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Sample records for afterglow langmuir probe

  1. Advanced Langmuir Probe (LP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voronka, N. R.; Block, B. P.; Carignan, G. R.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamic response of the MK-2 version of the Langmuir probe amplifier was studied. The settling time of the step response is increased by: (1) stray node-to-ground capacitance at series connections between high value feedback resistors; and (2) input capacitance due to the input cable, FET switches, and input source follower. The stray node-to-ground capacitances can be reduced to tolerable levels by elevating the string of feedback resistors above the printing board. A new feedback network was considered, with promising results. The design uses resistances having much lower nominal values, thereby minimizing the effect of stray capacitances. Faster settling times can be achieved by using an operational amplifier having a higher gain-bandwidth product.

  2. Fast Langmuir probe sweeping circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Milnes, K.A.; Ehlers, K.W.; Leung, K.N.; Owren, H.M.; Williams, M.D.

    1980-06-01

    An inexpensive, simple, and fast Langmuir probe sweeping circuit is presented. This sweeper completes a probe trace in 1.4 ms and has a maximum probe current capability of 5 A. It is suitable for pulsemode plasma operation with density greater than 10/sup 12/ ions/cm/sup 3/.

  3. Surface morphology implications on Langmuir probe measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, Padmashri

    2011-12-01

    Langmuir probes are extensively employed to study the plasmas in space and laboratory environments. Successful measurements require a comprehensive modeling of both the plasma environment and the probe conditions in the form of current collection models. In this thesis, the surface morphology implications on the probe current collection are investigated. This problem is applied and solved in the context of a CubeSat regime. The first problem that is investigated is the consequence of surface structural variability on the current measurements. A new model for dealing with non-uniformity of the probe surface structure is developed in this paper. This model is applied to analyze the Langmuir probe data from a sounding rocket mission that was subjected to surface structural non-homogeneities. This model would be particularly useful for CubeSat platforms where elaborate probe design procedures are not feasible. The second problem that is investigated is the surface area implications on Langmuir probe measurements. It has been established that surface area ratio of the spacecraft to that of the probe needs to be sufficiently large to make successful plasma measurements. CubeSats would therefore pose a challenge for employing Langmuir-type instruments to study the space plasma. We inspect the feasibility of making plasma measurements using Langmuir probes subjected to CubeSat area constraints. This analysis is done for a forthcoming Utah State University (USU)/Space Dynamics Lab (SDL) CubeSat mission.

  4. Investigation of modulated radio frequency plasma etching of GaAs using Langmuir probes

    SciTech Connect

    Law, V.J.; Braithwaite, N.St.J.; Ingram, S.G.

    1994-11-01

    Radio frequency ClCH{sub 3}/H{sub 2} plasma etching of GaAs is examined in the 10-140 mTorr pressure ranging using square-wave modulation of the excitation source to control the etching. A Langmuir probe is used to measure time-resolved electron density, characteristic temperature, and floating potential during the plasma afterglow period. The ClCH{sub 3}/H{sub 2} plasma electron energy is found to be 1.2 {+-} 0.3 eV. The near afterglow plasma density decay has a time constant in the order of {tau}=30 {mu}s at 140 mTorr for 10%-20% ClCh{sub 3} in H{sub 2} and {tau}=100 {mu}s for H{sub 2}. The floating potential continues to decay into the far afterglow, with a characteristic time of the order of milliseconds. The Langmuir probe measurements indicate that the ClCH{sub 3} plasmas the near afterglow is dominated by electron attachment, whereas the far afterglow is dominated by ambipolar diffusion. The GaAs etch rate experiments show that surface reactions continue into the far afterglow, dominating the behavior of the time average etch rate. 11 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Radio frequency-compensated Langmuir probe with auxiliary double probes

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Se-Jin; Oh, Seung-Ju; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2010-09-15

    A radio frequency (rf) compensation design using auxiliary double probes connected in parallel with a main measurement probe was developed for Langmuir probe diagnostics. This probe structure can reduce the sheath impedance of the main probe. In our probe design, the sheath capacitance of the probe can be increased and its sheath resistance can be decreased with increasing dc bias differential voltage between the auxiliary double probes. The I-V characteristic curve and electron energy distribution functions measured by our probe system had sufficient rf compensation performance in inductively coupled plasmas.

  6. Radio frequency-compensated Langmuir probe with auxiliary double probes.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se-Jin; Oh, Seung-Ju; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2010-09-01

    A radio frequency (rf) compensation design using auxiliary double probes connected in parallel with a main measurement probe was developed for Langmuir probe diagnostics. This probe structure can reduce the sheath impedance of the main probe. In our probe design, the sheath capacitance of the probe can be increased and its sheath resistance can be decreased with increasing dc bias differential voltage between the auxiliary double probes. The I-V characteristic curve and electron energy distribution functions measured by our probe system had sufficient rf compensation performance in inductively coupled plasmas. PMID:20886976

  7. Langmuir probe analysis in electronegative plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bredin, Jerome Chabert, Pascal; Aanesland, Ane

    2014-12-15

    This paper compares two methods to analyze Langmuir probe data obtained in electronegative plasmas. The techniques are developed to allow investigations in plasmas, where the electronegativity α{sub 0} = n{sub –}/n{sub e} (the ratio between the negative ion and electron densities) varies strongly. The first technique uses an analytical model to express the Langmuir probe current-voltage (I-V) characteristic and its second derivative as a function of the electron and ion densities (n{sub e}, n{sub +}, n{sub –}), temperatures (T{sub e}, T{sub +}, T{sub –}), and masses (m{sub e}, m{sub +}, m{sub –}). The analytical curves are fitted to the experimental data by adjusting these variables and parameters. To reduce the number of fitted parameters, the ion masses are assumed constant within the source volume, and quasi-neutrality is assumed everywhere. In this theory, Maxwellian distributions are assumed for all charged species. We show that this data analysis can predict the various plasma parameters within 5–10%, including the ion temperatures when α{sub 0} > 100. However, the method is tedious, time consuming, and requires a precise measurement of the energy distribution function. A second technique is therefore developed for easier access to the electron and ion densities, but does not give access to the ion temperatures. Here, only the measured I-V characteristic is needed. The electron density, temperature, and ion saturation current for positive ions are determined by classical probe techniques. The electronegativity α{sub 0} and the ion densities are deduced via an iterative method since these variables are coupled via the modified Bohm velocity. For both techniques, a Child-Law sheath model for cylindrical probes has been developed and is presented to emphasize the importance of this model for small cylindrical Langmuir probes.

  8. Langmuir probe analysis in electronegative plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredin, Jerome; Chabert, Pascal; Aanesland, Ane

    2014-12-01

    This paper compares two methods to analyze Langmuir probe data obtained in electronegative plasmas. The techniques are developed to allow investigations in plasmas, where the electronegativity α0 = n-/ne (the ratio between the negative ion and electron densities) varies strongly. The first technique uses an analytical model to express the Langmuir probe current-voltage (I-V) characteristic and its second derivative as a function of the electron and ion densities (ne, n+, n-), temperatures (Te, T+, T-), and masses (me, m+, m-). The analytical curves are fitted to the experimental data by adjusting these variables and parameters. To reduce the number of fitted parameters, the ion masses are assumed constant within the source volume, and quasi-neutrality is assumed everywhere. In this theory, Maxwellian distributions are assumed for all charged species. We show that this data analysis can predict the various plasma parameters within 5-10%, including the ion temperatures when α0 > 100. However, the method is tedious, time consuming, and requires a precise measurement of the energy distribution function. A second technique is therefore developed for easier access to the electron and ion densities, but does not give access to the ion temperatures. Here, only the measured I-V characteristic is needed. The electron density, temperature, and ion saturation current for positive ions are determined by classical probe techniques. The electronegativity α0 and the ion densities are deduced via an iterative method since these variables are coupled via the modified Bohm velocity. For both techniques, a Child-Law sheath model for cylindrical probes has been developed and is presented to emphasize the importance of this model for small cylindrical Langmuir probes.

  9. High-speed dual Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect

    Lobbia, Robert B.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2010-07-15

    In an effort to temporally resolve the electron density, electron temperature, and plasma potential for turbulent plasma discharges, a unique high-speed dual Langmuir probe (HDLP) has been developed. A traditional single Langmuir probe of cylindrical geometry (exposed to the plasma) is swept simultaneously with a nearby capacitance and noise compensating null probe (fully insulated from the plasma) to enable bias sweep rates on a microsecond timescale. Traditional thin-sheath Langmuir probe theory is applied for interpretation of the collected probe data. Data at a sweep rate of 100 kHz are presented; however the developed system is capable of running at 1 MHz--near the upper limit of the applied electrostatic Langmuir probe theory for the investigated plasma conditions. Large sets (100 000 sweeps at each of 352 spatial locations) of contiguous turbulent plasma properties are collected using simple electronics for probe bias driving and current measurement attaining 80 dB signal-to-noise measurements with dc to 1 MHz bandwidth. Near- and far-field plume measurements with the HDLP system are performed downstream from a modern Hall effect thruster where the time-averaged plasma properties exhibit the approximate ranges: electron density n{sub e} from (1x10{sup 15})-(5x10{sup 16}) m{sup -3}, electron temperature T{sub e} from 1 to 3.5 eV, and plasma potential V{sub p} from 5 to 15 V. The thruster discharge of 200 V (constant anode potential) and 2 A (average discharge current) displays strong, 2.2 A peak-to-peak, current oscillations at 19 kHz, characteristic of the thruster ''breathing mode'' ionization instability. Large amplitude discharge current fluctuations are typical for most Hall thrusters, yet the HDLP system reveals the presence of the same 19 kHz fluctuations in n{sub e}(t), T{sub e}(t), and V{sub p}(t) throughout the entire plume with peak-to-peak divided by mean plasma properties that average 94%. The propagation delays between the discharge current

  10. High-speed dual Langmuir probe.

    PubMed

    Lobbia, Robert B; Gallimore, Alec D

    2010-07-01

    In an effort to temporally resolve the electron density, electron temperature, and plasma potential for turbulent plasma discharges, a unique high-speed dual Langmuir probe (HDLP) has been developed. A traditional single Langmuir probe of cylindrical geometry (exposed to the plasma) is swept simultaneously with a nearby capacitance and noise compensating null probe (fully insulated from the plasma) to enable bias sweep rates on a microsecond timescale. Traditional thin-sheath Langmuir probe theory is applied for interpretation of the collected probe data. Data at a sweep rate of 100 kHz are presented; however the developed system is capable of running at 1 MHz-near the upper limit of the applied electrostatic Langmuir probe theory for the investigated plasma conditions. Large sets (100,000 sweeps at each of 352 spatial locations) of contiguous turbulent plasma properties are collected using simple electronics for probe bias driving and current measurement attaining 80 dB signal-to-noise measurements with dc to 1 MHz bandwidth. Near- and far-field plume measurements with the HDLP system are performed downstream from a modern Hall effect thruster where the time-averaged plasma properties exhibit the approximate ranges: electron density n(e) from (1x10(15))-(5x10(16)) m(-3), electron temperature T(e) from 1 to 3.5 eV, and plasma potential V(p) from 5 to 15 V. The thruster discharge of 200 V (constant anode potential) and 2 A (average discharge current) displays strong, 2.2 A peak-to-peak, current oscillations at 19 kHz, characteristic of the thruster "breathing mode" ionization instability. Large amplitude discharge current fluctuations are typical for most Hall thrusters, yet the HDLP system reveals the presence of the same 19 kHz fluctuations in n(e)(t), T(e)(t), and V(p)(t) throughout the entire plume with peak-to-peak divided by mean plasma properties that average 94%. The propagation delays between the discharge current fluctuations and the corresponding plasma

  11. Ion orbits in a cylindrical Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect

    Taccogna, Francesco; Longo, Savino; Capitelli, Mario

    2006-04-15

    It has been suggested that in weakly collisional sheaths, potential wells and barriers could appear due to ion-neutral momentum and charge transfer collisions. These can cause the presence of repulsed and trapped ions in the region surrounding a negatively biased Langmuir probe, invalidating the commonly used orbital-motion-limited theory of ion current. This is still an open question concerning also the charging and shielding of dust grains, and at present, no fully self-consistent treatment exists. For this reason, a particle-in-cell/test-particle Monte Carlo simulation of the dynamics of an argon plasma in the region surrounding an attracting cylindrical probe at medium gas pressure has been developed. The results of the present simulation for different probe potentials and discharge pressures demonstrate the complex structure of electric potential around the probe and the failure of collisionless theories.

  12. Langmuir Probe Measurements in Plasma Shadows

    SciTech Connect

    Waldmann, O.; Koch, B.; Fussmann, G.

    2006-01-15

    When immersing a target into a plasma streaming along magnetic field lines, a distinct shadow region extending over large distances is observed by the naked eye downstream of the target.In this work we present an experimental study of the effect applying Langmuir probes. In contrast to expectations, there are only marginal changes in the profiles of temperature and density behind masks that cut away about 50% of the plasma cross-section. On the other hand, the mean density is drastically reduced by an order of magnitude. First attempts to simulate the observations by solving the classical 2D diffusion equation were not successful.

  13. Langmuir probe analysis of highly electronegative plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bredin, Jerome; Chabert, Pascal; Aanesland, Ane

    2013-04-15

    A Langmuir probe analysis of highly electronegative plasmas is proposed. Analytical models are used to fit the IV-characteristics and their second derivatives above and below the plasma potential. Ion and electron densities are obtained for {alpha} (negative ion to electron density ratio) up to 3000, and the temperature of negative and positive ions is obtained for {alpha} ranging from 100 to 3000. The transport across a localized magnetic barrier is studied using this technique. It is shown that an ion-ion (electron free) plasma is formed downstream from the barrier at the highest magnetic field.

  14. Calibration of Langmuir probes against microwaves and plasma oscillation probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Francis F.; Evans, John D.; Zawalski, Wade

    2012-10-01

    The use of Langmuir probes for measuring plasma density is subject to uncertainty because the theories commonly used to interpret the data give widely differing results. This is especially troublesome in partially ionized plasmas used, for instance, in the semiconductor industry, since no existing theory adequately treats the case when there are a few collisions between ions and neutral atoms. In this work, plasma densities measured by microwave interferometry and plasma-oscillation probes are compared with those from probe data analyzed with Langmuir's orbital motion limited (OML) theory, the Allen-Boyd-Reynolds (ABR) theory and the Bernstein-Rabinowitz-Laframboise (BRL) theory. It is found that ABR underestimates and BRL overestimates the density, the problems being the neglect of ion orbiting in ABR and the effect of ion-neutral collisions in BRL. The best theory is either OML or the geometric mean between the ABR and BRL results. For thicker probes, other methods are suggested.

  15. Floating Potential Probe Langmuir Probe Data Reduction Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, Thomas L.; Minow, Joseph I.

    2002-01-01

    During its first five months of operations, the Langmuir Probe on the Floating Potential Probe (FPP) obtained data on ionospheric electron densities and temperatures in the ISS orbit. In this paper, the algorithms for data reduction are presented, and comparisons are made of FPP data with ground-based ionosonde and Incoherent Scattering Radar (ISR) results. Implications for ISS operations are detailed, and the need for a permanent FPP on ISS is examined.

  16. Empirical model for analyzing Langmuir Probe characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchill, J. K.

    2013-12-01

    A six-parameter empirical model is presented for obtaining plasma parameters from a Langmuir probe characteristic curve. The model curve is obtained by integrating expressions for the current derivative with respect to bias voltage. Slopes in the saturation regions are modeled by hyperbolic tangent sigmoids; the slope of the transition region between the two is modeled by a Gaussian. Nonlinear least-squares fits of lab- and satellite-based characteristics are used to investigate the robustness of the model over a wide range of plasma conditions. The technique may have utility in automated processing of characteristic curves, such as those from satellites where telemetry bandwidth is at a premium. Moreover, the technique may be useful as a basis for quantitative and systematic investigation of non-thermal and magnetized plasmas.

  17. Behavior of a Single Langmuir Probe in a Magnetic Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pytlinski, J. T.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes an experiment to demonstrate the influence of a magnetic field on the behavior of a single Langmuir probe. The experiment introduces the student to magnetically supported plasma and particle behavior in a magnetic field. (GA)

  18. Temporal limits of a rapidly swept Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect

    Lobbia, Robert B.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2010-07-15

    The finite, electrostatically achievable, temporal resolution of plasma properties from a turbulent discharge is limited by an array of effects wherein the theory of Langmuir probes breaks down. Formulations for the particle transit time, sheath formation time, plasma-probe resonance, polarization current, sheath capacitance, stray capacitance, and mutual capacitance effects are all evaluated for time-resolved operation of a Langmuir probe. The resulting time scales serve to place a theoretical bound on the maximum rate of a rapidly swept Langmuir probe as analyzed with typical thin-sheath collisionless probe theory. For plasma typical to the plume of a Hall effect thruster [xenon plasma, n{sub e}=(1-1000)x10{sup +15} m{sup -3}, and T{sub e}=1-20 eV], upper limits of 0.01-70 kHz are observed for a noncapacitive compensated Langmuir probe. With a high-speed dual Langmuir probe (HDLP) (a regular probe plus a null compensation probe), the upper probing frequency limits are increased to 0.04-11 MHz limited by sheath capacitance in the far and near field, and polarization effects for closer internal measurements. For a typical tokamak edge plasma (with HDLP), the thermally equilibrated hotter species (typically T{sub e}approx =T{sub i}approx =10 to 20 eV) and lighter ions together lend higher limiting rates of ion transit, sheath formation, and sheath capacitance effects (in excess of 20 MHz), but the fully magnetized plasma complicates the collected probe current, limiting the allowable sweep rate to <1 MHz (for a magnetic field of 2 T). Thus we find that the upper rate of Langmuir probe sweeping is in the low megahertz range for both electric thruster and fusion plasma device diagnostics.

  19. Contamination effects on fixed-bias Langmuir probes

    SciTech Connect

    Steigies, C. T.; Barjatya, A.

    2012-11-15

    Langmuir probes are standard instruments for plasma density measurements on many sounding rockets. These probes can be operated in swept-bias as well as in fixed-bias modes. In swept-bias Langmuir probes, contamination effects are frequently visible as a hysteresis between consecutive up and down voltage ramps. This hysteresis, if not corrected, leads to poorly determined plasma densities and temperatures. With a properly chosen sweep function, the contamination parameters can be determined from the measurements and correct plasma parameters can then be determined. In this paper, we study the contamination effects on fixed-bias Langmuir probes, where no hysteresis type effect is seen in the data. Even though the contamination is not evident from the measurements, it does affect the plasma density fluctuation spectrum as measured by the fixed-bias Langmuir probe. We model the contamination as a simple resistor-capacitor circuit between the probe surface and the plasma. We find that measurements of small scale plasma fluctuations (meter to sub-meter scale) along a rocket trajectory are not affected, but the measured amplitude of large scale plasma density variation (tens of meters or larger) is attenuated. From the model calculations, we determine amplitude and cross-over frequency of the contamination effect on fixed-bias probes for different contamination parameters. The model results also show that a fixed bias probe operating in the ion-saturation region is affected less by contamination as compared to a fixed bias probe operating in the electron saturation region.

  20. An automated Langmuir probe controller for plasma characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustos, A.; Juarez, A. M.; de Urquijo, J.; Muñoz, M.

    2016-08-01

    We present the design, construction and test of an automated electronic controller for a Langmuir plasma probe. The novel aspect of this system lies in the isolation of the high voltage present in the discharge from the grounded reference of the controller. This controller detects currents over the range from  ±1 μA to  ±50 mA, using dynamic and automated switching of a transresistance amplifier. This automated Langmuir probe (LP) system has been successfully tested in a glow discharge in argon at 0.8 and 10 Torr.

  1. The theory of Langmuir probes in strong electrostatic potential structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borovsky, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    The operation of collecting and emitting Langmuir probes and double probes within time-stationary strong electrostatic potential structures is analyzed. The cross sections of spherical and cylindrical probes to charged particles within the structures are presented and used to obtain the current-voltage characteristics of idealized probes. The acquisition of plasma parameters from these characteristics is outlined, and the operation of idealized floating double-probe systems is analyzed. Probe surface effects are added to the idealized theory, and some surface effects pertinent to spacecraft probes are quantified. Magnetic field effects on idealized probes are examined, and the time required for floating probes to change their potentials by collecting charge and by emitting photoelectrons is discussed. Calculations on the space-charge effects of probe-perturbed beams and on the space-charge limiting of electron emission are given in an appendix.

  2. Contamination effects on fixed-bias Langmuir probes.

    PubMed

    Steigies, C T; Barjatya, A

    2012-11-01

    Langmuir probes are standard instruments for plasma density measurements on many sounding rockets. These probes can be operated in swept-bias as well as in fixed-bias modes. In swept-bias Langmuir probes, contamination effects are frequently visible as a hysteresis between consecutive up and down voltage ramps. This hysteresis, if not corrected, leads to poorly determined plasma densities and temperatures. With a properly chosen sweep function, the contamination parameters can be determined from the measurements and correct plasma parameters can then be determined. In this paper, we study the contamination effects on fixed-bias Langmuir probes, where no hysteresis type effect is seen in the data. Even though the contamination is not evident from the measurements, it does affect the plasma density fluctuation spectrum as measured by the fixed-bias Langmuir probe. We model the contamination as a simple resistor-capacitor circuit between the probe surface and the plasma. We find that measurements of small scale plasma fluctuations (meter to sub-meter scale) along a rocket trajectory are not affected, but the measured amplitude of large scale plasma density variation (tens of meters or larger) is attenuated. From the model calculations, we determine amplitude and cross-over frequency of the contamination effect on fixed-bias probes for different contamination parameters. The model results also show that a fixed bias probe operating in the ion-saturation region is affected less by contamination as compared to a fixed bias probe operating in the electron saturation region. PMID:23206057

  3. Preliminary Langmuir probe results on the CTX gun experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Tuszewski, M.

    1981-12-01

    Preliminary results obtained with a double Langmuir probe in the Compact Toroid experiment facility confirm the existence of a gun plasma of n approx. 5 x 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/ and T approx. 10 eV lasting for approx. 250 to 400 ..mu..s, which is consistent with interferometry and Thomson scattering data. The probe current characteristics as a function of voltage suggest non-Maxwellian features of the particles distribution functions.

  4. Solar extreme ultraviolet sensor and advanced langmuir probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voronka, N. R.; Block, B. P.; Carignan, G. R.

    1992-01-01

    For more than two decades, the staff of the Space Physics Research Laboratory (SPRL) has collaborated with the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in the design and implementation of Langmuir probes (LP). This program of probe development under the direction of Larry Brace of GSFC has evolved methodically with innovations to: improve measurement precision, increase the speed of measurement, and reduce the weight, size, power consumption and data rate of the instrument. Under contract NAG5-419 these improvements were implemented and are what characterize the Advanced Langmuir Probe (ALP). Using data from the Langmuir Probe on the Pioneer Venus Orbiter, Brace and Walter Hoegy of GSFC demonstrated a novel method of monitoring the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) flux. This led to the idea of developing a sensor similar to a Langmuir probe specifically designed to measure solar EUV (SEUV) that uses a similar electronics package. Under this contract, a combined instrument package of the ALP and SEUV sensor was to be designed, constructed, and laboratory tested. Finally the instrument was to be flight tested as part of sounding rocket experiment to acquire the necessary data to validate this method for possible use in future earth and planetary aeronomy missions. The primary purpose of this contract was to develop the electronics hardware and software for this instrument, since the actual sensors were suppied by GSFC. Due to budget constraints, only a flight model was constructed. These electronics were tested and calibrated in the laboratory, and then the instrument was integrated into the rocket payload at Wallops Flight Facility where it underwent environmental testing. After instrument recalibration at SPRL, the payload was reintegrated and launched from the Poker Flat Research Range near Fairbanks Alaska. The payload was successfully recovered and after refurbishment underwent further testing and developing to improve its performance for future use.

  5. Operation of a Langmuir Probe in a Photoelectron Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dove, Adrienne; Robertson, Scott; Horanyi, Mihaly; Poppe, Andrew; Wang Xu

    2011-11-29

    Dust transport on the lunar surface is likely facilitated by the variable electric fields that are generated by changing plasma conditions. We have developed an experimental apparatus to study lunar photoelectric phenomena and gain a better understanding of the conditions controlling dust transport. As an initial step, Langmuir probe measurements are used to characterize the photoelectron plasma produced above a Zr surface, and these techniques will be extended to CeO{sub 2} and lunar simulant surfaces.

  6. Results from Langmuir probe measurements in PDX and PLT

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.

    1982-02-01

    Fits to Langmuir probe measurements made near the midplanes of the PDX and PLT tokamaks imply density and electron temperature profiles. In ohmically heated plasmas with either circular or diverted configurations, the edge densities decrease approximately exponentially with e-folding lengths of 1-4cm. Electron temperatures are low (5 to 50 eV) and decrease more gradually than the density profiles in the outer edge.

  7. A fixed bias, floating double probe technique with simple Langmuir probe characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szuszczewicz, E. P.

    1971-01-01

    A new floating double-probe method is presented which has advantages over other floated-probe systems previously described in literature. The method utilized two electrodes, one of constant area and the other with a variable area. The two-electrode configuration is separated by a fixed bias voltage. The current-voltage characteristics of the new technique, which are generated by varying the area of the one electrode, are identical to those of a simple Langmuir probe, thus coupling all the advantages of a floated-probe system with the simple analysis scheme generally applied to the Langmuir probe for the determination of plasma density and temperature.

  8. Fast reciprocating Langmuir probe for the DIII-D divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, J.G.; Hunter, J.; Tafoya, B.; Ulrickson, M.; Watson, R.D.; Moyer, R.A.; Cuthbertson, J.W.; Gunner, G.; Lehmer, R.; Luong, P.; Hill, D.N.; Mascaro, M.; Robinson, J.I.; Snider, R.; Stambaugh, R.

    1997-01-01

    A new reciprocating Langmuir probe was used to measure density and temperature profiles, ion flow, and potential fluctuation levels from the lower divertor floor up to the X point on the DIII-D Tokamak. This probe is designed to make fast (2 kHz swept, 20 kHz Mach, 500 kHz Vfloat) measurements with 2 mm spatial resolution in the region where the largest gradients on the plasma open flux tubes are found and therefore provide the best benchmarks for scrap-off layer and divertor numerical models. Profiles are constructed using the 300 ms time history of the probe measurements during the 25 cm reciprocating stroke. Both single and double null plasmas can be measured and compared with a 20 Hz divertor Thomson scattering system. The probe head is constructed of four different kinds of graphite to optimize the electrical and thermal characteristics. Electrically insulated pyrolytic graphite rings act as a heat shield to absorb the plasma heat flux on the probe shaft and are mounted on a carbon/carbon composite core for mechanical strength. The Langmuir probe sampling tips are made of a linear carbon fiber composite. The mechanical, electrical, data acquisition, and power supply systems will be described. Initial measurements will also be presented. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Design of a multi-needle Langmuir probe system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekkeng, T. A.; Jacobsen, K. S.; Bekkeng, J. K.; Pedersen, A.; Lindem, T.; Lebreton, J.-P.; Moen, J. I.

    2010-08-01

    The main goal of this work was to develop a Langmuir probe instrument for sounding rockets capable of performing high-speed absolute electron density measurements, and thereby be able to detect sub-meter ionospheric plasma density structures. The system comprises four cylindrical probes with a diameter of 0.51 mm and a length of 25 mm, each operated at a different fixed bias voltage in the electron saturation region. The probe diameter was chosen significantly less than the Debye shielding length to avoid complex sheath effects but large enough to ensure a probe area sufficiently large to accurately measure the electron currents drawn by the probes (in the range 1 nA to 1 µA). The crucial feature of the University of Oslo's multi-needle Langmuir probe (m-NLP) is that it is possible to determine the electron density without the need to know the spacecraft potential and the electron temperature Te. The m-NLP instrument covers a density range from ne = 109 m-3 to 1012 m-3, with sampling rates up to 9 kHz. The m-NLP instrument was successfully tested on the ICI-2 (Investigation of Cusp Irregularities) sounding rocket flight from Svalbard on 5 December 2008.

  10. Analysis of cylindrical Langmuir probe using experiment and different theories

    SciTech Connect

    Hassouba, M. A.; Galaly, A. R.; Rashed, U. M.

    2013-03-15

    Cylindrical probe data have been analyzed using different theories in order to determine some plasma parameters (electron temperature and electron and ion densities). Langmuir probe data are obtained in a cylindrical DC glow discharge in the positive column plasma at argon gas pressures varied from 0.5 to 6 Torr and at constant discharge current equal to 10 mA. The electron density has calculated from the electron current at the space potential and from Orbital Motion Limited (OML) collisionless theory. Ion density has obtained from the OML analysis of the ion saturation currents. In addition, the electron temperature has measured by three different methods using probe and electrons currents. The electron temperature T{sub e}, plasma density n{sub e}, and space potential V{sub s}, have been obtained from the measured single cylindrical probe I-V characteristic curves. The radial distribution of the electron temperature and plasma density along the glow discharge are measured and discussed. Using the collisionless theories by Langmuir cylindrical probe and up to several Torr argon gas pressures the differences between the values of electron temperature and electron and ion densities stay within reasonable error limits.

  11. Double Langmuir probe diagnostic of a resonant cavity microwave discharge

    SciTech Connect

    McColl, W.; Brooks, C.; Brake, M.L. )

    1993-07-01

    An Asmussen resonant cavity operating at 2.45 GHz provides the basis for the application of probe theory to a microwave discharge. A double Langmuir probe is inserted into a discharge produced by a microwave resonant cavity. Typical operating pressures range from 0.5 to 50 Torr in helium, with continuous wave microwave powers ranging from 60 to 120 W at 2.45 GHz. Typical probe data indicates electron densities in the range of 10[sup 11]--10[sup 12] cm[sup [minus]3] with electron temperatures of 5 to 20 eV. The probe data is compared with the results of a model based upon the electromagnetics of the discharge.

  12. Modeling of current characteristics of Segmented Langmuir Probe on DEMETER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imtiaz, Nadia; Marchand, Richard

    2012-10-01

    We model current characteristics of a Segmented Langmuir probe mounted on DEMETER satellite. The probe is used to measure electron density and temperature in the ionosphere on DEMETER at altitudes of 700 km.It also serves as a Mach probe and used to measure the plasma flow velocities in satellite frame of reference.The probe is partitioned into seven segments: six electrically insulated spherical caps and a Guard electrode (sphere). Comparisons are made between the model predictions and measurements for characteristics of various segments for actual ionospheric plasma conditions encountered along DEMETER orbit. Segment characteristics are computed numerically with PTetra, a 3 D PIC simulation code. The model accounts for several physical effects of importance in the interaction of spacecraft with the space environment e.g. satellite charging, photoelectron and secondary electron emission. The supersonic flow of plasma results in different characteristics for different segments of the probe. This anisotropy in turn can be used to infer the velocity of the background plasma. It is observed in that a positive bias can significantly modify plasma sheath region and wake formation around the probe.Computed characteristics and their angular anisotropy are compared with measurements.

  13. Langmuir probe theory and the problem of anisotropic collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyrala, A.

    1981-01-01

    A more general understanding of Langmuir probe theory by going beyond particular coordinate systems as far as possible was studied. To delineate the role of initial velocities in the problem and to characterize the interaction between the velocity flow field and the electrostatic potential field both of which enter into the determination of particle trajectories are desired. The probe is supposed to be negatively charged throughout and the ensuing region of positive space charge about it differs fundamentally from the plasma region beyond in the sense that the former represents a region in which deterministic trajectories dominate while the lattice is a region dominated by statistical interactions largely controlled by the collisionless stationary Boltzmann equation. A general solution of this Boltzmann equation is given and its relationship to the problem of saturation current density in 3D is elucidated.

  14. Relativistic current collection by a cylindrical Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Arriaga, G.; Sanmartin, J. R.

    2012-06-15

    The current I to a cylindrical Langmuir probe with a bias {Phi}{sub p} satisfying {beta}{identical_to}e{Phi}{sub p}/m{sub e}c{sup 2}{approx}O(1) is discussed. The probe is considered at rest in an unmagnetized plasma composed of electrons and ions with temperatures kT{sub e}{approx}kT{sub i} Much-Less-Than m{sub e}c{sup 2}. For small enough radius, the probe collects the relativistic orbital-motion-limited (OML) current I{sub OML}, which is shown to be larger than the non-relativistic result; the OML current is proportional to {beta}{sup 1/2} and {beta}{sup 3/2} in the limits {beta} Much-Less-Than 1 and {beta} Much-Greater-Than 1, respectively. Unlike the non-relativistic case, the electron density can exceed the unperturbed density value. An asymptotic theory allowed to compute the maximum radius of the probe to collect OML current, the sheath radius for probe radius well below maximum and how the ratio I/I{sub OML} drops below unity when the maximum radius is exceeded. A numerical algorithm that solves the Vlasov-Poisson system was implemented and density and potential profiles presented. The results and their implications in a possible mission to Jupiter with electrodynamic bare tethers are discussed.

  15. Revisiting plasma hysteresis with an electronically compensated Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, P. K.; Singh, S. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Mattoo, S. K.

    2012-09-15

    The measurement of electron temperature in plasma by Langmuir probes, using ramped bias voltage, is seriously affected by the capacitive current of capacitance of the cable between the probe tip and data acquisition system. In earlier works a dummy cable was used to balance the capacitive currents. Under these conditions, the measured capacitive current was kept less than a few mA. Such probes are suitable for measurements in plasma where measured ion saturation current is of the order of hundreds of mA. This paper reports that controlled balancing of capacitive current can be minimized to less than 20 {mu}A, allowing plasma measurements to be done with ion saturation current of the order of hundreds of {mu}A. The electron temperature measurement made by using probe compensation technique becomes independent of sweep frequency. A correction of {<=}45% is observed in measured electron temperature values when compared with uncompensated probe. This also enhances accuracy in the measurement of fluctuation in electron temperature as {delta}T{sub pk-pk} changes by {approx}30%. The developed technique with swept rate {<=}100 kHz is found accurate enough to measure both the electron temperature and its fluctuating counterpart. This shows its usefulness in measuring accurately the temperature fluctuations because of electron temperature gradient in large volume plasma device plasma with frequency ordering {<=}50 kHz.

  16. Langmuir probe measurements in a VHF dielectric plasma etcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorf, Leonid; Ramaswamy, Kartik; Collins, Ken; Merry, Walter

    2008-10-01

    Langmuir probe (LP) measurements in a realistic VHF CCP discharge are complicated by a number of factors, such as absence of a well-defined DC ground reference and unpredictable behavior of standard electronic components at VHF. The VHF source can produce plasma very efficiently; therefore, to reach the same plasma density, VHF discharges require lower power than HF discharges. Nevertheless, even at low source power (˜100--200W with Ne<= 10^10 cm-3), RF potential in a VHF CCP discharge can be large, especially compared to that in an ICP discharge with similar parameters. Uncompensated RF potential distorts both electron and ion parts of the measured V-I characteristic, resulting in unrealistic plasma parameters. Here, we present preliminary results of our work to develop a LP system suitable for measurements in a 162 MHz dielectric plasma etcher. The probe design employs many previously developed RF compensation techniques. Furthermore, all electronic components of the probe and the measuring circuit were characterized using a network analyzer to select adequate values. The probe was used to study the effects of magnetic field, input power, pressure, and other operating conditions on electron and ion density profiles. Electron temperature was found to be in the range of 1.8 -- 3.5 eV, and the shape of ion saturation curve was found to be in agreement with OML theory.

  17. Langmuir probe measurements of weakly collisional electropositive RF discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Paul; Dyson, Anthony; Allen, John E.

    2001-05-01

    We report on Langmuir probe measurements of low-pressure (0.1-20 Pa) electropositive plasmas in an RF discharge at 13.56 MHz. From the probe I-V characteristic it is found that the electron density inferred from the ion current in the ion saturation region using radial motion (Allen, Boyd and Reynolds, ABR) theory can be up to one-half that obtained directly from the electron current at the plasma potential. The reduction in the ion current is attributed to orbital motion (OM) of the ions and also to a small number of ion-neutral collisions in the presheath. We show that if a sufficiently large probe is chosen so as to minimize the OM effects then the collisional theory developed by Shih and Levi (1971) can be used to give an appropriate correction factor over a narrow pressure range. The corrected electron density is found to agree with the knee current value to typically 10% for Ar, N2 and Kr plasmas.

  18. Modeling of current characteristics of segmented Langmuir probe on DEMETER

    SciTech Connect

    Imtiaz, Nadia; Marchand, Richard; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre

    2013-05-15

    We model the current characteristics of the DEMETER Segmented Langmuir probe (SLP). The probe is used to measure electron density and temperature in the ionosphere at an altitude of approximately 700 km. It is also used to measure the plasma flow velocity in the satellite frame of reference. The probe is partitioned into seven collectors: six electrically insulated spherical segments and a guard electrode (the rest of the sphere and the small post). Comparisons are made between the predictions of the model and DEMETER measurements for actual ionospheric plasma conditions encountered along the satellite orbit. Segment characteristics are computed numerically with PTetra, a three-dimensional particle in cell simulation code. In PTetra, space is discretized with an unstructured tetrahedral mesh, thus, enabling a good representation of the probe geometry. The model also accounts for several physical effects of importance in the interaction of spacecraft with the space environment. These include satellite charging, photoelectron, and secondary electron emissions. The model is electrostatic, but it accounts for the presence of a uniform background magnetic field. PTetra simulation results show different characteristics for the different probe segments. The current collected by each segment depends on its orientation with respect to the ram direction, the plasma composition, the magnitude, and the orientation of the magnetic field. It is observed that the presence of light H{sup +} ions leads to a significant increase in the ion current branch of the I-V curves of the negatively polarized SLP. The effect of the magnetic field is demonstrated by varying its magnitude and direction with respect to the reference magnetic field. It is found that the magnetic field appreciably affects the electron current branch of the I-V curves of certain segments on the SLP, whereas the ion current branch remains almost unaffected. PTetra simulations are validated by comparing the computed

  19. Langmuir Probe Spacecraft Potential End Item Specification Document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilchrist, Brian; Curtis, Leslie (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This document describes the Langmuir Probe Spacecraft Potential (LPSP) investigation of the plasma environment in the vicinity of the ProSEDS Delta II spacecraft. This investigation will employ a group of three (3) Langmuir Probe Assemblies, LPAs, mounted on the Delta II second stage to measure the electron density and temperature (n(sub e) and T(sub e)), the ion density (n(sub i)), and the spacecraft potential (V(sub s)) relative to the surrounding ionospheric plasma. This document is also intended to define the technical requirements and flight-vehicle installation interfaces for the design, development, assembly, testing, qualification, and operation of the LPSP subsystem for the Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) and its associated Ground Support Equipment (GSE). This document also defines the interfaces between the LPSP instrument and the ProSEDS Delta II spacecraft, as well as the design, fabrication, operation, and other requirements established to meet the mission objectives. The LPSP is the primary measurement instrument designed to characterize the background plasma environment and is a supporting instrument for measuring spacecraft potential of the Delta II vehicle used for the ProSEDS mission. Specifically, the LPSP will use the three LPAs equally spaced around the Delta II body to make measurements of the ambient ionospheric plasma during passive operations to aid in validating existing models of electrodynamic-tether propulsion. These same probes will also be used to measure Delta II spacecraft potential when active operations occur. When the electron emitting plasma contractor is on, dense neutral plasma is emitted. Effective operation of the plasma contactor (PC) will mean a low potential difference between the Delta II second stage and the surrounding plasma and represents one of the voltage parameters needed to fully characterize the electrodynamic-tether closed circuit. Given that the LP already needs to be well away from any

  20. Theory and Capability of the Planar Langmuir Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, D. L.; Roddy, P. A.; Ballenthin, J.; Machuzak, J.; Albarran, R. M.; Klenzing, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Planar Langmuir Probe, PLP, in its simplest form is just a flat plate and perhaps a guard ring placed on the ram side of a Low Earth Orbit spacecraft such that it can intersect an uninterrupted flow of plasma. At small negative potential, it measures the ion ram current and thus the ion density with great accuracy, and when swept to positive potential, electrons are collected and the electron temperature may be extracted from the current-voltage characteristic. With rapid sampling, the turbulence spectrum of the plasma may also be sampled. AFRL has pioneered the development and application of the PLP for close to 2 decades. The PLP was used on numerous rocket flights in the 90's, was flown on the CHAMP satellite from 2002 to 2011, on the C/NOFS satellite from 2008 to present, and a new version is in development for possible future flights. This talk will review the design variations to date, data validation, lessons learned, and theory of operation. In particular we will present methods for extracting the electron temperature from the current-voltage characteristic, and address how the probes can measure higher moments of the electron distribution as suggested by the observations of Rother et.al. (Radio Sci, Vol 45, 2010).

  1. The Langmuir Probe and Waves (LPW) Instrument for MAVEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, L.; Ergun, R. E.; Delory, G. T.; Eriksson, A.; Westfall, J.; Reed, H.; McCauly, J.; Summers, D.; Meyers, D.

    2015-12-01

    We describe the sensors, the sensor biasing and control, the signal-processing unit, and the operation of the Langmuir Probe and Waves (LPW) instrument on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission. The LPW instrument is designed to measure the electron density and temperature in the ionosphere of Mars and to measure spectral power density of waves (DC-2 MHz) in Mars' ionosphere, including one component of the electric field. Low-frequency plasma waves can heat ions resulting in atmospheric loss. Higher-frequency waves are used to calibrate the density measurement and to study strong plasma processes. The LPW is part of the Particle and Fields (PF) suite on the MAVEN spacecraft. The LPW instrument utilizes two, 40 cm long by 0.635 cm diameter cylindrical sensors with preamplifiers, which can be configured to measure either plasma currents or plasma waves. The sensors are mounted on a pair of {˜}7 meter long stacer booms. The sensors and nearby surfaces are controlled by a Boom Electronics Board (BEB). The Digital Fields Board (DFB) conditions the analog signals, converts the analog signals to digital, processes the digital signals including spectral analysis, and packetizes the data for transmission. The BEB and DFB are located inside of the Particle and Fields Digital Processing Unit (PFDPU).

  2. DC Langmuir Probe for Measurement of Space Plasma: A Brief Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Koichiro

    2015-09-01

    Herein, we discuss the in situ measurement of the electron temperature in the ionosphere/plasmasphere by means of DC Langmuir probes. Major instruments which have been reported are a conventional DC Langmuir probe, whose probe voltage is swept; a pulsed probe, which uses pulsed bias voltage; a rectification probe, which uses sinusoidal signal; and a resonance cone probe, which uses radio wave propagation. The content reviews past observations made with the instruments above. We also discuss technical factors that should be taken into account for reliable measurement, such as problems related to the contamination of electrodes and the satellite surface. Finally, we discuss research topics to be studied in the near future.

  3. Improved optogalvanic detection with voltage biased Langmuir probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, A.; Berglund, M.; Salehpour, M.

    2014-12-01

    Optogalvanic detectors show great potential for infrared spectroscopy, especially in cavity enhanced techniques where they, in contrast to ordinary absorption detectors, can perform intracavity measurements. This enables them to utilize the signal-to-noise ratio improvement gained from the extended effective path length inside an optical cavity, without losing signal strength due to the limited amount of light exiting through the rear mirror. However, if optogalvanic detectors are to become truly competitive, their intrinsic sensitivity and stability has to be improved. This, in turn, requires a better understanding of the mechanisms behind the generation of the optogalvanic signal. The study presented here focuses on an optogalvanic detector based on a miniaturized stripline split-ring resonator plasma source equipped with Langmuir probes for detecting the optogalvanic signal. In particular, the effect of applying a constant bias voltage to one of the probes is investigated, both with respect to the sensitivity and stability, and to the mechanism behind the generation of the signal. Experiments with different bias voltages at different pressures and gas composition have been conducted. In particular, two different gas compositions (pure CO2 and 0.25% CO2 in 99.75% N2) at six different pressures (100 Pa to 600 Pa) have been studied. It has been shown that probe biasing effectively improves the performance of the detector, by increasing the amplitude of the signal linearly over one order of magnitude, and the stability by about 40% compared with previous studies. Furthermore, it has been shown that relatively straightforward plasma theory can be applied to interpret the mechanism behind the generation of the signal, although additional mechanisms, such as rovibrational excitation from electron-molecule collisions, become apparent in CO2 plasmas with electron energies in the 1-6 eV range. With the achieved performance improvement and the more solid theoretical

  4. Improved optogalvanic detection with voltage biased Langmuir probes

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, A.; Salehpour, M.; Berglund, M.

    2014-12-28

    Optogalvanic detectors show great potential for infrared spectroscopy, especially in cavity enhanced techniques where they, in contrast to ordinary absorption detectors, can perform intracavity measurements. This enables them to utilize the signal-to-noise ratio improvement gained from the extended effective path length inside an optical cavity, without losing signal strength due to the limited amount of light exiting through the rear mirror. However, if optogalvanic detectors are to become truly competitive, their intrinsic sensitivity and stability has to be improved. This, in turn, requires a better understanding of the mechanisms behind the generation of the optogalvanic signal. The study presented here focuses on an optogalvanic detector based on a miniaturized stripline split-ring resonator plasma source equipped with Langmuir probes for detecting the optogalvanic signal. In particular, the effect of applying a constant bias voltage to one of the probes is investigated, both with respect to the sensitivity and stability, and to the mechanism behind the generation of the signal. Experiments with different bias voltages at different pressures and gas composition have been conducted. In particular, two different gas compositions (pure CO{sub 2} and 0.25% CO{sub 2} in 99.75% N{sub 2}) at six different pressures (100 Pa to 600 Pa) have been studied. It has been shown that probe biasing effectively improves the performance of the detector, by increasing the amplitude of the signal linearly over one order of magnitude, and the stability by about 40% compared with previous studies. Furthermore, it has been shown that relatively straightforward plasma theory can be applied to interpret the mechanism behind the generation of the signal, although additional mechanisms, such as rovibrational excitation from electron-molecule collisions, become apparent in CO{sub 2} plasmas with electron energies in the 1–6 eV range. With the achieved performance improvement and

  5. Langmuir Probe Distortions and Probe Compensation in an Inductively Coupled Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ji, J. S.; Cappelli, M. A.; Kim, J. S.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Sharma, S. P.

    1999-01-01

    In many RF discharges, Langmuir probe measurements are usually made against a background of sinusoidal (and not so sinusoidal) fluctuations in the plasma parameters such as the plasma potential (Vp), the electron number density (ne), and the electron temperature (Te). The compensation of sinusoidal fluctuations in Vp has been extensively studied and is relatively well understood. Less attention has been paid to the possible distortions introduced by small fluctuations in plasma density and/or plasma temperature, which may arise in the sheath and pre-sheath regions of RF discharges. Here, we present the results of a model simulation of probe characteristics subject to fluctuations in both Vp and ne. The modeling of probe distortion due to possible fluctuations in Te is less straightforward. A comparison is presented of calculations with experimental measurements using a compensated and uncompensated Langmuir probe in an inductively coupled GEC reference cell plasma, operating on Ar and Ar/CF4 mixtures. The plasma parameters determined from the compensated probe characteristics are compared to previous measurements of others made in similar discharges, and to our own measurements of the average electron density derived from electrical impedance measurements.

  6. Ram-wake effects on plasma current collection of the PIX 2 Langmuir probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    The Plasma Interaction Experiment 2 (PIX 2) Langmuir probe readings of the same polar magnetospheric regions taken on consecutive orbits showed occasional apparent densities as much as 10 times lower than the average, although each pass clearly showed density structures related to the day/night boundary. At other points in the orbit, Langmuir probe currents varied by as much as a factor of 20 on a time scale of minutes. The hypothesis is advanced that these apparent inconsistencies in Langmuir probe current are the results of the probe's orientation relative to the body of the spacecraft and the velocity vector. Theoretical studies predict a possible depletion in collected electron current by a factor of 100 in the wake. Experimental results from other spacecraft indicate that a wake electron depletion by a factor of 10 or so is realistic. This amount of depletion is consistent with the PIX 2 data if the spacecraft was rotating. Both the Sun sensor and temperature sensor data on PIX 2 show a complex variation consistent with rotation of the Langmuir probe into and out of the spacecraft wake on a time scale of minutes. Furthermore, Langmuir probe data taken when the probe was not in the spacecraft wake are consistent from orbit to orbit. This supports the interpretation that ram/wake effects may be the source of apparent discrepancies at other orientations.

  7. PROBING EXTRAGALACTIC DUST THROUGH NEARBY GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, S. L.; Li Aigen E-mail: lia@missouri.ed

    2010-02-10

    The quantities and wavelength dependencies of the dust extinction along the lines of sight toward 33 nearby gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with redshifts z < 2 are derived from fitting their afterglow spectral energy distributions. Unlike previous studies which often assume a specific extinction law like that of the Milky Way (MW) and the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC/SMC), our approach-we call it the 'Drude' approach-is more flexible in determining the true wavelength dependence of the extinction (while the shape of the extinction curve inferred from that relying on a priori assumption of a template extinction law is, of course, fixed). The extinction curves deduced from the Drude approach display a wide diversity of shapes, ranging from relatively flat curves to curves which are featureless and steeply rise toward the far-ultraviolet, and from curves just like that of the MW, LMC, and SMC to curves resembling that of the MW and LMC but lacking the 2175 A bump. The visual extinction A{sub V} derived from the Drude approach is generally larger by a factor of {approx}2-5 than that inferred by assuming a SMC-type template extinction law. Consistent with previous studies, the extinction-to-gas ratio is mostly smaller than that of the MW, and does not seem to correlate with the shape of the extinction curve. It is shown that the standard silicate-graphite interstellar grain model closely reproduces the extinction curves of all 33 GRBs host galaxies. For these 33 bursts at z < 2, we find no evidence for the evolution of the dust extinction, dust sizes, and relative abundances of silicate to graphite on redshifts.

  8. Biasing, Acquisition and Interpretation of a Dense Langmuir Probe Array in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Jaworski, M. A.; Kallman, J.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Marsala, R.; Ruzic, D.

    2010-09-22

    A dense array of 99 Langmuir probes has been installed in the lower divertor region of the National Spherical Torus Experiments (NSTX). This array is instrumented with a system of elec- tronics that allows flexibility in the choice of probes to bias as well as the type of measurement (including standard swept, single probe, triple probe and operation as passive floating potential and scrape-off-layer (SOL) current monitors). The use of flush-mounted probes requires careful inter- pretation. The time dependent nature of the SOL makes swept-probe traces difficult to interpret. To overcome these challenges, the single- and triple-Langmuir probe signals are used in comple- mentary fashion to determine the temperature and density at the probe location. A comparison to mid-plane measurements is made. Work is supported by DOE contracts DE-AC02-09CHI1466 and DE-PS02-07ER07-29.

  9. Biasing, acquisition, and interpretation of a dense Langmuir probe array in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Jaworski, M. A.; Kallman, J.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Marsala, R.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2010-10-15

    A dense array of 99 Langmuir probes has been installed in the lower divertor region of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). This array is instrumented with a system of electronics that allows flexibility in the choice of probes to bias as well as the type of measurement (including standard swept, single probe, triple probe, and operation as passive floating potential and scrape-off-layer SOL current monitors). The use of flush-mounted probes requires careful interpretation. The time dependent nature of the SOL makes swept-probe traces difficult to interpret. To overcome these challenges, the single- and triple-Langmuir probe signals are used in complementary fashion to determine the temperature and density at the probe location. A comparison to midplane measurements is made.

  10. Means to remove electrode contamination effect of Langmuir probe measurement in space.

    PubMed

    Oyama, K-I; Lee, C H; Fang, H K; Cheng, C Z

    2012-05-01

    Precaution to remove the serious effect of electrode contamination in Langmuir probe experiments has not been taken in many space measurements because the effect is either not understood or ignored. We stress here that one should pay extra attention to the electrode contamination effect to get accurate and reliable plasma measurements so that the long time effort for sounding rocket/satellite missions does not end in vain or becomes less fruitful. In this paper, we describe two main features of voltage-current characteristic curves associated with the contaminated Langmuir probe, which are predicted from the equivalent circuit model, which we proposed in 1970's. We then show that fast sweeping dc Langmuir probes can give reliable results in the steady state regime. The fast sweeping probe can also give reliable results in transient situations such as satellite moves through plasma bubble in the ionosphere where the electron density drastically changes. This fact was first confirmed in our laboratory experiment. PMID:22667663

  11. Means to remove electrode contamination effect of Langmuir probe measurement in space

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, K.-I.; Lee, C. H.; Fang, H. K.; Cheng, C. Z.

    2012-05-15

    Precaution to remove the serious effect of electrode contamination in Langmuir probe experiments has not been taken in many space measurements because the effect is either not understood or ignored. We stress here that one should pay extra attention to the electrode contamination effect to get accurate and reliable plasma measurements so that the long time effort for sounding rocket/satellite missions does not end in vain or becomes less fruitful. In this paper, we describe two main features of voltage-current characteristic curves associated with the contaminated Langmuir probe, which are predicted from the equivalent circuit model, which we proposed in 1970's. We then show that fast sweeping dc Langmuir probes can give reliable results in the steady state regime. The fast sweeping probe can also give reliable results in transient situations such as satellite moves through plasma bubble in the ionosphere where the electron density drastically changes. This fact was first confirmed in our laboratory experiment.

  12. Ion currents to cylindrical Langmuir probes for finite ion temperature values: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ballesteros, J.; Palop, J.I.F.; Colomer, V.; Hernandez, M.A.

    1995-12-31

    As it is known, the experimental ion currents to a cylindrical Langmuir probe fit quite well to the radial motion theory, developed by Allen, Boyd and Reynolds (ABR Model) and generalized by Chen for the cylindrical probe case. In this paper, we are going to develop a generalization of the ABR theory, taking into account the influence of a finite ion temperature value.

  13. A time-resolved Langmuir double-probe method for the investigation of pulsed magnetron discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Welzel, Th.; Dunger, Th.; Kupfer, H.; Richter, F.

    2004-12-15

    Langmuir probes are important means for the characterization of plasma discharges. For measurements in plasmas used for the deposition of thin films, the Langmuir double probe is especially suited. With the increasing popularity of pulsed deposition discharges, there is also an increasing need for time-resolved characterization methods. For Langmuir probes, several single-probe approaches to time-resolved measurements are reported but very few for the double probe. We present a time-resolved Langmuir double-probe technique, which is applied to a pulsed magnetron discharge at several 100 kHz used for MgO deposition. The investigations show that a proper treatment of the current measurement is necessary to obtain reliable results. In doing so, a characteristic time dependence of the charge-carrier density during the ''pulse on'' time containing maximum values of almost 2{center_dot}10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} was found. This characteristic time dependence varies with the pulse frequency and the duty cycle. A similar time dependence of the electron temperature is only observed when the probe is placed near the magnesium target.

  14. Single Langmuir probe characteristic in a magnetized plasma at the text tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Jachmich, S.

    1995-05-01

    A single Langmuir probe tip was used at TEXT-Upgrade to obtain I-V characteristics in a magnetized plasma. Noisy data were reduced by a boxcar-averaging routine. Unexpected effects, namely nonsaturation of ion current, hysterises in the characteristics and I(V)-data were observed, which are in disagreement to the common single probe model. A double probe model allows parameterization of the I(V) curves and to determine the plasma properties in the scrape-off layer. It is shown in this model that a Langmuir probe does perturb the local space potential in the plasma. Comparisons were made with the triple probe technique of measuring temperatures. The nonsaturation of ion current leads to an error in the triple probe technique of order 20%.

  15. Payload charging events in the mesosphere and their impact on Langmuir type electric probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekkeng, T. A.; Barjatya, A.; Hoppe, U.-P.; Pedersen, A.; Moen, J. I.; Friedrich, M.; Rapp, M.

    2013-02-01

    Three sounding rockets were launched from Andøya Rocket Range in the ECOMA campaign in December 2010. The aim was to study the evolution of meteoric smoke particles during a major meteor shower. Of the various instruments onboard the rocket payload, this paper presents the data from a multi-Needle Langmuir Probe (m-NLP) and a charged dust detector. The payload floating potential, as observed using the m-NLP instrument, shows charging events on two of the three flights. These charging events cannot be explained using a simple charging model, and have implications towards the use of fixed bias Langmuir probes on sounding rockets investigating mesospheric altitudes. We show that for a reliable use of a single fixed bias Langmuir probe as a high spatial resolution relative density measurement, each payload should also carry an additional instrument to measure payload floating potential, and an instrument that is immune to spacecraft charging and measures absolute plasma density.

  16. A comparison of two rocket borne Langmuir probes having electrodes of different materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, S. R.; Smith, L. G.

    1975-01-01

    The behavior of two types of Langmuir probes, one with electrodes made of low-sulfur stainless steel and one with electrodes made of aluminum coated with Aquadag, has been compared on two rocket flights. Each rocket payload included one Langmuir probe of each type. The electron temperatures measured with the stainless-steel electrodes were about 15% higher than the electron temperatures measured with the Aquadag-coated electrodes at 150 km on ascent and about 10% higher at 180 km. These results imply that the use of Aquadag coated electrodes or electrodes of other carefully chosen materials permits greater reliability in the measurement of electron temperatures in the ionosphere by the Langmuir probe technique.

  17. Magnetic and Langmuir Probe Measurements on the Plasmoid Thruster Experiment (PTX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koelfgen, Syri J.; Eskridge, Richard; Lee, Michael H.; Martin, Adam; Hawk, Clark W.; Fimognan, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The Plasmoid Thruster Experiment (PTX) operates by inductively producing plasmoids in a conical theta-pinch coil and ejecting them at high velocity. A plasmoid is a plasma with an imbedded closed magnetic field structure. The shape and magnetic field structure of the translating plasmoids have been measured with of an array of magnetic field probes. Six sets of two B-dot probes were constructed for measuring B(sub z) and B(sub theta), the axial and azimuthal components of the magnetic field. The probes are wound on a square G10 form, and have an average (calibrated) NA of 9.37 x l0(exp -5) square meters, where N is the number of turns and A is the cross-sectional area. The probes were calibrated with a Helmholtz coil, driven by a high-voltage pulser to measure NA, and by a signal generator to determine the probe's frequency response. The plasmoid electron number density n(sub e) electron temperature T(sub e), and velocity ratio v/c(sub m), (where v is the bulk plasma flow velocity and c(sub m), is the ion thermal speed) have also been measured with a quadruple Langmuir probe. The Langmuir probe tips are 10 mm long, 20-mil diameter stainless steel wire, housed in a 6-inch long 4-bore aluminum rod. Measurements on PTX with argon and hydrogen from the magnetic field probes and quadruple Langmuir probe will be presented in this paper.

  18. Combined Impedance Probe and Langmuir Probe Studies of the Low-Latitude E Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowland, D. E.; Pfaff, R. F.; Steigies, C. T.

    2008-01-01

    The EQUIS-2 sounding rocket and radar campaign, launched from Kwajalein Atoll in 2004, included a mission to study low-latitude irregularities and electrodynamics, led by NASA GSFC. This mission included two instrumented rockets launched into the nighttime E region (apogee near 120 km), which included comprehensive electrodynamics and neutral density instrumentation. These rockets carried the first of a new generation of impedance probes, that utilize a wide-band drive signal to simultaneously measure the impedance of an antenna in a plasma as a function of frequency from 7 kEIz to 4 MHz. at a rapid cadence. This technique promises to permit true plasma spectroscopy, and resulted in the identification of multiple plasma resonances and accurate measurements of the plasma density, even in the low density nighttime E region. We present analyses of the technique and resulting spectra, and show how these data may be combined with fixed-bias Langmuir Probe data to infer the temperature structure of the E region as well as providing accurate absolute calibrations for the very high time resolution fixed-bias probe data. The data is shown to agree well with data from ionosonde, the ALTAIR radar, and the Peruvian beacon experiment.

  19. Particle-in-cell Simulation of Langmuir Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iza, Felipe

    2005-10-01

    Ion kinetics in the sheath and pre-sheath of planar and cylindrical probes has been studied by means of 1-dimensional (1d3v) particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision simulations. Collisionless and collisional regimes are considered and simulation results (floating potentials and the ion saturation currents) are compared with available theories. As pressure increases, the ion velocity at the sheath edge decreases below the Bohm velocity (uB). For planar probes, this velocity is ˜ uB(1+5λDe/λi) where λDe is the Debye length at the sheath edge and λi the ion mean free path. Although ionization can be neglected in the sheath region, it plays a key role in determining the voltage across the presheath. For planar probes and Maxwellian electrons, this voltage increases rapidly for electron temperatures below ˜2eV. For cylindrical probes, however, the voltage across the presheath can be drastically reduced by the geometrical increase of current density as ions approach the probe. At low pressure, simulation results lie between the Laframboise and the ABR theories. As pressure increases, however, collisions and ionization in the presheath becomes critical in determining the ion flux to the probe at a given bias voltage.

  20. Characterization of the TFTR plasma edge by Langmuir-calorimeter probes

    SciTech Connect

    Kilpatrick, S.J.; Manos, D.M.; Budny, R.V.; Stangeby, P.C.; Ritter, R.S.; Young, K.M.

    1986-03-01

    Two combination Langmuir-calorimeter probes were operated on the TFTR midplane to measure plasma properties of the scrape-off layer. Two different caloriemter elements were used: 0.5 x 3 x 8 mm Ta plates or 6.4 mm diameter graphite rods fitted with thermocouples. Separate graphite rods served as Langmuir elements. This paper presents Langmuir probe measurements of the radial profiles of edge density and electron temperature, and calorimeter measurements of heat flux. The variation of these quantities in certain operational regimes are presented, including dependence on ohmic and neutral beam heating, compression and free expansion, plasma major and minor radii, plasma current, and line integral density with and without Cr gettering.

  1. Gamma-ray burst afterglows as probes of their host galaxies and the cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucchiara, Antonino

    2010-12-01

    Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) represent the sole class of catastrophic phenomena seen over almost the entire history of the Universe. Their extreme luminosities in high energy gamma-ray radiation make them readily detectable, even with relatively small satellite-based detectors, out to the earliest cosmic epochs. Moreover, the brilliance of their fading afterglow light, routinely observed in X-ray, optical, near-infrared, and radio wavelengths, allows them to be exploited -- for hours, days, or weeks -- as cosmic lighthouses, probing the conditions of gas and dust along the line of sight, through their host galaxies and the cosmos at large. Since the November 2004 launch of Swift, this GRB-focused NASA mission has discovered more than 500 GRBs, in almost all cases reporting the burst coordinates to ground-based observers within seconds of the event. The availability of prompt burst positions from Swift, combined with promptly-reported flux measurements from instruments on Swift and an array of ground-based robotic telescopes, have enabled targeted spectroscopic campaigns that have gathered detailed observations of the young, bright afterglows of hundreds of these events. This thesis reports the results of my own efforts over the past 5 years, analyzing imaging and spectroscopic observations of Swift-detected GRBs as triggered according to my own requests, or as gathered from public data archives. In Chapter 2, I discuss our follow-up campaign for GRB090429B, one of our best "extreme redshift" (z > 8) candidates. This burst followed closely on the spectroscopicallyconfirmed z = 8.2 GRB090423, and our multiwavelength observations and SED modeling demonstrate the value and limitation of such studies, in cases where a spectroscopic redshift cannot be gathered in a timely fashion. I also address the importance of such extreme-redshift events from a cosmological perspective. In Chapter 3, I use high-resolution GRB afterglow spectra to study the properties of intervening

  2. Langmuir Probe Measurements in an Inductively Coupled GEC Reference Cell Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ji, J. S.; Kim, J. S.; Cappelli, M. A.; Sharma, S. P.; Arnold, J. O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Measurements of electron number density, electron temperature, and electron energy distribution function (EEDF) using a compensated Langmuir probe have been performed on an inductively (transformer ) coupled Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) reference cell plasma. The plasma source is operated with CH4, CF4, or their mixtures with argon. The effect of independently driving the electrode supporting the wafer on the probe data is studied. In particular, we find that the plasma structure depends on the phase in addition to the magnitude of the power coupled to the electrode relative to that of the transformer coil. The Langmuir probe is translated in a plane parallel to the electrode to investigate the spatial structure of the plasma. The probe data is also compared with fluid model predictions.

  3. LabVIEW software for analyzing Langmuir probe characteristics in magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, S.; Binwal, S.; Kabariya, H.; Karkari, S. K.

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes the methodology for processing Ampere-Volts (I-V) characteristics of the Langmuir probe in magnetized plasma using graphical programming language based on LabVIEW. Computing the plasma parameters from I-V characteristic involves several steps that include signal processing, interpolation, linear and non-linear curve fitting based on physical models, finding the derivatives of the experimental curve and determining the zero-crossing of the probe current as a function of the applied voltage. These operations are practically tedious to perform manually causing systematic errors in output parameters. To overcome this challenge, software is developed to analyze the planar Langmuir probe characteristics in magnetized plasma. The software allows simultaneous display of different plasma parameters that helps to verify the consistency of the analyzed plasma parameters with the standard probe theory. Using this software, plasma parameters are obtained in a linear plasma device and its characteristics are discussed.

  4. Asymmetric double Langmuir probe for fast and automatic measurements of plasma temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, T.

    1987-11-01

    We present a fast technique for determining the plasma electron temperature T/sub e/ automatically from the small signal application of the asymmetric double Langmuir probe when it is operated in the region where -1 < eV/sub a/T/sub e/ < 1. The method described here is based on simple time and rms averages of the probe current that results from a sinusoidally varying applied voltage V/sub a/. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Asymmetric double Langmuir probe for fast and automatic measurements of plasma temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, T.

    1988-01-01

    We present a fast technique for determining the plasma electron temperature T/sub e/ automatically from the small signal application of the asymmetric double Langmuir probe when it is operated in the region where -1probe current that results from a sinusoidally varying applied voltage V/sub a/.

  6. Test of Langmuir probes developed for the CubeSat LINK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Go Woon; Yang, Jongmann; Ryu, Kwangsun; Lee, Jun Chan; Min, Kyoung Wook

    2016-02-01

    We develop Langmuir probes with different gains to measure the electron density in the lower ionosphere and thermosphere at altitudes of 200 - 380 km on board a CubeSat. These probes sweep over a wide range of voltage, but the data are acquired mostly in the electron saturation region, from which the electron density is calculated. The frequency of the voltage sweep is set at a high level (10 Hz) to reduce the effect of probe contamination. The probes are tested and calibrated in a laboratory chamber that simulates plasma densities similar to those of the lower ionosphere. We report here the measurement principles, system architecture, and test results.

  7. Design and fabrication of an actively cooled Langmuir probe for long pulse applications

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, J.A.; Biagi, L.A.; Ehlers, K.W.; Koehler, G.W.

    1985-11-01

    The details of the mechanical design and fabrication for a Langmuir Probe for the continuous monitoring of plasma density are given. The probe was designed for use as a diagnostic tool in the development of long pulse positive ion plasma sources for use on neutral beam systems. The essential design feature of this probe is the incorporation of two electrically isolated cooling water circuits which actively cool the probe tip and probe jacket. The electrical isolation is required to prevent drain currents from the probe body disturbing the measurement of the probe tip current and thereby the plasma density measurement. The successful realization of the design requires precision components and vacuum tight ceramic to refractory metal brazes. To date this design has successfully operated in steady-state in plasma densities up to 250 mA/cmS and surface heat fluxes of 25 W/cmS.

  8. On the interpretation of Langmuir probe data inside a spacecraft sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.; Brenning, N.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Gunell, H.

    2010-10-15

    If a Langmuir probe is located inside the sheath of a negatively charged spacecraft, there is a risk that the probe characteristic is modified compared to that of a free probe in the ambient plasma. We have studied this probe-in-spacecraft-sheath problem in the parameter range of a small Langmuir probe (with radius r{sub LP}<<{lambda}{sub D}) using a modified version of the orbit motion limited (OML) probe theory. We find that the ambient electron contribution I{sub e}(U{sub LP}) to the probe characteristic is suitably analyzed in terms of three regions of applied probe potential U{sub LP}. In region I, where the probe is negatively charged (i.e., U{sub LP}probe position), the probe characteristic I{sub e}(U{sub LP}) is close to that of OML theory for a free probe in the ambient plasma. In the probe potential range U{sub LP}>U{sub 1}, there is first a transition region II in applied potential, U{sub 1}probe and the ambient plasma. This minimum gives the depth U{sub pl}-U{sub M} of a potential barrier that prevents the lowest energy ambient electrons from reaching the probe. For a high enough positive probe potential, in region III, the barrier becomes small. Here, I{sub e}(U{sub LP}) again approaches OML theory for a free probe. The boundary U{sub 2} between regions II and III is somewhat arbitrary; we propose a condition on the barrier, U{sub pl}-U{sub M}<probe characteristic is likely to depart from usual OML in crucial respects: (1) the ambient plasma potential U{sub pl} falls into the transition

  9. On the interpretation of Langmuir probe data inside a spacecraft sheath.

    PubMed

    Olson, J; Brenning, N; Wahlund, J-E; Gunell, H

    2010-10-01

    If a Langmuir probe is located inside the sheath of a negatively charged spacecraft, there is a risk that the probe characteristic is modified compared to that of a free probe in the ambient plasma. We have studied this probe-in-spacecraft-sheath problem in the parameter range of a small Langmuir probe (with radius r(LP)≪λ(D)) using a modified version of the orbit motion limited (OML) probe theory. We find that the ambient electron contribution I(e)(U(LP)) to the probe characteristic is suitably analyzed in terms of three regions of applied probe potential U(LP). In region I, where the probe is negatively charged (i.e., U(LP)probe position), the probe characteristic I(e)(U(LP)) is close to that of OML theory for a free probe in the ambient plasma. In the probe potential range U(LP)>U(1), there is first a transition region II in applied potential, U(1)probe and the ambient plasma. This minimum gives the depth U(pl)-U(M) of a potential barrier that prevents the lowest energy ambient electrons from reaching the probe. For a high enough positive probe potential, in region III, the barrier becomes small. Here, I(e)(U(LP)) again approaches OML theory for a free probe. The boundary U(2) between regions II and III is somewhat arbitrary; we propose a condition on the barrier, U(pl)-U(M)≪k(B)T(e)/e, as the definition of region III. The main findings in this work are qualitative rather than quantitative. The existence of the transition region points to that special care must be taken to extract plasma parameters from measured I(U(LP)) as the probe characteristic is likely to depart from usual OML in crucial respects: (1) the ambient plasma potential U(pl) falls into the transition region, but there is no obvious knee or other feature to identify it, (2) there is in this region no exponential part of I

  10. Spatiotemporal temperature fluctuation measurements by means of a fast swept Langmuir probe array.

    PubMed

    Schubert, M; Endler, M; Thomsen, H

    2007-05-01

    Stationary Langmuir probe measurements of ion saturation current and floating potential in a plasma cannot give direct information on density and plasma potential fluctuations in the presence of temperature fluctuations. This problem can be avoided if the probe bias voltage is continuously swept faster than the fluctuation time scale, recording the current-voltage characteristic. This article reports the development of a spatiotemporal highly resolving Langmuir probe array with 15 fast swept tips, operating in the strongly magnetized, collisionless edge plasma of the Wendelstein 7-AS stellarator [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 31, 1579 (1989)]. The probe tips are aligned in the poloidal direction, the tip spacing is 2 mm, and the sweeping frequency is 1.4 MHz. Current and voltage data are sampled with 50 MHz. The high bandwidth of the measurement is achieved by placing miniaturized differential amplifiers close to the probe tips in order to do an impedance transform. The surface-mounting technology and an additional inverse feedback module are utilized, allowing for an input voltage range of +/-100 V, and a common mode rejection rate of 55 dB at 4 MHz, which is sufficient to resolve the nonlinear probe characteristic. For the evaluation of the data, a fit model for stationary probes is employed and found adequate. Changes of the plasma parameters during one voltage sweep are taken into account by a linear interpolation of the fit parameters. Spatio-temporal fluctuation data gained by a fast swept Langmuir probe array, which can be relevant for the turbulent radial transport of particles and energy, are presented. PMID:17552818

  11. Virtual Cathodes near small electrodes biased near the plasma potential and its effects on Langmuir probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yip, Chi-Shung; Hershkowitz, Noah; Severn, Greg

    2015-09-01

    Movable small (3cm x 3.8cm) plates biased near the plasma potential are immersed in a filament discharge in a multi-dipole chamber. The plates are small (Aplate /Achamber < (me/Mi)1/2 such that an electron sheath is possible. Plasma potential and IVDF's near the plate are measured, and virtual cathodes, a double layer consists of an ion sheath and an electron sheath, was found to form. Ion velocities are determined by Laser-Induced Florescence, the electron temperature and electron density are measured by a planar Langmuir probe and the plasma potential is measured by an emissive probe. Effects of the virtual cathode on Langmuir probe I-V characteristics were predicted through estimating the current collection of an electrode in the presence of the virtual cathode, and was experimentally investigated by comparing I-V characteristics of the small plate and a 0.6cm diameter Langmuir probe. This work is supported by U.S. DOE under the Grant and Contract No. DE-FG02-97ER54437.

  12. A compact and portable PC-based Gundestrup-Langmuir probe diagnostic system

    SciTech Connect

    Sicard, P.; Boucher, C.; Litnovsky, A.; St-Germain, J.-P.

    2005-01-01

    A compact Gundestrup-Langmuir probe diagnostics system capable of data acquisition as well as data analysis was conceived at INRS-EMT, Canada, and used at IPP-FZJ, Germany. Data acquisition and analysis can be done with this system using several types of probes (Langmuir, double-Langmuir, Mach, Gundestrup,...). The versatility as to the different types of probe that one can use and the relative small size of the whole system makes it advantageous. Using a laptop computer makes the system small size and highly portable. The system acquires data at 1000 scans/s at 12 bit resolution on two probe systems simultaneously, using a total of 12 input channels. Bias is done by a DAC-ADC card and is amplified to give a {+-}100 V sweeping range. Measured temperatures ranged from 0.75 eV to 6.0 eV with densities observed as low as 1x10{sup 10} cm{sup -3} up to 5x10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}, which are the range of conditions to be found in our experimental device. This system is also easy to reproduce since the hardware is commercially available and the scripts can be duplicated and modified according to the specifics of the hardware.

  13. Langmuir probe diagnostics of plasma in high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P.; Kewlani, H.; Mishra, L.; Mittal, K. C.; Patil, D. S.

    2013-07-15

    A high current Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) proton ion source has been developed for low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. Langmuir probe diagnostics of the plasma generated in this proton ion source is performed using Langmuir probe. The diagnostics of plasma in the ion source is important as it determines beam parameters of the ion source, i.e., beam current, emittance, and available species. The plasma parameter measurement in the ion source is performed in continuously working and pulsed mode using hydrogen as plasma generation gas. The measurement is performed in the ECR zone for operating pressure and microwave power range of 10{sup −4}–10{sup −3} mbar and 400–1000 W. An automated Langmuir probe diagnostics unit with data acquisition system is developed to measure these parameters. The diagnostics studies indicate that the plasma density and plasma electron temperature measured are in the range 5.6 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3} to 3.8 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3} and 4–14 eV, respectively. Using this plasma, ion beam current of tens of mA is extracted. The variations of plasma parameters with microwave power, gas pressure, and radial location of the probe have been studied.

  14. A compact and portable PC-based Gundestrup-Langmuir probe diagnostic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicard, P.; Boucher, C.; Litnovsky, A.; St-Germain, J.-P.

    2005-01-01

    A compact Gundestrup-Langmuir probe diagnostics system capable of data acquisition as well as data analysis was conceived at INRS-EMT, Canada, and used at IPP-FZJ, Germany. Data acquisition and analysis can be done with this system using several types of probes (Langmuir, double-Langmuir, Mach, Gundestrup,…). The versatility as to the different types of probe that one can use and the relative small size of the whole system makes it advantageous. Using a laptop computer makes the system small size and highly portable. The system acquires data at 1000scans/s at 12bit resolution on two probe systems simultaneously, using a total of 12 input channels. Bias is done by a DAC-ADC card and is amplified to give a ±100V sweeping range. Measured temperatures ranged from 0.75eVto6.0eV with densities observed as low as 1×1010cm-3 up to 5×1011cm-3, which are the range of conditions to be found in our experimental device. This system is also easy to reproduce since the hardware is commercially available and the scripts can be duplicated and modified according to the specifics of the hardware.

  15. Rapid electron density decay observed by surface-wave probe in afterglow of pulsed fluorocarbon-based plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohya, Yoshinobu; Iwata, Manabu; Ishikawa, Kenji; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru; Sugai, Hideo

    2016-08-01

    To elucidate the pulsed fluorocarbon plasma behavior, a surface-wave probe with high time resolution was used to measure the electron density n e in the afterglow of plasma. In a dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasma of fluorocarbon chemistry, e.g., an O2-based C4F6 and Ar mixture, n e vanished rapidly in a short time (∼5 µs), whilst the dc current flowing onto the top electrode biased at ‑300 V decreased very slowly (decay time ∼70 µs). This observation is clear evidence of ion–ion plasma formation by electron attachment in the afterglow. We point out that the electron attachment rates for fluorocarbon radicals significantly affect the electrons and ion–ion plasma behaviors observed at the afterglow phase.

  16. Four free parameter empirical parametrization of glow discharge Langmuir probe data

    SciTech Connect

    Azooz, A. A.

    2008-10-15

    For the purpose of developing a simple empirical model capable of producing the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) from Langmuir probe I-V characteristics, a four parameter empirical equation that fits most Langmuir probe experimental data is suggested. The four free fitting parameters are related to the main plasma properties. These properties include the ion and electron saturation currents and the plasma electron temperature. This equation can be readily differentiated twice to give the EEDF according to the Druyvesteyn formula. Furthermore, a MATLAB platform based computer code based on this model yielding results for the plasma potential and all plasma parameters mentioned above is presented. The information given below can be used to write other computer codes for the same purpose in any other programming language.

  17. Dust Impact Detection by the Cassini Langmuir Probe in Saturn's E ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, H.-W.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Morooka, M.; Kempf, S.; Horanyi, M.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we present preliminary analysis of dust impact detections recorded by the Cassini Langmuir probe (LP) in Saturn's E ring. These signals appear as sharp spikes in the LP current-voltage (I-V) curves and show clear correlation with the E ring dust density. The statistical analysis will help to understand the nature of these detections as well as provide an alternative method to study the densest part of the E ring.

  18. A fast reciprocating Langmuir probe for the DIII-D divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, J.G.; Hunter, J.; Tafoya, B.

    1996-11-01

    A new reciprocating Langmuir probe has been used to measure density and temperature profiles, ion flow, and potential fluctuation levels from the lower divertor floor up to the X-point on the DIII-D tokamak. This probe is designed to make fast (2 kHz swept, 20 kHz Mach, 500 kHz Vfloat) measurements with 2 mm spatial resolution in the region where the largest gradients on the plasma open flux tubes are found and therefore provide the best benchmarks for SOL and divertor numerical models. Profiles are constructed using the 300 ms time history of the probe measurements during the 25 cm reciprocating stroke. Both single and double null plasmas can be measured and compared with a 20 Hz divertor Thomson scattering system. The probe head is constructed of four different kinds of graphite to optimize the electrical and thermal characteristics. Electrically insulated pyrolytic graphite rings act as a heat shield to absorb the plasma heat flux on the probe shaft and are mounted on a carbon/carbon composite core for mechanical strength. The Langmuir probe sampling tips are made of a linear carbon fiber composite. The mechanical, electrical, data acquisition and power supply systems design will be described. Initial measurements will also be presented.

  19. Langmuir probe diagnostic suite in the C-2 field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Roche, T. Armstrong, S.; Knapp, K.; Slepchenkov, M.; Sun, X.

    2014-11-15

    Several in situ probes have been designed and implemented into the diagnostic array of the C-2 field-reversed configuration (FRC) at Tri Alpha Energy [M. Tuszewski et al. (the TAE Team), Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 255008 (2012)]. The probes are all variations on the traditional Langmuir probe. They include linear arrays of triple probes, linear arrays of single-tipped swept probes, a multi-faced Gundestrup probe, and an ion-sensitive probe. The probes vary from 5 to 7 mm diameter in size to minimize plasma perturbations. They also have boron nitride outer casings that prevent unwanted electrical breakdown and reduce the introduction of impurities. The probes are mounted on motorized linear-actuators allowing for programmatic scans of the various plasma parameters over the course of several shots. Each probe has a custom set of electronics that allows for measurement of the desired signals. High frequency ( > 5MHz) analog optical-isolators ensure that plasma parameters can be measured at sub-microsecond time scales while providing electrical isolation between machine and data acquisition systems. With these probes time-resolved plasma parameters (temperature, density, spatial potential, flow, and electric field) can be directly/locally measured in the FRC jet and edge/scrape-off layer.

  20. Langmuir probe measurements of double-layers in a pulsed discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. S.; Crawford, F. W.

    1980-01-01

    Langmuir probe measurements were carried out which confirm the occurrence of double-layers in an argon positive column. Pulsing the discharge current permitted probe measurements to be performed in the presence of the double-layer. Supplementary evidence, obtained from DC and pulsed discharges, indicated that the double-layers formed in the two modes of operation were similar. The double-layers observed were weak and stable; their relation to other classes of double-layers are discussed, and directions for future work are suggested.

  1. Comparison of Plasma Density Measurements in ICP Discharges Using Langmuir Probe, Plasma Oscillation Probe and Interferometry Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, John; Zawalski, Wade; Chen, Francis

    2000-10-01

    A comparison study of the application of various probe theories, including the so-called orbital motion limited (OML) and ABR theories, in the interpretation of Langmuir probe I-V characteristics is performed. Experimental data for the comparison is obtained in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source over a wide range of parameters of interest to the plasma processing community. Measurements of Ni from the Hiden Electrostatic Plasma Probe (ESP) characteristics and software are compared to ``known" values of Ne obtained via microwave interferometry and the plasma oscillation probe (POP) technique, in regimes including those where the probe theories yield different results. Excellent agreement is obtained between the interferometry and POP methods at low Po, whereas POP starts to fail at Po>5 mTorr, as expected. Langmuir probe results using OML theory yield reasonable agreement for Ne<2x1011cm-3, but fail at higher Ne. Closely spaced multiple peaks in the spectra of the POP are observed in some cases at higher RF input powers, possibly due to RF modulation of the source plasma density, leading to experimental uncertainty in Ne values thus obtained. Other considerations for the applicability of the POP method will also be discussed.

  2. Direct Vlasov simulations of electron-attracting cylindrical Langmuir probes in flowing plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez-Arriaga, G.; Pastor-Moreno, D.

    2014-07-15

    Current collection by positively polarized cylindrical Langmuir probes immersed in flowing plasmas is analyzed using a non-stationary direct Vlasov-Poisson code. A detailed description of plasma density spatial structure as a function of the probe-to-plasma relative velocity U is presented. Within the considered parametric domain, the well-known electron density maximum close to the probe is weakly affected by U. However, in the probe wake side, the electron density minimum becomes deeper as U increases and a rarified plasma region appears. Sheath radius is larger at the wake than at the front side. Electron and ion distribution functions show specific features that are the signature of probe motion. In particular, the ion distribution function at the probe front side exhibits a filament with positive radial velocity. It corresponds to a population of rammed ions that were reflected by the electric field close to the positively biased probe. Numerical simulations reveal that two populations of trapped electrons exist: one orbiting around the probe and the other with trajectories confined at the probe front side. The latter helps to neutralize the reflected ions, thus explaining a paradox in past probe theory.

  3. Updates on Optical Emission Spectroscopy & Langmuir Probe Investigations on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karama, Jackson; Frank, John; Azzari, Phillip; Hopson, Jordan; James, Royce; Duke-Tinson, Omar; Paolino, Richard; Sandri, Eva; Sherman, Justin; Wright, Eva; Turk, Jeremy

    2015-11-01

    HPX is developing a to shorter lifetime (20 - 30 ns) more reproducible plasma at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Laboratory (CGAPL). Once achieved, spectral and particle probes will help to verify plasma mode transitions to the W-mode. These optical probes utilize movable filters, and ccd cameras to gather data at selected spectral frequency bands. Once corrections for the RF field are in place for the Langmuir probe, raw data will be collected and used to measure the plasma's density, temperature, and potentially the structure and behavior during experiments. Direct measurements of plasma properties can be determined with modeling and by comparison with the state transition tables, both using Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES). The spectral will add to HPX's data collection capabilities and be used in conjunction with the particle probes, and Thomson Scattering device to create a robust picture of the internal and external plasma parameters on HPX. Progress on the implementation of the OES and Langmuir probes will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY15.

  4. High accuracy plasma density measurement using hybrid Langmuir probe and microwave interferometer method

    SciTech Connect

    Deline, C.; Gilchrist, B. E.; Dobson, C.; Jones, J. E.; Chavers, D. G.

    2007-11-15

    High spatial resolution plasma density measurements have been taken as part of an investigation into magnetic nozzle physics at the NASA/MSFC Propulsion Research Center. These measurements utilized a Langmuir triple probe scanned across the measurement chord of either of two stationary rf interferometers. By normalizing the scanned profile to the microwave interferometer line-integrated density measurement for each electrostatic probe measurement, the effect of shot-to-shot variation of the line-integrated density can be removed. In addition, by summing the voltage readings at each radial position in a transverse scan, the line density can be reconstituted, allowing the absolute density to be determined, assuming that the shape of the profile is constant from shot to shot. The spatial and temporal resolutions of this measurement technique depend on the resolutions of the scanned electrostatic probe and the interferometer. The measurement accuracy is 9%-15%, which is on the order of the accuracy of the rf interferometer. The measurement technique was compared directly with both scanning rf interferometer and standard Langmuir probe theory. The hybrid technique compares favorably with the scanning rf interferometer, and appears more accurate than probe theory alone. Additionally, our measurement technique is generally applicable even for nonaxisymmetric plasmas.

  5. High accuracy plasma density measurement using hybrid Langmuir probe and microwave interferometer method.

    PubMed

    Deline, C; Gilchrist, B E; Dobson, C; Jones, J E; Chavers, D G

    2007-11-01

    High spatial resolution plasma density measurements have been taken as part of an investigation into magnetic nozzle physics at the NASA/MSFC Propulsion Research Center. These measurements utilized a Langmuir triple probe scanned across the measurement chord of either of two stationary rf interferometers. By normalizing the scanned profile to the microwave interferometer line-integrated density measurement for each electrostatic probe measurement, the effect of shot-to-shot variation of the line-integrated density can be removed. In addition, by summing the voltage readings at each radial position in a transverse scan, the line density can be reconstituted, allowing the absolute density to be determined, assuming that the shape of the profile is constant from shot to shot. The spatial and temporal resolutions of this measurement technique depend on the resolutions of the scanned electrostatic probe and the interferometer. The measurement accuracy is 9%-15%, which is on the order of the accuracy of the rf interferometer. The measurement technique was compared directly with both scanning rf interferometer and standard Langmuir probe theory. The hybrid technique compares favorably with the scanning rf interferometer, and appears more accurate than probe theory alone. Additionally, our measurement technique is generally applicable even for nonaxisymmetric plasmas. PMID:18052471

  6. Resistance and capacitance measurements of the films deposited on a planar Langmuir probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samara, Vladimir; Brouri, Mohand; de Marneffe, Jean-Francois; Milenin, Alexey P.; Boullart, Werner

    2011-10-01

    The beneficial use of DC-pulsing instead of RF for biasing a capacitively coupled planar Langmuir probe mounted in industrial CCP etcher is demonstrated. The ion flux is determined from the discharging of a DC-biased capacitor for Ar, O2, and C2H4-based plasmas taking into account the RC constant of the films grown on the probe. A comparison is made between the clean probe after Ar sputter-cleaning and the probe coated with a polymer film. A new fitting procedure is proposed including both the capacitance and resistance of the film. The experimental validation is done with a C2H4-based polymer film, which resistance and capacitance are measured. Finally, it is shown that, together with the measurement of intrinsic plasma parameters like Te and ion flux, one can monitor deposition on the chamber walls that can possibly be extrapolated to the etched wafer.

  7. High density Langmuir probe array for NSTX scrape-off layer measurements under lithiated divertor conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kallman, J.; Jaworski, M. A.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.; Gray, T. K.

    2010-10-15

    A high density Langmuir probe array has been developed for measurements of scrape-off layer parameters in NSTX. Relevant scale lengths for heat and particle fluxes are 1-5 cm. Transient edge plasma events can occur on a time scale of several milliseconds, and the duration of a typical plasma discharge is {approx}1 s. The array consists of 99 individual electrodes arranged in three parallel radial rows to allow both swept and triple-probe operation and is mounted in a carbon tile located in the lower outer divertor of NSTX between two segments of the newly installed liquid lithium divertor. Initial swept probe results tracking the outer strike point through probe flux measurements are presented.

  8. The detection of energetic electrons with the Cassini Langmuir probe at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, P.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Holmberg, M. K. G.; Morooka, M.; Grimald, S.; Eriksson, A.; Schippers, P.; Gurnett, D. A.; Krimigis, S. M.; Krupp, N.; Coates, A.; Crary, F.; Gustafsson, G.

    2012-10-01

    The Cassini Langmuir probe, part of the Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument, has provided a wealth of information about the cold and dense plasma in the Saturnian system. The analysis of the ion side current (current for negative potentials) measured by the probe from 2005 to 2008 reveals also a strong sensitivity to energetic electrons (250-450 eV). These electrons impact the surface of the probe, and generate a detectable current of secondary electrons. A broad secondary electrons current region is inferred from the observations in the dipole L Shell range of ˜6-10, with a peak full width at half maximum (FWHM) at L = 6.4-9.4 (near the Dione and Rhea magnetic dipole L Shell values). This magnetospheric flux tube region, which displays a large day/night asymmetry, is related to the similar structure in the energetic electron fluxes as the one measured by the onboard Electron Spectrometer (ELS) of the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS). It corresponds spatially to both the outer electron radiation belt observed by the Magnetosphere Imaging Instrument (MIMI) at high energies and to the low-energy peak which has been observed since the Voyager era. Finally, a case study suggests that the mapping of the current measured by the Langmuir probe for negative potentials can allow to identify the plasmapause-like boundary recently identified at Saturn, and thus potentially identify the separation between the closed and open magnetic field lines regions.

  9. Particle-in-cell modeling of Dual Segmented Langmuir Probe on PROBA2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imtiaz, Nadia; Marchand, Richard

    2015-11-01

    We model the current characteristics of the Dual Segmented Langmuir Probe (DSLP), which is a part of the scientific payload of the ESA satellite PROBA2. It is used for the directional measurement of plasma parameters in the ionosphere at an altitude of approximately 725 km. The DSLP consists of two independent segmented Langmuir probes. Each probe is partitioned into eight collectors: seven electrically insulated spherical segments and a Guard electrode (the rest of the sphere and a small post). The current characteristics of the DSLP are computed by using the 3D particle-in-cell code PTetra. The model is electrostatic and it accounts for a uniform background magnetic field. The computed characteristics of different probe segments exhibit significant variation which depends on their orientation with respect to the ram direction. The floating potential and ion current branch of the I-V curves of each segment illustrate the directional sensitivity of the DSLP. It is found that the magnetic field also affects the electron current branch of the I-V curves of certain segments on the DSLP. The I-V curves computed with and without the ambient magnetic field are then used to estimate the electron temperature. This study will be helpful to understand the floating potential and electron temperature anisotropies measured by the DSLP.

  10. Magnetic and Langmuir Probe Measurements on the Plasmoid Thruster Experiment (PTX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koelfgen, Syri J.; Eskridge, Richard; Fimognari, Peter; Hawk, Clark W.; Lee, Mike; Martin, Adam

    2004-01-01

    The Plasmoid Thruster Experiment (PTX) operates by inductively producing plasmoids in a conical theta-pinch coil and subsequently ejecting them at high velocity. An overview of PTX is described in a companion paper. The shape and magnetic field structure of the translating plasmoids will be measured with of an array of inductive magnetic field probes. Six sets of two B-dot probes (for a total of twelve probes) have been constructed for measuring B(sub z) and B(sub theta), the axial and azimuthal components of the magnetic field. The probes were calibrated with a Helmholtz coil, driven alternately by a high-voltage pulser or a signal generator. The probes are wound on a G-10 form, and have an average (calibrated) NA of 9.37 x 10(exp -5) square meters, where N is the number of turns and A is cross-sectional area. The frequency response of the probes was measured over the range from 1 kHz to 10 MHZ. The electron number density n(sub e), electron temperature T(sub e) and velocity v will be determined from measurements taken with a quadruple Langmuir probe, situated in the exhaust chamber. Three of the four probes on the quadruple probe sample the current-voltage characteristic, and from this yield measurements of T(sub e) and n(sub e). The fourth probe provides a measurement of plasma flow velocity. A 6-inch long alumina rod, hollowed with four holes to house the probe wires, is being used to construct the quadruple probe. A variety of propellants will be used, including hydrogen, nitrogen and argon. From the measurements of the plasmoid mass, density, temperature, and velocity, the basic propulsion characteristics of PTX will be evaluated.

  11. High heat flux Langmuir probe array for the DIII-D divertor platesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, J. G.; Taussig, D.; Boivin, R. L.; Mahdavi, M. A.; Nygren, R. E.

    2008-10-01

    Two modular arrays of Langmuir probes designed to handle a heat flux of up to 25 MW/m2 for 10 s exposures have been installed in the lower divertor target plates of the DIII-D tokamak. The 20 pyrolytic graphite probe tips have more than three times higher thermal conductivity and 16 times larger mass than the original DIII-D isotropic graphite probes. The probe tips have a fixed 12.5° surface angle to distribute the heat flux more uniformly than the previous 6 mm diameter domed collectors and a symmetric "rooftop" design to allow operation with reversed toroidal magnetic field. A large spring-loaded contact area improves heat conduction from each probe tip through a ceramic insulator into a cooled graphite divertor floor tile. The probe tips, brazed to molybdenum foil to ensure good electrical contact, are mounted in a ceramic tray for electrical isolation and reliable cable connections. The new probes are located 1.5 cm radially apart in a staggered arrangement near the entrance to the lower divertor pumping baffle and are linearly spaced 3 cm apart on the shelf above the in-vessel cryopump. Typical target plate profiles of Jsat, Te, and Vf with 4 mm spatial resolution are shown.

  12. The Use of Langmuir Probes in Non-Maxwellian Space Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, Walter R.; Brace, Larry H.

    1998-01-01

    Disturbance of the Maxwellian plasma may occur in the vicinity of a spacecraft due to photoemission, interactions between the spacecraft and thermospheric gases, or electron emissions from other devices on the spacecraft. Significant non-maxwellian plasma distributions may also occur in nature as a mixture of ionospheric and magnetospheric plasmas or secondaries produced by photoionization in the thermosphere or auroral precipitation. The general formulas for current collection (volt-ampere curves) by planar, cylindrical, and spherical Langmuir probes in isotropic and anisotropic non-maxwellian plasmas are examined. Examples are given of how one may identify and remove the non-maxwellian components in the Langmuir probe current to permit the ionospheric parameters to be determined. Theoretical volt-ampere curves presented for typical examples of non-maxwellian distributions include: two-temperature plasmas and a thermal plasma with an energetic electron beam. If the non-ionospheric electrons are Maxwellian at a temperature distinct from that of the ionosphere electrons, the volt-ampere curves can be fitted directly to obtain the temperatures and densities of both electron components without resorting to differenting the current. For an arbitrary isotropic distribution, the current for retarded particles is shown to be identical for the three geometries. For anisotropic distributions, the three probe geometries are not equally suited for measuring the ionospheric electron temperature and density or for determining the distribution function in the presence of non-maxwellian back-round electrons.

  13. H-mode Edge Turbulence and Pedestal Measurements in Pegasus Plasmas using Langmuir Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriete, D. M.; Bodner, G. M.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Thome, K. E.; Thompson, D. S.

    2015-11-01

    In Pegasus discharges, L-H mode transitions are induced using Ohmic heating and high-field-side fueling. H-mode plasmas have energy confinement consistent with the ITER98pb(y,2) scaling law, indications of increased electron and ion temperature, and an increase in core rotation compared to L-mode plasmas. Electron density and temperature profiles have been measured in the edge region using a scannable triple Langmuir probe on a shot-by-shot basis. In H-mode, a pressure pedestal that has a hyperbolic tangent shape and a ~ 2 cm ∇pe scale length is observed, in contrast to a linear shape in L-mode. Autopower spectra of the collected ion saturation current in H-mode discharges show a factor of ~ 3 reduction in fluctuations in the 50-200 kHz band with respect to L-mode. Two Langmuir probes with 8 cm poloidal separation have been installed on Pegasus. The turbulence correlation length in the edge will be measured by radially scanning the probes. Knowledge of the correlation length will be used to inform the design of a future 8-channel radial multiprobe array. This system will simultaneously measure the dynamic ne (R , t) , Te (R , t) , and Φ (R , t) profiles and fluctuations across the L-H mode transition and be used to investigate nonlinear ELM dynamics. Work supported by US DOE grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  14. On modified finite difference method to obtain the electron energy distribution functions in Langmuir probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun-Ju; Choi, Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Se-Hun; Yoo, Tae-Ho; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2016-06-01

    A modified central difference method (MCDM) is proposed to obtain the electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) in single Langmuir probes. Numerical calculation of the EEDF with MCDM is simple and has less noise. This method provides the second derivatives at a given point as the weighted average of second order central difference derivatives calculated at different voltage intervals, weighting each by the square of the interval. In this paper, the EEDFs obtained from MCDM are compared to those calculated via the averaged central difference method. It is found that MCDM effectively suppresses the noises in the EEDF, while the same number of points are used to calculate of the second derivative.

  15. Laser-Plasma Density and Temperature Measurements with Triple Langmuir Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, A.; Quiros, N.; Khanal, V.; Wan, W. C.; Meineke, J.; Kugland, N. L.; Morita, T.; Gregori, G.; Park, H.-S.; Presura, R.

    2013-10-01

    Experiments to investigate shocks produced by the explosive expansion of a laser-plasma plume against a gas background were performed on the Titan laser (LLNL). Knowledge of density and temperature is essential for understanding the underlying processes. Triple Langmuir probes (TLP) were used for measuring these quantities as function of time at a given location in the plasma. In the experiment, laser ablation plasma from a carbon rod expanded in hydrogen, helium, or argon ambient gas. Density and temperature jumps in the TLP measurements can be correlated with shocks detected by interferometry and proton deflectometry. This work was supported by the US DOE/OFES grant DE-SC0008829.

  16. Probing the Environment of Gravitational-wave Transient Sources with TeV Afterglow Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qin-Yu; Wang, Xiang-Yu

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory detected gravitational-wave (GW) transients from mergers of binary black holes (BHs). The system may also produce a wide-angle, relativistic outflow if the claimed short gamma-ray burst detected by GBM is in real association with GW150914. It was suggested that mergers of double neutron stars (or neutron star-black hole binaries), another promising source of GW transients, also produce fast, wide-angle outflows. In this paper, we calculate the high-energy gamma-ray emission arising from the blast waves driven by these wide-angle outflows. We find that TeV emission arising from the inverse-Compton process in the relativistic outflow, originating from mergers of binary BHs that are similar to those in GW150914, could be detectable by ground-based Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes such as the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) if the sources occur in a dense medium with a density of n≳ 0.3 {{cm}}-3. For neutron star–neutron star (NS–NS) and NS–BH mergers, TeV emission from the wide-angle, mildly relativistic outflow could be detected as well, if it occurs in a dense medium with n≳ 10{--}100 {{cm}}-3. Thus, TeV afterglow emission could be a useful probe of the environment of the GW transients, which could shed light on the evolution channels of the progenitors of GW transients.

  17. Langmuir probe data analysis for a magnetized inductive radio-frequency discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Popescu, S.; Ohtsu, Y.; Fujita, H.

    2007-11-01

    The properties of an inductively coupled argon plasma in a uniform magnetic field, at pressures of the order of 0.1 Pa, in the presence of a weak current-free electric double layer, are measured with a plane Langmuir probe. The static current-voltage probe characteristics, recorded on the symmetry axis of the experimental device, both in the plasma source and in the main chamber of the setup, showed the existence of two electron populations with different temperatures. The axial profiles of plasma parameters, such as the plasma potential and the cold and hot electron temperatures, offered a new insight into such a complex system. However, both the external magnetic field and the two electron populations contribute to the difficulty of calculation of the local plasma density. A method for solving this problem, involving the definition of an effective electron temperature, is also presented.

  18. Effect of electron temperature fluctuations on slowly swept Langmuir probe measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Rudakov, D.L.; Boedo, J.A.; Moyer, R.A.; Stangeby, P.C.; McLean, A.; Watkins, J.G.

    2004-10-01

    Swept Langmuir probes are widely used to measure electron temperature (T{sub e}) in laboratory plasmas by performing an exponential fit to the measured volt-ampere (I-V) characteristic. Often the probe voltage sweep frequency is much lower than the characteristic frequencies of the plasma fluctuations and a time-averaged I-V characteristic is used for the fit. We show by numerical modeling that in the presence of T{sub e} fluctuations with frequencies well above the voltage sweep frequency this standard technique applied to a swept single probe tends to read higher than the actual time-averaged T{sub e} provided no correlated plasma potential (V{sub p}) fluctuations are present. In the presence of coupled T{sub e} and V{sub p} fluctuations a slowly swept single probe may read either higher or lower than the average T{sub e}, depending on the relative amplitude and phase of the temperature and potential fluctuations. In contrast, swept double probe measurements of T{sub e} are virtually unaffected by either T{sub e} or V{sub p} fluctuations.

  19. Identification of when a Langmuir probe is in the sheath of a spacecraft: The effects of secondary electron emission from the probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Hsu, H.-W.; Horányi, M.

    2015-04-01

    Langmuir probes on spacecraft have been used for characterizing the ambient plasma parameters in space. When their boom is short compared to the Debye length, the probes remain immersed in the spacecraft sheath, causing the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics to deviate from that of a probe far away from the spacecraft. We present identification of when a Langmuir probe is in a sheath, based on the secondary electron (SE) emission from the probe itself. The I-V characteristics of a spherical probe are investigated in a plasma sheath above a conducting plate. Plasmas with cold and hot electrons (1 eV and 10 eV), as well as monoenergetic electrons (50-100 eV), are created. The derivative (dI/dV) of the probe I-V curves shows that in addition to a "knee" at a potential more positive than the plasma potential, an additional knee appears at a sheath potential at the probe location. This additional knee is created due to the SE emission from the probe and is identified as an indication of the probe being immersed in the sheath. Our experimental results reproduced the aspects of the Cassini Langmuir probe I-V characteristics, suggesting that at times, the probe may have been immersed in the sheath of the spacecraft in Saturn's magnetosphere, and SE emission from the probe itself may have significantly altered its I-V characteristics.

  20. Deriving large electron temperatures and small electron densities with the Cassini Langmuir probe at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, Philippe; Wahlund, Jan-Erik; Holmberg, Mika; Lewis, Geraint; Schippers, Patricia; Rochel Grimald, Sandrine; Gurnett, Donald; Coates, Andrew; Dandouras, Iannis; Waite, Hunter

    2014-05-01

    The Langmuir Probes (LPs) are commonly used to investigate the cold plasma characteristics in planetary ionospheres/magnetospheres. The LPs performances are limited to low temperatures (i.e. below 5-10 eV at Saturn) and large densities (above several particles/cm3). A strong sensitivity of the Cassini LP measurements to energetic electrons (hundreds eV) may however be observed at Saturn in the L Shell range L=6-10 RS. These electrons impact the surface of the probe and generate a detectable current of secondary electrons. We investigate the influence of such electrons on the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics (for negative potentials), and manage to reproduce the observations with a reasonable precision through empirical and theoretical methods. Conversely, the modelling allows us to derive useful information about the energetic electrons from the LP observations : some information about their pitch angle anisotropy (if combined with the data from a single CAPS ELS anode), as well as an estimate of the electron temperature (in the range 100-300 eV) and of the electron density (above 0.1 particles/cm3). This enlarges the LP measurements capabilities when the influence of the energetic electrons is large (essentially near L=6-10 RS at Saturn). We finally show that a significant influence of the energetic electrons (larger than the contribution of thermal ions) is also expected in various plasma environments of the Solar System, such as at Jupiter (i.e near Ganymede, Europa, Callisto and Io), or even at Earth (in the plasmasheet, the magnetosheath or in plasma cavities). Large electron temperatures and small electron densities could potentially be derived in these environments, which may be of interest for Langmuir Probes in the Earth magnetosphere or onboard the future JUICE mission at Jupiter.

  1. Afterglow Complex Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Samarian, A. A.; Boufendi, L.; Mikikian, M.

    2008-09-07

    The review of the first detailed experimental and theoretical studies of complex plasma in RF discharge afterglow is presented. The studies have been done in a frame of FAST collaborative research project between Complex Plasma Laboratory of the University of Sydney and the GREMI laboratory of Universite d'Orleans. We examined the existing models of plasma decay, presents experimental observations of dust dynamics under different afterglow complex plasma conditions, presents the experimental data obtained (in particular the presence of positively charged particles in discharge afterglow), discusses the use of dust particles as a probe to study the diffusion losses in afterglow plasmas.

  2. Dust impact detection by the Cassini Langmuir probe in Saturn's E ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, S.; Wahlund, J. E.; Kempf, S.; Wang, X.; Horanyi, M.; Morooka, M. W.

    2015-12-01

    Individual examination reveals the existence of sharp spikes in the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science / Langmuir probe (RPWS/LP) I-V (current-voltage) sweeps. These spikes are characterized as a sudden increase or decrease in the probe current, with many of them appearing as one-point anomalies lasting less than a millisecond. Their occurrence generally correlates with the E ring dust density - the closer to the ring plane and Enceladus, the more frequent the appearance of spikes. These characteristics suggest that the LP spike signals are caused by dust impacts - most likely the collection of plasma produced from high velocity dust-probe impacts. Because of the low detection rate and the flexibility regarding to the spacecraft attitude, LP spikes provide an alternative way to explore the densest part of the E ring. Here we will present a preliminary statistical analysis of the LP spike appearance as a function of the spacecraft location, the relative dust speed, the spacecraft and probe potentials, and other relevant parameters. Comparison with measurements carried out by the High Rate Detector, a subsystem of the Cassini Cosmic Dust Analyser, will provide constraints on the dust grain size responsible for these detections. We will also examine their spatial distribution to identify features that may associate with ring dynamical effects, such as the seasonal variation or the noon-to-midnight electric field.

  3. Investigations of laser plasmas dynamics by means of real and virtual Langmuir probes

    SciTech Connect

    Gambino, N.; Mascali, D.; Tudisco, S.; Anzalone, A.; Gammino, S.; Musumeci, F.; Spitaleri, A.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we propose a novel technique for LPP-Laser Produced Plasmas investigation, combining high time resolved measurements using compact Langmuir Probes with the output of a theoretical model called HYBLAS developed on purpose, which is able to simulate the charged particles collected by a so-called virtual probe. It will be shown that with an appropriate experimental set-up and with the use of a Matlab software able to accurately analyze the experimental I-V curves, laser plasmas can be investigated properly even if the probe is placed very close to the target surface. This permits not only to study the plume expansion with a high temporal resolution, but also to estimate correctly the self-generated coulomb electric field inside the plume and to detect the inner structure of the the first upcoming expanding plasma. HYBLAS is able to predict and describe the plume expansion at relatively low power densities and is a powerful method to compare directly the experimental current signals with the numerical results if the initial conditions are settled properly. A direct comparison of the theoretical data with the experimental ones realized on different metal targets shows that our method is able to predict properly the overall plasma expansion in the nanosecond laser pulse duration regime. The virtual probe method was moreover tested by comparing the numerical results with another numerical code called MULTI, which simulate the expansion by combining the hydrodynamics equations to a multigroup method in order to include the radiation transport. (authors)

  4. Observations of neutral mesospheric smoke particles using triboelectric current measurements from a multi-surface Langmuir probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barjatya, A.; Friedrich, M.; Strelnikov, B.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from two recent mesospheric rocket flights which were part of the German WADIS campaign from Andoya Rocket Range. One rocket was flown in polar summer, and the other in early winter. The payloads carried a novel multi-surface Langmuir probe. Three fixed bias Langmuir probes with different surfaces: Stainless Steel, Nickel and Platinum were exposed to the mesospheric plasma environment. In addition to collecting thermal electrons, each surface is expected to interact differently with the neutral constituents of the mesosphere: neutral metal atoms, mesospheric smoke particles, ice particles, etc. We estimate these particle densities from the measured electric current data.

  5. The DSLP Langmuir Probe experiment on-board Proba2: first observations and preliminary scientific results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stverak, Stepan; Travnicek, Pavel M.; Hercik, David; Hellinger, Petr; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Kozacek, Zdenek; Brinek, Jan

    2010-05-01

    The experiment Dual Segmented Langmuir Probe (DSLP) is one of the four scientific instruments on board the mini-satellite Proba-2 of the European Space Agency. The Proba 2 satellite was successfully launched on 2nd November 2009. First three months of the mission has been dedicated to overall commissioning phase of the Proba 2 payload including all scientific instruments. The main operational phase focused on nominal scientific data acquisition has started in February 2010. As a part of the Plasma Measurement Equipment, the DSLP instrument aims at mapping and studying characteristic macroscopic properties (e.g. density, temperature or flow dynamics) of ionospheric plasmas and their temporal and spatial variations. Furthermore, with use of Sun observations provided by SWAP and LYRA instruments, the DSLP experiment intends to identify observed ionospheric irregularities with possible solar-terrestrial connections related to sudden space weather events. Here we present first data samples acquired during the main operational phase and their preliminary scientific analysis.

  6. Soft Particle Spectrometer, Langmuir Probe, and Data Analysis for Aerospace Magnetospheric/Thermospheric Coupling Rocket Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharber, J. R.; Frahm, R. A.; Scherrer, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    Under this grant two instruments, a soft particle spectrometer and a Langmuir probe, were refurbished and calibrated, and flown on three instrumented rocket payloads as part of the Magnetosphere/Thermosphere Coupling program. The flights took place at the Poker Flat Research Range on February 12, 1994 (T(sub o) = 1316:00 UT), February 2, 1995 (T(sub o) = 1527:20 UT), and November 27, 1995 (T(sub o) = 0807:24 UT). In this report the observations of the particle instrumentation flown on all three of the flights are described, and brief descriptions of relevant geophysical activity for each flight are provided. Calibrations of the particle instrumentation for all ARIA flights are also provided.

  7. Decay of the electron number density in the nitrogen afterglow using a hairpin resonator probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siefert, Nicholas S.; Ganguly, Biswa N.; Sands, Brian L.; Hebner, Greg A.

    2006-08-01

    A hairpin resonator was used to measure the electron number density in the afterglow of a nitrogen glow discharge (p=0.25-0.75Torr). Electron number densities were measured using a time-dependent approach similar to the approach used by Spencer et al. [J. Phys. D 20, 923 (1987)]. The decay time of the electron number density was used to determine the electron temperature in the afterglow, assuming a loss of electrons via ambipolar diffusion to the walls. The electron temperature in the near afterglow remained between 0.4 and 0.6eV, depending on pressure. This confirms the work by Guerra et al. [IEEE Trans. Plasma. Sci. 31, 542 (2003)], who demonstrated experimentally and numerically that the electron temperature stays significantly above room temperature via superelastic collisions with highly vibrationally excited ground state molecules and metastables, such as AΣu+3.

  8. Langmuir probe measurements in the TEXTOR tokamak during ALT-I pump limiter experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Goebel, D.M.; Campbell, G.A.; Conn, R.W.; Leung, W.K.; Dippel, K.H.; Finken, K.H.; Thomas, G.J.; Pontau, A.E.

    1986-04-01

    Langmuir probes have been used to characterize the edge plasma of the TEXTOR tokamak and measure the parameters of the plasma incident on the ALT-I pump limiter during ohmic and ICRH heating. Probes mounted directly on the ALT limiter, and a scanning probe located 90/sup 0/ toroidally from the limiter, provide data for the evaluation of pump limiter performance and its effect on the edge plasma. The edge plasma is characterized by density and flux e-folding lengths of about 1.8cm when ALT is the main limiter. These scrape-off lengths do not vary significantly as ALT is moved between the normal 42-46cm minor radii, but increase to over 2.2cm when ALT is inserted to 40cm. The flux to probes at a fixed position in the limiter shadow varies by less than 25% for core density changes of a factor of five. This suggests that the global particle confinement time tau/sub p/, scales as the core density. Estimates from the probes indicate that tau/sub p/ is on the order of the energy confinement time, tau/sub E/. The edge electron temperature, T/sub e/, typically decreases by a factor of two when the core density is raised from 1 to 4 x 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/. The T/sub e/ profile is essentially flat in the limiter shadow, with values of 10-25 eV depending on the core plasma density and ICRH power. ICRH heating increases the electron temperature and flux in proportion to the coupled power. With ALT as the primary limiter and no direct shadowing, the ion side receives 2 to 3 times the flux of the electron side during both ohmic and ICRH heating. The edge plasma is not directly modified by pump limiter operation, but changes with the core plasma density as particle removal lowers the recycling of neutrals in the boundary.

  9. Langmuir probe diagnostics of an atmospheric pressure, vortex-stabilized nitrogen plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B. R.; Kelly, H.

    2012-09-15

    Langmuir probe measurements in an atmospheric pressure direct current (dc) plasma jet are reported. Sweeping probes were used. The experiment was carried out using a dc non-transferred arc torch with a rod-type cathode and an anode of 5 mm diameter. The torch was operated at a nominal power level of 15 kW with a nitrogen flow rate of 25 Nl min{sup -1}. A flat ion saturation region was found in the current-voltage curve of the probe. The ion saturation current to a cylindrical probe in a high-pressure non local thermal equilibrium (LTE) plasma was modeled. Thermal effects and ionization/recombination processes inside the probe perturbed region were taken into account. Averaged radial profiles of the electron and heavy particle temperatures as well as the electron density were obtained. An electron temperature around 11 000 K, a heavy particle temperature around 9500 K and an electron density of about 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} m{sup -3}, were found at the jet centre at 3.5 mm downstream from the torch exit. Large deviations from kinetic equilibrium were found throughout the plasma jet. The electron and heavy particle temperature profiles showed good agreement with those reported in the literature by using spectroscopic techniques. It was also found that the temperature radial profile based on LTE was very close to that of the electrons. The calculations have shown that this method is particularly useful for studying spraying-type plasma jets characterized by electron temperatures in the range 9000-14 000 K.

  10. Langmuir Probe Measurements of Inductively Coupled Plasmas in CF4/Ar/O2 Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. V. V. S.; Meyyappan, M.; Sharma, S. P.

    2000-01-01

    Fluorocarbon gases, such as CF4, and their mixtures are widely used in contemporary low-pressure and high-density plasma processing techniques. In such plasmas Langmuir probe is one of the most commonly employed diagnostic techniques to obtain electron number density (ne), electron temperature (Te), electron energy distribution function (EEDF), mean electron energy (Ee), ion number density (ni), and plasma potential (Vp). In this paper we report probe data for planar inductively coupled plasmas in CF4/O2/Ar mixtures. By varying the relative concentrations in the mixture, radial profiles of ne, ni, Te, Ee, Vp, EEDF were measured in the mid-plane of the plasma at 10 mTorr and 20 mTorr of gas pressures, and 200 W and 300 W of RF powers. Data show that ne and ni decrease with increase of CF4 content and decrease of gas-pressure but they increase with increase of RF-power, whereas Vp increases with decrease of gas-pressure and remains independent of RF-power. However, they all peak at the center of the plasma and decrease towards the edge while Te follows the other way and increases a little with increase of power. The measured EEDFs exhibit Druyvesteyn-like distribution at all pressures and powers. Data are analyzed and will be presented.

  11. Measurement of electronegativity at different laser wavelengths: accuracy of Langmuir probe assisted laser photo-detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirse, N.; Oudini, N.; Bendib, A.; Ellingboe, A. R.

    2016-08-01

    Langmuir probe (LP) assisted pulsed laser photo-detachment (LPD) of negative ions is one of the frequently used diagnostic techniques in electronegative plasmas. The technique is based on measuring the rise in electron saturation current following photo-detachment. During the photo-detachment process it is assumed that the background electron parameters (temperature and density) remain unchanged in the laser channel and the photo-detached electrons thermalize instantaneously with the background electrons (same temperature). Therefore, the measured electronegativity should be independent of laser wavelengths. However, our recent simulation results (2015 Phys. Plasmas 22 073509) demonstrates a failure of these assumptions and suggests that the measured rise in electron saturation current has a dependence on the laser wavelength. This letter presents experimental evidence in support of these simulation results. In this work, photo-detachment is performed at two different laser wavelengths in an oxygen inductively coupled plasma discharge. Electronegativity measured by LP assisted LPD is compared with those obtained by the hairpin probe (HPP) assisted LPD which is based on quasi-neutrality assumption. The experimental results reveal that the electronegativities measured by LP assisted LPD are affected by the laser wavelength, whereas, electronegativities measured by HPP assisted LPD are almost independent. The discrepancy between the measurements is higher at high electronegativities. In conclusion, the experimental results validate the weakness of assumptions to estimate electronegativity from LPD combined with LP and therefore emphasizes the need of a more realistic model to analyze raw data or an alternate solution is to utilize HPP.

  12. Langmuir Probe Measurements in an Inductively Coupled Ar/CF4 Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. V. V. S.; Meyyappan, M.; Sharma, S. P.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Technological advancement in the microelectronics industry requires an understanding of the physical and chemical processes occurring in plasmas of fluorocarbon gases, such as carbon tetrafluoride (CF4) which is commonly used as an etchant, and their mixtures to optimize various operating parameters. In this paper we report data on electron number density (ne), electron temperature'(Te), electron energy distribution function (EEDF), mean electron energy, ion number density (ni), and plasma potential (Vp) measured by using Langmuir probe in an inductively coupled 13.56 MHz radio frequency plasmas generated in 50%Ar:50%CF4 mixture in the GEC cell. The probe data were recorded at various radial positions providing radial profiles of these plasma parameters at 10-50 mTorr pressures and 200 W and 300 W of RF power. Present measurements indicate that the electron and ion number densities increase with increase in pressure and power. Whereas the plasma potential and electron temperature decrease with increase in pressure, and they weakly depend on RF power. The radial profiles exhibit that the electron and ion number densities and the plasma potential peak at the center of the plasma with an exponential fall away from it, while the electron temperature has a minimum at the center and it increases steadily towards the electrode edge. The EEDFs have a characteristic drop near the low energy end at all pressures and pressures and their shapes represent non-Maxwellian plasma and exhibit more like Druyvesteyn energy distribution.v

  13. Design of a Miniaturized Langmuir Plasma Probe for the QuadSat/PnP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landavazo, M.; Jorgensen, A. M.; Del Barga, C.; Ferguson, D.; Guillette, D.; Huynh, A.; Klepper, J.; Kuker, J.; Lyke, J. C.; Marohn, B.; Mason, J.; Quiroga, J.; Ravindran, V.; Yelton, C.; Zagrai, A. N.; Zufelt, B.

    2011-12-01

    We have developed a miniaturized Langmuir plasma probe for measuring plasma density in low-earth orbit. Measuring plasma density in the upper ionosphere is important as a diagnostic for the rest of the ionosphere and as an input to space weather forecasting models. Developing miniaturized instrumentation allows easier deployment of a large number of small satellites for monitoring space weather. Our instrument was designed for the Swedish QuadSat/PnP, with the following constraints: A volume constraint of 5x5x1.25cm for the electronics enclosure, a mass budget 100 g, and a power budget of 0.5 W. We met the volume and mass constraints and where able to use less power than budgeted, only 0.25 W. We designed the probe for a bias range of +/-15V and current measurements in the 1 nA to 1 mA range (6 orders of magnitude). Necessary voltage of +/- 15 V and 3.3 V were generated on-board from a single 5 V supply. The electronics suite is based off carefully selected yet affordable commercial components that exhibit low noise, low leakage currents and low power consumption. Size constraints, low noise and low leakage requirements called for a carefully designed four layer PCB with a properly guarded current path using surface mount components on both sides. An ultra-low power microcontroller handles instrument functionality and is fully controllable over i2c using SPA-1 space plug and play. We elected for a probe launched deployed, which required careful design to survive launch vibrations while staying within the mass budget. The QuadSat/PnP has not been launched at the time of writing. We will present details of the instrument design and initial calibration data.

  14. Radial-to-orbital motion transition in cylindrical Langmuir probes studied with particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejero-del-Caz, A.; Fernández Palop, J. I.; Díaz-Cabrera, J. M.; Ballesteros, J.

    2016-02-01

    A particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation of the plasma sheath around a cylindrical Langmuir probe has been developed to evaluate the ion current collected by the probe. The simulation includes the positive ion thermal motion and has been optimized by solely describing the positive ion motion. A transition from the prediction of the radial model to the orbital-motion-limited model is observed. The transition is explained as an effect of the positive ion thermal motion and the radial model is recovered when the positive ion to electron temperature ratio is decreased. The behaviour of this transition strongly depends on the dimensionless probe radius.

  15. A seven-month solar cycle observed with the Langmuir probe on Pioneer Venus Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, W. R.; Wolff, C. L.

    1989-01-01

    Data collected by the Langmuir probe aboard the Pioneer Venus orbiter (PVO) over the years 1979 though 1987 were normalized to remove the long-period 11-year solar maximum to minimum trend and were analyzed for periodicity. Results yield evidence for the existence of an approximately 7-month solar cycle, which was also observed from SME Lyman alpha and 2800-MHz radio flux measurements carried out from an earth-based platform. This coincidence suggests that the cycle is an intrinsic periodicity in the solar output. The cycle has a frequency independent of the orbital frequency of the PVO and is distinct from a 'rotating beacon' cycle whose period depends on the orbital motion of the PVO about the sun. The second most dominant cycle discovered was a 5-month period. Results of an oscillation model of solar periodicity indicate that the 7-month and 5-month cycles are caused by long-lived flux enhancements from nonlinear interactions of global oscillation modes in the sun's convective envelope (r modes) and radiative interior (g modes).

  16. Effect of fast drifting electrons on electron temperature measurement with a triple Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Subir Chowdhury, Satyajit; Pal, Rabindranath

    2015-08-14

    Triple Langmuir Probe (TLP) is a widely used diagnostics for instantaneous measurement of electron temperature and density in low temperature laboratory plasmas as well as in edge region of fusion plasma devices. Presence of a moderately energetic flowing electron component, constituting only a small fraction of the bulk electrons, is also a generally observed scenario in plasma devices, where plasmas are produced by electron impact ionization of neutrals. A theoretical analysis of its effect on interpretation of the TLP data for bulk electron temperature measurement is presented here assuming electron velocity distribution is not deviating substantially from a Maxwellian. The study predicts conventional expression from standard TLP theory to give overestimated value of bulk electron temperature. Correction factor is significant and largely depends on population density, temperature, and energy of the fast component. Experimental verification of theoretical results is obtained in the magnetized plasma linear experimental device of Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics where plasma is produced by an electron cyclotron resonance method and known to have a fast flowing electron component.

  17. The DSLP Langmuir Probe experiment on-board Proba2: instrument design and first in-flight operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hercik, David; Travnicek, Pavel M.; Stverak, Stepan; Hellinger, Petr; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Kozacek, Zdenek; Brinek, Jan

    2010-05-01

    The experiment Dual Segmented Langmuir Probe (DSLP) is part of the Plasma Measurements Equipment on board the mini-satellite Proba-2 of the European Space Agency. The Proba 2 satellite was successfully launched on 2nd November 2009. The DSLP instrument aims to test and verify a novel Langmuir probe design based on a segmented spherical sensor originally used on the experiment ISL (French satellite Demeter). From scientific point of view, DSLP will provide in situ observations of the ionospheric plasmas. Here we present an overall description of the instrument design and explain the data acquisition techniques and basic principles of measurements. In addition, we provide first measurements results from the initial in-flight operations of the DSLP instrument which were performed within the first three month of the Proba 2 mission during the commissioning phase of the overall payload.

  18. Hall thruster plume measurements from High-speed Dual Langmuir Probes with Ion Saturation Reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekerak, M.; McDonald, M.; Hofer, R.; Gallimore, A.

    The plasma plume of a 6 kW Hall Effect Thruster (HET) has been investigated in order to determine time-averaged and time-resolved plasma properties in a 2-D plane. HETs are steady-state devices with a multitude of kilohertz and faster plasma oscillations that are poorly understood yet impact their performance and may interact with spacecraft subsystems. HETs are known to operate in different modes with differing efficiencies and plasma characteristics, particularly the axial breathing mode and the azimuthal spoke mode. In order to investigate these phenomena, high-speed diagnostics are needed to observe time-resolved plasma properties and correlate them to thruster operating conditions. A new technique called the High-speed Dual Langmuir Probe with Ion Saturation Reference (HDLP-ISR) builds on recent results using an active and an insulated or null probe in conjunction with a third, fixed-bias electrode maintained in ion saturation for ion density measurements. The HDLP-ISR was used to measure the plume of a 6-kW-class single-channel HET called the H6 operated at 300 V and 20 A at 200 kHz. Time-averaged maps of electron density, electron temperature and plasma potential were determined in a rectangular region from the exit plane to over five channel radii downstream and from the centrally mounted cathode radially out to over three channel radii. The power spectral density (PSD) of the time-resolved plasma density oscillations showed four discrete peaks between 16 and 28 kHz which were above the broad breathing mode peak between 10 and 15 kHz. Using a high-speed camera called FastCam imaging at 87,500 frames per second, the plasma oscillations were correlated with visible rotating spokes in the discharge channel. Probes were vertically spaced in order to identify azimuthal plasma transients around the discharge channel where density delays of 14.4 μ s were observed correlating to a spoke velocity of 1800 m/s in the E× B direction. The results presented- here are

  19. Quantification of the error induced on Langmuir probe determined electron temperature and density due to an RF plasma potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafle, Nischal; Donovan, David; Martin, Elijah

    2015-11-01

    An RF plasma potential can significantly effect the IV characteristic of a Langmuir probe if not properly compensated. A substantial research effort in the low temperature plasma community has been carried out to determine this effect and how to achieve the required compensation for accurate measurements. However, quantification of the error induced on the extracted electron temperature and density from an uncompensated Langmuir probe due to an RF plasma potential has not been explored. The research presented is the first attempt to quantify this error in terms of RF plasma potential magnitude, electron temperature, and electron density. The Langmuir probe IV characteristic was simulated using empirical formulas fitted to the Laframboise simulation results. The RF effected IV characteristic was simulated by adding a sinusoidal variation to the plasma potential and computing the time average numerically. The error induced on the electron temperature and density was determined by fitting the RF effected IV characteristic to the empirical formulas representing the standard Laframboise simulation results. Experimental results indicating the accuracy of this quantification will be presented.

  20. Langmuir Probe and Mass Spectroscopic Measurements in Inductively Coupled CF4 Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. V. V. S.; Sharma, Surendra; Cruden, B. A.; Meyyappan, M.

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Electron and ion energy distribution functions and other plasma parameters such as plasma potential (V(sub p)) , electron temperature (T(sub e)), and electron and ion number densities (n (sub e) and n(sub i)) in low pressure CF4 plasmas have been measured. The experiments were conducted in a GEC cell using an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) device powered by a 13.56 MHz radio-frequency (rf) power source. The measurements were made at 300 W of input rf power at 10, 30 and 50 mTorr gas pressures. Langmuir probe measurements suggest that n(sub e), n(sub i) and V(sub p) remain constant over 60% of the central electrode area, beyond which they decrease. Within the limits of experimental error (+/- 0.25 eV), T(sub e) remains nearly constant over the electrode area. T(sub e) and V(sub p) increase with a decrease in pressure. n(sub e) and n(sub i) are not affected as significantly as T(sub e) or V(sub p) by variation in the gas pressure. The electron energy distribution function (EEDF) measurements indicate a highly non-Maxwellian plasma. CF3+ is the most dominant ion product of the plasma, followed by CF2+ and CF+. The concentrations of CF2+ and CF+ are much larger than that is possible from direct electron impact ionization of the parent gas. The cross-section data suggest that the direct electron impact ionization of fragment neutrals and negative ion production by electron attachment may be responsible for increase of the minor ions.

  1. Comparison between IRI and preliminary Swarm Langmuir probe measurements during the St. Patrick storm period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignalberi, Alessio; Pezzopane, Michael; Tozzi, Roberta; De Michelis, Paola; Coco, Igino

    2016-05-01

    Preliminary Swarm Langmuir probe measurements recorded during March 2015, a period of time including the St. Patrick storm, are considered. Specifically, six time periods are identified: two quiet periods before the onset of the storm, two periods including the main phase of the storm, and two periods during the recovery phase of the storm. Swarm electron density values are then compared with the corresponding output given by the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model, according to its three different options for modelling the topside ionosphere. Since the Swarm electron density measurements are still undergoing a thorough validation, a comparison with IRI in terms of absolute values would have not been appropriate. Hence, the similarity of trends embedded in the Swarm and IRI time series is investigated in terms of Pearson correlation coefficient. The analysis shows that the electron density representations made by Swarm and IRI are different for both quiet and disturbed periods, independently of the chosen topside model option. Main differences between trends modelled by IRI and those observed by Swarm emerge, especially at equatorial latitudes, and at northern high latitudes, during the main and recovery phases of the storm. Moreover, very low values of electron density, even lower than 2 × 104 cm-3, were simultaneously recorded in the evening sector by Swarm satellites at equatorial latitudes during quiet periods, and at magnetic latitudes of about ±60° during disturbed periods. The obtained results are an example of the capability of Swarm data to generate an additional valuable dataset to properly model the topside ionosphere.

  2. Plasma Potential and Langmuir Probe Measurements in the Near-field Plume of the NASA 300M Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Daniel A; Shastry, Rohit; Huang, Wensheng; Soulas, George C.; KamHawi, Hani

    2012-01-01

    In order to aid in the design of high-power Hall thrusters and provide experimental validation for existing modeling efforts, plasma potential and Langmuir probe measurements were performed in the near-field plume of the NASA 300M Hall thruster. A probe array consisting of a Faraday probe, Langmuir probe, and emissive probe was used to interrogate the plume from approximately 0.1 - 2.0 DT,m downstream of the thruster exit plane at four operating conditions: 300 V, 400 V, and 500 V at 20 kW as well as 300 V at 10 kW. Results show that the acceleration zone and high-temperature region were contained within 0.3 DT,m from the exit plane at all operating conditions. Isothermal lines were shown to strongly follow magnetic field lines in the nearfield, with maximum temperatures ranging from 19 - 27 eV. The electron temperature spatial distribution created large drops in measured floating potentials in front of the magnetic pole surfaces where the plasma density was small, which suggests strong sheaths at these surfaces. The data taken have provided valuable information for future design and modeling validation, and complements ongoing internal measurement efforts on the NASA 300 M.

  3. Plasma Potential and Langmuir Probe Measurements in the Near-field Plume of the NASA-457Mv2 Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastry, Rohit; Huang, Wensheng; Herman, Daniel A.; Soulas, George C.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2012-01-01

    In order to further the design of future high-power Hall thrusters and provide experimental validation for ongoing modeling efforts, plasma potential and Langmuir probe measurements were performed on the 50-kW NASA-457Mv2. An electrostatic probe array comprised of a near-field Faraday probe, single Langmuir probe, and emissive probe was used to interrogate the near-field plume from approximately 0.1 - 2.0 mean thruster diameters downstream of the thruster exit plane at the following operating conditions: 300 V, 400 V and 500 V at 30 kW and 500 V at 50 kW. Results have shown that the acceleration zone is limited to within 0.4 mean thruster diameters of the exit plane while the high-temperature region is limited to 0.25 mean thruster diameters from the exit plane at all four operating conditions. Maximum plasma potentials in the near-field at 300 and 400 V were approximately 50 V with respect to cathode potential, while maximum electron temperatures varied from 24 - 32 eV, depending on operating condition. Isothermal lines at all operating conditions were found to strongly resemble the magnetic field topology in the high-temperature regions. This distribution was found to create regions of high temperature and low density near the magnetic poles, indicating strong, thick sheath formation along these surfaces. The data taken from this study are considered valuable for future design as well as modeling validation.

  4. Plasma Potential and Langmuir Probe Measurements in the Near-Field Plume of the NASA-457Mv2 Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastry, Rohit; Huang, Wensheng; Herman, Daniel A.; Soulas, George C.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2012-01-01

    In order to further the design of future high-power Hall thrusters and provide experimental validation for ongoing modeling efforts, plasma potential and Langmuir probe measurements were performed on the 50-kW NASA-457Mv2. An electrostatic probe array comprised of a near-field Faraday probe, single Langmuir probe, and emissive probe was used to interrogate the near-field plume from approximately 0.1 ? 2.0 mean thruster diameters downstream of the thruster exit plane at the following operating conditions: 300 V, 400 V and 500 V at 30 kW and 500 V at 50 kW. Results have shown that the acceleration zone is limited to within 0.4 mean thruster diameters of the exit plane while the high-temperature region is limited to 0.25 mean thruster diameters from the exit plane at all four operating conditions. Maximum plasma potentials in the near-field at 300 and 400 V were approximately 50 V with respect to cathode potential, while maximum electron temperatures varied from 24 ? 32 eV, depending on operating condition. Isothermal lines at all operating conditions were found to strongly resemble the magnetic field topology in the high-temperature regions. This distribution was found to create regions of high temperature and low density near the magnetic poles, indicating strong, thick sheath formation along these surfaces. The data taken from this study are considered valuable for future design as well as modeling validation.

  5. Plasma Potential and Langmuir Probe Measurements in the Near-field Plume of the NASA-300M Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Daniel A.; Shastry, Rohit; Huang, Wensheng; Soulas, George C.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2012-01-01

    In order to aid in the design of high-power Hall thrusters and provide experimental validation for existing modeling efforts, plasma potential and Langmuir probe measurements were performed in the near-field plume of the NASA-300M Hall thruster. A probe array consisting of a Faraday probe, Langmuir probe, and emissive probe was used to interrogate the plume from approximately 0.1 - 2.0 mean thruster diameters downstream of the thruster exit plane at four operating conditions: 300 V, 400 V, and 500 V at 20 kW as well as 300 V at 10 kW. Results show that the acceleration zone and high-temperature region were contained within 0.3 mean thruster diameters from the exit plane at all operating conditions. Isothermal lines were shown to strongly follow magnetic field lines in the near-field, with maximum temperatures ranging from 19 - 27 eV. The electron temperature spatial distribution created large drops in measured floating potentials in front of the magnetic pole surfaces where the plasma density was low, which suggests strong sheaths at these surfaces. The data taken have provided valuable information for future design and modeling validation, and complements ongoing internal measurement efforts on the NASA-300M.

  6. The Fixed-bias Langmuir Probe on the Communication-navigation Outage Forecast System Satellite: Calibration and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klenzing, Jeffrey H.; Rowland, Douglas E.

    2012-01-01

    A fixed-bias spherical Langmuir probe is included as part of the Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI) suite on the Communication Navigation Outage Forecast System (CNOFS) satellite.CNOFS gathers data in the equatorial ionosphere between 400 and 860 km, where the primary constituent ions are H+ and O+. The ion current collected by the probe surface per unit plasmadensity is found to be a strong function of ion composition. The calibration of the collected current to an absolute density is discussed, and the performance of the spherical probe is compared to other in situ instruments on board the CNOFS satellite. The application of the calibration is discussed with respect to future xed-bias probes; in particular, it is demonstrated that some density fluctuations will be suppressed in the collected current if the plasma composition rapidly changes along with density. This is illustrated in the observation of plasma density enhancements on CNOFS.

  7. The Fixed-Bias Langmuir Probe on the Communication-Navigation Outage Forecast System Satellite: Calibration and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klenzing, J.; Rowland, D.

    2012-01-01

    A fixed-bias spherical Langmuir probe is included as part of the Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI) suite on the Communication Navigation Outage Forecast System (CNOFS) satellite.CNOFS gathers data in the equatorial ionosphere between 400 and 860 km, where the primary constituent ions are H+ and O+. The ion current collected by the probe surface per unit plasma density is found to be a strong function of ion composition. The calibration of the collected current to an absolute density is discussed, and the performance of the spherical probe is compared to other in situ instruments on board the CNOFS satellite. The application of the calibration is discussed with respect to future fixed-bias probes; in particular, it is demonstrated that some density fluctuations will be suppressed in the collected current if the plasma composition rapidly changes along with density. This is illustrated in the observation of plasma density enhancements on CNOFS.

  8. On the interpretation of fluctuation and ExB turbulent transport measured by Langmuir probes in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Calderon, E.; Hidalgo, C.; Pedrosa, M.A.; Silva, C.

    2004-10-01

    Plasma fluctuations and fluctuation-induced particle fluxes have been investigated in the plasma edge of the TJ-II stellarator using Langmuir probes. Simultaneous measurements of plasma fluctuations carried out by probes located in and out of the probe body sheath show similar results in the normalized level of fluctuations in the ion saturation current. However, floating potential fluctuations measured in the co and counter direction of the magnetic field on the sheath probe body show slight but significant differences. The local radial electrostatic turbulent driven transport measured in and out of the probe body sheath shows consistent results, within the errors bars due to uncertainties in the determination of the effective probe collecting area; the normalized local radial transport to the average ion saturation current (the effective velocity which is not affected by uncertainties in the probe area) show consistent results. These results and previous findings call into question the recent interpretation of probe measurements on the basis of the influence of the probe's pre-sheath zone [B. Labombard, Phys. Plasmas. 9, 1300 (2002)].

  9. Development of a novel sweeping Langmuir probe instrument for monitoring the upper ionosphere on board a pico-satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranvier, Sylvain; De Keyser, Johan; Cardoen, Pepijn; Pieroux, Didier

    2014-05-01

    A novel Langmuir probe instrument, which will fly on board the Pico-Satellite for Atmospheric and Space Science Observations (PICASSO), is under development at the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy. PICASSO was initiated to join the QB50 project as scientific in-orbit demonstrator. The sweeping Langmuir probe (SLP) instrument is designed to measure both plasma density and electron temperature at an altitude varying from about 400 km up to 700 km from a high inclination orbit. Therefore, the plasma density is expected to fluctuate over a wide range, from about 1e6/m³ at high latitude and high altitude up to 1e12/m³ at low/mid latitude and low altitude. The electron temperature is expected to lie between approximately 1000 K and 3000 K. Given the high inclination of the orbit, the SLP instrument will allow a global monitoring of the ionosphere with a maximum spatial resolution of the order of 150 m. The main goals are to study 1) the ionosphere-plasmasphere coupling, 2) the subauroral ionosphere and corresponding magnetospheric features, 3) auroral structures, 4) polar caps, and 5) ionospheric dynamics via coordinated observations with EISCAT's heating radar. To achieve the scientific objectives described above, the instrument includes four thin cylindrical probes whose electrical potential is swept in such a way that both plasma density and electron temperature can be derived. In addition, since at least two probes will be out of the spacecraft's wake at any given time, differential measurements can be performed to increase the accuracy. Along the orbit, the Debye length is expected to vary from a few millimetres up to a few meters. Due to the tight constraints in terms of mass and volume inherent to pico-satellites, the use of long booms, which would guarantee that the probes are outside the sheath of the spacecraft (several Debye lengths away), is not possible. Consequently, the probes might be in the sheath of the spacecraft in polar regions. Extensive

  10. Electron density and electron temperature measurement in a bi-Maxwellian electron distribution using a derivative method of Langmuir probes

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Ikjin; Chung, ChinWook; Youn Moon, Se

    2013-08-15

    In plasma diagnostics with a single Langmuir probe, the electron temperature T{sub e} is usually obtained from the slope of the logarithm of the electron current or from the electron energy probability functions of current (I)-voltage (V) curve. Recently, Chen [F. F. Chen, Phys. Plasmas 8, 3029 (2001)] suggested a derivative analysis method to obtain T{sub e} by the ratio between the probe current and the derivative of the probe current at a plasma potential where the ion current becomes zero. Based on this method, electron temperatures and electron densities were measured and compared with those from the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) measurement in Maxwellian and bi-Maxwellian electron distribution conditions. In a bi-Maxwellian electron distribution, we found the electron temperature T{sub e} obtained from the method is always lower than the effective temperatures T{sub eff} derived from EEDFs. The theoretical analysis for this is presented.

  11. First operation of a high-heat flux, flush mounted ``rail'' Langmuir probe array on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Adam Q.; Brunner, Dan; Labombard, Brian; Leccacorvi, Rick; Vieira, Rui

    2015-11-01

    Divertor Langmuir probes are typically built proud of the divertor surface for an accurate measurement of the plasma flux. However, under the high heat flux conditions seen in Alcator C-Mod, proud tungsten probes that present a 10 degree attack angle to the incident heat flux can experience melt damage with less then 1 second plasma exposure time. A similar situation is anticipated for ITER. It is therefore desirable to develop a flush probe system that can both survive reactor-level fluxes and take accurate measurements. A poloidal array of 21 flush-mounted ``rail'' probes have been installed in the C-Mod outer divertor plate, which are toroidally-extended and field-aligned to minimize sheath expansion effects. Initial results indicate that the ``rail'' probes have a well-defined ion saturation current, reporting similar density and temperature measurements as proud probes. However, uncertainty in the projected area becomes significant when the incident magnetic field angle becomes less than ~0.5 degrees. Additionally, because the flush probes are conformal to the divertor surface, they are ideally suited to measure the poloidal distribution of halo currents during disruptions. Supported by USDoE C-Mod award DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  12. A hemispherical Langmuir probe array detector for angular resolved measurements on droplet-based laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gambino, Nadia Brandstätter, Markus; Rollinger, Bob; Abhari, Reza

    2014-09-15

    In this work, a new diagnostic tool for laser-produced plasmas (LPPs) is presented. The detector is based on a multiple array of six motorized Langmuir probes. It allows to measure the dynamics of a LPP in terms of charged particles detection with particular attention to droplet-based LPP sources for EUV lithography. The system design permits to temporally resolve the angular and radial plasma charge distribution and to obtain a hemispherical mapping of the ions and electrons around the droplet plasma. The understanding of these dynamics is fundamental to improve the debris mitigation techniques for droplet-based LPP sources. The device has been developed, built, and employed at the Laboratory for Energy Conversion, ETH Zürich. The experimental results have been obtained on the droplet-based LPP source ALPS II. For the first time, 2D mappings of the ion kinetic energy distribution around the droplet plasma have been obtained with an array of multiple Langmuir probes. These measurements show an anisotropic expansion of the ions in terms of kinetic energy and amount of ion charge around the droplet target. First estimations of the plasma density and electron temperature were also obtained from the analysis of the probe current signals.

  13. Characterization of an inductively coupled nitrogen-argon plasma by Langmuir probe combined with optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Song, M. A.; Lee, Y. W.; Chung, T. H.

    2011-02-15

    The properties of low-pressure inductively coupled nitrogen-argon plasmas were investigated by using a Langmuir probe combined with optical emission spectroscopy (OES) under the conditions of pressures in the range of 1-30 mTorr and applied rf powers of 200-600 W. In the experiments, the argon was introduced as an actinometer and as an adding gas. The effect of the argon content in the gas mixture was examined in the range of 5%-80%. The electron energy probability function (EEPF), the electron density, and the electron temperature were obtained by using an rf-compensated Langmuir probe. The dissociation fractions were obtained from the OES actinometry. The electron temperature was also obtained by OES corona model and compared with that measured by the probe. The second positive and first negative systems of spectral bands from nitrogen molecules were analyzed to estimate the vibrational and rotational temperatures. The effects of the control parameters on the plasma parameters and dissociation fraction were investigated. While the calculated nitrogen atom density increased with power, it exhibited a maximum value near the Ar content of 30%.

  14. Multi-Needle Langmuir Probe concept for high-resolution plasma density measurements: A potential novel plasma sensor for Cubesats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moen, J.; Pedersen, A.; Bekkeng, T. A.; Lindem, T.; Jacobsen, K. S.

    2008-09-01

    A new concept Langmuir probe to measure absolute electron density at 2 kHz sampling rate will be presented. It comprises multiple Needle Langmuir Probes (m-NLP) with diameter smaller than the Debye shielding length. Each probe is fixed at a different potential, positive above the platform potential to draw electrons. With this method we eliminate the need to determine the electron temperature in deriving the electron density. A 4-NLP system has now been completed for the ICI-2 sounding rocket to investigate HF radar backscatter irregularities above Svalbard in December 2008. The weight of the experiment is <100g, i.e. a low weight and high performance instrument. Simulations and test results from the plasma tank at ESTEC will be presented. Furthermore we will outline a preliminary plan for an m-NLP system to be prepared for a Norwegian Cubesat. The main motivation is to develop a new capability to monitor Fregion irregularities in Equatorial and Polar Regions, that is a particularly relevant space weather issue for satellite communication and navigation systems.

  15. A new compact and low cost Langmuir Probe and associated onboard data handling system for CubeSat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralikrishna, Polinaya; Domingos, Sinval; Paredes, Andres; Abrahão Dos Santos, Walter

    2016-07-01

    A new compact and low cost Langmuir Probe and associated onboard data handling system are being developed at Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais for launching on board one of the future 2U CubeSat missions. The system is a simplified and compacted version of the Langmuir Probe payloads launched on board several Brazilian SONDA III rockets and also developed for the Brazilian scientific satellites SACI-1 and SACI-2. The onboard data handling system will have the dual functions of preprocessing the data collected by the Langmuir Probe and acting as the interface between the experiment and the on board computer. The Langmuir Probe sensor in the form of two rectangular stainless steel strips of total surface area of approximately 80cm2 will be deployed soon after the injection of the CubeSat into orbit. A sweep voltage varying linearly from 0V to 3.0V in about 1.5 seconds and then remaining fixed at 3.0V for 1 second will be applied to the LP sensor to obtain both the electron density and electron temperature. A high sensitivity preamplifier will be used to convert the sensor current expected to be in the range of a few nano amperes to a few micro amperes into a varying potential. In order to cover the large dynamic range of the expected sensor current the preamplifier output will be further amplified by a logarithmic amplifier before being sampled and sent to the data handling system. The data handling system is projected to handle 8 analog channels and 4 digital words of 8 bits each. The incoming data will be stored in a RAM and later sent to the on board computer using a serial RS422 communication protocol. The interface unit will process the telecommands received from the on board computer. The interface is also projected to do FFT analysis of the LP sensor data and send the averaged FFT spectral amplitudes in place of the original unprocessed data. The system details are presented here.

  16. A Langmuir Probe Diagnostic for Use in Inhomogeneous, Time-Varying Plasmas Produced by High-Energy Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J R; Emig, J A; Fournier, K B; Jenkins, P P; Trautz, K M; Seiler, S W; Davis, J F

    2012-05-01

    Langmuir probes (LP) are used extensively to characterize plasma environments produced by radio frequency, pulsed plasma thrusters, and laser ablation. We discuss here the development of a LP diagnostic to examine high-density, high-temperature inhomogeneous plasmas such as those that can be created at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics OMEGA facility. We have configured our diagnostic to examine the velocity of the plasma expanding from the target. We observe velocities of approximately 16-17 cm/{micro}s, with individual LP currents displaying complex structures, perhaps due to the multiple atomic species and ionization states that exist.

  17. Comparative measurements of plasma potential with ball-pen and Langmuir probe in low-temperature magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Zanáška, M.; Kudrna, P.; Tichý, M.; Adámek, J.; Peterka, M.

    2015-03-15

    The ball-pen probe (BPP) is used for direct plasma potential measurements in magnetized plasma. The probe can adjust the ratio of the electron and ion saturation currents I{sub sat}{sup −}/I{sub sat}{sup +} to be close to one and therefore its I-V characteristic becomes nearly symmetric. If this is achieved, the floating potential of the BPP is close to the plasma potential. Because of its rather simple construction, it offers an attractive probe for measurements in magnetized plasma. Comparative measurements of plasma potential by BPPs of different dimensions as well as one Langmuir probe (LP) in an argon discharge plasma of a cylindrical magnetron were performed at various experimental conditions. An additional comparison by an emissive probe was also performed. All these types of probes provide similar values of plasma potential in a wide range of plasma parameters. Our results for three different BPP dimensions indicate that the BPP can be operated in a cylindrical magnetron DC argon discharge if the value of the ratio of the magnetic field and neutral gas pressure, B/p, is greater than approximately 10 mT/Pa.

  18. Observations of Langmuir ponderomotive effects using the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory spacecraft as a density probe

    SciTech Connect

    Henri, P.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Briand, C.; Donato, S.

    2011-08-15

    Langmuir ponderomotive effects are nonlinear effects that enable to couple the electron and ion dynamics in space plasmas. The main difficulty to provide observational evidence of such nonlinear coupling is to simultaneously observe both fluctuations of plasma density and electric field. We have thus developed a new method to measure and to calibrate in situ small scale density fluctuations. Density fluctuations in the solar wind are measured using the observed quasistatic fluctuations of the STEREO spacecraft floating potential in the frequency range, where the spacecraft floating potential is in quasistatic equilibrium between photoionization and electron attachment, whereas the potential of the antenna, of much longer equilibrium time scale, is blind to the density fluctuations. Density fluctuations and Langmuir waves are thus directly and simultaneously measured using a dataset of more than three years of STEREO/WAVES measurements. We present here the first observational evidence for ponderomotive effects in the solar wind that nonlinearly couple density fluctuations to high energy Langmuir waves (({epsilon}{sub 0}E{sup 2})/(nk{sub B}T)>10{sup -4}).

  19. Comparison between Langmuir probe and microwave autointerferometry measurements at intermediate pressure in an argon surface wave discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseau, A.; Teboul, E.; Bechu, S.

    2005-10-15

    This paper is devoted to the validation of Langmuir probe technique by microwave autointerferometry in a surface wave discharge at medium pressure (from 0.1 up to 10 Torr). Temperatures of neutrals, obtained from Rayleigh scattering, and electrons, given by double probe measurements, have been used to estimate the mean free path and the sheath length. Hence, the number of collisions in the sheath has been obtained. We have verified that two different phenomena occur in the sheath, while the pressure increases. These phenomena are depicted, in literature, as two different coefficients used to modify the value of the noncollisional current of Laframboise. Coefficients given by various authors have been investigated with accuracy knowing the number of collisions in the sheath. Very good agreements are obtained between Zakrzewski and Kopiczynski theory and autointerferometry measurements which are unaffected by collisional phenomena.

  20. Upgrade of Langmuir probe diagnostic in ITER-like tungsten mono-block divertor on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak.

    PubMed

    Xu, J C; Wang, L; Xu, G S; Luo, G N; Yao, D M; Li, Q; Cao, L; Chen, L; Zhang, W; Liu, S C; Wang, H Q; Jia, M N; Feng, W; Deng, G Z; Hu, L Q; Wan, B N; Li, J; Sun, Y W; Guo, H Y

    2016-08-01

    In order to withstand rapid increase in particle and power impact onto the divertor and demonstrate the feasibility of the ITER design under long pulse operation, the upper divertor of the EAST tokamak has been upgraded to actively water-cooled, ITER-like tungsten mono-block structure since the 2014 campaign, which is the first attempt for ITER on the tokamak devices. Therefore, a new divertor Langmuir probe diagnostic system (DivLP) was designed and successfully upgraded on the tungsten divertor to obtain the plasma parameters in the divertor region such as electron temperature, electron density, particle and heat fluxes. More specifically, two identical triple probe arrays have been installed at two ports of different toroidal positions (112.5-deg separated toroidally), which can provide fundamental data to study the toroidal asymmetry of divertor power deposition and related 3-dimension (3D) physics, as induced by resonant magnetic perturbations, lower hybrid wave, and so on. The shape of graphite tip and fixed structure of the probe are designed according to the structure of the upper tungsten divertor. The ceramic support, small graphite tip, and proper connector installed make it possible to be successfully installed in the very narrow interval between the cassette body and tungsten mono-block, i.e., 13.5 mm. It was demonstrated during the 2014 and 2015 commissioning campaigns that the newly upgraded divertor Langmuir probe diagnostic system is successful. Representative experimental data are given and discussed for the DivLP measurements, then proving its availability and reliability. PMID:27587120

  1. Upgrade of Langmuir probe diagnostic in ITER-like tungsten mono-block divertor on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J. C.; Wang, L.; Xu, G. S.; Luo, G. N.; Yao, D. M.; Li, Q.; Cao, L.; Chen, L.; Zhang, W.; Liu, S. C.; Wang, H. Q.; Jia, M. N.; Feng, W.; Deng, G. Z.; Hu, L. Q.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J.; Sun, Y. W.; Guo, H. Y.

    2016-08-01

    In order to withstand rapid increase in particle and power impact onto the divertor and demonstrate the feasibility of the ITER design under long pulse operation, the upper divertor of the EAST tokamak has been upgraded to actively water-cooled, ITER-like tungsten mono-block structure since the 2014 campaign, which is the first attempt for ITER on the tokamak devices. Therefore, a new divertor Langmuir probe diagnostic system (DivLP) was designed and successfully upgraded on the tungsten divertor to obtain the plasma parameters in the divertor region such as electron temperature, electron density, particle and heat fluxes. More specifically, two identical triple probe arrays have been installed at two ports of different toroidal positions (112.5-deg separated toroidally), which can provide fundamental data to study the toroidal asymmetry of divertor power deposition and related 3-dimension (3D) physics, as induced by resonant magnetic perturbations, lower hybrid wave, and so on. The shape of graphite tip and fixed structure of the probe are designed according to the structure of the upper tungsten divertor. The ceramic support, small graphite tip, and proper connector installed make it possible to be successfully installed in the very narrow interval between the cassette body and tungsten mono-block, i.e., 13.5 mm. It was demonstrated during the 2014 and 2015 commissioning campaigns that the newly upgraded divertor Langmuir probe diagnostic system is successful. Representative experimental data are given and discussed for the DivLP measurements, then proving its availability and reliability.

  2. The influence of the secondary electrons induced by energetic electrons impacting the Cassini Langmuir probe at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, P.; Holmberg, M. K. G.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Lewis, G. R.; Grimald, S. Rochel; Thomsen, M. F.; Gurnett, D. A.; Coates, A. J.; Crary, F. J.; Dandouras, I.

    2013-11-01

    The Cassini Langmuir Probe (LP) onboard the Radio and Plasma Wave Science experiment has provided much information about the Saturnian cold plasma environment since the Saturn Orbit Insertion in 2004. A recent analysis revealed that the LP is also sensitive to the energetic electrons (250-450 eV) for negative potentials. These electrons impact the surface of the probe and generate a current of secondary electrons, inducing an energetic contribution to the DC level of the current-voltage (I-V) curve measured by the LP. In this paper, we further investigated this influence of the energetic electrons and (1) showed how the secondary electrons impact not only the DC level but also the slope of the (I-V) curve with unexpected positive values of the slope, (2) explained how the slope of the (I-V) curve can be used to identify where the influence of the energetic electrons is strong, (3) showed that this influence may be interpreted in terms of the critical and anticritical temperatures concept detailed by Lai and Tautz (2008), thus providing the first observational evidence for the existence of the anticritical temperature, (4) derived estimations of the maximum secondary yield value for the LP surface without using laboratory measurements, and (5) showed how to model the energetic contributions to the DC level and slope of the (I-V) curve via several methods (empirically and theoretically). This work will allow, for the whole Cassini mission, to clean the measurements influenced by such electrons. Furthermore, the understanding of this influence may be used for other missions using Langmuir probes, such as the future missions Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer at Jupiter, BepiColombo at Mercury, Rosetta at the comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko, and even the probes onboard spacecrafts in the Earth magnetosphere.

  3. The Influence of Energetic Electrons on the Cassini Langmuir Probe at Saturn : Deriving Large Electron Temperatures and Small Electron Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, P.; Wahlund, J.; Holmberg, M.; Lewis, G.; Schippers, P.; Thomsen, M. F.; Rochel Grimald, S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Coates, A. J.; Dandouras, I. S.; Waite, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    The Langmuir probes (LPs) are commonly used to investigate the cold plasma characteristics in planetary ionospheres/magnetospheres. The LPs performances are limited to low temperatures (i.e. below 5-10 eV at Saturn) and large densities (above several particles/cm3). A strong sensitivity of the Cassini LP measurements to energetic electrons (hundreds eV) may however be observed at Saturn in the L Shell range L=6-10 RS. These electrons impact the surface of the probe and generate a detectable current of secondary electrons. We investigated the influence of such electrons on the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics (for negative potentials), showing that both the DC level and slope of the I-V curve are modified. The influence of energetic electrons may be interpreted in terms of the critical and anticritical temperatures concept that is important for spacecraft charging studies. Estimations of the maximum secondary yield value for the LP surface are obtained without using laboratory measurements. Empirical and theoretical methods were developed to reproduce the influence of the energetic electrons with a reasonable precision. Conversely, this modelling allows us to derive useful information about the energetic electrons from the LP observations : some information about their pitch angle anisotropy (if combined with the data from a single CAPS ELS anode), as well as an estimate of the electron temperature (in the range 100-300 eV) and of the electron density (above 0.1 particles/cm3). This enlarges the LP measurements capabilities when the influence of the energetic electrons is large (essentially near L=6-10 RS at Saturn). The understanding of this influence may be used for other missions using Langmuir probes, such as the future missions JUICE at Jupiter, BepiColombo at Mercury, or even the probes in the Earth magnetosphere.

  4. A direct Vlasov code to study the non-stationary current collection by a cylindrical Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Arriaga, G.

    2013-01-15

    The time-dependent current collection by a cylindrical Langmuir probe, whose bias is suddenly changed from zero to a positive or negative finite value, is studied with a novel direct Vlasov code. The numerical algorithm is based on finite-difference formulas to approximate spatial and velocity derivatives and the time integration is carried out with an explicit Runge-Kutta method, or in the case of probe radius small compared with the Debye length, by using the unconditionally stable backward Euler scheme. Both electrons and ions are treated kinetically by the code, which implements initial and boundary conditions that are consistent with the presence of the probe. Within the considered parameter range, the plasma sheath around the probe exhibited an overshoot and it later recovered a steady state. Phase space diagrams of the particle trajectories revealed the presence of a trapped population of particles. The dependence of this population as a function of the probe radius is presented as well as a comparison with the stationary theory. The performance of the code and a comparison with previously used particle-in-cell algorithms are discussed.

  5. Advances in Langmuir probe diagnostics of the plasma potential and electron-energy distribution function in magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Tsv K.; Dimitrova, M.; Ivanova, P.; Kovačič, J.; Gyergyek, T.; Dejarnac, R.; Stöckel, J.; Pedrosa, M. A.; López-Bruna, D.; Hidalgo, C.

    2016-06-01

    Advanced Langmuir probe techniques for evaluating the plasma potential and electron-energy distribution function (EEDF) in magnetized plasma are reviewed. It is shown that when the magnetic field applied is very weak and the electrons reach the probe without collisions in the probe sheath the second-derivative Druyvesteyn formula can be used for EEDF evaluation. At low values of the magnetic field, an extended second-derivative Druyvesteyn formula yields reliable results, while at higher values of the magnetic field, the first-derivative probe technique is applicable for precise evaluation of the plasma potential and the EEDF. There is an interval of intermediate values of the magnetic field when both techniques—the extended second-derivative and the first-derivative one—can be used. Experimental results from probe measurements in different ranges of magnetic field are reviewed and discussed: low-pressure argon gas discharges in the presence of a magnetic field in the range from 0.01 to 0.08 T, probe measurements in circular hydrogen plasmas for high-temperature fusion (magnetic fields from 0.45 T to 1.3 T) in small ISTTOK and CASTOR tokamaks, D-shape COMPASS tokamak plasmas, as well as in the TJ-II stellarator. In the vicinity of the last closed flux surface (LCFS) in tokamaks and in the TJ-II stellarator, the EEDF obtained is found to be bi-Maxwellian, while close to the tokamak chamber wall it is Maxwellian. The mechanism of the appearance of a bi-Maxwellian EEDF in the vicinity of the LCFS is discussed. Comparison of the results from probe measurements with those obtained from calculations using the ASTRA and EIRENE codes shows that the main reason for the appearance of a bi-Maxwellian EEDF in the vicinity of the LCFS is the ionization of the neutral atoms.

  6. The fixed-bias Langmuir probe on the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecast System satellite: calibration and validation.

    PubMed

    Klenzing, J; Rowland, D

    2012-11-01

    A fixed-bias spherical Langmuir probe is included as part of the Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI) suite on the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecast System (C/NOFS) satellite. C/NOFS gathers data in the equatorial ionosphere between 400 and 860 km, where the primary constituent ions are H(+) and O(+). The ion current collected by the probe surface per unit plasma density is found to be a strong function of ion composition. The calibration of the collected current to an absolute density is discussed, and the performance of the spherical probe is compared to other in situ instruments on board the C/NOFS satellite. The application of the calibration is discussed with respect to future fixed-bias probes; in particular, it is demonstrated that some density fluctuations will be suppressed in the collected current if the plasma composition rapidly changes along with density. This is illustrated in the observation of plasma density enhancements on C/NOFS. PMID:23206077

  7. Application of Langmuir Probe Method to the Atmospheric Pressure Discharge Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, Hiroto; Matsumura, Yasuhiro; Nakano, Ken

    2008-12-31

    The heat balance model in the probe tip applied to atmospheric pressure plasma is constructed. Considering the natural convective heat loss, the limitation of plasma density for probe application to such a plasma is estimated. The rough limit is about n{sub e} = 10{sup 18} m{sup -3}. Four kind of materials (Cu, SUS, W, Al) are used for probe tips, and are tested in DC atmospheric pressure discharge. Heat conductivity is found to be a more important property than melting point in design of probes in high pressure discharge. DC atmospheric pressure discharge plasma parameters are obtained with our test probes. Obtained density is the order of 10{sup 17} m{sup -3} and does not contradict with the above density limitation. Change of space potential in air/Ar plasma is also confirmed.

  8. PICASSO-SLP: a Langmuir probe instrument for monitoring the upper ionosphere on board a pico-satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranvier, Sylvain; Anciaux, Michel; Cardoen, Pepijn; Gamby, Emmanuel; Bonnewijn, Sabrina; De Keyser, Johan; Echim, Marius; Pieroux, Didier

    2016-04-01

    A novel Langmuir probe instrument, which will fly on board the Pico-Satellite for Atmospheric and Space Science Observations (PICASSO), is under development at the Royal Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy. PICASSO, an ESA in-orbit demonstrator, is a triple unit CubeSat of dimensions 340.5x100x100 mm. The sweeping Langmuir probe (SLP) instrument, which includes four thin cylindrical probes whose electrical potential is swept, is designed to measure both plasma density and electron temperature at an altitude varying from about 400 km up to 700 km from a high inclination orbit. Therefore, the plasma density is expected to fluctuate over a wide range, from about 1e8/m³ at high latitude and high altitude up to several times 1e12/m³ at low/mid latitude and low altitude. The electron temperature is expected to lie between approximately 1.000 K and 10.000 K. Given the high inclination of the orbit, the SLP instrument will allow a global monitoring of the ionosphere with a maximum spatial resolution of the order of 150 m for the electron density and temperature, and up to a few meters for electron density only. The main goals are to study 1) the ionosphere-plasmasphere coupling, 2) the subauroral ionosphere and corresponding magnetospheric features, 3) auroral structures, 4) polar caps, 5) for the density, the multi-scale behaviour, spectral properties and turbulence of processes typical for the auroral regions, and 6) ionospheric dynamics via coordinated observations with EISCAT's heating radar. Along the orbit, the Debye length is expected to vary from a few millimetres up to a few meters. Due to the tight constraints in terms of mass and volume inherent to pico-satellites, the use of long booms, which would guarantee that the probes are outside the sheath of the spacecraft (several Debye lengths away), is not possible. Consequently, the probes might be in the sheath of the spacecraft in polar regions. Extensive modelling and simulations of the sheath effects on the

  9. Detection of electron energy distribution function anisotropy in a magnetized electron cyclotron resonance plasma by using a directional Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect

    Shikama, T. Hasuo, M.; Kitaoka, H.

    2014-07-15

    Anisotropy in the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in an electron cyclotron resonance plasma with magnetized electrons and weakly magnetized ions is experimentally investigated using a directional Langmuir probe. Under an assumption of independent EEDFs in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field, the directional variation of the EEDF is evaluated. In the measured EEDFs, a significantly large population density of electrons with energies larger than 30 eV is found in one of the cross-field directions depending on the magnetic field direction. With the aid of an electron trajectory calculation, it is suggested that the observed anisotropic electrons originate from the EEDF anisotropy and the cross-field electron drift.

  10. Characterization of O2/Ar inductively coupled plasma studied by using a Langmuir probe and global model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Wen, De-Qi; Zhao, Shu-Xia; Gao, Fei; Wang, You-Nian

    2015-04-01

    An O2/Ar inductively coupled plasma is investigated by a Langmuir probe and a global model (volume averaged model). The electron density, electron temperature and electron energy distribution function (EEDF) are measured at different O2 contents, gas pressures and applied powers. At fixed pressure and power, the electron density first drops quickly with the O2 ratio and then tends to saturate in the high O2 ratio range. The effective electron temperature exhibits completely opposite behaviors at low and high pressures. This is caused by the different evolving behaviors of low and high energy electrons of the EEDFs with the O2 ratio. Both the Langmuir probe and the global model predict that the electron density of O2/Ar mixed plasma first increases, peaks and then drops constantly, upon increasing the pressure. An analysis based on the simulation reveals that the non-monotonic variation of electron density with the pressure is due to the non-monotonic variation of the ionizations from both ground state O and metastable O*. Due to the strong ionizations, the electron density increases linearly with the power. The effective electron temperature is unchanged because the EEDF shape that determines the electron temperature is not varied upon increasing the power. The calculated electron density and temperature when varying the power agree better with the experiments at high pressure, i.e. 45 mTorr. The quantitative deviation between the model and the experiment when varying the pressure and the O2 ratio can be explained by two aspects. (1) The electron energy probability function is assumed to have a Maxwellian distribution in the global model while the realistic EEDFs vary significantly with the pressure and/or the O2 ratio, as revealed by the experiment. (2) The power transfer efficiency (i.e. the fraction of the power coupled into plasma) increases with the pressure.

  11. First electron density and temperature estimates from the Swarm Langmuir probes and a comparison with IS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchert, Stephan C.; Eriksson, Anders; Gill, Reine; Nilsson, Thomas; Åhlen, Lennart; Wahlund, Jan-Erik; Knudsen, David; Burchill, Johnathan; Archer, William; Kouznetsov, Alexei; Stricker, Nico; Bouridah, Abderrazak; Bock, Ralph; Häggström, Ingemar; Rietveld, Michael; Gonzalez, Sixto; Aponte, Nestor

    2014-05-01

    The Langmuir Probes (LP) on the Swarm satellites are part of the Electric Field Instruments (EFI), which are featuring thermal ion imagers (TII) and so are measuring 3-d ion distributions. The main task of the Langmuir probes is to provide measurements of spacecraft potentials influencing the ions before they enter the TIIs. In addition also electron density (Ne) and temperature (Te) are estimated from EFI LP data. The design of the Swarm LP includes a standard current sampling under sweeps of the bias voltage, and also a novel ripple technique yielding derivatives of the current-voltage characteristics at three points in a rapid cycle. In normal mode the time resolution of the Ne and Te measurements so becomes only 0.5 s. We show first Ne and Te estimates from the EFI LPs obtained in the commissioning phase in December 2013, when all three satellites were following each other at about 500 km altitude at mutual distances of a few tens of kilometers. The LP data are compared with observations by incoherent scatter radars, namely EISCAT UHF, VHF, the ESR, and also Arecibo. Acknowledgements: The EFIs were developed and built by a consortium that includes COM DEV Canada, the University of Calgary, and the Swedish Institute for Space Physics in Uppsala. The Swarm EFI project is managed and funded by the European Space Agency with additional funding from the Canadian Space Agency. EISCAT is an international association supported by research organisations in China (CRIRP), Finland (SA), Japan (NIPR and STEL), Norway (NFR), Sweden (VR), and the United Kingdom (NERC). The Arecibo Observatory is operated by SRI International under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation (AST-1100968), and in alliance with Ana G. Méndez-Universidad Metropolitana, and the Universities Space Research Association.

  12. Theory of cylindrical and spherical Langmuir probes in the limit of vanishing Debye number

    SciTech Connect

    Parrot, M.J.M.; Storey, L.R.O.; Parker, L.W.; Laframboise, J.G.

    1982-12-01

    A theory has been developed for cylindrical and spherical probes and other collectors in collisionless plasmas, in the limit where the ratio of Debye length to probe radius (the Debye number lambda/sub D/) vanishes. Results are presented for the case of equal electron and ion temperatures. On the scale of the probe radius, the distributions of potential and density in the presheath appear to have infinite slope at the probe surface. The dimensionless current--voltage characteristic is the same for the cylinder as for the sphere, within the limits of error of the numerical results, although no physical reason for this is evident. As the magnitude of probe potential (relative to space) increases, the current does not saturate abruptly but only asymptotically; its limiting value is about 45% larger than at space potential. Probe currents for small nonzero lambda/sub D/ approach those for zero lambda/sub D/ only very slowly, showing power-law behavior as function of lambda/sub D/ in the limit as lambda/sub D/ ..-->.. 0, with power-law exponents less than unity, resulting in infinite limiting derivatives with respect to lambda/sub D/.

  13. Predictions of VRF on a Langmuir Probe under the RF Heating Spiral on the Divertor Floor on NSTX-U

    SciTech Connect

    Hosea, J C; Perkins, R J; Jaworski, M A; Kramer, G J; Ahn, J-W

    2014-07-01

    RF heating deposition spirals are observed on the divertor plates on NSTX as shown in for a NB plus RF heating case. It has been shown that the RF spiral is tracked quite well by the spiral mapping of the strike points on the divertor plate of magnetic field lines passing in front of the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) antenna on NSTX. Indeed, both current instrumented tiles and Langmuir probes respond to the spiral when it is positioned over them. In particular, a positive increment in tile current (collection of electrons) is obtained when the spiral is over the tile. This current can be due to RF rectification and/or RF heating of the scrape off layer (SOL) plasma along the magnetic field lines passing in front of the the HHFW antenna. It is important to determine quantitatively the relative contributions of these processes. Here we explore the properties of the characteristics of probes on the lower divertor plate to determine the likelyhood that the primary cause of the RF heat deposition is RF rectification.

  14. Optimization of substrate-target distance for pulsed laser deposition of tungsten oxide thin films using Langmuir probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, A. Kumar; Singh, A.; Thirumurugesan, R.; Kuppusami, P.; Mohandas, E.

    2015-09-01

    The paper investigates the spatial and temporal variation of laser produced plasma of tungsten oxide using a Langmuir probe. The plasma was produced by laser ablation of tungsten oxide target using an Excimer laser of wavelength 248 nm. Our experimental studies confirmed that oxygen partial pressure (P) of 2× 10-2 mbar is sufficient enough to get stoichiometric tungsten oxide thin films and the plume dynamics was diagnosed for their spatial and temporal behaviour at the above optimised oxygen pressure. Spatial distribution was recorded with the target to substrate distance (D) ranging from the target position to a distance of 75 mm away from the target, whereas the temporal variation was taken in the range of 0-50 μ S with an interval of 0.5 μ S. The average electron densities were found to be maximum at 30 mm from the target position. However, ion density was constant beyond the probe distance of 45 mm from the target. The plasma current was found to be maximum at 28 μ S. The target to substrate distance was optimized for homogenous adherent good quality thin films using plasma parameters such as ion density and average electron density obtained at different oxygen pressure. The target distance and background gas pressure were correlated as PD scaling law and fitted as PD3 in the model.

  15. Compensated Langmuir Probe Measurement of the Near-keeper Plasma of a Hollow Cathode Operating in Plume Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taillefer, Zachary; Blandin, John; Szabo, James

    2014-10-01

    It has been reported that oscillations of the plasma potential, over a range of frequencies (<=1 kHz--2 MHz) are related to high energy ion production in the plume of a neutralizer hollow cathode when operating in plume mode. Impact of these high energy ions with the keeper electrode face is the dominant mechanism by which electrode erosion occurs over long periods of operation (~10,000 hours). Reliable measurement of the plasma properties in this operating mode is critical to development of computational models and efforts to mitigate the erosion and maximize lifetime of these cathodes. In this work, both plume and spot mode operating conditions of a low current (<=5 A), dispenser hollow cathode have been quantitatively identified. An emissive probe was used to characterize the plasma potential oscillations in the near-keeper plasma during plume mode operation. Large amplitude fluctuations (exceeding 70 V) of the plasma potential were observed, at a fundamental frequency of 55 kHz, along with 2nd and 3rd harmonics. In order to measure the local electron energy distribution function (EEDF) during plume mode operation, a compensated Langmuir probe was constructed, using RF chokes, to allow accurate measurement of the EEDF and calculation of the electron temperature.

  16. Application of an RF Biased Langmuir Probe to Etch Reactor Chamber Matching, Fault Detection and Process Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keil, Douglas; Booth, Jean-Paul; Benjamin, Neil; Thorgrimsson, Chris; Brooks, Mitchell; Nagai, Mikio; Albarede, Luc; Kim, Jung

    2008-10-01

    Semiconductor device manufacturing typically occurs in an environment of both increasing equipment costs and per unit sale price shrinkage. Profitability in such a conflicted economic environment depends critically on yield, throughput and cost-of-ownership. This has resulted in increasing interest in improved fault detection, process diagnosis, and advanced process control. Achieving advances in these areas requires an integrated understanding of the basic physical principles driving the processes of interest and the realities of commercial manufacturing. Following this trend, this work examines the usefulness of an RF-biased planar Langmuir probe^1. This method delivers precise real-time (10 Hz) measurements of ion flux and tail weighted electron temperature. However, it is also mechanically non-intrusive, reliable and insensitive to contamination and deposition on the probe. Since the measured parameters are closely related to physical processes occurring at the wafer-plasma interface, significant improvements in process control, chamber matching and fault detection are achieved. Examples illustrating the improvements possible will be given. ^1J.P. Booth, N. St. J. Braithwaite, A. Goodyear and P. Barroy, Rev.Sci.Inst., Vol.71, No.7, July 2000, pgs. 2722-2727.

  17. Plasma-material interactions: A Langmuir probe analysis of a cylindrical SiO(2) deposition system and a computational study using VFTRIM3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkot, Robert Bruce, Jr.

    This dissertation is broken into two sections describing, first, a computer code simulating ion-surface interactions, VFTRIM3D, and, second, an experimental Langmuir probe analysis of a cylindrical SiOsb2 deposition system. VFTRIM3D is a 3-dimensional, Monte-Carlo, binary collision code employing fractal algorithms used to simulate atomic-scale surface roughness. This work applies this code to studies of incident ion energies in the 10's to 100's of eV on various targets and comparisons to experimental data prove its dependability for such simulations. The experimental portion of this thesis includes the development and investigation of a cylindrical SiOsb2 deposition system used to deposit gas permeation barrier thin films onto PET bottles. The plasma analysis is done utilizing time- and spatially resolved Langmuir probe techniques. In order to study the characteristics of the dielectric deposition plasma, a "hot" Langmuir probe was developed to acquire typical Langmuir probe data during SiOsb2 deposition. The SiOsb2 films deposited in this system are analyzed for their gas permeation qualities and are correlated to the plasma properties gathered using Langmuir probes as well as the gas, pressure, and time recipes used to produce them. It is found in this work that the application of SiOsb2 films onto flexible PET bottles using the fashion explained herein results in a decrease in the gas permeation characteristics of the SiOsb2-PET membrane as desired, but is found to be independent of the thickness of the SiOsb2 present. This limit is found to be caused by cracks and pinhole defects across the SiOsb2 film that permit uninhibited gas flow directly to the PET bottle.

  18. Improved tunable external filter for Langmuir probe measurement at low density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yoon-Min; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Jeon, Sang-Bum; Kim, Dong-Hwan; Kim, Ju-Ho; Chung, Chin-Wook; Department of Electrical Engineering Team; Department of Nanoscale Semiconductor Engineering Team

    2015-09-01

    Measurement of the electron energy probability function (EEPF) at low density plasma, especially in molecular gas discharge, is difficult due to large RF fluctuation. To overcome the problem, an improved tunable external filter was developed. In contrast to an internal filter, the external filter can tune the resonance frequency of the choke filter. However, conventional external filter has low impedance due to a large stray capacitance between a probe tip and the external filter. To reduce the effect of the stray capacitance, an appropriate inductor was connected to the probe tip, and the external filter was designed to tune the first and the second harmonic frequencies independently. Using our filter, the EEPFs were measured at low density plasma with various gases, and the results show the improved performance of the filter as compared to the previous studies.

  19. A numerical method for determining highly precise electron energy distribution functions from Langmuir probe characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Jin-Young; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2010-12-15

    Electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) were determined from probe characteristics using a numerical ac superimposed method with a distortion correction of high derivative terms by varying amplitude of a sinusoidal perturbation voltage superimposed onto the dc sweep voltage, depending on the related electron energy. Low amplitude perturbation applied around the plasma potential represented the low energy peak of the EEDF exactly, and high amplitude perturbation applied around the floating potential was effective to suppress noise or distortion of the probe characteristic, which is fatal to the tail electron distribution. When a small random noise was imposed over the stabilized prove characteristic, the numerical differentiation method was not suitable to determine the EEDF, while the numerical ac superimposed method was able to obtain a highly precise EEDF.

  20. Ion currents to cylindrical Langmuir probes for finite ion temperature values: Experimental

    SciTech Connect

    Ballesteros, J.; Palop, J.I.F.; Colomer, V.; Hernandez, M.A.

    1995-12-31

    A new theoretical model about the ion currents to a cylindrical probe has been developed which takes into account the influence of a finite ion temperature value. The ABR (Allen, Boyd and Reynolds) model, which considers only radial motion for the positive ions, is recovered in the limit of cold ions. In this paper we axe going to show the experimental ion currents obtained in a plasma in which the positive ion temperature effect cannot be neglected.

  1. Measurement of edge plasma parameters in IR-T1 Tokamak by double Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoranneviss, M.; Khademian, A.; Masnavi, M.; Khorshid, P.; Salami, M.R.

    1996-12-31

    IR-T1 Tokamak is an air-core transformer type Tokamak. The vacuum chamber was made of 4 mm thick stainless steel with minor and major radii of 12.5 cm and 45 cm as respectively. Measurements of T{sub e} have been observed in IR-T1 with fabricated circuits of double pore design. This pore can be movable in the horizontal direction, therefore one can measure temperature along 1 cm distance. This note presents a theoretical and experimental explanation of double probe techniques. Details will be discussed in the full paper.

  2. Langmuir-magnetic probe measurements of ELMs and dithering cycles in the EAST tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, N.; Naulin, V.; Xu, G. S.; Rasmussen, J. J.; Wang, H. Q.; Liu, S. C.; Wang, L.; Liang, Y.; Nielsen, A. H.; Madsen, J.; Guo, H. Y.; Wan, B. N.

    2014-09-01

    Measurements of the dynamical behavior associated with edge localized modes (ELMs) have been carried out in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) by direct probing near the separatrix and far scrape-off layer (SOL) using electrostatic as well as magnetic probes. Type-III ELMs and dithering cycles have been investigated near the threshold power for the transition from the low confinement mode (L-mode) to the high confinement mode (H-mode). A precursor is observed prior to type-III ELM events with chirping frequency (130-70 kHz). It is located inside the separatrix and does not lead to considerable particle transport into the SOL. Distinct from type-III ELMs, no precursor modes precede the dithering cycles. It is evident from our measurements that the absence of precursor activity is a good indicator to distinguish the dithering cycles from type-III ELMs. A number of distinct current filaments are identified slightly inside the separatrix, both during type-III ELM events and dithering cycles. The characteristic current topology in these filaments is still ambiguous in our investigations. Furthermore, small ELMs are observed in type-I ELMy-like H-mode discharge regimes on EAST, in which solitary monopolar current filaments are observed to propagate in the SOL.

  3. The behavior of the plasmapause at mid-latitudes - Isis 1 Langmuir probe measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brace, L. H.; Theis, R. F.

    1974-01-01

    Observations of the electron concentration and the temperature from the electrostatic probes on the Isis 1 satellite were used to examine the location and behavior of the plasmapause at about 3000-km altitude in the vicinity of L = 4. At these altitudes the electron concentration measurements are equivalent to measurements of H(+), since the satellite is well into the protonosphere. The plasmapause is evident as a sharp drop in electron concentration by a factor of 100 as the satellite passes into the polar cap, and a corresponding increase is observed as it enters the plasmasphere on the opposite side of the earth. An enhancement of temperature is also observed at the plasmapause, an effect that is most visible at night, when the temperatures at latitudes above and below the plasmapause are usually very low. The position of the plasmapause decreases with magnetic activity but is found to be somewhat less sensitive to Kp than is the equatorial plasmapause.

  4. Plasma characterization of the superconducting proton linear accelerator plasma generator using a 2 MHz compensated Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitzer, C.; Kronberger, M.; Lettry, J.; Sanchez-Arias, J.; Stoeri, H.

    2012-02-15

    The CERN study for a superconducting proton Linac (SPL) investigates the design of a pulsed 5 GeV Linac operating at 50 Hz. As a first step towards a future SPL H{sup -} volume ion source, a plasma generator capable of operating at Linac4 or nominal SPL settings has been developed and operated at a dedicated test stand. The hydrogen plasma is heated by an inductively coupled RF discharge e{sup -} and ions are confined by a magnetic multipole cusp field similar to the currently commissioned Linac4 H{sup -} ion source. Time-resolved measurements of the plasma potential, temperature, and electron energy distribution function obtained by means of a RF compensated Langmuir probe along the axis of the plasma generator are presented. The influence of the main tuning parameters, such as RF power and frequency and the timing scheme is discussed with the aim to correlate them to optimum H{sup -} ion beam parameters measured on an ion source test stand. The effects of hydrogen injection settings which allow operation at 50 Hz repetition rate are discussed.

  5. Evolution of the plasma environment of comet 67P from spacecraft potential measurements by the Rosetta Langmuir probe instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odelstad, E.; Eriksson, A. I.; Edberg, N. J. T.; Johansson, F.; Vigren, E.; André, M.; Tzou, C.-Y.; Carr, C.; Cupido, E.

    2015-12-01

    We study the evolution of the plasma environment of comet 67P using measurements of the spacecraft potential from early September 2014 (heliocentric distance 3.5 AU) to late March 2015 (2.1 AU) obtained by the Langmuir probe instrument. The low collision rate keeps the electron temperature high (˜5 eV), resulting in a negative spacecraft potential whose magnitude depends on the electron density. This potential is more negative in the northern (summer) hemisphere, particularly over sunlit parts of the neck region on the nucleus, consistent with neutral gas measurements by the Cometary Pressure Sensor of the Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis. Assuming constant electron temperature, the spacecraft potential traces the electron density. This increases as the comet approaches the Sun, most clearly in the southern hemisphere by a factor possibly as high as 20-44 between September 2014 and January 2015. The northern hemisphere plasma density increase stays around or below a factor of 8-12, consistent with seasonal insolation change.

  6. Langmuir Probe Measurements of Inductively Coupled CHF3/Ar and Ar/CHF3/O2 Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, S. P.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Meyyappan, M.

    2000-01-01

    Plasma parameters, such as, electron number density (ne), electron temperature (Te), y electron energy distribution function (EEDF), mean electron energy (Ee), ion number density (ni), and plasma potential (Vp), have been measured by using Langmuir probe in low-pressure (10-50 mTorr) inductively coupled CHF3/Ar and CHF3/Ar/O2 plasmas generated in the GEC cell. The measurements were made at the center of the plasma, keeping the lower electrode grounded, for various CHF3/Ar and Ar/CHF3/O2 mixtures operating at 10-50 mTorr pressures and two input RF power levels, 200 and 300 W. EEDF data show a strong Druyvesteyn distribution with relatively lower number of low energy electrons as compared to a Maxwell distribution and a large electron population with energies higher than the plasma potential. The results further show that at low CHF3 concentrations (less than 50%) the electron number density remains nearly constant with increase in pressure. At higher CHF3 concentrations, however, it decreases with increase in pressure. Plasma potential and electron temperature increase with decrease in pressure and with increase in CHF3 concentration. An analysis of the above observations and mechanisms will be presented.

  7. Plasma characterization of the superconducting proton linear accelerator plasma generator using a 2 MHz compensated Langmuir probe.

    PubMed

    Schmitzer, C; Kronberger, M; Lettry, J; Sanchez-Arias, J; Störi, H

    2012-02-01

    The CERN study for a superconducting proton Linac (SPL) investigates the design of a pulsed 5 GeV Linac operating at 50 Hz. As a first step towards a future SPL H(-) volume ion source, a plasma generator capable of operating at Linac4 or nominal SPL settings has been developed and operated at a dedicated test stand. The hydrogen plasma is heated by an inductively coupled RF discharge e(-) and ions are confined by a magnetic multipole cusp field similar to the currently commissioned Linac4 H(-) ion source. Time-resolved measurements of the plasma potential, temperature, and electron energy distribution function obtained by means of a RF compensated Langmuir probe along the axis of the plasma generator are presented. The influence of the main tuning parameters, such as RF power and frequency and the timing scheme is discussed with the aim to correlate them to optimum H(-) ion beam parameters measured on an ion source test stand. The effects of hydrogen injection settings which allow operation at 50 Hz repetition rate are discussed. PMID:22380224

  8. Long Awaited Fundamental Measurement of the Martian Upper Atmosphere from the Langmuir Probe and Waves Instrument on the MAVEN Mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Laila; Andrews, David; Ergun, Bob; Delory, Greg; Morooka, Michiko; Fowler, Chris; McEnulty, Tess; Weber, Tristan; Eriksson, Anders; Malaspina, David; Crary, Frank; Mitchell, David; McFadden, Jim; Halekas, Jasper; Larson, Davin; Connerney, Jack; Espley, Jared; Eparvies, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Electron temperature and density are critical quantities in understanding an upper atmosphere. Approximately 40 years ago, the Viking landers reached the Martian surface, measuring the first (and only) two temperature profiles during it's descent. With the MAVEN mission arriving at Mars details of the Martian ionosphere can agin be studied by a complete plasma package. This paper investigates the first few months of data from the MAVEN mission when the orbit is below 500 km and around the northern hemisphere's terminator. The fo-cus of this presentation is on the different measure-ments that the Langmuir probe and Waves (LPW) in-strument is making on the MAVEN mission. Some of the LPW highlights that will be presented: (a) the long awaited new the electron temperature profiles; (b) the structures observed on the nightside ionosphere; (c) wave-particle insteractions observed below 500 km; and (d) the observed dusty environment at Mars. This presentation is supported by measurements from the other Particle and Fileds (PF) measurements on MAVEN.

  9. Solar EUV index for aeronomical studies at earth from Langmuir probe photoelectron measurements on the Pioneer Venus orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, W. R.; Mahajan, K. K.

    1992-01-01

    A solar EUV index for aeronomical studies at earth, obtained from the Langmuir probe measurement of photoelectron current on the Pioneer Venus orbiter, is presented. To examine the potential of E sub EUV as a solar EUV flux index, the behavior of ionospheric parameters f sub 0 E, f sub 0 F1, and f sub 0 F2 are studied at midlatitude stations, and their relationship with E sub EUV and with the 10.7-cm solar radio flux is compared. f sub 0 F1 and f sub 0 F2 are found to be better correlated with E sub EUV than with the 10.7-cm flux. F sub 0 E is better correlated with the 10.7-cm flux, because the 10.7-cm flux is also a proxy for soft X-rays, which are an important ionizing source in the E region. A table is also presented for the EUV index, E sub EUV, for the period February 12, 1979, through most of 1991.

  10. Density Structures Within the Martian Ionosphere from the Langmuir Probe and Waves Instrument on the MAVEN Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEnulty, Tess; Andrews, David; Andersson, Laila; Ergun, Robert E.; Delory, Greg T.; Fowler, Chris M.; Morooka, MIchiko W.; Weber, Tristan; Eriksson, Anders I.; Mitchell, David L.; McFadden, James P.; Halekas, Jasper; Larson, Davin; Connerney, Jack; Espley, Jared; Eparvier, Francis G.

    2015-04-01

    MAVEN is the first mission to Mars that has included a full suite of particles and fields instruments, allowing characterization of the plasma environment from the solar wind down to ~125-150 km altitude. These altitudes are below the exobase, and well into the ionosphere. The ionospheric density had not been measured locally down to these altitudes before MAVEN, and previous spacecraft that did measure the density at higher altitudes did not include full particles and fields suites. The Langmuir Probe and Waves (LPW) instrument on MAVEN provides measurements of the plasma frequency that allow the density to be determined within 5%. Since the plasma line is not always present, the LPW instrument was designed to be able to broadcast white noise to stimulate the plasma. This broadcasting feature has proven very successful and for some orbits the plasma line is observed nearly continuously. The cadence of these measurements within the ionosphere allows the density to be determined with a spatial resolution as small as ~8 to ~16 km. In this paper, observations of electron density structures from the first 6 months of operation are presented. During this time period the orbit precessed, so measurements were made both on the dayside and nightside. Observed density structures include variations of almost 2 orders of magnitude within ~40 km along the orbital track below 300 km. Observations of these density structures are presented with supporting measurements from the other particles and fields instruments.

  11. The behavior of the plasmapause at mid-latitudes: ISIS-1 Langmuir probe measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brace, L. H.; Theis, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    Observations of the electron concentration, N sub e, and temperature, T sub e, from the electrostatic probes on the ISIS-1 satellite were used to examine the location and behavior of the plasmapause at about 3000 kilometers altitude in the vicinity of L = 4. At these altitudes, the N sub e measurements are equivalent to measurements of H(+) since the satellite is well into the protonosphere. The plasmapause as is evident as a sharp drop in N sub e by a factor of 10 to 100 as the satellite passes into the polar cap, and a corresponding increase is observed as it enters the plasmasphere on the opposite side of the Earth. An enhancement of T sub e is also observed at the plasmapause, an effect that is most visible at night when the temperatures at latitudes above and below the plasmapause are usually very low. The position of the plasmapause decreases with magnetic activity but is found to be somewhat less sensitive to K sub p than is the equatorial plasmapause. Also unlike its equatorial behavior, the mid-latitude plasmapause exhibits no detectable late afternoon bulge. These differences imply rather complex coupling of the thermal plasma along the field lines that link these two regions of the plasmasphere. An additional factor may be the recently observed axial asymmetry in the geomagnetic field at high altitudes.

  12. Langmuir probes for SPIDER (source for the production of ions of deuterium extracted from radio frequency plasma) experiment: Tests in BATMAN (Bavarian test machine for negative ions)

    SciTech Connect

    Brombin, M. Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Pomaro, N.; Taliercio, C.; Palma, M. Dalla; Pasqualotto, R.; Schiesko, L.

    2014-11-15

    A prototype system of the Langmuir probes for SPIDER (Source for the production of Ions of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma) was manufactured and experimentally qualified. The diagnostic was operated in RF (Radio Frequency) plasmas with cesium evaporation on the BATMAN (BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions) test facility, which can provide plasma conditions as expected in the SPIDER source. A RF passive compensation circuit was realised to operate the Langmuir probes in RF plasmas. The sensors’ holder, designed to better simulate the bias plate conditions in SPIDER, was exposed to a severe experimental campaign in BATMAN with cesium evaporation. No detrimental effect on the diagnostic due to cesium evaporation was found during the exposure to the BATMAN plasma and in particular the insulation of the electrodes was preserved. The paper presents the system prototype, the RF compensation circuit, the acquisition system (as foreseen in SPIDER), and the results obtained during the experimental campaigns.

  13. Langmuir probes for SPIDER (source for the production of ions of deuterium extracted from radio frequency plasma) experiment: Tests in BATMAN (Bavarian test machine for negative ions)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brombin, M.; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Pomaro, N.; Taliercio, C.; Palma, M. Dalla; Pasqualotto, R.; Schiesko, L.

    2014-11-01

    A prototype system of the Langmuir probes for SPIDER (Source for the production of Ions of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma) was manufactured and experimentally qualified. The diagnostic was operated in RF (Radio Frequency) plasmas with cesium evaporation on the BATMAN (BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions) test facility, which can provide plasma conditions as expected in the SPIDER source. A RF passive compensation circuit was realised to operate the Langmuir probes in RF plasmas. The sensors' holder, designed to better simulate the bias plate conditions in SPIDER, was exposed to a severe experimental campaign in BATMAN with cesium evaporation. No detrimental effect on the diagnostic due to cesium evaporation was found during the exposure to the BATMAN plasma and in particular the insulation of the electrodes was preserved. The paper presents the system prototype, the RF compensation circuit, the acquisition system (as foreseen in SPIDER), and the results obtained during the experimental campaigns.

  14. Probing radical kinetics in the afterglow of pulsed discharges by absorption spectroscopy with light emitting diodes: Application to BCl radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vempaire, D.; Cunge, G.

    2009-01-01

    Measuring decay rates of radical densities in the afterglow of pulsed plasmas is a powerful approach to determine their gas phase and surface loss kinetics. We show that this measurement can be achieved by absorption spectroscopy with low cost and simple apparatus by using light emitting diodes as a light source. The feasibility is demonstrated by monitoring BCl radicals in pulsed low pressure high-density BCl3 plasmas. It is shown that BCl is lost both in the gas phase by reacting with Cl2 with a cross section of 9 Å2 and in the chamber walls with a sticking coefficient of about 0.3.

  15. Observed Coupling Between the International Space Station PCU Plasma and a FPMU Langmuir Probe Facilitated by the Geomagnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, William; Koontz, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    Electrical charging of the International Space Station (ISS) is a matter of serious concern resulting from the possibility of vehicle arcing and electrical shock hazard to crew during extravehicular activity (EVA). A Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU) was developed and integrated into ISS in order to control the ISS floating potential, thereby, minimize vehicle charging and associated hazards. One of the principle factors affecting ISS electrical charging is the ionosphere plasma state (i.e., electron temperature and density). To support ISS electrical charging studies a Floating Potential Monitoring Unit (FPMU) is also integrated into ISS in order to measure the ionosphere properties using Langmuir probes (LP). The FPMU was located on the Starboard side of ISS. The PCU is located near the center of ISS with its plasma exhaust pointed to port. From its integration on ISS in 2006 through November of 2009, the FPMU data exhibited nominal characteristics during PCU operation. On November 21, 2009 the FPMU was relocated from the Starboard location to a new Port location. After relocation significant enhanced noise was observed in both the LP current-voltage sweeps and the derived electron temperature data. The enhanced noise only occurred when the PCU was in discharge and at unique and repeatable locations of the ISS orbit. The cause of this enhanced noise was investigated. It was found that there is coupling occurring between the PCU plasma and the FPMU LP. In this paper we shall 1) present the on-orbit data and the presence of enhanced noise, 2) demonstrate that the coupling of the PCU plasma and the FPMU measurements is geomagnetically organized, 3) show that coupling of the PCU plasma and the FPMU is primarily due to and driven by particle-wave interaction and 4) show that the ionosphere conditions are adequate for Alfven waves to be generated by the PCU plasma.

  16. Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows as Probes of Environment and Blastwave Physics. 1; Absorption by Host Galaxy Gas and Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starling, R. L. C.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wiersema, K.; Rol, E.; Curran, P. A.; Kouveliotou, C.; vanderHorst, A. J.; Heemskerk, M. H. M.

    2006-01-01

    We use a new approach to obtain limits on the absorbing columns towards an initial sample of 10 long Gamma-Ray Bursts observed with BeppoSAX and selected on the basis of their good optical and nIR coverage, from simultaneous fits to nIR, optical and X-ray afterglow data, in count space and including the effects of metallicity. In no cases is a MIV-like ext,inction preferred, when testing MW, LMC and SMC extinction laws. The 2175A bump would in principle be detectable in all these afterglows, but is not present in the data. An SMC-like gas-to-dust ratio or lower value can be ruled out for 4 of the hosts analysed here (assuming Sh4C metallicity and extinction law) whilst the remainder of the sample have too large an error to discriminate. We provide a more accurate estimate of the line-of-sight extinction and improve upon the uncertainties for the majority of the extinction measurements made in previous studies of this sample. We discuss this method to determine extinction values in comparison with the most commonly employed existing methods.

  17. The behaviour of negative oxygen ions in the afterglow of a reactive HiPIMS discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowes, M.; Bradley, J. W.

    2014-07-01

    Using a single Langmuir probe, the temporal evolution of the oxygen negative ion, n-, and electron, ne, densities in the afterglow of a reactive HiPIMS discharge operating in argon-oxygen gas mixtures have been determined. The magnetron was equipped with a titanium target and operated in ‘poisoned’ mode at a frequency of 100 Hz with a pulse width of 100 µs for a range of oxygen partial pressures, {p_{O_{2}}}/{p_{total}} = 0.0{{-}}0.5 . In the initial afterglow, the density of the principle negative ion in the discharge (O-) was of the order of 1016 m-3 for all conditions. The O- concentration was found to decay slowly with characteristic decay times between 585 µs and 1.2 ms over the oxygen partial pressure range. Electron densities were observed to fall more rapidly, resulting in long-lived highly electronegative afterglow plasmas where the ratio, α = n-/ne, was found to reach values up to 672 (±100) for the highest O2 partial pressure. By comparing results to a simple plasma-chemical model, we speculate that with increased {p_{O_{2}}}/{p_{total}} ratio, more O- ions are formed in the afterglow via dissociative electron attachment to highly excited metastable oxygen molecules, with the latter being formed during the active phase of the discharge. After approximately 2.5 ms into the off-time, the afterglow degenerates into an ion-ion plasma and negative ions are free to impinge upon the chamber walls and grounded substrates with flux densities of the order of 1018 m-2 s-1, which is around 10% of the positive ion flux measured during the on-time. This illustrates the potential importance of the long afterglow in reactive HiPIMS, which can act as a steady source of low energy O- ions to a growing thin film at the substrate during periods of reduced positive ion bombardment.

  18. A particle-in-cell model of the Langmuir probe immersed in Xe plasma under conditions corresponding to those of Hall effect thruster plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenian, Adam; Chernukho, Andrey; Rachubiński, Hubert; Dudeck, Michel

    2014-05-01

    Hall effect thrusters (HETs) are efficient propulsion devices for the station-keeping of geostationary satellites. However, a further efficiency increase requires better knowledge of plasma and plasma-wall interactions. Electric probes are often used for diagnosing HET plasmas but the existing semi-analytical theories, used for the interpretation of probe characteristics, could only be applied with caution. Therefore, in this work a particle-in-cell model of the Langmuir probe immersed in plasma under conditions corresponding to those of HET plasma is developed. It was found that materials with a predominant elastic contribution to secondary electron emission (SEE) will generally lead to lower power deposition on a surface. In the case of inelastic and true SEE processes, the power deposited on a wall depends on the ratio of the sum of secondary electron energies to the electron impact energy. The axial magnetic field also leads to substantial reduction of power deposition on the probe.

  19. Electron energy distribution functions measured by Langmuir probe with optical emission spectroscopy in very high frequency capacitive discharge in nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Fattah, E.; Bazavan, M.; Sugai, H.

    2012-11-15

    By using a rf compensated Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy, the effects of driving frequency (13.56-50 MHz) on the electron energy probability function (EEPF), electron density, electron temperature, and the vibrational and rotational temperatures in capacitively coupled nitrogen discharge were investigated. Measurements were performed in the pressure range 60-200 mTorr, and at a fixed voltage of 140 V (peak-to-peak). With increasing the driving frequency, the dissipated power and electron density markedly increased along with the intensity of the optical emission lines belonging to the 2nd positive (337.1 nm) and 1st negative systems (391.4 nm) of N{sub 2}. The EEPF at low pressure 60 mTorr is two-temperature (bi-Maxwellian) distribution, irrespective of the driving frequency, in contrast with argon and helium discharges in the similar conditions. The mechanism forming such bi-Maxwellian shape was explained by two combined effects: one is the collisionless sheath-heating effect enhancing the tail electron population, and the other is the collision-induced reduction of electrons at the energy 2-4 eV where the collision cross-section for the vibrational excitation has a resonantly large peak. The two-temperature EEPF structure was basically retained at moderate pressure 120 mTorr and high pressure 200 mTorr. The vibrational temperature T{sub vib} and rotational temperature T{sub rot} are measured for the sequence ({Delta}{nu}=-2) of N{sub 2} second positive system (C{sup 3}{Pi}{sub u}{yields}B{sup 3}{Pi}{sub g}) using the method of comparing the measured and calculated spectra with a chi-squared minimization procedure. It was found that, both of T{sub vib} and T{sub rot} are a weakly dependent on driving frequency at low pressure 60 mTorr. At higher pressure (120 and 200 mTorr), T{sub vib} rises monotonically with the driving frequency, whereas the T{sub rot} slightly decreases with frequency below 37 MHz, beyond which it relatively increases or

  20. Comparison of currents predicted by NASCAP/LEO model simulations with elementary Langmuir-type bare probe models for an insulated cable containing a single pinhole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galofaro, Joel T.

    1990-01-01

    The behavior of a defect in the insulation of a short biased section of cable in a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) space environment was examined. Such studies are of the utmost importance for large space power systems where great quantities of cabling will be deployed. An insulated probe containing a pinhole was placed into a hypothetical high speed LEO plasma. The NASA Charging Analyzer Program (NASCAP/LEO) was used to explore sheath growth about the probe as a function of applied voltage and to predict I-V behavior. A set of independent current calculations using Langmuir's formulations for concentric spheres and coaxial cylinders were also performed. The case of concentric spheres was here extended to include the case of concentric hemispheres. Several simple Langmuir-type models were then constructed to bracket the current collected by the cable. The space-charge sheath radius and impact parameters were used to determine the proper current regime. I-V curves were plotted for the models and comparisons were made with NASCAP/LEO results. Finally, NASCAP/LEO potential contours and surface cell potential plots were examined to explain interesting features in the NASCAP/LEO I-V curve.

  1. Electrical characterization of the flowing afterglow of N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} microwave plasmas at reduced pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Afonso Ferreira, J.; Stafford, L. Leonelli, R.; Ricard, A.

    2014-04-28

    A cylindrical Langmuir probe was used to analyze the spatial distribution of the number density of positive ions and electrons as well as the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in the flowing afterglow of a 6 Torr N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} plasma sustained by a propagating electromagnetic surface wave in the microwave regime. In pure N{sub 2} discharges, ion densities were in the mid 10{sup 14} m{sup −3} in the pink afterglow and in the mid 10{sup 12} m{sup −3} early in the late afterglow. In both pink and late afterglows, the ion population was much higher than the electron population, indicating non-macroscopically neutral media. The EEDF was close to a Maxwellian with an electron temperature of 0.5 ± 0.1 eV, except in the pink afterglow where the temperature rose to 1.1 ± 0.2 eV. This latter behavior is ascribed to N{sub 2} vibration-vibration pumping in the pink afterglow that increases the concentration of high N{sub 2} vibrational states and thus rises the electron temperature by vibration-electron collisions. After addition of small amounts of O{sub 2} in the nominally pure N{sub 2} discharge, the charged particles densities and average electron energy first strongly increased and then decreased with increasing O{sub 2} concentration. Based on these data and the evolution of the N{sub 2}{sup +}(B) band emission intensities, it is concluded that a significant change in the positive ion composition of the flowing afterglow occurs, going from N{sub 2}{sup +} in nominally pure N{sub 2} discharges to NO{sup +} after addition of trace amounts of O{sub 2} in N{sub 2}.

  2. Response of Venus exospheric temperature measured by neutral mass spectrometer to solar EUV flux measured by Langmuir probe on the Pioneer Venus orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahajan, K. K.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Brace, L. H.; Niemann, H. B.; Hoegy, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    The photoelectron current from the Pioneer Venus Langmuir probe has provided measurements of the total flux of solar EUV photons at Venus since 1979. The neutral oxygen scale height measured by the orbiter neutral mass spectrometer has permitted the exospheric temperature to be derived during the same mission. In this paper, the EUV observations are used to examine the response of exospheric temperature to changes in solar activity, primarily those related to solar rotation. It is found that the dayside exospheric temperature quite faithfully tracks variations in the EUV flux. Comparison is also made with the earth-based solar activity index F10.7 adjusted to the position of Venus. This index varied from 142 to 249 flux units during the period of measurements. The exospheric temperature is better correlated with EUV flux than with the 10.7-cm solar radio flux.

  3. Probing a Gamma-Ray Burst Progenitor at a Redshift of z = 2: A Comprehensive Observing Campaign Campaign of the Afterglow of GRB 030226

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klose, S.; Greiner, J.; Rau, A.; Henden, A. A.; Hartmann, D. H.; Zeh, A.; Ries, C.; Masetti, N.; Malesani, D.; Guenther, E.

    2004-01-01

    We report results from a comprehensive follow-up observing campaign of the afterglow of GRB 030226 including VLT spectroscopy, VLT polarimetry, and Chandra X-ray observations. In addition, we present BOOTES-1 wide-field observations at the time of the occurrence of the burst. First observations at ESO started 0.2 days after the event when the gamma ray burst (GRB) afterglow was at a magnitude of R approximately 19 and continued until the afterglow had faded below the detection threshold (R greater than 26). No underlying host galaxy was found. The optical light curve shows a break around 0.8 days after the burst, which is achromatic within the observational errors, supporting the view that it was due to a jetted explosion. Close to the break time the degree of linear polarization of the afterglow light was less than 1.1%, which favors a uniform-jet model rather than a structured one. VLT spectra show two absorption line systems at redshifts z = 1.962 plus or minus 0.001 and 1.986 plus or minus 0.001, placing the lower limit for the redshift of the GRB close to 2. We emphasize that the kinematics and the composition of the absorbing clouds responsible for these line systems are very similar to those observed in the afterglow of GRB 021004. This corroborates the picture in which at least some GRBs are physically related to the explosion of a Wolf-Rayet star.

  4. Langmuir Probe Measurements Within the Discharge Channel of the 20-kW NASA-300M and NASA-300MS Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastry, Rohit; Huang, Wensheng; Haag, Thomas W.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2013-01-01

    NASA is presently developing a high-power, high-efficiency, long-lifetime Hall thruster for the Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission. In support of this task, studies have been performed on the 20-kW NASA-300M Hall thruster to aid in the overall design process. The ability to incorporate magnetic shielding into a high-power Hall thruster was also investigated with the NASA- 300MS, a modified version of the NASA-300M. The inclusion of magnetic shielding would allow the thruster to push existing state-of-the-art technology in regards to service lifetime, one of the goals of the Technology Demonstration Mission. Langmuir probe measurements were taken within the discharge channels of both thrusters in order to characterize differences at higher power levels, as well as validate ongoing modeling efforts using the axisymmetric code Hall2De. Flush-mounted Langmuir probes were also used within the channel of the NASA-300MS to verify that magnetic shielding was successfully applied. Measurements taken from 300 V, 10 kW to 600 V, 20 kW have shown plasma potentials near anode potential and electron temperatures of 4 to 12 eV at the walls near the thruster exit plane of the NASA-300MS, verifying magnetic shielding and validating the design process at this power level. Channel centerline measurements on the NASA-300M from 300 V, 10 kW to 500 V, 20 kW show the electron temperature peak at approximately 0.1 to 0.2 channel lengths upstream of the exit plane, with magnitudes increasing with discharge voltage. The acceleration profiles appear to be centered about the exit plane with a width of approximately 0.3 to 0.4 channel lengths. Channel centerline measurements on the NASA-300MS were found to be more challenging due to additional probe heating. Ionization and acceleration zones appeared to move downstream on the NASA-300MS compared to the NASA-300M, as expected based on the shift in peak radial magnetic field. Additional measurements or alternative

  5. Langmuir probe measurements in a time-fluctuating-highly ionized non-equilibrium cutting arc: Analysis of the electron retarding part of the time-averaged current-voltage characteristic of the probe

    SciTech Connect

    Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B.; Kelly, H.

    2013-12-15

    This work describes the application of Langmuir probe diagnostics to the measurement of the electron temperature in a time-fluctuating-highly ionized, non-equilibrium cutting arc. The electron retarding part of the time-averaged current-voltage characteristic of the probe was analysed, assuming that the standard exponential expression describing the electron current to the probe in collision-free plasmas can be applied under the investigated conditions. A procedure is described which allows the determination of the errors introduced in time-averaged probe data due to small-amplitude plasma fluctuations. It was found that the experimental points can be gathered into two well defined groups allowing defining two quite different averaged electron temperature values. In the low-current region the averaged characteristic was not significantly disturbed by the fluctuations and can reliably be used to obtain the actual value of the averaged electron temperature. In particular, an averaged electron temperature of 0.98 ± 0.07 eV (= 11400 ± 800 K) was found for the central core of the arc (30 A) at 3.5 mm downstream from the nozzle exit. This average included not only a time-average over the time fluctuations but also a spatial-average along the probe collecting length. The fitting of the high-current region of the characteristic using such electron temperature value together with the corrections given by the fluctuation analysis showed a relevant departure of local thermal equilibrium in the arc core.

  6. Langmuir probe measurements in a time-fluctuating-highly ionized non-equilibrium cutting arc: analysis of the electron retarding part of the time-averaged current-voltage characteristic of the probe.

    PubMed

    Prevosto, L; Kelly, H; Mancinelli, B

    2013-12-01

    This work describes the application of Langmuir probe diagnostics to the measurement of the electron temperature in a time-fluctuating-highly ionized, non-equilibrium cutting arc. The electron retarding part of the time-averaged current-voltage characteristic of the probe was analysed, assuming that the standard exponential expression describing the electron current to the probe in collision-free plasmas can be applied under the investigated conditions. A procedure is described which allows the determination of the errors introduced in time-averaged probe data due to small-amplitude plasma fluctuations. It was found that the experimental points can be gathered into two well defined groups allowing defining two quite different averaged electron temperature values. In the low-current region the averaged characteristic was not significantly disturbed by the fluctuations and can reliably be used to obtain the actual value of the averaged electron temperature. In particular, an averaged electron temperature of 0.98 ± 0.07 eV (= 11400 ± 800 K) was found for the central core of the arc (30 A) at 3.5 mm downstream from the nozzle exit. This average included not only a time-average over the time fluctuations but also a spatial-average along the probe collecting length. The fitting of the high-current region of the characteristic using such electron temperature value together with the corrections given by the fluctuation analysis showed a relevant departure of local thermal equilibrium in the arc core. PMID:24387432

  7. The X-ray afterglows of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, D.

    2014-07-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are renowned for being the brightest explosions since the Big Bang. They are extremely useful probes with which to study the cosmos, primarily because of their bright afterglows. While the afterglow is panchromatic, the X-ray afterglow has proved extremely useful: the first localisations of both short and long-duration GRBs were made via their X-ray afterglows, an X-ray afterglow is associated with almost every burst, and spectroscopy of the X-ray afterglow informs us of the material close to the GRB as well as providing an unobscured measurement of the afterglow flux for virtually every GRB. We now have an incredibly rich database of ten years worth of GRBs and their afterglows from the Swift satellite, where its rapid autonomous repointing has allowed its X-Ray Telescope to be on target only minutes after the GRB. Here I will review what we have learnt from the X-ray afterglows of GRBs and describe some exciting recent results.

  8. Numerical experiment to estimate the validity of negative ion diagnostic using photo-detachment combined with Langmuir probing

    SciTech Connect

    Oudini, N.; Sirse, N.; Ellingboe, A. R.; Benallal, R.; Taccogna, F.; Bendib, A.

    2015-07-15

    This paper presents a critical assessment of the theory of photo-detachment diagnostic method used to probe the negative ion density and electronegativity α = n{sub -}/n{sub e}. In this method, a laser pulse is used to photo-detach all negative ions located within the electropositive channel (laser spot region). The negative ion density is estimated based on the assumption that the increase of the current collected by an electrostatic probe biased positively to the plasma is a result of only the creation of photo-detached electrons. In parallel, the background electron density and temperature are considered as constants during this diagnostics. While the numerical experiments performed here show that the background electron density and temperature increase due to the formation of an electrostatic potential barrier around the electropositive channel. The time scale of potential barrier rise is about 2 ns, which is comparable to the time required to completely photo-detach the negative ions in the electropositive channel (∼3 ns). We find that neglecting the effect of the potential barrier on the background plasma leads to an erroneous determination of the negative ion density. Moreover, the background electron velocity distribution function within the electropositive channel is not Maxwellian. This is due to the acceleration of these electrons through the electrostatic potential barrier. In this work, the validity of the photo-detachment diagnostic assumptions is questioned and our results illustrate the weakness of these assumptions.

  9. Emissive sheath measurements in the afterglow of a radio frequency plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehan, J. P. Hershkowitz, N.; Barnat, E. V.; Weatherford, B. R.; Kaganovich, I. D.

    2014-01-15

    The difference between the plasma potential and the floating potential of a highly emissive planar surface was measured in the afterglow of a radio frequency discharge. A Langmuir probe was used to measure the electron temperature and an emissive probe was used to measure the spatial distribution of the potential using the inflection point in the limit of zero emission technique. Time-resolved measurements were made using the slow-sweep method, a technique for measuring time-resolved current-voltage traces. This was the first time the inflection point in the limit of zero emission was used to make time-resolved measurements. Measurements of the potential profile of the presheath indicate that the potential penetrated approximately 50% farther into the plasma when a surface was emitting electrons. The experiments confirmed a recent kinetic theory of emissive sheaths, demonstrating that late in the afterglow as the plasma electron temperature approached the emitted electron temperature, the emissive sheath potential shrank to zero. However, the difference between the plasma potential and the floating potential of a highly emissive planar surface data appeared to be much less sensitive to the electron temperature ratio than the theory predicts.

  10. Experimental estimation of tungsten impurity sputtering due to Type I ELMs in JET-ITER-like wall using pedestal electron cyclotron emission and target Langmuir probe measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemaut, C.; Jardin, A.; Horacek, J.; Borodkina, I.; Autricque, A.; Arnoux, G.; Boom, J.; Brezinsek, S.; Coenen, J. W.; De La Luna, E.; Devaux, S.; Eich, T.; Harting, D.; Kirschner, A.; Lipschultz, B.; Matthews, G. F.; Meigs, A.; Moulton, D.; O'Mullane, M.; Stamp, M.; contributors, JET

    2016-02-01

    The ITER baseline scenario, with 500 MW of DT fusion power and Q = 10, will rely on a Type I ELMy H-mode and will be achieved with a tungsten (W) divertor. W atoms sputtered from divertor targets during mitigated ELMs are expected to be the dominant source in ITER. W impurity concentration in the plasma core can dramatically degrade its performance and lead to potentially damaging disruptions. Understanding the physics of the target W source due to sputtering during ELMs and inter-ELMs is important and can be helped by experimental measurements with improved precision. It has been established that the ELMy target ion impact energy has a simple linear dependence with the pedestal electron temperature measured by Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE). It has also been shown that Langmuir Probes (LP) ion flux measurements are reliable during ELMs due to the surprisingly low electron temperature. Therefore, in this paper, LP and ECE measurements in JET-ITER-Like-Wall (ILW) unseeded Type I ELMy H-mode experiments have been used to estimate the W sputtering flux from divertor targets in ELM and inter-ELM conditions. Comparison with similar estimates using W I spectroscopy measurements shows a reasonable agreement for the ELM and inter-ELM W source. The main advantage of the method involving LP measurements is the very high time resolution of the diagnostic (˜10 μs) allowing very precise description of the W sputtering source during ELMs.

  11. Mass Spectrometric and Langmuir Probe Measurements in Inductively Coupled Plasmas in Ar, CHF3/Ar and CHF3/Ar/O2 Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, J. S.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Cappelli, M. A.; Sharma, S. P.; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Absolute fluxes and energy distributions of ions in inductively coupled plasmas of Ar, CHF3/Ar, and CHF3/Ar/O2 have been measured. These plasmas were generated in a Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) cell modified for inductive coupling at pressures 10-50 mTorr and 100-300 W of 13.56 MHz radio frequency (RF) power in various feedgas mixtures. In pure Ar plasmas, the Ar(+) flux increases linearly with pressure as well as RF-power. Total ion flux in CHF3 mixtures decreases with increase in pressure and also CHF3 concentration. Relative ion fluxes observed in the present studies are analyzed with the help of available cross sections for electron impact ionization and charge-exchange ion-molecule reactions. Measurements of plasma potential, electron and ion number densities, electron energy distribution function, and mean electron energy have also been made in the center of the plasma with a RF compensated Langmuir probe. Plasma potential values are compared with the mean ion energies determined from the measured ion energy distributions and are consistent. Electron temperature, plasma potential, and mean ion energy vary inversely with pressure, but increase with CHF3 content in the mixture.

  12. Correlation of plasma characteristics to etch rate and via sidewall angle in a deep reactive ion etch system using Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Koirala, S. P.; Awaah, I.; Burkett, S. L.; Gordon, M. H.

    2011-01-15

    A Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy were used in a deep reactive ion etch system to correlate plasma parameters (atomic fluorine and argon emission, electron density, ion density, and electron average energy) with the etch rate and via sidewall angle. All data were obtained for coil powers ranging from 200 to 800 W, platen powers ranging from 7 to 16 W, and pressure ranging from 3.8 to 62 mTorr with constant SF{sub 6} and Ar flow rates of 112 and 18 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP), respectively. Results indicate that there is a correlation with etch rate for all plasma parameters except for argon emission. For argon emission, the etch rate exhibits a double-valued relation where the etch rate can either increase or decrease with increasing argon emission intensity due to changes in pressure which affect the energy coupling efficiency. As expected, the etch rate increases for measured increases in fluorine emission, electron density, and ion density. The etch rate, however, decreases with increasing average electron energy due to collision processes. In contrast, no correlation is observed between any of the measured plasma parameters with sidewall angle. The last result is consistent with the idea that sidewall angle is primarily controlled by the passivation cycle as opposed to the etching cycle, where all the authors' data were obtained.

  13. Diagnostics of capacitively-coupled hydrocarbon plasmas for deposition of diamond-like carbon films using quadrupole mass spectrometry and Langmuir probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Akinori; Fukai, Shun; Kousaka, Hiroyuki; Ohta, Takayuki

    2015-09-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are the hydrogenated amorphous carbon films, which contains a mixture of sp2- and sp3-bonded carbon. The DLC films have been widely used for various applications, such as automotive, semiconductors, medical devices, since have excellent material properties in lower friction, higher chemical stability, higher hardness, higher wear resistance. Until now, numerous investigations on the DLC films using plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition have been done. For precise control of coating technique of DLC films, it is enormously important to clarify the fundamental properties in hydrocarbon plasmas, as a source of hydrocarbon ions and radicals. In this paper, the fundamental properties in a low pressure radio-frequency hydrocarbon (Ar/CH4 (1 %) gas mixture) plasmas have been diagnosed using a quadrupole mass spectrometer (HIDEN ANARYTICAL Ltd., EQP-300) and Langmuir probe system (HIDEN ANARYTICAL Ltd., ESPion). This work was partly supported by KAKENHI (No.26420247), and a ``Grant for Advanced Industrial Technology Development (No.11B06004d)'' in 2011 from the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) of Japan.

  14. New insights on boundary plasma turbulence and the quasi-coherent mode in Alcator C-Mod using a Mirror Langmuir Probe

    SciTech Connect

    LaBombard, B.; Golfinopoulos, T.; Terry, J. L.; Brunner, D.; Davis, E.; Greenwald, M.; Hughes, J. W.

    2014-05-15

    A new “Mirror Langmuir Probe” diagnostic, combined with a double-coil scanning magnetic probe, is used to interrogate Alcator C-Mod's quasi-coherent mode (QCM) with unprecedented detail. In ohmic EDA H-modes, the QCM is found to reside in a region of positive radial electric field, with a radial width (∼3 mm) that spans open and closed field line regions. Large amplitude, in-phase sinusoidal bursts (∼100 kHz) in density, electron temperature, and plasma potential are observed, with potential lagging density by ∼16°, producing an outward radial transport velocity of ∼10 m/s. Mode propagation corresponds to the sum of local E × B and electron diamagnetic drift velocities. Poloidal magnetic field fluctuations project to current filaments carrying peak current densities of ∼25 A/cm{sup 2}. An evaluation of parallel electron force balance (Ohm's law) over a fluctuation cycle indicates a significant electromotive component. Interchange drive is also a contributor in the current continuity (vorticity) equation. Thus, the QCM is primarily a separatrix-spanning electron drift-wave with interchange and electromagnetic contributions.

  15. Edge transport studies in the edge and scrape-off layer of the National Spherical Torus Experiment with Langmuir probes

    SciTech Connect

    Boedo, J. A. Rudakov, D. L.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Zweben, S.; Maingi, R.; Maqueda, R. J.; Bell, R.; Kugel, H.; Leblanc, B.; Roquemore, L. A.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Ahn, J. W.; Canik, J.; Crocker, N.

    2014-04-15

    Transport and turbulence profiles were directly evaluated using probes for the first time in the edge and scrape-off layer (SOL) of NSTX [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] in low (L) and high (H) confinement, low power (P{sub in}∼ 1.3 MW), beam-heated, lower single-null discharges. Radial turbulent particle fluxes peak near the last closed flux surface (LCFS) at ≈4×10{sup 21} s{sup −1} in L-mode and are suppressed to ≈0.2×10{sup 21} s{sup −1} in H mode (80%–90% lower) mostly due to a reduction in density fluctuation amplitude and of the phase between density and radial velocity fluctuations. The radial particle fluxes are consistent with particle inventory based on SOLPS fluid modeling. A strong intermittent component is identified. Hot, dense plasma filaments 4–10 cm in diameter, appear first ∼2 cm inside the LCFS at a rate of ∼1×10{sup 21} s{sup −1} and leave that region with radial speeds of ∼3–5 km/s, decaying as they travel through the SOL, while voids travel inward toward the core. Profiles of normalized fluctuations feature levels of 10% inside LCFS to ∼150% at the LCFS and SOL. Once properly normalized, the intermittency in NSTX falls in similar electrostatic instability regimes as seen in other devices. The L-H transition causes a drop in the intermittent filaments velocity, amplitude and number in the SOL, resulting in reduced outward transport away from the edge and a less dense SOL.

  16. Deriving the characteristics of warm electrons (100-500 eV) in the magnetosphere of Saturn with the Cassini Langmuir probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, P.; Holmberg, M. K. G.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Lewis, G. R.; Schippers, P.; Coates, A.; Gurnett, D. A.; Waite, J. H.; Dandouras, I.

    2014-12-01

    Though Langmuir probes (LP) are designed to investigate cold plasma regions (e.g. ionospheres), a recent analysis revealed a strong sensitivity of the Cassini LP measurements to hundreds of eV electrons. These warm electrons impact the surface of the probe and generate a significant current of secondary electrons, that impacts both the DC level and the slope of the current-voltage curve of the LP (for negative potentials) through energetic contributions that may be modeled with a reasonable precision. We show here how to derive information about the incident warm electrons from the analysis of these energetic contributions, in the regions where the cold plasma component is small with an average temperature in the range ~ [ 100 - 500 ] eV. First, modeling the energetic contributions (based on the incident electron flux given by a single anode of the CAPS spectrometer) allows us to provide information about the pitch angle anisotropies of the incident hundreds of eV electrons. The modeling reveals indeed sometimes a large variability of the estimated maximum secondary electron yield (which is a constant for a surface material) needed to reproduce the observations. Such dispersions give evidence for strong pitch angle anisotropies of the incident electrons, and using a functional form of the pitch angle distribution even allows us to derive the real peak angle of the distribution. Second, rough estimates of the total electron temperature may be derived in the regions where the warm electrons are dominant and thus strongly influence the LP observations, i.e. when the average electron temperature is in the range ~ [ 100 - 500 ] eV. These regions may be identified from the LP observations through large positive values of the current-voltage slope at negative potentials. The estimated temperature may then be used to derive the electron density in the same region, with estimated densities between ~ 0.1 and a few particles /cm3 (cc). The derived densities are in better

  17. Gamma-ray Burst Afterglows as Probes of Environment and Blastwave Physics: Absorption by Host Galaxy Gas and Dust, Circumburst Media and the Distribution of P

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starling, R. L. C.; Wijers, R. a. M. J.; Curran, P.; Rol, E.; Wiersema, K.; Kouveliotou, C.; vanderHorst, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    We use a new approach to obtain limits on the absorbing columns towards a sample of 10 Gamma-ray Bursts observed by BeppoSAX from simultaneous fits to X-ray, optical and IR data, in counts space and including the effects of metallicity. For half the afterglows the best-fitting model to the SED includes SMC-like extinction (as opposed to LMC or MW) and in one LMC-like extinction, and in no cases is there a preference for MW-like extinction. Gas-to-dust ratios generally do not match those of the 3 standard and most well-known extinction models of SMC, LMC and MW, but tend to be higher. We compare the results from this method to those of previous works using other methods. We constrain the jet models for a subsample of the bursts by constraining the cooling break position and power law spectral slopes, allowing the injected electron energy index to be measured. We derive secure values of p from our spectral fits and comparison with the temporal optical and X-ray slopes for 4 afterglows. The mean of these single value, suggesting that either external factors such as circumburst medium play a strong role or that the microphysics is not identical for each GRB. For GRB 971214 we find that the circumburst medium has a wind-like density profile and the cooling frequency appears to be moving to higher frequencies.

  18. Cross Comparison of Electron Density and Electron Temperature Observations from the DICE CubeSat Langmuir Probes and the Millstone Hill Incoherent Scatter Radar.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, C.; Erickson, P. J.; Crowley, G.; Pilinski, M.; Barjatya, A.; Fish, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Dynamic Ionosphere CubeSat Experiment (DICE) consists of two identical 1.5U CubeSats deployed simultaneously from a single P-POD (Poly Picosatellite Orbital Deployer) into the same orbit. Several observational campaigns were planned between the DICE CubeSats and the mid-latitude Millstone Hill Incoherent Scatter Radar (ISR) in order to calibrate the DICE measurements of electron density and electron temperature. In this presentation, we compare in-situ observations from the Dynamic Ionosphere CubeSat Experiment (DICE) and from the Millstone Hill ISR. Both measurements are cross-calibrated against an assimilative model of the global ionospheric electron density. The electron density and electron temperature were obtained for three Millstone Hill DICE overflights (2013-03-12, 2013-03-15, 2013-03-17). We compare the data during quiet and geomagnetically disturbed conditions and find evidence of an storm enhanced density (SED) plume in the topside ionosphere on 2013-03-17 at 19? UTC. During this disturbed interval, American longitude sector high density plasma was convected near 15 SLT towards the noontime cusp. DICE was selected for flight under the NSF "CubeSat-based Science Mission for Space Weather and Atmospheric Research" program. The DICE twin satellites were launched on a Delta II rocket on October 28, 2011. The satellites are flying in a "leader-follower" formation in an elliptical orbit which ranges from 820 to 400 km in altitude. Each satellite carries a fixed-bias DC Langmuir Probe (DCP) to measure in-situ ionospheric plasma densities and a science grade magnetometer to measure DC and AC geomagnetic fields. The purpose of these measurements was to permit accurate identification of storm-time features such as the SED bulge and plume. The mission team combines expertise from ASTRA, Utah State University/Space Dynamics Laboratory (USU/SDL), and Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. In this paper we present a comparison of data from DICE and Millstone Hill

  19. Different Adsorption Behavior of Rare Earth and Metallic Ion Complexes on Langmuir Mono layers Probed by Sum-Frequency Generation Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Woongmo; Vaknin, David; Kim, Doseok

    2013-02-25

    Adsorption behavior of counterions under a Langmuir monolayer was investigated by sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy. By comparing SFG spectra of arachidic acid (AA) Langmuir monolayer/water interface with and without added salt, it was found that the simple trivalent cation La3+ adsorbed on AA monolayer only when the carboxylic headgroups are charged (deprotonated), implying that counterion adsorption is induced by Coulomb interaction. On the other hand, metal hydroxide complex Fe(OH)3 adsorbed even on a charge-neutral AA monolayer, indicating that the adsorption of iron hydroxide is due to chemical interaction such as covalent or hydrogen bonding to the headgroup of the molecules at the monolayer.

  20. Comparison of Three Afterglow Morphologies

    SciTech Connect

    Salmonson, J D; Rossi, E; Lazzati, D

    2003-12-23

    Herein we compare three functional families for afterglow morphologies: the homogeneous afterglow with constant shock surface energy density, the structured afterglow for which the energy density decays as a power-law as a function of viewer angle, and the gaussian afterglow which has an exponential decay of energy density with viewer angle. We simulate observed lightcurves and polarization curves for each as seen from a variety of observer vantage points. We find that the homogeneous jet is likely inconsistent with observations and suggest that the future debate on the structure of afterglow jets will be between the other two candidates.

  1. Langmuir probe measurements and mass spectrometry of plasma plumes generated by laser ablation of La{sub 0.4}Ca{sub 0.6}MnO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jikun; Lippert, Thomas Ojeda-G-P, Alejandro; Stender, Dieter; Schneider, Christof W.; Wokaun, Alexander; Lunney, James G.

    2014-08-21

    The plasma formed in vacuum by UV nanosecond laser ablation of La{sub 0.4}Ca{sub 0.6}MnO{sub 3} in the fluence range of 0.8 to 1.9 J cm{sup −2} using both Langmuir probe analysis and energy-resolved mass spectrometry has been studied. Mass spectrometry shows that the main positive ion species are Ca{sup +}, Mn{sup +}, La{sup +}, and LaO{sup +}. The Ca{sup +} and Mn{sup +} energy distributions are quite broad and lie in the 0–100 eV region, with the average energies increasing with laser fluence. In contrast, the La{sup +} and LaO{sup +} distributions are strongly peaked around 10 eV. The net time-of-arrival signal derived from the measured positive ion energy distributions is broadly consistent with the positive ion signal measured by the Langmuir probe. We also detected a significant number of O{sup −} ions with energies in the range of 0 to 10 eV. The Langmuir probe was also used to measure the temporal variation of the electron density and temperature at 6 cm from the ablation target. In the period when O{sup −} ions are found at this position, the plasma conditions are consistent with those required for significant negative oxygen ion formation, as revealed by studies on radio frequency excited oxygen plasma.

  2. The air afterglow revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, F.

    1972-01-01

    The air afterglow, 0 + NO2 chemiluminescence, is discussed in terms of fluorescence, photodissociation, and quantum theoretical calculations of NO2. The experimental results presented include pressure dependence, M-dependence, spectral dependence of P and M, temperature dependence, and infrared measurements. The NO2 energy transfer model is also discussed.

  3. Methodology in the Afterglow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofsess, Brooke Anne

    2013-01-01

    My dissertation study seeks to understand how artist-teacher renewal may be nurtured through aesthetic experiential play in a Masters of Art Education degree program, and beyond, as my former students/participants and myself experience finding ourselves in its afterglow. "Aesthetic experiential play" could be described as a playful,…

  4. Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows as Probes of Environment and Blast Wave Physics. II. The Distribution of rho and Structure of the Circumburst Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starling, R. L. C.; vanderHorst, A. J.; Rol, E.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Wiersema, K.; Curran, P. A.; Weltervrede, P.

    2008-01-01

    We constrain blast wave parameters and the circumburst media ofa subsample of 10 BeppoSAX gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). For this sample we derive the values of the injected electron energy distribution index, p, and the density structure index of the circumburst medium, k, from simultaneous spectral fits to their X-ray, optical, and NIR afterglow data. The spectral fits have been done in count space and include the effects ofmetallicity, and are compared with the previously reported optical and X-ray temporal behavior. Using the blast wave model and some assumptions which include on-axis viewing and standard jet structure, constant blast wave energy, and no evolution of the microphysical parameters, we find a mean value ofp for the sample as a whole of 9.... oa -0.003.0" 2 a_ statistical analysis of the distribution demonstrates that the p-values in this sample are inconsistent with a single universal value forp at the 3 _ level or greater, which has significant implications for particle acceleration models. This approach provides us with a measured distribution ofcircumburst density structures rather than considering only the cases of k ----0 (homogeneous) and k - 2 (windlike). We find five GRBs for which k can be well constrained, and in four of these cases the circumburst medium is clearly windlike. The fifth source has a value of 0 < k < 1, consistent with a homogeneous circumburst medium.

  5. Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows as Probes of Environment and Blastwave Physics II: The Distribution of p and Structure of the Circumburst Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starling, R. L. C.; vanderHorst, A. J.; Rol, E.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Wiersema, K.; Curran, P. A.; Weltevrede, P.

    2007-01-01

    We constrain blastwave parameters and the circumburst media of a subsample of BeppoSAX Gamma-Ray Bursts. For this sample we derive the values of the injected electron energy distribution index, p, and the density structure index of the circumburst medium, k, from simultaneous spectral fits to their X-ray, optical and nIR afterglow data. The spectral fits have been done in count space and include the effects of metallicity, and are compared with the previously reported optical and X-ray temporal behaviour. Assuming the fireball model, we can find a mean value of p for the sample as a whole of 2.035. A statistical analysis Of the distribution demonstrates that the p values in this sample are inconsistent with a single universal value for p at the 3sigma level or greater. This approach provides us with a measured distribution of circumburst density structures rather than considering only the cases of k = 0 (homogeneous) and k = 2 (wind-like). We find five GRBs for which k can be well constrained, and in four of these cases the circumburst medium is clearly wind-like. The fifth source has a value of 0 less than or equal to k less than or equal to 1, consistent with a homogeneous circumburst medium.

  6. Temperature Correction in Probe Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutsev, S. A.

    2015-09-01

    This work is devoted to experimental investigations of a decaying plasma using Langmuir probes. The gas pressure, the discharge current, and the moment of afterglow were selected to obtain probe characteristics in collisionless, intermediate, and drifting regimes of motion of charged particles. The manner in which the shape of the volt- ampere characteristics changes on passage from the collisionless motion to diffusion motion has been shown. A detailed analysis has been made of the source of errors arising when orbital-motion formulas or the logarithmic-operation method are applied to processing of the probe curves. It has been shown that neglect of collisions of charged particles in the probe layer leads to an ion-density value overstated more than three times, an electron-temperature value overstated two times, and an ion temperature overstated three to nine times. A model of interaction of charged particles in the probe layer has been proposed for correction of the procedure of determining temperature. Such an approach makes it possible to determine the space-charge layer in the probe, and also the value of the self-consistent field. The use of the developed procedures gives good agreement between experimental and theoretical results.

  7. Langmuir vacuum and superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veklenko, B. A.

    2012-06-01

    It is shown that, in the "jelly" model of cold electron-ion plasma, the interaction between electrons and the quantum electromagnetic vacuum of Langmuir waves involves plasma superconductivity with an energy gap proportional to the energy of the Langmuir quantum.

  8. Langmuir vacuum and superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Veklenko, B. A.

    2012-06-15

    It is shown that, in the 'jelly' model of cold electron-ion plasma, the interaction between electrons and the quantum electromagnetic vacuum of Langmuir waves involves plasma superconductivity with an energy gap proportional to the energy of the Langmuir quantum.

  9. Comment on the paper ‘The impact of Langmuir probe geometries on electron current collection and the integral relation for obtaining electron energy distribution functions’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsankov, Tsanko V.; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2016-08-01

    A paper by El Saghir and Shannon (2012 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 21 025003) raises the question about the validity of the widely-used Druyvesteyn formula for obtaining the electron energy distribution function by cylindrical probes. They conclude that there are deviations between the Druyvesteyn formula for cylindrical and for spherical probes. In this comment this conclusion is questioned and the correct expressions are derived. It is shown that no such difference exists when all three velocity components are correctly accounted for. Furthermore, the disturbance to the plasma introduced by the probe is estimated.

  10. Investigating the role of hydrogen in silicon deposition using an energy-resolved mass spectrometer and a Langmuir probe in an Ar/H{sub 2} radio frequency magnetron discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Mensah, S. L.; Naseem, Hameed H.; Abu-Safe, Husam; Gordon, M. H.

    2012-07-15

    The plasma parameters and ion energy distributions (IED) of the dominant species in an Ar-H{sub 2} discharge are investigated with an energy resolved mass spectrometer and a Langmuir probe. The plasmas are generated in a conventional magnetron chamber powered at 150 W, 13.56 MHz at hydrogen flow rates ranging from 0 to 25 sccm with a fixed argon gas flow rate of 15 sccm. Various H{sub n}{sup +}, SiH{sub n}{sup +}, SiH{sub n} fragments (with n = 1, 2, 3) together with Ar{sup +} and ArH{sup +} species are detected in the discharge. The most important species for the film deposition is SiH{sub n} (with n = 0, 1, 2). H fragments affect the hydrogen content in the material. The flux of Ar{sup +} decreases and the flux of ArH{sup +} increases when the hydrogen flow rate is increased; however, both fluxes saturate at hydrogen flow rates above 15 sccm. Electron density, n{sub e}, electron energy, T{sub e}, and ion density, n{sub i}, are estimated from the Langmuir probe data. T{sub e} is below 1.2 eV at hydrogen flow rates below 8 sccm, and about 2 eV at flow rates above 8 sccm. n{sub e} and n{sub i} decrease with increased hydrogen flow but the ratio of n{sub i} to n{sub e} increases. The formation of H{sup +} ions with energies above 36 eV and electrons with energies greater than 2 eV contributes to the decrease in hydrogen content at hydrogen flow rates above 8 sccm. Analysis of the IEDs indicates an inter-dependence of the species and their contribution to the thin film growth and properties.

  11. GRB off-axis afterglows and the emission from the accompanying supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kathirgamaraju, Adithan; Barniol Duran, Rodolfo; Giannios, Dimitrios

    2016-09-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows are likely produced in the shock that is driven as the GRB jet interacts with the external medium. Long-duration GRBs are also associated with powerful supernovae (SNe). We consider the optical and radio afterglows of long GRBs for both blasts viewed along the jet axis (`on-axis' afterglows) and misaligned observes (`off-axis' afterglows). Comparing the optical emission from the afterglow with that of the accompanying SN, using SN 1998bw as an archetype, we find that only a few per cent of afterglows viewed off-axis are brighter than the SN. For observable optical off-axis afterglows, the viewing angle is at most twice the half-opening angle of the GRB jet. Radio off-axis afterglows should be detected with upcoming radio surveys within a few hundred Mpc. We propose that these surveys will act as `radio triggers', and that dedicated radio facilities should follow-up these sources. Follow-ups can unveil the presence of the radio SN remnant, if present. In addition, they can probe the presence of a mildly relativistic component, either associated with the GRB jet or the SN ejecta, expected in these sources.

  12. Circular polarization in the optical afterglow of GRB 121024A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersema, K.; Covino, S.; Toma, K.; van der Horst, A. J.; Varela, K.; Min, M.; Greiner, J.; Starling, R. L. C.; Tanvir, N. R.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Campana, S.; Curran, P. A.; Fan, Y.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Gorosabel, J.; Gomboc, A.; Götz, D.; Hjorth, J.; Jin, Z. P.; Kobayashi, S.; Kouveliotou, C.; Mundell, C.; O'Brien, P. T.; Pian, E.; Rowlinson, A.; Russell, D. M.; Salvaterra, R.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Tagliaferri, G.; Vergani, S. D.; Elliott, J.; Fariña, C.; Hartoog, O. E.; Karjalainen, R.; Klose, S.; Knust, F.; Levan, A. J.; Schady, P.; Sudilovsky, V.; Willingale, R.

    2014-05-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are most probably powered by collimated relativistic outflows (jets) from accreting black holes at cosmological distances. Bright afterglows are produced when the outflow collides with the ambient medium. Afterglow polarization directly probes the magnetic properties of the jet when measured minutes after the burst, and it probes the geometric properties of the jet and the ambient medium when measured hours to days after the burst. High values of optical polarization detected minutes after the burst of GRB 120308A indicate the presence of large-scale ordered magnetic fields originating from the central engine (the power source of the GRB). Theoretical models predict low degrees of linear polarization and no circular polarization at late times, when the energy in the original ejecta is quickly transferred to the ambient medium and propagates farther into the medium as a blast wave. Here we report the detection of circularly polarized light in the afterglow of GRB 121024A, measured 0.15 days after the burst. We show that the circular polarization is intrinsic to the afterglow and unlikely to be produced by dust scattering or plasma propagation effects. A possible explanation is to invoke anisotropic (rather than the commonly assumed isotropic) electron pitch-angle distributions, and we suggest that new models are required to produce the complex microphysics of realistic shocks in relativistic jets.

  13. Circular polarization in the optical afterglow of GRB 121024A.

    PubMed

    Wiersema, K; Covino, S; Toma, K; van der Horst, A J; Varela, K; Min, M; Greiner, J; Starling, R L C; Tanvir, N R; Wijers, R A M J; Campana, S; Curran, P A; Fan, Y; Fynbo, J P U; Gorosabel, J; Gomboc, A; Götz, D; Hjorth, J; Jin, Z P; Kobayashi, S; Kouveliotou, C; Mundell, C; O'Brien, P T; Pian, E; Rowlinson, A; Russell, D M; Salvaterra, R; di Serego Alighieri, S; Tagliaferri, G; Vergani, S D; Elliott, J; Fariña, C; Hartoog, O E; Karjalainen, R; Klose, S; Knust, F; Levan, A J; Schady, P; Sudilovsky, V; Willingale, R

    2014-05-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are most probably powered by collimated relativistic outflows (jets) from accreting black holes at cosmological distances. Bright afterglows are produced when the outflow collides with the ambient medium. Afterglow polarization directly probes the magnetic properties of the jet when measured minutes after the burst, and it probes the geometric properties of the jet and the ambient medium when measured hours to days after the burst. High values of optical polarization detected minutes after the burst of GRB 120308A indicate the presence of large-scale ordered magnetic fields originating from the central engine (the power source of the GRB). Theoretical models predict low degrees of linear polarization and no circular polarization at late times, when the energy in the original ejecta is quickly transferred to the ambient medium and propagates farther into the medium as a blast wave. Here we report the detection of circularly polarized light in the afterglow of GRB 121024A, measured 0.15 days after the burst. We show that the circular polarization is intrinsic to the afterglow and unlikely to be produced by dust scattering or plasma propagation effects. A possible explanation is to invoke anisotropic (rather than the commonly assumed isotropic) electron pitch-angle distributions, and we suggest that new models are required to produce the complex microphysics of realistic shocks in relativistic jets. PMID:24776800

  14. Did Irving Langmuir Observe Langmuir Circulations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Asaro, E. A.; Harcourt, R. R.; Shcherbina, A.; Thomson, J. M.; Fox-Kemper, B.

    2012-12-01

    Although surface waves are known to play an important role in mixing the upper ocean, the current generation of upper ocean boundary layer parameterizations does not include the explicit effects of surface waves. Detailed simulations using LES models which include the Craik-Leibovich wave-current interactions, now provide quantitative predictions of the enhancement of boundary layer mixing by waves. Here, using parallel experiments in Lake Washington and at Ocean Station Papa, we show a clear enhancement of vertical kinetic energy across the entire upper ocean boundary layer which can be attributed to surface wave effects. The magnitude of this effect is close to that predicted by LES models, but is not large, less than a factor of 2 on average, and increased by large Stokes drift and shallow mixed layers. Global estimates show the largest wave enhancements occur on the equatorial side of the westerlies in late Spring, due to the combination of large waves, shallow mixed layers and weak winds. In Lakes, however, the waves and the Craik-Leibovich interactions are weak, making it likely that the counter-rotating vortices famously observed by Irving Langmuir in Lake George were not driven by wave-current interactions.

  15. On Associating Fast Radio Bursts with Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedantham, H. K.; Ravi, V.; Mooley, K.; Frail, D.; Hallinan, G.; Kulkarni, S. R.

    2016-06-01

    A radio source that faded over six days, with a redshift of z ≈ 0.5 host, has been identified by Keane et al. as the transient afterglow to a fast radio burst (FRB 150418). We report follow-up radio and optical observations of the afterglow candidate and find a source that is consistent with an active galactic nucleus. If the afterglow candidate is nonetheless a prototypical FRB afterglow, existing slow-transient surveys limit the fraction of FRBs that produce afterglows to 0.25 for afterglows with fractional variation, m=2| {S}1-{S}2| /({S}1+{S}2)≥slant 0.7, and 0.07 for m ≥ 1, at 95% confidence. In anticipation of a barrage of bursts expected from future FRB surveys, we provide a simple framework for statistical association of FRBs with afterglows. Our framework properly accounts for statistical uncertainties, and ensures consistency with limits set by slow-transient surveys.

  16. The SEDs and Host Galaxies of the Dustiest GRB Afterglows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruhler, T.; Greiner, J.; Schady, P.; Savaglio, S.; Afonso, P. M. J.; Clemens, C.; Elliott, J.; Filgas, R.; Gruber, D.; Kann, D. A.; Klose, S.; Kupcu-Yoldas, A.; McBreen, S.; Olivares, E.; Pierini, D.; Rau, A.; Rossi, A.; Nardini, M.; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Sudilovsky, V.; Updike, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    The afterglows and host galaxies of long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer unique opportunities to study star-forming galaxies in the high-z Universe, Until recently, however. the information inferred from GRB follow-up observations was mostly limited to optically bright afterglows. biasing all demographic studies against sight-lines that contain large amounts of dust. Aims. Here we present afterglow and host observations for a sample of bursts that are exemplary of previously missed ones because of high visual extinction (A(sub v) (Sup GRB) approx > 1 mag) along the sight-line. This facilitates an investigation of the properties, geometry and location of the absorbing dust of these poorly-explored host galaxies. and a comparison to hosts from optically-selected samples. Methods. This work is based on GROND optical/NIR and Swift/XRT X-ray observations of the afterglows, and multi-color imaging for eight GRB hosts. The afterglow and galaxy spectral energy distributions yield detailed insight into physical properties such as the dust and metal content along the GRB sight-line as well as galaxy-integrated characteristics like the host's stellar mass, luminosity. color-excess and star-formation rate. Results. For the eight afterglows considered in this study we report for the first time the redshift of GRBs 081109 (z = 0.97S7 +/- 0.0005). and the visual extinction towards GRBs 0801109 (A(sub v) (Sup GRB) = 3.4(sup +0.4) (sub -0.3) mag) and l00621A (A(sub v) (Sup GRB) = 3.8 +/- 0.2 mag), which are among the largest ever derived for GRB afterglows. Combined with non-extinguished GRBs. there is a strong anti-correlation between the afterglow's metals-to-dust ratio and visual extinction. The hosts of the dustiest afterglows are diverse in their properties, but on average redder(((R - K)(sub AB)) approximates 1.6 mag), more luminous ( approximates 0.9 L (sup *)) and massive ((log M(sup *) [M(solar]) approximates 9.8) than the hosts of optically-bright events. We hence probe

  17. Five Years of Multi-frequency Monitoring of GRB030329 Afterglow Using the GMRT and WSRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamble, Atish; van der Horst, A. J.; Bhattacharya, D.; Wijers, Ralph; Chandra, C. H. Ishwara; Resmi, L.; Rol, Evert; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Strom, R.

    2009-05-01

    GRB 030329 displayed one of the brightest optical afterglows ever. We have followed the radio afterglow of GRB 030329 for over 5 years using the GMRT and WSRT at low radio frequencies. This is the longest as well as the lowest frequency follow up of any GRB afterglow ever. Radio observations of a GRB afterglow provide a unique probe of the physics of the blast wave at late times, when the expansion of the fireball slows down to non-relativistic speeds. Our GMRT-WSRT observations suggest that the afterglow of GRB030329 entered the non-relativistic phase around 60 days after the burst. The estimate of the fireball energy content, ~1051 erg, in this near-isotropic phase is much less susceptible to the collimation-related uncertainties arising in the relativistic phase. We have also been closely monitoring the evolution of the afterglow to look for possible signatures of emission from a counter jet, but no conclusive evidence has so far been found.

  18. Short GRB Prompt and Afterglow Correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2007-01-01

    The Swift data set on short GRBs has now grown large enough to study correlations of key parameters. The goal is to compare long and short bursts to better understand similarities and differences in the burst origins. In this study we consider the both prompt and afterglow fluxes. It is found that the optical, X-ray and gamma-ray emissions are linearly correlated - stronger bursts tend to have brighter afterglows, and bursts with brighter X-ray afterglow tend to have brighter optical afterglow. Both the prompt and afterglow fluxes are, on average, lower for short bursts than for long. Although there are short GRBs with undetected optical emission, there is no evidence for "dark" short bursts with anomalously low opt/X ratios. The weakest short bursts have a low X-ray/gamma-ray ratio.

  19. Phenomenological Modeling for Langmuir Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptiste, Dimitri; Kelly, David; Safford, Twymun; Prayaga, Chandra; Varney, Christopher N.; Wade, Aaron

    Experimentally, Langmuir monolayers have applications in molecular optical, electronic, and sensor devices. Traditionally, Langmuir monolayers are described by a rigid rod model where the rods interact via a Leonard-Jones potential. Here, we propose effective phenomenological models and utilize Monte Carlo simulations to analyze the phase behavior and compare with experimental isotherms. Research reported in this abstract was supported by UWF NIH MARC U-STAR 1T34GM110517-01.

  20. Energy input and response from prompt and early optical afterglow emission in gamma-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Vestrand, W T; Wren, J A; Wozniak, P R; Aptekar, R; Golentskii, S; Pal'shin, V; Sakamoto, T; White, R R; Evans, S; Casperson, D; Fenimore, E

    2006-07-13

    The taxonomy of optical emission detected during the critical first few minutes after the onset of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) defines two broad classes: prompt optical emission correlated with prompt gamma-ray emission, and early optical afterglow emission uncorrelated with the gamma-ray emission. The standard theoretical interpretation attributes prompt emission to internal shocks in the ultra-relativistic outflow generated by the internal engine; early afterglow emission is attributed to shocks generated by interaction with the surrounding medium. Here we report on observations of a bright GRB that, for the first time, clearly show the temporal relationship and relative strength of the two optical components. The observations indicate that early afterglow emission can be understood as reverberation of the energy input measured by prompt emission. Measurements of the early afterglow reverberations therefore probe the structure of the environment around the burst, whereas the subsequent response to late-time impulsive energy releases reveals how earlier flaring episodes have altered the jet and environment parameters. Many GRBs are generated by the death of massive stars that were born and died before the Universe was ten per cent of its current age, so GRB afterglow reverberations provide clues about the environments around some of the first stars. PMID:16838015

  1. GLAST Prospects for Swift-Era Afterglows

    SciTech Connect

    Gou, L.J.; Meszaros, P.; /Penn State U.

    2011-11-23

    We calculate the GeV spectra of gamma-ray burst afterglows produced by inverse Compton scattering of these objects sub-MeV emission. We improve on earlier treatments by using refined afterglow parameters and new model developments motivated by recent Swift observations. We present time-dependent GeV spectra for standard, constant-parameter models, as well as for models with energy injection and with time-varying parameters, for a range of burst parameters. We evaluate the limiting redshift to which such afterglows can be detected by the GLAST Large Area Telescope, as well as by AGILE.

  2. Study of Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett Thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Ross; Prayaga, Chandra; Wade, Aaron

    Arachidic Acid, Cholesterol, and Stearic Acid thin films were created and studied utilizing the Langmuir method in order to obtain a single molecule or monomolecular layer out of a desired substance at an air-water interface. The phase transitions are observed by measuring the surface pressure vs. area isotherms. Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films were created on a prepared substrate. The LB film structures were then studied using X-ray Diffraction, and Raman Spectroscopy. UWF Office of Undergraduate Research Project Award, UWF ITEP-Technology Fee Project Award, UWF Quality Enhancement Plan Award.

  3. Dust Cloud Dynamics in Complex Plasma Afterglow

    SciTech Connect

    Layden, B.; Samarian, A. A.; Vladimirov, S. V.; Coueedel, L.

    2008-09-07

    Experimental observations of dust cloud dynamics in a RF discharge afterglow are presented. Image analysis is used to extract information from videos taken of the plasma. Estimations of the mean confining electric field have been made for different experimental conditions using a model for the contraction of the dust cloud. Dust particle trajectories in the late afterglow evidence the co-existence of positively and negatively charged dust particles.

  4. Cavitating Langmuir turbulence in the terrestrial aurora.

    PubMed

    Isham, B; Rietveld, M T; Guio, P; Forme, F R E; Grydeland, T; Mjølhus, E

    2012-03-01

    Langmuir cavitons have been artificially produced in Earth's ionosphere, but evidence of naturally occurring cavitation has been elusive. By measuring and modeling the spectra of electrostatic plasma modes, we show that natural cavitating, or strong, Langmuir turbulence does occur in the ionosphere, via a process in which a beam of auroral electrons drives Langmuir waves, which in turn produce cascading Langmuir and ion-acoustic excitations and cavitating Langmuir turbulence. The data presented here are the first direct evidence of cavitating Langmuir turbulence occurring naturally in any space or astrophysical plasma. PMID:22463417

  5. Dichromatic Langmuir waves in degenerate quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dubinov, A. E. Kitayev, I. N.

    2015-06-15

    Langmuir waves in fully degenerate quantum plasma are considered. It is shown that, in the linear approximation, Langmuir waves are always dichromatic. The low-frequency component of the waves corresponds to classical Langmuir waves, while the high-frequency component, to free-electron quantum oscillations. The nonlinear problem on the profile of dichromatic Langmuir waves is solved. Solutions in the form of a superposition of waves and in the form of beatings of its components are obtained.

  6. Observation of the saturation of Langmuir waves driven by ponderomotive force in a large scale plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkwood, R. K.; Moody, J. D.; MacGowan, B. J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Kruer, W. L.; Estabrook, K. G.; Wharton, K. B.; Williams, E. A.; Berger, R. L.

    1997-06-22

    We report the observation of amplification of a probe laser beam (I {le} 1 {times} 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}) in a large scale ({approximately} 1 mm) plasma by interaction with a pumping laser beam (I = 2 {times} 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}) and a stimulated Langmuir wave. When the plasma density is adjusted to allow the Langmuir wave dispersion to match the difference frequency and wave number of the two beams, amplification factors as high as {times} 2.5 result. Interpretation of this amplification as scattering of pump beam energy by the Langmuir wave that is produced by the ponderomotive force of the two beams, allows the dependence of Langmuir wave amplitude on ponderomotive force to be measured. It is found that the Langmuir wave amplitude saturates at a level that depends on ion wave damping, and is generally consistent with secondary ion wave instabilities limiting its growth. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Polarization Evolution of Early Optical Afterglows of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Mi-Xiang; Wu, Xue-Feng; Dai, Zi-Gao

    2016-01-01

    The central engine and jet composition of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) remain mysterious. Here we suggest that observations on the polarization evolution of early optical afterglows may shed light on these questions. We first study the dynamics of a reverse shock and a forward shock that are generated during the interaction of a relativistic jet and its ambient medium. The jet is likely magnetized with a globally large-scale magnetic field from the central engine. The existence of the reverse shock requires that the magnetization degree of the jet should not be high (σ ≤ 1), so that the jet is mainly composed of baryons and leptons. We then calculate the light curves and polarization evolution of early optical afterglows and find that when the polarization position angle changes by 90° during the early afterglow, the polarization degree is zero for a toroidal magnetic field but is very likely to be nonzero for an aligned magnetic field. This result would be expected to provide a probe for the central engine of GRBs because an aligned field configuration could originate from a magnetar central engine and a toroidal field configuration could be produced from a black hole via the Blandford-Znajek mechanism. Finally, for such two kinds of magnetic field configurations, we fit the observed data of the early optical afterglow of GRB 120308A equally well.

  8. Nanostructure deposition in the afterglow of a low power barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenfeld, Axel; Papageorgiou, Vasileios; Reichen, Patrick; Körner, Lutz; von Rohr, Philipp Rudolf

    2011-02-01

    The precipitation of solid-state sphere-like nanostructures from an organosilicon precursor at atmospheric pressure is investigated with the prospect of improving powder flowability by the attachment of nanoscopic spacers to the powder particles' surfaces. Tetramethylsilane (TMS) is admixed to the afterglow of a low power (<0.5 W) barrier discharge (BD). The BD occurs in a single miniature flow channel, where Ar or He enriched with O2 is excited favouring homogeneous gas phase reactions of atomic oxygen and TMS in the afterglow. The chemical and morphological influence of Ar or He on the formation of nanostructures is explored at two positions in the afterglow by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. For the Ar-based BD, larger spherical nanostructures (100-1000 nm) of higher oxide content are obtained, while for He polymeric deposits with characteristic sizes below 100 nm are found. In addition, the processing capability of a BD device, consisting of a set of 64 miniature flow channels, is probed by means of the wettability improvement of polymer powder particles, conveyed through the BD afterglow zone of a multi-channel device. The treatment is shown to decrease the benzyl alcohol contact angle significantly with increasing oxygen feed.

  9. BRIGHT BROADBAND AFTERGLOWS OF GRAVITATIONAL WAVE BURSTS FROM MERGERS OF BINARY NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Gao He; Ding Xuan; Wu Xuefeng; Zhang Bing; Dai Zigao E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2013-07-10

    If double neutron star mergers leave behind a massive magnetar rather than a black hole, then a bright early afterglow can follow the gravitational wave burst (GWB) even if there is no short gamma-ray burst (SGRB)-GWB association or if there is an association but the SGRB does not beam toward Earth. Besides directly dissipating the proto-magnetar wind, as suggested by Zhang, here we suggest that the magnetar wind could push the ejecta launched during the merger process and, under certain conditions, would reach a relativistic speed. Such a magnetar-powered ejecta, when interacting with the ambient medium, would develop a bright broadband afterglow due to synchrotron radiation. We study this physical scenario in detail and present the predicted X-ray, optical, and radio light curves for a range of magnetar and ejecta parameters. We show that the X-ray and optical light curves usually peak around the magnetar spin-down timescale ({approx}10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} s), reaching brightnesses readily detectable by wide-field X-ray and optical telescopes, and remain detectable for an extended period. The radio afterglow peaks later, but is much brighter than the case without a magnetar energy injection. Therefore, such bright broadband afterglows, if detected and combined with GWBs in the future, would be a probe of massive millisecond magnetars and stiff equations of state for nuclear matter.

  10. rf-generated ambient-afterglow plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakir, Shariff; Mynampati, Sandhya; Pashaie, Bijan; Dhali, Shirshak K.

    2006-04-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasmas have gained importance due to their potential application in polymer surface treatment, surface cleaning of metals, thin film deposition, and destruction of biological hazards. In this paper a radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure afterglow plasma source in argon and helium is discussed. The light intensity measurement shows that the radio-frequency discharge is continuous in time unlike the intermittent nature of a low frequency dielectric-barrier discharge. The discharge, under ambient conditions, can be generated in argon, helium, and nitrogen. Spectroscopic measurements show that metastables are capable of producing oxygen atoms and other excited species. The argon afterglow, in particular, is capable of dissociating oxygen molecules in the ambient gas. An afterglow model has been developed to study the interaction of the plasma with the ambient gas. Results from applications of the plasma to surface treatment of metals and polymers, and bacterial decontamination are briefly discussed.

  11. GRB afterglows in the nonrelativistic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. F.; Lu, T.

    2008-10-01

    When discussing the afterglows of gamma-ray bursts analytically, it is usually assumed that the external shock is always ultra-relativisitc, with the bulk Lorentz factor much larger than 1. However, we show that the deceleration of the external shock is actually very quick. The afterglow may typically enter the nonrelativistic phase in several days to teens of days, and may even enter the deep Newtonian phase in tens of days to several months. One thus should be careful in using those familiar analytical expressions that are derived only under the ultra-relativistic assumption. To explain the observed afterglows that typically last for a few weeks to several months, we need to consider the dynamics and radiation in the nonrelativisitic phase.

  12. GRB050525A : Multiband modelling of the afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resmi, Lekshmi; Misra, Kuntal; Castro-Tirado, Alberto

    2011-08-01

    The Swift era has posed a challenge to the standard blast-wave model of Gamma Ray Burst afterglows. The achromatic steepening of the afterglow lightcurves (`jet break') considered in the model as the signature of outflow collimation, has become almost rare. Several afterglows exhibited complex lightcurves that did not confirm by the predicted spectral--temporal `closure relations' of the blastwave model. Here we present optical observations and broadband modelling of the afterglow of GRB0505025A, a bright burst detected and followed up by Swift. We find that the overall evolution of the afterglow can not be explained by a single forward shock emission, though the late time evolution is compatible with the predictions of the standard afterglow model, including a jet break. We explain the afterglow evolution based on a two-component jet model and estimate the physical parameters.

  13. Afterglow Organic Light-Emitting Diode.

    PubMed

    Kabe, Ryota; Notsuka, Naoto; Yoshida, Kou; Adachi, Chihaya

    2016-01-27

    An afterglow organic light-emitting diode (OLED) that displays electroluminescence with long transient decay after it is turned off is demonstrated. This OLED exhibits blue and green dual emission originating from fluorescence and phosphorescence, respectively. A phosphorescence lifetime of 4.3 s is achieved. PMID:26599764

  14. The Swift XRT: Observations of Early X-ray Afterglows

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, David N.; Kennea, J. A.; Nousek, J. A.; Osborne, J. P.; O'Brien, P. T.; Chincarini, G.; Tagliaferri, G.; Giommi, P.; Zhang, B.

    2006-05-19

    During the first year of operations of the Swift observatory, the X-ray Telescope has made a number of discoveries concerning the nature of X-ray afterglows of both long and short GRBs. We highlight the key findings, which include rapid declines at early times, a standard template of afterglow light curve shapes, common flaring, and the discovery of the first short GRB afterglow.

  15. Rapid GRB Afterglow Response With SARA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garimella, K. V.; Homewood, A. L.; Hartmann, D. H.; Riddle, C.; Fuller, S.; Manning, A.; McIntyre, T.; Henson, G.

    2006-05-01

    The Clemson GRB Follow-Up program utilizes the SARA 0.9-m telescope to observe optical afterglows of Gamma Ray Bursts. SARA is not yet robotic; it operates under direct and Target-of-Opportunity (ToO) interrupt modes. To facilitate rapid response and timely reporting of data analysis results, we developed a software suite that operates in two phases: first, to notify observers of a burst and assist in data collection, and second, to quickly analyze the images.

  16. Study of argon–oxygen flowing afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazánková, V.; Trunec, D.; Navrátil, Z.; Raud, J.; Krčma, F.

    2016-06-01

    The reaction kinetics in argon–oxygen flowing afterglow (post-discharge) was studied using NO titration and optical emission spectroscopy. The flowing DC post-discharge in argon–oxygen mixture was created in a quartz tube at the total gas pressure of 1000 Pa and discharge power of 90 W. The O(3P) atom concentration was determined by NO titration at different places along the flow tube. The optical emission spectra were also measured along the flow tube. Argon spectral lines, oxygen lines at 777 nm and 844.6 nm and atmospheric A-band of {{\\text{O}}2} were identified in the spectra. Rotational temperature of {{\\text{O}}2} was determined from the oxygen atmospheric A-band and also the outer wall temperature of the flow tube was measured by a thermocouple and by an IR thermometer. A zero-dimensional kinetic model for the reactions in the afterglow was developed. This model allows the time dependencies of particle concentrations and of gas temperature to be calculated. The wall recombination probability for O(3P) atoms {γ\\text{O≤ft(\\text{P}\\right)}}=≤ft(1.63+/- 0.06\\right)× {{10}-3} and wall deactivation probability for {{\\text{O}}2} (b {{}1}Σ\\text{g}+ ) molecules {γ{{\\text{O}2}≤ft(\\text{b}\\right)}}=≤ft(1.7+/- 0.1\\right)× {{10}-3} were determined from the fit of model results to experimental data. Sensitivity analysis was applied for the analysis of kinetic model in order to reveal the most important reactions in the model. The calculated gas temperature increases in the afterglow and then decreases at later afterglow times after reaching the maximum. This behavior is in good agreement with the spatial rotational temperature dependence. A similar trend was also observed at outer wall temperature measurement.

  17. On the use of Linearized Langmuir Equations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the most commonly used models for describing solute sorption to soils is the Langmuir model. Because the Langmuir model is nonlinear, fitting the model to sorption data requires that the model be solved iteratively using an optimization program. To avoid the use of optimization programs, a li...

  18. Limitations to Using Linearized Langmuir Equations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the most commonly used models for describing solute sorption to soils is the Langmuir model. Because the Langmuir model is nonlinear, fitting the model to sorption data requires that the model be solved iteratively using an optimization program. To avoid the use of optimization programs, a li...

  19. Detailed optical and near-infrared polarimetry, spectroscopy and broad-band photometry of the afterglow of GRB 091018: polarization evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersema, K.; Curran, P. A.; Krühler, T.; Melandri, A.; Rol, E.; Starling, R. L. C.; Tanvir, N. R.; van der Horst, A. J.; Covino, S.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Goldoni, P.; Gorosabel, J.; Hjorth, J.; Klose, S.; Mundell, C. G.; O'Brien, P. T.; Palazzi, E.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; D'Elia, V.; Evans, P. A.; Filgas, R.; Gomboc, A.; Greiner, J.; Guidorzi, C.; Kaper, L.; Kobayashi, S.; Kouveliotou, C.; Levan, A. J.; Rossi, A.; Rowlinson, A.; Steele, I. A.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Vergani, S. D.

    2012-10-01

    Follow-up observations of large numbers of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows, facilitated by the Swift satellite, have produced a large sample of spectral energy distributions and light curves, from which their basic micro- and macro-physical parameters can in principle be derived. However, a number of phenomena have been observed that defy explanation by simple versions of the standard fireball model, leading to a variety of new models. Polarimetry can be a major independent diagnostic of afterglow physics, probing the magnetic field properties and internal structure of the GRB jets. In this paper we present the first high-quality multi-night polarimetric light curve of a Swift GRB afterglow, aimed at providing a well-calibrated data set of a typical afterglow to serve as a benchmark system for modelling afterglow polarization behaviour. In particular, our data set of the afterglow of GRB 091018 (at redshift z = 0.971) comprises optical linear polarimetry (R band, 0.13-2.3 d after burst); circular polarimetry (R band) and near-infrared linear polarimetry (Ks band). We add to that high-quality optical and near-infrared broad-band light curves and spectral energy distributions as well as afterglow spectroscopy. The linear polarization varies between 0 and 3 per cent, with both long and short time-scale variability visible. We find an achromatic break in the afterglow light curve, which corresponds to features in the polarimetric curve. We find that the data can be reproduced by jet break models only if an additional polarized component of unknown nature is present in the polarimetric curve. We probe the ordered magnetic field component in the afterglow through our deep circular polarimetry, finding Pcirc < 0.15 per cent (2σ), the deepest limit yet for a GRB afterglow, suggesting ordered fields are weak, if at all present. Our simultaneous R- and Ks-band polarimetry shows that dust-induced polarization in the host galaxy is likely negligible.

  20. POPULATION III GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS: CONSTRAINTS ON STELLAR MASSES AND EXTERNAL MEDIUM DENSITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Toma, Kenji; Meszaros, Peter; Sakamoto, Takanori E-mail: nnp@astro.psu.edu

    2011-04-20

    Population (Pop.) III stars are theoretically expected to be prominent around redshifts z {approx} 20, consisting of mainly very massive stars with M{sub *} {approx}> 100 M{sub sun}, though there is no direct observational evidence for these objects. They may produce collapsar gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), with jets driven by magnetohydrodynamic processes, whose total isotropic-equivalent energy could be as high as E{sub iso} {approx}> 10{sup 57} erg over a cosmological-rest-frame duration of t{sub d} {approx}> 10{sup 4} s, depending on the progenitor mass. Here, we calculate the afterglow spectra of such Pop. III GRBs based on the standard external shock model and show that they will be detectable with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT)/XRT and Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) instruments. We find that in some cases a spectral break due to electron-positron pair creation will be observable in the LAT energy range, which can put constraints on the ambient density of the pre-collapse Pop. III star. Thus, high-redshift GRB afterglow observations could be unique and powerful probes of the properties of Pop. III stars and their environments. We examine the trigger threshold of the BAT instrument in detail, focusing on the image trigger system, and show that the prompt emission of Pop. III GRBs could also be detected by BAT. Finally we briefly show that the late-time radio afterglows of Pop. III GRBs for typical parameters, despite the large distances, can be very bright: {approx_equal} 140 mJy at 1 GHz, which may lead to a constraint on the Pop. III GRB rate from the current radio survey data, and {approx_equal} 2.4 mJy at 70 MHz, which implies that Pop. III GRB radio afterglows could be interesting background source candidates for 21 cm absorption line detections.

  1. Afterglows from the largest explosions in the universe

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Dieter H.

    1999-01-01

    The distinction of “largest explosions in the universe” has been bestowed on cosmic gamma-ray bursts. Their afterglows are brighter than supernovae and therefore are called hypernovae. Photometry and spectroscopy of these afterglows have provided major breakthroughs in our understanding of this mysterious phenomenon. PMID:10220364

  2. Residual dust charges in discharge afterglow

    SciTech Connect

    Coueedel, L.; Mikikian, M.; Boufendi, L.; Samarian, A. A.

    2006-08-15

    An on-ground measurement of dust-particle residual charges in the afterglow of a dusty plasma was performed in a rf discharge. An upward thermophoretic force was used to balance the gravitational force. It was found that positively charged, negatively charged, and neutral dust particles coexisted for more than 1 min after the discharge was switched off. The mean residual charge for 200-nm-radius particles was measured. The dust particle mean charge is about -5e at a pressure of 1.2 mbar and about -3e at a pressure of 0.4 mbar.

  3. Abegg, Lewis, Langmuir, and the Octet Rule.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, William B.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses major events leading to the development of the octet rule. Three conclusions based on the work of Mendeleev, Abegg, Thompson, Kossel, Lewis, and Langmuir are considered as is the debate over the rule's validity. (JN)

  4. Concepts in strong Langmuir turbulence theory

    SciTech Connect

    DuBois, D.F.; Rose, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    Some of the basic concepts of strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) theory are reviewed. In SLT system, a major fraction of the turbulent energy is carried by local, time-dependent, nonlinear excitations called cavitons. Modulational instability, localization of Langmuir fields by density fluctuations, caviton nucleation, collapse, and burnout and caviton correlations are reviewed. Recent experimental evidence will be presented for SLT phenomena in the interaction of powerful HF waves with the ionosphere and in laser-plasma interaction experiments. 38 refs., 11 figs.

  5. Afterglow Radiation from Gamma Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Desmond, Hugh; /Leuven U. /SLAC

    2006-08-28

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRB) are huge fluxes of gamma rays that appear randomly in the sky about once a day. It is now commonly accepted that GRBs are caused by a stellar object shooting off a powerful plasma jet along its rotation axis. After the initial outburst of gamma rays, a lower intensity radiation remains, called the afterglow. Using the data from a hydrodynamical numerical simulation that models the dynamics of the jet, we calculated the expected light curve of the afterglow radiation that would be observed on earth. We calculated the light curve and spectrum and compared them to the light curves and spectra predicted by two analytical models of the expansion of the jet (which are based on the Blandford and McKee solution of a relativistic isotropic expansion; see Sari's model [1] and Granot's model [2]). We found that the light curve did not decay as fast as predicted by Sari; the predictions by Granot were largely corroborated. Some results, however, did not match Granot's predictions, and more research is needed to explain these discrepancies.

  6. Laboratory plasma probe studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heikkila, W. J.

    1975-01-01

    Diagnostic experiments performed in a collisionless plasma using CO2 as the working gas are described. In particular, simultaneous measurements that have been performed by means of Langmuir- and RF-probes are presented. A resonance occurring above the parallel resonance in the frequency characteristic of a two electrode system is interpreted as being due to the resonant excitation of electroacoustic waves.

  7. A comparative study of electrical probe techniques for plasma diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szuszczewicz, E. P.

    1972-01-01

    Techniques for using electrical probes for plasma diagnostics are reviewed. Specific consideration is given to the simple Langmuir probe, the symmetric double probe of Johnson and Malter, the variable-area probe of Fetz and Oeschsner, and a floating probe technique. The advantages and disadvantages of each technique are discussed.

  8. MULTI-WAVELENGTH AFTERGLOWS OF FAST RADIO BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Shuang-Xi; Gao, He; Zhang, Bing

    2014-09-01

    The physical origin of fast radio bursts (FRBs) is unknown. Detecting electromagnetic counterparts to FRBs in other wavelengths is essential to measure their distances and to determine their physical origin. Assuming that at least some of them are of cosmological origin, we calculate their afterglow light curves in multiple wavelengths (X-rays, optical, and radio) by assuming a range of total kinetic energies and redshifts. We focus on forward shock emission, but also consider the possibility that some of the FRBs might have bright reverse shock emission. In general, FRB afterglows are too faint to be detected by current detectors. Only if an FRB has a very low radiative efficiency in radio (hence, a very large kinetic energy), and when it is close enough to observe can its afterglow be detected in the optical and radio bands. We discuss observational strategies for detecting these faint afterglows using future telescopes such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and Expanded Very Large Array.

  9. Suprathermal Solar Wind Electrons and Langmuir Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunjung; Yoon, Peter H.; Choe, G. S.; moon, Y.-J.

    2016-09-01

    The steady-state model recently put forth for the solar wind electron velocity distribution function during quiet time conditions, was originally composed of three population electrons (core, halo, and superhalo) with the core remaining nonresonant with any plasma waves while the halo and superhalo separately maintained steady-state resonance with whistler- and Langmuir-frequency range fluctuations, respectively. However, a recent paper demonstrates that whistler-range fluctuations in fact have no significant contribution. The present paper represents a consummation of the model in that a self-consistent model of the suprathermal electron population, which encompasses both the halo and the superhalo, is constructed solely on the basis of the Langmuir fluctuation spectrum. Numerical solutions to steady-state particle and wave kinetic equations are obtained on the basis of an initial trial electron distribution and Langmuir wave spectrum. Such a finding offers a self-consistent explanation for the observed steady-state electron distribution in the solar wind.

  10. Improved double planar probe data analysis technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ghim, Young-chul; Hershkowitz, Noah

    2009-03-15

    Plasma electron number density and ion number density in a dc multidipole weakly collisional Ar plasma are measured with a single planar Langmuir probe and a double planar probe, respectively. A factor of two discrepancy between the two density measurements is resolved by applying Sheridan's empirical formula [T. E. Sheridan, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3084 (2000)] for sheath expansion to the double probe data.

  11. Terahertz radiation by beating Langmuir waves

    SciTech Connect

    Son, S.; Moon, Sung Joon; Park, J. Y.

    2012-11-15

    An intense terahertz (THz) radiation generated by the beating of two Langmuir waves, which are excited by the forward Raman scattering, is analyzed theoretically. The radiation energy per shot can be as high as 0.1 J, with the duration of 10 ps. Appropriate plasma density and the laser characteristics are examined.

  12. Nonlinear, relativistic Langmuir waves in astrophysical magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chian, Abraham C.-L.

    1987-01-01

    Large amplitude, electrostatic plasma waves are relevant to physical processes occurring in the astrophysical magnetospheres wherein charged particles are accelerated to relativistic energies by strong waves emitted by pulsars, quasars, or radio galaxies. The nonlinear, relativistic theory of traveling Langmuir waves in a cold plasma is reviewed. The cases of streaming electron plasma, electronic plasma, and two-streams are discussed.

  13. Magnetically driven filament probe.

    PubMed

    Schmid, A; Herrmann, A; Rohde, V; Maraschek, M; Müller, H W

    2007-05-01

    A radially movable probe has been developed for studies of filamentary transport in ASDEX Upgrade during edge localized modes (ELMs) by means of Langmuir tips and magnetic pickup coils. The probe is permanently installed at the low field side in the ASDEX Upgrade vacuum vessel and is not subject to limitations in probe size, as, for example, probes on a shared manipulator are. The probe is moved by a magnetic drive, which allows for easy installation in the vessel, and has moderate machine requirements, as it will only require an electric feedthrough and an external power supply. The drive gives a linear motion with a radial range of 5 cm within 50 ms, where range and velocity can be largely scaled according to experimental requirements. The probe has been installed in the outer midplane of the ASDEX Upgrade vessel, where ELM filaments are expected to have their maximum amplitude. Filaments are coherent substructures within an ELM, carrying a fraction of the ELM released energy towards the wall. The new probe allows to measure the structure of these filaments, in particular, parameters such as filament rotation (by time delay measurements) and size (by peak width analysis). Activating the drive moves the probe from a safe position behind the limiter to a position in front of the limiters, i.e., exposes the Langmuir pins to the scrape-off layer plasma. PMID:17552815

  14. STEREO database of interplanetary Langmuir electric waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briand, C.; Henri, P.; Génot, V.; Lormant, N.; Dufourg, N.; Cecconi, B.; Nguyen, Q. N.; Goetz, K.

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes a database of electric waveforms that is available at the Centre de Données de la Physique des Plasmas (CDPP, http://cdpp.eu/). This database is specifically dedicated to waveforms of Langmuir/Z-mode waves. These waves occur in numerous kinetic processes involving electrons in space plasmas. Statistical analysis from a large data set of such waves is then of interest, e.g., to study the relaxation of high-velocity electron beams generated at interplanetary shock fronts, in current sheets and magnetic reconnection region, the transfer of energy between high and low frequencies, the generation of electromagnetic waves. The Langmuir waveforms were recorded by the Time Domain Sampler (TDS) of the WAVES radio instrument on board the STEREO mission. In this paper, we detail the criteria used to identify the Langmuir/Z-mode waves among the whole set of waveforms of the STEREO spacecraft. A database covering the November 2006 to August 2014 period is provided. It includes electric waveforms expressed in the normalized frame (B,B × Vsw,B × (B × Vsw)) with B and Vsw the local magnetic field and solar wind velocity vectors, and the local magnetic field in the variance frame, in an interval of ±1.5 min around the time of the Langmuir event. Quicklooks are also provided that display the three components of the electric waveforms together with the spectrum of E∥, together with the magnitude and components of the magnetic field in the 3 min interval, in the variance frame. Finally, the distribution of the Langmuir/Z-mode waves peak amplitude is also analyzed.

  15. The ultra-long GRB 111209A. II. Prompt to afterglow and afterglow properties

    SciTech Connect

    Stratta, G.; Gendre, B.; Boër, M.; Atteia, J. L.; Coward, D. M.; Howell, E.; De Pasquale, M.; Oates, S.; Klotz, A.; Piro, L.

    2013-12-10

    The 'ultra-long' gamma-ray burst GRB 111209A at redshift z = 0.677 is the longest GRB ever observed thus far, with a rest frame prompt emission duration of ∼4 hr. In order to explain the burst exceptional longevity, a low-metallicity blue supergiant progenitor was invoked. In this article we further constrain the phenomenology and progenitor properties of this peculiar GRB by performing a multiband temporal and spectral analysis of both the prompt and the afterglow emission. We use proprietary and publicly available data from Swift, Konus WIND, XMM-Newton, and TAROT, as well as from other ground-based optical and radio telescopes. We find some peculiar properties that are possibly connected to the exceptional nature of this burst, namely: (1) an unprecedented large optical delay of 410 ± 50 s between the peak time in gamma-rays and the peak time in the optical of a marked multiwavelength flare; (2) multiwavelength prompt emission spectral modeling requires a certain amount of dust in the circumburst environment. The dust produces a rest frame visual extinction of A{sub V} = 0.3-1.5 mag, and may undergo destruction at late times; and (3) we detect the presence of a hard spectral extra power-law component at the end of the X-ray steep steep decay phase and before the start of the X-ray afterglow, which has never been revealed thus far in past GRBs. The optical afterglow shows more usual properties; it has a flux power-law decay with an index of 1.6 ± 0.1 and a late rebrightening feature observed at ∼1.1 the day after the first Burst Alert Telescope trigger. We discuss our findings in the context of several possible interpretations that have been given thus far of the complex multiband GRB phenomenology and propose a binary channel formation for the blue supergiant progenitor.

  16. Emission spectrum of a sporadic fireball afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madiedo, J.; Trigo-Rodríguez, J.

    2014-07-01

    A mag. -11 fireball was imaged over southern Spain on April 14, 2013 at 22:35:49.8 ± 0.1s UTC. Its emission spectrum was also obtained. This event was assigned the SPMN code 140413 after the recording date. By the end of its atmospheric path, it exhibited a very bright flare which resulted in a persistent train whose spectrum was recorded. Here we present a preliminary analysis of this event and focus special attention on the evolution of the main emission lines in the spectrum of the afterglow. An array of low-lux CCD video devices (models 902H and 902H Ultimate from Watec Co.) operating from our stations at Sevilla and El Arenosillo was employed to record the SPMN140413 fireball. The operation of these systems is explained in [1,2]. Some of these are configured as spectrographs by attaching holographic diffraction gratings (1000 lines/mm) to the objective lens [3]. To calculate the atmospheric trajectory, radiant, and orbit we have employed our AMALTHEA software, which follows the planes intersection method [4]. The spectrum was analyzed with our CHIMET application [5]. The parent meteoroid impacted the atmosphere with an initial velocity of 28.9 ± 0.3 km/s and the fireball began at a height of 104.4 ± 0.5 km. The event ended at 80.7 ± 0.5 km above the ground level, with the main flare taking place at 83 ± 0.5 km. The calculated radiant and orbital parameters confirm the sporadic nature of the bolide. The calibrated emission spectrum shows that the most important contributions correspond to the Na I-1 (588.9 nm) and Mg I-2 (517.2 nm) multiplets. In the ultraviolet, the contribution from the H and K lines from Ca was also identified. As usual in meteor spectra, most of the lines correspond to Fe I. The train spectrum was recorded during about 0.12 seconds. This provided the evolution with time of the intensity of the emission lines in this signal. The contributions from Mg I, Na I, Ca I, Fe I, Ca II, and O I were identified in the afterglow, with the Na I-1

  17. The mysterious optical afterglow spectrum of GRB 140506A at z = 0.889

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fynbo, J. P. U.; Krühler, T.; Leighly, K.; Ledoux, C.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Schulze, S.; Noterdaeme, P.; Watson, D.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Bolmer, J.; Cano, Z.; Christensen, L.; Covino, S.; D'Elia, V.; Flores, H.; Friis, M.; Goldoni, P.; Greiner, J.; Hammer, F.; Hjorth, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Japelj, J.; Kaper, L.; Klose, S.; Knust, F.; Leloudas, G.; Levan, A.; Malesani, D.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Møller, P.; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Oates, S.; Pian, E.; Schady, P.; Sparre, M.; Tagliaferri, G.; Tanvir, N.; Thöne, C. C.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Vergani, S.; Wiersema, K.; Xu, D.; Zafar, T.

    2014-12-01

    Context. Gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows probe sightlines to star-forming regions in distant star-forming galaxies. Here we present a study of the peculiar afterglow spectrum of the z = 0.889Swift GRB 140506A. Aims: Our aim is to understand the origin of the very unusual properties of the absorption along the line of sight. Methods: We analyse spectroscopic observations obtained with the X-shooter spectrograph mounted on the ESO/VLT at two epochs 8.8 h and 33 h after the burst, and with imaging from the GROND instrument. We also present imaging and spectroscopy of the host galaxy obtained with the Magellan telescope. Results: The underlying afterglow appears to be a typical afterglow of a long-duration GRB. However, the material along the line of sight has imprinted very unusual features on the spectrum. First, there is a very broad and strong flux drop below 8000 Å (~4000 Å in the rest frame), which seems to be variable between the two spectroscopic epochs. We can reproduce the flux-drops both as a giant 2175 Å extinction bump and as an effect of multiple scattering on dust grains in a dense environment. Second, we detect absorption lines from excited H i and He i. We also detect molecular absorption from CH+. Conclusions: We interpret the unusual properties of these spectra as reflecting the presence of three distinct regions along the line of sight: the excited He i absorption originates from an H ii-region, whereas the Balmer absorption must originate from an associated photodissociation region. The strong metal line and molecular absorption and the dust extinction must originate from a third, cooler region along the line of sight. The presence of at least three separate regions is reflected in the fact that the different absorption components have different velocities relative to the systemic redshift of the host galaxy. Based on observations carried out under prog. ID 093.A-0069(B) with the X-shooter spectrograph installed at the Cassegrain focus of the

  18. Gamma-Ray Bursts: Afterglow and Prompt Emission Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bing

    2008-10-01

    Swift observations have revealed interesting but puzzling data that demand a rethink of the origins of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and their afterglows. The chromatic breaks in X-ray/optical afterglow lightcurves stimulated several innovative suggestions, most invoking a non-forward-shock origin of the X-ray afterglows. The status of both the observational facts and the theoretical models is critically reviewed. Besides the late ``internal'' emission from a long-live central engine, most observed X-ray afterglows likely still include the contribution of the traditional forward shock component. The physical nature (e.g. energy dissipation mechanism, emission site, and radiation mechanism) of the GRB prompt emission is currently not identified. The motivations and issues of three proposed prompt emission sites are reviewed. Several independent methods, invoking prompt gamma-ray, X-ray, optical and GeV emission information, respectively, have been applied to constrain the unknown emission site. Tentative evidence suggests a large prompt emission radius. Finally, the implications of the broad band high quality data of the ``naked eye'' GRB 080319B for our understanding of the afterglow and prompt emission mechanisms are discussed.

  19. X-ray afterglow light curves: toward a standard candle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendre, B.; Galli, A.; Boër, M.

    2008-05-01

    We investigate the clustering of afterglow light curves observed at X-ray and optical wavelengths. We construct a sample of 34 bursts with known distance and X-ray afterglow. We correct the light curves for cosmological effects and compare the observed X-ray fluxes one day after the burst. We check for correlations between the observed flux and the burst spectral and temporal properties. We confirm the previous result of Boër and Gendre (2000) that X-ray afterglow light curves cluster in luminosity, even when we consider the SWIFT data. We observe this clustering only for the afterglow light curves; the inclusion of prompt-related data broaden the distribution. The same clustering is observed for the optical light curves; GRB sources can be divided in three classes, namely optical and X-ray bright afterglows, optical and X-ray dim ones, and optically bright-X-ray dim ones. We argue that this clustering is related to the fireball total energy, the external medium density, the fraction of fireball energy going in relativistic electrons and magnetic fields. These parameters can be either fixed to a standard value, or correlated.

  20. X-ray afterglow light curves : toward standard candle ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendre, B.; Galli, A.; Boër, M.

    2007-07-01

    We investigate the clustering of afterglow light curves observed in X-ray and in optical before the launch of SWIFT in light of SWIFT observations. We have constructed a sample of 34 bursts with known distance and X-ray afterglow. This sample includes bursts observed by BeppoSAX, XMM-Newton, Chandra, and SWIFT. We correct the light curves for cosmological effects and compare the observed X-ray fluxes at 1 day after the burst. We check if there is any correlation between the observed flux and the burst spectral and temporal properties. We find that X-ray afterglow light curves cluster in luminosity, even in the SWIFT era. We show that this clustering is due only to the afterglow, and that the inclusion of prompt-related data broaden the distribution and hide the clustering. The same clustering is observed in optical, and we found three sub-division between optical and X-ray bright afterglows, dim ones, and optically bright -X-ray dim ones. We argue that the observed optical and X-ray clustering are related to the fireball total energy, the external medium density, the fraction of fireball energy going in relativistic electrons and magnetic fields. These parameters are either all fixed to a standard value, or all linked together.

  1. Radio rebrightening of the GRB afterglow by the accompanying supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barniol Duran, R.; Giannios, D.

    2015-12-01

    The gamma-ray burst (GRB) jet powers the afterglow emission by shocking the surrounding medium, and radio afterglow can now be routinely observed to almost a year after the explosion. Long-duration GRBs are accompanied by supernovae (SNe) that typically contain much more energy than the GRB jet. Here we consider the fact that the SN blast wave will also produce its own afterglow (supernova remnant emission), which will peak at much later time (since it is non-relativistic), when the SN blast wave transitions from a coasting phase to a decelerating Sedov-Taylor phase. We predict that this component will peak generally a few tens of years after the explosion and it will outshine the GRB powered afterglow well-before its peak emission. In the case of GRB 030329, where the external density is constrained by the ˜10-year coverage of the radio GRB afterglow, the radio emission is predicted to start rising over the next decade and to continue to increase for the following decades up to a level of ˜ mJy. Detection of the SN-powered radio emission will greatly advance our knowledge of particle acceleration in ˜0.1c shocks.

  2. The Onset of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Shiho; Zhang, Bing

    2007-02-01

    We discuss the reference time t0 of afterglow light curves in the context of the standard internal-external shock model. The decay index of early afterglow is very sensitive to the reference time one chooses. In order to understand the nature of early afterglow, it is essential to take a correct reference time. Our simple analytic model provides a framework for understanding special relativistic effects involved in early afterglow phase. We evaluate light curves of reverse shock emission as well as those of forward shock emission, based on full hydrodynamic calculations. We show that the reference time does not shift significantly even in the thick-shell case. For external shock emission components, measuring times from the beginning of the prompt emission is a good approximation and it does not cause an early steep decay. In the thin-shell case, the energy transfer time from fireball ejecta to ambient medium typically extends to thousands of seconds. This might be related to the shallow decay phases observed in early X-ray afterglow at least for some bursts.

  3. Irving Langmuir and the light bulb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, Graeme

    2009-02-01

    Irving Langmuir's principal contribution to lighting was a major improvement in the efficiency of the incandescent lamp. He also used experiments on these lamps to provide fundamental new insight into a number of other areas of physics, including evaporation of metals, the space charge limited current in a vacuum and thermionic emission of electrons from metallic surfaces. This paper describes his experiments, and the chain of ideas which led him to new discoveries.

  4. Langmuir Films of Polycyclic Molecules on Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Tamam,L.; Kraack, H.; Sloutskin, E.; Ocko, B.; Pershan, P.; Deutsch, M.

    2007-01-01

    Langmuir films (LFs) of biphenyl and anthracene derivatives on the surface of liquid mercury were studied by surface-specific X-ray and surface tension measurements. Phases of lying-down, side-lying and standing-up molecules were found, some of which exhibit long-range lateral order. The molecular symmetry and the position and nature of the side-, end-, and headgroups are shown to dominate the structural evolution of the LFs with surface coverage.

  5. GRB-081029: A Step Towards Understanding Multiple Afterglow Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland Stephen T.

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of the unusual optical light curve of the gamma-ray burst-081029 at a redshift of z = 3.8474. We combine X-ray and optical observations from (Swift) with optical and infrared data from REM to obtain a detailed data set extending from approx 10(exp 2)s to approx 10(exp 5)s after the BAT trigger, and from approx.10 keV to 16,000 AA. The X-ray afterglow showed a shallow initial decay followed by u rapid decay after about 18,000 s. The optical afterglow, however, shows an uncharecteristic rise at about 5000 s that has no corresponding feature in the X-ray light curve. The data are not consistent with a single-component jet. It is possible that there are multiple physical components contributing to the afterglow of GRB-081029.

  6. X-ray flares in early GRB afterglows.

    PubMed

    Burrows, D N; Falcone, A; Chincarini, G; Morris, D; Romano, P; Hill, J E; Godet, O; Moretti, A; Krimm, H; Osborne, J P; Racusin, J; Mangano, V; Page, K; Perri, M; Stroh, M

    2007-05-15

    The Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) has discovered that flares are quite common in early X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), being observed in roughly 50% of afterglows with prompt follow-up observations. The flares range in fluence from a few per cent to approximately 100% of the fluence of the prompt emission (the GRB). Repetitive flares are seen, with more than four successive flares detected by the XRT in some afterglows. The rise and fall times of the flares are typically considerably smaller than the time since the burst. These characteristics suggest that the flares are related to the prompt emission mechanism, but at lower photon energies. We conclude that the most likely cause of these flares is late-time activity of the GRB central engine. PMID:17293338

  7. GRB 030329: 3 years of radio afterglow monitoring.

    PubMed

    van der Horst, A J; Kamble, A; Wijers, R A M J; Resmi, L; Bhattacharya, D; Rol, E; Strom, R; Kouveliotou, C; Oosterloo, T; Ishwara-Chandra, C H

    2007-05-15

    Radio observations of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows are essential for our understanding of the physics of relativistic blast waves, as they enable us to follow the evolution of GRB explosions much longer than the afterglows in any other wave band. We have performed a 3-year monitoring campaign of GRB 030329 with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescopes and the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope. Our observations, combined with observations at other wavelengths, have allowed us to determine the GRB blast wave physical parameters, such as the total burst energy and the ambient medium density, as well as to investigate the jet nature of the relativistic outflow. Further, by modelling the late-time radio light curve of GRB 030329, we predict that the Low-Frequency Array (30-240 MHz) will be able to observe afterglows of similar GRBs, and constrain the physics of the blast wave during its non-relativistic phase. PMID:17293318

  8. Bulk organisation and alignment in Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett films of tetrachloroperylene tetracarboxylic acid esters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modlińska, Anna; Filipowicz, Marek; Martyński, Tomasz

    2016-12-01

    Perylene derivatives with chlorine atoms attached at the bay position to the dye core are expected to affect organisation and tendency to aggregation in Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films. Therefore, newly synthesized core-twisted homologous series of tetrachloroperylene tetracarboxylic acid esters with n = 1,4,5,6,9 carbon atoms in terminal alkyl chains were studied. Phase transitions and crystalline structures were specified by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. Intermolecular interactions and organisation of the dyes in monomolecular films were investigated by means of Brewster angle microscope (BAM), UV-Vis absorption and emission spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The dyes investigated do not form thermotropic mesogenic phases in bulk. The crystalline triclinic elementary cell with P-1 symmetry is revealed from X-ray experiments. In Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett films molecular tilted head-on alignment is postulated. Spectroscopic research confirmed by AFM texture images of the LB films show that in the Langmuir and LB films the dyes, depending on length of terminal chains, have a tendency to create H or I molecular aggregates. The impact of the twisted core on the molecular behavior in a bulk and thin films is discussed.

  9. Early optical polarization of a gamma-ray burst afterglow.

    PubMed

    Mundell, Carole G; Steele, Iain A; Smith, Robert J; Kobayashi, Shiho; Melandri, Andrea; Guidorzi, Cristiano; Gomboc, Andreja; Mottram, Chris J; Clarke, David; Monfardini, Alessandro; Carter, David; Bersier, David

    2007-03-30

    We report the optical polarization of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow, obtained 203 seconds after the initial burst of gamma-rays from GRB 060418, using a ring polarimeter on the robotic Liverpool Telescope. Our robust (2sigma) upper limit on the percentage of polarization, less than 8%, coincides with the fireball deceleration time at the onset of the afterglow. The combination of the rate of decay of the optical brightness and the low polarization at this critical time constrains standard models of GRB ejecta, ruling out the presence of a large-scale ordered magnetic field in the emitting region. PMID:17363631

  10. Early-Time Observations of GRBs afterglow with 2-m Robotic Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Melandri, A.; Mundell, C. G.; Steele, I. A.; Carter, D.; Kobayashi, S.; Bersier, D.; Bode, M. F.; Mottram, C. J.; Smith, R. J.; Gomboc, A.; Guidorzi, C.; Monfardini, A.

    2007-08-21

    In the era of rapid and accurate localisation of Gamma Ray Bursts by the Swift satellite, high quality early time multi-wavelength light curves, obtained by space and ground-based robotic telescopes, have shown that the standard 'smooth temporal power law decays' typical of late-time afterglow emission can be substantially modified at early times by e.g. energy injection from long-lived central engines, and/or interactions between the ejecta and clumps in the surrounding circumburst medium. Well-sampled optical light curves (covering a wide range in time, brightness and redshift) together with early-time polarimetry provide a powerful probe of the physics of GRBs, their ejecta and their environments. Here we summarise the GRB followup programme being conducted on a network of the world's three largest robotic telescopes that aims to obtain early-time multicolour photometric and polarimetric measurements crucial for the understanding of GRB physics.

  11. The Afterglows of Swift-era Gamma-Ray Bursts. II. Type I GRB versus Type II GRB Optical Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kann, D. A.; Klose, S.; Zhang, B.; Covino, S.; Butler, N. R.; Malesani, D.; Nakar, E.; Wilson, A. C.; Antonelli, L. A.; Chincarini, G.; Cobb, B. E.; D'Avanzo, P.; D'Elia, V.; Della Valle, M.; Ferrero, P.; Fugazza, D.; Gorosabel, J.; Israel, G. L.; Mannucci, F.; Piranomonte, S.; Schulze, S.; Stella, L.; Tagliaferri, G.; Wiersema, K.

    2011-06-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been separated into two classes, originally along the lines of duration and spectral properties, called "short/hard" and "long/soft." The latter have been conclusively linked to the explosive deaths of massive stars, while the former are thought to result from the merger or collapse of compact objects. In recent years, indications have been accumulating that the short/hard versus long/soft division does not map directly onto what would be expected from the two classes of progenitors, leading to a new classification scheme called Type I and Type II which is based on multiple observational criteria. We use a large sample of GRB afterglow and prompt-emission data (adding further GRB afterglow observations in this work) to compare the optical afterglows (or the lack thereof) of Type I GRBs with those of Type II GRBs. In comparison to the afterglows of Type II GRBs, we find that those of Type I GRBs have a lower average luminosity and show an intrinsic spread of luminosities at least as wide. From late and deep upper limits on the optical transients, we establish limits on the maximum optical luminosity of any associated supernova (SN), confirming older works and adding new results. We use deep upper limits on Type I GRB optical afterglows to constrain the parameter space of possible mini-SN emission associated with a compact-object merger. Using the prompt-emission data, we search for correlations between the parameters of the prompt emission and the late optical afterglow luminosities. We find tentative correlations between the bolometric isotropic energy release and the optical afterglow luminosity at a fixed time after the trigger (positive), and between the host offset and the luminosity (negative), but no significant correlation between the isotropic energy release and the duration of the GRBs. We also discuss three anomalous GRBs, GRB 060505, GRB 060614, and GRB 060121, in light of their optical afterglow luminosities. Based in part

  12. Numerical comparison of strong Langmuir turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Mei-Mei; Nicholson, D. R.

    1987-01-01

    Two models of Langmuir turbulence, the nonlinear Schroedinger equation and the Zakharov equations, are solved numerically for an initial value problem in which the electric field evolves from an almost flat initial condition via the modulational instability and finally saturates into a set of solitons. The two models agree well with each other only when the initial dimensionless electric field has an amplitude less than unity. An analytic soliton gas model consisting of equal-amplitude, randomly spaced, zero-speed solitons is remarkably good at reproducing the time-averaged Fourier spectra in both cases.

  13. The Optical Afterglow of a Short Gamma-ray Burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hjorth, Jens; Watson, Darach; Flynbo, Johan P.U.; Price, Paul A.; Jensen, Brian L.; Jorgensen, Uffe G.; Kubas, Daniel; Gorosabel, Javier; Jakobssonk, Pall; Sollerman, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    It has long been known that there are two classes of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), principally distinguished by their durations. The breakthrough in our understanding of long-duration GRBs (greater than 2 seconds in duration), that ultimately linked them with energetic Type Ic supernovae, came about from the discovery of their long-lived X-ray and optical "afterglow", when precise and rapid localizations of the sources could finally be obtained. Recently, X-ray localizations have become available for short (less than 2 seconds in duration) GRBs, a hitherto elusive GRB population, that has evaded optical detection for more than thirty years. Here we report the discovery of transient optical emission (R approximately 23 mag) associated with a short GRB. This first short GRB afterglow is localized with sub-arcsecond accuracy onto the outskirts of a blue dwarf galaxy. Unless the optical and X-ray afterglow arise from different mechanisms our observations 33 h after the GRB suggest that, analogously to long GRBs, we observe synchrotron emission from ultrarelativistic ejecta (ZZZ CAN WE LIMIT GAMMA?). In contrast, we did not detect a bright supernova, as found in most nearby long GRB afterglows, which suggests a different origidstrongly constrain the nature of the short GRB progenitors.

  14. Atmospheric pressure helium afterglow discharge detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Rice, Gary; D'Silva, Arthur P.; Fassel, Velmer A.

    1986-05-06

    An apparatus for providing a simple, low-frequency electrodeless discharge system for atmospheric pressure afterglow generation. A single quartz tube through which a gas mixture is passed is extended beyond a concentric electrode positioned thereabout. A grounding rod is placed directly above the tube outlet to permit optical viewing of the discharge between the electrodes.

  15. Atmospheric pressure helium afterglow discharge detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Rice, G.; D'Silva, A.P.; Fassel, V.A.

    1985-04-05

    An apparatus for providing a simple, low-frequency, electrodeless discharge system for atmospheric pressure afterglow generation. A single quartz tube through which a gas mixture is passed is extended beyond a concentric electrode positioned thereabout. A grounding rod is placed directly above the tube outlet to permit optical viewing of the discharge between the electrodes.

  16. ON PARTICLE ACCELERATION RATE IN GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Sagi, Eran; Nakar, Ehud

    2012-04-10

    It is well known that collisionless shocks are major sites of particle acceleration in the universe, but the details of the acceleration process are still not well understood. The particle acceleration rate, which can shed light on the acceleration process, is rarely measured in astrophysical environments. Here, we use observations of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows, which are weakly magnetized relativistic collisionless shocks in ion-electron plasma, to constrain the rate of particle acceleration in such shocks. We find, based on X-ray and GeV afterglows, an acceleration rate that is most likely very fast, approaching the Bohm limit, when the shock Lorentz factor is in the range of {Gamma} {approx} 10-100. In that case X-ray observations may be consistent with no amplification of the magnetic field in the shock upstream region. We examine the X-ray afterglow of GRB 060729, which is observed for 642 days showing a sharp decay in the flux starting about 400 days after the burst, when the shock Lorentz factor is {approx}5. We find that inability to accelerate X-ray-emitting electrons at late time provides a natural explanation for the sharp decay, and that also in that case acceleration must be rather fast, and cannot be more than a 100 times slower than the Bohm limit. We conclude that particle acceleration is most likely fast in GRB afterglows, at least as long as the blast wave is ultrarelativistic.

  17. DISCOVERY OF RADIO AFTERGLOW FROM THE MOST DISTANT COSMIC EXPLOSION

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Poonam; Frail, Dale A.; Fox, Derek; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Harrsion, Fiona; Kasliwal, Mansi; Berger, Edo; Cenko, S. Bradley; Bock, Douglas C.-J.

    2010-03-20

    We report on the discovery of radio afterglow emission from the gamma-ray burst GRB 090423, which exploded at a redshift of 8.3, making it the object with the highest known redshift in the universe. By combining our radio measurements with existing X-ray and infrared observations, we estimate the kinetic energy of the afterglow, the geometry of the outflow, and the density of the circumburst medium. Our best-fit model suggests a quasi-spherical, high-energy explosion in a low, constant-density medium. GRB 090423 had a similar energy release to the other well-studied high redshift GRB 050904 (z = 6.26), but their circumburst densities differ by 2 orders of magnitude. We compare the properties of GRB 090423 with a sample of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) at moderate redshifts. We find that the high energy and afterglow properties of GRB 090423 are not sufficiently different from other GRBs to suggest a different kind of progenitor, such as a Population III (Pop III) star. However, we argue that it is not clear that the afterglow properties alone can provide convincing identification of Pop III progenitors. We suggest that the millimeter and centimeter radio detections of GRB 090423 at early times contained emission from the reverse shock. If true, this may have important implications for the detection of high-redshift GRBs by the next generation of radio facilities.

  18. Afterglow processes responsible for memory effect in nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Pejovic, M. M.; Nesic, N. T.; Pejovic, M. M.; Zivanovic, E. N.

    2012-07-01

    The mechanisms responsible for memory effect in nitrogen at 6.6 mbars have been analysed based on experimental data of electrical breakdown time delay as a function of afterglow period. The analysis has shown that positive ions remaining from previous discharge, as well as metastable and highly vibrationally excited molecules, are responsible for memory effect in the early afterglow. These molecules lead to the formation of positive ions in mutual collisions in the afterglow. Positive ions initiate secondary electron emission from the cathode of a nitrogen-filled tube when voltage higher than static breakdown voltage is applied on the electrodes. On the other hand, N({sup 4}S) atoms have a large influence on memory effect in late afterglow. They recombine on the cathode surface forming metastable molecules, which release secondary electrons in collision with the cathode. The higher values of electrical breakdown time delay in the case of the tube with borosilicate glass walls than in the case of the tube with copper walls are a consequence of faster de-excitation of neutral active particles on the glass. Indirect confirmation of this assumption has been obtained when the tubes were irradiated with gamma radiation.

  19. Polarization Evolution of the Afterglow of GRB 030329

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greiner, Jochen; Klose, Sylvio; Reinsch, Klaus; Schmid, Hans Martin; Sari, Re'em; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Rau, Arne; Palazzi, Eliana; Straubmeier, Christian

    2003-01-01

    The association of a supernova with GRB 030329l strongly supports the collapsar model of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), where a relativistic jet forms after the progenitor star collapses. Such jets cannot be spatially resolved because of their cosmological distances. Their existence is conjectured based on breaks in GRB afterglow light curves and the theoretical desire to reduce the GRB energy requirements. Temporal evolution of polarization may provide independent evidence for the jet structure of the relativistic outflow. Small-level polarization (approx. 1-3%) has been reported for a few bursts, but the temporal evolution of polarization properties could not be established. Here, we report polarimetric observations of the afterglow of GRB 030329 with high signal-to-noise and high sampling frequency. We establish the polarization light curve, detect sustained polarization at the percent level, and find significant variability. The data imply that the afterglow magnetic field has small coherence length and is mostly random, probably generated by turbulence, in contrast with the high polarization detected in the prompt gamma-rays from GRB 02120618. Our results suggest a different structure and origin of the magnetic field in the prompt vs. afterglow emission regions.

  20. Radio afterglows and host galaxies of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long-Biao; Zhang, Zhi-Bin; Huang, Yong-Feng; Wu, Xue-Feng; Kong, Si-Wei; Li, Di; Chang, Heon-Young; Choi, Chul-Sung

    2015-08-01

    Considering the contribution of emission from the host galaxies of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) to radio afterglows, we investigate the effect of host galaxies on observations statistically. For the three types of event, i.e. low-luminosity, standard and high-luminosity GRBs, it is found that a tight correlation exists between the ratio of the radio flux (RRF) of the host galaxy to the total radio peak emission and the observational frequency. Towards lower frequencies, in particular, the contribution from the host increases significantly. The correlation can be used to obtain a useful estimate for the radio brightness of those host galaxies that only have very limited radio afterglow data. Using this prediction, we reconsidered the theoretical radio afterglow light curves for four kinds of event: high-luminosity, low-luminosity, standard and failed GRBs, taking into account the contribution from host galaxies and aiming to explore the detectability of these events by the Five-hundred-metre Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST). Lying at a typical redshift of z = 1, most of the events can be detected easily by FAST. For the less fierce low-luminosity GRBs, their radio afterglows are not strong enough to exceed the sensitivity limit of FAST at such distances. However, since a large number of low-luminosity bursts actually happen very near to us, it is expected that FAST will still be able to detect many of them.

  1. Physics of the GRB 030328 afterglow and its environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiorano, E.; Masetti, N.; Palazzi, E.; Savaglio, S.; Rol, E.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Pian, E.; Price, P. A.; Peterson, B. A.; Jelínek, M.; Amati, L.; Andersen, M. I.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Castro Cerón, J. M.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Frontera, F.; Fruchter, A. S.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Gorosabel, J.; Henden, A. A.; Hjorth, J.; Jensen, B. L.; Klose, S.; Kouveliotou, C.; Masi, G.; Møller, P.; Nicastro, L.; Ofek, E. O.; Pandey, S. B.; Rhoads, J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; van den Heuvel, E. P. J.

    2006-08-01

    Aims.To investigate the physical nature of the afterglow emission. We report on the photometric, spectroscopic and polarimetric observations of the optical afterglow of Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) 030328 detected by HETE-2.Methods.Photometric, spectroscopic and polarimetric monitoring of the optical afterglow.Results.Photometry, collected at 7 different telescopes, shows that a smoothly broken powerlaw decay, with indices α1 = 0.76 ± 0.03, α2 = 1.50 ± 0.07 and a break at tb = 0.48 ± 0.03 days after the GRB, provides the best fit of the optical afterglow decline. This shape is interpreted as due to collimated emission, for which we determine a jet opening angle θ_jet ˜ 3.2 °. An achromatic bump starting around ~0.2 d after the GRB is possibly marginally detected in the optical light curves. Optical spectroscopy shows the presence of two rest-frame ultraviolet metal absorption systems at z = 1.5216 ± 0.0006 and at z = 1.295 ± 0.001, the former likely associated with the GRB host galaxy. Analysis of the absorption lines at z = 1.5216 suggests that the host of this GRB may be a Damped Lyman-α Absorber. The optical V-band afterglow appears polarized, with P = (2.4 ± 0.6)% and θ = 170° ± 7°, suggesting an asymmetric blastwave expansion. An X-ray-to-optical spectral flux distribution of the GRB 030328 afterglow was obtained at 0.78 days after the GRB and fitted using a broken powerlaw, with an optical spectral slope β_opt = 0.47 ± 0.15, and an X-ray slope βX = 1.0 ± 0.2.Conclusions.The discussion of the results in the context of the "fireball model" shows that the preferred scenario for this afterglow is collimated structured jet with fixed opening angle in a homogeneous medium.

  2. X-Ray Afterglow Light Curves: Toward A Standard Candle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendre, B.; Galli, A.; Boër, M.

    2008-08-01

    We investigate the clustering of afterglow light curves observed at X-ray and optical wavelengths. We have constructed a sample of 61 bursts with known distance and X-ray afterglow. This sample includes bursts observed by BeppoSAX, XMM-Newton, Chandra, and Swift. We correct the light curves for cosmological effects and compare the observed X-ray fluxes 1 day after the burst. We check for correlations between the observed flux and the burst spectral and temporal properties. We confirm the previous result of Boër & Gendre that X-ray afterglow light curves cluster in luminosity, even when we consider the last Swift data. We observe this clustering only for the afterglow light curves; the inclusion of prompt-related data broadens the distribution. A similar clustering is observed for the optical light curves; gamma-ray burst (GRB) sources can be divided into three classes, namely, optically and X-ray bright afterglows, optically and X-ray dim ones, and optically bright but X-ray dim ones. We argue that this clustering is related to the fireball total energy, the external medium density, and the fraction of fireball energy going into relativistic electrons and magnetic fields. These parameters can be either fixed to a standard value or correlated. We finally propose a method for the estimation of the GRB source redshift based on the observed X-ray flux 1 day after the burst and optical properties. Using this method, we compute a redshift of 1.4 +/- 0.2 for GRB 980519 and of 1.9 +/- 0.3 for GRB 040827. We tested this method on three recently detected Swift GRBs with known redshift, and found it in good agreement with the reported distance from optical spectroscopy.

  3. Note: Refined possibilities for plasma probe diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masherov, P. E.; Riaby, V. A.; Abgaryan, V. K.

    2016-08-01

    In an earlier publication, the ion mass determination technique was proposed using the Langmuir probe measurement results for low-pressure Maxwellian plasmas and their analysis, based on the Bohm effect and the Child-Boguslavsky-Langmuir (CBL) probe sheath model, allowing for probe sheath thickness and ion mass evaluations after the Bohm coefficient CBCyl ≈ 1.13 for cylindrical probes had been determined. In the present study, the step-front sheath model, being physically closer to the reality of gas discharge plasmas, was considered in order to correct the CBL sheath model results. At this stage, more real Bohm coefficient (CBCyl ≈ 1.23) for cylindrical probes was found to provide a more reliable method of probe sheath thickness and ion mass determination.

  4. Note: Refined possibilities for plasma probe diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Masherov, P E; Riaby, V A; Abgaryan, V K

    2016-08-01

    In an earlier publication, the ion mass determination technique was proposed using the Langmuir probe measurement results for low-pressure Maxwellian plasmas and their analysis, based on the Bohm effect and the Child-Boguslavsky-Langmuir (CBL) probe sheath model, allowing for probe sheath thickness and ion mass evaluations after the Bohm coefficient CBCyl ≈ 1.13 for cylindrical probes had been determined. In the present study, the step-front sheath model, being physically closer to the reality of gas discharge plasmas, was considered in order to correct the CBL sheath model results. At this stage, more real Bohm coefficient (CBCyl ≈ 1.23) for cylindrical probes was found to provide a more reliable method of probe sheath thickness and ion mass determination. PMID:27587177

  5. High-power high-frequency-induced Langmuir turbulence in the smooth ionosphere at Arecibo. II. Low duty cycle, altitude-resolved, observations

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, P. Y.; Sulzer, M. P.; DuBois, D. F.; Russell, D. A.

    2001-03-01

    This is the second of two papers comprising a theoretical and observational study of new, altitude-resolved, observations at Arecibo of Langmuir turbulence induced in the ionosphere by a new, more powerful, high frequency heater operated at very low duty cycles. Altitude resolution of 150 m in incoherent scatter radar spectra is made possible by the coded-long-pulse method. Here we present the first observation at Arecibo of the well-developed parametric decay instability and the Langmuir decay instability cascade features in the Thomson scatter radar power spectrum, of the plasma line, at the unmodified matching altitudes under near-cold start conditions. The dependence of the plasma line spectra on altitude, pump power, and density scale length have been studied. The temporal growth and saturation of the spectra during heating and the decay of the spectra in the afterglow of heating has also been studied in detail. Comparisons are made here with the theoretical predictions of the companion paper I [DuBois , Phys. Plasmas 8, 791 (2001)]. From these comparisons and a comparison with recent observations at both Arecibo and Tromso, we conclude that all the predictions of modern Langmuir turbulence theory for the radar spectral signatures of the turbulence in a smooth ionosphere have now been verified.

  6. Simple solutions for relativistic generalizations of the Child-Langmuir law and the Langmuir-Blodgett law

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yongpeng; Liu Guozhi; Yang Zhanfeng; Shao Hao; Xiao Renzhen; Xing Qingzi; Zhong Huaqiang; Lin Yuzheng

    2009-04-15

    In this paper, the Child-Langmuir law and Langmuir-Blodgett law are generalized to the relativistic regime by a simple method. Two classical laws suitable for the nonrelativistic regime are modified to simple approximate expressions applicable for calculating the space-charge-limited currents of one-dimensional steady-state planar diodes and coaxial diodes under the relativistic regime. The simple approximate expressions, extending the Child-Langmuir law and Langmuir-Blodgett law to fit the full range of voltage, have small relative errors less than 1% for one-dimensional planar diodes and less than 5% for coaxial diodes.

  7. Beyond the Child-Langmuir limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caflisch, R. E.; Rosin, M. S.

    2012-05-01

    This article presents a new formulation of the solution for fully nonlinear and unsteady planar flow of an electron beam in a diode. Using characteristic variables (i.e., variables that follow particle paths) the solution is expressed through an exact analytic, but implicit, formula for any choice of incoming velocity v0, electric field E0, and current J0. For steady solutions, this approach clarifies the origin of the maximal current Jmax, derived by Child and Langmuir for v0=0 and by Jaffe for v0>0. The implicit formulation is used to find (1) unsteady solutions having constant incoming flux J0>Jmax, which leads to formation of a virtual cathode, and (2) time-periodic solutions whose average flux exceeds the adiabatic average of Jmax.

  8. Langmuir films containing ibuprofen and phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraldo, Vananélia P. N.; Pavinatto, Felippe J.; Nobre, Thatyane M.; Caseli, Luciano; Oliveira, Osvaldo N.

    2013-02-01

    This study shows the incorporation of ibuprofen, an anti-inflammatory drug, in Langmuir monolayers as cell membrane models. Significant effects were observed for dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline (DPPC) monolayers with relevant changes in the elasticity of the monolayer. Dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl glycerol (DPPG) monolayers were affected by small concentrations of ibuprofen, from 1 to 5 mol%. For both types of monolayer, ibuprofen could penetrate into the hydrophobic part of the monolayer, which was confirmed with polarization-modulated infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS). Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) images showed that ibuprofen prevents the formation of large domains of DPPC. The pharmacological action should occur primarily with penetration of ibuprofen via electrically neutral phospholipid headgroups of the membrane.

  9. Coherency properties of strong Langmuir turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, H.A.; DuBois, D.F.; Russell, D. )

    1989-01-01

    Strongly correlated Langmuir wave collapse has been observed in two dimensional simulations of Zakharov's model in a regime characterized by strong ion sound wave damping and an external drive frequency, {omega}{sub 0}, close to but less than the plasma frequency, ({omega}{sub p} {minus} {omega}{sub 0})/{omega}{sub 0} > {epsilon} with {epsilon} {approx equal} 0.005. Caviton-caviton interactions induce temporal correlations between different collapse sites on a time scale the order of a collapse cycle, and on a longer time scale site locations migrate possibly leading to strong spatial correlations. Certain features of ionospheric incoherent scatter radar (ISR) spectra are consistent with such correlations. 6 refs.

  10. Langmuir-Blodgettry of nanocrystals and nanowires.

    PubMed

    Tao, Andrea R; Huang, Jiaxing; Yang, Peidong

    2008-12-01

    Although nanocrystals and nanowires have proliferated new scientific avenues in the study of their physics and chemistries, the bottom-up assembly of these small-scale building blocks remains a formidable challenge for device fabrication and processing. An attractive nanoscale assembly strategy should be cheap, fast, defect tolerant, compatible with a variety of materials, and parallel in nature, ideally utilizing the self-assembly to generate the core of a device, such as a memory chip or optical display. Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) assembly is a good candidate for arranging vast numbers of nanostructures on solid surfaces. In the LB technique, uniaxial compression of a nanocrystal or nanowire monolayer floating on an aqueous subphase causes the nanostructures to assemble and pack over a large area. The ordered monolayer can then be transferred to a solid surface en masse and with fidelity. In this Account, we present the Langmuir-Blodgett technique as a low-cost method for the massively parallel, controlled organization of nanostructures. The isothermal compression of fluid-supported nanoparticles or nanowires is unique in its ability to achieve control over nanoscale assembly by tuning a macroscopic property such as surface pressure. Under optimized conditions (e.g., surface pressure, substrate hydrophobicity, and pulling speed), it allows continuous variation of particle density, spacing, and even arrangement. For practical application and device fabrication, LB compression is ideal for forming highly dense assemblies of nanowires and nanocrystals over unprecedented surface areas. In addition, the dewetting properties of LB monolayers can be used to further achieve patterning within the range of micrometers to tens of nanometers without a predefined template. The LB method should allow for easy integration of nanomaterials into current manufacturing schemes, in addition to fast device prototyping and multiplexing capability. PMID:18683954

  11. Improved double planar probe data analysis technique.

    PubMed

    Ghim Kim, Young-Chul; Hershkowitz, Noah

    2009-03-01

    Plasma electron number density and ion number density in a dc multidipole weakly collisional Ar plasma are measured with a single planar Langmuir probe and a double planar probe, respectively. A factor of two discrepancy between the two density measurements is resolved by applying Sheridan's empirical formula [T. E. Sheridan, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3084 (2000)] for sheath expansion to the double probe data. PMID:19334917

  12. Evidence for Langmuir wave collapse in the interplanetary plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellogg, Paul J.; Goetz, K.; Howard, R. L.; Monson, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    With the Fast Envelope Sampler part of the URAP experiment on Ulysses, there is observed much rapidly varying structure in plasma waves in the solar wind. Extremely narrow (1 ms) structures observed together with electrostatic Langmuir waves, as well as some broader Langmuir wave packets are discussed.

  13. ASSESSING THE ACCURACY OF THE LINEARIZED LANGMUIR MODEL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the most commonly used models for describing phosphorus (P) sorption to soils is the nonlinear Langmuir model. To avoid the difficulties in fitting the nonlinear Langmuir equation to sorption data, linearized versions are commonly used. Although concerns have been raised in the past regarding...

  14. Non-linear Langmuir waves in a warm quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dubinov, Alexander E. Kitaev, Ilya N.

    2014-10-15

    A non-linear differential equation describing the Langmuir waves in a warm quantum electron-ion plasma has been derived. Its numerical solutions of the equation show that ordinary electronic oscillations, similar to the classical oscillations, occur along with small-scale quantum Langmuir oscillations induced by the Bohm quantum force.

  15. Using Weighted Least Squares Regression for Obtaining Langmuir Sorption Constants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the most commonly used models for describing phosphorus (P) sorption to soils is the Langmuir model. To obtain model parameters, the Langmuir model is fit to measured sorption data using least squares regression. Least squares regression is based on several assumptions including normally dist...

  16. Supramolecular architecture in Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett films incorporating a chiral azobenzene.

    PubMed

    Haro, Marta; del Barrio, Jesús; Villares, Ana; Oriol, Luis; Cea, Pilar; López, M Carmen

    2008-09-16

    This article describes the synthesis and fabrication of Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films incorporating a chiral azobenzene derivative, namely, ( S)-4- sec-butyloxy-4'-[5''-(methyloxycarbonyl)pentyl-1''-oxy]azobenzene, abbreviated as AZO-C4(S). Appropriate conditions for the fabrication of monolayers of AZO-C4(S) at the air-water interface have been established, and the resulting Langmuir films have been characterized by a combination of surface pressure and surface potential versus area per molecule isotherms, Brewster angle microscopy, and UV-vis reflection spectroscopy. The results indicate the formation of an ordered trilayer at the air-water interface with UV-vis reflection spectroscopy showing a new supramolecular architecture for multilayered films as well as the formation of J aggregates. Films were transferred onto solid substrates, with AFM revealing well-ordered multilayered films without 3D defects. Infrared and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy indicate that the supramolecular architecture may be favored by the formation of H bonds between acid groups in neighboring layers and pi-pi intermolecular interactions. Circular dichroism spectra reveal chiro-optical activity in multilayered LB films. PMID:18686982

  17. Landau damping of Langmuir twisted waves with kappa distributed electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Arshad, Kashif Aman-ur-Rehman; Mahmood, Shahzad

    2015-11-15

    The kinetic theory of Landau damping of Langmuir twisted modes is investigated in the presence of orbital angular momentum of the helical (twisted) electric field in plasmas with kappa distributed electrons. The perturbed distribution function and helical electric field are considered to be decomposed by Laguerre-Gaussian mode function defined in cylindrical geometry. The Vlasov-Poisson equation is obtained and solved analytically to obtain the weak damping rates of the Langmuir twisted waves in a nonthermal plasma. The strong damping effects of the Langmuir twisted waves at wavelengths approaching Debye length are also obtained by using an exact numerical method and are illustrated graphically. The damping rates of the planar Langmuir waves are found to be larger than the twisted Langmuir waves in plasmas which shows opposite behavior as depicted in Fig. 3 by J. T. Mendoça [Phys. Plasmas 19, 112113 (2012)].

  18. Landau damping of Langmuir twisted waves with kappa distributed electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshad, Kashif; Aman-ur-Rehman, Mahmood, Shahzad

    2015-11-01

    The kinetic theory of Landau damping of Langmuir twisted modes is investigated in the presence of orbital angular momentum of the helical (twisted) electric field in plasmas with kappa distributed electrons. The perturbed distribution function and helical electric field are considered to be decomposed by Laguerre-Gaussian mode function defined in cylindrical geometry. The Vlasov-Poisson equation is obtained and solved analytically to obtain the weak damping rates of the Langmuir twisted waves in a nonthermal plasma. The strong damping effects of the Langmuir twisted waves at wavelengths approaching Debye length are also obtained by using an exact numerical method and are illustrated graphically. The damping rates of the planar Langmuir waves are found to be larger than the twisted Langmuir waves in plasmas which shows opposite behavior as depicted in Fig. 3 by J. T. Mendoça [Phys. Plasmas 19, 112113 (2012)].

  19. Shape modeling with family of Pearson distributions: Langmuir waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidojevic, Sonja

    2014-10-01

    Two major effects of Langmuir wave electric field influence on spectral line shapes are appearance of depressions shifted from unperturbed line and an additional dynamical line broadening. More realistic and accurate models of Langmuir waves are needed to study these effects with more confidence. In this article we present distribution shapes of a high-quality data set of Langmuir waves electric field observed by the WIND satellite. Using well developed numerical techniques, the distributions of the empirical measurements are modeled by family of Pearson distributions. The results suggest that the existing theoretical models of energy conversion between an electron beam and surrounding plasma is more complex. If the processes of the Langmuir wave generation are better understood, the influence of Langmuir waves on spectral line shapes could be modeled better.

  20. Simulation Study Of Early Afterglows Observed With Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hededal, C.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Fishman, G. J.

    2006-09-01

    A 3-D relativistic particle-in-cell code has been used to simulate the dynamics of forward and reverse shocks with thin and thick shells within the parameter constraints provided by present Swift observations and the present models of GRB emission. Our 3-D RPIC simulations have provided the dynamics of collisionless shocks in electron-ion and electron-positron plasmas with and without initial ambient magnetic fields and revealed the importance of ``jitter radiation'' with prompt and afterglow spectra due to the inhomogeneous magnetic fields generated by the Weibel instability. It is different from synchrotron radiation, which is usually assumed to be the dominant radiation process. We have investigated gamma-ray burst emissions from prompt, early, and late afterglows considering microscopic processes. Based on our previous investigation of the Weibel instability for each stage of evolution of ejecta propagating in the ISM, we have incorporated the plasma conditions (relativistic jets) with the density and composition of the plasmas, the magnetic field strength ($\\sigma$-values (the ratio of the electromagnetic energy flux to the particle energy flux)) and its direction, and the Lorentz factor for the different stages in prompt and afterglows. Systematic simulation studies of the relativistic collisionless shocks, associated particle acceleration, magnetic field generation and self-consistent radiation provide insight into undetermined issues in prompt and afterglows observed by Swift. Self-consistently calculated lightcurves, spectra, spectral evolutions, and polarization as function of viewing angle will be done to light a shed on recent new observations by Swift, in particular, X-ray flares, early steep decay, and shallow decay.

  1. Effect of secondary emission on the argon plasma afterglow with large dust density

    SciTech Connect

    Denysenko, I. B.; Azarenkov, N. A.; Burmaka, G. P.; Stefanović, I.

    2015-02-15

    A zero-dimensional, space-averaged model for argon plasma afterglow with large dust density is developed. In the model, three groups of electrons in the plasma afterglow are assumed: (i) thermal electrons with Maxwellian distribution, (ii) energetic electrons generated by metastable-metastable collisions (metastable pooling), and (iii) secondary electrons generated at collisions of ions with the electrodes, which have sufficiently large negative voltages in the afterglow. The model calculates the time-dependencies for electron densities in plasma afterglow based on experimental decay times for metastable density and electrode bias. The effect of secondary emission on electron density in the afterglow is estimated by varying secondary emission yields. It is found that this effect is less important than metastable pooling. The case of dust-free plasma afterglow is considered also, and it is found that in the afterglow the effect of secondary emission may be more important than metastable pooling. The secondary emission may increase thermal electron density n{sub e} in dust-free and dusty plasma afterglows on a few ten percentages. The calculated time dependencies for n{sub e} in dust-free and dusty plasma afterglows describe well the experimental results.

  2. Exploring the behaviour of long gamma-ray bursts with intrinsic afterglow correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oates, Samantha

    2016-07-01

    We present a correlation observed in both the optical and X-ray afterglows of long duration Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs), between the initial luminosity (measured at restframe 200s) and average afterglow decay rate. This correlation does not depend on the presence of specific light curve features and is potentially applicable to all long GRB afterglows. We explore how the correlation parameters from the optical and X-ray bands relate to each other and to the prompt emission phase. We will also explore the implications and test if the observations are consistent with the expectations of the standard afterglow model.

  3. The Late Afterglow and Host Galaxy of GRB 990712.

    PubMed

    Hjorth; Holland; Courbin; Dar; Olsen; Scodeggio

    2000-05-10

    We present deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging, as well as ground-based imaging and spectroscopy, of the optical afterglow associated with the long-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 990712 and its host galaxy. The data were obtained 48-123 days after the burst occurred. The magnitudes of the host (R=21.9, V=22.5) and optical afterglow (R=25.4, V=25.8, 47.7 days after the burst) favor a scenario in which the optical light follows a pure power-law decay with an index of alpha approximately -1.0. We find no evidence for a contribution from a supernova like SN 1998bw. This suggests that either there are multiple classes of long-duration gamma-ray bursts or that the peak luminosity of the supernova was more than 1.5 mag fainter than SN 1998bw. The HST images and EFOSC2 spectra indicate that the gamma-ray burst was located in a bright, extended feature (possibly a star-forming region) 1.4 kpc from the nucleus of a 0.2L*B galaxy at z=0.434, possibly a Seyfert 2 galaxy. The late-time afterglow and host galaxy of GRB 990712 bear some resemblance to those of GRB 970508. PMID:10813669

  4. Was the X-ray Afterglow of GRB 970815 Detected?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirabal, N.; Halpern, J. P.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Mukherjee, R.

    2004-09-01

    GRB 970815 was a well-localized gamma-ray burst (GRB) detected by the All-Sky Monitor (ASM) on the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) for which no afterglow was identified despite follow-up ASCA and ROSAT pointings and optical imaging to limiting magnitude R > 23. While an X-ray source, AX/RX J1606.8+8130, was detected just outside the ASM error box, it was never associated with the GRB because it was not clearly fading and because no optical afterglow was ever discovered. We recently made deep optical observations of the AX/RX J1606.8+8130 position, which is blank to a limit of V > 24.3 and I > 24.0, implying an X-ray-to-optical flux ratio fX/fV > 500. In view of this extreme limit, we analyze and reevaluate the ASCA and ROSAT data and conclude that the X-ray source AX/RX J1606.8+8130 was indeed the afterglow of GRB 970815, which corresponds to an optically ``dark'' GRB. Alternatively, if AX/RX J1608+8130 is discovered to be a persistent source, then it could be associated with EGRET source 3EG J1621+8203, whose error box includes this position.

  5. TWO POPULATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURST RADIO AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, P. J.; Gaensler, B. M.; Murphy, T.

    2013-10-20

    The detection rate of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows is ∼30% at radio wavelengths, much lower than in the X-ray (∼95%) or optical (∼70%) bands. The cause of this low radio detection rate has previously been attributed to limited observing sensitivity. We use visibility stacking to test this idea, and conclude that the low detection rate is instead due to two intrinsically different populations of GRBs: radio-bright and radio-faint. We calculate that no more than 70% of GRB afterglows are truly radio-bright, leaving a significant population of GRBs that lack a radio afterglow. These radio-bright GRBs have higher gamma-ray fluence, isotropic energies, X-ray fluxes, and optical fluxes than the radio-faint GRBs, thus confirming the existence of two physically distinct populations. We suggest that the gamma-ray efficiency of the prompt emission is responsible for the difference between the two populations. We also discuss the implications for future radio and optical surveys.

  6. Study of argon flowing afterglow with nitrogen injection

    SciTech Connect

    Mazánková, V.; Krčma, F.; Trunec, D.

    2013-10-28

    In this work, the reaction kinetics in argon flowing afterglow with nitrogen addition was studied by optical emission spectroscopy. The DC flowing post-discharge in pure argon was created in quartz tube at the total gas pressure of 1000 Pa and discharge power of 60 W. The nitrogen was added into the afterglow at the distance of 9 cm behind the active discharge. The optical emission spectra were measured along the flow tube. The argon spectral lines and after nitrogen addition also nitrogen second positive system (SPS) were identified in the spectra. The measurement of spatial dependence of SPS intensity showed a very slow decay of the intensity and the decay rate did not depend on the nitrogen concentration. In order to explain this behavior a kinetic model for reaction in afterglow was developed. This model showed that C {sup 3}Π{sub u} state of molecular nitrogen, which is the upper state of SPS emission, is produced by excitation transfer from argon metastables to nitrogen molecules. However, the argon metastables are also produced at Ar{sub 2}{sup +} ion recombination with electrons and this limits the decay of argon metastable concentration and it results in very slow decay of SPS intensity.

  7. The quest for short GRB radio afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlon, Davide; Gaensler, Bryan; Murphy, Tara; Hancock, Paul; Bell, Martin; Bannister, Keith; Greiner, Jochen; Klose, Sylvio; Ghirlanda, Giancarlo

    2014-10-01

    Short γ-ray bursts (SGRBs) are the most elusive among GRBs with just a few of them having being studied pan- chromatically. Only three SGRBs have been detected in the radio band in the last 14 years. Radio observations of short GRBs should provide fundamental parameters of the physical process acting in these sources and on the nature of their progenitors. The detection of even a few more short GRBs in the radio band could constrain their true energetics, their radiative efficiency and the density of the environment where they happen (with immediate implications on the nature of their progenitors). The proposed joint radio-optical observations, will allow us for the first time to probe the hydrodynamics of the explosion and the radiation mechanism. We were graded 3.8 for two semesters, but the NAPA was not triggered.

  8. Langmuir wave dispersion relation in non-Maxwellian plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ouazene, M.; Annou, R.

    2010-05-15

    The Langmuir wave dispersion relation is derived in partially ionized plasmas, where free electrons are confined to move in a nearest neighbor ions' potential well. The equilibrium velocity distribution function experiences then, a departure from Maxwell distribution function. The effect of the non-Maxwellian character of the distribution function on the Langmuir phase and group velocities as well as the phase matching conditions and the nonlinear growth rate of decay instability is investigated. The proposed Langmuir wave dispersion relation is relevant to dense and cryogenic plasmas.

  9. On the theory of Langmuir waves in a quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzelev, M. V.

    2010-04-15

    Nonlinear quantum-mechanical equations are derived for Langmuir waves in an isotropic electron collisionless plasma. A general analysis of dispersion relations is carried out for complex spectra of Langmuir waves and van Kampen waves in a quantum plasma with an arbitrary electron momentum distribution. Quantum nonlinear collisionless Landau damping in Maxwellian and degenerate plasmas is studied. It is shown that collisionless damping of Langmuir waves (including zero sound) occurs in collisionless plasmas due to quantum correction in the Cherenkov absorption condition, which is a purely quantum effect. Solutions to the quantum dispersion equation are obtained for a degenerate plasma.

  10. Relativistically strong Langmuir turbulence in the kinetic regime

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X. L.; Liu, S. Q.; Li, X. Q.

    2011-08-15

    Using a kinetic description, the relativistically strong Langmuir turbulence is investigated, which has considered the nonlinear wave-wave, wave-particle interactions and the relativistic effects of electrons. The relativistic Zakharov equations have been obtained. On the basis of these equations, dynamics of collapse has been studied. It is shown that the field strength of relativistic Langmuir plasmons will increase and the ponderomotive expulsion of particles gives rise to the formation of density caviton during the collapsing, which is useful for understanding the natural structural element of relativistically strong Langmuir turbulence.

  11. Two-component model of strong Langmuir turbulence - Scalings, spectra, and statistics of Langmuir waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, P. A.; Newman, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    A simple two-component model of strong turbulence that makes clear predictions for the scalings, spectra, and statistics of Langmuir waves is developed. Scalings of quantities such as energy density, power input, dissipation power wave collapse, and number density of collapsing objects are investigated in detail and found to agree well with model predictions. The nucleation model of wave-packet formation is strongly supported by the results. Nucleation proceeds with energy flowing from background to localized states even in the absence of a driver. Modulational instabilities play little or no role in maintaining the turbulent state when significant density nonuniformities are present.

  12. 'Self-absorbed' GeV light curves of gamma-ray burst afterglows

    SciTech Connect

    Panaitescu, A.; Vestrand, W. T.; Woźniak, P.

    2014-06-10

    We investigate the effect that the absorption of high-energy (above 100 MeV) photons produced in gamma-ray burst afterglow shocks has on the light curves and spectra of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) afterglows. Afterglows produced by the interaction of a relativistic outflow with a wind-like medium peak when the blast wave deceleration sets in, and the afterglow spectrum could be hardening before that peak, as the optical thickness to pair formation is decreasing. In contrast, in afterglows produced in the interaction with a homogeneous medium, the optical thickness to pair formation should increase and yield a light curve peak when it reaches unity, followed by a fast light curve decay, accompanied by spectral softening. If energy is injected in the blast wave, then the accelerated increase of the optical thickness yields a convex afterglow light curve. Other features, such as a double-peak light curve or a broad hump, can arise from the evolution of the optical thickness to photon-photon absorption. Fast decays and convex light curves are seen in a few LAT afterglows, but the expected spectral softening is rarely seen in (and difficult to measure with) LAT observations. Furthermore, for the effects of photon-photon attenuation to shape the high-energy afterglow light curve without attenuating it too much, the ejecta initial Lorentz factor must be in a relatively narrow range (50-200), which reduces the chance of observing those effects.

  13. Experimental signatures of localization in Langmuir wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, H.A.; DuBois, D.F.; Russell, D.; Bezzerides, B.

    1988-01-01

    Features in certain laser-plasma and ionospheric experiments are identified with the basic properties of Langmuir wave turbulence. Also, a model of caviton nucleation is presented which leads to certain novel scaling predictions. 12 refs., 19 figs.

  14. Comparative analyses of plasma probe diagnostics techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Godyak, V. A.; Alexandrovich, B. M.

    2015-12-21

    The subject of this paper is a comparative analysis of the plasma parameters inferred from the classical Langmuir probe procedure, from different theories of the ion current to the probe, and from measured electron energy distribution function (EEDF) obtained by double differentiation of the probe characteristic. We concluded that the plasma parameters inferred from the classical Langmuir procedure can be subjected to significant inaccuracy due to the non-Maxwellian EEDF, uncertainty of locating the plasma potential, and the arbitrariness of the ion current approximation. The plasma densities derived from the ion part of the probe characteristics diverge by as much as an order of magnitude from the density calculated according to Langmuir procedure or calculated as corresponding integral of the measured EEDF. The electron temperature extracted from the ion part is always subjected to uncertainty. Such inaccuracy is attributed to modification of the EEDF for fast electrons due to inelastic electron collisions, and to deficiencies in the existing ion current theories; i.e., unrealistic assumptions about Maxwellian EEDFs, underestimation of the ion collisions and the ion ambipolar drift, and discounting deformation of the one-dimensional structure of the region perturbed by the probe. We concluded that EEDF measurement is the single reliable probe diagnostics for the basic research and industrial applications of highly non-equilibrium gas discharge plasmas. Examples of EEDF measurements point up importance of examining the probe current derivatives in real time and reiterate significance of the equipment technical characteristics, such as high energy resolution and wide dynamic range.

  15. Electron acceleration by parametrically excited Langmuir waves. [in ionospheric modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fejer, J. A.; Graham, K. N.

    1974-01-01

    Simple physical arguments are used to estimate the downward-going energetic electron flux due to parametrically excited Langmuir waves in ionospheric modification experiments. The acceleration mechanism is a single velocity reversal as seen in the frame of the Langmuir wave. The flux is sufficient to produce the observed ionospheric airglow if focusing-type instabilities are invoked to produce moderate local enhancements of the pump field.

  16. THE LATE PEAKING AFTERGLOW OF GRB 100418A

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, F. E.; Holland, S. T.; Sakamoto, T.; Antonelli, L. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Siegel, M. H.; Covino, S.; Fugazza, D.; De Pasquale, M.; Oates, S. R.; Evans, P. A.; O'Brien, P. T.; Osborne, J. P.; Pagani, C.; Liang, E. W.; Wu, X. F.; Zhang, B.

    2011-02-01

    GRB 100418A is a long gamma-ray burst (GRB) at redshift z = 0.6235 discovered with the Swift Gamma-ray Burst Explorer with unusual optical and X-ray light curves. After an initial short-lived, rapid decline in X-rays, the optical and X-ray light curves observed with Swift are approximately flat or rising slightly out to at least {approx}7 x 10{sup 3} s after the trigger, peak at {approx}5 x 10{sup 4} s, and then follow an approximately power-law decay. Such a long optical plateau and late peaking is rarely seen in GRB afterglows. Observations with Rapid Eye Mount during a gap in the Swift coverage indicate a bright optical flare at {approx}2.5 x 10{sup 4} s. The long plateau phase of the afterglow is interpreted using either a model with continuous injection of energy into the forward shock of the burst or a model in which the jet of the burst is viewed off-axis. In both models the isotropic kinetic energy in the late afterglow after the plateau phase is {>=}10{sup 2} times the 10{sup 51} erg of the prompt isotropic gamma-ray energy release. The energy injection model is favored because the off-axis jet model would require the intrinsic T{sub 90} for the GRB jet viewed on-axis to be very short, {approx}10 ms, and the intrinsic isotropic gamma-ray energy release and the true jet energy to be much higher than the typical values of known short GRBs. The non-detection of a jet break up to t {approx} 2 x 10{sup 6} s indicates a jet half-opening angle of at least {approx}14{sup 0}, and a relatively high-collimation-corrected jet energy of E{sub jet} {>=} 10{sup 52} erg.

  17. The Late Peaking Afterglow of GR8 100418A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Frank; Antonelli, L. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Covino, S.; dePasquale, M.; Evans, P. A.; Fugazza, D.; Holland, S. T.; Liang, E. W.; OBrien, P. T.; Osborne, J. P.; Pagani, C.; Sakamoto, T.; Siegel, M. H.; Wu, X. F.; Zhang, B.

    2010-01-01

    GRB 100418A is a long Gamma-Ray Burst at redshift z=0.6235 discovered with the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer with unusual optical and X-ray light curves ' After an initial short-lived, rapid decline in X-rays, the optical and X-ray light curves observed with Swift are approximately flat or rising slightly out to at least approx.7 ks after the trigger, peak at approx.50 ks, and then follow an approximately power-law decay. Such a long optical plateau and late peaking is rarely seen in 6R8 afterglows. Observations with REM during a gap in the Swift coverage indicate a bright optical flare at approx.25 ks, The long plateau phase of the afterglow is interpreted using either a model with continuous injection of energy into the forward shock of the burst or a model in which the 'et of the burst is viewed off-axis. In both models the isotropic kinetic energy in the late afterglow after the plateau phase is >100 times the 10(exp 51) erg of the prompt isotropic gamma-ray energy release. The energy injection model is favored because the off-axis 'et model would require the intrinsic $T f801$ for the GR8 'et viewed on-axis to be very short, approx.10 ms, and the intrinsic isotropic gamma-ray energy release and the true jet energy to be much higher than the typical values of known short GRBs^ The non-detection of a 'et break up to approx.2 Ms indicates a jet half-opening angle of at least 14 degrees, and a relatively high collimation-corrected 'et energy of at least 10(exp 52) erg.

  18. On the optical and X-ray afterglows of gamma ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dado, S.; Dar, A.; De Rújula, A.

    2002-06-01

    We severely criticize the consuetudinary analysis of the afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in the conical-ejection fireball scenarios. We argue that, instead, recent observations imply that the long-duration GRBs and their afterglows are produced by highly relativistic jets of cannonballs (CBs) emitted in supernova explosions. The CBs are heated by their collision with the supernova shell. The GRB is the boosted surface radiation the CBs emit as they reach the transparent outskirts of the shell. The exiting CBs further decelerate by sweeping up interstellar matter (ISM). The early X-ray afterglow is dominated by thermal bremsstrahlung from the cooling CBs, the optical afterglow by synchrotron radiation from the ISM electrons swept up by the CBs. We show that this model fits simply and remarkably well all the measured optical afterglows of the 15 GRBs with known redshift, including that of GRB 990123, for which unusually prompt data are available. We demonstrate that GRB 980425 was a normal GRB produced by SN1998bw, with standard X-ray and optical afterglows. We find that the very peculiar afterglow of GRB 970508 can be explained if its CBs encountered a significant jump in density as they moved through the ISM. The afterglows of the nearest 8 of the known-redshift GRBs show various degrees of evidence for an association with a supernova akin to SN1998bw. In all other cases such an association, even if present, would have been undetectable with the best current photometric sensitivities. This gives strong support to the proposition that most, maybe all, of the long-duration GRBs are associated with supernovae. Although our emphasis is on optical afterglows, we also provide an excellent description of X-ray afterglows. Figures \\ref{fig228} to \\ref{X1216} are only available in electronic form at http:/www.edpsciences.org

  19. Study of nitrogen flowing afterglow with mercury vapor injection

    SciTech Connect

    Mazánková, V. Krčma, F.; Trunec, D.

    2014-10-21

    The reaction kinetics in nitrogen flowing afterglow with mercury vapor addition was studied by optical emission spectroscopy. The DC flowing post-discharge in pure nitrogen was created in a quartz tube at the total gas pressure of 1000 Pa and discharge power of 130 W. The mercury vapors were added into the afterglow at the distance of 30 cm behind the active discharge. The optical emission spectra were measured along the flow tube. Three nitrogen spectral systems – the first positive, the second positive, and the first negative, and after the mercury vapor addition also the mercury resonance line at 254 nm in the spectrum of the second order were identified. The measurement of the spatial dependence of mercury line intensity showed very slow decay of its intensity and the decay rate did not depend on the mercury concentration. In order to explain this behavior, a kinetic model for the reaction in afterglow was developed. This model showed that the state Hg(6 {sup 3}P{sub 1}), which is the upper state of mercury UV resonance line at 254 nm, is produced by the excitation transfer from nitrogen N{sub 2}(A{sup 3}Σ{sup +}{sub u}) metastables to mercury atoms. However, the N{sub 2}(A{sup 3}Σ{sup +}{sub u}) metastables are also produced by the reactions following the N atom recombination, and this limits the decay of N{sub 2}(A{sup 3}Σ{sup +}{sub u}) metastable concentration and results in very slow decay of mercury resonance line intensity. It was found that N atoms are the most important particles in this late nitrogen afterglow, their volume recombination starts a chain of reactions which produce excited states of molecular nitrogen. In order to explain the decrease of N atom concentration, it was also necessary to include the surface recombination of N atoms to the model. The surface recombination was considered as a first order reaction and wall recombination probability γ = (1.35 ± 0.04) × 10{sup −6} was determined from the experimental data. Also

  20. Study of nitrogen flowing afterglow with mercury vapor injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazánková, V.; Trunec, D.; Krčma, F.

    2014-10-01

    The reaction kinetics in nitrogen flowing afterglow with mercury vapor addition was studied by optical emission spectroscopy. The DC flowing post-discharge in pure nitrogen was created in a quartz tube at the total gas pressure of 1000 Pa and discharge power of 130 W. The mercury vapors were added into the afterglow at the distance of 30 cm behind the active discharge. The optical emission spectra were measured along the flow tube. Three nitrogen spectral systems - the first positive, the second positive, and the first negative, and after the mercury vapor addition also the mercury resonance line at 254 nm in the spectrum of the second order were identified. The measurement of the spatial dependence of mercury line intensity showed very slow decay of its intensity and the decay rate did not depend on the mercury concentration. In order to explain this behavior, a kinetic model for the reaction in afterglow was developed. This model showed that the state Hg(6 3P1), which is the upper state of mercury UV resonance line at 254 nm, is produced by the excitation transfer from nitrogen N2(A ^3 Σ ^+_u) metastables to mercury atoms. However, the N2(A ^3 Σ ^+_u) metastables are also produced by the reactions following the N atom recombination, and this limits the decay of N2(A ^3 Σ ^+_u) metastable concentration and results in very slow decay of mercury resonance line intensity. It was found that N atoms are the most important particles in this late nitrogen afterglow, their volume recombination starts a chain of reactions which produce excited states of molecular nitrogen. In order to explain the decrease of N atom concentration, it was also necessary to include the surface recombination of N atoms to the model. The surface recombination was considered as a first order reaction and wall recombination probability γ = (1.35 ± 0.04) × 10-6 was determined from the experimental data. Also sensitivity analysis was applied for the analysis of kinetic model in order to

  1. Reflections on Electric Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braithwaite, Nicholas

    2007-10-01

    One of the more immediate temptations for an experimental plasma physicist is to insert some kind of refractory, conducting material into a plasma, as a simple means of probing its charge composition. Irvine Langmuir tried it in the 1920s and was one of the first to develop an electrical probe method in his early work on electrical discharge plasmas. There are now numerous variations on the theme including planar, cylindrical and spherical geometry with single, double and triple probes. There are also probes that resonate, propagate and reciprocate. Some probes are electrostatic and others are electromagnetic; some are effectively wireless; most absorb but some emit. All types can be used in steady and transient plasmas, while special schemes have been devised for RF plasmas, using passive and active compensation. Magnetised plasmas pose further challenges. Each configuration is accompanied by assumptions that constrain both their applicability and the analytical methods that translate the measured currents and voltages variously into charge densities, space potentials, particle fluxes, energy distributions and measures of collisionality. This talk will take a broad look at the options and opportunities for electric probes, principally in the environment of non-equilibrium plasma.

  2. Linear and circular polarization in ultra-relativistic synchrotron sources - implications to GRB afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, Lara; Nakar, Ehud; Piran, Tsvi

    2016-01-01

    Polarization measurements from relativistic outflows are a valuable tool to probe the geometry of the emission region and the microphysics of the particle distribution. Indeed, the polarization level depends on (i) the local magnetic field orientation, (ii) the geometry of the emitting region with respect to the line of sight and (iii) the electron pitch angle distribution. Here we consider optically thin synchrotron emission and we extend the theory of circular polarization from a point source to an extended radially expanding relativistic jet. We present numerical estimates for both linear and circular polarization in such systems. We consider different configurations of the magnetic field, spherical and jetted outflows, isotropic and anisotropic pitch angle distributions, and outline the difficulty in obtaining the reported high level of circular polarization observed in the afterglow of Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) 121024A. We conclude that the origin of the observed polarization cannot be intrinsic to an optically thin synchrotron process, even when the electron pitch angle distribution is extremely anisotropic.

  3. Structural investigation of Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers of semifluorinated alkanes.

    PubMed

    Dynarowicz Łatka, Patrycja; Pérez-Morales, Marta; Muñoz, Eulogia; Broniatowski, Marcin; Martín-Romero, María T; Camacho, Luis

    2006-03-30

    The behavior of a semi-fluorinated alkane (C(10)F(21)C(19)H(39)) has been studied at the air-water interface by using surface pressure and surface potential-area isotherms as well as infrared spectroscopy for the Langmuir-Blodgett films. In addition, based on the quantum chemical PM3 semiempirical approach, the dimer structure was investigated, and the double helix was found to be the most stable conformation of the dimer. The obtained results allow us to imply that the phase transition observed in the course of the surface pressure/area isotherm is due to a conformational change originating from the double helix to a vertical, single helix configuration. PMID:16553421

  4. On the Afterglow and Progenitor of FRB 150418

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bing

    2016-05-01

    Keane et al. recently detected a fading radio source following FRB 150418, leading to the identification of a putative host galaxy at z = 0.492 ± 0.008. Assuming that the fading source is the afterglow of FRB 150418, I model the afterglow and constrain the isotropic energy of the explosion to be a few 1050 erg, comparable to that of a short-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB). The outflow may have a jet opening angle of ∼0.22 rad, so that the beaming-corrected energy is below 1049 erg. The results rule out most fast radio burst (FRB) progenitor models for this FRB, but may be consistent with either of the following two scenarios. The first scenario invokes a merger of an NS–NS binary, which produced an undetected short GRB and a supra-massive neutron star, which subsequently collapsed into a black hole, probably hundreds of seconds after the short GRB. The second scenario invokes a merger of a compact star binary (BH–BH, NS–NS, or BH–NS) system whose pre-merger dynamical magnetospheric activities made the FRB, which is followed by an undetected short GRB-like transient. The gravitational-wave (GW) event GW 150914 would be a sister of FRB 150418 in this second scenario. In both cases, one expects an exciting prospect of GW/FRB/GRB associations.

  5. Fermi and Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Population Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racusin, Judith I.

    2011-01-01

    The new and extreme population of GRBs detected by Fermi-LAT shows several new features in high energy gamma-rays that are providing interesting and unexpected clues into GRB prompt and afterglow emission mechanisms. Over the last 6 years, it has been Swift that has provided the robust data set of UV/optical and X-ray afterglow observations that opened many windows into components of GRB emission structure. The relationship between the LAT GRBs and the well studied, fainter, less energetic GRBs detected by Swift-BAT is only beginning to be explored by multi-wavelength studies. We explore the large sample of GRBs detected by BAT only, BAT and Fermi-GBM, and GBM and LAT, focusing on these samples separately in order to search for statistically significant differences between the populations, using only those GRBs with measured redshifts in order to physically characterize these objects. We disentangle which differences are instrumental selection effects versus intrinsic properties, in order to better understand the nature of the special characteristics of the LAT bursts.

  6. Fermi and Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Population Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racusin, J. L.; Oates, S. R.; Schady, P.; Burrows, D. N.; de Pasquale, M.; Donato, D.; Gehrels, N.; Koch, S.; McEnery, J.; Piran, T.; Roming, P.; Sakamoto, T.; Swenson, C.; Virgili, F.; Wanderman, D.; Zhang, B.

    2011-01-01

    The new and extreme population of GRBs detected by Fermi-LAT shows several new features in high energy gamma-rays that are providing interesting and unexpected clues into GRB prompt and afterglow emission mechanisms. Over the last 6 years, it has been Swift that has provided the robust data set of UV/optical and X-ray afterglow observations that opened many windows into components of GRB emission structure. The relationship between the LAT GRBs and the well studied, fainter, less energetic GRBs detected by Swift-BAT is only beginning to be explored by multiwavelength studies. We explore the large sample of GRBs detected by BAT only, BAT and Fermi-GBM, and GBM and LAT, focusing on these samples separately in order to search for statistically significant differences between the populations, using only those GRBs with measured redshifts in order to physically characterize these objects. We disentangle which differences are instrumental selection effects versus intrinsic properties, in order to better understand the nature of the special characteristics of the LAT bursts.

  7. Fermi and Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Population Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racusin, Judith L.; Oates, S. R.; Schady, P.; Burrows, D. N.; dePasquale, M.; Donato, D.; Gehrels, N.; Koch, S.; McEnery, J.; Piran, T.; Roming, P.; Sakamoto, T.; Swenson, C.; Troja, E.; Vasileiou, V.; Virgili, F.; Wanderman, D.; Zhang, B.

    2011-01-01

    The new and extreme population of GRBs detected by Fermi -LAT shows several new features in high energy gamma-rays that are providing interesting and unexpected clues into GRB prompt and afterglow emission mechanisms. Over the last 6 years, it has been Swift that has provided the robust dataset of UV/optical and X-ray afterglow observations that opened many windows into components of GRB emission structure. The relationship between the LAT detected GRBs and the well studied, fainter, less energetic GRBs detected by Swift -BAT is only beginning to be explored by multi-wavelength studies. We explore the large sample of GRBs detected by BAT only, BAT and Fermi -GBM, and GBM and LAT, focusing on these samples separately in order to search for statistically significant differences between the populations, using only those GRBs with measured redshifts in order to physically characterize these objects. We disentangle which differences are instrumental selection effects versus intrinsic properties, in order to better understand the nature of the special characteristics of the LAT bursts.

  8. FERMI AND SWIFT GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOW POPULATION STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Racusin, J. L.; Donato, D.; Gehrels, N.; McEnery, J.; Sakamoto, T.; Troja, E.; Vasileiou, V.; Oates, S. R.; De Pasquale, M.; Schady, P.; Burrows, D. N.; Koch, S.; Roming, P.; Swenson, C.; Piran, T.; Wanderman, D.; Virgili, F.; Zhang, B.

    2011-09-10

    The new and extreme population of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) shows several new features in high-energy gamma rays that are providing interesting and unexpected clues into GRB prompt and afterglow emission mechanisms. Over the last six years, it has been Swift that has provided the robust data set of UV/optical and X-ray afterglow observations that opened many windows into components of GRB emission structure. The relationship between the LAT-detected GRBs and the well-studied, fainter, and less energetic GRBs detected by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope is only beginning to be explored by multi-wavelength studies. We explore the large sample of GRBs detected by BAT only, BAT and the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), and GBM and LAT, focusing on these samples separately in order to search for statistically significant differences between the populations, using only those GRBs with measured redshifts in order to physically characterize these objects. We disentangle which differences are instrumental selection effects versus intrinsic properties in order to better understand the nature of the special characteristics of the LAT bursts.

  9. Gamma-Ray Bursts: Afterglows and Central Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, K. S.; Lu, T.

    2001-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most intense transient gamma-ray events in the sky; this, together with the strong evidence (the isotropic and inhomogeneous distribution of GRBs detected by BASTE) that they are located at cosmological distances, makes them the most energetic events ever known. For example, the observed radiation energies of some GRBs are equivalent to the total convertion into radiation of the mass energy of more than one solar mass. This is thousand times stronger than the energy of a supernova explosion. Some unconventional energy mechanism and extremely high conversion efficiency for these mysterious events are required. The discovery of host galaxies and association with supernovae at cosmological distances by the recently launched satellite of BeppoSAX and ground based radio and optical telescopes in GRB afterglow provides further support to the cosmological origin of GRBs and put strong constraints on their central engine. It is the aim of this article to review the possible central engines, energy mechanisms, dynamical and spectral evolution of GRBs, especially focusing on the afterglows in multi-wavebands.

  10. The hidden X-ray breaks in afterglow light curves

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, P. A.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Horst, A. J. van der; Starling, R. L. C.

    2008-05-22

    Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) afterglow observations in the Swift era have a perceived lack of achromatic jet breaks compared to the BeppoSAX, or pre-Swift era. Specifically, relatively few breaks, consistent with jet breaks, are observed in the X-ray light curves of these bursts. If these breaks are truly missing, it has serious consequences for the interpretation of GRB jet collimation and energy requirements, and the use of GRBs as standard candles.Here we address the issue of X-ray breaks which are possibly 'hidden' and hence the light curves are misinterpreted as being single power-laws. We show how a number of precedents, including GRB 990510 and GRB 060206, exist for such hidden breaks and how, even with the well sampled light curves of the Swift era, these breaks may be left misidentified. We do so by synthesising X-ray light curves and finding general trends via Monte Carlo analysis. Furthermore, in light of these simulations, we discuss how to best identify achromatic breaks in afterglow light curves via multi-wavelength analysis.

  11. Structural and Other Studies of Langmuir-Blodgett Films.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Maneesha

    Certain organic materials comprised of ampiphilic molecules will spread on the surface of water to form monolayer films known as Langmuir films. These films can be transferred to solid substrates by dipping the substrates in and out of the water. The films transfer to the substrates monolayer by monolayer and the resulting built-up films are known as Langmuir-Blodgett films. Langmuir-Blodgett films are very regular, with the planes aligned parallel to a high degree. This technique has potential for building structures that may exhibit unusual mechanical, optical, magnetic or electronic properties. Because the proposed uses of Langmuir-Blodgett films depend in a fundamental way on their structure, structural studies of Langmuir-Blodgett films are of great relevance. We have made Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett films of simple materials for the purpose of x-ray diffraction characterization. We have looked for differences between the structure of the materials in bulk form as compared with the structure in Langmuir -Blodgett film form. We have studied the in-plane structure of films of the lead salts of various fatty acids using both an external reflection geometry for samples made on glass slide substrates, and a transmission geometry for samples made on thin single crystal mica substrates. Information concerning the in-plane structure and correlations between the layers has been obtained. For the samples made on single crystal mica substrates, epitaxial growth has been observed, whereas on glass substrates the samples have been found to be powders in the plane. An anomalous intensity pattern has been observed for the in-plane and out-of-the -plane peaks. We have proposed a positioning of the hydrocarbon chans that nicely explains the data. We have investigated the conditions for transfer of films on the lipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, a primary consituent of cell membranes. We have succeeded in forming Langmuir-Blodgett films of this material by the addition of

  12. Analytically useful spectra excited in an atmospheric pressure active nitrogen afterglow

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, G.W.; D'Silva, A.P.; Fassel, V.A.

    1984-03-01

    An atmospheric pressure active nitrogen (APAN) discharge has been utilized for producing characteristic molecular emissions from nonmetallic species introduced into the afterglow region of the discharge. The addition of inorganic S-, P-, B-, Cl-, and Br-containing compounds into the afterglow has resulted in the formation of excited S/sub 2/, PN, BO, NCl, and NBr species, respectively. Intense molecular Br/sub 2/ emission and I/sub 2/ emission, as well as atomic I emission, have also been observed. Preliminary analytical utilization of the molecular or atomic emissions observed revealed that the APAN afterglow may serve as a potentially useful detector for the aforementioned elements.

  13. The Swift Discovery of X-ray Afterglows Accompanying Short Bursts from SGR 1900+14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakagawa, Y. E.; Sakamoto, T.; Sato, G.; Gehrels, N.; Hurley, K.; Palmer, D. M.

    2008-01-01

    The discovery of X-ray afterglows accompanying two short bursts from SGR1900+14 is presented. The afterglow luminosities at the end of each observation are lower by 30-50% than their initial luminosities, and decay with power law indices p approx. 0.2-0.4. Their initial bolometric luminosities are L approx. 10(exp 34)- 10(exp 35) erg/s. We discuss analogies and differences between the X-ray afterglows of SGR short bursts and short gamma-ray bursts.

  14. The distribution of equivalent widths in long GRB afterglow spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Thöne, C. C.; Christensen, L.; Gorosabel, J.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Schulze, S.; Jakobsson, P.; Wiersema, K.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Leloudas, G.; Zafar, T.; Malesani, D.; Hjorth, J.

    2012-12-01

    Context. The extreme brightness of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows and their simple spectral shape make them ideal beacons to study the interstellar medium of their host galaxies through absorption line spectroscopy at almost any redshift. Aims: We describe the distribution of rest-frame equivalent widths (EWs) of the most prominent absorption features in GRB afterglow spectra, providing the means to compare individual spectra to the sample and identify its peculiarities. Methods: Using 69 low-resolution GRB afterglow spectra, we conduct a study of the rest-frame EWs distribution of features with an average rest-frame EW larger than 0.5 Å. To compare an individual GRB with the sample, we develop EW diagrams as a graphical tool, and we give a catalogue with diagrams for the 69 spectra. We introduce a line strength parameter (LSP) that allows us to quantify the strength of the absorption features in a GRB spectrum as compared to the sample by a single number. Using the distributions of EWs of single-species features, we derive the distribution of their column densities by a curve of growth (CoG) fit. Results: We find correlations between the LSP and the extinction of the GRB, the UV brightness of the host galaxies and the neutral hydrogen column density. However, we see no significant evolution of the LSP with the redshift. There is a weak correlation between the ionisation of the absorbers and the energy of the GRB, indicating that, either the GRB event is responsible for part of the ionisation, or that galaxies with high-ionisation media produce more energetic GRBs. Spectral features in GRB spectra are, on average, 2.5 times stronger than those seen in QSO intervening damped Lyman-α (DLA) systems and slightly more ionised. In particular we find a larger excess in the EW of C ivλλ1549 relative to QSO DLAs, which could be related to an excess of Wolf-Rayet stars in the environments of GRBs. From the CoG fitting we obtain an average number of components in the

  15. Child-Langmuir flow with periodically varying anode voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Rokhlenko, A.

    2015-02-15

    Using the Lagrangian technique, we study settled Child-Langmuir flows in a one dimensional planar diodes whose anode voltages periodically vary around given positive values. Our goal is to find analytically if the average currents in these systems can exceed the famous Child-Langmuir limit found for the stationary current a long time ago. The main result of our study is that in a periodic quasi-stationary regime the average current can be larger than the Child-Langmuir maximum even by 50% compared with its adiabatic average value. The cathode current in this case has the form of rectangular pulses which are formed by a very special triangular voltage modulation. This regime, i.e., periodicity, shape of pulses, and their amplitude, needs to be carefully chosen for the best performance.

  16. Langmuir wave decay in turbulent inhomogeneous solar wind plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafft, C.; Volokitin, A.

    2016-03-01

    Langmuir wave decay in solar wind plasmas typical of type III bursts' source regions near 1 AU have been reported by several spacecraft observations. In such plasmas, due to the presence of random density fluctuations, wave decay occurs usually simultaneously and compete with other coupling effects between the fields and the density irregularities, as reflection, scattering and/or refraction processes. Numerical simulations show that resonant three-wave coupling processes including several cascades of Langmuir wave decay can occur in such plasmas, leading to wave energy transfer to smaller wavenumbers k, as shown in the frame of weak turbulence theory. However, in such conditions, and contrary to what occurs in homogeneous plasmas, the decay process is localized in space at a given time. Moreover, wave-wave coupling plays a significant role in the modulation of the Langmuir waveforms, in agreement with recent space observations.

  17. Backward Raman amplification in the Langmuir wavebreaking regime

    SciTech Connect

    Toroker, Z.; Malkin, V. M.; Fisch, N. J.

    2014-11-15

    In plasma-based backward Raman amplifiers, the output pulse intensity increases with the input pump pulse intensity, as long as the Langmuir wave mediating energy transfer from the pump to the seed pulse remains intact. However, at high pump intensity, the Langmuir wave breaks, at which point the amplification efficiency may no longer increase with the pump intensity. Numerical simulations presented here, employing a one-dimensional Vlasov-Maxwell code, show that, although the amplification efficiency remains high when the pump only mildly exceeds the wavebreaking threshold, the efficiency drops precipitously at larger pump intensities.

  18. Landau damping of Langmuir waves in non-Maxwellian plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ouazene, M.; Annou, R.

    2011-11-15

    As free electrons move in the nearest neighbour ion's potential well, the equilibrium velocity departs from Maxwell distribution. The effect of the non-Maxwellian velocity distribution function (NMVDF) on many properties of the plasma such as the transport coefficients, the kinetic energy, and the degree of ionization is found to be noticeable. A correction to the Langmuir wave dispersion relation is proved to arise due to the NMVDF as well [Phys. Plasmas 17, 052105 (2010)]. The study is extended hereafter to include the effect of NMVDF on the Landau damping of Langmuir wave.

  19. Delayed stimulated afterglow from holmium ions in crystals with coactivators

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, M.V.; Tkachuk, A.M.

    1980-12-01

    Delayed stimulated afterglow from holmium ions in ..cap alpha beta..-SrF/sub 2/-YF/sub 3/ crystals was observed and investigated. This took the form of several series of emission spikes separated by dark intervals after the action of a single pump pulse. The effect is attributed to some features of the mechanism for population of the upper active level of the lasing holmium ion in the presence of sensitizer ions. It is found that in order to observe the effect, the system must incorporate a metastable level from which energy transfer to the active level provides an independent ''additional pumping'' system for the holmium ions acting over times much longer than the pump pulse duration.

  20. Effect of Dust Extinction on Gamma-ray Burst Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lŭ, Gu-Jing; Shao, Lang; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Wei, Da-Ming

    2011-10-01

    In order to study the effect of dust extinction on the afterglow of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), we carry out numerical calculations with high precision based on the rigorous Mie theory and the latest optical properties of interstellar dust grains, and analyze the different extinction curves produced by dust grains with different physical parameters. Our results indicate that the absolute extinction quantity is substantially determined by the medium density and metallicity. However, the shape of the extinction curve is mainly determined by the size distribution of the dust grains. If the dust grains aggregate to form larger ones, they will cause a flatter or grayer extinction curve with lower extinction quantity. On the contrary, if the dust grains are disassociated to smaller ones due to some uncertain processes, they will cause a steeper extinction curve with larger amount of extinction. These results might provide an important insight into understanding the origin of the optically dark GRBs.

  1. Pink splash of active nitrogen in the discharge afterglow

    SciTech Connect

    Akishev, Yu. S.; Grushin, M. E.; Karal'nik, V. B.; Petryakov, A. V.; Trushkin, N. I.

    2007-09-15

    Results are presented from experimental studies of the glow dynamics of active nitrogen in the stage of its excitation by a current pulse and during the discharge afterglow. The mechanism is proposed for the generation of a light splash in a highly activated nitrogen after the end of its pulsed excitation. The key role in the generation of this splash is played by the D-V processes, by which the dissociation energy is transferred to the vibrational degrees of freedom in the course of recombination of nitrogen atoms, and the V-E processes, by which the vibrational energy of highly excited molecules N{sub 2}(X, v {>=} 25-27) is transferred to the emitting electronic states N{sub 2}(B, v) after the V-V delay. Results of simulations based on the mechanism proposed are also presented.

  2. Determination of hexabromocyclododecane by flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Smoluch, Marek; Silberring, Jerzy; Reszke, Edward; Kuc, Joanna; Grochowalski, Adam

    2014-10-01

    The first application of a flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow ion source for mass spectrometry (FAPA-MS) for the chemical characterization and determination of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is presented. The samples of technical HBCD and expanded polystyrene foam (EPS) containing HBCD as a flame retardant were prepared by dissolving the appropriate solids in dichloromethane. The ionization of HBCD was achieved with a prototype FAPA source. The ions were detected in the negative-ion mode. The ions corresponding to a deprotonated HBCD species (m/z 640.7) as well as chlorine (m/z 676.8), nitrite (m/z 687.8) and nitric (m/z 703.8) adducts were observed in the spectra. The observed isotope pattern is characteristic for a compound containing six bromine atoms. This technique is an effective approach to detect HBCD, which is efficiently ionized in a liquid phase, resulting in high detection efficiency and sensitivity. PMID:25059130

  3. Optical and NIR observations of the afterglow of GRB 020813

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covino, S.; Malesani, D.; Tavecchio, F.; Antonelli, L. A.; Arkharov, A.; Di Paola, A.; Fugazza, D.; Ghisellini, G.; Larionov, V.; Lazzati, D.; Mannucci, F.; Masetti, N.; Barrena, R.; Benetti, S.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Di Serego Alighieri, S.; Fiore, F.; Frontera, F.; Fruchter, A.; Ghinassi, F.; Gladders, M.; Hall, P. B.; Israel, G. L.; Klose, S.; Magazzù, A.; Palazzi, E.; Pedani, M.; Pian, E.; Romano, P.; Stefanon, M.; Stella, L.

    2003-06-01

    We present optical and near-infrared (NIR) photometry of the bright afterglow of GRB 020813. Our data span from 3 hours to 4 days after the GRB event. A rather sharp achromatic break is present in the light curve, 14 hours after the trigger. In the framework of jetted fireballs, this break corresponds to a jet half-opening angle of 1.9degr +/-0.2degr , the smallest value ever inferred for a GRB. We discuss our results in the framework of currently available models, and find that they have problems in explaining the joint temporal and spectral properties, and in particular the slow decay before the break. Based on observations partly made with ESO telescopes at the Paranal Observatories under programme Id 69.D-0461 and with the Italian TNG telescope under programme TAC 8_01(47).

  4. Alternate Search for Jet Breaks in Long GRB X-ray Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmire, Gordon

    2014-09-01

    In the standard fireball models of GRB afterglows, the jet opening angle can be determined from the achromatic jet break by measuring the time at which this break in the light curves occurs. This measure allows us to estimate the energy budget of the GRB explosion. Swift XRT observations have shown that jet breaks are not observed in the first several days or weeks of a typical X-ray afterglow. We have already exploited Chandra's better sensitivity to observe late XRT afterglows and put more stringent constraints on jet break times, and started a program to interpret results with more realistic jet models. We propose to observe 3 more exceptionally bright X-ray afterglows of GRBs from the past year that in absence of jet break would still be detectable in this cycle.

  5. Hidden in the light: Magnetically induced afterglow from trapped chameleon fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gies, Holger; Mota, David F.; Shaw, Douglas J.

    2008-01-01

    We propose an afterglow phenomenon as a unique trace of chameleon fields in optical experiments. The vacuum interaction of a laser pulse with a magnetic field can lead to a production and subsequent trapping of chameleons in the vacuum chamber, owing to their mass dependence on the ambient matter density. Magnetically induced reconversion of the trapped chameleons into photons creates an afterglow over macroscopic timescales that can conveniently be searched for by current optical experiments. We show that the chameleon parameter range accessible to available laboratory technology is comparable to scales familiar from astrophysical stellar energy-loss arguments. We analyze quantitatively the afterglow properties for various experimental scenarios and discuss the role of potential background and systematic effects. We conclude that afterglow searches represent an ideal tool to aim at the production and detection of cosmologically relevant scalar fields in the laboratory.

  6. MAGIC upper limits on the GRB 090102 afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksić, J.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Babic, A.; de Almeida, U. Barres; Barrio, J. A.; González, J. Becerra; Bednarek, W.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Boller, A.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Fidalgo, D. Carreto; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Cossio, L.; Covino, S.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Caneva, G.; De Lotto, B.; Mendez, C. Delgado; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Prester, D. Dominis; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Eisenacher, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Farina, E.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Frantzen, K.; Fruck, C.; López, R. J. García; Garczarczyk, M.; Terrats, D. Garrido; Gaug, M.; Giavitto, G.; Godinović, N.; Munoz, A. González; Gozzini, S. R.; Hadamek, A.; Hadasch, D.; Herrero, A.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Idec, W.; Kadenius, V.; Knoetig, M. L.; Krähenbühl, T.; Krause, J.; Kushida, J.; Barbera, A. La; Lelas, D.; Lewandowska, N.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López-Coto, R.; López, M.; López-Oramas, A.; Lorenz, E.; Lozano, I.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Masbou, J.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moldón, J.; Moralejo, A.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Nakajima, D.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nilsson, K.; Nowak, N.; Orito, R.; Overkemping, A.; Paiano, S.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Partini, S.; Persic, M.; Prada, F.; Moroni, P. G. Prada; Prandini, E.; Preziuso, S.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Garcia, J. Rodriguez; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, K.; Saito, T.; Salvati, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Stamatescu, V.; Stamerra, A.; Storz, J.; Sun, S.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Thaele, J.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Uellenbeck, M.; Vogler, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Weitzel, Q.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.; Bouvier, A.; Hayashida, M.; Tajima, H.; Longo, F.

    2014-02-01

    Indications of a GeV component in the emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are known since the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope observations during the 1990s and they have been confirmed by the data of the Fermi satellite. These results have, however, shown that our understanding of GRB physics is still unsatisfactory. The new generation of Cherenkov observatories and in particular the MAGIC telescope, allow for the first time the possibility to extend the measurement of GRBs from several tens up to hundreds of GeV energy range. Both leptonic and hadronic processes have been suggested to explain the possible GeV/TeV counterpart of GRBs. Observations with ground-based telescopes of very high energy (VHE) photons (E > 30 GeV) from these sources are going to play a key role in discriminating among the different proposed emission mechanisms, which are barely distinguishable at lower energies. MAGIC telescope observations of the GRB 090102 (z = 1.547) field and Fermi Large Area Telescope data in the same time interval are analysed to derive upper limits of the GeV/TeV emission. We compare these results to the expected emissions evaluated for different processes in the framework of a relativistic blastwave model for the afterglow. Simultaneous upper limits with Fermi and a Cherenkov telescope have been derived for this GRB observation. The results we obtained are compatible with the expected emission although the difficulties in predicting the HE and VHE emission for the afterglow of this event makes it difficult to draw firmer conclusions. Nonetheless, MAGIC sensitivity in the energy range of overlap with space-based instruments (above about 40 GeV) is about one order of magnitude better with respect to Fermi. This makes evident the constraining power of ground-based observations and shows that the MAGIC telescope has reached the required performance to make possible GRB multiwavelength studies in the VHE range.

  7. High-frequency Probing Diagnostic for Hall Current Plasma Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    A.A. Litvak; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2001-10-25

    High-frequency oscillations (1-100 MHz) in Hall thrusters have apparently eluded significant experimental scrutiny. A diagnostic setup, consisting of a single Langmuir probe, a special shielded probe connector-positioner, and an electronic impedance-matching circuit, was successfully built and calibrated. Through simultaneous high-frequency probing of the Hall thruster plasma at multiple locations, high-frequency plasma waves have been identified and characterized for various thruster operating conditions.

  8. Influence of plasma diffusion losses on dust charge relaxation in discharge afterglow

    SciTech Connect

    Coueedel, L.; Mikikian, M.; Boufendi, L.

    2008-09-07

    The influence of diffusive losses on residual dust charge in a complex plasma afterglow has been investigated. The dust residual charges were simulated based on a model developed to describe complex plasma decay. The experimental and simulated data show that the transition from ambipolar to free diffusion in the decaying plasma plays a significant role in determining the residual dust particle charges. The presence of positively charged dust particles is explained by a broadening of the charge distribution function in the afterglow plasma.

  9. Escherichia coli Morphological Changes and Lipid A Removal Induced by Reduced Pressure Nitrogen Afterglow Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Zerrouki, Hayat; Rizzati, Virginie; Bernis, Corinne; Nègre-Salvayre, Anne; Sarrette, Jean Philippe; Cousty, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Lipid A is a major hydrophobic component of lipopolysaccharides (endotoxin) present in the membrane of most Gram-negative bacteria, and the major responsible for the bioactivity and toxicity of the endotoxin. Previous studies have demonstrated that the late afterglow region of flowing post-discharges at reduced pressure (1-20 Torr) can be used for the sterilization of surfaces and of the reusable medical instrumentation. In the present paper, we show that the antibacterial activity of a pure nitrogen afterglow can essentially be attributed to the large concentrations of nitrogen atoms present in the treatment area and not to the UV radiation of the afterglow. In parallel, the time variation of the inactivation efficiency quantified by the log reduction of the initial Escherichia coli (E. coli) population is correlated with morphologic changes observed on the bacteria by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for increasing afterglow exposure times. The effect of the afterglow exposure is also studied on pure lipid A and on lipid A extracted from exposed E. coli bacteria. We report that more than 60% of lipid A (pure or bacteria-extracted) are lost with the used operating conditions (nitrogen flow QN2 = 1 standard liter per minute (slpm), pressure p = 5 Torr, microwave injected power PMW = 200 W, exposure time: 40 minutes). The afterglow exposure also results in a reduction of the lipid A proinflammatory activity, assessed by the net decrease of the redox-sensitive NFκB transcription factor nuclear translocation in murine aortic endothelial cells stimulated with control vs afterglow-treated (pure and extracted) lipid A. Altogether these results point out the ability of reduced pressure nitrogen afterglows to neutralize the cytotoxic components in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25837580

  10. Escherichia coli morphological changes and lipid A removal induced by reduced pressure nitrogen afterglow exposure.

    PubMed

    Zerrouki, Hayat; Rizzati, Virginie; Bernis, Corinne; Nègre-Salvayre, Anne; Sarrette, Jean Philippe; Cousty, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Lipid A is a major hydrophobic component of lipopolysaccharides (endotoxin) present in the membrane of most Gram-negative bacteria, and the major responsible for the bioactivity and toxicity of the endotoxin. Previous studies have demonstrated that the late afterglow region of flowing post-discharges at reduced pressure (1-20 Torr) can be used for the sterilization of surfaces and of the reusable medical instrumentation. In the present paper, we show that the antibacterial activity of a pure nitrogen afterglow can essentially be attributed to the large concentrations of nitrogen atoms present in the treatment area and not to the UV radiation of the afterglow. In parallel, the time variation of the inactivation efficiency quantified by the log reduction of the initial Escherichia coli (E. coli) population is correlated with morphologic changes observed on the bacteria by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for increasing afterglow exposure times. The effect of the afterglow exposure is also studied on pure lipid A and on lipid A extracted from exposed E. coli bacteria. We report that more than 60% of lipid A (pure or bacteria-extracted) are lost with the used operating conditions (nitrogen flow QN2 = 1 standard liter per minute (slpm), pressure p = 5 Torr, microwave injected power PMW = 200 W, exposure time: 40 minutes). The afterglow exposure also results in a reduction of the lipid A proinflammatory activity, assessed by the net decrease of the redox-sensitive NFκB transcription factor nuclear translocation in murine aortic endothelial cells stimulated with control vs afterglow-treated (pure and extracted) lipid A. Altogether these results point out the ability of reduced pressure nitrogen afterglows to neutralize the cytotoxic components in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25837580

  11. Theoretical Implications of Optical and X-ray Observations of Swift GRB Afterglows

    SciTech Connect

    Panaitescu, A.

    2007-08-21

    The Swift satellite has measured the X-ray emission of GRB afterglows starting from the burst epoch, filling thus a gap of about 2 decades in the temporal coverage of X-ray afterglows previously achieved. At the same time, the accurate localizations provided by Swift and their rapid dissemination has allowed ground-based telescopes to monitor the optical afterglow emission at comparably early epochs. Such optical and X-ray observations allows us to test more thoroughly the basic predictions of the relativistic blast-wave. Perhaps it is not an understatement to say that there were more surprises than anyone expected. A majority of Swift X-ray afterglows exhibit a slow-decay phase from 500 s to about 1 h after trigger, which indicates a long-lived process of energy injection into the blast-wave. At around 1 h, the X-ray decay steepens, indicating the end of significant energy addition to the forward shock. This steeper decay is consistent with the blast-wave model expectations but the 1 h break is, generally, not accompanied by a steepening of the optical light-curve, which indicates that forward-shock microphysical parameters are not constant, as was previously assumed and allowed by afterglow observations. A subsequent steepening of the X-ray light-curve decay, at about 1 d, was observed by Swift for only a few afterglows. This second break appears consistent with originating from the blast-wave collimation (a jet), but a better optical coverage is required to test that it is, indeed, a jet-break. Although the jet model has been the subject of many tens of papers, pre-Swift optical and X-ray observations of GRB afterglows have provided little proof that the 1 d optical breaks observed in a dozen afterglows are consistent with the expectations for a collimated outflow.

  12. Terahertz generation by beating two Langmuir waves in a warm and collisional plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Qiao, Xin; Cheng, Li-Hong; Tang, Rong-An; Zhang, Ai-Xia; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2015-09-15

    Terahertz (THz) radiation generated by beating of two Langmuir waves in a warm and collisional plasma is discussed theoretically. The critical angle between the two Langmuir waves and the critical wave-length (wave vector) of Langmuir waves for generating THz radiation are obtained analytically. Furthermore, the maximum radiation energy is obtained. We find that the critical angle, the critical wave-length, and the generated radiation energy strongly depend on plasma temperature and wave-length of the Langmuir waves. That is, the THz radiation generated by beating of two Langmuir waves in a warm and collisional plasma can be controlled by adjusting the plasma temperature and the Langmuir wave-length.

  13. DISCOVERY OF A TIGHT CORRELATION FOR GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS WITH 'CANONICAL' LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Ostrowski, Michal; Willingale, Richard; Capozziello, Salvatore; Cardone, Vincenzo Fabrizio E-mail: mio@oa.uj.edu.p E-mail: capozziello@na.infn.i

    2010-10-20

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed up to redshifts z>8 are fascinating objects to study due to their still unexplained relativistic outburst mechanisms and their possible use to test cosmological models. Our analysis of 77 GRB afterglows with known redshifts revealed a physical subsample of long GRBs with the canonical plateau breaking to power-law light curves with a significant luminosity L*{sub X}-break time T*{sub a} correlation in the GRB rest frame. This subsample forms approximately the upper envelope of the studied distribution. We have also found a similar relation for a small sample of GRB afterglows that belong to the intermediate class between the short and the long ones. It proves that within the full sample of afterglows there exist physical subclasses revealed here by tight correlations of their afterglow properties. The afterglows with regular ('canonical') light curves obey not only the mentioned tight physical scaling, but-for a given T*{sub a}-the more regular progenitor explosions lead to preferentially brighter afterglows.

  14. Synthesis and afterglow properties of MgAl2O4:Eu2+, Dy3+ nanopowders.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xuhui; Wang, Yuhua; Gong, Yu; Li, Yanqin

    2011-11-01

    The MgAl2O4:Eu2+, Dy3+ nanophosphors with different particle sizes have been synthesized through a simple and inexpensive precipitate approach followed by a post-annealing process. The structure and morphology of the phosphor are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). According to XRD and TEM results, the particle size of MgAl2O4:Eu2+, Dy3+ could be controlled via changing the ratio of MgSO4/Al2O3, and the obtained samples possess regular morphology. The afterglow properties of MgAl2O4:Eu2+, Dy3+ nanophosphors as a function of particle sizes are investigated by afterglow decay curves. Compared with the bulk phosphor, the nanophosphors exhibit longer afterglow time and higher initial afterglow intensity. In nanophosphors, there exist numerous defects on their surfaces due to the large surface to volume ratio, which generally act as luminescent killers, while some of which, however, can probably act as traps beneficial for the generation of afterglow. In the nanosized MgAl2O4:Eu2+, Dy3+ phosphor, the thermoluminescence results indeed indicate the existence of more traps which are introduced due to the large surface to volume ratio of nanoparticles and that the high temperature sintering process contributes to the longer afterglow in the nanophosphors. PMID:22413308

  15. a Three-Stage Model for the Inner Engine of GRBs:. Prompt Emission and Early Afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staff, J.; Niebergal, B.; Ouyed, R.

    We describe a model within the "quark-nova" scenario to interpret the recent observations of early X-ray afterglows of long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the Swift satellite. This is a three-stage model within the context of a core-collapse supernova. STAGE 1 is an accreting (proto-) neutron star leading to a possible delay between the core collapse and the GRB. STAGE 2 is accretion onto a quark star, launching an ultrarelativistic jet generating the prompt GRB. This jet also creates the afterglow as the jet interacts with the surrounding medium creating an external shock. Slower shells ejected from the quark star (during accretion), can re-energize the external shock leading to a flatter segment in the X-ray afterglow. STAGE 3, which occurs only if the quark star collapses to form a black hole, consists of an accreting black hole. The jet launched in this accretion process interacts with the preceding quark star jet, and could generate the flaring activity frequently seen in early X-ray afterglows. Alternatively, a STAGE 2b can occur in our model if the quark star does not collapse to a black hole. The quark star in this case can then spin down due to magnetic braking, and the spin down energy may lead to flattening in the X-ray afterglow as well. This model seems to account for both the energies and the timescales of GRBs, in addition to the newly discovered early X-ray afterglow features.

  16. Healing of Defects at the Interface of Nematic Liquid Crystals and Structured Langmuir-Blodgett Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit-Garrido, Núria; Trivedi, Rahul P.; Ignés-Mullol, Jordi; Claret, Josep; Lapointe, Clayton; Sagués, Francesc; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2011-10-01

    We use Langmuir-Blodgett molecular monolayers and nematic liquid crystals as model two- and three-dimensional orientationally ordered systems to study the stability and healing of topological defects at their contact interfaces. Integer-strength defects at the monolayer induce disclinations of similar strength in the nematic that, however, do not propagate deep into the bulk, but rather form single- or double-split arch-shaped loops pinned to the interface. This behavior is qualitatively independent of the far-field director orientation and involves either half-integer singular or twist-escaped unity-strength nonsingular nematic disclinations. These two defect configurations can be selected by varying sample preparation given their comparable free energy, consistently with direct probing by use of laser tweezers.

  17. ON THE FORMATION OF Lyalpha EMISSION FROM RESONANTLY SCATTERED CONTINUUM PHOTONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURST's AFTERGLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Wen; Wu Xiangping

    2010-02-20

    The continuum spectrum of gamma-ray burst's (GRB) afterglow at Lyalpha wavelength is known to be otherwise featureless except for the existence of a pair of smooth damping wings. Resonant scattering of photons with the ambient neutral hydrogen around the GRB may alter this picture. We study the formation and evolution of the spectral imprint of these resonantly scattered photons in the context of GRB's afterglow. Based on an analytic model that includes photons that are scattered only once, as well as a complete treatment of all the scatterings using Monte Carlo simulations, we are able to calculate the spectrum and luminosity of this Lyalpha emission from a very early moment up to a late epoch. We find that the amount, the motion, and the geometry of the neutral hydrogen around the GRB, together with the time behavior of the source are the crucial factors that affect the predicted luminosity and spectral profile. The flux of the Lyalpha emission is found to be mainly contributed by photons that are scattered only once. The flux is of the order 10{sup -4}-10{sup -9} relative to the undecayed maximum flux of the transmitted continuum, making the feature negligible but potentially observable. If not obscured by the host galaxy's damped Lyalpha absorption systems or intergalactic neutral hydrogen, the feature may appear sometime from 1 hr to several years when the directly transmitted light has faded away. This scattered emission feature can be distinguished from Lyalpha photons of other origins by its luminosity evolution and by its gradual narrowing of profile with time. The typical timescale for spectral variance is that of the light crossing time of a hydrogen clump close to the GRB. If observed, the resonant peaks' time-dependent behavior is a scanning probe on the distribution of neutral hydrogen in GRB's immediate neighborhood.

  18. CALORIMETRY OF GRB 030329: SIMULTANEOUS MODEL FITTING TO THE BROADBAND RADIO AFTERGLOW AND THE OBSERVED IMAGE EXPANSION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Mesler, Robert A.; Pihlstroem, Ylva M.

    2013-09-01

    We perform calorimetry on the bright gamma-ray burst GRB 030329 by fitting simultaneously the broadband radio afterglow and the observed afterglow image size to a semi-analytic MHD and afterglow emission model. Our semi-analytic method is valid in both the relativistic and non-relativistic regimes, and incorporates a model of the interstellar scintillation that substantially effects the broadband afterglow below 10 GHz. The model is fitted to archival measurements of the afterglow flux from 1 day to 8.3 yr after the burst. Values for the initial burst parameters are determined and the nature of the circumburst medium is explored. Additionally, direct measurements of the lateral expansion rate of the radio afterglow image size allow us to estimate the initial Lorentz factor of the jet.

  19. Langmuir turbulence in the auroral ionosphere 1: Linear theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, D. L.; Goldman, M. V.; Ergun, R. E.; Boehm, M. H.

    1994-01-01

    Intense bursts of Langmuir waves with electric fields of 50 to 500 mV / m have been frequently observed at altitudes greater than 500 km in the auroral ionosphere. These bursts are driven by 20 eV to 4 keV field-aligned electrons, which are embedded in an approximately isotropic nonthermal tail of scattered electrons. The Langmuir bursts are often observed at altitudes where the ionosphere is moderately magnetized (OMEGA (sub e) approximately equals omega (sub pe)). Both the moderate magnetization and the scattered electrons have a major influence on the linear dispersion and damping of Langmuir waves. In particular, the linear dispersion is topologically different depending on whether the magnetic field is subcritical (OMEGA (sub e) less than omega (sub pe)) or supercritical (OMEGA (sub e) greater than omega (sub pe)). The correct dispersion and damping can account for the observed polarization of the Langmuir waves, which is very nearly parallel to the geomagnetic field. Inferred properties of the linear instability driven by the field-aligned electrons are discussed. The linear dispersion and damping derived here provide the basis for a nonlinear turbulence study described in a companion paper (Newman et al., this issue).

  20. Instability-Enhanced Collisional Effects and Langmuir's Paradox

    SciTech Connect

    Baalrud, S. D.; Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C. C.

    2009-06-19

    Anomalously fast equilibration of the electron distribution function to a Maxwellian in gas-discharge plasmas with low temperature and pressure, i.e., Langmuir's paradox, may be explained by electron scattering via an instability-enhanced collective response and hence fluctuations arising from convective ion-acoustic instabilities near the discharge boundaries.

  1. Immunosensor systems with the Langmuir-film-based fluorescence detection

    SciTech Connect

    Chudinova, G K; Nagovitsyn, I A; Savranskii, V V; Karpov, R E

    2003-09-30

    A method is developed for detecting protein antigens for fluorescent immunoassay using a model system based on the technique for preparation of Langmuir films. Fluorescein isothiocyanate and donor-acceptor energy-transfer pairs of markers (the Yb complex of tetraphenyl porphyrin - benzoyl trifluoroacetoneisothiocyanate and derivatives of tetra(carboxyphenyl) porphyrin - cyanine dye containing a five-membered polyene chain), which were nor studied earlier, were used as markers for detecting the binding of an antigen on the surface of Langmuir films of antibodies. Fluorescence was detected in the near-IR region (for the first pair) and in the visible spectral range (for the second pair). To reduce the nonspecific sorption of a protein (antigen), a method was proposed for the preparation of a nonpolar surface by applying an even number of layers of stearic acid as a substrate for the Langmuir - Blodgett film. A high sensitivity of model systems to a protein antigen in solution was achieved ({approx}10{sup -11} M), the assay time being 6 - 8 min. The model system with the first donor - acceptor pair was tested in analysis of the blood plasma. The fluorescence of the Dy{sup 3+}, Tm{sup 3+}, and Yb{sup 3+} complexes of tetraphenyl porphyrin sensitised by diketonate complexes of lanthanides was studied for the first time and the enhancement of the IR fluorescence of these complexes in a Langmuir film was demonstrated. (papers devoted to the memory of academician a m prokhorov)

  2. Excitation of electron Langmuir frequency harmonics in the solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Fomichev, V. V.; Fainshtein, S. M.; Chernov, G. P.

    2013-05-15

    An alternative mechanism for the excitation of electron Langmuir frequency harmonics as a result of the development of explosive instability in a weakly relativistic beam-plasma system in the solar atmosphere is proposed. The efficiency of the new mechanism as compared to the previously discussed ones is analyzed.

  3. Electron Acceleration by Langmuir Waves Produced by a Decay Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafft, C.; Volokitin, A. S.

    2016-04-01

    It was recently reported that a significant part of the Langmuir waveforms observed by the STEREO satellite during type III solar radio bursts are likely consistent with the occurrence of electrostatic decay instabilities, when a Langmuir wave { L } resonantly interacts with another Langmuir wave { L }\\prime and an ion sound wave { S }\\prime through the decay channel { L }\\to { L }\\prime +{ S }\\prime . Usually such wave–wave interactions occur in regions of the solar wind where the presence of electron beams can drive Langmuir turbulence to levels allowing waves { L } to decay. Moreover, such solar wind plasmas can present long-wavelength, randomly fluctuating density inhomogeneities or monotonic density gradients which can significantly modify the development of such resonant instabilities. If some conditions are met, the waves can encounter a second decay cascade (SDC) according to { L }\\prime \\to { L }\\prime\\prime +{ S }\\prime\\prime . Analytical estimates and observations based on numerical simulations show that the Langmuir waves { L }\\prime\\prime produced by this SDC can accelerate beam particles up to velocities and kinetic energies exceeding two times the beam drift velocity vb and half the initial beam energy, respectively. Moreover, this process can be particularly efficient if the scattering effects of waves on the background plasma inhomogeneities have already accelerated a sufficient amount of beam electrons up to the velocity range where the phase velocities of the { L }\\prime\\prime waves are lying. The paper shows that the conditions necessary for such process to occur can be easily met in solar wind plasmas if the beam velocities do not exceed around 35 times the plasma thermal velocity.

  4. Note: The expansion of possibilities for plasma probe diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masherov, P. E.; Riaby, V. A.; Abgaryan, V. K.

    2016-05-01

    The determination of ion mass for low-pressure Maxwellian plasmas has been proposed. It can be done using Langmuir probe measurements and the Bohm formula for the ion current density to a floating probe, due to this formula's reliance on ion mass. This goal was achieved by accurate measurements of xenon plasma parameters in the inductive discharge at pressure p = 2 ṡ 10-3 Torr using the Plasma Sensors VGPS-12 probe station with the cylindrical Langmuir probes. The analysis of measurement data showed that in these conditions, the Bohm effect was valid with engineering-level precision, resulting in the experimental Bohm coefficient CBCyl ≈ 1.13 for cylindrical probes.

  5. Note: The expansion of possibilities for plasma probe diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Masherov, P E; Riaby, V A; Abgaryan, V K

    2016-05-01

    The determination of ion mass for low-pressure Maxwellian plasmas has been proposed. It can be done using Langmuir probe measurements and the Bohm formula for the ion current density to a floating probe, due to this formula's reliance on ion mass. This goal was achieved by accurate measurements of xenon plasma parameters in the inductive discharge at pressure p = 2 ⋅ 10(-3) Torr using the Plasma Sensors VGPS-12 probe station with the cylindrical Langmuir probes. The analysis of measurement data showed that in these conditions, the Bohm effect was valid with engineering-level precision, resulting in the experimental Bohm coefficient CBCyl ≈ 1.13 for cylindrical probes. PMID:27250479

  6. Radio afterglow of the jetted tidal disruption event Swift J1644+57

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, B. D.; Giannios, D.; Mimica, P.

    2012-12-01

    The recent transient event Swift J1644+57 has been interpreted as resulting from a relativistic outflow, powered by the accretion of a tidally disrupted star onto a supermassive black hole. This discovery of a new class of relativistic transients opens new windows into the study of tidal disruption events (TDEs) and offers a unique probe of the physics of relativistic jet formation and the conditions in the centers of distant quiescent galaxies. Unlike the rapidly-varying γ/X-ray emission from Swift J1644+57, the radio emission varies more slowly and is well modeled as synchrotron radiation from the shock interaction between the jet and the gaseous circumnuclear medium (CNM). Early after the onset of the jet, a reverse shock propagates through and decelerates the ejecta released during the first few days of activity, while at much later times the outflow approaches the self-similar evolution of Blandford and McKee. The point at which the reverse shock entirely crosses the earliest ejecta is clearly observed as an achromatic break in the radio light curve at t ≈ 10 days. The flux and break frequencies of the afterglow constrain the properties of the jet and the CNM, including providing robust evidence for a narrowly collimated jet. I briefly discuss the implications of Swift J1644+57 for the fraction of TDEs accompanied by relativistic jets; the physics of jet formation more broadly; and the prospects for detecting off-axis TDE radio emission, either via follow-up observations of TDE candidates discovered at other wavelengths or blindly with upcoming wide-field radio surveys. The radio rebrightening observed months after the onset of the jet remains a major unsolved mystery, the resolution of which may require considering a jet with more complex (temporal or angular) structure.

  7. Probe assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Avera, C.J.

    1981-01-06

    A hand-held probe assembly, suitable for monitoring a radioactive fibrinogen tracer, is disclosed comprising a substantially cylindrically shaped probe handle having an open end. The probe handle is adapted to be interconnected with electrical circuitry for monitoring radioactivity that is sensed or detected by the probe assembly. Mounted within the probe handle is a probe body assembly that includes a cylindrically shaped probe body inserted through the open end of the probe handle. The probe body includes a photomultiplier tube that is electrically connected with a male connector positioned at the rearward end of the probe body. Mounted at the opposite end of the probe body is a probe head which supports an optical coupler therewithin. The probe head is interconnected with a probe cap which supports a detecting crystal. The probe body assembly, which consists of the probe body, the probe head, and the probe cap is supported within the probe handle by means of a pair of compressible o-rings which permit the probe assembly to be freely rotatable, preferably through 360*, within the probe handle and removable therefrom without requiring any disassembly.

  8. Probing the bright radio flare and afterglow of GRB 130427A with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, G. E.; van der Horst, A. J.; Staley, T. D.; Fender, R. P.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Rumsey, C.; Titterington, D. J.; Rowlinson, A.; Saunders, R. D. E.

    2014-05-01

    We present one of the best sampled early-time light curves of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) at radio wavelengths. Using the Arcminute Mircrokelvin Imager (AMI), we observed GRB 130427A at the central frequency of 15.7 GHz between 0.36 and 59.32 d post-burst. These results yield one of the earliest radio detections of a GRB and demonstrate a clear rise in flux less than one day after the γ-ray trigger followed by a rapid decline. This early-time radio emission probably originates in the GRB reverse shock so our AMI light curve reveals the first ever confirmed detection of a reverse shock peak in the radio domain. At later times (about 3.2 d post-burst), the rate of decline decreases, indicating that the forward shock component has begun to dominate the light curve. Comparisons of the AMI light curve with modelling conducted by Perley et al. show that the most likely explanation of the early-time 15.7 GHz peak is caused by the self-absorption turn-over frequency, rather than the peak frequency, of the reverse shock moving through the observing bands.

  9. DIVERSITY OF SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS FROM COMPACT BINARY MERGERS HOSTING PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Cole; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; De Colle, Fabio; Montes, Gabriela

    2014-07-20

    Short-duration gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs) are widely believed to result from the mergers of compact binaries. This model predicts an afterglow that bears the characteristic signatures of a constant, low-density medium, including a smooth prompt-afterglow transition, and a simple temporal evolution. However, these expectations are in conflict with observations for a non-negligible fraction of sGRB afterglows. In particular, the onset of the afterglow phase for some of these events appears to be delayed and, in addition, a few of them exhibit late-time rapid fading in their light curves. We show that these peculiar observations can be explained independently of ongoing central engine activity if some sGRB progenitors are compact binaries hosting at least one pulsar. The Poynting flux emanating from the pulsar companion can excavate a bow-shock cavity surrounding the binary. If this cavity is larger than the shock deceleration length scale in the undisturbed interstellar medium, then the onset of the afterglow will be delayed. Should the deceleration occur entirely within the swept-up thin shell, a rapid fade in the light curve will ensue. We identify two types of pulsar that can achieve the conditions necessary for altering the afterglow: low-field, long-lived pulsars, and high-field pulsars. We find that a sizable fraction (≈20%-50%) of low-field pulsars are likely to reside in neutron star binaries based on observations, while their high-field counterparts are not. Hydrodynamical calculations motivated by this model are shown to be in good agreement with observations of sGRB afterglow light curves.

  10. The Afterglows of Swift-era Gamma-ray Bursts. I. Comparing pre-Swift and Swift-era Long/Soft (Type II) GRB Optical Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kann, D. A.; Klose, S.; Zhang, B.; Malesani, D.; Nakar, E.; Pozanenko, A.; Wilson, A. C.; Butler, N. R.; Jakobsson, P.; Schulze, S.; Andreev, M.; Antonelli, L. A.; Bikmaev, I. F.; Biryukov, V.; Böttcher, M.; Burenin, R. A.; Castro Cerón, J. M.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Chincarini, G.; Cobb, B. E.; Covino, S.; D'Avanzo, P.; D'Elia, V.; Della Valle, M.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Efimov, Yu.; Ferrero, P.; Fugazza, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Gålfalk, M.; Grundahl, F.; Gorosabel, J.; Gupta, S.; Guziy, S.; Hafizov, B.; Hjorth, J.; Holhjem, K.; Ibrahimov, M.; Im, M.; Israel, G. L.; Jeĺinek, M.; Jensen, B. L.; Karimov, R.; Khamitov, I. M.; Kiziloǧlu, Ü.; Klunko, E.; Kubánek, P.; Kutyrev, A. S.; Laursen, P.; Levan, A. J.; Mannucci, F.; Martin, C. M.; Mescheryakov, A.; Mirabal, N.; Norris, J. P.; Ovaldsen, J.-E.; Paraficz, D.; Pavlenko, E.; Piranomonte, S.; Rossi, A.; Rumyantsev, V.; Salinas, R.; Sergeev, A.; Sharapov, D.; Sollerman, J.; Stecklum, B.; Stella, L.; Tagliaferri, G.; Tanvir, N. R.; Telting, J.; Testa, V.; Updike, A. C.; Volnova, A.; Watson, D.; Wiersema, K.; Xu, D.

    2010-09-01

    We have gathered optical photometry data from the literature on a large sample of Swift-era gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows including GRBs up to 2009 September, for a total of 76 GRBs, and present an additional three pre-Swift GRBs not included in an earlier sample. Furthermore, we publish 840 additional new photometry data points on a total of 42 GRB afterglows, including large data sets for GRBs 050319, 050408, 050802, 050820A, 050922C, 060418, 080413A, and 080810. We analyzed the light curves of all GRBs in the sample and derived spectral energy distributions for the sample with the best data quality, allowing us to estimate the host-galaxy extinction. We transformed the afterglow light curves into an extinction-corrected z = 1 system and compared their luminosities with a sample of pre-Swift afterglows. The results of a former study, which showed that GRB afterglows clustered and exhibited a bimodal distribution in luminosity space, are weakened by the larger sample. We found that the luminosity distribution of the two afterglow samples (Swift-era and pre-Swift) is very similar, and that a subsample for which we were not able to estimate the extinction, which is fainter than the main sample, can be explained by assuming a moderate amount of line-of-sight host extinction. We derived bolometric isotropic energies for all GRBs in our sample, and found only a tentative correlation between the prompt energy release and the optical afterglow luminosity at 1 day after the GRB in the z = 1 system. A comparative study of the optical luminosities of GRB afterglows with echelle spectra (which show a high number of foreground absorbing systems) and those without, reveals no indication that the former are statistically significantly more luminous. Furthermore, we propose the existence of an upper ceiling on afterglow luminosities and study the luminosity distribution at early times, which was not accessible before the advent of the Swift satellite. Most GRBs feature

  11. Optical and X-Ray Observations of GRB 060526: A Complex Afterglow Consistent with an Achromatic Jet Break

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, X.; Halpern, J. P.; Morgan, N. D.; Armstrong, E.; Mirabal, N.; Haislip. J. B.; Reichart, D. E.; Stanek, K. Z.

    2007-01-01

    We obtained 98 R-band and 18 B, r', i' images of the optical afterglow of GRB 060526 (z = 3.21) with the MDM 1.3 m, 2.4 m, and the PROMPT telescopes at CTIO over the five nights following the burst trigger. Combining these data with other optical observations reported in GCN and the Swift XRT observations, we compare the optical and X-ray afterglow light curves of GRB 060526. Both the optical and X-ray afterglow light curves show rich features, such as flares and breaks. The densely sampled optical observations provide very good coverage at T > 10(exp 4) s. We observed a break at 2.4 x 10(exp 5) sin the optical afterglow light curve. Compared with the X-ray afterglow light curve, the break is consistent with an achromatic break supporting the beaming models of GRBs. However, the prebreak and postbreak temporal decay slopes are difficult to explain in simple afterglow models. We estimated a jet angle of theta(sub j) approx. 7deg and a prompt emission size of R(sub prompt) approx. 2 x 10(exp 14) cm. In addition, we detected several optical flares with amplitudes of (Delta)m approx. 0.2,0.6, and 0.2 mag. The X-ray afterglows detected by Swift have shown complicated decay patterns. Recently, many well-sampled optical afterglows also show decays with flares and multiple breaks. GRB 060526 provides an additional case of such a complex, well-observed optical afterglow. The accumulated well-sampled afterglows indicate that most of the optical afterglows are complex.

  12. Methylene blue adsorption on a DMPA lipid langmuir monolayer.

    PubMed

    Giner Casares, Juan José; Camacho, Luis; Martín-Romero, Maria Teresa; López Cascales, José Javier

    2010-07-12

    Adsorption of methylene blue (MB) onto a dimyristoylphosphatidic acid (DMPA) Langmuir air/water monolayer is studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, UV reflection spectroscopy and surface potential measurements. The free-energy profile associated with MB transfer from water to the lipid monolayer shows two minima of -66 and -60 kJ mol(-1) for its solid and gas phase, respectively, corresponding to a spontaneous thermodynamic process. From the position of the free-energy minima, it is possible to predict the precise location of MB in the interior of the DMPA monolayer. Thus, MB is accommodated in the phosphoryl or carbonyl region of the DMPA Langmuir air/water interface, depending on the isomorphic state (solid or gas phase, respectively). Reorientation of MB, measured from the bulk solution to the interior of the lipid monolayer, passes from a random orientation in bulk solution to an orientation parallel to the surface of the lipid monolayer when MB is absorbed. PMID:20544777

  13. Moment equations for chromatography based on Langmuir type reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Miyabe, Kanji

    2014-08-22

    Moment equations were derived for chromatography, in which the reaction kinetics between solute molecules and functional ligands on the stationary phase was represented by the Langmuir type rate equation. A set of basic equations of the general rate model of chromatography representing the mass balance, mass transfer rate, and reaction kinetics in the column were analytically solved in the Laplace domain. The moment equations for the first absolute moment and the second central moment in the real time domain were derived from the analytical solution in the Laplace domain. The moment equations were used for predicting the chromatographic behavior under hypothetical HPLC conditions. The influence of the parameters relating to the adsorption equilibrium and to the reaction kinetics on the chromatographic behavior was quantitatively evaluated. It is expected that the moment equations are effective for a detailed analysis of the influence of the mass transfer rates and of the Langmuir type reaction kinetics on the column efficiency. PMID:24999066

  14. Young's modulus of a solid two-dimensional Langmuir monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercegol, H.; Meunier, J.

    1992-03-01

    LANGMUIR monolayers-films of amphiphilic molecules at the surface of water-exhibit many phases1,2. Some of these behave like two-dimensional solids on experimental timescales, but previous measurements of the shear modulus of these 'solid' monolayers3-5 have yielded a value too small to be compatible with a two-dimensional crystal. The interpretation of these is complicated, however, by the likelihood of inhomogeneities in the films, which are probably assemblies of microscopic crystalline domains. Here we describe measurements of the Young's modulus of an isolated "solid' domain of NBD-stearic acid monolayers. We obtain a value large enough to be compatible with the modulus of a two-dimensional crystal6-8. This suggests that Langmuir monolayers should provide model systems for studies of melting in two dimensions6-8.

  15. From Engine to Afterglow: Collapsars Naturally Produce Top-heavy Jets and Early-time Plateaus in Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffell, Paul C.; MacFadyen, Andrew I.

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate that the steep decay and long plateau in the early phases of gamma-ray burst X-ray afterglows are naturally produced in the collapsar model, by a means ultimately related to the dynamics of relativistic jet propagation through a massive star. We present two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations that start from a collapsar engine and evolve all the way through the late afterglow phase. The resultant outflow includes a jet core that is highly relativistic after breaking out of the star, but becomes baryon loaded after colliding with a massive outer shell, corresponding to mass from the stellar atmosphere of the progenitor star which became trapped in front of the jet core at breakout. The prompt emission produced before or during this collision would then have the signature of a high Lorentz factor jet, but the afterglow is produced by the amalgamated post-collision ejecta that has more inertia than the original highly relativistic jet core and thus has a delayed deceleration. This naturally explains the early light curve behavior discovered by Swift, including a steep decay and a long plateau, without invoking late-time energy injection from the central engine. The numerical simulation is performed continuously from engine to afterglow, covering a dynamic range of over 10 orders of magnitude in radius. Light curves calculated from the numerical output demonstrate that this mechanism reproduces basic features seen in early afterglow data. Initial steep decays are produced by internal shocks, and the plateau corresponds to the coasting phase of the outflow.

  16. The shallow phase of X-ray afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, Gabriele

    2008-05-01

    We propose that the flat decay phase in the first 102-104 seconds of the X-ray light curve of Gamma Ray Bursts can be interpreted as prolonged activity of the central engine, producing shells of decreasing bulk Lorentz factors Γ. The internal dissipation of these late shells produces a continuous and smooth emission, usually dominant in X-rays and sometimes in the optical. When Γ of the late shells is larger than 1/θj, where θj is the jet opening angle, we see only a portion of the emitting surface. Eventually, Γ becomes smaller than 1/θj, and the entire emitting surface is visible. When Γ = 1/θj there is a break in the light curve, and the plateau ends. During the plateau phase, we see the sum of the ``late-prompt'' emission (due to late internal dissipation), and the ``real afterglow'' emission (due to external shocks). A variety of different optical and X-ray light curves are possible, explaining why the X-ray and the optical light curves often do not track each other, and why they often do not have simultaneous breaks.

  17. How Bad or Good Are the External Forward Shock Afterglow Models of Gamma-Ray Bursts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiang-Gao; Zhang, Bing; Liang, En-Wei; Gao, He; Li, Liang; Deng, Can-Min; Qin, Song-Mei; Tang, Qing-Wen; Kann, D. Alexander; Ryde, Felix; Kumar, Pawan

    2015-07-01

    The external forward shock models have been the standard paradigm to interpret the broadband afterglow data of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). One prediction of the models is that some afterglow temporal breaks at different energy bands should be achromatic; that is, the break times should be the same in different frequencies. Multiwavelength observations in the Swift era have revealed chromatic afterglow behaviors at least in some GRBs, casting doubts on the external forward shock origin of GRB afterglows. In this paper, using a large sample of GRBs with both X-ray and optical afterglow data, we perform a systematic study to address the question: how bad or good are the external forward shock models? Our sample includes 85 GRBs up to 2014 March with well-monitored X-ray and optical light curves. Based on how well the data abide by the external forward shock models, we categorize them into five grades and three samples. The first two grades (Grade I and II) include 45 of 85 GRBs. They show evidence of, or are consistent with having, an achromatic break. The temporal and spectral behaviors in each afterglow segment are consistent with the predictions (the “closure relations”) of the forward shock models. These GRBs are included in the Gold sample. The next two grades (Grade III and IV) include 37 of 85 GRBs. They are also consistent with having an achromatic break, even though one or more afterglow segments do not comply with the closure relations. These GRBs are included in the Silver sample. Finally, Grade V (3/85) shows direct evidence of chromatic behaviors, suggesting that the external shock models are inconsistent with the data. These are included in the Bad sample. We further perform statistical analyses of various observational properties (temporal index α, spectral index β, break time tb) and model parameters (energy injection index q, electron spectral index p, jet opening angle {θ }j, radiative efficiency ηγ, and so on) of the GRBs in the Gold sample

  18. Hydrogen Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Proteins at Langmuir Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Pirrone, Gregory F; Vernon, Briana C; Kent, Michael S; Engen, John R

    2015-07-21

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) mass spectrometry (MS) is valuable for providing conformational information for proteins/peptides that are very difficult to analyze with other methods such as peripheral membrane proteins and peptides that interact with membranes. We developed a new type of HX MS measurement that integrates Langmuir monolayers. A lipid monolayer was generated, a peptide or protein associated with it, and then the monolayer-associated peptide or protein was exposed to deuterium. The deuterated species was recovered from the monolayer, digested, and deuterium incorporation monitored by MS. Test peptides showed that deuterium recovery in an optimized protocol was equivalent to deuterium recovery in conventional solution HX MS. The reproducibility of the measurements was high, despite the requirement of generating a new monolayer for each deuterium labeling time. We validated that known conformational changes in the presence of a monolayer/membrane could be observed with the peptide melittin and the myristoylated protein Arf-1. Results in an accompanying paper show that the method can reveal details of conformational changes in a protein (HIV-1 Nef), which adopts a different conformation, depending on whether or not it is able to insert into the lipid layer. Overall, the HX MS Langmuir monolayer method provided new and meaningful conformational information for proteins that associate with lipid layers. The combination of HX MS results with neutron or X-ray reflection of the same proteins in Langmuir monolayers can be more informative than the isolated use of either method. PMID:26134943

  19. Saturation of Langmuir waves in laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K.L.

    1996-04-01

    This dissertation deals with the interaction of an intense laser with a plasma (a quasineutral collection of electrons and ions). During this interaction, the laser drives large-amplitude waves through a class of processes known as parametric instabilities. Several such instabilities drive one type of wave, the Langmuir wave, which involves oscillations of the electrons relative to the nearly-stationary ions. There are a number of mechanisms which limit the amplitude to which Langmuir waves grow. In this dissertation, these mechanisms are examined to identify qualitative features which might be observed in experiments and/or simulations. In addition, a number of experiments are proposed to specifically look for particular saturation mechanisms. In a plasma, a Langmuir wave can decay into an electromagnetic wave and an ion wave. This parametric instability is proposed as a source for electromagnetic emission near half of the incident laser frequency observed from laser-produced plasmas. This interpretation is shown to be consistent with existing experimental data and it is found that one of the previous mechanisms used to explain such emission is not. The scattering version of the electromagnetic decay instability is shown to provide an enhanced noise source of electromagnetic waves near the frequency of the incident laser.

  20. A Study of Uranus' Bow Shock Motions Using Langmuir Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xue, S.; Cairns, I. H.; Smith, C. W.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    During the Voyager 2 flyby of Uranus, strong electron plasma oscillations (Langmuir waves) were detected by the plasma wave instrument in the 1.78-kHz channel on January 23-24, 1986, prior to the inbound bow shock crossing. Langmuir waves are excited by energetic electrons streaming away from the bow shock. The goal of this work is to estimate the location and motion of Uranus' bow shock using Langmuir wave data, together with the spacecraft positions and the measured interplanetary magnetic field. The following three remote sensing analyses were performed: the basic remote sensing method, the lag time method, and the trace-back method. Because the interplanetary magnetic field was highly variable, the first analysis encountered difficulties in obtaining a realistic estimation of Uranus' bow shock motion. In the lag time method developed here, time lags due to the solar wind's finite convection speed are taken into account when calculating the shock's standoff distance. In the new trace-back method, limits on the standoff distance are obtained as a function of time by reconstructing electron paths. Most of the results produced by the latter two analyses are consistent with predictions based on the standard theoretical model and the measured solar wind plasma parameters. Differences between our calculations and the theoretical model are discussed.

  1. Studies of strong Langmuir turbulence effects at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheerin, J. P.; Oyama, S. I.; Watkins, B. J.; Bristow, W. A.

    2006-10-01

    High power HF transmitters induce a number of plasma instabilities in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma. Radars such as SuperDARN have been used to study artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI) created by the high power HF radiowave at the HAARP Ionospheric Observatory, Gakona, AK. A new Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) sited at HAARP may now be used to monitor changes in the Langmuir plasma waves detected in the UHF backscatter. We report the results from recent campaigns using these new facilities in coordinated and comprehensive studies of strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT). Among the effects observed and studied are: SLT spectra including the outshifted plasma line or `free-mode', appearance of a short timescale ponderomotive overshoot effect, temporal evolution of SLT, dependence of SLT on growth or suppression of AFAI, dependence of AFAI and MUIR backscatter on HAARP pulselength and duty-cycle, aspect angle dependence of the intensity of the plasma line. In particular, we explore the observed `magnetic-zenith' effect of increased turbulence with the HF wave directed up the field line. Langmuir modes parallel to the geomagnetic field are proposed to explain other features in stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE). These plasma waves are theorized to play a key role in certain features of radio-induced aurora. Experimental results are then compared to predictions from recent modeling efforts.

  2. Langmuir mixing effects on global climate: WAVEWATCH III in CESM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qing; Webb, Adrean; Fox-Kemper, Baylor; Craig, Anthony; Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Large, William G.; Vertenstein, Mariana

    2016-07-01

    Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) have shown the effects of ocean surface gravity waves in enhancing the ocean boundary layer mixing through Langmuir turbulence. Neglecting this Langmuir mixing process may contribute to the common shallow bias in mixed layer depth in regions of the Southern Ocean and the Northern Atlantic in most state-of-the-art climate models. In this study, a third generation wave model, WAVEWATCH III, has been incorporated as a component of the Community Earth System Model, version 1.2 (CESM1.2). In particular, the wave model is now coupled with the ocean model through a modified version of the K-Profile Parameterization (KPP) to approximate the influence of Langmuir mixing. Unlike past studies, the wind-wave misalignment and the effects of Stokes drift penetration depth are considered through empirical scalings based on the rate of mixing in LES. Wave-Ocean only experiments show substantial improvements in the shallow biases of mixed layer depth in the Southern Ocean. Ventilation is enhanced and low concentration biases of pCFC-11 are reduced in the Southern Hemisphere. A majority of the improvements persist in the presence of other climate feedbacks in the fully coupled experiments. In addition, warming of the subsurface water over the majority of global ocean is observed in the fully coupled experiments with waves, and the cold subsurface ocean temperature biases are reduced.

  3. Afterglow of a microwave microstrip plasma as an ion source for mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeuffer, Kevin P.; White, Allen; Broekaert, José A. C.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2015-01-01

    A microwave-induced plasma that was previously used for optical emission spectrometry has been repurposed as an afterglow ion source for mass spectrometry. This compact microwave discharge, termed the microstrip plasma (MSP), is operated at 20-50 W and 2.45 GHz in helium at a flow of 300 mL/min. The primary background ions present in the afterglow are ionized and protonated water clusters. An exponential dilution chamber was used to introduce volatile organic compounds into the MSP afterglow and yielded limits of detection in the 40 ppb to 7 ppm range (v/v). A hydride-generation system was also utilized for detection of volatile hydride-forming elements (arsenic, antimony, tin) in the afterglow and produced limits of detection in the 10-100 ppb range in solution. The MSP afterglow was found capable of desorption and ionization of analyte species directly from a solid substrate, suggesting its use as an ion source for ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

  4. Radio afterglow rebrightening: evidence for multiple active phases in gamma-ray burst central engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long-Biao; Zhang, Zhi-Bin; Rice, Jared

    2015-09-01

    The rebrightening phenomenon is an interesting feature in some X-ray, optical, and radio afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Here, we propose a possible energy-supply assumption to explain the rebrightenings of radio afterglows, in which the central engine with multiple active phases can supply at least two GRB pulses in a typical GRB duration time. Considering the case of double pulses supplied by the central engine, the double pulses have separate physical parameters, except for the number density of the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM). Their independent radio afterglows are integrated by the ground detectors to form the rebrightening phenomenon. In this Letter, we firstly simulate diverse rebrightening light curves under consideration of different and independent physical parameters. Using this assumption, we also give our best fit to the radio afterglow of GRB 970508 at three frequencies of 1.43, 4.86, and 8.46 GHz. We suggest that the central engine may be active continuously at a timescale longer than that of a typical GRB duration time as many authors have suggested (e.g., Zhang et al., Astrophys. J. 787:66, 2014; Gao and Mészáros, Astrophys. J. 802:90, 2015), and that it may supply enough energy to cause the long-lasting rebrightenings observed in some GRB afterglows.

  5. Exploring the canonical behaviour of long gamma-ray bursts using an intrinsic multiwavelength afterglow correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oates, S. R.; Racusin, J. L.; De Pasquale, M.; Page, M. J.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Gorosabel, J.; Smith, P. J.; Breeveld, A. A.; Kuin, N. P. M.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we further investigate the relationship, reported by Oates et al., between the optical/UV afterglow luminosity (measured at restframe 200 s) and average afterglow decay rate (measured from restframe 200 s onwards) of long duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We extend the analysis by examining the X-ray light curves, finding a consistent correlation. We therefore explore how the parameters of these correlations relate to the prompt emission phase and, using a Monte Carlo simulation, explore whether these correlations are consistent with predictions of the standard afterglow model. We find significant correlations between: log LO, 200 s and log LX, 200 s; αO, >200 s and αX, >200 s, consistent with simulations. The model also predicts relationships between log Eiso and log L200 s; however, while we find such relationships in the observed sample, the slope of the linear regression is shallower than that simulated and inconsistent at ≳3σ. Simulations also do not agree with correlations observed between log L200 s and α> 200 s, or logE_{iso} and α> 200 s. Overall, these observed correlations are consistent with a common underlying physical mechanism producing GRBs and their afterglows regardless of their detailed temporal behaviour. However, a basic afterglow model has difficulty explaining all the observed correlations. This leads us to briefly discuss alternative more complex models.

  6. Modeling the Afterglow of the Possible Fermi-GBM event Associated with GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsony, Brian J.; Workman, Jared C.; Ryan, Dominic M.

    2016-07-01

    We model the possible afterglow of the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) event associated with LIGO detection GW150914, under the assumption that the gamma-rays are produced by a short GRB-like relativistic outflow. We model GW150914-GBM as both a weak, on-axis short GRB and normal short GRB seen far off-axis. Given the large uncertainty in the position of GW150914, we determine that the best chance of finding the afterglow is with ASKAP or possibly the Murchinson Widefield Array (MWA), with the flux from an off-axis short GRB reaching 0.2–4 mJy (0.12–16 mJy) at 150 MHz (863.5 MHz) by 1–12 months after the initial event. At low frequencies, the source would evolve from a hard to soft spectrum over several months. The radio afterglow would be detectable for several months to years after it peaks, meaning the afterglow may still be detectable and increasing in brightness NOW (2016 mid-July). With a localization from the MWA or ASKAP, the afterglow would be detectable at higher radio frequencies with the ATCA and in X-rays with Chandra or XMM.

  7. Probe measurements in ion-beam plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dudin, S.V.

    1994-12-31

    The particularities of the electric probe measurements in the ion-beam plasma (IBP) have been investigated. To find the electron density n{sub e} and temperature T{sub c} as well as electron energy distribution it is necessary to separate electron current from full probe current, because ion part of this current is often large enough to mask the electron part. According to collisionless probe theory, radius of ion layer in strongly non-isothermal plasma (as in their case) and consequently the ion current are determined by Child`s law. However, at presence of ion beam with high enough energy {var_epsilon}{sub b} >> e{var_phi}{sub p}, this law is broken. The author has found the dependence of Langmuir probe ion current I{sub i} on probe potential {var_phi}{sub p} at presence of IB. The constant ion density approach was used in cylindrical and spherical geometry of the probe layer. Dependence of ion current founded experimentally accords with Child`s law when the probe is placed outside the beam and linear--within the beam. Application of only the chemical Langmuir probe is insufficient for energoanalysis of IBP electrons because of ion current interference. To solve this problem combination of the techniques of cylindrical probe, large plate probe (5 x 5mm) and two-grid energoanalyzer was used. Design and parameters of the two-grid analyzer are presented. Measuring system is described for determination of electron energy distribution function in low temperature plasma by double differentiation of the electric probe volt-ampere characteristic by modulation method.

  8. Naked-eye cadmium sensor: using chromoionophore arrays of Langmuir-Blodgett molecular assemblies.

    PubMed

    Prabhakaran, Deivasigamani; Yuehong, Ma; Nanjo, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Hideyuki

    2007-06-01

    This study demonstrates the possibility of a reversible naked-eye detection method for submicromolar levels of cadmium(II) using the Langmuir-Blodgett (L-B) technique. Molecular assemblies of 4-n-dodecyl-6-(2-thiazolylazo)resorcinol are transferred on precleaned microscopic glass slides, to act as a sensing probe. Isotherm (pi-A) measurements were performed to ensure the films' structural rigidity and homogeneity during sensor fabrication. The sensor surface morphology was characterized using atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The probe membrane exhibits visual color transition, forming a series of reddish-orange to pinkish-purple complexes with cadmium, over a wide concentration range (0.04-44.5 microM). Cadmium response kinetics and the changes in the sensors' intrinsic optical properties were monitored using absorption spectroscopy and further confirmed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A hybrid L-B film composite of poly(vinyl stearate) and poly(vinyl-N-octadecylcarbamate) were investigated for enhancing sensor performance. The sensor was tested for its practical approach to prove its cadmium selectivity and sensitivity amid common matrix constituents using synthetic mixtures and real water samples. Using the sensor strips, the respective lower limits of cadmium detection and quantification are 0.039 and 0.050 microM, as estimated from a normalized linear calibration plot. PMID:17447727

  9. Shallow Decay of Early X-Ray Afterglows from Inhomogeneous Gamma-Ray Burst Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toma, Kenji; Ioka, Kunihito; Yamazaki, Ryo; Nakamura, Takashi

    2006-04-01

    Almost all the X-ray afterglows of γ-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by the Swift satellite have a shallow decay phase in their first few thousand seconds. We show that in an inhomogeneous-jet model (multiple-subjet or patchy-shell), the superposition of the afterglows of off-axis subjets (patchy shells) can produce the shallow decay phase. The necessary condition for obtaining the shallow decay phase is that γ-ray-bright subjets (patchy shells) have γ-ray efficiencies higher than previously estimated and that they be surrounded by γ-ray-dim subjets (patchy shells) with low γ-ray efficiency. Our model predicts that events with dim prompt emission will have a conventional afterglow light curve without a shallow decay phase, like GRB 050416A.

  10. The bright optical flash and afterglow from the gamma-ray burst GRB 130427A.

    PubMed

    Vestrand, W T; Wren, J A; Panaitescu, A; Wozniak, P R; Davis, H; Palmer, D M; Vianello, G; Omodei, N; Xiong, S; Briggs, M S; Elphick, M; Paciesas, W; Rosing, W

    2014-01-01

    The optical light generated simultaneously with x-rays and gamma rays during a gamma-ray burst (GRB) provides clues about the nature of the explosions that occur as massive stars collapse. We report on the bright optical flash and fading afterglow from powerful burst GRB 130427A. The optical and >100-megaelectron volt (MeV) gamma-ray flux show a close correlation during the first 7000 seconds, which is best explained by reverse shock emission cogenerated in the relativistic burst ejecta as it collides with surrounding material. At later times, optical observations show the emergence of emission generated by a forward shock traversing the circumburst environment. The link between optical afterglow and >100-MeV emission suggests that nearby early peaked afterglows will be the best candidates for studying gamma-ray emission at energies ranging from gigaelectron volts to teraelectron volts. PMID:24263131

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Position catalogue of Swift XRT afterglows (Moretti+, 2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, A.; Perri, M.; Capalbi, M.; Angelini, L.; Hill, J. E.; Campana, S.; Burrows, D. N.; Osborne, J. P.; Tagliaferri, G.; Cusumano, G.; Giommi, P.; Romano, P.; Mineo, T.; Kennea, J.; Morris, D.; Nousek, J.; Pagani, C.; Racusin, J.; Abbey, A. F.; Beardmore, A. P.; Godet, O.; Goad, M. R.; Page, K. L.; Wells, A. A.; Chincarini, G.

    2006-02-01

    We present a catalogue of refined positions of 68 gamma ray burst (GRB) afterglows observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) from the launch up to 2005 Oct. 16. This is a result of the refinement of the XRT boresight calibration. We tested this correction by means of a systematic study of a large sample of X-ray sources observed by XRT with well established optical counterparts. We found that we can reduce the systematic error radius of the measurements by a factor of two, from 6.5 to 3.2 (90% of confidence). We corrected all the positions of the afterglows observed by XRT in the first 11 months of the Swift mission. This is particularly important for the 37 X-ray afterglows without optical counterpart. Optical follow-up of dark GRBs, in fact, will be more efficient with the use of the more accurate XRT positions. (1 data file).

  12. The Flat Decay Phase in the Early X-Ray Afterglows of Swift GRBs

    SciTech Connect

    Granot, Jonathan; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-03-27

    Many Swift GRBs show an early phase of shallow decay in their X-ray afterglows, lasting from t {approx} 10{sup 2.5} s to {approx} 10{sup 4} s after the GRB, where the flux decays as {approx} t{sup -0.2} - t{sup -0.8}. This is perhaps the most mysterious of the new features discovered by Swift in the early X-ray afterglow, since it is still not clear what causes it. I discuss different possible explanations for this surprising new discovery, as well as their potential implications for the gamma-ray efficiency, the afterglow kinetic energy, and perhaps even for the physics of collisionless relativistic shocks.

  13. The Early Time Properties of GRBs - Canonical Afterglows and the Importance of Prolonged Central Engine Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Melandri, A.; Mundell, C. G.; Kobayashi, S.; Bersier, D.; Steele, I. A.; Smith, R. J.; Carter, D.; Bode, M. F.; Guidorzi, C.; Gomboc, A.

    2009-05-25

    Using a new, comprehensive multiwavelength survey of 63 Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) with unprecedented temporal coverage, we classify the observed afterglows into four main classes and discuss the underlying physics that can explain them. The presence or absence of temporal breaks in X-ray and optical bands is used to examine the emission in the context of the standard model; a number of GRBs are shown to deviate from the forward shock model even with the inclusion of energy injection or ambient density gradients. We show that additional emission in the early-time X-ray afterglow due to late-time central engine activity is key and may explain both GRBs whose afterglows do not fit the standard model and those GRBs that appear to be optically dark even at early times.

  14. Machine Learning Search for Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows in Optical Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topinka, M.

    2016-06-01

    Thanks to the advances in robotic telescopes, time domain astronomy leads to a large number of transient events detected in images every night. Data mining and machine learning tools used for object classification are presented. The goal is to automatically classify transient events for both further follow-up by a larger telescope and for statistical studies of transient events. Special attention is given to the identification of gamma-ray burst afterglows. Machine learning techniques are used to identify GROND gamma-ray burst afterglow among the astrophysical objects present in the SDSS archival images based on the g'-r', r'-i' and i'-z' color indices. The performance of the support vector machine, random forest and neural network algorithms is compared. A joint meta-classifier, built on top of the individual classifiers, can identify GRB afterglows with the overall accuracy of ≳ 90%.

  15. Controlled growth of copper oxide nanostructures by atmospheric pressure micro-afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altaweel, A.; Filipič, G.; Gries, T.; Belmonte, T.

    2014-12-01

    A large variety of copper oxide nanostructures encompassing nanodots, nanowires and nanowalls, sometimes organized in “cabbage-like” architectures, are grown locally by direct oxidation of copper thin films using the micro-afterglow of an Ar-O2 microwave plasma operating at atmospheric pressure. Morphology, structure and composition of the oxidized copper thin films are characterized by X-ray diffraction, secondary ion mass spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy. The concentric areas where each kind of nanostructures is found are defined by both their radial position with respect to the afterglow centre and by experimental conditions. A growth mechanism is proposed, based on stress-induced outward migration of copper ions. The development of stress gradients is caused by the formation of a copper oxide scale layer. If copper oxide nanowires can be grown as in thermal oxidation processes, micro-afterglow conditions offer novel nanostructures and nano-architectures.

  16. Constraints on an Optical Afterglow and on Supernova Light Following the Short Burst GRB 050813

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrero, P.; Sanchez, S. F.; Kann, D. A.; Klose, S.; Greiner, J.; Gorosabel, J.; Hartmann, D. H.; Henden, A. A.; Moller, P.; Palazzi, E.; Rau, A.; Stecklum, B.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Fynbok J. P. U.; Hjorth, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Kouveliotou, C.; Masetti, N.; Pian, E.; Tanvir, N. R.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2006-01-01

    We report early follow-up observations of the error box of the short burst 050813 using the telescopes at Calar Alto and at Observatorio Sierra Nevada (OSN), followed by deep VLT/FORS2 I-band observations obtained under very good seeing conditions 5.7 and 11.7 days after the event. No evidence for a GRB afterglow was found in our Calar Alto and OSN data, no rising supernova component was detected in our FORS2 images. A potential host galaxy can be identified in our FORS2 images, even though we cannot state with certainty its association with GRB 050813. IN any case, the optical afterglow of GRB 050813 was very faint, well in agreement with what is known so far about the optical properties of afterglows of short bursts. We conclude that all optical data are not in conflict with the interpretation that GRB 050813 was a short burst.

  17. Modeling the Afterglows of Gamma Ray Bursts for Arbitrary Viewing Angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Dominic; Morsony, B. J.

    2014-01-01

    We present models of GRB afterglow light curves for simulated GRBs. We describe a method by which the energy distribution of the system can be determined for an arbitrary viewing angle relative to the jet axis. From this distribution, we calculate the time-evolution of the expanding shockwave from the stellar explosion. With relativistic considerations, we can model the synchrotron radiation emitted in this shockwave and construct the time-evolution of the afterglows seen by an observer at an arbitrary angle. We will present results of the calculated afterglow spectra as functions of time for energy distributions from numerical simulations as well as for simple jet models. This work was partially supported by the National Science Foundation's REU program through NSF Award AST-1004881 to the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  18. Revisiting the Dispersion Measure of Fast Radio Bursts Associated with Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yun-Wei

    2014-12-01

    Some fast radio bursts (FRBs) are expected to be associated with the afterglow emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), while a short-lived, supermassive neutron star (NS) forms during the GRBs. I investigate the possible contributions to the dispersion measure (DM) of the FRBs from the GRB ejecta and the wind blown from the precollapsing NS. On the one hand, sometimes an internal X-ray plateau afterglow could be produced by the NS wind, which indicates that a great number of electron-positron pairs are carried by the wind. If the pair-generation radius satisfies a somewhat rigorous condition, the relativistic and dense wind would contribute a high DM to the associated FRB, which can be comparable to and even exceed the DM contributed by the intergalactic medium. On the other hand, if the wind only carries a Goldreich-Julian particle flux, its DM contribution would become negligible; meanwhile, the internal plateau afterglow would not appear. Alternatively, the FRB should be associated with a GRB afterglow produced by the GRB external shock, i.e., an energy-injection-caused shallow-decay afterglow or a normal single-power-law afterglow if the impulsive energy release of the GRB is high enough. In the latter case, the DM contributed by the high-mass GRB ejecta could be substantially important, in particular, for an environment of main-sequence stellar wind. In summary, a careful assessment on the various DM contributors could be required for the cosmological application of the expected FRB-GRB association. The future DM measurements of GRB-associated FRBs could provide a constraint on the physics of NS winds.

  19. Revisiting the dispersion measure of fast radio bursts associated with gamma-ray burst afterglows

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yun-Wei

    2014-12-01

    Some fast radio bursts (FRBs) are expected to be associated with the afterglow emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), while a short-lived, supermassive neutron star (NS) forms during the GRBs. I investigate the possible contributions to the dispersion measure (DM) of the FRBs from the GRB ejecta and the wind blown from the precollapsing NS. On the one hand, sometimes an internal X-ray plateau afterglow could be produced by the NS wind, which indicates that a great number of electron-positron pairs are carried by the wind. If the pair-generation radius satisfies a somewhat rigorous condition, the relativistic and dense wind would contribute a high DM to the associated FRB, which can be comparable to and even exceed the DM contributed by the intergalactic medium. On the other hand, if the wind only carries a Goldreich-Julian particle flux, its DM contribution would become negligible; meanwhile, the internal plateau afterglow would not appear. Alternatively, the FRB should be associated with a GRB afterglow produced by the GRB external shock, i.e., an energy-injection-caused shallow-decay afterglow or a normal single-power-law afterglow if the impulsive energy release of the GRB is high enough. In the latter case, the DM contributed by the high-mass GRB ejecta could be substantially important, in particular, for an environment of main-sequence stellar wind. In summary, a careful assessment on the various DM contributors could be required for the cosmological application of the expected FRB-GRB association. The future DM measurements of GRB-associated FRBs could provide a constraint on the physics of NS winds.

  20. Degravitation, inflation and the cosmological constant as an afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Subodh P.

    2009-01-01

    In this report, we adopt the phenomenological approach of taking the degravitation paradigm seriously as a consistent modification of gravity in the IR, and investigate its consequences for various cosmological situations. We motivate degravitation — where Netwon's constant is promoted to a scale dependent filter function — as arising from either a small (resonant) mass for the graviton, or as an effect in semi-classical gravity. After addressing how the Bianchi identities are to be satisfied in such a set up, we turn our attention towards the cosmological consequences of degravitation. By considering the example filter function corresponding to a resonantly massive graviton (with a filter scale larger than the present horizon scale), we show that slow roll inflation, hybrid inflation and old inflation remain quantitatively unchanged. We also find that the degravitation mechanism inherits a memory of past energy densities in the present epoch in such a way that is likely significant for present cosmological evolution. For example, if the universe underwent inflation in the past due to it having tunneled out of some false vacuum, we find that degravitation implies a remnant `afterglow' cosmological constant, whose scale immediately afterwards is parametrically suppressed by the filter scale (L) in Planck units Λ ~ l2pl/L2. We discuss circumstances through which this scenario reasonably yields the presently observed value for Λ ~ O(10-120). We also find that in a universe still currently trapped in some false vacuum state, resonance graviton models of degravitation only degravitate initially Planck or GUT scale energy densities down to the presently observed value over timescales comparable to the filter scale. We argue that different functional forms for the filter function will yield similar conclusions. In this way, we argue that although the degravitation models we study have the potential to explain why the cosmological constant is not large in addition to

  1. ON THE EMERGENT SPECTRA OF HOT PROTOPLANET COLLISION AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Miller-Ricci, Eliza; Meyer, Michael R.; Seager, Sara; Elkins-Tanton, Linda

    2009-10-10

    We explore the appearance of terrestrial planets in formation by studying the emergent spectra of hot molten protoplanets during their collisional formation. While such collisions are rare, the surfaces of these bodies may remain hot at temperatures of 1000-3000 K for up to millions of years during the epoch of their formation (of duration 10-100 Myr). These objects are luminous enough in the thermal infrared to be observable with current and next-generation optical/IR telescopes, provided that the atmosphere of the forming planet permits astronomers to observe brightness temperatures approaching that of the molten surface. Detectability of a collisional afterglow depends on properties of the planet's atmosphere-primarily on the mass of the atmosphere. A planet with a thin atmosphere is more readily detected, because there is little atmosphere to obscure the hot surface. Paradoxically, a more massive atmosphere prevents one from easily seeing the hot surface, but also keeps the planet hot for a longer time. In terms of planetary mass, more massive planets are also easier to detect than smaller ones because of their larger emitting surface areas-up to a factor of 10 in brightness between 1 and 10 M {sub +} planets. We present preliminary calculations assuming a range of protoplanet masses (1-10 M {sub +}), surface pressures (1-1000 bar), and atmospheric compositions, for molten planets with surface temperatures ranging from 1000 to 1800 K, in order to explore the diversity of emergent spectra that are detectable. While current 8 to 10 m class ground-based telescopes may detect hot protoplanets at wide orbital separations beyond 30 AU (if they exist), we will likely have to wait for next-generation extremely large telescopes or improved diffraction suppression techniques to find terrestrial planets in formation within several AU of their host stars.

  2. The First Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope GRB Afterglow Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roming, P. W. A.; Koch, T. S.; Oates, S. R.; Porterfield, B. L.; Vanden Berk, D. E.; Boyd, P. T.; Holland, S. T.; Hoversten, E. A.; Immler, S.; Marshall, F. E.; Page, M. J.; Racusin, J. L.; Schneider, D. P.; Breeveld, A. A.; Brown, P. J.; Chester, M. M.; Cucchiara, A.; DePasquale, M.; Gronwall, C.; Hunsberger, S. D.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Landsman, W. B.; Schady, P.; Still, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present the first Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow catalog. The catalog contains data from over 64,000 independent UVOT image observations of 229 GRBs first detected by Swift, the High Energy Transient Explorer 2 (HETE2), the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL), and the Interplanetary Network (IPN). The catalog covers GRBs occurring during the period from 2005 January 17 to 2007 June 16 and includes ~86% of the bursts detected by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). The catalog provides detailed burst positional, temporal, and photometric information extracted from each of the UVOT images. Positions for bursts detected at the 3σ level are provided with a nominal accuracy, relative to the USNO-B1 catalog, of ~0farcs25. Photometry for each burst is given in three UV bands, three optical bands, and a "white" or open filter. Upper limits for magnitudes are reported for sources detected below 3σ. General properties of the burst sample and light curves, including the filter-dependent temporal slopes, are also provided. The majority of the UVOT light curves, for bursts detected at the 3σ level, can be fit by a single power-law, with a median temporal slope (α) of 0.96, beginning several hundred seconds after the burst trigger and ending at ~1 × 105 s. The median UVOT v-band (~5500 Å) magnitude at 2000 s for a sample of "well"-detected bursts is 18.02. The UVOT flux interpolated to 2000 s after the burst, shows relatively strong correlations with both the prompt Swift BAT fluence, and the Swift X-ray flux at 11 hr after the trigger.

  3. The γ-ray afterglows of tidal disruption events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xian; Gómez-Vargas, Germán Arturo; Guillochon, James

    2016-05-01

    A star wandering too close to a supermassive black hole (SMBH) will be tidally disrupted. Previous studies of such `tidal disruption event' (TDE) mostly focus on the stellar debris that are bound to the system, because they give rise to luminous flares. On the other hand, half of the stellar debris in principle are unbound and can stream to a great distance, but so far there is no clear evidence that this `unbound debris stream' (UDS) exists. Motivated by the fact that the circum-nuclear region around SMBHs is usually filled with dense molecular clouds (MCs), here we investigate the observational signatures resulting from the collision between an UDS and an MC, which is likely to happen hundreds of years after a TDE. We focus on γ-ray emission (0.1-105 GeV), which comes from the encounter of shock-accelerated cosmic rays with background protons and, more importantly, is not subject to extinction. We show that because of the high proton density inside an MC, the peak γ-ray luminosity, about 1039 erg s-1, is at least 100 times greater than that in the case without an MC (only with a smooth interstellar medium). The luminosity decays on a time-scale of decades, depending on the distance of the MC, and about a dozen of these `TDE afterglows' could be detected within a distance of about 16 Mpc by the future Cherenkov Telescope Array. Without careful discrimination, these sources potentially could contaminate the searches for starburst galaxies, galactic nuclei containing millisecond pulsars or dark matter annihilation signals.

  4. GRB Orphan Afterglows in Present and Future Radio Transient Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghirlanda, G.; Burlon, D.; Ghisellini, G.; Salvaterra, R.; Bernardini, M. G.; Campana, S.; Covino, S.; D'Avanzo, P.; D'Elia, V.; Melandri, A.; Murphy, T.; Nava, L.; Vergani, S. D.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2014-05-01

    Orphan Afterglows (OA) are slow transients produced by Gamma Ray Bursts seen off-axis that become visible on timescales of days/years at optical/NIR and radio frequencies, when the prompt emission at high energies (X and γ rays) has already ceased. Given the typically estimated jet opening angle of GRBs θjet ~ 3°, for each burst pointing to the Earth there should be a factor ~ 700 more GRBs pointing in other directions. Despite this, no secure OAs have been detected so far. Through a population synthesis code we study the emission properties of the population of OA at radio frequencies. OAs reach their emission peak on year-timescales and they last for a comparable amount of time. The typical peak fluxes (which depend on the observing frequency) are of few μJy in the radio band with only a few OA reaching the mJy level. These values are consistent with the upper limits on the radio flux of SN Ib/c observed at late times. We find that the OA radio number count distribution has a typical slope - 1.7 at high fluxes and a flatter ( - 0.4) slope at low fluxes with a break at a frequency-dependent flux. Our predictions of the OA rates are consistent with the (upper) limits of recent radio surveys and archive searches for radio transients. Future radio surveys like VAST/ASKAP at 1.4 GHz should detect ~ 3 × 10- 3 OA deg- 2 yr- 1, MeerKAT and EVLA at 8.4 GHz should see ~ 3 × 10- 1 OA deg- 2 yr- 1. The SKA, reaching the μJy flux limit, could see up to ~ 0.2 - 1.5 OA deg- 2 yr- 1. These rates also depend on the duration of the OA above a certain flux limit and we discuss this effect with respect to the survey cadence.

  5. Observation on long afterglow of Tb{sup 3+} in CaWO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Haoyi; Hu, Yihua; Kang, Fengwen; Chen, Li; Wang, Xiaojuan; Ju, Guifang; Mu, Zhongfei

    2011-12-15

    Graphical abstract: The afterglow of Tb{sup 3+} is observed in CaWO{sub 4} matrix. The main emission of the afterglow is ascribed to the {sup 5}D{sub 4} {yields} {sup 7}F{sub 5} and {sup 5}D{sub 4} {yields} {sup 7}F{sub 6}. Emission due to {sup 5}D{sub 3} {yields} {sup 7}F{sub 4} and {sup 5}D{sub 3} {yields} {sup 7}F{sub 5} is weak. The cross-relaxation dominate the afterglow emission and it enhances the transition from {sup 5}D{sub 4} whereas from {sup 5}D{sub 3}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A green long afterglow is observed from Tb{sup 3+} in CaWO{sub 4} matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two traps which may have a strong influence on the afterglow properties are revealed by TL. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A mechanism model based on energy transfer from WO{sub 4}{sup 2-} group to Tb{sup 3+} followed by cross-relaxation is proposed. -- Abstract: The Tb{sup 3+} doped CaWO{sub 4} phosphors are synthesized via high temperature solid state reaction. The X-ray diffraction shows that small amount of Tb{sup 3+} does not have a significant influence on the structure of CaWO{sub 4}. A broad absorption band of the WO{sub 4}{sup 2-} group is observed from photoluminescence and the energy transfer from WO{sub 4}{sup 2-} group to Tb{sup 3+} ions induces the f-f transition. The cross-relaxation between two adjacent Tb{sup 3+} ions weakens {sup 5}D{sub 3}-{sup 7}F{sub j} transitions and enhances the {sup 5}D{sub 4}-{sup 7}F{sub j} transitions, leading to a green long afterglow of the phosphors. The thermoluminescence curves centered around 75 Degree-Sign C reveal the trap depth for afterglow generation is about 0.74-0.77 eV. The optimum Tb{sup 3+} concentration for afterglow properties is about 1%. A deep hole trap is induced when Tb{sup 3+} concentration exceeds 1% and it suppresses the thermoluminescence and the decay properties.

  6. The multipole resonance probe: characterization of a prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapke, Martin; Oberrath, Jens; Schulz, Christian; Storch, Robert; Styrnoll, Tim; Zietz, Christian; Awakowicz, Peter; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Musch, Thomas; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Rolfes, Ilona

    2011-08-01

    The multipole resonance probe (MRP) was recently proposed as an economical and industry compatible plasma diagnostic device (Lapke et al 2008 Appl. Phys. Lett. 93 051502). This communication reports the experimental characterization of a first MRP prototype in an inductively coupled argon/nitrogen plasma at 10 Pa. The behavior of the device follows the predictions of both an analytical model and a numerical simulation. The obtained electron densities are in excellent agreement with the results of Langmuir probe measurements.

  7. Langmuir Probe Measurements of Inductively Coupled Plasma in CF4/AR/O2 Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. V. V. S.; Cruden, Brett; Sharma, Surendra; Meyyappan, Meyya

    2001-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasmas of CF4:Ar:O2, which have been of importance to material processing, were studied in the GEC cell at 80:10:10, 60:20:20, and 40:30:30 mixture ratios. Radial distributions of plasma potential (V(sub p)), electron and ion number densities (n(sub e) and n(sub i)), electron temperature (T(sub e)), and electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) were measured in the mid-plane of plasma across the electrodes in the pressure range of 10-50 mTorr, and RF power of 200 and 300 W. V(sub p), n(sub e) and n(sub i), which peak in the center of the plasma, increase with decrease of pressure. T(sub e) also increases with pressure but peaks toward the electrode edge. Both V(sub p) and T(sub e) remain nearly independent of RF power, whereas n(sub e) and n(sub i) increase with power. In all conditions the EEDFs exhibit non-Maxwellian shape and are more like Druyvesteyn form at higher energies. They exhibit a broad lip in the energy range 0-10 eV suggesting an electron loss mechanism, which could be due to via resonance electron attachment processes producing negative ions in this rich electronegative gas mixture. This behavior is more prominent towards the electrode edge.

  8. Langmuir Probe Measurements of Inductively Coupled Plasmas in CF4/Ar/O2 Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. V. V. S.; Cruden, Brett; Sharma, Surendra; Meyyappan, Meyya

    2001-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasmas of CF4:Ar:O2, which have been of importance to material processing, were studied in the GEC cell at 80:10:10, 60:20:20, and 40:30:30 mixture ratios. Radial distributions of plasma potential (V(sub p)), electron and ion number densities (n(sub e) and n(sub i), electron temperature (T(sub e)), and electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) were measured in the mid-plane of plasma across the electrodes in the pressure range of 10-50 mTorr, and RF (radio frequency) power of 200 and 300 W. V(sub p), n(sub e) and n(sub i), which peak in the center of the plasma, increase with decrease of pressure. T(sub e) also increases with pressure but peaks toward the electrode edge. Both V(sub p) and T(sub e) remain nearly independent of RF power, whereas n(sub e) and n(sub i) increase with power. In all conditions the EEDFs exhibit non-Maxwellian shape and are more like Druyvesteyn form at higher energies. They exhibit a broad dip in the energy range 0-10 eV suggesting an electron loss mechanism, which could be due to via resonance electron attachment processes producing negative ions in this rich electronegative gas mixture. This behavior is more prominent towards the electrode edge.

  9. Significant Chiral Signal Amplification of Langmuir Monolayers Probed by Second Harmonic Generation.

    PubMed

    Lv, Kai; Lin, Lu; Wang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Li; Guo, Yuan; Lu, Zhou; Liu, Minghua

    2015-05-01

    With the development of the nonlinear optical technique such as SHG (second harmonic generation), the in situ measurements of the chirality in the monolayers at the air/water interface have become possible. However, when performing the SHG measurement of the chirality in a monolayer, it is still a great challenge to obtain the chiral signals with a good S/N (signal-to-noise) ratio. In this Letter, interfacial assemblies with induced supramolecular chirality were used to amplify the weak chiral SHG signals from the monolayers at the air/water interface. Tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl) porphyrin (TPPS) J aggregates were used as the subphase, and when chiral amphiphilic molecules were spread on it, chiral domains of the amphiphile/TPPS J aggregates were formed and then significantly amplified chiral signals that otherwise could not be detected. Moreover, the sign of the DCE (degree of chiral excess) changed with the chirality of the amphiphilic molecules, thus providing a possible way to obtain the absolute chiral information in situ in the monolayers. PMID:26263339

  10. Cylindrical short-pulse Child-Langmuir law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Wee Shing

    2005-10-01

    Laser-driven short pulses have been prevalently used in photo-injectors to produce extremely high current densities. If the pulse length of the short-pulse current is less than the transit time across the gap, the space-charge-limiting (SCL) current density of the electron beam exceeds that of the classical long-pulse limit as given by the Child-Langmuir (CL) Law. The 1D short-pulse CL law for a planar electrode has been derived with verification from PIC simulation [1]. The extension to the 2D and 3D models of the short-pulse CL law has also been presented recently [2]. In the long pulse limit, the 2D and 3D CL laws for both planar and cylindrical diodes have also been developed [3]. In this paper, we will present the 1D and 2D short-pulse CL law in the coaxial cylinder configuration for both convergent and divergent flows. The analytical results will be compared with 2D PIC simulation results. [1] 'Ag'ust Valfells et. al. , ``Effects of pulse-length and emitter area in virtual cathode formation in electron guns'', Phys. Plasmas 9, 2377 (2002). [2] W. S. Koh and L. K. Ang, "Two-dimensional Short-Pulse Chid-Langmuir Law", The 32nd International Conference on Plasma Science (ICOPS), N05CH37707, 3P38, pp. 298 (2005).[3] W. S. Koh, et. al., Three-dimensional Child-Langmuir law for hot electron emission, Phys. Plasmas 12, 053107 (2005). Email: elkang@ntu.edu.sg

  11. Nonlinear wavenumber shift of large amplitude Langmuir waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dehui; Wang, Shaojie

    2016-07-01

    Nonlinear particle-in-cell simulation is carried out to investigate the nonlinear behavior of the Langmuir wave launched with a fixed frequency in a uniform plasma. It is found that in the strong driving case, the launched wave propagates in a phase velocity larger than that predicted by the linear theory; there appears a nonlinear down-shift of wavenumber. The phase velocity of the nonlinear wave and the down-shift of the wavenumber are demonstrated to be determined by the velocity of nonlinearly accelerated resonant electrons.

  12. Langmuir Turbulence in the Solar Wind : Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafft, C.; Volokitin, A.; Krasnoselskikh, V.

    2014-12-01

    Observations performed in the solar wind by different satellites show that electron beams accelerated in the low corona during solar flares can propagate up to distances around 1 AU, that Langmuir waves' packets can be clumped into spikes with peak amplitudes three orders of magnitude above the mean and that the average level of density fluctuations in the solar wind plasmas can reach several percents. A Hamiltonian model is built describing the properties of Langmuir waves propagating in a plasma with random density fluctuations by the Zakharov's equations and the beam by means of particles moving self-consistently in the fields of the waves. Numerical simulations, performed using parameters relevant to solar type III conditions at 1 AU, show that when the average level of density fluctuations is sufficiently low, the beam relaxation and the wave excitation processes are similar to those in a homogeneous plasma and can be described by the quasilinear equations of the weak turbulence theory. On the contrary, when the average level of density fluctuations overcomes some threshold depending on the ratio of the thermal velocity to the beam velocity, the plasma inhomogeneities crucially influence on the characteristics of the Langmuir turbulence and the beam-plasma interaction. In this case, fluxes of accelerated particles are observed, whose density and kinetic energy can be calculated as a function of the beam and plasma characteristics. Langmuir waveforms are presented in the form they would appear if recorded by a satellite moving in the solar wind. Comparison with recent measurements by the STEREO and WIND satellites shows that their characteristic features are very similar to the observations. Moreover, wave-wave coupling and three wave decay processes are studied as a function of the average level of plasma density fluctuations. References Volokitin, V. V. Krasnoselskikh, C. Krafft, and E. Kuznetsov, Modelling of the beam-plasma interaction in a strongly

  13. Hole burning on porphyrin centers in langmuir-blodgett films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, J.; Orrit, M.; Personov, R. I.; Samoilenko, A. D.

    1989-12-01

    Spectral holes were burnt in the excitation spectra of porphyrin centers imbedded in a multilayer assembly of poly-heptyl-cyanoacrylate Langmuir-Blodgett films. We found a strong dependence of the hole width on the burning wavelength and attributed it to energy transfer to lower energy centers in our concentrated sample. The temperature dependence of the hole width was measured between 1.7 and 10 K for two wavelengths and found steeper than in glasses but weaker than in most crystals. The holes were shallower and broader in a monolayer sample.

  14. Particle simulation of Langmuir turbulence during ionospheric heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, K. L.; Payne, G. L.; Nicholson, D. R.

    1990-01-01

    Ionospheric heating leads to strong Langmuir turbulence including modulational instability, soliton formation, and spatial collapse. The Zakharov model usually used to describe these effects contains a low-frequency ion-acoustic wave equation which cannot be rigorously justified in the ionosphere where the electron and ion temperatures are comparable. In the present work, the low-frequency physics is described by a many-ion computer simulation. While some differences are found, the results for the most part confirm the earlier, much less difficult, Zakharov calculations.

  15. An optical spectrum of the afterglow of a gamma-ray burst at a redshift of z = 6.295.

    PubMed

    Kawai, N; Kosugi, G; Aoki, K; Yamada, T; Totani, T; Ohta, K; Iye, M; Hattori, T; Aoki, W; Furusawa, H; Hurley, K; Kawabata, K S; Kobayashi, N; Komiyama, Y; Mizumoto, Y; Nomoto, K; Noumaru, J; Ogasawara, R; Sato, R; Sekiguchi, K; Shirasaki, Y; Suzuki, M; Takata, T; Tamagawa, T; Terada, H; Watanabe, J; Yatsu, Y; Yoshida, A

    2006-03-01

    The prompt gamma-ray emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) should be detectable out to distances of z > 10 (ref. 1), and should therefore provide an excellent probe of the evolution of cosmic star formation, reionization of the intergalactic medium, and the metal enrichment history of the Universe. Hitherto, the highest measured redshift for a GRB has been z = 4.50 (ref. 5). Here we report the optical spectrum of the afterglow of GRB 050904 obtained 3.4 days after the burst; the spectrum shows a clear continuum at the long-wavelength end of the spectrum with a sharp cut-off at around 9,000 A due to Lyman alpha absorption at z approximately 6.3 (with a damping wing). A system of absorption lines of heavy elements at z = 6.295 +/- 0.002 was also detected, yielding the precise measurement of the redshift. The Si ii fine-structure lines suggest a dense, metal-enriched environment around the progenitor of the GRB. PMID:16525466

  16. DETERMINATION OF THE INTRINSIC LUMINOSITY TIME CORRELATION IN THE X-RAY AFTERGLOWS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Petrosian, Vahe'; Singal, Jack; Ostrowski, Michal E-mail: vahep@stanford.edu E-mail: dainotti@oa.uj.edu.pl

    2013-09-10

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which have been observed up to redshifts z Almost-Equal-To 9.5, can be good probes of the early universe and have the potential to test cosmological models. Dainotti's analysis of GRB Swift afterglow light curves with known redshifts and a definite X-ray plateau shows an anti-correlation between the rest-frame time when the plateau ends (the plateau end time) and the calculated luminosity at that time (or approximately an anti-correlation between plateau duration and luminosity). Here, we present an update of this correlation with a larger data sample of 101 GRBs with good light curves. Since some of this correlation could result from the redshift dependences of these intrinsic parameters, namely, their cosmological evolution, we use the Efron-Petrosian method to reveal the intrinsic nature of this correlation. We find that a substantial part of the correlation is intrinsic and describe how we recover it and how this can be used to constrain physical models of the plateau emission, the origin of which is still unknown. The present result could help to clarify the debated nature of the plateau emission.

  17. Flowing afterglow measurements of the density dependence of gas-phase ion-ion mutual neutralization reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Shuman, Nicholas S.; Viggiano, Albert A.; Johnsen, Rainer

    2013-05-28

    We have studied the dependence of several ion-ion mutual neutralization (MN) reactions on helium density in the range from 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} to 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} at 300 K, using the Variable Electron and Neutral Density Attachment Mass Spectrometry method. The rate coefficients of the reactions Ar{sup +}+ Br{sub 2}{sup -}, Ar{sup +}+ SF{sub 6}{sup -}, and Ar{sup +}+ C{sub 7}F{sub 14}{sup -} were found to be independent of gas density over the range studied, in disagreement with earlier observations that similar MN reactions are strongly enhanced at the same gas densities. The cause of the previous enhancement with density is traced to the use of 'orbital-motion-limit' theory to infer ion densities from the currents collected by ion-attracting Langmuir probes in a region where it is not applicable.

  18. Gamma-ray burst radio afterglows from Population III stars: simulation methods and detection prospects with SKA precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macpherson, D.; Coward, D.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the prospects of detecting radio afterglows from long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) from Population III (Pop III) progenitors using the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) precursor instruments MWA (Murchison Widefield Array) and ASKAP (Australian SKA Pathfinder). We derive a realistic model of GRB afterglows that encompasses the widest range of plausible physical parameters and observation angles. We define the best case scenario of Pop III GRB energy and redshift distributions. Using probability distribution functions fitted to the observed microphysical parameters of long GRBs, we simulate a large number of Pop III GRB afterglows to find the global probability of detection. We find that ASKAP may be able to detect 35 per cent of Pop III GRB afterglows in the optimistic case, and 27 per cent in the pessimistic case. A negligible number will be detectable by MWA in either case. Detections per image for ASKAP, found by incorporating intrinsic rates with detectable time-scales, are as high as ˜6000 and as low as ˜11, which shows the optimistic case is unrealistic. We track how the afterglow flux density changes over various time intervals and find that, because of their very slow variability, the cadence for blind searches of these afterglows should be as long as possible. We also find Pop III GRBs at high redshift have radio afterglow light curves that are indistinguishable from those of regular long GRBs in the more local Universe.

  19. Luminescence and afterglow in Sr{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+}, RE{sup 3+} [RE = Ce, Nd, Sm and Dy] phosphors-Role of co-dopants in search for afterglow

    SciTech Connect

    Lakshminarasimhan, N. Varadaraju, U.V.

    2008-11-03

    Luminescence of Eu{sup 2+} in Sr{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+}, RE{sup 3+} [RE = Ce, Nd, Sm and Dy] phosphors was studied with a view to obtain an afterglow phosphor. The synthesized phosphors were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), diffuse reflectance, photo- and thermoluminescence spectroscopic techniques. Afterglow was observed only with Dy{sup 3+} co-doped phosphor. The observed afterglow with Dy{sup 3+} co-doping originated from the formation of suitable traps which was supported by thermoluminescence results.

  20. Gas Phase Model of Surface Reactions for N{2} Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marković, V. Lj.; Petrović, Z. Lj.; Pejović, M. M.

    1996-07-01

    The adequacy of the homogeneous gas phase model as a representation of the surface losses of diffusing active particles in gas phase is studied. As an example the recent data obtained for the surface recombination coefficients are reanalyzed. The data were obtained by the application of the breakdown delay times which consists of the measurements of the breakdown delay times t_d as a function of the afterglow period tau. It was found that for the conditions of our experiment, the diffusion should not be neglected as the final results are significantly different when obtained by approximate gas phase representation and by exact numerical solution to the diffusion equation. While application of the gas phase effective coefficients to represent surface losses gives an error in the value of the recombination coefficient, it reproduces correctly other characteristics such as order of the process which can be obtained from simple fits to the experimental data. Dans cet article, nous étudions la validité du modèle approximatif représentant les pertes superficielles des particules actives qui diffusent de la phase gazeuse comme pertes dans la phase homogène du gaz. Les données actuelles du coefficient de recombination en surface sont utilisées par cette vérification . Les données experimentales sont obtenues en utilisant la technique qui consiste en la mesure du temps de retard du début de la décharge en fonction de la période de relaxation. Nous avons trouvé que, pour nos conditions expérimentales, la diffusion ne peut être négligée. Aussi, les résultats finals sont considérablement différents quand ils sont obtenus en utilisant le modèle approximatif par comparaison aves les résultats obtenus par la solution numérique exacte de l'équation de la diffusion. L'application des coefficients effectifs dans la phase gaseuse pour la présentation des pertes superficielles donne, pour les coefficients de la recombinaison, des valeurs qui diffèrent en

  1. Erratum: The Late Afterglow and Host Galaxy of GRB 990712

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjorth, J.; Holland, S.; Courbin, F.; Dar, A.; Olsen, L. F.; Scodeggio, M.

    2000-08-01

    In the Letter ``The Late Afterglow and Host Galaxy of GRB 990712'' by J. Hjorth, S. Holland, F. Courbin, A. Dar, L. F. Olsen, & M. Scodeggio (ApJ, 534, L147 [2000]), there was an error in the flux calibration of the spectrum. The y-axis scale of Figure 2 and the fluxes in the last column of Table 1 should be multiplied by a factor of 3.47 to read 2.25, 0.86, 1.61, and 3.79×10-16 ergs s-1 cm-2. The error affects the luminosities and star formation rates (SFRs) presented in the third and fourth paragraphs of § 5 as follows. In the third paragraph, the total SFR based on the continuum flux should be 0.91-1.41 Msolar yr-1 instead of 0.29-0.45 the [O II] luminosity should be L3727=1.5×1041 ergs s-1 instead of 6.3×1040 and the implied [O II] SFR should be 2.12+/-0.60 Msolar yr-1 instead of 0.88+/-0.25. Consequently, the last two sentences of this paragraph are revised to read ``The derived SFR (from the [O II] flux) is about half of the SFR found by Bloom et al. (1999b) for the host of GRB 990123 and 2-3 times that of the host of GRB 970508 (Bloom et al. 1998). The specific SFR per unit luminosity of the GRB 990712 host galaxy is comparable to that of the host galaxies of GRB 990123 and GRB 970508.'' In the fourth paragraph, the total V-band flux in the feature should be 0.405+/-0.004 μJy instead of 0.323+/-0.003 the power-law spectral index should be β=-2.57 instead of -2.93 and the SFR in the feature should be 0.11-0.17 Msolar instead of 0.03-0.05. The main results and conclusions of the original Letter are unaffected by the error. The authors thank P. M. Vreeswijk for bringing this error to their attention.

  2. Complicated variations in the early optical afterglow of GRB 090726

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šimon, V.; Polášek, C.; Jelínek, M.; Hudec, R.; Štrobl, J.

    2010-02-01

    Aims: We report on the detection of an early rising phase of optical afterglow (OA) of a long GRB 090726. We resolve a complicated profile of the optical light curve. We also investigate the relation of the optical and X-ray emission of this event. Methods: We made use of the optical photometry of this OA obtained by the 0.5 m telescope of AI AS CR, supplemented by the data obtained by other observers, and the X-ray Swift/XRT data. Results: The optical emission peaked at ˜17.5 mag(R) at t - T0 ≈ 500 s. We find a complex profile of the light curve during the early phase of this OA: an approximately power-law rise, a rapid transition to a plateau, a weak flare superimposed on the center of this plateau, and a slowly steepening early decline followed by a power-law decay. We discuss several possibilities for explaining the short flare on the flat top of the optical light curve at t-T0 ≈ 500 s. Activity of the central engine is favored, although reverse shock cannot be ruled out. We show that power-law outflow with Θ_obs/Θc > 2.5 is the best case for the OA of GRB 090726. The initial Lorentz factor is Γ0 ≈ 230-530 in the case of propagation of the blast wave in a homogeneous medium, while propagation of this wave in a wind environment gives Γ0 ≈ 80-300. The value of Γ0 in GRB 090726 thus falls into the lower half of the range observed in GRBs and it may even lie on the lower end. We also show that both the optical and X-ray emission decayed simultaneously and that the spectral profile from X-ray to the optical band did not vary. This is true for both the time periods before and after the break in the X-ray light curve. This break can be regarded as achromatic. The available data show that neither the dust nor the gaseous component of the circumburst medium underwent any evolution during the decay of this OA, that is, after t-T0 < 3000 s. We also show that this OA belongs to the least luminous ones in the phase of its power-law decay, corresponding to what

  3. Shear-induced molecular precession in a hexatic Langmuir monolayer.

    PubMed

    Ignés-Mullol, J; Schwartz, D K

    2001-03-15

    Liquid crystalline behaviour is generally limited to a select group of specially designed bulk substances. By contrast, it is a common feature of simple molecular monolayers and other quasi-two-dimensional systems, which often possess a type of in-plane ordering that results from unbinding of dislocations-a 'hexatic' liquid crystalline phase. The flow of monolayers is closely related to molecular transport in biological membranes, affects foam and emulsion stability and is relevant to microfluidics research. For liquid crystalline phases, it is important to understand the coupling of the molecular orientation to the flow. Orientationally ordered (nematic) phases in bulk liquid crystals exhibit 'shear aligning' or 'tumbling' behaviour under shear, and are described quantitatively by Leslie-Ericksen theory. For hexatic monolayers, the effects of flow have been inferred from textures of Langmuir-Blodgett films and directly observed at the macroscopic level. However, there is no accepted model of hexatic flow at the molecular level. Here we report observations of a hexatic Langmuir monolayer that reveal continuous, shear-induced molecular precession, interrupted by occasional jump discontinuities. Although superficially similar to tumbling in a bulk nematic phase, the kinematic details are quite different and provide a possible mechanism for domain coarsening and eventual molecular alignment in monolayers. We explain the precession and jumps within a quantitative framework that involves coupling of molecular orientation to the local molecular hexatic 'lattice', which is continuously deformed by shear. PMID:11268206

  4. The effect of kinetic processes on Langmuir turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Sanbonmatsu, K. Y.; Vu, H. X.; Bezzerides, B.; DuBois, D. F.

    2000-05-01

    Kinetic processes are shown to be crucial in determining the saturation level of stimulated Raman scattering for regimes relevant to NOVA [Campbell et al., Fusion Technol. 21, 1344 (1992)] and the National Ignition Facility [Lindl, Phys. Plasmas 2, 3933 (1995)]. To investigate these kinetic effects, the Zakharov, quasilinear-Zakharov, and reduced-description particle-in-cell simulation models are compared in the test case of a uniformly driven plasma. Good agreement is observed between all three simulation methods for relatively low primary Langmuir wave numbers (k{sub 1}{lambda}{sub De}{approx}0.1) in weakly driven regimes. In the strongly driven case, quasilinear diffusion provides an important correction to the Landau damping rate, producing saturation levels in agreement with reduced-description particle-in-cell simulations, in contrast to pure Zakharov simulations, which overestimate the saturation significantly. At higher k{sub 1}{lambda}{sub De}{approx}0.25, both the quasilinear-Zakharov and pure Zakharov models fail. In this regime, the autocorrelation time of the Langmuir wave spectrum is much larger than the quasilinear diffusion time, causing the quasilinear diffusion approximation to break down. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  5. The influence of flowing afterglow exposure on the degradation of various polymeric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Letton, Alan; Rock, Neil I.; Williams, Kevin D.

    1991-01-01

    Changes in polymer properties which result after exposure to an atomic oxygen-rich environment of a flowing afterglow are presented. Dynamic mechanical and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectra as well as scanning electron microscopy micrographs were employed to monitor variations in mechanical properties and chemical and physical structure. Polymers analyzed include polystyrene, PEKK, and a polyester.

  6. Constraints on the Source for Gamma-ray bursts from Observed X-Ray Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, Grant; Ruffini, Remo

    2015-04-01

    X-ray afterglows from long-duration gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are associated with energetic type Ic supernovae and the late time behavior of the afterglow from all GRBs follows the same universal normalization and power-law behavior at late times (~104 - 107 sec) when plotted relative to the time of the initial GRB trigger. We describe constraints from this afterglow on the engine for GRBs in the context of simple model for X-ray emission from accelerated relativistic electrons within an outgoing relativistic shock. We show that this universal scaling imposes 3 constraints: 1) The shock breakout energy is the same (~1051 ergs) for all bursts independently of the observed GRB luminosity; 2) After breakout, the shock propagates through an optically thin low-density (~ 1 - 10 g cm-3 medium; 3) The energy radiated by the shock is a small fraction of the total shock energy. These suggest that the late-time power-law afterglow emission derives from the underlying energetic supernova with a similar total shock energy. The correlation of the of the observed GRB energy with the luminosity of the plateau suggests a GRB engine occurring at different radii within the expanding SN consistent with the induced gravitational collapse paradigm. Work at the University of Notre Dame (GJM) supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Nuclear Theory Grant DE-FG02-95-ER40934.

  7. CORRELATED SPECTRAL AND TEMPORAL BEHAVIOR OF LATE-TIME AFTERGLOWS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon

    2012-12-20

    The cannonball (CB) model of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) predicts that the asymptotic behavior of the spectral energy density of GRB afterglows is a power law in time and in frequency, and the difference between the temporal and spectral power-law indices, {alpha}{sub X} - {beta}{sub X}, is restricted to the values 0, 1/2, and 1. Here we report the distributions of the values {alpha}{sub X} and {beta}{sub X}, and their difference for a sample of 315 Swift GRBs. This sample includes all Swift GRBs that were detected before 2012 August 1, whose X-ray afterglow extended well beyond 1 day and the estimated error in {alpha}{sub X} - {beta}{sub X} was {<=}0.25. The values of {alpha}{sub X} were extracted from the CB-model fits to the entire light curves of their X-ray afterglow while the spectral index was extracted by the Swift team from the time-integrated X-ray afterglow of these GRBs. We found that the distribution of the difference {alpha}{sub X} - {beta}{sub X} for these 315 Swift GRBs has three narrow peaks around 0, 1/2, and 1 whose widths are consistent with being due to the measurement errors, in agreement with the CB-model prediction.

  8. Testing Models for the Shallow Decay Phase of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows with Polarization Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Mi-Xiang; Wu, Xue-Feng; Dai, Zi-Gao

    2016-08-01

    The X-ray afterglows of almost one-half of gamma-ray bursts have been discovered by the Swift satellite to have a shallow decay phase of which the origin remains mysterious. Two main models have been proposed to explain this phase: relativistic wind bubbles (RWBs) and structured ejecta, which could originate from millisecond magnetars and rapidly rotating black holes, respectively. Based on these models, we investigate polarization evolution in the shallow decay phase of X-ray and optical afterglows. We find that in the RWB model, a significant bump of the polarization degree evolution curve appears during the shallow decay phase of both optical and X-ray afterglows, while the polarization position angle abruptly changes its direction by 90°. In the structured ejecta model, however, the polarization degree does not evolve significantly during the shallow decay phase of afterglows whether the magnetic field configuration in the ejecta is random or globally large-scale. Therefore, we conclude that these two models for the shallow decay phase and relevant central engines would be testable with future polarization observations.

  9. Measurement of effective sheath width around cutoff probe in low-pressure plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D. W.; Oh, W. Y.; You, S. J. Kim, J. H.; Chang, H. Y.

    2014-05-15

    Previous studies indicated that the measurement results of microwave probes can be improved by applying the adequate sheath width to their measurement models, and consequently the sheath width around the microwave probe tips has become very important information for microwave probe diagnostics. In this paper, we propose a method for measuring the argon plasma sheath width around the cutoff probe tips by applying the circuit model to the cutoff probe phase spectrum. The measured sheath width of the cutoff probe was found to be in good agreement with the floated sheath width calculated from the Child-Langmuir sheath law. The physical reasons for a discrepancy between the two measurements are also discussed.

  10. Measurement of effective sheath width around cutoff probe in low-pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D. W.; You, S. J.; Kim, J. H.; Chang, H. Y.; Oh, W. Y.

    2014-05-01

    Previous studies indicated that the measurement results of microwave probes can be improved by applying the adequate sheath width to their measurement models, and consequently the sheath width around the microwave probe tips has become very important information for microwave probe diagnostics. In this paper, we propose a method for measuring the argon plasma sheath width around the cutoff probe tips by applying the circuit model to the cutoff probe phase spectrum. The measured sheath width of the cutoff probe was found to be in good agreement with the floated sheath width calculated from the Child-Langmuir sheath law. The physical reasons for a discrepancy between the two measurements are also discussed.

  11. The Late-time Afterglow of the Extremely Energetic Short Burst GRB 090510 Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guelbenzu, A. Nicuesa; Klose, S.; Kruehler, T.; Greiner, J.; Rossi, A.; Kann, D. A.; Olivares, F.; Rau, A.; Afonso, P. M. J.; Elliott, J.; Filgas, R.; Yoldas, A. Kuepcue; McBreen, S.; Nardini, M.; Schady, P.; Schmidl, S.; Sudilovsky, V.; Updike, A. C.; Yoldas, A.

    2012-01-01

    Context. The Swift discovery of the short burst GRB 090510 has raised considerable attention mainly because of two reasons: first, it had a bright optical afterglow, and second it is among the most energetic events detected so far within the entire GRB population (long plus short). The afterglow of GRB 090510 was observed with Swift/UVOT and Swift/XRT and evidence of a jet break around 1.5 ks after the burst has been reported in the literature, implying that after this break the optical and X-ray light curve should fade with the same decay slope. Aims. As noted by several authors, the post-break decay slope seen in the UVOT data is much shallower than the steep decay in the X-ray band, pointing to a (theoretically hard to understand) excess of optical flux at late times. We assess here the validity of this peculiar behavior. Methods. We reduced and analyzed new afterglow light-curve data obtained with the multichannel imager GROND. These additional g'r'i'z' data were then combined with the UVOT and XRT data to study the behavior of the afterglow at late times more stringently. Results. Based on the densely sampled data set obtained with GROND, we find that the optical afterglow of GRB 090510 did indeed enter a steep decay phase starting around 22 ks after the burst. During this time the GROND optical light curve is achromatic, and its slope is identical to the slope of the X-ray data. In combination with the UVOT data this implies that a second break must have occurred in the optical light curve around 22 ks post burst, which, however, has no obvious counterpart in the X-ray band, contradicting the interpretation that this could be another jet break. Conclusions. The GROND data provide the missing piece of evidence that the optical afterglow of GRB 090510 did follow a post-jet break evolution at late times. The break seen in the optical light curve around 22 ks in combination with its missing counterpart in the X-ray band could be due to the passage of the

  12. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, W.S.; O'Rourke, P.E.

    1994-08-02

    A support structure is described bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe. 3 figs.

  13. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, William S.; O'Rourke, Patrick E.

    1994-01-01

    A support structure bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe.

  14. The Langmuir waves associated with the 1 December 2013 type II burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, D. B.; Cairns, Iver H.

    2015-06-01

    The Langmuir waves associated with an interplanetary type II source region are presented. The type II burst was first observed on 29 November 2013 by STEREO A and B, with the shock crossing STEREO A on 1 December 2013. In the foreshock region upstream of the shock, 11 Langmuir-like waveforms were recorded by STEREO A's Time Domain Sampler on three orthogonal antennas. The observed Langmuir wave electric fields are of large amplitude and aligned with the background magnetic field. Some of the waveforms show evidence of electrostatic decay, and several are consistent with Langmuir eigenmodes of density wells. Harmonic electric fields are observed simultaneously with the Langmuir waveforms and are consistent with fields produced by nonlinear currents. The beam speeds vb exciting the Langmuir waves are estimated from the waveform data, yielding speeds vb≈ (0.01-0.04)c. These are consistent with previous observations. The beam speeds are slower than those associated with type III solar radio bursts, consistent with the Langmuir wave electric fields being field aligned. The evidence found for electrostatic decay and against strong perpendicular fields, and so low-wave number Langmuir/z-mode waves, suggests that the dominant emission mechanisms for this type II foreshock involve electrostatic decay and nonlinear wave processes, rather than linear-mode conversion. Harmonic radio emission via antenna mechanisms involving Langmuir waves remains possible.

  15. Nonlinear amplification of Langmuir waves in a plasma with regular and random magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivitskii, V. S.; Priadko, Iu. M.; Tsytovich, V. N.

    1990-07-01

    The nonlinear interaction of Langmuir waves in a turbulent plasma with random resonance magnetic fields in the presence of an external regular magnetic field is investigated analytically. In particular, attention is given to the possibility of Langmuir wave amplification using the plasma maser effect. The frequency and angle dependences of the amplification increment (attenuation decrement) of Langmuir waves are determined in the isotropic case and in the presence of anisotropy. For an anisotropic particle distribution function, the amplification increment of Langmuir waves may reach values of the order of the plasma frequency.

  16. Determination Of Plasma Parameters In The PUPR Mirror and Cusp Plasma Machine Via Electrostatic Probe Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Rivera, Miguel A.; Colmenares, Franklyn; Leal, David; Rivera, Ramon; Leal-Quiros, Edbertho; Gonzales, Angel

    2006-12-04

    Electrostatic probes are constructed for the PUPR Mirror and Cusp Plasma Machine and preliminary measurements of the plasma parameters are obtained. The machine is cylindrical in shape with two copper coils wound around the machine to provide the necessary mirror or cusp field configuration. The plasma is heated using the electron cyclotron heating method at a frequency of 2.45 GHz. I-V characteristics are obtained using single, double, and emissive Langmuir probes in Argon plasma at approximately 1*10-4 Torr and with approximate field strength of {approx} 0.1T at the point cusp. The single and double Langmuir probes consist of 3.5 mm radius stainless steel disks. Characteristics are obtained for the single and double Langmuir probes using a source meter and programming a voltage sweep while recording the current from the digital readout. The emissive probe is constructed by using a tungsten filament and characteristics are obtained in a manner similar to that described for the single and double Langmuir probes. An emission current is superposed on top of the sweeping signal using a DC power source. An electron temperature of approximately 7.5eV is observed in the plasma at a density of {approx}4.0*1014m-3 using the single Langmuir probe. In addition, with the distribution function obtained from the single probe, the plasma potential is observed to be approximately 25-30V. The measurement of 25-30V for the plasma potential is supported by measurements obtained from the emissive probe.

  17. Determination Of Plasma Parameters In The PUPR Mirror and Cusp Plasma Machine Via Electrostatic Probe Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Rivera, Miguel A.; Colmenares, Franklyn; Leal, David; Rivera, Ramon; Gonzales, Angel; Leal-Quiros, Edbertho

    2006-12-01

    Electrostatic probes are constructed for the PUPR Mirror and Cusp Plasma Machine and preliminary measurements of the plasma parameters are obtained. The machine is cylindrical in shape with two copper coils wound around the machine to provide the necessary mirror or cusp field configuration. The plasma is heated using the electron cyclotron heating method at a frequency of 2.45 GHz. I-V characteristics are obtained using single, double, and emissive Langmuir probes in Argon plasma at approximately 1*10-4 Torr and with approximate field strength of ˜ 0.1T at the point cusp. The single and double Langmuir probes consist of 3.5 mm radius stainless steel disks. Characteristics are obtained for the single and double Langmuir probes using a source meter and programming a voltage sweep while recording the current from the digital readout. The emissive probe is constructed by using a tungsten filament and characteristics are obtained in a manner similar to that described for the single and double Langmuir probes. An emission current is superposed on top of the sweeping signal using a DC power source. An electron temperature of approximately 7.5eV is observed in the plasma at a density of ˜4.0*1014m-3 using the single Langmuir probe. In addition, with the distribution function obtained from the single probe, the plasma potential is observed to be approximately 25-30V. The measurement of 25-30V for the plasma potential is supported by measurements obtained from the emissive probe.

  18. The geometry of interacting liquid domains in Langmuir monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinig, Peter

    2003-07-01

    The present work investigates the structure formation and wetting in two dimensional (2D) Langmuir monolayer phases in local thermodynamic equilibrium. A Langmuir monolayer is an isolated 2D system of surfactants at the air/water interface. It exhibits crystalline, liquid crystalline, liquid and gaseous phases differing in positional and/or orientational order. Permanent electric dipole moments of the surfactants lead to a long range repulsive interaction and to the formation of mesoscopic patterns. An interaction model is used describing the structure formation as a competition between short range attraction (bare line tension) and long range repulsion (surface potentials) on a scale Delta. Delta has the meaning of a dividing length between the short and long range interaction. In the present work the thermodynamic equilibrium conditions for the shape of two phase boundary lines (Young-Laplace equation) and three phase intersection points (Young′s condition) are derived and applied to describe experimental data: The line tension is measured by pendant droplet tensiometry. The bubble shape and size of 2D foams is calculated numerically and compared to experimental foams. Contact angles are measured by fitting numerical solutions of the Young-Laplace equation on micron scale. The scaling behaviour of the contact angle allows to measure a lower limit for Delta. Further it is discussed, whether in biological membranes wetting transitions are a way in order to control reaction kinetics. Studies performed in our group are discussed with respect to this question in the framework of the above mentioned theory. Finally the apparent violation of Gibbs′ phase rule in Langmuir monolayers (non-horizontal plateau of the surface pressure/area-isotherm, extended three phase coexistence region in one component systems) is investigated quantitatively. It has been found that the most probable explanation are impurities within the system whereas finite size effects or the

  19. Dynamic Properties of Langmuir Films by Laser Light Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, John Newell

    A technique and instrumentation for measuring visco-elastic properties of Langmuir film organic monolayers has been developed. This technique is used to characterize certain films used in the manufacture of Langmuir-Blodgett solid films. Furthermore a comparison of the dynamic viscous and elastic moduli determined by this technique is made with static values determined from the Pressure versus Area Isotherm. Briefly, a Langmuir film consists of amphiphilic organic molecules spread in a trough filled with pure water. The hydrophobic ends of the molecules trap them on the water surface. When spread at a dilute concentration the molecules exhibit two dimensional ideal gas behavior. By increasing the surface concentration one obtains two dimensional liquid and finally two dimensional solid behavior. The measurement is performed by electrodynamically driving the liquid surface with the electric field from a razor blade brought to within less than 1 mm of the surface. A sinusoidally varying electric field induces dipoles in the water subphase and generates waves at twice the driving frequency (Attractive dipoles are generated whether the field is positive or negative). The space propagation and damping of these waves is measured by laser light scattering. A focused laser beam incident on the surface is reflected at an angle due to the slope of the waves on the surface. By observing the movement of the beam the amplitude and phase of the oscillation with respect to the driving function may be determined (via a Lock-In amplifier) at various distances from the razor blade. One may directly profile the waves by translating the profiler, or one may observe the variation in amplitude and phase while scanning the frequency or surface pressure. In the latter cases one uses a known reference state to determine the wavelength and damping from the amplitude and phase change. This data is fit by a non-linear least squares curve fitting program to determine the wavelength and space

  20. Evaluation of the end-to-end distance of chains solubilized in a polymer Langmuir monolayer by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaki, Jiro

    Polymer chain packing in two-dimensional (2D) condense state is still not well understood. Direct observation of the chain packing in a monolayer should be the best way to understand this, however, it is still difficult even using atomic force microscopy (AFM) except for extraordinarily thick polymers. In this study, we successfully evaluate the end-to-end distance of the chains in a Langmuir-Blodgett monolayer composed of a conventional polymer by AFM. We successfully solubilized a small amount of a polystyrene-b-poly(methyl methacrylate)-b-polystyrene (PS-b-PMMA-b-PS) triblock copolymer in a PMMA Langmuir monolayer with the PS blocks being condensed as single-PS-block particles which could be used as a probe of the position of the chain ends. The evaluated end-to-end distance was 2.5 times longer than that of the 2D ideal chain, indicating the chains in the 2D monolayer are not strongly segregated but interpenetrates into other chains.

  1. Tethered Chains in Poor Solvent Conditions: An Experimental Study Involving Langmuir Diblock Copolymer Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, M.S.; Lee, L.T.; Majewski, J.; Satija, S.; Smith, G.S.

    1998-10-13

    We have employed Langmuir monolayer of highly asymmetric polydimethylsiloxane- polystyrene (PDMS-PS) diblock copolymers on dioctyl phthalate (DOP) at temperatures ranging from 22 "C to -35 `C as a model system for tethered chains in poor solvent conditions. The thicknesses of the tethered PS layers extending into the DOP subphase, measured by neutron reflection, decrease with decreasing temperature (T) over this entire r~ge. However, the v~iation with T becomes weak below -20 "C. At the ]owest T, the layer thicknesses are contracted 55 % -75 `% of their values at the theta condition (T8 = 22 "C), but are still quite swollen compared to the fully collapsed, nonsolvent limit. The contraction of the layer with decreasing T is determined as a function of surface density and molecular weight. These data are compared to universal scaling forms. The PS segments are depleted from the air surface over the entire T range, the thickness of the depletion layer increasing slightly with decreasing T. The free energy of the surface layer is probed by surface tension measurements. Negative surface pressures are observed at low coverages for both PDMS-PS and PDMS monolayer, indicating metastability toward lateral phase separation. Evidence for a trruisition from a dispersed phase to a condensed phase with decreasing T was observed in the reflectivity at very low PDMS-PS coverage.

  2. Langmuir films of an amide extracted from Piperaceae and its interaction with phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, P. A.; Oliveira, O. N.; Aroca, R. F.; Chierice, G. O.; Constantino, C. J. L.

    2005-06-01

    In this work, we investigate Langmuir monolayers from an amide extracted from dried roots of Ottonia propinqua, a native Brazilian plant believed to exhibit anesthetic and hallucinogen activities. In addition to producing monolayers from the amide itself, we probe the molecular-level action of the amide on phospholipids employed as simple membrane models. The surface pressure-molecular area ( π- A) isotherms for the amide were little affected by a number of subphase conditions. Almost no changes were observed upon varying the compression speed, spreading volume onto the surface, ions in the subphase, ionic strength and the solution solvent. However, stronger effects occurred when the subphase temperature and pH were altered, as the isotherms were shifted to larger areas with increasing temperatures and decreasing pHs. These results are discussed in terms of the molecular packing adopted by the amide at the air-water interface. In the mixed films with arachidic acid, the area per molecule varied linearly with the concentration of amide, probably due to phase separation. On the other hand, in the mixed films with dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline (DPPC), small amounts of the amide were sufficient to change the π- A isotherms significantly. This points to a strong molecular-level interaction, probably between the phosphate group in the zwitterion of DPPC and the nitrogen from the amidic group.

  3. Properties of Langmuir wave bursts associated with magnetic holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDowall, R. J.; Lin, N.; Kellogg, P. J.; Phillips, J. L.; Neugebauer, M.; Balogh, A.; Forsyth, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    The radio and plasma wave receivers on the Ulysses spacecraft have detected thousands of short-duration bursts of waves at approximately the electron plasma frequency. These wave events believed to be Langmuir waves are usually less than approximately 5 minutes in duration. They occur in or at the boundaries of depletions in the magnetic field amplitude known as magnetic holes. Using the 16 sec time resolution provided by the plasma frequency receiver, it is possible to examine the density structure inside of magnetic holes. Even higher time resolutions are sometimes available from the radio receiver data. The Ulysses observations show that these wave bursts occur more frequently at high heliographic latitudes; the occurrence rates depend on both latitude and distance from the Sun. We review the statistics for the wave events, compare them to magnetic and plasma parameters, and review the reasons for the more frequent occurrence at high heliographic latitudes.

  4. Photocontrol of protein conformation in a Langmuir monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicuta, Pietro; Hopkinson, Ian; Petrov, Peter G.

    2001-12-01

    We report a method to control the conformation of a weak polyampholyte (the protein β-casein) in Langmuir monolayers by light, even though the protein is not photosensitive. Our approach is to couple the monolayer state to a photochemical reaction excited in the liquid subphase. The conformational transition of the protein molecule is triggered through its sensitivity to a subphase bulk field (pH in this study), changing in the course of the photochemical process. Thus, reaction of photoaquation of the ferrocyanide ion, which increases the subphase pH from 7.0 to about 8.3, produces a change in the surface monolayer pressure, ΔΠ, between -0.5 and +1.5 mN/m (depending on the surface concentration), signalling a conformational switch. The approach proposed here can be used to selectively target and influence different interfacial properties by light, without embedding photosensitizers in the matrix.

  5. Highly conducting graphene sheets and Langmuir-Blodgett films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaolin; Zhang, Guangyu; Bai, Xuedong; Sun, Xiaoming; Wang, Xinran; Wang, Enge; Dai, Hongjie

    2008-09-01

    Graphene is an intriguing material with properties that are distinct from those of other graphitic systems. The first samples of pristine graphene were obtained by `peeling off' and epitaxial growth. Recently, the chemical reduction of graphite oxide was used to produce covalently functionalized single-layer graphene oxide. However, chemical approaches for the large-scale production of highly conducting graphene sheets remain elusive. Here, we report that the exfoliation-reintercalation-expansion of graphite can produce high-quality single-layer graphene sheets stably suspended in organic solvents. The graphene sheets exhibit high electrical conductance at room and cryogenic temperatures. Large amounts of graphene sheets in organic solvents are made into large transparent conducting films by Langmuir-Blodgett assembly in a layer-by-layer manner. The chemically derived, high-quality graphene sheets could lead to future scalable graphene devices.

  6. Studies of Strong Langmuir Turbulence at the HAARP Ionospheric Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheerin, J. P.; Bacon, M. E.; Gerres, J. M.; Watkins, B. J.; Bristow, W. A.; Oyama, S. I.; Heinselman, C. J.

    2008-11-01

    High power HF transmitters have induced a number of plasma instabilities in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma. We report results from a series of such experiments using over one gigawatt of HF power (ERP) in comprehensive studies of strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) and particle acceleration at the HAARP Observatory, Gakona, Alaska. Among the effects observed and studied are: SLT spectra including the outshifted plasma line or free-mode, appearance of a short timescale ponderomotive overshoot effect, collapse, cascade and co-existing spectra, control of artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI), the aspect angle dependence of the plasma line, and suprathermal electrons. We explore the observed magnetic-zenith effect of enhanced turbulence backscatter with the HF pump wave directed up the field line. We have discovered a second region of strong interaction displaced southward of the primary HF interaction region. Experimental results are compared to previous high latitude experiments and predictions from recent modeling efforts.

  7. Quasiperiodic behavior in beam-driven strong Langmuir turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, P. A.; Newman, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    The evolution of unmagnetized beam-driven strong Langmuir turbulence is studied in two dimensions by numerically integrating the Zakharov equations for systems pumped by monochromatic and broadband negative-damping drivers with nonzero central wavenumber. Long-time statistically steady states are reached for which the dependence of the evolution on the driver wavenumber, growth rate, and bandwidth is examined in detail. For monochromatic drivers, a quasiperiodic cycle is found to develop if the driver wavenumber is sufficiently large. The characteristic frequency of the quasiperiodic cycle and the average system energy are both approximately proportional to the growth rate. Broadening of the driver in wavenumber tends to degrade the system-wide coherence of the cycle, but its main features appear to survive on the scale of the coherence length of the driver.

  8. Ferroelectric nanomesa formation from polymer Langmuir-Blodgett films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Mengjun; Ducharme, Stephen

    2004-10-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale ferroelectric structures consisting of disk-shaped nanomesas averaging 8.7±0.4nm in height and 95±22nm in diameter, and nanowells 9.8±3.3nm in depth and 128±37nm in diameter, formed from Langmuir-Blodgett films of vinylidene fluoride copolymers after annealing in the paraelectric phase. The nanomesas retain the ferroelectric properties of the bulk material and so may be suitable for use in high-density nonvolatile random-access memories, acoustic transducer arrays, or infrared imaging arrays. The nanomesa and nanowell patterns may provide useful templates for nanoscale molding or contact-printing.

  9. Langmuir-like waves and radiation in planetary foreshocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.; Anderson, R. R.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.

    1995-01-01

    The basic objectives of this NASA Grant are to develop theoretical understandings (tested with spacecraft data) of the generation and characteristics of electron plasma waves, commonly known as Langmuir-like waves, and associated radiation near f(sub p) and 2f(sub p) in planetary foreshocks. (Here f(sub p) is plasma frequency.) Related waves and radiation in the source regions of interplanetary type III solar radio bursts provide a simpler observational and theoretical context for developing and testing such understandings. Accordingly, applications to type III bursts constitute a significant fraction of the research effort. The testing of the new Stochastic Growth Theory (SGT) for type III bursts, and its extension and testing for foreshock waves and radiation, constitutes a major longterm strategic goal of the research effort.

  10. Soliton and strong Langmuir turbulence in solar flare processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, M. T.; Wu, S. T.; Dryer, M.

    1989-01-01

    The occurrence of modulational instability in the current sheet of a solar flare is investigated. Special attention is given to the plasma microinstability in this sheet and its relation to the flare process. It is found that solitons or strong Langmuir turbulence are likely to occur in the diffusion region under solar flare conditions in which the electric resistivity could be enhanced by several orders of magnitude in the region, resulting in significant heating and stochastic acceleration of particles. A numerical example is used to demonstrate the transition of the magnetic field velocity and plasma density from the outer MHD region into the diffusive region and then back out again with the completion of the energy conversion process. This is all made possible by an increase in resistivity of four to five orders of magnitude over the classical value.

  11. Langmuir films study on lipid-containing artificial tears.

    PubMed

    Torrent-Burgués, J

    2016-04-01

    Lipid-containing artificial tears are a type of artificial tears that use lipid components in order to restore the lipid layer of the tear film. One of these components is lecithin which can be applied in spray solutions containing lecithin liposomes. In this work the behavior of three of these commercial tears based on lecithin, Innoxa, Opticalm and Optrex, are studied using the Langmuir technique. The obtained isotherms are presented, discussed and compared. This technique seems useful in order to see the film behavior of the lipid components of these tears and determine some important parameters such as fluidity and extension at the air-water interface, and allows us to discern differences between these commercial tears. Innoxa and Optrex tears are more similar to each other than to Opticalm tears. Opticalm presents more fluidity, probably due to the presence of more insaturations in the fatty acid chains of the phospholipids of the lecithin used in fabrication. PMID:26764100

  12. The puzzling afterglow of GRB 050721: a rebrightening seen in the optical but not in the X-ray

    SciTech Connect

    Antonelli, L. A.; Romano, P.; Testa, V.; D'Elia, V.; Guetta, D.; Torii, K.; Malesani, D.

    2007-08-21

    We present here the analysis of the early and late multiwavelength afterglow emission, as observed by Swift a small robotic telescope, and the VLT. We compare early observations with late afterglow observations obtained with Swift and the VLT and we observe an intense rebrightening in the optical band at about one day after the burst which is not present in the X-ray band. The lack of detection in X-ray of such a strong rebrightening at lower energies may be described with a variable external density profile. In such a scenario, the combined X-ray and optical observations allow us to derive that the matter density located at {approx} 1017 cm from the burst is about a factor of 10 higher than in the inner region. This is the first time in which a rebrightening has been observed in the optical afterglow of a GRB that is clearly absent in the X-ray afterglow.

  13. The Radio Afterglow of GRB030329 at Centimetre Wavelengths: Evidence for Multiple Jets or a Structured Jet. Chapter 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rol, E.; vanderHorst, A. J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Strom, R.; Kaper, L.; Kouveliotou, C.; vandenHeuvel, E. P. J.

    2003-01-01

    We present our centimetre wavelength (1.4, 2.3 and 4.9 GHz) light curves of the afterglow of GRB030329, which were obtained with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. Modelling the data according to a collimated afterglow results in a jet-break time t(sub j) of 17 days. This is in contrast with earlier results obtained at higher frequencies, which indicate t(sub j) to be around 10 days. Furthermore, with respect to the afterglow model, some additional flux at the lower frequencies is present when these light curves reach their maximum. We subsequently show that the afterglow can be modelled with two or more components with progressively later jet breaks. From these results we infer that the jet is in fact a structured or a layered jet, where the ejecta with lower Lorentz factors produce additional flux which becomes visible at late times in the lowest frequency bands.

  14. Reciprocating and fixed probe measurements of n{sub e} and T{sub e} in the DIII-D divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, J.G.; Moyer, R.A.; Cuthbertson, J.W.; Buchenauer, D.A.; Carlstrom, T.N.; Hill, D.N.; Ulrickson, M.

    1996-11-01

    This paper describes divertor density and temperature measurements using both a new reciprocating Langmuir probe (XPT-RCP) which plunges vertically above the divertor floor up to the X-point height and swept, single, Langmuir probes fixed horizontally across the divertor floor. These types of measurements are important for testing models of the SOL and divertor which then are used to design plasma facing components in reactor size tokamaks. This paper presents an overview of the new divertor probe measurements and how they compare with the new divertor Thomson scattering system. The fast time response of the probe measurements allows detailed study of ELMs.

  15. Indium-chlorine and gallium-chlorine tetrasubstituted phthalocyanines in a bulk system, Langmuir monolayers and Langmuir-Blodgett nanolayers--spectroscopic investigations.

    PubMed

    Bursa, B; Wróbel, D; Biadasz, A; Kędzierski, K; Lewandowska, K; Graja, A; Szybowicz, M; Durmuş, M

    2014-07-15

    The paper deals with spectroscopic characterization of metallic phthalocyanines (Pc's) (indium and gallium) complexed with chlorine and substituted with four benzyloxyphenoxy peripheral groups in bulk systems, 2D Langmuir monolayers and Langmuir-Blodgett nanolayers. An influence of the molecular structure of dyes (the presence of metal and of substitutes attached to the phthalocyanine macroring) on the in situ measurements of light absorption is reported. Molecular arrangement of the phthalocyanine molecular skeleton in the Langmuir monolayers on water substrate and in the Langmuir-Blodgett nanolayers is evaluated. A comparison of the light absorption spectra of the phthalocyanine monolayers with the spectra of the dyes in solution supports the existence of dye aggregates in the monolayer. It was shown that the type of dye aggregates (oblique and H types) depends markedly on the dye molecular structures. The NIR-IR, IR reflection-absorption and Raman spectra are also monitored for Langmuir-Blodgett nanolayers in non-polarized and polarized light. It was shown that the dye molecules in the Langmuir-Blodgett layers are oriented nearly vertically with respect to a gold substrate. PMID:24682066

  16. Indium-chlorine and gallium-chlorine tetrasubstituted phthalocyanines in a bulk system, Langmuir monolayers and Langmuir-Blodgett nanolayers - Spectroscopic investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bursa, B.; Wróbel, D.; Biadasz, A.; Kędzierski, K.; Lewandowska, K.; Graja, A.; Szybowicz, M.; Durmuş, M.

    2014-07-01

    The paper deals with spectroscopic characterization of metallic phthalocyanines (Pc's) (indium and gallium) complexed with chlorine and substituted with four benzyloxyphenoxy peripheral groups in bulk systems, 2D Langmuir monolayers and Langmuir-Blodgett nanolayers. An influence of the molecular structure of dyes (the presence of metal and of substitutes attached to the phthalocyanine macroring) on the in situ measurements of light absorption is reported. Molecular arrangement of the phthalocyanine molecular skeleton in the Langmuir monolayers on water substrate and in the Langmuir-Blodgett nanolayers is evaluated. A comparison of the light absorption spectra of the phthalocyanine monolayers with the spectra of the dyes in solution supports the existence of dye aggregates in the monolayer. It was shown that the type of dye aggregates (oblique and H types) depends markedly on the dye molecular structures. The NIR-IR, IR reflection-absorption and Raman spectra are also monitored for Langmuir-Blodgett nanolayers in non-polarized and polarized light. It was shown that the dye molecules in the Langmuir-Blodgett layers are oriented nearly vertically with respect to a gold substrate.

  17. Revisiting a Statistical Shortcoming When Fitting the Langmuir Model to Sorption Data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Langmuir model is commonly used for describing sorption behavior of reactive solutes to surfaces. Fitting the Langmuir model to sorption data requires either the use of nonlinear regression or, alternatively, linear regression using one of the linearized versions of the model. Statistical limit...

  18. Using proper regression methods for fitting the Langmuir model to sorption data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Langmuir model, originally developed for the study of gas sorption to surfaces, is one of the most commonly used models for fitting phosphorus sorption data. There are good theoretical reasons, however, against applying this model to describe P sorption to soils. Nevertheless, the Langmuir model...

  19. A Sixth-Form Teaching Unit on the Langmuir Adsorption Isotherm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walkley, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Presents a teaching unit on the Langmuir absorption isotherm suitable for advanced secondary school chemistry classes. Describes the experimental investigation of the isothermal adsorption of sulfur dioxide on charcoal, and discusses the derivation of the Langmuir equation and some applications. (JR)

  20. Photovoltaic Effects of Retinal-Related Materials in Langmuir-Blodgett Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okazaki, Choichiro

    1998-03-01

    Multilayer films consisting of retinal, retinoic acid, and retinol were fabricated using the Langmuir-Blodgett method. It was found for the first time that these three materials in Langmuir-Blodgett films exhibit different photovoltaic characteristics. To study this difference of photovoltaic characteristics, the surface pressure vs area isotherms of these materials were measured and the dipole moment of the materials were calculated.

  1. A Convenient Spreadsheet Method for Fitting the Nonlinear Langmuir Equation to Sorption Data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Langmuir model is commonly used model for describing solute and metal sorption to soils. This model can be fit to data using nonlinear regression or, alternatively, a linearized version of the model can be fit to the data using linear regression. Although linearized versions of the Langmuir equa...

  2. Afterglow Observations Shed New Light on the Nature of X-ray Flashes

    SciTech Connect

    Granot, J

    2005-02-17

    X-ray flashes (XRFs) and X-ray rich gamma-ray bursts (XRGRBs) share many observational characteristics with long duration ({approx}> 2 s) GRBs, but the reason for which the spectral energy distribution of their prompt emission peaks at lower photon energies, E{sub p}, is still a subject of debate. Although many different models have been invoked in order to explain the lower values of E{sub p}, their implications for the afterglow emission were not considered in most cases, mainly because observations of XRF afterglows have become available only recently. Here we examine the predictions of the various XRF models for the afterglow emission, and test them against the observations of XRF 030723 and XRGRB 041006, the events with the best monitored afterglow light curves in their respective class. We show that most existing XRF models are hard to reconcile with the observed afterglow light curves, which are very flat at early times. Such light curves are, however, naturally produced by a roughly uniform jet with relatively sharp edges that is viewed off-axis (i.e. from outside of the jet aperture). This type of model self consistently accommodates both the observed prompt emission and the afterglow light curves of XRGRB 041006 and XRF 030723, implying viewing angles {theta}{sub obs} from the jet axis of ({theta}{sub obs}-{theta}{sub 0}) {approx} 0.15 {theta}{sub 0} and ({theta}{sub obs}-{theta}{sub 0}) {approx} {theta}{sub 0}, respectively, where {theta}{sub 0} {approx} 3{sup o} is the half-opening angle of the jet. This suggests that GRBs, XRGRBs and XRFs are intrinsically similar relativistic jets viewed from different angles. It is then natural to identify GRBs with {gamma}({theta}{sub obs} - {theta}{sub 0}) {approx}< 1, XRGRBs with 1 {approx}< ({theta}{sub obs} - {theta}{sub 0}) {approx}< a few, and XRFs with {gamma}({theta}{sub obs} - {theta}{sub 0}) {approx}> a few, where {gamma} is the Lorentz factor of the outflow near the edge of the jet from which most of the

  3. THE PROPERTIES OF THE 2175 A EXTINCTION FEATURE DISCOVERED IN GRB AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Zafar, Tayyaba; Watson, Darach; Eliasdottir, Ardis; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Kruehler, Thomas; Leloudas, Giorgos; Schady, Patricia; Greiner, Jochen; Jakobsson, Pall; Thoene, Christina C.; Perley, Daniel A.; Morgan, Adam N.; Bloom, Joshua E-mail: darach@dark-cosmology.dk

    2012-07-01

    The unequivocal, spectroscopic detection of the 2175 A bump in extinction curves outside the Local Group is rare. To date, the properties of the bump have been examined in only two gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows (GRB 070802 and GRB 080607). In this work, we analyze in detail the detections of the 2175 Angstrom-Sign extinction bump in the optical spectra of two further GRB afterglows: GRB 080605 and 080805. We gather all available optical/near-infrared photometric, spectroscopic, and X-ray data to construct multi-epoch spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for both GRB afterglows. We fit the SEDs with the Fitzpatrick and Massa model with a single or broken power law. We also fit a sample of 38 GRB afterglows, known to prefer a Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC)-type extinction curve, with the same model. We find that the SEDs of GRB 080605 and GRB 080805 at two epochs are fit well with a single power law with a derived extinction of A{sub V} = 0.52{sup +0.13}{sub -0.16} and 0.50{sup +0.13}{sub -0.10}, and 2.1{sup +0.7}{sub -0.6} and 1.5 {+-} 0.2, respectively. While the slope of the extinction curve of GRB 080805 is not well constrained, the extinction curve of GRB 080605 has an unusual very steep far-UV rise together with the 2175 A bump. Such an extinction curve has previously been found in only a small handful of sightlines in the Milky Way. One possible explanation of such an extinction curve may be dust arising from two different regions with two separate grain populations, however we cannot distinguish the origin of the curve. We finally compare the four 2175 A bump sightlines to the larger GRB afterglow sample and to Local Group sightlines. We find that while the width and central positions of the bumps are consistent with what is observed in the Local Group, the relative strength of the detected bump (A{sub bump}) for GRB afterglows is weaker for a given A{sub V} than for almost any Local Group sightline. Such dilution of the bump strength may offer tentative

  4. Characterization of the flowing afterglows of an N2 O2 reduced-pressure discharge: setting the operating conditions to achieve a dominant late afterglow and correlating the NOβ UV intensity variation with the N and O atom densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudam, M. K.; Saoudi, B.; Moisan, M.; Ricard, A.

    2007-03-01

    The flowing afterglow of an N2-O2 discharge in the 0.6-10 Torr range is examined in the perspective of achieving sterilization of medical devices (MDs) under conditions ensuring maximum UV intensity with minimum damage to polymer-based MDs. The early afterglow is shown to be responsible for creating strong erosion damage, requiring that the sterilizer be operated in a dominant late-afterglow mode. These two types of afterglow can be characterized by optical emission spectroscopy: the early afterglow is distinguished by an intense emission from the N_{2}^{+} 1st negative system (band head at 391.4 nm) while the late afterglow yields an overpopulation of the v' = 11 ro-vibrational level of the N2(B) state, indicating a reduced contribution from the early afterglow N2 metastable species. We have studied the influence of operating conditions (pressure, O2 content in the N2-O2 mixture, distance of the discharge from the entrance to the afterglow (sterilizer) chamber) in order to achieve a dominant late afterglow that also ensures maximum and almost uniform UV intensity in the sterilization chamber. As far as operating conditions are concerned, moving the plasma source sufficiently far from the chamber entrance is shown to be a practical means for significantly reducing the density of the characteristic species of the early afterglow. Using the NO titration method, we obtain the (absolute) densities of N and O atoms in the afterglow at the NO injection inlet, a few cm before the chamber entrance: the N atom density goes through a maximum at approximately 0.3-0.5% O2 and then decreases, while the O atom density increases regularly with the O2 percentage. The spatial variation of the N atom (relative) density in the chamber is obtained by recording the emission intensity from the 1st positive system at 580 nm: in the 2-5 Torr range, this density is quite uniform everywhere in the chamber. The (relative) densities of N and O atoms in the discharge are determined by using

  5. Development progress of the Materials Analysis and Particle Probe.

    PubMed

    Lucia, M; Kaita, R; Majeski, R; Bedoya, F; Allain, J P; Boyle, D P; Schmitt, J C; Onge, D A St

    2014-11-01

    The Materials Analysis and Particle Probe (MAPP) is a compact in vacuo surface science diagnostic, designed to provide in situ surface characterization of plasma facing components in a tokamak environment. MAPP has been implemented for operation on the Lithium Tokamak Experiment at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), where all control and analysis systems are currently under development for full remote operation. Control systems include vacuum management, instrument power, and translational/rotational probe drive. Analysis systems include onboard Langmuir probes and all components required for x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, low-energy ion scattering spectroscopy, direct recoil spectroscopy, and thermal desorption spectroscopy surface analysis techniques. PMID:25430248

  6. Development progress of the Materials Analysis and Particle Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucia, M.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Bedoya, F.; Allain, J. P.; Boyle, D. P.; Schmitt, J. C.; Onge, D. A. St.

    2014-11-01

    The Materials Analysis and Particle Probe (MAPP) is a compact in vacuo surface science diagnostic, designed to provide in situ surface characterization of plasma facing components in a tokamak environment. MAPP has been implemented for operation on the Lithium Tokamak Experiment at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), where all control and analysis systems are currently under development for full remote operation. Control systems include vacuum management, instrument power, and translational/rotational probe drive. Analysis systems include onboard Langmuir probes and all components required for x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, low-energy ion scattering spectroscopy, direct recoil spectroscopy, and thermal desorption spectroscopy surface analysis techniques.

  7. Development progress of the Materials Analysis and Particle Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Lucia, M. Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Boyle, D. P.; Schmitt, J. C.; Onge, D. A. St.; Bedoya, F.; Allain, J. P.

    2014-11-15

    The Materials Analysis and Particle Probe (MAPP) is a compact in vacuo surface science diagnostic, designed to provide in situ surface characterization of plasma facing components in a tokamak environment. MAPP has been implemented for operation on the Lithium Tokamak Experiment at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), where all control and analysis systems are currently under development for full remote operation. Control systems include vacuum management, instrument power, and translational/rotational probe drive. Analysis systems include onboard Langmuir probes and all components required for x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, low-energy ion scattering spectroscopy, direct recoil spectroscopy, and thermal desorption spectroscopy surface analysis techniques.

  8. Irving Langmuir Prize in Chemical Physics Talk: Attosecond Electron Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    Isolated attosecond pulses are produced by the process of high order harmonics, and these pulses are used as a soft X-ray probe in wavelength-dispersed transient absorption. Inner shell core-level spectroscopic transitions are thus used to analyze the chemical and electronic environment of specific atomic states as a function of time following ionization and dissociation. High field ionization processes, using 800 nm pulses, result in spin-orbit electronic state populations, alignment, and electronic wave packet superpositions, all of which are investigated by the spectrally-resolved X-ray probe. By using isolated attosecond pulses as the probe, high field ionization events on a subfemtosecond timescale are investigated. The generality of the transient absorption method for attosecond dyamics is described, as well as the challenges during the pump-probe pulse overlap time period. The results are compared to theoretical calculations by collaborators. Supported by DOE, NSF and AFOSR.

  9. The properties of a novel green long afterglow phosphor Zn2GeO4:Mn2+, Pr3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Minhua; Wang, Yinhai; Wang, Xiansheng; Zhao, Hui; Hu, Zhengfa

    2014-01-01

    Novel Zn2GeO4:Mn2+, Pr3+ long afterglow phosphor was successfully synthesized by the high temperature solid state reaction. Long afterglow properties of the sample has been investigated in detail by measuring the X-ray diffraction (XRD), excitation spectrum, emission spectrum, afterglow spectrum, decay curve and thermoluminescence curve. The X-ray diffraction phases indicate that the co-doped Mn2+, Pr3+ have little influence on the crystal structure of Zn2GeO4. According to the emission spectra, we found that the Zn2GeO4:Mn2+, Pr3+ exhibit a narrow band emission with the peak at 532 nm, which could be ascribed to Mn2+ transition between 4T1 and 6A1 electron configurations. The green long afterglow of Zn2GeO4:Mn2+, Pr3+ could be observed for three hours by naked eyes at room temperature under 254 nm UV excitation. The thermoluminescence (TL) curve is employed for the discussion of the origin of the traps and the mechanism of the persistent luminescence. The results suggest that Zn2GeO4 may be an excellent host material for Mn2+-based long afterglow. Furthermore, the function of co-doped Pr3+ ions is confirmed as trap center, which can greatly postpone the afterglow emission properties of Mn2+.

  10. The potential for detecting gamma-ray burst afterglows from population III stars with the next generation of infrared telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Macpherson, D.; Coward, D. M.; Zadnik, M. G.

    2013-12-10

    We investigate the detectability of a proposed population of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) from the collapse of Population III (Pop III) stars. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) will be able to observe the late time infrared afterglows. We have developed a new method to calculate their detectability, which takes into account the fundamental initial mass function and formation rates of Pop III stars, from which we find the temporal variability of the afterglows and ultimately the length of time JWST and SPICA can detect them. In the range of plausible Pop III GRB parameters, the afterglows are always detectable by these instruments during the isotropic emission, for a minimum of 55 days and a maximum of 3.7 yr. The average number of detectable afterglows will be 2.96× 10{sup –5} per SPICA field of view (FOV) and 2.78× 10{sup –6} per JWST FOV. These are lower limits, using a pessimistic estimate of Pop III star formation. An optimal observing strategy with SPICA could identify a candidate orphan afterglow in ∼1.3 yr, with a 90% probability of confirmation with further detailed observations. A beamed GRB will align with the FOV of the planned GRB detector Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope once every 9 yr. Pop III GRBs will be more easily detected by their isotropic emissions (i.e., orphan afterglows) rather than by their prompt emissions.

  11. The Potential for Detecting Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows from Population III Stars with the Next Generation of Infrared Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macpherson, D.; Coward, D. M.; Zadnik, M. G.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the detectability of a proposed population of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) from the collapse of Population III (Pop III) stars. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) will be able to observe the late time infrared afterglows. We have developed a new method to calculate their detectability, which takes into account the fundamental initial mass function and formation rates of Pop III stars, from which we find the temporal variability of the afterglows and ultimately the length of time JWST and SPICA can detect them. In the range of plausible Pop III GRB parameters, the afterglows are always detectable by these instruments during the isotropic emission, for a minimum of 55 days and a maximum of 3.7 yr. The average number of detectable afterglows will be 2.96× 10-5 per SPICA field of view (FOV) and 2.78× 10-6 per JWST FOV. These are lower limits, using a pessimistic estimate of Pop III star formation. An optimal observing strategy with SPICA could identify a candidate orphan afterglow in ~1.3 yr, with a 90% probability of confirmation with further detailed observations. A beamed GRB will align with the FOV of the planned GRB detector Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope once every 9 yr. Pop III GRBs will be more easily detected by their isotropic emissions (i.e., orphan afterglows) rather than by their prompt emissions.

  12. Radio observations of GRB 100418a: Test of an energy injection model explaining long-lasting GRB afterglows

    SciTech Connect

    Moin, A.; Wang, Z.; Chandra, P.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Tingay, S. J.; Reynolds, C.; Taylor, G. B.; Frail, D. A.; Phillips, C. J.

    2013-12-20

    We present the results of our radio observational campaign of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 100418a, for which we used the Australia Telescope Compact Array, the Very Large Array, and the Very Long Baseline Array. GRB 100418a was a peculiar GRB with unusual X-ray and optical afterglow profiles featuring a plateau phase with a very shallow rise. This observed plateau phase was believed to be due to a continued energy injection mechanism that powered the forward shock, giving rise to an unusual and long-lasting afterglow. The radio afterglow of GRB 100418a was detectable several weeks after the prompt emission. We conducted long-term monitoring observations of the afterglow and attempted to test the energy injection model advocating that the continuous energy injection is due to shells of material moving at a wide range of Lorentz factors. We obtained an upper limit of γ < 7 for the expansion rate of the GRB 100418a radio afterglow, indicating that the range-of-Lorentz factor model could only be applicable for relatively slow-moving ejecta. A preferred explanation could be that continued activity of the central engine may have powered the long-lasting afterglow.

  13. Determination of state-to-state electron-impact rate coefficients between Ar excited states: a review of combined diagnostic experiments in afterglow plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xi-Ming; Cheng, Zhi-Wen; Carbone, Emile; Pu, Yi-Kang; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2016-08-01

    Electron-impact excitation processes play an important role in low-temperature plasma physics. Cross section and rate coefficient data for electron-impact processes from the ground state to excited states or between two excited states are required for both diagnostics and modeling works. However, the collisional processes between excited states are much less investigated than the ones involving the ground state due to various experimental challenges. Recently, a method for determining electron excitation rate coefficients between Ar excited states in afterglow plasmas was successfully implemented and further developed to obtain large sets of collisional data. This method combines diagnostics for electron temperature, electron density, and excited species densities and kinetic modeling of excited species, from which the electron excitation rate coefficients from one of the 1s states to the other 1s states or to one of 2p or 3p states are determined (states are in Paschen’s notation). This paper reviews the above method—namely the combined diagnostics and modeling in afterglow plasmas. The results from other important approaches, including electron-beam measurement of cross sections, laser pump-probe technique for measuring rate coefficients, and theoretical calculations by R-matrix and distorted-wave models are also discussed. From a comparative study of these results, a fitted mathematical expression of excitation rate coefficients is obtained for the electron temperature range of 1–5 eV, which can be used for the collisional-radiative modeling of low-temperature Ar plasmas. At last, we report the limitations in the present dataset and give some suggestions for future work in this area.

  14. Order in phospholipid Langmuir-Blodgett layers and the effect of the electrical potential of the substrate.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, J; Kleijn, J M

    1999-01-01

    The ordering in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers and bilayers on a semiconducting indium tin oxide (ITO) surface has been investigated at the equilibrium potential of the interface and at various externally applied potentials. Second- and fourth-rank order parameters of a diphenylhexatriene (DPH) containing phospholipid probe were derived from total internal reflection fluorescence measurements, and orientation distributions were calculated using the maximum-entropy method. Generally, bimodal orientation distributions were obtained, suggesting that only part of the probes is aligned with the DPPC molecules. The effect of applied potentials is small for DPPC layers on unmodified (hydrophilic) ITO; with decreasing potential the ordering changes slightly to more random distributions, possibly because of the onset of hydrogen evolution at the substrate surface. For monolayers on hydrophobized ITO, where the phospholipids are initially with their tails directed toward the surface, the changes are more significant. At the highest positive potential applied, the derived order parameters indicate that nearly all probes are flat on the surface. This can be understood as a result of enhanced competition between headgroups and tails for access to the surface as it becomes more polarized. On unmodified ITO the electrochemistry of Fe(CN)6(3-/4-) and Ru(bipyridyl)3(2+/3+) is hardly hindered by the presence of DPPC monolayers or bilayers. On hydrophobized ITO a DPPC monolayer enhances the redox reactions. PMID:9876144

  15. Measurement of electron density using reactance cutoff probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, K. H.; You, S. J.; Kim, D. W.; Na, B. K.; Seo, B. H.; Kim, J. H.; Seong, D. J.; Chang, H. Y.

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a new measurement method of electron density using the reactance spectrum of the plasma in the cutoff probe system instead of the transmission spectrum. The highly accurate reactance spectrum of the plasma-cutoff probe system, as expected from previous circuit simulations [Kim et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 131502 (2011)], was measured using the full two-port error correction and automatic port extension methods of the network analyzer. The electron density can be obtained from the analysis of the measured reactance spectrum, based on circuit modeling. According to the circuit simulation results, the reactance cutoff probe can measure the electron density more precisely than the previous cutoff probe at low densities or at higher pressure. The obtained results for the electron density are presented and discussed for a wide range of experimental conditions, and this method is compared with previous methods (a cutoff probe using the transmission spectrum and a single Langmuir probe).

  16. X-Ray Afterglow of Swift J1644+57: A Compton Echo?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, K. S.; Chernyshov, D. O.; Dogiel, V. A.; Kong, Albert K. H.; Ko, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Swift, Chandra, and XMM have found a weak but nearly constant X-ray component from Swift J1644+57 that appeared at ∼500 days and was visible at least until ∼1400 days after the stellar capture, which cannot be explained by standard tidal disruption theories. We suggest that this X-ray afterglow component may result from the Thomson scattering between the primary X-rays and its surrounding plasma, i.e., a Compton echo effect. Similar phenomena have also been observed from molecular clouds in our Galactic Center, which were caused by the past activity of Srg A*. If this interpretation of Swift J1644+57 afterglow is correct, this is the first Compton Echo effect observed in the cosmological distances.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: GRB 120815A afterglow spectra (Kruehler+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruehler, T.; Ledoux, C.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Schmidl, S.; Malesani, D.; Christensen, L.; De Cia, A.; Hjorth, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Kann, D. A.; Kaper, L.; Vergani, S. D.; Afonso, P. M. J.; Covino, S.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; D'Elia, V.; Filgas, R.; Goldoni, P.; Greiner, J.; Hartoog, O. E.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Nardini, M.; Piranomonte, S.; Rossi, A.; Sanchez-Ramirez, R.; Schady, P.; Schulze, S.; Sudilovsky, V.; Tanvir, N. R.; Tagliaferri, G.; Watson, D. J.; Wiersema, K.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Xu, D.

    2013-07-01

    Flux-calibrated VLT/X-shooter medium resolution spectrum of the GRB 120815A afterglow. Spectroscopic observations of the GRB 120815A afterglow in the wavelength range between 3000 and 24800Å commenced on 2012-08-15 at 03:55 UT (6.06ks after the BAT trigger) with the cross-dispersed echelle spectrograph Xshooter mounted at ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) UT2. They consisted of four nodded exposures in the sequence ABBA with exposure times of 600s each, taken simultaneously in X-shooter's ultraviolet/blue (UVB - 3150-5900Å), visible (VIS - 5600-10080Å) and near-infrared (NIR - 10200-24080Å) arms with R~6000, 10400, 6200 for the UVB/VIS and NIR arm, respectively. (3 data files).

  18. On the Electron Energy Distribution Index of Swift Gamma-ray Burst Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, P. A.; Evans, P. A.; de Pasquale, M.; Page, M. J.; van der Horst, A. J.

    2010-06-01

    The electron energy distribution index, p, is a fundamental parameter of the synchrotron emission from a range of astronomical sources. Here we examine one such source of synchrotron emission, gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows observed by the Swift satellite. Within the framework of the blast wave model, we examine the constraints placed on the distribution of p by the observed X-ray spectral indices and parameterize the distribution. We find that the observed distribution of spectral indices are inconsistent with an underlying distribution of p composed of a single discrete value but consistent with a Gaussian distribution centered at p = 2.36 and having a width of 0.59. Furthermore, accepting that the underlying distribution is a Gaussian, we find that the majority (gsim94%) of GRB afterglows in our sample have cooling break frequencies less than the X-ray frequency.

  19. Long afterglow properties of Zn2GeO4:Mn2+, Cr3+ phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Yan; He, Yangyang; Dong, Bin; Xiao, Yu; Wang, Limei

    2015-04-01

    Zn2GeO4:Mn2+, Cr3+ phosphors were prepared by conventional solid state reaction and the photoluminescence properties were investigated. The Mn2+ activated Zn2GeO4 phosphors exhibited green emission at 533 nm due to the 4T1(4G) → 6A1(6S) transition of Mn2+ ions. With Cr3+ co-doping in Zn2GeO4 host, long afterglow characteristics were found from the same transition of Mn2+. The TL results revealed the presence of same traps in the phosphor, and the doping of Cr3+ ions deepened the VGe traps. The native defect VGe as a hole traps is responsible for the long afterglow emission in Zn2GeO4:Mn2+, Cr3+ phosphor. The possible mechanism of this phosphor has also been discussed.

  20. Evidence for an Early High-Energy Afterglow Observed with BATSE from GRB 980923

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giblin, T. W.; vanParadijs, J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Connaughton, V.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Briggs, M. S.; Preece, R. D.; Fishman, G. J.

    1999-01-01

    In this Letter, we present the first evidence in the BATSE data for a prompt high-energy (25-300 keV) afterglow component from a gamma-ray burst, GRB 980923. The event consists of rapid variability lasting approximately 40 s followed by a smooth power-law emission tail lasting approximately 400 s. An abrupt change in spectral shape is found when the tail becomes noticeable. Our analysis reveals that the spectral evolution in the tail of the burst mimics that of a cooling synchrotron spectrum, similar to the spectral evolution of the low-energy afterglows for gamma-ray bursts. This evidence for a separate emission component is consistent with the internal-external shock scenario in the relativistic fireball picture. In particular, it illustrates that the external shocks can be generated during the gamma-ray emission phase, as in the case of GRB 990123.

  1. Erosion of a-C:H in the afterglow of ammonia plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drenik, Aleksander; Mourkas, Angelos; Zaplotnik, Rok; Primc, Gregor; Mozetič, Miran; Panjan, Peter; Alegre, Daniel; Tabarés, Francisco L.

    2016-07-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) deposits were eroded in the afterglow of a NH3 plasma, created with an inductively coupled RF generator in pure NH3 at the gas pressure of 50 Pa. The plasma system was characterised by optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, and the erosion process was monitored in-situ with a laser interferometry system. Based on the mass spectrometry measurements, the degree of dissociation of the NH3 molecules was estimated at 90% at the highest generator forward power in the discharge region, however the densities of N and H atoms were significantly smaller at the location of the sample holder. The erosion rates were found to increase with surface temperature and forward generator power. In the high dissociation regime, the composition of the afterglow and the reaction products highlight the role of N atoms in the erosion process.

  2. Characterization of a Plasmoid in the Afterglow of a Supersonic Flowing Microwave Discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, D. J.; Miller, S.; Nikolic, M.; Popovic, S.; Vuskovic, L.

    2009-01-01

    We performed a detailed characterization a plasmoid in the afterglow region of an Ar supersonic microwave cavity discharge. The supersonic flow was generated using a convergent-divergent nozzle upstream of the discharge region. A cylindrical cavity was used to sustain a discharge in the pressure range of 100-600 Pa. Optical emission spectroscopy was used to observe populations of excited and ionic species in the plasmoid region. Plasmoid formation in the supersonic flowing afterglow located downstream from the primary microwave cavity discharge was characterized by measuring the radial and axial distributions of Argon excited states and Argon ions. More experiments are being carried out on the plasmoid to understand the discharge parameters within the region, i.e. rotational temperature, vibrational temperature, electron density, and how the electrodynamic and aerodynamic effects combine to form this plasmoid.

  3. A Search for Early High-Energy Afterglows in BATSE Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giblin, Timothy W.

    2003-01-01

    The scope of this project was to perform a detailed search for the early high-energy afterglow component of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in the BATSE GRB data archive. GRBs are believed to be the product of shock waves generated in a relativistic outflow from the demise of extremely massive stars and/or binary neutron star mergers. The outflow undeniably encounters the ambient medium of the progenitor object and another shock wave is set up. A forward shock propagates into the medium and a reverse shock propagates through the ejecta. This "external" shock dissipates the kinetic energy of the ejecta in the form of radiation via synchrotron losses and slows the outflow eventually to a non-relativistic state. Radiation from the forward external shock is therefore expected to be long-lived, lasting days, weeks, and even months. This radiation is referred to as the 'afterglow'.

  4. A search for correlations between gamma-ray burst variability and afterglow onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, S. A.; Moore, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    We compared the time (or time limit) of onset for optical afterglow emission to the γ-ray variability V in 76 gamma-ray bursts with redshifts. In the subset (25 cases) with the rise evident in the data, we fit the shape of the onset peak as well and compared the rising and decaying indices to V. We did not find any evidence for any patterns between these properties and there is no statistical support for any correlations. This indicates a lack of connection between irregularities of the prompt γ-ray emission and the establishment of the afterglow phase. In the ordinary prompt internal shocks interpretation, this would indicate a lack of relationship between V and the bulk Lorentz factor of the event.

  5. Erosion of a-C:H films under interaction with nitrous oxide afterglow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalavutdinov, R. Kh.; Gorodetsky, A. E.; Bukhovets, V. L.; Zakharov, A. P.; Mazul, I. V.

    2009-06-01

    Hydrocarbon film removal using chemically active oxygen formed in a direct current glow discharge with a hollow cathode in nitrous oxide was investigated. In the afterglow region sufficiently fast removal of a-C:H films about 500 nm thick during about 8 h was achieved at N 2O pressure of 12 Pa and 370 K. The erosion rate in the afterglow region was directly proportional to the initial pressure and increased two orders of magnitude at temperature rising from 300 to 500 K. The products of a-C:H film plasmolysis were CO, CO 2, H 2O, and H 2. After removal of a-C:H films previously deposited on stainless steel, molybdenum or tungsten 3-30 nm thick oxide films were formed on the substrates. Reactions of oxygen ion neutralization and atomic oxygen recombination suppressed further oxidation of the materials.

  6. VLBI AND ARCHIVAL VLA AND WSRT OBSERVATIONS OF THE GRB 030329 RADIO AFTERGLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Mesler, Robert A.; Pihlstroem, Ylva M.; Taylor, Greg B.; Granot, Johnathan

    2012-11-01

    We present VLBI and archival Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) observations of the radio afterglow from the gamma-ray burst (GRB) of 2003 March 29 (GRB 030329) taken between 672 and 2032 days after the burst. The VLA and WSRT data suggest a simple power-law decay in the flux at 5 GHz, with no clear signature of any rebrightening from the counterjet. We report an unresolved source at day 2032 of size 1.18 {+-} 0.13 mas, which we use in conjunction with the expansion rate of the burst to argue for the presence of a uniform, interstellar-medium-like circumburst medium. A limit of <0.067 mas yr{sup -1} is placed on the proper motion, supporting the standard afterglow model for gamma-ray bursts.

  7. Fast ion measurement using a hybrid directional probe in the large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaoka, Kenichi; Watanabe, Kiyomasa Y.; Osakabe, Masaki; Takeiri, Yasuhiko; Minami, Takashi; Toi, Kazuo; Isobe, Mitsutaka; Nishiura, Masaki; Ito, Takafumi; Ogawa, Kunihiro

    2008-10-15

    A hybrid directional probe was newly installed in the large helical device for fast ion measurement. The collector of the probe mounts a thermocouple to estimate local power flux and can be also utilized as a collector of a conventional Langmuir probe; therefore, the hybrid directional probe can simultaneously measure both local power density flux and current flux at the same collector surface. The concept and design of the hybrid directional probe, the calibration of the power density measurement, and preliminary result of the fast ion measurement are presented.

  8. Observation of antibacterial effects obtained at atmospheric and reduced pressures in afterglow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrette, J.-P.; Cousty, S.; Merbahi, N.; Nègre-Salvayre, A.; Clément, F.

    2010-01-01

    Bactericidal activities of three different afterglows operating at reduced and atmospheric pressures and ambient temperature are established and compared through the use of a unique protocol for bacteria (E. coli, CIP 54.8 T) exposition, recovery and numeration. The influence of three important parameters is shown. An original scenario for bacterial inactivation at reduced pressure is proposed, compatible with previously published results and with the observation of conformational changes appearing on the treated bacteria.

  9. Afterglow chemistry of atmospheric-pressure helium-oxygen plasmas with humid air impurity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Tomoyuki; Niemi, Kari; Gans, Timo; O'Connell, Deborah; Graham, William G.

    2014-04-01

    The formation of reactive species in the afterglow of a radio-frequency-driven atmospheric-pressure plasma in a fixed helium-oxygen feed gas mixture (He+0.5%O2) with humid air impurity (a few hundred ppm) is investigated by means of an extensive global plasma chemical kinetics model. As an original objective, we explore the effects of humid air impurity on the biologically relevant reactive species in an oxygen-dependent system. After a few milliseconds in the afterglow environment, the densities of atomic oxygen (O) decreases from 1015 to 1013 cm-3 and singlet delta molecular oxygen (O2(1D)) of the order of 1015 cm-3 decreases by a factor of two, while the ozone (O3) density increases from 1014 to 1015 cm-3. Electrons and oxygen ionic species, initially of the order of 1011 cm-3, recombine much faster on the time scale of some microseconds. The formation of atomic hydrogen (H), hydroxyl radical (OH), hydroperoxyl (HO2), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitric oxide (NO) and nitric acid (HNO3) resulting from the humid air impurity as well as the influence on the afterglow chemistry is clarified with particular emphasis on the formation of dominant reactive oxygen species (ROS). The model suggests that the reactive species predominantly formed in the afterglow are major ROS O2(1D) and O3 (of the order of 1015 cm-3) and rather minor hydrogen- and nitrogen-based reactive species OH, H2O2, HNO3 and NO2/NO3, of which densities are comparable to the O-atom density (of the order of 1013 cm-3). Furthermore, the model quantitatively reproduces the experimental results of independent O and O3 density measurements.

  10. Phenomenology of reverse-shock emission in the optical afterglows of gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Japelj, J.; Kopač, D.; Gomboc, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Harrison, R.; Virgili, F. J.; Mundell, C. G.; Guidorzi, C.; Melandri, A. E-mail: andreja.gomboc@fmf.uni-lj.si

    2014-04-20

    We use a parent sample of 118 gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows, with known redshift and host galaxy extinction, to separate afterglows with and without signatures of dominant reverse-shock (RS) emission and to determine which physical conditions lead to a prominent reverse-shock emission. We identify 10 GRBs with reverse-shock signatures: 990123, 021004, 021211, 060908, 061126, 080319B, 081007, 090102, 090424, and 130427A. By modeling their optical afterglows with reverse- and forward-shock analytic light curves and using Monte Carlo simulations, we estimate the parameter space of the physical quantities describing the ejecta and circumburst medium. We find that physical properties cover a wide parameter space and do not seem to cluster around any preferential values. Comparing the rest-frame optical, X-ray, and high-energy properties of the larger sample of non-RS-dominated GRBs, we show that the early-time (<1 ks) optical spectral luminosity, X-ray afterglow luminosity, and γ-ray energy output of our reverse-shock dominated sample do not differ significantly from the general population at early times. However, the GRBs with dominant reverse-shock emission have fainter than average optical forward-shock emission at late times (>10 ks). We find that GRBs with an identifiable reverse-shock component show a high magnetization parameter R {sub B} = ε{sub B,r}/ε{sub B,f} ∼ 2-10{sup 4}. Our results are in agreement with the mildly magnetized baryonic jet model of GRBs.

  11. Understanding the flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (FAPA) ambient ionization source through optical means.

    PubMed

    Shelley, Jacob T; Chan, George C-Y; Hieftje, Gary M

    2012-02-01

    The advent of ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS) has led to the development of a large number of atmospheric-pressure ionization sources. The largest group of such sources is based on electrical discharges; yet, the desorption and ionization processes that they employ remain largely uncharacterized. Here, the atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) and afterglow of a helium flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (FAPA) ionization source were examined by optical emission spectroscopy. Spatial emission profiles of species created in the APGD and afterglow were recorded under a variety of operating conditions, including discharge current, electrode polarity, and plasma-gas flow rate. From these studies, it was found that an appreciable amount of atmospheric H(2)O vapor, N(2), and O(2) diffuses through the hole in the plate electrode into the discharge to become a major source of reagent ions in ADI-MS analyses. Spatially resolved plasma parameters, such as OH rotational temperature (T(rot)) and electron number density (n(e)), were also measured in the APGD. Maximum values for T(rot) and n(e) were found to be ~1100 K and ~4×10(19) m(-3), respectively, and were both located at the pin cathode. In the afterglow, rotational temperatures from OH and N(2)(+) yielded drastically different values, with OH temperatures matching those obtained from infrared thermography measurements. The higher N(2)(+) temperature is believed to be caused by charge-transfer ionization of N(2) by He(2)(+). These findings are discussed in the context of previously reported ADI-MS analyses with the FAPA source. PMID:22125181

  12. ON THE EVOLUTION OF THE SPECTRAL BREAK IN THE AFTERGLOW OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon

    2012-02-20

    The temporal evolution of the spectral break in the time-resolved spectral energy density of the broadband afterglow of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) 091127 and 080319B was shown recently to be inconsistent with that expected for the cooling break in the standard fireball model of GRBs. Here we show that it is, however, in good agreement with the predicted temporal evolution of the smooth injection break/bend in the cannonball model of GRBs.

  13. Suppression of Afterglow in Microcolumnar CsI:Tl by Codoping With Sm2+: Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Thacker, Samta C.; Gaysinskiy, Valeriy; Ovechkina, Lena E.; Miller, Stuart R.; Cool, Steven; Brecher, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Microcolumnar CsI:Tl remains a highly desirable sensor for digital X-ray imaging due to its superior spatial resolution, bright emission, high absorption efficiency, and ready availability. Despite such obvious advantages, two characteristic properties of CsI:Tl undermine their use in clinical and high speed imaging: a persistent afterglow in its scintillation decay, and a hysteresis effect that distorts the scintillation yield after exposure to high radiation doses. In our earlier work we have discovered that the addition of 0.05 to 0.5 mol percent of Sm2+ to crystals of CsI:Tl suppresses their afterglow by a factor of up to 50, even when subjected to a very high exposure of 120 R. This additive also diminishes hysteresis by an order of magnitude, which is a major accomplishment. Consequent- ly, our work is now focused on developing codoped microcolumnar CsI:Tl, Sm films that can potentially combine excellent properties of the current state-of-the-art CsI:Tl films with the reduced afterglow and hysteresis observed in codoped crystals. While our earlier attempts in CsI:Tl, Sm film fabrication, reported at the previous IEEE meeting, demonstrated obvious advantages of the approach, the recent work has succeeded in producing films that show improvement by at least a factor of 7 in afterglow and 150% in brightness compared to the standard CsI:Tl films. We report these important results in this paper, along with other recent advances in film growth and new imaging results. PMID:20617107

  14. The afterglow of GRB 130427A from 1 to 10{sup 16} GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Perley, D. A.; Cenko, S. B.; Corsi, A.; Tanvir, N. R.; Wiersema, K.; Levan, A. J.; Kann, D. A.; Greiner, J.; Sonbas, E.; Zheng, W.; Clubb, K. I.; Zhao, X.-H.; Bai, J.-M.; Chang, L.; Bremer, M.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Fruchter, A.; Göğüş, E.; Güver, T.; and others

    2014-01-20

    We present multiwavelength observations of the afterglow of GRB 130427A, the brightest (in total fluence) gamma-ray burst (GRB) of the past 29 yr. Optical spectroscopy from Gemini-North reveals the redshift of the GRB to be z = 0.340, indicating that its unprecedented brightness is primarily the result of its relatively close proximity to Earth; the intrinsic luminosities of both the GRB and its afterglow are not extreme in comparison to other bright GRBs. We present a large suite of multiwavelength observations spanning from 300 s to 130 days after the burst and demonstrate that the afterglow shows relatively simple, smooth evolution at all frequencies, with no significant late-time flaring or rebrightening activity. The entire data set from 1 GHz to 10 GeV can be modeled as synchrotron emission from a combination of reverse and forward shocks in good agreement with the standard afterglow model, providing strong support to the applicability of the underlying theory and clarifying the nature of the GeV emission observed to last for minutes to hours following other very bright GRBs. A tenuous, wind-stratified circumburst density profile is required by the observations, suggesting a massive-star progenitor with a low mass-loss rate, perhaps due to low metallicity. GRBs similar in nature to GRB 130427A, inhabiting low-density media and exhibiting strong reverse shocks, are probably not uncommon but may have been difficult to recognize in the past owing to their relatively faint late-time radio emission; more such events should be found in abundance by the new generation of sensitive radio and millimeter instruments.

  15. Hydrothermal synthesis and afterglow luminescence properties of hollow SnO{sub 2}:Sm{sup 3+},Zr{sup 4+} spheres for potential application in drug delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Pengfei; Zhang, Jiachi Qin, Qingsong; Hu, Rui; Wang, Yuhua

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • We designed a novel afterglow labeling material SnO{sub 2}:Sm{sup 3+},Zr{sup 4+} for the first time. • Hollow SnO{sub 2}:Sm{sup 3+},Zr{sup 4+} spheres with afterglow were prepared by hydrothermal method. • Hollow SnO{sub 2}:Sm{sup 3+},Zr{sup 4+} is a potential afterglow labeling medium for drug delivery. - Abstract: A novel afterglow labeling material SnO{sub 2}:Sm{sup 3+},Zr{sup 4+} with hollow sphere shape and intense afterglow luminescence is prepared by hydrothermal method at 180 °C for the first time. The morphology and the sphere growth process of this material are investigated by scanning electron microscopy in detail. The afterglow measurement shows that this hydrothermal obtained material exhibits obvious red afterglow luminescence (550–700 nm) of Sm{sup 3+} which can last for 542 s (0.32 mcd/m{sup 2}). The depth of traps in this hydrothermal obtained material is calculated to be as shallow as 0.58 eV. The results demonstrate that although it is necessary to further improve the afterglow performance of the hydrothermal derived hollow SnO{sub 2}:Sm{sup 3+},Zr{sup 4+} spheres, it still can be regarded as a potential afterglow labeling medium for drug delivery.

  16. Probe Measurements in the H-mode Pedestal Region in the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodner, G. M.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Thome, K. E.; Thompson, D. S.

    2014-10-01

    In near-unity aspect ratio Pegasus discharges, Ohmic heating and high-field-side fueling together trigger an L-H mode transition in both limited and diverted configurations. H-mode plasmas are predicted to exhibit pedestals in both the pressure and current density profiles. Operation at A ~ 1 allows for the use of local magnetic and Langmuir probes in the pedestal region. A current pedestal is routinely observed in Pegasus H-mode plasmas, but not in L-mode plasmas or during ELMs. Conventionally, edge pedestal measurements are observed in the edge pressure profile. A triple Langmuir probe has recently been installed in order to investigate the structure of the edge pressure pedestal in Pegasus H-mode discharges and complement the current density profile measurements. Local density and temperature measurements will be collected using the triple Langmuir probe at varying spatial locations to identify edge pressure profiles. These pressure profiles will be measured in both the L-mode and H-mode regimes. The triple probe will additionally be used to observe the turbulence levels before, during, and after the L-H mode transition. Complete density and temperature profiles including the pedestal will be obtained using a combination of Langmuir probe and Thomson scattering measurements. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  17. GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOW SCALING RELATIONS FOR THE FULL BLAST WAVE EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Van Eerten, Hendrik J.; MacFadyen, Andrew I.

    2012-03-10

    We demonstrate that gamma-ray burst afterglow spectra and light curves can be calculated for arbitrary explosion and radiation parameters by scaling the peak flux and the critical frequencies connecting different spectral regimes. Only one baseline calculation needs to be done for each jet opening angle and observer angle. These calculations are done numerically using high-resolution relativistic hydrodynamical afterglow blast wave simulations which include the two-dimensional dynamical features of expanding and decelerating afterglow blast waves. Any light curve can then be generated by applying scaling relations to the baseline calculations. As a result, it is now possible to fully fit for the shape of the jet break, e.g., at early-time X-ray and optical frequencies. In addition, late-time radio calorimetry can be improved since the general shape of the transition into the Sedov-Taylor regime is now known for arbitrary explosion parameters so the exact moment when the Sedov-Taylor asymptote is reached in the light curve is no longer relevant. When calculating the baselines, we find that the synchrotron critical frequency {nu}{sub m} and the cooling break frequency {nu}{sub c} are strongly affected by the jet break. The {nu}{sub m} temporal slope quickly drops to the steep late-time Sedov-Taylor slope, while the cooling break {nu}{sub c} first steepens and then rises to meet the level of its shallow late-time asymptote.

  18. Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Scaling Relations for the Full Blast Wave Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eerten, Hendrik J.; MacFadyen, Andrew I.

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate that gamma-ray burst afterglow spectra and light curves can be calculated for arbitrary explosion and radiation parameters by scaling the peak flux and the critical frequencies connecting different spectral regimes. Only one baseline calculation needs to be done for each jet opening angle and observer angle. These calculations are done numerically using high-resolution relativistic hydrodynamical afterglow blast wave simulations which include the two-dimensional dynamical features of expanding and decelerating afterglow blast waves. Any light curve can then be generated by applying scaling relations to the baseline calculations. As a result, it is now possible to fully fit for the shape of the jet break, e.g., at early-time X-ray and optical frequencies. In addition, late-time radio calorimetry can be improved since the general shape of the transition into the Sedov-Taylor regime is now known for arbitrary explosion parameters so the exact moment when the Sedov-Taylor asymptote is reached in the light curve is no longer relevant. When calculating the baselines, we find that the synchrotron critical frequency ν m and the cooling break frequency ν c are strongly affected by the jet break. The ν m temporal slope quickly drops to the steep late-time Sedov-Taylor slope, while the cooling break ν c first steepens and then rises to meet the level of its shallow late-time asymptote.

  19. Investigations on the afterglow of a thin cathode discharge in argon at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, Sebastian; Du, Beilei; Luggenhölscher, Dirk; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2010-07-01

    A thin cathode discharge consists of two electrodes separated by a dielectric layer with a thickness of ca 100 µm. The shape of the anode can be chosen arbitrarily, while the thickness of the cathode is also about 100 µm. Through this 'sandwich', a hole with a diameter of 200 µm is drilled. When such a device is operated at pressures of several hundred hectopascals, it shows a self-pulsing behaviour in which high electron densities of several 1016 cm-3 are reached. Electrical measurements showed that this can be explained by the repeated ignition of a short-living spark discharge. Due to the high pressure and the related high collision frequencies, the afterglow of this discharge was expected to last several tens of nanoseconds. Instead, lifetimes of several hundred nanoseconds were observed. In order to identify the mechanisms responsible for this long living afterglow, a kinetic model of the afterglow was developed. As a result, Penning ionization, superelastic collisions with both atoms in excited states and excimers were found to play a crucial role in the production and heating of electrons.

  20. GRB 081029: A Gamma-Ray Burst with a Multi-Component Afterglow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Stephen T.; DePasquale, Massimiliano; Mao, Jirong; Sakamoto, Taka; Shady, Patricia; Covino, Stefano; Yi-Zhong, Fan; Zhi-Ping, Jin; D'Avanzo, Paolo; Antonelli, Angelo; D'Elia, Valerio; Chincarini, Guido; Fiore, Fabrizio; Pandey, Shashi Bhushan

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of the unusual optical light curve of the gamma-ray burst GRB 081029, a long-soft burst with a redshift of z = 3.8479. We combine X-ray and optical observations from the Swift X-Ray Telescope and the Swift UltraViolet Optical Telescope with ground-based optical and infrared data obtained using the REM and ROTSE telescopes to construct a detailed data set extending from 86 s to approx. 100000 s after the BAT trigger. Our data cover a wide energy range, from 10 keV to 0.77 eV (1.24 A to 16000 A). The X-ray afterglow shows a shallow initial decay followed by a rapid decay starting at about 18000 s. The optical and infrared afterglow, however, shows an uncharacteristic rise at about 5000 s that does not correspond to any feature in the X-ray light curve. Our data are not consistent with synchrotron radiation from a jet interacting with an external medium, a two-component jet, or continuous energy injection from the central engine. We find that the the optical light curves can be broadly explained by a collision between two ejecta shells within a two-component jet. A growing number of gamma-ray burst afterglows are consistent with complex jets, which suggests that some (or all) gamma-ray burst jets are complex and will require detailed modelling to fully understand them.