajesh, B.; Vijayan, N.; Sivaiah, B.; Dhar, A.; Haranath, D.

    2015-04-01

    Long afterglow SrAl2O4:Eu2+,Dy3+ nanophosphors were synthesized via a facile but effectual auto-combustion technique followed by post-annealing treatment at elevated temperatures. The influence of various fuels during synthesis and thereafter improvement in the luminescence decay characteristics under various illuminant irradiations of long afterglow nanophosphors have been reported. Extensive studies on structural, morphological and luminescent properties of the as-synthesized afterglow nanophosphors have been presented. Powder X-ray diffraction studies confirm the presence of high-purity, single-phase monoclinic nanophosphors. HRTEM investigations confirm the formation of nanophosphors of particle size less than 50 nm. Photoluminescence emission is attributed to the characteristic d-f transition (4f65d1→4f7) of Eu2+ ions and was positioned at 512 nm. As-synthesized nanophosphors exhibit considerable confinement effects resulting into blue shift in emission maxima as compared to their bulk counterparts. The mechanism underlined for long afterglow has been discussed using trapping-detrapping model. The nanophosphor being multifunctional finds many interesting applications including dark-vision display, energy storage, fingerprint detection, in vivo and in vitro biological staining, etc.

  2. Emission properties of explosive field emission cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Amitava; Patel, Ankur; Menon, Rakhee; Sharma, Archana; Chakravarthy, D. P.; Patil, D. S.

    2011-10-15

    The research results of the explosive field emission cathode plasma expansion velocity and the initial emission area in the planar diode configuration with cathodes made of graphite, stainless steel, polymer velvet, carbon coated, and carbon fiber (needle type) cathodes are presented. The experiments have been performed at the electron accelerator LIA-200 (200 kV, 100 ns, and 4 kA). The diode voltage has been varied from 28-225 kV, whereas the current density has been varied from 86-928 A/cm{sup 2} with 100 ns pulse duration. The experimentally obtained electron beam diode perveance has been compared with the 1 dimensional Child-Langmuir- law. It was found that initially only a part of the cathode take part in the emission process. The plasma expands at 1.7-5.2 cm/{mu}s for 4 mm anode-cathode gap for various cathode materials. It was found that the plasma expansion velocity increases with the decrease in the cathode diameter. At the beginning of the accelerating pulse, the entire cathode area participates in the electron emission process only for the multiple needle type carbon fiber cathode.

  3. Analytically useful spectra excited in an atmospheric pressure active nitrogen afterglow

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, G.W.; D'Silva, A.P.; Fassel, V.A.

    1984-03-01

    An atmospheric pressure active nitrogen (APAN) discharge has been utilized for producing characteristic molecular emissions from nonmetallic species introduced into the afterglow region of the discharge. The addition of inorganic S-, P-, B-, Cl-, and Br-containing compounds into the afterglow has resulted in the formation of excited S/sub 2/, PN, BO, NCl, and NBr species, respectively. Intense molecular Br/sub 2/ emission and I/sub 2/ emission, as well as atomic I emission, have also been observed. Preliminary analytical utilization of the molecular or atomic emissions observed revealed that the APAN afterglow may serve as a potentially useful detector for the aforementioned elements.

  4. Radio rebrightening of the GRB afterglow by the accompanying supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barniol Duran, R.; Giannios, D.

    2015-12-01

    The gamma-ray burst (GRB) jet powers the afterglow emission by shocking the surrounding medium, and radio afterglow can now be routinely observed to almost a year after the explosion. Long-duration GRBs are accompanied by supernovae (SNe) that typically contain much more energy than the GRB jet. Here we consider the fact that the SN blast wave will also produce its own afterglow (supernova remnant emission), which will peak at much later time (since it is non-relativistic), when the SN blast wave transitions from a coasting phase to a decelerating Sedov-Taylor phase. We predict that this component will peak generally a few tens of years after the explosion and it will outshine the GRB powered afterglow well-before its peak emission. In the case of GRB 030329, where the external density is constrained by the ˜10-year coverage of the radio GRB afterglow, the radio emission is predicted to start rising over the next decade and to continue to increase for the following decades up to a level of ˜ mJy. Detection of the SN-powered radio emission will greatly advance our knowledge of particle acceleration in ˜0.1c shocks.

  5. Gamma ray burst outflows and afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsony, Brian J.

    2008-08-01

    We carry out a theoretical investigation of jet propagation in Gamma Ray Bursts and examine the jitter radiation mechanism as a means of producing prompt and afterglow emission. We study the long-term evolution of relativistic jets in collapsars and examine the effects of viewing angle on the subsequent gamma ray bursts. Our simulations allow us to single out three phases in the jet evolution: a precursor phase in which relativistic material turbulently shed from the head of the jet first emerges from the star; a shocked jet phase where a fully shocked jet of material is emerging; and an unshocked jet phase where the jet consists of a free-streaming, unshocked core surrounded by a thin boundary layer of shocked jet material. We also carry out a series of simulations with central engines that vary on long time periods comparable to the breakout time of the jet, on short time periods (0.1s) much less than the breakout time, and finally that decay as a power law at late times. We conclude that rapid variability seen in prompt GRB emission, as well as shallow decays and flares seen in the X-ray afterglow, can be caused by central engine variability. Finally, we present a detailed computation of the jitter radiation spectrum, including self-absorption, for electrons inside Weibel-like shock- generated magnetic fields. We apply our results to the case of the prompt and afterglow emission of gamma-ray bursts. We conclude that jitter and synchrotron afterglows can be distinguished from each other with good quality observations. However, it is unlikely that the difference can explain the peculiar behavior of several recent observations, such as flat X-ray slopes and uncorrelated optical and X-ray behavior.

  6. The Onset of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Shiho; Zhang, Bing

    2007-02-01

    We discuss the reference time t0 of afterglow light curves in the context of the standard internal-external shock model. The decay index of early afterglow is very sensitive to the reference time one chooses. In order to understand the nature of early afterglow, it is essential to take a correct reference time. Our simple analytic model provides a framework for understanding special relativistic effects involved in early afterglow phase. We evaluate light curves of reverse shock emission as well as those of forward shock emission, based on full hydrodynamic calculations. We show that the reference time does not shift significantly even in the thick-shell case. For external shock emission components, measuring times from the beginning of the prompt emission is a good approximation and it does not cause an early steep decay. In the thin-shell case, the energy transfer time from fireball ejecta to ambient medium typically extends to thousands of seconds. This might be related to the shallow decay phases observed in early X-ray afterglow at least for some bursts.

  7. Altitudinal dependence of meteor radio afterglows measured via optical counterparts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obenberger, K. S.; Holmes, J. M.; Dowell, J. D.; Schinzel, F. K.; Stovall, K.; Sutton, E. K.; Taylor, G. B.

    2016-09-01

    Utilizing the all-sky imaging capabilities of the first station of the Long Wavelength Array along with a host of all-sky optical cameras, we have now observed 44 optical meteor counterparts to radio afterglows. Combining these observations, we have determined the geographic positions of all 44 afterglows. Comparing the number of radio detections as a function of altitude above sea level to the number of expected bright meteors, we find a strong altitudinal dependence characterized by a cutoff below ˜90 km, below which no radio emission occurs, despite the fact that many of the observed optical meteors penetrated well below this altitude. This cutoff suggests that wave damping from electron collisions is an important factor for the evolution of radio afterglows. This finding agrees with the hypothesis that the emission is the result of electron plasma wave emission.

  8. Numerical models of blackbody-dominated gamma-ray bursts - II. Emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuesta-Martínez, C.; Aloy, M. A.; Mimica, P.; Thöne, C.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.

    2015-01-01

    Blackbody-dominated (BBD) gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are events characterized by long durations and the presence of a significant thermal component following the prompt emission, as well as by the absence of a typical afterglow. GRB 101225A is the most prominent member of this class. A plausible progenitor system for it and for BBD-GRBs is the merger a neutron star and a helium core of an evolved, massive star. Using relativistic hydrodynamic simulations we model the propagation of ultrarelativistic jets through the environments created by such mergers. In a previous paper we showed that the thermal emission in BBD-GRBs is linked to the interaction of an ultrarelativistic jet with the ejected envelope of the secondary star of the binary. Here we focus on explaining the emission properties of BBD-GRBs computing the whole radiative signature (both thermal and non-thermal) of the jet dynamical evolution. The non-thermal emission of the forward shock of the jet is dominant during the early phases of the evolution, when that shock is moderately relativistic. Our models do not produce a classical afterglow because the quick deceleration of the jet results primarily from the mass entrainment in the beam, and not from the process of plowing mass from the external medium in front of the GRB ejecta. The contribution of the reverse shock is of the same magnitude than that of the forward shock during the first 80 min after the GRB. Later, it quickly fades because the jet/environment interaction chocks the ultrarelativistic jet beam and effectively dumps the reverse shock. In agreement with observations, we obtain rather flat light curves during the first 2 d after the GRB, and a spectral evolution consistent with the observed reddening of the system.

  9. Study of argon-oxygen flowing afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazánková, V.; Trunec, D.; Navrátil, Z.; Raud, J.; Krčma, F.

    2016-06-01

    The reaction kinetics in argon-oxygen flowing afterglow (post-discharge) was studied using NO titration and optical emission spectroscopy. The flowing DC post-discharge in argon-oxygen mixture was created in a quartz tube at the total gas pressure of 1000 Pa and discharge power of 90 W. The O(3P) atom concentration was determined by NO titration at different places along the flow tube. The optical emission spectra were also measured along the flow tube. Argon spectral lines, oxygen lines at 777 nm and 844.6 nm and atmospheric A-band of {{\\text{O}}2} were identified in the spectra. Rotational temperature of {{\\text{O}}2} was determined from the oxygen atmospheric A-band and also the outer wall temperature of the flow tube was measured by a thermocouple and by an IR thermometer. A zero-dimensional kinetic model for the reactions in the afterglow was developed. This model allows the time dependencies of particle concentrations and of gas temperature to be calculated. The wall recombination probability for O(3P) atoms {γ\\text{O≤ft(\\text{P}\\right)}}=≤ft(1.63+/- 0.06\\right)× {{10}-3} and wall deactivation probability for {{\\text{O}}2} (b {{}1}Σ\\text{g}+ ) molecules {γ{{\\text{O}2}≤ft(\\text{b}\\right)}}=≤ft(1.7+/- 0.1\\right)× {{10}-3} were determined from the fit of model results to experimental data. Sensitivity analysis was applied for the analysis of kinetic model in order to reveal the most important reactions in the model. The calculated gas temperature increases in the afterglow and then decreases at later afterglow times after reaching the maximum. This behavior is in good agreement with the spatial rotational temperature dependence. A similar trend was also observed at outer wall temperature measurement.

  10. Study of argon–oxygen flowing afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazánková, V.; Trunec, D.; Navrátil, Z.; Raud, J.; Krčma, F.

    2016-06-01

    The reaction kinetics in argon–oxygen flowing afterglow (post-discharge) was studied using NO titration and optical emission spectroscopy. The flowing DC post-discharge in argon–oxygen mixture was created in a quartz tube at the total gas pressure of 1000 Pa and discharge power of 90 W. The O(3P) atom concentration was determined by NO titration at different places along the flow tube. The optical emission spectra were also measured along the flow tube. Argon spectral lines, oxygen lines at 777 nm and 844.6 nm and atmospheric A-band of {{\\text{O}}2} were identified in the spectra. Rotational temperature of {{\\text{O}}2} was determined from the oxygen atmospheric A-band and also the outer wall temperature of the flow tube was measured by a thermocouple and by an IR thermometer. A zero-dimensional kinetic model for the reactions in the afterglow was developed. This model allows the time dependencies of particle concentrations and of gas temperature to be calculated. The wall recombination probability for O(3P) atoms {γ\\text{O≤ft(\\text{P}\\right)}}=≤ft(1.63+/- 0.06\\right)× {{10}-3} and wall deactivation probability for {{\\text{O}}2} (b {{}1}Σ\\text{g}+ ) molecules {γ{{\\text{O}2}≤ft(\\text{b}\\right)}}=≤ft(1.7+/- 0.1\\right)× {{10}-3} were determined from the fit of model results to experimental data. Sensitivity analysis was applied for the analysis of kinetic model in order to reveal the most important reactions in the model. The calculated gas temperature increases in the afterglow and then decreases at later afterglow times after reaching the maximum. This behavior is in good agreement with the spatial rotational temperature dependence. A similar trend was also observed at outer wall temperature measurement.

  11. Global Properties of X-Ray Flashes and X-Ray-Rich GRBs Observed by Swift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, T.; Yamazaki, R.; Cummings, J.; Krimm, H.; Parsons, A.; Hullinger, D.; Barbier, L.; Fenimore, E.; Markwardt, C.; Tueller, J.; Sato, G.; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N.; Palmer, D.

    2007-01-01

    We describe and discuss the spectral and temporal characteristics of the prompt emission and X-ray afterglow emission of X-ray flashes (XRFs) detected and observed by Swift between December 2005 and September 2006. We compare these characteristics to a sample of X-ray rich gamma-ray bursts (XRRs) and conventional classical gamma-ray bursts (C-GRBs)observed during the same period. We confirm the correlation between Epeak and fluence noted by others and find further evidence that XRFs and C-GRBs form a continuum. We also confirmed that our known redshift samples are consistent with the correlation between the peak energy (Epeak) and the isotropic radiated energy (Eiso), so called the Epeak-Eiso relation. The spectral properties of X-ray afterglows are similar to those of gamma-ray burst afterglows, but the temporal properties of the two classes are quite different. We found that the light curves of C-GRBs afterglow show a break to steeper indices (shallow-to-steep break) at much earlier times than do XRF afterglows. Moreover, the overall luminosity of X-ray afterglows of XRFs are systematically smaller by a factor of two or more compared with that of C-GRBs. These distinct differences in the X-ray afterglow between XRFs and C-GRBs are key to understanding not only a mysterious shallow-to-steep phase in the X-ray afterglow but also the unique nature of XRFs.

  12. The Detectability of Orphan Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakar, Ehud; Piran, Tsvi; Granot, Jonathan

    2002-11-01

    The realization that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) release a constant amount of energy implies that post-jet-break afterglow evolution is largely universal. For a given redshift, all afterglows should be detected up to a fixed observer angle. We estimate the observed magnitude and the implied detectability of orphan afterglows. We show that for reasonable limiting magnitudes (mlim=25), orphan afterglows will typically be detected from small (~10°) angles away from the GRB jet axis. A detected orphan afterglow generally corresponds to a ``near miss'' of a GRB whose jet is pointing just slightly away from us. With our most optimistic parameters, we expect that 15 orphan afterglows will be recorded in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and 35 transients will be recorded in a dedicated 2 m class telescope operating full time for a year in an orphan afterglow search. The rate is smaller by a factor of 15 for our ``canonical'' parameters. We show that for a given facility, an optimal survey should be shallower, covering a larger area, rather than deeper. The limiting magnitude should not be, however, lower than ~23, as in this case, more transients from on-axis GRBs will be discovered than orphan afterglows. About 15% of the transients could be discovered with a second exposure of the same area provided that it follows after 3, 4, and 8 days for mlim=23, 25, and 27, respectively.

  13. The Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Modeling Project: Foundational Statistics and Absorption & Extinction Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trotter, Adam Somers

    The Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) Afterglow Modeling Project (AMP) will model, in a statistically sound and self-consistent way, every GRB afterglow observed since the first detection in 1997, using all available radio, infrared, optical, ultraviolet and X-ray data. The result will be a catalog of fitted empirical model parameters describing the intrinsic afterglow emission, and extinction due to dust and absorption due to gas along the line of sight to the GRB. This ever-growing catalog of fitted model parameters will allow us to infer the astrophysical properties of GRBs and their environments, and to explore their variety and evolution over the history of the universe. First, I present a new, broadly applicable statistical technique, the TRF statistic, for fitting model distributions to data in two dimensions, where the data have intrinsic uncertainties in both dimensions, and extrinsic scatter in both dimensions that is greater than can be accounted for by the intrinsic uncertainties alone. I demonstrate the properties of the TRF statistic, which is invertible but not scalable, and present an algorithm for obtaining an optimum scale for fits to a given data set. I then apply the TRF statistic to observations of interstellar extinction of stars along various Milky Way and Magellanic Cloud lines of sight, and to observations of Lyalpha forest flux deficits in quasars, to construct a comprehensive empirical model for extinction due to interstellar dust in the source frame and in the Milky Way, and absorption due to gas in the source frame and in the intergalactic medium. Combined with theoretical models of synchrotron emission from GRB jets, the resulting parameterization provides a framework for modeling the observed emission from most GRB afterglows. Furthermore, the extinction and absorption models are broadly applicable, in that they may be used to model observations of any extragalactic point source of radiation. Finally, I describe the results of model fitting to

  14. Linear and circular polarimetry observations of gamma-ray burst afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersema, K.

    2013-07-01

    Follow-up observations of large numbers of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows, facilitated by the Swift satellite, have produced a large sample of spectral energy distributions and light curves, from which the basic micro- and macrophysical parameters of afterglows may be derived. However, a number of phenomena have been observed that defy explanation by simple versions of the standard fireball model, leading to a variety of new models. Polarimetry has shown great promise as a diagnosis of afterglow physics, probing the magnetic field properties of the afterglow and geometrical effects (e.g. jet breaks). Unfortunately, high quality polarimetry of a significant sample of afterglows is difficult to acquire, requiring specialised instrumentation and observing modes. In this talk I will review the recent successes in afterglow polarimetry, also showing first results of new instruments and observing campaigns. I will particularly focus on jet breaks.

  15. Rydberg state, metastable, and electron dynamics in the low-pressure argon afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsankov, Tsanko V.; Johnsen, Rainer; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2015-12-01

    In this work a time-dependent collisional-radiative model for recombining plasmas is developed. It tracks the collisional and radiative capture of electrons into highly-excited (Rydberg) states and their consecutive deexcitation through collisions and radiation to the ground or the metastable state. The model allows the calculation of the net recombination rate and the electron energy gain by recombination. It is coupled to the volume-averaged balance equations for the electron density and temperature. The numerical solution of these equations includes a model for the diffusion cooling of the electrons (Celik et al 2012 Phys. Rev. E 85 046407) and a simplified model for the gas cooling. Using as only input the experimentally determined initial values of the electron density and temperature, gas temperature and metastable density, the temporal evolution of all parameters in the afterglow is calculated and compared with measurements. The results reproduce very well the measured quantities (electron density, light emission and metastable density) without the need to invoke adjustable parameters. This gives confidence in the validity of the model that allows it to be used not only to deepen the understanding of afterglow plasmas but also to tailor their properties as required for applications. The analysis of the model results further shows that gas heating and cooling must be explicitly taken into account to reproduce experimental observations. The electron heating by recombination is another process that is important for the good agreement. Both of these effects were largely ignored in previous works on afterglows.

  16. Green chemistry-mediated synthesis of nanostructures of afterglow phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Pooja; Haranath, D.; Chander, Harish; Singh, Sukhvir

    2008-04-01

    Various nanostructures of SrAl 2O 4:Eu 2+, Dy 3+ (SAC) afterglow phosphor were prepared in a single-step reaction using a green chemistry-mediated modified combustion process. The evolution of hazardous NxOx gases during the customary combustion reaction was completely eliminated by employing an innovative complex formation route. Another fascinating feature of the process was that, a slight change in the processing conditions ensured the synthesis of either nanoparticles or nanowires. The photoluminescence spectrum of nanophosphor showed a slight blue shift in emission (˜511 nm) as compared to the bulk phosphor (˜520 nm). The afterglow (decay) profiles of SAC nanoparticles, nanowires and bulk phosphor were compared. The chemistry underlying the nanostructure synthesis and the probable afterglow mechanism were discussed.

  17. CALORIMETRY OF GRB 030329: SIMULTANEOUS MODEL FITTING TO THE BROADBAND RADIO AFTERGLOW AND THE OBSERVED IMAGE EXPANSION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Mesler, Robert A.; Pihlstroem, Ylva M.

    2013-09-01

    We perform calorimetry on the bright gamma-ray burst GRB 030329 by fitting simultaneously the broadband radio afterglow and the observed afterglow image size to a semi-analytic MHD and afterglow emission model. Our semi-analytic method is valid in both the relativistic and non-relativistic regimes, and incorporates a model of the interstellar scintillation that substantially effects the broadband afterglow below 10 GHz. The model is fitted to archival measurements of the afterglow flux from 1 day to 8.3 yr after the burst. Values for the initial burst parameters are determined and the nature of the circumburst medium is explored. Additionally, direct measurements of the lateral expansion rate of the radio afterglow image size allow us to estimate the initial Lorentz factor of the jet.

  18. The Supercritical Pile GRB Model: The Prompt to Afterglow Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2008-01-01

    The 'Supercritical Pile' is a very economical gamma ray burst (GRB) model that provides for the efficient conversion of the energy stored in the protons of a Relativistic Blast Wave (RBW) into radiation and at the same time produces - in the prompt GRB phase, even in the absence of any particle acceleration - a spectral peak at an energy sim 1 MeV. We extend this model to include also the evolution of the RBW Lorentz factor Gamma and thus follow the spectral and temporal features of this model into the early GRB afterglow stage. One of the novel features of the present treatment is the inclusion of the feedback of the GRB produced radiation on the evolution of Gamma with radius. This feedback and the presence of kinematic and dynamic thresholds in the model can be the sources of rich time evolution which we have begun to explore. In particular, one can this way obtain afterglow light curves with steep decays followed by the more conventional flatter afterglow slopes, while at the same time preserving the desirable features of the model, i.e. the well defined relativistic electron source and radiative processes that produce the proper peak in the nu F spectra. Furthermore, the existence of a kinematic threshold in this model provides for a operational distinction of the prompt and afterglow GRB stages; in fact, the afterglow stage sets in when the RBW Lorentz factor cannot anymore fulfill the kinematic condition for pair formation in the photon - proton pair production reactions that constitute the fundamental process for the dissipation of the blast wave kinetic energy. We present the results of a specific set of parameters of this model with emphasis on the multiwavelength prompt emission and transition to the early afterglow.

  19. The Optical Afterglow of a Short Gamma-ray Burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hjorth, Jens; Watson, Darach; Flynbo, Johan P.U.; Price, Paul A.; Jensen, Brian L.; Jorgensen, Uffe G.; Kubas, Daniel; Gorosabel, Javier; Jakobssonk, Pall; Sollerman, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    It has long been known that there are two classes of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), principally distinguished by their durations. The breakthrough in our understanding of long-duration GRBs (greater than 2 seconds in duration), that ultimately linked them with energetic Type Ic supernovae, came about from the discovery of their long-lived X-ray and optical "afterglow", when precise and rapid localizations of the sources could finally be obtained. Recently, X-ray localizations have become available for short (less than 2 seconds in duration) GRBs, a hitherto elusive GRB population, that has evaded optical detection for more than thirty years. Here we report the discovery of transient optical emission (R approximately 23 mag) associated with a short GRB. This first short GRB afterglow is localized with sub-arcsecond accuracy onto the outskirts of a blue dwarf galaxy. Unless the optical and X-ray afterglow arise from different mechanisms our observations 33 h after the GRB suggest that, analogously to long GRBs, we observe synchrotron emission from ultrarelativistic ejecta (ZZZ CAN WE LIMIT GAMMA?). In contrast, we did not detect a bright supernova, as found in most nearby long GRB afterglows, which suggests a different origidstrongly constrain the nature of the short GRB progenitors.

  20. Gamma-Ray Bursts and Afterglows: a Multi-Wavelength Study in the Swift Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y. W.

    2010-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which are generally followed by long-lasting low-frequency afterglow emission, are short and intense pulses of gamma-rays observed from the sky in arbitrary directions. In order to observe the multi-wavelength emission at the early afterglow phase and even the prompt emission phase, NASA launched the Swift satellite on Nov. 20th 2004. Swift can localize GRBs within about 10 seconds. A brief review on the recent progress in observations and theories in the Swift era is given in Chapter 1. This paper focuses on the features of the early afterglows and the multi-wavelength prompt emission. In Chapters 2 and 3, we try to explain the shallow-decaying X-ray afterglows and X-ray flares, both of which are unaccountable in the standard afterglow model. (1) It is widely accepted that the shallow decay phase indicates a continuous energy injection into the GRB blast wave, and this energy could be released from the central engine after the burst. Based on the knowledge of the evolution of a pulsar wind, we argue that the injected flow interacting with the GRB blast wave is an ultra-relativistic kinetic-energy flow (i.e., wind) rather than pure electromagnetic waves. Therefore, a relativistic wind bubble (RWB) including a pair of shocks will be formed. Our numerical calculations and the fitting results show that the emission from an RWB can well account for the X-ray shallow decay phase. (2) For the X-ray flares that are attributed to some intermediate late activities of the central engine, we analyze the detailed dynamics of late internal shocks which directly produce the flare emission. Comparing the theoretical results with the lower limits of the observational luminosities and the profiles of the flare light curves, we find some constraints on the properties of the pre-collision shells, which are directly determined by the central object. In Chapter 4, we investigate the high-energy afterglow emission during the shallow decay phase in two models, i

  1. Statistical Properties of Multiple Optical Emission Components in Gamma-Ray Bursts and Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, En-Wei; Li, Liang; Tang, Qing-Wen; Chen, Jie-Min; Zhang, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Well-sampled optical lightcurves of 146 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are complied from the literature. Multiple optical emission components are extracted with power-law function fits to these lightcurves. We present a systematical analysis for statistical properties and their relations to prompt gamma-ray emission and X-ray afterglow for each component. We show that peak luminosity in the prompt and late flares are correlated and the evolution of the peak luminosity may signal the evolution of the accretion rate. No tight correlation between the shallow decay phase/plateau and prompt gamma-ray emission is found. Assuming that they are due to a long-lasting wind injected by a compact object, we show that the injected behavior favors the scenarios of a long-lasting wind powered by a Poynting flux from a black hole via the Blandford-Znajek mechanism fed by fall-back mass or by the spin-down energy release of a magnetar after the main burst episode. The peak luminosity of the afterglow onset is tightly correlated with Eγ,iso, and it is dimmer as peaking later. Assuming that the onset bump is due to the fireball deceleration by the external medium, we examine the Γ0 - Eγ,iso relation and find that it is confirmed with the current sample. Optical re-brightening is observed in 30 GRBs in our sample. It shares the same relation between the width and the peak time as found in the onset bump, but no clear correlation between LR,p and Eγ,iso similar to that observed for the onset bumps is found. Although its peak luminosity also decays with time, the slope is much shallower than that of the onset peak, as is the case for the onset bumps. We get L∝ t-1 p, being consistent with off-axis observations to an expanding external fireball in a wind-like circum medium. Therefore, the late re-brightening may signal another jet component. Mixing of different emission components may be the reason for the observed chromatic breaks of the shallow decay segment in different energy bands.

  2. Gamma-Ray Bursts and Afterglows: a Multi-Wavelength Study in the Swift Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y. W.

    2010-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which are generally followed by long-lasting low-frequency afterglow emission, are short and intense pulses of gamma-rays observed from the sky in arbitrary directions. In order to observe the multi-wavelength emission at the early afterglow phase and even the prompt emission phase, NASA launched the Swift satellite on Nov. 20th 2004. Swift can localize GRBs within about 10 seconds. A brief review on the recent progress in observations and theories in the Swift era is given in Chapter 1. This paper focuses on the features of the early afterglows and the multi-wavelength prompt emission. In Chapters 2 and 3, we try to explain the shallow-decaying X-ray afterglows and X-ray flares, both of which are unaccountable in the standard afterglow model. (1) It is widely accepted that the shallow decay phase indicates a continuous energy injection into the GRB blast wave, and this energy could be released from the central engine after the burst. Based on the knowledge of the evolution of a pulsar wind, we argue that the injected flow interacting with the GRB blast wave is an ultra-relativistic kinetic-energy flow (i.e., wind) rather than pure electromagnetic waves. Therefore, a relativistic wind bubble (RWB) including a pair of shocks will be formed. Our numerical calculations and the fitting results show that the emission from an RWB can well account for the X-ray shallow decay phase. (2) For the X-ray flares that are attributed to some intermediate late activities of the central engine, we analyze the detailed dynamics of late internal shocks which directly produce the flare emission. Comparing the theoretical results with the lower limits of the observational luminosities and the profiles of the flare light curves, we find some constraints on the properties of the pre-collision shells, which are directly determined by the central object. In Chapter 4, we investigate the high-energy afterglow emission during the shallow decay phase in two models, i

  3. Afterglow processes responsible for memory effect in nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Pejovic, M. M.; Nesic, N. T.; Pejovic, M. M.; Zivanovic, E. N.

    2012-07-01

    The mechanisms responsible for memory effect in nitrogen at 6.6 mbars have been analysed based on experimental data of electrical breakdown time delay as a function of afterglow period. The analysis has shown that positive ions remaining from previous discharge, as well as metastable and highly vibrationally excited molecules, are responsible for memory effect in the early afterglow. These molecules lead to the formation of positive ions in mutual collisions in the afterglow. Positive ions initiate secondary electron emission from the cathode of a nitrogen-filled tube when voltage higher than static breakdown voltage is applied on the electrodes. On the other hand, N({sup 4}S) atoms have a large influence on memory effect in late afterglow. They recombine on the cathode surface forming metastable molecules, which release secondary electrons in collision with the cathode. The higher values of electrical breakdown time delay in the case of the tube with borosilicate glass walls than in the case of the tube with copper walls are a consequence of faster de-excitation of neutral active particles on the glass. Indirect confirmation of this assumption has been obtained when the tubes were irradiated with gamma radiation.

  4. The Supercritical Pile GRB Model: The Prompt to Afterglow Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastichiadis, A.; Kazanas, D.

    2009-01-01

    The "Supercritical Pile" is a very economical GRB model that provides for the efficient conversion of the energy stored in the protons of a Relativistic Blast Wave (RBW) into radiation and at the same time produces - in the prompt GRB phase, even in the absence of any particle acceleration - a spectral peak at energy approx. 1 MeV. We extend this model to include the evolution of the RBW Lorentz factor Gamma and thus follow its spectral and temporal features into the early GRB afterglow stage. One of the novel features of the present treatment is the inclusion of the feedback of the GRB produced radiation on the evolution of Gamma with radius. This feedback and the presence of kinematic and dynamic thresholds in the model can be the sources of rich time evolution which we have began to explore. In particular. one can this may obtain afterglow light curves with steep decays followed by the more conventional flatter afterglow slopes, while at the same time preserving the desirable features of the model, i.e. the well defined relativistic electron source and radiative processes that produce the proper peak in the (nu)F(sub nu), spectra. In this note we present the results of a specific set of parameters of this model with emphasis on the multiwavelength prompt emission and transition to the early afterglow.

  5. Afterglow processes responsible for memory effect in nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejović, M. M.; Nešić, N. T.; Pejović, M. M.; Živanović, E. N.

    2012-07-01

    The mechanisms responsible for memory effect in nitrogen at 6.6 mbars have been analysed based on experimental data of electrical breakdown time delay as a function of afterglow period. The analysis has shown that positive ions remaining from previous discharge, as well as metastable and highly vibrationally excited molecules, are responsible for memory effect in the early afterglow. These molecules lead to the formation of positive ions in mutual collisions in the afterglow. Positive ions initiate secondary electron emission from the cathode of a nitrogen-filled tube when voltage higher than static breakdown voltage is applied on the electrodes. On the other hand, N(S4) atoms have a large influence on memory effect in late afterglow. They recombine on the cathode surface forming N2(AΣ3u+) metastable molecules, which release secondary electrons in collision with the cathode. The higher values of electrical breakdown time delay in the case of the tube with borosilicate glass walls than in the case of the tube with copper walls are a consequence of faster de-excitation of neutral active particles on the glass. Indirect confirmation of this assumption has been obtained when the tubes were irradiated with gamma radiation.

  6. Circular polarization in the optical afterglow of GRB 121024A.

    PubMed

    Wiersema, K; Covino, S; Toma, K; van der Horst, A J; Varela, K; Min, M; Greiner, J; Starling, R L C; Tanvir, N R; Wijers, R A M J; Campana, S; Curran, P A; Fan, Y; Fynbo, J P U; Gorosabel, J; Gomboc, A; Götz, D; Hjorth, J; Jin, Z P; Kobayashi, S; Kouveliotou, C; Mundell, C; O'Brien, P T; Pian, E; Rowlinson, A; Russell, D M; Salvaterra, R; di Serego Alighieri, S; Tagliaferri, G; Vergani, S D; Elliott, J; Fariña, C; Hartoog, O E; Karjalainen, R; Klose, S; Knust, F; Levan, A J; Schady, P; Sudilovsky, V; Willingale, R

    2014-05-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are most probably powered by collimated relativistic outflows (jets) from accreting black holes at cosmological distances. Bright afterglows are produced when the outflow collides with the ambient medium. Afterglow polarization directly probes the magnetic properties of the jet when measured minutes after the burst, and it probes the geometric properties of the jet and the ambient medium when measured hours to days after the burst. High values of optical polarization detected minutes after the burst of GRB 120308A indicate the presence of large-scale ordered magnetic fields originating from the central engine (the power source of the GRB). Theoretical models predict low degrees of linear polarization and no circular polarization at late times, when the energy in the original ejecta is quickly transferred to the ambient medium and propagates farther into the medium as a blast wave. Here we report the detection of circularly polarized light in the afterglow of GRB 121024A, measured 0.15 days after the burst. We show that the circular polarization is intrinsic to the afterglow and unlikely to be produced by dust scattering or plasma propagation effects. A possible explanation is to invoke anisotropic (rather than the commonly assumed isotropic) electron pitch-angle distributions, and we suggest that new models are required to produce the complex microphysics of realistic shocks in relativistic jets.

  7. Circular polarization in the optical afterglow of GRB 121024A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersema, K.; Covino, S.; Toma, K.; van der Horst, A. J.; Varela, K.; Min, M.; Greiner, J.; Starling, R. L. C.; Tanvir, N. R.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Campana, S.; Curran, P. A.; Fan, Y.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Gorosabel, J.; Gomboc, A.; Götz, D.; Hjorth, J.; Jin, Z. P.; Kobayashi, S.; Kouveliotou, C.; Mundell, C.; O'Brien, P. T.; Pian, E.; Rowlinson, A.; Russell, D. M.; Salvaterra, R.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Tagliaferri, G.; Vergani, S. D.; Elliott, J.; Fariña, C.; Hartoog, O. E.; Karjalainen, R.; Klose, S.; Knust, F.; Levan, A. J.; Schady, P.; Sudilovsky, V.; Willingale, R.

    2014-05-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are most probably powered by collimated relativistic outflows (jets) from accreting black holes at cosmological distances. Bright afterglows are produced when the outflow collides with the ambient medium. Afterglow polarization directly probes the magnetic properties of the jet when measured minutes after the burst, and it probes the geometric properties of the jet and the ambient medium when measured hours to days after the burst. High values of optical polarization detected minutes after the burst of GRB 120308A indicate the presence of large-scale ordered magnetic fields originating from the central engine (the power source of the GRB). Theoretical models predict low degrees of linear polarization and no circular polarization at late times, when the energy in the original ejecta is quickly transferred to the ambient medium and propagates farther into the medium as a blast wave. Here we report the detection of circularly polarized light in the afterglow of GRB 121024A, measured 0.15 days after the burst. We show that the circular polarization is intrinsic to the afterglow and unlikely to be produced by dust scattering or plasma propagation effects. A possible explanation is to invoke anisotropic (rather than the commonly assumed isotropic) electron pitch-angle distributions, and we suggest that new models are required to produce the complex microphysics of realistic shocks in relativistic jets.

  8. Circular polarization in the optical afterglow of GRB 121024A.

    PubMed

    Wiersema, K; Covino, S; Toma, K; van der Horst, A J; Varela, K; Min, M; Greiner, J; Starling, R L C; Tanvir, N R; Wijers, R A M J; Campana, S; Curran, P A; Fan, Y; Fynbo, J P U; Gorosabel, J; Gomboc, A; Götz, D; Hjorth, J; Jin, Z P; Kobayashi, S; Kouveliotou, C; Mundell, C; O'Brien, P T; Pian, E; Rowlinson, A; Russell, D M; Salvaterra, R; di Serego Alighieri, S; Tagliaferri, G; Vergani, S D; Elliott, J; Fariña, C; Hartoog, O E; Karjalainen, R; Klose, S; Knust, F; Levan, A J; Schady, P; Sudilovsky, V; Willingale, R

    2014-05-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are most probably powered by collimated relativistic outflows (jets) from accreting black holes at cosmological distances. Bright afterglows are produced when the outflow collides with the ambient medium. Afterglow polarization directly probes the magnetic properties of the jet when measured minutes after the burst, and it probes the geometric properties of the jet and the ambient medium when measured hours to days after the burst. High values of optical polarization detected minutes after the burst of GRB 120308A indicate the presence of large-scale ordered magnetic fields originating from the central engine (the power source of the GRB). Theoretical models predict low degrees of linear polarization and no circular polarization at late times, when the energy in the original ejecta is quickly transferred to the ambient medium and propagates farther into the medium as a blast wave. Here we report the detection of circularly polarized light in the afterglow of GRB 121024A, measured 0.15 days after the burst. We show that the circular polarization is intrinsic to the afterglow and unlikely to be produced by dust scattering or plasma propagation effects. A possible explanation is to invoke anisotropic (rather than the commonly assumed isotropic) electron pitch-angle distributions, and we suggest that new models are required to produce the complex microphysics of realistic shocks in relativistic jets. PMID:24776800

  9. An investigation into the role of metastable argon atoms in the afterglow plasma of a low pressure discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, J. A.; Ferreira, N. P.; Human, H. G. C.

    An investigation into the behaviour of metastable argon atoms in a low pressure (250 Pa) pulsed electrical discharge was undertaken in an effort to find the cause of the persisting emission from sputtered metal atoms in the afterglow of an atomic fluorimeter. Results obtained by time-resolved emission and absorption measurements of several argon and copper spectral lines indicate that low energy electrons in the afterglow are converted to high energy electrons via the recombination of electrons with argon ions and the subsequent collisions of pairs of metastable argon atoms. The high energy electrons excite the sputtered metal atoms to give rise to a slow decaying emission tail in the afterglow. A probable change in the electron energy distribution in the afterglow may also have an effect on the observed emission. This phenomenon may be reduced by the use of a suitable quenching gas.

  10. Optical and X-Ray Observations of GRB 060526: A Complex Afterglow Consistent with an Achromatic Jet Break

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, X.; Halpern, J. P.; Morgan, N. D.; Armstrong, E.; Mirabal, N.; Haislip. J. B.; Reichart, D. E.; Stanek, K. Z.

    2007-01-01

    We obtained 98 R-band and 18 B, r', i' images of the optical afterglow of GRB 060526 (z = 3.21) with the MDM 1.3 m, 2.4 m, and the PROMPT telescopes at CTIO over the five nights following the burst trigger. Combining these data with other optical observations reported in GCN and the Swift XRT observations, we compare the optical and X-ray afterglow light curves of GRB 060526. Both the optical and X-ray afterglow light curves show rich features, such as flares and breaks. The densely sampled optical observations provide very good coverage at T > 10(exp 4) s. We observed a break at 2.4 x 10(exp 5) sin the optical afterglow light curve. Compared with the X-ray afterglow light curve, the break is consistent with an achromatic break supporting the beaming models of GRBs. However, the prebreak and postbreak temporal decay slopes are difficult to explain in simple afterglow models. We estimated a jet angle of theta(sub j) approx. 7deg and a prompt emission size of R(sub prompt) approx. 2 x 10(exp 14) cm. In addition, we detected several optical flares with amplitudes of (Delta)m approx. 0.2,0.6, and 0.2 mag. The X-ray afterglows detected by Swift have shown complicated decay patterns. Recently, many well-sampled optical afterglows also show decays with flares and multiple breaks. GRB 060526 provides an additional case of such a complex, well-observed optical afterglow. The accumulated well-sampled afterglows indicate that most of the optical afterglows are complex.

  11. The SEDs and Host Galaxies of the Dustiest GRB Afterglows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruhler, T.; Greiner, J.; Schady, P.; Savaglio, S.; Afonso, P. M. J.; Clemens, C.; Elliott, J.; Filgas, R.; Gruber, D.; Kann, D. A.; Klose, S.; Kupcu-Yoldas, A.; McBreen, S.; Olivares, E.; Pierini, D.; Rau, A.; Rossi, A.; Nardini, M.; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Sudilovsky, V.; Updike, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    The afterglows and host galaxies of long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer unique opportunities to study star-forming galaxies in the high-z Universe, Until recently, however. the information inferred from GRB follow-up observations was mostly limited to optically bright afterglows. biasing all demographic studies against sight-lines that contain large amounts of dust. Aims. Here we present afterglow and host observations for a sample of bursts that are exemplary of previously missed ones because of high visual extinction (A(sub v) (Sup GRB) approx > 1 mag) along the sight-line. This facilitates an investigation of the properties, geometry and location of the absorbing dust of these poorly-explored host galaxies. and a comparison to hosts from optically-selected samples. Methods. This work is based on GROND optical/NIR and Swift/XRT X-ray observations of the afterglows, and multi-color imaging for eight GRB hosts. The afterglow and galaxy spectral energy distributions yield detailed insight into physical properties such as the dust and metal content along the GRB sight-line as well as galaxy-integrated characteristics like the host's stellar mass, luminosity. color-excess and star-formation rate. Results. For the eight afterglows considered in this study we report for the first time the redshift of GRBs 081109 (z = 0.97S7 +/- 0.0005). and the visual extinction towards GRBs 0801109 (A(sub v) (Sup GRB) = 3.4(sup +0.4) (sub -0.3) mag) and l00621A (A(sub v) (Sup GRB) = 3.8 +/- 0.2 mag), which are among the largest ever derived for GRB afterglows. Combined with non-extinguished GRBs. there is a strong anti-correlation between the afterglow's metals-to-dust ratio and visual extinction. The hosts of the dustiest afterglows are diverse in their properties, but on average redder(((R - K)(sub AB)) approximates 1.6 mag), more luminous ( approximates 0.9 L (sup *)) and massive ((log M(sup *) [M(solar]) approximates 9.8) than the hosts of optically-bright events. We hence probe

  12. Study of argon flowing afterglow with nitrogen injection

    SciTech Connect

    Mazánková, V.; Krčma, F.; Trunec, D.

    2013-10-28

    In this work, the reaction kinetics in argon flowing afterglow with nitrogen addition was studied by optical emission spectroscopy. The DC flowing post-discharge in pure argon was created in quartz tube at the total gas pressure of 1000 Pa and discharge power of 60 W. The nitrogen was added into the afterglow at the distance of 9 cm behind the active discharge. The optical emission spectra were measured along the flow tube. The argon spectral lines and after nitrogen addition also nitrogen second positive system (SPS) were identified in the spectra. The measurement of spatial dependence of SPS intensity showed a very slow decay of the intensity and the decay rate did not depend on the nitrogen concentration. In order to explain this behavior a kinetic model for reaction in afterglow was developed. This model showed that C {sup 3}Π{sub u} state of molecular nitrogen, which is the upper state of SPS emission, is produced by excitation transfer from argon metastables to nitrogen molecules. However, the argon metastables are also produced at Ar{sub 2}{sup +} ion recombination with electrons and this limits the decay of argon metastable concentration and it results in very slow decay of SPS intensity.

  13. GRB Orphan Afterglows in Present and Future Radio Transient Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghirlanda, G.; Burlon, D.; Ghisellini, G.; Salvaterra, R.; Bernardini, M. G.; Campana, S.; Covino, S.; D'Avanzo, P.; D'Elia, V.; Melandri, A.; Murphy, T.; Nava, L.; Vergani, S. D.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2014-05-01

    Orphan Afterglows (OA) are slow transients produced by Gamma Ray Bursts seen off-axis that become visible on timescales of days/years at optical/NIR and radio frequencies, when the prompt emission at high energies (X and γ rays) has already ceased. Given the typically estimated jet opening angle of GRBs θjet ~ 3°, for each burst pointing to the Earth there should be a factor ~ 700 more GRBs pointing in other directions. Despite this, no secure OAs have been detected so far. Through a population synthesis code we study the emission properties of the population of OA at radio frequencies. OAs reach their emission peak on year-timescales and they last for a comparable amount of time. The typical peak fluxes (which depend on the observing frequency) are of few μJy in the radio band with only a few OA reaching the mJy level. These values are consistent with the upper limits on the radio flux of SN Ib/c observed at late times. We find that the OA radio number count distribution has a typical slope - 1.7 at high fluxes and a flatter ( - 0.4) slope at low fluxes with a break at a frequency-dependent flux. Our predictions of the OA rates are consistent with the (upper) limits of recent radio surveys and archive searches for radio transients. Future radio surveys like VAST/ASKAP at 1.4 GHz should detect ~ 3 × 10- 3 OA deg- 2 yr- 1, MeerKAT and EVLA at 8.4 GHz should see ~ 3 × 10- 1 OA deg- 2 yr- 1. The SKA, reaching the μJy flux limit, could see up to ~ 0.2 - 1.5 OA deg- 2 yr- 1. These rates also depend on the duration of the OA above a certain flux limit and we discuss this effect with respect to the survey cadence.

  14. Hidden in the light: Magnetically induced afterglow from trapped chameleon fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gies, Holger; Mota, David F.; Shaw, Douglas J.

    2008-01-01

    We propose an afterglow phenomenon as a unique trace of chameleon fields in optical experiments. The vacuum interaction of a laser pulse with a magnetic field can lead to a production and subsequent trapping of chameleons in the vacuum chamber, owing to their mass dependence on the ambient matter density. Magnetically induced reconversion of the trapped chameleons into photons creates an afterglow over macroscopic timescales that can conveniently be searched for by current optical experiments. We show that the chameleon parameter range accessible to available laboratory technology is comparable to scales familiar from astrophysical stellar energy-loss arguments. We analyze quantitatively the afterglow properties for various experimental scenarios and discuss the role of potential background and systematic effects. We conclude that afterglow searches represent an ideal tool to aim at the production and detection of cosmologically relevant scalar fields in the laboratory.

  15. Simulation Study Of Early Afterglows Observed With Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hededal, C.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Fishman, G. J.

    2006-09-01

    A 3-D relativistic particle-in-cell code has been used to simulate the dynamics of forward and reverse shocks with thin and thick shells within the parameter constraints provided by present Swift observations and the present models of GRB emission. Our 3-D RPIC simulations have provided the dynamics of collisionless shocks in electron-ion and electron-positron plasmas with and without initial ambient magnetic fields and revealed the importance of ``jitter radiation'' with prompt and afterglow spectra due to the inhomogeneous magnetic fields generated by the Weibel instability. It is different from synchrotron radiation, which is usually assumed to be the dominant radiation process. We have investigated gamma-ray burst emissions from prompt, early, and late afterglows considering microscopic processes. Based on our previous investigation of the Weibel instability for each stage of evolution of ejecta propagating in the ISM, we have incorporated the plasma conditions (relativistic jets) with the density and composition of the plasmas, the magnetic field strength ($\\sigma$-values (the ratio of the electromagnetic energy flux to the particle energy flux)) and its direction, and the Lorentz factor for the different stages in prompt and afterglows. Systematic simulation studies of the relativistic collisionless shocks, associated particle acceleration, magnetic field generation and self-consistent radiation provide insight into undetermined issues in prompt and afterglows observed by Swift. Self-consistently calculated lightcurves, spectra, spectral evolutions, and polarization as function of viewing angle will be done to light a shed on recent new observations by Swift, in particular, X-ray flares, early steep decay, and shallow decay.

  16. Temperature-dependence of the structural and afterglow luminance properties of polymer/SrAlxOy:Eu2+,Dy3+ composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bem, Daniel B.; Luyt, A. S.; Dejene, B. F.; Swart, H. C.

    2012-05-01

    Although aluminate phosphors have attracted great interest for applications in lamps, cathode ray tubes and plasma display panels, there still remain issues affecting operational parameters such as luminescence efficiency, stability against temperature, high color purity and perfect decay time. In addition, issues involving important aspects of the monoclinic↔hexagonal phase transition temperature still exist. In this work, SrAlxOy:Eu2+,Dy3+ phosphor powders were prepared by the sol-gel method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) has shown that both crystallinity and crystallite sizes increased as the temperature increased. Both SrAl2O4 and Sr2Al3O6 phases were observed. Photoluminescence (PL) characterization shows temperature-dependence, which indicates emission at low and high annealing temperatures originating from Eu2+ and Eu3+ ions. Thermoluminescence glow and decay measurements provided useful insight on the influence of traps on luminescence behavior. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric studies (TGA) on composites of the phosphor in low density polyethylene (LDPE) demonstrated the varied influence of annealing temperature on some luminescence and thermal properties.

  17. DISCOVERY OF A TIGHT CORRELATION FOR GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS WITH 'CANONICAL' LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Ostrowski, Michal; Willingale, Richard; Capozziello, Salvatore; Cardone, Vincenzo Fabrizio E-mail: mio@oa.uj.edu.p E-mail: capozziello@na.infn.i

    2010-10-20

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed up to redshifts z>8 are fascinating objects to study due to their still unexplained relativistic outburst mechanisms and their possible use to test cosmological models. Our analysis of 77 GRB afterglows with known redshifts revealed a physical subsample of long GRBs with the canonical plateau breaking to power-law light curves with a significant luminosity L*{sub X}-break time T*{sub a} correlation in the GRB rest frame. This subsample forms approximately the upper envelope of the studied distribution. We have also found a similar relation for a small sample of GRB afterglows that belong to the intermediate class between the short and the long ones. It proves that within the full sample of afterglows there exist physical subclasses revealed here by tight correlations of their afterglow properties. The afterglows with regular ('canonical') light curves obey not only the mentioned tight physical scaling, but-for a given T*{sub a}-the more regular progenitor explosions lead to preferentially brighter afterglows.

  18. The Case for Anisotropic Afterglow Efficiency Within Gamma-Ray Burst Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, David; Granot, Jonathan; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2005-10-05

    Early X-ray afterglows recently detected by Swift frequently show a phase of very shallow flux decay lasting from a few hundred seconds up to {approx} 10{sup 4} s, followed by a steeper, more familiar decay. We suggest that the flat early part of the light curve may be a combination of the decaying tail of the prompt emission and the delayed onset of the afterglow emission observed from viewing angles slightly outside the edge of the jet, as predicted previously. This would imply that a significant fraction of viewers have a very small external shock energy along their line of sight and a very high {gamma}-ray to kinetic energy ratio. The early flat phase in the afterglow light curve implies, according to this or other interpretations, a very large {gamma}-ray efficiency, typically {approx}> 90%, which is very difficult to produce by internal shocks.

  19. TWO POPULATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURST RADIO AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, P. J.; Gaensler, B. M.; Murphy, T.

    2013-10-20

    The detection rate of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows is ∼30% at radio wavelengths, much lower than in the X-ray (∼95%) or optical (∼70%) bands. The cause of this low radio detection rate has previously been attributed to limited observing sensitivity. We use visibility stacking to test this idea, and conclude that the low detection rate is instead due to two intrinsically different populations of GRBs: radio-bright and radio-faint. We calculate that no more than 70% of GRB afterglows are truly radio-bright, leaving a significant population of GRBs that lack a radio afterglow. These radio-bright GRBs have higher gamma-ray fluence, isotropic energies, X-ray fluxes, and optical fluxes than the radio-faint GRBs, thus confirming the existence of two physically distinct populations. We suggest that the gamma-ray efficiency of the prompt emission is responsible for the difference between the two populations. We also discuss the implications for future radio and optical surveys.

  20. Spectral softening in the X-RAY afterglow of GRB 130925A as predicted by the dust scattering model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yi-Nan; Shao, Lang

    2014-07-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) usually occur in a dense star-forming region with a massive circumburst medium. The small-angle scattering of intense prompt X-ray emission off the surrounding dust grains will have observable consequences and sometimes can dominate the X-ray afterglow. In most of the previous studies, only the Rayleigh-Gans (RG) approximation is employed for describing the scattering process, which works accurately for the typical size of grains (with radius of a ≤ 0.1 μm) in the diffuse interstellar medium. When the size of the grains may significantly increase, as in a more dense region where GRBs would occur, the RG approximation may not be valid enough for modeling detailed observational data. In order to study the temporal and spectral properties of the scattered X-ray emission more accurately with potentially larger dust grains, we provide a practical approach using the series expansions of anomalous diffraction (AD) approximation based on the complicated Mie theory. We apply our calculations to understand the puzzling X-ray afterglow of recently observed GRB 130925A that showed a significant spectral softening. We find that the X-ray scattering scenarios with either AD or RG approximation adopted could well reproduce both the temporal and spectral profile simultaneously. Given the plateau present in the early X-ray light curve, a typical distribution of smaller grains as in the interstellar medium would be suggested for GRB 130925A.

  1. Spectral Softening in the X-Ray Afterglow of GRB 130925A as Predicted by the Dust Scattering Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yi-Nan; Shao, Lang

    2014-07-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) usually occur in a dense star-forming region with a massive circumburst medium. The small-angle scattering of intense prompt X-ray emission off the surrounding dust grains will have observable consequences and sometimes can dominate the X-ray afterglow. In most of the previous studies, only the Rayleigh-Gans (RG) approximation is employed for describing the scattering process, which works accurately for the typical size of grains (with radius of a <= 0.1 μm) in the diffuse interstellar medium. When the size of the grains may significantly increase, as in a more dense region where GRBs would occur, the RG approximation may not be valid enough for modeling detailed observational data. In order to study the temporal and spectral properties of the scattered X-ray emission more accurately with potentially larger dust grains, we provide a practical approach using the series expansions of anomalous diffraction (AD) approximation based on the complicated Mie theory. We apply our calculations to understand the puzzling X-ray afterglow of recently observed GRB 130925A that showed a significant spectral softening. We find that the X-ray scattering scenarios with either AD or RG approximation adopted could well reproduce both the temporal and spectral profile simultaneously. Given the plateau present in the early X-ray light curve, a typical distribution of smaller grains as in the interstellar medium would be suggested for GRB 130925A.

  2. The potential for detecting gamma-ray burst afterglows from population III stars with the next generation of infrared telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Macpherson, D.; Coward, D. M.; Zadnik, M. G.

    2013-12-10

    We investigate the detectability of a proposed population of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) from the collapse of Population III (Pop III) stars. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) will be able to observe the late time infrared afterglows. We have developed a new method to calculate their detectability, which takes into account the fundamental initial mass function and formation rates of Pop III stars, from which we find the temporal variability of the afterglows and ultimately the length of time JWST and SPICA can detect them. In the range of plausible Pop III GRB parameters, the afterglows are always detectable by these instruments during the isotropic emission, for a minimum of 55 days and a maximum of 3.7 yr. The average number of detectable afterglows will be 2.96× 10{sup –5} per SPICA field of view (FOV) and 2.78× 10{sup –6} per JWST FOV. These are lower limits, using a pessimistic estimate of Pop III star formation. An optimal observing strategy with SPICA could identify a candidate orphan afterglow in ∼1.3 yr, with a 90% probability of confirmation with further detailed observations. A beamed GRB will align with the FOV of the planned GRB detector Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope once every 9 yr. Pop III GRBs will be more easily detected by their isotropic emissions (i.e., orphan afterglows) rather than by their prompt emissions.

  3. The Potential for Detecting Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows from Population III Stars with the Next Generation of Infrared Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macpherson, D.; Coward, D. M.; Zadnik, M. G.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the detectability of a proposed population of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) from the collapse of Population III (Pop III) stars. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) will be able to observe the late time infrared afterglows. We have developed a new method to calculate their detectability, which takes into account the fundamental initial mass function and formation rates of Pop III stars, from which we find the temporal variability of the afterglows and ultimately the length of time JWST and SPICA can detect them. In the range of plausible Pop III GRB parameters, the afterglows are always detectable by these instruments during the isotropic emission, for a minimum of 55 days and a maximum of 3.7 yr. The average number of detectable afterglows will be 2.96× 10-5 per SPICA field of view (FOV) and 2.78× 10-6 per JWST FOV. These are lower limits, using a pessimistic estimate of Pop III star formation. An optimal observing strategy with SPICA could identify a candidate orphan afterglow in ~1.3 yr, with a 90% probability of confirmation with further detailed observations. A beamed GRB will align with the FOV of the planned GRB detector Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope once every 9 yr. Pop III GRBs will be more easily detected by their isotropic emissions (i.e., orphan afterglows) rather than by their prompt emissions.

  4. Absorption and emission properties of photonic crystals and metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Lili

    2007-01-01

    We study the emission and absorption properties of photonic crystals and metamaterials using Comsol Multiphysics and Ansoft HFSS as simulation tools. We calculate the emission properties of metallic designs using drude model and the results illustrate that an appropriate termination of the surface of the metallic structure can significantly increase the absorption and therefore the thermal emissivity. We investigate the spontaneous emission rate modifications that occur for emitters inside two-dimensional photonic crystals and find the isotropic and directional emissions with respect to different frequencies as we have expected.

  5. A Decade of Short-duration Gamma-ray Burst Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, Wen-fai

    2014-10-01

    The afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) provide a unique way to study the explosion properties and sub-parsec environments of these catastrophic events. Indeed, observational campaigns to characterize the afterglows of long GRBs (duration > 2 sec) have lent crucial insight to their massive star progenitors. Short GRBs, which are linked to the mergers of two compact objects, are discovered at a significantly lower rate and have faint afterglows, thus making an understanding of their basic explosion properties more challenging. In this talk, I describe an observational campaign to characterize the afterglows of short GRBs over the past decade, spanning radio to X-ray wavelengths. I use the temporal and spectral behavior of their afterglows to quantify their kinetic energy scales, circumburst densities, and jet opening angles for the first time. I explore any trends between these explosion properties and their host galaxies. Finally, since compact object mergers are the premier candidates for Advanced LIGO detection, I assess the implications for electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves.

  6. Radiation properties and emissivity parameterization of high level thin clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, M.-L. C.

    1984-01-01

    To parameterize emissivity of clouds at 11 microns, a study has been made in an effort to understand the radiation field of thin clouds. The contributions to the intensity and flux from different sources and through different physical processes are calculated by using the method of successive orders of scattering. The effective emissivity of thin clouds is decomposed into the effective absorption emissivity, effective scattering emissivity, and effective reflection emissivity. The effective absorption emissivity depends on the absorption and emission of the cloud; it is parameterized in terms of optical thickness. The effective scattering emissivity depends on the scattering properties of the cloud; it is parameterized in terms of optical thickness and single scattering albedo. The effective reflection emissivity follows the similarity relation as in the near infrared cases. This is parameterized in terms of the similarity parameter and optical thickness, as well as the temperature difference between the cloud and ground.

  7. The Influence of Fuelbed Physical Properties on Biomass Burning Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanski, S. P.; Lincoln, E.; Baker, S. P.; Richardson, M.

    2014-12-01

    Emissions from biomass fires can significantly degrade regional air quality and therefore are of major concern to air regulators and land managers in the U.S. and Canada. Accurately estimating emissions from different fire types in various ecosystems is crucial to predicting and mitigating the impact of fires on air quality. The physical properties of ecosystems' fuelbeds can heavily influence the combustion processes (e.g. flaming or smoldering) and the resultant emissions. However, despite recent progress in characterizing the composition of biomass smoke, significant knowledge gaps remain regarding the linkage between basic fuelbed physical properties and emissions. In laboratory experiments we examined the effects of fuelbed properties on combustion efficiency (CE) and emissions for an important fuel component of temperate and boreal forests - conifer needles. The bulk density (BD), depth (DZ), and moisture content (MC) of Ponderosa Pine needle fuelbeds were manipulated in 75 burns for which gas and particle emissions were measured. We found CE was negatively correlated with BD, DZ and MC and that the emission factors of species associated with smoldering combustion processes (CO, CH4, particles) were positively correlated with these fuelbed properties. The study indicates the physical properties of conifer needle fuelbeds have a significant effect on CE and hence emissions. However, many of the emission models used to predict and manage smoke impacts on air quality assume conifer litter burns by flaming combustion with a high CE and correspondingly low emissions of CO, CH4, particles, and organic compounds. Our results suggest emission models underestimate emissions from fires involving a large component of conifer needles. Additionally, our findings indicate that laboratory studies of emissions should carefully control fuelbed physical properties to avoid confounding effects that may obscure the effects being tested and lead to erroneous interpretations.

  8. The puzzling afterglow of GRB 050721: a rebrightening seen in the optical but not in the X-ray

    SciTech Connect

    Antonelli, L. A.; Romano, P.; Testa, V.; D'Elia, V.; Guetta, D.; Torii, K.; Malesani, D.

    2007-08-21

    We present here the analysis of the early and late multiwavelength afterglow emission, as observed by Swift a small robotic telescope, and the VLT. We compare early observations with late afterglow observations obtained with Swift and the VLT and we observe an intense rebrightening in the optical band at about one day after the burst which is not present in the X-ray band. The lack of detection in X-ray of such a strong rebrightening at lower energies may be described with a variable external density profile. In such a scenario, the combined X-ray and optical observations allow us to derive that the matter density located at {approx} 1017 cm from the burst is about a factor of 10 higher than in the inner region. This is the first time in which a rebrightening has been observed in the optical afterglow of a GRB that is clearly absent in the X-ray afterglow.

  9. Bright x-ray flares in gamma-ray burst afterglows.

    PubMed

    Burrows, D N; Romano, P; Falcone, A; Kobayashi, S; Zhang, B; Moretti, A; O'brien, P T; Goad, M R; Campana, S; Page, K L; Angelini, L; Barthelmy, S; Beardmore, A P; Capalbi, M; Chincarini, G; Cummings, J; Cusumano, G; Fox, D; Giommi, P; Hill, J E; Kennea, J A; Krimm, H; Mangano, V; Marshall, F; Mészáros, P; Morris, D C; Nousek, J A; Osborne, J P; Pagani, C; Perri, M; Tagliaferri, G; Wells, A A; Woosley, S; Gehrels, N

    2005-09-16

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows have provided important clues to the nature of these massive explosive events, providing direct information on the nearby environment and indirect information on the central engine that powers the burst. We report the discovery of two bright x-ray flares in GRB afterglows, including a giant flare comparable in total energy to the burst itself, each peaking minutes after the burst. These strong, rapid x-ray flares imply that the central engines of the bursts have long periods of activity, with strong internal shocks continuing for hundreds of seconds after the gamma-ray emission has ended.

  10. Gamma-Ray Bursts: The Afterglow Revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galama, Titus J.; Sari, Re'em

    GRBs were discovered with the Vela satellites, whose main purpose was to verify compliance with the 1963 Limited Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. Since their discovery these events, which emit the bulk of their energy in the 0.1 - 1.0 MeV range, and whose durations span milliseconds to tens of minutes, posed one of the great unsolved problems in astrophysics. GRBs are formed in extreme relativistic outflows and provide important information about highly relativistic acceleration mechanisms. Until 1997, no counterparts (quiescent as well as transient) could be found and observations did not provide a direct measurement of their distance. The breakthrough came in early 1997, when the Wide Field Cameras aboard the Italian-Dutch BeppoSAX satellite allowed rapid and accurate localization of GRBs. Follow-up on these positions resulted in the discovery of X-ray, optical and radio afterglows. These observations revealed that GRBs come from 'cosmological' distances, and that they are by far the most luminous photon sources in the Universe, with peak luminosities in γ rays up to 1052 erg/s, and total energy budgets up to several times 1053-54 erg (for assumed isotropic emission). Evidence is accumulating, however, that GRB outflow is collimated in the form of jets and when corrected for the geometry of the outflow the energies of GRBs appear to cluster around 5 x 1050 ergs- very comparable to that of supernovae. GRBs are rare phenomena with an overall rate about 2000 times smaller than that of supernovae. Indirect evidence in the last several years shows that a fraction of GRBs may be related to a peculiar type of supernova explosions. Theoretical work has shown that these supernovae most likely mark the birth events of stellar mass black holes as the final products of the evolution of very massive stars. A fundamental question is whether there are also other processes that can drive such an engine, for example the coalescence of a double neutron-star system. Finally, the

  11. Processes in afterglow responsible for initiation of electrical breakdown in xenon at low pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejović, Momčilo M.; Spasić, Ivana V.; Pejović, Milić M.; Nešić, Nikola T.; Brajović, Dragan V.; Brajović

    2013-10-01

    The processes responsible for initiation of electrical breakdown in xenon-filled tube with two spherical iron electrodes at 2.7-mbar pressure have been analyzed. The analysis is based on the experimental data of electrical breakdown time delay as a function of afterglow period. It is shown that positive ions remaining from previous discharge, as well as positive ions created in mutual collisions of metastable atoms in afterglow, have a dominant role in secondary emission of electrons from the cathode which lead to initiation of breakdown in early afterglow. In late afterglow, dominant role in initiation of breakdown is taken by N(4S) atoms formed during the discharge by dissociation of ground state nitrogen molecules that are present as impurities in xenon. When the concentration of N(4S) atoms decreases sufficiently, the initiation of breakdown is caused by cosmic radiation. Small doses of gamma-ray irradiation also contribute to the initiation of breakdown, but only for large values of the afterglow period.

  12. Dust Cloud Dynamics in Complex Plasma Afterglow

    SciTech Connect

    Layden, B.; Samarian, A. A.; Vladimirov, S. V.; Coueedel, L.

    2008-09-07

    Experimental observations of dust cloud dynamics in a RF discharge afterglow are presented. Image analysis is used to extract information from videos taken of the plasma. Estimations of the mean confining electric field have been made for different experimental conditions using a model for the contraction of the dust cloud. Dust particle trajectories in the late afterglow evidence the co-existence of positively and negatively charged dust particles.

  13. Characterization of the flowing afterglows of an N2 O2 reduced-pressure discharge: setting the operating conditions to achieve a dominant late afterglow and correlating the NOβ UV intensity variation with the N and O atom densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudam, M. K.; Saoudi, B.; Moisan, M.; Ricard, A.

    2007-03-01

    The flowing afterglow of an N2-O2 discharge in the 0.6-10 Torr range is examined in the perspective of achieving sterilization of medical devices (MDs) under conditions ensuring maximum UV intensity with minimum damage to polymer-based MDs. The early afterglow is shown to be responsible for creating strong erosion damage, requiring that the sterilizer be operated in a dominant late-afterglow mode. These two types of afterglow can be characterized by optical emission spectroscopy: the early afterglow is distinguished by an intense emission from the N_{2}^{+} 1st negative system (band head at 391.4 nm) while the late afterglow yields an overpopulation of the v' = 11 ro-vibrational level of the N2(B) state, indicating a reduced contribution from the early afterglow N2 metastable species. We have studied the influence of operating conditions (pressure, O2 content in the N2-O2 mixture, distance of the discharge from the entrance to the afterglow (sterilizer) chamber) in order to achieve a dominant late afterglow that also ensures maximum and almost uniform UV intensity in the sterilization chamber. As far as operating conditions are concerned, moving the plasma source sufficiently far from the chamber entrance is shown to be a practical means for significantly reducing the density of the characteristic species of the early afterglow. Using the NO titration method, we obtain the (absolute) densities of N and O atoms in the afterglow at the NO injection inlet, a few cm before the chamber entrance: the N atom density goes through a maximum at approximately 0.3-0.5% O2 and then decreases, while the O atom density increases regularly with the O2 percentage. The spatial variation of the N atom (relative) density in the chamber is obtained by recording the emission intensity from the 1st positive system at 580 nm: in the 2-5 Torr range, this density is quite uniform everywhere in the chamber. The (relative) densities of N and O atoms in the discharge are determined by using

  14. Shallow Decay of Early X-Ray Afterglows from Inhomogeneous Gamma-Ray Burst Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toma, Kenji; Ioka, Kunihito; Yamazaki, Ryo; Nakamura, Takashi

    2006-04-01

    Almost all the X-ray afterglows of γ-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by the Swift satellite have a shallow decay phase in their first few thousand seconds. We show that in an inhomogeneous-jet model (multiple-subjet or patchy-shell), the superposition of the afterglows of off-axis subjets (patchy shells) can produce the shallow decay phase. The necessary condition for obtaining the shallow decay phase is that γ-ray-bright subjets (patchy shells) have γ-ray efficiencies higher than previously estimated and that they be surrounded by γ-ray-dim subjets (patchy shells) with low γ-ray efficiency. Our model predicts that events with dim prompt emission will have a conventional afterglow light curve without a shallow decay phase, like GRB 050416A.

  15. Discovery of a tight correlation among the prompt emission properties of long gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firmani, C.; Ghisellini, G.; Avila-Reese, V.; Ghirlanda, G.

    2006-07-01

    We report the discovery of a correlation among three prompt emission properties of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). These are the isotropic peak luminosity Liso, the peak energy (in νLν) of the time-integrated prompt emission spectrum Epk, and the `high signal' time-scale T0.45, previously used to characterize the variability behaviour of bursts. In the rest frame of the source, the discovered correlation reads Liso ~ E1.62pkT-0.490.45. We find other strong correlations, but at the cost of increasing the number of variables, involving the variability and the isotropic energy of the prompt emission. With respect to the other tight correlations found in GRBs (i.e. between the collimation corrected energy Eγ and Epk, the so-called Ghirlanda correlation, and the phenomenological correlation among the isotropic emitted energy Eiso,Epk and the jet break time tbreak), the newly found correlation does not require any information from the afterglow phase of the bursts, nor any model-dependent assumption. In the popular scenario in which we are receiving beamed radiation originating in a fireball pointing at us, the discovered correlation preserves its form in the comoving frame. This helps to explain the small scatter of the correlation and underlines the role of the local brightness (i.e. the brightness of the visible fraction of the fireball surface). This correlation has been found with a relatively small number of objects and it is hard to establish if any selection bias affects it. Its connection with the prompt local brightness is promising, but a solid physical understanding is still to be found. Despite all that, we find that some properties of the correlation, which we discuss, support its true existence, and this has important implications for the GRB physics. Furthermore, it is possible to use such correlation as an accurate redshift estimator, and, more importantly, its tightness will allow us to use it as a tool to constrain the cosmological parameters.

  16. Investigating the Impact of Optical Selection Effects on Observed Rest-frame Prompt GRB Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turpin, D.; Heussaff, V.; Dezalay, J.-P.; Atteia, J.-L.; Klotz, A.; Dornic, D.

    2016-11-01

    Measuring gamma-ray burst (GRB) properties in their rest frame is crucial for understanding the physics at work in GRBs. This can only be done for GRBs with known redshifts. Since redshifts are usually measured from the optical spectrum of the afterglow, correlations between prompt and afterglow emissions may introduce biases into the distribution of the rest-frame properties of the prompt emission, especially considering that we measure the redshift of only one-third of Swift GRBs. In this paper, we study the optical flux of GRB afterglows and its connection to various intrinsic properties of GRBs. We also discuss the impact of the optical selection effect on the distribution of rest-frame prompt properties of GRBs. Our analysis is based on a sample of 90 GRBs with good optical follow-up and well-measured prompt emission. Seventy-six of them have a measure of redshift and 14 have no redshift. We compare the rest-frame prompt properties of GRBs with different afterglow optical fluxes in order to check for possible correlations between the promt properties and the optical flux of the afterglow. The optical flux is measured two hours after the trigger, which is a typical time for the measure of the redshift. We find that the optical flux of GRB afterglows in our sample is mainly driven by their optical luminosity and depends only slightly on their redshift. We show that GRBs with low and high afterglow optical fluxes have similar E {}{{pi}}, E {}{{iso}}, and L {}{{iso}}, indicating that the rest-frame distributions computed from GRBs with a redshift are not significantly distorted by optical selection effects. However, we found that the {T}90{rest} distribution is not immune to optical selection effects, which favor the selection of GRBs with longer durations. Finally, we note that GRBs well above the E {}{{pi}}–E {}{{iso}} relation have lower optical fluxes and we show that optical selection effects favor the detection of GRBs with bright optical afterglows

  17. An Achromatic Break in the Afterglow of the Short GRB 140903A: Evidence for a Narrow Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troja, E.; Sakamoto, T.; Cenko, S. B.; Lien, A.; Gehrels, N.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Ricci, R.; Capone, J.; Toy, V.; Kutyrev, A.; Kawai, N.; Cucchiara, A.; Fruchter, A.; Gorosabel, J.; Jeong, S.; Levan, A.; Perley, D.; Sanchez-Ramirez, R.; Tanvir, N.; Veilleux, S.

    2016-08-01

    We report the results of our observing campaign on GRB 140903A, a nearby (z = 0.351) short-duration (T 90 ˜ 0.3 s) gamma-ray burst discovered by Swift. We monitored the X-ray afterglow with Chandra up to 15 days after the burst and detected a steeper decay of the X-ray flux after t j ≈ 1 day. Continued monitoring at optical and radio wavelengths showed a similar decay in flux at nearly the same time, and we interpret it as evidence of a narrowly collimated jet. By using the standard fireball model to describe the afterglow evolution, we derive a jet opening angle θ j ≈ 5° and a collimation-corrected total energy release E ≈ 2 × {10}50 erg. We further discuss the nature of the GRB progenitor system. Three main lines disfavor a massive star progenitor: the properties of the prompt gamma-ray emission, the age and low star formation rate of the host galaxy, and the lack of a bright supernova. We conclude that this event likely originated from a compact binary merger.

  18. ON THE ORIGIN OF > 10 GeV PHOTONS IN GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiangyu; Liu Ruoyu; Lemoine, Martin

    2013-07-10

    Fermi/LAT has detected long-lasting high-energy photons (>100 MeV) from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), with the highest energy photons reaching about 100 GeV. One proposed scenario is that they are produced by high-energy electrons accelerated in GRB forward shocks via synchrotron radiation. We study the maximum synchrotron photon energy in this scenario, considering the properties of the microturbulence magnetic fields behind the shock, as revealed by recent particle-in-cell simulations and theoretical analyses of relativistic collisionless shocks. Due to the small-scale nature of the microturbulent magnetic field, the Bohm acceleration approximation, in which the scattering mean free path is equal to the particle Larmor radius, breaks down at such high energies. This effect leads to a typical maximum synchrotron photon of a few GeV at 100 s after the burst and this maximum synchrotron photon energy decreases quickly with time. We show that the fast decrease of the maximum synchrotron photon energy leads to a fast decay of the synchrotron flux. The 10-100 GeV photons detected after the prompt phase cannot be produced by the synchrotron mechanism. They could originate from the synchrotron self-Compton emission of the early afterglow if the circumburst density is sufficiently large, or from the external inverse Compton process in the presence of central X-ray emission, such as X-ray flares and prompt high-latitude X-ray emission.

  19. Study of nitrogen flowing afterglow with mercury vapor injection

    SciTech Connect

    Mazánková, V. Krčma, F.; Trunec, D.

    2014-10-21

    The reaction kinetics in nitrogen flowing afterglow with mercury vapor addition was studied by optical emission spectroscopy. The DC flowing post-discharge in pure nitrogen was created in a quartz tube at the total gas pressure of 1000 Pa and discharge power of 130 W. The mercury vapors were added into the afterglow at the distance of 30 cm behind the active discharge. The optical emission spectra were measured along the flow tube. Three nitrogen spectral systems – the first positive, the second positive, and the first negative, and after the mercury vapor addition also the mercury resonance line at 254 nm in the spectrum of the second order were identified. The measurement of the spatial dependence of mercury line intensity showed very slow decay of its intensity and the decay rate did not depend on the mercury concentration. In order to explain this behavior, a kinetic model for the reaction in afterglow was developed. This model showed that the state Hg(6 {sup 3}P{sub 1}), which is the upper state of mercury UV resonance line at 254 nm, is produced by the excitation transfer from nitrogen N{sub 2}(A{sup 3}Σ{sup +}{sub u}) metastables to mercury atoms. However, the N{sub 2}(A{sup 3}Σ{sup +}{sub u}) metastables are also produced by the reactions following the N atom recombination, and this limits the decay of N{sub 2}(A{sup 3}Σ{sup +}{sub u}) metastable concentration and results in very slow decay of mercury resonance line intensity. It was found that N atoms are the most important particles in this late nitrogen afterglow, their volume recombination starts a chain of reactions which produce excited states of molecular nitrogen. In order to explain the decrease of N atom concentration, it was also necessary to include the surface recombination of N atoms to the model. The surface recombination was considered as a first order reaction and wall recombination probability γ = (1.35 ± 0.04) × 10{sup −6} was determined from the experimental data. Also

  20. Radio observations of GRB 100418a: Test of an energy injection model explaining long-lasting GRB afterglows

    SciTech Connect

    Moin, A.; Wang, Z.; Chandra, P.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Tingay, S. J.; Reynolds, C.; Taylor, G. B.; Frail, D. A.; Phillips, C. J.

    2013-12-20

    We present the results of our radio observational campaign of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 100418a, for which we used the Australia Telescope Compact Array, the Very Large Array, and the Very Long Baseline Array. GRB 100418a was a peculiar GRB with unusual X-ray and optical afterglow profiles featuring a plateau phase with a very shallow rise. This observed plateau phase was believed to be due to a continued energy injection mechanism that powered the forward shock, giving rise to an unusual and long-lasting afterglow. The radio afterglow of GRB 100418a was detectable several weeks after the prompt emission. We conducted long-term monitoring observations of the afterglow and attempted to test the energy injection model advocating that the continuous energy injection is due to shells of material moving at a wide range of Lorentz factors. We obtained an upper limit of γ < 7 for the expansion rate of the GRB 100418a radio afterglow, indicating that the range-of-Lorentz factor model could only be applicable for relatively slow-moving ejecta. A preferred explanation could be that continued activity of the central engine may have powered the long-lasting afterglow.

  1. Constraints on an Optical Afterglow and on Supernova Light Following the Short Burst GRB 050813

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrero, P.; Sanchez, S. F.; Kann, D. A.; Klose, S.; Greiner, J.; Gorosabel, J.; Hartmann, D. H.; Henden, A. A.; Moller, P.; Palazzi, E.; Rau, A.; Stecklum, B.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Fynbok J. P. U.; Hjorth, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Kouveliotou, C.; Masetti, N.; Pian, E.; Tanvir, N. R.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2006-01-01

    We report early follow-up observations of the error box of the short burst 050813 using the telescopes at Calar Alto and at Observatorio Sierra Nevada (OSN), followed by deep VLT/FORS2 I-band observations obtained under very good seeing conditions 5.7 and 11.7 days after the event. No evidence for a GRB afterglow was found in our Calar Alto and OSN data, no rising supernova component was detected in our FORS2 images. A potential host galaxy can be identified in our FORS2 images, even though we cannot state with certainty its association with GRB 050813. IN any case, the optical afterglow of GRB 050813 was very faint, well in agreement with what is known so far about the optical properties of afterglows of short bursts. We conclude that all optical data are not in conflict with the interpretation that GRB 050813 was a short burst.

  2. Revisiting the dispersion measure of fast radio bursts associated with gamma-ray burst afterglows

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yun-Wei

    2014-12-01

    Some fast radio bursts (FRBs) are expected to be associated with the afterglow emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), while a short-lived, supermassive neutron star (NS) forms during the GRBs. I investigate the possible contributions to the dispersion measure (DM) of the FRBs from the GRB ejecta and the wind blown from the precollapsing NS. On the one hand, sometimes an internal X-ray plateau afterglow could be produced by the NS wind, which indicates that a great number of electron-positron pairs are carried by the wind. If the pair-generation radius satisfies a somewhat rigorous condition, the relativistic and dense wind would contribute a high DM to the associated FRB, which can be comparable to and even exceed the DM contributed by the intergalactic medium. On the other hand, if the wind only carries a Goldreich-Julian particle flux, its DM contribution would become negligible; meanwhile, the internal plateau afterglow would not appear. Alternatively, the FRB should be associated with a GRB afterglow produced by the GRB external shock, i.e., an energy-injection-caused shallow-decay afterglow or a normal single-power-law afterglow if the impulsive energy release of the GRB is high enough. In the latter case, the DM contributed by the high-mass GRB ejecta could be substantially important, in particular, for an environment of main-sequence stellar wind. In summary, a careful assessment on the various DM contributors could be required for the cosmological application of the expected FRB-GRB association. The future DM measurements of GRB-associated FRBs could provide a constraint on the physics of NS winds.

  3. Synthesis of ZnS:Ag,Co water-soluble blue afterglow nanoparticles and application in photodynamic activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lun; Zou, Xiaoju; Hossu, Marius; Chen, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Silver and cobalt co-doped ZnS (ZnS:Ag,Co) water-soluble afterglow nanoparticles were synthesized using a wet chemistry method followed by aging at room temperature. The nanoparticles had a cubic zinc blende structure with average sizes of approximately 4 nm and emitted a blue fluorescence emission centered at 441 nm due to radiative transitions from surface defects to Ag+ luminescent centers. Intense afterglow emission peaking at 475 nm from the obtained nanoparticles was observed and was red-shifted compared to the fluorescence emission peak. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed a large increase of O/S ratio, indicating a surface oxidation process during aging. The S vacancies produced accordingly may contribute to form more electron traps and enhance afterglow. The ZnS:Ag,Co afterglow nanoparticles have a very low dark-toxicity and are applied as a light source for photodynamic therapy activation by conjugating with protoporphyrin together. Our preliminary study has shown that the ZnS:Ag,Co afterglow nanoparticles can significantly reduce the x-ray dosage used in activation and thus may be a very promising candidate for future x-ray excited photodynamic therapy in deep cancer treatment.

  4. Emission properties of biomimetic composites for dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seredin, P. V.; Goloshchapov, D. L.; Kashkarov, V. M.; Ippolitov, Yu. A.; Prutskij, T.

    Biocomposites based on carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite synthesized from the biological source of calcium (Goloshchapov et al., 2013) and organic primer on the basis of amino acids found in the enamel tubules of teeth, namely, arginine, histidine, lysine and hyaluronic acid were obtained and studied in this work. Incorporation of organic primer into biocomposite formulation allowed us to obtain the emission characteristics (luminescence) that were identical to those inherent to the native tissues of the human tooth (enamel and dentine).

  5. rf-generated ambient-afterglow plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shakir, Shariff; Mynampati, Sandhya; Pashaie, Bijan; Dhali, Shirshak K.

    2006-04-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasmas have gained importance due to their potential application in polymer surface treatment, surface cleaning of metals, thin film deposition, and destruction of biological hazards. In this paper a radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure afterglow plasma source in argon and helium is discussed. The light intensity measurement shows that the radio-frequency discharge is continuous in time unlike the intermittent nature of a low frequency dielectric-barrier discharge. The discharge, under ambient conditions, can be generated in argon, helium, and nitrogen. Spectroscopic measurements show that metastables are capable of producing oxygen atoms and other excited species. The argon afterglow, in particular, is capable of dissociating oxygen molecules in the ambient gas. An afterglow model has been developed to study the interaction of the plasma with the ambient gas. Results from applications of the plasma to surface treatment of metals and polymers, and bacterial decontamination are briefly discussed.

  6. GRB afterglows in the nonrelativistic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. F.; Lu, T.

    2008-10-01

    When discussing the afterglows of gamma-ray bursts analytically, it is usually assumed that the external shock is always ultra-relativisitc, with the bulk Lorentz factor much larger than 1. However, we show that the deceleration of the external shock is actually very quick. The afterglow may typically enter the nonrelativistic phase in several days to teens of days, and may even enter the deep Newtonian phase in tens of days to several months. One thus should be careful in using those familiar analytical expressions that are derived only under the ultra-relativistic assumption. To explain the observed afterglows that typically last for a few weeks to several months, we need to consider the dynamics and radiation in the nonrelativisitic phase.

  7. FROM ENGINE TO AFTERGLOW: COLLAPSARS NATURALLY PRODUCE TOP-HEAVY JETS AND EARLY-TIME PLATEAUS IN GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Duffell, Paul C.; MacFadyen, Andrew I. E-mail: macfadyen@nyu.edu

    2015-06-20

    We demonstrate that the steep decay and long plateau in the early phases of gamma-ray burst X-ray afterglows are naturally produced in the collapsar model, by a means ultimately related to the dynamics of relativistic jet propagation through a massive star. We present two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations that start from a collapsar engine and evolve all the way through the late afterglow phase. The resultant outflow includes a jet core that is highly relativistic after breaking out of the star, but becomes baryon loaded after colliding with a massive outer shell, corresponding to mass from the stellar atmosphere of the progenitor star which became trapped in front of the jet core at breakout. The prompt emission produced before or during this collision would then have the signature of a high Lorentz factor jet, but the afterglow is produced by the amalgamated post-collision ejecta that has more inertia than the original highly relativistic jet core and thus has a delayed deceleration. This naturally explains the early light curve behavior discovered by Swift, including a steep decay and a long plateau, without invoking late-time energy injection from the central engine. The numerical simulation is performed continuously from engine to afterglow, covering a dynamic range of over 10 orders of magnitude in radius. Light curves calculated from the numerical output demonstrate that this mechanism reproduces basic features seen in early afterglow data. Initial steep decays are produced by internal shocks, and the plateau corresponds to the coasting phase of the outflow.

  8. Prompt Emission Properties of Swift GRBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, T.; Barthelmy, S.; Baumgartner, W.; Cummings, J.; Fenimore, E.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H.; Markwardt, Craig B.; Palmer, D.; Parsons, A.; Sato, G.; Stamatikos, M.; Tueller, J.; Ukwatta, T.

    2010-01-01

    We present the results from the second Swift BAT catalog of 476 gamma-ray bursts, which contains bursts detected by the BAT between 2004 December 19 and 2009 December 21. In addition to the spectral and temporal parameters extracted from the first BAT GRB catalog, 3324 time-resolved spectra have been extracted and analyzed. We show and discuss 1) the duration distribution, 2) the hardness of short GRBs, 3) Epeak distribution, 4) the line of death problem and 5) an additional power-law component in the prompt emission spectrum.

  9. Advances in flowing afterglow and selected-ion flow tube techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squires, Robert R.

    1992-09-01

    New developments in flowing afterglow and selected-ion flow tube (SIFT) techniques are briefly reviewed. Particular emphasis is given to the new chemical and physical information that can be obtained with use of the tandem flowing afterglow-triple quadrupole apparatus developed in the author's laboratory. Several outstanding recent achievements in the design and utilization of flowing afterglow and SIFT instruments in other laboratories are briefly highlighted that illustrate the power and flexibility of flow-tube-based methods. These include isotope tracer experiments with the tandem flowing afterglow-SIFT instrument in Boulder, studies of large molecular cluster ions with the variable temperature facility at Penn State, and gas-phase metal ion reactions with the laser ablation/fast flow reactor in Madison. Recent applications of the flowing afterglow-triple quadrupole instrument in our laboratory have made use of collision-induced dissociation (CID) as a tool for synthesizing novel ions and for obtaining new thermo-chemical information from threshold energy measurements. Collision-induced decar☐ylation of organic car☐ylate ions provides access to a variety of unusual and highly basic carbanions that cannot be generated with conventional ion sources. The formation and properties of saturated alkyl ions and studies of gas-phase reactions of the methyl anion are briefly described. We have developed a new method for carrying out "preparative CID" in a flowing afterglow with use of a mini-drift tube; some recent applications of this new ion source are presented. Measurement of CID thresholds for simple cleavage reactions of thermalized ions can provide accurate measures of bond strengths, gas-phase acidities and basicities, and heats of formation for ions and reactive neutral species. Applications of this approach in the thermochemical characterization of carbenes, benzynes and biradicals are described. Future prospects for the continued development of flow

  10. Afterglow Observations Shed New Light on the Nature of X-ray Flashes

    SciTech Connect

    Granot, J

    2005-02-17

    X-ray flashes (XRFs) and X-ray rich gamma-ray bursts (XRGRBs) share many observational characteristics with long duration ({approx}> 2 s) GRBs, but the reason for which the spectral energy distribution of their prompt emission peaks at lower photon energies, E{sub p}, is still a subject of debate. Although many different models have been invoked in order to explain the lower values of E{sub p}, their implications for the afterglow emission were not considered in most cases, mainly because observations of XRF afterglows have become available only recently. Here we examine the predictions of the various XRF models for the afterglow emission, and test them against the observations of XRF 030723 and XRGRB 041006, the events with the best monitored afterglow light curves in their respective class. We show that most existing XRF models are hard to reconcile with the observed afterglow light curves, which are very flat at early times. Such light curves are, however, naturally produced by a roughly uniform jet with relatively sharp edges that is viewed off-axis (i.e. from outside of the jet aperture). This type of model self consistently accommodates both the observed prompt emission and the afterglow light curves of XRGRB 041006 and XRF 030723, implying viewing angles {theta}{sub obs} from the jet axis of ({theta}{sub obs}-{theta}{sub 0}) {approx} 0.15 {theta}{sub 0} and ({theta}{sub obs}-{theta}{sub 0}) {approx} {theta}{sub 0}, respectively, where {theta}{sub 0} {approx} 3{sup o} is the half-opening angle of the jet. This suggests that GRBs, XRGRBs and XRFs are intrinsically similar relativistic jets viewed from different angles. It is then natural to identify GRBs with {gamma}({theta}{sub obs} - {theta}{sub 0}) {approx}< 1, XRGRBs with 1 {approx}< ({theta}{sub obs} - {theta}{sub 0}) {approx}< a few, and XRFs with {gamma}({theta}{sub obs} - {theta}{sub 0}) {approx}> a few, where {gamma} is the Lorentz factor of the outflow near the edge of the jet from which most of the

  11. A possible explanation for the radio afterglow of GRB 980519: the dense medium effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. Y.; Dai, Z. G.; Lu, T.

    2000-09-01

    GRB 980519 is characterized by its rapidly declining optical and X-ray afterglows. Explanations of this behaviour include models invoking a dense medium environment, which makes the shock wave evolve quickly into the subrelativistic phase, a jet-like outflow, and a wind-shaped circumburst medium environment. Recently, Frail et al. found that the latter two cases are consistent with the radio afterglow of this burst. Here, by considering the transrelativistic shock hydrodynamics, we show that the dense medium model can also account for the radio light curve quite well. The potential virtue of the dense medium model for GRB 980519 is that it implies a smaller angular size of the afterglow, which is essential for interpreting the strong modulation of the radio light curve. Optical extinction arising from the dense medium is not important if the prompt optical-UV flash accompanying the γ-ray emission can destroy dust by sublimation out to an appreciable distance. Comparisons with some other radio afterglows are also discussed.

  12. On the Electron Energy Distribution Index of Swift Gamma-ray Burst Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, P. A.; Evans, P. A.; de Pasquale, M.; Page, M. J.; van der Horst, A. J.

    2010-06-01

    The electron energy distribution index, p, is a fundamental parameter of the synchrotron emission from a range of astronomical sources. Here we examine one such source of synchrotron emission, gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows observed by the Swift satellite. Within the framework of the blast wave model, we examine the constraints placed on the distribution of p by the observed X-ray spectral indices and parameterize the distribution. We find that the observed distribution of spectral indices are inconsistent with an underlying distribution of p composed of a single discrete value but consistent with a Gaussian distribution centered at p = 2.36 and having a width of 0.59. Furthermore, accepting that the underlying distribution is a Gaussian, we find that the majority (gsim94%) of GRB afterglows in our sample have cooling break frequencies less than the X-ray frequency.

  13. Optical and field emission properties of Zinc Oxide nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hui; Zhu, Yanwu; Ni, Zhenhua; Sun, Han; Poh, Cheekok; Lim, Sanhua; Sow, Chornghaur; Shen, Zexiang; Feng, Yuanping; Lin, Jianyi

    2005-10-01

    Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nano-pikes were produced by oxidative evaporation and condensation of Zn powders. The crystalline structure and optical properties of the ZnO nanostructures (ZnONs) greatly depend on the deposition position of the ZnONs. TEM and XRD indicated that the ZnONs close to the reactor center, ZnON-A, has better crystalline structure than the ZnONs away from the center, ZnON-B. ZnON-A showed the PL and Raman spectra characteristic of perfect ZnO crystals, whereas ZnON-B produced very strong green emission band at 500 nm in the photoluminescence (PL) spectrum and very strong Raman scattering peak at 560 cm(-1), both related to the oxygen deficiency due to insufficient oxidation of zinc vapor. ZnON-B exhibited better field emission properties with higher emission current density and lower turn-on field than ZnON-A.

  14. Evidence for a Canonical GRB Afterglow Light Curve in the Swift/XRT Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nousek, J. A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Grupe, D.; Page, K.; Granot, J.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Patel, S. K.; Burrows, D. N.; Mangano, V.; Barthelmy, S.

    2005-01-01

    We present new observations of the early X-ray afterglows of the first 27 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected with the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT). The early X-ray afterglows show a canonical behavior, where the light curve broadly consists of three distinct power law segments. These power law segments are separated by two corresponding break times. On top of this canonical behavior of the early X-ray light curve, many events have superimposed X-ray flares, which are most likely caused by internal shocks due to long lasting sporadx activity of the central engine, up to several hours after the GRB. We find that the initial steep decay is consistent with it being the tail of the prompt emission: from photons that are radiated at large angles relative to our line of sight. The first break in the light curve takes place when the forward shock emission becomes dominant, with the intermediate shallow flux decay likely caused by the continuous energy injection into the external shock. When this energy injection stops, a second break is then observed in the light curve. This energy injection increases the energy of the afterglow shock by at least a factor of f greater than or approx. equal to 4, and augments the already severe requirements for the efficiency of the prompt gamma-ray emission.

  15. GRB 110530A: Peculiar Broad Bump and Delayed Plateau in Early Optical Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Shu-Qing; Xin, Li-Ping; Liang, En-Wei; Wei, Jian-Yan; Urata, Yuji; Huang, Kui-Yun; Qiu, Yu-Lei; Deng, Can-Min; Wang, Yuan-Zhu; Deng, Jin-Song

    2016-11-01

    We report our very early optical observations of GRB 110530A and investigate its jet properties together with its X-ray afterglow data. A peculiar broad onset bump followed by a plateau is observed in its early R band afterglow light curve. The optical data in the other bands and the X-ray data are well consistent with the temporal feature of the R band light curve. Our joint spectral fits of the optical and X-ray data show that they are in the same regime, with a photon index of ∼1.70. The optical and X-ray afterglow light curves are well fitted with the standard external shock model by considering a delayed energy injection component. Based on our modeling results, we find that the radiative efficiency of the gamma-ray burst jet is ∼ 1 % and the magnetization parameter of the afterglow jet is \\lt 0.04 with a derived extremely low {ε }B (the ratio of shock energy to the magnetic field) of (1.64+/- 0.25)× {10}-6. These results indicate that the jet may be matter dominated. A discussion on delayed energy injection from the accretion of the late fall-back material of its pre-supernova star is also presented.

  16. Synthesis, characterization and field emission properties of nanotubes and nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lifeng

    2005-11-01

    In this study, we investigated several novel methods to synthesize carbon nanotubes and nanowires of various compositions with controlled properties, utilized electron microscopy and microanalysis techniques to study their growth mechanisms and effects of growth parameters on their internal structures and morphologies, and set up a field emission microscope and a field emission probe system to study field emission properties of single nanotube/nanowires and thin films of nanostructures. The introduction of H2 during catalyst activation and nanotube growth periods thermodynamically and kinetically facilitates the formation of high quality nanotubes. With the inclusion of H2, the nanotube diameter decreased from 300 nm to 15 nm and growth rate increased from 78 nm/s to 145 nm/s. The growth location and orientation of carbon nanotubes to substrates can be controlled by the position and density of catalysts, respectively. Focused Ion Beam (FIB) techniques were utilized to confine catalyst locations and to directly deposit patterned catalyst precursors. Nanotube internal structures including graphitization and number of graphite layers can be tailored using different hydrocarbon gases (CH4 or C2H2) as carbon sources or by varying catalyst elements (Fe, Ni, or Co). Besides effects of nanoscale radius and high aspect ratio, the internal structures of carbon nanotubes greatly affects their field mission properties including turn-on field, threshold field and enhancement factor. Carbon nanotubes from Fe or Co demonstrate better field emission properties than those from Ni. At high electric fields, nanotube emission deviates from the Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) theory due to space charge and field emission-induced temperature effects. Also, an abnormal noise power spectral density (PSD) peak was observed at the space charge regime and PSD decreases with the increase of emission current due to Joule self-heating. In order to investigate field emission properties of nanostructures

  17. Synthesis and luminescent properties of Sr3Al2O5Cl2: Eu2+, Dy3+ rod-like nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhengliang; Zhang, Qiuhan; Rong, Meizhu; Tan, Huiying; Wang, Qin; Zhou, Qiang; Chen, Guo

    2016-08-01

    White long afterglow phosphor with nano-rods, Sr3Al2O5Cl2: Eu2+, Dy3+, has been successfully synthesized by the solid state reaction. Their structure, morphology, scanning electron microscopy, luminescent properties and long afterglow properties were investigated by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy luminescence spectra and the luminescence decay curve. The obtained phosphor Sr3Al2O5Cl2: Eu2+, Dy3+ exhibits two broad emission bands, which are located at ∼445 nm and ∼590 nm, respectively. White light can be observed from this phosphor with appropriate CIE values (x = 0.357, y = 0.332). The white afterglow duration of this phosphor is about 0.5 h (>0.35 mcd/m2).

  18. Fundamental properties of field emission-driven direct current microdischarges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumbach, Paul; Go, David B.

    2012-11-01

    For half a century, it has been known that the onset of field emission in direct current microdischarges with gap sizes less than 10 μm can lead to breakdown at applied voltages far less than predicted by Paschen's law. It is still unclear how field emission affects other fundamental plasma properties at this scale. In this work, a one-dimensional fluid model is used to predict basic scaling laws for fundamental properties including ion density, electric field due to space charge, and current-voltage relations in the pre-breakdown regime. Computational results are compared with approximate analytic solutions. It is shown that field emission provides an abundance of cathode electrons, which in turn create large ion concentrations through ionizing collisions well before Paschen's criterion for breakdown is met. Breakdown due to ion-enhanced field emission occurs when the electric field due to space charge becomes comparable to the applied electric field. Simple scaling analysis of the 1D Poisson equation demonstrates that an ion density of n+ ≈ 0.1VAɛ0/qd2 is necessary to significantly distort the electric field. Defining breakdown in terms of this critical ion density leads analytically to a simple, effective secondary emission coefficient γ' of the same mathematical form initially suggested by Boyle and Kisliuk [Phys. Rev. 97, 255 (1955)].

  19. Optical properties and emissivities of liquid metals and alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, Shankar; Nordine, Paul C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the results from our on-going program to investigate the optical properties of liquid metals and alloys at elevated temperatures. Ellipsometric and polarimetric techniques have been used to investigate the optical properties of materials in the 1000 - 3000 K temperature range and in the 0.3 - 0.1 mu m wavelength range. The ellipsometric and polarimetric techniques are described and the characteristics of the instruments are presented. The measurements are conducted by reflecting a polarized laser beam from an electromagnetically levitated liquid metal or alloy specimen. A Rotating Analyzer Ellipsometer (RAE) or a four-detector Division-of-Amplitude Photopolarimeter (DOAP) is used to determine the polarimetric properties of the light reflected at an angle of incidence of approximately 68 deg. Optical properties of the specimen which are calculated from these measurements include the index of refraction, extinction coefficient, normal spectral emissivity, and spectral hemispherical emissivity. These properties have been determined at various wavelengths and temperatures for liquid Ag, Al, Au, Cu, Nb, Ni, Pd, Pt, Si, Ti, Ti-Al alloys, U, and Zr. We also describe new experiments using pulsed-dye laser spectroscopic ellipsometry for studies of the wavelength dependence of the emissivities and optical properties of materials at high temperature. Preliminary results are given for liquid Al. The application of four-detector polarimetry for rapid determination of surface emissivity and true temperature is also described. Characteristics of these devices are presented. An example of the accuracy of this instrument in measurements of the melting point of zirconium is illustrated.

  20. SED and Emission Line Properties of Red 2MASS AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuraszkiewicz, Joanna; Wilkes, Belinda J.; Schmidt, Gary; Ghosh, Himel

    2009-09-01

    Radio and far-IR surveys, and modeling of the cosmic X-ray background suggest that a large population of obscured AGN has been missed by traditional, optical surveys. The Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) has revealed a large population (surface density comparable to that of optically selected AGN with Ks<14.5mag) of mostly nearby (median z=0.25), red, moderately obscured AGN, among which 75% are previously unidentified emission-line AGN, with 85% showing broad emission lines. We present the SED and emission line properties of 44 such red (J-Ks>2) 2MASS AGN observed with Chandra. They lie at z<0.37, span a full range of spectral types (Type 1, intermediate, Type 2),Ks-to-X-ray slopes, and polarization (<13%). Their IR-to-X-ray spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are red in the near-IR/opt/UV showing little or no blue bump. The optical colors are affected by reddening, host galaxy emission, redshift, and in few, highly polarized objects, also by scattered AGN light. The levels of obscuration obtained from optical, X-rays, and far-IR imply N_H emission line equivalent widths, suggest a predominance of inclined objects in which obscuration/inclination allows us to see and study weaker emission components which are generally swamped by the direct AGN light. PCA analysis of the IR-X-ray SED and emission line properties shows that, while obscuration/inclination is important, the dominant cause of variance in the sample (eigenvector 1) is the L/L_{edd} ratio (perhaps because the red near-IR selection limits the range of inclination/obscuration values in our sample). This analysis also distinguishes two sources of obscuration: the host galaxy and circumnuclear absorption.

  1. The Swift XRT: Observations of Early X-ray Afterglows

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, David N.; Kennea, J. A.; Nousek, J. A.; Osborne, J. P.; O'Brien, P. T.; Chincarini, G.; Tagliaferri, G.; Giommi, P.; Zhang, B.

    2006-05-19

    During the first year of operations of the Swift observatory, the X-ray Telescope has made a number of discoveries concerning the nature of X-ray afterglows of both long and short GRBs. We highlight the key findings, which include rapid declines at early times, a standard template of afterglow light curve shapes, common flaring, and the discovery of the first short GRB afterglow.

  2. Snow property measurements correlative to microwave emission at 35 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Robert E.; Dozier, Jeff; Chang, Alfred T. C.

    1987-01-01

    Snow microstructure, measured by plane section analysis, and snow wetness, measured by the dilution method, are used to calculate input parameters for a microwave emission model that uses the radiative transfer method. The scattering and absorbing properties are calculated by Mie theory. The effects of different equivalent sphere conversions, adjustments for near-field interference, and different snow wetness characterizations are compared for various snow conditions. The concentric shell geometry of liquid water in snow yields higher emissivities and better model results than the separate-sphere configuration for liquid water contents greater than 0.05, while at lower liquid water contents the separate-sphere treatment gives better results.

  3. Snow property measurements correlative to microwave emission at 35 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. E.; Dozier, J.; Chang, A. T. C.

    1986-01-01

    Snow microstructure, measured by plane section analysis, and snow wetness, measured by the dilution method, are used to calculate input parameters for a microwave emission model that uses the radiative transfer method. The scattering and absorbing properties are calculated by Mie theory. The effects of different equivalent sphere conversions, adjustments for near-field interference, and different snow wetness characterizations are compared for various snow conditions. The concentric shell geometry of liquid water in snow yields higher emissivities and better model results than the separate-sphere configuration for liquid water contents greater than 0.05, while at lower liquid water contents the separate-sphere treatment gives better results.

  4. The afterglow of GRB 130427A from 1 to 10{sup 16} GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Perley, D. A.; Cenko, S. B.; Corsi, A.; Tanvir, N. R.; Wiersema, K.; Levan, A. J.; Kann, D. A.; Greiner, J.; Sonbas, E.; Zheng, W.; Clubb, K. I.; Zhao, X.-H.; Bai, J.-M.; Chang, L.; Bremer, M.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Fruchter, A.; Göğüş, E.; Güver, T.; and others

    2014-01-20

    We present multiwavelength observations of the afterglow of GRB 130427A, the brightest (in total fluence) gamma-ray burst (GRB) of the past 29 yr. Optical spectroscopy from Gemini-North reveals the redshift of the GRB to be z = 0.340, indicating that its unprecedented brightness is primarily the result of its relatively close proximity to Earth; the intrinsic luminosities of both the GRB and its afterglow are not extreme in comparison to other bright GRBs. We present a large suite of multiwavelength observations spanning from 300 s to 130 days after the burst and demonstrate that the afterglow shows relatively simple, smooth evolution at all frequencies, with no significant late-time flaring or rebrightening activity. The entire data set from 1 GHz to 10 GeV can be modeled as synchrotron emission from a combination of reverse and forward shocks in good agreement with the standard afterglow model, providing strong support to the applicability of the underlying theory and clarifying the nature of the GeV emission observed to last for minutes to hours following other very bright GRBs. A tenuous, wind-stratified circumburst density profile is required by the observations, suggesting a massive-star progenitor with a low mass-loss rate, perhaps due to low metallicity. GRBs similar in nature to GRB 130427A, inhabiting low-density media and exhibiting strong reverse shocks, are probably not uncommon but may have been difficult to recognize in the past owing to their relatively faint late-time radio emission; more such events should be found in abundance by the new generation of sensitive radio and millimeter instruments.

  5. Signature of a Spin-up Magnetar from Multi-band Afterglow Rebrightening of GRB 100814A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y. B.; Huang, Y. F.; Wu, X. F.; Xu, M.; Geng, J. J.

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, more and more gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with late rebrightenings in their multi-band afterglows have revealed the late-time activity of their central engines. GRB 100814A is a special case among the well-sampled events, with complex temporal and spectral evolution. The single power-law shallow decay index of the optical light curve observed by GROND between 640 s and 10 ks is {{α }opt}=0.57+/- 0.02, which apparently conflicts with expectations from the simple external shock model. In particular, there is remarkable rebrightening in the optical to near-infrared bands at late times, challenging the external shock model with synchrotron emission coming from the interaction of the blast wave with the surrounding interstellar medium. In this paper, we invoke a magnetar with spin evolution to explain the complex multi-band afterglow emission of GRB 100814A. The initial shallow decay phase in the optical bands and the plateau in the X-ray can be explained as being due to energy injection from a spin-down magnetar. At late times, with materials from the fall-back disk falling onto the central object of the burster, the angular momentum of the accreted materials is transferred to the magnetar, which leads to a spin up process. As a result, the magnetic dipole radiation luminosity will increase, resulting in significant rebrightening of the optical afterglow. We show that the model can well reproduce the observed multi-band afterglow emission.

  6. The X-ray afterglows of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, D.

    2014-07-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are renowned for being the brightest explosions since the Big Bang. They are extremely useful probes with which to study the cosmos, primarily because of their bright afterglows. While the afterglow is panchromatic, the X-ray afterglow has proved extremely useful: the first localisations of both short and long-duration GRBs were made via their X-ray afterglows, an X-ray afterglow is associated with almost every burst, and spectroscopy of the X-ray afterglow informs us of the material close to the GRB as well as providing an unobscured measurement of the afterglow flux for virtually every GRB. We now have an incredibly rich database of ten years worth of GRBs and their afterglows from the Swift satellite, where its rapid autonomous repointing has allowed its X-Ray Telescope to be on target only minutes after the GRB. Here I will review what we have learnt from the X-ray afterglows of GRBs and describe some exciting recent results.

  7. The distribution of equivalent widths in long GRB afterglow spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Thöne, C. C.; Christensen, L.; Gorosabel, J.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Schulze, S.; Jakobsson, P.; Wiersema, K.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Leloudas, G.; Zafar, T.; Malesani, D.; Hjorth, J.

    2012-12-01

    Context. The extreme brightness of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows and their simple spectral shape make them ideal beacons to study the interstellar medium of their host galaxies through absorption line spectroscopy at almost any redshift. Aims: We describe the distribution of rest-frame equivalent widths (EWs) of the most prominent absorption features in GRB afterglow spectra, providing the means to compare individual spectra to the sample and identify its peculiarities. Methods: Using 69 low-resolution GRB afterglow spectra, we conduct a study of the rest-frame EWs distribution of features with an average rest-frame EW larger than 0.5 Å. To compare an individual GRB with the sample, we develop EW diagrams as a graphical tool, and we give a catalogue with diagrams for the 69 spectra. We introduce a line strength parameter (LSP) that allows us to quantify the strength of the absorption features in a GRB spectrum as compared to the sample by a single number. Using the distributions of EWs of single-species features, we derive the distribution of their column densities by a curve of growth (CoG) fit. Results: We find correlations between the LSP and the extinction of the GRB, the UV brightness of the host galaxies and the neutral hydrogen column density. However, we see no significant evolution of the LSP with the redshift. There is a weak correlation between the ionisation of the absorbers and the energy of the GRB, indicating that, either the GRB event is responsible for part of the ionisation, or that galaxies with high-ionisation media produce more energetic GRBs. Spectral features in GRB spectra are, on average, 2.5 times stronger than those seen in QSO intervening damped Lyman-α (DLA) systems and slightly more ionised. In particular we find a larger excess in the EW of C ivλλ1549 relative to QSO DLAs, which could be related to an excess of Wolf-Rayet stars in the environments of GRBs. From the CoG fitting we obtain an average number of components in the

  8. Properties of a field emission-driven Townsend discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumbach, Paul; Go, David

    2012-10-01

    For half a century, it has been known that the onset of field emission in direct current (DC) microplasmas with gap sizes less than 10 μm can lead to breakdown at applied voltages far less than predicted by Paschen's law. It is still unclear how field emission affects other fundamental plasma properties at this scale. In this work, a one-dimensional fluid model is used to predict basic scaling laws for fundamental properties such as ion density, electric field due to space charge, and current voltage relations in the pre-breakdown regime. Computational results are compared with approximate analytic solutions. It is shown that ionizing collisions by field-emitted electrons produce significant ion densities well before Paschen's criteria for breakdown is met. When positive space charge densities become sufficiently large, the effect of ion-enhanced field emission leads to breakdown. Defining breakdown mathematically using a solvability condition leads to a full modified Paschen's curve, while defining it physically in terms of a critical ion density leads analytically to an effective secondary emission coefficient, γ', of the form initially suggested by Boyle and Kisliuk.footnotetextBoyle, W.S. and Kisliuk, P., Phys. Rev. 97, 255 (1955).

  9. Luminescence of divalent europium activated spinels synthesized by combustion and the enhanced afterglow by dysprosium incorporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haoyi; Jin, Yahong

    2016-05-01

    Herein we report a luminescent phenomenon of Eu2+ in the spinel MgAl2O4 and ZnAl2O4 samples which are successfully synthesized via a combustion method. The XRD shows cubic spinel structure is obtained from the prepared samples. The mean crystal sizes estimated from XRD data are 30 and 10 nm for MgAl2O4 and ZnAl2O4 respectively, and the large grain particles are the agglomeration of crystallites. The Eu2+ ions show a blue emission at around 480 nm and an afterglow phenomenon is observed after the removal of excitation. The afterglow spectrum of MgAl2O4: Eu2+, Dy3+ shows two emissions at 480 and 520 nm while only one at 480 nm is observed in ZnAl2O4: Eu2+, Dy3+. The afterglow intensity and the persisting duration can be substantially enhanced by the Dy3+ incorporation because the trapping ability of the electron traps is reinforced. This is confirmed by the TL curves of the samples.

  10. Crystal Composition and Afterglow in Mixed Silicates: The Role of Melting Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidletskiy, O.; Vedda, A.; Fasoli, M.; Neicheva, S.; Gektin, A.

    2015-08-01

    Modern applications of scintillator materials demand cutting-edge performances and require often a response speed in the nanosecond time scale. Slow light emission causing an "afterglow" is, therefore, of considerable concern in the development of fast scintillators. The mechanism of afterglow emission in mixed Ce-doped oxyorthosilicate scintillators is investigated by means of time-resolved scintillation, thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL), and radio-luminescence measurements. Various Ce-doped Lu2 xGd2 -2 xSiO5 oxyorthosilicate crystals (with x ranging from 0 to1) and Lu1.8Y0.2SiO5 grown by the Czochralski technique are considered. The detailed TSL analysis reveals that thermally assisted tunneling recombination of electrons trapped by oxygen vacancies with holes trapped by Ce luminescence centers occurs for all compositions. The reduction of the afterglow intensity by adding gadolinium or yttrium into the host is accompanied by a lowering of the traps concentration, as deduced by the TSL intensity. Such lowering of the oxygen vacancy concentrations is found to be correlated with the decrease of the melting temperature induced by gadolinium or yttrium content increase, which governs the oxygen vapor pressure. The occurrence of a similar mechanism also in other scintillators and its influence on carrier trapping is discussed.

  11. Characterization of a Plasmoid in the Afterglow of a Supersonic Flowing Microwave Discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, D. J.; Miller, S.; Nikolic, M.; Popovic, S.; Vuskovic, L.

    2009-01-01

    We performed a detailed characterization a plasmoid in the afterglow region of an Ar supersonic microwave cavity discharge. The supersonic flow was generated using a convergent-divergent nozzle upstream of the discharge region. A cylindrical cavity was used to sustain a discharge in the pressure range of 100-600 Pa. Optical emission spectroscopy was used to observe populations of excited and ionic species in the plasmoid region. Plasmoid formation in the supersonic flowing afterglow located downstream from the primary microwave cavity discharge was characterized by measuring the radial and axial distributions of Argon excited states and Argon ions. More experiments are being carried out on the plasmoid to understand the discharge parameters within the region, i.e. rotational temperature, vibrational temperature, electron density, and how the electrodynamic and aerodynamic effects combine to form this plasmoid.

  12. Erosion of a-C:H in the afterglow of ammonia plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drenik, Aleksander; Mourkas, Angelos; Zaplotnik, Rok; Primc, Gregor; Mozetič, Miran; Panjan, Peter; Alegre, Daniel; Tabarés, Francisco L.

    2016-07-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) deposits were eroded in the afterglow of a NH3 plasma, created with an inductively coupled RF generator in pure NH3 at the gas pressure of 50 Pa. The plasma system was characterised by optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, and the erosion process was monitored in-situ with a laser interferometry system. Based on the mass spectrometry measurements, the degree of dissociation of the NH3 molecules was estimated at 90% at the highest generator forward power in the discharge region, however the densities of N and H atoms were significantly smaller at the location of the sample holder. The erosion rates were found to increase with surface temperature and forward generator power. In the high dissociation regime, the composition of the afterglow and the reaction products highlight the role of N atoms in the erosion process.

  13. Evaluation of the temporal profiles and the analytical features of a laser ablation - Pulsed glow discharge coupling for optical emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González de Vega, Claudia; Bordel, Nerea; Pereiro, Rosario; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2016-07-01

    The coupling of a glow discharge (GD) in pulsed mode (PGD) as secondary source for excitation/ionization of the material provided by laser ablation (LA) has been investigated using optical emission spectrometry (OES). The variation of the laser pulse delay with respect to the GD pulse allows to producing the ablation process during prepeak, plateau or afterglow GD regions. Emission properties of the LA-PGD plasma in each temporal region of the GD pulse have been evaluated for analytical lines of different elements. Resonant atomic lines have shown higher emission intensity in the prepeak region compared to non-resonant lines. Non-resonant lines showed higher enhancement of the emission intensity in the afterglow region. Moreover, the coupled LA-PGD system offered better linear correlation coefficients using a set of glass standards for calibration as well as lower detection limits (by at least a factor of two) when compared to laser induced breakdown spectroscopy.

  14. Understanding the Flowing Atmospheric-Pressure Afterglow (FAPA) Ambient Ionization Source through Optical Means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelley, Jacob T.; Chan, George C.-Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2012-02-01

    The advent of ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS) has led to the development of a large number of atmospheric-pressure ionization sources. The largest group of such sources is based on electrical discharges; yet, the desorption and ionization processes that they employ remain largely uncharacterized. Here, the atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) and afterglow of a helium flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (FAPA) ionization source were examined by optical emission spectroscopy. Spatial emission profiles of species created in the APGD and afterglow were recorded under a variety of operating conditions, including discharge current, electrode polarity, and plasma-gas flow rate. From these studies, it was found that an appreciable amount of atmospheric H2O vapor, N2, and O2 diffuses through the hole in the plate electrode into the discharge to become a major source of reagent ions in ADI-MS analyses. Spatially resolved plasma parameters, such as OH rotational temperature (Trot) and electron number density (ne), were also measured in the APGD. Maximum values for Trot and ne were found to be ~1100 K and ~4 × 1019 m-3, respectively, and were both located at the pin cathode. In the afterglow, rotational temperatures from OH and N{2/+} yielded drastically different values, with OH temperatures matching those obtained from infrared thermography measurements. The higher N{2/+} temperature is believed to be caused by charge-transfer ionization of N2 by He{2/+}. These findings are discussed in the context of previously reported ADI-MS analyses with the FAPA source.

  15. Afterglows from the largest explosions in the universe

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Dieter H.

    1999-01-01

    The distinction of “largest explosions in the universe” has been bestowed on cosmic gamma-ray bursts. Their afterglows are brighter than supernovae and therefore are called hypernovae. Photometry and spectroscopy of these afterglows have provided major breakthroughs in our understanding of this mysterious phenomenon. PMID:10220364

  16. Field emission properties of ZnO nanosheet arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Naik, Kusha Kumar; Rout, Chandra Sekhar E-mail: dj.late@ncl.res.in E-mail: csrout@iitbbs.ac.in; Khare, Ruchita; More, Mahendra A.; Chakravarty, Disha; Late, Dattatray J. E-mail: dj.late@ncl.res.in E-mail: csrout@iitbbs.ac.in; Thapa, Ranjit E-mail: dj.late@ncl.res.in E-mail: csrout@iitbbs.ac.in

    2014-12-08

    Electron emission properties of electrodeposited ZnO nanosheet arrays grown on Indium tin oxide coated glass substrates have been studied. Influence of oxygen vacancies on electronic structures and field emission properties of ZnO nanosheets are investigated using density functional theory. The oxygen vacancies produce unshared d electrons which form an impurity energy state; this causes shifting of Fermi level towards the vacuum, and so the barrier energy for electron extraction reduces. The ZnO nanosheet arrays exhibit a low turn-on field of 2.4 V/μm at 0.1 μA/cm{sup 2} and current density of 50.1 μA/cm{sup 2} at an applied field of 6.4 V/μm with field enhancement factor, β = 5812 and good field emission current stability. The nanosheet arrays grown by a facile electrodeposition process have great potential as robust high performance vertical structure electron emitters for future flat panel displays and vacuum electronic device applications.

  17. Spectral and polarization properties of photospheric emission from stratified jets

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Hirotaka; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Matsumoto, Jin; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Tolstov, Alexey; Mao, Jirong; Dainotti, Maria; Mizuta, Akira

    2014-07-10

    We explore the spectral and polarization properties of photospheric emissions from stratified jets in which multiple components, separated by sharp velocity shear regions, are distributed in lateral directions. Propagation of thermal photons injected at a high optical depth region are calculated until they escape from the photosphere. It is found that the presence of the lateral structure within the jet leads to the nonthermal feature of the spectra and significant polarization signal in the resulting emission. The deviation from thermal spectra, as well as the polarization degree, tends to be enhanced as the velocity gradient in the shear region increases. In particular, we show that emissions from multicomponent jet can reproduce the typical observed spectra of gamma-ray bursts irrespective of the position of the observer when a velocity shear region is closely spaced in various lateral (θ) positions. The degree of polarization associated with the emission is significant (>few percent) at a wide range of observer angles and can be higher than 30%.

  18. Amplified spontaneous emission properties of semiconducting organic materials.

    PubMed

    Calzado, Eva M; Boj, Pedro G; Díaz-García, María A

    2010-06-18

    This paper aims to review the recent advances achieved in the field of organic solid-state lasers with respect to the usage of semiconducting organic molecules and oligomers in the form of thin films as active laser media. We mainly focus on the work performed in the last few years by our research group. The amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) properties, by optical pump, of various types of molecules doped into polystyrene films in waveguide configuration, are described. The various systems investigated include N,N'-bis(3-methylphenyl)-N,N'-diphenylbenzidine (TPD), several perilenediimide derivatives (PDIs), as well as two oligo-phenylenevinylene derivatives. The ASE characteristics, i.e., threshold, emission wavelength, linewidth, and photostability are compared with that of other molecular materials investigated in the literature.

  19. Amplified Spontaneous Emission Properties of Semiconducting Organic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Calzado, Eva M.; Boj, Pedro G.; Díaz-García, María A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to review the recent advances achieved in the field of organic solid-state lasers with respect to the usage of semiconducting organic molecules and oligomers in the form of thin films as active laser media. We mainly focus on the work performed in the last few years by our research group. The amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) properties, by optical pump, of various types of molecules doped into polystyrene films in waveguide configuration, are described. The various systems investigated include N,N′-bis(3-methylphenyl)-N,N′-diphenylbenzidine (TPD), several perilenediimide derivatives (PDIs), as well as two oligo-phenylenevinylene derivatives. The ASE characteristics, i.e., threshold, emission wavelength, linewidth, and photostability are compared with that of other molecular materials investigated in the literature. PMID:20640167

  20. An inverse Compton origin for the 55 GeV photon in the late afterglow of GRB 130907A

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Qing-Wen; Wang, Xiang-Yu; Tam, Pak-Hin Thomas E-mail: phtam@phys.nthu.edu.tw

    2014-06-20

    The extended high-energy gamma-ray (>100 MeV) emission which occurs well after the prompt gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is usually explained as the afterglow synchrotron radiation. Here we report the analysis of Fermi Large Area Telescope observations of GRB 130907A. A 55 GeV photon compatible with the position of the burst was found about 5 hr after the prompt phase. The probability that this photon is associated with GRB 130907A is higher than 99.96%. The energy of this photon exceeds the maximum synchrotron photon energy at this time and its occurrence thus challenges the synchrotron mechanism as the origin for the extended high-energy >10 GeV emission. Modeling of the broadband spectral energy distribution suggests that such high energy photons can be produced by the synchrotron self-Compton emission of the afterglow.

  1. Residual dust charges in discharge afterglow

    SciTech Connect

    Coueedel, L.; Mikikian, M.; Boufendi, L.; Samarian, A. A.

    2006-08-15

    An on-ground measurement of dust-particle residual charges in the afterglow of a dusty plasma was performed in a rf discharge. An upward thermophoretic force was used to balance the gravitational force. It was found that positively charged, negatively charged, and neutral dust particles coexisted for more than 1 min after the discharge was switched off. The mean residual charge for 200-nm-radius particles was measured. The dust particle mean charge is about -5e at a pressure of 1.2 mbar and about -3e at a pressure of 0.4 mbar.

  2. Electrodeposited ZnO films with high UV emission properties

    SciTech Connect

    Matei, Elena; Enculescu, Ionut

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} Electrodeposition of ZnO from nitrate baths is investigated. {yields} The influence of process parameters on morphological and optical properties is studied. {yields} Experimental conditions to fabricate ZnO films with high UV emission were found. -- Abstract: We report here our results in the preparation of ZnO films with high UV band to band characteristic luminescence emission by potentiostatic electrodeposition. Zinc nitrate aqueous baths with different concentration and additives were employed for the preparation of the films on platinum substrates. We focused our research in determining how the electrodeposition bath composition, i.e. zinc nitrate concentration and addition of KCl or polyvinyl pyrolidone and applied overpotential influence the morphological and optical properties of the oxide films. Scanning electron microscopy was employed for characterizing the films in terms of morphology. Optical reflection, photoluminescence spectroscopy and cathodoluminescence were used for determining the optical characteristics of the samples. The morphology of the deposit varies from hexagonal prisms to platelets as a function of the deposition rate. This experimental parameter also influences the luminescence properties. We found that at low deposition rates high UV luminescent material is obtained.

  3. Synthesis and electron emission properties of aligned carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupane, Suman

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have become one of the most interesting allotropes of carbon due to their intriguing mechanical, electrical, thermal and optical properties. The synthesis and electron emission properties of CNT arrays have been investigated in this work. Vertically aligned CNTs of different densities were synthesized on copper substrate with catalyst dots patterned by nanosphere lithography. The CNTs synthesized with catalyst dots patterned by spheres of 500 nm diameter exhibited the best electron emission properties with the lowest turn-on/threshold electric fields and the highest field enhancement factor. Furthermore, CNTs were treated with NH3 plasma for various durations and the optimum enhancement was obtained for a plasma treatment of 1.0 min. CNT point emitters were also synthesized on a flat-tip or a sharp-tip to understand the effect of emitter geometry on the electron emission. The experimental results show that electron emission can be enhanced by decreasing the screening effect of the electric field by neighboring CNTs. In another part of the dissertation, vertically aligned CNTs were synthesized on stainless steel (SS) substrates with and without chemical etching or catalyst deposition. The density and length of CNTs were determined by synthesis time. For a prolonged growth time, the catalyst activity terminated and the plasma started etching CNTs destructively. CNTs with uniform diameter and length were synthesized on SS substrates subjected to chemical etching for a period of 40 minutes before the growth. The direct contact of CNTs with stainless steel allowed for the better field emission performance of CNTs synthesized on pristine SS as compared to the CNTs synthesized on Ni/Cr coated SS. Finally, fabrication of large arrays of free-standing vertically aligned CNT/SnO2 core-shell structures was explored by using a simple wet-chemical route. The structure of the SnO2 nanoparticles was studied by X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy

  4. Discovery of the Low-Redshift Afterglow of GRB 011121 and Its Progenitor Supernova 2001ke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnavich, P. M.; Stanek, K. Z.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Infante, L.; Bendek, E.; Holland, S. T.; Bersier, D.; Jha, S.; Matheson, T.; Kirshner, R. P.; Phillips, M. M.; Krisciunas, K.; Carlberg, R.

    2002-05-01

    We identify and present the first optical observations of the afterglow of the Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) 011121. Images were obtained with the OGLE 1.3m telescope in BVRI passbands, starting 10.3;hours after the burst. The temporal analysis of our data indicates a steep decay, independent of wavelength with Fν t{-1.72+/- 0.05}. There is no evidence for a break in the light curve earlier than 2.5 days after the burst. The spectral energy distribution determined from the early broad-band photometry is a power-law with Fν ν {-0.46+/- 0.10} after correcting for a large Galactic extinction. Spectra, obtained with the Magellan 6.5m Baade telescope, reveal narrow emission lines from the host galaxy and these provide a redshift of z=0.36, which is the lowest measured redshift for an optical afterglow. We also present late R and J-band observations of the afterglow ~ 14;days after the burst. The late-time photometry shows a large deviation from the initial decline and our data combined with Hubble Space Telescope photometry provide strong evidence for a supernova peaking less than 10 rest-frame days after the GRB. This is the best evidence to date that classical, long gamma-ray bursts are generated by core-collapse supernovae. This work is partially supported by NASA LTSA grant NAG5-9364.

  5. The afterglow of XRF 071031: Evidence for correlated optical and X-ray flares

    SciTech Connect

    Kruehler, T.; Greiner, J.; Clemens, C.; McBreen, S.; Klose, S.; Rossi, A.; Yoldas, A. Kuepcue

    2009-05-25

    We present a densely sampled early light curve of the optical/near-infrared (NIR) afterglow of the X-Ray Flash (XRF) 071031 at z 2.692. Continuous observations in seven photometric bands from g' to K{sub S} simultaneously with the Gamma Ray Burst Optical Near-Infrared Detector (GROND) at the 2.2 m MPI/ESO telescope on LaSilla were performed between 4 minutes and 7 hours after the burst. The optical/NIR light curve is dominated by an early increase in brightness which can be attributed to the apparent onset of the forward shock (FS) emission. In addition, there are several bumps which are superimposed onto the overall rise and decay. Significant flaring is also visible in the Swift X-Ray Telescope (XRT) light curve at early and late times. The broadband data enables detailed studies of the connection between the X-ray and optical/NIR afterglow and its colour evolution during the first night post burst. We find evidence of spectral hardening in the optical spectral energy distribution contemporaneous with the emergence of the bumps from an underlying afterglow component. The bumps in the optical/NIR light curve can be associated with flares in the X-ray regime suggesting late central engine activity as the common origin.

  6. CORRELATED OPTICAL AND X-RAY FLARES IN THE AFTERGLOW OF XRF 071031

    SciTech Connect

    Kruehler, T.; Greiner, J.; McBreen, S.; Afonso, P.; Clemens, C.; Filgas, R.; Yoldas, A.; Klose, S.; Rossi, A.; Yoldas, A. Kuepcue; Szokoly, G. P.

    2009-05-20

    We present a densely sampled early light curve of the optical/near-infrared (NIR) afterglow of the X-Ray Flash (XRF) 071031 at z = 2.692. Simultaneous and continuous observations in seven photometric bands from g' to K{sub S} with GROND (Gamma-Ray Burst Optical/Near-InfraRed Detector) at the 2.2-m MPI/ESO telescope on LaSilla were performed between 4 minutes and 7 hr after the burst. The light curve consists of 547 individual points which allows us to study the early evolution of the optical transient associated with XRF 071031 in great detail. The optical/NIR light curve is dominated by an early increase in brightness which can be attributed to the apparent onset of the forward shock emission. There are several bumps which are superimposed onto the overall rise and decay. Significant flaring is also visible in the Swift X-Ray Telescope (XRT) light curve from early to late times. The availability of high-quality, broadband data enables detailed studies of the connection between the X-ray and optical/NIR afterglow and its color evolution during the first night postburst. We find evidence of spectral hardening in the optical bands contemporaneous with the emergence of the bumps from an underlying afterglow component. The bumps in the optical/NIR light curve can be associated with flares in the X-ray regime suggesting late central engine activity as the common origin.

  7. Emission properties of body-centered cubic elemental metal photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tuo; Rickman, Benjamin L. Schroeder, W. Andreas

    2015-04-07

    A first principles analysis of photoemission is developed to explain the lower than expected rms transverse electron momentum measured using the solenoid scan technique for the body-centered cubic Group Vb (V, Nb, and Ta) and Group VIb (Cr, Mo, and W) metallic photocathodes. The density functional theory based analysis elucidates the fundamental role that the electronic band structure (and its dispersion) plays in determining the emission properties of solid-state photocathodes and includes evaluation of work function anisotropy using a thin-slab method.

  8. REM observations of GRB 060418 and GRB 060607A: the onset of the afterglow and the initial fireball Lorentz factor determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, E.; Vergani, S. D.; Malesani, D.; Covino, S.; D'Avanzo, P.; Chincarini, G.; Zerbi, F. M.; Antonelli, L. A.; Conconi, P.; Testa, V.; Tosti, G.; Vitali, F.; D'Alessio, F.; Malaspina, G.; Nicastro, L.; Palazzi, E.; Guetta, D.; Campana, S.; Goldoni, P.; Masetti, N.; Meurs, E. J. A.; Monfardini, A.; Norci, L.; Pian, E.; Piranomonte, S.; Rizzuto, D.; Stefanon, M.; Stella, L.; Tagliaferri, G.; Ward, P. A.; Ihle, G.; Gonzalez, L.; Pizarro, A.; Sinclaire, P.; Valenzuela, J.

    2007-07-01

    Context: Gamma-ray burst (GRB) emission is believed to originate in highly relativistic fireballs. Aims: Currently, only lower limits were securely set to the initial fireball Lorentz factor Γ_0. We aim to provide a direct measure of Γ_0. Methods: The early-time afterglow light curve carries information about Γ_0, which determines the time of the afterglow peak. We have obtained early observations of the near-infrared afterglows of GRB 060418 and GRB 060607A with the REM robotic telescope. Results: For both events, the afterglow peak could be clearly singled out, allowing a firm determination of the fireball Lorentz of Γ_0˜ 400, fully confirming the highly relativistic nature of GRB fireballs. The deceleration radius was inferred to be R_dec ≈ 1017 cm. This is much larger than the internal shocks radius (believed to power the prompt emission), thus providing further evidence for a different origin of the prompt and afterglow stages of the GRB. Tables 2 and 3 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. Unified GRB Paradigm: Correlation between Afterglow Beaming Fraction and Gamma-ray Spectral Lag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, J. P.

    2001-12-01

    Without redshifts, studies of the pulse structures in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) were largely phenomenological. Now that approximately twenty GRBs have associated redshifts, it is clear that cosmological GRBs exhibit a large dynamic range in observed luminosity and total energy. Thus from afterglow measurements, inferences on the physics of GRB spectral/temporal properties become possible. For a subset of bursts where redshifts and BATSE data are available, a correlation between luminosity and spectral lag has been reported (Norris, Marani & Bonnell 2001, ApJ 534, 248). It has also been demonstrated from breaks in GRB afterglow temporal decays (e.g., Frail et al. 2001, ApJL, accepted) that GRBs manifest a wide dynamic range in opening angle, or beaming fraction -- implying more uniform isotropic luminosities and energies for GRBs. Even more exciting, the beaming fraction and average spectral lag appear to be correlated (both being related to luminosity), signaling a profound, but indirect, link between the gamma-ray and afterglow phases. While the sample is still small, and the analysis techniques for beaming fraction and spectral lag are still being refined, it is possible to extend observed BATSE distributions and prognosticate on distributional properties of GRBs, such as luminosity and redshift, that should be observable by Swift.

  10. Afterglow Radiation from Gamma Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Desmond, Hugh; /Leuven U. /SLAC

    2006-08-28

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRB) are huge fluxes of gamma rays that appear randomly in the sky about once a day. It is now commonly accepted that GRBs are caused by a stellar object shooting off a powerful plasma jet along its rotation axis. After the initial outburst of gamma rays, a lower intensity radiation remains, called the afterglow. Using the data from a hydrodynamical numerical simulation that models the dynamics of the jet, we calculated the expected light curve of the afterglow radiation that would be observed on earth. We calculated the light curve and spectrum and compared them to the light curves and spectra predicted by two analytical models of the expansion of the jet (which are based on the Blandford and McKee solution of a relativistic isotropic expansion; see Sari's model [1] and Granot's model [2]). We found that the light curve did not decay as fast as predicted by Sari; the predictions by Granot were largely corroborated. Some results, however, did not match Granot's predictions, and more research is needed to explain these discrepancies.

  11. A burst in a wind bubble and the impact on baryonic ejecta: high-energy gamma-ray flashes and afterglows from fast radio bursts and pulsar-driven supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Kohta; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Mészáros, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Tenuous wind bubbles, which are formed by the spin-down activity of central compact remnants, are relevant in some models of fast radio bursts (FRBs) and superluminous supernovae (SNe). We study their high-energy signatures, focusing on the role of pair-enriched bubbles produced by young magnetars, rapidly rotating neutron stars, and magnetized white dwarfs. (i) First, we study the nebular properties and the conditions allowing for escape of high-energy gamma-rays and radio waves, showing that their escape is possible for nebulae with ages of ≳10-100 yr. In the rapidly rotating neutron star scenario, we find that radio emission from the quasi-steady nebula itself may be bright enough to be detected especially at sub-mm frequencies, which is relevant as a possible counterpart of pulsar-driven SNe and FRBs. (ii) Secondly, we consider the fate of bursting emission in the nebulae. We suggest that an impulsive burst may lead to a highly relativistic flow, which would interact with the nebula. If the shocked nebula is still relativistic, pre-existing non-thermal particles in the nebula can be significantly boosted by the forward shock, leading to short-duration (maybe millisecond or longer) high-energy gamma-ray flashes. Possible dissipation at the reverse shock may also lead to gamma-ray emission. (iii) After such flares, interactions with the baryonic ejecta may lead to afterglow emission with a duration of days to weeks. In the magnetar scenario, this burst-in-bubble model leads to the expectation that nearby (≲10-100 Mpc) high-energy gamma-ray flashes may be detected by the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory and the Cherenkov Telescope Array, and the subsequent afterglow emission may be seen by radio telescopes such as the Very Large Array. (iv) Finally, we discuss several implications specific to FRBs, including constraints on the emission regions and limits on soft gamma-ray counterparts.

  12. Comparison of temporal variation in emission intensity of OH(A) in after-glow period of Ar/H2O and He/H2O gas-mixture plasmas in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirafuji, Tatsuru

    2014-10-01

    Previously, we have reported quite long duration (approx. 500 ns) of optical emission intensity of OH(A) in an after glow period of Ar plasma in water. Numerical simulation has revealed that this phenomenon can be explained in terms of production of OH(A) through the reaction of H3O+ and low temperature electrons. We can perform similar plasma processing using He plasma in water with almost the same process performance in the case of decomposition of methylene blue molecules in aqueous solution. Thus, we have expected that the long duration of OH(A) optical emission can be observed also in He plasma in water. However, such long duration of OH(A) optical emission has not been observed in the case of He plasma in water. To understand this difference, we have performed numerical simulation of Ar/H2O and He/H2O plasmas, and discuss differences in major reaction pathways to produce OH(A) in Ar/H2O and He/H2O plasmas. This work has been partly supported by the Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Priority Area ``Frontier science of interactions between plasmas and nano-interfaces'' from MEXT, Japan, and a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C) from JSPS.

  13. Fabrication and field emission properties of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng

    Research on the area of the fabrication of carbon nanotubes is fundamental and critical to the entire subject of carbon nanotubes. This dissertation describes an experiment to fabricate carbon nanotubes by the method of Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (MPECVD) and the electron field emission properties of carbon nanotubes. A MPECVD system was built and used to fabricate the vertical aligned carbon nanotube film. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the as-grown carbon nanotube samples. By using a metal-containing diblock copolymer catalyst, carbon nanotubes with a diameter of 4 to 7 nm were synthesized. The effect of growth parameters was studied and these parameters were optimized. The growth of high density (˜ 109/cm2) and large coverage area (˜ 1 cm2) carbon nanotube film on glass substrate at low growth temperature was realized. Based on a series of experiments, the effects of oxygen atoms and Ti/N underlayer on the growth were studied. A series of experiments were evaluated to characterize the field emission properties of the various carbon nanotube cathodes. A simple technique of scratching the pattern surface by a cotton swab was found effective to activate more carbon nanotubes to emit. By using the techniques of photolithography and shadow mask, various carbon nanotube patterns were achieved in order to obtain high emission current density and a low threshold electric field. The lowest threshold electric field was found to be 2.3 V/um. The highest current density was found to be 2.2 mA/cm2 when the electric field was 4.7 V/um. Our work shows that it is feasible to provide greater control over the fabrication of carbon nanotubes so that more obstacles in the broad application of carbon nanotubes can be overcome.

  14. Type 1 AGN at low z. I. Emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, J.; Laor, A.

    2012-07-01

    We analyze the emission properties of a new sample of 3 596 type 1 AGN, selected from the SDSS DR7 based on the detection of broad Hα emission. The sample extends over a broad Hα luminosity LbHα of 1040-1044 erg s-1 and a broad Hα FWHM of 1 000-25 000 km s-1, which covers the range of black hole mass 106 < MBH/Modot < 109.5 and luminosity in Eddington units 10-3 < L/LEdd < 1. We combine ROSAT, GALEX and 2MASS observations to form the SED from 2.2 μm to 2 keV. We find the following: 1. The distribution of the Hα FWHM values is independent of luminosity. 2. The observed mean optical-UV SED is well matched by a fixed shape SED of luminous quasars, which scales linearly with LbHα, and a host galaxy contribution. 3. The host galaxy r-band (fibre) luminosity function follows well the luminosity function of inactive non-emission line galaxies (NEG), consistent with a fixed fraction of ~ 3% of NEG hosting an AGN, regardless of the host luminosity. 4. The optical-UV SED of the more luminous AGN shows a small dispersion, consistent with dust reddening of a blue SED, as expected for thermal thin accretion disc emission. 5. There is a rather tight relation of νLν(2 keV) and LbHα, which provides a useful probe for unobscured (true) type 2 AGN.

  15. THE UNUSUAL RADIO AFTERGLOW OF THE ULTRA-LONG GAMMA-RAY BURST GRB 130925A

    SciTech Connect

    Horesh, Assaf; Cenko, S. Bradley; Perley, Daniel A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Hallinan, Gregg; Bellm, Eric

    2015-10-10

    GRB 130925A is one of the recent additions to the growing family of ultra-long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs; T90 ≳1000 s). While the X-ray emission of ultra-long GRBs have been studied extensively in the past, no comprehensive radio data set has been obtained so far. We report here the early discovery of an unusual radio afterglow associated with the ultra-long GRB 130925A. The radio emission peaks at low-frequencies (∼7 GHz) at early times, only 2.2 days after the burst occurred. More notably, the radio spectrum at frequencies above 10 GHz exhibits a rather steep cut-off, compared to other long GRB radio afterglows. This cut-off can be explained if the emitting electrons are either mono-energetic or originate from a rather steep, dN/dE ∝ E{sup −4}, power-law energy distribution. An alternative electron acceleration mechanism may be required to produce such an electron energy distribution. Furthermore, the radio spectrum exhibits a secondary underlying and slowly varying component. This may hint that the radio emission we observed is comprised of emission from both a reverse and a forward shock. We discuss our results in comparison with previous works that studied the unusual X-ray spectrum of this event and discuss the implications of our findings on progenitor scenarios.

  16. Electrical characterization of the flowing afterglow of N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} microwave plasmas at reduced pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Afonso Ferreira, J.; Stafford, L. Leonelli, R.; Ricard, A.

    2014-04-28

    A cylindrical Langmuir probe was used to analyze the spatial distribution of the number density of positive ions and electrons as well as the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in the flowing afterglow of a 6 Torr N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} plasma sustained by a propagating electromagnetic surface wave in the microwave regime. In pure N{sub 2} discharges, ion densities were in the mid 10{sup 14} m{sup −3} in the pink afterglow and in the mid 10{sup 12} m{sup −3} early in the late afterglow. In both pink and late afterglows, the ion population was much higher than the electron population, indicating non-macroscopically neutral media. The EEDF was close to a Maxwellian with an electron temperature of 0.5 ± 0.1 eV, except in the pink afterglow where the temperature rose to 1.1 ± 0.2 eV. This latter behavior is ascribed to N{sub 2} vibration-vibration pumping in the pink afterglow that increases the concentration of high N{sub 2} vibrational states and thus rises the electron temperature by vibration-electron collisions. After addition of small amounts of O{sub 2} in the nominally pure N{sub 2} discharge, the charged particles densities and average electron energy first strongly increased and then decreased with increasing O{sub 2} concentration. Based on these data and the evolution of the N{sub 2}{sup +}(B) band emission intensities, it is concluded that a significant change in the positive ion composition of the flowing afterglow occurs, going from N{sub 2}{sup +} in nominally pure N{sub 2} discharges to NO{sup +} after addition of trace amounts of O{sub 2} in N{sub 2}.

  17. Modeling the Multi-band Afterglow of GRB 130831A: Evidence for a Spinning-down Magnetar Dominated by Gravitational Wave Losses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Huang, Y. F.; Zong, H. S.

    2016-06-01

    The X-ray afterglow of GRB 130831A shows an “internal plateau” with a decay slope of ˜0.8, followed by a steep drop at around 105 s with a slope of ˜6. After the drop, the X-ray afterglow continues with a much shallower decay. The optical afterglow exhibits two segments of plateaus separated by a luminous optical flare, followed by a normal decay with a slope basically consistent with that of the late-time X-ray afterglow. The decay of the internal X-ray plateau is much steeper than what we expect in the simplest magnetar model. We propose a scenario in which the magnetar undergoes gravitational-wave-driven r-mode instability, and the spin-down is dominated by gravitational wave losses up to the end of the steep plateau, so that such a relatively steep plateau can be interpreted as the internal emission of the magnetar wind and the sharp drop can be produced when the magnetar collapses into a black hole. This scenario also predicts an initial X-ray plateau lasting for hundreds of seconds with an approximately constant flux which is compatible with observation. Assuming that the magnetar wind has a negligible contribution in the optical band, we interpret the optical afterglow as the forward shock emission by invoking the energy injection from a continuously refreshed shock following the prompt emission phase. It is shown that our model can basically describe the temporal evolution of the multi-band afterglow of GRB 130831A.

  18. GRB 110731A: Early Afterglow in Stellar Wind Powered By a Magnetized Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraija, N.

    2015-05-01

    One of the most energetic gamma-ray bursts, GRB 110731A, was observed from an optical to GeV energy range. Previous analysis of the prompt phase revealed similarities between the Large Area Telescope (LAT) bursts observed by Fermi: (1) a delayed onset of the high-energy emission (\\gt 100 MeV), (2) a short-lasting bright peak at later times, and (3) a temporally extended component from this phase, lasting hundreds of seconds. Additionally to the prompt phase, multiwavelength observations over different epochs showed that the spectral energy distribution was better fitted by a wind afterglow model. We present a leptonic model based on an early afterglow that evolves in a stellar wind of its progenitor. We apply this model to interpret the temporally extended LAT emission and the brightest LAT peak exhibited by the prompt phase of GRB 110731A. Additionally, using the same set of parameters, we describe the multiwavelength afterglow observations. The origin of the temporally extended LAT, X-ray, and optical flux is explained through synchrotron radiation from the forward shock (FS) and the brightest LAT peak is described, evoking the synchrotron self-Compton emission from the reverse shock (RS). The bulk Lorentz factor required in this model (Γ ≃ 520) lies in the range of values demanded for most LAT-detected GRBs. We show that the strength of the magnetic field in the RS region is ∼50 times stronger than that in the FS region. This result suggests that, for GRB 110731A, the central engine is likely entrained with strong magnetic fields.

  19. Evidence for a Canonical GRB Afterglow Light Curve in the Swift/XRT Data

    SciTech Connect

    Nousek, J.A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Grupe, D.; Page, K.; Granot, J.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Patel, S.K.; Burrows, D.N.; Mangano, V.; Barthelmy, S.; Beardmore, A.P.; Campana, S.; Capalbi, M.; Chincarini, G.; Cusumano, G.; Falcone, A.D.; Gehrels, N.; Giommi, P.; Goad, M.; Godet, O.; Hurkett, C.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /NASA, Marshall /Leicester U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study /NASA, Marshall /IASF, Palermo /Brera Observ. /Frascati /Milan Bicocca U. /NASA, Goddard

    2005-08-17

    We present new observations of the early X-ray afterglows of the first 27 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected with the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT). The early X-ray afterglows show a canonical behavior, where the light curve broadly consists of three distinct power law segments: (1) an initial very steep decay ({infinity} t{sup -a} with 3 {approx}< a{sub 1} {approx}< 5) , followed by (2) a very shallow decay (0.2 {approx}< a{sub 2} {approx}< 0.8), and finally (3) a somewhat steeper decay (1 {approx}< a{sub 3} {approx}< 1.5). These power law segments are separated by two corresponding break times, 300 s {approx}< t{sub break,1} {approx}< 500 s and 10{sup 3} s {approx}< t{sub break,2} {approx}< 10{sup 4} s. On top of this canonical behavior of the early X-ray light curve, many events have superimposed X-ray flares, which are most likely caused by internal shocks due to long lasting sporadic activity of the central engine, up to several hours after the GRB. We find that the initial steep decay is consistent with it being the tail of the prompt emission, from photons that are radiated at large angles relative to our line of sight. The first break in the light curve (t{sub break,1}) takes place when the forward shock emission becomes dominant, with the intermediate shallow flux decay (a{sub 2}) likely caused by the continuous energy injection into the external shock. When this energy injection stops, a second break is then observed in the light curve (t{sub break,2}). This energy injection increases the energy of the afterglow shock by at least a factor of f {approx}> 4, and augments the already severe requirements for the efficiency of the prompt gamma-ray emission.

  20. Type 1 AGN at low z- I. Emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Jonathan; Laor, Ari

    2012-06-01

    We analyse the emission properties of a new sample of 3579 type 1 AGN, selected from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 based on the detection of broad Hα emission. The sample extends over a broad Hα luminosity LbHα of ? and a broad Hα full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of ?, which covers the range of black hole mass 106 < MBH/M⊙ < 109.5 and luminosity in Eddington units 10-3 < L/LEdd < 1. We combine ROSAT, GALEX and 2MASS observations to form the spectral energy distribution (SED) from 2.2 ?m to 2 keV. We find the following. (1) The distribution of the Hα FWHM values is independent of luminosity. (2) The observed mean optical-ultraviolet (optical-UV) SED is well matched by a fixed-shape SED of luminous quasars, which scales linearly with LbHα, and a host galaxy contribution. (3) The host galaxy r-band (fibre) luminosity function follows well the luminosity function of inactive non-emission-line galaxies (NEGs), consistent with a fixed fraction of ˜3 per cent of NEGs hosting an AGN, regardless of the host luminosity. (4) The hosts of lower luminosity AGN have a mean z-band luminosity and u-z colour which are identical to NEGs with the same redshift distribution. With increasing LbHα the AGN hosts become bluer and less luminous than NEGs. The implied increasing star formation rate with LbHα is consistent with the relation for SDSS type 2 AGN of similar bolometric luminosity. (5) The optical-UV SED of the more luminous AGN shows a small dispersion, consistent with dust reddening of a blue SED, as expected for thermal thin accretion disc emission. (6) There is a rather tight relation between ? and LbHα, which provides a useful probe for unobscured (true) type 2 AGN. (7) The primary parameter that drives the X-ray to UV emission ratio is luminosity, rather than MBH or L/LEdd.

  1. Extremely Soft X-Ray Flash as the Indicator of Off-axis Orphan GRB Afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urata, Yuji; Huang, Kuiyun; Yamazaki, Ryo; Sakamoto, Takanori

    2015-06-01

    We verified the off-axis jet model of X-ray flashes (XRFs) and examined a discovery of off-axis orphan gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows. The XRF sample was selected on the basis of the following three factors: (1) a constraint on the lower peak energy of the prompt spectrum {E}{obs}{src}, (2) redshift measurements, and (3) multicolor observations of an earlier (or brightening) phase. XRF 020903 was the only sample selected on the basis of these criteria. A complete optical multicolor afterglow light curve of XRF 020903 obtained from archived data and photometric results in the literature showed an achromatic brightening around 0.7 days. An off-axis jet model with a large observing angle (0.21 rad, which is twice the jet opening half-angle, {θ }{jet}) can naturally describe the achromatic brightening and the prompt X-ray spectral properties. This result indicates the existence of off-axis orphan GRB afterglow light curves. Events with a larger viewing angle (\\gt ∼ 2{θ }{jet}) could be discovered using an 8 m class telescope with wide-field imagers such as the Subaru Hyper-Suprime-Cam and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  2. Study of Fuel Property Effects Using Future Low Emissions Heavy Duty Truck Engine Hardware

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Sharon

    2000-08-20

    Fuel properties have had substantial impact on engine emissions. Fuel impact varies with engine technology. An assessment of fuel impact on future low emission designs was needed as part of an EMAEPA-API study effort

  3. Field-emission properties of sulphur doped nanocrystalline diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranauskas, V.; Sampaio, M. A.; Peterlevitz, A. C.; Ceragioli, H. J.; Quispe, J. C. R.

    2007-03-01

    Nanostructured diamond doped with sulphur has been prepared using a hot-filament assisted chemical vapour deposition system fed with an ethyl alcohol, carbon disulfide, hydrogen, and argon mixture. The reduction of diamond grains to the nanoscale is relevant to create a network of defective grain boundaries which may be n-type doped to facilitate the transport and injection of electrons to the diamond grains located at the vacuum interface, enhancing the electron field-emission properties of the samples. The downsizing was produced by secondary nucleation and defects induced by sulphur and argon atoms in the chemical vapour deposition surface reactions. Sulphur also acts as an n-type dopant of diamond. Raman measurements show that the samples are nanodiamonds embedded in a matrix of graphite and disordered carbon grains and the morphology, revealed by field electron scanning microscopy, shows that the grains are in the range of 10 to 30 nm. The lowest threshold achieved for field emission was 13.20 V/μm.

  4. Synthesis and field emission properties of Cu dendritic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianwen; Yu, Ke; Zhu, Ziqiang

    2010-03-01

    Cu dendritic nanostructures were synthesized on ITO glass substructure by electrochemical deposition. SEM images showed that these Cu dendritic nanostuctures revealed a clear and well-defined dendritic fractal structure with a pronounced trunk and highly ordered branches distributed on both sides of the trunk. The diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) model was used to explain the fractal growth of Cu dendritic nanostructures. Field emission properties of these Cu dendritic nanostructures were measured, which have possessed good performance with the turn-on field of 7.5 V/μm (defined as the electric field required to be detected at a current density of 0.1 mA/cm 2) and the field enhancement factor β of 1094.

  5. Detailed optical and near-infrared polarimetry, spectroscopy and broad-band photometry of the afterglow of GRB 091018: polarization evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersema, K.; Curran, P. A.; Krühler, T.; Melandri, A.; Rol, E.; Starling, R. L. C.; Tanvir, N. R.; van der Horst, A. J.; Covino, S.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Goldoni, P.; Gorosabel, J.; Hjorth, J.; Klose, S.; Mundell, C. G.; O'Brien, P. T.; Palazzi, E.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; D'Elia, V.; Evans, P. A.; Filgas, R.; Gomboc, A.; Greiner, J.; Guidorzi, C.; Kaper, L.; Kobayashi, S.; Kouveliotou, C.; Levan, A. J.; Rossi, A.; Rowlinson, A.; Steele, I. A.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Vergani, S. D.

    2012-10-01

    Follow-up observations of large numbers of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows, facilitated by the Swift satellite, have produced a large sample of spectral energy distributions and light curves, from which their basic micro- and macro-physical parameters can in principle be derived. However, a number of phenomena have been observed that defy explanation by simple versions of the standard fireball model, leading to a variety of new models. Polarimetry can be a major independent diagnostic of afterglow physics, probing the magnetic field properties and internal structure of the GRB jets. In this paper we present the first high-quality multi-night polarimetric light curve of a Swift GRB afterglow, aimed at providing a well-calibrated data set of a typical afterglow to serve as a benchmark system for modelling afterglow polarization behaviour. In particular, our data set of the afterglow of GRB 091018 (at redshift z = 0.971) comprises optical linear polarimetry (R band, 0.13-2.3 d after burst); circular polarimetry (R band) and near-infrared linear polarimetry (Ks band). We add to that high-quality optical and near-infrared broad-band light curves and spectral energy distributions as well as afterglow spectroscopy. The linear polarization varies between 0 and 3 per cent, with both long and short time-scale variability visible. We find an achromatic break in the afterglow light curve, which corresponds to features in the polarimetric curve. We find that the data can be reproduced by jet break models only if an additional polarized component of unknown nature is present in the polarimetric curve. We probe the ordered magnetic field component in the afterglow through our deep circular polarimetry, finding Pcirc < 0.15 per cent (2σ), the deepest limit yet for a GRB afterglow, suggesting ordered fields are weak, if at all present. Our simultaneous R- and Ks-band polarimetry shows that dust-induced polarization in the host galaxy is likely negligible.

  6. BATMAN beam properties characterization by the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Bonomo, F.; Ruf, B.; Schiesko, L.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Riedl, R.; Wünderlich, D.; Barbisan, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G.; Cristofaro, S.

    2015-04-08

    The ITER neutral beam heating systems are based on the production and acceleration of negative ions (H/D) up to 1 MV. The requirements for the beam properties are strict: a low core beam divergence (< 0.4 °) together with a low source pressure (≤ 0.3 Pa) would permit to reduce the ion losses along the beamline, keeping the stripping particle losses below 30%. However, the attainment of such beam properties is not straightforward. At IPP, the negative ion source testbed BATMAN (BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions) allows for deepening the knowledge of the determination of the beam properties. One of the diagnostics routinely used to this purpose is the Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES): the H{sub α} light emitted in the beam is detected and the corresponding spectra are evaluated to estimate the beam divergence and the stripping losses. The BES number of lines of sight in BATMAN has been recently increased: five horizontal lines of sight providing a vertical profile of the beam permit to characterize the negative ion beam properties in relation to the source parameters. Different methods of H{sub α} spectra analysis are here taken into account and compared for the estimation of the beam divergence and the amount of stripping. In particular, to thoroughly study the effect of the space charge compensation on the beam divergence, an additional hydrogen injection line has been added in the tank, which allows for setting different background pressure values (one order of magnitude, from about 0.04 Pa up to the source pressure) in the beam drift region.

  7. BATMAN beam properties characterization by the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonomo, F.; Ruf, B.; Barbisan, M.; Cristofaro, S.; Schiesko, L.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Pasqualotto, R.; Riedl, R.; Serianni, G.; Wünderlich, D.

    2015-04-01

    The ITER neutral beam heating systems are based on the production and acceleration of negative ions (H/D) up to 1 MV. The requirements for the beam properties are strict: a low core beam divergence (< 0.4 °) together with a low source pressure (≤ 0.3 Pa) would permit to reduce the ion losses along the beamline, keeping the stripping particle losses below 30%. However, the attainment of such beam properties is not straightforward. At IPP, the negative ion source testbed BATMAN (BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions) allows for deepening the knowledge of the determination of the beam properties. One of the diagnostics routinely used to this purpose is the Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES): the Hα light emitted in the beam is detected and the corresponding spectra are evaluated to estimate the beam divergence and the stripping losses. The BES number of lines of sight in BATMAN has been recently increased: five horizontal lines of sight providing a vertical profile of the beam permit to characterize the negative ion beam properties in relation to the source parameters. Different methods of Hα spectra analysis are here taken into account and compared for the estimation of the beam divergence and the amount of stripping. In particular, to thoroughly study the effect of the space charge compensation on the beam divergence, an additional hydrogen injection line has been added in the tank, which allows for setting different background pressure values (one order of magnitude, from about 0.04 Pa up to the source pressure) in the beam drift region.

  8. SWIFT Discovery of Gamma-ray Bursts without Jet Break Feature in their X-ray Afterglows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, G.; Yamazaki, R.; Sakamoto, T.; Takahashi, T; Nakazawa, K.; Nakamura, T.; Toma, K.; Hullinger, D.; Tashiro, M.; Parsons, A. M.; Krimm, H. A.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Gehrels, N.; Burrows, D. N.; O'Brien, P. T.; Osborne, J. P.; Chincarini, G.; Lamb, D. Q.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze Swift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and X-ray afterglows for three GRBs with spectroscopic redshift determinations - GRB 050401, XRF 050416a, and GRB 050525a. We find that the relation between spectral peak energy and isotropic energy of prompt emissions (the Amati relation) is consistent with that for the bursts observed in pre-Swift era. However, we find that the X-ray afterglow lightcurves, which extend up to 10 - 70 days, show no sign of the jet break that is expected in the standard framework of collimated outflows. We do so by showing that none of the X-ray afterglow lightcurves in our sample satisfies the relation between the spectral and temporal indices that is predicted for the phase after jet break. The jet break time can be predicted by inverting the tight empirical relation between the peak energy of the spectrum and the collimation-corrected energy of the prompt emission (the Ghirlanda relation). We find that there are no temporal breaks within the predicted time intervals in X-ray band. This requires either that the Ghirlanda relation has a larger scatter than previously thought, that the temporal break in X-rays is masked by some additional source of X-ray emission, or that it does not happen because of some unknown reason.

  9. Gamma-ray burst afterglows as probes of their host galaxies and the cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucchiara, Antonino

    2010-12-01

    Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) represent the sole class of catastrophic phenomena seen over almost the entire history of the Universe. Their extreme luminosities in high energy gamma-ray radiation make them readily detectable, even with relatively small satellite-based detectors, out to the earliest cosmic epochs. Moreover, the brilliance of their fading afterglow light, routinely observed in X-ray, optical, near-infrared, and radio wavelengths, allows them to be exploited -- for hours, days, or weeks -- as cosmic lighthouses, probing the conditions of gas and dust along the line of sight, through their host galaxies and the cosmos at large. Since the November 2004 launch of Swift, this GRB-focused NASA mission has discovered more than 500 GRBs, in almost all cases reporting the burst coordinates to ground-based observers within seconds of the event. The availability of prompt burst positions from Swift, combined with promptly-reported flux measurements from instruments on Swift and an array of ground-based robotic telescopes, have enabled targeted spectroscopic campaigns that have gathered detailed observations of the young, bright afterglows of hundreds of these events. This thesis reports the results of my own efforts over the past 5 years, analyzing imaging and spectroscopic observations of Swift-detected GRBs as triggered according to my own requests, or as gathered from public data archives. In Chapter 2, I discuss our follow-up campaign for GRB090429B, one of our best "extreme redshift" (z > 8) candidates. This burst followed closely on the spectroscopicallyconfirmed z = 8.2 GRB090423, and our multiwavelength observations and SED modeling demonstrate the value and limitation of such studies, in cases where a spectroscopic redshift cannot be gathered in a timely fashion. I also address the importance of such extreme-redshift events from a cosmological perspective. In Chapter 3, I use high-resolution GRB afterglow spectra to study the properties of intervening

  10. The Supercritical Pile Gamma-Ray Burst Model: The GRB Afterglow Steep Decline and Plateau Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sultana, Joseph; Kazanas, D.; Mastichiadis, A.

    2013-01-01

    We present a process that accounts for the steep decline and plateau phase of the Swift X-Ray Telescope (XRT) light curves, vexing features of gamma-ray burst (GRB) phenomenology. This process is an integral part of the "supercritical pile" GRB model, proposed a few years ago to account for the conversion of the GRB kinetic energy into radiation with a spectral peak at E(sub pk) is approx. m(sub e)C(exp 2). We compute the evolution of the relativistic blast wave (RBW) Lorentz factor Gamma to show that the radiation-reaction force due to the GRB emission can produce an abrupt, small (approx. 25%) decrease in Gamma at a radius that is smaller (depending on conditions) than the deceleration radius R(sub D). Because of this reduction, the kinematic criticality criterion of the "supercritical pile" is no longer fulfilled. Transfer of the proton energy into electrons ceases and the GRB enters abruptly the afterglow phase at a luminosity smaller by approx. m(sub p)/m(sub e) than that of the prompt emission. If the radius at which this slow-down occurs is significantly smaller than R(sub D), the RBW internal energy continues to drive the RBW expansion at a constant (new) Gamma and its X-ray luminosity remains constant until R(sub D) is reached, at which point it resumes its more conventional decay, thereby completing the "unexpected" XRT light curve phase. If this transition occurs at R is approx. equal to R(sub D), the steep decline is followed by a flux decrease instead of a "plateau," consistent with the conventional afterglow declines. Besides providing an account of these peculiarities, the model suggests that the afterglow phase may in fact begin before the RBW reaches R is approx. equal to R(sub D), thus providing novel insights into GRB phenomenology.

  11. The Supercritical Pile Gamma-Ray Burst Model: The GRB Afterglow Steep Decline and Plateau Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, J.; Kazanas, D.; Mastichiadis, A.

    2013-12-01

    We present a process that accounts for the steep decline and plateau phase of the Swift X-Ray Telescope (XRT) light curves, vexing features of gamma-ray burst (GRB) phenomenology. This process is an integral part of the "supercritical pile" GRB model, proposed a few years ago to account for the conversion of the GRB kinetic energy into radiation with a spectral peak at E pk ~ mec 2. We compute the evolution of the relativistic blast wave (RBW) Lorentz factor Γ to show that the radiation-reaction force due to the GRB emission can produce an abrupt, small (~25%) decrease in Γ at a radius that is smaller (depending on conditions) than the deceleration radius RD . Because of this reduction, the kinematic criticality criterion of the "supercritical pile" is no longer fulfilled. Transfer of the proton energy into electrons ceases and the GRB enters abruptly the afterglow phase at a luminosity smaller by ~mp /me than that of the prompt emission. If the radius at which this slow-down occurs is significantly smaller than RD , the RBW internal energy continues to drive the RBW expansion at a constant (new) Γ and its X-ray luminosity remains constant until RD is reached, at which point it resumes its more conventional decay, thereby completing the "unexpected" XRT light curve phase. If this transition occurs at R ~= RD , the steep decline is followed by a flux decrease instead of a "plateau," consistent with the conventional afterglow declines. Besides providing an account of these peculiarities, the model suggests that the afterglow phase may in fact begin before the RBW reaches R ~= RD , thus providing novel insights into GRB phenomenology.

  12. Chemical abundances associated with gamma-ray bursts: nucleosynthesis in afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Tao; Wang, Min

    2014-03-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) ejecta carries huge amounts of energy expanding into the surrounding medium and heats up these materials, making it possible that nucleosynthesis can take place in such hot sites in afterglow stage. Here, we study possible changes in chemical abundances in the GRB afterglow processes of Wolf-Rayet (WR) star wind environments (Case A) and constant density surroundings (Case B). We find that the light element of lithium-beryllium-boron could occur in the afterglows via He+He process and spallation reactions. Some isotopes of F, Ne, Mg, Al, Si, P, S and Fe-group elements are also new species formed in the afterglows via proton-, neutron- and α-capture. The results show that the nucleosynthetic yields might be a diagnostic of the GRB's ambient environment. Our calculations indicate that Mg, Al, Si, P, Cr, Mn, Fe and Co have trended to appear in Case A, while Ne, Ti and Ni trend to occur in Case B. Furthermore, although some species have occurred both in Cases A and B, their mass fractions are quite different in these two cases. Here, we show that the mass fractions of 7Li, 7Be, 24Mg and 30Si are higher in Case A than that in Case B, but 18F gives an opposite conclusion. Nucleosynthetic outputs might also be an indice to estimate the luminosity-temperature relation factor β. In this study, when β reduces, the mass abundances of 11B and 20Ne are higher in Case B than that in Case A; in contrast, as the β becomes larger, this trend would be reversed; therefore, perhaps we could select the above elements as the indicators to estimate the properties of the surroundings around the GRBs. We also suggest that the spectroscopic observations of a GRB afterglow could only reveal the nucleosynthetic outputs from the interaction site between the GRB jet and its ambient matter, but could not represent the original composition of the pre-GRB surrounding medium.

  13. Sequential afterglow processing and non-contact Corona-Kelvin metrology of 4H-silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Eugene L., III

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a wide band-gap semiconductor with advantageous electrical and thermal properties making it attractive for high temperature and power applications. However, difficulties with oxide/SiC structures have posed challenges to the development of practical MOS-type devices. Surface conditioning and oxidation of 4H-SiC were investigated using a novel sequential afterglow processing approach combined with the unique capabilities of non-contact corona-Kelvin metrology. The use of remote plasma assisted thermal oxidation facilitated film growth at low temperature and pressure with the flexibility of sequential in-situ processing options including pre-oxidation surface conditioning. Corona-Kelvin metrology (C-KM) provided a fast, nondestructive method for electrical evaluation of oxide films and semiconductor surfaces. Non-contact C-KM oxide capacitance-voltage characteristics combined with direct measurement of SiC surfaces using C-KM depletion surface barrier monitoring and XPS analysis of surface chemistry were interpreted relating the impact of afterglow conditioning on the surface and its influence on subsequent oxide thin film growth. Afterglow oxide films of thicknesses 50--500 A were fabricated on SiC epi-layers at low growth temperatures in the range 600--850°C, an achievement not possible using conventional atmospheric oxidation techniques. The inclusion of pre-oxidation surface conditioning in forming gas (N2:H2)* afterglow was found to produce an increase in oxide growth rate (10--25%) and a significant improvement in oxide film thickness uniformity. Analysis of depletion voltage transients on conditioned SiC surfaces revealed the highest degree of surface passivation, uniformity, and elimination of sources of charge compensation accomplished by the (N2:H2)* afterglow treatment for 20 min. at 600--700°C compared to other conditioning variations. The state of surface passivation was determined to be very stable and resilient when exposed

  14. DISCOVERY OF SMOOTHLY EVOLVING BLACKBODIES IN THE EARLY AFTERGLOW OF GRB 090618: EVIDENCE FOR A SPINE–SHEATH JET?

    SciTech Connect

    Basak, Rupal; Rao, A. R. E-mail: arrao@tifr.res.in

    2015-10-20

    GRB 090618 is a bright gamma-ray burst (GRB) with multiple pulses. It shows evidence of thermal emission in the initial pulses as well as in the early afterglow phase. Because high-resolution spectral data from the Swift/X-ray Telescope (XRT) are available for the early afterglow, we investigate the shape and evolution of the thermal component in this phase using data from the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), the Swift/XRT, and the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor detectors. An independent fit to the BAT and XRT data reveals two correlated blackbodies with monotonically decreasing temperatures. Hence, we investigated the combined data with a model consisting of two blackbodies and a power law (2BBPL), a model suggested for several bright GRBs. We elicit the following interesting features of the 2BBPL model: (1) the same model is applicable from the peak of the last pulse in the prompt emission to the afterglow emission, (2) the ratio of temperatures and the fluxes of the two blackbodies remains constant throughout the observations, (3) the blackbody temperatures and fluxes show a monotonic decrease with time, with the BB fluxes dropping about a factor of two faster than that of the power-law (PL) emission, and (4) attributing the blackbody emission to photospheric emissions, we find that the photospheric radii increase very slowly with time, and the lower-temperature blackbody shows a larger emitting radius than that of the higher-temperature blackbody. We find some evidence that the underlying shape of the nonthermal emission is a cutoff power law rather than a PL. We sketch a spine–sheath jet model to explain our observations.

  15. Dust from southern Africa: rates of emission and biogeochemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattachan, A.; D'Odorico, P.; Zobeck, T. M.; Okin, G. S.; Dintwe, K.

    2012-12-01

    The stabilized linear dunefields in the southern Kalahari show signs of reactivation due to reduced vegetation cover owing to drought and/or overgrazing. It has been demonstrated with a laboratory dust generator that the southern Kalahari soils are good emitters of dust and that large-scale dune reactivation can potentially make the region an important dust source in the relatively low-dust Southern Hemisphere. We show that emergence of the southern Kalahari as a new dust source may affect ocean biogeochemistry as the soils are rich in soluble iron and the dust from the southern Kalahari commonly reaches the Southern Ocean. We investigate the biogeochemical properties of the fine fraction of soil from the Kalahari dunes and compare them to those of currently active dust sources such as the Makgadikgadi and the Etosha pans as well as other smaller pans in the region. Using field measurements of sediment fluxes and satellite images, we calculate the rates of dust emission from the southern Kalahari under different land cover scenarios. To assess the reversibility of dune reactivation in the southern Kalahari, we investigate the resilience of dunefield vegetation by looking at changes in soil nutrients, fine soil fractions, and seed bank in areas affected by intense denudation.

  16. Modeling Saharan dust emissions, transport, deposition, and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colarco, Peter Richard

    We simulate Saharan dust emissions, transport, and removal with a three-dimensional aerosol transport model driven by assimilated meteorology. We explore dust distributions and optical properties for model runs over the tropical North Atlantic for time periods covering the ACE-2 (summer 1997, Canary Islands) and PRIDE (summer 2000, Puerto Rico) field experiments. Modeled dust fields are compared to ground-based, in situ, and satellite observations. Dust imaginary refractive index and single scatter albedo at UV wavelengths are inferred near source regions by computing the TOMS Aerosol Index from modeled dust fields. Our results indicate a dust aerosol that is considerably less absorbing than previous estimates. The timing of downwind dust events is generally uncorrelated with the details of the dust source process, indicating the dust exists in a persistent reservoir over source regions and the timing of its transport to remote regions is most strongly controlled by the transporting dynamics. Our model simulates the complicated vertical distributions of dust observed over Puerto Rico. The dust vertical distribution is controlled by sedimentation of dust particles and a general descending air motion over the tropical North Atlantic. Low-level dust can be transported directly from source regions, but the majority of it is efficiently eroded away in transit by wet removal processes. Our computed estimates of iron deposition fluxes into the North Atlantic are in reasonable agreement with estimates based on station data.

  17. The plateau phase of gamma-ray burst afterglows in the thick-shell scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leventis, K.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; van der Horst, A. J.

    2014-01-01

    We present analytic calculations of synchrotron radiation from the forward and the reverse shock of gamma-ray burst blast waves, in the thick-shell scenario (i.e. when the reverse shock is relativistic). We show that this scenario can naturally account for the plateau phase, observed early in the afterglows of about half the bursts detected by Swift. We generalize our approach to include power-law luminosity of the central engine and show that when radiation from both regions (forward and reverse shock) is taken into account, a wide range of possibilities emerge, including chromatic and achromatic breaks, frequency-dependent spectral evolution during the injection break and widely varying decay indices in different bands. For both the forward and the reverse shock, we derive formulas for the spectral parameters and the observed flux in different power-law segments of the spectrum, as a function of observer time. We explore the Fb-tb relation (between the observed time of the end of the plateau phase and the flux at that point) in the framework of the presented model and show that model predictions favour the reverse shock as the dominant source of emission in both optical and X-rays. As case studies, we present simultaneous fits to X-ray and optical/IR afterglow data of GRB 080928 and GRB 090423. We identify the end of the plateau phase with the cessation of energy injection and infer the corresponding upper limits to central-engine activity, which are about 1 h for the former and 1.5 h for the latter. We conclude that smooth energy injection through the reverse shock is a plausible explanation for the plateau phase of gamma-ray burst afterglows. During that phase, radiation from the reverse shock is likely to be important, or even dominant, and should be taken into account when fitting model parameters to observations.

  18. Spin-Dependent Dissociative Excitation in a Laser Pumped Afterglow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohler, Christopher Lee

    The energy and spin dependence of dissociating collisions between two types of noble gas metastable atoms and cadmium dihalide molecules have been studied in a flowing afterglow apparatus. The fluorescence spectra obtained in the range of 3000-7600 A which result from the Ar( ^{3}P_2) + CdX_2 interactions indicate a dominant dissociative excitation production mechanism. On the other hand, for the He(2^3S _1) + CdX_2 collisions, there appears to be competition between dissociative excitation and other "dark" channels. The emission spectra are further used to narrow the uncertainty in the currently accepted values for the dissociation energy of the CdX _2 molecules. The Wigner spin rule (conservation of total electronic spin) was verified for these processes as shown by the dominance of final state triplet production as compared to the virtual absence of singlet spin state production. In an attempt to further study the spin dependence of the dissociative excitation process, transfer of the longitudinal component of the electronic spin from oriented He(2 ^3S_1) atoms to Cd(6 ^3S_1) atoms was monitored. These data showed a null result for the transfor of the spin component, but were limited by a 3% systematic error of the apparatus. The spin dependent measurements rely on the ability to spin-polarize the He(2^3S _1) atoms by laser optical pumping methods. Four laser materials which exhibit promising characteristics for this procedure have been studied, and the results are presented for Nd^{3+}:YAP, La_{rm 1-x}Nd _{rm x}MgAl_ {11}O_{19}, Nd^{3+}:LiNbO _3, and Nd^{3+} :Silicate fibers.

  19. The γ-ray afterglows of tidal disruption events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xian; Gómez-Vargas, Germán Arturo; Guillochon, James

    2016-05-01

    A star wandering too close to a supermassive black hole (SMBH) will be tidally disrupted. Previous studies of such `tidal disruption event' (TDE) mostly focus on the stellar debris that are bound to the system, because they give rise to luminous flares. On the other hand, half of the stellar debris in principle are unbound and can stream to a great distance, but so far there is no clear evidence that this `unbound debris stream' (UDS) exists. Motivated by the fact that the circum-nuclear region around SMBHs is usually filled with dense molecular clouds (MCs), here we investigate the observational signatures resulting from the collision between an UDS and an MC, which is likely to happen hundreds of years after a TDE. We focus on γ-ray emission (0.1-105 GeV), which comes from the encounter of shock-accelerated cosmic rays with background protons and, more importantly, is not subject to extinction. We show that because of the high proton density inside an MC, the peak γ-ray luminosity, about 1039 erg s-1, is at least 100 times greater than that in the case without an MC (only with a smooth interstellar medium). The luminosity decays on a time-scale of decades, depending on the distance of the MC, and about a dozen of these `TDE afterglows' could be detected within a distance of about 16 Mpc by the future Cherenkov Telescope Array. Without careful discrimination, these sources potentially could contaminate the searches for starburst galaxies, galactic nuclei containing millisecond pulsars or dark matter annihilation signals.

  20. Characterization of Magnetoacoustic Emission Related to Structural Properties of Ferromagnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, M.; Wincheski, B.; Fulton, J. P.; Todhunter, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    An extensive study of magnetoacoustic emission (MAE) properties has been performed over the past several years. As a result, the dependence of the spectral characteristics of MAE on certain microstructural variations and uniaxially applied stress in a particular type of low carbon steel are now well known. The embrittlement-causing concentration of certain atomic species, e. g., tin, sulphur, phosphorous etc., at the grain boundaries of this steel creates strong potential barriers resisting the motion of non-180 domain walls which is the source of MAE. (Since the only type of non-180 domain walls in this material are 90 domain walls, the term 90 domain wall will be used throughout this paper in place of non-180 domain wall.) An MAE burst produced during one-half cycle of a hysteresis loop at a low AC magnetic field frequency (e. g., 0.7 Hz) shows two sub-peaks; the leading peak is usually sharp and short-lived, while the trailing peak is usually smooth and long-lasting. It has been shown that the enhanced domain wall-defect interaction, due to the strengthened potential barriers, causes an increase in the asymmetry of the MAE signal by suppressing the leading sub-peak and amplifying the trailing sub-peak. This phenomena is due to the delayed motion of the 90 domain walls. The effect of a tensile stress applied parallel to the external AC magnetic field is to diminish the MAE. On the other hand, the amplitude of the MAE burst has been shown to be a non-monotonic function of the stress amplitude. Recently, our study has concentrated on obtaining quantitative values for parameters computed from the MAE spectra averaged over a sufficient number of cycles to achieve statistical stability. Nevertheless, certain fundamental elements of the MAE characteristics remain unexplained.

  1. KILOPARSEC-SCALE PROPERTIES OF EMISSION-LINE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmati, Shoubaneh; Miller, Sarah H.; Mobasher, Bahram; Nayyeri, Hooshang; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Guo, Yicheng; Koo, David C.

    2014-12-20

    We perform a detailed study of the resolved properties of emission-line galaxies at kiloparsec scales to investigate how small-scale and global properties of galaxies are related. We use a sample of 119 galaxies in the GOODS fields. The galaxies are selected to cover a wide range in morphologies over the redshift range 0.2 < z < 1.3. High resolution spectroscopic data from Keck/DEIMOS observations are used to fix the redshift of all the galaxies in our sample. Using the HST/ACS and HST/WFC3 imaging data taken as a part of the CANDELS project, for each galaxy, we perform spectral energy distribution fitting per resolution element, producing resolved rest-frame U – V color, stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), age, and extinction maps. We develop a technique to identify ''regions'' of statistical significance within individual galaxies, using their rest-frame color maps to select red and blue regions, a broader definition for what are called ''clumps'' in other works. As expected, for any given galaxy, the red regions are found to have higher stellar mass surface densities and older ages compared to the blue regions. Furthermore, we quantify the spatial distribution of red and blue regions with respect to both redshift and stellar mass, finding that the stronger concentration of red regions toward the centers of galaxies is not a significant function of either redshift or stellar mass. We find that the ''main sequence'' of star-forming galaxies exists among both red and blue regions inside galaxies, with the median of blue regions forming a tighter relation with a slope of 1.1 ± 0.1 and a scatter of ∼0.2 dex compared to red regions with a slope of 1.3 ± 0.1 and a scatter of ∼0.6 dex. The blue regions show higher specific SFRs (sSFRs) than their red counterparts with the sSFR decreasing since z ∼ 1, driven primarily by the stellar mass surface densities rather than the SFRs at a given resolution element.

  2. Odour emissions from poultry litter - A review litter properties, odour formation and odorant emissions from porous materials.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, Mark W; Blackall, Patrick J; Stuetz, Richard M

    2016-07-15

    Odour emissions from meat chicken sheds can at times cause odour impacts on surrounding communities. Litter is seen as the primary source of this odour. Formation and emission of odour from meat chicken litter during the grow-out period are influenced by various factors such as litter conditions, the environment, microbial activity, properties of the odorous gases and management practices. Odour emissions vary spatially and temporally. This variability has made it challenging to understand how specific litter conditions contribute to odour emissions from the litter and production sheds. Existing knowledge on odorants, odour formation mechanisms and emission processes that contribute to odour emissions from litter are reviewed. Litter moisture content and water thermodynamics (i.e. water activity, Aw) are also examined as factors that contribute to microbial odour formation, physical litter conditions and the exchange of individual odorant gases at the air-water interface. Substantial opportunities exist for future research on litter conditions and litter formation mechanisms and how these contribute to odour emissions. Closing this knowledge gap will improve management strategies that intercept and interfere with odour formation and emission processes leading to an overall reduction in the potential to cause community impacts. PMID:27111649

  3. GRB 030329: 3 years of radio afterglow monitoring.

    PubMed

    van der Horst, A J; Kamble, A; Wijers, R A M J; Resmi, L; Bhattacharya, D; Rol, E; Strom, R; Kouveliotou, C; Oosterloo, T; Ishwara-Chandra, C H

    2007-05-15

    Radio observations of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows are essential for our understanding of the physics of relativistic blast waves, as they enable us to follow the evolution of GRB explosions much longer than the afterglows in any other wave band. We have performed a 3-year monitoring campaign of GRB 030329 with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescopes and the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope. Our observations, combined with observations at other wavelengths, have allowed us to determine the GRB blast wave physical parameters, such as the total burst energy and the ambient medium density, as well as to investigate the jet nature of the relativistic outflow. Further, by modelling the late-time radio light curve of GRB 030329, we predict that the Low-Frequency Array (30-240 MHz) will be able to observe afterglows of similar GRBs, and constrain the physics of the blast wave during its non-relativistic phase.

  4. GRB 030329: 3 years of radio afterglow monitoring.

    PubMed

    van der Horst, A J; Kamble, A; Wijers, R A M J; Resmi, L; Bhattacharya, D; Rol, E; Strom, R; Kouveliotou, C; Oosterloo, T; Ishwara-Chandra, C H

    2007-05-15

    Radio observations of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows are essential for our understanding of the physics of relativistic blast waves, as they enable us to follow the evolution of GRB explosions much longer than the afterglows in any other wave band. We have performed a 3-year monitoring campaign of GRB 030329 with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescopes and the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope. Our observations, combined with observations at other wavelengths, have allowed us to determine the GRB blast wave physical parameters, such as the total burst energy and the ambient medium density, as well as to investigate the jet nature of the relativistic outflow. Further, by modelling the late-time radio light curve of GRB 030329, we predict that the Low-Frequency Array (30-240 MHz) will be able to observe afterglows of similar GRBs, and constrain the physics of the blast wave during its non-relativistic phase. PMID:17293318

  5. Very Large Telescope/Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph and FORS2 spectroscopy of the GRB 081008 afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Elia, V.; Campana, S.; Covino, S.; D'Avanzo, P.; Piranomonte, S.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2011-11-01

    We aim at studying the gamma-ray burst (GRB), GRB 081008, environment by analysing the spectra of its optical afterglow. Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph/Very Large Telescope (UVES/VLT) high-resolution spectroscopy of GRB 081008 was secured ˜5 h after the Swift-BAT trigger. Our data set also comprises three VLT/FORS2 nearly simultaneous spectra of the same source. The availability of nearly simultaneous high- and low-resolution spectra for a GRB afterglow is an extremely rare event. The GRB-damped Lyman α system at z= 1.9683 shows that the interstellar medium (ISM) of the host galaxy is constituted by at least three components which contribute to the line profiles. Component I is the redmost one, and is 20 and 78 km s-1 redward components II and III, respectively. We detect several ground state and excited absorption features in components I and II. These features have been used to compute the distances between the GRB and the absorbers. Component I is found to be 52 ± 6 pc away from the GRB, while component II presents few excited transitions and its distance is 200+60- 80 pc. Component III only features a few, low-ionization and saturated lines suggesting that it is even farther from the GRB. Component I represents the closest absorber ever detected near a GRB. This (relatively) low distance can possibly be a consequence of a dense GRB environment, which prevents the GRB prompt/afterglow emission to strongly affect the ISM up to higher distances. The hydrogen column density associated with GRB 081008 is log NH/cm-2= 21.11 ± 0.10, and the metallicity of the host galaxy is in the range of [X/H] =-1.29 to -0.52. In particular, we found [Fe/H] =-1.19 ± 0.11 and [Zn/H] =-0.52 ± 0.11 with respect to solar values. This discrepancy can be explained by the presence of dust in the GRB ISM, given the opposite refractory properties of iron and zinc. By deriving the depletion pattern for GRB 081008, we find the optical extinction in the visual band to be AV

  6. Modeling the Early Afterglow in the Short and Hard GRB 090510

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraija, N.; Lee, W. H.; Veres, P.; Barniol Duran, R.

    2016-11-01

    The bright, short, and hard GRB 090510 was detected by all instruments aboard the Fermi and Swift satellites. The multiwavelength observations of this burst presented similar features to the Fermi-LAT-detected gamma-ray bursts. In the framework of the external shock model of early afterglow, a leptonic scenario that evolves in a homogeneous medium is proposed to revisit GRB 090510 and explain the multiwavelength light curve observations presented in this burst. These observations are consistent with the evolution of a jet before and after the jet break. The long-lasting LAT, X-ray, and optical fluxes are explained in the synchrotron emission from the adiabatic forward shock. Synchrotron self-Compton emission from the reverse shock is consistent with the bright LAT peak provided that the progenitor environment is entrained with strong magnetic fields. It could provide compelling evidence of magnetic field amplification in the neutron star merger.

  7. Nitric oxide kinetics in the afterglow of a diffuse plasma filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnette, D.; Montello, A.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2014-08-01

    A suite of laser diagnostics is used to study kinetics of vibrational energy transfer and plasma chemical reactions in a nanosecond pulse, diffuse filament electric discharge and afterglow in N2 and dry air at 100 Torr. Laser-induced fluorescence of NO and two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence of O and N atoms are used to measure absolute, time-resolved number densities of these species after the discharge pulse, and picosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy is used to measure time-resolved rotational temperature and ground electronic state N2(v = 0-4) vibrational level populations. The plasma filament diameter, determined from plasma emission and NO planar laser-induced fluorescence images, remains nearly constant after the discharge pulse, over a few hundred microseconds, and does not exhibit expansion on microsecond time scale. Peak temperature in the discharge and the afterglow is low, T ≈ 370 K, in spite of significant vibrational nonequilibrium, with peak N2 vibrational temperature of Tv ≈ 2000 K. Significant vibrational temperature rise in the afterglow is likely caused by the downward N2-N2 vibration-vibration (V-V) energy transfer. Simple kinetic modeling of time-resolved N, O, and NO number densities in the afterglow, on the time scale longer compared to relaxation and quenching time of excited species generated in the plasma, is in good agreement with the data. In nitrogen, the N atom density after the discharge pulse is controlled by three-body recombination and radial diffusion. In air, N, NO and O concentrations are dominated by the reverse Zel'dovich reaction, N + NO → N2 + O, and ozone formation reaction, O + O2 + M → O3 + M, respectively. The effect of vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules and excited N atoms on NO formation kinetics is estimated to be negligible. The results suggest that NO formation in the nanosecond pulse discharge is dominated by reactions of excited electronic states of nitrogen, occurring on

  8. A possible bright blue supernova in the afterglow of GRB020305

    SciTech Connect

    Gorosabel, J.; Fynbo, J.P.U.; Fruchter, A.; Levan, A.; Hjorth,J.; Nugent, P.; Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Castro Ceron, J.M.; Rhoads, J.; Bersier, D.; Burud, I.

    2005-07-01

    We report on ground-based and HST(+STIS) imaging of the afterglow and host galaxy of the Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) of March 5, 2002. The GRB occurred in a R=25.17+-0.14 galaxy, which apparently is part of an interacting system. The light curve of the optical afterglow shows are brightening, or at least a plateau, 12-16 days after the gamma-ray event. UBVRIK' multi-band imaging of the afterglow {approx}12 days after the GRB reveals a blue spectral energy distribution (SED). The SED is consistent with a power-law with a spectral index of beta=-0.63+-0.16,but there is tentative evidence for deviations away from a power-law. Unfortunately, a spectroscopic redshift has not been secured for GRB020305. From the SED we impose a redshift upper limit of z<{approx}2.8,hence excluding the pseudo redshift of 4.6 reported for this burst. We discuss the possibilities for explaining the light curve, SED and host galaxy properties for GRB 020305. The most natural interpretation of the light curve and the SED is an associated supernova (SN). Our data can not precisely determine the redshift of the GRB. The most favored explanation is a low redshift (z{approx}0.2) SN, but a higher redshift(z>{approx}0.5) SN can not be excluded. We also discuss less likely scenarios not based on SNe, like a burst occurring in a z=2.5 galaxy with an extinction curve similar to that of the Milky Way.

  9. [Study on self-propagating synthesis of the doped SrAl2O4 rare earth long afterglow phosphors].

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Zhao, Yong-Liang; Liu, Yong-Gang; Wei, Xiao-Yan; Ren, Yue

    2011-06-01

    Twenty one doped SrAl2O4 long after-glowed phosphors with 4 series were synthesized by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis method (SHS) with urea-nitrate solution which served as media at 600 degrees C. They are SrAl2O4: Eu(2+)0.012 5, RE(3+)0.012 5 (RE(3+) = Ce(3+), Pr(3+), Nd(3+), Tb(3+), Dy(3+)), SrAl2O4 : Eu(2+)0.012 5, M0.012 5 (M = Li(+), Be(2+), Cd(2+), Mn(2+), Cu(2+), Ag(+), Zn(2+), Pb(2+)), SrAl2O4 : Eu(2+)0.012 5, Dy(3+)0.012 5, M0.012 5 (M = Mn(2+), Cu(2+), Ag(+), Zn(2+)), and SrAlO4 = Eu(2+)0.012 5, Dy(3+)0.012 5, RE(3+)0.012 5 (RE(3+) = Ce(3+), Pr(3+), Nd(3+), Tb(3+)), of which luminescence and after-glowing features were tested. The morphology of all these samples presents a state of porosity and laxity. The samples show an intense emission peak at 514 nm and broad peaks of the excitation spectra at 290-360 nm, Tb(3+) and Dy(3+) had most effects on luminance and after-glowed time respectively. The SrAl2O4 : Eu(2+)0.012 5, Dy(3+)0.012 5 had good luminance and proper after-glowed time as well.

  10. The radio afterglow of Swift J1644+57 reveals a powerful jet with fast core and slow sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimica, P.; Giannios, D.; Metzger, B. D.; Aloy, M. A.

    2015-07-01

    We model the non-thermal transient Swift J1644+57 as resulting from a relativistic jet powered by the accretion of a tidally disrupted star on to a supermassive black hole. Accompanying synchrotron radio emission is produced by the shock interaction between the jet and the dense circumnuclear medium, similar to a gamma-ray burst afterglow. An open mystery, however, is the origin of the late-time radio re-brightening, which occurred well after the peak of the jetted X-ray emission. Here, we systematically explore several proposed explanations for this behaviour by means of multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations coupled to a self-consistent radiative transfer calculation of the synchrotron emission. Our main conclusion is that the radio afterglow of Swift J1644+57 is not naturally explained by a jet with a one-dimensional top-hat angular structure. However, a more complex angular structure comprised of an ultrarelativistic core (Lorentz factor Γ ˜ 10) surrounded by a slower (Γ ˜ 2) sheath provides a reasonable fit to the data. Such a geometry could result from the radial structure of the super-Eddington accretion flow or as the result of jet precession. The total kinetic energy of the ejecta that we infer of ˜ few 1053 erg requires a highly efficient jet launching mechanism. Our jet model providing the best fit to the light curve of the on-axis event Swift J1644+57 is used to predict the radio light curves for off-axis viewing angles. Implications for the presence of relativistic jets from tidal disruption events (TDEs) detected via their thermal disc emission, as well as the prospects for detecting orphan TDE afterglows with upcoming wide-field radio surveys and resolving the jet structure with long baseline interferometry, are discussed.

  11. The First Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope GRB Afterglow Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roming, P. W. A.; Koch, T. S.; Oates, S. R.; Porterfield, B. L.; Vanden Berk, D. E.; Boyd, P. T.; Holland, S. T.; Hoversten, E. A.; Immler, S.; Marshall, F. E.; Page, M. J.; Racusin, J. L.; Schneider, D. P.; Breeveld, A. A.; Brown, P. J.; Chester, M. M.; Cucchiara, A.; DePasquale, M.; Gronwall, C.; Hunsberger, S. D.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Landsman, W. B.; Schady, P.; Still, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present the first Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow catalog. The catalog contains data from over 64,000 independent UVOT image observations of 229 GRBs first detected by Swift, the High Energy Transient Explorer 2 (HETE2), the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL), and the Interplanetary Network (IPN). The catalog covers GRBs occurring during the period from 2005 January 17 to 2007 June 16 and includes ~86% of the bursts detected by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). The catalog provides detailed burst positional, temporal, and photometric information extracted from each of the UVOT images. Positions for bursts detected at the 3σ level are provided with a nominal accuracy, relative to the USNO-B1 catalog, of ~0farcs25. Photometry for each burst is given in three UV bands, three optical bands, and a "white" or open filter. Upper limits for magnitudes are reported for sources detected below 3σ. General properties of the burst sample and light curves, including the filter-dependent temporal slopes, are also provided. The majority of the UVOT light curves, for bursts detected at the 3σ level, can be fit by a single power-law, with a median temporal slope (α) of 0.96, beginning several hundred seconds after the burst trigger and ending at ~1 × 105 s. The median UVOT v-band (~5500 Å) magnitude at 2000 s for a sample of "well"-detected bursts is 18.02. The UVOT flux interpolated to 2000 s after the burst, shows relatively strong correlations with both the prompt Swift BAT fluence, and the Swift X-ray flux at 11 hr after the trigger.

  12. ON THE EMERGENT SPECTRA OF HOT PROTOPLANET COLLISION AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Miller-Ricci, Eliza; Meyer, Michael R.; Seager, Sara; Elkins-Tanton, Linda

    2009-10-10

    We explore the appearance of terrestrial planets in formation by studying the emergent spectra of hot molten protoplanets during their collisional formation. While such collisions are rare, the surfaces of these bodies may remain hot at temperatures of 1000-3000 K for up to millions of years during the epoch of their formation (of duration 10-100 Myr). These objects are luminous enough in the thermal infrared to be observable with current and next-generation optical/IR telescopes, provided that the atmosphere of the forming planet permits astronomers to observe brightness temperatures approaching that of the molten surface. Detectability of a collisional afterglow depends on properties of the planet's atmosphere-primarily on the mass of the atmosphere. A planet with a thin atmosphere is more readily detected, because there is little atmosphere to obscure the hot surface. Paradoxically, a more massive atmosphere prevents one from easily seeing the hot surface, but also keeps the planet hot for a longer time. In terms of planetary mass, more massive planets are also easier to detect than smaller ones because of their larger emitting surface areas-up to a factor of 10 in brightness between 1 and 10 M {sub +} planets. We present preliminary calculations assuming a range of protoplanet masses (1-10 M {sub +}), surface pressures (1-1000 bar), and atmospheric compositions, for molten planets with surface temperatures ranging from 1000 to 1800 K, in order to explore the diversity of emergent spectra that are detectable. While current 8 to 10 m class ground-based telescopes may detect hot protoplanets at wide orbital separations beyond 30 AU (if they exist), we will likely have to wait for next-generation extremely large telescopes or improved diffraction suppression techniques to find terrestrial planets in formation within several AU of their host stars.

  13. Expressing cycles and their emissions on the basis of properties and results from other cycles.

    PubMed

    Clark, Nigel N; Vora, Kuntal A; Wang, Lijuan; Gautam, Mridul; Wayne, W Scott; Thompson, Gregory J

    2010-08-01

    A method is proposed to predict vehicle emissions over a driving cycle on the basis of the vehicle's emissions measured over other driving cycles and the properties of these cycles. These properties include average velocity, average inertial power, and average acceleration. This technique was demonstrated and verified using data from the Coordinating Research Council (CRC) E-55/59 emissions inventory program using the statistical properties of the cycles used for measurement in E-55/59. These cycles were Idle mode, Creep mode, Cruise mode, and Transient mode of the 5-Mode CARB H-HDDT, and their intensive properties were average velocity, average acceleration, and average inertial power. The predicted emissions were from the vehicle driven over the U.S. heavy-duty urban dynamometer driving schedule (UDDS). The emissions data were collected from 56 heavy-duty trucks operating at a test weight of 56000 lbs. The predicted emissions data for the UDDS can be expressed as a linear combination of emissions from Idle, Transient, and Cruise modes, and the weighting factors for the linear combination can be determined without prior knowledge of the UDDS emissions themselves. Different combinations of cycles were employed to predict UDDS emissions, and the combination of Idle, Transient, and Cruise modes was found to be the most suitable. For the 56 heavy-duty trucks, the coefficient of determination (R2) in predicting carbon dioxide (CO2) was 0.80, oxides of nitrogen (NOx) was 0.89, and total particulate matter (PM) was 0.71. The average errors between the predicted and measured cycle emissions were 4.2%, 7.8%, and 46.8%, respectively. As with most emissions modeling tools, CO2 and NOx were better predicted than PM. The generic use of the technique was further demonstrated by predicting the emissions expected to arise from operation over the European Transient Cycle (ETC).

  14. Atmospheric pressure helium afterglow discharge detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Rice, Gary; D'Silva, Arthur P.; Fassel, Velmer A.

    1986-05-06

    An apparatus for providing a simple, low-frequency electrodeless discharge system for atmospheric pressure afterglow generation. A single quartz tube through which a gas mixture is passed is extended beyond a concentric electrode positioned thereabout. A grounding rod is placed directly above the tube outlet to permit optical viewing of the discharge between the electrodes.

  15. Atmospheric pressure helium afterglow discharge detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Rice, G.; D'Silva, A.P.; Fassel, V.A.

    1985-04-05

    An apparatus for providing a simple, low-frequency, electrodeless discharge system for atmospheric pressure afterglow generation. A single quartz tube through which a gas mixture is passed is extended beyond a concentric electrode positioned thereabout. A grounding rod is placed directly above the tube outlet to permit optical viewing of the discharge between the electrodes.

  16. ON PARTICLE ACCELERATION RATE IN GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Sagi, Eran; Nakar, Ehud

    2012-04-10

    It is well known that collisionless shocks are major sites of particle acceleration in the universe, but the details of the acceleration process are still not well understood. The particle acceleration rate, which can shed light on the acceleration process, is rarely measured in astrophysical environments. Here, we use observations of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows, which are weakly magnetized relativistic collisionless shocks in ion-electron plasma, to constrain the rate of particle acceleration in such shocks. We find, based on X-ray and GeV afterglows, an acceleration rate that is most likely very fast, approaching the Bohm limit, when the shock Lorentz factor is in the range of {Gamma} {approx} 10-100. In that case X-ray observations may be consistent with no amplification of the magnetic field in the shock upstream region. We examine the X-ray afterglow of GRB 060729, which is observed for 642 days showing a sharp decay in the flux starting about 400 days after the burst, when the shock Lorentz factor is {approx}5. We find that inability to accelerate X-ray-emitting electrons at late time provides a natural explanation for the sharp decay, and that also in that case acceleration must be rather fast, and cannot be more than a 100 times slower than the Bohm limit. We conclude that particle acceleration is most likely fast in GRB afterglows, at least as long as the blast wave is ultrarelativistic.

  17. Electron Field Emission Properties of Textured Platinum Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.

    2002-01-01

    During ground tests of electric microthrusters and space tests of electrodynamic tethers the electron emitters must successfully operate at environmental pressures possibly as high as 1x10(exp -4) Pa. High partial pressures of oxygen, nitrogen, and water vapor are expected in such environments. A textured platinum surface was used in this work for field emission cathode assessments because platinum does not form oxide films at low temperatures. Although a reproducible cathode conditioning process did not evolve from this work, some short term tests for periods of 1 to 4 hours showed no degradation of emission current at an electric field of 8 V/mm and background pressures of about 1x10(exp -6) Pa. Increases of background pressure by air flow to about 3x10(exp -4) Pa yield a hostile environment for the textured platinum field emission cathode.

  18. Outstanding field emission properties of wet-processed titanium dioxide coated carbon nanotube based field emission devices

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jinzhuo; Ou-Yang, Wei Chen, Xiaohong; Guo, Pingsheng; Piao, Xianqing; Sun, Zhuo; Xu, Peng; Wang, Miao; Li, Jun

    2015-02-16

    Field emission devices using a wet-processed composite cathode of carbon nanotube films coated with titanium dioxide exhibit outstanding field emission characteristics, including ultralow turn on field of 0.383 V μm{sup −1} and threshold field of 0.657 V μm{sup −1} corresponding with a very high field enhancement factor of 20 000, exceptional current stability, and excellent emission uniformity. The improved field emission properties are attributed to the enhanced edge effect simultaneously with the reduced screening effect, and the lowered work function of the composite cathode. In addition, the highly stable electron emission is found due to the presence of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the carbon nanotubes, which prohibits the cathode from the influence of ions and free radical created in the emission process as well as residual oxygen gas in the device. The high-performance solution-processed composite cathode demonstrates great potential application in vacuum electronic devices.

  19. A look at some systemic properties of self-bioluminescent emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creath, Katherine

    2008-08-01

    Self-bioluminescent emission (SBE) is a type of biological chemiluminescence where photons are emitted as part of chemical reactions occurring during metabolic processes. This emission is also known as biophoton emission, ultraweak photon emission and ultraweak bioluminescence. This paper outlines research over the past century on some systemic properties of SBE as measured with biological detectors, photomultiplier detectors and ultra-sensitive imaging arrays. There is an apparent consensus in the literature that emission in the deep blue and ultraviolet (150-450nm) is related to DNA / RNA processes while emission in the red and near infrared (600-1000nm) is related to mitochondria and oxidative metabolisms involving reactive oxygen species, singlet oxygen and free radicals in plant, animal and human cells along with chlorophyll fluorescent decay in plants. Additionally, there are trends showing that healthy, unstressed and uninjured samples have less emission than samples that are unhealthy, stressed or injured. Mechanisms producing this emission can be narrowed down by isolating the wavelength region of interest and waiting for short-term fluorescence to decay leaving the ultraweak long-term metabolic emission. Examples of imaging this emission in healthy versus unhealthy, stressed versus unstressed, and injured versus uninjured plant parts are shown. Further discussion poses questions still to be answered related to properties such as coherence, photon statistics, and methodological means of isolating mechanisms.

  20. Superior Field Emission Properties of Layered WS2-RGO Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Rout, Chandra Sekhar; Joshi, Padmashree D.; Kashid, Ranjit V.; Joag, Dilip S.; More, Mahendra A.; Simbeck, Adam J.; Washington, Morris; Nayak, Saroj K.; Late, Dattatray J.

    2013-01-01

    We report here the field emission studies of a layered WS2-RGO composite at the base pressure of ~1 × 10−8 mbar. The turn on field required to draw a field emission current density of 1 μA/cm2 is found to be 3.5, 2.3 and 2 V/μm for WS2, RGO and the WS2-RGO composite respectively. The enhanced field emission behavior observed for the WS2-RGO nanocomposite is attributed to a high field enhancement factor of 2978, which is associated with the surface protrusions of the single-to-few layer thick sheets of the nanocomposite. The highest current density of ~800 μA/cm2 is drawn at an applied field of 4.1 V/μm from a few layers of the WS2-RGO nanocomposite. Furthermore, first-principles density functional calculations suggest that the enhanced field emission may also be due to an overalp of the electronic structures of WS2 and RGO, where graphene-like states are dumped in the region of the WS2 fundamental gap. PMID:24257504

  1. Properties, performance and emissions of biofuels in blends with gasoline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami, Farshad

    The emission performance of fuels and their blends in modern combustion systems have been studied with the purpose of reducing regulated and unregulated emissions, understanding of exhaust products of fuels such as gasoline, ethanol and 2,5-dimethylfuran and comparison of results. A quantitative analysis of individual hydrocarbon species from exhaust emissions of these three fuels were carried out with direct injects spark ignition (DISI) single cylinder engine. The analysis of hydrocarbon species were obtained using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS) connected on-line to SI engine. During this project, novel works have been done including the set up of on-line exhaust emission measurement device for detection and quantification of individual volatile hydrocarbons. Setting of a reliable gas chromatography mass spectrometry measurement system required definition and development of a precise method. Lubricity characteristics of biofuels and gasoline were investigated using High Frequency Reciprocating Rig (HFRR). Results showed great enhancing lubricity characteristics of biofuels when added to conventional gasoline. 2,5-dimenthylfuran was found to be the best among the fuels used, addition of this fuel to gasoline also showed better result compared with ethanol addition.

  2. The influence of oxidation properties on the electron emission characteristics of porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Li; Zhang, Xiaoning; Wang, Wenjiang; Wei, Haicheng

    2016-09-01

    In order to investigate the influence of oxidation properties such as oxygen content and its distribution gradient on the electron emission characteristics of porous silicon (PS) emitters, emitters with PS thickness of 8 μm, 5 μm, and 3 μm were prepared and then oxidized by electrochemical oxidation (ECO) and ECO-RTO (rapid thermal oxidation) to get different oxidation properties. The experimental results indicated that the emission current density, efficiency, and stability of the PS emitters are mainly determined by oxidation properties. The higher oxygen content and the smaller oxygen distribution gradient in the PS layer, the larger emission current density and efficiency we noted. The most favorable results occurred for the PS emitter with the smallest oxygen distribution gradient and the highest level of oxygen content, with an emission current density of 212.25 μA/cm2 and efficiency of 59.21‰. Additionally, it also demonstrates that thick PS layer benefits to the emission stability due to its longer electron acceleration tunnel. The FN fitting plots indicated that the effective emission areas of PS emitters can be enlarged and electron emission thresholds is decreased because of the higher oxygen content and smaller distribution gradient, which were approved by the optical micrographs of top electrode of PS emitters before and after electron emission.

  3. Growth temperature effect on field emission properties of printable carbon nanotubes cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lili; Sun, Zhuo; Chen, Ting; Que, Wenxiu

    2006-05-01

    The carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were synthesized by low pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in the temperature range of 500-750 °C. The dependence of field emission properties of screen-printed cathode on the CNTs growth temperatures was studied. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and Raman spectra showed that with the temperature increasing from 500 °C to 750 °C, the average diameter of most CNTs decreased, and the crystallinity of the nanotubes increases as shown by the narrower and more intense G peak in the Raman spectra. It is found that the higher growth temperature, the better field emission properties of the screen-printed nanotubes cathodes, i.e. lower turn-on emission field, higher emission current and more uniform emission.

  4. The Subaru FMOS galaxy redshift survey (FastSound). II. The emission line catalog and properties of emission line galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Hiroyuki; Totani, Tomonori; Tonegawa, Motonari; Akiyama, Masayuki; Dalton, Gavin; Glazebrook, Karl; Iwamuro, Fumihide; Ohta, Kouji; Takato, Naruhisa; Tamura, Naoyuki; Yabe, Kiyoto; Bunker, Andrew J.; Goto, Tomotsugu; Hikage, Chiaki; Ishikawa, Takashi; Okumura, Teppei; Shimizu, Ikkoh

    2016-06-01

    We present basic properties of ˜3300 emission line galaxies detected by the FastSound survey, which are mostly Hα emitters at z ˜ 1.2-1.5 in the total area of about 20 deg2, with the Hα flux sensitivity limit of ˜1.6 × 10-16 erg cm-2 s-1 at 4.5 σ. This paper presents the catalog of the FastSound emission lines and galaxies, which is open to the public. We also present basic properties of typical FastSound Hα emitters, which have Hα luminosities of 1041.8-1043.3 erg s-1, star formation rates (SFRs) of 20-500 M⊙ yr-1, and stellar masses of 1010.0-1011.3 M⊙. The 3D distribution maps for the four fields of Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) W1-4 are presented, clearly showing large scale clustering of galaxies at the scale of ˜100-600 comoving Mpc. Based on 1105 galaxies with detections of multiple emission lines, we estimate that the contamination of non-Hα lines is about 4% in the single-line emission galaxies, which is mostly [O III]λ5007. This contamination fraction is also confirmed by the stacked spectrum of all the FastSound spectra, in which Hα, [N II]λλ6548,6583, [S II]λλ6717,6731, and [O I]λλ6300,6364 are seen.

  5. Polarization properties of OH emission in planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, José F.; Uscanga, Lucero; Green, James A.; Miranda, Luis F.; Suárez, Olga; Bendjoya, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    We present the interferometric, full-polarization observations of the four ground-state transitions of OH, towards five confirmed and one candidate OH-emitting planetary nebulae (OHPNe). OHPNe are believed to be very young PNe, and information on their magnetic fields (provided by their polarization) could be key to understand the early evolution of PNe. We detect significant circular and linear polarization in four and two objects, respectively. Possible Zeeman pairs are seen in JaSt 23 and IRAS 17393-2727, resulting in estimates of magnetic field strengths between 0.8 and 24 mG. We also report the new detection of OH emission at 1720 MHz towards Vy 2-2, making it the third known PN with this type of emission. We suggest that younger PNe have spectra dominated by narrow maser features and higher degrees of polarization. Shock-excited emission at 1720 MHz seems to be more common in PNe than in early evolutionary phases, and could be related to equatorial ejections during the early PN phase.

  6. Emission and Propagation Properties of Midinfrared Quantum Cascade Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnaswami, Kannan; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Cannon, Bret D.; Ho, Nicolas; Anheier, Norman C.

    2008-02-15

    We report divergence, astigmatism and M2 measurements of quantum cascade lasers (QCL) with an emission wavelength of 8.77 mum. Emission profiles from the QCL facet showed divergence angles of 62° and 32° FWHM ± 2° for the fast and slow axes, respectively. The observation of far field structure superimposed on the fast axes profiles was attributed to the position of the QCL die with respect to the edge of the laser submount, emphasizing the need for careful placement. Two diffraction-limited Germanium aspheric microlenses were designed and fabricated to efficiently collect, collimate, and focus QCL emission. A confocal system comprised of these lenses was used to measure the beam propagation figure of merit (M2) yielding 1.8 and 1.2 for the fast and slow axes, respectively. Astigmatism at the exit facet was calculated to be about 3.4 mum, or less than half a wave. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental measurement of astigmatism and M2 reported for mid-IR QCLs.

  7. A possible macronova in the late afterglow of the long-short burst GRB 060614

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Li, Xiang; Covino, Stefano; Zheng, Xian-Zhong; Hotokezaka, Kenta; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Piran, Tsvi; Wei, Da-Ming

    2015-06-01

    Long-duration (>2 s) γ-ray bursts that are believed to originate from the death of massive stars are expected to be accompanied by supernovae. GRB 060614, that lasted 102 s, lacks a supernova-like emission down to very stringent limits and its physical origin is still debated. Here we report the discovery of near-infrared bump that is significantly above the regular decaying afterglow. This red bump is inconsistent with even the weakest known supernova. However, it can arise from a Li-Paczyński macronova--the radioactive decay of debris following a compact binary merger. If this interpretation is correct, GRB 060614 arose from a compact binary merger rather than from the death of a massive star and it was a site of a significant production of heavy r-process elements. The significant ejected mass favours a black hole-neutron star merger but a double neutron star merger cannot be ruled out.

  8. A possible macronova in the late afterglow of the long-short burst GRB 060614.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Li, Xiang; Covino, Stefano; Zheng, Xian-Zhong; Hotokezaka, Kenta; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Piran, Tsvi; Wei, Da-Ming

    2015-06-11

    Long-duration (>2 s) γ-ray bursts that are believed to originate from the death of massive stars are expected to be accompanied by supernovae. GRB 060614, that lasted 102 s, lacks a supernova-like emission down to very stringent limits and its physical origin is still debated. Here we report the discovery of near-infrared bump that is significantly above the regular decaying afterglow. This red bump is inconsistent with even the weakest known supernova. However, it can arise from a Li-Paczyński macronova--the radioactive decay of debris following a compact binary merger. If this interpretation is correct, GRB 060614 arose from a compact binary merger rather than from the death of a massive star and it was a site of a significant production of heavy r-process elements. The significant ejected mass favours a black hole-neutron star merger but a double neutron star merger cannot be ruled out.

  9. Emission properties of an organic light-emitting diode patterned by a photoinduced autostructuration process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, C.; Fiorini-Debuisschert, C.; Hassiaoui, I.; Rocha, L.; Raimond, P.; Nunzi, J.-M.

    2005-11-01

    The photoluminescence properties of a periodically structured organic light-emitting diode are presented. Patterning is achieved using an original single-step autostructuration technique based on photoinduced effects in azo-polymer films. We show that single beam laser irradiation can lead to the induction of regular two-dimensional surface relief gratings. The waveguide properties of these microstructures as well as their effect on the emission properties of a light-emitting material are studied. We demonstrate a new straightforward technique to improve external light emission efficiency by outcoupling part of the light that was initially guided into the different diode layers.

  10. Field emission properties of a graphene/polymer composite.

    PubMed

    Patole, Shashikant P; Lee, Jong Hak; Park, Jae Hong; Yu, Seong Man; Makotchenko, V G; Nazarov, A S; Fedorov, V E; Shin, Dong Wook; Alegaonkar, Prashant S; More, Mahendra A; Yoo, Ji-Beom

    2013-11-01

    Thin graphene/polymer sheet composites were fabricated using easily soluble expanded graphite (ESEG), and their field emission (FE) parameters were examined. Due to the high dispersability of ESEG, a stable graphene suspension was prepared by ultrasonication in toluene without the need for a surfactant. The suspension consisted of exfoliated graphene sheets with a thickness of 1 - 2 nm. Using a calendering process, the solution was further shear mixed with ethyl cellulose to obtain a well-dispersed graphene/polymer composite. The composite was screen printed onto a conducing substrate to fabricate the FE cathode layers. The FE measurements were taken in a diode configuration at an applied electrostatic field and inter-electrode distance of 1.7 to 6 V/microm and approximately 200 microm, respectively. The threshold turn-on-field was approximately 3.5 V/microm at a current density of approximately 10 microA/cm2 with a corresponding mean field enhancement factor of 1350 +/- 50. Emission occurred mainly from the edges and bends of the graphene layers. The luminescence uniformity of the composite cathode layers was examined using a phosphor-coated anode.

  11. Amino-terminated diamond surfaces: Photoelectron emission and photocatalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Di; Bandy, Jason A.; Li, Shuo; Hamers, Robert J.

    2016-08-01

    We report a new approach to making stable negative electron-affinity diamond surfaces by terminating diamond with amino groups (also known as amine groups, -NH2). Previous studies have shown that negative electron affinity can be induced by terminating diamond surfaces with hydrogen, creating a surface dipole favorable toward electron emission. Here, we demonstrate that covalent tethering of positive charges in the form of protonated amino groups, -NH3+, also leads to negative electron affinity (NEA) and facile electron emission into vacuum and into water. Amino-terminated diamond was prepared using a very mild plasma discharge. Valence-band photoemission studies of the amino-terminated diamond samples show a characteristic "NEA" peak, demonstrating that the amino-terminated surface has NEA. Diamond's ability to emit electrons into water was evaluated using photochemical conversion of N2 to NH3. Time-resolved surface photovoltage studies were used to characterize charge separation at the diamond interface, and Mott-Schottky measurements were performed to characterize band-bending at the diamond-water interface. XPS studies show that the amino-terminated surfaces provide increased chemical resistance to oxidation compared with H-terminated diamond when illuminated with ultraviolet light.

  12. THE AFTERGLOW AND ULIRG HOST GALAXY OF THE DARK SHORT GRB 120804A

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.; Zauderer, B. A.; Margutti, R.; Laskar, T.; Fong, W.; Chornock, R.; Dupuy, T. J.; Levan, A.; Tunnicliffe, R. L.; Mangano, V.; Fox, D. B.; Tanvir, N. R.; Menten, K. M.; Hjorth, J.; Roth, K.

    2013-03-10

    We present the optical discovery and subarcsecond optical and X-ray localization of the afterglow of the short GRB 120804A, as well as optical, near-IR, and radio detections of its host galaxy. X-ray observations with Swift/XRT, Chandra, and XMM-Newton extending to {delta}t Almost-Equal-To 19 days reveal a single power-law decline. The optical afterglow is faint, and comparison to the X-ray flux indicates that GRB 120804A is ''dark'', with a rest-frame extinction of A {sup host}{sub V} Almost-Equal-To 2.5 mag (at z = 1.3). The intrinsic neutral hydrogen column density inferred from the X-ray spectrum, N{sub H,{sub int}}(z = 1.3) Almost-Equal-To 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}, is commensurate with the large extinction. The host galaxy exhibits red optical/near-IR colors. Equally important, JVLA observations at Almost-Equal-To 0.9-11 days reveal a constant flux density of F{sub {nu}}(5.8 GHz) = 35 {+-} 4 {mu}Jy and an optically thin spectrum, unprecedented for GRB afterglows, but suggestive instead of emission from the host galaxy. The optical/near-IR and radio fluxes are well fit with the scaled spectral energy distribution of the local ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) Arp 220 at z Almost-Equal-To 1.3, with a resulting star formation rate of x Almost-Equal-To 300 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. The inferred extinction and small projected offset (2.2 {+-} 1.2 kpc) are also consistent with the ULIRG scenario, as is the presence of a companion galaxy at the same redshift and with a separation of about 11 kpc. The limits on radio afterglow emission, in conjunction with the observed X-ray and optical emission, require a circumburst density of n {approx} 10{sup -3} cm{sup -3}, an isotropic-equivalent energy scale of E{sub {gamma},{sub iso}} Almost-Equal-To E{sub K,{sub iso}} Almost-Equal-To 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 51} erg, and a jet opening angle of {theta}{sub j} {approx}> 11 Degree-Sign . The expected fraction of luminous infrared galaxies in the short GRB

  13. The magnetoionic modes and propagation properties of auroral radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, Wynne; Hashimoto, Kozo

    1990-01-01

    The nature of the magnetoionic wave modes which accompany the aurora is clarified here by a detailed analysis, using multiple techniques, of DE 1 auroral radio observations. All four of the possible magnetoionic wave modes are found to occur, apparently emitted from two different source regions on the same auroral field line. AKR originates primarily in the X mode near the electron cyclotron frequency, and is frequently also accompanied by a weaker O-mode component from the same location. The next most prominent auroral emission is the W-mode auroral hiss originating from altitudes always well below the DE 1 satellite at frequencies below the local cyclotron frequency. The previously reported Z-mode auroral radiation was also detected, but from sources also below the satellite at the poleward edge of the cavity, and not from the expected AKR source at the cyclotron frequency.

  14. Gamma-ray bursts: afterglows from cylindrical jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, K. S.; Huang, Y. F.; Lu, T.

    2001-08-01

    Nearly all previous discussions on beaming effects in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have assumed a conical geometry. However, more and more observations on relativistic jets in radio galaxies, active galactic nuclei, and `microquasars' in the Galaxy have shown that many of these outflows are not conical, but cylindrical, i.e. they maintain constant cross-sections at large scales. Thus it is necessary to discuss the possibility of gamma-ray bursts being due to highly collimated cylindrical jets, not conical ones. Here we study the dynamical evolution of cylindrical jets and discuss their afterglows. Both analytical and numerical results are presented. It is shown that when the lateral expansion is not taken into account, a cylindrical jet typically remains highly relativistic for ~108-109s. During this relativistic phase, the optical afterglow at first decays as Sν~t-p/2, where p is the index characterizing the power-law energy distribution of electrons. Then the light curve steepens to Sν~t-(p+1)/2 due to cooling of electrons. After entering the non-relativistic phase (i.e. t>=1011s), the afterglow is Sν~t-(5p-4)/6. However, if the cylindrical jet expands laterally at the comoving sound speed, then the decay becomes Sν~t-p and Sν~t-(15p-21)/10-t-(15p-20)/10 in the ultrarelativistic and in the non-relativistic phase respectively. Note that in both cases the light curve turns flatter after the relativistic-Newtonian transition point, which differs markedly from the behaviour of a conical jet. It is suggested that some GRBs with afterglows decaying as t-1.1-t-1.3 may be due to cylindrical jets, not necessarily isotropic fireballs.

  15. Spectroscopic Observations of the Bright Afterglow of GRB021004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Fiona

    2001-09-01

    One of the holy grails of gamma-ray burst research is to detect X-ray line signatures from an afterglow with high statistical significance. Of all possible observations, this perhaps offers the best chance of constraining the GRB mechanism and environment, and could provide the "smoking gun" signature connecting GRBs to massive stellar deaths. In order to accomplish this, we know long observations within one day of the event are necessary.

  16. Growth of Aligned Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes and the Effect of Adsorbates on the Field Emission Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, W. I.; Teo, K. B. K.; Lansley, S. B.; Chhowalla, M.; Amaratunga, G. A. J.; Semet, V.; Binh, Vu Thien; Pirio, G.; Legagneux, P.

    2003-10-01

    In attempt to decipher the field emission characteristics of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), we have developed a fabrication method based on plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) to provide utmost control of the nanotube structure such as their alignment, individual position, diameter, length and morphology. We investigated the field emission properties of these nanotubes to elucidate the effect of adsorbates on the nanotubes. Our results show that although the adsorbates cause an apparent lowering of the required turn on voltage/field of the nanotubes, the adsorbates undesirably cause a saturation of the current, large temporal fluctuations in the current, and also a deviation of the emission characteristics from Fowler-Nordheim like emission. The adsorbates are easily removed by extracting an emission current of 1 uA per nanotube or using a high applied electric field (˜25V/um).

  17. The Late Afterglow and Host Galaxy of GRB 990712.

    PubMed

    Hjorth; Holland; Courbin; Dar; Olsen; Scodeggio

    2000-05-10

    We present deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging, as well as ground-based imaging and spectroscopy, of the optical afterglow associated with the long-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 990712 and its host galaxy. The data were obtained 48-123 days after the burst occurred. The magnitudes of the host (R=21.9, V=22.5) and optical afterglow (R=25.4, V=25.8, 47.7 days after the burst) favor a scenario in which the optical light follows a pure power-law decay with an index of alpha approximately -1.0. We find no evidence for a contribution from a supernova like SN 1998bw. This suggests that either there are multiple classes of long-duration gamma-ray bursts or that the peak luminosity of the supernova was more than 1.5 mag fainter than SN 1998bw. The HST images and EFOSC2 spectra indicate that the gamma-ray burst was located in a bright, extended feature (possibly a star-forming region) 1.4 kpc from the nucleus of a 0.2L*B galaxy at z=0.434, possibly a Seyfert 2 galaxy. The late-time afterglow and host galaxy of GRB 990712 bear some resemblance to those of GRB 970508. PMID:10813669

  18. Emissive properties of SiO2 thin films through photonic windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, D.; Garín, M.; Trifonov, T.; Rodríguez, A.; Alcubilla, R.

    2012-02-01

    In this work, we study the selective emission properties of silicon-based three-dimensional photonic crystals coated with thin films of silicon dioxide presenting temperature emission measurements at 600 K of oxidized macroporous silicon structures. The photonic band gap of the structure is centered at 9 μm with 2.5 μm bandwidth. Through this photonic window defined by the gap, a narrow emission peak arises from the oxide layer. We propose the given structure as a selective thermal source for infrared spectroscopy applications in the fingerprint spectral region (6-12 μm wavelength).

  19. Comparison of the coherence properties of superradiance and laser emission in semiconductor structures

    SciTech Connect

    Vasil'ev, Petr P; Penty, R V; White, I H

    2012-12-31

    The coherence properties of a transient electron - hole state developing during superradiance emission in semiconductor laser structures have been studied experimentally using a Michelson interferometer and Young's classic double-slit configuration. The results demonstrate that, in the lasers studied, the first-order correlation function, which quantifies spatial coherence, approaches unity for superradiant emission and is 0.2 - 0.5 for laser emission. The supercoherence is due to long-range ordering upon the superradiant phase transition. (special issue devoted to the 90th anniversary of n.g. basov)

  20. The chemical and microphysical properties of secondary organic aerosols from Holm Oak emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang-Yona, N.; Rudich, Y.; Mentel, Th. F.; Buchholz, A.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kleist, E.; Spindler, C.; Tillmann, R.; Wildt, J.

    2010-02-01

    The Mediterranean region is expected to experience substantial climatic change in the next 50 years. But, possible effects of climate change on biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions as well as on the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) produced from these VOC are yet unexplored. To address such issues, the effects of temperature and light intensity on the VOC emissions of Mediterranean Holm Oak have been studied in the Jülich plant aerosol atmosphere chamber, as well as the optical and microphysical properties of the resulting SOA. Monoterpenes dominated the VOC emissions from Holm Oak (97.5%) and temperature increase enhanced the emission strength under variation of the emission pattern. The amount of SOA increased linearly with the emission strength with a fractional mass yield of 5.7±1%, independent of the detailed emission pattern. The particles were highly scattering with no absorption abilities. Their average hygroscopic growth factor was 1.13±0.03 at 90% RH with a critical diameter of droplet activation of 100±4 nm at a supersaturation of 0.4%. All microphysical properties did not depend on the detailed emission pattern, in accordance with an invariant O/C ratio (0.57(+0.03/-0.1)) of the SOA observed by high resolution aerosol mass spectrometry. The increase of Holm oak emissions with temperature (≈20% per degree) was stronger than e.g. for Boreal tree species (≈10% per degree). Increasing mean temperature in Mediterranean areas therefore may have a stronger impact on VOC emissions and SOA formation than in areas with Boreal forests.

  1. Low-macroscopic field emission properties of wide bandgap copper aluminium oxide nanoparticles for low-power panel applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan Banerjee, Arghya; Joo, Sang W.

    2011-09-01

    Field emission properties of CuAlO2 nanoparticles are reported for the first time, with a low turn-on field of approximately 2 V µm - 1 and field enhancement factor around 230. The field emission process follows the standard Fowler-Nordheim tunnelling of cold electron emission. The emission mechanism is found to be a combination of low electron affinity, internal nanostructure and large field enhancement at the low-dimensional emitter tips of the nanoparticles. The field emission properties are comparable to the conventional carbon-based field emitters, and thus can become alternative candidate for field emission devices for low-power panel applications.

  2. Low-macroscopic field emission properties of wide bandgap copper aluminium oxide nanoparticles for low-power panel applications.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Arghya Narayan; Joo, Sang W

    2011-09-01

    Field emission properties of CuAlO(2) nanoparticles are reported for the first time, with a low turn-on field of approximately 2 V µm(-1) and field enhancement factor around 230. The field emission process follows the standard Fowler-Nordheim tunnelling of cold electron emission. The emission mechanism is found to be a combination of low electron affinity, internal nanostructure and large field enhancement at the low-dimensional emitter tips of the nanoparticles. The field emission properties are comparable to the conventional carbon-based field emitters, and thus can become alternative candidate for field emission devices for low-power panel applications. PMID:21841217

  3. Microstructure and far infrared emission properties of tourmaline powders eroded by hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jinsheng; Li, Juan; Meng, Junping; Ding, Yan; Xue, Gang

    2010-03-01

    The microstructure and far infrared emission properties of tourmaline powders eroded by hydrochloric acid were investigated. The indexes including crystal structure, unit cell volume, microstructure and infrared spectra were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results show that the crystal structure was not changed; however, the unit cell volume decreased, the angularities of tourmaline particles became smooth, and there appeared nanohollows on their surfaces. The infrared emission properties were enhanced at proper concentrations of hydrochloric acid solutions. PMID:20355630

  4. Microstructure and far infrared emission properties of tourmaline powders eroded by hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jinsheng; Li, Juan; Meng, Junping; Ding, Yan; Xue, Gang

    2010-03-01

    The microstructure and far infrared emission properties of tourmaline powders eroded by hydrochloric acid were investigated. The indexes including crystal structure, unit cell volume, microstructure and infrared spectra were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results show that the crystal structure was not changed; however, the unit cell volume decreased, the angularities of tourmaline particles became smooth, and there appeared nanohollows on their surfaces. The infrared emission properties were enhanced at proper concentrations of hydrochloric acid solutions.

  5. Wide field x-ray telescopes: Detecting x-ray transients/afterglows related to GRBs

    SciTech Connect

    Hudec, Rene; Pina, Ladislav; Inneman, Adolf; Gorenstein, Paul

    1998-05-16

    The recent discovery of X-ray afterglows of GRBs opens the possibility of analyses of GRBs by their X-ray detections. However, imaging X-ray telescopes in current use mostly have limited fields of view. Alternative X-ray optics geometries achieving very large fields of view have been theoretically suggested in the 70's but not constructed and used so far. We review the geometries and basic properties of the wide-field X-ray optical systems based on one- and two-dimensional lobster-eye geometry and suggest technologies for their development and construction. First results of the development of double replicated X-ray reflecting flats for use in one-dimensional X-ray optics of lobster-eye type are presented and discussed. The optimum strategy for locating GRBs upon their X-ray counterparts is also presented and discussed.

  6. The Chemical and Microphysical Properties of Secondary Organic Aerosols from Holm Oak Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang-Yona, Naama; Rudich, Yinon; Thomas, Mentel; Angela, Buchholz; Astrid, Kiendler-Scharr; Einhard, Kleist; Christian, Spindler; Ralf, Tillmann; Jürgen, Wildt

    2010-05-01

    Plant-emitted volatile organic compounds (VOC) undergo atmospheric oxidation, which leads to the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Large uncertainties exist about possible climatic effects on SOA formation from biogenic sources. Therefore it is important to investigate the impact of environmental conditions on the plants' emissions, on the formation of biogenic SOA, and on SOA properties in order to understand possible climatic impacts. The Mediterranean region is expected to experience substantial climatic change in the next 50 years and the possible effects on biogenic emissions are yet unexplored. To address such issues, the effects of temperature and light intensity on Mediterranean Holm Oak VOC emissions, as well as on microphysical properties and chemical composition of the resulting SOA have been studied in the Jülich plant aerosol atmosphere chamber. We studied SOA formation from Holm Oak under conditions possibly simulating future climate warming. Monoterpenes dominate the VOC emissions from Holm Oak (97.5%) and temperature increase enhanced the emission strength and changed the emission pattern. Enhanced emissions lead to linearly enhanced SOA formation with a fractional mass yield of SOA (5.7±1%) independent of the detailed emission pattern. The particles are highly scattering with no absorption abilities. Their average hygroscopic growth factor was 1.13±0.03 at 90% RH with a critical diameter of droplet activation was 100±4 nm at a supersaturation of 0.4%. All microphysical properties were not dependent on the detailed emission pattern, in accordance with an invariant O/C ratio (0.57(+0.03/-0.1)) of the SOA as derived from high resolution aerosol mass spectrometry. The temperature increase for the plants essentially led to stronger VOC emissions with the SOA mass being linearly related to the VOC concentrations. However, the increase of Holm oak emissions with temperature (≈ 20 % per degree) was stronger than for Boreal tree species

  7. Studies of x-ray emission properties of photoionized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feilu; Han, Bo; Jin, Rui; Salzmann, David; Liang, Guiyun; Wei, Huigang; Zhong, Jiayong; Zhao, Gang; Li, Jia-ming

    2016-03-01

    In this paper three aspects of photoionized plasmas are discussed in both laboratory and astrophysical contexts. First, the importance of accurate atomic/ionic data for the analysis of photoionized plasmas is shown. Second, an overview of present computer codes for the analysis of photoionized plasmas is given. We introduce our computer model, radiative-collisional code based on the flexible atomic code (RCF), for calculations of the properties of such plasmas. RCF uses database generated by the flexible atomic code. Using RCF it is shown that incorporating the satellite lines from doubly excited Li-like ions into the He{}α triplet lines is necessary for reliable analysis of observational spectra from astrophysical objects. Finally, we introduce a proposal to generate photoionized plasmas by x-ray free electron laser, which may facilitate the simulation in lab of astrophysical plasmas in photoionization equilibrium.

  8. The chemical and microphysical properties of secondary organic aerosols from Holm Oak emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang-Yona, N.; Rudich, Y.; Mentel, Th. F.; Bohne, A.; Buchholz, A.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kleist, E.; Spindler, C.; Tillmann, R.; Wildt, J.

    2010-08-01

    The Mediterranean region is expected to experience substantial climatic change in the next 50 years. But, possible effects of climate change on biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions as well as on the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) produced from these VOC are yet unexplored. To address such issues, the effects of temperature on the VOC emissions of Mediterranean Holm Oak and small Mediterranean stand of Wild Pistacio, Aleppo Pine, and Palestine Oak have been studied in the Jülich plant aerosol atmosphere chamber. For Holm Oak the optical and microphysical properties of the resulting SOA were investigated. Monoterpenes dominated the VOC emissions from Holm Oak (97.5%) and Mediterranean stand (97%). Higher temperatures enhanced the overall VOC emission but with different ratios of the emitted species. The amount of SOA increased linearly with the emission strength with a fractional mass yield of 6.0±0.6%, independent of the detailed emission pattern. The investigated particles were highly scattering with no absorption abilities. Their average hygroscopic growth factor of 1.13±0.03 at 90% RH with a critical diameter of droplet activation was 100±4 nm at a supersaturation of 0.4%. All microphysical properties did not depend on the detailed emission pattern, in accordance with an invariant O/C ratio (0.57(+0.03/-0.1)) of the SOA observed by high resolution aerosol mass spectrometry. The increase of Holm oak emissions with temperature (≈20% per degree) was stronger than e.g. for Boreal tree species (≈10% per degree). The SOA yield for Mediterranean trees determined here is similar as for Boreal trees. Increasing mean temperature in Mediterranean areas could thus have a stronger impact on BVOC emissions and SOA formation than in areas with Boreal forests.

  9. Links between phytoplankton, CO2 emissions and water properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, A. P.; Cabeçadas, L.

    2009-04-01

    estimated an amount of ~5 tons of CaCO3 produced in the upper 30 m of water resulting in a emission of CO2 of 7.4 mmol m-2 d-1, which indicates that the calcification process constitutes an additional source of CO2 to the water and, eventually, to the atmosphere. Our findings illustrate the sensitivity of the phytoplankton species composition in the shelf system under study to climate variations and also its importance in the carbon cycle. Thus, if phytoplankton community is vulnerable to this type of perturbations, one may expect impacts on higher trophic levels that involve specific trophic links.Please fill in your abstract text.

  10. Piezoflurochromism and Aggregation Induced Emission Properties of 9, 10-bis (trisalkoxystyryl) Anthracene Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Duraimurugan, Kumaraguru; Sivamani, Jayaraman; Sathiyaraj, Munusamy; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Siva, Ayyanar

    2016-07-01

    We report the synthesis of trisalkoxy substituted 9, 10-bis styrylanthracene derivatives (C8-ant and C12-ant) by Heck coupling with very good yield and their photophysical properties. Both C8-ant and C12-ant exhibit aggregation induced emission (AIE), mechnoflurochromism and thermochromism. Trisubstituted 9, 10-distyrylanthracene molecules having all the luminescent properties in a single molecule are first of its kind.

  11. Dielectric properties and emissivity of seawater at C-band microwave frequency.

    PubMed

    Murugkar, A G; Joshi, A S; Kurtadikar, M L

    2012-10-01

    Microwave remote sensing applications over ocean using radar and radiometers, a precise knowledge of emissivity and reflectivity, are required. Emissivity of ocean surface is a function of the surface configuration, frequency of radiation, temperature and its dielectric properties. The emissivity of a smooth ocean surface at a particular wavelength is determined by its complex dielectric properties. In present study, laboratory measurements of complex dielectric properties, real part epsilon', and imaginary part epsilon", of surface seawater samples collected from Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea are carried out. Measurements of these seawater samples are done at 5 GHz and 30 degrees C using an automated C-band microwave bench set up. The salinity of samples is also measured using autosalinometer. The salinity values are used to determine epsilon' and epsilon" using the Debye equations. The normal incidence emissivity and brightness temperature values for smooth sea surface are reported for surface samples. The dielectric constant epsilon' decreases and dielectric loss increases with increase in salinity at 5 GHz and 30 degrees C. At normal incidence, emissivity is almost constant for varying salinities.

  12. DYNAMICS AND AFTERGLOW LIGHT CURVES OF GAMMA-RAY BURST BLAST WAVES WITH A LONG-LIVED REVERSE SHOCK

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Z. Lucas; Zhang Bing; Hascoeet, Romain; Daigne, Frederic; Mochkovitch, Robert; Park, Il H.

    2012-12-20

    We perform a detailed study on the dynamics of a relativistic blast wave with the presence of a long-lived reverse shock (RS). Although a short-lived RS has been widely considered, the RS is believed to be long-lived as a consequence of a stratification expected on the ejecta Lorentz factors. The existence of a long-lived RS causes the forward shock (FS) dynamics to deviate from a self-similar Blandford-McKee solution. Employing the ''mechanical model'' that correctly incorporates the energy conservation, we present an accurate solution for both the FS and RS dynamics. We conduct a sophisticated calculation of the afterglow emission. Adopting a Lagrangian description of the blast wave, we keep track of an adiabatic evolution of numerous shells between the FS and RS. An evolution of the electron spectrum is also followed individually for every shell. We then find the FS and RS light curves by integrating over the entire FS and RS shocked regions, respectively. Exploring a total of 20 different ejecta stratifications, we explain in detail how a stratified ejecta affects its blast wave dynamics and afterglow light curves. We show that, while the FS light curves are not sensitive to the ejecta stratifications, the RS light curves exhibit much richer features, including steep declines, plateaus, bumps, re-brightenings, and a variety of temporal decay indices. These distinctive RS features may be observable if the RS has higher values of the microphysics parameters than the FS. We discuss possible applications of our results in understanding the gamma-ray burst afterglow data.

  13. Spectrophotometric analysis of gamma-ray burst afterglow extinction curves with X-Shooter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Japelj, J.; Covino, S.; Gomboc, A.; Vergani, S. D.; Goldoni, P.; Selsing, J.; Cano, Z.; D'Elia, V.; Flores, H.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Hammer, F.; Hjorth, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Kaper, L.; Kopač, D.; Krühler, T.; Melandri, A.; Piranomonte, S.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Tagliaferri, G.; Tanvir, N. R.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Watson, D.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2015-07-01

    We use gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow spectra observed with the VLT/X-Shooter spectrograph to measure rest-frame extinction in GRB lines-of-sight by modelling the broadband near-infrared (NIR) to X-ray afterglow spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Our sample consists of nine Swift GRBs, of which eight belong to the long-duration and one to the short-duration class. Dust is modelled using the average extinction curves of the Milky Way and the two Magellanic Clouds. We derive the rest-frame extinction of the entire sample, which fall in the range 0 ≲ AV ≲ 1.2. Moreover, the SMC extinction curve is the preferred extinction curve template for the majority of our sample, a result that is in agreement with those commonly observed in GRB lines of sights. In one analysed case (GRB 120119A), the common extinction curve templates fail to reproduce the observed extinction. To illustrate the advantage of using the high-quality, X-Shooter afterglow SEDs over the photometric SEDs, we repeat the modelling using the broadband SEDs with the NIR-to-UV photometric measurements instead of the spectra. The main result is that the spectroscopic data, thanks to a combination of excellent resolution and coverage of the blue part of the SED, are more successful in constraining extinction curves and therefore dust properties in GRB hosts with respect to photometric measurements. In all cases but one the extinction curve of one template is preferred over the others. We show that themodelled values of the extinction AV and the spectral slope, obtained through spectroscopic and photometric SED analysis, can differ significantly for individual events, though no apparent trend in the differences is observed. Finally we stress that, regardless of the resolution of the optical-to-NIR data, the SED modelling gives reliable results only when the fit is performed on a SED covering a broader spectral region (in our case extending to X-rays). Based on observations collected at the European

  14. Marigold-like nanocrystals: controllable synthesis, field emission, and photocatalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Changqing; Yu, Ke; Yin, Haihong; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Li, Shouchuan; Wang, Yang; Zhu, Ziqiang

    2014-06-01

    Cubic marigold-like Cu2S nanostructures were synthesized from a facile hydrothermal process without using any additives or surfactants. After thermal annealed at different condition, monoclinic Cu2S and tetragonal Cu1.81S nanostructures were obtained for the first time, maintaining the marigold-like morphology undestroyed. Field emission (FE) properties of these three types of nanostructures were investigated for the first time. The results indicated that the tetragonal Cu1.81S nanostructures had excellent field emission performance with turn-on field of and threshold field of . Moreover, their photocatalytic properties of the three nanostructures were also investigated by photodegradating methylene blue (MB). The results showed that the tetragonal Cu1.81S nanostructures may be a competitive material in both field emission and photocatalytic applications.

  15. Synthesis and excellent field emission properties of three-dimensional branched GaN nanowire homostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Enling; Sun, Lihe; Cui, Zhen; Ma, Deming; Shi, Wei; Wang, Xiaolin

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional branched GaN nanowire homostructures have been synthesized on the Si substrate via a two-step approach by chemical vapor deposition. Structural characterization reveals that the single crystal GaN nanowire trunks have hexagonal wurtzite characteristics and grow along the [0001] direction, while the homoepitaxial single crystal branches grow in a radial direction from the six-sided surfaces of the trunks. The field emission measurements demonstrate that the branched GaN nanowire homostructures have excellent field emission properties, with low turn-on field at 2.35 V/μm, a high field enhancement factor of 2938, and long emission current stability. This indicates that the present branched GaN nanowire homostructures will become valuable for practical field emission applications.

  16. Controlled growth and field emission properties of zinc oxide nanopyramid arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongsheng; Qi, Junjie; Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Xiaomei; Liao, Qingliang; Huang, Yunhua

    2007-09-01

    Single-crystalline, pyramidal zinc oxide nanorods have been synthesized in a large quantity on p-Si substrate via catalyst-free thermal chemical vapor deposition at low temperature. SEM investigations showed that the nanorods were vertically aligned on the substrate, with diameters ranging from 60 to 80 nm and lengths about 1.5 μm. A self-catalysis VLS growth mechanism was proposed for the formation of the ZnO nanorods. The field emission properties of the ZnO nanopyramid arrays were investigated. A turn-on field about 3.8 V/μm was obtained at a current density of 10 μA/cm 2, and the field emission data was analyzed by applying the Fowler-Nordheim theory. The stability of emission current density under a high voltage was also tested, indicating that the ZnO nanostructures are promising for an application such as field emission sources.

  17. Discharge and photo-luminance properties of a parallel plates electron emission lighting device.

    PubMed

    Li, Chia-Hung; Liu, Ming-Chung; Chiang, Chang-Lin; Li, Jung-Yu; Chen, Shih-Pu; Hsieh, Tai-Chiung; Chou, Yen-I; Lin, Yi-Ping; Wang, Po-Hung; Chun, Ming-Shin; Zeng, Hui-Kai; Juang, Jenh-Yih

    2011-01-01

    The gas discharge and photo-luminance properties of a planar lighting source featuring highly uniform light emission and mercury-free design were studied. The current density-voltage characteristics and the associated gas discharge of the devices operating with the values of the ratio of electric field to gas pressure (E/p) between 4.3 kV/Torr-cm and 35.7 kV/Torr-cm indicate that the width of the cathode fall extends over the entire gap between the two electrodes and the device is mostly in the obstructed discharge regime. The optical emission analysis confirmed the electron collision-induced gas emissions and strong effect of gas pressure on the phosphor emission when operated at constant current density, both are indicative of the primary roles played by the electron energy. PMID:21263712

  18. Influence of cluster-assembly parameters on the field emission properties of nanostructured carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducati, C.; Barborini, E.; Piseri, P.; Milani, P.; Robertson, J.

    2002-11-01

    Supersonic cluster beam deposition has been used to produce films with different nanostructures by controlling the deposition parameters such as the film thickness, substrate temperature and cluster mass distribution. The field emission properties of cluster-assembled carbon films have been characterized and correlated to the evolution of the film nanostructure. Threshold fields ranging between 4 and 10 V/mum and saturation current densities as high as 0.7 mA have been measured for samples heated during deposition. A series of voltage ramps, i.e., a conditioning process, was found to initiate more stable and reproducible emission. It was found that the presence of graphitic particles (onions, nanotube embryos) in the films substantially enhances the field emission performance. Films patterned on a micrometer scale have been conditioned spot by spot by a ball-tip anode, showing that a relatively high emission site density can be achieved from the cluster-assembled material.

  19. 'Self-absorbed' GeV light curves of gamma-ray burst afterglows

    SciTech Connect

    Panaitescu, A.; Vestrand, W. T.; Woźniak, P.

    2014-06-10

    We investigate the effect that the absorption of high-energy (above 100 MeV) photons produced in gamma-ray burst afterglow shocks has on the light curves and spectra of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) afterglows. Afterglows produced by the interaction of a relativistic outflow with a wind-like medium peak when the blast wave deceleration sets in, and the afterglow spectrum could be hardening before that peak, as the optical thickness to pair formation is decreasing. In contrast, in afterglows produced in the interaction with a homogeneous medium, the optical thickness to pair formation should increase and yield a light curve peak when it reaches unity, followed by a fast light curve decay, accompanied by spectral softening. If energy is injected in the blast wave, then the accelerated increase of the optical thickness yields a convex afterglow light curve. Other features, such as a double-peak light curve or a broad hump, can arise from the evolution of the optical thickness to photon-photon absorption. Fast decays and convex light curves are seen in a few LAT afterglows, but the expected spectral softening is rarely seen in (and difficult to measure with) LAT observations. Furthermore, for the effects of photon-photon attenuation to shape the high-energy afterglow light curve without attenuating it too much, the ejecta initial Lorentz factor must be in a relatively narrow range (50-200), which reduces the chance of observing those effects.

  20. DETECTION OF HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION DURING THE X-RAY FLARING ACTIVITY IN GRB 100728A

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Ballet, J.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Bouvier, A.; Brigida, M. E-mail: Julie.E.McEnery@nasa.gov E-mail: vlasios.vasileiou@univ-montp2.fr

    2011-06-20

    We present the simultaneous Swift and Fermi observations of the bright GRB 100728A and its afterglow. The early X-ray emission is dominated by a vigorous flaring activity continuing until 1 ks after the burst. In the same time interval, high-energy emission is significantly detected by the Fermi/Large Area Telescope. Marginal evidence of GeV emission is observed up to later times. We discuss the broadband properties of this burst within both the internal and external shock scenarios, with a particular emphasis on the relation between X-ray flares, the GeV emission, and a continued long-duration central engine activity as their power source.

  1. [Methane emission from rice paddy soils as influenced by soil physicochemical properties].

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yan; Huang, Yao; Zong, Lianggang; Zhou, Quansuo; Sass, Ronald L; Fisher, Frank M

    2002-09-01

    To identify the key soil parameters influencing methane emission from rice paddies, and to quantitatively describe the relationship of methane emission with the soil properties, an outdoor pot experiment with a total of 18 paddy soils sampled from different regions in Jiangsu province was conducted in Nanjing Agricultural University during 2000 rice growing season. Seasonal average rate of CH4 emission for all the 18 soils was 6.42 +/- 2.70 mg.(m2.h)-1, ranging from 1.96 to 11.06 mg.(m2.h)-1, approximately a 5.6-fold difference between the maximum and the minimum. Correlation analysis indicated that the seasonal average of CH4 emission was positively dependent on soil sand content (r = 0.528, p = 0.024) and negatively on soil clay content (r = -0.484, p = 0.042). Negative correlation of CH4 emission against soil total nitrogen (r = -0.449, p = 0.062), available nitrogen (r = -0.611, p = 0.007) and NH4(+)-N(r = -0.649, p = 0.004) was also observed. Copper content of soils has a significant negative impact on CH4 emission. The correlation coefficient (r) of CH4 emission against soil available copper and with total copper was -0.594 (p = 0.009) and -0.547 (p = 0.019), respectively. No clear relationship existed between CH4 emission and soil carbon content. A further investigation suggests that the seasonal average rate of CH4 emission can be quantitatively determined by a linear combination of soil available copper, total manganese, and a ratio of available to total iron (R2 = 0.755, p = 0.0001).

  2. On the optical and X-ray afterglows of gamma ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dado, S.; Dar, A.; De Rújula, A.

    2002-06-01

    We severely criticize the consuetudinary analysis of the afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in the conical-ejection fireball scenarios. We argue that, instead, recent observations imply that the long-duration GRBs and their afterglows are produced by highly relativistic jets of cannonballs (CBs) emitted in supernova explosions. The CBs are heated by their collision with the supernova shell. The GRB is the boosted surface radiation the CBs emit as they reach the transparent outskirts of the shell. The exiting CBs further decelerate by sweeping up interstellar matter (ISM). The early X-ray afterglow is dominated by thermal bremsstrahlung from the cooling CBs, the optical afterglow by synchrotron radiation from the ISM electrons swept up by the CBs. We show that this model fits simply and remarkably well all the measured optical afterglows of the 15 GRBs with known redshift, including that of GRB 990123, for which unusually prompt data are available. We demonstrate that GRB 980425 was a normal GRB produced by SN1998bw, with standard X-ray and optical afterglows. We find that the very peculiar afterglow of GRB 970508 can be explained if its CBs encountered a significant jump in density as they moved through the ISM. The afterglows of the nearest 8 of the known-redshift GRBs show various degrees of evidence for an association with a supernova akin to SN1998bw. In all other cases such an association, even if present, would have been undetectable with the best current photometric sensitivities. This gives strong support to the proposition that most, maybe all, of the long-duration GRBs are associated with supernovae. Although our emphasis is on optical afterglows, we also provide an excellent description of X-ray afterglows. Figures \\ref{fig228} to \\ref{X1216} are only available in electronic form at http:/www.edpsciences.org

  3. The Late Peaking Afterglow of GR8 100418A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Frank; Antonelli, L. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Covino, S.; dePasquale, M.; Evans, P. A.; Fugazza, D.; Holland, S. T.; Liang, E. W.; OBrien, P. T.; Osborne, J. P.; Pagani, C.; Sakamoto, T.; Siegel, M. H.; Wu, X. F.; Zhang, B.

    2010-01-01

    GRB 100418A is a long Gamma-Ray Burst at redshift z=0.6235 discovered with the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer with unusual optical and X-ray light curves ' After an initial short-lived, rapid decline in X-rays, the optical and X-ray light curves observed with Swift are approximately flat or rising slightly out to at least approx.7 ks after the trigger, peak at approx.50 ks, and then follow an approximately power-law decay. Such a long optical plateau and late peaking is rarely seen in 6R8 afterglows. Observations with REM during a gap in the Swift coverage indicate a bright optical flare at approx.25 ks, The long plateau phase of the afterglow is interpreted using either a model with continuous injection of energy into the forward shock of the burst or a model in which the 'et of the burst is viewed off-axis. In both models the isotropic kinetic energy in the late afterglow after the plateau phase is >100 times the 10(exp 51) erg of the prompt isotropic gamma-ray energy release. The energy injection model is favored because the off-axis 'et model would require the intrinsic $T f801$ for the GR8 'et viewed on-axis to be very short, approx.10 ms, and the intrinsic isotropic gamma-ray energy release and the true jet energy to be much higher than the typical values of known short GRBs^ The non-detection of a 'et break up to approx.2 Ms indicates a jet half-opening angle of at least 14 degrees, and a relatively high collimation-corrected 'et energy of at least 10(exp 52) erg.

  4. Relative influence upon microwave emissivity of fine-scale stratigraphy, internal scattering, and dielectric properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    England, A.W.

    1976-01-01

    The microwave emissivity of relatively low-loss media such as snow, ice, frozen ground, and lunar soil is strongly influenced by fine-scale layering and by internal scattering. Radiometric data, however, are commonly interpreted using a model of emission from a homogeneous, dielectric halfspace whose emissivity derives exclusively from dielectric properties. Conclusions based upon these simple interpretations can be erroneous. Examples are presented showing that the emission from fresh or hardpacked snow over either frozen or moist soil is governed dominantly by the size distribution of ice grains in the snowpack. Similarly, the thickness of seasonally frozen soil and the concentration of rock clasts in lunar soil noticeably affect, respectively, the emissivities of northern latitude soils in winter and of the lunar regolith. Petrophysical data accumulated in support of the geophysical interpretation of microwave data must include measurements of not only dielectric properties, but also of geometric factors such as finescale layering and size distributions of grains, inclusions, and voids. ?? 1976 Birkha??user Verlag.

  5. Prompt, early and afterglow optical observations of five γ-ray bursts: GRB 100901A, GRB 100902A, GRB 100905A, GRB 100906A and GRB 101020A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbovskoy, E. S.; Lipunova, G. V.; Lipunov, V. M.; Kornilov, V. G.; Belinski, A. A.; Shatskiy, N. I.; Tyurina, N. V.; Kuvshinov, D. A.; Balanutsa, P. V.; Chazov, V. V.; Kuznetsov, A.; Zimnukhov, D. S.; Kornilov, M. V.; Sankovich, A. V.; Krylov, A.; Ivanov, K. I.; Chvalaev, O.; Poleschuk, V. A.; Konstantinov, E. N.; Gress, O. A.; Yazev, S. A.; Budnev, N. M.; Krushinski, V. V.; Zalozhnich, I. S.; Popov, A. A.; Tlatov, A. G.; Parhomenko, A. V.; Dormidontov, D. V.; Senik, V.; Yurkov, V. V.; Sergienko, Yu. P.; Varda, D.; Kudelina, I. P.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Gorosabel, J.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Jelinek, M.; Tello, J. C.

    2012-04-01

    We present the results of the prompt, early and afterglow optical observations of five γ-ray bursts (GRBs): GRB 100901A, GRB 100902A, GRB 100905A, GRB 100906A and GRB 101020A. These observations were made with the Mobile Astronomical System of TElescope-Robots in Russia (MASTER-II Net), the 1.5-m telescope of the Sierra Nevada Observatory and the 2.56-m Nordic Optical Telescope. For two sources, GRB 100901A and GRB 100906A, we detected optical counterparts and obtained light curves starting before the cessation of γ-ray emission, at 113 and 48 s after the trigger, respectively. Observations of GRB 100906A were conducted in two polarizing filters. Observations of the other three bursts gave the upper limits on the optical flux; their properties are briefly discussed. A more detailed analysis of GRB 100901A and GRB 100906A, supplemented by Swift data, provides the following results and indicates different origins for the prompt optical radiation in the two bursts. The light-curve patterns and spectral distributions suggest that there is a common production site for the prompt optical and high-energy emission in GRB 100901A. The results of the spectral fits for GRB 100901A in the range from optical to X-ray favour power-law energy distributions and a consistent value of the optical extinction in the host galaxy. GRB 100906A produced a smoothly peaking optical light curve, suggesting that the prompt optical radiation in this GRB originated in a front shock. This is supported by a spectral analysis. We have found that the Amati and Ghirlanda relations are satisfied for GRB 100906A. We obtain an upper limit on the value of the optical extinction on the host of GRB 100906A.

  6. Synthesis, characterization, growth mechanism, photoluminescence and field emission properties of novel dandelion-like gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Ghulam; Cao, Chuanbao; Khan, Waheed S.; Hussain, Sajad; Usman, Zahid; Safdar, Muhammad; Shah, Sajjad Hussain; Khattak, Noor Abass Din

    2011-09-01

    Dandelion-like gallium nitride (GaN) microstructures were successfully synthesized via Ni catalyst assisted chemical vapor deposition method at 1200 °C under NH3 atmosphere by pre-treating precursors with aqueous ammonia. The as-synthesized product was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that as-synthesized dandelion-like GaN was pure and has hexagonal wurtzite structure. SEM results showed that the size of the dandelion-like GaN structure was in the range of 30-60 μm. Dandelion-like GaN microstructures exhibited reasonable field emission properties with the turn-on field of 9.65 V μm-1 (0.01 mA cm-2) and threshold field of 11.35 V μm-1 (1 mA cm-2) which is sufficient for applications of electron emission devices, field emission displays and vacuum micro electronic devices. Optical properties were studied at room temperature by using fluorescence spectrophotometer. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements of dandelion-like GaN showed a strong near-band-edge emission at 370.2 nm (3.35 eV) with blue band emission at 450.4 nm (2.75 eV) and 465.2 nm (2.66 eV) but with out yellow band emission. The room-temperature photoluminescence properties showed that it has also potential application in light-emitting devices. The tentative growth mechanism for the growth of dandelion-like GaN was also described.

  7. Tailoring the emissive properties of photocathodes through materials engineering: Ultra-thin multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velázquez, Daniel; Seibert, Rachel; Ganegoda, Hasitha; Olive, Daniel; Rice, Amy; Logan, Kevin; Yusof, Zikri; Spentzouris, Linda; Terry, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    We report on an experimental verification that emission properties of photocathodes can be manipulated through the engineering of the surface electronic structure. Ultrathin multilayered MgO/Ag(0 0 1)/MgO films were grown by pulsed laser deposition, tuning the thickness n of the flanking MgO layers to 0, 2, 3, and 4 monolayers. We observed an increase in quantum efficiency and simultaneous decrease in work function with layer thickness. The scale and trend direction of measurements are in good but not excellent agreement with theory. Angle resolved photoemission data for the multilayered sample n = 3 showed that the emission profile has a metallic-like momentum dispersion. Deviations from theoretical predictions [K. Németh et al., PRL 104, 046801 (2010)] are attributed to imperfections of real surfaces in contrast with the ideal surfaces of the calculation. Photoemissive properties of cathodes are critical for electron beam applications such as photoinjectors for Free Electron Lasers (FEL) and Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL). An ideal photoemitter has a high quantum efficiency, low work function, low intrinsic emittance and long lifetime. It has been demonstrated here that emission properties may be systematically tailored by control of layer thickness in ultrathin multilayered structures. The reproducibility of the emission parameters under specific growth conditions is excellent, even though the interfaces themselves have varying degrees of roughness.

  8. Phase of thermal emission spectroscopy for properties measurements of delaminating thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Fengling; Bennett, Ted D.

    2005-11-15

    Phase of thermal emission spectroscopy is developed for determining the thermal properties of thermal barrier coating (TBC) in the presence of thermal contact resistance between the coating and the substrate. In this method, a TBC sample is heated using a periodically modulated laser and the thermal emission from the coating is collected using an infrared detector. The phase difference between the heating signal and the emission signal is measured experimentally. A mathematical model is developed to predict the phase difference between the laser and the measured emission, which considers the coating properties and the thermal contact resistance of the interface. An electron-beam physical vapor deposition thermal barrier coating with local regions delaminated by laser shock is characterized using this technique. The measurements are made on two regions of the coating, one where good thermal contact between the coating and substrate exists and the other where the interface has been damaged by laser shock. The results for the thermal properties and thermal contact resistance of the interface are presented and compared.

  9. GRB 080503 LATE AFTERGLOW RE-BRIGHTENING: SIGNATURE OF A MAGNETAR-POWERED MERGER-NOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, He; Ding, Xuan; Wu, Xue-Feng; Dai, Zi-Gao; Zhang, Bing E-mail: xfwu@pmo.ac.cn E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2015-07-10

    GRB 080503 is a short gamma-ray burst (GRB) detected by Swift and has been classified as a GRB originating from a compact star merger. The soft extended emission and the simultaneous late re-brightening in both the X-ray and optical afterglow light curves raise interesting questions regarding its physical origin. We show that the broadband data of GRB 080503 can be well explained within the framework of the double neutron star merger model, provided that the merger remnant is a rapidly rotating massive neutron star with an extremely high magnetic field (i.e., a millisecond magnetar). We show that the late optical re-brightening is consistent with the emission from a magnetar-powered “merger-nova.” This adds one more case to the growing sample of merger-novae associated with short GRBs. The soft extended emission and the late X-ray excess emission are well connected through a magnetar dipole spin-down luminosity evolution function, suggesting that direct magnetic dissipation is the mechanism to produce these X-rays. The X-ray emission initially leaks from a hole in the merger ejecta pierced by the short GRB jet. The hole subsequently closes after the magnetar spins down and the magnetic pressure drops below ram pressure. The X-ray photons are then trapped behind the merger-nova ejecta until the ejecta becomes optically thin at a later time. This explains the essentially simultaneous re-brightening in both the optical and X-ray light curves. Within this model, future gravitational-wave sources could be associated with a bright X-ray counterpart along with the merger-nova, even if the short GRB jet beams away from Earth.

  10. Emission-Tunable Multicolor Graphene Molecules with Controllable Synthesis, Excellent Optical Properties, and Specific Applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junwei; Huang, Yuli; Zhu, Haoyun; Huang, Wei; Wang, Weizhi

    2016-03-01

    Series of graphene molecules with varied emission colors have been prepared by oxidative cyclodehydrogenation using anhydrous ferric chloride (FeCl3) as the catalyst under mild conditions. By controlling the oxidation time in the initial step only, molecules with different fluorescence colors are conveniently obtained. New colors can be recorded evidently because of the stepwise and controllable process, which highly related to the conjugation length. Blue emissive starting compounds in the solid state can be transformed into orange upon brief oxidation, whereas green emissive oligomers are varied to red with an emission wavelength redshift about 123 nm. Cyclic voltammetry measurements performed can give the corresponding data, which verify the results drawn from the UV and PL spectroscope. The gradual change of conjugation length with tunable emission is confirmed in the MALDI-TOF study as well. Further characterizations indicate that the graphene molecules possess satisfactory optical properties, which are highly emissive both in solution and in the solid state because of the alkyl group. In addition, the good thermal stability and the self-assembly of graphene molecules suggest that they are promising candidates for high-tech applications. Furthermore, the fabricated field-effect transistors possess the nice performance, whose mobilities are about 0.57 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) with an on-off ratio of 1 × 10(4) and 0.81 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) with an on-off ratio of 1 × 10(3), respectively. PMID:26974338

  11. Emission-Tunable Multicolor Graphene Molecules with Controllable Synthesis, Excellent Optical Properties, and Specific Applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junwei; Huang, Yuli; Zhu, Haoyun; Huang, Wei; Wang, Weizhi

    2016-03-01

    Series of graphene molecules with varied emission colors have been prepared by oxidative cyclodehydrogenation using anhydrous ferric chloride (FeCl3) as the catalyst under mild conditions. By controlling the oxidation time in the initial step only, molecules with different fluorescence colors are conveniently obtained. New colors can be recorded evidently because of the stepwise and controllable process, which highly related to the conjugation length. Blue emissive starting compounds in the solid state can be transformed into orange upon brief oxidation, whereas green emissive oligomers are varied to red with an emission wavelength redshift about 123 nm. Cyclic voltammetry measurements performed can give the corresponding data, which verify the results drawn from the UV and PL spectroscope. The gradual change of conjugation length with tunable emission is confirmed in the MALDI-TOF study as well. Further characterizations indicate that the graphene molecules possess satisfactory optical properties, which are highly emissive both in solution and in the solid state because of the alkyl group. In addition, the good thermal stability and the self-assembly of graphene molecules suggest that they are promising candidates for high-tech applications. Furthermore, the fabricated field-effect transistors possess the nice performance, whose mobilities are about 0.57 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) with an on-off ratio of 1 × 10(4) and 0.81 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) with an on-off ratio of 1 × 10(3), respectively.

  12. iPTF14yb: The First Discovery of a Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Independent of a High-Energy Trigger

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cenko, S. Bradley; Urban, Alex L.; Perley, Daniel A.; Horesh, Assaf; Corsi, Alessandra; Fox, Derek B.; Cao, Yi; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Lien, Amy; Arcavi, Iair; et al

    2015-04-20

    We report here the discovery by the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) of iPTF14yb, a luminous (Msub>r ≈ ₋27.8 mag), cosmological (redshift 1.9733), rapidly fading optical transient. We demonstrate, based on probabilistic arguments and a comparison with the broader population, that iPTF14yb is the optical afterglow of the long-duration gamma-ray burst GRB140226A. This marks the rst unambiguous discovery of a GRB afterglow prior to (and thus entirely independent of) an associated high-energy trigger. We estimate the rate of iPTF14yb-like sources (i.e., cosmologically dis- tant relativistic explosions) based on iPTF observations, inferring an all-sky value ofmore » $$R_{rel}$$ = 610yr-1 (68% con dence interval of 110{2000 yr-1). Our derived rate is consistent (within the large uncer- tainty) with the all-sky rate of on-axis GRBs derived by the Swift satellite. Finally, we brie y discuss the implications of the nondetection to date of bona de \\orphan" afterglows (i.e., those lacking de- tectable high-energy emission) on GRB beaming and the degree of baryon loading in these relativistic jets.« less

  13. iPTF14yb: The First Discovery of a Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Independent of a High-Energy Trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Cenko, S. Bradley; Urban, Alex L.; Perley, Daniel A.; Horesh, Assaf; Corsi, Alessandra; Fox, Derek B.; Cao, Yi; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Lien, Amy; Arcavi, Iair; Bloom, Joshua S.; Butler, Nat R.; Cucchiara, Antonino; Diego, José A. de; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Gehrels, Neil; Georgiev, Leonid; Gonzalez, J. Jesus; Graham, John F.; Greiner, Jochen; Kann, D. Alexander; Klein, Christopher R.; Knust, Fabian; Kulkarni, S. R.; Kutyrev, Alexander; Laher, Russ; Lee, William H.; Nugent, Peter E.; Xavier Prochaska, J.; Rubin, Adam; Urata, Yuji; Varela, Karla; Watson, Alan M.; Wozniak, Przemek R.

    2015-04-20

    We report here the discovery by the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) of iPTF14yb, a luminous (Msub>r ≈ ₋27.8 mag), cosmological (redshift 1.9733), rapidly fading optical transient. We demonstrate, based on probabilistic arguments and a comparison with the broader population, that iPTF14yb is the optical afterglow of the long-duration gamma-ray burst GRB140226A. This marks the rst unambiguous discovery of a GRB afterglow prior to (and thus entirely independent of) an associated high-energy trigger. We estimate the rate of iPTF14yb-like sources (i.e., cosmologically dis- tant relativistic explosions) based on iPTF observations, inferring an all-sky value of $R_{rel}$ = 610yr-1 (68% con dence interval of 110{2000 yr-1). Our derived rate is consistent (within the large uncer- tainty) with the all-sky rate of on-axis GRBs derived by the Swift satellite. Finally, we brie y discuss the implications of the nondetection to date of bona de \\orphan" afterglows (i.e., those lacking de- tectable high-energy emission) on GRB beaming and the degree of baryon loading in these relativistic jets.

  14. iPTF14yb: The First Discovery of a Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Independent of a High-Energy Trigger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cenko, S. Bradley; Urban, Alex L.; Perley, Daniel A.; Horesh, Assaf; Corsi, Alessandra; Fox, Derek B.; Cao, Yi; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Lien, Amy; Arcavi, Iair; Bloom, Joshua S.; Butler, Nat R.; Cucchiara, Antonino; De Diego, Jose A.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Gehrels, Neil; Georgiev, Leonid; Gonzalez, J. Jesus; Graham, John F.; Greiner, Jochen; Kann, D. Alexander; Klein, Christopher R.; Knust, Fabian; Kutyrev, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    We report here the discovery by the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) of iPTF14yb, a luminous (Mr >> -27.8 mag), cosmological (redshift 1.9733), rapidly fading optical transient. We demonstrate, based on probabilistic arguments and a comparison with the broader population, that iPTF14yb is the optical afterglow of the long-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 140226A. This marks the first unambiguous discovery of a GRB afterglow prior to (and thus entirely independent of) an associated high-energy trigger. We estimate the rate of iPTF14yb-like sources (i.e., cosmologically distant relativistic explosions) based on iPTF observations, inferring an all-sky value of Rrel = 610/yr (68% confidence interval of 110-2000/yr). Our derived rate is consistent (within the large uncertainty) with the all-sky rate of on-axis GRBs derived by the Swift satellite. Finally, we briefly discuss the implications of the nondetection to date of bona fide "orphan" afterglows (i.e., those lacking detectable high-energy emission) on GRB beaming and the degree of baryon loading in these relativistic jets.

  15. iPTF14yb: The First GRB Discovered Outside the Gamma-Ray Bandpass and the Rate of Orphan Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenko, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    We report here the discovery by the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) of iPTF14yb, the first unambiguous detection of an afterglow-like transient identified outside the γ-ray bandpass. Subsequent to our discovery announcement, the ``parent'' γ-ray burst GRB 140226A was identified by the InterPlanetary Network of high-energy detectors. We demonstrate an association between iPTF14yb and GRB 140226A based both on probabilistic arguments and by comparing iPTF14yb with the known population of long GRB afterglows and host galaxies. We furthermore estimate the rate of iPTF14yb-like transients based on iPTF observations, and demonstrate it is consistent with the rate of on-axis long GRBs. Finally, we briefly discuss the implications of the non-detection to date of bona fide ``orphan'' afterglows (i.e., those lacking entirely in high-energy emission) on GRB beaming and the degree of baryon loading in these relativistic jets.

  16. iPTF14yb: The First Discovery of a Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Independent of a High-energy Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenko, S. Bradley; Urban, Alex L.; Perley, Daniel A.; Horesh, Assaf; Corsi, Alessandra; Fox, Derek B.; Cao, Yi; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Lien, Amy; Arcavi, Iair; Bloom, Joshua S.; Butler, Nat R.; Cucchiara, Antonino; de Diego, José A.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Gehrels, Neil; Georgiev, Leonid; Jesús González, J.; Graham, John F.; Greiner, Jochen; Kann, D. Alexander; Klein, Christopher R.; Knust, Fabian; Kulkarni, S. R.; Kutyrev, Alexander; Laher, Russ; Lee, William H.; Nugent, Peter E.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Richer, Michael G.; Rubin, Adam; Urata, Yuji; Varela, Karla; Watson, Alan M.; Wozniak, Przemek R.

    2015-04-01

    We report here the discovery by the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) of iPTF14yb, a luminous ({{M}r}≈ -27.8 mag), cosmological (redshift 1.9733), rapidly fading optical transient. We demonstrate, based on probabilistic arguments and a comparison with the broader population, that iPTF14yb is the optical afterglow of the long-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 140226A. This marks the first unambiguous discovery of a GRB afterglow prior to (and thus entirely independent of) an associated high-energy trigger. We estimate the rate of iPTF14yb-like sources (i.e., cosmologically distant relativistic explosions) based on iPTF observations, inferring an all-sky value of {{\\Re }rel}=610 yr-1 (68% confidence interval of 110-2000 yr-1). Our derived rate is consistent (within the large uncertainty) with the all-sky rate of on-axis GRBs derived by the Swift satellite. Finally, we briefly discuss the implications of the nondetection to date of bona fide “orphan” afterglows (i.e., those lacking detectable high-energy emission) on GRB beaming and the degree of baryon loading in these relativistic jets.

  17. A search for absorption features in the afterglow of the unusual GRB 130925A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellm, Eric

    2012-09-01

    GRB 130925A produced several emission episodes triggering Swift-BAT, Fermi-GBM, and MAXI. The extraordinary length of this emission--over 10^4 seconds--would give GRB 130925A one of the highest total durations ever observed for a gamma-ray burst. While the initial bursting phase was similar to that of the the relativistic tidal disruption event Swift J1644+57, starting at 10^4 seconds after the trigger this event has entered a steady decay phase without new bursts (www.swift.ac.uk/xrt_curves/00571830/). Its classification is thus uncertain, as neither the long GRB class nor Swift J1644 provide direct parallels. Our NuSTAR spectroscopy during the decay phase has revealed evidence for a broad absorption feature never previously observed for either GRB afterglows or for tidal disruption events. Chandra observations will enable searches for lower-energy lines which may constrain the ionization state of this unprecedented event.

  18. Ambient magnetic field amplification in shock fronts of relativistic jets: an application to GRB afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha da Silva, G.; Falceta-Gonçalves, D.; Kowal, G.; de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.

    2015-01-01

    Strong downstream magnetic fields of the order of ˜1 G, with large correlation lengths, are believed to cause the large synchrotron emission at the afterglow phase of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Despite the recent theoretical efforts, models have failed to fully explain the amplification of the magnetic field, particularly in a matter-dominated scenario. We revisit the problem by considering the synchrotron emission to occur at the expanding shock front of a weakly magnetized relativistic jet over a magnetized surrounding medium. Analytical estimates and a number of high-resolution 2D relativistic magnetohydrodynamical (RMHD) simulations are provided. Jet opening angles of θ = 0°-20°, and ambient to jet density ratios of 10-4-102 were considered. We found that most of the amplification is due to compression of the ambient magnetic field at the contact discontinuity between the reverse and forward shocks at the jet head, with substantial pile-up of the magnetic field lines as the jet propagates sweeping the ambient field lines. The pile-up is maximum for θ → 0, decreasing with θ, but larger than in the spherical blast problem. Values obtained for certain models are able to explain the observed intensities. The maximum correlation lengths found for such strong fields is of lcorr ≤ 1014 cm, 2-6 orders of magnitude larger than the found in previous works.

  19. Shocked by the Very Bright Radio Flare and Afterglow of GRB 130427A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Horst, Alexander J.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A was extremely bright across the electromagnetic spectrum, with emission spanning 16 orders of magnitude in observing frequency, from almost 100 GeV gamma-rays down to the GHz radio regime. While the intrinsic luminosity of this GRB was not extreme compared to other GRBs, it displayed the largest measured fluence of the last three decades due to its proximity with a redshift of 0.34. One of the most notable characteristics of this GRB was its bright radio emission, in particular the radio flare which has been observed only a few times in other GRBs and is usually attributed to the reverse shock moving back into the GRB jet. Here we present radio observations with unprecedented temporal coverage at three observing frequencies obtained with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) and the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager (AMI). AMI had the earliest radio detection at 8 hours after the initial flash of gamma-rays, catching the radio flare on the rise. The 12-hour WSRT observations in the first few days enabled a detailed study of the short time-scale behavior at radio wavelengths. Besides our observations of the radio flare and afterglow up to three months after the gamma-ray trigger, we present our results for modeling the radio light curves together with the broadband data set in various other wavelength regimes, enabling us to determine physical parameters of both the reverse and forward shock of this enigmatic GRB.

  20. Dynamics and afterglow light curves of gamma-ray burst blast waves encountering a density bump or void

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Z. Lucas; Zhang, Bing E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the dynamics and afterglow light curves of gamma-ray burst blast waves that encounter various density structures (such as bumps, voids, or steps) in the surrounding ambient medium. We present and explain the characteristic response features that each type of density structure in the medium leaves on the forward shock (FS) and reverse shock (RS) dynamics for blast waves with either a long-lived or short-lived RS. We show that when the ambient medium density drops, the blast waves exhibit in some cases a period of an actual acceleration (even during their deceleration stage) due to adiabatic cooling of blast waves. Comparing numerical examples that have different shapes of bumps or voids, we propose a number of consistency tests that must be satisfied by correct modeling of blast waves. Our model results successfully pass these tests. Employing a Lagrangian description of blast waves, we perform a sophisticated calculation of afterglow emission. We show that as a response to density structures in the ambient medium, the RS light curves produce more significant variations than the FS light curves. Some observed features (such as rebrightenings, dips, or slow wiggles) can be more easily explained within the RS model. We also discuss the origin of these different features imprinted on the FS and RS light curves.

  1. Dynamics and Afterglow Light Curves of Gamma-Ray Burst Blast Waves Encountering a Density Bump or Void

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhm, Z. Lucas; Zhang, Bing

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the dynamics and afterglow light curves of gamma-ray burst blast waves that encounter various density structures (such as bumps, voids, or steps) in the surrounding ambient medium. We present and explain the characteristic response features that each type of density structure in the medium leaves on the forward shock (FS) and reverse shock (RS) dynamics for blast waves with either a long-lived or short-lived RS. We show that when the ambient medium density drops, the blast waves exhibit in some cases a period of an actual acceleration (even during their deceleration stage) due to adiabatic cooling of blast waves. Comparing numerical examples that have different shapes of bumps or voids, we propose a number of consistency tests that must be satisfied by correct modeling of blast waves. Our model results successfully pass these tests. Employing a Lagrangian description of blast waves, we perform a sophisticated calculation of afterglow emission. We show that as a response to density structures in the ambient medium, the RS light curves produce more significant variations than the FS light curves. Some observed features (such as rebrightenings, dips, or slow wiggles) can be more easily explained within the RS model. We also discuss the origin of these different features imprinted on the FS and RS light curves.

  2. Field Emission Properties of Carbon Nanotube Fibers and Sheets for a High Current Electron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christy, Larry

    Field emission (FE) properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers from Rice University and the University of Cambridge have been studied for use within a high current electron source for a directed energy weapon. Upon reviewing the performance of these two prevalent CNT fibers, cathodes were designed with CNT fibers from the University of Cincinnati Nanoworld Laboratory. Cathodes composed of a single CNT fiber, an array of three CNT fibers, and a nonwoven CNT sheet were investigated for FE properties; the goal was to design a cathode with emission current in excess of 10 mA. Once the design phase was complete, the cathode samples were fabricated, characterized, and then analyzed to determine FE properties. Electrical conductivity of the CNT fibers was characterized with a 4-probe technique. FE characteristics were measured in an ultra-high vacuum chamber at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The arrayed CNT fiber and the enhanced nonwoven CNT sheet emitter design demonstrated the most promising FE properties. Future work will include further analysis and cathode design using this nonwoven CNT sheet material to increase peak current performance during electron emission.

  3. The prompt-early afterglow connection in gamma-ray bursts: implications for the early afterglow physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hascoët, R.; Daigne, F.; Mochkovitch, R.

    2014-07-01

    The early X-ray afterglow of gamma-ray bursts revealed by Swift carried many surprises. Following an initial steep decay the light curve often exhibits a plateau phase that can last up to several 104 s, with in addition the presence of flares in 50 per cent of the cases. We focus in this paper on the plateau phase whose origin remains highly debated. We confront several newly discovered correlations between prompt and afterglow quantities (isotropic emitted energy in gamma-rays, luminosity and duration of the plateau) to several models proposed for the origin of plateaus in order to check if they can account for these observed correlations. We first show that the scenario of plateau formation by energy injection into the forward shock leads to an efficiency crisis for the prompt phase and therefore study two possible alternatives: the first one still takes place within the framework of the standard forward shock model but allows for a variation of the microphysics parameters to reduce the radiative efficiency at early times; in the second scenario the early afterglow results from a long-lived reverse shock. Its shape then depends on the distribution of energy as a function of Lorentz factor in the ejecta. In both cases, we first present simple analytical estimates of the plateau luminosity and duration and then compute detailed light curves. In the two considered scenarios we find that plateaus following the observed correlations can be obtained under the condition that specific additional ingredients are included. In the forward shock scenario, the preferred model supposes a wind external medium and a microphysics parameter ɛe that first varies as n-ξ (n being the external density), with ξ ˜ 1 to get a flat plateau, before staying constant below a critical density n0. To produce a plateau in the reverse shock scenario the ejecta must contain a tail of low Lorentz factor with a peak of energy deposition at Γ ≳ 10.

  4. Field emission property of ZnO nanowires prepared by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Htay, Myo Than; Hashimoto, Yoshio

    2015-08-01

    The field emission property of cold cathode emitters utilizing the ZnO nanowires with various conditions prepared by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis technique was discussed. It is found that the emission current was enhanced in the emitters having higher aspect ratio as well as smaller sheet resistance. Applying of post-annealing process, utilization of additional Mo back electrode in the cathode, and coating of Mo on the ZnO nanowires resulted in the improvement of the emission current and lowering the threshold voltage. A threshold voltage of about 5.5 V/μm to obtain 1.0 μA/cm2 was achieved in the sample prepared at the growth temperatures varying continuously from 250 °C to 300 °C.

  5. Influence of neodymium concentration on excitation and emission properties of Nd doped gallium oxide nanocrystalline films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podhorodecki, A.; Banski, M.; Misiewicz, J.; Lecerf, C.; Marie, P.; Cardin, J.; Portier, X.

    2010-09-01

    Gallium oxide and more particularly β-Ga2O3 matrix is an excellent material for new generation of devices electrically or optically driven as it is known as the widest band gap transparent conductive oxide. In this paper, the optical properties of neodymium doped gallium oxide films grown by magnetron sputtering have been analyzed. The influence of the Nd ions concentration on the excitation/emission mechanisms of Nd ions and the role of gallium oxide matrix have been investigated. The grain size reduction into gallium oxide films have been observed when concentration of Nd increases. It has been found for all samples that the charge transfer is the main excitation mechanism for Nd ions where defect states play an important role as intermediate states. As a consequence Nd emission efficiency increases with temperature giving rise to most intensive emission at 1087 nm at room temperature.

  6. Influence of neodymium concentration on excitation and emission properties of Nd doped gallium oxide nanocrystalline films

    SciTech Connect

    Podhorodecki, A.; Banski, M.; Misiewicz, J.; Lecerf, C.; Marie, P.; Cardin, J.; Portier, X.

    2010-09-15

    Gallium oxide and more particularly {beta}-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix is an excellent material for new generation of devices electrically or optically driven as it is known as the widest band gap transparent conductive oxide. In this paper, the optical properties of neodymium doped gallium oxide films grown by magnetron sputtering have been analyzed. The influence of the Nd ions concentration on the excitation/emission mechanisms of Nd ions and the role of gallium oxide matrix have been investigated. The grain size reduction into gallium oxide films have been observed when concentration of Nd increases. It has been found for all samples that the charge transfer is the main excitation mechanism for Nd ions where defect states play an important role as intermediate states. As a consequence Nd emission efficiency increases with temperature giving rise to most intensive emission at 1087 nm at room temperature.

  7. On the Afterglow and Progenitor of FRB 150418

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bing

    2016-05-01

    Keane et al. recently detected a fading radio source following FRB 150418, leading to the identification of a putative host galaxy at z = 0.492 ± 0.008. Assuming that the fading source is the afterglow of FRB 150418, I model the afterglow and constrain the isotropic energy of the explosion to be a few 1050 erg, comparable to that of a short-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB). The outflow may have a jet opening angle of ˜0.22 rad, so that the beaming-corrected energy is below 1049 erg. The results rule out most fast radio burst (FRB) progenitor models for this FRB, but may be consistent with either of the following two scenarios. The first scenario invokes a merger of an NS-NS binary, which produced an undetected short GRB and a supra-massive neutron star, which subsequently collapsed into a black hole, probably hundreds of seconds after the short GRB. The second scenario invokes a merger of a compact star binary (BH-BH, NS-NS, or BH-NS) system whose pre-merger dynamical magnetospheric activities made the FRB, which is followed by an undetected short GRB-like transient. The gravitational-wave (GW) event GW 150914 would be a sister of FRB 150418 in this second scenario. In both cases, one expects an exciting prospect of GW/FRB/GRB associations.

  8. The hidden X-ray breaks in afterglow light curves

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, P. A.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Horst, A. J. van der; Starling, R. L. C.

    2008-05-22

    Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) afterglow observations in the Swift era have a perceived lack of achromatic jet breaks compared to the BeppoSAX, or pre-Swift era. Specifically, relatively few breaks, consistent with jet breaks, are observed in the X-ray light curves of these bursts. If these breaks are truly missing, it has serious consequences for the interpretation of GRB jet collimation and energy requirements, and the use of GRBs as standard candles.Here we address the issue of X-ray breaks which are possibly 'hidden' and hence the light curves are misinterpreted as being single power-laws. We show how a number of precedents, including GRB 990510 and GRB 060206, exist for such hidden breaks and how, even with the well sampled light curves of the Swift era, these breaks may be left misidentified. We do so by synthesising X-ray light curves and finding general trends via Monte Carlo analysis. Furthermore, in light of these simulations, we discuss how to best identify achromatic breaks in afterglow light curves via multi-wavelength analysis.

  9. A late-time flattening of light curves in gamma-ray burst afterglows

    SciTech Connect

    Sironi, Lorenzo; Giannios, Dimitrios E-mail: dgiannio@purdue.edu

    2013-12-01

    The afterglow emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is usually interpreted as synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons accelerated at the GRB external shock. We investigate the temporal decay of the afterglow emission at late times, when the bulk of the shock-accelerated electrons are non-relativistic (the 'deep Newtonian phase', as denoted by Huang and Cheng). We assume that the electron spectrum in the deep Newtonian phase is a power-law distribution in momentum with slope p, as dictated by the theory of Fermi acceleration in non-relativistic shocks. For a uniform circumburst medium, the deep Newtonian phase begins at t{sub DN}∼3 ϵ{sub e,−1}{sup 5/6}t{sub ST}, where t {sub ST} marks the transition of the blast wave to the non-relativistic, spherically symmetric Sedov-Taylor (ST) solution, and ε {sub e} = 0.1 ε {sub e,–1} quantifies the amount of shock energy transferred to the electrons. For typical parameters, the deep Newtonian stage starts ∼0.5 to several years after the GRB. The radio flux in this phase decays as F {sub ν}∝t {sup –3(p+1)/10}∝t {sup –(0.9÷1.2)}, for a power-law slope 2 < p < 3. This is shallower than the scaling F {sub ν}∝t {sup –3(5p–7)/10}∝t {sup –(0.9÷2.4)} derived by Frail et al., which only applies if the GRB shock is non-relativistic, but the electron distribution still peaks at ultra-relativistic energies (a regime that is relevant for a narrow time interval, and only if t {sub DN} ≳ t {sub ST}, namely, ε {sub e} ≳ 0.03). We discuss how the deep Newtonian phase can be reliably used for GRB calorimetry, and we comment on the good detection prospects of trans-relativistic blast waves at 0.1÷10 GHz with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array and LOw-Frequency ARray.

  10. A Late-time Flattening of Light Curves in Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironi, Lorenzo; Giannios, Dimitrios

    2013-12-01

    The afterglow emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is usually interpreted as synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons accelerated at the GRB external shock. We investigate the temporal decay of the afterglow emission at late times, when the bulk of the shock-accelerated electrons are non-relativistic (the "deep Newtonian phase," as denoted by Huang and Cheng). We assume that the electron spectrum in the deep Newtonian phase is a power-law distribution in momentum with slope p, as dictated by the theory of Fermi acceleration in non-relativistic shocks. For a uniform circumburst medium, the deep Newtonian phase begins at t{_{\\scriptsize {DN}}}\\sim 3\\,\\epsilon _{e,-1}^{5/6}t{_{\\scriptsize {ST}}}, where t ST marks the transition of the blast wave to the non-relativistic, spherically symmetric Sedov-Taylor (ST) solution, and epsilon e = 0.1 epsilon e, -1 quantifies the amount of shock energy transferred to the electrons. For typical parameters, the deep Newtonian stage starts ~0.5 to several years after the GRB. The radio flux in this phase decays as F νvpropt -3(p + 1)/10vpropt -(0.9÷1.2), for a power-law slope 2 < p < 3. This is shallower than the scaling F νvpropt -3(5p - 7)/10vpropt -(0.9÷2.4) derived by Frail et al., which only applies if the GRB shock is non-relativistic, but the electron distribution still peaks at ultra-relativistic energies (a regime that is relevant for a narrow time interval, and only if t DN >~ t ST, namely, epsilon e >~ 0.03). We discuss how the deep Newtonian phase can be reliably used for GRB calorimetry, and we comment on the good detection prospects of trans-relativistic blast waves at 0.1÷10 GHz with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array and LOw-Frequency ARray.

  11. NIR emission studies and dielectric properties of Er3+-doped multicomponent tellurite glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajna, M. S.; Thomas, Sunil; Jayakrishnan, C.; Joseph, Cyriac; Biju, P. R.; Unnikrishnan, N. V.

    2016-05-01

    Multicomponent tellurite glasses containing altered concentrations of Er2O3 (ranging from 0 to 1 mol%) were prepared by the standard melt quenching technique. Investigations through energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Raman scattering spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, near-infrared (NIR) emission studies and dielectric measurement techniques were done to probe their compositional, structural, spectroscopic and dielectric characteristics. The broad emission together with the high values of the effective linewidth (~ 63 nm), stimulated emission cross-section (9.67 × 10- 21 cm2) and lifetime (2.56 ms) of 4I13/2 level for 0.5 mol% of Er3+ makes these glasses attractive for broadband amplifiers. From the measured capacitance and dissipation factor, the relative permittivity, dielectric loss and the conductivity were computed; which furnish the dielectric nature of the multicomponent tellurite glasses that depend on the applied frequency. Assuming the ideal Debye behavior as substantiated by Cole-Cole plot, an examination of the real and imaginary parts of impedance was performed. The power-law and Cole-Cole parameters were resolved for all the glass samples. From the assessment of the emission analysis and dielectric properties of the glass samples, it was obvious that the Er3+ ion concentration had played a vital role in tuning the optical and dielectric properties and the 0.5 mol% of Er3+ -doped glass was confirmed as the optimum composition.

  12. Influence of morphology on the emissive properties of dye-doped PVP nanofibers produced by electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enculescu, Monica; Evanghelidis, Alex; Enculescu, Ionut

    2014-12-01

    Dye-doped polymer micro- and nanofibers with tailored light emission properties have great potential for applications in optical, optoelectronic, or photonic devices. In this study, these types of structures were obtained by electrospinning rhodamine 6 G-doped polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) using a polymer solution of 10% (mass) concentration in ethanol. Polymer nanofibers with different morphologies (smooth and beaded) and diameters of about 500 nm were obtained using different electrospinning conditions with the same solutions. Fluorescence optical microscopy observations showed that the dye was distributed uniformly in the doped PVP nanofibers. Different shifts were observed when we compared the wavelength of the dye emission band peak of the smooth nanofibers (566 nm) and the wavelength of the dye emission band peak of the beaded fibers (561.5 nm) produced by electrospinning in different conditions with the wavelength of the emission band peak for transparent thin films produced by spin coating (558 nm) using the same polymer solution. This demonstrates that it is possible to tune the optical properties of electrospun dye-doped polymer nanofibers simply by modifying the morphology of the material, i.e., the parameters of the electrospinning process.

  13. Emission factors and real-time optical properties of particles emitted from traditional wood burning cookstoves.

    PubMed

    Roden, Christoph A; Bond, Tami C; Conway, Stuart; Pinel, Anibal Benjamin Osorto

    2006-11-01

    It is estimated that the combustion of biofuel generates 20% of all carbonaceous aerosols, yet these particles are studied less than those of other common sources. We designed and built a portable battery-operated emission-sampling cart to measure the real-time optical properties and other emission characteristics of biofuel cookstoves. In a field study in Honduras, we measured emission factors averaging 8.5 g/kg, higher than those found in previous laboratory studies. Strong flaming events emitted very dark particles with the optical properties of black particles. The elemental carbon to total carbon ratios ranged from 0.07 to 0.64, confirming that high elemental carbon fractions can be emitted from biofuel combustion and may not be used to distinguish fossil-fuel from biofuel sources when cooking is the dominant usage. Absorption Angstrom exponents, representing the dependence of absorption on wavelength, ranged from 1 (black) to 5 (yellow). Strongly absorbing particles with absorption inversely dependent on wavelength were emitted separately from particles with weak absorption and strong wavelength dependence; the latter probably contained conjugated aromatic compounds. Because combustion occurs in distinct phases, different types of carbonaceous aerosols from biofuel combustion are externally mixed at emission and may have different atmospheric fates.

  14. NIR emission studies and dielectric properties of Er(3+)-doped multicomponent tellurite glasses.

    PubMed

    Sajna, M S; Thomas, Sunil; Jayakrishnan, C; Joseph, Cyriac; Biju, P R; Unnikrishnan, N V

    2016-05-15

    Multicomponent tellurite glasses containing altered concentrations of Er2O3 (ranging from 0 to 1 mol%) were prepared by the standard melt quenching technique. Investigations through energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Raman scattering spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, near-infrared (NIR) emission studies and dielectric measurement techniques were done to probe their compositional, structural, spectroscopic and dielectric characteristics. The broad emission together with the high values of the effective linewidth (~63 nm), stimulated emission cross-section (9.67 × 10(-21) cm(2)) and lifetime (2.56 ms) of (4)I13/2 level for 0.5 mol% of Er(3+) makes these glasses attractive for broadband amplifiers. From the measured capacitance and dissipation factor, the relative permittivity, dielectric loss and the conductivity were computed; which furnish the dielectric nature of the multicomponent tellurite glasses that depend on the applied frequency. Assuming the ideal Debye behavior as substantiated by Cole-Cole plot, an examination of the real and imaginary parts of impedance was performed. The power-law and Cole-Cole parameters were resolved for all the glass samples. From the assessment of the emission analysis and dielectric properties of the glass samples, it was obvious that the Er(3+) ion concentration had played a vital role in tuning the optical and dielectric properties and the 0.5 mol% of Er(3+) -doped glass was confirmed as the optimum composition. PMID:26967514

  15. NIR emission studies and dielectric properties of Er(3+)-doped multicomponent tellurite glasses.

    PubMed

    Sajna, M S; Thomas, Sunil; Jayakrishnan, C; Joseph, Cyriac; Biju, P R; Unnikrishnan, N V

    2016-05-15

    Multicomponent tellurite glasses containing altered concentrations of Er2O3 (ranging from 0 to 1 mol%) were prepared by the standard melt quenching technique. Investigations through energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Raman scattering spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, near-infrared (NIR) emission studies and dielectric measurement techniques were done to probe their compositional, structural, spectroscopic and dielectric characteristics. The broad emission together with the high values of the effective linewidth (~63 nm), stimulated emission cross-section (9.67 × 10(-21) cm(2)) and lifetime (2.56 ms) of (4)I13/2 level for 0.5 mol% of Er(3+) makes these glasses attractive for broadband amplifiers. From the measured capacitance and dissipation factor, the relative permittivity, dielectric loss and the conductivity were computed; which furnish the dielectric nature of the multicomponent tellurite glasses that depend on the applied frequency. Assuming the ideal Debye behavior as substantiated by Cole-Cole plot, an examination of the real and imaginary parts of impedance was performed. The power-law and Cole-Cole parameters were resolved for all the glass samples. From the assessment of the emission analysis and dielectric properties of the glass samples, it was obvious that the Er(3+) ion concentration had played a vital role in tuning the optical and dielectric properties and the 0.5 mol% of Er(3+) -doped glass was confirmed as the optimum composition.

  16. Remote Control by π-Conjugation of the Emissive Properties of Fischer Carbene-BODIPY Dyads.

    PubMed

    Chu, Gong M; Guerrero-Martínez, Andrés; Ramírez de Arellano, Carmen; Fernández, Israel; Sierra, Miguel A

    2016-03-21

    The synthesis, structure, and complete characterization of mono- and bimetallic dyads joining Fischer carbene complexes and BODIPY chromophores are reported. In these organometallic species, the Fischer carbene complex is attached to the BODIPY moiety through a p-aminophenyl group linked at the C8 carbon atom of the BODIPY core. The photophysical properties, namely the corresponding UV/vis absorption and emission spectra of these new metal-carbene complexes, are analyzed and discussed. It is found that whereas the absorption of the considered dyads strongly resembles that of the parent 4-anilinyl-substituted BODIPY, the fluorescence emission is significantly reduced in these species, very likely as a result of a Förster-type energy transfer mechanism. At variance, the replacement of the pentacarbonyl-metal(0) fragment by a carbonyl group leads to high fluorescence emission intensity. In addition, the emissive properties of the BODIPY core in these organometallic dyads can be tuned by remote groups by means of π-conjugation, as supported by density functional theory calculations.

  17. Water-processed carbon nanotube/graphene hybrids with enhanced field emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Meng; Xu, Peng; Song, Yenan; Wang, Xu; Li, Zhenhua; Shang, Xuefu; Wu, Huizhen; Zhao, Pei; Wang, Miao

    2015-09-01

    Integrating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene into hybrid structures provides a novel approach to three dimensional (3D) materials with advantageous properties. Here we present a water-processing method to create integrated CNT/graphene hybrids and test their field emission properties. With an optimized mass ratio of CNTs to graphene, the hybrid shows a significantly enhanced field emission performance, such as turn-on electric field of 0.79 V/μm, threshold electric field of 1.05 V/μm, maximum current density of 0.1 mA/cm2, and field enhancement factor of ˜1.3 × 104. The optimized mass ratio for field emission emphasizes the importance of both CNTs and graphene in the hybrid. We also hypothesize a possible mechanism for this enhanced field emission performance from the CNT/graphene hybrid. During the solution treatment, graphene oxide behaves as surfactant sheets for CNTs to form a well dispersed solution, which leads to a better organized 3D structure with more conducting channels for electron transport.

  18. Water-processed carbon nanotube/graphene hybrids with enhanced field emission properties

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Meng; Xu, Peng; Wang, Xu; Wu, Huizhen; Wang, Miao E-mail: miaowang@css.zju.edu.cn; Song, Yenan; Li, Zhenhua; Zhao, Pei E-mail: miaowang@css.zju.edu.cn; Shang, Xuefu

    2015-09-15

    Integrating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene into hybrid structures provides a novel approach to three dimensional (3D) materials with advantageous properties. Here we present a water-processing method to create integrated CNT/graphene hybrids and test their field emission properties. With an optimized mass ratio of CNTs to graphene, the hybrid shows a significantly enhanced field emission performance, such as turn-on electric field of 0.79 V/μm, threshold electric field of 1.05 V/μm, maximum current density of 0.1 mA/cm{sup 2}, and field enhancement factor of ∼1.3 × 10{sup 4}. The optimized mass ratio for field emission emphasizes the importance of both CNTs and graphene in the hybrid. We also hypothesize a possible mechanism for this enhanced field emission performance from the CNT/graphene hybrid. During the solution treatment, graphene oxide behaves as surfactant sheets for CNTs to form a well dispersed solution, which leads to a better organized 3D structure with more conducting channels for electron transport.

  19. Effects of particle size on far infrared emission properties of tourmaline superfine powders.

    PubMed

    Meng, Junping; Jin, Wei; Liang, Jinsheng; Ding, Yan; Gan, Kun; Yuan, Youde

    2010-03-01

    Tourmaline superfine powders with different particle sizes were prepared by grinding, superfine ball milling, and high-speed centrifugation. The powders were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, dynamic contact angle meter and tensiometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. The results show that tourmaline powders exhibit improved far infrared emission properties as the particle size decreases. The increased surface free energy and proportion of the polar component are considered to play an important role for their properties. The spontaneous polarization is increased, and the dipole moment of tourmaline is stimulated to a high energy level more easily for the chemical bond vibration, so that the energy is apt to emit by transition. In the range of 2000-500 cm(-1), the emissivity values of the samples with D50 size of 2.67 microm and 0.2 microm are 0.973 and 0.991, respectively. PMID:20355631

  20. Effects of particle size on far infrared emission properties of tourmaline superfine powders.

    PubMed

    Meng, Junping; Jin, Wei; Liang, Jinsheng; Ding, Yan; Gan, Kun; Yuan, Youde

    2010-03-01

    Tourmaline superfine powders with different particle sizes were prepared by grinding, superfine ball milling, and high-speed centrifugation. The powders were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, dynamic contact angle meter and tensiometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. The results show that tourmaline powders exhibit improved far infrared emission properties as the particle size decreases. The increased surface free energy and proportion of the polar component are considered to play an important role for their properties. The spontaneous polarization is increased, and the dipole moment of tourmaline is stimulated to a high energy level more easily for the chemical bond vibration, so that the energy is apt to emit by transition. In the range of 2000-500 cm(-1), the emissivity values of the samples with D50 size of 2.67 microm and 0.2 microm are 0.973 and 0.991, respectively.

  1. Modulation of field emission properties of znO nanorods during arc discharge.

    PubMed

    Fang, F; Kennedy, J; Carder, D A; Futter, J; Murmu, P; Markwitz, A

    2010-12-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods have been synthesized via the arc discharge method. Different oxygen partial pressures were applied in the arc discharge chamber to modulate the field emission properties of the as-synthesized ZnO nanorods. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was carried out to analyze the morphology of the ZnO nanorods. The ion beam analysis technique of proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) was performed to probe the impurities in ZnO nanorods. SEM images clearly revealed the formation of randomly oriented ZnO nanorods with diameters between 10-50 nm. It was found that the morphology and the electrical properties of the ZnO nanorods were dependent on the oxygen partial pressure during arc discharge. In addition enhanced UV-sensitive photoconductivity was found for ZnO nanorods synthesized at high oxygen partial pressure during arc discharge. The field emission properties of the nanorods were studied. The turn-on field, which is defined at a current density of 10 microA cm(-2), was about 3 V microm(-1) for ZnO nanorods synthesized at 99% oxygen partial pressure during arc discharge. The turn-on field for ZnO nanorods increased with the decrease of oxygen partial pressure during arc discharge. The simplicity of the synthesis route coupled with the modulation of field emission properties due to the arc discharge method make the ZnO nanorods a promising candidate for a low cost and compact cold cathode material. PMID:21121322

  2. Optical and field emission properties of layer-structure GaN nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Zhen; Li, Enling; Shi, Wei; Ma, Deming

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • The layer-structure GaN nanowires with hexagonal-shaped cross-sections are produced via a process based on the CVD method. • The diameter of the layer-structure GaN nanowire gradually decreases from ∼500 nm to ∼200 nm along the wire axis. • The layer-structure GaN nanowire film possesses good field emission property. - Abstract: A layer-structure gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires, grown on Pt-coated n-type Si (1 1 1) substrate, have been synthesized using chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The results show: (1) SEM indicates that the geometry structure is layer-structure. HRTEM indicates that GaN nanowire’s preferential growth direction is along [0 0 1] direction. (2) The room temperature PL emission spectrum of the layer-structure GaN nanowires has a peak at 375 nm, which proves that GaN nanowires have potential application in light-emitting nano-devices. (3) Field-emission measurements show that the layer-structure GaN nanowires film has a low turn-on field of 4.39 V/μm (at room temperature), which is sufficient for electron emission devices, field emission displays and vacuum nano-electronic devices. The growth mechanism for GaN nanowires has also been discussed briefly.

  3. Experimental and theoretical study on field emission properties of zinc oxide nanoparticles decorated carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Zhou, Wei-Man; Liu, Wei-Hua; Wang, Xiao-Li

    2015-05-01

    Field emission properties of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) decorated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are investigated experimentally and theoretically. CNTs are in situ decorated with ZnO NPs during the growth process by chemical vapor deposition using a carbon source from the iron phthalocyanine pyrolysis. The experimental field emission test shows that the ZnO NP decoration significantly improves the emission current from 50 μA to 275 μA at 550 V and the reduced threshold voltage from 450 V to 350 V. The field emission mechanism of ZnO NPs on CNTs is theoretically studied by the density functional theory (DFT) combined with the Penn-Plummer method. The ZnO NPs reconstruct the ZnO-CNT structure and pull down the surface barrier of the entire emitter system to 0.49 eV so as to reduce the threshold electric field. The simulation results suggest that the presence of ZnO NPs would increase the LDOS near the Fermi level and increase the emission current. The calculation results are consistent with the experiment results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 91123018, 61172040, and 61172041) and the Natural Science Foundation of Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2014JM7277).

  4. Measurement of dielectric properties and determination of microwave emissivity of polluted waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blume, H.-J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The dielectric properties of polluted waters are measured with a reflection-type resonant cavity at 1.43 GHz. Very small water samples in quartz tubes of known volume are placed in the center of the maximum electric field. Measurement of the resonance-frequency variation and a change of the cavity's quality factor are used to determine the dielectric properties. The microwave emissivity of the polluted water is then calculated via the Fresnel equation and applied to data reductions of microwave radiometer measurements.

  5. Optical properties of aerosol emissions from biomass burning in the tropics, BASE-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, Brent N.; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Setzer, Alberto W.; Tanre, Didre D.; Ward, Darold E.

    1991-01-01

    Ground-based and airborne measurements of biomass-burning smoke particle optical properties, obtained with a view to aerosol-absorption properties, are presented as a function of time and atmospheric height. The wavelength dependence of the optical thickness can be explained by a log-normal size distribution, with particles' effective radius varying between 0.1 and 0.2 microns. The strong correlation noted between aerosol particle profile and CO profile indicates that smoke particulates constitute a good tracer for emission trace gases from tropical biomass burning.

  6. Constraining Gamma-ray Burst Initial Lorentz Factor with the Afterglow Onset Feature and Discovery of a Tight Γ0-E γ,iso Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, En-Wei; Yi, Shuang-Xi; Zhang, Jin; Lü, Hou-Jun; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Zhang, Bing

    2010-12-01

    The onset of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow is characterized by a smooth bump in the early afterglow light curve as the GRB fireball is decelerated by the circumburst medium. We extensively search for GRBs with such an onset feature in their optical and X-ray light curves from the literature and from the catalog established with the Swift/XRT. Twenty optically selected GRBs and 12 X-ray-selected GRBs are obtained, among which 17 optically selected and 2 X-ray-selected GRBs have redshift measurements. We fit these light curves with a smooth broken power law and measure the width (w), rising timescale (t r), and decaying timescale (t d) at full width at half-maximum. Strong mutual correlations among these timescales and with the peak time (t p) are found. The ratio t r/t d is almost universal among bursts, but the ratio t r/t p varies from 0.3 to ~1. The optical peak luminosity in the R band (L R,p) is anti-correlated with t p and w in the burst frame, indicating a dimmer and broader bump peaking at a later time. The isotropic prompt gamma-ray energy (E γ,iso) is also tightly correlated with L R,p and t p in the burst frame. Assuming that the bumps signal the deceleration of the GRB fireballs in a constant density medium, we calculate the initial Lorentz factor (Γ0) and the deceleration radius (R d) of the GRBs with redshift measurements. The derived Γ0 is typically a few hundreds, and the deceleration radius is R dec ~ 2 × 1017 cm. More intriguingly, a tight correlation between Γ0 and E γ,iso is found, namely Γ0 ~= 182(E γ,iso/1052 erg)0.25. This correlation also applies to the small sample of GRBs which show the signature of the afterglow onset in their X-ray afterglow, and to two bursts (GRBs 990123 and 080319B) whose early optical emission is dominated by a reverse shock. The lower limits of Γ0 derived from a sample of optical afterglow light curves showing a decaying feature from the beginning of the observation are also generally consistent with such

  7. The Swift Discovery of X-ray Afterglows Accompanying Short Bursts from SGR 1900+14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakagawa, Y. E.; Sakamoto, T.; Sato, G.; Gehrels, N.; Hurley, K.; Palmer, D. M.

    2008-01-01

    The discovery of X-ray afterglows accompanying two short bursts from SGR1900+14 is presented. The afterglow luminosities at the end of each observation are lower by 30-50% than their initial luminosities, and decay with power law indices p approx. 0.2-0.4. Their initial bolometric luminosities are L approx. 10(exp 34)- 10(exp 35) erg/s. We discuss analogies and differences between the X-ray afterglows of SGR short bursts and short gamma-ray bursts.

  8. Synthesis, characterization and field emission properties of rare-earth hexaboride nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Han

    Rare-earth hexaborides are a family of compounds which have low work function, high melting point, and high mechanical strength. These properties are highly suitable for electron field emission applications. To explore this possibility, we developed a chemical vapor deposition method and produced three different types of 1D nano-structures, which include single crystalline nanowires of LaB6, CeB6, and GdB6; polycrystalline nanowires of YB12, LaB12, MgO, and Mg3N 2; core-shell nanocables of MgB2-in-MgO and LaB6-in-CNT. TEM, SEM, EELS and EDX techniques were applied to characterize structural and chemical information about the synthesized nano-structures. Vapor-solid growth, catalyst-assisted vapor-liquid-solid growth and CNT-assisted template growth are proposed to be accounted for the formation mechanisms of these 1D nano-structures and the theoretical predictions match the experimental observations quantitatively. To fabricate a single nanowire field emitter, direct contact, electron beam lithography and focused ion beam welding techniques were used to attach a single LaB6 nanowire to the tip of a tungsten wire. Cold field emission properties were measured from such made single nanowire emitters. Work function values of 2.6 eV and 1.5 eV were obtained from a LaB 6 nanowire emitter and GdB6 nanowire emitter respectively. An Emission Current density as high as 5x105 A/cm 2 was obtained from a single LaB6 nanowire emitter, under an extraction voltage of 800 V. Emission current stability was also studied for the nanowire emitter and the results indicate surface-contamination induced emission current fluctuations. A home-designed TEM in-situ field emission measurement holder was fabricated for a JEOL 2010F HRTEM. Field electron emission was performed on a single LaB6 nanowire field electron emitter simultaneously with high resolution TEM imaging. Image contrast changes were observed at under-focus imaging conditions when a series of negative biases were applied to the

  9. Discovery of a cosmological, relativistic outburst via its rapidly fading optical emission

    SciTech Connect

    Cenko, S. Bradley; Nugent, Peter E.; Miller, Adam A.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Horesh, Assaf; Carpenter, John; Perley, Daniel A.; Groot, Paul J.; Hallinan, G.; Corsi, Alessandra; Fox, Derek B.; Frail, Dale A.; Gruber, D.; Rau, Arne; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ofek, Eran O.; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; and others

    2013-06-01

    We report the discovery by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) of the transient source PTF11agg, which is distinguished by three primary characteristics: (1) bright (R {sub peak} = 18.3 mag), rapidly fading (ΔR = 4 mag in Δt = 2 days) optical transient emission; (2) a faint (R = 26.2 ± 0.2 mag), blue (g' – R = 0.17 ± 0.29 mag) quiescent optical counterpart; and (3) an associated year-long, scintillating radio transient. We argue that these observed properties are inconsistent with any known class of Galactic transients (flare stars, X-ray binaries, dwarf novae), and instead suggest a cosmological origin. The detection of incoherent radio emission at such distances implies a large emitting region, from which we infer the presence of relativistic ejecta. The observed properties are all consistent with the population of long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), marking the first time such an outburst has been discovered in the distant universe independent of a high-energy trigger. We searched for possible high-energy counterparts to PTF11agg, but found no evidence for associated prompt emission. We therefore consider three possible scenarios to account for a GRB-like afterglow without a high-energy counterpart: an 'untriggered' GRB (lack of satellite coverage), an 'orphan' afterglow (viewing-angle effects), and a 'dirty fireball' (suppressed high-energy emission). The observed optical and radio light curves appear inconsistent with even the most basic predictions for off-axis afterglow models. The simplest explanation, then, is that PTF11agg is a normal, on-axis long-duration GRB for which the associated high-energy emission was simply missed. However, we have calculated the likelihood of such a serendipitous discovery by PTF and find that it is quite small (≈2.6%). While not definitive, we nonetheless speculate that PTF11agg may represent a new, more common (>4 times the on-axis GRB rate at 90% confidence) class of relativistic outbursts lacking associated high

  10. Entropy emission properties of near-extremal Reissner-Nordström black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hod, Shahar

    2016-05-01

    Bekenstein and Mayo have revealed an interesting property of evaporating (3 +1 )-dimensional Schwarzschild black holes: their entropy emission rates S˙Sch are related to their energy emission rates P by the simple relation S˙Sch=CSch×(P /ℏ)1/2, where CSch is a numerically computed dimensionless coefficient. Remembering that (1 +1 )-dimensional perfect black-body emitters are characterized by the same functional relation, S˙1 +1=C1 +1×(P /ℏ)1/2 [with C1 +1=(π /3 )1/2], Bekenstein and Mayo have concluded that, in their entropy emission properties, (3 +1 )-dimensional Schwarzschild black holes behave effectively as (1 +1 )-dimensional entropy emitters. Later studies have shown that this intriguing property is actually a generic feature of all radiating (D +1 )-dimensional Schwarzschild black holes. One naturally wonders whether all black holes behave as simple (1 +1 )-dimensional entropy emitters? In order to address this interesting question, we shall study in this paper the entropy emission properties of Reissner-Nordström black holes. We shall show, in particular, that the physical properties which characterize the neutral sector of the Hawking emission spectra of these black holes can be studied analytically in the near-extremal TBH→0 regime (here TBH is the Bekenstein-Hawking temperature of the black hole). We find that the Hawking radiation spectra of massless neutral scalar fields and coupled electromagnetic-gravitational fields are characterized by the nontrivial entropy-energy relations S˙RNScalar=-CRNScalar×(A P3/ℏ3)1/4ln (A P /ℏ) and S˙RN Elec -Grav=-CRNElec -Grav×(A4P9/ℏ9)1 /10ln (A P /ℏ) in the near-extremal TBH→0 limit (here {CRNScalar,CRNElec -Grav} are analytically calculated dimensionless coefficients and A is the surface area of the Reissner-Nordström black hole). Our analytical results therefore indicate that not all black holes behave as simple (1 +1 )-dimensional entropy emitters.

  11. Anatomy of a dark burst - the afterglow of GRB 060108

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oates, S. R.; Mundell, C. G.; Piranomonte, S.; Page, K. L.; de Pasquale, M.; Monfardini, A.; Melandri, A.; Zane, S.; Guidorzi, C.; Malesani, D.; Gomboc, A.; Bannister, N.; Blustin, A. J.; Capalbi, M.; Carter, D.; D'Avanzo, P.; Kobayashi, S.; Krimm, H. A.; O'Brien, P. T.; Page, M. J.; Smith, R. J.; Steele, I. A.; Tanvir, N.

    2006-10-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of GRB 060108 - the 100th gamma-ray burst discovered by Swift. The X-ray flux and light curve (three segments plus a flare) detected with the X-ray Telescope are typical of Swift long bursts. We report the discovery of a faint optical afterglow detected in deep BVRi'-band imaging obtained with the Faulkes Telescope North beginning 2.75 min after the burst. The afterglow is below the detection limit of the Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope within 100 s of the burst, while is evident in K-band images taken with the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope 45 min after the burst. The optical light curve is sparsely sampled. Observations taken in the R and i' bands can be fitted either with a single power-law decay in flux, F(t) ~ t-α where α = 0.43 +/- 0.08, or with a two-segment light curve with an initial steep decay α1 < 0.88 +/- 0.2, flattening to a slope α2 ~ 0.31 +/- 0.12. A marginal evidence for rebrightening is seen in the i' band. Deep R-band imaging obtained ~12 d post-burst with the Very Large Telescope reveals a faint, extended object (R ~ 23.5mag) at the location of the afterglow. Although the brightness is compatible with the extrapolation of the slow decay with index α2, significant flux is likely due to a host galaxy. This implies that the optical light curve had a break before 12 d, akin to what observed in the X-rays. We derive the maximum photometric redshift z < 3.2 for GRB 060108. We find that the spectral energy distribution at 1000 s after the burst, from the optical to the X-ray range, is best fitted by a simple power law, Fν ~ ν-β, with βOX = 0.54 and a small amount of extinction. The optical to X-ray spectral index (βOX) confirms GRB 060108 to be one of the optically darkest bursts detected. Our observations rule out a high redshift as the reason for the optical faintness of GRB 060108. We conclude that a more likely explanation is a combination of an intrinsic optical faintness of the burst, a hard optical

  12. Properties and cellular effects of particulate matter from direct emissions and ambient sources.

    PubMed

    Jin, Wenjie; Su, Shu; Wang, Bin; Zhu, Xi; Chen, Yilin; Shen, Guofeng; Liu, Junfeng; Cheng, Hefa; Wang, Xilong; Wu, Shuiping; Zeng, Eddy; Xing, Baoshan; Tao, Shu

    2016-10-14

    The pollution of particulate matter (PM) is of great concern in China and many other developing countries. It is generally recognized that the toxicity of PM is source and property dependent. However, the relationship between PM properties and toxicity is still not well understood. In this study, PM samples from direct emissions of wood, straw, coal, diesel combustion, cigarette smoking and ambient air were collected and characterized for their physicochemical properties. Their expression of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and levels of inflammatory cytokines (i.e., tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)) was measured using a RAW264.7 cell model. Our results demonstrated that the properties of the samples from different origins exhibited remarkable differences. Significant increases in ROS were observed when the cells were exposed to PMs from biomass origins, including wood, straw and cigarettes, while increases in TNF-α were found for all the samples, particularly those from ambient air. The most important factor associated with ROS generation was the presence of water-soluble organic carbon, which was extremely abundant in the samples that directly resulted from biomass combustion. Metals, endotoxins and PM size were the most important properties associated with increases in TNF-α expression levels. The association of the origins of PM particles and physicochemical properties with cytotoxic properties is illustrated using a cluster analysis. PMID:27409416

  13. Properties and cellular effects of particulate matter from direct emissions and ambient sources.

    PubMed

    Jin, Wenjie; Su, Shu; Wang, Bin; Zhu, Xi; Chen, Yilin; Shen, Guofeng; Liu, Junfeng; Cheng, Hefa; Wang, Xilong; Wu, Shuiping; Zeng, Eddy; Xing, Baoshan; Tao, Shu

    2016-10-14

    The pollution of particulate matter (PM) is of great concern in China and many other developing countries. It is generally recognized that the toxicity of PM is source and property dependent. However, the relationship between PM properties and toxicity is still not well understood. In this study, PM samples from direct emissions of wood, straw, coal, diesel combustion, cigarette smoking and ambient air were collected and characterized for their physicochemical properties. Their expression of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and levels of inflammatory cytokines (i.e., tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)) was measured using a RAW264.7 cell model. Our results demonstrated that the properties of the samples from different origins exhibited remarkable differences. Significant increases in ROS were observed when the cells were exposed to PMs from biomass origins, including wood, straw and cigarettes, while increases in TNF-α were found for all the samples, particularly those from ambient air. The most important factor associated with ROS generation was the presence of water-soluble organic carbon, which was extremely abundant in the samples that directly resulted from biomass combustion. Metals, endotoxins and PM size were the most important properties associated with increases in TNF-α expression levels. The association of the origins of PM particles and physicochemical properties with cytotoxic properties is illustrated using a cluster analysis.

  14. Microwave scattering and emission properties of large impact craters on the surface of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacy, N. J. S.; Campbell, D. B.; Devries, C.

    1992-01-01

    Many of the impact craters on Venus imaged by the Magellan synthetic aperture radar (SAR) have interior floors with oblique incidence angle backscatter cross sections 2 to 16 times (3 dB to 12 dB) greater than the average scattering properties of the planet's surface. Such high backscatter cross sections are indicative of a high degree of wavelength-scale surface roughness and/or a high intrinsic reflectivity of the material forming the crater floors. Fifty-three of these (radar) bright floored craters are associated with 93 percent of the parabolic-shaped radar-dark features found in the Magellan SAR and emissivity data, features that are thought to be among the youngest on the surface of Venus. It was suggested by Campbell et al. that either the bright floors of the parabolic feature parent craters are indicative of a young impact and the floor properties are modified with time to a lower backscatter cross section or that they result from some property of the surface or subsurface material at the point of impact or from the properties of the impacting object. As a continuation of earlier work we have examined all craters with diameters greater than 30 km (except 6 that were outside the available data) so both the backscatter cross section and emissivity of the crater floors could be estimated from the Magellan data.

  15. Electron and ion acceleration in relativistic shocks with applications to GRB afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Donald C.; Ellison, Donald C.; Bykov, Andrei M.; Lee, Shiu-Hang

    2015-09-01

    We have modelled the simultaneous first-order Fermi shock acceleration of protons, electrons, and helium nuclei by relativistic shocks. By parametrizing the particle diffusion, our steady-state Monte Carlo simulation allows us to follow particles from particle injection at non-relativistic thermal energies to above PeV energies, including the non-linear smoothing of the shock structure due to cosmic ray (CR) backpressure. We observe the mass-to-charge (A/Z) enhancement effect believed to occur in efficient Fermi acceleration in non-relativistic shocks and we parametrize the transfer of ion energy to electrons seen in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. For a given set of environmental and model parameters, the Monte Carlo simulation determines the absolute normalization of the particle distributions and the resulting synchrotron, inverse Compton, and pion-decay emission in a largely self-consistent manner. The simulation is flexible and can be readily used with a wide range of parameters typical of γ-ray burst (GRB) afterglows. We describe some preliminary results for photon emission from shocks of different Lorentz factors and outline how the Monte Carlo simulation can be generalized and coupled to hydrodynamic simulations of GRB blast waves. We assume Bohm diffusion for simplicity but emphasize that the non-linear effects we describe stem mainly from an extended shock precursor where higher energy particles diffuse further upstream. Quantitative differences will occur with different diffusion models, particularly for the maximum CR energy and photon emission, but these non-linear effects should be qualitatively similar as long as the scattering mean-free path is an increasing function of momentum.

  16. Optical absorption and emission properties of Nd3+-doped oxyfluorosilicate glasses for solid state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachari, D.; Rama Moorthy, L.; Jayasankar, C. K.

    2014-11-01

    Optical absorption and near-infrared luminescent properties of Nd3+ ions doped oxyfluorosilicate (NKZLSNd) glasses were investigated. Raman spectrum was recorded to investigate the structural properties of NKZLSNd glasses. The Judd-Ofelt theory (JO) has been applied to the absorption spectrum of 1.0 mol% Nd3+-doped oxyfluorosilicate glass to derive the JO intensity parameters (Ωλ), which are in turn used to calculate the radiative properties of Nd3+ ions luminescent levels. The near-infrared emission spectra recorded with 808 nm laser diode excitation revealed the effective bandwidths values around 30-40 nm for the 4F3/2 level of Nd3+-doped oxyfluorosilicate glasses. The measured decay times of 4F3/2 level decreased with increasing Nd3+ ions concentration due to the concentration quenching.

  17. Field emission properties of hybrid few-layer graphene-carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei Qi, Jun; Zhang, Fu; Xia Zhang, Li; Cao, Jian; Cai Feng, Ji

    2014-04-01

    Few-layer graphene (FLG) and carbon nanotube (CNT) hybrid is prepared by in situ growth of FLG on the walls of CNTs, using PECVD, without catalyst. The amount and size of FLG can be controlled by total gas pressure and growth time. The field emission (FE) characteristics of CNTs coated with different-density FLG were studied, and an FE phenomenon schematic and electrostatic field equipotential model of these FLG-CNTs were proposed. These results show that the geometrical morphology of FLG plays an important role in the FE property of hybrid FLG-CNTs. The medium-density FLG on the CNTs exhibits excellent FE properties, with a low turn-on electric field and threshold field, as well as large field enhancement factor, which are much better than those of the as-grown CNTs. The excellent FE properties of the FLG-CNT hybrids make them promising candidates for high-performance FE emitters.

  18. On the afterglow and host galaxy of GRB 021004: A comprehensivestudy with the Hubble Space Telescope1

    SciTech Connect

    Fynbo, J.P.U.; Gorosabel, J.; Smette, A.; Fruchter, A.; Hjorth,J.; Pedersen, K.; Levan, A.; Burud, I.; Sahu, K.; Vreeswijk, P.M.; Bergeron, E.; Kouveliotou1, C.; Tanvir, N.; Thorsett11, S.E.; Wijers,R.A.M.J.; Castro Ceron, J.M.; Castro-Tirado, A.; Garnavich, P.; Holland,S.T.; Jakobsson, P.; Moller, P.; Nugent, P.; Pian, E.; Rhoads, J.; Thomsen, B.; Watson, D.; Woosley, S.

    2004-12-01

    We report on Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the late-time afterglow and host galaxy of GRB 021004 (z = 2.33).Although this gamma-ray burst (GRB) is one of the best observed so far in terms of sampling in the time domain, multi-wavelength coverage and polarimetric observations, there is large disagreement between different measurements and interpretations of this burst in the literature. We have observed the field of GRB 021004 with the HST at multiple epochs from 3 days until almost 10 months after the burst. With STI S prism and G430L spectroscopy we cover the spectral region from about 2000 Angstrom to 5700 Angstrom corresponding to 600 1700 Angstrom in the rest frame. From the limit on the flux recovery bluewards of the Lyman-limit we constrain the H I column density to be above 1 x 1018 cm-2 (5 sigma). Based on ACS and N ICMOS imaging we find that the afterglow evolved a chromatically within the errors (any variation must be less then 5 percent) during the period of HST observations. The color changes observed by other authors during the first four days must be related to a 'noisy' phenomenon superimposed on an afterglow component with a constant spectral shape. This also means that the cooling break has remained on the blue side of the optical part of the spectrum for at least two weeks after the explosion. The optical to X-ray slope OX is consistent with being the same at 1.4 and 52.4 days after the burst. This indicates that the cooling frequency is constant and hence, according to fireball models, that the circumburst medium has a constant density profile. The late-time slope of the light curve (alpha 2, F nu proportional to t-alpha2) is in the range 2 = 1.8-1.9, although inconsistent with a single power-law. This could be due to a late-time flattening caused by the transition to non-relativistic expansion or due to excess emission (a 'bump' in the light curve) about 7 days afterburst. The host galaxy is like most previously studied GRB hosts

  19. Functionalization of emissive conjugated polymer nanoparticles by coprecipitation: consequences for particle photophysics and colloidal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amita; Bezuidenhout, Michael; Walsh, Nichola; Beirne, Jason; Felletti, Riccardo; Wang, Suxiao; Fitzgerald, Kathleen T.; Gallagher, William M.; Kiely, Patrick; Redmond, Gareth

    2016-07-01

    The functionalization of polyfluorene (PFO) nanoparticles by coprecipitation of the conjugated polymer with an amphiphilic comb polymer, consisting of a hydrophobic polystyrene backbone with hydrophilic, carboxylic acid-terminated polyethylene oxide side-chains (PS-PEG-COOH), is investigated. The comb polymer affects the properties of the formed hybrid nanoparticles. Non-functionalized particles are typically larger (28 nm) than functionalized ones (20 nm); peak molar extinction coefficients are found to differ in a similar trend. Zeta potentials are negative, consistent with negative surface charge on PFO particles due to chemical defect formation, with additional charge on functionalized particles due to the pendant carboxylic acid groups. Emission quantum yields of functionalized particles are typically larger, consistent with lower efficiency of energy transfer to quenchers in smaller particles and weaker PFO interchain interactions due to chain dilution. The trend in per-particle fluorescence brightness values, as confirmed by single particle fluorescence imaging, reflects the nanoparticle extinction coefficients. Photostability studies on aqueous dispersions of hybrid particles indicate mild photobrightening under continuous illumination while PFO particles exhibit slow exponential emission decay. Functionalized particles are also resistant to aggregation during exposure to adenocarcinoma cells. Generally, the hybrid particles exhibit more favorable time-, pH- and medium-dependent stabilities, likely due to steric and electrostatic stabilization by PEG-carboxylic acid functionalities. Overall, the functionalized particles exhibit attractive properties: Reasonably small size, tight size distribution, high absorption cross section, radiative rate and emission quantum yield, excellent brightness and photostability, and good colloidal stability.

  20. Functionalization of emissive conjugated polymer nanoparticles by coprecipitation: consequences for particle photophysics and colloidal properties.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amita; Bezuidenhout, Michael; Walsh, Nichola; Beirne, Jason; Felletti, Riccardo; Wang, Suxiao; Fitzgerald, Kathleen T; Gallagher, William M; Kiely, Patrick; Redmond, Gareth

    2016-07-29

    The functionalization of polyfluorene (PFO) nanoparticles by coprecipitation of the conjugated polymer with an amphiphilic comb polymer, consisting of a hydrophobic polystyrene backbone with hydrophilic, carboxylic acid-terminated polyethylene oxide side-chains (PS-PEG-COOH), is investigated. The comb polymer affects the properties of the formed hybrid nanoparticles. Non-functionalized particles are typically larger (28 nm) than functionalized ones (20 nm); peak molar extinction coefficients are found to differ in a similar trend. Zeta potentials are negative, consistent with negative surface charge on PFO particles due to chemical defect formation, with additional charge on functionalized particles due to the pendant carboxylic acid groups. Emission quantum yields of functionalized particles are typically larger, consistent with lower efficiency of energy transfer to quenchers in smaller particles and weaker PFO interchain interactions due to chain dilution. The trend in per-particle fluorescence brightness values, as confirmed by single particle fluorescence imaging, reflects the nanoparticle extinction coefficients. Photostability studies on aqueous dispersions of hybrid particles indicate mild photobrightening under continuous illumination while PFO particles exhibit slow exponential emission decay. Functionalized particles are also resistant to aggregation during exposure to adenocarcinoma cells. Generally, the hybrid particles exhibit more favorable time-, pH- and medium-dependent stabilities, likely due to steric and electrostatic stabilization by PEG-carboxylic acid functionalities. Overall, the functionalized particles exhibit attractive properties: Reasonably small size, tight size distribution, high absorption cross section, radiative rate and emission quantum yield, excellent brightness and photostability, and good colloidal stability. PMID:27306338

  1. Functionalization of emissive conjugated polymer nanoparticles by coprecipitation: consequences for particle photophysics and colloidal properties.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amita; Bezuidenhout, Michael; Walsh, Nichola; Beirne, Jason; Felletti, Riccardo; Wang, Suxiao; Fitzgerald, Kathleen T; Gallagher, William M; Kiely, Patrick; Redmond, Gareth

    2016-07-29

    The functionalization of polyfluorene (PFO) nanoparticles by coprecipitation of the conjugated polymer with an amphiphilic comb polymer, consisting of a hydrophobic polystyrene backbone with hydrophilic, carboxylic acid-terminated polyethylene oxide side-chains (PS-PEG-COOH), is investigated. The comb polymer affects the properties of the formed hybrid nanoparticles. Non-functionalized particles are typically larger (28 nm) than functionalized ones (20 nm); peak molar extinction coefficients are found to differ in a similar trend. Zeta potentials are negative, consistent with negative surface charge on PFO particles due to chemical defect formation, with additional charge on functionalized particles due to the pendant carboxylic acid groups. Emission quantum yields of functionalized particles are typically larger, consistent with lower efficiency of energy transfer to quenchers in smaller particles and weaker PFO interchain interactions due to chain dilution. The trend in per-particle fluorescence brightness values, as confirmed by single particle fluorescence imaging, reflects the nanoparticle extinction coefficients. Photostability studies on aqueous dispersions of hybrid particles indicate mild photobrightening under continuous illumination while PFO particles exhibit slow exponential emission decay. Functionalized particles are also resistant to aggregation during exposure to adenocarcinoma cells. Generally, the hybrid particles exhibit more favorable time-, pH- and medium-dependent stabilities, likely due to steric and electrostatic stabilization by PEG-carboxylic acid functionalities. Overall, the functionalized particles exhibit attractive properties: Reasonably small size, tight size distribution, high absorption cross section, radiative rate and emission quantum yield, excellent brightness and photostability, and good colloidal stability.

  2. Field emission properties and growth mechanism of In2O3 nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Four kinds of nanostructures, nanoneedles, nanohooks, nanorods, and nanotowers of In2O3, have been grown by the vapor transport process with Au catalysts or without any catalysts. The morphology and structure of the prepared nanostructures are determined on the basis of field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The growth direction of the In2O3 nanoneedles is along the [001], and those of the other three nanostructures are along the [100]. The growth mechanism of the nanoneedles is the vapor-liquid–solid (VLS), and those of the other three nanostructures are the vapor-solid (VS) processes. The field emission properties of four kinds of In2O3 nanostructures have been investigated. Among them, the nanoneedles have the best field emission properties with the lowest turn-on field of 4.9 V/μm and the threshold field of 12 V/μm due to possessing the smallest emitter tip radius and the weakest screening effect. PMID:24612921

  3. Field emission properties and growth mechanism of In2O3 nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bing; Zheng, Zhaoqiang; Wu, Huanyu; Zhu, Lianfeng

    2014-03-01

    Four kinds of nanostructures, nanoneedles, nanohooks, nanorods, and nanotowers of In2O3, have been grown by the vapor transport process with Au catalysts or without any catalysts. The morphology and structure of the prepared nanostructures are determined on the basis of field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The growth direction of the In2O3 nanoneedles is along the [001], and those of the other three nanostructures are along the [100]. The growth mechanism of the nanoneedles is the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS), and those of the other three nanostructures are the vapor-solid (VS) processes. The field emission properties of four kinds of In2O3 nanostructures have been investigated. Among them, the nanoneedles have the best field emission properties with the lowest turn-on field of 4.9 V/μm and the threshold field of 12 V/μm due to possessing the smallest emitter tip radius and the weakest screening effect.

  4. TALIF measurements of oxygen atom density in the afterglow of a capillary nanosecond discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochko, A. V.; Lemainque, J.; Booth, J. P.; Starikovskaia, S. M.

    2015-04-01

    The atomic oxygen density has been measured in the afterglow of a capillary nanosecond discharge in 24-30 mbar synthetic air (N2 : O2 = 4 : 1) by the two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) technique, combined with absolute calibration by comparison with xenon TALIF. The discharge was initiated by a train of 30 ns FWHM pulses of alternating positive-negative-positive polarity, separated by 250 ns, with a train repetition frequency of 10 Hz. The amplitude of the first pulse was 10 kV in the cable. A flow of synthetic air through the tube provided complete gas renewal between pulse trains. The O-atom density measurements were made over the time interval 200 ns-2 µs after the initial pulse. The gas temperature was determined by analysis of the molecular nitrogen second positive system optical emission spectrum. The influence of the gas temperature on the atom density measurements, and the reactions producing O atoms, are discussed.

  5. A possible macronova in the late afterglow of the long–short burst GRB 060614

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Li, Xiang; Covino, Stefano; Zheng, Xian-Zhong; Hotokezaka, Kenta; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Piran, Tsvi; Wei, Da-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Long-duration (>2 s) γ-ray bursts that are believed to originate from the death of massive stars are expected to be accompanied by supernovae. GRB 060614, that lasted 102 s, lacks a supernova-like emission down to very stringent limits and its physical origin is still debated. Here we report the discovery of near-infrared bump that is significantly above the regular decaying afterglow. This red bump is inconsistent with even the weakest known supernova. However, it can arise from a Li-Paczyński macronova—the radioactive decay of debris following a compact binary merger. If this interpretation is correct, GRB 060614 arose from a compact binary merger rather than from the death of a massive star and it was a site of a significant production of heavy r-process elements. The significant ejected mass favours a black hole–neutron star merger but a double neutron star merger cannot be ruled out. PMID:26065563

  6. A possible macronova in the late afterglow of the long-short burst GRB 060614.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Li, Xiang; Covino, Stefano; Zheng, Xian-Zhong; Hotokezaka, Kenta; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Piran, Tsvi; Wei, Da-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Long-duration (>2 s) γ-ray bursts that are believed to originate from the death of massive stars are expected to be accompanied by supernovae. GRB 060614, that lasted 102 s, lacks a supernova-like emission down to very stringent limits and its physical origin is still debated. Here we report the discovery of near-infrared bump that is significantly above the regular decaying afterglow. This red bump is inconsistent with even the weakest known supernova. However, it can arise from a Li-Paczyński macronova--the radioactive decay of debris following a compact binary merger. If this interpretation is correct, GRB 060614 arose from a compact binary merger rather than from the death of a massive star and it was a site of a significant production of heavy r-process elements. The significant ejected mass favours a black hole-neutron star merger but a double neutron star merger cannot be ruled out. PMID:26065563

  7. SHOCK CORRUGATION BY RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR INSTABILITY IN GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOW JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Duffell, Paul C.; MacFadyen, Andrew I. E-mail: macfadyen@nyu.edu

    2014-08-10

    Afterglow jets are Rayleigh-Taylor unstable and therefore turbulent during the early part of their deceleration. There are also several processes which actively cool the jet. In this Letter, we demonstrate that if cooling significantly increases the compressibility of the flow, the turbulence collides with the forward shock, destabilizing and corrugating it. In this case, the forward shock is turbulent enough to produce the magnetic fields responsible for synchrotron emission via small-scale turbulent dynamo. We calculate light curves assuming the magnetic field is in energy equipartition with the turbulent kinetic energy and discover that dynamic magnetic fields are well approximated by a constant magnetic-to-thermal energy ratio of 1%, though there is a sizeable delay in the time of peak flux as the magnetic field turns on only after the turbulence has activated. The reverse shock is found to be significantly more magnetized than the forward shock, with a magnetic-to-thermal energy ratio of the order of 10%. This work motivates future Rayleigh-Taylor calculations using more physical cooling models.

  8. Effect of Purity and Substrate on Field Emission Properties of Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) have been synthesized by chemical vapour decomposition (CVD) of acetylene over Rare Earth (RE) based AB2(DyNi2) alloy hydride catalyst. The as-grown carbon nanotubes were purified by acid and heat treatments and characterized using powder X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Thermo Gravimetric Analysis and Raman Spectroscopy. Fully carbon based field emitters have been fabricated by spin coating a solutions of both as-grown and purified MWNT and dichloro ethane (DCE) over carbon paper with and without graphitized layer. The use of graphitized carbon paper as substrate opens several new possibilities for carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters, as the presence of the graphitic layer provides strong adhesion between the nanotubes and carbon paper and reduces contact resistance. The field emission characteristics have been studied using an indigenously fabricated set up and the results are discussed. CNT field emitter prepared by spin coating of the purified MWNT–DCE solution over graphitized carbon paper shows excellent emission properties with a fairly stable emission current over a period of 4 h. Analysis of the field emission characteristics based on the Fowler–Nordheim (FN) theory reveals current saturation effects at high applied fields for all the samples. PMID:21798103

  9. Effect of Purity and Substrate on Field Emission Properties of Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Rakhi, Rb; Sethupathi, K; Ramaprabhu, S

    2007-06-21

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) have been synthesized by chemical vapour decomposition (CVD) of acetylene over Rare Earth (RE) based AB2(DyNi2) alloy hydride catalyst. The as-grown carbon nanotubes were purified by acid and heat treatments and characterized using powder X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Thermo Gravimetric Analysis and Raman Spectroscopy. Fully carbon based field emitters have been fabricated by spin coating a solutions of both as-grown and purified MWNT and dichloro ethane (DCE) over carbon paper with and without graphitized layer. The use of graphitized carbon paper as substrate opens several new possibilities for carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters, as the presence of the graphitic layer provides strong adhesion between the nanotubes and carbon paper and reduces contact resistance. The field emission characteristics have been studied using an indigenously fabricated set up and the results are discussed. CNT field emitter prepared by spin coating of the purified MWNT-DCE solution over graphitized carbon paper shows excellent emission properties with a fairly stable emission current over a period of 4 h. Analysis of the field emission characteristics based on the Fowler-Nordheim (FN) theory reveals current saturation effects at high applied fields for all the samples.

  10. Optically active substituted polyacetylene@carbon nanotube hybrids: Preparation, characterization and infrared emissivity property study

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, Xiaohai; Zhou, Yuming Zhang, Tao; Wang, Yongjuan; Zhang, Zewu; He, Man

    2014-08-15

    Optically active substituted polyacetylene@multiwalled carbon nanotubes (SPA@MWCNTs) nanohybrids were fabricated by wrapping helical SPA copolymers onto the surface of modified nanotubes through ester bonding linkage. SPA copolymer based on chiral phenylalanine and serine was pre-polymerized by a rhodium zwitterion catalyst in THF, and evidently proved to possess strong optical activity and adopt a predominately one-handed helical conformation. Various characterizations including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated that the SPA had been covalently grafted onto the nanotubes without destroying their original graphite structure. The wrapped SPA was found to exhibit an enhancement in thermal stability and still maintained considerable optical activity after grafting. The infrared emissivity property of the nanohybrids at 8–14 μm was investigated in addition. The results indicated that the SPA@MWCNTs hybrid matrix could possess a much lower infrared emissivity value (ε=0.707) than raw MWCNTs, which might be due to synergistic effect of the unique helical conformation of optically active SPA and strengthened interfacial interaction between the organic polymers and inorganic nanoparticles. - Graphical abstract: Optically active SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids with low infrared emissivity. - Highlights: • Synthesis of optically active SPA copolymer derived from serine and phenylalanine. • Preparation and characterization of optically active SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids. • Application study of the SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids (ε=0.707) in lowering the infrared emissivity.

  11. Effect of Oxygen Adsorbates on Terahertz Emission Properties of Various Semiconductor Surfaces Covered with Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagsican, Filchito Renee; Zhang, Xiang; Ma, Lulu; Wang, Minjie; Murakami, Hironaru; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Kono, Junichiro; Tonouchi, Masayoshi; Kawayama, Iwao

    2016-11-01

    We have studied coherent terahertz (THz) emission from graphene-coated surfaces of three different semiconductors—InP, GaAs, and InAs—to provide insight into the influence of O2 adsorption on charge states and dynamics at the graphene/semiconductor interface. The amplitude of emitted THz radiation from graphene-coated InP was found to change significantly upon desorption of O2 molecules by thermal annealing, while THz emission from bare InP was nearly uninfluenced by O2 desorption. In contrast, the amount of change in the amplitude of emitted THz radiation due to O2 desorption was essentially the same for graphene-coated GaAs and bare GaAs. However, in InAs, neither graphene coating nor O2 adsorption/desorption affected the properties of its THz emission. These results can be explained in terms of the effects of adsorbed O2 molecules on the different THz generation mechanisms in these semiconductors. Furthermore, these observations suggest that THz emission from graphene-coated semiconductors can be used for probing surface chemical reactions (e.g., oxidation) as well as for developing O2 gas sensor devices.

  12. Ultra-weak photon emission from biological samples: definition, mechanisms, properties, detection and applications.

    PubMed

    Cifra, Michal; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2014-10-01

    This review attempts to summarize molecular mechanisms, spectral and intensity properties, detection techniques and applications of ultra-weak photon emission. Ultra-weak photon emission is the chemiluminescence from biological systems where electronically excited species are formed during oxidative metabolic or oxidative stress processes. It is generally accepted that photons are emitted (1) at near UVA, visible, and near IR spectral ranges from 350 to 1300nm and (2) at the intensity of photon emission in the range of several units to several hundreds (oxidative metabolic process) and several hundreds to several thousands (oxidative stress process) photons s(-1)cm(-2). Current development in detection using low-noise photomultiplier tubes and imaging using highly sensitive charge coupled device cameras allows temporal and spatial visualization of oxidative metabolic or oxidative stress processes, respectively. As the phenomenon of ultra-weak photon emission reflects oxidative metabolic or oxidative stress processes, it can be widely used as a non-invasive tool for monitoring of the physiological state of biological systems.

  13. Effect of Oxygen Adsorbates on Terahertz Emission Properties of Various Semiconductor Surfaces Covered with Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagsican, Filchito Renee; Zhang, Xiang; Ma, Lulu; Wang, Minjie; Murakami, Hironaru; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Kono, Junichiro; Tonouchi, Masayoshi; Kawayama, Iwao

    2016-07-01

    We have studied coherent terahertz (THz) emission from graphene-coated surfaces of three different semiconductors—InP, GaAs, and InAs—to provide insight into the influence of O2 adsorption on charge states and dynamics at the graphene/semiconductor interface. The amplitude of emitted THz radiation from graphene-coated InP was found to change significantly upon desorption of O2 molecules by thermal annealing, while THz emission from bare InP was nearly uninfluenced by O2 desorption. In contrast, the amount of change in the amplitude of emitted THz radiation due to O2 desorption was essentially the same for graphene-coated GaAs and bare GaAs. However, in InAs, neither graphene coating nor O2 adsorption/desorption affected the properties of its THz emission. These results can be explained in terms of the effects of adsorbed O2 molecules on the different THz generation mechanisms in these semiconductors. Furthermore, these observations suggest that THz emission from graphene-coated semiconductors can be used for probing surface chemical reactions (e.g., oxidation) as well as for developing O2 gas sensor devices.

  14. Determination of hexabromocyclododecane by flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Smoluch, Marek; Silberring, Jerzy; Reszke, Edward; Kuc, Joanna; Grochowalski, Adam

    2014-10-01

    The first application of a flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow ion source for mass spectrometry (FAPA-MS) for the chemical characterization and determination of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is presented. The samples of technical HBCD and expanded polystyrene foam (EPS) containing HBCD as a flame retardant were prepared by dissolving the appropriate solids in dichloromethane. The ionization of HBCD was achieved with a prototype FAPA source. The ions were detected in the negative-ion mode. The ions corresponding to a deprotonated HBCD species (m/z 640.7) as well as chlorine (m/z 676.8), nitrite (m/z 687.8) and nitric (m/z 703.8) adducts were observed in the spectra. The observed isotope pattern is characteristic for a compound containing six bromine atoms. This technique is an effective approach to detect HBCD, which is efficiently ionized in a liquid phase, resulting in high detection efficiency and sensitivity. PMID:25059130

  15. Langmuir-Probe Measurements in Flowing-Afterglow Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsen, R.; Shunko, E. V.; Gougousi, T.; Golde, M. F.

    1994-01-01

    The validity of the orbital-motion theory for cylindrical Langmuir probes immersed in flowing- afterglow plasmas is investigated experimentally. It is found that the probe currents scale linearly with probe area only for electron-collecting but not for ion-collecting probes. In general, no agreement is found between the ion and electron densities derived from the probe currents. Measurements in recombining plasmas support the conclusion that only the electron densities derived from probe measurements can be trusted to be of acceptable accuracy. This paper also includes a brief derivation of the orbital-motion theory, a discussion of perturbations of the plasma by the probe current, and the interpretation of plasma velocities obtained from probe measurements.

  16. Pink splash of active nitrogen in the discharge afterglow

    SciTech Connect

    Akishev, Yu. S.; Grushin, M. E.; Karal'nik, V. B.; Petryakov, A. V.; Trushkin, N. I.

    2007-09-15

    Results are presented from experimental studies of the glow dynamics of active nitrogen in the stage of its excitation by a current pulse and during the discharge afterglow. The mechanism is proposed for the generation of a light splash in a highly activated nitrogen after the end of its pulsed excitation. The key role in the generation of this splash is played by the D-V processes, by which the dissociation energy is transferred to the vibrational degrees of freedom in the course of recombination of nitrogen atoms, and the V-E processes, by which the vibrational energy of highly excited molecules N{sub 2}(X, v {>=} 25-27) is transferred to the emitting electronic states N{sub 2}(B, v) after the V-V delay. Results of simulations based on the mechanism proposed are also presented.

  17. Energy Injection in Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskar, Tanmoy; Berger, Edo; Margutti, Raffaella; Perley, Daniel; Zauderer, B. Ashley; Sari, Re'em; Fong, Wen-fai

    2015-11-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations and modeling of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that exhibit a simultaneous re-brightening in their X-ray and optical light curves, and are also detected at radio wavelengths. We show that the re-brightening episodes can be modeled by injection of energy into the blastwave and that in all cases the energy injection rate falls within the theoretical bounds expected for a distribution of energy with ejecta Lorentz factor. Our measured values of the circumburst density, jet opening angle, and beaming-corrected kinetic energy are consistent with the distribution of these parameters for long-duration GRBs at both z˜ 1 and z≳ 6, suggesting that the jet launching mechanism and environment of these events are similar to that of GRBs that do not have bumps in their light curves. However, events exhibiting re-brightening episodes have lower radiative efficiencies than average, suggesting that a majority of the kinetic energy of the outflow is carried by slow-moving ejecta, which is further supported by steep measured distributions of the ejecta energy as a function of Lorentz factor. We do not find evidence for reverse shocks over the energy injection period, implying that the onset of energy injection is a gentle process. We further show that GRBs exhibiting simultaneous X-ray and optical re-brightenings are likely the tail of a distribution of events with varying rates of energy injection, forming the most extreme events in their class. Future X-ray observations of GRB afterglows with Swift and its successors will thus likely discover several more such events, while radio follow-up and multi-wavelength modeling of similar events will unveil the role of energy injection in GRB afterglows.

  18. Influence of plasma diffusion losses on dust charge relaxation in discharge afterglow

    SciTech Connect

    Coueedel, L.; Mikikian, M.; Boufendi, L.

    2008-09-07

    The influence of diffusive losses on residual dust charge in a complex plasma afterglow has been investigated. The dust residual charges were simulated based on a model developed to describe complex plasma decay. The experimental and simulated data show that the transition from ambipolar to free diffusion in the decaying plasma plays a significant role in determining the residual dust particle charges. The presence of positively charged dust particles is explained by a broadening of the charge distribution function in the afterglow plasma.

  19. Escherichia coli morphological changes and lipid A removal induced by reduced pressure nitrogen afterglow exposure.

    PubMed

    Zerrouki, Hayat; Rizzati, Virginie; Bernis, Corinne; Nègre-Salvayre, Anne; Sarrette, Jean Philippe; Cousty, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Lipid A is a major hydrophobic component of lipopolysaccharides (endotoxin) present in the membrane of most Gram-negative bacteria, and the major responsible for the bioactivity and toxicity of the endotoxin. Previous studies have demonstrated that the late afterglow region of flowing post-discharges at reduced pressure (1-20 Torr) can be used for the sterilization of surfaces and of the reusable medical instrumentation. In the present paper, we show that the antibacterial activity of a pure nitrogen afterglow can essentially be attributed to the large concentrations of nitrogen atoms present in the treatment area and not to the UV radiation of the afterglow. In parallel, the time variation of the inactivation efficiency quantified by the log reduction of the initial Escherichia coli (E. coli) population is correlated with morphologic changes observed on the bacteria by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for increasing afterglow exposure times. The effect of the afterglow exposure is also studied on pure lipid A and on lipid A extracted from exposed E. coli bacteria. We report that more than 60% of lipid A (pure or bacteria-extracted) are lost with the used operating conditions (nitrogen flow QN2 = 1 standard liter per minute (slpm), pressure p = 5 Torr, microwave injected power PMW = 200 W, exposure time: 40 minutes). The afterglow exposure also results in a reduction of the lipid A proinflammatory activity, assessed by the net decrease of the redox-sensitive NFκB transcription factor nuclear translocation in murine aortic endothelial cells stimulated with control vs afterglow-treated (pure and extracted) lipid A. Altogether these results point out the ability of reduced pressure nitrogen afterglows to neutralize the cytotoxic components in Gram-negative bacteria.

  20. Escherichia coli Morphological Changes and Lipid A Removal Induced by Reduced Pressure Nitrogen Afterglow Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Zerrouki, Hayat; Rizzati, Virginie; Bernis, Corinne; Nègre-Salvayre, Anne; Sarrette, Jean Philippe; Cousty, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Lipid A is a major hydrophobic component of lipopolysaccharides (endotoxin) present in the membrane of most Gram-negative bacteria, and the major responsible for the bioactivity and toxicity of the endotoxin. Previous studies have demonstrated that the late afterglow region of flowing post-discharges at reduced pressure (1-20 Torr) can be used for the sterilization of surfaces and of the reusable medical instrumentation. In the present paper, we show that the antibacterial activity of a pure nitrogen afterglow can essentially be attributed to the large concentrations of nitrogen atoms present in the treatment area and not to the UV radiation of the afterglow. In parallel, the time variation of the inactivation efficiency quantified by the log reduction of the initial Escherichia coli (E. coli) population is correlated with morphologic changes observed on the bacteria by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for increasing afterglow exposure times. The effect of the afterglow exposure is also studied on pure lipid A and on lipid A extracted from exposed E. coli bacteria. We report that more than 60% of lipid A (pure or bacteria-extracted) are lost with the used operating conditions (nitrogen flow QN2 = 1 standard liter per minute (slpm), pressure p = 5 Torr, microwave injected power PMW = 200 W, exposure time: 40 minutes). The afterglow exposure also results in a reduction of the lipid A proinflammatory activity, assessed by the net decrease of the redox-sensitive NFκB transcription factor nuclear translocation in murine aortic endothelial cells stimulated with control vs afterglow-treated (pure and extracted) lipid A. Altogether these results point out the ability of reduced pressure nitrogen afterglows to neutralize the cytotoxic components in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25837580

  1. Field emission properties of porous diamond-like films produced by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammana, V. P.; Santos, T. E. A.; Mammana, A. P.; Baranauskas, V.; Ceragioli, Helder J.; Peterlevitz, A. C.

    2002-10-01

    The field emission properties of "porous diamond-like" carbon structures have been characterized. A hot filament chemical vapor deposition system fed with ethyl alcohol vapor diluted in helium was used to deposit the samples. Morphological analysis by field emission scanning electron microscopy revealed that they had a highly porous structure, which was attributed to the modification of the kinetics of the carbon deposition process due to the presence of helium as a buffer gas. Micro-Raman spectroscopy showed two peaks in the graphene and microcrystalline graphite frequencies and a new peak at 1620 cm-1. Low threshold fields (Et) and hysteresis in the current versus voltage characteristic have been observed, and a model to explain the hysteresis is proposed.

  2. Thermionic emission properties of a single-crystal LaB6 cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futamoto, M.; Nakazawa, M.; Usami, K.; Hosoki, S.; Kawabe, U.

    1980-07-01

    A new type of LaB6 cathode has been developed. It consists of a <001> oriented LaB6 single-crystal tip and a glassy carbon filament. The influence of gas pressure on the thermionic emission properties are investigated for O2, H2O, CH4, and H2. Evaporation rates and surface composition of the LaB6 cathode are also examined. Thermionic emission current decreased in all gases examined here, depending on cathode temperature and gas pressure. In O2 and H2O gas atmosphere, the cathode surface composition appears to change to La2O3 as gas pressure is increased. The evaporation rate of the LaB6 single crystals is represented by equation V=4×1014 exp [-(570×103/RT)] μm/h, for the temperature range between 1800 and 2200 K.

  3. Enhanced field emission properties of screen-printed doubled-walled carbon nanotubes by polydimethylsiloxane elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hui; Feng, Tao; Zhang, Zhejuan; Wang, Kai; Qian, Min; Chen, Yiwei; Sun, Zhuo

    2010-09-01

    Field emission (FE) properties of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) treated by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer with different heating temperature have been systematically studied. The current density of treated DWCNT films decreases with the increase of heating temperature. The screen-printed DWCNTs treated by PDMS elastomer with drying temperature 150 °C for 20 min have the best FE performance with a marvelous field enhancement factor ( β = 20194). The optimized FE performance is attributed to the morphological change of DWCNT films after PDMS elastomer treatment and the change of separation energy for the CNT-substrate interface. It is proved that the PDMS treatment is a facile and effective method for field emission display (FED) application, especially for low-temperature FED preparation.

  4. Hydrothermal synthesis and infrared emissivity property of flower-like SnO2 particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, J. X.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Yan, J. F.; Ruan, X. F.; Yun, J. N.; Zhao, W.; Zhai, C. X.

    2014-04-01

    The flower-like SnO2 particles are synthesized through a simple hydrothermal process. The microstructure, morphology and the infrared emissivity property of the as-prepared products are characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and infrared spectroradio meter (ISM) respectively. The results show that the as-prepared SnO2 products are all indexed to tetragonal cassiterite phase of SnO2. The different molarity ratios of the OH- concentration to Sn4+ concentration ([OH-]:[Sn4+]) and the polyacrylamide (PAM) lead to the different morphological structures of SnO2, which indicates that both the [OH-]:[Sn4+] and the PAM play an important role in the morphological evolution respectively. The infrared emissivities of the as-prepared SnO2 products are discussed.

  5. Hydrothermal synthesis and infrared emissivity property of flower-like SnO{sub 2} particles

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, J. X.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Yan, J. F.; Ruan, X. F.; Yun, J. N.; Zhao, W.; Zhai, C. X.

    2014-04-15

    The flower-like SnO{sub 2} particles are synthesized through a simple hydrothermal process. The microstructure, morphology and the infrared emissivity property of the as-prepared products are characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and infrared spectroradio meter (ISM) respectively. The results show that the as-prepared SnO{sub 2} products are all indexed to tetragonal cassiterite phase of SnO{sub 2}. The different molarity ratios of the OH{sup −} concentration to Sn{sup 4+} concentration ([OH{sup −}]:[Sn{sup 4+}]) and the polyacrylamide (PAM) lead to the different morphological structures of SnO{sub 2}, which indicates that both the [OH{sup −}]:[Sn{sup 4+}] and the PAM play an important role in the morphological evolution respectively. The infrared emissivities of the as-prepared SnO{sub 2} products are discussed.

  6. Theoretical modeling of the plasma-assisted catalytic growth and field emission properties of graphene sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Suresh C.; Gupta, Neha

    2015-12-15

    A theoretical modeling for the catalyst-assisted growth of graphene sheet in the presence of plasma has been investigated. It is observed that the plasma parameters can strongly affect the growth and field emission properties of graphene sheet. The model developed accounts for the charging rate of the graphene sheet; number density of electrons, ions, and neutral atoms; various elementary processes on the surface of the catalyst nanoparticle; surface diffusion and accretion of ions; and formation of carbon-clusters and large graphene islands. In our investigation, it is found that the thickness of the graphene sheet decreases with the plasma parameters, number density of hydrogen ions and RF power, and consequently, the field emission of electrons from the graphene sheet surface increases. The time evolution of the height of graphene sheet with ion density and sticking coefficient of carbon species has also been examined. Some of our theoretical results are in compliance with the experimental observations.

  7. Modification of Optical Properties of Seawater Exposed to Oil Contaminants Based on Excitation-Emission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baszanowska, E.; Otremba, Z.

    2015-10-01

    The optical behaviour of seawater exposed to a residual amount of oil pollution is presented and a comparison of the fluorescence spectra of oil dissolved in both n-hexane and seawater is discussed based on excitation-emission spectra. Crude oil extracted from the southern part of the Baltic Sea was used to characterise petroleum properties after contact with seawater. The wavelength-independent fluorescence maximum for natural seawater and seawater artificially polluted with oil were determined. Moreover, the specific excitation-emission peaks for natural seawater and polluted water were analysed to identify the natural organic matter composition. It was found that fluorescence spectra identification is a promising method to detect even an extremely low concentration of petroleum residues directly in the seawater. In addition, alien substances disturbing the fluorescence signatures of natural organic substances in a marine environment is also discussed.

  8. Effect of plasma parameters on growth and field emission properties of spherical carbon nanotube tip

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Suresh C.; Tewari, Aarti

    2011-06-15

    The effect of plasma parameters (e.g., electron density and temperature, ion density and temperature, neutral atom density and temperature) on the growth (without a catalyst), structure, and field emission properties of a spherical carbon nanotube (CNT) tip has been theoretically investigated. A theoretical model of charge neutrality, including the kinetics of electrons, positively charged ions, and neutral atoms and the energy balance of the various species in plasma, has been developed. Numerical calculations of the radius of the spherical CNT tip for different CNT number densities and plasma parameters have been carried out for the typical glow discharge plasma parameters. It is found that upon an increase in the CNT number density and plasma parameters, the radius of the spherical CNT tip decreases, and consequently the field emission factor for the spherical CNT tip increases.

  9. Impact of chemically amended pig slurry on greenhouse gas emissions, soil properties and leachate.

    PubMed

    O' Flynn, Cornelius J; Healy, Mark G; Lanigan, Gary J; Troy, Shane M; Somers, Cathal; Fenton, Owen

    2013-10-15

    The effectiveness of chemical amendment of pig slurry to ameliorate phosphorus (P) losses in runoff is well studied, but research mainly has concentrated only on the runoff pathway. The aims of this study were to investigate changes to leachate nutrient losses, soil properties and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions due to the chemical amendment of pig slurry spread at 19 kg total phosphorus (TP), 90 kg total nitrogen (TN), and 180 kg total carbon (TC) ha(-1). The amendments examined were: (1) commercial grade liquid alum (8% Al2O3) applied at a rate of 0.88:1 [Al:TP], (2) commercial-grade liquid ferric chloride (38% FeCl3) applied at a rate of 0.89:1 [Fe:TP] and (3) commercial-grade liquid poly-aluminium chloride (PAC) (10% Al2O3) applied at a rate of 0.72:1 [Al:TP]. Columns filled with sieved soil were incubated for 8 mo at 10 °C and were leached with 160 mL (19 mm) distilled water wk(-1). All amendments reduced the Morgan's phosphorus and water extractable P content of the soil to that of the soil-only treatment, indicating that they have the ability to reduce P loss in leachate following slurry application. There were no significant differences between treatments for nitrogen (N) or carbon (C) in leachate or soil, indicating no deleterious impact on reactive N emissions or soil C cycling. Chemical amendment posed no significant change to GHG emissions from pig slurry, and in the cases of alum and PAC, reduced cumulative N2O and CO2 losses. Chemical amendment of land applied pig slurry can reduce P in runoff without any negative impact on nutrient leaching and GHG emissions. Future work must be conducted to ascertain if more significant reductions in GHG emissions are possible with chemical amendments.

  10. Highly Conductive Diamond-Graphite Nanohybrid Films with Enhanced Electron Field Emission and Microplasma Illumination Properties.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Adhimoorthy; Huang, Bohr-Ran; Sankaran, Kamatchi Jothiramalingam; Tai, Nyan-Hwa; Lin, I-Nan

    2015-07-01

    Bias-enhanced nucleation and growth of diamond-graphite nanohybrid (DGH) films on silicon substrates by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using CH4/N2 gas mixture is reported herein. It is observed that by controlling the growth time, the microstructure of the DGH films and, thus, the electrical conductivity and the electron field emission (EFE) properties of the films can be manipulated. The films grown for 30 min (DGHB30) possess needle-like geometry, which comprised of a diamond core encased in a sheath of sp(2)-bonded graphitic phase. These films achieved high conductivity of σ = 900 S/cm and superior EFE properties, namely, low turn-on field of 2.9 V/μm and high EFE current density of 3.8 mA/cm(2) at an applied field of 6.0 V/μm. On increasing the growth time to 60 min (the DGHB60), the acicular grain growth ceased and formed nanographite clusters or defective diamond clusters (n-diamond). Even though DGHB60 films possess higher electrical conductivity (σ = 1549 S/cm) than the DGHB30 films, the EFE properties degraded. The implication of this result is that higher conductivity by itself does not guarantee better EFE properties. The nanosized diamond grains with needle-like geometry are the most promising ones for the electron emission, exclusively when they are encased in graphene-like layers. The salient feature of such materials with unique granular structure is that their conductivity and EFE properties can be tuned in a wide range, which makes them especially useful in practical applications.

  11. Global volcanic aerosol properties derived from emissions, 1990-2015, using CESM1(WACCM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Michael; Schmidt, Anja; Easter, Richard; Solomon, Susan; Kinnison, Douglas; Ghan, Steven; Neely, Ryan; Marsh, Daniel; Conley, Andrew; Bardeen, Charles; Gettelman, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Accurate representation of global stratospheric aerosols from volcanic and non-volcanic sulfur emissions is key to understanding the cooling effects and ozone-losses that may be linked to volcanic activity. Attribution of climate variability to volcanic activity is of particular interest in relation to the post-2000 slowing in the rate of global average temperature increases. We have compiled a database of volcanic SO2 emissions and plume altitudes for eruptions from 1990 to 2015, and developed a new prognostic capability for simulating stratospheric sulfate aerosols in the Community Earth System Model (CESM). We combined these with other non-volcanic emissions of sulfur sources to reconstruct global aerosol properties from 1990 to 2015. Our calculations show remarkable agreement with ground-based lidar observations of stratospheric aerosol optical depth (SAOD), and with in situ measurements of stratospheric aerosol surface area density (SAD). These properties are key parameters in calculating the radiative and chemical effects of stratospheric aerosols. Our SAOD calculations represent a clear improvement over available satellite-based analyses, which generally ignore aerosol extinction below 15 km, a region that can contain the vast majority of stratospheric aerosol extinction at mid- and high-latitudes. Our SAD calculations greatly improve on that provided for the Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative, which misses about 60% of the SAD measured in situ on average during both volcanically active and volcanically quiescent periods. The stark differences in SAOD and SAD compared to other data sets will have significant effects on calculations of the radiative forcing of climate and global stratospheric chemistry over the period 2005-2015. In light of these results, the impact of volcanic aerosols in reducing the rate of global average temperature increases since the year 2000 should be revisited. We have made our calculated aerosol properties from January 1990 to

  12. Controlled Atmosphere Electrospinning of Organic Nanofibers with Improved Light Emission and Waveguiding Properties

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Electrospinning in controlled nitrogen atmosphere is developed for the realization of active polymer nanofibers. Fibers electrospun under controlled atmospheric conditions are found to be smoother and more uniform than samples realized by conventional electrospinning processes performed in air. In addition, they exhibit peculiar composition, incorporating a greatly reduced oxygen content during manufacturing, which favors enhanced optical properties and increases emission quantum yield. Active waveguides with optical losses coefficients lowered by 10 times with respect to fibers spun in air are demonstrated through this method. These findings make the process very promising for the highly controlled production of active polymer nanostructures for photonics, electronics and sensing. PMID:26617419

  13. The Luminosity Evolution Over the Equitemporal Surfaces in the Prompt Emission of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, Carlo Luciano; Massucci, Francesco Alessandro; Ruffini, Remo

    Due to the ultrarelativistic velocity of the expanding "fireshell" (Lorentz gamma factor γ ~ 102-103), photons emitted at the same time from the fireshell surface do not reach the observer at the same arrival time. In interpreting Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) it is crucial to determine the properties of the EQuiTemporal Surfaces (EQTSs): the locus of points which are source of radiation reaching the observer at the same arrival time. In the current literature this analysis is performed only in the latest phases of the afterglow. Here we study the distribution of the GRB bolometric luminosity over the EQTSs, with special attention to the prompt emission phase. We analyze as well the temporal evolution of the EQTS apparent size in the sky. We use the analytic solutions of the equations of motion of the fireshell and the corresponding analytic expressions of the EQTSs which have been presented in recent works and which are valid for both the fully radiative and the adiabatic dynamics. We find the novel result that at the beginning of the prompt emission the most luminous regions of the EQTSs are the ones closest to the line of sight. On the contrary, in the late prompt emission and in the early afterglow phases the most luminous EQTS regions are the ones closest to the boundary of the visible region. This transition in the emitting region may lead to specific observational signatures, i.e. an anomalous spectral evolution, in the rising part or at the peak of the prompt emission. We find as well an expression for the apparent radius of the EQTS in the sky, valid in both the fully radiative and the adiabatic regimes. Such considerations are essential for the theoretical interpretation of the prompt emission phase of GRBs.

  14. Emissive and reflective properties of curved displays in relation to image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boher, Pierre; Leroux, Thierry; Bignon, Thibault; Collomb-Patton, Véronique; Blanc, Pierre; Sandré-Chardonnal, Etienne

    2016-03-01

    Different aspects of the characterization of curved displays are presented. The limit of validity of viewing angle measurements without angular distortion on such displays using goniometer or Fourier optics viewing angle instrument is given. If the condition cannot be fulfilled the measurement can be corrected using a general angular distortion formula as demonstrated experimentally using a Samsung Galaxy S6 edge phone display. The reflective properties of the display are characterized by measuring the spectral BRDF using a multispectral Fourier optics viewing angle system. The surface of a curved OLED TV has been measured. The BDRF patterns show a mirror like behavior with and additional strong diffraction along the pixels lines and columns that affect the quality of the display when observed with parasitic lighting. These diffraction effects are very common on OLED surfaces. We finally introduce a commercial ray tracing software that can use directly the measured emissive and reflective properties of the display to make realistic simulation under any lighting environment.

  15. Image properties of list mode likelihood reconstruction for a rectangular positron emission mammography with DOI measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jinyi; Klein, Gregory J.; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2000-10-01

    A positron emission mammography scanner is under development at our Laboratory. The tomograph has a rectangular geometry consisting of four banks of detector modules. For each detector, the system can measure the depth of interaction information inside the crystal. The rectangular geometry leads to irregular radial and angular sampling and spatially variant sensitivity that are different from conventional PET systems. Therefore, it is of importance to study the image properties of the reconstructions. We adapted the theoretical analysis that we had developed for conventional PET systems to the list mode likelihood reconstruction for this tomograph. The local impulse response and covariance of the reconstruction can be easily computed using FFT. These theoretical results are also used with computer observer models to compute the signal-to-noise ratio for lesion detection. The analysis reveals the spatially variant resolution and noise properties of the list mode likelihood reconstruction. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with Monte Carlo results.

  16. Morphology-dependent field emission properties and wetting behavior of ZnO nanowire arrays

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The fabrication of three kinds of ZnO nanowire arrays with different structural parameters over Au-coated silicon (100) by facile thermal evaporation of ZnS precursor is reported, and the growth mechanism are proposed based on structural analysis. Field emission (FE) properties and wetting behavior were revealed to be strongly morphology dependent. The nanowire arrays in small diameter and high aspect ratio exhibited the best FE performance showing a low turn-on field (4.1 V/μm) and a high field-enhancement factor (1745.8). The result also confirmed that keeping large air within the films was an effective way to obtain super water-repellent properties. This study indicates that the preparation of ZnO nanowire arrays in an optimum structural model is crucial to FE efficiency and wetting behavior. PMID:21711609

  17. Study of GRB Light-curve Decay Indices in the Afterglow Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Vecchio, Roberta; Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Ostrowski, Michał

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we study the distribution of temporal power-law decay indices, α, in the gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow phase, fitted for 176 GRBs (139 long GRBs, 12 short GRBs with extended emission, and 25 X-ray flashes) with known redshifts. These indices are compared with the temporal decay index, α W , derived with the light-curve fitting using the Willingale et al. model. This model fitting yields similar distributions of α W to the fitted α, but for individual bursts a difference can be significant. Analysis of (α, L a ) distribution, where L a is the characteristic luminosity at the end of the plateau, reveals only a weak correlation of these quantities. However, we discovered a significant regular trend when studying GRB α values along the Dainotti et al. correlation between L a and the end time of the plateau emission in the rest frame, {T}a* , hereafter LT correlation. We note a systematic variation of the α parameter distribution with luminosity for any selected {T}a* . We analyze this systematics with respect to the fitted LT correlation line, expecting that the presented trend may allow us to constrain the GRB physical models. We also attempted to use the derived correlation of α ({T}a) versus {L}a({T}a) to diminish the luminosity scatter related to the variations of α along the LT distribution, a step forward in the effort of standardizing GRBs. A proposed toy model accounting for this systematics applied to the analyzed GRB distribution results in a slight increase of the LT correlation coefficient.

  18. Effect of the local morphology in the field emission properties of conducting polymer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Assis, T. A.; Benito, R. M.; Losada, J. C.; Andrade, R. F. S.; Miranda, J. G. V.; de Souza, Nara C.; de Castilho, C. M. C.; Mota, F. de B.; Borondo, F.

    2013-07-01

    In this work, we present systematic theoretical evidence of a relationship between the point local roughness exponent (PLRE) (which quantifies the heterogeneity of an irregular surface) and the cold field emission properties (indicated by the local current density and the macroscopic current density) of real polyaniline (PANI) surfaces, considered nowadays as very good candidates in the design of field emission devices. The latter are obtained from atomic force microscopy data. The electric field and potential are calculated in a region bounded by the rough PANI surface and a distant plane, both boundaries held at distinct potential values. We numerically solve Laplace’s equation subject to appropriate Dirichlet’s condition. Our results show that local roughness reveals the presence of specific sharp emitting spots with a smooth geometry, which are the main ones responsible (but not the only) for the emission efficiency of such surfaces for larger deposition times. Moreover, we have found, with a proper choice of a scale interval encompassing the experimentally measurable average grain length, a highly structured dependence of local current density on PLRE, considering different ticks of PANI surfaces.

  19. Discrete resonance CARS emission from NO/sub 2/: Its temporal and spectral properties

    SciTech Connect

    McIlwain, M.E.; Hindman, J.C.

    1980-07-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes emission has been observed for resonance excitation of NO/sub 2/ within an optical pumping geometry similar to that employed for CARS spectroscopy. Spectra have been measured for excitation of NO/sub 2/ in three wavelength regions of its absorption: 585, 564, and 542 nm. These spectra have been used to investigate the four wave process which produces this emission and to determine the ro--vibronic contributions to the absorption of NO/sub 2/ at these wavelengths. Results from pressure quenching and time dependence studies indicate that a coherent level is produced which has a relatively long lifetime. The anti-Stokes emission has the same temporal properties as the Stokes pulse. This indicates that only the first pump photon is in resonance with an electronic transition. A comparison of these results with those expected for resonance Raman and discrete resonance Raman in particular indicates that the resonance CARS process can be interpreted by theoretical and phenomenological considerations developed to describe resonance Raman.

  20. Tuning Crystal Phase and Emission Properties of Upconversion Nanocrystals Through Lanthanide Doping.

    PubMed

    Luo, L; Liu, H B; Yao, L L; Dong, G S; Zhang, W; Wang, Y H; Qiu, Z R; Chen, J

    2016-01-01

    Infrared-to-visible upconversion fluorescent nanocrystals of Yb³⁺/Er³⁺-codoped NaYF₄ and Yb³⁺/Er³⁺/Gd³⁺-tridoped NaYF₄ were synthesized using a modified coprecipitation process. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron diffraction scans of the nanocrystals confirmed that Gd³⁺ doping caused a phase transition to occur in the nanocrystals, changing them from a cubic to a hexagonal phase. Hexagonal phase Yb³⁺/Er³⁺/Gd³⁺-tridoped NaYF₄ nanocrystals displayed much stronger and sharper upconversion luminescence, and larger intensity ratios of red over green emissions relative to their cubic phase counterparts. The influence of the crystal phase on the upconversion emission properties was explored by use of excitation power dependence curves, dynamic fluorescence and Raman spectra. The results suggest that the cubic-to-hexagonal phase transition decreases the crystal field symmetry, and then enhances upconversion luminescence intensity by relaxing forbidden selection rules. The conversion into the hexagonal phase also increases the number of phonon modes, and consequently improves the phonon-assisted energy transfer efficiency from Yb³⁺ to Er³⁺, thus facilitating the output of red emissions. PMID:27398498

  1. Emission energy, exciton dynamics and lasing properties of buckled CdS nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Sun, Liaoxin; Lu, Jian; Ren, Ming-Liang; Zhang, Tianning; Huang, Yan; Zhou, Xiaohao; Sun, Yan; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Changqing; Shen, Xuechu; Agarwal, Ritesh; Lu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We report the modulation of emission energy, exciton dynamics and lasing properties in a single buckled CdS nanoribbon (NR) by strain-engineering. Inspired by ordered structure fabrication on elastomeric polymer, we develop a new method to fabricate uniform buckled NRs supported on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Wavy structure, of which compressive and tensile strain periodically varied along the CdS NR, leads to a position-dependent emission energy shift as large as 14 nm in photoluminescence (PL) mapping. Both micro-PL and micro-reflectance reveal the spectral characteristics of broad emission of buckled NR, which can be understood by the discrepancy of strain-induced energy shift of A- and B-exciton of CdS. Furthermore, the dynamics of excitons under tensile strain are also investigated; we find that the B-exciton have much shorter lifetime than that of redshifted A-exciton. In addition, we also present the lasing of buckled CdS NRs, in which the strain-dominated mode selection in multi-mode laser and negligible mode shifts in single-mode laser are clearly observed. Our results show that the strained NRs may serve as new functional optical elements for flexible light emitter or on-chip all-optical devices. PMID:27210303

  2. Light absorption properties and radiative effects of primary organic aerosol emissions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zifeng; Streets, David G; Winijkul, Ekbordin; Yan, Fang; Chen, Yanju; Bond, Tami C; Feng, Yan; Dubey, Manvendra K; Liu, Shang; Pinto, Joseph P; Carmichael, Gregory R

    2015-04-21

    Organic aerosols (OAs) in the atmosphere affect Earth's energy budget by not only scattering but also absorbing solar radiation due to the presence of the so-called "brown carbon" (BrC) component. However, the absorptivities of OAs are not represented or are poorly represented in current climate and chemical transport models. In this study, we provide a method to constrain the BrC absorptivity at the emission inventory level using recent laboratory and field observations. We review available measurements of the light-absorbing primary OA (POA), and quantify the wavelength-dependent imaginary refractive indices (kOA, the fundamental optical parameter determining the particle's absorptivity) and their uncertainties for the bulk POA emitted from biomass/biofuel, lignite, propane, and oil combustion sources. In particular, we parametrize the kOA of biomass/biofuel combustion sources as a function of the black carbon (BC)-to-OA ratio, indicating that the absorptive properties of POA depend strongly on burning conditions. The derived fuel-type-based kOA profiles are incorporated into a global carbonaceous aerosol emission inventory, and the integrated kOA values of sectoral and total POA emissions are presented. Results of a simple radiative transfer model show that the POA absorptivity warms the atmosphere significantly and leads to ∼27% reduction in the amount of the net global average POA cooling compared to results from the nonabsorbing assumption. PMID:25811601

  3. Emission energy, exciton dynamics and lasing properties of buckled CdS nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Sun, Liaoxin; Lu, Jian; Ren, Ming-Liang; Zhang, Tianning; Huang, Yan; Zhou, Xiaohao; Sun, Yan; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Changqing; Shen, Xuechu; Agarwal, Ritesh; Lu, Wei

    2016-05-01

    We report the modulation of emission energy, exciton dynamics and lasing properties in a single buckled CdS nanoribbon (NR) by strain-engineering. Inspired by ordered structure fabrication on elastomeric polymer, we develop a new method to fabricate uniform buckled NRs supported on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Wavy structure, of which compressive and tensile strain periodically varied along the CdS NR, leads to a position-dependent emission energy shift as large as 14 nm in photoluminescence (PL) mapping. Both micro-PL and micro-reflectance reveal the spectral characteristics of broad emission of buckled NR, which can be understood by the discrepancy of strain-induced energy shift of A- and B-exciton of CdS. Furthermore, the dynamics of excitons under tensile strain are also investigated; we find that the B-exciton have much shorter lifetime than that of redshifted A-exciton. In addition, we also present the lasing of buckled CdS NRs, in which the strain-dominated mode selection in multi-mode laser and negligible mode shifts in single-mode laser are clearly observed. Our results show that the strained NRs may serve as new functional optical elements for flexible light emitter or on-chip all-optical devices.

  4. Emission energy, exciton dynamics and lasing properties of buckled CdS nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Sun, Liaoxin; Lu, Jian; Ren, Ming-Liang; Zhang, Tianning; Huang, Yan; Zhou, Xiaohao; Sun, Yan; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Changqing; Shen, Xuechu; Agarwal, Ritesh; Lu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We report the modulation of emission energy, exciton dynamics and lasing properties in a single buckled CdS nanoribbon (NR) by strain-engineering. Inspired by ordered structure fabrication on elastomeric polymer, we develop a new method to fabricate uniform buckled NRs supported on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Wavy structure, of which compressive and tensile strain periodically varied along the CdS NR, leads to a position-dependent emission energy shift as large as 14 nm in photoluminescence (PL) mapping. Both micro-PL and micro-reflectance reveal the spectral characteristics of broad emission of buckled NR, which can be understood by the discrepancy of strain-induced energy shift of A- and B-exciton of CdS. Furthermore, the dynamics of excitons under tensile strain are also investigated; we find that the B-exciton have much shorter lifetime than that of redshifted A-exciton. In addition, we also present the lasing of buckled CdS NRs, in which the strain-dominated mode selection in multi-mode laser and negligible mode shifts in single-mode laser are clearly observed. Our results show that the strained NRs may serve as new functional optical elements for flexible light emitter or on-chip all-optical devices. PMID:27210303

  5. Light absorption properties and radiative effects of primary organic aerosol emissions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zifeng; Streets, David G; Winijkul, Ekbordin; Yan, Fang; Chen, Yanju; Bond, Tami C; Feng, Yan; Dubey, Manvendra K; Liu, Shang; Pinto, Joseph P; Carmichael, Gregory R

    2015-04-21

    Organic aerosols (OAs) in the atmosphere affect Earth's energy budget by not only scattering but also absorbing solar radiation due to the presence of the so-called "brown carbon" (BrC) component. However, the absorptivities of OAs are not represented or are poorly represented in current climate and chemical transport models. In this study, we provide a method to constrain the BrC absorptivity at the emission inventory level using recent laboratory and field observations. We review available measurements of the light-absorbing primary OA (POA), and quantify the wavelength-dependent imaginary refractive indices (kOA, the fundamental optical parameter determining the particle's absorptivity) and their uncertainties for the bulk POA emitted from biomass/biofuel, lignite, propane, and oil combustion sources. In particular, we parametrize the kOA of biomass/biofuel combustion sources as a function of the black carbon (BC)-to-OA ratio, indicating that the absorptive properties of POA depend strongly on burning conditions. The derived fuel-type-based kOA profiles are incorporated into a global carbonaceous aerosol emission inventory, and the integrated kOA values of sectoral and total POA emissions are presented. Results of a simple radiative transfer model show that the POA absorptivity warms the atmosphere significantly and leads to ∼27% reduction in the amount of the net global average POA cooling compared to results from the nonabsorbing assumption.

  6. Quantifying the impact of AGN and nebular emission on stellar population properties with REBETIKO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, L. S. M.; Gomes, J. M.; Papaderos, P.

    2016-06-01

    Spectral synthesis enables the reconstruction of the star formation and chemical evolution histories (SFH & CEH) of a galaxy that are encoded in its spectral energy distribution (SED). Most state-of-the-art population synthesis codes however consider only purely stellar emission and are hence inadequate for modelling studies of galaxies where non-stellar emission components contribute significantly to the SED. This work combines evolutionary and population synthesis techniques to quantify the impact of active galactic nucleus (AGN) and nebular emission on the determination of the stellar population properties in galaxies. We have developed an evolutionary synthesis code called REBETIKO - Reckoning galaxy Emission By means of Evolutionary Tasks with Input Key Observables - to compute and study the time evolution of the SED of AGN-hosts and starburst galaxies. Our code takes into account the main ingredients of a galaxy's SED (e.g. non-thermal emission and/or nebular continuum and lines) for various commonly used parameterizations of the SFH, such as instantaneous burst, constant, exponentially decreasing, and gradually increasing peaking at a redshift between 1-10. Synthetic SEDs computed with REBETIKO have been subsequently fitted with the STARLIGHT population synthesis code (PSC) which can be regarded as representative for currently available state-of-the-art (i.e. purely stellar) PSCs. The objective is to study the impact of non-stellar SED components on the recovery of the true total stellar mass M_{star} and SFH of a galaxy, as well as other evolutionary properties, such as CEH and light- and mass-weighted mean stellar age and metallicity. We find that purely stellar fits in galaxies with a strong non-stellar continuum (e.g. Seyfert and/or starburst galaxies) can for instance overestimate M_{star} by up to 3 orders of magnitude, while the mean stellar age and metallicity can deviate from their true values up to 2 and 4 dex, respectively. These results imply

  7. Properties of Galaxies Detected in Emission and Absorption with Background Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straka, Lorrie Ann

    The question of how galaxies evolve is a difficult one to answer. By studying galaxies hosting Damped (DLA) and sub-Damped Lyman-alpha (sub-DLA) systems, we hope to shed some light on the subject. DLA and sub-DLA systems contain the vast majority of neutral gas in the universe, making them ideal candidates for studies of primordial gas. However, it is unclear how these absorption systems relate to present day galaxies. Observations of these systems detected through absorption in background quasar spectra indicate the DLAs are metal poor and slowly evolving while their counterparts, the sub-DLAs, are highly enriched. In order to determine the relationship between galaxies detected in absorption and normal galaxies, we compile a sample of low redshift quasar galaxy pairs (QGP) detected in emission in quasar spectra. These emission detected galaxies are searched for absorption features that may indicate a connection to higher redshift galaxy absorption systems, including DLAs and sub-DLAs. While the roles of spectroscopy and imaging play equal parts in determining characteristics of these systems, focus here is placed on the broad-band imaging aspect, used to locate absorption host galaxies and determine their photometric properties. These properties can then be compared to the known properties of galaxies at other epochs. The role of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey has been paramount in this study. Presented here are two sets of data: high metallicity DLA and sub-DLA absorption systems at z > 0.4 and quasar-galaxy pairs selected in emission from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey at z < 0.4. Results show that the z < 0.4 sample has low star formation rate values and a high degree of reddening which is in good agreement with higher redshift samples of quasar absorbers and our z > 0.4 sample of DLAs and sub-DLAs. Morphologically, those galaxies selected by emission naturally tend to be late-type, while our sample of DLAs and sub-DLAs appears to be primarily early-type.

  8. Scintillation properties of undoped CdS for ionizing radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagida, Takayuki; Koshimizu, Masanori; Okada, Go

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, nondoped CdS crystal with a size of 5 × 5 × 0.5 mm3 was investigated on the optical and scintillation properties. The optical transmittance was 70% at wavelength longer than 500 nm, and the absorption edge was around 490 nm. The photoluminescence emission peak appeared around 490 nm under 340 nm excitation with 6.6 ns fast decay time. In X-ray induced radioluminescence spectrum over the temperature range of 7-300 K, it showed four emission bands around 490, 500-540 with several peaks, 600, and 750 nm. Temperature dependences of each emission band were different. The scintillation decay time was reproduced by two exponential decay components of 8 and 67 ns, and that for X-ray induced afterglow was approximately 0.1% at 20 ms after switching of the X-ray irradiation.

  9. Nonthermal emission properties of the northwestern rim of supernova remnant RX J0852.0-4622

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishishita, T.; Hiraga, J.; Uchiyama, Y.

    2013-03-01

    The supernova remnant (SNR) RX J0852.0-4622 (Vela Jr., G266.6-1.2) is one of the most important SNRs for investigating the acceleration of multi-TeV particles and the origin of Galactic cosmic rays because of its strong synchrotron X-ray and TeV γ-ray emission, which show a shell-like morphology similar to each other. Using the XMM-Newton archival data consisting of multiple pointing observations of the northwestern rim of the remnant, we investigate the spatial properties of the nonthermal X-ray emission as a function of distance from an outer shock wave. All X-ray spectra are well reproduced by an absorbed power-law model above 2 keV. It is found that the spectra show gradual softening from a photon index Γ = 2.56 in the rim region to Γ = 2.96 in the interior region. We show that this radial profile can be interpreted as a gradual decrease of the cutoff energy of the electron spectrum due to synchrotron cooling. By using a simple spectral evolution model that includes continuous synchrotron losses, the spectral softening can be reproduced with the magnetic field strength in the post-shock flow to less than several tens of μG. If this is a typical magnetic field in the SNR shell, γ-ray emission would be accounted for by inverse Compton scattering of high-energy electrons that also produce the synchrotron X-ray emission. Future hard X-ray imaging observations with Nustar and ASTRO-H and TeV γ-ray observations with the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) will allow us to explore other possible explanations of the systematic softening of the X-ray spectra.

  10. Physical Properties of the Magellanic Bridge Tidal Remnant through Mapped Hα, [SII], and [NII] Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, Kathleen; Haffner, L. Matthew

    2016-01-01

    We present the first kinematically resolved [S II] λ6716 and [N II] λ6583 emission maps of the entire Magellanic Bridge that were observed with the Wisconsin Hα Mapper Telescope. Combining these maps with the complementary Hα maps of Barger et al. (2013), we explore the temperature, sulfur and nitrogen ionization state, and sources of the ionization of the warm-ionized gas in the Magellanic Bridge, the SMC-Tail, and the LMC-Bridge interface region. Within the Magellanic Bridge, we find that the low velocity (+100 to +200 km s-1 ) and the high velocity (+200 to +300 km s-1 ) gas have different properties, suggesting that it is composed of at least two separate and coherent filaments. Within the high-velocity filament, a high-velocity ridge of gas—with different properties from the high-velocity structure—extends along the high-latitude edge of the Hα SMC-Tail to low latitude edge LMC-Bridge interface. This ridge coincides with a strip of early-type stars, suggesting that these stars are influencing this gas. We further find that the properties of both the SMC-Tail and LMC-Bridge interface regions have similar properties and therefore are likely affected by similar ionization sources.

  11. On the Afterglow and Host Galaxy of GRB 021004: A Comprehensive Study with the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fynbo, J. P. U.; Gorosabel, J.; Smette, A.; Fruchter, A.; Hjorth, J.; Pedersen, K.; Levan, A.; Burud, I.; Sahu, K.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Bergeron, E.; Kouveliotou, C.; Tanvir, N.; Thorsett, S. E.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Castro Cerón, J. M.; Castro-Tirado, A.; Garnavich, P.; Holland, S. T.; Jakobsson, P.; Møller, P.; Nugent, P.; Pian, E.; Rhoads, J.; Thomsen, B.; Watson, D.; Woosley, S.

    2005-11-01

    We report on Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the late-time afterglow and host galaxy of GRB 021004 (z=2.33). Although this gamma-ray burst (GRB) is one of the best observed so far in terms of sampling in the time domain, multiwavelength coverage, and polarimetric observations, there is substantial disagreement between different interpretations of data sets on this burst in the literature. We have observed the field of GRB 021004 with the HST at multiple epochs from 3 days until almost 10 months after the burst. With the STIS PRISM and G430L spectroscopy, we cover the spectral region from about 2000 to 5700 Å, corresponding to 600-1700 Å in the rest frame. From the limit on the flux recovery blueward of the Lyman limit, we constrain the H I column density to be above 1×1018 cm-2 (5 σ). On the basis of ACS and NICMOS imaging, we find that the afterglow evolved achromatically within the errors (any variation must be less than 5%) during the period of the HST observations. The color changes observed by other authors during the first 4 days must be related to a stochastic phenomenon superimposed on an afterglow component with a constant spectral shape. This achromaticity implies that the cooling break has remained on the blue side of the optical part of the spectrum for at least 2 weeks after the explosion. The optical-to-X-ray slope βOX is consistent with being the same at 1.4 and 52.4 days after the burst. This indicates that the cooling frequency is constant and, hence, according to fireball models, that the circumburst medium has a constant density profile. The late-time slope of the light curve (α2, Fν~t-α2) is in the range α2=1.8-1.9 and is inconsistent with a single power law. This could be due to a late-time flattening caused by the transition to nonrelativistic expansion or could be due to excess emission (a ``bump'' in the light curve) about 7 days after the burst. The host galaxy is, like most previously studied GRB hosts, a (very) blue

  12. DIVERSITY OF SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS FROM COMPACT BINARY MERGERS HOSTING PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Cole; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; De Colle, Fabio; Montes, Gabriela

    2014-07-20

    Short-duration gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs) are widely believed to result from the mergers of compact binaries. This model predicts an afterglow that bears the characteristic signatures of a constant, low-density medium, including a smooth prompt-afterglow transition, and a simple temporal evolution. However, these expectations are in conflict with observations for a non-negligible fraction of sGRB afterglows. In particular, the onset of the afterglow phase for some of these events appears to be delayed and, in addition, a few of them exhibit late-time rapid fading in their light curves. We show that these peculiar observations can be explained independently of ongoing central engine activity if some sGRB progenitors are compact binaries hosting at least one pulsar. The Poynting flux emanating from the pulsar companion can excavate a bow-shock cavity surrounding the binary. If this cavity is larger than the shock deceleration length scale in the undisturbed interstellar medium, then the onset of the afterglow will be delayed. Should the deceleration occur entirely within the swept-up thin shell, a rapid fade in the light curve will ensue. We identify two types of pulsar that can achieve the conditions necessary for altering the afterglow: low-field, long-lived pulsars, and high-field pulsars. We find that a sizable fraction (≈20%-50%) of low-field pulsars are likely to reside in neutron star binaries based on observations, while their high-field counterparts are not. Hydrodynamical calculations motivated by this model are shown to be in good agreement with observations of sGRB afterglow light curves.

  13. The afterglow and the host galaxy of GRB 011211

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsson, P.; Hjorth, J.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Gorosabel, J.; Pedersen, K.; Burud, I.; Levan, A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Tanvir, N.; Fruchter, A.; Rhoads, J.; Grav, T.; Hansen, M. W.; Michelsen, R.; Andersen, M. I.; Jensen, B. L.; Pedersen, H.; Thomsen, B.; Weidinger, M.; Bhargavi, S. G.; Cowsik, R.; Pandey, S. B.

    2003-09-01

    We present optical, near-infrared, and X-ray observations of the optical afterglow (OA) of the X-ray rich, long-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 011211. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data obtained 14, 26, 32, and 59 days after the burst, show the host galaxy to have a morphology that is fairly typical of blue galaxies at high redshift. We measure its magnitude to be R = 24.95 +/- 0.11. We detect a break in the OA R-band light curve which is naturally accounted for by a collimated outflow geometry. By fitting a broken power-law to the data we find a best fit with a break 1.56 +/- 0.02 days after the burst, a pre-break slope of alpha1 = -0.95 +/- 0.02, and a post-break slope of alpha2 = -2.11 +/- 0.07. The UV-optical spectral energy distribution (SED) around 14 hours after the burst is best fit with a power-law with index beta = -0.56 +/- 0.19 reddened by an SMC-like extinction law with a modest AV = 0.08 +/- 0.08 mag. By comparison, from the XMM-Newton X-ray data at around the same time, we find a decay index of alphaX = -1.62 +/- 0.36 and a spectral index of betaX = -1.21+0.10-0.15. Interpolating between the UV-optical and X-ray implies that the cooling frequency is located close to ~ 1016 Hz in the observer frame at the time of the observations. We argue, using the various temporal and spectral indices above, that the most likely afterglow model is that of a jet expanding into an external environment that has a constant mean density rather than a wind-fed density structure. We estimate the electron energy index for this burst to be p ~ 2.3. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the Paranal Observatory by GRACE under programme ID 69.D-0701. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the

  14. Emission properties of oxyluciferin and its derivatives in water: revealing the nature of the emissive species in firefly bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Ghose, Avisek; Rebarz, Mateusz; Maltsev, Oleg V; Hintermann, Lukas; Ruckebusch, Cyril; Fron, Eduard; Hofkens, Johan; Mély, Yves; Naumov, Panče; Sliwa, Michel; Didier, Pascal

    2015-02-12

    The first systematic steady-state and time-resolved emission study of firefly oxyluciferin (emitter in firefly bioluminescence) and its analogues in aqueous buffers provided the individual emission spectra of all chemical forms of the emitter and the excited-state equilibrium constants in strongly polar environment with strong hydrogen bonding potential. The results confirmed the earlier hypothesis that excited-state proton transfer from the enol group is favored over proton transfer from the phenol group. In water, the phenol-keto form is the strongest photoacid among the isomers and its conjugate base (phenolate-keto) has the lowest emission energy (634 nm). Furthermore, for the first time we observed green emission (525 nm) from a neutral phenol-keto isomer constrained to the keto form by cyclopropyl substitution. The order of emission energies indicates that in aqueous solution a second deprotonation at the phenol group after the enol group had dissociated (that is, deprotonation of the phenol-enolate) does not occur in the first excited state. The pH-dependent emission spectra and the time-resolved fluorescence parameters revealed that the keto-enol tautomerism reaction, which can occur in a nonpolar environment (toluene) in the presence of a base, is not favored in water. PMID:25364813

  15. Emission properties of oxyluciferin and its derivatives in water: revealing the nature of the emissive species in firefly bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Ghose, Avisek; Rebarz, Mateusz; Maltsev, Oleg V; Hintermann, Lukas; Ruckebusch, Cyril; Fron, Eduard; Hofkens, Johan; Mély, Yves; Naumov, Panče; Sliwa, Michel; Didier, Pascal

    2015-02-12

    The first systematic steady-state and time-resolved emission study of firefly oxyluciferin (emitter in firefly bioluminescence) and its analogues in aqueous buffers provided the individual emission spectra of all chemical forms of the emitter and the excited-state equilibrium constants in strongly polar environment with strong hydrogen bonding potential. The results confirmed the earlier hypothesis that excited-state proton transfer from the enol group is favored over proton transfer from the phenol group. In water, the phenol-keto form is the strongest photoacid among the isomers and its conjugate base (phenolate-keto) has the lowest emission energy (634 nm). Furthermore, for the first time we observed green emission (525 nm) from a neutral phenol-keto isomer constrained to the keto form by cyclopropyl substitution. The order of emission energies indicates that in aqueous solution a second deprotonation at the phenol group after the enol group had dissociated (that is, deprotonation of the phenol-enolate) does not occur in the first excited state. The pH-dependent emission spectra and the time-resolved fluorescence parameters revealed that the keto-enol tautomerism reaction, which can occur in a nonpolar environment (toluene) in the presence of a base, is not favored in water.

  16. Electron Emission Properties of Insulator Materials Pertinent to the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, C. D.; Zavyalov, V.; Dennison, J. R.; Corbridge, Jodie

    2004-01-01

    We present the results of our measurements of the electron emission properties of selected insulating and conducting materials used on the International Space Station (ISS). Utah State University (USU) has performed measurements of the electron-, ion-, and photon-induced electron emission properties of conductors for a few years, and has recently extended our capabilities to measure electron yields of insulators, allowing us to significantly expand current spacecraft material charging databases. These ISS materials data are used here to illustrate our various insulator measurement techniques that include: i) Studies of electron-induced secondary and backscattered electron yield curves using pulsed, low current electron beams to minimize deleterious affects of insulator charging. ii) Comparison of several methods used to determine the insulator 1st and 2nd crossover energies. These incident electron energies induce unity total yield at the transition between yields greater than and less than one with either negative or positive charging, respectively. The crossover energies are very important in determining both the polarity and magnitude of spacecraft surface potentials. iii) Evolution of electron emission energy spectra as a function of insulator charging used to determine the surface potential of insulators. iv) Surface potential evolution as a function of pulsed-electron fluence to determine how quickly insulators charge, and how this can affect subsequent electron yields. v) Critical incident electron energies resulting in electrical breakdown of insulator materials and the effect of breakdown on subsequent emission, charging and conduction. vi) Charge-neutralization techniques such as low-energy electron flooding and UV light irradiation to dissipate both positive and negative surface potentials during yield measurements. Specific ISS materials being tested at USU include chromic and sulfuric anodized aluminum, RTV-silicone solar array adhesives, solar cell

  17. Correlation of structure and solid state emission properties of anionic copper(I) halide complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurtaeva, Aliya Kamidollovna

    The correlation of emission properties with structural characteristics of solid state copper (I) halide complexes, supported by ab initio calculations, has been the focus of this work. Twenty-four new anionic Cu (I)---iodide complexes with alkali and alkaline earth metals complexed crown ethers as cations have been synthesized and characterized by single crystal diffraction. The complexes belong to 4 different groups: (1) Cu2I 42-, (2) Cu4I6 2-, (3) polymeric CupIq-(q-p) species and (4) simple iodides. The first two groups emit at room temperature when excited in the ultraviolet. The wavelength of maximum emission varies with the symmetry elements present in the crystalline cluster. Four different Cu2I42-rhombs were seen: (1) flat with a center of symmetry---452--453 nm; (2) bent---675 nm (640 nm---shoulder); (3) 2/m symmetry---479 nm and (4) a mixture of flat and bent---474--478 (with long wavelength tail). Ab initio calculations identified the electronic transition, responsible for excitation of the centrosymmetric cluster Cu2I4 2- to be: 26 (Au) → 29 or 31 (Ag) followed by reemission to the ground state. For the bent cluster the corresponding electron transition are HOMO (26) → LUMO (27) for excitation and HOMO (26) → LUMO (27) for emission. The energy gap between these neighboring orbitals is smaller than that for complexes of type I, which explains the relative position of bands in luminescence spectra. Mixed complexes (type 4), containing both types of Cu2I42- units, possess an asymmetrical emission band comprised of both type 1 and type 2 bands. Three hexaiodotetracuprates(I), emitting at 519--524 nm, possess a crystallographic center of symmetry in the center of disordered cluster. While the disorder results in centrosymmetric species, the emitting tetrahedron Cu4I6 is not centrosymmetric. There are no forbidden transitions for this motif. Nine polymeric species (Cu2I3-, Cu 4I6-2 and Cu5I7 -2) are non-emitting at both ambient and low temperature

  18. Physical properties of particulate matter from animal houses-empirical studies to improve emission modelling.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Ehab; Nannen, Christoph; Henseler, Jessica; Diekmann, Bernd; Gates, Richard; Buescher, Wolfgang

    2016-06-01

    Maintaining and preserving the environment from pollutants are of utmost importance. Particulate matter (PM) is considered one of the main air pollutants. In addition to the harmful effects of PM in the environment, it has also a negative indoor impact on human and animal health. The specific forms of damage of particulate emission from livestock buildings depend on its physical properties. The physical properties of particulates from livestock facilities are largely unknown. Most studies assume the livestock particles to be spherical with a constant density which can result in biased estimations, leading to inaccurate results and errors in the calculation of particle mass concentration in livestock buildings. The physical properties of PM, including difference in density as a function of particle size and shape, can have a significant impact on the predictions of particles' behaviour. The aim of this research was to characterize the physical properties of PM from different animal houses and consequently determine PM mass concentration. The mean densities of collected PM from laying hens, dairy cows and pig barns were 1450, 1520 and 2030 kg m(-3), respectively, whilst the mass factors were 2.17 × 10(-3), 2.18 × 10(-3) and 5.36 × 10(-3) μm, respectively. The highest mass concentration was observed in pig barns generally followed by laying hen barns, and the lowest concentration was in dairy cow buildings. Results are presented in such a way that they can be used in subsequent research for simulation purposes and to form the basis for a data set of PM physical properties. PMID:26976010

  19. Physical properties of particulate matter from animal houses-empirical studies to improve emission modelling.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Ehab; Nannen, Christoph; Henseler, Jessica; Diekmann, Bernd; Gates, Richard; Buescher, Wolfgang

    2016-06-01

    Maintaining and preserving the environment from pollutants are of utmost importance. Particulate matter (PM) is considered one of the main air pollutants. In addition to the harmful effects of PM in the environment, it has also a negative indoor impact on human and animal health. The specific forms of damage of particulate emission from livestock buildings depend on its physical properties. The physical properties of particulates from livestock facilities are largely unknown. Most studies assume the livestock particles to be spherical with a constant density which can result in biased estimations, leading to inaccurate results and errors in the calculation of particle mass concentration in livestock buildings. The physical properties of PM, including difference in density as a function of particle size and shape, can have a significant impact on the predictions of particles' behaviour. The aim of this research was to characterize the physical properties of PM from different animal houses and consequently determine PM mass concentration. The mean densities of collected PM from laying hens, dairy cows and pig barns were 1450, 1520 and 2030 kg m(-3), respectively, whilst the mass factors were 2.17 × 10(-3), 2.18 × 10(-3) and 5.36 × 10(-3) μm, respectively. The highest mass concentration was observed in pig barns generally followed by laying hen barns, and the lowest concentration was in dairy cow buildings. Results are presented in such a way that they can be used in subsequent research for simulation purposes and to form the basis for a data set of PM physical properties.

  20. Morphology and Optical Properties of Black-Carbon Particles Relevant to Engine Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelsen, H. A.; Bambha, R.; Dansson, M. A.; Schrader, P. E.

    2013-12-01

    Black-carbon particles are believed to have a large influence on climate through direct radiative forcing, reduction of surface albedo of snow and ice in the cryosphere, and interaction with clouds. The optical properties and morphology of atmospheric particles containing black carbon are uncertain, and characterization of black carbon resulting from engines emissions is needed. Refractory black-carbon particles found in the atmosphere are often coated with unburned fuel, sulfuric acid, water, ash, and other combustion by-products and atmospheric constituents. Coatings can alter the optical and physical properties of the particles and therefore change their optical properties and cloud interactions. Details of particle morphology and coating state can also have important effects on the interpretation of optical diagnostics. A more complete understanding of how coatings affect extinction, absorption, and incandescence measurements is needed before these techniques can be applied reliably to a wide range of particles. We have investigated the effects of coatings on the optical and physical properties of combustion-generated black-carbon particles using a range of standard particle diagnostics, extinction, and time-resolved laser-induced incandescence (LII) measurements. Particles were generated in a co-flow diffusion flame, extracted, cooled, and coated with oleic acid. The diffusion flame produces highly dendritic soot aggregates with similar properties to those produced in diesel engines, diffusion flames, and most natural combustion processes. A thermodenuder was used to remove the coating. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) was used to monitor aggregate sizes; a centrifugal particle mass analyzer (CPMA) was used to measure coating mass fractions, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to characterize particle morphologies. The results demonstrate important differences in optical measurements between coated and uncoated particles.

  1. Modeling Extragalactic Extinction through Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zonca, Alberto; Cecchi-Pestellini, Cesare; Mulas, Giacomo; Casu, Silvia; Aresu, Giambattista

    2016-09-01

    We analyze extragalactic extinction profiles derived through gamma-ray burst afterglows, using a dust model specifically constructed on the assumption that dust grains are not immutable but respond, time-dependently, to the local physics. Such a model includes core-mantle spherical particles of mixed chemical composition (silicate core, sp2, and sp3 carbonaceous layers), and an additional molecular component in the form of free-flying polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. We fit most of the observed extinction profiles. Failures occur for lines of sight, presenting remarkable rises blueward of the bump. We find a tendency for the carbon chemical structure to become more aliphatic with the galactic activity, and to some extent with increasing redshifts. Moreover, the contribution of the molecular component to the total extinction is more important in younger objects. The results of the fitting procedure (either successes and failures) may be naturally interpreted through an evolutionary prescription based on the carbon cycle in the interstellar medium of galaxies.

  2. Mapping the subcellular mechanical properties of live cells in tissues with fluorescence emission-Brillouin imaging.

    PubMed

    Elsayad, Kareem; Werner, Stephanie; Gallemí, Marçal; Kong, Jixiang; Sánchez Guajardo, Edmundo R; Zhang, Lijuan; Jaillais, Yvon; Greb, Thomas; Belkhadir, Youssef

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrices (ECMs) are central to the advent of multicellular life, and their mechanical properties are modulated by and impinge on intracellular signaling pathways that regulate vital cellular functions. High spatial-resolution mapping of mechanical properties in live cells is, however, extremely challenging. Thus, our understanding of how signaling pathways process physiological signals to generate appropriate mechanical responses is limited. We introduce fluorescence emission-Brillouin scattering imaging (FBi), a method for the parallel and all-optical measurements of mechanical properties and fluorescence at the submicrometer scale in living organisms. Using FBi, we showed that changes in cellular hydrostatic pressure and cytoplasm viscoelasticity modulate the mechanical signatures of plant ECMs. We further established that the measured "stiffness" of plant ECMs is symmetrically patterned in hypocotyl cells undergoing directional growth. Finally, application of this method to Arabidopsis thaliana with photoreceptor mutants revealed that red and far-red light signals are essential modulators of ECM viscoelasticity. By mapping the viscoelastic signatures of a complex ECM, we provide proof of principle for the organism-wide applicability of FBi for measuring the mechanical outputs of intracellular signaling pathways. As such, our work has implications for investigations of mechanosignaling pathways and developmental biology. PMID:27382028

  3. Active species in N2 and N2-O2 afterglows for surface treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard, A.; Pointu, A. M.; Villeger, S.; Canal, C.

    2010-01-01

    Production of active species is studied in N2 and in N2-O2 afterglows of electrical discharges at low and atmospheric gas pressures. They are produced in microwave discharges in a large range of gas pressures from a few Torr to 100 Torr and in corona discharges at atmospheric gas pressure. The active species in N2 afterglows are the N-atoms which are in the range of a few percents in the afterglows. The effect of O2 molecules in low percentages in low pressure N2microwave plasmas and as impurity in corona N2 discharges is specially analysed. The interaction of N and O-atoms with surfaces is studied for bacteria decontamination and for transmission of N-atoms though porous membranes. The processes of bacteria decontamination in N2-O2 afterglows are described for low pressure microwave and atmospheric pressure corona discharges. Transmission of N-atoms through porous membranes is studied at medium pressure (10-100 Torr) microwave afterglows.

  4. Global Properties of X-Ray Flashes and X-Ray-Rich Gamma-Ray Bursts Observed by Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Takanori; Yamazaki, Ryo; Barthelmy, Scott; Gehrels, Neil; Osborne, Julian; Hullinger, Derek; Sato, Goro; Barbier, Louis; Cummings, Jay; Fenimore, Ed; Krimm, Hans; Lamb, Don; Markwardt, Craig; Palmer, David; Parsons, Ann; Stamatikos, Michael; Tueller, Jack

    Takanori Sakamoto, Taka.Sakamoto@nasa.gov NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, United States Ryo Yamazaki, ryo@theo.phys.sci.hiroshima-u.ac.jp Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Japan Scott Barthelmy, scott@milkyway.gsfc.nasa.gov NASA GSFC, Greenbelt, Maryland, United States Neil Gehrels, gehrels@milkyway.gsfc.nasa.gov NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, United States Julian Osborne, julo@star.le.ac.uk University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom Derek Hullinger, derek.hullinger@gmail.com Moxtek, Inc, Orem, Utah, United States Goro Sato, Goro.Sato@nasa.gov Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, United States Louis Barbier, lmb@milkyway.gsfc.nasa.gov Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, United States Jay Cummings, jayc@milkyway.gsfc.nasa.gov Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, United States Ed Fenimore, efenimore@lanl.gov Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, California, United States Hans Krimm, hans.krimm@nasa.gov Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, United States Don Lamb, d-lamb@uchicago.edu University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States Craig Markwardt, Craig.Markwardt@nasa.gov Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, United States David Palmer, palmer@lanl.gov Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, California, United States Ann Parsons, Ann.M.Parsons@nasa.gov Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, United States Michael Stamatikos, michael@milkyway.gsfc.nasa.gov Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, United States Jack Tueller, jack.tueller@nasa.gov Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, United States We present the spectral and temporal characteristics of the prompt emission and X-ray afterglow emission of X-ray flashes (XRFs) and X-ray-rich gamma-ray bursts (XRRs) detected and observed by Swift between December 2004 and September 2006. We compare these characteristics to a sample of conventional

  5. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes/Si nanowires core-sheath structure arrays and their field emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, M.; Li, M. K.; Zhang, Z. J.; Li, H. L.

    2003-09-01

    A new composite structure of carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/Si nanowires (SiNWs) arrays have been synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) within the pores of microporous alumina template. The results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microcopy (TEM) reveal that the obtained well-aligned composite structure has a core-sheath structure and the deposited material in the carbon sheath is polycrystalline silicon. Field emission from these CNTs-sheathed SiNWs exhibits significant enhancement compared to the pure SiNWs in turn-on field, total emission current and stability. The field emission characteristics of the composite structure are analyzed based on Fowler-Nordheim theory. The electron field emission increased with decreasing diameter of such structure. The well-aligned core-sheath structure provides an important means to fabricate emitter devices with chemically inert surface as well as with superior performance of field emission properties.

  6. Surface Plasmon Excitation and Emission Light Property for Otto/Kretschmann Configuration with MEH-PPV Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafuka, Megumi; Minagawa, Masahiro; Ohdaira, Yasuo; Baba, Akira; Shinbo, Kazunari; Kato, Keizo; Kaneko, Futao

    Attenuated total reflection (ATR) property utilizing surface plasmon (SP) excitation was investigated for BK-7 prism/MgF2/Ag film/fluorescent organic dye film structure. In the structure, it is expected that SPs are excited at MgF2/Ag and Ag/dye film interfaces by Otto and Kretschmann configurations, respectively. In the experimental ATR curve, reflection dips for the SP excitations at the interfaces could be detected. Furthermore, SP emission lights were observed by irradiation of Ar ion laser beam from the dye film side. The SP emission light curve with two peaks was observed and it was also considered that the peaks corresponded to the SP excitation of Otto and Kretschmann configurations. The SP emission light spectra indicated the excited fluorescent dyes induced the SP emission lights. Intense emission light of Otto configuration was observed in this sample.

  7. Shape controlled Sn doped ZnO nanostructures for tunable optical emission and transport properties

    SciTech Connect

    Rakshit, T.; Manna, I.; Ray, S. K.

    2013-11-15

    Pure and Sn doped ZnO nanostructures have been grown on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates by vapor-solid technique without using any catalysts. It has been found that the morphology of the nanostructures depend strongly on the growth temperature and doping concentration. By proper tuning of the growth temperature, morphology of pure ZnO can be changed from tetrapods to multipods. On the other hand, by varying the doping concentration of Sn in ZnO, the morphology can be tuned from tetrapods to flower-like multipods to nanowires. X-ray diffraction pattern reveals that the nanostructures have a preferred (0002) growth orientation, and they are tensile strained with the increase of Sn doping in ZnO. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence characteristics of these nanostructures have been investigated in the range from 10 to 300 K. Pure ZnO tetrapods exhibited less defect state emissions than that of pure ZnO multipods. The defect emission is reduced with low concentration of Sn doping, but again increases at higher concentration of doping because of increased defects. Transport properties of pure and Sn doped ZnO tetrapods have been studied using complex-plane impedance spectroscopy. The contribution from the arms and junctions of a tetrapod could be distinguished. Sn doped ZnO samples showed lower conductivity but higher relaxation time than that of pure ZnO tetrapods.

  8. Aqueous Phase Synthesis and Enhanced Field Emission Properties of ZnO-Sulfide Heterojunction Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guojing; Li, Zhengcao; Li, Mingyang; Chen, Chienhua; Lv, Shasha; Liao, Jiecui

    2016-07-01

    ZnO-CdS, ZnO-ZnS, and ZnO-Ag2S core-shell heterojunction structures were fabricated using low-temperature, facile and simple aqueous solution approaches. The polycrystalline sulfide shells effectively enhance the field emission (FE) properties of ZnO nanowires arrays (NWAs). This results from the formation of the staggered gap heterointerface (ZnO-sulfide) which could lead to an energy well at the interfaces. Hence, electrons can be collected when an electric field is applied. It is observed that ZnO-ZnS NWAs have the lowest turn-on field (3.0 Vμm-1), compared with ZnO-CdS NWAs (6.3 Vμm-1) and ZnO-Ag2S NWAs (5.0 Vμm-1). This may be associated with the pyramid-like ZnS shell which increases the number of emission nanotips. Moreover, the Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) plot displays a nonlinear relationship in the low and high electric field regions caused by the double well potential effect of the heterojunction structures.

  9. Recent progress in low-voltage cathodoluminescent materials: synthesis, improvement and emission properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Guogang; Lin, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays there are several technologies used for flat panel displays (FPDs) and the development of FPDs with enhanced energy efficiency and improved display quality is strongly required. Field emission displays (FEDs) have been considered as one of the most promising next generation flat panel display technologies due to their excellent display performance and low energy consumption. For the development of FEDs, phosphors are irreplaceable components. In the past decade, the study of highly efficient low-voltage cathodoluminescent materials, namely FED phosphors, has become the focus of enhancing energy efficiency and realizing high-quality displays. This review summaries the recent progress in the chemical synthesis and improvement of novel, rare-earth and transition metal ions activated inorganic cathodoluminescent materials in powder and thin film forms. The discussion is focused on the modification of morphology, size, surface, composition and conductivity of phosphors and the corresponding effects on their cathodoluminescent properties. Special emphases are given to the selection of host and luminescent centers, the adjustment of emission colors through doping concentration optimization, energy transfer and mono- or co-doping activator ions, the improvement of chromaticity, color stability and color gamut as well as the saturation behavior and the degradation behavior of phosphors under the excitation of a low-voltage electron beam. Finally, the research prospects and future directions of FED phosphors are discussed with recommendations to facilitate the further study of new and highly efficient low-voltage cathodoluminescent materials. PMID:24960634

  10. Enhanced field emission from lanthanum hexaboride coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes: Correlation with physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Rajkumar; Ghosh, S.; Sheremet, E.; Jha, Menaka; Rodriguez, R. D.; Lehmann, D.; Ganguli, A. K.; Schmidt, H.; Schulze, S.; Hietschold, M.; Zahn, D. R. T.; Schmidt, O. G.

    2014-10-01

    Detailed results from field emission studies of lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) coated multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) films, pristine LaB6 films, and pristine MWCNT films are reported. The films have been synthesized by a combination of chemical and physical deposition processes. An impressive increase in field enhancement factor and temporal stability as well as a reduction in turn-on field and threshold field are observed in LaB6-coated MWCNTs compared to pristine MWCNT and pristine LaB6 films. Surface morphology of the films has been examined by scanning electron microscopy. Introduction of LaB6 nanoparticles on the outer walls of CNTs LaB6-coated MWCNTs films is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The presence of LaB6 was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results and further validated by the Raman spectra. Raman spectroscopy also shows 67% increase in defect concentration in MWCNTs upon coating with LaB6 and an upshift in the 2D band that could be attributed to p-type doping. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy studies reveal a reduction in the work function of LaB6-coated MWCNT with respect to its pristine counterpart. The enhanced field emission properties in LaB6-coated MWCNT films are correlated with a change in microstructure and work function.

  11. Enhanced field emission from lanthanum hexaboride coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes: Correlation with physical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Patra, Rajkumar; Ghosh, S.; Sheremet, E.; Rodriguez, R. D.; Lehmann, D.; Zahn, D. R. T.; Jha, Menaka; Ganguli, A. K.; Schmidt, H.; Schulze, S.; Hietschold, M.; Schmidt, O. G.

    2014-10-28

    Detailed results from field emission studies of lanthanum hexaboride (LaB{sub 6}) coated multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) films, pristine LaB{sub 6} films, and pristine MWCNT films are reported. The films have been synthesized by a combination of chemical and physical deposition processes. An impressive increase in field enhancement factor and temporal stability as well as a reduction in turn-on field and threshold field are observed in LaB{sub 6}-coated MWCNTs compared to pristine MWCNT and pristine LaB{sub 6} films. Surface morphology of the films has been examined by scanning electron microscopy. Introduction of LaB{sub 6} nanoparticles on the outer walls of CNTs LaB{sub 6}-coated MWCNTs films is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The presence of LaB{sub 6} was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results and further validated by the Raman spectra. Raman spectroscopy also shows 67% increase in defect concentration in MWCNTs upon coating with LaB{sub 6} and an upshift in the 2D band that could be attributed to p-type doping. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy studies reveal a reduction in the work function of LaB{sub 6}-coated MWCNT with respect to its pristine counterpart. The enhanced field emission properties in LaB{sub 6}-coated MWCNT films are correlated with a change in microstructure and work function.

  12. Optically active substituted polyacetylene@carbon nanotube hybrids: Preparation, characterization and infrared emissivity property study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Xiaohai; Zhou, Yuming; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Yongjuan; Zhang, Zewu; He, Man

    2014-08-01

    Optically active substituted polyacetylene@multiwalled carbon nanotubes (SPA@MWCNTs) nanohybrids were fabricated by wrapping helical SPA copolymers onto the surface of modified nanotubes through ester bonding linkage. SPA copolymer based on chiral phenylalanine and serine was pre-polymerized by a rhodium zwitterion catalyst in THF, and evidently proved to possess strong optical activity and adopt a predominately one-handed helical conformation. Various characterizations including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated that the SPA had been covalently grafted onto the nanotubes without destroying their original graphite structure. The wrapped SPA was found to exhibit an enhancement in thermal stability and still maintained considerable optical activity after grafting. The infrared emissivity property of the nanohybrids at 8-14 μm was investigated in addition. The results indicated that the SPA@MWCNTs hybrid matrix could possess a much lower infrared emissivity value (ε=0.707) than raw MWCNTs, which might be due to synergistic effect of the unique helical conformation of optically active SPA and strengthened interfacial interaction between the organic polymers and inorganic nanoparticles.

  13. Aqueous Phase Synthesis and Enhanced Field Emission Properties of ZnO-Sulfide Heterojunction Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guojing; Li, Zhengcao; Li, Mingyang; Chen, Chienhua; Lv, Shasha; Liao, Jiecui

    2016-01-01

    ZnO-CdS, ZnO-ZnS, and ZnO-Ag2S core-shell heterojunction structures were fabricated using low-temperature, facile and simple aqueous solution approaches. The polycrystalline sulfide shells effectively enhance the field emission (FE) properties of ZnO nanowires arrays (NWAs). This results from the formation of the staggered gap heterointerface (ZnO-sulfide) which could lead to an energy well at the interfaces. Hence, electrons can be collected when an electric field is applied. It is observed that ZnO-ZnS NWAs have the lowest turn-on field (3.0 Vμm−1), compared with ZnO-CdS NWAs (6.3 Vμm−1) and ZnO-Ag2S NWAs (5.0 Vμm−1). This may be associated with the pyramid-like ZnS shell which increases the number of emission nanotips. Moreover, the Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) plot displays a nonlinear relationship in the low and high electric field regions caused by the double well potential effect of the heterojunction structures. PMID:27387653

  14. Enhanced field electron emission properties of hierarchically structured MWCNT-based cold cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, Loïck-Alexandre; Le Borgne, Vincent; Al Moussalami, Samir; El Khakani, My Ali

    2014-02-01

    Hierarchically structured MWCNT (h-MWCNT)-based cold cathodes were successfully achieved by means of a relatively simple and highly effective approach consisting of the appropriate combination of KOH-based pyramidal texturing of Si (100) substrates and PECVD growth of vertically aligned MWCNTs. By controlling the aspect ratio (AR) of the Si pyramids, we were able to tune the field electron emission (FEE) properties of the h-MWCNT cathodes. Indeed, when the AR is increased from 0 (flat Si) to 0.6, not only the emitted current density was found to increase exponentially, but more importantly its associated threshold field (TF) was reduced from 3.52 V/μm to reach a value as low as 1.95 V/μm. The analysis of the J- E emission curves in the light of the conventional Fowler-Nordheim model revealed the existence of two distinct low-field (LF) and high-field (HF) FEE regimes. In both regimes, the hierarchical structuring was found to increase significantly the associated β LF and β HF field enhancement factors of the h-MWCNT cathodes (by a factor of 1.7 and 2.2, respectively). Pyramidal texturing of the cathodes is believed to favor vacuum space charge effects, which could be invoked to account for the significant enhancement of the FEE, particularly in the HF regime where a β HF as high as 6,980 was obtained for the highest AR value of 0.6.

  15. Synthesis and field emission properties of different ZnO nanostructure arrays

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In this article, zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures of different shapes were fabricated on silicon substrate. Well-aligned and long ZnO nanowire (NW) arrays, as well as leaf-like ZnO nanostructures (which consist of modulated and single-phase structures), were fabricated by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method without the assistance of a catalyst. On the other hand, needle-like ZnO NW arrays were first fabricated with the CVD process followed by chemical etching of the NW arrays. The use of chemical etching provides a low-cost and convenient method of obtaining the needle-like arrays. In addition, the field emission properties of the different ZnO NW arrays were also investigated where some differences in the turn-on field and the field-enhancement factors were observed for the ZnO nanostructures of different lengths and shapes. It was experimentally observed that the leaf-like ZnO nanostructure is most suitable for field emission due to its lowest turn-on and threshold field as well as its high field-enhancement factor among the different synthesized nanostructures. PMID:22444723

  16. Recent progress in low-voltage cathodoluminescent materials: synthesis, improvement and emission properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Guogang; Lin, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays there are several technologies used for flat panel displays (FPDs) and the development of FPDs with enhanced energy efficiency and improved display quality is strongly required. Field emission displays (FEDs) have been considered as one of the most promising next generation flat panel display technologies due to their excellent display performance and low energy consumption. For the development of FEDs, phosphors are irreplaceable components. In the past decade, the study of highly efficient low-voltage cathodoluminescent materials, namely FED phosphors, has become the focus of enhancing energy efficiency and realizing high-quality displays. This review summaries the recent progress in the chemical synthesis and improvement of novel, rare-earth and transition metal ions activated inorganic cathodoluminescent materials in powder and thin film forms. The discussion is focused on the modification of morphology, size, surface, composition and conductivity of phosphors and the corresponding effects on their cathodoluminescent properties. Special emphases are given to the selection of host and luminescent centers, the adjustment of emission colors through doping concentration optimization, energy transfer and mono- or co-doping activator ions, the improvement of chromaticity, color stability and color gamut as well as the saturation behavior and the degradation behavior of phosphors under the excitation of a low-voltage electron beam. Finally, the research prospects and future directions of FED phosphors are discussed with recommendations to facilitate the further study of new and highly efficient low-voltage cathodoluminescent materials.

  17. An array of Eiffel-tower-shape AlN nanotips and its field emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yongbing; Cong, Hongtao; Chen, Zhigang; Cheng, Huiming

    2005-06-01

    An array of Eiffel-tower-shape AlN nanotips has been synthesized and assembled vertically with Si substrate by a chemical vapor deposition method at 700 °C. The single-crystalline AlN nanotips along [001] direction, including sharp tips with 10-100 nm in diameter and submicron-sized bases, are distributed uniformly with density of 106-107tips/cm2. Field emission (FE) measurements show that its turn on field is 4.7 V/μm, which is comparable to that of carbon nanotubes, and the fluctuation of FE current is as small as 0.74% for 4 h. It is revealed this nanostructure is available to optimize the FE properties and make the array a promising field emitter.

  18. Sputtering and secondary ion emission properties of alkali metal films and adsorbed monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, A R; Gruen, D M

    1980-01-01

    The secondary ion emission of alkali metal adsorbed monlayer and multilayer films has been studied. Profiling with sub-monolayer resolution has been performed by Auger, x-ray photoemission and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Characteristic differences in the sputtering yields, and ion fraction have been observed which are associated with both the surface bonding properties and the mechanism leading to the formation of secondary ions. By sputtering with a negative bias applied to the sample, positive secondary ions are returned to the surface, resulting in a reduced sputter-induced erosion rate. Comparison with the results obtained with K and Li overlayers sputtered without sample bias provides an experimental value of both the total and secondary ion sputtering yields. The first and second monolayers can be readily identified and the first monolayer exhibits a lower sputtering yield and higher secondary ion fraction. This result is related to adsorption theory and measured values are compared with those obtained by thermal desorption measurements.

  19. Naphthyl-functionalized oligophenyls: Photophysical properties, film morphology, and amplified spontaneous emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lin; Wu, Zhaoxin; Lei, Ting; Yu, Yue; Yuan, Fang; Jiao, Bo; Hou, Xun

    2016-04-01

    Herein, we reported a series of deep-blue-emitting naphthyl-functionalized oligophenyls as new organic laser active materials with tunable wavelength from 385 to 410 nm in solid state. Introduction of peripheral naphthyl into the oligophenyls enabled the great sterical dimensions due to the prominent steric hindrance but not destroyed the molecular conjugation. We assumed that it would suppress the π-π stacking efficiently, driving by intermolecular interaction, to hinder crystallization in solid films. Finally, the neat films of naphthyl-functionalized oligophenyls demonstrated amorphous state compared to the polycrystalline state of oligophenyls. Thus, naphthyl-functionalized oligophenyls displayed high emission quantum yield (22-35%) in solid state neat films. In addition, these molecules possessed large oscillator strength and radiative decay rate, as predicted by the theoretical analysis. The outstanding photophysical properties and amorphous films render naphthyl-functionalized oligophenyls a new class of optical gain media in solid state.

  20. Enhanced field emission properties from CNT arrays synthesized on Inconel superalloy.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, S; Ge, L; Tiwary, C S; Hart, A C; Ozden, S; Kalaga, K; Lei, S; Sridhar, S V; Sinha, R K; Harsh, H; Kordas, K; Ajayan, P M; Vajtai, R

    2014-02-12

    One of the most promising materials for fabricating cold cathodes for next generation high-performance flat panel devices is carbon nanotubes (CNTs). For this purpose, CNTs grown on metallic substrates are used to minimize contact resistance. In this report, we compare properties and field emission performance of CNTs grown via water assisted chemical vapor deposition using Inconel vs silicon (Si) substrates. Carbon nanotube forests grown on Inconel substrates are superior to the ones grown on silicon; low turn-on fields (∼1.5 V/μm), high current operation (∼100 mA/cm(2)) and very high local field amplification factors (up to ∼7300) were demonstrated, and these parameters are most beneficial for use in vacuum microelectronic applications. PMID:24417432

  1. Growth of single-crystalline cobalt silicide nanowires and their field emission property

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this work, cobalt silicide nanowires were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition processes on Si (100) substrates with anhydrous cobalt chloride (CoCl2) as precursors. Processing parameters, including the temperature of Si (100) substrates, the gas flow rate, and the pressure of reactions were varied and studied; additionally, the physical properties of the cobalt silicide nanowires were measured. It was found that single-crystal CoSi nanowires were grown at 850°C ~ 880°C and at a lower gas flow rate, while single-crystal Co2Si nanowires were grown at 880°C ~ 900°C. The crystal structure and growth direction were identified, and the growth mechanism was proposed as well. This study with field emission measurements demonstrates that CoSi nanowires are attractive choices for future applications in field emitters. PMID:23819795

  2. Charge transfer emission of T-shaped π-conjugated molecules: impact of quinoid character on the excited state properties.

    PubMed

    Inouchi, Toshifumi; Nakashima, Takuya; Kawai, Tsuyoshi

    2014-04-10

    We investigate the impact of quinoid character of a π-conjugation system on the emission properties of T-shaped cross-conjugated molecules. Three π-conjugated systems with different quinoid nature including benzothiophene, 2-phenylthiophene, and 2-phenylthieno[3,2-b]thiophene were connected orthogonally to a π-conjugated bis(phenylethynyl)arylene with an acid responsive N-methylbenzimidazole junction. The enhancement of quinoid character of a vertical π-system effectively suppressed the twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) emission, leading to a more planar ICT state with enhanced emission intensity as well as a shortened Stokes shift.

  3. Experimental Investigation of Charging Properties of Interstellar Type Silica Dust Grains by Secondary Electron Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tankosic, D.; Abbas, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    The dust charging by electron impact is an important dust charging processes in astrophysical and planetary environments. Incident low energy electrons are reflected or stick to the grains charging the dust grains negatively. At sufficiently high energies electrons penetrate the grains, leading to excitation and emission of electrons referred to as secondary electron emission (SEE). Available classical theoretical models for calculations of SEE yields are generally applicable for neutral, planar, or bulk surfaces. These models, however, are not valid for calculations of the electron impact charging properties of electrostatically charged micron/submicron-size dust grains in astrophysical environments. Rigorous quantum mechanical models are not yet available, and the SEE yields have to be determined experimentally for development of more accurate models for charging of individual dust grains. At the present time, very limited experimental data are available for charging of individual micron-size dust grains, particularly for low energy electron impact. The experimental results on individual, positively charged, micron-size lunar dust grains levitated carried out by us in a unique facility at NASA-MSFC, based on an electrodynamic balance, indicate that the SEE by electron impact is a complex process. The electron impact may lead to charging or discharging of dust grains depending upon the grain size, surface potential, electron energy, electron flux, grain composition, and configuration (Abbas et al, 2010, 2012). In this paper, we discuss SEE charging properties of individual micron-size silica microspheres that are believed to be analogs of a class of interstellar dust grains. The measurements indicate charging of the 0.2m silica particles when exposed to 25 eV electron beams and discharging when exposed to higher energy electron beams. Relatively large size silica particles (5.2-6.82m) generally discharge to lower equilibrium potentials at both electron energies

  4. Pulsed-Laser Deposited Amorphous Diamond and Related Materials: Synthesis, Characterization, and Field Emission Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, L.R.; Geohegan, D.B.; Jellison, G.E., Jr.; Lowndes, D.H.; Merkulov, V.I.; Puretzky, A.A.

    1999-01-23

    Amorphous carbon films with variable sp{sup 3} content were produced by ArF (193nm) pulsed laser deposition. An in-situ ion probe was used to measure kinetic energy of C{sup +} ions. In contrast to measurements made as a function of laser fluence, ion probe measurements of kinetic energy are a convenient as well as more accurate and fundamental method for monitoring deposition conditions, with the advantage of being readily transferable for inter-laboratory comparisons. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements reveal that tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films with the most diamond-like properties are obtained at the C ion kinetic energy of {approximately}90 eV. Film properties are uniform within a 12-15{degree} angle from the plume centerline. Tapping-mode atomic force microscope measurements show that films deposited at near-optimum kinetic energy are extremely smooth, with rms roughness of only {approximately} 1 {angstrom} over distances of several hundred nm. Field emission (FE) measurements show that ta-C does not appear to be a good electron emitter. After conditioning of ta-C films deposited on n-type Si a rather high turn-on voltage of {approximately}50 V/{micro}m was required to draw current of {approximately}1 nA to the probe. The emission was unstable and typically ceased after a few minutes of operation. The FE tests of ta-C and other materials strongly suggest that surface morphology plays a dominant role in the FE process, in agreement with conventional Fowler-Nordheim theory.

  5. Pulsed-laser-deposited amorphous diamond and related materials: synthesis, characterization, and field emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkulov, Vladimir I.; Lowndes, Douglas H.; Baylor, Larry R.; Jellison, Gerald E., Jr.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Geohegan, David B.

    1999-07-01

    Amorphous carbon films with variable sp3 content were produced by ArF pulsed laser deposition. An in-situ ion probe was used to measure kinetic energy of C+ ions. In contrast to measurements made as a function of laser fluence, ion probe measurements of kinetic energy are a convenient as well as more accurate and fundamental method for monitoring deposition conditions, with the advantage of being readily transferable for inter-laboratory comparisons. Electron energy loss spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurement reveal that tetrahedral amorphous carbon films with the most diamond-like properties are obtained at the C ion kinetic energy of approximately 90 eV. Film properties are uniform within a 12-15 degrees angle from the plume centerline. Tapping-mode atomic force microscope measurements show that films deposited at near- optimum kinetic energy are extremely smooth, with rms roughness of only approximately 1 angstrom over distances of several hundred nm. Field emission (FE) measurements show that ta-C does not appear to be a good electron emitter. After conditioning of ta-C films deposited on n-type Si a rather high turn-on voltage of approximately 50 V/micrometers was required to draw current of approximately 1 nA to the probe. The emission was unstable and typically ceased after a few minutes of operation. The FE tests of ta-C and other materials strongly suggest that surface morphology plays a dominant role in the FE process, in agreement with conventional Fowler-Nordheim theory.

  6. Emissivity and electrooptical properties of semiconducting quantum dots/rods and liquid crystal composites: a review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gautam; Fisch, Michael; Kumar, Satyendra

    2016-05-01

    Investigations of the mixtures of semiconducting quantum scale particles in anisotropic liquid crystal (LC) medium have become a vibrant area of research primarily due to their very interesting phenomenology. The results of these investigations fall into four groups: (i) Photoluminescent emissive properties of the quantum particles ordinarily depend on the size, shape, and chemical nature of the particles. These undergo important changes in their spectrum, polarization, and isotropy of emission when dissolved in an anisotropic LC phase. Moreover, their response to external stimuli such as mechanical, optical, or electric fields is altered in important ways; (ii) physical properties of LCs such as viscosity, dielectric relaxation, etc are modified by the addition of quantum particles. Their presence in ferroelectric smectic LC is known to give rise to an antiferro- to ferri-electric phase transition and suppresses the paraelectric phase; (iii) switching characteristics of LC devices are altered in important ways by the addition of quantum particles. Their threshold voltage is usually lowered, contrast ratio, and switching speed of nematic, ferroelectric, and cholesteric devices may increase or decrease depending on the concentration, applied field, and particle anisotropy; and (iv) controlled aggregation of quantum particles at the interface between isotropic and LC domains, near added polystyrene beads, and in the vicinity of point defects gives rise to interesting photonic structures, enables studies of photon antibunching and single photon sources. Clearly, there is a need to understand the basic and applied aspects of these systems and find routes to their technological applications including sensors, electrooptical devices, and solar energy harvesting. This review provides an overview of recent work involving liquid crystals and a variety of quantum particles. PMID:27088655

  7. Experimental Investigation of Charging Properties of Interstellar Type Silica Dust Grains by Secondary Electron Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tankosic, Dragana; Abbas, M. M.

    2013-06-01

    The dust charging by electron impact is an important dust charging process in astrophysical and planetary environments. Incident low energy electrons are reflected or stick to the grains charging the dust grains negatively. At sufficiently high energies electrons penetrate the grains, leading to excitation and emission of electrons referred to as secondary electron emission (SEE). Available classical theoretical models for calculations of SEE yields are generally applicable for neutral, planar, or bulk surfaces. However, these models are not valid for calculations of the electron impact charging properties of electrostatically charged micron/submicron-size dust grains in astrophysical environments. Rigorous quantum mechanical models are not yet available, and the SEE yields have to be determined experimentally for development of more accurate models for charging of individual dust grains. At the present time, very limited experimental data are available for charging of individual micron-size dust grains, particularly for low energy electron impact. Our laboratory measurements on individual, positively charged, micron-size dust grains levitated carried out in a unique facility at NASA-MSFC, based on an electrodynamic balance, indicate that the SEE by electron impact is a complex process. The electron impact may lead to charging or discharging of dust grains depending upon the grain size, surface potential, electron energy, electron flux, grain composition, and configuration (Abbas et al, 2010, 2012). In this paper, we discuss SEE charging properties of individual micron-size silica microspheres that are believed to be analogs of a class of interstellar dust grains. The measurements indicate charging of the 0.2 micron silica particles when exposed to 25 eV electron beams and discharging when exposed to higher energy electron beams. Relatively large size silica particles (5.2-6.82 micron) generally discharge to lower equilibrium potentials at both electron energies

  8. Emissivity and electrooptical properties of semiconducting quantum dots/rods and liquid crystal composites: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gautam; Fisch, Michael; Kumar, Satyendra

    2016-05-01

    Investigations of the mixtures of semiconducting quantum scale particles in anisotropic liquid crystal (LC) medium have become a vibrant area of research primarily due to their very interesting phenomenology. The results of these investigations fall into four groups: (i) Photoluminescent emissive properties of the quantum particles ordinarily depend on the size, shape, and chemical nature of the particles. These undergo important changes in their spectrum, polarization, and isotropy of emission when dissolved in an anisotropic LC phase. Moreover, their response to external stimuli such as mechanical, optical, or electric fields is altered in important ways; (ii) physical properties of LCs such as viscosity, dielectric relaxation, etc are modified by the addition of quantum particles. Their presence in ferroelectric smectic LC is known to give rise to an antiferro- to ferri-electric phase transition and suppresses the paraelectric phase; (iii) switching characteristics of LC devices are altered in important ways by the addition of quantum particles. Their threshold voltage is usually lowered, contrast ratio, and switching speed of nematic, ferroelectric, and cholesteric devices may increase or decrease depending on the concentration, applied field, and particle anisotropy; and (iv) controlled aggregation of quantum particles at the interface between isotropic and LC domains, near added polystyrene beads, and in the vicinity of point defects gives rise to interesting photonic structures, enables studies of photon antibunching and single photon sources. Clearly, there is a need to understand the basic and applied aspects of these systems and find routes to their technological applications including sensors, electrooptical devices, and solar energy harvesting. This review provides an overview of recent work involving liquid crystals and a variety of quantum particles.

  9. Emissivity and electrooptical properties of semiconducting quantum dots/rods and liquid crystal composites: a review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gautam; Fisch, Michael; Kumar, Satyendra

    2016-05-01

    Investigations of the mixtures of semiconducting quantum scale particles in anisotropic liquid crystal (LC) medium have become a vibrant area of research primarily due to their very interesting phenomenology. The results of these investigations fall into four groups: (i) Photoluminescent emissive properties of the quantum particles ordinarily depend on the size, shape, and chemical nature of the particles. These undergo important changes in their spectrum, polarization, and isotropy of emission when dissolved in an anisotropic LC phase. Moreover, their response to external stimuli such as mechanical, optical, or electric fields is altered in important ways; (ii) physical properties of LCs such as viscosity, dielectric relaxation, etc are modified by the addition of quantum particles. Their presence in ferroelectric smectic LC is known to give rise to an antiferro- to ferri-electric phase transition and suppresses the paraelectric phase; (iii) switching characteristics of LC devices are altered in important ways by the addition of quantum particles. Their threshold voltage is usually lowered, contrast ratio, and switching speed of nematic, ferroelectric, and cholesteric devices may increase or decrease depending on the concentration, applied field, and particle anisotropy; and (iv) controlled aggregation of quantum particles at the interface between isotropic and LC domains, near added polystyrene beads, and in the vicinity of point defects gives rise to interesting photonic structures, enables studies of photon antibunching and single photon sources. Clearly, there is a need to understand the basic and applied aspects of these systems and find routes to their technological applications including sensors, electrooptical devices, and solar energy harvesting. This review provides an overview of recent work involving liquid crystals and a variety of quantum particles.

  10. Measuring the beaming angle of GRB 030329 by fitting the rebrightenings in its multiband afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Wei; Huang, Yong-Feng; Kong, Si-Wei

    2010-11-01

    Multiple rebrightenings have been observed in the multiband afterglow of GRB 030329. In particular, a marked and quick rebrightening occurred at about t ~ 1.2 × 105 s. Energy injection from late and slow shells seems to be the best interpretation for these rebrightenings. Usually it is assumed that the energy is injected into the whole external shock. However, in the case of GRB 030329, the rebrightenings are so quick that the usual consideration fails to give a satisfactory fit to the observed light curves. Actually, since these late/slow shells freely coast in the wake of the external shock, they should be cold and may not expand laterally. The energy injection then should only occur at the central region of the external shock. Considering this effect, we numerically re-fit the quick rebrightenings observed in GRB 030329. By doing this, we were able to derive the beaming angle of the energy injection process. Our result, with a relative residual of only 5% - 10% during the major rebrightening, is better than any previous modeling. The derived energy injection angle is about 0.035. We assume that these late shells are ejected by the central engine via the same mechanism as those early shells that produce the prompt gamma-ray burst. The main difference is that their velocities are much slower, so that they catch up with the external shock relatively late and are manifested as the observed quick rebrightenings. If this were true, then the derived energy injection angle can give a good measure of the beaming angle of the prompt γ-ray emission. Our study may hopefully provide a novel method to measure the beaming angle of gamma-ray bursts.

  11. Properties of solar energetic particle events inferred from their associated radio emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouloumvakos, A.; Nindos, A.; Valtonen, E.; Alissandrakis, C. E.; Malandraki, O.; Tsitsipis, P.; Kontogeorgos, A.; Moussas, X.; Hillaris, A.

    2015-08-01

    Aims: We study selected properties of solar energetic particle (SEP) events as inferred from their associated radio emissions. Methods: We used a catalogue of 115 SEP events, which consists of entries of proton intensity enhancements at one AU, with complete coverage over solar cycle 23 based on high-energy (~68 MeV) protons from SOHO/ERNE. We also calculated the proton release time at the Sun using velocity dispersion analysis (VDA). After an initial rejection of cases with unrealistic VDA path lengths, we assembled composite radio spectra for the remaining events using data from ground-based and space-borne radio spectrographs. We registered the associated radio emissions for every event, and we divided the events in groups according to their associated radio emissions. In cases of type III-associated events, we extended our study to the timings between the type III radio emission, the proton release, and the electron release as inferred from VDA based on Wind/3DP 20-646 keV data. Results: The proton release was found to be most often accompanied by both type III and II radio bursts, but a good association percentage was also registered in cases accompanied by type IIIs only. The worst association was found for the cases only associated with type II. In the type III-associated cases, we usually found systematic delays of both the proton and electron release times as inferred by the particles' VDAs, with respect to the start of the associated type III burst. The comparison of the proton and electron release times revealed that, in more than half of the cases, the protons and electrons were simultaneously released within the statistical uncertainty of our analysis. For the cases with type II radio association, we found that the distribution of the proton release heights had a maximum at ~2.5 R⊙. Most (69%) of the flares associated with our SEP events were located in the western hemisphere, with a peak within the well-connected region of 50°-60° western

  12. Controlled growth of copper oxide nanostructures by atmospheric pressure micro-afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altaweel, A.; Filipič, G.; Gries, T.; Belmonte, T.

    2014-12-01

    A large variety of copper oxide nanostructures encompassing nanodots, nanowires and nanowalls, sometimes organized in “cabbage-like” architectures, are grown locally by direct oxidation of copper thin films using the micro-afterglow of an Ar-O2 microwave plasma operating at atmospheric pressure. Morphology, structure and composition of the oxidized copper thin films are characterized by X-ray diffraction, secondary ion mass spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy. The concentric areas where each kind of nanostructures is found are defined by both their radial position with respect to the afterglow centre and by experimental conditions. A growth mechanism is proposed, based on stress-induced outward migration of copper ions. The development of stress gradients is caused by the formation of a copper oxide scale layer. If copper oxide nanowires can be grown as in thermal oxidation processes, micro-afterglow conditions offer novel nanostructures and nano-architectures.

  13. X-ray excited ZnS:Cu,Co afterglow nanoparticles for photodynamic activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lun; Zou, Xiaoju; Bui, Brian; Chen, Wei; Song, Kwang Hyun; Solberg, Timothy

    2014-07-01

    Copper and cobalt co-doped ZnS (ZnS:Cu,Co) afterglow nanoparticles were conjugated to photosensitizer tetrabromorhodamine-123 (TBrRh123) and efficient energy transfer from the nanoparticles to TBrRh123 was observed. In addition to their X-ray excited luminescence, the ZnS:Cu,Co nanoparticles also show long lasting afterglow, which continuously serve as a light source for photodynamic therapy (PDT) activation. Compared to TBrRh123 or ZnS:Cu,Co alone, the ZnS:Cu,Co-TBrRh123 conjugates show low dark toxicity but high X-ray induced toxicity to human prostate cancer cells. The results indicate that the ZnS:Cu,Co afterglow nanoparticles have a good potential for PDT activation.

  14. Machine Learning Search for Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows in Optical Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topinka, M.

    2016-06-01

    Thanks to the advances in robotic telescopes, time domain astronomy leads to a large number of transient events detected in images every night. Data mining and machine learning tools used for object classification are presented. The goal is to automatically classify transient events for both further follow-up by a larger telescope and for statistical studies of transient events. Special attention is given to the identification of gamma-ray burst afterglows. Machine learning techniques are used to identify GROND gamma-ray burst afterglow among the astrophysical objects present in the SDSS archival images based on the g'-r', r'-i' and i'-z' color indices. The performance of the support vector machine, random forest and neural network algorithms is compared. A joint meta-classifier, built on top of the individual classifiers, can identify GRB afterglows with the overall accuracy of ≳ 90%.

  15. Line-ratio determination of atomic oxygen and N_2(A\\,{}^3\\Sigma_u^+) metastable absolute densities in an RF nitrogen late afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard, André; Oh, Soo-ghee; Guerra, Vasco

    2013-06-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy line-ratio methods are developed in order to estimate the absolute densities of nitrogen and oxygen atoms and metastable N2(A) molecules in the nitrogen late afterglow of an RF discharge, operating at p = 8 Torr, Q = 1 slm and P = 100 W, in what constitutes an extension of the typical domain of application of these methods. [N] is obtained from the first positive (1+) emission with calibration by NO titration, [O] from the ratio of the NOβ to 1+ bands, and [N2(A)] from the ratios of (i) the NOγ and NOβ bands, (ii) the second positive (2+) and NOβ bands and (iii) the 1+ and 2+ bands. In addition to the determination of the N, O and N2(A) absolute densities, the present investigation gives an indication on the order of magnitude of the rate coefficient of the very important reaction N2(X, v ⩾ 13) + O → NO + N at room temperature.

  16. The behaviour of negative oxygen ions in the afterglow of a reactive HiPIMS discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowes, M.; Bradley, J. W.

    2014-07-01

    Using a single Langmuir probe, the temporal evolution of the oxygen negative ion, n-, and electron, ne, densities in the afterglow of a reactive HiPIMS discharge operating in argon-oxygen gas mixtures have been determined. The magnetron was equipped with a titanium target and operated in ‘poisoned’ mode at a frequency of 100 Hz with a pulse width of 100 µs for a range of oxygen partial pressures, {p_{O_{2}}}/{p_{total}} = 0.0{{-}}0.5 . In the initial afterglow, the density of the principle negative ion in the discharge (O-) was of the order of 1016 m-3 for all conditions. The O- concentration was found to decay slowly with characteristic decay times between 585 µs and 1.2 ms over the oxygen partial pressure range. Electron densities were observed to fall more rapidly, resulting in long-lived highly electronegative afterglow plasmas where the ratio, α = n-/ne, was found to reach values up to 672 (±100) for the highest O2 partial pressure. By comparing results to a simple plasma-chemical model, we speculate that with increased {p_{O_{2}}}/{p_{total}} ratio, more O- ions are formed in the afterglow via dissociative electron attachment to highly excited metastable oxygen molecules, with the latter being formed during the active phase of the discharge. After approximately 2.5 ms into the off-time, the afterglow degenerates into an ion-ion plasma and negative ions are free to impinge upon the chamber walls and grounded substrates with flux densities of the order of 1018 m-2 s-1, which is around 10% of the positive ion flux measured during the on-time. This illustrates the potential importance of the long afterglow in reactive HiPIMS, which can act as a steady source of low energy O- ions to a growing thin film at the substrate during periods of reduced positive ion bombardment.

  17. A promising new mechanism of ionizing radiation detection for positron emission tomography: modulation of optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Li; Daghighian, Henry M.; Levin, Craig S.

    2016-11-01

    Using conventional scintillation detection, the fundamental limit in positron emission tomography (PET) time resolution is strongly dependent on the inherent temporal variances generated during the scintillation process, yielding an intrinsic physical limit for the coincidence time resolution of around 100 ps. On the other hand, modulation mechanisms of the optical properties of a material exploited in the optical telecommunications industry can be orders of magnitude faster. In this paper we borrow from the concept of optics pump-probe measurement to for the first time study whether ionizing radiation can produce modulations of optical properties, which can be utilized as a novel method for radiation detection. We show that a refractive index modulation of approximately 5× {{10}-6} is induced by interactions in a cadmium telluride (CdTe) crystal from a 511 keV photon source. Furthermore, using additional radionuclide sources, we show that the amplitude of the optical modulation signal varies linearly with both the detected event rate and average photon energy of the radiation source.

  18. Emission properties of organic light-emitting diodes directly patterned using optically controlled nanostructuration means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Christophe; Fiorini-Debuisschert, Celine; Rocha, Licinio; Raimond, Paul; Nunzi, Jean-Michel

    2004-09-01

    In a classical multilayer organic light emitting diode (OLED) structure, almost 80% of the light emitted happens to be lost following guiding through the different layers. Patterning of the OLEDs structure was already proposed and reported as an interesting solution towards the optimization of an OLED external efficiency. As an alternative to classical lithographic patterning methods which appear to be quite complex, we propose here the implementation of a quite direct and easy-to-set light-induced patterning method using azo-dye polymers. When a polymer film containing azobenzene dyes is irradiated by an interference pattern between polarized laser beams at a wavelength near the chromophore absorption band, the film surface undergoes a direct, reversible and controlled topographic modification. More surprisingly, we have recently experimentally evidenced that uniform irradiation of an azo-dye polymer using a single laser beam with normal incidence onto the polymer film surface could lead to a self structuration process resulting in the formation of a quasi hexagonal surface-relief grating. After a description of the main features related to light-induced surface relief gratings, we show here that this original patterning process offers an interesting solution for control and optimisation of optoelectronic devices such as OLEDs. The guiding properties of both 1D and 2D structures have been studied and their effects on the light emission properties of a patterned electroluminescent polymer have been characterized and compared after angle dependent measurement of the photoluminescence spectrum. Quite efficient decoupling is evidenced.

  19. Soil biochemical properties of grassland ecosystems under anthropogenic emission of nitrogen compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudrevatykh, Irina; Ivashchenko, Kristina; Ananyeva, Nadezhda

    2016-04-01

    Inflow of pollutants in terrestrial ecosystems nowadays increases dramatically, that might be led to disturbance of natural biogeochemical cycles and landscapes structure. Production of nitrogen fertilizers is one of the air pollution sources, namely by nitrogen compounds (NH4+, NO3-, NO2-). Air pollution by nitrogen compounds of terrestrial ecosystems might be affected on soil biochemical properties, which results increasing mineral nitrogen content in soil, changing soil P/N and Al/Ca ratios, and, finally, the deterioration of soil microbial community functioning. The research is focused on the assessment of anthropogenic emission of nitrogen compounds on soil properties of grassland ecosystems in European Russia. Soil samples (Voronic Chernozem Pachic, upper 10 cm mineral layer, totally 10) were taken from grassland ecosystem: near (5-10 m) nitrogen fertilizer factory (NFF), and far from it (20-30 km, served as a control) in Tula region. In soil samples the NH4+ and NO3- (Kudeyarov's photocolorimetric method), P, Ca, Al (X-ray fluorescence method) contents were measured. Soil microbial biomass carbon (Cmic) was analyzed by substrate-induced respiration method. Soil microbial respiration (MR) was assessed by CO2 rate production. Soil microbial metabolic quotient (qCO2) was calculated as MR/Cmic ratio. Near NFF the soil ammonium and nitrate nitrogen contents were a strongly varied, variation coefficient (CV) was 42 and 86This study was supported by Russian Foundation of Basic Research Grant No. 14-04-00098, 15-44-03220, 15-04-00915.

  20. THE AFTERGLOW AND ENVIRONMENT OF THE SHORT GRB 111117A

    SciTech Connect

    Margutti, R.; Berger, E.; Fong, W.; Zauderer, B. A.; Soderberg, A. M.; Milisavljevic, D.; Sanders, N.; Cenko, S. B.; Greiner, J.; Cucchiara, A.

    2012-09-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of the afterglow of the short GRB 111117A, and follow-up observations of its host galaxy. From rapid optical and radio observations, we place limits of r {approx}> 25.5 mag at {delta}t Almost-Equal-To 0.55 days and F{sub {nu}}(5.8 GHz) {approx}< 18 {mu}Jy at {delta}t Almost-Equal-To 0.50 days, respectively. However, using a Chandra observation at {delta}t Almost-Equal-To 3.0 days we locate the absolute position of the X-ray afterglow to an accuracy of 0.''22 (1{sigma}), a factor of about six times better than the Swift/XRT position. This allows us to robustly identify the host galaxy and to locate the burst at a projected offset of 1.''25 {+-} 0.''20 from the host centroid. Using optical and near-IR observations of the host galaxy we determine a photometric redshift of z = 1.3{sup +0.3}{sub -0.2}, one of the highest for any short gamma-ray burst (GRB), leading to a projected physical offset for the burst of 10.5 {+-} 1.7 kpc, typical of previous short GRBs. At this redshift, the isotropic {gamma}-ray energy is E{sub {gamma},iso} Almost-Equal-To 3.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 51} erg (rest-frame 23-2300 keV) with a peak energy of E{sub pk} Almost-Equal-To 850-2300 keV (rest-frame). In conjunction with the isotropic X-ray energy, GRB 111117A appears to follow our recently reported E{sub x,iso}-E{sub {gamma},iso}-E{sub pk} universal scaling. Using the X-ray data along with the optical and radio non-detections, we find that for a blastwave kinetic energy of E{sub K,iso} Almost-Equal-To E{sub {gamma},iso} erg, the circumburst density is n{sub 0} Almost-Equal-To 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} - 1 cm{sup -3} (for a range of {epsilon}{sub B} = 0.001-0.1). Similarly, from the non-detection of a break in the X-ray light curve at {delta}t {approx}< 3 days, we infer a minimum opening angle for the outflow of {theta}{sub j} {approx}> 3-10 Degree-Sign (depending on the circumburst density). We conclude that Chandra observations of short

  1. Recombination of H3+ Ions with Electrons in Afterglow Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsen, Rainer; Glosik, Juraj; Dohnal, Petr; Rubovic, Peter; Kalosi, Abel; Plasil, Radek

    2015-09-01

    Our past and ongoing flowing and stationary afterglow experiments at temperatures from 60-340 K have resulted in a more complete picture of the plasma recombination of H3+ ions: (1) Optical absorption studies indicate that at T = 300 K both para and ortho H3+ ions recombine with nearly the same binary coefficient αbin ~ 0.6 × 10-7 cm3/s. However, at T = 60 K para H3+ recombines faster by about a factor of ~10 than does ortho H3+.(2) Earlier discrepancies between data obtained in plasmas and those obtained in merged-beam or storage-rings have been traced to ternary recombination due to ambient helium atoms and/or hydrogen molecules. Ternary recombination of H3+ due to He or H2 is more efficient by factors ~ 102 or 105, respectively, than expected from the theoretical model of Bates and Khare for atomic ions. (3) The ternary processes enhance recombination at low third-body densities (1017 cm-3) but then level off (``saturate'') when their contribution approaches ~ 1.5 × 10-7 cm3/s. This saturation can lead to the false inference that the overall recombination is binary, resulting in a recombination coefficient that is about 3 times too large. (4) A tentative complex model has been developed that rationalizes the observed effects. This work was partly supported by Czech Science Foundation projects GACR 14-14649P and GACR 15-15077S and by Charles University in Prague projects GAUK 692214, GAUK 572214, UNCE 204020/2012 and SVV 260.

  2. PROBING EXTRAGALACTIC DUST THROUGH NEARBY GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, S. L.; Li Aigen E-mail: lia@missouri.ed

    2010-02-10

    The quantities and wavelength dependencies of the dust extinction along the lines of sight toward 33 nearby gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with redshifts z < 2 are derived from fitting their afterglow spectral energy distributions. Unlike previous studies which often assume a specific extinction law like that of the Milky Way (MW) and the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC/SMC), our approach-we call it the 'Drude' approach-is more flexible in determining the true wavelength dependence of the extinction (while the shape of the extinction curve inferred from that relying on a priori assumption of a template extinction law is, of course, fixed). The extinction curves deduced from the Drude approach display a wide diversity of shapes, ranging from relatively flat curves to curves which are featureless and steeply rise toward the far-ultraviolet, and from curves just like that of the MW, LMC, and SMC to curves resembling that of the MW and LMC but lacking the 2175 A bump. The visual extinction A{sub V} derived from the Drude approach is generally larger by a factor of {approx}2-5 than that inferred by assuming a SMC-type template extinction law. Consistent with previous studies, the extinction-to-gas ratio is mostly smaller than that of the MW, and does not seem to correlate with the shape of the extinction curve. It is shown that the standard silicate-graphite interstellar grain model closely reproduces the extinction curves of all 33 GRBs host galaxies. For these 33 bursts at z < 2, we find no evidence for the evolution of the dust extinction, dust sizes, and relative abundances of silicate to graphite on redshifts.

  3. Quantitative Determination of Dielectric Thin-Film Properties Using Infrared Emission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, J.E.; Haaland, D.M.; Niemczyk, T.M.; Zhang, S.

    1998-10-14

    We have completed an experimental study to investigate the use of infrared emission spectroscopy (IRES) for the quantitative analysis of borophosphosilicate glass (BPSG) thin films on silicon monitor wafers. Experimental parameters investigated included temperatures within the range used in the microelectronics industry to produce these films; hence the potential for using the IRES technique for real-time monitoring of the film deposition process has been evaluated. The film properties that were investigated included boron content, phosphorus content, film thickness, and film temperature. The studies were conducted over two temperature ranges, 125 to 225 *C and 300 to 400 *C. The later temperature range includes realistic processing temperatures for the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of the BPSG films. Partial least squares (PLS) multivariate calibration methods were applied to spectral and film property calibration data. The cross-validated standard errors of prediction (CVSEP) fi-om the PLS analysis of the IRES spectraof21 calibration samples each measured at 6 temperatures in the 300 to 400 "C range were found to be 0.09 wt. `?40 for B, 0.08 wt. `%0 for P, 3.6 ~m for film thickness, and 1.9 *C for temperature. By lowering the spectral resolution fi-om 4 to 32 cm-l and decreasing the number of spectral scans fi-om 128 to 1, we were able to determine that all the film properties could be measured in less than one second to the precision required for the manufacture and quality control of integrated circuits. Thus, real-time in-situ monitoring of BPSG thin films formed by CVD deposition on Si monitor wafers is possible with the methods reported here.

  4. Improved field emission properties of carbon nanotubes grown on stainless steel substrate and its application in ionization gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Detian; Cheng, Yongjun; Wang, Yongjun; Zhang, Huzhong; Dong, Changkun; Li, Da

    2016-03-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays were fabricated by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique on different substrates. Microstructures and field emission characteristics of the as-grown CNT arrays were investigated systematically, and its application in ionization gauge was also evaluated preliminarily. The results indicate that the as-grown CNT arrays are vertically well-aligned relating to the substrate surfaces, but the CNTs grown on stainless steel substrate are longer and more crystalline than the ones grown on silicon wafer substrate. The field emission behaviors of the as-grown CNT arrays are strongly dependent upon substrate properties. Namely, the CNT array grown on stainless steel substrate has better field emission properties, including lower turn on and threshold fields, better emission stability and repeatability, compared with the one grown on silicon wafer substrate. The superior field emission properties of the CNT array grown on stainless steel substrate are mainly attributed to low contact resistance, high thermal conductivity, good adhesion strength, etc. In addition, the metrological behaviors of ionization gauge with the CNT array grown on stainless steel substrate as an electron source were investigated, and this novel cathode ionization gauge extends the lower limit of linear pressure measurement to 10-8 Pa, which is one order of magnitude lower than the result reported for the same of gauge with CNT cathode.

  5. MAGNETICALLY DRIVEN WINDS FROM DIFFERENTIALLY ROTATING NEUTRON STARS AND X-RAY AFTERGLOWS OF SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, Daniel M.; Ciolfi, Riccardo; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2014-04-10

    Besides being among the most promising sources of gravitational waves, merging neutron star binaries also represent a leading scenario to explain the phenomenology of short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). Recent observations have revealed a large subclass of SGRBs with roughly constant luminosity in their X-ray afterglows, lasting 10-10{sup 4} s. These features are generally taken as evidence of a long-lived central engine powered by the magnetic spin-down of a uniformly rotating, magnetized object. We propose a different scenario in which the central engine powering the X-ray emission is a differentially rotating hypermassive neutron star (HMNS) that launches a quasi-isotropic and baryon-loaded wind driven by the magnetic field, which is built-up through differential rotation. Our model is supported by long-term, three-dimensional, general-relativistic, and ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations, showing that this isotropic emission is a very robust feature. For a given HMNS, the presence of a collimated component depends sensitively on the initial magnetic field geometry, while the stationary electromagnetic luminosity depends only on the magnetic energy initially stored in the system. We show that our model is compatible with the observed timescales and luminosities and express the latter in terms of a simple scaling relation.

  6. DETERMINATION OF THE INTRINSIC LUMINOSITY TIME CORRELATION IN THE X-RAY AFTERGLOWS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Petrosian, Vahe'; Singal, Jack; Ostrowski, Michal E-mail: vahep@stanford.edu E-mail: dainotti@oa.uj.edu.pl

    2013-09-10

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which have been observed up to redshifts z Almost-Equal-To 9.5, can be good probes of the early universe and have the potential to test cosmological models. Dainotti's analysis of GRB Swift afterglow light curves with known redshifts and a definite X-ray plateau shows an anti-correlation between the rest-frame time when the plateau ends (the plateau end time) and the calculated luminosity at that time (or approximately an anti-correlation between plateau duration and luminosity). Here, we present an update of this correlation with a larger data sample of 101 GRBs with good light curves. Since some of this correlation could result from the redshift dependences of these intrinsic parameters, namely, their cosmological evolution, we use the Efron-Petrosian method to reveal the intrinsic nature of this correlation. We find that a substantial part of the correlation is intrinsic and describe how we recover it and how this can be used to constrain physical models of the plateau emission, the origin of which is still unknown. The present result could help to clarify the debated nature of the plateau emission.

  7. Optical light curve of GRB 121011A: a textbook for the onset of GRB afterglow in a mixture of ISM and wind-type medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Li-Ping; Wei, Jian-Yan; Qiu, Yu-Lei; Deng, Jin-Song; Wang, Jing; Han, Xu-Hui

    2016-01-01

    We report the optical observations of GRB 121011A by the 0.8m TNT facility at Xinglong observatory, China. The light curve of the optical afterglow shows a smooth and featureless bump during the epoch of ∼130 s and ∼5000 s with a rising index of 1.57 ± 0.28 before the break time of 539 ± 44 s, and a decaying index of about 1.29 ± 0.07 up to the end of our observations. Moreover, the X-ray light curve decays in a single power-law with a slope of about 1.51 ± 0.03 observed by XRT onboard Swift from 100 s to about 10 000 s after the burst trigger. The featureless optical light curve could be understood as an onset process under the external-shock model. The typical frequency has been below or near the optical one before the deceleration time, and the cooling frequency is located between the optical and X-ray wavelengths. The external medium density has a transition from a mixed stage of ISM and wind-type medium before the peak time to the ISM at the later phase. The joint-analysis of X-ray and optical light curves shows that the emissions from both frequencies are consistent with the prediction of the standard afterglow model without any energy injections, indicating that the central engine has stopped its activity and does not restart anymore after the prompt phase.

  8. Mean and extreme radio properties of quasars and the origin of radio emission

    SciTech Connect

    Kratzer, Rachael M.; Richards, Gordon T.

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the evolution of both the radio-loud fraction (RLF) and (using stacking analysis) the mean radio loudness of quasars. We consider how these properties evolve as a function of redshift and luminosity, black hole (BH) mass and accretion rate, and parameters related to the dominance of a wind in the broad emission-line region. We match the FIRST source catalog to samples of luminous quasars (both spectroscopic and photometric), primarily from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. After accounting for catastrophic errors in BH mass estimates at high redshift, we find that both the RLF and the mean radio luminosity increase for increasing BH mass and decreasing accretion rate. Similarly, both the RLF and mean radio loudness increase for quasars that are argued to have weaker radiation line driven wind components of the broad emission-line region. In agreement with past work, we find that the RLF increases with increasing optical/UV luminosity and decreasing redshift, while the mean radio loudness evolves in the exact opposite manner. This difference in behavior between the mean radio loudness and the RLF in L−z may indicate selection effects that bias our understanding of the evolution of the RLF; deeper surveys in the optical and radio are needed to resolve this discrepancy. Finally, we argue that radio-loud (RL) and radio-quiet (RQ) quasars may be parallel sequences, but where only RQ quasars at one extreme of the distribution are likely to become RL, possibly through slight differences in spin and/or merger history.

  9. Enhanced field electron emission properties of hierarchically structured MWCNT-based cold cathodes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hierarchically structured MWCNT (h-MWCNT)-based cold cathodes were successfully achieved by means of a relatively simple and highly effective approach consisting of the appropriate combination of KOH-based pyramidal texturing of Si (100) substrates and PECVD growth of vertically aligned MWCNTs. By controlling the aspect ratio (AR) of the Si pyramids, we were able to tune the field electron emission (FEE) properties of the h-MWCNT cathodes. Indeed, when the AR is increased from 0 (flat Si) to 0.6, not only the emitted current density was found to increase exponentially, but more importantly its associated threshold field (TF) was reduced from 3.52 V/μm to reach a value as low as 1.95 V/μm. The analysis of the J-E emission curves in the light of the conventional Fowler-Nordheim model revealed the existence of two distinct low-field (LF) and high-field (HF) FEE regimes. In both regimes, the hierarchical structuring was found to increase significantly the associated βLF and βHF field enhancement factors of the h-MWCNT cathodes (by a factor of 1.7 and 2.2, respectively). Pyramidal texturing of the cathodes is believed to favor vacuum space charge effects, which could be invoked to account for the significant enhancement of the FEE, particularly in the HF regime where a βHF as high as 6,980 was obtained for the highest AR value of 0.6. PMID:24484649

  10. Effect of morphology of dispersed nano-CeO2 on far infrared emission property of natural tourmaline.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dongbin; Xu, Anping; Liang, Jinsheng

    2011-11-01

    Dispersed nano-CeO2 successfully grew on the surface of natural tourmaline powders by a precipitation method. The results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed that CeO2 (111) nanospots could apparently enhance the far infrared emission property of tourmaline in relation to CeO2 nanoparticles. This is the first report regarding the effect of the morphology of nano-CeO2 on the far infrared emission property of natural tourmaline. The results of the characterization by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) showed that CeO2 (111) nanospots have much more chemisorbed oxygen than CeO2 nanoparticles, which is beneficial to the unit cell volume shrinkage of tourmaline, thus increasing its far infrared emissivity. PMID:22413254

  11. Effect of morphology of dispersed nano-CeO2 on far infrared emission property of natural tourmaline.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dongbin; Xu, Anping; Liang, Jinsheng

    2011-11-01

    Dispersed nano-CeO2 successfully grew on the surface of natural tourmaline powders by a precipitation method. The results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed that CeO2 (111) nanospots could apparently enhance the far infrared emission property of tourmaline in relation to CeO2 nanoparticles. This is the first report regarding the effect of the morphology of nano-CeO2 on the far infrared emission property of natural tourmaline. The results of the characterization by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) showed that CeO2 (111) nanospots have much more chemisorbed oxygen than CeO2 nanoparticles, which is beneficial to the unit cell volume shrinkage of tourmaline, thus increasing its far infrared emissivity.

  12. Enhancement mechanism of field electron emission properties in hybrid carbon nanotubes with tree- and wing-like features

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.M.; Yang, C.C.; Xu, Q.; Zheng, W.T.; Li, S.

    2009-12-15

    In this work, the tree-like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with branches of different diameters and the wing-like CNTs with graphitic-sheets of different densities were synthesized by using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The nanostructures of the as-prepared hybrid carbon materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The structural dependence of field electron emission (FEE) property was also investigated. It is found that both of the tree- and wing-like CNTs exhibit a lower turn-on field and higher emission current density than the pristine CNTs, which can be ascribed to the effects of branch size, crystal orientation, and graphitic-sheet density. - Graphical abstract: Tree-like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with branches and the wing-like CNTs with graphitic-sheets were synthesized by using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The structural dependence of field electron emission property was also investigated.

  13. Effects of fuel properties on white smoke emission from the latest heavy-duty DI diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Tahara, Yoshihiro; Akasaka, Yukio

    1995-12-31

    The effects of fuel properties on white smoke emission from the latest DI diesel engine were investigated with a new type of white smoke meter. The new smoke meter could distinguish fuel effects on smoke much more than the conventional PHS meter. The repeatability of the smoke meter was better than that of the PHS meter. Cetane number was the dominant factor for smoke emission. Distillation temperature and composition also affected emission. A nitrate type cetane improver was effective for reducing emission. White smoke was analyzed with GC and HPLC and compounds in white smoke from low cetane number fuel were found almost the same as in fuel. But those from high cetane number fuel consisted of compounds in fuel and many combustion products.

  14. A multiplex fluorophore molecular beacon: detection of the target sequence using large Stokes shift and multiple emission signal properties.

    PubMed

    Joo, Han Na; Seo, Young Jun

    2015-02-18

    We have developed a multiplex fluorophore molecular beacon () with fluorophores located at its end to produce unique FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer). It exhibited diverse fluorescence properties depending on the mixing pattern, such as large Stokes shift emission and multiple colors, namely, blue, green and red using one excitation wavelength. Our also worked in probing a target perfect matched sequence with exonuclease III.

  15. Electromagnetic Emission from Long-lived Binary Neutron Star Merger Remnants. II. Lightcurves and Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Daniel M.; Ciolfi, Riccardo

    2016-03-01

    Recent observations indicate that in a large fraction of binary neutron star (BNS) mergers a long-lived neutron star (NS) may be formed rather than a black hole. Unambiguous electromagnetic (EM) signatures of such a scenario would strongly impact our knowledge on how short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) and their afterglow radiation are generated. Furthermore, such EM signals would have profound implications for multimessenger astronomy with joint EM and gravitational-wave (GW) observations of BNS mergers, which will soon become reality thanks to the ground-based advanced LIGO/Virgo GW detector network. Here we explore such EM signatures based on the model presented in a companion paper, which provides a self-consistent evolution of the post-merger system and its EM emission up to ˜107 s. Light curves and spectra are computed for a wide range of post-merger physical properties. We present X-ray afterglow light curves corresponding to the “standard” and the “time-reversal” scenario for SGRBs (prompt emission associated with the merger or with the collapse of the long-lived NS). The light curve morphologies include single and two-plateau features with timescales and luminosities that are in good agreement with Swift observations. Furthermore, we compute the X-ray signal that should precede the SGRB in the time-reversal scenario, the detection of which would represent smoking-gun evidence for this scenario. Finally, we find a bright, highly isotropic EM transient peaking in the X-ray band at ˜102-104 s after the BNS merger with luminosities of LX ˜ 1046-1048 erg s-1. This signal represents a very promising EM counterpart to the GW emission from BNS mergers.

  16. Gamma-ray burst radio afterglows from Population III stars: simulation methods and detection prospects with SKA precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macpherson, D.; Coward, D.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the prospects of detecting radio afterglows from long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) from Population III (Pop III) progenitors using the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) precursor instruments MWA (Murchison Widefield Array) and ASKAP (Australian SKA Pathfinder). We derive a realistic model of GRB afterglows that encompasses the widest range of plausible physical parameters and observation angles. We define the best case scenario of Pop III GRB energy and redshift distributions. Using probability distribution functions fitted to the observed microphysical parameters of long GRBs, we simulate a large number of Pop III GRB afterglows to find the global probability of detection. We find that ASKAP may be able to detect 35 per cent of Pop III GRB afterglows in the optimistic case, and 27 per cent in the pessimistic case. A negligible number will be detectable by MWA in either case. Detections per image for ASKAP, found by incorporating intrinsic rates with detectable time-scales, are as high as ˜6000 and as low as ˜11, which shows the optimistic case is unrealistic. We track how the afterglow flux density changes over various time intervals and find that, because of their very slow variability, the cadence for blind searches of these afterglows should be as long as possible. We also find Pop III GRBs at high redshift have radio afterglow light curves that are indistinguishable from those of regular long GRBs in the more local Universe.

  17. Luminescence and afterglow in Sr{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+}, RE{sup 3+} [RE = Ce, Nd, Sm and Dy] phosphors-Role of co-dopants in search for afterglow

    SciTech Connect

    Lakshminarasimhan, N. Varadaraju, U.V.

    2008-11-03

    Luminescence of Eu{sup 2+} in Sr{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+}, RE{sup 3+} [RE = Ce, Nd, Sm and Dy] phosphors was studied with a view to obtain an afterglow phosphor. The synthesized phosphors were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), diffuse reflectance, photo- and thermoluminescence spectroscopic techniques. Afterglow was observed only with Dy{sup 3+} co-doped phosphor. The observed afterglow with Dy{sup 3+} co-doping originated from the formation of suitable traps which was supported by thermoluminescence results.

  18. Measurements of Electrical and Electron Emission Properties of Highly Insulating Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, J. R.; Brunson, Jerilyn; Hoffman, Ryan; Abbott, Jonathon; Thomson, Clint; Sim, Alec

    2005-01-01

    Highly insulating materials often acquire significant charges when subjected to fluxes of electrons, ions, or photons. This charge can significantly modify the materials properties of the materials and have profound effects on the functionality of the materials in a variety of applications. These include charging of spacecraft materials due to interactions with the severe space environment, enhanced contamination due to charging in Lunar of Martian environments, high power arching of cables and sources, modification of tethers and ion thrusters for propulsion, and scanning electron microscopy, to name but a few examples. This paper describes new techniques and measurements of the electron emission properties and resistivity of highly insulating materials. Electron yields are a measure of the number of electrons emitted from a material per incident particle (electron, ion or photon). Electron yields depend on incident species, energy and angle, and on the material. They determine the net charge acquired by a material subject to a give incident flu. New pulsed-beam techniques will be described that allow accurate measurement of the yields for uncharged insulators and measurements of how the yields are modified as charge builds up in the insulator. A key parameter in modeling charge dissipation is the resistivity of insulating materials. This determines how charge will accumulate and redistribute across an insulator, as well as the time scale for charge transport and dissipation. Comparison of new long term constant-voltage methods and charge storage methods for measuring resistivity of highly insulating materials will be compared to more commonly used, but less accurate methods.

  19. Spectral properties of X-ray selected narrow emission line galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Colmenero, E.

    1998-03-01

    This thesis reports a study of the X-ray and optical properties of two samples of X-ray selected Narrow Emission Line Galaxies (NELGs), and their comparison with the properties of broad line Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). One sample (18 NELGs) is drawn from the ROSAT International X-ray Optical Survey (RIXOS), the other (19 NELGs and 33 AGN) from the ROSAT UK Deep Survey. ROSAT multi-channel X-ray spectra have been extracted and fitted with power-law, bremsstrahlung and black body models for the brighter RIXOS sources. In most cases, power-law and bremsstrahlung models provide the best results. The average spectral energy index, alpha, of the RIXOS NELGs is 0.96 +/- 0.07, similar to that of AGN (alpha~1). For the fainter RIXOS NELGs, as well as for all the UK Deep Survey sources, counts in three spectral bands have been extracted and fitted with a power-law model, assuming the Galactic value for N_H. The brighter RIXOS sources demonstrated that the results obtained by these two different extraction and fitting procedures provide consistent results. Two average X-ray spectra, one for the NELGs and another for the AGN, were created from the UK Deep Survey sources. The power-law slope of the average NELG is alpha = 0.45 +/- 0.09, whilst that of the AGN is alpha = 0.96 +/- 0.03. ROSAT X-ray surveys have shown that the fractional surface density of NELGs increases with respect to AGN at faint fluxes (<= 2e-15 ergs cm-2 s-1), thus suggesting that NELGs are important contributors to the residual soft (<2 keV) X-ray background (XRB). Moreover, the spectral slope of this background (alpha~0.4, 1-10 keV) is harder than that of AGN (alpha~1), which are known to contribute most of the XRB at higher flux levels. The work presented in this thesis shows unequivocally for the first time that the integrated spectrum of the faintest NELGs (alpha~0.4) is consistent with that of the soft X-ray background, finally reconciling it with the properties of the sources that are thought to

  20. Spectral properties of x-ray selected narrow emission line galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero Colmenero, Encarnacion

    This thesis reports a study of the X-ray and optical properties of two samples of X-ray selected Narrow Emission Line Galaxies (NELGs), and their comparison with the properties of broad line Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). One sample (18 NELGs) is drawn from the ROSAT International X-ray Optical Survey (RIXOS), the other (19 NELGs and 33 AGN) from the ROSAT UK Deep Survey. ROSAT multi-channel X-ray spectra have been extracted and fitted with power-law, bremsstrahlung and black body models for the brighter RIXOS sources. In most cases, power-law and bremsstrahlung models provide the best results. The average spectral energy index, alpha, of the RIXOS NELGs is 0.96 +/- 0.07, similar to that of AGN (alpha ~ 1). For the fainter RIXOS NELGs, as well as for all the UK Deep Survey sources, counts in three spectral bands have been extracted and fitted with a power-law model, assuming the Galactic value for NH. The brighter RIXOS sources demonstrated that the results obtained by these two different extraction and fitting procedures provide consistent results. Two average X-ray spectra, one for the NELGs and another for the AGN, were created from the UK Deep Survey sources. The power-law spectral slope of the average NELG is S = 0.45 +/- 0.09, whilst that of the AGN is S = 0.96 +/- 0.03. ROSAT X-ray surveys have shown that the fractional surface density of NELGs increases with respect to AGN at faint fluxes (< 2 x 10-15erg cm-2 s -1), thus suggesting that NELGs are important contributors to the residual soft (< 2 keV) X-ray background (XRB). Moreover, the spectral slope of this background (S ~ 0.4, 1-10 keV) is harder than that of AGN (S ~ 1), which are known to contribute most of the XRB at higher flux levels. The work presented in this thesis shows unequivocally for the first time that the integrated spectrum of the faintest NELGs (alpha ~ 0.4) is consistent with that of the soft X-ray background, finally reconciling it with the properties of the sources that are thought to

  1. The use of the bulk properties of gamma-ray burst prompt emission spectra for the study of cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Adam

    The study of bulk spectral properties of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) is important to understanding the physics behind these powerful explosions and may even be an aide in studying cosmology. The prompt emission spectral properties have long been studied by a growing community of researchers, and many theories have been developed since the discovery of GRBs. Even though the exact physics of these phenomena is not completely understood, GRBs have been proposed to give insight on other astrophysical phenomena from dark matter to the expansion of the universe. Obviously, using GRBs to study cosmology requires a large sample size to adequately constrain results and provide confident conjectures. For this reason, BATSE and GBM results are paramount to the study of the prompt emission of GRBs. Using results from both instruments, I study the bulk spectral properties of GRBs and describe analysis techniques that can be used to study cosmology.

  2. CORRELATED SPECTRAL AND TEMPORAL BEHAVIOR OF LATE-TIME AFTERGLOWS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon

    2012-12-20

    The cannonball (CB) model of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) predicts that the asymptotic behavior of the spectral energy density of GRB afterglows is a power law in time and in frequency, and the difference between the temporal and spectral power-law indices, {alpha}{sub X} - {beta}{sub X}, is restricted to the values 0, 1/2, and 1. Here we report the distributions of the values {alpha}{sub X} and {beta}{sub X}, and their difference for a sample of 315 Swift GRBs. This sample includes all Swift GRBs that were detected before 2012 August 1, whose X-ray afterglow extended well beyond 1 day and the estimated error in {alpha}{sub X} - {beta}{sub X} was {<=}0.25. The values of {alpha}{sub X} were extracted from the CB-model fits to the entire light curves of their X-ray afterglow while the spectral index was extracted by the Swift team from the time-integrated X-ray afterglow of these GRBs. We found that the distribution of the difference {alpha}{sub X} - {beta}{sub X} for these 315 Swift GRBs has three narrow peaks around 0, 1/2, and 1 whose widths are consistent with being due to the measurement errors, in agreement with the CB-model prediction.

  3. Kinetic simulations of argon dusty plasma afterglow including metastable atom kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, A. L. Schweigert, I. V.; Ariskin, D. A.

    2013-04-15

    The afterglow of a dusty plasma of rf discharge in argon is simulated by the particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) method. The experimental observation that heavy dust contamination of plasma leads to an anomalous increase in the electron density at the beginning of afterglow is explained by release of electrons from the dust surface. Under the assumption that the floating potential of particles is in equilibrium with plasma conditions, the fast cooling of electrons in afterglow plasma due to a rapid escape of hot electrons from the volume leads to a decrease in the magnitude of the floating potential and hence to a loss of charge by dust. The intensive desorption of electrons from nanoparticles is the origin of anomalous behavior of the electron density. At the next stage of afterglow, when the electrons become cool, the plasma decay is defined by ambipolar diffusion. The effect of metastable argon atoms is also considered. Additional ionization due to metastable atom collisions affects the electron temperature but does not change the behavior of the electron density qualitatively.

  4. Testing Models for the Shallow Decay Phase of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows with Polarization Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Mi-Xiang; Wu, Xue-Feng; Dai, Zi-Gao

    2016-08-01

    The X-ray afterglows of almost one-half of gamma-ray bursts have been discovered by the Swift satellite to have a shallow decay phase of which the origin remains mysterious. Two main models have been proposed to explain this phase: relativistic wind bubbles (RWBs) and structured ejecta, which could originate from millisecond magnetars and rapidly rotating black holes, respectively. Based on these models, we investigate polarization evolution in the shallow decay phase of X-ray and optical afterglows. We find that in the RWB model, a significant bump of the polarization degree evolution curve appears during the shallow decay phase of both optical and X-ray afterglows, while the polarization position angle abruptly changes its direction by 90°. In the structured ejecta model, however, the polarization degree does not evolve significantly during the shallow decay phase of afterglows whether the magnetic field configuration in the ejecta is random or globally large-scale. Therefore, we conclude that these two models for the shallow decay phase and relevant central engines would be testable with future polarization observations.

  5. Polarization Evolution of Early Optical Afterglows of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Mi-Xiang; Wu, Xue-Feng; Dai, Zi-Gao

    2016-01-01

    The central engine and jet composition of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) remain mysterious. Here we suggest that observations on the polarization evolution of early optical afterglows may shed light on these questions. We first study the dynamics of a reverse shock and a forward shock that are generated during the interaction of a relativistic jet and its ambient medium. The jet is likely magnetized with a globally large-scale magnetic field from the central engine. The existence of the reverse shock requires that the magnetization degree of the jet should not be high (σ ≤ 1), so that the jet is mainly composed of baryons and leptons. We then calculate the light curves and polarization evolution of early optical afterglows and find that when the polarization position angle changes by 90° during the early afterglow, the polarization degree is zero for a toroidal magnetic field but is very likely to be nonzero for an aligned magnetic field. This result would be expected to provide a probe for the central engine of GRBs because an aligned field configuration could originate from a magnetar central engine and a toroidal field configuration could be produced from a black hole via the Blandford-Znajek mechanism. Finally, for such two kinds of magnetic field configurations, we fit the observed data of the early optical afterglow of GRB 120308A equally well.

  6. BRIGHT BROADBAND AFTERGLOWS OF GRAVITATIONAL WAVE BURSTS FROM MERGERS OF BINARY NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Gao He; Ding Xuan; Wu Xuefeng; Zhang Bing; Dai Zigao E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2013-07-10

    If double neutron star mergers leave behind a massive magnetar rather than a black hole, then a bright early afterglow can follow the gravitational wave burst (GWB) even if there is no short gamma-ray burst (SGRB)-GWB association or if there is an association but the SGRB does not beam toward Earth. Besides directly dissipating the proto-magnetar wind, as suggested by Zhang, here we suggest that the magnetar wind could push the ejecta launched during the merger process and, under certain conditions, would reach a relativistic speed. Such a magnetar-powered ejecta, when interacting with the ambient medium, would develop a bright broadband afterglow due to synchrotron radiation. We study this physical scenario in detail and present the predicted X-ray, optical, and radio light curves for a range of magnetar and ejecta parameters. We show that the X-ray and optical light curves usually peak around the magnetar spin-down timescale ({approx}10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} s), reaching brightnesses readily detectable by wide-field X-ray and optical telescopes, and remain detectable for an extended period. The radio afterglow peaks later, but is much brighter than the case without a magnetar energy injection. Therefore, such bright broadband afterglows, if detected and combined with GWBs in the future, would be a probe of massive millisecond magnetars and stiff equations of state for nuclear matter.

  7. Orphan Gamma-Ray Burst Radio Afterglows: Candidates and Constraints on Beaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinson, Amir; Ofek, Eran O.; Waxman, Eli; Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2002-09-01

    The number of orphan radio afterglows associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that should be detected by a flux-limited radio survey is calculated. It is shown that for jetted GRBs, this number is smaller for a smaller jet opening angle θ, contrary to naive expectation. For a beaming factor f-1b≡(θ2/2)- 1~=500, roughly the value inferred by Frail et al. from analysis of afterglow light curves, we predict that between several hundred to several thousand orphan radio afterglows should be detectable (over all sky) above 1 mJy at GHz frequencies at any given time. This orphan population is dominated by sources lying at distances of a few hundred Mpc and having an age of ~1 yr. A search for pointlike radio transients with flux densities greater than 6 mJy was conducted using the FIRST and NVSS surveys, yielding a list of nine orphan candidates. We argue that most of the candidates are unlikely to be radio supernovae. However, the possibility that they are radio-loud active galactic nuclei cannot be ruled out without further observation. Our analysis sets a conservative 95% CL upper limit for the all-sky number of radio orphans, which corresponds to a lower limit f-1b>13 on the beaming factor. Rejection of all candidates found in our search would imply f-1b>80. This, and the possibility that some candidates may indeed be radio afterglows, strongly motivate further observations of these transients.

  8. Surface scattering properties estimated from modeling airborne multiple emission angle reflectance data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinness, Edward A.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Irons, J. R.; Harding, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    Here, researchers apply the Hapke function to airborne bidirectional reflectance data collected over three terrestrial surfaces. The objectives of the study were to test the range of natural surfaces that the Hapke model fits and to evaluate model parameters in terms of known surface properties. The data used are multispectral and multiple emission angle data collected during the Geologic Remote Sensing Field Experiment (GRSFE) over a mud-cracked playa, an artificially roughened playa, and a basalt cobble strewn playa at Lunar Lake Playa in Nevada. Airborne remote sensing data and associated field measurements were acquired at the same time. The airborne data were acquired by the Advanced Solid State Array Spectroradiometer (ASAS) instrument, a 29-spectral band imaging system. ASAS reflectance data for a cobble-strewn surface and an artificially rough playa surface on Lunar Lake Playa can be explained with the Hanke model. The cobble and rough playa sites are distinguishable by a single scattering albedo, which is controlled by material composition; by the roughness parameter, which appears to be controlled by the surface texture and particle size; and the symmetry factor of the single particle phase function, which is controlled by particle size and shape. A smooth playa surface consisting of compacted, fine-grained particles has reflectance variations that are also distinct from either the cobble site or rough playa site. The smooth playa appears to behave more like a Lambertian surface that cannot be modeled with the Hapke function.

  9. Production and excitation-emission fluorescence properties of colored dissolved organic matter from marine tropical species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, W. G.; Zika, R. G.

    2009-12-01

    Colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) plays an important key role in the photochemistry and biogeochemical cycling of carbon in the coastal region. Their distribution can vary in space and time due to supply of CDOM from different sources. To determine properties of fluorescence-CDOM produced by various marine tropical species, two species from each of the different marine communities were examined after incubation in the dark for forty-nine (49) days: seagrasses-Enhalus acoroides (EA), Thalassia testudinium (TT); corals-Pocillopora cylindrical (PC), Seriatopora hystrix (SH) ; mangroves- Avicennia marina (AM), Sonneratia alba (SA); brown algae-Hormophysa cuneiformis (HC), Sargassum sp.(SS). Average CDOM production is highest from mangrove species (218 QSU/g-sample/day), followed by seagrass (42 QSU/g-sample/day), brown alga (26 QSU/g-sample/day) then corals (19 QSU/g-sample/day).The fluorescence maximum at 312; 380-420 nm emission-excitation pair appears to be present in all species that is an identified humic-like signature. These results suggest that the production of the fluorescent CDOM fraction is a common phenomenon of tropical marine species and as such constitutes a major part of the marine CDOM pool in coastal regions.

  10. Gas Phase Model of Surface Reactions for N{2} Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marković, V. Lj.; Petrović, Z. Lj.; Pejović, M. M.

    1996-07-01

    The adequacy of the homogeneous gas phase model as a representation of the surface losses of diffusing active particles in gas phase is studied. As an example the recent data obtained for the surface recombination coefficients are reanalyzed. The data were obtained by the application of the breakdown delay times which consists of the measurements of the breakdown delay times t_d as a function of the afterglow period tau. It was found that for the conditions of our experiment, the diffusion should not be neglected as the final results are significantly different when obtained by approximate gas phase representation and by exact numerical solution to the diffusion equation. While application of the gas phase effective coefficients to represent surface losses gives an error in the value of the recombination coefficient, it reproduces correctly other characteristics such as order of the process which can be obtained from simple fits to the experimental data. Dans cet article, nous étudions la validité du modèle approximatif représentant les pertes superficielles des particules actives qui diffusent de la phase gazeuse comme pertes dans la phase homogène du gaz. Les données actuelles du coefficient de recombination en surface sont utilisées par cette vérification . Les données experimentales sont obtenues en utilisant la technique qui consiste en la mesure du temps de retard du début de la décharge en fonction de la période de relaxation. Nous avons trouvé que, pour nos conditions expérimentales, la diffusion ne peut être négligée. Aussi, les résultats finals sont considérablement différents quand ils sont obtenus en utilisant le modèle approximatif par comparaison aves les résultats obtenus par la solution numérique exacte de l'équation de la diffusion. L'application des coefficients effectifs dans la phase gaseuse pour la présentation des pertes superficielles donne, pour les coefficients de la recombinaison, des valeurs qui diffèrent en

  11. Effect of the Dosage of Tourmaline on Far Infrared Emission Properties of Tourmaline/Glass Composite Materials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongchen; Meng, Junping; Liang, Jinsheng; Liu, Jie; Zeng, Zhaoyang

    2016-04-01

    Tourmaline/glass composite materials were prepared by sintering at 600 °C using micron-size tourmaline mineral and glass powders as raw materials. The glass has lower melting point than the transition temperature of tourmaline. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that the far infrared emissivity of composite was significantly higher than that of either tourmaline or glass powders. A highest far infrared emissivity of 0.925 was obtained when the dosage of tourmaline was 10 wt%. The effects of the amount of tourmaline on the far infrared emission properties of composite was also systematically studied by field emission scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction. The tourmaline phase was observed in the composite, showing a particle size of about 70 nm. This meant that the tourmaline particles showed nanocrystallization. They distributed homogenous in the glass matrix when the dosage of tourmaline was not more than 20 wt%. Two reasons were attributed to the improved far infrared emission properties of composite: the particle size of tourmaline-doped was nanocrystallized and the oxidation of Fe2+ (0.076 nm in radius) to Fe3+ (0.064 nm in radius) took place inside the tourmaline-doped. This resulted in the shrinkage of unit cell of the tourmaline in the composite.

  12. Effect of the Dosage of Tourmaline on Far Infrared Emission Properties of Tourmaline/Glass Composite Materials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongchen; Meng, Junping; Liang, Jinsheng; Liu, Jie; Zeng, Zhaoyang

    2016-04-01

    Tourmaline/glass composite materials were prepared by sintering at 600 °C using micron-size tourmaline mineral and glass powders as raw materials. The glass has lower melting point than the transition temperature of tourmaline. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that the far infrared emissivity of composite was significantly higher than that of either tourmaline or glass powders. A highest far infrared emissivity of 0.925 was obtained when the dosage of tourmaline was 10 wt%. The effects of the amount of tourmaline on the far infrared emission properties of composite was also systematically studied by field emission scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction. The tourmaline phase was observed in the composite, showing a particle size of about 70 nm. This meant that the tourmaline particles showed nanocrystallization. They distributed homogenous in the glass matrix when the dosage of tourmaline was not more than 20 wt%. Two reasons were attributed to the improved far infrared emission properties of composite: the particle size of tourmaline-doped was nanocrystallized and the oxidation of Fe2+ (0.076 nm in radius) to Fe3+ (0.064 nm in radius) took place inside the tourmaline-doped. This resulted in the shrinkage of unit cell of the tourmaline in the composite. PMID:27451734

  13. The Late-time Afterglow of the Extremely Energetic Short Burst GRB 090510 Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guelbenzu, A. Nicuesa; Klose, S.; Kruehler, T.; Greiner, J.; Rossi, A.; Kann, D. A.; Olivares, F.; Rau, A.; Afonso, P. M. J.; Elliott, J.; Filgas, R.; Yoldas, A. Kuepcue; McBreen, S.; Nardini, M.; Schady, P.; Schmidl, S.; Sudilovsky, V.; Updike, A. C.; Yoldas, A.

    2012-01-01

    Context. The Swift discovery of the short burst GRB 090510 has raised considerable attention mainly because of two reasons: first, it had a bright optical afterglow, and second it is among the most energetic events detected so far within the entire GRB population (long plus short). The afterglow of GRB 090510 was observed with Swift/UVOT and Swift/XRT and evidence of a jet break around 1.5 ks after the burst has been reported in the literature, implying that after this break the optical and X-ray light curve should fade with the same decay slope. Aims. As noted by several authors, the post-break decay slope seen in the UVOT data is much shallower than the steep decay in the X-ray band, pointing to a (theoretically hard to understand) excess of optical flux at late times. We assess here the validity of this peculiar behavior. Methods. We reduced and analyzed new afterglow light-curve data obtained with the multichannel imager GROND. These additional g'r'i'z' data were then combined with the UVOT and XRT data to study the behavior of the afterglow at late times more stringently. Results. Based on the densely sampled data set obtained with GROND, we find that the optical afterglow of GRB 090510 did indeed enter a steep decay phase starting around 22 ks after the burst. During this time the GROND optical light curve is achromatic, and its slope is identical to the slope of the X-ray data. In combination with the UVOT data this implies that a second break must have occurred in the optical light curve around 22 ks post burst, which, however, has no obvious counterpart in the X-ray band, contradicting the interpretation that this could be another jet break. Conclusions. The GROND data provide the missing piece of evidence that the optical afterglow of GRB 090510 did follow a post-jet break evolution at late times. The break seen in the optical light curve around 22 ks in combination with its missing counterpart in the X-ray band could be due to the passage of the

  14. Implications of the Early X-Ray Afterglow Light Curves of Swift GRBs

    SciTech Connect

    Granot, Jonathan; Konigl, Arieh; Piran, Tsvi; /Hebrew U.

    2006-01-17

    According to current models, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are produced when the energy carried by a relativistic outflow is dissipated and converted into radiation. The efficiency of this process, {epsilon}{sub {gamma}}, is one of the critical factors in any GRB model. The X-ray afterglow light curves of Swift GRBs show an early stage of flattish decay. This has been interpreted as reflecting energy injection. When combined with previous estimates, which have concluded that the kinetic energy of the late ({approx}> 10 hr) afterglow is comparable to the energy emitted in {gamma}-rays, this interpretation implies very high values of {epsilon}{sub {gamma}}, corresponding to {approx}> 90% of the initial energy being converted into {gamma}-rays. Such a high efficiency is hard to reconcile with most models, including in particular the popular internal-shocks model. We re-analyze the derivation of the kinetic energy from the afterglow X-ray flux and re-examine the resulting estimates of the efficiency. We confirm that, if the flattish decay arises from energy injection and the pre-Swift broad-band estimates of the kinetic energy are correct, then {epsilon}{sub {gamma}} {approx}> 0.9. We discuss various issues related to this result, including an alternative interpretation of the light curve in terms of a two-component outflow model, which we apply to the X-ray observations of GRB 050315. We point out, however, that another interpretation of the flattish decay--a variable X-ray afterglow efficiency (e.g., due to a time dependence of afterglow shock microphysical parameters)--is possible. We also show that direct estimates of the kinetic energy from the late X-ray afterglow flux are sensitive to the assumed values of the shock microphysical parameters and suggest that broad-band afterglow fits might have underestimated the kinetic energy (e.g., by overestimating the fraction of electrons that are accelerated to relativistic energies). Either one of these possibilities implies a

  15. Enhanced electrical properties and field emission characteristics of AZO/ZnO-nanowire core-shell structures.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jheng-Ming; Tsai, Shang-You; Ku, Ching-Shun; Lin, Chih-Ming; Chen, San-Yuan; Lee, Hsin-Yi

    2016-06-01

    The electrical properties and field-emission characteristics of ZnO nanowires (ZnO-NWs) fabricated using a vapor-liquid-solid method were systematically investigated. In particular, we explored the effects of Al-doped ZnO (AZO) films (thickness 4-100 nm) deposited on ZnO-NWs using an atomic layer deposition (ALD) method on the optoelectronic properties. The results show that the sheet resistance of net-like ZnO-NW structures can be significantly improved, specifically to become ∼1/1000 of the sheet resistance of the as-grown ZnO-NWs, attaining less than 10 Ω Sq(-1). The emission current density measured at the maximum field was roughly quadrupled relative to that of the as-grown ZnO-NWs. The data of the enhanced field-emission characteristics show that, with the ALD system, the AZO films of small resistance are readily coated on a structure with a high aspect ratio and the coating radius is controlled relative to the turn-on voltage and current density. The ultrathin AZO film from a one-monolayer coating process also significantly improved emission properties through modification of the effective work function at the AZO/ZnO-NW surface. PMID:27210896

  16. Enhanced electrical properties and field emission characteristics of AZO/ZnO-nanowire core-shell structures.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jheng-Ming; Tsai, Shang-You; Ku, Ching-Shun; Lin, Chih-Ming; Chen, San-Yuan; Lee, Hsin-Yi

    2016-06-01

    The electrical properties and field-emission characteristics of ZnO nanowires (ZnO-NWs) fabricated using a vapor-liquid-solid method were systematically investigated. In particular, we explored the effects of Al-doped ZnO (AZO) films (thickness 4-100 nm) deposited on ZnO-NWs using an atomic layer deposition (ALD) method on the optoelectronic properties. The results show that the sheet resistance of net-like ZnO-NW structures can be significantly improved, specifically to become ∼1/1000 of the sheet resistance of the as-grown ZnO-NWs, attaining less than 10 Ω Sq(-1). The emission current density measured at the maximum field was roughly quadrupled relative to that of the as-grown ZnO-NWs. The data of the enhanced field-emission characteristics show that, with the ALD system, the AZO films of small resistance are readily coated on a structure with a high aspect ratio and the coating radius is controlled relative to the turn-on voltage and current density. The ultrathin AZO film from a one-monolayer coating process also significantly improved emission properties through modification of the effective work function at the AZO/ZnO-NW surface.

  17. Physical properties, chemical composition, and cloud forming potential of particulate emissions from a marine diesel engine at various load conditions.

    PubMed

    Petzold, A; Weingartner, E; Hasselbach, J; Lauer, P; Kurok, C; Fleischer, F

    2010-05-15

    Particulate matter (PM) emissions from one serial 4-stroke medium-speed marine diesel engine were measured for load conditions from 10% to 110% in test rig studies using heavy fuel oil (HFO). Testing the engine across its entire load range permitted the scaling of exhaust PM properties with load. Emission factors for particle number, particle mass, and chemical compounds were determined. The potential of particles to form cloud droplets (cloud condensation nuclei, CCN) was calculated from chemical composition and particle size. Number emission factors are (3.43 +/- 1.26) x 10(16) (kg fuel)(-1) at 85-110% load and (1.06 +/- 0.10) x 10(16) (kg fuel)(-1) at 10% load. CCN emission factors of 1-6 x 10(14) (kg fuel)(-1) are at the lower bound of data reported in the literature. From combined thermal and optical methods, black carbon (BC) emission factors of 40-60 mg/(kg fuel) were determined for 85-100% load and 370 mg/(kg fuel) for 10% load. The engine load dependence of the conversion efficiency for fuel sulfur into sulfate of (1.08 +/- 0.15)% at engine idle to (3.85 +/- 0.41)% at cruise may serve as input to global emission calculations for various load conditions.

  18. Properties, performance and emissions of medium concentration methanol-gasoline blends in a single-cylinder, spark-ignition engine

    SciTech Connect

    Sapre, A.R

    1988-01-01

    Methanol-gasoline blends containing 30 to 70 percent by volume methanol have potential to eliminate, or at least alleviate, major technical problems with the use of neat methanol such as safety, cold start and the reduced vehicle range. However, little information exits on their properties, performance and emissions. Experiments were carried out in a spark-ignited, single-cylinder, variable compression ratio, Waukesha RDH engine with primarily commercial grade unleaded gasoline, commercial grade methanol, M30, M50 and M70 methanol-gasoline blends to compare efficiency, performance and emissions characteristics. The fuels were compared at their knock-limited compression ratios and MBT spark-timing.

  19. Effects of biochar and other amendments on the physical properties and greenhouse gas emissions of an artificially degraded soil.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, A; Lal, R; Zimmerman, A R

    2014-07-15

    Short and long-term impacts of biochar on soil properties under field conditions are poorly understood. In addition, there is a lack of field reports of the impacts of biochar on soil physical properties, gaseous emissions and C stability, particularly in comparison with other amendments. Thus, three amendments - biochar produced from oak at 650°C, humic acid (HA) and water treatment residual - (WTR) were added to a scalped silty-loam soil @ 0.5% (w/w) in triplicated plots under soybean. Over the 4-month active growing season, all amendments significantly increased soil pH, but the effect of biochar was the greatest. Biochar significantly increased soil-C by 7%, increased sub-nanopore surface area by 15% and reduced soil bulk density by 13% compared to control. However, only WTR amendment significantly increased soil nanopore surface area by 23% relative to the control. While total cumulative CH4 and CO2 emissions were not significantly affected by any amendment, cumulative N2O emission was significantly decreased in the biochar-amended soil (by 92%) compared to control over the growing period. Considering both the total gas emissions and the C removed from the atmosphere as crop growth and C added to the soil, WTR and HA resulted in net soil C losses and biochar as a soil C gain. However, all amendments reduced the global warming potential (GWP) of the soil and biochar addition even produced a net negative GWP effect. The short observation period, low application rate and high intra-treatment variation resulted in fewer significant effects of the amendments on the physicochemical properties of the soils than one might expect indicating further possible experimentation altering these variables. However, there was clear evidence of amendment-soil interaction processes affecting both soil properties and gaseous emissions, particularly for biochar, that might lead to greater changes with additional field emplacement time.

  20. Influence of gas and treatment time on the surface modification of EPDM rubber treated at afterglow microwave plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Maia, J. V.; Pereira, F. P.; Dutra, J. C. N.; Mello, S. A. C.; Becerra, E. A. O.; Massi, M.; Sobrinho, A. S. da Silva

    2013-11-01

    The ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) rubber possesses excellent physical/chemical bulk properties, is cost-effective, and has been used in the mechanical and aerospace industry. However, it has an inert surface and needs a surface treatment in order to improve its adhesion properties. Plasma modification is the most accepted technique for surface modification of polymers without affecting the properties of the bulk. In this study, an afterglow microwave plasma reactor was used to generate the plasma species responsible for the EPDM surface modification. The plasma modified surfaces were analyzed by means of contact angle measurement, adhesion tests, attenuated total reflection-infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Two experimental variables were analyzed: type of the plasma gases and exposure time were considered. The predominant failure mode was adhesive, for long treatment times a mixture of adhesive and cohesive failure can be observed and the best conditions tested there was an increase of the rupture strength of about 27%, that can be associated mainly with the creation of oxygen containing functional groups on the rubber surface (CO, COC and CO) identified by spectroscopic methods. The predominant failure mode was adhesive, for long treatment times a mixture of adhesive and cohesive failure can be observed. In various conditions tested the contact angles easily decreased more than 500%. What can be concluded that high wettability is a necessary condition to obtain good adhesion, but this is not a sufficient condition.

  1. Properties of z ~ 3-6 Lyman break galaxies. II. Impact of nebular emission at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Barros, S.; Schaerer, D.; Stark, D. P.

    2014-03-01

    Context. To gain insight on the mass assembly and place constraints on the star formation history (SFH) of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs), it is important to accurately determine their properties. Aims: We estimate how nebular emission and different SFHs affect parameter estimation of LBGs. Methods: We present a homogeneous, detailed analysis of the spectral energy distribution (SED) of ~1700 LBGs from the GOODS-MUSIC catalogue with deep multi-wavelength photometry from the U band to 8 μm to determine stellar mass, age, dust attenuation, and star formation rate. Using our SED fitting tool, which takes into account nebular emission, we explore a wide parameter space. We also explore a set of different star formation histories. Results: Nebular emission is found to significantly affect the determination of the physical parameters for the majority of z ~ 3-6 LBGs. We identify two populations of galaxies by determining the importance of the contribution of emission lines to broadband fluxes. We find that ~65% of LBGs show detectable signs of emission lines, whereas ~35% show weak or no emission lines. This distribution is found over the entire redshift range. We interpret these groups as actively star-forming and more quiescent LBGs, respectively. We find that it is necessary to considerer SED fits with very young ages (<50 Myr) to reproduce some colours affected by strong emission lines. Other arguments favouring episodic star formation and relatively short star formation timescales are also discussed. Considering nebular emission generally leads to a younger age, lower stellar mass, higher dust attenuation, higher star formation rate, and a large scatter in the SFR-M⋆ relation. Our analysis yields a trend of increasing specific star formation rate with redshift, as predicted by recent galaxy evolution models. Conclusions: The physical parameters of approximately two thirds of high redshift galaxies are significantly modified when we account for nebular emission. The

  2. Physical properties of thin-film field emission cathodes with molybdenum cones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spindt, C. A.; Brodie, I.; Humphrey, L.; Westerberg, E. R.

    1976-01-01

    Field emission cathodes fabricated using thin-film techniques and electron beam microlithography are described, together with effects obtained by varying the fabrication parameters. The emission originates from the tip of molybdenum cones that are about 1.5 micron tall with a tip radius around 500 A. Such cathodes have been produced in closely packed arrays containing 100 and 5000 cones as well as singly. Maximum currents in the range 50-150 microamp per cone can be drawn. Life tests with the 100-cone arrays drawing 2 mA total emission (or 3 A per sq cm) have proceeded in excess of 7000 hr with about a 10% drop in emission current. Studies are presented of the emission characteristics and current fluctuation phenomena. It is tentatively concluded that the emission arises from only one or a few atomic sites on the cone tips.

  3. GRB 050826: A Subluminous Event at z=0.296 Finds Its Place in the Luminosity Distribution of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirabal, N.; Halpern J. P.; O'Brien, P. T.

    2007-01-01

    We present the optical identification and spectroscopy of the host galaxy of GRB 050826 at redshift z = 0.296 +/- 0.001. Image subtraction among observations obtained on three consecutive nights reveals a fading object 5 hr after the burst, confirming its identification as the optical afterglow of this event. Deep imaging shows that the optical afterglow is offset by 0.4" (1.76 kpc) from the center of its irregular host galaxy, which is typical for long-duration gamma-ray bursts. Combining these results with X-ray measurements acquired by the Swift XRT instrument, we find that GRB 050826 falls entirely within the subluminous, subenergetic group of long gamma-ray bursts at low redshift (z less than or equal to 0.3). The results are discussed in the context of models that possibly account for this trend, including the nature of the central engine, the evolution of progenitor properties as a function of redshift, and incompleteness in current gamma-ray burst samples.

  4. A Correlation between the Intrinsic Brightness and Average Decay Rate of Gamma-Ray Burst X-Ray Afterglow Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racusin, J. L.; Oates, S. R.; de Pasquale, M.; Kocevski, D.

    2016-07-01

    We present a correlation between the average temporal decay ({α }{{X},{avg},\\gt 200{{s}}}) and early-time luminosity ({L}{{X},200{{s}}}) of X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts as observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope. Both quantities are measured relative to a rest-frame time of 200 s after the γ-ray trigger. The luminosity-average decay correlation does not depend on specific temporal behavior and contains one scale-independent quantity minimizing the role of selection effects. This is a complementary correlation to that discovered by Oates et al. in the optical light curves observed by the Swift Ultraviolet Optical Telescope. The correlation indicates that, on average, more luminous X-ray afterglows decay faster than less luminous ones, indicating some relative mechanism for energy dissipation. The X-ray and optical correlations are entirely consistent once corrections are applied and contamination is removed. We explore the possible biases introduced by different light-curve morphologies and observational selection effects, and how either geometrical effects or intrinsic properties of the central engine and jet could explain the observed correlation.

  5. Afterglow thermoluminescence band as a possible early indicator of changes in the photosynthetic electron transport in leaves.

    PubMed

    Roncel, Mercedes; Ortega, José M

    2005-06-01

    The afterglow (AG) band of thermoluminescence (TL) has been investigated in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. Excitation of dark-adapted leaves with two saturating single turn-over flashes induced the appearance of a complex TL glow curve that could be well simulated by three components: the two components, B1 and B2, of the usually called B-band, peaking at 18 and 26 degrees C, respectively, and a band with tmax at 41 degrees C, which we attributed to an AG emission. Illumination of dark-adapted leaves with 720 nm monochromatic and FR lights generated the emission of a sharp single band peaking also around at 41 degrees C, that it is usually assigned to an AG emission band. Dark-incubation of whole plants increased the intensity of AG-band in TL curves induced by two flashes and, in parallel, decreased B-bands. Selective illumination of leaves with light mostly absorbed by PS II (650 nm light) completely abolished the AG-band induced by two flashes, B-band being the only TL band observed. The single AG-band induced by 720 nm light was abolished if leaves were also illuminated with 650 nm light. On the other hand, AG-band could be restored if 650 nm illuminated leaves were afterwards illuminated with 720 nm light. The changes in the intensity of B and AG bands induced by selective illuminations seem to be related to alterations in the redox state of QB and plastoquinone pool. PMID:16049770

  6. Particulate matter and black carbon optical properties and emission factors from prescribed fires in the southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holder, Amara L.; Hagler, Gayle S. W.; Aurell, Johanna; Hays, Michael D.; Gullett, Brian K.

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol optical properties of biomass burning emissions are critical parameters determining how these emissions impact the Earth's climate. Despite their importance, field measurements of aerosol optical properties from fires remain scarce. Aerosol emissions from prescribed fires of forested and grass plots in the southeastern United States were measured and compared to emissions from laboratory simulations. Fine particulate matter (PM2.5), black carbon (BC), and aerosol light scattering and absorption were characterized for all fires. Refractory BC emission factors (EFs) measured at ground level (~2 m) were 0.76 ± 0.15 g/kg, comparable to the 0.93 ± 0.32 g/kg measured aloft (~100-600 m). However, PM EFs measured by aircraft were only 18% (5.4 ± 2.0 g/kg) of those measured on the ground (28.8 ± 9.8 g/kg). Such large differences in PM EFs for the same fire have not been previously reported and may plausibly be due to the differing particle measurement methodologies being applied but also likely related to partitioning of organic compounds to the gas phase as the plume dilutes aloft. Higher PM EFs on the ground may also be related to a higher contribution from smoldering combustion. The absorption Ångström exponents (αa) for the high intensity South Carolina fires were 3.92 ± 0.6, which was larger than prescribed forest fire in Florida (2.84) and the grass fire in Florida (2.71), implying a larger absorption contribution from brown carbon from higher-intensity fires. Aerosol optical properties from laboratory simulations did not represent field measurements.

  7. GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOW PLATEAUS AND GRAVITATIONAL WAVES: MULTI-MESSENGER SIGNATURE OF A MILLISECOND MAGNETAR?

    SciTech Connect

    Corsi, Alessandra; Meszaros, Peter E-mail: nnp@astro.psu.edu

    2009-09-10

    The existence of a shallow decay phase in the early X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts is a common feature. Here we investigate the possibility that this is connected to the formation of a highly magnetized millisecond pulsar, pumping energy into the fireball on timescales longer than the prompt emission. In this scenario, the nascent neutron star could undergo a secular bar-mode instability, leading to gravitational wave losses which would affect the neutron star spin-down. In this case, nearby gamma-ray bursts with isotropic energies of the order of 10{sup 50} ergs would produce a detectable gravitational wave signal emitted in association with an observed X-ray light-curve plateau, over relatively long timescales of minutes to about an hour. The peak amplitude of the gravitational wave signal would be delayed with respect to the gamma-ray burst trigger, offering gravitational wave interferometers such as the advanced LIGO and Virgo the challenging possibility of catching its signature on the fly.

  8. An optical spectrum of the afterglow of a gamma-ray burst at a redshift of z = 6.295.

    PubMed

    Kawai, N; Kosugi, G; Aoki, K; Yamada, T; Totani, T; Ohta, K; Iye, M; Hattori, T; Aoki, W; Furusawa, H; Hurley, K; Kawabata, K S; Kobayashi, N; Komiyama, Y; Mizumoto, Y; Nomoto, K; Noumaru, J; Ogasawara, R; Sato, R; Sekiguchi, K; Shirasaki, Y; Suzuki, M; Takata, T; Tamagawa, T; Terada, H; Watanabe, J; Yatsu, Y; Yoshida, A

    2006-03-01

    The prompt gamma-ray emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) should be detectable out to distances of z > 10 (ref. 1), and should therefore provide an excellent probe of the evolution of cosmic star formation, reionization of the intergalactic medium, and the metal enrichment history of the Universe. Hitherto, the highest measured redshift for a GRB has been z = 4.50 (ref. 5). Here we report the optical spectrum of the afterglow of GRB 050904 obtained 3.4 days after the burst; the spectrum shows a clear continuum at the long-wavelength end of the spectrum with a sharp cut-off at around 9,000 A due to Lyman alpha absorption at z approximately 6.3 (with a damping wing). A system of absorption lines of heavy elements at z = 6.295 +/- 0.002 was also detected, yielding the precise measurement of the redshift. The Si ii fine-structure lines suggest a dense, metal-enriched environment around the progenitor of the GRB.

  9. An optical spectrum of the afterglow of a gamma-ray burst at a redshift of z = 6.295.

    PubMed

    Kawai, N; Kosugi, G; Aoki, K; Yamada, T; Totani, T; Ohta, K; Iye, M; Hattori, T; Aoki, W; Furusawa, H; Hurley, K; Kawabata, K S; Kobayashi, N; Komiyama, Y; Mizumoto, Y; Nomoto, K; Noumaru, J; Ogasawara, R; Sato, R; Sekiguchi, K; Shirasaki, Y; Suzuki, M; Takata, T; Tamagawa, T; Terada, H; Watanabe, J; Yatsu, Y; Yoshida, A

    2006-03-01

    The prompt gamma-ray emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) should be detectable out to distances of z > 10 (ref. 1), and should therefore provide an excellent probe of the evolution of cosmic star formation, reionization of the intergalactic medium, and the metal enrichment history of the Universe. Hitherto, the highest measured redshift for a GRB has been z = 4.50 (ref. 5). Here we report the optical spectrum of the afterglow of GRB 050904 obtained 3.4 days after the burst; the spectrum shows a clear continuum at the long-wavelength end of the spectrum with a sharp cut-off at around 9,000 A due to Lyman alpha absorption at z approximately 6.3 (with a damping wing). A system of absorption lines of heavy elements at z = 6.295 +/- 0.002 was also detected, yielding the precise measurement of the redshift. The Si ii fine-structure lines suggest a dense, metal-enriched environment around the progenitor of the GRB. PMID:16525466

  10. Climate-relevant properties of diesel particulate emissions: results from a piggyback study in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, R; Winijkul, Ekbordin; Bond, Tami C; Thiansathit, Worrarat; Oanh, Nguyen Thi Kim; Paw-armart, Ittipol; Duleep, K G

    2009-06-01

    A "piggyback" approach is used to characterize aerosol emissions to obtain input for large-scale models of atmospheric transport. Particulate and gaseous emissions from diesel trucks, light-duty vehicles, and buses were measured by the Bangkok Pollution Control Department as part of the Developing Integrated Emissions Strategies for Existing Land Transport (DIESEL) project. We added filter-based measurements of carbonaceous composition, particulate light absorption, and water uptake. For 88 "normal" diesel vehicles (PM emission rate < 4.7 g/kg), our best estimate of the average PM2.5 emission rate is 2.2 +/- 0.5 g/kg, whereas for 15 high emitters, it is 8.4 +/- 1.9 g/kg. The effect of Euro standards on PM emission rates was apparent for heavy-duty vehicles, but not for light-duty vehicles. Carbonaceous composition appears relatively consistent, with particulate (artifact-corrected) OC at 17 +/- 1% and EC at 40 +/- 8% of PM for 103 pickups, vans, heavy-duty trucks and buses. The median absorption cross-section for EC is 10.5 m2/g at 532 nm. The history of average emission rate and chemical composition during the project suggests that about 25 vehicles can provide a regional PM emission rate for normal vehicles. Other studies such as remote sensing measurements will be required to estimate the important contribution of high-emitting vehicles.

  11. Climate-relevant properties of diesel particulate emissions: results from a piggyback study in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, R; Winijkul, Ekbordin; Bond, Tami C; Thiansathit, Worrarat; Oanh, Nguyen Thi Kim; Paw-armart, Ittipol; Duleep, K G

    2009-06-01

    A "piggyback" approach is used to characterize aerosol emissions to obtain input for large-scale models of atmospheric transport. Particulate and gaseous emissions from diesel trucks, light-duty vehicles, and buses were measured by the Bangkok Pollution Control Department as part of the Developing Integrated Emissions Strategies for Existing Land Transport (DIESEL) project. We added filter-based measurements of carbonaceous composition, particulate light absorption, and water uptake. For 88 "normal" diesel vehicles (PM emission rate < 4.7 g/kg), our best estimate of the average PM2.5 emission rate is 2.2 +/- 0.5 g/kg, whereas for 15 high emitters, it is 8.4 +/- 1.9 g/kg. The effect of Euro standards on PM emission rates was apparent for heavy-duty vehicles, but not for light-duty vehicles. Carbonaceous composition appears relatively consistent, with particulate (artifact-corrected) OC at 17 +/- 1% and EC at 40 +/- 8% of PM for 103 pickups, vans, heavy-duty trucks and buses. The median absorption cross-section for EC is 10.5 m2/g at 532 nm. The history of average emission rate and chemical composition during the project suggests that about 25 vehicles can provide a regional PM emission rate for normal vehicles. Other studies such as remote sensing measurements will be required to estimate the important contribution of high-emitting vehicles. PMID:19569354

  12. The Radio Afterglow of GRB030329 at Centimetre Wavelengths: Evidence for Multiple Jets or a Structured Jet. Chapter 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rol, E.; vanderHorst, A. J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Strom, R.; Kaper, L.; Kouveliotou, C.; vandenHeuvel, E. P. J.

    2003-01-01

    We present our centimetre wavelength (1.4, 2.3 and 4.9 GHz) light curves of the afterglow of GRB030329, which were obtained with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. Modelling the data according to a collimated afterglow results in a jet-break time t(sub j) of 17 days. This is in contrast with earlier results obtained at higher frequencies, which indicate t(sub j) to be around 10 days. Furthermore, with respect to the afterglow model, some additional flux at the lower frequencies is present when these light curves reach their maximum. We subsequently show that the afterglow can be modelled with two or more components with progressively later jet breaks. From these results we infer that the jet is in fact a structured or a layered jet, where the ejecta with lower Lorentz factors produce additional flux which becomes visible at late times in the lowest frequency bands.

  13. Tunable emission properties by ferromagnetic coupling Mn(II) aggregates in Mn-doped CdS microbelts/nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshad Kamran, Muhammad; Liu, Ruibin; Shi, Li-Jie; Li, Zi-An; Marzi, Thomas; Schöppner, Christian; Farle, Michael; Zou, Bingsuo

    2014-09-01

    Tunable optical emission properties from ferromagnetic semiconductors have not been well identified yet. In this work, high-quality Mn(II)-doped CdS nanowires and micrometer belts were prepared using a controlled chemical vapor deposition technique. The Mn doping could be controlled with time, precursor concentration and temperature. These wires or belts can produce both tunable redshifted emissions and ferromagnetic responses simultaneously upon doping. The strong emission bands at 572, 651, 693, 712, 745, 768, 787 and 803 nm, due to the Mn(II) 4T1(4G) → 6A1(6s) d-d transition, can be detected and accounted for by the aggregation of Mn ions at Cd sites in the CdS lattice at high temperature. These aggregates with ferromagnetism and shifted luminescence are related to the excitonic magnetic polaron (EMP) and localized EMP formations; this is verified by ab initio calculations. The correlation between aggregation-dependent optical emissions and ferromagnetic responses not only presents a new size effect for diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMSs), but also supplies a possible way to study or modulate the ferromagnetic properties of a DMS and to fabricate spin-related photonic devices in the future.

  14. Effects of potassium hydroxide post-treatments on the field-emission properties of thermal chemical vapor deposited carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Li-Ying; Lee, Shih-Fong; Chang, Yung-Ping; Hsiao, Wei-Shao

    2011-12-01

    In this study, a simple potassium hydroxide treatment was applied to functionalize the surface and to modify the structure of multi-walled carbon nanotubes grown on silicon substrates by thermal chemical vapor deposition. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and energy dispersive spectrometry were employed to investigate the mechanism causing the modified field-emission properties of carbon nanotubes. From our experimental data, the emitted currents of carbon nanotubes after potassium hydroxide treatment are enhanced by more than one order of magnitude compared with those of untreated carbon nanotubes. The emitted current density of carbon nanotubes increases from 0.44 mA/cm2 to 7.92 mA/cm2 after 30 minutes KOH treatment. This technique provides a simple, economical, and effective way to enhance the field-emission properties of carbon nanotubes. PMID:22409082

  15. Emission properties and back-bombardment for CeB6 compared to LaB6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakr, Mahmoud; Kawai, M.; Kii, T.; Zen, H.; Masuda, K.; Ohgaki, H.

    2015-02-01

    The emission properties of CeB6 compared to LaB6 thermionic cathodes have been measured using an electrostatic DC gun. Obtaining knowledge of the emission properties is the first step in understanding the back-bombardment effect that limits wide usage of thermionic radio-frequency electron guns. The effect of back-bombardment electrons on CeB6 compared to LaB6 was studied using a numerical simulation model. The results show that for 6 μs pulse duration with input radio-frequency power of 8 MW, CeB6 should experience 14% lower temperature increase and 21% lower current density rise compared to LaB6. We conclude that CeB6 has the potential to become the future replacement for LaB6 thermionic cathodes in radio-frequency electron guns.

  16. 2 μm emission properties and hydroxy groups quenching of Tm3+ in germanate-tellurite glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Muzhi; Lu, Yu; Cao, Ruijie; Tian, Ying; Xu, Shiqing; Zhang, Junjie

    2016-07-01

    Tm3+ activated germanate-tellurite glasses with good thermal stability and anti-crystallization ability were prepared. Efficient 2 μm fluorescence was observed in the optimal concentration Tm3+ doped glass and the corresponding radiative properties were investigated. For Tm3+: 3F4 → 3H6 transition, high spontaneous radiative transition probability (260.75 s-1) and large emission cross section (7.66 × 10-21 cm2) were obtained from the prepared glass. According to Dexter's and Forster's theory, energy transfer microscopic parameters were computed to elucidate the observed 2 μm emissions in detail. Besides, the effect of hydroxy groups quenching was also quantificationally investigated based on simplified rate equations. Results demonstrate that the optimal concentration Tm3+ doped germanate-tellurite glass possessing excellent spectroscopic properties might be an attractive candidate for 2 μm laser or amplifier.

  17. Emission properties and back-bombardment for CeB{sub 6} compared to LaB{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect

    Bakr, Mahmoud; Kawai, M.; Kii, T.; Zen, H.; Masuda, K.; Ohgaki, H.

    2015-02-14

    The emission properties of CeB{sub 6} compared to LaB{sub 6} thermionic cathodes have been measured using an electrostatic DC gun. Obtaining knowledge of the emission properties is the first step in understanding the back-bombardment effect that limits wide usage of thermionic radio-frequency electron guns. The effect of back-bombardment electrons on CeB{sub 6} compared to LaB{sub 6} was studied using a numerical simulation model. The results show that for 6 μs pulse duration with input radio-frequency power of 8 MW, CeB{sub 6} should experience 14% lower temperature increase and 21% lower current density rise compared to LaB{sub 6}. We conclude that CeB{sub 6} has the potential to become the future replacement for LaB{sub 6} thermionic cathodes in radio-frequency electron guns.

  18. Unique Properties of Thermally Tailored Copper: Magnetically Active Regions and Anomalous X-ray Fluorescence Emissions

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    When high-purity copper (≥99.98%wt) is melted, held in its liquid state for a few hours with iterative thermal cycling, then allowed to resolidify, the ingot surface is found to have many small regions that are magnetically active. X-ray fluorescence analysis of these regions exhibit remarkably intense lines from “sensitized elements” (SE), including in part or fully the contiguous series V, Cr, Mn, Fe, and Co. The XRF emissions from SE are far more intense than expected from known impurity levels. Comparison with blanks and standards show that the thermal “tailoring” also introduces strongly enhanced SE emissions in samples taken from the interior of the copper ingots. For some magnetic regions, the location as well as the SE emissions, although persistent, vary irregularly with time. Also, for some regions extraordinarily intense “sensitized iron” (SFe) emissions occur, accompanied by drastic attenuation of Cu emissions. PMID:20037657

  19. Propagation properties of quasiperiodic VLF emissions observed by the DEMETER spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayosh, Mykhaylo; Němec, František; Santolík, Ondřej; Parrot, Michel

    2016-02-01

    Quasiperiodic (QP) emissions are electromagnetic waves in the frequency range of about 0.5-4 kHz observed in the inner magnetosphere that exhibit a periodic time modulation of the wave intensity, with modulation periods from a few seconds up to 10 min. We present results of a detailed wave analysis of nearly 200 events measured by the low-altitude Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER) spacecraft. Upper frequency range of studied emissions was limited to 1 kHz due to the sampling rate of the analyzed data. It is found that QP emissions propagate nearly field aligned at larger geomagnetic latitudes; they become more oblique at midlatitudes and eventually perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field at the geomagnetic equator and thus perpendicular to the Earth's surface, allowing their downward propagation through the ionosphere. The observed propagation pattern is consistent with the source of emissions located in the equatorial region at larger radial distances.

  20. Synthesis, characterization and field emission properties of ultra long aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes grown using chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinson, Herbert A.

    Carbon allotropes and their potential applications have been studied extensively over the past few decades. The exceptional electrical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) make them practical candidates for a variety of electronic devices. The variability of the physical structure and therefore the properties of CNTs is accomplished through different synthesis methods and catalyst selection. Controlled growth of CNTs with precise architectures is necessary for the development of applications such as cold-cathode flat panel displays, field emission devices, and vertical interconnect assemblies. The implementation of aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes (AMWNTs) for these applications will require large scale synthesis methods. AMWNTs where synthesized by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD), using a ferrocene/xylene solution [1g-(Fe(C5H5)2) / 100mL-C6H 4(CH3)2] as a catalyst as well as a carbon source. Growth of AMWNTs was achieved on a variety of substrates including: silicon dioxide and inconel. The AMWNTs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Further characterization was accomplished by investigating the electron transport properties of the AMWNTs. Field emission (FE) devices were fabricated using bulk AMWNTs grown on a silicon substrate. The field emission properties were determined from the Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) plots that were obtained from the I-V curves. Analysis of the data and corresponding F-N plots revealed a field enhancement factor beta of 2490 for the bulk sample grown on silicon. The results confirm that the synthesized ultra-long AMWNTs are exceptional candidates for field emission devices.

  1. Experimental studies on particle emissions from cruising ship, their characteristic properties, transformation and atmospheric lifetime in the marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzold, A.; Hasselbach, J.; Lauer, P.; Baumann, R.; Franke, K.; Gurk, C.; Schlager, H.; Weingartner, E.

    2007-10-01

    Particle emissions from ship engines and their atmospheric transformation in the marine boundary layer (MBL) were investigated in engine test bed studies and in airborne measurements of expanding ship plumes. During the test rig studies, detailed aerosol microphysical and chemical properties were measured in the exhaust gas of a serial MAN B&W seven-cylinder four-stroke marine diesel engine under various load conditions. The emission studies were complemented by airborne aerosol transformation studies in the plume of a large container ship in the English Channel using the DLR aircraft Falcon 20 E-5. Observations from emission studies and plume studies combined with a Gaussian plume dispersion model yield a consistent picture of particle transformation processes from emission to atmospheric processing during plume expansion. Particulate matter emission indices obtained from plume measurements are 8.8±1.0×1015(kg fuel)-1 by number for non-volatile particles and 174±43 mg (kg fuel)-1 by mass for Black Carbon (BC). Values determined for test rig conditions between 85 and 110% engine load are of similar magnitude.