Science.gov

Sample records for aftershock decay rates

  1. Aftershock Decay Rates in the Iranian Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ommi, S.; Zafarani, H.; Zare, M.

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by the desire to have more information following the occurrence of damaging events, the main purpose of this article is to study aftershock sequence parameters in the Iranian plateau. To this end, the catalogue of the Iranian earthquakes between 2002 to the end of 2013 has been collected and homogenized among which 15 earthquakes have been selected to study their aftershock decay rates. For different tectonic provinces, the completeness magnitudes ( M c) of the earthquake catalogue have been calculated in different time intervals. Also, the M c variability in spatial and temporal windows has been determined for each selected event. For major Iranian earthquakes, catalogue of aftershocks has been collected thanks to three declustering methods: first, the classical windowing method of Gardner and Knopoff (Bull Seismol Soc Am 64:1363-1367, 1974); second, a modified version of this using spatial windowing based on the Wells and Coppersmith (Bull Seismol Soc Am 84:974-1002, 1994) relations; and third, the Burkhard and Grünthal (Swiss J Geosci 102:149-188, 2009) scheme. Effects of the temporal windows also have been investigated using the time periods of 1 month, 100 days, and 1 year in the declustering method of Gardner and Knopoff (Bull Seismol Soc Am 64:1363-1367, 1974). In the next step, the modified Omori law coefficients have been calculated for the 15 selected earthquakes. The calibrated regional generic model describing the temporal and magnitude distribution of aftershocks is of interest for time-dependent seismic hazard forecasts. The regional characteristics of the aftershock decay rates have been studied for the selected Iranian earthquakes in the Alborz, Zagros and Central Iran regions considering their different seismotectonics regimes. However, due to the lack of sufficient data, no results have been reported for the Kopeh-Dagh and Makran seismotectonic regions.

  2. Aftershock Decay Rates in the Iranian Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ommi, S.; Zafarani, H.; Zare, M.

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by the desire to have more information following the occurrence of damaging events, the main purpose of this article is to study aftershock sequence parameters in the Iranian plateau. To this end, the catalogue of the Iranian earthquakes between 2002 to the end of 2013 has been collected and homogenized among which 15 earthquakes have been selected to study their aftershock decay rates. For different tectonic provinces, the completeness magnitudes (M c) of the earthquake catalogue have been calculated in different time intervals. Also, the M c variability in spatial and temporal windows has been determined for each selected event. For major Iranian earthquakes, catalogue of aftershocks has been collected thanks to three declustering methods: first, the classical windowing method of uc(Gardner) and uc(Knopoff) (Bull Seismol Soc Am 64:1363-1367, 1974); second, a modified version of this using spatial windowing based on the uc(Wells) and uc(Coppersmith) (Bull Seismol Soc Am 84:974-1002, 1994) relations; and third, the uc(Burkhard) and uc(Grünthal) (Swiss J Geosci 102:149-188, 2009) scheme. Effects of the temporal windows also have been investigated using the time periods of 1 month, 100 days, and 1 year in the declustering method of uc(Gardner) and uc(Knopoff) (Bull Seismol Soc Am 64:1363-1367, 1974). In the next step, the modified Omori law coefficients have been calculated for the 15 selected earthquakes. The calibrated regional generic model describing the temporal and magnitude distribution of aftershocks is of interest for time-dependent seismic hazard forecasts. The regional characteristics of the aftershock decay rates have been studied for the selected Iranian earthquakes in the Alborz, Zagros and Central Iran regions considering their different seismotectonics regimes. However, due to the lack of sufficient data, no results have been reported for the Kopeh-Dagh and Makran seismotectonic regions.

  3. Statistical properties of aftershock rate decay: Implications for the assessment of continuing activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamaki, Aggeliki; Papadimitriou, Eleftheria; Tsaklidis, George; Karakostas, Vassilios

    2011-08-01

    Aftershock rates seem to follow a power law decay, but the assessment of the aftershock frequency immediately after an earthquake, as well as during the evolution of a seismic excitation remains a demand for the imminent seismic hazard. The purpose of this work is to study the temporal distribution of triggered earthquakes in short time scales following a strong event, and thus a multiple seismic sequence was chosen for this purpose. Statistical models are applied to the 1981 Corinth Gulf sequence, comprising three strong (M = 6.7, M = 6.5, and M = 6.3) events between 24 February and 4 March. The non-homogeneous Poisson process outperforms the simple Poisson process in order to model the aftershock sequence, whereas the Weibull process is more appropriate to capture the features of the short-term behavior, but not the most proper for describing the seismicity in long term. The aftershock data defines a smooth curve of the declining rate and a long-tail theoretical model is more appropriate to fit the data than a rapidly declining exponential function, as supported by the quantitative results derived from the survival function. An autoregressive model is also applied to the seismic sequence, shedding more light on the stationarity of the time series.

  4. Aftershock production rate of driven viscoelastic interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagla, E. A.

    2014-10-01

    We study analytically and by numerical simulations the statistics of the aftershocks generated after large avalanches in models of interface depinning that include viscoelastic relaxation effects. We find in all the analyzed cases that the decay law of aftershocks with time can be understood by considering the typical roughness of the interface and its evolution due to relaxation. In models where there is a single viscoelastic relaxation time there is an exponential decay of the number of aftershocks with time. In models in which viscoelastic relaxation is wave-vector dependent we typically find a power-law dependence of the decay rate that is compatible with the Omori law. The factors that determine the value of the decay exponent are analyzed.

  5. Aftershock production rate of driven viscoelastic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Jagla, E A

    2014-10-01

    We study analytically and by numerical simulations the statistics of the aftershocks generated after large avalanches in models of interface depinning that include viscoelastic relaxation effects. We find in all the analyzed cases that the decay law of aftershocks with time can be understood by considering the typical roughness of the interface and its evolution due to relaxation. In models where there is a single viscoelastic relaxation time there is an exponential decay of the number of aftershocks with time. In models in which viscoelastic relaxation is wave-vector dependent we typically find a power-law dependence of the decay rate that is compatible with the Omori law. The factors that determine the value of the decay exponent are analyzed. PMID:25375460

  6. Do aftershock probabilities decay with time?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michael, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    So, do aftershock probabilities decay with time? Consider a thought experiment in which we are at the time of the mainshock and ask how many aftershocks will occur a day, week, month, year, or even a century from now. First we must decide how large a window to use around each point in time. Let's assume that, as we go further into the future, we are asking a less precise question. Perhaps a day from now means 1 day 10% of a day, a week from now means 1 week 10% of a week, and so on. If we ignore c because it is a small fraction of a day (e.g., Reasenberg and Jones, 1989, hereafter RJ89), and set p = 1 because it is usually close to 1 (its value in the original Omori law), then the rate of earthquakes (K=t) decays at 1=t. If the length of the windows being considered increases proportionally to t, then the number of earthquakes at any time from now is the same because the rate decrease is canceled by the increase in the window duration. Under these conditions we should never think "It's a bit late for this to be an aftershock."

  7. Regional stressing rate appears to control duration and decay of off-fault aftershocks in the 2011 M=9.0 Tohoku-oki, Japan, earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, S.; Stein, R. S.

    2013-12-01

    The 11 March 2001 M=9.0 Tohoku-oki, Japan, earthquake brought the unprecedented broad increase in seismicity over inland Japan and far offshore. The seismicity rate increase was observed at distances of up to 425 km from the locus of high seismic slip on the megathrust, which roughly corresponds to the areas over 0.1 bar Coulomb stress increase (e.g., Toda et al., 2011). Such stress perturbation in the entire eastern Honshu island gives us a great opportunity to test one of the hypotheses in rate and state friction of Dieterich (1994): aftershock duration (ta) is inversely proportional to fault stressing rate. The Tohoku-oki mainshock indeed started a stopwatch simultaneously for all the off-fault and on-fault aftershocks in various tectonic situations. We have carefully examined the aftershock decays fitting the Omori-Utsu formula in several activated regions, including on the 2011 source fault, several inland areas of Tohoku (Akita, Iwaki, northern Sendai, and Fukushima), Tokyo metropolitan area, Choshi (east of Tokyo), Izu Peninsula, and areas along the most active Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line (ISTL) central Honshu. Comparing the regional aftershock decays with the background rates of seismicity estimated from the JMA catalog from 2000 to 2010, we measured ta. One of the extreme short duration was measured at the Izu Peninsula where the heightened seismicity was rapidly toned down to the normal in one month. Overall seismicity in the Tohoku mainshock zone has been mostly closing to normal in 2 - 3 years. Both regions are characterized by high loading rate due to plate collision and subduction. Seismicity beneath Tokyo, also characterized by complex plate interfaces and brought average 1 bar closer to failure, has not followed the simple Omori decay but being settled a new higher rate after a rapid decay. In contrast to these highly deformed regions, current seismicity in slowly loading Tohoku inland regions are still much higher than background rate, which

  8. Self-similar aftershock rates.

    PubMed

    Davidsen, Jörn; Baiesi, Marco

    2016-08-01

    In many important systems exhibiting crackling noise-an intermittent avalanchelike relaxation response with power-law and, thus, self-similar distributed event sizes-the "laws" for the rate of activity after large events are not consistent with the overall self-similar behavior expected on theoretical grounds. This is particularly true for the case of seismicity, and a satisfying solution to this paradox has remained outstanding. Here, we propose a generalized description of the aftershock rates which is both self-similar and consistent with all other known self-similar features. Comparing our theoretical predictions with high-resolution earthquake data from Southern California we find excellent agreement, providing particularly clear evidence for a unified description of aftershocks and foreshocks. This may offer an improved framework for time-dependent seismic hazard assessment and earthquake forecasting. PMID:27627324

  9. Decay of aftershock density with distance indicates triggering by dynamic stress.

    PubMed

    Felzer, K R; Brodsky, E E

    2006-06-01

    The majority of earthquakes are aftershocks, yet aftershock physics is not well understood. Many studies suggest that static stress changes trigger aftershocks, but recent work suggests that shaking (dynamic stresses) may also play a role. Here we measure the decay of aftershocks as a function of distance from magnitude 2-6 mainshocks in order to clarify the aftershock triggering process. We find that for short times after the mainshock, when low background seismicity rates allow for good aftershock detection, the decay is well fitted by a single inverse power law over distances of 0.2-50 km. The consistency of the trend indicates that the same triggering mechanism is working over the entire range. As static stress changes at the more distant aftershocks are negligible, this suggests that dynamic stresses may be triggering all of these aftershocks. We infer that the observed aftershock density is consistent with the probability of triggering aftershocks being nearly proportional to seismic wave amplitude. The data are not fitted well by models that combine static stress change with the evolution of frictionally locked faults. PMID:16760974

  10. Decay of aftershock density with distance indicates triggering by dynamic stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Felzer, K.R.; Brodsky, E.E.

    2006-01-01

    The majority of earthquakes are aftershocks, yet aftershock physics is not well understood. Many studies suggest that static stress changes trigger aftershocks, but recent work suggests that shaking (dynamic stresses) may also play a role. Here we measure the decay of aftershocks as a function of distance from magnitude 2-6 mainshocks in order to clarify the aftershock triggering process. We find that for short times after the mainshock, when low background seismicity rates allow for good aftershock detection, the decay is well fitted by a single inverse power law over distances of 0.2-50 km. The consistency of the trend indicates that the same triggering mechanism is working over the entire range. As static stress changes at the more distant aftershocks are negligible, this suggests that dynamic stresses may be triggering all of these aftershocks. We infer that the observed aftershock density is consistent with the probability of triggering aftershocks being nearly proportional to seismic wave amplitude. The data are not fitted well by models that combine static stress change with the evolution of frictionally locked faults. ?? 2006 Nature Publishing Group.

  11. Modeling of Kashmir Aftershock Decay Based on Static Coulomb Stress Changes and Laboratory-Derived Rate-and-State Dependent Friction Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javed, F.; Hainzl, S.; Aoudia, A.; Qaisar, M.

    2016-05-01

    We model the spatial and temporal evolution of October 8, 2005 Kashmir earthquake's aftershock activity using the rate-and-state dependent friction model incorporating uncertainties in computed coseismic stress perturbations. We estimated the best possible value for frictional resistance " Aσ n", background seismicity rate " r" and coefficient of stress variation "CV" using maximum log-likelihood method. For the whole Kashmir earthquake sequence, we measure a frictional resistance Aσ n ~ 0.0185 MPa, r ~ 20 M3.7+ events/year and CV = 0.94 ± 0.01. The spatial and temporal forecasted seismicity rate of modeled aftershocks fits well with the spatial and temporal distribution of observed aftershocks that occurred in the regions with positive static stress changes as well as in the apparent stress shadow region. To quantify the effect of secondary aftershock triggering, we have re-run the estimations for 100 stochastically declustered catalogs showing that the effect of aftershock-induced secondary stress changes is obviously minor compared to the overall uncertainties, and that the stress variability related to uncertain slip model inversions and receiver mechanisms remains the major factor to provide a reasonable data fit.

  12. When and where the aftershock activity was depressed: Contrasting decay patterns of the proximate large earthquakes in southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ogata, Y.; Jones, L.M.; Toda, S.

    2003-01-01

    Seismic quiescence has attracted attention as a possible precursor to a large earthquake. However, sensitive detection of quiescence requires accurate modeling of normal aftershock activity. We apply the epidemic-type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model that is a natural extension of the modified Omori formula for aftershock decay, allowing further clusters (secondary aftershocks) within an aftershock sequence. The Hector Mine aftershock activity has been normal, relative to the decay predicted by the ETAS model during the 14 months of available data. In contrast, although the aftershock sequence of the 1992 Landers earthquake (M = 7.3), including the 1992 Big Bear earthquake (M = 6.4) and its aftershocks, fits very well to the ETAS up until about 6 months after the main shock, the activity showed clear lowering relative to the modeled rate (relative quiescence) and lasted nearly 7 years, leading up to the Hector Mine earthquake (M = 7.1) in 1999. Specifically, the relative quiescence occurred only in the shallow aftershock activity, down to depths of 5-6 km. The sequence of deeper events showed clear, normal aftershock activity well fitted to the ETAS throughout the whole period. We argue several physical explanations for these results. Among them, we strongly suspect aseismic slips within the Hector Mine rupture source that could inhibit the crustal relaxation process within "shadow zones" of the Coulomb's failure stress change. Furthermore, the aftershock activity of the 1992 Joshua Tree earthquake (M = 6.1) sharply lowered in the same day of the main shock, which can be explained by a similar scenario.

  13. Static stress triggering explains the empirical aftershock distance decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hainzl, Sebastian; Moradpour, Javad; Davidsen, Jörn

    2014-12-01

    The shape of the spatial aftershock decay is sensitive to the triggering mechanism and thus particularly useful for discriminating between static and dynamic stress triggering. For California seismicity, it has been recently recognized that its form is more complicated than typically assumed consisting of three different regimes with transitions at the scale of the rupture length and the thickness of the crust. The intermediate distance range is characterized by a relative small decay exponent of 1.35 previously declared to relate to dynamic stress triggering. We perform comprehensive simulations of a simple clock-advance model, in which the number of aftershocks is just proportional to the Coulomb-stress change, to test whether the empirical result can be explained by static stress triggering. Similarly to the observations, the results show three scaling regimes. For simulations adapted to the depths and focal mechanisms observed in California, we find a remarkable agreement with the observation over the whole distance range for a fault distribution with fractal dimension of 1.8, which is shown to be in good agreement with an independent analysis of California seismicity.

  14. Aftershock triggering by postseismic stresses: A study based on Coulomb rate-and-state models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattania, Camilla; Hainzl, Sebastian; Wang, Lifeng; Enescu, Bogdan; Roth, Frank

    2015-04-01

    The spatiotemporal clustering of earthquakes is a feature of medium- and short-term seismicity, indicating that earthquakes interact. However, controversy exists about the physical mechanism behind aftershock triggering: static stress transfer and reloading by postseismic processes have been proposed as explanations. In this work, we use a Coulomb rate-and-state model to study the role of coseismic and postseismic stress changes on aftershocks and focus on two processes: creep on the main shock fault plane (afterslip) and secondary aftershock triggering by previous aftershocks. We model the seismic response to Coulomb stress changes using the Dieterich constitutive law and focus on two events: the Parkfield, Mw = 6.0, and the Tohoku, Mw = 9.0, earthquakes. We find that modeling secondary triggering systematically improves the maximum log likelihood fit of the sequences. The effect of afterslip is more subtle and difficult to assess for near-fault events, where model errors are largest. More robust conclusions can be drawn for off-fault aftershocks: following the Tohoku earthquake, afterslip promotes shallow crustal seismicity in the Fukushima region. Simple geometrical considerations indicate that afterslip-induced stress changes may have been significant on trench parallel crustal fault systems following several of the largest recorded subduction earthquakes. Moreover, the time dependence of afterslip strongly enhances its triggering potential: seismicity triggered by an instantaneous stress change decays more quickly than seismicity triggered by gradual loading, and as a result we find afterslip to be particularly important between few weeks and few months after the main shock.

  15. Decay of aftershock density with distance does not indicate triggering by dynamic stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richards-Dinger, K.; Stein, R.S.; Toda, S.

    2010-01-01

    Resolving whether static or dynamic stress triggers most aftershocks and subsequent mainshocks is essential to understand earthquake interaction and to forecast seismic hazard. Felzer and Brodsky examined the distance distribution of earthquakes occurring in the first five minutes after 2 ≤ M  M  M ≥ 2 aftershocks showed a uniform power-law decay with slope −1.35 out to 50 km from the mainshocks. From this they argued that the distance decay could be explained only by dynamic triggering. Here we propose an alternative explanation for the decay, and subject their hypothesis to a series of tests, none of which it passes. At distances more than 300 m from the 2 ≤  M< 3 mainshocks, the seismicity decay 5 min before the mainshocks is indistinguishable from the decay five minutes afterwards, indicating that the mainshocks have no effect at distances outside their static triggering range. Omori temporal decay, the fundamental signature of aftershocks, is absent at distances exceeding 10 km from the mainshocks. Finally, the distance decay is found among aftershocks that occur before the arrival of the seismic wave front from the mainshock, which violates causality. We argue that Felzer and Brodsky implicitly assume that the first of two independent aftershocks along a fault rupture triggers the second, and that the first of two shocks in a creep- or intrusion-driven swarm triggers the second, when this need not be the case.

  16. Decay of aftershock density with distance does not indicate triggering by dynamic stress.

    PubMed

    Richards-Dinger, Keith; Stein, Ross S; Toda, Shinji

    2010-09-30

    Resolving whether static or dynamic stress triggers most aftershocks and subsequent mainshocks is essential to understand earthquake interaction and to forecast seismic hazard. Felzer and Brodsky examined the distance distribution of earthquakes occurring in the first five minutes after 2 ≤ M < 3 and 3 ≤ M < 4 mainshocks and found that their magnitude M ≥ 2 aftershocks showed a uniform power-law decay with slope -1.35 out to 50 km from the mainshocks. From this they argued that the distance decay could be explained only by dynamic triggering. Here we propose an alternative explanation for the decay, and subject their hypothesis to a series of tests, none of which it passes. At distances more than 300 m from the 2 ≤ M < 3 mainshocks, the seismicity decay 5 min before the mainshocks is indistinguishable from the decay five minutes afterwards, indicating that the mainshocks have no effect at distances outside their static triggering range. Omori temporal decay, the fundamental signature of aftershocks, is absent at distances exceeding 10 km from the mainshocks. Finally, the distance decay is found among aftershocks that occur before the arrival of the seismic wave front from the mainshock, which violates causality. We argue that Felzer and Brodsky implicitly assume that the first of two independent aftershocks along a fault rupture triggers the second, and that the first of two shocks in a creep- or intrusion-driven swarm triggers the second, when this need not be the case. PMID:20882015

  17. Global Omori law decay of triggered earthquakes: Large aftershocks outside the classical aftershock zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.

    2002-01-01

    Triggered earthquakes can be large, damaging, and lethal as evidenced by the 1999 shocks in Turkey and the 2001 earthquakes in El Salvador. In this study, earthquakes with Ms ??? 7.0 from the Harvard centroid moment tensor (CMT) catalog are modeled as dislocations to calculate shear stress changes on subsequent earthquake rupture planes near enough to be affected. About 61% of earthquakes that occured near (defined as having shear stress change ???????? ??? 0.01 MPa) the Ms ??? 7.0 shocks are associated with calculated shear stress increases, while ???39% are associated with shear stress decreases. If earthquakes associated with calculated shear stress increases are interpreted as triggered, then such events make up at least 8% of the CMT catalog. Globally, these triggered earthquakes obey an Omori law rate decay that lasts between ???7-11 years after the main shock. Earthquakes associated with calculated shear stress increases occur at higher rates than background up to 240 km away from the main shock centroid. Omori's law is one of the few time-predictable patterns evident in the global occurrence of earthquakes. If large triggered earthquakes habitually obey Omori's law, then their hazard can be more readily assessed. The characteristics rate change with time and spatial distribution can be used to rapidly assess the likelihood of triggered earthquakes following events of Ms ??? 7.0. I show an example application to the M = 7.7 13 January 2001 El Salvador earthquake where use of global statistics appears to provide a better rapid hazard estimate than Coulomb stress change calculations.

  18. Global Omori law decay of triggered earthquakes: large aftershocks outside the classical aftershock zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Triggered earthquakes can be large, damaging, and lethal as evidenced by the 1999 shocks in Turkey and the 2001 earthquakes in El Salvador. In this study, earthquakes with Ms ≥ 7.0 from the Harvard centroid moment tensor (CMT) catalog are modeled as dislocations to calculate shear stress changes on subsequent earthquake rupture planes near enough to be affected. About 61% of earthquakes that occurred near (defined as having shear stress change ∣Δτ∣ ≥ 0.01 MPa) the Ms ≥ 7.0 shocks are associated with calculated shear stress increases, while ∼39% are associated with shear stress decreases. If earthquakes associated with calculated shear stress increases are interpreted as triggered, then such events make up at least 8% of the CMT catalog. Globally, these triggered earthquakes obey an Omori law rate decay that lasts between ∼7–11 years after the main shock. Earthquakes associated with calculated shear stress increases occur at higher rates than background up to 240 km away from the main shock centroid. Omori's law is one of the few time-predictable patterns evident in the global occurrence of earthquakes. If large triggered earthquakes habitually obey Omori's law, then their hazard can be more readily assessed. The characteristic rate change with time and spatial distribution can be used to rapidly assess the likelihood of triggered earthquakes following events of Ms ≥ 7.0. I show an example application to the M = 7.7 13 January 2001 El Salvador earthquake where use of global statistics appears to provide a better rapid hazard estimate than Coulomb stress change calculations.

  19. Global Omori law decay of triggered earthquakes: Large aftershocks outside the classical aftershock zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Tom

    2002-09-01

    Triggered earthquakes can be large, damaging, and lethal as evidenced by the1999 shocks in Turkey and the 2001 earthquakes in El Salvador. In this study, earthquakes with Ms ≥ 7.0 from the Harvard centroid moment tensor (CMT) catalog are modeled as dislocations to calculate shear stress changes on subsequent earthquake rupture planes near enough to be affected. About 61% of earthquakes that occurred near (defined as having shear stress change ∣Δτ∣ ≥ 0.01 MPa) the Ms ≥ 7.0 shocks are associated with calculated shear stress increases, while ˜39% are associated with shear stress decreases. If earthquakes associated with calculated shear stress increases are interpreted as triggered, then such events make up at least 8% of the CMT catalog. Globally, these triggered earthquakes obey an Omori law rate decay that lasts between ˜7-11 years after the main shock. Earthquakes associated with calculated shear stress increases occur at higher rates than background up to 240 km away from the main shock centroid. Omori's law is one of the few time-predictable patterns evident in the global occurrence of earthquakes. If large triggered earthquakes habitually obey Omori's law, then their hazard can be more readily assessed. The characteristic rate change with time and spatial distribution can be used to rapidly assess the likelihood of triggered earthquakes following events of Ms ≥ 7.0. I show an example application to the M = 7.7 13 January 2001 El Salvador earthquake where use of global statistics appears to provide a better rapid hazard estimate than Coulomb stress change calculations.

  20. Implications of Secondary Aftershocks for Failure Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, S. J.

    2001-12-01

    When a seismic sequence with more than one mainshock or an unusually large aftershock occurs, there is a compound aftershock sequence. The secondary aftershocks need not have exactly the same decay as the primary sequence, with the differences having implications for the failure process. When the stress step from the secondary mainshock is positive but not large enough to cause immediate failure of all the remaining primary aftershocks, failure processes which involve accelerating slip will produce secondary aftershocks that decay more rapidly than primary aftershocks. This is because the primary aftershocks are an accelerated version of the background seismicity, and secondary aftershocks are an accelerated version of the primary aftershocks. Real stress perturbations may be negative, and heterogeneities in mainshock stress fields mean that the real world situation is quite complicated. I will first describe and verify my picture of secondary aftershock decay with reference to a simple numerical model of slipping faults which obeys rate and state dependent friction and lacks stress heterogeneity. With such a model, it is possible to generate secondary aftershock sequences with perturbed decay patterns, quantify those patterns, and develop an analysis technique capable of correcting for the effect in real data. The secondary aftershocks are defined in terms of frequency linearized time s(T), which is equal to the number of primary aftershocks expected by a time T, $ s ≡ ∫ t=0T n(t) dt, where the start time t=0 is the time of the primary aftershock, and the primary aftershock decay function n(t) is extrapolated forward to the times of the secondary aftershocks. In the absence of secondary sequences the function s(T)$ re-scales the time so that approximately one event occurs per new time unit; the aftershock sequence is gone. If this rescaling is applied in the presence of a secondary sequence, the secondary sequence is shaped like a primary aftershock sequence

  1. Can current New Madrid seismicity be explained as a decaying aftershock sequence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, M. T.; Hough, S. E.; Felzer, K. R.

    2012-12-01

    It has been suggested that continuing seismicity in the New Madrid, central U.S. region is primarily composed of the continuing long-lived aftershock sequence of the 1811-1812 sequence, and thus cannot be taken as an indication of present-day strain accrual in the region. We examine historical and instrumental seismicity in the New Madrid region to determine if such a model is feasible given 1) the observed protracted nature of past New Madrid sequences, with multiple mainshocks with apparently similar magnitudes; 2) the rate of historically documented early aftershocks from the 1811-1812 sequence; and 3) plausible mainshock magnitudes and aftershock-productivity parameters. We use ETAS modeling to search for sub-critical sets of direct Omori parameters that are consistent with all of these datasets, given a realistic consideration of their uncertainties, and current seismicity in the region. The results of this work will help to determine whether or not future sequences are likely to be clusters of events like those in the past, a key issue for earthquake response planning.

  2. Insights on earthquake triggering processes from early aftershocks of repeating microearthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengliné, O.; Ampuero, J.-P.

    2015-10-01

    Characterizing the evolution of seismicity rate of early aftershocks can yield important information about earthquake nucleation and triggering. However, this task is challenging because early aftershock seismic signals are obscured by those of the mainshock. Previous studies of early aftershocks employed high-pass filtering and template matching but had limited performance and completeness at very short times. Here we take advantage of repeating events previously identified on the San Andreas Fault at Parkfield and apply empirical Green's function deconvolution techniques. Both Landweber and sparse deconvolution methods reveal the occurrence of aftershocks as early as few tenths of a second after the mainshock. These events occur close to their mainshock, within one to two rupture lengths away. The aftershock rate derived from this enhanced catalog is consistent with Omori's law, with no flattening of the aftershock rate down to the shortest resolvable timescale ˜0.3 s. The early aftershock rate decay determined here matches seamlessly the decay at later times derived from the original earthquake catalog, yielding a continuous aftershock decay over timescales spanning nearly 8 orders of magnitude. Aftershocks of repeating microearthquakes may hence be governed by the same mechanisms from the earliest time resolved here, up to the end of the aftershock sequence. Our results suggest that these early aftershocks are triggered by relatively large stress perturbations, possibly induced by aseismic afterslip with very short characteristic time. Consistent with previous observations on bimaterial faults, the relative location of early aftershocks shows asymmetry along strike, persistent over long periods.

  3. Model for the Distribution of Aftershock Interoccurrence Times

    SciTech Connect

    Shcherbakov, Robert; Yakovlev, Gleb; Rundle, John B.; Turcotte, Donald L.

    2005-11-18

    In this work the distribution of interoccurrence times between earthquakes in aftershock sequences is analyzed and a model based on a nonhomogeneous Poisson (NHP) process is proposed to quantify the observed scaling. In this model the generalized Omori's law for the decay of aftershocks is used as a time-dependent rate in the NHP process. The analytically derived distribution of interoccurrence times is applied to several major aftershock sequences in California to confirm the validity of the proposed hypothesis.

  4. Stress evolution following the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, earthquake: Consequences for afterslip, relaxation, aftershocks and departures from Omori decay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chan, C.-H.; Stein, R.S.

    2009-01-01

    We explore how Coulomb stress transfer and viscoelastic relaxation control afterslip and aftershocks in a continental thrust fault system. The 1999 September 21 Mw = 7.6 Chi-Chi shock is typical of continental ramp-d??collement systems throughout the world, and so inferences drawn from this uniquely well-recorded event may be widely applicable. First, we find that the spatial and depth distribution of aftershocks and their focal mechanisms are consistent with the calculated Coulomb stress changes imparted by the coseismic rupture. Some 61 per cent of the M ??? 2 aftershocks and 83 per cent of the M ??? 4 aftershocks lie in regions for which the Coulomb stress increased by ???0.1 bars, and there is a 11-12 per cent gain in the percentage of aftershocks nodal planes on which the shear stress increased over the pre-Chi Chi control period. Second, we find that afterslip occurred where the calculated coseismic stress increased on the fault ramp and d??collement, subject to the condition that friction is high on the ramp and low on the d??collement. Third, viscoelastic relaxation is evident from the fit of the post-seismic GPS data on the footwall. Fourth, we find that the rate of seismicity began to increase during the post-seismic period in an annulus extending east of the main rupture. The spatial extent of the seismicity annulus resembles the calculated ???0.05-bar Coulomb stress increase caused by viscoelastic relaxation and afterslip, and we find a 9-12 per cent gain in the percentage of focal mechanisms with >0.01-bar shear stress increases imparted by the post-seismic afterslip and relaxation in comparison to the control period. Thus, we argue that post-seismic stress changes can for the first time be shown to alter the production of aftershocks, as judged by their rate, spatial distribution, and focal mechanisms. ?? Journal compilation ?? 2009 RAS.

  5. Modeling aftershocks as a stretched exponential relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignan, A.

    2015-11-01

    The decay rate of aftershocks has been modeled as a power law since the pioneering work of Omori in the late nineteenth century. Although other expressions have been proposed in recent decades to describe the temporal behavior of aftershocks, the number of model comparisons remains limited. After reviewing the aftershock models published from the late nineteenth century until today, I solely compare the power law, pure exponential and stretched exponential expressions defined in their simplest forms. By applying statistical methods recommended recently in applied mathematics, I show that all aftershock sequences tested in three regional earthquake catalogs (Southern and Northern California, Taiwan) and with three declustering techniques (nearest-neighbor, second-order moment, window methods) follow a stretched exponential instead of a power law. These results infer that aftershocks are due to a simple relaxation process, in accordance with most other relaxation processes observed in Nature.

  6. A generalized law for aftershock rates in a damage rheology model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Zion, Y.; Lyakhovsky, V.

    2003-12-01

    Aftershocks are the response of a damaged rock surrounding large earthquake ruptures to the stress perturbations produced by the large events. Lyakhovsky et al. [JGR, 1997] developed a damage rheology model that provides a quantitative treatment for macroscopic effects of evolving distributed cracking with local density represented by a state variable a. The equation for damage evolution, based on the balance equations of energy and entropy and generalization of linear elasticity, accounts for both degradation and healing as a function of the existing strain tensor and material properties that may be constrained by lab data (rate coefficients and ratio of strain invariants separating states of degradation and healing). Analyses of stress-strain and acoustic emission laboratory data during deformation leading to brittle failure indicate further [Liu et al., AGU, F01; Hamiel et al., this meeting] that the fit between model predictions and observations improves if we also incorporate gradual accumulation of a non-reversible deformation with a rate proportional to the rate of damage increase. For analysis of aftershocks, we consider the relaxation process of a material following the application of a strain step associated with the occurrence of a mainshock. The coupled differential equations governing the damage evolution and stress relaxation can be written in non-dimensional form by scaling the elastic stress to its initial value and the time to characteristic time of damage evolution td. With this, the system behavior is controlled by a single non-dimensional ratio R = td/tM representing the ratio between the damage time scale to the Maxwell relaxation time tM. For very small R there is no relaxation and the response consists of constant rate of damage increase until failure. For very large R there is rapid relaxation without significant change to the level of damage. For intermediate cases the equations are strongly coupled and nonlinear. The analytical solution

  7. Sensitivity study of forecasted aftershock seismicity based on Coulomb stress calculation and rate- and state-dependent frictional response (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocco, M.; Hainzl, S.; Woessner, J.; Enescu, B.; Catalli, F.; Lombardi, A.

    2009-12-01

    space. Second, we demonstrate that all model parameters are strongly correlated for physical and statistical reasons. We discuss this correlation emphasizing that the estimations of the background seismicity rate, stressing rate and Aσ parameter are strongly correlated to reproduce the observed aftershock productivity. Our results demonstrate the impact of these model parameters on the Omori-like aftershock decay (the c-value and the productivity of the Omori law), implying a p-value smaller or equal to 1. Finally, we discuss an optimal strategy to constrain model parameters for near-real time forecasts. Our case studies demonstrate that accounting for realistic uncertainties in stress changes as well as for the correlation among model parameters strongly improves the forecasting performances, although the original deterministic approach is converted into a statistical method.

  8. Early aftershock statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narteau, C.; Shebalin, P.; Holschneider, M.; Schorlemmer, D.

    2009-04-01

    In the Limited Power Law model (LPL) we consider that after a triggering event - the so-called mainshock - rocks subject to sufficiently large differential stress can fail spontaneously by static fatigue. Then, earlier aftershocks occur in zones of highest stress and the c-value, i.e. the delay before the onset of the power-law aftershock decay rate, depends on the amplitude of the stress perturbation in the aftershock zone. If we assume that this stress perturbation is proportional to the absolute level of stress in the area, the model also predicts that shorter delay occur in zones of higher stress. Here, we present two analyses that support such a prediction. In these analyses, we use only aftershocks of 2.5 < M < 4.5 earthquakes to avoid well-known artifacts resulting from overlapping records. First, we analyze the c-value across different types of faulting in southern California to compare with the differential shear stress predicted by a Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion. As expected, we find that the c-value is on average shorter for thrust earthquakes (high stress) than for normal ones (low stress), taking intermediate values for strike-slip earthquakes (intermediate stress). Second, we test the hypothesis that large earthquakes occur in zones where the level of stress is abnormally high. Instead of the c-value we use the < t >-value, the geometric average of early aftershock times. One more time, we observed that M > 5 earthquakes occur where and when the < t >-value is small. This effect is even stronger for M > 6 earthquakes.

  9. How Long is an Aftershock Sequence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godano, Cataldo; Tramelli, Anna

    2016-06-01

    The occurrence of a mainschok is always followed by aftershocks spatially distributed within the fault area. The aftershocks rate decay with time is described by the empirical Omori law which was inferred by catalogues analysis. The sequences discrimination within catalogues is not a straightforward operation, especially for low-magnitude mainshocks. Here, we describe the rate decay of the Omori law obtained using different sequence discrimination tools and we discover that, when the background seismicity is excluded, the sequences tend to last for the temporal extension of the catalogue.

  10. How Long is an Aftershock Sequence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godano, Cataldo; Tramelli, Anna

    2016-07-01

    The occurrence of a mainschok is always followed by aftershocks spatially distributed within the fault area. The aftershocks rate decay with time is described by the empirical Omori law which was inferred by catalogues analysis. The sequences discrimination within catalogues is not a straightforward operation, especially for low-magnitude mainshocks. Here, we describe the rate decay of the Omori law obtained using different sequence discrimination tools and we discover that, when the background seismicity is excluded, the sequences tend to last for the temporal extension of the catalogue.

  11. Correlation between the parameters of the aftershock rate equation: Implications for the forecasting of future sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasperini, Paolo; Lolli, Barbara

    2006-06-01

    We analyzed the correlations among the parameters of the Reasenberg and Jones [Reasenberg, P.A., Jones, L.M., 1989. Earthquake hazard after a mainshock in California, Science 243, 1173-1176] formula describing the aftershock rate after a mainshock as a function of time and magnitude, on the basis of parameter estimates made in previous works for New Zealand, Italy and California. For all of three datasets we found that the magnitude-independent productivity a is significantly correlated with the b-value of the Gutenberg-Richter law and, in some cases, with parameters p and c of the modified Omori's law. We also found significant correlations between p and c but, different from some previous works, not between p and b. We verified that assuming a coefficient for mainshock magnitude α ≈ 2/3 b (instead of b) removes the correlation between a and b and improves the ability to forecast the behavior of Italian sequences occurred from 1997 to 2003 on the basis of average parameters estimated from sequences occurred from 1981 to 1996. This assumption well agrees with direct α estimates made in the framework of an epidemic type model (ETAS) from the data of some large Italian sequences. Our results suggest a modification of the original Reasenberg and Jones (1989) formulation leading to predict lower rates (and probabilities) for stronger mainshocks and conversely higher rates for weaker ones. We also inferred that the correlation of a with p and c might be the consequence of the trade-off between the two parameters of the modified Omori's law. In this case the correlation can be partially removed by renormalizing the time-dependent part of the rate equation. Finally, the absence of correlation between p and b, observed for all the examined datasets, indicates that such correlation, previously inferred from theoretical considerations and empirical results in some regions, does not represent a common property of aftershock sequences in different part of the world.

  12. Forecasting magnitude, time, and location of aftershocks for aftershock hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K.; Tsai, Y.; Huang, M.; Chang, W.

    2011-12-01

    In this study we investigate the spatial and temporal seismicity parameters of the aftershock sequence accompanying the 17:47 20 September 1999 (UTC) 7.45 Chi-Chi earthquake Taiwan. Dividing the epicentral zone into north of the epicenter, at the epicenter, and south of the epicenter, it is found that immediately after the earthquake the area close by the epicenter had a lower value than both the northern and southern sections. This pattern suggests that at the time of the Chi-Chi earthquake, the area close by the epicenter remained prone to large magnitude aftershocks and strong shaking. However, with time the value increases. An increasing value indicates a reduced likelihood of large magnitude aftershocks. The study also shows that the value is higher at the southern section of the epicentral zone, indicating a faster rate of decay in this section. The primary purpose of this paper is to design a predictive model for forecasting the magnitude, time, and location of aftershocks to large earthquakes. The developed model is presented and applied to the 17:47 20 September 1999 7.45 Chi-Chi earthquake Taiwan, and the 09:32 5 November 2009 (UTC) Nantou 6.19, and 00:18 4 March 2010 (UTC) Jiashian 6.49 earthquake sequences. In addition, peak ground acceleration trends for the Nantou and Jiashian aftershock sequences are predicted and compared to actual trends. The results of the estimated peak ground acceleration are remarkably similar to calculations from recorded magnitudes in both trend and level. To improve the predictive skill of the model for occurrence time, we use an empirical relation to forecast the time of aftershocks. The empirical relation improves time prediction over that of random processes. The results will be of interest to seismic mitigation specialists and rescue crews. We apply also the parameters and empirical relation from Chi-Chi aftershocks of Taiwan to forecast aftershocks with magnitude M > 6.0 of 05:46 11 March 2011 (UTC) Tohoku 9

  13. Aftershocks triggered by fluid intrusion: Evidence for the aftershock sequence occurred 2014 in West Bohemia/Vogtland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hainzl, S.; Fischer, T.; Čermáková, H.; Bachura, M.; Vlček, J.

    2016-04-01

    The West Bohemia/Vogtland region, central Europe, is well known for its repeating swarm activity. However, the latest activity in 2014, although spatially overlapping with previous swarm activity, consisted of three classical aftershock sequences triggered by ML3.5, 4.4, and 3.5 events. To decode the apparent system change from swarm-type to mainshock-aftershock characteristics, we have analyzed the details of the major ML4.4 sequence based on focal mechanisms and relocated earthquake data. Our analysis shows that the mainshock occurred with rotated mechanism in a step over region of the fault plane, unfavorably oriented to the regional stress field. Most of its intense aftershock activity occurred in-plane with classical characteristics such as (i) the maximum magnitude of the aftershocks is significantly less than the mainshock magnitude and (ii) the decay can be well fitted by the Omori-Utsu law. However, the absolute number of aftershocks and the fitted Omori-Utsu c and p parameters are much larger than for typical sequences. By means of the epidemic-type aftershock sequence model, we show that an additional aseismic source with an exponentially decaying strength triggered a large fraction of the aftershocks. Corresponding pore pressure simulations with an exponentially decreasing flow rate of the fluid source show a good agreement with the observed spatial migration front of the aftershocks extending approximately with log(t). Thus, we conclude that the mainshock opened fluid pathways from a finite fluid source into the fault plane explaining the unusual high rate of aftershocks, the migration patterns, and the exponential decrease of the aseismic signal.

  14. Evolution of aftershock statistics with depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narteau, C.; Shebalin, P.; Holschneider, M.

    2013-12-01

    The deviatoric stress varies with depth and may strongly affect earthquake statistics. Nevertheless, if the Anderson faulting theory may be used to define the relative stress magnitudes, it remains extremely difficult to observe significant variations of earthquake properties from the top to the bottom of the seismogenic layer. Here, we concentrate on aftershock sequences in normal, strike-slip and reverse faulting regimes to isolate specific temporal properties of this major relaxation process with respect to depth. More exactly, we use Bayesian statistics of the Modified Omori Law to characterize the exponent p of the power-law aftershock decay rate and the duration c of the early stage of aftershock activity that does not fit with this power-law regime. Preliminary results show that the c-value decreases with depth without any significant variation of the p-value. Then, we infer the duration of a non power-law aftershock decay rate over short times can be related to the level of stress in the seismogenic crust.

  15. Leading aftershocks and cascades: two possible stress release processes after a main shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monterrubio, Marisol; Martinez, Maria-Dolors; Lana, Xavier

    2010-05-01

    Three series of aftershocks in Southern California, associated with the main shocks of Landers (1992), Northridge (1994) and Hector Mine (1999), are interpreted as the superposition of a lasting relaxation stress process and numerous short episodes of sudden stress release. The set of aftershocks belonging to the lasting process are designed as leading aftershocks and its rate decays with time, fitting well to the classical Omori's law. The remaining aftershocks are assigned to the different episodes characterised by sudden release of stresses, each of them being designed as a cascade. Cascades are characterised by four basic properties. First, the number of aftershocks belonging to a cascade is submitted to remarkable time fluctuations. Nevertheless, it is observed a positive trend in the number of aftershocks with respect to the elapsed time measured since the origin time of the main event. Second, the rate for aftershocks belonging to a cascade can be assumed constant. Third, a power law quantifies the rate for every cascade, with the elapsed time since the main event to the beginning of the cascade being the argument of this power law. Fourth, the validity of the Gutemberg-Richter law is preserved both for the set of leading aftershocks as for the set of tremors associated to cascades. Given that the number of available aftershocks for the three seismic crisis is very high (exceeding 10,000 tremors), a detailed analysis of cascades is available.

  16. What Controls the Duration of Aftershocks, and Why It Matters for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, R. S.; Toda, S.

    2014-12-01

    A fundamental problem confronting hazard modelers in slowly deforming regions such as the central and eastern United States, Australia, and inner Honshu, is whether the current seismicity represents the steady state earthquake potential, or is instead a decaying potential associated with past mainshocks. If the current seismicity were composed of long-lived aftershock sequences, it might then be anti-correlated with the next large earthquakes. While aftershock productivity is known to be a property of the mainshock magnitude, aftershock duration (the time until the aftershock rate decays to the pre-mainshock rate) should, according to rate/state friction theory of Dieterich[1994], be inversely proportional to the fault stressing rate. If so, slowly deforming regions would be expected to sustain long aftershock sequences. Most tests have supported the Dieterich hypothesis, but use ambiguous proxies for the fault stressing rate, such as the mainshock recurrence interval. Here we test the hypothesis by examining off-fault aftershocks of the 2011 M=9 Tohoku-oki rupture up to 250 km from the source, as well as near-fault aftershocks of six large Japanese mainshocks, sampling a range of receiver faults, from thrusts slipping 80 mm/yr, to normal faults slipping 0.1 mm/yr. We find that aftershock sequences lasted a month on the fastest-slipping faults, have durations of 10-100 years on faults slipping 1-10 mm/yr, and are projected to persist for at least 200 years on the slowest faults. Although the Omori decay exponent for short and long sequences is similar, the very different background rates account for the duration differences. If the stressing rate is generally proportional to fault slip rate, then aftershock durations indeed support the Dieterich hypothesis. The test means that the hazard associated with aftershocks depends on local tectonic conditions rather than on the mainshock magnitude alone. Because declustering approaches do not remove such long

  17. Nonlinear Viscoelastic Stress Transfer As a Possible Aftershock Triggering Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Shcherbakov, R.

    2014-12-01

    . The stress transfer function of linear viscoelasticity has an time-dependent exponential form, and the corresponding aftershock occurrence rate exhibits an exponential decay. The stress transfer function of nonlinear viscoelasticity has a time-dependent power-law form, this results in a power-law decay of the aftershock occurrence rate.

  18. Ratios of heavy hadron semileptonic decay rates

    SciTech Connect

    Gronau, Michael; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    2011-02-01

    Ratios of charmed meson and baryon semileptonic decay rates appear to be satisfactorily described by considering only the lowest-lying (S-wave) hadronic final states and assuming the kinematic factor describing phase space suppression is the same as that for free quarks. For example, the rate for D{sub s} semileptonic decay is known to be (17.0{+-}5.3)% lower than those for D{sup 0} or D{sup +}, and the model accounts for this difference. When applied to hadrons containing b quarks, this method implies that the B{sub s} semileptonic decay rate is about 1% higher than that of the nonstrange B mesons. This small difference thus suggests surprisingly good local quark-hadron duality for B semileptonic decays, complementing the expectation based on inclusive quark-hadron duality that these differences in rates should not exceed a few tenths of a percent. For {Lambda}{sub b} semileptonic decay, however, the inclusive rate is predicted to be about 13% greater than that of the nonstrange B mesons. This value, representing a considerable departure from a calculation using a heavy-quark expansion, is close to the corresponding experimental ratio {Gamma}({Lambda}{sub b})/{Gamma}(B)=1.13{+-}0.03 of total decay rates.

  19. Aftershock Statistics of the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan Earthquake and the Concept of Omori Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ya-Ting; Turcotte, Donald L.; Rundle, John B.; Chen, Chien-Chih

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we consider the statistics of the aftershock sequence of the m = 7.65 20 September 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan earthquake. We first consider the frequency-magnitude statistics. We find good agreement with Gutenberg-Richter scaling but find that the aftershock level is anomalously high. This level is quantified using the difference in magnitude between the main shock and the largest inferred aftershock {{Updelta}}m^{ *}. Typically, {{Updelta}}m^{ *} is in the range 0.8-1.5, but for the Chi-Chi earthquake the value is {{Updelta}}m^{ *} = 0.03. We suggest that this may be due to an aseismic slow-earthquake component of rupture. We next consider the decay rate of aftershock activity following the earthquake. The rates are well approximated by the modified Omori's law. We show that the distribution of interoccurrence times between aftershocks follow a nonhomogeneous Poisson process. We introduce the concept of Omori times to study the merging of the aftershock activity with the background seismicity. The Omori time is defined to be the mean interoccurrence time over a fixed number of aftershocks.

  20. Exploring aftershock properties with depth using Bayesian statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narteau, Clement; Shebalin, Peter; Holschneider, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    Stress magnitudes and frictional faulting properties vary with depth and may strongly affect earthquake statistics. Nevertheless, if the Anderson faulting theory may be used to define the relative stress magnitudes, it remains extremely difficult to observe significant variations of earthquake properties from the top to the bottom of the seismogenic layer. Here, we concentrate on aftershock sequences in normal, strike-slip and reverse faulting regimes to isolate specific temporal properties of this major relaxation process with respect to depth. More exactly, we use Bayesian statistics of the Modified Omori Law to characterize the exponent p of the power-law aftershock decay rate and the duration c of the early stage of aftershock activity that does not fit with this power-law regime. Preliminary results show that the c-value decreases with depth without any significant variation of the p-value. Then, we infer the duration of a non power-law aftershock decay rate over short times can be related to the level of stress in the seismogenic crust.

  1. Power spectrum analyses of nuclear decay rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javorsek, D.; Sturrock, P. A.; Lasenby, R. N.; Lasenby, A. N.; Buncher, J. B.; Fischbach, E.; Gruenwald, J. T.; Hoft, A. W.; Horan, T. J.; Jenkins, J. H.; Kerford, J. L.; Lee, R. H.; Longman, A.; Mattes, J. J.; Morreale, B. L.; Morris, D. B.; Mudry, R. N.; Newport, J. R.; O'Keefe, D.; Petrelli, M. A.; Silver, M. A.; Stewart, C. A.; Terry, B.

    2010-10-01

    We provide the results from a spectral analysis of nuclear decay data displaying annually varying periodic fluctuations. The analyzed data were obtained from three distinct data sets: 32Si and 36Cl decays reported by an experiment performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), 56Mn decay reported by the Children's Nutrition Research Center (CNRC), but also performed at BNL, and 226Ra decay reported by an experiment performed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany. All three data sets exhibit the same primary frequency mode consisting of an annual period. Additional spectral comparisons of the data to local ambient temperature, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity, Earth-Sun distance, and their reciprocals were performed. No common phases were found between the factors investigated and those exhibited by the nuclear decay data. This suggests that either a combination of factors was responsible, or that, if it was a single factor, its effects on the decay rate experiments are not a direct synchronous modulation. We conclude that the annual periodicity in these data sets is a real effect, but that further study involving additional carefully controlled experiments will be needed to establish its origin.

  2. Quantifying Early Aftershock Activity of the 2004 Mid Niigata Prefecture Earthquake (Mw6.6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enescu, B.; Mori, J.; Miyazawa, M.

    2006-12-01

    We analyse the early aftershock activity of the 2004 Mid Niigata earthquake, using both earthquake catalog data and continuous waveform recordings. The frequency-magnitude distribution analysis of the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) catalog shows that the magnitude of completeness of the aftershocks changes from values around 5.0, immediately after the mainshock, to about 1.8, twelve hours later. Such a large incompleteness of early events can bias significantly the estimation of aftershock rates. To better determine the temporal pattern of aftershocks in the first minutes after the Niigata earthquake, we analyse the continuous seismograms recorded at six Hi-Net (High Sensitivity Seismograph Network) stations located close to the aftershock distribution. Clear aftershocks can be seen from about 35 sec. after the mainshock. We use events which are both identified on the filtered waveforms and are listed in the JMA catalogue, to calibrate an amplitude-magnitude relation. We estimate that the events picked on the waveforms recorded at two seismic stations (NGOH and YNTH), situated on opposite sides of the aftershock distribution, are complete above a threshold magnitude of 3.4. The c-value determined by taking these events into account is about 0.003 days (4.3 min). Statistical tests demonstrate that a small, but non-zero, c-value is a reliable result. We also analyse the decay with time of the moment release rates of the aftershocks in the JMA catalog, since these rates should be much less influenced by the missing small events. The moment rates follow a power-law time dependence from a few minutes to months after the mainshock. We finally show that the rate-and-state dependent friction law or stress corrosion could explain well our findings.

  3. Halley's comet - Its size and decay rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallis, M. K.; Wickramasinghe, N. C.

    1985-09-01

    The outgassing rates inferred from the 1910 apparition and the brightness decay over the previous two millenia are compatible with the minimum nuclear brightness currently observed if the comet nucleus is small, 1.8 - 2.7 km radius with an albedo of 0.1 - 0.2. Outgassing is faster than from a bare nucleus of dirty H2O-ice, which is attributed either to a hot microdust coma or to an organic polymer composition. Halley's comet will decay away within another 45 - 65 apparitions.

  4. Time-dependent Induced Seismicity Rates Described with an Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence Model at The Geysers Geothermal Field, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. W.; Totten, E. J.; Burgmann, R.

    2015-12-01

    To improve understanding of the link between injection/production activity and seismicity, we apply an Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model to an earthquake catalog from The Geysers geothermal field (GGF) between 2005-2015 using >140,000 events and Mc 0.8 . We partition the catalog along a northeast-southwest trending divide, which corresponds to regions of high and low levels of enhanced geothermal stimulation (EGS) across the field. The ETAS model is fit to the seismicity data using a 6-month sliding window with a 1-month time step to determine the background seismicity rate. We generate monthly time series of the time-dependent background seismicity rate in 1-km depth intervals from 0-5km. The average wellhead depth is 2-3 km and the background seismicity rates above this depth do not correlate well with field-wide injected masses over the time period of interest. The auto correlation results show a 12-month period for monthly time series proximal to the average wellhead depths (2-3km and 3-4km) for northwest GGF strongly correlates with field-wide fluid injection masses, with a four-month phase shift between the two depth intervals as fluid migrates deeper. This periodicity is not observed for the deeper depth interval of 4-5 km, where monthly background seismicity rates reduce to near zero. Cross-correlation analysis using the monthly time series for background seismicity rate and the field-wide injection, production and net injection (injection minus production) suggest that injection most directly modulates seismicity. Periodicity in the background seismicity is not observed as strongly in the time series for the southeast field. We suggest that the variation in background seismicity rate is a proxy for pore-pressure diffusion of injected fluids at depth. We deduce that the contrast between the background seismicity rates in the northwest and southeast GGF is a result of reduced EGS activity in the southeast region.

  5. International Aftershock Forecasting: Lessons from the Gorkha Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, A. J.; Blanpied, M. L.; Brady, S. R.; van der Elst, N.; Hardebeck, J.; Mayberry, G. C.; Page, M. T.; Smoczyk, G. M.; Wein, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Following the M7.8 Gorhka, Nepal, earthquake of April 25, 2015 the USGS issued a series of aftershock forecasts. The initial impetus for these forecasts was a request from the USAID Office of US Foreign Disaster Assistance to support their Disaster Assistance Response Team (DART) which coordinated US Government disaster response, including search and rescue, with the Government of Nepal. Because of the possible utility of the forecasts to people in the region and other response teams, the USGS released these forecasts publicly through the USGS Earthquake Program web site. The initial forecast used the Reasenberg and Jones (Science, 1989) model with generic parameters developed for active deep continental regions based on the Garcia et al. (BSSA, 2012) tectonic regionalization. These were then updated to reflect a lower productivity and higher decay rate based on the observed aftershocks, although relying on teleseismic observations, with a high magnitude-of-completeness, limited the amount of data. After the 12 May M7.3 aftershock, the forecasts used an Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence model to better characterize the multiple sources of earthquake clustering. This model provided better estimates of aftershock uncertainty. These forecast messages were crafted based on lessons learned from the Christchurch earthquake along with input from the U.S. Embassy staff in Kathmandu. Challenges included how to balance simple messaging with forecasts over a variety of time periods (week, month, and year), whether to characterize probabilities with words such as those suggested by the IPCC (IPCC, 2010), how to word the messages in a way that would translate accurately into Nepali and not alarm the public, and how to present the probabilities of unlikely but possible large and potentially damaging aftershocks, such as the M7.3 event, which had an estimated probability of only 1-in-200 for the week in which it occurred.

  6. Triggering cascades and statistical properties of aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, C.; Davidsen, J.

    2011-12-01

    Applying a recently introduced general statistical procedure for identifying aftershocks based on complex network theory, we investigate the statistical properties of aftershocks for a high-resolution earthquake catalog covering Southern California. In comparison with earlier studies of aftershock sequences, we show that many features depend sensitively on how one defines aftershocks and whether one includes only first-generation of aftershocks or one also takes all indirectly triggered aftershocks into account. This includes the temporal variation in the rate of aftershocks for mainshocks of small magnitude, for example, as well as the variation in the rate of aftershocks for short to intermediate times after a mainshock. Other features are, however, robust indicating that they truly characterize aftershock sequences. These include the p-values in the Omori-Utsu law for large mainshocks, B{aa}th's law and the productivity law with an exponent smaller than the b-value in the Gutenberg-Richter law. We also find that, for large mainshocks, the dependence of the parameters in the Omori-Utsu law on the lower magnitude cut-off are in excellent agreement with a recent proposition based on B{aa}th's law and the Gutenberg-Richter law, giving rise to a generalized Omori-Utsu law. Our analysis also provides evidence that the exponent p in the Omori-Utsu law does not vary significantly with mainshock magnitude.

  7. Studies of the South Napa Earthquake Aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcotte, D. L.; Shcherbakov, R.; Yikilmaz, M. B.; Kellogg, L. H.; Rundle, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we present studies of the aftershock sequence of the 24 August, 2014, M = 6.0 South Napa earthquake. We give the cumulative frequency-magnitude distributions of the aftershocks for several time intervals following the main shock. We give the magnitude of the largest aftershock (Bath's law) as well as the largest aftershock obtained from a Gutenberg-Richter fit to the frequency-magnitude data (modified form of Bath's law). The latter is a measure of the aftershock productivity. We also give the rates of occurrence of aftershocks as a function of time after the main shock for several magnitude ranges. The fit of this data to Omori's law is discussed. We compare the results of our study of the South Napa earthquake with our previous study of the aftershock statistics of the 28 September, 2004, M = 6.0 Parkfield earthquake. Specifically we will discuss any difference that can be attributed to the large difference in recurrence intervals for the two earthquakes. We also present studies of the three dimensional distribution of aftershock locations as a function of time and their association with the surface rupture. Aftershocks at large distances from the rupture zone will be discussed particularly those in the Geysers geothermal area.

  8. Universal Distribution of Litter Decay Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forney, D. C.; Rothman, D. H.

    2008-12-01

    Degradation of litter is the result of many physical, chemical and biological processes. The high variability of these processes likely accounts for the progressive slowdown of decay with litter age. This age dependence is commonly thought to result from the superposition of processes with different decay rates k. Here we assume an underlying continuous yet unknown distribution p(k) of decay rates [1]. To seek its form, we analyze the mass-time history of 70 LIDET [2] litter data sets obtained under widely varying conditions. We construct a regularized inversion procedure to find the best fitting distribution p(k) with the least degrees of freedom. We find that the resulting p(k) is universally consistent with a lognormal distribution, i.e.~a Gaussian distribution of log k, characterized by a dataset-dependent mean and variance of log k. This result is supported by a recurring observation that microbial populations on leaves are log-normally distributed [3]. Simple biological processes cause the frequent appearance of the log-normal distribution in ecology [4]. Environmental factors, such as soil nitrate, soil aggregate size, soil hydraulic conductivity, total soil nitrogen, soil denitrification, soil respiration have been all observed to be log-normally distributed [5]. Litter degradation rates depend on many coupled, multiplicative factors, which provides a fundamental basis for the lognormal distribution. Using this insight, we systematically estimated the mean and variance of log k for 512 data sets from the LIDET study. We find the mean strongly correlates with temperature and precipitation, while the variance appears to be uncorrelated with main environmental factors and is thus likely more correlated with chemical composition and/or ecology. Results indicate the possibility that the distribution in rates reflects, at least in part, the distribution of microbial niches. [1] B. P. Boudreau, B.~R. Ruddick, American Journal of Science,291, 507, (1991). [2] M

  9. Molecular decay rate near nonlocal plasmonic particles.

    PubMed

    Girard, Christian; Cuche, Aurélien; Dujardin, Erik; Arbouet, Arnaud; Mlayah, Adnen

    2015-05-01

    When the size of metal nanoparticles is smaller than typically 10 nm, their optical response becomes sensitive to both spatial dispersion and quantum size effects associated with the confinement of the conduction electrons inside the particle. In this Letter, we propose a nonlocal scheme to compute molecular decay rates near spherical nanoparticles which includes the electron-electron interactions through a simple model of electronic polarizabilities. The plasmonic particle is schematized by a dynamic dipolar polarizability α(NL)(ω), and the quantum system is characterized by a two-level system. In this scheme, the light matter interaction is described in terms of classical field susceptibilities. This theoretical framework could be extended to address the influence of nonlocality on the dynamics of quantum systems placed in the vicinity of nano-objects of arbitrary morphologies. PMID:25927799

  10. Properties of the Aftershock Sequences of the 2003 Bingöl, M D = 6.4, (Turkey) Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztürk, S.; Çinar, H.; Bayrak, Y.; Karsli, H.; Daniel, G.

    2008-02-01

    Aftershock sequences of the magnitude M W =6.4 Bingöl earthquake of 1 May, 2003 (Turkey) are studied to analyze the spatial and temporal variability of seismicity parameters of the b value of the frequency-magnitude distribution and the p value describing the temporal decay rate of aftershocks. The catalog taken from the KOERI contains 516 events and one month’s time interval. The b value is found as 1.49 ± 0.07 with Mc =3.2. Considering the error limits, b value is very close to the maximum b value stated in the literature. This larger value may be caused by the paucity of the larger aftershocks with magnitude M D ≥ 5.0. Also, the aftershock area is divided into four parts in order to detect the differences in b value and the changes illustrate the heterogeneity of the aftershock region. The p value is calculated as 0.86 ± 0.11, relatively small. This small p value may be a result of the slow decay rate of the aftershock activity and the small number of aftershocks. For the fitting of a suitable model and estimation of correct values of decay parameters, the sequence is also modeled as a background seismicty rate model. Constant background activity does not appear to be important during the first month of the Bingöl aftershock sequences and this result is coherent with an average estimation of pre-existing seismicity. The results show that usage of simple modified Omori law is reasonable for the analysis. The spatial variability in b value is between 1.2 and 1.8 and p value varies from 0.6 to 1.2. Although the physical interpretation of the spatial variability of these seismicity parameters is not straightforward, the variation of b and p values can be related to the stress and slip distribution after the mainshock, respectively. The lower b values are observed in the high stress regions and to a certain extent, the largest b values are related to Holocene alluvium. The larger p values are found in some part of the aftershock area although no slip occurred

  11. Aftershock activity of the 2015 Gorkha, Nepal, earthquake determined using the Kathmandu strong motion seismographic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiyanagi, Masayoshi; Takai, Nobuo; Shigefuji, Michiko; Bijukchhen, Subeg; Sasatani, Tsutomu; Rajaure, Sudhir; Dhital, Megh Raj; Takahashi, Hiroaki

    2016-02-01

    The characteristics of aftershock activity of the 2015 Gorkha, Nepal, earthquake (Mw 7.8) were evaluated. The mainshock and aftershocks were recorded continuously by the international Kathmandu strong motion seismographic array operated by Hokkaido University and Tribhuvan University. Full waveform data without saturation for all events enabled us to clarify aftershock locations and decay characteristics. The aftershock distribution was determined using the estimated local velocity structure. The hypocenter distribution in the Kathmandu metropolitan region was well determined and indicated earthquakes located shallower than 12 km depth, suggesting that aftershocks occurred at depths shallower than the Himalayan main thrust fault. Although numerical investigation suggested less resolution for the depth component, the regional aftershock epicentral distribution of the entire focal region clearly indicated earthquakes concentrated in the eastern margin of the major slip region of the mainshock. The calculated modified Omori law's p value of 1.35 suggests rapid aftershock decay and a possible high temperature structure in the aftershock region.

  12. Spectral scaling of the aftershocks of the Tocopilla 2007 earthquake in northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancieri, M.; Madariaga, R.; Bonilla, F.

    2012-04-01

    We study the scaling of spectral properties of a set of 68 aftershocks of the 2007 November 14 Tocopilla (M 7.8) earthquake in northern Chile. These are all subduction events with similar reverse faulting focal mechanism that were recorded by a homogenous network of continuously recording strong motion instruments. The seismic moment and the corner frequency are obtained assuming that the aftershocks satisfy an inverse omega-square spectral decay; radiated energy is computed integrating the square velocity spectrum corrected for attenuation at high frequencies and for the finite bandwidth effect. Using a graphical approach, we test the scaling of seismic spectrum, and the scale invariance of the apparent stress drop with the earthquake size. To test whether the Tocopilla aftershocks scale with a single parameter, we introduce a non-dimensional number, ?, that should be constant if earthquakes are self-similar. For the Tocopilla aftershocks, Cr varies by a factor of 2. More interestingly, Cr for the aftershocks is close to 2, the value that is expected for events that are approximately modelled by a circular crack. Thus, in spite of obvious differences in waveforms, the aftershocks of the Tocopilla earthquake are self-similar. The main shock is different because its records contain large near-field waves. Finally, we investigate the scaling of energy release rate, Gc, with the slip. We estimated Gc from our previous estimates of the source parameters, assuming a simple circular crack model. We find that Gc values scale with the slip, and are in good agreement with those found by Abercrombie and Rice for the Northridge aftershocks.

  13. Correlation of Static and Peak Dynamic Coulomb Failure Stress with Aftershocks, Seismicity Rate Change, and Triggered Slip in the Salton Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddo, J.; Olsen, K.

    2007-12-01

    Numerous studies have found significant correlation of static Coulomb Failure Stress (sCFS, co-seismic earthquake induced stresses) with the occurrence of mainshocks, aftershocks, and triggered slip (e.g. Stein, 1999; Kilb, 2003; King et al., 1994, Arnadottir, 2003; Du et al., 2003; Freed, 2005). Static CFS estimates are primarily dependent on the final co-seismic slip distribution and fault geometry. Recently, complete or dynamic Coulomb Failure Stress, parameterized by its largest positive value (peak dCFS), has been proposed as an alternative triggering mechanism (Kilb, 2002). Peak dCFS estimates, in addition to the final slip dependence, have been shown to be strongly dependent on co-seismic source effects, such as rupture directivity (Kilb, 2002). However, most studies of stress transfer and earthquake triggering only incorporate sCFS and only a few studies have attempted to correlate seismicity rate change and triggered slip on surrounding faults. In this study we have modeled the distributions of sCFS and peak dCFS for four recent historical earthquakes (1968 M6.7 Borrego Mountain, 1979 M6.6 Imperial Valley, 1987 M6.6 Elmore Ranch, and M6.5 Superstition Hills) using a fourth-order staggered-grid finite-difference method, which incorporates anelastic attenuation, a 3-D velocity model, and heterogeneous slip distributions derived from strong ground-motion and geodetic inversions. The study area is 150 by 150 km located in the Salton Trough of the Imperial Valley, California. A cross-correlation is calculated between the modeled stresses and seismicity rate change in terms of the Z-value (Habermann, 1983) with a background seismicity rate removed. Modeling results show that peak dCFS provides significantly better correlation with aftershock distributions, seismicity rate change, and triggered slip than sCFS for all four events. Both sCFS and peak dCFS provide significant goodness of fit (>55%) with seismicity rate change up to a month after the mainshocks, with

  14. Mechanical origin of aftershocks.

    PubMed

    Lippiello, E; Giacco, F; Marzocchi, W; Godano, C; de Arcangelis, L

    2015-01-01

    Aftershocks are the most striking evidence of earthquake interactions and the physical mechanisms at the origin of their occurrence are still intensively debated. Novel insights stem from recent results on the influence of the faulting style on the aftershock organisation in magnitude and time. Our study shows that the size of the aftershock zone depends on the fault geometry. We find that positive correlations among parameters controlling aftershock occurrence in time, energy and space are a stable feature of seismicity independently of magnitude range and geographic areas. We explain the ensemble of experimental findings by means of a description of the Earth Crust as an heterogeneous elastic medium coupled with a Maxwell viscoelastic asthenosphere. Our results show that heterogeneous stress distribution in an elastic layer combined with a coupling to a viscous flow are sufficient ingredients to describe the physics of aftershock triggering. PMID:26497720

  15. Mechanical origin of aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippiello, E.; Giacco, F.; Marzocchi, W.; Godano, C.; de Arcangelis, L.

    2015-10-01

    Aftershocks are the most striking evidence of earthquake interactions and the physical mechanisms at the origin of their occurrence are still intensively debated. Novel insights stem from recent results on the influence of the faulting style on the aftershock organisation in magnitude and time. Our study shows that the size of the aftershock zone depends on the fault geometry. We find that positive correlations among parameters controlling aftershock occurrence in time, energy and space are a stable feature of seismicity independently of magnitude range and geographic areas. We explain the ensemble of experimental findings by means of a description of the Earth Crust as an heterogeneous elastic medium coupled with a Maxwell viscoelastic asthenosphere. Our results show that heterogeneous stress distribution in an elastic layer combined with a coupling to a viscous flow are sufficient ingredients to describe the physics of aftershock triggering.

  16. Mechanical origin of aftershocks

    PubMed Central

    Lippiello, E.; Giacco, F.; Marzocchi, W.; Godano, C.; de Arcangelis, L.

    2015-01-01

    Aftershocks are the most striking evidence of earthquake interactions and the physical mechanisms at the origin of their occurrence are still intensively debated. Novel insights stem from recent results on the influence of the faulting style on the aftershock organisation in magnitude and time. Our study shows that the size of the aftershock zone depends on the fault geometry. We find that positive correlations among parameters controlling aftershock occurrence in time, energy and space are a stable feature of seismicity independently of magnitude range and geographic areas. We explain the ensemble of experimental findings by means of a description of the Earth Crust as an heterogeneous elastic medium coupled with a Maxwell viscoelastic asthenosphere. Our results show that heterogeneous stress distribution in an elastic layer combined with a coupling to a viscous flow are sufficient ingredients to describe the physics of aftershock triggering. PMID:26497720

  17. Tests of remote aftershock triggering by small mainshocks using Taiwan's earthquake catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, W.; Toda, S.

    2014-12-01

    To understand earthquake interaction and forecast time-dependent seismic hazard, it is essential to evaluate which stress transfer, static or dynamic, plays a major role to trigger aftershocks and subsequent mainshocks. Felzer and Brodsky focused on small mainshocks (2≤M<3) and their aftershocks, and then argued that only dynamic stress change brings earthquake-to-earthquake triggering, whereas Richards-Dingers et al. (2010) claimed that those selected small mainshock-aftershock pairs were not earthquake-to-earthquake triggering but simultaneous occurrence of independent aftershocks following a larger earthquake or during a significant swarm sequence. We test those hypotheses using Taiwan's earthquake catalog by taking the advantage of lacking any larger event and the absence of significant seismic swarm typically seen with active volcano. Using Felzer and Brodsky's method and their standard parameters, we only found 14 mainshock-aftershock pairs occurred within 20 km distance in Taiwan's catalog from 1994 to 2010. Although Taiwan's catalog has similar number of earthquakes as California's, the number of pairs is about 10% of the California catalog. It may indicate the effect of no large earthquakes and no significant seismic swarm in the catalog. To fully understand the properties in the Taiwan's catalog, we loosened the screening parameters to earn more pairs and then found a linear aftershock density with a power law decay of -1.12±0.38 that is very similar to the one in Felzer and Brodsky. However, none of those mainshock-aftershock pairs were associated with a M7 rupture event or M6 events. To find what mechanism controlled the aftershock density triggered by small mainshocks in Taiwan, we randomized earthquake magnitude and location. We then found that those density decay in a short time period is more like a randomized behavior than mainshock-aftershock triggering. Moreover, 5 out of 6 pairs were found in a swarm-like temporal seismicity rate increase

  18. Triggered Swarms and Induced Aftershock Sequences in Geothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, R.; Turcotte, D. L.; Yikilmaz, M. B.; Kellogg, L. H.; Rundle, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Natural geothermal systems, which are used for energy generation, are usually associated with high seismic activity. This can be related to the large-scale injection and extraction of fluids to enhance geothermal recovery. This results in the changes of the pore pressure and pore-elastic stress field and can stimulate the occurrence of earthquakes. These systems are also prone to triggering of seismicity by the passage of seismic waves generated by large distant main shocks. In this study, we analyze clustering and triggering of seismicity at several geothermal fields in California. Particularly, we consider the seismicity at the Geysers, Coso, and Salton Sea geothermal fields. We analyze aftershock sequences generated by local large events with magnitudes greater than 4.0 and earthquake swarms generated by several significant long distant main shocks. We show that the rate of the aftershock sequences generated by the local large events in the two days before and two days after the reference event can be modelled reasonably well by the time dependent Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model. On the other hand, the swarms of activity triggered by large distant earthquakes cannot be described by the ETAS model. To model the increase in the rate of seismicity associated with triggering by large distant main shocks we introduce an additional time-dependent triggering mechanism into the ETAS model. In almost all cases the frequency-magnitude statistics of triggered sequences follow Gutenberg-Richter scaling to a good approximation. The analysis indicates that the seismicity triggered by relatively large local events can initiate sequences similar to regular aftershock sequences. In contrast, the distant main shocks trigger swarm like activity with faster decaying rates.

  19. Foreshock activity related to enhanced aftershock production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsan, D.; Helmstetter, A.; Bouchon, M.; Dublanchet, P.

    2014-10-01

    Foreshock activity sometimes precedes the occurrence of large earthquakes, but the nature of this seismicity is still debated, and whether it marks transient deformation and/or slip nucleation is still unclear. We here study at the worldwide scale how foreshock occurrence affects the postseismic phase and find a significant positive correlation between foreshock and aftershock activities: earthquakes preceded by accelerating seismicity rates produce 40% more aftershocks on average, and the length of the aftershock zone after 20 days is 20% larger. These observations cannot be reproduced by standard earthquake clustering models that predict the accelerating pattern of foreshock occurrence but not its impact on aftershock activity. This strongly suggests that slow deformation transients, possibly related to episodic creep, could initiate prior to the main shock and extend past the coseismic phase, resulting in compound ruptures that include a very long period (up to tens of days) component.

  20. Discrete characteristics of the aftershock sequence of the 2011 Van earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toker, Mustafa

    2014-10-01

    An intraplate earthquake of magnitude Mw 7.2 occurred on a NE-SW trending blind oblique thrust fault in accretionary orogen, the Van region of Eastern Anatolia on October 23, 2011. The aftershock seismicity in the Van earthquake was not continuous but, rather, highly discrete. This shed light on the chaotic nonuniformity of the event distribution and played key roles in determining the seismic coupling between the rupturing process and seismogeneity. I analyzed the discrete statistical mechanics of the 2011 Van mainshock-aftershock sequence with an estimation of the non-dimensional tuning parameters consisting of; temporal clusters (C) and the random (RN) distribution of aftershocks, range of size scales (ROSS), strength change (εD), temperature (T), P-value of temporal decay, material parameter R-value, seismic coupling χ, and Q-value of aftershock distribution. I also investigated the frequency-size (FS), temporal (T) statistics and the sequential characteristics of aftershock dynamics using discrete approach and examined the discrete evolutionary periods of the Van earthquake Gutenberg-Richter (GR) distribution. My study revealed that the FS and T statistical properties of aftershock sequence represent the Gutenberg-Richter (GR) distribution, clustered (C) in time and random (RN) Poisson distribution, respectively. The overall statistical behavior of the aftershock sequence shows that the Van earthquake originated in a discrete structural framework with high seismic coupling under highly variable faulting conditions. My analyses relate this larger dip-slip event to a discrete seismogenesis with two main components of complex fracturing and branching framework of the ruptured fault and dynamic strengthening and hardening behavior of the earthquake. The results indicate two dynamic cases. The first is associated with aperiodic nature of aftershock distribution, indicating a time-independent Poissonian event. The second is associated with variable slip model

  1. Forecasting large aftershocks within one day after the main shock

    PubMed Central

    Omi, Takahiro; Ogata, Yosihiko; Hirata, Yoshito; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Forecasting the aftershock probability has been performed by the authorities to mitigate hazards in the disaster area after a main shock. However, despite the fact that most of large aftershocks occur within a day from the main shock, the operational forecasting has been very difficult during this time-period due to incomplete recording of early aftershocks. Here we propose a real-time method for efficiently forecasting the occurrence rates of potential aftershocks using systematically incomplete observations that are available in a few hours after the main shocks. We demonstrate the method's utility by retrospective early forecasting of the aftershock activity of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake of M9.0 in Japan. Furthermore, we compare the results by the real-time data with the compiled preliminary data to examine robustness of the present method for the aftershocks of a recent inland earthquake in Japan. PMID:23860594

  2. 40 CFR 1065.644 - Vacuum-decay leak rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vacuum-decay leak rate. 1065.644 Section 1065.644 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.644 Vacuum-decay leak...

  3. 40 CFR 1065.644 - Vacuum-decay leak rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vacuum-decay leak rate. 1065.644 Section 1065.644 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.644 Vacuum-decay leak...

  4. 40 CFR 1065.644 - Vacuum-decay leak rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vacuum-decay leak rate. 1065.644 Section 1065.644 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.644 Vacuum-decay leak...

  5. 40 CFR 1065.644 - Vacuum-decay leak rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vacuum-decay leak rate. 1065.644 Section 1065.644 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.644 Vacuum-decay leak...

  6. 40 CFR 1065.644 - Vacuum-decay leak rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vacuum-decay leak rate. 1065.644 Section 1065.644 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.644 Vacuum-decay leak...

  7. Statistical Variability and Tokunaga Branching of Aftershock Sequences Utilizing BASS Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, Mark R.; Van Aalsburg, Jordan; Turcotte, Donald L.; Abaimov, Sergey G.; Rundle, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Aftershock statistics provide a wealth of data that can be used to better understand earthquake physics. Aftershocks satisfy scale-invariant Gutenberg-Richter (GR) frequency-magnitude statistics. They also satisfy Omori's law for power-law seismicity rate decay and Båth's law for maximum-magnitude scaling. The branching aftershock sequence (BASS) model, which is the scale-invariant limit of the epidemic-type aftershock sequence model (ETAS), uses these scaling laws to generate synthetic aftershock sequences. One objective of this paper is to show that the branching process in these models satisfies Tokunaga branching statistics. Tokunaga branching statistics were originally developed for drainage networks and have been subsequently shown to be valid in many other applications associated with complex phenomena. Specifically, these are characteristic of a universality class in statistical physics associated with diffusion-limited aggregation. We first present a deterministic version of the BASS model and show that it satisfies the Tokunaga side-branching statistics. We then show that a fully stochastic BASS simulation gives similar results. We also study foreshock statistics using our BASS simulations. We show that the frequency-magnitude statistics in BASS simulations scale as the exponential of the magnitude difference between the mainshock and the foreshock, inverse GR scaling. We also show that the rate of foreshock occurrence in BASS simulations decays inversely with the time difference between foreshock and mainshock, an inverse Omori scaling. Both inverse scaling laws have been previously introduced empirically to explain observed foreshock statistics. Observations have demonstrated both of these scaling relations to be valid, consistent with our simulations. ETAS simulations, in general, do not generate Båth's law and do not generate inverse GR scaling.

  8. Modern Measurements of Uranium Decay Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons-Moss, T.; Faye, S. A.; Williams, R. W.; Wang, T. F.; Renne, P. R.; Mundil, R.; Harrison, M.; Bandong, B. B.; Moody, K.; Knight, K. B.

    2015-12-01

    It has been widely recognized that accurate and precise decay constants (λ) are critical to geochronology as highlighted by the EARTHTIME initiative, particularly the calibration benchmarks λ235U and λ238U. [1] Alpha counting experiments in 1971[2] measured λ235U and λ238U with ~0.1% precision, but have never been independently validated. We are embarking on new direct measurements of λ235U, λ238U, λ234Th, and λ234U using independent approaches for each nuclide. For the measurement of λ235U, highly enriched 235U samples will be chemically purified and analyzed for U concentration and isotopic composition by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). Thin films will be electrodeposited from these solutions and the α activity will be measured in an α-γ coincidence counting apparatus, which allows reduced uncertainty in counting efficiency while achieving adequate counting statistics. For λ238U measurement we will measure ingrowth of 234Th in chemically purified, isotopically enriched 238U solutions, by quantitatively separating the Th and allowing complete decay to 234U. All of the measurements will be done using MC-ICP-MS aiming at 0.05% precision. This approach is expected to result in values of λ238U with less than 0.1% uncertainty, if combined with improved λ234Th measements. These will be achieved using direct decay measurements with an E-∆E charged particle telescope in coincidence with a gamma detector. This system allows measurement of 234Th β-decay and simultaneous detection and identification of α particles emitted by the 234U daughter, thus observing λ234U at the same time. The high-precision λ234U obtained by the direct activity measurements can independently verify the commonly used values obtained by indirect methods.[3] An overarching goal of the project is to ensure the quality of results including metrological traceability in order to facilitate implementation across diverse disciplines. [1] T

  9. Rate of gravitational inflaton decay via gauge trace anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Yuki

    2011-02-15

    We analyze decay processes of the inflaton field, {phi}, during the coherent oscillation phase after inflation in f({phi})R gravity. It is inevitable that the inflaton decays gravitationally into gauge fields in the presence of f({phi})R coupling. We show a concrete calculation of the rate that the inflaton field decays into a pair of gauge fields via the trace anomaly. Comparing this new decay channel via the anomaly with the channels from the tree-level analysis, we find that the branching ratio crucially depends on masses and the internal multiplicities (flavor quantum number) of decay product particles. While the inflaton decays exclusively into light fields, heavy fields still play a role in quantum loops. We argue that this process in principle allows us to constrain the effects of arbitrary heavy particles in the reheating. We also apply our analysis to Higgs inflation, and find that the gravitational decay rate would never exceed gauge interaction decay rates if quantum gravity is unimportant.

  10. A Fluid-driven Earthquake Cycle, Omori's Law, and Fluid-driven Aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Few models exist that predict the Omori's Law of aftershock rate decay, with rate-state friction the only physically-based model. ETAS is a probabilistic model of cascading failures, and is sometimes used to infer rate-state frictional properties. However, the (perhaps dominant) role of fluids in the earthquake process is being increasingly realised, so a fluid-based physical model for Omori's Law should be available. In this talk, I present an hypothesis for a fluid-driven earthquake cycle where dehydration and decarbonization at depth provides continuous sources of buoyant high pressure fluids that must eventually make their way back to the surface. The natural pathway for fluid escape is along plate boundaries, where in the ductile regime high pressure fluids likely play an integral role in episodic tremor and slow slip earthquakes. At shallower levels, high pressure fluids pool at the base of seismogenic zones, with the reservoir expanding in scale through the earthquake cycle. Late in the cycle, these fluids can invade and degrade the strength of the brittle crust and contribute to earthquake nucleation. The mainshock opens permeable networks that provide escape pathways for high pressure fluids and generate aftershocks along these flow paths, while creating new pathways by the aftershocks themselves. Thermally activated precipitation then seals up these pathways, returning the system to a low-permeability environment and effective seal during the subsequent tectonic stress buildup. I find that the multiplicative effect of an exponential dependence of permeability on the effective normal stress coupled with an Arrhenius-type, thermally activated exponential reduction in permeability results in Omori's Law. I simulate this scenario using a very simple model that combines non-linear diffusion and a step-wise increase in permeability when a Mohr Coulomb failure condition is met, and allow permeability to decrease as an exponential function in time. I show very

  11. The decay rates of autoionizing quasi-molecular states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishinevsky, L. M.; Krakov, B. G.; Parilis, E. S.

    1981-09-01

    The decay rates of three quasi-molecular autoionizing states of a HeBe 4+-like system consisting of two electrons and two Coulomb centres are calculated. It is shown that with decreasing internuclear distance the decay rate passes through a maximum which for (2 pσ) 2 states is 1.6 × 10 15s-1. This considerably exceeds the value for the united atom.

  12. Decay rate of the second radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Robbins, D. E.

    Variations in the Earth's trapped (Van Allen) belts produced by solar flare particle events are not well understood. Few observations of increases in particle populations have been reported. This is particularly true for effects in low Earth orbit, where manned spaceflights are conducted. This paper reports the existence of a second proton belt and it's subsequent decay as measured by a tissue-equivalent proportional counter and a particle spectrometer on five Space Shuttle flights covering an eighteen-month period. The creation of this second belt is attributed to the injection of particles from a solar particle event which occurred at 2246 UT, March 22, 1991. Comparisons with observations onboard the Russian Mir space station and other unmanned satellites are made. Shuttle measurements and data from other spacecraft are used to determine that the e-folding time of the peak of the second proton belt. It was ten months. Proton populations in the second belt returned to values of quiescent times within eighteen months. The increase in absorbed dose attributed to protons in the second belt was approximately 20%. Passive dosimeter measurements were in good agreement with this value.

  13. Comparison of the non-proliferation event aftershocks with other Nevada Test Site events

    SciTech Connect

    Jarpe, S.; Goldstein, P.; Zucca, J.J.

    1994-04-01

    As part of a larger effort to develop technology for on-site inspection of ambiguous underground seismic events, we have been working to identify phenomenology of aftershock seismicity which would be useful for discriminating between nuclear explosions, chemical explosions, earthquakes or other seismic events. Phenomenology we have investigated includes; the spatial distribution of aftershocks, the number of aftershocks as a function of time after the main event, the size of the aftershocks, and waveform frequency content. Our major conclusions are: (1) Depending on local geologic conditions, aftershock production rate two weeks after zero time ranges from 1 to 100 per day. (2) Aftershocks of concentrated chemical explosions such as the NPE are indistinguishable from aftershocks of nuclear explosions. (3) Earthquake and explosion aftershock sequences may be differentiated on the basis of depth, magnitude, and in some cases, frequency content of seismic signals.

  14. Photoluminescence decay rate of silicon nanoparticles modified with gold nanoislands

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We investigated plasmon-assisted enhancement of emission from silicon nanoparticles (ncs-Si) embedded into porous SiO x matrix in the 500- to 820-nm wavelength range. In the presence in the near-surface region of gold nanoisland film, ncs-Si exhibited up to twofold luminescence enhancement at emission frequencies that correspond to the plasmon resonance frequency of Au nanoparticles. Enhancement of the photoluminescence (PL) intensity was attributed to coupling with the localized surface plasmons (LSPs) excited in Au nanoparticles and to increase in the radiative decay rate of ncs-Si. It has been shown that spontaneous emission decay rate of ncs-Si modified by thin Au film over the wide emission spectral range was accelerated. The emission decay rate distribution was determined by fitting the experimental decay curves to the stretched exponential model. The observed increase of the PL decay rate distribution width for the Au-coated nc-Si-SiO x sample in comparison with the uncoated one was explained by fluctuations in the surface-plasmon excitation rate. PACS 78. 67. Bf; 78.55.-m PMID:24708532

  15. Bayesian Predictive Distribution for the Magnitude of the Largest Aftershock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, R.

    2014-12-01

    Aftershock sequences, which follow large earthquakes, last hundreds of days and are characterized by well defined frequency-magnitude and spatio-temporal distributions. The largest aftershocks in a sequence constitute significant hazard and can inflict additional damage to infrastructure. Therefore, the estimation of the magnitude of possible largest aftershocks in a sequence is of high importance. In this work, we propose a statistical model based on Bayesian analysis and extreme value statistics to describe the distribution of magnitudes of the largest aftershocks in a sequence. We derive an analytical expression for a Bayesian predictive distribution function for the magnitude of the largest expected aftershock and compute the corresponding confidence intervals. We assume that the occurrence of aftershocks can be modeled, to a good approximation, by a non-homogeneous Poisson process with a temporal event rate given by the modified Omori law. We also assume that the frequency-magnitude statistics of aftershocks can be approximated by Gutenberg-Richter scaling. We apply our analysis to 19 prominent aftershock sequences, which occurred in the last 30 years, in order to compute the Bayesian predictive distributions and the corresponding confidence intervals. In the analysis, we use the information of the early aftershocks in the sequences (in the first 1, 10, and 30 days after the main shock) to estimate retrospectively the confidence intervals for the magnitude of the expected largest aftershocks. We demonstrate by analysing 19 past sequences that in many cases we are able to constrain the magnitudes of the largest aftershocks. For example, this includes the analysis of the Darfield (Christchurch) aftershock sequence. The proposed analysis can be used for the earthquake hazard assessment and forecasting associated with the occurrence of large aftershocks. The improvement in instrumental data associated with early aftershocks can greatly enhance the analysis and

  16. Energy decay rate of the thermoelastic Bresse system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhuangyi; Rao, Bopeng

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we study the energy decay rate for the thermoelastic Bresse system which describes the motion of a linear planar, shearable thermoelastic beam. If the longitudinal motion and heat transfer are neglected, this model reduces to the well-known thermoelastic Timoshenko beam equations. The system consists of three wave equations and two heat equations coupled in certain pattern. The two wave equations about the longitudinal displacement and shear angle displacement are effectively damped by the dissipation from the two heat equations. Actually, the corresponding energy decays exponentially like the classical one-dimensional thermoelastic system. However, the third wave equation about the vertical displacement is only weakly damped. Thus the decay rate of the energy of the overall system is still unknown. We will show that the exponentially decay rate is preserved when the wave speed of the vertical displacement coincides with the wave speed of longitudinal displacement or of the shear angle displacement. Otherwise, only a polynomial type decay rate can be obtained. These results are proved by verifying the frequency domain conditions.

  17. Observations of HF backscatter decay rates from HAARP generated FAI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, William; Hysell, David

    2016-07-01

    Suitable experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facilities in Gakona, Alaska, create a region of ionospheric Field-Aligned Irregularities (FAI) that produces strong radar backscatter observed by the SuperDARN radar on Kodiak Island, Alaska. Creation of FAI in HF ionospheric modification experiments has been studied by a number of authors who have developed a rich theoretical background. The decay of the irregularities, however, has not been so widely studied yet it has the potential for providing estimates of the parameters of natural irregularity diffusion, which are difficult measure by other means. Hysell, et al. [1996] demonstrated using the decay of radar scatter above the Sura heating facility to estimate irregularity diffusion. A large database of radar backscatter from HAARP generated FAI has been collected over the years. Experiments often cycled the heater power on and off in a way that allowed estimates of the FAI decay rate. The database has been examined to extract decay time estimates and diffusion rates over a range of ionospheric conditions. This presentation will summarize the database and the estimated diffusion rates, and will discuss the potential for targeted experiments for aeronomy measurements. Hysell, D. L., M. C. Kelley, Y. M. Yampolski, V. S. Beley, A. V. Koloskov, P. V. Ponomarenko, and O. F. Tyrnov, HF radar observations of decaying artificial field aligned irregularities, J. Geophys. Res. , 101, 26,981, 1996.

  18. Radiative decay rates of impurity states in semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Turkov, Vadim K.; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Rukhlenko, Ivan D.

    2015-10-15

    Doped semiconductor nanocrystals is a versatile material base for contemporary photonics and optoelectronics devices. Here, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, we theoretically calculate the radiative decay rates of the lowest-energy states of donor impurity in spherical nanocrystals made of four widely used semiconductors: ZnS, CdSe, Ge, and GaAs. The decay rates were shown to vary significantly with the nanocrystal radius, increasing by almost three orders of magnitude when the radius is reduced from 15 to 5 nm. Our results suggest that spontaneous emission may dominate the decay of impurity states at low temperatures, and should be taken into account in the design of advanced materials and devices based on doped semiconductor nanocrystals.

  19. Statistical estimation of the duration of aftershock sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hainzl, S.; Christophersen, A.; Rhoades, D.; Harte, D.

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that large earthquakes generally trigger aftershock sequences. However, the duration of those sequences is unclear due to the gradual power-law decay with time. The triggering time is assumed to be infinite in the epidemic type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model, a widely used statistical model to describe clustering phenomena in observed earthquake catalogues. This assumption leads to the constraint that the power-law exponent p of the Omori-Utsu decay has to be larger than one to avoid supercritical conditions with accelerating seismic activity on long timescales. In contrast, seismicity models based on rate- and state-dependent friction observed in laboratory experiments predict p ≤ 1 and a finite triggering time scaling inversely to the tectonic stressing rate. To investigate this conflict, we analyse an ETAS model with finite triggering times, which allow smaller values of p. We use synthetic earthquake sequences to show that the assumption of infinite triggering times can lead to a significant bias in the maximum likelihood estimates of the ETAS parameters. Furthermore, it is shown that the triggering time can be reasonably estimated using real earthquake catalogue data, although the uncertainties are large. The analysis of real earthquake catalogues indicates mainly finite triggering times in the order of 100 days to 10 years with a weak negative correlation to the background rate, in agreement with expectations of the rate- and state-friction model. The triggering time is not the same as the apparent duration, which is the time period in which aftershocks dominate the seismicity. The apparent duration is shown to be strongly dependent on the mainshock magnitude and the level of background activity. It can be much shorter than the triggering time. Finally, we perform forward simulations to estimate the effective forecasting period, which is the time period following a mainshock, in which ETAS simulations can improve rate estimates after the

  20. Influences of the astrophysical environment on nuclear decay rates

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, E.B.

    1987-09-01

    In many astronomical environments, physical conditions are so extreme that nuclear decay rates can be significantly altered from their laboratory values. Such effects are relevant to a number of current problems in nuclear astrophysics. Experiments related to these problems are now being pursued, and will be described in this talk. 19 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Uncertainties in Astrophysical β-decay Rates from the FRDM

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolli, M.G.; Möller, P.; Jones, S.

    2014-06-15

    β{sup −}-decay rates are of crucial importance in stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis, as they are a key component in stellar processes. Tabulated values of the decay rates as functions of both temperature T and density ρ are necessary input to stellar evolution codes such as MESA, or largescale nucleosynthesis simulations such as those performed by the NuGrid collaboration. Therefore, it is interesting to know the uncertainties in these rates and the effects of these uncertainties on stellar structure and isotopic yields. We have calculated β-strength functions and reaction rates for nuclei ranging from {sup 16}O to {sup 339}136, extending from the proton drip line to the neutron drip line based on a quasi-particle random-phase approximation (QRPA) in a deformed folded-Yukawa single-particle model. Q values are determined from the finite-range droplet mass model (FRDM). We have investigated the effect of model uncertainty on astrophysical β{sup −}-decay rates calculated by the FRDM. The sources of uncertainty considered are Q values and deformation. The rates and their uncertainties are generated for a variety of temperature and density ranges, corresponding to key stellar processes. We demonstrate the effects of these rate uncertainties on isotopic abundances using the NuGrid network calculations.

  2. Materials Outgassing Rate Decay in Vacuum at Isothermal Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Alvin Y.; Kastanas, George N.; Kramer, Leonard; Soares, Carlos E.; Mikatarian, Ronald R.

    2016-01-01

    As a laboratory for scientific research, the International Space Station has been in Low Earth Orbit for nearly 20 years and is expected to be on-orbit for another 10 years. The ISS has been maintaining a relatively pristine contamination environment for science payloads. Materials outgassing induced contamination is currently the dominant source for sensitive surfaces on ISS and modeling the outgassing rate decay over a 20 to 30 year period is challenging. Materials outgassing is described herein as a diffusion-reaction process using ASTM E 1559 rate data. The observation of -1/2 (diffusion) or non-integers (reaction limited) as rate decay exponents for common ISS materials indicate classical reaction kinetics is unsatisfactory in modeling materials outgassing. Non-randomness of reactant concentrations at the interface is the source of this deviation from classical reaction kinetics. A diffusion limited decay was adopted as the result of the correlation of the contaminant layer thicknesses on returned ISS hardware, the existence of high outgassing silicone exhibiting near diffusion limited decay, and the confirmation of non-depleted material after ten years in the Low Earth Orbit.Keywords: Materials Outgassing, ASTM E 1559, Reaction Kinetics, Diffusion, Space Environments Effects, Contamination

  3. Hurricane Irene's Impacts on the Aftershock Sequence of the 2011 Mw5.8 Virginia Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, X.; Peng, Z.; Yang, H.; Allman, S.

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that typhoon could trigger shallow slow-slip events in Taiwan. However, it is unclear whether such extreme weather events could affect the occurrence of regular earthquakes as well. A good opportunity to test this hypothesis occurred in 2011 when an Mw 5.8 earthquake struck Louisa County, Virginia. This event ruptured a shallow, reverse fault. Roughly 5 days later, hurricane Irene struck the coast of Norfolk, Virginia, which is near the epicentral region of the Virginia mainshock. Because aftershocks listed in the ANSS catalog were incomplete immediately after the main shock, it is very difficult to find the genuine correlation between the seismicity rate changes and hurricane Irene. Hence, we use a recently developed waveform matched filter technique to scan through the continuous seismic data to detect small aftershocks that are previously unidentified. A mixture of 7 temporary stations from the IRIS Ramp deployment and 8 temporary stations deployed by Virginia Tech is used. The temporary stations were set up between 24 to 72 hours following the main shock around its immediate vicinity, which provides us a unique dataset recording the majority aftershock sequence of an intraplate earthquake. We us 80 aftershocks identified by Chapman [2013] as template events and scan through the continuous data from 23 August 2011 through 10 September 2011. So far, we have detected 704 events using a threshold of 12 times the median absolute deviation (MAD), which is ~25 times more than listed in the ANSS catalog. The aftershock rate generally decayed with time as predicted by the Omori's law. A statistically significant increase of seismicity rate is found when hurricane Irene passed by the epicentral region. A possible explanation is that the atmosphere pressure drop unloaded the surface, which brought the reverse faults closer to failure. However, we also identified similar fluctuations of seismicity rate changes at other times. Hence, it is still

  4. Fine and ultrafine particle decay rates in multiple homes.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Lance; Kindzierski, Warren; Kearney, Jill; MacNeill, Morgan; Héroux, Marie-Ève; Wheeler, Amanda J

    2013-11-19

    Human exposure to particles depends on particle loss mechanisms such as deposition and filtration. Fine and ultrafine particles (FP and UFP) were measured continuously over seven consecutive days during summer and winter inside 74 homes in Edmonton, Canada. Daily average air exchange rates were also measured. FP were also measured outside each home and both FP and UFP were measured at a central monitoring station. A censoring algorithm was developed to identify indoor-generated concentrations, with the remainder representing particles infiltrating from outdoors. The resulting infiltration factors were employed to determine the continuously changing background of outdoor particles infiltrating the homes. Background-corrected indoor concentrations were then used to determine rates of removal of FP and UFP following peaks due to indoor sources. About 300 FP peaks and 400 UFP peaks had high-quality (median R(2) value >98%) exponential decay rates lasting from 30 min to 10 h. Median (interquartile range (IQR)) decay rates for UFP were 1.26 (0.82-1.83) h(-1); for FP 1.08 (0.62-1.75) h(-1). These total decay rates included, on average, about a 25% contribution from air exchange, suggesting that deposition and filtration accounted for the major portion of particle loss mechanisms in these homes. Models presented here identify and quantify effects of several factors on total decay rates, such as window opening behavior, home age, use of central furnace fans and kitchen and bathroom exhaust fans, use of air cleaners, use of air conditioners, and indoor-outdoor temperature differences. These findings will help identify ways to reduce exposure and risk. PMID:24143863

  5. Aftershock relocation and frequency-size distribution, stress inversion and seismotectonic setting of the 7 August 2013 M = 5.4 earthquake in Kallidromon Mountain, central Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganas, Athanassios; Karastathis, Vassilios; Moshou, Alexandra; Valkaniotis, Sotirios; Mouzakiotis, Evangelos; Papathanassiou, George

    2014-03-01

    On August 7, 2013 a moderate earthquake (NOA ML = 5.1, NOA Mw = 5.4) occurred in central Kallidromon Mountain, in the Pthiotis region of central Greece. 2270 aftershocks were relocated using a modified 1-D velocity model for this area. The b-value of the aftershock sequence was b = 0.85 for a completeness magnitude of Mc = 1.7. The rate of aftershock decay was determined at p = 0.63. The spatial distribution of the aftershock sequence points towards the reactivation of a N70° ± 10°E striking normal fault at crustal depths between 8 and 13 km. A NNW-SSE cross-section imaged the activation of a steep, south dipping normal fault. A stress inversion analysis of 12 focal mechanisms showed that the minimum horizontal stress is extensional at N173°E. No primary surface ruptures were observed in the field; however, the earthquake caused severe damage in the villages of the Kallidromon area. The imaged fault strike and the orientation of the long-axis of the aftershock sequence distribution are both at a high-angle to the strike of known active faults in this area of central Greece. We interpret the Kallidromon seismic sequence as release of extensional seismic strain on secondary, steep faults inside the Fokida-Viotia crustal block.

  6. Reduced Aftershock Productivity in Regions with Known Slow Slip Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, G.; Mina, A.; Richardson, E.; McGuire, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Reduced aftershock activity has been observed in areas with high rates of aseismic slip, such as transform fault zones and some subduction zones. Fault conditions that could explain both of these observations include a low effective normal stress regime and/or a high temperature, semi-brittle/plastic rheology. To further investigate the possible connection between areas of aseismic slip and reduced aftershock productivity, we compared the mainshock-aftershock sequences in subduction zones where aseismic slip transients have been observed to those of adjacent (along-strike) regions where no slow slip events have been detected. Using the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) catalog, we counted aftershocks that occurred within 100 km and 14 days of 112 M>=5.0 slab earthquake mainshocks from January 1980 - July 2013, including 90 since January 2000, inside observed regions of detected slow slip: south central Alaska, Cascadia, the Nicoya Peninsula (Costa Rica), Guerrero (Mexico), and the North Island of New Zealand. We also compiled aftershock counts from 97 mainshocks from areas adjacent to each of these regions using the same criteria and over the same time interval. Preliminary analysis of these two datasets shows an aftershock triggering exponent (alpha in the ETAS model) of approximately 0.8, consistent with previous studies of aftershocks in a variety of tectonic settings. Aftershock productivity for both datasets is less than that of continental earthquakes. Contrasting the two datasets, aftershock productivity inside slow slip regions is lower than in adjacent areas along the same subduction zone and is comparable to that of mid-ocean ridge transform faults.

  7. Improved understanding of aftershock triggering by waveform detection of aftershocks with GPU computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Z.; Meng, X.; Hong, B.; Yu, X.

    2012-12-01

    Large shallow earthquakes are generally followed by increased seismic activities around the mainshock rupture zone, known as "aftershocks". Whether static or dynamic triggering is responsible for triggering aftershocks is still in debate. However, aftershocks listed in standard earthquake catalogs are generally incomplete immediately after the mainshock, which may result in inaccurate estimation of seismic rate changes. Recent studies have used waveforms of existing earthquakes as templates to scan through continuous waveforms to detect potential missing aftershocks, which is termed 'matched filter technique'. However, this kind of data mining is computationally intensive, which raises new challenges when applying to large data sets with tens of thousands of templates, hundreds of seismic stations and years of continuous waveforms. The waveform matched filter technique exhibits parallelism at multiple levels, which allows us to use GPU-based computation to achieve significant acceleration. By dividing the procedure into several routines and processing them in parallel, we have achieved ~40 times speedup for one Nvidia GPU card compared to sequential CPU code, and further scaled the code to multiple GPUs. We apply this paralleled code to detect potential missing aftershocks around the 2003 Mw 6.5 San Simeon and 2004 Mw6.0 Parkfield earthquakes in Central California, and around the 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake in southern California. In all these cases, we can detect several tens of times more earthquakes immediately after the mainshocks as compared with those listed in the catalogs. These newly identified earthquakes are revealing new information about the physical mechanisms responsible for triggering aftershocks in the near field. We plan to improve our code so that it can be executed in large-scale GPU clusters. Our work has the long-term goal of developing scalable methods for seismic data analysis in the context of "Big Data" challenges.

  8. Evolution of the vigorous 2006 swarm in Zakynthos (Greece) and probabilities for strong aftershocks occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimitriou, Eleftheria; Gospodinov, Dragomir; Karakostas, Vassilis; Astiopoulos, Anastasios

    2013-04-01

    A multiplet of moderate-magnitude earthquakes (5.1 ≤ M ≤ 5.6) took place in Zakynthos Island and offshore area (central Ionian Islands, Greece) in April 2006. The activity in the first month occupied an area of almost 35 km long, striking roughly NNW-SSE, whereas aftershocks continued for several months, decaying with time but persisting at the same place. The properties of the activated structure were investigated with accurate relocated data and the available fault plane solutions of some of the stronger events. Both the distribution of seismicity and fault plane solutions show that thrusting with strike-slip motions are both present in high-angle fault segments. The segmentation of the activated structure could be attributed to the faulting complexity inherited from the regional compressive tectonics. Investigation of the spatial and temporal behavior of seismicity revealed possible triggering of adjacent fault segments that may fail individually, thus preventing coalescence in a large main rupture. In an attempt to forecast occurrence probabilities of six of the strong events ( M w ≥ 5.0), estimations were performed following the restricted epidemic-type aftershock sequence model, applied to data samples before each one of these strong events. Stochastic modeling was also used to identify "quiescence" periods before the examined aftershocks. In two out of the six cases, real aftershock rate did decrease before the next strong shock compared to the modeled one. The latter results reveal that rate decrease is not a clear precursor of strong shocks in the swarm and no quantitative information, suitable to supply probability gain, could be extracted from the data.

  9. Three Ingredients for Improved Global Aftershock Forecasts: Tectonic Region, Time-Dependent Catalog Incompleteness, and Inter-Sequence Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, M. T.; Hardebeck, J.; Felzer, K. R.; Michael, A. J.; van der Elst, N.

    2015-12-01

    Following a large earthquake, seismic hazard can be orders of magnitude higher than the long-term average as a result of aftershock triggering. Due to this heightened hazard, there is a demand from emergency managers and the public for rapid, authoritative, and reliable aftershock forecasts. In the past, USGS aftershock forecasts following large, global earthquakes have been released on an ad-hoc basis with inconsistent methods, and in some cases, aftershock parameters adapted from California. To remedy this, we are currently developing an automated aftershock product that will generate more accurate forecasts based on the Reasenberg and Jones (Science, 1989) method. To better capture spatial variations in aftershock productivity and decay, we estimate regional aftershock parameters for sequences within the Garcia et al. (BSSA, 2012) tectonic regions. We find that regional variations for mean aftershock productivity exceed a factor of 10. The Reasenberg and Jones method combines modified-Omori aftershock decay, Utsu productivity scaling, and the Gutenberg-Richter magnitude distribution. We additionally account for a time-dependent magnitude of completeness following large events in the catalog. We generalize the Helmstetter et al. (2005) equation for short-term aftershock incompleteness and solve for incompleteness levels in the global NEIC catalog following large mainshocks. In addition to estimating average sequence parameters within regions, we quantify the inter-sequence parameter variability. This allows for a more complete quantification of the forecast uncertainties and Bayesian updating of the forecast as sequence-specific information becomes available.

  10. Isolating the Decay Rate of Cosmological Gravitational Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengjie

    2006-08-01

    The decay rate of cosmological gravitational potential measures the deviation from Einstein-de Sitter universe and can put strong constraints on the nature of dark energy and gravity. The usual method to measure this decay rate is through the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect-large-scale structure (LSS) cross-correlation. However, the interpretation of the measured correlation signal is complicated by galaxy bias and the matter power spectrum. This could bias and/or degrade its constraints on the nature of dark energy and gravity. But combining the lensing-LSS cross-correlation measurements, the decay rate of gravitational potential can be isolated. For any given narrow redshift bin of LSS, the ratio of the two cross-correlations directly measures (dlnDφ/dlna)H(z)/W(χ, χs), where Dφ is the linear growth factor of the gravitational potential, H is the Hubble constant at redshift z, W(χ, χs) is the lensing kernel, and χ and χs are the comoving angular diameter distance to lens and source, respectively. This method is optimal in the sense that (1) the measured quantity is essentially free of systematic errors and is only limited by cosmic variance, and (2) the measured quantity depends only on several cosmological parameters and can be predicted from first principles unambiguously. Although fundamentally limited by the inevitably large cosmic variance associated with the ISW measurements, it can still put useful independent constraints on the amount of dark energy and its equation of state. It can also provide a powerful test of modified gravity and can distinguish the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati model from ΛCDM at >2.5 σ confidence level.

  11. Solvent Polarity Effect on Nonradiative Decay Rate of Thioflavin T.

    PubMed

    Stsiapura, Vitali I; Kurhuzenkau, Siarhei A; Kuzmitsky, Valery A; Bouganov, Oleg V; Tikhomirov, Sergey A

    2016-07-21

    It has been established earlier that fluorescence quantum yield of thioflavin T (ThT)-a probe widely used for amyloid fibrils detection-is viscosity-dependent, and photophysical properties of ThT can be well-described by the fluorescent molecular rotor model, which associates twisted internal charge transfer (TICT) reaction with the main nonradiative decay process in the excited state of the dye. Solutions of ThT in a range of polar solvents were studied using steady-state fluorescence and sub-picosecond transient absorption spectroscopy methods, and we showed that solvent effect on nonradiative transition rate knr cannot be reduced to the dependence on viscosity only and that ∼3 times change of knr can be observed for ThT in aprotic solvents and water, which correlates with solvent polarity. Different behavior was observed in alcohol solutions, particularly in longer n-alcohols, where TICT rate was mainly determined by rotational diffusion of ThT fragments. Quantum-chemical calculations of S0 → S1 transition energy were performed to get insight of polar solvent contribution to the excited-state energy stabilization. Effect of polar solvent on electronic energy levels of ThT was simulated by applying homogeneous electric field according to the Onsager cavity model. Static solvent effect on the excited-state potential energy surface, where charge transfer reaction takes place, was not essential to account for experimentally observed TICT rate differences in water and aprotic solvents. From the other side, nonradiative decay rate of ThT in water, ethylene glycol, and aprotic solvents was found to follow dynamics of polar solvation knr ∼ τS(-1), which can explain dependence of the TICT rate on both polarity and viscosity of the solvents. PMID:27351358

  12. Relocation of Early and Late Aftershocks of the 2001 Bhuj Earthquake Using Joint Hypocentral Determination (JHD) Technique: Implication toward the Continued Aftershock Activity for more than Four Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Prantik; Narsaiah, R.; Sairam, B.; Satyamurty, C.; Raju, I. P.

    2006-08-01

    We employed layered model joint hypocentral determination (JHD) with station corrections to improve location identification for the 26 January, 2001 Mw 7.7 Bhuj early and late aftershock sequence. We relocated 999 early aftershocks using the data from a close combined network (National Geophysical Research Institute, India and Center for Earthquake Research Institute, USA) of 8 18 digital seismographs during 12 28 February, 2001. Additionally, 350 late aftershocks were also relocated using the data from 4 10 digital seismographs/accelerographs during August 2002 to December 2004. These precisely relocated aftershocks (error in the epicentral location<30 meter, error in the focal depth estimation < 50 meter) delineate an east-west trending blind thrust (North Wagad Fault, NWF) dipping (~ 45°) southward, about 25 km north of Kachchh main land fault (KMF), as the causative fault for the 2001 Bhuj earthquake. The aftershock zone is confined to a 60-km long and 40-km wide region lying between the KMF to the south and NWF to the north, extending from 2 to 45 km depth. Estimated focal depths suggest that the aftershock zone became deeper with the passage of time. The P- and S-wave station corrections determined from the JHD technique indicate that the larger values (both +ve and -ve) characterize the central aftershock zone, which is surrounded by the zones of smaller values. The station corrections vary from -0.9 to +1.1 sec for the P waves and from -0.7 to +1.4 sec for the S waves. The b-value and p-value of the whole aftershock (2001 2004) sequences of Mw ≥ 3 are estimated to be 0.77 ± 0.02 and 0.99 ± 0.02, respectively. The p-value indicates a smaller value than the global median of 1.1, suggesting a relatively slow decay of aftershocks, whereas, the relatively lower b-value (less than the average b-value of 1.0 for stable continental region earthquakes of India) suggests a relatively higher probability for larger earthquakes in Kachchh in comparison to other

  13. On the adaptive daily forecasting of seismic aftershock hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimian, Hossein; Jalayer, Fatemeh; Asprone, Domenico; Lombardi, Anna Maria; Marzocchi, Warner; Prota, Andrea; Manfredi, Gaetano

    2013-04-01

    Post-earthquake ground motion hazard assessment is a fundamental initial step towards time-dependent seismic risk assessment for buildings in a post main-shock environment. Therefore, operative forecasting of seismic aftershock hazard forms a viable support basis for decision-making regarding search and rescue, inspection, repair, and re-occupation in a post main-shock environment. Arguably, an adaptive procedure for integrating the aftershock occurrence rate together with suitable ground motion prediction relations is key to Probabilistic Seismic Aftershock Hazard Assessment (PSAHA). In the short-term, the seismic hazard may vary significantly (Jordan et al., 2011), particularly after the occurrence of a high magnitude earthquake. Hence, PSAHA requires a reliable model that is able to track the time evolution of the earthquake occurrence rates together with suitable ground motion prediction relations. This work focuses on providing adaptive daily forecasts of the mean daily rate of exceeding various spectral acceleration values (the aftershock hazard). Two well-established earthquake occurrence models suitable for daily seismicity forecasts associated with the evolution of an aftershock sequence, namely, the modified Omori's aftershock model and the Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) are adopted. The parameters of the modified Omori model are updated on a daily basis using Bayesian updating and based on the data provided by the ongoing aftershock sequence based on the methodology originally proposed by Jalayer et al. (2011). The Bayesian updating is used also to provide sequence-based parameter estimates for a given ground motion prediction model, i.e. the aftershock events in an ongoing sequence are exploited in order to update in an adaptive manner the parameters of an existing ground motion prediction model. As a numerical example, the mean daily rates of exceeding specific spectral acceleration values are estimated adaptively for the L'Aquila 2009

  14. Aftershock process of Chu earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanov, Alexey; Leskova, Ekaterina; Emanov, Aleksandr; Kolesnikov, Yury; Fateyev, Aleksandr

    2010-05-01

    Chu earthquake of 27.09.2003, Ms =7.3 occurred in joint zone of Chagan-Uzun raised block with North-Chu ridge. Epicentral zone cover a series of contrast geological structures of Mountain Altai (two hollows: Chu and Kurai, devided by Chagan-Uzun block, and mountain range, franking them,: Nort-Chu, Kurai, South-Chu, Aigulak). The seismic process occurred in zone of expressive block structure, and this is embodied in its space-time structure. The high accuracy of hypocental construction in epicenral zone of Chu earthquake is provided by local network of seismological stations (fifteen stations) and experiments with temporary station network in this zone (20-50 stations). The first stage of aftershock process formation is connected with Chagan-Uzun block. The second large aftershock of 01.10.2003 changes cardinally spatial pattern of aftershock process. Instead of round area an elongate aftershock area is formed along boundary of Kurai hollow with North-Chu ridge. In the following process spread out in north-west angle of Chu hollow. Linear elongate aftershock area is subdivided into four elements. The north-west element has form of horse tail, starting as a line in area of outlet of Aktru River in Kurai hollow, and ramifies short of settlement Chibit. Slope of plane of aftershocks for this element is determined from hollow under North-Chu ridge. The seismic process is going not along boundary hollow-mountain ridge, but displaced in hollow side. The central part of element - this are mainly horizontal shift faults, and outlying districts have pronounced vertical components of displacements. The second element stretches from Aktru River to Chagan-Uzun block. Earthquake epicenters in plane make two curved parallel lines. In the angle of Chagan-Uzun block are ceiling amount of uplifts. The third element is the boundary of Chagan-Uzun block with North-Chu ridge. The forth element is formed by aftershocks, leaving in range of Chu hollow. Areal dispersal of earthquakes is

  15. Decay Rate for Travelling Waves of a Relaxation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hailiang; Woo, Ching Wah; Yang, Tong

    1997-03-01

    A relaxation model was proposed in [Shi Jin and Zhouping Xin,Comm. Pure Appl. Math.48(1995), 555-563] to approximate the hyperbolic systems numerically under the subcharacteristic condition introduced in [T. P. Liu,Comm. Math. Phys.108(1987), 153-175]. The stability of travelling waves with strong shock profile and integral zero was proved in [H. L. Liu, J. H. Wang, and T. Yang, Stability in a relaxation model with nonconvex flux, preprint, 1996; H. L. Liu and J. Wang, Asymptotic stability of travelling wave solutions of a hyperbolic system with relaxation terms, preprint, 1995] when the original system is scalar. In this paper, we study the rate of the asymptotic convergence speed of thse travelling wave solutions. The analysis applies to the case of a nonconvex flux and when the shock speed coincides with characteristic speed of the state at infinity. The decay rate is obtained by applying the energy method and is shown to be the same as the one for the viscous conservation law [A. Matsumura and K. Nishihara,Comm. Math. Phys.165(1994), 83-96].

  16. Aftershocks in coherent-noise models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilke, C.; Altmeyer, S.; Martinetz, T.

    1998-09-01

    The decay pattern of aftershocks in the so-called ‘coherent-noise’ models [M.E.J. Newman, K. Sneppen, Phys. Rev. E 54 (1996) 6226] is studied in detail. Analytical and numerical results show that the probability to find a large event at time t after an initial major event decreases as t- τ for small t, with the exponent τ ranging from 0 to values well above 1. This is in contrast to Sneppen and Newman, who stated that the exponent is about 1, independent of the microscopic details of the simulation. Numerical simulations of an extended model [C. Wilke, T. Martinetz, Phys. Rev. E 56 (1997) 7128] show that the power-law is only a generic feature of the original dynamics and does not necessarily appear in a more general context. Finally, the implications of the results to the modelling of earthquakes are discussed.

  17. Aftershocks and triggered events of the Great 1906 California earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meltzner, A.J.; Wald, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    and an M ???5.0 event under or near Santa Monica Bay, 11.3 and 31.3 hr after the San Francisco mainshock, respectively. The western Arizona event is inferred to have been triggered dynamically. In general, the largest aftershocks occurred at the ends of the 1906 rupture or away from the rupture entirely; very few significant aftershocks occurred along the mainshock rupture itself. The total number of large aftershocks was less than predicted by a generic model based on typical California mainshock-aftershock statistics, and the 1906 sequence appears to have decayed more slowly than average California sequences. Similarities can be drawn between the 1906 aftershock sequence and that of the 1857 (Mw 7.9) San Andreas fault earthquake.

  18. Time decay rates for the equations of the compressible heat-conductive flow through porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qing; Tan, Zhong; Wu, Guochun

    2015-11-01

    We consider the time decay rates of smooth solutions to the Cauchy problem for the equations of the compressible heat-conductive flow through porous media. We prove the global existence and uniqueness of the solutions by the standard energy method. Moreover, we establish the optimal decay rates of the solution as well as its higher-order spatial derivatives. And the damping effect on the time decay rates of the solution is studied in detail.

  19. Larger aftershocks happen farther away: Nonseparability of magnitude and spatial distributions of aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elst, Nicholas J.; Shaw, Bruce E.

    2015-07-01

    Aftershocks may be driven by stress concentrations left by the main shock rupture or by elastic stress transfer to adjacent fault sections or strands. Aftershocks that occur within the initial rupture may be limited in size, because the scale of the stress concentrations should be smaller than the primary rupture itself. On the other hand, aftershocks that occur on adjacent fault segments outside the primary rupture may have no such size limitation. Here we use high-precision double-difference relocated earthquake catalogs to demonstrate that larger aftershocks occur farther away than smaller aftershocks, when measured from the centroid of early aftershock activity—a proxy for the initial rupture. Aftershocks as large as or larger than the initiating event nucleate almost exclusively in the outer regions of the aftershock zone. This observation is interpreted as a signature of elastic rebound in the earthquake catalog and can be used to improve forecasting of large aftershocks.

  20. Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Kristoffersen, A.R.; Gadgil, A.J.; Lorenzetti, D.M.

    2004-05-01

    Tracer gas measurements are commonly used to estimate the fresh air exchange rate in a room or building. Published tracer decay methods account for fresh air supply, infiltration, and leaks in ductwork. However, the time delay associated with a ventilation system recirculating tracer back to the room also affects the decay rate. We present an analytical study of tracer gas decay in a well-mixed, mechanically-ventilated room with recirculation. The analysis shows that failing to account for delays can lead to under- or over-estimates of the fresh air supply, depending on whether the decay rate calculation includes the duct volume.

  1. Forecasting Aftershocks from Multiple Earthquakes: Lessons from the Mw=7.3 2015 Nepal Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Abigail; NicBhloscaidh, Mairéad; McCloskey, John

    2016-04-01

    The Omori decay of aftershocks is often perturbed by large secondary events which present particular, but not uncommon, challenges to aftershock forecasting. The Mw = 7.8, 25 April 2015, Gorkha, Nepal earthquake was followed on 12 May by the Mw = 7.3 Kodari earthquake, superimposed its own aftershocks on the Gorkha sequence, immediately invalidating forecasts made by single-mainshock forecasting methods. The complexity of the Gorkha rupture process, where the hypocentre and moment centroid were separated by some 75 km, provided an insurmountable challenge for other standard forecasting methods. Here, we report several modifications of existing algorithms, which were developed in response to the complexity of this sequence and which appear to provide a more general framework for the robust and dependable forecasting of aftershock probabilities. We suggest that these methods may be operationalised to provide a scientific underpinning for an evidence-based management system for post-earthquake crises.

  2. USE OF GEOSTATISTICS TO PREDICT VIRUS DECAY RATES FOR DETERMINATION OF SEPTIC TANK SETBACK DISTANCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water samples were collected from 71 public drinking-water supply wells in the Tucson, Arizona, basin. Virus decay rates in the water samples were determined with MS-2 coliphage as a model virus. The correlations between the virus decay rates and the sample locations were shown b...

  3. Performance of aftershock forecasts: problem and formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Wu, Z.; Li, L.

    2010-12-01

    WFSD project deals with the problems of earthquake physics, in which one of the important designed aims is the forecast of the on-going aftershock activity of the Wenchuan earthquake, taking the advantage of the fast response to great earthquakes. Correlation between fluid measurements and aftershocks provided heuristic clues to the forecast of aftershocks, invoking the discussion on the performance of such ‘precursory anomalies’, even if in a retrospective perspective. In statistical seismology, one of the critical issues is how to test the statistical significance of an earthquake forecast scheme against real seismic activity. Due to the special characteristics of aftershock series and the feature of aftershock forecasts that it deals with a limited spatial range and specific temporal duration, the test of the performance of aftershock forecasts has to be different from the standard tests for main shock series. In this presentation we address and discuss the possible schemes for testing the performance of aftershock forecasts - a seemingly simple but practically important issue in statistical seismology. As a simple and preliminary approach, we use an alternative form of Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) test, as well as other similar tests, considering the properties of aftershock series by using Omori law, ETAS model, and/or CFS calculation. We also discussed the lessons and experiences of the Wenchuan aftershock forecasts, exploring how to make full use of the present knowledge of the regularity of aftershocks to serve the earthquake rescue and relief endeavor as well as the post-earthquake reconstruction.

  4. Implications of spatial and temporal development of the aftershock sequence for the Mw 8.3 June 9, 1994 Deep Bolivian Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Stephen C.; Wallace, Terry C.; Beck, Susan L.; Silver, Paul G.; Zandt, George; Vandecar, John; Minaya, Estela

    On June 9, 1994 the Mw 8.3 Bolivia earthquake (636 km depth) occurred in a region which had not experienced significant, deep seismicity for at least 30 years. The mainshock and aftershocks were recorded in Bolivia on the BANJO and SEDA broadband seismic arrays and on the San Calixto Network. We used the joint hypocenter determination method to determine the relative location of the aftershocks. We have identified no foreshocks and 89 aftershocks (m > 2.2) for the 20-day period following the mainshock. The frequency of aftershock occurrence decreased rapidly, with only one or two aftershocks per day occuring after day two. The temporal decay of aftershock activity is similar to shallow aftershock sequences, but the number of aftershocks is two orders of magnitude less. Additionally, a mb ∼6, apparently triggered earthquake occurred just 10 minutes after the mainshock about 330 km east-southeast of the mainshock at a depth of 671 km. The aftershock sequence occurred north and east of the mainshock and extends to a depth of 665 km. The aftershocks define a slab striking N68°W and dipping 45°NE. The strike, dip, and location of the aftershock zone are consistent with this seismicity being confined within the downward extension of the subducted Nazca plate. The location and orientation of the aftershock sequence indicate that the subducted Nazca plate bends between the NNW striking zone of deep seismicity in western Brazil and the N-S striking zone of seismicity in central Bolivia. A tear in the deep slab is not necessitated by the data. A subset of the aftershock hypocenters cluster along a subhorizontal plane near the depth of the mainshock, favoring a horizontal fault plane. The horizontal dimensions of the mainshock [Beck et al., this issue; Silver et al., 1995] and slab defined by the aftershocks are approximately equal, indicating that the mainshock ruptured through the slab.

  5. Matched-filter Detection of the Missing Foreshocks and Aftershocks of the 2015 Gorkha earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, L.; Huang, H.; Wang, Y.; Plasencia Linares, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    The 25 April 2015 Mw 7.8 Gorkha earthquake occurred at the bottom edge of the locking portion of the Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT), where the Indian plate under-thrusts the Himalayan wedge. The earthquake is followed by a number of large aftershocks but is not preceded by any foreshocks within ~3 weeks according to the NEIC, ISC and NSC catalog. However, a large portion of aftershocks could be missed due to either the contamination of the mainshock coda or small signal to noise ratio. It is also unclear whether there are foreshocks preceding the mainshock, the underlying physical processes of which are crucial for imminent seismic hazard assessment. Here, we employ the matched filter technique to recover the missing events from 22 April to 30 April. We collect 3-component broadband seismic waveforms recorded by one station in Nepal operated by Ev-K2-CNR, OGS Italy and eleven stations in Tibet operated by the China Earthquake Networks Center. We bandpass the seismograms to 1-6 Hz to retain high frequency energies. The template waveforms with high signal-to-noise ratios (> 5) are obtained at several closest stations. To detect and locate the events that occur around the templates, correlograms are shifted at each station with differential travel time as a function of source location based on the CRUST1.0 model. We find ~14 times more events than those listed in the ISC catalog. Some of the detected events are confirmed by visual inspections of the waveforms at the closest stations. The preliminary results show a streak of seismicity occurred around 2.5 days before the mainshock to the southeast of the mainshock hypocenter. The seismicity rate is elevated above the background level during this period of time and decayed subsequently following the Omori's law. The foreshocks appear to migrate towards the hypocenter with logarithmic time ahead of the mainshock, which indicates possible triggering of the mainshock by the propagating afterslip of the foreshocks. Immediately

  6. Reduced Beta Decay Rates of Iron Isotopes for Supernova Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Nabi, Jameel-Un

    2009-07-07

    During the late phases of stellar evolution beta decay on iron isotopes, in the core of massive stars, plays a crucial role in the dynamics of core-collapse. The beta decay contributes in maintaining a 'respectable' lepton-to-baryon ratio (PSI{sub e}) of the core prior to collapse which results in a larger shock energy to power the explosion. It is indeed a fine tuning of the parameter PSI{sub e} at various stages of supernova physics which can lead to a successful transformation of the collapse into an explosion. The calculations presented here might help in fine-tuning of PSI{sub e} for the collapse simulators of massive stars.

  7. Aftershock triggering by complete Coulomb stress changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilb, Debi; Gomberg, J.; Bodin, P.

    2002-01-01

    We examine the correlation between seismicity rate change following the 1992, M7.3, Landers, California, earthquake and characteristics of the complete Coulomb failure stress (CFS) changes (??CFS(t)) that this earthquake generated. At close distances the time-varying "dynamic" portion of the stress change depends on how the rupture develops temporally and spatially and arises from radiated seismic waves and from permanent coseismic fault displacement. The permanent "static" portion (??CFS) depends only on the final coseismic displacement. ??CFS diminishes much more rapidly with distance than the transient, dynamic stress changes. A common interpretation of the strong correlation between ??CFS and aftershocks is that load changes can advance or delay failure. Stress changes may also promote failure by physically altering properties of the fault or its environs. Because it is transient, ??CFS(t) can alter the failure rate only by the latter means. We calculate both ??CFS and the maximum positive value of ??CFS(t) (peak ??CFS(t)) using a reflectivity program. Input parameters are constrained by modeling Landers displacement seismograms. We quantify the correlation between maps of seismicity rate changes and maps of modeled ??CFS and peak ??CFS(t) and find agreement for both models. However, rupture directivity, which does not affect ??CFS, creates larger peak ??CFS(t) values northwest of the main shock. This asymmetry is also observed in seismicity rate changes but not in ??CFS. This result implies that dynamic stress changes are as effective as static stress changes in triggering aftershocks and may trigger earthquakes long after the waves have passed.

  8. Biomass decay rates and tissue nutrient loss in bloom and non-bloom-forming macroalgal species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conover, Jessie; Green, Lindsay A.; Thornber, Carol S.

    2016-09-01

    Macroalgal blooms occur in shallow, low-wave energy environments and are generally dominated by fast-growing ephemeral macroalgae. When macroalgal mats undergo senescence and decompose they can cause oxygen depletion and release nutrients into the surrounding water. There are relatively few studies that examine macroalgal decomposition rates in areas impacted by macroalgal blooms. Understanding the rate of macroalgal bloom decomposition is essential to understanding the impacts of macroalgal blooms following senescence. Here, we examined the biomass, organic content, nitrogen decay rates and δ15N values for five macroalgal species (the bloom-forming Agardhiella subulata, Gracilaria vermiculophylla, Ulva compressa, and Ulva rigida and the non-bloom-forming Fucus vesiculosus) in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, U.S.A. using a litterbag design. Bloom-forming macroalgae had similar biomass decay rates (0.34-0.51 k d-1) and decayed significantly faster than non-bloom-forming macroalgae (0.09 k d-1). Biomass decay rates also varied temporally, with a significant positive correlation between biomass decay rate and water temperature for U. rigida. Tissue organic content decreased over time in all species, although A. subulata and G. vermiculophylla displayed significantly higher rates of organic content decay than U. compressa, U. rigida, and F. vesiculosus. Agardhiella subulata had a significantly higher rate of tissue nitrogen decay (0.35 k d-1) than all other species. By contrast, only the δ15N of F. vesiculosus changed significantly over the decay period. Overall, our results indicate that bloom-forming macroalgal species decay more rapidly than non-bloom-forming species.

  9. Calculations on decay rates of various proton emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yibin; Ren, Zhongzhou

    2016-03-01

    Proton radioactivity of neutron-deficient nuclei around the dripline has been systematically studied within the deformed density-dependent model. The crucial proton-nucleus potential is constructed via the single-folding integral of the density distribution of daughter nuclei and the effective M3Y nucleon-nucleon interaction or the proton-proton Coulomb interaction. After the decay width is obtained by the modified two-potential approach, the final decay half-lives can be achieved by involving the spectroscopic factors from the relativistic mean-field (RMF) theory combined with the BCS method. Moreover, a simple formula along with only one adjusted parameter is tentatively proposed to evaluate the half-lives of proton emitters, where the introduction of nuclear deformation is somewhat discussed as well. It is found that the calculated results are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental values and consistent with other theoretical studies, indicating that the present approach can be applied to the case of proton emission. Predictions on half-lives are made for possible proton emitters, which may be useful for future experiments.

  10. Seasonal determinations of algal virus decay rates reveal overwintering in a temperate freshwater pond.

    PubMed

    Long, Andrew M; Short, Steven M

    2016-07-01

    To address questions about algal virus persistence (i.e., continued existence) in the environment, rates of decay of infectivity for two viruses that infect Chlorella-like algae, ATCV-1 and CVM-1, and a virus that infects the prymnesiophyte Chrysochromulina parva, CpV-BQ1, were estimated from in situ incubations in a temperate, seasonally frozen pond. A series of experiments were conducted to estimate rates of decay of infectivity in all four seasons with incubations lasting 21 days in spring, summer and autumn, and 126 days in winter. Decay rates observed across this study were relatively low compared with previous estimates obtained for other algal viruses, and ranged from 0.012 to 11% h(-1). Overall, the virus CpV-BQ1 decayed most rapidly whereas ATCV-1 decayed most slowly, but for all viruses the highest decay rates were observed during the summer and the lowest were observed during the winter. Furthermore, the winter incubations revealed the ability of each virus to overwinter under ice as ATCV-1, CVM-1 and CpV-BQ1 retained up to 48%, 19% and 9% of their infectivity after 126 days, respectively. The observed resilience of algal viruses in a seasonally frozen freshwater pond provides a mechanism that can support the maintenance of viral seed banks in nature. However, the high rates of decay observed in the summer demonstrate that virus survival and therefore environmental persistence can be subject to seasonal bottlenecks. PMID:26943625

  11. Statistical monitoring of aftershock sequences: a case study of the 2015 Mw7.8 Gorkha, Nepal, earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Yosihiko; Tsuruoka, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Early forecasting of aftershocks has become realistic and practical because of real-time detection of hypocenters. This study illustrates a statistical procedure for monitoring aftershock sequences to detect anomalies to increase the probability gain of a significantly large aftershock or even an earthquake larger than the main shock. In particular, a significant lowering (relative quiescence) in aftershock activity below the level predicted by the Omori-Utsu formula or the epidemic-type aftershock sequence model is sometimes followed by a large earthquake in a neighboring region. As an example, we detected significant lowering relative to the modeled rate after approximately 1.7 days after the main shock in the aftershock sequence of the Mw7.8 Gorkha, Nepal, earthquake of April 25, 2015. The relative quiescence lasted until the May 12, 2015, M7.3 Kodari earthquake that occurred at the eastern end of the primary aftershock zone. Space-time plots including the transformed time can indicate the local places where aftershock activity lowers (the seismicity shadow). Thus, the relative quiescence can be hypothesized to be related to stress shadowing caused by probable slow slips. In addition, the aftershock productivity of the M7.3 Kodari earthquake is approximately twice as large as that of the M7.8 main shock.

  12. Beta decay rates of neutron-rich nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marketin, Tomislav; Huther, Lutz; Petković, Jelena; Paar, Nils; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2016-06-01

    Heavy element nucleosynthesis models involve various properties of thousands of nuclei in order to simulate the intricate details of the process. By necessity, as most of these nuclei cannot be studied in a controlled environment, these models must rely on the nuclear structure models for input. Of all the properties, the beta-decay half-lives are one of the most important ones due to their direct impact on the resulting abundance distributions. In this study we present the results of a large-scale calculation based on the relativistic nuclear energy density functional, where both the allowed and the first-forbidden transitions are studied in more than 5000 neutron-rich nuclei. Aside from the astrophysical applications, the results of this calculation can also be employed in the modeling of the electron and antineutrino spectra from nuclear reactors.

  13. Decay rates and electromagnetic transitions of heavy quarkonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, J. N.; Soni, N. R.; Devlani, N.; Rai, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    The electromagnetic radiative transition widths for heavy quarkonia, as well as digamma and digluon decay widths, are computed in the framework of the extended harmonic confinement model (ERHM) and Coulomb plus power potential (CPPν) with varying potential index ν. The outcome is compared with the values obtained from other theoretical models and experimental results. While the mass spectra, digamma and digluon widths from ERHM as well as CPPν=1 are in good agreement with experimental data, the electromagnetic transition widths span over a wide range for the potential models considered here making it difficult to prefer a particular model over the others because of the lack of experimental data for most transition widths. Supported by University Grants Commission, India for Major Research Project F. No.42-775/2013(SR) (J N Pandya) and Dept. of Science and Technology, India, under SERC fast track scheme SR/FTP/PS-152/2012 (A K Rai)

  14. Complex Configuration Effects on β-DECAY Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severyukhin, A. P.; Voronov, V. V.; Borzov, I. N.; Arsenyev, N. N.; van Giai, Nguyen

    2015-06-01

    Starting from a Skyrme interaction the Gamow-Teller (GT) strength in the Qβ- window has been studied within a microscopic model including the 2p-2h configuration effects. The suggested approach enables one to perform the calculations in very large configuration spaces. As a result, the β--decay halflife is decreased due to the 2p - 2h fragmentation of GT states. Using the Skyrme interaction SGII with tensor terms we study this reduction effect for the neutron-rich N = 82 isotones below the doubly magic nucleus 132Sn. Predictions are given for 126Ru and 128Pd in comparison to 130Cd which is the r-process waiting-point nucleus.

  15. Beta decay rates of neutron-rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Marketin, Tomislav; Huther, Lutz; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2015-10-15

    Heavy element nucleosynthesis models involve various properties of thousands of nuclei in order to simulate the intricate details of the process. By necessity, as most of these nuclei cannot be studied in a controlled environment, these models must rely on the nuclear structure models for input. Of all the properties, the beta-decay half-lives are one of the most important ones due to their direct impact on the resulting abundance distributions. Currently, a single large-scale calculation is available based on a QRPA calculation with a schematic interaction on top of the Finite Range Droplet Model. In this study we present the results of a large-scale calculation based on the relativistic nuclear energy density functional, where both the allowed and the first-forbidden transitions are studied in more than 5000 neutron-rich nuclei.

  16. Continuum-state and bound-state β--decay rates of the neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, M.; Ivanov, A. N.; Ivanova, V. A.; Marton, J.; Pitschmann, M.; Serebrov, A. P.; Troitskaya, N. I.; Wellenzohn, M.

    2009-09-01

    For the β--decay of the neutron we analyze the continuum-state and bound-state decay modes. We calculate the decay rates, the electron energy spectrum for the continuum-state decay mode, and angular distributions of the decay probabilities for the continuum-state and bound-state decay modes. The theoretical results are obtained for the new value for the axial coupling constant gA=1.2750(9), obtained recently by H. Abele [Prog. Part. Nucl. Phys. 60, 1 (2008)] from the fit of the experimental data on the coefficient of the correlation of the neutron spin and the electron momentum of the electron energy spectrum of the continuum-state decay mode. We take into account the contribution of radiative corrections and the scalar and tensor weak couplings. The calculated angular distributions of the probabilities of the bound-state decay modes of the polarized neutron can be used for the experimental measurements of the bound-state β--decays into the hyperfine states with total angular momentum F=1 and scalar and tensor weak coupling constants.

  17. Prolonged decay of molecular rate estimates for metazoan mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Simon Y.W.

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary timescales can be estimated from genetic data using the molecular clock, often calibrated by fossil or geological evidence. However, estimates of molecular rates in mitochondrial DNA appear to scale negatively with the age of the clock calibration. Although such a pattern has been observed in a limited range of data sets, it has not been studied on a large scale in metazoans. In addition, there is uncertainty over the temporal extent of the time-dependent pattern in rate estimates. Here we present a meta-analysis of 239 rate estimates from metazoans, representing a range of timescales and taxonomic groups. We found evidence of time-dependent rates in both coding and non-coding mitochondrial markers, in every group of animals that we studied. The negative relationship between the estimated rate and time persisted across a much wider range of calibration times than previously suggested. This indicates that, over long time frames, purifying selection gives way to mutational saturation as the main driver of time-dependent biases in rate estimates. The results of our study stress the importance of accounting for time-dependent biases in estimating mitochondrial rates regardless of the timescale over which they are inferred. PMID:25780773

  18. Seasonal variations of decay rate measurement data and their interpretation.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Heinrich

    2016-08-01

    Measurement data of long-lived radionuclides, for example, (85)Kr, (90)Sr, (108m)Ag, (133)Ba, (152)Eu, (154)Eu and (226)Ra, and particularly the relative residuals of fitted raw data from current measurements of ionization chambers for half-life determination show small periodic seasonal variations with amplitudes of about 0.15%. The interpretation of these fluctuations is a matter of controversy whether the observed effect is produced by some interaction with the radionuclides themselves or is an artifact of the measuring chain. At the origin of such a discussion there is the exponential decay law of radioactive substances used for data fitting, one of the fundamentals of nuclear physics. Some groups of physicists use statistical methods and analyze correlations with various parameters of the measurement data and, for example, the Earth-Sun distance, as a basis of interpretation. In this article, data measured at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt and published earlier are the subject of a correlation analysis using the corresponding time series of data with varying measurement conditions. An overview of these measurement conditions producing instrument instabilities is given and causality relations are discussed. The resulting correlation coefficients for various series of the same radionuclide using similar measurement conditions are in the order of 0.7, which indicates a high correlation, and for series of the same radionuclide using different measurement conditions and changes of the measuring chain of the order of -0.2 or even lower, which indicates an anti-correlation. These results provide strong arguments that the observed seasonal variations are caused by the measuring chain and, in particular, by the type of measuring electronics used. PMID:27258217

  19. Hawking-Moss Bounces and Vacuum Decay Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, Erick J.

    2007-06-22

    The conventional interpretation of the Hawking-Moss (HM) solution implies a transition rate between vacua that depends only on the values of the potential in the initial vacuum and at the top of a potential barrier, leading to the implausible conclusion that transitions to distant vacua can be as likely as those to a nearby one. I analyze this issue using a nongravitational example with analogous properties. I show that such HM bounces do not give reliable rate calculations, but are instead related to the probability of finding a quasistable configuration at a local potential maximum.

  20. WEST NILE VIRUS ANTIBODY DECAY RATE IN FREE-RANGING BIRDS.

    PubMed

    McKee, Eileen M; Walker, Edward D; Anderson, Tavis K; Kitron, Uriel D; Brawn, Jeffrey D; Krebs, Bethany L; Newman, Christina; Ruiz, Marilyn O; Levine, Rebecca S; Carrington, Mary E; McLean, Robert G; Goldberg, Tony L; Hamer, Gabriel L

    2015-07-01

    Antibody duration, following a humoral immune response to West Nile virus (WNV) infection, is poorly understood in free-ranging avian hosts. Quantifying antibody decay rate is important for interpreting serologic results and for understanding the potential for birds to serorevert and become susceptible again. We sampled free-ranging birds in Chicago, Illinois, US, from 2005 to 2011 and Atlanta, Georgia, US, from 2010 to 2012 to examine the dynamics of antibody decay following natural WNV infection. Using serial dilutions in a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we quantified WNV antibody titer in repeated blood samples from individual birds over time. We quantified a rate of antibody decay for 23 Northern Cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis) of 0.198 natural log units per month and 24 individuals of other bird species of 0.178 natural log units per month. Our results suggest that juveniles had a higher rate of antibody decay than adults, which is consistent with nonlinear antibody decay at different times postexposure. Overall, most birds had undetectable titers 2 yr postexposure. Nonuniform WNV antibody decay rates in free-ranging birds underscore the need for cautious interpretation of avian serology results in the context of arbovirus surveillance and epidemiology. PMID:25919465

  1. Vitamin C: Rate of Decay and Stability Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kakis, Frederic J.; Rossi, Carl J.

    1974-01-01

    Describes an experiment designed to provide the opportunity for studying some of the parameters affecting the stability of Vitamin C in various environments, and to acquaint the student with an experimental procedure for studying simple reaction kinetics and the calculations of specific rate constants. (Author/JR)

  2. Spectra and decay rates of bb¯ meson using Gaussian wave function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Ajay Kumar; Devlani, Nayneshkumar; Kher, Virendrasinh H.

    2015-05-01

    Using the Gaussian wave function mass spectra and decay rates of bb¯ meson are investigated in the framework of phenomenological quark anti-quark potential (coulomb plus power) model consisting of relativistic corrections to the kinetic energy term. The spin-spin, spin-orbit and tensor interactions are employed to obtain the pseudoscalar and vector meson masses. The decay constants (fP/V) are computed using the wave function at the origin. The di-gamma and di-leptonic decays of the bb¯ meson are investigated using Van-Rayan Weisskopf formula as well as in the NRQCD formalism.

  3. Anomalous stress diffusion, Omori's law and Continuous Time Random Walk in the 2010 Efpalion aftershock sequence (Corinth rift, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michas, Georgios; Vallianatos, Filippos; Karakostas, Vassilios; Papadimitriou, Eleftheria; Sammonds, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Efpalion aftershock sequence occurred in January 2010, when an M=5.5 earthquake was followed four days later by another strong event (M=5.4) and numerous aftershocks (Karakostas et al., 2012). This activity interrupted a 15 years period of low to moderate earthquake occurrence in Corinth rift, where the last major event was the 1995 Aigion earthquake (M=6.2). Coulomb stress analysis performed in previous studies (Karakostas et al., 2012; Sokos et al., 2012; Ganas et al., 2013) indicated that the second major event and most of the aftershocks were triggered due to stress transfer. The aftershocks production rate decays as a power-law with time according to the modified Omori law (Utsu et al., 1995) with an exponent larger than one for the first four days, while after the occurrence of the second strong event the exponent turns to unity. We consider the earthquake sequence as a point process in time and space and study its spatiotemporal evolution considering a Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) model with a joint probability density function of inter-event times and jumps between the successive earthquakes (Metzler and Klafter, 2000). Jump length distribution exhibits finite variance, whereas inter-event times scale as a q-generalized gamma distribution (Michas et al., 2013) with a long power-law tail. These properties are indicative of a subdiffusive process in terms of CTRW. Additionally, the mean square displacement of aftershocks is constant with time after the occurrence of the first event, while it changes to a power-law with exponent close to 0.15 after the second major event, illustrating a slow diffusive process. During the first four days aftershocks cluster around the epicentral area of the second major event, while after that and taking as a reference the second event, the aftershock zone is migrating slowly with time to the west near the epicentral area of the first event. This process is much slower from what would be expected from normal diffusion, a

  4. Decay rates of charmonia within a quark-antiquark confining potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smruti, Patel; Vinodkumar, P. C.; Shashank, Bhatnagar

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we investigate the spectroscopy and decay rates of charmonia within the framework of the non-relativistic Schrödinger equation by employing an approximate inter quark-antiquark potential. The spin hyperfine, spin-orbit and tensor components of the one gluon exchange interaction are employed to compute the spectroscopy of the excited S states and a few low-lying P and D waves. The resultant wave functions at zero inter-quark separation as well as some finite separations are employed to predict the di-gamma, di-leptonic and di-gluon decay rates of charmonia states using the conventional Van Royen-Weisskopf formula. The di-gamma and di-leptonic decay widths are also computed by incorporating the relativistic corrections of order v 4 within the NRQCD formalism. We have observed that the NRQCD predictions with their matrix elements computed at finite radial separation yield results which are found to be in better agreement with experimental values for both di-gamma and di-leptonic decays. The same scenario is seen in the case when di-gamma and di-leptonic decay widths are computed with the Van Royen-Weisskopf formula. It is also observed that the di-gluon decay width with the inclusion of binding energy effects are in better agreement with the experimental data available for 1S-2S and 1P. The di-gluon decay width of 3S and 2P waves waves are also predicted. Thus, the present study of decay rates clearly indicates the importance of binding energy effects. Supported by Major Research Project NO. F. 40-457/2011(SR), UGC, India

  5. Neglected role of fungal community composition in explaining variation in wood decay rates.

    PubMed

    Van der Wal, A; Ottosson, E; De Boer, W

    2015-01-01

    Decomposition of wood is an important component of global carbon cycling. Most wood decomposition models are based on tree characteristics and environmental conditions; however, they do not include community dynamics of fungi that are the major wood decomposers. We examined the factors explaining variation in sapwood decay in oak tree stumps two and five years after cutting. Wood moisture content was significantly correlated with sapwood decay in younger stumps, whereas ITS-based composition and species richness of the fungal community were the best predictors for mass loss in the older stumps. Co-occurrence analysis showed that, in freshly cut trees and in younger stumps, fungal communities were nonrandomly structured, whereas fungal communities in old stumps could not be separated from a randomly assembled community. These results indicate that the most important factors explaining variation in wood decay rates can change over time and that the strength of competitive interactions between fungi in decaying tree stumps may level off with increased wood decay. Our field analysis further suggests that ascomycetes may have a prominent role in wood decay, but their wood-degrading abilities need to be further tested under controlled conditions. The next challenging step will be to integrate fungal community assembly processes in wood decay models to improve carbon sequestration estimates of forests. PMID:26236897

  6. Aftershock patterns and main shock faulting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mendoza, C.; Hartzell, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    We have compared aftershock patterns following several moderate to large earthquakes with the corresponding distributions of coseismic slip obtained from previous analyses of the recorded strong ground motion and teleseismic waveforms. Our results are consistent with a hypothesis of aftershock occurrence that requires a secondary redistribution of stress following primary failure on the earthquake fault. Aftershocks followng earthquakes examined in this study occur mostly outside of or near the edges of the source areas indicated by the patterns of main shock slip. The spatial distribution of aftershocks reflects either a continuation of slip in the outer regions of the areas of maximum coseismic displacement or the activation of subsidiary faults within the volume surrounding the boundaries of main shock rupture. -from Authors

  7. Nonlinear Stability Analysis with Decay Rates of Two Classes of Waves for Conservation Laws.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zingano, Paulo Ricardo

    1990-08-01

    We study in this work the decay rate of disturbances to certain elementary waves for conservation laws when their initial profile is perturbed. In the first problem, rarefaction waves for the scalar equation u_ {t}+f(u)_{x}=u_{xx }, f convex, are considered, and we show that disturbances decay in the L^2 -norm as O(t^{-1/4+mu }), for mu > 0 arbitrarily small, provided they belong to the space L^1cap H^1 initially. The second problem concerns the stability of weak shock waves of a certain class of hyperbolic systems with relaxation, disturbances in this case are shown to decay in L ^2 at certain algebraic rates which depend on how fast they die off as x to +/- infty at initial time, provided they are sufficiently weak. This behavior is due to the compressibility of such waves with respect to the dynamic characteristics governing the propagation of disturbances, a basic feature of shock waves. This result is in vivid contrast to the corresponding one for rarefaction waves, where the decay is ultimately governed by diffusion processes which impose a limit on the overall rate. In both problems treated here, the analysis is based on the derivation of suitable energy inequalities with appropriate decay rates.

  8. Sensitivity studies for the main r process: β-decay rates

    SciTech Connect

    Mumpower, M.; Cass, J.; Passucci, G.; Aprahamian, A.; Surman, R.

    2014-04-15

    The pattern of isotopic abundances produced in rapid neutron capture, or r-process, nucleosynthesis is sensitive to the nuclear physics properties of thousands of unstable neutron-rich nuclear species that participate in the process. It has long been recognized that the some of the most influential pieces of nuclear data for r-process simulations are β-decay lifetimes. In light of experimental advances that have pushed measurement capabilities closer to the classic r-process path, we revisit the role of individual β-decay rates in the r process. We perform β-decay rate sensitivity studies for a main (A > 120) r process in a range of potential astrophysical scenarios. We study the influence of individual rates during (n, γ)-(γ, n) equilibrium and during the post-equilibrium phase where material moves back toward stability. We confirm the widely accepted view that the most important lifetimes are those of nuclei along the r-process path for each astrophysical scenario considered. However, we find in addition that individual β-decay rates continue to shape the final abundance pattern through the post-equilibrium phase, for as long as neutron capture competes with β decay. Many of the lifetimes important for this phase of the r process are within current or near future experimental reach.

  9. Coordinate-dependent diffusion coefficients: Decay rate in open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sargsyan, V. V.; Palchikov, Yu. V.; Antonenko, N. V.; Kanokov, Z.; Adamian, G. G.

    2007-06-15

    Based on a master equation for the reduced density matrix of an open quantum collective system, the influence of coordinate-dependent microscopical diffusion coefficients on the decay rate from a metastable state is treated. For various frictions and temperatures larger than a crossover temperature, the quasistationary decay rates obtained with the coordinate-dependent microscopical set of diffusion coefficients are compared with those obtained with the coordinate-independent microscopical set of diffusion coefficients and coordinate-independent and -dependent phenomenological sets of diffusion coefficients. Neglecting the coordinate dependence of diffusion coefficients, one can strongly overestimate or underestimate the decay rate at low temperature. The coordinate-dependent phenomenological diffusion coefficient in momentum are shown to be suitable for applications.

  10. Beyond the bucket: testing the effect of experimental design on rate and sequence of decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbott, Sarah; Murdock, Duncan; Purnell, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Experimental decay has revealed the potential for profound biases in our interpretations of exceptionally preserved fossils, with non-random sequences of character loss distorting the position of fossil taxa in phylogenetic trees. By characterising these sequences we can rewind this distortion and make better-informed interpretations of the affinity of enigmatic fossil taxa. Equally, rate of character loss is crucial for estimating the preservation potential of phylogentically informative characters, and revealing the mechanisms of preservation themselves. However, experimental decay has been criticised for poorly modeling 'real' conditions, and dismissed as unsophisticated 'bucket science'. Here we test the effect of a differing experimental parameters on the rate and sequence of decay. By doing so, we can test the assumption that the results of decay experiments are applicable to informing interpretations of exceptionally preserved fossils from diverse preservational settings. The results of our experiments demonstrate the validity of using the sequence of character loss as a phylogenetic tool, and sheds light on the extent to which environment must be considered before making decay-informed interpretations, or reconstructing taphonomic pathways. With careful consideration of experimental design, driven by testable hypotheses, decay experiments are robust and informative - experimental taphonomy needn't kick the bucket just yet.

  11. Aftershocks in a time-to-failure slider-block model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gran, J. D.; Rundle, J. B.; Turcotte, D. L.

    2011-12-01

    Several earthquake models have been used to study the mechanisms that lead to a Gutenberg-Richter distribution of earthquake magnitudes. One such model is the cellular automaton (CA) slider-block model. Events (earthquakes) in this model are initiated by a loader plate increasing stress uniformly on all blocks until a single block reaches a static friction failure threshold which can trigger a cascade of failures of blocks. This model, although useful, misses a key part of the earthquake process, i.e. aftershocks. Aftershocks occur within a short time period following the main-shock and are due to stress redistributions within the earth's crust rather than movement of the interacting tectonic plates. We describe here a modified version of CA slider-block model, which includes a time-to-failure mode, that allows blocks to fail below the static threshold value if enough time passes. This new feature allows multiple independent events to occur during a single plate update. We measure time in Monte Carlo steps and have tested various functions for the time-to-failure to understand the connection between the time-to-failure and Omori's law for the frequency of aftershocks following the main-shock. After each loader plate update, we see a main-shock followed in time by multiple aftershocks that decay in magnitude. We believe this to be another mechanism for the occurrence of aftershocks in addition to that found by Dietrich, JGR(1994).

  12. The Use of Explosion Aftershock Probabilities for Planning and Deployment of Seismic Aftershock Monitoring System for an On-site Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labak, P.; Ford, S. R.; Sweeney, J. J.; Smith, A. T.; Spivak, A.

    2011-12-01

    One of four elements of CTBT verification regime is On-site inspection (OSI). Since the sole purpose of an OSI shall be to clarify whether a nuclear weapon test explosion or any other nuclear explosion has been carried out, inspection activities can be conducted and techniques used in order to collect facts to support findings provided in inspection reports. Passive seismological monitoring, realized by the seismic aftershock monitoring (SAMS) is one of the treaty allowed techniques during an OSI. Effective planning and deployment of SAMS during the early stages of an OSI is required due to the nature of possible events recorded and due to the treaty related constrains on size of inspection area, size of inspection team and length of an inspection. A method, which may help in planning the SAMS deployment is presented. An estimate of aftershock activity due to a theoretical underground nuclear explosion is produced using a simple aftershock rate model (Ford and Walter, 2010). The model is developed with data from the Nevada Test Site and Semipalatinsk Test Site, which we take to represent soft- and hard-rock testing environments, respectively. Estimates of expected magnitude and number of aftershocks are calculated using the models for different testing and inspection scenarios. These estimates can help to plan the SAMS deployment for an OSI by giving a probabilistic assessment of potential aftershocks in the Inspection Area (IA). The aftershock assessment combined with an estimate of the background seismicity in the IA and an empirically-derived map of threshold magnitude for the SAMS network could aid the OSI team in reporting. We tested the hard-rock model to a scenario similar to the 2008 Integrated Field Exercise 2008 deployment in Kazakhstan and produce an estimate of possible recorded aftershock activity.

  13. Analysis of Mw 7.2 2014 Molucca Sea earthquake and its aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiddiqi, Hasbi Ash; Widiyantoro, Sri; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Ramdhan, Mohamad; Wiyono, Samsul Hadi; Wandono, Wandono

    2016-05-01

    A Mw 7.2 earthquake struck an area in the Molucca Sea region on November 15, 2014, and was followed by more than 300 aftershocks until the end of December 2014. This earthquake was the second largest event in the Molucca Sea during the last decade and was well recorded by local networks. Although the seismicity rate of the aftershocks was declining at the end of 2014, several significant earthquakes with magnitude (Mw) larger than five still occurred from January to May 2015 within the vicinity of the mainshock location. In this study, we investigated the earthquake process and its relation to the increasing seismicity in the Molucca Sea within six months after the earthquake. We utilized teleseismic double-difference hypocenter relocation method using local, regional, and teleseismic direct body-wave arrival times of 514 earthquakes from the time of mainshock occurrence to May 2015. Furthermore, we analyzed the focal mechanism solutions from the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED), Japan. From our results, we observed that aftershocks propagated along the NNE-SSW direction within a 100 km fault segment length of the Mayu Ridge. The highest number of the aftershocks was located in the SSW direction of the main event. The aftershocks were terminated at around 60 km depth, which may represent the location of the top of the Molucca Sea Plate (MSP). Between January and May 2015, several significant earthquakes propagated westward and were extended to the Molucca Sea slab. From focal mechanism catalog, we found that the mainshock mechanism was reverse with strike 192o and dip 55o. While most of the large aftershock mechanisms were consistent with the main event, several aftershocks had reverse, oblique mechanisms. Stress inversion result from focal mechanism data revealed that the maximum stress direction was SE and was not perpendicular with fault direction. We suggest that the non-perpendicular maximum stress caused several

  14. An Explosion Aftershock Model with Application to On-Site Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Sean R.; Labak, Peter

    2016-01-01

    An estimate of aftershock activity due to a theoretical underground nuclear explosion is produced using an aftershock rate model. The model is developed with data from the Nevada National Security Site, formerly known as the Nevada Test Site, and the Semipalatinsk Test Site, which we take to represent soft-rock and hard-rock testing environments, respectively. Estimates of expected magnitude and number of aftershocks are calculated using the models for different testing and inspection scenarios. These estimates can help inform the Seismic Aftershock Monitoring System (SAMS) deployment in a potential Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty On-Site Inspection (OSI), by giving the OSI team a probabilistic assessment of potential aftershocks in the Inspection Area (IA). The aftershock assessment, combined with an estimate of the background seismicity in the IA and an empirically derived map of threshold magnitude for the SAMS network, could aid the OSI team in reporting. We apply the hard-rock model to a M5 event and combine it with the very sensitive detection threshold for OSI sensors to show that tens of events per day are expected up to a month after an explosion measured several kilometers away.

  15. Non-Markovian dynamics of quantum systems. II. Decay rate, capture, and pure states

    SciTech Connect

    Palchikov, Yu.V.; Antonenko, N.V.; Kanokov, Z.; Adamian, G.G.; Scheid, W.

    2005-01-01

    On the basis of a master equation for the reduced density matrix of open quantum systems, we study the influence of time-dependent friction and diffusion coefficients on the decay rate from a potential well and the capture probability into a potential well. Taking into account the mixed diffusion coefficient D{sub qp}, the quasistationary decay rates are compared with the analytically derived Kramers-type formulas for different temperatures and frictions. The diffusion coefficients supplying the purity of states are derived for a non-Markovian dynamics.

  16. The Aftershock Risk Index - quantification of aftershock impacts during ongoing strong-seismic sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Andreas; Daniell, James; Khazai, Bijan; Wenzel, Friedemann

    2016-04-01

    The occurrence and impact of strong earthquakes often triggers the long-lasting impact of a seismic sequence. Strong earthquakes are generally followed by many aftershocks or even strong subsequently triggered ruptures. The Nepal 2015 earthquake sequence is one of the most recent examples where aftershocks significantly contributed to human and economic losses. In addition, rumours about upcoming mega-earthquakes, false predictions and on-going cycles of aftershocks induced a psychological burden on the society, which caused panic, additional casualties and prevented people from returning to normal life. This study shows the current phase of development of an operationalised aftershock intensity index, which will contribute to the mitigation of aftershock hazard. Hereby, various methods of earthquake forecasting and seismic risk assessments are utilised and an integration of the inherent aftershock intensity is performed. A spatio-temporal analysis of past earthquake clustering provides first-hand data about the nature of aftershock occurrence. Epidemic methods can additionally provide time-dependent variation indices of the cascading effects of aftershock generation. The aftershock hazard is often combined with the potential for significant losses through the vulnerability of structural systems and population. A historical database of aftershock socioeconomic effects from CATDAT has been used in order to calibrate the index based on observed impacts of historical events and their aftershocks. In addition, analytical analysis of cyclic behaviour and fragility functions of various building typologies are explored. The integration of many different probabilistic computation methods will provide a combined index parameter which can then be transformed into an easy-to-read spatio-temporal intensity index. The index provides daily updated information about the probability of the inherent seismic risk of aftershocks by providing a scalable scheme fordifferent aftershock

  17. Sharp rates of decay of solutions to the nonlinear fast diffusion equation via functional inequalities

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez, J. L.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to state the optimal decay rate for solutions of the nonlinear fast diffusion equation and, in self-similar variables, the optimal convergence rates to Barenblatt self-similar profiles and their generalizations. It relies on the identification of the optimal constants in some related Hardy–Poincaré inequalities and concludes a long series of papers devoted to generalized entropies, functional inequalities, and rates for nonlinear diffusion equations. PMID:20823259

  18. Disproof of solar influence on the decay rates of 90Sr/90 Y

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossert, Karsten; Nähle, Ole J.

    2015-09-01

    A custom-built liquid scintillation counter was used for long-term measurements of 90Sr/90 Y sources. The detector system is equipped with an automated sample changer and three photomultiplier tubes, which makes the application of the triple-to-double coincidence ratio (TDCR) method possible. After decay correction, the measured decay rates were found to be stable and no annual oscillation could be observed. Thus, the findings of this work are in strong contradiction to those of Parkhomov (2011) who reported on annual oscillations when measuring 90Sr/90 Y with a Geiger-Müller counter. Sturrock et al. (2012) carried out a more detailed analysis of the experimental data from Parkhomov and claimed to have found correlations between the decay rates and processes inside the Sun. These findings are questionable, since they are based on inappropriate experimental data as is demonstrated in this work. A frequency analysis of our activity data does not show any significant periodicity.

  19. Blackbody-induced decay, excitation and ionization rates for Rydberg states in hydrogen and helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhov, I. L.; Nekipelov, E. A.; Ovsiannikov, V. D.

    2010-06-01

    New features of the blackbody-induced radiation processes on Rydberg atoms were discovered on the basis of numerical data for the blackbody-induced decay Pdnl(T), excitation Penl(T) and ionization Pionnl(T) rates of nS, nP and nD Rydberg states calculated together with the spontaneous decay rates Pspnl in neutral hydrogen, and singlet and triplet helium atoms for some values of the principal quantum number n from 10 to 500 at temperatures from T = 100 K to 2000 K. The fractional rates Rd(e, ion)nl(T) = Pnld(e, ion)(T)/Pspnl equal to the ratio of the induced decay (excitation, ionization) rates to the rate of spontaneous decay were determined as functions of T and n in every series of states with a given angular momentum l = 0, 1, 2. The calculated data reveal an essential difference between the asymptotic dependence of the ionization rate Pionnl(T) and the rates of decay and excitation Pd(e)nl(T)~T/n2. The departures appear in each Rydberg series for n > 100 and introduce appreciable corrections to the formula of Cooke and Gallagher. Two different approximation formulae are proposed on the basis of the numerical data, one for Rd(e)nl(T) and another one for Rionnl(T), which reproduce the calculated values in wide ranges of principal quantum number from n = 10 to 1000 and temperatures between T = 100 K and T = 2000 K with an accuracy of 2% or better. Modified Fues' model potential approach was used for calculating matrix elements of bound-bound and bound-free radiation transitions in helium.

  20. Evidence for correlations between fluctuations in 54Mn decay rates and solar storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohsinally, T.; Fancher, S.; Czerny, M.; Fischbach, E.; Gruenwald, J. T.; Heim, J.; Jenkins, J. H.; Nistor, J.; O'Keefe, D.

    2016-02-01

    Following recent indications that several radioactive isotopes show fluctuating decay rates which may be influenced by solar activity, we present findings from a 2 year period of data collection on 54Mn. Measurements were recorded hourly from a 1 μCi sample of 54Mn monitored from January 2010-December 2011. A series of signal-detection algorithms determine regions of statistically significant fluctuations in decay behaviour from the expected exponential form. The 239 decay flags identified during this interval were compared to daily distributions of multiple solar indices, generated by NOAA, which are associated with heightened solar activity. The indices were filtered to provide a list of the 413 strongest events during a coincident period. We find that 49% of the strongest solar events are preceded by at least 1 decay flag within a 48 h interval, and 37% of decay flags are followed by a reported solar event within 48 h. These results are significant at the 0.9σ and 2.8σ levels respectively, based on a comparison to results obtained from a shuffle test, in which the decay measurements were randomly shuffled in time 10,000 times. We also present results from a simulation combining constructed data reflecting 10 sites which compared and filtered decay flags generated from all sites. The results indicate a potential 35% reduction in the false positive rate in going from 1 to 10 sites. By implication, the improved statistics attest to the benefit of analysing data from a larger number of geographically distributed sites in parallel.

  1. Delayed Triggering of Early Aftershocks by Multiple Waves Circling the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, B.; Peng, Z.

    2011-12-01

    It is well known that direct surface waves of large earthquakes are capable of triggering shallow earthquakes and deep tremor at long-range distances. Recent studies have shown that multiple surface waves circling the earth could also remotely trigger microearthquakes [Peng et al., 2011]. However, it is still not clear whether multiple surface waves returning back to the mainshock epicenters could also trigger/modulate aftershock activities. Here we conduct a study to search for evidence of such triggering by systematically examining aftershock activities of 20 magnitude-8-or-higher earthquakes since 1990 that are capable of producing surface waves circling the globe repeatedly. We compute the magnitude of completeness for each sequence, and stack all the sequences together to compute the seismicity and moment rates by sliding data windows. The sequences are also shuffled randomly and these rates are compared to the actual data as well as synthetic aftershock sequences to estimate the statistical significance of the results. We also compare them with varying stacks of magnitude 7-8 earthquakes to better understand the possible biases that could be introduced by our rate calculation method. Our preliminary results suggest that there is some moderate increase of early aftershock activity after a few hours when the surface waves return to the epicentral region. However, we could not completely rule out the possibility that such an increase is purely due to random fluctuations of aftershocks or caused by missing aftershocks in the first few hours after the mainshock. We plan to examine continuous waveform data of selected sequences to obtain a better understanding of the multiple surface waves and aftershock activity.

  2. False vacuum transitions —Analytical solutions and decay rate values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, R. A. C.; Moraes, P. H. R. S.; da Rocha, Roldão

    2015-08-01

    In this work we show a class of oscillating configurations for the evolution of the domain walls in Euclidean space. The solutions are obtained analytically. Phase transitions are achieved from the associated fluctuation determinant, by the decay rates of the false vacuum.

  3. Universal behavior of the spin-echo decay rate in La2CuO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubukov, Andrey V.; Sachdev, Subir; Sokol, Alexander

    1994-04-01

    We present a theoretical expression for the spin-echo decay rate 1/T2G in the quantum-critical regime of square-lattice quantum antiferromagnets. Our results are in good agreement with recent experimental data by Imai et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 1254 (1993)] for La2CuO4.

  4. Conserved Non-Coding Sequences are Associated with Rates of mRNA Decay in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Spangler, Jacob B.; Feltus, Frank Alex

    2013-01-01

    Steady-state mRNA levels are tightly regulated through a combination of transcriptional and post-transcriptional control mechanisms. The discovery of cis-acting DNA elements that encode these control mechanisms is of high importance. We have investigated the influence of conserved non-coding sequences (CNSs), DNA patterns retained after an ancient whole genome duplication event, on the breadth of gene expression and the rates of mRNA decay in Arabidopsis thaliana. The absence of CNSs near α duplicate genes was associated with a decrease in breadth of gene expression and slower mRNA decay rates while the presence CNSs near α duplicates was associated with an increase in breadth of gene expression and faster mRNA decay rates. The observed difference in mRNA decay rate was fastest in genes with CNSs in both non-transcribed and transcribed regions, albeit through an unknown mechanism. This study supports the notion that some Arabidopsis CNSs regulate the steady-state mRNA levels through post-transcriptional control mechanisms and that CNSs also play a role in controlling the breadth of gene expression. PMID:23675377

  5. Estimate Of The Decay Rate Constant of Hydrogen Sulfide Generation From Landfilled Drywall

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research was conducted to investigate the impact of particle size on H2S gas emissions and estimate a decay rate constant for H2S gas generation from the anaerobic decomposition of drywall. Three different particle sizes of regular drywall and one particle size of paperless drywa...

  6. The rate of decay of fresh fission products from a nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, David J.

    Determining the rate of decay of fresh fission products from a nuclear reactor is complex because of the number of isotopes involved, different types of decay, half-lives of the isotopes, and some isotopes decay into other radioactive isotopes. Traditionally, a simplified rule of 7s and 10s is used to determine the dose rate from nuclear weapons and can be to estimate the dose rate from fresh fission products of a nuclear reactor. An experiment was designed to determine the dose rate with respect to time from fresh fission products of a nuclear reactor. The experiment exposed 0.5 grams of unenriched Uranium to a fast and thermal neutron flux from a TRIGA Research Reactor (Lakewood, CO) for ten minutes. The dose rate from the fission products was measured by four Mirion DMC 2000XB electronic personal dosimeters over a period of six days. The resulting dose rate following a rule of 10s: the dose rate of fresh fission products from a nuclear reactor decreases by a factor of 10 for every 10 units of time.

  7. Invariance of decay rate with respect to boundary conditions in thermoelastic Timoshenko systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, M. S.; Jorge Silva, M. A.; Ma, T. F.; Muñoz Rivera, J. E.

    2016-06-01

    This paper is mainly concerned with the polynomial stability of a thermoelastic Timoshenko system recently introduced by Almeida Júnior et al. (Z Angew Math Phys 65(6):1233-1249, 2014) that proved, in the general case when equal wave speeds are not assumed, different polynomial decay rates depending on the boundary conditions, namely, optimal rate {t^{-1/2}} for mixed Dirichlet-Neumann boundary condition and rate {t^{-1/4}} for full Dirichlet boundary condition. Here, our main achievement is to prove the same polynomial decay rate {t^{-1/2}} (corresponding to the optimal one) independently of the boundary conditions, which improves the existing literature on the subject. As a complementary result, we also prove that the system is exponentially stable under equal wave speeds assumption. The technique employed here can probably be applied to other kind of thermoelastic systems.

  8. Configuration splitting and gamma-decay transition rates in the two-group shell model

    SciTech Connect

    Isakov, V. I.

    2015-09-15

    Expressions for reduced gamma-decay transition rates were obtained on the basis of the twogroup configuration model for the case of transitions between particles belonging to identical groups of nucleons. In practical applications, the present treatment is the most appropriate for describing decays for odd–odd nuclei in the vicinity of magic nuclei or for nuclei where the corresponding subshells stand out in energy. Also, a simple approximation is applicable to describing configuration splitting in those cases. The present calculations were performed for nuclei whose mass numbers are close to A ∼ 90, including N = 51 odd—odd isotones.

  9. Measurement of the decay rate of the SiH feature as a function of temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Kraus, George F.

    1994-01-01

    We have previously suggested that the SiH fundamental stretch could serve as a diagnostic indicator of the oxidation state of silicate surfaces exposed to the solar wind for prolonged periods. We have now measured the primary decay rate of SiH in vacuo as a function of temperature and find that the primary rate constant for the decay can be characterized by the following equation: k(min(exp -1)) approximately equals 0.186 exp(-9/RT) min(exp -1), where R = 2 x 10(exp -3) kcal deg(exp -1) mole(exp -1). This means that the half-life for the decay of the SiH feature at room temperature is approximately 20 yrs, whereas the half-life at a peak lunar regolith temperature of approximately 500K would be only approximately 20 days. At the somewhat lower temperature of approximately 400K the half-life for the decay is on the order of 200 days. The rate of loss of SiH as a function of temperature provides an upper limit to the quantity of H implanted by the solar wind which can be retained by a silicate grain in a planetary regolith. This will be discussed in more detail here.

  10. Beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability of improved gross theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koura, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-01

    A theoretical study has been carried out on beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability. The gross theory of the beta decay is based on an idea of the sum rule of the beta-decay strength function, and has succeeded in describing beta-decay half-lives of nuclei overall nuclear mass region. The gross theory includes not only the allowed transition as the Fermi and the Gamow-Teller, but also the first-forbidden transition. In this work, some improvements are introduced as the nuclear shell correction on nuclear level densities and the nuclear deformation for nuclear strength functions, those effects were not included in the original gross theory. The shell energy and the nuclear deformation for unmeasured nuclei are adopted from the KTUY nuclear mass formula, which is based on the spherical-basis method. Considering the properties of the integrated Fermi function, we can roughly categorized energy region of excited-state of a daughter nucleus into three regions: a highly-excited energy region, which fully affect a delayed neutron probability, a middle energy region, which is estimated to contribute the decay heat, and a region neighboring the ground-state, which determines the beta-decay rate. Some results will be given in the presentation. A theoretical study has been carried out on beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability. The gross theory of the beta decay is based on an idea of the sum rule of the beta-decay strength function, and has succeeded in describing beta-decay half-lives of nuclei overall nuclear mass region. The gross theory includes not only the allowed transition as the Fermi and the Gamow-Teller, but also the first-forbidden transition. In this work, some improvements are introduced as the nuclear shell correction on nuclear level densities and the nuclear deformation for nuclear strength functions, those effects were not included in the original gross theory. The shell energy and the nuclear deformation for

  11. High frequencies are a critical component of aftershock triggering at <100-150 km (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felzer, K. R.

    2010-12-01

    Triggered earthquakes at large distances from the mainshock have been observed to closely follow the arrival of ~0.03-0.6 Hz surface waves (Hill, 2008). Triggering by body waves at these distances is generally not observed. At distances closer than 50-100 km, however, surface waves are not well developed and have minimal amplitude. Thus triggering at these distances is presumably accomplished by static stress change and/or by body waves via a mechanism that does not work at further distances. Pollitz (2006) demonstrated that slow slip events on the San Andreas fault do not trigger many aftershocks, suggesting that static stresses alone are not effective triggers, while Felzer and Brodsky (2006) demonstrated that dynamic stresses alone do appear to trigger aftershocks at least in the 10--50 km range. Yet Parsons and Velasco (2009) found that underground nuclear tests, which are essentially dynamic-only sources, do not produce aftershocks at regional distances. Here we demonstrate that Southern California quarry blasts also fail to produce aftershocks. Both nuclear tests and quarry blasts are depleted in high frequency energy in comparison to tectonic earthquakes (Su et al. 1991; Allman et al. 2008). Therefore the observation that both slow slip events and blasts fail to trigger many aftershocks suggests that the missing ingredient of high frequency body wave energy plays a critical role in the triggering process. Quarry blast spectra data and scaling considerations allow the critical triggering frequency to be constrained to > 20-60 Hz. Energy in this frequency band may be expected to persist at depth at least out to 100 km (Leary, 1995). Huc and Main (2003) found that aftershock triggering by global earthquakes follows a continuous decay curve out to ~150 km, suggesting that triggering by high frequency body waves might extend this far. At much further distances the high frequencies are likely attenuated, explaining why only low frequency surface wave triggering

  12. Determination of phonon decay rate in p-type silicon under Fano resonance by measurement of coherent phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Keiko; Oguri, Katsuya; Sanada, Haruki; Tawara, Takehiko; Sogawa, Tetsuomi; Gotoh, Hideki

    2015-09-01

    We determine phonon decay rate by measuring the temperature dependence of coherent phonons in p-type Si under Fano resonance, where there is interference between the continuum and discrete states. As the temperature decreases, the decay rate of coherent phonons decreases, whereas that evaluated from the Raman linewidth increases. The former follows the anharmonic decay model, whereas the latter does not. The different temperature dependences of the phonon decay rate of the two methods originate from the way that the continuum state, which originates from the Fano resonance, modifies the time- and frequency-domain spectra. The observation of coherent phonons is useful for evaluating the phonon decay rate free from the interaction with the continuum state and clarifies that the anharmonic decay is dominant in p-type Si even under Fano resonance.

  13. Preliminary Double-Difference Relocations of Bhuj Aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raphael, A. J.; Bodin, P.; Horton, S.; Gomberg, J.

    2001-12-01

    The Mw=7.7 Bhuj earthquake of 26 January, 2001 in Gujarat, India, was a scientifically important earthquake that took place in a rather poorly instrumented region. Lack of nearby mainshock recordings and lack of surface rupture preclude the calculation of a high-resolution picture of the mainshock rupture processes like those presented for other recent large, better instrumented earthquakes. This is particularly vexing because, given its history of infrequent moderate-to-large earthquakes and its setting within a continental plate interior, the Bhuj earthquake might provide important insights for other high-consequence-but-low-occurrence-rate regions such as the central US. Fortunately we do have excellent recordings of numerous aftershocks on a temporary network of 8 portable seismographs. In order to constrain rupture complexity, we are computing high-resolution relative relocations of aftershocks using HypoDD, the double-difference algorithm of Waldhauser and Ellsworth \\(BSSA, 2000\\) to look for aftershock patterns that may reflect rupture characteristics. We are currently using a subset of all of the aftershocks that have been analyzed \\(P and S phases recorded on at least 4 stations\\) which consists of nearly 1000 events. This subset is less than half of all the data, and more events are being added as they are analyzed. Our preliminary results show concentrated patches of relocated aftershocks that dip to the south between 6 and 37 km deep. Strong clusters appear to illuminate the lateral edges of a rupture, with a NE trending cluster at the eastern side and a NW trending cluster at the western side, both plunging southward. The central part of the apparent rupture, which coincides with teleseismic estimates of maximum slip, appears to be relatively quiescent. We have not up to this point used waveform cross-correlation to provide relative arrival timing, but feel this may be appropriate for subsets of the overall data set. We also note the presence of

  14. Geodetic displacements and aftershocks following the 2001 Mw = 8.4 Peru earthquake: Implications for the mechanics of the earthquake cycle along subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perfettini, H.; Avouac, J.-P.; Ruegg, J.-C.

    2005-09-01

    We analyzed aftershocks and postseismic deformation recorded by the continuous GPS station AREQ following the Mw = 8.4, 23 June 2001 Peru earthquake. This station moved by 50 cm trenchward, in a N235°E direction during the coseismic phase, and continued to move in the same direction for an additional 15 cm over the next 2 years. We compare observations with the prediction of a simple one-dimensional (1-D) system of springs, sliders, and dashpot loaded by a constant force, meant to simulate stress transfer during the seismic cycle. The model incorporates a seismogenic fault zone, obeying rate-weakening friction, a zone of deep afterslip, the brittle creep fault zone (BCFZ) obeying rate-strengthening friction, and a zone of viscous flow at depth, the ductile fault zone (DFZ). This simple model captures the main features of the temporal evolution of seismicity and deformation. Our results imply that crustal strain associated with stress accumulation during the interseismic period is probably not stationary over most of the interseismic period. The BCFZ appears to control the early postseismic response (afterslip and aftershocks), although an immediate increase, by a factor of about 1.77, of ductile shear rate is required, placing constraints on the effective viscosity of the DFZ. Following a large subduction earthquake, displacement of inland sites is trenchward in the early phase of the seismic cycle and reverse to landward after a time ti for which an analytical expression is given. This study adds support to the view that the decay rate of aftershocks may be controlled by reloading due to deep afterslip. Given the ratio of preseismic to postseismic viscous creep, we deduce that frictional stresses along the subduction interface account for probably 70% of the force transmitted along the plate interface.

  15. The role of wall confinement on the decay rate of an initially isotropic turbulent field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, David R.; Movahed, Pooya; Johnsen, Eric

    2014-11-01

    The problem of freely decaying isotropic turbulence has been the subject of intensive research during the past few decades due to its importance for modeling purposes. While isotropy and periodic boundary conditions assumptions simplify the analysis, large-scale anisotropy (e.g., caused by rotation, shear, acceleration or walls) is in practice present in most turbulent flows and affects flow dynamics across different scales, as well as the kinetic energy decay. We investigate the role of wall confinement and viscous dissipation on the decay rate of an initially isotropic field for confining volumes of different aspect ratios. We first generate an isotropic velocity field in a cube with periodic boundary conditions. Next, using this field, we change the boundary conditions to no-slip walls on all sides. These walls restrict the initial field to a confined geometry and also provide an additional viscous dissipation mechanism. The problem is considered for confining volumes of different aspect ratios by adjusting the initial field. The change in confining volume introduces an additional length scale to the problem. Direct numerical simulation of the proposed set-up is used to verify the scaling arguments for the decay rate of kinetic energy. This work used the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE), which is supported by National Science Foundation Grant Number ACI-1053575.

  16. Polynomial decay rate of a thermoelastic Mindlin-Timoshenko plate model with Dirichlet boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobbelaar-Van Dalsen, Marié

    2015-02-01

    In this article, we are concerned with the polynomial stabilization of a two-dimensional thermoelastic Mindlin-Timoshenko plate model with no mechanical damping. The model is subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions on the elastic as well as the thermal variables. The work complements our earlier work in Grobbelaar-Van Dalsen (Z Angew Math Phys 64:1305-1325, 2013) on the polynomial stabilization of a Mindlin-Timoshenko model in a radially symmetric domain under Dirichlet boundary conditions on the displacement and thermal variables and free boundary conditions on the shear angle variables. In particular, our aim is to investigate the effect of the Dirichlet boundary conditions on all the variables on the polynomial decay rate of the model. By once more applying a frequency domain method in which we make critical use of an inequality for the trace of Sobolev functions on the boundary of a bounded, open connected set we show that the decay is slower than in the model considered in the cited work. A comparison of our result with our polynomial decay result for a magnetoelastic Mindlin-Timoshenko model subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions on the elastic variables in Grobbelaar-Van Dalsen (Z Angew Math Phys 63:1047-1065, 2012) also indicates a correlation between the robustness of the coupling between parabolic and hyperbolic dynamics and the polynomial decay rate in the two models.

  17. Triggering of Aftershocks by Free Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufe, C. G.; Varnes, D. J.

    2001-12-01

    Periodicities observed in aftershock sequences may result from earthquake triggering by free oscillations of the Earth produced by the main shock. Using an algorithm we developed to compute spectra of inter-event times, we examine inter-event intervals of teleseismically recorded aftershock sequences from large (M>7.5) main shocks that occurred during 1980-2001. Observed periodicities may result from triggering at intervals that are multiples of normal mode periods. We have focussed our analysis of inter-event times on identification of triggering by free oscillations at periods in the range 6-60 minutes. In this paper we describe our most commonly observed aftershock inter-event times and the free oscillation modes most likely to be the triggers. Because of their separation, the longer period modes are easiest to identify in the aftershock data (0S2 at 53.9 minutes, 0S3 at 35.6 minutes, 0S4 at 25.8 minutes, and 0T2 at 43.9 minutes). Evidence of triggering by 0S2 and 0T2 was also found in the aftershocks of the 1989 Loma Prieta, CA (M 7) earthquake (Kamal and Mansinha, 1996). Because of the plethora of higher modes, shorter inter-event periods are more difficult to identify with a particular mode. Preliminary analysis of the 2001 Bhuj, India (M 7.7) earthquake sequence tentatively identifies a contribution to triggering of the first four large aftershocks by multiples of 0S12 (8.37 minutes).

  18. Analysing the 1811-1812 New Madrid earthquakes with recent instrumentally recorded aftershocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, K.; Hough, S.E.; Bilham, R.

    2004-01-01

    Although dynamic stress changes associated with the passage of seismic waves are thought to trigger earthquakes at great distances, more than 60 per cent of all aftershocks appear to be triggered by static stress changes within two rupture lengths of a mainshock. The observed distribution of aftershocks may thus be used to infer details of mainshock rupture geometry. Aftershocks following large mid-continental earthquakes, where background stressing rates are low, are known to persist for centuries, and models based on rate-and-state friction laws provide theoretical support for this inference. Most past studies of the New Madrid earthquake sequence have indeed assumed ongoing microseismicity to be a continuing aftershock sequence. Here we use instrumentally recorded aftershock locations and models of elastic stress change to develop a kinematically consistent rupture scenario for three of the four largest earthquakes of the 1811-1812 New Madrid sequence. Our results suggest that these three events occurred on two contiguous faults, producing lobes of increased stress near fault intersections and end points, in areas where present-day microearthquakes have been hitherto interpreted as evidence of primary mainshock rupture. We infer that the remaining New Madrid mainshock may have occurred more than 200 km north of this region in the Wabash Valley of southern Indiana and Illinois-an area that contains abundant modern microseismicity, and where substantial liquefaction was documented by historic accounts. Our results suggest that future large midplate earthquake sequences may extend over a much broader region than previously suspected.

  19. Analysing the 1811-1812 New Madrid earthquakes with recent instrumentally recorded aftershocks.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Karl; Hough, Susan E; Bilham, Roger

    2004-05-20

    Although dynamic stress changes associated with the passage of seismic waves are thought to trigger earthquakes at great distances, more than 60 per cent of all aftershocks appear to be triggered by static stress changes within two rupture lengths of a mainshock. The observed distribution of aftershocks may thus be used to infer details of mainshock rupture geometry. Aftershocks following large mid-continental earthquakes, where background stressing rates are low, are known to persist for centuries, and models based on rate-and-state friction laws provide theoretical support for this inference. Most past studies of the New Madrid earthquake sequence have indeed assumed ongoing microseismicity to be a continuing aftershock sequence. Here we use instrumentally recorded aftershock locations and models of elastic stress change to develop a kinematically consistent rupture scenario for three of the four largest earthquakes of the 1811-1812 New Madrid sequence. Our results suggest that these three events occurred on two contiguous faults, producing lobes of increased stress near fault intersections and end points, in areas where present-day microearthquakes have been hitherto interpreted as evidence of primary mainshock rupture. We infer that the remaining New Madrid mainshock may have occurred more than 200 km north of this region in the Wabash Valley of southern Indiana and Illinois--an area that contains abundant modern microseismicity, and where substantial liquefaction was documented by historic accounts. Our results suggest that future large mid-plate earthquake sequences may extend over a much broader region than previously suspected. PMID:15152249

  20. Real-time forecast of aftershocks from a single seismic station signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippiello, E.; Cirillo, A.; Godano, G.; Papadimitriou, E.; Karakostas, V.

    2016-06-01

    The evaluation of seismic hazard in the hours following large earthquakes is strongly affected by biases due to difficulties in determining earthquake location. This leads to the huge incompleteness of instrumental catalogs. Here we show that if, on the one hand, the overlap of aftershock coda waves hides many small events, on the other hand, it leads to a well-determined empirical law controlling the decay of the amplitude of the seismic signal at a given site. The fitting parameters of this law can be related to those controlling the temporal decay of the aftershock number, and it is then possible to obtain short-term postseismic occurrence probability from a single recorded seismic signal. We therefore present a novel procedure which, without requiring earthquake location, produces more accurate and almost real-time forecast, in a site of interest, directly from the signal of a seismic station installed at that site.

  1. Processing Aftershock Sequences Using Waveform Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resor, M. E.; Procopio, M. J.; Young, C. J.; Carr, D. B.

    2008-12-01

    For most event monitoring systems, the objective is to keep up with the flow of incoming data, producing a bulletin with some modest, relatively constant, time delay after present time, often a period of a few hours or less. Because the association problem scales exponentially and not linearly with the number of detections, a dramatic increase in seismicity due to an aftershock sequence can easily cause the bulletin delay time to increase dramatically. In some cases, the production of a bulletin may cease altogether, until the automatic system can catch up. For a nuclear monitoring system, the implications of such a delay could be dire. Given the expected similarity between a mainshock and aftershocks, it has been proposed that waveform correlation may provide a powerful means to simultaneously increase the efficiency of processing aftershock sequences, while also lowering the detection threshold and improving the quality of the event solutions. However, many questions remain unanswered. What are the key parameters for achieving the best correlations between waveforms (window length, filtering, etc.), and are they sequence-dependent? What is the overall percentage of similar events in an aftershock sequence, i.e. what is the maximum level of efficiency that a waveform correlation could be expected to achieve? Finally, how does this percentage of events vary among sequences? Using data from the aftershock sequence for the December 26, 2004 Mw 9.1 Sumatra event, we investigate these issues by building and testing a prototype waveform correlation event detection system that automatically expands its library of known events as new signatures are indentified in the aftershock sequence (by traditional signal detection and event processing). Our system tests all incoming data against this dynamic library, thereby identify any similar events before traditional processing takes place. In the region surrounding the Sumatra event, the NEIC EDR contains 4997 events in the 9

  2. A Self-Organized Model for Cell-Differentiation Based on Variations of Molecular Decay Rates

    PubMed Central

    Hanel, Rudolf; Pöchacker, Manfred; Schölling, Manuel; Thurner, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Systemic properties of living cells are the result of molecular dynamics governed by so-called genetic regulatory networks (GRN). These networks capture all possible features of cells and are responsible for the immense levels of adaptation characteristic to living systems. At any point in time only small subsets of these networks are active. Any active subset of the GRN leads to the expression of particular sets of molecules (expression modes). The subsets of active networks change over time, leading to the observed complex dynamics of expression patterns. Understanding of these dynamics becomes increasingly important in systems biology and medicine. While the importance of transcription rates and catalytic interactions has been widely recognized in modeling genetic regulatory systems, the understanding of the role of degradation of biochemical agents (mRNA, protein) in regulatory dynamics remains limited. Recent experimental data suggests that there exists a functional relation between mRNA and protein decay rates and expression modes. In this paper we propose a model for the dynamics of successions of sequences of active subnetworks of the GRN. The model is able to reproduce key characteristics of molecular dynamics, including homeostasis, multi-stability, periodic dynamics, alternating activity, differentiability, and self-organized critical dynamics. Moreover the model allows to naturally understand the mechanism behind the relation between decay rates and expression modes. The model explains recent experimental observations that decay-rates (or turnovers) vary between differentiated tissue-classes at a general systemic level and highlights the role of intracellular decay rate control mechanisms in cell differentiation. PMID:22693554

  3. A self-organized model for cell-differentiation based on variations of molecular decay rates.

    PubMed

    Hanel, Rudolf; Pöchacker, Manfred; Schölling, Manuel; Thurner, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Systemic properties of living cells are the result of molecular dynamics governed by so-called genetic regulatory networks (GRN). These networks capture all possible features of cells and are responsible for the immense levels of adaptation characteristic to living systems. At any point in time only small subsets of these networks are active. Any active subset of the GRN leads to the expression of particular sets of molecules (expression modes). The subsets of active networks change over time, leading to the observed complex dynamics of expression patterns. Understanding of these dynamics becomes increasingly important in systems biology and medicine. While the importance of transcription rates and catalytic interactions has been widely recognized in modeling genetic regulatory systems, the understanding of the role of degradation of biochemical agents (mRNA, protein) in regulatory dynamics remains limited. Recent experimental data suggests that there exists a functional relation between mRNA and protein decay rates and expression modes. In this paper we propose a model for the dynamics of successions of sequences of active subnetworks of the GRN. The model is able to reproduce key characteristics of molecular dynamics, including homeostasis, multi-stability, periodic dynamics, alternating activity, differentiability, and self-organized critical dynamics. Moreover the model allows to naturally understand the mechanism behind the relation between decay rates and expression modes. The model explains recent experimental observations that decay-rates (or turnovers) vary between differentiated tissue-classes at a general systemic level and highlights the role of intracellular decay rate control mechanisms in cell differentiation. PMID:22693554

  4. Correlation Between Decay Rate and Amplitude of Solar Cycles as Revealed from Observations and Dynamo Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Gopal; Karak, Bidya Binay; Banerjee, Dipankar; Choudhuri, Arnab Rai

    2015-06-01

    Using different proxies of solar activity, we have studied the following features of the solar cycle: i) The linear correlation between the amplitude of cycle and its decay rate, ii) the linear correlation between the amplitude of cycle and the decay rate of cycle , and iii) the anti-correlation between the amplitude of cycle and the period of cycle . Features ii) and iii) are very useful because they provide precursors for future cycles. We have reproduced these features using a flux-transport dynamo model with stochastic fluctuations in the Babcock-Leighton effect and in the meridional circulation. Only when we introduce fluctuations in meridional circulation, are we able to reproduce different observed features of the solar cycle. We discuss the possible reasons for these correlations.

  5. Optimal decay rates of classical solutions for the full compressible MHD equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jincheng; Tao, Qiang; Yao, Zheng-an

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we are concerned with optimal decay rates for higher-order spatial derivatives of classical solutions to the full compressible MHD equations in three-dimensional whole space. If the initial perturbation is small in {H^3}-norm and bounded in {L^q(qin [1, 6/5 ))}-norm, we apply the Fourier splitting method by Schonbek (Arch Ration Mech Anal 88:209-222, 1985) to establish optimal decay rates for the second-order spatial derivatives of solutions and the third-order spatial derivatives of magnetic field in {L^2}-norm. These results improve the work of Pu and Guo (Z Angew Math Phys 64:519-538, 2013).

  6. General decay rate estimates for viscoelastic wave equation with Balakrishnan-Taylor damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Tae Gab

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we consider the viscoelastic wave equation with Balakrishnan-Taylor damping. This work is devoted to prove uniform decay rates of the energy without imposing any restrictive growth assumption on the damping term and weakening the usual assumptions on the relaxation function. Our estimate depends both on the behavior of the damping term near zero and on behavior of the relaxation function at infinity.

  7. Absorption cross-section and decay rate of rotating linear dilaton black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakalli, I.; Aslan, O. A.

    2016-02-01

    We analytically study the scalar perturbation of non-asymptotically flat (NAF) rotating linear dilaton black holes (RLDBHs) in 4-dimensions. We show that both radial and angular wave equations can be solved in terms of the hypergeometric functions. The exact greybody factor (GF), the absorption cross-section (ACS), and the decay rate (DR) for the massless scalar waves are computed for these black holes (BHs). The results obtained for ACS and DR are discussed through graphs.

  8. Peculiarities of parabolic-barrier penetrability and thermal decay rate with the quantum diffusion approach

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzyakin, R. A.; Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2011-06-15

    With the quantum diffusion approach, the passing probability through the parabolic barrier is examined in the limit of linear coupling in the momentum between the collective subsystem and environment. The dependencies of the penetrability on time, energy, and the coupling strength between the interacting subsystems are studied. The quasistationary thermal decay rate from a metastable state is considered in the cases of linear couplings both in the momentum and in the coordinate.

  9. Initial cooperative decay rate and cooperative Lamb shift of resonant atoms in an infinite cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Friedberg, Richard; Manassah, Jamal T.

    2011-08-15

    We obtain in both the scalar and vector photon models the analytical expressions for the initial cooperative decay rate and the cooperative Lamb shift for an ensemble of resonant atoms distributed uniformly in an infinite cylindrical geometry for the case that the initial state of the system is prepared in a phased state modulated in the direction of the cylindrical axis. We find that qualitatively the scalar and vector theories give different results.

  10. 31Cl beta decay and the 30P31S reaction rate in nova nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Michael; Wrede, C.; Brown, B. A.; Liddick, S. N.; Pérez-Loureiro, D.; NSCL e12028 Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The 30P31S reaction rate is critical for modeling the final isotopic abundances of ONe nova nucleosynthesis, identifying the origin of presolar nova grains, and calibrating proposed nova thermometers. Unfortunately, this rate is essentially experimentally unconstrained because the strengths of key 31S proton capture resonances are not known, due to uncertainties in their spins and parities. Using a 31Cl beam produced at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, we have populated several 31S states for study via beta decay and devised a new decay scheme which includes updated beta feedings and gamma branchings as well as multiple states previously unobserved in 31Cl beta decay. Results of this study, including the unambiguous identification due to isospin mixing of a new l = 0 , Jπ = 3 /2+ 31S resonance directly in the middle of the Gamow Window, will be presented, and significance to the evaluation of the 30P31S reaction rate will be discussed. Work supported by U.S. Natl. Sci. Foundation (Grants No. PHY-1102511, PHY-1404442, PHY-1419765, and PHY-1431052); U.S. Dept. of Energy, Natl. Nucl. Security Administration (Award No. DE-NA0000979); Nat. Sci. and Eng. Research Council of Canada.

  11. Radiative decay rate of excitons in square quantum wells: Microscopic modeling and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khramtsov, E. S.; Belov, P. A.; Grigoryev, P. S.; Ignatiev, I. V.; Verbin, S. Yu.; Efimov, Yu. P.; Eliseev, S. A.; Lovtcius, V. A.; Petrov, V. V.; Yakovlev, S. L.

    2016-05-01

    The binding energy and the corresponding wave function of excitons in GaAs-based finite square quantum wells (QWs) are calculated by the direct numerical solution of the three-dimensional Schrödinger equation. The precise results for the lowest exciton state are obtained by the Hamiltonian discretization using the high-order finite-difference scheme. The microscopic calculations are compared with the results obtained by the standard variational approach. The exciton binding energies found by two methods coincide within 0.1 meV for the wide range of QW widths. The radiative decay rate is calculated for QWs of various widths using the exciton wave functions obtained by direct and variational methods. The radiative decay rates are confronted with the experimental data measured for high-quality GaAs/AlGaAs and InGaAs/GaAs QW heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The calculated and measured values are in good agreement, though slight differences with earlier calculations of the radiative decay rate are observed.

  12. Direct Measurement of the Unimolecular Decay Rate of Criegee Intermediates to OH Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fang; Fang, Yi; Klippenstein, Stephen; McCoy, Anne; Lester, Marsha

    Ozonolysis of alkenes is an important non-photolytic source of OH radicals in the troposphere. The production of OH radicals proceeds though formation and unimolecular decay of Criegee intermediates such as syn-CH3CHOO and (CH3)2COO. These alkyl-substituted Criegee intermediates can undergo a 1,4-H transfer reaction to form an energized vinyl hydroperoxide species, which breaks apart to OH and vinoxy products. Recently, this laboratory used IR excitation in the C-H stretch overtone region to initiate the unimolecular decay of syn-CH3CHOO and (CH3)2COO Criegee intermediates, leading to OH formation. Here, direct time-domain measurements are performed to observe the rate of appearance of OH products under collision-free conditions utilizing UV laser-induced fluorescence for detection. The experimental rates are in excellent agreement with statistical RRKM calculations using barrier heights predicted from high-level electronic structure calculations. Accurate determination of the rates and barrier heights for unimolecular decay of Criegee intermediates is essential for modeling the kinetics of alkene ozonolysis reactions, a significant OH radical source in atmospheric chemistry, as well as the steady-state concentration of Criegee intermediates in the atmosphere. This research was supported through the National Science Foundation under grant CHE-1362835.

  13. Photonic effects on the radiative decay rate and luminescence quantum yield of doped nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Senden, Tim; Rabouw, Freddy T; Meijerink, Andries

    2015-02-24

    Nanocrystals (NCs) doped with luminescent ions form an emerging class of materials. In contrast to excitonic transitions in semiconductor NCs, the optical transitions are localized and not affected by quantum confinement. The radiative decay rates of the dopant emission in NCs are nevertheless different from their bulk analogues due to photonic effects, and also the luminescence quantum yield (QY, important for applications) is affected. In the past, different theoretical models have been proposed to describe the photonic effects for dopant emission in NCs, with little experimental validation. In this work we investigate the photonic effects on the radiative decay rate of luminescent doped NCs using 4 nm LaPO4 NCs doped with Ce(3+) or Tb(3+) ions in different refractive index solvents and bulk crystals. We demonstrate that the measured influence of the refractive index on the radiative decay rate of the Ce(3+) emission, having near unity QY, is in excellent agreement with the theoretical nanocrystal-cavity model. Furthermore, we show how the nanocrystal-cavity model can be used to quantify the nonunity QY of Tb(3+)-doped LaPO4 NCs and demonstrate that, as a general rule, the QY is higher in media with higher refractive index. PMID:25584627

  14. CONCERNING THE PHASES OF THE ANNUAL VARIATIONS OF NUCLEAR DECAY RATES

    SciTech Connect

    Sturrock, P. A.; Buncher, J. B.; Fischbach, E.; Jenkins, J. H.; Mattes, J. J.; Javorsek, D. II

    2011-08-20

    Recent analyses of data sets acquired at the Brookhaven National Laboratory and at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt both show evidence of pronounced annual variations, suggestive of a solar influence. However, the phases of decay-rate maxima do not correspond precisely to the phase of minimum Sun-Earth distance, as might then be expected. We here examine the hypothesis that decay rates are influenced by an unknown solar radiation, but that the intensity of the radiation is influenced not only by the variation in Sun-Earth distance, but also by a possible north-south asymmetry in the solar emission mechanism. We find that this can lead to phases of decay-rate maxima in the range 0-0.183 or 0.683-1 (September 6 to March 8) but that, according to this hypothesis, phases in the range of 0.183-0.683 (March 8 to September 6) are 'forbidden'. We find that phases of the three data sets analyzed here fall in the allowed range.

  15. β -decay rates of Cs-131121 in the microscopic interacting boson-fermion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardones, E.; Barea, J.; Alonso, C. E.; Arias, J. M.

    2016-03-01

    β -decay rates of Cs-131121 have been calculated in the framework of the neutron-proton interacting boson-fermion model (IBFM-2). For odd-A nuclei, the decay operator can be written in a relatively simple form in terms of the one-nucleon transfer operator. Previous studies of β decay in IBFM-2 were based on a transfer operator obtained by using the number operator approximation (NOA). In this work a new form of the one-nucleon transfer operator, derived microscopically without the NOA approximation, is used. The results from both approaches are compared and show that the deviation from experimental data is reduced without using the NOA approximation. Indications about the renormalization of the Fermi and Gamow-Teller matrix elements are discussed. This is a further step toward a more complete description of low-lying states in medium and heavy nuclei which is necessary to compute reliable matrix elements in studies of current active interest such as double-β decay or neutrino absorption experiments.

  16. Generalized Omori-Utsu law for aftershock sequences in southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidsen, J.; Gu, C.; Baiesi, M.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the validity of a proposed generalized Omori-Utsu law for the aftershock sequences for the Landers, Hector Mine, Northridge and Superstition Hills earthquakes, the four largest events in the southern California catalogue we analyse. This law unifies three of the most prominent empirical laws of statistical seismology-the Gutenberg-Richter law, the Omori-Utsu law, and a generalized version of Båth's law-in a formula casting the parameters in the Omori-Utsu law as a function of the lower magnitude cutoff mc for the aftershocks considered. By applying a recently established general procedure for identifying aftershocks, we confirm that the generalized Omori-Utsu law provides a good approximation for the observed rates overall. In particular, we provide convincing evidence that the characteristic time c is not constant but a genuine function of mc, which cannot be attributed to short-term aftershock incompleteness. However, the estimation of the specific parameters is somewhat sensitive to the aftershock selection method used. This includes c(mc), which has important implications for inferring the underlying stress field.

  17. Nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Pond, R.B.; Matos, J.E.

    1996-12-31

    This document has been prepared to assist research reactor operators possessing spent fuel containing enriched uranium of United States origin to prepare part of the documentation necessary to ship this fuel to the United States. Data are included on the nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate, and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies. Isotopic masses of U, Np, Pu and Am that are present in spent research reactor fuel are estimated for MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assembly types. The isotopic masses of each fuel assembly type are given as functions of U-235 burnup in the spent fuel, and of initial U-235 enrichment and U-235 mass in the fuel assembly. Photon dose rates of spent MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assemblies are estimated for fuel assemblies with up to 80% U-235 burnup and specific power densities between 0.089 and 2.857 MW/kg[sup 235]U, and for fission product decay times of up to 20 years. Thermal decay heat loads are estimated for spent fuel based upon the fuel assembly irradiation history (average assembly power vs. elapsed time) and the spent fuel cooling time.

  18. Radionuclide mass inventory, activity, decay heat, and dose rate parametric data for TRIGA spent nuclear fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Sterbentz, J.W.

    1997-03-01

    Parametric burnup calculations are performed to estimate radionuclide isotopic mass and activity concentrations for four different Training, Research, and Isotope General Atomics (TRIGA) nuclear reactor fuel element types: (1) Aluminum-clad standard, (2) Stainless Steel-clad standard, (3) High-enrichment Fuel Life Improvement Program (FLIP), and (4) Low-enrichment Fuel Life Improvement Program (FLIP-LEU-1). Parametric activity data are tabulated for 145 important radionuclides that can be used to generate gamma-ray emission source terms or provide mass quantity estimates as a function of decay time. Fuel element decay heats and dose rates are also presented parametrically as a function of burnup and decay time. Dose rates are given at the fuel element midplane for contact, 3.0-feet, and 3.0-meter detector locations in air. The data herein are estimates based on specially derived Beginning-of-Life (BOL) neutron cross sections using geometrically-explicit TRIGA reactor core models. The calculated parametric data should represent good estimates relative to actual values, although no experimental data were available for direct comparison and validation. However, because the cross sections were not updated as a function of burnup, the actinide concentrations may deviate from the actual values at the higher burnups.

  19. Instrument for precision long-term β-decay rate measurements.

    PubMed

    Ware, M J; Bergeson, S D; Ellsworth, J E; Groesbeck, M; Hansen, J E; Pace, D; Peatross, J

    2015-07-01

    We describe an experimental setup for making precision measurements of relative β-decay rates of (22)Na, (36)Cl, (54)Mn, (60)Co, (90)Sr, (133)Ba, (137)Cs, (152)Eu, and (154)Eu. The radioactive samples are mounted in two automated sample changers that sequentially position the samples with high spatial precision in front of sets of detectors. The set of detectors for one sample changer consists of four Geiger-Müller (GM) tubes and the other set of detectors consists of two NaI scintillators. The statistical uncertainty in the count rate is few times 0.01% per day for the GM detectors and about 0.01% per hour on the NaI detectors. The sample changers, detectors, and associated electronics are housed in a sealed chamber held at constant absolute pressure, humidity, and temperature to isolate the experiment from environmental variations. The apparatus is designed to accumulate statistics over many years in a regulated environment to test recent claims of small annual variations in the decay rates. We demonstrate that absent this environmental regulation, uncontrolled natural atmospheric pressure variations at our location would imprint an annual signal of 0.1% on the Geiger-Müller count rate. However, neither natural pressure variations nor plausible indoor room temperature variations cause a discernible influence on our NaI scintillator detector count rate. PMID:26233381

  20. Instrument for precision long-term β-decay rate measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, M. J. Bergeson, S. D.; Ellsworth, J. E.; Groesbeck, M.; Hansen, J. E.; Pace, D.; Peatross, J.

    2015-07-15

    We describe an experimental setup for making precision measurements of relative β-decay rates of {sup 22}Na, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 152}Eu, and {sup 154}Eu. The radioactive samples are mounted in two automated sample changers that sequentially position the samples with high spatial precision in front of sets of detectors. The set of detectors for one sample changer consists of four Geiger-Müller (GM) tubes and the other set of detectors consists of two NaI scintillators. The statistical uncertainty in the count rate is few times 0.01% per day for the GM detectors and about 0.01% per hour on the NaI detectors. The sample changers, detectors, and associated electronics are housed in a sealed chamber held at constant absolute pressure, humidity, and temperature to isolate the experiment from environmental variations. The apparatus is designed to accumulate statistics over many years in a regulated environment to test recent claims of small annual variations in the decay rates. We demonstrate that absent this environmental regulation, uncontrolled natural atmospheric pressure variations at our location would imprint an annual signal of 0.1% on the Geiger-Müller count rate. However, neither natural pressure variations nor plausible indoor room temperature variations cause a discernible influence on our NaI scintillator detector count rate.

  1. Instrument for precision long-term β-decay rate measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, M. J.; Bergeson, S. D.; Ellsworth, J. E.; Groesbeck, M.; Hansen, J. E.; Pace, D.; Peatross, J.

    2015-07-01

    We describe an experimental setup for making precision measurements of relative β-decay rates of 22Na, 36Cl, 54Mn, 60Co, 90Sr, 133Ba, 137Cs, 152Eu, and 154Eu. The radioactive samples are mounted in two automated sample changers that sequentially position the samples with high spatial precision in front of sets of detectors. The set of detectors for one sample changer consists of four Geiger-Müller (GM) tubes and the other set of detectors consists of two NaI scintillators. The statistical uncertainty in the count rate is few times 0.01% per day for the GM detectors and about 0.01% per hour on the NaI detectors. The sample changers, detectors, and associated electronics are housed in a sealed chamber held at constant absolute pressure, humidity, and temperature to isolate the experiment from environmental variations. The apparatus is designed to accumulate statistics over many years in a regulated environment to test recent claims of small annual variations in the decay rates. We demonstrate that absent this environmental regulation, uncontrolled natural atmospheric pressure variations at our location would imprint an annual signal of 0.1% on the Geiger-Müller count rate. However, neither natural pressure variations nor plausible indoor room temperature variations cause a discernible influence on our NaI scintillator detector count rate.

  2. Analysis of Growth and Decay Rates of the Axial Dipole in Geodynamo Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avery, M. S.; Constable, C.; Davies, C.; Gubbins, D.

    2013-12-01

    Observations of the Earth's magnetic field made at the surface reveal temporal variations in the field originating in the outer core. PADM2M is a reconstruction of the 0 to 2 Ma paleomagnetic axial dipole moment. Ziegler & Constable, 2011 showed that for periods longer than 25 kyr the rate of growth of the geomagnetic dipole is greater than its decay rate. This asymmetry is not limited to times when the field is reversing; this may be indicative of a key physical process of secular variation. To investigate the possible core processes underlying this observation we have analyzed a suite of numerical dynamo simulations, specifically the temporal variation of their axial dipole moments. We use the magnetic diffusion time to scale the simulations' nondimensional time, as this is more appropriate for the periods of interest here. An advantage to analyzing simulations is that they do not suffer from the same limitations in spatial and temporal resolution as the data; however, simulations cannot yet run with Earth-like rotational rates or diffusivities. All of our simulations span multiple diffusion times. We have chosen a broad range of simulations with different reversal regimes (dipole-dominated, non-reversing; dipole-dominated, reversing; multipolar, reversing) and with different heating modes (bottom, internal, or a combination of the two). For each simulation we conduct the same analysis that was applied to PADM2M. Families of smoothed axial dipole models are constructed using penalized smoothing splines as an effective low-pass filter to see at what timescales any asymmetry exist. The first derivatives of each axial dipole record are calculated in order to examine the rates of growth and decay. The results vary with the nature of the simulations. Further analysis is needed to determine what dynamo parameters, and related physical properties, determine the relative rates of growth and decay.

  3. Variation in radical decay rates in epoxy as a function of crosslink density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, G. M.; Memory, J. M.; Gilbert, R. D.; Fornes, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    A study was made of the behavior of radicals generated by Co-60 gamma radiation in the epoxy system tetraglycidyl-4,4'-diaminodiphenyl methane (TGDDM) cured with 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS). The molar ratio of TGDDM to DDS was varied in the epoxy samples, and they were prepared under the same curing conditions to obtain various extents of crosslinking. ESR spectrometry data suggest that the rate of decay of radicals is related to inhomogeneities in the resin, with radicals in the highly crosslinked regions having long decay times. The inhomogeneities are thought to be due to statistical variation associated with the complex crosslinking reactions or to difficulties in mixing the reactants.

  4. Measurement of the production rates of η and η‧ in hadronic Z decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Mours, B.; Alemany, R.; Ariztizabal, F.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Pacheco, A.; Pascual, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Quattromini, M.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Gao, Y.; Hu, H.; Huang, D.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Lou, J.; Qiao, C.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, R.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, W.; Atwood, W. B.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Blucher, E.; Bonvicini, G.; Bossi, F.; Boudreau, J.; Burnett, T. H.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Haywood, S.; Hilgart, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lançon, E.; Lehraus, I.; Lohse, T.; Lusiani, A.; Martinez, M.; Mato, P.; Mattison, T.; Meinhard, H.; Menary, S.; Meyer, T.; Minten, A.; Miguel, R.; Moser, H.-G.; Nash, J.; Palazzi, P.; Perlas, J. A.; Ranjard, F.; Redlinger, G.; Rolandi, L.; Roth, A.; Rothberg, J.; Ruan, T.; Saich, M.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Sefkow, F.; Tejessy, W.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Bencheikh, A. M.; El Fellous, R.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Proriol, J.; Prulhière, F.; Stimpfl, G.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Møllerud, R.; Nilsson, B. S.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Badier, J.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Fouque, G.; Gamess, A.; Orteu, S.; Rosowsky, A.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Veitch, E.; Moneta, L.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Ikeda, M.; Lannutti, J.; Levinthal, D.; Mermikides, M.; Sawyer, L.; Wasserbaech, S.; Antonelli, A.; Baldini, R.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; D'Ettorre-Piazzoli, B.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Picchi, P.; Altoon, B.; Boyle, O.; Colrain, P.; Ten Have, I.; Lynch, J. G.; Maitland, W.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Thompson, A. S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Brandl, B.; Braun, O.; Geiges, R.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Maumary, Y.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Stahl, A.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Belk, A. T.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Cattaneo, M.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Dugeay, S.; Greene, A. M.; Hassard, J. F.; Lieske, N. M.; Patton, S. J.; Payne, D. G.; Phillips, M. J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wright, A. G.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jackson, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Nuttall, M.; Patel, A.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Whelan, E. P.; Barczewski, T.; Kleinknecht, K.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Roehn, S.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, H.; Steeg, F.; Walther, S. M.; Wolf, B.; Aubert, J.-J.; Benchouk, C.; Bernard, V.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Drinkard, J.; Etienne, F.; Papalexiou, S.; Payre, P.; Qian, Z.; Rousseau, D.; Schwemling, P.; Talby, M.; Adlung, S.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Cowan, G.; Dehning, B.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Frank, M.; Halley, A. W.; Lauber, J.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Richter, R.; Schröder, J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Stiegler, U.; St. Denis, R.; Takashima, M.; Thomas, J.; Wolf, G.; Bertin, V.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, X.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Janot, P.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Abbaneo, D.; Amendolia, S. R.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bosisio, L.; Bottigli, U.; Bradaschia, C.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foà, L.; Focardi, E.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Ligabue, F.; Mannelli, E. B.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Carter, J. M.; Green, M. G.; March, P. V.; Mir, Ll. M.; Medcalf, T.; Quazi, I. S.; Strong, J. A.; West, L. R.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Edwards, M.; Fisher, S. M.; Jones, T. J.; Norton, P. R.; Salmon, D. P.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Kozanecki, W.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Loucatos, S.; Monnier, E.; Perez, P.; Perrier, F.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Wear, J.; Ashman, J. G.; Babbage, W.; Booth, C. N.; Buttar, C.; Carney, R. E.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hatfield, F.; Reeves, P.; Thompson, L. F.; Barberio, E.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Mirabito, L.; Schäfer, U.; Ganis, G.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Ragusa, F.; Bellantoni, L.; Cinabro, D.; Conway, J. S.; Cowen, D. F.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Jared, R. C.; Leclaire, B. W.; Lishka, C.; Pan, Y. B.; Pater, J. R.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Saadi, Y.; Sharma, V.; Schmitt, M.; Shi, Z. H.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Whitney, M. H.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1992-10-01

    The decays η → γγ and η‧ → ηπ+π- have been observed in hadronic decays of the Z produced at LEP. The fragmentation functions of both the η and η‧ have been measured. The measured multiplicities for x > 0.1 are 0.298±0.023±0.021 and 0.068±0.016 for η and η‧ respectively. While the fragmentation function for the η is fairly well described by the JETSET Monte Carlo, it is found that the production rate of the η‧ is a factor of four less than the corresponding prediction.

  5. Combined Results on b-Hadron Production Rates and Decay Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Dong

    2002-09-11

    Combined results on b-hadron lifetimes, b-hadron production rates, B{sub d}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub d}{sup 0} and B{sub s}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} oscillations, the decay width difference between the mass eigenstates of the B{sub s}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} system, the average number of c and {bar c} quarks in b-hadron decays, and searches for CP violation in the B{sub d}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub d}{sup 0} system are presented. They have been obtained from published and preliminary measurements available in Summer 2000 from the ALEPH, CDF, DELPHI, L3, OPAL and SLD Collaborations. These results have been used to determine the parameters of the CKM unitarity triangle.

  6. Optimal Decay Rate of the Compressible Navier-Stokes-Poisson System in {mathbb {R}^3}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai-Liang; Matsumura, Akitaka; Zhang, Guojing

    2010-05-01

    The compressible Navier-Stokes-Poisson (NSP) system is considered in {mathbb {R}^3} in the present paper, and the influences of the electric field of the internal electrostatic potential force governed by the self-consistent Poisson equation on the qualitative behaviors of solutions is analyzed. It is observed that the rotating effect of electric field affects the dispersion of fluids and reduces the time decay rate of solutions. Indeed, we show that the density of the NSP system converges to its equilibrium state at the same L 2-rate {(1+t)^{-frac {3}{4}}} or L ∞-rate (1 + t)-3/2 respectively as the compressible Navier-Stokes system, but the momentum of the NSP system decays at the L 2-rate {(1+t)^{-frac {1}{4}}} or L ∞-rate (1 + t)-1 respectively, which is slower than the L 2-rate {(1+t)^{-frac {3}{4}}} or L ∞-rate (1 + t)-3/2 for compressible Navier-Stokes system [Duan et al., in Math Models Methods Appl Sci 17:737-758, 2007; Liu and Wang, in Comm Math Phys 196:145-173, 1998; Matsumura and Nishida, in J Math Kyoto Univ 20:67-104, 1980] and the L ∞-rate (1 + t)- p with {p in (1, 3/2)} for irrotational Euler-Poisson system [Guo, in Comm Math Phys 195:249-265, 1998]. These convergence rates are shown to be optimal for the compressible NSP system.

  7. Initial colonization, community assembly and ecosystem function: fungal colonist traits and litter biochemistry mediate decay rate.

    PubMed

    Cline, Lauren C; Zak, Donald R

    2015-10-01

    Priority effects are an important ecological force shaping biotic communities and ecosystem processes, in which the establishment of early colonists alters the colonization success of later-arriving organisms via competitive exclusion and habitat modification. However, we do not understand which biotic and abiotic conditions lead to strong priority effects and lasting historical contingencies. Using saprotrophic fungi in a model leaf decomposition system, we investigated whether compositional and functional consequences of initial colonization were dependent on initial colonizer traits, resource availability or a combination thereof. To test these ideas, we factorially manipulated leaf litter biochemistry and initial fungal colonist identity, quantifying subsequent community composition, using neutral genetic markers, and community functional characteristics, including enzyme potential and leaf decay rates. During the first 3 months, initial colonist respiration rate and physiological capacity to degrade plant detritus were significant determinants of fungal community composition and leaf decay, indicating that rapid growth and lignolytic potential of early colonists contributed to altered trajectories of community assembly. Further, initial colonization on oak leaves generated increasingly divergent trajectories of fungal community composition and enzyme potential, indicating stronger initial colonizer effects on energy-poor substrates. Together, these observations provide evidence that initial colonization effects, and subsequent consequences on litter decay, are dependent upon substrate biochemistry and physiological traits within a regional species pool. Because microbial decay of plant detritus is important to global C storage, our results demonstrate that understanding the mechanisms by which initial conditions alter priority effects during community assembly may be key to understanding the drivers of ecosystem-level processes. PMID:26331892

  8. Aftershock Characteristics as a Means of Discriminating Explosions from Earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2009-05-20

    The behavior of aftershock sequences around the Nevada Test Site in the southern Great Basin is characterized as a potential discriminant between explosions and earthquakes. The aftershock model designed by Reasenberg and Jones (1989, 1994) allows for a probabilistic statement of earthquake-like aftershock behavior at any time after the mainshock. We use this model to define two types of aftershock discriminants. The first defines M{sub X}, or the minimum magnitude of an aftershock expected within a given duration after the mainshock with probability X. Of the 67 earthquakes with M > 4 in the study region, 63 of them produce an aftershock greater than M{sub 99} within the first seven days after a mainshock. This is contrasted with only six of 93 explosions with M > 4 that produce an aftershock greater than M{sub 99} for the same period. If the aftershock magnitude threshold is lowered and the M{sub 90} criteria is used, then no explosions produce an aftershock greater than M{sub 90} for durations that end more than 17 days after the mainshock. The other discriminant defines N{sub X}, or the minimum cumulative number of aftershocks expected for given time after the mainshock with probability X. Similar to the aftershock magnitude discriminant, five earthquakes do not produce more aftershocks than N{sub 99} within 7 days after the mainshock. However, within the same period all but one explosion produce less aftershocks then N{sub 99}. One explosion is added if the duration is shortened to two days after than mainshock. The cumulative number aftershock discriminant is more reliable, especially at short durations, but requires a low magnitude of completeness for the given earthquake catalog. These results at NTS are quite promising and should be evaluated at other nuclear test sites to understand the effects of differences in the geologic setting and nuclear testing practices on its performance.

  9. Optimal decay rate of the non-isentropic compressible Navier-Stokes-Poisson system in R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guojing; Li, Hai-Liang; Zhu, Changjiang

    In this paper, the compressible non-isentropic Navier-Stokes-Poisson (NSP) system is considered in R and the influences of internal electric field on the qualitative behaviors of solutions are analyzed. We observe that the electric field leads to the rotating phenomena in charge transport and reduces the speed of fluid motion, but it does not influence the transport of charge density and the heat diffusion. Indeed, we show that both density and temperature of the NSP system converge to their equilibrium state at the same rate (1 as the non-isentropic compressible Navier-Stokes system, but the momentum decays at the rate (1, which is slower than the rate (1 for the pure compressible Navier-Stokes system. These convergence rates are also shown to be optimal for the non-isentropic compressible NSP system.

  10. Application of the renormalization group to the calculation of the vacuum decay rate in flat and curved space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, Dimitrios

    2007-02-01

    I show that an application of renormalization group arguments may lead to significant corrections to the vacuum decay rate for phase transitions in flat and curved space-time. It can also give some information regarding its dependence on the parameters of the theory, including the cosmological constant in the case of decay in curved space-time.

  11. Aftershocks of the 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake revealcomplex faulting in the Yuha Desert, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kroll, K.; Cochran, Elizabeth S.; Richards-Dinger, K.; Sumy, Danielle

    2013-01-01

    We detect and precisely locate over 9500 aftershocks that occurred in the Yuha Desert region during a 2 month period following the 4 April 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah (EMC) earthquake. Events are relocated using a series of absolute and relative relocation procedures that include Hypoinverse, Velest, and hypoDD. Location errors are reduced to ~40 m horizontally and ~120 m vertically.Aftershock locations reveal a complex pattern of faulting with en echelon fault segments trending toward the northwest, approximately parallel to the North American-Pacific plate boundary and en echelon, conjugate features trending to the northeast. The relocated seismicity is highly correlated with published surface mapping of faults that experienced triggered surface slip in response to the EMC main shock. Aftershocks occurred between 2 km and 11 km depths, consistent with previous studies of seismogenic thickness in the region. Three-dimensional analysis reveals individual and intersecting fault planes that are limited in their along-strike length. These fault planes remain distinct structures at depth, indicative of conjugate faulting, and do not appear to coalesce onto a throughgoing fault segment. We observe a complex spatiotemporal migration of aftershocks, with seismicity that jumps between individual fault segments that are active for only a few days to weeks. Aftershock rates are roughly consistent with the expected earthquake production rates of Dieterich (1994). The conjugate pattern of faulting and nonuniform aftershock migration patterns suggest that strain in the Yuha Desert is being accommodated in a complex manner.

  12. Stress transferred by the 1995 Mw = 6.9 Kobe, Japan, shock: Effect on aftershocks and future earthquake probabilities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toda, S.; Stein, R.S.; Reasenberg, P.A.; Dieterich, J.H.; Yoshida, A.

    1998-01-01

    The Kobe earthquake struck at the edge of the densely populated Osaka-Kyoto corridor in southwest Japan. We investigate how the earthquake transferred stress to nearby faults, altering their proximity to failure and thus changing earthquake probabilities. We find that relative to the pre-Kobe seismicity, Kobe aftershocks were concentrated in regions of calculated Coulomb stress increase and less common in regions of stress decrease. We quantify this relationship by forming the spatial correlation between the seismicity rate change and the Coulomb stress change. The correlation is significant for stress changes greater than 0.2-1.0 bars (0.02-0.1 MPa), and the nonlinear dependence of seismicity rate change on stress change is compatible with a state- and rate-dependent formulation for earthquake occurrence. We extend this analysis to future mainshocks by resolving the stress changes on major faults within 100 km of Kobe and calculating the change in probability caused by these stress changes. Transient effects of the stress changes are incorporated by the state-dependent constitutive relation, which amplifies the permanent stress changes during the aftershock period. Earthquake probability framed in this manner is highly time-dependent, much more so than is assumed in current practice. Because the probabilities depend on several poorly known parameters of the major faults, we estimate uncertainties of the probabilities by Monte Carlo simulation. This enables us to include uncertainties on the elapsed time since the last earthquake, the repeat time and its variability, and the period of aftershock decay. We estimate that a calculated 3-bar (0.3-MPa) stress increase on the eastern section of the Arima-Takatsuki Tectonic Line (ATTL) near Kyoto causes fivefold increase in the 30-year probability of a subsequent large earthquake near Kyoto; a 2-bar (0.2-MPa) stress decrease on the western section of the ATTL results in a reduction in probability by a factor of 140 to

  13. Determination of HF artificial ionospheric turbulence characteristics using comparison of calculated plasma wave decay rates with the measured see decay rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grach, Savely; Bareev, Denis; Gavrilenko, Vladimir; Sergeev, Evgeny

    Damping rates of plasma waves with ω ˜ ωuh (ω is the plasma wave frequency, ωuh is the upper hybrid frequency) were calculated for frequencies close to and distant from the double resonance where ωuh ˜ nωce (ωce is the electron cyclotron frequency, n=4,5 are the gyroharmonic num-bers). The calculations were performed numerically on the base of full plasma wave dispersion relation not restricted by both the 'long wave limit' and 'short wave limit', i.e. a fulfillment of the inequalities |∆| |k |vTe and |∆| |k |vTe was not required. Here ∆ = ω - nωce , vTe = (Te /me )1/2 is the electron thermal velocity and k is the projection of the wave vector onto the magnetic field direction. It is shown that the plasma wave damping rates do not differ noticeably from ones calculated under the long wave and short wave limits. The results obtained are compared with the data of the relaxation of the stimulated electromagnetic emission (SEE) after the pump wave turn off, which demonstrate an essential decrease of the relaxation time near 4th electron gyroharmonic, so far as the SEE relaxation is attributed to the damping of plasma waves responsible for the SEE generation. The comparison allows to determine characteristics of plasma waves mostly contributing to the SEE generation, such as wave numbers and the angles between the wave vectors and geomagnetic field, and the altitude region of the SEE source. The dependence of the decay rate on ∆ can be applied also to interpretation of the SEE spectral shape at different pump frequencies near gyroharmonics. The work is supported by RFBR grants 10-02-00642, 09-02-01150 and Federal Special-purpose Program "Scientific and pedagogical personnel of innovative Russia".

  14. The impact of sea-level rise on organic matter decay rates in Chesapeake Bay brackish tidal marshes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirwanm, M.L.; Langley, J.A.; Guntenspergen, Gleen R.; Megonigal, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    The balance between organic matter production and decay determines how fast coastal wetlands accumulate soil organic matter. Despite the importance of soil organic matter accumulation rates in influencing marsh elevation and resistance to sea-level rise, relatively little is known about how decomposition rates will respond to sea-level rise. Here, we estimate the sensitivity of decomposition to flooding by measuring rates of decay in 87 bags filled with milled sedge peat, including soil organic matter, roots and rhizomes. Experiments were located in field-based mesocosms along 3 mesohaline tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay. Mesocosm elevations were manipulated to influence the duration of tidal inundation. Although we found no significant influence of inundation on decay rate when bags from all study sites were analyzed together, decay rates at two of the sites increased with greater flooding. These findings suggest that flooding may enhance organic matter decay rates even in water-logged soils, but that the overall influence of flooding is minor. Our experiments suggest that sea-level rise will not accelerate rates of peat accumulation by slowing the rate of soil organic matter decay. Consequently, marshes will require enhanced organic matter productivity or mineral sediment deposition to survive accelerating sea-level rise.

  15. The impact of sea-level rise on organic matter decay rates in Chesapeake Bay brackish tidal marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirwan, M. L.; Langley, J. A.; Guntenspergen, G. R.; Megonigal, J. P.

    2013-03-01

    The balance between organic matter production and decay determines how fast coastal wetlands accumulate soil organic matter. Despite the importance of soil organic matter accumulation rates in influencing marsh elevation and resistance to sea-level rise, relatively little is known about how decomposition rates will respond to sea-level rise. Here, we estimate the sensitivity of decomposition to flooding by measuring rates of decay in 87 bags filled with milled sedge peat, including soil organic matter, roots and rhizomes. Experiments were located in field-based mesocosms along 3 mesohaline tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay. Mesocosm elevations were manipulated to influence the duration of tidal inundation. Although we found no significant influence of inundation on decay rate when bags from all study sites were analyzed together, decay rates at two of the sites increased with greater flooding. These findings suggest that flooding may enhance organic matter decay rates even in water-logged soils, but that the overall influence of flooding is minor. Our experiments suggest that sea-level rise will not accelerate rates of peat accumulation by slowing the rate of soil organic matter decay. Consequently, marshes will require enhanced organic matter productivity or mineral sediment deposition to survive accelerating sea-level rise.

  16. Comparison of the perfluorocarbon and tracer gas decay methods for assessing infiltration rates in residents

    SciTech Connect

    Schaap, L.; Leaderer, B.P.; Renes, S.; Verstraelen, H.; Tosun, T.; Dietz, R.N.

    1985-01-01

    The passive perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technique for determining air infiltration rates into homes and buildings was evaluated in an environmental chamber. The impact of sampler orientation at a constant ventilation rate and a constant temperature, of variable ventilation rate at a constant temperature, and of variable temperature at a constant ventilation rate were evaluated. The average relative standard deviation of 16 paired samplers deployed in experiment 1 was +- 1.9% +- 1.0% indicating good reproducibility of the passive sampling rate and sample analysis. No impact of sampler orientation with respect to low air velocities (<0.2 m/s) present in houses is expected. The passive samplers accurately measured the average tracer concentration as compared with calculations based on the known source strength (CO/sub 2/ decays) and the measured ventilation rate under conditions of a 3-fold variation in ventilation rates (experiment 2). Temperature cycling differences of 8/sup 0/C (experiment 3) did not produce a bias in the PFT determined ventilation rate. The PFT technique is applicable to the expected range of condition in homes and buildings. 3 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  17. Analysis of flow decay potential on Galileo. [oxidizer flow rate reduction by iron nitrate precipitates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, T. W.; Frisbee, R. H.; Yavrouian, A. H.

    1987-01-01

    The risks posed to the NASA's Galileo spacecraft by the oxidizer flow decay during its extended mission to Jupiter is discussed. The Galileo spacecraft will use nitrogen tetroxide (NTO)/monomethyl hydrazine bipropellant system with one large engine thrust-rated at a nominal 400 N, and 12 smaller engines each thrust-rated at a nominal 10 N. These smaller thrusters, because of their small valve inlet filters and small injector ports, are especially vulnerable to clogging by iron nitrate precipitates formed by NTO-wetted stainless steel components. To quantify the corrosion rates and solubility levels which will be seen during the Galileo mission, corrosion and solubility testing experiments were performed with simulated Galileo materials, propellants, and environments. The results show the potential benefits of propellant sieving in terms of iron and water impurity reduction.

  18. Derivative expansion and gauge independence of the false vacuum decay rate in various gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, D.

    2001-04-01

    In theories with radiative symmetry breaking, the calculation of the false vacuum decay rate requires the inclusion of higher-order terms in the derivative expansion of the effective action. I show here that, in the case of covariant gauges, the presence of infrared singularities forbids the consistent calculation by keeping the lowest-order terms. The situation is remedied, however, in the case of Rξ gauges. Using the Nielsen identities I show that the final result is gauge independent for generic values of the gauge parameter v that are not anomalously small.

  19. Comparison of nonmesonic hypernuclear decay rates computed in laboratory and center-of-mass coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    De Conti, C.; Barbero, C.; Galeão, A. P.; Krmpotić, F.

    2014-11-11

    In this work we compute the one-nucleon-induced nonmesonic hypernuclear decay rates of {sub Λ}{sup 5}He, {sub Λ}{sup 12}C and {sub Λ}{sup 13}C using a formalism based on the independent particle shell model in terms of laboratory coordinates. To ascertain the correctness and precision of the method, these results are compared with those obtained using a formalism in terms of center-of-mass coordinates, which has been previously reported in the literature. The formalism in terms of laboratory coordinates will be useful in the shell-model approach to two-nucleon-induced transitions.

  20. An Examination of Sunspot Number Rates of Growth and Decay in Relation to the Sunspot Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of annual sunspot number averages, sunspot number rates of growth and decay are examined relative to both minimum and maximum amplitudes and the time of their occurrences using cycles 12 through present, the most reliably determined sunspot cycles. Indeed, strong correlations are found for predicting the minimum and maximum amplitudes and the time of their occurrences years in advance. As applied to predicting sunspot minimum for cycle 24, the next cycle, its minimum appears likely to occur in 2006, especially if it is a robust cycle similar in nature to cycles 17-23.

  1. The 1886-1889 aftershocks of the Charleston, South Carolina, Earthquake: A Widespread burst of seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeber, L.; Armbruster, J. G.

    1987-03-01

    A systematic search of contemporary newspapers in South Carolina, North Carolina, Georgia and eastern Tennessee during the 1886-1889 (inclusive) aftershock sequence of the August 31, 1886 earthquake near Charleston, South Carolina has provided more than 3000 intensity reports for 522 earthquakes as compared to 144 previously known earthquakes for the same period. Of these 144 events, 138 were felt in Charleston/Summerville and had been assigned epicenters in that area. In contrast the new data provide 112 well-constrained macroseismic epicenters. The 1886-1889 seismicity is characterized by a linear relation between log frequency and magnitude with a slope b≈1, a temporal decay of earthquake frequency proportional to time-1, and a low level of seismicity prior to the main shock. These are frequently observed characteristics of aftershock sequences. By 1889, the level of seismicity had decreased more than 2 orders of magnitude, reaching approximately the current level in the same area. The 1886-1889 epicenters delineate a large aftershock zone that extends northwest about 250 km across Appalachian strike from the coast into the Piedmont and at least 100 km along strike near the Fall Line of South Carolina and Georgia. An abrupt change in stress and/or effective strength is required over this zone. If this change can only occur in the near field of a single fault dislocation, this fault must be larger horizontally than the thickness of the seismogenic zone by an order of magnitude and must be shallow dipping. The correlation between the area of intensity VIII in the main shock with the area of large aftershocks is consistent with this hypothesis. The lack of a major fault affecting the post-Upper Jurassic onlap sediments also favors a shallow dipping active fault, possibly a Paleozoic-Mesozoic southeasterly dipping fault or detachment that may outcrop northwest of the aftershock zone. The 1886-1889 aftershocks occupy the same area as the South Carolina

  2. Analysis of decay dose rates and dose management in the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Khater, Hesham; Brereton, Sandra; Dauffy, Lucile; Hall, Jim; Hansen, Luisa; Kim, Soon; Kohut, Tom; Pohl, Bertram; Sitaraman, Shiva; Verbeke, Jerome; Young, Mitchell

    2013-06-01

    A detailed model of the Target Bay (TB) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been developed to estimate the post-shot radiation environment inside the facility. The model includes the large number of structures and diagnostic instruments present inside the TB. These structures and instruments are activated by neutrons generated during a shot, and the resultant gamma dose rates are estimated at various decay times following the shot. A set of computational tools was developed to help in estimating potential radiation exposure to TB workers. The results presented in this paper describe the expected radiation environment inside the TB following a low-yield DT shot of 10(16) neutrons. General environment dose rates drop below 30 μSv h(-1) within 3 h following a shot, with higher dose rates observed in the vicinity (~30 cm) of few components. The dose rates drop by more than a factor of two at 1 d following the shot. Dose rate maps of the different TB levels were generated to aid in estimating worker stay-out times following a shot before entry is permitted into the TB. Primary components, including the Target Chamber and diagnostic and beam line components, are constructed of aluminum. Near-term TB accessibility is driven by the decay of the aluminum activation product, 24Na. Worker dose is managed using electronic dosimeters (EDs) self-issued at kiosks using commercial dose management software. The software programs the ED dose and dose rate alarms based on the Radiological Work Permit (RWP) and tracks dose by individual, task, and work group. PMID:23629063

  3. A case study of two M~5 mainshocks in Anza, California: Is the footprint of an aftershock sequence larger than we think?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fritts, Karen R.; Kilb, Debi

    2009-01-01

    It has been traditionally held that aftershocks occur within one to two fault lengths of the mainshock. Here we demonstrate that this perception has been shaped by the sensitivity of seismic networks. The 31 October 2001 Mw 5.0 and 12 June 2005 Mw 5.2 Anza mainshocks in southern California occurred in the middle of the densely instrumented ANZA seismic network and thus were unusually well recorded. For the June 2005 event, aftershocks as small as M 0.0 could be observed stretching for at least 50 km along the San Jacinto fault even though the mainshock fault was only ∼4.5 km long. It was hypothesized that an observed aseismic slipping patch produced a spatially extended aftershock-triggering source, presumably slowing the decay of aftershock density with distance and leading to a broader aftershock zone. We find, however, the decay of aftershock density with distance for both Anza sequences to be similar to that observed elsewhere in California. This indicates there is no need for an additional triggering mechanism and suggests that given widespread dense instrumentation, aftershock sequences would routinely have footprints much larger than currently expected. Despite the large 2005 aftershock zone, we find that the probability that the 2005 Anza mainshock triggered the M 4.9 Yucaipa mainshock, which occurred 4.2 days later and 72 km away, to be only 14%±1%. This probability is a strong function of the time delay; had the earthquakes been separated by only an hour, the probability of triggering would have been 89%.

  4. The aftershock signature of supershear earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Bouchon, Michel; Karabulut, Hayrullah

    2008-06-01

    Recent studies show that earthquake faults may rupture at speeds exceeding the shear wave velocity of rocks. This supershear rupture produces in the ground a seismic shock wave similar to the sonic boom produced by a supersonic airplane. This shock wave may increase the destruction caused by the earthquake. We report that supershear earthquakes are characterized by a specific pattern of aftershocks: The fault plane itself is remarkably quiet whereas aftershocks cluster off the fault, on secondary structures that are activated by the supershear rupture. The post-earthquake quiescence of the fault shows that friction is relatively uniform over supershear segments, whereas the activation of off-fault structures is explained by the shock wave radiation, which produces high stresses over a wide zone surrounding the fault. PMID:18535239

  5. Aftershocks in a frictional earthquake model.

    PubMed

    Braun, O M; Tosatti, Erio

    2014-09-01

    Inspired by spring-block models, we elaborate a "minimal" physical model of earthquakes which reproduces two main empirical seismological laws, the Gutenberg-Richter law and the Omori aftershock law. Our point is to demonstrate that the simultaneous incorporation of aging of contacts in the sliding interface and of elasticity of the sliding plates constitutes the minimal ingredients to account for both laws within the same frictional model. PMID:25314453

  6. Triggering of earthquake aftershocks by dynamic stresses.

    PubMed

    Kilb, D; Gomberg, J; Bodin, P

    2000-11-30

    It is thought that small 'static' stress changes due to permanent fault displacement can alter the likelihood of, or trigger, earthquakes on nearby faults. Many studies of triggering in the near-field, particularly of aftershocks, rely on these static changes as the triggering agent and consider them only in terms of equivalent changes in the applied load on the fault. Here we report a comparison of the aftershock pattern of the moment magnitude Mw = 7.3 Landers earthquake, not only with static stress changes but also with transient, oscillatory stress changes transmitted as seismic waves (that is, 'dynamic' stresses). Dynamic stresses do not permanently change the applied load and thus can trigger earthquakes only by altering the mechanical state or properties of the fault zone. These dynamically weakened faults may fail after the seismic waves have passed by, and might even cause earthquakes that would not otherwise have occurred. We find similar asymmetries in the aftershock and dynamic stress patterns, the latter being due to rupture propagation, whereas the static stress changes lack this asymmetry. Previous studies have shown that dynamic stresses can promote failure at remote distances, but here we show that they can also do so nearby. PMID:11117741

  7. Effects of Aftershock Declustering in Risk Modeling: Case Study of a Subduction Sequence in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, D. L.; Nyst, M.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquake hazard and risk models often assume that earthquake rates can be represented by a stationary Poisson process, and that aftershocks observed in historical seismicity catalogs represent a deviation from stationarity that must be corrected before earthquake rates are estimated. Algorithms for classifying individual earthquakes as independent mainshocks or as aftershocks vary widely, and analysis of a single catalog can produce considerably different earthquake rates depending on the declustering method implemented. As these rates are propagated through hazard and risk models, the modeled results will vary due to the assumptions implied by these choices. In particular, the removal of large aftershocks following a mainshock may lead to an underestimation of the rate of damaging earthquakes and potential damage due to a large aftershock may be excluded from the model. We present a case study based on the 1907 - 1911 sequence of nine 6.9 <= Mw <= 7.9 earthquakes along the Cocos - North American plate subduction boundary in Mexico in order to illustrate the variability in risk under various declustering approaches. Previous studies have suggested that subduction zone earthquakes in Mexico tend to occur in clusters, and this particular sequence includes events that would be labeled as aftershocks in some declustering approaches yet are large enough to produce significant damage. We model the ground motion for each event, determine damage ratios using modern exposure data, and then compare the variability in the modeled damage from using the full catalog or one of several declustered catalogs containing only "independent" events. We also consider the effects of progressive damage caused by each subsequent event and how this might increase or decrease the total losses expected from this sequence.

  8. Relativistic two-photon decay rates with the Lagrange-mesh method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippin, Livio; Godefroid, Michel; Baye, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Relativistic two-photon decay rates of the 2 s1 /2 and 2 p1 /2 states towards the 1 s1 /2 ground state of hydrogenic atoms are calculated by using numerically exact energies and wave functions obtained from the Dirac equation with the Lagrange-mesh method. This approach is an approximate variational method taking the form of equations on a grid because of the use of a Gauss quadrature approximation. Highly accurate values are obtained by a simple calculation involving different meshes for the initial, final, and intermediate wave functions and for the calculation of matrix elements. The accuracy of the results with a Coulomb potential is improved by several orders of magnitude in comparison with benchmark values from the literature. The general requirement of gauge invariance is also successfully tested, down to rounding errors. The method provides high accuracies for two-photon decay rates of a particle in other potentials and is applied to a hydrogen atom embedded in a Debye plasma simulated by a Yukawa potential.

  9. Sensitivity of β -decay rates to the radial dependence of the nucleon effective mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severyukhin, A. P.; Margueron, J.; Borzov, I. N.; Van Giai, N.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the sensitivity of β -decay rates in 78Ni and Sn,132100 to a correction term in Skyrme energy-density functionals (EDFs) which modifies the radial shape of the nucleon effective mass. This correction is added on top of several Skyrme parametrizations which are selected from their effective mass properties and predictions about the stability properties of 132Sn . The impact of the correction on high-energy collective modes is shown to be moderate. From the comparison of the effects induced by the surface-peaked effective mass in the three doubly magic nuclei, it is found that 132Sn is largely impacted by the correction, while 78Ni and 100Sn are only moderately affected. We conclude that β -decay rates in these nuclei can be used as a test of different parts of the nuclear EDF: 78Ni and 100Sn are mostly sensitive to the particle-hole interaction through the B (GT) values, while 132Sn is sensitive to the radial shape of the effective mass. Possible improvements of these different parts could therefore be better constrained in the future.

  10. Time Modulation of the {beta}{sup +}-Decay Rate of H-Like {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+} Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A. N.; Kryshen, E. L.; Pitschmann, M.; Kienle, P.

    2008-10-31

    Recent experimental data at GSI on the rates of the number of daughter ions, produced by the nuclear K-shell electron capture (EC) decays of the H-like ions {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+} and {sup 142}Pm{sup 60+}, suggest that they are modulated in time with periods T{sub EC}{approx_equal}7 sec and amplitudes a{sub EC}{approx_equal}0.20. Since it is known that these ions are unstable also under the nuclear positron ({beta}{sup +}) decays, we study a possible time dependence of the nuclear {beta}{sup +}-decay rate of the H-like {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+} ion. We show that the time dependence of the {beta}{sup +}-decay rate of the H-like {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+} ion as well as any H-like heavy ions cannot be observed.

  11. A possible mechanism for aftershocks: time-dependent stress relaxation in a slider-block model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gran, Joseph D.; Rundle, John B.; Turcotte, Donald L.

    2012-08-01

    We propose a time-dependent slider-block model which incorporates a time-to-failure function for each block dependent on the stress. We associate this new time-to-failure mechanism with the property of stress fatigue. We test two failure time functions including a power law and an exponential. Failure times are assigned to 'damaged' blocks with stress above a damage threshold, σW and below a static failure threshold, σF. If the stress of a block is below the damage threshold the failure time is infinite. During the aftershock sequence the loader-plate remains fixed and all aftershocks are triggered by stress transfer from previous events. This differs from standard slider-block models which initiate each event by moving the loader-plate. We show the resulting behaviour of the model produces both the Gutenberg-Richter scaling law for event sizes and the Omori's scaling law for the rate of aftershocks when we use the power-law failure time function. The exponential function has limited success in producing Omori's law for the rate of aftershocks. We conclude the shape of the failure time function is key to producing Omori's law.

  12. A New Hybrid STEP/Coulomb model for Aftershock Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steacy, S.; Jimenez, A.; Gerstenberger, M.

    2014-12-01

    Aftershock forecasting models tend to fall into two classes - purely statistical approaches based on clustering, b-value, and the Omori-Utsu law; and Coulomb rate-state models which relate the forecast increase in rate to the magnitude of the Coulomb stress change. Recently, hybrid models combining physical and statistical forecasts have begun to be developed, for example by Bach and Hainzl (2012) and Steacy et al. (2013). The latter approach combined Coulomb stress patterns with the STEP (short-term earthquake probability) model by redistributing expected rate from areas with decreased stress to regions where the stress had increased. The chosen 'Coulomb Redistribution Parameter' (CRP) was 0.93, based on California earthquakes, which meant that 93% of the total rate was expected to occur where the stress had increased. The model was tested against the Canterbury sequence and the main result was that the new model performed at least as well as, and often better than, STEP when tested against retrospective data but that STEP was generally better in pseudo-prospective tests that involved data actually available within the first 10 days of each event of interest. The authors suggested that the major reason for this discrepancy was uncertainty in the slip models and, particularly, in the geometries of the faults involved in each complex major event. Here we develop a variant of the STEP/Coulomb model in which the CRP varies based on the percentage of aftershocks that occur in the positively stressed areas during the forecast learning period. We find that this variant significantly outperforms both STEP and the previous hybrid model in almost all cases, even when the input Coulomb model is quite poor. Our results suggest that this approach might be more useful than Coulomb rate-state when the underlying slip model is not well constrained due to the dependence of that method on the magnitude of the Coulomb stress change.

  13. Recent Experiences in Aftershock Hazard Modelling in New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerstenberger, M.; Rhoades, D. A.; McVerry, G.; Christophersen, A.; Bannister, S. C.; Fry, B.; Potter, S.

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of several sequences of earthquakes in New Zealand in the last few years has meant that GNS Science has gained significant recent experience in aftershock hazard and forecasting. First was the Canterbury sequence of events which began in 2010 and included the destructive Christchurch earthquake of February, 2011. This sequence is occurring in what was a moderate-to-low hazard region of the National Seismic Hazard Model (NSHM): the model on which the building design standards are based. With the expectation that the sequence would produce a 50-year hazard estimate in exceedance of the existing building standard, we developed a time-dependent model that combined short-term (STEP & ETAS) and longer-term (EEPAS) clustering with time-independent models. This forecast was combined with the NSHM to produce a forecast of the hazard for the next 50 years. This has been used to revise building design standards for the region and has contributed to planning of the rebuilding of Christchurch in multiple aspects. An important contribution to this model comes from the inclusion of EEPAS, which allows for clustering on the scale of decades. EEPAS is based on three empirical regressions that relate the magnitudes, times of occurrence, and locations of major earthquakes to regional precursory scale increases in the magnitude and rate of occurrence of minor earthquakes. A second important contribution comes from the long-term rate to which seismicity is expected to return in 50-years. With little seismicity in the region in historical times, a controlling factor in the rate is whether-or-not it is based on a declustered catalog. This epistemic uncertainty in the model was allowed for by using forecasts from both declustered and non-declustered catalogs. With two additional moderate sequences in the capital region of New Zealand in the last year, we have continued to refine our forecasting techniques, including the use of potential scenarios based on the aftershock

  14. Vacuum stability and Higgs diphoton decay rate in the Zee-Babu model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Wei; Zhang, Jian-Hui; Zhang, Yongchao

    2013-06-01

    Although recent Higgs data from ATLAS and CMS are compatible with a Standard Model (SM) signal at 2σ level, both experiments see indications for an excess in the diphoton decay channel, which points to new physics beyond the SM. Given such a low Higgs mass m H ~ 125 GeV, another sign indicating the existence of new physics beyond the SM is the vacuum stability problem, i.e., the SM Higgs quartic coupling may run to negative values at a scale below the Planck scale. In this paper, we study the vacuum stability and enhanced Higgs diphoton decay rate in the Zee-Babu model, which was used to generate tiny Majorana neutrino masses at two-loop level. We find that it is rather difficult to find overlapping regions allowed by the vacuum stability and diphoton enhancement constraints. As a consequence, it is almost inevitable to introduce new ingredients into the model, in order to resolve these two issues simultaneously.

  15. Initial measurements of O-ion and He-ion decay rates observed from the Van Allen probes RBSPICE instrument

    PubMed Central

    Gerrard, Andrew; Lanzerotti, Louis; Gkioulidou, Matina; Mitchell, Donald; Manweiler, Jerry; Bortnik, Jacob; Keika, Kunihiro

    2014-01-01

    H-ion (∼45 keV to ∼600 keV), He-ion (∼65 keV to ∼520 keV), and O-ion (∼140 keV to ∼1130 keV) integral flux measurements, from the Radiation Belt Storm Probe Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument aboard the Van Allan Probes spacecraft B, are reported. These abundance data form a cohesive picture of ring current ions during the first 9 months of measurements. Furthermore, the data presented herein are used to show injection characteristics via the He-ion/H-ion abundance ratio and the O-ion/H-ion abundance ratio. Of unique interest to ring current dynamics are the spatial-temporal decay characteristics of the two injected populations. We observe that He-ions decay more quickly at lower L shells, on the order of ∼0.8 day at L shells of 3–4, and decay more slowly with higher L shell, on the order of ∼1.7 days at L shells of 5–6. Conversely, O-ions decay very rapidly (∼1.5 h) across all L shells. The He-ion decay time are consistent with previously measured and calculated lifetimes associated with charge exchange. The O-ion decay time is much faster than predicted and is attributed to the inclusion of higher-energy (> 500 keV) O-ions in our decay rate estimation. We note that these measurements demonstrate a compelling need for calculation of high-energy O-ion loss rates, which have not been adequately studied in the literature to date. Key Points We report initial observations of ring current ions We show that He-ion decay rates are consistent with theory We show that O-ions with energies greater than 500 keV decay very rapidly PMID:26167435

  16. Tracing nitrogen accumulation in decaying wood and examining its impact on wood decomposition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinne, Katja T.; Rajala, Tiina; Peltoniemi, Krista; Chen, Janet; Smolander, Aino; Mäkipää, Raisa

    2016-04-01

    Decomposition of dead wood, which is controlled primarily by fungi is important for ecosystem carbon cycle and has potentially a significant role in nitrogen fixation via diazotrophs. Nitrogen content has been found to increase with advancing wood decay in several studies; however, the importance of this increase to decay rate and the sources of external nitrogen remain unclear. Improved knowledge of the temporal dynamics of wood decomposition rate and nitrogen accumulation in wood as well as the drivers of the two processes would be important for carbon and nitrogen models dealing with ecosystem responses to climate change. To tackle these questions we applied several analytical methods on Norway spruce logs from Lapinjärvi, Finland. We incubated wood samples (density classes from I to V, n=49) in different temperatures (from 8.5oC to 41oC, n=7). After a common seven day pre-incubation period at 14.5oC, the bottles were incubated six days in their designated temperature prior to CO2 flux measurements with GC to determine the decomposition rate. N2 fixation was measured with acetylene reduction assay after further 48 hour incubation. In addition, fungal DNA, (MiSeq Illumina) δ15N and N% composition of wood for samples incubated at 14.5oC were determined. Radiocarbon method was applied to obtain age distribution for the density classes. The asymbiotic N2 fixation rate was clearly dependent on the stage of wood decay and increased from stage I to stage IV but was substantially reduced in stage V. CO2 production was highest in the intermediate decay stage (classes II-IV). Both N2 fixation and CO2 production were highly temperature sensitive having optima in temperature 25oC and 31oC, respectively. We calculated the variation of annual levels of respiration and N2 fixation per hectare for the study site, and used the latter data together with the 14C results to determine the amount of N2 accumulated in wood in time. The proportion of total nitrogen in wood

  17. Indoor acrolein emission and decay rates resulting from domestic cooking events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, Vincent Y.; Bennett, Deborah H.; Cahill, Thomas M.

    2009-12-01

    Acrolein (2-propenal) is a common constituent of both indoor and outdoor air, can exacerbate asthma in children, and may contribute to other chronic lung diseases. Recent studies have found high indoor levels of acrolein and other carbonyls compared to outdoor ambient concentrations. Heated cooking oils produce considerable amounts of acrolein, thus cooking is likely an important source of indoor acrolein. A series of cooking experiments were conducted to determine the emission rates of acrolein and other volatile carbonyls for different types of cooking oils (canola, soybean, corn and olive oils) and deep-frying different food items. Similar concentrations and emission rates of carbonyls were found when different vegetable oils were used to deep-fry the same food product. The food item being deep-fried was generally not a significant source of carbonyls compared to the cooking oil. The oil cooking events resulted in high concentrations of acrolein that were in the range of 26.4-64.5 μg m -3. These concentrations exceed all the chronic regulatory exposure limits and many of the acute exposure limits. The air exchange rate and the decay rate of the carbonyls were monitored to estimate the half-life of the carbonyls. The half-life for acrolein was 14.4 ± 2.6 h, which indicates that indoor acrolein concentrations can persist for considerable time after cooking in poorly-ventilated homes.

  18. How ubiquitous are aftershock sequences driven by high pressure fluids at depth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S. A.

    2008-12-01

    Strong evidence suggests that two earthquake-aftershock episodes, the 2004 Niigata (Japan) sequence and the 1997 Umbria-Marche (Italy) sequence, were driven by high pressure fluids at depth. Since Niigata was in a compressional environment and Umbria-Marche in extension, a question arises about whether such a mechanism is more general than just these two cases. Although it is not clear by what mechanism fluids of sufficient volume can be trapped in the lower crust, if such pockets of high pressure fluids exist, then they must necessarily be expelled when a large earthquake provides the hydraulic connection to the hydrostatically pressured free surface. In this talk, aftershock data is analyzed for a number of different earthquakes in a variety of tectonic settings, including 1992 Landers, 1994 Northridge, and the 2001 Bhuj earthquakes. Comparisons are made between model results of the evolved fluid pressure state from a high pressure source at depth, and the spatio-temporal distributions of aftershocks. The data is further analyzed and compared with model results for differences in the rate of aftershocks (p-value in Omori's Law) and their dependence on the orientation of the mainshock relative to the prevailing regional stress field.

  19. Cooperative Lamb shift and the cooperative decay rate for an initially detuned phased state

    SciTech Connect

    Friedberg, Richard; Manassah, Jamal T.

    2010-04-15

    The cooperative Lamb shift (CLS) is hard to measure because in samples much larger than a resonant wavelength it is much smaller, for an initially prepared resonantly phased state, than the cooperative decay rate (CDR). We show, however, that if the phasing of the initial state is detuned so that the spatial wave vector is k{sub 1} congruent with k{sub 0{+-}}O((1/R)) (where k{sub 0}={omega}{sub 0}/c is the resonant frequency), the CLS grows to 'giant' magnitudes making it comparable to the CDR. Moreover, for certain controlled values of detuning, the initial CDR becomes small so that the dynamical Lamb shift (DLS) can be measured over a considerable period of time.

  20. Spontaneous decay rate and Casimir-Polder potential of an atom near a lithographed surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Radiative corrections to an atom are calculated near a half-space that has arbitrarily shaped small depositions upon its surface. The method is based on calculation of the classical Green's function of the macroscopic Maxwell equations near an arbitrarily perturbed half-space using a Born-series expansion about the bare half-space Green's function. The formalism of macroscopic quantum electrodynamics is used to carry this over into the quantum picture. The broad utility of the calculated Green's function is demonstrated by using it to calculate two quantities: the spontaneous decay rate of an atom near a sharp surface feature and the Casimir-Polder potential of a finite grating deposited on a substrate. Qualitatively different behavior is found for the latter case where it is observed that the periodicity of the Casimir-Polder potential persists even outside the immediate vicinity of the grating.

  1. Combined results on b-hadron production rates, lifetimes, oscillations and semileptonic decays

    SciTech Connect

    WIllocq, stephane

    2000-08-02

    Combined results on b-hadron lifetimes, b-hadron production rates B{sub d}{sup 0}--Anti-B{sub d}{sup 0} and B{sub s}{sup 0}--Anti-B{sub s}{sup 0} oscillations, the decay width difference between the mass eigenstates of the B{sub s}{sup 0}--Anti-B{sub s}{sup 0} system, and the values of the CKM matrix elements {vert_bar}V{sub cb}{vert_bar} and {vert_bar}V{sub ub}{vert_bar} are obtained from published and preliminary measurements available in Summer 99 from the ALEPH, CDF, DELPHI, L3, OPAL and SLD Collaborations.

  2. Rate of Temperature Decay in Human Muscle Following 3 MHz Ultrasound: The Stretching Window Revealed

    PubMed Central

    Draper, David O.; Ricard, Mark D.

    1995-01-01

    Researchers have determined that when therapeutic ultrasound vigorously heats connective tissue, it can be effective in increasing extensibility of collagen affected by scar tissue. These findings give credence to the use of continuous thermal ultrasound to heat tissue before stretching, exercise, or friction massage in an effort to decrease joint contractures and increase range of motion. Before our investigation, it was not known how long following an ultrasound treatment the tissue will remain at a vigorous heating level (>3°C). We conducted this study to determine the rate of temperature decay following 3 MHz ultrasound, in order to determine the time period of optimal stretching. Twenty subjects had a 23-gauge hypodermic needle microprobe inserted 1.2 cm deep into the medial aspect of their anesthetized triceps surae muscle. Subjects then received a 3 MHz ultrasound treatment at 1.5 W/cm2 until the tissue temperature was increased at least 5°C. The mean baseline temperature before each treatment was 33.8 ± 1.3°C, and it peaked at 39.1 ± 1.2°C from the ultrasound. Immediately following the treatment, we recorded the rate at which the temperature dropped at 30-second intervals. We ran a stepwise nonlinear regression analysis to predict temperature decay as a function of time following ultrasound treatment. We found a significant nonlinear relationship between time and temperature decay. The average time it took for the temperature to drop each degree as expressed in minutes and seconds was: 1°C = 1:20; 2°C = 3:22; 3°C = 5:50; 4°C = 9:13; 5°C = 14:55; 5.3°C = 18:00 (baseline). We conclude that under similar circumstances where the tissue temperature is raised 5°C, stretching will be effective, on average, for 3.3 minutes following an ultrasound treatment. To increase this stretching window, we suggest that stretching be applied during and immediately after ultrasound application. ImagesFig 1.Fig 2. PMID:16558352

  3. The effects of supramolecular assembly on exciton decay rates in organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Clément; Makereel, François; Herz, Laura M.; Hoeben, Freek J. M.; Jonkheijm, Pascal; Schenning, Albertus P. H. J.; Meijer, E. W.; Friend, Richard H.; Silva, Carlos

    2005-08-01

    We present time-resolved photoluminescence measurements on two series of oligo-p-phenylenevinylene (OPV) materials that are functionalized with quadruple hydrogen-bonding groups. These form supramolecular assemblies with thermotropic reversibility. The morphology of the assemblies depends on the way that the oligomers are functionalized; monofunctionalized OPVs (MOPVs) form chiral, helical stacks while bifunctionalized OPVs (BOPVs) form less organized structures. These are therefore model systems to investigate the effects of supramolecular assembly, the effects of morphology, and the dependence of oligomer length on the radiative and nonradiative rates of π-conjugated materials. The purpose of this work is to use MOPV and BOPV derivatives as model systems to study the effect of intermolecular interactions on the molecular photophysics by comparing optical properties in the dissolved phase and the supramolecular assemblies. A simple photophysical analysis allows us to extract the intrinsic radiative and nonradiative decay rates and to unravel the consequences of interchromophore coupling with unprecedented detail. We find that interchromophore coupling strongly reduces both radiative and intrinsic nonradiative rates and that the effect is more pronounced in short oligomers.

  4. Pressure Decay Testing Methodology for Quantifying Leak Rates of Full-Scale Docking System Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Daniels, Christopher C.; Wasowski, Janice L.; Garafolo, Nicholas G.; Penney, Nicholas; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2010-01-01

    NASA is developing a new docking system to support future space exploration missions to low-Earth orbit and the Moon. This system, called the Low Impact Docking System, is a mechanism designed to connect the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle to the International Space Station, the lunar lander (Altair), and other future Constellation Project vehicles. NASA Glenn Research Center is playing a key role in developing the main interface seal for this docking system. This seal will be relatively large with an outside diameter in the range of 54 to 58 in. (137 to 147 cm). As part of this effort, a new test apparatus has been designed, fabricated, and installed to measure leak rates of candidate full-scale seals under simulated thermal, vacuum, and engagement conditions. Using this test apparatus, a pressure decay testing and data processing methodology has been developed to quantify full-scale seal leak rates. Tests performed on untreated 54 in. diameter seals at room temperature in a fully compressed state resulted in leak rates lower than the requirement of less than 0.0025 lbm, air per day (0.0011 kg/day).

  5. Investigating the decay rates of Escherichia coli relative to Vibrio parahemolyticus and Salmonella Typhi in tropical coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choon Weng; Ng, Angie Yee Fang; Bong, Chui Wei; Narayanan, Kumaran; Sim, Edmund Ui Hang; Ng, Ching Ching

    2011-02-01

    Using the size fractionation method, we measured the decay rates of Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhi and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in the coastal waters of Peninsular Malaysia. The size fractions were total or unfiltered, <250 μm, <20 μm, <2 μm, <0.7 μm, <0.2 μm and <0.02 μm. We also carried out abiotic (inorganic nutrients) and biotic (bacterial abundance, production and protistan bacterivory) measurements at Port Dickson, Klang and Kuantan. Klang had highest nutrient concentrations whereas both bacterial production and protistan bacterivory rates were highest at Kuantan. We observed signs of protist-bacteria coupling via the following correlations: Protistan bacterivory-Bacterial Production: r = 0.773, df = 11, p < 0.01; Protist-Bacteria: r = 0.586, df = 12, p < 0.05. However none of the bacterial decay rates were correlated with the biotic variables measured. E. coli and Salmonella decay rates were generally higher in the larger fraction (>0.7 μm) than in the smaller fraction (<0.7 μm) suggesting the more important role played by protists. E. coli and Salmonella also decreased in the <0.02 μm fraction and suggested that these non-halophilic bacteria did not survive well in seawater. In contrast, Vibrio grew well in seawater. There was usually an increase in Vibrio after one day incubation. Our results confirmed that decay or loss rates of E. coli did not match that of Vibrio, and also did not correlate with Salmonella decay rates. However E. coli showed persistence where its decay rates were generally lower than Salmonella. PMID:21146847

  6. Decay Rates and Semi-stable Fraction Formation after 12 years of Foliar Litter Decomposition in Canadian Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofymow, J. A.; Smyth, C.; Moore, T.; Prescott, C.; Titus, B.; Siltanen, M.; Visser, S.; Preston, C. M.; Nault, J.

    2009-12-01

    Litter decay in early and midphases of decomposition have been shown to highly influenced by climate and substrate quality, however factors affecting decay during the late semi-stable phase are less well understood. The Canadian Intersite Decomposition Experiment (CIDET) was established in 1992 with the objective of providing data on the long-term rates of litter decomposition and nutrient mineralization for a range of forested ecoclimatic regions in Canada. Such data were needed to help verify models used for national C accounting, as well as aid in the development of other soil C models. CIDET examined the annual decay, over a 12-year period, of 10 standard foliar litters and 2 wood substrates at 18 forested upland and 3 wetland sites ranging from the cool temperate to subarctic regions, a nearly 20oC span in temperature. On a subset of sites and litter types, changes in litter C chemistry over time were also determined. Over the first 6 years, C/N ratio and iron increased, NMR showed an overall decline in O-alkyl C (carbohydrates) and increase in alkyl, aromatic, phenolic, and carboxyl C. Proximate analysis showed the acid unhydrolyzable residue (AUR) increases, but true lignin did not accumulate, in contrast to the conceptual ligno-cellulose model of decomposition. Litter decay during first phase was related to initial litter quality (AUR and water soluble extract), winter precipitation, but not temperature, suggesting the importance of leaching during this phase. Decay rate “k” during the mid phase was related to temperature, initial litter quality (AUR and AUR/N), summer precipitation, but not soil N. In most cases decay had approached an asymptote before end of experiment. Although annual temperature was the best single predictor for 12-year asymptotes, summer precipitation and forest floor pH and C/N ratio were the best set of combined predictors. The changes in the decay factors during different phases may explain some of the discrepancies in the

  7. Comparison of Early Aftershocks for the 2004 Mid-Niigata and 2007 Noto Hanto Earthquakes in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, J.; Kano, Y.; Enescu, B.

    2007-12-01

    We compared the aftershock sequences of the similar 2004 Mid-Niigata (Mw6.6) and 2007 Noto Hanto (Mw6.7) earthquakes in central Japan. Although the two mainshocks had similar size, depth, and focal mechanisms, the numbers of aftershocks were quite different, with the Niigata mainshock producing a much stronger sequence. We examined the continuously recorded data from nearby Hi-Net stations operated by the National Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED), to identify the early aftershocks following both mainshocks. A 5 hz high-pass filter was chosen to facilitate identification of the high-frequency arrivals from individual aftershocks. We used 6 stations distributed at distances within about 30 km. Aftershocks were identified by looking at large printouts of the continuous records for the six stations and peak amplitudes were measured to calculate the magnitude. The magnitude determination using these high-pass filtered records was calibrated by using a set of 30 earthquakes that were also listed in the catalog of the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). We estimate that the completeness level of small aftershocks is about Mj3.5. The event counts show that the aftershock sequences of the two earthquakes were quite similar for about the first 7 minutes. Following that time, the Niigata aftershocks clearly continue at a much higher rate which is about 3 times the rate of the Noto earthquake. The time where the rates diverge corresponds to the occurrence of a Mj6.3 earthquake in the Niigata sequence. This pattern can be seen in both the plots for the Mj¡Ý3.5 and Mj¡Ý4.0 events. Since there are more earthquakes for the Mj¡Ý3.5 data set, the time resolution is better. These results show an enhanced triggering of aftershocks for the Niigata sequence several minutes after the mainshock. The Niigata region is an area of hydrocarbon production with regions of high pressure fluids, and Sibson (2007) proposes that the swarm-like behavior is due to

  8. Spin-dependent energy distribution of B-hadrons from polarized top decays considering the azimuthal correlation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosavi Nejad, S. M.

    2016-04-01

    Basically, the energy distribution of bottom-flavored hadrons produced through polarized top quark decays t (↑) →W+ + b (→Xb), is governed by the unpolarized rate and the polar and the azimuthal correlation functions which are related to the density matrix elements of the decay t (↑) → bW+. Here we present, for the first time, the analytical expressions for the O (αs) radiative corrections to the differential azimuthal decay rates of the partonic process t (↑) → b +W+ in two helicity systems, which are needed to study the azimuthal distribution of the energy spectrum of the hadrons produced in polarized top decays. These spin-momentum correlations between the top quark spin and its decay product momenta will allow the detailed studies of the top decay mechanism. Our predictions of the hadron energy distributions also enable us to deepen our knowledge of the hadronization process and to test the universality and scaling violations of the bottom-flavored meson fragmentation functions.

  9. FAST TRACK PAPER: Observational analysis of correlations between aftershock productivities and regional conditions in the context of a damage rheology model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenzheng; Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    2009-05-01

    Aftershock sequences are commonly observed but their properties vary from region to region. Ben-Zion and Lyakhovsky developed a solution for aftershocks decay in a damage rheology model. The solution indicates that the productivity of aftershocks decreases with increasing value of a non-dimensional material parameter R, given by the ratio of timescale for brittle deformation to timescale for viscous relaxation. The parameter R is inversely proportional to the degree of seismic coupling and is expected to increase primarily with increasing temperature and also with existence of sedimentary rocks at seismogenic depth. To test these predictions, we use aftershock sequences from several southern California regions. We first analyse properties of individual aftershock sequences generated by the 1992 Landers and 1987 Superstition Hills earthquakes. The results show that the ratio of aftershock productivities in these sequences spanning four orders of event magnitudes is similar to the ratio of the average heat flow in the two regions. To perform stronger statistical tests, we systematically analyse the average properties of stacked aftershock sequences in five regions. In each region, we consider events with magnitudes between 4.0 and 6.0 to be main shocks. For each main shock, we consider events to be aftershocks if they occur in the subsequent 50 d, within a circular region that scales with the magnitude of the main shock and in the magnitude range between that of the main shock and 2 units lower. This procedure produces 28-196 aftershock sequences in each of the five regions. We stack the aftershock sequences in each region and analyse the properties of the stacked data. The results indicate that the productivities of the stacked sequences are inversely correlated with the heat flow and existence of deep sedimentary covers, in agreement with the damage model predictions. Using the observed ratios of aftershock productivities, along with simple expressions based on the

  10. Local near instantaneously dynamically triggered aftershocks of large earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenyuan; Shearer, Peter M

    2016-09-01

    Aftershocks are often triggered by static- and/or dynamic-stress changes caused by mainshocks. The relative importance of the two triggering mechanisms is controversial at near-to-intermediate distances. We detected and located 48 previously unidentified large early aftershocks triggered by earthquakes with magnitudes between ≥7 and 8 within a few fault lengths (approximately 300 kilometers), during times that high-amplitude surface waves arrive from the mainshock (less than 200 seconds). The observations indicate that near-to-intermediate-field dynamic triggering commonly exists and fundamentally promotes aftershock occurrence. The mainshocks and their nearby early aftershocks are located at major subduction zones and continental boundaries, and mainshocks with all types of faulting-mechanisms (normal, reverse, and strike-slip) can trigger early aftershocks. PMID:27609887

  11. Measurement of the beta+ and orbital electron-capture decay rates in fully ionized, hydrogenlike, and heliumlike 140Pr ions.

    PubMed

    Litvinov, Yu A; Bosch, F; Geissel, H; Kurcewicz, J; Patyk, Z; Winckler, N; Batist, L; Beckert, K; Boutin, D; Brandau, C; Chen, L; Dimopoulou, C; Fabian, B; Faestermann, T; Fragner, A; Grigorenko, L; Haettner, E; Hess, S; Kienle, P; Knöbel, R; Kozhuharov, C; Litvinov, S A; Maier, L; Mazzocco, M; Montes, F; Münzenberg, G; Musumarra, A; Nociforo, C; Nolden, F; Pfützner, M; Plass, W R; Prochazka, A; Reda, R; Reuschl, R; Scheidenberger, C; Steck, M; Stöhlker, T; Torilov, S; Trassinelli, M; Sun, B; Weick, H; Winkler, M

    2007-12-31

    We report on the first measurement of the beta+ and orbital electron-capture decay rates of 140Pr nuclei with the simplest electron configurations: bare nuclei, hydrogenlike, and heliumlike ions. The measured electron-capture decay constant of hydrogenlike 140Pr58+ ions is about 50% larger than that of heliumlike 140Pr57+ ions. Moreover, 140Pr ions with one bound electron decay faster than neutral 140Pr0+ atoms with 59 electrons. To explain this peculiar observation one has to take into account the conservation of the total angular momentum, since only particular spin orientations of the nucleus and of the captured electron can contribute to the allowed decay. PMID:18233571

  12. Design of cycler trajectories and analysis of solar influences on radioactive decay rates during space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Blake A.

    This thesis investigates the design of interplanetary missions for the continual habitation of Mars via Earth-Mars cyclers and for the detection of variations in nuclear decay rates due to solar influences. Several cycler concepts have been proposed to provide safe and comfortable quarters for astronauts traveling between the Earth and Mars. However, no literature has appeared to show how these massive vehicles might be placed into their cycler trajectories. Trajectories are designed that use either Vinfinity leveraging or low thrust to establish cycler vehicles in their desired orbits. In the cycler trajectory cases considered, the use of Vinfinity leveraging or low thrust substantially reduces the total propellant needed to achieve the cycler orbit compared to direct orbit insertion. In the case of the classic Aldrin cycler, the propellant savings due to Vinfinity leveraging can be as large as a 24 metric ton reduction for a cycler vehicle with a dry mass of 75 metric tons, and an additional 111 metric ton reduction by instead using low thrust. The two-synodic period cyclers considered benefit less from Vinfinity leveraging, but have a smaller total propellant mass due to their lower approach velocities at Earth and Mars. It turns out that, for low-thrust establishment, the propellant required is approximately the same for each of the cycler trajectories. The Aldrin cycler has been proposed as a transportation system for human missions between Earth and Mars. However, the hyperbolic excess velocity values at the planetary encounters for these orbits are infeasibly large, especially at Mars. In a new version of the Aldrin cycler, low thrust is used in the interplanetary trajectories to reduce the encounter velocities. Reducing the encounter velocities at both planets reduces the propellant needed by the taxis (astronauts use these taxis to transfer between the planetary surfaces and the cycler vehicle) to perform hyperbolic rendezvous. While the propellant

  13. Aftershock Duration of the 1976 Ms 7.8 Tangshan Earthquake: Implication for the Seismic Hazard Model with a Sensitivity Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Q.; Shi, B.

    2011-12-01

    The disaster of the Ms 7.8 earthquake occurred in Tangshan, China, on July 28th 1976 caused at least 240,000 deaths. The mainshock was followed by two largest aftershocks, the Ms 7.1 occurred after 15 hr later of the mainshock, and the Ms 6.9 occurred on 15 November. The aftershock sequence is lasting to date, making the regional seismic activity rate around the Tangshan main fault much higher than that of before the main event. If these aftershocks are involved in the local main event catalog for the PSHA calculation purpose, the resultant seismic hazard calculation will be overestimated in this region and underestimated in other place. However, it is always difficult to accurately determine the time duration of aftershock sequences and identifies the aftershocks from main event catalog for seismologist. In this study, by using theoretical inference and empirical relation given by Dieterich, we intended to derive the plausible time length of aftershock sequences of the Ms 7.8 Tangshan earthquake. The aftershock duration from log-log regression approach gives us about 120 years according to the empirical Omori's relation. Based on Dietrich approach, it has been claimed that the aftershock duration is a function of remote shear stressing rate, normal stress acting on the fault plane, and fault frictional constitutive parameters. In general, shear stressing rate could be estimated in three ways: 1. Shear stressing rate could be written as a function of static stress drop and a mean earthquake recurrence time. In this case, the time length of aftershock sequences is about 70-100 years. However, since the recurrence time inherits a great deal of uncertainty. 2. Ziv and Rubin derived a general function between shear stressing rate, fault slip speed and fault width with a consideration that aftershock duration does not scale with mainshock magnitude. Therefore, from Ziv's consideration, the aftershock duration is about 80 years. 3. Shear stressing rate is also can be

  14. Minimally allowed neutrinoless double beta decay rates within an anarchical framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, James

    2009-06-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay (ββ0ν) is the only realistic probe of the Majorana nature of the neutrino. In the standard picture, its rate is proportional to mee, the e-e element of the Majorana neutrino mass matrix in the flavor basis. I explore minimally allowed mee values within the framework of mass matrix anarchy where neutrino parameters are defined statistically at low energies. Distributions of mixing angles are well defined by the Haar integration measure, but masses are dependent on arbitrary weighting functions and boundary conditions. I survey the integration measure parameter space and find that for sufficiently convergent weightings, mee is constrained between (0.01-0.4) eV at 90% confidence. Constraints from neutrino mixing data lower these bounds. Singular integration measures allow for arbitrarily small mee values with the remaining elements ill-defined, but this condition constrains the flavor structure of the model’s ultraviolet completion. ββ0ν bounds below mee˜5×10-3eV should indicate symmetry in the lepton sector, new light degrees of freedom, or the Dirac nature of the neutrino.

  15. Minimally allowed neutrinoless double beta decay rates within an anarchical framework

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, James

    2009-06-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay ({beta}{beta}0{nu}) is the only realistic probe of the Majorana nature of the neutrino. In the standard picture, its rate is proportional to m{sub ee}, the e-e element of the Majorana neutrino mass matrix in the flavor basis. I explore minimally allowed m{sub ee} values within the framework of mass matrix anarchy where neutrino parameters are defined statistically at low energies. Distributions of mixing angles are well defined by the Haar integration measure, but masses are dependent on arbitrary weighting functions and boundary conditions. I survey the integration measure parameter space and find that for sufficiently convergent weightings, m{sub ee} is constrained between (0.01-0.4) eV at 90% confidence. Constraints from neutrino mixing data lower these bounds. Singular integration measures allow for arbitrarily small m{sub ee} values with the remaining elements ill-defined, but this condition constrains the flavor structure of the model's ultraviolet completion. {beta}{beta}0{nu} bounds below m{sub ee}{approx}5x10{sup -3} eV should indicate symmetry in the lepton sector, new light degrees of freedom, or the Dirac nature of the neutrino.

  16. Precision measurement of the decay rate of the negative positronium ion Ps{sup -}

    SciTech Connect

    Ceeh, Hubert; Hugenschmidt, Christoph; Schreckenbach, Klaus; Gaertner, Stefan A.; Thirolf, Peter G.; Fleischer, Frank; Schwalm, Dirk

    2011-12-15

    The negative positronium ion Ps{sup -} is a bound system consisting of two electrons and a positron. Its three constituents are pointlike leptonic particles of equal mass, which are subject only to the electroweak and gravitational force. Hence, Ps{sup -} is an ideal object in which to study the quantum mechanics of a three-body system. The ground state of Ps{sup -} is stable against dissociation but unstable against annihilation into photons. We report here on a precise measurement of the Ps{sup -} ground-state decay rate {Gamma}, which was carried out at the high-intensity NEutron induced POsitron source MUniCh (NEPOMUC) at the research reactor FRM II in Garching. A value of {Gamma}=2.0875(50) ns{sup -1} was obtained, which is three times more precise than previous experiments and in agreement with most recent theoretical predictions. The achieved experimental precision is at the level of the leading corrections in the theoretical predictions.

  17. Contributions of the W-boson propagator to the μ and τ leptonic decay rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferroglia, Andrea; Greub, Christoph; Sirlin, Alberto; Zhang, Zhibai

    2013-08-01

    We derive closed expressions and useful expansions for the contributions of the tree-level W-boson propagator to the muon and τ leptonic decay rates. Calling M and m the masses of the initial and final charged leptons, our results in the limit m=0 are valid to all orders in M2/MW2. In the terms of O(mj2/MW2) (mj=M, m), our leading corrections, of O(M2/MW2), agree with the canonical value (3/5)M2/MW2, while the coefficient of our subleading contributions, of O(m2/MW2), differs from that reported in the recent literature. A possible explanation of the discrepancy is presented. The numerical effect of the O(mj2/MW2) corrections is briefly discussed. A general expression, valid for arbitrary values of MW, M, and m in the range MW>M>m, is given in the Appendix. The paper also contains a review of the traditional definition and evaluation of the Fermi constant.

  18. Using the Inflection Points and Rates of Growth and Decay to Predict Levels of Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.

    2008-01-01

    The ascending and descending inflection points and rates of growth and decay at specific times during the sunspot cycle are examined as predictors for future activity. On average, the ascending inflection point occurs about 1-2 yr after sunspot minimum amplitude (Rm) and the descending inflection point occurs about 6-7 yr after Rm. The ascending inflection point and the inferred slope (including the 12-mo moving average (12-mma) of (Delta)R (the month-to-month change in the smoothed monthly mean sunspot number (R)) at the ascending inflection point provide strong indications as to the expected size of the ongoing cycle s sunspot maximum amplitude (RM), while the descending inflection point appears to provide an indication as to the expected length of the ongoing cycle. The value of the 12-mma of (Delta)R at elapsed time T = 27 mo past the epoch of RM (E(RM)) seems to provide a strong indication as to the expected size of Rm for the following cycle. The expected Rm for cycle 24 is 7.6 +/- 4.4 (the 90-percent prediction interval), occurring before September 2008. Evidence is also presented for secular rises in selected cycle-related parameters and for preferential grouping of sunspot cycles by amplitude and/or period.

  19. Probing Anderson localization of light via decay rate statistics in aperiodic Vogel spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christofi, Aristi; Pinheiro, Felipe A.; Dal Negro, Luca

    We systematically investigate the spectral properties of different types of two-dimensional aperiodic Vogel spiral arrays of pointlike scatterers and three-dimensional metamaterials with Vogel spiral chirality using rigorous Green's function spectral method. We considered an efficient T-matrix approach to analyze multiple-scattering effects, including all scattering orders, and to understand localization properties through the statistics of the Green's matrix eigenvalues. The knowledge of the spectrum of the Green matrix of multi-particle scattering systems provides important information on the character of light propagation and localization in chiral media with deterministic aperiodic geometry. In particular, we analyze for the first time the statistics of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Green matrix and extract the decay rates of the eigenmodes, their inverse participation ratio (IPR), the Wigner delay times and their quality factors. We emphasize the unique properties of aperiodic Vogel spirals with respect to random scattering media, which have been investigated so far. This work was supported by the Army Research Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement Number W911NF-12-2-0023.

  20. Determination of plate wave velocities and diffuse field decay rates with braod-band acousto-ultrasonic signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    1993-01-01

    Lowest symmetric and lowest antisymmetric plate wave modes were excited and identified in broad-band acousto-ultrasonic (AU) signals collected from various high temperature composite materials. Group velocities have been determined for these nearly nondispersive modes. An algorithm has been developed and applied to determine phase velocities and hence dispersion curves for the frequency ranges of the broad-band pulses. It is demonstrated that these data are sensitive to changes in the various stiffness moduli of the materials, in agreement by analogy, with the theoretical and experimental results of Tang and Henneke on fiber reinforced polymers. Diffuse field decay rates have been determined in the same specimen geometries and AU configuration as for the plate wave measurements. These decay rates are of value in assessing degradation such as matrix cracking in ceramic matrix composites. In addition, we verify that diffuse field decay rates respond to fiber/matrix interfacial shear strength and density in ceramic matrix composites. This work shows that velocity/stiffness and decay rate measurements can be obtained in the same set of AU experiments for characterizing materials and in specimens with geometries useful for mechanical measurements.

  1. Decay rates of a molecule in the vicinity of a spherical surface of an isotropic magnetodielectric material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, H. Y.; Leung, P. T.; Tsai, D. P.

    2012-10-01

    A comprehensive study is presented on the decay rates of excited molecules in the vicinity of a magnetodielectric material of spherical geometry via electrodynamic modeling. Both the models based on a driven-damped harmonic oscillator and on energy transfers will be applied so that the total decay rates can be rigorously decomposed into the radiative and the nonradiative rates. Clarifications of the equivalence of these two models for arbitrary geometry will be provided. Different possible orientations and locations of the molecule are studied with the molecule being placed near a spherical particle or a cavity. Among other results, TE modes are observed which can be manifested via nonradiative transfer from a tangential dipole within a small range of dissipation parameters set for the spherical particle. In addition, spectral analysis shows that decay rates at such a particle with small absorption are largely dominated by radiative transfer except at multipolar resonances when nonradiative transfer becomes prominent, and relatively unmodified decay is possible when negative refraction takes place.

  2. Analysis of the 2012 Oct 27 Haida Gwaii Aftershock Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, T.; Brillon, C.; Bentkowski, W.; White, M.; Rosenberger, A.; Rogers, G. C.; Vernon, F.; Kao, H.

    2013-12-01

    The magnitude 7.7 thrust earthquake that occurred on 2012 Oct 28 offshore of Haida Gwaii (formerly the Queen Charlotte Islands), in British Columbia, Canada, produced a rich and on-going aftershock sequence. Ten months of aftershock events are determined from analyst reviewed solutions and automatic detectors and locators. For automated solutions, rotating the waveforms and running P and S wave filters (Rosenberger, 2010) over them produced phase arrivals for an improved catalogue of aftershocks compared to using a traditional signal to noise ratio detector on standard vertical and horizontal component seismograms. The automated aftershock locations from the rotated waveforms are compared to the automated locations from the standard vertical and horizontal waveforms and to analyst locations (which are generally M>2.5). The best of the automated solutions are comparable in quality to analyst solutions and much more numerous making this a viable method of processing extensive aftershock sequences. They outline a region approximately 50 km wide and 100 km long, with the aftershocks in two parallel bands. Most of the aftershocks are not on the rupture surface but are in the overlying or underlying plates. It is thought that this earthquake represents the Pacific plate thrusting underneath the North America plate with the rupture surface lying beneath the sedimentary Queen Charlotte terrace and terminating to the east in the vicinity of the Queen Charlotte fault. Due to the one-sided station distribution on land, depth trades off with distance offshore, resulting in poor depth determinations. However, using ocean bottom seismometers deployed early in the aftershock sequence, depth resolution was significantly improved. First motion focal North America plate with the rupture surface lying beneath the sedimentary Queen Charlotte terrace and terminating to the east in the vicinity of the Queen Charlotte fault.mechanisms for a portion of the aftershock sequence are compared

  3. Viral abundance, production, decay rates and life strategies (lysogeny versus lysis) in Lake Bourget (France).

    PubMed

    Thomas, Rozenn; Berdjeb, Lyria; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore; Jacquet, Stéphan

    2011-03-01

    We have investigated the ecology of viruses in Lake Bourget (France) from January to August 2008. Data were analysed for viral and bacterial abundance and production, viral decay, frequency of lysogenic cells, the contribution of bacteriophages to prokaryotic mortality and their potential influence on nutrient dynamics. Analyses and experiments were conducted on samples from the epilimnion (2 m) and the hypolimnion (50 m), taken at the reference site of the lake. The abundance of virus-like particles (VLP) varied from 3.4 × 10⁷to 8.2 × 10⁷ VLP ml⁻¹; with the highest numbers and virus-to-bacterium ratio (VBR = 69) recorded in winter. Viral production varied from 3.2 × 10⁴ VLP ml⁻¹  h⁻¹ (July) to 2 × 10⁶ VLP ml⁻¹ h⁻¹ (February and April), and production was lower in the hypolimnion. Viral decay rate reached 0.12-0.15 day⁻¹, and this parameter varied greatly with sampling date and methodology (i.e. KCN versus filtration). Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, viral lysis was responsible for 0% (January) to 71% (February) of bacterial mortality, while viral lysis varied between 0% (April) and 53% (January) per day when using a modified dilution approach. Calculated from viral production and burst size, the virus-induced bacterial mortality varied between 0% (January) and 68% (August). A weak relationship was found between the two first methods (TEM versus dilution approach). Interestingly, flow cytometry analysis performed on the dilution experiment samples revealed that the viral impact was mostly on high DNA content bacterial cells whereas grazing, varying between 8.3% (June) and 75.4% (April), was reflected in both HDNA and LDNA cells equally. The lysogenic fraction varied between 0% (spring/summer) and 62% (winter) of total bacterial abundance, and increased slightly with increasing amounts of mitomycin C added. High percentages of lysogenic cells were recorded when bacterial abundance and activity were the lowest

  4. Exact evaluation of the rates of electrostatic decay and scattering off thermal ions for an unmagnetized Maxwellian plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Layden, B.; Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.

    2013-08-15

    Electrostatic decay of Langmuir waves into Langmuir and ion sound waves (L→L′+S) and scattering of Langmuir waves off thermal ions (L+i→L′+i′, also called “nonlinear Landau damping”) are important nonlinear weak-turbulence processes. The rates for these processes depend on the quadratic longitudinal response function α{sup (2)} (or, equivalently, the quadratic longitudinal susceptibility χ{sup (2)}), which describes the second-order response of a plasma to electrostatic wave fields. Previous calculations of these rates for an unmagnetized Maxwellian plasma have relied upon an approximate form for α{sup (2)} that is valid where two of the wave fields are fast (i.e., v{sub φ}=ω/k≫V{sub e} where ω is the angular frequency, k is the wavenumber, and V{sub e} is the electron thermal speed) and one is slow (v{sub φ}≪V{sub e}). Recently, an exact expression was derived for α{sup (2)} that is valid for any phase speeds of the three waves in an unmagnetized Maxwellian plasma. Here, this exact α{sup (2)} is applied to the calculation of the three-dimensional rates for electrostatic decay and scattering off thermal ions, and the resulting exact rates are compared with the approximate rates. The calculations are performed using previously derived three-dimensional rates for electrostatic decay given in terms of a general α{sup (2)}, and newly derived three-dimensional rates for scattering off thermal ions; the scattering rate is derived assuming a Maxwellian ion distribution, and both rates are derived assuming arc distributions for the wave spectra. For most space plasma conditions, the approximate rate is found to be accurate to better than 20%; however, for sufficiently low Langmuir phase speeds (v{sub φ}/V{sub e}≈3) appropriate to some spatial domains of the foreshock regions of planetary bow shocks and type II solar radio bursts, the use of the exact rate may be necessary for accurate calculations. The relative rates of electrostatic decay

  5. The Mw 8.1 2014 Iquique, Chile, seismic sequence: a tale of foreshocks and aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesca, S.; Grigoli, F.; Heimann, S.; Dahm, T.; Kriegerowski, M.; Sobiesiak, M.; Tassara, C.; Olcay, M.

    2016-03-01

    The 2014 April 1, Mw 8.1 Iquique (Chile) earthquake struck in the Northern Chile seismic gap. With a rupture length of less than 200 km, it left unbroken large segments of the former gap. Early studies were able to model the main rupture features but results are ambiguous with respect to the role of aseismic slip and left open questions on the remaining hazard at the Northern Chile gap. A striking observation of the 2014 earthquake has been its extensive preparation phase, with more than 1300 events with magnitude above ML 3, occurring during the 15 months preceding the main shock. Increasing seismicity rates and observed peak magnitudes accompanied the last three weeks before the main shock. Thanks to the large data sets of regional recordings, we assess the precursor activity, compare foreshocks and aftershocks and model rupture preparation and rupture effects. To tackle inversion challenges for moderate events with an asymmetric network geometry, we use full waveforms techniques to locate events, map the seismicity rate and derive source parameters, obtaining moment tensors for more than 300 events (magnitudes Mw 4.0-8.1) in the period 2013 January 1-2014 April 30. This unique data set of fore- and aftershocks is investigated to distinguish rupture process models and models of strain and stress rotation during an earthquake. Results indicate that the spatial distributions of foreshocks delineated the shallower part of the rupture areas of the main shock and its largest aftershock, well matching the spatial extension of the aftershocks cloud. Most moment tensors correspond to almost pure double couple thrust mechanisms, consistent with the slab orientation. Whereas no significant differences are observed among thrust mechanisms in different areas, nor among thrust foreshocks and aftershocks, the early aftershock sequence is characterized by the presence of normal fault mechanisms, striking parallel to the trench but dipping westward. These events likely occurred

  6. Rates of decay to non homogeneous Timoshenko model with tip body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz Rivera, Jaime E.; Ávila, Andrés I.

    2015-05-01

    We consider the uniform stabilization of a hybrid elastic model consisting of a Timoshenko beam and a tip load at the free end of the beam. Our main result proves that the semigroup eAt associated to this model is not exponentially stable. Moreover, we prove that the semigroup decays polynomially to zero as t - 1 / 2. When the damping mechanism is effective only on the boundary of the rotational angle, the solution also decays polynomially as t - 1 / 2 provided the wave speeds are equal. Otherwise it decays as t - 1 / 4 for any initial data taken in D (A).

  7. Decay rates of Gaussian-type I-balls and Bose-enhancement effects in 3+1 dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Yamada, Masaki E-mail: yamadam@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-02-01

    I-balls/oscillons are long-lived spatially localized lumps of a scalar field which may be formed after inflation. In the scalar field theory with monomial potential nearly and shallower than quadratic, which is motivated by chaotic inflationary models and supersymmetric theories, the scalar field configuration of I-balls is approximately Gaussian. If the I-ball interacts with another scalar field, the I-ball eventually decays into radiation. Recently, it was pointed out that the decay rate of I-balls increases exponentially by the effects of Bose enhancement under some conditions and a non-perturbative method to compute the exponential growth rate has been derived. In this paper, we apply the method to the Gaussian-type I-ball in 3+1 dimensions assuming spherical symmetry, and calculate the partial decay rates into partial waves, labelled by the angular momentum of daughter particles. We reveal the conditions that the I-ball decays exponentially, which are found to depend on the mass and angular momentum of daughter particles and also be affected by the quantum uncertainty in the momentum of daughter particles.

  8. Decay rates of Gaussian-type I-balls and Bose-enhancement effects in 3+1 dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Yamada, Masaki

    2014-02-03

    I-balls/oscillons are long-lived spatially localized lumps of a scalar field which may be formed after inflation. In the scalar field theory with monomial potential nearly and shallower than quadratic, which is motivated by chaotic inflationary models and supersymmetric theories, the scalar field configuration of I-balls is approximately Gaussian. If the I-ball interacts with another scalar field, the I-ball eventually decays into radiation. Recently, it was pointed out that the decay rate of I-balls increases exponentially by the effects of Bose enhancement under some conditions and a non-perturbative method to compute the exponential growth rate has been derived. In this paper, we apply the method to the Gaussian-type I-ball in 3+1 dimensions assuming spherical symmetry, and calculate the partial decay rates into partial waves, labelled by the angular momentum of daughter particles. We reveal the conditions that the I-ball decays exponentially, which are found to depend on the mass and angular momentum of daughter particles and also be affected by the quantum uncertainty in the momentum of daughter particles.

  9. The effect of restoration of broken SU(4) symmetry on 2 νβ-β- decay rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünlü, Serdar; Çakmak, Neçla

    2015-07-01

    The effect of restoration of SU(4) symmetry violations stemming from the mean field approximation on the 2 νβ-β- decay amplitudes and half-lives for 76Ge →76Se, 82Se →82Kr, 96Zr →96Mo and 100Mo →100Ru decay systems is investigated within the framework of the proton-neutron quasi-particle random phase approximation (pnQRPA) method. In this respect, the broken SU(4) symmetry property of the central quasi-particle mean field term is restored by using Pyatov's restoration method. In order to see the influence of restoration on the stability of the nuclear matrix element, the variation of the nuclear matrix element with particle-particle strength parameter is computed within and without restoration. The calculated decay rates within restoration are compared with the schematic and shell model estimates.

  10. DNA decay rate in papyri and human remains from Egyptian archaeological sites.

    PubMed

    Marota, Isolina; Basile, Corrado; Ubaldi, Massimo; Rollo, Franco

    2002-04-01

    The writing sheets made with strips from the stem (caulis) of papyri (Cyperus papyrus) are one of the most ingenious products of ancient technology. We extracted DNA from samples of modern papyri varying in age from 0-100 years BP and from ancient specimens from Egypt, with an age-span from 1,300-3,200 years BP. The copy number of the plant chloroplast DNA in the sheets was determined using a competitive PCR system designed on the basis of a short (90 bp) tract of the chloroplast's ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase large subunit (rbcL) gene sequence. The results allowed us to establish that the DNA half-life in papyri is about 19-24 years. This means that the last DNA fragments will vanish within no more than 532-672 years from the sheets being manufactured. In a parallel investigation, we checked the archaeological specimens for the presence of residual DNA and determined the extent of racemization of aspartic (Asp) acid in both modern and ancient specimens, as a previous report (Poinar et al. [1996], Science 272:864-866) showed that racemization of aspartic acid and DNA decay are linked. The results confirmed the complete loss of authentic DNA, even in the less ancient (8th century AD) papyri. On the other hand, when the regression for Asp racemization rates in papyri was compared with that for human and animal remains from Egyptian archaeological sites, it proved, quite surprisingly, that the regressions are virtually identical. Our study provides an indirect argument against the reliability of claims about the recovery of authentic DNA from Egyptian mummies and bone remains. PMID:11920366

  11. Distribution of similar earthquakes in aftershocks of inland earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, M.; Hiramatsu, Y.; Aftershock Observations Of 2007 Noto Hanto, G.

    2010-12-01

    Frictional properties control the slip behavior on a fault surface such as seismic slip and aseismic slip. Asperity, as a seismic slip area, is characterized by a strong coupling in the interseismic period and large coseismic slip. On the other hand, steady slip or afterslip occurs in an aseismic slip area around the asperity. If an afterslip area includes small asperities, a repeating rupture of single asperity can generate similar earthquakes due to the stress accumulation caused by the afterslip. We here investigate a detail distribution of similar earthquakes in the aftershocks of the 2007 Noto Hanto earthquake (Mjma 6.9) and the 2000 Western Tottori earthquake (Mjma 7.3), inland large earthquakes in Japan. We use the data obtained by the group for the aftershock observations of the 2007 Noto Hanto Earthquake and by the group for the aftershock observations of the 2000 Western Tottori earthquake. First, we select pairs of aftershocks whose cross correlation coefficients in 10 s time window of band-pass filtered waveforms of 1~4 Hz are greater than 0.95 at more than 5 stations and divide those into groups by a link of the cross correlation coefficients. Second, we reexamine the arrival times of P and S waves and the maximum amplitude for earthquakes of each group and apply the double-difference method (Waldhouser and Ellsworth, 2000) to relocate them. As a result of the analysis, we find 24 groups of similar earthquakes in the aftershocks on the source fault of the 2007 Noto Hanto Earthquake and 86 groups of similar earthquakes in the aftershocks on the source fault of the 2000 Western Tottori Earthquake. Most of them are distributed around or outside the asperity of the main shock. Geodetic studies reported that postseismic deformation was detected for the both earthquakes (Sagiya et al., 2002; Hashimoto et al., 2008). The source area of similar earthquakes seems to correspond to the afterslip area. These features suggest that the similar earthquakes observed

  12. Variation of b and p values from aftershocks sequences along the Mexican subduction zone and their relation to plate characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ávila-Barrientos, L.; Zúñiga, F. R.; Rodríguez-Pérez, Q.; Guzmán-Speziale, M.

    2015-11-01

    Aftershock sequences along the Mexican subduction margin (between coordinates 110ºW and 91ºW) were analyzed by means of the p value from the Omori-Utsu relation and the b value from the Gutenberg-Richter relation. We focused on recent medium to large (Mw > 5.6) events considered susceptible of generating aftershock sequences suitable for analysis. The main goal was to try to find a possible correlation between aftershock parameters and plate characteristics, such as displacement rate, age and segmentation. The subduction regime of Mexico is one of the most active regions of the world with a high frequency of occurrence of medium to large events and plate characteristics change along the subduction margin. Previous studies have observed differences in seismic source characteristics at the subduction regime, which may indicate a difference in rheology and possible segmentation. The results of the analysis of the aftershock sequences indicate a slight tendency for p values to decrease from west to east with increasing of plate age although a statistical significance is undermined by the small number of aftershocks in the sequences, a particular feature distinctive of the region as compared to other world subduction regimes. The b values show an opposite, increasing trend towards the east even though the statistical significance is not enough to warrant the validation of such a trend. A linear regression between both parameters provides additional support for the inverse relation. Moreover, we calculated the seismic coupling coefficient, showing a direct relation with the p and b values. While we cannot undoubtedly confirm the hypothesis that aftershock generation depends on certain tectonic characteristics (age, thickness, temperature), our results do not reject it thus encouraging further study into this question.

  13. Large-scale evaluation of β -decay rates of r -process nuclei with the inclusion of first-forbidden transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marketin, T.; Huther, L.; Martínez-Pinedo, G.

    2016-02-01

    Background: r -process nucleosynthesis models rely, by necessity, on nuclear structure models for input. Particularly important are β -decay half-lives of neutron-rich nuclei. At present only a single systematic calculation exists that provides values for all relevant nuclei making it difficult to test the sensitivity of nucleosynthesis models to this input. Additionally, even though there are indications that their contribution may be significant, the impact of first-forbidden transitions on decay rates has not been systematically studied within a consistent model. Purpose: Our goal is to provide a table of β -decay half-lives and β -delayed neutron emission probabilities, including first-forbidden transitions, calculated within a fully self-consistent microscopic theoretical framework. The results are used in an r -process nucleosynthesis calculation to asses the sensitivity of heavy element nucleosynthesis to weak interaction reaction rates. Method: We use a fully self-consistent covariant density functional theory (CDFT) framework. The ground state of all nuclei is calculated with the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) model, and excited states are obtained within the proton-neutron relativistic quasiparticle random phase approximation (p n -RQRPA). Results: The β -decay half-lives, β -delayed neutron emission probabilities, and the average number of emitted neutrons have been calculated for 5409 nuclei in the neutron-rich region of the nuclear chart. We observe a significant contribution of the first-forbidden transitions to the total decay rate in nuclei far from the valley of stability. The experimental half-lives are in general well reproduced for even-even, odd-A , and odd-odd nuclei, in particular for short-lived nuclei. The resulting data table is included with the article as Supplemental Material. Conclusions: In certain regions of the nuclear chart, first-forbidden transitions constitute a large fraction of the total decay rate and must be

  14. The 20th April 2005 Koryakia earthquake (Russia): a case of study for its aftershock seismic sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caccamo, D.; Barbieri, L. M.; Lagana, C.; Francesco, P.; D'Amico, S.

    2009-12-01

    Even if the Koryakia earthquake (April 20, 2005 at 23:25:02-UTC) occurred in sparsely populated northeastern Russia about 40 people were injured and the several villages were destroyed. Some buildings and water supply systems were badly damaged as well. The Koryakia earthquake occurred in north-northeast of the Kamchatka Peninsula. The earthquake was in a complicated geological setting where the configuration and interaction of the tectonic plates between northeastern Asia and northwestern North America are still poorly understood. The aim of this paper is to study the Koryakia seismic sequence trough the application of the Delta/Sigma method (PEPI - Caccamo et al. 2005) and using data coming from the USGS data-bank. Using this method is possible to observe statistically significant anomalies in the temporal decay of seismic sequence before the occurrence of a large aftershock. The Delta/Sigma analysis show some anomalies in the temporal decay a few days before the occurrence of large aftershock. They possibly are not random fluctuations but probably could be considered as precursors. Fractal geometry is sometimes important to better explain the mechanisms of seismicity and so it could be useful to analyze the behavior of aftershocks occurrence. In this paper a fractal analysis od the seismic sequence was performed investigating the box-counting dimension (D0) and the correlation dimension (D2).

  15. Large β-delayed one and two neutron emission rates in the decay of 86Ga.

    PubMed

    Miernik, K; Rykaczewski, K P; Gross, C J; Grzywacz, R; Madurga, M; Miller, D; Batchelder, J C; Borzov, I N; Brewer, N T; Jost, C; Korgul, A; Mazzocchi, C; Mendez, A J; Liu, Y; Paulauskas, S V; Stracener, D W; Winger, J A; Wolińska-Cichocka, M; Zganjar, E F

    2013-09-27

    Beta decay of 86Ga was studied by means of β-neutron-γ spectroscopy. An isotopically pure ^{86}Ga beam was produced at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility using a resonance ionization laser ion source and high-resolution electromagnetic separation. The decay of 86Ga revealed a half-life of 43(-15)(+21) ms and large β-delayed one-neutron and two-neutron branching ratios of P1n=60(10)% and P2n=20(10)%. The βγ decay of 86Ga populated a 527 keV transition that is interpreted as the deexcitation of the first 2+ state in the N=54 isotone 86Ge and suggests a quick onset of deformation in Ge isotopes beyond N=50. PMID:24116772

  16. Rates, polarizations, and asymmetries in charmless vector-vector B meson decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kral, J F; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Morgan, S E; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Barlow, N R; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Schwanke, U; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Barillari, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Tinslay, J; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Forti, A C; Hart, P A; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Hast, C; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Pulliam, T; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Tanaka, H A; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel De Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Grauges-Pous, E; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2003-10-24

    With a sample of approximately 89 x 10(6) B(-)B pairs collected with the BABAR detector, we perform a search for B meson decays into pairs of charmless vector mesons (phi, rho, and K*). We measure the branching fractions, determine the degree of longitudinal polarization, and search for CP violation asymmetries in the processes B+-->phiK(*+), B0-->phiK(*0), B+-->rho(0)K(*+), and B+-->rho(0)rho(+). We also set an upper limit on the branching fraction for the decay B0-->rho(0)rho(0). PMID:14611334

  17. Extracting partial decay rates of helium from complex rotation: autoionizing resonances of the one-dimensional configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Klaus; Lugan, Pierre; Jörder, Felix; Heitz, Nicolai; Schmidt, Maximilian; Bouri, Celsus; Rodriguez, Alberto; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Partial autoionization rates of doubly excited one-dimensional helium in the collinear Zee and eZe configuration are obtained by means of the complex rotation method. The approach presented here relies on a projection of back-rotated resonance wave functions onto singly ionized H{{e}+} channel wave functions and the computation of the corresponding particle fluxes. In spite of the long-range nature of the Coulomb potential between the electrons and the nucleus, an asymptotic region where the fluxes are stationary is clearly observed. Low-lying doubly excited states are found to decay predomintantly into the nearest single-ionization continuum. This approach paves the way for a systematic analysis of the decay rates observed in higher-dimensional models, and of the role of electronic correlations and atomic structure in recent photoionization experiments.

  18. Interelectronic-interaction effects on the two-photon decay rates of heavy He-like ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volotka, A. V.; Surzhykov, A.; Shabaev, V. M.; Plunien, G.

    2011-06-01

    Based on a rigorous quantum electrodynamics (QED) approach, a theoretical analysis is performed for the two-photon transitions in heavy He-like ions. Special attention is paid to the interelectronic-interaction corrections to the decay rates that are taken into account within the two-time Green-function method. Detailed calculations are carried out for the two-photon transitions 21S0→11S0 and 23S1→11S0 in He-like ions within the range of nuclear numbers Z=28-92. The total decay rates together with the spectral distributions are given. The obtained results are compared with experimental values and previous calculations.

  19. Identification of a major segment boundary between two megathrust subduction zone earthquakes from aftershock seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobiesiak, M.; Victor, P.; Eggert, S.

    2009-04-01

    Aftershock seismicity is commonly used to characterize the extent of rupture planes of megathrust earthquakes. From unique datasets, covering the two adjacent fault planes of the Mw 8.0, 1995, Antofagasta and the Mw 7.7, 2007, Tocopilla earthquakes, we were able to identify a segment boundary (SB), located beneath Mejillones Peninsula. This segment boundary hosted the onset of the Antofagasta rupture and constituted the end of the Tocopilla rupture plane. The data recorded during the mission of the German Task Force for Earthquakes after the 2007 Tocopilla earthquake is supporting our observations regarding the northern part of the SB. 34 seismological stations registered the aftershocks from November 2007 until May 2008. First hypocenter determinations show that the aftershock sequences of both events meet along this E-W oriented segment boundary. The segment boundary is furthermore conformed by the historic record of megathrust events. Evidence for long term persistency of this SB comes from geological observations as differential uplift rates across the boundary and different fault patterns. Geomorpholocical analysis defines a topographic anomaly ~ 20 km wide and oriented along strike the SB..The main shock hypocenter determinations (NEIC, local network, ISC) which are related to the start of the rupture are all located in this zone. The SB is further characterized by intermediate b-values derived from a spatial b-value study of the Antofagasta fault plane and hosts several elongated clusters of aftershock seismicity. A detailed study of the focal mechanism solutions in one of these clusters showed a number of aligned strike slip events with one E-W striking nodal plane having a strike angle which is similar to the angle of subduction obliquity of the oceanic Nazca plate in this area. In further investigations we will search for detailed information on the nature and dynamics of processes along such a segment boundary, their meaning for the initiation of large

  20. Long aftershock sequences within continents and implications for earthquake hazard assessment.

    PubMed

    Stein, Seth; Liu, Mian

    2009-11-01

    One of the most powerful features of plate tectonics is that the known plate motions give insight into both the locations and average recurrence interval of future large earthquakes on plate boundaries. Plate tectonics gives no insight, however, into where and when earthquakes will occur within plates, because the interiors of ideal plates should not deform. As a result, within plate interiors, assessments of earthquake hazards rely heavily on the assumption that the locations of small earthquakes shown by the short historical record reflect continuing deformation that will cause future large earthquakes. Here, however, we show that many of these recent earthquakes are probably aftershocks of large earthquakes that occurred hundreds of years ago. We present a simple model predicting that the length of aftershock sequences varies inversely with the rate at which faults are loaded. Aftershock sequences within the slowly deforming continents are predicted to be significantly longer than the decade typically observed at rapidly loaded plate boundaries. These predictions are in accord with observations. So the common practice of treating continental earthquakes as steady-state seismicity overestimates the hazard in presently active areas and underestimates it elsewhere. PMID:19890328

  1. Measurement of HO{sub x}{center_dot} production rate due to radon decay in air

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Huiling

    1993-08-01

    Radon in indoor air may cause the exposure of the public to excessive radioactivity. Radiolysis of water vapor in indoor air due to radon decay could produce ({center_dot}OH and HO{sub 2} {center_dot}) that may convert atmospheric constituents to compounds of lower vapor pressure. These lower vapor pressure compounds might then nucleate to form new particles in the indoor atmosphere. Chemical amplification was used to determine HO{sub x}{center_dot} production rate in indoor air caused by radon decay. Average HO{sub x}{center_dot} production rate was found to be (4.31{plus_minus}0.07) {times} 10{sup 5} HO{sub x}{center_dot} per Rn decay per second (Bq) 3.4 to 55.0% at 22C. This work provided G{sub (HO{sub x}{center_dot})}-value, 7.86{plus_minus}0.13 No./100 eV in air by directly measuring [HO{sub x}{center_dot}] formed from the radiolysis procedure. This G value implies that HO{sub x}{center_dot} produced by radon decay in air might be formed by multiple processes and may be result of positive ion-molecule reactions, primary radiolysis, and radical reactions. There is no obvious relation between HO{sub x}{center_dot} production rate and relative humidity. A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system has been used for {center_dot}OH production rate measurement; it consists of an excimer laser, a dye laser, a frequency doubler, a gaseous fluorescence chamber, and other optical and electronic parts. This system needs to be improved to eliminate the interferences of light scattering and artificial {center_dot}OH produced from the photolysis of O{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O.

  2. Temperature, pressure and deuterium effects on the phosphorescence decay-rate constant of naphthalene in a single crystal of durene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshi, Nagahiro; Yamauchi, Seigo; Hirota, Noboru

    1990-06-01

    It is suggested that the hitherto unexplained drastic temperature, pressure and external deuterium isotope effects on the phosphorescence decay-rate constant ( kT) of naphthalene in a single crystal of durene can be consistently explained in terms of the photoinduced hydrogen-abstraction reaction of triplet naphthalene from durene in which tunneling plays an essential role. This suggestion is supported by calculations based on the "golden rule" approach to tunneling developed by Siebrand, Wildman and Zgierski.

  3. Experimental investigation of effects of jet decay rate on jet-induced pressures on a flat plate: Tabulated data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, J. M.; Ousterhout, D. S.; Warcup, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Tabular data are presented for an experimental study of the effects of jet decay rate on the jet-induced pressure distribution on a flat plate for a single jet issuing at right angle to the flat plate into a uniform crossflow. The data are presented in four sections: (1) presents the static nozzle calibration data; (2) lists the plate surface static pressure data and integrated loads; (3) lists the jet centerline trajectory data; and (4) lists the centerline dynamic pressure data.

  4. Foreshock and aftershocks in simple earthquake models.

    PubMed

    Kazemian, J; Tiampo, K F; Klein, W; Dominguez, R

    2015-02-27

    Many models of earthquake faults have been introduced that connect Gutenberg-Richter (GR) scaling to triggering processes. However, natural earthquake fault systems are composed of a variety of different geometries and materials and the associated heterogeneity in physical properties can cause a variety of spatial and temporal behaviors. This raises the question of how the triggering process and the structure interact to produce the observed phenomena. Here we present a simple earthquake fault model based on the Olami-Feder-Christensen and Rundle-Jackson-Brown cellular automata models with long-range interactions that incorporates a fixed percentage of stronger sites, or asperity cells, into the lattice. These asperity cells are significantly stronger than the surrounding lattice sites but eventually rupture when the applied stress reaches their higher threshold stress. The introduction of these spatial heterogeneities results in temporal clustering in the model that mimics that seen in natural fault systems along with GR scaling. In addition, we observe sequences of activity that start with a gradually accelerating number of larger events (foreshocks) prior to a main shock that is followed by a tail of decreasing activity (aftershocks). This work provides further evidence that the spatial and temporal patterns observed in natural seismicity are strongly influenced by the underlying physical properties and are not solely the result of a simple cascade mechanism. PMID:25768785

  5. Foreshock and Aftershocks in Simple Earthquake Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemian, J.; Tiampo, K. F.; Klein, W.; Dominguez, R.

    2015-02-01

    Many models of earthquake faults have been introduced that connect Gutenberg-Richter (GR) scaling to triggering processes. However, natural earthquake fault systems are composed of a variety of different geometries and materials and the associated heterogeneity in physical properties can cause a variety of spatial and temporal behaviors. This raises the question of how the triggering process and the structure interact to produce the observed phenomena. Here we present a simple earthquake fault model based on the Olami-Feder-Christensen and Rundle-Jackson-Brown cellular automata models with long-range interactions that incorporates a fixed percentage of stronger sites, or asperity cells, into the lattice. These asperity cells are significantly stronger than the surrounding lattice sites but eventually rupture when the applied stress reaches their higher threshold stress. The introduction of these spatial heterogeneities results in temporal clustering in the model that mimics that seen in natural fault systems along with GR scaling. In addition, we observe sequences of activity that start with a gradually accelerating number of larger events (foreshocks) prior to a main shock that is followed by a tail of decreasing activity (aftershocks). This work provides further evidence that the spatial and temporal patterns observed in natural seismicity are strongly influenced by the underlying physical properties and are not solely the result of a simple cascade mechanism.

  6. General decay rates for the wave equation with mixed-type damping mechanisms on unbounded domain with finite measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias Silva, Flávio R.; Nascimento, Flávio A. F.; Rodrigues, José H.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the study of the uniform decay rates of the energy associated with the wave equation subject to a locally distributed viscoelastic dissipation and a nonlinear frictional damping u_{tt}- Δ u+ int_0^t g(t-s)div[a(x)nabla u(s)] ds + b(x) f(u_t)=0 quad on quad Ω×]0,infty[, where {Ωsubset{R}^n, n≥ 2} is an unbounded open set with finite measure and unbounded smooth boundary {partialΩ = Γ}. Supposing that the localization functions satisfy the "competitive" assumption {a(x)+b(x)≥δ>0} for all {xin Ω} and the relaxation function g satisfies certain nonlinear differential inequalities introduced by Lasiecka et al. (J Math Phys 54(3):031504, 2013), we extend to our considered domain the prior results of Cavalcanti and Oquendo (SIAM J Control Optim 42(4):1310-1324, 2003). In addition, while in Cavalcanti and Oquendo (2003) the authors just consider exponential and polynomial decay rate estimates, in the present article general decay rate estimates are obtained.

  7. Implications of Higgs boson to diphoton decay rate in the bilinear R-parity violating supersymmetric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hundi, Raghavendra Srikanth

    2013-06-01

    The Large Hadron Collider has recently discovered a Higgs-like particle having a mass around 125 GeV and also indicated that there is an enhancement in the Higgs to diphoton decay rate as compared to that in the standard model. We have studied implications of these discoveries in the bilinear R-parity violating supersymmetric model, whose main motivation is to explain the nonzero masses for neutrinos. The R-parity violating parameters in this model are ɛ and bɛ, and these parameters determine the scale of neutrino masses. If the enhancement in the Higgs to diphoton decay rate is true, then we have found ɛ≳0.01GeV and bɛ˜1GeV2 in order to be compatible with the neutrino oscillation data. Also, in the above mentioned analysis, we can determine the soft masses of sleptons (mL) and CP-odd Higgs boson mass (mA). We have estimated that mL≳300GeV and mA≳700GeV. We have also commented on the allowed values of ɛ and bɛ, in case there is no enhancement in the Higgs to diphoton decay rate. Finally, we present a model to explain the smallness of ɛ and bɛ.

  8. Measurement of the Branching Fraction and Decay Rate Asymmetry of B to D_pi+ pi- pi0 K-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Oregon U. /SLAC /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-06-10

    The authors report the observation of the decay B{sup -} {yields} D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}}K{sup -}, where D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}} indicates a neutral D meson detected in the final state {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, excluding K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. This doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay chain can be used to measure the CKM phase {gamma}. Using about 229 million e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} B{bar B} events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring, they measure the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}K{sup -}}) = (5.5 {+-} 1.0 (stat.) {+-} 0.7 (syst.)) x 10{sup -6} and the decay rate asymmetry A = -0.02 {+-} 0.16 (stat.) {+-} 0.03 (syst.) for the full decay chain.

  9. Decay of H (D) atoms in solid hydrogen at 4. 2 K. Rate constant for tunneling reaction H sub 2 (D sub 2 , HD) + H (D)

    SciTech Connect

    Miyazaki, Tetsuo; Iwata, Nobuchika; Lee, Kwangpill; Fueki, Kenji )

    1989-04-20

    Decay of H (or D) atoms at 4.2 K, produced by {gamma}-radiolysis of solid hydrogen, has been studied by ESR spectroscopy. The decay is caused by quantum mechanical tunneling. The decay rate of H atoms in H{sub 2} depends upon the initial concentration of the H atoms, and their decay is represented by second-order kinetics. D atoms decay very slowly in the D{sub 2} solid and disappear by reaction with HD, which exists as an impurity. In the HD solid, D atoms decay fast, while H atoms increase complementarily. Since the decay of these atoms is associated with hydrogen atom-molecule tunneling reactions the rate constants for the reactions are obtained from the decay rates. The rate constants for the tunneling reactions H{sub 2} + H {yields} H + H{sub 2}, D{sub 2} + D {yields} D + D{sub 2}, and HD + D {yields} H + D{sub 2} were 1.8 {times} 10, 1.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}3}, and 1.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} cm{sup 3} mol{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, respectively, at 4.2 K. Room light and desk light promote remarkably the decay rate of H atoms in the H{sub 2} solid and slightly the decay rate of D atoms in the D{sub 2} solid. The decay of D atoms in the HD solid is not, however, affected by the light illumination.

  10. Evidence for CP violation in time-integrated D0→h(-)h(+) decay rates.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellan Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Arrabito, L; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Bailey, D S; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chiapolini, N; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Constantin, F; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Cowan, G A; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Lorenzi, F; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Estève, L; Falabella, A; Fanchini, E; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauvin, N; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harji, R; Harnew, N; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Holubyev, K; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Koopman, R; Koppenburg, P; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kruzelecki, K; Kucharczyk, M; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Maynard, B; Mazurov, A; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Messi, R; Miglioranzi, S; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Musy, M; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Nedos, M; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, K; Palacios, J; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Paterson, S K; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrella, A; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Plackett, R; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Navarro, A Puig; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Rosello, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, A C; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'jampens, S; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urquijo, P; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Voss, H; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yushchenko, O; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zverev, E; Zvyagin, A

    2012-03-16

    A search for time-integrated CP violation in D(0)→h(-)h(+) (h=K, π) decays is presented using 0.62 fb(-1) of data collected by LHCb in 2011. The flavor of the charm meson is determined by the charge of the slow pion in the D(*+)→D(0)π(+) and D(*-)→D[over ¯](0)π(-) decay chains. The difference in CP asymmetry between D(0)→K(-)K(+) and D(0)→π(-)π(+), ΔA(CP)≡A(CP)(K(-)K(+))-A(CP)(π(-)π(+)), is measured to be [-0.82±0.21(stat)±0.11(syst)]%. This differs from the hypothesis of CP conservation by 3.5 standard deviations. PMID:22540460

  11. A measurement of the gluon splitting rate into pairs in hadronic Z decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Alemany, R.; Boix, G.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Graugès, E.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Casper, D.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Ciulli, V.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Halley, A. W.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J.-C.; Bourdon, P.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Marinelli, N.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Buck, P. G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Robertson, N. A.; Williams, M. I.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Etienne, F.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Büscher, V.; Cowan, G.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Lütjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Boccali, T.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    1998-08-01

    A measurement of the fraction of hadronic Z decays in which a gluon splits into a bb¯ pair, gbb¯, is presented using data collected by ALEPH from 1992 to 1995 at the Z resonance. The selection is based on four-jet events. Events are selected by means of topological cuts and a lifetime tag. The result is gbb¯=(2.77+/-0.42(stat)+/-0.57(syst))x10- 3.

  12. Simultaneous detection of tissue autofluorescence decay distribution and time-gated photo-bleaching rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lihachev, Alexey; Ferulova, Inesa; Spigulis, Janis; Tamosiunas, Mindaugas

    2015-05-01

    Experimental methodology for parallel measurements of in-vivo skin autofluorescence (AF) lifetimes and photobleaching dynamic has been developed and tested. The AF lifetime decay distributions were periodically collected from fixed tissue area with subsequent detection of the fluorescence intensity decrease dynamic at different time gates after the pulse excitation. Temporal distributions of human in-vivo skin AF lifetimes and bleaching kinetics were collected and analyzed by means of commercial time-correlated single photon counting system.

  13. Development of a water boil-off spent-fuel calorimeter system. [To measure decay heat generation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Creer, J.M.; Shupe, J.W. Jr.

    1981-05-01

    A calorimeter system was developed to measure decay heat generation rates of unmodified spent fuel assemblies from commercial nuclear reactors. The system was designed, fabricated, and successfully tested using the following specifications: capacity of one BWR or PWR spent fuel assembly; decay heat generation range 0.1 to 2.5 kW; measurement time of < 12 h; and an accuracy of +-10% or better. The system was acceptance tested using a dc reference heater to simulate spent fuel assembly heat generation rates. Results of these tests indicated that the system could be used to measure heat generation rates between 0.5 and 2.5 kW within +- 5%. Measurements of heat generation rates of approx. 0.1 kW were obtained within +- 15%. The calorimeter system has the potential to permit measurements of heat generation rates of spent fuel assemblies and other devices in the 12- to 14-kW range. Results of calorimetry of a Turkey Point spent fuel assembly indicated that the assembly was generating approx. 1.55 kW.

  14. Local-field correction to the spontaneous decay rate of atoms embedded in bodies of finite size

    SciTech Connect

    Ho Trung Dung; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi; Welsch, Dirk-Gunnar

    2006-08-15

    The influence of the size and shape of a dispersing and absorbing dielectric body on the local-field-corrected spontaneous decay of an excited atom embedded in a body is studied on the basis of the real-cavity model. By means of a Born expansion of the Green tensor of the system it is shown that to linear order in the susceptibility of the body the decay rate exactly follows Tomas's formula found for the special case of an atom at the center of a homogeneous dielectric sphere [Phys. Rev. A 63, 053811 (2001)]. It is further shown that for an atom situated at the interior of an arbitrary dielectric body this formula remains valid beyond linear order. The case of an atom embedded in a weakly polarizable sphere is discussed in detail.

  15. β+/EC decay rates of deformed neutron-deficient nuclei in the deformed QRPA with realistic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Dongdong; Ren, Zhongzhou

    2015-05-01

    The weak-decay (β+ and EC) rates of neutron-deficient Kr, Sr, Zr, and Mo isotopes are investigated within the deformed quasiparticle random-phase approximation with realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions. The particle-particle and particle-hole channels of residual interactions are handled in large single-particle model spaces, based on the Brückner G-matrix with charge-dependent Bonn nucleon-nucleon forces. Contributions from allowed Gamow-Teller and Fermi transitions as well as first-forbidden transitions are calculated. The calculated half-lives show good agreement with the experimental data over a wide range of magnitude, from 10-2 to 107 s. Moreover, predictions of β-decay half-lives are made for some extremely proton-rich isotopes, which could be useful for future experiments.

  16. Rates, Polarizations, and Asymmetries in Charmless Vector-Vector B Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Schaffer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu. G; Kral, J F; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Barlow, N R; Bhimji, W; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hadavand, H K; Wright, Doug

    2003-03-11

    With a sample of approximately 89 million B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector, they measure branching fractions, determine the degree of longitudinal polarization, and search for direct CP violation in the decays B{sup 0} {yields} {phi}K*{sup 0} and B{sup +} {yields} {phi}K*{sup +}. They perform a search for other charmless vector-vector B decays involving {rho} and K*(892) resonances and observe the decays B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0} K*{sup +} and B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{rho}{sup +}. The branching fractions are measured to be {Beta}({phi}K*{sup 0}) = (11.1{sub -1.2}{sup +1.3} {+-} 1.1) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}({phi}K*{sup +}) = (12.1{sub -1.9}{sup +2.1} {+-} 1.5) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}({rho}{sup 0} K*{sup +}) = (7.7{sub -2.0}{sup +2.1} {+-} 1.4) x 10{sup -6}, and {Beta}({rho}{sup 0}{rho}{sup +}) = (9.9{sub -2.5}{sup +2.6} {+-} 2.5) x 10{sup -6}. The longitudinal polarization fractions are measured to be {Lambda}{sub L}/{Lambda}({phi}K*{sup 0}) = 0.65 {+-} 0.07 {+-} 0.04 and {Lambda}{sub L}/{Lambda}({phi}K*{sup +}) = 0.46 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.05. They measure the charge asymmetries: {Alpha}{sub CP}({phi}K*{sup 0}) = +0.04 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.02 and {Alpha}{sub CP}({phi}K*{sup +}) = +0.16 {+-} 0.17 {+-} 0.04.

  17. Global Existence and Energy Decay Rates for a Kirchhoff-Type Wave Equation with Nonlinear Dissipation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dojin; Hong, Keum-Shik; Jung, Il Hyo

    2014-01-01

    The first objective of this paper is to prove the existence and uniqueness of global solutions for a Kirchhoff-type wave equation with nonlinear dissipation of the form Ku′′ + M(|A1/2u|2)Au + g(u′) = 0 under suitable assumptions on K, A, M(·), and g(·). Next, we derive decay estimates of the energy under some growth conditions on the nonlinear dissipation g. Lastly, numerical simulations in order to verify the analytical results are given. PMID:24977217

  18. Statistical signatures of aftershock sequences generated by supershear mainshocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, P.; Shcherbakov, R.; Tiampo, K. F.; Mansinha, L.

    2010-12-01

    The rupture process during supershear earthquakes generates a seismic shock wave redistributing stress away from the fault resembling a sonic boom produced by a supersonic aircraft. This leads to a relative quiescence in aftershock activity along the supershear segment of the rupture. The occurrence of supershear ruptures is also generally associated with a region of local high pre-stress and an unusually smooth friction profile over the supershear segment, leading to a conspicuous absence of high frequency ground motions. We have considered the aftershock sequences of five well-known supershear earthquakes from around the world (1979 Imperial Valley, 1992 Landers, 1999 Izmit and Duzce and 2002 Denali earthquakes) to test whether the aftershock statistics around the supershear rupture are different from the statistics in the rest of the region due to the aforementioned stress conditions and redistributions. Specifically, we have looked at the frequency-magnitude distribution in order to study the variation of the b value for each of the sequences and observe statistically significant variations. In particular, we have determined that the b value is always higher in the zone surrounding a supershear segment than in the rest of the aftershock region. The Omori Law, however, does not show such clear trends. We also looked at the average difference in magnitude between the mainshock and the largest aftershock and found it is larger than that predicted by Bath's law. The results certainly point towards a relationship between aftershock statistics and the mainshock rupture process and might facilitate a physical process based understanding of the empirical laws of earthquake statistics.

  19. Design of cycler trajectories and analysis of solar influences on radioactive decay rates during space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Blake A.

    This thesis investigates the design of interplanetary missions for the continual habitation of Mars via Earth-Mars cyclers and for the detection of variations in nuclear decay rates due to solar influences. Several cycler concepts have been proposed to provide safe and comfortable quarters for astronauts traveling between the Earth and Mars. However, no literature has appeared to show how these massive vehicles might be placed into their cycler trajectories. Trajectories are designed that use either Vinfinity leveraging or low thrust to establish cycler vehicles in their desired orbits. In the cycler trajectory cases considered, the use of Vinfinity leveraging or low thrust substantially reduces the total propellant needed to achieve the cycler orbit compared to direct orbit insertion. In the case of the classic Aldrin cycler, the propellant savings due to Vinfinity leveraging can be as large as a 24 metric ton reduction for a cycler vehicle with a dry mass of 75 metric tons, and an additional 111 metric ton reduction by instead using low thrust. The two-synodic period cyclers considered benefit less from Vinfinity leveraging, but have a smaller total propellant mass due to their lower approach velocities at Earth and Mars. It turns out that, for low-thrust establishment, the propellant required is approximately the same for each of the cycler trajectories. The Aldrin cycler has been proposed as a transportation system for human missions between Earth and Mars. However, the hyperbolic excess velocity values at the planetary encounters for these orbits are infeasibly large, especially at Mars. In a new version of the Aldrin cycler, low thrust is used in the interplanetary trajectories to reduce the encounter velocities. Reducing the encounter velocities at both planets reduces the propellant needed by the taxis (astronauts use these taxis to transfer between the planetary surfaces and the cycler vehicle) to perform hyperbolic rendezvous. While the propellant

  20. Simulating Aftershocks for an On Site Inspection (OSI) Exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, J. J.; Ford, S. R.

    2015-10-05

    The experience of IFE14 emphasizes the need for a better way to simulate aftershocks during an OSI exercise. The obvious approach is to develop a digital model of aftershocks that can be used either for a real field exercise or for a computer simulation that can be done in an office, for training for example. However, this approach involves consideration of several aspects, such as how and when to introduce waveforms in a way that maximizes the realism of the data and that will be convincing to a savvy, experienced seismic analyst. The purpose of this report is to outline a plan for how this approach can be implemented.

  1. Alzheimer's dementia produces a loss of discrimination but no increase in rate of memory decay in delayed matching to sample.

    PubMed

    Money, E A; Kirk, R C; McNaughton, N

    1992-02-01

    Patients diagnosed with senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT) were compared with control subjects on a computerized delayed matching to sample task. Performance was assessed with a measure of discriminability at zero delay and a measure of rate of forgetting--these are the two parameters of an exponential function derived from extensive animal testing. The SDAT group showed significantly poorer discriminability at zero delay than controls but equivalent rates of forgetting over a 32-sec delay. These data suggest that SDAT may have little effect on the decay rate of the short term (or 'primary') memory trace and may instead affect encoding, initial storage or retrieval mechanisms. The effects of SDAT on this task are consistent with previous results with anticholinergic agents in rats. PMID:1560892

  2. Survival analysis approach to account for non-exponential decay rate effects in lifetime experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coakley, K. J.; Dewey, M. S.; Huber, M. G.; Huffer, C. R.; Huffman, P. R.; Marley, D. E.; Mumm, H. P.; O`Shaughnessy, C. M.; Schelhammer, K. W.; Thompson, A. K.; Yue, A. T.

    2016-03-01

    In experiments that measure the lifetime of trapped particles, in addition to loss mechanisms with exponential survival probability functions, particles can be lost by mechanisms with non-exponential survival probability functions. Failure to account for such loss mechanisms produces systematic measurement error and associated systematic uncertainties in these measurements. In this work, we develop a general competing risks survival analysis method to account for the joint effect of loss mechanisms with either exponential or non-exponential survival probability functions, and a method to quantify the size of systematic effects and associated uncertainties for lifetime estimates. As a case study, we apply our survival analysis formalism and method to the Ultra Cold Neutron lifetime experiment at NIST. In this experiment, neutrons can escape a magnetic trap before they decay due to a wall loss mechanism with an associated non-exponential survival probability function.

  3. Measurement of branching fractions and rate asymmetries in the rare decays B→K(*)l⁺l⁻

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; et al

    2012-08-24

    In a sample of 471×10⁶ BB¯¯¯ events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e⁺e⁻ collider we study the rare decays B→K(*)l⁺l⁻, where l⁺l⁻ is either e⁺e⁻ or μ⁺μ⁻. We report results on partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries in seven bins of dilepton mass-squared. We further present CP and lepton-flavor asymmetries for dilepton masses below and above the J/ψ resonance. We find no evidence for CP or lepton-flavor violation. The partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries are consistent with the Standard Model predictions and with results from other experiments.

  4. Towards more realistic Coulomb-Rate-and-State seismicity models: effect of receiver fault orientation and afterslip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattania, C.; Hainzl, S.; Roth, F.

    2012-12-01

    Changes in Coulomb stress (ΔCFS) induced by a mainshock have been shown to influence aftershock seismicity and are the foundation of current physics-based aftershock models; however, large uncertainties exist in stress calculations, which should be considered in the forecasts. Several of these models also rely on the assumption that the stress field is constant in time after each mainshock, thus neglecting the effect of time dependent postseismic processes. In the first part of this work, we study one source of epistemic uncertainties: the choice of receiver faults on which the stress tensor is resolved. The two commonly adopted approaches consist of resolving stresses on fixed mechanisms (such as the focal mechanism of the mainshock) or planes which are optimally oriented for Coulomb failure (Optimally Oriented Planes, OOPs). Here we test the use of focal mechanisms from a catalog of previous seismicity in the area. Such approach is justified by the observation that the distribution of aftershocks focal mechanisms is more similar to the distribution of previous focal mechanisms than to that of fixed planes or OOPs. We use a rate-and-state approach to model aftershock seismicity following the Mw = 7.3 Landers earthquake. Rate-and-state parameters (Aσ and r) are simultaneously inverted using the maximum Likelihood approach over a period from 100 days before to 100 days after the mainshock. The standard deviation of ΔCFS obtained from the distribution of focal mechanisms tends to be higher closer to the fault, and to first order similar to the decay of |ΔCFS|. However, we find that the Coefficient of Variation (CV = SD/|ΔCFS|) is not uniform in space: these results indicate that the assumption of fixed CV may not reflect the uncertainties introduced by heterogeneity in fault orientation. From the forecasting perspective, however, the model using the full distribution of focal mechanisms performs less well than models which assume a Gaussian distribution of

  5. Aerobic stabilization of biological sludge characterized by an extremely low decay rate: modeling, identifiability analysis and parameter estimation.

    PubMed

    Martínez-García, C G; Olguín, M T; Fall, C

    2014-08-01

    Aerobic digestion batch tests were run on a sludge model that contained only two fractions, the heterotrophic biomass (XH) and its endogenous residue (XP). The objective was to describe the stabilization of the sludge and estimate the endogenous decay parameters. Modeling was performed with Aquasim, based on long-term data of volatile suspended solids and chemical oxygen demand (VSS, COD). Sensitivity analyses were carried out to determine the conditions for unique identifiability of the parameters. Importantly, it was found that the COD/VSS ratio of the endogenous residues (1.06) was significantly lower than for the active biomass fraction (1.48). The decay rate constant of the studied sludge (low bH, 0.025 d(-1)) was one-tenth that usually observed (0.2d(-1)), which has two main practical significances. Digestion time required is much more long; also the oxygen uptake rate might be <1.5 mg O₂/gTSSh (biosolids standards), without there being significant decline in the biomass. PMID:24907570

  6. Hypocentral Relocations of the 2008 Mt. Carmel, Illinois Aftershock Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, K.; Hamburger, M. W.; Pavlis, G. L.; Horton, S. P.; Withers, M. M.

    2009-12-01

    On April 18, 2008, a moderate sized earthquake (Mw 5.2, hypocentral depth of 16 km) occurred near the Indiana-Illinois state border within 3 km of the Mt. Carmel-New Harmony fault at the northern termination of the Wabash Valley Fault System. A total of 257 aftershocks were recorded over the next month by a fourteen-station temporary network deployed by Indiana University and University of Memphis/Center of Earthquake Research and Information (CERI). The number of recorded aftershocks is greater than aftershocks recorded from previous earthquakes in the WVFS of similar magnitude within the last 50 years. The number and density of local stations allowed the generation of precise hypocentral relocations with the combination of waveform cross-correlation and joint hypocentral techniques. The relocated hypocenters indicate a well-defined near-vertical fault plane striking east-west. The fault orientation is consistent with the focal mechanism of the main shock and nearly orthogonal with respect to the trace of the neighboring Mt. Carmel-New Harmony fault. The interpreted ruptured fault orientation suggests the aftershock sequence occurred on a transfer structure at the fault termination. The structure may be related to the change in deformation styles suggested by the transition from the northeast-trending WVFS to the northwest-trending La Salle anticlinorium.

  7. Convergence Properties of Posttranslationally Modified Protein-Protein Switching Networks with Fast Decay Rates.

    PubMed

    Fan, Gaoyang; Cummins, Bree; Gedeon, Tomáš

    2016-06-01

    A significant conceptual difficulty in the use of switching systems to model regulatory networks is the presence of so-called "black walls," co-dimension 1 regions of phase space with a vector field pointing inward on both sides of the hyperplane. Black walls result from the existence of direct negative self-regulation in the system. One biologically inspired way of removing black walls is the introduction of intermediate variables that mediate the negative self-regulation. In this paper, we study such a perturbation. We replace a switching system with a higher-dimensional switching system with rapidly decaying intermediate proteins, and compare the dynamics between the two systems. We find that the while the individual solutions of the original system can be approximated for a finite time by solutions of a sufficiently close perturbed system, there are always solutions that are not well approximated for any fixed perturbation. We also study a particular example, where global basins of attraction of the perturbed system have a strikingly different form than those of the original system. We perform this analysis using techniques that are adapted to dealing with non-smooth systems. PMID:27271120

  8. Analysis of the Petatlan aftershocks: Numbers, energy release, and asperities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ValdéS, Carlos; Meyer, Robert P.; ZuñIga, Ramón; Havskov, Jens; Singh, Shri K.

    1982-10-01

    The Petatlan earthquake of March 14, 1979 (Ms = 7.6), occurred between the Middle America trench and the Mexican coast, 15 km southwest of Petatlan, Guerrero, Mexico. From seismograms recorded on smoked paper, FM, and digital tapes, we have identified 255 aftershocks with coda lengths greater than 60 s that occurred 11 hours to 36 days after the main shock. Based on these events, the aftershock epicentral area defined during the period between 11 and 60 hours was about 2000 km2; between 11 hours and 6 days it was about 2400 km2. Although the area grew to 6060 km2 in 36 days, most of the activity was still confined within the area defined after 6 days. This suggests that the smaller aftershock area might represent an asperity. The distribution of events and energy release per unit area confirm the existence of heterogeneity in the aftershock area. Thus our data support the concept of an inhomogeneous rupture area that includes an asperity, as suggested by Chael and Stewart (1982) to account for the differences they computed for the body and surface wave moments from WWSSN data. However, the combination of the moments Reichle et al. (1982) report for body and surface waves from IDA data and the rupture areas reported in this paper results in a solution that is most physically realizable in terms of stress drop and slip. We calculate stress drops of 5 and 15 bars, the former for the average over the entire area, the latter for the asperity, and an average slip of 60 cm for the entire area and 120 cm for the asperity. These values for slip are 30% and 60%, respectively, of the convergence of the Cocos plate relative to the North America plate during the 36-year period between the last two major earthquakes in the Petatlan area. Hypocenters of the aftershocks define a zone about 25 km thick, dipping 15° with an azimuth of N20°E, which is perpendicular to the Middle America trench. Most aftershocks are below the main shock. The b value estimated for aftershocks in the

  9. A measurement of the 2 neutrino double beta decay rate of Te-130 in the CUORICINO experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kogler, Laura K.

    2011-11-30

    CUORICINO was a cryogenic bolometer experiment designed to search for neutrinoless double beta decay and other rare processes, including double beta decay with two neutrinos (2vββ). The experiment was located at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and ran for a period of about 5 years, from 2003 to 2008. The detector consisted of an array of 62 TeO2 crystals arranged in a tower and operated at a temperature of 10 mK. Events depositing energy in the detectors, such as radioactive decays or impinging particles, produced thermal pulses in the crystals which were read out using sensitive thermistors. The experiment included 4 enriched crystals, 2 enriched with 130Te and 2 with 128Te, in order to aid in the measurement of the 2vββ rate. The enriched crystals contained a total of 350 g 130Te. The 128-enriched (130-depleted) crystals were used as background monitors, so that the shared backgrounds could be subtracted from the energy spectrum of the 130- enriched crystals. Residual backgrounds in the subtracted spectrum were fit using spectra generated by Monte-Carlo simulations of natural radioactive contaminants located in and on the crystals. The 2vββ half-life was measured to be T2v1/2 = [9.81± 0.96(stat)± 0.49(syst)] x1020 y.

  10. Nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Pond, R.B.; Matos, J.E.

    1996-05-01

    As part of the Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel acceptance criteria, the mass of uranium and transuranic elements in spent research reactor fuel must be specified. These data are, however, not always known or readily determined. It is the purpose of this report to provide estimates of these data for some of the more common research reactor fuel assembly types. The specific types considered here are MTR, TRIGA and DIDO fuel assemblies. The degree of physical protection given to spent fuel assemblies is largely dependent upon the photon dose rate of the spent fuel material. These data also, are not always known or readily determined. Because of a self-protecting dose rate level of radiation (dose rate greater than 100 ren-x/h at I m in air), it is important to know the dose rate of spent fuel assemblies at all time. Estimates of the photon dose rate for spent MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assemblies are given in this report.

  11. Time Modulation of the K-Shell Electron Capture Decay Rates of H-like Heavy Ions at GSI Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A. N.; Kienle, P.

    2009-08-07

    According to experimental data at GSI, the rates of the number of daughter ions, produced by the nuclear K shell electron capture decays of the H-like heavy ions with one electron in the K shell, such as {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+}, {sup 142}Pm{sup 60+}, and {sup 122}I{sup 52+}, are modulated in time with periods T{sub EC} of the order of a few seconds, obeying an A scaling T{sub EC}=A/20 s, where A is the mass number of the mother nuclei, and with amplitudes a{sub d}{sup EC}approx0.21. We show that these data can be explained in terms of the interference of two massive neutrino mass eigenstates. The appearance of the interference term is due to overlap of massive neutrino mass eigenstate energies and of the wave functions of the daughter ions in two-body decay channels, caused by the energy and momentum uncertainties introduced by time differential detection of the daughter ions in GSI experiments.

  12. Joint Inversion of Gravity and Gravity Tensor Data Using the Structural Index as Weighting Function Rate Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ialongo, S.; Cella, F.; Fedi, M.; Florio, G.

    2011-12-01

    Most geophysical inversion problems are characterized by a number of data considerably higher than the number of the unknown parameters. This corresponds to solve highly underdetermined systems. To get a unique solution, a priori information must be therefore introduced. We here analyze the inversion of the gravity gradient tensor (GGT). Previous approaches to invert jointly or independently more gradient components are by Li (2001) proposing an algorithm using a depth weighting function and Zhdanov et alii (2004), providing a well focused inversion of gradient data. Both the methods give a much-improved solution compared with the minimum length solution, which is invariably shallow and not representative of the true source distribution. For very undetermined problems, this feature is due to the role of the depth weighting matrices used by both the methods. Recently, Cella and Fedi (2011) showed however that for magnetic and gravity data the depth weighting function has to be defined carefully, under a preliminary application of Euler Deconvolution or Depth from Extreme Point methods, yielding the appropriate structural index and then using it as the rate decay of the weighting function. We therefore propose to extend this last approach to invert jointly or independently the GGT tensor using the structural index as weighting function rate decay. In case of a joint inversion, gravity data can be added as well. This multicomponent case is also relevant because the simultaneous use of several components and gravity increase the number of data and reduce the algebraic ambiguity compared to the inversion of a single component. The reduction of such ambiguity was shown in Fedi et al, (2005) decisive to get an improved depth resolution in inverse problems, independently from any form of depth weighting function. The method is demonstrated to synthetic cases and applied to real cases, such as the Vredefort impact area (South Africa), characterized by a complex density

  13. Preparation phase and consequences of a large earthquake: insights from foreshocks and aftershocks of the 2014 Mw 8.1 Iquique earthquake, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesca, Simone; Grigoli, Francesco; Heimann, Sebastian; Dahm, Torsten

    2015-04-01

    The April 1, 2014, Mw 8.1 Iquique earthquake in Northern Chile, was preceded by an anomalous, extensive preparation phase. The precursor seismicity at the ruptured slab segment was observed sporadically several months before the main shock, with a significant increment in seismicity rates and observed magnitudes in the last three weeks before the main shock. The large dataset of regional recordings helped us to investigate the role of such precursor activity, comparing foreshock and aftershock seismicity to test models of rupture preparation and models of strain and stress rotation during an earthquake. We used full waveforms techniques to locate events, map the seismicity rate, derive source parameters, and assess spatiotemporal stress changes. Results indicate that the spatial distributions of foreshocks delineated the shallower part of the rupture areas of the main shock and its largest aftershock, and is well matching the spatial extension of the aftershocks. During the foreshock sequence, seismicity spatially is mainly localized in two clusters, separated by a region of high locking. The ruptures of mainshock and largest aftershock nucleate within these clusters and propagate to the locked region; the aftershocks are again localized in correspondence to the original spatial clusters, and the central region is locked again. More than 300 moment tensor inversions were performed, down to Mw 4.0, most of them corresponding to almost pure double couple thrust mechanisms, with a geometry consistent with the slab orientation. No significant differences are observed among thrust mechanisms in different areas, nor among thrust foreshocks and aftershocks. However, a new family of normal fault mechanisms appears after the main shock, likely affecting the shallow wedge structure in consequence of the increased extensional stress in this region. We infer a stress rotation after the main shock, as proposed for recent larger thrust earthquakes, which suggests that the April

  14. The β-decay rates of 59Fe isotopes in shell burning environments and their influences on the production of 60Fe in massive star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K.; Lam, Y. H.; Qi, C.; Tang, X.; Zhang, N.

    2016-02-01

    The experimental B(GT) strengths of the 59Fe excited states were employed to determine the transition strengths which greatly contribute 59Fe stellar β-decay at typical carbon shell burning temperature. The result has been compared with the theoretical rates FFN (Fuller-Fowler-Newman) and LMP (Langanke&Martinez-Pinedo). Impact of the newly determined rate on the synthesis of cosmic γ emitter 60Fe has also been studied using one-zone model calculation. Our results show 59Fe stellar β-decay rate plays an important role in the 60Fe nucleosynthesis. However the uncertainty of the decay rate is rather large due to the error of B(GT) strength that requires further studies.

  15. Detection and decay rates of prey and prey symbionts in the gut of a predator through metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Paula, Débora P; Linard, Benjamin; Andow, David A; Sujii, Edison R; Pires, Carmen S S; Vogler, Alfried P

    2015-07-01

    DNA methods are useful to identify ingested prey items from the gut of predators, but reliable detection is hampered by low amounts of degraded DNA. PCR-based methods can retrieve minute amounts of starting material but suffer from amplification biases and cross-reactions with the predator and related species genomes. Here, we use PCR-free direct shotgun sequencing of total DNA isolated from the gut of the harlequin ladybird Harmonia axyridis at five time points after feeding on a single pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. Sequence reads were matched to three reference databases: Insecta mitogenomes of 587 species, including H. axyridis sequenced here; A. pisum nuclear genome scaffolds; and scaffolds and complete genomes of 13 potential bacterial symbionts. Immediately after feeding, multicopy mtDNA of A. pisum was detected in tens of reads, while hundreds of matches to nuclear scaffolds were detected. Aphid nuclear DNA and mtDNA decayed at similar rates (0.281 and 0.11 h(-1) respectively), and the detectability periods were 32.7 and 23.1 h. Metagenomic sequencing also revealed thousands of reads of the obligate Buchnera aphidicola and facultative Regiella insecticola aphid symbionts, which showed exponential decay rates significantly faster than aphid DNA (0.694 and 0.80 h(-1) , respectively). However, the facultative aphid symbionts Hamiltonella defensa, Arsenophonus spp. and Serratia symbiotica showed an unexpected temporary increase in population size by 1-2 orders of magnitude in the predator guts before declining. Metagenomics is a powerful tool that can reveal complex relationships and the dynamics of interactions among predators, prey and their symbionts. PMID:25545417

  16. Triggering of aftershocks in viscoelastic spring-block models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Shcherbakov, R.

    2013-12-01

    Identifying the mechanisms of the aftershock generation is an important part in the comprehensive theory of earthquake physics. The mechanism of the aftershock generation remains controversial, and models that yield robust aftershock statistics are still in search. The dynamics of earthquake faults can be modelled by a spring-block system, as first proposed by Burridge and Knopoff (1967). However, the quantitative difference between the spring-block model dynamics and the realistic seismicity may be due to the oversimplified setup of the spring-block model, which might not capture effectively the essential physical mechanisms of earthquake dynamics. In particular, the interactions of the spring-block system are purely elastic. The rheology of the fault zone, which plays an important rule in the earthquake dynamics, is thus neglected. In this work, several possible models are studied in order to reproduce the scaling relations of the aftershocks, especially the Omori's law. We adopt the basic picture of the spring-block model, and introduce the crustal relaxation process during the stress redistribution and the global loading. This is implemented by incorporating viscoelastic interactions in the system: the viscoelastic transmission and the viscoelastic driving. The viscoelastic transmission mechanism features an instantaneous response of the stress transmission, which immediately leads to an avalanche followed by the relaxation. The viscoelastic driving mechanism features an instantaneous stress drop, which is later partly restored by the crustal relaxation. We combine the two mechanisms, and find that the dynamics of the system is determined by three parameters, the elastic transmission parameter α, the relaxation time of the viscoelastic driving τ_L , and the relaxation time of the viscoelastic transmission τ. Different with the elastic spring-block model, avalanches can be triggered either by the global loading or by the relaxation in this combined

  17. Thermo-tolerant coliform bacteria decay rates in a full scale waste stabilization pond system in northeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Macedo, S L; Araújo, A L C; Pearson, H W

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the results for thermo-tolerant coliform (TTC) decay rates (K(b)) in a full scale WSP system located in Natal-RN, northeast Brazil. The series comprises a primary facultative pond (2 m deep), followed by two maturation ponds (1.5 m deep) giving a total area of 11 ha. The influent sewage and the pond effluents were monitored weekly during a seven month period. The results showed that the K(b) values predicted by the Marais equation assuming a hydraulic regime of complete mixing overestimated TTC die-off rates. The K(b) value adopted in the project design was 6.20 d(-1) but the mean value found for the WSP system during the monitoring programme was only 0.85 d(-1). This value is low compared to the values cited in the literature for shallow ponds (<1.25 m deep) but similar to values for deeper ponds. The sub optimal TTC removal rate in this WSP system may be caused by the adoption of too high a K(b) value at the design stage and the negative influence of high wind conditions on the mixing regime in the water columns of the ponds. Thus values for K(b) adopted at the design stage of WSP systems should be coherent with the hydraulic flow model, the type of pond, pond depth, and with the surface organic loading. PMID:21436574

  18. Spatial correlation of aftershock locations and on-fault main shock properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woessner, J.; Schorlemmer, D.; Wiemer, S.; Mai, P. M.

    2006-08-01

    We quantify the correlation between spatial patterns of aftershock hypocenter locations and the distribution of coseismic slip and stress drop on a main shock fault plane using two nonstandard statistical tests. Test T1 evaluates if aftershock hypocenters are located in low-slip regions (hypothesis H1), test T2 evaluates if aftershock hypocenters occur in regions of increased shear stress (hypothesis H2). In the tests, we seek to reject the null hypotheses H0: Aftershock hypocenters are not correlated with (1) low-slip regions or (2) regions of increased shear stress, respectively. We tested the hypotheses on four strike-slip events for which multiple earthquake catalogs and multiple finite fault source models of varying accuracy exist. Because we want to retain earthquake clustering as the fundamental feature of aftershock seismicity, we generate slip distributions using a random spatial field model and derive the stress drop distributions instead of generating seismicity catalogs. We account for uncertainties in the aftershock locations by simulating them within their location error bounds. Our findings imply that aftershocks are preferentially located in regions of low-slip (u ≤ ?umax) and of increased shear stress (Δσ < 0). In particular, the correlation is more significant for relocated than for general network aftershock catalogs. However, the results show that stress drop patterns provide less information content on aftershock locations. This implies that static shear stress change of the main shock may not be the governing process for aftershock genesis.

  19. Decay Rates to Equilibrium for Nonlinear Plate Equations with Degenerate, Geometrically-Constrained Damping

    SciTech Connect

    Geredeli, Pelin G.; Webster, Justin T.

    2013-12-15

    We analyze the convergence to equilibrium of solutions to the nonlinear Berger plate evolution equation in the presence of localized interior damping (also referred to as geometrically constrained damping). Utilizing the results in (Geredeli et al. in J. Differ. Equ. 254:1193–1229, 2013), we have that any trajectory converges to the set of stationary points N . Employing standard assumptions from the theory of nonlinear unstable dynamics on the set N , we obtain the rate of convergence to an equilibrium. The critical issue in the proof of convergence to equilibria is a unique continuation property (which we prove for the Berger evolution) that provides a gradient structure for the dynamics. We also consider the more involved von Karman evolution, and show that the same results hold assuming a unique continuation property for solutions, which is presently a challenging open problem.

  20. Constraints on recent earthquake source parameters, fault geometry and aftershock characteristics in Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, D. E.; Benz, H.; Herrmann, R. B.; Bergman, E. A.; McMahon, N. D.; Aster, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    In late 2009, the seismicity of Oklahoma increased dramatically. The largest of these earthquakes was a series of three damaging events (Mw 4.8, 5.6, 4.8) that occurred over a span of four days in November 2011 near the town of Prague in central Oklahoma. Studies suggest that these earthquakes were induced by reactivation of the Wilzetta fault due to the disposal of waste water from hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") and other oil and gas activities. The Wilzetta fault is a northeast trending vertical strike-slip fault that is a well known structural trap for oil and gas. Since the November 2011 Prague sequence, thousands of small to moderate (M2-M4) earthquakes have occurred throughout central Oklahoma. The most active regions are located near the towns of Stillwater and Medford in north-central Oklahoma, and Guthrie, Langston and Jones near Oklahoma City. The USGS, in collaboration with the Oklahoma Geological Survey and the University of Oklahoma, has responded by deploying numerous temporary seismic stations in the region in order to record the vigorous aftershock sequences. In this study we use data from the temporary seismic stations to re-locate all Oklahoma earthquakes in the USGS National Earthquake Information Center catalog using a multiple-event approach known as hypo-centroidal decomposition that locates earthquakes with decreased uncertainty relative to one another. Modeling from this study allows us to constrain the detailed geometry of the reactivated faults, as well as source parameters (focal mechanisms, stress drop, rupture length) for the larger earthquakes. Preliminary results from the November 2011 Prague sequence suggest that subsurface rupture lengths of the largest earthquakes are anomalously long with very low stress drop. We also observe very high Q (~1000 at 1 Hz) that explains the large felt areas and we find relatively low b-value and a rapid decay of aftershocks.

  1. Disease aftershocks - The health effects of natural disasters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guptill, S.C.

    2001-01-01

    While the initial activity of a natural disaster event may directly injure or kill a number of people, it is possible that a significant number of individuals will be affected by disease outbreaks that occur after the first effects of the disaster have passed. Coupling the epidemiologist's knowledge of disease outbreaks with geographic information systems and remote sensing technology could help natural disaster relief workers to prevent additional victims from disease aftershocks.

  2. Iterative Strategies for Aftershock Classification in Automatic Seismic Processing Pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, Steven J.; Kværna, Tormod; Harris, David B.; Dodge, Douglas A.

    2016-04-01

    Aftershock sequences following very large earthquakes present enormous challenges to near-realtime generation of seismic bulletins. The increase in analyst resources needed to relocate an inflated number of events is compounded by failures of phase association algorithms and a significant deterioration in the quality of underlying fully automatic event bulletins. Current processing pipelines were designed a generation ago and, due to computational limitations of the time, are usually limited to single passes over the raw data. With current processing capability, multiple passes over the data are feasible. Processing the raw data at each station currently generates parametric data streams which are then scanned by a phase association algorithm to form event hypotheses. We consider the scenario where a large earthquake has occurred and propose to define a region of likely aftershock activity in which events are detected and accurately located using a separate specially targeted semi-automatic process. This effort may focus on so-called pattern detectors, but here we demonstrate a more general grid search algorithm which may cover wider source regions without requiring waveform similarity. Given many well-located aftershocks within our source region, we may remove all associated phases from the original detection lists prior to a new iteration of the phase association algorithm. We provide a proof-of-concept example for the 2015 Gorkha sequence, Nepal, recorded on seismic arrays of the International Monitoring System. Even with very conservative conditions for defining event hypotheses within the aftershock source region, we can automatically remove over half of the original detections which could have been generated by Nepal earthquakes and reduce the likelihood of false associations and spurious event hypotheses. Further reductions in the number of detections in the parametric data streams are likely using correlation and subspace detectors and/or empirical matched

  3. Computational Software for Fitting Seismic Data to Epidemic-Type Aftershock Sequence Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, A.

    2014-12-01

    Modern earthquake catalogs are often analyzed using spatial-temporal point process models such as the epidemic-type aftershock sequence (ETAS) models of Ogata (1998). My work introduces software to implement two of ETAS models described in Ogata (1998). To find the Maximum-Likelihood Estimates (MLEs), my software provides estimates of the homogeneous background rate parameter and the temporal and spatial parameters that govern triggering effects by applying the Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm introduced in Veen and Schoenberg (2008). Despite other computer programs exist for similar data modeling purpose, using EM-algorithm has the benefits of stability and robustness (Veen and Schoenberg, 2008). Spatial shapes that are very long and narrow cause difficulties in optimization convergence and problems with flat or multi-modal log-likelihood functions encounter similar issues. My program uses a robust method to preset a parameter to overcome the non-convergence computational issue. In addition to model fitting, the software is equipped with useful tools for examining modeling fitting results, for example, visualization of estimated conditional intensity, and estimation of expected number of triggered aftershocks. A simulation generator is also given with flexible spatial shapes that may be defined by the user. This open-source software has a very simple user interface. The user may execute it on a local computer, and the program also has potential to be hosted online. Java language is used for the software's core computing part and an optional interface to the statistical package R is provided.

  4. Effect of metal side claddings on emission decay rates of single quantum dots embedded in a sub-wavelength semiconductor waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takumi; Ota, Yasutomo; Ishida, Satomi; Kumagai, Naoto; Iwamoto, Satoshi; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2016-08-01

    We experimentally investigate the emission decay rates of self-assembled single InAs quantum dots (QDs) embedded in sub-wavelength semiconductor waveguides with and without metal side claddings. Compared with as-grown single QDs, we observe a clear suppression (enhancement) in the radiative decay rates of single InAs QDs embedded in the sub-wavelength semiconductor waveguides without (with) metal cladding, respectively. The decay rate for QDs in metal-clad waveguides is ∼2 times faster than that in waveguides without metal. Numerical calculations using models that include the effects of structural imperfections show good agreement with the experimental results, and reveal that the most important structural imperfection is the gap between the metal and the semiconductor.

  5. Measurement of the {beta}{sup +} and Orbital Electron-Capture Decay Rates in Fully Ionized, Hydrogenlike, and Heliumlike {sup 140}Pr Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinov, Yu. A.; Geissel, H.; Winckler, N.; Knoebel, R.; Litvinov, S. A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Bosch, F.; Beckert, K.; Brandau, C.; Dimopoulou, C.; Hess, S.; Kozhuharov, C.; Mazzocco, M.; Nociforo, C.; Nolden, F.; Prochazka, A.; Reuschl, R.; Steck, M.; Stoehlker, T.; Trassinelli, M.

    2007-12-31

    We report on the first measurement of the {beta}{sup +} and orbital electron-capture decay rates of {sup 140}Pr nuclei with the simplest electron configurations: bare nuclei, hydrogenlike, and heliumlike ions. The measured electron-capture decay constant of hydrogenlike {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+} ions is about 50% larger than that of heliumlike {sup 140}Pr{sup 57+} ions. Moreover, {sup 140}Pr ions with one bound electron decay faster than neutral {sup 140}Pr{sup 0+} atoms with 59 electrons. To explain this peculiar observation one has to take into account the conservation of the total angular momentum, since only particular spin orientations of the nucleus and of the captured electron can contribute to the allowed decay.

  6. High-Resolution Low Power, Intergrated Aftershock and Microzonation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimakov, L.; Passmore, P.

    2012-04-01

    Refraction Technology, Inc. has developed a self-contained, fully integrated Aftershock System, model 160-03, providing the customer simple and quick deployment during aftershock emergency mobilization and microzonation studies. The 160-03 has no external cables or peripheral equipment for command/control and operation in the field. The 160-03 contains three major components integrated in one case: a) 24-bit resolution state-of-the art low power ADC with CPU and Lid interconnect boards; b) power source; and c) three component 2 Hz sensors (two horizontals and one vertical), and built-in ±4g accelerometer. Optionally, the 1 Hz sensors can be built-in the 160-03 system at the customer's request. The self-contained rechargeable battery pack provides power autonomy up to 7 days during data acquisition at 200 sps on continuous three weak motion and triggered three strong motion recording channels. For longer power autonomy, the 160-03 Aftershock System battery pack can be charged from an external source (solar power system). The data in the field is recorded to a built-in swappable USB flash drive. The 160-03 configuration is fixed based on a configuration file stored on the system. The detailed specifications and performance are presented and discussed

  7. First-forbidden β-decay rates, energy rates of β-delayed neutrons and probability of β-delayed neutron emissions for neutron-rich nickel isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Çakmak, Necla; Iftikhar, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    First-forbidden (FF) transitions can play an important role in decreasing the calculated half-lives specially in environments where allowed Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions are unfavored. Of special mention is the case of neutron-rich nuclei where, due to phase-space amplification, FF transitions are much favored. We calculate the allowed GT transitions in various pn-QRPA models for even-even neutron-rich isotopes of nickel. Here we also study the effect of deformation on the calculated GT strengths. The FF transitions for even-even neutron-rich isotopes of nickel are calculated assuming the nuclei to be spherical. Later we take into account deformation of nuclei and calculate GT + unique FF transitions, stellar β-decay rates, energy rate of β-delayed neutrons and probability of β-delayed neutron emissions. The calculated half-lives are in excellent agreement with measured ones and might contribute in speeding-up of the r-matter flow.

  8. Time since death and decay rate constants of Norway spruce and European larch deadwood in subalpine forests determined using dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrillo, M.; Cherubini, P.; Fravolini, G.; Ascher, J.; Schärer, M.; Synal, H.-A.; Bertoldi, D.; Camin, F.; Larcher, R.; Egli, M.

    2015-09-01

    Due to the large size and highly heterogeneous spatial distribution of deadwood, the time scales involved in the coarse woody debris (CWD) decay of Picea abies (L.) Karst. and Larix decidua Mill. in Alpine forests have been poorly investigated and are largely unknown. We investigated the CWD decay dynamics in an Alpine valley in Italy using the five-decay class system commonly employed for forest surveys, based on a macromorphological and visual assessment. For the decay classes 1 to 3, most of the dendrochronological samples were cross-dated to assess the time that had elapsed since tree death, but for decay classes 4 and 5 (poorly preserved tree rings) and some others not having enough tree rings, radiocarbon dating was used. In addition, density, cellulose and lignin data were measured for the dated CWD. The decay rate constants for spruce and larch were estimated on the basis of the density loss using a single negative exponential model. In the decay classes 1 to 3, the ages of the CWD were similar varying between 1 and 54 years for spruce and 3 and 40 years for larch with no significant differences between the classes; classes 1-3 are therefore not indicative for deadwood age. We found, however, distinct tree species-specific differences in decay classes 4 and 5, with larch CWD reaching an average age of 210 years in class 5 and spruce only 77 years. The mean CWD rate constants were 0.012 to 0.018 yr-1 for spruce and 0.005 to 0.012 yr-1 for larch. Cellulose and lignin time trends half-lives (using a multiple-exponential model) could be derived on the basis of the ages of the CWD. The half-lives for cellulose were 21 yr for spruce and 50 yr for larch. The half-life of lignin is considerably higher and may be more than 100 years in larch CWD.

  9. Application of the t-model of optimal prediction to the estimationof the rate of decay of solutions of the Euler equations in two and threedimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hald, Ole H.; Shvets, Yelena; Stinis, Panagiotis

    2006-10-07

    The "t-model" for dimensional reduction is applied to theestimation of the rate of decay of solutions of the Burgers equation andof the Euler equations in two and three space dimensions. The model wasfirst derived in a statistical mechanics context, but here we analyze itpurely as a numerical tool and prove its convergence. In the Burgers casethe model captures the rate of decay exactly, as was already previouslyshown. For the Euler equations in two space dimensions, the modelpreserves energy as it should. In three dimensions, we find a power lawdecay in time and observe a temporal intermittency.

  10. Deterministic model of earthquake clustering shows reduced stress drops for nearby aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Bruce E.; Richards-Dinger, Keith; Dieterich, James H.

    2015-11-01

    While a number of viable physical mechanisms have been offered to explain the temporal clustering of aftershocks, the spatial clustering of aftershocks, in particular the concentrated productivity of aftershocks very near the mainshock rupture area, has been difficult to reproduce with physical models. Here we present a new deterministic physical model capable of reproducing both the spatial and temporal clustering. We apply this new model to a longstanding puzzling question raised by ground motion observations, which suggest that nearby aftershocks show reduced ground motions relative to similar magnitude mainshocks. In the model, the physical basis for these observations is reduced stress drops for nearby aftershocks compared to similar magnitude mainshocks. These reduced stress drops are due to nearby aftershocks rerupturing incompletely healed parts of the fault which ruptured in the mainshock.

  11. Time since death and decay rate constants of Norway spruce and European larch deadwood in subalpine forests determined using dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrillo, Marta; Cherubini, Paolo; Fravolini, Giulia; Marchetti, Marco; Ascher-Jenull, Judith; Schärer, Michael; Synal, Hans-Arno; Bertoldi, Daniela; Camin, Federica; Larcher, Roberto; Egli, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Due to the large size (e.g. sections of tree trunks) and highly heterogeneous spatial distribution of deadwood, the timescales involved in the coarse woody debris (CWD) decay of Picea abies (L.) Karst. and Larix decidua Mill. in Alpine forests are largely unknown. We investigated the CWD decay dynamics in an Alpine valley in Italy using the chronosequence approach and the five-decay class system that is based on a macromorphological assessment. For the decay classes 1-3, most of the dendrochronological samples were cross-dated to assess the time that had elapsed since tree death, but for decay classes 4 and 5 (poorly preserved tree rings) radiocarbon dating was used. In addition, density, cellulose, and lignin data were measured for the dated CWD. The decay rate constants for spruce and larch were estimated on the basis of the density loss using a single negative exponential model, a regression approach, and the stage-based matrix model. In the decay classes 1-3, the ages of the CWD were similar and varied between 1 and 54 years for spruce and 3 and 40 years for larch, with no significant differences between the classes; classes 1-3 are therefore not indicative of deadwood age. This seems to be due to a time lag between the death of a standing tree and its contact with the soil. We found distinct tree-species-specific differences in decay classes 4 and 5, with larch CWD reaching an average age of 210 years in class 5 and spruce only 77 years. The mean CWD rate constants were estimated to be in the range 0.018 to 0.022 y-1 for spruce and to about 0.012 y-1 for larch. Snapshot sampling (chronosequences) may overestimate the age and mean residence time of CWD. No sampling bias was, however, detectable using the stage-based matrix model. Cellulose and lignin time trends could be derived on the basis of the ages of the CWD. The half-lives for cellulose were 21 years for spruce and 50 years for larch. The half-life of lignin is considerably higher and may be more than

  12. THE LONG-TERM DECAY IN PRODUCTION RATES FOLLOWING THE EXTREME OUTBURST OF COMET 17P/HOLMES

    SciTech Connect

    Schleicher, David G.

    2009-10-15

    Numerous sets of narrowband filter photometry were obtained of Comet 17P/Holmes from Lowell Observatory during the interval of 2007 November 1 to 2008 March 5. Observations began 8 days following its extreme outburst, at which time the derived water production rate, based on OH measurements, was 5 x 10{sup 29} molecule s{sup -1} and the derived proxy of dust production, A({theta})f{rho}, was about 5 x 10{sup 5} cm. Relative production rates for the other gas species, CN, C{sub 2}, C{sub 3}, and NH, are consistent with 'typical' composition (based on our update to the classifications by A'Hearn et al.). An exponential decay in the logarithm of measured production rates as a function of time was observed for all species, with each species dropping by factors of about 200-500 after 125 days. All gas species exhibited clear trends with aperture size, and these trends are consistent with larger apertures having a greater proportion of older material that was released when production rates were higher. Much larger aperture trends were measured for the dust, most likely because the dust grains have smaller outflow velocities and longer lifetimes than the gas species; therefore, a greater proportion of older, i.e., higher production dust is contained within a given aperture. By extrapolating to a sufficiently small aperture size, we derive near-instantaneous water and dust production rates throughout the interval of observation, and also estimate values immediately following the outburst. The finite lifetime of the gas species requires that much higher ice vaporization rates were taking place throughout the observation interval than occurred prior to the outburst, likely due to the continued release of icy grains from the nucleus. The relatively small aperture trends for the gas species also imply that the bulk of fresh, excess volatiles are confined to the nucleus and near-nucleus regime, rather than being associated with the outburst ejecta cloud. A minimum of about 0

  13. The 11 April 2012 east Indian Ocean earthquake triggered large aftershocks worldwide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, Fred F.; Stein, Ross S.; Sevilgen, Volkan; Burgmann, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Large earthquakes trigger very small earthquakes globally during passage of the seismic waves and during the following several hours to days1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, but so far remote aftershocks of moment magnitude M≥5.5 have not been identified11, with the lone exception of an M=6.9 quake remotely triggered by the surface waves from an M=6.6 quake 4,800 kilometres away12. The 2012 east Indian Ocean earthquake that had a moment magnitude of 8.6 is the largest strike-slip event ever recorded. Here we show that the rate of occurrence of remote M≥5.5 earthquakes (>1,500 kilometres from the epicentre) increased nearly fivefold for six days after the 2012 event, and extended in magnitude to M≥7. These global aftershocks were located along the four lobes of Love-wave radiation; all struck where the dynamic shear strain is calculated to exceed 10-7 for at least 100 seconds during dynamic-wave passage. The other M≥8.5 mainshocks during the past decade are thrusts; after these events, the global rate of occurrence of remote M≥5.5 events increased by about one-third the rate following the 2012 shock and lasted for only two days, a weaker but possibly real increase. We suggest that the unprecedented delayed triggering power of the 2012 earthquake may have arisen because of its strike-slip source geometry or because the event struck at a time of an unusually low global earthquake rate, perhaps increasing the number of nucleation sites that were very close to failure.

  14. The 11 April 2012 east Indian Ocean earthquake triggered large aftershocks worldwide.

    PubMed

    Pollitz, Fred F; Stein, Ross S; Sevilgen, Volkan; Bürgmann, Roland

    2012-10-11

    Large earthquakes trigger very small earthquakes globally during passage of the seismic waves and during the following several hours to days, but so far remote aftershocks of moment magnitude M ≥ 5.5 have not been identified, with the lone exception of an M = 6.9 quake remotely triggered by the surface waves from an M = 6.6 quake 4,800 kilometres away. The 2012 east Indian Ocean earthquake that had a moment magnitude of 8.6 is the largest strike-slip event ever recorded. Here we show that the rate of occurrence of remote M ≥ 5.5 earthquakes (>1,500 kilometres from the epicentre) increased nearly fivefold for six days after the 2012 event, and extended in magnitude to M ≤ 7. These global aftershocks were located along the four lobes of Love-wave radiation; all struck where the dynamic shear strain is calculated to exceed 10(-7) for at least 100 seconds during dynamic-wave passage. The other M ≥ 8.5 mainshocks during the past decade are thrusts; after these events, the global rate of occurrence of remote M ≥ 5.5 events increased by about one-third the rate following the 2012 shock and lasted for only two days, a weaker but possibly real increase. We suggest that the unprecedented delayed triggering power of the 2012 earthquake may have arisen because of its strike-slip source geometry or because the event struck at a time of an unusually low global earthquake rate, perhaps increasing the number of nucleation sites that were very close to failure. PMID:23023131

  15. Global Well-Posedness and Decay Rates of Strong Solutions to a Non-Conservative Compressible Two-Fluid Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evje, Steinar; Wang, Wenjun; Wen, Huanyao

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we consider a compressible two-fluid model with constant viscosity coefficients and unequal pressure functions {P^+neq P^-}. As mentioned in the seminal work by Bresch, Desjardins, et al. (Arch Rational Mech Anal 196:599-629, 2010) for the compressible two-fluid model, where {P^+=P^-} (common pressure) is used and capillarity effects are accounted for in terms of a third-order derivative of density, the case of constant viscosity coefficients cannot be handled in their settings. Besides, their analysis relies on a special choice for the density-dependent viscosity [refer also to another reference (Commun Math Phys 309:737-755, 2012) by Bresch, Huang and Li for a study of the same model in one dimension but without capillarity effects]. In this work, we obtain the global solution and its optimal decay rate (in time) with constant viscosity coefficients and some smallness assumptions. In particular, capillary pressure is taken into account in the sense that {Δ P=P^+ - P^-=fneq 0} where the difference function {f} is assumed to be a strictly decreasing function near the equilibrium relative to the fluid corresponding to {P^-}. This assumption plays an key role in the analysis and appears to have an essential stabilization effect on the model in question.

  16. Oscillator strengths and radiative decay rates for spin-changing S-P transitions in helium: finite nuclear mass effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Donald C.; Schulhoff, Eva E.; Drake, G. W. F.

    2015-12-01

    We have calculated the electric dipole (E1) and magnetic quadrupole (M2) oscillator strengths and spontaneous decay rates for 24 spin-changing transitions of atomic helium. We included the effects of the finite nuclear mass and the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron augmented by the recently derived Pachucki term. The specific transitions for 4He are n{ }1{{{S}}}0-{n}\\prime { }3{{{P}}}{1,2} and n{ }3{{{S}}}1-{n}\\prime { }1{{{P}}}1 with n,{n}\\prime ≤slant 3 and n≤slant 10 for {n}\\prime =n. For the E1 calculations we used the Breit approximation and pseudostate expansions to perform the perturbation sums over intermediate states in both the length and velocity gauge as a check on both numerical accuracy and validity of the transition operators. The corrections for the nuclear mass and the electron anomaly tend to cancel, indicating that if one is included, then so should be the other. The tables give mass- and anomaly-dependent coefficients permitting the easy generation of results for the other isotopes of helium.

  17. Probability of passing through a parabolic barrier and thermal decay rate: Case of linear coupling both in momentum and in coordinate

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzyakin, R. A.; Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2011-09-15

    With the quantum diffusion approach, the probability of passing through the parabolic barrier and the quasistationary thermal decay rate from a metastable state are examined in the limit of linear coupling both in momentum and in coordinate between a collective subsystem and the environment. An increase of passing probability with friction coefficient is demonstrated to occur at subbarrier energies.

  18. Some characteristics of aftershock sequences of major earthquakes from 1994 to 2002 in the Kivu province, Western Rift Valley of Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavonga, Tuluka

    2007-07-01

    The temporal and spatial distribution of the aftershock sequences of the Ruwenzori (February 5, 1994, Mb (5.8)), Masisi (April 29, 1995, Mb (5.1)) and Kalehe (October 24, 2002, Mb (5.9)) earthquakes have been studied. It has been found that most of the aftershocks of the Ruwenzori earthquake are located on the eastern flank of the main escarpment and those of the Masisi earthquake are confined to the northwest of Lake Kivu margin where earthquake occurrence of swarm-type was normally observed. The Kalehe earthquake occurred in the central part of Lake Kivu and it was the largest earthquake observed in the Lake Kivu basin since 1900. The rate of decrease in aftershock activity with the time has shown that the p-value for Ruwenzori and Masisi earthquake equals 0.6, somehow smaller than that found in other geotectonic zones where p is close to 1. The p-value of the Kalehe earthquake is a normal value equal to 1. From an area delimited by spatial distribution of aftershocks, the linear dimension of the fault was estimated. The fault area determined in this study correlates well with those of previous studies which occurred in the Western Rift Valley of Africa including the Tanganyika and Upemba Rift.

  19. Aftershocks of the 2014 South Napa, California, Earthquake: Complex faulting on secondary faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hardebeck, Jeanne L.; Shelly, David R.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the aftershock sequence of the 2014 MW6.0 South Napa, California, earthquake. Low-magnitude aftershocks missing from the network catalog are detected by applying a matched-filter approach to continuous seismic data, with the catalog earthquakes serving as the waveform templates. We measure precise differential arrival times between events, which we use for double-difference event relocation in a 3D seismic velocity model. Most aftershocks are deeper than the mainshock slip, and most occur west of the mapped surface rupture. While the mainshock coseismic and postseismic slip appears to have occurred on the near-vertical, strike-slip West Napa fault, many of the aftershocks occur in a complex zone of secondary faulting. Earthquake locations in the main aftershock zone, near the mainshock hypocenter, delineate multiple dipping secondary faults. Composite focal mechanisms indicate strike-slip and oblique-reverse faulting on the secondary features. The secondary faults were moved towards failure by Coulomb stress changes from the mainshock slip. Clusters of aftershocks north and south of the main aftershock zone exhibit vertical strike-slip faulting more consistent with the West Napa Fault. The northern aftershocks correspond to the area of largest mainshock coseismic slip, while the main aftershock zone is adjacent to the fault area that has primarily slipped postseismically. Unlike most creeping faults, the zone of postseismic slip does not appear to contain embedded stick-slip patches that would have produced on-fault aftershocks. The lack of stick-slip patches along this portion of the fault may contribute to the low productivity of the South Napa aftershock sequence.

  20. Aftershock Triggering and Estimation of the Coulomb Stress Changes with Approach of Optimally Oriented Fault Planes: Examples of Some Contemporary Earthquakes in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirci, Alper

    2013-04-01

    The Coulomb Stress changes due to the some moderate and large earthquakes are shaped according to the orientations of reciever faults or weakness zones along the corresponding seismogenic zones. In some cases, the determination of the fault plane parameters (e.g. length, width, strike, dip) of the receiver faults are more difficult due to the tectonical complexity of the region. Therefore, in order to understand the aftershock distrubition in such areas Coulomb stress changes can be calculated under the assumption of optimally oriented fault planes which increases the spatial correlation between stress changes and aftershock distribution. In the scope of the present sutdy, aftershock distrubiton of some contemporary earthquakes in Turkey (Simav (Mw 5.8), May 2011; Van (Mw 7.0), Oct 2011 and Gulf of Fethiye (Mw 6.1), June 2012) and their coulomb stress changes were correlated. Fault plane parameters of these earthquakes which suggest three different types of focal mechanism were calculated using moment tensor inversion technique and aftershock location data in a period of 30 days for each corresponding events were taken from Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute (KOERI) catalog. The focal mechanisms of the selected earthquakes represent normal, strike slip and thrust faulting for the earthquakes of Simav, Gulf of Fethite and Van, respectively. Coulomb Stress Changes were calculated using the open source Matlab based (Coulomb 3.3) codes. The calculations were performed by assuming Poisson's ratio and apparent friction coefficient to be 0.25 and 0.4, respectively. The coulomb stress variations were calculated at fixed depths for each event and aftershocks were selected as ±4 km for corresponding depths. Keeping in mind that the increase of static stress more than 0.5 bar can cause the triggered events in an area, the accordance rates of Coulomb stress changes and aftershock distribution under different tectonic regimes were disscussed. The accordance

  1. The Importance of Small Aftershocks for Earthquake Triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woessner, Jochen; Meier, Men-Andrin; Werner, Max; Wiemer, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Earthquakes occur in response to changes in the crust's stress state, however, the full picture of the causative process for earthquake triggering remains unclear. Many researchers have employed Coulomb stress change theory, which quantifies the changes in static Coulomb stress from nearby ruptures. This theory seems to at least partly explain the spatial patterns of triggered earthquakes, in particular during aftershock sequences and along faults. Several assumptions are needed to facilitate the calculation of stress changes. Here, we challenge the typical neglect of stress changes induced by the small but numerous and strongly clustered aftershocks during the evolution of the sequence. Both empirical observations and a simple scaling law suggest that this neglect may not be justified. We estimate the evolution of Coulomb stress changes during the 1992 Mw 7.3 Landers earthquake sequence by including the effect of the detected aftershocks using the focal mechanisms from the recently updated Southern California catalog. This estimation is hampered by that only 62% of located events from our study window have a focal mechanism, by the neglect of events that are too small to be detected and by the unreliability of near-field stress change estimations. As a consequence, we are limited to analyzing only a part of the full stress change signal imparted by small events. Despite these shortcomings, our calculations suggest that small to moderate events strongly dominate static stress redistribution in dense secondary aftershock clusters. However, their relative importance varies over space and is, on average, smaller than the main shock contribution. Furthermore, we find that aftershocks - with their reported relative orientations and positions - impose more often positive than negative stress changes, which is what would be expected if they were actively involved in triggering processes. However, this effect appears to be limited to event pairs with inter-event distances

  2. Changes of static stress and aftershocks distribution for the strike-slip earthquakes in the West Pilippine Sea Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Lin, J.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last few decades, several strike-slip type earthquakes have been observed within the West Philippine Sea Plate (WPSP), to the east of the Gagua Ridge area. Nearly all of these earthquakes possessed a similar focal mechanism pattern with one fault plane sub-parallel to approximately N35°E. Based on bathymetric and magnetic anomaly data, several obvious NE-SW ancient fracture zones have been identified in the WPSP and considered to be the main rupture plane of these strike-slip earthquakes. However, the aftershocks distributions of these strike-slip earthquakes show NW-SE trending pattern, which is almost in orthogonal with the fracture zones orientation. Thus, the real rupture plane of these events is still undetermined. Otherwise, many researches have provided evidence that stress increase promotes seismicity: the increase of static Coulomb stress is generally correlated to the high occurrence of aftershocks. In our study, we chose three large earthquakes occurred in the WPSP to analyze the relationship between static Coulomb stress changes and seismicity rate changes, in the aim of determining an appropriate rupture plane for these strike-slip events. In our analysis, two fault planes have been used to estimate the static Coulomb stress change. Then, we compared the aftershocks distribution with the Coulomb stress distribution pattern. Our results shows that when the fault plane is trending NW-SE direction, the aftershocks occurred in the region with positive Coulomb stress changes, while the seismicity was decreased in the region of negative Coulomb stress changes. Otherwise, the other fault plane could not at all explain the observed aftershocks distribution. Consequently, the NW-SE fault plane is the preferred rupture plane for the strike-slip events occurred in the WPSP. The 11 April 2012, Mw 8.6 and Mw 8.2 earthquakes occurred off the west coast of northern Sumatra, Indonesia, are also strike-slip fault events within the Indo-Australia plate. These

  3. Fault Simulator with Dilatant Effects Used to Investigate Statistics of Foreshocks/Aftershocks, Including Magnitude Dependent Seismic Quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. E.; Sacks, S. I.; Rydelek, P. A.

    2011-12-01

    We add dilatant effects to a fault simulator to include physics consistent with observations of seismic quiescence. Using this simulator, we examine precursory and aftershock statistics of major events, changes in b-value, correlations between slip and static stress changes, changes in the in-plane focal mechanisms, and temporal decay of aftershocks. Seismic quiescence has been observed for a number major events including, 1982 Urakawa-Oki earthquake [Taylor et al., 1992], 1994 Hokkaido-Toho-Oki earthquake [Takanami et al., 1996], 1994 Northridge earthquake [Smith and Sacks, 2011], 1995 Kobe earthquake [Enescu et al., 2011], 1988 Spitak earthquake [Wysse and Martirosyan, 1998], and 2011 Tohoku earthquake [Katsumata, in press, 2011]. The physics of dilatancy theory [Nur, 1972; Whitcomb et al., 1973; Scholz et al., 1973], which we include in the simulator, is proposed as an explanation for seismic quiescence [Takanami et al., 1996; Scholz, 2000]. As the fault is loaded toward failure and the stress increases, if the stress is sufficiently high, the rock can begin to dilate. As dilation causes an increase in the rock volume, the pore pressure decreases, the effective normal stress increases, and the fault core strengthens [Rice, 1975]. Because the fault core supports more of the stress, the seismicity of the surrounding region will decrease as is observed. Over time (~2-20 years) the water will percolate back into the fault core from the surrounding region. The pore pressure in the fault core increases again, the normal stress decreases, and failure is encouraged. This dilatant effect on the fault core foreshocks, surrounding quiescence zone, and the aftershocks, can be studied by modifying the fault simulator of Sacks and Rydelek [1995]; Rydelek and Sacks [1996]. Based on simple physics: discrete patches, Coulomb failure, and redistribution of stresses on a specified fault geometry, this simulator (without dilatancy) has already been shown to reproduce Gutenberg

  4. Absolute site effects in Kachchh, India, determined from aftershocks of the 2002 Bhuj earthquake.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malagnini, L.; Mayeda, K.; Bodin, P.; Akinci, A.

    2004-12-01

    What can be learned about absolute site effects on ground motions from recordings of aftershocks at ten temporary seismic stations, none of which could be considered a "reference" (hard rock) site, and for which no geotechnical information is available? This challenge motivated our current study of Bhuj aftershocks; and our answer, briefly put, is: quite a bit. We started by constraining the regional attenuation and geometric spreading: this was the result of an earlier study [Bodin et al., BSSA 2004], the goal of which was to be able to reproduce the general character of the observations with a constrained set of stochastic synthetic ground motions. Our present work is based on the same aftershock data we used in the prior study. We first produced stable and reliable, unbiased source moment-rate spectra using the technique described by Mayeda et al., [BSSA, 2003]. With these known "absolute" source spectra, and the propagation terms we quantified in the previous study we inverted for the site response using only the largest ~200 earthquakes (M>2.8) in each of two depth ranges (0-25 km, and 20-40 km), to yield the "absolute" site terms for horizontal and vertical ground motions. We were able to obtain stable results in the 1-14 hz frequency band. The results reveal that the site terms generally share a common character: small amplifications (near unity) at the longer-period end of the pass-band, and decreases (perhaps due to attenuation or near-site scattering) at the higher frequency end. This character is evident in a similar study of earthquake ground motions in the Alps at sites on hard rock [Malagnini et al., BSSA 2004]. In contrast to Alpine hard rock sites, however, the vertical site terms at our sediment and soft-rock sites are generally rather flat and featureless. We observe differences in site response between stations which appeared to be on similar geologic conditions, and vice versa. For sites that appear to be on deep unconsolidated soils

  5. Comparisons of ground motions from five aftershocks of the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, earthquake with empirical predictions largely based on data from California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, G.-Q.; Boore, D.M.; Igel, H.; Zhou, X.-Y.

    2004-01-01

    The observed ground motions from five large aftershocks of the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, earthquake are compared with predictions from four equations based primarily on data from California. The four equations for active tectonic regions are those developed by Abrahamson and Silva (1997), Boore et al. (1997), Campbell (1997, 2001), and Sadigh et al. (1997). Comparisons are made for horizontal-component peak ground accelerations and 5%-damped pseudoacceleration response spectra at periods between 0.02 sec and 5 sec. The observed motions are in reasonable agreement with the predictions, particularly for distances from 10 to 30 km. This is in marked contrast to the motions from the Chi-Chi mainshock, which are much lower than the predicted motions for periods less than about 1 sec. The results indicate that the low motions in the mainshock are not due to unusual, localized absorption of seismic energy, because waves from the mainshock and the aftershocks generally traverse the same section of the crust and are recorded at the same stations. The aftershock motions at distances of 30-60 km are somewhat lower than the predictions (but not nearly by as small a factor as those for the mainshock), suggesting that the ground motion attenuates more rapidly in this region of Taiwan than it does in the areas we compare with it. We provide equations for the regional attenuation of response spectra, which show increasing decay of motion with distance for decreasing oscillator periods. This observational study also demonstrates that ground motions have large earthquake-location-dependent variability for a specific site. This variability reduces the accuracy with which an earthquake-specific prediction of site response can be predicted. Online Material: PGAs and PSAs from the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake and five aftershocks.

  6. Largest Aftershocks of Megathrust Earthquakes in the World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, J.; Tsuzuki, M.

    2012-12-01

    The 2011 Tohoku-oki megathrust earthquake of Mw9.0 induced the earthquake activity in high level all over Japan. It included not only earthquakes near active faults but also volcanic earthquakes. Although we have observed tens of thousands of aftershocks, yet we do not know which is the largest aftershock of the 2011 megathrust. There occurred several megathrust earthquakes worldwide in the last one hundred years, which are almost the same size or larger than the 2011 megathrust. We have studied their largest aftershocks based on our new hypothesis of along-dip double segmentation (ADDS) and along-strike single segmentation (ASSS). ADDS in the Tohoku-oki region along the Japan trench is characterized by the apparent absence of earthquakes in the trench-ward segments as opposed to the Japan Island-ward segments that have repeated small earthquakes of up to Mw8 class. In contrast, the 1960 Chile and the 2010 Maule megathrusts are characterized by ASSS with the weak seismic activity before the main event everywhere in the subduction zone. The difference between these two types of seismic segmentations would be that strongly coupled areas of trench-ward segments give rise to ADDS, whereas almost 100% coupled areas of shallow-parts of subduction zones give rise to ASSS. In other words, the phenomenon of a seismic gap can be identified for an ASSS megathrust, where as a doughnut pattern of seismic activity appears prior to a main ADDS event. In summary, most of the largest aftershocks of ADDS megathrusts are earthquakes of outer-rise(outer trench-slope) normal faultings, where there occur two types, dip-slip and strike-slip, depending on the structure of subducting oceanic plates. The 1933 Sanriku-oki Mw8.6 (the 1896 Meiji-Sanriku M~8.5) and the 2011 Tohoku-oki Mw7.7 (the 2011 Tohoku-oki Mw9.0) are the former and the 1987 Off Alaska Mw7.8 (the 1964 Alaska Mw9.2) and the 2012 Sumatra Mw8.6 (the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman Mw9.3) are the latter. Those of ASSS megathrusts occurred

  7. Quantitative law describing market dynamics before and after interest-rate change.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Alexander M; Wang, Fengzhong; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H Eugene

    2010-06-01

    We study the behavior of U.S. markets both before and after U.S. Federal Open Market Commission meetings and show that the announcement of a U.S. Federal Reserve rate change causes a financial shock, where the dynamics after the announcement is described by an analog of the Omori earthquake law. We quantify the rate n(t) of aftershocks following an interest-rate change at time T and find power-law decay which scales as n(t-T)∼(t-T)(-Ω) , with Ω positive. Surprisingly, we find that the same law describes the rate n'(|t-T|) of "preshocks" before the interest-rate change at time T . This study quantitatively relates the size of the market response to the news which caused the shock and uncovers the presence of quantifiable preshocks. We demonstrate that the news associated with interest-rate change is responsible for causing both the anticipation before the announcement and the surprise after the announcement. We estimate the magnitude of financial news using the relative difference between the U.S. Treasury Bill and the Federal Funds effective rate. Our results are consistent with the "sign effect," in which "bad news" has a larger impact than "good news." Furthermore, we observe significant volatility aftershocks, confirming a "market under-reaction" that lasts at least one trading day. PMID:20866492

  8. Quantitative law describing market dynamics before and after interest-rate change

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Alexander M.; Wang Fengzhong; Stanley, H. Eugene; Havlin, Shlomo

    2010-06-15

    We study the behavior of U.S. markets both before and after U.S. Federal Open Market Commission meetings and show that the announcement of a U.S. Federal Reserve rate change causes a financial shock, where the dynamics after the announcement is described by an analog of the Omori earthquake law. We quantify the rate n(t) of aftershocks following an interest-rate change at time T and find power-law decay which scales as n(t-T)approx(t-T){sup -O}MEGA, with OMEGA positive. Surprisingly, we find that the same law describes the rate n{sup '}(|t-T|) of 'preshocks' before the interest-rate change at time T. This study quantitatively relates the size of the market response to the news which caused the shock and uncovers the presence of quantifiable preshocks. We demonstrate that the news associated with interest-rate change is responsible for causing both the anticipation before the announcement and the surprise after the announcement. We estimate the magnitude of financial news using the relative difference between the U.S. Treasury Bill and the Federal Funds effective rate. Our results are consistent with the 'sign effect', in which 'bad news' has a larger impact than 'good news'. Furthermore, we observe significant volatility aftershocks, confirming a 'market under-reaction' that lasts at least one trading day.

  9. Quantitative law describing market dynamics before and after interest-rate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Alexander M.; Wang, Fengzhong; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2010-06-01

    We study the behavior of U.S. markets both before and after U.S. Federal Open Market Commission meetings and show that the announcement of a U.S. Federal Reserve rate change causes a financial shock, where the dynamics after the announcement is described by an analog of the Omori earthquake law. We quantify the rate n(t) of aftershocks following an interest-rate change at time T and find power-law decay which scales as n(t-T)˜(t-T)-Ω , with Ω positive. Surprisingly, we find that the same law describes the rate n'(|t-T|) of “preshocks” before the interest-rate change at time T . This study quantitatively relates the size of the market response to the news which caused the shock and uncovers the presence of quantifiable preshocks. We demonstrate that the news associated with interest-rate change is responsible for causing both the anticipation before the announcement and the surprise after the announcement. We estimate the magnitude of financial news using the relative difference between the U.S. Treasury Bill and the Federal Funds effective rate. Our results are consistent with the “sign effect,” in which “bad news” has a larger impact than “good news.” Furthermore, we observe significant volatility aftershocks, confirming a “market under-reaction” that lasts at least one trading day.

  10. Measurement of the B s0 lifetime and production rate with D s-ℓ + combinations in Z decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; Casper, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Ariztizabal, F.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Palla, F.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Bonvicini, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Engelhardt, A.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Markou, C.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Meinhard, H.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Oest, T.; Palazzi, P.; Pater, J. R.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Barres, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Saadi, F.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Passalacqua, L.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Delfino, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Ten Have, I.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; Morton, W. T.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Smith, M. G.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Konstantinidis, N.; Moneta, L.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; San Martin, G.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Dissertori, G.; Girler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Wanke, R.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Thulasidas, M.; Nicod, D.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Denis, R. St; Wolf, G.; Alemany, R.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Courault, F.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Musolino, G.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Johnson, D. L.; Medcalf, T.; Mir, Ll. M.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; Bertin, V.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Edwards, M.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marz, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Beddall, A.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Dawson, I.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Rankin, C.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Feigl, E.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Ragusa, F.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Bellantoni, L.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I. J.; Sharma, V.; Turk, J. D.; Walsh, A. M.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1995-02-01

    The lifetime of the B s0 meson is measured in approximately 3 million hadronic Z decays accumulated using the ALEPH detector at LEP from 1991 to 1994. Seven different D s- decay modes were reconstructed and combined with an opposite sign lepton as evidence of semileptonic B s0 decays. Two hundred and eight D s-ℓ + candidates satisfy selection criteria designed to ensure precise proper time reconstruction and yield a measured B s0 lifetime of τ(B s0) = 1.59 -0.15+0.17 (stat) ±0.03 (syst) ps. Using a larger, less constrained sample of events, the product branching ratio is measured to be Br( overlineb → B s0) · Br(B s0 → D s-ℓ +νX) = 0.82 ± 0.09 (stat) -0.14+0.13 (syst) %.

  11. Efficient computation of the spontaneous decay rate of arbitrarily shaped 3D nanosized resonators: a Krylov model-order reduction approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerling, Jörn; Wei, Lei; Urbach, Paul; Remis, Rob

    2016-03-01

    We present a Krylov model-order reduction approach to efficiently compute the spontaneous decay (SD) rate of arbitrarily shaped 3D nanosized resonators. We exploit the symmetry of Maxwell's equations to efficiently construct so-called reduced-order models that approximate the SD rate of a quantum emitter embedded in a resonating nanostructure. The models allow for frequency sweeps, meaning that a single model provides SD rate approximations over an entire spectral interval of interest. Field approximations and dominant quasinormal modes can be determined at low cost as well.

  12. Decay of metastable topological defects

    SciTech Connect

    Preskill, J. ); Vilenkin, A. Lyman Laboratory of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 )

    1993-03-15

    We systematically analyze the decay of metastable topological defects that arise from the spontaneous breakdown of gauge or global symmetries. Quantum-mechanical tunneling rates are estimated for a variety of decay processes. The decay rate for a global string, vortex, domain wall, or kink is typically suppressed compared to the decay rate for its gauged counterpart. We also discuss the decay of global texture, and of semilocal and electroweak strings.

  13. Analysis of D0 -> K+ pi- pi0 Decays: Search for D0-D0bar Mixing, and Measurements of the Doubly Cabibbo-Suppressed Decay Rate and Resonance Contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Michael Galante

    2005-12-13

    Analyzing D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decays, herein are presented the methods and results of a search for D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing, a measurement of the branching ratio R {equivalent_to} {Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0})/{Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}), and measurements of the contributions from D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{rho}{sup -}, K*{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, K*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}; 230.4 fb{sup -1} of data collected from the BABAR detector at the PEP-II collider during 2000-2004 (Runs 1-4) are analyzed. An event-level tagging technique is developed, which facilitates the accurate determination of doubly Cabibbo-suppressed resonance contributions by suppressing background from Cabibbo-favored decays. The branching ratio is measured as R = (0.214 {+-} 0.008 (stat) {+-} 0.008 (syst))%, with (46.1 {+-} 3.3 (stat) {+-} 2.9 (syst))% of D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decays proceeding through the channel D{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. The data are consistent with the null-D-mixing hypothesis at a confidence level of 10%, and the expected value of {+-} {radical}(x{sup 2} + y{sup 2}) is measured as -0.013 {+-} 0.010 (stat), indicating negative interference between mixing and doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay. The expected value of the integrated mixing rate is (x{sup 2} + y{sup 2})/2 = (0.013 {+-} 0.013 (stat))%.

  14. Estimation of decay rates for fecal indicator bacteria and bacterial pathogens in agricultural field-applied manure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field-applied manure is an important source of pathogenic exposure in surface water bodies for humans and ecological receptors. We analyzed the persistence and decay of fecal indicator bacteria and bacterial pathogens from three sources (cattle, poultry, swine) for agricultural f...

  15. Stress-based aftershock forecasts made within 24 h postmain shock: Expected north San Francisco Bay area seismicity changes after the 2014 M = 6.0 West Napa earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Tom; Segou, Margaret; Sevilgen, Volkan; Milner, Kevin; Field, Edward; Toda, Shinji; Stein, Ross S.

    2014-12-01

    We calculate stress changes resulting from the M = 6.0 West Napa earthquake on north San Francisco Bay area faults. The earthquake ruptured within a series of long faults that pose significant hazard to the Bay area, and we are thus concerned with potential increases in the probability of a large earthquake through stress transfer. We conduct this exercise as a prospective test because the skill of stress-based aftershock forecasting methodology is inconclusive. We apply three methods: (1) generalized mapping of regional Coulomb stress change, (2) stress changes resolved on Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast faults, and (3) a mapped rate/state aftershock forecast. All calculations were completed within 24 h after the main shock and were made without benefit of known aftershocks, which will be used to evaluative the prospective forecast. All methods suggest that we should expect heightened seismicity on parts of the southern Rodgers Creek, northern Hayward, and Green Valley faults.

  16. Stress-based aftershock forecasts made within 24h post mainshock: Expected north San Francisco Bay area seismicity changes after the 2014M=6.0 West Napa earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, Thomas E.; Segou, Margaret; Sevilgen, Volkan; Milner, Kevin; Field, Ned; Toda, Shinji; Stein, Ross S.

    2014-01-01

    We calculate stress changes resulting from the M= 6.0 West Napa earthquake on north San Francisco Bay area faults. The earthquake ruptured within a series of long faults that pose significant hazard to the Bay area, and we are thus concerned with potential increases in the probability of a large earthquake through stress transfer. We conduct this exercise as a prospective test because the skill of stress-based aftershock forecasting methodology is inconclusive. We apply three methods: (1) generalized mapping of regional Coulomb stress change, (2) stress changes resolved on Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast faults, and (3) a mapped rate/state aftershock forecast. All calculations were completed within 24 h after the main shock and were made without benefit of known aftershocks, which will be used to evaluative the prospective forecast. All methods suggest that we should expect heightened seismicity on parts of the southern Rodgers Creek, northern Hayward, and Green Valley faults.

  17. Aftershocks illuninate the 2011 Mineral, Virginia, earthquake causative fault zone and nearby active faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horton, Jr., J. Wright; Shah, Anjana K.; McNamara, Daniel E.; Snyder, Stephen L.; Carter, Aina M

    2015-01-01

    Deployment of temporary seismic stations after the 2011 Mineral, Virginia (USA), earthquake produced a well-recorded aftershock sequence. The majority of aftershocks are in a tabular cluster that delineates the previously unknown Quail fault zone. Quail fault zone aftershocks range from ~3 to 8 km in depth and are in a 1-km-thick zone striking ~036° and dipping ~50°SE, consistent with a 028°, 50°SE main-shock nodal plane having mostly reverse slip. This cluster extends ~10 km along strike. The Quail fault zone projects to the surface in gneiss of the Ordovician Chopawamsic Formation just southeast of the Ordovician–Silurian Ellisville Granodiorite pluton tail. The following three clusters of shallow (<3 km) aftershocks illuminate other faults. (1) An elongate cluster of early aftershocks, ~10 km east of the Quail fault zone, extends 8 km from Fredericks Hall, strikes ~035°–039°, and appears to be roughly vertical. The Fredericks Hall fault may be a strand or splay of the older Lakeside fault zone, which to the south spans a width of several kilometers. (2) A cluster of later aftershocks ~3 km northeast of Cuckoo delineates a fault near the eastern contact of the Ordovician Quantico Formation. (3) An elongate cluster of late aftershocks ~1 km northwest of the Quail fault zone aftershock cluster delineates the northwest fault (described herein), which is temporally distinct, dips more steeply, and has a more northeastward strike. Some aftershock-illuminated faults coincide with preexisting units or structures evident from radiometric anomalies, suggesting tectonic inheritance or reactivation.

  18. Maximal radius of the aftershock zone in earthquake networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezentsev, A. Yu.; Hayakawa, M.

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, several seismoactive regions were investigated (Japan, Southern California and two tectonically distinct Japanese subregions) and structural seismic constants were estimated for each region. Using the method for seismic clustering detection proposed by Baiesi and Paczuski [M. Baiesi, M. Paczuski, Phys. Rev. E 69 (2004) 066106; M. Baiesi, M. Paczuski, Nonlin. Proc. Geophys. (2005) 1607-7946], we obtained the equation of the aftershock zone (AZ). It was shown that the consideration of a finite velocity of seismic signal leads to the natural appearance of maximal possible radius of the AZ. We obtained the equation of maximal radius of the AZ as a function of the magnitude of the main event and estimated its values for each region.

  19. A random effects epidemic-type aftershock sequence model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Feng-Chang

    2011-04-01

    We consider an extension of the temporal epidemic-type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model with random effects as a special case of a well-known doubly stochastic self-exciting point process. The new model arises from a deterministic function that is randomly scaled by a nonnegative random variable, which is unobservable but assumed to follow either positive stable or one-parameter gamma distribution with unit mean. Both random effects models are of interest although the one-parameter gamma random effects model is more popular when modeling associated survival times. Our estimation is based on the maximum likelihood approach with marginalized intensity. The methods are shown to perform well in simulation experiments. When applied to an earthquake sequence on the east coast of Taiwan, the extended model with positive stable random effects provides a better model fit, compared to the original ETAS model and the extended model with one-parameter gamma random effects. PMID:24039322

  20. A Quantitative Test for the Spatial Relationship Between Aftershock Distributions and Mainshock Rupture Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woessner, J.; Ripperger, J.; Mai, M. P.; Wiemer, S.

    2004-12-01

    Correlating the properties of the mainshock rupture with the location of corresponding aftershocks may provide insight into the relationship between mainshock-induced static stress changes and aftershock occurrence. In this study, we develop a rigorous statistical test to quantify the spatial pattern of aftershock locations with the corresponding distributions of coseismic slip and stress-drop. Well-located aftershock hypocenters are projected onto the mainshock fault plane and coseismic slip and stress drop values are interpolated to their respective location. The null hypothesis H0 for the applied test statistic is: Aftershock hypocenters are randomly distributed on the mainshock fault plane and are not correlated with mainshock properties. Because we want to maintain spatial earthquake clustering as one of the important observed features of seismicity, we synthesize slip distributions using a random spatial field model from which we then compute the respective stress-drop distributions. For each simulation of earthquake slip, we compute the test statistic for the slip and stress-drop distribution, testing whether or not an apparent correlation between mainshock properties and aftershock locations exists. Uncertainties in the aftershock locations are accounted for by simulating a thousand catalogues for which we randomize the location of the aftershocks within their given location error bounds. We then determine the number of aftershocks in low-slip or negative stress-drop regions for simulated slip distributions, and compare those to the measurements obtained for finite-source slip inversions. We apply the test to crustal earthquakes in California and Japan. If possible, we use different source models and earthquake catalogues with varying accuracy to investigate the dependence of the test results on, for example, the location uncertainties of aftershocks. Contrary to the visual impression, we find that for some strike-slip earthquakes or segments of the

  1. Computing decay rates for new physics theories with FEYNRULES  and MADGRAPH 5_AMC@NLO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alwall, Johan; Duhr, Claude; Fuks, Benjamin; Mattelaer, Olivier; Öztürk, Deniz Gizem; Shen, Chia-Hsien

    2015-12-01

    We present new features of the FEYNRULES  and MADGRAPH 5_AMC@NLO  programs for the automatic computation of decay widths that consistently include channels of arbitrary final-state multiplicity. The implementations are generic enough so that they can be used in the framework of any quantum field theory, possibly including higher-dimensional operators. We extend at the same time the conventions of the Universal FEYNRULES  Output (or UFO) format to include decay tables and information on the total widths. We finally provide a set of representative examples of the usage of the new functions of the different codes in the framework of the Standard Model, the Higgs Effective Field Theory, the Strongly Interacting Light Higgs model and the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model and compare the results to available literature and programs for validation purposes.

  2. Transition in the decay rates of stationary distributions of Lévy motion in an energy landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaleta, Kamil; Lőrinczi, József

    2016-02-01

    The time evolution of random variables with Lévy statistics has the ability to develop jumps, displaying very different behaviors from continuously fluctuating cases. Such patterns appear in an ever broadening range of examples including random lasers, non-Gaussian kinetics, or foraging strategies. The penalizing or reinforcing effect of the environment, however, has been little explored so far. We report a new phenomenon which manifests as a qualitative transition in the spatial decay behavior of the stationary measure of a jump process under an external potential, occurring on a combined change in the characteristics of the process and the lowest eigenvalue resulting from the effect of the potential. This also provides insight into the fundamental question of what is the mechanism of the spatial decay of a ground state.

  3. Electron-capture and β-decay Rates for sd-Shell Nuclei in Stellar Environments Relevant to High-density O-Ne-Mg Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Toshio; Toki, Hiroshi; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2016-02-01

    Electron-capture and β-decay rates for nuclear pairs in the sd-shell are evaluated at high densities and high temperatures relevant to the final evolution of electron-degenerate O-Ne-Mg cores of stars with initial masses of 8-10 M⊙. Electron capture induces a rapid contraction of the electron-degenerate O-Ne-Mg core. The outcome of rapid contraction depends on the evolutionary changes in the central density and temperature, which are determined by the competing processes of contraction, cooling, and heating. The fate of the stars is determined by these competitions, whether they end up with electron-capture supernovae or Fe core-collapse supernovae. Since the competing processes are induced by electron capture and β-decay, the accurate weak rates are crucially important. The rates are obtained for pairs with A = 20, 23, 24, 25, and 27 by shell-model calculations in the sd-shell with the USDB Hamiltonian. Effects of Coulomb corrections on the rates are evaluated. The rates for pairs with A = 23 and 25 are important for nuclear Urca processes that determine the cooling rate of the O-Ne-Mg core, while those for pairs with A = 20 and 24 are important for the core contraction and heat generation rates in the core. We provide these nuclear rates at stellar environments in tables with fine enough meshes at various densities and temperatures for studies of astrophysical processes sensitive to the rates. In particular, the accurate rate tables are crucially important for the final fates of not only O-Ne-Mg cores but also a wider range of stars, such as C-O cores of lower-mass stars.

  4. Study of η - η' mixing from measurement of B{(s)/0} → J/ψη(') decay rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, AB; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casanova Mohr, R. C. M.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H.-M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gastaldi, U.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianí, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lowdon, P.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Polikarpov, S.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilschut, H. W.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.

    2015-01-01

    A study of B and Bs meson decays into J/ψ η and J/ψ η' final states is performed using a data set of proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, collected by the LCHb experiment and corresponding to 3.0 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. The decay B0 → J/ψ η' is observed for the first time. The following ratios of branching fractions are measured: where the third uncertainty is related to the present knowledge of fs/fd, the ratio between the probabilities for a b quark to form a Bs or a B0 meson. The branching fraction ratios are used to determine the parameters of η - η' meson mixing. In addition, the first evidence for the decay Bs → ψ(2S)η' is reported, and the relative branching fraction is measured, where the third uncertainty is due to the limited knowledge of the branching fractions of J/ψ and ψ(2S) mesons. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Measurements of Rates, Asymmetries, and Angular Distributions in B -> K l+ l- and B -> K* l+ l- Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Hollar, Jonathan; /SLAC /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-09-21

    This dissertation describes studies of the rare decays B{sub d} {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} and B{sub d} {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}, where {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} is either an e{sup +}e{sup -} or a {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} pair. These decays are highly suppressed in the Standard Model, and could be strongly affected by physics beyond the Standard Model. The authors measure the total branching fractions {Beta}(B{sub d} {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}) = (0.34 {+-} 0.07 {+-} 0.03) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sub d} {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}) = (0.78{sub -0.17}{sup +0.19} {+-} 0.12) x 10{sup -6}. In addition, they measure the partial branching fractions, relative abundance of muons to electrons, direct CP asymmetry, dilepton forward-backward asymmetry, and longitudinal polarization of the K* in these modes. They also search for the lepton flavor-violating decays B{sub d} {yields} Ke{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {-+}} and B{sub d} {yields} K*e{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {-+}}. The measurements were performed at the SLAC PEP II storage ring running at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance.

  6. Aftershock seismicity of the 2010 Maule Mw=8.8 Chile, earthquake: Correlation between co-seismic slip models and aftershock distribution?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rietbrock, A.; Ryder, I.; Hayes, G.; Haberland, C.; Comte, D.; Roecker, S.

    2012-01-01

    The 27 February 2010 Maule, Chile (Mw=8.8) earthquake is one of the best instrumentally observed subduction zone megathrust events. Here we present locations, magnitudes and cumulative equivalent moment of the first -2 months of aftershocks, recorded on a temporary network deployed within 2 weeks of the occurrence of the mainshock. Using automatically-determined onset times and a back projection approach for event association, we are able to detect over 30,000 events in the time period analyzed. To further increase the location accuracy, we systematically searched for potential S-wave arrivals and events were located in a regional 2D velocity model. Additionally, we calculated regional moment tensors to gain insight into the deformation history of the aftershock sequence. We find that the aftershock seismicity is concentrated between 40 and 140 km distance from the trench over a depth range of 10 to 35 km. Focal mechanisms indicate a predominance of thrust faulting, with occasional normal faulting events. Increased activity is seen in the outer-rise region of the Nazca plate, predominantly in the northern part of the rupture area. Further down-dip, a second band of clustered seismicity, showing mainly thrust motion, is located at depths of 40–45 km. By comparing recent published mainshock source inversions with our aftershock distribution, we discriminate slip models based on the assumption that aftershocks occur in areas of rapid transition between high and low slip, surrounding high-slip regions of the mainshock.

  7. On rate-state and Coulomb failure models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, J.; Beeler, N.; Blanpied, M.

    2000-01-01

    We examine the predictions of Coulomb failure stress and rate-state frictional models. We study the change in failure time (clock advance) Δt due to stress step perturbations (i.e., coseismic static stress increases) added to "background" stressing at a constant rate (i.e., tectonic loading) at time t0. The predictability of Δt implies a predictable change in seismicity rate r(t)/r0, testable using earthquake catalogs, where r0 is the constant rate resulting from tectonic stressing. Models of r(t)/r0, consistent with general properties of aftershock sequences, must predict an Omori law seismicity decay rate, a sequence duration that is less than a few percent of the mainshock cycle time and a return directly to the background rate. A Coulomb model requires that a fault remains locked during loading, that failure occur instantaneously, and that Δt is independent of t0. These characteristics imply an instantaneous infinite seismicity rate increase of zero duration. Numerical calculations of r(t)/r0 for different state evolution laws show that aftershocks occur on faults extremely close to failure at the mainshock origin time, that these faults must be "Coulomb-like," and that the slip evolution law can be precluded. Real aftershock population characteristics also may constrain rate-state constitutive parameters; a may be lower than laboratory values, the stiffness may be high, and/or normal stress may be lower than lithostatic. We also compare Coulomb and rate-state models theoretically. Rate-state model fault behavior becomes more Coulomb-like as constitutive parameter a decreases relative to parameter b. This is because the slip initially decelerates, representing an initial healing of fault contacts. The deceleration is more pronounced for smaller a, more closely simulating a locked fault. Even when the rate-state Δt has Coulomb characteristics, its magnitude may differ by some constant dependent on b. In this case, a rate-state model behaves like a modified

  8. Investigation of the high-frequency attenuation parameter, κ (kappa), from aftershocks of the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neighbors, Corrie; Liao, E. J.; Cochran, Elizabeth S.; Funning, G. J.; Chung, A. I.; Lawrence, J. F.; Christensen, C. M.; Miller, M.; Belmonte, A.; Sepulveda, H. H. Andrés

    2014-01-01

    The Bío Bío region of Chile experienced a vigorous aftershock sequence following the 2010 February 27 Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake. The immediate aftershock sequence was captured by two temporary seismic deployments: the Quake Catcher Network Rapid Aftershock Mobilization Program (QCN RAMP) and the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology CHile Aftershock Mobilization Program (IRIS CHAMP). Here, we use moderate to large aftershocks (ML ≥ 4.0) occurring between 2010 March 1 and June 30 recorded by QCN RAMP and IRIS CHAMP stations to determine the spectral decay parameter, kappa (κ). First, we compare waveforms and κ estimates from the lower-resolution QCN stations to the IRIS CHAMP stations to ensure the QCN data are of sufficient quality. We find that QCN stations provide reasonable estimates of κ in comparison to traditional seismic sensors and provide valuable additional observations of local ground motion variation. Using data from both deployments, we investigate the variation in κ for the region to determine if κ is influenced primarily by local geological structure, path attenuation, or source properties (e.g. magnitude, mechanism and depth). Estimates of κ for the Bío Bío region range from 0.0022 to 0.0704 s with a mean of 0.0295 s and are in good agreement with κ values previously reported for similar tectonic environments. κ correlates with epicentral distance and, to a lesser degree, with source magnitude. We find little to no correlation between the site kappa, κ0, and mapped geology, although we were only able to compare the data to a low-resolution map of surficial geology. These results support an increasing number of studies that suggest κobservations can be attributed to a combination of source, path and site properties; additionally, measured κ are often highly scattered making it difficult to separate the contribution from each of these factors. Thus, our results suggest that contributions from the site

  9. Investigation of the high-frequency attenuation parameter, κ (kappa), from aftershocks of the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neighbors, C.; Liao, E. J.; Cochran, E. S.; Funning, G. J.; Chung, A. I.; Lawrence, J. F.; Christensen, C.; Miller, M.; Belmonte, A.; Andrés Sepulveda, H. H.

    2015-01-01

    The Bío Bío region of Chile experienced a vigorous aftershock sequence following the 2010 February 27 Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake. The immediate aftershock sequence was captured by two temporary seismic deployments: the Quake Catcher Network Rapid Aftershock Mobilization Program (QCN RAMP) and the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology CHile Aftershock Mobilization Program (IRIS CHAMP). Here, we use moderate to large aftershocks (ML ≥ 4.0) occurring between 2010 March 1 and June 30 recorded by QCN RAMP and IRIS CHAMP stations to determine the spectral decay parameter, kappa (κ). First, we compare waveforms and κ estimates from the lower-resolution QCN stations to the IRIS CHAMP stations to ensure the QCN data are of sufficient quality. We find that QCN stations provide reasonable estimates of κ in comparison to traditional seismic sensors and provide valuable additional observations of local ground motion variation. Using data from both deployments, we investigate the variation in κ for the region to determine if κ is influenced primarily by local geological structure, path attenuation, or source properties (e.g. magnitude, mechanism and depth). Estimates of κ for the Bío Bío region range from 0.0022 to 0.0704 s with a mean of 0.0295 s and are in good agreement with κ values previously reported for similar tectonic environments. κ correlates with epicentral distance and, to a lesser degree, with source magnitude. We find little to no correlation between the site kappa, κ0, and mapped geology, although we were only able to compare the data to a low-resolution map of surficial geology. These results support an increasing number of studies that suggest κ observations can be attributed to a combination of source, path and site properties; additionally, measured κ are often highly scattered making it difficult to separate the contribution from each of these factors. Thus, our results suggest that contributions from the site, path and source

  10. The May 29 2008 earthquake aftershock sequence within the South Iceland Seismic Zone: Fault locations and source parameters of aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandsdottir, B.; Parsons, M.; White, R. S.; Gudmundsson, O.; Drew, J.

    2010-12-01

    The mid-Atlantic plate boundary breaks up into a series of segments across Iceland. The South Iceland Seismic Zone (SISZ) is a complex transform zone where left-lateral E-W shear between the Reykjanes Peninsula Rift Zone and the Eastern Volcanic Zone is accommodated by bookshelf faulting along N-S lateral strike-slip faults. The SISZ is also a transient feature, migrating sideways in response to the southward propagation of the Eastern Volcanic Zone. Sequences of large earthquakes (M > 6) lasting from days to years and affecting most of the seismic zone have occurred repeatedly in historical time (last 1100 years), separated by intervals of relative quiescence lasting decades to more than a century. On May 29 2008, a Mw 6.1 earthquake struck the western part of the South Iceland Seismic Zone, followed within seconds by a slightly smaller event on a second fault ~5 km further west. Aftershocks, detected by a temporal array of 11 seismometers and three permanent Icelandic Meteorological Office stations were located using an automated Coalescence Microseismic Mapping technique. The epicenters delineate two major and several smaller N-S faults as well as an E-W zone of activity stretching further west into the Reykjanes Peninsula Rift Zone. Fault plane solutions show both right lateral and oblique strike slip mechanisms along the two major N-S faults. The aftershocks deepen from 3-5 km in the north to 8-9 km in the south, suggesting that the main faults dip southwards. The faulting is interpreted to be driven by the local stress due to transform motion between two parallel segments of the divergent plate boundary crossing Iceland.

  11. Aftershocks of the 2014 M6 South Napa Earthquake: Detection, Location, and Focal Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardebeck, J.; Shelly, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    The aftershock sequence of the South Napa earthquake is notable both for its low productivity and for its geometric complexity. The aftershocks do not clearly define a fault plane consistent with the NNW-striking vertical plane implied by the mainshock moment tensor and the mapped surface rupture, but instead seem to delineate multiple secondary structures at depth. We investigate this unusual sequence by identifying additional aftershocks that do not appear in the network catalog, relocating the combined aftershock catalog using waveform cross-correlation arrival times and double-difference techniques, and determining focal mechanisms for individual events and event clusters. Additional aftershocks are detected by applying a matched filter approach to the continuous seismic data at nearby stations, with the catalog earthquakes serving as the waveform templates. In tandem with new event detections, we measure precise differential arrival times between events, which we then use in double-difference event location. We detect about 4 times as many well-located aftershocks as in the network catalog. We relocate the events using double-difference in both a 1D and a 3D velocity model. Most of the aftershocks occur between 8 and 11 km depth, similar depth to the mainshock hypocenter and deeper than most of the slip imaged seismically and geodetically. The aftershocks form a diffuse NNW-trending structure, primarily to the north of the mainshock hypocenter and on the west side of the main surface rupture. Within this diffuse trend there are clusters of aftershocks, some suggesting a N-S strike, and some that appear to dip to the east or west. Preliminary single-event and composite focal mechanisms also imply N-S striking strike-slip structures. The mainshock hypocenter and many of the aftershocks occur near the intersection of a sharply defined NE-dipping seismicity structure and the probable location of the West Napa fault, suggesting that stress is concentrated at a

  12. Strain rates, stress markers and earthquake clustering (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, B.; Gerstenberger, M.; Abercrombie, R. E.; Reyners, M.; Eberhart-Phillips, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    The 2010-present Canterbury earthquakes comprise a well-recorded sequence in a relatively low strain-rate shallow crustal region. We present new scientific results to test the hypothesis that: Earthquake sequences in low-strain rate areas experience high stress drop events, low-post seismic relaxation, and accentuated seismic clustering. This hypothesis is based on a physical description of the aftershock process in which the spatial distribution of stress accumulation and stress transfer are controlled by fault strength and orientation. Following large crustal earthquakes, time dependent forecasts are often developed by fitting parameters defined by Omori's aftershock decay law. In high-strain rate areas, simple forecast models utilizing a single p-value fit observed aftershock sequences well. In low-strain rate areas such as Canterbury, assumptions of simple Omori decay may not be sufficient to capture the clustering (sub-sequence) nature exhibited by the punctuated rise in activity following significant child events. In Canterbury, the moment release is more clustered than in more typical Omori sequences. The individual earthquakes in these clusters also exhibit somewhat higher stress drops than in the average crustal sequence in high-strain rate regions, suggesting the earthquakes occur on strong Andersonian-oriented faults, possibly juvenile or well-healed . We use the spectral ratio procedure outlined in (Viegas et al., 2010) to determine corner frequencies and Madariaga stress-drop values for over 800 events in the sequence. Furthermore, we will discuss the relevance of tomographic results of Reyners and Eberhart-Phillips (2013) documenting post-seismic stress-driven fluid processes following the three largest events in the sequence as well as anisotropic patterns in surface wave tomography (Fry et al., 2013). These tomographic studies are both compatible with the hypothesis, providing strong evidence for the presence of widespread and hydrated regional

  13. Correlating Aftershock Hypocenters With On-fault Main Shock Properties: Introducing Non-standard Statistical Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woessner, J.; Schorlemmer, D.; Wiemer, S.; Mai, P. M.

    2005-12-01

    Quantitatively correlating properties of finite-fault source models with hypocenters of aftershocks may provide new insight in the relationship between either slip or static stress change distributions and aftershock occurrence. We present advanced non-standard statistical test approaches to evaluate the test hypotheses (1) if aftershocks are preferentially located in areas of low slip and (2) if aftershocks are located in increased shear stress against the null hypothesis: aftershocks are located randomly on the fault plane. By using multiple test approaches, we investigate possible pitfalls and the information content of statistical testing. To perform the tests, we use earthquakes for which multiple finite-fault source models and earthquake catalogs of varying accuracy exist. The aftershock hypocenters are projected onto the main-shock rupture plane and uncertainties are accounted for by simulating hypocenter locations in the given error bounds. For the statistical tests, we retain the spatial clustering of earthquakes as the most important observed features of seismicity and synthesize random slip distributions with different approaches: first, using standard statistical methods that randomize the obtained finite-fault source model values and second, using a random spatial field model. We then determine the number of aftershocks in low-slip or increased shear-stress regions for simulated slip distributions, and compare those to the measurements obtained for finite-source slip inversions. We apply the tests to prominent earthquakes in California and Japan and find statistical significant evidence that aftershocks are preferentially located in low-slip regions. The tests, however, show a lower significance for the correlation with the shear-stress distribution, but are in general agreement with the expectations of the asperity model. Tests using the hypocenters of relocated catalogs show higher significances.

  14. Rate-State Modeling of Stress Relaxation in Geometrically Complex Fault Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieterich, J.; Smith, D. E.

    2007-12-01

    Slip of geometrically complex faults involves interactions and processes that do not occur in standard planar fault models. These include off-fault yielding and stress relaxation, which are required to prevent the development of pathological stress conditions on the fault (or in extreme cases fault lock-up). Nielsen and Knopoff [1988] introduced yielding through a simplified form of viscoelastic stress relaxation. However, the mechanical characteristics of the brittle seismogenic crust indicate that faulting processes will dominate the stress relaxation processes. The fractal-like character of fault systems and fault roughness, together with the finite strength of rocks, insures that slight movements of secondary faults, at all scales, will be necessary to accommodate slip of major through-going faults. To model the integrated effect of these processes, we employ an earthquake rate formulation [Dieterich, 1994], which incorporates laboratory-derived rate- and state-dependent frictional properties, on geometrically complex faults. With the rate-state formulation we find that stress relaxation occurs co-seismically during large earthquakes, as delayed stress relaxation in the form of aftershocks, and as spatially distributed background seismicity. During aftershocks the spatial mean of stresses decay at a rate proportional to 1/t. We find large spatial and temporal differences in models of slip of faults with relaxation compared to faults in purely elastic media. We conclude that that yielding and relaxation are important controlling processes that are the mechanics of slip on geometically complex faults

  15. Determination of the production rate of D*0 mesons and of the ratio V/( V+P) in Z^0 to cbar c decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerstaff, K.; Alexander, G.; Allison, J.; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K. J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S. F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A. H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J. R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, K. W.; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S. D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I. J.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, R. M.; Burckhart, H. J.; Burgard, C.; Bürgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R. K.; Carter, A. A.; R. Carter, J.; Chang, C. Y.; Charlton, D. G.; Chrisman, D.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J. E.; Cooke, O. C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R. L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Davis, R.; Jong, S. De; Del Pozo, L. A.; de Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M. S.; Doucet, M.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P. G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H. G.; Evans, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A. A.; Feld, L.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fischer, H. M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Fong, D. G.; Foucher, M.; Fürtjes, A.; Futyan, D. I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J. W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S. M.; Geddes, N. I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W. R.; Gingrich, D. M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M. J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwé, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G. G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C. K.; Hart, P. A.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R. J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R. D.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hill, J. C.; Hillier, S. J.; Hobson, P. R.; Hocker, A.; Homer, R. J.; Honma, A. K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K. R.; Howard, R.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D. C.; Ishii, K.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P. W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, C. R.; Jones, M.; Jost, U.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T. R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P. I.; Keeler, R. K.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kennedy, B. W.; Kirk, J.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D. S.; Kokott, T. P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, R. V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W. P.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S. R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J. G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A. M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; List, B.; Lloyd, S. L.; Loebinger, F. K.; Long, G. D.; Losty, M. J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; MacPherson, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Markus, C.; Martin, A. J.; Martin, J. P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mättig, P.; McDonald, W. J.; McKenna, J.; McKigney, E. A.; McMahon, T. J.; McPherson, R. A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F. S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D. J.; Mincer, A.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Mihara, S.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H. A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S. W.; Oakham, F. G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H. O.; Oh, A.; Oldershaw, N. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Orito, S.; Pálinkás, J.; Pásztor, G.; Pater, J. R.; Patrick, G. N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, D. E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Rembser, C.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S. A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J. M.; Rooke, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Ruppel, U.; Rust, D. R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W. M.; Sarkisyan, E. K. G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A. D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schleper, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schöming, A.; Schröder, M.; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W. G.; Shears, T. G.; Shen, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G. P.; Sittler, A.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A. M.; Snow, G. A.; Sobie, R.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, R. W.; Sproston, M.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Stoll, K.; Strom, D.; Ströhmer, R.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Talbot, S. D.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M. A.; von Törne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trócsányi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A. S.; Turner-Watson, M. F.; Ueda, I.; Utzat, P.; van Kooten, R.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Vikas, P.; Vokurka, E. H.; Voss, H.; Wäckerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C. P.; Ward, D. R.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Wells, P. S.; Wermes, N.; White, J. S.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, J. A.; Wyatt, T. R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1998-08-01

    In e+e2212 collisions at centre-of-mass energies around 91 GeV, D*0 mesons have been reconstructed using data collected with the OPAL detector at LEP. The hadronisation fraction has been measured to be f(c→D*0)=0.218±0.054±0.045±0.007, where the errors correspond to the statistical and systematic errors specific to this analysis, and to systematic uncertainties from externally measured branching fractions, respectively. Together with previous OPAL measurements of the hadronisation fractions of other charmed mesons, this value is used to investigate the relative production of observed vector and pseudoscalar charmed mesons in Z^0 to cbar c decays. The production ratio is determined to be P {eff/V} = V/( V+ P)=0.57±0.05. The relative primary production of vector and pseudoscalar mesons, P {v/rim}, is studied in the context of the production and decay of orbitally excited charmed resonances. The first measurement of the inclusive Ds*+ production rate in hadronic Z0 decays is presented.

  16. Investigations of Periodic Disturbances on Seismic Aftershock Recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebsch, Mattes; Gorschlüter, Felix; Knoop, Jan-Frederik; Altmann, Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    The Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Organisation (CTBTO) runs the International Monitoring System (IMS) to detect possible violations of the treaty. The seismic sensors of the IMS are set up to detect every underground explosion with a yield of 1 kT TNT equivalent or even better everywhere on the world. Under consideration of all IMS data the hypocentre of a large underground explosion is located within an area of about 1000 sq km. To verify if it was a violation of the Test-Ban Treaty the CTBTO (after CTBT entry into force) is allowed to carry out an on-site inspection (OSI) in the area of suspicion. During an OSI the hypocentre is to be located much more precisely; for this a local seismic aftershock monitoring system (SAMS) can be installed to detect small seismic events caused as a consequence of the explosion, such as relaxation of the rock around the cavity. However the magnitude of these aftershock signals is extremely weak. Other difficulties arise from other seismic signals in the inspection area, for example caused by vehicles of the inspectors, from coupling of airborne signals to the ground, or even by intended attempts to disturb the OSI. While the aftershock signals have a pulsed shape, man-made seismic signals (primarily created by engines) usually show periodic characteristics and thus are representable as a sum of sine functions and their harmonics. A mathematical expression for the Hann-windowed discrete Fourier transform of the underlying sine is used to characterise every such disturbance by the amplitude, frequency and phase. The contributions of these sines are computed and subtracted from the complex spectrum sequentially. Synthetic sines superposed to real signals, orders of magnitude stronger than the latter, can be removed successfully. Removal of periodic content from the signals of a helicopter overflight reduces the amplitude by a factor 3.3 when the frequencies are approximately constant. To reduce or prevent disturbing seismic

  17. Forecasting aftershock activity: 1. Adaptive estimates based on the Omori and Gutenberg-Richter laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, S. V.; Shebalin, P. N.

    2016-05-01

    The method for forecasting the intensity of the aftershock processes after strong earthquakes in different magnitude intervals is considered. The method is based on the joint use of the time model of the aftershock process and the Gutenberg-Richter law. The time model serves for estimating the intensity of the aftershock flow with a magnitude larger than or equal to the magnitude of completeness. The Gutenberg-Richter law is used for magnitude scaling. The suggested approach implements successive refinement of the parameters of both components of the method, which is the main novelty distinguishing it from the previous ones. This approach, to a significant extent, takes into account the variations in the parameters of the frequency-magnitude distribution, which often show themselves by the decreasing fraction of stronger aftershocks with time. Testing the method on eight aftershock sequences in the regions with different patterns of seismicity demonstrates the high probability of successful forecasts. The suggested technique can be employed in seismological monitoring centers for forecasting the aftershock activity of a strong earthquake based on the results of operational processing.

  18. A preliminary study of the Santa Barbara, California, earthquake of August 13, 1978, and its major aftershocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, William Hung Kan; Johnson, C.E.; Henyey, T.L.; Yerkes, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    The ML5.1 Santa Barbara earthquake of August 13, 1978 occurred at lat 34 ? 22.2'N., long 119 ? 43.0' 4 km south of Santa Barbara, Calif. at a depth of 12.5 km in the northeast Santa Barbara Channel, part of the western Transverse Ranges geomorphic-structural province. This part of the province is characterized by seismically active, east-trending reverse faults and rates of coastal uplift that have averaged up to about 10 m/1000 years over the last 45,000 years. No surface rupture was detected onshore. Subsurface rupture propagated northwest from the main shock toward Goleta, 15 km west of Santa Barbara, where a maximum acceleration of 0.44 g was measured at ground level and extensive minor damage occurred; only minor injuries were reported. A fairly well-constrained fault-plane solution of the main shock and distribution of the aftershocks indicate that left-reverse-oblique slip occurred on west-northwest-trending, north-dipping reverse faults; inadequate dip control precludes good correlation with any one of several mapped faults. Had the earthquake been larger and rupture propagated to the southeast or a greater distance to the northwest, it could have posed a hazard to oilfield operations. The fault-plane solution and aftershock pattern closely fit the model of regional deformation and the solution closely resembles those of five previously mapped events located within a 15-km radius.

  19. Short-term forecasting of aftershock sequences, microseismicity and swarms inside the Corinth Gulf continental rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segou, Margarita

    2014-05-01

    Corinth Gulf (Central Greece) is the fastest continental rift in the world with extension rates 11-15 mm/yr with diverse seismic deformation including earthquakes with M greater than 6.0, several periods of increased microseismic activity, usually lasting few months and possibly related with fluid diffusion, and swarm episodes lasting few days. In this study I perform a retrospective forecast experiment between 1995-2012, focusing on the comparison between physics-based and statistical models for short term time classes. Even though Corinth gulf has been studied extensively in the past there is still today a debate whether earthquake activity is related with the existence of either a shallow dipping structure or steeply dipping normal faults. In the light of the above statement, two CRS realization are based on resolving Coulomb stress changes on specified receiver faults, expressing the aforementioned structural models, whereas the third CRS model uses optimally-oriented for failure planes. The CRS implementation accounts for stress changes following all major ruptures with M greater than 4.5 within the testing phase. I also estimate fault constitutive parameters from modeling the response to major earthquakes at the vicinity of the gulf (Aσ=0.2, stressing rate app. 0.02 bar/yr). The generic ETAS parameters are taken as the maximum likelihood estimates derived from the stochastic declustering of the modern seismicity catalog (1995-2012) with minimum triggering magnitude M2.5. I test whether the generic ETAS can efficiently describe the aftershock spatio-temporal clustering but also the evolution of swarm episodes and microseismicity. For the reason above, I implement likelihood tests to evaluate the forecasts for their spatial consistency and for the total amount of predicted versus observed events with M greater than 3.0 in 10-day time windows during three distinct evaluation phases; the first evaluation phase focuses on the Aigio 1995 aftershock sequence (15

  20. Enhancement of the lepton flavor violating Higgs boson decay rates from SUSY loops in the inverse seesaw model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arganda, E.; Herrero, M. J.; Marcano, X.; Weiland, C.

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we study the full one-loop SUSY contributions to the lepton flavor violating Higgs decay h →τ μ ¯, within the context of the supersymmetric inverse seesaw model. We assume that both the right-handed neutrino masses, MR, and their supersymmetric partner masses, mν˜R , are not far from the interesting O (TeV ) energy scale, and we work with scenarios with large neutrino Yukawa couplings that transmit large lepton flavor violating effects. By exploring the behavior with the most relevant parameters, mainly MR, mν ˜R and the trilinear sneutrino coupling Aν, we will look for regions of the parameter space where the enhancement of BR (h →τ μ ¯ ) is large enough to reach values at the percent level, which could explain the excess recently reported by CMS and ATLAS at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  1. Gamow-Teller strength and beta-decay rate within the self-consistent deformed pnQRPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, M.; Goriely, S.; Péru, S.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years fully consistent quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) calculations using finite range Gogny force have been performed to study electromagnetic excitations of several axially-symmetric deformed nuclei up to the 238U. Here we present the extension of this approach to the charge-exchange nuclear excitations (pnQRPA). In particular we focus on the Gamow-Teller (GT) excitations which are known to play a crucial role in several fields of physics, in particular in nuclear astrophysics (stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis). A comparison of the predicted GT strength distribution with existing experimental data is presented. The role of nuclear deformation is shown. Special attention is paid to β-decay halflives calculations for which experimental data exist and for specific isotonic chains of relevance for the r-process nucleosynthesis.

  2. Measurement of branching fractions and rate asymmetries in the rare decays B→K(*)l⁺l⁻

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2012-08-24

    In a sample of 471×10⁶ BB¯¯¯ events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e⁺e⁻ collider we study the rare decays B→K(*)l⁺l⁻, where l⁺l⁻ is either e⁺e⁻ or μ⁺μ⁻. We report results on partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries in seven bins of dilepton mass-squared. We further present CP and lepton-flavor asymmetries for dilepton masses below and above the J/ψ resonance. We find no evidence for CP or lepton-flavor violation. The partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries are consistent with the Standard Model predictions and with results from other experiments.

  3. High-resolution relocation and mechanism of aftershocks of the 2007 Tocopilla (Chile) earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuenzalida, A.; Schurr, B.; Lancieri, M.; Sobiesiak, M.; Madariaga, R.

    2013-08-01

    We study the distribution of the aftershocks of Tocopilla Mw 7.7 earthquake of 2007 November 14 in northern Chile in detail. This earthquake broke the lower part of the seismogenic zone at the southern end of the Northern Chile gap, a region that had its last megathrust earthquake in 1877. The aftershocks of Tocopilla occurred in several steps: the first day they were located along the coast inside the co-seismic rupture zone. After the second day they extended ocean-wards near the Mejillones peninsula. Finally in December they concentrated in the South near the future rupture zone of the Michilla intermediate depth earthquake of 2007 December 16. The aftershock sequence was recorded by the permanent IPOC (Integrated Plate Boundary Observatory in Chile) network and the temporary task force network installed 2 weeks after the main event. A total of 1238 events were identified and the seismic arrival times were directly read from seismograms. Initially we located these events using a single event procedure and then we relocated them using the double-difference method and a cross-correlation technique to measure time differences for clusters of aftershocks. We tested a 1-D velocity model and a 2-D one that takes into account the presence of the subducted Nazca Plate. Relocation significantly reduced the width of the aftershock distribution: in the inland area, the plate interface imaged by the aftershocks is thinner than 2 km. The two velocity models give similar results for earthquakes under the coast and a larger difference for events closer to the trench. The surface imaged by the aftershocks had a length of 160 km. It extends from 30 to 50 km depth in the northern part of the rupture zone; and between 5 and 55 km depth near the Mejillones peninsula. We observed a change in the dip angle of the subduction interface from 18° to 24° at a depth of 30 km. We propose that this change in dip is closely associated with the upper limit of the rupture zone of the main

  4. Aftershock Records in the Kathmandu Valley of the 2015 Gorkha, Nepal, Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigefuji, M.; Takai, N.; Sasatani, T.; Bijukchhen, S.; Ichiyanagi, M.; Rajaure, S.; Dhital, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    The devastating earthquake, named the Gorkha Earthquake, was followed by a series of aftershocks: more than 350 of them greater than M 4 and four aftershock greater than M 6. The rupture of main shock originating 80 km NW of capital Kathmandu propagated towards east. The ensuing aftershock activities are concentrated in the eastern part of the rupture area. The aftershock of Mw 6.6 occurred about half an hour later at epicentre near to that of the main shock. The other three large aftershocks however, were originated in the eastern extreme of the rupture zone. The aftershock of Mw 7.3 that occurred on 12th May 2015 brought about more damages to infrastructures already vulnerable due to the main shock. To understand the site effect of the Kathmandu valley structure, we installed continuous recording accelerometers in four different parts of the valley. Four stations were installed along a west-to-east profile of the valley at KTP (Kirtipur; hill top), TVU (Kirtipur; hill side), PTN (Patan) and THM (Thimi). The surface S-wave velocity of the KTP site was over 700 cm s-1, but for each of the other three sites it was less than 200 cm s-1. These velocities are consistent with the geological formations; KTP is above hard rock, and TVU, PTN and THM are over the lake sediment of the valley. It is normal for the amplitude of earthquake motion to be larger in areas lying above sedimentary soil than in areas above hard rock, and these motions can be amplified further by certain deep underground structures. To know deep underground structure using with aftershock records, we installed more four instruments in the Kathmandu basin after main shock. We analysed the strong-motion data of these five aftershocks recorded in the eight strong-motion accelerometers. The station of KTP is considered as reference site to compare the effect of sediments on the earthquake waves. The large aftershocks all have highest Peak Ground Velocity (PGV) at TVU and the station of KTP showed the least

  5. Aftershock communication during the Canterbury Earthquakes, New Zealand: implications for response and recovery in the built environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Julia Becker; Wein, Anne; Sally Potter; Emma Doyle; Ratliff, Jamie L.

    2015-01-01

    On 4 September 2010, a Mw7.1 earthquake occurred in Canterbury, New Zealand. Following the initial earthquake, an aftershock sequence was initiated, with the most significant aftershock being a Mw6.3 earthquake occurring on 22 February 2011. This aftershock caused severe damage to the city of Christchurch and building failures that killed 185 people. During the aftershock sequence it became evident that effective communication of aftershock information (e.g., history and forecasts) was imperative to assist with decision making during the response and recovery phases of the disaster, as well as preparedness for future aftershock events. As a consequence, a joint JCDR-USGS research project was initiated to investigate: • How aftershock information was communicated to organisations and to the public; • How people interpreted that information; • What people did in response to receiving that information; • What information people did and did not need; and • What decision-making challenges were encountered relating to aftershocks. Research was conducted by undertaking focus group meetings and interviews with a range of information providers and users, including scientists and science advisors, emergency managers and responders, engineers, communication officers, businesses, critical infrastructure operators, elected officials, and the public. The interviews and focus group meetings were recorded and transcribed, and key themes were identified. This paper focuses on the aftershock information needs for decision-making about the built environment post-earthquake, including those involved in response (e.g., for building assessment and management), recovery/reduction (e.g., the development of new building standards), and readiness (e.g. between aftershocks). The research has found that the communication of aftershock information varies with time, is contextual, and is affected by interactions among roles, by other information, and by decision objectives. A number

  6. On the c-values of the off-fault aftershocks triggered by the 1995 Kobe earthquake, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugaya, K.; Hiramatsu, Y.; Furumoto, M.; Katao, H.; Ogata, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The Omori-Utsu law is applicable not only to aftershocks in a source region but also to off-fault aftershocks triggered by the mainshock.In this study, we estimate the c-values using the maximum-likelihood method (Ogata, 1983) from the seismicity activation in the Tamba region induced by the coseismic static stress change due to the 1995 Kobe earthquake of M7.3, Japan. We use earthquakes (M≥1.8) shallower than 20 km from the JMA catalog and remove remarked clusters of the aftershock due to moderate earthquakes with the method of Reasenberg (1985). Our analyzed period is from the occurrence of the earthquake (17 January 1995) to December 1995. The obtained c-values in the divided subregions, near and far to the rupture zone, are 58.1 ± 26.1 days and 164.7 ± 98.0 days, respectively. This is consistent with the rate- and state-dependent friction law of Dieterich (1994) in that the c-values of induced off-fault seismicity are larger than those of the source region depending on the static stress change. We estimate Aσ and the stressing rate after the earthquake in the whole region with the average ΔCFS of 30 kPa (Hashimoto, 1995, 1997) using a grid search following Toda et al. (2005). The friction law’s parameters in the whole region are estimated to be 13.8 ~ 16.2 kPa/yr and 15.0 ~ 16.6 kPa at the stressing rate and Aσ, respectively. Furthermore, we estimate ΔCFSs in the two subregions using the stressing rate of 15.5 kPa/yr and Aσ of 15.5 kPa obtained above. The obtained ΔCFSs in the divided subregions, near and far to the rupture zone, are 39.9 ~ 43.4 kPa and 17.3 ~ 19.9 kPa, respectively. These are coincident with the distribution of ΔCFS drawn by using a geodetic fault model (Hashimoto et al., 1996).

  7. Magnetic field effects on the Rabi splitting and radiative decay rates of the exciton-polariton states in a semiconductor microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenniche, H.; Jaziri, S.; Bennaceur, R.

    1998-12-01

    We study theoretically a particular type of semiconductor microcavity formed by a quantum well embedded inside it and the distributed Bragg reflectors presenting a gradual structure. We apply to this structure a static magnetic field along the growth direction. In the strong coupling regime between the confined exciton and cavity modes, we evaluate the polariton Rabi splitting corresponding to the two lowest lying exciton states: HH1-CB1 and HH2-CB2 as a function of the applied magnetic field. In high magnetic field and for distinct reflectivities, we find that the Rabi splitting magnitude of the HH2-CB2 exciton is close to the fundamental one (HH1-CB1). In the presence of the magnetic field, the polariton Rabi splitting can be obtained even in low reflectivity. The dispersion polariton radiative decay rates related to the two lowest lying exciton states: HH1-CB1 and HH2-CB2 are calculated for different magnetic field values. At k //=0 and in the weak coupling regime, the polariton radiative decay rates are evaluated for both the HH1-CB1 and HH2-CB2 excitons. We show that for the fundamental excitonic state, the magnetic field value which determines the transition from the weak to the strong coupling regime is different from the HH2-CB2 exciton state.

  8. Electron-capture decay rate of {sup 7}Be-C{sub 60} by first-principles calculations based on density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Morisato, Tsuguo; Ohno, Kaoru; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu; Hirose, Kentaro; Sluiter, Marcel; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2008-09-15

    Carrying out a first-principles calculation assuming linear relationship between the electron density at Be nucleus and the electron-capture (EC) decay rate, we explained why {sup 7}Be-C{sub 60} shows higher EC decay rate than {sup 7}Be crystal, which was originally found experimentally by Ohtsuki et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 112501 (2004)]. From the results of the calculation, we found that there are inequivalent four stable (i.e., lower energy) Be sites inside C{sub 60} and that center of C{sub 60} (C{sub C60}) is the most favorable site. For C{sub C60}, the electron density at the Be nucleus is the highest. It is also much higher than that at the Be nucleus in a Be crystal. Also, we estimated the expected electron density at the Be nucleus at room temperature by taking statistical average of the electron densities at the four Be nucleus sites using the Boltzmann distribution. The results of the calculation show fairly good agreement with the experimental results. In this paper, we focus on the detail of calculation, which was not fully demonstrated in the paper by Ohtsuki.

  9. Investigation and modeling of biomass decay rate in the dark and its potential influence on net productivity of solar photobioreactors for microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis.

    PubMed

    Le Borgne, François; Pruvost, Jérémy

    2013-06-01

    Biomass decay rate (BDR) in the dark was investigated for Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (microalga) and Arthrospira platensis (cyanobacterium). A specific setup based on a torus photobioreactor with online gas analysis was validated, enabling us to follow the time course of the specific BDR using oxygen monitoring and mass balance. Various operating parameters that could limit respiration rates, such as culture temperature and oxygen deprivation, were then investigated. C. reinhardtii was found to present a higher BDR in the dark than A. platensis, illustrating here the difference between eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. In both cases, temperature proved an influential parameter, and the Arrhenius law was found to efficiently relate specific BDR to culture temperature. The utility of decreasing temperature at night to increase biomass productivity in a solar photobioreactor is also illustrated. PMID:23619140

  10. Explanation of temporal clustering of tsunami sources using the epidemic-type aftershock sequence model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, Eric L.

    2014-01-01

    Temporal clustering of tsunami sources is examined in terms of a branching process model. It previously was observed that there are more short interevent times between consecutive tsunami sources than expected from a stationary Poisson process. The epidemic‐type aftershock sequence (ETAS) branching process model is fitted to tsunami catalog events, using the earthquake magnitude of the causative event from the Centennial and Global Centroid Moment Tensor (CMT) catalogs and tsunami sizes above a completeness level as a mark to indicate that a tsunami was generated. The ETAS parameters are estimated using the maximum‐likelihood method. The interevent distribution associated with the ETAS model provides a better fit to the data than the Poisson model or other temporal clustering models. When tsunamigenic conditions (magnitude threshold, submarine location, dip‐slip mechanism) are applied to the Global CMT catalog, ETAS parameters are obtained that are consistent with those estimated from the tsunami catalog. In particular, the dip‐slip condition appears to result in a near zero magnitude effect for triggered tsunami sources. The overall consistency between results from the tsunami catalog and that from the earthquake catalog under tsunamigenic conditions indicates that ETAS models based on seismicity can provide the structure for understanding patterns of tsunami source occurrence. The fractional rate of triggered tsunami sources on a global basis is approximately 14%.

  11. Chapter D. The Loma Prieta, California, Earthquake of October 17, 1989 - Aftershocks and Postseismic Effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reasenberg, Paul A., (Edited By)

    1997-01-01

    While the damaging effects of the earthquake represent a significant social setback and economic loss, the geophysical effects have produced a wealth of data that have provided important insights into the structure and mechanics of the San Andreas Fault system. Generally, the period after a large earthquake is vitally important to monitor. During this part of the seismic cycle, the primary fault and the surrounding faults, rock bodies, and crustal fluids rapidly readjust in response to the earthquake's sudden movement. Geophysical measurements made at this time can provide unique information about fundamental properties of the fault zone, including its state of stress and the geometry and frictional/rheological properties of the faults within it. Because postseismic readjustments are rapid compared with corresponding changes occurring in the preseismic period, the amount and rate of information that is available during the postseismic period is relatively high. From a geophysical viewpoint, the occurrence of the Loma Prieta earthquake in a section of the San Andreas fault zone that is surrounded by multiple and extensive geophysical monitoring networks has produced nothing less than a scientific bonanza. The reports assembled in this chapter collectively examine available geophysical observations made before and after the earthquake and model the earthquake's principal postseismic effects. The chapter covers four broad categories of postseismic effect: (1) aftershocks; (2) postseismic fault movements; (3) postseismic surface deformation; and (4) changes in electrical conductivity and crustal fluids.

  12. Determination of rate constants and branching ratios for TCE degradation by zero-valent iron using a chain decay multispecies model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Hyoun-Tae; Jeen, Sung-Wook; Sudicky, Edward A.; Illman, Walter A.

    2015-06-01

    The applicability of a newly-developed chain-decay multispecies model (CMM) was validated by obtaining kinetic rate constants and branching ratios along the reaction pathways of trichloroethene (TCE) reduction by zero-valent iron (ZVI) from column experiments. Changes in rate constants and branching ratios for individual reactions for degradation products over time for two columns under different geochemical conditions were examined to provide ranges of those parameters expected over the long-term. As compared to the column receiving deionized water, the column receiving dissolved CaCO3 showed higher mean degradation rates for TCE and all of its degradation products. However, the column experienced faster reactivity loss toward TCE degradation due to precipitation of secondary carbonate minerals, as indicated by a higher value for the ratio of maximum to minimum TCE degradation rate observed over time. From the calculated branching ratios, it was found that TCE and cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) were dominantly dechlorinated to chloroacetylene and acetylene, respectively, through reductive elimination for both columns. The CMM model, validated by the column test data in this study, provides a convenient tool to determine simultaneously the critical design parameters for permeable reactive barriers and natural attenuation such as rate constants and branching ratios.

  13. On the origin of diverse aftershock mechanisms following the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilb, Debi; Ellis, M.; Gomberg, J.; Davis, S.

    1997-01-01

    We test the hypothesis that the origin of the diverse suite of aftershock mechanisms following the 1989 M 7.1 Loma Prieta, California, earthquake is related to the post-main-shock static stress field. We use a 3-D boundary-element algorithm to calculate static stresses, combined with a Coulomb failure criterion to calculate conjugate failure planes at aftershock locations. The post-main-shock static stress field is taken as the sum of a pre-existing stress field and changes in stress due to the heterogeneous slip across the Loma Prieta rupture plane. The background stress field is assumed to be either a simple shear parallel to the regional trend of the San Andreas fault or approximately fault-normal compression. A suite of synthetic aftershock mechanisms from the conjugate failure planes is generated and quantitatively compared (allowing for uncertainties in both mechanism parameters and earthquake locations) to well-constrained mechanisms reported in the US Geological Survey Northern California Seismic Network catalogue. We also compare calculated rakes with those observed by resolving the calculated stress tensor onto observed focal mechanism nodal planes, assuming either plane to be a likely rupture plane. Various permutations of the assumed background stress field, frictional coefficients of aftershock fault planes, methods of comparisons, etc. explain between 52 and 92 per cent of the aftershock mechanisms. We can explain a similar proportion of mechanisms however by comparing a randomly reordered catalogue with the various suites of synthetic aftershocks. The inability to duplicate aftershock mechanisms reliably on a one-to-one basis is probably a function of the combined uncertainties in models of main-shock slip distribution, the background stress field, and aftershock locations. In particular we show theoretically that any specific main-shock slip distribution and a reasonable background stress field are able to generate a highly variable suite of failure

  14. Propagation of Coulomb stress uncertainties in physics-based aftershock models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattania, Camilla; Hainzl, Sebastian; Wang, Lifeng; Roth, Frank; Enescu, Bogdan

    2014-10-01

    Stress transfer between earthquakes is recognized as a fundamental mechanism governing aftershock sequences. A common approach to relate stress changes to seismicity rate changes is the rate-and-state constitutive law developed by Dieterich: these elements are the foundation of Coulomb-rate-and-state (CRS) models. Despite the successes of Coulomb hypothesis and of the rate-and-state formulation, such models perform worse than statistical models in an operational forecasting context: one reason is that Coulomb stress is subject to large uncertainties and intrinsic spatial heterogeneity. In this study, we characterize the uncertainties in Coulomb stress inherited from different physical quantities and assess their effect on CRS models. We use a Monte Carlo method and focus on the following aspects: the existence of multiple receiver faults; the stress heterogeneity within grid cells, due to their finite size; and errors inherited from the coseismic slip model. We study two well-recorded sequences from different tectonic settings: the Mw = 6.0 Parkfield and the Mw= 9.0 Tohoku earthquakes. We find that the existence of multiple receiver faults is the most important source of intrinsic stress heterogeneity, and CRS models perform significantly better when this variability is taken into account. The choice of slip model also generates large uncertainties. We construct an ensemble model based on published slip models and find that it outperforms individual models. Our findings highlight the importance of identifying sources of errors and quantifying confidence boundaries in the forecasts; moreover, we demonstrate that consideration of stress heterogeneity and epistemic uncertainty has the potential to improve the performance of operational forecasting models.

  15. Aftershock locations and rupture characteristics of the 2006 May 27, Yogyakarta-Indonesia earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwan, M.; Ando, M.; Kimata, F.; Tadokoro, K.; Nakamichi, H.; Muto, D.; Okuda, T.; Hasanuddin, A.; Mipi A., K.; Setyadji, B.; Andreas, H.; Gamal, M.; Arif, R.

    2006-12-01

    A strong earthquake (M6.3) rocked the Bantul district, south of Yogyakarta Special Province (DIY) on the morningof May 27, 2006. We installed a temporary array of 6 seismographs to record aftershocks of the earthquake. The area of aftershocks, which may be interpreted as mainshock ruptured area has dimensions of about 25 km length and 20 km width, in the N48E direction. At depth the seismicity mainly concentrated between 5 to 15 km. The distribution of aftershock does not appear to come very close to the surface. There is no obvious surface evidence of causative fault in this area, though we find many crack and fissures that seem to have produced by the strong ground motion. We used the orientation and size of the fault determined from our aftershock results to carry out an inversion of teleseismic data for the slip distribution. We used broad- band seismograms of the IRIS network with epicentral distances between 30 and 90 degrees. We assume a single fault plane, strike 48 degree and dip 80 degree, which is inferred from the aftershock distribution. The total seismic moment is 0.369 x 10(19) Nm with maximum slip 0.4 meters. The asperity is located about 5 km away southwest of USGS estimated epicenter. Although the distances from the seismic source to heavily damaged areas Bantul and Klaten are 10 to 50 km, soft sedimentary soil likely to have generated very damaging motions within the area.

  16. Thrust-faulting earthquake induced many normal-faulting aftershocks, in northeastern Chiba Prefecture, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, S.; Kato, A.; Hirata, N.; Nakagawa, S.; Kasahara, K.; Sato, H.; Kurashimo, E.; Nanjo, K.; Panayotopoulos, Y.; Obara, K.; Aketagawa, T.; Kimura, H.

    2010-12-01

    A thrust faulting type earthquake of a local body wave magnitude (MJMA) of 4.9 occurred near the upper interface of the subducting Philippine Sea Plate (PHS) in northeastern Chiba Prefecture on July 22, 2010. We have been developing a dense seismic net work call the MeSO-net in the Tokyo Metropolitan area. So far, 249 stations are available for the study of a large felt earthquakes and small event as low as M=1.5. We also deployed a temporary seismic array 24 of which were used for the analysis of the aftershocks. We locate the July 22 earthquake(MJMA=4.9) and its 19 aftershocks (M>1.5) by the double difference location algorithm. We also determine focal mechanisms for the main- and after-shocks. The locations of the main shock and three aftershocks are closely distributed near the upper interface of PHS, which is consistent with the idea that the event occurred on the plate interface. However, most aftershocks whose focal mechanism is normal-fault type with a T-axis directing NE-SW are located off the upper interface indicating that intra-slab events are also generated by the event. Acknowledgement: The present study is supported by Special Project for Earthquake Disaster Mitigation in Tokyo Metropolitan Area from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology of Japan.

  17. Quantifying the Earthquake Clustering that Independent Sources with Stationary Rates (as Included in Current Risk Models) Can Produce.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzenz, D. D.; Nyst, M.; Apel, E. V.; Muir-Wood, R.

    2014-12-01

    The recent Canterbury earthquake sequence (CES) renewed public and academic awareness concerning the clustered nature of seismicity. Multiple event occurrence in short time and space intervals is reminiscent of aftershock sequences, but aftershock is a statistical definition, not a label one can give an earthquake in real-time. Aftershocks are defined collectively as what creates the Omori event rate decay after a large event or are defined as what is taken away as "dependent events" using a declustering method. It is noteworthy that depending on the declustering method used on the Canterbury earthquake sequence, the number of independent events varies a lot. This lack of unambiguous definition of aftershocks leads to the need to investigate the amount of clustering inherent in "declustered" risk models. This is the task we concentrate on in this contribution. We start from a background source model for the Canterbury region, in which 1) centroids of events of given magnitude are distributed using a latin-hypercube lattice, 2) following the range of preferential orientations determined from stress maps and focal mechanism, 3) with length determined using the local scaling relationship and 4) rates from a and b values derived from the declustered pre-2010 catalog. We then proceed to create tens of thousands of realizations of 6 to 20 year periods, and we define criteria to identify which successions of events in the region would be perceived as a sequence. Note that the spatial clustering expected is a lower end compared to a fully uniform distribution of events. Then we perform the same exercise with rates and b-values determined from the catalog including the CES. If the pre-2010 catalog was long (or rich) enough, then the computed "stationary" rates calculated from it would include the CES declustered events (by construction, regardless of the physical meaning of or relationship between those events). In regions of low seismicity rate (e.g., Canterbury before

  18. Comment on 'Time modulation of K-shell electron capture decay rates of H-like heavy ions at GSI experiments.'

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, H. J.; Physics; Weizmann Inst. of Science; Tel Aviv Univ.

    2010-04-16

    A Comment on the Letter by A.N. Ivanov and P. Kienle, Physical Review Letters volume 103, Issue 6, 062502 (2009). The authors of the Letter offer a Reply to experimental data at GSI, the rates of the number of daughter ions, produced by the nuclear K shell electron capture decays of the H-like heavy ions with one electron in the K shell, such as {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+}, {sup 142}Pm{sup 60+}, and {sup 122}I{sup 52+}, are modulated in time with periods T{sub EC} of the order of a few seconds, obeying an A scaling T{sub EX}=A/20 s, where A is the mass number of the mother nuclei, and with amplitudes a{sub d {sup EC}}{approx}0.21. We show that these data can be explained in terms of the interference of two massive neutrino mass eigenstates. The appearance of the interference term is due to overlap of massive neutrino mass eigenstate energies and of the wave functions of the daughter ions in two-body decay channels, caused by the energy and momentum uncertainties introduced by time differential detection of the daughter ions in GSI experiments.

  19. EFFECT OF VENTILATION SYSTEMS AND AIR FILTERS ON DECAY RATES OF PARTICLES PRODUCED BY INDOOR SOURCES IN AN OCCUPIED TOWNHOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several studies have shown the importance of particle losses in real homes due to deposition and filtration; however, none have quantitatively shown the impact of using a central forced air fan and in-duct filter on particle loss rates. In an attempt to provide such data, we me...

  20. Effect of ventilation systems and air filters on decay rates of particles produced by indoor sources in an occupied townhouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard-Reed, Cynthia; Wallace, Lance A.; Emmerich, Steven J.

    Several studies have shown the importance of particle losses in real homes due to deposition and filtration; however, none have quantitatively shown the impact of using a central forced air fan and in-duct filter on particle loss rates. In an attempt to provide such data, we measured the deposition of particles ranging from 0.3 to 10 μm in an occupied townhouse and also in an unoccupied test house. Experiments were run with three different sources (cooking with a gas stove, citronella candle, pouring kitty litter), with the central heating and air conditioning (HAC) fan on or off, and with two different types of in-duct filters (electrostatic precipitator and ordinary furnace filter). Particle size, HAC fan operation, and the electrostatic precipitator had significant effects on particle loss rates. The standard furnace filter had no effect. Surprisingly, the type of source (combustion vs. mechanical generation) and the type of furnishings (fully furnished including carpet vs. largely unfurnished including mostly bare floor) also had no measurable effect on the deposition rates of particles of comparable size. With the HAC fan off, average deposition rates varied from 0.3 h -1 for the smallest particle range (0.3-0.5 μm) to 5.2 h -1 for particles greater than 10 μm. Operation of the central HAC fan approximately doubled these rates for particles <5 μm, and increased rates by 2 h -1 for the larger particles. An in-duct electrostatic precipitator increased the loss rates compared to the fan-off condition by factors of 5-10 for particles <2.5 μm, and by a factor of 3 for 2.5-5.0 μm particles. In practical terms, use of the central fan alone could reduce indoor particle concentrations by 25-50%, and use of an in-duct ESP could reduce particle concentrations by 55-85% compared to fan-off conditions.

  1. Decaying light particles in the SHiP experiment. III. Signal rate estimates for scalar and pseudoscalar sgoldstinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astapov, K. O.; Gorbunov, D. S.

    2016-02-01

    For supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model with light sgoldstinos—scalar and pseudoscalar superpartners of goldstinos—we estimate the signal rate anticipated at the recently proposed fixed target experiment SHiP utilizing a CERN Super Proton Synchrotron beam of 400 GeV protons. We also place new limits on the model parameters from a similar analysis of the published results of the CHARM experiment.

  2. Lancang—Gengma Earthquake: A Preliminary Report on the November 6, 1988, Event and Its Aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuntai; Wu, Francis T.

    On November 6, 1988, two earthquakes with magnitude >7 occurred within 15 minutes in southwestern Yunnan Province, China, near the Burmese border. The aftershock series in the next six weeks included three earthquakes with magnitude >6.0. Rapid deployment of accelerographs enabled us to record a large number of aftershocks, including two Ms >6 events, at near-source distances.At 130314.5 UT on November 6 an earthquake with Ms = 7.6 (U.S. Geological Survey Ms = 7.3) occurred 40 km northwest of Lancang (Figure 1). Thirteen minutes later another large event with Ms = 7.2 (USGS Ms 6.4) occurred 60 km north-northwest of the first shock. By December 20 more than 600 aftershocks with Ms >3 had occurred.

  3. Rapid heating tensile tests of high-energy-rate-forged 316L stainless steel containing internal helium from radioactive decay of absorbed tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    316L stainless steel is a candidate material for construction of equipment that will be exposed to tritium. This austenitic stainless steel is frequently used in the high-energy-rate-forged (HERF) metallurgical condition to take advantage of increased strength produced by cold work introduced by this process. Proper design of tritium-handling equipment will require an understanding of how helium-3, the product of radioactive decay of tritium, affects mechanical properties. This report describes results of elevated-temperature tensile testing of HERF 316L stainless steel specimens containing helium concentrations of 171 (calculated) atomic parts per million (appm). Results are compared with those reported previously for specimens containing 0 and 94 (measured) appm helium.

  4. Rapid heating tensile tests of high-energy-rate-forged 316L stainless steel containing internal helium from radioactive decay of absorbed tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    1990-12-31

    316L stainless steel is a candidate material for construction of equipment that will be exposed to tritium. This austenitic stainless steel is frequently used in the high-energy-rate-forged (HERF) metallurgical condition to take advantage of increased strength produced by cold work introduced by this process. Proper design of tritium-handling equipment will require an understanding of how helium-3, the product of radioactive decay of tritium, affects mechanical properties. This report describes results of elevated-temperature tensile testing of HERF 316L stainless steel specimens containing helium concentrations of 171 (calculated) atomic parts per million (appm). Results are compared with those reported previously for specimens containing 0 and 94 (measured) appm helium.

  5. Aftershock source imaging using reverse time migration of data from the dense AIDA array deployed after the 2011 Virginia earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Davenport, K. K.; Hole, J. A.; Chapman, M. C.; Quiros, D. A.; Brown, L. D.

    2013-12-01

    Reverse time migration has previously been used to back-project energy recorded by dense arrays to the source region of large subduction-zone earthquakes. The results have illuminated energy release as a function of time and space on the fault surface, improving our understanding of rupture processes. We apply reverse time migration to data from a dense local aftershock array to image magnitude <0 to 3.7 events. AIDA (Aftershock Imaging with Dense Arrays) recorded aftershocks of the August 23, 2011, magnitude 5.8 earthquake in Louisa County, Virginia. AIDA deployed 201 stations in three phases to record wavefields at 200-400 m spacing to reduce spatial aliasing and to lower the event detection threshold. Aftershocks recorded by AIDA were reverse-time migrated in a velocity model created by aftershock travel-time tomography. An aftershock with a magnitude less than 0 was successfully imaged as a point source with a resolution of <200 m. Slip propagation was successfully imaged for a magnitude 3.7 aftershock, propagating 200-300 m shallower and southward. Both P and S-wave data were independently migrated, with similar results. The method is being applied to automatically detect and locate tiny events with low signal-to-noise ratio. Tests show that the images are limited by insufficient temporal sampling and predictable migration artifacts caused by the station geometry. Future aftershock deployments can improve these conditions.

  6. GIS-based 3D visualization of the Mw 7.7, 2007, Tocopilla aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggert, S.; Sobiesiak, M.; Altenbrunn, K.

    2009-12-01

    The November 14, 2007 Mw 7.7 earthquake nucleated on the west coast of northern Chile about 40 km east of the city of Tocopilla. It took place in the southern part of a large seismic gap, the Iquique subduction zone segment which is supposed to be at the end of its seismic cycle. The Tocopilla fault plane appears to be the northern continuation of the Mw 8.0, 1995 Antofagasta earthquake. We present a complex 3D model of the rupture area including first hypocenter localizations of aftershocks following the event. The data was recorded during a mission of the German Task Force for Earthquakes after the 2007 Tocopilla earthquake. The seismic stations were recording the aftershocks from November 2007 until May 2008. In general, subduction zones have a complex structure where most of the volumes examined are characterized by strong variations in physical and material parameters. Therefore, 3D representation of the geophysical and geological conditions to be found are of great importance to understand such a subduction environment. We start with a two-dimensional visualization of the geological and geophysical setting. In a second step, we use GIS as a three-dimensional modeling tool which gives us the possibility to visualize the complex geophysical processes. One can easily add and delete data and focus on the information one needs. This allows us to investigate the aftershock distribution along the subducting slab and identify clear structures and clusters within the data set. Furthermore we combine the 2007 Tocopilla data set with the 1995 Antofagasta aftershocks which provides a new, three-dimensional insight into the segment boundary of these two events. Analyzing the aftershock sequence with a GIS-based model will not only help to visualize the setting but also be the base for various calculations and further explorations of the complex structures. Aftershocks following the 1995 Antofagasta earthquake and the 2007 Tocopilla earthquake

  7. Aftershocks of the june 20, 1978, Greece earthquake: A multimode faulting sequence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carver, D.; Bollinger, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    A 10-station portable seismograph network was deployed in northern Greece to study aftershocks of the magnitude (mb) 6.4 earthquake of June 20, 1978. The main shock occurred (in a graben) about 25 km northeast of the city of Thessaloniki and caused an east-west zone of surface rupturing 14 km long that splayed to 7 km wide at the west end. The hypocenters for 116 aftershocks in the magnitude range from 2.5 to 4.5 were determined. The epicenters for these events cover an area 30 km (east-west) by 18 km (north-south), and focal depths ranges from 4 to 12 km. Most of the aftershocks in the east half of the aftershock zone are north of the surface rupture and north of the graben. Those in the west half are located within the boundaries of the graben. Composite focalmechanism solutions for selected aftershocks indicate reactivation of geologically mapped normal faults in the area. Also, strike-slip and dip-slip faults that splay off the western end of the zone of surface ruptures may have been activated. The epicenters for four large (M ??? 4.8) foreshocks and the main shock were relocated using the method of joint epicenter determination. Collectively, those five epicenters form an arcuate pattern convex southward, that is north of and 5 km distant from the surface rupturing. The 5-km separation, along with a focal depth of 8 km (average aftershock depth) or 16 km (NEIS main-shock depth), implies that the fault plane dips northward 58?? or 73??, respectively. A preferred nodal-plane dip of 36?? was determined by B.C. Papazachos and his colleagues in 1979 from a focal-mechanism solution for the main shock. If this dip is valid for the causal fault and that fault projects to the zone of surface rupturing, a decrease of dip with depth is required. ?? 1981.

  8. Modeling hepatitis C virus kinetics: the relationship between the infected cell loss rate and the final slope of viral decay

    PubMed Central

    Dahari, Harel; Shudo, Emi; Cotler, Scott J.; Layden, Thomas J.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) who respond to treatment with interferon-α plus ribavirin exhibit biphasic or triphasic viral load declines. While the rapid first phase is indicative of the effectiveness of therapy in blocking viral production, ε, the slope of the final phase, λ, i.e., the second phase in biphasic declines and the third phase in triphasic declines, depends on the infected-cell loss rate, δ. Further, in standard models λ is approximately εδ, when the viral-clearance rate c>>δ as has been previously estimated. Methods The relationship among ε, δ, λ and the baseline fraction of HCV-infected hepatocytes, π, was investigated in a model that includes proliferation of hepatocytes. Results We find that λ is not proportional to ε but rather obeys complex relationship that can lead to dramatic increases in estimates of δ as ε increases. In particular, when ε<99%, λ moderately underestimates δ in patients with a small π, whereas δ may be up to 10-fold larger than λ in patients with a large π. Interestingly, when ε>99%, δ~λ, regardless of π. Conclusions Our results indicate that under therapy achieving <2 log reduction in viral load (ε<99%), previously estimated δ values may represent only a minimal estimate of the infected-cell loss rate. Moreover, combining interferon-α with new antiviral agents to achieve ε>99% should allow for a more accurate estimate of δ in HCV-RNA kinetic studies. This may be important when using viral kinetics to estimate the impact of the immune response on viral elimination and the attainment of sustained virological response. PMID:19474480

  9. Spatial and temporal analysis of the Mw 7.7, 2007, Tocopilla aftershock sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggert, Silke; Sobiesiak, Monika

    2010-05-01

    On 14 November 2007, 15:40:51 UTC a large Mw 7.7 earthquake occurred in the region of Tocopilla in Northern Chile. The epicenter is located at 22.30°S, 69.89°W, ~ 35 km south east of the city of Tocopilla and 160 km north of Antofagasta (earthquake location by GEOFON network). The earthquake took place in the southern part of the Northern Chile seismic gap which is supposed to be at the end of its seismic cycle. Currently, the gap is spanning the rupture area of the Mw=9 1877 Iquique event, a region which is now unbroken for almost 150 years. Therefore, the 2007 Tocopilla earthquake is the first large event that occurred inside the Northern Chile seismic gap since 1877. We present a study of the spatial and temporal distribution of the aftershock activity following the 2007 Tocopilla event using the frequency-magnitude distribution and other parameters. Studying this aftershock sequence will provide closer insight into the fault dimension of this subduction zone earthquake and the tectonic setting of the region. The distribution of aftershocks into depth shows that the majority of the hypocenters are located along the subduction interface, reaching down to ~ 50 km depth. In the western part, the aftershock sequence splits into two branches, one heading towards the trench, the other bending into the crust in front of the Mejillones Peninsula. In the epicentral horizontal, we observe a concentration of aftershocks around the northern part of the Mejillones Peninsula and along the coast up to the Río Loa. This leads to the conclusion that the shallow part in the north west did probably not break during the event. The spatial density of aftershocks shows two offshore patches north-east of the peninsula. Analyzing the spatio-temporal distribution of our aftershock data set, we can see that the fault rupture propagated towards the south west with a fault plane of about 150 km length. These observations are consistent with first results by other studies. Our

  10. DETERMINATION OF ELASTIC WAVE VELOCITY AND RELATIVE HYPOCENTER LOCATIONS USING REFRACTED WAVES. II. APPLICATION TO THE HAICHENG, CHINA, AFTERSHOCK SEQUENCE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shedlock, Kaye M.; Jones, Lucile M.; Ma, Xiufang

    1985-01-01

    The authors located the aftershocks of the February 4, 1975 Haicheng, China, aftershock sequence using an arrival time difference (ATD) simultaneous inversion method for determining the near-source (in situ) velocity and the location of the aftershocks with respect to a master event. The aftershocks define a diffuse zone, 70 km multiplied by 25 km, trending west-northwest, perpendicular to the major structural trend of the region. The main shock and most of the large aftershocks have strike-slip fault plane solutions. The preferred fault plane strikes west-northwest, and the inferred sense of motion is left-lateral. The entire Haicheng earthauake sequence appears to have been the response of an intensely faulted range boundary to a primarily east-west crustal compression and/or north-south extension.

  11. A damage mechanics model for power-law creep and earthquake aftershock and foreshock sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Main, Ian G.

    2000-07-01

    It is common practice to refer to three independent stages of creep under static loading conditions in the laboratory: namely transient, steady-state, and accelerating. Here we suggest a simple damage mechanics model for the apparently trimodal behaviour of the strain and event rate dependence, by invoking two local mechanisms of positive and negative feedback applied to constitutive rules for time-dependent subcritical crack growth. In both phases, the individual constitutive rule for measured strain ɛ takes the form ɛ(t)=ɛ0[1+t/mτ]m, where τ is the ratio of initial crack length to rupture velocity. For a local hardening mechanism (negative feedback), we find that transient creep dominates, with 0∞ can be defined at a finite failure time, resulting in the localization of damage and the formation of a throughgoing fracture. In the hybrid model, transient creep dominates in the early stages of damage and accelerating creep in the latter stages. At intermediate times the linear superposition of the two mechanisms spontaneously produces an apparent steady-state phase of relatively constant strain rate, with a power-law rheology, as observed in laboratory creep test data. The predicted acoustic emission event rates in the transient and accelerating phases are identical to the modified Omori laws for aftershocks and foreshocks, respectively, and provide a physical meaning for the empirical constants measured. At intermediate times, the event rate tends to a relatively constant background rate. The requirement for a finite event rate at the time of the main shock can be satisfied by modifying the instability criterion to having a finite crack velocity at the dynamic failure time, dx/dt->VR, where VR is the dynamic rupture velocity. The same hybrid

  12. Optimally oriented ``fault-valve'' thrusts: Evidence for aftershock-related fluid pressure pulses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micklethwaite, S.

    2008-04-01

    A thrust-vein network from the Triumph gold deposit, Western Australia, is explained in terms of an extremely high rate of fluid-pressure increase, prior to failure, relative to the rate of stress increase. The thrust fault is a small-displacement fault characterized by a thick, fault-parallel shear vein, plus multiple low-angle extension veins, with orientations that demonstrate the thrust was optimally oriented relative to the locally imposed crustal stresses. Large extension veins have irregular margins, are dominantly composed of coarse milky quartz with no obvious laminations or solid inclusion trails, and are regularly spaced along the thrust (1-2 m). The fault-vein geometries indicate the Triumph thrust is a rare candidate for "fault-valve" failure of an optimally oriented thrust, and it is possible the structure formed in a small number of failure events, during load weakening of the thrust. An analysis using the Coulomb criterion shows that load weakening of a thrust occurs when fluid pressure increases relative to tectonic stress by a factor dependent on the orientation of the thrust. Thrust and reverse faults in dry crust load strengthen prior to failure, but the poroelastic behavior of sealed, fluid-saturated crust is enough to induce load weakening in compressive environments; thus poroelastic load weakening is expected to be an important failure mechanism in hydrothermal environments. However, in the case of the Triumph thrust, dilatant shear failure necessitates a fluid pressure increase which is an order of magnitude larger still. The observations and results are consistent with a pulse of high fluid pressure migrating up through fault or fracture networks that have elevated permeability relative to the wall rock, under conditions of transiently low differential stress. Fluid pressure differences resulted between the fault and wall rock, leading to extension fracture and fault failure. Such conditions may occur when adjacent large earthquakes induce

  13. A theoretical investigation of the influence of gold nanosphere size on the decay and energy transfer rates and efficiencies of quantum emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marocico, Cristian A.; Zhang, Xia; Bradley, A. Louise

    2016-01-01

    We present in this contribution a comprehensive investigation of the effect of the size of gold nanospheres on the decay and energy transfer rates of quantum systems placed close to these nanospheres. These phenomena have been investigated before, theoretically and experimentally, but no comprehensive study of the influence of the nanoparticle size on important dependences of the decay and energy transfer rates, such as the dependence on the donor-acceptor spectral overlap and the relative positions of the donor, acceptor, and nanoparticle, exists. As such, different accounts of the energy transfer mechanism have been presented in the literature. We perform an investigation of the energy transfer mechanisms between emitters and gold nanospheres and between donor-acceptor pairs in the presence of the gold nanospheres using a Green's tensor formalism, experimentally verified in our lab. We find that the energy transfer rate to small nanospheres is greatly enhanced, leading to a strong quenching of the emission of the emitter. When the nanosphere size is increased, it acts as an antenna, increasing the emission of the emitter. We also investigate the emission wavelength and intrinsic quantum yield dependence of the energy transfer to the nanosphere. As evidenced from the literature, the energy transfer process between the quantum system and the nanosphere can have a complicated distance dependence, with a r-6 regime, characteristic of the Förster energy transfer mechanism, but also exhibiting other distance dependences. In the case of a donor-acceptor pair of quantum systems in the presence of a gold nanosphere, when the donor couples strongly to the nanosphere, acting as an enhanced dipole; the donor-acceptor energy transfer rate then follows a Förster trend, with an increased Förster radius. The coupling of the acceptor to the nanosphere has a different distance dependence. The angular dependence of the energy transfer efficiency between donor and acceptor

  14. Conservation laws, radiative decay rates, and excited state localization in organometallic complexes with strong spin-orbit coupling.

    PubMed

    Powell, B J

    2015-01-01

    There is longstanding fundamental interest in 6-fold coordinated d(6) (t(2g)(6)) transition metal complexes such as [Ru(bpy)3](2+) and Ir(ppy)3, particularly their phosphorescence. This interest has increased with the growing realisation that many of these complexes have potential uses in applications including photovoltaics, imaging, sensing, and light-emitting diodes. In order to design new complexes with properties tailored for specific applications a detailed understanding of the low-energy excited states, particularly the lowest energy triplet state, T1, is required. Here we describe a model of pseudo-octahedral complexes based on a pseudo-angular momentum representation and show that the predictions of this model are in excellent agreement with experiment - even when the deviations from octahedral symmetry are large. This model gives a natural explanation of zero-field splitting of T1 and of the relative radiative rates of the three sublevels in terms of the conservation of time-reversal parity and total angular momentum modulo two. We show that the broad parameter regime consistent with the experimental data implies significant localization of the excited state. PMID:26123864

  15. Conservation laws, radiative decay rates, and excited state localization in organometallic complexes with strong spin-orbit coupling

    PubMed Central

    Powell, B. J.

    2015-01-01

    There is longstanding fundamental interest in 6-fold coordinated d6 () transition metal complexes such as [Ru(bpy)3]2+ and Ir(ppy)3, particularly their phosphorescence. This interest has increased with the growing realisation that many of these complexes have potential uses in applications including photovoltaics, imaging, sensing, and light-emitting diodes. In order to design new complexes with properties tailored for specific applications a detailed understanding of the low-energy excited states, particularly the lowest energy triplet state, T1, is required. Here we describe a model of pseudo-octahedral complexes based on a pseudo-angular momentum representation and show that the predictions of this model are in excellent agreement with experiment - even when the deviations from octahedral symmetry are large. This model gives a natural explanation of zero-field splitting of T1 and of the relative radiative rates of the three sublevels in terms of the conservation of time-reversal parity and total angular momentum modulo two. We show that the broad parameter regime consistent with the experimental data implies significant localization of the excited state. PMID:26123864

  16. Coda Q in the Kachchh Basin, Western India Using Aftershocks of the Bhuj Earthquake of January 26, 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S. C.; Kumar, Ashwani; Shukla, A. K.; Suresh, G.; Baidya, P. R.

    2006-08-01

    Q C -estimates of Kachchh Basin in western India have been obtained in a high frequency range from 1.5 to 24.0 Hz using the aftershock data of Bhuj earthquake of January 26, 2001 recorded within an epicentral distance of 80 km. The decay of coda waves of 30 sec window from 186 seismograms has been analysed in four lapse time windows, adopting the single backscattering model. The study shows that Q c is a function of frequency and increases as frequency increases. The frequency dependent Q c relations obtained for four lapse-time windows are: Q c =82 f 1.17 (20 50 sec), Q c =106 f 1.11 (30 60 sec), Q c =126f 1.03 (40 70 sec) and Q c =122f 1.02 (50 80 sec). These empirical relations represent the average attenuation properties of a zone covering the surface area of about 11,000, 20,000, 28,000 and 38,000 square km and a depth extent of about 60, 80, 95, 110 km, respectively. With increasing window length, the degree of frequency dependence, n, decreases marginally from 1.17 to 1.02, whereas Q 0 increases significantly from 82 to 122. At lower frequencies up to 6 Hz, Q c -1 of Kachchh Basin is in agreement with other regions of the world, whereas at higher frequencies from 12 to 24 Hz it is found to be low.

  17. Hypernuclear Weak Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itonaga, K.; Motoba, T.

    The recent theoretical studies of Lambda-hypernuclear weak decaysof the nonmesonic and pi-mesonic ones are developed with the aim to disclose the link between the experimental decay observables and the underlying basic weak decay interactions and the weak decay mechanisms. The expressions of the nonmesonic decay rates Gamma_{nm} and the decay asymmetry parameter alpha_1 of protons from the polarized hypernuclei are presented in the shell model framework. We then introduce the meson theoretical Lambda N -> NN interactions which include the one-meson exchanges, the correlated-2pi exchanges, and the chiral-pair-meson exchanges. The features of meson exchange potentials and their roles on the nonmesonic decays are discussed. With the adoption of the pi + 2pi/rho + 2pi/sigma + omega + K + rhopi/a_1 + sigmapi/a_1 exchange potentials, we have carried out the systematic calculations of the nonmesonic decay observables for light-to-heavy hypernuclei. The present model can account for the available experimental data of the decay rates, Gamma_n/Gamma_p ratios, and the intrinsic asymmetry parameters alpha_Lambda (alpha_Lambda is related to alpha_1) of emitted protons well and consistently within the error bars. The hypernuclear lifetimes are evaluated by converting the total weak decay rates Gamma_{tot} = Gamma_pi + Gamma_{nm} to tau, which exhibit saturation property for the hypernuclear mass A ≥ 30 and agree grossly well with experimental data for the mass range from light to heavy hypernuclei except for the very light ones. Future extensions of the model and the remaining problems are also mentioned. The pi-mesonic weak processes are briefly surveyed, and the calculations and predictions are compared and confirmed by the recent high precision FINUDA pi-mesonic decay data. This shows that the theoretical basis seems to be firmly grounded.

  18. Measurement of the Radiative Decay Rate and Energy of the Metastable (2s22p51=23s1=2)(J=0) Level in Fe XVII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Crespo López-Urrutia, J. R.; Träbert, E.

    2016-01-01

    Measurements at the Livermore electron beam ion trap have been performed in order to infer the energy and the radiative lifetime of the {(1{s}22{s}22{p}1/253{s}1/2)}J=0 level in the Fe xvii spectrum. This is the longest-lived level in the neonlike iron ion, and its radiative decay produces the Fe xvii line at 1153 Å, feeding the population of the {(1{s}22{s}22{p}3/253{s}1/2)}J=1 upper level of one of the most prominent lines in the Fe xvii L-shell X-ray spectrum, commonly dubbed 3G. In the presence of a strong (≥slant few kG) magnetic field, the {(1{s}22{s}22{p}1/253{s}1/2)}J=0 level has a finite probability to decay directly to the {(1{s}22{s}22{p}6)}J=0 neonlike ground level via the emission of an L-shell X-ray. Our measurements allow us to observe this X-ray line in the Fe xvii L-shell spectrum and from it to infer the radiative rate for the magnetic dipole decay of the {(1{s}22{s}22{p}1/253{s}1/2)}J=0 level to the {(1{s}22{s}22{p}3/253{s}1/2)}J=1. Our result of (1.45+/- 0.15)× {10}4 s-1 is in agreement with predictions. We have also measured the wavelength of the associated X-ray line to be 16.804 ± 0.002 Å, which means that the line is displaced 1.20 ± 0.05 eV from the neighboring {(2{s}22{p}1/253{s}1/2)}J=1\\to {(2{s}22{p}6)}J=0 transition, commonly labeled 3F. From our measurement, we infer 5950570 ± 710 cm-1 for the energy of the {(1{s}22{s}22{p}1/253{s}1/2)}J=0 level.

  19. Shear wave attenuation estimated from the spectral decay rate in the vicinity of the Petropavlovsk station, Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, A. A.; Guseva, E. M.

    2016-07-01

    The parameters of S-wave attenuation (the total effect of absorption and scattering) near the Petropavlovsk (PET) station in Kamchatka were estimated by means of the spectral method through an original procedure. The spectral method typically analyzes the changes with distance of the shape of spectra of the acceleration records assuming that the acceleration spectrum at the earthquake source is flat. In reality, this assumption is violated: the source acceleration spectra often have a high-frequency cutoff (the source-controlled f max) which limits the spectral working bandwidth. Ignoring this phenomenon not only leads to a broad scatter of the individual estimates but also causes systematic errors in the form of overestimation of losses. In the approach applied in the present study, we primarily estimated the frequency of the mentioned high-frequency cutoff and then constructed the loss estimates only within the frequency range where the source spectrum is approximately flat. The shape of the source spectrum was preliminarily assessed by the approximate loss compensation technique. For this purpose, we used the tentative attenuation estimates which are close to the final ones. The difference in the logarithms of the spectral amplitudes at the edges of the working bandwidth is the input for calculating the attenuation. We used the digital accelerograms from the PET station, with 80 samples per second digitization rate, and based on them, we calculated the averaged spectrum of the S-waves as the root mean square along two horizontal components. Our analysis incorporates 384 spectra from the local earthquakes with M = 4-6.5 at the hypocentral distances ranging from 80 to 220 km. By applying the nonlinear least-square method, we found the following parameters of the loss model: the Q-factor Q 0 = 156 ± 33 at frequency f = 1 Hz for the distance interval r = 0-100 km; the exponent in the power-law relationship describing the growth of the Q-factor with frequency,

  20. Aftershock seismicity and Tectonic Setting of the 16 September 2015 Mw 8.3 Illapel earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Dietrich; Geersen, Jacob; Barrientos, Sergio; Moreno, Marcos; Grevemeyer, Ingo; Contreras-Reyes, Eduardo; Kopp, Heidrun

    2016-04-01

    Powerful subduction zone earthquakes rupture thousands of square kilometers along continental margins but at certain locations earthquake rupture terminates. On 16 September 2015 the Mw. 8.3 Illapel earthquake ruptured a 200 km long stretch of the Central Chilean subduction zone, triggering a tsunami and causing significant damage. Here we analyze the spatial pattern of coseismic rupture and the temporal and spatial pattern of local seismicity for aftershocks and foreshocks in relation to the tectonic setting in the earthquake area. Aftershock seismicity surrounds the rupture area in lateral and downdip direction. For the first 24 hours following the mainshock we observe aftershock migration to both lateral directions with velocities of approximately 2.5 and 5 km/h. At the southern earthquake boundary aftershocks cluster around individual subducted seamounts located on the prolongation of the downthrusting Juan Fernández Ridge indicating stress transfer from the main rupture area. In the northern part of the rupture area a deeper band of local seismicity is observed indicating an alternation of seismic to aseismic behavior of the plate interface in downdip direction. This aseismic region at ~30 km depth that is also observed before the Illapel 2015 earthquake is likely controlled by the intersection of the continental Moho with the subducting slab.

  1. Aftershocks and Omori's law in a modified Carlson-Langer model with nonlinear viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Okamura, Kazuki

    2015-05-01

    A modified Carlson-Langer model for earthquakes is proposed, which includes nonlinear viscoelasticity. Several aftershocks are generated after the main shock owing to the damping of the additional viscoelastic force. Both the Gutenberg-Richter law and Omori's law are reproduced in a numerical simulation of the modified Carlson-Langer model on a critical percolation cluster of a square lattice.

  2. 2008 Little Andaman aftershock: Genetic linkages with the subducting 90°E ridge and 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catherine, J. K.; Gahalaut, V. K.; Ambikapathy, A.; Kundu, Bhaskar; Subrahmanyam, C.; Jade, S.; Bansal, Amit; Chadha, R. K.; Narsaiah, M.; Premkishore, L.; Gupta, D. C.

    2009-12-01

    We analyse the June 27, 2008 Little Andaman aftershock (Mw 6.6) of December 26, 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake (Mw 9.2) that occurred near the trench in the subducting India plate beneath the Sunda Plate. Unlike majority of the other aftershocks in the frontal arc, the Little Andaman aftershock and its own aftershocks occurred through normal slip on the north-south oriented steep planes. We use the coseismic and ongoing postseismic deformation due to the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake at a GPS site nearest to the Little Andaman aftershock and compute changes in the Coulomb stresses due to the coseismic slip and postseismic afterslip. The Coulomb stress on the Little Andaman aftershock fault plane progressively increased since the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake which probably led to the occurrence of the Little Andaman aftershock on the pre-existing N-S oriented strike-slip steep planes of the subducting 90°E ridge that were reactivated through normal slip.

  3. Three Dimensional P Wave Velocity Model for the Crust Containing Aftershocks of the Bhuj, India Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, C. A.; Vlahovic, G.; Bodin, P.; Horton, S.

    2001-12-01

    A three-dimensional P wave velocity model has been constructed for the crust in the vicinity of the Mw=7.7 January 26th Bhuj, India earthquake using aftershock data obtained by CERI away teams. Aftershocks were recorded by 8 portable, digital K2 seismographs (the MAEC/ISTAR network) and by a continuously recording Guralp CMG40TD broad-band seismometer. Station spacing is roughly 30 km. The network was in place for 18 days and recorded ground motions from about 2000 aftershocks located within about 100 km of all stations. The 3-D velocity model is based upon an initial subset of 461 earthquakes with 2848 P wave arrivals. The initial 1-D velocity model was determined using VELEST and the 3-D model was determined using the nonlinear travel time tomography method of Benz et al. [1996]. Block size was set at 2 by 2 by 2 km. A 45% reduction in RMS travel time residuals was obtained after 10 iterations holding hypocenters fixed. We imaged velocity anomalies in the range -2 to 4%. Low velocities were found in the upper 6 km and the anomalies follow surface features such as the Rann of Kutch. High velocity features were imaged at depth and are associated with the aftershock hypocenters. High crustal velocities are present at depths exceeding 20 km with the exception of the crust below the Rann of Kutch. The imaged velocity anomaly pattern does not change when different starting models are used and when hypocenters are relocated using P wave arrivals only. The analysis will be extended to an expanded data set of 941 aftershocks.

  4. Radiative B Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Bard, D.; /Imperial Coll., London

    2011-11-23

    I discuss recent results in radiative B decays from the Belle and BaBar collaborations. I report new measurements of the decay rate and CP asymmetries in b {yields} s{gamma} and b {yields} d{gamma} decays, and measurements of the photon spectrum in b {yields} s{gamma}. Radiative penguin decays are flavour changing neutral currents which do not occur at tree level in the standard model (SM), but must proceed via one loop or higher order diagrams. These transitions are therefore suppressed in the SM, but offer access to poorlyknown SM parameters and are also a sensitive probe of new physics. In the SM, the rate is dominated by the top quark contribution to the loop, but non-SM particles could also contribute with a size comparable to leading SM contributions. The new physics effects are potentially large which makes them theoretically very interesting, but due to their small branching fractions they are typically experimentally challenging.

  5. Modulated curvaton decay

    SciTech Connect

    Assadullahi, Hooshyar; Wands, David; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein E-mail: firouz@mail.ipm.ir E-mail: david.wands@port.ac.uk

    2013-03-01

    We study primordial density perturbations generated by the late decay of a curvaton field whose decay rate may be modulated by the local value of another isocurvature field, analogous to models of modulated reheating at the end of inflation. We calculate the primordial density perturbation and its local-type non-Gaussianity using the sudden-decay approximation for the curvaton field, recovering standard curvaton and modulated reheating results as limiting cases. We verify the Suyama-Yamaguchi inequality between bispectrum and trispectrum parameters for the primordial density field generated by multiple field fluctuations, and find conditions for the bound to be saturated.

  6. The north-northwest aftershock pattern of the June 28, 1992 Landers earthquake and the probability of large earthquakes in Indian Wells Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Roquemore, G.R. . Dept. of Geosciences); Simila, G.A. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Immediately following the June 28, 1992 Landers earthquake, a strong north-northwest pattern of aftershocks and triggered earthquakes developed. The most intense pattern developed between the north end of primary rupture on the Emerson fault and southern Owens Valley. The trend of seismicity cuts through the east-west trending Garlock fault at a high angle. The Garlock fault has no apparent affect on the trend or pattern. Within the aftershock zone, south of the Garlock fault, the Calico and Blackwater faults provide the most likely pathway for the Mojave shear zone into Indian Wells and Owens Valleys. In Indian Wells Valley the seismically active Little Lake fault aligns well with the Blackwater fault to the south and the southern Owens Valley fault zone to the north. Several recent research papers suggest that Optimum Coulomb failure stress changes caused by the Landers earthquake have enhanced the probability of earthquakes within the north-northwest trending aftershock zone. This increase has greater significance when the presumed Optimum Coulomb failure stress changes caused by the 1872 Owens Valley earthquake and its affects on Indian Wells Valley are considered. Indian Wells Valley and the Coso Volcanic field may have received two significant stress increases from earthquakes of magnitude 7.5 or greater in the last 120 years. If these two earthquakes increased the shear stress of aults in the Indian Wells/Coso areas, the most likely site for the next large earthquake within the Mojave shear zone may be there. The rate of seismicity within Indian Wells Valley had increased since 1980 including a magnitude 5.0 earthquake in 1982.

  7. Aftershock Observation of the 2014 South Napa Earthquake and Shallow S-wave Velocity Structure Obtained by Passive Surface Wave Method at Three Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, K.; Roughley, C.; Craig, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    A M6.0 earthquake occurred in South Napa County on August 24, 2014. We recorded aftershocks and conducted S-wave velocity (VS) surveys using a passive surface method at three sites in Napa.On the day of the earthquake, we confirmed surface rupture for at least 5 km. Seismographs were deployed at three locations the day after the mainshock; on east side of Napa Valley (CSUEB-3), the west side (CSUEB-2), and at Stone Bridge School (CSUEB-1 SBS), which is located directly on the line of surface rupture (Fig. 1). The seismographs recorded continuous data for two weeks. At least 60 aftershocks with magnitudes between 1.0 and 3.9 were recorded. Preliminary analysis indicates a difference in local amplification of horizontal ground motion for 1-5 Hz, with amplitudes on the west side of Napa Valley larger than those on the east side. A passive surface wave survey using the two-station spatial autocorrelation (2ST-SPAC) method was conducted at each of the aftershock observation sites. At each site, one seismograph was established at a fixed location and recorded ambient noise for the duration of the survey. A second seismograph was placed at a series of different locations, with the distance from the fixed station ranging from 5 to 40 m. At each measurement location, ambient noise was recorded for intervals ranging from 5 to 20 minutes using a 10 ms sample rate, for a total of approximately one hour of data acquisition per site. The vertical component of ambient noise was used in the SPAC analysis to calculate phase velocity. Fig. 2 shows a VS profile at Stone Bridge School (CSUEB-1), which consists of two layers; the first with VS of about 150 m/sec and the second with VS of 400-500 m/sec. Depth to the second layer is about 20 m.

  8. First observation of the Bs->K+K- decay mode, and measurement of the B0 and Bs mesons decay-rates into two-body charmless final states at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Tonelli, Diego; /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore

    2006-11-01

    The authors searched for decays of the type B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} h{sup +}h{prime}{sup -} (where h, h{prime} = K or {pi}) in a sample corresponding to 180 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, collected by the upgraded Collider Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. A total signal of approximately 900 events was reconstructed, and the relative branching fractions ({Beta}) of each decay mode were determined with a likelihood fit.

  9. Tooth Decay

    MedlinePlus

    ... decay starts in the outer layer, called the enamel. Without a filling, the decay can get deep into the tooth and its nerves and cause a toothache or abscess. To help prevent cavities Brush your teeth every day with a fluoride toothpaste Clean between ...

  10. The Pegasus Bay aftershock sequence of the Mw 7.1 Darfield (Canterbury), New Zealand earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristau, John; Holden, Caroline; Kaiser, Anna; Williams, Charles; Bannister, Stephen; Fry, Bill

    2013-10-01

    The Pegasus Bay aftershock sequence is the most recent aftershock sequence of the 2010 September 3 UTC moment magnitude (Mw) 7.1 Darfield earthquake in the Canterbury region of New Zealand. The Pegasus Bay aftershock sequence began on 2011 December 23 UTC with three events of Mw 5.4-5.9 located in the offshore region of Pegasus Bay, east of Christchurch city. We present a summary of key aspects of the sequence derived using various geophysical methods. Relocations carried out using double-difference tomography show a well-defined NNE-SSW to NE-SW series of aftershocks with most of the activity occurring at depths >5 km and an average depth of ˜10 km. Regional moment tensor solutions calculated for the Pegasus Bay sequence indicate that the vast majority (45 of 53 events) are reverse-faulting events with an average P-axis azimuth of 125°. Strong-motion data inversion favours a SE-dipping fault plane for the largest event (Mw 5.9) with a slip patch of 18 km × 15 km and a maximum slip of 0.8 m at 3.5 km depth. Peak ground accelerations ranging up to 0.98 g on the vertical component were recorded during the sequence, and the largest event produced horizontal accelerations of 0.2-0.4 g in the Christchurch central business district. Apparent stress estimates for the two largest events are 1.1 MPa (Mw 5.9) and 0.2 MPa (Mw 5.8), which are compatible with global averages, although lower than other large events in the Canterbury aftershock sequence. Coulomb stress analysis indicates that previous large earthquakes in the Canterbury sequence generate Coulomb stress increases for the two events only at relatively shallow depths (3-5 km). At greater depths, Coulomb stress decreases are predicted at the locations of the two events. The trend of the aftershocks is similar to mapped reverse faults north of Christchurch, and the high number of reverse-faulting mechanisms suggests that similar reverse-faulting structures are present in the offshore region east of Christchurch.

  11. Seismic wave attenuation in Israel region estimated from the multiple lapse time window analysis and S-wave coda decay rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meirova, Tatiana; Pinsky, Vladimir

    2014-04-01

    For the first time, a regional seismic attenuation for the Israel region is quantitatively estimated as a combination of intrinsic and scattering attenuations. We use a multiple lapse time windows analysis (MLTWA) to determinate the relative contributions of intrinsic absorption and scattering processes to the total regional attenuation in the crust. A single isotropic scattering model assuming a uniform half-space lithosphere is used to fit MLTWA predicted and measured energies from the records of 232 regional earthquakes recorded at 17 short-period and 5 broad-band local seismic stations. Analysis is performed for a set of 10 frequencies between 0.5 and 10 Hz. The frequency-dependent quality factor Q obtained by MLTWA ranges between Q = 77f0.96 in the Northern Israel and Q = 132f0.96 in Southern Israel. Independent estimates of regional coda Q value based on S-wave coda decay rate obtained by averaging of five broad-band Israel Seismic Network stations are approximated by the relation Qc = 126f1.05. As a whole, our findings indicate that in the Israel region, intrinsic absorption prevails over scattering attenuation. Separate analysis for three tectonically different regions in Israel region-Galilee-Lebanon, Judea-Samaria and Eastern Sinai-shows a regional dependence of attenuation parameters. The variation of attenuation characteristics implies different physical mechanisms of seismic attenuation in the Israel region and is related to the differences of structure in the Earth's crust beneath Israel. Such variation in the attenuation patterns is in agreement with the assumption that Northern Israel is tectonically more active than Southern Israel and that in the northern and central parts of Israel the upper crust is more heterogeneous than in the southern part.

  12. The aftershock sequence of the 2015 April 25 Gorkha-Nepal earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, L. B.; Gautam, U. P.; Koirala, B. P.; Bhattarai, M.; Kandel, T.; Gupta, R. M.; Timsina, C.; Maharjan, N.; Maharjan, K.; Dahal, T.; Hoste-Colomer, R.; Cano, Y.; Dandine, M.; Guilhem, A.; Merrer, S.; Roudil, P.; Bollinger, L.

    2015-12-01

    The M 7.8 2015 April 25 Gorkha earthquake devastated the mountainous southern rim of the High Himalayan range in central Nepal. The main shock was followed by 553 earthquakes of local magnitude greater than 4.0 within the first 45 days. In this study, we present and qualify the bulletin of the permanent National Seismological Centre network to determine the spatio-temporal distribution of the aftershocks. The Gorkha sequence defines a ˜140-km-long ESE trending structure, parallel to the mountain range, abutting on the presumed extension of the rupture plane of the 1934 M 8.4 earthquake. In addition, we observe a second seismicity belt located southward, under the Kathmandu basin and in the northern part of the Mahabarat range. Many aftershocks of the Gorkha earthquake sequence have been felt by the 3 millions inhabitants of the Kathmandu valley.

  13. Implications of mainshock-aftershocks interactions during the 2013 Ebreichsdorf sequence, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tary, Jean-Baptiste; Apoloner, Maria-Theresia; Bokelmann, Götz

    2015-04-01

    The Vienna basin is a pull-apart basin located at the contact between the Alpine arc and the Eurasian plate, with the Eastern Alps to the West, the Western Carpathian to the East, the Bohemian massif to the North, and the Pannonian basin to the South. The southern border of this basin, called the Vienna Basin Fault System (VBFS), is accommodating part of the extrusion of the Pannonian basin (~1-2 mm/yr) due to the convergence between the Adriatic microplate and the Eurasian plate. The VBFS is a sinistral strike-slip fault and one of the most active fault in Austria. Along the VBFS, the seismicity is mainly concentrated in separate clusters with a spacing of approximately 20 km. In 2000 and 2013, two sequences constituted by two main shocks and 20-30 aftershocks occurred in one of these clusters located close to Ebreichsdorf, approximately 30 km south of Vienna. We focus here on the sequence of 2013 whose earthquakes were relocated using the double-difference method. The two main shocks, with local magnitudes of 4.2 and very similar focal mechanisms (N63, sinistral strike-slip), seem to be almost collocated. The aftershocks are located mainly to the northwest and at shallower depths compared with the main shocks. In order to better understand the relationships between the two main shocks and their aftershocks, we use two simple models of Coulomb failure stress to investigate possible coseismic static stress transfer between the main shocks and the aftershocks: the constant apparent friction model and the isotropic poroelastic model. The Coulomb failure stress change at the location of most aftershocks is positive but under 0.01 MPa. Aftershock triggering due to coseismic static stress is then unlikely. On the other hand, two other mechanisms could drive this sequence i.e., rapid non-linear pore pressure diffusion along the fault plane or aseismic slip. Given inter-event distances and times of ~0.5-1 km and hours to days, respectively, a high hydraulic diffusivity of

  14. Aftershocks of the December 7, 2012 intraplate doublet near the Japan Trench axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obana, Koichiro; Kodaira, Shuichi; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Sato, Takeshi; Fujie, Gou; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Yojiro

    2014-12-01

    On December 7, 2012, a pair of large Mw 7.2 intraplate earthquakes occurred near the Japan Trench axis off Miyagi, northeast Japan. This doublet consisted of a deep reverse-faulting event followed by a shallow normal-faulting event. Aftershock observations using conventional and newly developed ultra-deep ocean bottom seismographs in the trench axis area showed that the shallow normal-faulting event occurred in the subducting Pacific plate just landward of the trench axis. The shallow normal-faulting aftershock activity indicated that in-plate tension in the incoming/subducting Pacific plate extends to a depth of at least 30 km, which is deeper than before the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake, whereas in-plate compression occurs at depths of more than 50 km. Hence, we concluded that the neutral plane of the in-plate stress is located between depths of 30 and 50 km near the trench axis.

  15. Internal tectonic structure of the Central American Wadati-Benioff zone based on analysis of aftershock sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Špičák, Aleš; Hanuš, Václav; Vaněk, Jiří; Běhounková, Marie

    2007-09-01

    Relocated Engdahl et al. (1998) global seismological data for 10 aftershock sequences were used to analyze the internal tectonic structure of the Central American subduction zone; the main shocks of several of these were the most destructive and often referenced earthquakes in the region (e.g., the 1970 Chiapas, 1983 Osa, 1992 Nicaragua, 1999 Quepos, 2001 El Salvador earthquakes). The spatial analysis of aftershock foci distribution was performed in a rotated Cartesian coordinate system (x, y, z) related to the Wadati-Benioff zone, and not in a standard coordinate system ($\\varphi$, λ, h are latitude, longitude, focal depth, respectively). Available fault plane solutions were also transformed into the plane approximating the Wadati-Benioff zone. The spatial distribution of earthquakes in each aftershock sequence was modeled as either a plane fit using a least squares approximation or a volume fit with a minimum thickness rectangular box. The analysis points to a quasi-planar distribution of earthquake foci in all aftershock sequences, manifesting the appurtenance of aftershocks to fracture zones. Geometrical parameters of fracture zones (strike, dip, and dimensions) hosting individual sequences were calculated and compared with the seafloor morphology of the Cocos Plate. The smooth character of the seafloor correlates with the aftershock fracture zones oriented parallel to the trench and commonly subparallel to the subducting slab, whereas subduction of the Cocos Ridge and seamounts around the Quepos Plateau coincides with steeply dipping fracture zones. Transformed focal mechanisms are almost exclusively (>90%) of normal character.

  16. Internal tectonic structure of the Central American Wadati-Benioff zone based on analysis of aftershock sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Å PičáK, Aleš; Hanuš, VáClav; VaněK, JiřÃ.­; BěHounková, Marie

    2007-09-01

    Relocated Engdahl et al. (1998) global seismological data for 10 aftershock sequences were used to analyze the internal tectonic structure of the Central American subduction zone; the main shocks of several of these were the most destructive and often referenced earthquakes in the region (e.g., the 1970 Chiapas, 1983 Osa, 1992 Nicaragua, 1999 Quepos, 2001 El Salvador earthquakes). The spatial analysis of aftershock foci distribution was performed in a rotated Cartesian coordinate system (x, y, z) related to the Wadati-Benioff zone, and not in a standard coordinate system (ϕ, λ, h are latitude, longitude, focal depth, respectively). Available fault plane solutions were also transformed into the plane approximating the Wadati-Benioff zone. The spatial distribution of earthquakes in each aftershock sequence was modeled as either a plane fit using a least squares approximation or a volume fit with a minimum thickness rectangular box. The analysis points to a quasi-planar distribution of earthquake foci in all aftershock sequences, manifesting the appurtenance of aftershocks to fracture zones. Geometrical parameters of fracture zones (strike, dip, and dimensions) hosting individual sequences were calculated and compared with the seafloor morphology of the Cocos Plate. The smooth character of the seafloor correlates with the aftershock fracture zones oriented parallel to the trench and commonly subparallel to the subducting slab, whereas subduction of the Cocos Ridge and seamounts around the Quepos Plateau coincides with steeply dipping fracture zones. Transformed focal mechanisms are almost exclusively (>90%) of normal character.

  17. Aftershock seismicity and tectonic setting of the 16 September 2015 Mw 8.3 Illapel earthquake, Central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Dietrich; Geersen, Jacob; Barrientos, Sergio; Moreno, Marcos; Grevemeyer, Ingo; Contreras-Reyes, Eduardo; Kopp, Heidrun

    2016-06-01

    Powerful subduction zone earthquakes rupture thousands of square kilometers along continental margins but at certain locations earthquake rupture terminates. To date detailed knowledge of the parameters that govern seismic rupture and aftershocks is still incomplete. On 16 September 2015 the Mw. 8.3 Illapel earthquake ruptured a 200 km long stretch of the Central Chilean subduction zone, triggering a tsunami and causing significant damage. Here we analyze the temporal and spatial pattern of the co-seismic rupture and aftershocks in relation to the tectonic setting in the earthquake area. Aftershocks cluster around the area of maximum coseismic slip, in particular in lateral and downdip direction. During the first 24 hours after the mainshock, aftershocks migrated in both lateral directions with velocities of approximately 2.5 and 5 km/h. At the southern rupture boundary aftershocks cluster around individual subducted seamounts that are related to the downthrusting Juan Fernández Ridge. In the northern part of the rupture area aftershocks separate into an upper cluster (above 25 km depth) and a lower cluster (below 35 km depth). This dual seismic-aseismic transition in downdip direction is also observed in the interseismic period suggesting that it may represent a persistent feature for the Central Chilean subduction zone.

  18. The Mechanisms and Spatiotemporal Behavior of the 2011 Mw7.1 Van, Eastern Turkey Earthquake Aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezgi Guvercin Isik, Sezim; Ozgun Konca, A.; Karabulut, Hayrullah

    2016-04-01

    We studied the mechanisms and spatiotemporal distribution of the aftershocks of the Mw7.1 Van Earthquake, in Eastern Turkey. The 2011 Van Earthquake occurred on a E-W trending blind thrust fault in Eastern Turkey which is under N-S compression due to convergence of the Arabian plate toward the Eurasia. In this study, we relocated and studied the mechanisms of the M3.5-5.5 aftershocks from regional Pnl and surface waves using the "Cut and Paste" algorithm of Zhu and Helmberger (1996). Our results reveal that the aftershocks in the first day following the mainshock are in the vicinity of the co-seismic slip and have mostly thrust mechanism consistent with the mainshock. In the following day, a second cluster of activity at the northeast termination of the fault ( North of Lake Erçek) has started. These aftershocks have approximately N-S lineation and left lateral source mechanisms. The aftershocks surrounding the mainshock rupture are deeper (>20 km) than the aftershocks triggered on the north (<15km). We also observe strike slip earthquakes on the south of the mainshock. Both of delayed activities (north of the mainshock and south of the mainshock) are consistent with the Coulomb stress increase due to slip on the mainshock. We propose that the Van Fault is truncated by two strike-slip faults at each end, which has determined the along-strike rupture extent of the 2011 mainshock.

  19. Aftershock seismicity and tectonic setting of the 2015 September 16 Mw 8.3 Illapel earthquake, Central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Dietrich; Geersen, Jacob; Barrientos, Sergio; Moreno, Marcos; Grevemeyer, Ingo; Contreras-Reyes, Eduardo; Kopp, Heidrun

    2016-08-01

    Powerful subduction zone earthquakes rupture thousands of square kilometres along continental margins but at certain locations earthquake rupture terminates. To date, detailed knowledge of the parameters that govern seismic rupture and aftershocks is still incomplete. On 2015 September 16, the Mw 8.3 Illapel earthquake ruptured a 200 km long stretch of the Central Chilean subduction zone, triggering a tsunami and causing significant damage. Here, we analyse the temporal and spatial pattern of the coseismic rupture and aftershocks in relation to the tectonic setting in the earthquake area. Aftershocks cluster around the area of maximum coseismic slip, in particular in lateral and downdip direction. During the first 24 hr after the main shock, aftershocks migrated in both lateral directions with velocities of approximately 2.5 and 5 km hr-1. At the southern rupture boundary, aftershocks cluster around individual subducted seamounts that are related to the downthrusting Juan Fernández Ridge. In the northern part of the rupture area, aftershocks separate into an upper cluster (above 25 km depth) and a lower cluster (below 35 km depth). This dual seismic-aseismic transition in downdip direction is also observed in the interseismic period suggesting that it may represent a persistent feature for the Central Chilean subduction zone.

  20. Seismological aspects of the 27 June 2015 Gulf of Aqaba earthquake and its sequence of aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd el-aal, Abd el-aziz Khairy; Badreldin, Hazem

    2016-04-01

    On 27 June 2015, a moderate earthquake with magnitude Mb 5.2 struck the Gulf of Aqaba near Nuweiba City. This event was instrumentally recorded by the Egyptian National Seismic Network (ENSN) and many other international seismological centres. The event was felt in all the cities on the Gulf of Aqaba, as well as Suez City, Hurghada City, the greater Cairo Metropolitan Area, Israel, Jordan and the north-western part of Saudi Arabia. No casualties were reported, however. Approximately 95 aftershocks with magnitudes ranging from 0.7 to 4.2 were recorded by the ENSN following the mainshock. In the present study, the source characteristics of both the mainshock and the aftershocks were estimated using the near-source waveform data recorded by the very broadband stations of the ENSN, and these were validated by the P-wave polarity data from short period stations. Our analysis reveals that an estimated seismic moment of 0.762 × 1017 Nm was released, corresponding to a magnitude of Mw 5.2, a focal depth of 14 km, a fault radius of 0.72 km and a rupture area of approximately 1.65 km2. Monitoring the sequence of aftershocks reveals that they form a cluster around the mainshock and migrated downwards in focal depth towards the west. We compared the results we obtained with the published results from the international seismological centres. Our results are more realistic and accurate, in particular with respect to the epicenteral location, magnitude and fault plane solution which are in accordance with the hypocentre distribution of the aftershocks.

  1. Full waveform modelling of aftershock seismicity in the Chilean subduction zone using the VERCE platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garth, T.; Hicks, S. P.; Fuenzalida Velasco, A. J.; Casarotti, E.; Spinuso, A.; Rietbrock, A.

    2014-12-01

    The VERCE platform allows high resolution waveforms to be simulated through an interactive web-based portal. The platform runs on a variety of HPC clusters, and waveforms are calculated using SPECFEM3D. We use the full waveform modelling techniques supported on the VERCE platform to test the validity of a number of subduction zone velocity models from the Chilean subduction zone. Waveforms are calculated for aftershocks of the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule (central Chile) and the Mw 8.1 2014 Pisagua (Northern Chile) earthquakes. For the Maule region, we use a 2D tomographic model of the rupture area (Hicks et al., 2012), and the focal mechanisms of Agurto et al., (2012). For the Pisagua earthquake, we use a 2.5D composite velocity model based on tomographic studies of the region (e.g. Husen et al., 2000, Contreras-Reyes et al., 2012) and Slab1.0 (Hayes et al., 2012). Focal mechanisms for the Pisagua aftershock sequence are produced from waveforms recorded on the IPOC network using the program ISOLA (Sokos and Zahradnik, 2008). We also test a number of synthetic velocity models. The simulated waveforms are directly compared to waveforms recorded on the temporary deployment for the Maule earthquake aftershocks, and waveforms recorded on the IPOC network for the Pisagua earthquake aftershocks. The waveforms produced by the 3D full waveform simulations are also compared to the waveforms produced by the focal mechanism inversion, which assume a 1D velocity model. The VERCE platform allows waveforms from the full 3D model to be produced easily, and allows us to quantifiably assess the validity of both the velocity model and the source mechanisms. In particular the dependence of the dip of the focal mechanism on the velocity model used is explored, in order to assess the reliability of current models of the plate interface geometry in the Chilean subduction zone.

  2. Seismological aspects of the 27 June 2015 Gulf of Aqaba earthquake and its sequence of aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd el-aal, Abd el-aziz Khairy; Badreldin, Hazem

    2016-07-01

    On 27 June 2015, a moderate earthquake with magnitude Mb 5.2 struck the Gulf of Aqaba near Nuweiba City. This event was instrumentally recorded by the Egyptian National Seismic Network (ENSN) and many other international seismological centres. The event was felt in all the cities on the Gulf of Aqaba, as well as Suez City, Hurghada City, the greater Cairo Metropolitan Area, Israel, Jordan and the north-western part of Saudi Arabia. No casualties were reported, however. Approximately 95 aftershocks with magnitudes ranging from 0.7 to 4.2 were recorded by the ENSN following the mainshock. In the present study, the source characteristics of both the mainshock and the aftershocks were estimated using the near-source waveform data recorded by the very broadband stations of the ENSN, and these were validated by the P-wave polarity data from short period stations. Our analysis reveals that an estimated seismic moment of 0.762 × 1017 Nm was released, corresponding to a magnitude of Mw 5.2, a focal depth of 14 km, a fault radius of 0.72 km and a rupture area of approximately 1.65 km2. Monitoring the sequence of aftershocks reveals that they form a cluster around the mainshock and migrated downwards in focal depth towards the west. We compared the results we obtained with the published results from the international seismological centres. Our results are more realistic and accurate, in particular with respect to the epicenteral location, magnitude and fault plane solution which are in accordance with the hypocentre distribution of the aftershocks.

  3. Urban seismology - Northridge aftershocks recorded by multi-scale arrays of portable digital seismographs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meremonte, M.; Frankel, A.; Cranswick, E.; Carver, D.; Worley, D.

    1996-01-01

    We deployed portable digital seismographs in the San Fernando Valley (SFV), the Los Angeles basin (LAB), and surrounding hills to record aftershocks of the 17 January 1994 Northridge California earthquake. The purpose of the deployment was to investigate factors relevant to seismic zonation in urban areas, such as site amplification, sedimentary basin effects, and the variability of ground motion over short baselines. We placed seismographs at 47 sites (not all concurrently) and recorded about 290 earthquakes with magnitudes up to 5.1 at five stations or more. We deployed widely spaced stations for profiles across the San Fernando Valley, as well as five dense arrays (apertures of 200 to 500 m) in areas of high damage, such as the collapsed Interstate 10 overpass, Sherman Oaks, and the collapsed parking garage at CalState Northridge. Aftershock data analysis indicates a correlation of site amplification with mainshock damage. We found several cases where the site amplification depended on the azimuth of the aftershock, possibly indicating focusing from basin structures. For the parking garage array, we found large ground-motion variabilities (a factor of 2) over 200-m distances for sites on the same mapped soil unit. Array analysis of the aftershock seismograms demonstrates that sizable arrivals after the direct 5 waves consist of surface waves traveling from the same azimuth as that of the epicenter. These surface waves increase the duration of motions and can have frequencies as high as about 4 Hz. For the events studied here, we do not observe large arrivals reflected from the southern edge of the San Fernando Valley.

  4. Measurements of Branching Fractions, Rate Asymmetries, and Angular Distributions in the Rare Decays B -> Kl+l- and B -> K*l+ l-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-04-07

    We present measurements of the flavor-changing neutral current decays B {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} and B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}, where {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} is either an e{sup +}e{sup -} or {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} pair. The data sample comprises 229 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. Flavor-changing neutral current decays are highly suppressed in the Standard Model and their predicted properties could be significantly modified by new physics at the electroweak scale. We measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}) = (0.34 {+-} 0.07 {+-} 0.02) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}) = (0.78{sub -0.17}{sup +0.19} {+-} 0.11) x 10{sup -6}, the direct CP asymmetries of these decays, and the relative abundances of decays to electrons and muons. For two regions in {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} mass, above and below m{sub J/{psi}}, we measure partial branching fractions and the forward-backward angular asymmetry of the lepton pair. In these same regions we also measure the K* longitudinal polarization in B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} decays. Upper limits are obtained for the lepton flavor-violating decays B {yields} Ke{mu} and B {yields} K*e{mu}. All measurements are consistent with Standard Model expectations.

  5. The Mw 5.8 Virginia Earthquake of August 23, 2011 and its Aftershocks: A Shallow High Stress Drop Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellsworth, W. L.; Imanishi, K.; Luetgert, J. H.; Kruger, J.; Hamilton, J.

    2011-12-01

    We analyze the hypocentral distribution and source parameters of the aftershocks of the Virginia Earthquake of August 23, 2011 using a temporary array of telemetered instruments deployed within 20 km of the main shock. Our data come from four USGS NetQuakes accelerometers and seven IRIS/PASSCAL seismometers that were established within a few days of the earthquake. Aftershock seismograms at these near-source stations are characterized by impulsive, high-frequency P and S phases at most sites. In addition, we use the five closest permanent stations (60 - 310 km distance) to analyze the main shock. Hypocenters, crustal velocity model and station corrections were determined using the program VELEST (Kissling, et al, 1994). The aftershocks define a 10-km-long, N 30 degree E striking, 45 degree ESE dipping fault. This fault plane agrees well with the USGS moment tensor solutions for the main shock. Aftershock depths range from 2.5 to 8 km, placing the sequence in the Cambrian metamorphic rocks of the Eastern Piedmont thrust sheet. We relocated the main shock relative to a well-located Mw 3.5 aftershock using the P-wave arrival times at the five permanent stations. The main shock epicenter lies in the middle of the aftershock zone. Its focal depth, although not well constrained, is similar to the aftershocks. A crustal-scale seismic reflection profile was acquired by the USGS in 1981 along I-64 just 4 km southwest of the nearest aftershocks. This profile runs nearly parallel to the dip direction of the aftershock zone and has been interpreted to contain many ESE-dipping reverse faults in the allochthonous upper crust (Harris et al., 1986; Pratt, et al., 1988). When projected onto the reflection profile the aftershocks locate within a relatively non-reflective zone bounded above and below by prominent bands of more shallowly dipping reflectors reported by Pratt et al. (1988) raising the question whether or not the earthquake reactivated a pre-existing fault. Seismic

  6. Aftershocks of the western Argentina (Caucete) earthquake of 23 November 1977: some tectonic implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, C.J.; Bollinger, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    An aftershock survey, using a network of eight portable and two permanent seismographs, was conducted for the western Argentina (Caucete) earthquake (MS 7.3) of November 23, 1977. Monitoring began December 6, almost 2 weeks after the main shock and continued for 11 days. The data set includes 185 aftershock hypocenters that range in the depth from near surface to more than 30 km. The spatial distribution of those events occupied a volume of about 100 km long ??50 km wide ??30 km thick. The volumnar nature of the aftershock distribution is interpreted to be a result of a bimodal distribution of foci that define east- and west-dipping planar zones. Efforts to select which of those zones was associated with the causal faulting include special attention to the determination of the mainshock focal depth and dislocation theory modeling of the coseismic surface deformation in the epicentral region. Our focal depth (25-35 km) and modeling studies lead us to prefer an east-dipping plane as causal. A previous interpretation by other investigators used a shallower focal depth (17 km) and similar modeling calculations in choosing a west-dipping plane. Our selection of the east-dipping plane is physically more appealing because it places fault initiation at the base of the crustal seismogenic layer (rather than in the middle of that layer) which requires fault propagation to be updip (rather than downdip). ?? 1988.

  7. Main shock and aftershock records of the 1999 Izmit and Duzce, Turkey earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, M.; Akkar, Sinan; Gulerce, U.; Sanli, A.; Bundock, H.; Salkin, A.

    2001-01-01

    The August 17, 1999 Izmit (Turkey) earthquake (Mw=7.4) will be remembered as one of the largest earthquakes of recent times that affected a large urban environment (U.S. Geological Survey, 1999). This significant event was followed by many significant aftershocks and another main event (Mw=7.2) that occurred on November 12, 1999 near Duzce (Turkey). The shaking that caused the widespread damage and destruction was recorded by a handful of accelerographs (~30) in the earthquake area operated by different networks. The characteristics of these records show that the recorded peak accelerations, shown in Figure 1, even those from near field stations, are smaller than expected (Çelebi, 1999, 2000). Following this main event, several organizations from Turkey, Japan, France and the USA deployed temporary accelerographs and other aftershock recording hardware. Thus, the number of recording stations in the earthquake affected area was quadrupled (~130). As a result, as seen in Figure 2, smaller magnitude aftershocks yielded larger peak accelerations, indicating that because of the sparse networks, recording of larger motions during the main shock of August 17, 1999 were possibly missed.

  8. Measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates and coupling strengths using pp collision data at √s = 7 and 8 TeV in the ATLAS experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-01-05

    In this study, combined analyses of the Higgs boson production and decay rates as well as its coupling strengths to vector bosons and fermions are presented. The combinations include the results of the analyses of the H → γγ, ZZ*, WW*, Zγ, bb¯, ττ and μμ decay modes, and the constraints on the associated production with a pair of top quarks and on the off-shell coupling strengths of the Higgs boson. The results are based on the LHC proton-proton collision datasets, with integrated luminosities of up to 4.7 fb–1 at √s = 7 TeV and 20.3 fb–1 at √s =more » 8 TeV, recorded by the ATLAS detector in 2011 and 2012. Combining all production modes and decay channels, the measured signal yield, normalised to the Standard Model expectation, is 1.18+0.15-0.14. The observed Higgs boson production and decay rates are interpreted in a leading-order coupling framework, exploring a wide range of benchmark coupling models both with and without assumptions on the Higgs boson width and on the Standard Model particle content in loop processes. The data are found to be compatible with the Standard Model expectations for a Higgs boson at a mass of 125.36 GeV for all models considered.« less

  9. Measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates and coupling strengths using pp collision data at √{s}=7 and 8 TeV in the ATLAS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Childers, J. T.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K.-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Gupta, S.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamer, M.; Hamilton, A.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, L.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Hengler, C.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herrberg-Schubert, R.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hetherly, J. W.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hinman, R. R.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hohn, D.; Holmes, T. R.; Homann, M.; Hong, T. M.; Hooft van Huysduynen, L.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, C.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hu, D.; Hu, Q.; Hu, X.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hülsing, T. A.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Ideal, E.; Idrissi, Z.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikematsu, K.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Inamaru, Y.; Ince, T.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Irles Quiles, A.; Isaksson, C.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Iuppa, R.; Ivarsson, J.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jabbar, S.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, M.; Jackson, P.; Jaekel, M. R.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jakubek, J.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansen, E.; Jansky, R. W.; Janssen, J.; Janus, M.; Jarlskog, G.; Javadov, N.; Javůrek, T.; Jeanty, L.; Jejelava, J.; Jeng, G.-Y.; Jennens, D.; Jenni, P.; Jentzsch, J.; Jeske, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Ji, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, Y.; Jiggins, S.; Jimenez Pena, J.; Jin, S.; Jinaru, A.; Jinnouchi, O.; Joergensen, M. D.; Johansson, P.; Johns, K. A.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, T. J.; Jongmanns, J.; Jorge, P. M.; Joshi, K. D.; Jovicevic, J.; Ju, X.; Jung, C. A.; Jussel, P.; Juste Rozas, A.; Kaci, M.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kahn, S. J.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalderon, C. W.; Kama, S.; Kamenshchikov, A.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneda, M.; Kaneti, S.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kapliy, A.; Kar, D.; Karakostas, K.; Karamaoun, A.; Karastathis, N.; Kareem, M. J.; Karnevskiy, M.; Karpov, S. N.; Karpova, Z. M.; Karthik, K.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kashif, L.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kataoka, Y.; Katre, A.; Katzy, J.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kazama, S.; Kazanin, V. F.; Kazarinov, M. Y.; Keeler, R.; Kehoe, R.; Keller, J. S.; Kempster, J. J.; Keoshkerian, H.; Kepka, O.; Kerševan, B. P.; Kersten, S.; Keyes, R. A.; Khalil-zada, F.; Khandanyan, H.; Khanov, A.; Kharlamov, A. G.; Khoo, T. J.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kim, H. Y.; Kim, H.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.; Kimura, N.; Kind, O. M.; King, B. T.; King, M.; King, R. S. B.; King, S. B.; Kirk, J.; Kiryunin, A. E.; Kishimoto, T.; Kisielewska, D.; Kiss, F.; Kiuchi, K.; Kivernyk, O.; Kladiva, E.; Klein, M. H.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klimek, P.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinger, J. A.; Klioutchnikova, T.; Kluge, E.-E.; Kluit, P.; Kluth, S.; Kneringer, E.; Knoops, E. B. F. G.; Knue, A.; Kobayashi, A.; Kobayashi, D.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kocian, M.; Kodys, P.; Koffas, T.; Koffeman, E.; Kogan, L. A.; Kohlmann, S.; Kohout, Z.; Kohriki, T.; Koi, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Koletsou, I.; Komar, A. A.; Komori, Y.; Kondo, T.; Kondrashova, N.; Köneke, K.; König, A. C.; König, S.; Kono, T.; Konoplich, R.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kopeliansky, R.; Koperny, S.; Köpke, L.; Kopp, A. K.; Korcyl, K.; Kordas, K.; Korn, A.; Korol, A. A.; Korolkov, I.; Korolkova, E. V.; Kortner, O.; Kortner, S.; Kosek, T.; Kostyukhin, V. V.; Kotov, V. M.; Kotwal, A.; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, A.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouskoura, V.; Koutsman, A.; Kowalewski, R.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Kozanecki, W.; Kozhin, A. S.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Kramberger, G.; Krasnopevtsev, D.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kraus, J. K.; Kravchenko, A.; Kreiss, S.; Kretz, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kreutzfeldt, K.; Krieger, P.; Krizka, K.; Kroeninger, K.; Kroha, H.; Kroll, J.; Kroseberg, J.; Krstic, J.; Kruchonak, U.; Krüger, H.; Krumnack, N.; Krumshteyn, Z. V.; Kruse, A.; Kruse, M. C.; Kruskal, M.; Kubota, T.; Kucuk, H.; Kuday, S.; Kuehn, S.; Kugel, A.; Kuger, F.; Kuhl, A.; Kuhl, T.; Kukhtin, V.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Kuleshov, S.; Kuna, M.; Kunigo, T.; Kupco, A.; Kurashige, H.; Kurochkin, Y. A.; Kurumida, R.; Kus, V.; Kuwertz, E. S.; Kuze, M.; Kvita, J.; Kwan, T.; Kyriazopoulos, D.; La Rosa, A.; La Rosa Navarro, J. L.; La Rotonda, L.; Lacasta, C.; Lacava, F.; Lacey, J.; Lacker, H.; Lacour, D.; Lacuesta, V. R.; Ladygin, E.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lagouri, T.; Lai, S.; Lambourne, L.; Lammers, S.; Lampen, C. L.; Lampl, W.; Lançon, E.; Landgraf, U.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lang, V. S.; Lange, J. C.; Lankford, A. J.; Lanni, F.; Lantzsch, K.; Laplace, S.; Lapoire, C.; Laporte, J. F.; Lari, T.; Lasagni Manghi, F.; Lassnig, M.; Laurelli, P.; Lavrijsen, W.; Law, A. T.; Laycock, P.; Lazovich, T.; Le Dortz, O.; Le Guirriec, E.; Le Menedeu, E.; LeBlanc, M.; LeCompte, T.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lee, C. A.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, L.; Lefebvre, G.; Lefebvre, M.; Legger, F.; Leggett, C.; Lehan, A.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Lei, X.; Leight, W. A.; Leisos, A.; Leister, A. G.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, R.; Lellouch, D.; Lemmer, B.; Leney, K. J. C.; Lenz, T.; Lenzi, B.; Leone, R.; Leone, S.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Leontsinis, S.; Leroy, C.; Lester, C. G.; Levchenko, M.; Levêque, J.; Levin, D.; Levinson, L. J.; Levy, M.; Lewis, A.; Leyko, A. M.; Leyton, M.; Li, B.; Li, H.; Li, H. L.; Li, L.; Li, L.; Li, S.; Li, Y.; Liang, Z.; Liao, H.; Liberti, B.; Liblong, A.; Lichard, P.; Lie, K.; Liebal, J.; Liebig, W.; Limbach, C.; Limosani, A.; Lin, S. C.; Lin, T. H.; Linde, F.; Lindquist, B. E.; Linnemann, J. T.; Lipeles, E.; Lipniacka, A.; Lisovyi, M.; Liss, T. M.; Lissauer, D.; Lister, A.; Litke, A. M.; Liu, B.; Liu, D.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, K.; Liu, L.; Liu, M.; Liu, M.; Liu, Y.; Livan, M.; Lleres, A.; Llorente Merino, J.; Lloyd, S. L.; Lo Sterzo, F.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loch, P.; Lockman, W. S.; Loebinger, F. K.; Loevschall-Jensen, A. E.; Loginov, A.; Lohse, T.; Lohwasser, K.; Lokajicek, M.; Long, B. A.; Long, J. D.; Long, R. E.; Looper, K. A.; Lopes, L.; Lopez Mateos, D.; Lopez Paredes, B.; Lopez Paz, I.; Lorenz, J.; Lorenzo Martinez, N.; Losada, M.; Loscutoff, P.; Lösel, P. J.; Lou, X.; Lounis, A.; Love, J.; Love, P. A.; Lu, N.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luci, C.; Lucotte, A.; Luehring, F.; Lukas, W.; Luminari, L.; Lundberg, O.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lynn, D.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Ma, H.; Ma, L. L.; Maccarrone, G.; Macchiolo, A.; Macdonald, C. M.; Machado Miguens, J.; Macina, D.; Madaffari, D.; Madar, R.; Maddocks, H. J.; Mader, W. F.; Madsen, A.; Maeland, S.; Maeno, T.; Maevskiy, A.; Magradze, E.; Mahboubi, K.; Mahlstedt, J.; Maiani, C.; Maidantchik, C.; Maier, A. A.; Maier, T.; Maio, A.; Majewski, S.; Makida, Y.; Makovec, N.; Malaescu, B.; Malecki, Pa.; Maleev, V. P.; Malek, F.; Mallik, U.; Malon, D.; Malone, C.; Maltezos, S.; Malyshev, V. M.; Malyukov, S.; Mamuzic, J.; Mancini, G.; Mandelli, B.; Mandelli, L.; Mandić, I.; Mandrysch, R.; Maneira, J.; Manfredini, A.; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, L.; Manjarres Ramos, J.; Mann, A.; Manning, P. M.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Mansoulie, B.; Mantifel, R.; Mantoani, M.; Mapelli, L.; March, L.; Marchiori, G.; Marcisovsky, M.; Marino, C. P.; Marjanovic, M.; Marroquim, F.; Marsden, S. P.; Marshall, Z.; Marti, L. F.; Marti-Garcia, S.; Martin, B.; Martin, T. A.; Martin, V. J.; Martin dit Latour, B.; Martinez, M.; Martin-Haugh, S.; Martoiu, V. S.; Martyniuk, A. C.; Marx, M.; Marzano, F.; Marzin, A.; Masetti, L.; Mashimo, T.; Mashinistov, R.; Masik, J.; Maslennikov, A. L.; Massa, I.; Massa, L.; Massol, N.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mastroberardino, A.; Masubuchi, T.; Mättig, P.; Mattmann, J.; Maurer, J.; Maxfield, S. J.; Maximov, D. A.; Mazini, R.; Mazza, S. M.; Mazzaferro, L.; Mc Goldrick, G.; Mc Kee, S. P.; McCarn, A.; McCarthy, R. L.; McCarthy, T. G.; McCubbin, N. A.; McFarlane, K. W.; Mcfayden, J. A.; Mchedlidze, G.; McMahon, S. J.; McPherson, R. A.; Medinnis, M.; Meehan, S.; Mehlhase, S.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meineck, C.; Meirose, B.; Mellado Garcia, B. R.; Meloni, F.; Mengarelli, A.; Menke, S.; Meoni, E.; Mercurio, K. M.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mermod, P.; Merola, L.; Meroni, C.; Merritt, F. S.; Messina, A.; Metcalfe, J.; Mete, A. S.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, J.-P.; Meyer, J.; Middleton, R. P.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mijović, L.; Mikenberg, G.; Mikestikova, M.; Mikuž, M.; Milesi, M.; Milic, A.; Miller, D. W.; Mills, C.; Milov, A.; Milstead, D. A.; Minaenko, A. A.; Minami, Y.; Minashvili, I. A.; Mincer, A. I.; Mindur, B.; Mineev, M.; Ming, Y.; Mir, L. M.; Mitani, T.; Mitrevski, J.; Mitsou, V. A.; Miucci, A.; Miyagawa, P. S.; Mjörnmark, J. U.; Moa, T.; Mochizuki, K.; Mohapatra, S.; Mohr, W.; Molander, S.; Moles-Valls, R.; Mönig, K.; Monini, C.; Monk, J.; Monnier, E.; Montejo Berlingen, J.; Monticelli, F.; Monzani, S.; Moore, R. W.; Morange, N.; Moreno, D.; Moreno Llácer, M.; Morettini, P.; Morgenstern, M.; Morii, M.; Morinaga, M.; Morisbak, V.; Moritz, S.; Morley, A. K.; Mornacchi, G.; Morris, J. D.; Mortensen, S. S.; Morton, A.; Morvaj, L.; Mosidze, M.; Moss, J.; Motohashi, K.; Mount, R.; Mountricha, E.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Moyse, E. J. W.; Muanza, S.; Mudd, R. D.; Mueller, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, K.; Mueller, R. S. P.; Mueller, T.; Muenstermann, D.; Mullen, P.; Munwes, Y.; Murillo Quijada, J. A.; Murray, W. J.; Musheghyan, H.; Musto, E.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nackenhorst, O.; Nadal, J.; Nagai, K.; Nagai, R.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, K.; Nagarkar, A.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nagata, K.; Nagel, M.; Nagy, E.; Nairz, A. M.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, I.; Namasivayam, H.; Naranjo Garcia, R. F.; Narayan, R.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Nechaeva, P. Yu.; Neep, T. J.; Nef, P. D.; Negri, A.; Negrini, M.; Nektarijevic, S.; Nellist, C.; Nelson, A.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neumann, M.; Neves, R. M.; Nevski, P.; Newman, P. R.; Nguyen, D. H.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nicquevert, B.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforou, N.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsen, J. K.; Nilsson, P.; Ninomiya, Y.; Nisati, A.; Nisius, R.; Nobe, T.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Nooney, T.; Norberg, S.; Nordberg, M.; Novgorodova, O.; Nowak, S.; Nozaki, M.; Nozka, L.; Ntekas, K.; Nunes Hanninger, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurse, E.; Nuti, F.; O'Brien, B. J.; O'grady, F.; O'Neil, D. C.; O'Shea, V.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Obermann, T.; Ocariz, J.; Ochi, A.; Ochoa, I.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Ogren, H.; Oh, A.; Oh, S. H.; Ohm, C. C.; Ohman, H.; Oide, H.; Okamura, W.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Olariu, A.; Olivares Pino, S. A.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Oliver Garcia, E.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlando, N.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Otero y Garzon, G.; Otono, H.; Ouchrif, M.; Ouellette, E. A.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Ovcharova, A.; Owen, M.; Owen, R. E.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagáčová, M.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paganis, E.; Pahl, C.; Paige, F.; Pais, P.; Pajchel, K.; Palacino, G.; Palestini, S.; Palka, M.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Pan, Y. B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Pandini, C. E.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Paolozzi, L.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, K. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N. D.; Pater, J. R.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pearson, B.; Pedersen, L. E.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Peng, H.; Penning, B.; Penwell, J.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pignotti, D. T.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pinto, B.; Pires, S.; Pitt, M.; Pizio, C.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Pluth, D.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Ptacek, E.; Puddu, D.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reisin, H.; Relich, M.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Saddique, A.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saimpert, M.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simoniello, R.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; St. Denis, R. D.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, L.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-01-01

    Combined analyses of the Higgs boson production and decay rates as well as its coupling strengths to vector bosons and fermions are presented. The combinations include the results of the analyses of the H→ γ γ , ZZ^*, WW^*, Zγ , bbar{b}, τ τ and μ μ decay modes, and the constraints on the associated production with a pair of top quarks and on the off-shell coupling strengths of the Higgs boson. The results are based on the LHC proton-proton collision datasets, with integrated luminosities of up to 4.7 {fb}^{-1} at √{s}=7 TeV and 20.3 {fb}^{-1} at √{s}=8 TeV, recorded by the ATLAS detector in 2011 and 2012. Combining all production modes and decay channels, the measured signal yield, normalised to the Standard Model expectation, is 1.18^{+0.15}_{-0.14}. The observed Higgs boson production and decay rates are interpreted in a leading-order coupling framework, exploring a wide range of benchmark coupling models both with and without assumptions on the Higgs boson width and on the Standard Model particle content in loop processes. The data are found to be compatible with the Standard Model expectations for a Higgs boson at a mass of 125.36 GeV for all models considered.

  10. Spatial/Temporal interdependence of aftershocks following the 10/31/2001 M5.1 Anza Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilb, D.; Martynov, V.; Vernon, F. L.

    2004-12-01

    On 10/31/2001, a M5.1 earthquake occurred in the middle of the ANZA network (7 24-bit broadband stations were within 20 km of the epicenter) that spans the San Jacinto fault zone in southern California. A high pass filter (f > 1.0 Hz) was used to identify seismic arrival times of the aftershocks and in turn determine the aftershock locations. In this way, we cataloged 599 events (0< M < 2.5) in the initial 2 hours of this sequence and 4500 aftershocks within the first 2 months, complete to M ≈ 0.0. Here, we study three different temporal/spatial features found in these data. (1) Initially we suspected earthquakes within the region of the mainshock had a bimodal distribution of earthquake magnitudes (peaks at M=0.1 and M=1.5); however, we found this distribution was an artifact of the spatial recording capabilities of small magnitude aftershocks. (2) In the original aftershock locations we found two linear voids in seismicity (trends ˜N45W and ˜N45E) in the primary aftershock cluster forming an X pattern. This is not likely caused by the number of significant digits in the location algorithm because these voids do not follow individual latitude or longitude lines, nor is this likely due to recording inaccuracies because the network coverage of the region is more than optimal. We are investigating other causes of these voids. (3) In the broadband data, we found only one detectable aftershock in the first 2 minutes of the continuous waveforms; yet on the short period records at one of the closest stations, TRO, we can identify an additional event at 15 seconds into the sequence. To quantify our detection capabilities, we estimate when aftershocks of different magnitudes can be identified within the mainshock coda. We are fairly confident that \\> M 1.5 events 45 seconds or longer after the mainshock should be detectable, which suggests that the lack of seismicity in the 45 second-2.0 minute range is potentially real. This non-zero lag-time between the mainshock

  11. Focal Depth of the WenChuan Earthquake Aftershocks from modeling of Seismic Depth Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.; Zeng, X.; Chong, J.; Ni, S.; Chen, Y.

    2008-12-01

    After the 05/12/2008 great WenChuan earthquake in Sichuan Province of China, tens of thousands earthquakes occurred with hundreds of them stronger than M4. Those aftershocks provide valuable information about seismotectonics and rupture processes for the mainshock, particularly accurate spatial distribution of aftershocks is very informational for determining rupture fault planes. However focal depth can not be well resolved just with first arrivals recorded by relatively sparse network in Sichuan Province, therefore 3D seismicity distribution is difficult to obtain though horizontal location can be located with accuracy of 5km. Instead local/regional depth phases such as sPmP, sPn, sPL and teleseismic pP,sP are very sensitive to depth, and be readily modeled to determine depth with accuracy of 2km. With reference 1D velocity structure resolved from receiver functions and seismic refraction studies, local/regional depth phases such as sPmP, sPn and sPL are identified by comparing observed waveform with synthetic seismograms by generalized ray theory and reflectivity methods. For teleseismic depth phases well observed for M5.5 and stronger events, we developed an algorithm in inverting both depth and focal mechanism from P and SH waveforms. Also we employed the Cut and Paste (CAP) method developed by Zhao and Helmberger in modeling mechanism and depth with local waveforms, which constrains depth by fitting Pnl waveforms and the relative weight between surface wave and Pnl. After modeling all the depth phases for hundreds of events , we find that most of the M4 earthquakes occur between 2-18km depth, with aftershocks depth ranging 4-12km in the southern half of Longmenshan fault while aftershocks in the northern half featuring large depth range up to 18km. Therefore seismogenic zone in the northern segment is deeper as compared to the southern segment. All the aftershocks occur in upper crust, given that the Moho is deeper than 40km, or even 60km west of the

  12. Tomographic velocity model for the aftershock region of the 2001 Gujarat, India earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negishi, H.; Kumar, S.; Mori, J. J.; Sato, T.; Bodin, P.; Rastogi, B.

    2002-12-01

    A tomographic inversion was applied to the aftershock data collected after the January 26, 2001 Bhuj earthquake (Ms 7.9, Mw 7.7), which occurred on a south dipping (~50 degrees) reverse fault in the state of Gujarat in western India. We used high quality arrivals from 8,374 P and 7,994 S waves of 1404 aftershocks recorded on 27 digital stations from temporary seismic arrays setup by the India-Japan team; NGRI, India; and CERI, Memphis Univ., USA, following the Bhuj main shock. First, we used the Joint Hypocenters Determination Method for obtaining relocated hypocenters and a one-dimensional Vp and Vs velocity model, and then the resultant hypocenters and 1-D velocity model were used as the initial parameters for a 3-D tomographic inversion. The tomography technique is based on a grid-modeling method by Zhao et al. . Vp, Vs and hypocenters are determined simultaneously. We tried to use the Cross-Validation Technique for determining an optimum model in the seismic tomography. This approach has been applied to other tomographic studies to investigate the quantitative fluctuation range of velocity perturbations . Significant variations in the velocity (up to 6%) and Poisson's ratio (up to 8%) are revealed in the aftershock area. It seems that the aftershock distribution corresponds to the boundary between high and low velocity heterogeneities. Small values of Vp/Vs are generally found at depths of 10 to 35 km, i.e. the depth range of aftershock distribution. However, the deeper region below the hypocenter of the mainshock, at depths of 35 to 45 km, is characterized by relatively high values of Vp/Vs and low values of Vs. This anomaly may be due to a weak fractured and fluid filled rock matrix, which might have contributed to triggering this earthquake. This earthquake occurred on a relatively deep and steeply dipping fault with a large stress drop . Theoretically it is difficult to slip steep faults, especially in the lower crust. Our tomographic investigation provides

  13. An Improved Source-Scanning Algorithm for Locating Earthquake Clusters or Aftershock Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Y.; Kao, H.; Hsu, S.

    2010-12-01

    The Source-scanning Algorithm (SSA) was originally introduced in 2004 to locate non-volcanic tremors. Its application was later expanded to the identification of earthquake rupture planes and the near-real-time detection and monitoring of landslides and mud/debris flows. In this study, we further improve SSA for the purpose of locating earthquake clusters or aftershock sequences when only a limited number of waveform observations are available. The main improvements include the application of a ground motion analyzer to separate P and S waves, the automatic determination of resolution based on the grid size and time step of the scanning process, and a modified brightness function to utilize constraints from multiple phases. Specifically, the improved SSA (named as ISSA) addresses two major issues related to locating earthquake clusters/aftershocks. The first one is the massive amount of both time and labour to locate a large number of seismic events manually. And the second one is to efficiently and correctly identify the same phase across the entire recording array when multiple events occur closely in time and space. To test the robustness of ISSA, we generate synthetic waveforms consisting of 3 separated events such that individual P and S phases arrive at different stations in different order, thus making correct phase picking nearly impossible. Using these very complicated waveforms as the input, the ISSA scans all model space for possible combination of time and location for the existence of seismic sources. The scanning results successfully associate various phases from each event at all stations, and correctly recover the input. To further demonstrate the advantage of ISSA, we apply it to the waveform data collected by a temporary OBS array for the aftershock sequence of an offshore earthquake southwest of Taiwan. The overall signal-to-noise ratio is inadequate for locating small events; and the precise arrival times of P and S phases are difficult to

  14. High-Resolution Uitra Low Power, Intergrated Aftershock and Microzonation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passmore, P.; Zimakov, L. G.

    2012-12-01

    Rapid Aftershock Mobilization plays an essential role in the understanding of both focal mechanism and rupture propagation caused by strong earthquakes. A quick assessment of the data provides a unique opportunity to study the dynamics of the entire earthquake process in-situ. Aftershock study also provides practical information for local authorities regarding the post earthquake activity, which is very important in order to conduct the necessary actions for public safety in the area affected by the strong earthquake. Refraction Technology, Inc. has developed a self-contained, fully integrated Aftershock System, model 160-03, providing the customer simple and quick deployment during aftershock emergency mobilization and microzonation studies. The 160-03 has no external cables or peripheral equipment for command/control and operation in the field. The 160-03 contains three major components integrated in one case: a) 24-bit resolution state-of-the art low power ADC with CPU and Lid interconnect boards; b) power source; and c) three component 2 Hz sensors (two horizontals and one vertical), and built-in ±4g accelerometer. Optionally, the 1 Hz sensors can be built-in the 160-03 system at the customer's request. The self-contained rechargeable battery pack provides power autonomy up to 7 days during data acquisition at 200 sps on continuous three weak motion and triggered three strong motion recording channels. For longer power autonomy, the 160-03 Aftershock System battery pack can be charged from an external source (solar power system). The data in the field is recorded to a built-in swappable USB flash drive. The 160-03 configuration is fixed based on a configuration file stored on the system, so no external command/control interface is required for parameter setup in the field. For visual control of the system performance in the field, the 160-03 has a built-in LED display which indicates the systems recording status as well as a hot swappable USB drive and battery

  15. New limit on the K{sub L}{sup 0}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{nu} decay rate

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, J. K.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. Y.; Akune, Y.; Fujioka, Y.; Ishibashi, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Sugiyama, A.; Tsukamoto, T.; Baranov, V.; Kurilin, A. S.; Kuzmin, E.; Moisseenko, A.; Perov, S.; Podolsky, S.; Porokhovoy, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Doroshenko, M.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Inagaki, T.

    2006-09-01

    The first dedicated experiment for the rare kaon decay K{sub L}{sup 0}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{nu} has been performed by the E391a Collaboration at the KEK 12-GeV proton synchrotron. A new upper limit of 2.1x10{sup -7} at the 90% confidence level was set for the branching ratio of the decay K{sub L}{sup 0}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{nu} using about 10% of the data collected during the first period of data taking.

  16. Penguin diagram dominance in radiative weak decays of bottom baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Kohara, Yoji

    2005-05-01

    Radiative weak decays of antitriplet bottom baryons are studied under the assumption of penguin diagram dominance and flavor-SU(3) (or SU(2)) symmetry. Relations among decay rates of various decay modes are derived.

  17. Tau decays: A theoretical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1992-11-01

    Theoretical predictions for various tau decay rates are reviewed. Effects of electroweak radiative corrections are described. Implications for precision tests of the standard model and ``new physics`` searches are discussed. A perspective on the tau decay puzzle and 1-prong problem is given.

  18. Tau decays: A theoretical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1992-11-01

    Theoretical predictions for various tau decay rates are reviewed. Effects of electroweak radiative corrections are described. Implications for precision tests of the standard model and new physics'' searches are discussed. A perspective on the tau decay puzzle and 1-prong problem is given.

  19. Aftershocks hazard in Italy Part I: Estimation of time-magnitude distribution model parameters and computation of probabilities of occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lolli, Barbara; Gasperini, Paolo

    We analyzed the available instrumental data on Italian earthquakes from1960 to 1996 to compute the parameters of the time-magnitudedistribution model proposed by Reasenberg and Jones (1989) andcurrently used to make aftershock forecasting in California. From 1981 to1996 we used the recently released Catalogo Strumentale deiTerremoti `Italiani' (CSTI) (Instrumental Catalog Working Group, 2001)joining the data of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia(INGV) and of the Italian major local seismic network, with magnituderevalued according to Gasperini (2001). From 1960 to 1980 we usedinstead the Progetto Finalizzato Geodinamica (PFG) catalog(Postpischl, 1985) with magnitude corrected to be homogeneous with thefollowing period. About 40 sequences are detected using two dif