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Sample records for afterschool tutoring program

  1. Analysis of the Dynamics among Tutors in an After-School Tutoring Program in a Homeless Shelter for Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacGillivray, Laurie; Goode, Gretchen S.

    2016-01-01

    Researchers of after-school tutoring primarily focus on educational outcomes with little attention to the social dynamics of such programs. In our qualitative case study, we examined the nature of interactions among tutors in a tutoring program at a homeless shelter for families. Employing Bourdieu's concepts of "social capital" and…

  2. The Effects of an After-School Tutoring Program on the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carbone, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    Due to the challenges of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, many schools and school districts are implementing after-school tutoring programs to provide students additional instruction to score proficient or better in reading and mathematics. This doctoral study analyzed the effects of the ABC Middle School Educational Assistance Program…

  3. Blog-Based Support for Preservice Teachers in an Afterschool Tutoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ro, Jennifer Moon; Magiera, Kathleen; Gradel, Kathleen; Simmons, Rhea

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on findings from a study that explored blogging (a web-based log) as a tool for literacy graduate students to deliver support to preservice teachers who were working in an afterschool intervention program. Its effectiveness is compared to the use of an online literacy instructional module. Analyses of the discussions in nine…

  4. Pupils in the After-School Tutoring Program Five Years Later.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blowers, E. A.

    1987-01-01

    Follow-up of 34 pupils (age range 6-22 originally) who had attended a university-sponsored tutoring program 5 years earlier is discussed in terms of persistence and nature of the problems, and characteristics of subgroups including graduates from academic high school programs, graduates from non-academic programs, drop-outs, and a reportedly…

  5. Building Effective Afterschool Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fashola, Olatokunbo S.

    Through a comprehensive review of various afterschool programs across the United States, this resource provides a practical overview of the research and best practices that can be easily adapted and applied in the development of highly effective afterschool programs. chapters focus on: (1) "Why Afterschool Programs?" (benefits, challenges, and…

  6. After-School Tutoring and the Distribution of Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Min-Hsiung

    2013-01-01

    As more primary and secondary students worldwide seek after-school tutoring in academic subjects, concerns are being raised about whether after-school tutoring can raise average test scores without widening the variability in student performance, and whether students of certain ability levels may benefit more than others from after-school…

  7. Minority Male Afterschool Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Herbert F., Jr.

    Through a program called the Minority Male Afterschool Program (MMAP), college students at Mississippi Valley State University in Itta Bena (Mississippi) are working one-on-one with high school students. The MMAP is an enrichment program that encourages at-risk African American students aged 12 to 19 to complete high school and pursue…

  8. Evaluating Afterschool Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Priscilla M.

    2014-01-01

    Well-implemented afterschool programs can promote a range of positive learning and developmental outcomes. However, not all research and evaluation studies have shown the benefits of participation, in part because programs and their evaluation were out of sync. This chapter provides practical guidance on how to foster that alignment between…

  9. A Literature Review of Afterschool Mentoring Programs for Children at Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Sara; Yarbrough, Anna-Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Afterschool programs such as tutoring and school-based or community-based programs have effectively functioned as prevention and intervention programs for children at risk. This literature review focuses on afterschool mentoring programs for children at risk. The purpose of reviewing the literature was to (a) determine the breadth and scope of the…

  10. Teacher Candidates Learning from English Learners: Constructing Concepts of Language and Culture in Tuesday's Tutors After-School Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitts, Shanan; Gross, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    In teacher preparation programs across the United States, early field experiences are considered to be an effective method of providing teacher candidates with opportunities to observe and interact with children (National Council for Accreditation for Teacher Education (NCATE, 2010). These practicum arrangements assist candidates in developing…

  11. Cultural Competence in Afterschool Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpkins, Sandra D.; Riggs, Nathaniel R.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing ethnic diversity among American youth, in combination with funding priorities often targeting underserved populations, has increased the number of diverse youth attending afterschool programs (ASPs). At present, there is little guidance on how to best design ASPs and prepare staff to support the development of these diverse youth. The…

  12. Improving Participation in After-School Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen E.; Arbreton, Amy J. A.

    2005-01-01

    After-school programs attempt to provide safe havens that keep youth off the streets and offer them a variety of opportunities to enhance their experiences and skills, including educational outcomes such as grades. What the programs actually accomplish has been somewhat different. Major evaluations of after-school programs have shown that they do…

  13. Discovering Community: Activities for Afterschool Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institute on Out-of-School Time, Wellesley College, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The project activities highlighted in this publication were conducted within the framework of school-based afterschool programs operated by community-based organizations. The intention of the Discovering Community initiative, created by The After-School Corporation and MetLife Foundation, is to foster greater collaborations and mutual respect…

  14. Afterschool in Action: How Innovative Afterschool Programs Address Critical Issues Facing Middle School Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Over the last four years, the Afterschool Alliance and MetLife Foundation have worked together to identify exemplary, and often lesser-known afterschool programs across the nation. For the past two years, efforts have focused on finding innovative afterschool programs serving middle school students. This focus was developed to address the need for…

  15. After-School Tutoring in the Context of No Child Left Behind: Effectiveness of Two Programs in the Pittsburgh Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmer, Ron; Hamilton, Laura; Christina, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind (NCLB) legislation has created pressure for districts to improve their students' proficiency levels on state tests. Districts that fail to meet their academic targets for 3 years must use their Title I funds to pay for supplemental education services (SES) that provide tutoring or other academic instruction. Many…

  16. Learning Everywhere: Afterschool and Summer Programs for Youth. Satellite Town Meeting #71 (June 20, 2000). [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    Schools and communities are finding new ways to provide students with quality learning opportunities outside the traditional school day. Statistics reveal that as many as 5 million children may be left alone at home each week while parents work. Before- and afterschool programs, summer learning activities, and mentoring and tutoring efforts are…

  17. Examining the Impact of Afterschool STEM Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnamurthi, Anita; Ballard, Melissa; Noam, Gil G.

    2014-01-01

    Afterschool programs that provide strong science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) learning experiences are making an impact on participating youth not only become excited and engaged in these fields but develop STEM skills and proficiencies, come to value these fields and their contributions to society, and--significantly--begin to see…

  18. Effect of an After-School Tutorial Program on Academic Performance of Middle School Students At-Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathleen M. T.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    This study examined the extent to which an After-School Peer Tutoring (ASPT) program in a rural southeastern school district was effective in elevating achievement levels of 89 at-risk middle school students enrolled in the program for one semester. End-of-semester grade was used as a measure of performance. The study also analyzed indicators of…

  19. Afterschool Programs: Helping Kids Succeed in Rural America. Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No. 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Investing in afterschool programs helps children of rural communities break out of the cycle of poverty and creates opportunities for at-risk youth. In areas where prospects and resources are limited, afterschool programs are often the only source of supplemental enrichment in literacy, nutrition education, technology, and preparation for college…

  20. Afterschool Programs: A Wise Public Investment. Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No.22

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2005

    2005-01-01

    After-school advocates and practitioners face a seemingly continual struggle for adequate funding. While there have been successes, budgets have tightened at all levels of government, and advocates must be prepared to demonstrate that after-school programs are a worthy investment. This report highlights benefits of these programs by pointing out…

  1. Developing Social Inclusion through After-School Homework Tutoring: A Study of African Refugee Students in Greater Western Sydney

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naidoo, Loshini

    2009-01-01

    Schools represent the primary setting where refugee children learn about Australian life and culture. They serve as a broad context for acculturation not only for academic development and language acquisition but for cultural learning too. This paper focuses on the after-school homework tutoring programme that uses University of Western Sydney…

  2. Supporting African Refugees in Greater Western Sydney: A Critical Ethnography of After-School Homework Tutoring Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naidoo, Loshini

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the Refugee Action Support Partnership Project between the University of Western Sydney, The Australian Literacy and Numeracy Foundation and the NSW-Department of Education and Training (DET). The critical ethnographic method is used to evaluate the after-school homework tutoring centres as a vehicle of literacy development…

  3. Afterschool Programs: Helping Kids Compete in Tomorrow's Workforce. Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No. 25

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Preparing youth for success in tomorrow's workforce is of increasing concern to American schools, communities, policymakers and businesses. After-school programs are uniquely situated to help youth develop the skills needed in the 21st Century workplace. The after-school setting provides additional time for learning, and allows for engaging…

  4. After-School Programs: Keeping Children Safe and Smart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, An-Me

    This guide provides information on the benefits of afterschool programs and the qualities of good after school programs. Afterschool programs reduce the risk of juvenile delinquency, substance use, and violent crime victimization. Children involved in quality programs decrease their chances of dropping out, earn higher grades, and develop better…

  5. Do School-Based Tutoring Programs Significantly Improve Student Performance on Standardized Tests?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Terri; Henderson, Mary

    2011-01-01

    This study used a pre-post, nonequivalent control group design to examine the impact of an in-district, after-school tutoring program on eighth grade students' standardized test scores in language arts and mathematics. Students who had scored in the near-passing range on either the language arts or mathematics aspect of a standardized test at the…

  6. How the Arts Can Enhance After-School Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otterbourg, Susan D.

    To help communities meet the need for after-school programs, the U.S. Department of Education has instituted the 21st Century Community Learning Centers program, which supports after-school, summer, and weekend activities in neighborhood schools. This report provides an introduction to the role of the arts in those programs. Part 1 of the report…

  7. Evaluations Backgrounder: A Summary of Formal Evaluations of the Academic Impact of Afterschool Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Although afterschool programs for children have been operating for decades in some communities, the afterschool movement--the great national awakening to the opportunity afterschool offers--is just a few years old. As public demand for afterschool has grown, so has the demand for accountability. That is particularly true in afterschool programs…

  8. HISD After-School Opportunities Programs Description 1990-91.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkpatrick, Nanda D.; And Others

    This report describes after-school programs available in the Houston (Texas) Independent School District (HISD). Fifty-nine sites offer either after-school child care or instruction to elementary school students in the HISD. Magnet's Extended Instructional Day program is the largest and the Houston Committee for Private Sector Initiatives'…

  9. Youth Sport as a Component of Organized Afterschool Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coatsworth, J. Douglas; Conroy, David E.

    2007-01-01

    Organized afterschool programs have received increased attention over the past two decades because of changes in family demographics and in society's structures for supervising and socializing youth. The number of afterschool programs has been rapidly expanding to meet the increased need. However, not all youth in need are being reached, and the…

  10. Evaluations Backgrounder: A Summary of Formal Evaluations of the Academic Impact of Afterschool Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This compilation focuses chiefly on the impact of afterschool programs on student academic achievement. Although afterschool programs for children have been operating for many years in some communities, the afterschool movement is just a few years old. As public demand for afterschool has grown, so has the demand for accountability. That is…

  11. A Qualitative Study of Elementary Afterschool Teachers' Perceptions of the Impact of Afterschool Programs on Students Receiving Special Education Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legaspi, Margareth

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study, "A Qualitative Study of Elementary Afterschool Teachers' Perceptions of the Impact of Afterschool Programs on Students Receiving Special Education Services," was to assess elementary afterschool teachers' perceptions of the impact of afterschool programs on students receiving special education…

  12. Physical activity opportunities in afterschool programs.

    PubMed

    Weaver, R Glenn; Beets, Michael W; Huberty, Jennifer; Freedman, Darcy; Turner-Mcgrievy, Gabrielle; Ward, Diane

    2015-05-01

    Afterschool programs (ASPs) have potential to provide children moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA). The availability and types (e.g., free play or organized activities) of physical activity opportunities, their structure (e.g., presence of lines, elimination games), and staff behaviors (e.g., encouragement, engaged) can influence children's MVPA. This study explored these factors in 20 ASPs serving over 1,700 elementary-age children. The occurrence, types, and structure of physical activity opportunities, and staff behaviors were collected via the SOSPAN (System for Observing Staff Promotion of Physical Activity and Nutrition). A total of 4,660 SOSPAN scans were completed across 63 complete program days (1,733 during physical activity opportunities). Physical activity opportunities were observed on 60 program days across all 20 sites, with 73% of those opportunities classified as free play. ASPs scheduled an average of 66.3 minutes (range 15-150 minutes) of physical activity opportunities daily. Games played included basketball, tag, soccer, and football. Staff rarely engaged in physical activity promotion behaviors, and the structure of organized games discouraged MVPA. For example, staff verbally promoted physical activity in just 6.1% of scans, while organized games were more likely to involve lines and elimination. Professional development training may enhance staffs' physical activity promotion and the structure of activity opportunities.

  13. Physical activity opportunities in afterschool programs

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, R. Glenn; Beets, Michael W.; Huberty, Jennifer; Freedman, Darcy; Turner-Mcgrievy, Gabrielle; Ward, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Afterschool programs (ASPs) have potential to provide children moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). The availability and types (e.g., free play or organized activities) of physical activity opportunities, their structure (e.g., presence of lines, elimination games), and staff behaviors (e.g., encouragement, engaged) can influence children’s MVPA. This study explored these factors in 20 ASPs serving over 1,700 elementary-age children. The occurrence, types and structure of physical activity opportunities, and staff behaviors were collected via the System for Observing Staff Promotion of Physical Activity and Nutrition (SOSPAN). A total of 4,660 SOSPAN scans were completed across 63 complete program days (1733 during physical activity opportunities). Physical activity opportunities were observed on 60 program days across all 20 sites, with 73% of those opportunities classified as free play. ASPs scheduled an average of 66.3 minutes (range 15-150min) of physical activity opportunities daily. Games played included basketball, tag, soccer and football. Staff rarely engaged in physical activity promotion behaviors, and the structure of organized games discouraged MVPA. For example, staff verbally promoted physical activity in just 6.1% of scans, while organized games were more likely to involve lines and elimination. Professional development training may enhance staffs’ physical activity promotion and the structure of activity opportunities. PMID:25586132

  14. Strengthening Connections between Schools and Afterschool Programs. Revised Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caplan, Judith G.; Calfee, Carol S.

    2006-01-01

    Afterschool programs are rich with educational opportunities. Programs can make what is learned during the traditional day vibrant and relevant to the lives of children. Comprehensive programs that are integrated into the regular school program and draw on resources within the community can yield positive outcomes for children. Key to this…

  15. After-School Youth Development Programs: A Developmental-Ecological Model of Current Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggs, Nathaniel R.; Greenberg, Mark T.

    2004-01-01

    Although there has been a rapid increase in funding and attention to after-school programs, there is little understanding of how after-school programs impact children's developmental trajectories. The heterogeneity of American children makes it very unlikely that all children need after-school programming or that there is but one brand of…

  16. The Association between Socio-Ecological Factors and Having an After-School Physical Activity Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Acker, Ragnar; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; De Martelaer, Kristine; Seghers, Jan; De Cocker, Katrien; Cardon, Greet

    2012-01-01

    Background: After-school physical activity (PA) programs promote PA among youth. Few studies have used socio-ecological health models to identify barriers and facilitators of after-school PA programs. This study examined which socio-ecological factors are associated with having an after-school PA program. Methods: A questionnaire was administered…

  17. After-School Programs and Academic Impact: A Study of Chicago's After School Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goerge, Robert; Cusick, Gretchen R.; Wasserman, Miriam; Gladden, Matthew

    2007-01-01

    After-school programs for adolescents may be a way to promote positive youth development, and thus, it is important to understand what impact after-school programs can have on the educational achievement of high school students. Chicago's After School Matters (ASM) program offers an exceptional opportunity to study whether an after-school program…

  18. After-School Physical Activity Programs for Adolescent Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Doris L.; Poczwaradowski, Artur; Eisenman, Pat

    2000-01-01

    Describes adolescent girls' responses to an after-school physical activity program, examining how it functioned as a listening tool within a social marketing approach to promoting physical activity. Focus groups and interviews indicated that girls enjoyed and valued the program. Though the program did not increase girls' physical activity levels,…

  19. Working for Children and Families: Safe and Smart After-School Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, An-Me, Ed.

    After-school programs have the potential to keep children safe and out of trouble and can help to improve the academic performance of the increasing numbers of participating children. This report presents positive research on after-school programs and examples illustrating the potential of high-quality after-school activities to keep children…

  20. Beyond the Bell: Principal's Guide to Effective Afterschool Programs. Tools for School Improvement. Third Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diedrich, Krista C.; McElvain, Carol K.; Kaufman, Seth

    2005-01-01

    Quality afterschool programs offer participants productive ways to spend the crucial afterschool hours--whether these hours are between 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. on school days, during weekends, or before school--that otherwise might be spent in unsupervised and potentially harmful activities. Also, afterschool programs help provide additional support to…

  1. Students Create Art: Expanding an After-School Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Diane C.; Pace, Darra

    2008-01-01

    For the past 4 years the special education program at History University has partnered with a Long Island, New York school district in an after-school tutorial program for eighth grade students receiving special education services or considered "at risk." This partnership emerged as a result of a state improvement grant offered to…

  2. Research-Based Practices in Afterschool Mentoring Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Sara C.; Yarbrough, Anna-Margaret; Besnoy, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Most communities have afterschool programs that give school-aged students a safe place to go after the dismissal bell rings. The next step after simply providing a safe haven is to create a nurturing environment that develops young people's talents and supports their needs. A formal mentoring program can help to achieve this goal. In order to…

  3. What Works after School? The Relationship between After-School Program Quality, Program Attendance, and Academic Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leos-Urbel, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between after-school program quality, program attendance, and academic outcomes for a sample of low-income after-school program participants. Regression and hierarchical linear modeling analyses use a unique longitudinal data set including 29 after-school programs that served 5,108 students in Grades 4 to 8…

  4. Learning from Science: Case Studies of Science Offerings in Afterschool Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundh, Patrik; House, Ann; Means, Barbara; Harris, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Afterschool programs have increasingly gained attention as settings that can help enrich students' science learning. Even though science is widely included in afterschool activities, sites often lack adequate materials and staff know-how to implement quality science. To address this need, this article examines afterschool science in light of the…

  5. Family, School, and Community Partnerships: Practical Strategies for Afterschool Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn-Stevenson, Matia

    2014-01-01

    Much attention is given today to the importance of forging family, school, and community partnerships. Growing numbers of schools, many of them with afterschool programs, are dedicating resources to support and sustain relationships with families and community-based organizations. And, among government agencies and the philanthropic sector, there…

  6. Structure and Deviancy Training in After-School Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rorie, Melissa; Gottfredson, Denise C.; Cross, Amanda; Wilson, Denise; Connell, Nadine M.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence regarding the effectiveness of after-school programs (ASPs) for reducing problem behaviors is mixed. Unstructured ASPs may increase antisocial behavior by increasing "deviancy training" opportunities, when peers reinforce deviant attitudes and behaviors. This research analyses approximately 3000 five-minute intervals from 398 observations…

  7. Seven Steps for Implementing Afterschool Programs: Strategies for Physical Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price-Shingles, June N.; Place, Greg

    2016-01-01

    After-school programs (ASP) are a long-standing activity historically facilitated by organizations such as the YMCA, Boys and Girls Club, social service/community centers and, in the past decade, an increasing number of municipal park districts. Staffing usually consist of recreation professionals, social and youth workers, and volunteers. In…

  8. Embedding Positive Behavior Intervention and Supports in Afterschool Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Anne F.; Collier-Meek, Melissa A.; Pons, Shelby R.

    2013-01-01

    There is growing recognition that after-school programs (ASPs) provide opportunities for positive youth development. Many ASPs focus on behavior and socio-emotional challenges, provide evidence-based interventions to improve homework completion and academic skills, and offer physical activities and nutritious foods. Generally speaking, ASPs offer…

  9. Healthy Choices Afterschool: Investigation of the Alignment of Physical Activity and Nutrition Programs/Curricula and the National Afterschool Association Program Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Georgia; Gruber, Diane

    2006-01-01

    This document reports on physical activity and nutrition curriculum choices for afterschool programs, linking with the National Afterschool Association Program Standards. This project was stimulated by the national concern for child and youth obesity and the valuable role out-of-school time programs can fulfill in helping to address the crisis.…

  10. Evaluations Backgrounder: A Summary of Formal Evaluations of Afterschool Programs' Impact on Academics, Behavior, Safety and Family Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Afterschool programs have been operating for decades in communities across the country, and federal investment in afterschool has increased dramatically since the mid-1990s. However, even more investment in the field of afterschool, which includes before-school, afterschool and summer learning programs, is needed to keep up with the growing…

  11. Effects of a Peer Tutor Training Program on Tutors and Tutees with Severe Disabilities in Adapted Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vonlintel, Drew James

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation examines the efficacy of peer tutor training in adapted physical education (APE). A peer tutor evaluation form was created to assess the skills of untrained peer tutors (n = 12). Once skills were assessed, a peer tutor training protocol was created. The protocol was implemented in a peer tutor training program. After peer tutors…

  12. WWC Quick Review of the Report "Outcomes Linked to High-Quality Afterschool Programs: Longitudinal Findings from the Study of Promising Afterschool Programs"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This study examines whether high-quality after-school programs operating in high-poverty communities improve the academic, social, and behavioral outcomes of participating students. The study compared students who regularly participated in high-quality after-school programs to students who regularly spent time with no adult supervision after…

  13. After-school programs for health promotion in rural communities: Ashe County Middle School 4-H After-School Program.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Michael B; Miller, Jennifer L; Blackburn, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Rural youth have a higher risk for lower health and developmental outcomes, often facing numerous constraints (eg, poor socioeconomic conditions, lower levels of social support, fewer recreational programs and facilities, and inadequate transportation). After-school programs have the potential to effectively deliver health-promoting activities but often face significant challenges in these areas. Ashe County is a rural community in the Appalachian region of North Carolina. Ashe County is economically depressed and its youth population has many poor health and developmental indicators. However, with more than 20 years of sustained activity, one important community resource trying to address disparities in youth health and development is the Ashe County 4-H After-School Program. To successfully overcome inherent challenges, the program has positioned itself as essential to community development, supported and retained qualified personnel, and cultivated a network of key partners to continue its efforts to provide essential youth programs for this rural community.

  14. Evaluations Backgrounder: A Summary of Formal Evaluations of Afterschool Programs' Impact on Behavior, Safety and Family Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Although afterschool programs for children have been operating for many years in some communities, the afterschool movement--the great national awakening to the opportunity afterschool offers--is just a few years old. As public demand for afterschool has grown, so has the demand for accountability. That is particularly true in afterschool…

  15. Teaching Students Astronomy Through After-School Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthi, A.; Lochner, J.

    2006-08-01

    "Imagine the Universe" (http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/) is an effort from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's astrophysics division. This program aims to educate teachers about topics in high-energy astrophysics and complex science themes in areas that do not generally have the "hook" of pretty pictures. We are currently working on the adaptation of the existing formal education materials from "Imagine" (and similar resources) for informal education environments such as after-school programs. There is a huge demand for quality science programs in the after-school environment. The utilization of existing formal education resources for informal settings follows a strategy of taking one product idea and repackaging it for different venues. This has been found to be an effective approach to insuring consistency in the scientific themes presented, regardless of the learning context. However, there are several challenges to this approach, including training a non-expert in a short amount of time to lead sessions on astronomy. We will discuss our effort to pilot an astronomy program in summer 2006 (June-July) for a small group of after-school programs in the Washington, DC, area. Based on the feedback we receive from the pilot program, we will refine the effort and expand upon the idea. The ultimate goal is to have a recipe book of activities that after-school staff members can be trained with to bring astronomy to a wider audience. We also plan to explore the idea of engaging scientists in disseminating this effort by offering this program as something they can lead in their local areas.

  16. Handbook for Coordinators of Volunteer Tutor Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Staff Development Committee for Vocational Education and Training, Chadstone (Australia).

    This handbook is designed to provide guidance particularly to inexperienced coordinators of adult literacy volunteer tutor programs or to those isolated from support personnel or structures. It is not a curriculum to be followed from beginning to end, but a selection of materials from all states in Australia. Each section contains references and…

  17. A Successful Peer Tutor Program to Improve Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starks, Gretchen

    The purpose of a peer tutoring program is to assist those students who require ongoing and formal instruction in a subject area. If effectively run, it can have an impact on retention. There are five areas that need to be addressed when initiating a peer tutor program: (1) organization and funding; (2) supervision; (3) tutor training; (4) tutor…

  18. The National Partnership for Quality Afterschool Learning Randomized Controlled Trial Studies of Promising Afterschool Programs: Summary of Findings. Afterschool Research Brief. Issue No. 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaden-Kiernan, Michael; Jones, Debra Hughes; Rudo, Zena; Fitzgerald, Robert; Hartry, Ardice; Chambers, Bette; Smith, Dewi; Muller, Patricia; Moss, Marcey A.

    2008-01-01

    Recent evaluations and research syntheses of afterschool programs rated as high quality show they are associated with increases in student achievement and other positive socio-behavioral outcomes (Lauer et al., 2006; Vandell, Reisner, & Pierce, 2007). Those examinations provide a springboard for the next much-needed area of…

  19. Educing Education Majors' Reflections about After-School Literacy Tutoring: A Poetic Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Janet C.

    2016-01-01

    Contemplating one's teaching has long been an essential part of teacher education. Accordingly, as an instructor of a literacy methods course with a tutoring component, I asked education majors in the class to send me weekly e-mail reflections about their teaching experiences. However, they had difficulty considering their lessons. I knew poetry…

  20. High-Quality After-School Programs Tied to Test-Score Gains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra

    2007-01-01

    Disadvantaged students who regularly attend top-notch after-school programs end up, after two years, academically far ahead of peers who spend more out-of-school time in unsupervised activities, according to findings from an eight-state study of those programs. Known as the Promising Afterschool Programs study, the new research examined 35…

  1. A Case for Middle School After-School Programs in Rural America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinstein, Sheryl

    2003-01-01

    Asserts that in addition to providing safe places where students can develop a sense of belonging, after-school programs can enhance performance in the regular academic program of middle school students. Specifically reviews current research on the impact of after-school programs on academic achievement, work habits, interpersonal skills, and…

  2. Research-Based Practices in Afterschool Programs for High School Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holstead, Jenell; Hightower King, Mindy; Miller, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Structured afterschool programs are often perceived as a service for young children only. Communities often overlook teenagers, expecting more substantial benefits from investments in programs for younger children (Hall & Gruber, 2007). Of about 8.4 million children participating in afterschool programs nationwide, only 1 million are high…

  3. After-School Programs: A Resource for Young Black Males and Other Urban Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodland, Malcolm H.

    2016-01-01

    While after-school programs are plentiful, they are often developed arbitrarily with little attention given to theoretical underpinnings that may inform program interventions. In this article, after-school programs are situated in resilience theory as protective factors, which encourage resilience among young Black males and other urban youth. The…

  4. Developing a Peer Tutoring Program: A Self-Instructional Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Richard W.

    This two-part module was prepared to assist instructors in designing and implementing a peer tutoring program. After introductory material and the presentation of a rationale for peer tutoring, Part I begins by stating learning objectives and providing a pretest. It then presents an overview of peer tutoring, outlining a systematic tutoring…

  5. Impact of an After-School Physical Activity Program on Youth's Physical Activity Correlates and Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chaoqun; Gao, Zan; Hannon, James C.; Schultz, Barry; Newton, Maria; Jenson, William

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effect of a sports-based, after-school physical activity (PA) program on youth's physical activity PA levels and PA correlates. After the pretest, 130 youth were assigned to the intervention group (i.e., after-school PA group) or the comparison (i.e., no after-school PA group) group.…

  6. Determinants of After-School Programming for School-Age Immigrant Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Joy P.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the child and family characteristics that predict enrollment in after-school programming for school-age children of immigrant and nonimmigrant families. Although much is known about the beneficial effects of after-school programming for children and youths, the literature focused on immigrant children--the…

  7. Quality After-School Programming and Its Relationship to Achievement-Related Behaviors and Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grassi, Annemarie M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the relationship between quality social support networks developed through high quality afterschool programming and achievement amongst middle school and high school aged youth. This study seeks to develop a deeper understanding of how quality after-school programs influence a youth's developmental…

  8. Cosmopolitan Literacies of Belonging in an After-School Program with Court-Involved Youths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasudevan, Lalitha; Kerr, Kristine Rodriguez; Hibbert, Melanie; Fernandez, Eric; Park, Ahram

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on the concept of belonging as an embodied practice that is expressed by adolescents in multimodal ways and that can be nurtured inside and also beyond schools, such as within afterschool programs. We explore belonging in an afterschool program designed for court-involved youth. Our research is theoretically framed by…

  9. Tandem Pedagogy: Embedding Service-Learning into an After-School Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tannenbaum, Sally Cahill; Brown-Welty, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    Educators continually seek effective strategies to address the educational needs of students. Two popular strategies are service-learning and after-school programs. The purpose of this study was to begin to explore the value of embedding service-learning into after-school programs. This study utilized a historical database and compared two groups…

  10. Evaluation of Children's After-School Programs in Taiwan: FAHP Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Amy H. I.; Yang, Chih-Neng; Lin, Chun-Yu

    2012-01-01

    The need of after-school programs has become urgent for school-age children in many industrialized countries due to social structure changes. This research develops a hierarchical framework to evaluate after-school programs from two distinct aspects--service quality from parents' perspectives and marketing strategy from operators'…

  11. An Objective Assessment of Children's Physical Activity during the Keep It Moving! After-School Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuna, John M., Jr.; Lauersdorf, Rebekah L.; Behrens, Timothy K.; Liguori, Gary; Liebert, Mina L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: After-school programs may provide valuable opportunities for children to accumulate healthful physical activity (PA). This study assessed the PA of third-, fourth-, and ?fth-grade children in the Keep It Moving! (KIM) after-school PA program, which was implemented in an ethnically diverse and low socioeconomic status school district in…

  12. Physical Activity Intensity, Lesson Context, and Teacher Interactions during an Unstructured Afterschool Physical Activity Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrens, Timothy K.; Miller, Daniel J.; Schuna, John M.; Liebert, Mina L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Afterschool programs are promising arenas to improve youth physical activity (PA) levels. During the school year for 2012-2013, 5 elementary schools from a low-socioeconomic status (SES) school district in southern Colorado participated in evaluation of the afterschool program entitled Keep It Moving! (KIM). Methods: In this…

  13. Challenges and Opportunities in After-School Programs: Lessons for Policymakers and Funders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Jean Baldwin; Walker, Karen; Raley, Rebecca

    This report describes program realities that policymakers must consider when shaping after-school initiatives in impoverished neighborhoods. Information comes from the multi-year evaluation of the Extended-Service Schools Adaptation Initiative, which is examining 60 after-school programs in 17 cities nationwide. Each initiative is adapting one of…

  14. After-School Programs: A Potential Partner to Support Urban Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Ashley; Leung, Brian P.

    2012-01-01

    After-school programs (ASPs) are learning centers that provide enrichment opportunities after regular school hours. This article examines the value these programs can add to a child's educational day, especially for urban youth who are vulnerable during after-school hours. Quality ASPs can be part of the solution to help mitigate the effects of…

  15. Beyond the Bell: A Toolkit for Creating Effective After-School Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Katie E.; Caplan, Judith G.; McElvain, Carol K.

    After-school programs provide an important educational setting for an increasing number of children and have been viewed as a way to help solve school problems, reduce drug use, and prevent violence and youth crime. This toolkit is designed to help school-based after-school program staff plan and make decisions in six critical areas: (1)…

  16. The Assessment of Afterschool Program Practices Tool (APT): Findings from the APT Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracy, Allison; Surr, Wendy; Richer, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    The Assessment of Afterschool Program Practices Tool ("APT"), developed by the National Institute of Out-of-School Time (NIOST), is an observational instrument designed to measure the aspects of afterschool program quality that research suggests contribute to the 21st century skills, attitudes, and behaviors youth need to be successful…

  17. Building Management Information Systems to Coordinate Citywide Afterschool Programs: A Toolkit for Cities. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingsley, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This executive summary describes highlights from the report, "Building Management Information Systems to Coordinate Citywide Afterschool Programs: A Toolkit for Cities." City-led efforts to build coordinated systems of afterschool programming are an important strategy for improving the health, safety and academic preparedness of children…

  18. Moving from Afterschool Training to the Workplace: The Second Year of the Palm Beach County Afterschool Educator Certificate Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Stephen; Johnson, Lauren; Turski, Konrad; Lockaby, Tracey; Daley, Kathleen; Klumpner, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Effective professional development is accepted as necessary for the improvement of afterschool program quality, which is itself a cornerstone for improving youth outcomes. But professional development is most effective when both individual participants are engaged and building relevant knowledge and skills, and the organizations to which they…

  19. Professional Development for Afterschool Practitioners: The First Year of the Palm Beach County Afterschool Educator Certificate Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Stephen; Lockaby, Tracey; Guterman, Kai; Klumpner, Susan

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the first year implementation of a new professional development program, Palm Beach County Afterschool Educator Certificate (PBC-AEC). Set within a larger systemic quality improvement effort in Palm Beach County, this training seeks to provide a concentrated course of learning, practice, and reflection. The training seeks to…

  20. Measuring Afterschool Program Quality Using Setting-Level Observational Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Yoonkyung; Osgood, D. Wayne; Smith, Emilie P.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of afterschool hours for youth development is widely acknowledged, and afterschool settings have recently received increasing attention as an important venue for youth interventions, bringing a growing need for reliable and valid measures of afterschool quality. This study examined the extent to which the two observational tools,…

  1. Palm Beach County's Prime Time Initiative: Improving the Quality of After-School Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielberger, Julie; Lockaby, Tracey

    2008-01-01

    This report covers the third year of Chapin Hall's process evaluation of the Prime Time Initiative of Palm Beach County, Florida, a system-building effort to strengthen the quality of after-school programs in the county. During the past two decades, the after-school field has expanded enormously, partly in response to increasing concern about…

  2. A Peer Mentor Tutor Program in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nossal, S. M.; Jacob, A. T.; Buehlman, J. D.; Middlecamp, C. H.

    2001-05-01

    The Peer Mentor Tutor (PMT) program in the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Physics Department matches upper level undergraduate physics majors in small groups with students potentially at-risk for having academic trouble with their gateway introductory non-calculus physics course or for feeling isolated at the University. The program enhances students'learning and confidence by providing an emphasis on problem solving, a supportive environment for asking questions, and opportunities for acquiring missing math skills. The students assisted include, among others, returning adults, students of color,students with English as a second language, and students who have never taken physics in high school. The tutors acquire teaching and leadership experience with ongoing training throughout the year. The Physics PMT program is run in collaboration with a similar program in Chemistry. The peer model is also being applied to other science courses at the University of Wisconsin. We will describe the structure of the Physics PMT program and our current efforts to expand the program into a broader Physics Learning Center that may serve multiple purposes and courses.

  3. After-School Program Engagement: Links to Child Competence and Program Quality and Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Joseph L; Parente, Maria E.; Lord, Heather

    2007-01-01

    This 2-year study assessed program-level differences in after-school program (ASP) engagement in relation to child competencies (effectance motivation, social competence, school grades) and program quality and content. Participants were 141 children (M age = 8.4 years) who attended 9 ASPs in an urban, disadvantaged city in the United States.…

  4. Teacher Perceptions of an Online Tutoring Program for Elementary Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whetstone, Patti; Clark, Amy; Flake, Mari Wheeler

    2014-01-01

    This study explores elementary teacher perceptions related to the implementation of an online tutoring program. Teachers were surveyed regarding factors that affected use of the online tutoring program as a supplement to mathematics instruction. Results indicated that teachers overwhelmingly reported positive views of the training and support…

  5. Afterschool Programs: Keeping Kids -- and Communities -- Safe. Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No. 27

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2007

    2007-01-01

    After 14 years of decline, cities across the nation are reporting spikes in crime rates, which many law enforcement officials attribute to decreased federal spending on crime prevention and more juveniles becoming involved in violent crimes. This report highlights the "after-school" gap: 20-25 hours per week that children are out of…

  6. The "Generacion Diez" after-school program and Latino parent involvement with schools.

    PubMed

    Riggs, Nathaniel R; Medina, Carmen

    2005-11-01

    The current study examines associations between participation in after-school programs and change in Latino parent involvement with schools. Hierarchical linear regression analyses demonstrated that parents of children who had higher after-school program attendance rates were significantly more likely to report increases in the quality of relationships with their children's teachers, frequency of parent-teacher contact, and engagement with their children's schooling over a two-year period. However, greater home educator contacts were related to decreases in quality and quantity of parent-school involvement. A primary implication is that attendance in school-based after-school programs may draw parents into children's regular-day school context. Editors' Strategic Implications The authors illustrate the promising practice of using after-school programs to promote parent involvement and to help integrate the often disparate family and school contexts for Latino children.

  7. Connecting Scientists, College Students, Middle School Students & Elementary Students through Intergenerational Afterschool STEM Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, N. A.; Paglierani, R.; Raftery, C. L.; Romero, V.; Harper, M. R.; Chilcott, C.; Peticolas, L. M.; Hauck, K.; Yan, D.; Ruderman, I.; Frappier, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Multiverse education group at UC Berkeley's Space Sciences Lab created the NASA-funded "Five Stars Pathway" model in which five "generations" of girls and women engage in science together in an afterschool setting, with each generation representing one stage in the pathway of pursuing a career in science, technology, engineering, or math (STEM). The five stages are: elementary-age students, middle-school-age students, undergraduate-level college students, graduate-level college students and professional scientists. This model was field-tested at two Girls Inc. afterschool locations in the San Francisco Bay Area and distributed to Girls Inc. affiliates and other afterschool program coordinators nationwide. This presentation will explore some of the challenges and success of implementing a multigenerational STEM model as well as distributing the free curriculum for interested scientists and college students to use with afterschool programs.

  8. Two Worlds of Private Tutoring: The Prevalence and Causes of After-School Mathematics Tutoring in Korea and the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jaekyung

    2007-01-01

    Background/Context: Although prior research shows that the nature and extent of private tutoring practices vary significantly from country to country, differences between Eastern and Western countries in terms of their cultural and institutional aspects of private tutoring choice have not been closely examined. We need to bridge the gap by…

  9. Kids on the Move: Afterschool Programs Promoting Healthy Eating and Physical Activity. America After 3PM Special Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Afterschool programs have continued to grow in sophistication, increase their offerings and improve quality. As the role of afterschool programs has evolved from primarily providing a safe and supervised environment to a resource that provides a host of supports for their students, programs have become valuable partners in helping students reach…

  10. Improving Reading Comprehension through Holistic Intervening and Tutoring During After-School with High Risk Minority Elementary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Kaprea F.; Gupta, Abha; Rosen, Hana; Rosen, Howard

    2013-01-01

    The current study took a quasi-experimental approach investigating the effect of a holistic after-school intervention, on reading comprehension measured by the Gray Oral Reading Test (GORT)-4 on at-risk students in Grade 2 through Grade 5. Analysis of Variance was used to investigate the relationship between pre- and post-intervention scores. The…

  11. Examining the Quality of 21st Century Community Learning Center After-School Programs: Current Practices and Their Relationship to Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paluta, Lauren M.; Lower, Leeann; Anderson-Butcher, Dawn; Gibson, Allison; Iachini, Aidyn L.

    2016-01-01

    Although many youths participate in afterschool programs, the research is unclear about which aspects of afterschool program quality contribute most to positive outcomes. This article examines the relationship among quality and outcomes of 21st Century Community Learning Centers (CLCCs) afterschool programs, as perceived by 3,388 stakeholders from…

  12. "We Only Speak English Here": English Dominance in Language Diverse, Immigrant After-School Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gast, Melanie Jones; Okamoto, Dina G.; Feldman, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    Past research suggests that community after-school programs (ASPs) are crucial sites for culturally relevant programming for minority and immigrant youth; yet, we know little about how ASPs address language in their programming. Using an ethnographic fieldwork approach, we examine the goals and practices of ASP workers serving immigrant youth with…

  13. After-School Toolkit: Tips, Techniques and Templates for Improving Program Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, Nora; Bradshaw, Molly; Furano, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    This toolkit offers program managers a hands-on guide for implementing quality programming in the after-school hours. The kit includes tools and techniques that increased the quality of literacy programming and helped improve student reading gains in the Communities Organizing Resources to Advance Learning (CORAL) initiative of The James Irvine…

  14. Effects of Participation in after-School Programs for Middle School Students: A Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottfredson, Denise; Cross, Amanda Brown; Wilson, Denise; Rorie, Melissa; Connell, Nadine

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of attending an after-school program (ASP) on a range of outcomes for middle school youths. The program operated for 9 hr per week for 30 weeks and included attendance monitoring and reinforcement, academic assistance, a prevention curriculum, and recreational programming. Participants were 447 students randomly…

  15. The Development of After-School Program Educators through University-Community Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Joseph L.; Levine, Mark D.; Hinga, Briana

    2010-01-01

    Participation in after-school programs (ASPs) "can" positively affect the development of young people. However, "whether" ASPs are beneficial depends on program quality. Although many factors influence the quality of a program, the competencies of adult staff who lead ASPs are a critical determinant. Unfortunately, ASP staff…

  16. Urban High School Students' Experiences in an Afterschool College Readiness Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parikh, Sejal B.

    2013-01-01

    This transcendental phenomenological investigation examined urban students' experiences in Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP), an afterschool college readiness program. The federally funded program provides low-income and minority students information and access to services that lead to increased…

  17. Voluntary After-School Alcohol and Drug Programs for Middle School Youth: If You Build It "Right", They Will Come

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Amico, Elizabeth J.; Green, Harold D., Jr.; Miles, Jeremy N. V.; Zhou, Annie J.; Tucker, Joan S.; Shih, Regina A.

    2012-01-01

    Few after-school programs target alcohol and other drug (AOD) use because it is difficult to encourage a diverse group of youth to voluntarily attend. The current study describes CHOICE, a voluntary after-school program which targeted AOD use among middle school students. Over 4,000 students across eight schools completed surveys and 15%…

  18. Quality Child Care and After-School Programs: Powerful Weapons against Crime. A Report from "Fight Crime: Invest in Kids."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fight Crime: Invest in Kids, Washington, DC.

    This report examines the crime prevention potential of child care and after-school programs for at-risk children and youth. Part 1 of the report, "Assessing the Crime Prevention Impact of Child Care and After-School Programs," presents research information on the effectiveness of early childhood/parenting skills training and after-school…

  19. Incorporating a Healthy Reimbursable Snack in an Afterschool Homework Program for Middle School Students: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nanney, Marilyn S.; Olaleye, Temitope M.; Wang, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Background: This study tested the feasibility and acceptability of adding a reimbursable snack that meets the Institute of Medicine nutrition recommendations to an afterschool homework program for middle school students. Methods: Snack menu was developed and administered to students attending an afterschool homework program over 12 weeks. In…

  20. After-School Programs & the K-8 Principal: Standards for Quality School-Age Child Care. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Elementary School Principals, Reston, VA.

    This publication for principals about after-school programs provides practical assistance with guidelines for administration, resources for information, collaboration, and funding, along with evaluation checklists. Drawing increasing government attention, after-school programs are overwhelmingly popular with the public as a means to reduce…

  1. Report on the Peer Tutoring Program, 1973-1975 School Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerstiens, Gene

    This paper reports on the Peer Tutoring Program at El Camino College. If a student, counselor, or instructor feels a student needs tutoring, the student applies for tutorial assistance. Upon approval by his instructor, arrangements are made for the student to be tutored. Peer Tutors are selected from among applicants who received a "B"…

  2. The Impact of an Online Tutoring Program on Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Amy K.; Whetstone, Patti

    2014-01-01

    The authors explored the impact of an online tutoring program, Math Whizz (Whizz Education, 2014), on student mathematics achievement at 15 elementary schools. Students participated in the use of the Math Whizz program for the duration of the school year as a supplement to mathematics instruction. The Math Whizz program recorded such information…

  3. Community-Based Education and Social Capital in an Urban After-School Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative case study examined how social capital development was facilitated in an urban after-school program. Specific attention was devoted to identifying structures and strategies that helped student participants develop social capital, the types of social networks that were developed through program participation, and the outcomes that…

  4. Collaborating in the Community: Fostering Identity and Creative Expression in an Afterschool Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavendish, Leslie M.; Vess, Sarah F.; Li-Barber, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Nationwide budget cuts have forced many public school systems to significantly reduce opportunities for engaging in creative arts in the classroom despite the fact that such programs are associated with positive child outcomes. To address this deficit, we developed and executed the "Afterschool Creative Expression Program" (ASCEP) and…

  5. Parents' and Children's Perceptions of the Keep It Moving! After-School Physical Activity Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrens, Timothy K.; Wegner, Rebekah L.; Miller, Daniel J.; Liebert, Mina L.; Smith, Jennifer Howard

    2015-01-01

    After-school PA programs have been used as an outlet to help children increase PA levels. To attract children and their parents, it is important to understand perceptions about programs. With child and parent input, researchers and practitioners will better be able to increase PA with activities the children enjoy and encourage increased PA. A…

  6. Incorporating Environmental Education into an Urban After-School Program in New York City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruyere, Brett L.; Wesson, Mark; Teel, Tara

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the integration of environmental education (EE) into an after-school program in the Bronx borough of New York City. In this qualitative case study, focus group interviews were conducted to first determine parent and educator interest in and barriers to participation in nature programs and incorporation of EE into curriculum.…

  7. The Evaluation of Enhanced Academic Instruction in After-School Programs: Final Report. NCEE 2009-4077

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Alison Rebeck; Somers, Marie-Andree; Doolittle, Fred; Unterman, Rebecca; Grossman, Jean Baldwin

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to determine whether providing structured academic instruction in reading or math to students in grades two to five during their afterschool hours--instead of the less formal academic supports offered in regular after-school programs-- improves their academic performance in the subject. This is the second and…

  8. When the School Bell Rings... Juvenile Crime or Constructive Time? After-School Programs Are the Answer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Tim; Cornelius, Aisha; Francis, Ann Potter; Parsons, Lena

    Noting that the after-school hours are peak hours for Illinois juveniles to be either victims of crime or involved in criminal activity, this report provides evidence that making quality after-school programs available to all youth who need them will reduce crime and provide constructive activities for youth. The report details statistics on…

  9. Analysing Student Programs in the PHP Intelligent Tutoring System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weragama, Dinesha; Reye, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Programming is a subject that many beginning students find difficult. The PHP Intelligent Tutoring System (PHP ITS) has been designed with the aim of making it easier for novices to learn the PHP language in order to develop dynamic web pages. Programming requires practice. This makes it necessary to include practical exercises in any ITS that…

  10. Effectiveness and Spillover of an After-School Health Promotion Program for Hispanic Elementary School Children

    PubMed Central

    Koehly, Laura; Pederson, Rockie; Morera, Osvaldo

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the effectiveness and spillover of an after-school health education and physical activity program among Hispanic elementary school children. Methods. In fall 2008, students in third through fifth grades in 6 schools in El Paso, Texas (n = 901), were randomized to intervention (n = 292 participants) or control (n = 354) classrooms (4 unknown). Intervention classrooms also contained a spillover group (n = 251) that did not join the after-school program but that completed measurements and surveys. The intervention was a 12-week culturally tailored after-school program meeting twice a week. Four-month outcomes were body mass index, aerobic capacity, and dietary intentions and knowledge. We calculated intervention exposure as the proportion of after-school participants per classroom. Results. Intervention exposure predicted lower body mass index (P = .045), higher aerobic capacity (P = .012), and greater intentions to eat healthy (P = .046) for the classroom at follow-up. Intervention effectiveness increased with increasing proportions of intervention participants in a classroom. Nonparticipants who had classroom contact with program participants experienced health improvements that could reduce their risk of obesity. Conclusions. Spillover of beneficial intervention effects to nonparticipants is a valuable public health benefit and should be part of program impact assessments. PMID:21852659

  11. Community Partnership to Address Snack Quality and Cost in After-School Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beets, Michael W.; Tilley, Falon; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Weaver, Robert G.; Jones, Sonya

    2014-01-01

    Background: Policies call on after-school programs (ASPs) to serve more nutritious snacks. A major barrier for improving snack quality is cost. This study describes the impact on snack quality and expenditures from a community partnership between ASPs and local grocery stores. Methods: Four large-scale ASPs (serving ~500 children, aged 6-12?years,…

  12. Impact of Policy Environment Characteristics on Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviors of Children Attending Afterschool Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beets, Michael W.; Huberty, Jennifer; Beighle, Aaron; Moore, Justin B.; Webster, Collin; Ajja, Rahma; Weaver, Glenn

    2013-01-01

    State and national organizations recently developed policies focused on increasing physical activity (PA) in afterschool programs (ASPs). These policies emphasize "activity friendly" environment characteristics that, when present, should lead to higher levels of PA and reduce the amount of time children spend sedentary during an ASP.…

  13. Defining Standards and Policies for Promoting Physical Activity in Afterschool Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beets, Michael W.; Wallner, Megan; Beighle, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    Background: National guidelines exist that define "quality" afterschool programs (3-6 pm, ASP). No widely adopted national standards/policies exist, however, for ASP providers for the promotion of physical activity (PA). To address this gap, state-level ASP organizations have developed or adopted standards/policies related to PA. The extent to…

  14. A Conceptual Model for Training After-School Program Staffers to Promote Physical Activity and Nutrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Robert Glenn; Beets, Michael W.; Webster, Collin; Beighle, Aaron; Huberty, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Background: After-school programs (ASPs, 3 pm to 6 pm) have been called upon to increase the amount of daily physical activity children accumulate and improve the nutritional quality of the snacks served. To this end, state and national physical activity and nutrition (PAaN) policies have been proposed. Frontline staff who directly interact with…

  15. Implementing a Structured Reading Program in an Afterschool Setting: Problems and Potential Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartry, Ardice; Fitzgerald, Robert; Porter, Kristie

    2008-01-01

    In this article, Ardice Hartry, Robert Fitzgerald, and Kristie Porter present results from their implementation study of a structured reading program for fourth, fifth, and sixth graders in an afterschool setting. As the authors explain, schools and districts often view an extended school day as a promising way to address the literacy needs of…

  16. After-School Programs for Early Adolescents: A Path for Building Resiliency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Explores some of the approaches used in one after-school program operating in seven sites in Massachusetts to provide an environment and build individual traits that lead to resilience in early adolescents. Describes four categories of voluntary activity clubs: the arts, including drama, photography, and dance; practical skills, including cooking,…

  17. Physical and Social-Motivational Contextual Correlates of Youth Physical Activity in Underresourced Afterschool Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarrett, Nicole; Sorensen, Carl; Cook, Brittany Skiles

    2015-01-01

    Afterschool programs (ASPs) have become increasingly recognized as a key context to support youth daily physical activity (PA) accrual. The purpose of the present study was to assess the physical and social-motivational climate characteristics of ASPs associated with youth PA, and variations in contextual correlates of PA by youth sex. Systematic…

  18. Effectiveness of an Afterschool-Based Aggression Management Program for Elementary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staecker, Emma; Puett, Eli; Afrassiab, Shayda; Ketcherside, Miranda; Azim, Sabiya; Rhodes, Darson; Wang, Anna

    2016-01-01

    A school-community partnership team implemented an aggression management curriculum in an afterschool program as an early-intervention strategy at the upper elementary level. Although statistically significant differences in physical or psychological aggression were not found, the partnership team gained a better understanding of evidence-based…

  19. Creating Healthier Afterschool Environments in the Healthy Eating Active Communities Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinkle, Arnell J.; Yoshida, Sallie

    2014-01-01

    Afterschool programs in California have the potential to play a major role in obesity prevention given that they serve close to a million low-income children. A five-year initiative called the Healthy Eating Active Communities (HEAC) was funded in 2005 by the California Endowment to demonstrate that disparities related to childhood obesity and…

  20. Comparative Effectiveness of After-School Programs to Increase Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gesell, Sabina B.; Sommer, Evan C.; Lambert, E. Warren; Vides de Andrade, Ana Regina; Davis, Lauren; Beech, Bettina M.; Mitchell, Stephanie J.; Neloms, Stevon; Ryan, Colleen K.

    2013-01-01

    Background. We conducted a comparative effectiveness analysis to evaluate the difference in the amount of physical activity children engaged in when enrolled in a physical activity-enhanced after-school program based in a community recreation center versus a standard school-based after-school program. Methods. The study was a natural experiment with 54 elementary school children attending the community ASP and 37 attending the school-based ASP. Accelerometry was used to measure physical activity. Data were collected at baseline, 6 weeks, and 12 weeks, with 91% retention. Results. At baseline, 43% of the multiethnic sample was overweight/obese, and the mean age was 7.9 years (SD = 1.7). Linear latent growth models suggested that the average difference between the two groups of children at Week 12 was 14.7 percentage points in moderate-vigorous physical activity (P < .001). Cost analysis suggested that children attending traditional school-based ASPs—at an average cost of $17.67 per day—would need an additional daily investment of $1.59 per child for 12 weeks to increase their moderate-vigorous physical activity by a model-implied 14.7 percentage points. Conclusions. A low-cost, alternative after-school program featuring adult-led physical activities in a community recreation center was associated with increased physical activity compared to standard-of-care school-based after-school program. PMID:23984052

  1. Advantages of Gardening as a Form of Physical Activity in an After-School Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Joshua; Hermann, Janice R.; Parker, Stephany P.; Denney, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Children who normally abstain from physical activity may view gardening as a viable non-competitive alternative. The study reported here evaluated the effect of an Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service after-school gardening program on self-reported physical activity level of children in 3rd through 5th grade using the ACTIVITY self-report…

  2. Whole Grains and Food Fun in an After-School Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilboy, Mary Beth

    2009-01-01

    Programs in community-based, after-school settings are ideal to teach children about healthy eating. Objectives: After completing this Whole Grains & Food Fun lesson, children will be able to: (1) list at least two benefits of eating more whole grains, (2) demonstrate skills involved in child-friendly, basic food preparation, and (3) choose a…

  3. Salty or Sweet? Nutritional Quality, Consumption, and Cost of Snacks Served in Afterschool Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beets, Michael W.; Weaver, Robert G.; Tilley, Falon; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Huberty, Jennifer; Ward, Dianne S.; Freedman, Darcy A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Snacks served in afterschool programs (ASPs, 3-6?pm) represent an important opportunity to promote healthy eating. ASP policies suggest a fruit/vegetable is served daily, while sugar-sweetened foods/beverages and artificially flavored snacks are eliminated. Limited information exists on the types of snacks served in ASPs, if snacks…

  4. California Standards Test Scores and Attendance Rates in an Afterschool Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Sandra M.

    2013-01-01

    The Problem: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether or not there were any statistically significant differences in the Mathematics California Standard Test scores and attendance rates for African American and Latina high school girls who participated in an afterschool program. Method: A quasi-experimental design was conducted with…

  5. Fidelity in After-School Program Intervention Research: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynard, Brandy R.; Peters, Kristen E.; Vaughn, Michael G.; Sarteschi, Christine M.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 2 decades, the number of after-school programs (ASP) and the number of students attending ASPs has markedly increased. Although several reviews and meta-analyses have examined the outcomes of ASPs, ASP intervention study reviews have not specifically examined intervention fidelity. Establishing intervention fidelity is critically…

  6. After-School Program Implementation in Urban Environments: Increasing Engagement among Adolescent Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelcher, Allison; Rajan, Sonali

    2016-01-01

    Background: After-school programs (ASPs) play a crucial role in supplementing the present school day. However, implementing ASPs in the urban environment and among adolescents (grades 6-12) poses unique challenges. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic literature review to identify evidence-based barriers and facilitators to…

  7. Afterschool Program Participation and the Development of Child Obesity and Peer Acceptance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Joseph L.; Lord, Heather; Carryl, Erica

    2005-01-01

    This longitudinal study assessed the role of afterschool program (ASP) participation in the development of child obesity and peer acceptance in a sample of 439 children. Most participants lived in poverty and were Hispanic or African American. Measurements of height and weight determined obesity status and peer acceptance was assessed through…

  8. Predicting Social Responsibility and Belonging in Urban After-School Physical Activity Programs with Underserved Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Jeffrey J.; Byrd, Brigid; Garn, Alex; McCaughtry, Nate; Kulik, Noel; Centeio, Erin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this cross sectional study was to predict feelings of belonging and social responsibility based on the motivational climate perceptions and contingent self-worth of children participating in urban after-school physical activity programs. Three-hundred and four elementary school students from a major Midwestern city participated.…

  9. Competing Language Ideologies in a Bilingual/Bicultural After-School Program in Southern California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pastor, Ana Maria Relano

    2008-01-01

    This article looks at the competing language ideologies that preschool children negotiate in "Mi Clase Magica" (MCM), a Spanish-English bilingual/bicultural after-school program in San Diego. It examines children's language choice in interactions with peers and adults taking place at computer and "tareas" (homework) activities.…

  10. Putting It All Together: Guiding Principles for Quality After-School Programs Serving Preteens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Rachel A.; Goldsmith, Julie; Arbreton, Amy J. A.

    2008-01-01

    Successfully navigating early adolescence depends, in large part, on the availability of safe and engaging activities and supportive relationships with adults, yet many preteens have limited access to positive supports and opportunities such as high-quality after-school programs that could put them on a path to success. Funders, policymakers and…

  11. City Strategies to Engage Older Youth in Afterschool Programs. Strategy Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Lane; Deich, Sharon; Padgette, Heather Clapp; Cox, Amy

    2012-01-01

    A wide body of research shows that consistent participation in high-quality afterschool and summer programs, also called out-of-school time or OST, provides substantial benefits to children and youth and their communities. Youth are more prone to engage in juvenile delinquency, substance abuse and other risky behaviors after 3:00 p.m. if there are…

  12. After-School Programs in Public Elementary Schools: First Look. NCES 2009-043

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsad, Basmat; Lewis, Laurie

    2009-01-01

    How school-age children spend their time after school is a topic of interest among educators, policymakers, researchers, and parents. Many parents choose to have their children attend after-school programs, which may provide services such as academic instruction, cultural enrichment, safe places to stay, and adult supervision for children. This…

  13. Build IT: Scaling and Sustaining an Afterschool Computer Science Program for Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Melissa; Gorges, Torie; Penuel, William R.

    2012-01-01

    "Co-design"--including youth development staff along with curriculum designers--is the key to developing an effective program that is both scalable and sustainable. This article describes Build IT, a two-year afterschool and summer curriculum designed to help middle school girls develop fluency in information technology (IT), interest in…

  14. The Importance of Afterschool and Summer Learning Programs in African-American and Latino Communities. Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No. 59

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In classrooms across the country, when students hear the bell ring at 3 p.m., it signals the end of the school day and, for many, the start of an afternoon without supervision, without productive activities and without direction. Afterschool and summer learning programs are filling the invaluable role of providing essential services--such as a…

  15. Interventions Using Regular Activities to Engage High-Risk School-Age Youth: a Review of After-School Programs in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Cid, Alejandro

    2016-09-08

    In this paper, I review an issue that is an urgent challenge in the development field-the effectiveness of after-school programs for preventing school-age youth violence in vulnerable settings in Latin American and the Caribbean. These programs have proliferated in the region and include sports, recreation, music, tutoring, and other focused activities. Given their popularity and because they target known risk factors for violence (such as drop-out from school, poor academic performance, lack of motivation, too much idle time, low quality and quantity of adult supervision, and social isolation), it is critical to examine empirically whether they can be effective prevention strategies. Unfortunately, most rigorous trials of after-school interventions to prevent youth violence have been conducted in developed countries, with far fewer in Latin America. In this review, a broad range of databases was searched systematically. Only six studies in five Latin American and Caribbean countries were identified. Reported results indicate at least some benefits for youth behavior, although not across all youth. Additional concerns regarding how these programs are implemented and whether specific components can be tied to violence prevention are noted. The need for more rigorous evaluation of these programs is noted.

  16. Tryon Trekkers: An Evaluation of a STEM Based Afterschool Program for At-Risk Youth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckels Anderson, Chessa

    This study contributed to the body of research that supports a holistic model of afterschool learning through the design of an afterschool intervention that benefits elementary school students of low socioeconomic status. This qualitative study evaluated a science focused afterschool curriculum that was designed using principles from Risk and Resiliency Theory, academic motivation theories, science core ideas from the Next Generation Science Standards, and used environmental education philosophy. The research question of this study is: how does an outdoor and STEM based afterschool program impact at-risk students' self-efficacy, belonging and engagement and ability to apply conceptual knowledge of environmental science topics? The study collected information about the participants' affective experiences during the intervention using structured and ethnographic observations and semi-structured interviews. Observations and interviews were coded and analyzed to find patterns in participants' responses. Three participant profiles were developed using the structured observations and ethnographic observations to provide an in depth understanding of the participant experience. The study also assessed the participants' abilities to apply conceptual understanding of the program's science topics by integrating an application of conceptual knowledge task into the curriculum. This task in the form of a participant project was assessed using an adapted version of the Portland Metro STEM Partnership's Application of Conceptual Knowledge Rubric. Results in the study showed that participants demonstrated self-efficacy, a sense of belonging and engagement during the program. Over half of the participants in the study demonstrated a proficient understanding of program concepts. Overall, this holistic afterschool program demonstrated that specific instructional practices and a multi-modal science curriculum helped to support the social and emotional needs of at-risk children.

  17. An Annotated Bibliography of the Literature Dealing with the Educational and Social Benefits of Tutoring Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Melita

    This document provides (1) an annotated bibliography of 30 studies of the educational and social benefits of tutoring programs for handicapped and non-handicapped tutors and tutees and the importance of training in tutoring programs, and (2) a 6-page summary of the findings. Annotations are organized in five sections concerning training in…

  18. Promising Afterschool Practices: A Showcase of Innovative, Creative and Successful Afterschool Programs. Fourth Annual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institute on Out-of-School Time, 2009

    2009-01-01

    A "Promising Practice" is a system, process, or activity in a program that works and leads to good results. It is something that would work in other programs, if only they were aware about it. "Promising Practices" capture some of the most innovative, creative and successful ways that programs serve youth. This publication…

  19. Free afterschool program for at-risk African American children: findings and lessons.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Linda; Froeber, Deanna; Clinton, Barbara; Ruchman, Eileen

    2013-01-01

    A promising afterschool intervention to increase health knowledge and influence choices to reduce risks related to type II diabetes in school-aged, low-income, African American youth is described. Researchers used a community-based program called CASTLES (Communities and Students Together for Learning Enhanced Service). Repeated measures were used to test the effect of the afterschool program on exercise and nutrition. Forty-six children participated in this free program. Significant results demonstrated decreased consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and screen time and increased exercise and health knowledge. Communities interested in influencing behaviors related to childhood obesity should develop strong community-based programs, such as the CASTLES model, incorporating nutrition information and structured physical activity.

  20. Evaluation of the Early Start to Emancipation Preparation Tutoring Program, Los Angeles County, California: Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtney, Mark E.; Zinn, Andrew; Zielewski, Erica H.; Bess, Roseana J.; Malm, Karin E.; Stagner, Matthew; Pergamit, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This report presents findings from a rigorous evaluation of the Early Start to Emancipation Preparation (ESTEP)-Tutoring Program in Los Angeles. ESTEP-Tutoring provides up to 50 hours of remedial one-on-one tutoring in reading and math to foster youths ages 14 to 15 who are one to three years behind grade level in either reading or math. The…

  1. Evaluation of the 1979-80 Title-I Migrant Tutoring Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rincon, Ramon; Zepeda, R. A.

    Using Spanish and/or English according to each student's need, the Migrant Tutoring Program (MTP) provided 20 minutes of tutoring daily in oral language development, language arts, and reading to 238 migrant students (K-6) in 17 schools during the year. Questionnaires designed for principals, teachers, and tutors were used to obtain process…

  2. Science in Afterschool Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falkenberg, Karen; McClure, Patricia; McComb, Errin M.

    2006-01-01

    In considering science in afterschool, research was reviewed and is presented in this document on how students learn science; how science is assessed, particularly inquiry science; recommended practices for afterschool science; and current afterschool science programs. Databases such as ERIC, Wilson Web, and PsychINFO were searched using…

  3. Strategies to Increase After-School Program Staff Skills to Promote Healthy Eating and Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Weaver, R Glenn; Beets, Michael W; Beighle, Aaron; Webster, Collin; Huberty, Jennifer; Moore, Justin B

    2016-01-01

    Standards targeting children's healthy eating and physical activity (HEPA) in after-school programs call for staff to display or refrain from HEPA-promoting or -discouraging behaviors that are linked to children's HEPA. This study evaluated strategies to align staff behaviors with HEPA Standards. Staff at four after-school programs serving approximately 500 children participated in professional development training from January 2012 to May 2013. Site leaders also attended workshops and received technical support during the same time frame. Changes in staff behaviors were evaluated using the System for Observing Staff Promotion of Activity and Nutrition in a pre- (fall 2011) multiple-post (spring 2012, fall 2012, and spring 2013), no-control group study design. A total of 8,949 scans were completed across the four measurement periods. Of the 19 behaviors measured, 14 changed in the appropriate direction. For example, staff engaging in physical activity with children increased from 27% to 40% of scans and staff eating unhealthy foods decreased from 56% to 14% of days. Ongoing training and technical assistance can have a measureable impact on staff behaviors linked to child-level HEPA outcomes. Future research should explore the feasibility of disseminating ongoing trainings to after-school program staff on a large scale.

  4. Power-Up: A Collaborative After-School Program to Prevent Obesity in African American Children

    PubMed Central

    Choudhry, Shahid; McClinton-Powell, Lori; Solomon, Marla; Davis, Dawnavan; Lipton, Rebecca; Darukhanavala, Amy; Steenes, Althera; Selvaraj, Kavitha; Gielissen, Katherine; Love, Lorne; Salahuddin, Renee; Embil, Frank K.; Huo, Dezheng; Chin, Marshall H.; Quinn, Michael T.; Burnet, Deborah L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Schools represent a key potential venue for addressing childhood obesity. Objective To assess the feasibility of Power-Up, an after-school program to decrease obesity risk among African American children, using community-based participatory research (CBPR) principles. Methods Teachers led 14 weekly nutrition and physical activity sessions during after-school care at the Woodlawn Community School on Chicago’s South Side. Forty African American children ages 5 to 12 participated; their 28 parents discussed similar topics weekly at pickup time, and families practiced relevant skills at home. Pre- and post-intervention anthropometrics, blood pressure, dietary measures, and health knowledge and beliefs for children and parents were compared in univariate analysis. Results At baseline, 26% of children were overweight; 28% were obese. Post-intervention, mean body mass index (BMI) z scores decreased from 1.05 to 0.81 (p < .0001). Changes were more pronounced for overweight (−0.206 z-score units) than for obese children (−0.062 z-score units; p = .01). Girls decreased their combined prevalence of overweight/obesity from 52% to 46%; prevalence across these categories did not change for boys. The prevalence of healthful attitudes rose, including plans to “eat more foods that are good for you” (77% to 90%; p = .027) and “planning to try some new sports” (80% to 88%; p = .007). Conclusion Children in the Power-Up program reduced mean BMI z scores significantly. The after-school venue proved feasible. The use of CBPR principles helped to integrate Power-Up into school activities and contributed to likelihood of sustainability. Engaging parents effectively in the after-school time frame proved challenging; additional strate gies to engage parents are under development. Plans are underway to evaluate this intervention through a randomized study. PMID:22616204

  5. The Impact of Length of Engagement in After-School STEM Programs on Middle School Girls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cupp, Garth Meichel

    An underrepresentation of females exists in the STEM fields. In order to tackle this issue, work begins early in the education of young women to ensure they are interested and have the confidence to gain a career in the STEM fields. It is important to engage girls in STEM opportunities in and out of school to ignite their interest and build their confidence. Brigid Barron's learning ecology perspective shows that girls pursuing STEM outside of the classroom is critical to their achievement in the STEM pipeline. This study investigated the impact after-school STEM learning opportunities have on middle school girls by investigating (a) how the length of engagement in after-school programs can affect the confidence of female students in their science and math abilities; (b) how length of engagement in after-school programs can affect the interest of female students in attaining a career in STEM; (c) how length of engagement in after-school programs can affect interest in science and math classes; and (d) how length of engagement can affect how female students' view gender parity in the STEM workforce. The major findings revealed no statistical significance when comparing confidence in math or science abilities or the perception that gender plays a role in attaining a career in STEM. The findings revealed statistical significance in the areas when comparing length of engagement in the girls' interest in their math class and attaining a career in three of the four STEM fields: science, technology, and engineering. The findings showed that multiple terms of engagement in the after-school STEM programs appear to be an effective catalyst to maintain the interest of girls pursuing STEM-related careers, in addition to allowing their interest in a topic to provide a new lens for the way they see their math work during the school day. The implications of this study show that schools must engage middle school girls who are interested in STEM in a multitude of settings

  6. Green Youth of Russia, Kazakhstan and Ukraine: After-School Naturalist Programs in Post-Soviet Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blinnikov, Mikhail S.; Lindsey, Jason Royce

    2010-01-01

    This paper compares the status of young naturalist after-school programs in three post-Soviet republics: Russia, Ukraine and Kazakhstan. In the past, the region's environmental teachers, leaders and activists have emerged from such youth programs. Thus, the health of these programs is a leading indicator for the long-term viability of broader…

  7. Enhancing Quality in Afterschool Programs: Fifth-Year Report on a Process Evaluation of Prime Time Palm Beach County, Inc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Stephen; Spielberger, Julie; Lockaby, Tracey; Guterman, Kai

    2010-01-01

    Prime Time Palm Beach County, Inc. is an organization dedicated to improving the availability and quality of afterschool programs in the county. During the 2007-2008 program year, Prime Time implemented a county-wide Quality Improvement System (QIS) that included program standards, an assessment process, and on-site technical assistance delivered…

  8. Specific features of after-school program quality: associations with children's functioning in middle childhood.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Kim M; Bolt, Daniel M; Vandell, Deborah Lowe

    2010-06-01

    This longitudinal study examined associations between three after-school program quality features (positive staff-child relations, available activities, programming flexibility) and child developmental outcomes (reading and math grades, work habits, and social skills with peers) in Grade 2 and then Grade 3. Participants (n = 120 in Grade 2, n = 91 in Grade 3) attended after-school programs more than 4 days per week, on average. Controlling for child and family background factors and children's prior functioning on the developmental outcomes, positive staff-child relations in the programs were positively associated with children's reading grades in both Grades 2 and 3, and math grades in Grade 2. Positive staff-child relations also were positively associated with social skills in Grade 2, for boys only. The availability of a diverse array of age-appropriate activities at the programs was positively associated with children's math grades and classroom work habits in Grade 3. Programming flexibility (child choice of activities) was not associated with child outcomes.

  9. The Impact of a Peer-Tutoring Program on Quality Standards in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arco-Tirado, Jose L.; Fernandez-Martin, Francisco D.; Fernandez-Balboa, Juan-Miguel

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of this study were, on one had, to determine the impact of a peer tutoring program on preventing academic failure and dropouts among first-year students (N = 100), from Civil Engineering, Economics, Pharmacy, and Chemical Engineering careers; while, on the other hand, to identify the potential benefits of such tutoring program on the…

  10. Evidence to Support Peer Tutoring Programs at the Undergraduate Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colver, Mitchell; Fry, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined undergraduate peer tutoring in three phases. Phase I qualitatively surveyed students' perceptions about the effectiveness of tutoring. Phase II examined the usefulness of promoting regular use of services through a tutoring contract. Phase III utilized an archival, quasi-experimental approach to estimate the effect of…

  11. Explore Locally, Excel Digitally: A Participatory Learning After-School Program for Enriching Citizenship On- and Offline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felt, Laurel J.; Vartabedian, Vanessa; Literat, Ioana; Mehta, Ritesh

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the design and implementation of a participatory culture pedagogy in the context of a pilot after-school program at LAUSD's Robert F. Kennedy Community Schools. Ethnographic fieldnotes, instructor and student reflections, photographs, video recordings, and student work illustrate the program's culture of participatory…

  12. Kids on the Move: Afterschool Programs Promoting Healthy Eating and Physical Activity. America After 3PM Special Report. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Afterschool programs continue to make advances when it comes to providing students with nutritious foods, keeping them physically fit and promoting health. Such programs have great potential to help prevent obesity and instill lifelong healthy habits, serving more than 10 million children and youth across America, with more than 19 million more…

  13. Don't You Want to Do Better? Implementing a Goal-Setting Intervention in an Afterschool Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallenbeck, Amy; Fleming, David

    2011-01-01

    Goal setting is not an innate skill. Adults who are successful at reaching their goals have learned to set realistic goals and to plan to attain them. Afterschool programs, because they have latitude in their curricular offerings and program elements, can provide strong backdrops for goal-setting initiatives. While studies have shown that goal…

  14. Summer Programs. Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No. 12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2002

    2002-01-01

    The need for youth to be supervised and safe does not end with the school year. For this reason, summer programs like those funded by the US Department of Education's 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21st CCLC) program are vital for the well-being of youth. Summer schools have traditionally served youth who are in need of remedial academic…

  15. Recruiting and Retaining Older African American and Hispanic Boys in After-School Programs: What We Know and What We Still Need to Learn. GroundWork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauh, Tina J.

    2010-01-01

    With funding from the Collaborative for Building After-School Systems (CBASS)--through support from The Atlantic Philanthropies--Public/Private Ventures (P/PV) conducted a small study to begin identifying promising strategies currently used by after-school programs to recruit and retain middle- and high-school-aged African American and Hispanic…

  16. Four Commentaries: The Policy Climate for After-School Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligson, Michelle E.; Brown, Cynthia G.; Barnes-O'Connor, Kimberly L.; Walker, Gary C.

    1999-01-01

    Four essays by policy analysts approach programs for school-age children from differing perspectives, each identifying the key forces that influence the policy climate and directions for the future. (Author/SLD)

  17. The Effectiveness of Volunteer Tutoring Programs for Elementary and Middle School Students: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Gary W.; Barnett, Joshua H.; Denny, George S.; Albin, Ginger R.

    2009-01-01

    This meta-analysis assesses the effectiveness of volunteer tutoring programs for improving the academic skills of students enrolled in public schools Grades K-8 in the United States and further investigates for whom and under what conditions tutoring can be effective. The authors found 21 studies (with 28 different study cohorts in those studies)…

  18. Constructing Adult Literacies at a Local Literacy Tutor-Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roderick, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates how literacy was constructed at an adult literacy organization's volunteer tutor-training program. By drawing on qualitative analysis of training texts used during training, such as training evaluations, and data gathered from interviews with experienced tutors, it is possible to identify the assumptions about literacy…

  19. Grade Level and Gender Differences in a School-Based Reading Tutoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Sau Hou

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate the grade level and gender differences in a school-based reading tutoring program. The treatment group included 10 first-grade and 12 second-grade struggling readers, and the control group included 41 first-grade and 63 second-grade nonstruggling readers. The tutors were teacher candidates in an…

  20. Valued Youth Partnership Program: Dropout Prevention through Cross-Age Tutoring [Summary].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosa, Alicia Salinas

    1986-01-01

    In 1984 the Edgewood and South San Antonio Independent School Districts implemented the Valued Youth Partnership Program (VYP). VYP identifies Hispanic junior high and high school students at high risk of dropping out and gives them an opportunity to serve as tutors of younger children. As they tutor, the older students also learn basic skills,…

  1. Volunteer Motivations and Satisfaction in a Tutoring Program: Implications for Recruitment and Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Kimberly

    2009-01-01

    The present study employed a functional approach to assess the motivations of tutors volunteering at a non-profit tutoring program. Based on the work of Clary et al. (1998), the "Volunteer Functions Inventory" (VFI) was used to differentiate between six different functions or motivations; values, understanding, social, career, protective and…

  2. An Apple a Day and at Night: A Distance Tutoring Program for At-Risk Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Steven M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes a program of distance tutoring developed by Apple Computer, Inc., Memphis City Schools, and Memphis State University for at-risk minority students. The electronic bulletin board system (BBS) used is described; types of distance learning systems are explained; and research outcomes are discussed, including tutor roles and writing skills.…

  3. A Pilot Study Exploring After-School Care Providers' Response to the Incredible Years Classroom Management Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks-Hoste, Taylor B.; Carlson, John S.; Tiret, Holly B.

    2015-01-01

    The need for and importance of bringing evidence-based interventions into school settings has been firmly established. Adapting and adjusting intervention programs to meet the unique needs of a school district requires personnel to use a data-based approach to implementation. This pilot study is the first to report on after-school care providers'…

  4. The Effects of an After-School Science Program on Middle School Female Students' Attitudes towards Science, Mathematics and Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferreira, Maria M.

    This study examined the impact of an after-school science program that incorporated cooperative learning, hands-on activities, mentoring, and role models on a group of minority female students' attitudes toward science, engineering, and mathematics. Eighteen African American middle school students participated in the study. Seven female engineers…

  5. Making Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Policy Practice: Process Evaluation of a Group Randomized Controlled Intervention in Afterschool Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, R. Glenn; Beets, Michael W.; Hutto, Brent; Saunders, Ruth P.; Moore, Justin B.; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Huberty, Jennifer L.; Ward, Dianne S.; Pate, Russell R.; Beighle, Aaron; Freedman, Darcy

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the link between level of implementation and outcomes from an intervention to increase afterschool programs' (ASPs) achievement of healthy eating and physical activity (HE-PA) Standards. Ten intervention ASPs implemented the Strategies-To-Enhance-Practice (STEPs), a multi-component, adaptive intervention framework identifying…

  6. Achievement Goals and Their Relations to Children's Disruptive Behaviors in an After-School Physical Activity Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agbuga, Bulent; Xiang, Ping; McBride, Ron

    2010-01-01

    This study used a trichotomous achievement goal model to explore and describe what actually happened in terms of students' achievement goals and disruptive behaviors in an after-school physical activity program. Participants included 158 students in grades 3-6. They completed questionnaires assessing their achievement goals and disruptive…

  7. A Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluation of an After-School Prosocial Behavior Program in an Area of Socioeconomic Disadvantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hare, Liam; Biggart, Andy; Kerr, Karen; Connolly, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial was used to evaluate the effects of a prosocial behavior after-school program called Mate-Tricks for 9- and 10-year-old children and their parents living in an area of significant socioeconomic disadvantage. The children were randomly assigned to an intervention (n = 220) or a control group (n = 198). Children were…

  8. A Qualitative Study of Urban Hispanic Youth in an After-School Program: Career, Cultural, and Educational Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Justin C.; Calhoun-Butts, Candice

    2012-01-01

    Based on a diverse sample of 11 urban Hispanic youth, the career, educational, and cultural domains of developmental adjustment were investigated through a triangulation of interview data and field notes within the context of delivering an after-school program. Consensual qualitative research (CQR) and content analysis were used to explore how…

  9. Students' Attitudes toward Science as Predictors of Gains on Student Content Knowledge: Benefits of an After-School Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newell, Alana D.; Zientek, Linda R.; Tharp, Barbara Z.; Vogt, Gregory L.; Moreno, Nancy P.

    2015-01-01

    High-quality after-school programs devoted to science have the potential to enhance students' science knowledge and attitudes, which may impact their decisions about pursuing science-related careers. Because of the unique nature of these informal learning environments, an understanding of the relationships among aspects of students' content…

  10. Bodily Play in the After-School Program: Fulfillment of Intentionality in Interaction between Body and Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Londal, Knut

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates the relationship between children in an after-school program (ASP) and the places where they play. It focuses on the kind of bodily play the children themselves choose and control. The author applies a life-world approach to this study, and his theoretical perspective is based on phenomenological philosophy. The…

  11. Going Global and Getting Graphic: Critical Multicultural Citizenship Education in an Afterschool Program for Immigrant and Refugee Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Jie Y.

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative case study reports on the experiences of six recent-arrival immigrant and refugee girls as they participated in an afterschool program designed to promote critical multicultural citizenship through graphic novels. Analysis of discourse data revealed how the girls explored the interdependence among nation-states and wrestled with…

  12. Afterschool Keeps Kids Safe. Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No. 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Afterschool programs provide safe places for youth after school in addition to improving academic achievement and helping working families. Afterschool programs provide youth a safe, supervised environment that reduces their risk of committing or becoming a victim of violent crime. A recent report from Fight Crime: Invest in Kids has found that…

  13. Serving English Language Learners Afterschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holstead, Jenell; Doll, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Over the last several decades, the number of afterschool programs has grown considerably due to the growing employment rates of mothers and concerns regarding at-risk students (James-Burdumy, Dynarski, & Deke, 2007). Afterschool programs impact the lives of nearly 10.2 million children in Kindergarten through 12th grade, an overall increase…

  14. Students’ Attitudes Toward Science as Predictors of Gains on Student Content Knowledge: Benefits of an After-School Program

    PubMed Central

    Newell, Alana D.; Tharp, Barbara Z.; Vogt, Gregory L.; Moreno, Nancy P.; Zientek, Linda R.

    2015-01-01

    High-quality after-school programs devoted to science have the potential to enhance students’ science knowledge and attitudes, which may impact their decisions about pursuing science-related careers. Due to the unique nature of these informal learning environments, an understanding of the relationships among aspects of students’ content knowledge acquisition and attitudes toward science may aid in the development of effective science-related interventions. We investigated the impact of a semester-long after-school intervention utilizing an inquiry-based infectious diseases curriculum (designed for use after-school) on 63 urban students’ content knowledge and aspects of their attitudes towards science. Content knowledge increased 24.6% from pre- to posttest. Multiple regression analyses indicated suggested that the “self-directed effort” subscale of the Simpson-Troost Attitude Questionnaire - Revised best predicted increases in students’ science content knowledge. The construct “science is fun for me” served as a suppressor effect. These findings suggest that future after-school programs focusing on aspects of attitudes toward science most closely associated with gains in content knowledge might improve students’ enthusiasm and academic preparedness for additional science coursework by improving student attitudes towards their perceptions of their self-directed effort. PMID:26778859

  15. Students' Attitudes Toward Science as Predictors of Gains on Student Content Knowledge: Benefits of an After-School Program.

    PubMed

    Newell, Alana D; Tharp, Barbara Z; Vogt, Gregory L; Moreno, Nancy P; Zientek, Linda R

    2015-05-01

    High-quality after-school programs devoted to science have the potential to enhance students' science knowledge and attitudes, which may impact their decisions about pursuing science-related careers. Due to the unique nature of these informal learning environments, an understanding of the relationships among aspects of students' content knowledge acquisition and attitudes toward science may aid in the development of effective science-related interventions. We investigated the impact of a semester-long after-school intervention utilizing an inquiry-based infectious diseases curriculum (designed for use after-school) on 63 urban students' content knowledge and aspects of their attitudes towards science. Content knowledge increased 24.6% from pre- to posttest. Multiple regression analyses indicated suggested that the "self-directed effort" subscale of the Simpson-Troost Attitude Questionnaire - Revised best predicted increases in students' science content knowledge. The construct "science is fun for me" served as a suppressor effect. These findings suggest that future after-school programs focusing on aspects of attitudes toward science most closely associated with gains in content knowledge might improve students' enthusiasm and academic preparedness for additional science coursework by improving student attitudes towards their perceptions of their self-directed effort.

  16. Afterschool and Students with Special Needs. Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No. 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Afterschool programs can provide important benefits to all students, including those who have learning, developmental and physical disabilities. Students in afterschool programs have better grades and behavior, increased self-esteem and more positive attitudes about school. For students with special needs, afterschool programs also provide a level…

  17. Afterschool Education: Approaches to an Emerging Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noam, Gil G.; Biancarosa, Gina; Dechausay, Nadine

    Noting that there exists little systematic and conclusive research on after-school education to guide the development of practices in this emerging field, this book contributes to the definition of after-school education by focusing on three essential aspects of such programming: (1) bridging school to after-school (2) homework, or extended…

  18. Afterschool Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Charles; Akiva, Tom; McGovern, Gina; Peck, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter discusses efforts to define and improve the quality of afterschool services, highlighting areas of agreement and identifying leading-edge issues. We conclude that the afterschool field is especially well positioned to deliver high-quality services and demonstrate effectiveness at scale because a strong foundation has been built for…

  19. Keeping Children Safe: Afterschool Staff and Mandated Child Maltreatment Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandarilla, Maria; O'Donnell, Julie

    2014-01-01

    With 8.4 million children in the U.S. spending an average of eight hours a week in afterschool programs, afterschool providers are an important part of the network of caring adults who can help to keep children safe. In addition, afterschool staff are "mandated reporters." Whether or not the laws specifically mention afterschool staff,…

  20. The after-school needs and resources of a low-income urban community: surveying youth and parents for community change.

    PubMed

    Cornelli Sanderson, Rebecca; Richards, Maryse H

    2010-06-01

    Using a collaborative research approach, this project describes a partnership between community residents and university researchers to develop a comprehensive survey of the after-school needs of a low-income urban community in a large Midwestern city. Surveying parents and children was considered particularly important because the current literature on after-school does not include much input from them, the key stakeholders in programming. By surveying pre- and young adolescent youth (N = 416) and parents (N = 225) in the community, information was gathered to document the need for after-school programming, tap program preferences, and uncover barriers to participation and enrollment. Survey findings revealed significant differences between youth and parent perspectives. Disagreements between youth and parent survey responses suggest that after-school programs in the community should offer a balance of academic, recreational, and social activities, as well as a tutoring or homework component. Further, in order to increase participation and attendance rates, community after-school programs need to address the following barriers to participation: safety, transportation, family responsibilities (e.g., care for siblings, household chores), and access to information about available programs. These findings guided the planning of future after-school programs. The survey results and comparisons between youth and parent data will be presented.

  1. The Volunteer Tutor's Toolbox.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrmann, Beth Ann, Ed.

    Intended for volunteers in community literacy programs, one-on-one tutors, or parents who want to support classroom learning, this book presents tutoring ideas, teaching activities, and evaluation suggestions. The book guides tutors as they teach students to become independent learners and shows tutors how to provide support but not "do"…

  2. Improving Nutrition and Physical Activity Policies in Afterschool Programs: Results from a Group-Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, Erica L.; Giles, Catherine M.; deBlois, Madeleine E.; Gortmaker, Steven L.; Chinfatt, Sherene; Cradock, Angie L.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Afterschool programs can be health-promoting environments for children. Written policies positively influence nutrition and physical activity (PA) environments, but effective strategies for building staff capacity to write such policies have not been evaluated. This study measures the comprehensiveness of written nutrition, PA, and screen time policies in afterschool programs and assesses impact of the Out of School Nutrition and Physical Activity (OSNAP) intervention on key policies. METHODS Twenty afterschool programs in Boston, MA participated in a group-randomized, controlled trial from September 2010 to June 2011. Intervention program staff attended learning collaboratives focused on practice and policy change. The Out-of-School Time (OST) Policy Assessment Index evaluated written policies. Inter-rater reliability and construct validity of the measure and impact of the intervention on written policies were assessed. RESULTS The measure demonstrated moderate to excellent inter-rater reliability (Spearman’s r=0.53 to 0.97) and construct validity. OSNAP was associated with significant increases in standards-based policy statements surrounding snacks (+2.6, p=0.003), beverages (+2.3, p=0.008), screen time (+0.8, p=0.046), family communication (+2.2, p=0.002), and a summary index of OSNAP goals (+3.3, p=0.02). CONCLUSIONS OSNAP demonstrated success in building staff capacity to write health-promoting policy statements. Future research should focus on determining policy change impact on practices. PMID:24941286

  3. Ask-Elle: An Adaptable Programming Tutor for Haskell Giving Automated Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerdes, Alex; Heeren, Bastiaan; Jeuring, Johan; van Binsbergen, L. Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Ask-Elle is a tutor for learning the higher-order, strongly-typed functional programming language Haskell. It supports the stepwise development of Haskell programs by verifying the correctness of incomplete programs, and by providing hints. Programming exercises are added to Ask-Elle by providing a task description for the exercise, one or more…

  4. Children "At Risk": Constructions of Childhood in the 21st Century Community Learning Centers Federal After-School Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Sharon Verner

    2006-01-01

    In 2001, the U.S. government allocated $4.5 billion to after-school programs through the 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21st CCLC) grant directed at high-poverty, low-performing schools. Since 2003, 6,800 rural and urban public schools have been served around the country, at county, city, and district levels as well as some organizations…

  5. Promoting healthful diets and exercise: efficacy of a 12-week after-school program in urban African Americans.

    PubMed

    Engels, Hermann-J; Gretebeck, Randall J; Gretebeck, Kimberlee A; Jiménez, Linda

    2005-03-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a unique extracurricular after-school initiative designed to promote healthy diets and exercise in urban African Americans. The Students and Parents Actively Involved in Being Fit after-school program was offered for 12 weeks to students and their parents/guardians at an urban middle school. Specific aims of the intervention were to increase participants' vegetable and fruit intake by using established 5 A Day for Better Health educational resource materials/activities and to affect their health-related fitness through dance, games, and fitness activities. Fifty-six children and 25 parents/guardians completed a standard battery of evaluations before and after the program. Pre-post pairwise t test revealed that both children and their parents/guardians showed an increase in fruit consumption and a reduction in diastolic blood pressure (P <.05). Moreover, children showed improvements in systolic blood pressure and fruit juice, salad, and nonfried potato consumption while parents/guardians showed a decrease in body fat, body mass index, and endurance walk/run time (P <.05). Overall, findings indicate that children tended to gain more diet-related benefits while parents/guardians tended to derive more fitness-related benefits. After-school programs like the Students and Parents Actively Involved in Being Fit initiative can potentially contribute to improved health levels in urban African Americans.

  6. The New Stories/New Cultures after-school enrichment program: a direct cultural intervention.

    PubMed

    Frank, G; Fishman, M; Crowley, C; Blair, B; Murphy, S T; Montoya, J A; Hickey, M P; Brancaccio, M V; Bensimon, E M

    2001-01-01

    This article describes the organization, curriculum, and outcomes for New Stories/New Cultures, an activity-based program for after-school enrichment in five schools in the low-income neighborhood near a major American university. The program encourages students (70% Hispanic-American, 30% African-American) to experience themselves as producers of culture, not just as consumers. Its methods include (a) creative team use of video equipment and other expressive media and (b) lessons about media literacy (i.e., making critical choices about images and activities depicted in popular culture and commercials). Outcome measures with the cohort of fifth and sixth graders support the programs occupation-based philosophy. They show that students are more likely to experience themselves as building skills when engaged in activities that are both challenging and enjoyable. The students reported greatest engagement and enjoyment in activities that were creative, team-based, and involving media production. These same activities were correlated with increased self-esteem. The term direct cultural intervention is used to describe the application of occupational principles and critical perspectives to provide a population with conceptual tools and skills for interpreting and successfully navigating the social world.

  7. The Effectiveness of an After-school Program Targeting Urban African American Youth

    PubMed Central

    Hanlon, Thomas E.; Simon, Betsy D.; O’Grady, Kevin E.; Carswell, Steven B.; Callaman, Jason M.

    2010-01-01

    The present study reports on the effectiveness at one-year follow-up of an after-school prevention program targeting 6th grade African American youth residing in high-risk urban areas. The program, conducted on-site over the school-year period, involved a group mentoring approach emphasizing remedial education and an appreciation of African American cultural heritage in promoting school bonding, social skills development, and greater academic achievement. Behavioral and adjustment outcome data were obtained from two participating middle-school sites (intervention and comparison, involving 237 and 241 students, respectively) serving essentially equivalent urban communities. Results of the study revealed significant effects for academic achievement and behavior in terms of grade point average and teacher ratings that favored students at the intervention site. At this site, greater participation of parents in the intervention program was found to be positively related to improvement of the children in grade point average. No differential site-related changes in negative behavior were observed. PMID:20300430

  8. Digital Media & Learning in Afterschool. MetLife Foundation Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No. 58

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The Afterschool Alliance, in partnership with MetLife Foundation, is proud to present the final issue brief in its latest series of four issue briefs examining critical issues facing middle school youth and the vital role afterschool programs play in addressing these issues. This brief explores afterschool and digital learning. At the core of…

  9. Arts Enrichment in Afterschool. MetLife Foundation Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No. 56

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Afterschool Alliance, in partnership with MetLife Foundation, is proud to present the second in its latest series of four issue briefs examining critical issues facing middle school youth and the vital role afterschool programs play in addressing these issues. This brief explores afterschool and arts enrichment. The arts have the remarkable…

  10. Network Interventions on Physical Activity in an Afterschool Program: An Agent-Based Social Network Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Shoham, David A.; Tesdahl, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We studied simulated interventions that leveraged social networks to increase physical activity in children. Methods. We studied a real-world social network of 81 children (average age = 7.96 years) who lived in low socioeconomic status neighborhoods, and attended public schools and 1 of 2 structured afterschool programs. The sample was ethnically diverse, and 44% were overweight or obese. We used social network analysis and agent-based modeling simulations to test whether implementing a network intervention would increase children’s physical activity. We tested 3 intervention strategies. Results. The intervention that targeted opinion leaders was effective in increasing the average level of physical activity across the entire network. However, the intervention that targeted the most sedentary children was the best at increasing their physical activity levels. Conclusions. Which network intervention to implement depends on whether the goal is to shift the entire distribution of physical activity or to influence those most adversely affected by low physical activity. Agent-based modeling could be an important complement to traditional project planning tools, analogous to sample size and power analyses, to help researchers design more effective interventions for increasing children’s physical activity. PMID:25689202

  11. Process Evaluation of an Intervention to Increase Child Activity Levels in Afterschool Programs

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, R. Glenn; Saunders, Ruth; Webster, Collin; Beets, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Identifying effective strategies in Afterschool programs (ASPs) to increase children's moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in the ASP setting is crucial. This study describes the process evaluation outcomes from an intervention to reduce child sedentary time and increase MVPA in ASPs. Methods Four ASPs participated in a quasi-experimental single-group pre-post study targeting child sedentary time and MVPA. The strategies implemented to help ASPs meet Physical Activity Standards consisted of detailed schedules, professional development trainings, on-site booster sessions, and technical assistance. Process evaluation related to staff behaviors was collected via systematic observation to identify the interventions impact on the physical and social environment of the ASP. Random-effects regression models examined the impact of the intervention on boys/girls observed sedentary behavior, MVPA, and changes in staff behaviors. Results Increases in MVPA and reductions in sedentary behavior were observed during enrichment, academics, organized and free-play physical activities (PA). Corresponding changes in staff behaviors were observed during these ASP contexts. For example, staff reduced child idle-time during organized PA (38.9%-1.8%) and provided energizers more often during enrichment (0.2%-11.5%). Conclusions This study identified changes in staff behavior during ASP contexts that led to increases in child MVPA and decreases in child sedentary behavior. PMID:24836999

  12. The Florida State University's Learning District: A Case Study of an Academic Library-Run Peer Tutoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demeter, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    In March 2010, the first floor of the main library at The Florida State University was renovated as a learning commons. With this change in design, all tutoring that existed throughout the library was moved into the commons. The crown jewel of these programs is the library's in-house, late-night peer tutoring program that has seen incredible…

  13. Bilingual Mini-School Tutoring Project. Evaluation Progress Report Number 2, Final Evaluation Program Year 1, July 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, Beverly

    An early childhood education program for children of migrant and seasonal farm workers, the Project provides tutoring, usually outside of regular school hours, to kindergarten and first grade children. The tutoring is done by adult paraprofessionals who are former migrants or seasonal farm workers. Program focus is to: (1) develop the child's…

  14. Effects of After-School Programs with At-Risk Youth on Attendance and Externalizing Behaviors: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Maynard, Brandy R.; Polanin, Joshua R.; Vaughn, Michael G.; Sarteschi, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    The popularity, demand, and increased federal and private funding for after-school programs have resulted in a marked increase in after-school programs over the past two decades. After-school programs are used to prevent adverse outcomes, decrease risks, or improve functioning with at-risk youth in several areas, including academic achievement, crime and behavioral problems, socio-emotional functioning, and school engagement and attendance; however, the evidence of effects of after-school programs remains equivocal. This systematic review and meta-analysis, following Campbell Collaboration guidelines, examined the effects of after-school programs on externalizing behaviors and school attendance with at-risk students. A systematic search for published and unpublished literature resulted in the inclusion of 24 studies. A total of 64 effect sizes (16 for attendance outcomes; 49 for externalizing behavior outcomes) extracted from 31 reports were included in the meta-analysis using robust variance estimation to handle dependencies among effect sizes. Mean effects were small and non-significant for attendance and externalizing behaviors. A moderate to large amount of heterogeneity was present; however, no moderator variable tested explained the variance between studies. Significant methodological shortcomings were identified across the corpus of studies included in this review. Implications for practice, policy and research are discussed. PMID:25416228

  15. The Effectiveness of a Tutoring Program for Junior High Latino Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valenzuela-Smith, Marina

    Evaluation of effectiveness of an experimental tutoring program for 22 Latino junior high students in Antelope Valley, California, sought to determine whether the program would change students' school achievement, school-related behaviors, and self-esteem positively. The tutorial system was based on personal analysis of the students' learning…

  16. Developing an Embedded Peer Tutor Program in Design Studio to Support First Year Design Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamberlan, Lisa; Wilson, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    An improved first year student experience is a strategic focus for higher education in an increasingly competitive marketplace. A successful peer tutoring program creates a visible community of practice, supports the student learning experience, elevates senior students as ambassadors of the program, and reinforces an emphasis on learning through…

  17. Tutoring Programs for Struggling Readers: The America Reads Challenge. Rutgers Invitational Symposia on Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Lesley Mandel, Ed.; Woo, Deborah Gee, Ed.

    As a result of the America Reads Challenge Act of 1997, numerous tutoring programs have been established to help ensure that every child reads independently by the end of third grade. This book describes exemplary America Reads programs across the country as well as other effective early literacy interventions, including Reading Recovery, the…

  18. Afterschool Universe - Bringing Astronomy Down to Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthi, Anita; Eyermann, S.; Mitchell, S.; Lochner, J.; Reynolds, C.

    2008-05-01

    Afterschool Universe is an out-of-school-time astronomy program targeted at middle school students. It explores astronomy concepts through engaging hands-on activities and takes participants on a journey through the Universe beyond the solar system. Afterschool Universe underwent extensive pilot testing with several hundred participants in 2006 and 2007 under the name Beyond Einstein Explorers’ Program (BEEP) and is now widely available to run in your own local communities. We will discuss the structure of the program and resources available to implement it. Afterschool Universe is ideally run as a partnership between astronomers or EPO professionals and local afterschool program providers. The former contribute content expertise to help train the program leaders while the latter have a deep understanding of their target audience. Furthermore, it provides a relatively easy plug-and-play opportunity for astronomers to engage in EPO efforts within their communities. This program addresses several IYA themes as it works with an audience that doesn't typically get much exposure to astronomy. The adult afterschool program leaders do not usually have science backgrounds and middle school students do not normally get to explore the topics in Afterschool Universe at this age. Afterschool programs often reach those who most need additional help and can be offered in a variety of settings where the students go when the school day is over. The afterschool community is looking for quality science programming that will engage the children. Afterschool Universe offers just such an engagement opportunity.

  19. Pongase en accion! Materiales para actividades despues de la escuela (Get into Action! Afterschool Action Kit).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, Washington, DC.

    Noting that after-school programs are a critical link to helping children become successful adults, this Spanish-language kit explains what after-school programs can and should do for young people and how to locate or start an after-school program. The kit provides a rationale for developing after-school programs, noting the number of children…

  20. Social and Emotional Learning through a Teaching Personal and Social Responsibility Based After-School Program for Disengaged Middle-School Boys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Barrie; Jacobs, Jenn M.; Wright, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined a long-term afterschool leadership program situated in a Midwestern university town in the US. The activity-based program for boys considered to be disengaged with school and at risk for dropping out of education, was based on the Teaching Personal and Social Responsibility (TPSR) model. The program curriculum was strongly…

  1. Salty or Sweet? Nutritional quality, consumption, and cost of snacks served in afterschool programs

    PubMed Central

    Beets, Michael W.; Weaver, R. Glenn; Tilley, Falon; Turner-McGrievy, Brie; Huberty, Jennifer; Ward, Dianne S.; Freedman, Darcy A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Snacks served in afterschool programs (ASPs, 3–6pm) represent an important opportunity to promote healthy eating. ASP policies suggest a fruit/vegetable is served daily, while sugar-sweetened foods/beverages and artificially-flavored snacks are eliminated. Limited information exists on the types of snacks served in ASPs, if snacks meet existing nutrition policies, whether children eat the snacks, and their cost. METHODS Direct observation of snacks served and consumed was collected in 20 ASPs serving over 1,700 elementary-age children. The number of days snacks were served/week was evaluated for compliance with nutrition policies. Costs of snacks were collected via receipts. RESULTS Programs served desserts and artificially-flavored salty-snacks on 2.7 and 2.1 days/week. Fruits and vegetables were served 0.6 and 0.1 days/wk, respectively. Sugar-sweetened-beverages were served 1.8 days/wk. Of the children (N=383) observed, 75–100% consumed the snack served, with 95% and 100% of served fruits/vegetables consumed. No ASP served fruit/vegetables daily, 18 served sugar-sweetened foods, 16 served artificially-flavored snacks, and 14 served sugar-sweetened-beverages. Desserts and salty-snacks cost $0.27–$0.32/snack vs. $0.38–$0.40/snack for vegetables/fruits. CONCLUSIONS The quality of snacks failed to meet nutrition policies and consists of predominately high-sugar and artificially-flavored options. Strategies to improve snack offerings in ASPs while addressing price barriers are required. PMID:25564980

  2. Physical and Social-Motivational Contextual Correlates of Youth Physical Activity in Underresourced Afterschool Programs.

    PubMed

    Zarrett, Nicole; Sorensen, Carl; Cook, Brittany Skiles

    2015-08-01

    Afterschool programs (ASPs) have become increasingly recognized as a key context to support youth daily physical activity (PA) accrual. The purpose of the present study was to assess the physical and social-motivational climate characteristics of ASPs associated with youth PA, and variations in contextual correlates of PA by youth sex. Systematic observations of 7 ASPs serving underserved youth (minority, low income) was conducted using the System for Observing Play and Leisure Activity in Youth and a social-motivational climate observation tool founded on self-determination theory. For five program days at each site, teams of two coders conducted continuous observations of youth PA (sedentary, moderate, vigorous), five physical features (e.g., equipment availability), eight staff interactions (e.g., encourage PA), and seven motivational climate components (e.g., inclusive). Aligned with previous research, regressions controlling for variations by site indicated that organized PA, provision of portable equipment, and staff PA participation and supervision are key correlates of youth PA. Moreover, as the first study to systematically observe motivational-context characteristics of ASPs, we identified several key modifiable motivational features that are necessary to address in order to increase youth engagement in PA during the out-of-school hours. Among motivational features assessed, "relatedness" components (positive peer relations, inclusive/cooperative activities) were primary correlates of girls' PA. In contrast, all three motivational features specified by self-determination theory (support for autonomy, mastery/competence, and inclusion/relatedness) were correlated with boys' PA. Findings are discussed in terms of policy and practice for understanding strengths and needs of ASPs to effectively engage youth in PA.

  3. Specific Features of After-School Program Quality: Associations with Children’s Functioning in Middle Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Bolt, Daniel M.; Vandell, Deborah Lowe

    2010-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined associations between three after-school program quality features (positive staff–child relations, available activities, programming flexibility) and child developmental outcomes (reading and math grades, work habits, and social skills with peers) in Grade 2 and then Grade 3. Participants (n = 120 in Grade 2, n = 91 in Grade 3) attended after-school programs more than 4 days per week, on average. Controlling for child and family background factors and children’s prior functioning on the developmental outcomes, positive staff–child relations in the programs were positively associated with children’s reading grades in both Grades 2 and 3, and math grades in Grade 2. Positive staff–child relations also were positively associated with social skills in Grade 2, for boys only. The availability of a diverse array of age-appropriate activities at the programs was positively associated with children’s math grades and classroom work habits in Grade 3. Programming flexibility (child choice of activities) was not associated with child outcomes. PMID:20336364

  4. Top-Down, Bottom-Up, and Around the Jungle Gym: A Social Exchange and Networks Approach to Engaging Afterschool Programs in Implementing Evidence-Based Practices

    PubMed Central

    Smith, E. P.; Wise, E.; Rosen, H.; Childs, S.; McManus, M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the use of concepts from Social Networks and Social Exchange theories to implement an evidence-based practice in afterschool programs. The members of the LEGACY Together Afterschool Project team conduct collaborative research to design and deliver a behavioral strategy that has been documented to reduce disruptive behaviors in classroom settings to a new setting—that of afterschool programs. We adapted the Paxis Institute’s version of the Good Behavior Game (PaxGBG) to context of afterschool, which exhibits many differences from in-school settings, including more fluid attendance, multiple age groupings, diverse activities that may take place simultaneously, and differences in staff training and experience (Barrish, Saunders, & Wolf, 1969; Embry, Straatemeier, Richardson, Lauger, & Mitich, 2003; Hynes, Perkins, & Smith, 2009; Kellam et al., 2008). This paper presents the experiences of the three adult groups involved in the implementation process who give first-person accounts of implementation: 1) university-based scientist, 2) community partners who trained and provided technical assistance/coaching, and 3) an afterschool program administrator. We introduce here the AIMS model used to frame the implementation process conceptualized by this town-gown collaborative team. AIMS builds upon previous work in implementation science using four phases in which the three collaborators have overlapping roles: Approach/engagement, Implementation, Monitoring, and Sustainability. Within all four phases principles of Social Exchange Theory (SET) and Social Network Theory (SNT) are highlighted. PMID:24781678

  5. Peer and Cross-Age Tutoring. ERIC Digest, Number 79.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaustad, Joan

    One-to-one tutoring programs, such as peer and cross-age tutoring, can result in emotional and learning benefits for the tutor and the tutee. Peer tutoring involves two students of the same age. In cross-age tutoring, the tutor is older than the tutee. The Willamette High School Peer Tutoring Program in Eugene, Oregon; the Coca-Cola Valued Youth…

  6. Community Partnership to Address Snack Quality and Cost in Afterschool Programs

    PubMed Central

    Tilley, Falon; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Weaver, Robert Glenn; Jones, Sonya

    2014-01-01

    Background Policies call on afterschool programs (ASPs) to serve more nutritious snacks. A major barrier for improving snack quality is cost. This study describes the impact on snack quality and expenditures from a community-partnership between ASPs and local grocery stores. Methods Four large-scale ASPs (serving ∼500 children aged 6-12 years each day) and a single local grocery store chain participated in the study. The nutritional quality of snacks served was recorded pre-intervention (18 weeks spring/fall 2011) and post-intervention (7 weeks spring 2012) via direct observation, along with cost/child/snack/day. Results Pre-intervention snacks were low-nutrient-density salty snacks (eg, chips, 3.0 servings/week), sugar-sweetened beverages (eg, powdered-lemonade, 1.9 servings/week), and desserts (eg, cookies, 2.1servings/week), with only 0.4 servings/week of fruits and no vegetables. By post-intervention, fruits (3.5 servings/week) and vegetables (1.2 servings/week) increased, while sugar-sweetened beverages and desserts were eliminated. Snack expenditures were $0.26 versus $0.24 from pre-intervention to post-intervention. Partnership savings versus purchasing snacks at full retail cost was 24.5% or $0.25/serving versus $0.34/serving. Conclusions This innovative partnership can serve as a model in communities where ASPs seek to identify low-cost alternatives to providing nutritious snacks. PMID:25040123

  7. Teachers Attending to Students' Mathematical Reasoning: Lessons from an After-School Research Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francisco, John M.; Maher, Carolyn A.

    2011-01-01

    There is a documented need for more opportunities for teachers to learn about students' mathematical reasoning. This article reports on the experiences of a group of elementary and middle school mathematics teachers who participated as interns in an after-school, classroom-based research project on the development of mathematical ideas involving…

  8. The Effects of Homework Programs and After-School Activities on School Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosden, Merith; Morrison, Gale; Gutierrez, Lisa; Brown, Megan

    2004-01-01

    The role of homework needs to be considered within the context of the broader developmental needs of children. This article focuses on how children spend their time after school and how homework, as well as other activities, can contribute to school success. Children differ in their after-school experiences, from "latchkey" children who lack…

  9. Hanging Out: Community-Based After-School Programs for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Ruth, Ed.

    Noting the major changes in mothers' work lives and the significance that out-of-home care arrangements take on in children's lives, this book is a collection of accounts of what children do after school, both outside and inside after-school centers. The centers described are in differing communities, with differing values and differing ways of…

  10. Gaining Ground: Supporting English Learners through After-School Literacy Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsmith, Julie; Jucovy, Linda; Arbreton, Amy

    2008-01-01

    This brief presents findings that demonstrate a relationship between key approaches in Communities Organizing to Advance learning (CORAL), an eight-year, $58 million after-school initiative of The James Irvine Foundation, and the academic progress of English learners. Reported findings include: (1) Children who participated in CORAL fit the…

  11. Successful University & School Partnerships: Social Studies Clubs in Elementary Afterschool Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gieselmann, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    The University of Evansville (UE) is a small liberal arts college in southern Indiana. Through a unique four-year partnership between UE's School of Education and Dexter Elementary School, powerful social studies activities are delivered by preservice teachers to inner-city schoolchildren. The purpose of the afterschool social studies club…

  12. Should Rey Mysterio Drink Gatorade? Cultural Competence in Afterschool STEM Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciechanowski, Kathryn; Bottoms, SueAnn; Fonseca, Ana Lucia; St. Clair, Tyler

    2015-01-01

    Creating a space for learning science outside the traditional classroom shifts the expectations for both educators and children. In the classroom, both groups have preconceived notions of their roles and of what classroom science looks like. In the hybrid space of afterschool, students and educators are free to explore alternative ways of teaching…

  13. Join the AMICUS Club!: Increasing High Schoolers' Social Skills in an After-School Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sodac, David G.

    1997-01-01

    This article describes a high school club for students with and without disabilities that was established to promote constructive social relationships through an after-school club format and to develop students' self-confidence, social acceptance, and peer interaction opportunities. The membership, meetings, officers, and activities of the club…

  14. Junior-Senior High Tutor-Aide Program at Malcolm X Elementary School: An Evaluation Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Thomas

    This two-year project used students at the junior and senior high school level as tutors to elementary students in the basic skills of math and reading. Tutor selection was based on continuing interest, attendance, scholastic achievement, and overall attitude toward the program. The final evaluative report includes the following information: (1)…

  15. Complementary Machine Intelligence and Human Intelligence in Virtual Teaching Assistant for Tutoring Program Tracing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Chih-Yueh; Huang, Bau-Hung; Lin, Chi-Jen

    2011-01-01

    This study proposes a virtual teaching assistant (VTA) to share teacher tutoring tasks in helping students practice program tracing and proposes two mechanisms of complementing machine intelligence and human intelligence to develop the VTA. The first mechanism applies machine intelligence to extend human intelligence (teacher answers) to evaluate…

  16. Mobilizing Volunteer Tutors to Improve Student Literacy: Implementation, Impacts, and Costs of the Reading Partners Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tepper Jacob, Robin; Armstrong, Catherine; Willard, Jacklyn Altuna

    2015-01-01

    This study reports on an evaluation of the "Reading Partners" program, which uses community volunteers to provide one-on-one tutoring to struggling readers in underresourced elementary schools. Established in 1999 in East Menlo Park, California, the mission of "Reading Partners" is to help children become lifelong readers by…

  17. Data-Driven Hint Generation in Vast Solution Spaces: A Self-Improving Python Programming Tutor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivers, Kelly; Koedinger, Kenneth R.

    2017-01-01

    To provide personalized help to students who are working on code-writing problems, we introduce a data-driven tutoring system, ITAP (Intelligent Teaching Assistant for Programming). ITAP uses state abstraction, path construction, and state reification to automatically generate personalized hints for students, even when given states that have not…

  18. Academic Skills Center Program: Peer Tutoring, Study Skills Classes, Academic Assistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Betty Marie; And Others

    The Academic Skills Center at Black Hills State University provides a peer assistance program comprising both individual tutoring in classes offered in each academic division and credit classes in study skills. The goal of the Center is to respond effectively and quickly to individual educational needs of students and faculty through a…

  19. Supporting Social and Emotional Development through Quality Afterschool Programs. Beyond the Bell: Research to Practice in the Afterschool and Expanded Learning Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devaney, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    During the past 20 years, the afterschool field has been held accountable in varying ways--first, on the ability to provide safe places for young people to spend time while their parents work; then, on success in helping to improve participants' academic achievement as a supplement to the school day. Today, measuring success in afterschool…

  20. Programas despues de las horas de clase: Manteniendo a los ninos seguros y aprendiendo (After-School Programs: Keeping Children Safe and Smart).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, An-Me

    This document explains the advantages of afterschool programs for students and describes the components that make them successful. The major benefits from such programs are increased safety for children, a reduction in risk taking among children participating, and improved learning. Among the elements that characterize high quality afterschool…

  1. Feasibility and Preliminary Efficacy of an After-School Program for Middle Schoolers with ADHD: A Randomized Trial in a Large Public Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molina, Brooke S. G.; Flory, Kate; Bukstein, Oscar G.; Greiner, Andrew R.; Baker, Jennifer L.; Krug, Vicky; Evans, Steven W.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This pilot study tests the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of an after-school treatment program for middle schoolers with ADHD using a randomized clinical trial design. Method: A total of 23 students with ADHD (25% female, 48% African American) from a large public middle school were randomly assigned to a 10-week program or to…

  2. Fiscal Fitness for Non-Profits: Project Puts Chicago After-School Programs and Funders through a Financial Workout. Stories from the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Strengthening after-school programming for city youngsters has long been an objective of The Wallace Foundation, a national philanthropy based in New York City. In its work over the years, Wallace has found that weak financial management of the nonprofits running many high-quality programs hampers their ability to improve and expand. In 2009,…

  3. Tutoring the Tutors: Supporting Effective Personal Tutoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarlane, Kathryn J.

    2016-01-01

    The research into personal tutoring in higher education from a tutor's perspective suggests that tutors lack training in tutoring and may lack clarity as to the purpose and boundaries of the role. This article explores personal tutors' perceptions of their confidence and competence in relation to personal tutoring and identifies strategies that…

  4. Urban High School Students' IT/STEM Learning: Findings from a Collaborative Inquiry- and Design-Based Afterschool Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duran, Mesut; Höft, Margret; Lawson, Dan B.; Medjahed, Brahim; Orady, Elsayed A.

    2013-06-01

    This exploratory study examines the impact of a collaborative inquiry- and design-based afterschool program on urban high school students' IT/STEM learning—using information technology (IT) within the context of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). The study used a mixed methods design, involving 77 participants within two cohort groups, each participating in an eighteen-month intervention period. Data were collected from the pre- and post-surveys, analysis of the participants' IT/STEM projects, external evaluation reports, and follow-up interviews. Findings indicate that the program had a significant impact on students' technology and IT/STEM skills, frequency of technology use, and understanding of IT use in STEM-oriented fields. Some degree of impact on attitude changes toward IT/STEM and career aspirations in these fields was also in evidence. The study demonstrates that IT/STEM experiences supported through technology-enhanced, inquiry- and design-based collaborative learning strategies have significant impact on urban high school students' IT/STEM learning. Effect of afterschool programs on attitude changes and IT/STEM-related career aspirations of urban high school students are recommended areas of further investigation.

  5. The Back-Up Brigade: Volunteer Tutors Lend a Hand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grindstaff, Gordon

    1981-01-01

    Describes three tutoring centers--two in churches, one in an office building--where adults from the community provide voluntary after-school help to children from Chicago's disadvantaged Cabrini Green housing project. (SJL)

  6. Planning Considerations for Afterschool Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, L. Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Professional development is vital to the success of afterschool programs. Effective professional development enhances afterschool program quality by facilitating staff performance and knowledge; in addition, professional development is vital for improving student learning outcomes (Bouffard & Little, 2004; Hall & Surr, 2005; Joyce &…

  7. "Niggaz Dyin' Don't Make No News": Exploring the Intellectual Work of an African American Urban Adolescent Boy in an After-School Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staples, Jeanine M.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, and from the standpoint of an African American woman teacher/researcher, the author explores what happened when one African American adolescent boy known inside of school as a "severely disengaged" student cultivated literacy practices and events of his own volition in an after-school program. The author asks, how does race and…

  8. Bringing Up Girls in Science (BUGS): The Effectiveness of an Afterschool Environmental Science Program for Increasing Female Students' Interest in Science Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler-Wood, Tandra; Ellison, Amber; Lim, Okyoung; Periathiruvadi, Sita

    2012-01-01

    Bringing Up Girls in Science (BUGS) was an afterschool program for 4th and 5th grade girls that provided authentic learning experiences in environmental science as well as valuable female mentoring opportunities in an effort to increase participants' academic achievement in science. BUGS participants demonstrated significantly greater amounts of…

  9. Translanguaging Practices as Mobilization of Linguistic Resources in a Spanish/English Bilingual After-School Program: An Analysis of Contradictions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martínez-Roldán, Carmen María

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the results of an empirical study that examined the translanguaging practices of primary-grade, bilingual Latino students, as mediated by bilingual teacher candidates (TCs), in an after-school program in the southwestern United States. Expansive Learning theory, within the cultural-historical activity tradition, guided the…

  10. The Relationship between Intensity and Breadth of After-School Program Participation and Academic Achievement: Evidence from a Short-Term Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Ken; Diffily, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    We explored the extent to which intensity and breadth of participation in an after-school program (ASP) predicted academic achievement, as measured by changes in grades and attendance. The sample comprised 719 2nd-grade through 8th-grade Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Dallas members during the 2009-2010 academic year. With respect to intensity,…

  11. An Ecological Analysis of After-School Program Participation and the Development of Academic Performance and Motivational Attributes for Disadvantaged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Joseph L.; Lord, Heather; Carryl, Erica

    2005-01-01

    This longitudinal study evaluated after-school program (ASP) participation and the development of academic performance (school grades, reading achievement) and teacher-rated motivational attributes (expectancy of success, effectance motivation) over a school year. Participants were 599 boys and girls (6.3 to 10.6 years) from an urban,…

  12. Effects of After-School Programs on Attendance and Externalizing Behaviors with Primary and Secondary School Students: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynard, Brandy R.; Kremer, Kristen P.; Polanin, Joshua R.; Vaughn, Michael G.; Sarteschi, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the number and types of after-school programs (ASPs) have increased substantially as a result of increased federal and private spending and because ASPs are perceived to provide wide-ranging and far-reaching benefits to students, families, schools and the public. The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis is…

  13. Urban High School Students' IT/STEM Learning: Findings from a Collaborative Inquiry- and Design-Based Afterschool Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duran, Mesut; Höft, Margret; Lawson, Dan B.; Medjahed, Brahim; Orady, Elsayed A.

    2014-01-01

    This exploratory study examines the impact of a collaborative inquiry- and design-based afterschool program on urban high school students' IT/STEM learning--using information technology (IT) within the context of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). The study used a mixed methods design, involving 77 participants within…

  14. Using Culture as a Resource in Mathematics: The Case of Four Mexican-American Prospective Teachers in a Bilingual After-School Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vomvoridi-Ivanovic, Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores Mexican-American prospective teachers' use of culture--defined as social practices and shared experiences--as an instructional resource in mathematics. The setting is an after-school mathematics program for the children of Mexican heritage. Qualitative analysis of the prospective teachers' and children's interactions reveals…

  15. MacGeneRisk and MacMedRisk--HyperCard programs which tutor Bayesian risk assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Caster, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    Programs have been devised for the Macintosh computer which tutor medical students in the solution of risk assessment problems in human genetics and clinical test interpretation, using Bayesian probability. PMID:1807746

  16. Afterschool: An Ally in Promoting Middle School Improvement. MetLife Foundation Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No. 55

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Afterschool Alliance, in partnership with MetLife Foundation, is proud to present the first in its latest series of four issue briefs examining critical issues facing middle school youth and the vital role afterschool programs play in addressing these issues. This brief explores afterschool and school improvement. In communities across the…

  17. Afterschool and the Common Core State Standards. MetLife Foundation Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No. 63

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Afterschool Alliance, in partnership with MetLife Foundation, is proud to present the first in their latest series of four issue briefs examining critical issues facing middle school youth and the vital role afterschool programs play in addressing these issues. This series explores afterschool and: the Common Core State Standards, students…

  18. Afterschool Supporting Students with Disabilities and Other Special Needs. MetLife Foundation Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No. 64

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Afterschool Alliance, in partnership with MetLife Foundation, is proud to present the second in their latest series of four issue briefs examining critical issues facing middle school youth and the vital role afterschool programs play in addressing these issues. This series explores afterschool and: the Common Core State Standards, students…

  19. Afterschool: A Key to Successful Parent Engagement. MetLife Foundation Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No. 57

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Afterschool Alliance, in partnership with MetLife Foundation, is proud to present the third in its latest series of four issue briefs examining critical issues facing middle school youth and the vital role afterschool programs play in addressing these issues. This brief explores afterschool and parent engagement. There is little dispute…

  20. Afterschool and Healthy Youth. Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No. 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Afterschool programs often play an important role in promoting healthy lifestyles for youth. Many programs offer youth opportunities to engage in an array of organized physical activities such as softball, martial arts or ballet. Most programs also serve healthy afternoon snacks while emphasizing the value of a nutritious diet. Physical fitness…

  1. Partnerships with STEM-Rich Institutions. Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No. 61

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The Afterschool Alliance is proud to present the first in a series of two issue briefs on afterschool STEM programs, generously supported by the Noyce Foundation. The issue brief topics represent emerging discussions within the afterschool field and are drawn from the two award categories of the 2013 Afterschool STEM Impact Awards: (1)…

  2. Top 10 States for Afterschool in 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Each day in America, millions of kids go home to an empty house after school. In recent years, the growth of quality, affordable afterschool programs has begun to offer positive alternatives to the parents of these children. In 2009, the Afterschool Alliance contracted with RTi, a market research firm, to conduct a household survey of nearly…

  3. Bilingual Mini-School Tutoring Project. A State of Washington URRD (Urban, Rural, Racial, Disadvantaged) Program. Mid-Year Evaluation, 1975-76 Program Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, Beverly

    Combining URRD and other funding sources, the program provides an interstate and interdistrict tutoring service, usually outside of regular school hours, to children of migrant and seasonal farm worker families. The tutoring is done by adult paraprofessionals, many of whom are parents or relatives of the children served. Parents also participate…

  4. Top-down, bottom-up, and around the jungle gym: a social exchange and networks approach to engaging afterschool programs in implementing evidence-based practices.

    PubMed

    Smith, Emilie Phillips; Wise, Eileen; Rosen, Howard; Rosen, Alison; Childs, Sharon; McManus, Margaret

    2014-06-01

    This paper uses concepts from social networks and social exchange theories to describe the implementation of evidence-based practices in afterschool programs. The members of the LEGACY Together Afterschool Project team have been involved in conducting collaborative research to migrate a behavioral strategy that has been documented to reduce disruptive behaviors in classroom settings to a new setting-that of afterschool programs. We adapted the Paxis Institute's version of the Good Behavior Game to afterschool settings which differ from in-school settings, including more fluid attendance, multiple age groupings, diverse activities that may take place simultaneously, and differences in staff training and experience (Barrish et al. in J Appl Behav Anal 2(2):119-124, 1969; Embry et al. in The Pax Good Behavior Game. Hazelden, Center City, 2003; Hynes et al. in J Child Serv 4(3):4-20, 2009; Kellam et al. in Drug Alcohol Depend 95:S5-S28, 2008; Tingstrom et al. in Behav Modif 30(2):225-253, 2006). This paper presents the experiences of the three adult groups involved in the implementation process who give first-person accounts of implementation: (1) university-based scientist-practitioners, (2) community partners who trained and provided technical assistance/coaching, and (3) an afterschool program administrator. We introduce here the AIMS model used to frame the implementation process conceptualized by this town-gown collaborative team. AIMS builds upon previous work in implementation science using four phases in which the three collaborators have overlapping roles: approach/engagement, implementation, monitoring, and sustainability. Within all four phases principles of Social Exchange Theory and Social Network Theory are highlighted.

  5. Afterschool and the Building of Character. Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No. 14

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Building of character and promoting positive behavior is an important part of every afterschool program. Besides the basics of homework help and physical fitness activities, afterschool programs are using teamwork exercises, service learning, volunteerism and other activities to teach kids about making the right decisions that will help them…

  6. Growing Plants and Scientists: Fostering Positive Attitudes toward Science among All Participants in an Afterschool Hydroponics Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patchen, Amie K.; Zhang, Lin; Barnett, Michael

    2016-12-01

    This study examines an out-of-school time program targeting elementary-aged youth from populations that are typically underrepresented in science fields (primarily African-American, Hispanic, and/or English Language Learner participants). The program aimed to foster positive attitudes toward science among youth by engaging them in growing plants hydroponically (in water without soil). Participants' attitudes toward science, including anxiety, desire, and self-concept, were examined through pre-post survey data (n = 234) over the course of an afterschool program at three separate sites. Data showed that participants' anxiety decreased and desire increased for both male and female participants over the program. Self-concept increased for female participants at all three sites but did not change significantly for male participants. Participants' first language (English or Spanish) was not a factor in attitude outcomes. The primarily positive outcomes suggest that hydroponics can be a useful educational platform for engaging participants in garden-based programming year round, particularly for settings that do not have the physical space or climate to conduct outdoor gardening. Similarities in positive attitude outcomes at the three sites despite differences in format, implementation, and instructor background experience suggest that the program is resilient to variation in context. Understanding which aspects of the program facilitated positive outcomes in the varied contexts could be useful for the design of future programs.

  7. Paraprofessional Reading Tutors: Assessment of the Edmark Reading Program and Flexible Teaching1

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Barbara L.; Licht, Barbara G.; Ullmann, Rina K.; Buck, Sylvia T.; Redd, William H.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the effectiveness of two strategies for using undergraduate paraprofessionals as tutors for first-grade children with reading difficulties. The two groups of undergraduates taught first graders the same 150 words, and both reinforced (socially and materially) correct performances. However, one group employed a programmed method of word presentation (i.e., the Edmark Reading Program), while the other group of tutors was allowed flexibility in the pacing and methods for presenting words. The performance of each reading group was compared to that of a control group who engaged in educational activities not directly related to reading. Thirty-six poor readers were randomly assigned to one of the three groups. Subjects were tutored after school by university undergraduates for an average of twenty-three 40-minute sessions. Children in both reading groups showed significantly more improvement than controls on an oral reading posttest of the 150 criterion words. Treatment effects did not emerge on a test composed mainly of noncriterion words. PMID:19668353

  8. The Effects of a Traditional and Technology-Based After-School Program on 6th Grade Student's Mathematics Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Xiangen; Craig, Scotty D.; Bargagliotti, Anna E.; Graesser, Arthur C.; Okwumabua, Theresa; Anderson, Celia; Cheney, Kyle R.; Sterbinsky, Allan

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of the Assessment and LEarning in Knowledge Spaces (ALEKS) system as a method of strategic intervention in after-school settings to improve the mathematical skills of struggling 6th grade students. Students were randomly assigned to after-school classrooms in which they either worked with ALEKS to improve…

  9. Afterschool Universe - Bringing Astronomy Down to Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthi, Anita; Eyermann, S. E.; Mitchell, S.

    2010-01-01

    Bring the universe beyond the solar system to middle-schoolers in your community! Afterschool Universe (AU) is a 12-session out-of-school-time astronomy program that explores astronomy concepts through engaging hands-on activities. It introduces participants to the tools of astronomy and takes them on a journey through the universe beyond the solar system. Afterschool programs reach a very diverse population and are offered in a variety of settings where the students go when the school day is over. The afterschool community is looking for quality science programming that will engage the children. AU offers just such an opportunity to bring science and astronomy to this under-served population. The afterschool community all over the country has received this well-tested curriculum very enthusiastically. It recently passed the rigorous NASA Product Review with flying colors. Help us disseminate it far and wide by working with afterschool program providers in your community. AU is ideally run as a partnership between astronomers or EPO professionals and local afterschool program providers. The former contribute content expertise to help train the program leaders while the latter have a deep understanding of their target audience. This program addresses several IYA themes as it works with an audience that doesn't typically get much exposure to astronomy. The adult afterschool program leaders do not usually have science backgrounds and middle school students do not normally get to explore the topics in Afterschool Universe despite their interest in this content. Bring the universe down to earth by engaging adults and children in your community through an Afterschool Universe partnership!

  10. Mastery Learning and Peer Tutoring in a Special Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Anne S.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental program in New York City to improve the rate of success in first-year algebra is described. Students, teachers, techniques used, and Regents Examination results in the double-period class are described. (MNS)

  11. Bilingual Mini-School Tutoring Project. Evaluation Progress Report Number 4, Final Evaluation, Program Year 2, July 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, Beverly

    The Bilingual Mini-School Tutoring Project offers parents a major role in their children's education as decision makers responsible for hiring and other areas of program operations and as teachers providing bilingual, bicultural instruction. The program design has two components: the mobile and the non-mobile component. The non-mobile program has…

  12. After-School and Beyond: A 15-Year History of TASC (The After-School Corporation)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiester, Leila

    2014-01-01

    In 1998, George Soros and Herb Sturz seized an opportunity to significantly improve children's lives by founding The After-School Corporation (TASC). They believed that increasing the quality and availability of after-school programs, with the ultimate goal of changing public policy, could transform the potential for many New York City kids who…

  13. Afterschool: Providing a Successful Route to Credit Attainment and Recovery. Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No.39

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Afterschool provides older youth with critical academic supports including credit attainment and recovery opportunities. Many educators are turning to afterschool programs to reach students who fail one or more courses, become disengaged, or want alternatives to the traditional path to graduation. Credit recovery refers to recovering credits that…

  14. Building Literacy in Afterschool. Dollar General Afterschool Literacy Issue Brief. No. 67

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The Afterschool Alliance, in partnership with Dollar General Literacy Foundation, is proud to present this issue brief examining the vital role afterschool programs play to build students' literacy skills. This issue brief will explore the additional support needed to help students with their reading, writing and critical thinking skills, as well…

  15. Computing and Engineering in Afterschool. Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No. 62

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This Afterschool Alert Issue Brief explores how afterschool programs are offering innovative, hands-on computing and engineering education opportunities. Both these subjects have emerged as priority areas within the "STEM" fields. Computing is one of the fastest growing industries, and yet current rates of college graduation in computer…

  16. Perceptions of Tutoring Roles and Psychological Distance among Instructors, Tutors and Students at a Korean University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hye-Jung; Hong, Youngil; Choi, Hyoseon

    2017-01-01

    This study explores issues related to the tutor's role when initiating tutoring as an institutional strategy at a conventional university. Based on a pilot tutoring program implemented in four college courses, we investigated the perceptions of instructors, tutors and students regarding the role of tutoring and whether it affected the…

  17. Staff's perceptions of the use of evidence-based physical activity promotion strategies for promoting girls' physical activity at afterschool programs: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Dinkel, Danae; Huberty, Jennifer; Beets, Michael; Tibbits, Melissa

    2014-08-01

    There is a need to improve girls' physical activity (PA) in afterschool programs as girls' PA levels are consistently lower than boys'. An evidence-based professional development framework, the 5 Ms, has been effective in helping staff to improve PA in both girls and boys but further improvements in girls' PA are needed. Little is known about staff's perceptions of using PA promotion strategies to promote girls' PA. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore staff perceptions of the use of evidence-based PA promotion strategies for promoting PA in girls. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with staff from three community-based afterschool programs located within a school setting (n=18). Data were analyzed using the process of immersion/crystallization. A majority of staff had some knowledge of PA promotion strategies but few staff consistently utilized these strategies and a majority felt several strategies were unnecessary (i.e., having a PA policy). Newer staff reported depending on senior staff to promote PA in girls. Overall, findings suggest that staff's perceptions may impact their use of PA promotions strategies. The results of this study will contribute to the enhancement of an existing staff training framework (the 5 Ms) to improve girls' PA in afterschool programs.

  18. A faculty development program integrating cross-cultural care into a gastrointestinal pathophysiology tutorial benefits students, tutors, and the course.

    PubMed

    Shields, Helen M; Leffler, Daniel A; Peters, Antoinette S; Llerena-Quinn, Roxana; Nambudiri, Vinod E; White, Augustus A; Hayward, Jane N; Pelletier, Stephen R

    2015-06-01

    A specific faculty development program for tutors to teach cross-cultural care in a preclinical gastrointestinal pathophysiology course with weekly longitudinal followup sessions was designed in 2007 and conducted in the same manner over a 6-yr period. Anonymous student evaluations of how "frequently" the course and the tutor were actively teaching cross-cultural care were performed. The statements "This tutor actively teaches culturally competent care" and "Issues of culture and ethnicity were addressed" were significantly improved over baseline 2004 data. These increases were sustained over the 6-yr period. A tutor's overall rating as a teacher was moderately correlated with his/her "frequently" actively teaching cross-cultural care (r = 0.385, P < 0. 001). Course evaluation scores were excellent and put the course into the group of preclinical courses with the top ratings. Students in the Race in Curriculum Group asked that the program be expanded to other preclinical courses. In conclusion, from 2007 to 2012, a faculty development program for teaching cross-cultural care consistently increased the discussion of cross-cultural care in the tutorial and course over each year beginning with 2007 compared with the baseline year of 2004. Our data suggest that cross-cultural care can be effectively integrated into pathophysiology tutorials and helps improve students' satisfaction and tutors' ratings. Teaching cross-cultural care in a pathophysiology tutorial did not detract from the course's overall evaluations, which remained in the top group over the 6-yr period.

  19. Longitudinal Effect of a Volunteer Tutoring Program on Reading Skills of Students Identified as At-Risk for Reading Failure: A Two-Year Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Matthew K.; Senesac, Barbara J.; Silberglitt, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    There is a recent interest in volunteer tutoring programs and research has suggested effectiveness in improving reading skills. Previous research found that the Help One Student to Succeed (HOSTS) volunteer tutoring program increased reading fluency and comprehension over a 5-month interval (Burns, Senesac, & Symington, 2004). The current…

  20. Marketized Private Tutoring as a Supplement to Regular Schooling: Liberal Studies and the Shadow Sector in Hong Kong Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Claudia; Bray, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Around the world, increasing numbers of students receive after-school private supplementary tutoring. Such tutoring may be provided through informal channels or by companies, and it may be received one-to-one, in small groups or in large classes. The tutoring is commonly called shadow education since its content mimics that of regular schooling.…

  1. Intelligent Tutor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA also seeks to advance American education by employing the technology utilization process to develop a computerized, artificial intelligence-based Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS) to help high school and college physics students. The tutoring system is designed for use with the lecture and laboratory portions of a typical physics instructional program. Its importance lies in its ability to observe continually as a student develops problem solutions and to intervene when appropriate with assistance specifically directed at the student's difficulty and tailored to his skill level and learning style. ITS originated as a project of the Johnson Space Center (JSC). It is being developed by JSC's Software Technology Branch in cooperation with Dr. R. Bowen Loftin at the University of Houston-Downtown. Program is jointly sponsored by NASA and ACOT (Apple Classrooms of Tomorrow). Other organizations providing support include Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, the National Research Council, Pennzoil Products Company and the George R. Brown Foundation. The Physics I class of Clear Creek High School, League City, Texas are providing the classroom environment for test and evaluation of the system. The ITS is a spinoff product developed earlier to integrate artificial intelligence into training/tutoring systems for NASA astronauts flight controllers and engineers.

  2. Making healthy eating and physical activity policy practice: process evaluation of a group randomized controlled intervention in afterschool programs

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, R. Glenn; Beets, Michael W.; Hutto, Brent; Saunders, Ruth P.; Moore, Justin B.; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Huberty, Jennifer L.; Ward, Dianne S.; Pate, Russell R.; Beighle, Aaron; Freedman, Darcy

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the link between level of implementation and outcomes from an intervention to increase afterschool programs’ (ASPs) achievement of healthy eating and physical activity (HE-PA) Standards. Ten intervention ASPs implemented the Strategies-To-Enhance-Practice (STEPs), a multi-component, adaptive intervention framework identifying factors essential to meeting HE-PA Standards, while 10 control ASPs continued routine practice. All programs, intervention and control, were assigned a STEPs for HE-PA index score based on implementation. Mixed-effects linear regressions showed high implementation ASPs had the greatest percentage of boys and girls achieving 30 min of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (47.3 and 29.3%), followed by low implementation ASPs (41.3 and 25.0%), and control ASPs (34.8 and 18.5%). For healthy eating, high/low implementation programs served fruits and vegetables an equivalent number of days, but more days than control programs (74.0 and 79.1% of days versus 14.2%). A similar pattern emerged for the percent of days sugar-sweetened foods and beverages were served, with high and low implementation programs serving sugar-sweetened foods (8.0 and 8.4% of days versus 52.2%), and beverages (8.7 and 2.9% of days versus 34.7%) equivalently, but less often than control programs. Differences in characteristics and implementation of STEPs for HE-PA between high/low implementers were also identified. PMID:26590240

  3. Administrator's Memo: Youth Tutoring Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Commission on Resources for Youth, Inc., New York, NY.

    This manual, designed for the use of administrators in implementing a Youth Tutoring Youth Program (developed to encourage positive attitudes in tutors towards going to school, holding jobs, and helping others), outlines the employment of underachieving, disadvantaged 14- and 15-year-old Neighborhood Youth Corps enrollees as tutors for elementary…

  4. Intelligent Tutoring Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, John R.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Cognitive psychology, artificial intelligence, and computer technology have advanced so much that it is feasible to build computer systems that are as effective as intelligent human tutors. Computer tutors have been developed for teaching students to do proofs in geometry and to write computer programs in the LISP language. (JN)

  5. Tooth Tutoring: The Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cone, Richard; And Others

    Findings are reported on a three year cross-age tutoring program in which undergraduate dental hygiene students and college students from other disciplines trained upper elementary students to tutor younger students in the techniques of dental hygiene. Data includes pre-post scores on the Oral Hygiene Index of plaque for both experimental and…

  6. STEM Learning in Afterschool: An Analysis of Impact and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This document summarizes evaluation reports from afterschool science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) programs across the United States and identifies common trends and strengths that afterschool learning brings to STEM education. Like many programs nationwide, several of the programs highlighted in this paper were designed specifically to…

  7. AASA's Study on After-School's Ups and Downs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Nancy

    2005-01-01

    AASA began an inquiry in 2001 to understand how barriers to effective after-school programs could be overcome by school district leaders. The issue, well-known anecdotally, had not to date been researched. School leaders tend to agree that after-school programs are sound educationally but struggle to operate and sustain such programs.…

  8. Intervention leads to improvements in the nutrient profile of snacks served in afterschool programs: a group randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Beets, Michael W; Turner-McGrievy, Brie; Weaver, R Glenn; Huberty, Jennifer; Moore, Justin B; Ward, Dianne S; Freedman, Darcy A

    2016-09-01

    Widely adopted nutrition policies for afterschool programs (ASPs) focus on serving a fruit/vegetable daily and eliminating sugar-sweetened foods/beverages. The impact of these policies on the nutrient profile of snacks served is unclear. Evaluate changes in macro/micronutrient content of snacks served in ASPs. A 1-year group randomized controlled trial was conducted in 20 ASPs serving over 1700 elementary-age children. Intervention ASPs received a multistep adaptive framework intervention. Direct observation of snack served was collected and nutrient information determined using the USDA Nutrient Database, standardized to nutrients/100 kcal. By post-assessment, intervention ASPs reduced total kcal/snack served by 66 kcal (95CI -114 to -19 kcal) compared to control ASPs. Total fiber (+1.7 g/100 kcal), protein (+1.4 g/100 kcal), polyunsaturated fat (+1.2 g/100 kcal), phosphorous (+49.0 mg/100 kcal), potassium (+201.8 mg/100 kcal), and vitamin K (+21.5 μg/100 kcal) increased in intervention ASPs, while added sugars decreased (-5.0 g/100 kcal). Nutrition policies can lead to modest daily caloric reductions and improve select macro/micronutrients in snacks served. Long-term, these nutritional changes may contribute to healthy dietary habits.

  9. Pathways to Youth Empowerment and Community Connectedness: A Study of Youth-Adult Partnership in Malaysian After-School, Co-Curricular Programs.

    PubMed

    Zeldin, Shepherd; Krauss, Steven Eric; Kim, Taehan; Collura, Jessica; Abdullah, Haslinda

    2016-08-01

    After-school programs are prevalent across the world, but there is a paucity of research that examines quality within the "black box" of programs at the point of service. Grounded in current theory, this research examined hypothesized pathways between the experience of youth-adult partnership (youth voice in decision-making; supportive adult relationships), the mediators of program safety and engagement, and the developmental outcomes of youth empowerment (leadership competence, policy control) and community connectedness (community connections, school attachment). Surveys were administered to 207 ethnically diverse (47.3 % female; 63.3 % Malay) youth, age 15-16, attending after-school co-curricular programs in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Results showed that youth voice in program decision-making predicted both indicators of youth empowerment. Neither youth voice nor supportive adult relationships was directly associated with community connectedness, however. Program engagement mediated the associations between youth-adult partnership and empowerment. In contrast, program safety mediated the associations between youth-adult partnership and community connectedness. The findings indicate that the two core components of youth-adult partnership-youth voice and supportive adult relationships-may operate through different, yet complementary, pathways of program quality to predict developmental outcomes. Implications for future research are highlighted. For reasons of youth development and youth rights, the immediate challenge is to create opportunities for youth to speak on issues of program concern and to elevate those adults who are able and willing to help youth exercise their voice.

  10. Tutoring Strategies: A Case Study Comparing Learning Center Tutors and Academic Department Tutors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Geoffrey K.

    2010-01-01

    Peer tutoring at the postsecondary level has been studied extensively, particularly over the last twenty years. Peer tutoring programs are common across institutional type and size in the United States (Boylan, Bonham, Bliss, & Saxon, 1995; Maxwell, 2001) given students' preferences for tutors who share age and status similarity (Cohen, 1986;…

  11. Better Together: Building Local Systems to Improve Afterschool (A Conference Report)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummins, H. J.

    2013-01-01

    What happens when teams from 57 cities building afterschool systems gather to discuss two key system responsibilities--improving afterschool programs and using data for informed decision-making? Lots of rich discussion. This report covers a national afterschool conference held in February 2013. It details what mayors, program providers, system…

  12. Towards Pedagogies of Mathematics Achievement: An Analysis of Learning Advisers' Approaches to the Tutoring of Mathematics in an Indigenous Tertiary Entry Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makuwira, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    This research examined different ways in which tutors of mathematics approach their tutoring among Indigenous students enrolled in the Tertiary Entry Program (TEP) at Central Queensland University's Indigenous Learning, Spirituality and Research Centre. The study sought to establish whether or not there were any differences between Indigenous and…

  13. Junior-Senior High Tutor/Aide Program at Malcolm X Elementary School, ESEA Title III Evaluation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Thomas J.; Hamilton, Edwin

    This project proposes to select, train, and utilize junior and senior high school students from neighboring schools as tutors for their young peers and as aides to the instructional team. Projected results of the program are that tutees will improve skills in reading, math, and special interests; that there will be an increase in individualized…

  14. Reading Partners: The Implementation and Effectiveness of a One-on-One Tutoring Program Delivered by Community Volunteers. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacob, Robin Tepper; Smith, Thomas J.; Willard, Jacklyn A.; Rifkin, Rachel E.

    2014-01-01

    This policy brief summarizes the positive results of a rigorous evaluation of Reading Partners, a widely used program that offers one-on-one tutoring provided by community volunteers to struggling readers in low-income elementary schools. A total of 1,265 students in 19 schools in three states were randomly assigned to receive Reading…

  15. Differential Entry into a Voucher Program: A Longitudinal Examination of Families Who Apply To and Enroll in the Cleveland Scholarship and Tutoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Kelli M.; Legan, Natalie A.; Metcalf, Kim K.

    2007-01-01

    Publicly funded voucher programs attempt to target low-income families, but concern exists as to whether such programs actually "cream" students from public schools. Data collected as part of the evaluation of the Cleveland Scholarship and Tutoring Program are used to examine whether differences exist between three subgroups of…

  16. After the Bell Rings: Student Perceptions of After-School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litke, Erica

    2009-01-01

    Background/Context: Research on after-school programs has traditionally focused on those programs serving students in younger grades but found positive correlations between student participation in enriching after-school activities and school engagement. For older students, particularly teenagers, there tends to be lower participation. Research…

  17. High-Impact Afterschool for All: A Statewide Quality Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siaca, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    The need for afterschool programs is clear: Research and practice demonstrate that quality afterschool programs keep youth safe; support working families; and provide critical learning, personal development, arts, and recreational opportunities. New York State alone uses nearly $300 million in local, state, and federal funds for afterschool…

  18. An Afterschool Director's Educational Leadership Strategies: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marino, Tammy

    2014-01-01

    Afterschool programs linked to schools provide opportunities to keep children safe and engage them in enrichment activities that can support their growth and development. Often, these programs are led by afterschool directors with a background in youth development and no experience or education in leading in educational environments. These…

  19. Factors Influencing the Implementation of Organized Physical Activity and Fruit and Vegetable Snacks in the HOP'N After-School Obesity Prevention Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastmann, Tanis J.; Bopp, Melissa; Fallon, Elizabeth A.; Rosenkranz, Richard R.; Dzewaltowski, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify barriers and facilitators for improving the after-school organized physical activity (PA) and snack quality. Methods: After-school staff (Year 1, n = 20; Year 2, n = 17) participated in qualitative, semistructured interviews about the implementation of an after-school obesity prevention intervention. Interviews were…

  20. Something to Say: Success Principles for Afterschool Arts Programs from Urban Youth and Other Experts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Denise; Rogovin, Peter; Persaud, Neromanie

    2013-01-01

    How can high-quality arts programs attract and retain low-income urban tweens? Drawing on hundreds of interviews with young people, their families, leaders of exemplary programs and others nationwide, this report offers some answers, including 10 principles for developing effective programming. An infographic illustrating key findings, a report…

  1. Shared Use of School Facilities with Community Organizations and Afterschool Physical Activity Program Participation: A Cost-Benefit Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanters, Michael A.; Bocarro, Jason N.; Filardo, Mary; Edwards, Michael B.; McKenzie, Thomas L.; Floyd, Myron F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Partnerships between school districts and community-based organizations to share school facilities during afterschool hours can be an effective strategy for increasing physical activity. However, the perceived cost of shared use has been noted as an important reason for restricting community access to schools. This study examined…

  2. Technology Education Students: E-Tutors for School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Genevieve Marie; Bratt, Sharon E.

    2009-01-01

    E-tutoring refers to individualized learning support mediated by Internet technology. While increased demand for tutors has led to a surge in commercial e-tutoring services, volunteer e-tutoring programs for children are rare. To test the viability of volunteer e-tutoring for elementary school students, 10 undergraduate students enrolled in a…

  3. An Intelligent Tutoring System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, Albert

    1988-01-01

    Discusses a research project that uses artificial intelligence techniques to help teach programing. Describes principles and implementation of the LISP Intelligent Tutoring System (LISPITS). Explains how the artificial intelligence technique was developed and possible future research. (MVL)

  4. New York Operation: Military Kids Afterschool Universe Cosmic Camps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaff, N.

    2010-08-01

    The Cornell Center for Radiophysics and Space Research education and public outreach program and the New York State Operation: Military Kids program partnered to plan four weekend "Cosmic Camps" for youth from military families using the NASA Afterschool Universe program.

  5. Effects of Two Tutoring Programs on the English Reading Development of Spanish-English Bilingual Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, Carolyn A.; Anthony, Jason L.; Parker, Richard; Hasbrouck, Jan E.

    2004-01-01

    Spanish-dominant bilingual students in grades 2-5 were tutored 3 times per week for 40 minutes over 10 weeks, using 2 English reading interventions. Tutoring took place from February through April of 1 school year. One, Read Well, combined systematic phonics instruction with practice in decodable text, and the other, a revised version of Read…

  6. Teaching the Tacit Knowledge of Programming to Novices with Natural Language Tutoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, H. Chad; VanLehn, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    For beginning programmers, inadequate problem solving and planning skills are among the most salient of their weaknesses. In this paper, we test the efficacy of natural language tutoring to teach and scaffold acquisition of these skills. We describe ProPL (Pro-PELL), a dialogue-based intelligent tutoring system that elicits goal decompositions and…

  7. Evaluation of a Ten-Year Statewide After-School Program for Struggling Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meehan, Merrill L.; Cowley, Kimberly S.; Chadwick, Kristine; Schumacher, Debbie; Hauser, Brenda

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of a comprehensive evaluation of the Kentucky statewide Extended School Services (ESS) program. The Extended School Services (ESS) program was established in 1990 as part of the Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA). Designed specifically to address the needs of Kentucky's at-risk student population, ESS is an…

  8. Supporting Success: Why and How to Improve Quality in After-School Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheldon, Jessica; Hopkins, Leigh

    2008-01-01

    This report examines the program improvement strategies, step-by-step, that allowed The James Irvine Foundation's Communities Organizing to Advance Learning (CORAL) initiative to achieve the levels of quality needed to boost the academic success of participating students, and makes policy and funding suggestions for improving program performance.…

  9. College Students' Engagement in E-Tutoring Children in Remote Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ChanLin, Lih-Juan; Lin, Hong-Yen; Lu, Tze-Han

    2016-01-01

    To bridge the digital divide and learning gap among children in remote areas, an online tutoring service has been initiated for after-school learning in remote schools. College students were recruited for the role of teaching and supporting remote learners through online tutoring. This research aimed to study college students' involvement in…

  10. Teaching the Teacher: Tutoring SimStudent Leads to More Effective Cognitive Tutor Authoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsuda, Noboru; Cohen, William W.; Koedinger, Kenneth R.

    2015-01-01

    SimStudent is a machine-learning agent initially developed to help novice authors to create cognitive tutors without heavy programming. Integrated into an existing suite of software tools called Cognitive Tutor Authoring Tools (CTAT), SimStudent helps authors to create an expert model for a cognitive tutor by tutoring SimStudent on how to solve…

  11. Example-Tracing Tutors: Intelligent Tutor Development for Non-Programmers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aleven, Vincent; McLaren, Bruce M.; Sewall, Jonathan; van Velsen, Martin; Popescu, Octav; Demi, Sandra; Ringenberg, Michael; Koedinger, Kenneth R.

    2016-01-01

    In 2009, we reported on a new Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS) technology, example-tracing tutors, that can be built without programming using the Cognitive Tutor Authoring Tools (CTAT). Creating example-tracing tutors was shown to be 4-8 times as cost-effective as estimates for ITS development from the literature. Since 2009, CTAT and its…

  12. Making Afterschool Count: Communities & Schools Working Together, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Making Afterschool Count, 1999

    1999-01-01

    This document consists of the three 1999 issues of a journal highlighting the Making After-School Count Initiative, programs across the country wherein communities and schools cooperate to serve children during after-school hours. The February 1999 issue describes grassroots efforts by California parents and religious leaders to secure funding for…

  13. Making Afterschool Count: Communities & Schools Working Together, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Andrea; Yost, Ann

    2001-01-01

    This document is comprised of the single 2001 issue of a journal highlighting notable after-school programs, many funded by 21st Century Community Learning Center grants, and the school-community collaboration they entail. Articles in this issue on literacy are: (1) "Literacy and Afterschool: A Perfect Fit," focusing on literacy programs…

  14. Making Afterschool Count: Communities & Schools Working Together, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yost, Ann

    2000-01-01

    This document consists of three issues from 2000 of a journal highlighting notable after-school programs, many funded by 21st Century Community Learning Center (CCLC) grants, and the school-community collaboration they entail. The June 2000 issue features a cover story on the successful inclusion of parents in various after-school initiatives;…

  15. The Friendship Club: an after-school program for children with Asperger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carter, Crystal; Meckes, Linnley; Pritchard, Lindsey; Swensen, Samantha; Wittman, Peggy Prince; Velde, Beth

    2004-01-01

    The Friendship Club is a program designed and implemented by occupational therapy students and faculty to help teach children, ages 8-15, activities related to friendship and skills necessary to maintain friends. The program, a joint effort between university partners, a local parent support group, and a local Rotary Club that provided funding, was deemed successful by participants, parents, and leaders. This article reviews the interdisciplinary development of the club, the program, and its outcomes. Recommendations for the group's continuation are supported by feedback obtained from participants and their parents.

  16. A Roadmap to Afterschool for All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinehart, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    During the past 20 years, afterschool programs have become an increasingly vital part of most American communities. Today, some 6.5 million children across the nation participate in these programs. Another 15 million children would participate if a program were available to them, according to their parents. These numbers tell at least two…

  17. Afterschool: A Strategy for Addressing and Preventing Middle School Bullying. MetLife Foundation Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No. 51

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Afterschool Alliance, in partnership with MetLife Foundation, is proud to present the second in a series of four issue briefs examining critical issues facing middle school youth and the vital role afterschool programs play in addressing these issues. This brief focuses on bullying awareness and prevention. Bullying is a dangerous behavior…

  18. Growing Our Own: Former Participants as Staff in Afterschool Youth Development Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matloff-Nieves, Susan

    2007-01-01

    This article grew out of a participatory research project conducted with support of the Robert Bowne Foundation from January 2003 through January 2004. Six young people who had been participants in Forest Hills Community House (FHCH) programs for eight years or longer agreed to be interviewed in depth about experiences that had affected their…

  19. Effect of an After-School Garden Club Program on Elementary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGriff, Maggie Caroline

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if three elementary school garden club programs influenced students' attitudes and behaviors regarding fruit and vegetable consumption. Both quantitative and qualitative data collection and analysis took place, in the form of pretest and posttest questionnaires as well as participant interviews. Overall,…

  20. Intelligent tutoring systems

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.R.; Boyle, C.F.; Reiser, B.J.

    1985-04-26

    Cognitive psychology, artificial intelligence, and computer technology have advanced to the point where it is feasible to build computer systems that are as effective as intelligent human tutors. Computer tutors based on a set of pedagogical principles derived from the ACT theory of cognition have been developed for teaching students to do proofs in geometry and to write computer programs in the language LISP. 19 references, 2 figures.

  1. Engaging Students as Tutors, Trainers, and Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derrick, Deirdre

    2015-01-01

    While starting a tutoring program may seem like a daunting and time-consuming task, it does not have to be. The best way to approach the creation and development of a tutoring service is with a list of clear objectives. In this article, the author describes the process she used to create a tutoring program with her English as a foreign language…

  2. The Relationship between Gender, Ethnicity, and Technology on the Impact of Mathematics Achievement in an After-School Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Xudong; Craig, Scotty D.; Xie, Jun; Graesser, Arthur C.; Okwumabua, Theresa; Cheney, Kyle R.; Hu, Xiangen

    2013-01-01

    The gap among ethnicities and gender in mathematics achievement is a well-known problem. While the gap has been shrinking over the past three decades, it has not completely diminished (Jencks & Phillips, 1998; McGraw, Lubienski, & Strutchens, 2006). The ALEKS, Assessment and LEarning in Knowledge Spaces, tutoring system is one promising…

  3. Association of Environment and Policy Characteristics on Children’s Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity and Time Spent Sedentary in Afterschool Programs

    PubMed Central

    Ajja, Rahma; Clennin, Morgan N.; Weaver, R. Glenn; Moore, Justin B.; Huberty, Jennifer L.; Ward, Dianne S.; Pate, Russell R.; Beets, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Afterschool programs (ASPs) are an important setting in which to promote children’s physical activity. This study examines the association of environmental and policy characteristics on the moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary behavior of children attending ASPs. Methods A total of 1,302 children attending 20 ASPs across South Carolina wore accelerometers (ActiGraph GT3X+) for up to 4 non-consecutive days. Policy-level characteristics were evaluated using the Healthy Afterschool Program Index-Physical Activity (HAPI-PA) scale. Physical activity space was measured using a measuring wheel (indoor, ft2) and GIS (outdoor, acres). The structure (free-play or organized) of activity opportunities, was evaluated via direct observation. Time spent in MVPA and sedentary, both indoors and outdoors, was estimated using accelerometry. Results For every 5000ft2 of utilized indoor activity space an additional 2.4 and 3.3 minutes/day of sedentary behavior was observed among boys and girls, respectively. A higher ratio of free-play to organized play was associated with higher indoor sedentary behavior among boys and girls (3.9 minutes/day and 10.0 minutes/day, respectively). For every one acre of outdoor activity space used, an additional 2.7 minutes/day of MVPA was observed for boys. A higher free-play to organized play ratio was associated with higher outdoor MVPA for boys and girls (4.4 and 3.4 minutes/day increase, respectively). Policy characteristics were unrelated to MVPA levels and time spent sedentary. Conclusion Findings indicate that policies and the size of activity space had limited influence on MVPA and sedentary behavior, suggesting that programmatic structure may be a more effective option to improve MVPA levels of children attending ASPs. PMID:25251100

  4. So...What's a Tutor To Do?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roller, Cathy M.

    Suggesting that the goal of having every child read by the end of third grade can be realized only if tutors are trained properly, this book describes best practices based on years of tutoring experience. Calling for tutor training programs to "do it right," the book outlines research in reading and writing development as a basis for the…

  5. Instructional Aspects of Intelligent Tutoring Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pieters, Jules M., Ed.

    This collection contains three papers addressing the instructional aspects of intelligent tutoring systems (ITS): (1) "Some Experiences with Two Intelligent Tutoring Systems for Teaching Computer Programming: Proust and the LISP-Tutor" (van den Berg, Merrienboer, and Maaswinkel); (2) "Some Issues on the Construction of Cooperative…

  6. Keeping Kids Safe and Supported in the Hours After School. MetLife Foundation Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No. 65

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Afterschool Alliance, in partnership with MetLife Foundation, is proud to present the third issue brief in their latest series of four issue briefs examining critical issues facing middle school youth and the vital role afterschool programs play in addressing these issues. This series explores afterschool and: the Common Core State Standards,…

  7. America's After-School Choice: The Prime Time for Juvenile Crime, or Youth Enrichment and Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Sanford A.; Fox, James Alan; Flynn, Edward A.; Christeson, William

    Noting that after-school programs have the potential to reduce not only juvenile crime but also later adult crime, this report examines the needs for after-school programs, the impact of such programs on youth, and the importance of quality programming. Following an executive summary, the report is presented in six chapters. Chapter 1 details…

  8. Community Engagement in K-12 Tutoring Programs: A Research-Based Guide for Best Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mozolic, Jennifer; Shuster, Julia

    2016-01-01

    This report on historical trends and recent findings in the literature on academic tutoring is the first step in a community-based research collaboration between faculty and students at a small liberal arts college, the local public school district, and a nonprofit foundation that supports public K-12 education. Each year, this nonprofit…

  9. Evaluating Math Recovery: Assessing the Causal Impact of a Diagnostic Tutoring Program on Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Thomas M.; Cobb, Paul; Farran, Dale C.; Cordray, David S.; Munter, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Mathematics Recovery (MR) is designed to identify first graders who are struggling in mathematics and provide them with intensive one-to-one tutoring. We report findings from a 2-year evaluation of MR conducted in 20 elementary schools across five districts in two states. The design allowed for the estimation of the counterfactual growth…

  10. Patterns of peer tutoring in nursing.

    PubMed

    Blowers, Sally; Ramsey, Priscilla; Merriman, Carolyn; Grooms, Janelle

    2003-05-01

    Peer tutoring in higher education is an effective strategy for promoting academic gains. Within nursing, peer tutoring has been used in the clinical setting, but little information is available regarding its use across the nursing curriculum. A peer tutoring program was created at a regional Appalachian university to meet the needs of students with poor academic backgrounds and multiple risk factors for failure. As the program naturally evolved, students moved beyond the time-honored one-on-one model. Many tutoring patterns developed including dyad, small group, large group, skill based, assignment based, and question based. Qualitative evaluation data from the program revealed that each pattern required different tutor skills, involved varied tutor-tutoree relationships, focused on different outcomes, and had certain advantages and disadvantages. All tutoring patterns contributed to improved academic skills and performance.

  11. Impact of Science Tutoring on African Americans' Science Scores on the High School Students' Graduation Examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Edward

    This study investigated the relationship between an after-school tutorial program for African American high school students at a Title I school and scores on the science portion of the High School Graduation Examination (HSGE). Passing the examination was required for graduation. The target high school is 99% African American and the passing rate of the target high school was 42%---lower than the state average of 76%. The purpose of the study was to identify (a) the relationship between a science tutorial program and scores on the science portion of the HSGE, (b) the predictors of tutoring need by analyzing the relationship between biology grades and scores on the science portion of the HSGE, and (c) the findings between biology grades and scores on the science portion of the HSGE by analyzing the relationship between tutorial attendance and HSGE scores. The study was based on Piaget's cognitive constructivism, which implied the potential benefits of tutorials on high-stakes testing. This study used a 1-group pretest-posttest, quantitative methodology. Results showed a significant relationship between tutoring and scores on the biology portion of the HSGE. Results found no significant relationship between the tutorial attendance and the scores on the biology portion of the HSGE or between the biology grades and scores on the biology portion of the HSGE before tutoring. It has implications for positive social change by providing educational stakeholders with empirically-based guidance in determining the potential benefit of tutorial intervention strategies on high school graduation examination scores.

  12. Learning English and beyond: A Holistic Approach to Supporting English Learners in Afterschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharya, Jhumpa; Quiroga, Jimena

    2011-01-01

    Throughout the nation, afterschool programs are seeing increasing numbers of English learners (ELs) among their participants. Many afterschool program practitioners, recognizing the growth in the EL population in their programs, are hungry for professional development and research to understand how better to educate this population. However,…

  13. Training Undergraduate Physics Peer Tutors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nossal, S. M.; Jacob, A. T.

    2004-05-01

    The University of Wisconsin's Physics Peer Mentor Tutor Program matches upper level undergraduate physics students in small study groups with students studying introductory algebra-based physics. We work with students who are potentially at-risk for having academic trouble with the course. They include students with a low exam score, learning disabilities, no high school physics, weak math backgrounds, and/or on academic probation. We also work with students from groups under represented in the sciences and who may be feeling isolated or marginal on campus such as minority, returning adult, and international students. The tutors provide a supportive learning environment, extra practice problems, and an overview of key concepts. In so doing, they help our students to build confidence and problem solving skills applicable to physics and other areas of their academic careers. The Physics Peer Mentor Tutor Program is modeled after a similar program for chemistry created by the University of Wisconsin's Chemistry Learning Center. Both programs are now run in collaboration. The tutors are chosen for their academic strength and excellent communication skills. Our tutors are majoring in physics, math, and secondary-level science education. The tutors receive ongoing training and supervision throughout the year. They attend weekly discipline-specific meetings to discuss strategies for teaching the content currently being discussed in the physics course. They also participate in a weekly teaching seminar with science tutors from chemistry and biochemistry to discuss teaching methods, mentoring, and general information relating to the students with whom we work. We will describe an overview of the Physics Peer Mentor Tutor Program with a focus on the teacher training program for our undergraduate tutors.

  14. A Typology of Approaches to Peer Tutoring: Unraveling Peer Tutors' Behavioural Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berghmans, Inneke; Neckebroeck, Fanny; Dochy, Filip; Struyven, Katrien

    2013-01-01

    Peer tutors' behaviour has been stated to have the power to create and increase learning opportunities within peer tutoring programs. However, previous studies have shown that peer tutors struggle to adopt facilitative and constructivist-oriented strategies, as they lean more towards directive and knowledge-telling strategies. This study aims…

  15. The Impact of Web Conferencing Training on Peer Tutors' Attitudes toward Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dvorak, Johanna; Roessger, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the attitudes of peer tutors who received web conferencing training in preparation for synchronous online tutoring. A quasi-experimental design was employed to evaluate changes in peer tutors' attitudes toward distance learning following participation in an online tutor training program. Peer tutors were found to have: (a)…

  16. Success in tutoring electronic troubleshooting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Ellen M.

    1990-01-01

    Two years ago Dr. Sherrie Gott of the Air Force Human Resources Laboratory described an avionics troubleshooting tutor being developed under the Basic Job Skills Research Program. The tutor, known as Sherlock, is directed at teaching the diagnostic procedures necessary to investigate complex test equipment used to maintain F-15 fighter aircraft. Since Dr. Gott's presentation in 1987, the tutor has undergone field testing at two Air Force F-15 flying wings. The results of the field test showed that after an average of 20 hours on the tutor, the 16 airmen in the experimental group (who average 28 months of experience) showed significant performance gains when compared to a control group (having a mean experience level of 37 months) who continued participating in the existing on-the-job training program. Troubleshooting performance of the tutored group approached the level of proficiency of highly experienced airmen (averaging approximately 114 months of experience), and these performance gains were confirmed in delayed testing six months following the intervention. The tutor is currently undergoing a hardware and software conversion form a Xerox Lisp environment to a PC-based environment using an object-oriented programming language. Summarized here are the results of the successful field test. The focus is on: (1) the instructional features that contributed to Sherlock's success; and (2) the implementation of these features in the PC-based version of the avionics troubleshooting tutor.

  17. Service-Learning in Afterschool: Helping Students Grow and Communities Prosper. MetLife Foundation Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No. 52

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Afterschool Alliance, in partnership with MetLife Foundation, is proud to present the third in a series of four issue briefs examining critical issues facing middle school youth and the vital role afterschool programs play in addressing these issues. This brief focuses on service-learning opportunities for middle schoolers. Pairing service…

  18. Literacy in Afterschool: An Essential Building Block for Learning and Development. MetLife Foundation Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No. 53

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Afterschool Alliance, in partnership with MetLife Foundation, is proud to present the fourth in a series of four issue briefs examining critical issues facing middle school youth and the vital role afterschool programs play in addressing these issues. This brief focuses on literacy education. While literacy's definition continues to expand to…

  19. STEM in Afterschool: Changing Perspectives. Shaping Lives. The Impact of Afterschool rograms on Young People's Aspirations and Skills in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2014

    2014-01-01

    After the school bell rings, young people are learning, exploring, making and questioning. Afterschool programs have long influenced students' personal development and supported their social and emotional growth. Today, the afterschool field has enthusiastically embraced STEM as an integral part of their educational offerings. This handout…

  20. Bringing Up Girls in Science (BUGS): The Effectiveness of an Afterschool Environmental Science Program for Increasing Female Students' Interest in Science Careers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler-Wood, Tandra; Ellison, Amber; Lim, Okyoung; Periathiruvadi, Sita

    2012-02-01

    Bringing Up Girls in Science (BUGS) was an afterschool program for 4th and 5th grade girls that provided authentic learning experiences in environmental science as well as valuable female mentoring opportunities in an effort to increase participants' academic achievement in science. BUGS participants demonstrated significantly greater amounts of gain in science knowledge as measured by the Iowa Test of Basic Skills in Science (ITBS-S). The original BUGS participants and contrasts have now completed high school and entered college, allowing researchers to assess the long-term impact of the BUGS program. Fourteen former BUGS participants completed two instruments to assess their perceptions of science and science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) careers. Their results were compared to four contrast groups composed entirely of females: 12 former BUGS contrasts, 10 college science majors, 10 non-science majors, and 9 current STEM professionals. Results indicate that BUGS participants have higher perceptions of science careers than BUGS contrasts. There were no significant differences between BUGS participants, Science Majors, and STEM professionals in their perceptions of science and STEM careers, whereas the BUGS contrast group was significantly lower than BUGS participants, Science Majors, and STEM Professionals. Additional results and implications are discussed within.

  1. Arts and Afterschool: A Powerful Combination. Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No. 21

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2005

    2005-01-01

    In an increasingly competitive information age and creative economy, knowledge and skills in the arts and music are important in their own right. Additionally, the integration of the arts into after-school programs helps build and reinforce important student learning. It helps strengthen teamwork, responsibility, persistence, self-discipline, and…

  2. Afterschool: A Natural Platform for Career Development. Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No. 19

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2004

    2004-01-01

    As technology evolves and the economy changes, greater demands will be placed on the workforce of the future. Myriad opportunities are and will be available to those who have the knowledge and the skills to meet those challenges. Afterschool programs offer a key opportunity to expose students to ideas and teach them skills that can unlock doors to…

  3. Safe and Smart: Making the After-School Hours Work for Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pederson, Julie; de Kanter, Adriana; Bobo, Lynson Moore; Weinig, Katrina; Noeth, Kristyn

    After-school programs provide wide-ranging benefits to children, their families, and the whole community. This report focuses on the benefits children receive: increased safety, reduced risk-taking, and improved learning. Quality afterschool programs keep kids out of trouble, prevent crime, juvenile delinquency, school vandalism, and violent…

  4. SAMHSA Funding Opportunities for Afterschool: Substance Abuse Prevention and Mental Health Services. Funding Note

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbins, Dionne

    2005-01-01

    Many children served in afterschool programs would be left alone in dangerous neighborhoods, potentially engaging in risky sexual and criminal behaviors, if not for their participation in structured programming. In fact, research has shown that students who spend the majority of their afterschool hours in unsupervised activities are more likely to…

  5. Roadmap to Afterschool for All: Examining Current Investments and Mapping Future Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earle, Alison

    2009-01-01

    Quality afterschool programs are improving and transforming the lives of children and youth across the nation. Research shows that afterschool programs keep kids safe, inspire them to learn and help working parents. They give children opportunities to see new worlds, put school lessons into practice, discover their talents and explore career…

  6. A self-training program in inductive reasoning for low-education elderly: tutor-guided training vs. self-training.

    PubMed

    Calero, M D; García-Berbén, T M

    1997-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of a self-training program in inductive reasoning run for elderly with low levels of education. Two different training settings were considered, i.e. tutor-guided training and self-training, to ascertain whether results obtained in both settings would be similar. A total of 25 subjects took part in this study (average age = 68.266, range = 60-85 years), all volunteers and residents of the city of Granada. A quasi-experimental design was used with random assignment to either training setting. The design was applied in four stages: pre-test, cognitive training (tutor-guided vs. self-trained inductive reasoning), post-test immediately after training and follow-up at 3 months. Results show considerable gains in inductive reasoning training both in tutor-guided and self-trained groups.

  7. Somos Todos Ayudantes y Estudiantes: A Demonstration of a Classwide Peer Tutoring Program in a Modified Spanish Class for Secondary Students Identified as Learning Disabled or Academically At-Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Jane E.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Sixteen students with learning disabilities or at risk of failure in foreign language study participated in a peer tutoring program with Spanish vocabulary. The classwide reciprocal peer tutoring system was found to be a feasible component of foreign language instruction, as high levels of Spanish words were learned and maintained, and incidental…

  8. Evaluation of a Voluntary Tutoring Program in Chemistry, Physics and Mathematics for First-Year Undergraduates at Universidad Andres Bello, Chile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiménez, Verónica A.; Acuña, Fabiola C.; Quiero, Felipe J.; López, Margarita; Zahn, Carmen I.

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the preliminary results of a tutoring program that provides personalized academic assistance to first-year undergraduates enrolled in introductory chemistry, physics and mathematics courses at Universidad Andres Bello (UNAB), in Concepción, Chile. Intervened courses have historically large enrolments, diverse student population…

  9. Introducing a curricular program culminating in a certificate for training peer tutors in medical education.

    PubMed

    Fellmer-Drüg, Erika; Drude, Nina; Sator, Marlene; Schultz, Jobst-Hendrik; Irniger, Erika; Chur, Dietmar; Neumann, Boris; Resch, Franz; Jünger, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Zielsetzung: Studentische Tutorien sind in der medizinischen Lehre inzwischen fest verankert. Bislang gibt es jedoch lediglich vereinzelte Bestrebungen, eine strukturierte medizindidaktische Ausbildung für studentische TutorInnen zu etablieren. Um diese Lücke zu schließen, wurde an der Medizinischen Fakultät Heidelberg ein zentrales didaktisches Qualifizierungsprogramm für TutorInnen implementiert, das mit einem universitären Zertifikat abschließt und im Rahmen des postgraduellen „Baden-Württemberg Zertifikat für Hochschuldidaktik“ angerechnet wird. Methodik: Auf Basis einer Bedarfsanalyse wurde in Kooperation mit der Abteilung Schlüsselkompetenzen und Hochschuldidaktik der Universität Heidelberg ein modulares Programm bestehend aus vier Bausteinen und insgesamt 200 Unterrichtseinheiten (UE) entwickelt, das im Sommersemester 2010 implementiert wurde. Dieses beinhaltet sowohl themenspezifische Schulungen als auch eine eigenständige Lehrtätigkeit sowie eine integrierte Auswertung des Lernprozesses, welche den AbsolventInnen in Form eines strukturierten Feedback rückgemeldet wird. Zudem wurden halbstrukturierte Interviews (N=18) zur Bewertung des Gesamtkonzepts mit den AbsolventInnen geführt. Ergebnisse: Bislang wurden 495 TutorInnen im Grundlagenbaustein zu Medizindidaktik geschult, der mit einer durchschnittlichen Gesamtnote von 1,7 (SW: 0,6) bewertet wird und seit 2010 den Baustein I des Programms bildet. Insgesamt 17% (N=83) dieser TutorInnen haben sich seitdem in das aufbauende Qualifizierungsprogramm eingeschrieben, 27 von Ihnen (m=12, w=15) haben es bereits erfolgreich abgeschlossen. Anhand qualitativer Analysen wird ersichtlich, dass das übergeordnete didaktische Zertifikat und dessen Anrechenbarkeit im Rahmen der hochschuldidaktischen Ausbildung für Dozierende ein großer Anreiz für die AbsolventInnen ist. Für die erfolgreiche Implementierung erweisen sich insbesondere eine zentrale Koordinationsstelle, eine umfangreiche Abstimmung auf

  10. Effects of an afterschool community center physical activity program on fitness and body composition in obese youth.

    PubMed

    Crouter, Scott E; Salas, Carlos; Wiecha, Jean

    2017-06-01

    Physical activity (PA) promotes health in obese youth and is an important adjunct to medical weight management. Access to structured fitness programmes for obese, low-income youth is limited and potential benefits of such programmes are poorly understood. We describe an urban afterschool fitness programme for obese youth and participants' changes in fitness and body composition. A case series of 30 youth (age: 11.5 ± 2.5 years) with BMI ≥95th percentile and physician referral received a 24-wk programme scholarship. The programme, offered 4 times a week for 90-min.session, included aerobic, strength, and self-organised PA. Primary outcomes, measured at baseline (BL) time 1 (4-8 wk) and time 2 (12-16 wk) were BMI, per cent body fat (%BF), fat-free mass (FFM), heart rate during a treadmill test, and muscular strength (one repetition maximum (1RM)) and endurance (reps at 70% of 1RM) on the leg press (LP) and chest press (CP). Average participation was 1.5 ± 0.6 visits per week for 18.7 ± 6.5 weeks. Between BL and time 2, LP and CP 1RM and endurance significantly improved (P < 0.05). Additionally, there was a significant interaction for %BF with boys losing 5.2% (P > 0.05) while girls lost 0% (>0.05). Obese youth attending an urban fitness programme for at least three months improved strength and body composition, but average attendance was below planned levels.

  11. Focus on After-School Time for Violence Prevention. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patten, Peggy; Robertson, Anne S.

    Perhaps 8 million children spend the after-school hours at home alone. In the absence of adult supervision, many of these youths are likely to engage in delinquent or other high-risk activities. Research suggests that after-school programs can help to prevent youths from engaging in these activities in two ways: by providing constructive…

  12. Opportunities for Policy Leadership on Afterschool Care. Policy Briefing Series. Issue 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Andrew; Weber, Julie

    2010-01-01

    For most full-time employed parents, the gap between the end of the school day and the time they arrive home from work adds up to about 20 to 25 hours per week. Thus, many parents look to afterschool programs to satisfy their desire for safe, enriching experiences for their children while they are working. "Afterschool" is the general term used to…

  13. "Active Science": Integrating Physical Activity and Science Learning into the Afterschool Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Kevin E.; Yan, Zi; McInnis, Kyle J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Afterschool programs offer significant opportunities to increase physical activity levels and improve academic performance of children. Purpose: This study assessed an innovative approach to embed physical activity into science lessons in an afterschool community setting. Methods: Participants were 47 boys and girls (age = 10.8 ± 0.7…

  14. Developmental Process Model for the Java Intelligent Tutoring System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sykes, Edward

    2007-01-01

    The Java Intelligent Tutoring System (JITS) was designed and developed to support the growing trend of Java programming around the world. JITS is an advanced web-based personalized tutoring system that is unique in several ways. Most programming Intelligent Tutoring Systems require the teacher to author problems with corresponding solutions. JITS,…

  15. An Examination of an Online Tutoring Program's Impact on Low-Achieving Middle School Students' Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Shanan; Arnold, Pamela; Nunnery, John; Grant, Melva

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods study was to determine the impact of synchronous online tutoring services on struggling middle school students' mathematics achievement. The online tutoring was provided as a response to intervention (RTI) Tier 3 support (intensive, individualized intervention) in schools implementing a school-wide mathematics…

  16. Making healthy eating and physical activity policy practice: the design and overview of a group randomized controlled trial in afterschool programs.

    PubMed

    Beets, Michael W; Glenn Weaver, R; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Huberty, Jennifer; Ward, Dianne S; Freedman, Darcy A; Saunders, Ruth; Pate, Russell R; Beighle, Aaron; Hutto, Brent; Moore, Justin B

    2014-07-01

    National and state organizations have developed policies calling upon afterschool programs (ASPs, 3-6 pm) to serve a fruit or vegetable (FV) each day for snack, while eliminating foods and beverages high in added-sugars, and to ensure children accumulate a minimum of 30 min/d of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Few efficacious and cost-effective strategies exist to assist ASP providers in achieving these important public health goals. This paper reports on the design and conceptual framework of Making Healthy Eating and Physical Activity (HEPA) Policy Practice in ASPs, a 3-year group randomized controlled trial testing the effectiveness of strategies designed to improve snacks served and increase MVPA in children attending community-based ASPs. Twenty ASPs, serving over 1800 children (6-12 years) will be enrolled and match-paired based on enrollment size, average daily min/d MVPA, and days/week FV served, with ASPs randomized after baseline data collection to immediate intervention or a 1-year delayed group. The framework employed, STEPs (Strategies To Enhance Practice), focuses on intentional programming of HEPA in each ASPs' daily schedule, and includes a grocery store partnership to reduce price barriers to purchasing FV, professional development training to promote physical activity to develop core physical activity competencies, as well as ongoing technical support/assistance. Primary outcome measures include children's accelerometry-derived MVPA and time spend sedentary while attending an ASP, direct observation of staff HEPA promoting and inhibiting behaviors, types of snacks served, and child consumption of snacks, as well as, cost of snacks via receipts and detailed accounting of intervention delivery costs to estimate cost-effectiveness.

  17. [The Education Program of Work for Health of the University of São Paulo (capital campus): the viewpoint of the tutors].

    PubMed

    Fonsêca, Graciela Soares; Junqueira, Simone Rennó

    2014-04-01

    In order to bring about positive changes in the education process of health professionals, the Ministries of Health and Education established the Education Program of Work for Health in 2008. The study aimed to achieve the consensus of a group of experts about the Program established at the University of São Paulo, Capital Campus, Brazil. The subjects of the study were the tutors who joined the program in 2010-2012. A qualitative approach was used based on the Delphi Technique. Among the data collected, tutors believe the program provides benefits to teaching practices and contributes to qualification of professionals involved in health services, and offers improvements for training in the health area. From the subjects' point of view, the tutors are the link between academia and the health services and the instructors are critical to ensure the effectiveness of activities. The staging of regular meetings and seminars help in the process. The main limitations are the lack of explicit commitment shown by some students and the high workload of undergraduate courses.

  18. Putting Our Questions at the Center: Afterschool Matters Practitioner Fellowships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Sara L.; Matloff-Nieves, Susan; Townsend, Lena O.

    2009-01-01

    Once a motley mix of afterschool, before-school, summer, and weekend programs, the out-of-school-time (OST) field is fast consolidating. As in other emerging fields, efforts to professionalize are gaining momentum; the field now boasts several professional certificates as well as degree programs. Strong emphasis has been placed on in-service…

  19. After-School Child Care: Dilemma in a Rural Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warnock, Mary M.

    1992-01-01

    A rural community established an after-school child care program by forming a community coalition, acquiring funding, obtaining space, and arranging for children's transportation. The program enriched the quality of life for children, parents, and staff. Children's grades improved and the number of mothers satisfied with child care services…

  20. Student Involvement in the Instructional Process Through Tutoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClellan, Billie Frances

    This review of the literature on student tutoring considers four questions: 1) are there patterns of cross-age, cross-culture, or cross-ability which increase or decrease the tutoring effectiveness? 2) does a highly-structured, controlled program mean better results than informal tutoring? 3) is the level of learning actually raised for both tutor…

  1. Peer Tutoring: Issues and Concerns. Results of a Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaritsky, Joyce Ship

    In 1988, a survey was conducted to determine the characteristics and extent of peer tutoring programs at two- and four-year colleges in New York. Data were also collected on supplemental instruction, a variant of peer tutoring in which the peer tutor works closely with a faculty member to help students in identified high-risk courses. Of the 270…

  2. Naming Their World in a Culturally Responsive Space: Experiences of Hmong Adolescents in an After-School Theatre Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngo, Bic

    2017-01-01

    This article draws on ethnographic research of a youth theatre program within a Hmong arts organization to explore the ways in which a culturally responsive program nurtured critical consciousness among Hmong immigrant youth. Hmong youth "named" struggles with stereotypes and acculturation expectations, and constructed positive ethnic…

  3. Positive Youth Development: Minority Male Participation in a Sport-Based Afterschool Program in an Urban Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Rhema D.; Percy, Vernon E.; Bruening, Jennifer E.; Cotrufo, Raymond J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: As there is little research that investigates the experiences of minority boys participating in youth development programs (Fashola, 2003), the current research focused on a sport-based youth development program for early adolescent Black and Latino boys in Hartford, CT. Specifically, the present study explored (a) what attracted minority…

  4. Hours of Opportunity, Volume 2: The Power of Data to Improve After-School Programs Citywide. Monograph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCombs, Jennifer Sloan; Orr, Nate; Bodilly, Susan J.; Naftel, Scott; Constant, Louay; Scherer, Ethan; Gershwin, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    High-quality out-of-school-time (OST) programs have a positive effect on youth development, but many cities have found it difficult to address the challenges of expanding and improving the quality of programs offered to underserved and high-need students. In response, The Wallace Foundation sponsored an initiative to help five cities increase…

  5. Assessing the 21st Century After-School Program and the Educational Gains of LEP Participants: A Contextual Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Carol; Gibbs, Benjamin G.; Buttars, Rilee; Gaither, Patricia Grace; Burraston, Bert

    2015-01-01

    This study examines math and English standardized test score progress of students who participated in the 21st century program across 2 years of involvement with a focus on the learning trajectories of limited English proficiency (LEP) students. We find that math and English scores are highly associated with the school and program type--even…

  6. Hours of Opportunity, Volume 3: Profiles of Five Cities Improving After-School Programs through a Systems Approach. Technical Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCombs, Jennifer Sloan; Bodilly, Susan J.; Orr, Nate; Scherer, Ethan; Constant, Louay; Gershwin, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    High-quality out-of-school-time (OST) programs have a positive effect on youth development, but many cities have found it difficult to address the challenges of expanding and improving the quality of programs offered to underserved and high-need students. In response, The Wallace Foundation sponsored an initiative to help five cities increase…

  7. Patterns of Peer Tutoring in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blowers, Sally; Ramsey, Priscilla; Grooms, Janelle; Merriman, Carolyn

    2003-01-01

    A peer tutoring program at an Appalachian university was designed to meet the needs of students with poor academic backgrounds and multiple risk factors. Tutoring patterns included dyad, small group, large group, skill based, assignment based, and question based. Qualitative evaluation data revealed that each pattern required different tutor…

  8. 28 CFR 544.83 - Inmate tutors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inmate tutors. 544.83 Section 544.83 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT EDUCATION Education, Training and Leisure-Time Program Standards § 544.83 Inmate tutors. Institutions may establish...

  9. 28 CFR 544.83 - Inmate tutors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inmate tutors. 544.83 Section 544.83 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT EDUCATION Education, Training and Leisure-Time Program Standards § 544.83 Inmate tutors. Institutions may establish...

  10. A Comparison of Peer and Tutor Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamer, John; Purchase, Helen; Luxton-Reilly, Andrew; Denny, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We report on a study comparing peer feedback with feedback written by tutors on a large, undergraduate software engineering programming class. Feedback generated by peers is generally held to be of lower quality to feedback from experienced tutors, and this study sought to explore the extent and nature of this difference. We looked at how…

  11. Out-of-School Research Meets After-School Policy. Out-of-School Time Policy Commentary #1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Karen; Yohalem, Nicole; Wilson-Ahlstrom, Alicia

    2002-01-01

    The past five years have seen a ground swell in public attention and public policy aimed at increasing the availability of after-school programs for children and young teens during the "risk" hours when safety, supervision and homework are a top concern. Popularly called "after-school," these programs represent a new and growing variation on the…

  12. Youth Tutoring Youth. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Commission on Resources for Youth, Inc., New York, NY.

    A new type of Neighborhood Youth Corps (NYC) job station was tested by the National Commission on Resources for Youth, Inc. The objective of this demonstration project was to explore the feasibility and value of establishing a "model" in-school NYC program whereby disadvantaged youth work as tutors for younger children. The program model, "Youth…

  13. Memories of GAMES: Exploring the Long-Term Impacts of After-School Museum Programming on Girls' Attitudes Towards Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, Sarah Elizabeth

    The purpose of this study is to investigate any lasting impacts of the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History's Girls at the Museum Exploring Science (GAMES) Program. Using assessment document analysis, student focus groups, and adult interviews, this study examined whether students' positive associations with science continue after completion of the program and whether the program affects the academic and career choices of past participants. Results from the analysis suggest that GAMES has a generally positive impact on participant attitudes towards science in both the short- and long-term. These results also support existing research in identifying key factors in the success of the program including hands-on activities, exposure to diverse careers and female role models, and the incorporation of authentic objects and experiences. These factors of success can contribute to the evidence base about the role of informal education programs in increasing science participation among women, as well as ways in which schools and universities can collaborate to effectively serve populations that are traditionally underrepresented in the sciences.

  14. REbeL peer education: A model of a voluntary, after-school program for eating disorder prevention.

    PubMed

    Breithaupt, Lauren; Eickman, Laura; Byrne, Catherine E; Fischer, Sarah

    2016-10-27

    Dissonance-based eating disorder prevention leads to decreases in risk factors for these disorders. Although controlled trials have demonstrated that targeted, manualized programs reduce eating disorder risk, concerns regarding implementation and dissemination remain. A primary concern is the difficulty in adapting programs for a high school setting for populations at highest risk: adolescents. This paper describes the REbeL Peer Education model and assesses the initial pilot trials of the intervention. The program is novel in that it utilizes a voluntary, self-selection model that is sustainable in a high school setting, and focuses on empowerment and effective cognitive dissonance based prevention activities. High school peer-educators self-selected into the semi-manualized dissonance based intervention. Group activities were peer led, designed to critique the thin ideal, and designed to empower macro (school and larger community wide) changes in the pilot trial (N=47) assess the effectiveness and feasibility of the intervention. Results of the initial pilot study revealed preliminary support for the feasibility of the program, increases in feelings of empowerment, and decreases in eating disorder cognitions and behaviors with moderate to large effect sizes. Feedback from participants indicated that the intervention was enjoyable, educational, and empowering. This study is the first to adapt dissonance-based prevention models to a semi-manualized, peer-led, prevention program integrated into high school settings.

  15. After-School Programs and Addressing Barriers to Learning. A "Technical Aid Packet" from the Center's Clearinghouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Mental Health in Schools at UCLA, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Recent trends have resulted in schools implementing an extensive range of preventive and corrective activity oriented to students' needs and problems. Some programs are provided through a school district, others are carried out at, or linked to, targeted schools. Some are owned and operated by schools; some are owned by community agencies. Few…

  16. Preadolescence Female Development through Sport and Physical Activity: A Case Study of an Urban After-School Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruening, Jennifer E.; Dover, Kydani M.; Clark, Brianna S.

    2009-01-01

    Youth development research has found that children become more engaged and benefit more from being incorporated as decision makers. Thus participation helps promote development and encourages engagement. Based in theories of engagement and free-choice learning, the current research focused on a program combining sport/physical activity, life…

  17. Gathering Evidence on an After-School Supplemental Instruction Program: Design Challenges and Early Findings in Light of NCLB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatterji, Madhabi; Kwon, Young Ae; Sng, Clarice

    2006-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 requires that public schools adopt research-supported programs and practices, with a strong recommendation for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) as the "gold standard" for scientific rigor in empirical research. Within that policy framework, this paper compares the relative utility of…

  18. Preadolescent female development through sport and physical activity: a case study of an urban after-school program.

    PubMed

    Bruening, Jennifer E; Dover, Kydani M; Clark, Brianna S

    2009-03-01

    Youth development research has found that children become more engaged and benefit more from being incorporated as decision makers. Thus participation helps promote development and encourages engagement. Based in theories of engagement and free-choice learning, the current research focused on a program combining sport/physical activity, life skills, and mentoring while promoting healthy life choices for preadolescent girls of color The co-investigators, all women, conducted two 2-hr visits per week for two 12-week periods with a group of 8 girls at a community recreation center in Hartford, Connecticut, including lessons in nutrition and life skills and participation in a sport/physical activity. Five of the girls completed every stage of data collection, including participant journals and four individual interviews with each participant and her parents, over the course of the 24 weeks. The co-investigators also kept journals throughout the program. The results reflected the following themes: self-esteem/self-worth, accountability/responsibility for self connections to community and a sense of belonging, knowledge and acquisition of health/life skills, application of those skills, and planning and recognizing one's own influence on self and others.

  19. The Afterschool Hours: A New Focus for America's Cities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouellette, Mark; Hutchinson, Audrey M.; Frant, Nina

    2005-01-01

    During a typical week, as many as 14 million children and youth across the United States lack adult supervision during non-school hours. According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the lack of structured and supervised afterschool programs in American communities contributes to a higher incidence of drug and alcohol use and delinquent…

  20. Afterschool Mathematics Practices: A Review of Supporting Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs-Hale, Chris; Judd, April; Martindill, Heather; Parsley, Danette

    2006-01-01

    Given the current emphasis on providing evidence of increased student achievement, many afterschool programs are expanding their focus to include support for students' academic growth. One of the tools the National Partnership, of which the Mid-continent Research for Education and Learning (McREL) is a part, has been charged by the Department of…

  1. Making the Science Literacy Connection: After-School Science Clubs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore-Hart, Margaret A.; Liggit, Peggy; Daisey, Peggy

    2004-01-01

    Children make discoveries spontaneously while participating in hands-on science learning experiences. The students in this study were attending an after-school science program that was organized around authentic literacy activities and hands-on science learning experiences related to the theme of wetlands. Literacy connections formed natural…

  2. After-School Math PLUS (ASM+) Final Evaluation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academy for Educational Development, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes findings from the Academy for Educational Development's (AED's) evaluation of After-School Math PLUS (ASM+). This program was designed to help students find the math in everyday experiences and create awareness about the importance of math skills for future career options. The evaluation was conducted by AED's Center for…

  3. Use of SPARK to Promote After-School Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrick, Heidi; Thompson, Hannah; Kinder, Jennifer; Madsen, Kristine A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The after-school period is potentially an important venue for increasing physical activity for youth. We sought to assess the effectiveness of the Sports, Play, and Recreation for Youth (SPARK) program to increase physical activity and improve cardiorespiratory fitness and weight status among elementary students after school. Methods:…

  4. Designing Culturally Responsive Organized After-School Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpkins, Sandra D.; Riggs, Nathaniel R.; Ngo, Bic; Vest Ettekal, Andrea; Okamoto, Dina

    2017-01-01

    Organized after-school activities promote positive youth development across a range of outcomes. To be most effective, organized activities need to meet high-quality standards. The eight features of quality developed by the National Research Council's Committee on Community-Level Programs for Youth have helped guide the field in this regard.…

  5. Valued Youth Partnerships: Programs in Caring. Cross-Age Tutoring Dropout Prevention Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Intercultural Development Research Association, San Antonio, TX.

    This booklet provides information about the Valued Youth Partnership (VYP) program for dropout prevention. Begun in 1984 with the support of the Coca-Cola Company and the collaboration of the Intercultural Development Research Association, the VYP program is being implemented in the Edgewood and South San Antonio school districts in San Antonio,…

  6. Its Ada: An Intelligent Tutoring System for the ADA Programming Language

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    interchange programs and programmers and virtually impossible for effective software maintenance (Sammet, 1986, p. 722). In 1975, at the request of DoD...for a Xerox machine exclusively. PROUST receives a complete program produced by the student as input for diagnosis and prints out a comprehensive bug... printed on the screen, the student will be placed directly into the editor to write Ada code in response to the • pic problem just presented. The editing

  7. Ocean Literacy After-School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlinka, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    Ocean Literacy is a topic that is often underrepresented in secondary school science curriculum. To combat this deficit, our School has partnered up with Hudson River Community Sailing (HRCS), a local organization in New York City that offers an after-school program to high-need high school students in the surrounding community. This organization has developed a 9th grade Sail Academy which allows students from participating public high schools to increase their proficiency in math and science by learning basic sailing, navigation, and boat building. Upon successfully completing the 9th grade Sail Academy curriculum, students enter the "First Mates Program" which offers a scaffolded set of youth development experiences that prepare students for college, career, leadership, and stewardship. This program is built in the context of a new Ocean Literacy Curriculum focused around 3 major topics within Ocean Literacy: Marine Debris, Meteorology, and Ecology (specifically water quality). The learning experiences include weekly data collection of marine debris, weather conditions, and water quality testing in the Hudson River adjacent to the HRCS Boathouse. Additionally there are weekly lessons engaging students in the fundamentals of each of the 3 topics and how they are also important in the lens of sailing. During the marine debris portion of the curriculum students identify sources of marine debris, impacts on the local environment, and study how debris can travel along the ocean currents leading in to larger garbage gyres. To supplement the curriculum, students embarked on a day trip to the Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Facility in Brooklyn, NY to learn how and where NYC receives its drinking water, how wastewater is treated, and how water quality in the local area can be easily influenced. While on the trip, students did their data collection of marine debris, weather conditions, and water quality testing at Newtown Creek, and then they compared their results

  8. The Learning that Begins after the Bell. After Words: A Newsletter of the SEDL National Center for Quality Afterschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shankland, Laura, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    The Southwest Educational Development Laboratory (SEDL) National Center for Quality Afterschool helps state education agencies and local practitioners develop high-quality programs for academic enrichment as well as youth development activities. This newsletter contains the following: (1) Afterschool News; (2) Planning Lessons; and (3) Events…

  9. Electrophoresis-tutor: an image-based personal computer program that teaches clinical interpretation of protein electrophoresis patterns of serum, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Astion, M L; Rank, J; Wener, M H; Torvik, P; Schneider, J B; Killingsworth, L M

    1995-09-01

    High-resolution protein electrophoresis of serum, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) can aid in the diagnosis of multiple myeloma, amyloidosis, macroglobulinemia, multiple sclerosis, and other diseases. Electrophoresis-Tutor is a personal computer program based on approximately 150 digital images that teaches the clinical interpretation of agarose gel electrophoretic patterns. The program is divided into the following sections: introduction, CSF, serum, urine, review of disease states, program navigator, and final exam. The CSF section describes normal and abnormal CSF findings with emphasis on oligoclonal banding, as seen in the CSF of patients with multiple sclerosis. The serum section emphasizes monoclonal gammopathy patterns but also has detailed descriptions of inflammation, liver disease, protein-losing disorders, genetic deficiencies, and other patterns. Monoclonal gammopathy is described in the context of specific associated clinical conditions (e.g., myeloma, amyloidosis). For each monoclonal gammopathy example, results of standard electrophoresis, densitometry, and immunofixation are presented. The review of disease states uses animation to illustrate the development and remission of a variety of pathological patterns. The program navigator allows the user to jump quickly to any place in the program. The optional exam contains 20 questions, and detailed feedback is given after each question. Electrophoresis-Tutor can be used as a stand-alone teaching tool, a companion to traditional instruction, or a reference source.

  10. After-School Program for urban youth: Evaluation of a health careers course in New York City high schools.

    PubMed

    Holden, Lynne; Berger, Wallace; Zingarelli, Rebecca; Siegel, Elliot

    Mentoring in Medicine (MIM) addresses an urgent national need for minority health professionals and promotes careers in health care for urban youth. The MIM After School Program (ASP or The Course) has as its primary objectives to provide academic enrichment in human biology and motivate disadvantaged youth to pursue a career in the health professions. Secondary objectives of The Course, although not evaluated here, are to improve students' health literacy and knowledge of healthy living behaviors. Since 2009, over 1500 middle and high school students have completed the New York City based Course, which is offered once a week over a 10 week semester in an out-of-school venue. This study assesses the success of The Course in achieving its primary objectives with 84 students at five New York City high schools during the fall 2014 semester. The Course curriculum was created especially for MIM, comprises the body's 11 organ systems, and is presented in discrete modules (one each semester), along with complementary educational activities, including field trips and class projects. This study reports on a formal evaluation using quantitative and qualitative methods. The quantitative evaluation found that the students significantly increased their knowledge of the Gastrointestinal System. Students across the academic spectrum appeared to have learned the MIM ASP Course content - high school GPA was not a predictor of knowledge acquisition. The students also reported that The Course significantly increased their self-confidence in their ability to succeed (self-efficacy). The students expressed a significant increase in five health care related attitudes and an additional increase in their ability to overcome personal issues to succeed in their career and significantly improving their feeling toward, and likely pursuit of, a health career. The students stated that The Course significantly increased their interest and intent to seek out more information about health care

  11. Launching Loyola's E-Tutor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooney, T. R.

    This paper describes how Loyola University New Orleans's Writing across the Curriculum program began extending writing support to its distance learners through e-mail. The paper also explains why a limited group of students was targeted for this service, as well as how the tutors developed their online voices and personalized these…

  12. The Relative Effectiveness of Human Tutoring, Intelligent Tutoring Systems, and Other Tutoring Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanLehn, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    This article is a review of experiments comparing the effectiveness of human tutoring, computer tutoring, and no tutoring. "No tutoring" refers to instruction that teaches the same content without tutoring. The computer tutoring systems were divided by their granularity of the user interface interaction into answer-based, step-based, and…

  13. After-School Program for urban youth: Evaluation of a health careers course in New York City high schools

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Lynne; Berger, Wallace; Zingarelli, Rebecca; Siegel, Elliot

    2015-01-01

    Mentoring in Medicine (MIM) addresses an urgent national need for minority health professionals and promotes careers in health care for urban youth. The MIM After School Program (ASP or The Course) has as its primary objectives to provide academic enrichment in human biology and motivate disadvantaged youth to pursue a career in the health professions. Secondary objectives of The Course, although not evaluated here, are to improve students’ health literacy and knowledge of healthy living behaviors. Since 2009, over 1500 middle and high school students have completed the New York City based Course, which is offered once a week over a 10 week semester in an out-of-school venue. This study assesses the success of The Course in achieving its primary objectives with 84 students at five New York City high schools during the fall 2014 semester. The Course curriculum was created especially for MIM, comprises the body’s 11 organ systems, and is presented in discrete modules (one each semester), along with complementary educational activities, including field trips and class projects. This study reports on a formal evaluation using quantitative and qualitative methods. The quantitative evaluation found that the students significantly increased their knowledge of the Gastrointestinal System. Students across the academic spectrum appeared to have learned the MIM ASP Course content – high school GPA was not a predictor of knowledge acquisition. The students also reported that The Course significantly increased their self-confidence in their ability to succeed (self-efficacy). The students expressed a significant increase in five health care related attitudes and an additional increase in their ability to overcome personal issues to succeed in their career and significantly improving their feeling toward, and likely pursuit of, a health career. The students stated that The Course significantly increased their interest and intent to seek out more information about health

  14. Detention Home Teens as Tutors: A Cooperative Cross-Age Tutoring Pilot Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazerson, David B.

    2005-01-01

    Concerned professionals in the juvenile justice field frequently express concern for effective programs that help youth offenders successfully rejoin society. This mixed-method pilot study involved detention home teens functioning as tutors for special education students in a public school. Tutors were selected who, based on previous assessment as…

  15. Selected Characteristics of TUTOR Programs Produced in ARPA-Sponsored PLATO Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Larry; And Others

    This document reports on a study of several characteristics of the Computer Based Education (CBE) lessons written at military training sites whose CBE projects were sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA). The purposes of the study were (1) to demonstrate the potential of computer-based scanning of CBE programs as a means…

  16. Feedback Control and Learning To Program with the CMU Lisp Tutor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, Albert T.; Anderson, John R.

    This study manipulated the timing and control of error feedback in problem solving and examined their effects on skill acquisition by 40 undergraduate students learning to program in the computer language Lisp under four error feedback conditions. These four conditions included two types of symbol-by-symbol feedback that vary in content, a…

  17. A TUTOR Minicomputer System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-02-07

    the PLATO System and its performance properties . Discussion with Paul Tenczar, Professor Donald Bitzer of the University of Illinois and Ed...Available Hardware TUTOR LESSON STRUCTURE 5. 1 Properties of TUTOR Lessons 5.2 Strategy for Accessing TUTOR Lessons 5, 3 Strategy for...Some TUTOR authors appear to use the high pre- cision of the CYBER as a substitute for fully understanding the computa- tional properti ’.-s of

  18. Selected Characteristics of Tutor Programs Produced in ARPA Sponsored PLATO Projects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-01-01

    possible that the Chanute programming is so straight- forward that persons responsible for making revisions can do so readily even with only an average...ECS occupied by a lesson while in use. Only a few sites reported having shortages of ECS because of their use of large lessons. Chanute AF9 (Dailman...A. An overview of chanute lessons. Urbana, Ill.: University of Illinois, Computer-based Education Research Laboratory, 1977a. Klecka, J. A. Three

  19. The Revitalized Tutoring Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koselak, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    One high-leverage strategy rooted in a strong research base--the revitalized tutoring center--provides a wealth of opportunity to students who may be otherwise underserved. This embedded, open-all-day tutoring center supports collaborative teacher teams by using peer tutors and community volunteers. By centralizing resources and providing supports…

  20. Pygmalion effects among outreach supervisors and tutors: extending sex generalizability.

    PubMed

    Natanovich, Gloria; Eden, Dov

    2008-11-01

    Students who supervised other students who tutored grade-school pupils in a university-based outreach program were randomly assigned to Pygmalion and control conditions. Experimental supervisors were told that their tutors were ideally qualified for their tutoring role; control supervisors were told nothing about their tutors' qualifications. A manipulation check revealed that the experimental supervisors expected more of their tutors. Analysis of variance of tutorial success measures confirmed the Pygmalion effect among supervisors of both sexes. No main effect or interaction involving either supervisor sex or tutor sex was significant. As predicted, the experimental supervisors also provided better leadership and the experimental tutors increased their self-efficacy. This was the first demonstration of the Pygmalion effect among women leading men. Pygmalion effects may be produced without regard for sex.

  1. Behavior Management in Afterschool Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    Although behavioral management is one of the most challenging aspects of working in an afterschool setting, staff do not typically receive formal training in evidence-based approaches to handling children's behavior problems. Common approaches to behavioral management such as punishment or time-out are temporary solutions because they do not…

  2. Prevalence and Psychosocial Correlates of After-School Activities among Chinese Adolescents in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Cecilia M. S.; Shek, Daniel Tan Lei

    2014-01-01

    Using a cross-sectional design, this study (a) explores the prevalence of after-school activities among Chinese early adolescents and (b) assesses the relationships between participation in after-school activities, personal well-being, and family functioning. A total of 3,328 Grade 7 students (mean age = 12.59 years, SD = 0.74) completed a self-administered questionnaire. Results showed that the majority of adolescents returned home under adult supervision. Further analyses showed the associations between after-school activities, positive youth development qualities, academic and school competence, family functioning, and risky behavior. Implications regarding efforts aimed at designing high quality and structured after-school youth programs are discussed. PMID:25309895

  3. Learning Through Tutoring: Low-Achieving Children as Tutors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Vernon L.; Feldman, Robert S.

    1973-01-01

    Study was concerned only with the impact of tutoring on the tutor's learning and attempted to determine whether tutors cognitively restructure the material in anticipation of teaching it to someone else. (Author/RK)

  4. Effects of Gifted Peers Tutoring Struggling Reading Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yawn, Christopher D.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a peer tutoring program that used a Direct Instruction (DI) reading curriculum. Students identified as gifted and talented delivered instruction, using the DI reading program, to their struggling reading peers. The students used a cross-skill peer tutoring instructional format. The results indicated that all of…

  5. PC Tutor. Bericht uber ein PC-gestutzes Tutorensystem = PC Tutor. Report on a Tutoring System with Personal Computer. ZIFF Papiere 75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritsch, Helmut

    A project was conducted to increase as well as to professionalize communication between tutors and learners in a West German university's distance education program by the use of personal computers. Two tutors worked on the systematic development of a PC-based correcting system. The goal, apart from developing general language skills in English,…

  6. After-School Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Phyllis

    1986-01-01

    Describes the origin, development, and activity options of the Hands-On-Science Program. Explains the program's process-oriented, interdisciplinary approach, its staffing procedures, and activity format. Lists the current and future locations of the program. Also provides an example of an activity on solar energy for primary level students. (ML)

  7. Computer Tutors Get Personal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, David L.

    2005-01-01

    After decades of research in artificial intelligence (AI) and cognitive psychology, a number of companies have emerged that offer intelligent tutor system (ITS) soft ware to schools. These systems try to mimic the help that a human tutor would provide to an individual student, something nearly impossible for teachers to accomplish in the…

  8. Tutoring Your Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohn, Joanne

    The parents' role as teacher is important to a child's learning process. Parents tutoring their children are advised to remain positive and patient, be aware of the child's feelings, keep the tutoring time short, select a quiet place away from distractions, use games and manipulative objects rather than more abstract experiences, etc. Informal…

  9. Enfoque en las horas despues del dia en escuela para la prevencion de violencia (Focus on After-School Time for Violence Prevention). ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patten, Peggy; Robertson, Anne S.

    Perhaps 8 million children spend the after-school hours at home alone. In the absence of adult supervision, many of these youth are likely to engage in delinquent or other high-risk activities. This Spanish-language digest reveals research that suggests after-school programs can help to prevent youths from engaging in these activities in two ways:…

  10. Moving beyond Attendance: Lessons Learned from Assessing Engagement in Afterschool Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredricks, Jennifer A.; Bohnert, Amy M.; Burdette, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    Youth engagement is the least researched, but potentially most important, aspect of participation in afterschool programs. The level of youth engagement can vary across programs, across youth within a program, and within individual youth over time. Engagement is important for both recruiting and retaining participants, and has been associated with…

  11. Youth Historians in Harlem: An After-School Blueprint for History Engagement through the Historical Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldenberg, Barry M.

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript, written with the educator in mind, describes the Youth Historians in Harlem (YHH) program, a twenty-week after-school history program that engaged urban students in history by immersing them in aspects of the historical process. Throughout the program, a group of Black male high school students were apprenticed as historical…

  12. A Window into Mathematical Support: How Parents' Perceptions Change Following Observations of Mathematics Tutoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westenskow, Arla; Boyer-Thurgood, Jennifer; Moyer-Packenham, Patricia S.

    2015-01-01

    This research study examined the perceptions of 24 parents of rising 5th-grade students with mathematics learning difficulties as part of a 10-week summer mathematics tutoring experience. During the summer tutoring program, parents observed their children participating in mathematics learning experiences during one-to-one tutoring sessions. At the…

  13. EFFECT OF TUTORING ON PERFORMANCE AND MOTIVATION RATINGS IN SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WEITZMAN, DAVID L.

    THIS TUTORING EXPERIMENT WAS CONDUCTED TO PROVIDE A PLACE OUTSIDE OF REGULAR SCHOOL HOURS WHERE STUDENTS COULD RECEIVE ADDITIONAL INSTRUCTION AND PRACTICE, AND TO CREATE AN EXPERIMENTAL SITUATION IN WHICH THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A TUTORING PROGRAM AT THE SECONDARY SCHOOL LEVEL COULD BE EVALUATED. TUTORING WAS DONE BY JUNIOR AND SENIOR STUDENTS FROM…

  14. A Case Study of E-Tutors' Teaching Practice: Does Technology Drive Pedagogy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chuang, Hsueh-Hua

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a case study of e-tutoring teaching practice during a 20-week e-tutoring program aimed at improving the English proficiency of targeted students. The study revealed what and why certain online tools were used by e-tutors and investigated how different technological proficiency and face-to-face (f2f) teaching experience shaped…

  15. Afterschool Programs Strengthen Communities. Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No. 18

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Some say America's attention to community is in decline. As people work longer hours, endure longer commutes, and have less time to socialize and join community organizations, they are not getting to know their neighbors and communities. Schools exist in a vacuum, having little or no association with the surrounding neighborhood, and many…

  16. Using Cognitive Tutor Software in Learning Linear Algebra Word Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Kai-Ju

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on a study of twelve 10th grade students using Cognitive Tutor, a math software program, to learn linear algebra word concept. The study's purpose was to examine whether students' mathematics performance as it is related to using Cognitive Tutor provided evidence to support Koedlinger's (2002) four instructional principles used…

  17. A Hypermedia Computer-Aided Parasitology Tutoring System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theodoropoulos, Georgios; Loumos, Vassili

    A hypermedia tutoring system for teaching parasitology to college students was developed using an object oriented software development tool, Knowledge Pro. The program was designed to meet four objectives: knowledge incorporation, tutoring, indexing of key words for Boolean search, and random generation of quiz questions with instant scoring. The…

  18. An Intelligent Tutoring System for Introductory C Language Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, J. S.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    This discussion of intelligent tutoring systems (ITS) focuses on a description of C-Tutor, a knowledge-based ITS for novice C programmers. The program analyzer, which is a compound of a reverse engineering system and a didactic system, is explained, and implementation and evaluation is discussed. (LRW)

  19. Summary of the uTutor Language. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avner, Elaine

    This summary presents features of the uTUTOR programming language. Intended for the experienced author who needs a quick reference for the form of a tag and for some of the restrictions on commands, it does not discuss fine details of the uTUTOR language. Topics covered are: (1) calculating, including operations and symbols, system functions,…

  20. Effects of Structure Strategy Instruction Delivered to Fifth-Grade Children Using the Internet with and without the Aid of Older Adult Tutors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Bonnie J. F.; Middlemiss, Wendy; Theodorou, Elena; Brezinski, Kristen L.; McDougall, Janet; Bartlett, Brendan J.

    2002-01-01

    Assesses the impact of using the structure strategy as a base for an intergenerational Internet tutoring program in which older adults provided Internet-based tutoring for 5th-grade students. Both tutors and children in the structure strategy group with tutors increased strategy use, total and main idea recall, and self-efficacy. Findings have…

  1. Afterschool: Key to Health and Wellness for Pre-Teens and Teens. MetLife Foundation Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No. 45

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2010

    2010-01-01

    With a growing number of school hours devoted to increased instructional time and physical education programs being scaled back in many schools, the afterschool hours are becoming increasingly crucial to ensuring the healthy development of the nation's youth. Additionally, with students spending the majority of their waking hours and consuming the…

  2. Building Citywide Systems for Quality: A Guide and Case Studies for Afterschool Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yohalem, Nicole; Devaney, Elizabeth; Smith, Charles; Wilson-Ahlstrom, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    A quality improvement system (QIS) is an intentional effort to raise the quality of afterschool programming in an ongoing, organized fashion. There are a number of reasons the QIS is gaining popularity. The main reasons community leaders are drawn to improving quality is that they know that 1) higher quality programs will mean better experiences…

  3. 7 CFR 226.17a - At-risk afterschool care center provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... standards will remain a precondition for any afterschool center's eligibility for CACFP nutrition benefits... Section 226.17a Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM...

  4. 7 CFR 226.17a - At-risk afterschool care center provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... any afterschool center's eligibility for CACFP nutrition benefits. In cases where Federal, State or... Section 226.17a Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM...

  5. Advancing Achievement: Findings from an Independent Evaluation of a Major After-School Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbreton, Amy; Sheldon, Jessica; Bradshaw, Molly; Goldsmith, Julie

    2008-01-01

    This report presents outcomes from Public/Private Ventures research on CORAL, an eight-year, $58 million after-school initiative of The James Irvine Foundation. Findings described in the report demonstrate the relationship between high-quality literacy programming and academic gains and underscore the potential role that quality programs may play…

  6. Learning How: After-School Occupational Skills Training for High School Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabato, Ann S.

    1973-01-01

    The best salesmen for New York City's After-School Occupational Skills Program are the students themselves, who have obtained valuable work experience, skill development, and in many cases good jobs as a result of the training received from the program in a very large number of different work areas. (SA)

  7. Emotional Engagement, Social Interactions, and the Development of an Afterschool Game Design Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwah, Helen; Milne, Catherine; Tsai, Tzuchi; Goldman, Ricki; Plass, Jan L.

    2016-01-01

    This formative design study examines how a program curriculum and implementation was emergently (re)designed in dynamic relation to the expressed emotions of teachers and students. The context was a yearlong afterschool game design program for STEM learning at an urban and public all-girls middle school. Using Randall Collins' (Interaction ritual…

  8. The Quest for Quality in Afterschool Science: The Development and Application of a New Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papazian, Anahit Evoyan; Noam, Gil Gabriel; Shah, Ashima Mathur; Rufo-McCormick, Caitlin

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence shows that participation in out-of-school time (OST) activities positively supports youth development in general. However, simply participating in a self-identified STEM program is not sufficient. Youth will benefit more if they participate in "quality" afterschool programs. Therefore, a common understanding of quality…

  9. 45 CFR 2522.940 - What are the requirements for a program in which AmeriCorps members serve as tutors?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... requirements in § 2522.910. (b) Identify the strategies or tools it will use to assess student progress and measure student outcomes; (c) Certify that the tutoring curriculum and pre-service and in-service...

  10. Aspects of Tutor and Writing Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaidin, M. Arifin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the correlation between aspects of tutor and the students' basic writing outcomes of the Elementary School Teacher Education at the Distance Learning Program Unit, Open University of Palu. This is ex post facto correlation with the population research of 387 people and the total sample of 100 people. This…

  11. Online tutors as a solution to the shortage of nurse practitioner educators.

    PubMed

    Bruce, T Joyce

    2007-01-01

    The shortage of nursing faculty in Canada, particularly those qualified to teach students in nurse practitioner programs, has contributed to the use of adjunct teachers and online methodologies. The author discusses 1 nurse practitioner online program's use of nurse practitioners who work in full-time clinical roles as tutors. Learning through experience, the author shares how the online tutor role was developed to assist those who are considering using tutors as a program delivery strategy.

  12. Automatic Detection of Tutoring Styles Based on Tutors' Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bendjebar, Safia; Lafifi, Yacine; Zedadra, Amina

    2016-01-01

    In e-learning systems, tutors have a significant impact on learners' life to increase their knowledge level and to make the learning process more effective. They are characterized by different features. Therefore, identifying tutoring styles is a critical step in understanding the preference of tutors on how to organize and help the learners. In…

  13. My Science Tutor: A Conversational Multimedia Virtual Tutor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Wayne; Cole, Ron; Bolaños, Daniel; Buchenroth-Martin, Cindy; Svirsky, Edward; Weston, Tim

    2013-01-01

    My Science Tutor (MyST) is an intelligent tutoring system designed to improve science learning by elementary school students through conversational dialogs with a virtual science tutor in an interactive multimedia environment. Marni, a lifelike 3-D character, engages individual students in spoken dialogs following classroom investigations using…

  14. Learning through Tutoring: Low-Achieving Children as Tutors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Robert S.; Allen, Vernon L.

    Recent evidence suggests that the use of children acting as tutors for their peers may prove beneficial to the tutor as well as to the tutee. There is now abundant, unsubstantiated anecdotal evidence, and some controlled experimental work, which suggests that the tutor benefits greatly from his involvement in teaching. The enactment of the role of…

  15. Joint Tutoring: A Perspective on Tutoring the Incarcerated College Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culmer, Sean M.

    The challenges and headaches of tutoring college students in prisons are ample, but the joys of witnessing the academic benefits are precious. One tutor views his tutoring sessions much like a counselor would approach a therapeutic session with his/her client. The interaction is divided into 3 phases: assessment, intervention, and termination. The…

  16. You're the Tutor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Commission on Resources for Youth, Inc., New York, NY.

    The manual, "You're the Tutor" presents plans and ideas for youth tutoring youth. Full page black and white pictures are used throughout the booklet. Ideas to go along with the pictures are given in large print. Usually one idea is given per page. Techniques tutors can use such as drawing, picture use, games and gimmicks; puppets, trips, writing,…

  17. Adult Academy Tutor Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isserlis, Janet; And Others

    This handbook is for volunteer tutors, student interns, and VISTA volunteers working with adult basic education (ABE) and English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) learners. The community-based handbook contains information about adult literacy and tutoring--what tutors do, who the learners are, and how the literacy learning process works. Introductory…

  18. Mentoring and Tutoring by Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodlad, Sinclair, Ed.

    This book provides an international, current account of the developments of mentoring and tutoring by students in tertiary and secondary education. Included are research reviews, case studies of mature projects, and ideas for new uses of student tutoring and mentoring. Chapter titles are as follows: "Students as Tutors and Mentors"…

  19. Nonverbal Behavior in Tutoring Interactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Robert S.

    This document reports on a series of studies carried out concerning nonverbal behavior in peer tutoring interactions. The first study examined the encoding (enactment) of nonverbal behavior in a tutoring situation. Results clearly indicated that the tutor's nonverbal behavior was affected by the performance of the tutee. The question of whether or…

  20. A Special Kind of Tutor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Linda Brown

    2007-01-01

    Tutoring has long been recognized as superior to group instruction, especially for students with special needs. Tutors can adapt instruction to the learner's pace, learning style and level of understanding. Feedback and correction are immediate. Basic misunderstandings can be quickly identified and corrected. Tutoring also has emotional benefits:…

  1. NCLB Tutoring outside the Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, David J.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes one community-based nonprofit group that provides free tutoring to poor children under the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) law. Unlike most other tutoring sessions under the law, the one at Erie Neighborhood House, a social-services agency in Chicago, is not happening in a school building or at a corporate tutoring outlet. Those…

  2. The desktop interface in intelligent tutoring systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baudendistel, Stephen; Hua, Grace

    1987-01-01

    The interface between an Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS) and the person being tutored is critical to the success of the learning process. If the interface to the ITS is confusing or non-supportive of the tutored domain, the effectiveness of the instruction will be diminished or lost entirely. Consequently, the interface to an ITS should be highly integrated with the domain to provide a robust and semantically rich learning environment. In building an ITS for ZetaLISP on a LISP Machine, a Desktop Interface was designed to support a programming learning environment. Using the bitmapped display, windows, and mouse, three desktops were designed to support self-study and tutoring of ZetaLISP. Through organization, well-defined boundaries, and domain support facilities, the desktops provide substantial flexibility and power for the student and facilitate learning ZetaLISP programming while screening the student from the complex LISP Machine environment. The student can concentrate on learning ZetaLISP programming and not on how to operate the interface or a LISP Machine.

  3. R.E.A.C.H.: An After-School Approach to Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marttinen, Risto; Fredrick, Ray N., III.

    2017-01-01

    After-school physical activity programs are great opportunities to increase daily physical activity for adolescent youth in urban environments who often do not get the recommended amounts of physical activity needed for health benefits. Black and Hispanic youth in urban environments are particularly under-resourced in not just facilities but…

  4. 4-H and Forestry Afterschool Clubs: A Collaboration to Foster Stewardship Attitudes and Behaviors in Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Angela S.; Grant, Samantha; Strauss, Andrea Lorek

    2012-01-01

    The University of Minnesota Extension's 4-H and Forestry Afterschool program combined the 4-H structure and various forestry curricula to foster positive attitudes towards the environment and stewardship-related behaviors as these may serve as precursors to later choices that benefit the environment. Evaluation of third through fifth grade club…

  5. 21st Century Community Learning Centers: Providing Afterschool and Summer Learning Support to Communities Nationwide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21st CCLC) initiative is the only federal funding source dedicated exclusively to before-school, afterschool, and summer learning programs. Each state education agency receives funds based on its share of Title I funding for low-income students at high-poverty, low performing schools. Funds are also…

  6. Exciting Young Students in Grades K-8 about STEM through an Afterschool Robotics Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karp, Tanja; Maloney, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the successful implementation of an afterschool LEGO robotics program for elementary and middle school students that is annually offered by the Whitacre College of Engineering at Texas Tech University. Three events are held on campus: the kickoff, a trial run, and the competition, spread over a period of eight weeks. In…

  7. Academics After-School Style: Informal, Experiential Approaches to Learning, with Flexibility Built in, Are Ideal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisburd, Claudia

    2005-01-01

    Many adults today consider the hours after school to be an opportunity for students to squeeze in a little more help with schoolwork. For most children, though, that final bell rings freedom. The last thing they want is more school, and faced with an after-school program that looks like an extension of their school day, they'll opt out.…

  8. Student-Centered Tutoring: Using Initial Lesson Results to Set Future Goals. Instructional Concept Guide No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Joyce D.; Palmatier, Robert A.

    The instructional concept guide is part of a system developed for tutor training and support. It is primarily designed for volunteers, but it can also be adapted to the training of paraprofessional tutors for any type of adult literacy program. A key component in the system is the Tutor Support Library, consisting of Instructional Concept Guides…

  9. The Use of a Cognitive Tutoring System in the Improvement of the Abstract Reasoning Component of Word Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, J. L.; Regian, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a study of ninth-grade students that evaluated the ability of the Word Problem Solving Tutor, a cognitive tutoring system, to improve the abstract-reasoning component of word-problem solving. Compares combinations of traditional instruction, computer-assisted instruction, and the tutoring program and discusses implications for math…

  10. Hours of Opportunity, Volume 1: Lessons from Five Cities on Building Systems to Improve After-School, Summer School, and Other Out-of-School-Time Programs. Monograph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodilly, Susan J.; McCombs, Jennifer Sloan; Orr, Nate; Scherer, Ethan; Constant, Louay; Gershwin, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    High-quality out-of-school-time (OST) programs have a positive effect on youth development, but many cities have found it difficult to address the challenges of expanding and improving the quality of programs offered to underserved and high-need students. In response, The Wallace Foundation sponsored an initiative to help five cities increase…

  11. The Quality of School-Age Child Care in After-School Settings. Research-to-Policy Connections No. 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Priscilla M.

    2007-01-01

    This brief identifies the features of high-quality after-school settings that have emerged from the research and are reflected in program quality tools. It also examines key research linking program quality to positive developmental outcomes; it reviews current practice in program quality assessment; and it offers considerations for policymakers…

  12. Probing Skills for Tutors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Beryl E.

    The Office of Academic Support and Instructional Services (OASIS) at the University of California at San Diego sponsors a workshop that teaches tutors to use five types of probing skills. The use of the skills is fundamental to the student learner's acquisition of complex relationships and problem solving skills. The five types of probes are:…

  13. Investigating Peer Tutoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mynard, Jo; Almarzouqi, Iman

    2006-01-01

    This article gives an overview of a piece of qualitative research conducted at a women's university in the United Arab Emirates. The aim of the study was to evaluate the English language peer tutoring programme in order to highlight benefits and challenges, and to make informed improvements. The study drew particularly on participant perceptions…

  14. The Effects of Peer Tutoring between Domestic and International Students: The Tutor System at Japanese Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lassegard, James P.

    2008-01-01

    International students often require extracurricular assistance upon arrival in the host country. Many universities operate programs pairing international and domestic students for academic and adjustment assistance. The tutor system operating at Japanese national universities has similar objectives. Although the literature has highlighted several…

  15. Assessment of a Multinational Online Faculty Development Program on Online Teaching: Reflections of Candidate E-Tutors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adnan, Muge; Kalelioglu, Filiz; Gulbahar, Yasemin

    2017-01-01

    Teaching online requires different skills, roles and competencies for online instructors compared to teaching in traditional learning environments. Universities should offer ongoing support in various forms to help academic staff through their online journey. This paper provides insights into a multinational faculty development program for…

  16. When Schools Stay Open Late: The National Evaluation of the 21st Century Community Learning Centers Program--New Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dynarski, Mark; James-Burdumy, Susanne; Moore, Mary; Rosenberg, Linda; Deke, John; Mansfield, Wendy

    2004-01-01

    After-school programs have grown rapidly in recent years, spurred by rising employment rates of mothers, pressure to increase academic achievement, and concerns about risks to children who are unsupervised during after-school hours. The percentage of public schools offering "extended day" programs (which include before- and after-school programs)…

  17. Tutoring Middle School Students with Disabilities by High School Students: Effects on Oral Reading Fluency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lingo, Amy Shearer

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of high school tutors' implementation of "Great Leaps Reading" (Campbell, 1998), a reading fluency supplementary instructional program. The program consists of three sections: phonics, sight word phrases, and story passages. Daily 15-minute tutoring sessions involved repeated 1-minute timings of…

  18. Enhancing the Quality of Tutorials through Peer-Connected Tutor Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calma, Angelito; Eggins, Mark

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates how a peer-connected tutor training program can lead to quality enhancement by helping tutors to develop more effective teaching strategies and promoting better learning approaches among business students. It uses 2007-2010 evaluation data from 343 program participants from accounting, economics, finance and management and…

  19. The Effects of Tutoring in Preparing Chinese Students for the Scholastic Aptitude Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Li

    2009-01-01

    Scholastic Aptitude Test, called SAT, has an immense influence in Chinese education. Most Chinese students choose to attend tutoring programs outside of the school curriculum to help them prepare. This study explores the tutoring programs both in China and the United States to assess variables that affect the quality of their preparation.…

  20. Connecting Kids To The Universe: Partnering With 4-H Youth Development To Pilot 'Afterschool Universe' In New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaff, Nancy

    2008-05-01

    4-H Youth Development - as the youth program of the Cooperative Extension system associated with the land grant university in every state - is an ideal partner for statewide dissemination of EPO programs. With funding from a Chandra Cycle 9 EPO grant we are piloting `Afterschool Universe’ in five urban locations in New York State. `Afterschool Universe’ is an education/outreach effort sponsored by NASA's Beyond Einstein program and was developed in partnership with the Imagine the Universe EPO program. The program is targeted at middle school students in out-of-school-time settings and explores basic astronomy concepts focused on the Universe beyond the solar system. Consisting of 12 sessions of engaging hands-on activities, the flexibly structured program can be used in a variety of settings, including astronomy days, youth groups, summer camps, and afterschool programs. Partnering with 4-H Youth Development helps us reach large numbers of underserved and underrepresented minority youth and girls in widely dispersed areas of New York and fits ideally with the current national 4-H SET (science, engineering, and technology) initiative and emphasis on 4-H afterschool programming. The pilot program provides teaching kits and workshops for program leaders. Our 4-H county partners recruit afterschool program staff, science center staff, 4-H volunteers, 4-H teens, and other youth group leaders as workshop participants. The 4-H program will house and loan the kit to trained leaders. By providing kits and training in 2008, we are gearing up for International Year of Astronomy programs in 2009 in out-of-school settings. Based on pilot results, we will seek additional funding to expand the program. The poster will discuss kit development, 4-H partnership, workshops, participating organizations, target audiences, successes, and challenges.

  1. Connecting Kids to the Universe: Partnering with 4--H Youth Development to Pilot Afterschool Universe in New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaff, N.

    2008-11-01

    To offer effective astrophysics outreach education, developmentally appropriate hands-on activities that develop conceptual understanding and create excitement about science and careers are needed. The new NASA Afterschool Universe Program is ideal to enhance astronomy and astrophysics outreach. Afterschool Universe is a comprehensive project that builds a strong conceptual understanding of the Universe beyond the solar system for out-of-school groups at the middle school level. Students at this age are fascinated by mysteries (to them) of the universe, but are introduced primarily to the Solar System in school. We determined that access to materials and training would be essential to successful implementation of Afterschool Universe. Therefore, we secured funding from the Chandra EPO program to develop kits and implement five regional workshops in collaboration with 4--H Youth Development in New York State during 2008, in preparation for the International Year of Astronomy.

  2. Reaching for the Stars: Examining YoungStar and Its Effect on the Quality of Milwaukee County's Afterschool Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterangelo, Joe; Carlson, Virginia; Henken, Rob

    2014-01-01

    The authors' recent research has revealed that most afterschool programs in Milwaukee County have received relatively low ratings, and that their biggest hurdle to improving their scores often involved the educational qualifications of program staff. In light of the potential consequences of that finding--which include the possibility that the…

  3. Ready for Prime Time: Implementing a Formal Afterschool Quality Improvement System by Prime Time Palm Beach County, Inc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielberger, Julie; Lockaby, Tracey; Mayers, Leifa; Guterman, Kai

    2009-01-01

    This is the fourth report of a process evaluation of Palm Beach County Prime Time, Inc., an intermediary organization dedicated to improving the quality of afterschool programs, by Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago. It covers the 2007-2008 program year, which was the inaugural year of Prime Time's formal Quality Improvement System (QIS)…

  4. Tips for Reading Tutors = Consejos para los Tutores en Lectura.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    Reading is the basis for learning and school success. While reading is learned primarily in the classroom, many students need extra time and help. Research shows that tutoring is a great way for individuals and groups outside school to support learning, but effective tutoring requires appropriate training and careful planning. This brochure,…

  5. Tutoring Writing: Healing or What?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Diane Stelzer

    1991-01-01

    Compares writing students with medical patients. Discusses the challenges of writing teachers and tutors to provide the most useful methods to help their students develop as writers. Describes the author's experiences as a tutor after having been in medical practice. (MG)

  6. Stupid Tutoring Systems, Intelligent Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Ryan S.

    2016-01-01

    The initial vision for intelligent tutoring systems involved powerful, multi-faceted systems that would leverage rich models of students and pedagogies to create complex learning interactions. But the intelligent tutoring systems used at scale today are much simpler. In this article, I present hypotheses on the factors underlying this development,…

  7. Promoting Physical Activity in Afterschool Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beighle, Aaron; Beets, Michael W.; Erwin, Heather E.; Huberty, Jennifer; Moore, Justin B.; Stellino, Megan

    2010-01-01

    Children in the United States are not engaging in sufficient amounts of routine physical activity, and this lack is an emerging public health concern (Strong, Malina, Blimkie, Daniels, Dishman, Gutin, et al., 2005). Efforts to increase the physical activity levels of children and adolescents has become a national priority, attracting attention…

  8. [Afterschool physical activity programs: Literature review].

    PubMed

    Reloba-Martínez, Sergio; Martín-Tamayo, Ignacio; Martínez-López, Emilio José; Guerrero-Almeida, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to analyze the scientific production about extra-curricular physical activity (PA) in western children of 6-12 years. Medline / Pub-Med, Scopus and Google Scholar were used. This search collects articles published between January 1990 and May 2013. A total of 104 publications were analyzed. The body composition parameters are best used to assess the results of the studies, followed by those which estimate the maximum aerobic capacity. Articles of intervention are presented with very heterogeneous methodological features but there are clear trends in the use of certain aspects. As for the reviews, most are systematic and include meta-analysis. In this studies, body mass index (BMI) is the most used parameter.

  9. Peer Tutoring at Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Mikyong Minsun

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the important roles of peer tutoring and peer tutoring services that utilize student tutors in higher education. First, the roles and potential benefits of peer tutoring are identified and reviewed as they apply to various dimensions of student development. Second, the impacts, benefits, and extended beneficiaries of peer…

  10. An Alternative Architecture for Intelligent Tutoring Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelepithis, Petros A. M.; Goodfellow, Robin

    1992-01-01

    Presents an alternative architecture for intelligent tutoring systems (ITSs) that is based on (1) the understanding/explanation process for tutoring and (2) the learner-tutor duality. Learner and tutor models are explained, knowledge types are described, and suggestions for further work are given. (18 references) (LRW)

  11. Epistemics and Expertise in Peer Tutoring Interactions: Co-Constructing Knowledge of Spanish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Back, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Peer tutoring is viewed as a valuable component of additional language learning due to the presence of a more knowledgeable interlocutor. Yet researchers and language program directors alike often ignore the linguistic and cultural differences that peer tutors possess, instead categorizing them homogeneously as "experts" or "native…

  12. Children Interactions in Literacy Tutoring Situations: A Study with Urban Marginalized Populations in Argentina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosemberg, Celia Renata; Alam, Florencia; Stein, Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    The study analyzed the conversational exchanges through which child tutors mediated literacy abilities and knowledge with young children in the framework of the project "From Child to Child: A Tutor-Child Literacy Program," that is being conducted in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The analysis considered the conversational moves deployed by…

  13. "Mao Might Cheat": The Interactional Construction of the Imaginary Situation in a Fifth Dimension After-School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    This article explores Vygtosky's (1978) notion of the imaginary situation through analysis of interaction and activity in a Fifth Dimension after-school setting, one of a network of programs designed with an aim to realize developmental concepts proposed by Vygotsky and others in the cultural-historical tradition (see, e.g., Cole & the…

  14. Afterschool Alert: Poll Report No.3. A Report of Findings from a June 2000 Poll of Registered Voters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, Washington, DC.

    This report summarizes key findings from a 2000 nationwide poll regarding support and demand for after-school programs. Participating in the poll were 800 adults over age 18 who are registered to vote. The findings included the following: (1) 92 percent of respondents agreed that there should be an organized activity/place for children and teens…

  15. Validation of an Evaluation Tutoring Task Scale at the University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sáiz-Manzanares, María Consuelo; Bol-Arreba, Alfredo; Payo-Hernanz, René Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Recent investigations have emphasized the need for university teachers to develop tutorial programs for students at university. Many universities are committed to broadening research on university teaching that will sharpen academic performance and levels of student satisfaction. Tutoring programs improve the development of the…

  16. Identifying Training Needs of Novice Online English Language Tutors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez Buitrago, Carolina

    2013-01-01

    Online and blended learning are of growing interest in the English language learning community. In Colombia, national initiatives and policies promote online educational programs and online English courses specifically. As a result, new online tutors are constantly needed for new programs and courses offered by institutions as well as by private…

  17. Saturday Schools and Tutoring as Interventions. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Being clear about the reason for academic intervention programs is essential prior to establishing programs. Saturday School and tutoring are two approaches that can be helpful in student retention and increasing graduation rates but only if they are set up to meet the specific needs of the school's students. There are no common measures of the…

  18. Exploring the Relationships between Perceptions of Tutoring and Tutoring Behaviours: A Focus on Graduate Students Serving as Peer Tutors to College-Level Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velasco, Jonathan B.; Stains, Marilyne

    2015-01-01

    It has been established that both tutors and tutees gain from tutoring sessions. However, tutors' benefits may be enhanced or limited depending on the type of behaviours they perform during the tutoring sessions. Although behaviours enhancing both tutor and tutee learning can be promoted by training, generalized tutor training models that are…

  19. Students' Attitudes toward an After-School Physical Activity Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agbuga, Bulent; Xiang, Ping; McBride, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Though considerable research on student attitudes has been conducted in physical education, little information exists concerning student attitudes toward after-school physical activity programmes. This study assessed students' attitudes toward their after-school physical activity programme located in southwest Texas, USA. Participants included 158…

  20. Surveys and Polls Show Strong Support for Afterschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2007

    2007-01-01

    In addition to the Afterschool Alliance's "Voters' Polls" and "America After 3 PM", a number of other surveys and polls have been conducted in recent years to gauge American support for after-school. This report consolidates information gathered from 2003 through 2006 and reports that, across the various polls and timeframes, it remains clear that…

  1. Afterschool: A High School Dropout Prevention Tool. Afterschool Alert Issue Brief No.38

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Over one million students who enter ninth grade each year fail to graduate with their peers four years later because they drop out of school. Seven thousand students drop out of school every day, and each year roughly 1.2 million students fail to graduate from high school. More than half of these students are from minority groups. Afterschool

  2. Afterschool and the Environment: A Natural Fit. Afterschool Alert Issue Brief No.35

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Children have a wonderful curiosity about nature and the environment, which, if encouraged through afterschool activities can have a profound impact on their health and well-being. Children also take readily to concepts of conservation which will make them excellent stewards of the future of our environment. This issue brief explores the…

  3. Tea for Tutors and Tutees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witkin, Mildren Hope

    1972-01-01

    Briefly described is a get-together for old and prospective participants in a student tutorial effort at Fairleigh Dickinson University, at which friendships were formed and tutoring experiences were related. (CJ)

  4. Peer tutoring with or without home-based reinforcement, for reading remediation.

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, J; Bucher, B

    1980-01-01

    An operant-based corrective reading program was established to study effectiveness of peer tutoring in the school, for reading deficient children. Sixty-nine second to fourth grade students were matched on measures of initial reading ability and level of reading retardation, and randomly assigned to three groups: Peer Tutoring Only, Peer Tutoring with Home Based Reinforcement, and Control. SRA materials were used in training for the experimental groups, supplemented with additional reading materials. The program continued for 15 weeks, in seven public schools. Changes in oral reading accuracy and comprehansion were assessed. Both reading and comprehension were significantly increased by peer tutoring, relative to the control group. The addition of home-based reinforcement doubled this increase. The measured gain in oral reading, based upon standardized testing, was 0.19 years for the controls and 1.27 years for peer tutoring with home-based reinforcement. Internal measures of gain showed similar results, and comprehension gains were also comparable. A high rate of compliance with the tutoring program was maintained by the tutors. High ratings of satisfaction were obtained for the program, from all groups of participants. The feasibility of the program for application in the school system is discussed. PMID:7364691

  5. Teaching styles of tutors in a problem-based curriculum: students' and tutors' perception.

    PubMed

    Kassab, Salah; Al-Shboul, Qasim; Abu-Hijleh, Marwan; Hamdy, Hossam

    2006-08-01

    This study compared the self-rated with student-rated teaching styles of PBL tutors. We also examined the relationship between teaching styles of tutors' and students' evaluation of tutor effectiveness in tutorials. The study included 48 tutors and 276 medical students. Tutors, and students' were given a teaching style inventory with a 5-point scale consisting of 21 items that comprise four domains of teaching styles (facilitative, collaborative, suggestive and assertive). In addition, quantitative and qualitative evaluations of tutor effectiveness by students were analyzed. Tutors perceived themselves in the facilitative-collaborative end of the spectrum of styles In contrast, students perceived tutors as less 'facilitative-collaborative' and more 'suggestive-assertive' than tutors self-ratings (p < 0.001). In addition, the difference in perception between students and tutors ratings in the facilitative-collaborative domains was more evident as students progressed in the PBL curriculum. The students' ratings of the effectiveness of tutors correlated more strongly with facilitative-collaborative than with suggestive-assertive domains of teaching styles. However, other tutor attributes such as establishing rapport with students, providing academic help for them and having content expertise were considered important criteria of an effective tutor. We conclude that there is a mismatch between students' and tutors' perceptions about teaching styles of tutor. Tutor attributes other than teaching styles are important determinants of an effective tutor.

  6. Applying and evaluating computer-animated tutors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, Dominic W.; Bosseler, Alexis; Stone, Patrick S.; Connors, Pamela

    2002-05-01

    We have developed computer-assisted speech and language tutors for deaf, hard of hearing, and autistic children. Our language-training program utilizes our computer-animated talking head, Baldi, as the conversational agent, who guides students through a variety of exercises designed to teach vocabulary and grammer, to improve speech articulation, and to develop linguistic and phonological awareness. Baldi is an accurate three-dimensional animated talking head appropriately aligned with either synthesized or natural speech. Baldi has a tongue and palate, which can be displayed by making his skin transparent. Two specific language-training programs have been evaluated to determine if they improve word learning and speech articulation. The results indicate that the programs are effective in teaching receptive and productive language. Advantages of utilizing a computer-animated agent as a language tutor are the popularity of computers and embodied conversational agents with autistic kids, the perpetual availability of the program, and individualized instruction. Students enjoy working with Baldi because he offers extreme patience, he doesn't become angry, tired, or bored, and he is in effect a perpetual teaching machine. The results indicate that the psychology and technology of Baldi holds great promise in language learning and speech therapy. [Work supported by NSF Grant Nos. CDA-9726363 and BCS-9905176 and Public Health Service Grant No. PHS R01 DC00236.

  7. The Impact of Afterschool Tutoring on Reading Scores of Elementary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Latrice T.

    2014-01-01

    Students from an urban elementary school did not meet criteria on the standardized reading assessment for 3 consecutive years as mandated by the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act. Students were at risk of failing future classes requiring proficiency in reading, and the school did not meet annual yearly progress. To address this problem,…

  8. What Positive Impacts Does Peer Tutoring Have upon the Peer Tutors at SQU?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al kharusi, Dhafra

    2016-01-01

    This paper attempts to provide an answer to the question: What positive impacts does peer tutoring have upon the peer tutors at SQU? It is conducted in the LC Tutorial Centre at Sultan Qaboos University where senior English language students are hired to tutor their peers who are struggling with the language. It sheds light on the peer tutors'…

  9. Expertise Amiss: Interactivity Fosters Learning but Expert Tutors Are Less Interactive than Novice Tutors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herppich, Stephanie; Wittwer, Jörg; Nückles, Matthias; Renkl, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which tutors are interactive and engage in dialogue with a student tends to depend on their pedagogical expertise. Normally, tutors with pedagogical expertise are more interactive than tutors without pedagogical expertise. This finding, however, has largely been obtained when examining tutoring in procedural domains such as…

  10. Does it Make a Difference? Investigating the Assessment Accuracy of Teacher Tutors and Student Tutors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herppich, Stephanie; Wittwer, Jorg; Nuckles, Matthias; Renkl, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Tutors often have difficulty with accurately assessing a tutee's understanding. However, little is known about whether the professional expertise of tutors influences their assessment accuracy. In this study, the authors examined the accuracy with which 21 teacher tutors and 25 student tutors assessed a tutee's understanding of the human…

  11. AutoTutor and Family: A Review of 17 Years of Natural Language Tutoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nye, Benjamin D.; Graesser, Arthur C.; Hu, Xiangen

    2014-01-01

    AutoTutor is a natural language tutoring system that has produced learning gains across multiple domains (e.g., computer literacy, physics, critical thinking). In this paper, we review the development, key research findings, and systems that have evolved from AutoTutor. First, the rationale for developing AutoTutor is outlined and the advantages…

  12. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Tutoring: An Easier Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holliday, Tacy

    2012-01-01

    Many learning center administrators understand the need to evaluate the effectiveness of their tutoring programs, but they do not have much free time to design and conduct meaningful research. This article presents a method of evaluation that can be used to determine whether students were able to demonstrate understanding after a tutoring…

  13. Preparing Preservice Teachers to Implement Class Wide Peer Tutoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maheady, Larry; Harper, Gregory F.; Mallette, Barbara; Karnes, Melinda

    2004-01-01

    This study focused on preservice general education teachers who were prepared to use an evidence-based teaching practice and the effects the practice had on their pupils' academic performance. Participants learned to use Juniper Gardens Children's Project's Class Wide Peer Tutoring (CWPT) program through a two-hour workshop and with in class…

  14. Recorded Readings: A Taped Parent-Tutoring Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kupzyk, Sara; McCurdy, Merilee; Hofstadter, Kristi L.; Berger, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Parent tutoring has been successfully used to increase children's oral reading fluency. However, commonly used procedures pose a challenge for parents who are not proficient in reading or who speak English as a second language. A taped reading program that included listening passage preview, repeated reading, and performance feedback was developed…

  15. Impact of Science Tutoring on African Americans' Science Scores on the High School Students' Graduation Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Edward

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between an after-school tutorial program for African American high school students at a Title I school and scores on the science portion of the High School Graduation Examination (HSGE). Passing the examination was required for graduation. The target high school is 99% African American and the passing rate…

  16. CLIPSITS - CLIPS INTELLIGENT TUTORING SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, G.

    1994-01-01

    The CLIPS Intelligent Tutoring System (CLIPSITS) is designed to be used to learn CLIPS, the C-language Integrated Production System expert system shell developed by the Software Technology Branch at Johnson Space Center. The goal of CLIPSITS is to provide the student with a tool to practice the syntax and concepts covered in the CLIPS User's Guide. It attempts to provide expert diagnosis and advice during problem solving which is typically not available without an instructor. CLIPSITS is divided into 10 lessons which mirror the first 10 chapters of the CLIPS User's Guide. This version of CLIPSITS is compatible with the Version 4.2 and 4.3 CLIPS User's Guide. However, the program does not cover any new features of CLIPS v4.3 that were added since the release of v4.2. The chapter numbers in the CLIPS User's Guide correspond directly with the lesson numbers in CLIPSITS. Each lesson in the program contains anywhere from 1 to 10 problems. Most of these have multiple parts. The student is given a subset of these problems from each lesson to work. The actual number of problems presented depends on how well the student masters the previous problem(s). The progression through these lessons is maintained in a personalized file under the student's name. As with most computer languages, there is usually more than one way to solve a problem. CLIPSITS attempts to be as flexible as possible and to allow as many correct solutions as possible. CLIPSITS gives the student the option of setting his/her own colors for the screen interface and the option of redefining special keystroke combinations used within the program. CLIPSITS requires an IBM PC compatible with 640K RAM and optional 2 or 3 button mouse. A 286- or 386-based machine is preferable. Performance will be somewhat slower on an XT class machine. The program must be installed on a hard disk with 825 KB space available. The program was developed in 1989. The standard distribution media is three 5.25" IBM PC DOS format

  17. Rec and Read Mentor Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Amy Carpenter; Halas, Joannie

    2011-01-01

    For the past six years in Winnipeg, Canada, young people from diverse Aboriginal backgrounds have been volunteering their time, energy, and talents to develop and deliver after-school physical activity, nutrition, and education programs for children in their school's neighbourhood. Known as "Rec and Read," the after-school activities are…

  18. Reciprocal Tutoring: Design with Cognitive Load Sharing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Chih-Yueh; Chan, Tak-Wai

    2016-01-01

    "Reciprocal tutoring," as reported in "Exploring the design of computer supports for reciprocal tutoring" (Chan and Chou 1997), has extended the meaning and scope of "intelligent tutoring" originally implemented in stand alone computers. This research is a follow-up to our studies on a "learning companion…

  19. Identifying Inservice Topics for Volunteer Literacy Tutors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Barbara E.

    A Tutor Self-Assessment Inventory (TSAI) was developed from the literature on reading, adult basic education, literacy education, and comments of professionals in order to provide the volunteer literacy tutor an opportunity to compare his or her self-perceptions regarding tutoring abilities and knowledge to attributes and competencies considered…

  20. Multimedia Tutors for Science and Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolf, Beverly Park; Poli, Corrado; Grosse, Ian; Day, Roberta

    We have built several multimedia tutors for science and engineering education. This paper discusses Design for Manufacturing tutors and an electronic homework systems used by over 2000 students daily. The engineering tutors instruct students on efficient procedures for designing parts for manufacture. The goal is to support a deeper understanding…

  1. Academic Voices and the Challenges of Tutoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Bob

    2003-01-01

    Grounded-theory based research involved interviews with 41 distance education nursing students and 22 tutors and 24 tutorial and 69 field observations. A key theme was students' development of academic voice in the support relationship with tutors. This voice helped them manage learning and determine what kinds of help tutors should give.…

  2. Intelligent tutoring systems for systems engineering methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Richard J.; Toland, Joel; Decker, Louis

    1991-01-01

    The general goal is to provide the technology required to build systems that can provide intelligent tutoring in IDEF (Integrated Computer Aided Manufacturing Definition Method) modeling. The following subject areas are covered: intelligent tutoring systems for systems analysis methodologies; IDEF tutor architecture and components; developing cognitive skills for IDEF modeling; experimental software; and PC based prototype.

  3. Investigating Language Tutor Social Inclusion Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkhuizen, Gary

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the identities of tutors working in one-to-one instructional arrangements, which entail a tutor and an adult English learner working together to meet the particular language learning needs and goals of the learner. The tutors in this study are matched with their partners through an organization in New Zealand which aims to…

  4. Peer Tutoring. Resource Paper No. 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holder, Barbara; Lister, Bob

    A brief description is provided of a successful peer tutoring model implemented by Portsmouth High School (New Hampshire) in which student tutors volunteer to work under the direct supervision of the special educator on reading, math, science, and pre-vocational skills. Peer tutor responsibilities on assisting students in reading are presented,…

  5. Increasing At-Risk Students' Literacy Skills: Fostering Success for Children and Their Preservice Reading Endorsement Tutors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leal, Dorothy; Johanson, George; Toth, Allison; Huang, Chin-Cheng

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to (a) examine how the reading skills of children at-risk are affected by tutoring by preservice reading endorsement students, (b) to identify differences by setting, gender and grade level, and to (c) identify effective strategies and influences on student success in a four-month tutoring program. Data were collected…

  6. Implementation as a Focus of Consultation to Evaluate Academic Tutoring Services in an Urban School District: A Case Study Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Julie Q.; English, Sarah Baker

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a multiagency initiative to evaluate academic tutoring services by focusing on the processes that contribute to effective program implementation. Community-based tutoring service providers serving students in the Cincinnati Public Schools (OH) partnered to initiate a "Seal of Approval" process for promoting…

  7. 25 CFR 36.90 - What recreation, academic tutoring, student safety, and health care services must homeliving...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What recreation, academic tutoring, student safety, and... What recreation, academic tutoring, student safety, and health care services must homeliving programs..., recreation, and health care services for their students, as deemed necessary by the local school board...

  8. 25 CFR 36.90 - What recreation, academic tutoring, student safety, and health care services must homeliving...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What recreation, academic tutoring, student safety, and... What recreation, academic tutoring, student safety, and health care services must homeliving programs..., recreation, and health care services for their students, as deemed necessary by the local school board...

  9. A Multi-Dimensional Tutoring and Academic Counseling Model: Applications and Effects Upon Minority High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, William H.; Sanderson, Leslie A.

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the relationship between Tutoring and Academic Counseling (TAC) and the academic performance of minority group high school students. The treatment group of 16 students was exposed to TAC, an intensive program of one-to-one tutoring in academic areas and counseling on study skills and interpersonal…

  10. "Your Model Is Predictive-- but Is It Useful?" Theoretical and Empirical Considerations of a New Paradigm for Adaptive Tutoring Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    González-Brenes, José P.; Huang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Classification evaluation metrics are often used to evaluate adaptive tutoring systems-- programs that teach and adapt to humans. Unfortunately, it is not clear how intuitive these metrics are for practitioners with little machine learning background. Moreover, our experiments suggest that existing convention for evaluating tutoring systems may…

  11. Learning Through Tutoring: Low-Achieving Childern as Tutors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Vernon L.; Feldman, Robert S.

    Low-achieving fifth-grade children either taught a third grader or studied alone for a series of daily sessions. At the end of the two-week period, the low-achievers' performance was significantly better in the tutoring condition than in the studying condition. This showed a reversal in the direction from the initial difference between conditions.…

  12. AutoTutor: a human tutoring simulation with an animated pedagogical interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Scotty D.; Hu, Xiangen; Gholson, Barry; Marks, William; Graesser, Arthur C.

    2000-11-01

    This paper presents an overview AutoTutor, an intelligent tutoring system that engages in conversationally smooth dialogue with students. AutoTutor simulates the discourse patterns and dialogue moves of human tutors with modest tutoring expertise. In order to concretize the situation we begin with two short snapshots of AutoTutor in action. In one snapshot, involving an articulate and knowledgeable student, AutoTutor begins with a how question and then simply pumps for further information. In the other, with an inarticulate and less knowledgeable student AutoTutor begins with a why question and follows this with numerous hints and prompts until the topic is covered. The remainder of the paper describes the system's architecture, which is comprised of seven modules: a curriculum script, language extraction, speech act classification, latent semantic analysis, topic selection, dialogue move generation, and animated agent. AutoTutor responds to the learner in real time and runs of a single Pentium processor.

  13. Wanted: Top-Notch Tutors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joiner, Lottie L.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the challenges facing school districts in hiring qualified tutors to provide supplemental services for low-income students in failing Title I schools under the provisions of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). Describes the supplemental-services provision of NCLB. (PKP)

  14. Intelligent Tutoring Systems as Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Albert K. W.; Lee, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Proposes the notion of intelligent tutoring systems (ITS) as design in order to engage ITS development with more rigor. Topics include engineering design versus ITS design; systems approach; design as problem solving; a hierarchy of paradigms; the emergence of an agent-theoretic approach; and the need for an ITS design notation. (Author/LRW)

  15. A New Intelligent Tutoring System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Lindsey

    2008-01-01

    Early in 1984, Logica started an ICAI research contract with MoD (Procurement Executive), which was to be undertaken in collaboration with the technical authority at the Royal Signals and Radar Establishment, Malvern. A prototype system, which has become known as TUTOR, was scheduled for delivery to the client later in 1985. Initially, and for…

  16. Developing an Intelligent Language Tutor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heift, Trude

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the development and functionalities of an intelligent computer-assisted language learning (ICALL) system. By way of example, we describe "E-Tutor", an ICALL system for L2 learners of German that has been in use for a decade. Based on advancements in technology, user studies with L2 learners of German as well as feedback…

  17. Peer-Tutoring: Toward a New Model. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartner, Audrey; Riessman, Frank

    The literature on peer tutoring indicates that gains for tutors often outdistance those of the students receiving help. Learning through teaching is a significant mechanism that provides an opportunity to reformulate and extend the use of peer tutoring. This digest discusses a new tutor-centered, peer tutoring model being designed at the Peer…

  18. Conversations with AutoTutor Help Students Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graesser, Arthur C.

    2016-01-01

    AutoTutor helps students learn by holding a conversation in natural language. AutoTutor is adaptive to the learners' actions, verbal contributions, and in some systems their emotions. Many of AutoTutor's conversation patterns simulate human tutoring, but other patterns implement ideal pedagogies that open the door to computer tutors eclipsing…

  19. Early Bird Gymnastics Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Gary K.

    1979-01-01

    This article describes procedures for setting up a before- or after-school gymnastics program based on three principles: basic skills and safety rules; orientation to the physical setup and a demonstration of spotting techniques; and rewarding students. (JMF)

  20. Understanding the Impact of Intelligent Tutoring Agents on Real-Time Training Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Dr. Sottilare is a graduate of the Advanced Program Managers Course at the Defense Systems Management College at Ft. Belvoir, Virginia and his...2008). Human tutors are devoted to learners’ motivation goals as much as their cognitive and informational goals (Lepper & Hodell, 1989; Woolf ...making and memorization ( Woolf , et al, 2009), human tutors rely on understanding both the learner’s initial/real-time cognitive competency and the